Science.gov

Sample records for carboxyl functional groups

  1. Structure and function studies on enzymes with a catalytic carboxyl group(s): from ribonuclease T1 to carboxyl peptidases

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    A group of enzymes, mostly hydrolases or certain transferases, utilize one or a few side-chain carboxyl groups of Asp and/or Glu as part of the catalytic machinery at their active sites. This review follows mainly the trail of studies performed by the author and his colleagues on the structure and function of such enzymes, starting from ribonuclease T1, then extending to three major types of carboxyl peptidases including aspartic peptidases, glutamic peptidases and serine-carboxyl peptidases. PMID:23759941

  2. Retention of heavy metals by carboxyl functional groups of biochars in small arms range soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term effectiveness of biochar for heavy metal stabilization depends upon biochar’s sorptive property and recalcitrance in soil. To understand the role of carboxyl functional groups on heavy metal stabilization, cottonseed hull biochar and flax shive steam activated biochar having low O/C ratio...

  3. Gas-Phase Reactivity of Carboxylic Acid Functional Groups with Carbodiimides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, Boone M.; Gilbert, Joshua D.; Stutzman, John R.; Forrest, William P.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase modification of carboxylic acid functionalities is performed via ion/ion reactions with carbodiimide reagents [ N-cyclohexyl- N'-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide (CMC) and [3-(3-Ethylcarbodiimide-1-yl)propyl]trimethylaminium (ECPT)]. Gas-phase ion/ion covalent chemistry requires the formation of a long-lived complex. In this instance, the complex is stabilized by an electrostatic interaction between the fixed charge quaternary ammonium group of the carbodiimide reagent cation and the analyte dianion. Subsequent activation results in characteristic loss of an isocyanate derivative from one side of the carbodiimide functionality, a signature for this covalent chemistry. The resulting amide bond is formed on the analyte at the site of the original carboxylic acid. Reactions involving analytes that do not contain available carboxylic acid groups (e.g., they have been converted to sodium salts) or reagents that do not have the carbodiimide functionality do not undergo a covalent reaction. This chemistry is demonstrated using PAMAM generation 0.5 dendrimer, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and the model peptide DGAILDGAILD. This work demonstrates the selective gas-phase covalent modification of carboxylic acid functionalities.

  4. Gas-phase reactivity of carboxylic acid functional groups with carbodiimides.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Boone M; Gilbert, Joshua D; Stutzman, John R; Forrest, William P; McLuckey, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase modification of carboxylic acid functionalities is performed via ion/ion reactions with carbodiimide reagents [N-cyclohexyl-N'-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide (CMC) and [3-(3-Ethylcarbodiimide-1-yl)propyl]trimethylaminium (ECPT)]. Gas-phase ion/ion covalent chemistry requires the formation of a long-lived complex. In this instance, the complex is stabilized by an electrostatic interaction between the fixed charge quaternary ammonium group of the carbodiimide reagent cation and the analyte dianion. Subsequent activation results in characteristic loss of an isocyanate derivative from one side of the carbodiimide functionality, a signature for this covalent chemistry. The resulting amide bond is formed on the analyte at the site of the original carboxylic acid. Reactions involving analytes that do not contain available carboxylic acid groups (e.g., they have been converted to sodium salts) or reagents that do not have the carbodiimide functionality do not undergo a covalent reaction. This chemistry is demonstrated using PAMAM generation 0.5 dendrimer, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and the model peptide DGAILDGAILD. This work demonstrates the selective gas-phase covalent modification of carboxylic acid functionalities. PMID:23208744

  5. Preparation and Sonodynamic Antitumor Effect of Protohemin-Conjugated Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Functionalized with Carboxylic Group.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuan-Jin; Li, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Preclinical Research Sonodynamic therapy (SDT) is a cutting edge approach to treating cancer that involves necrosis and/or apoptosis. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes functionalized with carboxylic groups (MWCNTs-COOH) due their physicochemical structure represent a novel drug delivery system in the field of nanomedicine. The purpose of the research reported in this paper was to increase the antitumor potency and reduce the potential side effects of protohemin (Ph), a sonosensitizer for SDT, which was noncovalently encapsulated into MWCNTs-COOH (MWCNTs-Ph). The Ph loading efficiency in MWCNTs-COOH carrier was determined as approximately 68.8% (w/w). The growth inhibition rate of MWCNTs-Ph (Ph: 180 μg/mL) was approximately 95 ± 8.5%, whereas Ph-F (Ph: 180 μg/mL) inhibited 58 ± 4.5% of tumor cell. Ph (Ph: 180 μg/mL) alone had no antitumor effect in HepG-2 cells using ultrasound treatment at 1.0 MHz and 0.5 W/cm(2) for 100 s. Assessment of the antitumor effects of MWCNTs-Ph and Ph-F at day 11 after SDT showed that he tumor inhibition ratio for MWCNTs-Ph (6.18 × 10(-2) g·kg(-1) ·d(-1) ) was 82.8%, twice that of Ph-F (6.18 × 10(-2) g·kg(-1) ·d(-1) ) ay 41.8%. In conclusion, MWCNTs-Ph had increased antitumor efficiency and also decreased potential side effects. Drug Dev Res 77 : 152-158, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27029561

  6. Adsorption of pesticidal compounds bearing a single carboxyl functional group and biogenic amines by humic fraction-immobilized silica gel.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng-Sheng; Chen, Shushi

    2013-04-17

    Fractions collected from humic acids under acidic and basic conditions were immobilized on silica gel and used as adsorbents for a variety of agricultural pesticide compounds bearing a single carboxyl functional group and biogenic amines in acetonitrile. Among these compounds examined under the same conditions, the percentage of adsorption varies considerably from 0 to almost 100%. The percentage is found to be highly related to the structure of the analyte and the type of functional group attached to it. The adsorption, better performed on adsorbent immobilized with the fraction collected under acidic conditions, is believed to result from the reversible interaction between the functional moieties of the analyte and humic acids (e.g., amino or carboxyl group of analyte vs carboxyl group of humic acids, etc.) as no adsorption is observed under the same conditions for analytes that are derivatives of alcohol, amide, and ester. Given the nature of the analyte, the time needed to reach the maximum percent of adsorption decreases as the amount of adsorbent is increased. Also, the longer the time that has elapsed, the higher the percentage of analyte adsorbed, thus indicating that the adsorption process is surface-oriented. Factors such as the acidic or basic origin of the additive in the liquid phase of the matrix also affect the percentage of analyte adsorbed. PMID:23521499

  7. Carboxyl group reactivity in actin

    SciTech Connect

    Elzinga, M.

    1986-01-01

    While earlier work showed that the carboxyl groups of proteins could be quantitatively coupled to amino groups at pH 4.75 in the presence of EDC and a denaturing agent, the work presented here indicates that under milder conditions the modification of sidechain carboxyls is limited and somewhat specific. Most of the incorporated glycine ethyl ester (GEE) is apparently bound to five carboxyls. The total GEE incorporated was 3 to 4 moles/mole of protein as measured by an increase in Gly upon acid hydrolysis and amino acid analysis, as well as total radioactivity. 3.55 residues were found in peptides, 2.75 bound to residues 1 to 4, and 0.8 bound to Gly-100. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Electronic and optical response of Ru(II) complexes functionalized by methyl, carboxylate groups: joint theoretical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Tretiak, Sergei

    2008-01-01

    New photovoltaic and photocatalysis applications have been recently proposed based on the hybrid Ru(II)-bipyridine-complex/semiconductor quantum dot systems. In order to attach the complex to the surface of a semiconductor, a linking bridge - a carboxyl group - is added to one or two of the 2,2{prime}-bipyridine ligands. Such changes in the ligand structure, indeed, affect electronic and optical properties and consequently, the charge transfer reactivity of Ru-systems. In this study, we apply both theoretical and experimental approaches to analyze the effects brought by functionalization of bipyridine ligands with the methyl, carboxyl, and carboxilate groups on the electronic structure and optical response of the Ru(II) bipyridine complex. First principle calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) and linear response time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) are used to simulate the ground and excited-state structures of functionalized Ru-complexes in the gas phase, as well as in acetonitrile solution. In addition, an inelaborate Frenkel exciton model is used to explain the optical activity and splitting patterns of the low-energy excited states. All theoretical results nicely complement experimental absorption spectra of Ru-complexes and contribute to their interpretation. We found that the carboxyl group breaks the degeneracy of two low-energy optically bright excited states and red-shifts the absorption spectrum, while leaves ionization and affinity energies of complexes almost unchanged. Experimental studies show a high probability of deprotonation of the carbboxyl group in the Ru-complexes resulted in a slight blue shift and decrease of intensities of the low energy absorption peaks. Comparison of experimental and theoretical linear response spectra of deprotanated complexes demonstrate strong agreement when acetonitrile solvent is used in simulations. A polar solvent is found to play an important role in calculations of optical spectra: it stabilizes the energy of states localized on the carboxyl or carboxylate groups eliminating artificial charge transport states, which typically appear in TDDFT calculations. Thus, it is validated that the excited-state structure of the functionalized Ru-complexes, specifically in the case of the deprotonated functions, can be accurately modeled by TDDFT with the addition of a dielectric continuum in simulations.

  9. Effect of Carboxylic Functional Group Functionalized on Carbon Nanotubes Surface on the Removal of Lead from Water

    PubMed Central

    Atieh, Muataz Ali; Bakather, Omer Yehya; Al-Tawbini, Bassam; Bukhari, Alaadin A.; Abuilaiwi, Faraj Ahmad; Fettouhi, Mohamed B.

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption mechanism of the removal of lead from water by using carboxylic functional group (COOH) functionalized on the surface of carbon nanotubes was investigated. Four independent variables including pH, CNTs dosage, contact time, and agitation speed were carried out to determine the influence of these parameters on the adsorption capacity of the lead from water. The morphology of the synthesized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was characterized by using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in order to measure the diameter and the length of the CNTs. The diameters of the carbon nanotubes were varied from 20 to 40 nm with average diameter at 24 nm and 10 micrometer in length. Results of the study showed that 100% of lead was removed by using COOH-MCNTs at pH 7, 150 rpm, and 2 hours. These high removal efficiencies were likely attributed to the strong affinity of lead to the physical and chemical properties of the CNTs. The adsorption isotherms plots were well fitted with experimental data. PMID:21350599

  10. Carboxyl group participation in sulfate and sulfamate group transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, A.; Williams, A.

    1982-04-23

    The pH dependence for the hydrolysis of N-(2-carboxyphenyl)sulfamic acid exhibits a plateau region corresponding to participation of the carboxyl function. A normal deuterium oxide solvent isotope effect indicates that proton transfer from the carboxylic acid is concerted with sulfamate group transfer to water. Hydrolysis of salicylic sulfate and N-(2-carboxyphenyl)sulfamate in /sup 18/O-enriched water yields salicylic acid and anthranilic acids with no enrichment, excluding catalysis by neighboring nucleophilic attack on sulfur by the carboxylate group. Intermolecular catalysis by carboxylic acids is demonstrated in the hydrolysis of N-(1-naphthyl)sulfamic acid; the mechanism is shown to involve preequilibrium protonation of the nitrogen followed by nucleophilic attack on sulfur by the carboxylate anion. Fast decomposition of the acyl sulfate completes the hydrolysis; this mechanism is considered to be the most efficient but is excluded in the intramolecular case which is constrained by the electronic requirements of displacement at the sulfur atom (6-ENDO-tet).

  11. Controllable growth of Prussian blue nanostructures on carboxylic group-functionalized carbon nanofibers and its application for glucose biosensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Ye, Yinjian; Zhu, Haozhi; Song, Yonghai; He, Shuijian; Xu, Fugang; Hou, Haoqing

    2012-11-16

    Glucose detection is very important in biological analysis, clinical diagnosis and the food industry, and especially for the routine monitoring of diabetes. This work presents an electrochemical approach to the detection of glucose based on Prussian blue (PB) nanostructures/carboxylic group-functionalized carbon nanofiber (FCNF) nanocomposites. The hybrid nanocomposites were constructed by growing PB onto the FCNFs. The obtained PB-FCNF nanocomposites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The mechanism of formation of PB-FCNF nanocomposites was investigated and is discussed in detail. The PB-FCNF modified glassy carbon electrode (PB-FCNF/GCE) shows good electrocatalysis toward the reduction of H(2)O(2), a product from the reduction of O(2) followed by glucose oxidase (GOD) catalysis of the oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid. Further immobilizing GOD on the PB-FCNF/GCE, an amperometric glucose biosensor was achieved by monitoring the generated H(2)O(2) under a relatively negative potential. The resulting glucose biosensor exhibited a rapid response of 5 s, a low detection limit of 0.5 μM, a wide linear range of 0.02-12 mM, a high sensitivity of 35.94 μA cm(-2) mM(-1), as well as good stability, repeatability and selectivity. The sensor might be promising for practical application. PMID:23090569

  12. Thermoreversible hydrogels based on triblock copolymers of poly(ethylene glycol) and carboxyl functionalized poly(ε-caprolactone): The effect of carboxyl group substitution on the transition temperature and biocompatibility in plasma.

    PubMed

    Safaei Nikouei, Nazila; Vakili, Mohammad Reza; Bahniuk, Markian S; Unsworth, Larry; Akbari, Ali; Wu, Jianping; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh

    2015-01-01

    In this study we report on the development, characterization and plasma protein interaction of novel thermoresponsive in situ hydrogels based on triblock copolymers of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(α-carboxyl-co-benzyl carboxylate)-ε-caprolactone (PCBCL) having two different degrees of carboxyl group substitution on the PCBCL block. Block copolymers were synthesized through ring-opening polymerization of α-benzyl carboxylate-ε-caprolactone by dihydroxy PEG, leading to the production of poly(α-benzyl carboxylate-ε-caprolactone)-PEG-poly(α-benzyl carboxylate-ε-caprolactone) (PBCL-PEG-PBCL). This was followed by partial debenzylation of PBCL blocks under controlled conditions, leading to the preparation of PCBCL-PEG-PCBCL triblock copolymers with 30 and 54mol.% carboxyl group substitution. Prepared PCBCL-PEG-PCBCL block copolymers have been shown to have a concentration-dependent sol to gel transition as a result of an increase in temperature above ∼29°C, as evidenced by the inverse flow method, differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis. The sol-gel transition temperature/concentration and dynamic mechanical properties of the gel were found to be dependent on the level of carboxyl group substitution. Both hydrogels (30 and 54mol.% carboxyl group substitution) showed similar amounts of protein adsorption but striking differences in the profiles of the adsorbed proteome. Additionally, the two systems showed similarities in their clot formation kinetics but substantial differences in clot endpoints. The results show great promise for the above-mentioned thermoreversible in situ hydrogels as biocompatible materials for biomedical applications. PMID:25451305

  13. Functionalization of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes with Carboxylic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Sriram; Britt, Phillip F.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Puretzky, Alex A.; Lance, Michael J.; Geohegan, David B.; Oak Ridge National Laboratory Collaboration

    2003-03-01

    The chemical functionalization of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) is necessary to solubilize the materials and to assist in the dispersion of the bundles for a variety of applications. One approach has been to derivatize the pendant carboxyl groups that are formed in the oxidative purification of the SWNT. Unfortunately, these carboxyl groups are found in low concentrations because the purification conditions also leads to decarboxylation. Thus, methods were investigated to increase the concentration of carboxylic acids on SWNT by chemical oxidation with a variety of reagents including potassium permanganate, sulfuric acid/nitric acid, and sulfuric acid/hydrogen peroxide. The concentration of carboxylic acids was analyzed by FTIR, and the samples were characterized by TGA, Raman spectroscopy, SEM, and TEM. Surprisingly, many of the oxidative methods lead to the formation of amorphous carbon and little if any increase in carboxyl content of the SWNT.

  14. Anchoring functional molecules on TiO2 surfaces: A comparison between the carboxylic and the phosphonic acid group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luschtinetz, R.; Gemming, S.; Seifert, G.

    2011-10-01

    The adsorption of formic acid on clean TiO2 anatase (101) and rutile (110) surfaces is studied by density-functional-based methods and compared with the results for coupling related phosphonic acids to titania surfaces. The preferred adsorption mode of the formic acid on both surfaces is a dissociative bridging bidentate complex, which is similar to the adsorption geometry of phosphonic acid. Higher adsorption energies and shorter Ti-O bond lengths indicate that phosphonic acid binds more strongly to TiO2 than formic acid. The preference for the bidentate adsorption mode is supported by a detailed analysis of the charge distribution in the adsorption complexes. The strong interfacial electronic coupling between the adsorbate orbitals and the electronic states of the anatase (101) surface slab leads to additional states in the band gap of the clean surface. For rutile (110) no or only weak coupling of the adsorbate orbitals and the surface states occurs at the band edges, which leads to an increase of the band gap.

  15. Carboxyl groups and the proton pump of bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Herz, J.M.; Packer, L.

    1983-08-01

    Chemical modification and spin-labeled studies of purple membranes isolated from Halobacterium halobium have provided the first evidence for buried carboxyl residues within the hydrophobic, membrane-protein domains. Spin label data showed that modification of buried carboxyl residues resulted in loss of protein activity. A pH-sensitive, chromophoric reporter group demostrated that a carboxyl residue in a hydrophobic membrane environment interacts with the retinal chromophore of bacteriorhodopsin. These results appear consistent with the idea that carboxyl residues in hydrophobic environments may be a general feature required for activity of membrane proton pumps.

  16. Nanocellulose/nanobentonite composite anchored with multi-carboxyl functional groups as an adsorbent for the effective removal of Cobalt(II) from nuclear industry wastewater samples.

    PubMed

    Anirudhan, T S; Deepa, J R; Christa, J

    2016-04-01

    A novel adsorbent, poly(itaconic acid/methacrylic acid)-grafted-nanocellulose/nanobentonite composite [P(IA/MAA)-g-NC/NB] with multi carboxyl functional groups for the effective removal of Cobalt(II) [Co(II)] from aqueous solutions. The adsorbent was characterized using FTIR, XRD, SEM-EDS, AFM and potentiometric titrations before and after adsorption of Co(II) ions. FTIR spectra revealed that Co(II) adsorption on to the polymer may be due to the involvement of COOH groups. The surface morphological changes were observed by the SEM images. The pH was optimized as 6.0. An adsorbent dose of 2.0g/L found to be sufficient for the complete removal of Co(II) from 100mg/L at room temperature. Pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models were tested to describe kinetic data and adsorption of Co(II) follows pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium attained at 120min. Isotherm studies were conducted and data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich and Sips isotherm models and best fit was Sips model. Thermodynamic study confirmed endothermic and physical nature of adsorption of the Co(II) onto the adsorbent. Desorption experiments were done with 0.1MHCl proved that without significant loss in performance adsorbent could be reused for six cycles. The practical efficacy and effectiveness of the adsorbent were tested using nuclear industrial wastewater. A double stage batch adsorption system was designed from the adsorption isotherm data of Co(II) by constructing operating lines. PMID:26844393

  17. Characterization and diagenesis of strong-acid carboxyl groups in humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Brown, G.K.; Reddy, M.M.

    2003-01-01

    A small fraction of carboxylic acid functional groups in humic substances are exceptionally acidic with pKa values as low as 0.5. A review of acid-group theory eliminated most models and explanations for these exceptionally acidic carboxyl groups. These acidic carboxyl groups in Suwannee River fulvic acid were enriched by a 2-stage fractionation process and the fractions were characterized by elemental, molecular-weight, and titrimetric analyses, and by infrared and 13C- and 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. An average structural model of the most acidic fraction derived from the characterization data indicated a high density of carboxyl groups clustered on oxygen-heterocycle alicyclic rings. Intramolecular H-bonding between adjacent carboxyl groups in these ring structures enhanced stabilization of the carboxylate anion which results in low pKa1 values. The standard, tetrahydrofuran tetracarboxylic acid, was shown to have similar acidity characteristics to the highly acidic fulvic acid fraction. The end products of 3 known diagenetic pathways for the formation of humic substances were shown to result in carboxyl groups clustered on oxygen-heterocycle alicyclic rings.

  18. Soluble, High Molecular Weight Polysilsesquioxanes with Carboxylate Functionalities

    SciTech Connect

    RAHIMIAN,KAMYAR; LOY,DOUGLAS A.; WHEELER,DAVID R.

    2000-07-14

    Trialkoxysilyl-containing monomers of the type (RO){sub 3}Si(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}C(O)OtBu (R = Me, Et) were prepared by hydrosilation of the corresponding vinylic tert-butyl esters CH{sub 3}CHCH{sub 2}C(O)OtBu. Acid- or base-catalyzed polymerization of the monomers leads to very high molecular weight polymers with relatively narrow polydispersities. The polymerization results in complete condensation of the alkoxy groups while the tert-butyl ester functionality remains fully intact. Partial or full deprotection of the tert-butyl group can easily be achieved to yield the corresponding carboxylic acid polymers. The ester and carboxylic acid functionalities of these new materials allow for their potential use in a variety of applications such as scavenging of heavy metals.

  19. IDENTIFICATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF AEROSOL POLAR OXYGENATED COMPOUNDS BEARING CARBOXYLIC AND/OR HYDROXYL GROUPS. 1. METHOD DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, a new analytical technique was developed for the identification and quantification of multi-functional compounds containing simultaneously at least one hydroxyl or one carboxylic group, or both. This technique is based on derivatizing first the carboxylic group(s) ...

  20. Green process for chemical functionalization of nanocellulose with carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Espino-Pérez, Etzael; Domenek, Sandra; Belgacem, Naceur; Sillard, Cécile; Bras, Julien

    2014-12-01

    An environmentally friendly and simple method, named SolReact, has been developed for a solvent-free esterification of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) surface by using two nontoxic carboxylic acids (CA), phenylacetic acid and hydrocinnamic acid. In this process, the carboxylic acids do not only act as grafting agent, but also as solvent media above their melting point. Key is the in situ solvent exchange by water evaporation driving the esterification reaction without drying the CNC. Atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses showed no significant change in the CNC dimensions and crystallinity index after this green process. The presence of the grafted carboxylic was characterized by analysis of the "bulk" CNC with elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy, and (13)C NMR. The ability to tune the surface properties of grafted nanocrystals (CNC-g-CA) was evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The hydrophobicity behavior of the functionalized CNC was studied through the water contact-angle measurements and vapor adsorption. The functionalization of these bionanoparticles may offer applications in composite manufacturing, where these nanoparticles have limited dispersibility in hydrophobic polymer matrices and as nanoadsorbers due to the presence of phenolic groups attached on the surface. PMID:25353612

  1. Improved antifouling properties of polyamide nanofiltration membranes by reducing the density of surface carboxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yinghui; Tiraferri, Alberto; Yip, Ngai Yin; Adout, Atar; Huang, Xia; Elimelech, Menachem

    2012-12-18

    Carboxyls are inherent functional groups of thin-film composite polyamide nanofiltration (NF) membranes, which may play a role in membrane performance and fouling. Their surface presence is attributed to incomplete reaction of acyl chloride monomers during the membrane active layer synthesis by interfacial polymerization. In order to unravel the effect of carboxyl group density on organic fouling, NF membranes were fabricated by reacting piperazine (PIP) with either isophthaloyl chloride (IPC) or the more commonly used trimesoyl chloride (TMC). Fouling experiments were conducted with alginate as a model hydrophilic organic foulant in a solution, simulating the composition of municipal secondary effluent. Improved antifouling properties were observed for the IPC membrane, which exhibited lower flux decline (40%) and significantly greater fouling reversibility or cleaning efficiency (74%) than the TMC membrane (51% flux decline and 40% cleaning efficiency). Surface characterization revealed that there was a substantial difference in the density of surface carboxyl groups between the IPC and TMC membranes, while other surface properties were comparable. The role of carboxyl groups was elucidated by measurements of foulant-surface intermolecular forces by atomic force microscopy, which showed lower adhesion forces and rupture distances for the IPC membrane compared to TMC membranes in the presence of calcium ions in solution. Our results demonstrated that a decrease in surface carboxyl group density of polyamide membranes fabricated with IPC monomers can prevent calcium bridging with alginate and, thus, improve membrane antifouling properties. PMID:23205860

  2. Functionalized carboxyl nanoparticles enhance mucus dispersion and hydration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Eric Y.; Daley, David; Wang, Yung-Chen; Garnica, Maria; Chen, Chi-Shuo; Chin, Wei-Chun

    2012-01-01

    Luminal accumulation of viscous, poorly hydrated, and less transportable mucus has been associated with altered mucus rheology and reduced mucociliary clearance. These symptoms are some of the cardinal clinical manifestations found throughout major respiratory diseases as well as gastrointestinal and digestive disorders. Applications of current mucolytics may yield short-term improvements but are continuously challenged by undesirable side-effects. While nanoparticles (NPs) can interact with mucin polymers, whether functionalized NPs can rectify mucus rheology is unknown. Herein, we report that carboxyl-functionalized NPs (24 nm and 120 nm) dramatically reduced mucin gel size and accelerated mucin matrix hydration rate (diffusivity). Our results suggest that carboxyl-functionalized NPs disperse mucin gels possibly by enhancing network hydration. This report highlights the prospective usages of carboxyl-functionalized NPs as a novel mucus dispersant or mucolytic agent in adjusting mucus rheological properties and improving mucociliary transport to relieve clinical symptoms of patients suffering from relevant diseases. PMID:22355725

  3. Characterizing monoclonal antibody structure by carboxyl group footprinting.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Parminder; Tomechko, Sara E; Kiselar, Janna; Shi, Wuxian; Deperalta, Galahad; Wecksler, Aaron T; Gokulrangan, Giridharan; Ling, Victor; Chance, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Structural characterization of proteins and their antigen complexes is essential to the development of new biologic-based medicines. Amino acid-specific covalent labeling (CL) is well suited to probe such structures, especially for cases that are difficult to examine by alternative means due to size, complexity, or instability. We present here a detailed account of carboxyl group labeling (with glycine ethyl ester (GEE) tagging) applied to a glycosylated monoclonal antibody therapeutic (mAb). The experiments were optimized to preserve the structural integrity of the mAb, and experimental conditions were varied and replicated to establish the reproducibility of the technique. Homology-based models were generated and used to compare the solvent accessibility of the labeled residues, which include aspartic acid (D), glutamic acid (E), and the C-terminus (i.e., the target probes), with the experimental data in order to understand the accuracy of the approach. Data from the mAb were compared to reactivity measures of several model peptides to explain observed variations in reactivity. Attenuation of reactivity in otherwise solvent accessible probes is documented as arising from the effects of positive charge or bond formation between adjacent amine and carboxyl groups, the latter accompanied by observed water loss. A comparison of results with previously published data by Deperalta etal using hydroxyl radical footprinting showed that 55% (32/58) of target residues were GEE labeled in this study whereas the previous study reported 21% of the targets were labeled. Although the number of target residues in GEE labeling is fewer, the two approaches provide complementary information. The results highlight advantages of this approach, such as the ease of use at the bench top, the linearity of the dose response plots at high levels of labeling, reproducibility of replicate experiments (<2% variation in modification extent), the similar reactivity of the three target probes, and significant correlation of reactivity and solvent accessible surface area. PMID:25933350

  4. Characterizing monoclonal antibody structure by carboxyl group footprinting

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Parminder; Tomechko, Sara E; Kiselar, Janna; Shi, Wuxian; Deperalta, Galahad; Wecksler, Aaron T; Gokulrangan, Giridharan; Ling, Victor; Chance, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Structural characterization of proteins and their antigen complexes is essential to the development of new biologic-based medicines. Amino acid-specific covalent labeling (CL) is well suited to probe such structures, especially for cases that are difficult to examine by alternative means due to size, complexity, or instability. We present here a detailed account of carboxyl group labeling (with glycine ethyl ester (GEE) tagging) applied to a glycosylated monoclonal antibody therapeutic (mAb). The experiments were optimized to preserve the structural integrity of the mAb, and experimental conditions were varied and replicated to establish the reproducibility of the technique. Homology-based models were generated and used to compare the solvent accessibility of the labeled residues, which include aspartic acid (D), glutamic acid (E), and the C-terminus (i.e., the target probes), with the experimental data in order to understand the accuracy of the approach. Data from the mAb were compared to reactivity measures of several model peptides to explain observed variations in reactivity. Attenuation of reactivity in otherwise solvent accessible probes is documented as arising from the effects of positive charge or bond formation between adjacent amine and carboxyl groups, the latter accompanied by observed water loss. A comparison of results with previously published data by Deperalta et al using hydroxyl radical footprinting showed that 55% (32/58) of target residues were GEE labeled in this study whereas the previous study reported 21% of the targets were labeled. Although the number of target residues in GEE labeling is fewer, the two approaches provide complementary information. The results highlight advantages of this approach, such as the ease of use at the bench top, the linearity of the dose response plots at high levels of labeling, reproducibility of replicate experiments (<2% variation in modification extent), the similar reactivity of the three target probes, and significant correlation of reactivity and solvent accessible surface area. PMID:25933350

  5. New and extended parameterization of the thermodynamic model AIOMFAC: calculation of activity coefficients for organic-inorganic mixtures containing carboxyl, hydroxyl, carbonyl, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, and aromatic functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Booth, A. M.; Lienhard, D. M.; Soonsin, V.; Krieger, U. K.; Topping, D. O.; McFiggans, G.; Peter, T.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2011-05-01

    We present a new and considerably extended parameterization of the thermodynamic activity coefficient model AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) at room temperature. AIOMFAC combines a Pitzer-like electrolyte solution model with a UNIFAC-based group-contribution approach and explicitly accounts for interactions between organic functional groups and inorganic ions. Such interactions constitute the salt-effect, may cause liquid-liquid phase separation, and affect the gas-particle partitioning of aerosols. The previous AIOMFAC version was parameterized for alkyl and hydroxyl functional groups of alcohols and polyols. With the goal to describe a wide variety of organic compounds found in atmospheric aerosols, we extend here the parameterization of AIOMFAC to include the functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, aldehyde, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, aromatic carbon-alcohol, and aromatic hydrocarbon. Thermodynamic equilibrium data of organic-inorganic systems from the literature are critically assessed and complemented with new measurements to establish a comprehensive database. The database is used to determine simultaneously the AIOMFAC parameters describing interactions of organic functional groups with the ions H+, Li+, Na+, K+, NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, Br-, NO3-, HSO4-, and SO42-. Detailed descriptions of different types of thermodynamic data, such as vapor-liquid, solid-liquid, and liquid-liquid equilibria, and their use for the model parameterization are provided. Issues regarding deficiencies of the database, types and uncertainties of experimental data, and limitations of the model, are discussed. The challenging parameter optimization problem is solved with a novel combination of powerful global minimization algorithms. A number of exemplary calculations for systems containing atmospherically relevant aerosol components are shown. Amongst others, we discuss aqueous mixtures of ammonium sulfate with dicarboxylic acids and with levoglucosan. Overall, the new parameterization of AIOMFAC agrees well with a large number of experimental datasets. However, due to various reasons, for certain mixtures important deviations can occur. The new parameterization makes AIOMFAC a versatile thermodynamic tool. It enables the calculation of activity coefficients of thousands of different organic compounds in organic-inorganic mixtures of numerous components. Models based on AIOMFAC can be used to compute deliquescence relative humidities, liquid-liquid phase separations, and gas-particle partitioning of multicomponent mixtures of relevance for atmospheric chemistry or in other scientific fields.

  6. New and extended parameterization of the thermodynamic model AIOMFAC: calculation of activity coefficients for organic-inorganic mixtures containing carboxyl, hydroxyl, carbonyl, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, and aromatic functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Booth, A. M.; Lienhard, D. M.; Soonsin, V.; Krieger, U. K.; Topping, D. O.; McFiggans, G.; Peter, T.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2011-09-01

    We present a new and considerably extended parameterization of the thermodynamic activity coefficient model AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) at room temperature. AIOMFAC combines a Pitzer-like electrolyte solution model with a UNIFAC-based group-contribution approach and explicitly accounts for interactions between organic functional groups and inorganic ions. Such interactions constitute the salt-effect, may cause liquid-liquid phase separation, and affect the gas-particle partitioning of aerosols. The previous AIOMFAC version was parameterized for alkyl and hydroxyl functional groups of alcohols and polyols. With the goal to describe a wide variety of organic compounds found in atmospheric aerosols, we extend here the parameterization of AIOMFAC to include the functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, aldehyde, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, aromatic carbon-alcohol, and aromatic hydrocarbon. Thermodynamic equilibrium data of organic-inorganic systems from the literature are critically assessed and complemented with new measurements to establish a comprehensive database. The database is used to determine simultaneously the AIOMFAC parameters describing interactions of organic functional groups with the ions H+, Li+, Na+, K+, NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, Br-, NO3-, HSO4-, and SO42-. Detailed descriptions of different types of thermodynamic data, such as vapor-liquid, solid-liquid, and liquid-liquid equilibria, and their use for the model parameterization are provided. Issues regarding deficiencies of the database, types and uncertainties of experimental data, and limitations of the model, are discussed. The challenging parameter optimization problem is solved with a novel combination of powerful global minimization algorithms. A number of exemplary calculations for systems containing atmospherically relevant aerosol components are shown. Amongst others, we discuss aqueous mixtures of ammonium sulfate with dicarboxylic acids and with levoglucosan. Overall, the new parameterization of AIOMFAC agrees well with a large number of experimental datasets. However, due to various reasons, for certain mixtures important deviations can occur. The new parameterization makes AIOMFAC a versatile thermodynamic tool. It enables the calculation of activity coefficients of thousands of different organic compounds in organic-inorganic mixtures of numerous components. Models based on AIOMFAC can be used to compute deliquescence relative humidities, liquid-liquid phase separations, and gas-particle partitioning of multicomponent mixtures of relevance for atmospheric chemistry or in other scientific fields.

  7. Temperature dependence of C-terminal carboxylic group IR absorptions in the amide I‧ region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Benjamin A.; Literati, Alex; Ball, Borden; Kubelka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Studies of structural changes in peptides and proteins using IR spectroscopy often rely on subtle changes in the amide I‧ band as a function of temperature. However, these changes can be obscured by the overlap with other absorptions, namely the side-chain and terminal carboxylic groups. The former were the subject of our previous report (Anderson et al., 2014). In this paper we investigate the IR spectra of the asymmetric stretch of α-carboxylic groups for amino acids representing all major types (Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ser, Thr, Asp, Glu, Lys, Asn, His, Trp, Pro) as well as the C-terminal groups of three dipeptides (Gly-Gly, Gly-Ala, Ala-Gly) in D2O at neutral pH. Experimental temperature dependent IR spectra were analyzed by fitting of both symmetric and asymmetric pseudo-Voigt functions. Qualitatively the spectra exhibit shifts to higher frequency, loss in intensity and narrowing with increased temperature, similar to that observed previously for the side-chain carboxylic groups of Asp. The observed dependence of the band parameters (frequency, intensity, width and shape) on temperature is in all cases linear: simple linear regression is therefore used to describe the spectral changes. The spectral parameters vary between individual amino acids and show systematic differences between the free amino acids and dipeptides, particularly in the absolute peak frequencies, but the temperature variations are comparable. The relative variations between the dipeptide spectral parameters are most sensitive to the C-terminal amino acid, and follow the trends observed in the free amino acid spectra. General rules for modeling the α-carboxylic IR absorption bands in peptides and proteins as the function of temperature are proposed.

  8. Rational design of carboxyl groups perpendicularly attached to a graphene sheet: a platform for enhanced biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Bonanni, Alessandra; Chua, Chun Kiang; Pumera, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO)-based materials offer great potential for biofunctionalization with applications ranging from biosensing to drug delivery. Such biofunctionalization utilizes specific functional groups, typically a carboxyl moiety, as anchoring points for biomolecule. However, due to the fact that the exact chemical structure of GO is still largely unknown and poorly defined (it was postulated to consist of various oxygen-containing groups, such as epoxy, hydroxyl, carboxyl, carbonyl, and peroxy in varying ratios), it is challenging to fabricate highly biofunctionalized GO surfaces. The predominant anchoring sites (i.e., carboxyl groups) are mainly present as terminal groups on the edges of GO sheets and thus account for only a fraction of the oxygen-containing groups on GO. Herein, we suggest a direct solution to the long-standing problem of limited abundance of carboxyl groups on GO; GO was first reduced to graphene and consequently modified with only carboxyl groups grafted perpendicularly to its surface by a rational synthesis using free-radical addition of isobutyronitrile with subsequent hydrolysis. Such grafted graphene oxide can contain a high amount of carboxyl groups for consequent biofunctionalization, at which the extent of grafting is limited only by the number of carbon atoms in the graphene plane; in contrast, the abundance of carboxyl groups on "classical" GO is limited by the amount of terminal carbon atoms. Such a graphene platform embedded with perpendicularly grafted carboxyl groups was characterized in detail by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and its application was exemplified with single-nucleotide polymorphism detection. It was found that the removal of oxygen functionalities after the chemical reduction enhanced the electron-transfer rate of the graphene. More importantly, the introduction of carboxyl groups promoted a more efficient immobilization of DNA probes on the electrode surface and improved the performance of graphene as a biosensor in comparison to GO. The proposed material can be used as a universal platform for biomolecule immobilization to facilitate rapid and sensitive detection of DNA or proteins for point-of-care investigations. Such reactive carboxyl groups grafted perpendicularly on GO holds promise for a highly efficient tailored biofunctionalization for applications in biosensing or drug delivery. PMID:24311348

  9. Highly visible-light luminescence properties of the carboxyl-functionalized short and ultrashort MWNTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yongsong; Xia, Xiaohong; Liang, Ying; Zhang, Yonggang; Ren, Qinfeng; Li, Jialin; Jia, Zhijie; Tang, Yiwen

    2007-06-01

    Luminescence of the short multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) conjugated with carboxylic acid groups has been studied. The results show that the carboxyl-functionalized short MWNTs could emit luminescence and the emission peak appears at 500 nm with a corresponding optimal excitation wavelength centering at 310 nm. When the short MWNTs are filtered through 0.15 μm polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane, the ultrashort MWNTs are obtained from the filtrate. An interesting feature for the ultrashort MWNTs is that the emission intensity is strengthened and the peak is slightly blue shifted to 460 nm. This result indicates that the luminescence properties of MWNTs are strongly affected by the tube length. After chemical oxidization cutting, defects and carboxylic acid groups at the tube end and/or sidewall can be produced; the more shorten of MWNTs, the better dispersion and carboxylic passivation of the nanotubes, and the more intense luminescence emissions. The broad emissions are logically attributed to the trapping of excitation energy by defect sites in the carboxyl-functionalized nanotube structure.

  10. Density Functional Theory Study on the Interactions of Metal Ions with Long Chain Deprotonated Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Mehandzhiyski, Aleksandar Y; Riccardi, Enrico; van Erp, Titus S; Koch, Henrik; Åstrand, Per-Olof; Trinh, Thuat T; Grimes, Brian A

    2015-10-01

    In this work, interactions between carboxylate ions and calcium or sodium ions are investigated via density functional theory (DFT). Despite the ubiquitous presence of these interactions in natural and industrial chemical processes, few DFT studies on these systems exist in the literature. Special focus has been placed on determining the influence of the multibody interactions (with up to 4 carboxylates and one metal ion) on an effective pair-interaction potential, such as those used in molecular mechanics (MM). Specifically, DFT calculations are employed to quantify an effective pair-potential that implicitly includes multibody interactions to construct potential energy curves for carboxylate-metal ion pairs. The DFT calculated potential curves are compared to a widely used molecular mechanics force field (OPLS-AA). The calculations indicate that multibody effects do influence the energetic behavior of these ionic pairs and the extent of this influence is determined by a balance between (a) charge transfer from the carboxylate to the metal ions which stabilizes the complex and (b) repulsion between carboxylates, which destabilizes the complex. Additionally, the potential curves of the complexes with 1 and 2 carboxylates and one counterion have been examined to higher separation distance (20 Å) by the use of relaxed scan optimization and constrained density functional theory (CDFT). The results from the relaxed scan optimization indicate that near the equilibrium distance, the charge transfer between the metal ion and the deprotonated carboxylic acid group is significant and leads to non-negligible differences between the DFT and MM potential curves, especially for calcium. However, at longer separation distances the MM calculated interaction potential functions converge to those calculated with CDFT, effectively indicating the approximate domain of the separation distance coordinate where charge transfer between the ions is occurring. PMID:26331433

  11. Theoretical insights on the interaction of uranium with amidoxime and carboxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong-Zhi; Lan, Jian-Hui; Wu, Qun-Yan; Luo, Qiong; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Wang, Xiang-Ke; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2014-09-15

    Recovery of uranium from seawater is extremely challenging but important for the persistent development of nuclear energy, and thus exploring the coordination structures and bonding nature of uranyl complexes becomes essential for designing highly efficient uranium adsorbents. In this work, the interactions of uranium and a series of adsorbents with various well-known functional groups including amidoximate (AO(-)), carboxyl (Ac(-)), glutarimidedioximate (HA(-)), and bifunctional AO(-)/Ac(-), HA(-)/Ac(-) on different alkyl chains (R'═CH3, R″═C13H26) were systematically studied by quantum chemical calculations. For all the uranyl complexes, the monodentate and η(2) coordination are the main binding modes for the AO(-) groups, while Ac(-) groups act as monodentate and bidentate ligands. Amidoximes can also form cyclic imide dioximes (H2A), which coordinate to UO2(2+) as tridentate ligands. Kinetic analysis of the model displacement reaction confirms the rate-determining step in the extraction process, that is, the complexing of uranyl by amidoxime group coupled with the dissociation of the carbonate group from the uranyl tricarbonate complex [UO2(CO3)3](4-). Complexing species with AO(-) groups show higher binding energies than the analogues with Ac(-) groups. However, the obtained uranyl complexes with Ac(-) seem to be more favorable according to reactions with [UO2(CO3)3](4-) as reactant, which may be due to the higher stability of HAO compared to HAc. This is also the reason that species with mixed functional group AO(-)/Ac(-) are more stable than those with monoligand. Thus, as reported in the literature, the adsorbability of uranium can be improved by the synergistic effects of amidoxime and carboxyl groups. PMID:25188818

  12. Carboxylic Acid Functionalized Clathrochelate Complexes: Large, Robust, and Easy-to-Access Metalloligands.

    PubMed

    Marmier, Mathieu; Wise, Matthew D; Holstein, Julian J; Pattison, Philip; Schenk, Kurt; Solari, Euro; Scopelliti, Rosario; Severin, Kay

    2016-04-18

    Polycarboxylate ligands are among the most important building blocks for the synthesis of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The ability to access these ligands in an efficient way is of key importance for future applications of MOFs. Here, we demonstrate that mono- and dinuclear clathrochelate complexes are versatile scaffolds for the preparation of polytopic carboxylate ligands. The largely inert clathrochelate complexes have a trigonal-bipyramidal shape. The synthesis of functionalized clathrochelates with two, three, four, or five carboxylic acid groups in the ligand periphery can be achieved in a few steps from simple starting materials. Apart from being easily accessible, the metalloligands display interesting characteristics for applications in metallasupramolecular chemistry and materials science: they are rigid, large (up to 2.2 nm), and robust and they can show additional functions (e.g., fluorescence or extra charge) depending on the metal ion that is present in the clathrochelate core. The utility of these new metalloligands in MOF chemistry is demonstrated by the synthesis of zinc- and zirconium-based coordination polymers. The combination of Zn(NO3)2 with clathrochelates having two or three carboxylic acid groups gives MOFs in which the clathrochelate ligands are connected by Zn4O clusters or zinc paddlewheel links. The structures of the resulting two- and three-dimensional networks could be established by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The reaction of carboxylic acid functionalized clathrochelates with ZrCl4 gives amorphous powders that display permanent porosity after solvent removal. PMID:27035252

  13. Structural environments of carboxyl groups in natural organic molecules from terrestrial systems. Part 1: Infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, Michael B.; Myneni, Satish C. B.

    2007-07-01

    Carboxyls play an important role in the chemistry of natural organic molecules (NOM) in the environment, and their behavior is dependent on local structural environment within the macromolecule. We studied the structural environments of carboxyl groups in dissolved NOM from the Pine Barrens (New Jersey, USA), and IHSS NOM isolates from soils and river waters using attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. It is well established that the energies of the asymmetric stretching vibrations of the carboxylate anion (COO -) are sensitive to the structural environment of the carboxyl group. These energies were compiled from previous infrared studies on small organic acids for a wide variety of carboxyl structural environments and compared with the carboxyl spectral features of the NOM samples. We found that the asymmetric stretching peaks for all NOM samples occur within a narrow range centered at 1578 cm -1, suggesting that all NOM samples examined primarily contain very similar carboxyl structures, independent of sample source and isolation techniques employed. The small aliphatic acids containing hydroxyl (e.g., D-lactate, gluconate), ether/ester (methoxyacetate, acetoxyacetate), and carboxylate (malonate) substitutions on the α-carbon, and the aromatic acids salicylate ( ortho-OH) and furancarboxylate ( O-heterocycle), exhibit strong overlap with the NOM range, indicating that similar structures may be common in NOM. The width of the asymmetric peak suggests that the structural heterogeneity among the predominant carboxyl configurations in NOM is small. Changes in peak area with pH at energies distant from the peak at 1578 cm -1, however, may be indicative of a small fraction of other aromatic carboxyls and aliphatic structures lacking α-substitution. This information is important in understanding NOM-metal and mineral-surface complexation, and in building appropriate structural and mechanistic models of humic materials.

  14. Polycarboxylation of carbon nanofibers under Friedel-Crafts condition: A simple route to direct binding of carboxylic functionalities to graphitic π-system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiancheng; Cai, Hualun; Xu, Kai; Fu, Zien; Liu, Xin; Chen, Mingcai; Zhang, Xiuju

    2012-11-01

    The functionalization of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with oxalyl chloride, via Friedel-Crafts reaction in the presence of aluminum chloride, was first demonstrated as an efficient way to introduce carboxyl groups onto the nanofiber sidewalls. Octa-aminophenylsilsesquioxane (OASQ) was then covalently attached to the carboxylated nanocarbon CNF-(COOH)n through amide linkage. Taking into account the nature of the electrophilic aromatic substitution, this chemical functionalization may involve formation of conjugated carboxylic acid moiety. Structural analysis combined with electron microscopy observation of the robust octasilsesquioxane species show that carboxyl groups are uniformly distributed on the nanofibers surface.

  15. Photoacidic and Photobasic Behavior of Transition Metal Compounds with Carboxylic Acid Group(s).

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Ryan M; Sampaio, Renato N; Li, Guocan; Johansson, Patrik G; Ward, Cassandra L; Meyer, Gerald J

    2016-03-23

    Excited state proton transfer studies of six Ru polypyridyl compounds with carboxylic acid/carboxylate group(s) revealed that some were photoacids and some were photobases. The compounds [Ru(II)(btfmb)2(LL)](2+), [Ru(II)(dtb)2(LL)](2+), and [Ru(II)(bpy)2(LL)](2+), where bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine, btfmb is 4,4'-(CF3)2-bpy, and dtb is 4,4'-((CH3)3C)2-bpy, and LL is either dcb = 4,4'-(CO2H)2-bpy or mcb = 4-(CO2H),4'-(CO2Et)-2,2'-bpy, were synthesized and characterized. The compounds exhibited intense metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) absorption bands in the visible region and room temperature photoluminescence (PL) with long τ > 100 ns excited state lifetimes. The mcb compounds had very similar ground state pKa's of 2.31 ± 0.07, and their characterization enabled accurate determination of the two pKa values for the commonly utilized dcb ligand, pKa1 = 2.1 ± 0.1 and pKa2 = 3.0 ± 0.2. Compounds with the btfmb ligand were photoacidic, and the other compounds were photobasic. Transient absorption spectra indicated that btfmb compounds displayed a [Ru(III)(btfmb(-))L2](2+)* localized excited state and a [Ru(III)(dcb(-))L2](2+)* formulation for all the other excited states. Time dependent PL spectral shifts provided the first kinetic data for excited state proton transfer in a transition metal compound. PL titrations, thermochemical cycles, and kinetic analysis (for the mcb compounds) provided self-consistent pKa* values. The ability to make a single ionizable group photobasic or photoacidic through ligand design was unprecedented and was understood based on the orientation of the lowest-lying MLCT excited state dipole relative to the ligand that contained the carboxylic acid group(s). PMID:26901780

  16. A temperature induced ferrocene-ferrocenium interconversion in a ferrocene functionalized μ3-O chromium carboxylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereacre, Valeriu; Schlageter, Martin; Powell, Annie K.

    2015-05-01

    The infrared spectra and 57Fe Mössbauer measurements of a ferrocenecarboxylate functionalized {Cr3O} complex in solid state are reported. It was established that conjugation of ferrocene Cp orbitals with the π orbitals of the adjacent carboxylic group stabilizes the trapped mixed-valence state leading to an intriguing coexistence of ferrocene and ferrocenium species giving rise to a new type of compound showing valence tautomerism in the solid state.

  17. In vitro thrombogenicity investigation of new water-dispersible polyurethane anionomers bearing carboxylate groups.

    PubMed

    Poussard, L; Burel, F; Couvercelle, J-P; Lesouhaitier, O; Merhi, Y; Tabrizian, M; Bunel, C

    2005-01-01

    New segmented polyurethane (PU) anionomers based on hydroxytelechelic polybutadiene were synthesized via an aqueous dispersion process. Incorporation of carboxylic groups was achieved using thioacids of different length. Surface properties were investigated by mean of water absorption analysis and static contact-angle measurements using water, diiodomethane, formamide and ethylene glycol. Blood compatibility of the PUs was evaluated by in vitro adhesion assays using 111In-radiolabeled platelet-rich plasma and [125I]fibrinogen. Morphology of the adhered platelets was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results were compared to two biomedical-grade PUs, namely Pellethane and Tecoflex. Insertion of carboxylic groups increased surface hydrophilicity and limited water uptake ( < 8% for an ion content of 5% by weight). Surface energy of all synthesized PUs was between 40 and 45 mJ/m2. Platelet adhesion and fibrinogen adsorption on the PU anionomer surfaces were affected as a function to the increase of graft length; thiopropionic was the most haemocompatible, followed by thiosuccinic and then thioglycolic acid. SEM analyses of all ionic PU samples exhibited low platelet adhesion to surfaces with no morphological modification. In conclusion, increased hydrophily, dynamic mobility and charge repulsion are synergistic key factors for enhanced haemocompatibility. PMID:15850288

  18. Isotope-Encoded Carboxyl Group Footprinting for Mass Spectrometry-Based Protein Conformational Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Haijun; Blankenship, Robert E.; Gross, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    We report an isotope-encoding method coupled with carboxyl-group footprinting to monitor protein conformational changes. The carboxyl groups of aspartic/glutamic acids and of the C-terminus of proteins can serve as reporters for protein conformational changes when labeled with glycine ethyl ester (GEE) mediated by carbodiimide. In the new development, isotope-encoded "heavy" and "light" GEE are used to label separately the two states of the orange carotenoid protein (OCP) from cyanobacteria. Two samples are mixed (1:1 ratio) and analyzed by a single LC-MS/MS experiment. The differences in labeling extent between the two states are represented by the ratio of the "heavy" and "light" peptides, providing information about protein conformational changes. Combining isotope-encoded MS quantitative analysis and carboxyl-group footprinting reduces the time of MS analysis and improves the sensitivity of GEE and other footprinting.

  19. Gold nanostar-enhanced surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiong; Sun, Ying; Ma, Pinyi; Zhang, Di; Li, Shuo; Wang, Xinghua; Song, Daqian

    2016-03-24

    A new high-sensitivity surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on biofunctional gold nanostars (AuNSs) and carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide (cGO) sheets was described. Compared with spherical gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), the anisotropic structure of AuNSs, which concentrates the electric charge density on its sharp tips, could enhance the local electromagnetic field and the electronic coupling effect significantly. cGO was obtained by a diazonium reaction of graphene oxide (GO) with 4-aminobenzoic acid. Compared with GO, cGO could immobilize more antibodies due to the abundant carboxylic groups on its surface. Testing results show that there are fairly large improvements in the analytical performance of the SPR biosensor using cGO/AuNSs-antigen conjugate, and the detection limit of the proposed biosensor is 0.0375 μg mL(-1), which is 32 times lower than that of graphene oxide-based biosensor. PMID:26944998

  20. Novel Carbazole (Cbz)-Based Carboxylated Functional Monomers: Design, Synthesis, and Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Ejabul; Lellouche, Jean-Paul; Naddaka, Maria

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel functional carbazole (Cbz)-based carboxylated monomers were synthesized and characterized. A Clauson-Kaas procedure, a deprotection step, amide coupling, and hydrolysis were utilized as key chemical reactions towards the multistep synthesis of monomers in good to excellent isolated yields. The design strategy was further extended to complex carbazole-COOH monomers incorporated arylazo groups as photoreactive moieties. In addition, photoreactive hybrid carbazole (Cbz)-pyrrole (Pyr)-based carboxylated monomers, comprising a pyrrole core linking a carbazole and a photoreactive phenylazide or benzophenone moiety through an amide spacer in the molecular structure, were also synthesized. The latter can be utilized for surface modification of polymeric films in their monomeric form or as polymeric microparticles (MPs). PMID:26478845

  1. Changing reactivity of receptor carboxyl groups during bacterial sensing.

    PubMed

    Stock, J B; Koshland, D E

    1981-11-10

    A microdistillation procedure has been developed to analyze carboxylmethylation of the Mr = 60,000 chemoreceptor proteins involved in chemotaxis of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli. Methylation levels obtained by this method are substantially higher than those reported in the literature. In highly motile strains under optimal conditions there are approximately 100,000 methylated receptor residues per cell which are entirely composed of gamma-methylglutamyl esters. Whereas with previously used methods only groups which turn over could be detected, the microdistillation assay provides absolute values. Under steady state conditions, approximately one-half the total number of methyl ester residues are continuously hydrolyzed and resynthesized, while the remainder are sequestered. A mechanism has been devised to explain the observed patterns of methyl ester synthesis and hydrolysis. According to this hypothesis, substrate glutamyl residues on the receptor are located in a restricted region near the active sites of transferase and esterase which are bound to the receptor protein. Small, stimuli-induced changes in receptor conformation effect perturbations in receptor methylation by shifting the focus of activity of the modifying enzymes from one pair of closely spaced groups to another. PMID:7026562

  2. Functionalized carbon nanotubes containing isocyanate groups

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Chungui; Ji Lijun; Liu Huiju; Hu Guangjun; Zhang Shimin; Yang Mingshu . E-mail: yms@iccas.ac.cn; Yang Zhenzhong . E-mail: yangzz@iccas.ac.cn

    2004-12-01

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes containing isocyanate groups can extend the nanotube chemistry, and may promote their many potential applications such as in polymer composites and coatings. This paper describes a facile method to prepare functionalized carbon nanotubes containing highly reactive isocyanate groups on its surface via the reaction between toluene 2,4-diisocyanate and carboxylated carbon nanotubes. Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed that reactive isocyanate groups were covalently attached to carbon nanotubes. The content of isocyanate groups were determined by chemical titration and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)

  3. Mapping of Fab-1:VEGF Interface Using Carboxyl Group Footprinting Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wecksler, Aaron T.; Kalo, Matt S.; Deperalta, Galahad

    2015-12-01

    A proof-of-concept study was performed to demonstrate that carboxyl group footprinting, a relatively simple, bench-top method, has utility for first-pass analysis to determine epitope regions of therapeutic mAb:antigen complexes. The binding interface of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the Fab portion of a neutralizing antibody (Fab-1) was analyzed using carboxyl group footprinting with glycine ethyl ester (GEE) labeling. Tryptic peptides involved in the binding interface between VEGF and Fab-1 were identified by determining the specific GEE-labeled residues that exhibited a reduction in the rate of labeling after complex formation. A significant reduction in the rate of GEE labeling was observed for E93 in the VEGF tryptic peptide V5, and D28 and E57 in the Fab-1 tryptic peptides HC2 and HC4, respectively. Results from the carboxyl group footprinting were compared with the binding interface identified from a previously characterized crystal structure (PDB: 1BJ1). All of these residues are located at the Fab-1:VEGF interface according to the crystal structure, demonstrating the potential utility of carboxyl group footprinting with GEE labeling for mapping epitopes.

  4. The comparison between carboxyl, amido and hydroxy group in influencing electrorheological performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huo; Li, Jun-Ran; Liao, Fu-Hui

    2011-03-01

    Three kinds of electrorheological (ER) materials with carboxyl, amido and hydroxyl group, respectively, were synthesized by a simple adsorption method. The powder of silicon dioxide as a substrate of the materials, as well as terephthalic acid [ p-C6H4(COOH)2, abbr.: phen-COOH], p-phenylenediamine [ p-C6H4(NH2)2, abbr.: phen-NH2] and hydroquinone [ p-C6H4(OH)2, abbr.: phen-OH] were chosen as starting materials. The ER properties of suspensions of the materials in silicon oil were studied. The suspension of the material adsorbing phen-COOH reveals the highest ER activity, the relative shear stress of the suspension (25 wt%), τr(=τE/τ0, τE and τ0 are the shear stresses at electric field strengths of E=4.2 and 0 kV/mm, respectively), reaches 220 under a DC electric field at a shear rate of 14.5 s-1. The shear stress of the suspension of the material adsorbing phen-NH2 is the largest at an high electric field strength. The ER activity of the material adsorbing phen-OH is the lowest among the three materials. The molecule structure is an importance factor in influencing ER performance of the materials for similar compounds with different polar function groups. The relationship between the ER activity and dielectric property of the materials was discussed.

  5. Carboxyl functionalization of carbon fibers via aryl diazonium reaction in molten urea to enhance interfacial shear strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuwei; Meng, Linghui; Fan, Liquan; Wu, Guangshun; Ma, Lichun; Zhao, Min; Huang, Yudong

    2016-01-01

    Using molten urea as the solvent, carbon fibers were functionalized with carboxylic acid groups via aryl diazonium reaction in 15 min to improve their interfacial bonding with epoxy resin. The surface functionalization was quantified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which showed that the relative surface coverage of carboxylic acid groups increased from an initial percentage of 3.17-10.41%. Mechanical property test results indicated that the aryl diazonium reaction in this paper could improve the interfacial shear strength by 66%. Meanwhile, the technique did not adopt any pre-oxidation step to produce functional groups prior to grafting and was shown to maintain the tensile strength of the fibers. This methodology provided a rapid, facile and economically viable route to produce covalently functionalized carbon fibers in large quantities with an eco-friendly method.

  6. Short communication: carboxylate functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) for the reduction of S. aureus growth post biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Leuba, Kohana D; Durmus, Naside Gozde; Taylor, Erik N; Webster, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms formed by antibiotic resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) continue to be a problem for medical devices. Antibiotic resistant bacteria (such as S. aureus) often complicate the treatment and healing of the patient, yet, medical devices are needed to heal such patients. Therefore, methods to treat these Biofilms once formed on medical devices are badly needed. Due to their small size and magnetic properties, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) may be one possible material to penetrate Biofilms and kill or slow the growth of bacteria. In this study, SPION were functionalized with amine, carboxylate, and isocyanate functional groups to further improve their efficacy to disrupt the growth of S. aureus Biofilms. Without the use of antibiotics, results showed that SPION functionalized with carboxylate groups (followed by isocyanate then amine functional groups then unfunctionalized SPION) significantly disrupted Biofilms and retarded the growth of S. aureus compared to untreated Biofilms (by over 35% after 24 hours). PMID:23450111

  7. Optimization and characterization of a homogeneous carboxylic surface functionalization for silicon-based biosensing.

    PubMed

    Chiadò, Alessandro; Palmara, Gianluca; Ricciardi, Serena; Frascella, Francesca; Castellino, Micaela; Tortello, Mauro; Ricciardi, Carlo; Rivolo, Paola

    2016-07-01

    A well-organized immobilization of bio-receptors is a crucial goal in biosensing, especially to achieve high reproducibility, sensitivity and specificity. These requirements are usually attained with a controlled chemical/biochemical functionalization that creates a stable layer on a sensor surface. In this work, a chemical modification protocol for silicon-based surfaces to be applied in biosensing devices is presented. An anhydrous silanization step through 3-aminopropylsilane (APTES), followed by a further derivatization with succinic anhydride (SA), is optimized to generate an ordered flat layer of carboxylic groups. The properties of APTES/SA modified surface were compared with a functionalization in which glutaraldehyde (GA) is used as crosslinker instead of SA, in order to have a comparison with an established and largely applied procedure. Moreover, a functionalization based on the controlled deposition of a plasma polymerized acrylic acid (PPAA) thin film was used as a reference for carboxylic reactivity. Advantages and drawbacks of the considered methods are highlighted, through physico-chemical characterizations (OCA, XPS, and AFM) and by means of a functional Protein G/Antibody immunoassay. These analyses reveal that the most homogeneous, reproducible and active surface is achieved by using the optimized APTES/SA coupling. PMID:27022864

  8. Functional Group Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter T., Jr.; Patterson, John M.

    1984-01-01

    Literature on analytical methods related to the functional groups of 17 chemical compounds is reviewed. These compounds include acids, acid azides, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amino acids, aromatic hydrocarbons, carbodiimides, carbohydrates, ethers, nitro compounds, nitrosamines, organometallic compounds, peroxides, phenols, silicon compounds,

  9. Functional Group Interconversions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeadon, A.

    1974-01-01

    Describes some functional group interconversions that can be carried out on a small scale. The reactions are examples of transformations found in A-level, ONC and HNC courses for British chemistry students. (Author/GS)

  10. Removal of transition metals from dilute aqueous solution by carboxylic acid group containing absorbent polymers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new carboxylic acid group containing resin with cation exchange capacity, 12.67 meq/g has been used to remove Cu2+, Co2+ and Ni2+ ions from dilute aqueous solution. The resin has Cu2+, Co2+ and Ni2+ removal capacity, 216 mg/g, 154 mg/g and 180 mg/g, respectively. The selectivity of the resin to ...

  11. Preferential Interaction of Na+ over K+ to Carboxylate-functionalized Silver Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elucidating mechanistic interactions between specific ions (Na+/ K+) and nanoparticle surfaces to alter particle stability in polar media has received little attention. We investigated relative preferential binding of Na+ and K+ to carboxylate-functionalized silver nanoparticles ...

  12. Role of carboxyl group in Na+-entry step at apical membrane of toad urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Park, C S; Kipnowski, J; Fanestil, D D

    1983-12-01

    Mucosal addition of N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline (EEDQ) and some lipid-soluble carbodiimides, agents which are selective for carboxyl groups, irreversibly inhibited Na+ transport as measured by short-circuit current (SCC) in the urinary bladder of the toad. The inhibition of Na+ transport by EEDQ had the following characteristics: 1) the inhibition was accompanied by a significant increase in the transepithelial electrical resistance; 2) the decrease in SCC was accounted for by a comparable decrease in 22Na+ influx without effect on Na+ efflux; 3) amphotericin B produced complete recovery of SCC inhibited with EEDQ but not with antimycin A or ouabain; 4) mucosal EEDQ decreased the amiloride-sensitive reversal of Na+ current that is induced by serosal nystatin in the absence of mucosal Na+; 5) vasopressin and acid mucosal pH caused an increase in SCC in proportion to the SCC remaining after EEDQ inhibition; and 6) Vmax of the SCC was decreased without alteration in the apparent Km for Na+. Based on these characteristics of EEDQ inhibition of Na+ transport, we infer that a carboxyl group of the Na+ channel is involved in the Na+-entry step across the apical membrane of "tight" epithelia. The inhibition of Na+ transport with EEDQ most likely involves closing the Na+ channel through a chemical reaction involving a carboxyl group of the channel. PMID:6140855

  13. Hemocompatibilty of new ionic polyurethanes: influence of carboxylic group insertion modes.

    PubMed

    Poussard, L; Burel, F; Couvercelle, J-P; Merhi, Y; Tabrizian, M; Bunel, C

    2004-08-01

    New segmented polyurethane (PU) anionomers based on hydroxytelechelic polybutadiene (HTPB) were synthesized via two environment-friendly chemical routes. The effects of carboxylic content and ion incorporation mode on the surface properties were investigated by mean of water absorption analysis and static contact angle measurements using water, diiodomethane, formamide and ethylene glycol. Blood compatibility of the PUs was evaluated by in vitro adhesion assay using 111In-radiolabeled platelet rich plasma and 125I-fibrinogen. The morphology of platelet adhesion was also observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results were compared with a biomedical-grade PU, Pellethane. Insertion of the carboxylic groups on the soft segments (S-alpha series), using thioglycolic acid (TGA), increases surface hydrophilicity, limits water uptake (5%, for an ion content of 3.6 wt%), and reduces platelet adhesion and fibrinogen adsorption on the PUs' surfaces. In contrast, the classical insertion onto the hard segment (H-alpha series), using dimethylolpropionate (DMPA) as chain extender, leads to high water uptake (18%, for an ion content of 3.6 wt%) and promotes platelet and fibrinogen adhesion. SEM analyses of the non-ionic PUs exhibited surfaces with adhered platelets which underwent morphological modification. Similarly, the H-alpha ionic PUs show adherent and activated platelets. On the contrary, no platelet morphology changes were observed on the S-alpha ionic surfaces. In conclusion, insertion of carboxyl groups on the soft segments of PUs reduces their thrombogenicity. PMID:15020121

  14. Renormalization group functional equations

    SciTech Connect

    Curtright, Thomas L.; Zachos, Cosmas K.

    2011-03-15

    Functional conjugation methods are used to analyze the global structure of various renormalization group trajectories and to gain insight into the interplay between continuous and discrete rescaling. With minimal assumptions, the methods produce continuous flows from step-scaling {sigma} functions and lead to exact functional relations for the local flow {beta} functions, whose solutions may have novel, exotic features, including multiple branches. As a result, fixed points of {sigma} are sometimes not true fixed points under continuous changes in scale and zeroes of {beta} do not necessarily signal fixed points of the flow but instead may only indicate turning points of the trajectories.

  15. ANIBAL, stable isotope-based quantitative proteomics by aniline and benzoic acid labeling of amino and carboxylic groups.

    PubMed

    Panchaud, Alexandre; Hansson, Jenny; Affolter, Michael; Bel Rhlid, Rachid; Piu, Stéphane; Moreillon, Philippe; Kussmann, Martin

    2008-04-01

    Identification and relative quantification of hundreds to thousands of proteins within complex biological samples have become realistic with the emergence of stable isotope labeling in combination with high throughput mass spectrometry. However, all current chemical approaches target a single amino acid functionality (most often lysine or cysteine) despite the fact that addressing two or more amino acid side chains would drastically increase quantifiable information as shown by in silico analysis in this study. Although the combination of existing approaches, e.g. ICAT with isotope-coded protein labeling, is analytically feasible, it implies high costs, and the combined application of two different chemistries (kits) may not be straightforward. Therefore, we describe here the development and validation of a new stable isotope-based quantitative proteomics approach, termed aniline benzoic acid labeling (ANIBAL), using a twin chemistry approach targeting two frequent amino acid functionalities, the carboxylic and amino groups. Two simple and inexpensive reagents, aniline and benzoic acid, in their (12)C and (13)C form with convenient mass peak spacing (6 Da) and without chromatographic discrimination or modification in fragmentation behavior, are used to modify carboxylic and amino groups at the protein level, resulting in an identical peptide bond-linked benzoyl modification for both reactions. The ANIBAL chemistry is simple and straightforward and is the first method that uses a (13)C-reagent for a general stable isotope labeling approach of carboxylic groups. In silico as well as in vitro analyses clearly revealed the increase in available quantifiable information using such a twin approach. ANIBAL was validated by means of model peptides and proteins with regard to the quality of the chemistry as well as the ionization behavior of the derivatized peptides. A milk fraction was used for dynamic range assessment of protein quantification, and a bacterial lysate was used for the evaluation of relative protein quantification in a complex sample in two different biological states. PMID:18083701

  16. [Functions of carboxyl-terminus of Hsc70 interacting protein and its role in neurodegenerative disease].

    PubMed

    Yan, Wei-qian; Wang, Jun-ling; Tang, Bei-sha

    2012-08-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are a group of chronic progressive neuronal damage disorders. The cause is unclear, most of them share a same pathological hallmark with misfold proteins accumulating in neurons. Carboxyl-terminus of Hsc70 interacting protein (CHIP) is a dual functional molecule, which has a N terminal tetratrico peptide repeat (TPR) domain that interacts with Hsc/Hsp70 complex and Hsp90 enabling CHIP to modulate the aberrant protein folding; and a C terminal U-box ubiquitin ligase domain that binds to the 26S subunit of the proteasome involved in protein degradation via ubiqutin-proteasome system. CHIP protein mediates interactions between the chaperone system and the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and plays an important role in maintaining the protein homeostasis in cells. This article reviews the molecular characteristics and physiological functions of CHIP, and its role in cellular metabolism and discusses the relationship between CHIP dysfunction and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22875499

  17. Snythesis and characterization of the first main group oxo-centered trinuclear carboxylate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duraj, Stan A.

    1994-01-01

    The synthesis and structural characterization of the first main group oxo-centered, trinuclear carboxylato-bridged species is reported, namely (Ga3(mu(sub 3)-O) (mu-O2CC6H5)6 (4-Mepy)3) GaCl4 center dot 4-Mepy (compound 1), where 4-Mepy is 4-methylpyridine. Compound 1 is a main group example of a well-established class of complexes, referred to as 'basic carboxylates' of the general formula (M3(mu(sub 3)-O)(mu-O2CR)6L3)(+), previously observed only for transition metals.

  18. "Fifty Shades" of Black and Red or How Carboxyl Groups Fine Tune Eumelanin and Pheomelanin Properties.

    PubMed

    Micillo, Raffaella; Panzella, Lucia; Koike, Kenzo; Monfrecola, Giuseppe; Napolitano, Alessandra; d'Ischia, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in the chemistry of melanins have begun to disclose a number of important structure-property-function relationships of crucial relevance to the biological role of human pigments, including skin (photo) protection and UV-susceptibility. Even slight variations in the monomer composition of black eumelanins and red pheomelanins have been shown to determine significant differences in light absorption, antioxidant, paramagnetic and redox behavior, particle morphology, surface properties, metal chelation and resistance to photo-oxidative wear-and-tear. These variations are primarily governed by the extent of decarboxylation at critical branching points of the eumelanin and pheomelanin pathways, namely the rearrangement of dopachrome to 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) and 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA), and the rearrangement of 5-S-cysteinyldopa o-quinoneimine to 1,4-benzothiazine (BTZ) and its 3-carboxylic acid (BTZCA). In eumelanins, the DHICA-to-DHI ratio markedly affects the overall antioxidant and paramagnetic properties of the resulting pigments. In particular, a higher content in DHICA decreases visible light absorption and paramagnetic response relative to DHI-based melanins, but markedly enhances antioxidant properties. In pheomelanins, likewise, BTZCA-related units, prevalently formed in the presence of zinc ions, appear to confer pronounced visible and ultraviolet A (UVA) absorption features, accounting for light-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, whereas non-carboxylated benzothiazine intermediates seem to be more effective in inducing ROS production by redox cycling mechanisms in the dark. The possible biological and functional significance of carboxyl retention in the eumelanin and pheomelanin pathways is discussed. PMID:27196900

  19. Functional Group Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter T., Jr.; Patterson, John M.

    1984-01-01

    Literature on analytical methods related to the functional groups of 17 chemical compounds is reviewed. These compounds include acids, acid azides, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amino acids, aromatic hydrocarbons, carbodiimides, carbohydrates, ethers, nitro compounds, nitrosamines, organometallic compounds, peroxides, phenols, silicon compounds,…

  20. A Convenient, General Synthesis of 1,1-Dimethylallyl Esters as Protecting Groups for Carboxylic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Sedighi, Minoo; Lipton, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    Carboxylic acids were converted in high yield to their 1,1-dimethylallyl (DMA) esters in two steps. Palladium-catalyzed deprotection of DMA esters was shown to be compatible with tert-butyl, benzyl and Fmoc protecting groups, and Fmoc deprotection could be carried out selectively in the presence of DMA esters. DMA esters were also shown to be resistant to nucleophilic attack, suggesting that they will serve as alternatives to tert-butyl esters when acidic deprotection conditions need to be avoided. PMID:15816730

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of functionalized carbon nanotubes in water: Effects of type and position of functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroutan, Masumeh; Moshari, Mahshad

    2010-11-01

    In this work the behavior of the (8,2) single walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and functionalized carbon nanotubes (FCNTs) with four functional groups in water were studied using molecular dynamic (MD) simulation method. Glutamine as a long chain functional group and carboxyl as a short chain functional group have been used as functional groups in FCNTs. Four functional groups in each FCNT were localized at two positions: (i) all four functional groups were in the sidewalls of nanotube, (ii) two functional groups were at the ends and two functional groups were in the sidewalls of nanotube. The intermolecular interaction energies between CNTs or FCNTs and water molecules, the plots of radial distribution function and the diffusion coefficients of CNTs and FCNTs in water were computed for investigating the effects of type and position of functional groups on the behavior of FCNTs in water. The obtained results from three methods are consistent with each others. Results showed that the position of the functional groups in FCNTs has an important role in the interaction of hydrophilic groups of FCNTs with water molecules. Furthermore we also investigated the behavior of FCNTs with sixteen carboxyl functional groups in water. The presence of these large numbers of carboxyl functional groups on the carbon nanotubes prevents water molecules from moving towards hydrophilic carboxyl functional groups. This demonstrates the advantage of using lower number of functional groups each containing many hydrophilic groups like glutamine functional group.

