Science.gov

Sample records for cardiac arrest cases

  1. Cardiac arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment for cardiac arrest. It is a medical device that gives an electrical shock to the heart. The shock can get the heart beating normally again. Small, portable defibrillators are often available in public areas for ...

  2. A Unique Case of Cardiac Arrest following K2 Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Wannenburg, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) accounts for up to 450,000 deaths every year in the United States (Zipes et al. (2006)). Most cases of sudden cardiac death occur in subjects with no prior history of heart disease (Myerburg et al. (1998)). The incidence of sudden death in a general population has been shown to increase contemporaneously with substance abuse (Phillips et al. (1999)). The causative association of sudden death with cocaine, methadone, and volatile agents is well established (Adgey et al. (1995) and Isner et al. (1986)). We describe a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest temporally related to abuse of the synthetic cannabinoid street drug known as K2. To our knowledge, there are no previously documented cases of sudden cardiac death associated with synthetic cannabinoids although they have been linked to myocardial infarction in teenagers despite normal coronary angiography (Mir et al. (2011)). PMID:24963415

  3. [RESUSCITATION MEASURES IN CASE OF CARDIAC ARREST].

    PubMed

    Lamhaut, Lionel; Cariou, Alain

    2015-09-01

    Improving the survival rate of sudden cardiac death victims mainly relies in the prompt activation of the "chain of survival", resulting in efficient performance at basic life support maneuvers by bystanders. Among these maneuvers, cardiac compressions and use of automated external defibrillation are the most important components. Since basic life support is easy to learn, spreading its practice throughout the general population should be a priority for public health policy. Following initial resuscitation, the last step of the "chain of survival" is ensured by expert pre-hospital and ICU teams, which are able to provide appropriate care. Organization and sequence of these different steps are the object of regularly updated guidelines, summarized in the form of algorithms that facilitate their application. PMID:26619726

  4. Sports Induced Cardiac Arrest: A Case of Missed Rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Parshotam L; Luthra, Neeru; Nain, Prabhdeep Singh

    2015-09-01

    Exercise induced rhabdomyolysis although uncommon, is well known in strenuous and exhaustive sports like marathons, cycling and wrestlers. But it is not known in Kabaddi players. We report a case of nearly fatal rhabdomyolysis which was missed during early resuscitation in emergency room and lead to cardiac arrest due to catastrophic metabolic acidosis and severe -hyperkalemia. After high quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation and return of spontaneous rhythm, emergency resuscitative exploratory laparotomy was performed for suspected bladder injury which was negative. He had remarkable recovery over 24 h following diagnosis and aggressive supportive management including peritoneal dialysis. Heat stroke and rhabdomyolysis should be suspected early in players playing strenuous sports in tropical countries even during winter. High degree of suspicion and early aggressive general support is the key to success for unusual clinical presentation of any such clinical entity. PMID:26500986

  5. Sports Induced Cardiac Arrest: A Case of Missed Rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Parshotam L; Nain, Prabhdeep Singh

    2015-01-01

    Exercise induced rhabdomyolysis although uncommon, is well known in strenuous and exhaustive sports like marathons, cycling and wrestlers. But it is not known in Kabaddi players. We report a case of nearly fatal rhabdomyolysis which was missed during early resuscitation in emergency room and lead to cardiac arrest due to catastrophic metabolic acidosis and severe -hyperkalemia. After high quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation and return of spontaneous rhythm, emergency resuscitative exploratory laparotomy was performed for suspected bladder injury which was negative. He had remarkable recovery over 24 h following diagnosis and aggressive supportive management including peritoneal dialysis. Heat stroke and rhabdomyolysis should be suspected early in players playing strenuous sports in tropical countries even during winter. High degree of suspicion and early aggressive general support is the key to success for unusual clinical presentation of any such clinical entity. PMID:26500986

  6. [Thoracic lavage and open cardiac massage as treatment of hypothermic cardiac arrest--case report].

    PubMed

    Koponen, Timo; Vänni, Ville; Kettunen, Minna; Reinikainen, Matti; Hakala, Tapio

    2016-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass is the treatment of choice for a severely hypothermic patient with cardiac arrest. However, the treatment is not always available. We describe a successful three-and-a-half hour resuscitation of a hypothermic cardiac arrest patient with manual chest compressions followed by open cardiac massage and rewarming with thoracic lavage. PMID:27188092

  7. Therapeutic Hypothermia after Prolonged Cardiac Arrest: Case Report with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Sankalp; Garg, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    Patients who survive cardiac arrest often develop severe neurological dysfunction due to the hypoxic brain injury and reperfusion induced cell death. Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) has become a standard therapy of cerebral protection following the successful return of spontaneous circulation in patients of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, according to American heart association guidelines. This is a case report of a 30-year-old patient who developed in-hospital cardiac arrest and was revived after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and also required primary angioplasty. TH was then established with local measures for 24 hours for cerebral protection. The patient was gradually and successfully weaned off from ventilator with no neurological impairment. There is an increasing evidence of TH and its protective mechanisms in patients with non-shockable arrest rhythms with particular emphasis on neurological outcomes. This article emphasizes the role of TH in every successful CPR irrespective of the cardiac rhythm. PMID:26500937

  8. Cardiac arrest in children.

    PubMed

    Tress, Erika E; Kochanek, Patrick M; Saladino, Richard A; Manole, Mioara D

    2010-07-01

    Major advances in the field of pediatric cardiac arrest (CA) were made during the last decade, starting with the publication of pediatric Utstein guidelines, the 2005 recommendations by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, and culminating in multicenter collaborations. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of in-hospital and out-of-hospital CA are now well described. Four phases of CA are described and the term "post-cardiac arrest syndrome" has been proposed, along with treatment goals for each of its four phases: immediate post-arrest, early post-arrest, intermediate and recovery phase. Hypothermia is recommended to be considered as a therapy for post-CA syndrome in comatose patients after CA, and large multicenter prospective studies are underway. We reviewed landmark articles related to pediatric CA published during the last decade. We present the current knowledge of epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of CA relevant to pre-hospital and acute care health practitioners. PMID:20930971

  9. Back pain, leg swelling and a cardiac arrest: an interesting case of endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Joseph; Hatcher, James; Riddell, Anna; Tiberi, Simon

    2014-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman with a history of tissue aortic valve replacement and chronic back pain presented to the emergency department with a suspected right leg deep vein thrombosis. A recent outpatient MRI had revealed discitis. A ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest occurred in the emergency department. Cardiac output was restored on the fifth defibrillation. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed large aortic valve vegetations. Clinical impression was of infective endocarditis with cardiac arrest secondary to coronary artery embolisation. Peripheral blood cultures grew Cardiobacterium hominis, and appropriate intravenous antibiotic therapy was administered. The infected prosthetic valve was excised. The patient experienced postoperative complete heart block and a right hemisphere cerebrovascular accident, however she is now recovering well. This case describes an unusual case of infective endocarditis secondary to C. hominis, with disc, leg, coronary artery and brain septic embolisation. Infective endocarditis is an important differential diagnosis in multisystem presentations. PMID:24859548

  10. Cardiac arrest during dipyridamole imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, M.S.; McCauley, C.S.

    1988-05-01

    A case of cardiac arrest and subsequent acute myocardial infarction occurring during thallium-201 imaging with oral dipyridamole augmentation is presented. Previous reports emphasizing the safety of this procedure are briefly reviewed and a recommendation for close hemodynamic and arrhythmia monitoring during the study is made. Large doses of oral dipyridamole may be contraindicated in patients with unstable angina.

  11. [A Successful Case of Recovery from the Amniotic Fluid Embolism with Cardiac Arrest during the Operation].

    PubMed

    Oi, Chikako; Hori, Yasuo; Sano, Hiroaki; Yamama, Yoshihiro; Nakatani, Keiji

    2015-11-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is a disorder with a high mortality rate. We present a case of AFE with cardiac arrest during the cesarean section who recovered sequela. A 28-year-old woman was diagnosed as low lying placenta and planned to undergo cesarean section in 38th gestational week. She had atypical genital bleeding in 32nd gestational weeks and she received emergency cesarean section under general anesthesia. After expulsion of her fetus, she lost many blood. We suspected obstetric DIC and started therapy immediately, but cardiac arrest occurred suddenly. She was resuscitated, and we decided to suspend the operation with temporary gauze-packing. After in better general condition, we removed the packed gauze from her abdomen. She could leave the intensive care unit 7 days after the first operation. In this case, the crucial points for successful resuscitation were prompt obstetric anesthesiologist involvement and good communication with obstetricians. PMID:26689072

  12. [Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest].

    PubMed

    Virkkunen, Ilkka; Hoppu, Sanna; Kämäräinen, Antti

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac arrest as the first symptom of coronary artery disease is not uncommon. Some of previously healthy people with sudden cardiac arrest may be saved by effective resuscitation and post-resuscitative therapy. The majority of cardiac arrest patients experience the cardiac arrest outside of the hospital, in which case early recognition of lifelessness, commencement of basic life support and entry to professional care without delay are the prerequisites for recovery. After the heart has started beating again, the clinical picture of post-resuscitation syndrome must be recognized and appropriate treatment utilized. PMID:22204143

  13. A Case of Survival after Cardiac Arrest and 3½ Hours of Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Nusbaum, Derek M.; Bassett, Scott T.; Gregoric, Igor D.; Kar, Biswajit

    2014-01-01

    Although survival rates after cardiac arrest remain low, new techniques are improving patients' outcomes. We present the case of a 40-year-old man who survived a cardiac arrest that lasted approximately 3½ hours. Resuscitation was performed with strict adherence to American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology Advanced Cardiac Life Support guidelines until bedside extracorporeal membrane oxygenation could be placed. A hypothermia protocol was initiated immediately afterwards. The patient had a full neurologic recovery and was bridged from dual ventricular assist devices to a total artificial heart. On hospital day 160, he underwent orthotopic heart and cadaveric kidney transplantation. On day 179, he was discharged from the hospital in ambulatory condition. To our knowledge, this is the only reported case in which a patient survived with good neurologic outcomes after a resuscitation that lasted as long as 3½ hours. Documented cases of resuscitation with good recovery after prolonged arrest give hope for improved overall outcomes in the future. PMID:24808789

  14. Ibogaine-associated cardiac arrest and death: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Meisner, Jessica A; Wilcox, Susan R; Richards, Jeremy B

    2016-04-01

    A naturally occurring hallucinogenic plant alkaloid, ibogaine has been used as an adjuvant for opiate withdrawal for the past 50 years. In the setting of an escalating nationwide opiate epidemic, use of substances such as ibogaine may also increase. Therefore, familiarity with the mechanisms and potential adverse effects of ibogaine is important for clinicians. We present the case report of a man whose use of ibogaine resulted in cardiac arrest and death, complemented by a review of the literature regarding ibogaine's clinical effects. A 40-year-old man who used ibogaine for symptoms of heroin withdrawal suffered acute cardiac arrest leading to cerebral edema and brain death. His presentation was consistent with ibogaine-induced cardiotoxicity and ibogaine-induced cardiac arrest, and a review of the literature regarding the history, mechanisms, risks and clinical outcomes associated with ibogaine is presented. The case presented underscores the significant potential clinical risks of ibogaine. It is important the healthcare community be aware of the possible effects of ibogaine such that clinicians can provide informed counseling to their patients regarding the risks of attempting detoxification with ibogaine. PMID:27141291

  15. Ibogaine-associated cardiac arrest and death: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Meisner, Jessica A.; Wilcox, Susan R.; Richards, Jeremy B.

    2016-01-01

    A naturally occurring hallucinogenic plant alkaloid, ibogaine has been used as an adjuvant for opiate withdrawal for the past 50 years. In the setting of an escalating nationwide opiate epidemic, use of substances such as ibogaine may also increase. Therefore, familiarity with the mechanisms and potential adverse effects of ibogaine is important for clinicians. We present the case report of a man whose use of ibogaine resulted in cardiac arrest and death, complemented by a review of the literature regarding ibogaine’s clinical effects. A 40-year-old man who used ibogaine for symptoms of heroin withdrawal suffered acute cardiac arrest leading to cerebral edema and brain death. His presentation was consistent with ibogaine-induced cardiotoxicity and ibogaine-induced cardiac arrest, and a review of the literature regarding the history, mechanisms, risks and clinical outcomes associated with ibogaine is presented. The case presented underscores the significant potential clinical risks of ibogaine. It is important the healthcare community be aware of the possible effects of ibogaine such that clinicians can provide informed counseling to their patients regarding the risks of attempting detoxification with ibogaine. PMID:27141291

  16. Cardiac Arrest and Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Case of Medical Heuristics

    PubMed Central

    Ajayi, Tokunbo; Okudo, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient clinical data from patients is a major cause of errors in medical diagnostics. In an attempt to make a diagnosis, initial clinical information provided to the physician may be overly relied on as the only information required in making diagnosis leading to anchoring. Failure to rely on differential diagnoses in spite of new signs and symptoms or rethinking of initial hypothesis may lead to fixation on a certain diagnosis, which may lead to significant morbidity and mortality. In the event that there is an anchoring heuristic, like in our patient, it is important to consider differential diagnoses; however, it is not wrong to rely on some form of anchor. We report a case of a 62-year-old male with a history of multiple medical conditions and a history of acetaminophen overdose who presented to the hospital with large amounts of coffee ground emesis. He was subsequently transferred to the liver transplant center on discovery that he was in fulminant hepatic failure and died two days later in spite of aggressive medical treatment. PMID:27366152

  17. Asystolic Cardiac Arrest of Unknown Duration in Profound Hypothermia and Polysubstance Overdose: A Case Report of Complete Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Lubana, Sandeep Singh; Genin, Dennis Iilya; Singh, Navdeep; De La Cruz, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 20 Final Diagnosis: Asystolic cardiac arrest in profound hypothermia and poly-substance overdose Symptoms: Cardiac arrestcardiac arrhythmia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Endotracheal intubation • hemodialysis Specialty: Critical Care Medicine Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Opioid addiction and overdose is a serious problem worldwide. Fatal overdoses from opioids are responsible for numerous deaths and are increasing, especially if taken in combination with other psychoactive substances. Combined with environmental exposure, opioid overdose can cause profound hypothermia. Opioid abuse and other drugs of abuse impair thermoregulation, leading to severe hypothermia. Both drug overdose and severe hypothermia can cause cardiac arrest. Case Report: We report a case of 20-year-old man with history of polysubstance abuse presenting with severe hypothermia and asystole of unknown duration with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) achieved after 28 minutes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Urine toxicology was positive for cocaine, heroin, and benzodiazepine, along with positive blood alcohol level. The patient was rewarmed using non-invasive techniques. Hospital course was complicated by acute renal failure (ARF), severe rhabdomyolysis, severe hyperkalemia, ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), shock liver, coagulopathy, and aspiration pneumonia. Conclusions: Survival with full cardiovascular and neurologic recovery after a cardiac arrest caused by drug overdose in the setting of severe hypothermia is still possible, even if the cardiac arrest is of unknown or prolonged duration. Patients with severe hypothermia experiencing cardiac arrest/hemodynamic instability can be rewarmed using non-invasive methods and may not necessarily need invasive rewarming techniques. PMID:26054008

  18. Cardiac arrest and pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Tabitha A; Sanson, Tracy G

    2009-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary arrest in pregnancy is rare occurring in 1 in 30,000 pregnancies. When it does occur, it is important for a clinician to be familiar with the features peculiar to the pregnant state. Knowledge of the anatomic and physiologic changes of pregnancy is helpful in the treatment and diagnosis. Although the main focus should be on the mother, it should not be forgotten that there is another potential life at stake. Resuscitation of the mother is performed in the same manner as in any other patient, except for a few minor adjustments because of the changes of pregnancy. The specialties of obstetrics and neonatology should be involved early in the process to ensure appropriate treatment of both mother and the newborn. This article will explore the changes that occur in pregnancy and their impact on treatment. The common causes of maternal cardiac arrest will be discussed briefly. PMID:19561954

  19. [Diagnosis of essential thrombocythemia after myocardial infarction and cardiac arrest: A case report].

    PubMed

    Cartigny, G; Faivre, V; Stamboul, K; Aulagne, J; Cottin, Y

    2015-09-01

    Acute coronary syndrome is now a well-known disease, with codified treatments. The main presentation is chest pain, but more and more cases are revealed by cardiorespiratory arrest thanks to pre-hospital care. And, depending on the evolution in such situations, cardiocirculatory support techniques like extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can be implemented. If the more common cause of SCA is atherosclerosis, consequence of the combination of one or more cardiovascular risk factors, there are rare aetiologies, which include myeloproliferative syndromes, in particular essential thrombocythemia. We describe the case of a 34-year-old man presenting with anterior ST-elevation myocardial infarction complicated by an initial cardiac arrest, whose aetiology is unknown essential thrombocythemia, and its therapeutic management requiring circulatory support by ECMO and IMPELLA(®) techniques. PMID:26044307

  20. Registry of Unexplained Cardiac Arrest

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-16

    Cardiac Arrest; Long QT Syndrome; Brugada Syndrome; Catecholaminergi Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia; Idiopathic VentricularFibrillation; Early Repolarization Syndrome; Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy

  1. Neuroprognostication After Pediatric Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Kirschen, Matthew P.; Topjian, Alexis A.; Hammond, Rachel; Illes, Judy; Abend, Nicholas S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Management decisions and parental counseling after pediatric cardiac arrest depend on the ability of physicians to make accurate and timely predictions regarding neurological recovery. We evaluated neurologists and intensivists performing neuroprognostication after cardiac arrest to determine prediction agreement, accuracy, and confidence. METHODS Pediatric neurologists (n = 10) and intensivists (n = 9) reviewed 18 cases of children successfully resuscitated from a cardiac arrest and managed in the pediatric intensive care unit. Cases were sequentially presented (after arrest day 1, days 2–4, and days 5–7), with updated examinations, neurophysiologic data, and neuroimaging data. At each time period, physicians predicted outcome by Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category and specified prediction confidence. RESULTS Predicted discharge Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category versus actual hospital discharge Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category outcomes were compared. Exact (Predicted Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category – Actual Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category = 0) and close (Predicted Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category – Actual Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category = ±1) outcome prediction accuracies for all physicians improved over successive periods (P < 0.05). Prediction accuracy did not differ significantly between physician groups at any period or overall. Agreement improved over time among neurologists (day 1 Kappa [κ], 0.28; days 2–4 κ, 0.43; days 5–7 κ, 0.68) and among intensivists (day 1 κ, 0.30; days 2–4 κ, 0.44; days 5–7 κ, 0.57). Prediction confidence increased over time (P < 0.001) and did not differ between physician groups. CONCLUSIONS Inter-rater agreement among neurologists and among intensivists improved over time and reached moderate levels. For all physicians, prediction accuracy and confidence improved over time. Further prospective research is needed to better characterize how physicians

  2. Recovery of brain function after cardiac arrest, case report and review.

    PubMed

    Nekoui, A; Tresierra, del Carmen Escalante; Abdolmohammadi, S; Charbonneau, S; Blaise, G

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral hypoxia during cardiac arrest is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in survival victims. To reduce cerebral damage, studies focus on finding effective treatments during the resuscitation period. Our report focuses on a 36-year-old police officer who had had two cardiac arrests (one at home and one at the hospital). After acute treatment, his cardiac and brain functions recovered impressively. Neuropsychological results were normal except for mild anomia. He also reported some retrograde memory loss. Surprisingly, he also reported an improvement in a very specific capacity, his episodic memory. We here review the possible causes and mechanisms that may have affected his memory abilities. PMID:27363214

  3. Spontaneous defibrillation after cessation of resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a case of Lazarus phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Kämäräinen, Antti; Virkkunen, Ilkka; Holopainen, Leevi; Erkkilä, Elja-Pekka; Yli-Hankala, Arvi; Tenhunen, Jyrki

    2007-12-01

    This report describes a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with spontaneous defibrillation and subsequent return of circulation after cessation of resuscitative efforts. A 47-year-old man was found in cardiac arrest and resuscitation was initiated. As no response was achieved, the efforts were withdrawn and final registered cardiac rhythm was ventricular fibrillation. Fifteen minutes later the patient was found to be normotensive and breathing spontaneously. The patient made a poor neurological recovery and died 3 months after the arrest. The authors are unable to give an explanation to the event, but suspect the effect of adrenaline combined with mild hypothermia to have contributed to the self-defibrillation of the myocardium. PMID:17629389

  4. Successful Resuscitation of a Cardiac Arrest following Slit Neck and Carotid Artery Injury: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Sayyed Ehtesham Hussain; Ali, Eram; Beg, Mohammed Haneef; Varshney, Saurav

    2016-06-01

    Carotid artery injuries constitute a specific and relatively small group of vascular trauma among the traumatic injuries to neck. They have the potential of killing the patients within minutes to hours due to haemodynamic instability if not managed by the specialist team within time. Central Neurologic deficit from cerebral hypoxia either resulting primarily from trauma or secondarily from surgery is a major concern. We hereby present a case of a 22-year-old man who presented to emergency department with alleged assault and vascular trauma to neck in a state of cardiac arrest. On exploration patient had injuries to external and internal carotid arteries and external jugular vein. Combined effort of trauma team lead to successful resuscitation and saved the life of the patient. PMID:27504354

  5. Successful Resuscitation of a Cardiac Arrest following Slit Neck and Carotid Artery Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Eram; Beg, Mohammed Haneef; Varshney, Saurav

    2016-01-01

    Carotid artery injuries constitute a specific and relatively small group of vascular trauma among the traumatic injuries to neck. They have the potential of killing the patients within minutes to hours due to haemodynamic instability if not managed by the specialist team within time. Central Neurologic deficit from cerebral hypoxia either resulting primarily from trauma or secondarily from surgery is a major concern. We hereby present a case of a 22-year-old man who presented to emergency department with alleged assault and vascular trauma to neck in a state of cardiac arrest. On exploration patient had injuries to external and internal carotid arteries and external jugular vein. Combined effort of trauma team lead to successful resuscitation and saved the life of the patient. PMID:27504354

  6. Malignant Course of Anomalous Left Coronary Artery Causing Sudden Cardiac Arrest: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Anantha Narayanan, Mahesh; DeZorzi, Christopher; Akinapelli, Abhilash; Mahfood Haddad, Toufik; Smer, Aiman; Baskaran, Janani; Biddle, William P.

    2015-01-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest has been reported to occur in patients with congenital anomalous coronary artery disease. About 80% of the anomalies are benign and incidental findings at the time of catheterization. We present a case of sudden cardiac arrest caused by anomalous left anterior descending artery. 61-year-old African American female was brought to the emergency department after sudden cardiac arrest. Initial EKG showed sinus rhythm with RBBB and LAFB with nonspecific ST-T wave changes. Coronary angiogram revealed no atherosclerotic disease. The left coronary artery was found to originate from the right coronary cusp. Cardiac CAT scan revealed similar findings with interarterial and intramural course. Patient received one-vessel arterial bypass graft to her anomalous coronary vessel along with a defibrillator for secondary prevention. Sudden cardiac arrest secondary to congenital anomalous coronary artery disease is characterized by insufficient coronary flow by the anomalous left coronary artery to meet elevated left ventricular (LV) myocardial demand. High risk defects include those involved with the proximal coronary artery or coursing of the anomalous artery between the aorta and pulmonary trunk. Per guidelines, our patient received one vessel bypass graft to her anomalous vessel. It is important for clinicians to recognize such presentations of anomalous coronary artery. PMID:26257964

  7. Cardiac arrest during spinal anesthesia for cervical conization: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Ikuko; Numata, Masahiro; Ikegami, Atsushi; Teramoto, Katsuhiro; Hirata, Shuji

    2016-05-01

    Spinal anesthesia is regularly performed worldwide and is an integral part of the modern day anesthesia practice. Although unexpected cardiac arrests during this procedure are very rare, medical professionals should be aware of the potential for this complication. In making the decision to use spinal anesthesia, judicious patient selection, adequate preventive measures, and strict monitoring are important. PMID:27190608

  8. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... from American Heart Association Aneurysms and Dissections Angina Arrhythmia Bundle Branch Block Cardiomyopathy Carotid Artery Disease Chronic ... terms: SCA, sudden cardiac death (SCD), sudden death, arrhythmias, ... ventricular fibrillation, defibrillator, automatic cardiac defibrillator ( ...

