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Sample records for carbonic acid solution

  1. Adsorption of organic acids from dilute aqueous solution onto activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.W.

    1980-06-01

    The radioisotope technique was used to study the removal of organic acid contaminants from dilute aqueous solutions onto activated carbon. Acetic acid, propionic acid, n-butyric acid, n-hexanoic acid and n-heptanoic acid were studied at 278, 298, and 313/sup 0/K. Three bi-solute acid mixtures (acetic and propionic acids, acetic and butanoic acids, and propionic and butanoic acids) were studied at 278 and 298/sup 0/K. Isotherms of the single-solute systems were obtained at three different temperatures in the very dilute concentration region (less than 1% by weight). These data are very important in the prediction of bi-solute equilibrium data. A Polanyi-based competitive adsorption potential theory was used to predict the bi-solute equilibrium uptakes. Average errors between calculated and experimental data ranges from 4% to 14%. It was found that the competitive adsorption potential theory gives slightly better results than the ideal adsorbed solution theory.

  2. Electrochemical formation of hydroxide for enhancing carbon dioxide and acid gas uptake by a solution

    DOEpatents

    Rau, Gregory Hudson (Castro Valley, CA)

    2012-05-15

    A system is described for forming metal hydroxide from a metal carbonate utilizing a water electrolysis cell having an acid-producing anode and a hydroxyl-producing cathode immersed in a water solution of sufficient ionic content to allow an electric current to pass between the hydroxyl-producing cathode and the acid-producing anode. A metal carbonate, in particular water-insoluble calcium carbonate or magnesium carbonate, is placed in close proximity to the acid-producing anode. A direct current electrical voltage is provided across the acid-producing anode and the hydroxyl-producing cathode sufficient to generate acid at the acid-producing anode and hydroxyl ions at the hydroxyl-producing cathode. The acid dissolves at least part of the metal carbonate into metal and carbonate ions allowing the metal ions to travel toward the hydroxyl-producing cathode and to combine with the hydroxyl ions to form the metal hydroxide. The carbonate ions travel toward the acid-producing anode and form carbonic acid and/or water and carbon dioxide. Among other uses, the metal hydroxide formed can be employed to absorb acid gases such as carbon dioxide from a gas mixture. The invention can also generate hydrogen and oxidative gases such as oxygen or chlorine.

  3. Electrochemical formation of hydroxide for enhancing carbon dioxide and acid gas uptake by a solution

    DOEpatents

    Rau, Gregory Hudson

    2014-07-01

    A system for forming metal hydroxide from a metal carbonate utilizes a water electrolysis cell having an acid-producing anode and a hydroxyl-producing cathode immersed in a water solution of sufficient ionic content to allow an electric current to pass between the hydroxyl-producing cathode and the acid-producing anode. A metal carbonate is placed in close proximity to the acid-producing anode. A direct current electrical voltage is provided across the acid-producing anode and the hydroxyl-producing cathode sufficient to generate acid at the acid-producing anode and hydroxyl ions at the hydroxyl-producing cathode. The acid dissolves at least part of the metal carbonate into metal and carbonate ions allowing the metal ions to travel toward the hydroxyl-producing cathode and to combine with the hydroxyl ions to form the metal hydroxide. The carbonate ions travel toward the acid-producing anode and form carbonic acid and/or water and carbon dioxide.

  4. Extraction of palladium from acidic solutions with the use of carbon adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    O.N. Kononova; N.G. Goryaeva; N.B. Dostovalova; S.V. Kachin; A.G. Kholmogorov

    2007-08-15

    We studied the sorption of palladium(II) on LKAU-4, LKAU-7, and BAU carbon adsorbents from model hydrochloric acid solutions and the solutions of spent palladium-containing catalysts. It was found that sorbents based on charcoal (BAU) and anthracite (LKAU-4) were characterized by high sorption capacities for palladium. The kinetics of the saturation of carbon adsorbents with palladium(II) ions was studied, and it was found that more than 60% of the initial amount of Pd(II) was recovered in a 1-h contact of an adsorbent with a model solution. This value for the solutions of spent catalysts was higher than 35%.

  5. Collagen tissue treated with chitosan solutions in carbonic acid for improved biological prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Gallyamov, Marat O; Chaschin, Ivan S; Khokhlova, Marina A; Grigorev, Timofey E; Bakuleva, Natalia P; Lyutova, Irina G; Kondratenko, Janna E; Badun, Gennadii A; Chernysheva, Maria G; Khokhlov, Alexei R

    2014-04-01

    Calcification of bovine pericardium dramatically shortens typical lifetimes of biological prosthetic heart valves and thus precludes their choice for younger patients. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate that the calcification is to be mitigated by means of treatment of bovine pericardium in solutions of chitosan in carbonic acid, i.e. water saturated with carbon dioxide at high pressure. This acidic aqueous fluid unusually combines antimicrobial properties with absolute biocompatibility as far as at normal pressure it decomposes spontaneously and completely into H2O and CO2. Yet, at high pressures it can protonate and dissolve chitosan materials with different degrees of acetylation (in the range of 16-33%, at least) without any further pretreatment. Even exposure of the bovine pericardium in pure carbonic acid solution without chitosan already favours certain reduction in calcification, somewhat improved mechanical properties, complete biocompatibility and evident antimicrobial activity of the treated collagen tissue. The reason may be due to high extraction ability of this peculiar compressed fluidic mixture. Moreover, exposure of the bovine pericardium in solutions of chitosan in carbonic acid introduces even better mechanical properties and highly pronounced antimicrobial activity of the modified collagen tissue against adherence and biofilm formation of relevant Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains. Yet, the most important achievement is the detected dramatic reduction in calcification for such modified collagen tissues in spite of the fact that the amount of the thus introduced chitosan is rather small (typically ca. 1wt.%), which has been reliably detected using original tritium labelling method. We believe that these improved properties are achieved due to particularly deep and uniform impregnation of the collagen matrix with chitosan from its pressurised solutions in carbonic acid. PMID:24582232

  6. Interaction of organic acids with carbonate mineral surfaces in seawater and related solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Zullig, J.J.; Morse, J.W. )

    1988-06-01

    The adsorption of C{sub 4} to C{sub 18} fatty acid anion homologs from seawater and related solutions was examined on calcite, aragonite, dolomite and magnesite surfaces. Butyrate, octanoate and laurate did not adsorb, while myristate, palmitate and stearate absorbed on all carbonate surfaces. An increasing affinity for carbonate surfaces was found with increasing alkyl chain length for these fatty acids. Adsorption at low concentrations typical of marine waters is controlled by surface adsorption sites. At high concentration adsorption is governed by solution composition and limited by aqueous solubility. Adsorption-desorption reactions were characterized by a large resistant component that resulted in nonsingular isotherms. Myristate adsorption was enhanced in the presence of stearate cosorption. Orthophosphate in trace quantities was capable of displacing fatty acids from carbonate surfaces, but contrary to earlier studies, the authors found on major influence from magnesium ion on adsorption. The results of this study are interpreted in terms of a model based on the different types of forces which contribute to adsorption of these organic compounds. This model emphasizes the importance of organic aqueous solubility and the acid function as criteria controlling the adsorption of natural hydrophobic organics with carbonate mineral surfaces in aqueous fluids.

  7. Removal of boron from aqueous solution using magnetic carbon nanotube improved with tartaric acid

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Boron removal capacity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified with tartaric acid was investigated in this study. Modification of MWCNTs with tartaric acid was confirmed by Boehm surface chemistry method and fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Experiments were performed to determine the adsorption isotherm and adsorption thermodynamic parameters of boron adsorption on tartaric acid modified MWCNTs (TA-MWCNTs). The effect of variables including initial pH, dosage of adsorbent, contact time and temperature was investigated. Analysis of data showed that adsorption equilibrium could be better described by Freundlich isotherm and the maximum adsorption capacities obtained at the pH of 6.0 was 1.97 mg/g. The estimated thermodynamic values of free energy (?G°), entropy (?S°) and enthalpy (?H°) indicated a spontaneous and an endothermic process. Furthermore, the TA-MWCNTs was magnetized for separation of boron-contaminated adsorbent from aqueous solution by applying magnetic field. The results showed that magnetic TA-MWCNTs particles were separated effectively after adsorption from contaminated water. PMID:24393401

  8. Mechanisms of enhanced total organic carbon elimination from oxalic acid solutions by electro-peroxone process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huijiao; Yuan, Shi; Zhan, Juhong; Wang, Yujue; Yu, Gang; Deng, Shubo; Huang, Jun; Wang, Bin

    2015-09-01

    Electro-peroxone (E-peroxone) is a novel electrocatalytic ozonation process that combines ozonation and electrolysis process to enhance pollutant degradation during water and wastewater treatment. This enhancement has been mainly attributed to several mechanisms that increase O3 transformation to ·OH in the E-peroxone system, e.g., electro-generation of H2O2 from O2 at a carbon-based cathode and its subsequent peroxone reaction with O3 to ·OH, electro-reduction of O3 to ·OH at the cathode, and O3 decomposition to ·OH at high local pH near the cathode. To get more insight how these mechanisms contribute respectively to the enhancement, this study investigated total organic carbon (TOC) elimination from oxalic acid (OA) solutions by the E-peroxone process. Results show that the E-peroxone process significantly increased TOC elimination rate by 10.2-12.5 times compared with the linear addition of the individual rates of corresponding ozonation and electrolysis process. Kinetic analyses reveal that the electrochemically-driven peroxone reaction is the most important mechanism for the enhanced TOC elimination rate, while the other mechanisms contribute minor to the enhancement by a factor of 1.6-2.5. The results indicate that proper selection of electrodes that can effectively produce H2O2 at the cathode is critical to maximize TOC elimination in the E-peroxone process. PMID:25989593

  9. Surface modification of activated carbon for enhanced adsorption of perfluoroalkyl acids from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Yue; Liu, Jinxia

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the research was to examine the effect of increasing carbon surface basicity on uptake of perfluorooctane sulfonic (PFOS) and carboxylic acids (PFOA) by activated carbon. Granular activated carbons made from coal, coconut shell, wood, and phenolic-polymer-based activated carbon fibers were modified through high-temperature and ammonia gas treatments to facilitate systematical evaluation of the impact of basicity of different origins. Comparison of adsorption isotherms and adsorption distribution coefficients showed that the ammonia gas treatment was more effective than the high-temperature treatment in enhancing surface basicity. The resultant higher point of zero charges and total basicity (measured by total HCl uptake) correlated with improved adsorption affinity for PFOS and PFOA. The effectiveness of surface modification to enhance adsorption varied with carbon raw material. Wood-based carbons and activated carbon fibers showed enhancement by one to three orders of magnitudes while other materials could experience reduction in adsorption towards either PFOS or PFOA. PMID:26469934

  10. GENERATION OF SOIL SOLUTION ACID NEUTRALIZING CAPACITY BY ADDITION OF DISSOLVED INORGANIC CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Spodosol B horizon(base saturation of 5.4%) collected at the Watershed Manipulation Project site at Lead Mountain, ME, was used to examine soil solution chemistry in response to increasing solution levels of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). cid-neutralizing capacity (ANC), det...

  11. The adsorption of gold, palladium and platinum from acidic chloride solutions on mesoporous carbons.

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Zalupski; Rocklan McDowell; Guy Dutech

    2014-10-01

    Studies on the adsorption characteristics of gold, palladium and platinum on mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) and sulfur-impregnated mesoporous carbon (CMK-3/S) evaluated the benefits/drawbacks of the presence of a layer of elemental sulfur inside mesoporous carbon structures. Adsorption isotherms collected for Au(III), Pd(II) and Pt(IV) on those materials suggest that sulfur does enhance the adsorption of those metal ions in mildly acidic environment (pH 3). The isotherms collected in 1 M HCl show that the benefit of sulfur disappears due to the competing influence of large concentration of hydrogen ions on the ion-exchanging mechanism of metal ions sorption on mesoporous carbon surfaces. The collected acid dependencies illustrate similar adsorption characteristics for CMK-3 and CMK-3/S in 1-5 M HCl concentration range. Sorption of metal ions from diluted aqueous acidic mixtures of actual leached electronic waste demonstrated the feasibility of recovery of gold from such liquors.

  12. Acceleration of suspending single-walled carbon nanotubes in BSA aqueous solution induced by amino acid molecules.

    PubMed

    Kato, Haruhisa; Nakamura, Ayako; Horie, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) suspensions in aqueous media were prepared using bovine serum albumin (BSA) and amino acid molecules. It was found that the amino acid molecules clearly decreased the time required for suspending the SWCNTs in BSA aqueous solutions. Dynamic light scattering measurements revealed that the particle sizes of the SWCNTs suspended in aqueous media with and without amino acid molecules were approximately the same and stable for more than one week. The zeta potential values of the BSA molecules in pure water and amino acid aqueous solutions were different, and these values were also reflected in the surface potential of colloidal SWCNT particles in the corresponding aqueous media, thus inducing different dispersibility of SWCNTs in aqueous media. Pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance measurements showed that the interactions between the SWCNTs and the amino acid molecules are weak and comprise chemical exchange interactions and not bonding interactions. Amino acid molecules play a fascinating role in the preparation of SWCNT suspensions in BSA aqueous media by increasing electrostatic repulsive interactions between SWCNT colloidal particles and consequently enhancing the dispersion ability of the BSA molecules. PMID:25313479

  13. CORROSION TESTING OF CARBON STEEL IN OXALIC ACID CHEMICAL CLEANING SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.; Mickalonis, J.; Subramanian, K.; Ketusky, E.

    2011-10-14

    Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 60 years at the Savannah River Site. The site is currently in the process of removing the waste from these tanks in order to place it into vitrified, stable state for longer term storage. The last stage in the removal sequence is a chemical cleaning step that breaks up and dissolves metal oxide solids that cannot be easily pumped out of the tank. Oxalic acid has been selected for this purpose because it is an effective chelating agent for the solids and is not as corrosive as other acids. Electrochemical and immersion studies were conducted to investigate the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in simulated chemical cleaning environments. The effects of temperature, agitation, and the presence of sludge solids in the oxalic acid on the corrosion rate and the likelihood of hydrogen evolution were determined. The testing showed that the corrosion rates decreased significantly in the presence of the sludge solids. Corrosion rates increased with agitation, however, the changes were less noticeable.

  14. ELECTROCHEMICAL STUDIES ON THE CORROSION OF CARBON STEEL IN OXALIC ACID CLEANING SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B; John Mickalonis, J

    2007-10-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will disperse or dissolve precipitated metal oxides as part of radioactive waste tank closure operations. Previously SRS has utilized oxalic acid to accomplish this task. Since the waste tanks are constructed of carbon steel, a significant amount of corrosion may occur. Although the total amount of corrosion may be insignificant for a short contact time, a significant amount of hydrogen may be generated due to the corrosion reaction. Linear polarization resistance and anodic/cathodic polarization tests were performed to investigate the corrosion behavior during the process. The effect of process variables such as temperature, agitation, aeration, sample orientation, light as well as surface finish on the corrosion behavior were evaluated. The results of the tests provided insight into the corrosion mechanism for the iron-oxalic acid system.

  15. Enhanced removal of 8-quinolinecarboxylic acid in an activated carbon cloth by electroadsorption in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    López-Bernabeu, S; Ruiz-Rosas, R; Quijada, C; Montilla, F; Morallón, E

    2016-02-01

    The effect of the electrochemical treatment (potentiostatic treatment in a filter-press electrochemical cell) on the adsorption capacity of an activated carbon cloth (ACC) was analyzed in relation with the removal of 8-quinolinecarboxylic acid pollutant from water. The adsorption capacity of an ACC is quantitatively improved in the presence of an electric field (electroadsorption process) reaching values of 96% in comparison to 55% in absence of applied potential. In addition, the cathodic treatment results in higher removal efficiencies than the anodic treatment. The enhanced adsorption capacity has been proved to be irreversible, since the removed compound remains adsorbed after switching the applied potential. The kinetics of the adsorption processes is also improved by the presence of an applied potential. PMID:26433936

  16. Effects of impurities on the electroreduction of carbon dioxide on platinum electrodes in acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H. )

    1992-02-01

    The electroreduction of carbon dioxide has been studied in this laboratory using electrochemical techniques and in situ Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FTIRRAS) on both polycrystalline and single-crystalline platinum electrodes in 0.1M HClO{sub 4} solution. On polycrystalline electrodes and two single-crystalline planes ((110) and (100)), the reduction reaction proceeds in the hydrogen absorption region and gives rise the polycrystalline electrode and Pt(110), and bridge-bonded Co on Pt(100). No. CO was detected on Pt(111). The introduction of CO{sub 2} in solution shows a similar effect on the Butterfly peaks of Pt(111) to that of specifically adsorbed anions, such as bisulfate. The has been attributed tentatively to the absorption of HCO{sub 3} in the potential region between the onset of the butterfly peaks and the formation of oxide. The IR absorption peak between 1418 and 1456 cm{sup {minus}1}, which is assigned to the absorbed HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, shows a large positive shift with increasing potential (127 cm{sup {minus}1}/V). As part of the research on CO{sub 2} reduction, this paper examines the effects of impurities (Cl{sup {minus}}) and electrode rotation rates on Co{sub 2} reduction on polycrystalline Pt electrodes in 0.1M HClO{sub 4} solutions.

  17. The Inhibitory Effect of Some Bipyridine Derivatives on the Corrosion Behavior of N80 Carbon Steel in Sulphuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xia; Okafor, Peter C.; Jiang, Bin; Hu, Hongxiang; Zheng, Yugui

    2015-11-01

    The corrosion inhibition characteristics of 2,2?-bipyridine (BIPY) and 2,2?-bipyridine-3,3?-dicarboxylic acid (BIDA), on carbon steel in sulphuric acid solutions was studied using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques at 20°C, 30°C and 40°C. The results indicate that the organic compounds inhibit the corrosion of mild steel in H2SO4 solutions and the extent of inhibition increases with inhibitor concentration and decreases with temperature. A mixed-inhibition mechanism is proposed for the inhibitive effects of the compounds. The order of inhibition efficiency obtained was BIDA>BIPY. There is a good correlation between the quantum chemical parameters and experimentally determined inhibition efficiency of the inhibitors. The adsorption characteristics of the inhibitor were approximated by Temkin isotherm. Morphological study of the carbon steel electrode surface was undertaken by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the interfacial species formed on the surface in the presence of inhibitors analyzed by Infrared spectroscopy.

  18. Removal of hexavalent chromium in carbonic acid solution by oxidizing slag discharged from steelmaking process in electric arc furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Seiji; Okazaki, Kohei; Sasano, Junji; Izaki, Masanobu

    2014-02-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is well-known to be a strong oxidizer, and is recognized as a carcinogen. Therefore, it is regulated for drinking water, soil, groundwater and sea by the environmental quality standards all over the world. In this study, it was attempted to remove Cr(VI) ion in a carbonic acid solution by the oxidizing slag that was discharged from the normal steelmaking process in an electric arc furnace. After the addition of the slag into the aqueous solution contained Cr(VI) ion, concentrations of Cr(VI) ion and total chromium (Cr(VI) + trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) ions decreased to lower detection limit of them. Therefore, the used slag could reduce Cr(VI) and fix Cr(III) ion on the slag. While Cr(VI) ion existed in the solution, iron did not dissolve from the slag. From the relation between predicted dissolution amount of iron(II) ion and amount of decrease in Cr(VI) ion, the Cr(VI) ion did not react with iron(II) ion dissolved from the slag. Therefore, Cr(VI) ion was removed by the reductive reaction between Cr(VI) ion and the iron(II) oxide (FeO) in the slag. This reaction progressed on the newly appeared surface of iron(II) oxide due to the dissolution of phase composed of calcium etc., which existed around iron(II) oxide grain in the slag.

  19. Acid sorption regeneration process using carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    King, C. Judson (Kensington, CA); Husson, Scott M. (Anderson, SC)

    2001-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks onto a solid adsorbent in the presence of carbon dioxide under pressure. The acids are freed from the sorbent phase by a suitable regeneration method, one of which is treating them with an organic alkylamine solution thus forming an alkylamine-carboxylic acid complex which thermally decomposes to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine.

  20. Characterization of the International Humic Substances Society standard and reference fulvic and humic acids by solution state carbon-13 (13C) and hydrogen-1 (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Folan, Daniel W.; MacCarthy, Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Standard and reference samples of the International Humic Substances Society have been characterized by solution state carbon-13 and hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. Samples included the Suwannee River, soil, and peat standard fulvic and humic acids, the Leonardite standard humic acid, the Nordic aquatic reference fulvic and humic acids, and the Summit Hill soil reference humic acid. Aqueous-solution carbon-13 NMR analyses included the measurement of spin-lattice relaxation times, measurement of nuclear Overhauser enhancement factors, measurement of quantitative carbon distributions, recording of attached proton test spectra, and recording of spectra under nonquantitative conditions. Distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer carbon-13 NMR spectra also were recorded on the Suwannee River fulvic acid in deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide. Hydrogen-1 NMR spectra were recorded on sodium salts of the samples in deuterium oxide. The carbon aromaticities of the samples ranged from 0.24 for the Suwannee River fulvic acid to 0.58 for the Leonardite humic acid.

  1. Modeling of wormhole behavior in carbonate acidizing

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    A mathematical model that describes the growth and competition of wormholes during an acidizing treatment in a carbonate formation is developed. The purpose of the treatment is to remove any near wellbore permeability damage created by drilling or completion fluids so that the production of reservoir fluids is stimulated. Hydrochloric acid is commonly used for this purpose. Since the acid solution tends to flow into the less resistant areas, large pores on the rock surface receive most acid fluid. Pores are enlarged due to the reaction between acid solution and carbonates. The growth of large pores in the formation is referred to as wormholing. Results from the model show that wormholes are formed due to the heterogeneity of carbonate rock and the reaction kinetics between acid and carbonates. Formation of a dominant wormhole is controlled by fluid diffusivity and fluid loss. Model results have good agreement with the results from published papers.

  2. Sonolysis of Short-Chain Organic Dicarboxylic Acid Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naruke, Yukio; Harada, Hisashi

    2011-07-01

    Sonolyses of C4 (carbon number 4) dicarboxylic acids (succinic acid, maleic acid, and fumaric acid) were performed in aqueous solution. They changed one into the other during sonication, affording carbon-number-conserving transformations. Maleic acid and fumaric acid were produced from saccinic acid by dehydrogenation. Furthermore, malic acid and tartaric acid were obtained by hydroxylation. The sonochemical reaction processes are discussed in terms of the time dependences of products and the addition of radical scavengers. In addition, mutual isomerization of fumaric acid and maleic acid was observed during sonication without the use of mediators.

  3. Acid neutralizing processes in an alpine watershed front range, Colorado, U.S.A.-1: Buffering capacity of dissolved organic carbon in soil solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iggy, Litaor M.; Thurman, E.M.

    1988-01-01

    Soil interstitial waters in the Green Lakes Valley, Front Range, Colorado were studied to evaluate the capacity of the soil system to buffer acid deposition. In order to determine the contribution of humic substances to the buffering capacity of a given soil, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and pH of the soil solutions were measured. The concentration of the organic anion, Ai-, derived from DOC at sample pH and the concentration of organic anion, Ax- at the equivalence point were calculated using carboxyl contents from isolated and purified humic material from soil solutions. Subtracting Ax- from Ai- yields the contribution of humic substances to the buffering capacity (Aequiv.-). Using this method, one can evaluate the relative contribution of inorganic and organic constituents to the acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of the soil solutions. The relative contribution of organic acids to the overall ANC was found to be extremely important in the alpine wetland (52%) and the forest-tundra ecotone (40%), and somewhat less important in the alpine tundra sites (20%). A failure to recognize the importance of organic acids in soil solutions to the ANC will result in erroneous estimates of the buffering capacity in the alpine environment of the Front Range, Colorado. ?? 1988.

  4. Influence of activated carbon surface acidity on adsorption of heavy metal ions and aromatics from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Sanae; Yoshihara, Kazuya; Moriyama, Koji; Machida, Motoi; Tatsumoto, Hideki

    2007-08-01

    Adsorption of toxic heavy metal ions and aromatic compounds onto activated carbons of various amount of surface C-O complexes were examined to study the optimum surface conditions for adsorption in aqueous phase. Cadmium(II) and zinc(II) were used as heavy metal ions, and phenol and nitrobenzene as aromatic compounds, respectively. Activated carbon was de-ashed followed by oxidation with nitric acid, and then it was stepwise out-gassed in helium flow up to 1273 K to gradually remove C-O complexes introduced by the oxidation. The oxidized activated carbon exhibited superior adsorption for heavy metal ions but poor performance for aromatic compounds. Both heavy metal ions and aromatics can be removed to much extent by the out-gassed activated carbon at 1273 K. Removing C-O complexes, the adsorption mechanisms would be switched from ion exchange to C?-cation interaction for the heavy metals adsorption, and from some kind of oxygen-aromatics interaction to ?-? dispersion for the aromatics.

  5. A systematic study on the effect of acidic, basic and neutral additives on dispersion of multiwalled carbon nanotubes using a dimethylformamide solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Sasmita; Bhattacharjee, Sarama; Singh, Bimal P.

    2014-12-01

    Presence of acidic, basic and neutral additives on dispersion of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in dimethylforamide (DMF) solution has been investigated. The surface charge measurement showed that MWCNTs in the presence of acidic additives in DMF exhibit a higher surface charge (-85 C g-1) than that with the basic additives (-22 C g-1). The stability of the MWCNTs dispersion was visually monitored and it was found that in the presence of acidic and no additives it would be stable and dispersed for more than five days, whereas MWCNTs suspension immediately settle down in the presence of basic and neutral additives. The degree of defects on MWCNTs was determined by analysis of detailed Raman spectra of as-received MWNCTs and MWNCTs dispersed in DMF with different additives. By exploring the correlation between the ID/IG (Raman analysis) ratio and the degree of defects, it was found that the carbon-carbon double bond (C=C) of MWCNTs was slightly damaged by adding additives to the solvent.

  6. Decomposition Studies of Triphenylboron, Diphenylborinic Acid and Phenylboric Acid in Aqueous Alkaline Solutions Containing Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.L.; Peterson, R. A.

    1997-02-11

    This report documents the copper-catalyzed chemical kinetics of triphenylboron, diphenylborinic acid and phenylboric acid (3PB, 2PB and PBA) in aqueous alkaline solution contained in carbon-steel vessels between 40 and 70 degrees C.

  7. Sequential study on reactive blue 29 dye removal from aqueous solution by peroxy acid and single wall carbon nanotubes: experiment and theory

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The majority of anthraquinone dye released to the environment come from antrapogenic sources. Several techniques are available for dyes' removal. In this study removal of reactive blue 29 (RB29) by an advanced oxidation process sequenced with single wall carbon nanotubes was investigated. Advanced oxidation process was optimized over a period of 60 minutes by changing the ratio of acetic acid to hydrogen peroxide, the compounds which form peroxy acid. Reduction of 20.2% -56.4% of reactive blue 29 was observed when the ratio of hydrogen peroxide/acetic acid/dye changed from 344/344/1 to 344/344/0.08 at different times (60, 120 and 180 min). The optimum ratio of acetic acid/hydrogen peroxide/dye was found to be 344/344/0.16 over 60 min. The resultant then was introduced for further removal by single wall carbon nanotubes(SWCNTs) as adsorbent. The adsorption of reactive blue 29 onto SWCNTs was also investigated. Langmuir, Freundlich and BET isotherms were determined and the results revealed that the adsorption of RB29 onto SWCNTs was well explained by BET model and changed to Freundlich isotherm when SWCNTs was used after the application of peroxy acid. Kinetic study showed that the equilibrium time for adsorption of RB 29 on to SWCNT is 4 h. Experiments were carried out to investigate adsorption kinetics, adsorbent capacity and the effect of solution pH on the removal of reactive blue29. The pseudo-second order kinetic equation could best describe the sorption kinetics. The most efficient pH for color removal (amongst pH=3, 5 and 8) was pH= 5. Further studies are needed to identify the peroxy acid degradation intermediates and to investigate their effects on SWCNTs. PMID:23369540

  8. Carbonic Acid Pretreatment of Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    G. Peter van Walsum; Kemantha Jayawardhana; Damon Yourchisin; Robert McWilliams; Vanessa Castleberry

    2003-05-31

    This project sought to address six objectives, outlined below. The objectives were met through the completion of ten tasks. 1) Solidify the theoretical understanding of the binary CO2/H2O system at reaction temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamics of pH prediction have been improved to include a more rigorous treatment of non-ideal gas phases. However it was found that experimental attempts to confirm theoretical pH predictions were still off by a factor of about 1.8 pH units. Arrhenius experiments were carried out and the activation energy for carbonic acid appears to be substantially similar to sulfuric acid. Titration experiments have not yet confirmed or quantified the buffering or acid suppression effects of carbonic acid on biomass. 2) Modify the carbonic acid pretreatment severity function to include the effect of endogenous acid formation and carbonate buffering, if necessary. It was found that the existing severity functions serve adequately to account for endogenous acid production and carbonate effects. 3) Quantify the production of soluble carbohydrates at different reaction conditions and severity. Results show that carbonic acid has little effect on increasing soluble carbohydrate concentrations for pretreated aspen wood, compared to pretreatment with water alone. This appears to be connected to the release of endogenous acids by the substrate. A less acidic substrate such as corn stover would derive benefit from the use of carbonic acid. 4) Quantify the production of microbial inhibitors at selected reaction conditions and severity. It was found that the release of inhibitors was correlated to reaction severity and that carbonic acid did not appear to increase or decrease inhibition compared to pretreatment with water alone. 5) Assess the reactivity to enzymatic hydrolysis of material pretreated at selected reaction conditions and severity. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates increased with severity, but no advantage was detected for the use of carbonic acid compared to water alone. 6) Determine optimal conditions for carbonic acid pretreatment of aspen wood. Optimal severities appeared to be in the mid range tested. ASPEN-Plus modeling and economic analysis of the process indicate that the process could be cost competitive with sulfuric acid if the concentration of solids in the pretreatment is maintained very high (~50%). Lower solids concentrations result in larger reactors that become expensive to construct for high pressure applications.

  9. Carbonic Acid Retreatment of Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor university

    2003-06-01

    This project sought to address six objectives, outlined below. The objectives were met through the completion of ten tasks. (1) Solidify the theoretical understanding of the binary CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O system at reaction temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamics of pH prediction have been improved to include a more rigorous treatment of non-ideal gas phases. However it was found that experimental attempts to confirm theoretical pH predictions were still off by a factor of about 1.8 pH units. Arrhenius experiments were carried out and the activation energy for carbonic acid appears to be substantially similar to sulfuric acid. Titration experiments have not yet confirmed or quantified the buffering or acid suppression effects of carbonic acid on biomass. (2) Modify the carbonic acid pretreatment severity function to include the effect of endogenous acid formation and carbonate buffering, if necessary. It was found that the existing severity functions serve adequately to account for endogenous acid production and carbonate effects. (3) Quantify the production of soluble carbohydrates at different reaction conditions and severity. Results show that carbonic acid has little effect on increasing soluble carbohydrate concentrations for pretreated aspen wood, compared to pretreatment with water alone. This appears to be connected to the release of endogenous acids by the substrate. A less acidic substrate such as corn stover would derive benefit from the use of carbonic acid. (4) Quantify the production of microbial inhibitors at selected reaction conditions and severity. It was found that the release of inhibitors was correlated to reaction severity and that carbonic acid did not appear to increase or decrease inhibition compared to pretreatment with water alone. (5) Assess the reactivity to enzymatic hydrolysis of material pretreated at selected reaction conditions and severity. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates increased with severity, but no advantage was detected for the use of carbonic acid compared to water alone. (6) Determine optimal conditions for carbonic acid pretreatment of aspen wood. Optimal severities appeared to be in the mid range tested. ASPEN-Plus modeling and economic analysis of the process indicate that the process could be cost competitive with sulfuric acid if the concentration of solids in the pretreatment is maintained very high ({approx}50%). Lower solids concentrations result in larger reactors that become expensive to construct for high pressure applications.

  10. NiP? nanosheet arrays supported on carbon cloth: an efficient 3D hydrogen evolution cathode in both acidic and alkaline solutions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ping; Liu, Qian; Sun, Xuping

    2014-11-21

    Designing efficient and stable hydrogen evolution catalysts made from earth-abundant elements is essential to the development of solar-driven water-splitting devices. In this communication, we develop a two-step strategy for constructing NiP2 nanosheet arrays on carbon cloth (NiP2 NS/CC). As a novel 3D hydrogen evolution cathode, the NiP2 NS/CC electrode is highly active in acidic solutions and needs an overpotential of 75 and 204 mV to achieve current densities of 10 and 100 mA cm(-2), respectively, and it preserves its catalytic activity for at least 57 h. Moreover, it also operates efficiently under alkaline conditions. PMID:25293654

  11. Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct mineral carbonation with carbonic acid

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, W.K.; Dahlin, D.C.; Nilsen, D.N.; Walters, R.P.; Turner, P.C.

    2000-07-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been conducting a series of mineral carbonation tests at its Albany, Oregon, facility over the past 2 years as part of a Mineral Carbonation Study Program within the DOE. The ARC tests have focused on ex-situ mineral carbonation in an aqueous system. The process developed at ARC utilizes a slurry of water mixed with a magnesium silicate mineral, olivine [forsterite and member (mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4})], or serpentine [Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}]. This slurry is reacted with supercritical carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) to produce magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The CO{sub 2} is dissolved in water to form carbonic acid (H{sub 2}CO{sub 3}), which dissociates to H{sup +} and HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. The H{sup +} reacts with the mineral, liberating Mg{sup 2+} cations which react with the bicarbonate to form the solid carbonate. The process is designed to simulate the natural serpentinization reaction of ultramafic minerals, and for this reason, these results may also be applicable to in-situ geological sequestration regimes. Results of the baseline tests, conducted on ground products of the natural minerals, have been encouraging. Tests conducted at ambient temperature (22 C) and subcritical CO{sub 2} pressures (below 73 atm) resulted in very slow conversion to the carbonate. However, when elevated temperatures and pressures are utilized, coupled with continuous stirring of the slurry and gas dispersion within the water column, significant reaction occurs within much shorter reaction times. Extent of reaction, as measured by the stoichiometric conversion of the silicate mineral (olivine) to the carbonate, is roughly 90% within 24 hours, using distilled water, and a reaction temperature of 185 C and a partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (P{sub CO{sub 2}}) of 115 atm. Recent tests using a bicarbonate solution, under identical reaction conditions, have achieved roughly 83% conversion of heat treated serpentine and 84% conversion of olivine to the carbonate in 6 hours. The results from the current studies suggest that reaction kinetics can be improved by pretreatment of the mineral, catalysis of the reaction, or some combination of the two. Future tests are intended to examine a broader pressure/temperature regime, various pretreatment options, as well as other mineral groups.

  12. Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct mineral carbonation with carbonic acid

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Nilsen, David N.; Walters, Richard P.; Turner, Paul C.

    2000-01-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) of the U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE) has been conducting a series of mineral carbonation tests at its Albany, Oregon, facility over the past 2 years as part of a Mineral Carbonation Study Program within the DOE. Other participants in this Program include the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Arizona State University, Science Applications International Corporation, and the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. The ARC tests have focused on ex-situ mineral carbonation in an aqueous system. The process developed at ARC utilizes a slurry of water mixed with a magnesium silicate mineral, olivine [forsterite end member (Mg2SiO4)], or serpentine [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4]. This slurry is reacted with supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) to produce magnesite (MgCO3). The CO2 is dissolved in water to form carbonic acid (H2CO3), which dissociates to H+ and HCO3 -. The H+ reacts with the mineral, liberating Mg2+ cations which react with the bicarbonate to form the solid carbonate. The process is designed to simulate the natural serpentinization reaction of ultramafic minerals, and for this reason, these results may also be applicable to in-situ geological sequestration regimes. Results of the baseline tests, conducted on ground products of the natural minerals, have been encouraging. Tests conducted at ambient temperature (22 C) and subcritical CO2 pressures (below 73 atm) resulted in very slow conversion to the carbonate. However, when elevated temperatures and pressures are utilized, coupled with continuous stirring of the slurry and gas dispersion within the water column, significant reaction occurs within much shorter reaction times. Extent of reaction, as measured by the stoichiometric conversion of the silicate mineral (olivine) to the carbonate, is roughly 90% within 24 hours, using distilled water, and a reaction temperature of 185?C and a partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2) of 115 atm. Recent tests using a bicarbonate solution, under identical reaction conditions, have achieved roughly 83% conversion of heat treated serpentine and 84% conversion of olivine to the carbonate in 6 hours. The results from the current studies suggest that reaction kinetics can be improved by pretreatment of the mineral, catalysis of the reaction, or some combination of the two. Future tests are intended to examine a broader pressure/temperature regime, various pretreatment options, as well as other mineral groups.

  13. Salinity, water hardness, and dissolved organic carbon modulate degradation of peracetic acid (PAA) compounds in aqueous solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is used in aquaculture under different conditions for disinfection purposes. However, there is a lack of information about its environmental fate, particularly its persistence in aquatic systems with different chemistries. Therefore, the impact of water hardness, salinity, and d...

  14. ORGANIC CARBON FRACTIONS IN O AND B HORIZON SOLUTIONS FROM A NEW ENGLAND SPODOSOL: EFFECTS OF ACID TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the effects of H2SO4 and HNO3 on dissolved organic carbon (DOC), pH, and DOC fractions in extracts from Spodosol O and B horizon samples of a forest soil from eastern Maine. reliminary work with HNO3 at pH=3(1 to 24h shaking, ionic strength adjustment with NaNO3 (I=0....

  15. Dissolution of Spent Nuclear Fuel in Carbonate-Peroxide Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2010-01-31

    This study shows that spent UO2 fuel can be completely dissolved in a carbonate-peroxide solution apparently without attacking the metallic Mo-Tc-Ru-Rh-Pd fission product phase. Samples of spent nuclear fuel were pulverized and sieved to a uniform size, then duplicate aliquots were weighed into beakers for analysis. One set was dissolved in near-boiling 10M nitric acid, and the other set was dissolved in a solution of ammonium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide at room temperature. All the resulting fuel solutions were then analyzed for Sr-90, Tc-99, Cs-137, plutonium, and Am-241. For all the samples, the concentrations of Cs-137, Sr-90, plutonium, and Am-241 were the same for both the nitric acid dissolution and the ammonium carbonate-hydrogen peroxide dissolution, but the technetium concentration of the ammonium carbonate-hydrogen peroxide fuel solution was only about 25% of the same fuels dissolved in hot nitric acid.

  16. Water treatment by H2O2 and/or UV affects carbon nanotube (CNT) properties and fate in water and tannic acid solution.

    PubMed

    Czech, Bo?ena; Oleszczuk, Patryk; Wi?cek, Agnieszka Ewa; Barczak, Mariusz

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the study was to estimate how water treatment (stimulation of real conditions) by H2O2 and/or UV affects carbon nanotube (CNT) properties and fate (stability/aggregation) in water and tannic acid solution. The processes studied had only a slight effect on SBET, porosity, and surface composition of CNTs. There was a change in the morphology of CNTs. After H2O2 and/or UV treatment, CNTs underwent shortening, opening up of their ends, and exfoliation. Treatment with H2O2 increased the content of oxygen in CNTs. A decrease was observed in the surface charge and in the mobility of CNTs, which caused an increase in their stability. UV irradiation of CNTs led to an increased incidence of defects that were manifested by both an increase of zeta potential and an increased mobility of CNT, whereas the presence of H2O2 during UV irradiation had only a slight effect on the parameters of the porous structure of nanotubes. PMID:26304806

  17. Reactive solute transport in acidic streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broshears, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Spatial and temporal profiles of Ph and concentrations of toxic metals in streams affected by acid mine drainage are the result of the interplay of physical and biogeochemical processes. This paper describes a reactive solute transport model that provides a physically and thermodynamically quantitative interpretation of these profiles. The model combines a transport module that includes advection-dispersion and transient storage with a geochemical speciation module based on MINTEQA2. Input to the model includes stream hydrologic properties derived from tracer-dilution experiments, headwater and lateral inflow concentrations analyzed in field samples, and a thermodynamic database. Simulations reproduced the general features of steady-state patterns of observed pH and concentrations of aluminum and sulfate in St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream near Leadville, Colorado. These patterns were altered temporarily by injection of sodium carbonate into the stream. A transient simulation reproduced the observed effects of the base injection.

  18. Ions in hyaluronic acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horkay, Ferenc; Basser, Peter J.; Londono, David J.; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Geissler, Erik

    2009-11-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is an anionic biopolymer that is almost ubiquitous in biological tissues. An attempt is made to determine the dominant features that account for both its abundance and its multifunctional role, and which set it apart from other types of biopolymers. A combination of osmotic and scattering techniques is employed to quantify its dynamic and static properties in near-physiological solution conditions, where it is exposed both to mono- and divalent counterions. An equation of state is derived for the osmotic pressure ? in the semidilute concentration region, in terms of two variables, the polymer concentration c and the ionic strength J of the added salt, according to which ? =1.4×103c9/4/J3/4 kPa, where c and J are expressed in mole. Over the physiological ion concentration range, the effect of the sodium chloride and calcium chloride on the osmotic properties of HA solutions is fully accounted for by their contributions to the ionic strength. The absence of precipitation, even at high CaCl2 concentrations, distinguishes this molecule from other biopolymers such as DNA. Dynamic light scattering measurements reveal that the collective diffusion coefficient in HA solutions exceeds that in aqueous solutions of typical neutral polymers by a factor of approximately 5. This property ensures rapid adjustment to, and recovery from, stress applied to HA-containing tissue. Small angle x-ray scattering measurements confirm the absence of appreciable structural reorganization over the observed length scale range 10-1000 Å, as a result of calcium-sodium ion exchange. The scattered intensity in the transfer momentum range q >0.03 Å-1 varies as 1/q, indicating that the HA chain segments in semidilute solutions are linear over an extended concentration range. The osmotic compression modulus c ??/?c, a high value of which is a prerequisite in structural biopolymers, is several times greater than in typical neutral polymer solutions.

  19. Extraction of silicotungstic acid from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulimov, A. V.; Danov, S. M.; Balashov, A. L.; Ovcharova, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    Patterns in obtaining silicotungstic acid from aqueous solutions via extraction are studied. It is shown that processing a 30 wt % aqueous solution of silicotungstic acid with a mixed organic extractant (butanol-1 with benzene additive) allows the extraction of up to 55 wt % of silicotungstic acid from the aqueous phase. It is established that adding hydrochloric acid in amounts of 1.5-2.0% raises the degree of extraction to 98-99 wt % of the silicotungstic acid.

  20. executive summary Ten scalable solutions for carbon

    E-print Network

    Zwicker, Matthias

    BENDING THE CURVE executive summary Ten scalable solutions for carbon neutrality and climate the announcement of the Carbon Neutrality Initiative of the University of California #12;This Executive Summary the Curve: 10 scalable solutions for carbon neutrality and climate stability. Published by the University

  1. Adsorption of lanthanides(III), uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) from nitric acid solutions by carbon inverse opals modified with tetraphenylmethylenediphospine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Turanov, A N; Karandashev, V K; Masalov, V M; Zhokhov, A A; Emelchenko, G A

    2013-09-01

    Carbon inverse opals (C-IOP) were noncovalently modified with tetraphenylmethylenediphospine dioxide (TPMDPDO). The distribution of TPMDPDO between C-IOP and aqueous HNO3 solutions has been studied. The effect of HNO3 concentration in the aqueous phase and that of the TPMDPDO concentration in the sorbent phase on the adsorption of microquantities of Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, U, and Th nitrates from HNO3 solutions by C-IOP modified with TPMDPDO is considered. The stoichiometry of the sorbed complexes has been determined by the slope analysis method. The efficiency of lanthanide(III) adsorption from moderate-concentration HNO3 solutions decreases with increasing element atomic number. PMID:23786834

  2. Nitric acid vapor removal by activated, impregnated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, G.O.

    1996-12-31

    Laboratory and industrial workers can be exposed to vapors of nitric acid, especially in accidents, such as spills. Nitric acid can also be a product of incineration for energy production or waste (e.g., CW agent) disposal. Activated carbons containing impregnants for enhancing vapor and gas removal have been tested for effectiveness in removing vapors of nitric acid from air. The nitric acid vapor was generated from concentrated acid solutions and detected by trapping in a water bubbler for pH measurements. Both low and moderate relative humidity conditions were used. All carbons were effective at vapor contact times representative of air-purifying respirator use. One surprising observation was the desorption of low levels of ammonia from impregnated carbons. This was apparently due to residual ammonia from the impregnation processes.

  3. GC/MS method for determining carbon isotope enrichment and concentration of underivatized short-chain fatty acids by direct aqueous solution injection of biogas digester samples.

    PubMed

    Mulat, Daniel Girma; Feilberg, Anders

    2015-10-01

    In anaerobic digestion of organic matter, several metabolic pathways are involved during the simultaneous production and consumption of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) in general and acetate in particular. Understanding the role of each pathway requires both the determination of the concentration and isotope enrichment of intermediates in conjunction with isotope labeled substrates. The objective of this study was to establish a rapid and simple GC/MS method for determining the isotope enrichment of acetate and concentration of underivatized short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) in biogas digester samples by direct liquid injection of acidified aqueous samples. Sample preparation involves only acidification, centrifugation and filtration of the aqueous solution followed by direct injection of the aqueous supernatant solution onto a polar column. With the sample preparation and GC/MS conditions employed, well-resolved and sharp peaks of underivatized SCFA were obtained in a reasonably short time. Good recovery (96.6-102.3%) as well as low detection (4-7 µmol/L) and quantification limits (14-22 µmol/L) were obtained for all the 6 SCFA studied. Good linearity was achieved for both concentration and isotope enrichment measurement with regression coefficients higher than 0.9978 and 0.9996, respectively. The method has a good intra- and inter-day precision with a relative standard deviation (RSD) below 6% for determining the tracer-to-tracee ratio (TTR) of both [2-(13)C]acetate and [U-(13)C]acetate. It has also a good intra- and inter-day precision with a RSD below 6% and 5% for determining the concentration of standard solution and biogas digester samples, respectively. Acidification of biogas digester samples with oxalic acid provided the low pH required for the protonation of SCFA and thus, allows the extraction of SCFA from the complex sample matrix. Moreover, oxalic acid was the source of formic acid which was produced in the injector set at high temperature. The produced formic acid prevented the adsorption of SCFA in the column, thereby eliminating peak tailing and ghost peaks. The applicability of the validated GC/MS method for determining the concentration of acetate and its (13)C isotope enrichment in anaerobic digester samples was tested and the results demonstrated the suitability of this method for identifying the metabolic pathways involved in degradation and production of acetate. PMID:26078128

  4. Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Kalina, Dale G. (Naperville, IL); Kaplan, Louis (Lombard, IL); Mason, George W. (Clarendon Hills, IL)

    1985-01-01

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions with an organic extractant having the formula: ##STR1## where .phi. is phenyl, R.sup.1 is a straight or branched alkyl or alkoxyalkyl containing from 6 to 12 carbon atoms and R.sup.2 is an alkyl containing from 3 to 6 carbon atoms. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

  5. Removal of cadmium from acidic phosphatic solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Frankenfeld, K.; Brodt, P.; Eich, G.; Ruschke, P.

    1985-01-08

    The invention is concerned with a process of removing cadmium from acid, especially P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-containing solutions by liquid/liquid extraction with the aid of alkyl amine salts that are dissolved in an inert, organic solvent. The cadmium ions are removed from the acid, aqueous phase and are enriched in the organic phase. The cadmium-containing organic phase, subsequently, is re-extracted with an aqueous salt solution, with the cadmium ions migrating from the organic phase into the aqueous phase. The process is particularly suitable for extracting cadmium from concentrated, highly acid aqueous solutions.

  6. NIR spectroscopic properties of aqueous acids solutions.

    PubMed

    Omar, Ahmad Fairuz; Atan, Hanafi; Matjafri, Mohd Zubir

    2012-01-01

    Acid content is one of the important quality attributes in determining the maturity index of agricultural product, particularly fruits. Despite the fact that much research on the measurement of acidity in fruits through non-destructive spectroscopy analysis at NIR wavelengths between 700 to 1,000 nm has been conducted, the same response towards individual acids is not well known. This paper presents NIR spectroscopy analysis on aqueous citric, tartaric, malic and oxalic solutions through quantitative analysis by selecting a set of wavelengths that can best be used to measure the pH of the solutions. The aquaphotomics study of the acid solutions has generated R² above 0.9 for the measurement of all acids. The most important wavelengths for pH are located at 918-925 nm and 990-996 nm, while at 975 nm for water. PMID:22706373

  7. ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION BY ACTIVATED CARBON TREATED WITH SULFURIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study of the adsorption of elemental mercury at 125 C by a sulfuric-acid (H2S04, 50% w/w/ solution)-treated carbon for the removal of mercury from flue gas. The pore structure of the sample was characterized by nitrogen (N2) at -196 C and the t-plot m...

  8. Acidizing High-Temperature Carbonate Formations Using Methanesulfonic Acid 

    E-print Network

    Ortega, Alexis

    2015-03-25

    Hydrochloric acid (HCl) is the most commonly used stimulation fluid for high-temperature wells drilled in carbonate reservoirs due to its high dissolving power and low cost. However, the high corrosion rate of HCl on well ...

  9. Dissolution of Feldspars in Oxalic Acid Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, S. A.; Ullman, W. J.

    1992-07-01

    The rates of plagioclase feldspar and quartz dissolution in solutions of oxalic acid exceed those determined in inorganic solutions at the same pH. The effect of oxalic acid is not strictly additive to the rates in inorganic solution. A better empirical description of the dissolution process requires 6 terms, 3 each for Si and Al release. These terms describe proton-promoted dissolution, ligand-promoted dissolution, and a mixed proton/ligand interaction. The proton/ligand synergy is consistent with a mechanism in which HOx{sup -} (HOOCCOO{sup -}) is the species which attacks the mineral surface.

  10. Diffusion of sulfuric acid in concentrated solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Umino, S.; Newman, J. )

    1993-08-01

    Aqueous sulfuric acid is an economically important chemical reagent. It is one of the largest volume chemical commodities, finding uses in fertilizer production, petroleum refining, extraction of metals from their ores, production of inorganic pigments, pickling of iron and steel, synthesis of surface-active agents, and as a reactant in the lead-acid storage battery. The restricted diffusion method was used to measure the differential diffusion coefficient of sulfuric acid in water at 25 C for the concentration range from 0.3 to 7.5 molar. The concentration gradients of diffusing species were observed by Rayleigh interferometry. Experimental transport data are analyzed with concentrated solution theory of electrolytes in order to elucidate macroscopic transport characteristics of sulfuric acid in terms of specific binary interactions in solution. Results indicate that the transport properties of sulfuric acid are determined by the hydrogen ion-water molecule.

  11. Reference electrode for strong oxidizing acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Rigdon, Lester P. (Livermore, CA); Harrar, Jackson E. (Castro Valley, CA); Bullock, Sr., Jack C. (Pleasanton, CA); McGuire, Raymond R. (Brentwood, CA)

    1990-01-01

    A reference electrode for the measurement of the oxidation-reduction potentials of solutions is especially suitable for oxidizing solutions such as highly concentrated and fuming nitric acids, the solutions of nitrogen oxides, N.sub.2 O.sub.4 and N.sub.2 O.sub.5, in nitric acids. The reference electrode is fabricated of entirely inert materials, has a half cell of Pt/Ce(IV)/Ce(III)/70 wt. % HNO.sub.3, and includes a double-junction design with an intermediate solution of 70 wt. % HNO.sub.3. The liquid junctions are made from Corning No. 7930 glass for low resistance and negligible solution leakage.

  12. ?-Irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negron-Mendoza, Alicia; Graff, Rebecca L.; Ponnamperuma, Cyril

    1980-12-01

    The ?-irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions was studied under initially oxygenated and oxygen-free conditions in an attempt to determine the possible interconversion of malic acid into other carboxylic acids, specifically those associated with Krebs cycle. The effect of dose on product formation of the system was investigated. Gas-liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry was used as the principal means of identification of the non-volatile products. Thin layer chromotography and direct probe mass spectroscopy were also employed. The findings show that a variety of carboxylic acids are formed, with malonic and succinic acids in greatest abundance. These products have all been identified as being formed in the ?-irradiation of acetic acid, suggesting a common intermediary. Since these molecules fit into a metabolic cycle, it is strongly suggestive that prebiotic pathways provided the basis for biological systems.

  13. REACTIONS OF CHLORITE WITH ACTIVATED CARBON AND WITH VANILLIC ACID AND INDAN ADSORBED ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reaction between chlorite (CO2(-1)) and vanillic acid, at pH 6.0 in the presence of granular activated carbon (GAC), yielded several reaction products identifiable by GC/MS; no products were found in the absence of GAC. Indan and ClO2 or ClO2(-1) reacted in aqueous solution a...

  14. Direct synthesis of formic acid from carbon dioxide by hydrogenation in acidic media

    PubMed Central

    Moret, Séverine; Dyson, Paul J.; Laurenczy, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    The chemical transformation of carbon dioxide into useful products becomes increasingly important as CO2 levels in the atmosphere continue to rise as a consequence of human activities. In this article we describe the direct hydrogenation of CO2 into formic acid using a homogeneous ruthenium catalyst, in aqueous solution and in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), without any additives. In water, at 40?°C, 0.2?M formic acid can be obtained under 200?bar, however, in DMSO the same catalyst affords 1.9?M formic acid. In both solvents the catalysts can be reused multiple times without a decrease in activity. Worldwide demand for formic acid continues to grow, especially in the context of a renewable energy hydrogen carrier, and its production from CO2 without base, via the direct catalytic carbon dioxide hydrogenation, is considerably more sustainable than the existing routes. PMID:24886955

  15. Fabrication of carbon-aerogel electrodes for use in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    E-print Network

    Tharp, Ronald S

    2005-01-01

    An experiment was done to determine the ability to fabricate carbon aerogel electrodes for use in a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC). It was found that the use of a 25% solution of the surfactant Cetyltrimethylammonium ...

  16. Acidities of Water and Methanol in Aqueous Solution and DMSO

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Daqing

    2009-01-01

    The relative acidities of water and methanol have been a nagging issue. In gas phase, methanol is more acidic than water by 36.0 kJ/mol; however, in aqueous solution, the acidities of methanol and water are almost identical. The acidity of an acid in solution is determined by both the intrinsic gas-phase ionization Gibbs energy and the solvent…

  17. Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, Mark (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

    2003-01-01

    An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

  18. Rapid analysis of acid in etching and pickling solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tumbina, V.P.; Chinokalov, V.Ya.

    1995-02-01

    A computational method for determining sulfuric and hydrochloric acids in two-component etching solutions has been proposed. The method makes use of linear relationships, assuming that the sum of free and bound acid in solution remains constant.

  19. Study of Acid Response of Qatar Carbonate Rocks 

    E-print Network

    Wang, Zhaohong

    2012-02-14

    reservoirs. Recently papers published from industry discussed the techniques, planning, and optimization of acid stimulation for Qatar carbonate. To the best of author’s knowledge, no study has focused on the acid reaction to Qatar carbonates. The lack...

  20. Solution influence on biomolecular equilibria - Nucleic acid base associations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, A.; Pratt, L. R.; Burt, S. K.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    Various attempts to construct an understanding of the influence of solution environment on biomolecular equilibria at the molecular level using computer simulation are discussed. First, the application of the formal statistical thermodynamic program for investigating biomolecular equilibria in solution is presented, addressing modeling and conceptual simplications such as perturbative methods, long-range interaction approximations, surface thermodynamics, and hydration shell. Then, Monte Carlo calculations on the associations of nucleic acid bases in both polar and nonpolar solvents such as water and carbon tetrachloride are carried out. The solvent contribution to the enthalpy of base association is positive (destabilizing) in both polar and nonpolar solvents while negative enthalpies for stacked complexes are obtained only when the solute-solute in vacuo energy is added to the total energy. The release upon association of solvent molecules from the first hydration layer around a solute to the bulk is accompanied by an increase in solute-solvent energy and decrease in solvent-solvent energy. The techniques presented are expectd to displace less molecular and more heuristic modeling of biomolecular equilibria in solution.

  1. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-06

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 4 figs.

  2. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  3. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  4. Aqueous solution dispersement of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are dispersed in an aqueous buffer solution consisting of at least 50 weight percent water and a remainder weight percent that includes a buffer material. The buffer material has a molecular structure defined by a first end, a second end, and a middle disposed between the first and second ends. The first end is a cyclic ring with nitrogen and oxygen heteroatomes, the middle is a hydrophobic alkyl chain, and the second end is a charged group.

  5. Experimental High Velocity Acid Jetting in Limestone Carbonates 

    E-print Network

    Holland, Christopher

    2014-04-30

    Acid jetting is a well stimulation technique that is used in carbonate reservoirs. It typically involves injecting acid down hole at high flow rates through small orifices which cause high velocities of acid to strike the borehole wall...

  6. Nitric acid uptake by sulfuric acid solutions under stratospheric conditions - Determination of Henry's Law solubility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reihs, Christa M.; Golden, David M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1990-01-01

    The uptake of nitric acid by sulfuric acid solutions representative of stratospheric particulate at low temperatures was measured to determine the solubility of nitric acid in sulfuric acid solutions as a function of H2SO4 concentration and solution temperature. Solubilities are reported for sulfuric acid solutions ranging from 58 to 87 wt pct H2SO4 over a temperature range from 188 to 240 K, showing that, in general, the solubility of nitric acid increases with decreasing sulfuric acid concentration and with decreasing temperature. The measured solubilities indicate that nitric acid in the global stratosphere will be found predominantly in the gas phase.

  7. Solubilities of carbon dioxide in aqueous potassium carbonate solutions mixed with physical solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.B.; Lee, H.; Lee, K.H.

    1998-09-01

    The removal of acidic gases such as CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and COS from gas streams is a very important operation for petrochemical, oil refineries, ammonia manufacture, coal gasification, and natural gas purification plants. Here, the solubilities of carbon dioxide in aqueous potassium carbonate (K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) solutions mixed with physical solvents were measured at 298.2 and 323.2 K with a CO{sub 2} partial-pressure range of 5 kPa to 2 MPa. 1,2-propanediol and propylene carbonate were selected as physical solvents. The aqueous solutions treated in this study were 5 mass% K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-15 mass% 1,2-propanediol and propylene carbonate were selected as physical solvents. The aqueous solutions treated in this study were 5 mass% K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-15 mass% propylene carbonate. The experimental solubility results were presented by the mole ratio of CO{sub 2} and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} contained in the liquid mixture. The addition of 1,2-propanediol to 5 mass% K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution lowered the solubility of CO{sub 2} at constant temperature and pressure conditions when CO{sub 2} partial-pressure range of 5 kPa to 2 MPa. In the case of propylene carbonate the addition of propylene carbonate increased the experimental solubilities in the region of low CO{sub 2} partial pressures and decreased as the CO{sub 2} partial pressure was increased above atmospheric. The solubilities of CO{sub 2} decreased with increasing temperature in the range of 298.2 to 323.2 K.