  2. Study of carboxylic functionalization of polypropylene surface using the underwater plasma technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, R. S.; Friedrich, J. F.; Wagner, M. H.

    2009-08-01

    Non-equilibrium solution plasma treatment of polymer surfaces in water offers the possibility of more dense and selective polymer surface functionalization in comparison to the well-known and frequently used low-pressure oxygen plasma. Functional groups are introduced when the polymer surface contacts the plasma moderated solution especially water solutions. The emission of ions, electrons, energy-rich neutrals and complexes, produced by the ion avalanche are limited by quenching, with the aid of the ambient water phase. The UV-radiation produced in plasma formation also helps to moderate the reaction solution further by producing additional excited, ionized/dissociated molecules. Thus, monotype functional groups equipped polymer surfaces, preferably OH groups, originating from the dissociated water molecules, could be produced more selectively. An interesting feature of the technique is its flexibility to use a wide variety of additives in the water phase. Another way to modify polymer surfaces is the deposition of plasma polymers carrying functional groups as carboxylic groups used in this work. Acetic acid, acrylic acid, maleic and itaconic acid were used as additive monomers. Acetic acid is not a chemically polymerizing monomer but it could polymerize by monomer/molecular fragmentation and recombination to a cross linked layer. The other monomers form preferably water-soluble polymers on a chemical way. Only the fragmented fraction of these monomers could form an insoluble coating by cross linking to substrate. The XPS analysis was used to track the alterations in -O-CO- bond percentage on the PP surface. To identify the -COOH groups on substrate surface unambiguously, which have survived the plasma polymerization process, the derivatization with trifluoroethanol was performed.

  3. Incorporating Diblock Copolymer Nanoparticles into Calcite Crystals: Do Anionic Carboxylate Groups Alone Ensure Efficient Occlusion?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    New spherical diblock copolymer nanoparticles were synthesized via RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization of 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA) at 70 °C and 20% w/w solids using either poly(carboxybetaine methacrylate) or poly(proline methacrylate) as the steric stabilizer block. Both of these stabilizers contain carboxylic acid groups, but poly(proline methacrylate) is anionic above pH 9.2, whereas poly(carboxybetaine methacrylate) has zwitterionic character at this pH. When calcite crystals are grown at an initial pH of 9.5 in the presence of these two types of nanoparticles, it is found that the anionic poly(proline methacrylate)-stabilized particles are occluded uniformly throughout the crystals (up to 6.8% by mass, 14.0% by volume). In contrast, the zwitterionic poly(carboxybetaine methacrylate)-stabilized particles show no signs of occlusion into calcite crystals grown under identical conditions. The presence of carboxylic acid groups alone therefore does not guarantee efficient occlusion: overall anionic character is an additional prerequisite. PMID:27042383

  4. Activation of carboxyl group with cyanate: peptide bond formation from dicarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Danger, Grégoire; Charlot, Solenne; Boiteau, Laurent; Pascal, Robert

    2012-06-01

    The reaction of cyanate with C-terminal carboxyl groups of peptides in aqueous solution was considered as a potential pathway for the abiotic formation of peptide bonds under the condition of the primitive Earth. The catalytic effect of dicarboxylic acids on cyanate hydrolysis was definitely attributed to intramolecular nucleophilic catalysis by the observation of the 1H-NMR signal of succinic anhydride when reacting succinic acid with KOCN in aqueous solution (pH 2.2-5.5). The formation of amide bonds was noticed when adding amino acids or amino acid derivatives into the solution. The reaction of N-acyl aspartic acid derivatives was observed to proceed similarly and the scope of the cyanate-promoted reaction was analyzed from the standpoint of prebiotic peptide formation. The role of cyanate in activating peptide C-terminus constitutes a proof of principle that intramolecular reactions of adducts of peptides C-terminal carboxyl groups with activating agents represent a pathway for peptide activation in aqueous solution, the relevance of which is discussed in connexion with the issue of the emergence of homochirality. PMID:21769498

  5. Chemical derivatization of peptide carboxyl groups for highly efficient electron transfer dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Brian L.; Ladror, Daniel T.; Sondalle, Samuel B.; Krusemark, Casey J.; Jue, April L.; Coon, Joshua J.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2013-01-01

    The carboxyl groups of tryptic peptides were derivatized with a tertiary or quaternary amine labeling reagent to generate more highly charged peptide ions that fragment efficiently by electron transfer dissociation (ETD). All peptide carboxyl groups—aspartic and glutamic acid side-chains as well as C-termini—were derivatized with an average reaction efficiency of 99%. This nearly complete labeling avoids making complex peptide mixtures even more complex due to partially-labeled products, and it allows the use of static modifications during database searching. Alkyl tertiary amines were found to be the optimal labeling reagent among the four types tested. Charge states are substantially higher for derivatized peptides: a modified tryptic digest of bovine serum albumin (BSA) generates ∼90% of its precursor ions with z > 2, compared to less than 40% for the unmodified sample. The increased charge density of modified peptide ions yields highly efficient ETD fragmentation, leading to many additional peptide identifications and higher sequence coverage (e.g. 70% for modified versus only 43% for unmodified BSA). The utility of this labeling strategy was demonstrated on a tryptic digest of ribosomal proteins isolated from yeast cells. Peptide derivatization of this sample produced an increase in the number of identified proteins, a >50% increase in the sequence coverage of these proteins, and a doubling of the number of peptide spectral matches. This carboxyl derivatization strategy greatly improves proteome coverage obtained from ETD-MS/MS of tryptic digests, and we anticipate that it will also enhance identification and localization of post-translational modifications. PMID:23918461

  6. Surface grafting of carboxylic groups onto thermoplastic polyurethanes to reduce cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, P.; Ferreira, P.; Kaiser, Jean-Pierre; Salk, Natalie; Bruinink, Arie; de Sousa, Hermínio C.; Gil, M. H.

    2013-10-01

    The interaction of polymers with other materials is an important issue, being their surface properties clearly crucial. For some important polymer applications, their surfaces have to be modified. Surface modification aims to tailor the surface characteristics of a material for a specific application without affecting its bulk properties. Materials can be surface modified by using biological, chemical or physical methods. The aim of this work was to improve the reactivity of the thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) material (Elastollan®) surface and to make its surface cell repellent by grafting carboxylic groups onto its surface. Two TPU materials were studied: a polyether-based TPU and a polyester-based TPU. The grafting efficiency was evaluated by contact angle measurements and by analytical determination of the COOH groups. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the membranes surface was performed as well as cell adhesion tests. It was proved that the surfaces of the TPUs membranes were successfully modified and that cell adhesion was remarkably reduced.

  7. Detection of a CO and NH3 gas mixture using carboxylic acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ki-Young; Choi, Jinnil; Lee, Yang Doo; Kang, Byung Hyun; Yu, Youn-Yeol; Choi, Hyang Hee; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are extremely sensitive to environmental gases. However, detection of mixture gas is still a challenge. Here, we report that 10 ppm of carbon monoxide (CO) and ammonia (NH3) can be electrically detected using a carboxylic acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (C-SWCNT). CO and NH3 gases were mixed carefully with the same concentrations of 10 ppm. Our sensor showed faster response to the CO gas than the NH3 gas. The sensing properties and effect of carboxylic acid group were demonstrated, and C-SWCNT sensors with good repeatability and fast responses over a range of concentrations may be used as a simple and effective detection method of CO and NH3 mixture gas. PMID:23286690

  8. Transition metal chemistry of main group hydrazides. Part 3:{sup 1} carboxylate appended phosphorus hydrazides as novel functionalized chelating systems. Synthesis and characterization of new cyclometallaphosphohydrazides. X-ray structure of a Palladium(II) representative

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, P.R.; Jimenez, H.; Barnes, C.L.; Katti, K.V. |; Volkert, W.A. |

    1994-02-16

    The synthesis of new bifunctional chelating agents (BFCAs) based on the phosphorus hydrazide ligand family for potential {sup 109}Pd labeling of tumor-localizing biomolecules such as proteins/peptides is described. The new BFCAs were achieved in good yields (75-90%) by the reaction of the phosphorus hydrazide PhP(S)(NMeNH{sub 2}){sub 2} (1) with functionalized aldehydes to yield the Schiff-base products with the following chemical compositions as air-stable crystalline solids: PhP(S)(NMeNH{sub 2})(NMeNCHC{sub 6}H{sub 4}COOH), 2; PhP(S)(NMeNCHC{sub 6}H{sub 4}COOH){sub 2}, 3; PhP(S)(NMeNH{sub 2})(NMeNCHC{sub 6}H{sub 4}CH=CHCOOH), 4; PhP(S)(NMeNCHC{sub 6}H{sub 4}CH-CHCOOH){sub 2}, 5. The reactions of three of the new phosphorus hydrazides (2-4) with PdCl{sub 2}(PhCN){sub 2} resulted in the new Pd(II) metallacycles PhP(S)(NMeNH{sub 2})(NMeNCHC{sub 6}H{sub 4}COOH){center_dot}PdCl{sub 2}, 6; PhP(S)(NMeNCHC{sub 6}H{sub 4}COOH){sub 2}{center_dot}PdCl{sub 2}, 7; and PhP(S)(NMeNH{sub 2})(NMeNCHC{sub 6}H{sub 4}CH=CHCOOH){center_dot}PdCl{sub 2}, 8. The reactivity of 6 toward n-butylamine has been evaluated as a model for the preparation of new bioconjugates. The structural elucidation of all the new compounds has been carried out by analytical and complete NMR ({sup 1}H, {sup 31}P) and IR spectroscopic data. As a representative example, the X-ray structure of one of the Pd(II) complexes, 8, has been determined.

  9. Sulfite oxidase from chicken liver. Further characterization of the role of carboxyl groups in the reaction with cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Ritzmann, M; Bosshard, H R

    1988-03-01

    The mitochondrial enzyme sulfite oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of cytochrome c by sulfite. The reaction is inhibited when the enzyme is treated with N-cyclohexyl-N'-[2-(N-methylmorpholino)-ethyl]carbodiimide p-toluenesulfonate (CMC). Inhibition follows the conversion of two carboxyl groups to N-acylurea derivatives. The two groups are about equally reactive toward this inhibitor and blocking of either group abolishes electron transfer to cytochrome c. The rate of inactivation is almost the same in the presence of cytochrome c and under conditions where, on average, 89% of the enzyme is bound to cytochrome c. Therefore, the functional groups are not likely to be at the cytochrome c binding site. There are two equal and non-interacting cytochrome c binding sites per sulfite oxidase monomer. The Kd is 7.5 microM at pH 6.0 and low ionic strength. The data are difficult to reconcile with binding of cytochrome c to a cluster of acidic residues in the area of the heme b prosthetic group, as was envisaged for the cytochrome-b5--cytochrome c complex [Salemme, F.R. (1976) J. Mol. Biol. 102, 563-568]. An improved method for the purification of sulfite oxidase from chicken liver, using affinity chromatography on cytochrome c--Sepharose, is described. PMID:2832163

  10. Simple synthesis of carboxyl-functionalized upconversion nanoparticles for biosensing and bioimaging applications.

    PubMed

    Han, Gui-Mei; Li, Hui; Huang, Xiao-Xi; Kong, De-Ming

    2016-01-15

    We report a simple one-step hydrothermal method for the synthesis of hydrophilic luminescent upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) using malonic acid as the stabilizer and functional agent. Using this method, two UCNPs with different colors of upconversion luminescence were synthesized. The surface of the as-prepared UCNPs was capped with carboxyl groups, which not only resulted in the UCNPs having good dispersity in water, but also allowed further conjugation with other functional molecules, thus indicating the potential applications in biosensing and bioimaging. To demonstrate this, amino-labeled single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) was conjugated on the surface of the UCNPs. Based on the different absorption and luminescence quenching abilities of graphene oxide (GO) to ssDNA-modified UCNPs before and after exonuclease I (Exo I)-triggered hydrolysis of ssDNA, a detection platform was developed for the detection of Exo I activity with a detection limit of 0.02U mL(-1). The prepared hydrophilic UCNPs were also used successfully for in vivo upconversion luminescence imaging of nude mice. PMID:26592597

  11. Synthesis and structural characterization of group 4 metal carboxylates for nanowire production.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Timothy J; Yonemoto, Daniel T; Doan, Thu Q; Alam, Todd M

    2014-12-01

    The synthesis and characterization of a series of group 4 carboxylate derivatives ([M(ORc)4] where M = Ti, Zr, Hf) was undertaken for potential utility as precursors to ceramic nanowires. The attempted syntheses of the [M(ORc)4] precursors were undertaken from the reaction of [M(OBu(t))4] with a select set of carboxylic acids (H-ORc where ORc = OPc (O2CCH(CH3)2), OBc (O2CC(CH3)3), ONc (O2CCH2C(CH3)3)). The products were identified by single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies as [Ti(η(2)-OBc)3(OBu(t))] (1), [Zr2(μ3-O)(μ-OPc)4(μ,η(2)-OPc)(η(2)-OPc)]2 (2), [H]2[Zr(η(2)-OBc)2(OBc)2(OBc)2] (3), [Zr(μ-ONc)2(η(2)-ONc)2]2 (4), or [Hf(μ-ORc)2(η(2)-ORc)2]2 [ORc = OPc (5), OBc (6, shown), ONc (7)]. The majority of compounds (4-7) were isolated as dinuclear species with a dodecahedral-like (CN-8) bonding mode around the metals due to chelation and bridging of the ORc ligand. The two monomers (1 and 3) were found to adopt a capped trigonal prismatic and CN-8 geometry, respectively, due to chelating ORc and terminal ORc or OBu(t) ligands. The metals of the oxo-species 2 were isolated in octahedral and CN-8 arrangements. These compounds were then processed by electrospinning methods (applied voltage 10 kV, flow rate 30-60 μL/min, electric field 0.5 kV/cm), and wire-like morphologies were isolated using compounds 4, 6 (shown), and 7. PMID:25402557

  12. Hydroxyapatite nucleation and growth mechanism on electrospun fibers functionalized with different chemical groups and their combinations.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wenguo; Li, Xiaohong; Xie, Chengying; Zhuang, Huihui; Zhou, Shaobing; Weng, Jie

    2010-06-01

    Controlled nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals on electrospun fibers should play important roles in fabrication of composite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering, but no attempt has been made to clarify the effects of chemical group densities and the cooperation of two and more groups on the biomineralization process. The aim of the current study was to investigate into HA nucleation and growth on electrospun poly(dl-lactide) fibers functionalized with carboxyl, hydroxyl and amino groups and their combinations. Electrospun fibers with higher densities of carboxyl groups, combination of hydroxyl and carboxyl groups with the ratio of 3/7, and combination of amino, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups with the ratio of 2/3/5 were favorable for HA nucleation and growth, resulting in higher content and lower crystal size of formed HA. Carboxyl groups were initially combined with calcium ions through electrostatic attraction, and the introduction of hydroxyl groups could modulate the distance between carboxyl groups. The introduction of amino groups may lead to the inner ionic bonding with carboxyl groups, but can accelerate phosphate ions to form HA through a chelate ring with the calcium ion and carbonyl oxygen. The biological evaluation indicated that the mineralized scaffolds acted as an excellent cell support to maintain desirable cell-substrate interactions, to provide favorable conditions for cell proliferation and to stimulate the osteogenic differentiation. PMID:20303582

  13. Functional Group Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter T., Jr.; Patterson, John M.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses analytical methods selected from current research articles. Groups information by topics of general interest, including acids, aldehydes and ketones, nitro compounds, phenols, and thiols. Cites 97 references. (CS)

  14. Carboxylic Acids as A Traceless Activation Group for Conjugate Additions: A Three-Step Synthesis of (±)-Pregabalin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The direct application of carboxylic acids as a traceless activation group for radical Michael additions has been accomplished via visible light-mediated photoredox catalysis. Photon-induced oxidation of a broad series of carboxylic acids, including hydrocarbon-substituted, α-oxy, and α-amino acids, provides a versatile CO2-extrusion platform to generate Michael donors without the requirement for organometallic activation or propagation. A diverse array of Michael acceptors is amenable to this new conjugate addition strategy. An application of this technology to a three-step synthesis of the medicinal agent pregabalin (commercialized by Pfizer under the trade name Lyrica) is also presented. PMID:25032785

  15. The stereochemistry of amide side chains containing carboxyl groups influences water exchange rates in EuDOTA-tetraamide complexes.

    PubMed

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Opina, Ana Christina L; Zhao, Piyu; Evbuomwan, Osasere M; Milburn, Nate; Tircso, Gyula; Kumas, Cemile; Sherry, A Dean

    2014-02-01

    Many Eu(III) complexes formed with DOTA-tetraamide ligands (where DOTA is 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid) have sufficiently slow water exchange kinetics to meet the slow-to-intermediate condition required to serve as chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) contrast agents for MRI. This class of MRI contrast agents offers an attractive platform for creating biological sensors because water exchange is exquisitely sensitive to subtle ligand stereochemistry and electronic effects. Introduction of carboxyl groups or carboxyl ethyl ester groups on the amide substituents has been shown to slow water exchange in these complexes, but less is known about the orientation or position of these side-chain groups relative to the inner-sphere Eu(III)-bound water molecule. In this study, a series of Eu(III) complexes having one or more carboxyl groups or carboxyl esters at the ?-position of the pendant amide side chains were prepared. Initial attempts to prepare optically pure EuDOTA-[(S)-Asp]4 resulted in a chemically pure ligand consisting of a mixture of stereochemical isomers. This was traced to racemization of (S)-aspartate diethyl ester during the synthetic procedure. Nevertheless, NMR studies of the Eu(III) complexes of this mixture revealed that each isomer had a different water exchange rate, differing by a factor of 2 or more. A second controlled synthesis and CEST study of EuDOTA-[(S)-Asp]4 and cis-EuDOTA-[(S)-Asp]2[(R)-Asp]2 confirmed that the water exchange rates in these diastereomeric complexes are controlled by the axial versus equatorial orientation of the carboxyl groups on the amide side chains. These observations provide new insights toward the development of even more slowly water exchanging systems which will be necessary for practical in vivo applications. PMID:23979260

  16. Dielectric, electric and thermal properties of carboxylic functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes impregnated polydimethylsiloxane nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagar, Sadia; Iqbal, Nadeem; Maqsood, Asghari

    2013-06-01

    The dielectric, electric and thermal properties of carboxylic functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (F-MWCNT) incorporated into the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were evaluated to determine their potential in the field of electronic materials. Carboxylic functionalization of the pristine multi walled carbon tubes (Ps-MWCNT) was confirmed through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction patterns for both Ps-MWCNTs and F-MWCNTs elaborated that crystalline behavior did not change with carboxylic moieties. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses were performed to elucidate the thermal stability with increasing weight % addition of F-MWCNTs in the polymer matrix. Crystallization/glass transition / melting temperatures were evaluated using differential scanning calorimeter and it was observed that glass transition and crystallization temperatures were diminished while temperatures of first and second melting transitions were progressed with increasing F-MWCNT concentration in the PDMS matrix. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy were carried out to confirm the morphology, functionalization, and uniform dispersion of F-MWCNTs in the polymer matrix. Electrical resistivity at temperature range (100-300°C), dielectric loss (tanδ) and dielectric parameters (epsilon/ epsilon//) were measured in the frequency range (1MHz-3GHz). The measured data simulate that the aforementioned properties were influenced by increasing filler contents in the polymer matrix because of the high polarization of conductive F-MWCNTs at the reinforcement/polymer interface.

  17. Facile one-step coating approach to magnetic submicron particles with poly(ethylene glycol) coats and abundant accessible carboxyl groups

    PubMed Central

    Long, Gaobo; Yang, Xiao-lan; Zhang, Yi; Pu, Jun; Liu, Lin; Liu, Hong-bo; Li, Yuan-li; Liao, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic submicron particles (MSPs) are pivotal biomaterials for magnetic separations in bioanalyses, but their preparation remains a technical challenge. In this report, a facile one-step coating approach to MSPs suitable for magnetic separations was investigated. Methods Polyethylene glycol) (PEG) was derived into PEG-bis-(maleic monoester) and maleic monoester-PEG-succinic monoester as the monomers. Magnetofluids were prepared via chemical co-precipitation and dispersion with the monomers. MSPs were prepared via one-step coating of magnetofluids in a water-in-oil microemulsion system of aerosol-OT and heptane by radical co-polymerization of such monomers. Results The resulting MSPs contained abundant carboxyl groups, exhibited negligible nonspecific adsorption of common substances and excellent suspension stability, appeared as irregular particles by electronic microscopy, and had submicron sizes of broad distribution by laser scattering. Saturation magnetizations and average particle sizes were affected mainly by the quantities of monomers used for coating magnetofluids, and steric hindrance around carboxyl groups was alleviated by the use of longer monomers of one polymerizable bond for coating. After optimizations, MSPs bearing saturation magnetizations over 46 emu/g, average sizes of 0.32 μm, and titrated carboxyl groups of about 0.21 mmol/g were obtained. After the activation of carboxyl groups on MSPs into N-hydroxysuccinimide ester, biotin was immobilized on MSPs and the resulting biotin-functionalized MSPs isolated the conjugate of streptavidin and alkaline phosphatase at about 2.1 mg/g MSPs; streptavidin was immobilized at about 10 mg/g MSPs and retained 81% ± 18% (n = 5) of the specific activity of the free form. Conclusion The facile approach effectively prepares MSPs for magnetic separations. PMID:23589687

  18. Selective complexation of α-amino acids and simple peptides via their carboxylate groups.

    PubMed

    Schnitter, Roland; Gallego, Daniel; Kersting, Berthold

    2014-09-28

    The complexation of anions of selected α-amino acids (alanine, valine, proline, tyrosine) and small peptides (L-alanyl-L-alanine, L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-alanine, and L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-alanine) by the dinuclear nickel(II) complex [LNi2(μ-Cl)]+ (1), where (L)2− represents a 24-membered binucleating hexamine-dithiophenolato ligand, has been investigated. The following complexes were prepared, isolated as perchlorate or tetraphenylborate salts, and characterized by UV/Vis, IR, and CD spectroscopy: [LNi2(μ-L-alaninato)]+ (2), [LNi2(μ-L-valinato)]+ (3), [LNi2(μ-L-prolinato)]+ (4), [LNi2(μ-L-tyrosinato)]+ (5a), [LNi2(μ-D-tyrosinato)]+ (5b), [LNi2(μ-L,D-tyrosinato)]+ (5c), [LNi2(μ-L-alanyl-L-alaninato)]+ (6), [LNi2(μ-(L-alanyl)2-L-alaninato)]+ (7), [LNi2(μ-(L-alanyl)3-L-alaninato)]+ (8). Compounds 4, 5a and 6 were additionally identified by X-ray crystallography. In contrast to unsupported amino carboxylate complexes which typically contain five membered NO chelate rings, the [LNi2]2+ fragment selectively binds the α-amino acids and peptides via μ1,3-bridging carboxylato groups. Coordination of the carboxylato coligands in this way confers dissymmetry on the complexes. The CD spectra of the syn,syn-bridged structures are significantly different from those of the NO chelates, and can distinguish between the two coordination modes. The encapsulation of the peptides increases their solubility in the solvent system MeOH–MeCN by up to two orders of magnitude. This is discussed in terms of the absence of intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions as indicated in the X-ray structure of 6. PMID:25098239

  19. A new protocol for the carboxylic acid sidewall functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darabi, Hossein Reza; Jafar Tehrani, Mohammad; Aghapoor, Kioumars; Mohsenzadeh, Farshid; Malekfar, Rasoul

    2012-09-01

    The carboxylic acid termination of the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) provides a convenient link for covalent bonding between the SWNTs and polymer or biological systems. In this work, two approaches for covalent attachment of carboxylic acid groups to the side-walls of single walled carbon nanotubes are presented. Both protocols are based on chemical manipulation of benzonitrile residues, easily introduced onto the SWNTs by in situ diazonium salt formation of 4-aminobenzonitrile. In the first approach, benzonitrile groups on SWNTs were treated with aq. NaOH solution to form benzoic acid moieties. The second approach on benzonitrile groups is leaded to the formation of benzothiomorpholides via Willgerodt-Kindler reaction which is then converted to benzoic acid moieties on SWNTs. Moreover, a simple one-pot entry into the formation of benzoic acid moieties is presented. SWNTs were characterized by a set of methods including FT-IR, UV/vis, TGA, SEM and Raman techniques. The presence of thioamide groups on SWNT is also proved directly by XPS spectroscopy.

  20. Functionalized polyoxometalates with covalently linked bisphosphonate, N-donor or carboxylate ligands: from electrocatalytic to optical properties.

    PubMed

    Dolbecq, Anne; Mialane, Pierre; Sécheresse, Francis; Keita, Bineta; Nadjo, Louis

    2012-08-28

    The structures of two families of hybrid organic-inorganic polyoxometalates (POMs) functionalized by covalently grafted carboxylate or bisphosphonate ligands are overviewed. The first family concerns the so-called POMOF materials, built from the connection of mixed-valent ε-Keggin type polyoxomolybdates via N-donor or carboxylate organic molecules coordinated to transition metal ions (Zn(II), Co(II), Ni(II)) grafted at the surface of the POMs. The simulation of the hypothetical zeolitic-like POMOF structures is presented and compared to the experimental ones. The second family gathers the various molecular Mo(V), Mo(VI) and W(VI) POMs incorporating directly into their architecture bisphosphonate (BP) ligands. The potentiality of this family of hybrid POMs comes from the organic group grafted on the carbon atom which bears the two phosphonate groups. For both families, besides the structural description, synthetic trends and an overview of their properties are presented. Namely, the electrocatalytic properties (production of H(2) and reduction of BrO(3)(-)) of the ε-Keggin type polyoxomolybdates are described. The optical and biological activities of the POM-BP compounds as well as their ability to form nanosystems are also reported. PMID:22763503

  1. Breaking the dogma of the metal-coordinating carboxylate group in integrin ligands: introducing hydroxamic acids to the MIDAS to tune potency and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, Dominik; Laufer, Burkhardt; Marinelli, Luciana; Limongelli, Vittorio; Novellino, Ettore; Zahn, Grit; Stragies, Roland; Kessler, Horst

    2009-01-01

    A suitable substitute: All integrin receptors bind their ligands, which contain an aspartate residue, in the metal-ion- dependent adhesion site (MIDAS). So far all attempts to replace the carboxyl group of aspartate with other, pharmacologically favorable isosteric groups have failed. Now it has been shown that a hydroxamic acid group can replace the carboxyl group; the resulting ligand retains its high binding activity. The picture shows one such ligand in the binding site of alphavbeta3. PMID:19343753

  2. Fatty acidomics: global analysis of lipid species containing a carboxyl group with a charge-remote fragmentation assisted approach

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Miao; Han, Rowland H.; Han, Xianlin

    2013-01-01

    Charge-remote fragmentation has been well recognized as an effective approach for dissociation of long aliphatic chains. Herein, we exploited this approach for structural identification of all fatty acids including saturated, unsaturated, and modified ones by using electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) after one-step derivatization of a charge-carried reagent through an amidation reaction. We tested the approach with different charge-carried reagents with respective to the hydrophobicity, charge strength, and distance from the charge to the carboxyl group. We found all the derivatives with these reagents could yield informative charge-remote fragmentation patterns regardless of the different chemical and physical properties of the reagents and these informative fragmentation patterns all could be effectively used for structural elucidation of lipid species containing a carboxyl group. We further found that the distinguished charge-remote fragmentations of fatty acid isomers enabled us to determine the composition of these isomers without any chromatographic separation. Finally, the abundant fragments yielded from individual derivatized moiety enabled us to sensitively quantify the individual species containing a carboxyl group. The described approach was a great extension to the multidimensional mass spectrometry-based shotgun lipidomics for global analysis of fatty acids including isomers and modifications. We believe that this approach could greatly facilitate the identification of the biochemical mechanisms underlying numerous pathological conditions. PMID:23971716

  3. Effect of functional groups of humic substances on uf performance.

    PubMed

    Lin, C F; Liu, S H; Hao, O J

    2001-07-01

    The role of different functional groups present in humic substances on the membrane flux is unclear. This study is undertaken to (1) separate the carboxyl and phenolic groups from a humic solution, and (2) evaluate the effect of each fractionated humic substances on the ultrafiltration (UF) performance. A weak-base amine resin was used for the adsorption (pH 7) and the subsequent desorption (pH 13) of the phenolic groups from a commercial humic solution. These fractions were evaluated qualitatively (via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) and quantitatively (titration); they were further subjected to the analyses of the trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) and ultrafiltration performance. Although, a complete separation of the phenolic and carboxyl groups is not possible, the results nevertheless provide useful information about their effects on UF performance. The fraction with a higher content of the phenolic OH group exhibits the highest THMFP (190 microg/mg C), whereas the fraction with a higher content of the carboxyl groups exhibits more flux decline. The UF system evaluated is unable to remove a significant portion of THM precursors, resulting in high THMs in permeate. The use of powdered activated carbon for the pretreatment of these fractions fails to improve membrane fouling. The pore size of UF membrane does not appear to affect the membrane flux, and the switch from the hydrophobic to hydrophilic membrane only slight improves the permeate flux. PMID:11394773

  4. Bipiperidinyl carboxylic acid amides as potent, selective, and functionally active CCR4 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Cyrille F; Bazin, Marc; Philippe, Laurence; Zhang, Jiansu; Tylaska, Laurie; Miret, Juan; Bauer, Paul H

    2007-09-01

    A cell-based assay for the chemokine G-protein-coupled receptor CCR4 was developed, and used to screen a small-molecule compound collection in a multiplex format. A series of bipiperidinyl carboxylic acid amides amenable to parallel chemistry were derived that were potent and selective antagonists of CCR4. One prototype compound was shown to be active in a functional model of chemotaxis, making it a useful chemical tool to explore the role of CCR4 in asthma, allergy, diabetes, and cancer. PMID:17718722

  5. Molecular level computational studies of polyethylene and polyacrylonitrile composites containing single walled carbon nanotubes: effect of carboxylic acid functionalization on nanotube-polymer interfacial properties

    PubMed Central

    Haghighatpanah, Shayesteh; Bohln, Martin; Bolton, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) and molecular mechanics (MM) methods have been used to investigate additive-polymer interfacial properties in single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)polyethylene and SWNTpolyacrylonitrile composites. Properties such as the interfacial shear stress and bonding energy are similar for the two composites. In contrast, functionalizing the SWNT with carboxylic acid groups leads to an increase in these properties, with a larger increase for the polar polyacrylonitrile composite. Increasing the percentage of carbon atoms that were functionalized from 1 to 5% also leads to an increase in the interfacial properties. In addition, the interfacial properties depend on the location of the functional groups on the SWNT wall. PMID:25229056

  6. “Fifty Shades” of Black and Red or How Carboxyl Groups Fine Tune Eumelanin and Pheomelanin Properties

    PubMed Central

    Micillo, Raffaella; Panzella, Lucia; Koike, Kenzo; Monfrecola, Giuseppe; Napolitano, Alessandra; d’Ischia, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in the chemistry of melanins have begun to disclose a number of important structure-property-function relationships of crucial relevance to the biological role of human pigments, including skin (photo) protection and UV-susceptibility. Even slight variations in the monomer composition of black eumelanins and red pheomelanins have been shown to determine significant differences in light absorption, antioxidant, paramagnetic and redox behavior, particle morphology, surface properties, metal chelation and resistance to photo-oxidative wear-and-tear. These variations are primarily governed by the extent of decarboxylation at critical branching points of the eumelanin and pheomelanin pathways, namely the rearrangement of dopachrome to 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) and 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA), and the rearrangement of 5-S-cysteinyldopa o-quinoneimine to 1,4-benzothiazine (BTZ) and its 3-carboxylic acid (BTZCA). In eumelanins, the DHICA-to-DHI ratio markedly affects the overall antioxidant and paramagnetic properties of the resulting pigments. In particular, a higher content in DHICA decreases visible light absorption and paramagnetic response relative to DHI-based melanins, but markedly enhances antioxidant properties. In pheomelanins, likewise, BTZCA-related units, prevalently formed in the presence of zinc ions, appear to confer pronounced visible and ultraviolet A (UVA) absorption features, accounting for light-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, whereas non-carboxylated benzothiazine intermediates seem to be more effective in inducing ROS production by redox cycling mechanisms in the dark. The possible biological and functional significance of carboxyl retention in the eumelanin and pheomelanin pathways is discussed. PMID:27196900

  7. Structure Property Relationships of Carboxylic Acid Isosteres

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The replacement of a carboxylic acid with a surrogate structure, or (bio)-isostere, is a classical strategy in medicinal chemistry. The general underlying principle is that by maintaining the features of the carboxylic acid critical for biological activity, but appropriately modifying the physicochemical properties, improved analogs may result. In this context, a systematic assessment of the physicochemical properties of carboxylic acid isosteres would be desirable to enable more informed decisions of potential replacements to be used for analog design. Herein we report the structure–property relationships (SPR) of 35 phenylpropionic acid derivatives, in which the carboxylic acid moiety is replaced with a series of known isosteres. The data set generated provides an assessment of the relative impact on the physicochemical properties that these replacements may have compared to the carboxylic acid analog. As such, this study presents a framework for how to rationally apply isosteric replacements of the carboxylic acid functional group. PMID:26967507

  8. Structure Property Relationships of Carboxylic Acid Isosteres.

    PubMed

    Lassalas, Pierrik; Gay, Bryant; Lasfargeas, Caroline; James, Michael J; Tran, Van; Vijayendran, Krishna G; Brunden, Kurt R; Kozlowski, Marisa C; Thomas, Craig J; Smith, Amos B; Huryn, Donna M; Ballatore, Carlo

    2016-04-14

    The replacement of a carboxylic acid with a surrogate structure, or (bio)-isostere, is a classical strategy in medicinal chemistry. The general underlying principle is that by maintaining the features of the carboxylic acid critical for biological activity, but appropriately modifying the physicochemical properties, improved analogs may result. In this context, a systematic assessment of the physicochemical properties of carboxylic acid isosteres would be desirable to enable more informed decisions of potential replacements to be used for analog design. Herein we report the structure-property relationships (SPR) of 35 phenylpropionic acid derivatives, in which the carboxylic acid moiety is replaced with a series of known isosteres. The data set generated provides an assessment of the relative impact on the physicochemical properties that these replacements may have compared to the carboxylic acid analog. As such, this study presents a framework for how to rationally apply isosteric replacements of the carboxylic acid functional group. PMID:26967507

  9. ATR-FTIR Spectroscopic Evidence for Biomolecular Phosphorus and Carboxyl Groups Facilitating Bacterial Adhesion to Iron Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Sanjai J.; Mukome, Fungai N.D.; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    Attenuated total reflectance (ATR) Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been used to probe the binding of bacteria to hematite (α-Fe2O3) and goethite (α-FeOOH). In situ ATR-FTIR experiments with bacteria (Pseudomonas putida, P. aeruginosa, Escherichia coli), mixed amino acids, polypeptide extracts, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), and a suite of model compounds were conducted. These compounds represent carboxyl, catecholate, amide, and phosphate groups present in siderophores, amino acids, polysaccharides, phospholipids, and DNA. Due in part to the ubiquitous presence of carboxyl groups in biomolecules, numerous IR peaks corresponding to outer-sphere or unbound (1400 cm−1) and inner-sphere (1310-1320 cm−1) coordinated carboxyl groups are noted following reaction of bacteria and biomolecules with α-Fe2O3 and α-FeOOH. However, the data also reveal that the presence of low-level amounts (i.e., 0.45-0.79%) of biomolecular phosphorous groups result in strong IR bands at ~1043 cm−1, corresponding to inner-sphere Fe-O-P bonds, underscoring the importance of bacteria associated P-containing groups in biomolecule and cell adhesion. Spectral comparisons also reveal slightly greater P-O-Fe contributions for bacteria (Pseudomonad, E. coli) deposited on α-FeOOH, as compared to α-Fe2O3. This data demonstrates that slight differences in bacterial adhesion to Fe oxides can be attributed to bacterial species and Fe-oxide minerals. However, more importantly, the strong binding affinity of phosphate in all bacteria samples to both Fe-oxides results in the formation of inner-sphere Fe-O-P bonds, signifying the critical role of biomolecular P in the initiation of bacterial adhesion. PMID:24859052

  10. Functionalization of carboxylated multiwall nanotubes with imidazole derivatives and their toxicity investigations

    PubMed Central

    Azizian, Javad; Tahermansouri, Hasan; Biazar, Esmaeil; Heidari, Saeed; Khoei, Davood Chobfrosh

    2010-01-01

    Imidazoles and their derivatives are compounds with chemotherapeutic applications. In this study, we investigated the chemical functionalization of carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT–COOH) by 1,2-phenylendiamine. Multiwalled nanotube (MWNT)–benzimidazole was obtained by an MWNT–amide reaction with POCl3 after 72 hours, which was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared, scanning electron microscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, and elemental analysis. These functionalizations were chosen due to -NH2 and NHCO active sites in MWNT–amide for future application. Toxicity assays with fibroblast cells and MTT test for measurement of viable cell numbers were also performed. Cellular results did not show any toxicity change in modified samples from that of the reference samples. PMID:21116331

  11. A structural and functional model for the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase.

    PubMed

    Sallmann, Madleen; Oldenburg, Fabio; Braun, Beatrice; Réglier, Marius; Simaan, A Jalila; Limberg, Christian

    2015-10-12

    The hitherto most realistic low-molecular-weight analogue for the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACCO) is reported. The ACCOs 2-His-1-carboxylate iron(II) active site was mimicked by a TpFe moiety, to which the natural substrate ACC could be bound. The resulting complex [Tp(Me,Ph) FeACC] (1), according to X-ray diffraction analysis performed for the nickel analogue, represents an excellent structural model, featuring ACC coordinated in a bidentate fashion-as proposed for the enzymatic substrate complex-as well as a vacant coordination site that forms the basis for the first successful replication also of the ACCO function: 1 is the first known ACC complex that reacts with O2 to produce ethylene. As a FeOOH species had been suggested as intermediate in the catalytic cycle, H2 O2 was tested as the oxidant, too, and indeed evolution of ethylene proceeded even more rapidly to give 65 % yield. PMID:26190407

  12. Synthesis and characterization of bifunctional surfaces with tunable functional group pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, John M.; Kung, Mayfair; Kung, Harold H.

    2016-06-01

    Grafting of pairs of functional groups onto a silica surface was demonstrated by tethering both terminals of an organochlorosilane precursor molecule, Cl2(CH3)Si(CH2)4(CO)(OSi(i-Pr)2)(CH2)2Si(CH3)Cl2, that possess a cleavable silyl ester bond, onto a silica surface. Hydrolytic cleavage of the silyl ester bond of the grafted molecule resulted in the generation of organized pairs of carboxylic acid and organosilanol groups. This organosilanol moiety was easily transformed into other functional groups through condensation reactions to form, together with the neighboring acid group, pairs such as carboxylic acid/secondary amine, carboxylic acid/pyridine, and carboxylic acid/phosphine. In the case of carboxylic acid/amine pairing, there was evidence of the formation of amide. A sample grafted with amine-carboxylic acid pairs was three times more active (per free amine) than a sample without such pairs for the nitroaldol condensation of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde and nitromethane.

  13. Carboxyl-functionalized magnetic microparticle carrier for isolation and identification of DNA in dairy products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horák, Daniel; Rittich, Bohuslav; Španová, Alena

    2007-04-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles about 14 nm in diameter were obtained by chemical coprecipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) salts with aqueous ammonia in the presence of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) microspheres about 1 μm in diameter were prepared by dispersion polymerization of GMA in aqueous ethanol in the presence of PEG-coated magnetite nanoparticles. The microspheres were hydrolyzed and carboxyl groups introduced by oxidation with KMnO4. The particles reversibly bound bacterial DNA of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus genera in the presence of high concentrations of PEG 6000 and sodium chloride from crude cell lysates of various dairy products (butter milk, cheese, yoghurt, probiotic tablets) or from cell lyophilisates. The presence of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus DNA in samples was confirmed by PCR amplification.

  14. Covalent attachments of boron nitride nanotubes through a carboxylic linker: Density functional studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaei, Mahmoud; Arshadi, Sattar; Abedini, Saboora; Yousefi, Mohammad; Meskinfam, Masoumeh

    2012-06-01

    Properties of attached boron nitride (BN) nanotubes based on linking two zigzag nanotubes through a carboxylic (-(Cdbnd O)O-) linker were investigated by performing density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The linking boron and nitrogen atoms at the edges of two zigzag BN nanotubes were linked to the -(C]O)O- linker to make possible the attachments of two BN nanotubes together. Total energies, energy gaps, dipole moments, linking bond lengths and angles, and quadrupole coupling constants were obtained for the optimized structures to determine the properties of the attached BN nanotubes. The results indicated that different properties could be seen for the investigated models based on their linking status. For quadrupole coupling constants, the most significant changes of parameters were observed for the linking atoms among the investigated models of attached BN nanotubes.

  15. Preparation and characterization of tannase immobilized onto carboxyl-functionalized superparamagnetic ferroferric oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changzheng; Xu, Caiyun; Ni, Hui; Yang, Qiuming; Cai, Huinong; Xiao, Anfeng

    2016-04-01

    Tannase from Aspergillus tubingensis was immobilized onto carboxyl-functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles (CMNPs), and conditions affecting tannase immobilization were investigated. Successful binding between CMNPs and tannase was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. Vibrating sample magnetometry and X-ray diffraction showed that the CMNPs and immobilized tannase exhibit distinct magnetic responses and superparamagnetic properties. Free and immobilized tannase exhibited identical optimal temperatures of 50°C and differing pH optima at 6 and 7, respectively. The thermal, pH, and storage stabilities of the immobilized tannase were superior to those of free tannase. After six cycles of catalytic hydrolysis of propyl gallate, the immobilized tannase maintained over 60% of its initial activity. The Michaelis constant (Km) of the immobilized enzyme indicated its higher affinity for substrate binding than the free enzyme. PMID:26809129

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of novel dental monomer with branched carboxyl acid group

    PubMed Central

    Song, Linyong; Ye, Qiang; Ge, Xueping; Misra, Anil; Laurence, Jennifer S.; Berrie, Cynthia L.; Spencer, Paulette

    2014-01-01

    To enhance the water miscibility and increase the mechanical properties of dentin adhesives, a new glycerol-based monomer with vinyl and carboxylic acid, 4-((1,3-bis(-methacryloyloxy)propan-2-yl)oxy)-2-methylene-4-oxobutanoic acid (BMPMOB), was synthesized and characterized. Dentin adhesive formulations containing 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy) phenyl]propane (BisGMA), and BMPMOB were characterized with regard to real-time photopolymerization behavior, water sorption, dynamic mechanical analysis, and microscale three-dimensional internal morphologies and compared with HEMA/BisGMA controls. The experimental adhesive copolymers showed higher glass transition temperature and rubbery moduli, as well as improved water miscibility compared to the controls. The enhanced properties of the adhesive copolymers indicated that BMPMOB is a promising comonomer for dental restorative materials. PMID:24596134

  17. The mixing effect of amine and carboxyl groups on electrorheological properties and its analysis by in situ FT-IR under an electric field.

    PubMed

    Ko, Young Gun; Lee, Hyun Jeong; Park, Yong Sung; Woo, Je Wan; Choi, Ung Su

    2013-10-21

    Herein, the mixing effect of amine and carboxyl groups on electrorheological (ER) properties has been presented with the chitosan and alginic acid dispersed suspensions. Chitosan (for the amine group) and alginic acid (for the carboxyl group) are used to investigate the mixing effect of the amine and carboxyl groups on ER properties with the control of their mixing ratio in the silicone oil. The surface-chemical structure of the mixture of the chitosan and alginic acid particles in the silicone oil is demonstrated by in situ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy at various electric fields for the first time. This study focuses on whether the mixture of chemical groups in the ER fluid can promote ER properties or not, and in situ FT-IR analysis of the interface between ER particles in the silicone oil at various DC electric fields. The ER fluids exhibited the increase of the yield stress values with the increase of the counter group addition up to the weight ratio of 50 : 50 (chitosan : alginic acid). A noteworthy result is that the mixing effect of the amine and carboxyl groups resulting in enhanced ER properties is clearly proved. In the in situ FT-IR study, the complex form of amine and carboxyl groups of particles in the ER fluid was confirmed under the electric field. PMID:23945542

  18. Carboxylic group-induced synthesis and characterization of selenium nanoparticles and its anti-tumor potential on Dalton's lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjay; Tomar, Munendra Singh; Acharya, Arbind

    2015-02-01

    Carboxylic group-induced synthesis of selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) was achieved using sodium selenosulphate as a precursor. The particles were stabilized and capped with 0.01% polyvinyl alcohol under ambient conditions. This is a simple and easy method of producing SeNPs in a size range from 35 to 105 nm. The synthesized SeNPs were purified by centrifugation at 11,500 × g for 20 min and characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, XRD, DSC and TEM. It was observed that the synthesized SeNPs showed differences in their absorption spectra, phase composition and crystal structure, thermodynamic behaviour, size and shape. Further, to confirm anti-tumour potential of the synthesized SeNPs induced by the carboxylic group of acetic acid, pyruvic acid and benzoic acid, cell viability assay, nuclear morphology testing and DNA fragmentation assay were carried out using Dalton's lymphoma (DL) cells. DL cells treated with the SeNPs showed reduced cell viability, altered nuclear morphology, typical apoptotic DNA ladder and apoptosis. Therefore, these SeNPs may have therapeutic relevance to treat this type of cancer. PMID:25616972

  19. Expression of a functional jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase is negatively correlated with strawberry fruit development.

    PubMed

    Preuß, Anja; Augustin, Christiane; Figueroa, Carlos R; Hoffmann, Thomas; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Sevilla, José F; Schwab, Wilfried

    2014-09-15

    The volatile metabolite methyl jasmonate (MeJA) plays an important role in intra- and interplant communication and is involved in diverse biological processes. In this study, we report the cloning and functional characterization of a S-adenosyl-l-methionine:jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (JMT) from Fragaria vesca and Fragaria×ananassa. Biochemical assays and comprehensive transcript analyses showed that JMT has been erroneously annotated as gene fusion with a carboxyl methyltransferase (CMT) (gene15184) in the first published genome sequence of F. vesca. Recombinant FvJMT catalyzed the formation of MeJA with KM value of 22.3μM while FvCMT and the fusion protein were almost inactive. Activity of JMT with benzoic acid and salicylic acid as substrates was less than 1.5% of that with JA. Leucine at position 245, an amino acid missing in other JMT sequences is essential for activity of FvJMT. In accordance with MeJA levels, JMT transcript levels decreased steadily during strawberry fruit ripening, as did the expression levels of JA biosynthesis and regulatory genes. It appears that CMT has originated by a recent duplication of JMT and lost its enzymatic activity toward JA. In the newest version of the strawberry genome sequence (June 2014) CMT and JMT are annotated as separate genes in accordance with differential temporal and spatial expression patterns of both genes in Fragaria sp. In conclusion, MeJA, the inactive derivative of JA, is probably involved in early steps of fruit development by modulating the levels of the active plant hormone JA. PMID:25046752

  20. A new fluorinated urethane dimethacrylate with carboxylic groups for use in dental adhesive compositions.

    PubMed

    Buruiana, Tinca; Melinte, Violeta; Aldea, Horia; Pelin, Irina M; Buruiana, Emil C

    2016-05-01

    A urethane macromer containing hexafluoroisopropylidene, poly(ethylene oxide) and carboxylic moieties (UF-DMA) was synthesized and used in proportions varying between 15 and 35wt.% (F1-F3) in dental adhesive formulations besides BisGMA, triethylene glycol dimethacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate. The FTIR and (1)H ((13)C) NMR spectra confirmed the chemical structure of the UF-DMA. The experimental adhesives were characterized with regard to the degree of conversion, water sorption/solubility, contact angle, diffusion coefficient, Vickers hardness, and morphology of the crosslinked networks and compared with the specimens containing 10wt.% hydroxyapatite (HAP) or calcium phosphate (CaP). The conversion degree (after 180s of irradiation with visible light) ranged from 59.5% (F1) to 74.8% (F3), whereas the water sorption was between 23.15μgmm(-3) (F1) and 40.52μgmm(-3) (F3). Upon the addition of HAP or CaP this parameter attained values of 37.82-49.14μgmm(-3) (F1-F3-HAP) and 34.58-45.56μgmm(-3), respectively. Also, the formation of resin tags through the infiltration of a dental composition (F3) was visualized by SEM analysis. The results suggest that UF-DMA taken as co-monomer in dental adhesives of acrylic type may provide improved properties in the moist environment of the mouth. PMID:26952402

  1. Learning the Functional Groups: Keys to Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Shannon; Hildreth, David P.

    2001-01-01

    Points out the difficulties students have when they are expected to learn functional groups, which are frameworks for chemical and physical properties of molecules. Presents a classification key for functional groups categorized by 10 common functional groups. (YDS)

  2. Functional Oligomerization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Isoprenylcysteine Carboxyl Methyltransferase, Ste14p

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Amy M.; Hahne, Kalub; Hrycyna, Christine A.

    2010-01-01

    The isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase (Icmt) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, also designated Ste14p, is a 26-kDa integral membrane protein that contains six transmembrane spanning segments. This protein is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane where it performs the methylation step of the CAAX post-translational processing pathway. Sequence analysis reveals a putative GXXXG dimerization motif located in transmembrane 1 of Ste14p, but it is not known whether Ste14p forms or functions as a dimer or higher order oligomer. We determined that Ste14p predominantly formed a homodimer in the presence of the cross-linking agent, bis-sulfosuccinimidyl suberate. Wild-type untagged Ste14p also co-immunoprecipitated and co-purified with N-terminal-tagged His10-myc3-Ste14p (His-Ste14p). Furthermore, enzymatically inactive His-Ste14p variants L81F and E213Q both exerted a dominant-negative effect on methyltransferase activity when co-expressed and co-purified with untagged wild-type Ste14p. Together, these data, although indirect, suggest that Ste14p forms and functions as a homodimer or perhaps a higher oligomeric species. PMID:20202940

  3. Direct Electrosynthesis and Characterization of a New Soluble Polythiophene Derivative Containing Carboxyl Groups in Boron Trifluoride Diethyl Etherate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yu; Guo, Wenjuan; Pei, Meishan; Zhang, Guangyou; Jiang, Junzi

    2012-09-01

    High-quality poly(3-thiophenemalonic acid) (P3TMA), a water-soluble polythiophene derivative, was successfully electrosynthesized in boron trifluoride diethyl etherate + 50% (by volume) trifluoroacetic acid at lower potential (0.1 V versus Pt). The carboxyl groups make P3TMA highly soluble in water, facilitating its potential application as a blue-light-emitting material. P3TMA film with conductivity of 16 S cm-1 obtained from this medium showed better redox activity and thermal stability. The structure and morphology of the polymer were studied by ultraviolet-visible, Fourier-transform infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on electrosynthesis of P3TMA film.

  4. Controlling the Reactivity of Bifunctional Ligands: Carboxylate-Bridged Nonheme Diiron(II) Complexes Bearing Free Thiol Groups.

    PubMed

    Pal, Nabhendu; Majumdar, Amit

    2016-03-21

    Carboxylate-bridged nonheme diiron(II) complexes, bearing free functional groups in general, and free thiol groups in particular, were sought. While the addition of sodium γ-hydroxybutyrate into a mixture of Fe(BF4)2·6H2O, HN-Et-HPTB, and Et3N afforded the complex [Fe2(N-Et-HPTB)(μ-O2C-(CH2)3-OH)](BF4)2 (2) (where N-Et-HPTB is the anion of N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-(1-ethylbenzimidazolyl))-2-hydroxy-1,3-diaminopropane), a similar, straightforward process could not be used for the synthesis of diiron(II) complexes with free thiol groups. In order to circumvent this problem, a new class of thiolate bridged diiron(II) complexes, [Fe2(N-Et-HPTB)(μ-SR(1))](BF4)2 (R(1) = Me (1a), Et (1b), (t)Bu (1c), Ph (1d)) was synthesized. Selective proton exchange reactions of one representative compound, 1b, with reagents of the type HS-R(2)-COOH yielded the target compounds, [Fe2(N-Et-HPTB)(μ-O2C-R(2)-SH)](BF4)2 (R(2) = C6H4 (3a), CH2CH2 (3b), CH2(CH2)5CH2 (3c)). Redox properties of the complexes 3a-3c were studied in comparison with the complex, [Fe2(N-Et-HPTB)(μ-O2CMe)](BF4)2 (5). Reaction of (Cp2Fe)(BF4) with 1b yielded [Fe(II)2(N-Et-HPTB)(DMF)3](BF4)3·DMF (4) (when crystallized from DMF/diethyl ether), which might indicate the formation of a transient ethanethiolate bridged {Fe(II)Fe(III)} species, followed by a rapid internal redox reaction to generate diethyldisulfide and the solvent coordinated diiron(II) complex, 4. This possibility was supported by a comparative cyclic voltammetric study of 1a-1c and 4. Prospects of the complexes of the type 3a-3c as potential building blocks for the synthesis of nonheme diiron(II) complexes covalently attached with other redox active metals has been substantiated by the synthesis of the complexes, [Fe2(N-EtHPTB)(μ-O2C-R(2)-S)Cu(Me3TACN)](BF4)2 (R = p-C6H4 (7a), CH2CH2 (7b)). All the compounds were characterized by a combination of single-crystal X-ray structure determinations and/or elemental analysis. PMID:26959857

  5. Effective removal of cationic dyes using carboxylate-functionalized cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Han; Zhou, Yanmei; Yu, Fang; Wang, Enze; Min, Yinghao; Huang, Qi; Pang, Lanfang; Ma, Tongsen

    2015-12-01

    A novel carboxylate-functionalized adsorbent (CNM) based on cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) was prepared and adsorptive removal of multiple cationic dyes (crystal violet, methylene blue, malachite green and basic fuchsin) were investigated. The maximum cationic dyes uptakes ranged from 30.0 to 348.9mgg(-1) following the order of: CNM>CNCs>raw cellulose. Furthermore, the removal of crystal violet by CNM was investigated representatively where kinetics, thermodynamics and isotherm analysis were employed to explain in-depth information associated with the adsorption process. The adsorption kinetics fitted well to the pseudo-second-order model and thermodynamic analysis revealed that the adsorption process was spontaneous and exothermic. Meanwhile, isothermal study demonstrated a monolayer adsorption behavior following the Langmuir model with a calculated maximum absorption capacity of 243.9mgg(-1), which is higher than those of many other reported adsorbents. These findings prefigure the promising potentials of CNM as a versatile adsorbent for the efficient removal of cationic dyes from wastewater. PMID:26298027

  6. Functional properties and structural characterization of rice δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase

    PubMed Central

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Bertazzini, Michele; Zarattini, Marco; Funck, Dietmar; Ruszkowski, Milosz; Nocek, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    The majority of plant species accumulate high intracellular levels of proline to cope with hyperosmotic stress conditions. Proline synthesis from glutamate is tightly regulated at both the transcriptional and the translational levels, yet little is known about the mechanisms for post-translational regulation of the enzymatic activities involved. The gene coding in rice (Oryza sativa L.) for δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the second and final step in this pathway, was isolated and expressed in Escherichia coli. The structural and functional properties of the affinity-purified protein were characterized. As for most species, rice P5C reductase was able to use in vitro either NADH or NADPH as the electron donor. However, strikingly different effects of cations and anions were found depending on the pyridine nucleotide used, namely inhibition of NADH-dependent activity and stimulation of NADPH-dependent activity. Moreover, physiological concentrations of proline and NADP+ were strongly inhibitory for the NADH-dependent reaction, whereas the NADPH-dependent activity was mildly affected. Our results suggest that only NADPH may be used in vivo and that stress-dependent variations in ion homeostasis and NADPH/NADP+ ratio could modulate enzyme activity, being functional in promoting proline accumulation and potentially also adjusting NADPH consumption during the defense against hyperosmotic stress. The apparent molecular weight of the native protein observed in size exclusion chromatography indicated a high oligomerization state. We also report the first crystal structure of a plant P5C reductase at 3.40-Å resolution, showing a decameric quaternary assembly. Based on the structure, it was possible to identify dynamic structural differences among rice, human, and bacterial enzymes. PMID:26284087

  7. Functional properties and structural characterization of rice δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Bertazzini, Michele; Zarattini, Marco; Funck, Dietmar; Ruszkowski, Milosz; Nocek, Bogusław

    2015-07-28

    The majority of plant species accumulate high intracellular levels of proline to cope with hyperosmotic stress conditions. Proline synthesis from glutamate is tightly regulated at both the transcriptional and the translational levels, yet little is known about the mechanisms for post-translational regulation of the enzymatic activities involved. The gene coding in rice (Oryza sativa L.) for δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the second and final step in this pathway, was isolated and expressed in Escherichia coli. The structural and functional properties of the affinity-purified protein were characterized. As for most species, rice P5C reductase was able to usemore » in vitro either NADH or NADPH as the electron donor. However, strikingly different effects of cations and anions were found depending on the pyridine nucleotide used, namely inhibition of NADH-dependent activity and stimulation of NADPH-dependent activity. Moreover, physiological concentrations of proline and NADP+ were strongly inhibitory for the NADH-dependent reaction, whereas the NADPH-dependent activity was mildly affected. Our results suggest that only NADPH may be used in vivo and that stress-dependent variations in ion homeostasis and NADPH/NADP+ ratio could modulate enzyme activity, being functional in promoting proline accumulation and potentially also adjusting NADPH consumption during the defense against hyperosmotic stress. The apparent molecular weight of the native protein observed in size exclusion chromatography indicated a high oligomerization state. We also report the first crystal structure of a plant P5C reductase at 3.40-Å resolution, showing a decameric quaternary assembly. It was possible to identify dynamic structural differences among rice, human, and bacterial enzymes.« less

  8. Screening biochars for heavy metal retention in soil: role of oxygen functional groups

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxygen-containing carboxyl, hydroxyl, and phenolic surface functional groups of soil organic and mineral components play central roles in binding metal ions, and biochar amendment can provide means of increasing these surface ligands in soil. In this study, positive matrix factorization (PMF) was f...

  9. Molecular level computational studies of polyethylene and polyacrylonitrile composites containing single walled carbon nanotubes: effect of carboxylic acid functionalization on nanotube-polymer interfacial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighatpanah, Shayesteh; Bohlén, Martin; Bolton, Kim

    2014-09-01

    Molecular dynamics and molecular mechanics methods have been used to investigate additive-polymer interfacial properties in single walled carbon nanotube - polyethylene and single walled carbon nanotube - polyacrylonitrile composites. Properties such as the interfacial shear stress and bonding energy are similar for the two composites. In contrast, functionalizing the single walled carbon nanotubes with carboxylic acid groups leads to an increase in these properties, with a larger increase for the polar polyacrylonitrile composite. Increasing the percentage of carbon atoms that were functionalized from 1% to 5% also leads to an increase in the interfacial properties. In addition, the interfacial properties depend on the location of the functional groups on the single walled carbon nanotube wall.

  10. Impact of polyacrylamide with different contents of carboxyl groups on the chromium (III) oxide adsorption properties in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewska, Małgorzata; Chibowski, Stanisław; Urban, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of experiments was determination of solution pH and contents of anionic groups in polyacrylamide (PAM) macromolecules on the stability mechanism of chromium (III) oxide suspension. The spectrophotometry, potentiometric titration, microelectrophoresis, viscosimetry and turbidimetry were applied. They enabled determination of polymer adsorbed amount, surface and diffusion charges of solid particles with and without PAM, thickness of polymer adsorption layer, macromolecule dimensions in the solution and stability of the Cr2O3 - polymer systems, respectively. It was found that adsorption of anionic PAM decreases and thickness of polymeric adsorption layer increases with the increasing pH. Slightly higher adsorption was obtained for the PAM samples containing a greater number of carboxyl groups. At pH 3 and 9 insignificant deterioration of stability conditions of Cr2O3 particle covered with polyacrylamide was observed (neutralization of solid positive charge by the adsorbed polymeric chains (pH 3) and single polymeric bridges formation (pH 9)). The electrosteric repulsion between the solid particles covered with PAM layers at pH 6, is the main reason for significant improvement of Cr2O3 suspension stability in the polymer presence. PMID:25464324

  11. Fluorescence dye adsorption assay to quantify carboxyl groups on the surface of poly(methyl methacrylate) microbeads.

    PubMed

    Rdiger, Stefan; Ruhland, Mirko; Schmidt, Carsten; Schrder, Christian; Grossmann, Kai; Bhm, Alexander; Nitschke, Jrg; Berger, Ingo; Schimke, Ingolf; Schierack, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Microbead-based assays have evolved into powerful tools for the multiplex detection of biomolecules. Analytes are captured by DNA or protein capture molecules which are coupled on microbead surfaces. A homogeneous carboxylation of microbeads is essential for the optimal and reproducible coupling of capture molecules and thus a prerequisite for an optimal multiplex microbead-based assay performance. We developed a simple fluorescence dye adsorption assay for the description of microbead carboxylation and for the prediction of coupling successes of capture molecules. Using the fluorescence dye SYTO-62 it is possible to quantify the degree of carboxylation of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microbeads within 1 h in a multiplex format by fluorescence microscopy or flow cytometry. Compared to conventional bulk assays which only provide an average degree of carboxylation the main advantage of the SYTO-62 assay is the single microbead analysis and therefore the description of the qualitative distribution of carboxylation in microbead populations. The SYTO-62 assay is sensitive enough to even determine weak carboxylation. Also, the quality of microbeads can be evaluated. To our knowledge this is the first report which applies a reversible noncovalent fluorescent dye adsorption assay to quantify the degree of carboxylation on surfaces. PMID:21413805

  12. A simple colorimetric chemosensor bearing a carboxylic acid group with high selectivity for CN-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gyeong Jin; Choi, Ye Won; Lee, Dongkuk; Kim, Cheal

    2014-11-01

    A new simple ‘naked eye' chemosensor 1 (sodium (E)-2-((2-(3-hydroxy-2-naphthoyl)hydrazono)methyl)benzoate) has been synthesized for detection of CN- in a mixture of DMF/H2O (9:1). The sensor 1 comprises of a naphthoic hydrazide as efficient hydrogen bonding donor group and a benzoic acid as the moiety with the water solubility. The receptor 1 showed high selectivity toward cyanide ions in a 1:1 stoichiometric manner, which induces a fast color change from colorless to yellow for CN- over other anions. Therefore, receptor 1 could be useful for cyanide detection in aqueous environment, displaying a high distinguishable selectivity from hydrogen bonded anions and being clearly visible to the naked eye.

  13. Polymethyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid coatings with controllable concentration of surface carboxyl groups: A novel approach in fabrication of polymeric platforms for potential bio-diagnostic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Samira; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Djordjevic, Ivan; Koole, Leo H.

    2014-05-01

    The generally accepted strategy in development of bio-diagnostic devices is to immobilize proteins on polymeric surfaces as a part of detection process for diseases and viruses through antibody/antigen coupling. In that perspective, polymer surface properties such as concentration of functional groups must be closely controlled in order to preserve the protein activity. In order to improve the surface characteristics of transparent polymethacrylate plastics that are used for diagnostic devices, we have developed an effective fabrication procedure of polymethylmetacrylate-co-metacrylic acid (PMMA-co-MAA) coatings with controlled number of surface carboxyl groups. The polymers were processed effectively with the spin-coating technique and the detailed control over surface properties is here by demonstrated through the variation of a single synthesis reaction parameter. The chemical structure of synthesized and processed co-polymers has been investigated with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and matrix-assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF-MS). The surface morphology of polymer coatings have been analyzed with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We demonstrate that the surface morphology and the concentration of surface -COOH groups (determined with UV-vis surface titration) on the processed PMMA-co-MAA coatings can be precisely controlled by variation of initial molar ratio of reactants in the free-radical polymerization reaction. The wettability of developed polymer surfaces also varies with macromolecular structure.

  14. Floral Benzenoid Carboxyl Methyltransferases: From in Vitro to in Planta Function

    SciTech Connect

    Effmert,U.; Saschenbrecker, S.; Ross, J.; Negre, F.; Fraser, C.; Noel, J.; Dudareva, N.; Piechulla, B.

    2005-01-01

    Benzenoid carboxyl methyltransferases synthesize methyl esters (e.g., methyl benzoate and methyl salicylate), which are constituents of aromas and scents of many plant species and play important roles in plant communication with the surrounding environment. Within the past five years, eleven such carboxyl methyltransferases were isolated and most of them were comprehensively investigated at the biochemical, molecular and structural level. Two types of enzymes can be distinguished according to their substrate preferences: the SAMT-type enzymes isolated from Clarkia breweri, Stephanotis floribunda, Antirrhinum majus, Hoya carnosa, and Petunia hybrida, which have a higher catalytic efficiency and preference for salicylic acid, while BAMT-type enzymes from A. majus, Arabidopsis thaliana, Arabidopsis lyrata, and Nicotiana suaveolens prefer benzoic acid. The elucidation of C. breweri SAMT's three-dimensional structure allowed a detailed modelling of the active sites of the carboxyl methyltransferases and revealed that the SAM binding pocket is highly conserved among these enzymes while the methyl acceptor binding site exhibits some variability, allowing a classification into SAMT-type and BAMT-type enzymes. The analysis of expression patterns coupled with biochemical characterization showed that these carboxyl methyltransferases are involved either in floral scent biosynthesis or in plant defense responses. While the latter can be induced by biotic or abiotic stress, the genes responsible for floral scent synthesis exhibit developmental and rhythmic expression pattern. The nature of the product and efficiency of its formation in plants depend on the availability of substrates, the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme toward benzoic acid and/or salicylic acid, and the transcriptional, translational, and post-translational regulation at the enzyme level. The biochemical properties of benzenoid carboxyl methyltransferases suggest that the genes involved in plant defenses might represent the ancestor for the presently existing floral genes which during evolution gained different expression profiles and encoded enzymes with the ability to accept structurally similar substrates.

  15. Floral benzenoid carboxyl methyltransferases: From in vitro to in planta function

    PubMed Central

    Effmert, Uta; Saschenbrecker, Sandra; Ross, Jeannine; Negre, Florence; Fraser, Chris M.; Noel, Joseph P.; Dudareva, Natalia; Piechulla, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    Benzenoid carboxyl methyltransferases synthesize methyl esters (e.g., methyl benzoate and methyl salicylate), which are constituents of aromas and scents of many plant species and play important roles in plant communication with the surrounding environment. Within the past five years, eleven such carboxyl methyltransferases were isolated and most of them were comprehensively investigated at the biochemical, molecular and structural level. Two types of enzymes can be distinguished according to their substrate preferences: the SAMT-type enzymes isolated from Clarkia breweri, Stephanotis floribunda, Antirrhinum majus, Hoya carnosa, and Petunia hybrida, which have a higher catalytic efficiency and preference for salicylic acid, while BAMT-type enzymes from A. majus, Arabidopsis thaliana, Arabidopsis lyrata, and Nicotiana suaveolens prefer benzoic acid. The elucidation of C. breweri SAMT’s three-dimensional structure allowed a detailed modelling of the active sites of the carboxyl methyltransferases and revealed that the SAM binding pocket is highly conserved among these enzymes while the methyl acceptor binding site exhibits some variability, allowing a classification into SAMT-type and BAMT-type enzymes. The analysis of expression patterns coupled with biochemical characterization showed that these carboxyl methyltransferases are involved either in floral scent biosynthesis or in plant defense responses. While the latter can be induced by biotic or abiotic stress, the genes responsible for floral scent synthesis exhibit developmental and rhythmic expression pattern. The nature of the product and efficiency of its formation in planta depend on the availability of substrates, the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme toward benzoic acid and/or salicylic acid, and the transcriptional, translational, and post-translational regulation at the enzyme level. The biochemical properties of benzenoid carboxyl methyltransferases suggest that the genes involved in plant defenses might represent the ancestor for the presently existing floral genes which during evolution gained different expression profiles and encoded enzymes with the ability to accept structurally similar substrates. PMID:15946712

  16. A Functional Analytic Approach to Group Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandenberghe, Luc

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a particular view on the use of Functional Analytical Psychotherapy (FAP) in a group therapy format. This view is based on the author's experiences as a supervisor of Functional Analytical Psychotherapy Groups, including groups for women with depression and groups for chronic pain patients. The contexts in which this approach…

  17. Functional Reconstitution of the Integral Membrane Enzyme, Isoprenylcysteine Carboxyl Methyltransferase, in Synthetic Bolalipid Membrane Vesicles†

    PubMed Central

    Febo-Ayala, Wilma; Morera-Félix, Shakira L.