  9. Neurological prognostication after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Sandroni, Claudio; Geocadin, Romergryko G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Prediction of neurological prognosis in patients who are comatose after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest remains difficult. Previous guidelines recommended ocular reflexes, somatosensory evoked potentials and serum biomarkers for predicting poor outcome within 72h from cardiac arrest. However, these guidelines were based on patients not treated with targeted temperature management and did not appropriately address important biases in literature. Recent findings Recent evidence reviews detected important limitations in prognostication studies, such as low precision and, most importantly, lack of blinding, which may have caused a self-fulfilling prophecy and overestimated the specificity of index tests. Maintenance of targeted temperature using sedatives and muscle relaxants may interfere with clinical examination, making assessment of neurological status before 72 h or more after cardiac arrest unreliable. Summary No index predicts poor neurological outcome after cardiac arrest with absolute certainty. Prognostic evaluation should start not earlier than 72 h after ROSC and only after major confounders have been excluded so that reliable clinical examination can be made. Multimodality appears to be the most reasonable approach for prognostication after cardiac arrest. PMID:25922894

  10. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation with assisted extracorporeal life support during cardiac arrest caused by drug-eluting stent thrombosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Hyun; Song, In Ae

    2014-01-01

    Discontinuation of dual antiplatelet therapy within 12 months after drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation increases the possibility of stent thrombosis. We now report the case of a 66-year-old man who suffered a cardiac arrest due to stent thrombosis after an elective laparoscopic anterior resection. Ten month ago, he underwent DES implantation and then had been taking dual antiplatelet therapy. Nine days prior to the surgery, he discontinued dual antiplatelet therapy. Forty minutes after intensive care unit admission, cardiac arrest occurred. However, his cardiac rhythm did not restore in spite of resuscitation, so immediately veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was implanted. Four days after the surgery, he was weaned from ECMO support, recovered completely, with no cardiopulmonary or neurological sequelae. PMID:24910731

  11. Vasovagal cardiac arrest during spinal anesthesia for Cesarean section -A case report-.

    PubMed

    Jang, Young-Eun; Do, Sang-Hwan; Song, In-Ae

    2013-01-01

    The vasovagal response is characterized by an inappropriate combination of bradycardia and paradoxical vasodilation. During a general or neuraxial anesthesia-induced sympathectomy, a sudden vagal activation and/or an acute reduction in sympathetic tone can cause serious vasovagal responses. Neuraxial anesthesia for Cesarean section may trigger vasovagal response, due to multiple risk factors; high neuraxial block, sudden hemorrhage, aortocarval compression, peritoneal manipulation, and emotional stress. A 39-year-old pregnant woman, at 38 weeks of gestation with episodes of non-sustained ventricular arrhythmia and newly developed vasovagal syncope during pregnancy, was scheduled to undergo a spinal anesthesia for an elective Cesarean section. Immediately after the placental expulsion, a sudden severe bradycardia, followed by a cardiac arrest occurred. The patient fully recovered after prompt cardiopulmonary resuscitation with chest compression, manual ventilation with oxygen, rapid injection of epinephrine and hydration. This case illustrates a serious potential risk of vasovagal response superimposed on neuraxial anesthesia, during a Cesarean section, especially during placental expulsion. PMID:23372892

  12. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find a Specialist Share Twitter Facebook SCA Risk Assessment Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) occurs abruptly and without ... of all ages and health conditions. Start Risk Assessment The Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment Tool ...

  13. Men Face Greater Risk of Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159651.html Men Face Greater Risk of Cardiac Arrest: Study Heart disease tends to develop earlier than ... About one in nine men will suffer a cardiac arrest before the age of 70, compared to about ...

  14. [The neuroprotective effect of mild therapeutic hypothermia after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with successful reanimation - a case report].

    PubMed

    Szczygieł, Jarosław; Mazurek, Justyna; Świątkowski, Andrzej; Broniec-Siekaniec, Katarzyna; Czapnik, Marta; Średniawa, Beata; Opara, Józef; Oleszczyk, Krystian

    2016-03-01

    The use of mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) in adult patients remaining in a coma following cardiac arrest, regardless of its mechanism and location, is recommended by the European Resuscitation Council. The study presents a case of a 52-year-old man in whom MTH was used following successfully resuscitated out-of- hospital sudden cardiac arrest caused by ventricular fibrillation. On the basis of this case it was indicated that the use of low temperatures may be an effective method of neuroprotective treatment since such activity is compatible with later observed great possibility of the brain to compensate and with the maintenance of brain plasticity which is crucial for neuropsychological rehabilitation. PMID:27088200

  15. Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Scheller, RoseAnn L; Johnson, Laurie; Lorts, Angela; Ryan, Thomas D

    2016-09-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in the pediatric population is a rare and potentially devastating occurrence. An understanding of the differential diagnosis for the etiology of the cardiac arrest allows for the most effective emergency care and provides the patient with the best possible outcome. Pediatric SCA can occur with or without prodromal symptoms and may occur during exercise or rest. The most common cause is arrhythmia secondary to an underlying channelopathy, cardiomyopathy, or myocarditis. After stabilization, evaluation should include electrocardiogram, chest radiograph, and echocardiogram. Management should focus on decreasing the potential for recurring arrhythmia, maintaining cardiac preload, and thoughtful medication use to prevent exacerbation of the underlying condition. The purpose of this review was to provide the emergency physician with a concise and current review of the incidence, differential diagnosis, and management of pediatric patients presenting with SCA. PMID:27585126

  16. Sudden Cardiac Arrest in a Patient With Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Case Report and a Brief Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Tanush; Paul, Neha; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Balasubramaniyam, Nivas; Aronow, Wilbert S; Kolte, Dhaval; Khera, Sahil; Shah, Amar B; Gass, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a phenotypic variant of nonobstructive HCM, in which hypertrophy of the myocardium predominantly involves the left ventricular apex. It is common in Japanese and other Asian populations but is rare in the United States. Apical HCM has a relatively benign prognosis in terms of cardiovascular mortality; however, morbid events such as ventricular aneurysms, apical thrombi, diastolic dysfunction, atrial fibrillation, and myocardial infarction are not uncommon. We report a case of an 18-year-old white man who presented to our hospital after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The patient had a witnessed collapse while playing basketball in the field. He was found to be pulseless and unresponsive by his coach, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was immediately started. Upon arrival of emergency medical services, an automated external defibrillator advised shock and he was defibrillated thrice. Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved in 15 minutes. He was intubated for airway protection and was brought to the hospital. Therapeutic hypothermia was initiated. He demonstrated good neurological status after active rewarming. Subsequent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was suggestive of apical HCM with right ventricular involvement. The patient underwent an implantable cardioverter defibrillator placement for secondary prevention and was subsequently discharged. In conclusion, apical HCM can rarely be associated with adverse cardiovascular events. The diagnosis may be missed on transthoracic 2-dimensional cardiac echocardiogram, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging should be considered to exclude apical HCM in young patients who present after sudden cardiac arrest. PMID:25923227

  17. Risk of Diabetes Mellitus on Incidence of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Young Sun; Song, Kyoung Jun; Kim, Joo Yeong; Lee, Eui Jung; Lee, Yu Jin; Ahn, Ki Ok; Hong, Ki Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to determine the risk of diabetes mellitus (DM) on incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and to investigate whether difference in effects of DM between therapeutic methods was observed. Methods This study was a case-control study using the Cardiac Arrest Pursuit Trial with Unique Registration and Epidemiologic Surveillance (CAPTURES) project database and 2013 Korean Community Health Survey (CHS). Cases were defined as EMS-treated adult (18 year old and older) OHCA patients with presumed cardiac etiology collected at 27 emergency departments from January to December 2014. OHCA patients whose arrest occurred at nursing homes or clinics and cases with unknown information on DM were excluded. Four controls were matched to one case with strata including age, gender, and county from the Korean CHS database. Multivariable conditional logistic regression analysis was conducted to estimate the risk of DM and treatment modality on incidence of OHCA. Results Total 1,386 OHCA patients and 5,544 community-based controls were analyzed. A total of 370 (26.7%) among cases and 860 (15.5%) among controls were diagnosed with DM. DM was associated with increasing risk of OHCA (AOR: 1.92 (1.65–2.24)). By DM treatment modality comparing with non-DM group, AOR (95% CI) was the highest in non-pharmacotherapy only group (4.65 (2.00–10.84)), followed by no treatment group (4.17 (2.91–5.96)), insulin group (2.69 (1.82–3.96)), and oral hypoglycemic agent group (1.55 (1.31–1.85)). Conclusion DM increased the risk of OHCA, which was the highest in the non-pharmacotherapy group and decreased in magnitude with pharmacotherapy. PMID:27105059

  18. [A Case of Cardiac Arrest Caused by Coronary Spasm Related to Induction of General Anesthesia before Carotid Endarterectomy].

    PubMed

    Sato, Kimitoshi; Abe, Katsutoshi; Kosaka, Yasuharu; Ohuchi, Takeshi; Okamoto, Hirotsugu; Ako, Junya; Kumabe, Toshihiro

    2016-07-01

    Coronary vasospasm(CV)can cause severe arrhythmia and myocardial infarction(MI). Intraoperative CV is not limited to cardiac surgery alone. We report the case of a patient who experienced cardiac arrest after the induction of general anesthesia, but did not demonstrate any abnormalities on preoperative examination. The patient was a 60-year-old man with no history of ischemic heart disease, with NASCET 80% asymptomatic left internal carotid stenosis(ICS). We decided to perform carotid endarterectomy(CEA). Preoperative stress myocardial scintigraphy did not reveal decreased local uptake. General anesthesia was rapidly induced with propofol and remifentanil, and maintained with sevoflurane. Shortly before the start of CEA, systolic blood pressure dropped to 80 mmHg. Electrocardiography indicated decreased ST, followed by an increase, after which complete atrioventricular block occurred. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was initiated immediately as the patient's pulse was not palpable;heart beat resumed quickly. CEA was canceled. CV was suspected by the test of nitrate administration to coronary artery performed afterwards. A temporary pacemaker was inserted and carotid artery stenting was performed under local anesthesia. Hence, no pacemaker was used intraoperatively and no abnormality was observed on electrocardiography. In the present case, CV in the coronary artery caused complete atrioventricular block, leading to cardiac arrest after inducing general anesthesia. For ICS treatment performed under general anesthesia, care must be taken regarding the possibility of the occurrence of CV. PMID:27384120

  19. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Diagnosis of Cor Triatriatum Sinistrum in Pediatric Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Kehrl, Thompson; Dagen, Callie T.; Becker, Brent A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac arrest in the adolescent population secondary to congenital heart disease (CHD) is rare. Focused cardiac ultrasound (FoCUS) in the emergency department (ED) can yield important clinical information, aid in resuscitative efforts during cardiac arrest and is commonly integrated into the evaluation of patients with pulseless electrical activity (PEA). We report a case of pediatric cardiac arrest in which FoCUS was used to diagnose a critical CHD known as cor triatriatum sinistrum as the likely cause for PEA cardiac arrest and help direct ED resuscitation. PMID:26587102

  20. [A Case of Cardiac Arrest following Intra-articular Administration of Levobupivacaine during Total Knee Arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Tomita, Asami; Satani, Makoto; Suzuki, Keitaro; Kaji, Arito; Urushitani, Shinji

    2016-02-01

    A 73-year-old woman with normal cardiac function underwent an elective total knee arthroplasty. After skin closure, levobupivacaine 225 mg was injected into the knee and 25 mg was injected subcutaneously. The patient recovered from general anesthesia 5 min after the surgery. Thirty five min after surgery, while in general radiology department her carotid arterial pulses were not palpable. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was initiated with intravenous (i.v.) administration of adrenaline 1 mg. Circulation was rapidly restored. Coronary angiography demonstrated no coronary stenosis; however, left ventriculography demonstrated takotsubo cardiomyopathy. The patient regained consciousness, but pulmonary edema and renal failure became worse. On postoperative day 2, continuous hemodialysis was instituted. Weaning from ventilatory support was completed on postoperative day 3; hemodialysis was stopped on day 14; and the patient left the intensive care unit on day 15. We believe cardiac arrest may have been precipitated by local anesthetic systemic toxicity (LAST), and administration of i. v. adrenaline 1 mg may have resulted in pulmonary edema. Patients should be carefully observed following local anesthetic with attention given to the side-effects of i. v. adrenaline. PMID:27017777

  1. Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Due to Trauma.

    PubMed

    Kjellemo, Hugo; Hansen, Andreas E; Øines, Dennis A; Nilsen, Thor O; Wik, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Survival from pediatric cardiac arrest due to trauma has been reported to be 0.0%-8.8%. Some argue that resuscitation efforts in the case of trauma-related cardiac arrests are futile. We describe a successful outcome in the case of a child who suffered cardiac arrest caused by external traumatic airway obstruction. Our case illustrates how to deal with pediatric traumatic cardiac arrests in an out-of-hospital environment. It also illustrates how good clinical treatment in these situations may be supported by correct treatment after hospital admission when it is impossible to ventilate the patient to provide sufficient oxygen delivery to vital organs. This case relates to a lifeless child of 3-5 years, blue, and trapped by an electrically operated garage door. The first ambulance arrived to find several men trying to bend the frame and the door apart in order to extricate the child, who was hanging in the air with head and neck squeezed between the horizontally-moving garage door and the vertical door frame. One paramedic found a car jack and used it to push the door and the frame apart, allowing the lifeless child to be extricated. Basic life support was then initiated. Intubation was performed by the anesthesiologist without drugs. With FiO2 1.0 the first documented SaO2 was <50%. Restoration of Spontaneous Circulation was achieved after thirty minutes, and she was transported to the hospital. After a few hours she was put on venous-arterial ECMO for 5.5 days and discharged home after two months. Outpatient examinations during the rest of 2013 were positive, and the child found not to be suffering from any injuries, either physical or mental. The last follow-up in October 2014 demonstrated she had made a 100% recovery and she started school in August 2014. PMID:26930137

  2. Myocardial Dysfunction and Shock after Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Jentzer, Jacob C.; Chonde, Meshe D.; Dezfulian, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    Postarrest myocardial dysfunction includes the development of low cardiac output or ventricular systolic or diastolic dysfunction after cardiac arrest. Impaired left ventricular systolic function is reported in nearly two-thirds of patients resuscitated after cardiac arrest. Hypotension and shock requiring vasopressor support are similarly common after cardiac arrest. Whereas shock requiring vasopressor support is consistently associated with an adverse outcome after cardiac arrest, the association between myocardial dysfunction and outcomes is less clear. Myocardial dysfunction and shock after cardiac arrest develop as the result of preexisting cardiac pathology with multiple superimposed insults from resuscitation. The pathophysiology involves cardiovascular ischemia/reperfusion injury and cardiovascular toxicity from excessive levels of inflammatory cytokine activation and catecholamines, among other contributing factors. Similar mechanisms occur in myocardial dysfunction after cardiopulmonary bypass, in sepsis, and in stress-induced cardiomyopathy. Hemodynamic stabilization after resuscitation from cardiac arrest involves restoration of preload, vasopressors to support arterial pressure, and inotropic support if needed to reverse the effects of myocardial dysfunction and improve systemic perfusion. Further research is needed to define the role of postarrest myocardial dysfunction on cardiac arrest outcomes and identify therapeutic strategies. PMID:26421284

  3. Cognitive and Functional Consequence of Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Perez, Claudia A; Samudra, Niyatee; Aiyagari, Venkatesh

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac arrest is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Better-quality bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation training, cardiocerebral resuscitation principles, and intensive post-resuscitation hospital care have improved survival. However, cognitive and functional impairment after cardiac arrest remain areas of concern. Research focus has shifted beyond prognostication in the immediate post-arrest period to identification of mechanisms for long-term brain injury and implementation of promising protocols to reduce neuronal injury. These include therapeutic temperature management (TTM), as well as pharmacologic and psychological interventions which also improve overall neurological function. Comprehensive assessment of cognitive function post-arrest is hampered by heterogeneous measures among studies. However, the domains of attention, long-term memory, spatial memory, and executive function appear to be affected. As more patients survive cardiac arrest for longer periods of time, there needs to be a greater focus on interventions that can enhance cognitive and psychosocial function post-arrest. PMID:27311306

  4. Circadian variation in witnessed out of hospital cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Soo, L; Gray, D; Young, T; Hampton, J

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To examine the effect on circadian variation of out of hospital cardiac arrest according to the underlying aetiology and presenting rhythm of arrest, and to explore strategies that might help to improve survival outcome using circadian variation.
DESIGN—Population based retrospective study.
SETTING—County of Nottinghamshire with a total population of 993 914 and an area of 2183 km2.
SUBJECTS—Between 1 January 1991 and 3 December 1994, all witnessed cardiac arrests attended by the Nottinghamshire Ambulance Service, of which 1196 patients had a cardiac cause for their arrest (ICD, 9th revision, codes 390-414 and 420-429) and 339 had a non-cardiac cause.
RESULTS—The circadian variation of the cardiac cases was not significantly different from that of non-cardiac cases (p = 0.587), even when adjusted for age, sex, or presenting rhythm of arrest. For cardiac cases, the circadian variation of those who presented with ventricular fibrillation was significantly different from those presenting with a rhythm other than ventricular fibrillation (p = 0.005), but was similar to the circadian variation of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (p = 0.306) and survivors (p = 0.542). Ambulance response time was also found to have a circadian variation.
CONCLUSIONS—There is a common circadian variation of out of hospital cardiac arrest, irrespective of underlying aetiology, where the presenting rhythm is other than ventricular fibrillation. This is different from the circadian variation of cases of cardiac aetiology presenting with ventricular fibrillation. The circadian variation of ventricular fibrillation, and consequently survival, may be affected by the availability of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the speed of ambulance response.


Keywords: out of hospital; cardiac arrest; circadian variation PMID:10995402

  5. Abulia following an episode of cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Naik, Vismay Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    The word 'abulia' means a lack of will, initiative or drive. The symptoms of abulia include lack of spontaneous action and speech, reduced emotional responsiveness and social interaction, poor attention and easy distractibility. These symptoms are independent of reduced levels of consciousness or cognitive impairment. We describe a case of a socially active 72-year-old female patient who presented with symptoms of abulia which may have occurred due to damage of the frontosubcortical circuits following an episode of cardiac arrest. The patient's symptoms improved dramatically following treatment with bromocriptine. PMID:26135487

  6. Essentials in cardiac arrest during cesarean section.

    PubMed

    van Liempt, Susan W J D; Stoecklein, Katrin; Tjiong, Ming Y; Schwarte, Lothar A; de Groot, Christianne J M; Teunissen, Pim W

    2015-01-28

    Cardiac arrest during cesarean section is very rare. Obstetrical teams have low exposure to these critical situations necessitating frequent rehearsal and knowledge of its differential diagnosis and treatment. A 40-year-old woman pregnant with triplets underwent cesarean sections because of vaginal bleeding due to a placenta previa at 35.2 weeks of gestation. Spinal anesthesia was performed. Asystole occurred during uterotomy. Immediate resuscitation and delivery of the neonates eventually resulted in good maternal and neonatal outcomes. The differential diagnosis is essential and should include obstetric and non-obstetric causes. We describe the consideration of Bezold Jarisch reflex and amniotic fluid embolism as most appropriate in this case. PMID:25918626

  7. A Patient With Blunt Trauma and Cardiac Arrest Arriving Pulseless at the Emergency Department; is that Enough Reason to Stop Resuscitation? Review of Literature and Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hamidian Jahromi, Alireza; Northcutt, Ashley; Youssef, Asser M

    2013-01-01

    The decision to stop or continue resuscitation in a patient with blunt trauma and cardiac arrest arriving pulseless to the hospital has always been controversial. While many authors still believe that it is a futile effort, with no chance of success for complete neurological recovery, some recent reports have challenged the idea. Here we report complete recovery of a severely injured patient following a motor vehicle accident who lost vital signs completely before arrival at our trauma center. No cardiac motion was detected on ultrasound examination on arrival. Emergency department thoracotomy, open cardiac massage, massive blood transfusion, damage control laparotomy with abdominal and pelvic packing, followed by angio-embolization of pelvic bleeding, and staged abdominal exploration were performed. This case is an example showing that resuscitation of patients with blunt trauma and cardiac arrest arriving pulseless to the hospital is not always futile. PMID:24693385

  8. Traumatic cardiac arrest: a unique approach.

    PubMed

    Harris, Tim; Masud, Syed; Lamond, Anna; Abu-Habsa, Mamoun

    2015-04-01

    Resuscitation of patients who sustain a cardiac arrest as a result of trauma (traumatic cardiac arrest) has previously been described as 'futile'. Several published series have since contradicted this claim and reported survival-to-discharge data ranging from 0 to 35%. International resuscitation guidelines (European Resuscitation Council and American Heart Association) promote a consistent approach to cardiopulmonary resuscitation on the basis of up-to-date evidence and consensus opinions. This minimizes de-novo decision-making under high-stress situations, promotes a rational approach and reduces the burden on an individual clinician. This narrative review sets out to highlight the differences in aetiology of traumatic cardiac arrest as compared with medical cardiac arrest and the consequent priorities in resuscitation. PMID:25163026

  9. Understand Your Risk for Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. The first six months after a heart attack is a particularly high-risk period for sudden cardiac arrest in patients with atherosclerotic heart disease . ...

  10. Men Face Greater Risk of Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159651.html Men Face Greater Risk of Cardiac Arrest: Study Heart ... 30, 2016 THURSDAY, June 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Men are significantly more likely to have their heart ...

  11. Cerebral oximetry and cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Skhirtladze-Dworschak, Keso; Dworschak, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Cerebral oximetry is a Food and Drug Administration-approved technology that allows monitoring of brain oxygen saturation in accessible superficial brain cortex regions, which are amongst the most vulnerable in regard to ischemic or hypoxic injury. Since most oxygen in the area of interest is located in the venous compartment, the determined regional brain oxygen saturation approximately reflects the local balance between oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption. Major systemic alterations in blood oxygen content and oxygen delivery will be accompanied by corresponding changes in regional brain saturation. This systematic review, which is based on a Medline search, focuses on the characteristic changes in regional cerebral oxygen saturation that occur, when global oxygen supply to the brain ceases. It further highlights the potential application of cerebral oximetry in the management of cardiac arrest victims, the predictability of clinical outcome after global cerebral ischemia, and it also indicates possible potentials for the management of cerebral reperfusion after having instituted return of spontaneous circulation. PMID:23782549

  12. Intra-arrest hypothermia during cardiac arrest: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Therapeutic hypothermia is largely used to protect the brain following return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after cardiac arrest (CA), but it is unclear whether we should start therapeutic hypothermia earlier, that is, before ROSC. Methods We performed a systematic search of PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and Ovid/Medline databases using "arrest" OR "cardiac arrest" OR "heart arrest" AND "hypothermia" OR "therapeutic hypothermia" OR "cooling" as keywords. Only studies using intra-arrest therapeutic hypothermia (IATH) were selected for this review. Three authors independently assessed the validity of included studies and extracted data regarding characteristics of the studied cohort (animal or human) and the main outcomes related to the use of IATH: Mortality, neurological status and cardiac function (particularly, rate of ROSC). Results A total of 23 animal studies (level of evidence (LOE) 5) and five human studies, including one randomized controlled trial (LOE 1), one retrospective and one prospective controlled study (LOE 3), and two prospective studies without a control group (LOE 4), were identified. IATH improved survival and neurological outcomes when compared to normothermia and/or hypothermia after ROSC. IATH was also associated with improved ROSC rates and with improved cardiac function, including better left ventricular function, and reduced myocardial infarct size, when compared to normothermia. Conclusions IATH improves survival and neurological outcome when compared to normothermia and/or conventional hypothermia in experimental models of CA. Clinical data on the efficacy of IATH remain limited. PMID:22397519

  13. Surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nick

    2016-05-01

    Emergency care nurses have been urged to play their part in Scotland's push to revolutionise care for cardiac arrest patients - by teaching others how to save a life. This article discusses the Scottish out-of-hospital cardiac arrest strategy, with particular focus on the drive to increase bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) rates, and on how emergency nurses are being enlisted to help promote the training of members of the public. PMID:27165393

  14. Cardiac arrest equipment to support circulation.

    PubMed

    Aldridge, Matthew; Jevon, Phil

    Cardiac arrest trolleys must be equipped with all the instruments and medication needed to deal with an acute adult cardiac arrest. Nurses must not only be familiar with these contents but also know how to use, check and maintain them. This first part of this two-part series looked at equipment to aid airway and breathing; this second part focuses on circulation. Note that drug doses mentioned here relate to the adult patient and will be different for children. PMID:25223000

  15. Cardiac arrest equipment to support airway.

    PubMed

    Aldridge, Matthew; Jevon, Phil

    Each hospital should have standardised cardiac arrest trolleys equipped with all the instruments and medication needed to deal with an acute adult cardiac arrest. Nurses must know the contents of these trolleys and how to use them to fulfil their common role as first responder. This first article in a two-part series looks at equipment to aid airway management and breathing; part two will focus on circulation. PMID:25174131

  16. Intravascular access in pediatric cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Brunette, D D; Fischer, R

    1988-11-01

    All cases of patients aged less than 48 months who presented in cardiac arrest to the Hennepin County Medical Center's emergency department (ED) during the years 1984 to 1986 were reviewed retrospectively. The ED record, initial and subsequent chest radiographs, hospital charts, and autopsy reports were analyzed. A total of 33 cases were reviewed. The average patient age was 5 months. The average time needed to establish intravascular access was 7.9 +/- 4.2 minutes. Success rates were 77% for central venous catheterization, 81% for surgical vein cutdown, 83% for intraosseous infusion, and 17% for percutaneous peripheral catheterization. Percutaneous peripheral catheterization, when successful, and bone marrow needle placement were the fastest methods of obtaining intravascular access. There were no major immediate complications, and delayed complications were minimal. Attempts at peripheral intravenous catheter placement should be brief, with rapid progression to intraosseous infusion if peripheral attempts are not successful. PMID:3178949

  17. Cardiac arrest due to a missed diagnosis of Boerhaave's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Davies, Jennifer; Spitzer, David; Phylactou, Maria; Glasser, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A 91-year-old presented with a rare cause of cardiac arrest. He was initially admitted with severe back pain following vomiting and diagnosed with probable aspiration pneumonia. On day 3 of admission, he was discovered in cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was started. On intubation, a left-sided pneumothorax and subcutaneous emphysema were noted. Needle decompression showed gastric fluid leaking from the cannula. The patient regained a cardiac output, and a subsequent CT scan confirmed a large pneumomediastinum with air tracking to the neck and chest, and bilateral pneumothoraces. A diagnosis of Boerhaave's syndrome was made. The patient was transferred to the intensive care unit but did not survive. This case demonstrates the importance of looking for and treating the rarer reversible causes of cardiac arrest, and of maintaining a high index of suspicion for Boerhaave's syndrome. Despite its rarity, Boerhaave's syndrome is often misdiagnosed on initial presentation, leading to delayed treatment and poor outcomes. PMID:27154984

  18. Recovery of consciousness and an injured ascending reticular activating system in a patient who survived cardiac arrest: A case report.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sung Ho; Hyun, Yi Ji; Lee, Han Do

    2016-06-01

    We report on a patient who survived cardiac arrest and showed recovery of consciousness and an injured ARAS at the early stage of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HI- BI) for 3 weeks, which was demonstrated by diffusion tensor tractography (DTT).A 52-year-old male patient who had suffered cardiac arrest caused by acute coronary syndrome was resuscitated immediately by a layman and paramedics for ∼25 minutes. He was then transferred immediately to the emergency room of a local medical center. When starting rehabilitation at 2 weeks after onset, his consciousness was impaired, with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 8 and Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (GRS-R) score of 8. He underwent comprehensive rehabilitative therapy, including drugs for recovery of consciousness. He recovered well and rapidly so that his consciousness had recovered to full scores in terms of GCS:15 and GRS-R:23 at 5 weeks after onset.The left lower dorsal and right lower ventral ARAS had become thicker on 5-week DTT compared with 2-week DTT (Fig. 1B). Regarding the change of neural connectivity of the thalamic ILN, increased neural connectivity to the basal forebrain and prefrontal cortex was observed in both hemispheres on 5-week DTT compared with 2-week DTT.Recovery of an injured ARAS was demonstrated in a patient who survived cardiac arrest and his consciousness showed rapid and good recovery for 3 weeks at the early stage of HI-BI. PMID:27368033

  19. Management of cardiac arrest in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jeejeebhoy, Farida; Windrim, Rory

    2014-05-01

    Cardiac arrest in pregnancy is a rare event in routine obstetric practice, but is increasing in frequency. Resuscitation of cardiac arrest is more complex for pregnant women because of a number of factors unique to pregnancy: the altered physiologic state induced by pregnancy; the requirement to consider both maternal and fetal issues during resuscitation; and the consequent possibility of perimortem caesarean section during resuscitation. These extra considerations create a unique clinical emergency and decision pathway requiring the co-ordinated response of medical, obstetric, and neonatal teams. Although many research questions remain in this area, recent consensus has been reached on appropriate resuscitation of a pregnant woman. Centres offering care for birthing women need to be aware of the changing demographics and resuscitation guidelines in this important area, and implement measures to ensure dependable and optimal team responses to maternal cardiac arrest. PMID:24797653

  20. [Changes in the management of cardiac arrest].

