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Sample records for carbonic anhydrase cah3

  1. Crystal structure and functional characterization of photosystem II-associated carbonic anhydrase CAH3 in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Benlloch, Reyes; Shevela, Dmitriy; Hainzl, Tobias; Grundström, Christin; Shutova, Tatyana; Messinger, Johannes; Samuelsson, Göran; Sauer-Eriksson, A Elisabeth

    2015-03-01

    In oxygenic photosynthesis, light energy is stored in the form of chemical energy by converting CO2 and water into carbohydrates. The light-driven oxidation of water that provides the electrons and protons for the subsequent CO2 fixation takes place in photosystem II (PSII). Recent studies show that in higher plants, HCO3 (-) increases PSII activity by acting as a mobile acceptor of the protons produced by PSII. In the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a luminal carbonic anhydrase, CrCAH3, was suggested to improve proton removal from PSII, possibly by rapid reformation of HCO3 (-) from CO2. In this study, we investigated the interplay between PSII and CrCAH3 by membrane inlet mass spectrometry and x-ray crystallography. Membrane inlet mass spectrometry measurements showed that CrCAH3 was most active at the slightly acidic pH values prevalent in the thylakoid lumen under illumination. Two crystal structures of CrCAH3 in complex with either acetazolamide or phosphate ions were determined at 2.6- and 2.7-Å resolution, respectively. CrCAH3 is a dimer at pH 4.1 that is stabilized by swapping of the N-terminal arms, a feature not previously observed in α-type carbonic anhydrases. The structure contains a disulfide bond, and redox titration of CrCAH3 function with dithiothreitol suggested a possible redox regulation of the enzyme. The stimulating effect of CrCAH3 and CO2/HCO3 (-) on PSII activity was demonstrated by comparing the flash-induced oxygen evolution pattern of wild-type and CrCAH3-less PSII preparations. We showed that CrCAH3 has unique structural features that allow this enzyme to maximize PSII activity at low pH and CO2 concentration. PMID:25617045

  2. Identification and functional role of the carbonic anhydrase Cah3 in thylakoid membranes of pyrenoid of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Sinetova, Maria A; Kupriyanova, Elena V; Markelova, Alexandra G; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I; Pronina, Natalia A

    2012-08-01

    The distribution of the luminal carbonic anhydrase Cah3 associated with thylakoid membranes in the chloroplast and pyrenoid was studied in wild-type cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and in its cia3 mutant deficient in the activity of the Cah3 protein. In addition, the effect of CO(2) concentration on fatty acid composition of photosynthetic membranes was examined in wild-type cells and in the cia3 mutant. In the cia3 mutant, the rate of growth was lower as compared to wild-type, especially in the cells grown at 0.03% CO(2). This might indicate a participation of thylakoid Cah3 in the CO(2)-concentrating mechanism (CCM) of chloroplast and reflect the dysfunction of the CCM in the cia3 mutant. In both strains, a decrease in the CO(2) concentration from 2% to 0.03% caused an increase in the content of polyunsaturated fatty acids in membrane lipids. At the same time, in the cia3 mutant, the increase in the majority of polyunsaturated fatty acids was less pronounced as compared to wild-type cells, whereas the amount of 16:4ω3 did not increase at all. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that luminal Cah3 is mostly located in the thylakoid membranes that pass through the pyrenoid. In the cells of CCM-mutant, cia3, the Cah3 protein was much less abundant, and it was evenly distributed throughout the pyrenoid matrix. The results support our hypothesis that CO(2) might be generated from HCO(3)(-) by Cah3 in the thylakoid lumen with the following CO(2) diffusion into the pyrenoid, where the CO(2) fixing Rubisco is located. This ensures the maintenance of active photosynthesis under CO(2)-limiting conditions, and, as a result, the active growth of cells. The relationships between the induction of CCM and restructuring of the photosynthetic membranes, as well as the involvement of the Cah3 of the pyrenoid in these events, are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability: from Natural to Artificial. PMID:22709623

  3. Plant Carbonic Anhydrases

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, C. A.; Patterson, B. D.; Graham, D.

    1972-01-01

    On the basis of polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis of leaf extracts from 24 species of higher plants, two main forms of carbonic anhydrase (EC 4.2.1.1) were recognized; the “dicotyledon” type and the “monocotyledon” type. More than one band of enzyme was found on gels from most species, suggesting the possibility of carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes in higher plants. Images PMID:16658144

  4. A novel alpha-type carbonic anhydrase associated with the thylakoid membrane in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is required for growth at ambient CO2.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, J; Clarke, A K; Chen, Z Y; Hugghins, S Y; Park, Y I; Husic, H D; Moroney, J V; Samuelsson, G

    1998-08-10

    A 29.5 kDa intracellular alpha-type carbonic anhydrase, designated Cah3, from the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the first of this type discovered inside a photosynthetic eukaryote cell. We describe the cloning of a cDNA which encodes the protein. Immunoblot studies with specific antibodies raised against Cah3 demonstrate that the polypeptide is associated exclusively with the thylakoid membrane. The putative transit peptide suggests that Cah3 is directed to the thylakoid lumen, which is confirmed further by the presence of mature sized Cah3 after thermolysin treatment of intact thylakoids. Complementation of the high inorganic carbon concentration-requiring mutant, cia-3, with a subcloned cosmid containing the cah3 gene yielded transformants that grew on atmospheric levels of CO2 (0.035%) and contained an active 29.5 kDa alpha-type carbonic anhydrase. Although, cia-3 has reduced internal carbonic anhydrase activity, unexpectedly the level of Cah3 was similar to that of the wild-type, suggesting that the mutant accumulates an inactive Cah3 polypeptide. Genomic sequence analysis of the mutant revealed two amino acid changes in the transit peptide. Results from photosynthesis and chlorophyll a fluorescence parameter measurements show that the cia-3 mutant is photosynthetically impaired. Our results indicate that the carbonic anhydrase, extrinsically located within the chloroplast thylakoid lumen, is essential for growth of C.reinhardtii at ambient levels of CO2, and that at these CO2 concentrations the enzyme is required for optimal photosystem II photochemistry. PMID:9482718

  5. Salivary carbonic anhydrase isoenzyme VI

    PubMed Central

    Kivelä, Jyrki; Parkkila, Seppo; Parkkila, Anna-Kaisa; Leinonen, Jukka; Rajaniemi, Hannu

    1999-01-01

    The carbonic anhydrases (CAs) participate in the maintenance of pH homeostasis in various tissues and biological fluids of the human body by catalysing the reversible reaction CO2+ H2O ⇌ HCO3−+ H+ (Davenport & Fisher, 1938; Davenport, 1939; Maren, 1967). Carbonic anhydrase isoenzyme VI (CA VI) is the only secretory isoenzyme of the mammalian CA gene family. It is exclusively expressed in the serous acinar cells of the parotid and submandibular glands, from where it is secreted into the saliva. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in research focused on the physiological role of salivary CA VI in the oral cavity and upper alimentary canal. PMID:10523402

  6. Accelerating Mineral Carbonation Using Carbonic Anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Power, Ian M; Harrison, Anna L; Dipple, Gregory M

    2016-03-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzymes have gained considerable attention for their potential use in carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies because they are able to catalyze rapidly the interconversion of aqueous CO2 and bicarbonate. However, there are challenges for widespread implementation including the need to develop mineralization process routes for permanent carbon storage. Mineral carbonation of highly reactive feedstocks may be limited by the supply rate of CO2. This rate limitation can be directly addressed by incorporating enzyme-catalyzed CO2 hydration. This study examined the effects of bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA) and CO2-rich gas streams on the carbonation rate of brucite [Mg(OH)2], a highly reactive mineral. Alkaline brucite slurries were amended with BCA and supplied with 10% CO2 gas while aqueous chemistry and solids were monitored throughout the experiments (hours to days). In comparison to controls, brucite carbonation using BCA was accelerated by up to 240%. Nesquehonite [MgCO3·3H2O] precipitation limited the accumulation of hydrated CO2 species, apparently preventing BCA from catalyzing the dehydration reaction. Geochemical models reproduce observed reaction progress in all experiments, revealing a linear correlation between CO2 uptake and carbonation rate. Data demonstrates that carbonation in BCA-amended reactors remained limited by CO2 supply, implying further acceleration is possible. PMID:26829491

  7. Carbonic anhydrases in industrial applications.

    PubMed

    González, Javier M; Fisher, S Zoë

    2014-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) catalyze a fundamental reaction: the reversible hydration and dehydration of carbon dioxide (CO2) and bicarbonate ([Formula: see text]), respectively. Current methods for CO2 capture and sequestration are harsh, expensive, and require prohibitively large energy inputs, effectively negating the purpose of removing CO2 from the atmosphere. Due to CA's activity on CO2 there is increasing interest in using CAs for industrial applications such as carbon sequestration and biofuel production. A lot of work in the last decade has focused on immobilizing CA onto various supports for incorporation into CO2 scrubbing applications or devices. Although the proof of principle has been validated, current CAs being tested do not withstand the harsh industrial conditions. The advent of large-scale genome sequencing projects has resulted in several emerging efforts seeking out novel CAs from a variety of microorganisms, including bacteria, micro-, and macro-algae. CAs are also being investigated for their use in medical applications, such drug delivery systems and artificial lungs. This review also looks at possible downstream uses of captured and sequestered CO2, from using it to enhance oil recovery to incorporating it into useful and financially viable products. PMID:24146390

  8. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors drug design.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Robert; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) has pharmacologic applications in the field of antiglaucoma, anticonvulsant, antiobesity, and anticancer agents but is also emerging for designing anti-infectives (antifungal and antibacterial agents) with a novel mechanism of action. As a consequence, the drug design of CA inhibitors (CAIs) is a very dynamic field. Sulfonamides and their isosteres (sulfamates/sulfamides) constitute the main class of CAIs which bind to the metal ion in the enzyme active site. Recently the dithiocarbamates, possessing a similar mechanism of action, were reported as a new class of inhibitors. Other families of CAIs possess a distinct mechanism of action: phenols, polyamines, some carboxylates, and sulfocoumarins anchor to the zinc-coordinated water molecule. Coumarins and five/six-membered lactones are prodrug inhibitors, binding in hydrolyzed form at the entrance of the active site cavity. Novel drug design strategies have been reported principally based on the tail approach for obtaining all these types of CAIs, which exploit more external binding regions within the enzyme active site (in addition to coordination to the metal ion), leading thus to isoform-selective compounds. Sugar-based tails as well as click chemistry were the most fruitful developments of the tail approach. Promising compounds that inhibit CAs from bacterial and fungal pathogens, of the dithiocarbamate, phenol and carboxylate types have also been reported. PMID:24146385

  9. Thermostable Carbonic Anhydrases in Biotechnological Applications.

    PubMed

    Di Fiore, Anna; Alterio, Vincenzo; Monti, Simona M; De Simone, Giuseppina; D'Ambrosio, Katia

    2015-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases are ubiquitous metallo-enzymes which catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide in bicarbonate ions and protons. Recent years have seen an increasing interest in the utilization of these enzymes in CO2 capture and storage processes. However, since this use is greatly limited by the harsh conditions required in these processes, the employment of thermostable enzymes, both those isolated by thermophilic organisms and those obtained by protein engineering techniques, represents an interesting possibility. In this review we will provide an extensive description of the thermostable carbonic anhydrases so far reported and the main processes in which these enzymes have found an application. PMID:26184158

  10. Thermostable Carbonic Anhydrases in Biotechnological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Di Fiore, Anna; Alterio, Vincenzo; Monti, Simona M.; De Simone, Giuseppina; D’Ambrosio, Katia

    2015-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases are ubiquitous metallo-enzymes which catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide in bicarbonate ions and protons. Recent years have seen an increasing interest in the utilization of these enzymes in CO2 capture and storage processes. However, since this use is greatly limited by the harsh conditions required in these processes, the employment of thermostable enzymes, both those isolated by thermophilic organisms and those obtained by protein engineering techniques, represents an interesting possibility. In this review we will provide an extensive description of the thermostable carbonic anhydrases so far reported and the main processes in which these enzymes have found an application. PMID:26184158

  11. Heterocyclic compounds as carbonic anhydrase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Husain, Asif; Madhesia, Diwakar

    2012-12-01

    The carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) constitute interesting targets for the design of pharmacological agents useful in the treatment or prevention of a variety of disorders such as, glaucoma, acid-base disequilibria, epilepsy, and other neuromuscular diseases, altitude sickness, edema, and obesity. A quite new and unexpected application of the CA inhibitors (CAIs) is with regard to their potential use in the management (imaging and treatment) of hypoxic tumors. A series of sulfonamides, including some clinically used derivatives like acetazolamide, methazolamide, ethoxzolamide, dichlorophenamide, dorzolamide, brinzolamide, benzolamide, and sulpiride, or indisulam, a compound in clinical development as antitumor drug, as well as the sulfamate antiepileptic drug topiramate have been reported to inhibit various human carbonic anhydrase isozyme. Various heterocyclic sulfonamides have been reported in this review with their potency to inhibit different carbonic anhydrases isozymes. PMID:21981003

  12. Atomic resolution studies of carbonic anhydrase II

    SciTech Connect

    Behnke, Craig A.; Le Trong, Isolde; Godden, Jeff W.; Merritt, Ethan A.; Teller, David C.; Bajorath, Jürgen; Stenkamp, Ronald E.

    2010-05-01

    The structure of human carbonic anhydrase II has been solved with a sulfonamide inhibitor at 0.9 Å resolution. Structural variation and flexibility is seen on the surface of the protein and is consistent with the anisotropic ADPs obtained from refinement. Comparison with 13 other atomic resolution carbonic anhydrase structures shows that surface variation exists even in these highly ordered isomorphous crystals. Carbonic anhydrase has been well studied structurally and functionally owing to its importance in respiration. A large number of X-ray crystallographic structures of carbonic anhydrase and its inhibitor complexes have been determined, some at atomic resolution. Structure determination of a sulfonamide-containing inhibitor complex has been carried out and the structure was refined at 0.9 Å resolution with anisotropic atomic displacement parameters to an R value of 0.141. The structure is similar to those of other carbonic anhydrase complexes, with the inhibitor providing a fourth nonprotein ligand to the active-site zinc. Comparison of this structure with 13 other atomic resolution (higher than 1.25 Å) isomorphous carbonic anhydrase structures provides a view of the structural similarity and variability in a series of crystal structures. At the center of the protein the structures superpose very well. The metal complexes superpose (with only two exceptions) with standard deviations of 0.01 Å in some zinc–protein and zinc–ligand bond lengths. In contrast, regions of structural variability are found on the protein surface, possibly owing to flexibility and disorder in the individual structures, differences in the chemical and crystalline environments or the different approaches used by different investigators to model weak or complicated electron-density maps. These findings suggest that care must be taken in interpreting structural details on protein surfaces on the basis of individual X-ray structures, even if atomic resolution data are available.

  13. Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems

    SciTech Connect

    Novick, Scott; Alvizo, Oscar

    2013-01-15

    The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

  14. Coral Carbonic Anhydrases: Regulation by Ocean Acidification

    PubMed Central

    Zoccola, Didier; Innocenti, Alessio; Bertucci, Anthony; Tambutté, Eric; Supuran, Claudiu T.; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Global change is a major threat to the oceans, as it implies temperature increase and acidification. Ocean acidification (OA) involving decreasing pH and changes in seawater carbonate chemistry challenges the capacity of corals to form their skeletons. Despite the large number of studies that have investigated how rates of calcification respond to ocean acidification scenarios, comparatively few studies tackle how ocean acidification impacts the physiological mechanisms that drive calcification itself. The aim of our paper was to determine how the carbonic anhydrases, which play a major role in calcification, are potentially regulated by ocean acidification. For this we measured the effect of pH on enzyme activity of two carbonic anhydrase isoforms that have been previously characterized in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata. In addition we looked at gene expression of these enzymes in vivo. For both isoforms, our results show (1) a change in gene expression under OA (2) an effect of OA and temperature on carbonic anhydrase activity. We suggest that temperature increase could counterbalance the effect of OA on enzyme activity. Finally we point out that caution must, thus, be taken when interpreting transcriptomic data on carbonic anhydrases in ocean acidification and temperature stress experiments, as the effect of these stressors on the physiological function of CA will depend both on gene expression and enzyme activity. PMID:27271641

  15. Coral Carbonic Anhydrases: Regulation by Ocean Acidification.

    PubMed

    Zoccola, Didier; Innocenti, Alessio; Bertucci, Anthony; Tambutté, Eric; Supuran, Claudiu T; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Global change is a major threat to the oceans, as it implies temperature increase and acidification. Ocean acidification (OA) involving decreasing pH and changes in seawater carbonate chemistry challenges the capacity of corals to form their skeletons. Despite the large number of studies that have investigated how rates of calcification respond to ocean acidification scenarios, comparatively few studies tackle how ocean acidification impacts the physiological mechanisms that drive calcification itself. The aim of our paper was to determine how the carbonic anhydrases, which play a major role in calcification, are potentially regulated by ocean acidification. For this we measured the effect of pH on enzyme activity of two carbonic anhydrase isoforms that have been previously characterized in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata. In addition we looked at gene expression of these enzymes in vivo. For both isoforms, our results show (1) a change in gene expression under OA (2) an effect of OA and temperature on carbonic anhydrase activity. We suggest that temperature increase could counterbalance the effect of OA on enzyme activity. Finally we point out that caution must, thus, be taken when interpreting transcriptomic data on carbonic anhydrases in ocean acidification and temperature stress experiments, as the effect of these stressors on the physiological function of CA will depend both on gene expression and enzyme activity. PMID:27271641

  16. Non-Classical Inhibition of Carbonic Anhydrase

    PubMed Central

    Lomelino, Carrie L.; Supuran, Claudiu T.; McKenna, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Specific isoforms from the carbonic anhydrase (CA) family of zinc metalloenzymes have been associated with a variety of diseases. Isoform-specific carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) are therefore a major focus of attention for specific disease treatments. Classical CAIs, primarily sulfonamide-based compounds and their bioisosteres, are examined as antiglaucoma, antiepileptic, antiobesity, antineuropathic pain and anticancer compounds. However, many sulfonamide compounds inhibit all CA isoforms nonspecifically, diluting drug effectiveness and causing undesired side effects due to off-target inhibition. In addition, a small but significant percentage of the general population cannot be treated with sulfonamide-based compounds due to a sulfa allergy. Therefore, CAIs must be developed that are not only isoform specific, but also non-classical, i.e. not based on sulfonamides, sulfamates, or sulfamides. This review covers the classes of non-classical CAIs and the recent advances in the development of isoform-specific inhibitors based on phenols, polyamines, coumarins and their derivatives. PMID:27438828

  17. Non-Classical Inhibition of Carbonic Anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Lomelino, Carrie L; Supuran, Claudiu T; McKenna, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Specific isoforms from the carbonic anhydrase (CA) family of zinc metalloenzymes have been associated with a variety of diseases. Isoform-specific carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) are therefore a major focus of attention for specific disease treatments. Classical CAIs, primarily sulfonamide-based compounds and their bioisosteres, are examined as antiglaucoma, antiepileptic, antiobesity, antineuropathic pain and anticancer compounds. However, many sulfonamide compounds inhibit all CA isoforms nonspecifically, diluting drug effectiveness and causing undesired side effects due to off-target inhibition. In addition, a small but significant percentage of the general population cannot be treated with sulfonamide-based compounds due to a sulfa allergy. Therefore, CAIs must be developed that are not only isoform specific, but also non-classical, i.e. not based on sulfonamides, sulfamates, or sulfamides. This review covers the classes of non-classical CAIs and the recent advances in the development of isoform-specific inhibitors based on phenols, polyamines, coumarins and their derivatives. PMID:27438828

  18. Detecting Extracellular Carbonic Anhydrase Activity Using Membrane Inlet Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Delacruz, Joannalyn; Mikulski, Rose; Tu, Chingkuang; Li, Ying; Wang, Hai; Shiverick, Kathleen T.; Frost, Susan C.; Horenstein, Nicole A.; Silverman, David N.

    2010-01-01

    Current research into the function of carbonic anhydrases in cell physiology emphasizes the role of membrane-bound carbonic anhydrases, such as carbonic anhydrase IX that has been identified in malignant tumors and is associated with extracellular acidification as a response to hypoxia. We present here a mass spectrometric method to determine the extent to which total carbonic anhydrase activity is due to extracellular carbonic anhydrase in whole cell preparations. The method is based on the biphasic rate of depletion of 18O from CO2 measured by membrane inlet mass spectrometry. The slopes of the biphasic depletion are a sensitive measure of the presence of carbonic anhydrase outside and inside of the cells. This property is demonstrated here using suspensions of human red cells in which external carbonic anhydrase was added to the suspending solution. It is also applied to breast and prostate cancer cells which both express exofacial carbonic anhydrase IX. Inhibition of external carbonic anhydrase is achieved by use of a membrane impermeant inhibitor that was synthesized for this purpose, p-aminomethylbenzenesulfonamide attached to a polyethyleneglycol polymer. PMID:20417171

  19. Carbonic Anhydrase Catalysis: An Experiment on Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spyridis, Greg T.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate enzyme kinetics experiment which uses bovine erythrocyte carbonic anhydrase, a very stable enzyme commercially available in lyophilized form. Includes background information, reactions involved, procedures used, and the calculation of typical results obtained. (JN)

  20. Structure and function of carbonic anhydrases.

    PubMed

    Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-07-15

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) catalyse the interconversion between CO2 and bicarbonate as well as other hydrolytic reactions. Among the six genetic families known to date, the α-, β-, γ-, δ-, ζ- and η-CAs, detailed kinetic and X-ray crystallographic studies have allowed a deep understanding of the structure-function relationship in this superfamily of proteins. A metal hydroxide nucleophilic species of the enzyme, and a unique active site architecture, with half of it hydrophilic and the opposing part hydrophobic, allow these enzymes to act as some of the most effective catalysts known in Nature. The CA activation and inhibition mechanisms are also known in detail, with a large number of new inhibitor classes being described in the last years. Apart from the zinc binders, some classes of inhibitors anchor to the metal ion coordinated nucleophile, others occlude the entrance of the active site cavity and more recently, compounds binding outside the active site were described. CA inhibition has therapeutic applications for drugs acting as diuretics, antiepileptics, antiglaucoma, antiobesity and antitumour agents. Targeting such enzymes from pathogens may lead to novel anti-infectives. Successful structure-based drug design campaigns allowed the discovery of highly isoform selective CA inhibitors (CAIs), which may lead to a new generation of drugs targeting these widespread enzymes. The use of CAs in CO2 capture processes for mitigating the global temperature rise has also been investigated more recently. PMID:27407171

  1. Dispensabilities of carbonic anhydrase in proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Kenji; Nishida, Hiromi; Beppu, Teruhiko

    2012-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) (E.C. 4.2.1.1) is a ubiquitous enzyme catalysing interconversion between CO(2) and bicarbonate. The irregular distribution of the phylogenetically distinct classes of CA in procaryotic genome suggests its complex evolutionary history in procaryotes. Genetic evidence regarding the dispensability of CA under high-CO(2) air in some model organisms indicates that CA-deficient microorganisms can persist in the natural environment by choosing high-CO(2) niches. In this study, we studied the distribution of CA in the genome of Proteobacteria. While a large majority of the genome-sequenced Proteobacteria retained a CA gene(s), intracellular bacterial genera such as Buchnera and Rickettsia contained CA-defective strains. Comparison between CA-retaining and CA- deficient genomes showed the absence of whole coding sequence in some strains and the presence of frameshifted coding sequence in other strains. The evidence suggests that CA is inactivated and lost in some proteobacteria during the course of evolution based on its dispensability. PMID:22675650

  2. Molecularly imprinted cryogels for carbonic anhydrase purification from bovine erythrocyte.

    PubMed

    Uygun, Murat; Karagözler, A Alev; Denizli, Adil

    2014-04-01

    Molecularly imprinted PHEMAH cryogels were synthesized and used for purification of carbonic anhydrase from bovine erythrocyte. Cryogels were prepared with free radical cryopolymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and methacryloylamido histidine and characterized by swelling degree, macroporosity, FTIR, SEM, surface area and elemental analysis. Maximum carbonic anhydrase adsorption of molecularly imprinted PHEMAH cryogel was found to be 3.16 mg/g. Selectivity of the molecularly imprinted cryogel was investigated using albumin, hemoglobin, IgG, γ-globulin, and lysozyme as competitor proteins and selectivity ratios were found to be 15.26, 60.05, 21.88, 17.61, and 17.42, respectively. Carbonic anhydrase purity was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE and zymogram results. PMID:24528406

  3. How many carbonic anhydrase inhibition mechanisms exist?

    PubMed

    Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-01-01

    Six genetic families of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) were described to date. Inhibition of CAs has pharmacologic applications in the field of antiglaucoma, anticonvulsant, anticancer, and anti-infective agents. New classes of CA inhibitors (CAIs) were described in the last decade with enzyme inhibition mechanisms differing considerably from the classical inhibitors of the sulfonamide or anion type. Five different CA inhibition mechanisms are known: (i) the zinc binders coordinate to the catalytically crucial Zn(II) ion from the enzyme active site, with the metal in tetrahedral or trigonal bipyramidal geometries. Sulfonamides and their isosters, most anions, dithiocarbamates and their isosters, carboxylates, and hydroxamates bind in this way; (ii) inhibitors that anchor to the zinc-coordinated water molecule/hydroxide ion (phenols, carboxylates, polyamines, 2-thioxocoumarins, sulfocoumarins); (iii) inhibitors which occlude the entrance to the active site cavity (coumarins and their isosters), this binding site coinciding with that where CA activators bind; (iv) compounds which bind out of the active site cavity (a carboxylic acid derivative was seen to inhibit CA in this manner), and (v) compounds for which the inhibition mechanism is not known, among which the secondary/tertiary sulfonamides as well as imatinib/nilotinib are the most investigated examples. As CAIs are used clinically in many pathologies, with a sulfonamide inhibitor (SLC-0111) in Phase I clinical trials for the management of metastatic solid tumors, this review updates the recent findings in the field which may be useful for a structure-based drug design approach of more selective/potent modulators of the activity of these enzymes. PMID:26619898

  4. Carbonic anhydrases as targets for medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Supuran, Claudiu T; Scozzafava, Andrea

    2007-07-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) are zinc enzymes acting as efficient catalysts for the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate. 16 different alpha-CA isoforms were isolated in mammals, where they play crucial physiological roles. Some of them are cytosolic (CA I, CA II, CA III, CA VII, CA XIII), others are membrane-bound (CA IV, CA IX, CA XII, CA XIV and CA XV), CA VA and CA VB are mitochondrial, and CA VI is secreted in saliva and milk. Three acatalytic forms are also known, the CA related proteins (CARP), CARP VIII, CARP X and CARP XI. Representatives of the beta-delta-CA family are highly abundant in plants, diatoms, eubacteria and archaea. The catalytic mechanism of the alpha-CAs is understood in detail: the active site consists of a Zn(II) ion co-ordinated by three histidine residues and a water molecule/hydroxide ion. The latter is the active species, acting as a potent nucleophile. For beta- and gamma-CAs, the zinc hydroxide mechanism is valid too, although at least some beta-class enzymes do not have water directly coordinated to the metal ion. CAs are inhibited primarily by two classes of compounds: the metal complexing anions and the sulfonamides/sulfamates/sulfamides possessing the general formula RXSO(2)NH(2) (R=aryl; hetaryl; perhaloalkyl; X=nothing, O or NH). Several important physiological and physio-pathological functions are played by CAs present in organisms all over the phylogenetic tree, related to respiration and transport of CO(2)/bicarbonate between metabolizing tissues and the lungs, pH and CO(2) homeostasis, electrolyte secretion in a variety of tissues/organs, biosynthetic reactions, such as the gluconeogenesis and ureagenesis among others (in animals), CO(2) fixation (in plants and algae), etc. The presence of these ubiquitous enzymes in so many tissues and in so different isoforms represents an attractive goal for the design of inhibitors with biomedical applications. Indeed, CA inhibitors are clinically used as

  5. Evaluation of a carbonic anhydrase mimic for industrial carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Floyd, William C; Baker, Sarah E; Valdez, Carlos A; Stolaroff, Joshuah K; Bearinger, Jane P; Satcher, Joe H; Aines, Roger D

    2013-09-01

    Zinc(II) cyclen, a small molecule mimic of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase, was evaluated under rigorous conditions resembling those in an industrial carbon capture process: high pH (>12), nearly saturated salt concentrations (45% K2CO3) and elevated temperatures (100-130 °C). We found that the catalytic activity of zinc cyclen increased with increasing temperature and pH and was retained after exposure to a 45% w/w K2CO3 solution at 130 °C for 6 days. However, high bicarbonate concentrations markedly reduced the activity of the catalyst. Our results establish a benchmark level of stability and provide qualitative insights for the design of improved small-molecule carbon capture catalysts. PMID:23883067

  6. Enzymes for carbon sequestration: neutron crystallographic studies of carbonic anhydrase

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, S. Z. Kovalevsky, A. Y.; Domsic, J.; Mustyakimov, M.; Silverman, D. N.; McKenna, R.; Langan, P.

    2010-11-01

    The first neutron crystal structure of carbonic anhydrase is presented. The structure reveals interesting and unexpected features of the active site that affect catalysis. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a ubiquitous metalloenzyme that catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO{sub 2} to form HCO{sub 3}{sup −} and H{sup +} using a Zn–hydroxide mechanism. The first part of catalysis involves CO{sub 2} hydration, while the second part deals with removing the excess proton that is formed during the first step. Proton transfer (PT) is thought to occur through a well ordered hydrogen-bonded network of waters that stretches from the metal center of CA to an internal proton shuttle, His64. These waters are oriented and ordered through a series of hydrogen-bonding interactions to hydrophilic residues that line the active site of CA. Neutron studies were conducted on wild-type human CA isoform II (HCA II) in order to better understand the nature and the orientation of the Zn-bound solvent (ZS), the charged state and conformation of His64, the hydrogen-bonding patterns and orientations of the water molecules that mediate PT and the ionization of hydrophilic residues in the active site that interact with the water network. Several interesting and unexpected features in the active site were observed which have implications for how PT proceeds in CA.

  7. Fluorescent Silica Nanoparticles with Multivalent Inhibitory Effects towards Carbonic Anhydrases.

    PubMed

    Touisni, Nadia; Kanfar, Nasreddine; Ulrich, Sébastien; Dumy, Pascal; Supuran, Claudiu T; Mehdi, Ahmad; Winum, Jean-Yves

    2015-07-13

    Invited for the cover of this issue are Jean-Yves Winum and co-workers at University of Montpellier (France) and University of Florence (Italy). The image depicts the multivalency approach applied to zinc metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrases. Read the full text of the article at 10.1002/chem.201501037. PMID:26061872

  8. Fluorescence Analysis of Sulfonamide Binding to Carbonic Anhydrase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Sheila C.; Zamble, Deborah B.

    2006-01-01

    A practical laboratory experiment is described that illustrates the application of fluorescence resonance energy transfer to the study of protein-ligand binding. The affinities of wild-type and mutant human carbonic anhydrase II for dansylamide were determined by monitoring the increase in ligand fluorescence that occurs due to energy transfer…

  9. CO2 Removal using a Synthetic Analogue of Carbonic Anhydrase

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-09-14

    Project attempts to develop a synthetic analogue for carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it in a membrane for separation of CO2 from coal power plant flue gas. Conference poster presents result of first 9 months of project progress including concept, basic system architecture and membrane properties target, results of molecular modeling for analogue - CO2 interaction, and next steps of testing analogue resistance to flue gas contaminants.

  10. Electropolymerized carbonic anhydrase immobilization for carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Merle, Geraldine; Fradette, Sylvie; Madore, Eric; Barralet, Jake E

    2014-06-17

    Biomimetic carbonation carried out with carbonic anhydrase (CA) in CO2-absorbing solutions, such as methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), is one approach that has been developed to accelerate the capture of CO2. However, there are several practical issues, such as high cost and limited enzyme stability, that need to be overcome. In this study, the capacity of CA immobilization on a porous solid support was studied to improve the instability in the tertiary amine solvent. We have shown that a 63% porosity macroporous carbon foam support makes separation and reuse facile and allows for an efficient supply and presentation of CO2 to an aqueous solvent and the enzyme catalytic center. These enzymatic supports conserved 40% of their initial activity after 42 days at 70 °C in an amine solvent, whereas the free enzyme shows no activity after 1 h in the same conditions. In this work, we have overcome the technical barrier associated with the recovery of the biocatalyst after operation, and most of all, these electropolymerized enzymatic supports have shown a remarkable increase of thermal stability in an amine-based CO2 sequestration solvent. PMID:24856780

  11. An Update on Natural Products with Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitory Activity.

    PubMed

    Karioti, Anastasia; Carta, Fabrizio; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) catalyze the fundamental reaction of CO2 hydration in all living organisms, being actively involved in the regulation of a plethora of patho/physiological processes. They represent a typical example of enzyme convergent evolution, as six genetically unrelated families of such enzymes were described so far. It is more than 70 years that synthetic compounds, mainly sulfonamides, have been used in clinical practice as diuretics and systemic acting antiglaucoma drugs. Recent studies using natural product libraries and isolated constituents from natural sources (such as fungi and plants) have disclosed novel chemotypes possessing carbonic anhydrase inhibition activities. These natural sources offer new opportunities in the search for new and more effective carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, and may serve as new leads for the design and development of future drugs. This review will discuss the most recent advances in the search of naturally occurring products and their synthetic derivatives that inhibit the CAs and their mechanisms of action at molecular level. Plant extracts are not considered in the present review. PMID:26654592

  12. Removal of Zinc Form Carbonic Anhydrase: A Kinetics Experiment for Upper-Level Chemistry Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kathryn R.; Adhyaru, Bhavin

    2004-01-01

    An experiment on kinetics of deactivation of carbonic anhydrase by removal of zinc is demonstrated. Carbonic anhydrase, the enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion of carbon dioxide and bicarbonate, requires on Zn(II) ion in its active site, and removal of the zinc cofactor by complexion to another ligand leaves the apoenzyme, which is totally…

  13. The catalytic properties of murine carbonic anhydrase VII.

    PubMed

    Earnhardt, J N; Qian, M; Tu, C; Lakkis, M M; Bergenhem, N C; Laipis, P J; Tashian, R E; Silverman, D N

    1998-07-28

    Carbonic anhydrase VII (CA VII) appears to be the most highly conserved of the active mammalian carbonic anhydrases. We have characterized the catalytic activity and inhibition properties of a recombinant murine CA VII. CA VII has steady-state constants similar to two of the most active isozymes of carbonic anhydrase, CA II and IV; also, it is very strongly inhibited by the sulfonamides ethoxzolamide and acetazolamide, yielding the lowest Ki values measured by the exchange of 18O between CO2 and water for any of the mammalian isozymes of carbonic anhydrase. The catalytic measurements of the hydration of CO2 and the dehydration of HCO3- were made by stopped-flow spectrophotometry and the exchange of 18O using mass spectrometry. Unlike the other isozymes of this class of CA, for which Kcat/K(m) is described by the single ionization of zinc-bound water, CA VII exhibits a pH profile for Kcat/K(m) for CO2 hydration described by two ionizations at pKa 6.2 and 7.5, with a maximum approaching 8 x 10(7) M-1 s-1. The pH dependence of kcat/K(m) for the hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl acetate could also be described by these two ionizations, yielding a maximum of 71 M-1 s-1 at pH > 9. Using a novel method that compares rates of 18O exchange and dehydration of HCO3-, we assigned values for the apparent pKa at 6.2 to the zinc-bound water and the pKa of 7.5 to His 64. The magnitude of Kcat, its pH profile, 18O-exchange data for both wild-type and a H64A mutant, and inhibition by CuSO4 and acrolein suggest that the histidine at position 64 is functioning as a proton-transfer group and is responsible for one of the observed ionizations. A truncation mutant of CA VII, in which 23 residues from the amino-terminal end were deleted, has its rate constant for intramolecular proton transfer decreased by an order of magnitude with no change in Kcat/K(m). This suggests a role for the amino-terminal end in enhancing proton transfer in catalysis by carbonic anhydrase. PMID:9692974

  14. Carbon dioxide "trapped" in a β-carbonic anhydrase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aggarwal, Mayank; Chua, Teck Khiang; Pinard, Melissa A.; Szebenyi, Doletha M.; McKenna, Robert

    2015-10-12

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are enzymes that catalyze the hydration/ dehydration of CO2/HCO3- with rates approaching diffusion-controlled limits (kcat/KM ~ 108 M–1s–1). Here, this family of enzymes has evolved disparate protein folds that all perform the same reaction at near catalytic perfection. Presented here is a structural study of a beta-CA (psCA3) expressed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in complex with CO2, using pressurized cryocooled crystallography. The structure has been refined to 1.6 angstrom resolution with Rcryst and Rfree values of 17.3 and 19.9%, respectively, and is compared with the α-CA, human CA isoform II (hCA II), the only other CA to havemore » CO2, captured in its active site. Despite the lack of structural similarity between psCA3 and hCA II, the CO2, binding orientation relative to the zinc-bound solvent is identical. In addition, a second CO2, binding site was located at the dimer interface of psCA3. Interestingly, all β-CAs function as dirners or higher-order oligomeric states, and the CO2, bound at the interface may contribute to the allosteric nature of this family of enzymes or may be a convenient alternative binding site as this pocket has been previously shown to be a promiscuous site for a variety of ligands, including bicarbonate, sulfate, and phosphate ions.« less

  15. Carbon Dioxide "Trapped" in a β-Carbonic Anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Mayank; Chua, Teck Khiang; Pinard, Melissa A; Szebenyi, Doletha M; McKenna, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are enzymes that catalyze the hydration/dehydration of CO2/HCO3(-) with rates approaching diffusion-controlled limits (kcat/KM ∼ 10(8) M(-1) s(-1)). This family of enzymes has evolved disparate protein folds that all perform the same reaction at near catalytic perfection. Presented here is a structural study of a β-CA (psCA3) expressed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in complex with CO2, using pressurized cryo-cooled crystallography. The structure has been refined to 1.6 Å resolution with R(cryst) and R(free) values of 17.3 and 19.9%, respectively, and is compared with the α-CA, human CA isoform II (hCA II), the only other CA to have CO2 captured in its active site. Despite the lack of structural similarity between psCA3 and hCA II, the CO2 binding orientation relative to the zinc-bound solvent is identical. In addition, a second CO2 binding site was located at the dimer interface of psCA3. Interestingly, all β-CAs function as dimers or higher-order oligomeric states, and the CO2 bound at the interface may contribute to the allosteric nature of this family of enzymes or may be a convenient alternative binding site as this pocket has been previously shown to be a promiscuous site for a variety of ligands, including bicarbonate, sulfate, and phosphate ions. PMID:26457866

  16. Highly stable beta-class carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems

    DOEpatents

    Alvizo, Oscar; Benoit, Mike; Novick, Scott

    2013-04-16

    The present disclosure relates to .beta.-class carbonic anhydrase polypeptides having improved properties including increased thermostability and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides formulations and uses of the polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering. Also provided are polynucleotides encoding the carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and host cells capable of expressing them.