    2008-01-01

    Three bipolar archaeal-type diglycerophosphocholine tetraether lipids (a.k.a., bolalipids) have been prepared to determine 1) the influence of molecular structure on the physical properties of bolalipid membranes and 2) their impact on the functional reconstitution of Ste14p, a membrane-associated isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The three bolalipids synthesized were: C20BAS, C32BAS, and C32phytBAS. These bolalipid structures differ in that the C20BAS derivative has a short sn-1 glyceryl diether C20H40 transmembrane alkyl chain and two ether-linked sn-2 n-decyl chains, whereas the C32BAS and C32phytBAS derivatives have a longer sn-1 diether C32H64 membrane-spanning chain and two ether-linked sn-2 n-hexadecyl or phytanyl chains, respectively. Differential scanning calorimetry and temperature-dependent 31P NMR was used to determine the gel-to-liquid crystalline phase transition temperatures of the bolalipids (C32BAS Tm > 85 °C; C32phytBAS Tm = 14 °C; C20BAS Tm = 17°C). The bolalipid lateral diffusion coefficients, determined by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching at 20 °C, were 1.5 × 10−8 and 1.8 × 10−9 cm2/s for C20BAS and C32phytBAS, respectively. The mobility of C32BAS could not be measured at this temperature. Ste14p activity was monitored by an in vitro methyltransferase assay in reconstituted vesicle dispersions composed of DMPC, C20BAS:E. coli polar lipid, C20BAS:POPC, C32phytBAS:E. coli polar lipid, and C32phytBAS:POPC. Ste14p activity was lost in vesicles composed of 75–100 mol% C20BAS and 0–100 mol% C32BAS, but retained in vesicles with 0–50 mol% C20BAS and 0–100 mol% C32phytBAS. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed the presence of Ste14p in 100 mol% C20BAS and 100 mol% C32phytBAS vesicle dispersions, even though the lamellar liquid crystalline phase thickness of C20BAS is only 32 Å. Since Ste14p activity was not affected by either the gel to liquid-crystal phase transition temperature of the lipid or the temperature of the assay, the low activity observed in 75–100 mol% C20BAS membranes can be attributed to hydrophobic mismatch between this bolalipid and the hydrophobic surface of Ste14p. PMID:17144661

  18. Spectroscopic studies on sidewall carboxylic acid functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with valine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deborah, M.; Jawahar, A.; Mathavan, T.; Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2015-03-01

    The valine functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTS) were prepared and characterized by using XRD, UV-Vis, FT-IR, EPR, SEM, and EDX, spectroscopic techniques. The enhanced XRD peak (0 0 2) intensity was observed for valine functionalized MWCNTs compared with oxidized MWCNTs, which is likely due to sample purification by acid washing. UV-Vis study shows the formation of valine functionalized MWCNTs. FT-IR study confirms the presence of functional groups of oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs. The ESR line shape analysis indicates that the observed EPR line shape is a Gaussian line shape. The g-values indicate that the systems are isotropic in nature. The morphology study was carried out for oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs by using SEM. The EDX spectra revealed that the high purity of oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs. The functionalization has been chosen because, functionalization of CNTs with amino acids makes them soluble and biocompatible. Thus, they have potential applications in the field of biosensors and targeted drug delivery.

  19. Synthesis, characterization, and bioactivity of carboxylic acid-functionalized titanium dioxide nanobelts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Surface modification strategies to reduce engineered nanomaterial (ENM) bioactivity have been used successfully in carbon nanotubes. This study examined the toxicity and inflammatory potential for two surface modifications (humic acid and carboxylation) on titanium nanobelts (TNB). Methods The in vitro exposure models include C57BL/6 alveolar macrophages (AM) and transformed human THP-1 cells exposed to TNB for 24 hrs in culture. Cell death and NLRP3 inflammasome activation (IL-1β release) were monitored. Short term (4 and 24 hr) in vivo studies in C57BL/6, BALB/c and IL-1R null mice evaluated inflammation and cytokine release, and cytokine release from ex vivo cultured AM. Results Both in vitro cell models suggest that the humic acid modification does not significantly affect TNB bioactivity, while carboxylation reduced both toxicity and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. In addition, short term in vivo exposures in both C57BL/6 and IL-1R null mouse strains demonstrated decreased markers of inflammation, supporting the in vitro finding that carboxylation is effective in reducing bioactivity. TNB instillations in IL-1R null mice demonstrated the critical role of IL-1β in initiation of TNB-induced lung inflammation. Neutrophils were completely absent in the lungs of IL-1R null mice instilled with TNB for 24 hrs. However, the cytokine content of the IL-1R null mice lung lavage samples indicated that other inflammatory agents, IL-6 and TNF-α were constitutively elevated indicating a potential compensatory inflammatory mechanism in the absence of IL-1 receptors. Conclusions Taken together, the data suggests that carboxylation, but not humic acid modification of TNB reduces, but does not totally eliminate bioactivity of TNB, which is consistent with previous studies of other long aspect ratio nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes. PMID:25179214

  20. Interaction between carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles and porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Song-Bae; Kang, Jin-Kyu; Yi, In-Geol

    2015-04-01

    Carbon nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes, fullerene, and graphene, have received considerable attention due to their unique physical and chemical characteristics, leading to mass production and widespread application in industrial, commercial, and environmental fields. During their life cycle from production to disposal, however, carbon nanomaterials are inevitably released into water and soil environments, which have resulted in concern about their health and environmental impacts. Carbon black is a nano-sized amorphous carbon powder that typically contains 90-99% elemental carbon. It can be produced from incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons in petroleum and coal. Carbon black is widely used in chemical and industrial products or applications such as ink pigments, coating plastics, the rubber industry, and composite reinforcements. Even though carbon black is strongly hydrophobic and tends to aggregate in water, it can be dispersed in aqueous media through surface functionalization or surfactant use. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the transport behavior of carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles (CBNPs) in porous media. Column experiments were performed for potassium chloride (KCl), a conservative tracer, and CBNPs under saturated flow conditions. Column experiments was conducted in duplicate using quartz sand, iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS), and aluminum oxide-coated sand (AOCS) to examine the effect of metal (Fe, Al) oxide presence on the transport of CBNPs. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) of CBNPs and chloride were obtained by monitoring effluent, and then mass recovery was quantified from these curves. Additionally, interaction energy profiles for CBNP-porous media were calculated using DLVO theory for sphere-plate geometry. The BTCs of chloride had relative peak concentrations ranging from 0.895 to 0.990. Transport parameters (pore-water velocity v, hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient D) obtained by the model fit from the tracer BTCs were 0.274±0.007 cm min-1 and 0.102±0.025 cm2 min-1, respectively. Mass recoveries of chloride were in the range of 94.7 to 101.9%, indicating that chloride behaved as a conservative tracer and that the column experiments were successful. The BTCs of CBNPs had different relative peak concentrations depending on the porous media used in the experiments. In quartz sand, the relative peak concentration was 0.768±0.005. The mass recovery of CBNPs in quartz sand was 83.1±2.7%, whereas no breakthrough of CBNPs (mass recovery = 0 %) was observed in IOCS or AOCS at the same flow rate, indicating that all CBNPs were retained in the IOCS and AOCS columns under the experimental conditions. These results indicate that metal (Fe, Al) oxides can play a significant role in the attachment of CBNPs to porous media. For the given solution conditions, both CBNPs and quartz sand were negatively charged with zeta potentials of -31.8±0.1 and -39.0±0.6 mV, respectively. Therefore, the electrostatic interactions between CBNPs and quartz sand were repulsive. Meanwhile, both IOCS and ACOS were positively charged with zeta potentials of 10.1±1.3 and 39.9±1.9 mV, respectively, such that the interaction between CBNPs and metal oxide-coated sands was electrostatically attractive, resulting in enhancement of CBNP attachment to the coated sands. Interaction energy profiles for CBNP-porous media were calculated using DLVO theory for sphere-plate geometry. Interaction energy profiles demonstrated that the interaction energy for CBNP-quartz sand was repulsive with a primary maximum (energy barrier) of 63.2 KBT, whereas the interaction energies for CBNP-IOCS and CBNP-AOCS were attractive with no energy barriers. Acknowledgement This research was supported by the National Institute of Environmental Research, Korea Ministry of Environment, in 2014.

  1. Gαq Protein Carboxyl Terminus Imitation Polypeptide GCIP-27 Improves Cardiac Function in Chronic Heart Failure Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiao Lan; Tong, Yang Fei; Liu, Ya; Xu, Ya Li; Yang, Hua; Zhang, Guo Yuan; Li, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Hai-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Background Gαq protein carboxyl terminus imitation polypeptide (GCIP)-27 has been shown to alleviate pathological cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by various factors. Pathological cardiac hypertrophy increases the morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases while it compensates for poor heart function. This study was designed to investigate the effects of GCIP-27 on heart function in rats with heart failure induced by doxorubicin. Methods and Results Forty-eight rats were randomly divided into the following six groups receiving vehicle (control), doxorubicin (Dox), losartan (6 mg/kg, i.g.) and three doses of GCIP-27 (10, 30, 90 μg/kg; i.p., bid), respectively. Heart failure was induced by Dox, which was administered at a 20 mg/kg cumulative dose. After 10 weeks of treatment, we observed that GCIP-27 (30, 90 μg/kg) significantly increased ejection fraction, fraction shortening, stroke volume and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase activity of Dox-treated hearts. Additionally, GCIP-27 decreased myocardial injury, heart weight index and left ventricular weight index, fibrosis and serum cardiac troponin-I concentration in Dox-treated mice. Immunohistochemistry, western blotting and real-time PCR experiments indicated that GCIP-27 (10–90 μg/kg) could markedly upregulate the protein expression of myocardial α-myosin heavy chain (MHC), Bcl-2, protein kinase C (PKC) ε and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) 1/2 as well as the mRNA expression of α-MHC, but downregulated the expression of β-MHC, Bax and PKC βII, and the mRNA expression levels of β-MHC in Dox-treated mice. It was also found that GCIP-27 (30, 90 μg/L) decreased cell size and protein content of cardiomyocytes significantly in vitro by comparison of Dox group. Conclusions GCIP-27 could effectively ameliorate heart failure development induced by Dox. PKC–ERK1/2 signaling might represent the underlying mechanism of the beneficial effects of GCIP-27. PMID:25822412

  2. Importance of Having Low-Density Functional Groups for Generating High-Performance Semiconducting Polymer Dots

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuanjun; Yu, Jiangbo; Wu, Changfeng; Jin, Yuhui; Rong, Yu; Ye, Fangmao

    2012-01-01

    Semiconducting polymers with low-density side-chain carboxylic acid groups were synthesized to form stable, functionalized, and highly fluorescent polymer dots (Pdots). The influence of the molar fraction of hydrophilic side-chains on Pdot properties and performance was systematically investigated. Our results show that the density of side-chain carboxylic acid groups significantly affects Pdot stability, internal structure, fluorescence brightness, and nonspecific binding in cellular labeling. Fluorescence spectroscopy, single-particle imaging, and a dye-doping method were employed to investigate the fluorescence brightness and the internal structure of the Pdots. The results of these experiments indicate that semiconducting polymers with low density of side-chain functional groups can form stable, compact, and highly bright Pdots as compared to those with high density of hydrophilic side-chains. The functionalized polymer dots were conjugated to streptavidin (SA) by carbodiimide-catalyzed coupling and the Pdot-SA probes effectively and specifically labeled the cancer cell-surface marker Her2 in human breast cancer cells. The carboxylate-functionalized polymer could also be covalently modified with small functional molecules to generate Pdot probes for click chemistry-based bioorthogonal labeling. This study presents a promising approach for further developing functional Pdot probes for biological applications. PMID:22607220

  3. Adsorption properties of the nanozirconia/anionic polyacrylamide system-Effects of surfactant presence, solution pH and polymer carboxyl groups content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiśniewska, Małgorzata; Chibowski, Stanisław; Urban, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    The adsorption mechanism of anionic polyacrylamide (PAM) on the nanozirconia surface was examined. The effects of solution pH, carboxyl groups content in macromolecules and anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate-SDS) addition were determined. The more probable structure of polymer adsorption layer was characterized based on the data obtained from spectrophotometry, viscosimetry and potentiometric titration methods. The adsorbed amount of polymer, size of macromolecules in the solution and surface charge density of ZrO2 particles in the absence and presence of PAM were assessed, respectively. Analysis of these results indicated that the increase of solution pH and content of carboxyl groups in the polymeric chains lead to more expanded conformations of adsorbing macromolecules. As a result, the adsorption of anionic polyacrylamide decreased. The SDS presence caused the significant increase of PAM adsorbed amount at pH 3, whereas at pH 6 and 9 the surfactant addition resulted in reduction of polymer adsorption level.

  4. Adsorption of Cu(II) to ferrihydrite and ferrihydrite-bacteria composites: Importance of the carboxyl group for Cu mobility in natural environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Ellen M.; Peacock, Caroline L.

    2012-09-01

    Bacterially associated iron (hydr)oxide composites are widespread in natural environments, and by analogy with isolated iron (hydr)oxides and bacteria, are important scavengers of dissolved trace-metals. We precipitated ferrihydrite via rapid Fe(III) hydrolysis in the absence and presence of the non-Fe metabolising, Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis, commonly found in natural waters, soils and sediments. We combined XRD, SEM, BET and Fe K-edge EXAFS to examine the mineralogy, morphology and crystallinity of the ferrihydrite composites. We find that the mineral fraction of the composites is unaltered in primary mineralogy, morphology and crystallinity compared to pure ferrihydrite. We then measured the adsorption of Cu to ferrihydrite and the ferrihydrite-B. subtilis composites as a function of pH and the ferrihydrite:bacteria mass ratio of the composites, and used EXAFS to determine the molecular mechanisms of Cu adsorption. We determine directly for the first time that Cu uptake by ferrihydrite-B. subtilis composites is the result of adsorption to both the ferrihydrite and B. subtilis fractions. Adsorption of Cu by the B. subtilis fraction results in significant Cu uptake in the low pH regime (pH 4, 20% of [Cu]total) and significantly enhanced Cu uptake in the mid pH regime. This composite sorption behaviour is in stark contrast to pure ferrihydrite, where Cu adsorption is negligible at low pH. Overall, for composites dominated by either ferrihydrite or B. subtilis, the bacterial fraction is exclusively responsible for Cu adsorption at low pH while the ferrihydrite fraction is predominantly responsible for adsorption at high pH. Furthermore, with an increased mass ratio of bacteria, the dominance of Cu adsorption to the bacterial fraction persists into the mid pH regime and extends significantly into the upper pH region. As such, the distribution of the total adsorbed Cu between the composite fractions is a function of both pH and the ferrihydrite:bacteria mass ratio of the composite. EXAFS shows that Cu adsorbs to ferrihydrite as an inner-sphere, (CuO4Hn)n - 6 bidentate edge-sharing complex; and to ferrihydrite composites as an inner-sphere, (CuO5Hn)n - 8 monodentate complex with carboxyl surface functional groups present on the bacterial fraction plus the bidentate edge-sharing complex on the ferrihydrite fraction. Our new results combined with previous work on Cu sorption to bacteria, humic substances and iron (hydr)oxides coated with humics, demonstrate the universal importance of the carboxyl moiety for Cu sorption and mobility in natural environments. Taken together these results show that Cu-carboxyl binding is the predominant mechanism by which Cu interacts with abiotic and biotic organic matter, and provides a ubiquitous control on Cu fate and mobility in natural waters, soils and sediments. Our results indicate that in environments where a significant proportion of iron (hydr)oxides are intimately intermixed with an organic fraction, we must consider Cu sequestration by these composites in addition to pure mineral phases.

  5. Functionally Important Carboxyls in a Bacterial Homologue of the Vesicular Monoamine Transporter (VMAT)*

    PubMed Central

    Yaffe, Dana; Vergara-Jaque, Ariela; Shuster, Yonatan; Listov, Dina; Meena, Sitaram; Singh, Satinder K.; Forrest, Lucy R.; Schuldiner, Shimon

    2014-01-01

    Transporters essential for neurotransmission in mammalian organisms and bacterial multidrug transporters involved in antibiotic resistance are evolutionarily related. To understand in more detail the evolutionary aspects of the transformation of a bacterial multidrug transporter to a mammalian neurotransporter and to learn about mechanisms in a milieu amenable for structural and biochemical studies, we identified, cloned, and partially characterized bacterial homologues of the rat vesicular monoamine transporter (rVMAT2). We performed preliminary biochemical characterization of one of them, Brevibacillus brevis monoamine transporter (BbMAT), from the bacterium B. brevis. BbMAT shares substrates with rVMAT2 and transports them in exchange with >1H+, like the mammalian transporter. Here we present a homology model of BbMAT that has the standard major facilitator superfamily fold; that is, with two domains of six transmembrane helices each, related by 2-fold pseudosymmetry whose axis runs normal to the membrane and between the two halves. The model predicts that four carboxyl residues, a histidine, and an arginine are located in the transmembrane segments. We show here that two of the carboxyls are conserved, equivalent to the corresponding ones in rVMAT2, and are essential for H+-coupled transport. We conclude that BbMAT provides an excellent experimental paradigm for the study of its mammalian counterparts and bacterial multidrug transporters. PMID:25336661

  6. Control of Surface Functional Groups on Pertechntate Sorption on Activated Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Wang; H. Gao; R. Yeredla; H. Xu; M. Abrecht; G.D. Stasio

    2006-07-05

    {sup 99}Tc is highly soluble and poorly adsorbed by natural materials under oxidizing conditions, thus being of particular concern for radioactive waste disposal. Activated carbon can potentially be used as an adsorbent for removing Tc from aqueous solutions. We have tested six commercial activated carbon materials for their capabilities for sorption of pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}). The tested materials can be grouped into two distinct types: Type I materials have high sorption capabilities with the distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) varying from 9.5 x 10{sup 5} to 3.2 x 10{sup 3} mL/g as the pH changes from 4.5 to 9.5, whereas type II materials have relatively low sorption capabilities with K{sub d} remaining more or less constant (1.1 x 10{sup 3} - 1.8 x 10{sup 3} mL/g) over a similar pH range. The difference in sorption behavior between the two types of materials is attributed to the distribution of surface functional groups. The predominant surface groups are identified to be carboxylic and phenolic groups. The carboxylic group can be further divided into three subgroups A, B, and C in the order of increasing acidity. The high sorption capabilities of type I materials are found to be caused by the presence of a large fraction of carboxylic subgroups A and B, while the low sorption capabilities of type II materials are due to the exclusive presence of phenolic and carboxylic subgroup C. Therefore, the performance of activated carbon for removing TcO{sub 4}{sup -} can be improved by enhancing the formation of carboxylic subgroups A and B during material processing.

  7. Relating Functional Groups to the Periodic Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struyf, Jef

    2009-01-01

    An introduction to organic chemistry functional groups and their ionic variants is presented. Functional groups are ordered by the position of their specific (hetero) atom in the periodic table. Lewis structures are compared with their corresponding condensed formulas. (Contains 5 tables.)

  8. Synthesis of New Functionalized Indoles Based on Ethyl Indol-2-carboxylate.

    PubMed

    Boraei, Ahmed T A; El Ashry, El Sayed H; Barakat, Assem; Ghabbour, Hazem A

    2016-01-01

    Successful alkylations of the nitrogen of ethyl indol-2-carboxylate were carried out using aq. KOH in acetone. The respective N-alkylated acids could be obtained without separating the N-alkylated esters by increasing the amount of KOH and water. The use of NaOMe in methanol led to transesterification instead of the alkylation, while the use of NaOEt led to low yields of the N-alkylated acids. Hydrazinolysis of the ester gave indol-2-carbohydrazide which then was allowed to react with different aromatic aldehydes and ketones in ethanol catalyzed by acetic acid. Indol-2-thiosemicarbazide was used in a heterocyclization reaction to form thiazoles. The new structures were confirmed using NMR, mass spectrometry and X-ray single crystal analysis. PMID:26978331

  9. Copper-Catalyzed Carboxylation of Aryl Iodides with Carbon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Tran-Vu, Hung; Daugulis, Olafs

    2013-01-01

    A method for carboxylation of aryl iodides with carbon dioxide has been developed. The reaction employs low loadings of copper iodide/TMEDA or DMEDA catalyst, 1 atm of CO2, DMSO or DMA solvent, and proceeds at 25–70 °C. Good functional group tolerance is observed, with ester, bromide, chloride, fluoride, ether, hydroxy, amino, and ketone functionalities tolerated. Additionally, hindered aryl iodides such as iodomesitylene can also be carboxylated PMID:24288654

  10. The central role of ketones in reversible and irreversible hydrothermal organic functional group transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ziming; Gould, Ian R.; Williams, Lynda B.; Hartnett, Hilairy E.; Shock, Everett L.

    2012-12-01

    Studies of hydrothermal reactions involving organic compounds suggest complex, possibly reversible, reaction pathways that link functional groups from reduced alkanes all the way to oxidized carboxylic acids. Ketones represent a critical functional group because they occupy a central position in the reaction pathway, at the point where Csbnd C bond cleavage is required for the formation of the more oxidized carboxylic acids. The mechanisms for the critical bond cleavage reactions in ketones, and how they compete with other reactions are the focus of this experimental study. We studied a model ketone, dibenzylketone (DBK), in H2O at 300 °C and 70 MPa for up to 528 h. Product analysis was performed as a function of time at low DBK conversions to reveal the primary reaction pathways. Reversible interconversion between ketone, alcohol, alkene and alkane functional groups is observed in addition to formation of radical coupling products derived from irreversible Csbnd C and Csbnd H homolytic bond cleavage. The product distributions are time-dependent but the bond cleavage products dominate. The major products that accumulate at longer reaction times are toluene and larger, dehydrogenated structures that are initially formed by radical coupling. The hydrogen atoms generated by dehydrogenation of the coupling products are predominantly consumed in the formation of toluene. Even though bond cleavage products dominate, no carboxylic acids were observed on the timescale of the reactions under the chosen experimental conditions.

  11. Effects of surface functional groups on proliferation and biofunction of Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaling; Ji, Yawei; Zhao, Yahong; Kong, Yan; Gao, Ming; Feng, Qilin; Wu, Yue; Yang, Yumin

    2016-05-01

    Scaffolds in tissue engineering should be rationally designed to become an adhesion substrate friendly to cells. Schwann cells play an important role in nerve regeneration and repair. Previous studies have suggested that surface chemical groups have effect on many types of cells. However, there have hitherto been few reports on Schwann cells. In this study, we investigated cell adhesion, survival, proliferation, and neurotrophic actions of Schwann cells cultured on glass coverslips modified with different chemical groups, including methyl, carboxyl, amino, hydroxyl, mercapto, and sulfonic groups. Schwann cells on amino and carboxyl surfaces had higher attachment rate, presenting good morphology, high proliferation, and strong neurotrophic functions, while on methyl surfaces, few cells can survive, cells shrunk into round shape, exhibiting poor proliferation and weak neurotrophic functions. Growth of cells on other groups was between methyl and amino, carboxyl, and had little difference among them. Our data indicated that chemical groups can regulate behavior of Schwann cells, indicating a way to design new scaffolds for peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:26911577

  12. Preparation and characterization of multi-carboxyl-functionalized silica gel for removal of Cu (II), Cd (II), Ni (II) and Zn (II) from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Li, Ming-yu; Feng, Chang-gen; Zeng, Qing-xuan

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the multi-carboxyl-functionalized silica gel was prepared by surface grafting method and applied for the removal of Cu (II), Cd (II), Ni (II) and Zn (II) from aqueous solution. The adsorbent was characterized by FT-IR, thermogravimetry, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area measurement and elemental analysis, and it proved that the organic functional group, carboxyl group, was grafted successfully onto the silica gel surface. The effect of solution pH on removal efficiencies of Cu (II), Cd (II), Ni (II) and Zn (II) was investigated and it was found that with the exception of Zn (II), the removal efficiencies of the rest of metal ions increased with the increasing of pH in the solution, the maximum removal efficiency occurred at pH 6.0, whereas the maximum removal efficiency for Zn (II) was found to be at pH 7.0. Adsorption equilibrium data were well fitted to Langmuir than Freundlich isotherm model and the maximum adsorption capacity for Cu (II), Cd (II), Ni (II) and Zn (II) was 47.07, 41.48, 30.80 and 39.96 mg/g, respectively. Competitive adsorption experiments demonstrated that the adsorbent material had excellent adsorption amount and high affinity for the Cu (II) in the binary systems. In addition, the column experiments were used to investigate stability and reusability of the adsorbent, the dynamic adsorption performance, and desorption of metal ions absorbed from the adsorbent. The results confirmed that the adsorbent presents good dynamic adsorption performance for Cu (II), Cd (II), Ni (II) and Zn (II) and these metal ions adsorbed were easy to be desorbed from the adsorbent. The adsorption capacities of metal ions did not present an obvious decrease after five cycles of adsorption-desorption.

  13. Organic Functional Group Playing Card Deck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Michael J.

    2003-04-01

    The recognition and identification of organic functional groups, while essential for chemistry and biology majors, is also very useful for non-science majors in the study of molecules in art and life. In order to make this task more palatable for the non-science major (art and communications students), the images of a traditional playing deck of cards (heart, spade, diamond, and club) have been replaced with four representations of common organic functional groups. The hierarchy rules for naming two groups in a molecule is loosely incorporated to represent the sequence (King, Queen, Jack, ?, Ace) of the deck. Students practice recognizing and identifying organic groups by playing simple card games of "Old Maid" and "Go Fish". To play games like "Poker" or "Gin", a student must not only recognize the functional groups, but also master a naming hierarchy for the organic groups.

  14. Fabrication of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone)-based hybrid proton-conducting membranes containing carboxyl or amino acid-functionalized titania by in situ sol-gel process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yongheng; Xu, Tao; He, Guangwei; Jiang, Zhongyi; Wu, Hong

    2015-02-01

    Functionalized titania are used as fillers to modify the sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) membrane for improved proton conductivity and methanol barrier property. The functionalized titania sol which contains proton conductive carboxylic acid groups or amino acid groups are derived from a facile chelation method using different functional additives. Then the novel SPEEK/carboxylic acid-functionalized titania (SPEEK/TC) and SPEEK/amino acid-functionalized titania (SPEEK/TNC) hybrid membranes are fabricated via in situ sol-gel method. The anti-swelling property and thermal stability of hybrid membranes are enhanced owing to the formation of electrostatic force between SPEEK and titania nanoparticles. The hybrid membranes exhibit higher proton conductivity than plain SPEEK membrane because more proton transfer sites are provided by the functionalized titania nanoparticles. Particularly, the proton conductivity of SPEEK/TNC membrane with 15% filler content reaches up to 6.24 × 10-2 S cm-1, which is 3.5 times higher than that of the pure SPEEK membrane. For methanol permeability, the SPEEK/TNC membranes possess the lowest values because the acid-base interaction between sulfonic acid groups in SPEEK and amino groups in functionalized titania leads to a more compact membrane structure.

  15. Aqueous infrared carboxylate absorbances: Aliphatic di-acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cabaniss, S.E.; Leenheer, J.A.; McVey, I.F.

    1998-01-01

    Aqueous attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectra of 18 aliphatic di-carboxylic acids are reported as a function of pH. The spectra show isosbestic points and intensity changes which indicate that Beer's law is obeyed, and peak frequencies lie within previously reported ranges for aqueous carboxylates and pure carboxylic acids. Intensity sharing from the symmetric carboxylate stretch is evident in many cases, so that bands which are nominally due to alkyl groups show increased intensity at higher pH. The asymmetric stretch of the HA- species is linearly related to the microscopic acidity constant of the H2A species, with ??pK 2 intervening atoms). The results suggest that aqueous ATR-FTIR may be able to estimate 'intrinsic' pKa values of carboxylic acids, in addition to providing quantitative estimates of ionization. ?? 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Synergistic effect of self-assembled carboxylic acid-functionalized carbon nanotubes and carbon fiber for improved electro-activated polymeric shape-memory nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haibao; Min Huang, Wei

    2013-06-01

    The present work studies the synergistic effect of self-assembled carboxylic acid-functionalized carbon nanotube (CNT) and carbon fiber on the electrical property and electro-activated recovery behavior of shape memory polymer (SMP) nanocomposites. The combination of CNT and carbon fiber results in improved electrical conductivity in the SMP nanocomposites. Carboxylic acid-functionalized CNTs are grafted onto the carbon fibers and then self-assembled by deposition to significantly enhance the reliability of the bonding between carbon fiber and SMP via van der Waals and covalent crosslink. Furthermore, the self-assembled carboxylic acid-functionalized CNTs and carbon fibers enable the SMP nanocomposites for Joule heating triggered shape recovery.

  17. FTIR Analysis of Functional Groups in Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, S. M.; McKenzie, G.; Dransfield, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are suspensions of particulate matter composed of compounds formed from chemical reactions of organic species in the atmosphere. Atmospheric particulate matter can have impacts on climate, the environment and human health. Standardized techniques to analyze the characteristics and composition of complex secondary organic aerosols are necessary to further investigate the formation of SOA and provide a better understanding of the reaction pathways of organic species in the atmosphere. While Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (AMS) can provide detailed information about the elemental composition of a sample, it reveals little about the chemical moieties which make up the particles. This work probes aerosol particles deposited on Teflon filters using FTIR, based on the protocols of Russell, et al. (Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, 2009) and the spectral fitting algorithm of Takahama, et al (submitted, 2012). To validate the necessary calibration curves for the analysis of complex samples, primary aerosols of key compounds (e.g., citric acid, ammonium sulfate, sodium benzoate) were generated, and the accumulated masses of the aerosol samples were related to their IR absorption intensity. These validated calibration curves were then used to classify and quantify functional groups in SOA samples generated in chamber studies by MIT's Kroll group. The fitting algorithm currently quantifies the following functionalities: alcohols, alkanes, alkenes, amines, aromatics, carbonyls and carboxylic acids.

  18. Cationic mononuclear ruthenium carboxylates as catalyst prototypes for self-induced hydrogenation of carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Naruto, Masayuki; Saito, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are ubiquitous in bio-renewable and petrochemical sources of carbon. Hydrogenation of carboxylic acids to yield alcohols produces water as the only byproduct, and thus represents a possible next generation, sustainable method for the production of these alternative energy carriers/platform chemicals on a large scale. Reported herein are molecular insights into cationic mononuclear ruthenium carboxylates ([Ru(OCOR)](+)) as prototypical catalysts for the hydrogenation of carboxylic acids. The substrate-derived coordinated carboxylate was found to function initially as a proton acceptor for the heterolytic cleavage of dihydrogen, and subsequently also as an acceptor for the hydride from [Ru-H](+), which was generated in the first step (self-induced catalysis). The hydrogenation proceeded selectively and at high levels of functional group tolerance, a feature that is challenging to achieve with existing heterogeneous/homogeneous catalyst systems. These fundamental insights are expected to significantly benefit the future development of metal carboxylate-catalysed hydrogenation processes of bio-renewable resources. PMID:26314266

  19. Cationic mononuclear ruthenium carboxylates as catalyst prototypes for self-induced hydrogenation of carboxylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Naruto, Masayuki; Saito, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are ubiquitous in bio-renewable and petrochemical sources of carbon. Hydrogenation of carboxylic acids to yield alcohols produces water as the only byproduct, and thus represents a possible next generation, sustainable method for the production of these alternative energy carriers/platform chemicals on a large scale. Reported herein are molecular insights into cationic mononuclear ruthenium carboxylates ([Ru(OCOR)]+) as prototypical catalysts for the hydrogenation of carboxylic acids. The substrate-derived coordinated carboxylate was found to function initially as a proton acceptor for the heterolytic cleavage of dihydrogen, and subsequently also as an acceptor for the hydride from [Ru–H]+, which was generated in the first step (self-induced catalysis). The hydrogenation proceeded selectively and at high levels of functional group tolerance, a feature that is challenging to achieve with existing heterogeneous/homogeneous catalyst systems. These fundamental insights are expected to significantly benefit the future development of metal carboxylate-catalysed hydrogenation processes of bio-renewable resources. PMID:26314266

  20. Identifying organic aerosol sources by comparing functional group composition in chamber and atmospheric particles

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Lynn M.; Bahadur, Ranjit; Ziemann, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of submicron particles by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in 14 campaigns in North America, Asia, South America, and Europe were used to identify characteristic organic functional group compositions of fuel combustion, terrestrial vegetation, and ocean bubble bursting sources, each of which often accounts for more than a third of organic mass (OM), and some of which is secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from gas-phase precursors. The majority of the OM consists of alkane, carboxylic acid, hydroxyl, and carbonyl groups. The organic functional groups formed from combustion and vegetation emissions are similar to the secondary products identified in chamber studies. The near absence of carbonyl groups in the observed SOA associated with combustion is consistent with alkane rather than aromatic precursors, and the absence of organonitrate groups can be explained by their hydrolysis in humid ambient conditions. The remote forest observations have ratios of carboxylic acid, organic hydroxyl, and nonacid carbonyl groups similar to those observed for isoprene and monoterpene chamber studies, but in biogenic aerosols transported downwind of urban areas the formation of esters replaces the acid and hydroxyl groups and leaves only nonacid carbonyl groups. The carbonyl groups in SOA associated with vegetation emissions provides striking evidence for the mechanism of esterification as the pathway for possible oligomerization reactions in the atmosphere. Forest fires include biogenic emissions that produce SOA with organic components similar to isoprene and monoterpene chamber studies, also resulting in nonacid carbonyl groups in SOA. PMID:21317360

  1. Geometric, electronic and magnetic structures of S = 19/2 and S = 20/2 thiophene-2-carboxylate functionalized Mn12 single molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jorge H; Ziegler, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    The geometric and magnetic structures of two structurally related, but magnetically inequivalent, single molecule magnets (SMMs) have been computationally characterized. The first SMM, with formula [Mn12O12(O2CC4H3S)16(H2O)2](-1) (I), has a half-integer spin (S(I) = 19/2) due to ferrimagnetic ordering. The second SMM, with formula Mn12O12(O2CC4H3S)16(H2O)4 (II), has an integer spin (S(II) = 20/2) and its geometric structure has been computationally predicted. Both SMMs include thiophene-2-carboxylate functional groups for potential use in molecular electronics. To determine structural and electronic differences between both SMMs, spin polarized density functional theory was applied to I and II. Hydrogen bonding of two and four Mn-bound water molecules in I and II, respectively, to thiophene-2-carboxylate oxygen atoms and inner cubane oxygen atoms is essential for structural stabilization of both complexes. The one-electron-reduction of I is concomitant with a structural asymmetry within its cubane whereby two ions, of nominal Mn(4+)(Si = 3/2) character, are inequivalent to the other two and acquire an incipient Mn(3+)(Si = 4/2) character. The geometric asymmetry in I provides an extra, albeit small, contribution to its zero field splitting and anisotropy barrier to spin reversal. Thus, despite its lower spin state, the anisotropy barrier of I is only slightly lower than that of II. PMID:25360814

  2. Identifying copepod functional groups from species functional traits

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Fabio; Gasparini, Stéphane; Ayata, Sakina-Dorothée

    2016-01-01

    We gathered information on the functional traits of the most representative copepod species in the Mediterranean Sea. Our database includes 191 species described by 7 traits encompassing diverse ecological functions: minimal and maximal body length, trophic group, feeding type, spawning strategy, diel vertical migration and vertical habitat. Cluster analysis in the functional trait space revealed that Mediterranean copepods can be separated into groups with distinct ecological roles. PMID:26811565

  3. Functional Groups in the Avian Auditory System

    PubMed Central

    Woolley, Sarah M. N.; Gill, Patrick R.; Fremouw, Thane; Theunissen, Frédéric E.

    2009-01-01

    Auditory perception depends on the coding and organization of the information-bearing acoustic features of sounds by auditory neurons. We report here that auditory neurons can be classified into functional groups each of which plays a specific role in extracting distinct complex sound features. We recorded the electrophysiological responses of single auditory neurons in the songbird midbrain and forebrain to conspecific song, measured their tuning by calculating spectrotemporal receptive fields (STRFs) and classified them using multiple cluster analysis methods. Based on STRF shape, cells clustered into functional groups that divided the space of acoustical features into regions that represent cues for the fundamental acoustic percepts of pitch, timbre and rhythm. Four major groups were found in the midbrain and five major groups were found in the forebrain. Comparing STRFs in midbrain and forebrain neurons suggested that both inheritance and emergence of tuning properties occur as information ascends the auditory processing stream. PMID:19261874

  4. Designed nitrogen doping of few-layer graphene functionalized by selective oxygenic groups

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Few-layer nitrogen doped graphene was synthesized originating from graphene oxide functionalized by selective oxygenic functional groups (hydroxyl, carbonyl, carboxyl etc.) under hydrothermal conditions, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) observation evidenced few-layer feature of the graphene oxide. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern confirmed phase structure of the graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide. Nitrogen doping content and bonding configuration of the graphene was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), which indicated that different oxygenic functional groups were evidently different in affecting the nitrogen doping process. Compared with other oxygenic groups, carboxyl group played a crucial role in the initial stage of nitrogen doping while hydroxyls exhibited more evident contribution to the doping process in the late stage of the reaction. Formation of graphitic-like nitrogen species was controlled by a synergistic effect of the involved oxygenic groups (e.g., -COOH, -OH, C-O-C, etc.). The doping mechanism of nitrogen in the graphene was scrutinized. The research in this work may not only contribute to the fundamental understandings of nitrogen doping within graphene but promote the development of producing novel graphene-based devices with designed surface functionalization. PMID:25520594

  5. Ising exponents from the functional renormalization group

    SciTech Connect

    Litim, Daniel F.; Zappala, Dario

    2011-04-15

    We study the 3d Ising universality class using the functional renormalization group. With the help of background fields and a derivative expansion up to fourth order we compute the leading index, the subleading symmetric and antisymmetric corrections to scaling, the anomalous dimension, the scaling solution, and the eigenperturbations at criticality. We also study the cross correlations of scaling exponents, their dependence on dimensionality, and the numerical convergence of the derivative expansion. Collecting all available data from functional renormalization group studies to date, we estimate that systematic errors are in good agreement with findings from Monte Carlo simulations, {epsilon}-expansion techniques, and resummed perturbation theory.

  6. Functional renormalization group in a finite volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fister, Leonard; Pawlowski, Jan M.

    2015-10-01

    We study a ?4 theory at finite temperature in a finite volume. Quantum, thermal and volume fluctuations are treated with the functional renormalization group. Specifically, we focus on the interplay of temperature and length scales driving the system. We find that thermodynamical observables at finite volume such as the pressure approach the infinite volume limit similarly to that of the vanishing temperature limit. We also advance the functional renormalization group method at finite volume. In particular, we identify requirements for suitable regulators that admit the exponential thermal and finite volume decay properties.

  7. Transesterification of PHA to Oligomers Covalently Bonded with (Bio)Active Compounds Containing Either Carboxyl or Hydroxyl Functionalities

    PubMed Central

    Kwiecień, Iwona; Radecka, Iza; Kowalczuk, Marek; Adamus, Grażyna

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript presents the synthesis and structural characterisation of novel biodegradable polymeric controlled-release systems of pesticides with potentially higher resistance to weather conditions in comparison to conventional forms of pesticides. Two methods for the preparation of pesticide-oligomer conjugates using the transesterification reaction were developed. The first method of obtaining conjugates, which consist of bioactive compounds with the carboxyl group and polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) oligomers, is "one-pot" transesterification. In the second method, conjugates of bioactive compounds with hydroxyl group and polyhydroxyalkanoates oligomers were obtained in two-step method, through cyclic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) oligomers. The obtained pesticide-PHA conjugates were comprehensively characterised using GPC, 1H NMR and mass spectrometry techniques. The structural characterisation of the obtained products at the molecular level with the aid of mass spectrometry confirmed that both of the synthetic strategies employed led to the formation of conjugates in which selected pesticides were covalently bonded to PHA oligomers via a hydrolysable ester bond. PMID:25781908

  8. Transesterification of PHA to oligomers covalently bonded with (bio)active compounds containing either carboxyl or hydroxyl functionalities.

    PubMed

    Kwiecień, Iwona; Radecka, Iza; Kowalczuk, Marek; Adamus, Grażyna

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript presents the synthesis and structural characterisation of novel biodegradable polymeric controlled-release systems of pesticides with potentially higher resistance to weather conditions in comparison to conventional forms of pesticides. Two methods for the preparation of pesticide-oligomer conjugates using the transesterification reaction were developed. The first method of obtaining conjugates, which consist of bioactive compounds with the carboxyl group and polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) oligomers, is "one-pot" transesterification. In the second method, conjugates of bioactive compounds with hydroxyl group and polyhydroxyalkanoates oligomers were obtained in two-step method, through cyclic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) oligomers. The obtained pesticide-PHA conjugates were comprehensively characterised using GPC, 1H NMR and mass spectrometry techniques. The structural characterisation of the obtained products at the molecular level with the aid of mass spectrometry confirmed that both of the synthetic strategies employed led to the formation of conjugates in which selected pesticides were covalently bonded to PHA oligomers via a hydrolysable ester bond. PMID:25781908

  9. Hygroscopic Characteristics of Alkylaminium Carboxylate Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Hernandez, Mario; McKeown, Megan; Secrest, Jeremiah; Marrero-Ortiz, Wilmarie; Lavi, Avi; Rudich, Yinon; Collins, Don R; Zhang, Renyi

    2016-03-01

    The hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity for a series of alkylaminium carboxylate aerosols have been measured using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer coupled to a condensation particle counter and a CCN counter. The particles, consisting of the mixtures of mono- (acetic, propanoic, p-toluic, and cis-pinonic acid) and dicarboxylic (oxalic, succinic, malic, adipic, and azelaic acid) acid with alkylamine (mono-, di-, and trimethylamines), represent those commonly found under diverse environmental conditions. The hygroscopicity parameter (κ) of the alkylaminium carboxylate aerosols was derived from the HGF and CCN results and theoretically calculated. The HGF at 90% RH is in the range of 1.3 to 1.8 for alkylaminium monocarboxylates and 1.1 to 2.2 for alkylaminium dicarboxylates, dependent on the molecular functionality (i.e., the carboxylic or OH functional group in organic acids and methyl substitution in alkylamines). The κ value for all alkylaminium carboxylates is in the range of 0.06-1.37 derived from the HGF measurements at 90% RH, 0.05-0.49 derived from the CCN measurements, and 0.22-0.66 theoretically calculated. The measured hygroscopicity of the alkylaminium carboxylates increases with decreasing acid to base ratio. The deliquescence point is apparent for several of the alkylaminium dicarboxylates but not for the alkylaminium monocarboxylates. Our results reveal that alkylaminium carboxylate aerosols exhibit distinct hygroscopic and deliquescent characteristics that are dependent on their molecular functionality, hence regulating their impacts on human health, air quality, and direct and indirect radiative forcing on climate. PMID:26794419

  10. Functional Assessment of Residues in the Amino- and Carboxyl-Termini of Crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormone (CHH) in the Mud Crab Scylla olivacea Using Point-Mutated Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-Jing; Huang, Shiau-Shan; Toullec, Jean-Yves; Chang, Cheng-Yen; Chen, Yun-Ru; Huang, Wen-San; Lee, Chi-Ying

    2015-01-01

    To assess functional importance of the residues in the amino- and carboxyl-termini of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone in the mud crab Scylla olivacea (Sco-CHH), both wild-type and point-mutated CHH peptides were produced with an amidated C-terminal end. Spectral analyses of circular dichroism, chromatographic retention time, and mass spectrometric analysis of the recombinant peptides indicate that they were close in conformation to native CHH and were produced with the intended substitutions. The recombinant peptides were subsequently used for an in vivo hyperglycemic assay. Two mutants (R13A and I69A rSco-CHH) completely lacked hyperglycemic activity, with temporal profiles similar to that of vehicle control. Temporal profiles of hyperglycemic responses elicited by 4 mutants (I2A, F3A, D12A, and D60A Sco-CHH) were different from that elicited by wild-type Sco-CHH; I2A was unique in that it exhibited significantly higher hyperglycemic activity, whereas the remaining 3 mutants showed lower activity. Four mutants (D4A, Q51A, E54A, and V72A rSco-CHH) elicited hyperglycemic responses with temporal profiles similar to those evoked by wild-type Sco-CHH. In contrast, the glycine-extended version of V72A rSco-CHH (V72A rSco-CHH-Gly) completely lost hyperglycemic activity. By comparing our study with previous ones of ion-transport peptide (ITP) and molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) using deleted or point-mutated mutants, detail discussion is made regarding functionally important residues that are shared by both CHH and ITP (members of Group I of the CHH family), and those that discriminate CHH from ITP, and Group-I from Group-II peptides. Conclusions summarized in the present study provide insights into understanding of how functional diversification occurred within a peptide family of multifunctional members. PMID:26261986

  11. Real time correlation functions and the functional renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlowski, Jan M.; Strodthoff, Nils

    2015-11-01

    We put forward a functional renormalization group approach for the direct computation of real time correlation functions, also applicable at finite temperature and density. We construct a general class of regulators that preserve the space-time symmetries, and allows the computation of correlation functions at complex frequencies. This includes both imaginary time and real time, and allows in particular the use of the plethora of imaginary time results for the computation of real time correlation functions. We also discuss real time computation on the Keldysh contour with general spatial momentum regulators. Both setups give access to the general momentum and frequency dependence of correlation functions.

  12. Electromigration of bivalent functional groups on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velizhanin, Kirill A.; Dandu, Naveen; Solenov, Dmitry

    2014-04-01

    Chemical functionalization of graphene holds promise for various applications ranging from nanoelectronics to catalysis, drug delivery, and nanoassembly. In many of these applications, it is critical to assess the rates of electromigration-directed motion of adsorbates along the surface of current-carrying graphene due to the electron wind force. In this paper, we develop an accurate analytical theory of electromigration of bivalent functional groups (epoxide, amine) on graphene. Specifically, we carefully analyze various factors contributing to the electron wind force, such as lattice effects and strong scattering beyond Born approximation, and derive a simple analytical expression for this force. Further, we perform accurate electronic-structure-theory calculations to parametrize the obtained analytical expression. The obtained results can be generalized to different functional groups and adsorbates, e.g., alkali atoms on graphene.

  13. Functionalization of cubic mesoporous silica SBA-16 with carboxylic acid via one-pot synthesis route for effective removal of cationic dyes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Hsun; Chang, Wei-Chieh; Saikia, Diganta; Wu, Cheng-En; Kao, Hsien-Ming

    2016-05-15

    In this work, we demonstrate that a high density of COOH groups loading, up to 60mol% based on silica, is successfully incorporated into SBA-16 via a one-pot synthesis route, which involves co-condensation of carboxyethylsilanetriol sodium salt (CES) and tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) templated by Pluronic F127 and P123 in an acidic medium. A variety of characterization techniques are performed to confirm quantitative incorporation of carboxylic groups into ordered cubic mesostructures. These functionalized materials are used to effectively remove two cationic dyes methylene blue (MB) and phenosafranine (PF) with the maximum adsorption capacities of 561 and 519mgg(-1), respectively, at pH 9. The zeta potential results reveal that the electrostatic interactions between cationic dye molecule and negatively charged surface of the adsorbent play a crucial role in their high adsorption capacities. For a binary component system consisting of MB and PF, competitive adsorption of these two dyes is observed with adsorption capacity values slightly lower than those of the corresponding single dye systems. The dye adsorbed material can be easily regenerated by simple acid washing and be reused for five times with MB removal efficiency still up to 98.6%, showing its great potentials in environmental remediation. PMID:26906434

  14. Elucidation of functional groups on gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial surfaces using infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Saxena, Anuradha; Song, Bongkeun; Ward, Bess B; Beveridge, Terry J; Myneni, Satish C B

    2004-12-21

    Surface functional group chemistry of intact Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cells and their isolated cell walls was examined as a function of pH, growth phase, and growth media (for intact cells only) using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Infrared spectra of aqueous model organic molecules, representatives of the common functional groups found in bacterial cell walls (i.e., hydroxyl, carboxyl, phosphoryl, and amide groups), were also examined in order to assist the interpretation of the infrared spectra of bacterial samples. The surface sensitivity of the ATR-FTIR spectroscopic technique was evaluated using diatom cells, which possess a several-nanometers-thick layer of glycoprotein on their silica shells. The ATR-FTIR spectra of bacterial surfaces exhibit carboxyl, amide, phosphate, and carbohydrate related features, and these are identical for both Gram-positive and Gram-negative cells. These results provide direct evidence to the previously held conviction that the negative charge of bacterial surfaces is derived from the deprotonation of both carboxylates and phosphates. Variation in solution pH has only a minor effect on the secondary structure of the cell wall proteins. The cell surface functional group chemistry is altered neither by the growth phase nor by the growth medium of bacteria. This study reveals the universality of the functional group chemistry of bacterial cell surfaces. PMID:15595767

  15. Novel palladium-catalyzed cascade carboxylative annulation to construct functionalized γ-lactones in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianxiao; Yang, Shaorong; Wu, Wanqing; Jiang, Huanfeng

    2014-02-01

    A novel palladium-catalyzed, one-pot, four-step cascade method has been developed to afford functionalized γ-lactones in moderate to good yields. This novel and general methodology represents a rare instance of carbonylation of the C(sp(3))-palladium bond. PMID:24346056

  16. The circular velocity function of group galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, Louis E.; Williams, Rik J.; Benson, Andrew J.; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Mulchaey, John S.

    2014-09-20

    A robust prediction of ΛCDM cosmology is the halo circular velocity function (CVF), a dynamical cousin of the halo mass function. The correspondence between theoretical and observed CVFs is uncertain, however: cluster galaxies are reported to exhibit a power-law CVF consistent with N-body simulations, but that of the field is distinctly Schechter-like, flattened compared to ΛCDM expectations at circular velocities v {sub c} ≲ 200 km s{sup –1}. Groups offer a powerful probe of the role environment plays in this discrepancy as they bridge the field and clusters. Here, we construct the CVF for a large, mass- and multiplicity-complete sample of group galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using independent photometric v {sub c} estimators, we find no transition from field to ΛCDM-shaped CVF above v {sub c} = 50 km s{sup –1} as a function of group halo mass. All groups with 12.4 ≲ log M {sub halo}/M {sub ☉} ≲ 15.1 (Local Group analogs to rich clusters) display similar Schechter-like CVFs marginally suppressed at low v {sub c} compared to that of the field. Conversely, some agreement with N-body results emerges for samples saturated with late-type galaxies, with isolated late-types displaying a CVF similar in shape to ΛCDM predictions. We conclude that the flattening of the low-v {sub c} slope in groups is due to their depressed late-type fractions—environment affecting the CVF only to the extent that it correlates with this quantity—and that previous cluster analyses may suffer from interloper contamination. These results serve as useful benchmarks for cosmological simulations of galaxy formation.

  17. General Method for Synthesis of Salicylic Acids from Phenols via Pd-Catalyzed Silanol-Directed C–H Carboxylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    A silanol directed, palladium catalyzed C–H carboxylation reaction of phenols into salicylic acids has been developed. This method features high efficiency and selectivity, and excellent functional group tolerance. The generality of this method was demonstrated by carboxylation of estrone and by the synthesis of a bis-unsymmetrically substituted phenolic compound via iterative C–H functionalizations. PMID:25597502

  18. Sorption of heavy metal ions onto carboxylate chitosan derivatives--a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Boamah, Peter Osei; Huang, Yan; Hua, Mingqing; Zhang, Qi; Wu, Jingbo; Onumah, Jacqueline; Sam-Amoah, Livingstone K; Boamah, Paul Osei

    2015-06-01

    Chitosan is of importance for the elimination of heavy metals due to their outstanding characteristics such as the presence of NH2 and -OH functional groups, non-toxicity, low cost and, large available quantities. Modifying a chitosan structure with -COOH group improves it in terms of solubility at pH ≤7 without affecting the aforementioned characteristics. Chitosan modified with a carboxylic group possess carboxyl, amino and hydroxyl multifunctional groups which are good for elimination of metal ions. The focal point of this mini-review will be on the preparation and characterization of some carboxylate chitosan derivatives as a sorbent for heavy metal sorption. PMID:25791666

  19. Biocompatible polymers coated on carboxylated nanotubes functionalized with betulinic acid for effective drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Tan, Julia M; Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Abd Gani, Shafinaz; Fakurazi, Sharida; Hussein, Mohd Zobir

    2016-02-01

    Chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes are highly suitable and promising materials for potential biomedical applications like drug delivery due to their distinct physico-chemical characteristics and unique architecture. However, they are often associated with problems like insoluble in physiological environment and cytotoxicity issue due to impurities and catalyst residues contained in the nanotubes. On the other hand, surface coating agents play an essential role in preventing the nanoparticles from excessive agglomeration as well as providing good water dispersibility by replacing the hydrophobic surfaces of nanoparticles with hydrophilic moieties. Therefore, we have prepared four types of biopolymer-coated single walled carbon nanotubes systems functionalized with anticancer drug, betulinic acid in the presence of Tween 20, Tween 80, polyethylene glycol and chitosan as a comparative study. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies confirm the bonding of the coating molecules with the SWBA and these results were further supported by Raman spectroscopy. All chemically coated samples were found to release the drug in a slow, sustained and prolonged fashion compared to the uncoated ones, with the best fit to pseudo-second order kinetic model. The cytotoxic effects of the synthesized samples were evaluated in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (3T3) at 24, 48 and 72 h. The in vitro results reveal that the cytotoxicity of the samples were dependent upon the drug release profiles as well as the chemical components of the surface coating agents. In general, the initial burst, drug release pattern and cytotoxicity could be well-controlled by carefully selecting the desired materials to suit different therapeutic applications. PMID:26704543

  20. Carboxyl- and amino-functionalized polystyrene nanoparticles differentially affect the polarization profile of M1 and M2 macrophage subsets.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Ann-Kathrin; Syrovets, Tatiana; Haas, Karina A; Loos, Cornelia; Musyanovych, Anna; Mailänder, Volker; Landfester, Katharina; Simmet, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Macrophages are key regulators of innate and adaptive immune responses. Exposure to microenvironmental stimuli determines their polarization into proinflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. M1 exhibit high expression of proinflammatory TNF-α and IL-1β, and M2 promote tissue repair, but likewise support tumor growth and cause immune suppression by expressing IL-10. Thus, the M1/M2 balance critically determines tissue homeostasis. By using carboxyl- (PS-COOH) and amino-functionalized (PS-NH2) polystyrene nanoparticles, the effects of surface decoration on the polarization of human macrophages were investigated. The nanoparticles did not compromise macrophage viability nor did they affect the expression of the M1 markers CD86, NOS2, TNF-α, and IL-1β. By contrast, in M2, both nanoparticles impaired expression of scavenger receptor CD163 and CD200R, and the release of IL-10. PS-NH2 also inhibited phagocytosis of Escherichia coli by both, M1 and M2. PS-COOH did not impair phagocytosis by M2, but increased protein mass in M1 and M2, TGF-β1 release by M1, and ATP levels in M2. Thus, nanoparticles skew the M2 macrophage polarization without affecting M1 markers. Given the critical role of the M1 and M2 polarization for the immunological balance in patients with cancer or chronic inflammation, functionalized nanoparticles might serve as tools for reprogramming the M1/M2 polarization. PMID:26854393

  1. Functional properties and structural characterization of rice δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Bertazzini, Michele; Zarattini, Marco; Funck, Dietmar; Ruszkowski, Milosz; Nocek, Bogusław

    2015-07-28

    The majority of plant species accumulate high intracellular levels of proline to cope with hyperosmotic stress conditions. Proline synthesis from glutamate is tightly regulated at both the transcriptional and the translational levels, yet little is known about the mechanisms for post-translational regulation of the enzymatic activities involved. The gene coding in rice (Oryza sativa L.) for δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the second and final step in this pathway, was isolated and expressed in Escherichia coli. The structural and functional properties of the affinity-purified protein were characterized. As for most species, rice P5C reductase was able to use in vitro either NADH or NADPH as the electron donor. However, strikingly different effects of cations and anions were found depending on the pyridine nucleotide used, namely inhibition of NADH-dependent activity and stimulation of NADPH-dependent activity. Moreover, physiological concentrations of proline and NADP+ were strongly inhibitory for the NADH-dependent reaction, whereas the NADPH-dependent activity was mildly affected. Our results suggest that only NADPH may be used in vivo and that stress-dependent variations in ion homeostasis and NADPH/NADP+ ratio could modulate enzyme activity, being functional in promoting proline accumulation and potentially also adjusting NADPH consumption during the defense against hyperosmotic stress. The apparent molecular weight of the native protein observed in size exclusion chromatography indicated a high oligomerization state. We also report the first crystal structure of a plant P5C reductase at 3.40-Å resolution, showing a decameric quaternary assembly. It was possible to identify dynamic structural differences among rice, human, and bacterial enzymes.

  2. POLYCOMB GROUP COMPLEXES MANY COMBINATIONS, MANY FUNCTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Kerppola, Tom K

    2010-01-01

    Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins are transcription regulatory proteins that control the expression of a variety of genes from early embryogenesis through birth to adulthood. PcG proteins form several complexes that are thought to collaborate to repress gene transcription. Individual PcG proteins have unique characteristics and mutations in genes encoding different PcG proteins cause distinct phenotypes. Histone modifications have important roles in some PcG protein functions, but they are not universally required. The mechanisms of gene-specific recruitment, transcription repression, and selective derepression of genes by vertebrate PcG proteins are incompletely understood. Future studies of this enigmatic group of developmental regulators are certain to produce unanticipated discoveries. PMID:19889541

  3. A layered mixed zirconium phosphate/phosphonate with exposed carboxylic and phosphonic groups: X-ray powder structure and proton conductivity properties.

    PubMed

    Donnadio, Anna; Nocchetti, Morena; Costantino, Ferdinando; Taddei, Marco; Casciola, Mario; da Silva Lisboa, Fábio; Vivani, Riccardo

    2014-12-15

    A novel mixed zirconium phosphate/phosphonate based on glyphosine, of formula Zr2(PO4)H5(L)2·H2O [L = (O3PCH2)2NCH2COO], was synthesized in mild conditions. The compound has a layered structure that was solved ab initio from laboratory PXRD data. It crystallizes in the monoclinic C2/c space group with the following cell parameters: a = 29.925(3), b = 8.4225(5), c = 9.0985(4) Å, and β = 98.474(6)°. Phosphate groups are placed inside the sheets and connect the zirconium atoms in a tetradentate fashion, while uncoordinated carboxylate and P-OH phosphonate groups are exposed on the layer surface. Due to the presence of these acidic groups, the compound showed remarkable proton conductivity properties, which were studied in a wide range of temperature and relative humidity (RH). The conductivity is strongly dependent on RH and reaches 1 × 10(-3) S cm(-1) at 140 °C and 95% RH. At this RH, the activation energy of conduction is 0.15 eV in the temperature range 80-140 °C. The similarities of this structure with related structures already reported in the literature were also discussed. PMID:25423946

  4. High fluorescence emission of carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene/BaTiO{sub 3} nanocomposites and rare earth metal complexes: Preparation and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, X. T.; Showkat, A. M.; Wang, Z.; Lim, K. T.

    2015-03-30

    Noble fluorescence nanocomposite compound based on barium titanate nanoparticles (BTO), polystyrene (PSt), and terbium ion (Tb{sup 3+}) was synthesized by a combination of surface-initiated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction and coordinate chemistry. Initially, a modification of surface of BTO was conducted by an exchange process with S-benzyl S’-trimethoxysilylpropyltrithiocarbonate to create macro-initiator for polymerization of styrene. Subsequently, aryl carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene grafted barium titanate (BTO-g-PSt-COOH) was generated by substitution reaction between 4-(Chloromethyl) benzoic acid and PSt chains. The coordination of the nanohybrids with Tb{sup 3+} ions afforded fluorescent Tb{sup 3+} tagged aryl carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene grafted barium titanate (BTO-g-PSt-Tb{sup 3+}) complexes. Structure, morphology, and fluorescence properties of nanohybrid complexes were investigated by respective physical and spectral studies. FT-IR and SEM analyses confirmed the formation of BTO-g-PSt-Tb{sup 3+}nanohybrids. Furthermore, TGA profiles demonstrated the grafting of aryl carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene on BTO surface. Optical properties of BTO-g-PSt-Tb{sup 3+} complexes were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy.

  5. High fluorescence emission of carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene/BaTiO3 nanocomposites and rare earth metal complexes: Preparation and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, X. T.; Showkat, A. M.; Wang, Z.; Lim, K. T.

    2015-03-01

    Noble fluorescence nanocomposite compound based on barium titanate nanoparticles (BTO), polystyrene (PSt), and terbium ion (Tb3+) was synthesized by a combination of surface-initiated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction and coordinate chemistry. Initially, a modification of surface of BTO was conducted by an exchange process with S-benzyl S'-trimethoxysilylpropyltrithiocarbonate to create macro-initiator for polymerization of styrene. Subsequently, aryl carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene grafted barium titanate (BTO-g-PSt-COOH) was generated by substitution reaction between 4-(Chloromethyl) benzoic acid and PSt chains. The coordination of the nanohybrids with Tb3+ ions afforded fluorescent Tb3+ tagged aryl carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene grafted barium titanate (BTO-g-PSt-Tb3+) complexes. Structure, morphology, and fluorescence properties of nanohybrid complexes were investigated by respective physical and spectral studies. FT-IR and SEM analyses confirmed the formation of BTO-g-PSt-Tb3+nanohybrids. Furthermore, TGA profiles demonstrated the grafting of aryl carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene on BTO surface. Optical properties of BTO-g-PSt-Tb3+ complexes were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy.

  6. Prediction of impact sensitivity of nitroaliphatic, nitroaliphatic containing other functional groups and nitrate explosives.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein

    2007-09-30

    This paper describes a new method for prediction of impact sensitivity of nitroaliphatic, nitroaliphatic containing other functional groups and nitrate explosives. The new procedure is based on some structural parameters of C(a)H(b)N(c)O(d) explosives. Three essential parameters would be needed in this scheme which contain a+b/2-d and the number of nitrogens as well as the number of RC(NO(2))(2)CH(2) structural parameters attached to oxygen of carboxylate functional groups where R is alkyl groups. The results are compared with experimental data and some empirical correlations. Predicted impact sensitivities for 58 explosives have a root mean square (rms) of deviation from experiment of 27 cm, which show good agreement with respect to measured values as compared to previous empirical models. PMID:17434263

  7. High-throughput aided synthesis of the porous metal-organic framework-type aluminum pyromellitate, MIL-121, with extra carboxylic acid functionalization.

    PubMed

    Volkringer, Christophe; Loiseau, Thierry; Guillou, Nathalie; Férey, Gérard; Haouas, Mohamed; Taulelle, Francis; Elkaim, Erik; Stock, Norbert

    2010-11-01

    A new porous metal-organic framework (MOF)-type aluminum pyromellitate (MIL-121 or Al(OH)[H(2)btec]·(guest), (guest = H(2)O, H(4)btec = pyromellitic acid) has been isolated by using a high-throughput synthesis method under hydrothermal conditions. Its structure was determined from powder X-ray diffraction analysis using synchrotron radiation (Soleil, France) and exhibits a network closely related to that of the MIL-53 series. It is a three-dimensional (3D) framework containing one-dimensional (1D) channels delimited by infinite trans-connected aluminum-centered octahedra AlO(4)(OH)(2) linked through the pyromellitate ligand. Here the organic ligand acts as tetradendate linker via two of the carboxylate groups. The two others remain non-bonded in their protonated form, and this constitutes a rare case of the occurrence of both bonding and non-bonding organic functionalities of the MOF family. The non-coordinated -COOH groups points toward the channels to get them an open form configuration. Within the tunnels are located unreacted pyromellitic acid and water species, which are evacuated upon heating, and a porous MIL-121 phase is obtained with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of 162 m(2) g(-1). MIL-121 has been characterized by IR, thermogravimetry (TG) analyses, and solid state NMR spectroscopy employing a couple of two-dimensional (2D) techniques such as (1)H-(1)H SQ-DQ BABA, (1)H-(1)H SQ-SQ RFDR, (27)Al{(1)H} CPHETCOR and (27)Al MQMAS. PMID:20923169

  8. Role of functional groups in fiber in the binding of zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, K.

    1986-03-01

    The binding of zinc by purified cellulose, xylan, methylated xylan, pectin and methylated pectin was measured in vitro. Methylated xylan and methylated pectin were prepared chemically from xylan and pectin, respectively, to block hydroxyl and carboxyl groups. Comparison of zinc binding capacities was made between xylan and methylated xylan, and between pectin and methylated pectin to assess the role of the two functional groups in binding minerals. The binding of zinc was conducted at pH 2.6, 4.0, 5.4 and 6.8 in various concentrations of ZnSO/sub 4/ solution containing /sup 65/Zn using a dialysis system for water-soluble pectin and an incubation-centrifugation model for the other four water-insoluble fibers. The results showed that zinc binding by each fiber was pH dependent and it increased from pH 2.6 to 6.8 (p < 0.001). At pH 6.8, % Zn bound to fiber decreased as concentration of ZnSO/sub 4/ increased from 1 ..mu..M to 96 ..mu..M (p less than or equal to 0.01). mean zinc binding ratio of pectin to methylated xylan was 5.1, whereas the ratio of pectin t methylated pectin was only 1.7. This suggests that the hydroxyl group in xylan plays a more important role than the carboxyl group in pectin in the binding of zinc.

  9. Functional renormalization group approach to noncollinear magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delamotte, B.; Dudka, M.; Mouhanna, D.; Yabunaka, S.

    2016-02-01

    A functional renormalization group approach to d -dimensional, N -component, noncollinear magnets is performed using various truncations of the effective action relevant to study their long distance behavior. With help of these truncations we study the existence of a stable fixed point for dimensions between d =2.8 and d =4 for various values of N focusing on the critical value Nc(d ) that, for a given dimension d , separates a first-order region for N Nc(d ) . Our approach concludes to the absence of a stable fixed point in the physical—N =2 ,3 and d =3 —cases, in agreement with the ɛ =4 -d expansion and in contradiction with previous perturbative approaches performed at fixed dimension and with recent approaches based on the conformal bootstrap program.

  10. Effects of trehalose polycation end-group functionalization on plasmid DNA uptake and transfection.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kevin; Sizovs, Antons; Cortez, Mallory; Waldron, Chris; Haddleton, D M; Reineke, Theresa M

    2012-08-13

    In this study, we have synthesized six analogs of a trehalose-pentaethylenehexamine glycopolymer (Tr4) that contain (1A) adamantane, (1B) carboxy, (1C) alkynyl-oligoethyleneamine, (1D) azido trehalose, (1E) octyl, or (1F) oligoethyleneamine end groups and evaluated the effects of polymer end group chemistry on the ability of these systems to bind, compact, and deliver pDNA to cultured HeLa cells. The polymers were synthesized in one-pot azide-alkyne cycloaddition reactions with an adaptation of the Carothers equation for step-growth polymerization to produce a series of polymers with similar degrees of polymerization. An excess of end-capping monomer was added at the end of the polymerizations to maximize functionalization efficiency, which was evaluated with GPC, NMR, and MALDI-TOF. The polymers were all found to bind and compact pDNA at similarly low N/P ratios and form polyplexes with plasmid DNA. The effects of the different end group structures were most evident in the polyplex internalization and transfection assays in the presence of serum as determined by flow cytometry and luciferase gene expression, respectively. The Tr4 polymers end-capped with carboxyl groups (1B) (N/P = 7), octyne (1E) (N/P = 7), and oligoethyleneamine (1F) (N/P = 7), were taken into cells as polyplex and exhibited the highest levels of fluorescence, resulting from labeled plasmid. Similarly, the polymers end-functionalized with carboxyl groups (1E at N/P = 7), octyl groups (1E at N/P = 15), and in particular oligoethyleneamine groups (1F at N/P = 15) yielded dramatically higher reporter gene expression in the presence of serum. This study yields insight into how very subtle structural changes in polymer chemistry, such as end groups can yield very significant differences in the biological delivery efficiency and transgene expression of polymers used for pDNA delivery. PMID:22616977

  11. FT-IR quantification of the carbonyl functional group in aqueous-phase secondary organic aerosol from phenols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Kathryn M.; Ruthenburg, Travis C.; Smith, Jeremy; Yu, Lu; Zhang, Qi; Anastasio, Cort; Dillner, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed from aqueous-phase reactions of some organic species, including phenols, contribute significantly to particulate mass in the atmosphere. In this study, we employ a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic technique to identify and quantify the functional group makeup of phenolic SOA. Solutions containing an oxidant (hydroxyl radical or 3,4-dimethoxybenzaldehyde) and either one phenol (phenol, guaiacol, or syringol) or a mixture of phenols mimicking softwood or hardwood emissions were illuminated to make SOA, atomized, and collected on a filter. We produced laboratory standards of relevant organic compounds in order to develop calibrations for four functional groups: carbonyls (Cdbnd O), saturated C-H, unsaturated C-H and O-H. We analyzed the SOA samples with transmission FT-IR to identify and determine the amounts of the four functional groups. The carbonyl functional group accounts for 3-12% of the SOA sample mass in single phenolic SOA samples and 9-14% of the SOA sample mass in mixture samples. No carbonyl functional groups are present in the initial reactants. Varying amounts of each of the other functional groups are observed. Comparing carbonyls measured by FT-IR (which could include aldehydes, ketones, esters, and carboxylic acids) with eight small carboxylic acids measured by ion chromatography indicates that the acids only account for an average of 20% of the total carbonyl reported by FT-IR.

  12. Cobalt(II) metal-organic framework micro-nanoparticles: Molecular self-assembly from layers to micropores showing the conjunctive orientation of carboxyl groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jing; Li, Xiaoqi; Xu, Zhen-liang; Xu, Haitao

    2015-08-01

    Cobalt metal-organic framework (MOF) materials CoL(1,4-chdc)·mH2O (1,4-chdc = 1,4-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid, L1 = 1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethylene, and m = 0 for 1Co; L2 = 1,4-bis(4-pyridyl)-2,3-diaza-1,3-butadiene and m = 2 for 2Co) were assembled in a MeOH-H2O solvent system. They crystallized in a monoclinic system with space group P2(1)/c, Z = 4, a = 9.479(4) Å, b = 13.704(6) Å, c = 14.455(6) Å, and β = 99.424(6)° for 1Co, and a = 14.349(11) Å, b = 12.088(9) Å, c = 26.62(2) Å, and β = 97.255(11)° for 2Co. It was shown that N-ligand can regulate and control the conjunctive orientation of carboxyl groups in these MOFs; thus, the MOFs exhibited structures that ranged from layers to micropores. Furthermore, the micro-nanoparticles of 1Co and 2Co were investigated for new potential applications of micro-nano MOFs.

  13. Mass spectrometry-based sequencing of protein C-terminal peptide using α-carboxyl group-specific derivatization and COOH capturing.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Chihiro; Kuyama, Hiroki; Tanaka, Koichi

    2012-09-15

    An approach to mass spectrometry (MS)-based sequence analysis of selectively enriched C-terminal peptide from protein is described. This approach employs a combination of the specific derivatization of α-carboxyl group (α-COOH), enzymatic proteolysis using endoproteinase GluC, and enrichment of C-terminal peptide through the use of COOH-capturing material. Highly selective derivatization of α-COOH was achieved by a combination of specific activation of α-COOH through oxazolone chemistry and amidation using 3-aminopropyltris-(2,4,6-trimethoxyphenyl)phosphonium bromide (TMPP-propylamine). This amine component was used to simplify fragmentation in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) measurement, which facilitated manual sequence interpretation. The peptides produced after GluC digestion were then treated with a COOH scavenger to enrich the C-terminal peptide that is only devoid of COOH groups, and the obtained C-terminal peptide was readily sequenced by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-MS/MS due to the TMPP mass tag. PMID:22749915

  14. Glioma cell line proliferation controlled by different chemical functional groups in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Su-Ju; Cui, Fu-Zhai; Yu, Xiao-Long; Kong, Xiang-Dong

    2013-03-01

    Glioma cell line C6 cultured on silicon surfaces modified by different chemical functional groups, including mercapto (-SH), carboxyl (-COOH), amino (-NH2), hydroxyl (-OH) and methyl (-CH3) groups, was studied here to investigate the influence of surface chemistry on the cell proliferation, adhesion and apoptosis. AFM confirmed the similar characteristic of different functional groups occupation. The adhering C6 exhibited morphological changes in response to different chemical functional groups. The C6 adhered to -COOH, -NH2, -OH and -CH3 surfaces and flattened morphology, while those on -SH surface exhibited the smallest contact area with mostly rounded morphology, which led to the death of cancer cells. The results of MTT assay showed that the -COOH and -NH2 groups promoted cell proliferation, while the -SH significantly inhibited the proliferation. Compared with other chemical functional groups, the -SH group exhibited its unique effect on the fate of cancer cells, which might provide means for the design of biomaterials to prevent and treat glioma.

  15. Carboxylic Acid (Bio)Isosteres in Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Ballatore, Carlo; Huryn, Donna M.; Smith, Amos B.