    PubMed

    Genest, Marc; Pochmalicki, Gilbert

    2004-05-22

    NEW RECOMMENDATIONS: for cardio-pulmonary resuscitation Methods such as mouth to mouth or the search for a pulse, until now the fundamental preliminaries, have now become second line. Everything must be organised to allow for defibrillation as rapidly as possible. NEW MODALITIES FOR CARDIAC MASSAGE: The frequency of compressions recommended is currently 100 per minute in the adult with a rhythm of compression-ventilation reaching 15/2 before intubation. Concerning the haemodynamic agents for cardiac arrest, the efficacy of high doses of adrenalin is not greater than with conventional doses. Vasopressin is not superior to intravenous adrenalin regarding survival at 24 hrs exepet in case of asystoly. Dopamine at a "renal" dose is no longer used. ANTIARRYTHMICS: Amiodarone is part of the decisional tree in the case of ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia without a pulse. Semi-automatic defibrillator accessibility should be generalized. INFUSED SOLUTIONS: Sodium bicarbonate does not improve the survival except in particular cases. Physiological serum should be preferred to glucosed serum during reanimation. PMID:15226695

  1. Long QT Syndrome Leading to Multiple Cardiac Arrests After Posaconazole Administration in an Immune-Compromised Patient with Sepsis: An Unusual Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Panos, George; Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vasilios; Matzaroglou, Charalampos; Tyllianakis, Minos

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 26 Final Diagnosis: Sepsis • drug induced long QT syndrome Symptoms: Cardiac arrestcardiac arrhythmia • fever • Qt prolongation Medication: Posaconazole Clinical Procedure: Pacemaker insertion Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: We present the case of a septic patient with severe immunodeficiency, who developed QT interval prolongation followed by episodes of lethal cardiac arrhythmia. Cardiac events occurred after posaconazole administration, incriminating posaconazole use, alone or in combination with voriconazole, as the culpable agent. Case Report: A 26-year-old female patient underwent orthopedic surgery to remove ectopic calcifications in her left hip joint. On the first post-operative day she became septic due to a surgical wound infection. Despite being treated according to the therapeutic protocols for sepsis, no clinical improvement was noticed and further assessment revealed an underlying immunodeficiency. Considering the underlying immunodeficiency and to that point poor clinical response, an antifungal agent was added to the antibiotic regiment. Following discontinuation of multiple antifungal agents due to adverse effects, posaconazole was administered. Posaconazole oral intake was followed by episodes of bradycardia and QT interval prolongation. The patient suffered continuous incidents of cardiac arrest due to polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (torsades des pointes) that degenerated to lethal ventricular fibrillation. Posaconazole was immediately discontinued and a temporary pacemaker was installed. The patient finally recovered without any neurological deficit, and was discharged in a good clinical status. Conclusions: Close cardiac monitoring is recommended in cases where posaconazole administration is combined with coexisting risk factors, as they may lead to severe ECG abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias such as long QT interval syndrome and torsades de pointes. Posaconazole

  2. Women Get Worse Cardiac Arrest Care Than Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_159505.html Women Get Worse Cardiac Arrest Care Than Men: Study They need to be ... June 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women who survive cardiac arrest are less likely than men to get aggressive, ...

  3. Out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest due to penetrating cardiac injury treated by percutaneous cardiopulmonary support in the emergency room: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kurimoto, Yoshihiko; Kano, Hitoshi; Yama, Naoya; Nara, Satoshi; Hase, Mamoru; Asai, Yasufumi

    2007-01-01

    Penetrating cardiac injury tends to generally be repaired without cardiopulmonary bypass in the operating room. We herein report the case of penetrating cardiac injury repaired using percutaneous cardiopulmonary support in an emergency room. A 57-year-old man attempted suicide by stabbing himself in the left anterior chest with a knife. Although the patient suffered cardiopulmonary arrest for 7 min in the ambulance, spontaneous circulation was restored following pericardiotomy through emergency left thoracotomy in the emergency room. To prevent coronary artery injury and control the massive bleeding, percutaneous cardiopulmonary support was instituted without systemic heparinization and the cardiac injury was repaired in the emergency room. The patient was then transferred to another hospital on day 46 for further rehabilitation. Percutaneous cardiopulmonary support might be helpful for treating critical patients in an emergency room, even in the case of trauma patients. PMID:17342366

  4. MedlinePlus: Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Journal Articles References and abstracts from MEDLINE/PubMed (National Library of Medicine) Article: A Prospective Study of Sudden Cardiac Death ... Players MedlinePlus Connect for EHRs For Developers U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department ...

  5. Treatment of cardiac arrest in the hyperbaric environment: key steps on the sequence of care--case reports.

    PubMed

    Wright, K T; Praske, S P; Bhatt, N A; Magalhaes, R M; Quast, T M

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. territory of Guam attracts thousands of military and civilian divers annually and is home to the only recompression facility within a 5,000-km radius that accepts critically injured dive casualties. As recompression chambers are confined spaces and standard use of electrical cardioversion cannot be used, cardiac resuscitation at depth must deviate from advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS) algorithms. Furthermore, many hyperbaric chambers that accept dive casualties are in remote locations, a situation that requires providers to approach cardiac resuscitation in a different way when compared to an in-hospital or ICU setting. This presents a challenge to trained medical and diving professionals. We present two contrasting vignettes of diving injuries initially responsive to appropriate treatment but then deteriorating during recompression therapy and ultimately requiring resuscitation at depth. Additionally, we explore the physiologic basis of resuscitation in a hyperbaric environment as it relates to the treatment of cardiac arrest at depth. This review critically examines the current guidelines in place for emergency cardiac resuscitation in a hyperbaric chamber followed by recommendations for the key steps in the sequence of care. PMID:27000016

  6. Drug therapy in cardiac arrest: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Andreas; Djärv, Therese; Engdahl, Johan; Hollenberg, Jacob; Nordberg, Per; Ravn-Fischer, Annika; Ringh, Mattias; Rysz, Susanne; Svensson, Leif; Herlitz, Johan; Lundgren, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the literature on human studies of drug therapy in cardiac arrest during the last 25 years. In May 2015, a systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and CRD databases. Prospective interventional and observational studies evaluating a specified drug therapy in human cardiac arrest reporting a clinical endpoint [i.e. return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or survival] and published in English 1990 or later were included, whereas animal studies, case series and reports, studies of drug administration, drug pharmacology, non-specified drug therapies, preventive drug therapy, drug administration after ROSC, studies with primarily physiological endpoints, and studies of traumatic cardiac arrest were excluded. The literature search identified a total of 8936 articles. Eighty-eight articles met our inclusion criteria and were included in the review. We identified no human study in which drug therapy, compared with placebo, improved long-term survival. Regarding adrenaline and amiodarone, the drugs currently recommended in cardiac arrest, two prospective randomized placebo-controlled trials, were identified for adrenaline, and one for amiodarone, but they were all underpowered to detect differences in survival to hospital discharge. Of all reviewed studies, only one recent prospective study demonstrated improved neurological outcome with one therapy over another using a combination of vasopressin, steroids, and adrenaline as the intervention compared with standard adrenaline administration. The evidence base for drug therapy in cardiac arrest is scarce. However, many human studies on drug therapy in cardiac arrest have not been powered to identify differences in important clinical outcomes such as survival to hospital discharge and favourable neurological outcome. Efforts are needed to initiate large multicentre prospective randomized clinical trials to evaluate both currently recommended and

  7. Hypothermia improves outcome from cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Bernard, S A

    2005-12-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is common and patients who are initially resuscitated by ambulance officers and transported to hospital are usually admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). In the past, the treatment in the ICU consisted of supportive care only, and most patients remained unconscious due to the severe anoxic neurological injury. It was this neurological injury rather than cardiac complications that caused the high rate of morbidity and mortality. However, in the early 1990's, a series of animal experiments demonstrated convincingly that mild hypothermia induced after return of spontaneous circulation and maintained for several hours dramatically reduced the severity of the anoxic neurological injury. In the mid-1990's, preliminary human studies suggested that mild hypothermia could be induced and maintained in post-cardiac arrest patients without an increase in the rate of cardiac or other complications. In the late 1990's, two prospective, randomised, controlled trials were conducted and the results confirmed the animal data that mild hypothermia induced after resuscitation and maintained for 12 - 24 hours dramatically improved neurological and overall outcomes. On the basis of these studies, mild hypothermia was endorsed in 2003 by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation as a recommended treatment for comatose patients with an initial cardiac rhythm of ventricular fibrillation. However, the application of this therapy into routine clinical critical care practice has been slow. The reasons for this are uncertain, but may relate to the relative complexity of the treatment, unfamiliarity with the pathophysiology of hypothermia, lack of clear protocols and/or uncertainty of benefit in particular patients. Therefore, recent research in this area has focused on the development of feasible, inexpensive techniques for the early, rapid induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Currently, the most promising strategy is a rapid

  8. Cardiac arrest: first presentation of anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Ewan, Sian-Lee; Moynihan, Patricia C

    2013-01-01

    A 16-year-old girl collapsed in cardiac arrest in a hospital car park. Investigations revealed a potassium level of 1.8. Following a 5-day intensive care unit admission she described behaviours consistent with restrictive-purging type anorexia nervosa, which had been concealed from her parents and health professionals. Long-term management has been difficult due to poor patient engagement. Further, recurrent episodes of hypokalaemia continue to feature. Here we explore the cardiac complications of anorexia nervosa and challenges with long-term management of this condition. PMID:24092611

  9. Maternal Cardiac Arrest: A Practical and Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Jeejeebhoy, Farida M.; Morrison, Laurie J.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrest during pregnancy is a dedicated chapter in the American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care; however, a robust maternal cardiac arrest knowledge translation strategy and emergency response plan is not usually the focus of institutional emergency preparedness programs. Although maternal cardiac arrest is rare, the emergency department is a high-risk area for receiving pregnant women in either prearrest or full cardiac arrest. It is imperative that institutions review and update emergency response plans for a maternal arrest. This review highlights the most recent science, guidelines, and recommended implementation strategies related to a maternal arrest. The aim of this paper is to increase the understanding of the important physiological differences of, and management strategies for, a maternal cardiac arrest, as well as provide institutions with the most up-to-date literature on which they can build emergency preparedness programs for a maternal arrest. PMID:23956861

  10. Modeling cardiac arrest and resuscitation in the domestic pig

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Brandon H; Nguyen, Anh Q; Hollrah, Roger A; Olivencia-Yurvati, Albert H; Mallet, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac arrest remains a leading cause of death and permanent disability worldwide. Although many victims are initially resuscitated, they often succumb to the extensive ischemia-reperfusion injury inflicted on the internal organs, especially the brain. Cardiac arrest initiates a complex cellular injury cascade encompassing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, Ca2+ overload, ATP depletion, pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins, mitochondrial dysfunction, and neuronal glutamate excitotoxity, which injures and kills cells, compromises function of internal organs and ignites a destructive systemic inflammatory response. The sheer complexity and scope of this cascade challenges the development of experimental models of and effective treatments for cardiac arrest. Many experimental animal preparations have been developed to decipher the mechanisms of damage to vital internal organs following cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and to develop treatments to interrupt the lethal injury cascades. Porcine models of cardiac arrest and resuscitation offer several important advantages over other species, and outcomes in this large animal are readily translated to the clinical setting. This review summarizes porcine cardiac arrest-CPR models reported in the literature, describes clinically relevant phenomena observed during cardiac arrest and resuscitation in pigs, and discusses numerous methodological considerations in modeling cardiac arrest/CPR. Collectively, published reports show the domestic pig to be a suitable large animal model of cardiac arrest which is responsive to CPR, defibrillatory countershocks and medications, and yields extensive information to foster advances in clinical treatment of cardiac arrest. PMID:25685718

  11. Multimodal Imaging after Sudden Cardiac Arrest in an 18-Year-Old Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Mobeen Ur; Atalay, Michael K.; Broderick, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a previously healthy 18-year-old male athlete who twice presented with sudden cardiac arrest. Our use of electrocardiography, echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance, coronary angiography, coronary computed tomographic angiography, and nuclear stress testing enabled the diagnoses of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and anomalous origin of the right coronary artery. We discuss the patient's treatment and note the useful role of multiple cardiovascular imaging methods in cases of sudden cardiac arrest. PMID:26664308

  12. Multimodal Imaging after Sudden Cardiac Arrest in an 18-Year-Old Athlete.

    PubMed

    Afari, Maxwell E; Rehman, Mobeen Ur; Atalay, Michael K; Broderick, Ryan J

    2015-12-01

    We report the case of a previously healthy 18-year-old male athlete who twice presented with sudden cardiac arrest. Our use of electrocardiography, echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance, coronary angiography, coronary computed tomographic angiography, and nuclear stress testing enabled the diagnoses of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and anomalous origin of the right coronary artery. We discuss the patient's treatment and note the useful role of multiple cardiovascular imaging methods in cases of sudden cardiac arrest. PMID:26664308

  13. Long QT Syndrome Leading to Multiple Cardiac Arrests After Posaconazole Administration in an Immune-Compromised Patient with Sepsis: An Unusual Case Report.

    PubMed

    Panos, George; Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vasilios; Matzaroglou, Charalampos; Tylianakis, Minos

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We present the case of a septic patient with severe immunodeficiency, who developed QT interval prolongation followed by episodes of lethal cardiac arrhythmia. Cardiac events occurred after posaconazole administration, incriminating posaconazole use, alone or in combination with voriconazole, as the culpable agent. CASE REPORT A 26-year-old female patient underwent orthopedic surgery to remove ectopic calcifications in her left hip joint. On the first post-operative day she became septic due to a surgical wound infection. Despite being treated according to the therapeutic protocols for sepsis, no clinical improvement was noticed and further assessment revealed an underlying immunodeficiency. Considering the underlying immunodeficiency and to that point poor clinical response, an antifungal agent was added to the antibiotic regiment. Following discontinuation of multiple antifungal agents due to adverse effects, posaconazole was administered. Posaconazole oral intake was followed by episodes of bradycardia and QT interval prolongation. The patient suffered continuous incidents of cardiac arrest due to polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (torsades des pointes) that degenerated to lethal ventricular fibrillation. Posaconazole was immediately discontinued and a temporary pacemaker was installed. The patient finally recovered without any neurological deficit, and was discharged in a good clinical status. CONCLUSIONS Close cardiac monitoring is recommended in cases where posaconazole administration is combined with coexisting risk factors, as they may lead to severe ECG abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias such as long QT interval syndrome and torsades de pointes. Posaconazole interactions with medications metabolized via the CYP3A4 pathway should be considered an additional risk factor for lethal cardiac incidents. PMID:27125217

  14. Therapeutic hypothermia after in-hospital cardiac arrest: a critique.

    PubMed

    Hessel, Eugene A

    2014-06-01

    More than 210,000 in-hospital cardiac arrests occur annually in the United States. Use of moderate therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in comatose survivors after return of spontaneous circulation following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOH-CA) caused by ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia is recommended strongly by many professional organizations and societies. The use of TH after cardiac arrest associated with nonshockable rhythms and after in-hospital cardiac arrest (IH-CA) is recommended to be considered by these same organizations and is being applied widely. The use in these latter circumstances is based on an extrapolation of the data supporting its use after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest associated with shockable rhythms. The purpose of this article is to review the limitations of existing data supporting these extended application of TH after cardiac arrest and to suggest approaches to this dilemma. The data supporting its use for OOH-CA appear to this author, and to some others, to be rather weak, and the data supporting the use of TH for IH-CA appear to be even weaker and to include no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or supportive observational studies. The many reasons why TH might be expected to be less effective following IH-CA are reviewed. The degree of neurologic injury may be more severe in many of these cases and, thus, may not be responsive to TH as currently practiced following OOH-CA. The potential adverse consequences of the routine use of TH for IH-CA are listed and include complications associated with TH, interference with diagnostic and interventional therapy, and use of scarce personnel and financial resources. Most importantly, it inhibits the ability of researchers to conduct needed RCTs. The author believes that the proper method of providing TH in these cases needs to be better defined. Based on this analysis the author concludes that TH should not be used indiscriminantly following most cases of IH-CA, and

  15. Modes of induced cardiac arrest: hyperkalemia and hypocalcemia - Literature review

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Marcos Aurélio Barboza; Brandi, Antônio Carlos; dos Santos, Carlos Alberto; Botelho, Paulo Henrique Husseini; Cortez, José Luis Lasso; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2014-01-01

    The entry of sodium and calcium play a key effect on myocyte subjected to cardiac arrest by hyperkalemia. They cause cell swelling, acidosis, consumption of adenosine triphosphate and trigger programmed cell death. Cardiac arrest caused by hypocalcemia maintains intracellular adenosine triphosphate levels, improves diastolic performance and reduces oxygen consumption, which can be translated into better protection to myocyte injury induced by cardiac arrest. PMID:25372919

  16. CRITICAL CARE ECHO ROUNDS: Echo in cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Asrress, Kaleab; Redwood, Simon; Gillon, Stuart; Walker, David

    2014-01-01

    Management of medical cardiac arrest is challenging. The internationally agreed approach is highly protocolised with therapy and diagnosis occurring in parallel. Early identification of the precipitating cause increases the likelihood of favourable outcome. Echocardiography provides an invaluable diagnostic tool in this context. Acquisition of echo images can be challenging in cardiac arrest and should occur in a way that minimises disruption to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In this article, the reversible causes of cardiac arrest are reviewed with associated echocardiography findings. Case A 71-year-old patient underwent right upper lobectomy for lung adenocarcinoma. On the 2nd post-operative day, he developed respiratory failure with rising oxygen requirement and right middle and lower lobe collapse and consolidation on chest X-ray. He was commenced on high-flow oxygen therapy and antibiotics. His condition continued to deteriorate and on the 3rd post-operative day he was intubated and mechanically ventilated. Six hours after intubation, he became suddenly hypotensive with a blood pressure of 50 systolic and then lost cardiac output. ECG monitoring showed pulseless electrical activity. CPR was commenced and return of circulation occurred after injection of 1 mg of adrenaline. Focused echocardiography was performed, which demonstrated signs of massive pulmonary embolism. Thrombolytic therapy with tissue plasminogen activator was given and his condition stabilised. PMID:26693304

  17. Pediatric defibrillation after cardiac arrest: initial response and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio; López-Herce, Jesús; García, Cristina; Domínguez, Pedro; Carrillo, Angel; Bellón, Jose María

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Shockable rhythms are rare in pediatric cardiac arrest and the results of defibrillation are uncertain. The objective of this study was to analyze the results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation that included defibrillation in children. Methods Forty-four out of 241 children (18.2%) who were resuscitated from inhospital or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest had been treated with manual defibrillation. Data were recorded according to the Utstein style. Outcome variables were a sustained return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and one-year survival. Characteristics of patients and of resuscitation were evaluated. Results Cardiac disease was the major cause of arrest in this group. Ventricular fibrillation (VF) or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (PVT) was the first documented electrocardiogram rhythm in 19 patients (43.2%). A shockable rhythm developed during resuscitation in 25 patients (56.8%). The first shock (dose, 2 J/kg) terminated VF or PVT in eight patients (18.1%). Seventeen children (38.6%) needed more than three shocks to solve VF or PVT. ROSC was achieved in 28 cases (63.6%) and it was sustained in 19 patients (43.2%). Only three patients (6.8%), however, survived at 1-year follow-up. Children with VF or PVT as the first documented rhythm had better ROSC, better initial survival and better final survival than children with subsequent VF or PVT. Children who survived were older than the finally dead patients. No significant differences in response rate were observed when first and second shocks were compared. The survival rate was higher in patients treated with a second shock dose of 2 J/kg than in those who received higher doses. Outcome was not related to the cause or the location of arrest. The survival rate was inversely related to the duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Conclusion Defibrillation is necessary in 18% of children who suffer cardiac arrest. Termination of VF or PVT after the first defibrillation dose is achieved in a low

  18. Unicuspid aortic valve presenting with cardiac arrest in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Tara; Kolcow, Walenty; Smyth, Yvonne; Veerasingham, David

    2015-01-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) is a rare congenital anomaly typically affecting patients in their fourth and fifth decades and presenting with signs of heart failure. Our case is one of a previously asymptomatic teenage girl with a UAV, who presented with cardiac arrest and was successfully treated. Only two other similar cases have been reported in the literature, both were of slightly older male patients. Our case highlights the morbidity associated with the anomaly supporting the need for careful assessment of the valve in cases where UAV is suspected. PMID:26178230

  19. Early Recognition of Foreign Body Aspiration as the Cause of Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Talib Hashmi, Hafiz Rizwan; Khaja, Misbahuddin

    2016-01-01

    Foreign body aspiration (FBA) is uncommon in the adult population but can be a life-threatening condition. Clinical manifestations vary according to the degree of airway obstruction, and, in some cases, making the correct diagnosis requires a high level of clinical suspicion combined with a detailed history and exam. Sudden cardiac arrest after FBA may occur secondary to asphyxiation. We present a 48-year-old male with no history of cardiac disease brought to the emergency department after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The patient was resuscitated after 15 minutes of cardiac arrest. He was initially managed with therapeutic hypothermia (TH). Subsequent history suggested FBA as a possible etiology of the cardiac arrest, and fiberoptic bronchoscopy demonstrated a piece of meat and bone lodged in the left main stem bronchus. The foreign body was removed with the bronchoscope and the patient clinically improved with full neurological recovery. Therapeutic hypothermia following cardiac arrest due to asphyxia has been reported to have high mortality and poor neurological outcomes. This case highlights the importance of early identification of FBA causing cardiac arrest, and we report a positive neurological outcome for postresuscitation therapeutic hypothermia following cardiac arrest due to asphyxia. PMID:27006837

  20. Women Get Worse Cardiac Arrest Care Than Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Women Get Worse Cardiac Arrest Care Than Men: Study They need to be treated as aggressively as men when their hearts stop, experts say To use ... who survive cardiac arrest are less likely than men to get aggressive, lifesaving care at the hospital, ...