  17. Highly stable beta-class carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alvizo, Oscar; Benoit, Michael R; Novick, Scott J

    2013-08-20

    The present disclosure relates to .beta.-class carbonic anhydrase polypeptides having improved properties including increased thermostability and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides formulations and uses of the polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering. Also provided are polynucleotides encoding the carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and host cells capable of expressing them.

  18. 21 CFR 866.5200 - Carbonic anhydrase B and C immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbonic anhydrase B and C immunological test system. 866.5200 Section 866.5200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND.... Measurements of carbonic anhydrase B and C aid in the diagnosis of abnormal hemoglobin metabolism....

  19. Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase IX as a novel anticancer mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Supuran, Claudiu T

    2012-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) catalyze the interconversion bewteen carbon dioxide and bicarbonate with generation of protons. The carbonic anhydrase isozyme IX (CA IX) is highly overexpresed in hypoxic tumors and shows very restricted expression in normal tissues. CA IX is a dimeric protein possessing very high catalytic activity for the hydration of carbon dioxide to protons and bicarbonate. Its quaternary structure is unique among members of this family of enzymes, allowing for structure-based drug design campaigns of selective inhibitors. Inhibition of CA IX with sulfonamide and/or coumarin inhibitors was recently shown to lead to a potent retardation for the growth of both primary tumors and metastases. Some fluorescent sulfonamides were shown to accumulate only in hypoxic tumor cells overexpressing CA IX, and might be used as diagnostic tools for imaging of hypoxic cancers. Sulfonamide inhibitors were also more effective in inhibiting the growth of the primary tumors when associated with irrdiation. CA IX is thus both a diagnostic and therapeutic validated target for the management of hypoxic tumors normally non-responsive to classical chemio- and radiotherapy. PMID:22787577

  20. Carbon dioxide "trapped" in a β-carbonic anhydrase

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, Mayank; Chua, Teck Khiang; Pinard, Melissa A.; Szebenyi, Doletha M.; McKenna, Robert

    2015-10-12

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are enzymes that catalyze the hydration/ dehydration of CO2/HCO3- with rates approaching diffusion-controlled limits (kcat/KM ~ 108 M–1s–1). Here, this family of enzymes has evolved disparate protein folds that all perform the same reaction at near catalytic perfection. Presented here is a structural study of a beta-CA (psCA3) expressed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in complex with CO2, using pressurized cryocooled crystallography. The structure has been refined to 1.6 angstrom resolution with Rcryst and Rfree values of 17.3 and 19.9%, respectively, and is compared with the α-CA, human CA isoform II (hCA II), the only other CA to have CO2, captured in its active site. Despite the lack of structural similarity between psCA3 and hCA II, the CO2, binding orientation relative to the zinc-bound solvent is identical. In addition, a second CO2, binding site was located at the dimer interface of psCA3. Interestingly, all β-CAs function as dirners or higher-order oligomeric states, and the CO2, bound at the interface may contribute to the allosteric nature of this family of enzymes or may be a convenient alternative binding site as this pocket has been previously shown to be a promiscuous site for a variety of ligands, including bicarbonate, sulfate, and phosphate ions.

  1. The effects of some bromophenols on human carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Taslimi, Parham; Gülçin, İlhami; Öztaşkın, Necla; Çetinkaya, Yasin; Göksu, Süleyman; Alwasel, Saleh H; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-08-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1), which are involved in a variety of physiological and pathological processes, are ubiquitous metalloenzymes mainly catalyzing the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide (CO2) to bicarbonate ([Formula: see text]) and proton (H(+)). In this study, a dozen of bromophenol derivatives (1-12) were evaluated as metalloenzyme CA (EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitors against the human carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes I and II (hCA I and II). Cytosolic hCA I and II isoenzymes were effectively inhibited by bromophenol derivatives (1-12) with Kis in the low nanomolar range of 1.85 ± 0.58 to 5.04 ± 1.46 nM against hCA I and in the range of 2.01 ± 0.52 to 2.94 ± 1.31 nM against hCA II, respectively. PMID:26133541

  2. Role of carbonic anhydrase in bone resorption induced by prostaglandin E2 in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, G. E.; Kenny, A. D.

    1985-01-01

    The possible role of carbonic anhydrase in bone resorption induced by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was studied using an in vitro neonatal mouse calvarial culture system. PGE2 (10 to the -6th M) was effective in stimulating resorption, as assessed by calcium release into culture media. This enhanced resorption was accompanied by significant increases in calvarial carbonic anhydrase activity over control values at 48 and 96 h. At 48 h, bones treated with PGE2 had 20 percent more carbonic anhydrase activity than controls. By 96 h, treated bones contained 79 percent more carbonic anhydrase activity than controls. PGE2-induced bone resorption was inhibited by the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide in a dose-dependent fashion from 10 to the -5th to 10 to the -4th M with 77 percent inhibition observed at 10 to the -4th M. The acetazolamide analogue CL 13,850 (N-t-butylacetazolamide), which does not inhibit carbonic anhydrase, failed to inhibit PGE2-induced resorption. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that carbonic anhydrase is a necessary component of the osteoclastic bone resorptive mechanism.

  3. Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase by parathyroid hormone and cyclic AMP in rat renal cortex in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Beck, N; Kim, K S; Wolak, M; Davis, B B

    1975-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that parathyroid hormone (PTH) inhibits the proximal tubular reabsorption of bicarbonate, and increases the urinary excretion of that ion. There is also a qualitative similarity between the alterations of the proximal tubular reabsorption of phosphate, sodium, and water after PTH administration and after acetazolamide administration. These findings suggest that the renal effect of PTH is possibly mediated through the inhibition of carbonic anhydrase in proximal tubules. Therefore, a possible inhibitory effect of PTH on carbonic anhydrase was evaluated in the homogenate of rat renal cortex by an indicator titration method. Incubation of cortical homogenates with PTH for 10 min at 37degreesC inhibited carbonic anhydrase activity. The inhibitory effect of PTH was ATP-, Mg++-, and K+-dependent and temperature-dependent; inactivation of PTH by heating at 100degreesC abolished the effect of PTH both to activate adenylate cyclase and to inhibit carbonic anhydrase. Calcium 5 mM also partially abolished effects of PTH to activate adenylate cyclase and to inhibit carbonic anhydrase. The inhibitory effect of PTH on carbonic anhydrase was specific to renal cortex. Cyclic AMP, the intracellular messenger substance for PTH, also inhibited carbonic anhydrase in renal cortex. The cyclic AMP-induced inhibition was also Mg++ dependent and temperature dependent, and required preincubation at 37degreesC. But 5'-AMP, a metabolic derivative of cyclic AMP without its biological effect, had no inhibitory effect on carbonic anhydrase. All the above results are consistent with the hypothesis that PTH inhibits proximal tubular reabsorption of bicarbonate and phosphate through the inhibition of carbonic anhydrase, and that inhibitory effect is mediated through the cyclic AMP system. PMID:233968

  4. Evolution of carbonic anhydrase in C4 plants.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Martha

    2016-06-01

    During the evolution of C4 photosynthesis, the intracellular location with most carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity has changed. In Flaveria, the loss of the sequence encoding a chloroplast transit peptide from an ancestral C3 CA ortholog confined the C4 isoform to the mesophyll cell cytosol. Recent studies indicate that sequence elements and histone modifications controlling the expression of C4-associated CAs were likely present in the C3 ancestral chromatin, enabling the evolution of the C4 pathway. Almost complete abolishment of maize CA activity yields no obvious phenotype at ambient CO2 levels. This contrasts with results for Flaveria CA mutants, and has opened discussion on the role of CA in the C4 carbon concentrating mechanism. PMID:27016649

  5. The role of carbonic anhydrase in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification in humans.

    PubMed

    Adeva-Andany, María M; Fernández-Fernández, Carlos; Sánchez-Bello, Rocío; Donapetry-García, Cristóbal; Martínez-Rodríguez, Julia

    2015-07-01

    Carbonic anhydrases are a group of isoenzymes that catalyze the reversible conversion of carbon dioxide into bicarbonate. They participate in a constellation of physiological processes in humans, including respiration, bone metabolism, and the formation of body fluids, including urine, bile, pancreatic juice, gastric secretion, saliva, aqueous humor, cerebrospinal fluid, and sweat. In addition, carbonic anhydrase may provide carbon dioxide/bicarbonate to carboxylation reactions that incorporate carbon dioxide to substrates. Several isoforms of carbonic anhydrase have been identified in humans, but their precise physiological role and the consequences of their dysfunction are mostly unknown. Carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes are involved in calcification processes in a number of biological systems, including the formation of calcareous spicules from sponges, the formation of shell in some animals, and the precipitation of calcium salts induced by several microorganisms, particularly urease-producing bacteria. In human tissues, carbonic anhydrase is implicated in calcification processes either directly by facilitating calcium carbonate deposition which in turn serves to facilitate calcium phosphate mineralization, or indirectly via its action upon γ-glutamyl-carboxylase, a carboxylase that enables the biological activation of proteins involved in calcification, such as matrix Gla protein, bone Gla protein, and Gla-rich protein. Carbonic anhydrase is implicated in calcification of human tissues, including bone and soft-tissue calcification in rheumatological disorders such as ankylosing spondylitis and dermatomyositis. Carbonic anhydrase may be also involved in bile and kidney stone formation and carcinoma-associated microcalcifications. The aim of this review is to evaluate the possible association between carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes and vascular calcification in humans. PMID:26005791

  6. Oncogenic roles of carbonic anhydrase 8 in human osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tze-Kai; Lin, Yu-Ming; Lo, Che-Min; Tang, Chih-Hsin; Teng, Chieh-Lin Jerry; Chao, Wei-Ting; Wu, Min Huan; Liu, Chin-San; Hsieh, Mingli

    2016-06-01

    Carbonic anhydrase 8 (CA8), a member of the carbonic anhydrase family, is one of the three isozymes that do not catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide due to the lack of one important histidine. In the present study, we observed increased expression of CA8 in more aggressive types of human osteosarcoma (OS) cells and found that CA8 expression is correlated with disease stages, such that more intense expression occurs in the disease late stage. We also demonstrated that overexpression of CA8 in human OS (HOS) cells significantly increased cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. Downregulated CA8 sensitized cells to apoptotic stress induced by staurosporine and cisplatin, suggesting a specific role of CA8 to protect cells from stresses. In addition, downregulation of CA8 in HOS cells reduced cell invasion and colony formation ability in soft agar and further decreased matrix metalloproteinase 9 and focal adhesion kinase expression, indicating that CA8 might facilitate cancer cell invasion via the activation of FAK-MMP9 signaling. Interestingly, HOS cells with CA8 knockdown showed a significant decrease in glycolytic activity and cell death under glucose withdrawal, further indicating that CA8 may be involved in regulating aerobic glycolysis and enhancing cell viability. Knockdown of CA8 significantly decreased phosphorylated Akt expression suggesting that the oncogenic role of CA8 may be mediated by the regulation of Akt activation through p-Akt induction. Importantly, the inhibition of glycolysis by 2-deoxyglucose sensitized CA8 HOS-CA8-myc cells to cisplatin treatment under low glucose condition, highlighting a new therapeutic option for OS cancer. PMID:26711783

  7. Fluorescent Silica Nanoparticles with Multivalent Inhibitory Effects towards Carbonic Anhydrases.

    PubMed

    Touisni, Nadia; Kanfar, Nasreddine; Ulrich, Sébastien; Dumy, Pascal; Supuran, Claudiu T; Mehdi, Ahmad; Winum, Jean-Yves

    2015-07-13

    Multifunctional silica nanoparticles decorated with fluorescent and sulfonamide carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitors were prepared and investigated as multivalent enzyme inhibitors against the cytosolic isoforms hCA I and II and the transmembrane tumor-associated ones hCA IX and XII. Excellent inhibitory effects were observed with these nanoparticles, with KI values in the low nanomolar range (6.2-0.67 nM) against all tested isozymes. A significant multivalency effect was seen for the inhibition of the monomeric enzymes hCA I and II compared to the dimeric hCA IX and hCA XII isoforms, where no multivalent effect was observed, suggesting that the multivalent binding is occurring through enzyme clustering. PMID:25965260

  8. Carbonic anhydrase in Acetobacterium woodii and other acetogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Braus-Stromeyer, S A; Schnappauf, G; Braus, G H; Gössner, A S; Drake, H L

    1997-11-01

    Acetobacterium woodii, Acetohalobium arabaticum, Clostridium formicoaceticum, and Sporomusa silvacetica were found to contain carbonic anhydrase (CA). Minimal to no CA activity was detected in Moorella thermoautotrophica, Moorella thermoacetica subsp. "pratumsolum," Sporomusa termitida, and Thermoanaerobacter kivui. Of the acetogens tested, A. woodii had the highest CA specific activity, approximately 14 U mg of protein(-1), in extracts of either glucose- or H2-CO2-cultivated cells. CA of A. woodii was cytoplasmic and was purified approximately 300-fold to a specific activity of 5,236 U mg of protein(-1). Intracellular acetate concentrations inhibited CA activity of A. woodii by 50 to 85%, indicating that intracellular acetate may affect in situ CA activity. PMID:9371472

  9. Recent Developments in Targeting Carbonic Anhydrase IX for Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Paul C.; Winum, Jean-Yves; Supuran, Claudiu T.; Dedhar, Shoukat

    2012-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is a hypoxia-inducible enzyme that is overexpressed by cancer cells from many tumor types, and is a component of the pH regulatory system invoked by these cells to combat the deleterious effects of a high rate of glycolytic metabolism. CAIX functions to help produce and maintain an intracellular pH (pHi) favorable for tumor cell growth and survival, while at the same time participating in the generation of an increasingly acidic extracellular space, facilitating tumor cell invasiveness. Pharmacologic interference of CAIX catalytic activity using monoclonal antibodies or CAIX-specific small molecule inhibitors, consequently disrupting pH regulation by cancer cells, has been shown recently to impair primary tumor growth and metastasis. Many of these agents are in preclinical or clinical development and constitute a novel, targeted strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:22289741

  10. Bortezomib inhibits bacterial and fungal β-carbonic anhydrases.

    PubMed

    Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-09-15

    Inhibition of the β-carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) from pathogenic fungi (Cryptococcus neoformans, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Malassezia globosa) and bacteria (three isoforms from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Rv3273, Rv1284 and Rv3588), as well from the insect Drosophila melanogaster (DmeCA) and the plant Flaveria bidentis (FbiCA1) with the boronic acid peptidomimetic proteosome inhibitor bortezomib was investigated. Bortezomib was a micromolar inhibitor of all these enzymes, with KIs ranging between 1.12 and 11.30μM. Based on recent crystallographic data it is hypothesized that the B(OH)2 moiety of the inhibitor is directly coordinated to the zinc ion from the enzyme active site. The class of boronic acids, an under-investigated type of CA inhibitors, may lead to the development of anti-infectives with a novel mechanism of action, based on the pathogenic organisms CA inhibition. PMID:27469982

  11. Carbonic anhydrase activity in isolated chloroplasts of chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Katzman, G.; Togasaki, R.K. ); Marcus, Y. ); Moroney, J.V. )

    1989-04-01

    In a new assay of carbonic anhydrase, NaH{sup 14}CO{sub 3} solution at the bottom of a sealed vessel releases {sup 14}CO{sub 3} which diffuses to the top of the vessel to be assimilated by actively photosynthesizing Chlamydomonas cells. The assay is initiated by illuminating cells and stopped by turning the light off and killing the cells with acid. Enzyme activity was estimated from acid stable radioactivity above the uncatalyzed background level. With bovine carbonic anhydrase, 1.5 Wilbur Anderson Unit (WAU) can be consistantly measured at 5-6 fold above background. Sonicated whole cells of air adapted wild type (+)gave 741.1 {plus minus} 12.4 WAU/mg chl. Intact washed cells of mixotrophically grown wall-less mutant CWD(-) and a high CO2 requiring wall-less double mutant CIA-3/CW15 (-) gave 7.1 {plus minus} 1.9 and 2.8 {plus minus} 7.8 WAU/mg chl respectively. Chloroplasts isolated from CWD and CIA-3/CW15 and subsequently disrupted gave 64.0 {plus minus} 14.7 and 2.8 {plus minus} 3.2 WAU/mg chl respectively. Chloroplast sonicate from another wall-less mutant CW15(-) gave activity comparable to CWD. Thus on a chlorophyll basis, enzyme activity in chloroplasts from mixotrophically grown cells is about 1/10th of the level found in air adapted wild type cells. CIA-3 seems to lack this activity.

  12. Phenolic compounds as antioxidants: carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gülçin, Ilhami; Beydemir, Şükrü

    2013-03-01

    Antioxidant compounds can scavenge free radicals and increase shelf life by retarding the process of lipid peroxidation, which is one of the major reasons for deterioration of food, medicine and pharmaceutical products during processing and storage. An antioxidant molecule has been defined as any substance when found in low concentrations compared to that of an oxidizable substrate significantly delays or inhibits the oxidation. The major antioxidant compounds are especially phenolics and flavonoids, which are responsible for their health benefits. Carbonic anhydrase (EC 4.2.1.1., CA) is a pH regulatory/metabolic enzyme in all life kingdoms, being found in organisms all over the phylogenetic tree. It catalyzes the hydration of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) to bicarbonate (HCO(3) -) and the corresponding dehydration of HCO(3) -in acidic medium with regeneration of CO(2). Also, CA isoforms are found in a variety of tissues where they participate in several important biological processes such as acid-base balance, respiration, carbon dioxide and ion transport, bone resorption, ureagenesis, gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis and electrolyte secretion. On the other hand, the phenyl moiety of phenol was found to lay in the hydrophobic part of the CA active site, where CO(2), the physiologic substrate of the CAs, binds in the precatalytic complex, explaining thus the behavior of phenol as a unique CO(2) competitive inhibitor. This review consists of two main sections. The first section is devoted to main phenolic antioxidant compounds in the foodstuffs and beverages. The second general section is about some definitions of CA inhibitory effects of the main phenolic compounds used for antioxidant activity. The phenolic compounds and acids had marked especially CA I and CA II inhibitory effects and might be used as leads for generating CA isoenzyme inhibitors. This class of compounds may lead to isoform-selective inhibitors targeting just one or few of the medicinally relevant CAs. In

  13. Carbonic anhydrase and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory effects of carbamates and sulfamoylcarbamates.

    PubMed

    Göçer, Hülya; Akincioğlu, Akın; Göksu, Süleyman; Gülçin, İlhami; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CA), as a family of metalloenzymes, are found in almost every type of tissue and play an important role in catalyzing the equilibration of carbon dioxide and carbonic acid. In this study, a series of carbamate derivative was synthesized, and their inhibition effects on hCA I, hCA II and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzymes were investigated. They were determined to be very good inhibitor against for both isoenzymes (hCA I and hCA II) and AChE. The hCA I and hCA II were effectively inhibited by the carbamate derivatives, with inhibition constants (Ki) in the range of 194.4-893.5 nM (for hCA I) and 103.9-835.7 nM (for hCA II). On the other hand, Ki parameters of these compounds for AChE enzyme inhibition were determined in the range of 12.0-61.3 nM. The results clearly showed that both CA isoenzymes and AChE were inhibited by carbamate derivatives at the nM levels. PMID:24964347

  14. Why Is Carbonic Anhydrase Essential to Escherichia coli?

    PubMed Central

    Merlin, Christophe; Masters, Millicent; McAteer, Sean; Coulson, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    The can (previously yadF) gene of Escherichia coli encodes a β-class carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme which interconverts CO2 and bicarbonate.Various essential metabolic processes require either CO2 or bicarbonate and, although carbon dioxide and bicarbonate spontaneously equilibrate in solution, the low concentration of CO2 in air and its rapid diffusion from the cell mean that insufficient bicarbonate is spontaneously made in vivo to meet metabolic and biosynthetic needs. We calculate that demand for bicarbonate is 103- to 104-fold greater than would be provided by uncatalyzed intracellular hydration and that enzymatic conversion of CO2 to bicarbonate is therefore necessary for growth. We find that can expression is ordinarily required for growth in air. It is dispensable if the atmospheric partial pressure of CO2 is high or during anaerobic growth in a closed vessel at low pH, where copious CO2 is generated endogenously. CynT, the single E. coli Can paralog, can, when induced with azide, replace Can; also, the γ-CA from Methanosarcina thermophila can at least partially replace it. Expression studies showed that can transcription does not appear to respond to carbon dioxide concentration or to be autoregulated. However, can expression is influenced by growth rate and the growth cycle; it is expressed best in slow-growing cultures and at higher culture densities. Expression can vary over a 10-fold range during the growth cycle and is also elevated during starvation or heat stress. PMID:14563877

  15. The effects of some avermectins on bovine carbonic anhydrase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Kose, Leyla Polat; Gülçin, İlhami; Özdemir, Hasan; Atasever, Ali; Alwasel, Saleh H; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-10-01

    Avermectins are effective agricultural pesticides and antiparasitic agents that are widely employed in the agricultural, veterinary and medical fields. The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of selected avermectins including abamectin, doramectin, emamectin, eprinomectin, ivermectin and moxidectin that are used as drugs against a wide variety of internal and external mammalian parasites, on the carbonic anhydrase enzyme (CA, EC 4.2.1.1.) purified from fresh bovine erythrocyte. CA catalyses the rapid interconversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) to bicarbonate ([Formula: see text]) and protons (H(+)) and regulate the acidity of the local tissues. Bovine erythrocyte CA (bCA) enzyme was purified by Sepharose-4B affinity chromatography with a yield of 21.96% and 262.7-fold purification. The inhibition results obtained from this study showed Ki values of 9.73, 17.39, 20.43, 13.39, 16.44 and 17.73 nM for abamectin, doramectin, emamectin, eprinomectin, ivermectin and moxidectin, respectively. However, acetazolamide, well-known clinically established CA inhibitor, possessed a Ki value of 27.68 nM. PMID:26207514

  16. Capsaicin: a potent inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Arabaci, Betul; Gulcin, Ilhami; Alwasel, Saleh

    2014-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) is a zinc containing metalloenzyme that catalyzes the rapid and reversible conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) into a proton (H+) and bicarbonate (HCO3-) ion. On the other hand, capsaicin is the main component in hot chili peppers and is used extensively used in spices, food additives and drugs; it is responsible for their spicy flavor and pungent taste. There are sixteen known CA isoforms in humans. Human CA isoenzymes I, and II (hCA I and hCA II) are ubiquitous cytosolic isoforms. In this study, the inhibition properties of capsaicin against the slow cytosolic isoform hCA I, and the ubiquitous and dominant rapid cytosolic isozymes hCA II were studied. Both CA isozymes were inhibited by capsaicin in the micromolar range. This naturally bioactive compound has a Ki of 696.15 µM against hCA I, and of 208.37 µM against hCA II. PMID:25014536

  17. Thermal-stable carbonic anhydrases: a structural overview.

    PubMed

    Alterio, Vincenzo; Monti, Simona Maria; De Simone, Giuseppina

    2014-01-01

    The potential of carbonic anhydrase (CA) family as target for the drug design of inhibitors with various medicinal chemistry applications has been recognized from long time, whereas the industrial interest in using these enzymes as biocatalysts for carbon dioxide sequestration and biofuel production is only recently emerging. However, an efficient utilization in these processes often requires stable enzymes, able to work in the harsh conditions typical of the CO2 capture process. In this context CAs active at very high temperatures are of extreme interest. In this chapter we have summarized in a comparative manner all existing data on thermostable CAs both isolated by extremophiles and obtained by protein engineering studies. Among the five CA-classes, the biochemical and structural features of thermostable α-, β- and γ-CAs have been discussed. Data show that so far α-CAs isolated from thermophilic organisms are the best candidates to be used in biotechnological processes, even if plenty of work can be still done in this field also with help of protein engineering. PMID:24146389

  18. Increased oxidation-related glutathionylation and carbonic anhydrase activity in endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Andrisani, Alessandra; Donà, Gabriella; Brunati, Anna Maria; Clari, Giulio; Armanini, Decio; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Ambrosini, Guido; Bordin, Luciana

    2014-06-01

    This study examined the possible involvement of carbonic anhydrase activation in response to an endometriosis-related increase in oxidative stress. Peripheral blood samples obtained from 27 healthy controls and 30 endometriosis patients, classified as having endometriosis by histological examination of surgical specimens, were analysed by multiple immunoassay and carbonic anhydrase activity assay. Red blood cells (RBC) were analysed for glutathionylated protein (GSSP) content in the membrane, total glutathione (GSH) in the cytosol and carbonic anhydrase concentration and activity. In association with a membrane increase of GSSP and a cytosolic decrease of GSH content in endometriosis patients, carbonic anhydrase significantly increased (P < 0.0001) both monomerization and activity compared with controls. This oxidation-induced activation of carbonic anhydrase was positively and significantly correlated with the GSH content of RBC (r = 0.9735, P < 0.001) and with the amount of the 30-kDa monomer of carbonic anhydrase (r = 0.9750, P < 0.001). Because carbonic anhydrase activation is implied in many physiological and biochemical processes linked to pathologies such as glaucoma, hypertension, obesity and infections, carbonic anhydrase activity should be closely monitored in endometriosis. These data open promising working perspectives for diagnosis and treatment of endometriosis and hopefully of other oxidative stress-related diseases. Endometriosis is a chronic disease associated with infertility and local inflammatory response, which is thought to spread rapidly throughout the body as a systemic subclinical inflammation. One of the causes in the pathogenesis/evolution of endometriosis is oxidative stress, which occurs when reactive oxygen species are produced faster than the endogenous antioxidant defence systems can neutralize them. Once produced, reactive oxygen species can alter the morphological and functional properties of endothelial cells, including

  19. Non-destructive measurement of carbonic anhydrase activity and the oxygen isotope composition of soil water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sam; Sauze, Joana; Ogée, Jérôme; Wohl, Steven; Bosc, Alexandre; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrases are a group of metalloenzymes that catalyse the hydration of aqueous carbon dioxide (CO2). The expression of carbonic anhydrase by bacteria, archaea and eukarya has been linked to a variety of important biological processes including pH regulation, substrate supply and biomineralisation. As oxygen isotopes are exchanged between CO2 and water during hydration, the presence of carbonic anhydrase in plants and soil organisms also influences the oxygen isotope budget of atmospheric CO2. Leaf and soil water pools have distinct oxygen isotope compositions, owing to differences in pool sizes and evaporation rates, which are imparted on CO2during hydration. These differences in the isotopic signature of CO2 interacting with leaves and soil can be used to partition the contribution of photosynthesis and soil respiration to net terrestrial CO2 exchange. However, this relies on our knowledge of soil carbonic anhydrase activity and currently, the prevalence and function of these enzymes in soils is poorly understood. Isotopic approaches used to estimate soil carbonic anhydrase activity typically involve the inversion of models describing the oxygen isotope composition of CO2 fluxes to solve for the apparent, potentially catalysed, rate of oxygen exchange during hydration. This requires information about the composition of CO2 in isotopic equilibrium with soil water obtained from destructive, depth-resolved soil water sampling. This can represent a significant challenge in data collection given the considerable potential for spatial and temporal variability in the isotopic composition of soil water and limited a priori information with respect to the appropriate sampling resolution and depth. We investigated whether we could circumvent this requirement by constraining carbonic anhydrase activity and the composition of soil water in isotopic equilibrium with CO2 by solving simultaneously the mass balance for two soil CO2 steady states differing only in the

  20. Circulating Carbonic Anhydrase IX and Antiangiogenic Therapy in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brown-Glaberman, Ursa; Marron, Marilyn; Chalasani, Pavani; Livingston, Robert; Iannone, Maria; Specht, Jennifer; Stopeck, Alison T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is a hypoxia regulated metalloenzyme integral to maintaining cellular pH. Increased CAIX expression is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. To explore CAIX as a biomarker for breast cancer therapies, we measured plasma CAIX levels in healthy control subjects and in breast cancer patients. Methods. In control subjects we evaluated plasma CAIX stability via commercially available ELISA. We then similarly quantified plasma CAIX levels in (1) locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) patients treated with neoadjuvant paclitaxel + sunitinib (T + S) followed by doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (AC); (2) metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients treated with systemic chemotherapy. Results. Plasma CAIX levels were stable at room temperature for at least 48 hours in control subjects. Mean baseline plasma CAIX levels were lower in controls compared to patients with LABC or MBC. In LABC, CAIX levels rose significantly in response to administration of antiangiogenic therapy (T + S) (p = 0.02) but not AC (p = 0.37). In patients with MBC treated without an antiangiogenic agent CAIX levels did not change with therapy. Conclusions. Our results suggest that CAIX may be an easily obtained, stable measure of tumor associated hypoxia as well as a useful pharmacodynamic biomarker for antiangiogenic therapy. PMID:26941473

  1. Glaucoma and the applications of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) has pharmacologic applications in the treatment of glaucoma, a disease affecting a large number of people and characterized by an elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). At least three isoforms, CA II, IV and XII are targeted by the sulfonamide inhibitors, some of which are clinically used drugs. Acetazolamide, methazolamide and dichlorophenamide are first generation CA inhibitors (CAIs) still used as systemic drugs for the management of this disease. Dorzolamide and brinzolamide represent the second generation inhibitors, being used topically, as eye drops, with less side effects compared to the first generation drugs. Third generation inhibitors have been developed by using the tail approach, but they did not reach the clinics yet. The most promising such derivatives are the sulfonamides incorporating either tails with nitric oxide releasing moieties or hybrid drugs possessing prostaglandin (PG) F agonist moieties in their molecules. Recently, the dithiocarbamates have also been described as CAIs possessing IOP lowering effects in animal models of glaucoma. CAIs are used alone or in combination with other drugs such as adrenergic agonist/antagonists, or PG analogs, being an important component of the antiglaucoma drugs armamentarium. PMID:24146387

  2. Structure-based drug discovery of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Supuran, Claudiu T

    2012-12-01

    Inhibition of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) has pharmacologic applications in the field of anti-glaucoma, anti-convulsant and anti-cancer agents. But recently, it has also emerged that these enzymes have the potential for designing anti-infective drugs (anti-fungal and anti-bacterial agents) with a novel mechanism of action. Sulphonamides and their isosteres (sulphamates/sulphamides) constitute the main class of CA inhibitors (CAIs), which bind to the metal ion from the enzyme active site. Recently, the dithiocarbamates (DTCs), possessing a similar mechanism of action, were reported as a new class of inhibitors. These types of CAIs will be discussed in detail in this review. Novel drug design strategies have been reported ultimately based on the tail approach for obtaining sulphonamides/DTCs, which exploit more external binding regions within the enzyme active site (in addition to coordination to the metal ion), leading thus to isoform-selective compounds. Most of the promising data have been obtained by combining x-ray crystallography of enzyme-inhibitor adducts with novel synthetic approaches for generating chemical diversity. Whereas sulphonamide - NO donating hybrid drugs were reported as effective anti-glaucoma agents, most of the interesting new inhibitors were designed for inhibiting specifically the tumour-associated isoforms CA IX and XII, validated targets for imaging and treatment of hypoxic tumours. Promising compounds that inhibit CAs from bacterial and fungal pathogens, of the DTC and carboxylate types, will be also reviewed. PMID:22468747

  3. Photooxidation of dinitrophenylhistidine-200 human carbonic anhydrase B.

    PubMed

    Kandel, M; Gornall, A G; Lam, L K; Kandel, S I

    1975-05-01

    Partial inactivation of tau-dinitrophenylhistidine-200 human carbonic anhydrase B, induced by visible light, followed first order kinetics (k(app) = 6.05 times 10-2 min-1). After 50 min the tau-dinitrophenylhistidine (tau-DNP-histidine) content decreased to a negligible level, but the illuminated enzyme retained, at pH 7.6, approximately 9.2 percent of the esterase activity of the native enzyme. The following lines of evidence suggest that the loss of activity results from the destruction of tau-DNP-histidine-200. (1) No significant loss of amino acid other than tau-DNP-histidine was detected after illumination. (2) The rate of loss of activity correlated well with the loss of tau-DNP-histidine. (3) In the photooxidized enzyme the DNP moiety was retained but had lost the characteristic sensitivity of tau-DNP-histidine to nucleophilic attack. Titration of the illuminated enzyme with acetazolamide indicated that the residual activity is an intrinsic property of the modified enzyme. The chromatographically purified photooxidized enzyme migrated as a single band on isoelectrofocusing in polyacylamide gel, and at pH 7.6 possessed 7.5 percent esterase activity relative to the native enzyme. By establishing effective destruction of histidine-200, it can be concluded that neither the pi N nor, as previously shown, the tau N of histidine-200 is critical for the catalysis. PMID:237619

  4. Thermal inactivation and conformational lock of bovine carbonic anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Alaei, L; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A; Hadi, H; Saboury, A A; Ahmad, F; Amani, M

    2012-08-01

    The kinetics of thermal inactivation of bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA) was studied in a 50 mM Tris-HCl buffer, pH 7.8 using p-nitrophenyl acetate as substrate in absorbance of 400 nm by UV-VIS spectrophotometry. The number of conformational locks and inter-subunit amino acid residues of BCA were obtained by thermal inactivation analysis. The cleavage bonds between dimers of BCA during thermal dissociation and type of interactions between specific amino acid residues were also detected. The thermal inactivation curves were plotted in temperatures ranging between 40-70°C. It was shown several phases for inactivation of BCA at 65°C. Analyses of the curves were done by the conformational lock theory. The subunits are dissociated and several intermediates appear during inactivation through increasing the temperature in comparison with native state. Dynamic light scattering measurements was done to study the changes in hydrodynamic radius during thermal inactivation. Three distinct zones were shown in DLS data. Biochemical computation using ligplot is performed to find the inter-subunit amino acid residues for BCA. PMID:22762185

  5. A magnificent enzyme superfamily: carbonic anhydrases, their purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Ozensoy Guler, Ozen; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we reviewed the purification and characterization methods of the α-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) class. Six genetic families (α-, β-, γ-, δ-, ζ- and η-CAs) all know to date, all encoding such enzymes in organisms widely distributed over the phylogenetic tree. Starting from the manuscripts published in the 1930s on the isolation and purification of α-CAs from blood and other tissues, and ending with the recent discovery of the last genetic family in protozoa, the η-CAs, considered for long time an α-CA, we present historically the numerous and different procedures which were employed for obtaining these catalysts in pure form. α-CAs possess important application in medicine (as many human α-CA isoforms are drug targets) as well as biotechnological processes, in which the enzymes are ultimately used for CO2 capture in order to mitigate the global warming effects due to greenhouse gases. Recently, it was discovered an involvement of CAs in cancerogenesis as well as infection caused by pathogenic agents such as bacteria, fungi and protozoa. Inhibition studies of CAs identified in the genome of the aforementioned organisms might lead to the discovery of innovative drugs with a novel mechanism of action. PMID:26118417

  6. N-Nitrosulfonamides: A new chemotype for carbonic anhydrase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Nocentini, Alessio; Vullo, Daniela; Bartolucci, Gianluca; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-08-15

    A series of N(1)-substituted aromatic sulfonamides was obtained by applying a selective sulfonamide nitration synthetic strategy leading to Ar-SO2NHNO2 derivatives which were investigated as carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitors. Two human (h) hCA isoforms, the cytosolic hCA II and the transmembrane hCA IX, in addition to the fungal enzyme from Malassezia globosa, MgCA, were included in the study. Most of the new compounds reported selectively inhibited hCA IX over hCA II and at the same time showed effective MgCA inhibitory properties, with KIs ranging between 0.22 and 8.09μM. The N-nitro sulfonamides are a new chemotype with CA inhibitory effects. As hCA IX was recently validated as antitumor/antimetastatic drug target, its selective inhibition could be exploited for interesting biomedical applications. Moreover, due to the effective MgCAs inhibitory properties of the N-nitro sulfonamides, of considerable interest in the cosmetics field as potential anti-dandruff agents, the N-nitro sulfonamides may be considered as interesting leads for the design of more efficient compounds targeting fungal enzymes. PMID:27290692

  7. Carbonic anhydrase enzymes regulate mast cell-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Henry, Everett K; Sy, Chandler B; Inclan-Rico, Juan M; Espinosa, Vanessa; Ghanny, Saleena S; Dwyer, Daniel F; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Rivera, Amariliz; Siracusa, Mark C

    2016-08-22

    Type 2 cytokine responses are necessary for the development of protective immunity to helminth parasites but also cause the inflammation associated with allergies and asthma. Recent studies have found that peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells contribute to type 2 cytokine-mediated inflammation through their enhanced ability to develop into mast cells. In this study, we show that carbonic anhydrase (Car) enzymes are up-regulated in type 2-associated progenitor cells and demonstrate that Car enzyme inhibition is sufficient to prevent mouse mast cell responses and inflammation after Trichinella spiralis infection or the induction of food allergy-like disease. Further, we used CRISPR/Cas9 technology and illustrate that genetically editing Car1 is sufficient to selectively reduce mast cell development. Finally, we demonstrate that Car enzymes can be targeted to prevent human mast cell development. Collectively, these experiments identify a previously unrecognized role for Car enzymes in regulating mast cell lineage commitment and suggest that Car enzyme inhibitors may possess therapeutic potential that can be used to treat mast cell-mediated inflammation. PMID:27526715

  8. Legionella pneumophila Carbonic Anhydrases: Underexplored Antibacterial Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Supuran, Claudiu T.