    2013-01-01

    The carboxylic acid functional group can be an important constituent of a pharmacophore, however, the presence of this moiety can also be responsible for significant drawbacks, including metabolic instability, toxicity, as well as limited passive diffusion across biological membranes. To avoid some of these shortcomings while retaining the desired attributes of the carboxylic acid moiety, medicinal chemists often investigate the use of carboxylic acid (bio)isosteres. The same type of strategy can also be effective for a variety other purposes, for example, to increase the selectivity of a biologically active compound or to create new intellectual property. Several carboxylic acid isosteres have been reported, however, the outcome of any isosteric replacement cannot be readily predicted as this strategy is generally found to be dependent upon the particular context (i.e., the characteristic properties of the drug and the drug–target). As a result, screening of a panel of isosteres is typically required. In this context, the discovery and development of novel carboxylic acid surrogates that could complement the existing palette of isosteres remains an important area of research. The goal of this Minireview is to provide an overview of the most commonly employed carboxylic acid (bio)isosteres and to present representative examples demonstrating the use and utility of each isostere in drug design. PMID:23361977

  16. Preconversion catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic functional groups

    SciTech Connect

    Kubiak, C.P.

    1991-01-01

    The deoxygenation of phenols is a conceptually simple, but unusually difficult chemical transformation to achieve. Aryl carbon-oxygen bond cleavage is a chemical transformation of importance in coal liquefaction and the upgrading of coal liquids as well as in the synthesis of natural products. This proposed research offers the possibility of effecting the selective catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic functional groups using CO. A program of research for the catalytic deoxygenation of phenols, via a low energy mechanistic pathway that is based on the use of the CO/CO{sub 2} couple to remove phenolic oxygen atoms, is underway. We are focusing on systems which have significant promise as catalysts: Ir(triphos)OPh, (Pt(triphos)OPh){sup +} and Rh(triphos)OPh. Our studies of phenol deoxygenation focus on monitoring the reactions for the elementary processes upon which catalytic activity will depend: CO insertion into M-OPh bonds, CO{sub 2} elimination from aryloxy carbonyls {l brace}M-C(O)-O-Ph{r brace}, followed by formation of a coordinated benzyne intermediate.

  17. Effects of alkyl chain length and solvents on thermodynamic dissociation constants of the ionic liquids with one carboxyl group in the alkyl chain of imidazolium cations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuehua; Wang, Huiyong; Wang, Jianji

    2014-05-01

    Thermodynamic dissociation constants of the Brønsted acidic ionic liquids (ILs) are important for their catalytic and separation applications. In this work, a series of imidazolium bromides with one carboxylic acid substitute group in their alkyl chain ([{(CH2)nCOOH}mim]Br, n = 1,3,5,7) have been synthesized, and their dissociation constants (pKa) at different ionic strengths have been determined in aqueous and aqueous organic solvents at 0.1 mole fraction (x) of ethanol, glycol, iso-propanol, and dimethyl sulfoxide by potentiometric titrations at 298.2 K. The standard thermodynamic dissociation constants (pKa(T)) of the ILs in these solvents were calculated from the extended Debye-Hückel equation. It was found that the pKa values increased with the increase of ionic strength of the media and of the addition of organic solvent in water. The pKa(T) values also increased with the increase of the alkyl chain length of cations of the ILs. In addition, the effect of solvent nature on pKa(T) values is interpreted from solvation of the dissociation components and their Gibbs energy of transfer from water to aqueous organic solutions. PMID:24720707

  18. pKa Values for Side-Chain Carboxyl Groups of a PGB1 Variant Explain Salt and pH-Dependent Stability

    PubMed Central

    Lindman, Stina; Linse, Sara; Mulder, Frans A. A.; André, Ingemar

    2007-01-01

    Determination of pKa values of titrating residues in proteins provides a direct means of studying electrostatic coupling as well as pH-dependent stability. The B1 domain of protein G provides an excellent model system for such investigations. In this work, we analyze the observed pKa values of all carboxyl groups in a variant of PGB1 (T2Q, N8D, N37D) at low and high ionic strength as determined using 1H-13C heteronuclear NMR in a structural context. The pKa values are used to calculate the pH-dependent stability in low and high salt and to investigate electrostatic coupling in the system. The observed pKa values can explain the pH dependence of protein stability but require pKa shifts relative to model values in the unfolded state, consistent with persistent residual structure in the denatured state. In particular, we find that most of the deviations from the expected random coil values can be explained by a significantly upshifted pKa value. We show also that 13C backbone carbonyl data can be used to study electrostatic coupling in proteins and provide specific information on hydrogen bonding and electrostatic potential at nontitrating sites. PMID:17040982

  19. A water-soluble carboxylic-functionalized chemosensor for detecting Al(3+) in aqueous media and living cells: Experimental and theoretical studies.

    PubMed

    Jun Lee, Jae; Jin Park, Gyeong; Sung Kim, Yong; Young Lee, Sun; Ji Lee, Hyun; Noh, Insup; Kim, Cheal

    2015-07-15

    A new water-soluble carboxylic-functionalized chemosensor 1 was designed and synthesized. 1 exhibited the selective fluorescence enhancement toward aluminum ions with a 1:1 complexation stoichiometry in aqueous solution. The detection limit (24nM) of 1 for Al(3+) is about two order lower than the WHO guideline (7.41μM) for the drinking water. 1 was successfully applied to living cells and real samples for detecting Al(3+). Moreover, the sensing mechanism originated from the inhibited excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) process and the chelation-enhanced fluorescence (CHEF) effect, as supported by theoretical calculations. PMID:25747507

  20. Transport of carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles in saturated porous media: Column experiments and model analyses.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jin-Kyu; Yi, In-Geol; Park, Jeong-Ann; Kim, Song-Bae; Kim, Hyunjung; Han, Yosep; Kim, Pil-Je; Eom, Ig-Chun; Jo, Eunhye

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the transport behavior of carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles (CBNPs) in porous media including quartz sand, iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS), and aluminum oxide-coated sand (AOCS). Two sets of column experiments were performed under saturated flow conditions for potassium chloride (KCl), a conservative tracer, and CBNPs. Breakthrough curves were analyzed to obtain mass recovery and one-dimensional transport model parameters. The first set of experiments was conducted to examine the effects of metal (Fe, Al) oxides and flow rate (0.25 and 0.5 mL min(-1)) on the transport of CBNPs suspended in deionized water. The results showed that the mass recovery of CBNPs in quartz sand (flow rate=0.5 mL min(-1)) was 83.1%, whereas no breakthrough of CBNPs (mass recovery=0%) was observed in IOCS and AOCS at the same flow rate, indicating that metal (Fe, Al) oxides can play a significant role in the attachment of CBNPs to porous media. In addition, the mass recovery of CBNPs in quartz sand decreased to 76.1% as the flow rate decreased to 0.25 mL min(-1). Interaction energy profiles for CBNP-porous media were calculated using DLVO theory for sphere-plate geometry, demonstrating that the interaction energy for CBNP-quartz sand was repulsive, whereas the interaction energies for CBNP-IOCS and CBNP-AOCS were attractive with no energy barriers. The second set of experiments was conducted in quartz sand to observe the effect of ionic strength (NaCl=0.1 and 1.0mM; CaCl2=0.01 and 0.1mM) and pH (pH=4.5 and 5.4) on the transport of CBNPs suspended in electrolyte. The results showed that the mass recoveries of CBNPs in NaCl=0.1 and 1.0mM were 65.3 and 6.4%, respectively. The mass recoveries of CBNPs in CaCl2=0.01 and 0.1mM were 81.6 and 6.3%, respectively. These results demonstrated that CBNP attachment to quartz sand can be enhanced by increasing the electrolyte concentration. Interaction energy profiles demonstrated that the interaction energy profile for CBNP-quartz sand was compressed and that the energy barrier decreased as the electrolyte concentration increased. Furthermore, the mass recovery of CBNPs in the presence of divalent ions (CaCl2=0.1 mM) was far lower than that in the presence of monovalent ions (NaCl=0.1 mM), demonstrating a much stronger effect of Ca(2+) than Na(+) on CBNP transport. Mass recovery of CBNPs at pH 4.5 was 55.6%, which was lower than that (83.1%) at pH 5.4, indicating that CBNP attachment to quartz sand can be enhanced by decreasing the pH. The sticking efficiencies (α) calculated from the mass recovery by colloid filtration theory were in the range from 2.1×10(-2) to 4.5×10(-1), which were far greater than the values (2.56×10(-6)-3.33×10(-2)) of theoretical sticking efficiencies (αtheory) calculated from the DLVO energy by the Maxwell model. PMID:25977994

  1. Transport of carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles in saturated porous media: Column experiments and model analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jin-Kyu; Yi, In-Geol; Park, Jeong-Ann; Kim, Song-Bae; Kim, Hyunjung; Han, Yosep; Kim, Pil-Je; Eom, Ig-Chun; Jo, Eunhye

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the transport behavior of carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles (CBNPs) in porous media including quartz sand, iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS), and aluminum oxide-coated sand (AOCS). Two sets of column experiments were performed under saturated flow conditions for potassium chloride (KCl), a conservative tracer, and CBNPs. Breakthrough curves were analyzed to obtain mass recovery and one-dimensional transport model parameters. The first set of experiments was conducted to examine the effects of metal (Fe, Al) oxides and flow rate (0.25 and 0.5 mL min- 1) on the transport of CBNPs suspended in deionized water. The results showed that the mass recovery of CBNPs in quartz sand (flow rate = 0.5 mL min- 1) was 83.1%, whereas no breakthrough of CBNPs (mass recovery = 0%) was observed in IOCS and AOCS at the same flow rate, indicating that metal (Fe, Al) oxides can play a significant role in the attachment of CBNPs to porous media. In addition, the mass recovery of CBNPs in quartz sand decreased to 76.1% as the flow rate decreased to 0.25 mL min- 1. Interaction energy profiles for CBNP-porous media were calculated using DLVO theory for sphere-plate geometry, demonstrating that the interaction energy for CBNP-quartz sand was repulsive, whereas the interaction energies for CBNP-IOCS and CBNP-AOCS were attractive with no energy barriers. The second set of experiments was conducted in quartz sand to observe the effect of ionic strength (NaCl = 0.1 and 1.0 mM; CaCl2 = 0.01 and 0.1 mM) and pH (pH = 4.5 and 5.4) on the transport of CBNPs suspended in electrolyte. The results showed that the mass recoveries of CBNPs in NaCl = 0.1 and 1.0 mM were 65.3 and 6.4%, respectively. The mass recoveries of CBNPs in CaCl2 = 0.01 and 0.1 mM were 81.6 and 6.3%, respectively. These results demonstrated that CBNP attachment to quartz sand can be enhanced by increasing the electrolyte concentration. Interaction energy profiles demonstrated that the interaction energy profile for CBNP-quartz sand was compressed and that the energy barrier decreased as the electrolyte concentration increased. Furthermore, the mass recovery of CBNPs in the presence of divalent ions (CaCl2 = 0.1 mM) was far lower than that in the presence of monovalent ions (NaCl = 0.1 mM), demonstrating a much stronger effect of Ca2 + than Na+ on CBNP transport. Mass recovery of CBNPs at pH 4.5 was 55.6%, which was lower than that (83.1%) at pH 5.4, indicating that CBNP attachment to quartz sand can be enhanced by decreasing the pH. The sticking efficiencies (α) calculated from the mass recovery by colloid filtration theory were in the range from 2.1 × 10- 2 to 4.5 × 10- 1, which were far greater than the values (2.56 × 10- 6-3.33 × 10- 2) of theoretical sticking efficiencies (αtheory) calculated from the DLVO energy by the Maxwell model.

  2. Transition from Bioinert to Bioactive Material by Tailoring the Biological Cell Response to Carboxylated Nanocellulose.

    PubMed

    Hua, Kai; Rocha, Igor; Zhang, Peng; Gustafsson, Simon; Ning, Yi; Strømme, Maria; Mihranyan, Albert; Ferraz, Natalia

    2016-03-14

    This work presents an insight into the relationship between cell response and physicochemical properties of Cladophora cellulose (CC) by investigating the effect of CC functional group density on the response of model cell lines. CC was carboxylated by electrochemical TEMPO-mediated oxidation. By varying the amount of charge passed through the electrolysis setup, CC materials with different degrees of oxidation were obtained. The effect of carboxyl group density on the material's physicochemical properties was investigated together with the response of human dermal fibroblasts (hDF) and human osteoblastic cells (Saos-2) to the carboxylated CC films. The introduction of carboxyl groups resulted in CC films with decreased specific surface area and smaller total pore volume compared with the unmodified CC (u-CC). While u-CC films presented a porous network of randomly oriented fibers, a compact and aligned fiber pattern was depicted for the carboxylated-CC films. The decrease in surface area and total pore volume, and the orientation and aggregation of the fibers tended to augment parallel to the increase in the carboxyl group density. hDF and Saos-2 cells presented poor cell adhesion and spreading on u-CC, which gradually increased for the carboxylated CC as the degree of oxidation increased. It was found that a threshold value in carboxyl group density needs be reached to obtain a carboxylated-CC film with cytocompatibility comparable to commercial tissue culture material. Hence, this study demonstrates that a normally bioinert nanomaterial can be rendered bioactive by carefully tuning the density of charged groups on the material surface, a finding that not only may contribute to the fundamental understanding of biointerface phenomena, but also to the development of bioinert/bioactive materials. PMID:26886265

  3. Identification of the functional groups on the surface of nanoparticles formed in photonucleation of aldehydes generated during forest fire events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dultsev, Fedor N.; Mik, Ivan A.; Dubtsov, Sergei N.; Dultseva, Galina G.

    2014-11-01

    We describe the new procedure developed to determine the functional groups on the surface of nanoparticles formed in photonucleation of furfural, one of the aldehydes generated during forest fire events. The procedure is based on the detection of nanoparticle rupture from chemically modified surface of the quartz crystal microbalance oscillating in the thickness shear mode under voltage sweep. The rupture force is determined from the voltage at which the rupture occurs. It depends on particle mass and on the affinity of the surface functional groups of the particle to the groups that are present on the modified QCM surface. It was demonstrated with the amine modification of the surface that the nanoparticles formed in furfural photonucleation contain carbonyl and carboxyl groups. The applicability of the method for the investigation of functional groups on the surface of the nanoparticles of atmospheric aerosol is demonstrated.

  4. Carboxyl-terminal domain of MUC16 imparts tumorigenic and metastatic functions through nuclear translocation of JAK2 to pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Das, Srustidhar; Lakshmanan, Imayavaramban; Majhi, Prabin D.; Smith, Lynette M.; Wagner, Kay-Uwe; Batra, Surinder K.

    2015-01-01

    MUC16 (CA125) is a type-I transmembrane glycoprotein that is up-regulated in multiple cancers including pancreatic cancer (PC). However, the existence and role of carboxyl-terminal MUC16 generated following its cleavage in PC is unknown. Our previous study using a systematic dual-epitope tagged domain deletion approach of carboxyl-terminal MUC16 has demonstrated the generation of a 17-kDa cleaved MUC16 (MUC16-Cter). Here, we demonstrate the functional significance of MUC16-Cter in PC using the dual-epitope tagged version (N-terminal FLAG- and C-terminal HA-tag) of 114 carboxyl-terminal residues of MUC16 (F114HA). In vitro analyses using F114HA transfected MiaPaCa-2 and T3M4 cells showed enhanced proliferation, motility and increased accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase with apoptosis resistance, a feature associated with cancer stem cells (CSCs). This was supported by enrichment of ALDH+ CSCs along with enhanced drug-resistance. Mechanistically, we demonstrate a novel function of MUC16-Cter that promotes nuclear translocation of JAK2 resulting in phosphorylation of Histone-3 up-regulating stemness-specific genes LMO2 and NANOG. Jak2 dependence was demonstrated using Jak2+/+ and Jak2−/− cells. Using eGFP-Luciferase labeled cells, we demonstrate enhanced tumorigenic and metastatic potential of MUC16-Cter in vivo. Taken together, we demonstrate that MUC16-Cter mediated enrichment of CSCs is partly responsible for tumorigenic, metastatic and drug-resistant properties of PC cells. PMID:25691062

  5. Functional group diversity increases with modularity in complex food webs.

    PubMed

    Montoya, D; Yallop, M L; Memmott, J

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity increases the ability of ecosystems to provide multiple functions. Most studies report a positive relationship between species richness and the number of ecosystem functions. However, it is not known whether the number of functional groups is related to the structure of the underlying species interaction network. Here we present food web data from 115 salt marsh islands and show that network structure is associated with the number of functional groups present. Functional group diversity is heterogeneously distributed across spatial scales, with some islands hosting more functional groups than others. Functional groups form modules within the community so that food webs with more modular architectures have more functional group diversity. Further, in communities with different interaction types, modularity can be seen as the multifunctional equivalent of trophic complementarity. Collectively, these findings reveal spatial heterogeneity in the number of functional groups that emerges from patterns in the structure of the food web. PMID:26059871

  6. Functional group diversity increases with modularity in complex food webs

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, D.; Yallop, M.L.; Memmott, J.

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity increases the ability of ecosystems to provide multiple functions. Most studies report a positive relationship between species richness and the number of ecosystem functions. However, it is not known whether the number of functional groups is related to the structure of the underlying species interaction network. Here we present food web data from 115 salt marsh islands and show that network structure is associated with the number of functional groups present. Functional group diversity is heterogeneously distributed across spatial scales, with some islands hosting more functional groups than others. Functional groups form modules within the community so that food webs with more modular architectures have more functional group diversity. Further, in communities with different interaction types, modularity can be seen as the multifunctional equivalent of trophic complementarity. Collectively, these findings reveal spatial heterogeneity in the number of functional groups that emerges from patterns in the structure of the food web. PMID:26059871

  7. Parameterization of Leaf-Level Gas Exchange for Plant Functional Groups From Amazonian Seasonal Tropical Rain Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingues, T. F.; Berry, J. A.; Ometto, J. P.; Martinelli, L. A.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2004-12-01

    Plant communities exert strong influence over the magnitude of carbon and water cycling through ecosystems by controlling photosynthetic gas exchange and respiratory processes. Leaf-level gas exchange fluxes result from a combination of physiological properties, such as carboxylation capacity, respiration rates and hydraulic conductivity, interacting with environmental drivers such as water and light availability, leaf-to-air vapor pressure deficit, and temperature. Carbon balance models concerned with ecosystem-scale responses have as a common feature the description of eco-physiological properties of vegetation. Here we focus on the parameterization of ecophysiological gas-exchange properties of plant functional groups from a pristine Amazonian seasonally dry tropical rain forest ecosystem (FLONA-Tapajós, Santarém, PA, Brazil). The parameters were specific leaf weight, leaf nitrogen content, leaf carbon isotope ratio, maximum photosynthetic assimilation rate, photosynthetic carboxylation capacity, dark respiration rates, and stomatal conductance to water vapor. Our plant functional groupings were lianas at the top of the canopy, trees at the top of the canopy, mid-canopy trees and undestory trees. Within the functional groups, we found no evidence that leaves acclimated to seasonal changes in precipitation. However, there were life-form dependent distinctions when a combination of parameters was included. Top-canopy lianas were statistically different from top-canopy trees for leaf carbon isotope ratio, maximum photosynthetic assimilation rate, and stomatal conductance to water vapor, suggesting that lianas are more conservative in the use of water, causing a stomatal limitation on photosynthetic assimilation. Top-canopy, mid canopy and understory groupings were distinct for specific leaf weight, leaf nitrogen content, leaf carbon isotope ratio, maximum photosynthetic assimilation rate, and photosynthetic carboxylation capacity. The recognition that plant functional groups have distinct impacts on ecosystem-scale gas exchange can increase the accuracy of process-based carbon balance models where structure is known and when logging activities are incorporated into production models.

  8. Self-assembly of Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu Solder in Thermoplastic Resin Containing Carboxyl Group and its Interconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyauchi, Kazuhiro; Yamashita, Yukihiko; Suzuki, Naoya; Takano, Nozomu

    2014-09-01

    The self-assembly of solder powder on pads is attractive as a novel interconnection method between chips and substrates. However, the solder used in this method is limited to Sn-58Bi and Sn-52In. In contrast, Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu has been relatively less studied despite its wide use as a lead-free solder in assembling semiconductor packages. Hence, here, polymeric materials incorporating Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu solder powder were investigated for the self-assembly of the solder on pads at temperatures up to 260°C in a lead-free reflow process. The self-assembly of the solder was observed with an optical microscope through transparent glass chips placed on substrates covered with the polymeric materials incorporating the solder powder. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements were performed to confirm the behaviors of the reaction of the resins and the melting of the solder. When epoxy resin with a fluxing additive was used as a matrix, self-assembly of the solder was prevented by the cross-linking reaction. Conversely, when thermoplastic resin containing carboxyl groups was used as a matrix, the self-assembly of solder was successfully achieved in the absence of fluxing additives. The shear strength of interconnection using reflowfilm with lamination was sufficient and significantly increased during the reflow process. However, the shear strength of the reflowfilm showed cohesive failure, possibly because of the brittle intermetallic compounds (Ag3Sn, Au4Sn) network in bulk was lower than that of conventional solder paste that showed interfacial failure after the reflow process with a rapid cooling rate.

  9. Functional group analysis in coal and on coal surfaces by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Verkade, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    An accurate knowledge of the oxygen-bearing labile hydrogen functional groups (e.g., carboxylic acids, phenols and alcohols) in coal is required for today's increasingly sophisticated coal cleaning and beneficiation processes. Phospholanes (compounds having the general structure -POCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O (1)) are being investigated as reagents for the tagging of liable hydrogen functional groups in coal materials with the NMR-active {sup 31}P nucleus. Of twelve such reagents investigated so far, 2 (2-chloro-1,3-dioxaphospholane, ClPOCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O) and 8 (2-chloro-1,3-dithiaphospholane, ClPSCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}S) have been found to be useful in identifying and quantitating, by {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy, labile hydrogen functional groups in an Illinois No. 6 coal condensate. Reagent 2 has also been used to quantitate moisture in pyridine extracts of Argonne Premium Coal Samples. Preliminary {sup 119}Sn NMR spectroscopic results on model compounds with the new reagent CF{sub 3}C(O)NHSnMe{sub 3} (N-trimethylstannyltrifluoroacetamide, 14) suggest that labile hydrogen functional groups in coal materials may be more precisely identified with 14 than with phospholanes. 14 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Direct enantioselective conjugate addition of carboxylic acids with chiral lithium amides as traceless auxiliaries.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Jackson, Jeffrey J; Eickhoff, John A; Zakarian, Armen

    2015-01-21

    Michael addition is a premier synthetic method for carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bond formation. Using chiral dilithium amides as traceless auxiliaries, we report the direct enantioselective Michael addition of carboxylic acids. A free carboxyl group in the product provides versatility for further functionalization, and the chiral reagent can be readily recovered by extraction with aqueous acid. The method has been applied in the enantioselective total synthesis of the purported structure of pulveraven B. PMID:25562717

  11. Direct Enantioselective Conjugate Addition of Carboxylic Acids with Chiral Lithium Amides as Traceless Auxiliaries

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Michael addition is a premier synthetic method for carbon–carbon and carbon–heteroatom bond formation. Using chiral dilithium amides as traceless auxiliaries, we report the direct enantioselective Michael addition of carboxylic acids. A free carboxyl group in the product provides versatility for further functionalization, and the chiral reagent can be readily recovered by extraction with aqueous acid. The method has been applied in the enantioselective total synthesis of the purported structure of pulveraven B. PMID:25562717

  12. Synthesis of carboxylate-functionalized graphene nanosheets for high dispersion of platinum nanoparticles based on the reduction of graphene oxide via 1-pyrenecarboxaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Yinjie; Chen, Jinhua; Zheng, Xingliang; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zhou, Qionghua; Lu, Cuihong

    2013-10-01

    A one-step reduction/functionalization strategy for the synthesis of carboxylate-functionalized graphene nanosheets is reported in this paper. 1-pyrenecarboxaldehyde (PCA) is introduced as a new reductant for the chemical reduction of graphene oxide (GO), serving three roles: reducing GO to graphene nanosheets (GNs), stabilizing the as-prepared GNs due to the electrostatic repulsion of the oxidation products of PCA (1-pyrenecarboxylate, PC-) on the surface of the GNs and anchoring Pt nanoparticles (Pt NPs) with high dispersion and small particle size. Transmission electron microscopy shows that Pt NPs with an average diameter of 1.3 ± 0.2 nm are uniformly dispersed on the surface of the PC--functionalized GNs (PC--GNs). The obtained Pt NPs/PC--GNs nanohybrids have higher electrocatalytic activity and stability towards methanol oxidation in comparison with Pt NPs supported on GNs obtained by the chemical reduction of GO with the typical reductant, hydrazine.

  13. Functional modulation of cerebral gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate: Presence of independent binding site for ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, J.; Kuriyama, K. )

    1990-05-01

    Effect of ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCE) on the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex was studied. Beta-CCE noncompetitively and competitively inhibited (3H)flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptor, but not (3H)muscimol binding to GABAA receptor as well as t-(3H)butylbicycloorthobenzoate (( 3H) TBOB) binding to chloride ion channel, in particulate fraction of the mouse brain. Ro15-1788 also inhibited competitively (3H) flunitrazepam binding. On the other hand, the binding of beta-(3H)CCE was inhibited noncompetitively and competitively by clonazepam and competitively by Ro15-1788. In agreement with these results, benzodiazepines-stimulated (3H)muscimol binding was antagonized by beta-CCE and Ro15-1788. Gel column chromatography for the solubilized fraction from cerebral particulate fraction by 0.2% sodium deoxycholate (DOC-Na) in the presence of 1 M KCl indicated that beta-(3H)CCE binding site was eluted in the same fraction (molecular weight, 250,000) as the binding sites for (3H)flunitrazepam, (3H)muscimol and (3H)TBOB. GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx into membrane vesicles prepared from the bovine cerebral cortex was stimulated and attenuated by flunitrazepam and beta-CCE, respectively. These effects of flunitrazepam and beta-CCE on the GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx were antagonized by Ro15-1788. The present results suggest that the binding site for beta-CCE, which resides on GABAA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex, may be different from that for benzodiazepine. Possible roles of beta-CCE binding site in the allosteric inhibitions on benzodiazepine binding site as well as on the functional coupling between chloride ion channel and GABAA receptor are also suggested.

  14. 14 CFR 11 - Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group II and Group III Air Carriers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group II and Group III Air Carriers Section 11 Section Section 11 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE... 11 Functional Classification—Operating Expenses of Group II and Group III Air Carriers...

  15. Functional group composition of organic aerosol from combustion emissions and secondary processes at two contrasted urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Haddad, Imad; Marchand, Nicolas; D'Anna, Barbara; Jaffrezo, Jean Luc; Wortham, Henri

    2013-08-01

    The quantification of major functional groups in atmospheric organic aerosol (OA) provides a constraint on the types of compounds emitted and formed in atmospheric conditions. This paper presents functional group composition of organic aerosol from two contrasted urban environments: Marseille during summer and Grenoble during winter. Functional groups were determined using a tandem mass spectrometry approach, enabling the quantification of carboxylic (RCOOH), carbonyl (RCOR‧), and nitro (RNO2) functional groups. Using a multiple regression analysis, absolute concentrations of functional groups were combined with those of organic carbon derived from different sources in order to infer the functional group contents of different organic aerosol fractions. These fractions include fossil fuel combustion emissions, biomass burning emissions and secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Results clearly highlight the differences between functional group fingerprints of primary and secondary OA fractions. OA emitted from primary sources is found to be moderately functionalized, as about 20 carbons per 1000 bear one of the functional groups determined here, whereas SOA is much more functionalized, as in average 94 carbons per 1000 bear a functional group under study. Aging processes appear to increase both RCOOH and RCOR‧ functional group contents by nearly one order of magnitude. Conversely, RNO2 content is found to decrease with photochemical processes. Finally, our results also suggest that other functional groups significantly contribute to biomass smoke and SOA. In particular, for SOA, the overall oxygen content, assessed using aerosol mass spectrometer measurements by an O:C ratio of 0.63, is significantly higher than the apparent O:C* ratio of 0.17 estimated based on functional groups measured here. A thorough examination of our data suggests that this remaining unexplained oxygen content can be most probably assigned to alcohol (ROH), organic peroxides (ROOH), organonitrates (RONO2) and/or organosulfates (ROSO3H).

  16. Adsorption of Fe(II) and U(VI) to carboxyl-functionalized microspheres : the influence of speciation on uranyl reduction studied by titration and XAFS.

    SciTech Connect

    Boyanov, M. I.; O'Loughlin, E. J.; Roden, E. E.; Fein, J. B.; Kemner, K. M.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Notre Dame; Univ. of Wisconsin

    2007-04-15

    The chemical reduction of U(VI) by Fe(II) is a potentially important pathway for immobilization of uranium in subsurface environments. Although the presence of surfaces has been shown to catalyze the reaction between Fe(II) and U(VI) aqueous species, the mechanism(s) responsible for the enhanced reactivity remain ambiguous. To gain further insight into the U--Fe redox process at a complexing, non-conducting surface that is relevant to common organic phases in the environment, we studied suspensions containing combinations of 0.1 mM U(VI), 1.0 mM Fe(II), and 4.2 g/L carboxyl-functionalized polystyrene microspheres. Acid-base titrations were used to monitor protolytic reactions, and Fe K-edge and U L-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy was used to determine the valence and atomic environment of the adsorbed Fe and U species. In the Fe + surface carboxyl system, a transition from monomeric to oligomeric Fe(II) surface species was observed between pH 7.5 and pH 8.4. In the U + surface carboxyl system, the U(VI) cation was adsorbed as a mononuclear uranyl-carboxyl complex at both pH 7.5 and 8.4. In the ternary U + Fe + surface carboxyl system, U(VI) was not reduced by the solvated or adsorbed Fe(II) at pH 7.5 over a 4-month period, whereas complete and rapid reduction to U(IV) nanoparticles occurred at pH 8.4. The U(IV) product reoxidized rapidly upon exposure to air, but it was stable over a 4-month period under anoxic conditions. Fe atoms were found in the local environment of the reduced U(IV) atoms at a distance of 3.56 Angstroms. The U(IV)-Fe coordination is consistent with an inner-sphere electron transfer mechanism between the redox centers and involvement of Fe(II) atoms in both steps of the reduction from U(VI) to U(IV). The inability of Fe(II) to reduce U(VI) in solution and at pH 7.5 in the U + Fe + carboxyl system is explained by the formation of a transient, 'dead-end' U(V)-Fe(III) complex that blocks the U(V) disproportionation pathway after the first electron transfer. The increased reactivity at pH 8.4 relative to pH 7.5 is explained by the reaction of U(VI) with an Fe(II) oligomer, whereby the bonds between Fe atoms facilitate the transfer of a second electron to the hypothetical U(V)--Fe(III) intermediate. We discuss how this mechanism may explain the commonly observed higher efficiency of uranyl reduction by adsorbed or structural Fe(II) relative to aqueous Fe(II).

  17. Photochemical and antimicrobial properties of silver nanoparticle-encapsulated chitosan functionalized with photoactive groups.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Thomas V; Kuriakose, Sunny

    2013-10-01

    Chitosan was functionalized with 4-((E)-2-(3-hydroxynaphthalen-2-yl)diazen-1-yl)benzoic acid by the coupling of the hydroxyl functional groups of chitosan with carboxylic acid group of the dye by DCC coupling method. The silver nanoparticles were prepared by sol-gel method of nanoparticle synthesis. Silver nanoparticle-encapsulated functionalized chitosan was prepared by the phase transfer method. The products were characterized by FTIR, UV-Vis, fluorescence and NMR spectroscopic methods and by SEM and TEM analysis. The photochemical properties of silver nanoparticle-encapsulated chitosan functionalized with 4-((E)-2-(3-hydroxynaphthalen-2-yl)diazen-1-yl)benzoic acid was studied in detail. The light-fastening properties of the chromophoric system was enhanced when attached to chitosan, and it can be further improved by the encapsulation of silver nanoparticles. The antibacterial analysis of silver nanoparticle-encapsulated functionalized chitosan was carried out against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli and against fungal species such as Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus terreus. This study showed that silver nanoparticles-encapsulated functionalized chitosan can be used for antibacterial and antifungal applications. PMID:23910360

  18. 1-Azaniumylcyclobutane-1-carboxylate monohydrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butcher, Ray J.; Brewer, Greg; Burton, Aaron S.; Dworkin, Jason

    2014-01-01

    In the title compound, C5H9NO2H2O, the amino acid is in the usual zwitterionic form involving the carboxylate group. The cyclobutane backbone of the amino acid is disordered over two conformations, with occupancies of 0.882 (7) and0.118 (7). In the crystal, NH O and OH O hydrogen bonds link the zwitterions [with the water molecule involved as both acceptor (with the NH3+) and donor (through a single carboxylate O from two different aminocyclobutane carboxylatemoities)], resulting in a two-dimensional layered structure lying parallel to (100).

  19. Mass spectrometry-based carboxyl footprinting of proteins: Method evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hao; Wen, Jianzhong; Huang, Richard Y-C.; Blankenship, Robert E.; Gross, Michael L.

    2012-02-01

    Protein structure determines function in biology, and a variety of approaches have been employed to obtain structural information about proteins. Mass spectrometry-based protein footprinting is one fast-growing approach. One labeling-based footprinting approach is the use of a water-soluble carbodiimide, 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) and glycine ethyl ester (GEE) to modify solvent-accessible carboxyl groups on glutamate (E) and aspartate (D). This paper describes method development of carboxyl-group modification in protein footprinting. The modification protocol was evaluated by using the protein calmodulin as a model. Because carboxyl-group modification is a slow reaction relative to protein folding and unfolding, there is an issue that modifications at certain sites may induce protein unfolding and lead to additional modification at sites that are not solvent-accessible in the wild-type protein. We investigated this possibility by using hydrogen deuterium amide exchange (H/DX). The study demonstrated that application of carboxyl group modification in probing conformational changes in calmodulin induced by Ca{sup 2+} binding provides useful information that is not compromised by modification-induced protein unfolding.

  20. Synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups on the hydrolysis of cellulose over activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Foo, Guo Shiou; Sievers, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    The chemical oxidation of activated carbon by H2 O2 and H2 SO4 is investigated, structural and chemical modifications are characterized, and the materials are used as catalysts for the hydrolysis of cellulose. Treatment with H2 O2 enlarges the pore size and imparts functional groups such as phenols, lactones, and carboxylic acids. H2 SO4 treatment targets the edges of carbon sheets primarily, and this effect is more pronounced with a higher temperature. Adsorption isotherms demonstrate that the adsorption of oligomers on functionalized carbon is dominated by van der Waals forces. The materials treated chemically are active for the hydrolysis of cellulose despite the relative weakness of most of their acid sites. It is proposed that a synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups enhances the activity by inducing a conformational change in the glucan chains if they are adsorbed at defect sites. This activates the glycosidic bonds for hydrolysis by in-plane functional groups. PMID:25504913

  1. Effects of functional groups and ionization on the structure of alkanethiol coated gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolintineanu, Dan S.; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Grest, Gary S.

    2013-03-01

    We report fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of alkanethiol coated gold nanoparticles solvated in water and decane. The structure of the coatings is analyzed as a function of various functional end groups, including amine and carboxyl groups in different neutralization states. We study the effects of charge in the end groups for two different chain lengths (10 and 18 carbons) and different counterions (mono- and divalent). For the longer alkanes we find significant local phase segregation of chains on the nanoparticle surface, which results in highly asymmetric coating structures. In general, the charged end groups attenuate this effect by enhancing the water solubility of the nanoparticles. Based on the coating structures and density profiles, we can qualitatively infer the overall solubility of the nanoparticles. The asymmetry in the alkanethiol coatings is also likely to have a significant effect on aggregation behavior. More importantly, our simulations suggest the ability to modulate end group charge states (e.g. by changing the pH of the solution) in order to control coating structure, and therefore control solubility and aggregation behavior.

  2. Extraction of Lanthanide and Actinide Ions from Aqueous Mixtures Using a Carboxylic Acid-Functionalized Porous Aromatic Framework

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Porous aromatic frameworks (PAFs) incorporating a high concentration of acid functional groups possess characteristics that are promising for use in separating lanthanide and actinide metal ions, as required in the treatment of radioactive waste. These materials have been shown to be indefinitely stable to concentrated acids and bases, potentially allowing for multiple adsorption/stripping cycles. Additionally, the PAFs combine exceptional features from MOFs and inorganic/activated carbons giving rise to tunable pore surfaces and maximum chemical stability. Herein, we present a study of the adsorption of selected metal ions, Sr2+, Fe3+, Nd3+, and Am3+, from aqueous solutions employing a carbon-based porous aromatic framework, BPP-7 (Berkeley Porous Polymer-7). This material displays high metal loading capacities together with excellent adsorption selectivity for neodymium over strontium based on Langmuir adsorption isotherms and ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) calculations. Based in part upon X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies, the stronger adsorption of neodymium is attributed to multiple metal ion and binding site interactions resulting from the densely functionalized and highly interpenetrated structure of BPP-7. Recyclability and combustibility experiments demonstrate that multiple adsorption/stripping cycles can be completed with minimal degradation of the polymer adsorption capacity. PMID:27163056

  3. Extraction of Lanthanide and Actinide Ions from Aqueous Mixtures Using a Carboxylic Acid-Functionalized Porous Aromatic Framework.

    PubMed

    Demir, Selvan; Brune, Nicholas K; Van Humbeck, Jeffrey F; Mason, Jarad A; Plakhova, Tatiana V; Wang, Shuao; Tian, Guoxin; Minasian, Stefan G; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Tohru; Kalmykov, Stepan N; Shiwaku, Hideaki; Shuh, David K; Long, Jeffrey R

    2016-04-27

    Porous aromatic frameworks (PAFs) incorporating a high concentration of acid functional groups possess characteristics that are promising for use in separating lanthanide and actinide metal ions, as required in the treatment of radioactive waste. These materials have been shown to be indefinitely stable to concentrated acids and bases, potentially allowing for multiple adsorption/stripping cycles. Additionally, the PAFs combine exceptional features from MOFs and inorganic/activated carbons giving rise to tunable pore surfaces and maximum chemical stability. Herein, we present a study of the adsorption of selected metal ions, Sr(2+), Fe(3+), Nd(3+), and Am(3+), from aqueous solutions employing a carbon-based porous aromatic framework, BPP-7 (Berkeley Porous Polymer-7). This material displays high metal loading capacities together with excellent adsorption selectivity for neodymium over strontium based on Langmuir adsorption isotherms and ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) calculations. Based in part upon X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies, the stronger adsorption of neodymium is attributed to multiple metal ion and binding site interactions resulting from the densely functionalized and highly interpenetrated structure of BPP-7. Recyclability and combustibility experiments demonstrate that multiple adsorption/stripping cycles can be completed with minimal degradation of the polymer adsorption capacity. PMID:27163056

  4. Toward functional carboxylate-bridged diiron protein mimics: achieving structural stability and conformational flexibility using a macrocylic ligand framework.

    PubMed

    Do, Loi H; Lippard, Stephen J

    2011-07-13

    A dinucleating macrocycle, H(2)PIM, containing phenoxylimine metal-binding units has been prepared. Reaction of H(2)PIM with [Fe(2)(Mes)(4)] (Mes = 2,4,6-trimethylphenyl) and sterically hindered carboxylic acids, Ph(3)CCO(2)H or Ar(Tol)CO(2)H (2,6-bis(p-tolyl)benzoic acid), afforded complexes [Fe(2)(PIM)(Ph(3)CCO(2))(2)] (1) and [Fe(2)(PIM)(Ar(Tol)CO(2))(2)] (2), respectively. X-ray diffraction studies revealed that these diiron(II) complexes closely mimic the active site structures of the hydroxylase components of bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases (BMMs), particularly the syn disposition of the nitrogen donor atoms and the bridging μ-η(1)η(2) and μ-η(1)η(1) modes of the carboxylate ligands at the diiron(II) centers. Cyclic voltammograms of 1 and 2 displayed quasi-reversible redox couples at +16 and +108 mV vs ferrocene/ferrocenium, respectively. Treatment of 2 with silver perchlorate afforded a silver(I)/iron(III) heterodimetallic complex, [Fe(2)(μ-OH)(2)(ClO(4))(2)(PIM)(Ar(Tol)CO(2))Ag] (3), which was structurally and spectroscopically characterized. Complexes 1 and 2 both react rapidly with dioxygen. Oxygenation of 1 afforded a (μ-hydroxo)diiron(III) complex [Fe(2)(μ-OH)(PIM)(Ph(3)CCO(2))(3)] (4), a hexa(μ-hydroxo)tetrairon(III) complex [Fe(4)(μ-OH)(6)(PIM)(2)(Ph(3)CCO(2))(2)] (5), and an unidentified iron(III) species. Oxygenation of 2 exclusively formed di(carboxylato)diiron(III) compounds, a testimony to the role of the macrocylic ligand in preserving the dinuclear iron center under oxidizing conditions. X-ray crystallographic and (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopic investigations indicated that 2 reacts with dioxygen to give a mixture of (μ-oxo)diiron(III) [Fe(2)(μ-O)(PIM)(Ar(Tol)CO(2))(2)] (6) and di(μ-hydroxo)diiron(III) [Fe(2)(μ-OH)(2)(PIM)(Ar(Tol)CO(2))(2)] (7) units in the same crystal lattice. Compounds 6 and 7 spontaneously convert to a tetrairon(III) complex, [Fe(4)(μ-OH)(6)(PIM)(2)(Ar(Tol)CO(2))(2)] (8), when treated with excess H(2)O. PMID:21682286

  5. Toward Functional Carboxylate-Bridged Diiron Protein Mimics: Achieving Structural Stability and Conformational Flexibility Using a Macrocylic Ligand Framework

    PubMed Central

    Do, Loi H.; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    A dinucleating macrocycle, H2PIM, containing phenoxylimine metal-binding units has been prepared. Reaction of H2PIM with [Fe2(Mes)4] (Mes = 2,4,6-trimethylphenyl) and sterically hindered carboxylic acids, Ph3CCO2H or ArTolCO2H (2,6-bis(p-tolyl)benzoic acid), afforded complexes [Fe2(PIM)(Ph3CCO2)2] (1) and [Fe2(PIM)(ArTolCO2)2] (2), respectively. X-ray diffraction studies revealed that these diiron(II) complexes closely mimic the active site structures of the hydroxylase components of bacterial multi-component monooxygenases (BMMs), particularly the syn disposition of the nitrogen donor atoms and the bridging μ-η1η2 and μ-η1η1 modes of the carboxylate ligands at the diiron(II) centers. Cyclic voltammograms of 1 and 2 displayed quasi-reversible redox couples at +16 and +108 mV vs. ferrocene/ferrocenium, respectively. Treatment of 2 with silver perchlorate afforded a silver(I)/iron(III) heterodimetallic complex, [Fe2(μ-OH)2(ClO4)2(PIM)(ArTolCO2)Ag] (3), which was structurally and spectroscopically characterized. Complexes 1 and 2 both react rapidly with dioxygen. Oxygenation of 1 afforded a (μ-hydroxo)diiron(III) complex [Fe2(μ-OH)(PIM)(Ph3CCO2)3] (4), a hexa(μ-hydroxo)tetrairon(III) complex [Fe4(μ-OH)6(PIM)2(Ph3CCO2)2] (5), and an unidentified iron(III) species. Oxygenation of 2 exclusively formed di(carboxylato)diiron(III) compounds, a testimony to the role of the macrocylic ligand in preserving the dinuclear iron center under oxidizing conditions. X-ray crystallographic and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopic investigations indicated that 2 reacts with dioxygen to give a mixture of (μ-oxo)diiron(III) [Fe2(μ-O)(PIM)(ArTolCO2)2] (6) and di(μ-hydroxo)diiron(III) [Fe2(μ-OH)2(PIM)(ArTolCO2)2] (7) units in the same crystal lattice. Compounds 6 and 7 spontaneously convert to a tetrairon(III) complex, [Fe4(μ-OH)6(PIM)2(ArTolCO2)2] (8), when treated with excess H2O. PMID:21682286

  6. The carboxyl group of Glu113 is required for stabilization of the diferrous and bis-FeIV states of MauG

    PubMed Central

    Tarboush, Nafez Abu; Yukl, Erik T.; Shin, Sooim; Feng, Manliang; Wilmot, Carrie M.; Davidson, Victor L.

    2013-01-01

    The diheme enzyme MauG catalyzes a six-electron oxidation required for posttranslational modification of a precursor of methylamine dehydrogenase (preMADH) to complete the biosynthesis of its protein-derived tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ) cofactor. Crystallographic studies have implicated Glu113 in the formation of the bis-FeIV state of MauG, in which one heme is FeIV=O and the other is FeIV with His-Tyr axial ligation. An E113Q mutation had no effect on the structure of MauG, but significantly altered its redox properties. E113Q MauG could not be converted to the diferrous state by reduction with dithionite, but was only reduced to a mixed valence FeII/FeIII state, which is never observed in wild-type (WT) MauG. Addition of H2O2 to E113Q MauG generated a high valence state that formed more slowly and was less stable than the bis-FeIV state of WT MauG. E113Q MauG exhibited no detectable TTQ biosynthesis activity in a steady-state assay with preMADH as the substrate. It did catalyze the steady-state oxidation of quinol MADH to the quinone, but 1000-fold less efficiently than WT MauG. Addition of H2O2 to a crystal of the E113Q MauG-preMADH complex resulted in partial synthesis of TTQ. Extended exposure of these crystals to H2O2 resulted in hydroxylation of Pro107 in the distal pocket of the high-spin heme. It is concluded that the loss of the carboxylic group of Glu113 disrupts the redox cooperativity between hemes that allows rapid formation of the diferrous state, and alters the distribution of high-valence species that participate in charge-resonance stabilization of the bis-FeIV redox state. PMID:23952537

  7. Preconversion catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic functional groups. Quarterly report, January 1--March 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Kubiak, C.P.

    1996-12-31

    Over the course of the studies on catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic residues in coal by carbon monoxide, the author performed preliminary investigations into the removal of other heteroatom groups. This report describes the attempted carbonylation of phenyl amido complexes. These studies resulted in the surprisingly facile formation of amidines. The amidine group is the nitrogen analog of carboxylic acids and esters. This functional group combines the properties of an azomethane-like C=N double bond with an amide-like C-N single bond. This group, like the related allyl (C-C-C), aza-allyl (C-N-C), and carboxylato (O-C-O) groups, form a number of transition metal derivatives, with both early and late transition metals. Various bonding modes of the amidino group have been reported. However, most isolated complexes have the amidino ligand as a chelating ligand or bridging two metals. This is due to the preference of amidines to bond via the nitrogen lone pairs, in contrast to the {eta}3 bonding observed in metal-allyl complexes. The experimental section of the paper describes the synthesis of platinum complexes, X-ray diffraction data for one Pt complex, and its reaction with carbon monoxide. Results are presented on the crystal and molecular structure of a platinum complex.

  8. Dissociation states of collagen functional groups and their effects on the priming efficacy of HEMA bonded to collagen.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, N; Suzuki, K; Nagatsuka, A; Yokota, I; Nemoto, K

    2003-04-01

    Applying 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) solution to etched dentin enhances the bonding of resin to dentin. However, the principal adhesion mechanisms have not yet been identified. In this study, we examined the dissociation states of the collagen functional groups of the side-chain amino acid residues and their effects on the bond strength of resin to etched dentin primed by the HEMA solution. The bond strength was strongly dependent upon the dissociation state of the collagen functional groups. Inhibiting the dissociation of the carboxylic acid or the amine of a collagen functional group resulted in increased bond strength of resin to collagen. By understanding the significance of inhibiting the dissociation state, we can better design and develop more effective and efficient primer and bonding agents. PMID:12651927

  9. Carboxylic acid functionalization prevents the translocation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes at predicted environmentally relevant concentrations into targeted organs of nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouara, Abdelli; Wu, Qiuli; Li, Yinxia; Tang, Meng; Wang, Haifang; Zhao, Yuliang; Wang, Dayong

    2013-06-01

    Carboxyl (-COOH) surface modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-COOH) can be used for targeted delivery of drugs and imaging. However, whether MWCNTs-COOH at environmentally relevant concentrations exert certain toxic effects on multicellular organisms and the underlying mechanisms are still largely unclear. In the present study, we applied the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to evaluate the properties of MWCNTs-COOH at environmentally relevant concentrations by comparing the effects of MWCNTs and MWCNTs-COOH exposure on C. elegans from L1-larvae to adult at concentrations of 0.001-1000 μg L-1. Exposure to MWCNTs could potentially damage the intestine (primary targeted organ) at concentrations greater than 0.1 μg L-1 and functions of neurons and reproductive organ (secondary targeted organs) at concentrations greater than 0.001 μg L-1. Carboxyl modification prevented the toxicity of MWCNTs on the primary and the secondary targeted organs at concentrations less than 100 μg L-1, suggesting that carboxyl modification can effectively prevent the adverse effects of MWCNTs at environmentally relevant concentrations. After exposure, MWCNTs-COOH (1 mg L-1) were translocated into the spermatheca and embryos in the body through the primary targeted organs. However, MWCNTs-COOH (10 μg L-1) were not observed in spermatheca and embryos in the body of nematodes. Moreover, relatively high concentrations of MWCNTs-COOH exposed nematodes might have a hyper-permeable intestinal barrier, whereas MWCNTs-COOH at environmentally relevant concentrations effectively sustained the normally permeable state for the intestinal barrier. Therefore, we elucidated the cellular basis of carboxyl modification to prevent toxicity of MWCNTs at environmentally relevant concentrations. Our data highlights the key role of biological barriers in the primary targeted organs to block toxicity formation from MWCNTs, which will be useful for the design of effective prevention strategies against MWCNTs toxicity.Carboxyl (-COOH) surface modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-COOH) can be used for targeted delivery of drugs and imaging. However, whether MWCNTs-COOH at environmentally relevant concentrations exert certain toxic effects on multicellular organisms and the underlying mechanisms are still largely unclear. In the present study, we applied the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to evaluate the properties of MWCNTs-COOH at environmentally relevant concentrations by comparing the effects of MWCNTs and MWCNTs-COOH exposure on C. elegans from L1-larvae to adult at concentrations of 0.001-1000 μg L-1. Exposure to MWCNTs could potentially damage the intestine (primary targeted organ) at concentrations greater than 0.1 μg L-1 and functions of neurons and reproductive organ (secondary targeted organs) at concentrations greater than 0.001 μg L-1. Carboxyl modification prevented the toxicity of MWCNTs on the primary and the secondary targeted organs at concentrations less than 100 μg L-1, suggesting that carboxyl modification can effectively prevent the adverse effects of MWCNTs at environmentally relevant concentrations. After exposure, MWCNTs-COOH (1 mg L-1) were translocated into the spermatheca and embryos in the body through the primary targeted organs. However, MWCNTs-COOH (10 μg L-1) were not observed in spermatheca and embryos in the body of nematodes. Moreover, relatively high concentrations of MWCNTs-COOH exposed nematodes might have a hyper-permeable intestinal barrier, whereas MWCNTs-COOH at environmentally relevant concentrations effectively sustained the normally permeable state for the intestinal barrier. Therefore, we elucidated the cellular basis of carboxyl modification to prevent toxicity of MWCNTs at environmentally relevant concentrations. Our data highlights the key role of biological barriers in the primary targeted organs to block toxicity formation from MWCNTs, which will be useful for the design of effective prevention strategies against MWCNTs toxicity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00847a

  10. AN ANALYSIS OF LABORATORY AND CLASSROOM GROUP FUNCTIONING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HUDGINS, BRYCE B.; SMITH, LOUIS M.

    GROUP FUNCTIONING AND ACTIVITIES WERE STUDIED IN TWO CONTEXTS, THE LABORATORY AND THE REGULAR SCHOOL CLASSROOM. THE LABORATORY STUDY INVOLVED SMALL GROUP PROBLEM-SOLVING IN ARITHMETIC AND IN SOCIAL STUDIES. STUDIES CONSISTED OF GROUP PERFORMANCE, THE RELATIONSHIP OF THE HIGH ABILITY STUDENTS TO GROUP PERFORMANCE, THE RELATIVE IMPORTANCE OF…

  11. The Impact of Structuring Technique on Group Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilborn, Bobbie L.; Muro, James J.

    1979-01-01

    Advocates at least a modicum of counselor structure for effective group functioning. Helping the group define goals and set limits provides the membership with a sense of purpose and assists individuals toward the achievement of those goals. (Author)

  12. Carboxyl-functionalized polyurethane nanoparticles with immunosuppressive properties as a new type of anti-inflammatory platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yen-Jang; Hung, Kun-Che; Hsieh, Fu-Yu; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of nanoparticles (NPs) with the body immune system is critically important for their biomedical applications. Most NPs stimulate the immune response of macrophages. Here we show that synthetic polyurethane nanoparticles (PU NPs, diameter 34-64 nm) with rich surface COO- functional groups (zeta potential -70 to -50 mV) can suppress the immune response of macrophages. The specially-designed PU NPs reduce the gene expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α) for endotoxin-treated macrophages. The PU NPs increase the intracellular calcium of macrophages (4.5-6.5 fold) and activate autophagy. This is in contrast to the autophagy dysfunction generally observed upon NP exposure. These PU NPs may further decrease the nuclear factor-κB-related inflammation via autophagy pathways. The immunosuppressive activities of PU NPs can prevent animal death by inhibiting the macrophage recruitment and proinflammatory responses, confirmed by an in vivo zebrafish model. Therefore, the novel biodegradable PU NPs demonstrate COO- dependent immunosuppressive properties without carrying any anti-inflammatory agents. This study suggests that NP surface chemistry may regulate the immune response, which provides a new paradigm for potential applications of NPs in anti-inflammation and immunomodulation.The interaction of nanoparticles (NPs) with the body immune system is critically important for their biomedical applications. Most NPs stimulate the immune response of macrophages. Here we show that synthetic polyurethane nanoparticles (PU NPs, diameter 34-64 nm) with rich surface COO- functional groups (zeta potential -70 to -50 mV) can suppress the immune response of macrophages. The specially-designed PU NPs reduce the gene expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α) for endotoxin-treated macrophages. The PU NPs increase the intracellular calcium of macrophages (4.5-6.5 fold) and activate autophagy. This is in contrast to the autophagy dysfunction generally observed upon NP exposure. These PU NPs may further decrease the nuclear factor-κB-related inflammation via autophagy pathways. The immunosuppressive activities of PU NPs can prevent animal death by inhibiting the macrophage recruitment and proinflammatory responses, confirmed by an in vivo zebrafish model. Therefore, the novel biodegradable PU NPs demonstrate COO- dependent immunosuppressive properties without carrying any anti-inflammatory agents. This study suggests that NP surface chemistry may regulate the immune response, which provides a new paradigm for potential applications of NPs in anti-inflammation and immunomodulation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06379e

  13. Prediction of cloud condensation nuclei activity for organic compounds using functional group contribution methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petters, M. D.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Ziemann, P. J.

    2015-09-01

    A wealth of recent laboratory and field experiments demonstrate that organic aerosol composition evolves with time in the atmosphere, leading to changes in the influence of the organic fraction to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra. There is a need for tools that can realistically represent the evolution of CCN activity to better predict indirect effects of organic aerosol on clouds and climate. This work describes a model to predict the CCN activity of organic compounds from functional group composition. The model combines Köhler theory with semi-empirical group contribution methods to estimate molar volumes, activity coefficients and liquid-liquid phase boundaries to predict the effective hygroscopicity parameter, kappa. Model evaluation against a selected database of published laboratory measurements demonstrates that kappa can be predicted within a factor of two. Simulation of homologous series is used to identify the relative effectiveness of different functional groups in increasing the CCN activity of weakly functionalized organic compounds. Hydroxyl, carboxyl, aldehyde, hydroperoxide, carbonyl, and ether moieties promote CCN activity while methylene and nitrate moieties inhibit CCN activity. The model can be incorporated into scale-bridging testbeds such as the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere to evaluate the evolution of kappa for a complex mix of organic compounds and to develop suitable parameterizations of CCN evolution for larger scale models.

  14. Prediction of cloud condensation nuclei activity for organic compounds using functional group contribution methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petters, M. D.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Ziemann, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    A wealth of recent laboratory and field experiments demonstrate that organic aerosol composition evolves with time in the atmosphere, leading to changes in the influence of the organic fraction to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra. There is a need for tools that can realistically represent the evolution of CCN activity to better predict indirect effects of organic aerosol on clouds and climate. This work describes a model to predict the CCN activity of organic compounds from functional group composition. Following previous methods in the literature, we test the ability of semi-empirical group contribution methods in Köhler theory to predict the effective hygroscopicity parameter, kappa. However, in our approach we also account for liquid-liquid phase boundaries to simulate phase-limited activation behavior. Model evaluation against a selected database of published laboratory measurements demonstrates that kappa can be predicted within a factor of 2. Simulation of homologous series is used to identify the relative effectiveness of different functional groups in increasing the CCN activity of weakly functionalized organic compounds. Hydroxyl, carboxyl, aldehyde, hydroperoxide, carbonyl, and ether moieties promote CCN activity while methylene and nitrate moieties inhibit CCN activity. The model can be incorporated into scale-bridging test beds such as the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) to evaluate the evolution of kappa for a complex mix of organic compounds and to develop suitable parameterizations of CCN evolution for larger-scale models.

  15. Improvement of the fracture toughness of hydroxyapatite (HAp) by incorporation of carboxyl functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (CfSWCNTs) and nylon.

    PubMed

    Khanal, S P; Mahfuz, H; Rondinone, A J; Leventouri, Th

    2016-03-01

    The potential of improving the fracture toughness of synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAp) by incorporating carboxyl functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (CfSWCNTs) and polymerized ε-caprolactam (nylon) was studied. A series of HAp samples with CfSWCNTs concentrations varying from 0 to 1.5wt.%, without, and with nylon addition was prepared. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the samples. The three point bending test was applied to measure the fracture toughness of the composites. A reproducible value of 3.6±0.3MPa.√m was found for samples containing 1wt.% CfSWCNTs and nylon. This value is in the range of the cortical bone fracture toughness. Increase of the CfSWCNTs content results to decrease of the fracture toughness, and formation of secondary phases. PMID:26706523

  16. Various fates of neuronal progenitor cells observed on several different chemical functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xi; Wang, Ying; He, Jin; Wang, Xiu-Mei; Cui, Fu-Zhai; Xu, Quan-Yuan

    2011-12-01

    Neuronal progenitor cells cultured on gold-coated glass surfaces modified by different chemical functional groups, including hydroxyl (-OH), carboxyl (-COOH), amino (-NH2), bromo (-Br), mercapto (-SH), - Phenyl and methyl (-CH3), were studied here to investigate the influence of surface chemistry on the cells' adhesion, morphology, proliferation and functional gene expression. Focal adhesion staining indicated in the initial culture stage cells exhibited morphological changes in response to different chemical functional groups. Cells cultured on -NH2 grafted surface displayed focal adhesion plaque and flattened morphology and had the largest contact area. However, their counter parts on -CH3 grafted surface displayed no focal adhesion and rounded morphology and had the smallest contact area. After 6 days culture, the proliferation trend was as follows: -NH2 > -SH> -COOH> - Phenyl > - Br > -OH> -CH3. To determine the neural functional properties of the cells affected by surface chemistry, the expression of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD67), nerve growth factor (NGF) and brainderived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were characterized. An increase of GAD67 expression was observed on -NH2, -COOH and -SH grafted surfaces, while no increase in NGF and BDNF expression was observed on any chemical surfaces. These results highlight the importance of surface chemistry in the fate determination of neuronal progenitor cells, and suggest that surface chemistry must be considered in the design of biomaterials for neural tissue engineering.

  17. Refinements to the structure of graphite oxide: absolute quantification of functional groups via selective labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eng, Alex Yong Sheng; Chua, Chun Kiang; Pumera, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Chemical modification and functionalization of inherent functional groups within graphite oxide (GO) are essential aspects of graphene-based nano-materials used in wide-ranging applications. Despite extensive research, there remains some discrepancy in its structure, with current knowledge limited primarily to spectroscopic data from XPS, NMR and vibrational spectroscopies. We report herein an innovative electrochemistry-based approach. Four electroactive labels are chosen to selectively functionalize groups in GO, and quantification of each group is achieved by voltammetric analysis. This allows for the first time quantification of absolute amounts of each group, with a further advantage of distinguishing various carbonyl species: namely ortho- and para-quinones from aliphatic ketones. Intrinsic variations in the compositions of permanganate versus chlorate-oxidized GOs were thus observed. Principal differences include permanganate-GO exhibiting substantial quinonyl content, in comparison to chlorate-GO with the vast majority of its carbonyls as isolated ketones. The results confirm that carboxylic groups are rare in actuality, and are in fact entirely absent from chlorate-GO. These observations refine and advance our understanding of GO structure by addressing certain disparities in past models resulting from employment of different oxidation routes, with the vital implication that GO production methods cannot be used interchangeably in the manufacture of graphene-based devices.Chemical modification and functionalization of inherent functional groups within graphite oxide (GO) are essential aspects of graphene-based nano-materials used in wide-ranging applications. Despite extensive research, there remains some discrepancy in its structure, with current knowledge limited primarily to spectroscopic data from XPS, NMR and vibrational spectroscopies. We report herein an innovative electrochemistry-based approach. Four electroactive labels are chosen to selectively functionalize groups in GO, and quantification of each group is achieved by voltammetric analysis. This allows for the first time quantification of absolute amounts of each group, with a further advantage of distinguishing various carbonyl species: namely ortho- and para-quinones from aliphatic ketones. Intrinsic variations in the compositions of permanganate versus chlorate-oxidized GOs were thus observed. Principal differences include permanganate-GO exhibiting substantial quinonyl content, in comparison to chlorate-GO with the vast majority of its carbonyls as isolated ketones. The results confirm that carboxylic groups are rare in actuality, and are in fact entirely absent from chlorate-GO. These observations refine and advance our understanding of GO structure by addressing certain disparities in past models resulting from employment of different oxidation routes, with the vital implication that GO production methods cannot be used interchangeably in the manufacture of graphene-based devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Voltammograms of labelled GO at acidic vs. neutral pH; control experiment investigating effects of non-specific adsorption; X-ray photoelectron spectra and Fourier transform infrared spectra of GOs after functionalization and their corresponding controls; Coulombic charges passed from electrochemical redox of labels; detailed calculation of epoxyl content in GO; inherent electrochemistry of GOs; physical images of functionalized and control GOs. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05891k

  18. A novel amino acid analysis method using derivatization of multiple functional groups followed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Yohei; Kinumi, Tomoya; Yamazaki, Taichi; Takatsu, Akiko

    2015-03-21

    We have developed a novel amino acid analysis method using derivatization of multiple functional groups (amino, carboxyl, and phenolic hydroxyl groups). The amino, carboxyl, and phenolic hydroxyl groups of the amino acids were derivatized with 1-bromobutane so that the hydrophobicities and basicities of the amino acids were improved. The derivatized amino acids, including amino group-modified amino acids, could be detected with high sensitivity using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In this study, 17 amino acids obtained by hydrolyzing proteins and 4 amino group-modified amino acids found in the human body (N,N-dimethylglycine, N-formyl-L-methionine, L-pyroglutamic acid, and sarcosine) were selected as target compounds. The 21 derivatized amino acids could be separated using an octadecyl-silylated silica column within 20 min and simultaneously detected. The detection limits for the 21 amino acids were 5.4-91 fmol, and the calibration curves were linear over the range of 10-100 nmol L(-1) (r(2) > 0.9984) with good repeatability. A confirmatory experiment showed that our proposed method could be applied to the determination of a protein certified reference material using the analysis of 12 amino acids combined with isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Furthermore, the proposed method was successfully applied to a stable isotope-coded derivatization method using 1-bromobutane and 1-bromobutane-4,4,4-d3 for comparative analysis of amino acids in human serum. PMID:25671319

  19. Functional Analytic Psychotherapy for Interpersonal Process Groups: A Behavioral Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoekstra, Renee

    2008-01-01

    This paper is an adaptation of Kohlenberg and Tsai's work, Functional Analytical Psychotherapy (1991), or FAP, to group psychotherapy. This author applied a behavioral rationale for interpersonal process groups by illustrating key points with a hypothetical client. Suggestions are also provided for starting groups, identifying goals, educating…

  20. Simultaneously functionalization and reduction of graphene oxide containing isocyanate groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Peng; Meng, Linghui; Huang, Yudong; Liu, Li; Fan, Dapeng

    2015-01-01

    A facile and efficient approach is developed to simultaneously functionalize and reduce graphene oxide (GO) containing isocyanate groups with toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI). In this approach, the reaction between some isocyanate groups of TDI and oxygen containing functional groups of GO has occurred, with the GO reducing. The result can be found that others active isocyanate groups of TDI remain upon surface of GO, and the surface of GO changes from hydrophile to hydrophobic. In order to obtain the largest amount of isocyanate groups on surface of TDI-rGO, appropriate temperature and equilibrium time of the reaction are determined to be 75 °C and 5 h.

  1. Integrated engineering of β-oxidation reversal and ω-oxidation pathways for the synthesis of medium chain ω-functionalized carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Clomburg, James M; Blankschien, Matthew D; Vick, Jacob E; Chou, Alexander; Kim, Seohyoung; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2015-03-01

    An engineered reversal of the β-oxidation cycle was exploited to demonstrate its utility for the synthesis of medium chain (6-10-carbons) ω-hydroxyacids and dicarboxylic acids from glycerol as the only carbon source. A redesigned β-oxidation reversal facilitated the production of medium chain carboxylic acids, which were converted to ω-hydroxyacids and dicarboxylic acids by the action of an engineered ω-oxidation pathway. The selection of a key thiolase (bktB) and thioesterase (ydiI) in combination with previously established core β-oxidation reversal enzymes, as well as the development of chromosomal expression systems for the independent control of pathway enzymes, enabled the generation of C6-C10 carboxylic acids and provided a platform for vector based independent expression of ω-functionalization enzymes. Using this approach, the expression of the Pseudomonas putida alkane monooxygenase system, encoded by alkBGT, in combination with all β-oxidation reversal enzymes resulted in the production of 6-hydroxyhexanoic acid, 8-hydroxyoctanoic acid, and 10-hydroxydecanoic acid. Following identification and characterization of potential alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases, chnD and chnE from Acinetobacter sp. strain SE19 were expressed in conjunction with alkBGT to demonstrate the synthesis of the C6-C10 dicarboxylic acids, adipic acid, suberic acid, and sebacic acid. The potential of a β-oxidation cycle with ω-oxidation termination pathways was further demonstrated through the production of greater than 0.8 g/L C6-C10 ω-hydroxyacids or about 0.5 g/L dicarboxylic acids of the same chain lengths from glycerol (an unrelated carbon source) using minimal media. PMID:25638687

  2. Electrical transport and field-effect transistors using inkjet-printed SWCNT films having different functional side groups.

    PubMed

    Gracia-Espino, Eduardo; Sala, Giovanni; Pino, Flavio; Halonen, Niina; Luomahaara, Juho; Mäklin, Jani; Tóth, Géza; Kordás, Krisztián; Jantunen, Heli; Terrones, Mauricio; Helistö, Panu; Seppä, Heikki; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Vajtai, Robert

    2010-06-22

    The electrical properties of random networks of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) obtained by inkjet printing are studied. Water-based stable inks of functionalized SWNTs (carboxylic acid, amide, poly(ethylene glycol), and polyaminobenzene sulfonic acid) were prepared and applied to inkjet deposit microscopic patterns of nanotube films on lithographically defined silicon chips with a back-side gate arrangement. Source-drain transfer characteristics and gate-effect measurements confirm the important role of the chemical functional groups in the electrical behavior of carbon nanotube networks. Considerable nonlinear transport in conjunction with a high channel current on/off ratio of approximately 70 was observed with poly(ethylene glycol)-functionalized nanotubes. The positive temperature coefficient of channel resistance shows the nonmetallic behavior of the inkjet-printed films. Other inkjet-printed field-effect transistors using carboxyl-functionalized nanotubes as source, drain, and gate electrodes, poly(ethylene glycol)-functionalized nanotubes as the channel, and poly(ethylene glycol) as the gate dielectric were also tested and characterized. PMID:20481513

  3. Stimulation of nonspecific resistance to infection induced by muramyl dipeptide analogs substituted in the gamma-carboxyl group and evaluation of N alpha-muramyl dipeptide-N epsilon-stearoyllysine.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, K; Otani, T; Une, T; Osada, Y; Ogawa, H; Azuma, I

    1983-01-01

    Stimulation of resistance to infection induced by the analogs of muramyl dipeptide (MDP) having substituted functions in the gamma-carboxyl group of D-isoglutamyl residue was examined in experimental Escherichia coli infections in mice. An MDP analog which is an efficient strengthener of resistance to infection, N alpha-MDP-N epsilon-stearoyllysine [MDP-Lys(L18)], was selected through the comparative assessment of a number of compounds in three categories: (i) gamma-alkylamides, (ii) gamma-esters, and (iii) N alpha-MDP-N epsilon-acyllysine derivatives. Furthermore, the antiinfectious activity of MDP-Lys(L18) was evaluated bacteriologically in comparison with that of MDP. The effect of MDP-Lys(L18) on the susceptibility of mice to infections with various species of microorganisms was studied. Protective activity was greatest against E. coli and staphylococcal infections, considerable against Pseudomonas and Candida infections, and least against Klebsiella infection. The effects of bacterial inoculum size and MDP treatment timing, dose, and route of administration on protective activity were studied. The efficacy of MDP-Lys(L18) in protection tests was demonstrated for all administration routes, even the oral. Its high potency was confirmed by the smaller influence of inoculum size and particularly small value of the minimum dosage required for inducing protective activity. A decrease in bacterial survival was observed in the blood and organs of mice treated with the analog and infected with E. coli. The following two useful effects were obtained: the synergistic effect of glycopeptide and chemotherapeutic agents and the stimulation of resistance to infection in animals immunocompromised by cyclophosphamide treatment. PMID:6341226

  4. Local renormalization group functions from quantum renormalization group and holographic bulk locality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Yu

    2015-06-01

    The bulk locality in the constructive holographic renormalization group requires miraculous cancellations among various local renormalization group functions. The cancellation is not only from the properties of the spectrum but from more detailed aspects of operator product expansions in relation to conformal anomaly. It is remarkable that one-loop computation of the universal local renormalization group functions in the weakly coupled limit of the super Yang-Mills theory fulfils the necessary condition for the cancellation in the strongly coupled limit in its SL(2, Z) duality invariant form. From the consistency between the quantum renormalization group and the holographic renormalization group, we determine some unexplored local renormalization group functions (e.g. diffusive term in the beta function for the gauge coupling constant) in the strongly coupled limit of the planar super Yang-Mills theory.

  5. Differential Item Functioning Detection across Two Methods of Defining Group Comparisons: Pairwise and Composite Group Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sari, Halil Ibrahim; Huggins, Anne Corinne

    2015-01-01

    This study compares two methods of defining groups for the detection of differential item functioning (DIF): (a) pairwise comparisons and (b) composite group comparisons. We aim to emphasize and empirically support the notion that the choice of pairwise versus composite group definitions in DIF is a reflection of how one defines fairness in DIF

  6. Differential Item Functioning Detection across Two Methods of Defining Group Comparisons: Pairwise and Composite Group Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sari, Halil Ibrahim; Huggins, Anne Corinne

    2015-01-01

    This study compares two methods of defining groups for the detection of differential item functioning (DIF): (a) pairwise comparisons and (b) composite group comparisons. We aim to emphasize and empirically support the notion that the choice of pairwise versus composite group definitions in DIF is a reflection of how one defines fairness in DIF…

  7. Using Text Analysis to Identify Functionally Coherent Gene Groups

    PubMed Central

    Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Schütze, Hinrich; Altman, Russ B.