  8. Toluene nitration in irradiated nitric acid and nitrite solution

    SciTech Connect

    Gracy Elias; Bruce J. Mincher; Stephen P. Mezyk; Jim Muller; Leigh R. Martin

    2011-04-01

    The kinetics, mechanisms, and stable products produced for the aryl alkyl mild ortho-para director - toluene, in irradiated nitric acid and neutral nitrite solutions were investigated using ?, and pulse radiolysis. Electron pulse radiolysis was used to determine the bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of toluene with different transient species produced by irradiation. HPLC with UV detection was primarily used to assess the stable reaction products. GC-MS and LC-MS were used to confirm the results from HPLC. Free-radical nitration reaction products were found in irradiated acidic and neutral media. In acidic medium, the ring substitution and side chain substitution and oxidation produced different nitro products. In ring substitution, nitrogen oxide radicals were added mainly to hydroxyl radical-produced cyclohexadienyl radical, and in side chain substitution they were added to the carbon-centered benzyl radical produced by H-atom abstraction. In neutral nitrite toluene solution, radiolytic ring nitration products approached a statistically random distribution, suggesting a free-radical reaction involving addition of the •NO2 radical.

  9. In situ synthesis carbonated hydroxyapatite layers on enamel slices with acidic amino acids by a novel two-step method.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Xu; Li, Yi; Yang, Tao; Yan, Xiujuan; Wang, Ke

    2015-09-01

    In situ fabrication of carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) remineralization layer on an enamel slice was completed in a novel, biomimetic two-step method. First, a CaCO3 layer was synthesized on the surface of demineralized enamel using an acidic amino acid (aspartic acid or glutamate acid) as a soft template. Second, at the same concentration of the acidic amino acid, rod-like carbonated hydroxyapatite was produced with the CaCO3 layer as a sacrificial template and a reactant. The morphology, crystallinity and other physicochemical properties of the crystals were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), respectively. Acidic amino acid could promote the uniform deposition of hydroxyapatite with rod-like crystals via absorption of phosphate and carbonate ions from the reaction solution. Moreover, compared with hydroxyapatite crystals coated on the enamel when synthesized by a one-step method, the CaCO3 coating that was synthesized in the first step acted as an active bridge layer and sacrificial template. It played a vital role in orienting the artificial coating layer through the template effect. The results show that the rod-like carbonated hydroxyapatite crystals grow into bundles, which are similar in size and appearance to prisms in human enamel, when using the two-step method with either aspartic acid or acidic glutamate (20.00 mmol/L). PMID:26046278

  10. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes in aqueous phytic acid for enhancing biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaoyu; Miao, Yun; Ye, Pingping; Wen, Ying; Yang, Haifeng

    2014-04-01

    The poor dispersion of carbon based nanomaterials without strong acid pretreatment in aqueous solution is a fundamental problem, limiting its applications in biology-related fields. A good dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in water was realized by 50 wt.% phytic acid (PA) solution. As an application case, the PA-MWCNTs dispersion in aqueous solution was used for the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and its direct electrochemistry was realized. The constructed biosensor has a sound limit of detection, wide linear range, and high affinity for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as well as being free from interference of co-existing electro-active species.

  11. Titration of Monoprotic Acids with Sodium Hydroxide Contaminated by Sodium Carbonate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalowski, Tadeusz

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the effects of using carbon dioxide contaminated sodium hydroxide solution as a titrant for a solution of a weak monoprotic acid and the resulting distortion of the titration curve in comparison to one obtained when an uncontaminated titrant is used. (CW)

  12. Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with carbonate-containing solutions

    DOEpatents

    Francis, Raymond

    2012-11-06

    Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with an acidic solution and then a carbonate-containing solution to produce a pretreated cellulosic material are provided. The pretreated material may then be further treated in a pulping process, for example, a soda-anthraquinone pulping process, to produce a cellulose pulp. The pretreatment solutions may be extracted from the pretreated cellulose material and selectively re-used, for example, with acid or alkali addition, for the pretreatment solutions. The resulting cellulose pulp is characterized by having reduced lignin content and increased yield compared to prior art treatment processes.

  13. Reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride using buffered alkaline ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ya-Ting; Liang, Chenju

    2015-10-01

    Alkaline ascorbic acid (AA) was recently discovered as a novel in-situ chemical reduction (ISCR) reagent for remediating chlorinated solvents in the subsurface. For this ISCR process, the maintenance of an alkaline pH is essential. This study investigated the possibility of the reduction of carbon tetrachloride (CT) using alkaline AA solution buffered by phosphate and by NaOH. The results indicated that CT was reduced by AA, and chloroform (CF) was a major byproduct at a phosphate buffered pH of 12. However, CT was completely reduced by AA in 2M NaOH without CF formation. In the presence of iron/soil minerals, iron could be reduced by AA and Fe(2+) tends to precipitate on the mineral surface to accelerate CT degradation. A simultaneous transfer of hydrogenolysis and dichloroelimination would occur under phosphate buffered pH 12. This implies that a high alkaline environment is a crucial factor for maintaining the dominant pathway of two electron transfer from dianionic AA to dehydroascorbic acid, and to undergo dichloroelimination of CT. Moreover, threonic acid and oxalic acid were identified to be the major AA decomposition products in alkaline solutions. PMID:25912910

  14. Nickel embedded in N-doped porous carbon for the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to p-aminophenol in sulphuric acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Dong, Zhen; Fu, Teng; Zhao, Yanchao; Wang, Tian; Wang, Yongzheng; Chen, Yi; Han, Baohang; Ding, Weiping

    2015-12-01

    An acid-resistant catalyst composed of nickel embedded in N-doped porous carbon is developed for the catalytic hydrogenation of nitrobenzene (NB) to p-aminophenol (PAP). The catalyst, due to a special electron donation from nickel to the N-doped porous carbon, shows an excellent catalytic performance and stability in sulphuric acid solution. PMID:26489366

  15. Acid Fracturing Feasibility Study for Heterogeneous Carbonate Formation 

    E-print Network

    Suleimenova, Assiya

    2015-03-03

    Acid fracturing is a stimulation technique that is commonly used by the industry to increase productivity or injectivity of wells in carbonate reservoirs. To determine a feasibility of acid fracturing treatment for a heterogeneous formation...

  16. pH-metric determination of ammonium carbonate and bicarbonate in solutions containing ammonium vanadate

    SciTech Connect

    Fofanov, Al.A.; Yuorenko, V.V.; Kharlampieva, T.I.; Potapov, V.I.

    1986-07-01

    Ammonium carbonate and bicarbonate and ammonium carbonate salts used in hydrometallurgy are characterized by low stability both in solid form and in solutions. The frequently used method of acid-base titration in the presence of a pH indicator is unsuitable in the presence of ions in solution that change color within the investigated pH range. The purpose of this paper is to develop a method of rapid determination of the concentration of ammonium carbonate and bicarbonate in solutions containing ammonium vanadate. The authors used a 0.1 M solution of hydrochloric acid, analytical grade ammonium vanadate, and ammonium carbonate salts, the composition of which approximates real technological solutions. An aliquot portion of the test solution (1-2 ml) is transferred to a 50-ml beaker, and 10 ml of distilled water is added. The electrodes of the pH meter are placed in the solution, and it is titrated with 0.1 M hydrochloric acid with constant mixing.

  17. A comparative study of solid carbon acid catalysts for the esterification of free fatty acids for biodiesel production. Evidence for the leaching of colloidal carbon.

    PubMed

    Deshmane, Chinmay A; Wright, Marcus W; Lachgar, Abdessadek; Rohlfing, Matthew; Liu, Zhening; Le, James; Hanson, Brian E

    2013-11-01

    The preparation of a variety of sulfonated carbons and their use in the esterification of oleic acid is reported. All sulfonated materials show some loss in activity associated with the leaching of active sites. Exhaustive leaching shows that a finite amount of activity is lost from the carbons in the form of colloids. Fully leached catalysts show no loss in activity upon recycling. The best catalysts; 1, 3, and 6; show initial TOFs of 0.07 s(-1), 0.05 s(-1), and 0.14 s(-1), respectively. These compare favorably with literature values. Significantly, the leachate solutions obtained from catalysts 1, 3, and 6, also show excellent esterification activity. The results of TEM and catalyst poisoning experiments on the leachate solutions associate the catalytic activity of these solutions with carbon colloids. This mechanism for leaching active sites from sulfonated carbons is previously unrecognized. PMID:24021721

  18. Sorption of zinc ions from aqueous solutions on regenerated activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Dabek, Lidia

    2003-07-18

    This paper discusses the increasing use of activated carbons to remove wastewater contaminants and their contribution to producing wastes abundant in heavy metals. Considering their threat to the environment and their possible recovery, research on the regeneration of spent carbon sorbents and catalysts is advisable. It has also been shown that it is possible to recover activated carbon from spent catalyst (CC(spent)) generated by vinyl acetate synthesis by using supercritical extraction with carbon dioxide or by leaching with hydrochloric acid or a solution of nitric acid assisted by microwave energy. Activated carbon recovered in this work had a high sorption for zinc ions that was comparable to that of fresh commercial activated carbon. PMID:12927735

  19. Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1992-03-31

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 5 figs.

  20. Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

    1992-01-01

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  1. Solubility of small-chain carboxylic acids in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, Darrell L.; Este?vez, L. Antonio; Hernandez, Rafael; McEwen, Jason; French, Todd

    2010-07-08

    The solubility of heptanoic acid and octanoic acid in supercritical carbon dioxide has been determined at temperatures of (313.15, 323.15, and 333.15) K over a pressure range of (8.5 to 30.0) MPa, depending upon the solute. The solubility of heptanoic acid ranged from a solute concentration of (0.08 ± 0.03) kg • m-3 (T = 323.15 K, p = 8.5 MPa) to (147 ± 0.2) kg • m-3 (T = 323.15 K, p = 20.0 MPa). The lowest octanoic acid solubility obtained was a solute concentration of (0.40 ± 0.1) kg • m-3 (T = 333.15 K, p = 10.0 MPa), while the highest solute concentration was (151 ± 2) kg • m-3 (T = 333.15 K, p = 26.7 MPa). In addition, solubility experiments were performed for nonanoic acid in supercritical carbon dioxide at 323.15 K and pressures of (10.0 to 30.0) MPa to add to the solubility data previously published by the authors. In general, carboxylic acid solubility increased with increasing solvent density. The results also showed that the solubility of the solutes decreased with increasing molar mass at constant supercritical-fluid density. Additionally, the efficacy of Chrastil's equation and other density-based models was evaluated for each fatty acid.

  2. Solubility of small-chain carboxylic acids in supercritical carbon dioxide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sparks, Darrell L.; Este?vez, L. Antonio; Hernandez, Rafael; McEwen, Jason; French, Todd

    2010-07-08

    The solubility of heptanoic acid and octanoic acid in supercritical carbon dioxide has been determined at temperatures of (313.15, 323.15, and 333.15) K over a pressure range of (8.5 to 30.0) MPa, depending upon the solute. The solubility of heptanoic acid ranged from a solute concentration of (0.08 ± 0.03) kg • m-3 (T = 323.15 K, p = 8.5 MPa) to (147 ± 0.2) kg • m-3 (T = 323.15 K, p = 20.0 MPa). The lowest octanoic acid solubility obtained was a solute concentration of (0.40 ± 0.1) kg • m-3 (T = 333.15 K, p = 10.0more »MPa), while the highest solute concentration was (151 ± 2) kg • m-3 (T = 333.15 K, p = 26.7 MPa). In addition, solubility experiments were performed for nonanoic acid in supercritical carbon dioxide at 323.15 K and pressures of (10.0 to 30.0) MPa to add to the solubility data previously published by the authors. In general, carboxylic acid solubility increased with increasing solvent density. The results also showed that the solubility of the solutes decreased with increasing molar mass at constant supercritical-fluid density. Additionally, the efficacy of Chrastil's equation and other density-based models was evaluated for each fatty acid.« less

  3. Experimental Investigation on the Effect of Permeability on the Optimum Acid Flux in Carbonate Matrix Acidizing 

    E-print Network

    Etten, Jordan Ruby

    2015-05-05

    stimulation design. Optimum interstitial velocity determines the injection rate for a treatment, and the optimum pore volume to breakthrough, PVbt-opt, suggests the total volume of acid needed. Studies of carbonate matrix acidizing have focused on the role...

  4. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK CLEANING: CORROSION RATE FOR ONE VERSUS EIGHT PERCENT OXALIC ACID SOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2011-01-20

    Until recently, the use of oxalic acid for chemically cleaning the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste tanks focused on using concentrated 4 and 8-wt% solutions. Recent testing and research on applicable dissolution mechanisms have concluded that under appropriate conditions, dilute solutions of oxalic acid (i.e., 1-wt%) may be more effective. Based on the need to maximize cleaning effectiveness, coupled with the need to minimize downstream impacts, SRS is now developing plans for using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution. A technology gap associated with using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution was a dearth of suitable corrosion data. Assuming oxalic acid's passivation of carbon steel was proportional to the free oxalate concentration, the general corrosion rate (CR) from a 1-wt% solution may not be bound by those from 8-wt%. Therefore, after developing the test strategy and plan, the corrosion testing was performed. Starting with the envisioned process specific baseline solvent, a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution, with sludge (limited to Purex type sludge-simulant for this initial effort) at 75 C and agitated, the corrosion rate (CR) was determined from the measured weight loss of the exposed coupon. Environmental variations tested were: (a) Inclusion of sludge in the test vessel or assuming a pure oxalic acid solution; (b) acid solution temperature maintained at 75 or 45 C; and (c) agitation of the acid solution or stagnant. Application of select electrochemical testing (EC) explored the impact of each variation on the passivation mechanisms and confirmed the CR. The 1-wt% results were then compared to those from the 8-wt%. The immersion coupons showed that the maximum time averaged CR for a 1-wt% solution with sludge was less than 25-mils/yr for all conditions. For an agitated 8-wt% solution with sludge, the maximum time averaged CR was about 30-mils/yr at 50 C, and 86-mils/yr at 75 C. Both the 1-wt% and the 8-wt% testing demonstrated that if the sludge was removed from the testing, there would be a significant increase in the CR. Specifically, the CR for an agitated 1-wt% pure oxalic acid solution at 45 or 75 C was about 4 to 10 times greater than those for a 1-wt% solution with sludge. For 8-wt% at 50 C, the effect was even larger. The lower CRs suggest that the cathodic reactions were altered by the sludge. For both the 1-wt% and 8-wt% solution, increasing the temperature did not result in an increased CR. Although the CR for a 1-wt% acid with sludge was considered to be non-temperature dependent, a stagnant solution with sludge resulted in a CR that was greater at 45 C than at 75 C, suggesting that the oxalate film formed at a higher temperature was better in mitigating corrosion. For both a 1 and an 8-wt% solution, agitation typically resulted in a higher CR. Overall, the testing showed that the general CR to the SRS carbon steel tanks from 1-wt% oxalic acid solution will remain bounded by those from an 8-wt% oxalic acid solution.

  5. Method for liquid chromatographic extraction of strontium from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  6. Polymerization of beta-amino acids in aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We have compared carbonyl diimidazole (CDI) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as activating agents for the oligomerization of negatively-charged alpha- and beta-amino acids in homogeneous aqueous solution. alpha-Amino acids can be oligomerized efficiently using CDI, but not by EDAC. beta-Amino acids can be oligomerized efficiently using EDAC, but not by CDI. Aspartic acid, an alpha- and beta-dicarboxylic acid is oligomerized efficiently by both reagents. These results are explained in terms of the mechanisms of the reactions, and their relevance to prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  7. Acid Diversion in Carbonate Reservoirs Using Polymer-Based In-Situ Gelled Acids 

    E-print Network

    Gomaa, Ahmed Mohamed Mohamed

    2012-07-16

    Diversion in carbonates is more difficult than in sandstones because of the ability of acid to significantly increase the permeability in carbonates as it reacts in the pore spaces and flow channels of matrix. In-situ gelled acids that are based...

  8. Raman spectra of amino acids and their aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangyong; Zhu, Xian; Fan, Qi; Wan, Xueliang

    2011-03-01

    Amino acids are the basic "building blocks" that combine to form proteins and play an important physiological role in all life-forms. Amino acids can be used as models for the examination of the importance of intermolecular bonding in life processes. Raman spectra serve to obtain information regarding molecular conformation, giving valuable insights into the topology of more complex molecules (peptides and proteins). In this paper, amino acids and their aqueous solution have been studied by Raman spectroscopy. Comparisons of certain values for these frequencies in amino acids and their aqueous solutions are given. Spectra of solids when compared to those of the solute in solution are invariably much more complex and almost always sharper. We present a collection of Raman spectra of 18 kinds of amino acids ( L-alanine, L-arginine, L-aspartic acid, cystine, L-glutamic acid, L-glycine, L-histidine, L-isoluecine, L-leucine, L-lysine, L-phenylalanine, L-methionone, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, L-tryptophan, L-tyrosine, L-valine) and their aqueous solutions that can serve as references for the interpretation of Raman spectra of proteins and biological materials.

  9. Method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, G.A.; Smith, J.W.; Ihle, N.C.

    1982-07-08

    A method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete is described wherein the phosphoric acid is reacted with Ca(OH)/sub 2/ to form a precipitate of hydroxyapatite and the hydroxyapatite is mixed with Portland cement to form concrete.

  10. Method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, Gary A [Kennewick, WA; Smith, Jeffrey W [Lancaster, OH; Ihle, Nathan C [Walla Walla, WA

    1984-01-01

    A method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete is described wherein the phosphoric acid is reacted with Ca(OH).sub.2 to form a precipitate of hydroxyapatite and the hydroxyapatite is mixed with portland cement to form concrete.

  11. Ultrasonic Investigation of Aqueous Solutions of Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid*

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    .The ultrasonicabsorp- tion acid titration curvesfor DNA exhibitmaximaaroundpH 2.6 and 12 [-J.Chim. Phys.66, 81 (1969Ultrasonic Investigation of Aqueous Solutions of Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid* W. D. O'BRIEN,J·.,t C. L,and base. The four common bases found in DNA are the pyrimidinesthymine (T) and cytosine

  12. Removal of lead from aqueous solutions on palm shell activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Issabayeva, Gulnaziya; Aroua, Mohamed Kheireddine; Sulaiman, Nik Meriam Nik

    2006-12-01

    The performance of a commercially available palm shell based activated carbon to remove lead ions from aqueous solutions by adsorption was evaluated. The adsorption experiments were carried out at pH 3.0 and 5.0. The effect of malonic and boric acid presence on the adsorption of lead ions was also studied. Palm shell activated carbon showed high adsorption capacity for lead ions, especially at pH 5 with an ultimate uptake of 95.2mg/g. This high uptake showed palm shell activated carbon as amongst the best adsorbents for lead ions. Boric acid presence did not affect significantly lead uptake, whereas malonic acid decreased it. The diffuse layer surface complexation model was applied to predict the extent of adsorption. The model prediction was found to be in concordance with the experimental values. PMID:16321520

  13. Phosphorylation of Glyceric Acid in Aqueous Solution Using Trimetaphosphate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Vera; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1996-01-01

    The phosphorylation of glyceric acid is an interesting prebiotic reaction because it converts a simple, potentially prebiotic organic molecule into phosphate derivatives that are central to carbohydrate metabolism. We find that 0.05 M glyceric acid in the presence of 0.5 M trimetaphosphate in alkaline solution gives a mixture of 2- and 3-phosphoglyceric acids in combined yields of up to 40%.

  14. Dissolution of Simulated and Radioactive Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Sludges with Oxalic Acid & Citric Acid Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    STALLINGS, MARY

    2004-07-08

    This report presents findings from tests investigating the dissolution of simulated and radioactive Savannah River Site sludges with 4 per cent oxalic acid and mixtures of oxalic and citric acid previously recommended by a Russian team from the Khlopin Radium Institute and the Mining and Chemical Combine (MCC). Testing also included characterization of the simulated and radioactive waste sludges. Testing results showed the following: Dissolution of simulated HM and PUREX sludges with oxalic and citric acid mixtures at SRTC confirmed general trends reported previously by Russian testing. Unlike the previous Russian testing six sequential contacts of a mixture of oxalic acid citric acids at a 2:1 ratio (v/w) of acid to sludge did not produce complete dissolution of simulated HM and PUREX sludges. We observed that increased sludge dissolution occurred at a higher acid to sludge ratio, 50:1 (v/w), compared to the recommended ratio of 2:1 (v/w). We observed much lower dissolution of aluminum in a simulated HM sludge by sodium hydroxide leaching. We attribute the low aluminum dissolution in caustic to the high fraction of boehmite present in the simulated sludge. Dissolution of HLW sludges with 4 per cent oxalic acid and oxalic/citric acid followed general trends observed with simulated sludges. The limited testing suggests that a mixture of oxalic and citric acids is more efficient for dissolving HM and PUREX sludges and provides a more homogeneous dissolution of HM sludge than oxalic acid alone. Dissolution of HLW sludges in oxalic and oxalic/citric acid mixtures produced residual sludge solids that measured at higher neutron poison to equivalent 235U weight ratios than that in the untreated sludge solids. This finding suggests that residual solids do not present an increased nuclear criticality safety risk. Generally the neutron poison to equivalent 235U weight ratios of the acid solutions containing dissolved sludge components are lower than those in the untreated sludge solids. We recommend that these results be evaluated further to determine if these solutions contain sufficient neutron poisons. We observed low general corrosion rates in tests in which carbon steel coupons were contacted with solutions of oxalic acid, citric acid and mixtures of oxalic and citric acids. Wall thinning can be minimized by maintaining short contact times with these acid solutions. We recommend additional testing with oxalic and oxalic/citric acid mixtures to measure dissolution performance of sludges that have not been previously dried. This testing should include tests to clearly ascertain the effects of total acid strength and metal complexation on dissolution performance. Further work should also evaluate the downstream impacts of citric acid on the SRS High-Level Waste System (e.g., radiochemical separations in the Salt Waste Processing Facility and addition of organic carbon in the Saltstone and Defense Waste Processing facilities).

  15. Preparation of iron oxide-impregnated spherical granular activated carbon-carbon composite and its photocatalytic removal of methylene blue in the presence of oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Kadirova, Zukhra C; Hojamberdiev, Mirabbos; Katsumata, Ken-Ichi; Isobe, Toshihiro; Matsushita, Nobuhiro; Nakajima, Akira; Sharipov, Khasan; Okada, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    The spherical granular activated carbon-carbon composites (GAC-Fe) with different iron oxide contents (Fe mass% = 0.6-10) were prepared by a pore volume impregnation method. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and N2-adsorption results confirm the presence of amorphous iron oxide, pyrolytic carbon, and graphitized globular carbon nanoparticles covered with amorphous carbon in the CAG-Fe. The rate of photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) in aqueous solution under UV light in the presence of oxalic acid correlates with porosity of the prepared materials. The total MB removal includes the combination of adsorption and photodegradation without the addition of H2O2. The results of total organic carbon (TOC) analysis reveal that the decolorization of MB in aqueous solution containing oxalic acid corresponds to the decomposition of organic compounds to CO2 and H2O. PMID:24679083

  16. A microalgae residue based carbon solid acid catalyst for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaobo; Li, Dianhong; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Yuanming; Huang, Weiya; Zhu, Yi; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Chengwu

    2013-10-01

    Biodiesel production from microalgae is recognized as one of the best solutions to deal with the energy crisis issues. However, after the oil extraction from the microalgae, the microalgae residue was generally discarded or burned. Here a novel carbon-based solid acid catalyst derived from microalgae residue by in situ hydrothermal partially carbonization were synthesized. The obtained catalyst was characterized and subjected to both the esterification of oleic acid and transesterification of triglyceride to produce biodiesel. The catalyst showed high catalytic activity and can be regenerated while its activity can be well maintained after five cycles. PMID:23953130

  17. Precipitation of plutonium from acidic solutions using magnesium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.A.

    1994-12-05

    Magnesium oxide will be used as a neutralizing agent for acidic plutonium-containing solutions. It is expected that as the magnesium oxide dissolves, the pH of the solution will rise, and plutonium will precipitate. The resulting solid will be tested for suitability to storage. The liquid is expected to contain plutonium levels that meet disposal limit requirements.

  18. Improved method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.; Mason, G.W.

    1983-07-26

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions uses a new series of neutral bi-functional extractants, the alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high-level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

  19. Carbon-based strong solid acid for cornstarch hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nata, Iryanti Fatyasari; Irawan, Chairul; Mardina, Primata; Lee, Cheng-Kang

    2015-10-01

    Highly sulfonated carbonaceous spheres with diameter of 100-500 nm can be generated by hydrothermal carbonization of glucose in the presence of hydroxyethylsulfonic acid and acrylic acid at 180 °C for 4 h. The acidity of the prepared carbonaceous sphere C4-SO3H can reach 2.10 mmol/g. It was used as a solid acid catalyst for the hydrolysis of cornstarch. Total reducing sugar (TRS) concentration of 19.91 mg/mL could be obtained by hydrolyzing 20 mg/mL cornstarch at 150 °C for 6 h using C4-SO3H as solid acid catalyst. The solid acid catalyst demonstrated good stability that only 9% decrease in TRS concentration was observed after five repeat uses. The as-prepared carbon-based solid acid catalyst can be an environmentally benign replacement for homogeneous catalyst.

  20. REMOVAL OF CHLORIDE FROM ACIDIC SOLUTIONS USING NO2

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, A; Robert Pierce, R; James Laurinat, J

    2006-08-22

    Chloride (Cl{sup -}) salt processing in strong acids is used to recycle plutonium (Pu) from pyrochemical residues. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is studying the potential application of nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) gas to effectively convert dissolved pyrochemical salt solutions to chloride-free solutions and improve recovery operations. An NO{sub 2} sparge has been shown to effectively remove Cl{sup -} from solutions containing 6-8 M acid (H{sup +}) and up to 5 M Cl{sup -}. Chloride removal occurs as a result of the competition of at least two reactions, one which is acid-dependent. Below 4 M H+, NO2 reacts with Cl- to produce nitrosyl chloride (ClNO). Between 6 M and 8 M H{sup +}, the reaction of hydrochloric acid (HCl) with nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), facilitated by the presence of NO{sub 2}, strongly affects the rate of Cl{sup -} removal. The effect of heating the acidic Cl{sup -} salt solution without pre-heating the NO{sub 2} gas has minimal effect on Cl{sup -} removal rates when the contact times between NO{sub 2} and the salt solution are on the order of seconds.

  1. Hydration of negative ions of trichloroacetic acid in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, G. V.; Morozov, I. I.; Vasiliev, E. S.; Strokova, N. E.; Savilov, S. V.; Lunin, V. V.

    2013-10-01

    Mass spectrum of negative ions of trichloroacetic acid (TCA) in aqueous solution was obtained by mass spectrographic method of electrolyte solution electrospray in vacuum (ESESv). The TCA reactivity was neutralized by potassium hydroxide. The mass spectrum of TCA consists of the acid residue ions, (CCl3COO)-, hydrated by different number of water molecules. The (CCl3COO)- ion hydrated by two water molecules has the maximum intensity. The ESESv method can be helpful for determination of the composition electrolyte solutions in ecological studies.

  2. Nylon Dissolution in Nitric Acid Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    KESSINGER, GLENF.

    2004-06-16

    H Area Operations is planning to process Pu-contaminated uranium scrap in support of de-inventory efforts. Nylon bags will be used to hold materials to be dissolved in H-Canyon. Based on this set of twelve nylon dissolutions, it is concluded that (when other variables are held constant): increased acid concentration results in increased dissolution rates; increased acid concentration results in a lower dissolution onset temperature; little, if any, H plus is consumed during the depolymerization process; and 2.0-3.0 M HNO3, with 0.025 M KF and 2 g/L B, is satisfactory for the dissolution of nylon bag materials to be used during H-Canyon processing.

  3. Observation of carbon growth and interface structures in methanol solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuno, Kimio

    2015-11-01

    In the deposition of carbon on the surface of a tungsten tip in methanol solution by electrolysis, the growth structure of the carbon films, the interface state, and the dissolution of carbon atoms into the tungsten matrix of the substrate have been investigated with the atomic events by field ion microscopy (FIM). The carbon films preferentially condense on the W{111} plane. The interfacial reaction at the carbon atom-tungsten substrate interface is vigorous and the carbon atoms also readily dissolve into the substrate matrix to form a tungsten-carbon complex. The reaction depth of the deposited carbon depends on the magnitude of electrolytic current and the treatment duration in the methanol solution. In this work, the resolution depth of carbon was found to be approximately 270 atomic layers below the top layer of the tungsten substrate by a field evaporation technique. In the case of a low electrolytic current, the tungsten substrate surface is entirely covered with carbon atoms having a pseudomorphic structure. The field-electron emission characteristics were also evaluated for various coverages of the carbon film formed on the substrate.

  4. Carbon dioxide-sustained adsorption of lactic acid at pH > pK{sub a} of the acid

    SciTech Connect

    Husson, S.M.; King, C.J.

    1999-04-01

    Experimental data are presented for batch and fixed-bed adsorption of lactic acid from aqueous sodium lactate solutions onto the tertiary amine sorbents, Dowex MWA-1 and Amberlite IRA-35, in the presence of carbon dioxide. The effects of carbon dioxide pressure and sodium lactate concentration on lactate uptake capacity were measured. A simple complexation model, which includes chemical-equilibria and mass- and charge-balance equations, was developed to describe the system. There are no fitted parameters in the model. The model predictions compare well with batch adsorption data.

  5. Selective Removal of Metallic Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Small Diameters by Using Nitric and Sulfuric Acids

    E-print Network

    Kim, Bongsoo

    in a mixed solution of nitric and sulfuric acids (HNO3 and H2SO4), they did not report on the metallicitySelective Removal of Metallic Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Small Diameters by Using Nitric and Sulfuric Acids Cheol-Min Yang, Jin Sung Park, Kay Hyeok An, Seong Chu Lim, Kwanyong Seo, Bongsoo Kim, Kyung

  6. Modeling of Acid Fracturing in Carbonate Reservoirs 

    E-print Network

    Al Jawad, Murtada s

    2014-06-05

    The acid fracturing process is a thermal, hydraulic, mechanical, and geochemical (THMG)-coupled phenomena in which the behavior of these variables are interrelated. To model the flow behavior of an acid into a fracture, mass and momentum balance...

  7. Phosphorylated Mesoporous Carbon as a Solid Acid Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Mayes, Richard T; Fulvio, Pasquale F; Ma, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Mesoporous carbon catalyst supports are attractive due to their wide chemical stability while potentially increasing masstransport through and providing a path for larger molecules to access catalytic sites. Herein we report the synthesis of a 10 phosphorylated mesoporous carbon solid-acid catalyst characterized by NH3-TPD and isopropanol dehydration.

  8. Vacuum-jacketed hydrofluoric acid solution calorimeter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, R.A.

    1965-01-01

    A vacuum-jacketed metal calorimeter for determining heats of solution in aqueous HF was constructed. The reaction vessel was made of copper and was heavily gold plated. The calorimeter has a cooling constant of 0.6 cal-deg -1-min-1, approximately 1/4 that of the air-jacketed calorimeters most commonly used with HF. It reaches equilibrium within 10 min after turning off the heater current. Measurements of the heat of solution of reagent grade KCl(-100 mesh dried 2 h at 200??C) at a mole ratio of 1 KCl to 200 H2O gave ??H = 4198??11 cal at 25??C. ?? 1965 The American Institute of Physics.

  9. Influence of acidic and alkaline waste solution properties on uranium migration in subsurface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szecsody, Jim E.; Truex, Mike J.; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Resch, Tom; Zhong, Lirong

    2013-08-01

    This study shows that acidic and alkaline wastes co-disposed with uranium into subsurface sediments have significant impact on changes in uranium retardation, concentration, and mass during downward migration. For uranium co-disposal with acidic wastes, significant rapid (i.e., hours) carbonate and slow (i.e., 100 s of hours) clay dissolution resulted, releasing significant sediment-associated uranium, but the extent of uranium release and mobility change was controlled by the acid mass added relative to the sediment proton adsorption capacity. Mineral dissolution in acidic solutions (pH 2) resulted in a rapid (< 10 h) increase in aqueous carbonate (with Ca2 +, Mg2 +) and phosphate and a slow (100 s of hours) increase in silica, Al3 +, and K+, likely from 2:1 clay dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong acid resulted in significant shallow uranium mineral dissolution and deeper uranium precipitation (likely as phosphates and carbonates) with downward uranium migration of three times greater mass at a faster velocity relative to uranium infiltration in pH neutral groundwater. In contrast, mineral dissolution in an alkaline environment (pH 13) resulted in a rapid (< 10 h) increase in carbonate, followed by a slow (10 s to 100 s of hours) increase in silica concentration, likely from montmorillonite, muscovite, and kaolinite dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong base resulted in not only uranium-silicate precipitation (presumed Na-boltwoodite) but also desorption of natural uranium on the sediment due to the high ionic strength solution, or 60% greater mass with greater retardation compared with groundwater. Overall, these results show that acidic or alkaline co-contaminant disposal with uranium can result in complex depth- and time-dependent changes in uranium dissolution/precipitation reactions and uranium sorption, which alter the uranium migration mass, concentration, and velocity.

  10. Influence of acidic and alkaline waste solution properties on uranium migration in subsurface sediments.

    PubMed

    Szecsody, Jim E; Truex, Mike J; Qafoku, Nikolla P; Wellman, Dawn M; Resch, Tom; Zhong, Lirong

    2013-08-01

    This study shows that acidic and alkaline wastes co-disposed with uranium into subsurface sediments have significant impact on changes in uranium retardation, concentration, and mass during downward migration. For uranium co-disposal with acidic wastes, significant rapid (i.e., hours) carbonate and slow (i.e., 100 s of hours) clay dissolution resulted, releasing significant sediment-associated uranium, but the extent of uranium release and mobility change was controlled by the acid mass added relative to the sediment proton adsorption capacity. Mineral dissolution in acidic solutions (pH2) resulted in a rapid (<10 h) increase in aqueous carbonate (with Ca(2+), Mg(2+)) and phosphate and a slow (100 s of hours) increase in silica, Al(3+), and K(+), likely from 2:1 clay dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong acid resulted in significant shallow uranium mineral dissolution and deeper uranium precipitation (likely as phosphates and carbonates) with downward uranium migration of three times greater mass at a faster velocity relative to uranium infiltration in pH neutral groundwater. In contrast, mineral dissolution in an alkaline environment (pH13) resulted in a rapid (<10h) increase in carbonate, followed by a slow (10 s to 100 s of hours) increase in silica concentration, likely from montmorillonite, muscovite, and kaolinite dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong base resulted in not only uranium-silicate precipitation (presumed Na-boltwoodite) but also desorption of natural uranium on the sediment due to the high ionic strength solution, or 60% greater mass with greater retardation compared with groundwater. Overall, these results show that acidic or alkaline co-contaminant disposal with uranium can result in complex depth- and time-dependent changes in uranium dissolution/precipitation reactions and uranium sorption, which alter the uranium migration mass, concentration, and velocity. PMID:23851265

  11. Influence of Acidic and Alkaline Waste Solution Properties on Uranium Migration in Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Wellman, Dawn M.; Resch, Charles T.; Zhong, Lirong

    2013-08-01

    This study shows that acidic and alkaline wastes co-disposed with uranium into subsurface sediments has significant impact on changes in uranium retardation, concentration, and mass during downward migration. For uranium co-disposal with acidic wastes, significant rapid (i.e., hours) carbonate and slow (i.e., 100s of hours) clay dissolution resulted, releasing significant sediment-associated uranium, but the extent of uranium release and mobility change was controlled by the acid mass added relative to the sediment proton adsorption capacity. Mineral dissolution in acidic solutions (pH 2) resulted in a rapid (< 10 h) increase in aqueous carbonate (with Ca2+, Mg2+) and phosphate and a slow (100s of hours) increase in silica, Al3+, and K+, likely from 2:1 clay dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong acid resulted in significant shallow uranium mineral dissolution and deeper uranium precipitation (likely as phosphates and carbonates) with downward uranium migration of three times greater mass at a faster velocity relative to uranium infiltration in pH neutral groundwater. In contrast, mineral dissolution in an alkaline environment (pH 13) resulted in a rapid (< 10 h) increase in carbonate, followed by a slow (10s to 100s of hours) increase in silica concentration, likely from montmorillonite, muscovite, and kaolinite dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong base resulted in uranium-silicate precipitation (presumed Na-boltwoodite) but also desorption of natural uranium on the sediment due to the high ionic strength solution, or 60% greater mass with greater retardation compared with groundwater. Overall, these results show that acidic or alkaline co-contaminant disposal with uranium can result in complex depth- and time-dependent changes in uranium dissolution/precipitation reactions and uranium sorption, which alter the uranium migration mass, concentration, and velocity.

  12. Electrochemical Behavior of Epinephrine at a Glassy Carbon Electrode Modified by Electrodeposited Films of Caffeic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wang; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2006-01-01

    A stable electroactive thin film of poly(caffeic acid) has been deposited on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode by potentiostatic technique in an aqueous solution containing caffeic acid. The voltammetric behavior of epinephrine (EP) at the poly(caffeic acid) modified glassy carbon electrode was studied by cyclic voltammetry. The poly(caffeic acid) modified electrode exhibited a promotion effect on the oxidation of EP. In a pH 7.4 phosphate buffer, the anodic current increased linearly with the concentration of EP in the range from 2.0 × 10?6 to 3.0 × 10?4 mol L?1 and the detection limit for EP was 6.0 × 10?7 mol L?1. The proposed method can be applied to the determination of EP in practical injection samples with simplicity, rapidness and accurate results.

  13. Does Nitric Acid Dissociate at the Aqueous Solution Surface?

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Tanza; Winter, Berndt; Stern, Abraham C.; Baer, Marcel D.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Tobias, Douglas J.; Hemminger, J. C.

    2011-11-03

    Nitric acid is a prevalent component of atmospheric aerosols, and the extent of nitric acid dissociation at aqueous interfaces is relevant to its role in heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry. Several experimental and theoretical studies have suggested that the extent of dissociation of nitric acid near aqueous interfaces is less than in bulk solution. Here, dissociation of HNO3 at the surface of aqueous nitric acid is quantified using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the nitrogen local electronic structure. The relative amounts of undissociated HNO3(aq) and dissociated NO3-(aq) are identified by the distinguishable N1s core-level photoelectron spectra of the two species, and we determine the degree of dissociation, ?int, in the interface (the first ~3 layers of solution) as a function of HNO3 concentration. Our measurements show that dissociation is decreased by approximately 20% near the solution interface compared with bulk, and furthermore that dissociation occurs even in the top-most solution layer. The experimental results are supported by first-principles MD simulations, which show that hydrogen-bonds between HNO3 and water molecules at the solution surface stabilize the molecular form at low concentration, in analogy to the stabilization of molecular HNO3 that occurs in bulk solution at high concentration. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  14. Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions by modification of Purex solvent

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.

    1986-03-04

    A process is described for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous solutions with an extraction solution containing an organic extractant having the formula as shown in a diagram where [phi] is phenyl, R[sup 1] is a straight or branched alkyl or alkoxyalkyl containing from 6 to 12 carbon atoms and R[sup 2] is an alkyl containing from 3 to 6 carbon atoms and phase modifiers in a water-immiscible hydrocarbon diluent. The addition of the extractant to the Purex process extractant, tri-n-butylphosphate in normal paraffin hydrocarbon diluent, will permit the extraction of multivalent lanthanide and actinide values from 0.1 to 12.0 molar acid solutions. 6 figs.

  15. Oxidative desulfurization of askale coal by nitric acid solution

    SciTech Connect

    Guru, M.

    2007-07-01

    Efficient use of fossil fuels is of utmost importance in a world that depends on these for the greatest part of its energy needs. Although lignite is a widely used fossil fuel, its sulfur content limits its consumption. This study aims to capture combustible sulfur in the ash by oxidizing it with solution of nitric acid solution. Thus, the combustible sulfur in the coal was converted to sulfate form in the ash. Parameters affecting the conversion of sulfur were determined to be nitric acid concentration, reaction time and mean particle size at constant (near room) temperature and shaking rate. The maximum desulfurization efficiency reached was 38.7% of the original combustible sulfur with 0.3 M nitric acid solution, 16 h of reaction time and 0.1 mm mean particle size.

  16. Conversion of carbon dioxide to resorcylic acid under ultrasonication by Kolbe-Schmitt reaction.

    PubMed

    Shanthi, B; Palanivelu, K

    2015-11-01

    The present work focuses on a new approach for the synthesis of ?-resorcylic acid based on Kolbe-Schmitt reaction using carbon dioxide under ultrasonic and mild condition. The Kolbe-Schmitt reaction is a process for the synthesis of ?-resorcylic acid (2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid) from resorcinol in aqueous potassium hydroxide solution with gaseous CO2. The influences of carbonation time, flow rate of CO2 and the molar ratio of resorcinol/potassium hydroxide on the yield percentage of resorcylic acid were investigated. The study was assessed with the conventional thermal method (non ultrasonic method) for Kolbe-Schmitt reaction and it was observed that applying ultrasound to save more than 95% and 38.6% energy as shown by energy consumption calculations in bath type and horn type sonicator respectively. ?-Resorcylic acid formed was characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, DEPT NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. The amount of CO2 utilized in the reaction was evaluated from the yield percentage of ?-resorcylic acid yield. The maximum yield of resorcylic acid of 30% and 65% was obtained at the resorcinol/potassium hydroxide ratio of 1:3, carbonation time of 150 min and the CO2 flow rate of 2L/min in bath type and horn type ultrasonicator, respectively. The applicability of the research work was examined in two different positional isomers of resorcinol under optimum conditions. PMID:26186845

  17. Highly accurate boronimeter assay of concentrated boric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, R.M. )

    1992-01-01

    The Random-Walk Boronimeter has successfully been used as an on-line indicator of boric acid concentration in an operating commercial pressurized water reactor. The principle has been adapted for measurement of discrete samples to high accuracy and to concentrations up to 6000 ppm natural boron in light water. Boric acid concentration in an aqueous solution is a necessary measurement in many nuclear power plants, particularly those that use boric acid dissolved in the reactor coolant as a reactivity control system. Other nuclear plants use a high-concentration boric acid solution as a backup shutdown system. Such a shutdown system depends on rapid injection of the solution and frequent surveillance of the fluid to ensure the presence of the neutron absorber. The two methods typically used to measure boric acid are the chemical and the physical methods. The chemical method uses titration to determine the ionic concentration of the BO[sub 3] ions and infers the boron concentration. The physical method uses the attenuation of neutrons by the solution and infers the boron concentration from the neutron absorption properties. This paper describes the Random-Walk Boronimeter configured to measure discrete samples to high accuracy and high concentration.

  18. Radiolysis of aqueous solutions of acetic acid in the presence of Na-montmorillonite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ramos, S.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1990-01-01

    The gamma-irradiation of 0.8 mol dm-3 aqueous, oxygen-free acetic acid solutions was investigated in the presence or absence of Na-montmorillonite. H2, CH4, CO, CO2, and several polycarboxylic acids were formed in all systems. The primary characteristics observed in the latter system were: (1) Higher yield of the decomposition of acetic acid; (2) Lower yield of the formation of polycarboxylic acids; (3) No effect on the formation of methane; (4) Higher yield of the formation of carbon dioxide; and (5) The reduction of Fe3+ in the octahedral sites of Na-montmorillonite. A possible reaction scheme was proposed to account for the observed changes. The results are important in understanding heterogeneous processes in radiation catalysis and might be significant to prebiotic chemistry.

  19. Modeling Sucrose Hydrolysis in Dilute Sulfuric Acid Solutions at Pretreatment Conditions for Lignocellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, S.; Wickramasinghe, R.; Nagle, N. J.; Schell, D. J.

    2008-01-01

    Agricultural and herbaceous feedstocks may contain appreciable levels of sucrose. The goal of this study was to evaluate the survivability of sucrose and its hydrolysis products, fructose and glucose, during dilute sulfuric acid processing at conditions typically used to pretreat lignocellulose biomass. Solutions containing 25 g/l sucrose with 0.1-2.0% (w/w) sulfuric acid concentrations were treated at temperatures of 160-200 C for 3-12 min. Sucrose was observed to completely hydrolyze at all treatment conditions. However, appreciable concentrations of fructose and glucose were detected and glucose was found to be significantly more stable than fructose. Different mathematical approaches were used to fit the kinetic parameters for acid-catalyzed thermal degradation of these sugars. Since both sugars may survive dilute acid pretreatment, they could provide an additional carbon source for production of ethanol and other bio-based products.

  20. Fragrance material review on carbonic acid, methyl phenylmethyl ester.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of carbonic acid, methyl phenylmethyl ester when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. Carbonic acid, methyl phenylmethyl ester is a member of the fragrance structural group Aryl Alkyl Alcohol Simple Acid Esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for carbonic acid, methyl phenylmethyl ester were evaluated, then summarized, and includes: physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, and skin sensitization data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document. Please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE in fragrances. PMID:22414647

  1. Methanol Uptake by Low Temperature Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, L. T.; Essin, A. M.; Golden, D. M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The global methanol budget is currently unbalanced, with source terms significantly larger than the sinks terms. To evaluate possible losses of gaseous methanol to sulfate aerosols, the solubility and reactivity of methanol in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols is under investigation. Methanol will partition into sulfate aerosols according to its Henry's law solubility. Using standard uptake techniques in a Knudsen cell reactor, we have measured the effective Henry's law coefficient, H*, for cold (196 - 220 K) solutions ranging between 45 and 70 wt % H2SO4. We have found that methanol solubility ranges from approx. 10(exp 5) - 10(exp 7) M/atm for UT/LS conditions. Solubility increases with decreasing temperature and with increasing sulfuric acid content. Although methanol is slightly more soluble than are acetone and formaldehyde, current data indicate that uptake by clean aqueous sulfuric acid particles will not be a significant sink for methanol in the UT/LS. These solubility measurements include uptake due to physical solvation and any rapid equilibria which are established in solution. Reaction between primary alcohols and sulfuric acid does occur, leading to the production of alkyl sulfates. Literature values for the rate of this reaction suggest that formation of CH3OSO3H is not significant over our experimental time scale for solutions below 80 wt % H2SO4. To confirm this directly, results obtained using a complementary equilibrium measurement technique will also be presented.

  2. A mechanistic model of wormhole growth in carbonate matrix acidizing and acid fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, K.M.; Hill, A.D.; Sepehrnoorl, K.

    1989-01-01

    A mathematical model that describes the growth and competition of wormholes during ann acidizing treatment in a carbonate formation was developed. The model is initialized with the distribution of largest pores. Wormhole characteristics (size, length, and distribution) were found too be controlled by acid-injection, diffusion, and fluid-loss rates.

  3. Phase transition of carbonate solvent mixture solutions at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Takefumi; Horiba, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    The phase transition of carbonate solvent mixture solutions consisting of ethylene carbonate (EC), dimethyl carbonate (DMC), ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), and LiPF6 salt have been studied for improving the low temperature performance of lithium-ion batteries. The Li ion conductivity at 25 °C was maximum at x = 0.3 in a series of 1 M LiPF6 mixed carbonate solvents compositions consisting of ECxDMC0.5-0.5xEMC0.5-0.5x (x = 0 to 0.6), while the maximum tended to shift to x = 0.2 as the temperature lowered. The differential scanning calorimetry results showed that the freezing temperature depressions of EC in the 1 M LiPF6 solution were larger than those of the DMC or EMC. The chemical shift of 7Li nuclear magnetic resonance changed from a constant to increasing at around x = 0.3, which could be reasonably understood by focusing on the change in solvation energy calculated using Born equation. However, in the region of a high EC concentration of over x = 0.3 (EC/LiPF6 > 4) in the 1 M LiPF6 solution, the free EC from the solvation to the lithium ions seems to reduce the freezing temperature depression of the EC, and thus, decreases the ionic conductivity of the solution at low temperatures, due to the EC freezing.

  4. The adsorption of pharmaceutically active compounds from aqueous solutions onto activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Raki?, Vesna; Rac, Vladislav; Krmar, Marija; Otman, Otman; Auroux, Aline

    2015-01-23

    In this study, the adsorption of pharmaceutically active compounds - salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, atenolol and diclofenac-Na onto activated carbons has been studied. Three different commercial activated carbons, possessing ?650, 900 or 1500m(2)g(-1) surface areas were used as solid adsorbents. These materials were fully characterized - their textural, surface features and points of zero charge have been determined. The adsorption was studied from aqueous solutions at 303K using batch adsorption experiments and titration microcalorimetry, which was employed in order to obtain the heats evolved as a result of adsorption. The maximal adsorption capacities of investigated solids for all target pharmaceuticals are in the range of 10(-4)molg(-1). The obtained maximal retention capacities are correlated with the textural properties of applied activated carbon. The roles of acid/base features of activated carbons and of molecular structures of adsorbate molecules have been discussed. The obtained results enabled to estimate the possibility to use the activated carbons in the removal of pharmaceuticals by adsorption. PMID:24857621

  5. Quantitative extraction and concentration of synthetic water-soluble acid dyes from aqueous media using a quinine-chloroform solution

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, F.; Ozawa, N.; Hanai, J.; Isobe, M.; Watabe, T.

    1986-12-01

    Twenty-one water-soluble acid dyes, including eleven azo, five triphenylmethane four xanthene, one naphthol derivatives, used at practical concentrations for food coloration, were quantitatively extracted from water and various carbonated beverages into a 0.1 M quinine-chloroform solution in the presence of 0.5 M boric acid by brief shaking. Quantitative extraction of these dyes was also accomplished by the 0.1 M quinine-chloroform solution made conveniently from chloroform, quinine hydrochloride, and sodium hydroxide added successively to water or beverages containing boric acid. Quinine acted as a countercation on the dyes having sulfonic and/or carboxylic acid group(s) to form chloroform-soluble ion-pair complexes. The diacidic base alkaloid interacted with each acid group of mono-, di-, tri-, and tetrasulfonic acid dyes approximately in the ratio 0.8-0.9 to 1. The dyes in the chloroform solution were quantitatively concentrated into a small volume of sodium hydroxide solution also by brief shaking. The convenient quinine-chloroform method was applicable to the quantitative extraction of a mixture of 12 dyes from carbonated beverages, which are all currently used for food coloration. A high-pressure liquid chromatographic method is also presented for the systematic separation and determination of these 12 dyes following their concentration into the aqueous alkaline solution. The chromatogram was monitored by double-wavelength absorptiometry in the visible and ultraviolet ray regions.

  6. Studies on the adsorption of americium on alumina from aqueous nitric acid-oxalic acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Subba Rao, M.; Gaikwad, A.M.; Rao, V.K.; Natarajan, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reports a study on the adsorption of Am(III) on alumina from oxalic acid-nitric acid solutions. Distribution coefficients for Am(III) on alumina at different oxalic acid-nitric acid concentrations have been determined and optimum conditions for loading and elution of Am from alumina columns have been established. Separation of Am from Pu and the effects of other ions, such as U(VI) and Fe(III), have also been studied. Am and Pu recoveries better than 99.5% were obtained. 3 references, 2 figures, 5 tables.

  7. USE OF FATTY ACID STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIO TO INDICATE MICROBIAL CARBON SOURCE IN TROPICAL SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory


    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotope ratio of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in soils as indicators of live microbial biomass levels, broad microbial community structure, and microbial carbon source. For studies of soil o...

  8. Separation of glycols from dilute aqueous solutions via complexation with boronic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Randel, L.A.; King, C.J.

    1991-07-01

    This work examines methods of separating low molecular weight glycols from dilute aqueous solution. Extraction into conventional solvents is generally not economical, since, in the literature reviewed, distribution ratios for the two- to four-carbon glycols are all less than one. Distribution ratios can be increased, however, by incorporating into the organic phase an extracting agent that will complex with the solute of interest. The extracting agent investigated in this work is 3-nitrophenylboronic acid (NPBA). NPBA, a boric acid derivative, reversibly complexes with many glycols. The literature on complexation of borate and related compounds with glycols, including mechanistic data, measurement techniques, and applications to separation processes, provides information valuable for designing experiments with NPBA and is reviewed herein. 88 refs., 15 figs., 24 tabs.

  9. Carbon quantum dots with photo-generated proton property as efficient visible light controlled acid catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haitao; Liu, Ruihua; Kong, Weiqian; Liu, Juan; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Xing; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Kang, Zhenhui

    2013-12-01

    Developing light-driven acid catalyst will be very meaningful for the controlled-acid catalytic processes towards a green chemical industry. Here, based on scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and ?pH testing, we demonstrate that the 5-10 nm carbon quantum dots (CQDs) synthesized by electrochemical ablation of graphite have strong light-induced proton properties under visible light in solution, which can be used as an acid catalyst. The 5-10 nm CQDs' catalytic activity is strongly dependent on the illumination intensity and the temperature of the reaction system. As an effective visible light driven and controlled acid-catalyst, 5-10 nm CQDs can catalyze a series of organic reactions (esterification, Beckmann rearrangement and aldol condensation) with high conversion (34.7-46.2%, respectively) in water solution under visible light, while the 1-4 nm CQDs and 10-2000 nm graphite do not have such excellent catalytic activity. The use of 5-10 nm CQDs as a light responsive and controllable photocatalyst is truly a novel application of carbon-based nanomaterials, which may significantly push research in the current catalytic industry, environmental pollution and energy issues.Developing light-driven acid catalyst will be very meaningful for the controlled-acid catalytic processes towards a green chemical industry. Here, based on scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and ?pH testing, we demonstrate that the 5-10 nm carbon quantum dots (CQDs) synthesized by electrochemical ablation of graphite have strong light-induced proton properties under visible light in solution, which can be used as an acid catalyst. The 5-10 nm CQDs' catalytic activity is strongly dependent on the illumination intensity and the temperature of the reaction system. As an effective visible light driven and controlled acid-catalyst, 5-10 nm CQDs can catalyze a series of organic reactions (esterification, Beckmann rearrangement and aldol condensation) with high conversion (34.7-46.2%, respectively) in water solution under visible light, while the 1-4 nm CQDs and 10-2000 nm graphite do not have such excellent catalytic activity. The use of 5-10 nm CQDs as a light responsive and controllable photocatalyst is truly a novel application of carbon-based nanomaterials, which may significantly push research in the current catalytic industry, environmental pollution and energy issues. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03996j

  10. The effect of electrolyzed strong acid aqueous solution on hemodialysis equipment.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, N; Fujisawa, T; Daimon, T; Fujiwara, K; Yamamoto, M; Abe, T

    1999-12-01

    We reported the high effectiveness of electrolyzed strong acid aqueous solution (ESAAS) in cleaning hemodialysis lines. Although ESAAS has a strong bactericidal action, one concern is its strong acidity. It has a pH of 2.3-2.7, more than 1,000 mV in oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), and 10-50 ppm of available chlorine. The possibility of metal corrosion, degradation of synthetic resins, chorine gas emission, or dissolving calcium carbonate (CaCO3) deposits due to ESAAS's acidity was tested using in vitro experiments. The bactericidal and antiviral effects of various ESAAS's were also tested. Metal corrosion and synthetic resin degradation, although they occurred, were not serious. There were no problems with chlorine gas emission and dissolving of CaCO3 deposits. Each type of ESAAS showed almost the same bactericidal and antiviral effect, but in some cases differences were observed. PMID:10619923

  11. Solution Preserves Nucleic Acids in Body-Fluid Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond P.

    2004-01-01

    A solution has been formulated to preserve deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) in specimens of blood, saliva, and other bodily fluids. Specimens of this type are collected for diagnostic molecular pathology, which is becoming the method of choice for diagnosis of many diseases. The solution makes it possible to store such specimens at room temperature, without risk of decomposition, for subsequent analysis in a laboratory that could be remote from the sampling location. Thus, the solution could be a means to bring the benefits of diagnostic molecular pathology to geographic regions where refrigeration equipment and diagnostic laboratories are not available. The table lists the ingredients of the solution. The functions of the ingredients are the following: EDTA chelates divalent cations that are necessary cofactors for nuclease activity. In so doing, it functionally removes these cations and thereby retards the action of nucleases. EDTA also stabilizes the DNA helix. Tris serves as a buffering agent, which is needed because minor contaminants in an unbuffered solution can exert pronounced effects on pH and thereby cause spontaneous degradation of DNA. SDS is an ionic detergent that inhibits ribonuclease activity. SDS has been used in some lysis buffers and as a storage buffer for RNA after purification. The use of the solution is straightforward. For example, a sample of saliva is collected by placing a cotton roll around in the subject's mouth until it becomes saturated, then the cotton is placed in a collection tube. Next, 1.5 mL of the solution are injected directly into the cotton and the tube is capped for storage at room temperature. The effectiveness of the solution has been demonstrated in tests on specimens of saliva containing herpes simplex virus. In the tests, the viral DNA, as amplified by polymerase chain reaction, was detected even after storage for 120 days.

  12. Synthesis and acid catalysis of cellulose-derived carbon-based solid acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganuma, Satoshi; Nakajima, Kiyotaka; Kitano, Masaaki; Yamaguchi, Daizo; Kato, Hideki; Hayashi, Shigenobu; Hara, Michikazu

    2010-06-01

    SO 3H-bearing amorphous carbon, prepared by partial carbonization of cellulose followed by sulfonation in fuming H 2SO 4, was applied as a solid catalyst for the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of ?-1,4 glucan, including cellobiose and crystalline cellulose. Structural analyses revealed that the resulting carbon material consists of graphene sheets with 1.5 mmol g -1 of SO 3H groups, 0.4 mmol g -1 of COOH, and 5.6 mmol g -1 of phenolic OH groups. The carbon catalyst showed high catalytic activity for the hydrolysis of ?-1,4 glycosidic bonds in both cellobiose and crystalline cellulose. Pure crystalline cellulose was not hydrolyzed by conventional strong solid Brønsted acid catalysts such as niobic acid, Nafion ® NR-50, and Amberlyst-15, whereas the carbon catalyst efficiently hydrolyzes cellulose into water-soluble saccharides. The catalytic performance of the carbon catalyst is due to the large adsorption capacity for hydrophilic reactants and the adsorption ability of ?-1,4 glucan, which is not adsorbed to other solid acids.