  1. Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest: outcome predictors

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Rodrigo Nazário; Ávila, Paulo; Cavaco, Raquel; Germano, Nuno; Bento, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Objective The determination of coma patient prognosis after cardiac arrest has clinical, ethical and social implications. Neurological examination, imaging and biochemical markers are helpful tools accepted as reliable in predicting recovery. With the advent of therapeutic hypothermia, these data need to be reconfirmed. In this study, we attempted to determine the validity of different markers, which can be used in the detection of patients with poor prognosis under hypothermia. Methods Data from adult patients admitted to our intensive care unit for a hypothermia protocol after cardiac arrest were recorded prospectively to generate a descriptive and analytical study analyzing the relationship between clinical, neurophysiological, imaging and biochemical parameters with 6-month outcomes defined according to the Cerebral Performance Categories scale (good 1-2, poor 3-5). Neuron-specific enolase was collected at 72 hours. Imaging and neurophysiologic exams were carried out in the 24 hours after the rewarming period. Results Sixty-seven patients were included in the study, of which 12 had good neurological outcomes. Ventricular fibrillation and electroencephalographic theta activity were associated with increased likelihood of survival and improved neurological outcomes. Patients who had more rapid cooling (mean time of 163 versus 312 minutes), hypoxic-ischemic brain injury on magnetic resonance imaging or neuron-specific enolase > 58ng/mL had poor neurological outcomes (p < 0.05). Conclusion Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury on magnetic resonance imaging and neuron-specific enolase were strong predictors of poor neurological outcomes. Although there is the belief that early achievement of target temperature improves neurological prognoses, in our study, there were increased mortality and worse neurological outcomes with earlier target-temperature achievement. PMID:26761469

  2. Management of cardiac arrest in a parturient with Eisenmenger's syndrome and complete atrioventricular block during Cesarean section: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gaab Soo; Chang, Choo Hoon; Lee, Eun Kyung; Choi, Jeong Yeon

    2015-01-01

    A 26-year-old parturient with Eisenmenger's syndrome and complete atrioventricular block was presented for emergency Cesarean section due to preterm labor. Ventricular tachycardia (VT), which progressed to ventricular fibrillation (VF), started immediately after the incision. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation with electric shocks was given by anesthesiologists while the obstetrician delivered the baby between the shocks. A cardiac surgeon was ready for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation institution in case of emergency but spontaneous circulation of the patient returned after the 3rd shock and the delivery of the baby. The newborn's Apgar score was 4 at 1 minute and 8 at 5 minutes. An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator was inserted before the discharge because the patient had recurrent episodes of VT and VF postoperatively. PMID:26634088

  3. Education for cardiac arrest--Treatment or prevention?

    PubMed

    Smith, Gary B; Welch, John; DeVita, Michael A; Hillman, Ken M; Jones, Daryl

    2015-07-01

    In-hospital cardiac arrests (IHCA) occur infrequently and individual staff members working on general wards may only rarely encounter one. Mortality following IHCA is high and the evidence for the benefits of many advanced life support (ALS) interventions is scarce. Nevertheless, regular, often frequent, ALS training is mandatory for many hospital medical staff and nurses. The incidence of pre-cardiac arrest deterioration is much higher than that of cardiac arrests, and there is evidence that intervention prior to cardiac arrest can reduce the incidence of IHCA. This article discusses a proposal to reduce the emphasis on widespread ALS training and to increase education in the recognition and response to pre-arrest clinical deterioration. PMID:25921543

  4. Office and operating room management of cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Sabiston, W R; Hicks, J N

    1982-02-01

    Management of cardiac arrest depends on a four-minute period of potential reversibility. Success depends on immediate diagnosis, documentation of the onset of cardiac arrest, and establishment of treatment priorities. Pupillary dilation, complete in two minutes, serves to verify the onset and duration of cardiac arrest. Treatment involves two phases--the emergency phase of oxygenation and perfusion and the definitive phase of restoring the spontaneous effective heartbeat. The two mechanisms of cardiac arrest, ventricular fibrillation and asystole, are characterized, and the conditions necessary for each to occur are listed. The treatment of ventricular fibrillation is defibrillation, whereas ventricular asystole responds to cardiac stimuli--a precordial blow, epinephrine, or calcium. The mnemonic "SALT CAN ADD GOOD TIME" is suggested as a guide for drug dosage, and a treatment flowchart is outlined. PMID:7036965

  5. Isolation Syndrome after Cardiac Arrest and Therapeutic Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Forgacs, Peter B.; Fridman, Esteban A.; Goldfine, Andrew M.; Schiff, Nicholas D.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the first description of an isolation syndrome in a patient who suffered prolonged cardiac arrest and underwent a standard therapeutic hypothermia protocol. Two years after the arrest, the patient demonstrated no motor responses to commands, communication capabilities, or visual tracking at the bedside. However, resting neuronal metabolism and electrical activity across the entire anterior forebrain was found to be normal despite severe structural injuries to primary motor, parietal, and occipital cortices. In addition, using quantitative electroencephalography, the patient showed evidence for willful modulation of brain activity in response to auditory commands revealing covert conscious awareness. A possible explanation for this striking dissociation in this patient is that altered neuronal recovery patterns following therapeutic hypothermia may lead to a disproportionate preservation of anterior forebrain cortico-thalamic circuits even in the setting of severe hypoxic injury to other brain areas. Compared to recent reports of other severely brain-injured subjects with such dissociation of clinically observable (overt) and covert behaviors, we propose that this case represents a potentially generalizable mechanism producing an isolation syndrome of blindness, motor paralysis, and retained cognition as a sequela of cardiac arrest and therapeutic hypothermia. Our findings further support that highly-preserved anterior cortico-thalamic integrity is associated with the presence of conscious awareness independent from the degree of injury to other brain areas. PMID:27375420

  6. Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest –Optimal Management

    PubMed Central

    Frõhlich, Georg M.; Lyon, Richard M; Sasson, Comilla; Crake, Tom; Whitbread, Mark; Indermuehle, Andreas; Timmis, Adam; Meier, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has attracted increasing attention over the past years because outcomes have improved impressively lately. The changes for neurological intact outcomes has been poor but several areas have achieved improving survival rates after adjusting their cardiac arrest care. The pre-hospital management is certainly key and decides whether a cardiac arrest patient can be brought back into a spontaneous circulation. However, the whole chain of resuscitation including the in-hospital care have improved also. This review describes aetiologies of OHCA, risk and potential protective factors and recent advances in the pre-hospital and in-hospital management of these patients. PMID:23228073

  7. Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia (PAID) syndrome following cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Dheeraj; Singla, Deepak; Singh, Jasveer; Jindal, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia (PAID) appears to be a unique syndrome following brain injury. It can echo many life-threatening conditions, making its early recognition and management a challenge for intensivists. A delay in early recognition and subsequent management may result in increased morbidity, which is preventable in affected patients. Herein, we report the case of a patient who was diagnosed with PAID syndrome following prolonged cardiac arrest, and discuss the pathophysiology, clinical presentation and management of this rare and under-recognised clinical entity. PMID:25189311

  8. Experience with bretylium tosylate by a hospital cardiac arrest team.

    PubMed

    Holder, D A; Sniderman, A D; Fraser, G; Fallen, E L

    1977-03-01

    The effect of bretylium tosylate (BT) was determined in 27 consecutive cases of resistant ventricular fibrillation (VF) encountered by a hospital cardiac arrest team. The VF was sustained and completely resistant to multiple injections of lidocaine, sequential DC shocks at 400 watt-sec and one or a combination of intravenous propranolol, diphenylhydantoin or procainamide. Following 30 min of sustained cardiac massage, BT (5 mg/kg i.v.) was administered. In 20 patients, VF was terminated within 9-12 min after DC shock. Eight of these patients failed to recover while 12 (44%) of all patients resuscitated survived to be discharged from hospital. Eleven out of 20 (55%) of all patients who had a cardiac arrest outside the CCU were survivors; only one out of seven in the CCU were successfully resuscitated. While receiving maintanance BT post-resuscitation (5 mg/kg i.m. q 8-12 hrs x 48 hrs), half the patients developed hypotension and three required vasopressors and/or fluid replacement. The data indicate that BT is a useful agent in patients with sustained VF refractory to repeated lidocaine injections, some other antiarrhythmic agents, and multiple DC shocks. PMID:837490

  9. Therapeutic Hypothermia and Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in a Child with Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Spurkeland, Nancy; Bennett, Gregory; Alexander, Chandran; Chang, Dennis; Ceneviva, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Neurologic outcomes following pediatric cardiac arrest are consistently poor. Early initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation has been shown to have positive effects on both survival to hospital discharge, and improved neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest. Additionally, the use of therapeutic hypothermia may improve survival in pediatric cardiac arrest patients admitted to the intensive care unit. We report a child with congenital hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, in whom the early initiation of effective prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation and subsequent administration of therapeutic hypothermia contributed to a positive outcome with no gross neurologic sequelae. Continuing efforts should be made to promote and employ high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which likely contributed to the positive outcome of this case. Further research will be necessary to develop and solidify national guidelines for the implementation of therapeutic hypothermia in selected subpopulations of children with OHCA. PMID:25861505

  10. Emergency Neurological Life Support: Resuscitation Following Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Rittenberger, Jon C; Friess, Stuart; Polderman, Kees H

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac arrest is the most common cause of death in North America. Neurocritical care interventions, including targeted temperature management (TTM), have significantly improved neurological outcomes in patients successfully resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Therefore, resuscitation following cardiac arrest was chosen as an emergency neurological life support protocol. Patients remaining comatose following resuscitation from cardiac arrest should be considered for TTM. This protocol will review induction, maintenance, and re-warming phases of TTM, along with management of TTM side effects. Aggressive shivering suppression is necessary with this treatment to ensure the maintenance of a target temperature. Ancillary testing, including electrocardiography, computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, continuous electroencephalography monitoring, and correction of electrolyte, blood gas, and hematocrit changes, are also necessary to optimize outcomes. PMID:26438463

  11. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for pediatric cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Jennie

    2015-02-01

    Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) remains a promising treatment for pediatric patients in cardiac arrest unresponsive to traditional cardiopulmonary resuscitation. With venoarterial extracorporeal support, blood is drained from the right atrium, oxygenated through the extracorporeal circuit, and transfused back to the body, bypassing the heart and lungs. The use of artificial oxygenation and perfusion thus provides the body a period of hemodynamic stability, while allowing resolution of underlying disease processes. Survival rates for ECPR patients are higher than those for traditional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), although neurological outcomes require further investigation. The impact of duration of CPR and length of treatment with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation vary in published reports. Furthermore, current guidelines for the initiation and use of ECPR are limited and may lead to confusion about appropriate use of this support. Many ethical concerns arise with this advanced form of life support. More often than not, the dilemma is not whether to withhold ECPR, but rather when to withdraw it. Although clinicians must decide if ECPR is appropriate and when further intervention is futile, the ultimate burden of choice is left to the patient's caregivers. Offering support and guidance to the patient's family as well as the patient is essential. PMID:25639578

  12. Cardiac arrest due to intracranial hypotension following pseudohypoxic brain swelling induced by negative suction drainage in a cranioplasty patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyun-Soo; Lee, Soo Kyung; Kim, Su Ryun; Kim, Seon Ju

    2016-06-01

    Pseudohypoxic brain swelling (PHBS) is known to be an uncommon event that may occur during and following an uneventful brain surgery, when negative suction drainage is used. The cerebrospinal fluid loss related to suction drainage can evoke intracranial hypotension that progress to PHBS. The main presentations of PHBS are sudden unexpected circulatory collapses, such as severe bradycardia, hypotension, cardiac arrest, consciousness deterioration and diffuse brain swelling as seen with brain computerized tomography (CT). We present a stuporous 22-year-old patient who underwent cranioplasty under general anesthesia. The entire course of the general anesthesia and operation progressed favorably. However, the time of scalp suture completion, sudden bradycardia and hypotension occurred, followed by cardiac arrest immediately after initiation of subgaleal and epidural suction drainage. After successful resuscitation, the comatose patient was transferred to the neurosurgical intensive care unit and PHBS was confirmed using brain CT. PMID:27274378

  13. Cardiac arrest due to intracranial hypotension following pseudohypoxic brain swelling induced by negative suction drainage in a cranioplasty patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Ryun; Kim, Seon Ju

    2016-01-01

    Pseudohypoxic brain swelling (PHBS) is known to be an uncommon event that may occur during and following an uneventful brain surgery, when negative suction drainage is used. The cerebrospinal fluid loss related to suction drainage can evoke intracranial hypotension that progress to PHBS. The main presentations of PHBS are sudden unexpected circulatory collapses, such as severe bradycardia, hypotension, cardiac arrest, consciousness deterioration and diffuse brain swelling as seen with brain computerized tomography (CT). We present a stuporous 22-year-old patient who underwent cranioplasty under general anesthesia. The entire course of the general anesthesia and operation progressed favorably. However, the time of scalp suture completion, sudden bradycardia and hypotension occurred, followed by cardiac arrest immediately after initiation of subgaleal and epidural suction drainage. After successful resuscitation, the comatose patient was transferred to the neurosurgical intensive care unit and PHBS was confirmed using brain CT. PMID:27274378

  14. Post-resuscitation care for survivors of cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Mangla, Ashvarya; Daya, Mohamud R.; Gupta, Saurabh

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest can occur following a myriad of clinical conditions. With advancement of medical science and improvements in Emergency Medical Services systems, the rate of return of spontaneous circulation for patients who suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) continues to increase. Managing these patients is challenging and requires a structured approach including stabilization of cardiopulmonary status, early consideration of neuroprotective strategies, identifying and managing the etiology of arrest and initiating treatment to prevent recurrence. This requires a closely coordinated multidisciplinary team effort. In this article, we will review the initial management of survivors of OHCA, highlighting advances and ongoing controversies. PMID:24568821

  15. Double Bolus Thrombolysis for Suspected Massive Pulmonary Embolism during Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Gerard; Fitzpatrick, Gareth; Gilligan, Peadar

    2015-01-01

    More than 70% of cardiac arrest cases are caused by acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or pulmonary embolism (PE). Although thrombolytic therapy is a recognised therapy for both AMI and PE, its indiscriminate use is not routinely recommended during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We present a case describing the successful use of double dose thrombolysis during cardiac arrest caused by pulmonary embolism. Notwithstanding the relative lack of high-level evidence, this case suggests a scenario in which recombinant tissue Plasminogen Activator (rtPA) may be beneficial in cardiac arrest. In addition to the strong clinical suspicion of pulmonary embolism as the causative agent of the patient's cardiac arrest, the extremely low end-tidal CO2 suggested a massive PE. The absence of dilatation of the right heart on subxiphoid ultrasound argued against the diagnosis of PE, but not conclusively so. In the context of the circulatory collapse induced by cardiac arrest, this aspect was relegated in terms of importance. The second dose of rtPA utilised in this case resulted in return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and did not result in haemorrhage or an adverse effect. PMID:26664765

  16. Double Bolus Thrombolysis for Suspected Massive Pulmonary Embolism during Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Gerard; Fitzpatrick, Gareth; El-Gammal, Ayman; Gilligan, Peadar

    2015-01-01

    More than 70% of cardiac arrest cases are caused by acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or pulmonary embolism (PE). Although thrombolytic therapy is a recognised therapy for both AMI and PE, its indiscriminate use is not routinely recommended during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We present a case describing the successful use of double dose thrombolysis during cardiac arrest caused by pulmonary embolism. Notwithstanding the relative lack of high-level evidence, this case suggests a scenario in which recombinant tissue Plasminogen Activator (rtPA) may be beneficial in cardiac arrest. In addition to the strong clinical suspicion of pulmonary embolism as the causative agent of the patient's cardiac arrest, the extremely low end-tidal CO2 suggested a massive PE. The absence of dilatation of the right heart on subxiphoid ultrasound argued against the diagnosis of PE, but not conclusively so. In the context of the circulatory collapse induced by cardiac arrest, this aspect was relegated in terms of importance. The second dose of rtPA utilised in this case resulted in return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and did not result in haemorrhage or an adverse effect. PMID:26664765

  17. Cardiac arrest due to airway obstruction in hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Fuse, Takashi; Nakada, Taka-aki; Taniguchi, Masashi; Mizushima, Yasuaki; Matsuoka, Tetsuya

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare genetic disease caused by a deficiency of functional C1 esterase inhibitor that causes swelling attacks in various body tissues. We hereby report a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to airway obstruction in HAE. Cutaneous swelling and abdominal pain attacks caused by gastrointestinal wall swelling are common symptoms in HAE, whereas laryngeal swelling is rare. Emergency physicians may have few chances to experience cases of life-threatening laryngeal edema resulting in a delay from symptom onset to the diagnosis of HAE. Hereditary angioedema is diagnosed by performing complement blood tests. Because safe and effective treatment options are available for the life-threatening swellings in HAE, the diagnosis potentially reduces the risk of asphyxiation in patients and their blood relatives. PMID:25913082

  18. Oral Phenytoin Toxicity Causing Sinus Arrest: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Thimmisetty, Ravi K.; Gorthi, Janardhana Rao

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of sinus node arrest leading to symptomatic junctional bradycardia from oral phenytoin toxicity, which is a rare presentation. Our patient had no prior cardiac history and was on phenytoin therapy for seizure disorder. Although bradycardia is more commonly associated with intravenous phenytoin and there were few case reports of bradycardia with oral phenytoin reported, the literature is limited. In this case report, we also reviewed the pathophysiology of phenytoin-induced cardiac toxicity. PMID:25343048

  19. Functional Outcomes: One Year after a Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Ketki D.; Rittenberger, Jon C.; Holm, Margo B.; Callaway, Clifton W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The study aim was to characterize the time-course of recovery in impairments, activity limitations, participation restrictions, disability, and quality of life during the first year after cardiac arrest. Secondarily, the study described the associations between the instruments used to measure each of these domains. Methods. Measures of global disability (Cerebral Performance Category, CPC, Modified Rankin Scale, mRS), quality of life, activity limitations, participation restrictions, and affective and cognitive impairments were administered to 29 participants 1, 6, and 12 months after cardiac arrest. Results. Global measures of disability indicated recovery between one month and one year after cardiac arrest (mean CPC: 2.1 versus 1.69,  P < 0.05; mean mRS: 2.55 versus 1.83, P < 0.05). While global measures of disability were moderately associated with participation, they were poorly associated with other measures. The cohort endorsed depressive symptomatology throughout the year but did not have detectable cognitive impairment. Conclusions. Recovery from cardiac arrest is multifaceted and recovery continues for months depending upon the measures being used. Measures of global disability, reintegration into the community, and quality of life yield different information. Future clinical trials should include a combination of measures to yield the most complete representation of recovery after cardiac arrest. PMID:26421282

  20. Swedish ambulance nurses' experiences of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Ricard; Engström, Åsa

    2013-04-01

    Effective pre-hospital treatment of a person suffering cardiac arrest is a challenging task for the ambulance nurses. The aim of this study was to describe ambulance nurses' experiences of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrest. Qualitative personal interviews were conducted during 2011 in Sweden with seven ambulance nurses with experience of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrests. The interview texts were analyzed using qualitative thematic content analysis, which resulted in the formulation of one theme with six categories. Mutual preparation, regular training and education were important factors in the nursing of patients suffering cardiac arrest. Ambulance nurses are placed in ethically demanding situations regarding if and for how long they should continue cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to accord with pre-hospital cardiac guidelines and patients' wishes. When a cardiac arrest patient is nursed their relatives also need the attention of ambulance nurses. Reflection is one way for ambulance nurses to learn from, and talk about, their experiences. This study provides knowledge of ambulance nurses' experiences in the care of people with cardiac arrest. Better feedback about the care given by the ambulance nurses, and about the diagnosis and nursing care the patients received after they were admitted to the hospital are suggested as improvements that would allow ambulance nurses to learn more from their experience. Further development and research concerning the technical equipment might improve the situation for both the ambulance nurses and the patients. Ambulance nurses need regularly training and education to be prepared for saving people's lives and also to be able to make the right decisions. PMID:23577977

  1. Management of survivors of cardiac arrest - the importance of genetic investigation.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Peter J; Dagradi, Federica

    2016-09-01

    Management of survivors of cardiac arrest is largely based on a traditional approach. However, during the past decade, arrhythmias of genetic origin have increasingly been recognized as contributing to many more cases than previously appreciated. This realization is forcing physicians managing the survivors of cardiac arrest also to consider family members. In this Perspectives article, we examine the appropriate management approaches for survivors of cardiac arrests related to channelopathies, cardiomyopathies, or ischaemic heart disease, and for their families. Important implications for families of individuals who have experienced sudden cardiac death as part of sudden infant death syndrome or during sport activity are also discussed. Congenital long QT syndrome provides a paradigm of the logical sequence of the steps that should be performed. When a diagnosis of the cause of the cardiac arrest is certain or probable, every effort should be made to identify the genetic basis of disease, because this approach will enable the identification and early protection of similarly affected family members. Accordingly, the availability in hospitals of at least one cardiologist with cardiovascular genetics expertise would improve the management of survivors of cardiac arrest as well as of their families. PMID:27383078

  2. Extracorporeal life support for cardiac arrest in a 13-year-old girl caused by Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyoung Hwan; Lee, Byung Kook; Jeung, Kyung Woon; Lee, Dong Hun

    2015-10-01

    Generally, Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome presents good prognosis. However, several case reports demonstrated malignant arrhythmia or sudden cardiac death as WPW syndrome's first presentation. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation using extracorporeal life support is a therapeutic option in refractory cardiac arrest. We present a WPW syndrome patient who had sudden cardiac arrest as the first presentation of the disease and treated it using extracorporeal life support with good neurologic outcome. PMID:26314214

  3. Ventilation and gas exchange management after cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Sutherasan, Yuda; Raimondo, Pasquale; Pelosi, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    For several decades, physicians had integrated several interventions aiming to improve the outcomes in post-cardiac arrest patients. However, the mortality rate after cardiac arrest is still as high as 50%. Post-cardiac arrest syndrome is associated with high morbidity and mortality due to not only poor neurological outcome and cardiovascular failure but also respiratory dysfunction. To minimize ventilator-associated lung injury, protective mechanical ventilation by using low tidal volume ventilation and driving pressure may decrease pulmonary complications and improve survival. Low level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) can be initiated and titrated with careful cardiac output and respiratory mechanics monitoring. Furthermore, optimizing gas exchange by avoiding hypoxia and hyperoxia as well as maintaining normocarbia may improve neurological and survival outcome. Early multidisciplinary cardiac rehabilitation intervention is recommended. Minimally invasive monitoring techniques, that is, echocardiography, transpulmonary thermodilution method measuring extravascular lung water, as well as transcranial Doppler ultrasound, might be useful to improve appropriate management of post-cardiac arrest patients. PMID:26670813

  4. Anaphylactic shock and cardiac arrest caused by thiamine infusion.

    PubMed

    Juel, Jacob; Pareek, Manan; Langfrits, Christian Sigvald; Jensen, Svend Eggert

    2013-01-01

    Parenteral thiamine has a very high safety profile. The most common adverse effect is local irritation; however, anaphylactic or anaphylactoid reactions may occur, mostly related to intravenous administration. We describe a 44-year-old man, a chronic alcoholic, who was admitted with alcohol intoxication and developed cardiac arrest due to anaphylactic shock following intravenous thiamine infusion. The patient was successfully resuscitated after 15 min and repeated epinephrine administrations. He was discharged in good health after 14 days. This case report emphasises both the importance of recognising the symptoms of anaphylaxis and the fact that facilities for treating anaphylaxis and cardiopulmonary resuscitation should be available when thiamine or for that matter, any drug is given in-hospital. PMID:23853017

  5. Cardiac Arrest During Medically-Supervised Exercise Training: A Report of Fifteen Successful Defibrillations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyfer, Howard R.; And Others

    The Cardio-Pulmonary Research Institute conducted an exercise program for men with a history of coronary heart disease. Over 7 years, there were 15 cases of cardiac arrest during exercise (one for every 6,000 man-hours of exercise). Trained medical personnel were present in all cases, and all were resuscitated by electrical defibrillation with no…

  6. The Practice of Therapeutic Hypothermia after Cardiac Arrest in France: A National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Orban, Jean-Christophe; Cattet, Florian; Lefrant, Jean-Yves; Leone, Marc; Jaber, Samir; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Allaouchiche, Bernard; Ichai, Carole

    2012-01-01

    Aims Cardiac arrest is a major health concern worldwide accounting for 375,000 cases per year in Europe with a survival rate of <10%. Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve patients’ neurological outcome and is recommended by scientific societies. Despite these guidelines, different surveys report a heterogeneous application of this treatment. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical practice of therapeutic hypothermia in cardiac arrest patients. Methods This self-declarative web based survey was proposed to all registered French adult intensive care units (ICUs) (n = 357). Paediatrics and neurosurgery ICUs were excluded. The different questions addressed the structure, the practical modalities of therapeutic hypothermia and the use of prognostic factors in patients admitted after cardiac arrest. Results One hundred and thirty-two out of 357 ICUs (37%) answered the questionnaire. Adherence to recommendations regarding the targeted temperature and hypothermia duration were 98% and 94% respectively. Both guidelines were followed in 92% ICUs. During therapeutic hypothermia, sedative drugs were given in 99% ICUs, mostly midazolam (77%) and sufentanil (59%). Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA) were used in 97% ICUs, mainly cisatracurium (77%). Numerous prognostic factors were used after cardiac arrest such as clinical factors (95%), biomarkers (53%), electroencephalography (78%) and evoked potentials (35%). Conclusions In France, adherence to recommendations for therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest is higher than those previously reported in other countries. Numerous prognostic factors are widely used even if their reliability remains controversial. PMID:23049783

  7. Out of hospital cardiac arrest and associated injury.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, A I; Stuart, M J; Gray, A J

    1998-01-01

    Three patients are described who sustained injuries around the time of a collapse that led to out of hospital cardiac arrest. In this group of patients the importance of taking a complete medical history and recording the circumstances of the syncopal episode cannot be overemphasised. If cardiac output is successfully restored the possibility of occult traumatic injury must be considered in high risk patients. PMID:9639185

  8. Validation of the Pittsburgh Cardiac Arrest Category illness severity score

    PubMed Central

    Coppler, Patrick J.; Elmer, Jonathan; Calderon, Luis; Sabedra, Alexa; Doshi, Ankur A.; Callaway, Clifton W.; Rittenberger, Jon C.; Dezfulian, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to validate the ability of an early post-cardiac arrest illness severity classification to predict patient outcomes. Methods The Pittsburgh Cardiac Arrest Category (PCAC) is a 4-level illness severity score that was found to be strongly predictive of outcomes in the initial derivation study. We assigned PCAC scores to consecutive in and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest subjects treated at two tertiary care centers between January 2011 and September 2013. We made assignments prospectively at Site 1 and retrospectively at Site 2. Our primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge. Inter-rater reliability of retrospective PCAC assessments was assessed. Secondary outcomes were favorable discharge disposition (home or acute rehabilitation), Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at hospital discharge. We tested the association of PCAC with each outcome using unadjusted and multivariable logistic regression. Results We included 607 cardiac arrest patients during the study (393 at Site 1 and 214 at Site 2). Site populations differed in age, arrest location, rhythm, use of hypothermia and distribution of PCAC. Inter-rater reliability of retrospective PCAC assignments was excellent (κ=0.81). PCAC was associated with survival (unadjusted odds ratio (OR) for Site 1: 0.33 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.27–0.41)) Site 2: 0.32 (95%CI 0.24–0.43)) even after adjustment for other clinical variables (adjusted OR Site 1: 0.32 (95%CI 0.25–0.41)) Site 2: 0.31 (95%CI 0.22–0.44)). PCAC was predictive of secondary outcomes. Conclusions Our results confirm that PCAC is strongly predictive of survival and good functional outcome after cardiac arrest. PMID:25636896

  9. Use of cold intravenous fluid to induce hypothermia in a comatose child after cardiac arrest due to a lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Min; Jeong, Ju-Hwan; Kyong, Yeon-Young; Kim, Han-Joon; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Park, Jeong-Ho; Park, Kyu-Nam

    2008-11-01

    We report a case in which mild hypothermia was induced successfully using a cold intravenous fluid infusion in a 12-year-old boy who was comatose following 21 min of cardiac arrest caused by a lightning strike. PMID:18805616

  10. The UK Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Outcome (OHCAO) project

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Gavin D; Brace-McDonnell, Samantha J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Reducing premature death is a key priority for the UK National Health Service (NHS). NHS Ambulance services treat approximately 30 000 cases of suspected cardiac arrest each year but survival rates vary. The British Heart Foundation and Resuscitation Council (UK) have funded a structured research programme—the Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Outcomes (OHCAO) programme. The aim of the project is to establish the epidemiology and outcome of OHCA, explore sources of variation in outcome and establish the feasibility of setting up a national OHCA registry. Methods and analysis This is a prospective observational study set in UK NHS Ambulance Services. The target population will be adults and children sustaining an OHCA who are attended by an NHS ambulance emergency response and where resuscitation is attempted. The data collected will be characterised broadly as system characteristics, emergency medical services (EMS) dispatch characteristics, patient characteristics and EMS process variables. The main outcome variables of interest will be return of spontaneous circulation and medium—long-term survival (30 days to 10-year survival). Ethics and dissemination Ethics committee permissions were gained and the study also has received approval from the Confidentiality Advisory Group Ethics and Confidentiality committee which provides authorisation to lawfully hold identifiable data on patients without their consent. To identify the key characteristics contributing to better outcomes in some ambulance services, reliable and reproducible systems need to be established for collecting data on OHCA in the UK. Reports generated from the registry will focus on data completeness, timeliness and quality. Subsequent reports will summarise demographic, patient, process and outcome variables with aim of improving patient care through focus quality improvement initiatives. PMID:26428332

  11. Thyroid Levels in High-Normal Range May Be Linked to Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... in High-Normal Range May Be Linked to Cardiac Arrest Study isn't cause for alarm, cardiologist says, ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Cardiac Arrest Thyroid Tests Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health ...