    2002-01-01

    The analysis of large-scale genomic information (such as sequence data or expression patterns) frequently involves grouping genes on the basis of common experimental features. Often, as with gene expression clustering, there are too many groups to easily identify the functionally relevant ones. One valuable source of information about gene function is the published literature. We present a method, neighbor divergence, for assessing whether the genes within a group share a common biological function based on their associated scientific literature. The method uses statistical natural language processing techniques to interpret biological text. It requires only a corpus of documents relevant to the genes being studied (e.g., all genes in an organism) and an index connecting the documents to appropriate genes. Given a group of genes, neighbor divergence assigns a numerical score indicating how “functionally coherent” the gene group is from the perspective of the published literature. We evaluate our method by testing its ability to distinguish 19 known functional gene groups from 1900 randomly assembled groups. Neighbor divergence achieves 79% sensitivity at 100% specificity, comparing favorably to other tested methods. We also apply neighbor divergence to previously published gene expression clusters to assess its ability to recognize gene groups that had been manually identified as representative of a common function. PMID:12368251

  8. Organic Mass Fragments and Organic Functional Groups in Aged Biomass Burning and Fossil Fuel Combustion Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, D. A.; Hawkins, L. N.; Russell, L. M.

    2009-12-01

    Organic functional group concentrations in submicron aerosol particles collected from 27 June to 17 September at the Scripps Pier in La Jolla, California as part of AeroSCOPE 2008 were quantified using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Organic and inorganic non-refractory components in the same air masses were quantified using a Quadrupole Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Q-AMS). Previous measurements at the Scripps pier indicate that a large fraction of submicron particle mass originates in Los Angeles and the port of Long Beach. Additional particle sources to the region include local urban emissions and periodic biomass burning during large wildfires. Three distinct types of organic aerosol components were identified from organic composition and elemental tracers, including biomass burning, fossil fuel combustion, and polluted marine components. Fossil fuel combustion organic aerosol was dominated by unsaturated alkane and was correlated with sulfur, vanadium, and nickel supporting ship and large trucks in and around the Los Angeles/Long Beach region as the dominant source. Biomass burning organic aerosol comprised a smaller unsaturated alkane fraction and larger fractions of non-acid carbonyl, amine, and carboxylic acid and was correlated with potassium and bromine. Polluted marine organic aerosol was dominated by organic hydroxyl and unsaturated alkane and was not correlated with any elemental tracers. Mass spectra of the organic aerosol support the aerosol sources determined by organic functional groups and elemental tracers and contain fragments commonly attributed to oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA), hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), and biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA). Comparisons of the PMF-derived Q-AMS source spectra with FTIR source spectra and functional group composition provide additional information on the relationship between commonly reported organic aerosol factors and organic functional groups in specific organic aerosol sources rather than mixtures of multiple sources.

  9. Oriented binding of the His6-tagged carboxyl-tail of the L-type Ca2+ channel alpha1-subunit to a new NTA-functionalized self-assembled monolayer.

    PubMed

    Gamsjaeger, Roland; Wimmer, Barbara; Kahr, Heike; Tinazli, Ali; Picuric, Srdjan; Lata, Suman; Tamp, Robert; Maulet, Yves; Gruber, Hermann J; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Romanin, Christoph

    2004-07-01

    Oriented stable binding of functional proteins on surfaces is of fundamental interest for receptor/ligand studies in atomic force microscopy (AFM) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) experiments. Here we have chosen the His6-tagged carboxyl-tail (C-tail) of the alpha1c-subunit of the L-type Ca2+ channel and calmodulin (CaM) as its cognitive partner as a model system to develop a new functional surface. Covalently attached self-assembled monolayers on ultraflat gold containing NTA-thiols to which the His6-tagged C-tail was bound and thiols with triethylene-glycol groups as matrix-thiols represented the system of choice. The topography of this surface was characterized using AFM; its ability to bind C-tail proteins oriented and stable was confirmed by SPR measurements and by complementary force spectroscopy experiments with a CaM4-construct covalently attached to the tip. The developed anchoring strategy can now be used to study receptor/ligand interactions in general applying force spectroscopy and SPR on His6-tagged proteins oriented immobilized onto this new NTA-functionalized self-assembled monolayer. PMID:16459605

  10. Stable isotope dilution analysis of small molecules with carboxylic acid functions using 18O labeling for HPLC-ESI-MS/MS: analysis of fumonisin B1.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Dominik; Hübner, Florian; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2013-08-21

    (18)O labeling is a well-known method for the stable isotope labeling of proteins and peptides. This study describes a modified procedure for using (18)O labeling on small molecules. Fumonisin B1, a worldwide occurring mycotoxin, which is routinely analyzed by HPLC-MS/MS, was chosen as model compound. (18)O labeling was achieved by acid-catalyzed oxygen exchange from H2(18)O. A mixture of different isotopologues was obtained from the exchange, which, however, could be used as an internal standard for HPLC-MS/MS analysis. The identity of the (18)O-labeled fumonisin B1 was confirmed by NMR and HRMS measurements. The applicability as internal standard has been verified by comparison of results obtained from the method described in this paper to results obtained by reference methods. The presented method is of special interest as the (18)O labeling can be generally applied to a large group of small molecules containing carboxylic groups. PMID:23895305

  11. Selective adsorption of L-serine functional groups on the anatase TiO2(101) surface in benthic microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan-Ling; Wang, Cui-Hong; Zhai, Ying; Zhang, Rui-Qin; Van Hove, Michel A

    2014-10-14

    To help design bacteria-friendly anodes for unmediated benthic microbial fuel cells (MFCs), we explore the role of anatase TiO2(101) surface biocompatibility in selecting the functional groups of the levo-isomer serine (L-Ser), which contains carboxyl, hydroxyl, and amino groups in a single molecule. By performing total energy calculations and molecular dynamics simulations based on a density-functional tight-binding method, we find that at room temperature, the surface should be active for biomolecules with carboxyl/carboxylic and hydroxyl groups, but it is not sensitive to those with amino groups. The hydrogen bonding between the hydroxyl H and surface O facilitates electron transfer from the pili or the bacterial matrix to the anode surface, which improves the output power density. Thus, in combination with conductive polymers, the anatase TiO2(101) surface can be an effective biocompatible substrate in benthic MFCs by enabling the surface O to form more hydrogen bonds with the hydroxyl H of the biomolecule. PMID:25165847

  12. Novel Rhizosphere Soil Alleles for the Enzyme 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Deaminase Queried for Function with an In Vivo Competition Assay.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhao; Di Rienzi, Sara C; Janzon, Anders; Werner, Jeff J; Angenent, Largus T; Dangl, Jeffrey L; Fowler, Douglas M; Ley, Ruth E

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomes derived from environmental microbiota encode a vast diversity of protein homologs. How this diversity impacts protein function can be explored through selection assays aimed to optimize function. While artificially generated gene sequence pools are typically used in selection assays, their usage may be limited because of technical or ethical reasons. Here, we investigate an alternative strategy, the use of soil microbial DNA as a starting point. We demonstrate this approach by optimizing the function of a widely occurring soil bacterial enzyme, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase. We identified a specific ACC deaminase domain region (ACCD-DR) that, when PCR amplified from the soil, produced a variant pool that we could swap into functional plasmids carrying ACC deaminase-encoding genes. Functional clones of ACC deaminase were selected for in a competition assay based on their capacity to provide nitrogen to Escherichia coli in vitro. The most successful ACCD-DR variants were identified after multiple rounds of selection by sequence analysis. We observed that previously identified essential active-site residues were fixed in the original unselected library and that additional residues went to fixation after selection. We identified a divergent essential residue whose presence hints at the possible use of alternative substrates and a cluster of neutral residues that did not influence ACCD performance. Using an artificial ACCD-DR variant library generated by DNA oligomer synthesis, we validated the same fixation patterns. Our study demonstrates that soil metagenomes are useful starting pools of protein-coding-gene diversity that can be utilized for protein optimization and functional characterization when synthetic libraries are not appropriate. PMID:26637602

  13. Novel Rhizosphere Soil Alleles for the Enzyme 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Deaminase Queried for Function with an In Vivo Competition Assay

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhao; Di Rienzi, Sara C.; Janzon, Anders; Werner, Jeff J.; Angenent, Largus T.; Dangl, Jeffrey L.; Fowler, Douglas M.

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomes derived from environmental microbiota encode a vast diversity of protein homologs. How this diversity impacts protein function can be explored through selection assays aimed to optimize function. While artificially generated gene sequence pools are typically used in selection assays, their usage may be limited because of technical or ethical reasons. Here, we investigate an alternative strategy, the use of soil microbial DNA as a starting point. We demonstrate this approach by optimizing the function of a widely occurring soil bacterial enzyme, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase. We identified a specific ACC deaminase domain region (ACCD-DR) that, when PCR amplified from the soil, produced a variant pool that we could swap into functional plasmids carrying ACC deaminase-encoding genes. Functional clones of ACC deaminase were selected for in a competition assay based on their capacity to provide nitrogen to Escherichia coli in vitro. The most successful ACCD-DR variants were identified after multiple rounds of selection by sequence analysis. We observed that previously identified essential active-site residues were fixed in the original unselected library and that additional residues went to fixation after selection. We identified a divergent essential residue whose presence hints at the possible use of alternative substrates and a cluster of neutral residues that did not influence ACCD performance. Using an artificial ACCD-DR variant library generated by DNA oligomer synthesis, we validated the same fixation patterns. Our study demonstrates that soil metagenomes are useful starting pools of protein-coding-gene diversity that can be utilized for protein optimization and functional characterization when synthetic libraries are not appropriate. PMID:26637602

  14. Rapid determination of memantine in human plasma by using nanoring carboxyl-functionalized paramagnetic molecularly imprinted polymer d-μ-SPE and UFLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hai-Wen; Xia, Lei; Gong, Li-Min; Ruan, Lie-Min; Zhao, Yong-Gang

    2015-06-01

    A novel, simple, and sensitive method based on the use of dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction (d-μ-SPE) procedure combined with ultra-fast liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (UFLC-MS/MS) for the determination of memantine (ME) was developed and validated over the linearity range 0.05-10.0 µg/L with 100 μL of human plasma using memantine-D6 (ME-D6) as the internal standard. The novel nanoring carboxyl-functionalized paramagnetic molecularly imprinted polymer (NR-CF-Mag-MIP) was synthesized by ultrasound-assisted suspension polymerization, using ME as a template molecule, methacrylic acid as a functional monomer, and divinylbenzene as a cross-linking agent. The NR-CF-Mag-MIP was used as the d-μ-SPE sorbent to extract ME from human plasma samples. The obtained results demonstrated the higher extraction capacity of NR-CF-Mag-MIP with recoveries between 97.6 and 101%. The limits of quantification (LOQs) for ME was 0.015 µg/L. Validation results on linearity, specificity, accuracy, precision, and stability, as well as on application to the analysis of samples taken up to 480 h after oral administration of 20 mg (two 10 mg capsules) of ME in healthy volunteers demonstrated the applicability to bioequivalence studies. PMID:25209851

  15. The luminosity function of galaxies in compact groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribeiro, A. L. B.; De Carvalho, R. R.; Zepf, S. E.

    1994-01-01

    We use counts of faint galaxies in the regions of compact groups to extend the study of the luminosity function of galaxies in compact groups to absolute magnitudes as faint as M(sub B) = -14.5 + 5 log h. We find a slope of the faint end of the luminosity function of approximately alpha = -0.8, with a formal uncertainty of 0.15. This slope is not significantly different from that found for galaxies in other environments. Our results do not support previous suggestions of a dramatic underabundance of intrinsically faint galaxies in compact groups, which were based on extrapolations from fits at brighter magnitudes. The normal faint-end slope of the luminosity function in compact groups is in agreement with previous evidence that most galaxies in compact groups have not been dramatically affected by recent merging.

  16. Functional Group and Substructure Searching as a Tool in Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Kotera, Masaaki; McDonald, Andrew G.; Boyce, Sinéad; Tipton, Keith F.

    2008-01-01

    Background A direct link between the names and structures of compounds and the functional groups contained within them is important, not only because biochemists frequently rely on literature that uses a free-text format to describe functional groups, but also because metabolic models depend upon the connections between enzymes and substrates being known and appropriately stored in databases. Methodology We have developed a database named “Biochemical Substructure Search Catalogue” (BiSSCat), which contains 489 functional groups, >200,000 compounds and >1,000,000 different computationally constructed substructures, to allow identification of chemical compounds of biological interest. Conclusions This database and its associated web-based search program (http://bisscat.org/) can be used to find compounds containing selected combinations of substructures and functional groups. It can be used to determine possible additional substrates for known enzymes and for putative enzymes found in genome projects. Its applications to enzyme inhibitor design are also discussed. PMID:18253485

  17. PLANT FUNCTIONAL GROUP DIVERSITY AS A MECHANISM FOR INVASION RESISTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A commonly cited mechanism for invasion resistance is that diverse plant assemblages use resources more completely through maximum niche occupation. Our research investigates the ability of plant functional groups in resisting invasion by a nonindigenous species, Centaurea maculosa (spotted knapwee...

  18. Detection of Differential Item Functioning in Multiple Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Seock-Ho; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A method is presented for detection of differential item functioning in multiple groups. This method is closely related to F. M. Lord's chi square for comparing vectors of item parameters estimated in two groups. An example is provided using data from 600 college students taking a mathematics test with and without calculators. (SLD)

  19. Metallicity retained by covalent functionalization of graphene with phenyl groups.

    PubMed

    Tang, Peizhe; Chen, Pengcheng; Wu, Jian; Kang, Feiyu; Li, Jia; Rubio, Angel; Duan, Wenhui

    2013-08-21

    To resolve the controversy over the functionalization effect on conductivity, we systematically investigate the structural and electronic properties of graphene covalently functionalized with phenyl groups. Using first-principles calculations combined with the model Hamiltonian analysis, we find that the structural stability, electronic and transport properties of the functionalized graphene are strongly dependent on the adsorption site of the phenyl groups. In detail, double-side functionalized graphene is energetically more favorable than single-side functionalized graphene, and more importantly, they exhibit an exotic non-magnetic metallic state and a magnetic semiconducting state, respectively. For covalently double-side functionalized graphene, two bands contributed by π electrons of graphene cross at the Fermi level with the preserved electron-hole symmetry, and the Fermi velocity of carriers could be flexibly tuned by changing the coverage of the phenyl groups. These results provide an insight into the experimental observation [ACS Nano 2011, 5, 7945], interpreting the origin of the increase in the conductivity of graphene covalently functionalized with phenyl groups. Our work reveals the great potential of these materials in future nanoelectronics or sensors by controlling the attachment of phenyl groups. PMID:23836075

  20. The effect of different functional groups on the ligand-promoted dissolution of NiO and other oxide minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Christian; Devidal, Jean-Luc; Casey, William H.

    1996-01-01

    Sets of homologous ligands were used to probe the dissolution of oxide minerals through experiments on bunsenite (NiO). The ligand sets have primary amine, hydroxyl, and carboxyl functional groups and form five-membered, bidentate, ring complexes at the mineral surface. A set of ligands that has only two metal-coordinating functional groups ( ox, en, gly) was compared with a set of larger, but similar, ligands ( nta, tren) that link three sets of functional groups with a tertiary amine. Experiments were also conducted with hydroxyl ligands ( tea), ammonia (NH 3), and ligands containing ring nitrogen ( pic). The dissolution rates of NiO(s) in the presence of these ligands established close consistency between metal detachment from a dissolving surface and the mechanisms of ligand exchange around dissolved Ni(II)-ligand complexes. The solution pH, however, is an important complicating factor. Metals compete with protons for ligand sites and this protonation changes the ligand structure and reactivity. Several types of protonation lead to different species at the mineral surface and this greatly complicates the rate laws for dissolution. The speciation will be particularly complicated for large-molecular-weight ligands with functional groups that protonate over a wide pH range. In terms of a rate law, protonation of ligand functional groups at the surface is distinct from protonation of structural oxygens at the mineral surface. These are different surface complexes (species) for the purpose of the rate law.

  1. Implement the medical group revenue function. Create competitive advantage.

    PubMed

    Colucci, C

    1998-01-01

    This article shows medical groups how they can employ new financial management and information technology techniques to safeguard their revenue and income streams. These managerial techniques stem from the application of the medical group revenue function, which is defined herein. This article also describes how the medical group revenue function can be used to create value by employing a database and a decision support system. Finally, the article describes how the decision support system can be used to create competitive advantage. Through the wise use of internally generated information, medical groups can negotiate better contract terms, improve their operations, cut their costs, embark on capital investment programs and improve market share. As medical groups gain market power by improving in these areas, they will be more attractive to potential strategic allies, payers and investment bankers. PMID:10181647

  2. Fast determination of catecholamines in human plasma using carboxyl-functionalized magnetic-carbon nanotube molecularly imprinted polymer followed by liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian-Bo; Qiu, Hai-Wen; Rui, Qiu-Hong; Liao, Yu-Feng; Chen, Yan-Min; Xu, Jin; Zhan, Ping-Ping; Zhao, Yong-Gang

    2016-01-15

    A novel, simple and sensitive method based on the use of dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction (d-μ-SPE) procedure combined with ultra-fast liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (UFLC-MS/MS) for the determination of catecholamines, i.e., dopamine (DA), norepinephrine(NE) and epinephrine (E), was developed and validated. The novel catecholamines molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) on the surface of carboxyl-functionalized magnetic-carbon nanotube (CF@m-CNTs-MIP) was synthesized and characterized by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The CF@m-CNTs-MIP was used as the d-μ-SPE sorbent to extract catecholamines from human plasma samples. The obtained results demonstrated the higher extraction capacity of CF@m-CNTs-MIP with recoveries between 87.5-110%. The limits of quantification (LOQs) for NE, E and DA were 76ng/L, 18ng/L and 10ng/L, respectively. Validation results on linearity, specificity, accuracy, precision and stability, as well as on application to the analysis of catecholamines in 120 healthy volunteers demonstrated the applicability to clinical studies. PMID:26718182

  3. The Inhibitory Effect of Kakkonto, Japanese Traditional (Kampo) Medicine, on Brain Penetration of Oseltamivir Carboxylate in Mice with Reduced Blood-Brain Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Kousuke; Oshima, Shinji; Fukuda, Nanami; Ochiai, Yumiko; Maruyama, Ayumi; Kanamuro, Aki; Negishi, Akio; Honma, Seiichi; Ohshima, Shigeru; Akimoto, Masayuki; Takenaka, Shingo; Kobayashi, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Oseltamivir phosphate (OP) is used to treat influenza virus infections. However, its use may result in central nervous system (CNS) adverse effects. In Japan, OP is used with Kampo formulations to improve clinical effectiveness. We evaluated the potential for using Kampo formulations to reduce CNS adverse effects by quantifying the CNS distribution of oseltamivir and its active metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate (OC) when administered with maoto and kakkonto. We administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by intraperitoneal injection to C57BL/6 mice to reduce blood-brain barrier function. Saline, maoto, and kakkonto were administered orally at the same time as LPS. OP was orally administered 4 hours after the last LPS injection and the migration of oseltamivir and OC was examined. Additionally, we examined the brain distribution of OC following intravenous administration. Changes in OC concentrations in the brain suggest that, in comparison to LPS-treated control mice, both Kampo formulations increased plasma levels of OC, thereby enhancing its therapeutic effect. Additionally, our findings suggest kakkonto may not only improve the therapeutic effect of oseltamivir but also reduce the risk of CNS-based adverse effects. Considering these findings, it should be noted that administration of kakkonto during periods of inflammation has led to increased OAT3 expression. PMID:25788966

  4. Immunocompatibility properties of lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles with heterogeneous surface functional groups

    PubMed Central

    Salvador-Morales, Carolina; Zhang, Liangfang; Langer, Robert; Farokhzad, Omid C

    2009-01-01

    Here we report the immunological characterization of lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) and propose a method to control the levels of complement activation induced by these NPs. This method consists of the highly specific modification of the NP surface with methoxyl, carboxyl, and amine groups. Hybrid NPs with methoxyl surface groups induced the lowest complement activation, whereas the NPs with amine surface groups induced the highest activation. All possible combinations among carboxyl, amine, and methoxyl groups also activated the complement system to a certain extent. All types of NPs activated the complement system primarily via the alternative pathway rather than the lectin pathway The classical pathway was activated to a very small extent by the NPs with carboxyl and amine surface groups. Human serum and plasma protein binding studies showed that these NPs had different protein binding patterns. Studies of both complement activation and coagulation activation suggested that NPs with methoxyl surface groups might be an ideal candidate for drug delivery applications, since they are not likely to cause any immunological adverse reaction in the human body. PMID:19167749

  5. Identification and Characterization of Carboxyl Esterases of Gill Chamber-Associated Microbiota in the Deep-Sea Shrimp Rimicaris exoculata by Using Functional Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Alcaide, María; Tchigvintsev, Anatoli; Martínez-Martínez, Mónica; Popovic, Ana; Reva, Oleg N.; Lafraya, Álvaro; Bargiela, Rafael; Nechitaylo, Taras Y.; Matesanz, Ruth; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne; Jebbar, Mohamed; Yakimov, Michail M.; Savchenko, Alexei; Golyshina, Olga V.; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    The shrimp Rimicaris exoculata dominates the fauna in deep-sea hydrothermal vent sites along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (depth, 2,320 m). Here, we identified and biochemically characterized three carboxyl esterases from microbial communities inhabiting the R. exoculata gill that were isolated by naive screens of a gill chamber metagenomic library. These proteins exhibit low to moderate identity to known esterase sequences (≤52%) and to each other (11.9 to 63.7%) and appear to have originated from unknown species or from genera of Proteobacteria related to Thiothrix/Leucothrix (MGS-RG1/RG2) and to the Rhodobacteraceae group (MGS-RG3). A library of 131 esters and 31 additional esterase/lipase preparations was used to evaluate the activity profiles of these enzymes. All 3 of these enzymes had greater esterase than lipase activity and exhibited specific activities with ester substrates (≤356 U mg−1) in the range of similar enzymes. MGS-RG3 was inhibited by salts and pressure and had a low optimal temperature (30°C), and its substrate profile clustered within a group of low-activity and substrate-restricted marine enzymes. In contrast, MGS-RG1 and MGS-RG2 were most active at 45 to 50°C and were salt activated and barotolerant. They also exhibited wider substrate profiles that were close to those of highly active promiscuous enzymes from a marine hydrothermal vent (MGS-RG2) and from a cold brackish lake (MGS-RG1). The data presented are discussed in the context of promoting the examination of enzyme activities of taxa found in habitats that have been neglected for enzyme prospecting; the enzymes found in these taxa may reflect distinct habitat-specific adaptations and may constitute new sources of rare reaction specificities. PMID:25595762

  6. Identification and characterization of carboxyl esterases of gill chamber-associated microbiota in the deep-sea shrimp Rimicaris exoculata by using functional metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Alcaide, María; Tchigvintsev, Anatoli; Martínez-Martínez, Mónica; Popovic, Ana; Reva, Oleg N; Lafraya, Álvaro; Bargiela, Rafael; Nechitaylo, Taras Y; Matesanz, Ruth; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne; Jebbar, Mohamed; Yakimov, Michail M; Savchenko, Alexei; Golyshina, Olga V; Yakunin, Alexander F; Golyshin, Peter N; Ferrer, Manuel

    2015-03-01

    The shrimp Rimicaris exoculata dominates the fauna in deep-sea hydrothermal vent sites along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (depth, 2,320 m). Here, we identified and biochemically characterized three carboxyl esterases from microbial communities inhabiting the R. exoculata gill that were isolated by naive screens of a gill chamber metagenomic library. These proteins exhibit low to moderate identity to known esterase sequences (≤52%) and to each other (11.9 to 63.7%) and appear to have originated from unknown species or from genera of Proteobacteria related to Thiothrix/Leucothrix (MGS-RG1/RG2) and to the Rhodobacteraceae group (MGS-RG3). A library of 131 esters and 31 additional esterase/lipase preparations was used to evaluate the activity profiles of these enzymes. All 3 of these enzymes had greater esterase than lipase activity and exhibited specific activities with ester substrates (≤356 U mg(-1)) in the range of similar enzymes. MGS-RG3 was inhibited by salts and pressure and had a low optimal temperature (30°C), and its substrate profile clustered within a group of low-activity and substrate-restricted marine enzymes. In contrast, MGS-RG1 and MGS-RG2 were most active at 45 to 50°C and were salt activated and barotolerant. They also exhibited wider substrate profiles that were close to those of highly active promiscuous enzymes from a marine hydrothermal vent (MGS-RG2) and from a cold brackish lake (MGS-RG1). The data presented are discussed in the context of promoting the examination of enzyme activities of taxa found in habitats that have been neglected for enzyme prospecting; the enzymes found in these taxa may reflect distinct habitat-specific adaptations and may constitute new sources of rare reaction specificities. PMID:25595762

  7. Visible-Light-Induced Direct Photocatalytic Carboxylation of Indoles with CBr4 /MeOH.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing-Qing; Marchini, Marianna; Xiao, Wen-Jing; Ceroni, Paola; Bandini, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Photocatalysis enables the cascade reactions of indoles and CBr4 in MeOH through a C(sp(2) )H functionalization/methanolysis sequence. The title reaction provides an efficient access to indole 2- and 3-carboxylates in a single operation (no preinstallation of protecting as well as directing groups was required) with good yields under mild reaction conditions. PMID:26509744

  8. Intracellular localization of a group II chaperonin indicates a membrane-related function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trent, Jonathan D.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Paavola, Chad D.; McMillan, R. Andrew; Howard, Jeanie; Jahnke, Linda; Lavin, Colleen; Embaye, Tsegereda; Henze, Christopher E.

    2003-01-01

    Chaperonins are protein complexes that are believed to function as part of a protein folding system in the cytoplasm of the cell. We observed, however, that the group II chaperonins known as rosettasomes in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, are not cytoplasmic but membrane associated. This association was observed in cultures grown at 60 degrees C and 76 degrees C or heat-shocked at 85 degrees C by using immunofluorescence microscopy and in thick sections of rapidly frozen cells grown at 76 degrees C by using immunogold electron microscopy. We observed that increased abundance of rosettasomes after heat shock correlated with decreased membrane permeability at lethal temperature (92 degrees C). This change in permeability was not seen in cells heat-shocked in the presence of the amino acid analogue azetidine 2-carboxylic acid, indicating functional protein synthesis influences permeability. Azetidine experiments also indicated that observed heat-induced changes in lipid composition in S. shibatae could not account for changes in membrane permeability. Rosettasomes purified from cultures grown at 60 degrees C and 76 degrees C or heat-shocked at 85 degrees C bind to liposomes made from either the bipolar tetraether lipids of Sulfolobus or a variety of artificial lipid mixtures. The presence of rosettasomes did not significantly change the transition temperature of liposomes, as indicated by differential scanning calorimetry, or the proton permeability of liposomes, as indicated by pyranine fluorescence. We propose that these group II chaperonins function as a structural element in the natural membrane based on their intracellular location, the correlation between their functional abundance and membrane permeability, and their potential distribution on the membrane surface.

  9. Intracellular localization of a group II chaperonin indicates a membrane-related function

    PubMed Central

    Trent, Jonathan D.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Paavola, Chad D.; McMillan, R. Andrew; Howard, Jeanie; Jahnke, Linda; Lavin, Colleen; Embaye, Tsegereda; Henze, Christopher E.

    2003-01-01

    Chaperonins are protein complexes that are believed to function as part of a protein folding system in the cytoplasm of the cell. We observed, however, that the group II chaperonins known as rosettasomes in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, are not cytoplasmic but membrane associated. This association was observed in cultures grown at 60C and 76C or heat-shocked at 85C by using immunofluorescence microscopy and in thick sections of rapidly frozen cells grown at 76C by using immunogold electron microscopy. We observed that increased abundance of rosettasomes after heat shock correlated with decreased membrane permeability at lethal temperature (92C). This change in permeability was not seen in cells heat-shocked in the presence of the amino acid analogue azetidine 2-carboxylic acid, indicating functional protein synthesis influences permeability. Azetidine experiments also indicated that observed heat-induced changes in lipid composition in S. shibatae could not account for changes in membrane permeability. Rosettasomes purified from cultures grown at 60C and 76C or heat-shocked at 85C bind to liposomes made from either the bipolar tetraether lipids of Sulfolobus or a variety of artificial lipid mixtures. The presence of rosettasomes did not significantly change the transition temperature of liposomes, as indicated by differential scanning calorimetry, or the proton permeability of liposomes, as indicated by pyranine fluorescence. We propose that these group II chaperonins function as a structural element in the natural membrane based on their intracellular location, the correlation between their functional abundance and membrane permeability, and their potential distribution on the membrane surface. PMID:14673104

  10. Single or functionalized fullerenes interacting with heme group

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Wallison Chaves; Diniz, Eduardo Moraes

    2014-09-15

    The heme group is responsible for iron transportation through the bloodstream, where iron participates in redox reactions, electron transfer, gases detection etc. The efficiency of such processes can be reduced if the whole heme molecule or even the iron is somehow altered from its original oxidation state, which can be caused by interactions with nanoparticles as fullerenes. To verify how such particles alter the geometry and electronic structure of heme molecule, here we report first principles calculations based on density functional theory of heme group interacting with single C{sub 60} fullerene or with C{sub 60} functionalized with small functional groups (−CH{sub 3}, −COOH, −NH{sub 2}, −OH). The calculations shown that the system heme + nanoparticle has a different spin state in comparison with heme group if the fullerene is functionalized. Also a functional group can provide a stronger binding between nanoparticle and heme molecule or inhibit the chemical bonding in comparison with single fullerene results. In addition heme molecule loses electrons to the nanoparticles and some systems exhibited a geometry distortion in heme group, depending on the binding energy. Furthermore, one find that such nanoparticles induce a formation of spin up states in heme group. Moreover, there exist modifications in density of states near the Fermi energy. Although of such changes in heme electronic structure and geometry, the iron atom remains in the heme group with the same oxidation state, so that processes that involve the iron might not be affected, only those that depend on the whole heme molecule.

  11. Characterization of three new carboxylic ester hydrolases isolated by functional screening of a forest soil metagenomic library.

    PubMed

    Biver, Sophie; Vandenbol, Micheline

    2013-02-01

    Three new lipolytic genes were isolated from a forest soil metagenomic library by functional screening on tributyrin agar plates. The genes SBLip1, SBLip2 and SBLip5.1 respectively encode polypeptides of 445, 346 and 316 amino acids. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that SBLip2 and SBLip5.1 belong to bacterial esterase/lipase family IV, whereas SBLip1 shows similarity to class C β-lactamases and is thus related to esterase family VIII. The corresponding genes were overexpressed and their products purified by affinity chromatography for characterization. Analyses of substrate specificity with different p-nitrophenyl esters showed that all three enzymes have a preference for short-acyl-chain p-nitrophenyl esters, a feature of carboxylesterases as opposed to lipases. The β-lactamase activity of SBLip1, measured with the chromogenic substrate nitrocefin, was very low. The three esterases have the same optimal pH (pH 10) and remain active across a relatively broad pH range, displaying more than 60 % activity between pH 6 and 10. The temperature optima determined were 35 °C for SBLip1, 45 °C for SBLip2 and 50 °C for SBLip5.1. The three esterases displayed different levels of tolerance to salts, solvents and detergents, SBLip2 being overall more tolerant to high concentrations of solvent and SBLip5.1 less affected by detergents. PMID:23160923

  12. Discretization of four types of Weyl group orbit functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrivnák, Jiří

    2013-11-01

    The discrete Fourier calculus of the four families of special functions, called C-, S-, Ss- and Sl -functions, is summarized. Functions from each of the four families of special functions are discretely orthogonal over a certain finite set of points. The generalizations of discrete cosine and sine transforms of one variable — the discrete Ss- and Sl-transforms of the group F4 — are considered in detail required for their exploitation in discrete Fourier spectral methods. The continuous interpolations, induced by the discrete expansions, are presented.

  13. From infinite to two dimensions through the functional renormalization group.

    PubMed

    Taranto, C; Andergassen, S; Bauer, J; Held, K; Katanin, A; Metzner, W; Rohringer, G; Toschi, A

    2014-05-16

    We present a novel scheme for an unbiased, nonperturbative treatment of strongly correlated fermions. The proposed approach combines two of the most successful many-body methods, the dynamical mean field theory and the functional renormalization group. Physically, this allows for a systematic inclusion of nonlocal correlations via the functional renormalization group flow equations, after the local correlations are taken into account nonperturbatively by the dynamical mean field theory. To demonstrate the feasibility of the approach, we present numerical results for the two-dimensional Hubbard model at half filling. PMID:24877952

  14. Boron-containing amino carboxylic acid compounds and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Kabalka, George W.; Srivastava, Rajiv R.

    2000-03-14

    Novel compounds which are useful for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are disclosed. The compounds comprise a stable boron-containing group and an aminocycloalkane carboxylic acid group or a boronated acyclic hydrocarbon-linked amino carboxylic acid. Methods for synthesis of the compounds and for use of the compounds in BNCT are disclosed.

  15. MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATION OF ESTERS OF CHLORINATED CARBOXYLIC ACIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two groups of compounds were selected for microbial transformation studies. In the first group were carboxylic acid esters having a fixed aromatic moiety and an increasing length of the alkyl component. Ethyl esters of chlorine-substituted carboxylic acids were in the second grou...

  16. Galaxy and Group Baryonic Mass Functions for the RESOLVE Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Kathleen D.; Kannappan, Sheila; Moffett, Amanda J.; Baker, Ashley; Stark, David; Berlind, Andreas A.; Storey-Fisher, Kate; Erickcek, Adrienne L.; Norris, Mark A.; Resolve Team

    2015-01-01

    We present a comparison of the galaxy and group baryonic mass functions for a subvolume of the RESOLVE (Resolved Spectroscopy Of a Local VolumE) survey. RESOLVE occupies A and B semester volumes totaling ~52,000 cubic Mpc, complete in baryonic mass to ~10^9.3 Msun and 10^9.0 Msun respectively, with galaxies and groups ranging in halo mass from 10^11-10^14 Msun. The A semester volume is surrounded by the larger ECO catalog, which lacks complete HI data but occupies ~561,000 cubic Mpc. We define the observed baryonic mass of a galaxy or group to be the sum of its stellar and cold atomic hydrogen components, with the latter inferred indirectly for much of ECO. For groups, we infer the total baryonic mass by summing the observed components of each constituent galaxy and add the likely hot halo gas based on prescriptions from observations and semi-analytic models. We perform subhalo/halo abundance matching between observed galaxies/groups and dark matter simulations, and we compare derived halo properties based on matching on luminosity vs. on observed baryonic mass (or on inferred total baryonic mass for groups). We also present a status update on the galaxy and group velocity functions for these surveys, which will allow for more direct comparison with dark matter simulations. This project was supported by NSF funding for the RESOLVE survey (AST-0955368).

  17. Species, functional groups, and thresholds in ecological resilience

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sundstrom, Shana M.; Allen, Craig R.; Barichievy, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The cross-scale resilience model states that ecological resilience is generated in part from the distribution of functions within and across scales in a system. Resilience is a measure of a system's ability to remain organized around a particular set of mutually reinforcing processes and structures, known as a regime. We define scale as the geographic extent over which a process operates and the frequency with which a process occurs. Species can be categorized into functional groups that are a link between ecosystem processes and structures and ecological resilience. We applied the cross-scale resilience model to avian species in a grassland ecosystem. A species’ morphology is shaped in part by its interaction with ecological structure and pattern, so animal body mass reflects the spatial and temporal distribution of resources. We used the log-transformed rank-ordered body masses of breeding birds associated with grasslands to identify aggregations and discontinuities in the distribution of those body masses. We assessed cross-scale resilience on the basis of 3 metrics: overall number of functional groups, number of functional groups within an aggregation, and the redundancy of functional groups across aggregations. We assessed how the loss of threatened species would affect cross-scale resilience by removing threatened species from the data set and recalculating values of the 3 metrics. We also determined whether more function was retained than expected after the loss of threatened species by comparing observed loss with simulated random loss in a Monte Carlo process. The observed distribution of function compared with the random simulated loss of function indicated that more functionality in the observed data set was retained than expected. On the basis of our results, we believe an ecosystem with a full complement of species can sustain considerable species losses without affecting the distribution of functions within and across aggregations, although ecological resilience is reduced. We propose that the mechanisms responsible for shaping discontinuous distributions of body mass and the nonrandom distribution of functions may also shape species losses such that local extinctions will be nonrandom with respect to the retention and distribution of functions and that the distribution of function within and across aggregations will be conserved despite extinctions.

  18. Comparison of solar cell performance of conducting polymer dyes with different functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Dong-Min; Yoon, Sang-Su; Won, Mi-Sook; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2011-10-01

    Conductive polymer precursors, including carboxylic acid, cyano groups, amino groups, 5,2‧:5‧,2″-terthiophene-3‧-carboxylic acid (TTCA), 3‧-cyano-5,2‧:5‧,2″-terthiophene (CTT), and 3‧,4‧-diamino-2,2‧:5‧,2″-terthiophene (DATT) are synthesized. Electrochemically polymerized films of the precursors on a nanocrystalline TiO2 layer are examined as photo sensitizers, and the cell performance is compared. The photovoltaic cells are assembled with a polymer-coated TiO2 layer treated with TiCl4 as an anode and a Pt layer as a cathode in a propionitrile solution containing an iodide ion-based redox electrolyte. The charge-transfer processes of polymer-dyed cells are studied using impedance spectroscopy. The polymer dyes on the TiO2 surfaces are characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS results show that the conducting polymer dye, bearing a carboxylic acid group, is more strongly bound to the TiO2 layer in comparison with other groups. Various experimental parameters affecting the cell efficiency are optimized, including the scan rate, number of potential cycles, and terthiophene monomer concentration. Of these polymers, the best cell efficiency is attained for poly-TTCA containing a carboxylic acid group. The optimized cell with the poly-TTCA dye shows a short-circuit current of 6.78 mA cm-2, an open-circuit voltage of 0.54 V, and a fill factor of 63.6. An energy conversion efficiency of 2.32% is obtained with a cell area of 0.24 cm2 under an air mass 1.5 solar simulated light irradiation of 100 mW cm-2.

  19. A general method for preparing bridged organosilanes with pendant functional groups and functional mesoporous organosilicas.

    PubMed

    Bürglová, Kristýna; Noureddine, Achraf; Hodačová, Jana; Toquer, Guillaume; Cattoën, Xavier; Wong Chi Man, Michel

    2014-08-11

    New organosilica precursors containing two triethoxysilyl groups suitable for the organosilica material formation through the sol-gel process were designed and synthesised. These precursors display alkyne or azide groups for attaching targeted functional groups by copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) and can be used for the preparation of functional organosilicas following two strategies: 1) the functional group is first appended by CuAAC under anhydrous conditions, then the functional material is prepared by the sol-gel process; 2) the precursor is first subjected to the sol-gel process, producing porous, clickable bridged silsesquioxanes or periodic mesoporous organosilicas (PMOs), then the desired functional groups are attached by means of CuAAC. Herein, we show the feasibility of both approaches. A series of bridged bis(triethoxysilane)s with different pending organic moieties was prepared, demonstrating the compatibility of the first approach with many functional groups. In particular, we demonstrate that organic functional molecules bearing only one derivatisation site can be used to produce bridged organosilanes and bridged silsesquioxanes. In the second approach, clickable PMOs and porous bridged silsesquioxanes were prepared from the alkyne- or azide-containing precursors, and thereafter, functionalised with complementary model azide- or alkyne-containing molecules. These results confirmed the potential of this approach as a general methodology for preparing functional organosilicas with high loadings of functional groups. Both approaches give rise to a wide range of new functional organosilica materials. PMID:25044077

  20. Chapter 8. Resident Group Influences on Team Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burford, Gale E.; Fulcher, Leon C.

    2006-01-01

    Research has documented important interplays between the diagnostic characteristics of residents in group care centers and the functioning of staff teams responsible for the delivery of services. Factors that impact on the quality of working life satisfactions and frustrations are variable over time and may originate from within the team, the…

  1. Functional characterization and expression analysis of rice δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase provide new insight into the regulation of proline and arginine catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Bertazzini, Michele; Zarattini, Marco; Funck, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    While intracellular proline accumulation in response to various stress conditions has been investigated in great detail, the biochemistry and physiological relevance of proline degradation in plants is much less understood. Moreover, the second and last step in proline catabolism, the oxidation of δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid (P5C) to glutamate, is shared with arginine catabolism. Little information is available to date concerning the regulatory mechanisms coordinating these two pathways. Expression of the gene coding for P5C dehydrogenase was analyzed in rice by real-time PCR either following the exogenous supply of amino acids of the glutamate family, or under hyperosmotic stress conditions. The rice enzyme was heterologously expressed in E. coli, and the affinity-purified protein was thoroughly characterized with respect to structural and functional properties. A tetrameric oligomerization state was observed in size exclusion chromatography, which suggests a structure of the plant enzyme different from that shown for the bacterial P5C dehydrogenases structurally characterized to date. Kinetic analysis accounted for a preferential use of NAD+ as the electron acceptor. Cations were found to modulate enzyme activity, whereas anion effects were negligible. Several metal ions were inhibitory in the micromolar range. Interestingly, arginine also inhibited the enzyme at higher concentrations, with a mechanism of uncompetitive type with respect to P5C. This implies that millimolar levels of arginine would increase the affinity of P5C dehydrogenase toward its specific substrate. Results are discussed in view of the involvement of the enzyme in either proline or arginine catabolism. PMID:26300893

  2. Understanding biocatalyst inhibition by carboxylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Jarboe, Laura R.; Royce, Liam A.; Liu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are an attractive biorenewable chemical in terms of their flexibility and usage as precursors for a variety of industrial chemicals. It has been demonstrated that such carboxylic acids can be fermentatively produced using engineered microbes, such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, like many other attractive biorenewable fuels and chemicals, carboxylic acids become inhibitory to these microbes at concentrations below the desired yield and titer. In fact, their potency as microbial inhibitors is highlighted by the fact that many of these carboxylic acids are routinely used as food preservatives. This review highlights the current knowledge regarding the impact that saturated, straight-chain carboxylic acids, such as hexanoic, octanoic, decanoic, and lauric acids can have on E. coli and S. cerevisiae, with the goal of identifying metabolic engineering strategies to increase robustness. Key effects of these carboxylic acids include damage to the cell membrane and a decrease of the microbial internal pH. Certain changes in cell membrane properties, such as composition, fluidity, integrity, and hydrophobicity, and intracellular pH are often associated with increased tolerance. The availability of appropriate exporters, such as Pdr12, can also increase tolerance. The effect on metabolic processes, such as maintaining appropriate respiratory function, regulation of Lrp activity and inhibition of production of key metabolites such as methionine, are also considered. Understanding the mechanisms of biocatalyst inhibition by these desirable products can aid in the engineering of robust strains with improved industrial performance. PMID:24027566

  3. Visible Light-Promoted Decarboxylative Di- and Trifluoromethylthiolation of Alkyl Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Candish, Lisa; Pitzer, Lena; Gómez-Suárez, Adrián; Glorius, Frank

    2016-03-24

    Described herein is a new and straightforward decarboxylative di- and trifluoromethylthiolation of alkyl carboxylic acids promoted by visible light. This approach enables the synthesis of biologically relevant alkyl SCF2 H and SCF3 compounds from cheap and abundant carboxylic acids. The method is operationally simple, using irradiation from household light sources, and its mild reaction conditions make it tolerant of a range of functional groups. The strategy employs electrophilic phthalimide-derived di- and trifluoromethylthiolation reagents and exploits the ability of the imidyl radical to carry a radical chain. PMID:26840376

  4. Oxygen functional groups in graphitic carbon nitride for enhanced photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shizhen; Li, Degang; Sun, Hongqi; Ang, Ha Ming; Tadé, Moses O; Wang, Shaobin

    2016-04-15

    Metal-free semiconductors offer a new opportunity for environmental photocatalysis toward a potential breakthrough in high photo efficiency with complete prevention of metal leaching. In this study, graphitic carbon nitride (GCN) modified by oxygen functional groups was synthesized by a hydrothermal treatment of pristine GCN at different temperatures with H2O2. Insights into the emerging characteristics of the modified GCN in photocatalysis were obtained by determining the optical properties, band structure, electrochemical activity and pollutant degradation efficiency. It was found that the introduction of GCN with oxygen functional groups can enhance light absorption and accelerate electron transfer so as to improve the photocatalytic reaction efficiency. The photoinduced reactive radicals and the associated photodegradation were investigated by in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The reactive radicals, O2(-) and OH, were responsible for organic degradation. PMID:26845029

  5. Functional group dependent dissociative electron attachment to simple organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhudesai, Vaibhav S.; Nandi, Dhananjay; Kelkar, Aditya H.; Krishnakumar, E.

    2008-04-01

    Dissociative electron attachment (DEA) cross sections for simple organic molecules, namely, acetic acid, propanoic acid, methanol, ethanol, and n-propyl amine are measured in a crossed beam experiment. We find that the H- ion formation is the dominant channel of DEA for these molecules and takes place at relatively higher energies (>4eV) through the core excited resonances. Comparison of the cross sections of the H- channel from these molecules with those from NH3, H2O, and CH4 shows the presence of functional group dependence in the DEA process. We analyze this new phenomenon in the context of the results reported on other organic molecules. This discovery of functional group dependence has important implications such as control in electron induced chemistry and understanding radiation induced damage in biological systems.

  6. A DFT-based model for calculating solvolytic reactivity. The nucleofugality of aliphatic carboxylates in terms of Nf parameters.

    PubMed

    Denegri, Bernard; Matić, Mirela; Kronja, Olga

    2014-08-14

    The most comprehensive nucleofugality scale, based on the correlation and solvolytic rate constants of benzhydrylium derivatives, has recently been proposed by Mayr and co-workers (Acc. Chem. Res., 2010, 43, 1537-1549). In this work, the possibility of employing quantum chemical calculations in further determination of nucleofugality (Nf) parameters of leaving groups is explored. Whereas the heterolytic transition state of benzhydryl carboxylate cannot be optimized by quantum chemical calculations, the possibility of an alternative model reaction is examined in order to obtain nucleofugality parameters of various aliphatic carboxylates, which can properly be included in the current nucleofugality scale. For that purpose, ground and transition state structures have been optimized for the proposed model reaction, which includes anchimerically assisted heterolytic dissociation of cis-2,3-dihydroxycyclopropyl trans-carboxylates. The validity of the model reaction as well as of applied DFT methods in the presence of the IEFPCM solvation model is verified by correlating calculated free energies of activation of the model reaction with literature experimental data for solvolysis of reference dianisylmethyl carboxylates. For this purpose the ability of several functionals (including popular B3LYP) is examined, among which the M06-2X gives the best results. The very good correlation indicates acceptable accurate relative reactivities of aliphatic carboxylates, and enables the estimation of rate constants for solvolysis of other dianisylmethyl carboxylates in aqueous ethanol mixtures, from which the corresponding Nf parameters are determined using mentioned Mayr's equation. In addition, DFT calculations confirm the previous experimental observation that the abilities of aliphatic carboxylate leaving groups in solution are governed by the inductive effect of substituents attached to the carboxyl group. PMID:24964919

  7. Correlation functions for pairs and groups of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalinkov, M.; Kuneva, I.

    1990-01-01

    There are many studies on the correlation functions of galaxies, of clusters of galaxies, even of superclusters (e.g., Groth and Peebles 1977; Davies and Peebles 1983; Kalinkov and Kuneva 1985, 1986; Bahcall 1988 and references therein) but not so many on pairs and groups of galaxies. Results of the calculations of two-point correlation fuctions for some catalogs of pairs and groups of galaxies are given. It is assumed that the distances to pairs and groups of galaxies are given by their mean redshifts according to R = sigma (sup n, sub i-1) V sub i/nH (sub 0), where n is the number of galaxies in the system and H sub 0 = 100 km s(exp -1) Mpc(exp -1).

  8. Scaling and superscaling solutions from the functional renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellwig, Tobias; Wipf, Andreas; Zanusso, Omar

    2015-10-01

    We study the renormalization group flow of Z2 -invariant supersymmetric and nonsupersymmetric scalar models in the local potential approximation using functional renormalization group methods. We focus our attention on the fixed points of the renormalization group flow of these models, which emerge as scaling solutions. In two dimensions these solutions are interpreted as the minimal (supersymmetric) models of conformal field theory, while in three dimensions they are manifestations of the Wilson-Fisher universality class and its supersymmetric counterpart. We also study the analytically continued flow in fractal dimensions between 2 and 4 and determine the critical dimensions for which irrelevant operators become relevant and change the universality class of the scaling solution. We include novel analytic and numerical investigations of the properties that determine the occurrence of the scaling solutions within the method. For each solution we offer new techniques to compute the spectrum of the deformations and obtain the corresponding critical exponents.

  9. Properties of graphene inks stabilized by different functional groups.

    PubMed

    Wei, Di; Li, Hongwei; Han, Dongxue; Zhang, Qixian; Niu, Li; Yang, Huafeng; Bower, Chris; Andrew, Piers; Ryhänen, Tapani

    2011-06-17

    Different graphene inks have been synthesized by chemical methods. These uniform dispersions were stabilized by various functional groups such as room temperature ionic liquid, polyaniline, polyelectrolyte (poly[2,5-bis(3-sulfonatopropoxy)-1,4-ethynylphenylene-alt-1,4-ethynylphenylene] sodium salt) and poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS). The dispersions can be easily cast into high-quality, free-standing films but with very different physiochemical properties such as surface tension and adhesion. SEM and AFM methods have been applied to have a detailed study of the properties of the inks. It is found that graphenes modified by p-type polyaniline show the highest surface tension. Diverse surface adhesive properties to the substrate are also found with various functional groups. The different viscoelasticities of graphene inks were related to the microscopic structure of their coating layer and subsequently related to the configuration, chemistry and molecular dimensions of the modifying molecules to establish the property-structure relationship. Modifications of graphene inks made from chemical reduction cannot only enable cost-effective processing for printable electronics but also extend the applications into, for example, self-assembly of graphene via bottom-up nano-architecture and surface energy engineering of the graphenes. To fabricate useful devices, understanding the surface properties of graphene inks is very important. It is the first paper of this kind to study the surface tension and adhesion of graphene influenced by different functional groups. PMID:21508455

  10. Water-enhanced solubility of carboxylic acids in organic solvents and its applications to extraction processes

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, J.N.; King, C.J.

    1991-11-01

    The solubilities of carboxylic acids in certain organic solvents increase remarkably with an increasing amount of water in the organic phase. This phenomenon leads to a novel extract regeneration process in which the co-extracted water is selectively removed from an extract, and the carboxylic acid precipitates. This approach is potentially advantageous compared to other regeneration processes because it removes a minor component of the extract in order to achieve a large recovery of acid from the extract. Carboxylic acids of interest include adipic acid, fumaric acid, and succinic acid because of their low to moderate solubilities in organic solvents. Solvents were screened for an increase in acid solubility with increased water concentration in the organic phase. Most Lewis-base solvents were found to exhibit this increased solubility phenomena. Solvents that have a carbonyl functional group showed a very large increase in acid solubility. 71 refs., 52 figs., 38 tabs.

  11. Functional renormalization group approach for tensorial group field theory: a rank-6 model with closure constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Dario; Lahoche, Vincent

    2016-05-01

    We develop the functional renormalization group formalism for a tensorial group field theory with closure constraint, in the case of a just renormalizable model over U{(1)}\\otimes 6, with quartic interactions. The method allows us to obtain a closed but non-autonomous system of differential equations which describe the renormalization group flow of the couplings beyond perturbation theory. The explicit dependence of the beta functions on the running scale is due to the existence of an external scale in the model, the radius of {S}1≃ U(1). We study the occurrence of fixed points and their critical properties in two different approximate regimes, corresponding to the deep UV and deep IR. Besides confirming the asymptotic freedom of the model, we find also a non-trivial fixed point, with one relevant direction. Our results are qualitatively similar to those found previously for a rank-3 model without closure constraint, and it is thus tempting to speculate that the presence of a Wilson-Fisher-like fixed point is a general feature of asymptotically free tensorial group field theories.

  12. Carboxylic acid sorption regeneration process

    DOEpatents

    King, C.J.; Poole, L.J.

    1995-05-02

    Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks into an organic liquid phase or onto a solid adsorbent. The acids are freed from the sorbent phase by treating it with aqueous alkylamine thus forming an alkylammonium carboxylate which is dewatered and decomposed to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine. 10 figs.

  13. Carboxylic acid sorption regeneration process

    DOEpatents

    King, C. Judson; Poole, Loree J.

    1995-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks into an organic liquid phase or onto a solid adsorbent. The acids are freed from the sorbent phase by treating it with aqueous alkylamine thus forming an alkylammonium carboxylate which is dewatered and decomposed to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine.

  14. 14 CFR Section 11 - Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group II and Group III Air Carriers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group II and Group III Air Carriers Section 11 Section 11 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... Functional Classification—Operating Expenses of Group II and Group III Air Carriers 5100Flying Operations....

  15. 14 CFR Section 11 - Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group II and Group III Air Carriers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group II and Group III Air Carriers Section 11 Section 11 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... Functional Classification—Operating Expenses of Group II and Group III Air Carriers 5100Flying Operations....

  16. 14 CFR Section 11 - Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group II and Group III Air Carriers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group II and Group III Air Carriers Section 11 Section 11 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... Functional Classification—Operating Expenses of Group II and Group III Air Carriers 5100Flying Operations....

  17. Characterization of Sea Lettuce Surface Functional Groups by Potentiometric Titrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebling, A. M.; Schijf, J.

    2008-12-01

    In pursuit of our ultimate goal to better understand the prodigious capacity of the marine macroalga Ulva lactuca (sea lettuce) for adsorbing a broad range of dissolved trace metals from seawater, we performed an initial characterization of its surface functional groups. Specifically, the number of distinct functional groups as well as their individual bulk concentrations and acid dissociation constants (pKas) were determined by potentiometric titrations in NaCl solutions of various ionic strengths (I = 0.01-5.0 M), under inert nitrogen atmosphere at 25°C. Depending on the ionic strength, Ulva samples were manually titrated down to pH 2 or 3 with 1 N HCl and then up to pH 10 with 1 N NaOH in steps of 0.1-0.2 units, continuously monitoring pH with a glass combination electrode. Titrations of a dehydrated Ulva standard reference material (BCR-279) were compared with fresh Ulva tissue cultured in our laboratory. A titration in filtered natural seawater was also compared with one in an NaCl solution of equal ionic strength. Equilibrium constants for the ionization of water in NaCl solutions as a function of ionic strength were obtained from the literature. Fits to the titration data ([H]T vs. pH) were performed with the FITEQL4.0 computer code using non-electrostatic 3-, 4-, and 5-site models, either by fixing ionic strength at its experimental value or by allowing it to be extrapolated to zero, while considering all functional group pKas and bulk concentrations as adjustable parameters. Since pKas and bulk concentrations were found to be strongly correlated, the latter were also fixed in some cases to further constrain the pKas. Whereas these calculations are currently ongoing, preliminary results point to three, possibly four, functional groups with pKas of about 4.1, 6.3, and 9.5 at I = 0. Bulk concentrations of the three groups are very similar, about 5-6×10-4 mol/g based on dry weight, which suggests that all are homogeneously distributed over the surface and probably part of a single macromolecular scaffold. Fresh Ulva tissue appears to contain the same three functional groups but at lower concentrations, based on wet weight. The titration in natural seawater was largely dominated by the non-carbonate alkalinity of the solution and could not be robustly modeled. Results of fits with ionic strengths fixed at their experimental values indicate that the pKas of all three groups display prominent Debije-Hückel-type behavior, hence that these acid dissociation reactions involve a different mechanism than metal-proton exchange reactions on mineral surfaces, whose distribution coefficients (i.e., equilibrium constants) generally show a weak ionic strength dependence.

  18. Pelagic functional group modeling: Progress, challenges and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, Raleigh R.; Laws, Edward A.; Armstrong, Robert A.; Bates, Nicholas R.; Brown, Christopher W.; Carlson, Craig A.; Chai, Fei; Doney, Scott C.; Falkowski, Paul G.; Feely, Richard A.; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Landry, Michael R.; Keith Moore, J.; Nelson, David M.; Richardson, Tammi L.; Salihoglu, Baris; Schartau, Markus; Toole, Dierdre A.; Wiggert, Jerry D.

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, we review the state of the art and major challenges in current efforts to incorporate biogeochemical functional groups into models that can be applied on basin-wide and global scales, with an emphasis on models that might ultimately be used to predict how biogeochemical cycles in the ocean will respond to global warming. We define the term "biogeochemical functional group" to refer to groups of organisms that mediate specific chemical reactions in the ocean. Thus, according to this definition, "functional groups" have no phylogenetic meaning—these are composed of many different species with common biogeochemical functions. Substantial progress has been made in the last decade toward quantifying the rates of these various functions and understanding the factors that control them. For some of these groups, we have developed fairly sophisticated models that incorporate this understanding, e.g. for diazotrophs (e.g. Trichodesmium), silica producers (diatoms) and calcifiers (e.g. coccolithophorids and specifically Emiliania huxleyi). However, current representations of nitrogen fixation and calcification are incomplete, i.e., based primarily upon models of Trichodesmium and E. huxleyi, respectively, and many important functional groups have not yet been considered in open-ocean biogeochemical models. Progress has been made over the last decade in efforts to simulate dimethylsulfide (DMS) production and cycling (i.e., by dinoflagellates and prymnesiophytes) and denitrification, but these efforts are still in their infancy, and many significant problems remain. One obvious gap is that virtually all functional group modeling efforts have focused on autotrophic microbes, while higher trophic levels have been completely ignored. It appears that in some cases (e.g., calcification), incorporating higher trophic levels may be essential not only for representing a particular biogeochemical reaction, but also for modeling export. Another serious problem is our tendency to model the organisms for which we have the most validation data (e.g., E. huxleyi and Trichodesmium) even when they may represent only a fraction of the biogeochemical functional group we are trying to represent. When we step back and look at the paleo-oceanographic record, it suggests that oxygen concentrations have played a central role in the evolution and emergence of many of the key functional groups that influence biogeochemical cycles in the present-day ocean. However, more subtle effects are likely to be important over the next century like changes in silicate supply or turbulence that can influence the relative success of diatoms versus dinoflagellates, coccolithophorids and diazotrophs. In general, inferences drawn from the paleo-oceanographic record and theoretical work suggest that global warming will tend to favor the latter because it will give rise to increased stratification. However, decreases in pH and Fe supply could adversely impact coccolithophorids and diazotrophs in the future. It may be necessary to include explicit dynamic representations of nitrogen fixation, denitrification, silicification and calcification in our models if our goal is predicting the oceanic carbon cycle in the future, because these processes appear to play a very significant role in the carbon cycle of the present-day ocean and they are sensitive to climate change. Observations and models suggest that it may also be necessary to include the DMS cycle to predict future climate, though the effects are still highly uncertain. We have learned a tremendous amount about the distributions and biogeochemical impact of bacteria in the ocean in recent years, yet this improved understanding has not yet been incorporated into many of our models. All of these considerations lead us toward the development of increasingly complex models. However, recent quantitative model intercomparison studies suggest that continuing to add complexity and more functional groups to our ecosystem models may lead to decreases in predictive ability if the models are not properly constrained with available data. We also caution that capturing the present-day variability tells us little about how well a particular model can predict the future. If our goal is to develop models that can be used to predict how the oceans will respond to global warming, then we need to make more rigorous assessments of predictive skill using the available data.

  19. Functional group diversity of bee pollinators increases crop yield.

    PubMed

    Hoehn, Patrick; Tscharntke, Teja; Tylianakis, Jason M; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf

    2008-10-01

    Niche complementarity is a commonly invoked mechanism underlying the positive relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, but little empirical evidence exists for complementarity among pollinator species. This study related differences in three functional traits of pollinating bees (flower height preference, daily time of flower visitation and within-flower behaviour) to the seed set of the obligate cross-pollinated pumpkin Cucurbita moschata Duch. ex Poir. across a land-use intensity gradient from tropical rainforest and agroforests to grassland in Indonesia. Bee richness and abundance changed with habitat variables and we used this natural variation to test whether complementary resource use by the diverse pollinator community enhanced final yield. We found that pollinator diversity, but not abundance, was positively related to seed set of pumpkins. Bees showed species-specific spatial and temporal variation in flower visitation traits and within-flower behaviour, allowing for classification into functional guilds. Diversity of functional groups explained even more of the variance in seed set (r2=45%) than did species richness (r2=32%) highlighting the role of functional complementarity. Even though we do not provide experimental, but rather correlative evidence, we can link spatial and temporal complementarity in highly diverse pollinator communities to pollination success in the field, leading to enhanced crop yield without any managed honeybees. PMID:18595841

  20. Functional group diversity of bee pollinators increases crop yield

    PubMed Central

    Hoehn, Patrick; Tscharntke, Teja; Tylianakis, Jason M; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf

    2008-01-01

    Niche complementarity is a commonly invoked mechanism underlying the positive relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, but little empirical evidence exists for complementarity among pollinator species. This study related differences in three functional traits of pollinating bees (flower height preference, daily time of flower visitation and within-flower behaviour) to the seed set of the obligate cross-pollinated pumpkin Cucurbita moschata Duch. ex Poir. across a land-use intensity gradient from tropical rainforest and agroforests to grassland in Indonesia. Bee richness and abundance changed with habitat variables and we used this natural variation to test whether complementary resource use by the diverse pollinator community enhanced final yield. We found that pollinator diversity, but not abundance, was positively related to seed set of pumpkins. Bees showed species-specific spatial and temporal variation in flower visitation traits and within-flower behaviour, allowing for classification into functional guilds. Diversity of functional groups explained even more of the variance in seed set (r2=45%) than did species richness (r2=32%) highlighting the role of functional complementarity. Even though we do not provide experimental, but rather correlative evidence, we can link spatial and temporal complementarity in highly diverse pollinator communities to pollination success in the field, leading to enhanced crop yield without any managed honeybees. PMID:18595841

  1. Involvement of nitrogen functional groups in high-affinity copper binding in tomato and wheat root apoplasts: spectroscopic and thermodynamic evidence.

    PubMed

    Guigues, Stéphanie; Bravin, Matthieu N; Garnier, Cédric; Masion, Armand; Chevassus-Rosset, Claire; Cazevieille, Patrick; Doelsch, Emmanuel

    2016-03-16

    Carboxylic groups located in plant cell walls (CW) are generally considered to be the main copper binding sites in plant roots, despite the presence of other functional groups. The aim of this study was to investigate sites responsible for copper binding in root apoplasts, i.e. CW and outer surface of the plasma membrane (PM) continuum. Binding sites in root apoplasts were investigated by comparing isolated CW of a monocotyledon (Triticum aestivum L.) and dicotyledon (Solanum lycopersicum L.) crop with their respective whole roots. Copper speciation was examined by X-ray absorption (XAS) and (13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies while the affinity of ligands involved in copper binding was investigated by modeling copper sorption isotherms. Homogeneous speciation and binding of copper was found in wheat and tomato root apoplasts. Only Cu-N and Cu-O bonds were detected in wheat and tomato root apoplasts. Nitrogen/oxygen ligands were identified in slightly higher proportions (40-70%) than single oxygen ligands. Furthermore, low- and high-affinity binding sites contributed in an almost equivalent proportion to copper binding in root apoplasts. The high-affinity N functional groups embedded in root apoplasts participated in copper binding in the same magnitude than the low-affinity carboxylic groups. PMID:26824877

  2. Organized thiol functional groups in mesoporous core shell colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Marchena, Martin H.; Granada, Mara; Bordoni, Andrea V.; Joselevich, Maria; Troiani, Horacio; Williams, Federico J.; Wolosiuk, Alejandro

    2012-03-15

    The co-condensation in situ of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as a template results in the synthesis of multilayered mesoporous structured SiO{sub 2} colloids with 'onion-like' chemical environments. Thiol groups were anchored to an inner selected SiO{sub 2} porous layer in a bilayered core shell particle producing different chemical regions inside the colloidal layered structure. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) shows a preferential anchoring of the -SH groups in the double layer shell system, while porosimetry and simple chemical modifications confirm that pores are accessible. We can envision the synthesis of interesting colloidal objects with defined chemical environments with highly controlled properties. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous core shell SiO{sub 2} colloids with organized thiol groups. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Double shell mesoporous silica colloids templated with CTAB. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sequential deposition of mesoporous SiO{sub 2} layers with different chemistries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XPS shows the selective functionalization of mesoporous layers with thiol groups.

  3. Characterization of acid functional groups of carbon dots by nonlinear regression data fitting of potentiometric titration curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Larissa A.; de Castro, Arthur H.; de Mendonça, Fernanda G.; de Mesquita, João P.

    2016-05-01

    The oxygenated functional groups present on the surface of carbon dots with an average size of 2.7 ± 0.5 nm were characterized by a variety of techniques. In particular, we discussed the fit data of potentiometric titration curves using a nonlinear regression method based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The results obtained by statistical treatment of the titration curve data showed that the best fit was obtained considering the presence of five Brønsted-Lowry acids on the surface of the carbon dots with constant ionization characteristics of carboxylic acids, cyclic ester, phenolic and pyrone-like groups. The total number of oxygenated acid groups obtained was 5 mmol g-1, with approximately 65% (∼2.9 mmol g-1) originating from groups with pKa < 6. The methodology showed good reproducibility and stability with standard deviations below 5%. The nature of the groups was independent of small variations in experimental conditions, i.e. the mass of carbon dots titrated and initial concentration of HCl solution. Finally, we believe that the methodology used here, together with other characterization techniques, is a simple, fast and powerful tool to characterize the complex acid-base properties of these so interesting and intriguing nanoparticles.

  4. Characterization of functional groups of airborne particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baitimirova, M.; Katkevics, J.; Baumane, L.; Bakis, E.; Viksna, A.

    2013-12-01

    Particulate matter of organic combustibles burning consists of various hydrocarbons and radicals, which may cause harmful impact to human health. In this study solid particulate matter were collected on the filters from burning of various combustibles in a burning chamber and from atmosphere of city of Riga by dichotomous impactor. FTIR spectra were obtained before and after samples' treatment. Absorptions associated with aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons and alcohol functional groups were observed in the FTIR spectra. Free radicals of particulate matter were detected by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  5. Cockayne Syndrome Group B Cellular and Biochemical Functions

    PubMed Central

    Licht, Cecilie Löe; Stevnsner, Tinna; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2003-01-01

    The devastating genetic disorder Cockayne syndrome (CS) arises from mutations in the CSA and CSB genes. CS is characterized by progressive multisystem degeneration and is classified as a segmental premature-aging syndrome. The CS complementation group B (CSB) protein is at the interface of transcription and DNA repair and is involved in transcription-coupled and global genome–DNA repair, as well as in general transcription. Recent structure-function studies indicate a process-dependent variation in the molecular mechanism employed by CSB and provide a starting ground for a description of the mechanisms and their interplay. PMID:14639525

  6. Functional renormalization group study of nuclear and neutron matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drews, Matthias; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    A chiral model based on nucleons interacting via boson exchange is investigated. Fluctuation effects are included consistently beyond the mean-field approximation in the framework of the functional renormalization group. The liquid-gas phase transition of symmetric nuclear matter is studied in detail. No sign of a chiral restoration transition is found up to temperatures of about 100 MeV and densities of at least three times the density of normal nuclear matter. Moreover, the model is extended to asymmetric nuclear matter and the constraints from neutron star observations are discussed.

  7. ESG: extended similarity group method for automated protein function prediction

    PubMed Central

    Chitale, Meghana; Hawkins, Troy; Park, Changsoon; Kihara, Daisuke

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Importance of accurate automatic protein function prediction is ever increasing in the face of a large number of newly sequenced genomes and proteomics data that are awaiting biological interpretation. Conventional methods have focused on high sequence similarity-based annotation transfer which relies on the concept of homology. However, many cases have been reported that simple transfer of function from top hits of a homology search causes erroneous annotation. New methods are required to handle the sequence similarity in a more robust way to combine together signals from strongly and weakly similar proteins for effectively predicting function for unknown proteins with high reliability. Results: We present the extended similarity group (ESG) method, which performs iterative sequence database searches and annotates a query sequence with Gene Ontology terms. Each annotation is assigned with probability based on its relative similarity score with the multiple-level neighbors in the protein similarity graph. We will depict how the statistical framework of ESG improves the prediction accuracy by iteratively taking into account the neighborhood of query protein in the sequence similarity space. ESG outperforms conventional PSI-BLAST and the protein function prediction (PFP) algorithm. It is found that the iterative search is effective in capturing multiple-domains in a query protein, enabling accurately predicting several functions which originate from different domains. Availability: ESG web server is available for automated protein function prediction at http://dragon.bio.purdue.edu/ESG/ Contact: cspark@cau.ac.kr; dkihara@purdue.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19435743

  8. Nitric Acid Dehydration Using Perfluoro Carboxylate and Mixed Sulfonate/Carboxylate Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    R.L. Ames

    2004-09-01

    Perfluoro ionomer membranes are tetrafluoro ethylene-based materials with microheterogeneous structures consisting of a hydrophobic polymer backbone and a hydrophilic side-chain cluster region. Due to the ionomer cluster morphology, these films exhibit unique transport properties. Recent investigations with perfluoro sulfonate and perfluoro sulfonate/carboxylate composite polymers have demonstrated their value in the dehydration of nitric acid and they show potential as an alternative to conventional, energy intensive unit operations in the concentration of acid feeds. As a result, investigations were conducted to determine the feasibility of using pure perfluoro carboxylate and mixed perfluoro sulfonate/carboxylate films for the dehydration of nitric acid because of the speculation of improved water selectivity of the carboxylate pendant chain. During the first phase of these investigations the effort was focused on generating a thin, solution cast perfluoro carboxylate ionomer film, to evaluate the general, chemical and physical characteristics of the polymer, and to assess the material's aqueous transport performance (flux and nitrate separation efficiencies) in pervaporation and high-pressure environments. Results demonstrated that generating robust solution-cast films was difficult yet a number of membranes survived high trans-membrane pressures up to 700 psig. General characterization of the solution cast product showed reduced ion exchange capacities when compared with thicker, ''as received'' perfluoro carboxylate and similar sulfonate films. Small angle x-ray scattering analysis results suggested that the solution cast carboxylate films contained a small fraction of sulfonate terminated side-chains. Aqueous transport experimentation showed that permeate fluxes for both pure water and nitric acid were approximately two orders of magnitude smaller for the carboxylate solution cast membranes when compared to their sulfonate counterparts of similar thickness (Nafion{trademark} 111). Additionally, nitric acid separation efficiencies ({alpha}) were approximately one order of magnitude higher for the carboxylate solution cast films when compared to Nafion{trademark} 111. The second phase of our work included the generation of thin carboxylate films made by the chemical synthesis perfluoro sulfonate and mixed sulfonate/carboxylate polymers from a perfluoro sulfonyl fluoride precursor, the characterization of the newly generated material, and a study of the transport characteristics of these membranes. Transport studies consisted of the dehydration of nitric acid feeds by pervaporation. In addition, the initial hypothesis was expanded to include demonstration that transmembrane flux and separation efficiencies are a function of the ratio between sulfonate and carboxylate terminated side chains of the perfluoro ionomer. Investigations demonstrated the ability to generate in- house films with varying sulfonate/carboxylate concentrations from commercially available perfluoro sulfonyl fluoride material, and showed that the converted films could be characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. Finally, the mixed films where subjected to nitric acid dehydration transport tests and a relationship was found to exist between sulfonate/carboxylate pendant chain ratio and both flux and water separation capability. In summary, experimental results confirmed that, when compared to Nafion 111{trademark}, the mixed film's bulk fluxes decrease by approximately three orders of magnitude and the water separation factor increases by as much as two orders of magnitude as the carboxylate side-chain content was increased from 0 (pure sulfonate film) to 53 mole%, supporting the hypothesis given for this effort. It was observed that the water selectivity improved for both the solution cast perfluoro carboxylate and mixed perfluoro sulfonate/carboxylate films when judged against similar perfluoro sulfonate materials. Of great benefit was that during the investigation a number of research tools were utilized including, but in no way limited to, basic chemical operations, procedure development and refinement, the use of a number of analytical systems (FTIR, XRF, thermal gravimetric analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance, etc.), data interpretation and analysis, and presentation and debate (defense) of results.