  13. Interaction of Ethyl Alcohol Vapor with Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, Ming-Taun

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the uptake of ethyl alcohol (ethanol) vapor by sulfuric acid solutions over the range approx.40 to approx.80 wt % H2SO4 and temperatures of 193-273 K. Laboratory studies used a fast flow-tube reactor coupled to an electron-impact ionization mass spectrometer for detection of ethanol and reaction products. The uptake coefficients ((gamma)) were measured and found to vary from 0.019 to 0.072, depending upon the acid composition and temperature. At concentrations greater than approx.70 wt % and in dilute solutions colder than 220 K, the values approached approx.0.07. We also determined the effective solubility constant of ethanol in approx.40 wt % H2SO4 in the temperature range 203-223 K. The potential implications to the budget of ethanol in the global troposphere are briefly discussed.

  14. DC diaphragm discharge in water solutions of selected organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyhnankova, Edita J.; Hammer, Malte U.; Reuter, Stephan; Krcma, Frantisek

    2015-07-01

    Effect of four simple organic acids water solution on a DC diaphragm discharge was studied. Efficiency of the discharge was quantified by the hydrogen peroxide production determined by UV-VIS spectrometry of a H2O2 complex formed with specific titanium reagent. Automatic titration was used to study the pH behaviour after the plasma treatment. Optical emission spectroscopy overview spectra were recorded and detailed spectra of OH band and H? line were used to calculate the rotational temperature and comparison of the line profile (reflecting electron concentration) in the acid solutions. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  15. CARBON CONTRIBUTION AND CHARACTERISTICS OF HUMIC ACID, FULVIC ACID, PARTICULATE ORGANIC MATTER AND GLOMALIN IN DIVERSE ECOSYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Global climate change and soil carbon sequestration issues are entering the forefront of public policy, and emphasis is growing for research on carbon sinks and long-term terrestrial carbon stabilization. Humic acid (HA), fulvic acid (FA), humin and particulate organic matter (POM) have traditionall...

  16. Acid mine drainage: An economic total resource recovery solution

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, R.L.; Clarke, S.R.; Brackenbury, D.R.

    1995-12-31

    A common feature of abandoned hard rock mines and subterranean coal mines is the creation of toxic and acidic solution often containing iron, copper, zinc, lead, cadmium, manganese and alkaline earth and alkali metals. A process is described which sequentially removes heavy metals using electrochemical ion exchange and rotating cylinder electrodes. Studies summarized indicate recovery of copper, zinc, iron, and aluminum oxide; selective stripping of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and lead; and recovery of water acceptable for drinking after removal of heavy metals.

  17. Recovery of rhenium from sulfuric acid solutions with activated coals

    SciTech Connect

    Troshkina, I.D.; Naing, K.Z.; Ushanova, O.N.; P'o, V.; Abdusalomov, A.A.

    2006-09-15

    Equilibrium and kinetic characteristics of rhenium sorption from sulfuric acid solutions (pH 2) by activated coals produced from coal raw materials (China) were studied. Constants of the Henry equation describing isotherms of rhenium sorption by activated coals were calculated. The effective diffusion coefficients of rhenium in the coals were determined. The dynamic characteristics of rhenium sorption and desorption were determined for the activated coal with the best capacity and kinetic characteristics.

  18. 40 CFR 721.10369 - Carbonic acid, diphenyl ester, polymer with diphenyl P-methylphosphonate and 4,4?-(1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...false Carbonic acid, diphenyl ester, polymer with diphenyl P-methylphosphonate and...10369 Carbonic acid, diphenyl ester, polymer with diphenyl P-methylphosphonate and...identified as carbonic acid, diphenyl ester, polymer with diphenyl...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10369 - Carbonic acid, diphenyl ester, polymer with diphenyl P-methylphosphonate and 4,4?-(1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...false Carbonic acid, diphenyl ester, polymer with diphenyl P-methylphosphonate and...10369 Carbonic acid, diphenyl ester, polymer with diphenyl P-methylphosphonate and...identified as carbonic acid, diphenyl ester, polymer with diphenyl...

  20. Capacitance of a passive iron electrode in acidic solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Grilikhes, M.S.; Berezin, M.Yu.; Gorlin, A.V.; Sapelova, E.V.; Sokolov, M.A.; Sukhotin, A.M.

    1985-12-01

    In the present work the authors measured the capacitance of the electrical double layer on passive Armco iron in acidic solutions with the simultaneous recording of the potentiodynamic curves. The measurements were carried out on an apparatus which is based on the double-pulse variant of the galvanostatic method with a pulse lifetime of 2 microseconds, in which the influence of the faradic processes on the capacitance curves is negligibly small in the case of electrochemical systems with small exchange currents. The experiments were carried out at room temperature in 0.5 M sulfuric acid (pH 0.25) and 0.5 M tartaric acid H/sub 2/C/sub 4/H/sub 4/O/sub 6/ (pH 1.6).

  1. Methanol Uptake By Low Temperature Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Essin, Andrew M.; Golden, David M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the role of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols in the global budget of methanol, the solubility and reactivity of CH3OH in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions are under investigation. Using standard uptake techniques in a Knudsen cell reactor, we have measured the effective Henry's law coefficient, H(*), for methanol dissolution into 45 to 70 percent by weight H2SO4. We find that methanol solubility ranges from 10(exp 5) to 10(exp 8) M/atm and increases with decreasing temperature and with increasing sulfuric acid content. These solubility measurements include uptake due to physical solvation and all rapid equilibria which are established in solution. Our data indicate that simple uptake by aqueous sulfuric acid particles will not be a significant sink for methanol in the UT/LS. These results differ from those recently reported in the literature, and an explanation of this disparity will be presented. In addition to solvation, reaction between primary alcohols and sulfuric acid does occur, leading to the production of alkyl sulfates. Literature values for the rate of this reaction suggest that formation of CH3OSO3H may proceed in the atmosphere but is not significant under our experimental conditions. Results obtained using a complementary equilibrium measurement technique confirm this directly. In addition, the extent of methanol sequestration via formation of mono- and dimethylsulfate will be evaluated under several atmospheric conditions.

  2. tructural membrane glycerolipids of all plant cells contain almost exclusively 16-carbon and 18-carbon fatty acids,

    E-print Network

    Kunst, Ljerka

    -carbon fatty acids, with up to three methylene-interrupted double bonds (16:0, 16:1*, 18:0, 18:1, 18:2, 18:3, and in some species 16:3). These fatty acids are often referred to as common fatty acids. In contrast with the conservative fatty acid composition of plant membrane lipids, tremendous fatty acid

  3. Simultaneous leaching and carbon sequestration in constrained aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, Tommy Joe; Moon, Ji Won; Roh, Yul; Cho, Kyu Seong

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of metal ions leaching and precipitated mineral phases of metal-rich fly ash (FA) was examined in order to evaluate microbial impacts on carbon sequestration and metal immobilization. The leaching solutions consisted of aerobic deionized water (DW) and artificial eutrophic water (AEW) that was anaerobic, organic- and mineral-rich, and higher salinity as is typical of bottom water in eutrophic algae ponds. The Fe- and Ca-rich FAs were predominantly composed of quartz, mullite, portlandite, calcite, hannebachite, maghemite, and hematite. After 86 days, only Fe and Ca contents exhibited a decrease in leaching solutions while other major and trace elements showed increasing or steady trends in preference to the type of FA and leaching solution. Ca-rich FA showed strong carbon sequestration efficiency ranging up to 32.3 g CO(2)/kg FA after 86 days, corresponding to almost 65% of biotic carbon sequestration potential under some conditions. Variations in the properties of FAs such as chemical compositions, mineral constituents as well as the type of leaching solution impacted CO(2) capture. Even though the relative amount of calcite increased sixfold in the AEW and the relative amount of mineral phase reached 37.3 wt% using Ca-rich FA for 86 days, chemical sequestration did not accomplish simultaneous precipitation and sequestration of several heavy metals.

  4. Nitrite sensing based on the carbon dots-enhanced chemiluminescence from peroxynitrous acid and carbonate.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhen; Dou, Xiangnan; Li, Haifang; Ma, Yuan; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2015-01-01

    In this work, chemiluminescence (CL) from peroxynitrous acid (ONOOH)-carbonate system greatly amplified by carbon dots was observed. The CL mechanism of the ONOOH-carbonate-carbon dots system has been investigated and the results reveal that the carbon dots could serve as the energy acceptor, which gives us new insight into the optical properties of the new emerging carbon nanomaterial. There is a good linear relationship between the CL signal and the concentration of the nitrite using for ONOOH formation, which provides us a nitrite sensing method with sensitivity as high as 5.0×10(-9) M (S/N=3). The method has been successfully applied to the determination of nitrite in tap water with the recovery of 98%. The standard deviations are within 2.5%. PMID:25476331

  5. Controlled exposures of volunteers to respirable carbon and sulfuric acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.R.; Avol, E.L.; Edwards, S.A.; Shamoo, D.A.; Ruchuan Peng; Linn, W.S.; Hackney, J.D. )

    1992-06-01

    Respirable carbon or fly ash particles are suspected to increase the respiratory toxicity of coexisting acidic air pollutants, by concentrating acid on their surfaces and so delivering it efficiently to the lower respiratory tract. To investigate this issue, the authors exposed 15 healthy and 15 asthmatic volunteers in a controlled-environment chamber to four test atmospheres: (1) clean air; (2) 0.5-{mu}m H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aerosol at {approx}100 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, generated from water solution; (3) 0.5-{mu}m carbon aerosol at {approx}250 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, generated from highly pure carbon black with specific surface area comparable to ambient pollution particles; and (4) carbon as in (3) plus {approx}100 {mu}g/m{sup 3} of ultrafine H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aerosol generated from fuming sulfuric acid. Electron microscopy showed that nearly all acid in (4) became attached to carbon particle surfaces, and that most particles remained in the sub-{mu}m size range. Exposures were performed double-blind, 1 week apart. They lasted 1 hr each, with alternate 10-min periods of heavy exercise (ventilation {approx}50 L/min) and rest. Subjects gargled citrus juice before exposure to suppress airway ammonia. Lung function and symptoms were measured pre-exposure, after initial exercise, and at end-exposure. Bronchial reactivity to methacholine was measured after exposure. Statistical analyses tested for effects of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or carbon, separate or interactive, on health measures.

  6. Voltammetric Detection of Oxalic Acid by Using Glassy Carbon Electrodes with Covalently Attached Nitrogen-containing Functional Groups.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Hiroaki; Akabe, Syuhei; Kitamura, Tsubasa; Takahashi, Takuto; Uchiyama, Shunichi

    2015-01-01

    We report on a novel voltammetric detection of oxalic acid by using glassy carbon electrodes with covalently attached nitrogen-containing functional groups prepared by stepwise electrolysis. A glassy carbon electrode electrooxidized in an ammonium carbamate solution was electroreduced at -1.0 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) in 1.0 M sulfuric acid for a long time. We found that the electrocatalytic oxidation wave of oxalic acid obtained by this modified glassy carbon electrode was moved to a more negative potential region than that obtained by a platinum electrode in an acidic medium. A good linearity for the peak current signals was observed in the concentration range from 0.1 to 50 mM. PMID:26165301

  7. Aquatic photolysis: photolytic redox reactions between goethite and adsorbed organic acids in aqueous solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, M.C.; Cunningham, K.M.; Weiner, Eugene R.

    1993-01-01

    Photolysis of mono and di-carboxylic acids that are adsorbed onto the surface of the iron oxyhydroxide (goethite) results in an oxidation of the organic material and a reduction from Fe(III) to Fe(II) in the iron complex. There is a subsequent release of Fe2+ ions into solution. At constant light flux and constant solution light absorption, the factors responsible for the degree of photolytic reaction include: the number of lattice sites that are bonded by the organic acid; the rate of acid readsorption to the surface during photolysis; the conformation and structure of the organic acid; the degree of oxidation of the organic acid; the presence or absence of an ??-hydroxy group on the acid, the number of carbons in the di-acid chain and the conformation of the di-acid. The ability to liberate Fe(III) at pH 6.5 from the geothite lattice is described by the lyotropic series: tartrate>citrate> oxalate > glycolate > maleate > succinate > formate > fumarate > malonate > glutarate > benzoate = butanoate = control. Although a larger amount of iron is liberated, the series is almost the same at pH 5.5 except that oxalate > citrate and succinate > maleate. A set of rate equations are given that describe the release of iron from the goethite lattice. It was observed that the pH of the solution increases during photolysis if the solutions are not buffered. There is evidence to suggest the primary mechanism for all these reactions is an electron transfer from the organic ligand to the Fe(III) in the complex. Of all the iron-oxyhydroxide materials, crystalline goethite is the least soluble in water; yet, this study indicates that in an aqueous suspension, iron can be liberated from the goethite lattice. Further, it has been shown that photolysis can occur in a multiphase system at the sediment- water interface which results in an oxidation of the organic species and release of Fe2+ to solution where it becomes available for further reaction. ?? 1993.

  8. Carbonic acid ionization and the stability of sodium bicarbonate and carbonate ion pairs to 200 °C - A potentiometric and spectrophotometric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefánsson, Andri; Bénézeth, Pascale; Schott, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    Carbonic acid ionization and sodium bicarbonate and carbonate ion pair formation constants have been experimentally determined in dilute hydrothermal solutions to 200 °C. Two experimental approaches were applied, potentiometric acid-base titrations at 10-60 °C and spectrophotometric pH measurements using the pH indicators, 2-napthol and 4-nitrophenol, at 25-200 °C. At a given temperature, the first and second ionization constants of carbonic acid (K1, K2) and the ion pair formation constants for NaHCO(aq)(K) and NaCO3-(aq)(K) were simultaneously fitted to the data. Results of this study compare well with previously determined values of K1 and K2. The NaHCO(aq) and NaCO3-(aq) ion pair formation constants vary between 25 and 200 °C having values of logK=-0.18 to 0.58 and logK=1.01 to 2.21, respectively. These ion pairs are weak at low-temperatures but become increasingly important with increasing temperature under neutral to alkaline conditions in moderately dilute to concentrated NaCl solutions, with NaCO3-(aq) predominating over CO32-(aq) in ?0.1 M NaCl solution at temperatures above 100 °C. The results demonstrate that NaCl cannot be considered as an inert (non-complexing) electrolyte in aqueous carbon dioxide containing solutions at elevated temperatures.

  9. Oxidative photodegradation of herbicide fenuron in aqueous solution by natural iron oxide ?-Fe2O3, influence of polycarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Kribéche, Mohamed El Amine; Mechakra, Hind; Sehili, Tahar; Brosillon, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The photodegradation of the herbicide fenuron (1,1-dimethyl-3-phenylurea) by using a natural iron oxide (NIO), ?-Fe2O3, in aqueous solution at acidic pH has been undertaken. The NIO was characterized by the Raman spectroscopy method. The degradation pathways and the formation of degradation products were studied. A high-pressure mercury lamp and sunlight were employed as light source. Fenuron photodegradation using NIO with oxalic acid followed the pseudo-first-order kinetics, the optimal experimental conditions were [oxalic acid]0?=?10(-3) M and [NIO]?=?0.1?g?L(-1) at pH 3. A UVA/NIO/oxalic acid system led to a low fenuron half-life (60?min). The results were even better when solar light is used (30?min). The variables studied were the doses of iron oxide, of carboxylic acids, the solution pH and the effect of sunlight irradiation. The effects of four carboxylic acids, oxalic, citric, tartaric and malic acids, on the fenuron photodegradation with NIO have been investigated, oxalic acid was the most effective carboxylic acid used at pH 3. A similar trend was observed for the removal of total organic carbon (TOC), 75% of TOC was removed. The analytical study showed many aromatic intermediates, short-chain carboxylic acids and inorganic ion. PMID:26102217

  10. INTERACTION OF AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS OF CHLORINE WITH MALIC ACID, TARTARIC ACID, AND VARIOUS FRUIT JUICES, A SOURCE OF MUTAGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interactions of aqueous solutions of chlorine with some fruit acids (citric acid, DL-malic acid, and L-tartaric acid) at different pH values were studied. iethyl ether extraction followed by GC/MS analysis indicated that a number of mutagens (certain chlorinated propanones an...

  11. Sorption of cobalt on activated carbons from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Paajanen, A.; Lehto, J.; Santapakka, T.; Morneau, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The efficiencies of 15 commercially available activated carbons were tested for the separation of trace cobalt ({sup 60}Co) in buffer solutions at pH 5.0, 6.7, and 9.1. On the basis of the results four carbon products, Diahope-006, Eurocarb TN5, Hydraffin DG47, and Norit ROW Supra, were selected for further study. These carbons represented varying (low, medium and high) cobalt removal efficiencies and were prepared of three typical raw materials: peat, coconut shell, or coal. Study was made of the effects on sorption efficiencies of factors of interest in metal/radionuclide-bearing waste effluents. These factors were pH, sodium ions, borate, and citrate.

  12. The erosion of carbonate stone by acid rain: Laboratory and field investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baedecker, P.A.; Reddy, M.M.

    1993-01-01

    One of the goals of research on the effects of acidic deposition on carbonate stone surfaces is to define the incremental impact of acidic deposition relative to natural weathering processes on the rate of carbonate stone erosion. If rain that impacts carbonate stone surfaces is resident on the surface long enough to approach chemical equilibrium, the incremental effect of hydrogen ion is expected to be small (i.e., 6% for a rain of pH 4.0). Under nonequilibrium (i.e., high flow rate) conditions, kinetic considerations suggest that the incremental effect of hydrogen ion deposition could be quite significant. Field run-off experiments involving the chemical analysis of rain collected from inclined stone slabs have been used to evaluate stone dissolution processes under ambient conditions of wet and dry deposition of acidic species. The stoichiometry of the reaction of stone with hydrogen ion is difficult to define from the field data due to scatter in the data attributed to hydrodynamic effects. Laboratory run-off experiments show that the stoichiometry is best defined by a reaction with H+ in which CO2 is released from the system. The baseline effect caused by water in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 is identical in the field and in laboratory simulation. The experiments show that the solutions are close enough to equilibrium for the incremental effect of hydrogen ion to be minor (i.e., 24% for marble for a rain of pH 4.0) relative to dissolution due to water and carbonic acid reactions. Stone erosion rates based on physical measurement are approximately double the recession rates that are due to dissolution (estimated from the observed calcium content of the run-off solutions). The difference may reflect the loss of granular material not included in recession estimates based on the run-off data. Neither the field nor the laboratory run-off experiments indicate a pH dependence for the grain-removal process.

  13. Experimental Investigation for the Effect of the Core Length on the Optimum Acid Flux in Carbonate Acidizing 

    E-print Network

    Dong, Kai

    2012-10-19

    Matrix acidizing is commonly used to stimulate wells in carbonate reservoirs. Large amounts of lab tests indicate an optimum acid interstitial velocity (Vi-opt, injection rate over flow area and porosity) exists, which results in the minimum volume...

  14. Modeling and Optimization of Matrix Acidizing in Horizontal Wells in Carbonate Reservoirs 

    E-print Network

    Tran, Hau

    2013-05-07

    In this study, the optimum conditions for wormhole propagation in horizontal well carbonate acidizing was investigated numerically using a horizontal well acidizing simulator. The factors that affect the optimum conditions are rock mineralogy, acid...

  15. Energetic changes in the surface of activated carbons and relationship with Ni(II) adsorption from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Estupiñan, Paola; Giraldo, Liliana; Moreno-Piraján, Juan Carlos

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated Ni(II) ion adsorption from aqueous solution on activated carbons obtained by chemically modifying the surface with the oxidizing agents nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide (CAGoxP and CAGoxN, respectively). The activated carbons were characterized by total acidity and basicity, pH at the point of charge zero determination and IR spectroscopy. Textural parameters such as the BET area and pore volumes were evaluated by gas adsorption. The BET area of the materials was between 816 and 876 m2 g-1. Additionally, the immersion enthalpies of the activated carbons in water and benzene were determined. The experimental results on adsorption in solution were adjusted to the Langmuir and Freundlich models, obtaining values for the monolayer capacity between 29.68 and 50.97 mg g-1, which indicates that the adsorption capacity depends largely on solid surface chemistry.

  16. Infrared optical constants of H2O ice, amorphous nitric acid solutions, and nitric acid hydrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Koehler, Birgit G.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.; Jordon, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    We determined the infrared optical constants of nitric acid trihydrate, nitric acid dihydrate, nitric acid monohydrate, and solid amorphous nitric acid solutions which crystallize to form these hydrates. We have also found the infrared optical constants of H2O ice. We measured the transmission of infrared light throught thin films of varying thickness over the frequency range from about 7000 to 500/cm at temperatures below 200 K. We developed a theory for the transmission of light through a substrate that has thin films on both sides. We used an iterative Kramers-Kronig technique to determine the optical constants which gave the best match between measured transmission spectra and those calculated for a variety of films of different thickness. These optical constants should be useful for calculations of the infrared spectrum of polar stratospheric clouds.

  17. Insights into non-Fickian solute transport in carbonates

    PubMed Central

    Bijeljic, Branko; Mostaghimi, Peyman; Blunt, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    [1] We study and explain the origin of early breakthrough and long tailing plume behavior by simulating solute transport through 3-D X-ray images of six different carbonate rock samples, representing geological media with a high degree of pore-scale complexity. A Stokes solver is employed to compute the flow field, and the particles are then transported along streamlines to represent advection, while the random walk method is used to model diffusion. We compute the propagators (concentration versus displacement) for a range of Peclet numbers (Pe) and relate it to the velocity distribution obtained directly on the images. There is a very wide distribution of velocity that quantifies the impact of pore structure on transport. In samples with a relatively narrow spread of velocities, transport is characterized by a small immobile concentration peak, representing essentially stagnant portions of the pore space, and a dominant secondary peak of mobile solute moving at approximately the average flow speed. On the other hand, in carbonates with a wider velocity distribution, there is a significant immobile peak concentration and an elongated tail of moving fluid. An increase in Pe, decreasing the relative impact of diffusion, leads to the faster formation of secondary mobile peak(s). This behavior indicates highly anomalous transport. The implications for modeling field-scale transport are discussed. Citation: Bijeljic, B., P. Mostaghimi, and M. J. Blunt (2013), Insights into non-Fickian solute transport in carbonates, Water Resour. Res., 49, 2714–2728, doi:10.1002/wrcr.20238. PMID:24223444

  18. The Estimation of Acidic Behavior of Wood by Treatment with Aqueous Na2HPO4 Solution

    PubMed Central

    Uçar, Güne?; Balaban Uçar, Mualla

    2012-01-01

    As a new approach, the acidity that wood exhibits under moderate conditions is assayed by stimulated dissociation of weak wood acids in lightly basic secondary phosphate solutions. To assure a sufficient dissociation of hardly soluble weak acids in the solution, the amount of wood suspended in Na2HPO4 solutions should be small but vary depending on the degree of acidity of wood species. However, the difficulties are associated with the titration of very dilute acids limiting the precision of the measurement. If the disintegrated wood is suspended in a secondary phosphate solution, the weak woods acids form the conjugate acid Na2HPO4 from secondary phosphate Na2HPO4 resulting in a pH fall of the solution. The decrease in the pH value in phosphate solution, which depends on the wood acidity, can be evaluated to estimate the acidity arising from wood under moderate conditions. PMID:22567561

  19. Concentration-Purification of Uranium from an Acid Leaching Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guettaf, H.; Becis, A.; Ferhat, K.; Hanou, K.; Bouchiha, D.; Yakoubi, K.; Ferrad, F.

    2009-11-01

    Chemical processes for the elaboration of uranium concentrate from uranium ore have been studied. This process is composed of successive units operations: crushing, milling, acid conventional leaching, filtration-washing, purification-concentration by ion exchange resins and uranium precipitation. The acid leaching operating conditions allow us to obtain a recovery uranium rate of 93%. The uranium concentration of the pregnant solution is approximately of 1.2 g/l. This value justifies the use of ion exchange resins to the concentration-purification of our pregnant solution. We have noticed that the pregnant solution contains a relatively high phosphate concentration which causes a premature uranium precipitation at pH=1.8. This pH value is in general, considered optimal to obtain the highest amount of fixed uranium by the anionic resin. To avoid the precipitation of uranium, the pH=1.5 has been fixed. We have obtained at this condition a good adsorption capacity. A 75% uranium concentrate have been elaborated, but the filtration of this concentrate has been very difficult. We have also noticed an excessive sulphate concentration. In order to improve this process, we have tested nitrates as eluant at different operating conditions.

  20. Version 3.0 SOP 14 --Sodium carbonate solutions October 12, 2007 Page 1 of 3

    E-print Network

    Version 3.0 SOP 14 -- Sodium carbonate solutions October 12, 2007 Page 1 of 3 SOP 14 Procedure for preparing sodium carbonate solutions for the calibration of coulometric CT measurements 1. Scope and field of application This procedure describes the preparation of a set of aqueous sodium carbonate solutions which

  1. Cryogenic-temperature electron microscopy direct imaging of carbon nanotubes and graphene solutions in superacids.

    PubMed

    Kleinerman, O; Parra-Vasquez, A Nicholas G; Green, M J; Behabtu, N; Schmidt, J; Kesselman, E; Young, C C; Cohen, Y; Pasquali, M; Talmon, Y

    2015-07-01

    Cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a powerful tool for imaging liquid and semiliquid systems. While cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) is a standard technique in many fields, cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) is still not that widely used and is far less developed. The vast majority of systems under investigation by cryo-EM involve either water or organic components. In this paper, we introduce the use of novel cryo-TEM and cryo-SEM specimen preparation and imaging methodologies, suitable for highly acidic and very reactive systems. Both preserve the native nanostructure in the system, while not harming the expensive equipment or the user. We present examples of direct imaging of single-walled, multiwalled carbon nanotubes and graphene, dissolved in chlorosulfonic acid and oleum. Moreover, we demonstrate the ability of these new cryo-TEM and cryo-SEM methodologies to follow phase transitions in carbon nanotube (CNT)/superacid systems, starting from dilute solutions up to the concentrated nematic liquid-crystalline CNT phases, used as the 'dope' for all-carbon-fibre spinning. Originally developed for direct imaging of CNTs and graphene dissolution and self-assembly in superacids, these methodologies can be implemented for a variety of highly acidic systems, paving a way for a new field of nonaqueous cryogenic electron microscopy. PMID:25818279

  2. Systems solutions by lactic acid bacteria: from paradigms to practice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are among the powerhouses of the food industry, colonize the surfaces of plants and animals, and contribute to our health and well-being. The genomic characterization of LAB has rocketed and presently over 100 complete or nearly complete genomes are available, many of which serve as scientific paradigms. Moreover, functional and comparative metagenomic studies are taking off and provide a wealth of insight in the activity of lactic acid bacteria used in a variety of applications, ranging from starters in complex fermentations to their marketing as probiotics. In this new era of high throughput analysis, biology has become big science. Hence, there is a need to systematically store the generated information, apply this in an intelligent way, and provide modalities for constructing self-learning systems that can be used for future improvements. This review addresses these systems solutions with a state of the art overview of the present paradigms that relate to the use of lactic acid bacteria in industrial applications. Moreover, an outlook is presented of the future developments that include the transition into practice as well as the use of lactic acid bacteria in synthetic biology and other next generation applications. PMID:21995776

  3. Karstification without carbonic acid: bedrock dissolution by gypsum- driven dedolomitization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, J.L.; Julia, R.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Rosenbauer, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    The primary karst-forming process at Lake Banyoles is dedolomitization of basement rocks driven by gypsum dissolution. Karstification takes place along the subsurface contact between the gypsiferous Beuda Formation and the dolomitic Perafita Formation. This process is here recognized for the first time to cause karstification on a large scale; this is significant because it proceeds without the addition of soil-generated carbonic acid. -from Authors

  4. Removal of arsenious acid from sulfuric acidic solution using ultrasound oxidation and goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okawa, Hirokazu; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Hosokawa, Ryota; Hangui, Shinji; Kawamura, Youhei; Sugawara, Katsuyasu

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the properties of synthetic goethite for the adsorption of As from strongly acidic solutions in ambient atmosphere under ultrasound irradiation. The goethite was successfully synthesized from iron-containing sulfuric acidic solution (1271 ppm) using an autoclave apparatus for 1 h at 0.12 MPa and 121 °C. The ratio of the iron eluted from the synthetic goethite to the acidic solution was only 0.58% at pH 2.1. Ultrasound irradiation (200 kHz, 200 W) was applied to oxidize 10 ppm of As(III) to As(V) at pH 2.2 for 60 min under various atmospheric conditions. Remarkably, the oxidation ratio of As(III) to As(V) is quite high (89.7%) at pH 2.2 in ambient atmosphere and is close to those obtained for Ar (95.3%) and O2 (95.9%) atmospheres. The As(III) removal ratio reached 94.5% after 60 min of irradiation. Therefore, goethite is a promising material for As adsorption using ultrasound oxidation in the acidic region in ambient atmosphere.

  5. Effects of acidic solutions on sexual reproduction of Pteridium aquilinum

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L.S.; Conway, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effects of acidic solutions on spermatozoid motility and fertilization of gametophytes of Pteridium aquilinum. Buffered solutions (approx 0.0025 m) were used to simulate exposures to acidic precipitation for up to a 3.5 hr exposure. Experimental results suggest that the spermatozoid population can be subdivided into several groups with respect to pH sensitivity: About 25% spermatozoids are immobile one min after exposure to pH 6.1 buffer while about an equal percentage remain motile after 30 min exposure to buffer of pH 5.1. Between these two response extremes are two other subpopulations. One is quite sensitive to pH but shows some recovery if pH is between 5.6 and 6.1, while the second subpopulation does not seem to exhibit any motility recovery at all but is more resistant to acidity than the first subpopulation. To complement experiments that evaluate spermatozoid responses, experiments were performed to view the process of fertilization under controlled environmental conditions as well as under the canopy of a forest. Fertilization of gametophytes in uncovered petri dishes under a forest canopy was similar to results in aseptic culture after gametophytes were exposed to various pH levels and 86.6 micrometers sulfate. Fertilization at pH 4.5 and 3.6 was about one-half that occurring at pH 6.1. Fertilization in gametophytes exposed to pH 3.0 was about 10-20% of that occurring at pH 6.1. Addition of 86.6 micrometers sulfate decreased fertilization under all culture conditions. These experimental results suggest that fertilization in p. Aquilinum may be used as a bioindicator of contaminants in rainwater. The results demonstrate that spermatozoid motility (and the process of fertilization) is more acid sensitive than gametophytic and sporophytic tissues.

  6. Soil-solution partitioning of DOC in acid organic soils: Results from a UK field acidification and alkalization experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oulehle, Filip; Jones, Timothy; Burden, Annette; Evans, Chris

    2013-04-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is an important component of the global carbon (C) cycle and has profound impacts on water chemistry and metabolism in lakes and rivers. Reported increases of DOC concentration in surface waters across Europe and Northern America have been attributed to several drivers; from changing climate and land-use to eutrophication and declining acid deposition. The last of these suggests that acidic deposition suppressed the solubility of DOC, and that this historic suppression is now being reversed by reducing emissions of acidifying pollutants. We studied a set of four parallel acidification and alkalization experiments in organic rich soils which, after three years of manipulation, have shown clear soil solution DOC responses to acidity change. We tested whether these DOC concentration changes were related to changes in the acid/base properties of DOC. Based on laboratory determination of DOC site density (S.D. = amount of carboxylic groups per milligram DOC) and charge density (C.D. = organic acid anion concentration per milligram DOC) we found that the change in DOC soil-solution partitioning was tightly related to the change in degree of dissociation (? = C.D./S.D. ratio) of organic acids (R2=0.74, p<0.01). Carbon turnover in soil organic matter (SOM), determined by soil respiration and ?-D-glucosidase enzyme activity measurements, also appears to have some impact on DOC leaching, via constraints on the actual supply of available DOC from SOM; when the turnover rate of C in SOM is low, the effect of ? on DOC leaching is reduced. Thus, differences in the magnitude of DOC changes seen across different environments might be explained by interactions between physicochemical restrictions of DOC soil-solution partitioning, and SOM carbon turnover effects on DOC supply.

  7. Adsorption of naphthenic acids on high surface area activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Iranmanesh, Sobhan; Harding, Thomas; Abedi, Jalal; Seyedeyn-Azad, Fakhry; Layzell, David B

    2014-01-01

    In oil sands mining extraction, water is an essential component; however, the processed water becomes contaminated through contact with the bitumen at high temperature, and a portion of it cannot be recycled and ends up in tailing ponds. The removal of naphthenic acids (NAs) from tailing pond water is crucial, as they are corrosive and toxic and provide a substrate for microbial activity that can give rise to methane, which is a potent greenhouse gas. In this study, the conversion of sawdust into an activated carbon (AC) that could be used to remove NAs from tailings water was studied. After producing biochar from sawdust by a slow-pyrolysis process, the biochar was physically activated using carbon dioxide (CO2) over a range of temperatures or prior to producing biochar, and the sawdust was chemically activated using phosphoric acid (H3PO4). The physically activated carbon had a lower surface area per gram than the chemically activated carbon. The physically produced ACs had a lower surface area per gram than chemically produced AC. In the adsorption tests with NAs, up to 35 mg of NAs was removed from the water per gram of AC. The chemically treated ACs showed better uptake, which can be attributed to its higher surface area and increased mesopore size when compared with the physically treated AC. Both the chemically produced and physically produced AC provided better uptake than the commercially AC. PMID:24766592

  8. Behavior of copper in acidic sulfate solution: Comparison with acidic chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Tromans, D.; Silva, J.C.

    1997-03-01

    The anodic polarization behavior of copper in a 0.1 M sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) + 1 M sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) solution (pH = 2.0) was studied at room temperature under quiescent and stirred conditions. The behavior was compared with aqueous equilibria via construction of a potential-vs-pH (E-pH) diagram for the copper-sulfate-water (Cu-SO{sub 4}{sup 2}-H{sub 2}O) system. Interpretation of the behavior was aided by comparison with aqueous equilibria and polarization studies of copper in a 0.2 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) + 1 M sodium chloride (NaCl) solution(pH = 0.8). The initial anodic dissolution region in the acidic sulfate solution exhibited Tafel behavior with a slope consistent with formation of cupric ions (Cu{sup 2+}) whose rate of formation was charge-transfer controlled. At higher potentials, limiting current density (i{sub L}) behavior was observed under E-pH conditions that were consistent with formation of a film of copper sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO{sub 4} {degree} 5H{sub 2}O). Comparison of experimental i{sub L} values with those predicted by mass transport-controlled processes, using estimates of the diffusion layer thickness obtained from the mass transfer-influenced region of apparent Tafel behavior in the acidic chloride solution, were in sufficient agreement to indicate i{sub L} was controlled by the rate of dissolution of the CuSO{sub 4} {degree} 5H{sub 2}O film via transport of Cu{sup 2+} from the film-electrolyte interface into the bulk solution.

  9. GADOLINIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY MEASUREMENTS IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.

    2012-02-22

    HB-Line will begin processing Pu solutions during FY2012 that will involve the recovery of Pu using oxalate precipitation and filtration. After the precipitation and filtration processes, the filtrate solution will be transferred from HB-Line to H-Canyon. The presence of excess oxalate and unfiltered Pu oxalate solids in these solutions create a criticality safety issue if they are sent to H-Canyon without controls in H-Canyon. One approach involves H-Canyon receiving the filtrate solution into a tank that is poisoned with soluble gadolinium (Gd). Decomposition of the oxalate will occur within a subsequent H-Canyon vessel. The receipt of excess oxalate into the H-Canyon receipt tanks has the potential to precipitate a portion of the Gd poison in the receipt tanks. Because the amount of Gd in solution determines the maximum amount of Pu solids that H-Canyon can receive, H-Canyon Engineering requested that SRNL determine the solubility of Gd in aqueous solutions of 4-10 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 4-12 g/L Gd, and 0.15-0.25 M oxalic acid (H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}) at 25 C. The target soluble Gd concentration is 6 g/L. The data indicate that the target can be achieved above 6 M HNO{sub 3} and below 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}. For 6 M HNO{sub 3}, 10.5 g/L and 7 g/L Gd are soluble in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. In 4 M HNO{sub 3}, the Gd solubility drops significantly to 2 g/L and 0.25 g/L in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. The solubility of Gd at 8-10 M HNO{sub 3} exceeds the solubility at 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The data for 4 M HNO{sub 3} showed good agreement with data in the literature. To achieve a target of 6 g/L soluble Gd in solution in the presence of 0.15-0.25 M oxalate, the HNO{sub 3} concentration must be maintained at or above 6 M HNO{sub 3}.

  10. The extraction of actinides from nitric acid solutions with diamides of dipicolinic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapka, Joseph L.; Paulenova, Alena; Alyapyshev, Mikhail Yu; Babain, Vasiliy A.; Law, Jack D.; Herbst, R. Scott

    2010-03-01

    Diamides of dipicolinic acid (N,N'-diethyl-N,N'-ditolyl-dipicolinamide, EtTDPA) were synthesized and evaluated for their extraction capability for actinides. In this work the extractions of neptunium(V), protactinium(V), and thorium(IV) with EtTDPA in a polar fluorinated diluent from nitric acid were investigated. EtTDPA shows a high affinity for Th(IV) even at millimolar concentrations. Np(V) and Pa(V) are both reasonably extractable with EtTDPA; however, near saturated solutions are required to achieve appreciable distribution ratios. A comparison with previously published actinide extraction data is given.

  11. NMR Study of Poly( ?-Glutamic Acid) and Partially Benzylated Poly( ?-Glutamic Acid): Nanoparticles in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Z.; Novák, L.; Kozma, C.; Berka, M.; Bányai, I.

    Poly(?-glutamic acid) (?-PGA) and its partially benzylamidated (hydrophobized) derivatives were prepared and studied in solution by means of dynamic light scattering (DLS), 1D, 2D and PGSE NMR in order to determine the structure, size and aggregation in solution. By pH potentiometric titrations in aqueous solution the apparent pK ? 4 of ?-PGA was determined. The measured diffusion coefficients as a function of pH showed the swelling of ?-PGA by deprotonation of carboxyls. DLS measurements showed a certain degree of aggregation even in dilute solution. The degree of aggregation is increased in the presence H2PO4 - and HPO4 2- buffer anions. Benzylamidation of 30-50% of caboxylates resulted in folded structure of the BzPGA, probably spherical like nanoparticles, verified by NMR diffusiometry and 2D NOE spectroscopy.

  12. Scavenging the Water Cation in Concentrated Acidic Solutions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; LaVerne, Jay A; Mostafavi, Mehran

    2015-10-29

    Picosecond pulse radiolysis techniques were used to observe the kinetics of the SO4(•-), H2PO4(•), Cl2(•-), and Br2(•-) species formed in the fast oxidation of concentrated and highly acidic solutions of SO4(2-), PO4(3-), Cl(-), and Br(-). Experimental results were compared with model predictions to gain insight into the possible mechanisms occurring on the fast time scales. Simple kinetics involving the oxidizing OH(•) radical formed by radiolytic water decomposition could not account for the observed yields at the very short times (within the electron pulse ?7 ps). Diffusion-kinetic simulations of the spur reactions induced by the incident electrons show that additional oxidation of the solutes must occur at very short times and involves their direct ionization along with scavenging of the highly oxidizing H2O(•+) radical formed in the initial ionization of the water medium. The fraction of H2O(•+) radicals scavenged varies as 0.26, 0.68, 0.92, and 0.97 for PO4(3-), SO4(2-), Cl(-), and Br(-) solutions, respectively. These studies represent the first semiquantitative estimation of the H2O(•+) radicals scavenging fractions for such a wide range of solutes. PMID:26449261

  13. Poly(lactic acid)/Carbon Nanotube Fibers as Novel Platforms for Glucose Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Juliano Elvis; Mattoso, Luiz Henrique Capparelli; Medeiros, Eliton Souto; Zucolotto, Valtencir

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this paper is the development and investigation of properties of new nanostructured architecture for biosensors applications. Highly porous nanocomposite fibers were developed for use as active materials in biosensors. The nanocomposites comprised poly(lactic acid)(PLA)/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) fibers obtained via solution-blow spinning onto indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes. The electrocatalytic properties of nanocomposite-modified ITO electrodes were investigated toward hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection. We investigated the effect of carbon nanotube concentration and the time deposition of fibers on the sensors properties, viz., sensitivity and limit of detection. Cyclic voltammetry experiments revealed that the nanocomposite-modified electrodes displayed enhanced activity in the electrochemical reduction of H2O2, which offers a number of attractive features to be explored in development of an amperometric biosensor. Glucose oxidase (GOD) was further immobilized by drop coating on an optimized ITO electrode covered by poly(lactic acid)/carbon nanotube nanofibrous mats. The optimum biosensor response was linear up to 800 mM of glucose with a sensitivity of 358 nA·mM?1 and a Michaelis-Menten constant (KM) of 4.3 mM. These results demonstrate that the solution blow spun nanocomposite fibers have great potential for application as amperometric biosensors due to their high surface to volume ratio, high porosity and permeability of the substrate. The latter features may significantly enhance the field of glucose biosensors. PMID:25585633

  14. Electrocatalytic hydrogenation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in acidic solution.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Youngkook; Birdja, Yuvraj Y; Raoufmoghaddam, Saeed; Koper, Marc T M

    2015-05-22

    Electrocatalytic hydrogenation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) is studied on solid metal electrodes in acidic solution (0.5?M H2 SO4 ) by correlating voltammetry with on-line HPLC product analysis. Three soluble products from HMF hydrogenation are distinguished: 2,5-dihydroxymethylfuran (DHMF), 2,5-dihydroxymethyltetrahydrofuran (DHMTHF), and 2,5-dimethyl-2,3-dihydrofuran (DMDHF). Based on the dominant reaction products, the metal catalysts are divided into three groups: (1)?metals mainly forming DHMF (Fe, Ni, Cu, and Pb), (2)?metals forming DHMF and DMDHF depending on the applied potentials (Co, Ag, Au, Cd, Sb, and Bi), and (3)?metals forming mainly DMDHF (Pd, Pt, Al, Zn, In, and Sb). Nickel and antimony are the most active catalysts for DHMF (0.95?mM?cm(-2) at ca. -0.35?VRHE and -20?mA?cm(-2) ) and DMDHF (0.7?mM?cm(-2) at -0.6?VRHE and -5?mA?cm(-2) ), respectively. The pH of the solution plays an important role in the hydrogenation of HMF: acidic condition lowers the activation energy for HMF hydro-genation and hydrogenates the furan ring further to tetrahydrofuran. PMID:25908308

  15. carbonate solid solution at high pressures up to 55 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spivak, Anna; Solopova, Natalia; Cerantola, Valerio; Bykova, Elena; Zakharchenko, Egor; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Litvin, Yuriy

    2014-09-01

    Magnesite, siderite and ferromagnesites Mg1- x Fe x CO3 ( x = 0.05, 0.09, 0.2, 0.4) were characterized using in situ Raman spectroscopy at high pressures up to 55 GPa. For the Mg-Fe-carbonates, the Raman peak positions of six modes (T, L, ?4, ?1, ?3 and 2?2) in the dependence of iron content in the carbonates at ambient conditions are presented. High-pressure Raman spectroscopy shows that siderite undergoes a spin transition at ~40 GPa. The examination of the solid solutions with compositions Mg0.6Fe0.4CO3, Mg0.8Fe0.2CO3, Mg0.91Fe0.09CO3 and Mg0.95Fe0.05CO3 indicates that with increase in the amount of the Fe spin transition pressure increases up to ~45 GPa.

  16. Decontamination of adsorbed chemical warfare agents on activated carbon using hydrogen peroxide solutions.

    PubMed

    Osovsky, Ruth; Kaplan, Doron; Nir, Ido; Rotter, Hadar; Elisha, Shmuel; Columbus, Ishay

    2014-09-16

    Mild treatment with hydrogen peroxide solutions (3-30%) efficiently decomposes adsorbed chemical warfare agents (CWAs) on microporous activated carbons used in protective garments and air filters. Better than 95% decomposition of adsorbed sulfur mustard (HD), sarin, and VX was achieved at ambient temperatures within 1-24 h, depending on the H2O2 concentration. HD was oxidized to the nontoxic HD-sulfoxide. The nerve agents were perhydrolyzed to the respective nontoxic methylphosphonic acids. The relative rapidity of the oxidation and perhydrolysis under these conditions is attributed to the microenvironment of the micropores. Apparently, the reactions are favored due to basic sites on the carbon surface. Our findings suggest a potential environmentally friendly route for decontamination of adsorbed CWAs, using H2O2 without the need of cosolvents or activators. PMID:25133545

  17. Activated carbons from potato peels: The role of activation agent and carbonization temperature of biomass on their use as sorbents for bisphenol A uptake from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arampatzidou, An; Deliyanni, Eleni A.

    2015-04-01

    Activated carbons prepared from potato peels, a solid waste by product, and activated with different activating chemicals, have been studied for the adsorption of an endocrine disruptor (Bisphenol-A) from aqueous solutions. The potato peels biomass was activated with phosphoric acid, KOH and ZnCl2. The different activating chemicals were tested in order the better activation agent to be found. The carbons were carbonized by pyrolysis, in one step procedure, at three different temperatures in order the role of the temperature of carbonization to be pointed out. The porous texture and the surface chemistry of the prepared activated carbons were characterized by Nitrogen adsorption (BET), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), thermal analysis (DTA) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Batch experiments were performed to investigate the effect of pH, the adsorbent dose, the initial bisphenol A concentration and temperature. Equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The thermodynamic parameters such as the change of enthalpy (?H0), entropy (?S0) and Gibb's free energy (?G0) of adsorption systems were also evaluated. The adsorption capacity calculated from the Langmuir isotherm was found to be 450 mg g-1 at an initial pH 3 at 25 °C for the phosphoric acid activated carbon, that make the activated carbon a promising adsorbent material.

  18. Colloidal methods for the fabrication of carbon nanotube-manganese dioxide and carbon nanotube-polypyrrole composites using bile acids.

    PubMed

    Ata, M S; Zhitomirsky, I

    2015-09-15

    Nature inspired strategies have been developed for the colloidal processing of advanced composites for supercapacitor applications. New approach was based on the use of commercially available bile acid salts, such as sodium cholate (ChNa) and taurocholic acid sodium salt (TChNa). It was demonstrated that cholic acid (ChH) films can be obtained by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) from ChNa solutions. The analysis of deposition yield, quartz crystal microbalance and cyclic voltammetry data provided an insight into the anodic deposition mechanism. The outstanding suspension stability of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), achieved using bile acids as anionic dispersants, allowed the fabrication of MWCNT films by EPD. The use of ChNa for EPD offered advantages of binding and film forming properties of this material. Composite MnO2-MWCNT films, prepared using ChNa as a dispersant and film forming agent for EPD, showed promising capacitive behavior. In another colloidal strategy, TChNa was used as a dispersant for MWCNT for the fabrication of polypyrrole (PPy) coated MWCNT. The use of PPy coated MWCNT allowed the fabrication of electrodes with high active mass loading, high capacitance and excellent capacitance retention at high charge-discharge rates. PMID:26001135

  19. Effects of dilute substitutional solutes on interstitial carbon in ?-Fe: Interactions and associated carbon diffusion from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peitao; Xing, Weiwei; Cheng, Xiyue; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi; Chen, Xing-Qiu

    2014-07-01

    By means of first-principles calculations coupled with the kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, we have systematically investigated the effects of dilute substitutional solutes on the behaviors of carbon in ?-Fe. Our results uncover the following. (i) Without the Fe vacancy the interactions between most solutes and carbon are repulsive due to the strain relief, whereas Mn has a weak attractive interaction with its nearest-neighbor carbon due to the local ferromagnetic coupling effect. (ii) The presence of the Fe vacancy results in attractive interactions of all the solutes with carbon. In particular, the Mn-vacancy pair shows an exceptionally large binding energy of -0.81 eV with carbon. (iii) The alloying addition significantly impacts the atomic-scale concentration distributions and chemical potential of carbon in the Fe matrix. Among them, Mn and Cr increase the carbon chemical potential, whereas Al and Si reduce it. (iv) Within the dilute scale of the alloying solution, the solute concentration- and temperature-dependent carbon diffusivities demonstrate that Mn has a little impact on the carbon diffusion, whereas Cr (Al or Si) remarkably retards the carbon diffusion. Our results provide a certain implication for better understanding the experimental observations related with the carbon solubility limit, carbon microsegregation, and carbide precipitations in the ferritic steels.

  20. Elusive Carbonic Acid: A Determination of its Vapor Pressures and Enthalpy of Sublimation for Mars and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Ariel S.; Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.; Cooper, P. D.

    2007-10-01

    Solid H2O and CO2 are present on Mars, some Galilean satellites, comets, and interstellar ices. Laboratory work on frozen H2O-CO2 mixtures shows that they produce H2CO3, carbonic acid, when exposed to either high-energy radiation (keV, MeV) or vacuum-UV photons (eV). While this molecule readily dissociates at 298 K, its stability below about 250 K suggests that it should exist in extraterrestrial environments. Unfortunately, little is known of solid-phase carbonic acid at temperatures relevant to planetary science. Recently we have studied some of the thermodynamic properties of carbonic acid. To synthesize this compound, we first injected a KHCO3 solution onto a substrate, pre-cooled to 15 K, to make a thin icy film. On top of this, an HBr solution was injected to make a second icy film. The substrate then was heated to about 200 K to initiate an acid-base reaction between KHCO3 and HBr, and to sublime the water present into a vacuum chamber. The resulting formation of carbonic acid was confirmed by recording infrared (IR) spectra of the samples before and after warming. The ices then were further heated to 240 - 255 K, and spectra recorded over time. Decreases in carbonic acid's IR bands near 1300 and 1500 cm-1 allowed the vapor pressure of the compound to be measured at several temperatures, from which an enthalpy of sublimation was determined. Comparisons were made to the heats of sublimation for formic and acetic acids, both those measured by us and those already in the literature. This work was supported by the Mars Fundamental Research Program and Goddard Center for Astrobiology. The first author was supported by an award from the Summer Undergraduate Internship in Astrobiology program.

  1. Hydrogen Generation During the Corrosion of Carbon Steel in Oxalic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    WIERSMA, BRUCEJ.

    2004-08-01

    A literature review of the corrosion mechanism for carbon steel in oxalic acid was performed to determine the ratio of moles of iron corroded to moles of hydrogen evolved during the corrosion of iron in oxalic acid. The theory of corrosion of carbon steel in oxalic acid and experimental work were reviewed. It was concluded that the maximum ratio of moles of hydrogen evolved to moles of iron corroded is 1:1. This ratio would be observed in a de-aerated environment. If oxygen or other oxidizing species are present, the ratio could be much less than 1:1. Testing would be necessary to determine how much less than 1:1 the ratio might be. Although the ratio of hydrogen evolution to iron corroded will not exceed 1:1, the total amount of hydrogen evolved can be influenced by such things as a decrease in the exposed surface area, suppression of hydrogen generation by gamma radiation, the presence of corrosion products on steel surface, etc. These and other variables present during chemical cleaning operations of the waste tank have not been examined by the tests reported in the literature i.e., the tests have focused on clean corrosion coupons in oxalic acid solutions. It is expected that most of these variables would reduce the total amount of hydrogen evolved. Further testing would need to be performed to quantify the reduction in hydrogen generation rate associated with these variables.

  2. Carbon dioxide generated from carbonates and acids for sampling blood-feeding arthropods.

    PubMed

    Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D; Blosser, Erik M; Young, Ryan M; Toé, Laurent D; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2015-09-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is utilized to attract mosquitoes and other blood-feeding arthropods to traps around the world. Commercial forms of CO2 (e.g., dry ice and compressed gas) are often unavailable or extremely expensive in developing nations, where vector surveillance is essential to make life-saving decisions. We developed and tested inexpensive and reproducible methods of CO2 production from the combination of acids and carbonates, ranging from very basic (crushed seashells and vinegar) to relatively elaborate (a device that controls the timing of the acid-carbonate reaction and extends the reaction over several hours). When utilized with mosquito traps in Florida, USA and black fly traps in Region des Cascades, Burkina Faso, these carbonate-acid CO2 sources attracted significantly greater numbers of both vector groups, than did unbaited traps. CO2 was generated for more than four hours at levels sufficient to attract vectors over the entire period. The utility of this simple methodology in developing nations should be further evaluated. PMID:26103427

  3. l-Lactic acid production from glycerol coupled with acetic acid metabolism by Enterococcus faecalis without carbon loss.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Nao; Oba, Mana; Iwamoto, Mariko; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Noguchi, Takuya; Bonkohara, Kaori; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed Ali; Zendo, Takeshi; Shimoda, Mitsuya; Sakai, Kenji; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Glycerol is a by-product in the biodiesel production process and considered as one of the prospective carbon sources for microbial fermentation including lactic acid fermentation, which has received considerable interest due to its potential application. Enterococcus faecalis isolated in our laboratory produced optically pure l-lactic acid from glycerol in the presence of acetic acid. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis using [1, 2-(13)C2] acetic acid proved that the E. faecalis strain QU 11 was capable of converting acetic acid to ethanol during lactic acid fermentation of glycerol. This indicated that strain QU 11 restored the redox balance by oxidizing excess NADH though acetic acid metabolism, during ethanol production, which resulted in lactic acid production from glycerol. The effects of pH control and substrate concentration on lactic acid fermentation were also investigated. Glycerol and acetic acid concentrations of 30 g/L and 10 g/L, respectively, were expected to be appropriate for lactic acid fermentation of glycerol by strain QU 11 at a pH of 6.5. Furthermore, fed-batch fermentation with 30 g/L glycerol and 10 g/L acetic acid wholly exhibited the best performance including lactic acid production (55.3 g/L), lactic acid yield (0.991 mol-lactic acid/mol-glycerol), total yield [1.08 mol-(lactic acid and ethanol)]/mol-(glycerol and acetic acid)], and total carbon yield [1.06 C-mol-(lactic acid and ethanol)/C-mol-(glycerol and acetic acid)] of lactic acid and ethanol. In summary, the strain QU 11 successfully produced lactic acid from glycerol with acetic acid metabolism, and an efficient fermentation system was established without carbon loss. PMID:26168904

  4. Nanolayered tin phosphate: a remarkably selective Cs ion sieve for acidic waste solutions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenyan; Komarneni, Sridhar; Aref, Amir Reza; Noh, Young Dong; Ma, Jianfeng; Chen, Kunfeng; Xue, Dongfeng; Jiang, Bibiao

    2015-11-01

    Herein, we report a unique tin phosphate that is remarkably selective to (137)Cs(+) from extremly acidic solutions because of its special layered structure with an unusually large interlayer space. This acidic exchanger is superior to other existing materials in terms of its selectivity and capacity for (137)Cs(+) from acidic solutions. PMID:26359760

  5. UPTAKE OF SHORT-CHAIN ALCOHOLS BY SULFURIC ACID SOLUTIONS USING RAMAN AND VIBRATIONAL SUM FREQUENCY

    E-print Network

    UPTAKE OF SHORT-CHAIN ALCOHOLS BY SULFURIC ACID SOLUTIONS USING RAMAN AND VIBRATIONAL SUM FREQUENCY-liquid interface of 0 to 96.5 wt% sulfuric acid (SA) solutions has been observed directly using vibrational sum in either the neat methanol or concentrated sulfuric acid spectra. This peak is attributed to the singly

  6. Effective Diffusion Coefficients for Methanol in Sulfuric Acid Solutions Measured by Raman Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Effective Diffusion Coefficients for Methanol in Sulfuric Acid Solutions Measured by Raman % sulfuric acid solutions was followed using Raman spectroscopy. Because methanol reacts to form protonated that the speciation of both methanol and sulfuric acid may be important in determining these transport coefficients

  7. Isotopic fractionations associated with phosphoric acid digestion of carbonate minerals: Insights from first-principles theoretical

    E-print Network

    Goddard III, William A.

    Isotopic fractionations associated with phosphoric acid digestion of carbonate minerals: Insights 27 May 2009; available online 23 June 2009 Abstract Phosphoric acid digestion has been used with phosphoric acid digestion of carbonates at 25 °C are 10.72&, 0.220&, 0.137&, 0.593& for, respectively, 18 O

  8. Bias-dependent amino-acid-induced conductance changes in short semi-metallic carbon nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Pulfrey, David L.

    Bias-dependent amino-acid-induced conductance changes in short semi-metallic carbon nanotubes G the interaction between short semi-metallic carbon nanotubes and different amino acids using molecular dynamics different mechanisms of nanotube-conductance-change upon adsorption of amino acids: one due to the change

  9. Electrochemical Determination of Glycoalkaloids Using a Carbon Nanotubes-Phenylboronic Acid Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huiying; Liu, Mingyue; Hu, Xinxi; Li, Mei; Xiong, Xingyao

    2013-01-01

    A versatile strategy for electrochemical determination of glycoalkaloids (GAs) was developed by using a carbon nanotubes-phenylboronic acid (CNTs-PBA) modified glassy carbon electrode. PBA reacts with ?-solanine and ?-chaconine to form a cyclic ester, which could be utilized to detect GAs. This method allowed GA detection from 1 ?M to 28 ?M and the detection limit was 0.3 ?M. Affinity interaction of GAs and immobilized PBA caused an essential change of the peak current. The CNT-PBA modified electrodes were sensitive for detection of GAs, and the peak current values were in quite good agreement with those measured by the sensors. PMID:24287539

  10. The aqueous photolysis of ?-pinene in solution with humic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, Marvin C.; Cunningham, Kirkwood M.; Aiken, George R.; Weiner, Eugene R.

    1992-01-01

    Terpenes are produced abundantly by environmental processes but are found in very low concentrations in natural waters. Aqueous photolysis of solutions containing ?-pinene, a representative terpene, in the presence of humic acid resulted in degradation of the pinene. Comparison of this reaction to photolysis of ?-pinene in the presence of methylene blue leads to the conclusion that the reactive pathway for the abiotic degradation of ?-pinene is due to reaction with singlet oxygen produced by irradiation of the humic material. The initial product of single oxygen and ?-pinene is a hydroperoxide. Since humic materials are prevalent in most natural waters, this mechanism of photodecomposition for ?-pinene probably also applies to other terpenes in surface waters and may be reasonably considered to contribute to their low environmental concentration.

  11. GADOLINIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY MEASUREMENTS IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R. A.