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) are metalloenzymes which catalyze the hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Many pathogenic bacteria encode such enzymes belonging to the α-, β-, and/or γ-CA families. In the last decade, enzymes from some of these pathogens, including Legionella pneumophila, have been cloned and characterized in detail. These enzymes were shown to be efficient catalysts for CO2 hydration, with kcat values in the range of (3.4–8.3) × 105 s−1 and kcat/KM values of (4.7–8.5) × 107 M−1·s−1. In vitro inhibition studies with various classes of inhibitors, such as anions, sulfonamides and sulfamates, were also reported for the two β-CAs from this pathogen, LpCA1 and LpCA2. Inorganic anions were millimolar inhibitors, whereas diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfamate, sulfamide, phenylboronic acid, and phenylarsonic acid were micromolar ones. The best LpCA1 inhibitors were aminobenzolamide and structurally similar sulfonylated aromatic sulfonamides, as well as acetazolamide and ethoxzolamide (KIs in the range of 40.3–90.5 nM). The best LpCA2 inhibitors belonged to the same class of sulfonylated sulfonamides, together with acetazolamide, methazolamide, and dichlorophenamide (KIs in the range of 25.2–88.5 nM). Considering such preliminary results, the two bacterial CAs from this pathogen represent promising yet underexplored targets for obtaining antibacterials devoid of the resistance problems common to most of the clinically used antibiotics, but further studies are needed to validate them in vivo as drug targets. PMID:27322334

  9. Thermodynamics of binding of Zn2+ to carbonic anhydrase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remko, Milan; Garaj, Vladimír

    The Becke3LYP functional of DFT theory and the two-layered ONIOM (B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p): MNDO) method were used to characterize 46 gas-phase complexes of 34 neutral and anionic ligands (H2O, CH3OH, CH3COOH, CH3CONH2, HOSO2NH2, CO2, HSO2NH2, CH3SO2NH2, CH3C(=O)NHOH, imidazole, NH2SO2NH2, anions of 4-aminobenzenesulphonamide, saccharin, 1I9L, brinzolamide, dorzolamide, acetazolamide, further HO(-), CH3O(-), CH3COO(-), CH3CONH(-), N=N=N(-), S=C=N(-), CH3C(=O)NHO(-), HOCOO(-), imidazoleN(-), phenol-O(-), HOSO2NH(-), (-)OSO2NH(-), (-)OSO2NH2, H2NSO2NH(-), HSO2NH(-), CH3SO2NH(-), and CF3SO2NH(-), respectively) with Zn2+. Proton dissociation enthalpies and Gibbs energies of acidic inhibitors in the presence of zinc were computed. Their gas-phase acidity considerably increases upon chelation. Of the bases investigated, the weakest zinc affinity is exhibited by carbon dioxide (-313.5 kJ mol-1). Deprotonated inhibitors have higher affinities for zinc than the neutral ones. Compared to the other mono-deprotonated ligands the acetohydroxamic acid anion has the highest affinity for zinc (-1872.7 kJ mol-1). The zinc affinity of the acetazolamide anion computed using the hybrid ONIOM (B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p): MNDO) method is in very good agreement with the full DFT ones and this method can be adopted to model large complexes of inhibitors with the active site of carbonic anhydrase.

  10. Molecular and biochemical characterization of carbonic anhydrases of Paracoccidioides

    PubMed Central

    Tomazett, Mariana Vieira; Zanoelo, Fabiana Fonseca; Bailão, Elisa Flávia Cardoso; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Borges, Clayton Luiz; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Carbonic anhydrases (CA) belong to the family of zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate. In the present work, we characterized the cDNAs of four Paracoccidioides CAs (CA1, CA2, CA3, and CA4). In the presence of CO2, there was not a significant increase in fungal ca1, ca2 and ca4 gene expression. The ca1 transcript was induced during the mycelium-to-yeast transition, while ca2 and ca4 gene expression was much higher in yeast cells, when compared to mycelium and mycelium-to-yeast transition. The ca1 transcript was induced in yeast cells recovered directly from liver and spleen of infected mice, while transcripts for ca2 and ca4 were down-regulated. Recombinant CA1 (rCA1) and CA4 (rCA4), with 33 kDa and 32 kDa respectively, were obtained from bacteria. The enzymes rCA1 (β-class) and rCA4 (α-class) were characterized regarding pH, temperature, ions and amino acids addition influence. Both enzymes were stable at pHs 7.5-8.5 and temperatures of 30-35 °C. The enzymes were dramatically inhibited by Hg+2 and activated by Zn+2, while only rCA4 was stimulated by Fe2+. Among the amino acids tested (all in L configuration), arginine, lysine, tryptophan and histidine enhanced residual activity of rCA1 and rCA4. PMID:27560991

  11. Legionella pneumophila Carbonic Anhydrases: Underexplored Antibacterial Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) are metalloenzymes which catalyze the hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Many pathogenic bacteria encode such enzymes belonging to the α-, β-, and/or γ-CA families. In the last decade, enzymes from some of these pathogens, including Legionella pneumophila, have been cloned and characterized in detail. These enzymes were shown to be efficient catalysts for CO₂ hydration, with kcat values in the range of (3.4-8.3) × 10⁵ s(-1) and kcat/KM values of (4.7-8.5) × 10⁷ M(-1)·s(-1). In vitro inhibition studies with various classes of inhibitors, such as anions, sulfonamides and sulfamates, were also reported for the two β-CAs from this pathogen, LpCA1 and LpCA2. Inorganic anions were millimolar inhibitors, whereas diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfamate, sulfamide, phenylboronic acid, and phenylarsonic acid were micromolar ones. The best LpCA1 inhibitors were aminobenzolamide and structurally similar sulfonylated aromatic sulfonamides, as well as acetazolamide and ethoxzolamide (KIs in the range of 40.3-90.5 nM). The best LpCA2 inhibitors belonged to the same class of sulfonylated sulfonamides, together with acetazolamide, methazolamide, and dichlorophenamide (KIs in the range of 25.2-88.5 nM). Considering such preliminary results, the two bacterial CAs from this pathogen represent promising yet underexplored targets for obtaining antibacterials devoid of the resistance problems common to most of the clinically used antibiotics, but further studies are needed to validate them in vivo as drug targets. PMID:27322334

  12. Molecular and biochemical characterization of carbonic anhydrases of Paracoccidioides.

    PubMed

    Tomazett, Mariana Vieira; Zanoelo, Fabiana Fonseca; Bailão, Elisa Flávia Cardoso; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Borges, Clayton Luiz; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2016-07-25

    Carbonic anhydrases (CA) belong to the family of zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate. In the present work, we characterized the cDNAs of four Paracoccidioides CAs (CA1, CA2, CA3, and CA4). In the presence of CO2, there was not a significant increase in fungal ca1, ca2 and ca4 gene expression. The ca1 transcript was induced during the mycelium-to-yeast transition, while ca2 and ca4 gene expression was much higher in yeast cells, when compared to mycelium and mycelium-to-yeast transition. The ca1 transcript was induced in yeast cells recovered directly from liver and spleen of infected mice, while transcripts for ca2 and ca4 were down-regulated. Recombinant CA1 (rCA1) and CA4 (rCA4), with 33 kDa and 32 kDa respectively, were obtained from bacteria. The enzymes rCA1 (β-class) and rCA4 (α-class) were characterized regarding pH, temperature, ions and amino acids addition influence. Both enzymes were stable at pHs 7.5-8.5 and temperatures of 30-35 °C. The enzymes were dramatically inhibited by Hg+2 and activated by Zn+2, while only rCA4 was stimulated by Fe2+. Among the amino acids tested (all in L configuration), arginine, lysine, tryptophan and histidine enhanced residual activity of rCA1 and rCA4. PMID:27459262

  13. Carbonic Anhydrase Protects Fatty Liver Grafts against Ischemic Reperfusion Damage

    PubMed Central

    Bejaoui, Mohamed; Pantazi, Eirini; De Luca, Viviana; Panisello, Arnau; Folch-Puy, Emma; Hotter, Georgina; Capasso, Clemente; T. Supuran, Claudiu; Rosselló-Catafau, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are ubiquitous metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and a proton. CAs are involved in numerous physiological and pathological processes, including acid-base homeostasis, electrolyte balance, oxygen delivery to tissues and nitric oxide generation. Given that these processes are found to be dysregulated during ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI), and taking into account the high vulnerability of steatotic livers to preservation injury, we hypothesized a new role for CA as a pharmacological agent able to protect against ischemic damage. Two different aspects of the role of CA II in fatty liver grafts preservation were evaluated: 1) the effect of its addition to Institut Georges Lopez (IGL-1) storage solution after cold ischemia; 2) and after 24h of cold storage followed by two hours of normothermic ex-vivo perfusion. In all cases, liver injury, CA II protein concentration, CA II mRNA levels and CA II activity were determined. In case of the ex-vivo perfusion, we further assessed liver function (bile production, bromosulfophthalein clearance) and Western blot analysis of phosphorylated adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK), mitogen activated protein kinases family (MAPKs) and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) parameters (GRP78, PERK, IRE, eIF2α and ATF6). We found that CA II was downregulated after cold ischemia. The addition of bovine CA II to IGL-1 preservation solution efficiently protected steatotic liver against cold IRI. In the case of reperfusion, CA II protection was associated with better function, AMPK activation and the prevention of ERS and MAPKs activation. Interestingly, CA II supplementation was not associated with enhanced CO2 hydration. The results suggest that CA II modulation may be a promising target for fatty liver graft preservation. PMID:26225852

  14. Molecular and biochemical characterization of carbonic anhydrases of Paracoccidioides.

    PubMed

    Tomazett, Mariana Vieira; Zanoelo, Fabiana Fonseca; Bailão, Elisa Flávia Cardoso; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Borges, Clayton Luiz; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CA) belong to the family of zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate. In the present work, we characterized the cDNAs of four Paracoccidioides CAs (CA1, CA2, CA3, and CA4). In the presence of CO2, there was not a significant increase in fungal ca1, ca2 and ca4 gene expression. The ca1 transcript was induced during the mycelium-to-yeast transition, while ca2 and ca4 gene expression was much higher in yeast cells, when compared to mycelium and mycelium-to-yeast transition. The ca1 transcript was induced in yeast cells recovered directly from liver and spleen of infected mice, while transcripts for ca2 and ca4 were down-regulated. Recombinant CA1 (rCA1) and CA4 (rCA4), with 33 kDa and 32 kDa respectively, were obtained from bacteria. The enzymes rCA1 (β-class) and rCA4 (α-class) were characterized regarding pH, temperature, ions and amino acids addition influence. Both enzymes were stable at pHs 7.5-8.5 and temperatures of 30-35 °C. The enzymes were dramatically inhibited by Hg+2 and activated by Zn+2, while only rCA4 was stimulated by Fe2+. Among the amino acids tested (all in L configuration), arginine, lysine, tryptophan and histidine enhanced residual activity of rCA1 and rCA4. PMID:27560991

  15. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: Synthesis, characterization and inhibition activities of furan sulfonylhydrazones against carbonic anhydrase I (hCA I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gündüzalp, Ayla Balaban; Parlakgümüş, Gökhan; Uzun, Demet; Özmen, Ümmuhan Özdemir; Özbek, Neslihan; Sarı, Musa; Tunç, Tuncay

    2016-02-01

    The methane sulfonic acide hydrazide (1) was used to obtain furan sulfonylhydrazones; 2-acetylfuranmethanesulfonylhydrazone (2), 2-furaldehydemethanesulfonylhydrazone (3), 5-nitro-2-furaldehydemethanesulfonylhydrazone (4). The structures of furan sulfonylhydrazones were determined by using elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and UV-vis methods. The structure of 5-nitro-2-furaldehydemethanesulfonylhydrazone (4) was also supported with X-ray difraction method and found that compound 4 was crystallized in triclinic, space group P 1 bar . In order to gain insight into the structure of the compounds, we performed computational studies by using 6-311G(d,p) basic set in which B3LYP correlation function was implemented. The geometry of the sulfonylhydrazones were optimized at DFT method with Gaussian 09 program package and the global reactivity descriptors were also calculated by this basic set. The enzyme inhibition activities of the sulfonylhydrazones were investigated on carbonic anhydrase I (hCA I) isoenzyme and their activity parameters (Km, IC50 and Ki) were calculated by spectrophotometric method. And also, their inhibitor effects were also investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) methods. Inhibition results show that compound 4 containing electron withdrawing group (NO2) has higher inhibition effect on hCA I isoenzyme than other's.

  16. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: Design, synthesis and structural characterization of new heteroaryl-N-carbonylbenzenesulfonamides targeting druggable human carbonic anhydrase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Buemi, Maria Rosa; De Luca, Laura; Ferro, Stefania; Bruno, Elvira; Ceruso, Mariangela; Supuran, Claudiu T; Pospíšilová, Klára; Brynda, Jiří; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Gitto, Rosaria

    2015-09-18

    A set of heteroaryl-N-carbonylbenzenesulfonamides has been designed, synthesized, and screened as inhibitors of human carbonic anhydrases (hCAs). The new sulfonamide derivatives were tested against hCA I, hCA II, hCA VII, hCA IX, and hCA XII isoforms using acetazolamide (AAZ, 1) and topiramate (TPM, 2) as reference compounds. Six compounds were low nanomolar inhibitors of tumor-associated hCA IX isoform (Ki values < 10 nM); among them we identified three arylsulfonamides showing unexpected inefficacy over brain distributed hCA VII isoform (hCA IX/hCA VII selectivity ratio > 1500 for compound 5c). Thus, these compounds can offer the opportunity to highlight the interactions preventing the inhibition of hCA VII mainly expressed in central nervous system. Thereby, we used structural and computational techniques to study in depth the interaction with hCAs. In an effort to confirm the inhibitory action we determined crystal structures of five selected heteroaryl-N-carbonylbenzenesulfonamides (4a, 4b, 4e, 5c, and 5e) in complex with hCA II. Moreover, to explore the lack of inhibitory effects of selected compounds (e.g.4b and 5c) we also performed docking studies into hCA VII catalytic site. PMID:26276436

  17. PEGylated Bis-Sulfonamide Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors Can Efficiently Control the Growth of Several Carbonic Anhydrase IX-Expressing Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Akocak, Suleyman; Alam, M Raqibul; Shabana, Ahmed M; Sanku, Rajesh Kishore Kumar; Vullo, Daniela; Thompson, Harry; Swenson, Erik R; Supuran, Claudiu T; Ilies, Marc A

    2016-05-26

    A series of aromatic/heterocyclic bis-sulfonamides were synthesized from three established aminosulfonamide carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitor pharmacophores, coupled with either ethylene glycol oligomeric or polymeric diamines to yield bis-sulfonamides with short or long (polymeric) linkers. Testing of novel inhibitors and their precursors against a panel of membrane-bound CA isoforms, including tumor-overexpressed CA IX and XII and cytosolic isozymes, identified nanomolar-potent inhibitors against both classes and several compounds with medium isoform selectivity in a detailed structure-activity relationship study. The ability of CA inhibitors to kill tumor cells overexpressing CA IX and XII was tested under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, using 2D and 3D in vitro cellular models. The study identified a nanomolar potent PEGylated bis-sulfonamide CA inhibitor (25) able to significantly reduce the viability of colon HT-29, breast MDA-MB231, and ovarian SKOV-3 cancer cell lines, thus revealing the potential of polymer conjugates in CA inhibition and cancer treatment. PMID:27144971

  18. Regulation of carbonic-anhydrase activity, inorganic-carbon uptake and photosynthetic biomass yield inChlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Patel, B N; Merrett, M J

    1986-03-01

    The regulation of carbonic anhydrase by environmental conditions was determined forChlamydomonas reinhardtii. The depression of carbonic anhydrase in air-grown cells was pH-dependent. Growth of cells on air at acid pH, corresponding to 10 μm CO2 in solution, resulted in complete repression of carbonic-anhydrase activity. At pH 6.9, increasing the CO2 concentration to 0.15% (v/v) in the gas phase, corresponding to 11 μM in solution, was sufficient to completely repress carbonic-anhydrase activity. Photosynthesis and intracellular inorganic carbon were measured in air-grown and high-CO2-grown cells using a silicone-oil centrifugation technique. With carbonic anhydrase repressed cells limited inorganic-carbon accumulation resulted from non-specific binding of CO2. With air-grown cells, inorganic-carbon uptake at acid pH, i.e. 5.5, was linear up to 0.5 mM external inorganic-carbon concentration whereas at alkaline pH, i.e. 7.5, the accumulation ratio decreased with increase in external inorganic-carbon concentration. It is suggested that in air-grown cells at acid pH, CO2 is the inorganic carbon species that crosses the plasmalemma. The conversion of CO2 to HCO 3 (-) by carbonic anhydrase in the cytosol results in inorganic-carbon accumulation and maintains the diffusion gradient for carbon dioxide across the cell boundary. However, this mechanism will not account for energy-dependent accumulation of inorganic carbon when there is little difference in pH between the exterior and cytosol. PMID:24232432

  19. Strong topical steroid, NSAID, and carbonic anhydrase inhibitor cocktail for treatment of cystoid macular edema

    PubMed Central

    Asahi, Masumi G; Bobarnac Dogaru, Gabriela L; Onishi, Spencer M; Gallemore, Ron P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the combination cocktail of strong steroid, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and carbonic anhydrase inhibitor drops for treatment of cystoid macular edema. Methods This is a retrospective case series of patients with cystoid macular edema managed with a topical combination of strong steroid (difluprednate), NSAID, and carbonic anhydrase inhibitor drops. The patients were followed with optical coherence tomography and fluorescein angiography. Results In our six cases, resolution of the cystic edema with improvement in visual acuity was achieved with the use of a combination cocktail of drops. Leakage on fluorescein angiography and cystic edema on optical coherence tomography both responded to treatment with the topical cocktail of drops. Conclusion A topical cocktail of strong steroid, NSAID, and carbonic anhydrase inhibitor drops are effective for managing cystoid macular edema. Further studies comparing this combination with more invasive treatments should be undertaken to determine the efficacy of this cocktail over other treatment options. PMID:26664246

  20. Cloning and expression of Brassica napus beta-carbonic anhydrase cDNA.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qiu-Hong; Li, Mao-Teng; Yu, Long-Jiang

    2009-01-01

    A new full-length beta-carbonic anhydrase cDNA was obtained from Brassica napus by homologous cloning. The cDNA has an open-reading frame of 996 nucleotides, encoding 331 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 35,692 Da and an estimated pI value of 5.459. The deduced amino acid sequence of beta-carbonic anhydrase from Brassica napus shared significant identity with beta-carbonic anhydrases from Brassica carinata, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Thlaspi caerulescens (97.9%, 94%, and 93.5% identity, respectively). This cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) using the expression vector pET-32a(+). The expression band corresponded to the calculated mass plus the N-terminal fusion protein derived from the vector. PMID:20158161

  1. EFFECTS OF SELECTED WATER TOXICANTS ON THE IN VITRO ACTIVITY OF FISH CARBONIC ANHYDRASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA, carbonate hydro-lyase EC 4.2.1.1) from lysed red blood cells of the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) was studied to determine physico-chemical kinetic properties and relative sensitivity to 56 chemicals of significance in water quality research. In ge...

  2. Biosynthesis and intracellular processing of carbonic anhydrase in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Toguri, T; Muto, S; Miyachi, S

    1986-08-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a glycoprotein of 35 kDa which is localized outside the plasma membrane. The activity of CA was increased when the CO2 concentration during photoautotrophic growth was decreased to air level. After decreasing the CO2 concentration from 4% to 0.04%, several polypeptides including CA were induced continuously or transiently. To investigate the biosynthesis and intracellular processing of CA, the cells of wall-less mutant CW-15, which secretes CA into the culture medium, were pulse-labeled with radioactive arginine, chased, and radioactive proteins were immunoprecipitated with anti-CA serum. A 42-kDa polypeptide with isoelectric point (pI) of 7.1-7.3 was first synthesized. Within 5 min the molecular mass of this polypeptide was decreased to 35 kDa and it was then secreted into the culture medium within 30 min. This indicates that the former is the precursor form and the latter the mature form of CA. The primary translation product from poly(A)-rich RNA in a cell-free reticulocyte lysate system from a rabbit was a 38-kDa polypeptide. This was cotranslationally converted into the 42-kDa precursor in vitro in the presence of dog pancreatic microsomal membranes. As the 42-kDa precursor had a high affinity to concanavalin A, it was assumed to have a high-mannose-type oligosaccharide. The mature enzyme had a pI of 6.1-6.2 and was composed of more than two isoforms, which had a complex-type oligosaccharide with low affinity to concanavalin A. Chemical deglycosylation of the mature enzyme by trifluoromethanesulfonic acid indicated that the molecular mass of the polypeptide moiety was 32 kDa and the difference between this and the primary translation product suggests that cleavage of the polypeptide occurs during its biosynthesis. PMID:2874027

  3. Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors. Part 461 Inhibition of Carbonic Anhydrase Isozymes I, II and IV With Trifluoromethylsulfonamide Derivatives and Their Zinc(II) and Copper(II) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Mincione, Giovanna; Scozzafava, Andrea

    1997-01-01

    Reaction of aromatic/heterocyclic sulfonamides containing a free amino group with triflic anhydride afforded compounds possessing trifluoromethanesulfonamido moieties in their molecule. The Zn(II) and Cu(II) complexes of these new sulfonamides were prepared and characterized by standard procedures (elemental analysis, spectroscopic, magnetic, thermogravimetric and conductimetric measurements). The new derivatives showed good inhibitory activity against three isozymes of carbonic anhydrase (CA), i.e., CA I, II and IV. PMID:18475762

  4. Carboxysomal carbonic anhydrases: Structure and role in microbial CO2 fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, Gordon C.; Heinhorst, Sabine; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2010-06-23

    Cyanobacteria and some chemoautotrophic bacteria are able to grow in environments with limiting CO2 concentrations by employing a CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM) that allows them to accumulate inorganic carbon in their cytoplasm to concentrations several orders of magnitude higher than that on the outside. The final step of this process takes place in polyhedral protein microcompartments known as carboxysomes, which contain the majority of the CO2-fixing enzyme, RubisCO. The efficiency of CO2 fixation by the sequestered RubisCO is enhanced by co-localization with a specialized carbonic anhydrase that catalyzes dehydration of the cytoplasmic bicarbonate and ensures saturation of RubisCO with its substrate, CO2. There are two genetically distinct carboxysome types that differ in their protein composition and in the carbonic anhydrase(s) they employ. Here we review the existing information concerning the genomics, structure and enzymology of these uniquely adapted carbonic anhydrases, which are of fundamental importance in the global carbon cycle.

  5. Dissolved carbonic anhydrase for enhancing post-combustion carbon dioxide hydration in aqueous ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, James R.; Heck, Robert W.; Zwoster, Andy

    2011-04-01

    Aqueous ammonia solvents that capture CO2 as ionic complexes of carbonates with ammonium have recently been advanced as alternatives to amine-based solvents due to their lower energy requirements for thermal regeneration. In ammonia based solvents, the hydration of CO2 to form bicarbonate may become a rate-limiting step as the CO2 loading increases and the resulting pH level of the solvent decreases. Variants of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase can accelerate the reversible hydration of CO2 to yield bicarbonate by more than 10(6)-fold. The possible benefit of bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA) addition to solutions of aqueous ammonia to enhance CO2 hydration was investigated in semi-batch reactions within continuously stirred tank reactors or in a bubble column gas-liquid contactor. Adding 154 mg/liter of BCA to 2 M aqueous ammonia provided a 34.1% overall increase in the rate of CO2 hydration (as indicated by the production of [H+]) as the pH declined from 9.6 to 8.6 during sparging with a 15% CO2, 85% N-2 gas at a flow rate of 3 lpm. The benefits of adding BCA to enhance CO2 hydration were only discernable below similar to pH 9. The implications of the apparent pH limitations on the utility of BCA are discussed in the context of absorber unit operation design. Possible embodiments of carbonic anhydrase as either an immobilized catalyst or as a dissolved, recirculating catalyst in potential plant scale aqueous ammonia systems are considered as well. (C) 2010 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Human carbonic anhydrase II as a host for piano-stool complexes bearing a sulfonamide anchor.

    PubMed

    Monnard, Fabien W; Heinisch, Tillmann; Nogueira, Elisa S; Schirmer, Tilman; Ward, Thomas R

    2011-08-01

    d(6)-piano-stool complexes bearing an arylsulfonamide anchor display sub-micromolar affinity towards human Carbonic Anhydrase II (hCA II). The 1.3 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of [(η(6)-C(6)Me(6))Ru(bispy 3)Cl](+)⊂ hCA II highlights the nature of the host-guest interactions. PMID:21706094

  7. 21 CFR 866.5200 - Carbonic anhydrase B and C immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... system. 866.5200 Section 866.5200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test... immunochemical techniques specific carbonic anhydrase protein molecules in serum and other body...

  8. 21 CFR 866.5200 - Carbonic anhydrase B and C immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... system. 866.5200 Section 866.5200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test... immunochemical techniques specific carbonic anhydrase protein molecules in serum and other body...

  9. 21 CFR 866.5200 - Carbonic anhydrase B and C immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... system. 866.5200 Section 866.5200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test... immunochemical techniques specific carbonic anhydrase protein molecules in serum and other body...

  10. 21 CFR 866.5200 - Carbonic anhydrase B and C immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... system. 866.5200 Section 866.5200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test... immunochemical techniques specific carbonic anhydrase protein molecules in serum and other body...

  11. Structure and Metal Exchange in the Cadmium Carbonic anhydrase of Marine Diatoms

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,Y.; Feng, l.; Jeffrey, P.; Shi, Y.; Morel, F.

    2008-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase, a zinc enzyme found in organisms from all kingdoms, catalyses the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide and is used for inorganic carbon acquisition by phytoplankton. In the oceans, where zinc is nearly depleted, diatoms use cadmium as a catalytic metal atom in cadmium carbonic anhydrase (CDCA). Here we report the crystal structures of CDCA in four distinct forms: cadmium-bound, zinc-bound, metal-free and acetate-bound. Despite lack of sequence homology, CDCA is a structural mimic of a functional {beta}-carbonic anhydrase dimer, with striking similarity in the spatial organization of the active site residues. CDCA readily exchanges cadmium and zinc at its active site--an apparently unique adaptation to oceanic life that is explained by a stable opening of the metal coordinating site in the absence of metal. Given the central role of diatoms in exporting carbon to the deep sea, their use of cadmium in an enzyme critical for carbon acquisition establishes a remarkable link between the global cycles of cadmium and carbon.

  12. Directed evolution of an ultrastable carbonic anhydrase for highly efficient carbon capture from flue gas

    PubMed Central

    Alvizo, Oscar; Nguyen, Luan J.; Savile, Christopher K.; Bresson, Jamie A.; Lakhapatri, Satish L.; Solis, Earl O. P.; Fox, Richard J.; Broering, James M.; Benoit, Michael R.; Zimmerman, Sabrina A.; Novick, Scott J.; Liang, Jack; Lalonde, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is one of nature’s fastest enzymes and can dramatically improve the economics of carbon capture under demanding environments such as coal-fired power plants. The use of CA to accelerate carbon capture is limited by the enzyme’s sensitivity to the harsh process conditions. Using directed evolution, the properties of a β-class CA from Desulfovibrio vulgaris were dramatically enhanced. Iterative rounds of library design, library generation, and high-throughput screening identified highly stable CA variants that tolerate temperatures of up to 107 °C in the presence of 4.2 M alkaline amine solvent at pH >10.0. This increase in thermostability and alkali tolerance translates to a 4,000,000-fold improvement over the natural enzyme. At pilot scale, the evolved catalyst enhanced the rate of CO2 absorption 25-fold compared with the noncatalyzed reaction. PMID:25368146

  13. Targeting carbonic anhydrase to treat diabetic retinopathy: Emerging evidences and encouraging results

    SciTech Connect

    Weiwei, Zhang; Hu, Renming

    2009-12-18

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of vision loss among working-age populations in developed countries. Current treatment options are limited to tight glycemic, blood pressure control and destructive laser surgery. Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are a group of enzymes involving in the rapid conversion of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Emerging evidences reveal CA inhibitors hold the promise for the treatment of DR. This article summarizes encouraging results from clinical and animal studies, and reviews the possible mechanisms.

  14. Carbonic anhydrase mediated carbon dioxide sequestration: promises, challenges and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Raju R; Krishnamurthi, Kannan; Mudliar, Sandeep N; Devi, S Saravana; Naoghare, Pravin K; Bafana, Amit; Chakrabarti, Tapan

    2014-06-01

    Anthropogenic activities have substantially increased the level of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere and are contributing significantly to the global warming. Carbon dioxide (CO2 ) is one of the major GHGs which plays a key role in the climate change. Various approaches and methodologies are under investigation to address CO2 capture and sequestration worldwide. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) mediated CO2 sequestration is one of the promising options. Therefore, the present review elaborates recent developments in CA, its immobilization and bioreactor methodologies towards CO2 sequestration using the CA enzyme. The promises and challenges associated with the efficient utilization of CA for CO2 sequestration and scale up from flask to lab-scale bioreactor are critically discussed. Finally, the current review also recommends the possible future needs and directions to utilize CA for CO2 sequestration. PMID:24740638

  15. [Targeting of type IV carbonic anhydrases in Capan-1 human pancreatic duct cells is concomitant of the polarization].

    PubMed

    Mairal, A; Fanjul, M; Hollande, E

    1996-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases II and IV play an essential role in the synthesis and secretion of HCO3- ions in pancreatic duct cells. Secretion of these ions is regulated by the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) chloride channel. In the present study, the expression of carbonic anhydrases IV and their targeting to plasma membranes were examined during the growth of human pancreatic duct cells in vitro. Human cancerous pancreatic duct cells of Capan-1 cell line which polarize during their growth were used. We show that: a) these cells express carbonic anhydrases IV continuously during growth in culture, and the expression depends on the stage of growth and the conformation of the cells; b) carbonic anhydrases IV are seen in the cytoplasm in non-polarized cells, but become progressively anchored to plasma membranes as the cells polarize, being targeted to the apical membranes of polarized cells; c) the subcellular distribution of carbonic anhydrases IV indicates that these enzymes are synthetized in rough endoplasmic reticulum and then transported towards the plasma membrane using the classical secretory pathway through the Golgi apparatus. The results indicated that targeting of carbonic anhydrases IV in Capan-1 cells is linked to cellular polarization. PMID:8881572

  16. Precipitation of hydrated Mg carbonate with the aid of carbonic anhydrase for CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, I. M.; Harrison, A. L.; Dipple, G. M.

    2011-12-01

    Strategies for sequestering CO2 directly from the atmosphere are likely required to achieve the desired reduction in CO2 concentration and avoid the most damaging effects of climate change [1]. Numerous studies have demonstrated the accelerated precipitation of calcium carbonate minerals with the aid of carbonic anhydrase (CA) as a means of sequestering CO2 in solid carbonate form; however, no study has examined precipitation of magnesium carbonate minerals using CA. Precipitation of magnesite (MgCO3) is kinetically inhibited [2]; therefore, Mg2+ must be precipitated as hydrated carbonate minerals. In laboratory experiments, the uptake of atmospheric CO2 into brine solutions (0.1 M Mg) was rate-limiting for the precipitation of dypingite [Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2-5H2O] with initial precipitation requiring 15 days [3]. It was also found that dypingite precipitation outpaced the uptake of CO2 gas into solution. CO2 uptake is limited by the hydration of CO2 to form carbonate ions [4]. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzymes are among the fastest known in nature and are able to catalyze the hydration of CO2, i.e., converting CO2(aq) to CO32- and HCO3- [5]. CA plays an important role in the carbon concentrating mechanism of photoautotrophic, chemoautotrophic, and heterotrophic prokaryotes and is involved in pH homeostasis, facilitated diffusion of CO2, ion transport, and the interconversion of CO2 and HCO3- [6]. Introducing CA into buffered Mg-rich solutions should allow for more rapid precipitation of hydrated magnesium carbonate minerals. Batch experiments were conducted using 125 mL flasks containing 100 mL of Millipore deionized water with 0.2 M of MgCl2-6H2O. To buffer pH, 1.0 g of pulverized brucite [Mg(OH)2] or 1.0 g of NaOH was added to the systems, which were amended with Bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA) (Sigma-Aldrich). Solutions were stirred continuously and kept at room temperature (~22°C) with laboratory air introduced by bubbling. Temperature and pH were measured routinely

  17. Sulfa Drugs as Inhibitors of Carbonic Anhydrase: New Targets for the Old Drugs

    PubMed Central

    al-Rashida, Mariya; Hussain, Sajad; Hamayoun, Mehwish; Altaf, Aisha

    2014-01-01

    Sulfa drugs are well-known antibacterial agents containing N-substituted sulfonamide group on para position of aniline ring (NH2RSO2NHR′). In this study 2,4-dichloro-1,3,5-triazine derivatives of sulfa drugs, sulfamerazine (1b), sulfaquinoxaline (2b), sulfadiazine (3b), sulfadimidine (4b), and sulfachloropyrazine (5b) (1a–5a) were synthesized and characterized. Their carbonic anhydrase inhibition activity was evaluated against bovine cytosolic carbonic anhydrase isozyme II (bCA II). For the sake of comparison the CA inhibition activity of the parent sulfa drugs (1b–5b) was also evaluated. A significant increase in CA inhibition activity of sulfa drugs was observed upon substitution with 2,4-dichloro-1,3,5-triazine moiety. Molecular docking studies were carried out to highlight binding site interactions. ADME properties were calculated to evaluate drug likeness of the compounds. PMID:25538942

  18. Sulfa drugs as inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase: new targets for the old drugs.

    PubMed

    al-Rashida, Mariya; Hussain, Sajad; Hamayoun, Mehwish; Altaf, Aisha; Iqbal, Jamshed

    2014-01-01

    Sulfa drugs are well-known antibacterial agents containing N-substituted sulfonamide group on para position of aniline ring (NH2RSO2NHR'). In this study 2,4-dichloro-1,3,5-triazine derivatives of sulfa drugs, sulfamerazine (1b), sulfaquinoxaline (2b), sulfadiazine (3b), sulfadimidine (4b), and sulfachloropyrazine (5b) (1a-5a) were synthesized and characterized. Their carbonic anhydrase inhibition activity was evaluated against bovine cytosolic carbonic anhydrase isozyme II (bCA II). For the sake of comparison the CA inhibition activity of the parent sulfa drugs (1b-5b) was also evaluated. A significant increase in CA inhibition activity of sulfa drugs was observed upon substitution with 2,4-dichloro-1,3,5-triazine moiety. Molecular docking studies were carried out to highlight binding site interactions. ADME properties were calculated to evaluate drug likeness of the compounds. PMID:25538942

  19. [Mode of action, clinical profile and relevance of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors in glaucoma therapy].

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, M

    2013-02-01

    Since their introduction the local carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAH) dorzolamide and brinzolamide have become well established in the drug therapy of glaucoma. They lower intraocular pressure (IOP) by blocking specifically carbonic anhydrase in the ciliary epithelium and thereby the secretion of aqueous humor. The IOP lowering effect is comparable with that of beta-blockers, but less than that of prostaglandin agonists. Because of their specific mode of action they produce an additive pressure lowering effect with any other glaucoma drug. Therefore they are ideal for being combined with other drugs. In addition, CAH may improve perfusion of the posterior eye. Preliminary results in glaucoma patients under dorzolamide therapy suggesting a reduction in the risk of progression due to enhanced blood flow need further confirmation. PMID:23430679

  20. Co-production of carbonic anhydrase and phycobiliproteins by Spirulina sp. and Synechococcus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Ores, Joana da Costa; Amarante, Marina Campos Assumpção de; Kalil, Susana Juliano

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study the co-production of the carbonic anhydrase, C-phycocyanin and allophycocyanin during cyanobacteria growth. Spirulina sp. LEB 18 demonstrated a high potential for simultaneously obtaining the three products, achieving a carbonic anhydrase (CA) productivity of 0.97U/L/d and the highest C-phycocyanin (PC, 5.9μg/mL/d) and allophycocyanin (APC, 4.3μg/mL/d) productivities. In the extraction study, high extraction yields were obtained from Spirulina using an ultrasonic homogenizer (CA: 25.5U/g; PC: 90mg/g; APC: 70mg/g). From the same biomass, it was possible to obtain three biomolecules that present high industrial value. PMID:27494103

  1. Carbonic anhydrases inhibitory effects of new benzenesulfonamides synthesized by using superacid chemistry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Martin-Mingot, Agnès; Lecornué, F; Jouannetaud, Marie-Paule; Maresca, Alfonso; Thibaudeau, Sebastien; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2012-12-01

    A series of benzofused sultams and fluorinated benzenesulfonamides were synthesized in superacid HF/SbF(5) from simple N-allylic derivatives. Almost all of these original compounds showed micromolar inhibitory activities against carbonic anhydrases I and II. The fluorinated derivatives inhibit better the tumor-associated isoforms IX and XII, and one of the tested compounds showed inhibition in the nanomolar range. PMID:22168802

  2. Consumption of carbonyl sulphide (COS) by higher plant carbonic anhydrase (CA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protoschill-Krebs, G.; Wilhelm, C.; Kesselmeier, J.

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA), isolated from pea leaves, was found to consume carbonyl sulphide (COS), a climatic relevant trace gas in the atmosphere. The isolated enzyme, free of other carboxylases, showed a very high affinity towards this substrate. The experiments confirm that CA is the key enzyme for the consumption of COS in higher plants. Furthermore, the identification of this enzyme furthers our understanding of additional sinks for COS, which are needed to understand the balance of known global sources.