  9. Characterization of Oxygen Containing Functional Groups on Carbon Materials with Oxygen K-edge X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    K Kim; P Zhu; L Na; X Ma; Y Chen

    2011-12-31

    Surface functional groups on carbon materials are critical to their surface properties and related applications. Many characterization techniques have been used to identify and quantify the surface functional groups, but none is completely satisfactory especially for quantification. In this work, we used oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy to identify and quantify the oxygen containing surface functional groups on carbon materials. XANES spectra were collected in fluorescence yield mode to minimize charging effect due to poor sample conductivity which can potentially distort XANES spectra. The surface functional groups are grouped into three types, namely carboxyl-type, carbonyl-type, and hydroxyl-type. XANES spectra of the same type are very similar while spectra of different types are significantly different. Two activated carbon samples were analyzed by XANES. The total oxygen contents of the samples were estimated from the edge step of their XANES spectra, and the identity and abundance of different functional groups were determined by fitting of the sample XANES spectrum to a linear combination of spectra of the reference compounds. It is concluded that oxygen K-edge XANES spectroscopy is a reliable characterization technique for the identification and quantification of surface functional groups on carbon materials.

  10. NMR contour maps as a new parameter of carboxyl's OH groups in amino acids recognition: A reason of tRNA-amino acid conjugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monajjemi, Majid; Wayne, Robert; Boggs, James E.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we have applied a statistical method by computing statistical nucleus-independent chemical shifts (SNICS) in point of probes motions within a spatial shielding and de-shielding spaces around the OH groups of some amino acids. NMR contour maps as a new parameter have been created for amino-acyl-tRNA conjugation, by using a computational method to identify this model theoretically, it is critical to understand the reasons for tRNA-amino acid conjugation. DFT, NMR, 3D Gaussian distribution and Monte Carlo methods have been applied for Methionine, Serine, Histidine, Glycine and Glutamine to investigate the structural stability in the active parts of the amino acid-tRNA linkage by chemical shielding effects.

  11. Heterogeneous Catalyst Design by Multiple Functional Group Positioning in Organic-Inorganic Materials: On the Route to Analogs of Multifunctional Enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margelefsky, Eric L.; Zeidan, Ryan K.; Davis, Mark E.

    Enzymes catalyze reactions with high rates and selectivities through the sophisticated use of cooperative interactions between neighboring functional groups within an active site. For example, the “catalytic triad” in proteases is capable of accelerating the cleavage of amides by 1011 through neighboring interactions between carboxylic acid, imidazole, and alcohol sites. Guided by these principles, heterogeneous catalysts having two different types of functional groups have been prepared, and the cooperative behavior have been demonstrated with catalytic reactions in the liquid phase. Cooperative interactions between thiols and sulfonic acids and between incompatible acid and base groups are achievable with rates and selectivities that are superior to homogeneous systems, especially for the latter case wherein there is no reactivity.

  12. Photo-induced coupling reactions of tetrazoles with carboxylic acids in aqueous solution: application in protein labelling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shan; Dai, Jianye; Hu, Mo; Liu, Chang; Meng, Rong; Liu, Xiaoyun; Wang, Chu; Luo, Tuoping

    2016-03-17

    The photo-induced reactions of diaryltetrazoles with carboxylic acids in aqueous solution were investigated. Besides measuring the apparent second-order rate constant and evaluating the functional group compatibility of these reactions, we further incorporated the tetrazoles into SAHA, leading to a new active-site-directed probe for labelling HDACs in both cell lysates and living cells. PMID:26953773

  13. Synthesis and Structure of a New Copper(II) Coordination Polymer Alternately Bridged by Oxamido and Carboxylate Groups: Evaluation of DNA/BSA Binding and Cytotoxic Activities.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiao-Ting; Zheng, Kang; Li, Yan-Tuan; Wu, Zhi-Yong; Yan, Cui-Wei

    2015-08-01

    A new one-dimensional (1D) copper(II) coordination polymer {[Cu2 (dmaepox)(dabt)](NO3) · 0.5 H2 O}n , where H3 dmaepox and dabt denote N-benzoato-N'-(3-methylaminopropyl)oxamide and 2,2'-diamino-4,4'-bithiazole, respectively, was synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and other methods. The crystal structure analysis revealed that the two copper(II) ions are bridged alternately by cis-oxamido and carboxylato groups to form a 1-D coordination polymer with the corresponding Cu · · · Cu separations of 5.1946(19) and 5.038(2) Å. There is a three-dimensional supramolecular structure constructed by hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking interactions in the crystal. The reactivity towards herring sperm DNA (HS-DNA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) indicated that the copper(II) polymer can interact with the DNA in the mode of intercalation, and bind to BSA responsible for quenching of tryptophan fluorescence by the static quenching mechanism. The in vitro cytotoxicity suggested that the copper(II) polymer exhibits cytotoxic effects against the selected tumor cell lines. PMID:25940657

  14. Water Mediated Ligand Functional Group Cooperativity: The Contribution of a Methyl Group to Binding Affinity is Enhanced by a COO− Group Through Changes in the Structure and Thermo dynamics of the Hydration Waters of Ligand-Thermolysin Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Nasief, Nader N; Tan, Hongwei; Kong, Jing; Hangauer, David

    2012-01-01

    Ligand functional groups can modulate the contributions of one another to the ligand-protein binding thermodynamics, producing either positive or negative cooperativity. Data presented for four thermolysin phosphonamidate inhibitors demonstrate that the differential binding free energy and enthalpy caused by replacement of a H with a Me group, which binds in the well-hydrated S2′ pocket, are more favorable in presence of a ligand carboxylate. The differential entropy is however less favorable. Dissection of these differential thermodynamic parameters, X-ray crystallography, and density-functional theory calculations suggest that these cooperativities are caused by variations in the thermodynamics of the complex hydration shell changes accompanying the H→Me replacement. Specifically, the COO− reduces both the enthalpic penalty and the entropic advantage of displacing water molecules from the S2′ pocket, and causes a subsequent acquisition of a more enthalpically, less entropically, favorable water network. This study contributes to understanding the important role water plays in ligand-protein binding. PMID:22894131

  15. Guest-Host Chemistry with Dendrimers—Binding of Carboxylates in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Ficker, Mario; Petersen, Johannes F.; Hansen, Jon S.; Christensen, Jørn B.

    2015-01-01

    Recognition and binding of anions in water is difficult due to the ability of water molecules to form strong hydrogen bonds and to solvate the anions. The complexation of two different carboxylates with 1-(4-carbomethoxypyrrolidone)-terminated PAMAM dendrimers was studied in aqueous solution using NMR and ITC binding models. Sodium 2-naphthoate and sodium 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoate were chosen as carboxylate model compounds, since they carry structural similarities to many non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and they possess only a limited number of functional groups, making them ideal to study the carboxylate-dendrimer interaction selectively. The binding stoichiometry for 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoate was found to be two strongly bound guest molecules per dendrimer and an additional 40 molecules with weak binding affinity. The NOESY NMR showed a clear binding correlation of sodium 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoate with the lyophilic dendrimer core, possibly with the two high affinity guest molecules. In comparison, sodium 2-naphthoate showed a weaker binding strength and had a stoichiometry of two guests per dendrimer with no additional weakly bound guests. This stronger dendrimer interaction with sodium 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoate is possibly a result of the additional interactions of the dendrimer with the extra hydroxyl group and an internal stabilization of the negative charge due to the hydroxyl group. These findings illustrate the potential of the G4 1-(4-carbomethoxy) pyrrolidone dendrimer to complex carboxylate guests in water and act as a possible carrier of such molecules. PMID:26448138

  16. Plant functional group composition modifies the effects of precipitation change on grassland ecosystem function.

    PubMed

    Fry, Ellen L; Manning, Pete; Allen, David G P; Hurst, Alex; Everwand, Georg; Rimmler, Martin; Power, Sally A

    2013-01-01

    Temperate grassland ecosystems face a future of precipitation change, which can alter community composition and ecosystem functions through reduced soil moisture and waterlogging. There is evidence that functionally diverse plant communities contain a wider range of water use and resource capture strategies, resulting in greater resistance of ecosystem function to precipitation change. To investigate this interaction between composition and precipitation change we performed a field experiment for three years in successional grassland in southern England. This consisted of two treatments. The first, precipitation change, simulated end of century predictions, and consisted of a summer drought phase alongside winter rainfall addition. The second, functional group identity, divided the plant community into three groups based on their functional traits- broadly described as perennials, caespitose grasses and annuals- and removed these groups in a factorial design. Ecosystem functions related to C, N and water cycling were measured regularly. Effects of functional groupidentity were apparent, with the dominant trend being that process rates were higher under control conditions where a range of perennial species were present. E.g. litter decomposition rates were significantly higher in plots containing several perennial species, the group with the highest average leaf N content. Process rates were also very strongly affected by the precipitation change treatmentwhen perennial plant species were dominant, but not where the community contained a high abundance of annual species and caespitose grasses. This contrasting response could be attributable to differing rooting patterns (shallower structures under annual plants, and deeper roots under perennials) and faster nutrient uptake in annuals compared to perennials. Our results indicate that precipitation change will have a smaller effect on key process rates in grasslandscontaining a range of perennial and annual species, and that maintaining the presence of key functional groups should be a crucial consideration in future grassland management. PMID:23437300

  17. Difference in nutritional risk between mild cognitive impairment group and normal cognitive function elderly group.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Soo; Hong, Chang Hyung; Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Oh, Byoung Hoon

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to delineate the difference in nutritional risk between mild cognitive impairment (MCI) groups and normal cognitive function (NCF) elderly groups in the community. Data obtained from 490 subjects (237 NCF elderly and 253 MCI subjects) between 60 and 90 years of age were analyzed. The study protocol comprised demographic characteristics, history of current and past illnesses, drug history, Korean version of short-form Geriatric Depression Scale (K-SGDS), and nutritional screening initiative (NSI) checklist. Cognitive function was assessed by digit span, Korean short version of Boston naming test (K-BNT), simple Rey figure test, auditory verbal learning test (AVLT), controlled oral word association test (COWAT), stroop, go-no go, and contrasting program. Also, we examined the blood pressure, fasting serum glucose level, lipid profile, body mass index (BMI), and ApoE genotype. Multiple logistic regression analysis found that MCI was associated with moderate or high nutritional risk after adjustment for age, sex, educational level, and K-SGDS score (odds ratio (OR)=1.13, 95%; confidence interval (CI)=1.01-1.26). These results suggest that MCI may be associated with nutritional risk. Screening for nutritional risk should be included in multidimensional geriatric evaluation. PMID:18524396

  18. Separation of aromatic carboxylic acids using quaternary ammonium salts on reversed-phase HPLC. 1. Separation behavior of aromatic carboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, K.; Okuwaki, A.; Verheyen, T.; Perry, G.J.

    2006-02-15

    In order to develop separation processes and analytical methods for aromatic carboxylic acids for the coal oxidation products, the separation behavior of aromatic carboxylic acids on a reversed-phase HPLC using eluent containing quaternary ammonium salt has been investigated. The retention mechanism of aromatic carboxylic acids was discussed on the basis of both ion-pair partition model and ion-exchange model. The retention behavior of aromatic carboxylic acids possessing one (or two) carboxylic acid group(s) followed the ion-pair partition model, where linear free energy relationship was observed between the capacity factor and the extraction equilibrium constants of benzoic acid and naphthalene carboxylic acid. Besides, the retention behavior followed ion-exchange model with increasing the number of carboxylic acids, where the capacity factor of benzene polycarboxylic acids is proportional to the association constants between aromatic acids and quaternary ammonium ions calculated on the basis of an electrostatic interaction model.

  19. Correlation functions from a unified variational principle: Trial Lie groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balian, R.; Vénéroni, M.

    2015-11-01

    Time-dependent expectation values and correlation functions for many-body quantum systems are evaluated by means of a unified variational principle. It optimizes a generating functional depending on sources associated with the observables of interest. It is built by imposing through Lagrange multipliers constraints that account for the initial state (at equilibrium or off equilibrium) and for the backward Heisenberg evolution of the observables. The trial objects are respectively akin to a density operator and to an operator involving the observables of interest and the sources. We work out here the case where trial spaces constitute Lie groups. This choice reduces the original degrees of freedom to those of the underlying Lie algebra, consisting of simple observables; the resulting objects are labeled by the indices of a basis of this algebra. Explicit results are obtained by expanding in powers of the sources. Zeroth and first orders provide thermodynamic quantities and expectation values in the form of mean-field approximations, with dynamical equations having a classical Lie-Poisson structure. At second order, the variational expression for two-time correlation functions separates-as does its exact counterpart-the approximate dynamics of the observables from the approximate correlations in the initial state. Two building blocks are involved: (i) a commutation matrix which stems from the structure constants of the Lie algebra; and (ii) the second-derivative matrix of a free-energy function. The diagonalization of both matrices, required for practical calculations, is worked out, in a way analogous to the standard RPA. The ensuing structure of the variational formulae is the same as for a system of non-interacting bosons (or of harmonic oscillators) plus, at non-zero temperature, classical Gaussian variables. This property is explained by mapping the original Lie algebra onto a simpler Lie algebra. The results, valid for any trial Lie group, fulfill consistency properties and encompass several special cases: linear responses, static and time-dependent fluctuations, zero- and high-temperature limits, static and dynamic stability of small deviations.

  20. Functional Group Analysis of Biomass Burning Particles Using Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horrell, K.; Lau, A.; Bond, T.; Iraci, L. T.

    2008-12-01

    Biomass burning is a significant source of particulate organic carbon in the atmosphere. These particles affect the energy balance of the atmosphere directly by absorbing and scattering solar radiation, and indirectly through their ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The chemical composition of biomass burning particles influences their ability to act as CCN, thus understanding the chemistry of these particles is required for understanding their effects on climate and air quality. As climate change influences the frequency and severity of boreal forest fires, the influence of biomass burning aerosols on the atmosphere may become significantly greater. Only a small portion of the organic carbon (OC) fraction of these particles has been identified at the molecular level, although several studies have explored the general chemical classes found in biomass burning smoke. To complement those studies and provide additional information about the reactive functional groups present, we are developing a method for polarity-based separation of compound classes found in the OC fraction, followed by infrared (IR) spectroscopic analysis of each polarity fraction. It is our goal to find a simple, relatively low-tech method which will provide a moderate chemical understanding of the entire suite of compounds present in the OC fraction of biomass burning particles. Here we present preliminary results from pine and oak samples representative of Midwestern United States forests burned at several different temperatures. Wood type and combustion temperature are both seen to affect the composition of the particles. The latter seems to affect relative contributions of certain functional groups, while oak demonstrates at least one additional chemical class of compounds, particularly at lower burning temperatures, where gradual solid-gas phase reactions can produce relatively large amounts of incompletely oxidized products.

  1. Observations of Adolescent Peer Group Interactions as a Function of Within- and Between-Group Centrality Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Wendy E.; Dumas, Tara M.; Mahdy, Jasmine C.; Wolfe, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Observations of adolescent (n = 258; M age = 15.45) peer group triads (n = 86) were analyzed to identify conversation and interaction styles as a function of within-group and between-group centrality status. Group members' discussions about hypothetical dilemmas were coded for agreements, disagreements, commands, and opinions. Interactions during…

  2. γ-Fe2O3 magnetic nanoparticle functionalized with carboxylated multi walled carbon nanotube: Synthesis, characterization, analytical and biomedical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kılınç, Ersin

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, magnetic nanoparticles attained special interest in nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine due to their uniqe properties and biocompatibilities. From this perspective, hybride nanostructure composed from γ-Fe2O3 magnetic nanoparticle and carboxylated multi walled carbon nanotube was synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, VSM, SEM, HR-TEM and ICP-OES. Microscopy images showed that magnetic nanoparticles were nearly spherical structure that arranged on the axis of carboxylated MWCNT. Particle size was found lower than 10 nm. VSM results showed that the obtained magnetic nanoparticles presented superparamagnetic properties at room temperature. The magnetic saturation value was determined as 35.2 emu/g. It was used for the adsorption and controlled release of harmane, a potent tremor-producing neurotoxin. Maximum adsorption capacity was calculated as 151.5 mg/g from Langmuir isotherm. Concentration of harmane was determined by HPLC with fluorescence detection. The antimicrobial activity of synthesized magnetic nanoparticle was investigated against gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. However, no activity was observed.

  3. A Mononuclear Carboxylate-Rich Oxoiron(IV) Complex: a Structural and Functional Mimic of TauD Intermediate ‘J’

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Aidan R.; Guo, Yisong; Vu, Van V.; Bominaar, Emile L.; Münck, Eckard; Que, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    The pentadentate ligand nBu-P2DA (2(b), nBu-P2DA = N-(1′,1′-bis(2-pyridyl)pentyl)iminodiacetate) was designed to bind an iron center in a carboxylate-rich environment similar to that found in the active sites of TauD and other α-ketoglutarate-dependent mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes. The iron(II) complex nBu4N[FeII(Cl)(nBu-P2DA)] (3(b)-Cl) was synthesized and crystallographically characterized to have a 2-pyridine-2-carboxylate donor set in the plane perpendicular to the Fe-Cl bond. Reaction of 3(b)-Cl with N-heterocyclic amines such as pyridine or imidazole yielded the N-heterocyclic amine adducts [FeII(N)(nBu-P2DA)]. These adducts in turn reacted with oxo-transfer reagents at −95 °C to afford a short-lived oxoiron(IV) complex [FeIV(O)(nBu-P2DA)] (5(b)) in yields as high as 90% depending on the heterocycle used. Complex 5(b) exhibits near-IR absorption features (λmax = 770 nm) and Mossbauer parameters (δ = 0.04 mm/s; ΔEQ = 1.13 mm/s; D = 27±2 cm−1) characteristic of an S = 1 oxoiron(IV) species. Direct evidence for an Fe=O bond of 1.66 Å was found from EXAFS analysis. DFT calculations on 5(b) in its S =1 spin state afforded a geometry-optimized structure consistent with the EXAFS data. They further demonstrated that the replacement of two pyridine donors in [FeIV(O)(N4Py)]2+ (N4Py = N,N-(bis(2-pyridyl)methyl)N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine) with carboxylate donors in 5(b) decreased the energy gap between the ground S = 1 and the excited S = 2 states, reflecting the weaker equatorial ligand field of 5(b) and accounting for its larger D value. Complex 5(b) reacted readily with dihydrotoluene, methyldiphenylphosphine and ferrocene at −60 °C, and in all cases was approximately a 5-fold more reactive oxidant than [FeIV(O)(N4Py)]2+. The reactivity differences between these two complexes may arise from a combination of electronic and steric factors. Carboxylate-rich 5(b) represents the closest structural mimic reported thus far of the oxoiron(IV) intermediate (‘J’) found in TauD and provides us with vital insights into the role carboxylate ligands play in modulating the spectroscopic and reactivity properties of the non-heme oxoiron(IV) moiety. PMID:23267430

  4. Four-point functions and the permutation group S4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichmann, Gernot; Fischer, Christian S.; Heupel, Walter

    2015-09-01

    Four-point functions are at the heart of many interesting physical processes. A prime example is the light-by-light scattering amplitude, which plays an important role in the calculation of hadronic contributions to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. In the calculation of such quantities one faces the challenge of finding a suitable and well-behaved basis of tensor structures in coordinate and/or momentum space. Provided all (or many) of the external legs represent similar particle content, a powerful tool to construct and organize such bases is the permutation group S4. We introduce an efficient notation for dealing with the irreducible multiplets of S4, and we highlight the merits of this treatment by exemplifying four-point functions with gauge-boson legs such as the four-gluon vertex and the light-by-light scattering amplitude. The multiplet analysis is also useful for isolating the important kinematic regions and the dynamical singularity content of such amplitudes. Our analysis serves as a basis for future efficient calculations of these and similar objects.

  5. Photochemical transformation of carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes: role of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiaolei; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Li, Qilin

    2013-12-17

    The study investigated the photochemical transformation of carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (COOH-MWCNTs), an important environmental process affecting their physicochemical characteristics and hence fate and transport. UVA irradiation removed carboxyl groups from COOH-MWCNT surface while creating other oxygen-containing functional groups with an overall decrease in total surface oxygen content. This was attributed to reactions with photogenerated reactive oxygen species (ROS). COOH-MWCNTs generated singlet oxygen ((1)O2) and hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) under UVA light, which exhibited different reactivity toward the COOH-MWCNT surface. Inhibition experiments that isolate the effects of (•)OH and (1)O2 as well as experiments using externally generated (•)OH and (1)O2 separately revealed that (•)OH played an important role in the photochemical transformation of COOH-MWCNTs under UVA irradiation. The Raman spectroscopy and surface functional group analysis results suggested that (•)OH initially reacted with the surface carboxylated carbonaceous fragments, resulting in their degradation or exfoliation. Further reaction between (•)OH and the graphitic sidewall led to formation of defects including functional groups and vacancies. These reactions reduced the surface potential and colloidal stability of COOH-MWCNTs, and are expected to reduce their mobility in aquatic systems. PMID:24255932

  6. Changes in Bird Functional Diversity across Multiple Land Uses: Interpretations of Functional Redundancy Depend on Functional Group Identity

    PubMed Central

    Luck, Gary W.; Carter, Andrew; Smallbone, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Examinations of the impact of land-use change on functional diversity link changes in ecological community structure driven by land modification with the consequences for ecosystem function. Yet, most studies have been small-scale, experimental analyses and primarily focussed on plants. There is a lack of research on fauna communities and at large-scales across multiple land uses. We assessed changes in the functional diversity of bird communities across 24 land uses aligned along an intensification gradient. We tested the hypothesis that functional diversity is higher in less intensively used landscapes, documented changes in diversity using four diversity metrics, and examined how functional diversity varied with species richness to identify levels of functional redundancy. Functional diversity, measured using a dendogram-based metric, increased from high to low intensity land uses, but observed values did not differ significantly from randomly-generated expected values. Values for functional evenness and functional divergence did not vary consistently with land-use intensification, although higher than expected values were mostly recorded in high intensity land uses. A total of 16 land uses had lower than expected values for functional dispersion and these were mostly low intensity native vegetation sites. Relations between functional diversity and bird species richness yielded strikingly different patterns for the entire bird community vs. particular functional groups. For all birds and insectivores, functional evenness, divergence and dispersion showed a linear decline with increasing species richness suggesting substantial functional redundancy across communities. However, for nectarivores, frugivores and carnivores, there was a significant hump-shaped or non-significant positive linear relationship between these functional measures and species richness indicating less redundancy. Hump-shaped relationships signify that the most functionally diverse communities occur at intermediate levels of species richness. Interpretations of redundancy thus vary for different functional groups and related ecosystem functions (e.g. pollination), and can be substantially different to relationships involving entire ecological communities. PMID:23696844

  7. Functional movement screen scores in a group of running athletes.

    PubMed

    Loudon, Janice K; Parkerson-Mitchell, Amy J; Hildebrand, Laurie D; Teague, Connie

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the mean values of the functional movement screen (FMS) in a group of long-distance runners. The secondary aims were to investigate whether the FMS performance differed between sexes and between young and older runners. Forty-three runners, 16 women (mean age = 33.5 years, height = 165.2 cm, weight = 56.3 kg, and body mass index [BMI] = 20.6) and 27 men (mean age = 39.3 years, height = 177.6 cm, weight = 75.8 kg, and BMI = 24.2) performed the FMS. All the runners were injury-free and ran >30 kmwk. Independent t-tests were performed on the composite scores to examine the differences between men and women and also between young (<40 years) and older runners (>40 years). Contingency tables (2 2) were developed for each of the 7 screening tests to further look at the differences in groups for each single test. The ? values were calculated to determine significant differences. Statistical significance was set at p ? 0.05. There was no significant difference in the composite score between women and men. There were significant differences between the sexes in the push-up and straight leg test scores, with the women scoring better on each test. A significant difference was found in the composite scores between younger and older runners (p < 0.000). Additional score differences were found for the squat, hurdle step, and in-line lunge tests with the younger runners scoring better. This study provided mean values for the FMS in a cohort of long-distance runners. These values can be used as a reference for comparing FMST scores in other runners who are screened with this tool. PMID:24662154

  8. Highly adaptive tests for group differences in brain functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junghi; Pan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and other technologies have been offering evidence and insights showing that altered brain functional networks are associated with neurological illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease. Exploring brain networks of clinical populations compared to those of controls would be a key inquiry to reveal underlying neurological processes related to such illnesses. For such a purpose, group-level inference is a necessary first step in order to establish whether there are any genuinely disrupted brain subnetworks. Such an analysis is also challenging due to the high dimensionality of the parameters in a network model and high noise levels in neuroimaging data. We are still in the early stage of method development as highlighted by Varoquaux and Craddock (2013) that “there is currently no unique solution, but a spectrum of related methods and analytical strategies” to learn and compare brain connectivity. In practice the important issue of how to choose several critical parameters in estimating a network, such as what association measure to use and what is the sparsity of the estimated network, has not been carefully addressed, largely because the answers are unknown yet. For example, even though the choice of tuning parameters in model estimation has been extensively discussed in the literature, as to be shown here, an optimal choice of a parameter for network estimation may not be optimal in the current context of hypothesis testing. Arbitrarily choosing or mis-specifying such parameters may lead to extremely low-powered tests. Here we develop highly adaptive tests to detect group differences in brain connectivity while accounting for unknown optimal choices of some tuning parameters. The proposed tests combine statistical evidence against a null hypothesis from multiple sources across a range of plausible tuning parameter values reflecting uncertainty with the unknown truth. These highly adaptive tests are not only easy to use, but also high-powered robustly across various scenarios. The usage and advantages of these novel tests are demonstrated on an Alzheimer's disease dataset and simulated data. PMID:26740916

  9. Highly adaptive tests for group differences in brain functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junghi; Pan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and other technologies have been offering evidence and insights showing that altered brain functional networks are associated with neurological illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease. Exploring brain networks of clinical populations compared to those of controls would be a key inquiry to reveal underlying neurological processes related to such illnesses. For such a purpose, group-level inference is a necessary first step in order to establish whether there are any genuinely disrupted brain subnetworks. Such an analysis is also challenging due to the high dimensionality of the parameters in a network model and high noise levels in neuroimaging data. We are still in the early stage of method development as highlighted by Varoquaux and Craddock (2013) that "there is currently no unique solution, but a spectrum of related methods and analytical strategies" to learn and compare brain connectivity. In practice the important issue of how to choose several critical parameters in estimating a network, such as what association measure to use and what is the sparsity of the estimated network, has not been carefully addressed, largely because the answers are unknown yet. For example, even though the choice of tuning parameters in model estimation has been extensively discussed in the literature, as to be shown here, an optimal choice of a parameter for network estimation may not be optimal in the current context of hypothesis testing. Arbitrarily choosing or mis-specifying such parameters may lead to extremely low-powered tests. Here we develop highly adaptive tests to detect group differences in brain connectivity while accounting for unknown optimal choices of some tuning parameters. The proposed tests combine statistical evidence against a null hypothesis from multiple sources across a range of plausible tuning parameter values reflecting uncertainty with the unknown truth. These highly adaptive tests are not only easy to use, but also high-powered robustly across various scenarios. The usage and advantages of these novel tests are demonstrated on an Alzheimer's disease dataset and simulated data. PMID:26740916

  10. Palladium-catalyzed synthesis of aromatic carboxylic acids with silacarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Friis, Stig D; Andersen, Thomas L; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2013-03-15

    Aryl iodides and bromides were easily converted to their corresponding aromatic carboxylic acids via a Pd-catalyzed carbonylation reaction using silacarboxylic acids as an in situ source of carbon monoxide. The reaction conditions were compatible with a wide range of functional groups, and with the aryl iodides, the carbonylation was complete within minutes. The method was adapted to the double and selective isotope labeling of tamibarotene. PMID:23441830

  11. Iron‐catalyzed Cross‐Coupling of Propargyl Carboxylates and Grignard Reagents: Synthesis of Substituted Allenes

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Simon N.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Presented herein is a mild, facile, and efficient iron‐catalyzed synthesis of substituted allenes from propargyl carboxylates and Grignard reagents. Only 1–5 mol % of the inexpensive and environmentally benign [Fe(acac)3] at −20 °C was sufficient to afford a broad range of substituted allenes in excellent yields. The method tolerates a variety of functional groups. PMID:26890161

  12. Boron-Catalyzed N-Alkylation of Amines using Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ming-Chen; Shang, Rui; Cheng, Wan-Min; Fu, Yao

    2015-07-27

    A boron-based catalyst was found to catalyze the straightforward alkylation of amines with readily available carboxylic acids in the presence of silane as the reducing agent. Various types of primary and secondary amines can be smoothly alkylated with good selectivity and good functional-group compatibility. This metal-free amine alkylation was successfully applied to the synthesis of three commercial medicinal compounds, Butenafine, Cinacalcet. and Piribedil, in a one-pot manner without using any metal catalysts. PMID:26150397

  13. Ordered self-assembled monolayers terminated with different chemical functional groups direct neural stem cell linage behaviours.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shenglian; Liu, Xi; He, Jin; Wang, Xiumei; Wang, Ying; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2016-02-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) have been a promising candidate for stem cell-based nerve tissue regeneration. Therefore, the design of idea biomaterials that deliver precise regulatory signals to control stem cell fate is currently a crucial issue that depends on a profound understanding of the interactions between NSCs with the surrounding micro-environment. In this work, self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols on gold with different chemical groups, including hydroxyl (-OH), amino (-NH2), carboxyl (-COOH) and methyl (-CH3), were used as a simple model to study the effects of surface chemistry on NSC fate decisions. Contact angle measurement and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) examination implied that all types of alkanethiols self-assembled on gold into a close-packed phase structure with similar molecular densities. In this study, we evaluated NSC adhesion, migration and differentiation in response to different chemical functional groups cultured under serum-free conditions. Our studies showed that NSCs exhibited certain phenotypes with extreme sensitivity to surface chemical groups. Compared with other functional groups, the SAMs with hydroxyl end-groups provided the best micro-environment in promoting NSC migration and maintaining an undifferentiated or neuronal differentiation state.  -NH2 surfaces directed neural stem cells into astrocytic lineages, while NSCs on  -COOH and  -CH3 surfaces had a similar potency to differentiate into three nerve lineages. To further investigate the possible signaling pathway, the gene expression of integrin β1 and β4 were examined. The results indicated that a high expression of β1 integrin would probably have a tight correlation with the expression of nestin, which implied the stemness of NSCs, while β4 integrin seemed to correspond to the differentiated NSCs. The results presented here give useful information for the future design of biomaterials to regulate the preservation, proliferation and differentiation of NSCs for central nervous tissue engineering. PMID:26694757

  14. Quantification of glycated N-terminal peptide of hemoglobin using derivatization for multiple functional groups of amino acids followed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Yohei; Kinumi, Tomoya; Yamazaki, Taichi; Takatsu, Akiko

    2016-02-01

    A novel method of amino acid analysis using derivatization of multiple functional groups (amino, carboxyl, and phenolic hydroxyl groups) was applied to measure glycated amino acids in order to quantify glycated peptides and evaluate the degree of glycation of peptide. Amino and carboxyl groups of amino acids were derivatized with 1-bromobutane so that the hydrophobicities and basicities of the amino acids, including glycated amino acids, were improved. These derivatized amino acids could be detected with high sensitivity using LC-MS/MS. In this study, 1-deoxyfructosyl-VHLTPE and VHLTPE, which are N-terminal peptides of the β-chains of hemoglobin, were selected as target compounds. After reducing the peptide sample solution with sodium borohydride, the obtained peptides were hydrolyzed with hydrochloric acid. The released amino acids were then derivatized with 1-bromobutane and analyzed with LC-MS/MS. The derivatized amino acids, including glycated amino acids, could be separated using an octadecyl silylated silica column and good sharp peaks were detected. We show a confirmatory experiment that the proposed method can be applied to evaluate the degree of glycation of peptides, using mixtures of glycated and non-glycated peptide. PMID:26037490

  15. Lysine carboxylation: unveiling a spontaneous post-translational modification

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Morales, David; Adamian, Larisa; Shi, Dashuang; Liang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    A computational method for the prediction of lysine carboxylation (KCX) in protein structures is described. The method accurately identifies misreported KCXs and predicts previously unknown KCX sites. The carboxylation of lysine residues is a post-translational modification (PTM) that plays a critical role in the catalytic mechanisms of several important enzymes. It occurs spontaneously under certain physicochemical conditions, but is difficult to detect experimentally. Its full impact is unknown. In this work, the signature microenvironment of lysine-carboxylation sites has been characterized. In addition, a computational method called Predictor of Lysine Carboxylation (PreLysCar) for the detection of lysine carboxylation in proteins with available three-dimensional structures has been developed. The likely prevalence of lysine carboxylation in the proteome was assessed through large-scale computations. The results suggest that about 1.3% of large proteins may contain a carboxylated lysine residue. This unexpected prevalence of lysine carboxylation implies an enrichment of reactions in which it may play functional roles. The results also suggest that by switching enzymes on and off under appropriate physicochemical conditions spontaneous PTMs may serve as an important and widely used efficient biological machinery for regulation.

  16. Synthesis of functionalized silica nanostructure: Unexpected conversion of cyanopropyl group in chloropropyl one during HCl-catalysed hydrolysis of the corresponding triethoxysilane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitriu, Ana-Maria-Corina; Balan, Mihaela; Bargan, Alexandra; Shova, Sergiu; Varganici, Cristian-Dragos; Cazacu, Maria

    2016-04-01

    During acid hydrolysis of 3-cyanopropyltriethoxysilane (CyTES) in a molar ratio HCl:CyTES - 4.6:1 in methanol, with the intention to prepare the properly polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSSQ) or carboxyl derivative, the conversion of organic functional group occurred by replacing the CN group with Cl forming octakis(chloropropyl)octasilsesquioxane (Cl-POSSQ). The structure was determined through X-ray single crystal diffraction, spectral (FTIR and NMR) techniques and elemental analysis. The stepwise conversion of the CN group during the 3-cyanopropyltriethoxysilane hydrolysis was monitored through IR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Thermal behavior was studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Moisture sorption capacity was evaluated by water vapor sorption in dynamic regime (DVS). The biological activity was in vitro tested against three fungi and two bacteria.

  17. Functional trait responses to grazing are mediated by soil moisture and plant functional group identity

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shuxia; Li, Wenhuai; Lan, Zhichun; Ren, Haiyan; Wang, Kaibo

    2015-01-01

    Abundant evidence has shown that grazing alters plant functional traits, community structure and ecosystem functioning of grasslands. Few studies, however, have tested how plant responses to grazing are mediated by resource availability and plant functional group identity. We examined the effects of grazing on functional traits across a broad range of species along a soil moisture gradient in Inner Mongolia grassland. Our results showed that trait syndromes of plant size (individual biomass) and shoot growth (leaf N content and leaf density) distinguished plant species responses to grazing. The effects of grazing on functional traits were mediated by soil moisture and dependent on functional group identity. For most species, grazing decreased plant height but increased leaf N and specific leaf area (SLA) along the moisture gradient. Grazing enhanced the community-weighted attributes (leaf NCWM and SLACWM), which were triggered mainly by the positive trait responses of annuals and biennials and perennial grasses, and increased relative abundance of perennial forbs. Our results suggest that grazing-induced species turnover and increased intraspecific trait variability are two drivers for the observed changes in community weighted attributes. The dominant perennial bunchgrasses exhibited mixed tolerance–resistance strategies to grazing and mixed acquisitive–conservative strategies in resource utilization. PMID:26655858

  18. Functional trait responses to grazing are mediated by soil moisture and plant functional group identity.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shuxia; Li, Wenhuai; Lan, Zhichun; Ren, Haiyan; Wang, Kaibo

    2015-01-01

    Abundant evidence has shown that grazing alters plant functional traits, community structure and ecosystem functioning of grasslands. Few studies, however, have tested how plant responses to grazing are mediated by resource availability and plant functional group identity. We examined the effects of grazing on functional traits across a broad range of species along a soil moisture gradient in Inner Mongolia grassland. Our results showed that trait syndromes of plant size (individual biomass) and shoot growth (leaf N content and leaf density) distinguished plant species responses to grazing. The effects of grazing on functional traits were mediated by soil moisture and dependent on functional group identity. For most species, grazing decreased plant height but increased leaf N and specific leaf area (SLA) along the moisture gradient. Grazing enhanced the community-weighted attributes (leaf NCWM and SLACWM), which were triggered mainly by the positive trait responses of annuals and biennials and perennial grasses, and increased relative abundance of perennial forbs. Our results suggest that grazing-induced species turnover and increased intraspecific trait variability are two drivers for the observed changes in community weighted attributes. The dominant perennial bunchgrasses exhibited mixed tolerance-resistance strategies to grazing and mixed acquisitive-conservative strategies in resource utilization. PMID:26655858

  19. Functional renormalization group - a new approach to frustrated quantum magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuther, Johannes

    The experimental and theoretical investigation of quantum spin systems has become one of the central disciplines of contemporary condensed matter physics. From an experimental viewpoint, the field has been significantly fueled by the recent synthesis of novel strongly correlated materials with exotic magnetic or quantum paramagnetic ground states. From a theoretical perspective, however, the numerical treatment of realistic models for quantum magnetism in two and three spatial dimensions still constitutes a serious challenge. This particularly applies to frustrated systems, which complicate the employment of established methods. This talk intends to propagate the pseudofermion functional renormalization group (PFFRG) as a novel approach to determine large size ground state correlations of a wide class of spin Hamiltonians. Using a diagrammatic pseudofermion representation for quantum spin models, the PFFRG performs systematic summations in all two-particle fermionic interaction channels, capturing the correct balance between classical magnetic ordering and quantum fluctuations. Numerical results for various frustrated spin models on different 2D and 3D lattices are reviewed, and benchmarked against other methods if available.

  20. Modification of polylactide surfaces with lactide-ethylene oxide functional block copolymers: accessibility of functional groups.

    PubMed

    Tresohlavá, Eliska; Popelka, Stepán; Machová, Ludka; Rypácek, Frantisek

    2010-01-11

    Feasibility of using amphiphilic block copolymers composed of polylactide (PLA) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) blocks for biomimetic surface modification of polylactide-based biomaterials for tissue engineering was investigated. PEO-b-PLA copolymers were deposited on the PLA surface from a solution in PEO-selective solvent. Copolymers with a neutral omega-methoxy end group of the PEO block (mPEO-b-PLA) were used to provide hydrophilic surface of PLLA, which exhibited suppressed nonspecific protein adsorption. Their analogues, containing biotin group at the end of PEO block (bPEO-b-PLA), were used as a model of functional copolymers, carrying a biomimetic group, for example, a cell-adhesion fibronectine-derived peptide sequence. The surface topography of functional groups on the modified surface and their accessibility for interaction with a protein receptor was investigated, taking advantage of specific biotin-avidin interaction, on surfaces modified with a combination of mPEO-b-PLA and bPEO-b-PLA copolymers. The accessibility of model biotin groups for interaction with their protein counterpart was proven through visualization of avidin or avidin-labeled nanospheres with atomic force microscopy. PMID:19954220

  1. Plant Species and Functional Group Combinations Affect Green Roof Ecosystem Functions

    PubMed Central

    Lundholm, Jeremy; MacIvor, J. Scott; MacDougall, Zachary; Ranalli, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Background Green roofs perform ecosystem services such as summer roof temperature reduction and stormwater capture that directly contribute to lower building energy use and potential economic savings. These services are in turn related to ecosystem functions performed by the vegetation layer such as radiation reflection and transpiration, but little work has examined the role of plant species composition and diversity in improving these functions. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a replicated modular extensive (shallow growing- medium) green roof system planted with monocultures or mixtures containing one, three or five life-forms, to quantify two ecosystem services: summer roof cooling and water capture. We also measured the related ecosystem properties/processes of albedo, evapotranspiration, and the mean and temporal variability of aboveground biomass over four months. Mixtures containing three or five life-form groups, simultaneously optimized several green roof ecosystem functions, outperforming monocultures and single life-form groups, but there was much variation in performance depending on which life-forms were present in the three life-form mixtures. Some mixtures outperformed the best monocultures for water capture, evapotranspiration, and an index combining both water capture and temperature reductions. Combinations of tall forbs, grasses and succulents simultaneously optimized a range of ecosystem performance measures, thus the main benefit of including all three groups was not to maximize any single process but to perform a variety of functions well. Conclusions/Significance Ecosystem services from green roofs can be improved by planting certain life-form groups in combination, directly contributing to climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies. The strong performance by certain mixtures of life-forms, especially tall forbs, grasses and succulents, warrants further investigation into niche complementarity or facilitation as mechanisms governing biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships in green roof ecosystems. PMID:20300196

  2. Crystal structure of ethyl 2,4-di-chloro-quinoline-3-carboxyl-ate.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Alberto; Miranda, Luis D; Reyes, Héctor; Aguirre, Gerardo; Chávez, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    In the crystal structure of the title compound, C12H9Cl2NO2, the mean planes through the quinoline and carboxyl-ate groups have r.m.s. deviations of 0.006 and 0.021 Å, respectively, and form a dihedral angle of 87.06 (19)°. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked via very weak C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming chains, which propagate along the c-axis direction. PMID:26870538

  3. Polymer containing functional end groups is base for new polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirshfield, S. M.

    1971-01-01

    Butadiene is polymerized with lithium-p-lithiophenoxide to produce linear polymer containing oxy-lithium group at one end and active carbon-lithium group at other end. Living polymers represent new approach to preparation of difunctional polymers in which structural features, molecular weight, type and number of end groups are controlled.

  4. In vitro mutagenesis of Caenorhabditis elegans cuticle collagens identifies a potential subtilisin-like protease cleavage site and demonstrates that carboxyl domain disulfide bonding is required for normal function but not assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, J; Kramer, J M

    1994-01-01

    The importance of conserved amino acids in the amino and carboxyl non-Gly-X-Y domains of Caenorhabditis elegans cuticle collagens was examined by analyzing site-directed mutations of the sqt-1 and rol-6 collagen genes in transgenic animals. Altered collagen genes on transgenic arrays were shown to produce appropriate phenotypes by injecting in vivo cloned mutant alleles. Equivalent alterations in sqt-1 and rol-6 generally produced the same phenotypes, indicating that conserved amino acids in these two collagens have similar functions. Serine substitutions for either of two conserved carboxyl domain cysteines produced LRol phenotypes. Substitution for both cysteines in sqt-1 also resulted in an LRol phenotype, demonstrating that disulfide bonding is important for normal function but not required for assembly. Arg-1 or Arg-4 to Cys mutations in homology block A (HBA; consensus, 1-RXRRQ-5; in the amino non-Gly-X-Y domain) caused RRol phenotypes, while the same alteration at Arg-3 had no effect, indicating that Arg-3 is functionally different from Arg-1 and Arg-4. Substitutions of Arg-4 with Ser, Leu, or Glu also produced the RRol phenotype, while Lys substitutions for Arg-1 or Arg-4 did not generate any abnormal phenotypes. His substitutions for Arg-1 or Arg-4 caused somewhat less severe RRol phenotypes. Therefore, strong positively charged residues, Arg or Lys, are required at positions 1 and 4 for normal function. The conserved pattern of arginines in HBA matches the cleavage sites of the subtilisin-like endoproteinases. HBA may be a cleavage site for a subtilisin-like protease, and cleavage may be important for cuticle collagen processing. PMID:8139571

  5. Impact of Functional Group Modifications on Designer Phenethylamine Induced Hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Grecco, Gregory G; Sprague, Jon E

    2016-05-16

    The popularity of designer phenethylamines such as synthetic cathinones ("bath salts") has led to increased reports of life-threatening hyperthermia. The diversity of chemical modifications has resulted in the toxicological profile of most synthetic cathinones being mostly uncharacterized. Here, we investigated the thermogenic effects of six recently identified designer phenethylamines (4-methylmethamphetamine, methylone, mephedrone, butylone, pentylone, and MDPV) and compared these effects to the established thermogenic agent 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). Specifically, we determined the impact of a β-ketone, α-alkyl, or pyrrolidine functional group on core-body temperature changes. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 5-6) were administered a dose (30 mg/kg, sc) of a designer phenethylamine or MDMA, and core body temperature measurements were recorded at 30 min intervals for 150 min post treatment. MDMA elicited the greatest maximum temperature change (ΔTmax), and this effect was significantly greater than that of its β-ketone analogue, methylone. Temperature-area under the curves (TAUCs) and ΔTmax were also significantly different between 4-methylmethamphetamine (4-MMA) and its β-ketone analogue mephedrone. Lengthening the α-alkyl chain of methylone to produce butylone and pentylone significantly attenuated the thermogenic response on both TAUCs and ΔTmax compared to those of methylone; however, butylone and pentylone were not different from each other. Pyrrolidine substitution on the N-terminus of pentylone produces 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), which did not significantly alter core body temperature. Thermogenic comparisons of MDMA vs methylone and 4-MMA vs mephedrone indicate that oxidation at the benzylic position significantly attenuates the hyperthermic response. Furthermore, either extending the α-alkyl chain to ethyl and propyl (butylone and pentylone, respectively) or extending the α-alkyl chain and adding a pyrrolidine on the N-terminus (MDPV) significantly blunted the thermogenic effects of methylone. Overall, the present study provides the first structure-activity relationship in vivo toxicological analysis of designer phenethylamines. PMID:26954347

  6. When does the in-group like the out-group? Bias among children as a function of group norms.

    PubMed

    Rutland, Adam; Hitti, Aline; Mulvey, Kelly Lynn; Abrams, Dominic; Killen, Melanie

    2015-06-01

    Research indicates that in-group favoritism is prevalent among both adults and children. Although research has documented that individuals do not consistently display an in-group bias, the conditions under which out-group preference exists are not well understood. In this study, participants (N = 462) aged 9 to 16 years judged in-group deviant acts that were either in line with or counter to a generic norm shared by both groups. The findings demonstrated, for the first time, that children preferred out-group over in-group deviance only when the in-group peer's deviance was in line with the generic norm and a threat to their group's identity. Participants justified their disapproval of these deviants by focusing on the need for group cohesion and loyalty, while they signified their approval by spotlighting the need for autonomy. Our findings suggest that children's intergroup attitudes are influenced by how the behavior of their peers matches different levels of group norms. PMID:25888686

  7. Dominant Functional Group Effects on the Invasion Resistance at Different Resource Levels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiang; Ge, Yuan; Zhang, Chong B.; Bai, Yi; Du, Zhao K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Functional group composition may affect invasion in two ways the effect of abundance, i.e. dominance of functional group; and the effect of traits, i.e. identity of functional groups. However, few studies have focused on the role of abundance of functional group on invasion resistance. Moreover, how resource availability influences the role of the dominant functional group in invasion resistance is even less understood. Methodology/Principal Findings In this experiment, we established experimental pots using four different functional groups (annual grass, perennial grass, deciduous shrub or arbor and evergreen shrub or arbor), and the dominant functional group was manipulated. These experimental pots were respectively constructed at different soil nitrogen levels (control and fertilized). After one year of growth, we added seeds of 20 different species (five species per functional group) to the experimental pots. Fertilization significantly increased the overall invasion success, while dominant functional group had little effect on overall invasion success. When invaders were grouped into functional groups, invaders generally had lower success in pots dominated by the same functional group in the control pots. However, individual invaders of the same functional group exhibited different invasion patterns. Fertilization generally increased success of invaders in pots dominated by the same than by another functional group. However, fertilization led to great differences for individual invaders. Conclusions/Significance The results showed that the dominant functional group, independent of functional group identity, had a significant effect on the composition of invaders. We suggest that the limiting similarity hypothesis may be applicable at the functional group level, and limiting similarity may have a limited role for individual invaders as shown by the inconsistent effects of dominant functional group and fertilization. PMID:24167565

  8. Controls of functional group chemistry on calcium carbonate nucleation: Insights into systematics of biomolecular innovations for skeletal mineralization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, P. M.; Hamm, L. M.; Giuffre, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Living organisms produce skeletal structures within a complex matrix of organic macromolecules that guide the nucleation and growth of crystalline structures into the organic-inorganic composites we know as biominerals. This type of biomolecule-directed mineralization is an ancient process as evidenced by structures in the fossil record that date to the Ediacaran (ca. 549 Ma). Our understanding of template-directed biomineralization, however, is largely based upon assumptions from studies that: 1) qualitatively demonstrate some chemical functionalities influence the nucleating mineral phase and morphology; 2) propose proteins are the primary driver to template-directed mineralization and 3) propose the ubiquitous polysaccharides are inert components. Thus, a mechanistic basis for how the underlying chemistry of macromolecules controls nucleation kinetics and thermodynamics in template-directed nucleation is not well established. Moreover, there is not yet a good appreciation for how patterns of skeletal mineralization evolved with biochemical innovations in response to environmental changes over geologic timescales. In small steps toward understanding biochemical controls on biomineralization, we test the hypothesis that the kinetics and thermodynamics of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) formation is regulated by a systematic relationship to the functional group chemistry of macromolecules. A long-term goal is to establish the energetic basis for biochemical motifs that are seen (and not seen) at sites of calcification across the phylogenetic tree. Two types of studies were conducted. The first measured nucleation rates on model biomolecular substrates with termini that are found in proteins associated with sites of calcification (-COOH, -PO4, and -SH) and two alkanethiol chain lengths (16-C and 11-C) at a variety of chemical driving forces. The measurements show functional group chemistry and molecule conformation regulate rates by a predictable relation to interfacial free energy. A second study tested the hypothesis that polysaccharides can also confer reactivity through their functional group chemistry. Using high purity polysaccharides with regular monomer sequences as simple model compounds, we quantify the effect of functional group chemistry (chitosan, hyaluronic acid, heparin, alginic acid) and monomer sequencing (two stereoisomers of alginic acid) on the kinetic and thermodynamic barriers to CaCO3 formation. Analysis of the data indicates the barriers to nucleation are correlated by a systematic relationship to charge as the number of carboxyl groups per monomer of polysaccharide. The findings demonstrate a physical basis for how organic surfaces regulate the thermodynamic barrier to nucleation through interfacial free energy and suggest the chemical basis for recurring motifs that are seen in modern organisms. We also show that polysaccharides may indeed have active roles in promoting calcite mineralization and suggest their presumed function as inert framework molecules should be revisited.

  9. Structural Characterization and Function Determination of a Nonspecific Carboxylate Esterase from the Amidohydrolase Superfamily with a Promiscuous Ability To Hydrolyze Methylphosphonate Esters

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The uncharacterized protein Rsp3690 from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily of enzymes. In this investigation the gene for Rsp3690 was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity, and the three-dimensional structure was determined to a resolution of 1.8 Å. The protein folds as a distorted (β/α)8-barrel, and the subunits associate as a homotetramer. The active site is localized to the C-terminal end of the β-barrel and is highlighted by the formation of a binuclear metal center with two manganese ions that are bridged by Glu-175 and hydroxide. The remaining ligands to the metal center include His-32, His-34, His-207, His-236, and Asp-302. Rsp3690 was shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of a wide variety of carboxylate esters, in addition to organophosphate and organophosphonate esters. The best carboxylate ester substrates identified for Rsp3690 included 2-naphthyl acetate (kcat/Km = 1.0 × 105 M–1 s–1), 2-naphthyl propionate (kcat/Km = 1.5 × 105 M–1 s–1), 1-naphthyl acetate (kcat/Km = 7.5 × 103 M–1 s–1), 4-methylumbelliferyl acetate (kcat/Km = 2.7 × 103 M–1 s–1), 4-nitrophenyl acetate (kcat/Km = 2.3 × 105 M–1 s–1), and 4-nitrophenyl butyrate (kcat/Km = 8.8 × 105 M–1 s–1). The best organophosphonate ester substrates included ethyl 4-nitrophenyl methylphosphonate (kcat/Km = 3.8 × 105 M–1 s–1) and isobutyl 4-nitrophenyl methylphosphonate (kcat/Km = 1.1 × 104 M–1 s–1). The (SP)-enantiomer of isobutyl 4-nitrophenyl methylphosphonate was hydrolyzed 10 times faster than the less toxic (RP)-enantiomer. The high inherent catalytic activity of Rsp3690 for the hydrolysis of the toxic enantiomer of methylphosphonate esters make this enzyme an attractive target for directed evolution investigations. PMID:24832101

  10. Students' Perceptions of Classroom Group Work as a Function of Group Member Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this assessment was to examine whether differences exist between students who self-select their classroom work group members and students who are randomly assigned to their classroom work groups in terms of their use of organizational citizenship behaviors with their work group members; their commitment to, trust in, and relational…

  11. Students' Perceptions of Classroom Group Work as a Function of Group Member Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this assessment was to examine whether differences exist between students who self-select their classroom work group members and students who are randomly assigned to their classroom work groups in terms of their use of organizational citizenship behaviors with their work group members; their commitment to, trust in, and relational

  12. STUDY OF THE NEAR INFRARED-MEDIATED HEATING OF DISPERSIONS OF PROTEIN-COATED PRISTINE AND CARBOXYLATED SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES.

    PubMed

    Sheardy, Alex T; Taylor, Jeremy J; Chilek, Jennifer L; Li, Synyoung; Wang, Ruhung; Draper, Rockford K; Pantano, Paul

    2012-10-01

    Previously, we demonstrated the selective NIR-mediated ablation of tumor cells in vitro using pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with adsorbed tumor-targeting ligands and carboxylated SWNTs with covalently-attached ligands. The covalent approach is advantageous in ensuring that protein ligands remain associated with the NIR-absorbing SWNTs in biological matrices and the noncovalent approach has the advantage of enabling SWNT functionalization without perturbation of the SWNT lattice and photothermal properties. Herein, we compare the ability of moderately-carboxylated (~4 at.% carboxylic acid groups) and pristine SWNT materials to absorb 808 nm radiation and convert it to heat. Under conditions of a constant 808 nm laser power density, the approach involved measuring the temperature of aqueous dispersions of protein-coated SWNTs as a function of the irradiation time. Nearly identical temperature profiles were observed for dispersions of moderately-carboxylated and pristine SWNTs possessing matched 808 nm optical densities and equivalent concentrations of carbonaceous species (i.e., SWNTs and amorphous carbon impurities). The results indicate that the amount of carbonaceous species in purified dispersions of protein-coated SWNTs is more important for converting absorbed 808 nm radiation into heat than whether or not the SWNTs were moderately carboxylated, and that moderately-carboxylated SWNTs could be the SWNT-material of choice for the targeted photothermal ablation of tumor cells. PMID:23645950

  13. Study of the Near Infrared-Mediated Heating of Dispersions of Protein-Coated Pristine and Carboxylated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheardy, Alex T.; Taylor, Jeremy J.; Chilek, Jennifer L.; Li, Synyoung; Wang, Ruhung; Draper, Rockford K.; Pantano, Paul

    2012-10-01

    Previously, we demonstrated the selective NIR-mediated ablation of tumor cells in vitro using pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with adsorbed tumor-targeting ligands and carboxylated SWNTs with covalently-attached ligands. The covalent approach is advantageous in ensuring that protein ligands remain associated with the NIR-absorbing SWNTs in biological matrices and the noncovalent approach has the advantage of enabling SWNT functionalization without perturbation of the SWNT lattice and photothermal properties. Herein, we compare the ability of moderately-carboxylated ( 4 at.% carboxylic acid groups) and pristine SWNT materials to absorb 808 nm radiation and convert it to heat. Under conditions of a constant 808 nm laser power density, the approach involved measuring the temperature of aqueous dispersions of protein-coated SWNTs as a function of the irradiation time. Nearly identical temperature profiles were observed for dispersions of moderately-carboxylated and pristine SWNTs possessing matched 808 nm optical densities and equivalent concentrations of carbonaceous species (i.e., SWNTs and amorphous carbon impurities). The results indicate that the amount of carbonaceous species in purified dispersions of protein-coated SWNTs is more important for converting absorbed 808 nm radiation into heat than whether or not the SWNTs were moderately carboxylated, and that moderately-carboxylated SWNTs could be the SWNT-material of choice for the targeted photothermal ablation of tumor cells.

  14. A polyoxometalate-based manganese carboxylate cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, X.; Kogerler, P.

    2008-01-01

    The functionalization of a pre-formed, high oxidation state {l_brace}Ce{sup IV}Mn{sup IV}{sub 6}{r_brace} cluster with a lacunary phosphotungstate, [{alpha}-P{sub 2}W{sub 15}O{sub 56}]{sup 12-}, exemplifies a straightforward route for grafting redox-active building blocks to existing Mn-carboxylate clusters and modeling their deposition onto metal oxide surfaces.

  15. Moral Judgment as a Function of Peer Group Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maitland, Karen A.; Goldman, Jacquelin R.

    1974-01-01

    This article presents an investigation into the effects of peer group interaction on moral judgment among 36 male and female eleventh and twelfth graders. The results indicate greater social conflict and pressure in a group discussion induces greater change in the level of moral judgment. (DE)

  16. The Social Support Function in Epilepsy Self-Help Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Droge, David; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Results of a preliminary survey of epilepsy self-help group members are presented, and effects relating to stigmatization, reasons for participation, asserted curative factors, and formal-only versus informal participation in the self-help group process are examined. Societal reaction to people with epilepsy is viewed as a major contributor to…

  17. Perceptual Visual Grouping under Inattention: Electrophysiological Functional Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razpurker-Apfeld, Irene; Pratt, Hillel

    2008-01-01

    Two types of perceptual visual grouping, differing in complexity of shape formation, were examined under inattention. Fourteen participants performed a similarity judgment task concerning two successive briefly presented central targets surrounded by task-irrelevant simple and complex grouping patterns. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were…

  18. Crystal structures of ethyl 6-(4-methyl-phen-yl)-4-oxo-4H-chromene-2-carboxyl-ate and ethyl 6-(4-fluoro-phen-yl)-4-oxo-4H-chromene-2-carboxyl-ate.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Ligia R; Low, John Nicolson; Fernandes, Carlos; Gaspar, Alexandra; Borges, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structures of two chromone derivatives, viz. ethyl 6-(4-methyl-phen-yl)-4-oxo-4H-chromene-2-carboxyl-ate, C19H16O4, (1), and ethyl 6-(4-fluoro-phen-yl)-4-oxo-4H-chromene-2-carboxyl-ate C18H13FO4, (2), have been determined: (1) crystallizes with two mol-ecules in the asymmetric unit. A comparison of the dihedral angles beween the mean planes of the central chromone core with those of the substituents, an ethyl ester moiety at the 2-position and a para-substituted phenyl ring at the 6-position shows that each mol-ecule differs significantly from the others, even the two independent mol-ecules (a and b) of (1). In all three mol-ecules, the carbonyl groups of the chromone and the carboxyl-ate are trans-related. The supra-molecular structure of (1) involves only weak C-H⋯π inter-actions between H atoms of the substituent phenyl group and the phenyl group, which link mol-ecules into a chain of alternating mol-ecules a and b, and weak π-π stacking inter-actions between the chromone units. The packing in (2) involves C-H⋯O inter-actions, which form a network of two inter-secting ladders involving the carbonyl atom of the carboxyl-ate group as the acceptor for H atoms at the 7-position of the chromone ring and from an ortho-H atom of the exocyclic benzene ring. The carbonyl atom of the chromone acts as an acceptor from a meta-H atom of the exocyclic benzene ring. π-π inter-actions stack the mol-ecules by unit translation along the a axis. PMID:26870574

  19. Chemical modification and pH dependence of kinetic parameters to identify functional groups in a glucosyltransferase from Strep. Mutans

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.E.; Leone, A.; Bell, E.T.

    1986-05-01

    A glucosyltransferase, forming a predominantly al-6 linked glucan, was partially purified from the culture filtrate of S. mutans GS-5. The kinetic properties of the enzyme, assessed using the transfer of /sup 14/C glucose from sucrose into total glucan, were studied at pH values from pH 3.5 to 6.5. From the dependence of km on pH, a group with pKa = 5.5 must be protonated to maximize substrate binding. From plots of V/sub max/ vs pH two groups, with pKa's of 4.5 and 5.5 were indicated. The results suggest the involvement of either two carboxyl groups (one protonated, one unprotonated in the native enzyme) or a carboxyl group (unprotonated) and some other protonated group such as histidine, cysteine. Chemical modification studies showed that Diethylyrocarbonate (histidine specific) had no effect on enzyme activity while modification with p-phydroxy-mercuribenzoate or iodoacetic acid (sulfhydryl reactive) and carbodimide reagents (carboxyl specific) resulted in almost complete inactivation. Activity loss was dependent upon time of incubation and reagent concentration. The disaccharide lylose, (shown to be an inhibitor of the enzyme with similar affinity to sucrose) offers no protection against modification by the sulfhydryl reactive reagents.

  20. Hydrolysis of organonitrate functional groups in aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shang; Shilling, John E.; Song, Chen; Hiranuma, Naruki; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Russell, Lynn M.

    2012-10-19

    Organonitrate (ON) groups are important substituents in secondary organic aerosols. Model simulations and laboratory studies indicate a large fraction of ON groups in aerosol particles, but much lower quantities are observed in the atmosphere. Hydrolysis of ON groups in aerosol particles has been proposed recently. To test this hypothesis, we simulated formation of ON molecules in a reaction chamber under a wide range of relative humidity (0% to 90%). The mass fraction of ON groups (5% to 20% for high-NOx experiments) consistently decreased with increasing relative humidity, which was best explained by hydrolysis of ON groups at a rate of 4 day-1 (lifetime of 6 hours) for reactions under relative humidity greater than 20%. In addition, we found that secondary nitrogen-containing molecules absorb light, with greater absorption under dry and high-NOx conditions. This work provides the first evidence for particle-phase hydrolysis of ON groups, a process that could substantially reduce ON group concentration in the atmosphere.

  1. Enhancing the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass by increasing the carboxylic acid content of the associated lignin.

    PubMed

    Nakagame, Seiji; Chandra, Richard P; Kadla, John F; Saddler, Jack N

    2011-03-01

    To assess the effects that the physical and chemical properties of lignin might have on the enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic substrates, protease treated lignin (PTL) and cellulolytic enzyme lignin (CEL) fractions, isolated from steam and organosolv pretreated corn stover, poplar, and lodgepole pine, were prepared and characterized. The adsorption of cellulases to the isolated lignin preparations corresponded to a Langmuir adsorption isotherm. It was apparent that, rather than the physical properties of the isolated lignin, the carboxylic acid functionality of the isolated lignin, as determined by FTIR and NMR spectroscopy, had much more of an influence when lignin was added to typical hydrolysis of pure cellulose (Avicel). An increase in the carboxylic content of the lignin preparation resulted in an increased hydrolysis yield. These results suggested that the carboxylic acids within the lignin partially alleviate non-productive binding of cellulases to lignin. To try to confirm this possible mechanism, dehydrogenative polymers (DHP) of monolignols were synthesized from coniferyl alcohol (CA) and ferulic acid (FA), and these model compounds were added to a typical enzymatic hydrolysis of Avicel. The DHP from FA, which was enriched in carboxylic acid groups compared with the DHP from CA, adsorbed a lower mount of cellulases and did not decrease hydrolysis yields when compared to the DHP from CA, which decreased the hydrolysis of Avicel by 8.4%. Thus, increasing the carboxylic acid content of the lignin seemed to significantly decrease the non-productive binding of cellulases and consequently increased the enzymatic hydrolysis of the cellulose. PMID:21246506

  2. Submicron aerosol organic functional groups, ions, and water content at the Centreville SEARCH site (Alabama), during SOAS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, G.; Ergin, G.; Modini, R. L.; Takahama, S.

    2013-12-01

    The SOAS campaign was conducted from June 1 to July 15 of 2013 in order to understand the relationship between biogenic and anthropogenic emissions in the South East US1,2. In this study, the organic and inorganic composition of submicron aerosol in the Centreville SEARCH site was measured by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and the Ambient Ion Monitor (AIM; URG Corporation), whereas the aerosol water content was measured with a Dry Ambient Aerosol Size Spectrometer (DAASS)3. Organic functional group analysis was performed on PM1 aerosol selected by cyclone and collected on teflon filters with a time resolution of 4-12 hours, using one inlet heated to 50 °C and the other operated either at ambient temperature or 70 °C 4. The AIM measured both condensed and gas phase composition with a time resolution of 1 hour, providing partitioning behavior of inorganic species such as NH3/NH4+, HNO3/NO3-. These measurements collectively permit calculation of pure-component vapor pressures of candidate organic compounds and activity coefficients of interacting components in the condensed phase, using models such as SIMPOL.15, E-AIM6, and AIOMFAC7. From these results, the water content of the aerosol is predicted, and a comparison between modeled and measured partitioning of inorganic compounds and water vapor are discussed, in addition to organic aerosol volatility prediction based on functional group analysis. [1]- Goldstein, A.H., et al., Biogenic carbon and anthropogenic pollutants combine to form a cooling haze over the southeastern United States. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2009. 106(22), 8835-8840. [2]- Carlton, A.G., Turpin, B.J., 2013. Particle partitioning potential of organic compounds is highest in the Eastern US and driven by anthropogenic water. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions 13, 12743-12770. [3]- Khlystov, A., Stanier, C.O., Takahama, S., Pandis, S.N., 2005. Water content of ambient aerosol during the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres 110, n/a-n/a. [4]- Takahama, S., Johnson, A., Russell, L.M., 2013. Quantification of Carboxylic and Carbonyl Functional Groups in Organic Aerosol Infrared Absorbance Spectra. Aerosol Science and Technology 47, 310-325. [5]- Pankow, J.F., Asher, W.E., 2008. SIMPOL.1: a simple group contribution method for predicting vapor pressures and enthalpies of vaporization of multifunctional organic compounds. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 8, 2773-2796. [6]- Clegg, S.L., Brimblecombe, P., Wexler, A.S., 1998. Thermodynamic Model of the System H+-NH4+-SO42--NO3--H2O at Tropospheric Temperatures. J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 2137-2154. [7]- Zuend, A., Marcolli, C., Booth, A.M., Lienhard, D.M., Soonsin, V., Krieger, U.K., Topping, D.O., McFiggans, G., Peter, T., Seinfeld, J.H., 2011. New and extended parameterization of the thermodynamic model AIOMFAC: calculation of activity coefficients for organic-inorganic mixtures containing carboxyl, hydroxyl, carbonyl, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, and aromatic functional groups. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 11, 9155-9206.

  3. The preparation of new functionalized [2.2]paracyclophane derivatives with N-containing functional groups

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Swaminathan Vijay; Jones, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    Summary The two isomeric bis(isocyanates) 4,12- and 4,16-di-isocyanato[2.2]paracyclophane, 16 and 28, have been prepared from their corresponding diacids by simple routes. The two isomers are versatile intermediates for the preparation of various cyclophanes bearing substituents with nitrogen-containing functional groups, e.g., the pseudo-ortho diamine 8, the bis secondary amine 23, and the crownophanes 18 and 19. Several of these new cyclophane derivatives (18, 19, 22, 26, 28) have been characterized by X-ray structural analysis. PMID:25977718

  4. Effects of spatial grouping on the functional response of predators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cosner, C.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Ault, J.S.; Olson, D.B.

    1999-01-01

    A unified mechanistic approach is given for the derivation of various forms of functional response in predator-prey models. The derivation is based on the principle-of-mass action but with the crucial refinement that the nature of the spatial distribution of predators and/or opportunities for predation are taken into account in an implicit way. If the predators are assumed to have a homogeneous spatial distribution, then the derived functional response is prey-dependent. If the predators are assumed to form a dense colony or school in a single (possibly moving) location, or if the region where predators can encounter prey is assumed to be of limited size, then the functional response depends on both predator and prey densities in a manner that reflects feeding interference between predators. Depending on the specific assumptions, the resulting functional response may be of Beddington-DeAngelis type, of Hassell-Varley type, or ratio-dependent.

  5. Reactivity of End-functionalized Polymers Containing Diels-Alder Functional Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yuan; Zhang, Yuan; Anthamatten, Mitchell

    2013-03-01

    Incorporation of reversible covalent bond into macromolecular systems has proven useful in engineering novel responsive architectures, and Diels-Alder bonding in this context is now well established. However, efficient synthesis of end-functionalized polymers is a major obstacle hindering further development of responsive and modular polymer architectures. In this current research, two immiscible polymers, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and poly(benzyl methacrylate) (PBzMA) with controlled molecular weight, bearing terminal furan-maleimide groups, are prepared via Reversible Addition-Fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The reactivity of such end-functionalized polymers is explored to expose the relationship between chain composition and their ability to undergo modular cross-coupling to form monodisperse block copolymers. To elucidate how reaction conditions affect the efficiency of the Diels-Alder reaction, Hydrogen Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (H-NMR) and Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC) techniques are actively applied. Experimental results will be interpreted on the basis of dissimilarity between interaction energies of polymer segments and the concentration of reactive groups.

  6. Oxidation of alpha-ketoglutarate is required for reductive carboxylation in cancer cells with mitochondrial defects

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Andrew R.; Hu, Zeping; Shi, Xiaolei; Jiang, Lei; Boroughs, Lindsey K.; Kovacs, Zoltan; Boriack, Richard; Rakheja, Dinesh; Sullivan, Lucas B.; Linehan, W. Marston; Chandel, Navdeep S.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mammalian cells generate citrate by decarboxylating pyruvate in the mitochondria to supply the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. In contrast, hypoxia and other impairments of mitochondrial function induce an alternative pathway that produces citrate by reductively carboxylating α-ketoglutarate (AKG) via NADPH-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH). It is unknown how cells generate reducing equivalents necessary to supply reductive carboxylation in the setting of mitochondrial impairment. Here we identified shared metabolic features in cells using reductive carboxylation. Paradoxically, reductive carboxylation was accompanied by concomitant AKG oxidation in the TCA cycle. Inhibiting AKG oxidation decreased reducing equivalent availability and suppressed reductive carboxylation. Interrupting transfer of reducing equivalents from NADH to NADPH by nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase increased NADH abundance and decreased NADPH abundance while suppressing reductive carboxylation. The data demonstrate that reductive carboxylation requires bidirectional AKG metabolism along oxidative and reductive pathways, with the oxidative pathway producing reducing equivalents used to operate IDH in reverse. PMID:24857658

  7. Rectifying and negative differential resistance behaviors of a functionalized Tour wire: The position effects of functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Gordon; Zhang, Zhenhua; Pan, Jinbo

    2011-09-01

    Based on Tour wire, we construct four D-π-A molecular devices with different positional functional groups, in an attempt to explore the position effects of functional groups on their electronic transport properties and to show that some interesting physical phenomena can emerge by only varying the position of functional groups. The first-principles calculations demonstrate that the position of functional groups can affect the rectifying behaviors (rectification direction and ratio) significantly and determines whether or not the negative differential resistance (NDR) can be observed as well as the physical origin of the NDR phenomenon.