    2012-03-12

    HB-Line will begin processing Pu solutions during FY2012 that will involve the recovery of Pu using oxalate precipitation and filtration. After the precipitation and filtration processes, the filtrate solution will be transferred from HB-Line to H-Canyon. The presence of excess oxalate and unfiltered Pu oxalate solids in these solutions create a criticality safety issue if they are sent to H-Canyon without controls in H-Canyon. One approach involves H-Canyon receiving the filtrate solution into a tank that is poisoned with soluble gadolinium (Gd). Decomposition of the oxalate will occur within a subsequent H-Canyon vessel. The receipt of excess oxalate into the H-Canyon receipt tanks has the potential to precipitate a portion of the Gd poison in the receipt tanks. Because the amount of Gd in solution determines the maximum amount of Pu solids that H-Canyon can receive, H-Canyon Engineering requested that SRNL determine the solubility of Gd in aqueous solutions of 4-10 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 4-12 g/L Gd, and 0.15-0.25 M oxalic acid (H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}) at 25 °C. The target soluble Gd concentration is 6 g/L. The data indicate that the target can be achieved above 6 M HNO{sub 3} and below 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}. At 25 °C, for 6 M HNO{sub 3}, 11 g/L and 7 g/L Gd are soluble in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. In 4 M HNO{sub 3}, the Gd solubility drops significantly to 2.5 g/L and 0.8 g/L in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. The solubility of Gd at 8-10 M HNO{sub 3} exceeds the solubility at 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The data for 4 M HNO{sub 3} showed good agreement with data in the literature. To achieve a target of 6 g/L soluble Gd in solution in the presence of 0.15-0.25 M oxalate, the HNO{sub 3} concentration must be maintained at or above 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The solubility of Gd in 4 M HNO{sub 3} with 0.15 M oxalate at 10 °C is about 1.5 g/L. For 6 M HNO{sub 3} with 0.15 M oxalate, the solubility of Gd at 10 °C is about 10 g/L. Gadolinium nitrate is very soluble in HNO{sub 3}. The solubility of Gd is linear as a function of HNO{sub 3} from 343 g/L Gd in 2.88 M HNO{sub 3} to 149 g/L in 8.16 M HNO{sub 3}. Below 2.88 M HNO{sub 3}, the solubility of Gd approaches a limit of about 360 g/L. However, there are no data available below 1.40 M HNO{sub 3}, which has a Gd solubility of 353 g/L.

  12. Preconcentration of f-elements from aqueous solution utilizing a modified carbon paste electrode.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Paul D; Fitzgerald, Kelly A; Schenk, James O; Clark, Sue B

    2011-02-15

    An evaluation using paraffin oil based, Acheson 38 carbon paste electrodes modified with ?-hydroxyisobutyric acid (HIBA) to preconcentrate f-elements cathodically is described. The modified paste was made by directly mixing solid HIBA into the carbon paste. A chemically reversible cyclic voltammogram for HIBA was observed on this modified carbon paste, which was found to be a non-Nerstian, single electron transfer process. Lanthanides (less promethium) were found to accumulate onto the electrode surface during a 30 s electrodeposition step at -0.4 V vs Ag/AgCl from 0.1 M LiCl. The elements were then stripped off into a 2% HNO(3) solution by an oxidative step at +0.8 V vs Ag/AgCl; quantitative removal from the electrode was confirmed by ICPMS. Ultratrace solutions with initial concentrations down to 5 parts per quadrillion (ppq) were preconcentrated in 5 min above our instrumental limit of detection (LOD) of around 1 ppt for lanthanides. PMID:21271692

  13. Release of nitrous acid and nitrogen dioxide from nitrate photolysis in acidic aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Scharko, Nicole K; Berke, Andrew E; Raff, Jonathan D

    2014-10-21

    Nitrate (NO3(-)) is an abundant component of aerosols, boundary layer surface films, and surface water. Photolysis of NO3(-) leads to NO2 and HONO, both of which play important roles in tropospheric ozone and OH production. Field and laboratory studies suggest that NO3¯ photochemistry is a more important source of HONO than once thought, although a mechanistic understanding of the variables controlling this process is lacking. We present results of cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy measurements of NO2 and HONO emitted during photodegradation of aqueous NO3(-) under acidic conditions. Nitrous acid is formed in higher quantities at pH 2-4 than expected based on consideration of primary photochemical channels alone. Both experimental and modeled results indicate that the additional HONO is not due to enhanced NO3(-) absorption cross sections or effective quantum yields, but rather to secondary reactions of NO2 in solution. We find that NO2 is more efficiently hydrolyzed in solution when it is generated in situ during NO3(-) photolysis than for the heterogeneous system where mass transfer of gaseous NO2 into bulk solution is prohibitively slow. The presence of nonchromophoric OH scavengers that are naturally present in the environment increases HONO production 4-fold, and therefore play an important role in enhancing daytime HONO formation from NO3(-) photochemistry. PMID:25271384

  14. Compatible solute influence on nucleic acids: Many questions but few answers

    PubMed Central

    Kurz, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Compatible solutes are small organic osmolytes including but not limited to sugars, polyols, amino acids, and their derivatives. They are compatible with cell metabolism even at molar concentrations. A variety of organisms synthesize or take up compatible solutes for adaptation to extreme environments. In addition to their protective action on whole cells, compatible solutes display significant effects on biomolecules in vitro. These include stabilization of native protein and nucleic acid structures. They are used as additives in polymerase chain reactions to increase product yield and specificity, but also in other nucleic acid and protein applications. Interactions of compatible solutes with nucleic acids and protein-nucleic acid complexes are much less understood than the corresponding interactions of compatible solutes with proteins. Although we may begin to understand solute/nucleic acid interactions there are only few answers to the many questions we have. I summarize here the current state of knowledge and discuss possible molecular mechanisms and thermodynamics. PMID:18522725

  15. Hydrogen chemisorption on Pt single crystal surfaces in acidic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Philip N.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen chemisorption from dilute acidic solution onto Pt single crystal surfaces was examined using an electrochemical cell directly coupled to LEED/Auger analytical system. No pre-anodization was used prior to observing hydrogen adsorption by cyclic voltammetry so that clean surfaces having the ordered structures indicated by LEED were studied. The problem of contributions from non-ordered parts of the electrode like support wires and edges was solved by using a gold evaporation masking technique. The specific contribution of atomic imperfections to the voltammetry curve was deduced from the ordered and countable imperfections occurring on high Miller index single crystal surfaces that have a stepped structure. The H-Pt bond energy was found to be structure sensitive, and sensitive both to local site geometry and long range order in the surface. The bond strength was found to vary systematically: n(111) × (100) > (100) > n(111) × (111) > (110) > (111). Distinct states for hydrogen at steps versus hydrogen on terraces could be distinguished. The (110) surface is shown to be a (111) vicinal, probably the [3(111) × 2(111)] microfacetted surface. The zero coverage heat of adsorption on the well-ordered (111) surface (48 {kJ}/{mol}) in solutions is the same as the value reported by Ertl and co-workers for adsorption on a (111) surface in vacuum. Adsorption isotherms for hydrogen on the (111) and (100) surfaces are adequately fit by the classical model for immobile adsorption at single sites with nearest neighbor repulsive interaction.

  16. Solution structures of europium(III) complexes of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Latva, M.; Kankara, J.; Haapakka, K.

    1996-04-01

    Coordination of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) with europium(III) has been studied at different concentrations in solution using {sup 7}F{sub 0}{yields}{sup 5}D{sub 0} excitation spectroscopy and excited-state lifetime measurements. EDTA forms with Eu(III) ion three different species in equimolar solutions at room temperature. At low pH values EuEDTAH is formed and at higher pH values than 1.5 two EuEDTA{sup -} complexes, which differ from each other with one water molecule in the first coordination sphere of the Eu(III) ion, total coordination number and coordination geometry, are also formed. When the concentration of EDTA is higher than the concentration of Eu(III), an EuEDTA(EDTAH){sup 4-} species where the second EDTA is weakly coordinated to EuEDTA{sup -}, is formed. If the concentration of Eu(III) ion is higher than EDTA, the extra Eu(III) ions associate with EuEDTA{sup -} and link to one of the carboxylate groups of EDTA thus causing a shortening of the excited-state lifetime of the EuEDTA{sup -} complex.

  17. Raman spectroscopic study of the phase transition of amorphous to crystalline beta-carbonic acid.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Ingrid; Winkel, Katrin; Bauer, Marion; Liedl, Klaus R; Loerting, Thomas; Mayer, Erwin

    2009-01-01

    What's the matter? The laboratory Raman spectra for carbonic acid (H(2)CO(3)), both for the beta-polymorph and its amorphous state, are required to detect carbonic acid on the surface of the pole caps of Mars in 2009, when the Mars Microbeam Raman Spectrometer lands on the planet. The picture shows a martian crater with ice of unknown composition, possibly containing carbonic acid (image adapted from DLR, with permission from ESA, DLR, and FU Berlin--G. Neukum). PMID:19212997

  18. EXAFS Study on the Reactions Between Iron And Fulvic Acid in Acid Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Schaik, J.W.J.van; Persson, I.; Kleja, D.B.; Gustafsson, J.P.

    2009-05-26

    Iron(III) competes with trace metals for binding sites on organic ligands. We used X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to determine the binding mode and oxidation state of iron in solutions initially containing only iron(III) and fulvic acid at pHs 2 and 4. EXAFS spectra were recorded at different times after sample preparation. Iron was octahedrally configured with inner-sphere Fe-O interactions at 1.98-2.10 {angstrom}, depending on the oxidation state of iron. Iron(III) formed complexes with fulvic acid within 15 min. Iron(III) was reduced to iron(II) with time at pH 2, whereas no significant reduction occurred at pH 4. No signs of dimeric/trimeric hydrolysis products were found in any of the solution samples (<0.45 {mu}m). However, the isolated precipitate of the pH 2 sample (>0.45 {mu}m) showed Fe{hor_ellipsis}Fe distances, indicating the presence of tightly packed iron(III) trimers and/or clusters of corner-sharing octahedra. It is suggested that the binding mode of iron(III) to fulvic acid at low pH may be phase-dependent: in solution mononuclear complexes predominate, whereas in the solid phase hydrolyzed polynuclear iron(III) complexes form, even at very low pH values. The observed pH dependence of iron(III) reduction was consistent with expected results based on thermodynamic calculations for model ligands.

  19. Uptake of Hypobromous Acid (HOBr) by Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions: Low-Temperature Solubility and Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Ashbourn, Samatha F. M.; Rammer, Thomas A.; Golden, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Hypobromous acid (HOBr) is a key species linking inorganic bromine to the chlorine and odd hydrogen chemical families. We have measured the solubility of HOBr in 45 - 70 wt% sulfuric acid solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosol composition. Over the temperature range 201 - 252 K, HOBr is quite soluble in sulfuric acid, with an effective Henry's law coefficient, H* = 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 7) mol/L/atm. H* is inversely dependent on temperature, with Delta H = -46.2 kJ/mol and Delta S = -106.2 J/mol/K for 55 - 70 wt% H2SO4 solutions. Our study includes temperatures which overlap both previous measurements of HOBr solubility. For uptake into aqueous 45 wt% H2SO4, the solubility can be described by log H* = 3665/T - 10.63. For 55 - 70 wt% H2SO4, log H* = 2412/T - 5.55. At temperatures colder than approx. 213 K, the solubility of HOBr in 45 wt% H2SO4 is noticeably larger than in 70 wt% H2SO4. The solubility of HOBr is comparable to that of HBr, indicating that upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols should contain equilibrium concentrations of HOBr which equal or exceed those of HBr. Our measurements indicate chemical reaction of HOBr upon uptake into aqueous sulfuric acid in the presence of other brominated gases followed by evolution of gaseous products including Br2O and Br2, particularly at 70 wt% H2SO4.

  20. A New Organic Acid to Stimulate Deep Wells in Carbonate Reservoirs 

    E-print Network

    Al-Douri, Ahmad F

    2014-05-28

    Carbonate acidizing has been carried out using HCl-based stimulation fluids for decades. However, at high temperatures, HCl does not produce acceptable results because of its fast reaction, acid penetration, and hence surface dissolution, and its...

  1. Tracer Fluid Flow through Porous Media: Theory Applied to Acid Stimulation Treatments in Carbonate Rocks 

    E-print Network

    Zakaria Mohamed Reda, Ahmed

    2014-07-29

    structure on the acid stimulation treatments. The objective of this study were to: 1) understand the effect of carbonate pore structure on the acid fluid flow through porous media by the use of thin section analysis, electrical measurements, nuclear...

  2. A Simple Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Fixation and Acid Production in CAM Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, John R. L.; McWha, James A.

    1976-01-01

    Described is an experiment investigating carbon dioxide fixation in the dark and the diurnal rhythm of acid production in plants exhibiting Crassulacean Acid Metabolism. Included are suggestions for four further investigations. (SL)

  3. Large-scale production of anhydrous nitric acid and nitric acid solutions of dinitrogen pentoxide

    DOEpatents

    Harrar, Jackson E. (Castro Valley, CA); Quong, Roland (Oakland, CA); Rigdon, Lester P. (Livermore, CA); McGuire, Raymond R. (Brentwood, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for a large scale, electrochemical production of anhydrous nitric acid and N.sub.2 O.sub.5. The method includes oxidizing a solution of N.sub.2 O.sub.4 /aqueous-HNO.sub.3 at the anode, while reducing aqueous HNO.sub.3 at the cathode, in a flow electrolyzer constructed of special materials. N.sub.2 O.sub.4 is produced at the cathode and may be separated and recycled as a feedstock for use in the anolyte. The process is controlled by regulating the electrolysis current until the desired products are obtained. The chemical compositions of the anolyte and catholyte are monitored by measurement of the solution density and the concentrations of N.sub.2 O.sub.4.

  4. Carbon composite micro- and nano-tubes-based electrodes for detection of nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The first aim of this study was to fabricate vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). MWCNTs were successfully prepared by using plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. Further, three carbon composite electrodes with different content of carbon particles with various shapes and sizes were prepared and tested on measuring of nucleic acids. The dependences of adenine peak height on the concentration of nucleic acid sample were measured. Carbon composite electrode prepared from a mixture of glassy and spherical carbon powder and MWCNTs had the highest sensitivity to nucleic acids. Other interesting result is the fact that we were able to distinguish signals for all bases using this electrode. PMID:21711910

  5. Hyaluronic acid solution injection for upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding after failed conventional endoscopic therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyung Hun

    2014-03-01

    Hyaluronic acid solution injection can be an additional endoscopic modality for controlling bleeding in difficult cases when other techniques have failed. We evaluated 12 cases in which we used hyaluronic acid solution injection for stopping bleeding. Immediately following hyaluronic acid solution injection, bleeding was controlled in 11 out of 12 cases. There was no clinical evidence of renewed bleeding in 11 cases during follow up.Hyaluronic acid solution injection can be a simple and efficient additional method for controlling upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding after failed endoscopic therapy. PMID:23731087

  6. Isotropic-Nematic Phase Transition of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Strong Acids

    E-print Network

    Natelson, Douglas

    Isotropic-Nematic Phase Transition of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Strong Acids Pradeep K. Rai nanotubes (SWNTs) in Brønsted-Lowry acids. We employ a centrifugation technique in conjunction with UV of SWNTs in strong acids. Centrifugation of biphasic dispersions of SWNTs, that is, acid dispersions

  7. Reactions of aqueous glucose solution over solid-acid Y-zeolite catalyst at 110-160 C

    SciTech Connect

    Lourvanij, K.; Rorrer, G.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Reactions of glucose with solid-acid Y-zeolite catalyst were studied to see if this heterogeneous system could produce oxygenated hydrocarbons by shape-selective, acid-catalyzed processes at fairly low temperatures. Experimentally, aqueous solutions of glucose (12 wt %) were reacted with HY-zeolite powder in a well-mixed batch reactor at temperatures ranging from 110 to 160 C and catalyst concentrations ranging from 2 to 20 g/150 ml. Unreacted glucose and oxygenated hydrocarbon products were measured by HPLC as a function of reaction time (0-24 h) and process conditions. Glucose conversions of 100% were obtained at 160 C after an 8-h reaction time. The apparent activation energy based on glucose conversion was 23.25 [plus minus] 0.40 kcal/mol. Several acid-catalyzed reactions were identified, including isomerization of glucose to fructose, partial dehydration of glucose to 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF), rehydration and cleavage of HMF to formic acid and 4-oxo-pentanoic acid, and carbonization . Polymers of HMF and seven minor additional products in the lower molecular weight organic acids/aldehydes/ketones elution range were also isolated by HPLC. High yields of organic acids relative to HMF and lowered selectivity of HMF in the bulk phase relative to the homogeneous acid-catalyzed reaction suggests the possibility of molecular sieving reactions within the Y-zeolite in addition to reactions on the outer surface of the Y-zeolite particle.

  8. Polyelectrolyte and carbon nanotube multilayers made from ionic liquid solutions.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Takuya; Zhu, Jian; Qin, Ming; Ho, Szushen; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2010-10-01

    The inevitable contact of substrates with water during the traditional practice of layer-by-layer assembly (LBL) creates problems for multiple potential applications of LBL films in electronics. To resolve this issue, we demonstrate here the possibility of a LBL process using ionic liquids (ILs), which potentially eliminates corrosion and hydration processes related to aqueous media and opens additional possibilities in structural control of LBL films. ILs are also considered to be one of the best "green" processing solvents, and hence, are advantageous in respect to traditional organic solvents. Poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) and poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) (PSS) were dispersed in a hydrophilic IL and successfully deposited in the LBL fashion. To produce electroactive thin films with significance to electronics, a similar process was realized for PSS-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT-PSS) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). Characterization of the coating using standard spectroscopy and microscopy techniques typical of the multilayer field indicated that there are both similarities and differences in the structure and properties of LBL films build from ILs and aqueous solutions. The films exhibited electrical conductivity of 10(2) S m(-1) with transparency as high as 98% for visible light, which is comparable to similar parameters for many carbon nanotube and graphene films prepared by both aqueous LBL and other methods. PMID:20931147

  9. Ethylbenzene Removal by Carbon Nanotubes from Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Bina, Bijan; Pourzamani, Hamidreza; Rashidi, Alimorad; Amin, Mohammad Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    The removal of ethylbenzene (E) from aqueous solution by multiwalled, single-walled, and hybrid carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, SWCNTs, and HCNTs) was evaluated for a nanomaterial dose of 1?g/L, concentration of 10–100?mg/L, and pH 7. The equilibrium amount removed by SWCNTs (E: 9.98?mg/g) was higher than by MWCNTs and HCNTs. Ethylbenzene has a higher adsorption tendency on CNTs, so that more than 98% of it adsorbed in first 14?min, which is related to the low water solubility and the high molecular weight. The SWCNTs performed better for ethylbenzene sorption than the HCNTs and MWCNTs. Isotherms study indicates that the BET isotherm expression provides the best fit for ethylbenzene sorption by SWCNTs. Carbon nanotubes, specially SWCNTs, are efficient and rapid adsorbents for ethylbenzene which possess good potential applications to maintain high-quality water. Therefore, it could be used for cleaning up environmental pollution to prevent ethylbenzene borne diseases. PMID:22187576

  10. Visible light caffeic acid degradation by carbon-doped titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Venditti, Francesco; Cuomo, Francesca; Ceglie, Andrea; Avino, Pasquale; Russo, Mario Vincenzo; Lopez, Francesco

    2015-03-31

    The removal of the phenolic compound, caffeic acid, by photodegradation has been investigated using carbon-doped titanium dioxide particles as a photocatalyst under visible light. UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry analyses revealed a substrate concentration dependence of the removal of caffeic acid from a water solution. The k2 and t(0.5) parameters of each reaction were calculated by fitting kinetics data to a second-order kinetic adsorption model. To evaluate the photodegradation event, the effect of the adsorption process on the whole degradation was also monitored in the absence of light. Adsorption isotherm studies supported by ? potential and scanning electron microscopy data demonstrated the pivotal role of the absorption mechanism. It was found that the whole photodegradation process is governed by a synergic mechanism in which adsorption and photodegradation are involved. This study, centered on the removal of caffeic acid from aqueous solutions, highlights the potential application of this technology for the elimination of phenolic compounds from olive mill wastewater, a fundamental goal in both the agronomical and environmental fields. PMID:25763603

  11. Carbon Footprint of Telemedicine Solutions - Unexplored Opportunity for Reducing Carbon Emissions in the Health Sector

    PubMed Central

    Holmner, Åsa; Ebi, Kristie L.; Lazuardi, Lutfan; Nilsson, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background The healthcare sector is a significant contributor to global carbon emissions, in part due to extensive travelling by patients and health workers. Objectives To evaluate the potential of telemedicine services based on videoconferencing technology to reduce travelling and thus carbon emissions in the healthcare sector. Methods A life cycle inventory was performed to evaluate the carbon reduction potential of telemedicine activities beyond a reduction in travel related emissions. The study included two rehabilitation units at Umeå University Hospital in Sweden. Carbon emissions generated during telemedicine appointments were compared with care-as-usual scenarios. Upper and lower bound emissions scenarios were created based on different teleconferencing solutions and thresholds for when telemedicine becomes favorable were estimated. Sensitivity analyses were performed to pinpoint the most important contributors to emissions for different set-ups and use cases. Results Replacing physical visits with telemedicine appointments resulted in a significant 40–70 times decrease in carbon emissions. Factors such as meeting duration, bandwidth and use rates influence emissions to various extents. According to the lower bound scenario, telemedicine becomes a greener choice at a distance of a few kilometers when the alternative is transport by car. Conclusions Telemedicine is a potent carbon reduction strategy in the health sector. But to contribute significantly to climate change mitigation, a paradigm shift might be required where telemedicine is regarded as an essential component of ordinary health care activities and not only considered to be a service to the few who lack access to care due to geography, isolation or other constraints. PMID:25188322

  12. [The subacute toxicity of glucosylthiazolidine-4-carbonic acid in rats].

    PubMed

    Lewerenz, H J; Plass, R; Bleyl, D W; Macholz, R; Zeise, S; Kroh, L

    1990-01-01

    Glucosylthiazolidine-4-carbonic acid, an intermediate of the Maillard reaction between D-glucose and L-cysteine, was given in doses of 0, 25, 50 or 100 mg/kg b.w. by oral intubation to male and female rats for 21 days. General appearance, growth, food consumption, haematology, urine analysis and serum chemistry including determinations of enzyme activities, organ weights and macroscopic and microscopic pathology were used as criteria for adverse effects. Effects on the kidneys were indicated by oliguria and decreased specific gravity of the urine in males and histopathological changes of the proximal tubules in females. The no-effect dose established from this study is 25 mg/kg b.w. PMID:2089262

  13. Starch saccharification by carbon-based solid acid catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Daizo; Hara, Michikazu

    2010-06-01

    The hydrolysis of cornstarch using a highly active solid acid catalyst, a carbon material bearing SO 3H, COOH and OH groups, was investigated at 353-393 K through an analysis of variance (ANOVA) and an artificial neural network (ANN). ANOVA revealed that reaction temperature and time are significant parameters for the catalytic hydrolysis of starch. The ANN model indicated that the reaction efficiency reaches a maximum at an optimal condition (water, 0.8-1.0 mL; starch, 0.3-0.4 g; catalyst, 0.3 g; reaction temperature, 373 K; reaction time, 3 h). The relationship between the reaction and these parameters is discussed on the basis of the reaction mechanism.

  14. Habit modification of calcium carbonate in the presence of malic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Mao Zhaofeng; Huang Jianhua

    2007-02-15

    The ability of malic acid to control calcium carbonate morphology has been investigated by aging calcium chloride solution in the presence of urea in a 90 deg. C bath. Malic acid favors the formation of calcite. A transition from single block to aggregate with special morphology occurs upon increasing malic acid concentration. The morphological development of CaCO{sub 3} crystal obviously depends on the starting pH. CaCO{sub 3} crystal grows from spindle seed to dumbbell in the pH regime from 7 to 11; while it evolves from spindle seed, through peanut, to sphere at pH=11.5. Both dumbbell and sphere consist of rods that are elongated along c-axis and capped with three smooth, well-defined rhombic {l_brace}1 0 4{r_brace} faces. A tentative growth mechanism is proposed based on the fractal model suggested by R. Kniep and S. Busch [Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 35 (1996) 2624]. - Graphical abstract: Dumbbell-like CaCO{sub 3} particles obtained in the presence of malic acid.

  15. Extensional Flow of Hyaluronic Acid Solutions in an Optimized Microfluidic Cross-Slot Devicea)

    E-print Network

    1 Extensional Flow of Hyaluronic Acid Solutions in an Optimized Microfluidic Cross-Slot Devicea) S and rheological properties of hyaluronic acid (HA) solutions representative of the synovial fluid (SF) found of physiological SF samples, which will lead to improved understanding of, and therapies for, disease progression

  16. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  17. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  18. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  19. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  20. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  1. FEATURE ARTICLE Unified Molecular Picture of the Surfaces of Aqueous Acid, Base, and Salt Solutions

    E-print Network

    FEATURE ARTICLE Unified Molecular Picture of the Surfaces of Aqueous Acid, Base, and Salt Solutions inorganic ions. Molecular dynamics calculations show that in salt solutions and bases the positively charged, consequently, these acids (unlike bases and salts) reduce the surface tension of water. The results

  2. Copper Catalyzed Sodium Tetraphenylborate, Triphenylborane, Diphenylborinic Acid and Phenylboronic Acid Decomposition Kinetic Studies in Aqueous Alkaline Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.L.

    1999-03-15

    This work studied the kinetics of copper-catalyzed decomposition of tetraphenylborate, triphenylborane, diphenylborinic acid and phenylboronic acid (NaTPB, 3PB, 2PB and 1PB, respectively) in aqueous alkaline solution over the temperature range of 25 to 70 degrees C. The statistically designed test matrices added copper sulfate to maximum concentrations of 10 mg/L. The relative rates of decomposition increase in the order of NaTPB < 1PB {tilde} 3PB < 2PB. Dependence of decomposition on the amount of added copper increases in the order of 3PB {tilde} 2PB < 1PB {tilde} NaTPB. Activation energies ranged from 82 to 143 kJ/mole over the temperature range studied. Final decomposition products predominately involved benzene and phenol. All 3PB, 2PB and 1PB intermediate phenylborate species proved relatively stable (< 8 percent decomposition over {tilde} 500 h) towards thermal hydrolysis in 1.5 M NaOH when contained in carbon-steel vessels sealed under air at ambient temperature (23 - 25 degrees C) with no added copper. Measurable (> 10-7 Mh-1) thermal hydrolysis of the phenylborate species occurs at 55 to 70 degrees C in alkaline (0.6-2.3 M OH-, 2-4.7 M Na+) solution with no added copper. The experiments suggest an important role for oxygen in copper-catalyzed phenylborate decomposition. NaTPB decomposes promptly under anoxic conditions while 3PB, 2PB and 1PB decompose faster in aerobic solutions. Benzene and phenol form as the predominant end-products from alkaline copper catalysis in static systems sealed under air. Both 2PB and 1PB decompose with near equal rates and quantitatively produce phenol under flowing air-purge conditions at 25 to 60 degrees C. Mechanisms for copper-catalyzed phenylborate decomposition likely involve a redox process giving loss of a phenyl group from the phenylborate with reduction of cupric ion, or dephenylation by reduced cuprous ion involving a phenylated copper intermediate.

  3. Determination of dopamine in presence of ascorbic acid and uric acid using poly (Spands Reagent) modified carbon paste electrode.

    PubMed

    Veera Manohara Reddy, Y; Prabhakara Rao, V; Vijaya Bhaskar Reddy, A; Lavanya, M; Venu, M; Lavanya, M; Madhavi, G

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we have fabricated a modified carbon paste electrode (CPE) by electropolymerisation of spands reagent (SR) onto surface of CPE using cyclic voltammetry (CV). The developed electrode was abbreviated as poly(SR)/CPE and the surface morphology of the modified electrode was studied by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The developed electrode showed higher electrocatalytic properties towards the detection of dopamine (DA) in 0.1M phosphate buffer solution (PBS) at pH7.0. The effect of pH, scan rate, accumulation time and concentration of dopamine was studied at poly(SR)/CPE. The poly(SR)/CPE was successfully used as a sensor for the selective determination of DA in presence of ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA) without any interference. The poly(SR)/CPE showed a good detection limit of 0.7 ?M over the linear dynamic range of 1.6 ?M to 16 ?M, which is extremely lower than the reported methods. The prepared poly(SR)/CPE exhibited good stability, high sensitivity, better reproducibility, low detection limit towards the determination of DA. The developed method was also applied for the determination of DA in real samples. PMID:26354279

  4. Investigating the Effects of Core Length on Pore Volume to Breakthrough (PVBT) Behavior in Carbonate Core Samples during Matrix Acidizing with Hydrochloric Acid 

    E-print Network

    Nour, Mohamed

    2014-05-06

    Most literature contains Hydrochloric acid (HCl) carbonate acidizing experiments performed on short (2 - 6 inch) cores. These cores do not accurately represent reservoir conditions, as spent acid is not propagated for any appreciable distance along...

  5. Probing counterion modulated repulsion and attraction between nucleic acid duplexes in solution

    E-print Network

    Das, Rhiju

    Probing counterion modulated repulsion and attraction between nucleic acid duplexes in solution Yu for review June 22, 2004) Understanding biological and physical processes involving nucleic acids of the ion atmosphere that surrounds nucleic acids. We have used a simple model DNA system to determine how

  6. Quantitative prediction of 3D solution shape and flexibility of nucleic acid nanostructures

    E-print Network

    Dietz, Hendrik

    Quantitative prediction of 3D solution shape and flexibility of nucleic acid nanostructures Do designed using nucleic acids. INTRODUCTION Programmable self-assembly of complementary single- stranded nucleic acids is a versatile approach to designing sophisticated nanoscale structures (2­4). Scaffolded

  7. NMR Analyses of Order and Dynamics in Poly(p-Benzamide)/ Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    E-print Network

    Frydman, Lucio

    NMR Analyses of Order and Dynamics in Poly(p-Benzamide)/ Sulfuric Acid Solutions Min Zhou, Veronica sulfuric acid. Quantitative determinations of order in the liquid crystal phases arising in these systems liquid crystalline dopes when dissolved in strong mineral acids at ap- propriate concentrations.10

  8. Polyelectrolyte and carbon nanotube multilayers made from ionic liquid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Takuya; Zhu, Jian; Qin, Ming; Ho, Szushen; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2010-10-01

    The inevitable contact of substrates with water during the traditional practice of layer-by-layer assembly (LBL) creates problems for multiple potential applications of LBL films in electronics. To resolve this issue, we demonstrate here the possibility of a LBL process using ionic liquids (ILs), which potentially eliminates corrosion and hydration processes related to aqueous media and opens additional possibilities in structural control of LBL films. ILs are also considered to be one of the best ``green'' processing solvents, and hence, are advantageous in respect to traditional organic solvents. Poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) and poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) (PSS) were dispersed in a hydrophilic IL and successfully deposited in the LBL fashion. To produce electroactive thin films with significance to electronics, a similar process was realized for PSS-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT-PSS) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). Characterization of the coating using standard spectroscopy and microscopy techniques typical of the multilayer field indicated that there are both similarities and differences in the structure and properties of LBL films build from ILs and aqueous solutions. The films exhibited electrical conductivity of 102 S m-1 with transparency as high as 98% for visible light, which is comparable to similar parameters for many carbon nanotube and graphene films prepared by both aqueous LBL and other methods.The inevitable contact of substrates with water during the traditional practice of layer-by-layer assembly (LBL) creates problems for multiple potential applications of LBL films in electronics. To resolve this issue, we demonstrate here the possibility of a LBL process using ionic liquids (ILs), which potentially eliminates corrosion and hydration processes related to aqueous media and opens additional possibilities in structural control of LBL films. ILs are also considered to be one of the best ``green'' processing solvents, and hence, are advantageous in respect to traditional organic solvents. Poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) and poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) (PSS) were dispersed in a hydrophilic IL and successfully deposited in the LBL fashion. To produce electroactive thin films with significance to electronics, a similar process was realized for PSS-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT-PSS) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). Characterization of the coating using standard spectroscopy and microscopy techniques typical of the multilayer field indicated that there are both similarities and differences in the structure and properties of LBL films build from ILs and aqueous solutions. The films exhibited electrical conductivity of 102 S m-1 with transparency as high as 98% for visible light, which is comparable to similar parameters for many carbon nanotube and graphene films prepared by both aqueous LBL and other methods. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Aggregation of PEI and PSS in [EMIm][EtSO4], detailed FTIR data, water-contact angle for (PEI/PSS)10 multilayers, and XPS survey spectra. See DOI: 10.1039/b9nr00333a

  9. Isothermal heat measurements of TBP-nitric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.; Cavin, W.S.

    1994-12-16

    Net heats of reaction were measured in an isothermal calorimeter for both single phase (organic) and two phase (organic and aqueous) TBP/HNO{sub 3} reacting solutions at temperatures above 100 C. The oxidation rate constant was determined to be 5.4E-4 min{sup {minus}1} at 110 C for an open ``vented`` system as compared to 1.33 E-3 min{sup {minus}1} in the closed system. The heat released per unit material oxidized was also reduced. The oxidation in both phases was found to be first order in nitric acid and pseudo-zero order in butylnitrate and water. The hydrolysis (esterification) rate constant determined by Nichols` (1.33E-3 min{sup {minus}1}) fit the experimental data from this work well. Forced evaporation of the volatile components by the product gases from oxidation resulted in a cooling mechanism which more than balanced the heat from the oxidation reaction in the two-phased systems. Rate expressions were derived and rate constants determined for both the single and two phase systems. An approximating mathematical model was developed to fit the experimental data and to extrapolate beyond the experimental conditions. This model shows that one foot of ``reacting`` 14.3M HNO{sub 3} aqueous phase solution at 121 C will transport sufficient water to the organic phase to replace evaporative losses, maintaining endothermicity, for organic layers up to 12.2 + 6.0 feet deep. If the pressure in a reacting system is allowed to increase due to insufficient venting the temperature of the organic phase would increase in temperature to reach a new equilibrium. The rate of oxidation would increase not only due to the increase in temperature but also from the increased concentration of dissolved HNO{sub 3} reduction products. Another important factor is that the cooling system described in this work becomes less effective as the total pressure increases. These factors probably contributed to the explosion at Tomsk.

  10. USE OF THE COMPOSITION AND STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIO OF MICROBIAL FATTY ACIDS TO STUDY CARBON CYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotopic ratio (Gamma 13C) of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAS) in soils and sediments as indicators of live microbial biomass levels and microbial carbon source. For studies of soil organic matter (SO...

  11. USE OF STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIOS OF FATTY ACIDS TO EVALUATE MICROBIAL CARBON SOURCES IN TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotopic ratio (D 13C) of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in soils as indicators of live microbial biomass levels and microbial carbon source. We found that intensive sugar cane cultivation leads to ...

  12. Corrosion Testing of Carbon Steel in Oxalic Acid that Contains Dissolved Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, Bruce J.; Mickalonis, John I.; Subramanian, Karthik H.

    2012-10-11

    Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 60 years at the Savannah River Site. The site is currently in the process of removing the waste from these tanks in order to place it into vitrified, stable state for longer term storage. The last stage in the removal sequence is a chemical cleaning step that breaks up and dissolves metal oxide solids that cannot be easily pumped out of the tank. Oxalic acid (OA) will be used to chemically clean the tanks after waste retrieval is completed. The waste tanks at SRS were constructed from carbon steel materials and thus are vulnerable to corrosion in acidic media. In addition to structural impacts, the impact of corrosion on the hydrogen generated during the process must be assessed. Electrochemical and coupon immersion tests were used to investigate the corrosion mechanism at anticipated process conditions. The testing showed that the corrosion rates were dependent upon the reduction of the iron species that had dissolved in solution. Initial corrosion rates were elevated due to the reduction of the ferric species to ferrous species. At later times, as the ferric species depleted, the corrosion rate decreased. On the other hand, the hydrogen evolution reaction became more dominant.

  13. Comparison of CO2 and oxygen DC submerged thermal plasmas for decomposition of carboxylic acid in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safa, S.; Hekmat-Ardakan, A.; Soucy, G.

    2014-11-01

    The feasibility of the carboxylic acid decomposition with two different direct current (DC) thermal plasma torches was investigated. An oxygen DC submerged thermal plasma torch and a newly designed submerged DC plasma torch operating with a mixture of carbon dioxide and methane (CO2/CH4) were used. Sebacic acid was selected as a representative of pollutants in the most wastewater produced by chemical process industries. The effect of different operational conditions including treatment time, the reactor pressure as well as the role of oxidizing agents such as (H2O2) were investigated on the decomposition rate of sebacic acid. Concentration of sebacic acid was quantified by Ion Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (IC/MS). The oxygen plasma showed higher decomposition rate in basic medium. Adding H2O2 into aqueous solution enhanced the sebacic acid decomposition rate with the CO2/CH4 plasma up to the same decomposition rate of the oxygen plasma. Increasing the pressure also increased the decomposition rate for both plasmas with an increase twice higher for the CO2/CH4 plasma than that of the oxygen plasma. This work therefore presents the conditions in which these plasmas can provide the same decomposition rate for contaminants in aqueous solution.

  14. Activated carbon enhanced ozonation of oxalate attributed to HO oxidation in bulk solution and surface oxidation: effect of activated carbon dosage and pH.

    PubMed

    Xing, Linlin; Xie, Yongbing; Minakata, Daisuke; Cao, Hongbin; Xiao, Jiadong; Zhang, Yi; Crittenden, John C

    2014-10-01

    Ozonation of oxalate in aqueous phase was performed with a commercial activated carbon (AC) in this work. The effect of AC dosage and solution pH on the contribution of hydroxyl radicals (HO) in bulk solution and oxidation on the AC surface to the removal of oxalate was studied. We found that the removal of oxalate was reduced by tert-butyl alcohol (tBA) with low dosages of AC, while it was hardly affected by tBA when the AC dosage was greater than 0.3g/L. tBA also inhibited ozone decomposition when the AC dosage was no more than 0.05g/L, but it did not work when the AC dosage was no less than 0.1g/L. These observations indicate that HO in bulk solution and oxidation on the AC surface both contribute to the removal of oxalate. HO oxidation in bulk solution is significant when the dosage of AC is low, whereas surface oxidation is dominant when the dosage of AC is high. The oxalate removal decreased with increasing pH of the solution with an AC dosage of 0.5g/L. The degradation of oxalate occurs mainly through surface oxidation in acid and neutral solution, but through HO oxidation in basic bulk solution. A mechanism involving both HO oxidation in bulk solution and surface oxidation was proposed for AC enhanced ozonation of oxalate. PMID:25288554

  15. Solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions of 2-amino-2-methyl-1,3-propanediol

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, J.I.; Yoon, J.H.

    1998-07-01

    The equilibrium solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions of 2-amino-2-methyl-1,3-propanediol (AMPD) has been measured at (30, 40, and 60) C and the partial pressure of carbon dioxide ranging from (0.5 to 3065) kPa. The concentrations of the aqueous solutions were (10 and 30) mass % AMPD. The tendency of the solubility of carbon dioxide in 30 mass % AMPD aqueous solution at 40 C was found to be similar to that in 30 mass % N-methyldiethanolamine aqueous solution.

  16. Carbon-Pt nanoparticles modified TiO2 nanotubes for simultaneous detection of dopamine and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Mahshid, Sara; Luo, Shenglian; Yang, Lixia; Mahshid, Sahar Sadat; Askari, Masoud; Dolati, Abolghasem; Cai, Qingyun

    2011-08-01

    The present work describes sensing application of modified TiO2 nanotubes having carbon-Pt nanoparticles for simultaneous detection of dopamine and uric acid. The TiO2 nanotubes electrode was prepared using anodizing method, followed by electrodeposition of Pt nanoparticles onto the tubes. Carbon was deposited by decomposition of polyethylene glycol in a tube furnace to improve the conductivity. The C-Pt-TiO2 nanotubes modified electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry methods. The modified electrode displayed high sensitivity towards the oxidation of dopamine and uric acid in a phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.00). The electro-oxidation currents of dopamine and uric acid were linearly related to the concentration over a wide range of 3.5 x 10(-8) M to 1 x 10(-5) M and 1 x 10(-7) M to 3 x 10(-5) M respectively. The limit of detection was determined as 2 x 10(-10) M for dopamine at signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The interference of uric acid was also investigated. Electro-oxidation currents of dopamine in the presence of fix amount of uric acid represented a linear behaviour towards successive addition of dopamine in range of 1 x 10(-7) M to 1 x 10(-5) M. Furthermore, in a solution containing dopamine, uric acid and ascorbic acid the overlapped oxidation peaks of dopamine and ascorbic acid could be easily separated by using C-Pt-TiO2 nanotubes modified electrode. PMID:22103066

  17. Sorption of perfluorooctanoic acid, perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluoroheptanoic acid on granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Di; Luo, Qi; Gao, Bin; Chiang, Sheau-Yun Dora; Woodward, David; Huang, Qingguo

    2016-02-01

    The sorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA) on granular activated carbon (GAC) was characterized and compared to explore the underlying mechanisms. Sorption of the three perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) on GAC appeared to be a rapid intra-particle diffusion process, which were well represented by the pseudo-second-order rate model with the sorption rate following the order PFOS > PFOA > PFHpA. Sorption isotherm data were well fitted by the Freundlich model with the sorption capacity (Kf) of PFOS, PFOA and PFHpA being 4.45, 2.42 and 1.66 respectively. This suggests that the hydrophilic head group on PFAAs, i.e. sulfonate vs carboxylic, has a strong influence on their sorption. Comparison between PFOA and PFHpA revealed that hydrophobicity could also play a role in the sorption of PFAAs on GAC when the fluorocarbon chain length is different. Analyses using Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR)-Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy suggested possible formation of a negative charge-assisted H-bond between PFAAs and the functionalities on GAC surfaces, including non-aromatic ketones, sulfides, and halogenated hydrocarbons. PMID:26606188

  18. Oxalic acid complexes: promising draw solutes for forward osmosis (FO) in protein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Ge, Qingchun; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2015-03-21

    Highly soluble oxalic acid complexes (OACs) were synthesized through a one-pot reaction. The OACs exhibit excellent performance as draw solutes in FO processes with high water fluxes and negligible reverse solute fluxes. Efficient protein enrichment was achieved. The diluted OACs can be recycled via nanofiltration and are promising as draw solutes. PMID:25697506

  19. Relation Between the Adsorbed Quantity and the Immersion Enthalpy in Catechol Aqueous Solutions on Activated Carbons

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Piraján, Juan Carlos; Blanco, Diego; Giraldo, Liliana

    2012-01-01

    An activated carbon, CarbochemTM—PS230, was modified by chemical and thermal treatment in flow of H2, in order to evaluate the influence of the activated carbon chemical characteristics in the adsorption of the catechol. The catechol adsorption in aqueous solution was studied along with the effect of the pH solution in the adsorption process of modified activated carbons and the variation of immersion enthalpy of activated carbons in the aqueous solutions of catechol. The interaction solid-solution is characterized by adsorption isotherms analysis, at 298 K and pH 7, 9 and 11 in order to evaluate the adsorption value above and below that of the catechol pKa. The adsorption capacity of carbons increases when the solution pH decreases. The retained amount increases slightly in the reduced carbon to maximum adsorption pH and diminishes in the oxidized carbon. Similar conclusions are obtained from the immersion enthalpies, whose values increase with the solute quantity retained. In granular activated carbon (CAG), the immersion enthalpies obtained are between 21.5 and 45.7 J·g?1 for catechol aqueous solutions in a range of 20 at 1500 mg·L?1. PMID:22312237

  20. A pharmaceutical product as corrosion inhibitor for carbon steel in acidic environments.

    PubMed

    Samide, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    A pharmaceutical product, Trimethoprim (TMP), IUPAC name: 5-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzyl)pyrimidine-2,4-diamine was investigated, as inhibitor to prevent carbon steel corrosion in acidic environments. The study was performed using weight loss and electrochemical measurements, in temperatures ranging between 25-55°C. The surface morphology before and after corrosion of carbon steel in 1.0 M HCl solution in the presence and absence of TMP was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The inhibition efficiency (IE) increased with the increasing of the inhibitor concentration, reaching a maximum value of 92% at 25°C and 0.9 mM TMP, and decreased with increasing temperature. The inhibition of carbon steel corrosion by TMP can be attributed to the adsorption ability of inhibitor molecules onto the reactive sites of the metal surface. The adsorption is spontaneous and it is best described by the Langmuir isotherm. The apparent activation energy (E(a)) for the corrosion process in the absence and presence of TMP was evaluated from Arrhenius equation, to elucidate its inhibitive properties. PMID:23043337

  1. GIAO-DFT Isotropic magnetic shielding constants and spin-spin coupling of tartaric acid in water solution

    E-print Network

    Fideles, Bruna; Colherinhas, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the nuclear isotropic shielding constants and spin-spin coupling for oxygen and carbons atoms of isomers of tartaric acid in gas phase and water solutions by Monte Carlo simulation and quantum mechanics calculations using the GIAO-B3LYP approach. Solute polarization effects are included iteratively and play an important role in the quantitative determination of shielding constants. Our MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ results show substantial increases of the dipole moment in solution as compared with the gas phase results (61-221%). The solvent effects on the {\\sigma}(13C) [J(C-C)] values are in general small. More appreciable solvent effects can be seen on the {\\sigma}(17O) and J(C-O).

  2. Delayed fracture of Ni-Ti superelastic alloys in acidic and neutral fluoride solutions.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Kaneko, Kazuyuki; Moriyama, Keiji; Asaoka, Kenzo; Sakai, Jun'ichi; Nagumo, Michihiko

    2004-04-01

    Hydrogen-related degradation of the mechanical properties of a Ni-Ti superelastic alloy has been examined by means of delayed fracture tests in acidic and neutral fluoride solutions and hydrogen thermal desorption analysis. Delayed fracture took place in both solutions; the time to fracture was shorter in the acidic solutions than in the neutral solutions with the same fluoride concentration. The time to fracture was reduced in both solutions when applied stress exceeded the critical stress for martensite transformation. In the acidic solutions, Ni-Ti superelastic alloy underwent general corrosion and absorbed substantial amounts of hydrogen. Fractographic features suggested that the delayed fracture in the acidic solutions was attributable to hydrogen embrittlement, whereas in the neutral solutions, a different fracture mode appeared associated with localized corrosion only in the vicinity of the fracture initiation area. In the neutral solutions, the amount of absorbed hydrogen was much less than that in the acidic solutions, and the delayed fracture was likely to be induced by active path corrosion accompanying hydrogen absorption. The results of the present study imply that the hydrogen-related degradation of performance of Ni-Ti superelastic alloys occurs in the presence of fluoride. PMID:14999757

  3. Temporal variations of organic carbon inputs into the upper Yukon River: Evidence from fatty acids and their

    E-print Network

    Guo, Laodong

    Temporal variations of organic carbon inputs into the upper Yukon River: Evidence from fatty acids, we tracked the changes in fatty acid con- centrations and their stable carbon isotopic compositions the beginning of snowmelt, while fatty acid contents (normalized to organic carbon in each pool) varied

  4. Removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same by adsorption on coal fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Scheitlin, Frank M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a process for the removal of radium from acidic aqueous solutions. In one aspect, the invention is a process for removing radium from an inorganic-acid solution. The process comprises contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple, comparatively inexpensive, and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities throughout the United States. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of .sup.226 Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings.

  5. Use of Pyrolyzed Iron Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid Modified Activated Carbon as Air-Cathode Catalyst in Microbial Fuel Cells

    E-print Network

    Use of Pyrolyzed Iron Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid Modified Activated Carbon as Air States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Activated carbon (AC) is a cost-effective catalyst. KEYWORDS: microbial fuel cell, oxygen reduction reaction, catalyst, activated carbon, iron

  6. Preparation and characterization of biomass carbon-based solid acid catalyst for the esterification of oleic acid with methanol.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tiantian; Li, Zhilong; Li, Wei; Shi, Congjiao; Wang, Yun

    2013-04-01

    A solid acid catalyst, prepared by sulfonating carbonized corn straw, was proved to be an efficient and environmental benign catalyst for the esterification of oleic acid and methanol. Various synthetic parameters, such as carbonization temperature and time were systematically examined. It was found that the catalyst exhibited the highest acid density of 2.64 mmol/g by NaOH titration. A quantitative yield (98%) of ester was achieved, using the most active sulfonated catalyst at 333 K with a 7 wt.% catalyst/oleic acid ratio for 4h, at a 7:1 M ratio of methanol/oleic acid, while the commercial available Amberlyst-15 only gave 85% yield under the same reaction condition. PMID:23453798

  7. Electrochemical Determination of Uric Acid at CdTe Quantum Dot Modified Glassy Carbon Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Deng; Rong, Shengzhong; Zhang, Guangteng; Zhang, Yannan; Zhou, Qiang; Liu, Fenghai; Li, Miaojing; Chang, Dong; Pan, Hongzhi

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry were used to investigate the electrochemical behavior of uric acid (UA) at a CdTe quantum dot (QD) modified the glassy carbon electrode (GCE). CdTe QDs, as new semiconductor nanocrystals, can greatly improve the peak current of UA. The anodic peak current of UA was linear with its concentration between 1.0×10(-6) and 4.0×10(-4) M in 0.1 M pH 5.0 phosphate buffer solution. The LOD for UA at the CdTe electrode (1.0×10(-7) M) was superior to that of the GCE. In addition, we also determined the effects of scan rate, pH, and interferences of UA for the voltammetric behavior and detection. The results indicated that modified electrode possessed excellent reproducibility and stability. Finally, a new and efficient electrochemical sensor for detecting UA was developed. PMID:26525244

  8. In-situ preparation and characterization of acid functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes with polyimide nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Dhakshnamoorthy, M; Ramakrishnan, S; Vikram, S; Kothurkar, Nikhil K; Rangarajan, Murali; Vasanthakumari, R

    2014-07-01

    Nanofiber composites (Polyimide/f-SWCNT) of Pyromellitic dianhydride, 4,4'-Oxydianiline, and 4,4'-(4,4'-isopropylidene diphenyl-1,1'-diyl dioxy) dianiline (PMDA-ODA/IDDA) and surface-functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (f-SWCNT) were made by electrospinning a solution of poly(amic acid) (PAA) containing 0-2 wt% f-SWCNT followed by thermal imidization. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra verified the oxidation of SWCNT surface after acid treatment, and indicated possible hydrogen bonding interactions between the f-SWCNTs and polyamic acid. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy images showed the average diameter of nanofibers to be below 150 nm, and transmission electron microscopy images showed that SWCNTs were aligned inside the polymer nanofiber. In thermogravimetric analysis, all composites showed increased thermal stability with increasing f-SWCNT content compared to neat PI. Storage modulus also increased from 124 MPa to 229 MPa from neat PI to 2% f-SWCNT composite. PMID:24757974

  9. Reductive dehalogenation of hexachloroethane, carbon tetrachloride, and bromoform by anthrahydroquinone disulfonate and humic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curtis, G.P.; Reinhard, M.

    1994-01-01

    The reductive dehalogenation of hexachloroethane (C2Cl6), carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), and bromoform (CHBr3) was examined at 50??C in aqueous solutions containing either (1) 500 ??M of 2,6-anthrahydroquinone disulfonate (AHQDS), (2) 250 ??M Fe2+, or (3) 250 ??M HS-. The pH ranged from 4.5 to 11.5 for AHQDS solutions and was 7.2 in the Fe2+ solutions and 7.8 in the HS- solutions. The observed disappearance of C2Cl6 in the presence of AHQDS was pseudo-first-order and fit k??ccl4 = k0[A(OH)2] + k1[A(OH)O-] + k2[A(O)22-] where A(OH)2, A(OH)O-, and A(O)22- represent the concentrations of the three forms of the AHQDS in solution. The values of k0, k1, and k2 were ???0,0.031, and 0.24 M-1 s-1, respectively. The addition of 25 mg of C/L of humic acid or organic matter extracted from Borden aquifer solids to aqueous solutions containing 250 ??M HS- or Fe2+ increased the reduction rate by factors of up to 10. The logarithms of the rate constants for the disappearance of C2Cl6 and CCl4 in seven different experimental systems were significantly correlated; log k???ccl4 = 0-64 log k??? c2cl6 - 0.83 with r2 = 0.80. The observed trend in reaction rates of C2Cl6 > CCl4 > CHBr3 is consistent with a decreasing trend in one-electron reduction potentials. ?? 1994 American Chemical Society.

  10. Chemical evaluation of soil-solution in acid forest soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; David, M.B.

    1996-01-01

    Soil-solution chemistry is commonly studied in forests through the use of soil lysimeters.This approach is impractical for regional survey studies, however, because lysimeter installation and operation is expensive and time consuming. To address these problems, a new technique was developed to compare soil-solution chemistry among red spruce stands in New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine. Soil solutions were expelled by positive air pressure from soil that had been placed in a sealed cylinder. Before the air pressure was applied, a solution chemically similar to throughfall was added to the soil to bring it to approximate field capacity. After the solution sample was expelled, the soil was removed from the cylinder and chemically analyzed. The method was tested with homogenized Oa and Bs horizon soils collected from a red spruce stand in the Adirondack Mountains of New York, a red spruce stand in east-central Vermont, and a mixed hardwood stand in the Catskill Mountains of New York. Reproducibility, effects of varying the reaction time between adding throughfall and expelling soil solution (5-65 minutes) and effects of varying the chemical composition of added throughfall, were evaluated. In general, results showed that (i) the method was reproducible (coefficients of variation were generally < 15%), (ii) variations in the length of reaction-time did not affect expelled solution concentrations, and (iii) adding and expelling solution did not cause detectable changes in soil exchange chemistry. Concentrations of expelled solutions varied with the concentrations of added throughfall; the lower the CEC, the more sensitive expelled solution concentrations were to the chemical concentrations of added throughfall. Addition of a tracer (NaBr) showed that the expelled solution was a mixture of added solution and solution that preexisted in the soil. Comparisons of expelled solution concentrations with concentrations of soil solutions collected by zero-tension and tension lysimetry indicated that expelled solution concentrations were higher than those obtained with either type of lysimeter, although there was less difference with tension lysimeters than zero-tension lysimeters. The method used for collection of soil solution should be taken into consideration whenever soil solution data are being interpreted.

  11. Reprocessing system with nuclide separation based on chromatography in hydrochloric acid solution

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Tatsuya; Tachibana, Yu; Koyama, Shi-ichi

    2013-07-01

    We have proposed the reprocessing system with nuclide separation processes based on the chromatographic technique in the hydrochloric acid solution system. Our proposed system consists of the dissolution process, the reprocessing process, the minor actinide separation process, and nuclide separation processes. In the reprocessing and separation processes, the pyridine resin is used as a main separation media. It was confirmed that the dissolution in the hydrochloric acid solution is easily achieved by the plasma voloxidation and by the addition of oxygen peroxide into the hydrochloric acid solution.

  12. On the black carbon problem and its solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, M. Z.

    2010-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) warms air temperatures in at least seven major ways: (a) directly absorbing downward solar radiation, (b) absorbing upward reflected solar radiation when it is situated above bright surfaces, such as snow, sea ice, and clouds, (c) absorbing some infrared radiation, (d) absorbing additional solar and infrared radiation upon obtaining a coating, (e) absorbing radiation multiply reflected within clouds when situated interstitially between cloud drops, (f) absorbing additional radiation when serving as CCN or scavenged inclusions within cloud drops, and (g) absorbing solar radiation when deposited on snow and sea ice, reducing the albedos of both. Modeling of the climate effects of BC requires treatment of all these processes in detail. In particular, treatment of BC absorption interstitially between cloud drops and from multiply-dispersed cloud drop BC inclusions must be treated simultaneously with treatment of cloud indirect effects to determine the net effects of BC on cloud properties. Here, results from several simulations of the effects of BC from fossil fuel and biofuel sources on global and regional climate and air pollution health are summarized. The simulations account for all the processes mentioned. Results are found to be statistically significant relative to chaotic variability in the climate system. Over time and in steady state, fossil-fuel soot plus biofuel soot are found to enhance warming more than methane. The sum of the soots causes less steady-state warming but more short term warming than does carbon dioxide. Thus eliminating soot emissions from both sources may be the fastest method of reducing rapid climate warming and possibly the only method of saving the Arctic ice. Eliminating such emissions may also reduce over 1.5 million deaths worldwide, particularly in developing countries. Short term mitigation options include the targeting of fossil-fuel and biofuel BC sources with particle traps, new stove technologies, and rural electrification. However, the real solution, to be implemented over a 20-40 year period is complete conversion of the combustion infrastructure to electricity and electrolytic hydrogen, where the electricity is all produced by near-zero emitting wind, water, and solar (WWS) based energy technologies. Such a conversion would reduce BC and greenhouse gases simultaneously with cooling aerosol particles. This would ramp down the presence of both warming and cooling agents, but still cause net reduction of global warming, while reducing devastating health impacts that are occurring from both warming and cooling aerosols.

  13. Effect of activated carbon surface oxygen- and/or nitrogen-containing groups on adsorption of copper(II) ions from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Biniak, S.; Pakula, M.; Szymanski, G.S.; Swiatkowski, A.

    1999-08-31

    The adsorption properties of a modified activated carbon with various oxygen-and/or nitrogen-containing surface groups toward copper ions was studied. Previously de-ashed and chemically modified commercial activated carbon D-43/1 (carbo-Tech, Essen, Germany) was used. The chemical properties of the modified carbon surface were estimated by standard neutralization titration with HCl, NaOH, and HaOC{sub 2}{sub 5}. The adsorption of Cu{sup 2+} ions on three modified activated carbons from aqueous CuSO{sub 4} solution of various pH was measured. The carbon samples with adsorbed Cu{sup 2+} ions were analyzed by spectroscopic methods (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy). In addition, an electrochemical measurement (cyclic voltammetry) was performed using powdered activated carbon electrodes. While the modification procedures employed alter the surface only slightly, they strongly influence the surface chemical structure. Basic groups are predominant in the heat-treated samples; acidic functional groups are predominant in the oxidized sample. Both the copper cation adsorption studies and the spectral and electrochemical measurements show that adsorbed ions interact with the carbon surface in different ways. The number of adsorbed ions depends on the nature and quantity of surface acid-base functionalities and on the pH equilibrium in the aqueous solution. The possible mechanisms of interactions between metal ions and carbon surface functionalities are summarized and discussed.

  14. The Formation and Stability of Carbonic Acid on Outer Solar System Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peeters, Z.; Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.; Lewis, Ariel

    2009-01-01

    The radiation chemistry, thermal stability, and vapor pressure of solid-phase carbonic acid (H2CO3) have been studied with mid-infrared spectroscopy. A new procedure for measuring this molecule's radiation stability has been used to obtain intrinsic IR band strengths and half-lives for radiolytic destruction. Results are compared to literature values. We report, for the first time, measurements of carbonic acid's vapor pressure and its heat of sublimation. We also report the first observation of a chemical reaction involving solid-phase carbonic acid. Possible applications of these findings are discussed, with an emphasis on the outer Solar System.