  12. Exercise-related sudden cardiac arrest in London: incidence, survival and bystander response

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Melanie J; Fothergill, Rachael T

    2015-01-01

    Objective The study aimed to (1) establish the incidence of exercise-related sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in London, (2) investigate survival from exercise-related SCA and (3) examine factors related to survival. Method This retrospective observational study examined 2 years’ data from the London Ambulance Service (LAS) cardiac arrest registry for patients in whom resuscitation was attempted following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), a cardiac cause was presumed and the arrest occurred during or within 1 h of exercise. Results The incidence of exercise-related SCA in London was estimated to be 0.6 per 100 000 person-years which equated to 0.5% of all OHCA, and 1.5% of all OHCA with presumed cardiac aetiology and resuscitation attempted. The majority of cases were male and the incidence increased from age 40 years. Just under one-third of patients survived to hospital discharge. Survival in the Utstein comparator group (cases with presumed cardiac aetiology, resuscitation attempted, bystander witnessed and a presenting cardiac rhythm of ventricular fibrillation or tachycardia) was higher at 42%. Survival was significantly associated with initial cardiac rhythm (χ2=17.5, df=2, p<0.001) and bystander defibrillation (Fisher's exact test, p<0.05). Conclusions Incidence of exercise-related SCA in the general population in London is rare. Survival following exercise-related SCA was considerably higher than survival for all OHCA with presumed cardiac aetiology and resuscitation attempted attended by the LAS during the same period. The major limitation of the study is the likely under identification of cases of exercise-related SCA. PMID:26468401

  13. Successful extracorporeal life support in sudden cardiac arrest due to coronary anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Wan; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Ki-Sik; Bang, Duk Won; Hyon, Min-Su; Lee, Min-Ho; Park, Byoung-Won

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) has recently been reported to have a survival benefit in patients with cardiac arrest. It is now used widely as a lifesaving modality. Here, we describe a case of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in a young athlete with an anomalous origin of the right coronary artery from the left coronary sinus. Resuscitation was successful using ECLS before curative bypass surgery. We highlight the efficacy of ECLS for a patient with SCA caused by a rare, unexpected aetiology. In conclusion, ECLS was a lifesaving modality for SCA due to an anomalous coronary artery in this young patient. PMID:27354896

  14. Warning Signs of Heart Attack, Stroke and Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... head up and check for at least five seconds. Learn more about cardiac arrest If these signs are ... CPR with breaths. Watch the demo video and learn how to save a life in 60 seconds. Login or Sign Up to save and share ...

  15. Heart Attack or Sudden Cardiac Arrest: How Are They Different?

    MedlinePlus

    ... a person loses consciousness and has no pulse. Death occurs within minutes if the victim does not receive treatment. What is the link? These two distinct heart conditions are linked. Sudden cardiac arrest can occur after a heart attack, or during recovery. Heart attacks increase the risk ...

  16. [Refractory cardiac arrest patients in prehospital care, potential organ donors].

    PubMed

    Le Jan, Arnaud; Dupin, Aurélie; Garrigue, Bruno; Sapir, David

    2016-09-01

    Under the authority of the French Biomedicine Agency, a new care pathway integrates refractory cardiac arrest patients into a process of organ donation. It is a medical, logistical and ethical challenge for the staff of the mobile emergency services. PMID:27596502

  17. Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest and myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Michael; Behringer, Wilhelm

    2008-12-01

    About 17 million people worldwide die from cardiovascular diseases each year. Impaired neurologic function after sudden cardiac arrest is a major cause of death in these patients. Up to now, no specific post-arrest therapy was available to improve outcome. Recently, two randomized clinical trials of mild therapeutic hypothermia after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest showed improvement of neurological outcome and reduced mortality. A broad implementation of this new therapy could save thousands of lives worldwide, as only 6 patients have to be treated to get one additional patient with favourable neurological recovery. At present, myocardial reperfusion by thrombolytic therapy or primary PCI as early as possible is the most effective therapy in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Mild therapeutic hypothermia might be a promising new therapy to prevent reperfusion injury after myocardial infarction, but its use in daily clinical routine cannot be recommended with the available evidence. PMID:19137812

  18. Cardiac Arrest in a Heart Transplant Patient Receiving Dexmedetomidine During Cardiac Catheterization.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Lawrence Israel; Miyamoto, Shelley D; Stenquist, Scott; Twite, Mark David

    2016-06-01

    Dexmedetomidine is an α-2 agonist with a sedative and cardiopulmonary profile that makes it an attractive anesthetic in pediatric cardiac patients. Cardiac transplant patients may suffer from acute cellular rejection of the cardiac conduction system and, therefore, are at an increased risk of the electrophysiological effect of dexmedetomidine. We present such a patient who had a cardiac arrest while receiving dexmedetomidine during cardiac catheterization. Because acute cellular rejection of the cardiac conduction system is difficult to diagnose, dexmedetomidine should be used with caution in pediatric heart transplant patients. PMID:26721807

  19. Sudden Cardiac Arrest During Sports Activity in Middle Age

    PubMed Central

    Marijon, Eloi; Uy-Evanado, Audrey; Reinier, Kyndaron; Teodorescu, Carmen; Narayanan, Kumar; Jouven, Xavier; Gunson, Karen; Jui, Jonathan; Chugh, Sumeet S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sports-associated sudden cardiac arrests (SCAs) occur mostly during middle age. We sought to determine burden, characteristics, and outcomes of SCA during sports among middle aged residents of a large US community. Methods and Results SCA cases aged 35–65 years were identified in a large, prospective, population-based study (2002–2013), with systematic and comprehensive assessment of their lifetime medical history. Of the 1,247 SCA cases, 63 (5%) occurred during sports activities at a mean age of 51.1±8.8 years, yielding an incidence of 21.7 (95%CI 8.1–35.4) per million per year. The incidence varied significantly based on sex, with a higher incidence among men (RR 18.68 95%CI 2.50–139.56) for sports SCA, as compared to all other SCA (RR 2.58, 95%CI 2.12–3.13). Sports SCA was also more likely to be a witnessed event (87 vs. 53%, P<0.001), with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (44 vs. 25%, P=0.001) and ventricular fibrillation (84 vs. 51%, P<0.0001). Survival to hospital discharge was higher for sports-associated SCA (23.2 vs. 13.6%, P=0.04). Sports SCA cases presented with known pre-existing cardiac disease in 16%, ≥1 cardiovascular risk factor in 56%, and overall, 36% of cases had typical cardiovascular symptoms during the week preceding SCA. Conclusions Sports-associated SCA in middle age represents a relatively small proportion of the overall SCA burden, reinforcing the idea of the high benefit-low risk nature of sports activity. Especially in light of current population aging trends, our findings emphasize that targeted education could maximize both safety and acceptance of sports activity in the older athlete. PMID:25847988

  20. High Schools Help Conquer Cardiac Arrest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyle, James

    1998-01-01

    A class of devices known as automated external defibrillators (AEDs) enable nonmedical professionals to respond to cardiac emergencies. The Jackson County School District, West Virginia, is the first in the country to have AEDs at high school sporting events. AEDs are proven to be safe, accurate, and easy to use. (MLF)

  1. Sudden cardiac arrest during anesthesia in a 30-month-old boy with syndactyly: a case of genetically proven Timothy syndrome.

    PubMed

    An, Hyo Soon; Choi, Eun Young; Kwon, Bo Sang; Kim, Gi Beom; Bae, Eun Jung; Noh, Chung Il; Choi, Jung Yun; Park, Sung Sup

    2013-05-01

    Timothy syndrome, long QT syndrome type 8, is highly malignant with ventricular tachyarrhythmia. A 30-month-old boy had sudden cardiac arrest during anesthesia induction before plastic surgery for bilateral cutaneous syndactyly. After successful resuscitation, prolonged QT interval (QTc, 0.58-0.60 sec) and T-wave alternans were found in his electrocardiogram. Starting β-blocker to prevent further tachycardia and collapse event, then there were no more arrhythmic events. The genes KCNQ1, KCNH2, KCNE1 and 2, and SCN5A were negative for long QT syndrome. The mutation p.Gly406Arg was confirmed in CACNA1C, which maintains L-type calcium channel depolarization in the heart and other systems. PMID:23678275

  2. [Amniotic fluid embolism: report of the successful outcome of a case with inaugural cardiac arrest and early DIVC complicated by hemoperitoneum of iatrogen origin and bleeding of an hepatic adenoma].

    PubMed

    Falzone, E; Ricard, J-D; Pachy, F; Mandelbrot, L; Keïta, H

    2012-10-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism is a relatively rare clinical entity and with difficult medical recognition. However, it is the second leading cause of maternal mortality. We report here the case of a 32-year-old patient who underwent elective caesarean section complicated by an amniotic fluid embolism with cardiac arrest. The presence of a major disseminated intravascular coagulation favored the occurrence of a retroperitoneal hematoma of iatrogenic origin on attempt of femoral venous catheterization and that of hemoperitoneum on bleeding of an hepatic adenoma. The diagnostic of amniotic fluid embolism was confirmed by the presence of amniotic cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage. The patient survived without sequelae. PMID:22925937

  3. Successful Management of Aluminium Phosphide Poisoning Resulting in Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Hakimoğlu, Sedat; Dikey, İsmail; Sarı, Ali; Kekeç, Leyla; Tuzcu, Kasım; Karcıoğlu, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum phosphide has high toxicity when it is ingested, and in case of contact with moisture, phosphine gas is released. Aluminum phosphide poisoning causes metabolic acidosis, arrhythmia, acute respiratory distress syndrome and shock, and there is no specific antidote. A 17-year-old male patient was referred to our hospital because of aluminum phosphide poisoning with 1500 mg of aluminum phosphide tablets. The patient’s consciousness was clear but he was somnolent. Vital parameters were as follows: blood pressure: 85/56 mmHg, pulse: 88 beats/min, SpO2: 94%, temperature: 36.4°C. Because of hypotension, noradrenaline and dopamine infusions were started. The patient was intubated because of respiratory distress and loss of consciousness. Severe metabolic acidosis was determined in the arterial blood gas, and metabolic acidosis was corrected by sodium bicarbonate treatment. In addition to supportive therapy of the poisoning, haemodialysis was performed. Cardiac arrest occurred during follow-ups in the intensive care unit, and sinus rhythm was achieved after 10 min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The patient was discharged after three sessions of haemodialysis on the ninth day. As a result, haemodialysis contributed to symptomatic treatment of aluminum phosphide poisoning in this case report. PMID:27366514

  4. Successful Management of Aluminium Phosphide Poisoning Resulting in Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Hakimoğlu, Sedat; Dikey, İsmail; Sarı, Ali; Kekeç, Leyla; Tuzcu, Kasım; Karcıoğlu, Murat

    2015-08-01

    Aluminum phosphide has high toxicity when it is ingested, and in case of contact with moisture, phosphine gas is released. Aluminum phosphide poisoning causes metabolic acidosis, arrhythmia, acute respiratory distress syndrome and shock, and there is no specific antidote. A 17-year-old male patient was referred to our hospital because of aluminum phosphide poisoning with 1500 mg of aluminum phosphide tablets. The patient's consciousness was clear but he was somnolent. Vital parameters were as follows: blood pressure: 85/56 mmHg, pulse: 88 beats/min, SpO2: 94%, temperature: 36.4°C. Because of hypotension, noradrenaline and dopamine infusions were started. The patient was intubated because of respiratory distress and loss of consciousness. Severe metabolic acidosis was determined in the arterial blood gas, and metabolic acidosis was corrected by sodium bicarbonate treatment. In addition to supportive therapy of the poisoning, haemodialysis was performed. Cardiac arrest occurred during follow-ups in the intensive care unit, and sinus rhythm was achieved after 10 min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The patient was discharged after three sessions of haemodialysis on the ninth day. As a result, haemodialysis contributed to symptomatic treatment of aluminum phosphide poisoning in this case report. PMID:27366514

  5. Mechanisms Linking Advanced Airway Management and Cardiac Arrest Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Justin L.; Prince, David K.; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced airway management – such as endotracheal intubation (ETI) or supraglottic airway (SGA) insertion – is one of the most prominent interventions in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) resuscitation. While randomized controlled trials are currently in progress to identify the best advanced airway technique in OHCA, the mechanisms by which airway management may influence OHCA outcomes remain unknown. We provide a conceptual model describing potential mechanisms linking advanced airway management with OHCA outcomes. PMID:26073275

  6. Hyperoxia toxicity after cardiac arrest: What is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Llitjos, Jean-François; Mira, Jean-Paul; Duranteau, Jacques; Cariou, Alain

    2016-12-01

    This review gives an overview of current knowledge on hyperoxia pathophysiology and examines experimental and human evidence of hyperoxia effects after cardiac arrest. Oxygen plays a pivotal role in critical care management as a lifesaving therapy through the compensation of the imbalance between oxygen requirements and supply. However, growing evidence sustains the hypothesis of reactive oxygen species overproduction-mediated toxicity during hyperoxia, thus exacerbating organ failure by various oxidative cellular injuries. In the cardiac arrest context, evidence of hyperoxia effects on outcome is fairly conflicting. Although prospective data are lacking, retrospective studies and meta-analysis suggest that hyperoxia could be associated with an increased mortality. However, data originate from retrospective, heterogeneous and inconsistent studies presenting various biases that are detailed in this review. Therefore, after an original and detailed analysis of all experimental and clinical studies, we herein provide new ideas and concepts that could participate to improve knowledge on oxygen toxicity and help in developing further prospective controlled randomized trials on this topic. Up to now, the strategy recommended by international guidelines on cardiac arrest (i.e., targeting an oxyhemoglobin saturation of 94-98 %) should be applied in order to avoid deleterious hypoxia and potent hyperoxia. PMID:27003426

  7. Out-of-hospital therapeutic hypothermia in cardiac arrest victims

    PubMed Central

    Behringer, Wilhelm; Arrich, Jasmin; Holzer, Michael; Sterz, Fritz

    2009-01-01

    Despite many years of research, outcome after cardiac arrest is dismal. Since 2005, the European Resuscitation Council recommends in its guidelines the use of mild therapeutic hypothermia (32-34°) for 12 to 24 hours in patients successfully resuscitated from cardiac arrest. The benefit of resuscitative mild hypothermia (induced after resuscitation) is well established, while the benefit of preservative mild to moderate hypothermia (induced during cardiac arrest) needs further investigation before recommending it for clinical routine. Animal data and limited human data suggest that early and fast cooling might be essential for the beneficial effect of resuscitative mild hypothermia. Out-of-hospital cooling has been shown to be feasible and safe by means of intravenous infusion with cold fluids or non-invasively with cooling pads. A combination of these cooling methods might further improve cooling efficacy. If out-of-hospital cooling will further improve functional outcome as compared with in-hospital cooling needs to be determined in a prospective, randomised, sufficiently powered clinical trial. PMID:19821966

  8. Out-of-Hospital Perimortem Cesarean Section as Resuscitative Hysterotomy in Maternal Posttraumatic Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Gatti, Francesca; Zerbi, Simone Maria; Colombo, Dario; Landriscina, Mario; Kette, Fulvio

    2014-01-01

    The optimal treatment of a severe hemodynamic instability from shock to cardiac arrest in late term pregnant women is subject to ongoing studies. However, there is an increasing evidence that early “separation” between the mother and the foetus may increase the restoration of the hemodynamic status and, in the cardiac arrest setting, it may raise the likelihood of a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in the mother. This treatment, called Perimortem Cesarean Section (PMCS), is now termed as Resuscitative Hysterotomy (RH) to better address the issue of an early Cesarean section (C-section). This strategy is in contrast with the traditional treatment of cardiac arrest characterized by the maintenance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) maneuvers without any emergent surgical intervention. We report the case of a prehospital perimortem delivery by Caesarean (C) section of a foetus at 36 weeks of gestation after the mother's traumatic cardiac arrest. Despite the negative outcome of the mother, the choice of performing a RH seems to represent up to date the most appropriate intervention to improve the outcome in both mother and foetus. PMID:25530891

  9. Intravenous ranitidine: Rapid bolus can lead to cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Kamlesh J; Parmar, Sarita J; Parikh, Rohan Pravinbhai; Gauswami, Prashant K; Dadhaniya, Nikunj; Surela, Abhilash

    2015-01-01

    This is a rare case report of a 30-year-old male, who was admitted to the Maxillofacial Surgery Department of the Dental College for a malunited fracture of the mandible and zygomatic bones. He was given oral medications namely, cefixime, metronidazole, ondansetron, and ranitidine for three days prior to the operation with complete normal preoperative workup. He had no significant past medical or family history. On the day of the operation, he was given injectable dexamethasone, cefotaxime, ondansetron, ranitidine, and metronidazole half-an-hour prior to the operation. In less than five minutes of giving a bolus ranitidine injection, the patient developed a cardiac arrest and was resuscitated by the anesthetist team on duty. He was transferred to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) on a ventilator, which was soon removed and the patient was off vasopressors, with stable vitals for 24 hours after the event. He was then transferred to the general ward of Medicine Department and observed for a further two days during which the patient remained uneventful and was finally transferred back to the Dental Department. PMID:25969659

  10. Post-Cardiac Arrest Syndrome: Focus on the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Manole, Mioara D.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Fink, Ericka L.; Clark, Robert S. B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review The field of pediatric cardiac arrest (CA) experienced recent advances secondary to multicenter collaborations. This review summarizes developments during the last year and identifies areas for further research. Recent findings A large retrospective review demonstrated important differences in etiology, severity and outcome of in-hospital versus out-of-hospital pediatric CA. This distinction is relevant to interpretation of retrospective studies that may not distinguish between these entities, and in planning therapeutic clinical trials. Hypothermia was further evaluated as a treatment strategy after neonatal hypoxia and leaders in the field of neonatology recommend universal use of hypothermia in term neonates. In infants and children after CA, there are inadequate data to make a specific recommendation. Two retrospectives studies evaluating hypothermia in children after CA found that it tended to be administered more frequently to sicker patients. However, similar or worse outcomes of patients treated with hypothermia were observed. Use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is another emerging area of research in pediatric CA, and surprisingly good outcomes have been seen with this modality in some cases. Summary Therapeutic hypothermia and ECMO continue to be the only treatment modalities over and above conventional care for pediatric CA. New approaches to monitoring, treatment and rehabilitation after CA remain to be explored. PMID:19726989

  11. Intravenous ranitidine: Rapid bolus can lead to cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Kamlesh J; Parmar, Sarita J; Parikh, Rohan Pravinbhai; Gauswami, Prashant K; Dadhaniya, Nikunj; Surela, Abhilash

    2015-01-01

    This is a rare case report of a 30-year-old male, who was admitted to the Maxillofacial Surgery Department of the Dental College for a malunited fracture of the mandible and zygomatic bones. He was given oral medications namely, cefixime, metronidazole, ondansetron, and ranitidine for three days prior to the operation with complete normal preoperative workup. He had no significant past medical or family history. On the day of the operation, he was given injectable dexamethasone, cefotaxime, ondansetron, ranitidine, and metronidazole half-an-hour prior to the operation. In less than five minutes of giving a bolus ranitidine injection, the patient developed a cardiac arrest and was resuscitated by the anesthetist team on duty. He was transferred to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) on a ventilator, which was soon removed and the patient was off vasopressors, with stable vitals for 24 hours after the event. He was then transferred to the general ward of Medicine Department and observed for a further two days during which the patient remained uneventful and was finally transferred back to the Dental Department. PMID:25969659

  12. Outcomes After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Treated by Basic vs Advanced Life Support

    PubMed Central

    Sanghavi, Prachi; Jena, Anupam B.; Newhouse, Joseph P.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Most out-of-hospital cardiac arrests receiving emergency medical services in the United States are treated by ambulance service providers trained in advanced life support (ALS), but supporting evidence for the use of ALS over basic life support (BLS) is limited. OBJECTIVE To compare the effects of BLS and ALS on outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Observational cohort study of a nationally representative sample of traditional Medicare beneficiaries from nonrural counties who experienced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between January 1, 2009, and October 2, 2011, and for whom ALS or BLS ambulance services were billed to Medicare (31 292 ALS cases and 1643 BLS cases). Propensity score methods were used to compare the effects of ALS and BLS on patient survival, neurological performance, and medical spending after cardiac arrest. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Survival to hospital discharge, to 30 days, and to 90 days; neurological performance; and incremental medical spending per additional survivor to 1 year. RESULTS Survival to hospital discharge was greater among patients receiving BLS (13.1% vs 9.2% for ALS; 4.0 [95% CI, 2.3–5.7] percentage point difference), as was survival to 90 days (8.0% vs 5.4% for ALS; 2.6 [95% CI, 1.2–4.0] percentage point difference). Basic life support was associated with better neurological functioning among hospitalized patients (21.8% vs 44.8% with poor neurological functioning for ALS; 23.0 [95% CI, 18.6–27.4] percentage point difference). Incremental medical spending per additional survivor to 1 year for BLS relative to ALS was $154 333. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who received BLS had higher survival at hospital discharge and at 90 days compared with those who received ALS and were less likely to experience poor neurological functioning. PMID:25419698

  13. Sudden cardiac arrest as a presentation of Brugada syndrome unmasked by thyroid storm.

    PubMed

    Korte, Anna K M; Derde, Lennie; van Wijk, Jeroen; Tjan, David H

    2015-01-01

    An 18-year-old man suffered a sudden cardiac arrest with ventricular fibrillation and was successfully resuscitated. He had neither a medical nor family history of cardiac disease/sudden death, but was known to have Graves' disease, for which he was treated with radioactive iodine. Recently, block-and-replacement therapy had been discontinued to evaluate thyroid functioning. On admission, thyroid hormone levels were markedly elevated, suggesting thyroid storm due to residual Graves' disease. The patient was treated with propylthiouracil, hydrocortisone and Lugol solution. ECG showed repolarisation patterns suggestive of an underlying type 1 Brugada syndrome (BS). These findings were confirmed by an additional ajmaline test. An implantable cardioverter defibrillator was implanted to prevent future arrhythmias. The patient underwent total thyroidectomy 9 months later and recovered completely. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a sudden cardiac arrest as a presentation of BS unmasked by thyroid storm. PMID:26718704

  14. Recurrent Syncope and Cardiac Arrest in a Patient with Systemic Light Chain Amyloidosis Treated with Bortezomib.

    PubMed

    Jaipaul, Navin; Pi, Alexander; Zhang, Zhiwei

    2016-05-10

    About 10-15% of patients with multiple myeloma develop light chain (AL) amyloidosis. AL amyloidosis is a systemic disease that may involve multiple organs, often including the heart. It may present clinically with bradyarrhythmia and syncope. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib has been used with clinical efficacy in treating patients with AL amyloidosis but also implicated as a possible cause of cardiomyocyte injury. We report a case of a 48-year-old man with AL amyloidosis and increased frequency of syncope and cardiac arrest after starting bortezomib. The biologic and clinical plausibility of a heightened risk for cardiac arrest in patients with cardiac AL amyloidosis and history of syncope being treated with bortezomib is a possibility that is not well documented in the medical literature and warrants further investigation. PMID:27499835

  15. Recurrent Syncope and Cardiac Arrest in a Patient with Systemic Light Chain Amyloidosis Treated with Bortezomib

    PubMed Central

    Jaipaul, Navin; Pi, Alexander; Zhang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    About 10-15% of patients with multiple myeloma develop light chain (AL) amyloidosis. AL amyloidosis is a systemic disease that may involve multiple organs, often including the heart. It may present clinically with bradyarrhythmia and syncope. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib has been used with clinical efficacy in treating patients with AL amyloidosis but also implicated as a possible cause of cardiomyocyte injury. We report a case of a 48-year-old man with AL amyloidosis and increased frequency of syncope and cardiac arrest after starting bortezomib. The biologic and clinical plausibility of a heightened risk for cardiac arrest in patients with cardiac AL amyloidosis and history of syncope being treated with bortezomib is a possibility that is not well documented in the medical literature and warrants further investigation. PMID:27499835

  16. Cardiac Arrests in Patients Undergoing Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: A Retrospective Analysis of 73,029 Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Goudra, Basavana; Nuzat, Ahmad; Singh, Preet M.; Gouda, Gowri B.; Carlin, Augustus; Manjunath, Amit K.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Airway difficulties leading to cardiac arrest are frequently encountered during propofol sedation in patients undergoing gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. With a noticeable increase in the use of propofol for endoscopic sedation, we decided to examine the incidence and outcome of cardiac arrests in patients undergoing gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy with sedation. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective study, cardiac arrest data obtained from the clinical quality improvement and local registry over 5 years was analyzed. The information of patients who sustained cardiac arrest attributable to sedation was studied in detail. Analysis included comparison of cardiac arrests due to all causes until discharge (or death) versus the cardiac arrests and death occurring during the procedure and in the recovery area. Results: The incidence of cardiac arrest and death (all causes, until discharge) was 6.07 and 4.28 per 10,000 in patients sedated with propofol, compared with non–propofol-based sedation (0.67 and 0.44). The incidence of cardiac arrest during and immediately after the procedure (recovery area) for all endoscopies was 3.92 per 10,000; of which, 72% were airway management related. About 90.0% of all peri-procedural cardiac arrests occurred in patients who received propofol. Conclusions: The incidence of cardiac arrest and death is about 10 times higher in patients receiving propofol-based sedation compared with those receiving midazolam–fentanyl sedation. More than two thirds of these events occur during EGD and ERCP. PMID:26655137

  17. Sudden cardiac arrest during pregnancy: a rare complication of acquired maternal diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, R; Honore, P M; Hosseinpour, N; Nieboer, K; Spapen, H D

    2012-01-01

    Acute cardiac arrest during pregnancy is a rare but devastating event. Major causes are haemorrhagic, septic or anaphylactic shock, trauma, pulmonary or amniotic fluid embolism, and congenital or acquired cardiac disease. We present a case of massive intrathoracic migration of viscera through a left diaphragmatic hernia in a pregnant multipara, causing acute obstructive shock and cardiac arrest. Complications of intrathoracic herniation occur when the intruding viscera cause left lung and cardiac compression or mediastinal "tamponade" with decreased venous return. Intrathoracic strangulation of viscera is also common and may cause ischaemia, gangrene and eventual perforation. Sudden cardiac arrest as first sign of left diaphragmatic rupture during pregnancy, however, has rarely been described. In contrast with our patient, this catastrophic event is mostly seen in nulli- and primipara with a known congenital left diaphragmatic defect. Management of a diaphragmatic hernia depends on the clinical presentation and the period of gestation during which it is detected. Despite prolonged resuscitation with more than 1 hour of chest compressions, our patient recovered completely. PMID:22897068

  18. Massive transfusion and hyperkalaemic cardiac arrest in craniofacial surgery in a child.

    PubMed

    Buntain, S G; Pabari, M

    1999-10-01

    Hyperkalaemia is a recognised complication of massive blood transfusion. We present a case of hyperkalaemic cardiac arrest in a male infant of 12 months, who was undergoing craniofacial surgery for sagittal craniosynostosis. At the time of arrest the patient had received a massive transfusion of predominantly irradiated packed red cells over a two-hour period, and had a measured plasma potassium concentration of 10.1 mmol/l. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was successful after 15 minutes. On the basis of our laboratory data and a review of the available literature, we recommend the use of fresh, non-irradiated packed red cells whenever possible in paediatric surgery. PMID:10520398

  19. [Cardiac arrest following blunt chest injury. Emergency thoracotomy without ifs or buts?].