  8. Post-Functionalized Polymer Brushes for Bio-Separation: Tuning GFP Adsorption via Functional Group Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamanti, Steve; Arifuzzaman, Shafi; Genzer, Jan; Naik, Rajesh; Vaia, Richard

    2007-03-01

    An inexpensive and robust biosensor platform that can be tuned to separate and/or detect complex mixtures of biomolecules while minimizing reagents would be of great use for military, homeland security, and medical diagnostic applications. Gradient surfaces of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) brushes have been previously shown to spatially localize biomolecule binding, while minimizing non-specific adsorption of the same biomolecule on other regions of the gradient specimen. In order to further improve the specificity and to provide latent functionality for detection of the binding events, post-polymerization modification of PHEMA with various functional groups has been investigated. Using standard succinimide-based coupling, hydroxyl pendants of PHEMA brushes were conjugated to oligo-peptides, alkanes and oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) through an alpha-terminus primary amine. Ellipsometry, contact angle, XPS and ER-FTIR spectroscopy indicated that coupling occurred with efficiencies ranging from 10-40%. Post-functionalization of PHEMA with OEG and hexadecane allows manipulation of the hydrophilicity of the surface and thus tuning of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) binding.

  9. Discriminant Function Analysis of Inventoried Interests Among Selected Engineering Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemens, Bryan; Linden, James

    The utility of multiple discriminant function analysis (MDFA) to differentiate among the interest patterns of engineers was examined. Subjects were 229 engineers who were administered the Strong Vocational Interest Blank (SVIB) in 1935 as college freshmen (1935 FR) and again in 1966, and 210 freshmen who completed the SVIB in 1966 and had…

  10. Effects of Oxygen-Containing Functional Groups on Supercapacitor Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Schwenzer, Birgit; Vijayakumar, M.

    2014-07-03

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the interface between graphene and the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate (BMIM OTf) were carried out to gain molecular-level insights into the performance of graphene-based supercapacitors and, in particular, determine the effects of the presence of oxygen-containing defects at the graphene surface on their integral capacitance. The MD simulations predict that increasing the surface coverage of hydroxyl groups negatively affects the integral capacitance, whereas the effect of the presence of epoxy groups is much less significant. The calculated variations in capacitance are found to be directly correlated to the interfacial structure. Indeed, hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl groups and SO3 anion moieties prevents BMIM+ and OTf- molecules from interacting favorably in the dense interfacial layer and restrains the orientation and mobility of OTf- ions, thereby reducing the permittivity of the ionic liquid at the interface. The results of the molecular simulations can facilitate the rational design of electrode materials for supercapacitors.

  11. Defining functional groups based on running kinematics using Self-Organizing Maps and Support Vector Machines.

    PubMed

    Hoerzer, Stefan; von Tscharner, Vinzenz; Jacob, Christian; Nigg, Benno M

    2015-07-16

    A functional group is a collection of individuals who react in a similar way to a specific intervention/product such as a sport shoe. Matching footwear features to a functional group can possibly enhance footwear-related comfort, improve running performance, and decrease the risk of movement-related injuries. To match footwear features to a functional group, one has to first define the different groups using their distinctive movement patterns. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to propose and apply a methodological approach to define functional groups with different movement patterns using Self-Organizing Maps and Support Vector Machines. Further study objectives were to identify differences in age, gender and footwear-related comfort preferences between the functional groups. Kinematic data and subjective comfort preferences of 88 subjects (16-76 years; 45 m/43 f) were analysed. Eight functional groups with distinctive movement patterns were defined. The findings revealed that most of the groups differed in age or gender. Certain functional groups differed in their comfort preferences and, therefore, had group-specific footwear requirements to enhance footwear-related comfort. Some of the groups, which had group-specific footwear requirements, did not show any differences in age or gender. This is important because when defining functional groups simply using common grouping criteria like age or gender, certain functional groups with group-specific movement patterns and footwear requirements might not be detected. This emphasises the power of the proposed pattern recognition approach to automatically define groups by their distinctive movement patterns in order to be able to address their group-specific product requirements. PMID:25869722

  12. Vibrational spectroscopic and molecular docking study of 4-Methylphenylquinoline-2-carboxylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazal, E.; Panicker, C. Yohannan; Varghese, Hema Tresa; Nagarajan, S.; Sudha, B. S.; War, Javeed Ahamad; Srivastava, S. K.; Harikumar, B.; Anto, P. L.

    2015-05-01

    FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 4-Methylphenylquinoline-2-carboxylate were recorded and analyzed. The structure of the molecule has been optimized and structural characteristics have been determined by density functional theory. The geometrical parameters (DFT) are in agreement with the XRD results. HOMO and LUMO and other chemical properties are reported. Nonlinear optical properties are also reported. A detailed molecular picture of the title compound and its interactions were obtained from NBO analysis. The negative (red and yellow) regions of the MEP are related to electrophilic reactivity and the positive (blue) regions to nucleophilic reactivity, as shown in the MEP plot and the carbonyl group and the phenyl rings are observed as electrophilic. PASS analysis predicts that the 4-Methylphenylquinoline-2-carboxylate might exhibit anti-diabetic activity. Molecular docking results suggest that the compound might exhibit inhibitory activity against GPb.

  13. A Generalized Logistic Regression Procedure to Detect Differential Item Functioning among Multiple Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magis, David; Raiche, Gilles; Beland, Sebastien; Gerard, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We present an extension of the logistic regression procedure to identify dichotomous differential item functioning (DIF) in the presence of more than two groups of respondents. Starting from the usual framework of a single focal group, we propose a general approach to estimate the item response functions in each group and to test for the presence

  14. A Generalized Logistic Regression Procedure to Detect Differential Item Functioning among Multiple Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magis, David; Raiche, Gilles; Beland, Sebastien; Gerard, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We present an extension of the logistic regression procedure to identify dichotomous differential item functioning (DIF) in the presence of more than two groups of respondents. Starting from the usual framework of a single focal group, we propose a general approach to estimate the item response functions in each group and to test for the presence…

  15. Duffy blood group antigens: structure, serological properties and function.

    PubMed

    Łukasik, Ewa; Waśniowska, Kazimiera

    2016-01-01

    Duffy (Fy) blood group antigens are located on seven-transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on erythrocytes and endothelial cells, which acts as atypical chemokine receptor (ACKR1) and malarial receptor. The biological role of the Duffy glycoprotein has not been explained yet. It is suggested that Duffy protein modulate the intensity of the inflammatory response. The Duffy blood group system consists of two major antigens, Fya and Fyb, encoded by two codominant alleles designated FY*A and FY*B which differ by a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at position 125G>A of the FY gene that results in Gly42Asp amino acid change in the Fya and Fyb antigens, respectively. The presence of antigen Fya and/or Fyb on the erythrocytes determine three Duffy-positive phenotypes: Fy(a+b-), Fy(a-b+) and Fy(a+b+), identified in Caucasian population. The Duffy-negative phenotype Fy(a-b-), frequent in Africans, but very rare in Caucasians, is defined by the homozygous state of FY*B-33 alleles. The FY*B-33 allele is associated with a SNP -33T>C in the promoter region of the FY gene, which suppresses erythroid expression of this gene without affecting its expression in other tissues. The FY*X allele, found in Caucasians, is correlated with weak expression of Fyb antigen. Fyx antigen differs from the native Fyb by the Arg89Cys and Ala100Thr amino acid substitutions due to SNPs: 265C>T and 298G>A in FY*B allele. The frequency of the FY alleles shows marked geographic disparities, the FY*B-33 allele is predominant in Africans, the FY*B in Caucasians, while the FY*A allele is dominant in Asians and it is the most prevalent allele globally. PMID:26943312

  16. Applying AFM-based nanofabrication for measuring the thickness of nanopatterns: the role of head groups in the vertical self-assembly of omega-functionalized n-alkanethiols.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Algernon T; Ngunjiri, Johnpeter N; Serem, Wilson K; Lawrence, Steve O; Yu, Jing-Jiang; Crowe, William E; Garno, Jayne C

    2010-03-01

    Molecules of n-alkanethiols with methyl head groups typically form well-ordered monolayers during solution self-assembly for a wide range of experimental conditions. However, we have consistently observed that, for either carboxylic acid or thiol-terminated n-alkanethiols, under certain conditions nanografted patterns are generated with a thickness corresponding precisely to a double layer. To investigate the role of head groups for solution self-assembly, designed patterns of omega-functionalized n-alkanethiols were nanografted with systematic changes in concentration. Nanografting is an in situ approach for writing patterns of thiolated molecules on gold surfaces by scanning with an AFM tip under high force, accomplished in dilute solutions of desired ink molecules. As the tip is scanned across the surface of a self-assembled monolayer under force, the matrix molecules are displaced from the surface and are immediately replaced with fresh molecules from solution to generate nanopatterns. In this report, side-by-side comparison of nanografted patterns is achieved for different matrix molecules using AFM images. The chain length and head groups (i.e., carboxyl, hydroxyl, methyl, thiol) were varied for the nanopatterns and matrix monolayers. Interactions such as head-to-head dimerization affect the vertical self-assembly of omega-functionalized n-alkanethiol molecules within nanografted patterns. At certain threshold concentrations, double layers were observed to form when nanografting with head groups of carboxylic acid and dithiols, whereas single layers were generated exclusively for nanografted patterns with methyl and hydroxyl groups, regardless of changes in concentration. PMID:20131892

  17. Water electrolyte promoted oxidation of functional thiol groups.

    PubMed

    Lauwers, K; Breynaert, E; Rombouts, I; Delcour, J A; Kirschhock, C E A

    2016-04-15

    The formation of disulfide bonds is of the utmost importance for a wide range of food products with gluten or globular proteins as functional agents. Here, the impact of mineral electrolyte composition of aqueous solutions on thiol oxidation kinetics was studied, using glutathione (GSH) and cysteine (CYS) as model systems. Interestingly, the oxidation rate of both compounds into their corresponding disulfides was significantly higher in common tap water than in ultrapure water. The systematic study of different electrolyte components showed that especially CaCl2 improved the oxidation rate of GSH. However, this effect was not observed for CYS, which indicated a strong impact of the local chemical environment on thiol oxidation kinetics. PMID:26675862

  18. Selective carboxyl methylation of structurally altered calmodulins in Xenopus oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Desrosiers, R.R.; Romanik, E.A.; O'Connor, C.M. )

    1990-12-05

    The eucaryotic protein carboxyl methyltransferase specifically modifies atypical D-aspartyl and L-isoaspartyl residues which are generated spontaneously as proteins age. The selectivity of the enzyme for altered proteins in intact cells was explored by co-injecting Xenopus laevis oocytes with S-adenosyl-L-(methyl-3H)methionine and structurally altered calmodulins generated during a 14-day preincubation in vitro. Control experiments indicated that the oocyte protein carboxyl methyltransferase was not saturated with endogenous substrates, since protein carboxyl methylation rates could be stimulated up to 8-fold by increasing concentrations of injected calmodulin. The oocyte protein carboxyl methyltransferase showed strong selectivities for bovine brain and bacterially synthesized calmodulins which had been preincubated in the presence of 1 mM EDTA relative to calmodulins which had been preincubated with 1 mM CaCl2. Radioactive methyl groups were incorporated into base-stable linkages with recombinant calmodulin as well as into carboxyl methyl esters following its microinjection into oocytes. This base-stable radioactivity most likely represents the trimethylation of lysine 115, a highly conserved post-translational modification which is present in bovine and Xenopus but not in bacterially synthesized calmodulin. Endogenous oocyte calmodulin incorporates radioactivity into both carboxyl methyl esters and into base-stable linkages following microinjection of oocytes with S-adenosyl-(methyl-3H)methionine alone. The rate of oocyte calmodulin carboxyl methylation in injected oocytes is calculated to be similar to that of lysine 115 trimethylation, suggesting that the rate of calmodulin carboxyl methylation is similar to that of calmodulin synthesis. At steady state, oocyte calmodulin contains approximately 0.0002 esters/mol of protein, which turn over rapidly.

  19. Preconversion catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic functional groups. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 30, 1996 and April 1--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Kubiak, C.P.

    1997-05-01

    Over the course of his studies on catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic residues in coal by carbon monoxide, the author performed preliminary investigations into the removal of other heteroatom groups. This report describes his attempted carbonylation of phenyl amido complexes. These studies resulted in the surprisingly facile formation of amidines. The amidine group is the nitrogen analog of carboxylic acids and esters. This functional group combines the properties of an azomethane-like C=N double bond with an amide-like C-N single bond. This group, like the related allyl (C-C-C), aza-allyl (C-N-C), and carboxylato (O-C-O) groups, form a number of transition metal derivatives, with both early and late transition metals. Various bonding modes of the amidino group have been reported. However, most isolated complexes have the amidino ligand as a chelating ligand or bridging two metals. This is due to the preference of amidines to bond via the nitrogen lone pairs, in contrast to the {eta}{sup 3} {pi} bonding observed in metal-allyl complexes.

  20. Effects of Oxygen Element and Oxygen-Containing Functional Groups on Surface Wettability of Coal Dust with Various Metamorphic Degrees Based on XPS Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Gang; Xu, Cuicui; Cheng, Weimin; Zhang, Qi; Nie, Wen

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the difference of surface oxygen element and oxygen-containing functional groups among coal dusts with different metamorphic degrees and their influence on surface wettability, a series of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments on 6 coal samples are carried out. The result demonstrates that the O/C ratio of coal surface shows an overall increasing trend compared with the result of its elements analysis. As the metamorphic degree increases, the O/C ratio on the surface gradually declines and the hydrophilic groups tend to fall off from coal surface. It could be found that different coals show different surface distributions of carboxyl and hydroxyl which are considered as the greatest promoter to the wettability of coal surface. With the change of metamorphic degree, the distribution of ether group is irregular while the carbonyl distribution keeps stable. In general, as the metamorphic degree goes higher, the content of oxygen-containing polar group tends to reduce. According to the measurement results, the contact angle is negatively related to the content of oxygen element, surface oxygen, and polar groups. In addition, compared with surface oxygen content, the content of oxygen-containing polar group serves as a more reasonable indicator of coal dust wettability. PMID:26257980

  1. Critical effect of dependency groups on the function of networks.

    PubMed

    Parshani, Roni; Buldyrev, Sergey V; Havlin, Shlomo

    2011-01-18

    Current network models assume one type of links to define the relations between the network entities. However, many real networks can only be correctly described using two different types of relations. Connectivity links that enable the nodes to function cooperatively as a network and dependency links that bind the failure of one network element to the failure of other network elements. Here we present an analytical framework for studying the robustness of networks that include both connectivity and dependency links. We show that a synergy exists between the failure of connectivity and dependency links that leads to an iterative process of cascading failures that has a devastating effect on the network stability. We present exact analytical results for the dramatic change in the network behavior when introducing dependency links. For a high density of dependency links, the network disintegrates in a form of a first-order phase transition, whereas for a low density of dependency links, the network disintegrates in a second-order transition. Moreover, opposed to networks containing only connectivity links where a broader degree distribution results in a more robust network, when both types of links are present a broad degree distribution leads to higher vulnerability. PMID:21191103

  2. Influence of the Surface Functional Group Density on the Carbon-Nanotube-Induced ?-Chymotrypsin Structure and Activity Alterations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xingchen; Hao, Fang; Lu, Dawei; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Qunfang; Jiang, Guibin

    2015-08-26

    Because of the special properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), their applications have been introduced to many fields. The biosafety of these emerging materials is of high concern concomitantly. Because CNTs may initially bind with proteins in biofluids before they exert biological effects, it is of great importance to understand how the target proteins interact with these exogenous nanomaterials. Here we investigated the interaction between ?-chymotrypsin (?-ChT) and carboxylized multiwalled CNTs in a simulated biophysical environment utilizing the techniques of fluorescence, UV-vis, circular dichroism spectroscopy, ? potential, atomic force microscopy, and bicinchoninic acid analysis. It was demonstrated that CNTs interacted with ?-ChT through electrostatic forces, causing a decrement in the ?-helix and an increment in the ?-sheet content of the protein. The protein fluorescence was quenched in a static mode. The increase in the surface modification density of CNTs enhanced the protein absorption and decreased the enzymatic activity correspondingly. ?-ChT activity inhibition induced by CNTs with low surface modification density exhibited noncompetitive characteristics; however, a competitive feature was observed when CNTs with high surface modification density interacted with the protein. An increase of the ionic strength in the reaction buffer may help to reduce the interaction between CNTs and ?-ChT because the high ionic strength may favor the release of the protein from binding on a CNT surface modified with functional groups. Accordingly, the functionalization density on the CNT surface plays an important role in the regulation of their biological effects and is worthy of concern when new modified CNTs are developed. PMID:26248557

  3. Metallicity Distribution Functions of Four Local Group Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Teresa L.; Holtzman, Jon; Saha, Abhijit; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J.

    2015-06-01

    We present stellar metallicities in Leo I, Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix dwarf galaxies derived from medium (F390M) and broad (F555W, F814W) band photometry using the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We measured metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) in two ways, (1) matching stars to isochrones in color-color diagrams and (2) solving for the best linear combination of synthetic populations to match the observed color-color diagram. The synthetic technique reduces the effect of photometric scatter and produces MDFs 30%-50% narrower than the MDFs produced from individually matched stars. We fit the synthetic and individual MDFs to analytical chemical evolution models (CEMs) to quantify the enrichment and the effect of gas flows within the galaxies. Additionally, we measure stellar metallicity gradients in Leo I and II. For IC 1613 and Phoenix our data do not have the radial extent to confirm a metallicity gradient for either galaxy. We find the MDF of Leo I (dwarf spheroidal) to be very peaked with a steep metal-rich cutoff and an extended metal-poor tail, while Leo II (dwarf spheroidal), Phoenix (dwarf transition), and IC 1613 (dwarf irregular) have wider, less peaked MDFs than Leo I. A simple CEM is not the best fit for any of our galaxies; therefore we also fit the “Best Accretion Model” of Lynden-Bell. For Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix we find similar accretion parameters for the CEM even though they all have different effective yields, masses, star formation histories, and morphologies. We suggest that the dynamical history of a galaxy is reflected in the MDF, where broad MDFs are seen in galaxies that have chemically evolved in relative isolation and narrowly peaked MDFs are seen in galaxies that have experienced more complicated dynamical interactions concurrent with their chemical evolution. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program 12304.

  4. Vibrational spectra, electronic absorption, nonlinear optical properties, evaluation of bonding, chemical reactivity and thermodynamic properties of ethyl 4-(1-(2-(hydrazinecarbonothioyl)hydrazono)ethyl)-3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate molecule by ab initio HF and density functional methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. N.; Rawat, Poonam; Sahu, Sangeeta

    2015-01-01

    In this work, detailed vibrational spectral analysis of ethyl 4-(1-(2-(hydrazinecarbonothioyl)hydrazono)ethyl)-3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate (EHCHEDPC) molecule has been carried out using FT-IR spectroscopy and potential energy distribution (PED). Theoretical calculations were performed by ab initio RHF and density functional theory (DFT) method, using 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311+G(d,p) basis sets. The other carried outwork cover: structural, thermodynamic properties, electronic transitions, bonding, multiple interaction, chemical reactivity and hyperpolarizability analysis. The results of the calculation were applied to the simulated spectra of (EHCHEDPC), which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. The vibrational analysis shows red shift in both group, the proton donor (pyrrole Nsbnd H) and proton acceptor (Cdbnd O of ester) indicating the presence of intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) has been used to find electronic excitations and their nature. The results of natural bond orbital (NBOs) analysis show the charges transfer and delocalization in various intra- and intermolecular interactions. The binding energy of intermolecular multiple interactions is calculated to be 12.54 kcal mol-1 using QTAIM calculation. The electronic descriptors analyses reveal the investigated molecule used as precursor for heterocyclic derivatives synthesis. First hyperpolarizability (β0) has been computed to evaluate non-linear optical (NLO) response.

  5. Vibrational spectra, electronic absorption, nonlinear optical properties, evaluation of bonding, chemical reactivity and thermodynamic properties of ethyl 4-(1-(2-(hydrazinecarbonothioyl)hydrazono)ethyl)-3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate molecule by ab initio HF and density functional methods.

    PubMed

    Singh, R N; Rawat, Poonam; Sahu, Sangeeta

    2015-01-25

    In this work, detailed vibrational spectral analysis of ethyl 4-(1-(2-(hydrazinecarbonothioyl)hydrazono)ethyl)-3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate (EHCHEDPC) molecule has been carried out using FT-IR spectroscopy and potential energy distribution (PED). Theoretical calculations were performed by ab initio RHF and density functional theory (DFT) method, using 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311+G(d,p) basis sets. The other carried outwork cover: structural, thermodynamic properties, electronic transitions, bonding, multiple interaction, chemical reactivity and hyperpolarizability analysis. The results of the calculation were applied to the simulated spectra of (EHCHEDPC), which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. The vibrational analysis shows red shift in both group, the proton donor (pyrrole N-H) and proton acceptor (C=O of ester) indicating the presence of intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) has been used to find electronic excitations and their nature. The results of natural bond orbital (NBOs) analysis show the charges transfer and delocalization in various intra- and intermolecular interactions. The binding energy of intermolecular multiple interactions is calculated to be 12.54 kcal mol(-1) using QTAIM calculation. The electronic descriptors analyses reveal the investigated molecule used as precursor for heterocyclic derivatives synthesis. First hyperpolarizability (β0) has been computed to evaluate non-linear optical (NLO) response. PMID:25168004

  6. Functional Groups Based on Leaf Physiology: Are they Spatially and Temporally Robust?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Tammy E.; Brooks, J. Renee; Quincy, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The functional grouping hypothesis, which suggests that complexity in function can be simplified by grouping species with similar responses, was tested in the Florida scrub habitat. Functional groups were identified based on how species in fire maintained FL scrub function in terms of carbon, water and nitrogen dynamics. The suite of physiologic parameters measured to determine function included both instantaneous gas exchange measurements obtained from photosynthetic light response curves and integrated measures of function. Using cluster analysis, five distinct physiologically-based functional groups were identified. Using non-parametric multivariate analyses, it was determined that these five groupings were not altered by plot differences or by the three different management regimes; prescribed burn, mechanically treated and burn, and fire-suppressed. The physiological groupings also remained robust between the two years 1999 and 2000. In order for these groupings to be of use for scaling ecosystem processes, there needs to be an easy-to-measure morphological indicator of function. Life form classifications were able to depict the physiological groupings more adequately than either specific leaf area or leaf thickness. THe ability of life forms to depict the groupings was improved by separating the parasitic Ximenia americana from the shrub category.

  7. Improved preparation of haloalkyl bridged carboxylic ortho esters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protection of a carboxylic acid function as a bridged ortho ester derivative enables the use of strong basic conditions in the synthetic strategy. For example, a protected 3-halopropionic acid can behave like an alkyl halide because the protons, alpha to the halide function, are less acidic. Ester...

  8. Organometallic carboxylate resists for extreme ultraviolet with high sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passarelli, James; Murphy, Michael; Re, Ryan Del; Sortland, Miriam; Hotalen, Jodi; Dousharm, Levi; Fallica, Roberto; Ekinci, Yasin; Neisser, Mark; Freedman, Daniel A.; Brainard, Robert L.

    2015-10-01

    We have developed organometallic carboxylate compounds [RnM)] capable of acting as negative-tone extreme ultraviolet (EUV) resists. The most sensitive of these resists contain antimony, three R-groups and two carboxylate groups, and carboxylate groups with polymerizable olefins (e.g., acrylate, methacrylate, or styrenecarboxylate). Evidence suggests that high sensitivity is achieved through the polymerization of olefins in the exposed region. We have performed a systematic sensitivity study of the molecules of the type RnM) where we have studied seven R groups, four main group metals (M), and three polymerizable carboxylate groups (O2CR?). The sensitivity of these resists was evaluated using Emax or dose to maximum resist thickness after exposure and development. We found that the greatest predictor of sensitivity of the RnSb) resists is their level of polymerizable olefins. We mathematically define the polymerizable olefin loading (POL) as the ratio of the number of olefins versus the number of nonhydrogen atoms. Linear and log plots of Emax versus POL for a variety of molecules of the type R3Sb) lend insight into the behavior of these resists.

  9. The interaction of carboxylic acids with aluminium oxides: journeying from a basic understanding of alumina nanoparticles to water treatment for industrial and humanitarian applications.

    PubMed

    Barron, Andrew R

    2014-06-14

    Carboxylic acids are found to react with aluminium oxides via a topotactic reaction such that the carboxylate acts as a bridging ligand. This reaction allows for carboxylate-functionalized alumina nanoparticles to be prepared directly from boehmite (AlOOH). Understanding the structural relationship between molecular and surface species allows for the rationalization/prediction of suitable alternative ligands as well as alternative oxide surfaces. The identity of the carboxylate substituent controls the pH stability of a nanoparticle as well as the porosity and processability of ceramics prepared by thermolysis. Through the choice of functional groups on the carboxylic acid the properties of the alumina surface or alumina nanoparticle can be tailored. For example, the solubility/miscibility of nanoparticles can be tuned to the solvent/matrix, and the wettability to be varied from hydrophobic to super hydrophilic. The choice Zwitter ionic substituents on alumina micro-/ultra-filtration membranes are found to enhance the flux and limit fouling while allowing for the facile separation of organic compounds from water. Examples are presented of purification of frac and flow-back water from oil well production as well as providing drinking water from contaminated sources in underdeveloped regions. PMID:24728503

  10. [Response of Phytoplankton Functional Groups to Eutrophication in Summer at Xiaoguan Reservoir].

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Li, Qiu-hua; Jiao, Shu-lin; Li, Yue; Xiao, Jing; Deng, Long; Sun, Rong-guo; Gao, Yong-chun; Luo, Lan

    2015-12-01

    Hydrology and Water Resources Bureau of Guizhou Province, Guiyang 550002, China) Abstract: In order to explore the distribution characteristics of phytoplankton functional groups, eutrophication characteristics and response of phytoplankton functional groups to eutrophication in Xiaoguan Reservoir, phytoplankton and water samples were taken once a week from 25th July 2014 to 27th September 2014. The results showed that there were 22 phytoplankton functional groups, groups S1, D, J, B, G, MP, L₀, SN, X1, Y, Xph, F, T and W1 were comparatively common functional groups, Wherein, S1, D and J were the dominant functional groups. Weekly dynamics of phytoplankton functional groups were: S1-->S1-->S1-->S1-->S1--S1-->S1-->J/D/S1-->Sl1- >/1D. group Sl1dominated over other groups, the cell abundance of S1 appeared two peaks at week 5 and week 7 respectively, but there was a slump at week 8, and rose again at last, compared to two peaks before, the cell abundance had dropped from 10⁸cells · L⁻¹ to 10⁷cells · L⁻¹ Water flush caused by discharge gate opening artificially was the main reason. Based on the three methods of eutrophication evaluation, the water was in moderately eutrophic and eutrophic states in Xiaoguan Reservoir in the summer of 2014. Multivariate analysis (RDA) indicated transparency was the main factor affecting the distribution of phytoplankton functional groups, and nutrients were no longer the limiting factor. The study suggested that phytoplankton functional groups could make a good response to eutrophication: groups S1 and J adapted to the turbid eutrophic water bodies, D adapted to shallow turbid waters and was sensitive to nutrient depletion. Also, common functional groups like G, X1, WW1 F etc. mostly adapted to eutrophic water bodies. PMID:27011978

  11. catena-Poly[[(6-carb-oxy-pyrazine-2-carboxyl-ato)lithium]-μ-aqua].

    PubMed

    Starosta, Wojciech; Leciejewicz, Janusz

    2011-12-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, [Li(C(6)H(3)N(2)O(4))(H(2)O)](n), contains an Li(I) ion with a distorted trigonal-bipyramidal coordination environment. It is chelated by a singly protonated ligand mol-ecule via its heterocyclic N atom, by two O aoms, each donated by an adjacent carboxyl-ate group, and is further coordinated by a water O atom which acts as a bridge, forming a mol-ecular ribbon. A proton attached to one of the carboxyl-ate O atoms is situated on an inversion centre and forms a short centrosymmetric hydrogen bond, generating mol-ecular layers parallel to the ac plane. These layers are held together by weak O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds in which the coordinated water mol-ecules act as donors, whereas carboxyl-ate O atoms are acceptors. PMID:22199521

  12. Electrochemiluminescence sensor for melamine based on a Ru(bpy)3(2+)-doped silica nanoparticles/carboxylic acid functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes/Nafion composite film modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaomei; Lian, Sai; Ma, Ying; Peng, Aihong; Tian, Xiaotian; Huang, Zhiyong; Chen, Xi

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) sensor for the determination of melamine (MEL) was developed based on a Ru(bpy)3(2+)-doped silica nanoparticles (RUDS)/carboxylic acid functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CMWCNTs)/Nafion composite film modified electrode. The homogeneous spherical RUDS were synthesized by a reverse microemulsion method. As Ru(bpy)3(2+) were encapsulated in the RUDS, Ru(bpy)3(2+) dropping from the modified electrode can be greatly prevented, which is helpful for obtaining a stable ECL signal. Moreover, to improve the conductivity of the film and promote the electron transfer rate on electrode surface, CMWCNTs with excellent electrical conductivity and large surface area were applied in the construction of the sensing film. As CMWCNTs acted as electron bridges making more Ru(bpy)3(2+) participate in the reaction, the ECL intensity was greatly enhanced. Under the optimum conditions, the relative ECL signal (△IECL) was proportional to the logarithmic MEL concentration ranging from 5×10(-13) to 1×10(-7)molL(-1) with a detection limit of 1×10(-13)molL(-1). To verify the reliability, the thus-fabricated ECL sensor was applied to determine the concentration of MEL in milk. Based on these investigations, the proposed ECL sensor exhibited good feasibility and high sensitivity for the determination of MEL, promising the applicability of this sensor in practical analysis. PMID:26695338

  13. Density functional study of electronic, charge density, and chemical bonding properties of 9-methyl-3-Thiophen-2-YI-Thieno [3,2-e] [1, 2, 4] Thriazolo [4,3-c] pyrimidine-8-Carboxylic acid ethyl ester crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshak, A. H.; Kamarudin, H.; Alahmed, Z. A.; Auluck, S.; Chyský, Jan

    2014-06-01

    A comprehensive theoretical density functional investigation of the electronic crystal structure, chemical bonding, and the electron charge densities of 9-Methyl-3-Thiophen-2-YI-Thieno [3, 2-e] [1, 2, 4] Thriazolo [4,3-c] Pyrimidine-8-Carboxylic Acid Ethyl Ester (C15H12N4O2S2) is performed. The density of states at Fermi level equal to 5.50 (3.45) states/Ry cell, and the calculated bare electronic specific heat coefficient is found to be 0.95 (0.59) mJ/mole-K2 for the local density approximation (Engel-Vosko generalized gradient approximation). The electronic charge density space distribution contours in (1 0 0) and (1 1 0) planes were calculated. We find that there are two independent molecules (A and B) in the asymmetric unit exhibit intramolecular C-H…O, C-H…N interactions. This intramolecular interaction is different in molecules A and B, where A molecule show C-H…O interaction while B molecule exhibit C-H…N interaction. We should emphasis that there is π-π interaction between the pyrimidine rings of the two neighbors B molecules gives extra strengths and stabilizations to the superamolecular structure. The calculated distance between the two neighbors pyrimidine rings found to be 3.345 Å, in good agreement with the measured one (3.424(1) Å).

  14. Functional group and species responses to spring precipitation in three semi-arid rangeland ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determining if precipitation-induced changes to forage production and basal and foliar cover in semi-arid rangelands are species-specific, functional group-specific or ubiquitous across species and functional groups will enhance decision making among producers and increase precision of forage produc...

  15. Development of acid functional groups during the thermal degradation of wood and wood components

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study provides data on acid functional groups in charcoals and how the acid functional group content varies with the formation conditions. Chars were created from purified cellulose, purified lignin, pine wood, and pine bark. The charring temperatures and charring duration were controlled in a ...

  16. Synthesis of porous carbon fibers with strong anion exchange functional groups.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weihua; Hu, Jingtian; Han, Zheshen; Wang, Zixing; Zheng, Zhen; Langer, James; Economy, James

    2015-06-18

    Hybrid porous carbon fibers with strong anion-exchangeable functional groups (HACAX) were synthesized by alkylation of pyrolyzed polyacrylonitrile. HACAX exhibits generic stable positively charged functional groups. This expands the applications of porous carbon media for interacting with anions without adjusting pH, such as Cr(vi) adsorption at natural pH. PMID:25990389

  17. Calcium carbonate crystallization controlled by functional groups: A mini-review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hua; Shen, Xing-Can; Wang, Xiu-Mei; Du, Chang

    2013-03-01

    Various functional groups have been suggested to play essential roles on biomineralization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in natural system. 2D and 3D models of regularly arranged functional groups have been established to investigate their effect on CaCO3 crystallization. This mini-review summarizes the recent progress and the future development is prospected.

  18. 14 CFR 10 - Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group I Air Carriers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group I Air Carriers Section 10 Section Section 10 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... Functional Classification—Operating Expenses of Group I Air Carriers 5100Flying Operations. (a) This...

  19. Biogeographical boundaries, functional group structure and diversity of Rocky Shore communities along the Argentinean coast.

    PubMed

    Wieters, Evie A; McQuaid, Christopher; Palomo, Gabriela; Pappalardo, Paula; Navarrete, Sergio A

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the extent to which functional structure and spatial variability of intertidal communities coincide with major biogeographical boundaries, areas where extensive compositional changes in the biota are observed over a limited geographic extension. We then investigate whether spatial variation in the biomass of functional groups, over geographic (10's km) and local (10's m) scales, could be associated to species diversity within and among these groups. Functional community structure expressed as abundance (density, cover and biomass) and composition of major functional groups was quantified through field surveys at 20 rocky intertidal shores spanning six degrees of latitude along the southwest Atlantic coast of Argentina and extending across the boundaries between the Argentinean and Magellanic Provinces. Patterns of abundance of individual functional groups were not uniformly matched with biogeographical regions. Only ephemeral algae showed an abrupt geographical discontinuity coincident with changes in biogeographic boundaries, and this was limited to the mid intertidal zone. We identified 3-4 main 'groups' of sites in terms of the total and relative abundance of the major functional groups, but these did not coincide with biogeographical boundaries, nor did they follow latitudinal arrangement. Thus, processes that determine the functional structure of these intertidal communities are insensitive to biogeographical boundaries. Over both geographical and local spatial scales, and for most functional groups and tidal levels, increases in species richness within the functional group was significantly associated to increased total biomass and reduced spatial variability of the group. These results suggest that species belonging to the same functional group are sufficiently uncorrelated over space (i.e. metres and site-to-site ) to stabilize patterns of biomass variability and, in this manner, provide a buffer, or "insurance", against spatial variability in environmental conditions. PMID:23166756

  20. Comparative electrochemical degradation of salicylic and aminosalicylic acids: Influence of functional groups on decay kinetics and mineralization.

    PubMed

    Florenza, Xavier; Garcia-Segura, Sergi; Centellas, Francesc; Brillas, Enric

    2016-07-01

    Solutions of 100 mL with 1.20 mM of salicylic acid (SA), 4-aminosalicylic acid (4-ASA) or 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) have been comparatively degraded by anodic oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (AO-H2O2), electro-Fenton (EF) and photoelectro-Fenton (PEF). Trials were carried out with a stirred tank reactor with a BDD anode and an air-diffusion cathode for continuous H2O2 production. A marked influence of the functional groups of the drugs was observed in their decay kinetics, increasing in the order SA < 5-ASA < 4-ASA in AO-H2O2 and 5-ASA < SA < 4-ASA in EF and PEF, due to the different attack of OH generated at the BDD surface and in the bulk from Fenton's reaction, respectively. This effect was clearly observed when varying the current density between 16.7 and 100 mA cm(-2). The relative mineralization power of the processes always followed the sequence: AO-H2O2 < EF < PEF. The three drugs underwent analogous mineralization abatement up to 88% by AO-H2O2 at 100 mA cm(-2). The mineralization rate in EF and PEF grew in the order: 4-ASA < 5-ASA < SA. The most powerful process was PEF, attaining >98% mineralization for all the drugs at 100 mA cm(-2). Oxalic and oxamic acids were detected as final short-linear aliphatic carboxylic acids by ion-exclusion HPLC, allowing the fast photolysis of their Fe(III) complexes by UVA light to justify the high power of PEF. PMID:27045634

  1. Biogeographical Boundaries, Functional Group Structure and Diversity of Rocky Shore Communities along the Argentinean Coast

    PubMed Central

    Wieters, Evie A.; McQuaid, Christopher; Palomo, Gabriela; Pappalardo, Paula; Navarrete, Sergio A.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the extent to which functional structure and spatial variability of intertidal communities coincide with major biogeographical boundaries, areas where extensive compositional changes in the biota are observed over a limited geographic extension. We then investigate whether spatial variation in the biomass of functional groups, over geographic (10′s km) and local (10′s m) scales, could be associated to species diversity within and among these groups. Functional community structure expressed as abundance (density, cover and biomass) and composition of major functional groups was quantified through field surveys at 20 rocky intertidal shores spanning six degrees of latitude along the southwest Atlantic coast of Argentina and extending across the boundaries between the Argentinean and Magellanic Provinces. Patterns of abundance of individual functional groups were not uniformly matched with biogeographical regions. Only ephemeral algae showed an abrupt geographical discontinuity coincident with changes in biogeographic boundaries, and this was limited to the mid intertidal zone. We identified 3–4 main ‘groups’ of sites in terms of the total and relative abundance of the major functional groups, but these did not coincide with biogeographical boundaries, nor did they follow latitudinal arrangement. Thus, processes that determine the functional structure of these intertidal communities are insensitive to biogeographical boundaries. Over both geographical and local spatial scales, and for most functional groups and tidal levels, increases in species richness within the functional group was significantly associated to increased total biomass and reduced spatial variability of the group. These results suggest that species belonging to the same functional group are sufficiently uncorrelated over space (i.e. metres and site-to-site ) to stabilize patterns of biomass variability and, in this manner, provide a buffer, or “insurance”, against spatial variability in environmental conditions. PMID:23166756

  2. Titania-Promoted Carboxylic Acid Alkylations of Alkenes and Cascade Addition–Cyclizations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Photochemical reactions employing TiO2 and carboxylic acids under dry anaerobic conditions led to several types of C–C bond-forming processes with electron-deficient alkenes. The efficiency of alkylation varied appreciably with substituents in the carboxylic acids. The reactions of aryloxyacetic acids with maleimides resulted in a cascade process in which a pyrrolochromene derivative accompanied the alkylated succinimide. The selectivity for one or other of these products could be tuned to some extent by employing the photoredox catalyst under different conditions. Aryloxyacetic acids adapted for intramolecular ring closures by inclusion of 2-alkenyl, 2-aryl, or 2-oximinyl functionality reacted rather poorly. Profiles of reactant consumption and product formation for these systems were obtained by an in situ NMR monitoring technique. An array of different catalyst forms were tested for efficiency and ease of use. The proposed mechanism, involving hole capture at the TiO2 surface by the carboxylates followed by CO2 loss, was supported by EPR spectroscopic evidence of the intermediates. Deuterium labeling indicated that the titania likely donates protons from surface hydroxyl groups as well as supplying electrons and holes, thus acting as both a catalyst and a reaction partner. PMID:24437519

  3. Succession of phytoplankton functional groups regulated by monsoonal hydrology in a large canyon-shaped reservoir.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Li-Juan; Wang, Tian; Hu, Ren; Han, Bo-Ping; Wang, Sheng; Qian, Xin; Padisák, Judit

    2011-10-15

    Liuxihe reservoir is a deep, monomictic, oligo-mesotrophic canyon-reservoir in the subtropical monsoon climate region of southern China. Phytoplankton functional groups in the reservoir were investigated and a comparison made between the succession observed in 2008, an exceptionally wet year, and 2009, an average year. The reservoir shows strong annual fluctuations in water level caused by monsoon rains and artificial drawdown. Altogether 28 functional groups of phytoplankton were identified, including 79 genera. Twelve of the groups were analyzed in detail using redundancy analysis. Because of the oligo-mesotrophic and P-limited condition of the reservoir, the dominant functional groups were those tolerant of nutrient (phosphorus) deficiency. The predominant functional groups in the succession process were Groups A (Cyclotella with greatest axial linear dimension<10 μm), B (Cyclotella with greatest axial linear dimension>10 μm), LO (Peridinium), LM (Ceratium and Microcystis), E (Dinobryon and Mallomonas), F (Botryococcus), X1 (Ankistrodesmus, Ankyra, Chlorella and Monoraphidium) and X2 (Chlamydomonas and Chroomonas). The development of groups A, B and LO was remarkably seasonal. Group A was dominant during stratification, when characteristic small size and high surface/volume ratio morphology conferred an advantage. Group LO was dominant during dry stratification, when motility was advantageous. Group B plankton exhibited a high relative biomass during periods of reduced euphotic depth and isothermy. Groups LM, E, F, X1 and X2 occasionally exhibited high relative biomasses attributable to specific environmental events (e.g. drawdown, changes in zooplankton community). A greater diversity of phytoplankton functional groups was apparent during isothermy. This study underscores the usefulness of functional algal groups in studying succession in subtropical impoundments, in which phytoplankton succession can be significantly affected by external factors such as monsoonal hydrology and artificial drawdown, which alter variables such as retention time, mixing regime and thermal structure and influence light and nutrient availability. PMID:21831406

  4. Use of the Sequence Rule for Indexing Functional Groups in Organic Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudrlik, Paul F.

    1973-01-01

    A new method of indexing functional groups in organic compounds is described, utilizing the Cahn-Ingold-Prelog sequence rule. Functional carbon atoms are first classified by functionality, a measure of the oxidation state, then ordered by means of a modified sequence rule. Substructure searching and other applications are discussed. (30…

  5. Microscopic mechanism of electron transfer through the hydrogen bonds between carboxylated alkanethiol molecules connected to gold electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yang; Tu, Xingchen; Wang, Minglang; Wang, Hao; Hou, Shimin; Sanvito, Stefano

    2014-11-07

    The atomic structure and the electron transfer properties of hydrogen bonds formed between two carboxylated alkanethiol molecules connected to gold electrodes are investigated by employing the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. Three types of molecular junctions are constructed, in which one carboxyl alkanethiol molecule contains two methylene, –CH{sub 2}, groups and the other one is composed of one, two, or three –CH{sub 2} groups. Our calculations show that, similarly to the cases of isolated carboxylic acid dimers, in these molecular junctions the two carboxyl, –COOH, groups form two H-bonds resulting in a cyclic structure. When self-interaction corrections are explicitly considered, the calculated transmission coefficients of these three H-bonded molecular junctions at the Fermi level are in good agreement with the experimental values. The analysis of the projected density of states confirms that the covalent Au–S bonds localized at the molecule-electrode interfaces and the electronic coupling between –COOH and S dominate the low-bias junction conductance. Following the increase of the number of the –CH{sub 2} groups, the coupling between –COOH and S decreases deeply. As a result, the junction conductance decays rapidly as the length of the H-bonded molecules increases. These findings not only provide an explanation to the observed distance dependence of the electron transfer properties of H-bonds, but also help the design of molecular devices constructed through H-bonds.

  6. Variation of phytoplankton functional groups modulated by hydraulic controls in Hongze Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chang; Pei, Haiyan; Hu, Wenrong; Hao, Daping; Doblin, Martina A; Ren, Ying; Wei, Jielin; Feng, Yawei

    2015-11-01

    Hongze Lake is a large, shallow, polymictic, eutrophic lake in the eastern China. Phytoplankton functional groups in this lake were investigated from March 2011 to February 2013, and a comparison was made between the eastern, western, and northern regions. The lake shows strong fluctuations in water level caused by monsoon rains and regular hydraulic controls. By application of the phytoplankton functional group approach, this study aims to investigate the spatial and temporal dynamics and analyze their influencing factors. Altogether, 18 functional groups of phytoplankton were identified, encompassing 187 species. In order to seek the best variable describing the phytoplankton functional group distribution, 14 of the groups were analyzed in detail using redundancy analysis. Due to the turbid condition of the lake, the dominant functional groups were those tolerant of low light. The predominant functional groups in the annual succession were D (Cyclotella spp. and Synedra acus), T (Planctonema lauterbornii), P (Fragilaria crotonensis), X1 (Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorella pyrenoidosa), C (Cyclotella meneghiniana and Cyclotella ocellata), and Y (Cryptomonas erosa). An opposite relationship between water level and the biomass of predominant groups was observed in the present study. Water level fluctuations, caused by monsoonal climate and artificial drawdown, were significant factors influencing phytoplankton succession in Hongze Lake, since they alter the hydrological conditions and influence light and nutrient availability. The clearly demonstrated factors, which significantly influence phytoplankton dynamics in Hongze Lake, will help government manage the large shallow lakes with frequent water level fluctuations. PMID:26178825

  7. Identification of carboxylic acid residues in glucoamylase G2 from Aspergillus niger that participate in catalysis and substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Svensson, B; Clarke, A J; Svendsen, I; Møller, H

    1990-02-22

    Functionally important carboxyl groups in glucoamylase G2 from Aspergillus niger were identified using a differential labelling approach which involved modification of the acarbose-inhibited enzyme with 1-ethyl-3-(4-azonia-4,4-dimethylpentyl)carbodiimide (EAC) and inactivation by [3H]EAC following removal of acarbose. Subsequent sequence localization of the substituted acidic residues was facilitated by specific phenylthiohydantoins. The acid cluster Asp176, Glu179 and Glu180 reacted exclusively with [3H]EAC, while Asp112, Asp153, Glu259 and Glu389 had incorporated both [3H]EAC and EAC. It is conceivable that one or two of the [3H]EAC-labelled side chains act in catalysis while the other fully protected residue(s) participates in substrate binding probably together with the partially protected ones. Twelve carboxyl groups that reacted with EAC in the enzyme-acarbose complex were also identified. Asp176, Glu179 and Glu180 are all invariant in fungal glucoamylases. Glu180 was tentatively identified as a catalytic group on the basis of sequence alignments to catalytic regions in isomaltase and alpha-amylase. The partially radiolabelled Asp112 corresponds in Taka-amylase A to Tyr75 situated in a substrate binding loop at a distance from the site of cleavage. A possible correlation between carbodiimide modification of an essential carboxyl group and its role in the glucoamylase catalysis is discussed. PMID:2108020

  8. Separation of certain carboxylic acids utilizing cation exchange membranes

    DOEpatents

    Chum, H.L.; Sopher, D.W.

    1983-05-09

    A method of substantially separating monofunctional lower carboxylic acids from a liquid mixture containing the acids wherein the pH of the mixture is adjusted to a value in the range of from about 1 to about 5 to form protonated acids. The mixture is heated to an elevated temperature not greater than about 100/sup 0/C and brought in contact with one side of a perfluorinated cation exchange membrane having sulfonate or carboxylate groups or mixtures thereof with the mixture containing the protonated acids. A pressure gradient can be established across the membrane with the mixture being under higher pressure, so that protonated monofunctional lower carboxylic acids pass through the membrane at a substantially faster rate than the remainder of the mixture thereby substantially separating the acids from the mixture.

  9. Separation of certain carboxylic acids utilizing cation exchange membranes

    DOEpatents

    Chum, Helena L.; Sopher, David W.

    1984-01-01

    A method of substantially separating monofunctional lower carboxylic acids from a liquid mixture containing the acids wherein the pH of the mixture is adjusted to a value in the range of from about 1 to about 5 to form protonated acids. The mixture is heated to an elevated temperature not greater than about 100.degree. C. and brought in contact with one side of a perfluorinated cation exchange membrane having sulfonate or carboxylate groups or mixtures thereof with the mixture containing the protonated acids. A pressure gradient can be established across the membrane with the mixture being under higher pressure, so that protonated monofunctional lower carboxylic acids pass through the membrane at a substantially faster rate than the remainder of the mixture thereby substantially separating the acids from the mixture.

  10. Acting-out: its functions within analytic group psychotherapy and its transformation into dreams.

    PubMed

    Richarz, Bernhard; Römisch, Sylvelin

    2002-07-01

    In group processes, acting-out has diverse functions, all of them equally important. It has an intrapsychic, interpersonal, and group dynamic function. Not only may it be understood as a form of resistance, but also in its communicative and reparative potential. The authors investigate the thesis that acting-out also contains the seed for change, thus helping patients divest themselves of pathological behavior. Using a group process as an example, this article shows how boundaries can be drawn between past and present experiences while using the communicative and reparative functions of acting-out. Unconscious psychodynamics can then be transformed from acting-out into dreams. PMID:12082675

  11. The role of oxygen functional groups in the adsorption of heteroaromatic nitrogen compounds.

    PubMed

    Han, Xue; Lin, Hongfei; Zheng, Ying

    2015-10-30

    A wood-based activated carbon (AC) was oxidized using different oxidants. The resultant adsorbents were applied to adsorb nitrogen (N) containing compounds that appeared in light cycled oil. Appropriate oxidation treatment can increase oxygen functional groups on the surface of AC without much damage to its pore structure. Oxygen functional groups play a key role in enhancing adsorptive selectivity of carbons. Lactone groups can facilitate the selective removal of 1-ring N compounds. Phenolic groups, total CO2-releasing groups and total O groups show an improvement in the adsorption of 2-ring N compounds. Aldehyde groups favor the adsorption of 3-ring and 4-ring N compounds. However, excessive oxidation can result in the collapse of pore structure and closure of pore channels. For instance, the carbon oxidized by a mixture of concentrated H2SO4 and HNO3 has an extremely low adsorption performance. PMID:25967098

  12. Purification to Homogeneity of Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Reductase of Barley

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Rolf; Jäger, Hans-Jürgen; Hintz, Martin; Pahlich, Edwin

    1986-01-01

    An enzyme has been purified to homogeneity from barley seedlings which has `proline dehydrogenase' and the pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid reductase activities. The purification achieved is 39,000-fold as calculated from the proline dehydrogenase activity. The subunit molecular weight of the protein is 30 kilodaltons. The native enzyme has molecular weights up to 480 kilodaltons, depending on the buffer environment. From the pH profiles, the specific activities and thermodynamic considerations, it is concluded that the plant proline dehydrogenase functions in vivo as a pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16664571

  13. Oxidation reaction of high molecular weight carboxylic acids in supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fangming; Moriya, Takehiko; Enomoto, Heiji

    2003-07-15

    Stearic acid, being a model compound of high molecular weight carboxylic acids, was oxidized in a batch reactor by changing the oxygen supply with an insufficient oxygen supply at a constant reaction time at 420 degrees C. On the basis of the intermediate products identified by GC/MS, NMR, and HPLC analyses and the free-radical reaction mechanism, the oxidation pathways of high molecular weight carboxylic acids in supercritical water are discussed. The reaction of carboxylic acids in supercritical water proceeds with the consecutive oxidation of higher molecular weight carboxylic acids to lower molecular weight carboxylic acids through several major pathways. The attack of the hydroxyl radical occurs not only at the carbons in alpha-, beta-, gamma-positions to a --COOH group but also at the carbons ((omega-1)-carbon and/or omega-carbon) far in the alkyl chain from a --COOH group, which may lead to the formation of dicarboxylic acids. PMID:12901673

  14. Improved Preparation of Halopropyl Bridged Carboxylic Ortho Esters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protection of a carboxylic acid function as a bridged ortho ester derivative enables the use of strongly basic conditions in the synthetic strategy because the protons, alpha to the previous carbonyl carbon, are less acidic. Protected 3-halopropionic acid can behave like an alkyl halide making them...

  15. An ab initio density functional study of the optical functions of 9-Methyl-3-Thiophen-2-YI-Thieno [3,2e] [1,2,4] Thriazolo [4,3c] Pyrimidine-8-Carboxylic Acid Ethyl Ester crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshak, Ali H.; Kityk, I. V.; Khenata, R.; Al-Douri, Y.; Auluck, S.

    An ab initio investigation of the optical constants of 9-Methyl-3-Thiophen-2-YI-Thieno [3,2e] [1,2,4] Thriazolo [4,3c] Pyrimidine-8-Carboxylic Acid Ethyl Ester crystal is performed within a framework of local density approximation (LDA), and the Engel-Vosko generalized gradient approximation (EV-GGA) exchange correlation potentials. It is established that there are two independent molecules (A and B) exhibiting different intra-molecular interactions: C-H⋯O (A) and C-H⋯N (B). These intra-molecular interactions favor stabilization of the crystal structure for molecules A and B. It should be emphasized that there exist remarkable ?-? interactions between the pyrimidine rings of the two neighbors B molecules giving extra strengths and stabilizations to the superamolecular structure. These different intra-molecular interactions C-H⋯O (A) and C-H⋯N (B) and the ?-? interaction between the pyrimidine rings of the two neighbors B molecules give principal contribution to dispersion of optical properties. With a view to seek deeper insight into the electronic structure, the optical properties were investigated. Our calculations show that the optical constants are very anisotropic. The EVGGA calculation shows a blue spectral shift of around 0.024 eV with significant changes in the spectra compared to the LDA calculation. The observed spectral shifts are in agreement with the calculated band structure and corresponding electron density of states.

  16. Controlling surface functionality through generation of thiol groups in a self-assembled monolayer.

    SciTech Connect

    Lud, S. Q.; Neppl, S.; Richter, G.; Bruno, P.; Gruen, D. M.; Jordan, R.; Feulner, P.; Stutzmann, M.; Garrido, J. A.; Materials Science Division; Technische Univ. Munchen

    2010-01-01

    A lithographic method to generate reactive thiol groups on functionalized synthetic diamond for biosensor and molecular electronic applications is developed. We demonstrate that ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) thin films covalently functionalized with surface-generated thiol groups allow controlled thiol-disulfide exchange surface hybridization processes. The generation of the thiol functional head groups was obtained by irradiating phenylsulfonic acid (PSA) monolayers on UNCD surfaces. The conversion of the functional headgroup of the self-assembled monolayer was verified by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), and fluorescence microscopy. Our findings indicate the selective generation of reactive thiol surface groups. Furthermore, we demonstrate the grafting of yeast cytochrome c to the thiol-modified diamond surface and the electron transfer between protein and electrode.

  17. Production of Printed Indexes of Chemical Reactions. I. Analysis of Functional Group Interconversions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clinging, R.; Lynch, M. F.

    1973-01-01

    A program is described which identifies functional group interconversion reactions, hydrogenations, and dehydrogenations in a data base containing structures encoded as Wiswesser Line Notations. Production of the data base is briefly described. (17 references) (Authors)

  18. β-Amino Esters from the Reductive Ring Opening of Aziridine-2-carboxylates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A general study is undertaken to examine the scope of the reductive ring opening of aziridine-2-carboxylates with samarium diiodide. The competition between C–C and C–N bond cleavage is examined as a function of the nature of the N-substituent of the aziridine, the nature of the substituent in the 3-position of the aziridine, and whether the substituent in the 3-position is in a cis or trans relationship with the carboxylate in the 2-position. The desired C–N bond cleavage leads to β-amino esters that are the predominant products for most aziridines with an N-activating group. However, C–C cleavage products are observed with an aryl group in the 3-position; this can be particularly pronounced with cis-aziridines where a nearly equal mixture of the two is observed. Exclusive formation of the C–N cleavage product is observed for all aziridines with the strongly N-activating p-toluene sulfonate group. Similarly high selectivity is observed for the 2-trimethylsilylethyl sulfonate group (SES), which is easier to remove. The utility of these methods is illustrated in the synthesis of protected forms of (R)-β3-DOPA and l-DOPA from the same aziridine, the former by SmI2-mediated reductive opening at C-2 and the latter by palladium-mediated reductive opening at C-3. PMID:25329528

  19. Evaluation of group A1B erythrocytes converted to type as group O: studies of markers of function and compatibility

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hong-Wei; Zhuo, Hai-Long; Zhang, Xue; Ji, Shou-Ping; Tan, Ying-Xia; Li, Su-Bo; Jia, Yan-Jun; Xu, Hua; Wu, Qing-Fa; Yun, Zhi-Min; Luo, Qun; Gong, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background Enzymatic conversion of blood group A1B red blood cells (RBC) to group O RBC (ECO) was achieved by combined treatment with α-galactosidase and α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase. The aim of this study was to evaluate the function and safety of these A1B-ECO RBC in vitro. Materials and methods A 20% packed volume of A1B RBC was treated with enzymes in 250 mM glycine buffer, pH 6.8. The efficiency of the conversion of A and B antigen was evaluated by traditional typing in test tubes, gel column agglutination technology and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis. The physiological and metabolic parameters of native and ECO RBC were compared, including osmotic fragility, erythrocyte deformation index, levels of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, ATP, methaemoglobin, free Na+, and free K+. The morphology of native and ECO RBC was observed by scanning electron microscopy. Residual α-galactosidase or α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase in A1B-ECO RBC was detected by double-antibody sandwich ELISA method. Manual cross-matching was applied to ensure blood compatibility. Results The RBC agglutination tests and FACS results showed that A1B RBC were efficiently converted to O RBC. Functional analysis suggested that the conversion process had little impact on the physiological and metabolic parameters of the RBC. The residual amounts of either α-galactosidase or α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase in the A1B-ECO RBC were less than 10 ng/mL of packed RBC. About 18% of group B and 55% of group O sera reacted with the A1B-ECO RBC in a sensitive gel column cross-matching test. Discussion The conversion process does not appear to affect the morphological, physiological or metabolic parameters of A1B-ECO RBC. However, the A1B-ECO RBC still reacted with some antigens. More research on group O and B sera, which may partly reflect the complexity of group A1 the safety of A1B-ECO RBC is necessary before the application of these RBC in clinical transfusion. PMID:26509826

  20. Characteristics of Interactional Management Functions in Group Oral by Japanese Learners of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Negishi, Junko

    2010-01-01

    This study attempted to investigate the characteristics of interaction dynamics in a group oral interaction carried out by Japanese learners of English. The relationship between the participants' language development and interactional management functions (IMFs) was also explored. Oral performance tests in a paired or a small group have recently…

  1. Identification of Differential Item Functioning in Multiple-Group Settings: A Multivariate Outlier Detection Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magis, David; De Boeck, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We focus on the identification of differential item functioning (DIF) when more than two groups of examinees are considered. We propose to consider items as elements of a multivariate space, where DIF items are outlying elements. Following this approach, the situation of multiple groups is a quite natural case. A robust statistics technique is

  2. Identification of Differential Item Functioning in Multiple-Group Settings: A Multivariate Outlier Detection Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magis, David; De Boeck, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We focus on the identification of differential item functioning (DIF) when more than two groups of examinees are considered. We propose to consider items as elements of a multivariate space, where DIF items are outlying elements. Following this approach, the situation of multiple groups is a quite natural case. A robust statistics technique is…

  3. The Use of Language Functions in Mathematical Group Games. Teacher Insights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Carolyn; Huerta, Maria G.

    1994-01-01

    Six group games were introduced into a second-grade bilingual classroom. Children's talk during each game was classified using a modification of Dyson's five language functions (representational, directive, heuristic, personal, and interactional). Group games provided many communication opportunities. Some children tried new communication styles.

  4. Suppression of Cytochrome P450 3A4 Function by UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 2B7 through a Protein-Protein Interaction: Cooperative Roles of the Cytosolic Carboxyl-Terminal Domain and the Luminal Anchoring Region.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, Yuu; Nagata, Kiyoshi; Yamazoe, Yasushi; Mackenzie, Peter I; Yamada, Hideyuki; Ishii, Yuji

    2015-10-01

    There is a large discrepancy between the interindividual difference in the hepatic expression level of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and that of drug clearance mediated by this enzyme. However, the reason for this discrepancy remains largely unknown. Because CYP3A4 interacts with UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B7 (UGT2B7) to alter its function, the reverse regulation is expected to modulate CYP3A4-catalyzed activity. To address this issue, we investigated whether protein-protein interaction between CYP3A4 and UGT2B7 modulates CYP3A4 function. For this purpose, we coexpressed CYP3A4, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, and UGT2B7 using a baculovirus-insect cell system. The activity of CYP3A4 was significantly suppressed by coexpressing UGT2B7, and this suppressive effect was lost when UGT2B7 was replaced with calnexin (CNX). These results strongly suggest that UGT2B7 negatively regulates CYP3A4 activity through a protein-protein interaction. To identify the UGT2B7 domain associated with CYP3A4 suppression we generated 12 mutants including chimeras with CNX. Mutations introduced into the UGT2B7 carboxyl-terminal transmembrane helix caused a loss of the suppressive effect on CYP3A4. Thus, this hydrophobic region is necessary for the suppression of CYP3A4 activity. Replacement of the hydrophilic end of UGT2B7 with that of CNX produced a similar suppressive effect as the native enzyme. The data using chimeric protein demonstrated that the internal membrane-anchoring region of UGT2B7 is also needed for the association with CYP3A4. These data suggest that 1) UGT2B7 suppresses CYP3A4 function, and 2) both hydrophobic domains located near the C terminus and within UGT2B7 are needed for interaction with CYP3A4. PMID:26243732

  5. Functional Groups Based on Leaf Physiology: Are they Spatially and Temporally Robust?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Tammy E.; Brooks, J. Renee

    2004-01-01

    The functional grouping hypothesis, which suggests that complexity in ecosystem function can be simplified by grouping species with similar responses, was tested in the Florida scrub habitat. Functional groups were identified based on how species in fire maintained Florida scrub regulate exchange of carbon and water with the atmosphere as indicated by both instantaneous gas exchange measurements and integrated measures of function (%N, delta C-13, delta N-15, C-N ratio). Using cluster analysis, five distinct physiologically-based functional groups were identified in the fire maintained scrub. These functional groups were tested to determine if they were robust spatially, temporally, and with management regime. Analysis of Similarities (ANOSIM), a non-parametric multivariate analysis, indicated that these five physiologically-based groupings were not altered by plot differences (R = -0.115, p = 0.893) or by the three different management regimes; prescribed burn, mechanically treated and burn, and fire-suppressed (R = 0.018, p = 0.349). The physiological groupings also remained robust between the two climatically different years 1999 and 2000 (R = -0.027, p = 0.725). Easy-to-measure morphological characteristics indicating functional groups would be more practical for scaling and modeling ecosystem processes than detailed gas-exchange measurements, therefore we tested a variety of morphological characteristics as functional indicators. A combination of non-parametric multivariate techniques (Hierarchical cluster analysis, non-metric Multi-Dimensional Scaling, and ANOSIM) were used to compare the ability of life form, leaf thickness, and specific leaf area classifications to identify the physiologically-based functional groups. Life form classifications (ANOSIM; R = 0.629, p 0.001) were able to depict the physiological groupings more adequately than either specific leaf area (ANOSIM; R = 0.426, p = 0.001) or leaf thickness (ANOSIM; R 0.344, p 0.001). The ability of life forms to depict the physiological groupings was improved by separating the parasitic Ximenia americana from the shrub category (ANOSIM; R = 0.794, p = 0.001). Therefore, a life form classification including parasites was determined to be a good indicator of the physiological processes of scrub species, and would be a useful method of grouping for scaling physiological processes to the ecosystem level.

  6. Multiple-Group Noncompensatory Differential Item Functioning in Raju's Differential Functioning of Items and Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oshima, T. C.; Wright, Keith; White, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Raju, van der Linden, and Fleer (1995) introduced a framework for differential functioning of items and tests (DFIT) for unidimensional dichotomous models. Since then, DFIT has been shown to be a quite versatile framework as it can handle polytomous as well as multidimensional models both at the item and test levels. However, DFIT is still limited

  7. Multiple-Group Noncompensatory Differential Item Functioning in Raju's Differential Functioning of Items and Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oshima, T. C.; Wright, Keith; White, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Raju, van der Linden, and Fleer (1995) introduced a framework for differential functioning of items and tests (DFIT) for unidimensional dichotomous models. Since then, DFIT has been shown to be a quite versatile framework as it can handle polytomous as well as multidimensional models both at the item and test levels. However, DFIT is still limited…

  8. Percolation galaxy groups and clusters in the sdss redshift survey: identification, catalogs, and the multiplicity function

    SciTech Connect

    Berlind, Andreas A.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Weinberg, David H.; Blanton, Michael R.; Warren, Michael S.; Abazajian, Kevork; Scranton, Ryan; Hogg, David W.; Scoccimarro, Roman; Bahcall, Neta A.; Brinkmann, J.; Gott, J.Richard, III; Kleinman, S.J.; Krzesinski, J.; Lee, Brian C.; Miller, Christopher J.; Nitta, Atsuko; Schneider, Donald P.; Tucker, Douglas L.; Zehavi, Idit; /CCPP, New York /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Ohio State U., Dept. Astron. /Los Alamos /Pittsburgh U. /Princeton U. /Subaru Telescope /Apache Point Observ. /Mt. Suhora Observ., Cracow /LBL, Berkeley /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Fermilab /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /Case Western Reserve U.

    2006-01-01

    We identify galaxy groups and clusters in volume-limited samples of the SDSS redshift survey, using a redshift-space friends-of-friends algorithm. We optimize the friends-of-friends linking lengths to recover galaxy systems that occupy the same dark matter halos, using a set of mock catalogs created by populating halos of N-body simulations with galaxies. Extensive tests with these mock catalogs show that no combination of perpendicular and line-of-sight linking lengths is able to yield groups and clusters that simultaneously recover the true halo multiplicity function, projected size distribution, and velocity dispersion. We adopt a linking length combination that yields, for galaxy groups with ten or more members: a group multiplicity function that is unbiased with respect to the true halo multiplicity function; an unbiased median relation between the multiplicities of groups and their associated halos; a spurious group fraction of less than {approx}1%; a halo completeness of more than {approx}97%; the correct projected size distribution as a function of multiplicity; and a velocity dispersion distribution that is {approx}20% too low at all multiplicities. These results hold over a range of mock catalogs that use different input recipes of populating halos with galaxies. We apply our group-finding algorithm to the SDSS data and obtain three group and cluster catalogs for three volume-limited samples that cover 3495.1 square degrees on the sky. We correct for incompleteness caused by fiber collisions and survey edges, and obtain measurements of the group multiplicity function, with errors calculated from realistic mock catalogs. These multiplicity function measurements provide a key constraint on the relation between galaxy populations and dark matter halos.

  9. First principles investigations on the electronic structure of anchor groups on ZnO nanowires and surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, A.; Lorke, M.; Rosa, A. L.; Frauenheim, Th.; Schoenhalz, A. L.; Dalpian, G. M.; Rocha, A. R.

    2014-05-28

    We report on density functional theory investigations of the electronic properties of monofunctional ligands adsorbed on ZnO-(1010) surfaces and ZnO nanowires using semi-local and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals. We consider three anchor groups, namely thiol, amino, and carboxyl groups. Our results indicate that neither the carboxyl nor the amino group modify the transport and conductivity properties of ZnO. In contrast, the modification of the ZnO surface and nanostructure with thiol leads to insertion of molecular states in the band gap, thus suggesting that functionalization with this moiety may customize the optical properties of ZnO nanomaterials.

  10. Expression of plant group 2 and group 3 lea genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed functional divergence among LEA proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Ohta, A; Takagi, M; Imai, R

    2000-04-01

    To study functions of late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, which accumulate in plant cells under water deficit conditions, in vivo functional analyses were carried out using a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) heterologous expression system. Two lea genes, tomato le4 (group 2) and barley HVA1 (group 3), were expressed under the GAL1 promoter, and the gene products were detected using specific antisera. The growth of the transformants was scored and compared with a control strain to analyze the effect of these proteins on yeast cells under stress conditions. The yeast cells expressing HVA1 showed shorter lag period when transferred to a medium containing 1.2 M NaCl as compared to a control strain, while the cells expressing le4 did not show improved growth. Attenuated growth inhibition in a medium containing 1.2 M KCl was observed in the yeast cells expressing le4 and HVA1. No obvious growth improvement was observed in a high sorbitol medium in the cells expressing either le4 or HVA1. Increased freezing tolerance was observed in both lea-expressing cells, while no effect on heat tolerance was observed. These results support the hypothesis that different LEA proteins play a distinctive role in the protection against cellular dehydration. PMID:10739953

  11. Loop expansion of the average effective action in the functional renormalization group approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrov, Peter M.; Merzlikin, Boris S.

    2015-10-01

    We formulate a perturbation expansion for the effective action in a new approach to the functional renormalization group method based on the concept of composite fields for regulator functions being their most essential ingredients. We demonstrate explicitly the principal difference between the properties of effective actions in these two approaches existing already on the one-loop level in a simple gauge model.

  12. Heterologous expression and functional analysis of the wheat group 1 pathogenesis-related (PR-1) proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The group 1 pathogenesis-related (PR-1) proteins have been widely used as hallmarks of plant defense pathways, but their biological functions are still unknown. We report here the functional analysis of two basic PR-1 proteins following the identification of the wheat PR-1 gene family (Lu et al., 20...

  13. Thermal-nutritional regulation of functional groups in running-water ecosystems. Informal technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cummins, K.W.

    1982-02-01

    The research continued to focus on three general areas: validation of the macroinvertebrate functional feeding group (shredders, collectors, scrapers and predators) method of stream ecosystem analysis; preparation of major reviews of the functional group system of analysis and a field key for the use of the procedure by a wide variety of groups having different levels of expertise; and, demonstration of the interactive importance of food quality (defined in terms of macroinvertebrate growth) and temperature on stream invertebrate growth and survival. The validation procedure involves light and scanning electron microscope analysis of the food acquisition morphology, biochemical analysis, and food resource-specific responses of selected representative species.