  15. Fabrication and processing of high-strength densely packed carbon nanotube yarns without solution processes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Zhu, Feng; Liu, Liang; Sun, Yinghui; Fan, Shoushan; Jiang, Kaili

    2012-06-01

    Defects of carbon nanotubes, weak tube-tube interactions, and weak carbon nanotube joints are bottlenecks for obtaining high-strength carbon nanotube yarns. Some solution processes are usually required to overcome these drawbacks. Here we fabricate ultra-long and densely packed pure carbon nanotube yarns by a two-rotator twisting setup with the aid of some tensioning rods. The densely packed structure enhances the tube-tube interactions, thus making high tensile strengths of carbon nanotube yarns up to 1.6 GPa. We further use a sweeping laser to thermally treat as-produced yarns for recovering defects of carbon nanotubes and possibly welding carbon nanotube joints, which improves their Young's modulus by up to ?70%. The spinning and laser sweeping processes are solution-free and capable of being assembled together to produce high-strength yarns continuously as desired. PMID:22538869

  16. THE SOLAR NEBULA ON FIRE: A SOLUTION TO THE CARBON DEFICIT IN THE INNER SOLAR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jeong-Eun; Bergin, Edwin A.; Nomura, Hideko E-mail: ebergin@umich.edu

    2010-02-10

    Despite a surface dominated by carbon-based life, the bulk composition of the Earth is dramatically carbon poor when compared to the material available at formation. Bulk carbon deficiency extends into the asteroid belt representing a fossil record of the conditions under which planets are born. The initial steps of planet formation involve the growth of primitive sub-micron silicate and carbon grains in the Solar Nebula. We present a solution wherein primordial carbon grains are preferentially destroyed by oxygen atoms ignited by heating due to stellar accretion at radii <5 AU. This solution can account for the bulk carbon deficiency in the Earth and meteorites, the compositional gradient within the asteroid belt, and for growing evidence for similar carbon deficiency in rocks surrounding other stars.

  17. Hydrothermal Carbonization: a feasible solution to convert biomass to soil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesch, Walter; Tesch, Petra; Pfeifer, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    The erosion of fertile soil is a severe problem arising right after peak oil (Myers 1996). That this issue is not only a problem of arid countries is shown by the fact that even the European Commission defined certain milestones to address the problem of soil erosion in Europe (European Commission 2011). The application of bio-char produced by torrefaction or pyrolysis for the remediation, revegetation and restoration of depleted soils started to gain momentum recently (Rillig 2010, Lehmann 2011, Beesley 2011). Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a promising thermo-chemical process that can be applied to convert organic feedstock into fertile soil and water, two resources which are of high value in regions being vulnerable to erosion. The great advantage of HTC is that organic feedstock (e.g. organic waste) can be used without any special pretreatment (e.g. drying) and so far no restrictions have been found regarding the composition of the organic matter. By applying HTC the organic material is processed along a defined pathway in the Van Krevelen plot (Behrendt 2006). By stopping the process at an early stage a nutritious rich material can be obtained, which is known to be similar to terra preta. Considering that HTC-coal is rich in functional groups and can be derived from the process under "wet" conditions, it can be expected that it shall allow soil bacteria to settle more easily compared to the bio-char derived by torrefaction or pyrolysis. In addition, up to 10 tons process water per ton organic waste can be gained (Vorlop 2009). Thus, as organic waste, loss of fertile soil and water scarcity becomes a serious issue within the European Union, hydrothermal carbonization can provide a feasible solution to address these issues of our near future. The presentation reviews the different types of feedstock investigated for the HTC-Process so far and gives an overview on the current stage of development of this technology. References Beesley L., Moreno-Jiménez E., Gomez-Eyles J.L., Harris H., Robinson B., Sizmur T.: A review of biochars' potential role in the remediation, revegetation and restoration of contaminated soils. Environmental Pollution (159), p. 3269 - 3282, 2011. Behrendt F.: Direktverflüssigung von Biomasse - Reaktionsmechanismen und Produktverteilungen Institut für Energietechnik, Technische Universität Berlin Studie im Auftrag der Bundesanstalt für Landwirtschaft und Ernährung; Projektnummer 114-50-10-0337/05-B, 2006. European Commission: "Roadmap to a Resource Efficient Europe", COM(2011) 571. Lehmann J., Rillig M.C., Thies J., Masiello C.A., Hockaday W.C., Crowley D.: Biochar effects on soil biota - A review, Soil Biology & Biochemistry, p. 1-25, 2011. Myers Norman: "Environmental services of biodiversity", Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA Vol 93, pp. 2764 - 2769, 1996. Rillig M.C., Wagner M., Salem M., Antunes P.M., George C., Ramke H.G., Titirici M.M., Antonietti M.: Material derived from hydrothermal carbonization: effects on plant growth and arbuscular mycorrhiza. Applied Soil Ecology (45), p. 238 - 242, 2010. Vorlop K.D., Schuchardt F., Prüße U.: Hydrothermale Carbonisierung Analyse und Ausblicke. FNR-Fachgespräch, Berlin, 2009.

  18. Separation of ions in acidic solution by capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, M.

    1997-10-08

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is an effective method for separating ionic species according to differences in their electrophoretic mobilities. CE separations of amino acids by direct detection are difficult due to their similar electrophoretic mobilities and low absorbances. However, native amino acids can be separated by CE as cations at a low pH by adding an alkanesulfonic acid to the electrolyte carrier which imparts selectivity to the system. Derivatization is unnecessary when direct UV detection is used at 185 nm. Simultaneous speciation of metal cations such as vanadium (IV) and vanadium (V) can easily be performed without complexation prior to analysis. An indirect UV detection scheme for acidic conditions was also developed using guanidine as the background carrier electrolyte (BCE) for the indirect detection of metal cations. Three chapters have been removed for separate processing. This report contains introductory material, references, and general conclusions. 80 refs.

  19. Effect of solution conductivity and electrode shape on the deposition of carbon nanotubes from solution using dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Naieni, A Kashefian; Nojeh, A

    2012-12-14

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is a popular technique for fabricating carbon nanotube (CNT) devices. The electric current passing through the solution during DEP creates a temperature gradient, which results in electrothermal fluid flow because of the presence of the electric field. CNT solutions prepared with various methods can have different conductivities and the motion of the solution because of the electrothermal phenomenon can affect the DEP deposition differently in each case. We investigated the effect of this movement in solutions with various levels of conductivity through experiments as well as numerical modeling. Our results show that electrothermal motion in the solution can alter the deposition pattern of the nanotubes drastically for high conductivity solutions, while DEP remains the dominant force when a low conductivity (surfactant-free) solution is used. The extent of effectiveness of each force is discussed in the various cases and the fluid movement model is investigated using two- and three-dimensional finite element simulations. PMID:23165429

  20. Changes in the Morphology and Proliferation of Astrocytes Induced by Two Modalities of Chemically Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes are Differentially Mediated by Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) levels accompany the changes in the morphology and proliferation of astrocytes induced by colloidal solutes and films of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). To determine if GFAP is required for the effects of CNTs on astrocytes, we used astrocytes isolated from GFAP null mice. We find that selected astrocytic changes induced by CNTs are mediated by GFAP, i.e., perimeter, shape, and cell death for solutes, and proliferation for films. PMID:24875845

  1. Composites of manganese oxide with carbon materials as catalysts for the ozonation of oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Orge, C A; Órfão, J J M; Pereira, M F R

    2012-04-30

    Manganese oxide and manganese oxide-carbon composites were prepared and tested as catalysts for the removal of oxalic acid by ozonation. Their performances were compared with the parent carbon material (activated carbon or carbon xerogel) used to prepare the composites. Oxalic acid degradation by carbon materials is slower than that attained with manganese oxide or manganese oxide-carbon composites. A complete degradation after 90 and 45 min of reaction was obtained for carbon materials and for the catalysts containing manganese, respectively. The ozonation in the presence of the prepared composites are supposed to occur mainly by surface reactions, following a direct oxidation mechanism by molecular ozone and/or surface oxygenated radicals. PMID:22341747

  2. Vapor-liquid equilibria for nitric acid-water and plutonium nitrate-nitric acid-water solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Maimoni, A.

    1980-01-01

    The liquid-vapor equilibrium data for nitric acid and nitric acid-plutnonium nitrate-water solutions were examined to develop correlations covering the range of conditions encountered in nuclear fuel reprocessing. The scanty available data for plutonium nitrate solutions are of poor quality but allow an order of magnitude estimate to be made. A formal thermodynamic analysis was attempted initially but was not successful due to the poor quality of the data as well as the complex chemical equilibria involved in the nitric acid and in the plutonium nitrate solutions. Thus, while there was no difficulty in correlating activity coefficients for nitric acid solutions over relatively narrow temperature ranges, attempts to extend the correlations over the range 25/sup 0/C to the boiling point were not successful. The available data were then analyzed using empirical correlations from which normal boiling points and relative volatilities can be obtained over the concentration ranges 0 to 700 g/l Pu, 0 to 13 M nitric acid. Activity coefficients are required, however, if estimates of individual component vapor pressures are needed. The required ternary activity coefficients can be approximated from the correlations.

  3. DETERMINATION OF HYDROCYANIC ACID AND FREE CYANIDE IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microgram-per-liter concentrations of HCN in aqueous solutions were determined directly by two methods: bubbling compressed air through a solution to displace a small quantity of HCN, which was collected in a glass bead concentration column, or allowing some HCN to diffuse from a...

  4. Sulfonated mesoporous silica-carbon composites and their use as solid acid catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle-Vigón, Patricia; Sevilla, Marta; Fuertes, Antonio B.

    2012-11-01

    The synthesis of highly functionalized porous silica-carbon composites made up of sulfonic groups attached to a carbon layer coating the pores of three types of mesostructured silica (i.e. SBA-15, KIT-6 and mesocellular silica) is presented. The synthesis procedure involves the following steps: (a) removal of the surfactant, (b) impregnation of the silica pores with a carbon precursor, (c) carbonization and (d) sulfonation. The resulting silica-carbon composites contain ˜30 wt % of carbonaceous matter with a high density of acidic groups attached to the deposited carbon (i.e.sbnd SO3H, sbnd COOH and sbnd OH). The structural characteristics of the parent silica are retained in the composite materials, which exhibit a high surface area, a large pore volume and a well-ordered porosity made up uniform mesopores. The high density of the sulfonic groups in combination with the mesoporous structure of the composites ensures that a large number of active sites are easily accessible to reactants. These sulfonated silica-carbon composites behave as eco-friendly, active, selective, water tolerant and recyclable solid acids. In this study we demonstrate the usefulness of these composites as solid acid catalysts for the esterification of maleic anhydride, succinic acid and oleic acid with ethanol. These composites exhibit a superior intrinsic catalytic activity to other commercial solid acids such as Amberlyst-15.

  5. Extensional flow of hyaluronic acid solutions in an optimized microfluidic cross-slot device

    E-print Network

    Haward, Simon J.

    We utilize a recently developed microfluidic device, the Optimized Shape Cross-slot Extensional Rheometer (OSCER), to study the elongational flow behavior and rheological properties of hyaluronic acid (HA) solutions ...

  6. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic...Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized,...

  7. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic...Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized,...

  8. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic...Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized,...

  9. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic...Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized,...

  10. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic...Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized,...

  11. A Functional Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Operates during Growth of Bordetella pertussis on Amino Acid Mixtures as Sole Carbon Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, Dominique; Speck, Denis

    2015-01-01

    It has been claimed that citrate synthase, aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase activities are non-functional in Bordetella pertussis and that this might explain why this bacterium’s growth is sometimes associated with accumulation of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and/or free fatty acids. However, the sequenced genome includes the entire citric acid pathway genes. Furthermore, these genes were expressed and the corresponding enzyme activities detected at high levels for the pathway when grown on a defined medium imitating the amino acid content of complex media often used for growth of this pathogenic microorganism. In addition, no significant PHB or fatty acids could be detected. Analysis of the carbon balance and stoichiometric flux analysis based on specific rates of amino acid consumption, and estimated biomass requirements coherent with the observed growth rate, clearly indicate that a fully functional tricarboxylic acid cycle operates in contrast to previous reports. PMID:26684737

  12. Thermodynamic and Ultrasonic Properties of Ascorbic Acid in Aqueous Protic Ionic Liquid Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vickramjeet; Sharma, Gyanendra; Gardas, Ramesh L.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we report the thermodynamic and ultrasonic properties of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) in water and in presence of newly synthesized ammonium based protic ionic liquid (diethylethanolammonium propionate) as a function of concentration and temperature. Apparent molar volume and apparent molar isentropic compression, which characterize the solvation state of ascorbic acid (AA) in presence of protic ionic liquid (PIL) has been determined from precise density and speed of sound measurements at temperatures (293.15 to 328.15) K with 5 K interval. The strength of molecular interactions prevailing in ternary solutions has been discussed on the basis of infinite dilution partial molar volume and partial molar isentropic compression, corresponding volume of transfer and interaction coefficients. Result has been discussed in terms of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions occurring between ascorbic acid and PIL in ternary solutions (AA + water + PIL). PMID:26009887

  13. Thermodynamic and ultrasonic properties of ascorbic Acid in aqueous protic ionic liquid solutions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vickramjeet; Sharma, Gyanendra; Gardas, Ramesh L

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we report the thermodynamic and ultrasonic properties of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) in water and in presence of newly synthesized ammonium based protic ionic liquid (diethylethanolammonium propionate) as a function of concentration and temperature. Apparent molar volume and apparent molar isentropic compression, which characterize the solvation state of ascorbic acid (AA) in presence of protic ionic liquid (PIL) has been determined from precise density and speed of sound measurements at temperatures (293.15 to 328.15) K with 5 K interval. The strength of molecular interactions prevailing in ternary solutions has been discussed on the basis of infinite dilution partial molar volume and partial molar isentropic compression, corresponding volume of transfer and interaction coefficients. Result has been discussed in terms of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions occurring between ascorbic acid and PIL in ternary solutions (AA + water + PIL). PMID:26009887

  14. Branched chain amino acid-enriched solutions in the septic patient. A randomized, prospective trial.

    PubMed Central

    Bower, R H; Muggia-Sullam, M; Vallgren, S; Hurst, J M; Kern, K A; LaFrance, R; Fischer, J E

    1986-01-01

    A prospective, randomized trial was undertaken to compare the nutritional efficacy in surgical stress of a standard amino acid solution and two branched chain-enriched amino acid solutions: one enriched primarily with valine, the other with leucine. The study comprised 37 patients in the surgical intensive care unit who received isocaloric, isonitrogenous parenteral nutrition started within 24 hours of the onset of major operation, injury, or sepsis. Nitrogen retention was marginally but statistically significantly better on days 5, 7, and 10 in both groups of patients receiving the branched chain-enriched solutions, but differences in cumulative nitrogen balance were not statistically significant. Amino acid composition appeared to be important in that the group receiving the leucine-enriched solution appeared to maintain hepatic protein synthesis better (as manifest by higher short-turnover plasma protein concentrations) and required less exogenous insulin to maintain euglycemia. Improved outcome was not seen in the groups receiving the branched chain-enriched solutions. PMID:3079994

  15. Antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects of phosphoric acid solution compared to other root canal irrigants

    PubMed Central

    PRADO, Maíra; da SILVA, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal; DUQUE, Thais Mageste; ZAIA, Alexandre Augusto; FERRAZ, Caio Cezar Randi; de ALMEIDA, José Flávio Affonso; GOMES, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoric acid has been suggested as an irrigant due to its effectiveness in removing the smear layer. Objectives : The purpose of this study was to compare the antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects of a 37% phosphoric acid solution to other irrigants commonly used in endodontics. Material and Methods : The substances 37% phosphoric acid, 17% EDTA, 10% citric acid, 2% chlorhexidine (solution and gel), and 5.25% NaOCl were evaluated. The antimicrobial activity was tested against Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Actinomyces meyeri, Parvimonas micra, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella nigrescens according to the agar diffusion method. The cytotoxicity of the irrigants was determined by using the MTT assay. Results : Phosphoric acid presented higher antimicrobial activity compared to the other tested irrigants. With regard to the cell viability, this solution showed results similar to those with 5.25% NaOCl and 2% chlorhexidine (gel and solution), whereas 17% EDTA and 10% citric acid showed higher cell viability compared to other irrigants. Conclusion : Phosphoric acid demonstrated higher antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity similar to that of 5.25% NaOCl and 2% chlorhexidine (gel and solution). PMID:26018307

  16. Molten Carbonate and Phosphoric Acid Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview and Gap Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Remick, R.; Wheeler, D.

    2010-09-01

    This report describes the technical and cost gap analysis performed to identify pathways for reducing the costs of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) and phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) stationary fuel cell power plants.

  17. Integrated Method to Evaluate Acid Stimulation of Horizontal Wells in Carbonate Reservoir through Treatment Pressure Analysis 

    E-print Network

    Ueda, Kenji

    2015-07-28

    Unlocking a tight carbonate formation for oil and gas production by multi-stage acid stimulation is a relatively cost-effective method as an alternative to propped fracturing for production enhancement. Depending on whether treatment pressure...

  18. Characterization of carbon nanotube thin films formed using electronic-grade carbon nanotube aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xuliang; Janzen, Daniel C.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are of great interests for a wide range of applications because of their unique structural, mechanical, electrical, optical, thermal, and chemical properties. Particularly, CNT thin films can be used as mechanically flexible, electrically conductive, and broadband optically transparent electrodes in various optoelectronic devices. However, one crucial obstacle to implementing CNT-based applications has been the unavailability of pure CNTs suitable for direct industrial use. The as-produced CNTs are very fluffy soot, and thus extremely difficult to be handled in the device fabrication process. Although CNTs can be grown directly on a substrate from the catalyst deposited on the substrate surface, the growing temperature is very high, typically > 900°C, which represents a big challenge to device fabrication and integration. Another issue is that the catalyst on the substrate surface must be removed without affecting the grown CNTs. In the raw CNT soot, there is always a considerable amount of impurities, including metallic particles from the catalyst and carbonaceous impurities from the chemical reaction by-products. Such impurities can greatly degrade the properties of CNT thin films. The production of electronic-grade CNT aqueous solutions, which contain only individually suspended pure CNTs without any kind of surfactant, is a critical milestone for implementing CNT-based applications. By using such solutions, pure CNT thin films of various densities can be formed through common solution-casting processes, such as spin coating, spray coating, micro-dispensing, and ink-jet printing. The properties of these pure CNT thin films will be discussed in this paper.

  19. VETERINARY ENTOMOLOGY Water Solutions of Boric Acid and Sugar for Management of German

    E-print Network

    VETERINARY ENTOMOLOGY Water Solutions of Boric Acid and Sugar for Management of German Cockroach cockroaches in a commercial swine nursery. Bait, consisting of 1 or 2% boric acid and 0.5 M sucrose in cockroach populations. When baits were withdrawn in the summer, the cockroach population increased sig- ni

  20. Liquid chromatographic assay of diatrizoic acid and its diiodo degradation products in radio-opaque solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Farag, S.A.

    1995-03-01

    A liquid chromatographic method is described for the analysis of diatrizoic acid (2,4,6-triiodo-3,5-diacetamidobenzoic acid) and its 2,4- and 2,6-diiodo degradation products in radio-opaque injection solutions. The method is accurate, precise, and linear at a concentration range of 5-50 ppm. 12 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Titanium Implant Osseointegration Problems with Alternate Solutions Using Epoxy/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the article is to present recent developments in material research with bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite that have produced highly influential results toward improving upon current titanium bone implant clinical osseointegration success. Titanium is now the standard intra-oral tooth root/bone implant material with biocompatible interface relationships that confer potential osseointegration. Titanium produces a TiO2 oxide surface layer reactively that can provide chemical bonding through various electron interactions as a possible explanation for biocompatibility. Nevertheless, titanium alloy implants produce corrosion particles and fail by mechanisms generally related to surface interaction on bone to promote an inflammation with fibrous aseptic loosening or infection that can require implant removal. Further, lowered oxygen concentrations from poor vasculature at a foreign metal surface interface promote a build-up of host-cell-related electrons as free radicals and proton acid that can encourage infection and inflammation to greatly influence implant failure. To provide improved osseointegration many different coating processes and alternate polymer matrix composite (PMC) solutions have been considered that supply new designing potential to possibly overcome problems with titanium bone implants. Now for important consideration, PMCs have decisive biofunctional fabrication possibilities while maintaining mechanical properties from addition of high-strengthening varied fiber-reinforcement and complex fillers/additives to include hydroxyapatite or antimicrobial incorporation through thermoset polymers that cure at low temperatures. Topics/issues reviewed in this manuscript include titanium corrosion, implant infection, coatings and the new epoxy/carbon-fiber implant results discussing osseointegration with biocompatibility related to nonpolar molecular attractions with secondary bonding, carbon fiber in vivo properties, electrical semiconductors, stress transfer, additives with low thermal PMC processing and new coating possibilities. PMID:25635227

  2. Preparation of a novel carbon-based solid acid from cassava stillage residue and its use for the esterification of free fatty acids in waste cooking oil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingtao; Dong, Xiuqin; Jiang, Haoxi; Li, Guiming; Zhang, Minhua

    2014-04-01

    A novel carbon-based solid acid catalyst was prepared by the sulfonation of incompletely carbonized cassava stillage residue (CSR) with concentrated sulfuric acid, and employed to catalyze the esterification of methanol and free fatty acids (FFAs) in waste cooking oil (WCO). The effects of the carbonization and the sulfonation temperatures on the pore structure, acid density and catalytic activity of the CSR-derived catalysts were systematically investigated. Low temperature carbonization and high temperature sulfonation can cause the collapse of the carbon framework, while high temperature carbonization is not conducive to the attachment of SO3H groups on the surface. The catalyst showed high catalytic activity for esterification, and the acid value for WCO is reduced to below 2mg KOH/g after reaction. The activity of catalyst can be well maintained after five cycles. CSR can be considered a promising raw material for the production of a new eco-friendly solid acid catalyst. PMID:24661813

  3. Metallocene/carbon hybrids prepared by a solution process for supercapacitor applications

    E-print Network

    Mao, Xianwen

    Efficient and scalable solution-based processes are not generally available to integrate well-studied pseudocapacitive materials (i.e., metal oxides and conducting polymers) with other components such as porous carbon, ...

  4. Effects of acidic deposition on the erosion of carbonate stone - experimental results from the U.S. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baedecker, P.A.; Reddy, M.M.; Reimann, K.J.; Sciammarella, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    One of the goals of NAPAP-sponsored research on the effects of acidic deposition on carbonate stone has been to quantify the incremental effects of wet and dry deposition of hydrogen ion, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides on stone erosion. Test briquettes and slabs of freshly quarried Indiana limestone and Vermont marble have been exposed to ambient environmental conditions in a long-term exposure program. Physical measurements of the recession of test stones exposed to ambient conditions at an angle of 30?? to horizontal at the five NAPAP materials exposure sites range from ~15 to ~30?? ??m yr-1 for marble, and from ~25 to ~45 ??m yr -1 for limestone, and are approximately double the recession estimates based on the observed calcium content of run-off solutions from test slabs. The difference between the physical and chemical recession measurements is attributed to the loss of mineral grains from the stone surfaces that are not measured in the run-off experiments. The erosion due to grain loss does not appear to be influenced by rainfall acidity, however, preliminary evidence suggests that grain loss may be influenced by dry deposition of sulfur dioxide between rainfall events. Chemical analyses of the run-off solutions and associated rainfall blanks suggest that ~30% of erosion by dissolution can be attributed to the wet deposition of hydrogen ion and the dry deposition of sulfur dioxide and nitric acid between rain events. The remaining ~70% of erosion by dissolution is accounted for by the solubility of carbonate stone in rain that is in equilibrium with atmospheric carbon dioxide ('clean rain'). These results are for marble and limestone slabs exposed at an angle of 30?? from horizontal. The relative contribution of sulfur dioxide to chemical erosion is significantly enhanced for stone slabs having an inclination of 60?? or 85??. The dry deposition of alkaline particulate material has a mitigating effect at the two urban field exposure sites at Washington, DC, and Steubenville, OH.

  5. DYNAMIC CONDUCTIVITY MEASUREMENTS IN HUMIC AND FULVIC ACID SOLUTIONS. (R828158)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conductivity changes of dilute aqueous humic and fulvic acids solutions were monitored after the addition of small quantities of Cu, Cd, Pb, and Zn. The solutions were stirred at a constant and reproducible rate, and measurements proceeded until stable conductivities were atta...

  6. USE OF THE COMPOSITION AND STABLE CARBONIISOTOPE RATIO OF MICROBIAL FATTY ACIDS TO STUDY CARBON CYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotopic ratio (*13C) of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in soils and sediments as indicators of live microbial biomass levels and microbial carbon source. For studies of soil organic matter (SOM) cy...

  7. TRANSPORTATION AND LAND USE SOLUTIONS FOR LOW-CARBON CITIES Kara Kockelman

    E-print Network

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    tolls, access, economic opportunity, and quality of life. In general, land development decisions impact1 TRANSPORTATION AND LAND USE SOLUTIONS FOR LOW-CARBON CITIES Kara Kockelman Professor and William at the NSF`s U.S.-China Workshop on Pathways to Low Carbon Cities Hong Kong Polytechnic University, December

  8. Integrated 3D Acid Fracturing Model for Carbonate Reservoir Stimulation 

    E-print Network

    Wu, Xi

    2014-06-23

    . In order to study the effect of this stochastic nature on acid fracturing, a fully 3D acid reaction model was developed based on the geostatistical parameters of the formation. It is possible to describe local conductivity distribution related to acid...

  9. Regeneration of Acid Orange 7 Exhausted Granular Activated Carbon Using Pulsed Discharge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huijuan; Guo, He; Liu, Yongjie; Yi, Chengwu

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a pulsed discharge plasma (PDP) system with a multi-needle-to-plate electrodes geometry was set up to investigate the regeneration of acid orange 7 (AO7) exhausted granular activated carbon (GAC). Regeneration of GAC was studied under different conditions of peak pulse discharge voltage and water pH, as well as the modification effect of GAC by the pulse discharge process, to figure out the regeneration efficiency and the change of the GAC structure by the PDP treatment. The obtained results showed that there was an appropriate peak pulse voltage and an optimal initial pH value of the solution for GAC regeneration. Analyses of scanning electron microscope (SEM), Boehm titration, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), Horvath-Kawazoe (HK), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) showed that there were more mesopore and macropore in the regenerated GAC and the structure turned smoother with the increase of discharge voltage; the amount of acidic functional groups on the GAC surface increased while the amount of basic functional groups decreased after the regeneration process. From the result of the XRD analysis, there were no new substances produced on the GAC after PDP treatment. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 21207052), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (No. 20110491353) and Jiangsu Planned Projects for Postdoctoral Research Funds, China (No. 1102116C)

  10. Application of Lactobacillus immobilized by Activated Carbon Fiber in Fermentation of Lactic Acid in Starch Wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Wang, Peng; Chi, Guoda; Huang, Chenyong

    2010-11-01

    Activated carbon fibers (ACF) as the carrier of Lactobacillus was introduced into fermenting system, and a method of modifying the surface of ACF by HNO3-Fe (III) was established. Factors that affect ACF carrier's effect on immobilization of Lactobacillus were studied. HCl, H2SO4, HNO3 and FeCl3 solutions were respectively used to modify the surface properties of ACF. The amount of Fe (III) carried on ACF surface was 0.1563 mol/kg after ACF surface was modified by HNO3 for 5 h and then by 0.1 mol/L FeCl3 for 4 h, when the thickness of Lactobacillus on a single silk of carrier reached 40 ?m. When ACF modified by HNO3-Fe (III) was applied in the fermentation of lactic acid in starch industry wastewater, the fermentation period reduced by 8 h and the output of L-lactic acid was 65.5 g/L, which was 3.3% more than that fermented without the carrier.

  11. Effect of L (+) ascorbic acid and monosodium glutamate concentration on the morphology of calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraya, Mohamed El-shahte Ismaiel

    2015-11-01

    In this study, monosodium glutamate and ascorbic acid were used as crystal and growth modifiers to control the crystallization of CaCO3. Calcium carbonate prepared by reacting a mixed solution of Na2CO3 with CaCl2 at ambient temperature, (25 °C), constant Ca++CO3-- molar ratio and pH with stirring. The polymorph and morphology of the crystals were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicate that rhombohedral calcite was only formed in water without organic additives, and both calcite and spherical vaterite with various morphologies were produced in the presence of monosodium glutamate. The content of vaterite increased as the monosodium glutamate increased. In addition, spherical vaterite was obtained in the presence of different concentrations of ascorbic acid. The spherical vaterite posses an aggregate shape composed of nano-particles, ranging from 30 to 50 nm as demonstrated by the SEM and TEM analyses. Therefore, the ascorbic stabilizes vaterite and result in nano-particles compared to monosodium glutamate.

  12. Metabolic engineering of yeast to produce fatty acid-derived biofuels: bottlenecks and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Jiayuan; Feng, Xueyang

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid-derived biofuels can be a better solution than bioethanol to replace petroleum fuel, since they have similar energy content and combustion properties as current transportation fuels. The environmentally friendly microbial fermentation process has been used to synthesize advanced biofuels from renewable feedstock. Due to their robustness as well as the high tolerance to fermentation inhibitors and phage contamination, yeast strains such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Yarrowia lipolytica have attracted tremendous attention in recent studies regarding the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, including fatty acids, fatty acid ethyl esters, fatty alcohols, and fatty alkanes. However, the native yeast strains cannot produce fatty acids and fatty acid-derived biofuels in large quantities. To this end, we have summarized recent publications in this review on metabolic engineering of yeast strains to improve the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, identified the bottlenecks that limit the productivity of biofuels, and categorized the appropriate approaches to overcome these obstacles. PMID:26106371

  13. Tackling carbon leakage Sector-specific solutions for a world

    E-print Network

    Jones, Peter JS

    the competitiveness of UK and EU businesses, especially heavy industries facing a carbon price under the EU ETS. Our of the Copenhagen conference, it is clearer than ever that forging ahead with climate change policy

  14. Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22 in Oxalic Acid and Sodium Chloride Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Day, S D; Whalen, M T; King, K J; Hust, G A; Wong, L L; Estill, J C; Rebak, R B

    2003-06-24

    Nickel based Alloy 22 (NO6022) is extensively used in aggressive industrial applications, especially due to its resistance to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in high chloride environments. The purpose of this work was to characterize the anodic behavior of Alloy 22 in oxalic acid solution and to compare its behavior to sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions. Standard electrochemical tests such as polarization resistance and cyclic polarization were used. Results show that the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 in oxalic acid solutions increased rapidly as the temperature and the acid concentration increased. Extrapolation studies show that even at a concentration of 10{sup -4}M oxalic acid, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 would be higher in oxalic acid than in 1 M NaCl solution. Alloy 22 was not susceptible to localized corrosion in oxalic acid solutions. Cyclic polarization tests in 1 M NaCl showed that Alloy 22 was susceptible to crevice corrosion at 90 C but was not susceptible at 60 C.

  15. Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions by modification of Purex solvent

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.

    1984-05-21

    A process has been developed for the extraction of multivalent lanthanide and actinide values from acidic waste solutions, and for the separation of these values from fission product and other values, which utilizes a new series of neutral bi-functional extractants, the alkyl(phenyl)-N, N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides, in combination with a phase modifier to form an extraction solution. The addition of the extractant to the Purex process extractant, tri-n-butylphosphate in normal paraffin hydrocarbon diluent, will permit the extraction of multivalent lanthanide and actinide values from 0.1 to 12.0 molar acid solutions.

  16. Carbon Isotope Compositions of Fatty Acids in Mussels from Newfoundland Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Dena E.; Abrajano, Teofilo A.

    1994-09-01

    This paper examines the carbon isotopic compositions of free fatty acids of two species of mussels (i.e. Mytilus edulis and Modiolus modiolus) from two estuarine environments around Newfoundland. Gas chromatography and conventional isotope ratio mass spectrometry were employed to characterize bulk fatty acids and gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry was utilized to characterize the carbon isotope compositions of individual fatty acids. The bulk fatty acid distribution (dominance of 16:0, 20:5n3, 22:6n3 and 16:1) and carbon isotopic compositions (-27·3 to -25·8 per mil) indicate a dominant marine phytoplankton dietary source for the mussels. In contrast to the narrow range of bulk fatty acid ? 13C values, up to 7 per mil variation in ? 13C of individual fatty acids was observed. In general, saturated fatty acids are isotopically heavier than corresponding mono- and polyunsaturates, consistent with previously suggested kinetic isotope effect associated with de novo desaturation reactions. The depletion of 13 C in 18:4n3 compared with 22:6n3 and 20:5n3 indicates a distinct dietary source for 18:4n3. The present study shows the potential for detailed assessment of carbon flow in benthic ecosystems using fatty acids and other compound classes by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

  17. Electrochemical control of brightener in acid copper sulfate plating solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Bronson, M.J. . Kansas City Div.); Hawley, M.D. )

    1990-11-01

    Electrochemical methods have been evaluated that attempt the indirect measurement of the effective concentration of a brighter additive in acid copper sulfate plating baths. The procedures all employed electrodeposition of copper on a platinum working electrode under carefully controlled conditions of mass transport, time, temperature, and potential, followed by the measurement of the charge that was required to strip the copper deposit from the working electrode. The amount of charge that was required to strip the copper deposit at a given concentration of additive varied significantly from fresh to production baths and from lot to lot of the additive. The feasibility of using electrochemical methods to control brightener additive in acid copper sulfate plating baths is discussed. 3 figs., 11 refs.

  18. Labradorite dissolution in aqueous organic acid solutions: an experimental study 

    E-print Network

    Ahmed, MD. Raquib Uddin

    1995-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in sand-pack, flow-through reactors to study labradorite solubility and dissolution kinetics at 50' and IOO'C and 13.8 MPa. Labradorite grains were reacted with distilled deionized water, HCI solutions (pHi=3.5, 4.7), p...

  19. Time dependent inhibition of xanthine oxidase in irradiated solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, K.; Pilot, T.F.; Meany, J.E. )

    1990-01-01

    The xanthine oxidase catalyzed oxidation of hypoxanthine was followed by monitoring the formation of uric acid at 290 nm. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase occurs in aqueous solutions of folic acid methotrexate and aminopterin. These compounds are known to dissociate upon exposure to ultraviolet light resulting in the formation of their respective 6-formylpteridine derivatives. The relative rates of dissociation were monitored spectrophotometrically by determining the absorbance of their 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatives at 500 nm. When aqueous solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate were exposed to uv light, a direct correlation was observed between the concentrations of the 6-formylpteridine derivatives existing in solution and the ability of these solutions to inhibit xanthine oxidase. The relative potency of the respective photolysis products were estimated.

  20. Growth behavior of anodic porous alumina formed in malic acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2013-11-01

    The growth behavior of anodic porous alumina formed on aluminum by anodizing in malic acid solutions was investigated. High-purity aluminum plates were electropolished in CH3COOH/HClO4 solutions and then anodized in 0.5 M malic acid solutions at 293 K and constant cell voltages of 200-350 V. The anodic porous alumina grew on the aluminum substrate at voltages of 200-250 V, and a black, burned oxide film was formed at higher voltages. The nanopores of the anodic oxide were only formed at grain boundaries of the aluminum substrate during the initial stage of anodizing, and then the growth region extended to the entire aluminum surface as the anodizing time increased. The anodic porous alumina with several defects was formed by anodizing in malic acid solution at 250 V, and oxide cells were approximately 300-800 nm in diameter.

  1. A comparison of water solubility enhancements of organic solutes by aquatic humic materials and commercial humic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chlou, C.T.; Kile, D.E.; Brinton, T.I.; Malcolm, R.L.; Leenheer, J.A.; MacCarthy, P.

    1987-01-01

    Water solubility enhancements of 1,1-bis(p-chloro-phenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane (p,p???-DDT), 2,4,5,2???,5???-pentachlorobiphenyl (2,4,5,2???,5???-PCB), and 2,4,4???-tri-chlorobiphenyl (2,4,4???-PCB) by dissolved organic matter have been studied with the following samples: (1) acidic water samples from the Suwannee River, Georgia, and the Sopchoppy River, Florida; (2) a humic extract of a nearly neutral pH water from the Calcasieu River, Louisiana; (3) commercial humic acids from the Aldrich Chemical Co. and Fluka-Tridom Chemical Corp. The calculated partition coefficients on a dissolved organic carbon basis (Kdoc) for organic solutes with water samples and aquatic humic extracts from this and earlier studies indicate that the enhancement effect varies with the molecular composition of the aquatic humic materials. The Kdoc values with water and aquatic humic samples are, however, far less than the observed Kdoc values obtained with the two commercial samples, by factors of about 4-20. In view of this finding, one should be cautious in interpreting the effects of the dissolved organic matter on solubility enhancement of organic solutes on the basis of the use of commercial humic acids.

  2. Infrared optical constants of H{sub 2}O ice, amorphous nitric acid solutions, and nitric acid hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Toon, O.B.; Tolbert, M.A.; Koehler, B.G.

    1994-12-20

    The authors determined the infrared optical constants of nitric acid trihydrate, nitric acid dihydrate, nitric acid monohydrate, and solid amorphous nitric acid solutions which crystallize to form these hydrates. They have also found the infrared optical constants of H{sub 2}O ice. They measured the transmission of infrared light through thin films of varying thickness over the frequency range from about 7000 to 500 cm {sub {minus}1} at temperatures below 200 K. The authors developed a theory for the transmission of light through a substrate that has thin films on both sides. They used an iterative Kramers-Kronig technique to determine the optical constants which gave the best match between measured transmission spectra and those calculated for a variety of films of different thickness. These optical constants should be useful for calculations of the infrared spectrum of polar stratospheric clouds. 24 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  3. An analysis of electrical conductances of aqueous solutions of polybasic organic acids. Benzenehexacarboxylic (mellitic) acid and its neutral and acidic salts.

    PubMed

    Apelblat, Alexander; Bester-Rogac, Marija; Barthel, Josef; Neueder, Roland

    2006-05-01

    A general approach is proposed to analyze electrical conductivities in aqueous solutions of polybasic organic acids. Experimental conductivities are examined in the context of dissociation and hydrolysis reactions by applying the Quint-Viallard conductivity equations and the Debye-Hückel equations for activity coefficients. The proposed numerical procedure is illustrated by the case of benzenehexacarboxylic (mellitic) acid and its neutral and acidic salts. From conductivity measurements of mellitic acid and its salts, performed in dilute aqueous solutions in the 278.15-308.15 K temperature range, the limiting conductances of mellitic anions, lambda(0)(1/jH(6-j)Mel(-j), T), j = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 are determined. PMID:16640450

  4. Photoinduced crystallization of calcium carbonate from a homogeneous precursor solution in the presence of partially hydrolyzed poly(vinyl alcohol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Takashi; Naka, Kensuke

    2015-04-01

    Photoinduced crystallization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) was demonstrated by the photodecarboxylation of ketoprofen (KP, 2-(3-benzoylphenyl)propionic acid) under alkaline conditions (pH 10). In this method, a homogeneous solution comprising KP, calcium chloride, ammonia, and partially hydrolyzed poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVAPS, degree of saponification: 86.5-89.0 mol %) was used as the precursor solution and was exposed to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation for different time periods. Thermogravimetric analysis of the obtained xerogels showed that increasing the UV irradiation time increased the amount of CaCO3 formed and the complete conversion of calcium ions to calcite was achieved after 50 min of UV irradiation. Furthermore, solid phase analyses suggested that nanometer-to-micron-sized calcite crystals were formed and dispersed in the obtained PVAPS matrix. Photoinduced crystallization of CaCO3 from homogenous solution was demonstrated. 2-(3-benzoylphenyl)propionic acid was used as a photoreactive CO2 generator. Partially hydrolyzed poly(vinyl alcohol) worked as a stabilizer in the solution. Complete conversion of Ca2+ to CaCO3 was achieved by UV irradiation for 50 min. Nanometer-to-micron-sized calcites dispersed in the poly(vinyl alcohol) matrix.

  5. X-ray microtomography of hydrochloric acid propagation in carbonate rocks.

    PubMed

    Machado, A C; Oliveira, T J L; Cruz, F B; Lopes, R T; Lima, I

    2015-02-01

    Acid treatments are used in the oil and gas industry, to increase the permeability of the carbonate reservoirs by creating preferential channels, called wormholes. Channels formation is strongly influenced by acid type and injection rate. The aim of this study is to evaluate some characteristics of the microporous system of carbonate rocks, before and after acidizing. For that purpose X-ray high-resolution microtomography was used. The results show that this technique can be used as a reliable method to analyze microstructural characteristics of the wormholes. PMID:25485884

  6. Sorption of 4-carboxyquinoline derivatives from aqueous acetonitrile solutions on the surface of porous graphitized carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenkova, A. S.; Buryak, A. K.; Kurbatova, S. V.

    2015-09-01

    The sorption of 4-carboxyquinoline derivatives from aqueous acetonitrile solutions on porous graphitized carbon was studied. The effect of the structure of analyte molecules and the eluent composition on the characteristics of retention under the conditions of RP HPLC was analyzed. The effect of pH of the eluent on the shift of equilibrium in aqueous acetonitrile solutions was investigated.

  7. Comparison of solution and crystal properties of Co(II)substituted human carbonic anhydrase II

    E-print Network

    Tanner, David B.

    Comparison of solution and crystal properties of Co(II)­substituted human carbonic anhydrase II was measured for Co(II)­ HCA II in solution containing 0.8 M citrate. Citrate is not an inhibitor to a coordination con- sistent with a mixed population of both tetrahedral and penta-coordinate at pH 8

  8. Na?-functionalized carbon quantum dots: a new draw solute in forward osmosis for seawater desalination.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chun Xian; Zhao, Dieling; Zhao, Qipeng; Wang, Peng; Lu, Xianmao

    2014-07-14

    A new type of biocompatible draw solute, Na(+)-functionalized carbon quantum dots (Na_CQDs) with ultra-small size and rich ionic species, in forward osmosis (FO) is developed for seawater desalination. The aqueous dispersion of Na_CQDs demonstrates a high osmotic pressure, which allows high FO water flux and negligible reverse solute permeation. PMID:24870226

  9. Porous structure and surface chemistry of phosphoric acid activated carbon from corncob

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sych, N. V.; Trofymenko, S. I.; Poddubnaya, O. I.; Tsyba, M. M.; Sapsay, V. I.; Klymchuk, D. O.; Puziy, A. M.

    2012-11-01

    Active carbons have been prepared from corncob using chemical activation with phosphoric acid at 400 °C using varied ratio of impregnation (RI). Porous structure of carbons was characterized by nitrogen adsorption and scanning electron microscopy. Surface chemistry was studied by IR and potentiometric titration method. It has been shown that porosity development was peaked at RI = 1.0 (SBET = 2081 m2/g, Vtot = 1.1 cm3/g), while maximum amount of acid surface groups was observed at RI = 1.25. Acid surface groups of phosphoric acid activated carbons from corncob includes phosphate and strongly acidic carboxylic (pK = 2.0-2.6), weakly acidic carboxylic (pK = 4.7-5.0), enol/lactone (pK = 6.7-7.4; 8.8-9.4) and phenol (pK = 10.1-10.7). Corncob derived carbons showed high adsorption capacity to copper, especially at low pH. Maximum adsorption of methylene blue and iodine was observed for carbon with most developed porosity (RI = 1.0).

  10. Effect of Mild Nitric Acid Oxidation on Dispersability, Size, and Structure of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Resasco, Daniel

    Effect of Mild Nitric Acid Oxidation on Dispersability, Size, and Structure of Single-Walled Carbon) with nitric acid increases their dispersability in water, methanol, and N,N-dimethylformamide. Two oxidation conditions carefully. Nitric acid has been the most frequently utilized agent for oxidation of carbon

  11. Interfacial structures of acidic and basic aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, C.; Ji, N.; Waychunas, G.; Shen, Y.R.

    2008-10-20

    Phase-sensitive sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy was used to study water/vapor interfaces of HCl, HI, and NaOH solutions. The measured imaginary part of the surface spectral responses provided direct characterization of OH stretch vibrations and information about net polar orientations of water species contributing to different regions of the spectrum. We found clear evidence that hydronium ions prefer to emerge at interfaces. Their OH stretches contribute to the 'ice-like' band in the spectrum. Their charges create a positive surface field that tends to reorient water molecules more loosely bonded to the topmost water layer with oxygen toward the interface, and thus enhances significantly the 'liquid-like' band in the spectrum. Iodine ions in solution also like to appear at the interface and alter the positive surface field by forming a narrow double-charge layer with hydronium ions. In NaOH solution, the observed weak change of the 'liquid-like' band and disappearance of the 'ice-like' band in the spectrum indicates that OH{sup -} ions must also have excess at the interface. How they are incorporated in the interfacial water structure is however not clear.

  12. Amino Acid Synthesis in a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide - Water System

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Kouki; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Shiohara, Tomoo; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Manome, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Mars is a CO2-abundant planet, whereas early Earth is thought to be also CO2-abundant. In addition, water was also discovered on Mars in 2008. From the facts and theory, we assumed that soda fountains were present on both planets, and this affected amino acid synthesis. Here, using a supercritical CO2/liquid H2O (10:1) system which mimicked crust soda fountains, we demonstrate production of amino acids from hydroxylamine (nitrogen source) and keto acids (oxylic acid sources). In this research, several amino acids were detected with an amino acid analyzer. Moreover, alanine polymers were detected with LC-MS. Our research lights up a new pathway in the study of life’s origin. PMID:19582225

  13. Amino acid synthesis in a supercritical carbon dioxide - water system.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Kouki; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Shiohara, Tomoo; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Manome, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2009-06-01

    Mars is a CO(2)-abundant planet, whereas early Earth is thought to be also CO(2)-abundant. In addition, water was also discovered on Mars in 2008. From the facts and theory, we assumed that soda fountains were present on both planets, and this affected amino acid synthesis. Here, using a supercritical CO(2)/liquid H(2)O (10:1) system which mimicked crust soda fountains, we demonstrate production of amino acids from hydroxylamine (nitrogen source) and keto acids (oxylic acid sources). In this research, several amino acids were detected with an amino acid analyzer. Moreover, alanine polymers were detected with LC-MS. Our research lights up a new pathway in the study of life's origin. PMID:19582225

  14. Recovery of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Verser, Dan W. (Menlo Park, CA); Eggeman, Timothy J. (Lakewood, CO)

    2011-11-01

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  15. Recovery of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Verser, Dan W. (Golden, CO); Eggeman, Timothy J. (Lakewood, CO)

    2009-10-13

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  16. Fumaric acid: an overlooked form of fixed carbon in Arabidopsis and other plant species

    SciTech Connect

    Chia, D.W.; Yoder, T.J.; Reiter, W.D.; Gibson, S.I.

    2000-10-01

    Photoassimilates are used by plants for production of energy, as carbon skeletons and in transport of fixed carbon between different plant organs. Many studies have been devoted to characterizing the factors that. regulate photoassimilate concentrations in different plant species. Most studies examining photoassimilate concentrations in C{sub 3} plants have focused on analyzing starch and soluble sugars. However, work presented here demonstrates that a number of C{sub 3} plants, including the popular model organism Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., and agriculturally important plants, such as soybean [Glycine ma (L.) Merr.], contain significant quantities of furnaric acid. In fact, furnaric acid can accumulate to levels of several mg per g fresh weight in A-abidopsis leaves, often exceeding starch and soluble sugar levels. Furnaric acid is a component of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and, like starch and soluble sugars, can be metabolized to yield energy and carbon skeletons for production of other compounds. Fumaric acid concentrations increase with plant age and light intensity in Arabidopsis leaves. Arabidopsis phloem exudates contain significant quantities of fumaric acid, raising the possibility that fumaric acid may function in carbon transport.

  17. [Study on solid dispersion of precipitated calcium carbonate-based oleanolic acid].

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong-mei; Zhang, Zhen-hai; Jia, Xiao-bin; Jiang, Yan-rong; Sun, E

    2015-05-01

    Oleanolic acid-precipitated calcium carbonate solid dispersion was prepared by using solvent evaporation method. The microscopic structure and physicochemical properties of solid dispersion were analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). And its in vitro release also was investigated. The properties of the precipitated calcium carbonate was studied which was as a carrier of oleanolic acid solid dispersion. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis suggested that oleanolic acid may be present in solid dispersion as amorphous substance. The in vitro release determination results of oleanolic acid-precipitated calcium carbonate (1: 5) solid dispersion showed accumulated dissolution rate of.oleanolic acid was up to 90% at 45 min. Accelerating experiment showed that content and in vitro dissolution of oleanolic acid solid dispersion did not change after storing over 6 months. The results indicated that in vitro dissolution of oleanolic acid was improved greatly by the solid dispersion with precipitated calcium carbonate as a carrier. The solid dispersion is a stabilizing system which has actual applied value. PMID:26390651

  18. Fabrication of carbon nanowires by pyrolysis of aqueous solution of sugar within asbestos nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butko, V. Yu.; Fokin, A. V.; Nevedomskii, V. N.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.

    2015-05-01

    Carbon nanowires have been fabricated by pyrolysis of an aqueous solution of sugar in nanochannels of asbestos fibers. Electron microscopy demonstrates that the diameter of these nanochannels corresponds to the diameter of the thinnest of the carbon nanowires obtained. Some of these nanowires have a graphite crystal lattice and internal pores. After asbestos is etched out, the carbon nanowires can retain the original shape of the asbestos fibers. Heating in an inert atmosphere reduces the electrical resistivity of the carbon nanowires to ˜0.035 ? cm.

  19. Uptake and Surface Reaction of Methanol by Sulfuric Acid Solutions Investigated by Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation and Raman Spectroscopies

    E-print Network

    Uptake and Surface Reaction of Methanol by Sulfuric Acid Solutions Investigated by Vibrational Sum and occurred on a much longer time scale. This suggests that uptake of methanol by sulfuric acid solutions Sulfuric acid (H2SO4) is the predominant aerosol component in the free troposphere.18 Flight measurements

  20. Isolation of an acidic protein from cholesterol gallstones, which inhibits the precipitation of calcium carbonate in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, S; Sabsay, B; Veis, A; Ostrow, J D; Rege, R V; Dawes, L G

    1989-01-01

    In seeking to identify nucleating/antinucleating proteins involved in the pathogenesis of cholesterol gallstones, a major acidic protein was isolated from each of 13 samples of cholesterol gallstones. After the stones were extracted with methyl t-butyl ether to remove cholesterol, and methanol to remove bile salts and other lipids, they were demineralized with EDTA. The extracts were desalted with Sephadex-G25, and the proteins separated by PAGE. A protein was isolated, of molecular weight below 10 kD, which included firmly-bound diazo-positive yellow pigments and contained 24% acidic, but only 7% basic amino acid residues. The presence of N-acetyl glucosamine suggested that this was a glycoprotein. This protein at concentrations as low as 2 micrograms/ml, but neither human serum albumin nor its complex with bilirubin, inhibited calcium carbonate precipitation from a supersaturated solution in vitro. This protein could be precipitated from 0.15 M NaCl solution by the addition of 0.5 M calcium chloride. Considering that cholesterol gallstones contain calcium and pigment at their centers, and that small acidic proteins are important regulators in other biomineralization systems, this protein seems likely to play a role in the pathogenesis of cholesterol gallstones. Images PMID:2592569

  1. Extraction of actinides into aqueous polyethylene glycol solutions from carbonate media in the presence of alizarin complexone

    SciTech Connect

    Molochnikova, N.P.; Frenkel', V.Ya.; Myasoedov, B.F.; Shkinev, V.M.; Spivakov, B.Ya.; Zolotov, Yu.A.

    1987-01-01

    Actinide extraction in a two-phase aqueous system based on polyethylene glycol from carbonate solutions of various compositions in presence of alizarin complexone is studied. It is shown that the nature of the alkali metals affects actinide extraction into the polyethylene glycol phase. Tri- and tetravalent actinides are extracted maximally from sodium carbonate solutions. Separation of actinides in different oxidation states is more effective in potassium carbonate solutions. The behavior of americium in different oxidation states in the system carbonate-polyethylene glycol-complexone is studied. The possibility of extraction separation of microamount of americium(V) from curium in carbonate solutions in presence of alizarin complexone is shown.

  2. Gamma-irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions. [prebiotic significance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Graff, R. L.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1980-01-01

    The gamma-irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions was studied under initially oxygenated and oxygen-free conditions in an attempt to determine the possible interconversion of malic acid into other carboxylic acids, specifically those associated with Krebs cycle. The effect of dose on product formation of the system was investigated. Gas-liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry was used as the principal means of identification of the nonvolatile products. Thin layer chromatography and direct probe mass spectroscopy were also employed. The findings show that a variety of carboxylic acids are formed, with malonic and succinic acids in greatest abundance. These products have all been identified as being formed in the gamma-irradiation of acetic acid, suggesting a common intermediary. Since these molecules fit into a metabolic cycle, it is strongly suggestive that prebiotic pathways provided the basis for biological systems.

  3. Formation of amino acids by cobalt-60 irradiation of hydrogen cyanide solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweeney, M. A.; Toste, A. P.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the pathway for the prebiotic origin of amino acids from hydrogen cyanide (HCN) under the action of ionizing radiation considered as an effective source of energy on the primitive earth. The irradiations were performed in a cobalt-60 source with a dose rate of 200,000 rad/hr. Seven naturally occurring amino acids are identified among the products formed by the hydrolysis of gamma-irradiated solutions of HCN: glycine, alanine, valine, serine, threonine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid. The identity of these amino acids is established by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Control experiments provided evidence that the amino acids are not the result of contamination.

  4. Stimulation of Carbonate Reservoirs Using a New Emulsified Acid System 

    E-print Network

    Sayed, Mohammed Ali Ibrahim

    2013-05-15

    The scope of work can be divided into; the measurement of the rheological properties of a new emulsified acid system that can be suitable for high temperature applications, a study of the performance of the new emulsified acid in stimulating both...

  5. The amino acid's backup bone - storage solutions for proteomics facilities.

    PubMed

    Meckel, Hagen; Stephan, Christian; Bunse, Christian; Krafzik, Michael; Reher, Christopher; Kohl, Michael; Meyer, Helmut Erich; Eisenacher, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics methods, especially high-throughput mass spectrometry analysis have been continually developed and improved over the years. The analysis of complex biological samples produces large volumes of raw data. Data storage and recovery management pose substantial challenges to biomedical or proteomic facilities regarding backup and archiving concepts as well as hardware requirements. In this article we describe differences between the terms backup and archive with regard to manual and automatic approaches. We also introduce different storage concepts and technologies from transportable media to professional solutions such as redundant array of independent disks (RAID) systems, network attached storages (NAS) and storage area network (SAN). Moreover, we present a software solution, which we developed for the purpose of long-term preservation of large mass spectrometry raw data files on an object storage device (OSD) archiving system. Finally, advantages, disadvantages, and experiences from routine operations of the presented concepts and technologies are evaluated and discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics in the Post-Identification Era. Guest Editors: Martin Eisenacher and Christian Stephan. PMID:23722089

  6. Acidizing Dolomite Reservoirs Using HCL Acid Prepared with Seawater: Problems and Solutions 

    E-print Network

    Arensman, Dennis G

    2014-04-28

    inhibitors in spent acid systems were used to compare the effectiveness at temperatures ranging from 77 to 325°F. Corefloods were conducted to investigate the extent of calcium sulfate precipitation without scale inhibitors and to test permeability...

  7. Partial carbonized nanoporous resin for uptake of lead from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ghiloufi, I; Al-Hobaib, A S; El Mir, L

    2015-01-01

    Four partial carbonized nanoporous resins (PCNRs), based on organic xerogel compounds, were synthesised by the sol-gel method from pyrogallol and formaldehyde mixtures in water using picric acid as catalyst. The PCNRs were prepared at different pyrolysis temperatures: T(1) = 200 °C (PF-200), T(2) = 300 °C (PF-300), T(3) = 400 °C (PF-400), or T(4) = 500 °C (PF-500). The PCNRs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and nitrogen porosimetry. The obtained results show that PF-200 is more efficient for the removal of Pb(2+) from aqueous solution than the other adsorbent prepared in this study. The characteristics of lead uptake by PF-200 were explored using well-established and effective parameters including pH, contact time, initial metal ion concentration and temperature. Optimum adsorption of Pb(2+), using PF-200, was observed at pH 4.5. The Langmuir model gave a better fit than the other models, and kinetic studies revealed that the adsorption was well fitted by the pseudo second-order kinetic model and thermodynamic properties, i.e., Gibbs free energy change, enthalpy change and entropy change, showed that adsorption of Pb(2+) onto PF-200 was endothermic, spontaneous and feasible in the temperature range of 298-328 K. PMID:26360758

  8. Radiation-induced degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid in aqueous solutions by gamma ray irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Wenbao; He, Yanquan; Ling, Yongsheng; Hei, Daqian; Shan, Qing; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jiatong

    2015-04-01

    The radiation-induced degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid under gamma ray irradiation was investigated. Degradation experiments were performed with 100 mL sealed Pyrex glass vessels loaded with 80 mL of cyclohexanebutyric acid solutions at various initial concentrations of 10, 20, and 40 mg L-1. The absorbed doses were controlled at 0, 0.65, 1.95, 3.25, 6.5, 9.75, and 13 kGy. The results showed that gamma ray irradiation could effectively degrade cyclohexanebutyric acid in aqueous solutions. The removal rate of cyclohexanebutyric acid increased significantly with the increase of absorbed dose and the decrease of its initial concentration. At the same time, the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was as effective as that of cyclohexanebutyric acid. The kinetic studies showed that the degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid followed pseudo first-order reaction. Above all, the proposed mechanism obtained when NaNO2, NaNO3 and tert-butanol were added showed that the •OH radical played a major role in the gamma degradation process of cyclohexanebutyric acid, while •H and eaq- played a minor role in the gamma degradation process. The degradation products were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) during cyclohexanebutyric acid degradation.

  9. Effect of Mineral Admixtures on Resistance to Sulfuric Acid Solution of Mortars with Quaternary Binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhloufi, Zoubir; Bederina, Madani; Bouhicha, Mohamed; Kadri, El-Hadj

    This research consists to study the synergistic action of three mineral additions simultaneously added to the cement. This synergistic effect has a positive effect on the sustainability of limestone mortars. Tests were performed on mortars based on crushed limestone sand and manufactured by five quaternary binders (ordinary Portland cement and CPO mixed simultaneously with filler limestone, blast-furnace and natural pozzolan). The purpose of this research was to identify the resistance of five different mortars to the solution of sulfuric acid. Changes in weight loss and compressive strength measured at 30, 60, 90, 120 and 180 days for each acid solution were studied. We followed up on the change in pH of the sulfuric acid solution at the end of each month up to 180 days.

  10. Dissolution kinetics of iron oxides in clay in oxalic acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, U. K.; Kurny, A. S. W.