  3. Carbonic anhydrases are upstream regulators of CO2-controlled stomatal movements in guard cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Honghong; Boisson-Dernier, Aurélien; Israelsson-Nordström, Maria; Böhmer, Maik; Xue, Shaowu; Ries, Amber; Godoski, Jan; Kuhn, Josef M; Schroeder, Julian I

    2010-01-01

    The continuing rise in atmospheric CO2 causes stomatal pores in leaves to close and thus globally affects CO2 influx into plants, water use efficiency and leaf heat stress. However, the CO2-binding proteins that control this response remain unknown. Moreover, which cell type responds to CO2, mesophyll or guard cells, and whether photosynthesis mediates this response are matters of debate. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana double-mutant plants in the beta-carbonic anhydrases betaCA1 and betaCA4 show impaired CO2-regulation of stomatal movements and increased stomatal density, but retain functional abscisic-acid and blue-light responses. betaCA-mediated CO2-triggered stomatal movements are not, in first-order, linked to whole leaf photosynthesis and can function in guard cells. Furthermore, guard cell betaca-overexpressing plants exhibit instantaneous enhanced water use efficiency. Guard cell expression of mammalian alphaCAII complements the reduced sensitivity of ca1 ca4 plants, showing that carbonic anhydrase-mediated catalysis is an important mechanism for betaCA-mediated CO2-induced stomatal closure and patch clamp analyses indicate that CO2/HCO3- transfers the signal to anion channel regulation. These findings, together with ht1-2 (ref. 9) epistasis analysis demonstrate that carbonic anhydrases function early in the CO2 signalling pathway, which controls gas-exchange between plants and the atmosphere. PMID:20010812

  4. The distribution of carbonic anhydrase and ribulose diphosphate carboxylase in maize leaves.

    PubMed

    Poincelot, R P

    1972-09-01

    Extraction of maize (Zea mays) leaves by progressive grinding under suitably protective conditions yields total carbonic anhydrase activities (4800 units per milligram chlorophyll) comparable to the activity in spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves. The total ribulose diphosphate carboxylase activity was also equal to or greater than the best literature values for maize. Of the total leaf carbonic anhydrase, 72.5% on a chlorophyll basis was present in the mesophyll cells and 14.2% in the bundle-sheath cells. The distribution of the total leaf ribulose diphosphate carboxylase between the mesophyll and bundle-sheath cells was 42.0 and 48.7% respectively. There was three times as much total chlorophyll in extracts of the mesophyll cells compared with the bundle-sheath cells of maize. Similar results for the above distribution of the two enzymes were found using a differential grinding technique. The possible function of carbonic anhydrase in photosynthesis is discussed. The equal distribution of ribulose diphosphate carboxylase activity between the mesophyll and bundle-sheath cells casts doubt upon the hypothesis that a rigid biochemical compartmentation exists between these cell types in maize. PMID:16658170

  5. Engineering de novo disulfide bond in bacterial α-type carbonic anhydrase for thermostable carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Byung Hoon; Park, Tae Yoon; Park, Hyun June; Yeon, Young Joo; Yoo, Young Je; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2016-07-01

    Exploiting carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme that rapidly catalyzes carbon dioxide hydration, is an attractive biomimetic route for carbon sequestration due to its environmental compatibility and potential economic viability. However, the industrial applications of CA are strongly hampered by the unstable nature of enzymes. In this work, we introduced in silico designed, de novo disulfide bond in a bacterial α-type CA to enhance thermostability. Three variants were selected and expressed in Escherichia coli with an additional disulfide bridge. One of the variants showed great enhancement in terms of both kinetic and thermodynamic stabilities. This improvement could be attributed to the loss of conformational entropy of the unfolded state, showing increased rigidity. The variant showed an upward-shifted optimal temperature and appeared to be thermoactivated, which compensated for the lowered activity at 25 °C. Collectively, the variant constructed by the rapid and effective de novo disulfide engineering can be used as an efficient biocatalyst for carbon sequestration under high temperature conditions.

  6. Engineering de novo disulfide bond in bacterial α-type carbonic anhydrase for thermostable carbon sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Byung Hoon; Park, Tae Yoon; Park, Hyun June; Yeon, Young Joo; Yoo, Young Je; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme that rapidly catalyzes carbon dioxide hydration, is an attractive biomimetic route for carbon sequestration due to its environmental compatibility and potential economic viability. However, the industrial applications of CA are strongly hampered by the unstable nature of enzymes. In this work, we introduced in silico designed, de novo disulfide bond in a bacterial α-type CA to enhance thermostability. Three variants were selected and expressed in Escherichia coli with an additional disulfide bridge. One of the variants showed great enhancement in terms of both kinetic and thermodynamic stabilities. This improvement could be attributed to the loss of conformational entropy of the unfolded state, showing increased rigidity. The variant showed an upward-shifted optimal temperature and appeared to be thermoactivated, which compensated for the lowered activity at 25 °C. Collectively, the variant constructed by the rapid and effective de novo disulfide engineering can be used as an efficient biocatalyst for carbon sequestration under high temperature conditions. PMID:27385052

  7. Engineered Escherichia coli with Periplasmic Carbonic Anhydrase as a Biocatalyst for CO2 Sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Byung Hoon; Kim, Im Gyu; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Kang, Dong Gyun

    2013-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase is an enzyme that reversibly catalyzes the hydration of carbon dioxide (CO2). It has been suggested recently that this remarkably fast enzyme can be used for sequestration of CO2, a major greenhouse gas, making this a promising alternative for chemical CO2 mitigation. To promote the economical use of enzymes, we engineered the carbonic anhydrase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (ngCA) in the periplasm of Escherichia coli, thereby creating a bacterial whole-cell catalyst. We then investigated the application of this system to CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation, a process with the potential to store large quantities of CO2. ngCA was highly expressed in the periplasm of E. coli in a soluble form, and the recombinant bacterial cell displayed the distinct ability to hydrate CO2 compared with its cytoplasmic ngCA counterpart and previously reported whole-cell CA systems. The expression of ngCA in the periplasm of E. coli greatly accelerated the rate of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) formation and exerted a striking impact on the maximal amount of CaCO3 produced under conditions of relatively low pH. It was also shown that the thermal stability of the periplasmic enzyme was significantly improved. These results demonstrate that the engineered bacterial cell with periplasmic ngCA can successfully serve as an efficient biocatalyst for CO2 sequestration. PMID:23974145

  8. Carbon Dioxide Sequestration by Using a Model Carbonic Anhydrase Complex in Tertiary Amine Medium.

    PubMed

    Sivanesan, Dharmalingam; Choi, Youngju; Lee, Jiyeon; Youn, Min Hye; Park, Ki Tae; Grace, Andrew Nirmala; Kim, Hak-Joo; Jeong, Soon Kwan

    2015-12-01

    Globally, the elevation of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) levels due to the anthropogenic effect poses a serious threat to the ecosystem. Hence, it is important to control and/or mitigate the level of CO2 in the atmosphere, which necessitates novel tools. Herein, it is proposed to improve CO2 sequestration by using model complexes based on the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) in aqueous tertiary amine medium. The effect of substituents on the model CA model complexes on CO2 absorption and desorption was determined by using a stopped-flow spectrophotometer to follow pH changes through coupling to pH indicator and a continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR). The CO2 hydration rate constants were determined under basic conditions and compound 6, which contained a hydrophilic group, showed the highest absorption or hydration levels of CO2 (2.860×10(3)  L mol(-1)  s(-1) ). In addition, CSTR results for the absorption and desorption of CO2 suggest that simple model CA complexes could be used in post-combustion processing. PMID:26564396

  9. Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors. Part 551 Metal Complexes of 1,3,4-Thiadiazole-2-Sulfonamide Derivatives: In Vitro Inhibition Studies With Carbonic Anhydrase Isozymes I, II and IV

    PubMed Central

    Scozzafava, Andrea; Briganti, Fabrizio; Ilies, Marc A.; Jitianu, Andrei

    1998-01-01

    Coordination compounds of 5-chloroacetamido-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-sulfonamide (Hcaz) with V(IV), Cr(lll), Fe(ll), Co(ll), Ni(ll) and Cu(ll) have been prepared and characterized by standard procedures (spectroscopic, magnetic, EPR, thermogravimetric and conductimetric measurements). Some of these compounds showed very good in vitro inhibitory properties against three physiologically relevant carbonic anhydrase (CA)isozymes, i.e., CA I, II, and IV. The differences between these isozymes in susceptibility to inhibition by these metal complexes is discussed in relationship to the characteristic features of their active sites, and is rationalized in terms useful for developing isozyme-specific CA inhibitors. PMID:18475829

  10. Membrane carbonic anhydrase (IV) and ciliary epithelium. Carbonic anhydrase activity is present in the basolateral membranes of the non-pigmented ciliary epithelium of rabbit eyes.

    PubMed

    Matsui, H; Murakami, M; Wynns, G C; Conroy, C W; Mead, A; Maren, T H; Sears, M L

    1996-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) lower intraocular pressure by reducing aqueous flow. It has been thought that this pharmacologic reduction of aqueous flow is mediated by the ciliary epithelium, but it is not known whether this cellular action is effected by inhibition of the membranal (CA IV) and/or cytosolic (CA II) carbonic anhydrases of the ciliary epithelium. The isolated ciliary epithelial bilayer maintains its anatomic and functional polarity and generates a transepithelial potential difference (TEP) in an Ussing type chamber. Depletion of HCO3-, accomplished either with an HCO3(-)-free solution bathing the epithelial bilayer, or, with addition of freely permeant CAIs to HCO3(-)-containing media, (from either the PE or NPE side of the bilayer) depolarizes the preparation. Addition of CAIs to an HCO3(-)-depleted preparation has no further effect, indicating the specific action of the CAIs. The CAI, 2-p-NH2 benzenesulfonamido-1,3,4,-thiadiazole-5-SO2NH2, linked to polybutadiene maleic acid yields an impermeant polymer of 20000 Da with no loss of activity. At 45 microM this impermeant polymer caused a 60% increase in the SCC, seen only when the compound was applied to the NPE side of the bilayer. This latter result indicates an effect from inhibition of CA IV in the basolateral membranes of the NPE. Thus there are probably two different cellular actions of CAIs upon the ciliary epithelium to reduce aqueous inflow, cytoplasmic and membranal. The action of NPE basolateral membranal CA IV is probably linked to the chloride/bicarbonate exchanger. PMID:8795459

  11. Cadmium-containing carbonic anhydrase CDCA1 in marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii.

    PubMed

    Alterio, Vincenzo; Langella, Emma; De Simone, Giuseppina; Monti, Simona Maria

    2015-04-01

    The Carbon Concentration Mechanism (CCM) allows phytoplakton species to accumulate the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) necessary for an efficient photosynthesis even under carbon dioxide limitation. In this mechanism of primary importance for diatoms, a key role is played by carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzymes which catalyze the reversible hydration of CO2, thus taking part in the acquisition of inorganic carbon for photosynthesis. A novel CA, named CDCA1, has been recently discovered in the marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii. CDCA1 is a cambialistic enzyme since it naturally uses Cd2+ as catalytic metal ion, but if necessary can spontaneously exchange Cd2+ to Zn2+. Here, the biochemical and structural features of CDCA1 enzyme will be presented together with its putative biotechnological applications for the detection of metal ions in seawaters. PMID:25815892

  12. Synthesis and carbonic anhydrase inhibitory effects of new N-glycosylsulfonamides incorporating the phenol moiety.

    PubMed

    Riafrecha, Leonardo E; Bua, Silvia; Supuran, Claudiu T; Colinas, Pedro A

    2016-08-15

    A small series of N-glycosylsulfonamides incorporating the phenol moiety has been prepared by Ferrier sulfonamidoglycosylation of d-glycals. N-Glycosides were tested for the inhibition of four isoforms of carbonic anhydrase. In this study, all compounds showed good inhibitory activity against hCA I and II, with selectivity against the cytosolic hCA II versus the tumor associated isozymes. These results confirm that attaching carbohydrate moieties to CA phenol pharmacophore improves and enhances its inhibitory activity. PMID:27423482

  13. Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibition with Benzenesulfonamides and Tetrafluorobenzenesulfonamides Obtained via Click Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A series of novel benzene- and 2,3,5,6-tetrafluorobenzenesulfonamide was synthesized by using a click chemistry approach starting from azido-substituted sulfonamides and alkynes, incorporating aryl, alkyl, cycloalkyl, and amino-/hydroxy-/halogenoalkyl moieties. The new compounds were medium potency inhibitors of the cytosolic carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoforms I and II and low nanomolar/subnanomolar inhibitors of the tumor-associated hCA IX and XII isoforms. The X-ray crystal structure of two such sulfonamides in adduct with hCA II allowed us to understand the factors governing inhibitory power. PMID:25147616

  14. Pharmacotherapy of intraocular pressure - part II. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, prostaglandin analogues and prostamides.

    PubMed

    Costagliola, Ciro; dell'Omo, Roberto; Romano, Mario R; Rinaldi, Michele; Zeppa, Lucia; Parmeggiani, Francesco

    2009-12-01

    The second part of this two part review (please see Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy 10(16)) reports the characteristics of other antiglaucoma medications: systemic (acetazomide) and topical (dorzolamide and brinzolamide) carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, which suppress aqueous humour formation; and prostaglandin analogues (latanoprost and travoprost) and prostamides (bimatoprost), which raise aqueous humour outflow. The pharmacologic properties of each compound and its efficacy in the medical treatment of glaucoma, mainly the primary open-angle form, are discussed briefly, focusing on the clinical evidence supporting their use. PMID:19929706

  15. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of NO-donor containing carbonic anhydrase inhibitors to lower intraocular pressure.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qinhua; Rui, Eugene Y; Cobbs, Morena; Dinh, Dac M; Gukasyan, Hovhannes J; Lafontaine, Jennifer A; Mehta, Saurabh; Patterson, Brian D; Rewolinski, David A; Richardson, Paul F; Edwards, Martin P

    2015-03-26

    The antiglaucoma drugs dorzolamide (1) and brinzolamide (2) lower intraocular pressure (IOP) by inhibiting the carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme to reduce aqueous humor production. The introduction of a nitric oxide (NO) donor into the alkyl side chain of dorzolamide (1) and brinzolamide (2) has led to the discovery of NO-dorzolamide 3a and NO-brinzolamide 4a, which could lower IOP through two mechanisms: CA inhibition to decrease aqueous humor secretion (reduce inflow) and NO release to increase aqueous humor drainage (increase outflow). Compounds 3a and 4a have shown improved efficacy of lowering IOP in both rabbits and monkeys compared to brinzolamide (2). PMID:25728019

  16. Dithiocarbamates: a new class of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Crystallographic and kinetic investigations.

    PubMed

    Carta, Fabrizio; Aggarwal, Mayank; Maresca, Alfonso; Scozzafava, Andrea; McKenna, Robert; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2012-02-11

    The zinc enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) is inhibited by several classes of zinc-binders (sulfonamides, sulfamates, and sulfamides) as well as by compounds which do not interact with the metal ion (phenols, polyamines and coumarins). Here we report a new class of potent CA inhibitors which bind the zinc ion: the dithiocarbamates (DTCs). They coordinate to the zinc ion from the enzyme active site in monodentate manner and establish many favorable interactions with amino acid residues nearby. Several low nanomolar CA I, II and IX inhibitors were detected. PMID:22218610

  17. Is carbonic anhydrase IX a validated target for molecular imaging of cancer and hypoxia?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianbo; Zhang, Guojian; Wang, Xuemei; Li, Xiao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT  The presence of hypoxia is a general feature of most solid malignancies, and hypoxia is considered as one of major factors for anticancer therapy failure. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) has been reported to be an endogenous hypoxia marker, CAIX monoclonal antibodies, their segments and inhibitors are developed for CAIX imaging. However, growing evidence indicates that CAIX expression under hypoxia condition may be cancer cell lines or cancer-type dependent. Here we review the current literature on CAIX and discuss the advantage and limitation of CAIX as a target for tumor hypoxia imaging. Accordingly, CAIX would be unreliable as a universal target for cancer and tumor hypoxia visualization. PMID:25963430

  18. Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Induced by the Topical Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors Brinzolamide and Dorzolamide

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Ji Sun; Lee, Jee Bum; Kim, Seong Jin; Won, Young Ho

    2008-01-01

    Brinzolamide and dorzolamide are highly specific topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs). They lower intraocular pressure (IOP) by reducing the rate of aqueous humour formation without serious side effects. Although systemic CAIs are the most potent medications for lowering intraocular pressure for conditions with ocular hypertension, many cases with adverse systemic reactions have been reported, including Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). Here, we report 2 cases of TEN that were associated with topical CAIs rather than systemic CAIs. PMID:27303208

  19. Carbonic anhydrase generates a pH gradient in Bombyx mori silk glands.

    PubMed

    Domigan, L J; Andersson, M; Alberti, K A; Chesler, M; Xu, Q; Johansson, J; Rising, A; Kaplan, D L

    2015-10-01

    Silk is a protein of interest to both biological and industrial sciences. The silkworm, Bombyx mori, forms this protein into strong threads starting from soluble silk proteins using a number of biochemical and physical cues to allow the transition from liquid to fibrous silk. A pH gradient has been measured along the gland, but the methodology employed was not able to precisely determine the pH at specific regions of interest in the silk gland. Furthermore, the physiological mechanisms responsible for the generation of this pH gradient are unknown. In this study, concentric ion selective microelectrodes were used to determine the luminal pH of B. mori silk glands. A gradient from pH 8.2 to 7.2 was measured in the posterior silk gland, with a pH 7 throughout the middle silk gland, and a gradient from pH 6.8 to 6.2 in the beginning of the anterior silk gland where silk processing into fibers occurs. The small diameter of the most anterior region of the anterior silk gland prevented microelectrode access in this region. Using a histochemical method, the presence of active carbonic anhydrase was identified in the funnel and anterior silk gland of fifth instar larvae. The observed pH gradient collapsed upon addition of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor methazolamide, confirming an essential role for this enzyme in pH regulation in the B. mori silk gland. Plastic embedding of whole silk glands allowed clear visualization of the morphology, including the identification of four distinct epithelial cell types in the gland and allowed correlations between silk gland morphology and silk stages of assembly related to the pH gradient. B. mori silk glands have four different epithelial cell types, one of which produces carbonic anhydrase. Carbonic anhydrase is necessary for the mechanism that generates an intraluminal pH gradient, which likely regulates the assembly of silk proteins and then the formation of fibers from soluble silk proteins. These new insights into native silk

  20. Carbonic Anhydrase as Pollution Biomarker: An Ancient Enzyme with a New Use

    PubMed Central

    Lionetto, Maria Giulia; Caricato, Roberto; Giordano, Maria Elena; Erroi, Elisa; Schettino, Trifone

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of cellular and sub-cellular responses to chemical contaminants (referred to as biomarkers) in living organisms represents a recent tool in environmental monitoring. The review focuses on carbonic anhydrase, a ubiquitous metalloenzyme which plays key roles in a wide variety of physiological processes involving CO2 and HCO3−. In the last decade a number of studies have demonstrated the sensitivity of this enzyme to pollutants such as heavy metals and organic chemicals in both humans and wildlife. The review analyses these studies and discusses the potentiality of this enzyme as novel biomarker in environmental monitoring and assessment. PMID:23202827

  1. 4-amino-substituted benzenesulfonamides as inhibitors of human carbonic anhydrases.

    PubMed

    Rutkauskas, Kęstutis; Zubrienė, Asta; Tumosienė, Ingrida; Kantminienė, Kristina; Kažemėkaitė, Marytė; Smirnov, Alexey; Kazokaitė, Justina; Morkūnaitė, Vaida; Čapkauskaitė, Edita; Manakova, Elena; Gražulis, Saulius; Beresnevičius, Zigmuntas J; Matulis, Daumantas

    2014-01-01

    A series of N-aryl-β-alanine derivatives and diazobenzenesulfonamides containing aliphatic rings were designed, synthesized, and their binding to carbonic anhydrases (CA) I, II, VI, VII, XII, and XIII was studied by the fluorescent thermal shift assay and isothermal titration calorimetry. The results showed that 4-substituted diazobenzenesulfonamides were more potent CA binders than N-aryl-β-alanine derivatives. Most of the N-aryl-β-alanine derivatives showed better affinity for CA II while diazobenzenesulfonamides possessed nanomolar affinities towards CA I isozyme. X-ray crystallographic structures showed the modes of binding of both compound groups. PMID:25353386

  2. Saccharin: a Lead Compound for Structure-Based Drug Design of Carbonic Anhydrase IX Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Brian P.; Hendon, Alex M.; Driscoll, Jenna M.; Rankin, Gregory M.; Poulsen, Sally-Ann; Supuran, Claudiu T.; McKenna, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is a key modulator of aggressive tumor behavior and a prognostic marker and target for several cancers. Saccharin (SAC) based compounds may provide an avenue to overcome CA isoform specificity, as they display both nanomolar affinity and preferential binding, for CA IX compared to CA II (>50-fold for SAC and >1000-fold when SAC is conjugated to a carbohydrate moiety). The X-ray crystal structures of SAC and a SAC-carbohydrate conjugate bound to a CA IX-mimic are presented and compared to CA II. The structures provide substantial new insight into the mechanism of SAC selective CA isoform inhibition. PMID:25614109

  3. Eriocitrin and Apigenin as New Carbonic Anhydrase VA Inhibitors from a Virtual Screening of Calabrian Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Gidaro, Maria Concetta; Alcaro, Francesca; Carradori, Simone; Costa, Giosuè; Vullo, Daniela; Supuran, Claudiu T; Alcaro, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we performed a structure-based virtual screening against five carbonic anhydrase isoforms using, as a ligand library, natural components of Citrus bergamia (Bergamot) and Allium cepa var. Tropea (red onion) sources, which are some typical Calabrian products. The most relevant Bergamot and red onion components, identified as potentially new hits by means of the computational work, were submitted to in vitro tests in order to confirm the ability to exert the predicted biological activity. Apigenin and eriocitrin were identified as new potent inhibitors of human carbonic anhydrase VA isozyme. PMID:25590364

  4. N-β-glycosyl sulfamides are selective inhibitors of the cancer associated carbonic anhydrase isoforms IX and XII.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Oscar M; Maresca, Alfonso; Témpera, Carlos A; Bravo, Rodolfo D; Colinas, Pedro A; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2011-08-01

    The transmembrane isoforms of carbonic anhydrase (CA IX and XII) have been shown to be linked to carcinogenesis and their inhibition to arrest primary tumor and metastases growth. In this Letter, we present a series of peracetylated and deprotected N-β-glycosyl sulfamides that were tested for the inhibition of 4 carbonic anhydrase isoforms: the cytosolic hCA I and hCA II and transmembrane tumor-associated IX and XII. Compounds 1-4 and 6-8 selectively target cancer-associated CAs (IX and XII) with K(I)s in the low nanomolar range. PMID:21723123

  5. Carbonic anhydrase and CO2 sensing during Cryptococcus neoformans growth, differentiation, and virulence.

    PubMed

    Bahn, Yong-Sun; Cox, Gary M; Perfect, John R; Heitman, Joseph

    2005-11-22

    The gas carbon dioxide (CO2) plays a critical role in microbial and mammalian respiration, photosynthesis in algae and plants, chemoreception in insects, and even global warming . However, how CO2 is transported, sensed, and metabolized by microorganisms is largely not understood. For instance, CO2 is known to induce production of polysaccharide capsule virulence determinants in pathogenic bacteria and fungi via unknown mechanisms . Therefore, we studied CO2 actions in growth, differentiation, and virulence of the basidiomycetous human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. The CAN2 gene encoding beta-carbonic anhydrase in C. neoformans was found to be essential for growth in environmental ambient conditions but dispensable for in vivo proliferation and virulence at the high CO2 levels in the host. The can2Delta mutant in vitro growth defect is largely attributable to defective fatty acid synthesis. CO2 was found to inhibit cell-cell fusion but not filamentation during sexual reproduction. The can2 mutation restored early mating events in high CO2 but not later steps (fruiting body formation, sporulation), indicating a major role for carbonic anhydrase and CO2/HCO3- in this developmental cascade leading to the production of infectious spores. Our studies illustrate diverse roles of an ancient enzyme class in enabling environmental survival of a ubiquitous human pathogen. PMID:16303560

  6. Identification and characterization of a gene encoding a vertebrate-type carbonic anhydrase in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Soltes-Rak, E; Mulligan, M E; Coleman, J R

    1997-01-01

    A gene (designated ecaA) encoding a vertebrate-like (alpha-type) carbonic anhydrase (CA) has been isolated from two disparate cyanobacteria, Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 and Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942. The deduced amino acid sequences correspond to proteins of 29 and 26 kDa, respectively, and revealed significant sequence similarity to human CAI and CAII, as well as Chlamydomonas CAHI, including conservation of most active-site residues identified in the animal enzymes. Structural similarities between the animal and cyanobacterial enzymes extend to the levels of antigenicity, as the Anabaena protein cross-reacts with antisera derived against chicken CAII. Expression of the cyanobacterial ecaA is regulated by CO2 concentration and is highest in cells grown at elevated levels of CO2. Immunogold localization using an antibody derived against the ecaA protein indicated an extracellular location. Preliminary analysis of Synechococcus mutants in which ecaA has been inactivated by insertion of a drug resistance cassette suggests that extracellular carbonic anhydrase plays a role in inorganic-carbon accumulation by maintaining equilibrium levels of CO2 and HCO3- in the periplasm. PMID:9006032

  7. CARBONIC ANHYDRASE ACTIVITY OF INTEGRAL-FUNCTIONAL COMPLEXES OF THYLAKOID MEMBRANES OF SPINACH CHLOROPLASTS.

    PubMed

    Semenihin, A V; Zolotareva, O K

    2015-01-01

    Isolated thylakoid membranes were disrupted by treatment with nonionic detergents digitonin or dodecyl maltoside. Solubilized polypeptide complexes were separated by native gel charge shift electrophoresis. The position of ATP-synthase complex and its isolated catalytic part (CF1) within gel was determined using the color reaction for ATPase activity. Due to the presence of cytochromes, the red band in unstained gels corresponded to the cytochrome b6f complex. Localization of the cytochrome b6f complex, ATP synthase and coupling CF1 in the native gel was confirmed by their subunit composition determined after SDS-electrophoretic analysis. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity in polypeptide zones of PS II, cytochrome b6f complex, and ATP-synthase CF1 was identified in native gels using indicator bromothymol blue. CA activity of isolated CF1 in solution was determined by infrared gas analysis as the rate of bicarbonate dehydration. The water-soluble acetazolamide, an inhibitor of CA, unlike lipophilic ethoxyzolamide inhibited CA activity of CF1 Thus, it was shown for the first time that ATP-synthase has a component which is capable of catalyzing the interconversion of forms of carbonic acid associated with proton exchange. The data obtained suggest the presence of multiple forms of carbonic anhydrase in the thylakoid membranes of spinach chloroplasts and confirm their involvement in the proton transfer to the ATP synthase. PMID:26502699

  8. Catalytic activity of human carbonic anhydrase isoform IX is displayed both extra- and intracellularly.

    PubMed

    Klier, Michael; Jamali, Somayeh; Ames, Samantha; Schneider, Hans-Peter; Becker, Holger M; Deitmer, Joachim W

    2016-01-01

    Most carbonic anhydrases catalyse the reversible conversion of carbon dioxide to protons and bicarbonate, either as soluble cytosolic enzymes, in or at intracellular organelles, or at the extracellular face of the cell membrane as membrane-anchored proteins. Carbonic anhydrase isoform IX (CA IX), a membrane-bound enzyme with catalytic activity at the extracellular membrane surface, has come to prominence in recent years because of its association with hypoxic tissue, particularly tumours, often indicating poor prognosis. We have evaluated the catalytic activity of CA IX heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes by measuring the amplitude and rate of cytosolic pH changes as well as pH changes at the outer membrane surface (pHs ) during addition and removal of 5% CO2 /25 mm HCO3-, and by mass spectrometry. Our results indicate both extracellular and intracellular catalytic activity of CA IX. Reduced rates of CO2 -dependent intracellular pH changes after knockdown of CA IX confirmed these findings in two breast cancer cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. Our results demonstrate a new function of CA IX that may be important in the search for therapeutic cancer drugs targeting CA IX. PMID:26470855

  9. Carbonic anhydrase III regulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}2

    SciTech Connect

    Mitterberger, Maria C.; Kim, Geumsoo; Rostek, Ursula; Levine, Rodney L.; Zwerschke, Werner

    2012-05-01

    Carbonic anhydrase III (CAIII) is an isoenzyme of the CA family. Because of its low specific anhydrase activity, physiological functions in addition to hydrating CO{sub 2} have been proposed. CAIII expression is highly induced in adipogenesis and CAIII is the most abundant protein in adipose tissues. The function of CAIII in both preadipocytes and adipocytes is however unknown. In the present study we demonstrate that adipogenesis is greatly increased in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from CAIII knockout (KO) mice, as demonstrated by a greater than 10-fold increase in the induction of fatty acid-binding protein-4 (FABP4) and increased triglyceride formation in CAIII{sup -/-} MEFs compared with CAIII{sup +/+} cells. To address the underlying mechanism, we investigated the expression of the two adipogenic key regulators, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}2 (PPAR{gamma}2) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-{alpha}. We found a considerable (approximately 1000-fold) increase in the PPAR{gamma}2 expression in the CAIII{sup -/-} MEFs. Furthermore, RNAi-mediated knockdown of endogenous CAIII in NIH 3T3-L1 preadipocytes resulted in a significant increase in the induction of PPAR{gamma}2 and FABP4. When both CAIII and PPAR{gamma}2 were knocked down, FABP4 was not induced. We conclude that down-regulation of CAIII in preadipocytes enhances adipogenesis and that CAIII is a regulator of adipogenic differentiation which acts at the level of PPAR{gamma}2 gene expression. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We discover a novel function of Carbonic anhydrase III (CAIII). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that CAIII is a regulator of adipogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate that CAIII acts at the level of PPAR{gamma}2 gene expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our data contribute to a better understanding of the role of CAIII in fat tissue.

  10. Kinetics of Formation of Cobalt(II)- and Nickel(II) Carbonic Anhydrase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuate, Robert S.; Reardon, John E.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the kinetic behavior associated with the interaction of metal ions with apocarbonic anhydrase, focusing on the formation of two metallocarbonic anhydrase--the biochemically active Co(II) and the inactive Ni(II)derivatives. (GA)

  11. Distinct Cellular Locations of Carbonic Anhydrases Mediate Carbon Dioxide Control of Stomatal Movements.

    PubMed

    Hu, Honghong; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Occhipinti, Rossana; Ries, Amber; Böhmer, Maik; You, Lei; Xiao, Chuanlei; Engineer, Cawas B; Boron, Walter F; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-10-01

    Elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) in leaves closes stomatal apertures. Research has shown key functions of the β-carbonic anhydrases (βCA1 and βCA4) in rapid CO2-induced stomatal movements by catalytic transmission of the CO2 signal in guard cells. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, because initial studies indicate that these Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) βCAs are targeted to distinct intracellular compartments upon expression in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) cells. Which cellular location of these enzymes plays a key role in native guard cells in CO2-regulated stomatal movements remains unknown. Here, we express fluorescently tagged CAs in guard cells of ca1ca4 double-mutant plants and show that the specific locations of βCA4 at the plasma membrane and βCA1 in native guard cell chloroplasts each can mediate rapid CO2 control of stomatal movements. Localization and complementation analyses using a mammalian αCAII-yellow fluorescent protein in guard cells further show that cytoplasmic localization is also sufficient to restore CO2 regulation of stomatal conductance. Mathematical modeling of cellular CO2 catalysis suggests that the dynamics of the intracellular HCO3 (-) concentration change in guard cells can be driven by plasma membrane and cytoplasmic localizations of CAs but not as clearly by chloroplast targeting. Moreover, modeling supports the notion that the intracellular HCO3 (-) concentration dynamics in guard cells are a key mechanism in mediating CO2-regulated stomatal movements but that an additional chloroplast role of CAs exists that has yet to be identified. PMID:26243620

  12. Distinct Cellular Locations of Carbonic Anhydrases Mediate Carbon Dioxide Control of Stomatal Movements1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Honghong; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Occhipinti, Rossana; Ries, Amber; Böhmer, Maik; You, Lei; Xiao, Chuanlei; Engineer, Cawas B.; Boron, Walter F.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) in leaves closes stomatal apertures. Research has shown key functions of the β-carbonic anhydrases (βCA1 and βCA4) in rapid CO2-induced stomatal movements by catalytic transmission of the CO2 signal in guard cells. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, because initial studies indicate that these Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) βCAs are targeted to distinct intracellular compartments upon expression in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) cells. Which cellular location of these enzymes plays a key role in native guard cells in CO2-regulated stomatal movements remains unknown. Here, we express fluorescently tagged CAs in guard cells of ca1ca4 double-mutant plants and show that the specific locations of βCA4 at the plasma membrane and βCA1 in native guard cell chloroplasts each can mediate rapid CO2 control of stomatal movements. Localization and complementation analyses using a mammalian αCAII-yellow fluorescent protein in guard cells further show that cytoplasmic localization is also sufficient to restore CO2 regulation of stomatal conductance. Mathematical modeling of cellular CO2 catalysis suggests that the dynamics of the intracellular HCO3− concentration change in guard cells can be driven by plasma membrane and cytoplasmic localizations of CAs but not as clearly by chloroplast targeting. Moreover, modeling supports the notion that the intracellular HCO3− concentration dynamics in guard cells are a key mechanism in mediating CO2-regulated stomatal movements but that an additional chloroplast role of CAs exists that has yet to be identified. PMID:26243620

  13. Comparison of inhibition effects of some benzoic acid derivatives on sheep heart carbonic anhydrase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiliç, Deryanur; Yildiz, Melike; Şentürk, Murat; Erdoǧan, Orhan; Küfrevioǧlu, Ömer Irfan

    2016-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a family of metalloenzymes that requires Zn as a cofactor and catalyze the quick conversion of CO2 to HCO3- and H+. Inhibitors of the carbonic anhydrases (CAs) have medical usage of significant diseases such as glaucoma, epilepsy, gastroduodenal ulcers, acid-base disequilibria and neurological disorders. In the present study, inhibition of CA with some benzoic derivatives (1-6) were investigated. Sheep heart CA (shCA) enzyme was isolated by means of designed affinity chromatography gel (cellulose-benzyl-sulfanylamide) 42.45-fold in a yield of 44 % with 564.65 EU/mg. Purified shCA enzyme was used in vitro studies. In the studies, IC50 values were calculated for 3-aminobenzoic acid (1), 4-aminobenzoic acid (2), 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (3), 2-benzoylbenzoic acid (4), 2,3-dimethoxybenzoic acid (5), and 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid (6), showing the inhibition effects on the purified enzyme. Such molecules can be used as pioneer for discovery of novel effective CA inhibitors for medicinal chemistry applications.

  14. Carbonic anhydrase, a respiratory enzyme in the gills of the shore crab Carcinus maenas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, K.; Siebers, D.; Sender, S.

    1995-03-01

    This paper summarizes investigations on the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) in the gills of the osmoregulating shore crab Carcinus maenas. Carbonic anhydrase, an enzyme catalyzing the reversible hydration of CO2 to HCO3 - and H+, is localized with highest activities in the posterior salt-transporting gills of the shore crab- and here CA activity is strongly dependent on salinity. Contrary to the earlier hypothesis established for the blue crab Callinectes sapidus that cytoplasmic branchial CA provides the counter ions HCO3 - and H+ for apical exchange against Na+ and Cl-, the involvement of CA in NaCl uptake mechanisms can be excluded in Carcinus. Differential and density gradient centrifugations indicate that branchial CA is a predominantly membrane-associated protein. Branchial CA was greatly inhibited by the sulfonamide acetazolamide (AZ) Ki=2.4·10-8 mol/l). Using the preparation of the isolated perfused gill, application of 10-4 mol/l AZ resulted in an 80% decrease of CO2/HCO3 - excretion. Thus we conclude that CA is localized in plasma membranes, maintaining the CO2 gradient by accelerating adjustment of the pH-dependent CO2/HCO3 - equilibrium.

  15. New selective carbonic anhydrase IX inhibitors: synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of diarylpyrazole-benzenesulfonamides.