  14. The dual roles of functional groups in the photoluminescence of graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shujun; Cole, Ivan S.; Zhao, Dongyuan; Li, Qin

    2016-03-01

    The photoluminescent properties of graphene nanoparticle (named graphene quantum dots) have attracted significant research attention in recent years owing to their profound application potential. However, the photoluminescence (PL) origin of this class of nanocarbons is still unclear. In this paper, combining direct experimental evidence enabled by a facile size-tunable oxygenated graphene quantum dots (GQDs) synthesis method and theoretical calculations, the roles of the aromatic core, functional groups and disordered structures (i.e. defects and sp3 carbon) in the PL of oxygenated GQDs are elucidated in detail. In particular, we found that the functional groups on GQDs play dual roles in the overall emission: (1) they enable π* --> n and σ* --> n transitions, resulting in a molecular type of PL, spectrally invariable with change of particle size or excitation energy; (2) similar to defects and sp3 carbon, functional groups also induce structural deformation to the aromatic core, leading to mid-gap states or, in other words, energy traps, causing π* --> mid-gap states --> π transitions. Therefore, functional groups contribute to both the blue edge and the red shoulder of GQDs' PL spectra. The new insights on the role of functional groups in PL of fluorescent nanocarbons will enable better designs of this new class of materials.The photoluminescent properties of graphene nanoparticle (named graphene quantum dots) have attracted significant research attention in recent years owing to their profound application potential. However, the photoluminescence (PL) origin of this class of nanocarbons is still unclear. In this paper, combining direct experimental evidence enabled by a facile size-tunable oxygenated graphene quantum dots (GQDs) synthesis method and theoretical calculations, the roles of the aromatic core, functional groups and disordered structures (i.e. defects and sp3 carbon) in the PL of oxygenated GQDs are elucidated in detail. In particular, we found that the functional groups on GQDs play dual roles in the overall emission: (1) they enable π* --> n and σ* --> n transitions, resulting in a molecular type of PL, spectrally invariable with change of particle size or excitation energy; (2) similar to defects and sp3 carbon, functional groups also induce structural deformation to the aromatic core, leading to mid-gap states or, in other words, energy traps, causing π* --> mid-gap states --> π transitions. Therefore, functional groups contribute to both the blue edge and the red shoulder of GQDs' PL spectra. The new insights on the role of functional groups in PL of fluorescent nanocarbons will enable better designs of this new class of materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07042b

  15. Functional specialization and generalization for grouping of stimuli based on colour and motion.

    PubMed

    Zeki, Semir; Stutters, Jonathan

    2013-06-01

    This study was undertaken to learn whether the principle of functional specialization that is evident at the level of the prestriate visual cortex extends to areas that are involved in grouping visual stimuli according to attribute, and specifically according to colour and motion. Subjects viewed, in an fMRI scanner, visual stimuli composed of moving dots, which could be either coloured or achromatic; in some stimuli the moving coloured dots were randomly distributed or moved in random directions; in others, some of the moving dots were grouped together according to colour or to direction of motion, with the number of groupings varying from 1 to 3. Increased activation was observed in area V4 in response to colour grouping and in V5 in response to motion grouping while both groupings led to activity in separate though contiguous compartments within the intraparietal cortex. The activity in all the above areas was parametrically related to the number of groupings, as was the prominent activity in Crus I of the cerebellum where the activity resulting from the two types of grouping overlapped. This suggests (a) that, the specialized visual areas of the prestriate cortex have functions beyond the processing of visual signals according to attribute, namely that of grouping signals according to colour (V4) or motion (V5); (b) that the functional separation evident in visual cortical areas devoted to motion and colour, respectively, is maintained at the level of parietal cortex, at least as far as grouping according to attribute is concerned; and (c) that, by contrast, this grouping-related functional segregation is not maintained at the level of the cerebellum. PMID:23415950

  16. Functional specialization and generalization for grouping of stimuli based on colour and motion

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, Semir; Stutters, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to learn whether the principle of functional specialization that is evident at the level of the prestriate visual cortex extends to areas that are involved in grouping visual stimuli according to attribute, and specifically according to colour and motion. Subjects viewed, in an fMRI scanner, visual stimuli composed of moving dots, which could be either coloured or achromatic; in some stimuli the moving coloured dots were randomly distributed or moved in random directions; in others, some of the moving dots were grouped together according to colour or to direction of motion, with the number of groupings varying from 1 to 3. Increased activation was observed in area V4 in response to colour grouping and in V5 in response to motion grouping while both groupings led to activity in separate though contiguous compartments within the intraparietal cortex. The activity in all the above areas was parametrically related to the number of groupings, as was the prominent activity in Crus I of the cerebellum where the activity resulting from the two types of grouping overlapped. This suggests (a) that, the specialized visual areas of the prestriate cortex have functions beyond the processing of visual signals according to attribute, namely that of grouping signals according to colour (V4) or motion (V5); (b) that the functional separation evident in visual cortical areas devoted to motion and colour, respectively, is maintained at the level of parietal cortex, at least as far as grouping according to attribute is concerned; and (c) that, by contrast, this grouping-related functional segregation is not maintained at the level of the cerebellum. PMID:23415950

  17. Density functional theory calculations on azobenzene derivatives: a comparative study of functional group effect.

    PubMed

    Piyanzina, Irina; Minisini, Benoit; Tayurskii, Dmitrii; Bardeau, Jean-François

    2015-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been used to investigate the structural properties, dipole moments, polarizabilities, Gibbs energies, hardness, electronegativity, HOMO/LUMO energies, and chemical potentials of trans and cis configurations of eight para-substituted azobenzene derivatives. All properties have been obtained using the B3LYP functional and 6-31++G(d,p) basis set. The planar structures have been obtained for all optimized trans configurations. The energy difference between trans and cis configurations for considered derivatives was found to be between 64.2-73.1 kJ/mole. It has been obtained that the p-aminodiazo-benzene (ADAB) has the difference in the dipole moments between trans and cis forms higher than for trans and cis azobenzene. PMID:25644369

  18. Classifying proteins into functional groups based on all-versus-all BLAST of 10 million proteins.

    PubMed

    Kolker, Natali; Higdon, Roger; Broomall, William; Stanberry, Larissa; Welch, Dean; Lu, Wei; Haynes, Winston; Barga, Roger; Kolker, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    To address the monumental challenge of assigning function to millions of sequenced proteins, we completed the first of a kind all-versus-all sequence alignments using BLAST for 9.9 million proteins in the UniRef100 database. Microsoft Windows Azure produced over 3 billion filtered records in 6 days using 475 eight-core virtual machines. Protein classification into functional groups was then performed using Hive and custom jars implemented on top of Apache Hadoop utilizing the MapReduce paradigm. First, using the Clusters of Orthologous Genes (COG) database, a length normalized bit score (LNBS) was determined to be the best similarity measure for classification of proteins. LNBS achieved sensitivity and specificity of 98% each. Second, out of 5.1 million bacterial proteins, about two-thirds were assigned to significantly extended COG groups, encompassing 30 times more assigned proteins. Third, the remaining proteins were classified into protein functional groups using an innovative implementation of a single-linkage algorithm on an in-house Hadoop compute cluster. This implementation significantly reduces the run time for nonindexed queries and optimizes efficient clustering on a large scale. The performance was also verified on Amazon Elastic MapReduce. This clustering assigned nearly 2 million proteins to approximately half a million different functional groups. A similar approach was applied to classify 2.8 million eukaryotic sequences resulting in over 1 million proteins being assign to existing KOG groups and the remainder clustered into 100,000 functional groups. PMID:21809957

  19. (2SR,4aSR,8aSR)-6-Oxoperhydro­naphthalene-2-carboxylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Efthimiopoulos, Georgia; Davison, Mark; Lalancette, Roger A.; Thompson, Hugh W.

    2009-01-01

    In the title racemic compound, C11H16O3, the mol­ecule adopts a conformation that places its carboxyl group in an equatorial position. Mol­ecules aggregate by hydrogen-bond pairing of carboxyl groups, yielding centrosymmetric dimers that are arranged into layers in the (020) planes. PMID:21581624

  20. The crystal structure of a new polymorph of hexa-aqua-nickel(II) bis-(6-oxo-1,6-di-hydro-pyridine-3-carboxyl-ate).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Aguirre, Rubén; Pérez-Yáñez, Sonia; Beobide, Garikoitz; Castillo, Oscar; Gutiérrez-Zorrilla, Juan Manuel; Luque, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    In a new polymorph of the title salt, [Ni(H2O)6](C6H4NO3)2, the metal atom of the cationic complex lies on a symmetry centre and is coordinated by six water mol-ecules to provide a quite regular octa-hedral coordination environment. These cations inter-act with 6-oxo-1,6-di-hydro-pyridine-3-carboxyl-ate anions through electrostatic inter-actions and by means of O-H⋯O and N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds involving the carboxyl-ate, keto and protonated imine groups of the anion, and the coordinating water mol-ecules from the cationic complex entity to generate a supra-molecular three-dimensional architecture. The previously reported polymorph of this compound presents a network of hydrogen bonds, in which the organic anions establish mutual hydrogen-bonding inter-actions involving their keto and protonated imine groups. PMID:26870443

  1. Engineering Light-Mediated Bistable Azobenzene Switches Bearing Urea d-Aminoglucose Units for Chiral Discrimination of Carboxylates.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowa, Kajetan; Niedbała, Patryk; Jurczak, Janusz

    2016-05-01

    The symmetrical molecular receptors 1a and 1b consisting of a photochemically addressable azobenzene tether functionalized with urea hydrogen-bonding groups and d-carbohydrates as chiral selectors were developed to achieve control over the chiral recognition of α-amino acid-derived carboxylates. The photo- and thermally interconvertible planar E-1 and concaved Z-1 were found to exhibit different affinities, selectivities, and binding modes toward these biologically important anions in a highly polar medium (DMSO + 0.5% H2O). Binding affinity for the same enantiomerically pure guest was up to 3 times higher for E-1 than for Z-1 (cf. parameter β). In addition, the rate of thermal Z → E isomerization was found to depend on the chiral binding ability of Z-1, i.e., more strongly bound carboxylate enantiomer as well as higher enantiomer concentration caused faster relaxation to E-1. PMID:27057921

  2. Polymerization process for carboxyl containing polymers utilizing oil soluble ionic surface active agents

    SciTech Connect

    Uebele, C.E.; Ball, L.E.; Jorkasky, R.J. II; Wardlow, E. Jr.

    1987-09-08

    This patent describes a method for polymerizing olefinically unsaturated carboxylic acid monomers containing at least one activated carbon to carbon olefinic double bond and at least one carboxyl group. The monomers are polymerized in an organic media consisting essentially of organic liquids, in the presence of free radical forming catalysts and at least one oil soluble ionic surface active agent selected from the group consisting of: (a) anionic surface active agents; (b) cationic surface active agents; and (c) amphoteric surface active agents.

  3. The dual roles of functional groups in the photoluminescence of graphene quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujun; Cole, Ivan S; Zhao, Dongyuan; Li, Qin

    2016-03-31

    The photoluminescent properties of graphene nanoparticle (named graphene quantum dots) have attracted significant research attention in recent years owing to their profound application potential. However, the photoluminescence (PL) origin of this class of nanocarbons is still unclear. In this paper, combining direct experimental evidence enabled by a facile size-tunable oxygenated graphene quantum dots (GQDs) synthesis method and theoretical calculations, the roles of the aromatic core, functional groups and disordered structures (i.e. defects and sp(3) carbon) in the PL of oxygenated GQDs are elucidated in detail. In particular, we found that the functional groups on GQDs play dual roles in the overall emission: (1) they enable π* → n and σ* → n transitions, resulting in a molecular type of PL, spectrally invariable with change of particle size or excitation energy; (2) similar to defects and sp(3) carbon, functional groups also induce structural deformation to the aromatic core, leading to mid-gap states or, in other words, energy traps, causing π* → mid-gap states → π transitions. Therefore, functional groups contribute to both the blue edge and the red shoulder of GQDs' PL spectra. The new insights on the role of functional groups in PL of fluorescent nanocarbons will enable better designs of this new class of materials. PMID:26731007

  4. Local and Regional Determinants of an Uncommon Functional Group in Freshwater Lakes and Ponds

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Michael James

    2015-01-01

    A combination of local and regional factors and stochastic forces is expected to determine the occurrence of species and the structure of communities. However, in most cases, our understanding is incomplete, with large amounts of unexplained variation. Using functional groups rather than individual species may help explain the relationship between community composition and conditions. In this study, I used survey data from freshwater lakes and ponds to understand factors that determine the presence of the floating plant functional group in the northeast United States. Of the 176 water bodies surveyed, 104 (59.1%) did not contain any floating plant species. The occurrence of this functional group was largely determined by local abiotic conditions, which were spatially autocorrelated across the region. A model predicting the presence of the floating plant functional group performed similarly to the best species-specific models. Using a permutation test, I also found that the observed prevalence of floating plants is no different than expected by random assembly from a species pool of its size. These results suggest that the size of the species pool interacts with local conditions in determining the presence of a functional group. Nevertheless, a large amount of unexplained variation remains, attributable to either stochastic species occurrence or incomplete predictive models. The simple permutation approach in this study can be extended to test alternative models of community assembly. PMID:26121636

  5. Carboxylate-phenolate tautomerism in 5-[(nitrophenyl)diazenyl]salicylate anions.

    PubMed

    Yatsenko, Alexandr V; Paseshnichenko, Ksenia A

    2016-04-01

    Aryldiazenyl derivatives of salicylic acid and their salts are used as dyes. In these structures, the carboxylate groups are engaged in short contacts with the cations and in hydrogen bonds with water molecules, if present. If both O atoms of the carboxylate group take part in such interactions, the negative charge is delocalized over the two atoms. In the absence of hydrogen bonds and contacts with cations, the negative charge is localized on one of the O atoms. In the crystal structures of tetramethylammonium 2-hydroxy-5-[(E)-(4-nitrophenyl)diazenyl]benzoate and tetramethylammonium 2-hydroxy-5-[(E)-(2-nitrophenyl)diazenyl]benzoate, both C4H12N(+)·C13H8N3O5(-), all the interactions between the cations and anions are weak, and their effect on the geometry of the anions is negligible. Under these conditions, the 2-nitro-substituted anion is an almost pure phenol-carboxylate tautomer, whereas in the 4-nitro-substituted anion, the phenolic H atom is shifted towards the carboxylate group, and thus the structure of this anion is intermediate between the phenol-carboxylate and phenolate-carboxylic acid tautomeric forms. The probable formation of such an intermediate form is supported by quantum chemical calculations. Being the characteristic feature of this form, a short distance between the phenolic and carboxylate O atoms is observed in the 4-nitro-substituted anion, as well as in the structures of some 3,5-dinitrosalicylates reported in the literature. PMID:27045176

  6. Quantification of chemical states, dissociation constants and contents of oxygen-containing groups on the surface of biochars produced at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zaiming; Xiao, Xin; Chen, Baoliang; Zhu, Lizhong

    2015-01-01

    Surface functional groups such as carboxyl play a vital role in the environmental applications of biochar as a soil amendment. However, the quantification of oxygen-containing groups on a biochar surface still lacks systematical investigation. In this paper, we report an integrated method combining chemical and spectroscopic techniques that were established to quantitatively identify the chemical states, dissociation constants (pK(a)), and contents of oxygen-containing groups on dairy manure-derived biochars prepared at 100-700 C. Unexpectedly, the dissociation pH of carboxyl groups on the biochar surface covered a wide range of pH values (pH 2-11), due to the varied structural microenvironments and chemical states. For low temperature biochars (? 350 C), carboxyl existed not only as hydrogen-bonded carboxyl and unbonded carboxyl groups but also formed esters at the surface of biochars. The esters consumed OH(-) via saponification in the alkaline pH region and enhanced the dissolution of organic matter from biochars. For high temperature biochars (? 500 C), esters came from carboxyl were almost eliminated via carbonization (ester pyrolysis), while lactones were developed. The surface density of carboxyl groups on biochars decreased sharply with the increase of the biochar-producing temperature, but the total contents of the surface carboxyls for different biochars were comparable (with a difference <3-fold) as a result of the expanded surface area at high pyrolytic temperatures. Understanding the wide pKa ranges and the abundant contents of carboxyl groups on biochars is a prerequisite to recognition of the multifunctional applications and biogeochemical cycling of biochars. PMID:25453912

  7. Synthesis of chromium(III) complex with 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone-6-carboxylic acid as insulin-mimetic agent and its spectroscopic and computational studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasarawan, Nuttawisit; Thipyapong, Khajadpai; Sirichai, Somsak; Ruangpornvisuti, Vithaya

    2013-01-01

    The new complex of chromium(III) and 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone-6-carboxylic acid was synthesized and its preparation routes were reported. Mass spectrometry and elemental analysis indicated the formation of chromium complex with the metal-to-ligand mole ratio of 1:3. Combination of spectroscopic measurement and spectral computations based on the density functional theory suggested that 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone-6-carboxylic acid was a bidentate ligand using one oxygen atom at pyridinone carbonyl group and the other at N-oxide group as donor atoms upon chelation with chromium(III), forming the six-coordinate complex with five-membered chelate rings. Due to the enhanced stability of the chelate rings, such the pathway of chelation was theoretically predicted to be more favorable than the case where the carboxylate oxygen atom of ligand participated in the chelation. According to the preliminary tests, the chromium(III) complex with 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone-6-carboxylic acid was found to be active in lowering plasma glucose levels in vivo.

  8. Assessment of female sexual function in a group of uncircumcised obese Egyptian women.

    PubMed

    Elnashar, A R M; Ibrahim, N H; Ahmed, H-Eh; Hassanin, A M; Elgawady, M A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess female sexual function in an obese group (250 women) and to compare it with a control group (100 women), among 25-35-year-old uncircumcised Egyptian women, using female sexual function index (FSFI) score. FSFI total score of ⩽ 26.55 was considered diagnostic of Female Sexual Dysfunction (FSD). The percentage of FSD in the obese group was 73.6% while it was 71% in the control group, which was statistically insignificant (P > 0.05). The difference between both groups regarding the total (FSFI) score was insignificant (P > 0.05), but arousal and satisfaction domains scores were significantly lower in the obese group. In the obese group, a strong negative correlation between body mass index and arousal, orgasm and the total FSFI score was found. Women with excessive obesity had the lowest total FSFI score. In the obese group, college graduates had the highest total scores and all domain scores of FSFI followed by high school graduates while the least educated women had the lowest scores and when these subgroups were compared, significant differences were found among them. We conclude that in uncircumcised 25-35-year-old Egyptian women, obesity is not a major detrimental factor for FSD, but it may affect some sexual domains such as arousal and satisfaction, although excessive obesity is associated with FSD. Also, educational and cultural factors may have an impact on perception of sex and pleasure. PMID:26155831

  9. Energies of the adsorption of functional groups to calcium carbonate polymorphs: the importance of -OH and -COOH groups.

    PubMed

    Okhrimenko, D V; Nissenbaum, J; Andersson, M P; Olsson, M H M; Stipp, S L S

    2013-09-01

    The adsorption behavior of calcium carbonate is an important factor in many processes in nature, industry, and biological systems. We determined and compared the adsorption energies for a series of small molecules of different sizes and polarities (i.e., water, several alcohols, and acetic acid) on three synthetic CaCO3 polymorphs (calcite, aragonite, and vaterite). We measured isosteric heats of adsorption from vapor adsorption isotherms for 273 < T < 293 K, and we used XRD and SEM to confirm that samples did not change phase during the experiments. Density functional calculations and molecular dynamics simulations complemented the experimental results and aided interpretation. Alcohols with molecular mass greater than that of methanol bind more strongly to the calcium carbonate polymorphs than water and acetic acid. The adsorption energies for the alcohols are typical of chemisorption and indicate alcohol displacement of water from calcium carbonate surfaces. This explains why organisms favor biomolecules that contain alcohol functional groups (-OH) to control which polymorph they use, the crystal face and orientation, and the particle shape and size in biomineralization processes. This new insight is also very useful in understanding organic molecule adsorption mechanisms in soils, sediments, and rocks, which is important for predicting the behavior of mineral-fluid interactions when the challenge is to remediate contaminated groundwater aquifers or to produce oil and gas from reservoirs. PMID:23919655

  10. Wigner functions for noncommutative quantum mechanics: A group representation based construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, S. Hasibul Hassan; Ali, S. Twareque

    2015-12-01

    This paper is devoted to the construction and analysis of the Wigner functions for noncommutative quantum mechanics, their marginal distributions, and star-products, following a technique developed earlier, viz, using the unitary irreducible representations of the group GNC, which is the three fold central extension of the Abelian group of ℝ4. These representations have been exhaustively studied in earlier papers. The group GNC is identified with the kinematical symmetry group of noncommutative quantum mechanics of a system with two degrees of freedom. The Wigner functions studied here reflect different levels of non-commutativity—both the operators of position and those of momentum not commuting, the position operators not commuting and finally, the case of standard quantum mechanics, obeying the canonical commutation relations only.

  11. Wigner functions for noncommutative quantum mechanics: A group representation based construction

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, S. Hasibul Hassan; Ali, S. Twareque

    2015-12-15

    This paper is devoted to the construction and analysis of the Wigner functions for noncommutative quantum mechanics, their marginal distributions, and star-products, following a technique developed earlier, viz, using the unitary irreducible representations of the group G{sub NC}, which is the three fold central extension of the Abelian group of ℝ{sup 4}. These representations have been exhaustively studied in earlier papers. The group G{sub NC} is identified with the kinematical symmetry group of noncommutative quantum mechanics of a system with two degrees of freedom. The Wigner functions studied here reflect different levels of non-commutativity—both the operators of position and those of momentum not commuting, the position operators not commuting and finally, the case of standard quantum mechanics, obeying the canonical commutation relations only.

  12. Carboxyl-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes negatively affect bacterial growth and denitrification activity

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Li, Mu; Wei, Yuanyuan; Huang, Haining

    2014-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been used in a wide range of fields, and the surface modification via carboxyl functionalization can further improve their physicochemical properties. However, whether carboxyl-modified SWNT poses potential risks to microbial denitrification after its release into the environment remains unknown. Here we present the possible effects of carboxyl-modified SWNT on the growth and denitrification activity of Paracoccus denitrificans (a model denitrifying bacterium). It was found that carboxyl-modified SWNT were present both outside and inside the bacteria, and thus induced bacterial growth inhibition at the concentrations of 10 and 50 mg/L. After 24 h of exposure, the final nitrate concentration in the presence of 50 mg/L carboxyl-modified SWNT was 21-fold higher than that in its absence, indicating that nitrate reduction was substantially suppressed by carboxyl-modified SWNT. The transcriptional profiling revealed that carboxyl-modified SWNT led to the transcriptional activation of the genes encoding ribonucleotide reductase in response to DNA damage and also decreased the gene expressions involved in glucose metabolism and energy production, which was an important reason for bacterial growth inhibition. Moreover, carboxyl-modified SWNT caused the significant down-regulation and lower activity of nitrate reductase, which was consistent with the decreased efficiency of nitrate reduction. PMID:25008009

  13. Carboxyl-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes negatively affect bacterial growth and denitrification activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Li, Mu; Wei, Yuanyuan; Huang, Haining

    2014-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been used in a wide range of fields, and the surface modification via carboxyl functionalization can further improve their physicochemical properties. However, whether carboxyl-modified SWNT poses potential risks to microbial denitrification after its release into the environment remains unknown. Here we present the possible effects of carboxyl-modified SWNT on the growth and denitrification activity of Paracoccus denitrificans (a model denitrifying bacterium). It was found that carboxyl-modified SWNT were present both outside and inside the bacteria, and thus induced bacterial growth inhibition at the concentrations of 10 and 50 mg/L. After 24 h of exposure, the final nitrate concentration in the presence of 50 mg/L carboxyl-modified SWNT was 21-fold higher than that in its absence, indicating that nitrate reduction was substantially suppressed by carboxyl-modified SWNT. The transcriptional profiling revealed that carboxyl-modified SWNT led to the transcriptional activation of the genes encoding ribonucleotide reductase in response to DNA damage and also decreased the gene expressions involved in glucose metabolism and energy production, which was an important reason for bacterial growth inhibition. Moreover, carboxyl-modified SWNT caused the significant down-regulation and lower activity of nitrate reductase, which was consistent with the decreased efficiency of nitrate reduction.

  14. Functional groups of marine ciliated protozoa and their relationships to water quality.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yong; Xu, Henglong; Hu, Xiaozhong; Warren, Alan; Song, Weibo

    2013-08-01

    Ciliated protozoa (ciliates) play important ecological roles in coastal waters, especially regarding their interaction with environmental parameters. In order to increase our knowledge and understanding on the functional structure of ciliate communities and their relationships to environmental conditions in marine ecosystems, a 12-month study was carried out in a semi-enclosed bay in northern China. Samples were collected biweekly at five sampling stations with differing levels of pollution/eutrophication, giving a total of 120 samples. Thirteen functional groups of ciliates (A-M) were defined based on their specific spatio-temporal distribution and relationships to physico-chemical parameters. Six of these groups (H-M) were the primary contributors to the ciliate communities in the polluted/eutrophic areas, whereas the other seven groups (A-G) dominated the communities in less polluted areas. Six groups (A, D, G, H, I and K) dominated during the warm seasons (summer and autumn), with the other seven (B, C, E, F, J, L and M) dominating in the cold seasons (spring and winter). Of these, groups B (mainly aloricate ciliates), I (aloricate ciliates) and L (mainly loricate tintinnids) were the primary contributors to the communities. It was also shown that aloricate ciliates and tintinnids represented different roles in structuring and functioning of the communities. The results suggest that the ciliate communities may be constructed by several functional groups in response to the environmental conditions. Thus, we conclude that these functional groups might be potentially useful bioindicators for bioassessment and conservation in marine habitats. PMID:23381800

  15. Solvent extraction of rare-earth metals by carboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Preez, A.C. du; Preston, J.S.

    1992-04-01

    The solvent extraction of the trivalent lanthanides and yttrium from nitrate media by solutions of carboxylic acids in xylene has been studied. Commercially available carboxylic acids such as Versatic 10 and naphthenic acids were used, as well as model compounds of known structure, such as 2-ethylhexanoic and 3-cyclohexylpropanoic acids. In a few cases, extraction of the metals from sulphate and chloride solutions was also investigated. The dependence of the extraction properties of the carboxylic acids on the atomic number of the lanthanide shows a definite relationship to the steric bulk of the carboxylic acid molecule quantified by means of the steric parameter, E{sub s}{prime} of the substituent alkyl group. The stoichiometries of the extracted complexes for representative light (La), middle (Gd) and heavy (Lu) rare-earth metals were investigated by the slope-analysis technique for a sterically hindered acid (Versatic 10 acid; -E{prime}{sub s} = 3.83) and an acid with low steric hindrance (3-cyclohexylpropanoic acid; -E{prime}{sub s} = 0.28). 14 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Water Contact Angle Dependence with Hydroxyl Functional Groups on Silica Surfaces under CO2 Sequestration Conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cong; Zhang, Ning; Li, Weizhong; Song, Yongchen

    2015-12-15

    Functional groups on silica surfaces under CO2 sequestration conditions are complex due to reactions among supercritical CO2, brine and silica. Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the effects of hydroxyl functional groups on wettability. It has been found that wettability shows a strong dependence on functional groups on silica surfaces: silanol number density, space distribution, and deprotonation/protonation degree. For neutral silica surfaces with crystalline structure (Q(3), Q(3)/Q(4), Q(4)), as silanol number density decreases, contact angle increases from 33.5° to 146.7° at 10.5 MPa and 318 K. When Q(3) surface changes to an amorphous structure, water contact angle increases 20°. Water contact angle decreases about 12° when 9% of silanol groups on Q(3) surface are deprotonated. When the deprotonation degree increases to 50%, water contact angle decreases to 0. The dependence of wettability on silica surface functional groups was used to analyze contact angle measurement ambiguity in literature. The composition of silica surfaces is complicated under CO2 sequestration conditions, the results found in this study may help to better understand wettability of CO2/brine/silica system. PMID:26509282

  17. A novel joint sparse partial correlation method for estimating group functional networks.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoyun; Connelly, Alan; Calamante, Fernando

    2016-03-01

    Advances in graph theory have provided a powerful tool to characterize brain networks. In particular, functional networks at group-level have great appeal to gain further insight into complex brain function, and to assess changes across disease conditions. These group networks, however, often have two main limitations. First, they are popularly estimated by directly averaging individual networks that are compromised by confounding variations. Secondly, functional networks have been estimated mainly through Pearson cross-correlation, without taking into account the influence of other regions. In this study, we propose a sparse group partial correlation method for robust estimation of functional networks based on a joint graphical models approach. To circumvent the issue of choosing the optimal regularization parameters, a stability selection method is employed to extract networks. The proposed method is, therefore, denoted as JGMSS. By applying JGMSS across simulated datasets, the resulting networks show consistently higher accuracy and sensitivity than those estimated using an alternative approach (the elastic-net regularization with stability selection, ENSS). The robustness of the JGMSS is evidenced by the independence of the estimated networks to choices of the initial set of regularization parameters. The performance of JGMSS in estimating group networks is further demonstrated with in vivo fMRI data (ASL and BOLD), which show that JGMSS can more robustly estimate brain hub regions at group-level and can better control intersubject variability than it is achieved using ENSS. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1162-1177, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26859311

  18. Habitat diversity and benthic functional trophic groups at Serra do Cipó, Southeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Callisto, M; Moreno, P; Barbosa, F A

    2001-05-01

    The assessment of the diversity of habitats and the characterisation of the functional trophic groups of benthic macroinvertebrate communities of some rivers of Serra do Cipó (MG) were the main objectives of this study. The available trophic resources and the types of substrata were characterised along with the structure and composition of their using functional trophic groups. Serra do Cipó is a watershed divisor of the São Francisco and Doce River basins, including a series of streams and rivers, of good water quality and well preserved ecological characteristics. Samples were collected in Cipó, Peixe and Preto do Itambé rivers, besides the Indaiá and Capão da Mata streams at 26 sampling stations, during the rainy (February) and dry (October) seasons of 1998, using "Kicking nets" of 0.125 mm mesh size. The group of collectors (Baetidae, Leptophlebiidae and Leptohyphidae) was the most abundant, followed by collector-predators (Hydrophilidae, Ceratopogonidae, Chironomidae-Tanypodinae), and detritivorous-herbivores (Oligochaeta). The riparian vegetation, together with the aquatic macrophytes, are the substrata containing the highest richness of functional trophic groups and the higher habitat diversity. The results suggest that the use of functional trophic groups, together with habitat evaluation, are efficient tools in the evaluation of the diversity of benthic macroinvertebrates, particularly in altitudinal lotic ecosystems. PMID:11514893

  19. Cellular distribution and cytotoxicity of graphene quantum dots with different functional groups

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been developed as promising optical probes for bioimaging due to their excellent photoluminescent properties. Additionally, the fluorescence spectrum and quantum yield of GQDs are highly dependent on the surface functional groups on the carbon sheets. However, the distribution and cytotoxicity of GQDs functionalized with different chemical groups have not been specifically investigated. Herein, the cytotoxicity of three kinds of GQDs with different modified groups (NH2, COOH, and CO-N (CH3)2, respectively) in human A549 lung carcinoma cells and human neural glioma C6 cells was investigated using thiazoyl blue colorimetric (MTT) assay and trypan blue assay. The cellular apoptosis or necrosis was then evaluated by flow cytometry analysis. It was demonstrated that the three modified GQDs showed good biocompatibility even when the concentration reached 200?g/mL. The Raman spectra of cells treated with GQDs with different functional groups also showed no distinct changes, affording molecular level evidence for the biocompatibility of the three kinds of GQDs. The cellular distribution of the three modified GQDs was observed using a fluorescence microscope. The data revealed that GQDs randomly dispersed in the cytoplasm but not diffused into nucleus. Therefore, GQDs with different functional groups have low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility regardless of chemical modification, offering good prospects for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. PMID:24597852

  20. Cellular distribution and cytotoxicity of graphene quantum dots with different functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiaochan; Liu, Zhiming; Guo, Zhouyi; Ji, Yanhong; Jin, Mei; Wang, Xinpeng

    2014-03-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been developed as promising optical probes for bioimaging due to their excellent photoluminescent properties. Additionally, the fluorescence spectrum and quantum yield of GQDs are highly dependent on the surface functional groups on the carbon sheets. However, the distribution and cytotoxicity of GQDs functionalized with different chemical groups have not been specifically investigated. Herein, the cytotoxicity of three kinds of GQDs with different modified groups (NH2, COOH, and CO-N (CH3)2, respectively) in human A549 lung carcinoma cells and human neural glioma C6 cells was investigated using thiazoyl blue colorimetric (MTT) assay and trypan blue assay. The cellular apoptosis or necrosis was then evaluated by flow cytometry analysis. It was demonstrated that the three modified GQDs showed good biocompatibility even when the concentration reached 200 μg/mL. The Raman spectra of cells treated with GQDs with different functional groups also showed no distinct changes, affording molecular level evidence for the biocompatibility of the three kinds of GQDs. The cellular distribution of the three modified GQDs was observed using a fluorescence microscope. The data revealed that GQDs randomly dispersed in the cytoplasm but not diffused into nucleus. Therefore, GQDs with different functional groups have low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility regardless of chemical modification, offering good prospects for bioimaging and other biomedical applications.

  1. Testing Group Differences in Brain Functional Connectivity: Using Correlations or Partial Correlations?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junghi; Wozniak, Jeffrey R.; Mueller, Bryon A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging allows one to study brain functional connectivity, partly motivated by evidence that patients with complex disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, may have altered functional brain connectivity patterns as compared with healthy subjects. A functional connectivity network describes statistical associations of the neural activities among distinct and distant brain regions. Recently, there is a major interest in group-level functional network analysis; however, there is a relative lack of studies on statistical inference, such as significance testing for group comparisons. In particular, it is still debatable which statistic should be used to measure pairwise associations as the connectivity weights. Many functional connectivity studies have used either (full or marginal) correlations or partial correlations for pairwise associations. This article investigates the performance of using either correlations or partial correlations for testing group differences in brain connectivity, and how sparsity levels and topological structures of the connectivity would influence statistical power to detect group differences. Our results suggest that, in general, testing group differences in networks deviates from estimating networks. For example, high regularization in both covariance matrices and precision matrices may lead to higher statistical power; in particular, optimally selected regularization (e.g., by cross-validation or even at the true sparsity level) on the precision matrices with small estimation errors may have low power. Most importantly, and perhaps surprisingly, using either correlations or partial correlations may give very different testing results, depending on which of the covariance matrices and the precision matrices are sparse. Specifically, if the precision matrices are sparse, presumably and arguably a reasonable assumption, then using correlations often yields much higher powered and more stable testing results than using partial correlations; the conclusion is reversed if the covariance matrices, not the precision matrices, are sparse. These results may have useful implications to future studies on testing functional connectivity differences. PMID:25492804

  2. Testing group differences in brain functional connectivity: using correlations or partial correlations?

    PubMed

    Kim, Junghi; Wozniak, Jeffrey R; Mueller, Bryon A; Pan, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging allows one to study brain functional connectivity, partly motivated by evidence that patients with complex disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, may have altered functional brain connectivity patterns as compared with healthy subjects. A functional connectivity network describes statistical associations of the neural activities among distinct and distant brain regions. Recently, there is a major interest in group-level functional network analysis; however, there is a relative lack of studies on statistical inference, such as significance testing for group comparisons. In particular, it is still debatable which statistic should be used to measure pairwise associations as the connectivity weights. Many functional connectivity studies have used either (full or marginal) correlations or partial correlations for pairwise associations. This article investigates the performance of using either correlations or partial correlations for testing group differences in brain connectivity, and how sparsity levels and topological structures of the connectivity would influence statistical power to detect group differences. Our results suggest that, in general, testing group differences in networks deviates from estimating networks. For example, high regularization in both covariance matrices and precision matrices may lead to higher statistical power; in particular, optimally selected regularization (e.g., by cross-validation or even at the true sparsity level) on the precision matrices with small estimation errors may have low power. Most importantly, and perhaps surprisingly, using either correlations or partial correlations may give very different testing results, depending on which of the covariance matrices and the precision matrices are sparse. Specifically, if the precision matrices are sparse, presumably and arguably a reasonable assumption, then using correlations often yields much higher powered and more stable testing results than using partial correlations; the conclusion is reversed if the covariance matrices, not the precision matrices, are sparse. These results may have useful implications to future studies on testing functional connectivity differences. PMID:25492804

  3. The Effect of Functional Groups in Bio-Derived Fuel Candidates.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Rhodri W; Moore, Cameron M; Semelsberger, Troy A; Chuck, Christopher J; Gordon, John C; Sutton, Andrew D

    2016-05-10

    Interest in developing renewable fuels is continuing to grow and biomass represents a viable source of renewable carbon with which to replace fossil-based components in transportation fuels. During our own work, we noticed that chemists think in terms of functional groups whereas fuel engineers think in terms of physical fuel properties. In this Concept article, we discuss the effect of carbon and oxygen functional groups on potential fuel properties. This serves as a way of informing our own thinking and provides us with a basis with which to design and synthesize molecules from biomass that could provide useful transportation fuels. PMID:27099975

  4. Effect of carboxylic acid of periodic mesoporous organosilicas on the fructose-to-5-hydroxymethylfurfural conversion in dimethylsulfoxide systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Saikat; Kao, Hsien-Ming; Wu, Kevin C.-W.

    2014-11-01

    This manuscript presents the preparation and catalytic application of highly ordered benzene bridged periodic mesoporous organosilicas (PMOs) functionalized with carboxylic acid (-COOH) group at varied density. The COOH-functionalized PMOs were synthesized by one-step condensation of 1,4-bis (triethoxysilyl) benzene and carboxylic group containing organosilane carboxyethylsilanetriol sodium salt using Brij-76 as the template. The obtained materials were characterized by a mean of methods including powder X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, scanning- and transmission electron microscopy, and 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. The potentials of the obtained PMO materials with ordered mesopores were examined as solid catalysts for the chemical conversion of fructose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) in an organic solvent. The results showed that COOH-functionalized PMO with 10% COOH loading exhibited best results for the fructose to HMF conversion and selectivity. The high surface area, the adequate density acid functional group, and the strength of the PMO materials contributing to a promising catalytic ability were observed.

  5. Effect of carboxylic acid of periodic mesoporous organosilicas on the fructose-to-5-hydroxymethylfurfural conversion in dimethylsulfoxide systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Saikat; Wu, Kevin C.-W. E-mail: kevinwu@ntu.edu.tw; Kao, Hsien-Ming E-mail: kevinwu@ntu.edu.tw

    2014-11-01

    This manuscript presents the preparation and catalytic application of highly ordered benzene bridged periodic mesoporous organosilicas (PMOs) functionalized with carboxylic acid (–COOH) group at varied density. The COOH-functionalized PMOs were synthesized by one-step condensation of 1,4-bis (triethoxysilyl) benzene and carboxylic group containing organosilane carboxyethylsilanetriol sodium salt using Brij-76 as the template. The obtained materials were characterized by a mean of methods including powder X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, scanning- and transmission electron microscopy, and {sup 13}C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. The potentials of the obtained PMO materials with ordered mesopores were examined as solid catalysts for the chemical conversion of fructose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) in an organic solvent. The results showed that COOH-functionalized PMO with 10% COOH loading exhibited best results for the fructose to HMF conversion and selectivity. The high surface area, the adequate density acid functional group, and the strength of the PMO materials contributing to a promising catalytic ability were observed.

  6. CCA-Secure Public Key Encryption without Group-Dependent Hash Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yang; Hanaoka, Goichiro; Imai, Hideki

    So far, in almost all of the practical public key encryption schemes, hash functions which are dependent on underlying cyclic groups are necessary, e.g., H: {0, 1}* ? Zp where p is the order of the underlying cyclic group, and it could be required to construct a dedicated hash function for each public key. The motivation of this note is derived from the following two facts: 1). there is an important technical gap between hashing to a specific prime-order group and hashing to a certain length bit sequence, and this could cause a security hole; 2). surprisingly, to our best knowledge, there is no explicit induction that one could use the simple construction, instead of tailor-made hash functions. In this note, we investigate this issue and provide the first rigorous discussion that in many existing schemes, it is possible to replace such hash functions with a target collision resistant hash function H: {0, 1}* ? {0, 1}k, where k is the security parameter. We think that it is very useful and could drastically save the cost for the hash function implementation in many practical cryptographic schemes.

  7. Pattern classification and recognition of invertebrate functional groups using self-organizing neural networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, WenJun

    2007-07-01

    Self-organizing neural networks can be used to mimic non-linear systems. The main objective of this study is to make pattern classification and recognition on sampling information using two self-organizing neural network models. Invertebrate functional groups sampled in the irrigated rice field were classified and recognized using one-dimensional self-organizing map and self-organizing competitive learning neural networks. Comparisons between neural network models, distance (similarity) measures, and number of neurons were conducted. The results showed that self-organizing map and self-organizing competitive learning neural network models were effective in pattern classification and recognition of sampling information. Overall the performance of one-dimensional self-organizing map neural network was better than self-organizing competitive learning neural network. The number of neurons could determine the number of classes in the classification. Different neural network models with various distance (similarity) measures yielded similar classifications. Some differences, dependent upon the specific network structure, would be found. The pattern of an unrecognized functional group was recognized with the self-organizing neural network. A relative consistent classification indicated that the following invertebrate functional groups, terrestrial blood sucker; terrestrial flyer; tourist (nonpredatory species with no known functional role other than as prey in ecosystem); gall former; collector (gather, deposit feeder); predator and parasitoid; leaf miner; idiobiont (acarine ectoparasitoid), were classified into the same group, and the following invertebrate functional groups, external plant feeder; terrestrial crawler, walker, jumper or hunter; neustonic (water surface) swimmer (semi-aquatic), were classified into another group. It was concluded that reliable conclusions could be drawn from comparisons of different neural network models that use different distance (similarity) measures. Results with the larger consistency will be more reliable. PMID:17180424

  8. Enantioselective Functionalization of Inactive sp(3) C-H Bonds Remote to Functional Group by Metal/Organo Cooperative Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Le; Wang, Pu-Sheng; Zhang, Da-Wei; Liu, Peng; Wang, Cheng-Ming; Gong, Liu-Zhu

    2015-10-16

    A metal/organo cooperative catalysis to enable the enantioselective functionalization of inactive C-H bonds γ to the formyl group in aliphatic aldehydes has been established. Instead of using enals as substrates in traditional organocatalytic cyclization reactions, the aliphatic aldehydes directly participated in [4 + 2] cyclization with quinone derivatives exploiting molecular oxygen as oxidants to afford optically active cyclic molecules with excellent levels of enantioselectivity. This method features a combination of pot, step, and atom economy. PMID:26414813

  9. Recovery of carboxylic acids produced by fermentation.

    PubMed

    López-Garzón, Camilo S; Straathof, Adrie J J

    2014-01-01

    Carboxylic acids such as citric, lactic, succinic and itaconic acids are useful products and are obtained on large scale by fermentation. This review describes the options for recovering these and other fermentative carboxylic acids. After cell removal, often a primary recovery step is performed, using liquid-liquid extraction, adsorption, precipitation or conventional electrodialysis. If the carboxylate is formed rather than the carboxylic acid, the recovery process involves a step for removing the cation of the formed carboxylate. Then, bipolar electrodialysis and thermal methods for salt splitting can prevent that waste inorganic salts are co-produced. Final carboxylic acid purification requires either distillation or crystallization, usually involving evaporation of water. Process steps can often be combined synergistically. In-situ removal of carboxylic acid by extraction during fermentation is the most popular approach. Recovery of the extractant can easily lead to waste inorganic salt formation, which counteracts the advantage of the in-situ removal. For industrial production, various recovery principles and configurations are used, because the fermentation conditions and physical properties of specific carboxylic acids differ. PMID:24751382

  10. Boron Carboxylate Catalysis of Homoallylboration

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Boron tris(trifluoroacetate) is identified as the first effective catalyst for the homoallyl- and homocrotylboration of aldehydes by cyclopropylcarbinylboronates. NMR spectroscopic studies and theoretical calculations of key intermediates and transition states both suggest that a ligand-exchange mechanism, akin to our previously reported PhBCl2-promoted homoallylations, is operative. Our experimental and theoretical results also suggest that the catalytic activity of boron tris(trifluoroacetate) might originate from more facile catalytic turnover of the trifluoroacetate ligands (in agreement with DFT calculations) or from a lower propensity for formation of off-pathway reservoir intermediates (as observed by 1H NMR). This work shows that carboxylates are viable catalytic ligands for homoallyl- and homocrotylations of carbonyl compounds and opens the door to the development of catalytic asymmetric versions of this transformation. PMID:24754566

  11. Speciation of functional groups formed on the surface of ammoxidised carbonaceous materials by XPS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachowski, Leszek; Sobczak, Janusz W.; Hofman, Magdalena

    2007-02-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to investigate the fate of nitrogen functional groups present in carbonaceous materials obtained from European plum ( Prunus domestica) stones and modified by ammonia-air mixture at 250 or 300 °C. Peaks have been found in the XPS patterns, corresponding to different nitrogen functional forms i.e. pyrrolic, pyridinic, pyridone, amine and chemisorbed nitrogen oxides. It has been found that the distribution of nitrogen functional forms changes as a result of the modification processes.

  12. Organic functional group transformations in water at elevated temperature and pressure: Reversibility, reactivity, and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipp, Jessie; Gould, Ian R.; Herckes, Pierre; Shock, Everett L.; Williams, Lynda B.; Hartnett, Hilairy E.

    2013-03-01

    Many transformation reactions involving hydrocarbons occur in the presence of H2O in hydrothermal systems and deep sedimentary systems. We investigate these reactions using laboratory-based organic chemistry experiments at high temperature and pressure (300 °C and 100 MPa). Organic functional group transformation reactions using model organic compounds based on cyclohexane with one or two methyl groups provided regio- and stereochemical markers that yield information about reversibility and reaction mechanisms. We found rapidly reversible interconversion between alkanes, alkenes, dienes, alcohols, ketones, and enones. The alkane-to-ketone reactions were not only completely reversible, but also exhibited such extensive reversibility that any of the functional groups along the reaction path (alcohol, ketone, and even the diene) could be used as the reactant and form all the other groups as products. There was also a propensity for these ring-based structures to dehydrogenate; presumably from the alkene, through a diene, to an aromatic ring. The product suites provide strong evidence that water behaved as a reactant and the various functional groups showed differing degrees of reactivity. Mechanistically-revealing products indicated reaction mechanisms that involve carbon-centered cation intermediates. This work therefore demonstrates that a wide range of organic compound types can be generated by abiotic reactions at hydrothermal conditions.

  13. Detection of Differential Item Functioning for More than Two Groups: A Monte Carlo Comparison of Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, W. Holmes

    2016-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) assessment is a crucial component in test construction, serving as the primary way in which instrument developers ensure that measures perform in the same way for multiple groups within the population. When such is not the case, scores may not accurately reflect the trait of interest for all individuals in the…

  14. Group Social Skills Instruction for Adolescents with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan W.; Koenig, Kathleen; Scahill, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Given the increased recognition of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and the chronic and pervasive nature of associated deficits, there is a pressing need for effective treatments. The feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a structured, group social skills training program for high-functioning youth with ASD was examined in this study. Fifteen…

  15. Chemkarta: A Card Game for Teaching Functional Groups in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudtson, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Students in undergraduate organic chemistry courses are frequently overwhelmed by the volume and complexity of information they are expected to learn. To aid in students' learning of organic functional groups, a novel card game "ChemKarta" is reported that can serve as a useful alternative to flashcards. This pedagogy is a simple…

  16. Neuropsychological Functioning in Specific Learning Disorders--Reading, Writing and Mixed Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohli, Adarsh; Kaur, Manreet; Mohanty, Manju; Malhotra, Savita

    2006-01-01

    Aim: The study compared the pattern of deficits, intelligence and neuropsychological functioning in subcategories of learning disorders. Methods: Forty-six children (16 with reading disorders, 11 with writing disorders and 19 with both reading and writing disorders--mixed group) in the age range of 7-14 years were assessed using the NIMHANS Index…

  17. Attraction to a Group as a Function of Attitude Similarity and Geographic Distance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, John M.

    1984-01-01

    Investigated attraction toward a group as a function of attitude similarity and perceived geographic distance in students (N=60). Results showed that effects of attitude similarity were strongly significant and that distance had no signficant effect on attraction and limited effect on evaluations. (LLL)

  18. Simple plant traits explain functional group diversity decline in novel grassland communities of Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent work on novel ecosystems suggests that exotic species contribute to functional group diversity decline as exotic systems replace native ones. We experimentally compared 18 exotic and 18 native prairie species paired for phylogeny, growth form, and mode of photosynthesis grown both in monocul...

  19. Group-Specific Effects of Matching Subtest Contamination on the Identification of Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keiffer, Elizabeth Ann

    2011-01-01

    A differential item functioning (DIF) simulation study was conducted to explore the type and level of impact that contamination had on type I error and power rates in DIF analyses when the suspect item favored the same or opposite group as the DIF items in the matching subtest. Type I error and power rates were displayed separately for the…

  20. A FUNCTIONAL GROUP CHARACTERIZATION OF ORGANIC PM 2.5 EXPOSURE: RESULTS FROM THE RIOPA STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The functional group (FG) composition of urban residential outdoor, indoor, and personal fine particle (PM2.5) samples is presented and used to provide insights relevant to organic PM2.5 exposure. PM2.5 samples (48 h) were collected during the Rel...

  1. Urinary Cortisol Circadian Rhythm in a Group of High-Functioning Children with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richdale, Amanda L.; Prior, Margot R.

    1992-01-01

    This study found no evidence for abnormal temporal placement of the basal urinary cortisol circadian rhythm in a group of 18 high-functioning children (ages 4-14) with autism. There was a tendency toward cortisol hypersecretion during the day, predominantly in autistic children who were integrated into the normal school system. (Author/JDD)

  2. Review of Social Skills Training Groups for Youth with Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappadocia, M. Catherine; Weiss, Jonathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Although social skills deficits represent core symptoms of Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism, there is limited research investigating the empirical validity of social skills interventions currently being used with these populations. This literature review compares three types of social skills training groups: traditional, cognitive…

  3. Detecting Native Language Group Differences at the Subskills Level of Reading: A Differential Skill Functioning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hongli; Suen, Hoi K.

    2013-01-01

    Differential skill functioning (DSF) exists when examinees from different groups have different probabilities of successful performance in a certain subskill underlying the measured construct, given that they have the same ability on the overall construct. Using a DSF approach, this study examined the differences between two native language…

  4. An Epistemological Inquiry into Organic Chemistry Education: Exploration of Undergraduate Students' Conceptual Understanding of Functional Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akkuzu, Nalan; Uyulgan, Melis Arzu

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to determine the levels of conceptual understanding of undergraduate students regarding organic compounds within different functional groups. A total of 60 students who were enrolled in the Department of Secondary Science and Mathematics Education of a Faculty of Education at a state university in Turkey and who had followed an…

  5. In situ and ex situ spectroscopic monitoring of biochar's surface functional groups

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A number of studies described the higher heating temperature (HHT) as the primary pyrolysis parameter dictating the biochar property: surface functional group and fixed carbon contents, O/C, H/C ratios, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area. In order to produce desirable biochar properties ...

  6. Detecting Native Language Group Differences at the Subskills Level of Reading: A Differential Skill Functioning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hongli; Suen, Hoi K.

    2013-01-01

    Differential skill functioning (DSF) exists when examinees from different groups have different probabilities of successful performance in a certain subskill underlying the measured construct, given that they have the same ability on the overall construct. Using a DSF approach, this study examined the differences between two native language

  7. Detecting Differential Item Functioning Using the Rasch Model with Equivalent-Group Cross-Validation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miao, Chang Y.; Kramer, Gene A.

    An approach to detecting differential item functioning using the Rasch model with equivalent-group cross-validation was investigated. College students taking the Dental Admission Test, were divided by gender (936 females and 1,537 males) into 2 different samples. Rasch analyses were performed on both samples. Data were recalibrated after

  8. Differential Tendencies To Guess as a Function of Gender and Lingual-Cultural Reference Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gafni, Naomi; Estela, Melamed

    The objective of this study was to investigate differential tendencies to avoid guessing as a function of three variables: (1) lingual-cultural-group; (2) gender; and (3) examination year. The Psychometric Entrance Test (PET) for universities in Israel was used, which is administered in Hebrew, Arabic, English, French, Spanish, and Russian. The…

  9. Social Resources and Change in Functional Health: Comparing Three Age Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, G. Kevin; Martin, Peter; Bishop, Alex J.; Johnson, Mary Ann; Poon, Leonard W.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the mediating and moderating role of social resources on the association between age and change in functional health for three age groups of older adults. Data were provided by those in their 60s, 80s, and 100s who participated in the first two phases of the Georgia Centenarian study. Analyses confirmed the study's hypothesis

  10. Group Social Skills Instruction for Adolescents with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan W.; Koenig, Kathleen; Scahill, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Given the increased recognition of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and the chronic and pervasive nature of associated deficits, there is a pressing need for effective treatments. The feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a structured, group social skills training program for high-functioning youth with ASD was examined in this study. Fifteen

  11. Detection of Differential Item Functioning for More than Two Groups: A Monte Carlo Comparison of Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, W. Holmes

    2016-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) assessment is a crucial component in test construction, serving as the primary way in which instrument developers ensure that measures perform in the same way for multiple groups within the population. When such is not the case, scores may not accurately reflect the trait of interest for all individuals in the

  12. Class-Wide Function-Related Intervention Teams: Effects of Group Contingency Programs in Urban Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamps, Debra; Wills, Howard P.; Heitzman-Powell, Linda; Laylin, Jeff; Szoke, Carolyn; Petrillo, Tai; Culey, Amy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effectiveness of the Class-Wide Function-related Intervention Teams (CW-FIT) program, a group contingency intervention for whole classes, and for students with disruptive behaviors who are at risk for emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD). The CW-FIT program includes four elements designed from…

  13. Chemkarta: A Card Game for Teaching Functional Groups in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudtson, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Students in undergraduate organic chemistry courses are frequently overwhelmed by the volume and complexity of information they are expected to learn. To aid in students' learning of organic functional groups, a novel card game "ChemKarta" is reported that can serve as a useful alternative to flashcards. This pedagogy is a simple

  14. IMPORTANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON'S OXYGEN SURFACE FUNCTIONAL GROUPS ON ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of varying physical and chemical properties of activated carbons on adsorption of elemental mercury [Hg(0)] was studied by treating two activated carbons to modify their surface functional groups and pore structures. Heat treatment (1200 K) in nitrogen (N2), air oxidat...

  15. An Epistemological Inquiry into Organic Chemistry Education: Exploration of Undergraduate Students' Conceptual Understanding of Functional Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akkuzu, Nalan; Uyulgan, Melis Arzu

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to determine the levels of conceptual understanding of undergraduate students regarding organic compounds within different functional groups. A total of 60 students who were enrolled in the Department of Secondary Science and Mathematics Education of a Faculty of Education at a state university in Turkey and who had followed an

  16. 14 CFR Section 10 - Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group I Air Carriers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group I Air Carriers Section 10 Section 10 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY... REPORTS FOR LARGE CERTIFICATED AIR CARRIERS Profit and Loss Classification Section 10...

  17. 14 CFR Section 10 - Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group I Air Carriers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group I Air Carriers Section 10 Section 10 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY... REPORTS FOR LARGE CERTIFICATED AIR CARRIERS Profit and Loss Classification Section 10...

  18. 14 CFR Section 10 - Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group I Air Carriers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group I Air Carriers Section 10 Section 10 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY... REPORTS FOR LARGE CERTIFICATED AIR CARRIERS Profit and Loss Classification Section 10...

  19. Social Resources and Change in Functional Health: Comparing Three Age Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, G. Kevin; Martin, Peter; Bishop, Alex J.; Johnson, Mary Ann; Poon, Leonard W.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the mediating and moderating role of social resources on the association between age and change in functional health for three age groups of older adults. Data were provided by those in their 60s, 80s, and 100s who participated in the first two phases of the Georgia Centenarian study. Analyses confirmed the study's hypothesis…

  20. Facile one-step synthesis of monodisperse micron-sized latex particles with highly carboxylated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Appel, Jeroen; Akerboom, Sabine; Fokkink, Remco G; Sprakel, Joris

    2013-08-01

    A facile method for the aqueous synthesis of monodisperse and micronmeter-sized colloids with highly carboxylated surfaces is presented. The method is applied to three different monomers, styrene, methyl methacrylate, and 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate, and illustrate tuning of the size and monodispersity in the reactions. High surface density of carboxylic acids of up to 10 COOH nm(-2) from potentiometric titrations, is achieved through copolymerization with itaconic acid. The versatility of this system is highlighted by creating highly fluorescent and monodisperse particles that can be index matched in aqueous solution and through surface modification via the carboxylic acid groups using standard amidation chemistry. PMID:23857734

  1. Localization and attempted quantification of various functional groups on pulpwood fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klash, A.; Ncube, E.; Meincken, M.

    2009-04-01

    The distribution of different free chemical functional groups on wood and pulp fibres has been determined by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with chemically modified tips. Because these functional groups show a higher affinity to similar groups on the substrate surface during scanning, AFM images determined with an additional digital pulsed-force mode (DPFM) controller allow the distribution of the chemical components to be imaged and to a degree also to be quantified. The investigated tip coatings showed a different sensitivity towards the major chemical components present in wood fibres, determined on spin-coated films and on wood fibres. A clear distinction between cellulose and lignin was possible in both cases. This technique could therefore be used to differentiate between cellulose and lignin present on pulp fibre surfaces and confirm the successful removal of lignin by pulping.

  2. Effect of Habitat Size, Quality, and Isolation on Functional Groups of Beetles in Hollow Oaks

    PubMed Central

    Pilskog, Hanne Eik; Birkemoe, Tone; Framstad, Erik; Sverdrup-Thygeson, Anne

    2016-01-01

    One of the largest threats to biodiversity is land use change and habitat loss. Hollow oaks (Quercus spp. L.) are well-defined patches that are hotspots for biodiversity and red-listed species, but they are often rare and fragmented in the landscape. We investigated the effect of patch size, habitat quality, and isolation on functional groups and red-listed saproxylic beetles in hollow oaks (n = 40) in Norway. The groups were defined by host tree association, trophic grouping, and red-listed status. Habitat quality, represented by tree form was most important in explaining species richness for most groups. Patch size, represented by circumference and amount of dead branches, was most important in explaining abundance. Isolation, that is single oaks compared with oaks in groups, had a negative effect on the abundance of beetles feeding both on wood and fungi (xylomycethopagous), as well as on species associated with broadleaved trees (oak semi-specialists), but did not affect species richness. This indicates that at this scale and in this landscape, isolated oaks are as species rich and valuable for conservation as other oaks, although some functional groups may be more vulnerable to isolation than others. The red-listed species only responded to patch size, indicating that oaks with large circumference and many dead branches are especially important for red-listed species and for conservation. PMID:26945089

  3. Effect of Habitat Size, Quality, and Isolation on Functional Groups of Beetles in Hollow Oaks.

    PubMed

    Pilskog, Hanne Eik; Birkemoe, Tone; Framstad, Erik; Sverdrup-Thygeson, Anne

    2016-01-01

    One of the largest threats to biodiversity is land use change and habitat loss. Hollow oaks (Quercus spp. L.) are well-defined patches that are hotspots for biodiversity and red-listed species, but they are often rare and fragmented in the landscape. We investigated the effect of patch size, habitat quality, and isolation on functional groups and red-listed saproxylic beetles in hollow oaks (n = 40) in Norway. The groups were defined by host tree association, trophic grouping, and red-listed status. Habitat quality, represented by tree form was most important in explaining species richness for most groups. Patch size, represented by circumference and amount of dead branches, was most important in explaining abundance. Isolation, that is single oaks compared with oaks in groups, had a negative effect on the abundance of beetles feeding both on wood and fungi (xylomycethopagous), as well as on species associated with broadleaved trees (oak semi-specialists), but did not affect species richness. This indicates that at this scale and in this landscape, isolated oaks are as species rich and valuable for conservation as other oaks, although some functional groups may be more vulnerable to isolation than others. The red-listed species only responded to patch size, indicating that oaks with large circumference and many dead branches are especially important for red-listed species and for conservation. PMID:26945089

  4. A meta-analysis of functional group responses to forest recovery outside of the tropics.

    PubMed

    Spake, Rebecca; Ezard, Thomas H G; Martin, Philip A; Newton, Adrian C; Doncaster, C Patrick

    2015-12-01

    Both active and passive forest restoration schemes are used in degraded landscapes across the world to enhance biodiversity and ecosystem service provision. Restoration is increasingly also being implemented in biodiversity offset schemes as compensation for loss of natural habitat to anthropogenic development. This has raised concerns about the value of replacing old-growth forest with plantations, motivating research on biodiversity recovery as forest stands age. Functional diversity is now advocated as a key metric for restoration success, yet it has received little analytical attention to date. We conducted a meta-analysis of 90 studies that measured differences in species richness for functional groups of fungi, lichens, and beetles between old-growth control and planted or secondary treatment forests in temperate, boreal, and Mediterranean regions. We identified functional-group-specific relationships in the response of species richness to stand age after forest disturbance. Ectomycorrhizal fungi averaged 90 years for recovery to old-growth values (between 45 years and unrecoverable at 95% prediction limits), and epiphytic lichens took 180 years to reach 90% of old-growth values (between 140 years and never for recovery to old-growth values at 95% prediction limits). Non-saproxylic beetle richness, in contrast, decreased as stand age of broadleaved forests increased. The slow recovery by some functional groups essential to ecosystem functioning makes old-growth forest an effectively irreplaceable biodiversity resource that should be exempt from biodiversity offsetting initiatives. PMID:26040756

  5. Structural and functional evolution of the P2Y12-like receptor group

    PubMed Central

    Hermsdorf, Thomas; Engemaier, Eva; Engel, Kathrin; Liebscher, Ines; Thor, Doreen; Zierau, Klaas; Römpler, Holger; Schulz, Angela

    2007-01-01

    Metabotropic pyrimidine and purine nucleotide receptors (P2Y receptors) belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). They are distinguishable from adenosine receptors (P1) as they bind adenine and/or uracil nucleotide triphosphates or diphosphates depending on the subtype. Over the past decade, P2Y receptors have been cloned from a variety of tissues and species, and as many as eight functional subtypes have been characterized. Most recently, several members of the P2Y12-like receptor group, which includes the clopidogrel-sensitive ADP receptor P2Y12, have been deorphanized. The P2Y12-like receptor group comprises several structurally related GPCR which, however, display heterogeneous agonist specificity including nucleotides, their derivatives, and lipids. Besides the established function of P2Y12 in platelet activation, expression in macrophages, neuronal and glial cells as well as recent results from functional studies implicate that several members of this group may have specific functions in neurotransmission, inflammation, chemotaxis, and response to tissue injury. This review focuses specifically on the structure-function relation and shortly summarizes some aspects of the physiological relevance of P2Y12-like receptor members. PMID:18404440

  6. Do functional traits improve prediction of predation rates for a disparate group of aphid predators?

    PubMed

    Bell, J R; Mead, A; Skirvin, D J; Sunderland, K D; Fenlon, J S; Symondson, W O C

    2008-12-01

    Aphid predators are a systematically disparate group of arthropods united on the basis that they consume aphids as part of their diet. In Europe, this group includes Araneae, Opiliones, Heteroptera, chrysopids, Forficulina, syrphid larvae, carabids, staphylinids, cantharids and coccinellids. This functional group has no phylogenetic meaning but was created by ecologists as a way of understanding predation, particularly for conservation biological control. We investigated whether trait-based approaches could bring some cohesion and structure to this predator group. A taxonomic hierarchy-based null model was created from taxonomic distances in which a simple multiplicative relationship described the Linnaean hierarchies (species, genera, etc.) of fifty common aphid predators. Using the same fifty species, a functional groups model was developed using ten behavioural traits (e.g. polyphagy, dispersal, activity, etc.) to describe the way in which aphids were predated in the field. The interrelationships between species were then expressed as dissimilarities within each model and separately analysed using PROXSCAL, a multidimensional scaling (MDS) program. When ordinated using PROXSCAL and then statistically compared using Procrustes analysis, we found that only 17% of information was shared between the two configurations. Polyphagy across kingdoms (i.e. predatory behaviour across animal, plant and fungi kingdoms) and the ability to withstand starvation over days, weeks and months were particularly divisive within the functional groups model. Confirmatory MDS indicated poor prediction of aphid predation rates by the configurations derived from either model. The counterintuitive conclusion was that the inclusion of functional traits, pertinent to the way in which predators fed on aphids, did not lead to a large improvement in the prediction of predation rate when compared to the standard taxonomic approach. PMID:18590596

  7. Crystal structure of ethyl 2-(3,5-di-fluoro-phen-yl)quinoline-4-carboxyl-ate.

    PubMed

    Sunitha, V M; Naveen, S; Manjunath, H R; Benaka Prasad, S B; Manivannan, V; Lokanath, N K

    2015-05-01

    In the title compound, C18H13F2NO2, the two rings of the quinoline system are fused almost coaxially, with a dihedral angle between their planes of 2.28 (8)°. The plane of the attached benzene ring is inclined to the plane of the quinoline system by 7.65 (7)°. The carboxyl-ate group attached to the quinoline system is in an anti-periplanar conformation. There is a short intra-molecular C-H⋯O contact involving the carbonyl group. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked via C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming chains lying in the (1-10) plane. PMID:25995938

  8. Development of Acid Functional Groups and Lactones During the Thermal Degradation of Wood and Wood Components

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rutherford, David W.; Wershaw, Robert L.; Reeves, James B., III

    2008-01-01

    Black carbon (pyrogenic materials including chars) in soils has been recognized as a substantial portion of soil organic matter, and has been shown to play a vital role in nutrient cycling; however, little is known concerning the properties of this material. Previous studies have largely been concerned with the creation of high-surface-area materials for use as sorbents. These materials have been manufactured at high temperature and have often been activated. Chars occurring in the environment can be formed over a wide range of temperature. Because it is extremely difficult to isolate black carbon once it has been incorporated in soils, chars produced in the laboratory under controlled conditions can be used to investigate the range of properties possible for natural chars. This report shows that charring conditions (temperature and time) have substantial impact on the acid functional group and lactone content of chars. Low temperatures (250?C) and long charring times (greater than 72 hours) produce chars with the highest acid functional group and lactone content. The charring of cellulose appears to be responsible for the creation of the acid functional group and lactones. The significance of this study is that low-temperature chars can have acid functional group contents comparable to humic materials (as high as 8.8 milliequivalents per gram). Acid functional group and lactone content decreases as charring temperature increases. The variation in formation conditions expected under natural fire conditions will result in a wide range of sorption properties for natural chars which are an important component of soil organic matter. By controlling the temperature and duration of charring, it is possible to tailor the sorption properties of chars, which may be used as soil amendments.

  9. Easy route to functionalize iron oxide nanoparticles via long-term stable thiol groups.

    PubMed

    Maurizi, L; Bisht, H; Bouyer, F; Millot, N

    2009-08-18

    The functionalization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) by meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) was investigated. Under ambient conditions, the thiol groups from DMSA are not stable and do not allow a direct functionalization without storage in stringent conditions or a chemical regeneration of free thiols. In this study, we have developed a protocol based on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) grafting of SPIO prior to DMSA anchoring. We have observed that PEG helps to increase the stability of thiol groups under ambient conditions. The thiol functionalized SPIOs were stable under physiological pH and ionic strength as determined by Ellman's essay and allowed us to graft a thiol reactive fluorescent dye: tetramethylrhodamine-5-maleimide (TMRM). PMID:19572525

  10. Quantification of protein group coherence and pathway assignment using functional association

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genomics and proteomics experiments produce a large amount of data that are awaiting functional elucidation. An important step in analyzing such data is to identify functional units, which consist of proteins that play coherent roles to carry out the function. Importantly, functional coherence is not identical with functional similarity. For example, proteins in the same pathway may not share the same Gene Ontology (GO) terms, but they work in a coordinated fashion so that the aimed function can be performed. Thus, simply applying existing functional similarity measures might not be the best solution to identify functional units in omics data. Results We have designed two scores for quantifying the functional coherence by considering association of GO terms observed in two biological contexts, co-occurrences in protein annotations and co-mentions in literature in the PubMed database. The counted co-occurrences of GO terms were normalized in a similar fashion as the statistical amino acid contact potential is computed in the protein structure prediction field. We demonstrate that the developed scores can identify functionally coherent protein sets, i.e. proteins in the same pathways, co-localized proteins, and protein complexes, with statistically significant score values showing a better accuracy than existing functional similarity scores. The scores are also capable of detecting protein pairs that interact with each other. It is further shown that the functional coherence scores can accurately assign proteins to their respective pathways. Conclusion We have developed two scores which quantify the functional coherence of sets of proteins. The scores reflect the actual associations of GO terms observed either in protein annotations or in literature. It has been shown that they have the ability to accurately distinguish biologically relevant groups of proteins from random ones as well as a good discriminative power for detecting interacting pairs of proteins. The scores were further successfully applied for assigning proteins to pathways. PMID:21929787

  11. Zooplankton functional groups on the continental shelf of the yellow sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Song; Huo, Yuanzi; Yang, Bo

    2010-06-01

    Zooplankton plays a vital role in marine ecosystems. Variations in the zooplankton species composition, biomass, and secondary production will change the structure and function of the ecosystem. How to describe this process and make it easier to be modeled in the Yellow Sea ecosystem is the main purpose of this paper. The zooplankton functional groups approach, which is considered a good method of linking the structure of food webs and the energy flow in the ecosystems, is used to describe the main contributors of secondary produciton of the Yellow Sea ecosystem. The zooplankton can be classified into six functional groups: giant crustaceans, large copepods, small copepods, chaetognaths, medusae, and salps. The giant crustaceans, large copepods, and small copepods groups, which are the main food resources for fish, are defined depending on the size spectrum. Medusae and chaetognaths are the two gelatinous carnivorous groups, which compete with fish for food. The salps group, acting as passive filter-feeders, competes with other species feeding on phytoplankton, but their energy could not be efficiently transferred to higher trophic levels. From the viewpoint of biomass, which is the basis of the food web, and feeding activities, the contributions of each functional group to the ecosystem were evaluated; the seasonal variations, geographical distribution patterns, and species composition of each functional group were analyzed. The average zooplankton biomass was 2.1 g dry wt m -2 in spring, to which the giant crustaceans, large copepods, and small copepods contributed 19, 44, and 26%, respectively. High biomasses of the large copepods and small copepods were distributed at the coastal waters, while the giant crustaceans were mainly located at offshore area. In summer, the mean biomass was 3.1 g dry wt m -2, which was mostly contributed by the giant crustaceans (73%), and high biomasses of the giant crustaceans, large copepods, and small copepods were all distributed in the central part of the Yellow Sea. During autumn, the mean biomass was 1.8 g dry wt m -2, which was similarly constituted by the giant crustaceans, large copepods, and small copepods (36, 33, and 23%, respectively), and high biomasses of the giant crustaceans and large copepods occurred in the central part of the Yellow Sea, while the small copepods were mainly located at offshore stations. The giant crustaceans and large copepods dominated the zooplankton biomass (2.9 g dry wt m -2) in winter, contributing respectively 57 and 27%, and they, as well as the small copepods, were all mainly located in the central part of the Yellow Sea. The chaetognaths group was mainly located in the northern part of the Yellow Sea during all seasons, but contributed less to the biomass compared with the other groups. The medusae and salps groups were distributed unevenly, with sporadic dynamics, mainly along the coastline and at the northern part of the Yellow Sea. No more than 10 species belonging to the respective functional groups dominated the zooplankton biomass and controlled the dynamics of the zooplankton community. The clear picture of the seasonal and spatial variations of each zooplankton functional group makes the complicated Yellow Sea ecosystem easier to be understood and modeled.

  12. Plastic scintillators with high loading of one or more metal carboxylates

    DOEpatents

    Cherepy, Nerine; Sanner, Robert Dean

    2016-01-12

    In one embodiment, a material includes at least one metal compound incorporated into a polymeric matrix, where the metal compound includes a metal and one or more carboxylate ligands, where at least one of the one or more carboxylate ligands includes a tertiary butyl group, and where the material is optically transparent. In another embodiment, a method includes: processing pulse traces corresponding to light pulses from a scintillator material; and outputting a result of the processing, where the scintillator material comprises at least one metal compound incorporated into a polymeric matrix, the at least one metal compound including a metal and one or more carboxylate ligands, where at least one of the one or more carboxylate ligands has a tertiary butyl group, and where the scintillator material is optically transparent and has an energy resolution at 662 keV of less than about 20%.

  13. Tumor-suppressor effects of chemical functional groups in an in vitro co-culture system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Su-Ju; Cui, Fu-Zhai; Kong, Xiang-Dong

    2014-06-01

    Liver normal cells and cancer cells co-cultured on surfaces modified by different chemical functional groups, including mercapto (-SH), hydroxyl (-OH) and methyl (-CH3) groups. The results showed that different cells exhibited changes in response to different surfaces. Normal cells on -SH surface exhibited the smallest contact area with mostly rounded morphology, which led to the death of cancer cells, while cancer cells could not grow on -CH3 groups, which also died. In the co-culture system, the -CH3 group exhibited its unique effect that could trigger the death of cancer cells and had no effects on normal cells. Our findings provide useful information on strategies for the design of efficient and safe regenerative medicine materials.

  14. Bioreduction and reoxidation of uranium enhanced by thiol functional groups in natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong-Wei; Xu, Fang

    2016-03-01

    Although natural organic matter (NOM) is known to affect biological reduction of U(VI) and subsequent reoxidation of U(IV), the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. This study investigated the redox reactions of sulfide with NOM to form thiol functional groups, which can greatly enhance U(VI) bioreduction and U(IV) reoxidation. Results showed that humic acid (HA) was found to be more effective than fulvic acid (FA) in producing thiol groups, both U(VI) bioreduction and U(IV) reoxidation rates increased with the increase of thiols content in HA and FA. These findings suggested that among other redox sites, thiol groups in NOM may play an important role in the electron transport between uranium and microbial cells, and are of great environmental implications because they provided direct proof that thiol groups are responsible for bioremediation and immobilization of uranium when it enters into the natural environments such as soil and groundwater. PMID:26751128