    2012-12-01

    Clay samples containing 8.15% iron oxides and 27.49% alumina were leached in oxalic acid. Leaching experiments were performed in aqueous solutions of oxalic acid of 0.2-2 mol/L at 40-80°C for up to 90 min. The mixed kinetic mechanism, i.e., t/?=[(1-2 X/3)-(1- X)2/3]+ b[1-(1- X)1/3], seemed to be the most appropriate one to fit the kinetic data of leaching iron oxides contained in clay in the aqueous oxalic acid solutions. The Arrhenius activation energy for leaching in the 1.8 mol/L oxalic acid was found to be 41.035 kJ/mol.

  11. Solution processable carbon nanotube network thin-film transistors operated in electrolytic solutions at various pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeberle, Tobias; Münzer, Alexandra M.; Buth, Felix; Antonio Garrido, Jose; Abdellah, Alaa; Fabel, Bernhard; Lugli, Paolo; Scarpa, Giuseppe

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the electronic properties of solution-gated carbon nanotube (CNT) thin-film transistors, where the active layer consists of a randomly distributed single-walled CNT network of >90% semiconducting nanotubes, deposited from an aqueous solution by spin-coating. The devices are characterized in different electrolytic solutions, where a reference electrode immersed in the liquid is used to apply the gate potential. We observe a gate-potential shift in the transfer characteristic when the pH and/or ionic strength of the electrolytic solution is changed with a pH sensitivity of ?19 mV/pH. This sensitivity is attributed to a surface charging effect at the CNT/electrolyte interface.

  12. Chemical and biological consequences of using carbon dioxide versus acid additions in ocean acidification experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, Kimberly K.; DuFore, Christopher M.; Robbins, Lisa L.

    2013-01-01

    Use of different approaches for manipulating seawater chemistry during ocean acidification experiments has confounded comparison of results from various experimental studies. Some of these discrepancies have been attributed to whether addition of acid (such as hydrochloric acid, HCl) or carbon dioxide (CO2) gas has been used to adjust carbonate system parameters. Experimental simulations of carbonate system parameter scenarios for the years 1766, 2007, and 2100 were performed using the carbonate speciation program CO2SYS to demonstrate the variation in seawater chemistry that can result from use of these approaches. Results showed that carbonate system parameters were 3 percent and 8 percent lower than target values in closed-system acid additions, and 1 percent and 5 percent higher in closed-system CO2 additions for the 2007 and 2100 simulations, respectively. Open-system simulations showed that carbonate system parameters can deviate by up to 52 percent to 70 percent from target values in both acid addition and CO2 addition experiments. Results from simulations for the year 2100 were applied to empirically derived equations that relate biogenic calcification to carbonate system parameters for calcifying marine organisms including coccolithophores, corals, and foraminifera. Calculated calcification rates for coccolithophores, corals, and foraminifera differed from rates at target conditions by 0.5 percent to 2.5 percent in closed-system CO2 gas additions, from 0.8 percent to 15 percent in the closed-system acid additions, from 4.8 percent to 94 percent in open-system acid additions, and from 7 percent to 142 percent in open-system CO2 additions.

  13. Structural and functional characterization of solute binding proteins for aromatic compounds derived from lignin: p-coumaric acid and related aromatic acids

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kemin; Chang, Changsoo; Cuff, Marianne; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Landorf, Elizabeth; Mack, Jamey C.; Zerbs, Sarah; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Collart, Frank R.

    2013-01-01

    Lignin comprises 15.25% of plant biomass and represents a major environmental carbon source for utilization by soil microorganisms. Access to this energy resource requires the action of fungal and bacterial enzymes to break down the lignin polymer into a complex assortment of aromatic compounds that can be transported into the cells. To improve our understanding of the utilization of lignin by microorganisms, we characterized the molecular properties of solute binding proteins of ATP.binding cassette transporter proteins that interact with these compounds. A combination of functional screens and structural studies characterized the binding specificity of the solute binding proteins for aromatic compounds derived from lignin such as p-coumarate, 3-phenylpropionic acid and compounds with more complex ring substitutions. A ligand screen based on thermal stabilization identified several binding protein clusters that exhibit preferences based on the size or number of aromatic ring substituents. Multiple X-ray crystal structures of protein-ligand complexes for these clusters identified the molecular basis of the binding specificity for the lignin-derived aromatic compounds. The screens and structural data provide new functional assignments for these solute.binding proteins which can be used to infer their transport specificity. This knowledge of the functional roles and molecular binding specificity of these proteins will support the identification of the specific enzymes and regulatory proteins of peripheral pathways that funnel these compounds to central metabolic pathways and will improve the predictive power of sequence-based functional annotation methods for this family of proteins. PMID:23606130

  14. Solution-reactor-produced Mo-99 using activated carbon to remore I-131

    SciTech Connect

    Kitten, S.; Cappiello, C.

    1998-06-01

    The production of {sup 99}Mo in a solution reactor was explored. Activated charcoal was used to filter the {sup 131}I contaminant from an irradiated fuel solution. Gamma spectroscopy confirmed that the activated carbon trapped a significant amount of {sup 131}I, as well as notable amounts of {sup 133}Xe, {sup 105}Rb, and {sup 140}Ba; the carbon trapped a diminutive amount of {sup 99}Mo. The results promote the idea of solution-reactor-produced {sup 99}Mo. Solution reactors are favorable both energetically and environmentally. A solution reactor could provide enough {sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Te to support both the current and future radiopharmaceutical needs of the U.S.

  15. Carbon fiber cloth supported Au nano-textile fabrics as an efficient catalyst for hydrogen peroxide electroreduction in acid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Cheng, Kui; Wang, Guiling; Cao, Dianxue

    2015-09-01

    The size-controlled hierarchical textile-like Au nanostructures supported carbon fiber cloth (Au NTs/CFC) is successfully fabricated through a simple low-cost electrochemical route. The electrodes are characterised by scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometer. Without any conducting carbons and polymer binders, the 3D electrode with unique structure is directly used as the electrocatalyst for H2O2 reduction in acid solution and the catalytic performance is evaluated by voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The Au NTs/CFC electrode exhibits much higher catalytic activity and remarkably improved utilization of Au than Au nanoparticles (Au NPs/CFC) prepared by the same method owing to its unique structure. In the solution of 3.0 mol L-1 H2SO4 + 0.1 mol L-1 H2O2, with the reduction potential of 0 V, the current of -0.72 A cm-2 mg-1 can be obtained on Au NTs/CFC electrode and only a current of -0.09 A cm-2 mg-1 can be achieved on Au NPs/CFC electrode. All these results reveal that the novel Au NTs/CFC electrode exhibits excellent catalytic performance and superior stability for H2O2 electroreduction in acid medium, benefitting from the unique 3D structure which can ensure high utilization of catalyst.

  16. Degradation of 17beta-estradiol in aqueous solution by ozonation in the presence of manganese(II) and oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liying; Zhang, Lu; Chen, Jianmeng; Ji, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Natural estrogens, such as 17beta-estradiol (E2), are the main substances responsible for estrogenic activity found in domestic sewage. In the work described herein, the degradation of E2 has been investigated by single ozonation and catalytic ozonation in the presence of manganese ion (Mn2+) and oxalic acid. The presence of Mn2+ and oxalic acid in the ozonation processes significantly improved the E2 degradation and, hence, the reduction of estrogenic activity in aqueous solution. The addition of Mn2+ and oxalic acid produced many more hydroxyl radicals in the catalytic ozonation system than in the single ozonation system. Oxidation products formed during ozonation of E2 have been identified by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), on the basis of which a possible reaction pathway for E2 degradation by ozonation is proposed. E2 was first oxidized to hydroxyl-semiquinone isomers, and these were subsequently degraded to low molecular weight compounds such as oxalic acid and malonic acid. The latter were easily oxidized by ozone to form carbon dioxide (CO2). The results demonstrate that the ozonation-Mn(2+)-oxalic acid system may serve as a powerful tool for removing E2, and the addition of Mn2+ and oxalic acid is favourable for the complete removal of estrogenic activity induced by steroid estrogens in aqueous solution. PMID:23530323

  17. Monodispersed Hollow SO3H-Functionalized Carbon/Silica as Efficient Solid Acid Catalyst for Esterification of Oleic Acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wang, Ding; Tan, Minghui; Jiang, Bo; Zheng, Jingtang; Tsubaki, Noritatsu; Wu, Mingbo

    2015-12-01

    SO3H-functionalized monodispersed hollow carbon/silica spheres (HS/C-SO3H) with primary mesopores were prepared with polystyrene as a template and p-toluenesulfonic acid (TsOH) as a carbon precursor and -SO3H source simultaneously. The physical and chemical properties of HS/C-SO3H were characterized by N2 adsorption, TEM, SEM, XPS, XRD, Raman spectrum, NH3-TPD, element analysis and acid-base titration techniques. As a solid acid catalyst, HS/C-SO3H shows excellent performance in the esterification of oleic acid with methanol, which is a crucial reaction in biodiesel production. The well-defined hollow architecture and enhanced active sites accessibility of HS/C-SO3H guarantee the highest catalytic performance compared with the catalysts prepared by activation of TsOH deposited on the ordered mesoporous silicas SBA-15 and MCM-41. At the optimized conditions, high conversion (96.9%) was achieved and no distinct activity drop was observed after 5 recycles. This synthesis strategy will provide a highly effective solid acid catalyst for green chemical processes. PMID:26588826

  18. In vitro toxicity of carbon nanotubes, nano-graphite and carbon black, similar impacts of acid functionalization.

    PubMed

    Figarol, Agathe; Pourchez, Jérémie; Boudard, Delphine; Forest, Valérie; Akono, Céline; Tulliani, Jean-Marc; Lecompte, Jean-Pierre; Cottier, Michèle; Bernache-Assollant, Didier; Grosseau, Philippe

    2015-12-25

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and nano-graphite (NG) are graphene-based nanomaterials which share exceptional physicochemical properties, but whose health impacts are unfortunately still not well understood. On the other hand, carbon black (CB) is a conventional and widely studied material. The comparison of these three carbon-based nanomaterials is thus of great interest to improve our understanding of their toxicity. An acid functionalization was carried out on CNT, NG and CB so that, after a thorough characterization, their impacts on RAW 264.7 macrophages could be compared for a similar surface chemistry (15 to 120?g·mL(-1) nanomaterials, 90-min to 24-h contact). Functionalized nanomaterials triggered a weak cytotoxicity similar to the pristine nanomaterials. Acid functionalization increased the pro-inflammatory response except for CB which did not trigger any TNF-? production before or after functionalization, and seemed to strongly decrease the oxidative stress. The toxicological impact of acid functionalization appeared thus to follow a similar trend whatever the carbon-based nanomaterial. At equivalent dose expressed in surface and equivalent surface chemistry, the toxicological responses from murine macrophages to NG were higher than for CNT and CB. It seemed to correspond to the hypothesis of a platelet and fiber paradigm. PMID:26381085

  19. Alkaline solution absorption of carbon dioxide method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for measuring the concentration of hydroxides (or pH) in alkaline solutions, using the tendency of hydroxides to adsorb CO{sub 2}. The method comprises passing CO{sub 2} over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the CO{sub 2} concentration. Comparison of the measurements yields the adsorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to adsorption fraction. A schematic is given of a process system according to a preferred embodiment of the invention. 2 figs.

  20. Solute-enhanced production of gamma-valerolactone (GVL) from aqueous solutions of levulinic acid

    DOEpatents

    Dumesic, James A; Wettstein, Stephanie G; Alonso, David Martin; Gurbuz, Elif Ispir

    2015-02-24

    A method to produce levulinic acid (LA) and gamma-valerolactone (GVL) from biomass-derived cellulose or lignocellulose by selective extraction of LA using GVL and optionally converting the LA so isolated into GVL, with no purifications steps required to yield the GVL.

  1. Photodegradation of Mercaptopropionic Acid- and Thioglycollic Acid-Capped CdTe Quantum Dots in Buffer Solutions.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yanping; Yang, Ping; Zhao, Jie; Du, Yingying; He, Haiyan; Liu, Yunshi

    2015-06-01

    CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized by 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) and thioglycollic acid (TGA) as capping agents. It is confirmed that TGA and MPA molecules were attached on the surface of the QDs using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra. The movement of the QDs in agarose gel electrophoresis indicated that MPA-capped CdTe QDs had small hydrodynamic diameter. The photoluminescence (PL) intensity of TGA-capped QDs is higher than that of MPA-capped QDs at same QD concentration because of the surface passivation of TGA. To systemically investigate the photodegradation, CdTe QDs with various PL peak wavelengths were dispersed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and Tris-borate-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (TBE) buffer solutions. It was found that the PL intensity of the QDs in PBS decreased with time. The PL peak wavelengths of the QDs in PBS solutions remained unchanged. As for TGA-capped CdTe QDs, the results of PL peak wavelengths in TBE buffer solutions indicated that S(2-) released by TGA attached to Cd(2+) and formed CdS-like clusters layer on the surface of aqueous CdTe QDs. In addition, the number of TGA on the CdTe QDs surface was more than that of MPA. When the QDs were added to buffer solutions, agents were removed from the surface of CdTe QDs, which decreased the passivation of agents thus resulted in photodegradation of CdTe QDs in buffer solutions. PMID:26369066

  2. Recovery of water and acid from leach solutions using direct contact membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    Kesieme, Uchenna K; Milne, Nicholas; Cheng, Chu Yong; Aral, Hal; Duke, Mikel

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes for the first time the use of direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) for acid and water recovery from a real leach solution generated by a hydrometallurgical plant. The leach solutions considered contained H2SO4 or HCl. In all tests the temperature of the feed solution was kept at 60 °C. The test work showed that fluxes were within the range of 18-33 kg/m(2)/h and 15-35 kg/m(2)/h for the H2SO4 and HCl systems, respectively. In the H2SO4 leach system, the final concentration of free acid in the sample solution increased on the concentrate side of the DCMD system from 1.04 M up to 4.60 M. The sulfate separation efficiency was over 99.9% and overall water recovery exceeded 80%. In the HCl leach system, HCl vapour passed through the membrane from the feed side to the permeate. The concentration of HCl captured in the permeate was about 1.10 M leaving behind only 0.41 M in the feed from the initial concentration of 2.13 M. In all the experiments, salt rejection was >99.9%. DCMD is clearly viable for high recovery of high quality water and concentrated H2SO4 from spent sulfuric acid leach solution where solvent extraction could then be applied to recover the sulfuric acid and metals. While HCl can be recovered for reuse using only DCMD. PMID:24569289

  3. Stability of antimicrobial activity of peracetic acid solutions used in the final disinfection process.

    PubMed

    Costa, Solange Alves da Silva; Paula, Olívia Ferreira Pereira de; Silva, Célia Regina Gonçalves E; Leão, Mariella Vieira Pereira; Santos, Silvana Soléo Ferreira dos

    2015-01-01

    The instruments and materials used in health establishments are frequently exposed to microorganism contamination, and chemical products are used before sterilization to reduce occupational infection. We evaluated the antimicrobial effectiveness, physical stability, and corrosiveness of two commercial formulations of peracetic acid on experimentally contaminated specimens. Stainless steel specimens were contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, blood, and saliva and then immersed in a ready peracetic acid solution: 2% Sekusept Aktiv (SA) or 0.25% Proxitane Alpha (PA), for different times. Then, washes of these instruments were plated in culture medium and colony-forming units counted. This procedure was repeated six times per day over 24 non-consecutive days. The corrosion capacity was assessed with the mass loss test, and the concentration of peracetic acid and pH of the solutions were measured with indicator tapes. Both SA and PA significantly eliminated microorganisms; however, the SA solution was stable for only 4 days, whereas PA remained stable throughout the experiment. The concentration of peracetic acid in the SA solutions decreased over time until the chemical was undetectable, although the pH remained at 5. The PA solution had a concentration of 500-400 mg/L and a pH of 2-3. Neither formulation induced corrosion and both reduced the number of microorganisms (p = 0.0001). However, the differences observed in the performance of each product highlight the necessity of establishing a protocol for optimizing the use of each one. PMID:25715037

  4. Precipitation pathways for ferrihydrite formation in acidic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Mengqiang; Frandsen, Cathrine; Wallace, Adam F.; Legg, Benjamin; Khalid, Syed; Zhang, Hengzhong; Mørup, Steen; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2016-01-01

    Iron oxides and oxyhydroxides form via Fe3+ hydrolysis and polymerization in many aqueous environments, but the pathway from Fe3+ monomers to oligomers and then to solid phase nuclei is unknown. In this work, using combined X-ray, UV-vis, and Mössbauer spectroscopic approaches, we were able to identify and quantify the long-time sought ferric speciation over time during ferric oxyhydroxide formation in partially-neutralized ferric nitrate solutions ([Fe3+] = 0.2 M, 1.8 < pH < 3). Results demonstrate that Fe exists mainly as Fe(H2O)63+, ?-oxo aquo dimers and ferrihydrite, and that with time, the ?-oxo dimer decreases while the other two species increase in their concentrations. No larger Fe oligomers were detected. Given that the structure of the ?-oxo dimer is incompatible with those of all Fe oxides and oxyhydroxides, our results suggest that reconfiguration of the ?-oxo dimer structure occurs prior to further condensation leading up to the nucleation of ferrihydrite. The structural reconfiguration is likely the rate-limiting step involved in the nucleation process.

  5. Precipitation pathways for ferrihydrite formation in acidic solutions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, Mengqiang; Khalid, Syed; Frandsen, Cathrine; Wallace, Adam F.; Legg, Benjamin; Zhang, Hengzhong; Morup, Steen; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2015-10-03

    In this study, iron oxides and oxyhydroxides form via Fe3+ hydrolysis and polymerization in many aqueous environments, but the pathway from Fe3+ monomers to oligomers and then to solid phase nuclei is unknown. In this work, using combined X-ray, UV–vis, and Mössbauer spectroscopic approaches, we were able to identify and quantify the long-time sought ferric speciation over time during ferric oxyhydroxide formation in partially-neutralized ferric nitrate solutions ([Fe3+] = 0.2 M, 1.8 2O)63+, ?-oxo aquo dimers and ferrihydrite, and that with time, the ?-oxo dimer decreases while the othermore »two species increase in their concentrations. No larger Fe oligomers were detected. Given that the structure of the ?-oxo dimer is incompatible with those of all Fe oxides and oxyhydroxides, our results suggest that reconfiguration of the ?-oxo dimer structure occurs prior to further condensation leading up to the nucleation of ferrihydrite. The structural reconfiguration is likely the rate-limiting step involved in the nucleation process.« less

  6. Precipitation pathways for ferrihydrite formation in acidic solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Mengqiang; Khalid, Syed; Frandsen, Cathrine; Wallace, Adam F.; Legg, Benjamin; Zhang, Hengzhong; Morup, Steen; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2015-10-03

    In this study, iron oxides and oxyhydroxides form via Fe3+ hydrolysis and polymerization in many aqueous environments, but the pathway from Fe3+ monomers to oligomers and then to solid phase nuclei is unknown. In this work, using combined X-ray, UV–vis, and Mössbauer spectroscopic approaches, we were able to identify and quantify the long-time sought ferric speciation over time during ferric oxyhydroxide formation in partially-neutralized ferric nitrate solutions ([Fe3+] = 0.2 M, 1.8 < pH < 3). Results demonstrate that Fe exists mainly as Fe(H2O)63+, ?-oxo aquo dimers and ferrihydrite, and that with time, the ?-oxo dimer decreases while the other two species increase in their concentrations. No larger Fe oligomers were detected. Given that the structure of the ?-oxo dimer is incompatible with those of all Fe oxides and oxyhydroxides, our results suggest that reconfiguration of the ?-oxo dimer structure occurs prior to further condensation leading up to the nucleation of ferrihydrite. The structural reconfiguration is likely the rate-limiting step involved in the nucleation process.

  7. Interfacial electron transfer of glucose oxidase on poly(glutamic acid)-modified glassy carbon electrode and glucose sensing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuechou; Tan, Bingcan; Zheng, Xinyu; Kong, Dexian; Li, Qinglu

    2015-11-15

    The interfacial electron transfer of glucose oxidase (GOx) on a poly(glutamic acid)-modified glassy carbon electrode (PGA/GCE) was investigated. The redox peaks measured for GOx and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are similar, and the anodic peak of GOx does not increase in the presence of glucose in a mediator-free solution. These indicate that the electroactivity of GOx is not the direct electron transfer (DET) between GOx and PGA/GCE and that the observed electroactivity of GOx is ascribed to free FAD that is released from GOx. However, efficient electron transfer occurred if an appropriate mediator was placed in solution, suggesting that GOx is active. The PGA/GCE-based biosensor showed wide linear response in the range of 0.5-5.5 mM with a low detection limit of 0.12 mM and high sensitivity and selectivity for measuring glucose. PMID:26278169

  8. One-Pot synthesis of phosphorylated mesoporous carbon heterogeneous catalysts with tailored surface acidity

    SciTech Connect

    Fulvio, Pasquale F; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Mayes, Richard T; Bauer, Christopher; Wang, Xiqing; Veith, Gabriel M; Dai, Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Soft-templated phosphorylated mesoporous carbons with homogeneous distributions of phosphate groups were prepared by a 'one-pot' synthesis method using mixtures of phosphoric acid with hydrochloric, or nitric acids in the presence of Pluronic F127 triblock copolymer. Adjusting the various ratios of phosphoric acid used in these mixtures resulted in carbons with distinct adsorption, structural and surface acidity properties. The pore size distributions (PSDs) from nitrogen adsorption at -196 C showed that mesoporous carbons exhibit specific surface areas as high as 551 m{sup 2}/g and mesopores as large as 13 nm. Both structural ordering of the mesopores and the final phosphate contents were strongly dependent on the ratios of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} in the synthesis gels, as shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron (XPS) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The number of surface acid sites determined from temperature programmed desorption of ammonia (NH{sub 3}-TPD) were in the range of 0.3-1.5 mmol/g while the active surface areas are estimated to comprise 5-54% of the total surface areas. Finally, the conversion temperatures for the isopropanol dehydration were lowered by as much as 100 C by transitioning from the least acidic to the most acidic catalysts surface.

  9. Influence of acid functionalization on the cardiopulmonary toxicity of carbon nanotubes and carbon black particles in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Haiyan McGee, John K.; Saxena, Rajiv K.; Kodavanti, Urmila P.; Devlin, Robert B.; Gilmour, M. Ian

    2009-09-15

    Engineered carbon nanotubes are being developed for a wide range of industrial and medical applications. Because of their unique properties, nanotubes can impose potentially toxic effects, particularly if they have been modified to express functionally reactive chemical groups on their surface. The present study was designed to evaluate whether acid functionalization (AF) enhanced the cardiopulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) as well as control carbon black particles. Mice were exposed by oropharyngeal aspiration to 10 or 40 {mu}g of saline-suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), acid-functionalized SWCNTs (AF-SWCNTs), ultrafine carbon black (UFCB), AF-UFCB, or 2 {mu}g LPS. 24 hours later, pulmonary inflammatory responses and cardiac effects were assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage and isolated cardiac perfusion respectively, and compared to saline or LPS-instilled animals. Additional mice were assessed for histological changes in lung and heart. Instillation of 40 {mu}g of AF-SWCNTs, UFCB and AF-UFCB increased percentage of pulmonary neutrophils. No significant effects were observed at the lower particle concentration. Sporadic clumps of particles from each treatment group were observed in the small airways and interstitial areas of the lungs according to particle dose. Patches of cellular infiltration and edema in both the small airways and in the interstitium were also observed in the high dose group. Isolated perfused hearts from mice exposed to 40 {mu}g of AF-SWCNTs had significantly lower cardiac functional recovery, greater infarct size, and higher coronary flow rate than other particle-exposed animals and controls, and also exhibited signs of focal cardiac myofiber degeneration. No particles were detected in heart tissue under light microscopy. This study indicates that while acid functionalization increases the pulmonary toxicity of both UFCB and SWCNTs, this treatment caused cardiac effects only with the AF-carbon nanotubes. Further experiments are needed to understand the physico-chemical processes involved in this phenomenon.

  10. Adipic and malonic acid aqueous solutions: surface tensions and saturation vapor pressures.

    PubMed

    Riipinen, Ilona; Koponen, Ismo K; Frank, Göran P; Hyvärinen, Antti-Pekka; Vanhanen, Joonas; Lihavainen, Heikki; Lehtinen, Kari E J; Bilde, Merete; Kulmala, Markku

    2007-12-20

    The surface tension of adipic aqueous solutions was measured as a function of temperature (T=278-313 K) and adipic acid mole fraction (X=0.000-0.003) using the Wilhelmy plate method. A parametrization fitted to these data is presented. The evaporation rates of binary water-malonic and water-adipic acid droplets were measured with a TDMA technique at different temperatures (T=293-300 K) and relative humidities (58-80%), and the saturation vapor pressures of subcooled liquid malonic and adipic acids were derived from the data using a binary evaporation model. The temperature dependence of the vapor pressures was obtained as least-squares fits to the derived vapor pressures: ln(Psat,l) (Pa)=220.2389-22634.96/T (K)-26.66767 ln T (K) for malonic acid and ln(Psat,l) (Pa)=140.6704-18230.97/T (K)-15.48011 ln T (K) for adipic acid. PMID:18044850

  11. Experimental shock chemistry of aqueous amino acid solutions and the cometary delivery of prebiotic compounds.

    PubMed

    Blank, J G; Miller, G H; Ahrens, M J; Winans, R E

    2001-01-01

    A series of shock experiments were conducted to assess the feasibility of the delivery of organic compounds to the Earth via cometary impacts. Aqueous solutions containing near-saturation levels of amino acids (lysine, norvaline, aminobutyric acid, proline, and phenylalanine) were sealed inside stainless steel capsules and shocked by ballistic impact with a steel projectile plate accelerated along a 12-m-long gun barrel to velocities of 0.5-1.9 km sec-1. Pressure-temperature-time histories of the shocked fluids were calculated using 1D hydrodynamical simulations. Maximum conditions experienced by the solutions lasted 0.85-2.7 microseconds and ranged from 5.1-21 GPa and 412-870 K. Recovered sample capsules were milled open and liquid was extracted. Samples were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry (MS). In all experiments, a large fraction of the amino acids survived. We observed differences in kinetic behavior and the degree of survivability among the amino acids. Aminobutyric acid appeared to be the least reactive, and phenylalanine appeared to be the most reactive of the amino acids. The impact process resulted in the formation of peptide bonds; new compounds included amino acid dimers and cyclic diketopiperazines. In our experiments, and in certain naturally occurring impacts, pressure has a greater influence than temperature in determining reaction pathways. Our results support the hypothesis that significant concentrations of organic material could survive a natural impact process. PMID:11296518

  12. Experimental Shock Chemistry of Aqueous Amino Acid Solutions and the Cometary Delivery of Prebiotic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, Jennifer G.; Miller, Gregory H.; Ahrens, Michael J.; Winans, Randall E.

    2001-02-01

    A series of shock experiments were conducted to assess the feasibility of the delivery of organic compounds to the Earth via cometary impacts. Aqueous solutions containing near-saturation levels of amino acids (lysine, norvaline, aminobutyric acid, proline, and phenylalanine) were sealed inside stainless steel capsules and shocked by ballistic impact with a steel projectile plate accelerated along a 12-m-long gun barrel to velocities of 0.5-1.9 km sec^-1. Pressure-temperature-time histories of the shocked fluids were calculated using 1D hydrodynamical simulations. Maximum conditions experienced by the solutions lasted 0.85-2.7 ?s and ranged from 5.1-21 GPa and 412-870 K. Recovered sample capsules were milled open and liquid was extracted. Samples were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry (MS). In all experiments, a large fraction of the amino acids survived. We observed differences in kinetic behavior and the degree of survivability among the amino acids. Aminobutyric acid appeared to be the least reactive, and phenylalanine appeared to be the most reactive of the amino acids. The impact process resulted in the formation of peptide bonds; new compounds included amino acid dimers and cyclic diketopiperazines. In our experiments, and in certain naturally occurring impacts, pressure has a greater influence than temperature in determining reaction pathways. Our results support the hypothesis that significant concentrations of organic material could survive a natural impact process.

  13. Citric Acid-Modified Fenton's Reaction for the Oxidation of Chlorinated Ethylenes in Soil Solution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Seol, Yongkoo; Javandel, Iraj

    2008-03-15

    Fenton's reagent, a solution of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous iron catalyst, is used for an in-situ chemical oxidation of organic contaminants. Sulfuric acid is commonly used to create an acidic condition needed for catalytic oxidation. Fenton's reaction often involves pressure buildup and precipitation of reaction products, which can cause safety hazards and diminish efficiency. We selected citric acid, a food-grade substance, as an acidifying agent to evaluate its efficiencies for organic contaminant removal in Fenton's reaction, and examined the impacts of using citric acid on the unwanted reaction products. A series of batch and column experiments were performed with varying H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations to decompose selected chlorinated ethylenes. Either dissolved iron from soil or iron sulfate salt was added to provide the iron catalyst in the batch tests. Batch experiments revealed that both citric and sulfuric acid systems achieved over 90% contaminant removal rates, and the presence of iron catalyst was essential for effective decontamination. Batch tests with citric acid showed no signs of pressure accumulation and solid precipitations, however the results suggested that an excessive usage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} relative to iron catalysts (Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} < 1/330) would result in lowering the efficiency of contaminant removal by iron chelations in the citric acid system. Column tests confirmed that citric acid could provide suitable acidic conditions to achieve higher than 55% contaminant removal rates.

  14. Grafting molecularly imprinted poly(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid) onto the surface of carbon microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongzhen; Zhang, Yan; Li, Sha; Liu, Xuguang; Xu, Bingshe

    2012-06-01

    Poly(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid) (PAMPS) was grafted on the surface of carbon microspheres (CMSs), which were modified in prior by a mixed acid (HNO3 and H2SO4) oxidation and 3-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane silanization. Then, the molecularly imprinting polymerization was carried out towards the macromolecule PAMPS grafted on the surface of CMSs using dibenzothiophene (DBT) as template, ethylene dimethacrylate as cross-linking agent and (NH4)2S2O8 (APS) as initiator to prepare surface molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP-PAMPS/CMSs) for adsorbing DBT. The optimized conditions of grafting PAMPS, including AMPS dosage, APS content, reaction temperature and reaction time, were emphasized in this paper. The morphology of the samples was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy. The functional groups were analyzed qualitatively by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. The grafting degree of PAMPS was investigated by thermogravimetry. The results show that the preferable AMPS dosage, APS content, reaction temperature and time were 5 g, 0.15 g, 70 °C and 12 h, respectively, for preparing PAMPS/CMSs composite on the basis of 1.0 g of silanized-CMSs. The absorbing characteristic of MIP-PAMPS/CMSs toward DBT was studied preliminarily with dynamic adsorption. In the experiment of dynamic adsorption, MIP-PAMPS/CMSs and non-imprinted polymer (NIP-PAMPS/CMSs) were compared with respect to their rapid adsorption in 1 mmol/L of DBT solution in n-hexane. When the first 1 mL of 1 mmol/L DBT solution was injected and flowed through a column packed with 0.1 g of MIP-PAMPS/CMSs, the content of DBT reduced to 0.265 mmol/L, that is, decreased significantly from 279 to 74 ppm. When 3 mL of DBT solution was flowed through the packed column, the adsorption of MIP-PAMPS/CMSs toward DBT reached saturation with the maximum adsorption amount of 1.38 × 10-2 mmol/g and the overall adsorption efficiency of 46%, while NIP-PAMPS/CMSs adsorbed only 1.66 × 10-3 mmol/g of DBT. It is suggested that the MIP-PAMPS/CMSs had much better adsorption property towards DBT than NIP-PAMPS/CMSs.

  15. In situ biodecolorization kinetics of Acid Red 66 in aqueous solutions by Trametes versicolor.

    PubMed

    Sukumar, M; Sivasamy, A; Swaminathan, G

    2009-08-15

    The biological decolorization methodology and the mechanism involved in the degradation of Acid Red 66 was chosen as a model of azo dye using the white rot fungi Trametes versicolor was studied. Biodecolorization of Acid Red 66 using white rot fungi T. versicolor was demonstrated by the decolorization of the culture medium, the extent of which was determined by monitoring the decrease in absorbance at 506 nm. The biodecolorization kinetics of Acid Red 66 (100 ppm) was found to be first order and the degradation rate coefficient is 1.312 x 10(-2)min(-1) (R=0.96683, n=8) at 30 degrees C. The effects of independent variables such as carbon sources, nitrogen sources pH, and temperature on the biodecolorization of Acid Red 66 was also investigated. PMID:19201090

  16. Basic solutions to carbon/carbon oxidation: Science and technology. Final report, 15 April 1993--14 April 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, I.R.; Chung, T.; Pantano, C.; Radovic, L.; Thrower, P.

    1998-04-14

    The goal of this study was to gain a fundamental understanding of the role of boron in carbon oxidation. Boron-doped carbons were synthesized via CVD, ion implantation and high temperature doping are subsequently characterized. It was found that high temperature doped HOPG carbons were ideal for oxidation studies because their surface could be reproduced, their surface structures were determined and they were able to be characterized by XPS, AFM and SEM. The direct analysis of the chemical structures and atomic arrangements in boron- doped carbon or carbon surfaces by these techniques was critical in determining the effect of boron on carbon oxidation. XPS was utilized in this work to determine the local bonding environment of boron in carbon before an after oxidation. It was necessary to obtain an accurate calibration of the B1s binding energy scale which was accomplished by obtaining photoemission spectra of boron-doped carbons with known structures (local boron bonding environments), such as boron oxide, boron carbide, triphenylboroxine, tourmaline, boric acid, danburite and high temperature boron-doped graphite. All of the aforementioned standards contain boron in a unique bonding environment and thus their spectra formulated a complete conversion of B1s binding energies to boron chemical environments which has not been reported in the past. It was clearly established that a chemical shift for substitutional boron in graphite exists at 186.5 eV with a FWHM of 1.2. The chemical structures of the boron in the standards were related to the binding energy using a Pauling charge distribution model and a modification of the Sanderson electronegativity method. This approach was used to determine whether the B1s binding energy would change depending upon the specific location of boron in the graphite or graphite surface.

  17. Solution Structure and Backbone Dynamics of Human Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein: Fatty Acid Binding Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jun; Lücke, Christian; Chen, Zhongjing; Qiao, Ye; Klimtchuk, Elena; Hamilton, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), a cytosolic protein most abundant in liver, is associated with intracellular transport of fatty acids, nuclear signaling, and regulation of intracellular lipolysis. Among the members of the intracellular lipid binding protein family, L-FABP is of particular interest as it can i), bind two fatty acid molecules simultaneously and ii), accommodate a variety of bulkier physiological ligands such as bilirubin and fatty acyl CoA. To better understand the promiscuous binding and transport properties of L-FABP, we investigated structure and dynamics of human L-FABP with and without bound ligands by means of heteronuclear NMR. The overall conformation of human L-FABP shows the typical ?-clam motif. Binding of two oleic acid (OA) molecules does not alter the protein conformation substantially, but perturbs the chemical shift of certain backbone and side-chain protons that are involved in OA binding according to the structure of the human L-FABP/OA complex. Comparison of the human apo and holo L-FABP structures revealed no evidence for an “open-cap” conformation or a “swivel-back” mechanism of the K90 side chain upon ligand binding, as proposed for rat L-FABP. Instead, we postulate that the lipid binding process in L-FABP is associated with backbone dynamics. PMID:22713574

  18. Study On Adsorption of Bromate From Aqueous Solution On Modified Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tong-mian; Cui, Fu-yi; Zhao, Zhi-wei; Liu, Dong-mei; Zhu, Qi; Wang, Huan

    2010-11-01

    A coal-based activated carbon was treated chemically with nitric acid, sodium hydroxide and ammonia for its surface modification, and its adsorption capacity was investigated with bromate. Several techniques were used to characterize the physicochemical properties of these materials including BET, XPS, pHpzc and Boehm titration. The results indicated that the specific surface area of the activated carbon decreased after oxidation with nitric acid. But the amount of surface acidic oxygen-containing functional groups of the oxidized sample increased compared to the raw carbon and the points of zero charge (pHpzc) decreased. The specific surface area of the activated carbon also decreased after sodium hydroxide treatment and the points of zero charge increased. The changes of surface chemical properties after the ammonia treatment was opposite to the oxidized sample. As a result, the pHpzc of the carbon was increased to near pH9.3, the amount of surface basic groups was increased. Furthermore, the data of bromate adsorption on all the samples were fitted to the Langmuir isotherm model well which indicates monolayer adsorption. In addition, the adsorption capacity of ammonia treatment sample was the highest and its saturated adsorption capacity reached 1.55 mg/g. A strong correlation was found between basic groups and adsorption capacity of bromate. Enhancement of basic groups was favorable for bromate removal.

  19. Simple quantification of surface carboxylic acids on chemically oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Hyejin; Kim, Seong-Taek; Lee, Jong Doo; Yim, Sanggyu

    2013-02-01

    The surface of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) was chemically oxidized using nitric acid and sulfuric-nitric acid mixtures. Thermogravimetric analysis, transmission electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy revealed that the use of acid mixtures led to higher degree of oxidation. More quantitative identification of surface carboxylic acids was carried out using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and acid-base titration. However, these techniques are costly and require very long analysis times to promptly respond to the extent of the reaction. We propose a much simpler method using pH measurements and pre-determined pKa value in order to estimate the concentration of carboxylic acids on the oxidized MWCNT surfaces. The results from this technique were consistent with those obtained from XPS and titration, and it is expected that this simple quantification method can provide a cheap and fast way to monitor and control the oxidation reaction of MWCNT.

  20. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of organic acids in total suspended particles and dusts from Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shexia; Peng, Ping'an; Song, Jianzhong; Zhao, Jinping; He, Lulu; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2010-10-01

    Stable carbon isotopic compositions of individual organic acids were determined in total suspended particles and dusts from Guangzhou. The ? 13C values of high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids (C 20-C 28) varied from -34.1‰ to -32.4‰ and tended to be heavier in summer and lighter in winter. These ? 13C values indicate that high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids were derived mainly from emission by C 3 plants. Reduced biological synthesis of high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids in winter may be the reason for the light carbon isotopic composition. The ? 13C values of low molecular weight n-alkanoic acids (C 10-C 18) changed from -31.7‰ to -30.3‰ and exhibited a reverse seasonal trend, i.e., heavier in winter and lighter in summer. Slightly heavier ? 13C values of low molecular weight n-alkanoic acids than those of high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids suggested that they may be emitted from blended sources, e.g., anthropogenic sources and vegetation waxes. Lighter ? 13C values in summer may be attributed to relatively low anthropogenic sources and high botanic sources in summer. Dicarboxylic acids and aromatic acids have been proposed as secondary products from photochemical degradation. The average ? 13C values of dicarboxylic acids and aromatic acids were heavier, and ranged from -25.2‰ to -22.9‰ and from -30.0‰ to -27.6‰, respectively. Both dicarboxylic acids and aromatic acids displayed the same temporal variations in the ? 13C values, i.e., negative ? 13C in the summer samples and positive in the winter samples, which may be controlled by photochemical reactions; they are generally severe in winter in Guangzhou under the monsoon weather system. The heaviest ? 13C values were observed in dicarboxylic acids, indicating that dicarboxylic acids were formed by fast and more complete oxidation reactions. These results indicate that the stable carbon isotopic composition of organic acids may provide important information about sources and photochemical reactions of organic matter in the atmosphere.

  1. Carbon isotopic fractionation in the biosynthesis of bacterial fatty acids. Ozonolysis of unsaturated fatty acids as a means of determining the intramolecular distribution of carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monson, K. David; Hayes, J. M.

    1982-02-01

    Methods for the determination of 13C abundances at individual olefinic carbon positions have been developed, tested, and shown to perform accurately. (1) The double bond is oxidized with ozone; (2) silver oxide is used to cleave the resulting ozonide quantitatively to carboxylic-acid fragments; (3) a modified Schmidt decarboxylation is used to produce CO 2 quantitatively from the carboxyl groups of the separated cleavage products; (4) the CO 2 is utilized for mass spectrometric analysis. The results of intramolecular isotopic analyses are combined with molecular-average isotopic compositions determined by total combustion in order to show that fatty acids biosynthesized by Escherichia coli grown aerobically with glucose as the sole carbon source and harvested at late log phase are depleted by approximately 3%. in 13C relative to the glucose. This fractionation arises in the formation of acetylcoenzyme A by pyruvate dehydrogenase and is localized at the carboxyl position in the acetyl-CoA product. The isotopic order in that two-carbon subunit is carried through the biosynthesis of fatty acids so that alternate positions in the fatty-acid chains are depleted in 13C by an amount equal to twice the molecular-average depletion. The kinetic isotope effect at C-2 for pyruvate dehydrogenase in vivo is shown to be approximately 2.3%. While it appears that no other fractionation mechanism has controlled the overall depletion of 13C in these fatty acids, a separate process responsible for control of isotopic abundances in the carboxyl groups has been identified and described elsewhere [Monson K.D. and Hayes J.M. (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 11435-11441]. It is concluded that kinetic, rather than thermodynamic, factors have controlled isotopic distributions in these cells and that kinetic factors will be dominant in most biological reactions.

  2. Carbon honeycomb grids for advanced lead-acid batteries. Part III: Technology scale-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchev, A.; Serra, L.; Dumenil, S.; Brichard, G.; Alias, M.; Jammet, B.; Vinit, L.

    2015-12-01

    The carbon honeycomb grid technology employs new carbon/carbon composites with ordered 3D structure instead of the classic lead-acid battery current collectors. The technology is laboratory scaled up from small size grids corresponding to electrodes with a capacity of 3 Ah to current collectors suitable for assembly of lead-acid batteries covering the majority of the typical lead-acid battery applications. Two series of 150 grids each (one positive and one negative) are manufactured using low-cost lab-scale equipment. They are further subjected to pasting with active materials and the resulting battery plates are assembled in 12 V AGM-VLRA battery mono-blocks for laboratory testing and outdoor demonstration in electric scooter replacing its original VRLAB pack. The obtained results demonstrate that the technology can replace successfully the state of the art negative grids with considerable benefits. The use of the carbon honeycomb grids as positive plate current collectors is limited by the anodic corrosion of the entire structure attacking both the carbon/carbon composite part and the electroplated lead-tin alloy coating.

  3. Length Scale Dependence of the Dynamic Properties of Hyaluronic Acid Solutions in the Presence of Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Horkay, Ferenc; Falus, Peter; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Geissler, Erik

    2010-12-07

    In solutions of the charged semirigid biopolymer hyaluronic acid in salt-free conditions, the diffusion coefficient D{sub NSE} measured at high transfer momentum q by neutron spin echo is more than an order of magnitude smaller than that determined by dynamic light scattering, D{sub DLS}. This behavior contrasts with neutral polymer solutions. With increasing salt content, D{sub DLS} approaches D{sub NSE}, which is independent of ionic strength. Contrary to theoretical expectation, the ion-polymer coupling, which dominates the low q dynamics of polyelectrolyte solutions, already breaks down at distance scales greater than the Debye-Hueckel length.

  4. Laboratory evaluation of limestone and lime neutralization of acidic uranium mill tailings solution. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Opitz, B.E.; Dodson, M.E.; Serne, R.J.

    1984-02-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate a two-step neutralization scheme for treatment of acidic uranium mill tailings solutions. Tailings solutions from the Lucky Mc Mill and Exxon Highland Mill, both in Wyoming, were neutralized with limestone, CaCO/sub 3/, to an intermediate pH of 4.0 or 5.0, followed by lime, Ca(OH)/sub 2/, neutralization to pH 7.3. The combination limestone/lime treatment methods, CaCO/sub 3/ neutralization to pH 4 followed by neutralization with Ca(OH)/sub 2/ to pH 7.3 resulted in the highest quality effluent solution with respect to EPA's water quality guidelines. The combination method is the most cost-effective treatment procedure tested in our studies. Neutralization experiments to evaluate the optimum solution pH for contaminant removal were performed on the same two tailings solutions using only lime Ca(OH)/sub 2/ as the neutralizing agent. The data indicate solution neutralization above pH 7.3 does not significantly increase removal of pH dependent contaminants from solution. Column leaching experiments were performed on the neutralized sludge material (the precipitated solid material which forms as the acidic tailings solutions are neutralized to pH 4 or above). The sludges were contacted with laboratory prepared synthetic ground water until several effluent pore volumes were collected. Effluent solutions were analyzed for macro ions, trace metals and radionuclides in an effort to evaluate the long term effectiveness of attenuating contaminants in sludges formed during solution neutralization. Neutralized sludge leaching experiments indicate that Ca, Na, Mg, Se, Cl, and SO/sub 4/ are the only constituents which show solution concentrations significantly higher than the synthetic ground water in the early pore volumes of long-term leaching studies.

  5. Spray washing carcasses with alkaline solutions of lauric acid to reduce bacterial contamination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of lauric acid (LA)-potassium hydroxide (KOH) solutions to reduce carcass bacterial contamination was examined. Skin of carcasses was inoculated with a cecal paste containing antibiotic resistant strains of Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimirum, and Campylobacter coli. In one trial, in...

  6. Modification of vital wheat gluten with phosphoric acid to produce high free-solution capacity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat gluten reacts with phosphoric acid to produce natural superabsorbent gels. The gel properties are defined by Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE), and uptake of water, salt solutions, and aqueous ethanol. Temperatures above 120'C and dry cond...

  7. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed...

  8. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed...

  9. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed...

  10. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed...

  11. Solution blow spun Poly(lactic acid)/Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose nanofibers with antimicrobial properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanofibers containing hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and tetracycline hydrochloride (THC) were solution blow spun from two different solvents, chloroform/acetone (CA, 80:20 v/v) and 2,2,2-triflouroethanol (TFE). The diameter distribution, chemical, thermal, thermal stab...

  12. Extraction of zirconium(IV) from aqueous acid solutions by trioctylphosphine oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, T.

    1983-01-01

    The extraction of zirconium(IV) from aqueous solutions of hydrochloric, nitric and sulphuric acids by trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in kerosene has been investigated under different conditions. The organic phases have been studied by infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. The extraction equilibria are discussed in light of the results obtained. 7 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Monte Carlo Simulation of the Electrodeposition of Copper II. Acid Sulfate Solution with Blocking Additive

    E-print Network

    Kushner, Mark

    Monte Carlo Simulation of the Electrodeposition of Copper II. Acid Sulfate Solution with Blocking, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA Simulation of copper electrodeposition in the presence of a hypothetical configurations in the shape of a rectangular trench. The mechanism of copper electrodeposition described in Part

  14. HOUSEHOLD AND STRUCTURAL INSECTS Laboratory Evaluation of Boric Acid-Sugar Solutions as Baits

    E-print Network

    for Management of German Cockroach Infestations J. CHAD GORE AND COBY SCHAL1 Department of Entomology, North was to evaluate the effectiveness of borate solutions as baits against the German cockroach. Several borate and expressed as lethal time90, the time taken to kill 90% of the cockroaches. Results showed that boric acid

  15. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed...

  16. Surface tensions and surface potentials of acid solutions Alexandre P. dos Santos and Yan Levina

    E-print Network

    Levin, Yan

    Surface tensions and surface potentials of acid solutions Alexandre P. dos Santos and Yan Levina October 2010 A theory is presented which allows us to quantitatively calculate the excess surface tension is quantitatively accurate for surface tensions and is qualitative for electrostatic potential difference across

  17. Effect of acid solutions on plants studied by the optical beam deflection method.

    PubMed

    Nie, Liangjiao; Kuboda, Mitsutoshi; Inoue, Tomomi; Wu, Xingzheng

    2013-12-01

    The optical beam deflection method was applied to study the effects of acid solution on both a terrestial and aquatic plants Egeria and Cerastium, which are common aquatic plant and terrestial weed respectively. A probe beam from a He-Ne laser was passed through a vicinity of a leaf of the plants, which were put in culture dishes filled with acid solutions. Deflection signals of the probe beam were monitored and compared for acid solutions with different pH values. The results of Egria showed that the deflection signals changed dramatically when pH values of acid solutions were 2.0 and 3.0, while little at pH of 4.0 and 5.0. For Cerastium when pH were below 3.0, deflection signals changed greatly with time at the begining. After a certain period of time, deflection signals changed little with time. When pH value was above 4.0, deflection signals of Cerastium were still changing with time even after 20 hours. The results suggested that the damage threshold of pH was between 3.0 and 4.0 for both the land and aquatic plants. PMID:25078849

  18. Long-term stability of earthen materials in contact with acidic tailings solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, S.R.; Erikson, R.L.; Gee, G.W.

    1982-11-01

    The objectives of the studies documented in this report were to use experimental and geochemical computer modeling tools to assess the long-term environmental impact of leachate movement from acidic uranium mill tailings. Liner failure (i.e., an increase in the permeability of the liner material) was not found to be a problem when various acidic tailings solutions leached through liner materials for periods up to 3 years. On the contrary, materials that contained over 30% clay showed a decrease in permeability with time in the laboratory columns. The high clay materials tested appear suitable for lining tailings impoundment ponds. The decreases in permeability are attributed to pore plugging resulting from the precipitation of minerals and solids. This precipitation takes place due to the increase in pH of the tailings solution brought about by the buffering capacity of the soil. Geochemical modeling predicts, and x-ray characterization confirms, that precipitation of solids from solution is occurring in the acidic tailings solution/liner interactions studied. In conclusion the same mineralogical changes and contaminant reactions predicted by geochemical modeling and observed in laboratory studies were found at a drained evaporation pond (Lucky Mc in Wyoming) with a 4 year history of acid attack.

  19. PHYSICAL SOLUTIONS FOR ACID ROCK DRAINAGE AT REMOTE SITES DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Program, Activity III, Project 42, Physical Solutions for Acid Rock Drainage at Remote Sites, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S. Department of Energy. A...

  20. Antimony recovery from SbCl5 acid solution by hydrolysis and aging

    E-print Network

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    Antimony recovery from SbCl5 acid solution by hydrolysis and aging Ling Meng, Shen-Gen Zhang*, De was recovered in the form of hydrated antimony pentoxide through the hydrolysis process. The effects of hydrolysis ratio and aging time on the Sb recovery process were studied, and the corresponding trends were

  1. Solution and shock-induced exsolution of argon in vitreous carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazis, Carey; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    To add to the knowledge of noble gas solution and exsolution in carbonaceus material, experiments were performed on vitreous carbon. Ar-rich vitreous carbon samples were prepared under vapor-saturated conditions using argon as the pressurizing medium. Solubility data were obtained for temperatures of 773 to 973 K and pressures of 250 to 1500 bars. Up to 7 wt pct Ar was dissolved in the carbon. The solubility data were compared to a thermodynamic model of argon atoms dissolving into a fixed population of 'holes' in the carbon. Two variations of the model yielded estimates of the enthalpy of solution of Ar in vitreous carbon equal to about -4700 cal/mole. Preliminary shock experiments showed that 28 percent of the total argon was released by driving 4 GPa shocks into the argon-rich carbon. It was demonstrated that shock-induced argon loss is not simply caused by the impact-induced diminution of grain size. The present value of shock pressure required for partial impact devolatilization of Ar from carbon is below the range (5-30 GPa) at which H2O is released from phyllosilicates.

  2. Sorption performance and mechanism of a sludge-derived char as porous carbon-based hybrid adsorbent for benzene derivatives in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingjun; Xiong, Ya; Sun, Lianpeng; Tian, Shuanghong; Xu, Xianyan; Zhao, Cunyuan; Luo, Rongshu; Yang, Xin; Shih, Kaimin; Liu, Haiyang

    2014-06-15

    A porous sludge-derived char was prepared by a new one-step pyrolytic process with citric acid-ZnCl2 mixed fabricating-pore agents. The sludge-derived char was confirmed to be a hierarchically porous hybrid adsorbent containing-elemental carbon, -highly carbonized organic species and -inorganic ash with a great surface area of 792.4m(2)g(-1). It was used as a carbon-based hybrid adsorbent for four benzene derivatives including 4-chlorophenol, phenol, benzoic acid and 4-hydroxylbenzoic acid in aqueous solution. Results showed that their sorption isotherms were nonlinear at low concentrations and linear at high concentrations. The sorption performance could be described by a multiple sorption model (QT=QA+KPCe). The order of these partition sorption coefficients (KP) of these benzene derivatives was consistent with their octanol-water partition coefficients (logKow), but those saturated amounts (QA) were inconsistent with their logKow. The inconstancy was found to be considerably dependent on the preferential interaction of benzoic acid with SiO2 in the sludge-derived char. Quantum theoretical calculation confirmed that the preferential interaction was attributed to the formation of hydrogen bonds (1.61 and 1.69?) and new Si-O bonds (1.83 and 1.87?) between the carboxyl of benzoic acid and the SiO2 surface in the sorption process. PMID:24793296

  3. Effects of solution chemistry and flow on the corrosion of carbon steel in sweet production

    SciTech Connect

    Herce, J.A.; Wright, E.J.; Efird, K.D.; Boros, J.A.; Hailey, T.G.

    1995-10-01

    The corrosion rate of AISI 1018 carbon steel was measured over a range of temperatures, CO{sub 2} partial pressures, flow rates, and solution chemistry under turbulent pipe flow conditions. The combined effects of CO{sub 2} partial pressure, ionic strength, temperature, and initial bicarbonate ion concentration, i.e., solution chemistry, may be described by a single variable, pH. The effects of flow can be combined with pH to form a new variable, hydrogen ion flux, to describe the overall effect of solution chemistry and flow on the sweet corrosion of a film free carbon steel surface. Sweet corrosion rates are directly proportional to hydrogen ion flux over a wide range of temperatures and solution pH`s. Finally, the separate effects of dissolved iron and chloride ion concentration are described.

  4. Effects of Lime and Carbonate of Lime on Acid Phosphate. 

    E-print Network

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1917-01-01

    STATION AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS W. B. BIZZELL, President BULLETIN NO. 243 MARCH, 1919 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY THE NEED OF TEXAS SOILS FOR LIME B. YOUNGBLOOD, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRtlZOS COUNTY, TEXAS STATION STAFFt... PAGE ............................................. What lime does 5 ............................................. Acidity of soils 7 ............................................. Sources of lime 8 ............................ Chemical...

  5. Formation of molecular complexes of salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, and methyl salicylate in a mixture of supercritical carbon dioxide with a polar cosolvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, V. E.; Antipova, M. L.; Gurina, D. L.; Odintsova, E. G.

    2015-08-01

    The solvate structures formed by salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, and methyl salicylate in supercritical (SC) carbon dioxide with a polar cosolvent (methanol, 0.03 mole fractions) at a density of 0.7 g/cm3 and a temperature of 318 K were studied by the molecular dynamics method. Salicylic and acetylsalicylic acids were found to form highly stable hydrogen-bonded complexes with methanol via the hydrogen atom of the carboxyl group. For methyl salicylate in which the carboxyl hydrogen is substituted by a methyl radical, the formation of stable hydrogen bonds with methanol was not revealed. The contribution of other functional groups of the solute to the interactions with the cosolvent was much smaller. An analysis of correlations between the obtained data and the literature data on the cosolvent effect on the solubility of the compounds in SC CO2 showed that the dissolving ability of SC CO2 with respect to a polar organic substance in the presence of a cosolvent increased only when stable hydrogen-bonded complexes are formed between this substance and the cosolvent.

  6. Enantioselective small molecule synthesis by carbon dioxide fixation using a dual Brønsted acid/base organocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Vara, Brandon A; Struble, Thomas J; Wang, Weiwei; Dobish, Mark C; Johnston, Jeffrey N

    2015-06-17

    Carbon dioxide exhibits many of the qualities of an ideal reagent: it is nontoxic, plentiful, and inexpensive. Unlike other gaseous reagents, however, it has found limited use in enantioselective synthesis. Moreover, unprecedented is a tool that merges one of the simplest biological approaches to catalysis-Brønsted acid/base activation-with this abundant reagent. We describe a metal-free small molecule catalyst that achieves the three component reaction between a homoallylic alcohol, carbon dioxide, and an electrophilic source of iodine. Cyclic carbonates are formed enantioselectively. PMID:26039818

  7. Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part I. Regeneration of Amine-Carboxylic Acid Extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, L.J.; King, C.J.

    1990-03-01

    Two novel regenerated solvent extraction processes are examined. The first process has the potential to reduce the energy costs inherent in the recovery of low-volatility carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solutions. The second process has the potential for reducing the energy costs required for separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases (e.g. CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) from industrial sour waters. The recovery of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solution can be achieved by extraction with tertiary amines. An approach for regeneration and product recovery from such extracts is to back-extract the carboxylic acid with a water-soluble, volatile tertiary amine, such as trimethylamine. The resulting trimethylammonium carboxylate solution can be concentrated and thermally decomposed, yielding the product acid and the volatile amine for recycle. Experimental work was performed with lactic acid, succinic acid, and fumaric acid. Equilibrium data show near-stoichiometric recovery of the carboxylic acids from an organic solution of Alamine 336 into aqueous solutions of trimethylamine. For fumaric and succinic acids, partial evaporation of the aqueous back extract decomposes the carboxylate and yields the acid product in crystalline form. The decomposition of aqueous solutions of trimethylammonium lactates was not carried out to completion, due to the high water solubility of lactic acid and the tendency of the acid to self-associate. The separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases from sour waters can be achieved by combining steam-stripping of the acid gases with simultaneous removal of ammonia by extraction with a liquid cation exchanger. The use of di-2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic acid as the liquid cation exchanger is explored in this work. Batch extraction experiments were carried out to measure the equilibrium distribution ratio of ammonia between an aqueous buffer solution and an organic solution of the phosphinic acid (0.2N) in Norpar 12. The concentration-based distribution ratios increase from 0.11 to 0.46 as the aqueous phase pH increases from 7.18 to 8.15. Regeneration of the organic extractant solution was carried out by stripping at elevated temperatures to remove the ammonia, with 99% recovery of the ammonia being obtained at 125 C.

  8. Carbonic acid as a reserve of carbon dioxide on icy moons: The formation of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in a polar environment

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Brant M.; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Strazzulla, Giovanni

    2014-06-20

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) has been detected on the surface of several icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn via observation of the ?{sub 3} band with the Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Galileo spacecraft and the Visible-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Cassini spacecraft. Interestingly, the CO{sub 2} band for several of these moons exhibits a blueshift along with a broader profile than that seen in laboratory studies and other astrophysical environments. As such, numerous attempts have been made in order to clarify this abnormal behavior; however, it currently lacks an acceptable physical or chemical explanation. We present a rather surprising result pertaining to the synthesis of carbon dioxide in a polar environment. Here, carbonic acid was synthesized in a water (H{sub 2}O)-carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) (1:5) ice mixture exposed to ionizing radiation in the form of 5 keV electrons. The irradiated ice mixture was then annealed, producing pure carbonic acid which was then subsequently irradiated, recycling water and carbon dioxide. However, the observed carbon dioxide ?{sub 3} band matches almost exactly with that observed on Callisto; subsequent temperature program desorption studies reveal that carbon dioxide synthesized under these conditions remains in solid form until 160 K, i.e., the sublimation temperature of water. Consequently, our results suggest that carbon dioxide on Callisto as well as other icy moons is indeed complexed with water rationalizing the shift in peak frequency, broad profile, and the solid state existence on these relatively warm moons.