    PubMed

    Rogez-Florent, Tiphaine; Meignan, Samuel; Foulon, Catherine; Six, Perrine; Gros, Abigaëlle; Bal-Mahieu, Christine; Supuran, Claudiu T; Scozzafava, Andrea; Frédérick, Raphaël; Masereel, Bernard; Depreux, Patrick; Lansiaux, Amélie; Goossens, Jean-François; Gluszok, Sébastien; Goossens, Laurence

    2013-03-15

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) IX expression is increased upon hypoxia and has been proposed as a therapeutic target since it has been associated with poor prognosis, tumor progression and pH regulation. We report the synthesis and the pharmacological evaluation of a new class of human carbonic anhydrase (hCA) inhibitors, 4-(5-aryl-2-hydroxymethyl-pyrazol-1-yl)-benzenesulfonamides. A molecular modeling study was conducted in order to simulate the binding mode of this new family of enzyme inhibitors within the active site of hCA IX. Pharmacological studies revealed high hCA IX inhibitory potency in the parameters nanomolar range. This study showed that the position of sulfonamide group in meta of the 1-phenylpyrazole increase a selectivity hCA IX versus hCA II of our compounds. An in vitro antiproliferative screening has been performed on the breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell using doxorubicin as cytotoxic agent and in presence of selected CA IX inhibitor. The results shown that the cytotoxic efficiency of doxorubicin in an hypoxic environment, expressed in IC50 value, is restored at 20% level with 1μM CA IX inhibitor. PMID:23168081

  16. Tracking solvent and protein movement during CO2 release in carbonic anhydrase II crystals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chae Un; Song, HyoJin; Avvaru, Balendu Sankara; Gruner, Sol M; Park, SangYoun; McKenna, Robert

    2016-05-10

    Carbonic anhydrases are mostly zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration/dehydration of CO2/HCO3 (-) Previously, the X-ray crystal structures of CO2-bound holo (zinc-bound) and apo (zinc-free) human carbonic anhydrase IIs (hCA IIs) were captured at high resolution. Here, we present sequential timeframe structures of holo- [T = 0 s (CO2-bound), 50 s, 3 min, 10 min, 25 min, and 1 h] and apo-hCA IIs [T = 0 s, 50 s, 3 min, and 10 min] during the "slow" release of CO2 Two active site waters, WDW (deep water) and WDW' (this study), replace the vacated space created on CO2 release, and another water, WI (intermediate water), is seen to translocate to the proton wire position W1. In addition, on the rim of the active site pocket, a water W2' (this study), in close proximity to residue His64 and W2, gradually exits the active site, whereas His64 concurrently rotates from pointing away ("out") to pointing toward ("in") active site rotameric conformation. This study provides for the first time, to our knowledge, structural "snapshots" of hCA II intermediate states during the formation of the His64-mediated proton wire that is induced as CO2 is released. Comparison of the holo- and apo-hCA II structures shows that the solvent network rearrangements require the presence of the zinc ion. PMID:27114542

  17. Ectopic expression of mitochondrial gamma carbonic anhydrase 2 causes male sterility by anther indehiscence.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Fernando; Martín, Victoria; Colaneri, Alejandro; González-Schain, Nahuel; Perales, Mariano; Martín, Mariana; Lombardo, Cristina; Braun, Hans-Peter; Bartoli, Carlos; Zabaleta, Eduardo

    2009-07-01

    Plant mitochondria include gamma-type carbonic anhydrases (gammaCAs) of unknown function. In Arabidopsis, the gammaCAs form a gene family of five members which all are attached to the NADH dehydrogenase complex (complex I) of the respiratory chain. Here we report a functional analysis of gamma carbonic anhydrase 2 (CA2). The gene encoding CA2 is constitutively expressed in all plant organs investigated but it is ten fold induced in flowers, particularly in tapetal tissue. Ectopic expression of CA2 in Arabidopsis causes male sterility in transgenic plants. In normal anther development, secondary thickenings of the endothecial cell wall cause anthers to open upon dehydration. Histological analyses revealed that abnormal secondary thickening prevents anther opening in 35S::CA2 transgenic plants. CA2 abundance in transgenic plants is increased 2-3 fold compared to wild-type plants as revealed by Western blotting analyses. Moreover, abundance of other members of the CA family, termed CA3 and CAL2, is increased in transgenic plants. Oxygen uptake measurements revealed that respiration in transgenic plants is mainly based on NADH reduction by the alternative NADH dehydrogenases present in plant mitochondria. Furthermore, the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is very low in transgenic plants. We propose that reduction in ROS inhibits H(2)O(2) dependent lignin polymerization in CA2 over-expressing plants, thereby causing male sterility. PMID:19326245

  18. Renal bicarbonate reabsorption in the rat. I. Effects of hypokalemia and carbonic anhydrase.

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, G; Kinne, R; Malnic, G; Giebisch, G

    1986-01-01

    Free-flow micropuncture studies were carried out on superficial rat proximal and distal tubules to assess the participation of different nephron segments in bicarbonate transport. Particular emphasis was placed on the role of the distal tubule, and micro-calorimetric methods used to quantitate bicarbonate reabsorption. Experiments were carried out in control conditions, during dietary potassium withdrawal, and after acute intravenous infusions of carbonic anhydrase. We observed highly significant net bicarbonate reabsorption in normal acid-base conditions as evidenced by the maintenance of significant bicarbonate concentration gradients in the presence of vigorous fluid absorption. Distal bicarbonate reabsorption persisted in hypokalemic alkalosis and even steeper transepithelial concentration gradients of bicarbonate were maintained. Enhancement of net bicarbonate reabsorption followed the acute intravenous administration of carbonic anhydrase but was limited to the nephron segments between the late proximal and early distal tubule. The latter observation is consistent with a disequilibrium pH along the proximal straight tubule (S3 segment), the thick ascending limb of Henle, and/or the early distal tubule. PMID:3097074

  19. Carbonic Anhydrase is Required for Statoconia Homeostasis in Organ Cultures of Statocysts from Aplysia californica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedrozo, H. A.; Schwartz, Z.; Nakaya, H.; Harrison, J. L.; Dean, D. D.; Wiederhold, M. L.; Boyan, B. D.

    1995-01-01

    A novel organ culture system has been developed to study the regulation of statoconia production in the gravity sensing organ in Aplysia californica. Statocysts were cultured in Leibovitz (LI5) medium supplemented with salts and Aplysia haemolymph for four days at 17 C. The viability of the system was evaluated by examining four parameters: statocyst morphology, the activity of the mechanosensory cilia in the statocyst, production of new statoconia during culture and change in statoconia volume after culture. There were no morphological differences in statocysts before and after culture when ciliary beating was maintained. There was a 29% increase in the number of statoconia after four days in culture. Mean statocyst, statolith and statoconia volumes were not affected by culture conditions. The presence of carbonic anhydrase in the statocysts was shown using immunohistochemistry. When statocysts were cultured in the presence of 4.0 x 10(exp -4) M acetazolamide to inhibit the enzyme activity, there was a decrease in statoconia production and statoconia volume, indicating a role for this enzyme in statoconia homeostasis, potentially, via pH regulation. These studies are the first to report a novel system for the culture of statocysts and show that carbonic anhydrase is involved in the regulation of statoconia volume and production.

  20. Structure of α-carbonic anhydrase from the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Compostella, Maria Elena; Berto, Paola; Vallese, Francesca; Zanotti, Giuseppe

    2015-08-01

    The crystal structure of α-carbonic anhydrase, an enzyme present in the periplasm of Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium that affects humans and that is responsible for several gastric pathologies, is described. Two enzyme monomers are present in the asymmetric unit of the monoclinic space group P21, forming a dimer in the crystal. Despite the similarity of the enzyme structure to those of orthologues from other species, the H. pylori protein has adopted peculiar features in order to allow the bacterium to survive in the difficult environment of the human stomach. In particular, the crystal structure shows how the bacterium has corrected for the mutation of an essential amino acid important for catalysis using a negative ion from the medium and how it localizes close to the inner membrane in the periplasm. Since carbonic anhydrase is essential for the bacterial colonization of the host, it is a potential target for antibiotic drugs. The definition of the shape of the active-site entrance and cavity constitutes a basis for the design of specific inhibitors. PMID:26249690

  1. Purification of carbonic anhydrase from dog erythrocytes and investigation of in vitro inhibition by various compounds.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Turan; Arslan, Oktay; Ugras, Halil Ibrahim; Cakir, Umit; Ozensoy, Ozen

    2007-12-01

    The enzyme carbonic anhydrase (E.C. 4.2.1.1) has a stimulatory effect on glaucoma, an eye disease that has a risk to dogs, which are models for the human eye disease, that is similar to that in humans. In this study, some sulfonamide derivatives, 2-(3-cyclohexene-1-carbamido)-1,3,4-thiadiazole-5-sulfonamide (CCTS), 4-(3-cyclohexene-1-carbamido) methyl-benzenesulfonamide (CCBS), 2-(9-octadecenoylamido)-1,3,4-thiadiazole-5-sulfonamide (ODTS), 2-(4,7,10-trioxa-tetradecanoylamido)-1,3,4-thiadiazole-5-sulfonamide (TDTS), and 2-(8-methoxycoumarine-3-carbamido)-1,3,4-thiadiazole-5-sulfonamide (MCTS), as well as some anionic compounds (perchlorate and chloride) and existing medicines (dorzolamide-HCl, gentamicine sulphate, tropicamide, and procaine-HCl) were assayed for their inhibition of dog carbonic anhydrase (dCA), which was purified from erythrocytes on an affinity gel of L-tyrosine-sulfonamide-Sepharose 4B. ODTS showed the highest potency amongst the synthetic compounds with IC50 value 1.18 x 10(-5) M. Amongst the medicines tested, only dorzolamide showed inhibition with IC50 value 5.05 x 10(-4) M. Procaine and tropicamide actually showed an activatory effect, whereas gentamicine sulfate had no significant effect. The inhibitory effects of anionic compounds such as perchlorate and chloride were also investigated; whereas perchlorate showed inhibition, chloride did not. PMID:18237029

  2. Efficient Expression and Crystallization System of Cancer-Associated Carbonic Anhydrase Isoform IX.

    PubMed

    Leitans, Janis; Kazaks, Andris; Balode, Agnese; Ivanova, Jekaterina; Zalubovskis, Raivis; Supuran, Claudiu T; Tars, Kaspars

    2015-11-25

    Human carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is overexpressed in a number of solid tumors and is considered to be a marker for cellular hypoxia that it is not produced in most normal tissues. CA IX contributes to the acidification of the extracellular matrix, which, in turn, favors tumor growth and metastasis. Therefore, CA IX is considered to be a promising anti-cancer drug target. However, the ability to specifically target CA IX is challenging due to the fact that the human genome encodes 15 different carbonic anhydrase isoforms that have a high degree of homology. Furthermore, structure-based drug design of CA IX inhibitors so far has been largely unsuccessful due to technical difficulties regarding the expression and crystallization of the enzyme. Currently, only one baculovirus-produced CA IX structure in complex with a nonspecific CA inhibitor, acetazolamide, is available in Protein Data Bank. We have developed an efficient system for the production of the catalytic domain of CA IX in methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. The produced protein can be easily crystallized in the presence of inhibitors, as we have demonstrated for several 2-thiophene-sulfonamide compounds. We have also observed significant differences in the binding mode of chemically identical compounds to CA IX and CA II, which can be further exploited in the design of CA IX-specific inhibitors. PMID:26522624

  3. Characteristics of recombinant α-carbonic anhydrase of polyextremophilic bacterium Bacillus halodurans TSLV1.

    PubMed

    Faridi, Shazia; Satyanarayana, T

    2016-08-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a biocatalyst that catalyzes the hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate and protons, thus useful in mitigating green house effect by sequestering CO2 from various point sources. An alkalistable and moderately thermostable α- carbonic anhydrase encoding gene (BhCA) from Bacillus halodurans TSLV1 has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. A 31.4-fold enhancement in CA production was achieved due to cloning and expression in E. coli. About 50% of the CA produced was secreted when recombinant E. coli with BhCA-pET22b was cultivated in a medium with EDTA and lysozyme because of the efficient pelB leader sequence. rBhCA is a ∼75kDa homodimeric protein with a Tm of 72°C and T1/2 values of 66 and 24min at 50 and 60°C, respectively. SDM analysis revealed that H137, H139, H156 and H110 present in the active site play an important role in catalysis. Mineralization of CO2 using rBhCA led to the accelerated precipitation of CaCO3 in calcite form. rBhCA also functions as an efficient virtual peroxidase when Zn(2+) is substituted with Mn(2+). PMID:27174908

  4. Combining stable isotope isotope geochemistry and carbonic anhydrase activity to trace vital effect in carbonate precipitation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaler, C.; Ader, M.; Menez, B.; Guyot, F. J.

    2013-12-01

    Carbonates precipitated by skeleton-forming eukaryotic organisms are often characterized by non-equilibrium isotopic signatures. This specificity is referred to as the "vital effect" and can be used as an isotopic evidence to trace life. Combining stable isotope geochemistry and enzymology (using the enzyme carbonic anhydrase) we aim to demonstrate that prokaryotes are also able to precipitate carbonate with a non-equilibrium d18OCaCO3. Indeed, if in an biomineralization experiment carbonates are precipitated with a vital effect, the addition of carbonic anhydrase should drive the system to isotope equilibrium, And provide a comparison point to estimate the vital effect range. This protocol allowed us to identify a -20‰ vital effect for the d18O of carbonates precipitated by Sporosarcina pasteurii, a bacterial model of carbonatogen metabolisms. This approach is thus a powerfull tool for the understanding of microbe carbonatogen activity and will probably bring new insights into the understanding of bacterial activity in subsurface and during diagenesis.

  5. Metabolic Effect of Estrogen Receptor Agonists on Breast Cancer Cells in the Presence or Absence of Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Belkaid, Anissa; Čuperlović-Culf, Miroslava; Touaibia, Mohamed; Ouellette, Rodney J.; Surette, Marc E.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic shift is one of the major hallmarks of cancer development. Estrogen receptor (ER) activity has a profound effect on breast cancer cell growth through a number of metabolic changes driven by its effect on transcription of several enzymes, including carbonic anhydrases, Stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1, and oncogenes including HER2. Thus, estrogen receptor activators can be expected to lead to the modulation of cell metabolism in estrogen receptor positive cells. In this work we have investigated the effect of 17β-estradiol, an ER activator, and ferulic acid, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, as well as ER activator, in the absence and in the presence of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide on the metabolism of MCF7 cells and MCF7 cells, stably transfected to express HER2 (MCF7HER2). Metabolic profiles were studied using 1D and 2D metabolomic Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments, combined with the identification and quantification of metabolites, and the annotation of the results in the context of biochemical pathways. Overall changes in hydrophilic metabolites were largest following treatment of MCF7 and MC7HER2 cells with 17β-estradiol. However, the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide had the largest effect on the profile of lipophilic metabolites. PMID:27240414

  6. Identification, sequencing, and localization of a new carbonic anhydrase transcript from the hydrothermal vent tubeworm Riftia pachyptila.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Sophie; Andersen, Ann C; Hourdez, Stéphane; Lallier, François H

    2007-10-01

    The vestimentiferan annelid Riftia pachyptila forms dense populations at hydrothermal vents along the East Pacific Rise at a depth of 2600 m. It harbors CO(2)-assimilating sulfide-oxidizing bacteria that provide all of its nutrition. To find specific host transcripts that could be important for the functioning of this symbiosis, we used a subtractive suppression hybridization approach to identify plume- or trophosome-specific proteins. We demonstrated the existence of carbonic anhydrase transcripts, a protein endowed with an essential role in generating the influx of CO(2) required by the symbionts. One of the transcripts was previously known and sequenced. Our quantification analyses showed a higher expression of this transcript in the trophosome compared to the branchial plume or the body wall. A second transcript, with 69.7% nucleotide identity compared to the previous one, was almost only expressed in the branchial plume. Fluorescent in situ hybridization confirmed the coexpression of the two transcripts in the branchial plume in contrast with the trophosome where only one transcript could be detected. An alignment of these translated carbonic anhydrase cDNAs with vertebrate and nonvertebrate carbonic anhydrase protein sequences revealed the conservation of most amino acids involved in the catalytic site. According to the phylogenetic analyses, the two R. pachyptila transcripts clustered together but not all nonvertebrate sequences grouped together. Complete sequencing of the new carbonic anhydrase transcript revealed the existence of two slightly divergent isoforms probably coded by two different genes. PMID:17892492

  7. The isoenzymes of carbonic anhydrase: tissue, subcellular distribution and functional significance, with particular reference to the intestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Carter, M. J.; Parsons, D. S.

    1971-01-01

    1. The total carbonic anhydrase activity in some guinea-pig tissues has been measured using a pH-stat procedure. Stomach, gall bladder, proximal colon and caecum all possess more carbonic anhydrase activity per unit amount of protein than does whole blood. 2. The carbonic anhydrase activity of the small intestine is low. Reasons are given for supposing that activity found there is not entirely due to contamination by whole blood, and it is suggested that in this tissue the enzyme may be localized in some cell type other than the columnar absorbing cells. 3. Evidence is presented which indicates that heavy metals interfere with the activity of the enzyme as measured in tissue homogenates. 4. The distribution and concentration of the two major isoenzymes of carbonic anhydrase have been measured in different tissues. Blood and proximal colon contain both isoenzymes in comparable concentrations, the ratio of the concentration of the `low activity' isoenzyme to that of the `high activity' being about 2. The gastric mucosa contains much `high activity' carbonic anhydrase, but only a negligible amount of the `low activity' isoenzyme. In the caecal mucosa, the `low activity' isoenzyme is predominant, the ratio of its concentration to that of the `high activity' isoenzyme being about 9. It is also found that more than 1·5% of the protein in the caecal mucosa is accounted for as carbonic anhydrase enzymes. 5. It is found that some 45% of the total carbonic anhydrase activity of sucrose homogenates of the guinea-pig colon is bound to particles. The activity is located mainly in the nuclear and microvillous fraction and in the `high-speed supernatant' fraction. The form of enzyme bound is largely of the `high activity' variety. When the tissue is homogenized in potassium chloride solutions less than 4% of the total activity is recovered in particulate fractions. The amount of activity which is bound to particulate fractions increases as the ionic strength or pH of the

  8. [Advances in researches on β-carbonic anhydrases as anti-parasitic drug targets].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cong-hui; Zhu, Huai-min

    2016-02-01

    β-carbonic anhydrases (β-CAs) are ubiquitous metalloenzymes which active site contains a zinc ion (Zn²⁺), and they could catalyze the hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons efficiently and are involved in many biological processes, such as respiration, pH and CO₂ homeostasis, biosynthetic reactions, virulence regulation and so on, and may play a critical role in the life activity of many organisms which contain these enzymes. β-CAs are widely distributed in fungi, bacteria, algae, plants and a small number of protozoan and metazoan except vertebrates. Therefore, as potential drug targets for designing and developing antibacterial and anti-parasitic drugs, β-CAs promise a broad application prospect. This paper focuses on the distribution, physiological function and the progress of researches on β-CAs in parasites and their vectors. PMID:27356420

  9. Otolith Growth and macular Carbonic Anhydrase Reactivity in larval Fish after Development at simulated Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, U.; Hilbig, R.; Anken, R.

    Otolith growth in terms of mineralisation mainly depends on the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). CA is located in specialized, mitochondria-rich macular cells (ionocytes), which are involved in the endolymphatic ion exchange, and the enzyme is responsible for the provision of the pH-value necessary for otolithic calcium carbonate deposition. Since it has been shown earlier that hypergravity slows down inner ear otolith growth in developing fish via a down-regulation of CA reactivity, we were prompted to elucidate whether (simulated) microgravity would possibly yield opposite effects. Therefore, larval siblings of cichlid fish (Oreochromis mossambicus) were housed in a submersed, two-dimensional clinostat (tube) during their development. Subsequently, the "physical capacity" (i.e., size) of the otoliths was measured, CA was histochemically demonstrated in ionocytes, and enzyme reactivity was determined densitometrically. The respective data will be communicated at the meeting. Acknowledgement: This work was financially supported by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) (FKZ: 50 WB 9997).

  10. Xanthates and trithiocarbonates strongly inhibit carbonic anhydrases and show antiglaucoma effects in vivo.

    PubMed

    Carta, Fabrizio; Akdemir, Atilla; Scozzafava, Andrea; Masini, Emanuela; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2013-06-13

    Dithiocarbamates (DTCs) were recently discovered as carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitors. A series of xanthates and a trithiocarbonate, structurally related to the DTCs, were prepared by reaction of alcohols/thiols with carbon disulfide in the presence of bases. These compounds were tested for the inhibition of four human (h) isoforms, hCA I, II, IX, and XII, involved in pathologies such as glaucoma (CA II and XII) or cancer (CA IX). Several low nanomolar xanthate/trithiocarbonate inhibitors targeting these CAs were detected. A docking study of some xanthates within the CA II active site showed that these compounds bind in a similar manner with the dithiocarbamates, coordinating monodentately to the Zn(II) ion from the enzyme active site. Several xanthates showed potent intraocular pressure lowering activity in two animal models of glaucoma via the topical administration. Xanthates and thioxanthates represent two novel, promising classes of CA inhibitors. PMID:23647428

  11. Dithiocarbamates strongly inhibit carbonic anhydrases and show antiglaucoma action in vivo.

    PubMed

    Carta, Fabrizio; Aggarwal, Mayank; Maresca, Alfonso; Scozzafava, Andrea; McKenna, Robert; Masini, Emanuela; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2012-02-23

    A series of dithiocarbamates were prepared by reaction of primary/secondary amines with carbon disulfide in the presence of bases. These compounds were tested for the inhibition of four human (h) isoforms of the zinc enzyme carbonic anhydrase, CA (EC 4.2.1.1), hCA I, II, IX, and XII, involved in pathologies such as glaucoma (CA II and XII) or cancer (CA IX). Several low nanomolar inhibitors targeting these CAs were detected. The X-ray crystal structure of the hCA II adduct with morpholine dithiocarbamate evidenced the inhibition mechanism of these compounds, which coordinate to the metal ion through a sulfur atom from the dithiocarbamate zinc-binding function. Some dithiocarbamates showed an effective intraocular pressure lowering activity in an animal model of glucoma. PMID:22276570

  12. Dithiocarbamates strongly inhibit carbonic anhydrases and show antiglaucoma action in vivo#

    PubMed Central

    Carta, Fabrizio; Aggarwal, Mayank; Maresca, Alfonso; Scozzafava, Andrea; McKenna, Robert; Masini, Emanuela; Supuran, Claudiu T.

    2012-01-01

    A series of dithiocarbamates was prepared by reaction of primary/secondary amines with carbon disulfide in the presence of bases. These compounds were tested for the inhibition of 4 human (h) isoforms of the zinc enzyme carbonic anhydrase, CA (EC 4.2.1.1), hCA I, II, IX and XII, involved in pathologies such as glaucoma (CA II and XII) or cancer (CA IX). Several low nanomolar inhibitors targeting these CAs were detected. X-ray crystal structure of hCA II adduct with morpholine dithiocarbamate evidenced the inhibition mechanism of these compounds, which coordinate to the metal ion through a sulfur atom from the dithiocarbamate zinc-binding function. Some dithiocarbamates showed effective intraocular pressure lowering activity in an animal model of glucoma. PMID:22276570

  13. Macromolecular conformation in solution. Study of carbonic anhydrase by the positron annihilation technique.

    PubMed Central

    Handel, E D; Graf, G; Glass, J C

    1980-01-01

    The structural features of carbonic anhydrase (carbonate hydro-lyase; EC 4.2.1.1) in aqueous solution were probed by the positron annihilation technique. The data obtained under varying conditions of temperature, pH, and enzyme concentration were interpreted in terms of the free volume model. The change of enzymic activity with temperature is accompanied by a change in free volume of the protein. Upon thermal denaturation an irreversible change in free volume of the molecule occurred. At low temperatures the protein-water interactions were investigated. These results are discussed in terms of current concepts of structure-function relationships in proteins. This study shows the sensitivity of the positron annihilation method toward the structure of proteins related to their overall conformation and to the nature of bound water. PMID:6789901

  14. Immunolocalization of carbonic anhydrase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in developing seeds of Medicago sativa.

    PubMed

    Aivalakis, Georgios; Dimou, Maria; Flemetakis, Emmanouil; Plati, Fotini; Katinakis, Panagiotis; Drossopoulos, J B

    2004-03-01

    To investigate the role of carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) during Medicago sativa seed development, the distribution of both proteins was examined using an immunohistological approach. Both enzymes are co-localized in most ovular and embryonic tissues. In early stages of seed development, both proteins were abundant in embryo and integuments, while at subsequent stages both proteins are accumulated in endosperm, nucellus and integuments. At late stages of seed development when both endosperm and nucellus are degraded, significant accumulation of both proteins was observed in the embryo proper. Chlorophyll was found to accumulate in embryos after the heart stage and reached a maximum at mature stage. It is suggested that CA and PEPC play a role in respiratory carbon dioxide refixation while generating malate to support amino acid and/or fatty acids biosynthesis. PMID:15051041

  15. Chapter 13: Carbonic Anhydrase IX as an Imaging and Therapeutic Target for Tumors and Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Tafreshi, Narges K.; Lloyd, Mark C.; Bui, Marilyn M.; Gillies, Robert J.; Morse, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) which is a zinc containing metalloprotein, efficiently catalyzes the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide. It is constitutively up-regulated in several cancer types and has an important role in tumor progression, acidification and metastasis. High expression of CAIX generally correlates with poor prognosis and is related to a decrease in the disease-free interval following successful therapy. Therefore, it is considered as a prognostic indicator in oncology. In this review, we describe CAIX regulation and its role in tumor hypoxia, acidification and metastasis. In addition, the molecular imaging of CAIX and its potential for use in cancer detection, diagnosis, staging, and for use in following therapy response is discussed. Both antibodies and small molecular weight compounds have been used for targeted imaging of CAIX expression. The use of CAIX expression as an attractive and promising candidate marker for systemic anticancer therapy is also discussed. PMID:24146382

  16. Carbonic anhydrases, EPF2 and a novel protease mediate CO2 control of stomatal development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engineer, Cawas B.; Ghassemian, Majid; Anderson, Jeffrey C.; Peck, Scott C.; Hu, Honghong; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2014-09-01

    Environmental stimuli, including elevated carbon dioxide levels, regulate stomatal development; however, the key mechanisms mediating the perception and relay of the CO2 signal to the stomatal development machinery remain elusive. To adapt CO2 intake to water loss, plants regulate the development of stomatal gas exchange pores in the aerial epidermis. A diverse range of plant species show a decrease in stomatal density in response to the continuing rise in atmospheric CO2 (ref. 4). To date, one mutant that exhibits deregulation of this CO2-controlled stomatal development response, hic (which is defective in cell-wall wax biosynthesis, ref. 5), has been identified. Here we show that recently isolated Arabidopsis thaliana β-carbonic anhydrase double mutants (ca1 ca4) exhibit an inversion in their response to elevated CO2, showing increased stomatal development at elevated CO2 levels. We characterized the mechanisms mediating this response and identified an extracellular signalling pathway involved in the regulation of CO2-controlled stomatal development by carbonic anhydrases. RNA-seq analyses of transcripts show that the extracellular pro-peptide-encoding gene EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR 2 (EPF2), but not EPF1 (ref. 9), is induced in wild-type leaves but not in ca1 ca4 mutant leaves at elevated CO2 levels. Moreover, EPF2 is essential for CO2 control of stomatal development. Using cell-wall proteomic analyses and CO2-dependent transcriptomic analyses, we identified a novel CO2-induced extracellular protease, CRSP (CO2 RESPONSE SECRETED PROTEASE), as a mediator of CO2-controlled stomatal development. Our results identify mechanisms and genes that function in the repression of stomatal development in leaves during atmospheric CO2 elevation, including the carbonic-anhydrase-encoding genes CA1 and CA4 and the secreted protease CRSP, which cleaves the pro-peptide EPF2, in turn repressing stomatal development. Elucidation of these mechanisms advances the understanding of

  17. Recognition and binding of a helix-loop-helix peptide to carbonic anhydrase occurs via partly folded intermediate structures.

    PubMed

    Lignell, Martin; Becker, Hans-Christian

    2010-02-01

    We have studied the association of a helix-loop-helix peptide scaffold carrying a benzenesulfonamide ligand to carbonic anhydrase using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The helix-loop-helix peptide, developed for biosensing applications, is labeled with the fluorescent probe dansyl, which serves as a polarity-sensitive reporter of the binding event. Using maximum entropy analysis of the fluorescence lifetime of dansyl at 1:1 stoichiometry reveals three characteristic fluorescence lifetime groups, interpreted as differently interacting peptide/protein structures. We characterize these peptide/protein complexes as mostly bound but unfolded, bound and partly folded, and strongly bound and folded. Furthermore, analysis of the fluorescence anisotropy decay resulted in three different dansyl rotational correlation times, namely 0.18, 1.2, and 23 ns. Using the amplitudes of these times, we can correlate the lifetime groups with the corresponding fluorescence anisotropy component. The 23-ns rotational correlation time, which appears with the same amplitude as a 17-ns fluorescence lifetime, shows that the dansyl fluorophore follows the rotational diffusion of carbonic anhydrase when it is a part of the folded peptide/protein complex. A partly folded and partly hydrated interfacial structure is manifested in an 8-ns dansyl fluorescence lifetime and a 1.2-ns rotational correlation time. This structure, we believe, is similar to a molten-globule-like interfacial structure, which allows segmental movement and has a higher degree of solvent exposure of dansyl. Indirect excitation of dansyl on the helix-loop-helix peptide through Förster energy transfer from one or several tryptophans in the carbonic anhydrase shows that the helix-loop-helix scaffold binds to a tryptophan-rich domain of the carbonic anhydrase. We conclude that binding of the peptide to carbonic anhydrase involves a transition from a disordered to an ordered structure of the helix

  18. Carbonic anhydrase: a key regulatory and detoxifying enzyme for Karst plants.

    PubMed

    Müller, Werner E G; Qiang, Li; Schröder, Heinz C; Hönig, Natalie; Yuan, Daoxian; Grebenjuk, Vlad A; Mussino, Francesca; Giovine, Marco; Wang, Xiaohong

    2014-01-01

    Karstification is a rapid process during which calcidic stones/limestones undergo dissolution with the consequence of a desertification of karst regions. A slow-down of those dissolution processes of Ca-carbonate can be approached by a reforestation program using karst-resistant plants that can resist alkaline pH and higher bicarbonate (HCO₃⁻) concentrations in the soil. Carbonic anhydrases (CA) are enzymes that mediate a rapid and reversible interconversion of CO₂ and HCO₃⁻. In the present study, the steady-state expression of a CA gene, encoding for the plant carbonic anhydrase from the parsley Petroselinum crispum, is monitored. The studies were primarily been performed during germination of the seeds up to the 12/14-day-old embryos. The CA cDNA was cloned. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis revealed that the gene expression level of the P. crispum CA is strongly and significantly affected at more alkaline pH in the growth medium (pH 8.3). This abolishing effect is counteracted both by addition of HCO₃⁻ and by addition of polyphosphate (polyP) to the culture medium. In response to polyP, the increased pH in the vacuoles of the growing plants is normalized. The effect of polyP let us to propose that this polymer acts as a buffer system that facilitates the adjustment of the pH in the cytoplasm. In addition, it is proposed that polyP has the potential to act, especially in the karst, as a fertilizer that allows the karstic plants to cope with the adverse pH and HCO₃⁻ condition in the soil. PMID:24385198

  19. Carbonic Anhydrases in Cnidarians: Novel Perspectives from the Octocorallian Corallium rubrum

    PubMed Central

    Le Goff, Carine; Ganot, Philippe; Zoccola, Didier; Caminiti-Segonds, Natacha; Allemand, Denis; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Although the ability to elaborate calcium carbonate biominerals was apparently gained independently during animal evolution, members of the alpha carbonic anhydrases (α-CAs) family, which catalyze the interconversion of CO2 into HCO3-, are involved in the biomineralization process across metazoans. In the Mediterranean red coral Corallium rubrum, inhibition studies suggest an essential role of CAs in the synthesis of two biominerals produced in this octocoral, the axial skeleton and the sclerites. Hitherto no molecular characterization of these enzymes was available. In the present study we determined the complete set of α-CAs in C. rubrum by data mining the genome and transcriptome, and measured their differential gene expression between calcifying and non-calcifying tissues. We identified six isozymes (CruCA1-6), one cytosolic and five secreted/membrane-bound among which one lacked two of the three zinc-binding histidines and was so referred to as a carbonic anhydrase related protein (CARP). One secreted isozyme (CruCA4) showed specific expression both by qPCR and western-blot in the calcifying tissues, suggesting its involvement in biomineralization. Moreover, phylogenetic analyses of α-CAs, identified in six representative cnidarians with complete genome, support an independent recruitment of α-CAs for biomineralization within anthozoans. Finally, characterization of cnidarian CARPs highlighted two families: the monophyletic cytosolic CARPs, and the polyphyletic secreted CARPs harboring a cnidarian specific cysteine disulfide bridge. Alignment of the cytosolic CARPs revealed an evolutionary conserved R-H-Q motif in place of the characteristic zinc-binding H-H-H necessary for the catalytic function of α-CAs. PMID:27513959

  20. Carbonic Anhydrases in Cnidarians: Novel Perspectives from the Octocorallian Corallium rubrum.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, Carine; Ganot, Philippe; Zoccola, Didier; Caminiti-Segonds, Natacha; Allemand, Denis; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Although the ability to elaborate calcium carbonate biominerals was apparently gained independently during animal evolution, members of the alpha carbonic anhydrases (α-CAs) family, which catalyze the interconversion of CO2 into HCO3-, are involved in the biomineralization process across metazoans. In the Mediterranean red coral Corallium rubrum, inhibition studies suggest an essential role of CAs in the synthesis of two biominerals produced in this octocoral, the axial skeleton and the sclerites. Hitherto no molecular characterization of these enzymes was available. In the present study we determined the complete set of α-CAs in C. rubrum by data mining the genome and transcriptome, and measured their differential gene expression between calcifying and non-calcifying tissues. We identified six isozymes (CruCA1-6), one cytosolic and five secreted/membrane-bound among which one lacked two of the three zinc-binding histidines and was so referred to as a carbonic anhydrase related protein (CARP). One secreted isozyme (CruCA4) showed specific expression both by qPCR and western-blot in the calcifying tissues, suggesting its involvement in biomineralization. Moreover, phylogenetic analyses of α-CAs, identified in six representative cnidarians with complete genome, support an independent recruitment of α-CAs for biomineralization within anthozoans. Finally, characterization of cnidarian CARPs highlighted two families: the monophyletic cytosolic CARPs, and the polyphyletic secreted CARPs harboring a cnidarian specific cysteine disulfide bridge. Alignment of the cytosolic CARPs revealed an evolutionary conserved R-H-Q motif in place of the characteristic zinc-binding H-H-H necessary for the catalytic function of α-CAs. PMID:27513959

  1. Saccharin sulfonamides as inhibitors of carbonic anhydrases I, II, VII, XII, and XIII.

    PubMed

    Morkūnaitė, Vaida; Baranauskienė, Lina; Zubrienė, Asta; Kairys, Visvaldas; Ivanova, Jekaterina; Trapencieris, Pēteris; Matulis, Daumantas

    2014-01-01

    A series of modified saccharin sulfonamides have been designed as carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitors and synthesized. Their binding to CA isoforms I, II, VII, XII, and XIII was measured by the fluorescent thermal shift assay (FTSA) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Saccharin bound the CAs weakly, exhibiting the affinities of 1-10 mM for four CAs except CA I where binding could not be detected. Several sulfonamide-bearing saccharines exhibited strong affinities of 1-10 nM towards particular CA isoforms. The functional group binding Gibbs free energy additivity maps are presented which may provide insights into the design of compounds with increased affinity towards selected CAs. PMID:25276805

  2. Design of [(2-pyrimidinylthio)acetyl]benzenesulfonamides as inhibitors of human carbonic anhydrases.

    PubMed

    Čapkauskaitė, Edita; Zubrienė, Asta; Baranauskienė, Lina; Tamulaitienė, Giedrė; Manakova, Elena; Kairys, Visvaldas; Gražulis, Saulius; Tumkevičius, Sigitas; Matulis, Daumantas

    2012-05-01

    A series of [(2-pyrimidinylthio)acetyl]benzenesulfonamides were designed and synthesized. Their binding affinities as inhibitors of several recombinant human carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozymes were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and thermal shift assay (TSA). A group of compounds containing a chlorine atom in the benzenesulfonamide ring were found to exhibit higher selectivity but lower binding affinity toward tested CAs. The crystal structures of selected compounds in complex with CA II were determined to atomic resolution. Docking studies were performed to compare the binding modes of experimentally determined crystallographic structures with computational prediction of the pyrimidine derivative binding to CA II. Several compounds bound to select CAs with single-digit nanomolar affinities and could be used as leads for inhibitor development toward a select CA isozyme. PMID:22440859

  3. Saccharin Sulfonamides as Inhibitors of Carbonic Anhydrases I, II, VII, XII, and XIII

    PubMed Central

    Morkūnaitė, Vaida; Baranauskienė, Lina; Zubrienė, Asta; Trapencieris, Pēteris

    2014-01-01

    A series of modified saccharin sulfonamides have been designed as carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitors and synthesized. Their binding to CA isoforms I, II, VII, XII, and XIII was measured by the fluorescent thermal shift assay (FTSA) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Saccharin bound the CAs weakly, exhibiting the affinities of 1–10 mM for four CAs except CA I where binding could not be detected. Several sulfonamide-bearing saccharines exhibited strong affinities of 1–10 nM towards particular CA isoforms. The functional group binding Gibbs free energy additivity maps are presented which may provide insights into the design of compounds with increased affinity towards selected CAs. PMID:25276805

  4. Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors. Part 541: Metal Complexes of Heterocyclic Sulfonamides: A New Class of Antiglaucoma Agents

    PubMed Central

    Scozzafava, Andrea; Jitianu, Andrei

    1997-01-01

    Metal complexes of heterocyclic sulfonamides possessing carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitory properties were recently shown to be useful as intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering agents in experimental animals, and might be developed as a novel class of antiglaucoma drugs. Here we report the synthesis of a heterocyclic sulfonamide CA inhibitor and of the metal complexes containing main group metal ions, such as Be(II), Mg(II), Al(III), Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) and the new sulfonamide as well as 5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-sulfonamide as ligands. The new complexes were characterized by standard physico-chemical procedures, and assayed as inhibitors of three CA isozymes, CA I, II and IV. Some of them (but not the parent sulfonamides) strongly lowered IOP in rabbits when administered as a 2% solution into the eye. PMID:18475811

  5. Poly(amidoamine) Dendrimers with Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitory Activity and Antiglaucoma Action.

    PubMed

    Carta, Fabrizio; Osman, Sameh M; Vullo, Daniela; Gullotto, Antonella; Winum, Jean-Yves; AlOthman, Zeid; Masini, Emanuela; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-05-14

    Four generations of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers decorated with benzenesulfonamide moieties were prepared by derivatizing the amino groups of the dendrimer with 4-carboxy-benzenesulfonamide functionalities. Compounds incorporating 4, 8, 16, and 32 sulfonamide moieties were thus obtained, which showed an increasing carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitory action with the increase of the number of sulfamoyl groups in the dendrimer. Best inhibitory activity (in the low nanomolar-subnanomolar range) was observed for isoforms CA II and XII, involved among others in glaucoma. In an animal model of this disease, the chronic administration of such dendrimers for 5 days led to a much more efficient drop of intraocular pressure compared to the standard drug dorzolamide. PMID:25849626

  6. Furazan and furoxan sulfonamides are strong α-carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and potential antiglaucoma agents.