    PubMed

    Leidel, B A; Kanz, K G; Kirchhoff, C; Bürklein, D; Wismüller, A; Mutschler, W

    2007-10-01

    In German-speaking countries, most serious thoracic injuries are attributable to the impact of blunt force; they are the second most frequent result of injury after head injury in polytrauma patients with multiple injuries. Almost one in every three polytraumatized patients with significant chest injury develops acute lung failure, and one in every four, acute circulatory failure. The acute circulatory arrest following serious chest injury involves a high mortality rate, and in most cases it reflects a tension pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade, or hemorrhagic shock resulting from injury to the heart or one of the large vessels close to it. Brisk drainage of tension pneumothorax and adequate volume restoration are therefore particularly important in resuscitation of multiply traumatized patients, as are rapid resuscitative thoracotomy to allow direct heart massage, drainage of pericardial tamponade, and control of hemorrhage. However the probability of survival described in the literature is very low for patients sustaining severe chest trauma with acute cardiac arrest. The case report presented here describes a female polytrauma patient who suffered an acute cardiac arrest following cardiac tamponade after admission in the emergency department and who survived without neurological deficits after an emergency thoracotomy. Selections from the topical literature can help the treating physician in the emergency department in making decisions on whether an emergency thoracotomy is indicated after a blunt chest injury and on the procedure itself. PMID:17909734

  20. Calmodulin Mutations Associated with Recurrent Cardiac Arrest in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Crotti, Lia; Johnson, Christopher N.; Graf, Elisabeth; De Ferrari, Gaetano M.; Cuneo, Bettina F.; Ovadia, Marc; Papagiannis, John; Feldkamp, Michael D.; Rathi, Subodh G.; Kunic, Jennifer D.; Pedrazzini, Matteo; Wieland, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Clark, Travis; Shaffer, Christian; Benson, D. Woodrow; Kääb, Stefan; Meitinger, Thomas; Strom, Tim M.; Chazin, Walter J.; Schwartz, Peter J.; George, Alfred L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Life-threatening disorders of heart rhythm may arise during infancy and can result in the sudden and tragic death of a child. We performed exome sequencing on two unrelated infants presenting with recurrent cardiac arrest to discover a genetic cause. Methods and Results We ascertained two unrelated infants (probands) with recurrent cardiac arrest and dramatically prolonged QTc interval who were both born to healthy parents. The two parent-child trios were investigated using exome sequencing to search for de novo genetic variants. We then performed follow-up candidate gene screening on an independent cohort of 82 subjects with congenital long-QT syndrome without an identified genetic cause. Biochemical studies were performed to determine the functional consequences of mutations discovered in two genes encoding calmodulin. We discovered three heterozygous de novo mutations in either CALM1 or CALM2, two of the three human genes encoding calmodulin, in the two probands and in two additional subjects with recurrent cardiac arrest. All mutation carriers were infants who exhibited life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias combined variably with epilepsy and delayed neurodevelopment. Mutations altered residues in or adjacent to critical calcium binding loops in the calmodulin carboxyl-terminal domain. Recombinant mutant calmodulins exhibited several fold reductions in calcium binding affinity. Conclusions Human calmodulin mutations disrupt calcium ion binding to the protein and are associated with a life-threatening condition in early infancy. Defects in calmodulin function will disrupt important calcium signaling events in heart affecting membrane ion channels, a plausible molecular mechanism for potentially deadly disturbances in heart rhythm during infancy. PMID:23388215

  1. In-hospital versus out-of-hospital pediatric cardiac arrest: A multicenter cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Moler, Frank W.; Meert, Kathleen; Donaldson, Amy E.; Nadkarni, Vinay; Brilli, Richard J.; Dalton, H.J.; Clark, Robert S. B.; Shaffner, D. H.; Schleien, Charles L.; Statler, Kimberly; Tieves, Kelly S.; Hackbarth, Richard; Pretzlaff, Robert; van der Jagt, Elise W.; Levy, Fiona; Hernan, Lynn; Silverstein, Faye S.; Dean, J Michael

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To describe a large multicenter cohort of pediatric cardiac arrest (CA) with return of circulation (ROC) from either the in-hospital (IH) or out-of-hospital (OH) setting in order to determine if significant differences related to pre-event, arrest event, early post-arrest event characteristics and outcomes exist that would be critical in planning a clinical trial of therapeutic hypothermia (TH). Design Retrospective cohort study Setting Fifteen Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) sites. Patients Patients from 24 hours (h) to 18 years with either IH or OH CA who had a history of at least 1 minute of chest compressions and ROC for at least 20 minutes were eligible. Interventions None Measurements and Main Results A total of 491 patients met study entry criteria with 353 IH cases and 138 OH cases. Major differences between the IH and OH cohorts were observed for patient pre-arrest characteristics; arrest event initial rhythm described; and arrest medication use. Several post-arrest interventions were utilized differently, however, the use of TH was similar (<5%) in both cohorts. During the 0–12 h interval following ROC, OH cases had lower minimum temperature and pH, and higher maximum serum glucose recorded. Mortality was greater in the OH cohort (62% vs. 51%, p=0.04) with the cause attributed to a neurological indication much more frequent in the OH than IH cohort (69% vs. 20%; p < 0.01). Conclusions For pediatric CA with ROC, several major differences exist between IH and OH cohorts. The finding that the etiology of death was attributed to neurological indications much more frequently in OH arrests has important implications for future research. Investigators planning to evaluate the efficacy of new interventions such as TH should be aware that the IH and OH populations differ greatly and require independent clinical trials. PMID:19455024

  2. Incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Rea, Thomas D; Pearce, Rachel M; Raghunathan, Trivellore E; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Jouven, Xavier; Siscovick, David S

    2004-06-15

    Estimates of the incidence of out-of-hospital primary cardiac arrest (CA) have typically relied solely upon emergency medical service or death certificate records and have not investigated incidence in clinical subgroups. Overall and temporal patterns of CA incidence were investigated in clinically defined groups using systematic methods to ascertain CA. Estimates of incidence were derived from a population-based case-control study in a large health plan from 1986 to 1994. Subjects were enrollees aged 50 to 79 years who had had CA (n = 1,275). A stratified random sample of enrollees who had not had CA was used to estimate the population at risk with various clinical characteristics (n = 2,323). Poisson's regression was used to estimate incidence overall and for 3-year time periods (1986 to 1988, 1989 to 1991, and 1992 to 1994). The overall CA incidence was 1.89/1,000 subject-years and varied up to 30-fold across clinical subgroups. For example, incidence was 5.98/1,000 subject-years in subjects with any clinically recognized heart disease compared with 0.82/1,000 subject-years in subjects without heart disease. In subgroups with heart disease, incidence was 13.69/1,000 subject-years in subjects with prior myocardial infarction and 21.87/1,000 subject-years in subjects with heart failure. Risk decreased by 20% from the initial to the final time period, with a greater decrease observed in those with (25%) compared with those without (12%) clinical heart disease. Thus, CA incidence varied considerably across clinical groups. The results provide insights regarding absolute and population-attributable risk in clinically defined subgroups, information that may aid strategies aimed at reducing mortality from CA. PMID:15194012

  3. A young mountaineer surviving sudden cardiac arrest at high altitude

    PubMed Central

    Indermuehle, Andreas; Cook, Stéphan; Marty, Hans

    2010-01-01

    A young mountaineer suffered from sudden cardiac arrest at high altitude. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was initiated immediately. After 30 min a rescue team arrived and successfully defibrillated ventricular fibrillation upon which spontaneous circulation returned. The subsequent ECG was suggestive of extensive anterior myocardial infarction. Therefore, the patient was thrombolysed and transferred for primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Echocardiography revealed severely reduced left ventricular function with antero-septo-apical akinesia. However, angiography showed unobstructed coronary arteries. The patient fully recovered and left ventricular function normalised within 2 weeks. It may be speculated that exposure to high altitude resulted in acute coronary thrombosis which dissolved by rapid thrombolysis. PMID:22778291

  4. Venoarterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Adults With Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jignesh K; Schoenfeld, Elinor; Parnia, Sam; Singer, Adam J; Edelman, Norman

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the use of conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), rates of return of spontaneous circulation and survival with minimal neurologic impairment remain low. Utilization of venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for CA in adults is steadily increasing. Propensity-matched cohort studies have reported outcomes associated with ECMO use to be superior to that of conventional CPR alone in in-hospital patients with CA. In this review, we discuss the mechanism, indications, complications, and evidence for ECMO in CA in adults. PMID:25922385

  5. Cerebral blood flow in humans following resuscitation from cardiac arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Cohan, S.L.; Mun, S.K.; Petite, J.; Correia, J.; Tavelra Da Silva, A.T.; Waldhorn, R.E.

    1989-06-01

    Cerebral blood flow was measured by xenon-133 washout in 13 patients 6-46 hours after being resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Patients regaining consciousness had relatively normal cerebral blood flow before regaining consciousness, but all patients who died without regaining consciousness had increased cerebral blood flow that appeared within 24 hours after resuscitation (except in one patient in whom the first measurement was delayed until 28 hours after resuscitation, by which time cerebral blood flow was increased). The cause of the delayed-onset increase in cerebral blood flow is not known, but the increase may have adverse effects on brain function and may indicate the onset of irreversible brain damage.

  6. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and post-cardiac arrest brain injury].

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    One of the most important topics in the field of resuscitation at present is the drafting of the 2015 version of the Consensus on Science and Treatment Recommendation (CoSTR) by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation. The Japan Resuscitation Council is preparing its 2015 Guideline based on this CoSTR and plans to release it in October 2015. A critical change in the upcoming CoSTR is the adoption of the GRADE system. The new Guideline incorporating the GRADE system will surely be more scientific than the previous Guideline issued in 2010. Meanwhile, an important finding appeared in a report from Nielsen et al.: hypothermia at a targeted temperature of 33 degrees C did not confer a benefit versus 36 degrees in unconscious survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac cause. PMID:26915250

  7. Genetic Deletion of NOS3 Increases Lethal Cardiac Dysfunction Following Mouse Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Beiser, David G.; Orbelyan, Gerasim A.; Inouye, Brendan T.; Costakis, James G.; Hamann, Kimm J.; McNally, Elizabeth M.; Hoek, Terry L. Vanden

    2010-01-01

    Study Aims Cardiac arrest mortality is significantly affected by failure to obtain return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) despite cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Severe myocardial dysfunction and cardiovascular collapse further affects mortality within hours of initial ROSC. Recent work suggests that enhancement of nitric oxide (NO) signaling within minutes of CPR can improve myocardial function and survival. We studied the role of NO signaling on cardiovascular outcomes following cardiac arrest and resuscitation using endothelial NO synthase knockout (NOS3-/-) mice. Methods Adult female wild-type (WT) and NOS3-/- mice were anesthetized, intubated, and instrumented with left-ventricular pressure-volume catheters. Cardiac arrest was induced with intravenous potassium chloride. CPR was performed after 8 min of untreated arrest. ROSC rate, cardiac function, whole-blood nitrosylhemoglobin (HbNO) concentrations, heart NOS3 content and phosphorylation (p-NOS3), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), and phospho-troponin I (p-TnI) were measured. Results Despite equal quality CPR, NOS3-/- mice displayed lower rates of ROSC compared to WT (47.6% [10/21] vs. 82.4% [14/17], p<0.005). Among ROSC animals, NOS3-/- versus WT mice exhibited increased left-ventricular dysfunction and 120 min mortality. Prior to ROSC, myocardial effectors of NO signaling including cGMP and p-TnI were decreased in NOS3-/- vs. WT mice (p<0.05). Following ROSC in WT mice, significant NOS3-dependent increases in circulating HbNO were seen by 120 min. Significant increases in cardiac p-NOS3 occurred between end-arrest and 15 min post-ROSC, while total NOS3 content was increased by 120 min post-ROSC (p<0.05). Conclusions Genetic deletion of NOS3 decreases ROSC rate and worsens post-ROSC left-ventricular function. Poor cardiovascular outcomes are associated with differences in NOS3-dependent myocardial cGMP signaling and circulating NO metabolites. PMID:20951489

  8. Epidemiology and Outcomes from Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children: The ROC Epistry-Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Dianne L.; Everson-Stewart, Siobhan; Sears, Gena K.; Daya, Mohamud; Osmond, Martin H.; Warden, Craig R.; Berg, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Population-based data for pediatric cardiac arrest are scant and largely from urban areas. The Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC) Epistry-Cardiac Arrest is a population-based emergency medical services (EMS) registry of out-of-hospital non-traumatic cardiac arrest (OHCA). This study examined age-stratified incidence and outcomes of pediatric OHCA. We hypothesized that survival to hospital discharge is less frequent from pediatric OHCA than adult OHCA. METHODS AND RESULTS Design Prospective population-based cohort study. Setting Eleven US and Canadian ROC sites. Population Persons <20 years who a) receive CPR or defibrillation by emergency medical services (EMS) providers and/or receive bystander AED shock or b) pulseless but receive no EMS resuscitation between December 2005 and March 2007. Patients were a priori stratified into 3 groups: <1 year (infants, n = 277), 1–11 years (children, n = 154), and 12–19 years (adolescents, n = 193). The incidence of pediatric OHCA was 8.04/100,000 person-years (72.71 in infants, 3.73 in children, and 6.37 in adolescents) versus 126.52 for adults. Survival for all pediatric OHCA was 6.4% (3.3% for infants, 9.1% for children and 8.9% for adolescents) versus 4.5% for adults (P=0.03). Unadjusted odds ratio (95% CI) for pediatric survival to discharge compared with adults was 0.71 (0.37, 1.39) for infants, 2.11 (1.21, 3.66) for children, and 2.04 (1.24, 3.38) for adolescents. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates that the incidence of OHCA in infants approaches that observed in adults but is lower among children and adolescents. Survival to discharge was more common among children and adolescents than infants or adults. PMID:19273724

  9. Effect of electroconvulsive stimulation on morphological and physiological aspects of post-cardiac arrest cerebral microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Sheleg, Sergey; Hixon, Hugh; Aizberg, Oleg R; Korotkevich, Alexander E; Nedzved, Mikhail K

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the effect of electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS) on cerebral circulation in vivo using the method for measuring microcirculation in real time with the photosensitizer dye Photosense and the fiber optic spectrofluorometer LESA-01-BIOSPEC. We have found that electroconvulsive stimulation significantly improved cerebral microcirculation (fourfold higher comparing to the control cerebral perfusion) after 30 min of room-temperature cardiac arrest. Morphologic study of the brain tissue showed the absence of rouleaux formation of erythrocytes ("sludged blood") in the cerebral cortex microcirculation after the application of electrical stimulus. Electroconvulsive stimulation may be useful for improving cerebral microcirculation (blood flow) in cases of long-term brain hypoxia/anoxia after prolonged cardiac arrest. PMID:18586374

  10. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in high-rise buildings: delays to patient care and effect on survival

    PubMed Central

    Drennan, Ian R.; Strum, Ryan P.; Byers, Adam; Buick, Jason E.; Lin, Steve; Cheskes, Sheldon; Hu, Samantha; Morrison, Laurie J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The increasing number of people living in high-rise buildings presents unique challenges to care and may cause delays for 911-initiated first responders (including paramedics and fire department personnel) responding to calls for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We examined the relation between floor of patient contact and survival after cardiac arrest in residential buildings. Methods: We conducted a retrospective observational study using data from the Toronto Regional RescuNet Epistry database for the period January 2007 to December 2012. We included all adult patients (≥ 18 yr) with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of no obvious cause who were treated in private residences. We excluded cardiac arrests witnessed by 911-initiated first responders and those with an obvious cause. We used multivariable logistic regression to determine the effect on survival of the floor of patient contact, with adjustment for standard Utstein variables. Results: During the study period, 7842 cases of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest met the inclusion criteria, of which 5998 (76.5%) occurred below the third floor and 1844 (23.5%) occurred on the third floor or higher. Survival was greater on the lower floors (4.2% v. 2.6%, p = 0.002). Lower adjusted survival to hospital discharge was independently associated with higher floor of patient contact, older age, male sex and longer 911 response time. In an analysis by floor, survival was 0.9% above floor 16 (i.e., below the 1% threshold for futility), and there were no survivors above the 25th floor. Interpretation: In high-rise buildings, the survival rate after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest was lower for patients residing on higher floors. Interventions aimed at shortening response times to treatment of cardiac arrest in high-rise buildings may increase survival. PMID:26783332

  11. Student perceptions of sudden cardiac arrest: a qualitative inquiry.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Annette; Callan, Krista; Egizio, Katelyn; Kenney, Kaye; Gray, Gillian; Mundry, Gillian; Re, Gillian

    Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is the number one cause of death in young athletes in high school and university settings. Survival and outcomes of SCA is dependent on appropriate recognition of symptoms and immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), along with a shock from an automatic external defibrillator (AED). The three aims of the authors' study presented in this article were: to describe university students' perceptions and beliefs about sudden cardiac arrest, to describe university students' understanding of an AED and their level of preparedness to recognize and respond to a life threatening emergency event, and to identify university students' experiences of responding to handling life-threatening emergency events. Qualitative methodology was employed using semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis. Three major themes emerged from data analysis: confusion, uncertainty, and fear/uncomfortableness. These themes characterised participant's perceptions about SCA. The authors concluded that a lack of understanding of what SCA is and participants' inability to respond to an emergency event was evident. PMID:22585265

  12. Electrophysiological Monitoring of Brain Injury and Recovery after Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ruoxian; Xiong, Wei; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Reliable prognostic methods for cerebral functional outcome of post cardiac-arrest (CA) patients are necessary, especially since therapeutic hypothermia (TH) as a standard treatment. Traditional neurophysiological prognostic indicators, such as clinical examination and chemical biomarkers, may result in indecisive outcome predictions and do not directly reflect neuronal activity, though they have remained the mainstay of clinical prognosis. The most recent advances in electrophysiological methods—electroencephalography (EEG) pattern, evoked potential (EP) and cellular electrophysiological measurement—were developed to complement these deficiencies, and will be examined in this review article. EEG pattern (reactivity and continuity) provides real-time and accurate information for early-stage (particularly in the first 24 h) hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury patients with high sensitivity. However, the signal is easily affected by external stimuli, thus the measurements of EP should be combined with EEG background to validate the predicted neurologic functional result. Cellular electrophysiology, such as multi-unit activity (MUA) and local field potentials (LFP), has strong potential for improving prognostication and therapy by offering additional neurophysiologic information to understand the underlying mechanisms of therapeutic methods. Electrophysiology provides reliable and precise prognostication on both global and cellular levels secondary to cerebral injury in cardiac arrest patients treated with TH. PMID:26528970

  13. Cardiac arrest in a 21-year-old man after ingestion of 1,3-DMAA-containing workout supplement.

    PubMed

    Karnatovskaia, Lioudmila V; Leoni, Juan C; Freeman, Michelle L

    2015-01-01

    Dietary supplements containing 1,3-dimethylamylamine (DMAA) have been determined to be illegal by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA); although banned, the products are still widely available for purchase. Adverse effects reported include cardiac arrest, hemorrhagic stroke, and death. Nonetheless, such products remain popular among young people because of advertised claims of exercise performance enhancement and fat burning. We describe a case of a young man who took such a supplement and suffered a cardiac arrest. Notably, the product consumed was not on the FDA list of substances containing DMAA. This case highlights the importance for clinicians to be aware of the potential harm of the DMAA-containing products by maintaining a high index of suspicion in otherwise healthy individuals presenting with cardiac arrest. It is of particular importance to sports medicine physicians who are most involved in education and counseling of patients potentially at risk of taking such products. PMID:24878759

  14. [Drowning versus cardiac ischemia: Cardiac arrest of an 11-year-old boy at a swimming lake].