  9. An HPLC chromatographic framework to analyze the ?-cyclodextrin/solute complexation mechanism using a carbon nanotube stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Aljhni, Rania; Andre, Claire; Lethier, Lydie; Guillaume, Yves Claude

    2015-11-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) stationary phase was used for the first time to study the ?-cyclodextrin (?-CD) solute complexation mechanism using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). For this, the ?-CD was added at various concentrations in the mobile phase and the effect of column temperature was studied on both the retention of a series of aniline and benzoic acid derivatives with the CNT stationary phase and their complexation mechanism with ?-CD. A decrease in the solute retention factor was observed for all the studied molecules without change in the retention order. The apparent formation constant KF of the inclusion complex ?-CD/solute was determined at various temperatures. Our results showed that the interaction of ?-CD with both the mobile phase and the stationary phase interfered in the complex formation. The enthalpy and entropy of the complex formation (?HF and ?SF) between the solute molecule and CD were determined using a thermodynamic approach. Negative enthalpies and entropies indicated that the inclusion process of the studied molecule in the CD cavity was enthalpically driven and that the hydrogen bonds between carboxylic or aniline groups and the functional groups on the ?-CD rim play an important role in the complex formation. PMID:26452814

  10. Rhizosphere bacterial carbon turnover is higher in nucleic acids than membrane lipids: implications for understanding soil carbon cycling

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ashish A.; Dannert, Helena; Griffiths, Robert I.; Thomson, Bruce C.; Gleixner, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Using a pulse chase 13CO2 plant labeling experiment we compared the flow of plant carbon into macromolecular fractions of rhizosphere soil microorganisms. Time dependent 13C dilution patterns in microbial cellular fractions were used to calculate their turnover time. The turnover times of microbial biomolecules were found to vary: microbial RNA (19 h) and DNA (30 h) turned over fastest followed by chloroform fumigation extraction-derived soluble cell lysis products (14 days), while phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) had the slowest turnover (42 days). PLFA/NLFA 13C analyses suggest that both mutualistic arbuscular mycorrhizal and saprophytic fungi are dominant in initial plant carbon uptake. In contrast, high initial 13C enrichment in RNA hints at bacterial importance in initial C uptake due to the dominance of bacterial derived RNA in total extracts of soil RNA. To explain this discrepancy, we observed low renewal rate of bacterial lipids, which may therefore bias lipid fatty acid based interpretations of the role of bacteria in soil microbial food webs. Based on our findings, we question current assumptions regarding plant-microbe carbon flux and suggest that the rhizosphere bacterial contribution to plant assimilate uptake could be higher. This highlights the need for more detailed quantitative investigations with nucleic acid biomarkers to further validate these findings. PMID:25914679

  11. A unified molecular picture of the surfaces of aqueous acid, base, and salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Mucha, M.; Frigato, Tomaso; Levering, Lori; Allen, Heather C.; Tobias, Douglas J.; Dang, Liem X.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2005-04-28

    A unified view of the structure of the air/solution interface of simple aqueous electrolytes containing monovalent inorganic ions is developed using molecular dynamics simulations and vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy. In salt solutions and bases the positively charged ions, such as alkali cations, are repelled from the air/solution interface, while the anions, such as halides or hydroxide, exhibit a varying propensity for the surface, correlated primarily with the polarizability of the ion. As a result, there is a net depletion of ions from the interfacial layer as a whole, which is connected via the Gibbs adsorption equation to an increase in surface tension with respect to neat water. The behavior of acids, such as aqueous HCl or HBr, is different due to a significant propensity of hydronium cations for the air/solution interface. Therefore, both cations and anions exhibit enhanced concentrations at the surface and, consequently, these acids reduce the surface tension of water. The key to the qualitatively different surface behavior of aqueous salt solutions and bases on one side and acids on the other thus lies in the appreciable adsorption of hydronium cations at the air/solution interface with their “hydrophobic” oxygen side oriented towards the gas phase. The results of the molecular dynamics calculations are supported by surface selective non-linear vibrational spectroscopy, which reveals among other things that the hydronium cations are present at the air/solution interface. The propensity of inorganic ions for the air/solution interface has important implications for heterogeneous chemical processes, in particular for atmospheric chemistry.

  12. Viscometric study of chitosan solutions in acetic acid/sodium acetate and acetic acid/sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Costa, Cristiane N; Teixeira, Viviane G; Delpech, Marcia C; Souza, Josefa Virginia S; Costa, Marcos A S

    2015-11-20

    A viscometric study was carried out at 25°C to assess the physical-chemical behavior in solution and the mean viscometric molar mass (M¯v) of chitosan solutions with different deacetylation degrees, in two solvent mixtures: medium 1-acetic acid 0.3mol/L and sodium acetate 0.2mol/L; and medium 2-acetic acid 0.1mol/L and sodium chloride 0.2mol/L. Different equations were employed, by graphical extrapolation, to calculate the intrinsic viscosities [?] and the viscometric constants, to reveal the solvent's quality: Huggins (H), Kraemer (K) and Schulz-Blaschke (SB). For single-point determination, the equations used were SB, Solomon-Ciuta (SC) and Deb-Chanterjee (DC), resulting in a faster form of analysis. The values of ?M¯v were calculated by applying the equation of Mark-Houwink-Sakurada. The SB and SC equations were most suitable for single-point determination of [?] and ?M¯v and the Schulz-Blachke constant (kSB), equal to 0.28, already utilized for various systems, can also be employed to analyze chitosan solutions under the conditions studied. PMID:26344278

  13. Evaluation of Perforated Carbonate Cores Under Acid Stimulation 

    E-print Network

    Diaz, Nerwing Jose

    2011-10-21

    productivity. Shaped charges? goal is to enhance well productivity by creating long perforations to by-pass the casing, cement and the contaminated zone resulting from drilling operations. But it is known that the stress created by the action of the jet... in obtaining single and deep penetrating wormholes. The purpose of this research study is to introduce the impact of reactive shaped charges in carbonate wormholing. The type of shaped charges tested in this research generates a secondary reaction...

  14. A Convenient Palladium-Catalyzed Carbonylative Suzuki Coupling of Aryl Halides with Formic Acid as the Carbon Monoxide Source.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xinxin; Jiang, Li-Bing; Li, Hao-Peng; Wu, Xiao-Feng

    2015-12-01

    A practical palladium-catalyzed carbonylative Suzuki coupling of aryl halides under carbon monoxide gas-free conditions has been developed. Here, formic acid was utilized as the carbon monoxide source for the first time with acetic anhydride as the additive. A variety of diarylketones were produced in moderate to excellent yields from the corresponding aryl halides and arylboronic acids. PMID:26486227

  15. Acid rain damage to carbonate stone: a quantitative assessment based on the aqueous geochemistry of rainfall runoff from stone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    An onsite experimental procedure was used to identify and quantify acid rain damage to carbonate stone, based on the change in rain runoff chemical composition. Onsite data obtained during the summer and fall of 1984 at three locations in the northeastern United States indicate that carbonate stone surface recession is related to acid deposition. -from Author

  16. On the formation of carbonic acid (H2CO3) in solar system ices Weijun Zheng a,b

    E-print Network

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    On the formation of carbonic acid (H2CO3) in solar system ices Weijun Zheng a,b , Ralf I. Kaiser b) of the formation pro- cesses. Our experimental results indicate that carbonic acid might be present in the solar; these temperatures do not mimic the majority of solar system ices that harbor these ice mixtures. Would higher

  17. Single wall carbon nanotube fibers extruded from super-acid suspensions: Preferred orientation, electrical, and thermal transport

    E-print Network

    Natelson, Douglas

    Single wall carbon nanotube fibers extruded from super-acid suspensions: Preferred orientation September 2003 Fibers of single wall carbon nanotubes extruded from super-acid suspensions exhibit preferred orientation along their axes. We characterize the alignment by x-ray fiber diagrams and polarized Raman

  18. Correlation between mesopore volume of carbon supports and the immobilization of laccase from Trametes versicolor for the decolorization of Acid Orange 7.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Montoya, Luis A; Hernández-Montoya, Virginia; Montes-Morán, Miguel A; Cervantes, Francisco J

    2015-10-01

    Immobilization of laccase from Trametes versicolor was carried out using carbon supports prepared from different lignocellulosic wastes. Enzymes were immobilized by physical adsorption. Taguchi methodology was selected for the design of experiments regarding the preparation of the carbon materials, which included the use of activating agents for the promotion of mesoporosity. A good correlation between the mesopore volumes of the carbon supports and the corresponding laccase loadings attained was observed. Specifically, the chemical activation of pecan nut shell with FeCl3 led to a highly mesoporous material that also behaved as the most efficient support for the immobilization of laccase. This particular laccase/carbon support system was used as biocatalyst for the decolorization of aqueous solutions containing Acid Orange 7. Mass spectrometry coupled to a liquid chromatograph allowed us to identify the products of the dye degradation. PMID:26241936

  19. Carbon Isotopic Measurements of Amino Acids in Stardust-Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned to Earth samples from comet 81P/Wild 2 in January 2006. Preliminary examinations revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds could not be identified. Here, we present the carbon isotopic ratios of glycine and e-aminocaproic acid (EACA), the two most abundant amino acids, in Stardust-returned foil samples measured by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled with quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-CAMS/IRMS).

  20. Carbon Isotopic Ratios of Amino Acids in Stardust-Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned to Earth samples from comet 81P/Wild 2 in January 2006. Preliminary examinations revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds could not be identified. Here. we present the carbon isotopic ratios of glycine and E-aminocaproic acid (EACH), the two most abundant amino acids observed, in Stardust-returned foil samples measured by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio crass spectrometry coupled with quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-QMS/IRMS).

  1. Roles of sulfuric acid in elemental mercury removal by activated carbon and sulfur-impregnated activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Morris, Eric A; Kirk, Donald W; Jia, Charles Q; Morita, Kazuki

    2012-07-17

    This work addresses the discrepancy in the literature regarding the effects of sulfuric acid (H(2)SO(4)) on elemental Hg uptake by activated carbon (AC). H(2)SO(4) in AC substantially increased Hg uptake by absorption particularly in the presence of oxygen. Hg uptake increased with acid amount and temperature exceeding 500 mg-Hg/g-AC after 3 days at 200 °C with AC treated with 20% H(2)SO(4). In the absence of other strong oxidizers, oxygen was able to oxidize Hg. Upon oxidation, Hg was more readily soluble in the acid, greatly enhancing its uptake by acid-treated AC. Without O(2), S(VI) in H(2)SO(4) was able to oxidize Hg, thus making it soluble in H(2)SO(4). Consequently, the presence of a bulk H(2)SO(4) phase within AC pores resulted in an orders of magnitude increase in Hg uptake capacity. However, the bulk H(2)SO(4) phase lowered the AC pore volume and could block the access to the active surface sites and potentially hinder Hg uptake kinetics. AC treated with SO(2) at 700 °C exhibited a much faster rate of Hg uptake attributed to sulfur functional groups enhancing adsorption kinetics. SO(2)-treated carbon maintained its fast uptake kinetics even after impregnation by 20% H(2)SO(4). PMID:22681637

  2. Spectrofluorimetric study of the interaction of ciprofloxacin with amino acids in aqueous solution following solvatochromic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Kamal; Mobarrez, Mahsa; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Norouzi, Parviz; Chaichi, Mohammad Javad

    Complexation of a fluoroquinolone derivative (ciprofloxacin), L, and some amino acids has been studied using spectrofluorimetric method. Results indicated that ciprofloxacin have a greater tendency to form a 1:1 complex with aspartic acid and arginine than the other tested molecules. The fluorescence of ciprofloxacin exhibits quenching process while it has been titrated with these amino acids. Formation constant values (Kf) for complex formed between ciprofloxacin and amino acids were also calculated. Thermodynamic parameters such as ?G°, ?H° and ?S° were studied too. Possible reasons for the observed stability sequence were discussed based on the structures proposed for the resulting complexes. Besides the solution studies, solvatochromic properties of the ciprofloxacin are discussed by studying its spectra in a selection of different solvents.

  3. Infusion of Branched-chain Enriched Amino Acid Solution in Patients with Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Herbert; Dienstag, Jules; Lehrich, James; Yoshimura, Norman; Bradford, Ronald R.; Rosen, Harvey; Atamian, Susan; Slemmer, Elizabeth; Holroyde, Jane; Fischer, Josef E.

    1982-01-01

    Hospitalized patients with hepatic insufficiency often suffer from severe catabolic states and are in urgent need of nutritional support during their acute illness. Protein intolerence, however, remains a significant problem with respect to the provision of adequate nutrition, either enterally or parenterally. The following report is an anecdotal series of 63 consecutive patients in a large urban hospital treated prospectively with nutritional support using a prototype high branched-chain amino acid solution (FO80) given by technique of total parenteral nutrition by the subclavian or internal jugular route with hypertonic dextrose. Sixty-three patients, of which 42 had chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) with acute decompensation and 17 with acute hepatic injury as well as four with hepatorenal syndrome, are the subject of this report. All required intravenous nutritional support and were either intolerant to commercially available parenteral nutrition solutions or were in hepatic encephalopathy at the time they were initially seen. The cirrhotic patients had been hospitalized for a mean of 14.5 ± 1.9 days before therapy, had a mean bilirubin of 13 mg/100 ml, and had been in coma for 4.8 ± 0.7 days despite standard therapy. Patients with acute hepatitis had been in the hospital for 16.2 ± 4.1 days before therapy, had a mean bilirubin of 25 mg/100 ml, and had been in coma 5.2 ± 1.6 days before therapy. Routine tests of liver function, blood chemistries, amino acids, EEGs, and complex neurological testing including Reitan trailmaking tests were used in the evaluation of these patients. Up to 120 grams of synthetic amino acid solution with hypertonic dextrose was tolerated in these patients with improvement noted in encephalopathy of at least one grade in 87% of the patients with cirrhosis and 75% of the patients with hepatitis. Nitrogen balance was achieved when 75 to 80 grams of synthetic amino acids were administered. Survival was 45% in the cirrhotic group and 47% in the acute hepatitis group. Encephalopathy appeared to correlate with individual amino acids differentially in the various groups and with the ratio between the aromatic and the branched-chain amino acids. Ammonia did not correlate with either the degree of encephalopathy or improvement therefrom. In 24 Patients therapy for hepatic encephalopathy was limited to infusion of the branched-chain enriched amino acid solution only, with wake-up in 66% of this group. The results strongly suggest that in protein intolerant patients requiring nutritional support, infusion with branchedchain enriched amino acid solutions is well tolerated with either no worsening of or improvement in hepatic encephalopathy coincident with the achievement of nitrogen equilibrium and adequate nutritional support. PMID:6284073

  4. Studies on adsorption of mercury from aqueous solution on activated carbons prepared from walnut shell.

    PubMed

    Zabihi, M; Haghighi Asl, A; Ahmadpour, A

    2010-02-15

    The adsorption ability of a powdered activated carbons (PAC) derived from walnut shell was investigated in an attempt to produce more economic and effective sorbents for the control of Hg(II) ion from industrial liquid streams. Carbonaceous sorbents derived from local walnut shell, were prepared by chemical activation methods using ZnCl(2) as activating reagents. Adsorption of Hg(II) from aqueous solutions was carried out under different experimental conditions by varying treatment time, metal ion concentration, pH and solution temperature. It was shown that Hg(II) uptake decreases with increasing pH of the solution. The proper choice of preparation conditions were resulted in microporous activated carbons with different BET surface areas of 780 (Carbon A, 1:0.5 ZnCl(2)) and 803 (Carbon B, 1:1 ZnCl(2))m(2)/g BET surface area. The monolayer adsorption capacity of these particular adsorbents were obtained as 151.5 and 100.9 mg/g for carbons A and B, respectively. It was determined that Hg(II) adsorption follows both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms as well as pseudo-second-order kinetics. PMID:19833433

  5. Extraction and recovery of plutonium and americium from nitric acid waste solutions by the TRUEX process - continuing development studies

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, R.A.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Kalina, D.G.; Fischer, D.F.; Bane, R.W.; Burris, L.; Horwitz, E.P.; Chiarisia, R.; Diamond, H.

    1985-09-01

    This report summarizes the work done to date on the application of the TRUEX solvent extraction process for removing and separately recovering plutonium and americium from a nitric acid waste solution containing these elements, uranium, and a complement of inert metal ions. This simulated waste stream is typical of a raffinate from a tributyl phosphate (TBP)-based solvent extraction process for removing uranium and plutonium from dissolved plutonium-containing metallurgical scrap. The TRUEX process solvent in these experiments was a solution of TBP and octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) dissolved in carbon tetrachloride. A flowsheet was designed on the basis of measured batch distribution ratios to reduce the TRU content of the solidified raffinate to less than or equal to 10 nCi/g and was tested in a countercurrent experiment performed in a 14-stage Argonne-model centrifugal contractor. The process solvent was recycled without cleanup. An unexpectedly high evaporative loss of CCl/sub 4/ resulted in concentration of the active extractant, CMPO, to nearly 0.30M in the solvent. Results are consistent with this higher CMPO concentration. The raffinate contained only 2 nCi/g of TRU, but the higher CMPO concentration resulted in reduced effectiveness in the stripping of americium from the solvent. Conditions can be easily adjusted to give high yields and good separation of americium and plutonium. Experimental studies of the hydrolytic and gamma-radiolytic degradation of the TRUEX-CCl/sub 4/ showed that solvent degradation would be (1) minimal for a year of processing this typical feed, which contained no fission products, and (2) could be explained almost entirely by hydrolytic and radiolytic damage to TBP. Even for gross amounts of solvent damage, scrubbing with aqueous sodium carbonate solution restored the original americium extraction and stripping capability of the solvent. 43 refs., 5 figs., 36 tabs.

  6. Study of the decomposition pathway of 12-molybdophosphoric acid in aqueous solutions by micro Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajuk-Bogdanovi?, D.; Uskokovi?-Markovi?, S.; Hercigonja, R.; Popa, A.; Holclajtner-Antunovi?, I.

    2016-01-01

    Micro Raman spectroscopy was applied to investigate the speciation of heteropoly and isopoly molybdates in 0.05 and 0.005 M aqueous solutions of 12-molybdophosphoric acid at pH values between 1 and 6. For comparative purposes, 31P NMR spectroscopy was applied too. It is shown that stability of Keggin anion is influenced both by pH and concentration of solution. The Keggin structure is stable in acidic solutions (pH < 1.6) while defective Keggin structures are formed with further alkalization (up to pH 5.6). Monolacunary anion PMo11O397 - is the main component in the pH region from 1.6 to 3.4. Further removal of molybdenyl species causes the appearance of other vacant Keggin structures such as PMo9O31(OH)36 - and PMo6O259 - at about pH 4. At pH 5.0, anion PMo6O259 - is the main species. In solutions with pH greater than 5.0, heteropolymolybdates disappear completely and isopolymolybdates Mo7O246 - and MoO42 - are formed in higher amounts. In more diluted solution of 0.005 M, the decomposition scheme of 12-molybdophosphoric acid solution with increasing of pH takes place without observation of significant amounts of Mo7O246 - species. If alkalinization is performed with 0.5 M instead of 5 M NaOH, there are no significant changes in the Raman spectra of solutions. It is shown that the spectra of evaporated samples may be used for the identification of molecular species in corresponding concentrated solutions. However, Raman spectra of dry residues of more diluted solutions differ from spectra of corresponding solutions due to the reactions performed during the process of drying and cannot be used for unambiguous identification of species in solution. Acidification of 0.05 M solution of Na2MoO4 shows that at pH > 5.6, molybdate anion MoO42 - dominates, while in the pH range between 5.6 and 1, heptamolybdate anion Mo7O246 - is preferentially formed.

  7. Study of the decomposition pathway of 12-molybdophosphoric acid in aqueous solutions by micro Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bajuk-Bogdanovi?, D; Uskokovi?-Markovi?, S; Hercigonja, R; Popa, A; Holclajtner-Antunovi?, I

    2016-01-15

    Micro Raman spectroscopy was applied to investigate the speciation of heteropoly and isopoly molybdates in 0.05 and 0.005M aqueous solutions of 12-molybdophosphoric acid at pH values between 1 and 6. For comparative purposes, (31)P NMR spectroscopy was applied too. It is shown that stability of Keggin anion is influenced both by pH and concentration of solution. The Keggin structure is stable in acidic solutions (pH<1.6) while defective Keggin structures are formed with further alkalization (up to pH5.6). Monolacunary anion PMo11O39(7-) is the main component in the pH region from 1.6 to 3.4. Further removal of molybdenyl species causes the appearance of other vacant Keggin structures such as PMo9O31(OH)3(6-) and PMo6O25(9-) at about pH4. At pH5.0, anion PMo6O25(9-) is the main species. In solutions with pH greater than 5.0, heteropolymolybdates disappear completely and isopolymolybdates Mo7O24(6-) and MoO4(2-) are formed in higher amounts. In more diluted solution of 0.005M, the decomposition scheme of 12-molybdophosphoric acid solution with increasing of pH takes place without observation of significant amounts of Mo7O24(6-) species. If alkalinization is performed with 0.5M instead of 5M NaOH, there are no significant changes in the Raman spectra of solutions. It is shown that the spectra of evaporated samples may be used for the identification of molecular species in corresponding concentrated solutions. However, Raman spectra of dry residues of more diluted solutions differ from spectra of corresponding solutions due to the reactions performed during the process of drying and cannot be used for unambiguous identification of species in solution. Acidification of 0.05M solution of Na2MoO4 shows that at pH>5.6, molybdate anion MoO4(2-) dominates, while in the pH range between 5.6 and 1, heptamolybdate anion Mo7O24(6-) is preferentially formed. PMID:26301540

  8. Preparation of activated carbon using low temperature carbonisation and physical activation of high ash raw bagasse for acid dye adsorption.

    PubMed

    Valix, M; Cheung, W H; McKay, G

    2004-08-01

    Activated carbons were prepared from bagasse through a low temperature (160 degrees C) chemical carbonisation treatment and gasification with carbon dioxide at 900 degrees C. The merit of low temperature chemical carbonisation in preparing chars for activation was assessed by comparing the physical and chemical properties of activated carbons developed by this technique to conventional methods involving the use of thermal and vacuum pyrolysis of bagasse. In addition, the adsorption properties (acid blue dye) of these bagasse activated carbons were also compared with a commercial activated carbon. The results suggest that despite the high ash content of the precursor, high surface areas (614-1433 m2 g(-1)) and microporous (median pore size from 0.45 to 1.2 nm) activated carbons can be generated through chemical carbonisation and gasification. The micropore area of the activated carbon developed from chars prepared by the low temperature chemical carbonisation provides favourable adsorption sites to acid blue dye (391 mg g(-1) of carbon). The alkalinity of the carbon surface and total surface area were shown to have complementary effects in promoting the adsorption of acid blue dye. Adsorption of the anionic coloured component of the acid dye was shown to be promoted in carbon exhibiting alkaline or positively charged surfaces. This study demonstrates that activated carbons with high acid dye adsorption capacities can be prepared from high ash bagasse based on low temperature chemical carbonisation and gasification. PMID:15212915

  9. Strontium removal from caustic carbonate waste solutions using carrier coprecipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, D.A.; Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Burgess, M.W.

    1994-09-01

    A carrier coprecipitation procedure has been developed for the radioactive strontium from caustic liquid low-level waste (LLLW) generated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The from caustic liquid low-level waste (LLLW) generated at Oak two-step treatment process involves the addition of normal Sr (as SrCl{sub 2}) to the waste matrix, which is composed primarily of 0.3 M NAOH and 0.6 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. The active Sr equilibrates with the normal Sr carrier and coprecipitates as SrCO{sub 3} at pH 13. A liquid/solid separation is made before the pH of the supernate is reduced to pH 8 with sulfuric acid. During the neutralization step, the aluminum in the waste precipitates as Al(OH){sub 3} Further Sr decontamination is achieved as traces of active Sr sorb to the Al(OH){sub 3} that precipitates during the neutralization step. A final liquid/solid separation is made at pH 8 to remove the sorbed active Sr.

  10. FATTY ACID STABLE ISOTOPE INDICATORS OF MICROBIAL CARBON SOURCE IN TROPICAL SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The soil microbial community plays an important role in tropical ecosystem functioning because of its importance in the soil organic matter (SOM) cycle. We have measured the stable carbon isotopic ratio (delta13C) of individual phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in a variety of tr...

  11. Numbers of bacteria recovered from broiler carcasses and chiller water treated with hypochlorous and carbonic acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of treating poultry chiller water with a mixture of hypochlorous and carbonic acids. Broiler carcasses and chiller water were obtained from a commercial processing facility which had recently installed a TOMCO Pathogen Management SystemJ to recycle wat...

  12. EFFECT OF ACID TREATMENT ON DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON RETENTION BY A SPODIC HORIZON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Processes involving the movement of organic substances in forest soils are not well understood. This study was conducted to examine the role of acidic inputs on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) mobility, processes affecting the retention of DOV by a B horizon, and SO2-4 adsorption....

  13. Polymerization of euphorbia oil with Lewis acid in carbon dioxide media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Boron trifluoride diethyl etherate (BF3-OEt2) Lewis acid catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of euphorbia oil (EO), a natural epoxy oil, in liquid carbon dioxide was conducted in an effort to develop useful vegetable oil based polymers. The resulting polymers (RPEO) were characterized by FTIR, 1H-...

  14. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of bacterial fatty acids in a seagrass dominated system 

    E-print Network

    Jones, Walter Brian

    2001-01-01

    as a proxy of organic carbon sources to the sediment. T. testudinum above ground tissues averaged -11.8±0.3[0/00] and benthic microalgae, as represented by the fatty acid 20:5[]3, averaged -20.5±0.6[0/00]. The TO¹³C from all habitats and depths were...

  15. Changing fluxes of carbon and other solutes from the Mekong River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Siyue; Bush, Richard T.

    2015-11-01

    Rivers are an important aquatic conduit that connects terrestrial sources of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and other elements with oceanic reservoirs. The Mekong River, one of the world’s largest rivers, is firstly examined to explore inter-annual fluxes of dissolved and particulate constituents during 1923–2011 and their associated natural or anthropogenic controls. Over this period, inter-annual fluxes of dissolved and particulate constituents decrease, while anthropogenic activities have doubled the relative abundance of SO42?, Cl? and Na+. The estimated fluxes of solutes from the Mekong decrease as follows (Mt/y): TDS (40.4)?>?HCO3? (23.4)?>?Ca2+ (6.4)?>?SO42? (3.8)?>?Cl? (1.74)~Na+ (1.7)?~?Si (1.67)?>?Mg2+ (1.2)?>?K+ (0.5). The runoff, land cover and lithological composition significantly contribute to dissolved and particulate yields globally. HCO3? and TDS yields are readily predicted by runoff and percent of carbonate, while TSS yield by runoff and population density. The Himalayan Rivers, including the Mekong, are a disproportionally high contributor to global riverine carbon and other solute budgets, and are of course underlined. The estimated global riverine HCO3? flux (Himalayan Rivers included) is 34014?×?109?mol/y (0.41 Pg C/y), 3915?Mt/y for solute load, including HCO3?, and 13553?Mt/y for TSS. Thereby this study illustrates the importance of riverine solute delivery in global carbon cycling.

  16. Room temperature synthesis of protonated layered titanate sheets using peroxo titanium carbonate complex solution.

    PubMed

    Sutradhar, Narottam; Sinhamahapatra, Apurba; Pahari, Sandip Kumar; Bajaj, Hari C; Panda, Asit Baran

    2011-07-21

    We report the synthesis of peroxo titanium carbonate complex solution as a novel water-soluble precursor for the direct synthesis of layered protonated titanate at room temperature. The synthesized titanates showed excellent removal capacity for Pb(2+) and methylene blue. Based on experimental observations, a probable mechanism for the formation of protonated layered dititanate sheets is also discussed. PMID:21655555

  17. Radiolysis of Bicarbonate and Carbonate Aqueous Solutions: Product Analysis and Simulation of Radiolytic Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Zhongli; Li Xifeng; Katsumura, Yosuke; Urabe, Osamu

    2001-11-15

    An understanding of the radiation-induced effects in groundwater is essential to evaluate the safe geological disposal of spent fuel. In groundwater, the bicarbonate ion is the predominant and common anion; this work investigated radiation-induced chemical reactions of (bi)carbonate aqueous solutions with steady-state irradiation and pulse radiolysis methods. Aqueous solutions of sodium (bi)carbonate as high as 50 mmol.dm{sup -3} were used. The formation of formate, oxalate, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} were measured under different conditions. A complete set of reaction steps and reliable kinetic data for the radiolysis of (bi)carbonate aqueous solutions at ionic strength close to the groundwater were proposed. Kinetic calculations were completed based on the proposed reaction steps and the kinetic data obtained in the present work. The results from the calculation are in good agreement with the experimental results. With these proposed reaction steps and kinetic data, computer simulation can be performed to predict the yield of radiolytic products of (bi)carbonate aqueous solutions as a function of irradiation time and used to evaluate the safety of geological disposal options of spent fuel.

  18. Sorption of metal ions from multicomponent aqueous solutions by activated carbons produced from waste

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhonova, L.P.; Goba, V.E.; Kovtun, M.F.; Tarasenko, Y.A.; Khavryuchenko, V.D.; Lyubchik, S.B.; Boiko, A.N.

    2008-08-15

    Activated carbons produced by thermal treatment of a mixture of sunflower husks, low-grade coal, and refinery waste were studied as adsorbents of transition ion metals from aqueous solutions of various compositions. The optimal conditions and the mechanism of sorption, as well as the structure of the sorbents, were studied.

  19. Changing fluxes of carbon and other solutes from the Mekong River

    PubMed Central

    Li, Siyue; Bush, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    Rivers are an important aquatic conduit that connects terrestrial sources of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and other elements with oceanic reservoirs. The Mekong River, one of the world’s largest rivers, is firstly examined to explore inter-annual fluxes of dissolved and particulate constituents during 1923–2011 and their associated natural or anthropogenic controls. Over this period, inter-annual fluxes of dissolved and particulate constituents decrease, while anthropogenic activities have doubled the relative abundance of SO42?, Cl? and Na+. The estimated fluxes of solutes from the Mekong decrease as follows (Mt/y): TDS (40.4)?>?HCO3? (23.4)?>?Ca2+ (6.4)?>?SO42? (3.8)?>?Cl? (1.74)~Na+ (1.7)?~?Si (1.67)?>?Mg2+ (1.2)?>?K+ (0.5). The runoff, land cover and lithological composition significantly contribute to dissolved and particulate yields globally. HCO3? and TDS yields are readily predicted by runoff and percent of carbonate, while TSS yield by runoff and population density. The Himalayan Rivers, including the Mekong, are a disproportionally high contributor to global riverine carbon and other solute budgets, and are of course underlined. The estimated global riverine HCO3? flux (Himalayan Rivers included) is 34014?×?109?mol/y (0.41 Pg C/y), 3915?Mt/y for solute load, including HCO3?, and 13553?Mt/y for TSS. Thereby this study illustrates the importance of riverine solute delivery in global carbon cycling. PMID:26522820

  20. Synthesis of nanostructured carbon through ionothermal carbonization of common organic solvents and solutions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuanqin; Antonietti, Markus; Fellinger, Tim-Patrick

    2015-04-27

    A combination of ionothermal synthesis and hot-injection techniques leads to novel nanocarbons made from organic solvents. Controlled addition of commonly used organic solvents into a hot ZnCl2 melt gives rise to spherical, sheetlike, and branched nanofibrous carbon nanoparticles with surprisingly high carbon efficiency. When heteroatom-containing solvents were used, the doping levels reach up to 14?wt.?% nitrogen and 13?wt.?% sulfur. Materials with high surface areas and large pore volumes of solvent carbons as high as 1666?m(2) ?g(-1) and 2.80?cm(3) ?g(-1) in addition to CO2 adsorption capacities of 4.13?mmol?g(-1) at 273?K and 1?bar can be obtained. The new method works not only for pure carbon materials, but was also extended for the synthesis of carbon/inorganic nanocomposites. ZnS@C, Ni@C, and Co@C were successfully prepared with this straightforward procedure. The obtained Ni@C nanocomposites perform well in the electrocatalytic water oxidation, comparable with commercial noble-metal catalysts. PMID:25740456

  1. The Effect of Acid Additives on Carbonate Rock Wettability and Spent Acid Recovery in Low Permeability Gas Carbonates 

    E-print Network

    Saneifar, Mehrnoosh

    2012-10-19

    of spent acid in the formation. Capillarity is a function of surface tension at the gas-liquid interface and contact angle of the fluids in the rock. To weaken capillary forces, surface tension should be low and contact angle should be large. This work...

  2. Enhanced sidewall functionalization of single-wall carbon nanotubes using nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Tobias, Gerard; Shao, Lidong; Ballesteros, Belin; Green, Malcolm L H

    2009-10-01

    When a sample of as-made single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is treated with nitric acid, oxidation debris are formed due to the functionalization (mainly carboxylation) of the amorphous carbon present in the sample and a continuous coating along the carbon nanotube walls is created preventing the sidewall functionalization of the SWNTs. This oxidation debris can be easily removed by an aqueous base wash leaving behind a sample with a low degree of functionality. After removal of the amorphous carbon (by steam purification) from a sample of as-made SWNTs, the resulting purified SWNTs are readily carboxylated on the walls by nitric acid treatment. The use of steam for the purification of SWNTs samples allows the removal of the amorphous carbon and graphitic layers coating the metal particles present in the sample without altering the tubular structure of the SWNTs. The exposed metal particles can then be easily removed by an acid wash. Comparison between the steam treatment and molten sodium hydroxide treatment is made. PMID:19908496

  3. Microbial mediated formation of Fe-carbonate minerals under extreme acidic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Román, Mónica; Fernández-Remolar, David; Amils, Ricardo; Sánchez-Navas, Antonio; Schmid, Thomas; Martin-Uriz, Patxi San; Rodríguez, Nuria; McKenzie, Judith A.; Vasconcelos, Crisogono

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of Fe-carbonate precipitation in Rio Tinto, a shallow river with very acidic waters, situated in Huelva, South-western Spain, adds a new dimension to our understanding of carbonate formation. Sediment samples from this low-pH system indicate that carbonates are formed in physico-chemical conditions ranging from acid to neutral pH. Evidence for microbial mediation is observed in secondary electron images (Fig. 1), which reveal rod-shaped bacteria embedded in the surface of siderite nanocrystals. The formation of carbonates in Rio Tinto is related to the microbial reduction of ferric iron coupled to the oxidation of organic compounds. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time, that Acidiphilium sp. PM, an iron-reducing bacterium isolated from Rio Tinto, mediates the precipitation of siderite (FeCO3) under acidic conditions and at a low temperature (30°C). We describe nucleation of siderite on nanoglobules in intimate association with the bacteria cell surface. This study has major implications for understanding carbonate formation on the ancient Earth or extraterrestrial planets. PMID:24755961

  4. Microbial mediated formation of Fe-carbonate minerals under extreme acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Román, Mónica; Fernández-Remolar, David; Amils, Ricardo; Sánchez-Navas, Antonio; Schmid, Thomas; San Martin-Uriz, Patxi; Rodríguez, Nuria; McKenzie, Judith A; Vasconcelos, Crisogono

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of Fe-carbonate precipitation in Rio Tinto, a shallow river with very acidic waters, situated in Huelva, South-western Spain, adds a new dimension to our understanding of carbonate formation. Sediment samples from this low-pH system indicate that carbonates are formed in physico-chemical conditions ranging from acid to neutral pH. Evidence for microbial mediation is observed in secondary electron images (Fig. 1), which reveal rod-shaped bacteria embedded in the surface of siderite nanocrystals. The formation of carbonates in Rio Tinto is related to the microbial reduction of ferric iron coupled to the oxidation of organic compounds. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time, that Acidiphilium sp. PM, an iron-reducing bacterium isolated from Rio Tinto, mediates the precipitation of siderite (FeCO3) under acidic conditions and at a low temperature (30°C). We describe nucleation of siderite on nanoglobules in intimate association with the bacteria cell surface. This study has major implications for understanding carbonate formation on the ancient Earth or extraterrestrial planets. PMID:24755961

  5. Regeneration of an aqueous solution from an acid gas absorption process by matrix stripping

    DOEpatents

    Rochelle, Gary T. (Austin, TX); Oyenekan, Babatunde A. (Katy, TX)

    2011-03-08

    Carbon dioxide and other acid gases are removed from gaseous streams using aqueous absorption and stripping processes. By replacing the conventional stripper used to regenerate the aqueous solvent and capture the acid gas with a matrix stripping configuration, less energy is consumed. The matrix stripping configuration uses two or more reboiled strippers at different pressures. The rich feed from the absorption equipment is split among the strippers, and partially regenerated solvent from the highest pressure stripper flows to the middle of sequentially lower pressure strippers in a "matrix" pattern. By selecting certain parameters of the matrix stripping configuration such that the total energy required by the strippers to achieve a desired percentage of acid gas removal from the gaseous stream is minimized, further energy savings can be realized.

  6. Method for separating constituents from solution employing a recyclable Lewis acid metal-hydroxy gel

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.H.

    1995-12-31

    This invention permits radionuclides, heavy metals, and organics to be extracted from solution by scavenging them with an amorphous gel. In the preferred embodiment, a contaminated solution (e.g. from soil washing, decontamination, or groundwater pumping) is transferred to a reaction vessel. The contaminated solution is contacted by the sequestering reagent which might contain for example, aluminate and EDTA anions in a 2.5 M NaOH solution. The pH of the reagent bearing solution is lowered on contact with the contaminated solution, or for example by bubbling carbon dioxide through it, causing an aluminum hydroxide gel to precipitate as the solution drops below the range of 1.8 to 2.5 molar NaOH (less than pH 14). This precipitating gel scavenges waste contaminants as it settles through solution leaving a clean supernatant which is then separated from the gel residue by physical means such as centrifugation, or simple settling. The gel residue containing concentrated contaminants is then redissolved releasing contaminants for separations and processing. This is a critical point: the stabilized gel used in this invention is readily re-dissolved by merely increasing the pH above the gels phase transition to aqueous anions. Thus, concentrated contaminants trapped in the gel can be released for convenient separation from the sequestering reagent, and said reagent can then be recycled.

  7. Dilute nitric or nitrous acid solution containing halide ions as effective media for pure gold dissolution.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Masashi; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Okamura, Kei

    2015-08-14

    The greatly enhanced oxidation ability of dilute aqueous nitric acid (0.10-2.0 mol L(-1)) containing bromide and iodide salts as well as chloride salts has been examined based on the dissolution kinetics of pure gold at 30-60 °C. It has been found that bromide salts are more effective than chloride salts in gaining the ability of dissolving gold in dilute aqueous nitric acid solution. At 60 °C, a piece of gold-wire (ca. 20 mg) is dissolved in 20 mL of as low as 0.10 mol L(-1) HNO3 solution containing 1.0-5.0 mol L(-1) NaBr and the dissolution rate constant, log(k/s(-1)), increases linearly (from -5.78 to -4.52) with the increasing NaBr concentration. The addition of organic solvents, such as acetonitrile and acetic acid, causes acceleration of gold dissolution in LiBr and NaBr solutions. With increasing MeCN contents, for instance, the log(k/s(-1)) value of 0.10 mol L(-1) HNO3 solution containing 2.0 mol L(-1) NaBr increases linearly from -5.30 to -4.61 at 30% (v/v) MeCN. The bromide salts affect the gold dissolution rate constant in the order of KBr < NaBr < LiBr < CaBr2. With increasing NaI concentration (0.20-3.0 mol L(-1)), some acceleration in log(k/s(-1)) of 0.50 or 1.0 mol L(-1) HNO3 solution has been observed; however, the slope of acceleration as the function of NaI concentration is much smaller than that of NaCl or NaBr. The gold dissolution ability has been examined also for nitrous acid containing chloride and bromide ions at 35 °C. The NaNO2 solution containing twice or more amounts of HX (X = Cl, Br) gives the maximum efficiency for gold dissolution, according to the log(k/s(-1)) values of the mixed solutions of NaNO2 (0.10-2.0 mol L(-1)) and HX of various concentrations. The influence of oxidation by dilute nitric and nitrous acids on the gold dissolution is discussed from the standpoint of the redox potentials in "modified" aqueous solutions and not of the changes in the activity coefficients of ions. PMID:26165394

  8. Dissolution of Wood Pulp in Aqueous NaOH/Urea Solution via Dilute Acid Pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhuqun; Yang, Quanling; Kuga, Shigenori; Matsumoto, Yuji

    2015-07-15

    Wood pulps with certain amounts of lignin were successfully dissolved in aqueous NaOH/urea solution by subjecting them to the dilute acid pretreatment. After the acid hydrolysis, viscosity-average degree of polymerization (DPv) of the pulps decreased. The results revealed that both the DPv and lignin contents influenced the dissolved proportions of wood pulps. When they were not so high, the wood pulps could almost completely dissolve with dissolved proportions >90%. In particular, the acid-pretreated unbleached kraft pulp with DPv of about 500 and lignin content of 6.9% could dissolve in NaOH/urea solvent and achieve a maximum pulp concentration of 4 wt % in the obtained lignocellulose solution. Moreover, the acid-pretreated bleached thermomechanical pulp with a high lignin content of 14.2% also almost completely dissolved. The lignocellulose films prepared from these wood pulp/NaOH/urea solutions exhibited good transparency and bendability, thus maybe promising as new biobased materials. PMID:26101792

  9. The infrared optical constants of sulfuric acid at 250 K. [spectral reflectance measurement of aqueous solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkley, L. W.; Williams, D.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for measurements of the IR spectral reflectance at near-normal incidence of aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid with acid concentrations of 75% and 95.6% by weight. Kramers-Kronig analyses of the reflectance data are employed to obtain values of the optical constants n(nu) and k(nu) in the spectral range from 400 to 6000 cm to the -1 power. The optical constants of these solutions at 250 K and 300 K are compared. It is found that in spectral regions remote from strong absorption bands, the values of the n(nu) indices obtained at 250 K agree with the values given by Lorentz-Lorenz correction of the same indices at 300 K. All absorption bands observed at 300 K are found to be present at 250 K with slight shifts in frequency and with significant differences in the k(nu) indices at the band maxima. Based on these results, it is concluded that the clouds of Venus probably consist of droplets of aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid with acid concentrations of about 75% by weight.

  10. Synthesis of sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres solid acid by a facile chemical activation route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Binbin; Guo, Yanzhen; Yin, Hang; Zhang, Shouren; Yang, Baocheng

    2015-01-01

    Generally, porous carbon nanospheres materials are usually prepared via a template method, which is a multi-steps and high-cost strategy. Here, we reported a porous carbon nanosphere solid acid with high surface area and superior porosity, as well as uniform nanospheical morphology, which prepared by a facile chemical activation with ZnCl2 using resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resins spheres as precursor. The activation of RF resins spheres by ZnCl2 at 400 °C brought high surface area and large volume, and simultaneously retained numerous oxygen-containing and hydrogen-containing groups due to the relatively low processing temperature. The presence of these functional groups is favorable for the modification of -SO3H groups by a followed sulfonation treating with sulphuric acid and organic sulfonic acid. The results of N2 adsorption-desorption and electron microscopy clearly showed the preservation of porous structure and nanospherical morphology. Infrared spectra certified the variation of surface functional groups after activation and the successful modification of -SO3H groups after sulfonation. The acidities of catalysts were estimated by an indirect titration method and the modified amount of -SO3H groups were examined by energy dispersive spectra. The results suggested sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres catalysts possessed high acidities and -SO3H densities, which endowed their significantly catalytic activities for biodiesel production. Furthermore, their excellent stability and recycling property were also demonstrated by five consecutive cycles.

  11. The healing effect of stearic acid applied on amorphous carbon film with dispersed nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, T.; Shoji, K.; Ikeshoji, T.-T.; Suzumura, A.

    2012-08-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been shown to improve the friction and wear properties of applications with severe loads. Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films (a-C:H), a type of DLC film, were coated onto 440C stainless steel disk surfaces. The plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition method was used as a coating process, and nanodiamond (ND) particles were dispersed into the film during the deposition process. Stearic acid was expected to affect the lubricating properties of the film because of its reported effectiveness on diamond surfaces. A lubricated reciprocal sliding friction test with 10,000 cycles confirmed that stearic acid improved the friction and wear properties of the ND dispersed a-C:H film. Furthermore, film wear caused by a sliding test without stearic acid could be healed by sliding with stearic acid as long as the level of critical damage was not reached. Raman spectra for the worn tracks revealed the healing effect of the stearic acid on the film because the spectra for the worn tracks after 10,000 cycles were identical to those of the control film, which was not worn. In contrast, the spectra for the worn tracks or debris showed a broad D band peak and no G peak, which was consistent with disordered amorphous carbon.

  12. Dissolution of single-walled carbon nanotubes in alkanol-cholic acid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyshin, A. A.; Eliseeva, O. V.; Bondarenko, G. V.; Kiselev, M. G.

    2015-09-01

    A procedure for dispersing the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) for preparing stable suspensions with high concentrations of individual nanotubes in various alcohols was described. The obtained suspensions were studied by Raman spectroscopy. The solubility of the single-walled carbon nanotubes in alcohols was found to depend on the concentration of cholic acid. The ethanol-surfactant mixture was shown to be the best solvent for all alkanol-cholic acid mixtures (0.018 mol/kg) under study used for preparing time-stable suspensions of single-walled carbon nanotubes. The dissolving ability of aliphatic alcohols was found to decrease in the series: ethanol-isopropanol- tert-butanol-butanol-propanol.

  13. Direct determination of peracetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and acetic acid in disinfectant solutions by far-ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Noboru; Yokota, Hiroshi; Hiraki, Satoru; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2005-04-01

    In this paper we propose a rapid and highly selective far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectroscopic method for the simultaneous determination of peracetic acid (PAA), hydrogen peroxide, and acetic acid (AA). For this purpose we developed a novel FUV spectrometer that enables us to measure the spectra down to 180 nm. Direct determination of PAA, H(2)O(2), and AA, the three main species in disinfectant solutions, was carried out by using their absorption bands in the 180-220-nm region. The proposed method does not require any reagents or catalysts, a calibration standard, and a complicated procedure for the analysis. The only preparation procedure requested is a dilution of H(2)O(2) with pure water to a concentration range lower than 0.2 wt % in the sample solutions. Usually, the required concentration range can be obtained by the 10 times volume dilution of the actual disinfectant solutions. As the measured sample does not leave any impurity for the disinfection, it can be reused completely by using a circulation system. The detection limit for PAA of the new FUV spectrometer was evaluated to be 0.002 wt %, and the dynamic ranges of the measured concentrations were from 0 to 0.05 wt %, from 0 to 0.2 wt %, and from 0 to 0.2 wt % for PAA, H(2)O(2), and AA, respectively. The response time for the simultaneous determination of the three species is 30 s, and the analysis is applicable even to the flowing samples. This method may become a novel approach for the continuous monitoring of PAA in disinfectant solutions on the process of sterilization. PMID:15801764

  14. Separation of uranium from nitric and hydrochloric acid solutions with extractant-coated magnetic microparticles.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, M. D.; Nunez, L.; Chemical Engineering

    2000-01-01

    The magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process utilizes selective magnetic microparticle composites to separate dissolved metals from solution. In this study, MACS particles were coated with neutral and acidic organophosphorus extractants,octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO), tributyl phosphate (TBP), trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO), and bis(2-ethyl-hexyl)phosphoric acid (D{sub 2}EHPA or HDEHP) and were evaluated for the separation of uranyl ions from nitric- and hydrochloric-acid solutions. The results suggest that a synergistic interaction between the particle surface and solvent coating may explain why the particles display, in some cases, orders of magnitude of higher partitioning coefficients than are estimated from solvent-extraction measurements. Particles coated with TBP and those coated with a combination of TOPO and D{sub 2}EHPA displayed the most desirable characteristics for removing uranium from dilute acid environments typical of contaminated groundwater. Uranium separation from moderate to highly acidic waste streams typical of Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear wastes is best accomplished using particles coated with a combination of CMPO and TBP.

  15. Precipitation of calcium carbonate in aqueous solutions in presence of ethylene glycol and dodecane.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsi, Panagiota D.; Rokidi, Stamatia; Koutsoukos, Petros G.

    2015-04-01

    The formation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in aqueous supersaturated solutions has been intensively studied over the past decades, because of its significance for a number of processes of industrial and environmental interest. In the oil and gas production industry the deposition of calcium carbonate affects adversely the productivity of the wells. Calcium carbonate scale deposits formation causes serious problems in water desalination, CO2 sequestration in subsoil wells, in geothermal systems and in heat exchangers because of the low thermal coefficient of the salt. Amelioration of the operational conditions is possible only when the mechanisms underlying nucleation and crystal growth of calcium carbonate in the aqueous fluids is clarified. Given the fact that in oil production processes water miscible and immiscible hydrocarbons are present the changes of the dielectric constant of the fluid phase has serious impact in the kinetics of calcium carbonate precipitation, which remains largely unknown. The problem becomes even more complicated if polymorphism exhibited by calcium carbonate is also taken into consideration. In the present work, the stability of aqueous solutions supersaturated with respect to all calcium carbonate polymorphs and the subsequent kinetics of calcium carbonate precipitation were measured. The measurements included aqueous solutions and solutions in the presence of water miscible (ethylene glycol, MEG) and water immiscible organics (n-dodecane). All measurements were done at conditions of sustained supersaturation using the glass/ Ag/AgCl combination electrode as a probe of the precipitation and pH as the master variable for the addition of titrant solutions with appropriate concentration needed to maintenance the solution supersaturation. Initially, the metastable zone width was determined from measurements of the effect of the solution supersaturation on the induction time preceding the onset of precipitation at free-drift conditions. The rates of crystal growth were measured as a function of the solution supersaturation using the highly accurate and reproducible methodology of constant supersaturation. The dependence of the rates of crystal growth on supersaturation suggested surface diffusion controlled mechanism. At constant supersaturation it was possible to extend the time period for the growth of the initially forming polymorph, in a way that sufficient amount is precipitated for characterization with X-ray diffraction (XRD). Moreover, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used for the characterization of the morphology of the precipitated solid. In all cases and depending on the solution supersaturation vaterite formed first from solutions of high supersaturation while at low supersaturations calcite formed exclusively. The presence of dodecane reduced the stability of the supersaturated solutions with the crystals forming at the oil-water interface. The presence of ethylene glycol (concentrations between 10-80%) also affected the stability and the kinetics of calcium carbonate precipitation. The morphology of the formed crystals showed habit modifications: Spherical formations consisting of aggregated nanocrystals and calcite crystals with profound pits on the faces were the characteristic feature in the presence of dodecane. ACKNOWLEDGMENT This research was partially funded by the European Union (European Social Fund-ESF) and Greek National Funds through the Operational program Education and Lifelong Learning under the action Aristeia II( Code No 4420).

  16. J. Chem. Soc., Perkin Trans. 2, 1997 821 Mechanism of the Beckmann rearrangement in sulfuric acid solution

    E-print Network

    Nguyen, Minh Tho

    J. Chem. Soc., Perkin Trans. 2, 1997 821 Mechanism of the Beckmann rearrangement in sulfuric acid the mechanism of the Beckmann rearrangement of formaldehyde oxime in concentrated sulfuric acid or in oleum hydrogen chloride, an oleum solution contains sulfuric acid and sulfur trioxide (H2SO4 SO3). An aqueous

  17. An amperometric uric acid biosensor based on chitosan-carbon nanotubes electrospun nanofiber on silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Numnuam, Apon; Thavarungkul, Panote; Kanatharana, Proespichaya

    2014-06-01

    A novel amperometric uric acid biosensor was fabricated by immobilizing uricase on an electrospun nanocomposite of chitosan-carbon nanotubes nanofiber (Chi-CNTsNF) covering an electrodeposited layer of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on a gold electrode (uricase/Chi-CNTsNF/AgNPs/Au). The uric acid response was determined at an optimum applied potential of -0.35 V vs Ag/AgCl in a flow-injection system based on the change of the reduction current for dissolved oxygen during oxidation of uric acid by the immobilized uricase. The response was directly proportional to the uric acid concentration. Under the optimum conditions, the fabricated uric acid biosensor had a very wide linear range, 1.0-400 ?mol L(-1), with a very low limit of detection of 1.0 ?mol L(-1) (s/n?=?3). The operational stability of the uricase/Chi-CNTsNF/AgNPs/Au biosensor (up to 205 injections) was excellent and the storage life was more than six weeks. A low Michaelis-Menten constant of 0.21 mmol L(-1) indicated that the immobilized uricase had high affinity for uric acid. The presence of potential common interfering substances, for example ascorbic acid, glucose, and lactic acid, had negligible effects on the performance of the biosensor. When used for analysis of uric acid in serum samples, the results agreed well with those obtained by use of the standard enzymatic colorimetric method (P?>?0.05). PMID:24718436

  18. Degradation of hydroxycinnamic acid mixtures in aqueous sucrose solutions by the Fenton process.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Danny M T; Zhang, Zhanying; Doherty, William O S

    2015-02-11

    The degradation efficiencies and behaviors of caffeic acid (CaA), p-coumaric acid (pCoA), and ferulic acid (FeA) in aqueous sucrose solutions containing the mixture of these hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs) were studied by the Fenton oxidation process. Central composite design and multiresponse surface methodology were used to evaluate and optimize the interactive effects of process parameters. Four quadratic polynomial models were developed for the degradation of each individual acid in the mixture and the total HCAs degraded. Sucrose was the most influential parameter that significantly affected the total amount of HCA degraded. Under the conditions studied there was a <0.01% loss of sucrose in all reactions. The optimal values of the process parameters for a 200 mg/L HCA mixture in water (pH 4.73, 25.15 °C) and sucrose solution (13 mass %, pH 5.39, 35.98 °C) were 77% and 57%, respectively. Regression analysis showed goodness of fit between the experimental results and the predicted values. The degradation behavior of CaA differed from those of pCoA and FeA, where further CaA degradation is observed at increasing sucrose and decreasing solution pH. The differences (established using UV/vis and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy) were because, unlike the other acids, CaA formed a complex with Fe(III) or with Fe(III) hydrogen-bonded to sucrose and coprecipitated with lepidocrocite, an iron oxyhydroxide. PMID:25585639

  19. Electro-oxidation of methanol on Pt(111) in acid solutions: effects of electrolyte anions during electrocatalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogasawara, Hirohito; Ito, Masatoki

    1995-10-01

    The electro-oxidation of methanol on a Pt(111) surface in both sulfuric and perchloric acid solutions was investigated by combined apparatus under both ultra-high vacuum and electrochemical environments. In sulfuric acid solution, a strong lateral interaction was observed between adsorbed bisulfate and CO derived from methanol. Coadsorption of CO derived from methanol with bisulfate ion yielded a (?7 × ?7)-R19.1°-CO-bisulfate structure. In perchloric acid solution, however, no lateral interaction between adsorbed CO and perchlorate was seen. The difference in reaction rates of methanol oxidation in both solutions was explained by these specific anion adsorption effects.

  20. Hydrogen-bond acidic functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with covalently-bound hexafluoroisopropanol groups

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Grate, Jay W.

    2010-06-01

    Fluorinated hydrogen-bond acidic groups are directly attached to the backbone of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) without the introduction of intermediate electron donating surface groups. Hexafluoroalcohol functional groups are exceptionally strong hydrogen bond acids, and are added to the nanotube surface using the aryl diazonium approach to create hydrogen-bond acidic carbon nanotube (CNT) surfaces. These groups can promote strong hydrogen-bonding interactions with matrix materials in composites or with molecular species to be concentrated and sensed. In the latter case, this newly developed material is expected to find useful application in chemical sensors and in CNT-based preconcentrator devices for the detection of pesticides, chemical warfare agents and explosives.

  1. Free Energetics of Carbon Nanotube Association in Pure and Aqueous Ionic Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Shuching; Patel, Sandeep; Bauer, Brad A.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a promising platform across a broad spectrum of applications ranging from separations technology, drug delivery, to bio(electronic) sensors. Proper dispersion of carbon nanotube materials is important to retaining the electronic properties of nanotubes. Experimentally it has been shown that salts can regulate the dispersing properties of CNTs in aqueous system with surfactants (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2009, 131:1144–1153); details of the physico-chemical mechanisms underlying such effects continue to be explored. We address the effects of inorganic monovalent salts (NaCl and NaI) on dispersion stability of carbon nanotubes. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations using non-polarizable interaction models to compute the potential of mean force between two (10,10) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in the presence of NaCl/NaI and compare to the potential of mean force between SWNTs in pure water. Addition of salts enhances stability of the contact state between two SWNT’s on the order of 4 kcal/mole. The ion-specific spatial distribution of different halide anions gives rise to starkly different contributions to the free energy stability of nanotubes in the contact state. Iodide anion directly stabilizes the contact state to a much greater extent than chloride anion. The enhanced stability arises from the locally repulsive forces imposed on nanotubes by the surface-segregated iodide anion. Within the timescale of our simulations, both NaI and NaCl solutions stabilize the contact state by equivalent amounts. The marginally higher stability for contact state in salt solutions recapitulates results for small hydrophobic solutes in NaCl solutions (Athawale et al, J. Phys. Chem. B., 112, 5661. 2008) as well as single walled carbon nanotubes in NaCl and CaCl2 aqueous solutions. PMID:22780909

  2. Adsorption of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes: Effects of background solution chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujuan; Shao, Ting; Bekaroglu, S Sule Kaplan; Karanfil, Tanju

    2010-03-01

    With the significant increase in the production and use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), they will be inevitably released into aquatic environments. Therefore, the fate and transport of CNTs in aqueous solutions have attracted extensive attention. In the present work, the effects of natural organic matter (NOM), solution pH and ionic strength on adsorption of three synthetic organic chemicals (SOCs) by both pristine and surface functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were investigated. The three SOCs (phenanthrene, biphenyl, and 2-phenylphenol) with different planarity, polarity, and hydrogen/electron-donor/acceptor ability, representing typical scenarios for the SOC-CNT interactions, were employed as probe molecules. Among the three background solution characteristics examined, NOM showed the most significant effect on SOC adsorption, while solution pH and ionic strength exhibited minimal or negligible impacts. The presence of NOM greatly suppressed the SOC adsorption by CNTs, and the impact on the SWNTs was higher than that on the MWNTs. The planarity and hydrophobicity of SOCs were two important factors determining the effects of NOM, solution pH and ionic strength on their adsorption by CNTs. PMID:20071001

  3. Synthesis of finely divided molybdenum sulfide nanoparticles in propylene carbonate solution

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasiev, Pavel

    2014-05-01

    Molybdenum sulfide nanoparticles have been prepared from the reflux solution reaction involving ammonium heptamolybdate and elemental sulfur in propylene carbonate. Addition to the reaction mixture of starch as a natural capping agent leads to lesser agglomeration and smaller size of the particles. Nanoparticles of MoS{sub x} (x?4) of 10–30 nm size are highly divided and form stable colloidal suspensions in organic solvents. Mo K edge EXAFS of the amorphous materials shows rapid exchange of oxygen to sulfur in the molybdenum coordination sphere during the solution reaction. Thermal treatment of the amorphous sulfides MoS{sub x} under nitrogen or hydrogen flow at 400 °C allows obtaining mesoporous MoS{sub 2} materials with very high pore volume and specific surface area, up to 0.45 cm{sup 3}/g and 190 m{sup 2}/g, respectively. The new materials show good potential for the application as unsupported hydrotreating catalysts. - Graphical abstract: Solution reaction in propylene carbonate allows preparing weakly agglomerated molybdenum sulfide with particle size 20 nm and advantageous catalytic properties. - Highlights: • Solution reaction in propylene carbonate yields MoS{sub x} particles near 20 nm size. • Addition of starch as capping agent reduces particles size and hinder agglomeration. • EXAFS at Mo K edge shows rapid oxygen to sulfur exchange in the solution. • Thermal treatment leads to MoS{sub 2} with very high porosity and surface area.