    PubMed

    Chegaev, Konstantin; Lazzarato, Loretta; Tamboli, Yasinalli; Boschi, Donatella; Blangetti, Marco; Scozzafava, Andrea; Carta, Fabrizio; Masini, Emanuela; Fruttero, Roberta; Supuran, Claudiu T; Gasco, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    A series of furazan and furoxan sulfonamides were prepared and studied for their ability to inhibit human carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoforms hCA I, hCA II, hCA IX, and hCA XII. The simple methyl substituted products 3-5 were potent inhibitors. Differing structural modifications of these leads had differing effects on potency and selectivity. In particular, products in which the sulfonamide group is separated from the hetero ring by a phenylene bridge retained high potency only on the hCA XII isoform. The sulfonamides 3-5 exerted intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering effects in vivo in hypertensive rabbits more efficiently than dorzolamide. Some other products (39-42), although less effective in vitro hCA II/XII inhibitors, also effectively lowered IOP in two different animal models of glaucoma. PMID:25022971

  7. Probing the Surface of Human Carbonic Anhydrase for Clues towards the Design of Isoform Specific Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Pinard, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    The alpha carbonic anhydrases (α-CAs) are a group of structurally related zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of CO2 to HCO3−. Humans have 15 different α-CAs with numerous physiological roles and expression patterns. Of these, 12 are catalytically active, and abnormal expression and activities are linked with various diseases, including glaucoma and cancer. Hence there is a need for CA isoform specific inhibitors to avoid off-target CA inhibition, but due to the high amino acid conservation of the active site and surrounding regions between each enzyme, this has proven difficult. However, residues towards the exit of the active site are variable and can be exploited to design isoform selective inhibitors. Here we discuss and characterize this region of “selective drug targetability” and how these observations can be utilized to develop isoform selective CA inhibitors. PMID:25811028

  8. Dithiocarbamates strongly inhibit the β-class carbonic anhydrases from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Maresca, Alfonso; Carta, Fabrizio; Vullo, Daniela; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2013-04-01

    A series of N-mono- and N,N-disubstituted dithiocarbamates have been investigated as inhibitors of two β-carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) from the bacterial pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, mtCA 1 (Rv1284) and mtCA 3 (Rv3273). Both enzymes were inhibited with efficacies between the subnanomolar to the micromolar one, depending on the substitution pattern at the nitrogen atom from the dithiocarbamate zinc-binding group. Aryl, arylalkyl-, heterocyclic as well as aliphatic and amino acyl such moieties led to potent mtCA 1 and 3 inhibitors in both the N-mono- and N,N-disubstituted dithiocarbamate series. This new class of β-CA inhibitors may have the potential for developing antimycobacterial agents with a diverse mechanism of action compared to the clinically used drugs for which many strains exhibit multi-drug/extensive multi-drug resistance. PMID:22145736

  9. The Complex Relationship between Metals and Carbonic Anhydrase: New Insights and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lionetto, Maria Giulia; Caricato, Roberto; Giordano, Maria Elena; Schettino, Trifone

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase is a ubiquitous metalloenzyme, which catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO2 to HCO3− and H+. Metals play a key role in the bioactivity of this metalloenzyme, although their relationships with CA have not been completely clarified to date. The aim of this review is to explore the complexity and multi-aspect nature of these relationships, since metals can be cofactors of CA, but also inhibitors of CA activity and modulators of CA expression. Moreover, this work analyzes new insights and perspectives that allow translating new advances in basic science on the interaction between CA and metals to applications in several fields of research, ranging from biotechnology to environmental sciences. PMID:26797606

  10. Rational engineering of a mesohalophilic carbonic anhydrase to an extreme halotolerant biocatalyst

    PubMed Central

    Warden, Andrew C.; Williams, Michelle; Peat, Thomas S.; Seabrook, Shane A.; Newman, Janet; Dojchinov, Greg; Haritos, Victoria S.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes expressed by highly salt-tolerant organisms show many modifications compared with salt-affected counterparts including biased amino acid and lower α-helix content, lower solvent accessibility and negative surface charge. Here, we show that halotolerance can be generated in an enzyme solely by modifying surface residues. Rational design of carbonic anhydrase II is undertaken in three stages replacing 18 residues in total, crystal structures confirm changes are confined to surface residues. Catalytic activities and thermal unfolding temperatures of the designed enzymes increase at high salt concentrations demonstrating their shift to halotolerance, whereas the opposite response is found in the wild-type enzyme. Molecular dynamics calculations reveal a key role for sodium ions in increasing halotolerant enzyme stability largely through interactions with the highly ordered first Na+ hydration shell. For the first time, an approach to generate extreme halotolerance, a trait with broad application in industrial biocatalysis, in a wild-type enzyme is demonstrated. PMID:26687908

  11. Heavy metal ion inhibition studies of human, sheep and fish α-carbonic anhydrases.

    PubMed

    Demirdağ, Ramazan; Yerlikaya, Emrah; Şentürk, Murat; Küfrevioğlu, Ö İrfan; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2013-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) were purified from sheep kidney (sCA IV), from the liver of the teleost fish Dicentrarchus labrax (dCA) and from human erythrocytes (hCA I and hCA II). The purification procedure consisted of a single step affinity chromatography on Sepharose 4B-tyrosine-sulfanilamide. The kinetic parameters of these enzymes were determined for their esterase activity with 4-nitrophenyl acetate as substrate. The following metal ions, Pb(2+), Co(2+), Hg(2+), Cd(2+), Zn(2+), Se(2+), Cu(2+), Al(3+) and Mn(3+) showed inhibitory effects on these enzymes. The tested metal ions inhibited these CAs competitively in the low milimolar/submillimolar range. The susceptibility to various cations inhibitors differs significantly between these vertebrate α-CAs and is probably due to their binding to His64 or the histidine cluster. PMID:22145795

  12. Coordination contributions to protein stability in metal-substituted carbonic anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Lisi, George P; Hughes, Russell P; Wilcox, Dean E

    2016-09-01

    Contributions of the active site metal to the stability of carbonic anhydrase (CA) were quantified by differential scanning calorimetry and complementary unfolding measurements of CA substituted with Co(2+), Cd(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+) and Mn(2+). The metal ions stabilize the protein to different extent, with the highest stability provided by the native Zn(2+). This additional stability does not correlate with the enthalpy of the three metal-imidazole (His) bonds at the active site or other properties of the metal ions (charge density, hydration enthalpy). However, DFT calculations reveal an energetic penalty associated with metal coordination at the active site, and the magnitude of this penalty correlates inversely with metal contributions to the stability of the protein. While the affinity of CA for metal ions generally reflects the Irving-Williams series, the additional thermal stability provided by metal ions is modulated by the rigid His3 coordination that is imposed at the protein site. PMID:27350155

  13. Brain but not retinal glial cells have carbonic anhydrase activity in the honeybee drone.

    PubMed

    Walz, B

    1988-02-15

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity was localized histochemically in the retina and brain of the honeybee drone. A positive reaction that could be inhibited with 10(-5) M acetazolamide was found only in brain glial cells such as those in the lamina and medulla of the optic lobes. In the retina, neither the photoreceptors nor the pigmented glial cells showed CA activity. Hence, there is a marked difference between retinal and brain glial cells with respect to those functions thought to be performed by CA. This study extends the range of tissues in which CA has been shown to be localized in glial cells, but the absence of CA from the retina will impose constraints on a general explanation of the role of CA in nervous tissue. PMID:3129680

  14. Pyridinium derivatives of histamine are potent activators of cytosolic carbonic anhydrase isoforms I, II and VII.

    PubMed

    Dave, Khyati; Scozzafava, Andrea; Vullo, Daniela; Supuran, Claudiu T; Ilies, Marc A

    2011-04-21

    A series of positively-charged derivatives has been prepared by reaction of histamine with substituted pyrylium salts. These pyridinium histamine derivatives were investigated as activators of the zinc enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) and more precisely the human isoforms hCA I, II and VII. Activities from the subnanomolar to the micromolar range were detected for these compounds as activators of the three isoforms, confirming the validity of current and previous designs. The substitution pattern at the pyridinium ring was the main factor influencing activity, the three isoforms showing different structural requirements for good activity, related with the number of pyridinium substituting groups and their nature, among various alkyl, phenyl and para-substituted styryl moieties. We were successful in identifying nanomolar potent and selective activators for each isozyme and also activators with a relatively good activity against all isozymes tested--valuable lead compounds for physiology and pathology studies involving these isozymes. PMID:21369613

  15. Carbonic anhydrase and urease: an investigation in vitro on the possibility of a synergic action.

    PubMed

    Botré, C; Botré, F

    1989-07-27

    The indirect interactions between the carbonic anhydrase (CA) and urease (UR) are investigated in the present work using rate determinations detected by combined potentiometric measurements. It is shown that, in accord with the mass-action law for the two enzyme catalyzed reactions, the two enzymes assume a synergic pattern: the increase in the rate of removal of CO2 from the solution facilitated by CA increases the rate of production of NH3 consequent from urea dissociation. The experimental system which has been set up to monitor these interactions consists of a potentiometric apparatus to follow the gaseous exchanges of CO2 and NH3 which take place from a buffered solution containing both CA and UR. The results of the present work are consistent with, and add a further support to the finding of Dodgson and Forster, who first demonstrated in vivo the existence of an indirect linkage between urea production and CA catalytic activity. PMID:2502184

  16. Carbonic Anhydrase Interaction With Lipothioars Enites: A Novel Class of Isozymes I and II Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Timotheatou, Despina; Ioannou, Panayiotis V.; Scozzafava, Andrea; Briganti, Fabrizio

    1996-01-01

    The interaction of carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozymes I and II with a series of As(III) derivatives, dialkyl and diaryl rac-2,3-dimyristoyloxypropyldithioarsonites, was investigated kinetically and spectrophotometrically, utilizing the native and Co(II)-substituted enzymes. Depending on the substitution pattern at the -As(SR)2 moiety of the investigated derivatives, inactive compounds were found for R = phenyl or naphthyl, and active ones for derivatives containing carboxyl groups (R = CH2COOH, cysteinyl and glutathionyl). Together with the arsonolipids previously investigated, the active compounds of this series - the "lipothioarsenites"- constitute a novel class of CA inhibitors that bind to the metal ion within the enzyme active site, as proved by changes in the electronic spectra of adducts of such inhibitors with Co(II)CA. PMID:18475756

  17. Rational engineering of a mesohalophilic carbonic anhydrase to an extreme halotolerant biocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Warden, Andrew C; Williams, Michelle; Peat, Thomas S; Seabrook, Shane A; Newman, Janet; Dojchinov, Greg; Haritos, Victoria S

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes expressed by highly salt-tolerant organisms show many modifications compared with salt-affected counterparts including biased amino acid and lower α-helix content, lower solvent accessibility and negative surface charge. Here, we show that halotolerance can be generated in an enzyme solely by modifying surface residues. Rational design of carbonic anhydrase II is undertaken in three stages replacing 18 residues in total, crystal structures confirm changes are confined to surface residues. Catalytic activities and thermal unfolding temperatures of the designed enzymes increase at high salt concentrations demonstrating their shift to halotolerance, whereas the opposite response is found in the wild-type enzyme. Molecular dynamics calculations reveal a key role for sodium ions in increasing halotolerant enzyme stability largely through interactions with the highly ordered first Na(+) hydration shell. For the first time, an approach to generate extreme halotolerance, a trait with broad application in industrial biocatalysis, in a wild-type enzyme is demonstrated. PMID:26687908

  18. Effect of Carbonic Anhydrase II in Molten Globule State on Physical Properties of Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine Liposome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Hiroko; Tanaka, Michiko; Imai, Kenichiro; Sonoyama, Masashi; Mitaku, Shigeki

    2001-05-01

    Ultrasonic relaxation measurement was employed for confirmation of the interaction between dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membrane and a soluble protein, carbonic anhydrase II (CA II). The enhancement of the fluctuation of DMPC membrane structure was observed in the presence of CA II under acidic condition, pH 3.6-4, indicating the interaction between DMPC and CA II@. The pyrene fluorescence spectrum of CA II solution clearly showed that this protein adopted an unfolding intermediate called the molten globule state under the low pH condition, in which CA II interacted with DMPC@. However, CA II in the molten globule state did not cause membrane lysis in contrast to the high lytic activity of α-lactalbumin on DMPC liposomes.

  19. Human secreted carbonic anhydrase: cDNA cloning, nucleotide sequence, and hybridization histochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Aldred, P.; Fu, Ping; Barrett, G.; Penschow, J.D.; Wright, R.D.; Coghlan, J.P.; Fernley, R.T. )

    1991-01-01

    Complementary DNA clones coding for the human secreted carbonic anhydrase isozyme (CAVI) have been isolated and their nucleotide sequences determined. These clones identify a 1.45-kb mRNA that is present in high levels in parotid submandibular salivary glands but absent in other tissues such as the sublingual gland, kidney, liver, and prostate gland. Hybridization histochemistry of human salivary glands shows mRNA for CA VI located in the acinar cells of these glands. The cDNA clones encode a protein of 308 amino acids that includes a 17 amino acid leader sequence typical of secreted proteins. The mature protein has 291 amino acids compared to 259 or 260 for the cytoplasmic isozymes, with most of the extra amino acids present as a carboxyl terminal extension. In comparison, sheep CA VI has a 45 amino acid extension. Overall the human CA VI protein has a sequence identity of 35 {percent} with human CA II, while residues involved in the active site of the enzymes have been conserved. The human and sheep secreted carbonic anhydrases have a sequence identity of 72 {percent}. This includes the two cysteine residues that are known to be involved in an intramolecular disulfide bond in the sheep CA VI. The enzyme is known to be glycosylated and three potential N-glycosylation sites (Asn-X-Thr/Ser) have been identified. Two of these are known to be glycosylated in sheep CA VI. Southern analysis of human DNA indicates that there is only one gene coding for CA VI.

  20. Carbonic anhydrase and acid base balance in relation to thermal stress in buffaloes ( Bubalus bubalis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, S. N.; Gangwar, P. C.

    1983-03-01

    The blood samples from fifteen normal lactating buffaloes were taken from December 15th 1978 to 31st August, 1979. Depending upon the climatic conditions, the whole period of study was divided into four seasons. The mean values of carbonic anhydrase (moles CO2/l/sec×10-5) were 3.08±0.26, 4.94±0.44, 5.23±0.35, 6.44±0.32 in pregnant and 4.87±0.27, 4.53±0.41, 4.74±0.45, 6.36±0.40 in non-pregnant animals during winter, spring, hot and dry and hot and humid seasons. Mean values of pO2 (mm Hg) were 31.26±1.41, 31.92±0.61, 35.90±0.59, 33.80 ±0.67 in pregnant and 31.89±0.44, 31.53±0.54, 35.52±0.69, 31.65±0.95 in non-pregnant buffaloes during winter, spring, hot and dry and hot and humid periods, respectively. There were highly significant (P< 0.01) differences between seasons with respect to pO2, pCO2, actual HCO3 and heamoglobin. However, PCV changed significantly (P<0.01) with the physiological status of the animal. Different correlation of biochemical parameters with climatic elements were discussed. Thus, the shifts in the levels of carbonic anhydrase, HCO3 and heamoglobin may prove to be a better tool/index for thermal stress in buffaloes.

  1. Carbonic anhydrase in Tectona grandis: kinetics, stability, isozyme analysis and relationship with photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Anita; Kumar, Pramod; Chawhaan, Pravin H; Singh, Sanjay; Ansari, S A

    2006-08-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC: 4.2.1.1) activity in teak (Tectona grandis L.f.) was studied to determine its characteristics, kinetics and isozyme patterns. We also investigated effects of leaf age, plant age and genotype on CA activity and gas exchange parameters. Carbonic anhydrase extracted from leaves in 12 mM veronal buffer, pH 7.8, had a K(m) for CO(2) of 15.20 mM and a V(max) of 35,448 U mg(-1) chlorophyll min(-1), which values declined by 50 and 70%, respectively, after 1 week of storage at 4 degrees C. A 15% native polyacrylamide gel revealed the absence of CA isozymes in teak, with only a single CA band of 45 kD molecular mass observed across 10 segregating half-sib families and groups of trees ranging in age from 10 to 25 years. Activity remained stable during the first month in storage at 0 degrees C, but gradually declined to 25% of the initial value after 1 year in storage. During the period of active growth (February-May), maximal CA activity was observed in fully expanded and illuminated leaves. Significant variation was observed in CA activity across 10 1-year-old half-sib families and 21 5-year-old half-sib families. There was a positive correlation between CA activity and photosynthetic rate in a population of 10-year-old trees (P < 0.005). Positive correlations between CA activity and photosynthetic rate were found in 10 of 21 5-year-old half-sib families (P < 0.005 to P < 0.05), which showed greater diversity in CA activity than in photosynthetic characteristics. Thus, CA may serve as a biochemical marker for photosynthetic capacity in teak genotypes. PMID:16651256

  2. Carbonic anhydrase-facilitated CO2 absorption with polyacrylamide buffering bead capture

    SciTech Connect

    Dilmore, Robert; Griffith, Craid; Liu, Zhu; Soong, Yee; Hedges, Sheila W.; Koepsel, Richard; Ataai, M

    2009-07-01

    A novel CO2 separation concept is described wherein the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) is used to increase the overall rate Of CO2 absorption after which hydrated CO2 reacts with regenerable amine-bearing polyacrylamide buffering beads (PABB). Following saturation of the material's immobilized tertiary amines, CA-bearing carrier water is separated and recycled to the absorption stage while CO2-loaded material is thermally regenerated. Process application of this concept would involve operation of two or more columns in parallel with thermal regeneration with low-pressure steam taking place after the capacity of a column of amine-bearing polymeric material was exceeded. PABB CO2- bearing capacity was evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) for beads of three acrylamido buffering monomer ingredient concentrations: 0 mol/kg bead, 0.857 mol/kg bead, and 2 mol/kg bead. TGA results demonstrate that CO2- bearing capacity increases with increasing PABB buffering concentration and that up to 78% of the theoretical CO2- bearing capacity was realized in prepared PABB samples (0.857 mol/kg recipe). The highest observed CO2-bearing capacity of PABB was 1.37 mol of CO2 per kg dry bead. TGA was also used to assess the regenerability Of CO2-loaded PABB. Preliminary results suggest that CO2 is partially driven from PABB samples at temperatures as low as 55 degrees C, with complete regeneration occurring at 100 degrees C. Other physical characteristics of PABB are discussed. In addition, the effectiveness of bovine carbonic anhydrase for the catalysis Of CO2 dissolution is evaluated. Potential benefits and drawbacks of the proposed process are discussed. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Analysis of the Binding Moiety Mediating the Interaction between Monocarboxylate Transporters and Carbonic Anhydrase II*

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Sina Ibne; Dietz, Steffen; Heidtmann, Hella; Boone, Christopher D.; McKenna, Robert; Deitmer, Joachim W.; Becker, Holger M.

    2015-01-01

    Proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) mediate the exchange of high energy metabolites like lactate between different cells and tissues. We have reported previously that carbonic anhydrase II augments transport activity of MCT1 and MCT4 by a noncatalytic mechanism, while leaving transport activity of MCT2 unaltered. In the present study, we combined electrophysiological measurements in Xenopus oocytes and pulldown experiments to analyze the direct interaction between carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) and MCT1, MCT2, and MCT4, respectively. Transport activity of MCT2-WT, which lacks a putative CAII-binding site, is not augmented by CAII. However, introduction of a CAII-binding site into the C terminus of MCT2 resulted in CAII-mediated facilitation of MCT2 transport activity. Interestingly, introduction of three glutamic acid residues alone was not sufficient to establish a direct interaction between MCT2 and CAII, but the cluster had to be arranged in a fashion that allowed access to the binding moiety in CAII. We further demonstrate that functional interaction between MCT4 and CAII requires direct binding of the enzyme to the acidic cluster 431EEE in the C terminus of MCT4 in a similar fashion as previously shown for binding of CAII to the cluster 489EEE in the C terminus of MCT1. In CAII, binding to MCT1 and MCT4 is mediated by a histidine residue at position 64. Taken together, our results suggest that facilitation of MCT transport activity by CAII requires direct binding between histidine 64 in CAII and a cluster of glutamic acid residues in the C terminus of the transporter that has to be positioned in surroundings that allow access to CAII. PMID:25561737

  4. Characterization of the Copper(II) Binding Sites in Human Carbonic Anhydrase II

    PubMed Central

    Nettles, Whitnee L.; Song, He; Farquhar, Erik R.; Fitzkee, Nicholas C.; Emerson, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Human carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a well-studied, robust, mononuclear Zn-containing metalloprotein that serves as an excellent biological ligand system to study the thermodynamics associated with metal ion coordination chemistry in aqueous solution. The apo-form of human carbonic anhydrase II (CA) binds two equivalents of copper(II) with high affinity. The Cu2+ ions bind independently forming two non-coupled type-II copper centers in CA (CuA and CuB). However, the location and coordination mode of the CuA site in solution is unclear, compared to the CuB site that has been well characterized. Using paramagnetic NMR techniques and X-ray absorption spectroscopy we have identified an N-terminal Cu2+ binding location and collected information on the coordination mode of the CuA site in CA, which is consistent with a four to five coordinate N-terminal Cu2+ binding site reminiscent to a number of N-terminal copper(II) binding sites including the copper(II)-ATCUN and copper(II)-beta-amyloid complexes. Additionally, we report a more detailed analysis of the thermodynamics associated with copper(II) binding to CA. Although we are still unable to fully deconvolute Cu2+ binding data to the high-affinity CuA site, we have derived pH- and buffer-independent values for the thermodynamics parameters K and ΔH associated with Cu2+ binding to the CuB site of CA to be 2 × 109 and −17.4 kcal/mol, respectively. PMID:26010488

  5. Converting human carbonic anhydrase II into a benzoate ester hydrolase through rational redesign.

    PubMed

    Höst, Gunnar E; Jonsson, Bengt-Harald

    2008-05-01

    Enzymes capable of benzoate ester hydrolysis have several potential medical and industrial applications. A variant of human carbonic anhydrase II (HCAII) was constructed, by rational design, that is capable of hydrolysing para-nitrophenyl benzoate (pNPBenzo) with an efficiency comparable to some naturally occurring esterases. The design was based on a previously developed strategy [G. Höst, L.G. Mårtensson, B.H. Jonsson, Redesign of human carbonic anhydrase II for increased esterase activity and specificity towards esters with long acyl chains, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1764 (2006) 1601-1606.], in which docking of a transition state analogue (TSA) to the active site of HCAII was used to predict mutations that would allow the reaction. A triple mutant, V121A/V143A/T200A, was thus constructed and shown to hydrolyze pNPBenzo with k(cat)/K(M)=625 (+/- 38) M(-1) s(-1). It is highly active with other ester substrates as well, and hydrolyzes para-nitrophenyl acetate with k(cat)/K(M)=101,700 (+/- 4800) M(-1) s(-1), which is the highest esterase efficiency so far for any CA variant. A parent mutant (V121A/V143A) has measurable K(M) values for para-nitrophenyl butyrate (pNPB) and valerate (pNPV), but for V121A/V143A/T200A no K(M) could be determined, showing that the additional T200A mutation has caused a decreased substrate binding. However, k(cat)/K(M) is higher with both substrates for the triple mutant, indicating that binding energy has been diverted from substrate binding to transition state stabilization. PMID:18346474

  6. Carbonic anhydrase enzyme as a potential therapeutic target for experimental trichinellosis.

    PubMed

    Saad, Abeer E; Ashour, Dalia S; Abou Rayia, Dina M; Bedeer, Asmaa E

    2016-06-01

    Trichinellosis is a globally distributed helminthic infection. There is a considerable interest in developing new anti-helminthic drugs affecting all the developmental stages of Trichinella. Acetazolamide (carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitor) involves a novel mechanism of action by inhibiting such an essential enzyme for parasite metabolism. This work aimed to study the effect of acetazolamide against different stages of T. spiralis in experimental animals. Mice were divided into three groups: group I: infected and treated with acetazolamide on day 2 post infection (P.I.), group II: infected and treated with acetazolamide on day 12 P.I., and group III: infected non-treated. From each group, small intestine and muscles were removed for histopathological and immunohistochemical studies. Also, total adult and muscle larval count were estimated. We found that acetazolamide was effective in reduction of both adult and muscle larval counts. When given early, the effect was more pronounced on the adults (62.7 %). However, the efficacy of the drug against muscle larvae was increased when given late (63 %). Improvement of the intestinal histopathological changes was observed in all the treated groups. Degeneration of encysted larvae with minimal pathologic changes of infected skeletal muscle was observed in the treated groups. Expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 showed a statistically significant decrease in the intestinal and muscle tissues in all treated groups as compared to the control group. In conclusion, the present study revealed that acetazolamide, carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, could be a promising drug against both adults and larvae of T. spiralis. PMID:26979731

  7. Modulation of the initial mineralization process of SaOS-2 cells by carbonic anhydrase activators and polyphosphate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; Schröder, Heinz C; Schlossmacher, Ute; Neufurth, Meik; Feng, Qingling; Diehl-Seifert, Bärbel; Müller, Werner E G

    2014-05-01

    Ca-phosphate/hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals constitute the mineral matrix of vertebrate bones, while Ca-carbonate is the predominant mineral of many invertebrates, like mollusks. Recent results suggest that CaCO₃ is also synthesized during early bone formation. We demonstrate that carbonic anhydrase-driven CaCO₃ formation in vitro is activated by organic extracts from the demosponge Suberites domuncula as well as by quinolinic acid, one component isolated from these extracts. Further results revealed that the stimulatory effect of bicarbonate (HCO₃ (-)) ions on mineralization of osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cells is strongly enhanced if the cells are exposed to inorganic polyphosphate (polyP), a linear polymer of phosphate linked by energy-rich phosphodiester bonds. The effect of polyP, administered as polyP (Ca²⁺ salt), on HA formation was found to be amplified by addition of the carbonic anhydrase-activating sponge extract or quinolinic acid. Our results support the assumption that CaCO₃ deposits, acting as bio-seeds for Ca-carbonated phosphate formation, are formed as an intermediate during HA mineralization and that the carbonic anhydrase-mediated formation of those deposits is under a positive-negative feedback control by bone alkaline phosphatase-dependent polyP metabolism, offering new targets for therapy of bone diseases/defects. PMID:24374859

  8. A novel evolutionary lineage of carbonic anhydrase (epsilon class) is a component of the carboxysome shell.

    PubMed

    So, Anthony K-C; Espie, George S; Williams, Eric B; Shively, Jessup M; Heinhorst, Sabine; Cannon, Gordon C

    2004-02-01

    A significant portion of the total carbon fixed in the biosphere is attributed to the autotrophic metabolism of prokaryotes. In cyanobacteria and many chemolithoautotrophic bacteria, CO(2) fixation is catalyzed by ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), most if not all of which is packaged in protein microcompartments called carboxysomes. These structures play an integral role in a cellular CO(2)-concentrating mechanism and are essential components for autotrophic growth. Here we report that the carboxysomal shell protein, CsoS3, from Halothiobacillus neapolitanus is a novel carbonic anhydrase (epsilon-class CA) that has an evolutionary lineage distinct from those previously recognized in animals, plants, and other prokaryotes. Functional CAs encoded by csoS3 homologues were also identified in the cyanobacteria Prochlorococcus sp. and Synechococcus sp., which dominate the oligotrophic oceans and are major contributors to primary productivity. The location of the carboxysomal CA in the shell suggests that it could supply the active sites of RuBisCO in the carboxysome with the high concentrations of CO(2) necessary for optimal RuBisCO activity and efficient carbon fixation in these prokaryotes, which are important contributors to the global carbon cycle. PMID:14729686

  9. [Immobilization and characterization of carbonic anhydrase on the surface of hollow fiber membrane of polymethyl pentene].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinmei; Zhang, Dihua; Zhang, Jingxia

    2009-07-01

    We immobilized carbonic anhydrase (CA) onto the surface of membrane oxygenator of polymethyl pentene (PMP) to enhance the removal of carbon dioxide in blood by two steps. We first introduced hydroxyl groups onto PMP surface by water plasma treatment, and then coupled CA onto PMP surface by using cyanate bromide (CNBr) as a crosslinker. After plasma treatment, the contact angle with water and chemical composition of PMP surface were characterized by analysis system of surface contact angle and XPS. Using p-nitrophenyl acetate (p-NPA) as a substrate, the activity, concentration, storage stability and re-usability of immobilized CA on PMP hollow fibers were studied by ultraviolet spectrophotometer. The preliminary data showed that hydroxyl groups could be introduced on the surface of PMP by water plasma treatment, and CA with catalysis activity could be successfully introduced onto PMP surface in high immobilization efficiency. The activity of covalently immobilized CA increased with the increase of concentration of CNBr, and the maximum was 73% of the theoretical activity of CA spread on PMP surface in monolayer in studied range. Covalently immobilized CA showed higher reusability compared to physically adsorbed CA, and higher storage stability compared to free CA in solution at 37 degrees C. The method would be used potentially in the membrane oxygenator to improve the capacity of removal of carbon dioxide in blood in the future. PMID:19835148

  10. The role of carbonic anhydrase in C4 photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Studer, Anthony

    2015-10-01

    Current pressures on the global food supply have accelerated the urgency for a second green revolution using novel and sustainable approaches to increase crop yield and efficiency. This proposal outlines experiments to address fundamental questions regarding the biology of C4 photosynthesis, the method of carbon fixation utilized by the most productive food, feed and bioenergy crops. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) has been implicated in multiple cellular functions including nitrogen metabolism, water use efficiency, and photosynthesis. CA catalyzes the first dedicated step in C4 photosynthesis, the hydration of CO2 into bicarbonate, and is potentially rate limiting in C4 grasses. Using insertional mutagenesis, we have generated CA mutants in maize, and propose the characterization of these mutants using phenotypic, physiological, and transcriptomic profiling to assay the plant’s response to altered CA activity. In addition, florescent protein tagging experiments will be employed to study the subcellular localization of CA paralogs, providing critical data for modeling carbon fixation in C4 plants. Finally, I propose parallel experiments in Setaria viridis to explore its relevance as model C4 grass. Using a multifaceted approach, this proposal addresses important questions in basic biology, as well as the need for translation research in response to looming global food challenges.

  11. Role of Photosynthetic Reactions in the Activity of Carbonic Anhydrase in Synechococcus sp. (UTEX 2380) in the Light 1

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, Hart; Wynns, George Clifford; Tu, Chingkuang

    1988-01-01

    The role of the photosystems in the exchange of 18O between species of inorganic carbon and water was studied in suspensions of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. (UTEX 2380) using membrane-inlet mass spectrometry. This 18O exchange is caused by the hydration-dehydration cycle of CO2 and is catalyzed by carbonic anhydrase. We observed the complex 18O exchange kinetics including dark-light-dark transients in suspensions of whole cells and found these to be identical to the 18O exchange kinetics of physiologically fully active spheroplast preparations. There was no enhancement effect of inorganic nitrogen on inorganic carbon accumulation. Membrane preparations exhibited no uptake of inorganic carbon and very little carbonic anhydrase activity, although these membranes were photosynthetically fully competent. DCMU, the inhibitor of photosystem II, eliminated almost entirely the 18O exchange activity of whole cells in the light. But this effect of DCMU could be reversed by addition of the electron donor couple 3,6-diaminodurene/ascorbate, suggesting the involvement of photosystem I in the events leading to 18O exchange. Iodoacetamide, an inhibitor of CO2 fixation, enhanced the 18O exchange in whole cell suspensions and inhibited neither the uptake of inorganic carbon nor the dehydration of bicarbonate in the light. The proton carrier carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone and the inhibitors diethylstilbestrol and N,N′ -dicyclohexyl carbodiimide affecting the membrane potential, totally abolished 18O exchange in the light. From 18 O-labeled inorganic carbon experiments we conclude that one of the roles of photosystem I is to provide the active uptake of inorganic carbon into the cells, where carbonic anhydrase catalyzes the interconversion between CO2 and HCO3− resulting in the 18O exchange from inorganic carbon to water. PMID:16666052

  12. A gene homologous to beta-type carbonic anhydrase is essential for the growth of Corynebacterium glutamicum under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, S; Ohnishi, J; Hayashi, M; Ikeda, M

    2004-02-01

    Carbonic anhydrase catalyzes the interconversion of CO(2) and bicarbonate. We focused on this enzyme in the amino acid-producing organism Corynebacterium glutamicum in order to assess the availability of bicarbonate for carboxylation reactions essential to growth and for those required for L-lysine overproduction. A whole-genome sequence revealed two genes encoding putative beta-type and gamma-type carbonic anhydrases in C. glutamicum. These genes encode polypeptides containing zinc ligands strictly conserved in each type of carbonic anhydrase and were designated bca and gca, respectively. Internal deletion of the chromosomal bca gene resulted in a phenotype showing severely reduced growth under atmospheric conditions (0.04% CO(2)) on both complete and minimal media. The growth defect of the Delta bca strain was restored under elevated CO(2) conditions (5% CO(2)). Introduction of the red alga Porphyridium purpureum carbonic anhydrase gene ( pca) could compensate for the bca deletion, allowing normal growth under an atmospheric level of CO(2). In contrast, the Delta gca strain behaved identically to the wild-type strain with respect to growth, irrespective of the CO(2) conditions. Attempts to increase the dosage of bca, gca, and pca in the defined L-lysine-producing strain C. glutamicum AHD-2 led to no discernable effects on growth and production. Northern blot analysis indicated that the bca transcript in strain AHD-2 and another L-lysine producer, C. glutamicum B-6, was present at a much higher level than in the wild-type strain, particularly during exponential growth phases. These results indicate that: (1) the bca product is essential to achieving normal growth under ordinary atmospheric conditions, and this effect is most likely due to the bca product's ability to maintain favorable intracellular bicarbonate/CO(2) levels, and (2) the expression of bca is induced during exponential growth phases and also in the case of L-lysine overproduction, both of which are

  13. An overview of the alpha-, beta- and gamma-carbonic anhydrases from Bacteria: can bacterial carbonic anhydrases shed new light on evolution of bacteria?