    PubMed

    Födinger, A; Wöss, C; Semsroth, S; Stadlbauer, K H; Wenzel, V

    2015-11-01

    This report describes a case of sudden cardiac arrest and subsequent attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation of an 11-year-old child on the shores of a swimming lake. Reports of eyewitnesses excluded the obviously suspected diagnosis of a drowning accident. The result of the autopsy was sudden cardiac death due to a congenital coronary anomaly (abnormal left coronary artery, ALCA). Favored by vigorous physical activity, this anomaly can lead to malignant arrhythmias because the ectopic coronary artery with its intramural course through the aortic wall is compressed during every systole. This pathology was not known to the boy or his family; in fact he liked sports but had suffered of a syncope once which was not followed up. Without a strong suspicion it is difficult to diagnose a coronary artery anomaly and it is often missed even in college athletes. Tragically, sudden cardiac arrest may be the first symptom of an undiagnosed abnormal coronary artery. Following syncope or chest pain during exercise with a normal electrocardiogram (ECG) cardiac imaging, such as computed tomography (CT) or angiography should be initiated in order to enable surgical repair of an abnormal coronary artery. PMID:26423258

  15. Hypothermic cardiac arrest: an 11 year review of ED management and outcome.

    PubMed

    Brunette, D D; McVaney, K

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the emergency department (ED) management of hypothermic cardiac arrest and its outcome. The medical records of all patients with hypothermic cardiac arrest treated in the ED from January 1, 1988 to January 31, 1999 were retrospectively reviewed. Data collected included initial body temperature, serum potassium, methods of rewarming, return of perfusing rhythm, and morbidity and mortality. Data were analyzed by descriptive methods. Eleven patients were treated in the ED resuscitation room for hypothermic cardiac arrest. Six patients were found in cardiac arrest in the field, one patient arrested during transport, and four patients arrested after ED arrival. The average initial temperature was 79.1 degrees F (range 69.0 degrees F to 86.7 degrees F). Seven patients received an ED thoracotomy with internal cardiac massage and warm mediastinal irrigation. Four patients had airway management in the ED and then direct transport to the operating room for cardiac bypass rewarming. Three of the seven patients who received an ED thoracotomy subsequently went to intraoperative cardiac bypass rewarming. Five of the seven (71.4%) patients who received an ED thoracotomy survived, versus none of the four patients (0%) who went directly to intraoperative cardiac bypass. A direct comparison of immediate ED thoracotomy versus intraoperative cardiac bypass without ED thoracotomy is cautiously made as this was an unmatched and nonrandomized study. Three of the surviving patients underwent intraoperative cardiac bypass rewarming after receiving an ED thoracotomy. In two of these patients a perfusing rhythm had been established after thoracotomy in the ED and before transport to the operating room for cardiac bypass. Only one of seven (14.3%) patients who arrested prehospital survived versus four of four (100%) who arrested in the ED. ED thoracotomy with internal cardiac massage and mediastinal irrigation rewarming is effective in the management

  16. The science of reperfusion injury post cardiac arrest--Implications for emergency nurses.

    PubMed

    Baker, Edward; Lee, Geraldine

    2016-01-01

    Survival following cardiac arrest in the developed world remains below 10%. In those who survive the initial cardiac arrest, prognosis remains poor due to the onset of multi-organ failure with both significant cardiac and neurological dysfunction. Nurses have demonstrated good understanding of cardiac arrest/post arrest guidelines and have good technical skills but deficits remain in their understanding of pathophysiological processes involved in post cardiac arrest syndromes. This article aims to provide an overview of these pathophysiological processes involved in the post cardiac arrest phase, potential treatment options and the nursing interventions that may be required within the emergency department setting. This article will focus emergency nurses to become more involved in patient management at this critical phase of treatment and highlight potential early signs of deterioration. Although return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) is crucial in the process of recovery from cardiac arrest, it is only the first of many complex stages. Given the complexity of post cardiac arrest syndrome and its impact on the patient, healthcare professionals need to understand the cellular changes associated with reperfusion injuries in order to improve outcomes. It is only through effective nursing care and medical management that improved outcomes will become more common in the future. PMID:26385262

  17. Neuropsychological, Academic, and Adaptive Functioning in Children Who Survive In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Resuscitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Robin D.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This study of 25 children, ages 2-15, who survived a cardiac arrest while hospitalized, found that a majority of subjects exhibited low-average to deficient levels of performance on neuropsychologic, achievement, and adaptive behavior measures. Duration of cardiac arrest and a medical risk score were significantly correlated with decreased…

  18. How Cool It Is: Targeted Temperature Management for Brain Protection Post-Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Rabinstein, Alejandro A

    2016-02-01

    Neurological recovery often determines outcome in patients resuscitated after cardiac arrest. Temperature control as a neuroprotective strategy has become standard of care. The first randomized trials showing improved neurological outcomes in patients treated with hypothermia with a target temperature of 33°C over a decade ago led to the inclusion of this intervention in practice guidelines and the broad adoption of hypothermia protocols across the world. More recently, large randomized trials showed no difference from targeting a temperature of 33 or 36°C and no benefit from pre-hospital induction of hypothermia. Temperature control remains a crucial part of post-cardiac arrest care. However, the optimal temperature target, timing of induction, duration of temperature control, and speed of rewarming are unclear. Similarly, the value of targeted temperature management in cases of in-hospital arrest and non-shockable rhythms is unknown. This article reviews the neuroprotective mechanisms of hypothermia, the evidence supporting targeted temperature management after cardiac resuscitation, areas of persistent uncertainty and controversy, and future research directions. PMID:26820272

  19. Simultaneous measurement of cerebral and muscle tissue parameters during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosrati, Reyhaneh; Ramadeen, Andrew; Hu, Xudong; Woldemichael, Ermias; Kim, Siwook; Dorian, Paul; Toronov, Vladislav

    2015-03-01

    In this series of animal experiments on resuscitation after cardiac arrest we had a unique opportunity to measure hyperspectral near-infrared spectroscopy (hNIRS) parameters directly on the brain dura, or on the brain through the intact pig skull, and simultaneously the muscle hNIRS parameters. Simultaneously the arterial blood pressure and carotid and femoral blood flow were recorded in real time using invasive sensors. We used a novel hyperspectral signalprocessing algorithm to extract time-dependent concentrations of water, hemoglobin, and redox state of cytochrome c oxidase during cardiac arrest and resuscitation. In addition in order to assess the validity of the non-invasive brain measurements the obtained results from the open brain was compared to the results acquired through the skull. The comparison of hNIRS data acquired on brain surface and through the adult pig skull shows that in both cases the hemoglobin and the redox state cytochrome c oxidase changed in similar ways in similar situations and in agreement with blood pressure and flow changes. The comparison of simultaneously measured brain and muscle changes showed expected differences. Overall the results show feasibility of transcranial hNIRS measurements cerebral parameters including the redox state of cytochrome oxidase in human cardiac arrest patients.

  20. Improving neurological outcome after cardiac arrest: Therapeutic hypothermia the best treatment

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Suchitra; Dhama, Satyavir S.; Kumar, Mohinder; Jain, Gaurav

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrest, irrespective of its etiology, has a high mortality. This event is often associated with brain anoxia which frequently causes severe neurological damage and persistent vegetative state. Only one out of every six patients survives to discharge following in-hospital cardiac arrest, whereas only 2-9% of patients who experience out of hospital cardiac arrest survive to go home. Functional outcomes of survival are variable, but poor quality survival is common, with only 3-7% able to return to their previous level of functioning. Therapeutic hypothermia is an important tool for the treatment of post-anoxic coma after cardiopulmonary resuscitation. It has been shown to reduce mortality and has improved neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest. Nevertheless, hypothermia is underused in critical care units. This manuscript aims to review the mechanism of hypothermia in cardiac arrest survivors and to propose a simple protocol, feasible to be implemented in any critical care unit. PMID:25885714

  1. Post-resuscitation care following out-of-hospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Girotra, Saket; Chan, Paul S; Bradley, Steven M

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in developed countries. Although a majority of cardiac arrest patients die during the acute event, a substantial proportion of cardiac arrest deaths occur in patients following successful resuscitation and can be attributed to the development of post-cardiac arrest syndrome. There is growing recognition that integrated post-resuscitation care, which encompasses targeted temperature management (TTM), early coronary angiography and comprehensive critical care, can improve patient outcomes. TTM has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome in patients who remain comatose especially following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to ventricular arrhythmias. Early coronary angiography and revascularisation if needed may also be beneficial during the post-resuscitation phase, based on data from observational studies. In addition, resuscitated patients usually require intensive care, which includes mechanical ventilator, haemodynamic support and close monitoring of blood gases, glucose, electrolytes, seizures and other disease-specific intervention. Efforts should be taken to avoid premature withdrawal of life-supporting treatment, especially in patients treated with TTM. Given that resources and personnel needed to provide high-quality post-resuscitation care may not exist at all hospitals, professional societies have recommended regionalisation of post-resuscitation care in specialised 'cardiac arrest centres' as a strategy to improve cardiac arrest outcomes. Finally, evidence for post-resuscitation care following in-hospital cardiac arrest is largely extrapolated from studies in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Future studies need to examine the effectiveness of different post-resuscitation strategies, such as TTM, in patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest. PMID:26385451

  2. Standardized EEG interpretation accurately predicts prognosis after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, Andrea O.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Wesenberg Kjaer, Troels; Horn, Janneke; Ullén, Susann; Friberg, Hans; Nielsen, Niklas; Rosén, Ingmar; Åneman, Anders; Erlinge, David; Gasche, Yvan; Hassager, Christian; Hovdenes, Jan; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Kuiper, Michael; Pellis, Tommaso; Stammet, Pascal; Wanscher, Michael; Wetterslev, Jørn; Wise, Matt P.; Cronberg, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify reliable predictors of outcome in comatose patients after cardiac arrest using a single routine EEG and standardized interpretation according to the terminology proposed by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society. Methods: In this cohort study, 4 EEG specialists, blinded to outcome, evaluated prospectively recorded EEGs in the Target Temperature Management trial (TTM trial) that randomized patients to 33°C vs 36°C. Routine EEG was performed in patients still comatose after rewarming. EEGs were classified into highly malignant (suppression, suppression with periodic discharges, burst-suppression), malignant (periodic or rhythmic patterns, pathological or nonreactive background), and benign EEG (absence of malignant features). Poor outcome was defined as best Cerebral Performance Category score 3–5 until 180 days. Results: Eight TTM sites randomized 202 patients. EEGs were recorded in 103 patients at a median 77 hours after cardiac arrest; 37% had a highly malignant EEG and all had a poor outcome (specificity 100%, sensitivity 50%). Any malignant EEG feature had a low specificity to predict poor prognosis (48%) but if 2 malignant EEG features were present specificity increased to 96% (p < 0.001). Specificity and sensitivity were not significantly affected by targeted temperature or sedation. A benign EEG was found in 1% of the patients with a poor outcome. Conclusions: Highly malignant EEG after rewarming reliably predicted poor outcome in half of patients without false predictions. An isolated finding of a single malignant feature did not predict poor outcome whereas a benign EEG was highly predictive of a good outcome. PMID:26865516

  3. Successful use of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest due to amitriptyline and venlafaxine intoxication.

    PubMed

    Kontio, Terhi; Salo, Ari; Kantola, Teemu; Toivonen, Lauri; Skrifvars, Markus B

    2015-06-01

    The prognosis of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) due to intoxication is dismal. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are widely used in the treatment of depression, but possess significant cardiotoxicity, and are one of the most common medications used in suicide attempts worldwide. TCA poisoning can cause hypotension, seizures, and cardiac conduction disturbances, which can lead to life-threatening arrhythmia. Current guidelines recommend mild therapeutic hypothermia (TH) for unconscious survivors of OHCA, but hypothermia treatment itself can cause disturbances in cardiac conduction, which could aggravate the effect of TCAs on cardiac conduction. We report the successful use of TH in a 19-year-old woman who was resuscitated from ventricular tachycardia after intentional ingestion of amitriptyline and venlafaxine, a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor. The cardiac arrest was witnessed, but no bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was performed. The initial rhythm was ventricular tachycardia with no detectable pulse. Three defibrillations, magnesium sulfate, and sodium bicarbonate were given and her trachea was intubated, after which return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was achieved in 26 minutes. After ROSC, she had seizures and was sedated with propofol. Out-of-hospital TH was initiated with 1500 mL of cold Ringer's acetate. An infusion of norepinephrine was initiated for low blood pressure. On arrival at the university hospital, she was unconscious and had dilated pupils. She was tachycardic with a body temperature of 33.5°C. She was transferred to the intensive care unit and TH was maintained with invasive cooling. During the TH treatment, she did not experience any serious cardiac arrhythmia, transthoracic echocardiogram was normal, and the electrocardiogram (ECG) returned to normal. The patient was extubated 45 hours after the cardiac arrest. After the extubation, she was alert and cooperative, but slightly delusional. She was

  4. Variation in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation and Transport Practices in the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium: ROC Epistry–Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Zive, Dana; Koprowicz, Kent; Schmidt, Terri; Stiell, Ian; Sears, Gena; Van Ottingham, Lois; Idris, Ahamed; Stephens, Shannon; Daya, Mohamud

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To identify variation in patient, event, and scene characteristics of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA) patients assessed by emergency medical services (EMS), and to investigate variation in transport practices in relation to documented prehospital return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) within eight regional clinical centers participating in the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC) Epistry–Cardiac Arrest. Methods OOHCA patient, event, and scene characteristics were compared to identify variation in treatment and transport practices across sites. Findings were adjusted for site and standard Utstein covariates. Using logistic regression, these covariates were modeled to identify factors related to the initiation of transport without documented prehospital ROSC as well as survival in these patients. Setting: Eight US and Canadian sites participating in the ROC Epistry–Cardiac Arrest. Population: Persons ≥ 20 years with OOHCA who a) received compressions or shock by EMS providers and/or received bystander AED shock or b) were pulseless but received no EMS compressions or shock between December 2005 and May 2007. Results 23,233 OOHCA cases were assessed by EMS in the defined period. Resuscitation (treatment) was initiated by EMS in 13,518 cases (58%, site range: 36-69%, p<0.0001). Of treated cases, 59% were transported (site range: 49-88%, p<0.0001). Transport was initiated in the absence of documented ROSC for 58% of transported cases (site range: 14-95%, p<0.0001). Of these transported cases, 8% achieved ROSC before hospital arrival (site range: 5-21%, p<0.0001) and 4% survived to hospital discharge (site range: 1-21%, p<0.0001). In cases with transport from the scene initiated after documented ROSC, 28% survived to hospital discharge (site range: 18-44%, p<0.0001). Conclusion Initiation of resuscitation and transport of OOHCA and the reporting of ROSC prior to transport markedly varies among ROC sites. This variation may help clarify

  5. Care for Cardiac Arrest on Golf Courses: Still Not up to Par?

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Leisa; Paternoster, Ryan; Putman, Kevin; Fales, William; Swor, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction. Early CPR and use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) have been shown to improve cardiac arrest (CA) outcomes. Placement of AEDs on golf courses has been advocated for more than a decade, with many trade golf publications calling for their use. Objective. To describe the incidence and treatment of CAs at Michigan golf courses and assess the response readiness of their staff. Methods. We performed a retrospective study of CA on Michigan golf courses from 2010 to 2012. Cases were identified from the Michigan EMS Information (MI-EMSIS) database. Cases with "golf" or "country club" were manually reviewed and location type was confirmed using Google Maps. We conducted a structured telephone survey capturing demographics, course preparedness, including CPR training and AED placement, and a description of events, including whether CPR was performed and if an AED was used. Our primary area of interest was the process of care. We also recorded return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) as an outcome measure. EMS Utstein data were collected from MI-EMSIS. Descriptive data are presented. Results. During the study period, there were 14,666 CAs, of which 40 (0.18%) occurred on 39 golf courses (1 arrest/64 courses/year). Of these, 38 occurred between May and October, yielding a rate of 1 arrest/33.5 courses/golf season. Almost all (96.2%) patients were male, mean age 66.3 (range 45-85), 68% had VT/VF, and 7 arrested after EMS arrival. Mean interval from 9-1-1 call to EMS arrival at the patient was 9:45 minutes (range 3-20). Of all cases, 24 (72.3%) patients received CPR with 2 patients having CPR performed by course staff. Although AEDs were available at 9 (22.5%) courses, they were only placed on 2 patients prior to EMS arrival. Sustained ROSC was obtained in 12 (30.0%) patients. Only 7, (17.9%) courses required CPR/AED training of staff. Conclusion. When seasonally adjusted, the rate of cardiac arrest on Michigan golf courses is similar to that of

  6. Code Blue on Orbit: Treating Cardiac Arrest on the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacal, Kira; Redmond, Melissa

    2004-01-01

    As a result of the Columbia tragedy on February 1,2003, the International Space Station (ISS) crew size has been temporarily reduced from three to two. This change forces adaptations in many operational procedures used by the crew, including medical protocols which were designed for scenarios involving one casualty and two caregivers. The Office of Space Medicine directed that the procedure for the resuscitation of a crewmember in cardiac arrest be rewritten for use by a single care provider. Methods: Adaptation of this procedure made use of current American Heart Association Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) procedures and reflects necessary compromises between the realities of the operational environment and prompt provision of medical care. Results: Numerous changes were incorporated due to the diminution in available personnel, including substitution of endotracheal rather than intravenous delivery of drugs, more rapid defibrillation, addition of a precordial thump, removal of transcutaneous pacing, streamlining of procedural steps, and clarification of termination criteria. Discussion: The on-orbit care available to the ISS crewmembers is constrained by numerous factors, including crew medical training, minimal medical assets, limited air/ground communication , and a single caregiver for the foreseeable future. All of these combine to make a successful resuscitation unlikely, however, this procedure must ultimately deal with not only the patient's welfare, but also that of the caregiver, the mission, and the program.

  7. Cardiac Arrest during Hospitalization for Delivery in the United States, 1998–2011

    PubMed Central

    Mhyre, Jill M.; Tsen, Lawrence C.; Einav, Sharon; Kuklina, Elena V.; Leffert, Lisa R.; Bateman, Brian T.

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the frequency, distribution of potential etiologies, and survival rates of maternal cardiopulmonary arrest during the hospitalization for delivery in the United States. Methods By using data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample during the years 1998 through 2011, the authors obtained weighted estimates of the number of U.S. hospitalizations for delivery complicated by maternal cardiac arrest. Clinical and demographic risk factors, potential etiologies, and outcomes were identified and compared in women with and without cardiac arrest. The authors tested for temporal trends in the occurrence and survival associated with maternal arrest. Results Cardiac arrest complicated 1 in 12,000 or 8.5 per 100,000 hospitalizations for delivery (99% CI, 7.7 to 9.3 per 100,000). The most common potential etiologies of arrest included hemorrhage, heart failure, amniotic fluid embolism, and sepsis. Among patients with cardiac arrest, 58.9% of patients (99% CI, 54.8 to 63.0%) survived to hospital discharge. Conclusions Approximately 1 in 12,000 hospitalizations for delivery is complicated by cardiac arrest, most frequently due to hemorrhage, heart failure, amniotic fluid embolism, or sepsis. Survival depends on the underlying etiology of arrest. PMID:24694844

  8. Survival to admission after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Seoul, South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Hue; Uhm, Tai-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) data derived according to the Utstein Style guidelines was used to try to determine factors influencing survival to admission (STA) and epidemiological rates of OHCA. Patients and methods This was an observational study of all age groups based on data from prehospital care reports in Seoul, South Korea. The collected data were reported according to the Utstein Style template for OHCA and analyzed in order to compare STA with non-STA. Univariate analysis was conducted using a binomial logistic regression model to identify predictors associated with trauma patients. Results Eighty-three (4.8%) OHCA survivors were admitted to the emergency department with carotid pulse. The median time from arrest to emergency medical personnel defibrillation was statistically significantly shorter in STA cases (8.0 minutes) than in non-STA cases (12.0 minutes; P<0.001). Factors independently associated with better prognosis in terms of trauma patients were female sex (odds ratio [OR]: 0.67; 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.50–0.91; P=0.01), arrest at home (OR: 0.36; 95% CI: 0.27–0.49; P<0.001), and witnessed arrest (OR: 2.64; 95% CI: 1.94–3.39; P<0.001). Conclusion Early basic life support, performed by either a layperson or emergency medical personnel, had a positive effect on STA. Male sex, arrest outside of the home, and witnessed arrest are significantly associated with trauma. PMID:27147881

  9. Year in review 2010: Critical Care--Cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Jeffery C; Eastman, Alexander L; Pepe, Paul E

    2011-01-01

    This review will summarize some of the data published in 2010 and focus on papers published in Critical Care in regard to cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. In particular, we discuss the latest research in therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest, including methods of inducing hypothermia, potential protective mechanisms, spontaneous hypothermia versus therapeutic hypothermia, and several predictors of outcome. Furthermore, we will discuss the effects of bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in patients with physician-assisted advanced cardiac life support, the role of hypercapnea in near-death experiences during cardiac arrest, markers of endothelial injury and endothelial repair after CPR, and the prognostic value of cell-free plasma DNA as a marker of poor outcome after cardiac arrest. PMID:22146697

  10. Plasma thioredoxin levels during post-cardiac arrest syndrome: relationship with severity and outcome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Despite experimental evidence, clinical demonstration of acute state of oxidative stress and inflammation during post-cardiac arrest syndrome is lacking. Plasma level of thioredoxin (TRX), a redox-active protein induced under conditions of oxidative stress and inflammation, is increased in various critical care conditions. We determined plasma TRX concentrations after cardiac arrest and assessed relationships with severity and outcome. Methods Retrospective study of consecutive patients admitted to a single academic intensive care unit (ICU) for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (between July 2006 and March 2008). Plasma levels of TRX were measured at admission, day (D) 1, 2 and 3. Results Of 176 patients included, median TRX values measured in ICU survivors and non-survivors were, respectively: 22 ng/mL (7.8 to 77) vs. 72.4 (21.9 to 117.9) at admission (P < 0.001); 5.9 (3.5 to 25.5) vs. 23.2 (5.8 to 81.4) at D1 (P = 0.003); 10.8 (3.6 to 50.8) vs. 11.7 (4.5 to 66.4) at D2 (P = 0.22); and 16.7 (5.3 to 68.3) vs. 17 (4.3 to 62.9) at D3 (P = 0.96). Patients dying within 24 hours had significantly (P < 0.001) higher TRX levels (118.6 ng/mL (94.8 to 280)) than those who died after 24 hours or survived (50.8 (13.9 to 95.7) and 22 (7.8 to 77)). The area under the ROC curve to predict early death was 0.84 (0.76 to 0.91). TRX levels on admission were significantly correlated with 'low-flow' duration (P = 0.003), sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score (P < 0.001), and blood lactate concentration (P < 0.001), but not with 'no-flow' duration or simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II score. TRX levels and admission arterial pO2 correlated negatively (r = -0.17, P = 0.03). Finally, cardiac arrest with cardiac etiology exhibited lower levels of TRX than in cases of extra-cardiac cause (46 ng/mL (11 to 104) vs. 68 (42 to 137), P = 0.01). Conclusions Our data show for the first time that TRX levels were elevated early following cardiac arrest, suggestive of

  11. Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest and return of spontaneous circulation: it's complicated.

    PubMed

    Beseda, Ryan; Smith, Susan; Veenstra, Amy

    2014-12-01

    Providing evidence-based care to patients with return of spontaneous circulation after a cardiac arrest is a recent complex innovation. Once resuscitated patients must be assessed for appropriateness for therapeutic hypothermia, be cooled in a timely manner, maintained while hypothermic, rewarmed within a specified time frame, and then assessed for whether hypothermia was successful for the patient through neuroprognostication. Nurses caring for therapeutic hypothermia patients must be knowledgeable and prepared to provide care to the patient and family. This article provides an overview of the complexity of therapeutic hypothermia for patients with return of spontaneous circulation in the form of a case study. PMID:25438893

  12. Study regarding the survival of patients suffering a traumatic cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Georgescu, V; Tudorache, O; Nicolau, M; Strambu, V

    2015-01-01

    Severe trauma is the most frequent cause of death in young people, in civilized countries with major social and vital costs. The speed of diagnostic decision making and the precocity of treatment approaches are both essential and depend on the specialists’ colaboration. The present study aims to emphasize the actual situation of medical interventions in case of cardiorespiratory arrest due to trauma. 1387 patients who suffered a cardio respiratory arrest both traumatic and non-traumatic were included in order to point out the place of traumatic arrest. Resuscitation of such patients is considered useless and resource consumer by many trauma practitioners who are reporting survival rates of 0%-3.5%. As the determinant of lesions, trauma etiology was as it follows car accidents – 43%, high falls – 30%, suicidal attempts – 3%, domestic violence – 3%, other causes – 21%. Hypovolemia remains the major cause of cardiac arrest and death and that is why the efforts of emergency providers (trauma team) must be oriented towards “hidden death” in order to avoid it. This condition could be revealed and solved easier with minimal diagnostic and therapeutic maneuvers in the emergency department. PMID:26366226

  13. Use of Sodium Bicarbonate in Cardiac Arrest: Current Guidelines and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vassilios; Pierrakos, Charalampos; Koniari, Ioanna; Apostolopoulou, Christina; Karanikolas, Menelaos

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the review was to summarize the literature over the last 25 years regarding bicarbonate administration in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. A PubMed search was conducted using the terms "bicarbonates" and "cardiac arrest", limited to human studies and reviews published in English (or at least with a meaningful abstract in English) in the last 25 years. Clinical and experimental data raised questions regarding the safety and effectiveness of sodium bicarbonate (SB) administration during cardiac arrest. Earlier advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) guidelines recommended routine bicarbonate administration as part of the ACLS algorithm, but recent guidelines no longer recommend its use. The debate in the literature is ongoing, but at the present time, SB administration is only recommended for cardiac arrest related to hypokalemia or overdose of tricyclic antidepressants. Several studies challenge the assumption that bicarbonate administration is beneficial for treatment of acidosis in cardiac arrest. At the present time, there is a trend against using bicarbonates in cardiac arrest, and this trend is supported by guidelines published by professional societies and organizations. PMID:26985247

  14. Survival of 1476 patients initially resuscitated from out of hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed Central

    Cobbe, S. M.; Dalziel, K.; Ford, I.; Marsden, A. K.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine the short and long term outcome of patients admitted to hospital after initially successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest out of hospital. DESIGN--Review of ambulance and hospital records. Follow up of mortality by "flagging" with the registrar general. Cox proportional hazards analysis of predictors of mortality in patients discharged alive from hospital. SETTING--Scottish Ambulance Service and acute hospitals throughout Scotland. SUBJECTS--1476 patients admitted to a hospital ward, of whom 680 (46%) were discharged alive. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Survival to hospital discharge, neurological status at discharge, time to death, and cause of death after discharge. RESULTS--The median duration of hospital stay was 10 days (interquartile range 8-15) in patients discharged alive and 1 (1-4) day in those dying in hospital. Neurological status at discharge in survivors was normal or mildly impaired in 605 (89%), moderately impaired in 58 (8.5%), and severely impaired in 13 (2%); one patient was comatose. Direct discharge to home occurred in 622 (91%) cases. The 680 discharged survivors were followed up for a median of 25 (range 0-68) months. There were 176 deaths, of which 81 were sudden cardiac deaths, 55 were non-sudden cardiac deaths, and 40 were due to other causes. The product limit estimate of 4 year survival after discharge was 68%. The independent predictors of mortality on follow up were increased age, treatment for heart failure, and cardiac arrest not due to definite myocardial infarction. CONCLUSION--About 40% of initial survivors of resuscitation out of hospital are discharged home without major neurological disability. Patients at high risk of subsequent cardiac death can be identified and may benefit from further cardiological evaluation. PMID:8664715

  15. Clinical review: Beyond immediate survival from resuscitation – long-term outcome considerations after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Arawwawala, Dilshan; Brett, Stephen J

    2007-01-01

    A substantial body of literature concerning resuscitation from cardiac arrest now exists. However, not surprisingly, the greater part concerns the cardiac arrest event itself and optimising survival and outcome at relatively proximal time points. The aim of this review is to present the evidence base for interventions and therapeutic strategies that might be offered to patients surviving the immediate aftermath of a cardiac arrest, excluding components of resuscitation itself that may lead to benefits in long-term survival. In addition, this paper reviews the data on long-term impact, physical and neuropsychological, on patients and their families, revealing a burden that is often underestimated and underappreciated. As greater numbers of patients survive cardiac arrest, outcome measures more sophisticated than simple survival are required. PMID:18177512

  16. Effect of a pharmacologically induced decrease in core temperature in rats resuscitated from cardiac arrest

    EPA Science Inventory

    Targeted temperature management is recommended to reduce brain damage after resuscitation from cardiac arrest in humans although the optimal target temperature remains controversial. 1 4 The American Heart Association (AHA) and the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation...