  4. Matrix Isolation Studies of Carbonic Acid—The Vapor Phase above the ?-Polymorph

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Twenty years ago two different polymorphs of carbonic acid, ?- and ?-H2CO3, were isolated as thin, crystalline films. They were characterized by infrared and, of late, by Raman spectroscopy. Determination of the crystal structure of these two polymorphs, using cryopowder and thin film X-ray diffraction techniques, has failed so far. Recently, we succeeded in sublimating ?-H2CO3 and trapping the vapor phase in a noble gas matrix, which was analyzed by infrared spectroscopy. In the same way we have now investigated the ?-polymorph. Unlike ?-H2CO3, ?-H2CO3 was regarded to decompose upon sublimation. Still, we have succeeded in isolation of undecomposed carbonic acid in the matrix and recondensation after removal of the matrix here. This possibility of sublimation and recondensation cycles of ?-H2CO3 adds a new aspect to the chemistry of carbonic acid in astrophysical environments, especially because there is a direct way of ?-H2CO3 formation in space, but none for ?-H2CO3. Assignments of the FTIR spectra of the isolated molecules unambiguously reveal two different carbonic acid monomer conformers (C2v and Cs). In contrast to the earlier study on ?-H2CO3, we do not find evidence for centrosymmetric (C2h) carbonic acid dimers here. This suggests that two monomers are entropically favored at the sublimation temperature of 250 K for ?-H2CO3, whereas they are not at the sublimation temperature of 210 K for ?-H2CO3. PMID:23631554

  5. Effects of Acid Additives on Spent Acid Flowback through Carbonate Cores 

    E-print Network

    Nasir, Ehsaan Ahmad

    2012-07-16

    Matrix acidizing is a well stimulation technique used to remove formation damage in the near wellbore region. But it comes with an associated set of challenges such as corrosion of the tubulars and iron precipitation in the formation. To counter...

  6. Investigating the Effect of Oil Saturation on Acid Propagation during Matrix Acidization of Carbonate Rocks 

    E-print Network

    Kumar, Rahul Pradeep

    2014-01-02

    The existence of an optimum injection rate for wormhole propagation, and face dissolution at low injection rates during matrix acidizing are well established. However, little has been documented that describes how the presence of residual oil...

  7. Low-cost, acid/alkaline-resistant, and fluorine-free superhydrophobic fabric coating from onionlike carbon microspheres converted from waste polyethylene terephthalate.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haibo; Gao, Lei; Chen, Changle; Chen, Qianwang

    2014-01-01

    Onionlike carbon microspheres composed of many nanoflakes have been prepared by pyrolyzing waste polyethylene terephthalate in supercritical carbon dioxide at 650 °C for 3 h followed by subsequent vacuum annealing at 1500 °C for 0.5 h. The obtained onionlike carbon microspheres have very high surface roughness and exhibit unique hydrophobic properties. Considering their structural similarities with a lotus leaf, we further developed a low-cost, acid/alkaline-resistant, and fluorine-free superhydrophobic coating strategy on fabrics by employing the onionlike carbon microspheres and polydimethylsiloxane as raw materials. This provides a novel technique to convert waste polyethylene terephthalate to valuable carbon materials. At the same time, we demonstrate a novel application direction of carbon materials by taking advantage of their unique structural properties. The combination of recycling waste solid materials as carbon feedstock for valuable carbon material production, with the generation of highly value-added products such as superhydrophobic fabrics, may provide a feasible solution for sustainable solid waste treatment. PMID:24502391

  8. Enhancing adsorption efficiency of dichloroacetic acid onto mesoporous carbons: Procedure optimization, mechanism and characterization.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ying; Zhu, Jianzhong; Ji, Dongliang; Cao, Yang; Ling, Xiaojia; Chen, Wei

    2015-08-15

    Highly ordered mesoporous carbon may be directly synthesized via supramolecular self-assembly with in situ evaporation-induced crystallization process by controlling thermal reaction temperatures and carbon mass loading. In the present study, the effects of thermal reaction temperatures on the structural characterization and adsorption capacity of mesoporous carbon have been investigated and analyzed with orthogonal test experiments. The results show the carbonization temperature (R=32.1) plays a more important role than the self-assembly temperature (R=8.5) and thermal polymerization temperature (R=10.1) in manipulating the pore texture structures. The optimization grouping temperature was 40-110-500 °C. The optimum mesoporous carbon sample had the highest BET specific surface area (474 m(2)/g), the largest pore volume (0.46 cm(3)/g), and with reasonable uniform pore size distribution. The adsorption evaluation also shows the adsorption capacity is strongly correlated with the pore structure of mesoporous carbon, the optimized mesoporous carbon sample displayed the largest adsorption capacity (350 mg/g) at an initial concentration of 20.0 mg/L of dichloroacetic acid. The study results indicate optimization of thermal reaction parameters is an effective approach for synthesis of ordered mesoporous carbons. PMID:25935284

  9. Interaction of manganese(IV) oxide with aqueous solutions of citric and sulfuric acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godunov, E. B.; Artamonova, I. V.; Gorichev, I. G.; Lainer, Yu. A.

    2012-01-01

    The kinetic laws of the dissolution of manganese(IV) oxide using citric acid are studied as functions of the temperature and pH of a solution and the concentration of citric acid. The following kinetic parameters of the dissolution are calculated: the reaction rate, the reaction order with respect to citrate ions ( n = 0.6), and the activation energy ( E a = 47.4 kJ/mol). The optimum conditions favoring an increase in the leaching intensity and economical consumption of the reactants are experimentally determined.

  10. Composition and process for separating cesium ions from an acidic aqueous solution also containing other ions

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, Mark L. (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Bartsch, Richard A. (Lubbock, TX); Barrans, Jr., Richard E. (Downers Grove, IL); Rausch, David (Naperville, IL)

    1999-01-01

    A crown ether cesium ion extractant is disclosed as is its synthesis. The crown ether cesium ion extractant is useful for the selective purification of cesium ions from aqueous acidic media, and more particularly useful for the isolation of radioactive cesium-137 from nuclear waste streams. Processes for isolating cesium ions from aqueous acidic media using the crown ether cesium extractant are disclosed as are processes for recycling the crown ether cesium extractant and processes for recovering cesium from a crown ether cesium extractant solution.

  11. Composition and process for separating cesium ions from an acidic aqueous solution also containing other ions

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, M.L.; Horwitz, E.P.; Bartsch, R.A.; Barrans, R.E. Jr.; Rausch, D.

    1999-03-30

    A crown ether cesium ion extractant is disclosed as is its synthesis. The crown ether cesium ion extractant is useful for the selective purification of cesium ions from aqueous acidic media, and more particularly useful for the isolation of radioactive cesium-137 from nuclear waste streams. Processes for isolating cesium ions from aqueous acidic media using the crown ether cesium extractant are disclosed as are processes for recycling the crown ether cesium extractant and processes for recovering cesium from a crown ether cesium extractant solution. 4 figs.

  12. Comparative behavior of titanium and zirconium in hydrofluoric-nitric acid pickling solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, E.M.M.; Hlawka, F.; Cornet, A. )

    1990-07-01

    The different behavior of titanium and zirconium in HF-HNO{sub 3} pickling solutions has been studied using electrochemical methods and Raman spectrometry. In each case, the depleting of the solutions during a pickling experiment could be correlated with the consumption of HF to form metal oxo or oxofluoro complexes. However, the mechanism of metal dissolution is quite different for the two metals. The titanium dissolution process in such solutions can be interpreted using a passivation model in which dissolution and passivation are two competing reactions at the surface of the bare metal. On the other hand, zirconium dissolution occurs through formation of an oxide film with ionic diffusion through the film being a rate-determining step. The particular role of strong acid added to the HF solution for pickling of titanium and zirconium is also discussed.

  13. Aqueous Solutions of Amino Acid Based Ionic Liquids. Dispersion and Structure

    E-print Network

    Chaban, Vitaly V

    2014-01-01

    New ionic liquids (ILs) are continuously introduced involving an increasing number of organic and inorganic ions. Amino acid based ILs (AAILs) represent a specific interest due to their natural origin and, allegedly, low cost. We apply our recently developed force field for imidazolium-based AAILs to investigate structure properties in their aqueous solutions via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. By reporting cluster analysis, radial distribution functions and spatial distribution functions, we argue that AAIL ions are well dispersed in the aqueous media, irrespective of the AAIL content. Aqueous solutions of AAILs exhibit desirable properties as solvents for chemical engineering. The AAILs in relatively dilute aqueous solutions (10 mol% AAIL) exist as ion pairs, while more concentrated solutions feature certain amount of larger ionic aggregates.

  14. Adsorption of carbon dioxide by solution-plasma-synthesized heteroatom-doped carbon nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thongwichit, Nanthiya; Li, Oi Lun Helena; Yaowarat, Wattanachai; Saito, Nagahiro; Suriyapraphadilok, Uthaiporn

    2016-01-01

    Porous carbon nanospheres (CNSs) synthesized by a plasma-in-liquid technique were applied as an adsorbent for CO2 adsorption. Two different types of aromatic solvents, benzene and pyridine, were used as precursors to generate CNSs. The prepared CNSs were carbonized and then activated with CO2 to obtain carbon materials with a suitable porous structure for CO2 adsorption. To improve CO2 adsorption capacity, activated CNSs were then chemically modified using different approaches of surface treatment, namely, HNO3 oxidation, amination without HNO3 preoxidation, and amination with HNO3 preoxidation. The CO2 adsorption capacities of the samples were investigated at 1 atm and 40 °C using a simultaneous thermal analyzer. It was found that the CO2 adsorption of CNSs was enhanced through the development of textural properties. All of the surface treatment approaches led to the increase in CO2 adsorption capacity of the activated CNSs owing to the presence of nitrogen or oxygen functional groups introduced onto the carbon surface during the treatment.

  15. Characterization of calcium carbonate/chitosan composites

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, K.E.; Zhang, S.

    1995-12-31

    The crystal growth of calcium carbonate on a chitosan substrate was achieved using a supersaturated calcium carbonate solution, by using various additives, polyacrylic acid (PAA). Polyacrylic acid modified the chitosan-film surface and promoted the nucleation of calcium carbonate crystals.

  16. Dynamical properties in uniform and periodic growth modes of ascorbic acid crystal domain from thin solution film

    E-print Network

    Yoshihiro Yamazaki; Mitsunobu Kikuchi; Akihiko Toda; Jun-ichi Wakita; Mitsugu Matsushita

    2013-11-19

    There exists the threshold-sensitive dynamical transition between the uniform and the periodic growth modes in the domain growth of ascorbic acid crystals from its aqueous supersaturated solution film. The crystal growth induces the solution flow. Humidity controls the fluidity of the solution. The solution flow varies the film thickness. The threshold exists in the thickness of the solution film, and the crystal growth almost stops if the thickness becomes lower than the threshold.

  17. Preparation of activated mesoporous carbons for electrosorption of ions from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Lee, Jeseung; Tsouris, Costas; DePaoli, David W; Wang, Xiqing

    2010-01-01

    Mesoporous carbon with a narrow pore size distribution centered at about 9 nm, which was prepared by self assembly of block copolymer and phloroglucinol-formaldehyde resin via the soft-template method, was activated by CO{sub 2} and potassium hydroxide (KOH). The effects of activation conditions, such as the temperature, activation time, and mass ratio of KOH/C, on the textural properties of the resulting activated mesoporous carbons were investigated. Activated mesoporous carbons exhibit high BET specific surface areas (up to {approx} 2000 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) and large pore volumes (up to {approx} 1.6 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1}), but still maintain a highly mesoporous structure. Heat treatment of mesoporous carbons by CO{sub 2} generally requires a moderate to high extent of activation in order to increase its BET surface area by 2-3 times, while KOH activation needs a much smaller degree of activation than the former to reach an identical surface area, ensuring high yields of activated mesoporous carbons. In addition, KOH activation allows a controllable degree of activation by adjusting the mass ratio of KOH/C (2-8), as evidenced by the fact that surface area and pore volume increase with the mass ratio of KOH/C. The electrosorption properties of activated mesoporous carbons were investigated by cyclic voltammetry in 0.1 M NaCl aqueous solutions. Upon activation, the electrosorption capacitance of activated mesoporous carbons was greatly enhanced.

  18. Approximate Solutions for a Self-Folding Problem of Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Y Mikata

    2006-08-22

    This paper treats approximate solutions for a self-folding problem of carbon nanotubes. It has been observed in the molecular dynamics calculations [1] that a carbon nanotube with a large aspect ratio can self-fold due to van der Waals force between the parts of the same carbon nanotube. The main issue in the self-folding problem is to determine the minimum threshold length of the carbon nanotube at which it becomes possible for the carbon nanotube to self-fold due to the van der Waals force. An approximate mathematical model based on the force method is constructed for the self-folding problem of carbon nanotubes, and it is solved exactly as an elastica problem using elliptic functions. Additionally, three other mathematical models are constructed based on the energy method. As a particular example, the lower and upper estimates for the critical threshold (minimum) length are determined based on both methods for the (5,5) armchair carbon nanotube.

  19. Differential proteomics to explore the inhibitory effects of acidic, slightly acidic electrolysed water and sodium hypochlorite solution on Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tai-Yuan; Kuo, Shu-Hao; Chen, Shui-Tein; Hwang, Deng-Fwu

    2016-03-01

    Slightly acidic electrolysed water (SlAEW) and acidic electrolysed water (AEW) have been demonstrated to effectively inactivate food-borne pathogens. However, the underlying mechanism of inactivation remains unknown. Therefore, in this study, a differential proteomic platform was used to investigate the bactericidal mechanism of SlAEW, AEW, and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) solutions against Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The upregulated proteins after SlAEW, AEW, and NaOCl treatments were identified as outer membrane proteins K and U. The downregulated proteins after the SlAEW, AEW, and NaOCl treatments were identified as adenylate kinase, phosphoglycerate kinase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and enolase, all of which are responsible for energy metabolism. Protein synthesis-associated proteins were downregulated and identified as elongation factor Tu and GAPDH. The inhibitory effects of SlAEW and AEW solutions against V. parahaemolyticus may be attributed to the changes in cell membrane permeability, protein synthesis activity, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) biosynthesis pathways such as glycolysis and ATP replenishment. PMID:26471589

  20. Vertically aligned carbon nanofiber electrode arrays for nucleic acid detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumugam, Prabhu U.; Yu, Edmond; Riviere, Roger; Meyyappan, M.

    2010-10-01

    We present electrochemical detection of DNA targets that corresponds to Escherichia coli O157:H7 16S rRNA gene using a nanoelectrode array consisting of vertically aligned carbon nanofiber (VACNF) electrodes. Parylene C is used as gap filling 'matrix' material to avoid high temperature processing in electrode construction. This easy to deposit film of several micron heights provides a conformal coating between the high aspect ratio VACNFs with negligible pin-holes. The low background currents show the potential of this approach for ultra-sensitive detection. Consistent and reproducible electrochemical-signals are achieved using a simple electrode preparation. This simple, reliable and low-cost approach is a forward step in developing practical sensors for applications like pathogen detection, early cancer diagnosis and environmental monitoring.

  1. Copper-Sulfate Pentahydrate as a Product of the Waste Sulfuric Acid Solution Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovi?, Radmila; Stevanovi?, Jasmina; Avramovi?, Ljiljana; Nedeljkovi?, Dragutin; Jugovi?, Branimir; Staji?-Troši?, Jasna; Gvozdenovi?, Milica

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study is synthesis of copper-sulfate pentahydrate from the waste sulfuric acid solution-mother liquor generated during the regeneration process of copper bleed solution. Copper is removed from the mother liquor solution in the process of the electrolytic treatment using the insoluble lead anodes alloyed with 6 mass pct of antimony on the industrial-scale equipment. As the result of the decopperization process, copper is removed in the form of the cathode sludge and is precipitated at the bottom of the electrolytic cell. By this procedure, the content of copper could be reduced to the 20 mass pct of the initial value. Chemical characterization of the sludge has shown that it contains about 90 mass pct of copper. During the decopperization process, the very strong poison, arsine, can be formed, and the process is in that case terminated. The copper leaching degree of 82 mass pct is obtained using H2SO4 aqueous solution with the oxygen addition during the cathode sludge chemical treatment at 80 °C ± 5 °C. Obtained copper salt satisfies the requirements of the Serbian Standard for Pesticide, SRPS H.P1. 058. Therefore, the treatment of waste sulfuric acid solutions is of great economic and environmental interest.

  2. Three-dimensional patterns from the thin-film drying of amino acid solutions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuehua; Crivoi, Alexandru; Duan, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Experimental atomic force microscopy (AFM) images show the dried-in patterns from amino acid solutions which can be in the form of dots or networks. The three-dimensional lattice-gas Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model is applied to simulate the formation of dot-like and network-like particle structures from the evaporating thin films of solutions. A sigmoidal jump in the chemical potential value is implemented to obtain dual-scale structures with the grain size distribution peaking at two distinctive values. The simulated and experimental results are qualitatively comparable. PMID:26039636

  3. Three-dimensional patterns from the thin-film drying of amino acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuehua; Crivoi, Alexandru; Duan, Fei

    2015-06-01

    Experimental atomic force microscopy (AFM) images show the dried-in patterns from amino acid solutions which can be in the form of dots or networks. The three-dimensional lattice-gas Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model is applied to simulate the formation of dot-like and network-like particle structures from the evaporating thin films of solutions. A sigmoidal jump in the chemical potential value is implemented to obtain dual-scale structures with the grain size distribution peaking at two distinctive values. The simulated and experimental results are qualitatively comparable.

  4. Three-dimensional patterns from the thin-film drying of amino acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuehua; Crivoi, Alexandru; Duan, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Experimental atomic force microscopy (AFM) images show the dried-in patterns from amino acid solutions which can be in the form of dots or networks. The three-dimensional lattice-gas Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model is applied to simulate the formation of dot-like and network-like particle structures from the evaporating thin films of solutions. A sigmoidal jump in the chemical potential value is implemented to obtain dual-scale structures with the grain size distribution peaking at two distinctive values. The simulated and experimental results are qualitatively comparable. PMID:26039636

  5. Spectral and Acid-Base Properties of Hydroxyflavones in Micellar Solutions of Cationic Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipkovska, N. A.; Barvinchenko, V. N.; Fedyanina, T. V.; Rugal', A. A.

    2014-09-01

    It has been shown that the spectral characteristics (intensity, position of the absorption band) and the acid-base properties in a series of structurally similar hydroxyflavones depend on the concentration of the cationic surfactants miramistin and decamethoxin in aqueous solutions, and the extent of their changes is more pronounced for hydrophobic quercetin than for hydrophilic rutin. For the first time, we have determined the apparent dissociation constants of quercetin and rutin in solutions of these cationic surfactants (pKa1) over a broad concentration range and we have established that they decrease in the series water-decamethoxin-miramistin.

  6. Facile Carbon Fixation to Performic Acids by Water-Sealed Dielectric Barrier Discharge.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Mitsuo; Morita, Tatsuo; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2015-01-01

    Carbon fixation refers to the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to organic materials, as commonly performed in nature through photosynthesis by plants and other autotrophic organisms. The creation of artificial carbon fixation processes is one of the greatest challenges for chemistry to solve the critical environmental issue concerning the reduction of CO2 emissions. We have developed an electricity-driven facile CO2 fixation process that yields performic acid, HCO2OH, from CO2 and water at neutral pH by dielectric barrier discharge with an input electric power conversion efficiency of currently 0.2-0.4%. This method offers a promising future technology for artificial carbon fixation on its own, and may also be scaled up in combination with e.g., the post-combustion CO2 capture and storage technology. PMID:26439402

  7. Facile Carbon Fixation to Performic Acids by Water-Sealed Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Mitsuo; Morita, Tatsuo; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2015-01-01

    Carbon fixation refers to the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to organic materials, as commonly performed in nature through photosynthesis by plants and other autotrophic organisms. The creation of artificial carbon fixation processes is one of the greatest challenges for chemistry to solve the critical environmental issue concerning the reduction of CO2 emissions. We have developed an electricity-driven facile CO2 fixation process that yields performic acid, HCO2OH, from CO2 and water at neutral pH by dielectric barrier discharge with an input electric power conversion efficiency of currently 0.2?0.4%. This method offers a promising future technology for artificial carbon fixation on its own, and may also be scaled up in combination with e.g., the post-combustion CO2 capture and storage technology. PMID:26439402

  8. Facile Carbon Fixation to Performic Acids by Water-Sealed Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Mitsuo; Morita, Tatsuo; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2015-10-01

    Carbon fixation refers to the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to organic materials, as commonly performed in nature through photosynthesis by plants and other autotrophic organisms. The creation of artificial carbon fixation processes is one of the greatest challenges for chemistry to solve the critical environmental issue concerning the reduction of CO2 emissions. We have developed an electricity-driven facile CO2 fixation process that yields performic acid, HCO2OH, from CO2 and water at neutral pH by dielectric barrier discharge with an input electric power conversion efficiency of currently 0.2-0.4%. This method offers a promising future technology for artificial carbon fixation on its own, and may also be scaled up in combination with e.g., the post-combustion CO2 capture and storage technology.

  9. Adsorption of naphthalene from aqueous solution onto fatty acid modified walnut shells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mijia; Yao, Jun; Dong, Lifu; Sun, Jingjing

    2016-02-01

    The removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from aqueous solution is challenging to environmental technologists. Agricultural waste is apparently the most attractive materials in removing PAHs because of its abundance, renewability, and economic advantage. The adsorption of PAHs (e.g., naphthalene) onto walnut shell (WNS) and its fatty acid (e.g., capric acid, lauric acid, palmitic acid, and oleic acid)-modified equivalent were investigated in this work to develop low-cost biosorbents for hydrophobic organic compounds. Compared with other modified sorbents, oleic acid graftted walnut shell (OWNS) showed the maximum partition coefficient (4330 ± 8.8 L kg(-1)) because of its lowest polarity and highest aromaticity. The adsorption capacity (7210 ?g g(-1)) of OWNS at the temperature of 298 K was observed for an initial naphthalene concentration of 25 mg L(-1) with contact time of 40 h, sorbent dosage of 1 g L(-1), and in neutral condition. Furthermore, the regeneration capability of OWNS implied that it was a promising biosorbent for naphthalene removal. PMID:26517393

  10. Separating nano graphene oxide from the residual strong-acid filtrate of the modified Hummers method with alkaline solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xuebing; Yu, Yun; Wang, Yongqing; Zhou, Jianer; Song, Lixin

    2015-02-01

    In the modified Hummers method for preparing graphene oxide, the yellow slurry can be obtained. After filtering through a quantitative filter paper, the strong-acid filtrate containing the unprecipitated nano graphene oxide was gained. The corresponding filtrate was added gradually with an alkaline (NaOH or KOH) solution at room temperature. The unprecipitated nano graphene oxide could undergo fast aggregation when the pH value of the filtrate was about 1.7 and formed the stable floccules. X-ray diffraction analysis shows the dominant peak of the floccules is about 11°, which accords to the peak of graphene oxide. Spectra of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirm the presence in the floccules of an abundance of oxygen functional groups and the purified graphene oxide floccules can be obtained. Atomic force microscopy measurement shows the graphene oxide floccules consists of sheet-like objects, mostly containing only a few layers (about 5 layers). Zeta potential analysis demonstrates the surface charge of the graphene oxide is pH-sensitive and its isoelectric point is ?1.7. The flocculation mechanism of graphene oxide ascribes to the acid-base interaction with the surface functional groups of the carbon layers.

  11. Neutralizing Carbonic Acid in Deep Carbonate Strata below the North Atlantic

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Schrag

    2005-12-01

    Our research is aimed at investigating several technical issues associated with carbon dioxide sequestration in calcium carbonate sediments below the sea floor through laboratory experiments and chemical transport modeling. Our goal is to evaluate the basic feasibility of this approach, including an assessment of optimal depths, sediment types, and other issues related to site selection. Through laboratory and modeling efforts, we are studying the flow of liquid carbon dioxide and carbon dioxide-water mixtures through calcium carbonate sediments to better understand the geomechanical and structural stability of the sediments during and after injection. Our modeling efforts in the first year show that the idea is feasible, but requires more sophisticated analysis of fluid flow at high pressure in deep sea sediments. In addition, we are investigating the kinetics of calcium carbonate dissolution in the presence of CO{sub 2}-water fluids, which is a critical feature of the system as it allows for increased permeability during injection. Our experimental results from the first year of work have shown that the kinetics are likely to be fast enough to create dissolution which will affect permeability. However, additional experiments are needed at high pressures, which will be a focus for years 2 and 3. We are also investigating the possibility of carbon dioxide hydrate formation in the pore fluid, which might complicate the injection procedure by reducing sediment permeability but might also provide an upper seal in the sediment-pore fluid system, preventing release of CO{sub 2} into the deep ocean, particularly if depth and temperature at the injection point rule out immediate hydrate formation. Finally, we are in the beginning stages of an economic analysis to estimate costs of drilling and gas injection, site monitoring as well as the availability of potential disposal sites with particular emphasis on those sites that are within the 200-mile economic zone of the United States.

  12. Kinetics of Ni3S2 sulfide dissolution in solutions of sulfuric and hydrochloric acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palant, A. A.; Bryukvin, V. A.; Vinetskaya, T. N.; Makarenkova, T. A.

    2008-02-01

    The kinetics of Ni3S2 sulfide (heazlewoodite) dissolution in solutions of hydrochloric and sulfuric acids is studied. The process under study in the temperature range of 30 90°C is found to occur in a kinetic regime and is controlled by the corresponding chemical reactions of the Ni3S2 decomposition by solutions of inorganic acids ( E a = 67 92 kJ/mol, or 16 22 kcal/mol). The only exception is the Ni3S2-HCl system at elevated temperatures (60 90°C). In this case, the apparent activation energy decreases sharply to 8.8 kJ/mol (2.1 kcal/mol), which is explained by the catalytic effect of gaseous chlorine formed under these conditions. The studies performed are related to the physicochemical substantiation of the hydrometallurgical processing of the copper-nickel converter mattes produced in the industrial cycle of the Norilsk Mining Company.

  13. Uptake of formaldehyde by sulfuric acid solutions - Impact on stratospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Margaret A.; Pfaff, Jeanne; Jayaweera, Indira; Prather, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    The study investigates the uptake of CH2O by low temperature sulfuric acid solutions representative of global stratospheric particulate. It is argued that if similar uptake occurs under stratospheric pressures of CH2O, i.e., 1000 times lower than used in the present study, then the removal of CH2O from the gas phase can take away a significant source of odd hydrogen in the mid- and high-latitude lower stratosphere. It is shown that with the inclusion of this reaction, concentrations of OH and H2O are reduced by as much as 4 percent under background levels of aerosols and more than 15 percent under elevated (volcanic) conditions. The accumulation of CH2O in stratospheric aerosols over a season, reaching about 1 M solutions, will alter the composition and may even change the reactivity of these sulfuric acid-water mixtures.

  14. Precipitation stripping of neodymium from carboxylate extractant with aqueous oxalic acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Konishi, Yasuhiro; Asai, Satoru; Murai, Tetuya )

    1993-05-01

    This paper describes a precipitation stripping method in which neodymium ions are stripped from carboxylate extractant in organic solvent and simultaneously precipitated with aqueous oxalic acid solution. For the single-stage process, a quantitative criterion for precipitating oxalate powders was derived theoretically, and stripping experiments were done under the precipitation conditions. The resultant precipitates were neodymium oxalate, which is completely free from contamination by the carboxylate extractant and the organic solvent. The overall rate of stripping was controlled by the transfer of neodymium carboxylate in the organic solution, indicating that the presence of oxalic acid in the aqueous phase has no effect on the stripping rate. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of combining the conventional stripping and precipitation stages in a solvent extraction process for separation and purification of rare earths.

  15. Evaluation of the Magnesium Hydroxide Treatment Process for Stabilizing PFP Plutonium/Nitric Acid Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Mark A.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Baker, Aaron B.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2000-09-28

    This document summarizes an evaluation of the magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] process to be used at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) for stabilizing plutonium/nitric acid solutions to meet the goal of stabilizing the plutonium in an oxide form suitable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-99. During the treatment process, nitric acid solutions bearing plutonium nitrate are neutralized with Mg(OH)2 in an air sparge reactor. The resulting slurry, containing plutonium hydroxide, is filtered and calcined. The process evaluation included a literature review and extensive laboratory- and bench-scale testing. The testing was conducted using cerium as a surrogate for plutonium to identify and quantify the effects of key processing variables on processing time (primarily neutralization and filtration time) and calcined product properties.

  16. Performance evaluation of trimethylamine-carbon dioxide thermolytic draw solution for engineered osmosis

    SciTech Connect

    Boo, C; Khalil, YF; Elimelech, M

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of trimethylamine-carbon dioxide (TMA-CO2) as a potential thermolytic draw solution for engineered osmosis. Water flux and reverse solute flux with TMA-CO2 draw solution were measured in forward osmosis (FO) and pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) modes using thin-film composite (TFC) and cellulose triacetate (CTA) FO membranes. Water flux with the TMA-CO2 draw solution was comparable to that obtained with the more common ammonia-carbon dioxide (NH3-CO2) thermolytic draw solution at similar (1 M) concentration. Using a TFC-FO membrane, the water fluxes produced by 1 M TMA-CO2 and NH3-CO2 draw solutions with a DI water feed were, respectively, 33.4 and 35.6 L m(-2) h(-1) in PRO mode and 14.5 and 152 L m(-2) h(-1) in FO mode. Reverse draw permeation of TMA-CO2 was relatively low compared to NH3-CO2, ranging from 0.1 to 0.2 mol m(-2) h(-1) in all experiments, due to the larger molecular size of TMA. Thermal separation and recovery efficiency for TMA-CO2 was compared to NH3-CO2 by modeling low-temperature vacuum distillation utilizing low-grade heat sources. We also discuss possible challenges in the use TMA-CO2, including potential adverse impact on human health and environments. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Beyond temperature: Clumped isotope signatures in dissolved inorganic carbon species and the influence of solution chemistry on carbonate mineral composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripati, Aradhna K.; Hill, Pamela S.; Eagle, Robert A.; Mosenfelder, Jed L.; Tang, Jianwu; Schauble, Edwin A.; Eiler, John M.; Zeebe, Richard E.; Uchikawa, Joji; Coplen, Tyler B.; Ries, Justin B.; Henry, Drew

    2015-10-01

    "Clumped-isotope" thermometry is an emerging tool to probe the temperature history of surface and subsurface environments based on measurements of the proportion of 13C and 18O isotopes bound to each other within carbonate minerals in 13C18O16O22- groups (heavy isotope "clumps"). Although most clumped isotope geothermometry implicitly presumes carbonate crystals have attained lattice equilibrium (i.e., thermodynamic equilibrium for a mineral, which is independent of solution chemistry), several factors other than temperature, including dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) speciation may influence mineral isotopic signatures. Therefore we used a combination of approaches to understand the potential influence of different variables on the clumped isotope (and oxygen isotope) composition of minerals. We conducted witherite precipitation experiments at a single temperature and at varied pH to empirically determine 13C-18O bond ordering (?47) and ?18O of CO32- and HCO3- molecules at a 25 °C equilibrium. Ab initio cluster models based on density functional theory were used to predict equilibrium 13C-18O bond abundances and ?18O of different DIC species and minerals as a function of temperature. Experiments and theory indicate ?47 and ?18O compositions of CO32- and HCO3- ions are significantly different from each other. Experiments constrain the ?47-?18O slope for a pH effect (0.011 ± 0.001; 12 ? pH ? 7). Rapidly-growing temperate corals exhibit disequilibrium mineral isotopic signatures with a ?47-?18O slope of 0.011 ± 0.003, consistent with a pH effect. Our theoretical calculations for carbonate minerals indicate equilibrium lattice calcite values for ?47 and ?18O are intermediate between HCO3- and CO32-. We analyzed synthetic calcites grown at temperatures ranging from 0.5 to 50 °C with and without the enzyme carbonic anhydrase present. This enzyme catalyzes oxygen isotopic exchange between DIC species and is present in many natural systems. The two types of experiments yielded statistically indistinguishable results, and these measurements yield a calibration that overlaps with our theoretical predictions for calcite at equilibrium. The slow-growing Devils Hole calcite exhibits ?47 and ?18O values consistent with lattice equilibrium. Factors influencing DIC speciation (pH, salinity) and the timescale for DIC equilibration, as well as reactions at the mineral-solution interface, have the potential to influence clumped-isotope signatures and the ?18O of carbonate minerals. In fast-growing carbonate minerals, solution chemistry may be an important factor, particularly over extremes of pH and salinity. If a crystal grows too rapidly to reach an internal equilibrium (i.e., achieve the value for the temperature-dependent mineral lattice equilibrium), it may record the clumped-isotope signature of a DIC species (e.g., the temperature-dependent equilibrium of HCO3-) or a mixture of DIC species, and hence record a disequilibrium mineral composition. For extremely slow-growing crystals, and for rapidly-grown samples grown at a pH where HCO3- dominates the DIC pool at equilibrium, effects of solution chemistry are likely to be relatively small or negligible. In summary, growth environment, solution chemistry, surface equilibria, and precipitation rate may all play a role in dictating whether a crystal achieves equilibrium or disequilibrium clumped-isotope signatures.

  18. Monitoring Technology for Gamma-Aminobutyric acid Production in Polished Mochi Barley Grains using a Carbon Dioxide Sensor.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yasuo; Kawata, Kohki; Watanabe, Seiya

    2015-06-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has many biological functions, including the inhibition of blood pressure increases and acceleration of growth hormone secretion. In this study, we discovered the utility of measuring the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) dissolved in the reaction solution, for development of a real-time and convenient technique to estimate GABA production. In addition to mochi barley bran, we examined the polished grains of three species: mochi barley (a variant of hulless barley), barley, and Japanese millet, all soaked in l-glutamic acid (l-Glu) solution at pH 4.5. We found a positive correlation between GABA and CO2 concentrations, and the production of CO2 was suppressed in the absence of l-Glu at pH 4.5. These results suggest that GABA content can be easily predicted by measuring the aqueous CO2 content using a CO2 sensor, during the process of GABA production in polished mochi barley grains and bran. PMID:25916326

  19. Shock wave synthesis of amino acids from solutions of ammonium formate and ammonium bicarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Chizuka; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Sekine, Toshimori; Nakazawa, Hiromoto; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2015-07-01

    The emergence of life's building blocks, such as amino acids and nucleobases, on the prebiotic Earth was a critical step for the beginning of life. Reduced species with low mass, such as ammonia, amines, or carboxylic acids, are potential precursors for these building blocks of life. These precursors may have been provided to the prebiotic ocean by carbonaceous chondrites and chemical reactions related to meteorite impacts on the early Earth. The impact of extraterrestrial objects on Earth occurred more frequently during this period than at present. Such impacts generated shock waves in the ocean, which have the potential to progress chemical reactions to form the building blocks of life from reduced species. To simulate shock-induced reactions in the prebiotic ocean, we conducted shock-recovery experiments on ammonium bicarbonate solution and ammonium formate solution at impact velocities ranging from 0.51 to 0.92 km/s. In the products from the ammonium formate solution, several amino acids (glycine, alanine, ß-alanine, and sarcosine) and aliphatic amines (methylamine, ethylamine, propylamine, and butylamine) were detected, although yields were less than 0.1 mol % of the formic acid reactant. From the ammonium bicarbonate solution, smaller amounts of glycine, methylamine, ethylamine, and propylamine were formed. The impact velocities used in this study represent minimum cases because natural meteorite impacts typically have higher velocities and longer durations. Our results therefore suggest that shock waves could have been involved in forming life's building blocks in the ocean of prebiotic Earth, and potentially in aquifers of other planets, satellites, and asteroids.

  20. Removal of transition metals from dilute aqueous solution by carboxylic acid group containing absorbent polymers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new carboxylic acid group containing resin with cation exchange capacity, 12.67 meq/g has been used to remove Cu2+, Co2+ and Ni2+ ions from dilute aqueous solution. The resin has Cu2+, Co2+ and Ni2+ removal capacity, 216 mg/g, 154 mg/g and 180 mg/g, respectively. The selectivity of the resin to ...

  1. REDUCTIVE DEHALOGENATION OF HEXACHLOROETHANE, CARBON TETRACHLORIDE, AND BROMOFORM BY ANTHRAHYDROQUINONE DISULFONATE AND HUMIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reductive dehalogenation of hexachloroethane (CzCLj), carbon tetrachloride (CC14), and bromoform (CHBr3) was examined at 50 “C in aqueous solutions containing ei- ther (1) 500 pM of 2,6-anthrahydroquinone disulfonate (AHQDS), (2) 250 pM Fe2+, or (3) 250 pM HS-. The pH ranged ...

  2. REDUCTIVE DEHALOGENATION OF HEXACHLOROETHANE, CARBON TETRACHLORIDE, AND BROMOFORM BY ANAHYDROQUINONE DISULFONATE AND HUMIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reductive dehalogenation of hexachloroethane (C2CI6), carbon tetrachloride (CC14), and bromoform (CHBr3) was examined at 50 degrees C in aqueous solutions containing either (1) 500 uM of 2,6-anthrahydroquinone disulfonate (AHQDS), (2) 250 uM Fe2+, or (3) 250 uM HS. The pH ran...

  3. Self-assembled polyaniline nanotubes grown from a polymeric acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijuan; Peng, Hui; Hsu, Chyong Fang; Kilmartin, Paul A.; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka

    2007-03-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) nanotubes were obtained by a self-assembly process, from a solution containing poly(methyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic acid) (PMVEA) by oxidative polymerization using ammonium persulfate as the oxidant. The size of the nanotubes was greatly affected by the weight ratio of polymeric acid to aniline as measured by SEM images. The outer diameter of the nanotubes increased from 65 to 160 nm as the weight ratio of PMVEA to aniline increased from 1 to 4 wt/wt%. The structural features of the nanotubes were characterized by FTIR, XPS and EPR spectroscopies, which confirmed the presence of the polymeric acid in the PANI nanotubes and their electronic conductive nature. The electrochemical properties were further analysed using cyclic voltammetry.

  4. Thermosensitivity of bile acid-based oligo(ethylene glycol) stars in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Strandman, Satu; Le Dévédec, Frantz; Zhu, X X

    2011-08-01

    Amphiphilic star-shaped oligo(ethylene glycol)s with a hydrophobic bile acid core and varying number of hydrophilic arms have been made. Their thermal behavior in aqueous solutions depends on the number rather than the length of the arms. The two-armed lithocholate derivative showed the strongest tendency for association and exhibited the lowest cloud point (79?°C) of the oligomers made, as well as another phase separation at a lower temperature (31?°C). The "double thermosensitivity" arising both from the salt-dependent LCST of the oligo(ethylene glycol) segments and the temperature-responsive self-assembly of amphiphilic bile acid derivative provides an interesting path in the design of bile acid-based smart materials. PMID:21661073

  5. Adsorption dynamics of Fe(III) from aqueous solutions onto activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Onganer, Y.; Temur, C.

    1998-09-15

    Granular activated carbon was utilized as adsorbent for the removal of Fe(III) ions from aqueous solutions at different temperatures and fixed pH. The batch adsorption kinetics has been described by the Lagergren equation which is a pseudo-first-order rate expression; the surface mass transfer coefficients and diffusion coefficients have been calculated at different temperatures. The intraparticle transport of Fe(III) within the pores of activated carbon was found to be the rate-limiting step, while the process of uptake obeyed the Langmuir model of adsorption.

  6. Ancient low–molecular-weight organic acids in permafrost fuel rapid carbon dioxide production upon thaw

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Travis W.; Wickland, Kimberly P.; Spencer, Robert G. M.; McKnight, Diane M.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Northern permafrost soils store a vast reservoir of carbon, nearly twice that of the present atmosphere. Current and projected climate warming threatens widespread thaw of these frozen, organic carbon (OC)-rich soils. Upon thaw, mobilized permafrost OC in dissolved and particulate forms can enter streams and rivers, which are important processors of OC and conduits for carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. Here, we demonstrate that ancient dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leached from 35,800 y B.P. permafrost soils is rapidly mineralized to CO2. During 200-h experiments in a novel high–temporal-resolution bioreactor, DOC concentration decreased by an average of 53%, fueling a more than sevenfold increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration. Eighty-seven percent of the DOC loss to microbial uptake was derived from the low–molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids acetate and butyrate. To our knowledge, our study is the first to directly quantify high CO2 production rates from permafrost-derived LMW DOC mineralization. The observed DOC loss rates are among the highest reported for permafrost carbon and demonstrate the potential importance of LMW DOC in driving the rapid metabolism of Pleistocene-age permafrost carbon upon thaw and the outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere by soils and nearby inland waters. PMID:26504243

  7. Ancient low-molecular-weight organic acids in permafrost fuel rapid carbon dioxide production upon thaw.

    PubMed

    Drake, Travis W; Wickland, Kimberly P; Spencer, Robert G M; McKnight, Diane M; Striegl, Robert G

    2015-11-10

    Northern permafrost soils store a vast reservoir of carbon, nearly twice that of the present atmosphere. Current and projected climate warming threatens widespread thaw of these frozen, organic carbon (OC)-rich soils. Upon thaw, mobilized permafrost OC in dissolved and particulate forms can enter streams and rivers, which are important processors of OC and conduits for carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. Here, we demonstrate that ancient dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leached from 35,800 y B.P. permafrost soils is rapidly mineralized to CO2. During 200-h experiments in a novel high-temporal-resolution bioreactor, DOC concentration decreased by an average of 53%, fueling a more than sevenfold increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration. Eighty-seven percent of the DOC loss to microbial uptake was derived from the low-molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids acetate and butyrate. To our knowledge, our study is the first to directly quantify high CO2 production rates from permafrost-derived LMW DOC mineralization. The observed DOC loss rates are among the highest reported for permafrost carbon and demonstrate the potential importance of LMW DOC in driving the rapid metabolism of Pleistocene-age permafrost carbon upon thaw and the outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere by soils and nearby inland waters. PMID:26504243

  8. Application of a reactive solute transport model to iron and aluminum reactions in a mountain stream affected by acid mine drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Kimball, B.A.; Broshears, R.E.; Runkel, R.L.

    1995-12-01

    Field experimentation in a mountain stream has helped to quantify hydrologic and chemical processes that control the transport of metals in water affected by acid mine drainage. Injection of sodium carbonate raised instream pH from 3.5 to a maximum of 5.8, and the response of aluminum and iron concentrations indicated the formation of aluminum and iron hydroxide solid phases. A reactive solute transport model was developed by coupling an existing transport code with a geochemical equilibrium model. Simulations using the coupled model reproduced general aspects of observed patterns of pH and metal concentration changes. Chemical interactions between solutes and the stream bed and kinetic restraints on the attainment of equilibrium are indicated by discrepancies between simulated and observed concentrations. Simulation of stream reach-scale field data provides an important evaluation of reactive solute transport models.

  9. Heterogeneous photo-Fenton degradation of acid red B over Fe2O3 supported on activated carbon fiber.

    PubMed

    Lan, Huachun; Wang, Aiming; Liu, Ruiping; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-03-21

    Fe2O3 supported on activated carbon fiber (Fe2O3/ACF) was prepared via an impregnation method and characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and BET analysis. The results indicated that Fe2O3 with small particle size was highly dispersed on the surface of the ACF and the introduction of Fe2O3 did not change the ACF pore structure. Fe2O3/ACF exhibited a higher Fenton efficiency for the degradation of acid red B (ARB), especially under simulated solar irradiation. Complete decoloration of the ARB solution and 43% removal of TOC could be achieved within 200 min under optimal conditions. It was verified that more ?OH radicals were generated in the photo-assisted Fenton process and involved as active species in ARB degradation. FTIR analysis indicated that the degradation of ARB was initiated through the cleavage of -N=N-, followed by hydroxylation and opening of phenyl rings to form aliphatic acids, and further oxidation of aliphatic acids would produce CO2 and H2O. Moreover, Fe2O3/ACF maintained its activity after being reused 4 times and the release of iron from the catalyst was found to be insignificant during the Fenton and photo-Fenton processes, indicating that Fe2O3/ACF had good long-term stability. PMID:25497030

  10. Enhancing thermal conductivity of palmitic acid based phase change materials with carbon nanotubes as fillers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jifen; Xie, Huaqing; Li, Yang; Chen, Lifei; Xin, Zhong

    2010-02-15

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as produced are usually entangled and not ready to be dispersed into organic matrix. CNTs were treated by mechano-chemical reaction with ball milling the mixture of potassium hydroxide and the pristine CNTs. Hydroxide radical functional groups have been introduced on the CNT surfaces, which enabled to make stable and homogeneous CNT composites. Treated CNTs were successfully dispersed into the palmitic acid matrix without any surfactant. Transient short-hot-wire apparatus was used to measure the thermal conductivities of these nanotube composites. Nanotube composites have substantially higher thermal conductivities than the base palmitic acid matrix, with the enhancement increasing with the mass fraction of CNTs in both liquid state and solid state. The enhancements of the thermal conductivity are about 30% higher than the reported corresponding values for palmitic acid based phase change nanocomposites containing 1 wt% CNTs treated by concentrated acid mixture. (author)

  11. The anodizing behavior of aluminum in malonic acid solution and morphology of the anodic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jianjun; Zuo, Yu

    2012-11-01

    The anodizing behavior of aluminum in malonic acid solution and morphology of the anodic films were studied. The voltage-time response for galvanostatic anodization of aluminum in malonic acid solution exhibits a conventional three-stage feature but the formation voltage is much higher. With the increase of electrolyte concentration, the electrolyte viscosity increases simultaneously and the high viscosity decreases the film growth rate. With the concentration increase of the malonic acid electrolyte, the critical current density that initiates local "burning" on the sample surface decreases. For malonic acid anodization, the field-assisted dissolution on the oxide surface is relatively weak and the nucleation of pores is more difficult, which results in greater barrier layer thickness and larger cell dimension. The embryo of the porous structure of anodic film has been created within the linear region of the first transient stage, and the definite porous structure has been established before the end of the first transient stage. The self-ordering behavior of the porous film is influenced by the electrolyte concentration, film thickness and the applied current density. Great current density not only improves the cell arrangement order but also brings about larger cell dimension.

  12. Chemical durability of glaze on Zsolnay architectural ceramics (Budapest, Hungary) in acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baricza, Ágnes; Bajnóczi, Bernadett; May, Zoltán; Tóth, Mária; Szabó, Csaba

    2015-04-01

    Zsolnay glazed architectural ceramics are among the most famous Hungarian ceramics, however, there is no profound knowledge about the deterioration of these building materials. The present study aims to reveal the influence of acidic solutions in the deterioration of Zsolnay ceramics. The studied ceramics are glazed roof tiles, which originate from two buildings in Budapest: one is located in the densely built-up city centre with high traffic rate and another one is in a city quarter with moderate traffic and more open space. The roof tiles represent the construction and the renovation periods of the buildings. The ceramics were mainly covered by lead glazes in the construction period and mainly alkali glazes in the renovation periods. The glaze of the tiles were coloured with iron (for yellow glaze) or chromium/copper/iron (for green glazes) in the case of the building located in the city centre, whereas cobalt was used as colorant and tin oxide as opacifier for the blue glaze of the ceramics of the other building. Six tiles were selected from each building. Sulphuric acid (H2SO4) solutions of pH2 and pH4 were used to measure the durability of the glazes up to 14 days at room temperature. The surfaces of the glazed ceramics after the treatment were measured by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and SEM-EDS techniques to determine the precipitated phases on the surface of the glaze. Electron microprobe analysis was used to quantitatively characterise phases found and to determine the chemical composition of the treated glaze. The recovered sulphuric acid solutions were measured with ICP-OES technique in order to quantify the extent of the ion exchange between the glaze and the solutions. There is a significant difference in the dissolution rates in the treatments with sulphuric acid solutions of pH2 and pH4, respectively. The solution of pH2 induced greater ion exchange (approx. 7-10 times) from the glaze compared to the solution of pH4. Alkali and alkali earth metals and lead indicate the most intensive dissolution. Greater amount of ion-exchange was observed for the lead glaze covering the ceramics from the construction periods of both buildings. Sulphate phases (e.g. anglesite, gypsum, anhydrite) newly appeared on corroded glaze parts and pits are clearly seen on the surface of the ceramics originated especially from the first renovation period of the building located in the city centre.

  13. Effect of Organic Acid Additions on the General and Localized Corrosion Susceptibility of Alloy 22 in Chloride Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Carranza, R M; Giordano, C M; Rodr?guez, M A; Ilevbare, G O; Rebak, R B

    2007-08-28

    Electrochemical studies such as cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed to determine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 (N06022) in 1M NaCl solutions at various pH values from acidic to neutral at 90 C. All the tested material was wrought Mill Annealed (MA). Tests were also performed in NaCl solutions containing weak organic acids such as oxalic, acetic, citric and picric. Results show that the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 was significantly higher in solutions containing oxalic acid than in solutions of pure NaCl at the same pH. Citric and picric acids showed a slightly higher corrosion rate, and acetic acid maintained the corrosion rate of pure chloride solutions at the same pH. Organic acids revealed to be weak inhibitors for crevice corrosion. Higher concentration ratios, compared to nitrate ions, were needed to completely inhibit crevice corrosion in chloride solutions. Results are discussed considering acid dissociation constants, buffer capacity and complex formation constants of the different weak acids.

  14. Trihalomethane formation potential of aquatic and terrestrial fulvic and humic acids: Sorption on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Abouleish, Mohamed Y Z; Wells, Martha J M

    2015-07-15

    Humic substances (HSs) are precursors for the formation of hazardous disinfection by-products (DBPs) during chlorination of water. Various surrogate parameters have been used to investigate the generation of DBPs by HS precursors and the removal of these precursors by activated carbon treatment. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC)- and ultraviolet absorbance (UVA254)-based isotherms are commonly reported and presumed to be good predictors of the trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP). However, THMFP-based isotherms are rarely published such that the three types of parameters have not been compared directly. Batch equilibrium experiments on activated carbon were used to generate constant-initial-concentration sorption isotherms for well-characterized samples obtained from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS). HSs representing type (fulvic acid [FA], humic acid [HA]), origin (aquatic, terrestrial), and geographical source (Nordic, Suwannee, Peat, Soil) were examined at pH6 and pH9. THMFP-based isotherms were generated and compared to determine if DOC- and UVA254-based isotherms were good predictors of the THMFP. The sorption process depended on the composition of the HSs and the chemical nature of the activated carbon, both of which were influenced by pH. Activated carbon removal of THM-precursors was pH- and HS-dependent. In some instances, the THMFP existed after UVA254 was depleted. PMID:25847173

  15. Crystal growth of calcium carbonate on the cellulose acetate/pyrrolidon blend films in the presence of L-aspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiuzhen; Xie, Anjian; Huang, Fangzhi; Shen, Yuhua

    2014-03-01

    The morphogenesis and growth process of calcium carbonate on the cellulose acetate/polyvinyl pyrrolidone (CA/PVP) blend films in the presence of L-aspartic acid was carefully investigated. The results showed that the concentration of L-aspartic acid, the initial pH value of reaction solution and temperature turned out to be important factors for the control of morphologies and polymorphs of calcium carbonate. Complex morphologies of CaCO3 particles, such as cubes, rose-like spheres, twinborn-spheres, cone-like, bouquet-like, etc. could be obtained under the different experimental conditions. The dynamic process of formation of rose-like sphere crystals was analyzed by monitoring the continuous morphological and structural evolution and components of crystals in different crystal stages. This research may provide a promising method to prepare other inorganic materials with complex morphologies.

  16. Retention of silica nanoparticles on calcium carbonate sands immersed in electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan Vivian; Cathles, Lawrence M

    2014-12-15

    Understanding nanoparticle-surface adhesion is necessary to develop inert tracers for subsurface applications. Here we show that nanoparticles with neutral surface charge may make the best subsurface tracers, and that it may be possible to used SiO2 nanoparticle retention to measure the fraction of solid surface that has positive charge. We show that silica nanoparticles dispersed in NaCl electrolyte solutions are increasingly retained in calcium carbonate (calcite) sand-packed columns as the solution ionic strength increases, but are not retained if they are injected in pure water or Na2SO4 electrolyte solutions. The particles retained in the NaCl experiments are released when the column is flushed with pure water or Na2SO4 solution. AFM measurements on calcite immersed in NaCl solutions show the initial repulsion of a silica colloidal probe as the surface is approached is reduced as the solution ionic strength increases, and that at high ionic strengths it disappears entirely and only attraction remains. These AFM measurements and their interpretation with Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory shows the calcite surface charge is always negative for Na2SO4 solutions, but changes from negative to positive in a patchy fashion as the ionic strength of the NaCl solution increases. Since mixed-charge (patchy) surfaces may be common in the subsurface, nanoparticles with near-zero charge may make the best tracers. PMID:25259754

  17. Simultaneous determination of mycophenolate mofetil and its active metabolite, mycophenolic acid, by differential pulse voltammetry using multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Soleimani, Mohammad; Afkhami, Abbas

    2014-09-01

    A highly sensitive electrochemical sensor for the simultaneous determination of mycophenolate mofetil (MPM) and mycophenolic acid (MPA) was fabricated by multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode (MWCNTs/GCE). The electrochemical behavior of these two drugs was studied at the modified electrode using cyclic voltammetry and adsorptive differential pulse voltammetry. MPM and MPA were oxidized at the GCE during an irreversible process. DPV analysis showed two oxidation peaks at 0.87V and 1.1V vs. Ag/AgCl for MPM and an oxidation peak at 0.87V vs. Ag/AgCl for MPA in phosphate buffer solution of pH5.0. The MWCNTs/GCE displayed excellent electrochemical activities toward oxidation of MPM and MPA relative to the bare GCE. The experimental design algorithm was used for optimization of DPV parameters. The electrode represents linear responses in the range 5.0×10(-6) to 1.6×10(-4)molL(-1) and 2.5×10(-6)molL(-1) to 6.0×10(-5)molL(-1) for MPM and MPA, respectively. The detection limit was found to be 9.0×10(-7)molL(-1) and 4.0×10(-7)molL(-1) for MPM and MPA, respectively. The modified electrode showed a good sensitivity and stability. It was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of MPM and MPA in plasma and urine samples. PMID:25063089

  18. EXAFS study of the speciation of protactinium(V) in aqueous hydrofluoric acid solutions.

    PubMed

    De Sio, Stéphanie M; Wilson, Richard E

    2014-12-01

    The speciation of protactinium(V) in hydrofluoric acid (HF) solutions was studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements were performed on an aqueous solution of 0.05 M protactinium(V) with various HF concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 27 M in order to probe the protactinium coordination sphere with respect to the identity and number of coordinating ligands. The resulting fits to the spectra suggest the presence of an eight-coordinate homoleptic fluoro complex in highly concentrated fluoride solutions (27 M), with equilibrium between seven- and eight-coordinate fluoro complexes at moderate acidities, and in more dilute solutions, results indicate that one water molecule is likely to replace a fluoride in the first coordination sphere, at a distance of 2.54-2.57 Å. Comparisons of this chemistry with group V metals, niobium and tantalum, are presented, and the potential implications for these results on the hydrolytic behavior of protactinium in aqueous systems are discussed. PMID:25389749

  19. Optimization of modified carbon paste electrode with multiwalled carbon nanotube/ionic liquid/cauliflower-like gold nanostructures for simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Afraz, Ahmadreza; Rafati, Amir Abbas; Najafi, Mojgan

    2014-11-01

    We describe the modification of a carbon paste electrode (CPE) with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and an ionic liquid (IL). Electrochemical studies by using a D-optimal mixture design in Design-Expert software revealed an optimized composition of 60% graphite, 14.2% paraffin, 10.8% MWCNT and 15% IL. The optimal modified CPE shows good electrochemical properties that are well matched with model prediction parameters. In the next step, the optimized CPE was modified with gold nanostructures by applying a double-pulse electrochemical technique. The resulting electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It gives three sharp and well-separated oxidation peaks for ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), and uric acid (UA). The sensor enables simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA with linear responses from 0.3 to 285, 0.08 to 200, and 0.1 to 450 ?M, respectively, and with 120, 30 and 30 nM detection limits (at an S/N of 3). The method was successfully applied to the determination of AA, DA, and UA in spiked samples of human serum and urine. PMID:25280680

  20. Dose rate dependence of the speciation of neptunium in irradiated solutions of nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Precek, M.; Paulenova, A.; Mincher, B.J.; Mezyk, S.P.

    2013-07-01

    The effects of radiation on the redox speciation of neptunium are of interest due to their impact on the performance of separation of neptunium from highly radioactive solutions of dissolved used nuclear fuel. In this study, the influence of dose rate change from 0.4 kGy/h to 6 kGy/h was examined during irradiation of solutions of initially hexavalent 2.0-2.5 mM neptunium in nitric acid of two different concentrations (0.5 and 1 M). Results indicate that the immediate radiolytic steady-state concentration of neptunium(V) were depressed and its initial radiolytic yield was up to 2-times lower (in 1 M HNO{sub 3} solutions)during irradiations with the higher dose rate. The finding is explained on the basis of the enhancement of the role of oxidizing radicals during the radiolytic process. (authors)