    PubMed

    Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) are metalloenzymes which catalyze a simple but physiologically crucial reaction in all life Domains, the carbon dioxide hydration to bicarbonate and protons: CO2 + H2O ⇔ HCO3(-)+ H(+). These enzymes are involved in many physiologic processes, such as photosynthesis, respiration, CO2 transport, as well as metabolism of xenobiotics. Five different, genetically distinct CA families are known to date: the α-, β-, γ-, δ- and ζ-CAs. α-, β- and δ-CAs use Zn(II) ions at the active site, the γ-CAs are probably Fe(II) enzymes (but they are active also with bound Zn(II) or Co(II) ions), whereas the ζ-class uses Cd(II) or Zn(II) to perform the physiologic reaction catalysis. Bacteria encode for enzymes belonging to the α-, β-, and γ-CA classes. They contain zinc ion (Zn(2+)) in their active site, coordinated by three histidine residues and a water molecule/hydroxide ion (in the α and γ) or by two cysteine and one histidine residues (in the β class), with the fourth ligand being a water molecule/hydroxide ion. Here we propose that bacterial CAs can be used as markers for understanding the evolution and genetic variability of the Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We addressed several questions such as: (1) why are α-CAs present only in the genome of Gram-negative bacteria; (2) why are α-CAs not present in all Gram-negative bacteria; (3) why do Bacteria show an intricate pattern of CA gene expression; (4) what are the physiologic roles of such diverse CAs in these prokaryotes. We proposed possible answers to the previous questions. Moreover, we speculated on the evolution of the CA classes (α, β and γ) identified in the Gram-negative and -positive bacteria. Our main hypothesis is that from the ancestral Ur-CA, the γ-class arose first, followed by the β-class; the α-class CAs came last it is found only in the Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:24766661

  14. Effects of carbonyl sulfide (COS) and carbonic anhydrase on stomatal conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakir, D.; Stimler, K.; Berry, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    The potential use of COS as tracer of the gross, one-way, CO2 flux into plants is based on its co-diffusion with CO2 into leaves without outflux stimulated research on COS-CO2 interactions during leaf gas exchange. We carried out gas exchange measurements of COS and CO2 in 22 plant species representing deciduous and evergreen trees, grasses, and shrubs, under a range of light intensities and ambient COS concentrations, using mid IR laser spectroscopy. A narrow range in the normalized ratio of the net uptake rates of COS (As) and CO2 (Ac; As/Ac*[CO2]/[COS]) was observed, with a mean value of 1.61±0.26. These results reflect the dominance of stomatal conductance over both COS and CO2 uptake, imposing a relatively constant ratio between the two fluxes (except under low light conditions when CO2, but not COS, metabolism is light limited). A relatively constant ratio under common ambient conditions will facilitate the application of COS as a tracer of gross photosynthesis from leaf to global scales. However, its effect on stomatal conductance may require a special attention. Increasing COS concentrations between 250 and 2800 pmol mol-1 (enveloping atmospheric levels) seems to stimulate stomatal conductance. We examined the stimulation of conductance by COS in a range of species and show that there is a large variation with some species showing almost no response while others are highly responsive (up to doubling stomatal conductance). Using C3 and C4 plants with antisense lines abolishing carbonic anhydrase activity, we show that the activity of this enzyme is essential for both the uptake of COS and the enhancement of stomatal conductance by COS. Since carbonic anhydrase catalyzes the conversion of COS to CO2 and H2S it seems likely that the stomata are responding to H2S produced in the mesophyll. In all natural species examined the uptake of COS and CO2 were highly correlated, and there was no relationship between the sensitivity of stomata and the rate of COS uptake

  15. The Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitor Ethoxzolamide Inhibits the Mycobacterium tuberculosis PhoPR Regulon and Esx-1 Secretion and Attenuates Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Benjamin K.; Colvin, Christopher J.; Needle, David B.; Mba Medie, Felix; Champion, Patricia A. DiGiuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis must sense and adapt to host environmental cues to establish and maintain an infection. The two-component regulatory system PhoPR plays a central role in sensing and responding to acidic pH within the macrophage and is required for M. tuberculosis intracellular replication and growth in vivo. Therefore, the isolation of compounds that inhibit PhoPR-dependent adaptation may identify new antivirulence therapies to treat tuberculosis. Here, we report that the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor ethoxzolamide inhibits the PhoPR regulon and reduces pathogen virulence. We show that treatment of M. tuberculosis with ethoxzolamide recapitulates phoPR mutant phenotypes, including downregulation of the core PhoPR regulon, altered accumulation of virulence-associated lipids, and inhibition of Esx-1 protein secretion. Quantitative single-cell imaging of a PhoPR-dependent fluorescent reporter strain demonstrates that ethoxzolamide inhibits PhoPR-regulated genes in infected macrophages and mouse lungs. Moreover, ethoxzolamide reduces M. tuberculosis growth in both macrophages and infected mice. Ethoxzolamide inhibits M. tuberculosis carbonic anhydrase activity, supporting a previously unrecognized link between carbonic anhydrase activity and PhoPR signaling. We propose that ethoxzolamide may be pursued as a new class of antivirulence therapy that functions by modulating expression of the PhoPR regulon and Esx-1-dependent virulence. PMID:25987613

  16. The Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitor Ethoxzolamide Inhibits the Mycobacterium tuberculosis PhoPR Regulon and Esx-1 Secretion and Attenuates Virulence.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benjamin K; Colvin, Christopher J; Needle, David B; Mba Medie, Felix; Champion, Patricia A DiGiuseppe; Abramovitch, Robert B

    2015-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis must sense and adapt to host environmental cues to establish and maintain an infection. The two-component regulatory system PhoPR plays a central role in sensing and responding to acidic pH within the macrophage and is required for M. tuberculosis intracellular replication and growth in vivo. Therefore, the isolation of compounds that inhibit PhoPR-dependent adaptation may identify new antivirulence therapies to treat tuberculosis. Here, we report that the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor ethoxzolamide inhibits the PhoPR regulon and reduces pathogen virulence. We show that treatment of M. tuberculosis with ethoxzolamide recapitulates phoPR mutant phenotypes, including downregulation of the core PhoPR regulon, altered accumulation of virulence-associated lipids, and inhibition of Esx-1 protein secretion. Quantitative single-cell imaging of a PhoPR-dependent fluorescent reporter strain demonstrates that ethoxzolamide inhibits PhoPR-regulated genes in infected macrophages and mouse lungs. Moreover, ethoxzolamide reduces M. tuberculosis growth in both macrophages and infected mice. Ethoxzolamide inhibits M. tuberculosis carbonic anhydrase activity, supporting a previously unrecognized link between carbonic anhydrase activity and PhoPR signaling. We propose that ethoxzolamide may be pursued as a new class of antivirulence therapy that functions by modulating expression of the PhoPR regulon and Esx-1-dependent virulence. PMID:25987613

  17. Sulfonamide inhibition studies of the γ-carbonic anhydrase from the Antarctic cyanobacterium Nostoc commune.

    PubMed

    Vullo, Daniela; De Luca, Viviana; Del Prete, Sonia; Carginale, Vincenzo; Scozzafava, Andrea; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-04-15

    A carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) belonging to the γ-class has been cloned, purified and characterized from the Antarctic cyanobacterium Nostoc commune. The enzyme showed a good catalytic activity for the physiologic reaction (hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and a proton) with the following kinetic parameters, kcat of 9.5×10(5)s(-1) and kcat/KM of 8.3×10(7)M(-1)s(-1), being the γ-CA with the highest catalytic activity described so far. A range of aromatic/heterocyclic sulfonamides and one sulfamate were investigated as inhibitors of the new enzyme, denominated here NcoCA. The best NcoCA inhibitors were some sulfonylated sulfanilamide derivatives possessing elongated molecules, aminobenzolamide, acetazolamide, benzolamide, dorzolamide, brinzolamide and topiramate, which showed inhibition constants in the range of 40.3-92.3nM. As 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) and γ-CAs are closely associated in carboxysomes of cyanobacteria for enhancing the affinity of RubisCO for CO2 and the efficiency of photosynthesis, investigation of this new enzyme and its affinity for modulators of its activity may bring new insights in these crucial processes. PMID:25773015

  18. On the Role of Carbonic Anhydrase in the early Phase of Fish Otolith Mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beier, M.; Anken, R.

    The first step in the formation of fish otoliths, calcified structures which are responsible for the internalization of gravitational information, is based on the action of so-called Tether- (T-) cells. These T-cells appear during the very early development of the inner ear and persist only a few hours. They are characterized by a kinocilium, which is - in contrast to the kinocilium of the later developing sensory hair cells - not mechanosensory, but binds seeding particles containing glycogen, thereby localizing otolith formation. Beating cilia distributed throughout the ear agitate seeding particles, thereby inhibiting premature agglutination. In the later development, a protein matrix is formed and mineralization/crystallization takes place. Since the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) plays a prominent role in otolith mineralization (it provides carbonate for CaCO_3 precipitation), we were prompted to investigate histochemically using larval cichlid fish (Oreochromis mossambicus), whether CA might be present as early as T-cells. Indeed, CA was present in T-cells with prominent amounts of reaction product being located along the kinocilium and around the seeding particles. These results strongly indicate that kinocilia of T-cells may act as structural guides for bicarbonate transportation towards the early otoliths' calcification sites. Acknowledgement: This work was financially supported by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) (FKZ: 50 WB 9997).

  19. On the role of carbonic anhydrase in the early phase of fish otolith mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beier, M.; Anken, R.

    2006-01-01

    The first step in the formation of fish otoliths, calcified structures which are responsible for the internalization of gravitational information, is based on the action of so-called Tether- (T-) cells. These T-cells appear during the very early development of the inner ear and persist only a few hours. They are characterized by a kinocilium, which is in contrast to the kinocilium of the later developing sensory hair cells not mechanosensory, but binds seeding particles containing glycogen, thereby localizing otolith formation (otolith seeding). Beating cilia distributed throughout the ear agitate seeding particles, thereby inhibiting premature agglutination. In the later development, a protein matrix is formed and mineralization/crystallization takes place. Since the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CAH) plays a prominent role in otolith mineralization (it provides carbonate for CaCO3 precipitation), we were prompted to investigate histochemically using larval cichlid fish (Oreochromis mossambicus), whether CAH might be present as early as T-cells. Indeed, CAH was present in T-cells with prominent amounts of reaction product being located along the kinocilia and around the seeding particles. These results strongly indicate that kinocilia of T-cells act as structural guides for CAH/bicarbonate transportation towards the early otoliths’ calcification sites. Besides its role in calcification, CAH in the very early stage of otolith seeding may moreover aid in the accretion process of the precursor particles.

  20. Acetylcholinesterase and carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes I and II inhibition profiles of taxifolin.

    PubMed

    Gocer, Hulya; Topal, Fevzi; Topal, Meryem; Küçük, Murat; Teke, Dilek; Gülçin, İlhami; Alwasel, Saleh H; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-06-01

    Taxifolin, also known as dihydroquercetin, is a flavonoid commonly found in plants. Carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) plays an important role in many critical physiological events including carbon dioxide (CO2)/bicarbonate ([Formula: see text]) respiration and pH regulation. There are 16 known CA isoforms in humans, of which human hCA isoenzymes I and II (hCA I and II) are ubiquitous cytosolic isoforms. In this study, the inhibition properties of taxifolin against the slow cytosolic isoenzyme hCA I, and the ubiquitous and dominant rapid cytosolic isoenzyme hCA II were studied. Taxifolin, as a naturally bioactive flavonoid, has a Ki of 29.2 nM against hCA I, and 24.2 nM against hCA II. For acetylcholinesterase enzyme (AChE) inhibition, Ki parameter of taxifolin was determined to be 16.7 nM. These results clearly show that taxifolin inhibited both CA isoenzymes and AChE at the nM levels. PMID:25893707

  1. How to get into bones: proton pump and carbonic anhydrase in Osedax boneworms

    PubMed Central

    Tresguerres, Martin; Katz, Sigrid; Rouse, Greg W.

    2013-01-01

    Osedax are gutless siboglinid worms that thrive on vertebrate bones lying on the ocean floor, mainly those of whales. The posterior body of female Osedax penetrates into the bone forming extensions known as ‘roots’, which host heterotrophic symbiotic bacteria in bacteriocytes beneath the epidermis. The Osedax root epithelium presumably absorbs bone collagen and/or lipids, which are metabolized by the symbiotic bacteria that in turn serve for Osedax's nutrition. Here, we show that Osedax roots express extremely high amounts of vacuolar-H+-ATPase (VHA), which is located in the apical membrane and in cytoplasmic vesicles of root and ovisac epithelial cells. The enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), which catalyses the hydration of CO2 into H+ and HCO3−, is also expressed in roots and throughout Osedax body. These results suggest Osedax roots have massive acid-secreting capacity via VHA, fuelled by H+ derived from the CA-catalysed hydration of CO2 produced by aerobic metabolism. We propose the secreted acid dissolves the bone carbonate matrix to then allow the absorption of bone-derived nutrients across the skin. In an exciting example of convergent evolution, this model for acid secretion is remarkably similar to mammalian osteoclast cells. However, while osteoclasts dissolve bone for repairing and remodelling, the Osedax root epithelium secretes acid to dissolve foreign bone to access nutrients. PMID:23760644

  2. Structural study of interaction between brinzolamide and dorzolamide inhibition of human carbonic anhydrases.

    PubMed

    Pinard, Melissa A; Boone, Christopher D; Rife, Brittany D; Supuran, Claudiu T; McKenna, Robert

    2013-11-15

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) are metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide and bicarbonate. Their pivotal role in metabolism, ubiquitous nature, and multiple isoforms (CA I-XIV) has made CAs an attractive drug target in clinical applications. The usefulness of CA inhibitors (CAIs) in the treatment of glaucoma and epilepsy are well documented. In addition several isoforms of CAs (namely, CA IX) also serve as biological markers for certain tumors, and therefore they have the potential for useful applications in the treatment of cancer. This is a structural study on the binding interactions of the widely used CA inhibitory drugs brinzolamide (marketed as Azopt®) and dorzolamide (marketed as Trusopt®) with CA II and a CA IX-mimic, which was created via site-directed mutagenesis of CA II cDNA such that the active site resembles that of CA IX. Also the inhibition of CA II and CA IX and molecular docking reveal brinzolamide to be a more potent inhibitor among the other catalytically active CA isoforms compared to dorzolamide. The structures show that the tail end of the sulfonamide inhibitor is critical in forming stabilizing interactions that influence tight binding; therefore, for future drug design it is the tail moiety that will ultimately determine isoform specificity. PMID:24090602

  3. Anion inhibition studies of the β-carbonic anhydrase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Vullo, Daniela; Del Prete, Sonia; De Luca, Viviana; Carginale, Vincenzo; Ferraroni, Marta; Dedeoglu, Nurcan; Osman, Sameh M; AlOthman, Zeid; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-03-01

    The genome of the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae encodes for three carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) belonging to the α-, β- and γ-classes. Here we report and anion inhibition study of the β-CA, VchCAβ with anions and other small molecules which inhibit metalloenzymes. The best VchCAβ anion inhibitors were sulfamide, sulfamate, phenylboronic acid and phenylarsonic acid, which showed KIs in the range of 54-86μM. Diethyldithiocarbonate was also an effective VchCAβ inhibitor, with an inhibition constant of 0.73mM. The halides, cyanate, thiocyanate, cyanide, bicarbonate, carbonate, nitrate, nitrite, stannate, selenate, tellurate, divanadate, tetraborate, perrhenate, perruthenate, peroxydisulfate, selenocyanide, trithiocarbonate, and fluorosulfonate showed affinity in the low millimolar range, with KIs of 2.3-9.5mM. Identification of selective inhibitors of VchCAβ (over the human CA isoforms) may lead to pharmacological tools useful for understanding the physiological role(s) of this under-investigated enzyme. PMID:26853167

  4. Characterization of carbonic anhydrase II from Chlorella vulgaris in bio-CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Fu, Ming-Lai; Zhao, Yong-Hao; Zhu, Yun-Tian

    2012-11-01

    Carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) can catalyze the reversible hydration reaction of CO(2) at a maximum of 1.4 × 10(6) molecules of CO(2) per second. The crude intracellular enzyme extract containing CA II was derived from Chlorella vulgaris. A successful CO(2) capture experiment with the presence of calcium had been conducted on the premise that the temperature was conditioned at a scope of 30-40 °C, that the biocatalyst-nurtured algal growth period lasted 3 days, and that pH ranged from7.5 to 8.5. Ions of K(+), Na(+), Ca(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), and Zn(2+) at 0.01, 0.1, and 0.5 M were found to exhibit no more than 30 % inhibition on the residual activity of the biocatalyst. It is reasonable to expect that calcification catalyzed by microalgae presents an alternative to geological carbon capture and sequestration through a chain of fundamental researches carried on under the guidance of sequestration technology. PMID:22821342

  5. Histochemical Localisation of Carbonic Anhydrase in the Inner Ear of developing Cichlid Fish, Oreochromis mossambicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beier, M.; Hilbig, R.; Anken, R.

    Inner ear otolith growth in terms of mineralisation mainly depends on the enzyme carbonic anhydrase CA CA is located in specialised mitochondria-rich macular cells ionocytes which are involved in the endolymphatic ion exchange and the enzyme is responsible for the provision of the pH-value necessary for otolithic calcium carbonate deposition In the present study for the first time the localisation of histochemically demonstrated CA was analysed during the early larval development of a teleost the cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus CA-reactivity was observed already in stage 7 animals onset of otocyst development staging follows Anken et al Zool Anz 231 1-10 1993 Neuroblasts from which sensory and supporting cells as well as ionocytes are derived proved to be CA positive Already at stage 12 hatch CA-positive regions could be attributed to ionocyte containg regions both in the so-called meshwork and patches area of the macula i e clearly before ionocytes can be identified on ultrastructural level or by employing immunocytochemistry In contrast to the circumstances observed in mammalian species sensory hair cells stained negative for CA in the cichlid With the onset of stage 16 finray primordia in dorsal fin yolk-sac being increasingly absorbed CA-reactivity was observed in the vestibular nerve This indicates the onset of myelinisation and thus commencement of operation The localisation of CA in the inner ear of fish especially the differences in comparison to mammals is discussed on the basis of its role in otolith

  6. Sclerostin regulates release of bone mineral by osteocytes by induction of carbonic anhydrase 2.

    PubMed

    Kogawa, Masakazu; Wijenayaka, Asiri R; Ormsby, Renee T; Thomas, Gethin P; Anderson, Paul H; Bonewald, Lynda F; Findlay, David M; Atkins, Gerald J

    2013-12-01

    The osteocyte product sclerostin is emerging as an important paracrine regulator of bone mass. It has recently been shown that osteocyte production of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) is important in osteoclastic bone resorption, and we reported that exogenous treatment of osteocytes with sclerostin can increase RANKL-mediated osteoclast activity. There is good evidence that osteocytes can themselves liberate mineral from bone in a process known as osteocytic osteolysis. In the current study, we investigated sclerostin-stimulated mineral dissolution by human primary osteocyte-like cells (hOCy) and mouse MLO-Y4 cells. We found that sclerostin upregulated osteocyte expression of carbonic anhydrase 2 (CA2/Car2), cathepsin K (CTSK/Ctsk), and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (ACP5/Acp5). Because acidification of the extracellular matrix is a critical step in the release of mineral from bone, we further examined the regulation by sclerostin of CA2. Sclerostin stimulated CA2 mRNA and protein expression in hOCy and in MLO-Y4 cells. Sclerostin induced a decrease in intracellular pH (pHi) in both cell types as well as a decrease in extracellular pH (pHo) and the release of calcium ions from mineralized substrate. These effects were reversed in the co-presence of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetozolamide. Car2-siRNA knockdown in MLO-Y4 cells significantly inhibited the ability of sclerostin to both reduce the pHo and release calcium from a mineralized substrate. Knockdown in MLO-Y4 cells of each of the putative sclerostin receptors, Lrp4, Lrp5 and Lrp6, using siRNA, inhibited the sclerostin induction of Car2, Catk and Acp5 mRNA, as well as pHo and calcium release. Consistent with this activity of sclerostin resulting in osteocytic osteolysis, human trabecular bone samples treated ex vivo with recombinant human sclerostin for 7 days exhibited an increased osteocyte lacunar area, an effect that was reversed by the co-addition of acetozolamide. These findings

  7. A carbonic anhydrase inhibitor as a potential modulator of cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Teicher, B A; Liu, S D; Liu, J T; Holden, S A; Herman, T S

    1993-01-01

    Since several anticancer drugs are known to become more cytotoxic to cells in an acidic milieu, we have attempted to utilize the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, Acetazolamide, to acidify the blood and tumor of C3H mice bearing the FSaIIC fibrosarcoma in order to sensitize tumor cells in vivo to CDDP, Melphalan, BCNU, SR4233 or PtCl4 (Fast Black)2 +/- hyperthermia. The direct cytotoxic interactions between the anticancer drugs and Acetazolamide were tested in FSaIIC cells in vitro with the monacidifying diuretic Chlorothrozide as a control. When cells were exposed to CDDP both diuretics protected against cytotoxicity in a dose dependent fashion. In contrast, cells exposed to Melphalan were minimally sensitized and those exposed to BCNU, SR4233, or PtCl4 (Fast Black)2 were essentially unaffected by the presence of the diuretic agents. Both diuretics were essentially non-toxic to cells in vitro, and, interestingly, both drugs markedly protected cells against hyperthermia under low pH conditions. In vitro, however, Acetzolamide produced a tumor growth delay of 2.3 days alone when given at 10 mg/kg i.p. once (the most effective dose) and produced additive growth delays with CDDP and Melphalan, but probably greater than additive delays with SR4233 and PtCl4 (Fast Black)2. When Acetazolamide was given daily for 5 days starting on the day the anticancer drugs were given once (day 7) essentially no further increase in tumor growth delay of nearly 16 days was observed versus only 4,6 days for the drug alone. When hyperthermia (43 degrees C min.) was delivered locally to the tumor after i.p. injection of the drugs, further growth delays were produced for every drug combination which probably were additive in extent. Blood and urine pH determinations revealed that a pH drop of 1 units occurred in the blood and a pH elevation of 1 to 21 units occurred in the urine 1 hr. after i.p. injection of Acetazolamide. These results indicate that this carbonic anhydrase inhibitor can add to

  8. Physiological and molecular biological characterization of intracellular carbonic anhydrase from the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Satoh, D; Hiraoka, Y; Colman, B; Matsuda, Y

    2001-08-01

    A single intracellular carbonic anhydrase (CA) was detected in air-grown and, at reduced levels, in high CO(2)-grown cells of the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum (UTEX 642). No external CA activity was detected irrespective of growth CO(2) conditions. Ethoxyzolamide (0.4 mM), a CA-specific inhibitor, severely inhibited high-affinity photosynthesis at low concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon, whereas 2 mM acetazolamide had little effect on the affinity for dissolved inorganic carbon, suggesting that internal CA is crucial for the operation of a carbon concentrating mechanism in P. tricornutum. Internal CA was purified 36.7-fold of that of cell homogenates by ammonium sulfate precipitation, and two-step column chromatography on diethylaminoethyl-sephacel and p-aminomethylbenzene sulfone amide agarose. The purified CA was shown, by SDS-PAGE, to comprise an electrophoretically single polypeptide of 28 kD under both reduced and nonreduced conditions. The entire sequence of the cDNA of this CA was obtained by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends method and indicated that the cDNA encodes 282 amino acids. Comparison of this putative precursor sequence with the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified CA indicated that it included a possible signal sequence of up to 46 amino acids at the N terminus. The mature CA was found to consist of 236 amino acids and the sequence was homologous to beta-type CAs. Even though the zinc-ligand amino acid residues were shown to be completely conserved, the amino acid residues that may constitute a CO(2)-binding site appeared to be unique among the beta-CAs so far reported. PMID:11500545

  9. Effect of carbonic anhydrase on silicate weathering and carbonate formation at present day CO2 concentrations compared to primordial values

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Leilei; Lian, Bin; Hao, Jianchao; Liu, Congqiang; Wang, Shijie

    2015-01-01

    It is widely recognized that carbonic anhydrase (CA) participates in silicate weathering and carbonate formation. Nevertheless, it is still not known if the magnitude of the effect produced by CA on surface rock evolution changes or not. In this work, CA gene expression from Bacillus mucilaginosus and the effects of recombination protein on wollastonite dissolution and carbonate formation under different conditions are explored. Real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR was used to explore the correlation between CA gene expression and sufficiency or deficiency in calcium and CO2 concentration. The results show that the expression of CA genes is negatively correlated with both CO2 concentration and ease of obtaining soluble calcium. A pure form of the protein of interest (CA) is obtained by cloning, heterologous expression, and purification. The results from tests of the recombination protein on wollastonite dissolution and carbonate formation at different levels of CO2 concentration show that the magnitudes of the effects of CA and CO2 concentration are negatively correlated. These results suggest that the effects of microbial CA in relation to silicate weathering and carbonate formation may have increased importance at the modern atmospheric CO2 concentration compared to 3 billion years ago. PMID:25583135

  10. Effect of carbonic anhydrase on silicate weathering and carbonate formation at present day CO2 concentrations compared to primordial values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Leilei; Lian, Bin; Hao, Jianchao; Liu, Congqiang; Wang, Shijie

    2015-01-01

    It is widely recognized that carbonic anhydrase (CA) participates in silicate weathering and carbonate formation. Nevertheless, it is still not known if the magnitude of the effect produced by CA on surface rock evolution changes or not. In this work, CA gene expression from Bacillus mucilaginosus and the effects of recombination protein on wollastonite dissolution and carbonate formation under different conditions are explored. Real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR was used to explore the correlation between CA gene expression and sufficiency or deficiency in calcium and CO2 concentration. The results show that the expression of CA genes is negatively correlated with both CO2 concentration and ease of obtaining soluble calcium. A pure form of the protein of interest (CA) is obtained by cloning, heterologous expression, and purification. The results from tests of the recombination protein on wollastonite dissolution and carbonate formation at different levels of CO2 concentration show that the magnitudes of the effects of CA and CO2 concentration are negatively correlated. These results suggest that the effects of microbial CA in relation to silicate weathering and carbonate formation may have increased importance at the modern atmospheric CO2 concentration compared to 3 billion years ago.

  11. Discovery and characterization of novel selective inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase IX.

    PubMed

    Dudutienė, Virginija; Matulienė, Jurgita; Smirnov, Alexey; Timm, David D; Zubrienė, Asta; Baranauskienė, Lina; Morkūnaite, Vaida; Smirnovienė, Joana; Michailovienė, Vilma; Juozapaitienė, Vaida; Mickevičiūtė, Aurelija; Kazokaitė, Justina; Bakšytė, Sandra; Kasiliauskaitė, Aistė; Jachno, Jelena; Revuckienė, Jurgita; Kišonaitė, Miglė; Pilipuitytė, Vilma; Ivanauskaitė, Eglė; Milinavičiūtė, Goda; Smirnovas, Vytautas; Petrikaitė, Vilma; Kairys, Visvaldas; Petrauskas, Vytautas; Norvaišas, Povilas; Lingė, Darius; Gibieža, Paulius; Capkauskaitė, Edita; Zakšauskas, Audrius; Kazlauskas, Egidijus; Manakova, Elena; Gražulis, Saulius; Ladbury, John E; Matulis, Daumantas

    2014-11-26

    Human carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is highly expressed in tumor tissues, and its selective inhibition provides a potential target for the treatment of numerous cancers. Development of potent, highly selective inhibitors against this target remains an unmet need in anticancer therapeutics. A series of fluorinated benzenesulfonamides with substituents on the benzene ring was designed and synthesized. Several of these exhibited a highly potent and selective inhibition profile against CA IX. Three fluorine atoms significantly increased the affinity by withdrawing electrons and lowering the pKa of the benzenesulfonamide group. The bulky ortho substituents, such as cyclooctyl or even cyclododecyl groups, fit into the hydrophobic pocket in the active site of CA IX but not CA II, as shown by the compound's co-crystal structure with chimeric CA IX. The strongest inhibitor of recombinant human CA IX's catalytic domain in human cells achieved an affinity of 50 pM. However, the high affinity diminished the selectivity. The most selective compound for CA IX exhibited 10 nM affinity. The compound that showed the best balance between affinity and selectivity bound with 1 nM affinity. The inhibitors described in this work provide the basis for novel anticancer therapeutics targeting CA IX. PMID:25358084

  12. Coumarin or benzoxazinone based novel carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: synthesis, molecular docking and anticonvulsant studies.

    PubMed

    Karataş, Mert Olgun; Uslu, Harun; Sarı, Suat; Alagöz, Mehmet Abdullah; Karakurt, Arzu; Alıcı, Bülent; Bilen, Cigdem; Yavuz, Emre; Gencer, Nahit; Arslan, Oktay

    2016-10-01

    Among many others, coumarin derivatives are known to show human carbonic anhydrase (hCA) inhibitory activity. Since hCA inhibition is one of the underlying mechanisms that account for the activities of some antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), hCA inhibitors are expected to have anti-seizure properties. There are also several studies reporting compounds with an imidazole and/or benzimidazole moiety which exert these pharmacological properties. In this study, we prepared fifteen novel coumarin-bearing imidazolium and benzimidazolium chloride, nine novel benzoxazinone-bearing imidazolium and benzimidazolium chloride derivatives and evaluated their hCA inhibitory activities and along with fourteen previously synthesized derivatives we scanned their anticonvulsant effects. As all compounds inhibited purified hCA isoforms I and II, some of them also proved protective against Maximal electroshock seizure (MES) and ScMet induced seizures in mice. Molecular docking studies with selected coumarin derivatives have revealed that these compounds bind to the active pocket of the enzyme in a similar fashion to that previously described for coumarin derivatives. PMID:26207513

  13. Serum anti-carbonic anhydrase II antibodies and oxidant-antioxidant balance in pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Aliyazicioglu, Rezzan; Guven, Suleyman; Mentese, Ahmet; Kolayli, Sevgi; Cengiz, Sevil; Deger, Orhan; Alver, Ahmet

    2011-10-01

    PROBLEM  The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of anti-carbonic anhydrase II antibodies (anti-CA II) antibodies in pre-eclampsia and the relationships between the autoantibodies, total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidant capacity (TOC), malondialdehyde (MDA) and oxidative stres index (OSI) parameters. METHOD OF STUDY  We studied 40 early and late onset pre-eclamptic patients and 40 healthy pregnant control and 39 healthy non-pregnant control subjects. Serum CA II antibodies, TAC and TOC, and MDA parameters were studied by ELISA. RESULTS  The mean values for TAC, TOC, OSI, MDA, and anti-CA II were significantly increased in patients with pre-eclampsia compared to the other groups. The anti-CA II antibody levels for the pregnant control subjects were 0.129 ± 0.04 and that for the pre-eclamptic patients were 0.282 ± 0.18. In this study, any absorbance value higher than 0.136, the mean absorbance + 2 S.D. of pregnant control subjects, was defined as positive. Positive results were obtained in 29 of 40 pre-eclamptic patients (72.5%). There were significant positive correlations between serum anti-CA II antibodies and TOC, MDA levels, and OSI levels. CONCLUSION  The results suggest that anti-CA II antibodies and impairment in oxidant-antioxidant balance may be involved in multifactorial etiology of pre-eclampsia. PMID:21244564

  14. Increased water flux induced by an aquaporin-1/carbonic anhydrase II interaction

    PubMed Central

    Vilas, Gonzalo; Krishnan, Devishree; Loganathan, Sampath Kumar; Malhotra, Darpan; Liu, Lei; Beggs, Megan Rachele; Gena, Patrizia; Calamita, Giuseppe; Jung, Martin; Zimmermann, Richard; Tamma, Grazia; Casey, Joseph Roman; Alexander, Robert Todd

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) enables greatly enhanced water flux across plasma membranes. The cytosolic carboxy terminus of AQP1 has two acidic motifs homologous to known carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) binding sequences. CAII colocalizes with AQP1 in the renal proximal tubule. Expression of AQP1 with CAII in Xenopus oocytes or mammalian cells increased water flux relative to AQP1 expression alone. This required the amino-terminal sequence of CAII, a region that binds other transport proteins. Expression of catalytically inactive CAII failed to increase water flux through AQP1. Proximity ligation assays revealed close association of CAII and AQP1, an effect requiring the second acidic cluster of AQP1. This motif was also necessary for CAII to increase AQP1-mediated water flux. Red blood cell ghosts resealed with CAII demonstrated increased osmotic water permeability compared with ghosts resealed with albumin. Water flux across renal cortical membrane vesicles, measured by stopped-flow light scattering, was reduced in CAII-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice. These data are consistent with CAII increasing water conductance through AQP1 by a physical interaction between the two proteins. PMID:25609088

  15. Sulfamate inhibitor S4 influences carbonic anhydrase IX ectodomain shedding in colorectal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hektoen, Helga Helseth; Ree, Anne Hansen; Redalen, Kathrine Røe; Flatmark, Kjersti

    2016-10-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is a pivotal pH regulator under hypoxia, which by its tumor-specific expression represents an attractive target for cancer therapy. Here, we report on effects of the sulfamate CAIX inhibitor S4 (4-(3'-(3″,5″-dimethylphenyl)ureido)phenyl sulfamate) in colorectal carcinoma cell lines. S4 was administered under experimental hypoxia or normoxia to HT29, KM20L2 and HCT116 cells. Effects on survival, proliferation, pH, lactate extrusion and CAIX protein expression were evaluated. S4 treatment resulted in attenuated hypoxia-induced extracellular acidification and reduced clonogenic survival under hypoxia in HT29 cells. The pH effects were present only in a [Formula: see text]-free buffer system and were accompanied by decreased lactate extrusion. The main finding of this work was that S4 treatment caused alterations in CAIX ectodomain shedding. This merits further investigation to understand how sulfamates influence CAIX activity and how such drugs may be of use in cancer treatment. PMID:26244271

  16. Comparison of amino and epoxy functionalized SBA-15 used for carbonic anhydrase immobilization.

    PubMed

    Fei, Xiaoyao; Chen, Shaoyun; Liu, Dai; Huang, Chunjie; Zhang, Yongchun

    2016-09-01

    Two functionalized SBA-15 [amine-functionalized SBA-15 (AFS) and epoxy-functionalized SBA-15 (GFS)] with different types of functional groups were synthesized by a hydrothermal process and post functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and 3-glycidyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS), respectively. They were used for the immobilization of carbonic anhydrase (CA). The physicochemical properties of the functionalized SBA-15 were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption-desorption, (13)C, (29)Si solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Before and after CA was immobilized on AFS and GFS, the effects of temperature and pH value on the enzyme activity, storage stability, and reusability were investigated using para-nitrophenyl acetate (p-NPA) assay. CA/GFS showed a better performance with respect to storage stability and reusability than CA/AFS. Moreover, the amount of CaCO3 precipitated over CA/AFS was less than that precipitated over CA/GFS, which was almost equal to that precipitated over the free CA. The results indicate that the epoxy group is a more suitable functional group for covalent bonding with CA than the amino group, and GFS is a promising support for CA immobilization. PMID:27215831

  17. Synthesis and carbonic anhydrase inhibitory properties of sulfamides structurally related to dopamine.

    PubMed

    Aksu, Kadir; Nar, Meryem; Tanc, Muhammet; Vullo, Daniela; Gülçin, Ilhami; Göksu, Süleyman; Tümer, Ferhan; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2013-06-01

    A series of novel sulfamides incorporating the dopamine scaffold were synthesized. Reaction of amines and tert-butyl-alcohol/benzyl alcohol in the presence of chlorosulfonyl isocyanate (CSI) afforded sulfamoyl carbamates, which were converted to the title compounds by treatment with trifluoroacetic acid or by palladium-catalyzed hydrogenolysis. Inhibition of six α-carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1), that is, CA I, CA II, CA VA, CA IX, CA XII and CA XIV, and two β-CAs from Candida glabrata (CgCA) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Rv3588) with these sulfamides was investigated. All CA isozymes were inhibited in the low micromolar to nanomolar range by the dopamine sulfamide analogues. K(i)s were in the range of 0.061-1.822 μM for CA I, 1.47-2.94 nM for CA II, 2.25-3.34 μM for CA VA, 0.041-0.37 μM for CA IX, 0.021-1.52 μM for CA XII, 0.007-0.219 μM for CA XIV, 0.35-5.31 μM for CgCA and 0.465-4.29 μM for Rv3588. The synthesized sulfamides may lead to inhibitors targeting medicinally relevant CA isoforms with potential applications as antiepileptic, antiobesity antitumor agents or anti-infective. PMID:23623256

  18. Enzyme renaturation to higher activity driven by the sol-gel transition: Carbonic anhydrase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, Vladimir V.; Avnir, David

    2015-09-01

    We describe a so-far unknown route for renaturing denatured enzymes, namely subjecting the denatured enzyme to an oxide sol-gel transition. The phenomenon was revealed in a detailed study of denatured carbonic anhydrase which was subjected to an alumina sol-gel transition, up to the thermally stabilizing entrapment in the final xerogel. Remarkably, not only that the killed enzyme regained its activity during the sol-gel process, but its activity increased to 180% of the native enzyme. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of enhanced activity following by renaturing (a “Phoenix effect”). Kinetic study which revealed a five-orders of magnitude (!) increase in the Arrhenius prefactor upon entrapment compared to solution. Circular dichroism analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, zeta potential analyses as well as synchronous fluorescence measurements, all of which were used to characterize the phenomenon, are consistent with a proposed mechanism which is based on the specific orienting interactions of the active site of the enzyme with respect to the alumina interface and its pores network.

  19. Antibodies reacting to carbonic anhydrase isozymes (I and II) and albumin in sera from dogs.

    PubMed

    Nishita, Toshiho; Miyazaki, Rui; Miyazaki, Takae; Ochiai, Hideharu; Orito, Kensuke

    2016-06-01

    IgGs to carbonic anhydrase isozymes (CA-I and CA-II) and albumin were identified in dog serum. IgG titers were determined in the sera of asymptomatic dogs, and in dogs with atopic dermatitis, diarrhea and/or vomiting, diabetes and/or pancreatitis, kidney disease, hepatic disease, and thyroid gland disease, using ELISA. Low titres of IgG-reactive CA-I, CA-II, BSA, and CSA were found in the sera of healthy beagles. Compared with healthy beagles, there was a significant difference in the titers of antibodies against CA-I in asymptomatic dogs, dogs with diabetes and/or pancreatitis, or thyroid gland disease, or hepatic disease. Compared with healthy beagles, there was a significant difference in the antibody titer of anti-CA-II IgG in asymptomatic dogs and in those with hepatic disease. There was a significant difference in the antibody titer of anti-BSA IgG between healthy beagles and dogs with hepatic disease. PMID:27234558

  20. Immobilization of carbonic anhydrase on carboxyl-functionalized ferroferric oxide for CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Lv, Bihong; Yang, Zhaoren; Pan, Fujun; Zhou, Zuoming; Jing, Guohua

    2015-08-01

    New materials of Fe3O4 magnetic microspheres were functionalized with carboxyl and prepared for carbonic anhydrase (CA) immobilization to capture CO2. The optimum conditions for immobilization, such as carrier dose, enzyme dose, pH, shaking speed, temperature and contact time, were determined. The pH and thermal stability of the free and the immobilized CA were compared. The results presented that the immobilized CA had a better enzyme activity, a higher pH and thermal stability than that of the free CA. Meanwhile, CO2 capture was respectively enhanced by the free and the immobilized CA in tris(hydroxymethyl) aminomethane (Tris) buffer solution. Moreover, the immobilized CA maintained 58.5% of its initial catalytic ability even after ten recovery cycles due to the protest of the magnetic microspheres. All the results confirmed the potential use of the carboxyl-functionalized Fe3O4 magnetic microspheres immobilized CA to remove CO2 from air or flue gas. PMID:26038102

  1. Stereoselective hydrogenation of olefins using rhodium-substituted carbonic anhydrase--a new reductase.

    PubMed

    Jing, Qing; Okrasa, Krzysztof; Kazlauskas, Romas J

    2009-01-01

    One useful synthetic reaction missing from nature's toolbox is the direct hydrogenation of substrates using hydrogen. Instead nature uses cofactors like NADH to reduce organic substrates, which adds complexity and cost to these reductions. To create an enzyme that can directly reduce organic substrates with hydrogen, researchers have combined metal hydrogenation catalysts with proteins. One approach is an indirect link where a ligand is linked to a protein and the metal binds to the ligand. Another approach is direct linking of the metal to protein, but nonspecific binding of the metal limits this approach. Herein, we report a direct hydrogenation of olefins catalyzed by rhodium(I) bound to carbonic anhydrase (CA-[Rh]). We minimized nonspecific binding of rhodium by replacing histidine residues on the protein surface using site-directed mutagenesis or by chemically modifying the histidine residues. Hydrogenation catalyzed by CA-[Rh] is slightly slower than for uncomplexed rhodium(I), but the protein environment induces stereoselectivity favoring cis- over trans-stilbene by about 20:1. This enzyme is the first cofactor-independent reductase that reduces organic molecules using hydrogen. This catalyst is a good starting point to create variants with tailored reactivity and selectivity. This strategy to insert transition metals in the active site of metalloenzymes opens opportunities to a wider range of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. PMID:19115310

  2. Dithiocarbamates with potent inhibitory activity against the Saccharomyces cerevisiae β-carbonic anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Bozdag, Murat; Carta, Fabrizio; Vullo, Daniela; Isik, Semra; AlOthman, Zeid; Osman, Sameh M; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-01-01

    Dithiocarbamates (DTCs) prepared from primary or secondary amines, which incorporated amino/hydroxyl-alkyl, mono-/bicyclic aliphatic/heterocyclic rings based on the quinuclidine, piperidine, hydroxy-/carboxy-/amino-substituted piperidine, morpholine and piperazine scaffolds, were investigated for the inhibition of α- and β-carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) of pharmacologic relevance, such as the human (h) isoform hCA I and II, as well as the Saccharomyces cerevisiae β-CA, scCA. The yeast and its β-CA were shown earlier to be useful models of pathogenic fungal infections. The DTCs investigated here were medium potency hCA I inhibitors (K(I)s of 66.5-910 nM), were more effective as hCA II inhibitors (K(I)s of 8.9-107 nM) and some of them showed excellent, low nanomolar activity against the yeast enzyme, with inhibition constants ranging between 6.4 and 259 nM. The detailed structure activity relationship for inhibition of the yeast and human enzymes is discussed. Several of the investigated DTCs showed excellent selectivity ratios for inhibiting the yeast over the human cytosolic CA isoforms. PMID:25669351

  3. More effective dithiocarbamate derivatives inhibiting carbonic anhydrases, generated by QSAR and computational design.

    PubMed

    Avram, Speranta; Milac, Adina Luminita; Carta, Fabrizio; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2013-04-01

    Dithiocarbamates (DTC) are promising compounds with potential applications in antitumoral and glaucoma therapy. Our aim is to understand molecular features affecting DTC interaction with carbonic anhydrases (CAs), zinc-containing enzymes maintaining acid-base balance in blood and other tissues. To this end, we generate QSAR models based on a compound series containing 25 DTC, inhibitors of four human (h) CAs isoforms: hCA I, II, IX and XII. We establish that critical physicochemical parameters for DTC inhibitory activity are: hydrophobic, electronic, steric, topological and shape. The predictive power of our QSAR models is indicated by significant values of statistical coefficients: cross-validated correlation q(2) (0.55-0.73), fitted correlation r(2) (0.75-0.84) and standard error of prediction (0.47-0.23). Based on the established QSAR equations, we analyse 22 new DTC derivatives and identify DTC dicarboxilic acids derivatives and their esters as potentially improved inhibitors of CA I, II, IX and XII. PMID:23116520

  4. Imaging of carbonic anhydrase IX with an 111In-labeled dual-motif inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xing; Minn, Il; Rowe, Steven P; Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Gorin, Michael A; Brummet, Mary; Lee, Hye Soo; Koo, Soo Min; Sysa-Shah, Polina; Mease, Ronnie C; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Allaf, Mohamad E; Pomper, Martin G

    2015-10-20

    We developed a new scaffold for radionuclide-based imaging and therapy of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) targeting carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX). Compound XYIMSR-01, a DOTA-conjugated, bivalent, low-molecular-weight ligand, has two moieties that target two separate sites on CAIX, imparting high affinity. We synthesized [111In]XYIMSR-01 in 73.8-75.8% (n = 3) yield with specific radioactivities ranging from 118 - 1,021 GBq/μmol (3,200-27,600 Ci/mmol). Single photon emission computed tomography of [111In]XYIMSR-01 in immunocompromised mice bearing CAIX-expressing SK-RC-52 tumors revealed radiotracer uptake in tumor as early as 1 h post-injection. Biodistribution studies demonstrated 26% injected dose per gram of radioactivity within tumor at 1 h. Tumor-to-blood, muscle and kidney ratios were 178.1 ± 145.4, 68.4 ± 29.0 and 1.7 ± 1.2, respectively, at 24 h post-injection. Retention of radioactivity was exclusively observed in tumors by 48 h, the latest time point evaluated. The dual targeting strategy to engage CAIX enabled specific detection of ccRCC in this xenograft model, with pharmacokinetics surpassing those of previously described radionuclide-based probes against CAIX. PMID:26418876

  5. Carbonic Anhydrase 9 mRNA/microRNA34a Interplay in Hypoxic Human Mammospheres.

    PubMed

    De Carolis, Sabrina; Bertoni, Sara; Nati, Marina; D'Anello, Laura; Papi, Alessio; Tesei, Anna; Cricca, Monica; Bonafé, Massimiliano

    2016-07-01

    The hypoxic environment is a crucial component of the cancer stem cell niche and it is capable of eliciting stem cell features in cancer cells. We previously reported that SNAI2 up-regulates the expression of Carbonic Anhydrase iso-enzyme 9 (CA9) in hypoxic MCF7 cells. Here we show that SNAI2 down-regulates miR34a expression in hypoxic MCF7 cell-derived mammospheres. Next, we report on the capability of miR34a to decrease CA9 mRNA stability and CA9 protein expression. We also convey that the over-expression of cloned CA9-mRNA-3'UTR increases the mRNA half-life and protein levels of two miR34a targets JAGGED1 and NOTCH3. The data here reported shows that the SNAI2-dependent down-regulation of miR34a substantially contributes to the post-transcriptional up-regulation of CA9, and that CA9-mRNA-3'UTR acts as an endogenous microRNA sponge. We conclude that CA9/miR34 interplay shares in the hypoxic regulation of mammospheres and therefore, may play a relevant role in the hypoxic breast cancer stem cell niche. PMID:26553365

  6. Coupling Protein Dynamics with Proton Transport in Human Carbonic Anhydrase II.

    PubMed

    Taraphder, Srabani; Maupin, C Mark; Swanson, Jessica M J; Voth, Gregory A

    2016-08-25

    The role of protein dynamics in enzyme catalysis is one of the most highly debated topics in enzymology. The main controversy centers around what may be defined as functionally significant conformational fluctuations and how, if at all, these fluctuations couple to enzyme catalyzed events. To shed light on this debate, the conformational dynamics along the transition path surmounting the highest free energy barrier have been herein investigated for the rate limiting proton transport event in human carbonic anhydrase (HCA) II. Special attention has been placed on whether the motion of an excess proton is correlated with fluctuations in the surrounding protein and solvent matrix, which may be rare on the picosecond and subpicosecond time scales of molecular motions. It is found that several active site residues, which do not directly participate in the proton transport event, have a significant impact on the dynamics of the excess proton. These secondary participants are shown to strongly influence the active site environment, resulting in the creation of water clusters that are conducive to fast, moderately slow, or slow proton transport events. The identification and characterization of these secondary participants illuminates the role of protein dynamics in the catalytic efficiency of HCA II. PMID:27063577

  7. Immobilization of carbonic anhydrase on spherical SBA-15 for hydration and sequestration of CO2.

    PubMed

    Vinoba, Mari; Bhagiyalakshmi, Margandan; Jeong, Soon Kwan; Yoon, Yeo Ii; Nam, Sung Chan

    2012-02-01

    Bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA) was immobilized on spherical SBA-15 through various approaches, including covalent attachment (BCA-CA), adsorption (BCA-ADS), and cross-linked enzyme aggregation (BCA-CLEA). The spherical SBA-15 was characterized by XRD, BET, and FE-SEM analysis. (29)Si CP-MAS NMR was used to confirm the 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane grafting (an intermediate step in the immobilization technique), and the immobilization of BCA was confirmed by FT-IR spectrum. The catalytic activities for hydration of CO(2) were calculated for free and immobilized BCA with and without buffer. The K(cat) values for free BCA, BCA-CLEA, BCA-CA and BCA-ADS were 0.79, 0.78, 0.58 and 0.36 s(-1), respectively, indicating that BCA-CLEA showed a comparatively higher hydration of CO(2) than BCA-CA and BCA-ADS, which was nearly the same as free BCA. The amount of CaCO(3) precipitated over free BCA, BCA-CLEA, BCA-CA and BCA-ADS were 140, 138, 135 and 130 mg, respectively. Performance studies, including assays on reusability, thermal stability and storage stability, were also carried out for BCA-CLEA. The results confirmed that BCA-CLEA is reusable, thermally stable and, withstands storage, and is thus a suitable candidate for use in hydration and sequestration of CO(2). PMID:22024402

  8. SYNTHESIS AND EVALUATION OF NEW PHTHALAZINE SUBSTITUTED β-LACTAM DERIVATIVES AS CARBONIC ANHYDRASE INHIBITORS.

    PubMed

    Berber, Nurcan; Arslan, Mustafa; Bilen, Çiğdem; Sackes, Zübeyde; Gençer, Nahit; Arslan, Oktay

    2015-01-01

    A new series of phthalazine substituted β-lactam derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory effects on the activity of purified human carbonic anhydrase (hCA I and II) were evaluated. 2H-Indazolo[2,1-b]phthala- zine-trione derivative was prepared with 4-nitrobenzaldehyde, dimedone, and phthalhydrazide in the presence of TFA in DMF, and the nitro group was reduced to 13-(4-aminophenyl)-3,3-dimethyl-3,4-dihydro- 2H-indazolo[1,2-b]phthalazine-1,6,11(13H)-trione with SnCl2 · 2H2O. The reduced compound was re- acted with different aromatic aldehydes, and phthalazine substituted imines were synthesized. The imine compounds undergo (2+2) cycloaddition reactions with ketenes to produce 2H-indazolo[2,1-b]phthala-zine-trione substituted β-lactam derivatives. The β-lactam compounds were tested as inhibitors of the CA isoenzyme activity. The results showed that all the synthesized compounds inhibited the CA isoenzyme activity. 1-(4-(3,3-dimethyl- 1,6,1 1-trioxo-2,3,4,6,11,13-hexahydro-1H-indazolo[1,2-b]phthalazin-13- yl)phenyl)-2-oxo-4-p-tolylazetidin-3-yl acetate (IC50 = 6.97 µM for hCA I and 8.48 µM for hCA II) had the most inhibitory effect. PMID:26615643

  9. Identification of Distinct Internal and External Isozymes of Carbonic Anhydrase in Chlorella saccharophila.

    PubMed

    Williams, T. G.; Colman, B.

    1993-11-01

    External carbonic anhydrase (CA) was detected in whole cells of alkaline-grown Chlorella saccharophila but was suppressed by growth at acid pH or growth on elevated levels of CO2. Internal CA activity was measured potentiometrically as an increase in activity in cell extracts over that of intact cells. Cells grown under all conditions had equal levels of internal CA activity. Two isozymes were identified after electrophoretic separation of soluble proteins on cellulose acetate plates. The fast isozyme was found in cells grown under all conditions, whereas the slow isozyme was found only in cells grown at alkaline pH. Western blot analysis following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis using antibodies produced against the periplasmic form of CA from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii revealed a single band at 39 kD, which did not change in intensity between growth conditions and was associated only with proteins eluted from the fast band. The slow isozyme was inactivated by incubation of cell extract at 30[deg]C and by incubation in 10 mM dithiothreitol, whereas the internal form was unaffected. These results indicate that external and internal forms of CA differ in structure and their activities respond differently to environmental conditions. PMID:12231991

  10. Molecular and biochemical analysis of the beta class carbonic anhydrases in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Fasseas, Michael K; Tsikou, Daniela; Flemetakis, Emmanouil; Katinakis, Panagiotis

    2010-07-01

    The beta class of the carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme family has been found in plants, yeast, bacteria and algae, but not in animals. Also, little is known concerning the CAs of C. elegans. Genes possibly encoding beta-CAs were revealed by in silico analysis of the C. elegans genome. Amino acid sequence and 3D structure analysis revealed a resemblance to both plant and cab-type beta-CAs. Temporal expression patterns of the two genes, as well as changes in expression levels under different atmospheric conditions (stress) were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. Recombinant enzymes, expressed in E. coli were used for in vitro measurement of CA activity, while a yeast complementation experiment was performed in order to assess their ability to complement the function of S. crevisieae beta-CA (NCE103) in vivo. RNAi by feeding was performed on wild-type populations that were then examined for a visible phenotype under normal or various stress conditions (pH, CO(2)/O(2)). Two genes possibly encoding beta-CAs were revealed (bca-1 and y116a8c.28). Their products contain elements of both plant and cab-type CAs. Both assays showed that Y116a8c.28 is an active CA. Both genes showed significant levels of transcript accumulation during development, while they also responded to the stress conditions. No visible phenotype was scored under normal or stress conditions. PMID:19816790

  11. Tobacco Nectarin III is a bifunctional enzyme with monodehydroascorbate reductase and carbonic anhydrase activities.

    PubMed

    Carter, Clay J; Thornburg, Robert W

    2004-02-01

    Tobacco plants secrete a limited array of proteins (nectarins) into their floral nectar. N-terminal sequencing of the Nectarin II ( NEC2; 35kD) and the Nectarin III ( NEC3; 40kD) proteins revealed that they both share identity with dioscorin, the major soluble protein of yam tubers. These sequences also revealed that NEC2 is a breakdown product of NEC3. Using these N-terminal peptide sequences, degenerate oligonucleotides were designed that permitted the isolation of a partial NEC3 cDNA. This cDNA was then used to probe a nectary specific cDNA library and a full-length NEC3 cDNA clone was isolated. Complete sequence analysis confirmed the identity of NEC3 as a dioscorin-like protein. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric fingerprinting of tryptic peptides derived from the purified NEC3 confirmed that this protein was encoded by the isolated cDNA. NEC3 was shown to possess both carbonic anhydrase and monodehydroascorbate reductase activities. RT-PCR based expression analyses demonstrated that NEC3 transcript is expressed throughout nectary development as well as in other floral organs. A proposed function in the maintenance of pH and oxidative balance in nectar is discussed. PMID:15284496

  12. Mitochondrial gamma carbonic anhydrases are required for complex I assembly and plant reproductive development.

    PubMed

    Fromm, Steffanie; Braun, Hans-Peter; Peterhansel, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    Complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) in plants contains an extra domain that is made up from proteins homologous to prokaryotic gamma-carbonic anhydrases (γCA). This domain has been suggested to participate in complex I assembly or to support transport of mitochondrial CO2 to the chloroplast. Here, we generated mutants lacking CA1 and CA2 - two out of three CA proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. Double mutants were characterized at the developmental and physiological levels. Furthermore, the composition and activity of the mETC were determined, and mutated CA versions were used for complementation assays. Embryo development of double mutants was strongly delayed and seed development stopped before maturation. Mutant plants could only be rescued on sucrose media, showed severe stress symptoms and never produced viable seeds. By contrast, callus cultures were only slightly affected in growth. Complex I was undetectable in the double mutants, but complex II and complex IV were upregulated concomitant with increased oxygen consumption in mitochondrial respiration. Ectopic expression of inactive CA variants was sufficient to complement the mutant phenotype. Data indicate that CA proteins are structurally required for complex I assembly and that reproductive development is dependent on the presence of complex I. PMID:26889912

  13. Carbonic anhydrase IV (CAR4) is expressed on IL-5 activated murine eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ting; Mingler, Melissa K.; Wahl, Benjamin; Khorki, M. Eyad; Pabst, Oliver; Zimmermann, Nives; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilia and its cellular activation are hallmark features of asthma, as well as other allergic/TH2 disorders, yet there are few, if any, reliable surface markers of eosinophil activation. We have employed a FACS-based genome-wide screening system to identify transcriptional alterations in murine lung eosinophils recruited and activated by pulmonary allergen exposure. Using a relatively stringent screen with false-positive correction, we identified 82 candidate genes that could serve as eosinophil activation markers and/or pathogenic effector markers in asthma. Carbonic anhydrase IV (Car4) was a top dysregulated gene with 36-fold induction in allergen-elicited pulmonary eosinophils, which was validated by quantitative PCR, IHC and by flow cytometry. Eosinophil CAR4 expression was kinetically regulated by IL-5 but not IL-13. IL-5 was both necessary and sufficient for induction of eosinophil CAR4. While CAR4-deficient mice did not have a defect in eosinophil recruitment to the lung nor a change in eosinophil pH-buffering capacity, allergen-challenged chimeric mice that contained Car4−/− hematopoietic cells aberrantly expressed a series of genes enriched in biological processes involved in epithelial differentiation, keratinization, and anion exchange. In conclusion, we have determined that eosinophils express CAR4 following IL-5 or allergen exposure, and that CAR4 is involved in regulating the lung transcriptome associated with allergic airway inflammation; as such, CAR4 has potential value for diagnosing and monitoring eosinophilic responses. PMID:24808371

  14. Sulfonamide inhibition studies of the η-class carbonic anhydrase from the malaria pathogen Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Vullo, Daniela; Del Prete, Sonia; Fisher, Gillian M; Andrews, Katherine T; Poulsen, Sally-Ann; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-02-01

    The η-carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) were recently discovered as the sixth genetic class of this metalloenzyme superfamily, and are so far known only in protozoa, including various Plasmodium species, the causative agents of malaria. We report here an inhibition study of the η-CA from Plasmodium falciparum (PfCA) against a panel of sulfonamides and one sulfamate compound, some of which are clinically used. The strongest inhibitors identified were ethoxzolamide and sulthiame, with KIs of 131-132 nM, followed by acetazolamide, methazolamide and hydrochlorothiazide (KIs of 153-198 nM). Brinzolamide, topiramate, zonisamide, indisulam, valdecoxib and celecoxib also showed significant inhibitory action against PfCA, with KIs ranging from 217 to 308 nM. An interesting observation was that the more efficient PfCA inhibitors are representative of several scaffolds and chemical classes, including benzene sulfonamides, monocyclic/bicyclic heterocyclic sulfonamides and compounds with a more complex scaffold (i.e., the sugar sulfamate derivative, topiramate, and the coxibs, celecoxib and valdecoxib). A comprehensive inhibition study of small molecules for η-CAs is needed as a first step towards assessing PfCA as a druggable target. The present work identifies the first known η-CA inhibitors and provides a platform for the development of next generation novel PfCA inhibitors. PMID:25533402

  15. Structural Insights into Carbonic Anhydrase IX Isoform Specificity of Carbohydrate-Based Sulfamates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is an extracellular transmembrane homodimeric zinc metalloenzyme that has been validated as a prognostic marker and therapeutic target for several types of aggressive cancers. CA IX shares a close homology with other CA isoforms, making the design of CA IX isoform selective inhibitors challenging. In this paper, we describe the development of a new class of CA IX inhibitors that comprise a sulfamate as the zinc binding group, a variable linker, and a carbohydrate “tail” moiety. Seven compounds inhibited CA IX with low nM Ki values of 1–2 nM and also exhibited permeability profiles to preferentially target the binding of extracellular CA IX over cytosolic CAs. The crystal structures of two of these compounds in complex with a CA IX-mimic (a variant of CA II, with active site residues that mimic CA IX) and one compound in complex with CA II have been determined to 1.7 Å resolution or better and demonstrate a selective mechanism of binding between the hydrophilic and hydrophobic pockets of CA IX versus CA II. These compounds present promising candidates for anti-CA IX drugs and the treatment for several aggressive cancer types. PMID:25254302

  16. Sulfonamide inhibition studies of the δ-carbonic anhydrase from the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii.

    PubMed

    Vullo, Daniela; Del Prete, Sonia; Osman, Sameh M; De Luca, Viviana; Scozzafava, Andrea; Alothman, Zeid; Supuran, Claudiu T; Capasso, Clemente

    2014-01-01

    The δ-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) TweCA from the marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii has recently been cloned, purified and its activity/inhibition with anions investigated. Here we report the first sulfonamide/sulfamate inhibition study of a δ-class CA. Among the 40 such compounds investigated so far, 3-bromosulfanilamide, acetazolamide, ethoxzolamide, dorzolamide and brinzolamide were the most effective TweCA inhibitors detected, with KIs of 49.6-118nM. Many simple aromatic sulfonamides as well as dichlorophenamide, benzolamide, topiramate, zonisamide, indisulam and valdecoxib were medium potency inhibitors, (KIs of 375-897nM). Saccharin and hydrochlorothiazide were ineffective inhibitors of the δ-class enzyme, with KIs of 4.27-9.20μM. The inhibition profile of the δ-CA is very different from that of α-, β- and γ-CAs from different organisms. Although no X-ray crystal structure of this enzyme is available, we hypothesize that as for other CA classes, the sulfonamides inhibit the enzymatic activity by binding to the Zn(II) ion from the δ-CA active site. PMID:24314394

  17. GdnHCl-induced unfolding intermediate in the mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase VA.

    PubMed

    Idrees, Danish; Prakash, Amresh; Haque, Md Anzarul; Islam, Asimul; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Faizan

    2016-10-01

    Carbonic anhydrase VA (CAVA) is a mitochondrial enzyme belonging to the α-family of CAs, which is involved in several physiological processes including ureagenesis, lipogenesis, gluconeogenesis and neuronal transmission. Here, we have tried to understand the folding mechanism of CAVA using guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl)-induced denaturation at pH 8.0 and 25°C. The conformational stability was measured from the GdnHCl-induced denaturation study of CAVA monitored by circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence measurements. On increasing the concentration of GdnHCl up to 5.0, a stable intermediate was observed between the concentrations 3.25M to 3.40M of the denaturant. However, CAVA gets completely denatured at 4.0M GdnHCl. The existence of a stable intermediate state was validated by 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS binding) fluorescence and near-UV CD measurements. In silico studies were also performed to analyse the effect of GdnHCl on the structure and stability of CAVA under explicit conditions. Molecular dynamics simulations for 40ns were carried out and a well-defined correlation was established for both in vitro and in silico studies. PMID:27365118

  18. Spectroscopic and MD simulation studies on unfolding processes of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase VA induced by urea.

    PubMed

    Idrees, Danish; Prakash, Amresh; Haque, Md Anzarul; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-09-01

    Carbonic anhydrase VA (CAVA) is primarily expressed in the mitochondria and involved in numerous physiological processes including lipogenesis, insulin secretion from pancreatic cells, ureagenesis, gluconeogenesis and neuronal transmission. To understand the biophysical properties of CAVA, we carried out a reversible urea-induced isothermal denaturation at pH 7.0 and 25°C. Spectroscopic probes, [θ]222 (mean residue ellipticity at 222 nm), F344 (Trp-fluorescence emission intensity at 344 nm) and Δε280 (difference absorption at 280 nm) were used to monitor the effect of urea on the structure and stability of CAVA. The urea-induced reversible denaturation curves were used to estimate [Formula: see text], Gibbs free energy in the absence of urea; Cm, the mid-point of the denaturation curve, i.e. molar urea concentration ([urea]) at which ΔGD = 0; and m, the slope (=∂ΔGD/∂[urea]). Coincidence of normalized transition curves of all optical properties suggests that unfolding/refolding of CAVA is a two-state process. We further performed 40 ns molecular dynamics simulation of CAVA to see the dynamics at different urea concentrations. An excellent agreement was observed between in silico and in vitro studies. PMID:26421381

  19. Anti-carbonic anhydrase II antibodies in systemic sclerosis: association with lung involvement.

    PubMed

    Alessandri, Cristiano; Bombardieri, Michele; Scrivo, Rossana; Viganego, Federico; Conti, Fabrizio; de Luca, Nicoletta; Riccieri, Valeria; Valesini, Guido

    2003-03-01

    Carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) is expressed on alveolar epithelium and participates to CO2 elimination, fluid secretion and post-capillary pH regulation. CAII is overexpressed in animal models of lung fibrosis in sites of epithelial injury. Autoantibodies directed against CAII (anti-CAII) have been described in sera from patients affected by systemic sclerosis (SSc), but no study focused on their clinical associations in this disease. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of anti-CAII in sera of SSc patients and to investigate their association with lung involvement. We performed ELISA to detect anti-CAII in 34 SSc patients who underwent pulmonary function tests (PFT) and Doppler echocardiography. We found increased prevalence and significantly elevated serum levels of anti-CAII in SSc patients affected by restrictive lung disease (RLD) compared to SSc patients without lung involvement and healthy controls. These findings suggest both a possible pathogenic role of anti-CAII in the development of lung damage and a potential clinical utility as serological marker of pulmonary involvement in SSc patients. PMID:12820690

  20. Enzyme renaturation to higher activity driven by the sol-gel transition: Carbonic anhydrase

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradov, Vladimir V.; Avnir, David

    2015-01-01

    We describe a so-far unknown route for renaturing denatured enzymes, namely subjecting the denatured enzyme to an oxide sol-gel transition. The phenomenon was revealed in a detailed study of denatured carbonic anhydrase which was subjected to an alumina sol-gel transition, up to the thermally stabilizing entrapment in the final xerogel. Remarkably, not only that the killed enzyme regained its activity during the sol-gel process, but its activity increased to 180% of the native enzyme. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of enhanced activity following by renaturing (a “Phoenix effect”). Kinetic study which revealed a five-orders of magnitude (!) increase in the Arrhenius prefactor upon entrapment compared to solution. Circular dichroism analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, zeta potential analyses as well as synchronous fluorescence measurements, all of which were used to characterize the phenomenon, are consistent with a proposed mechanism which is based on the specific orienting interactions of the active site of the enzyme with respect to the alumina interface and its pores network. PMID:26394694

  1. The Evolutionary History of Daphniid α-Carbonic Anhydrase within Animalia.

    PubMed

    Culver, Billy W; Morton, Philip K

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that drive acid-base regulation in organisms is important, especially for organisms in aquatic habitats that experience rapidly fluctuating pH conditions. Previous studies have shown that carbonic anhydrases (CAs), a family of zinc metalloenzymes, are responsible for acid-base regulation in many organisms. Through the use of phylogenetic tools, this present study attempts to elucidate the evolutionary history of the α-CA superfamily, with particular interest in the emerging model aquatic organism Daphnia pulex. We provide one of the most extensive phylogenies of the evolution of α-CAs, with the inclusion of 261 amino acid sequences across taxa ranging from Cnidarians to Homo sapiens. While the phylogeny supports most of our previous understanding on the relationship of how α-CAs have evolved, we find that, contrary to expectations, amino acid conservation with bacterial α-CAs supports the supposition that extracellular α-CAs are the ancestral state of animal α-CAs. Furthermore, we show that two cytosolic and one GPI-anchored α-CA in Daphnia genus have homologs in sister taxa that are possible candidate genes to study for acid-base regulation. In addition, we provide further support for previous findings of a high rate of gene duplication within Daphnia genus, as compared with other organisms. PMID:25893130

  2. Benzenesulfonamides incorporating bulky aromatic/heterocyclic tails with potent carbonic anhydrase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Bozdag, Murat; Alafeefy, Ahmed M; Vullo, Daniela; Carta, Fabrizio; Dedeoglu, Nurcan; Al-Tamimi, Abdul-Malek S; Al-Jaber, Nabila A; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-12-15

    Three series of sulfonamides incorporating long, bulky tails were obtained by applying synthetic strategies in which substituted anthranilic acids, quinazolines and aromatic sulfonamides have been used as starting materials. They incorporate long, bulky diamide-, 4-oxoquinazoline-3-yl- or quinazoline-4-yl moieties in their molecules, and were investigated for the inhibition of four physiologically relevant carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoforms, the cytosolic human (h) hCA I and II, as well as the transmembrane hCA IX and XII. Most of the new sulfonamides showed excellent inhibitory effects against the four isoforms, with KIs of 7.6-322nM against hCA I, of 0.06-85.4nM against hCA II; of 6.7-152nM against hCA IX and of 0.49-237nM against hCA XII; respectively. However no relevant isoform-selective behavior has been observed for any of them, although hCA II and XII, isoforms involved in glaucoma-genesis were the most inhibited ones. The structure-activity relationship for inhibiting the four CAs with these derivatives is discussed in detail. PMID:26639945

  3. Isatin-pyrazole benzenesulfonamide hybrids potently inhibit tumor-associated carbonic anhydrase isoforms IX and XII.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hany S; Abou-Seri, Sahar M; Tanc, Muhammet; Elaasser, Mahmoud M; Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-10-20

    New series of benzenesulfonamide derivatives incorporating pyrazole and isatin moieties were prepared using celecoxib as lead molecule. Biological evaluation of the target compounds was performed against the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) and more precisely against the human isoforms hCA I, II (cytosolic), IX and XII (transmembrane, tumor-associated enzymes). Most of the tested compounds efficiently inhibited hCA I, II and IX, with KIs of 2.5-102 nM, being more effective than the reference drug acetazolamide. Compounds 11e, 11f, 16e and 16f were found to inhibit hCA XII with Ki of 3.7, 6.5, 5.4 and 7.2 nM, respectively. Compounds 11e and 16e, with 5-NO2 substitution on the isatin ring, were found to be selective inhibitors of hCA IX and hCA XII. Docking studies revealed that the NO2 group of both compounds participate in interactions with Asp132 within the hCA IX active site, and with residues Lys67 and Asp130 in hCA XII, respectively. PMID:26408817

  4. Sulfonamide inhibition studies of the β-carbonic anhydrase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Sonia; Vullo, Daniela; De Luca, Viviana; Carginale, Vincenzo; Ferraroni, Marta; Osman, Sameh M; AlOthman, Zeid; Supuran, Claudiu T; Capasso, Clemente

    2016-03-01

    The genome of the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae encodes for three carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) belonging to the α-, β- and γ-classes. VchCA, the α-CA from this species was investigated earlier, whereas the β-class enzyme, VchCAβ was recently cloned, characterized kinetically and its X-ray crystal structure reported by this group. Here we report an inhibition study with sulfonamides and one sulfamate of this enzyme. The best VchCAβ inhibitors were deacetylated acetazolamide and methazolamide and hydrochlorothiazide, which showed inhibition constants of 68.2-87.0nM. Other compounds, with medium potency against VchCAβ, (KIs in the range of 275-463nM), were sulfanilamide, metanilamide, sulthiame and saccharin whereas the clinically used agents such as acetazolamide, methazolamide, ethoxzolamide, dorzolamide, zonisamide and celecoxib were micromolar inhibitors (KIs in the range of 4.51-8.57μM). Identification of potent and possibly selective inhibitors of VchCA and VchCAβ over the human CA isoforms, may lead to pharmacological tools useful for understanding the physiological role(s) of this under-investigated enzymes. PMID:26850377

  5. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitory properties of novel benzylsulfamides using molecular modeling and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Göksu, Süleyman; Naderi, Ali; Akbaba, Yusuf; Kalın, Pınar; Akıncıoğlu, Akın; Gülçin, İlhami; Durdagi, Serdar; Salmas, Ramin Ekhteiari

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a series of sulfamoyl carbamates and sulfamide derivatives were synthesized. Six commercially available benzyl amines and BnOH were reacted with chlorosulfonyl isocyanate (CSI) to give sulfamoyl carbamates. Pd-C catalyzed hydrogenolysis reactions of carbamates afforded sulfamides. The inhibition effects of novel benzylsulfamides on the carbonic anhydrase I, and II isoenzymes (CA I, and CA II) purified from fresh human blood red cells were determined by Sepharose-4B-L-Tyrosine-sulfanilamide affinity chromatography. In vitro studies were shown that all of novel synthesized benzylsulfamide analogs inhibited, concentration dependently, both hCA isoenzyme activities. The novel benzylsulfamide compounds investigated here exhibited nanomolar inhibition constants against the two isoenzymes. Ki values were in the range of 28.48±0.01-837.09±0.19nM and 112.01±0.01-268.01±0.22nM for hCAI and hCA II isoenzymes, respectively. Molecular modeling approaches were also applied for studied compounds. PMID:25159522

  6. Purification of Bovine Carbonic Anhydrase by Affinity Chromatography: An Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bering, C. Larry; Kuhns, Jennifer J.; Rowlett, Roger

    1998-08-01

    We have developed a rapid and inexpensive experiment utilizing affinity chromatography to isolate carbonic anhydrase (CA) from bovine blood. The more specific an affinity gel is the better the purification, but the greater the cost. Some costs would be prohibitive in the undergraduate biochemistry laboratory. Less specific resins may be more affordable but may bind a number of closely related proteins. One alternative would be to couple a specific ligand to an inexpensive resin such as an ion exchanger. We describe a simple procedure for preparing a sulfonamide-coupled resin which specifically binds CA from a blood hemolysate. The CA is eluted and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). It was found that only a single band of 31 kD was obtained. The instructor can readily prepare the affinity gel prior to the lab, and the students, beginning with packed red blood cells can carry out the lysis, binding to the gel, elution, enzymatic assays, and electrophoresis.

  7. Indazole, Pyrazole, and Oxazole Derivatives Targeting Nitric Oxide Synthases and Carbonic Anhydrases.

    PubMed

    Maccallini, Cristina; Di Matteo, Mauro; Vullo, Daniela; Ammazzalorso, Alessandra; Carradori, Simone; De Filippis, Barbara; Fantacuzzi, Marialuigia; Giampietro, Letizia; Pandolfi, Assunta; Supuran, Claudiu T; Amoroso, Rosa

    2016-08-19

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an essential endogenous mediator with a physiological role in the central nervous system as neurotransmitter and neuromodulator. A growing number of studies have demonstrated that abnormal nitrergic signaling is a crucial event in the development of neurodegeneration. In particular, the uncontrolled production of NO by neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is observed in several neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, it is well recognized that specific isoforms of human carbonic anhydrase (hCA) physiologically modulate crucial pathways of signal processing and that low expression of CA affects cognition, leading to mental retardation, Alzheimer's disease, and aging-related cognitive impairments. In light of this, dual agents that are able to target both NOS (inhibition) and CA (activation) could be useful drug candidates for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, aging, and other neurodegenerative diseases. In the present work, we show the design, synthesis, and in vitro biological evaluation of new nitrogen-based heterocyclic compounds. Among the tested molecules, 2-amino-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1H-indazol-5-yl)propanamide hydrochloride (10 b) was revealed to be a potent dual agent, able to act as a selective nNOS inhibitor and activator of the hCA I isoform. PMID:27377568

  8. Phosphorylation of carbonic anhydrase IX controls its ability to mediate extracellular acidification in hypoxic tumors.

    PubMed

    Ditte, Peter; Dequiedt, Franck; Svastova, Eliska; Hulikova, Alzbeta; Ohradanova-Repic, Anna; Zatovicova, Miriam; Csaderova, Lucia; Kopacek, Juraj; Supuran, Claudiu T; Pastorekova, Silvia; Pastorek, Jaromir

    2011-12-15

    In the hypoxic regions of a tumor, carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is an important transmembrane component of the pH regulatory machinery that participates in bicarbonate transport. Because tumor pH has implications for growth, invasion, and therapy, determining the basis for the contributions of CA IX to the hypoxic tumor microenvironment could lead to new fundamental and practical insights. Here, we report that Thr443 phosphorylation at the intracellular domain of CA IX by protein kinase A (PKA) is critical for its activation in hypoxic cells, with the fullest activity of CA IX also requiring dephosphorylation of Ser448. PKA is activated by cAMP, which is elevated by hypoxia, and we found that attenuating PKA in cells disrupted CA IX-mediated extracellular acidification. Moreover, following hypoxia induction, CA IX colocalized with the sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter and other PKA substrates in the leading edge membranes of migrating tumor cells, in support of the concept that bicarbonate metabolism is spatially regulated at cell surface sites with high local ion transport and pH control. Using chimeric CA IX proteins containing heterologous catalytic domains derived from related CA enzymes, we showed that CA IX activity was modulated chiefly by the intracellular domain where Thr443 is located. Our findings indicate that CA IX is a pivotal mediator of the hypoxia-cAMP-PKA axis, which regulates pH in the hypoxic tumor microenvironment. PMID:22037869

  9. Carbonic anhydrase immobilized on encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles for CO2 sequestration.

    PubMed

    Vinoba, Mari; Bhagiyalakshmi, Margandan; Jeong, Soon Kwan; Nam, Sung Chan; Yoon, Yeoil

    2012-09-17

    Bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA) was covalently immobilized onto OAPS (octa(aminophenyl)silsesquioxane)-functionalized Fe(3)O(4)/SiO(2) nanoparticles by using glutaraldehyde as a spacer. The Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles were coated with SiO(2), onto which was grafted OAPS, and the product was characterized using SEM, TEM, XRD, IR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and magnetometer analysis. The enzymatic activities of the free and Fe(3)O(4)/SiO(2)/OAPS-conjugated BCA (Fe-CA) were investigated by hydrolyzing p-nitrophenylacetate (p-NPA), and hydration and sequestration of CO(2) to CaCO(3). The CO(2) conversion efficiency and reusability of the Fe-CA were studied before and after washing the recovered Fe-CA by applying a magnetic field and quantifying the unreacted Ca(2+) ions by using ion chromatography. After 30 cycles, the Fe-CA displayed strong activity, and the CO(2) capture efficiency was 26-fold higher than that of the free enzyme. Storage stability studies suggested that Fe-CA retained nearly 82 % of its activity after 30 days. Nucleation of the precipitated CaCO(3) was monitored by using polarized light microscopy, which revealed the formation of two phases, calcite and valerite, at pH 10 upon addition of serine. The magnetic nanobiocatalyst was shown to be an excellent reusable catalyst for the sequestration of CO(2). PMID:22888048

  10. The Structure of Carbonic Anhydrase IX Is Adapted for Low-pH Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Brian P; Bhatt, Avni; Socorro, Lilien; Driscoll, Jenna M; Okoh, Cynthia; Lomelino, Carrie L; Mboge, Mam Y; Kurian, Justin J; Tu, Chingkuang; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Frost, Susan C; McKenna, Robert

    2016-08-23

    Human carbonic anhydrase IX (hCA IX) expression in many cancers is associated with hypoxic tumors and poor patient outcome. Inhibitors of hCA IX have been used as anticancer agents with some entering Phase I clinical trials. hCA IX is transmembrane protein whose catalytic domain faces the extracellular tumor milieu, which is typically associated with an acidic microenvironment. Here, we show that the catalytic domain of hCA IX (hCA IX-c) exhibits the necessary biochemical and biophysical properties that allow for low pH stability and activity. Furthermore, the unfolding process of hCA IX-c appears to be reversible, and its catalytic efficiency is thought to be correlated directly with its stability between pH 3.0 and 8.0 but not above pH 8.0. To rationalize this, we determined the X-ray crystal structure of hCA IX-c to 1.6 Å resolution. Insights from this study suggest an understanding of hCA IX-c stability and activity in low-pH tumor microenvironments and may be applicable to determining pH-related effects on enzymes. PMID:27439028