  17. Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Patients with Preserved Left Ventricular Systolic Function: A Clinical Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, Navinder; Narayan, Sanjiv M.

    2009-01-01

    Stratifying the risk for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in individuals with preserved systolic function remains a pressing public health problem. Current guidelines for the implantation of cardiac defibrillators largely ignore patients with preserved systolic function, even though they account for the majority of cases. However, risk stratification for such individuals is increasingly feasible. Notably, most individuals who experience SCA have structural heart disease, even if undiagnosed. Thus, clinical risk scores have been developed to identify high risk. Moreover, there are now promising data that T-Wave Alternans (TWA), alone and in combination with other indices, effectively predicts SCA in this population. This article presents our current understanding of SCA due to ventricular arrhythmias in patients with preserved LV systolic function, and attempts to build a framework to predict risk in this population. PMID:19251226

  18. Use of Sodium Bicarbonate in Cardiac Arrest: Current Guidelines and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vassilios; Pierrakos, Charalampos; Koniari, Ioanna; Apostolopoulou, Christina; Karanikolas, Menelaos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the review was to summarize the literature over the last 25 years regarding bicarbonate administration in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. A PubMed search was conducted using the terms “bicarbonates” and “cardiac arrest”, limited to human studies and reviews published in English (or at least with a meaningful abstract in English) in the last 25 years. Clinical and experimental data raised questions regarding the safety and effectiveness of sodium bicarbonate (SB) administration during cardiac arrest. Earlier advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) guidelines recommended routine bicarbonate administration as part of the ACLS algorithm, but recent guidelines no longer recommend its use. The debate in the literature is ongoing, but at the present time, SB administration is only recommended for cardiac arrest related to hypokalemia or overdose of tricyclic antidepressants. Several studies challenge the assumption that bicarbonate administration is beneficial for treatment of acidosis in cardiac arrest. At the present time, there is a trend against using bicarbonates in cardiac arrest, and this trend is supported by guidelines published by professional societies and organizations. PMID:26985247

  19. Late Gadolinium Enhancement Among Survivors of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Neilan, Tomas G.; Farhad, Hoshang; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Shah, Ravi V.; Dodson, John A.; Abbasi, Siddique A.; Danik, Stephan B.; Verdini, Daniel J.; Tokuda, Michifumi; Tedrow, Usha B.; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Hoffmann, Udo; Ghoshhajra, Brian B.; Stevenson, William G.; Kwong, Raymond Y.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to describe the role of contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in the workup of patients with aborted sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and in the prediction of long-term outcomes. BACKGROUND Myocardial fibrosis is a key substrate for SCA, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) on a CMR study is a robust technique for imaging of myocardial fibrosis. METHODS We performed a retrospective review of all survivors of SCA who were referred for CMR studies and performed follow-up for the subsequent occurrence of an adverse event (death and appropriate defibrillator therapy). RESULTS After a workup that included a clinical history, electrocardiogram, echocardiography, and coronary angiogram, 137 patients underwent CMR for workup of aborted SCA (66% male; mean age 56 ± 11 years; left ventricular ejection fraction 43 ± 12%). The presenting arrhythmias were ventricular fibrillation (n = 105 [77%]) and ventricular tachycardia (n = 32 [23%]). Overall, LGE was found in 98 patients (71%), with an average extent of 9.9 ± 5% of the left ventricular myocardium. CMR imaging provided a diagnosis or an arrhythmic substrate in 104 patients (76%), including the presence of an infarct-pattern LGE in 60 patients (44%), noninfarct LGE in 21 (15%), active myocarditis in 14 (10%), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 3 (2%), sarcoidosis in 3, and arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy in 3. In a median follow-up of 29 months (range 18 to 43 months), there were 63 events. In a multivariable analysis, the strongest predictors of recurrent events were the presence of LGE (adjusted hazard ratio: 6.7; 95% CI: 2.38 to 18.85; p < 0.001) and the extent of LGE (hazard ratio: 1.15; 95% CI: 1.11 to 1.19; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Among patients with SCA, CMR with contrast identified LGE in 71% and provided a potential arrhythmic substrate in 76%. In follow-up, both the presence and extent of LGE identified a group at markedly increased risk of future adverse events. PMID

  20. Therapeutic hypothermia impacts leukocyte kinetics after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Dufner, Matthias C.; Andre, Florian; Stiepak, Jan; Zelniker, Thomas; Chorianopoulos, Emmanuel; Preusch, Michael; Katus, Hugo A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients admitted to the hospital after primarily successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are at a very high risk for neurologic deficits and death. Targeted temperature management (TTM) for mild therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve survival compared to standard treatment. Acute cardiovascular events, such as myocardial infarction (MI), are a major cause for cardiac arrest (CA) in patients who undergo CPR. Recent findings have demonstrated the importance and impact of the leukocyte response following acute MI. Methods In this retrospective, single center study we enrolled 169 patients with CA due to non-traumatic causes and primarily successful CPR. A total of 111 subjects (66%) underwent TTM aiming for a target temperature of 32–34 °C. Results Analysis of 30 day follow up showed a significantly improved survival of all patients who received TTM compared to patients without hypothermia (P=0.0001). Furthermore TTM was an independent variable of good neurological outcome after 6 months (P=0.0030). Therapeutic hypothermia was found to be beneficial independent of differences in age and sex between both groups. While a higher rate of pneumonia was observed with TTM, this diagnosis had no additional impact on survival or neurological outcome. The beneficial effect on mortality remained significant in patients with the diagnosis of an acute cardiac event (P=0.0145). Next, we evaluated the kinetics of leukocytes in this group over the course of 7 days after CA. At presentation, patients showed a mean level of 16.5±6.7 of leukocytes per microliter. While this level stayed stable in the group of patients without hypothermia, patients who received TTM showed a significant decline of leukocyte levels resulting in significantly lower numbers of leukocytes on days 3 and 5 after CPR. Interestingly, these differences in leukocyte counts remained beyond the time period of TTM while C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were suppressed only during

  1. Clinical investigation: thyroid function test abnormalities in cardiac arrest associated with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Iltumur, Kenan; Olmez, Gonul; Arıturk, Zuhal; Taskesen, Tuncay; Toprak, Nizamettin

    2005-01-01

    Introduction It is known that thyroid homeostasis is altered during the acute phase of cardiac arrest. However, it is not clear under what conditions, how and for how long these alterations occur. In the present study we examined thyroid function tests (TFTs) in the acute phase of cardiac arrest caused by acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and at the end of the first 2 months after the event. Method Fifty patients with cardiac arrest induced by ACS and 31 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) who did not require cardioversion or cardiopulmonary resuscitation were enrolled in the study, as were 40 healthy volunteers. The patients were divided into three groups based on duration of cardiac arrest (<5 min, 5–10 min and >10 min). Blood samples were collected for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), tri-iodothyronine (T3), free T3, thyroxine (T4), free T4, troponin-I and creatine kinase-MB measurements. The blood samples for TFTs were taken at 72 hours and at 2 months after the acute event in the cardiac arrest and AMI groups, but only once in the control group. Results The T3 and free T3 levels at 72 hours in the cardiac arrest group were significantly lower than in both the AMI and control groups (P < 0.0001). On the other hand, there were no significant differences between T4, free T4 and TSH levels between the three groups (P > 0.05). At the 2-month evaluation, a dramatic improvement was observed in T3 and free T3 levels in the cardiac arrest group (P < 0.0001). In those patients whose cardiac arrest duration was in excess of 10 min, levels of T3, free T3, T4 and TSH were significantly lower than those in patients whose cardiac arrest duration was under 5 min (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.005 and P < 0.05, respectively). Conclusion TFTs are significantly altered in cardiac arrest induced by ACS. Changes in TFTs are even more pronounced in patients with longer periods of resuscitation. The changes in the surviving patients were characterized by euthyroid sick

  2. Electrocardiogram characteristics prior to in-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Attin, Mina; Feld, Gregory; Lemus, Hector; Najarian, Kayvan; Shandilya, Sharad; Wang, Lu; Sabouriazad, Pouya; Lin, Chii-Dean

    2015-06-01

    Survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest (I-HCA) remains < 30 %. There is very limited literature exploring the electrocardiogram changes prior to I-HCA. The purpose of the study was to determine demographics and electrocardiographic predictors prior to I-HCA. A retrospective study was conducted among 39 cardiovascular subjects who had cardiopulmonary resuscitation from I-HCA with initial rhythms of pulseless electrical activity (PEA) and asystole. Demographics including medical history, ejection fraction, laboratory values, and medications were examined. Electrocardiogram (ECG) parameters from telemetry were studied to identify changes in heart rate, QRS duration and morphology, and time of occurrence and location of ST segment changes prior to I-HCA. Increased age was significantly associated with failure to survive to discharge (p < 0.05). Significant change was observed in heart rate including a downtrend of heart rate within 15 min prior to I-HCA (p < 0.05). There was a significant difference in heart rate and QRS duration during the last hour prior to I-HCA compared to the previous hours (p < 0.05). Inferior ECG leads showed the most significant changes in QRS morphology and ST segments prior to I-HCA (p < 0.05). Subjects with an initial rhythm of asystole demonstrated significantly greater ECG changes including QRS morphology and ST segment changes compared to the subjects with initial rhythms of PEA (p < 0.05). Diagnostic ECG trends can be identified prior to I-HCA due to PEA and asystole and can be further utilized for training a predictive machine learning model for I-HCA. PMID:25236259

  3. The Effects of a Rapid Response Team on Decreasing Cardiac Arrest Rates and Improving Outcomes for Cardiac Arrests Outside Critical Care Areas.

    PubMed

    Angel, Melissa; Ghneim, Mira; Song, Juhee; Brocker, Jason; Tipton, Phyllis Hart; Davis, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to determine the effects of a well-functioning rapid response team (RRT) within one facility. A well-functioning RRT was associated with fewer cardiac arrests outside critical care settings and decreased critical care length of stay. PMID:27522841

  4. The costs of a suburban paramedic program in reducing deaths due to cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Urban, N; Bergner, L; Eisenberg, M S

    1981-04-01

    The marginal costs per averted death of a suburban paramedic program are estimated to be approximately $42,000, when program costs are attributed entirely to cardiac arrest cases due to underlying heart disease, and indirect costs attributable to episode-related hospitalization are included, It is suggested that at $42,000 per cardiac arrest death averted the program is cost-beneficial by two criteria. First, it compares favorably with an estimate obtained from the literature of the value to the average individual of saving the life of a myocardial infarction patient. Second, the people of King County passed a cost-commensurate Paramedic Program Property Tax Levy in 1979, revealing their willingness to support the program. Results of the study should be generalized in accordance with the facts that in King County 1) the population density averages approximately 1,300 per square mile; 2) a basic emergency medical system ensures a 4-minute average response time to initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation; 3) a citizen-training program in cardiopulmonary resuscitation further reduces average time to initiation of basic life support; and 4) the paramedic program is designed to ensure a 10-minute average time to definitive care. PMID:6785539

  5. Biallelic PPA2 Mutations Cause Sudden Unexpected Cardiac Arrest in Infancy.

    PubMed

    Guimier, Anne; Gordon, Christopher T; Godard, François; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Oufadem, Myriam; Vasnier, Christelle; Rambaud, Caroline; Nitschke, Patrick; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Masson, Cécile; Dauger, Stéphane; Longman, Cheryl; Laing, Nigel G; Kugener, Béatrice; Bonnet, Damien; Bouvagnet, Patrice; Di Filippo, Sylvie; Probst, Vincent; Redon, Richard; Charron, Philippe; Rötig, Agnès; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Dautant, Alain; de Pontual, Loïc; di Rago, Jean-Paul; Delahodde, Agnès; Amiel, Jeanne

    2016-09-01

    Sudden unexpected death in infancy occurs in apparently healthy infants and remains largely unexplained despite thorough investigation. The vast majority of cases are sporadic. Here we report seven individuals from three families affected by sudden and unexpected cardiac arrest between 4 and 20 months of age. Whole-exome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous missense mutations in PPA2 in affected infants of each family. PPA2 encodes the mitochondrial pyrophosphatase, which hydrolyzes inorganic pyrophosphate into two phosphates. This is an essential activity for many biosynthetic reactions and for energy metabolism of the cell. We show that deletion of the orthologous gene in yeast (ppa2Δ) compromises cell viability due to the loss of mitochondria. Expression of wild-type human PPA2, but not PPA2 containing the mutations identified in affected individuals, preserves mitochondrial function in ppa2Δ yeast. Using a regulatable (doxycycline-repressible) gene expression system, we found that the pathogenic PPA2 mutations rapidly inactivate the mitochondrial energy transducing system and prevent the maintenance of a sufficient electrical potential across the inner membrane, which explains the subsequent disappearance of mitochondria from the mutant yeast cells. Altogether these data demonstrate that PPA2 is an essential gene in yeast and that biallelic mutations in PPA2 cause a mitochondrial disease leading to sudden cardiac arrest in infants. PMID:27523598

  6. In-hospital resuscitation: recognising and responding to adults in cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Elizabeth

    2016-08-17

    Survival rates following in-hospital cardiac arrest remain low. The majority of patients who survive a cardiac arrest will be in a monitored environment, have a witnessed cardiac arrest and present with a shockable rhythm, usually ventricular fibrillation. Nurses have a responsibility to preserve safety, which requires the ability to accurately assess patients for signs of deterioration in physical health, and to provide assistance when an emergency arises in practice. Nurses must work within the limits of their competence and be able to establish the urgency of a situation. Nurses in all areas of practice must be able to recognise the signs of cardiac arrest and know the prompt response sequence required to improve the patient's chances of survival. This article focuses on inpatient resuscitation in acute healthcare environments and is aimed at staff who may be the first to respond to an in-hospital cardiac arrest. This does not include specialist units such as neurosurgery, intensive therapy units and cardiac catheterisation laboratories, where medical experts are available and clinical priorities may differ. PMID:27533415

  7. Is It Possible to Maintain Consciousness and Spontaneous Ventilation with Chest Compression in the Early Phase of Cardiac Arrest?

    PubMed Central

    Oksar, Menekse; Turhanoglu, Selim

    2016-01-01

    Chest compression is important in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. However, life support algorithms do not specify when chest compression should be initiated in patients with persistent spontaneous normal breathing in the early phase after cardiac arrest. Here we describe the case of a 69-year-old man who underwent femoral bypass surgery and was extubated at the end of the procedure. After extubation, the patient's breathing pattern and respiratory rate were normal. The patient subsequently developed ventricular fibrillation, evident on two monitors. Because defibrillation was ineffective, chest compression was initiated even though the patient had spontaneous normal breathing and defensive motor reflexes, which were continued throughout resuscitation. He regained consciousness and underwent tracheal extubation without neurological sequelae on postoperative day 1. This case highlights the necessity of chest compression in the early phase of cardiac arrest. PMID:26981288

  8. Number needed to treat = six: therapeutic hypothermia following cardiac arrest – an effective and cheap approach to save lives

    PubMed Central

    Böttiger, Bernd W; Schneider, Andreas; Popp, Erik

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) guidelines stated: Unconscious adult patients with spontaneous circulation after out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest should be cooled to 32 to 34°C for 12 to 24 hours. Patients with cardiac arrest from a non-shockable rhythm, in-hospital patients and children may also benefit from hypothermia. There is no argument to wait. We have to treat the next unconscious cardiac arrest patient with hypothermia. PMID:17850681

  9. Prolonged cardiac arrest complicating a massive ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction associated with marijuana consumption.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Jose; Blaak, Christa; Rajayer, Salil; Gurung, Vikash; Tam, Eric; Morante, Joaquin; Shamian, Ben; Malik, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Recreational substance use and misuse constitute a major public health issue. The annual rate of recreational drug overdose-related deaths is increasing exponentially, making unintentional overdose as the leading cause of injury-related deaths in the United States. Marijuana is the most widely used recreational illicit drug, with approximately 200 million users worldwide. Although it is generally regarded as having low acute toxicity, heavy marijuana usage has been associated with life-threatening consequences. Marijuana is increasingly becoming legal in the United States for both medical and recreational use. Although the most commonly seen adverse effects resulting from its consumption are typically associated with neurobehavioral and gastrointestinal symptoms, cases of severe toxicity involving the cardiovascular system have been reported. In this report, the authors describe a case of cannabis-associated ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction leading to a prolonged cardiac arrest. PMID:27609717

  10. Interdisciplinary ICU Cardiac Arrest Debriefing Improves Survival Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Heather; Zebuhr, Carleen; Topjian, Alexis A.; Nishisaki, Akira; Niles, Dana E.; Meaney, Peter A.; Boyle, Lori; Giordano, Rita T.; Davis, Daniela; Priestley, Margaret; Apkon, Michael; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Sutton, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective In-hospital cardiac arrest is an important public health problem. High-quality resuscitation improves survival but is difficult to achieve. Our objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of a novel, interdisciplinary, postevent quantitative debriefing program to improve survival outcomes after in-hospital pediatric chest compression events. Design, Setting, and Patients Single-center prospective interventional study of children who received chest compressions between December 2008 and June 2012 in the ICU. Interventions Structured, quantitative, audiovisual, interdisciplinary debriefing of chest compression events with front-line providers. Measurements and Main Results Primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge. Secondary outcomes included survival of event (return of spontaneous circulation for ≥ 20 min) and favorable neurologic outcome. Primary resuscitation quality outcome was a composite variable, termed “excellent cardiopulmonary resuscitation,” prospectively defined as a chest compression depth ≥ 38 mm, rate ≥ 100/min, ≤ 10% of chest compressions with leaning, and a chest compression fraction > 90% during a given 30-second epoch. Quantitative data were available only for patients who are 8 years old or older. There were 119 chest compression events (60 control and 59 interventional). The intervention was associated with a trend toward improved survival to hospital discharge on both univariate analysis (52% vs 33%, p = 0.054) and after controlling for confounders (adjusted odds ratio, 2.5; 95% CI, 0.91–6.8; p = 0.075), and it significantly increased survival with favorable neurologic outcome on both univariate (50% vs 29%, p = 0.036) and multivariable analyses (adjusted odds ratio, 2.75; 95% CI, 1.01–7.5; p = 0.047). Cardiopulmonary resuscitation epochs for patients who are 8 years old or older during the debriefing period were 5.6 times more likely to meet targets of excellent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (95% CI, 2.9–10

  11. Impact of advanced cardiac life support‐skilled paramedics on survival from out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest in a statewide emergency medical service

    PubMed Central

    Woodall, John; McCarthy, Molly; Johnston, Trisha; Tippett, Vivienne

    2007-01-01

    Background Prehospital research has found little evidence in support of advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) for out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest. However, these studies generally examine city‐based emergency medical services (EMS) systems. The training and experience of ACLS‐skilled paramedics differs internationally, and this may also contribute to negative findings. Additionally, the frequency of negative outcome in out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest suggests that it is difficult to establish sufficient numbers to detect an effect. Purpose To examine the effect of ACLS on cardiac arrest in Queensland, Australia. Queensland has a population of 3.8 million and an area of over 1.7 million km2, and is served by a statewide EMS system, which deploys resources using a two‐tier model. Advanced treatments such as intubation and cardioactive drug administration are provided by extensively trained intensive care paramedics. Methods An observational, retrospective design was used to examine all cases of cardiac arrest attended by the Queensland Ambulance Service from January 2000 to December 2002. Logistic regression was used to examine the effect of the presence of an intensive care paramedic on survival to hospital discharge, adjusting for age, sex, initial rhythm, the presence of a witness and bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Results The presence of an intensive care paramedic had a significant effect on survival (OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.02 to 1.99). Conclusions Highly trained ACLS‐skilled paramedics provide added survival benefit in EMS systems not optimised for early defibrillation. The reasons for this benefit are multifactorial, but may be the result of greater skill level and more informed use of the full range of prehospital interventions. PMID:17251628

  12. Emergency dispatch process and patient outcome in bystander-witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with a shockable rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Silfvast, Tom O.; Jäntti, T. Helena; Kuisma, Markku J.; Kurola, Jouni O.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the dispatch process for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in bystander-witnessed patients with initial shockable rhythm, and to evaluate whether recognition of OHCA by the emergency medical dispatcher (EMD) has an effect on the outcome. Methods This study was part of the FINNRESUSCI study focusing on the epidemiology and outcome of OHCA in Finland. Witnessed [not by Emergency Medical Service (EMS)] OHCA patients with initial shockable rhythm in the southern and the eastern parts of Finland during a 6-month period from March 1 to August 31 2010, were electronically collected from eight dispatch centres and from paper case reports filled out by EMS crews. Results Of the 164 patients, 82.3% (n=135) were correctly recognized by the EMD as cardiac arrests. The majority of all calls (90.7%) were dispatched within 2 min. Patients were more likely to survive and be discharged from the hospital if the EMS response time was within 8 min (P<0.001). Telephone-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation (T-CPR) was given in 53 cases (32.3%). Overall survival to hospital discharge was 43.4% (n=71). Survival to hospital discharge was 44.4% (n=60) when the EMD recognized OHCA and 37.9% (n=11) when OHCA was not recognized. The difference was not statistically significant (P=0.521). Conclusion The rate of recognition of cardiac arrest by EMD was high, but EMD recognition did not affect the outcome. The survival rate was high in both groups. Recognized cardiac arrest patients received bystander CPR more frequently than those for whom OHCA remained unrecognized. PMID:24809817

  13. Surviving Sudden Cardiac Arrest: A Pilot Qualitative Survey Study of Survivors.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Kelly N; Brown, Frances; Christensen, Roxanne; Damino, Colleen; Newman, Mary M; Kurz, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    Research describing survivors of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) has centered on quantifying functional ability, perceived quality of life, and neurocognitive assessment. Many gaps remain, however, regarding survivors' psychosocial perceptions of life in the aftermath of cardiac arrest. An important influence upon those perceptions is the presence of support and its role in a survivor's life. An Internet-based pilot survey study was conducted to gather data from SCA survivors and friends and/or family members (FFMs) representing their support system. The survey was distributed to members of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation (SCAF) via the Internet by SCAF leadership. Questions included both discrete multiple-choice and open-ended formats. Inductive thematic analyses were completed by three independent researchers trained in qualitative research methodology to identify primary themes consistent among study participants until thematic saturation was achieved. No statistical inferences were made. A total of 205 surveys were returned over the 5-month study period (July to November 2013); nine were received blank, leaving 196 surveys available for review. Major themes identified for survivors (N = 157) include the significance of and desire to share experiences with others; subculture identification (unique experience from those suffering a heart attack); and the need to seek a new normal, both personally and inter-personally. Major themes identified for FFMs (N = 39) include recognition of loved one's memory loss; a lack of information at discharge, including expectations after discharge; and concern for the patient experiencing another cardiac arrest. This pilot, qualitative survey study suggests several common themes important to survivors, and FFMs, of cardiac arrest. These themes may serve as a basis for future patient-centered focus groups and the development of patient-centered guidelines for patients and support persons of those surviving cardiac arrest

  14. Remote ischemic preconditioning improves post resuscitation cerebral function via overexpressing neuroglobin after cardiac arrest in rats.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ran; Yu, Tao; Lin, Jia-Li; Ren, Guang-Dong; Li, Yi; Liao, Xiao-Xing; Huang, Zi-Tong; Jiang, Chong-Hui

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of remote ischemic preconditioning on post resuscitation cerebral function in a rat model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation. The animals were randomized into six groups: 1) sham operation, 2) lateral ventricle injection and sham operation, 3) cardiac arrest induced by ventricular fibrillation, 4) lateral ventricle injection and cardiac arrest, 5) remote ischemic preconditioning initiated 90min before induction of ventricular fibrillation, and 6) lateral ventricle injection and remote ischemic preconditioning before cardiac arrest. Reagent of Lateral ventricle injection is neuroglobin antisense oligodeoxynucleotides which initiated 24h before sham operation, cardiac arrest or remote ischemic preconditioning. Remote ischemic preconditioning was induced by four cycles of 5min of limb ischemia, followed by 5min of reperfusion. Ventricular fibrillation was induced by current and lasted for 6min. Defibrillation was attempted after 6min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The animals were then monitored for 2h and observed for an additionally maximum 70h. Post resuscitation cerebral function was evaluated by neurologic deficit score at 72h after return of spontaneous circulation. Results showed that remote ischemic preconditioning increased neurologic deficit scores. To investigate the neuroprotective effects of remote ischemic preconditioning, we observed neuronal injury at 48 and 72h after return of spontaneous circulation and found that remote ischemic preconditioning significantly decreased the occurrence of neuronal apoptosis and necrosis. To further comprehend mechanism of neuroprotection induced by remote ischemic preconditioning, we found expression of neuroglobin at 24h after return of spontaneous circulation was enhanced. Furthermore, administration of neuroglobin antisense oligodeoxynucleotides before induction of remote ischemic preconditioning showed that the level of neuroglobin was decreased then partly abrogated

  15. Aging Effect on Post-recovery Hypofusion and Mortality Following Cardiac Arrest and Resuscitation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kui; Puchowicz, Michelle A; LaManna, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of aging on brain blood flow following transient global ischemia. Male Fisher rats (6 and 24 months old) underwent cardiac arrest (15 min) and resuscitation. Regional brain (cortex, hippocampus, brainstem and cerebellum) blood flow was measured in non-arrested rats and 1-h recovery rats using [14C] iodoantipyrene (IAP) autoradiography; the 4-day survival rate was determined in the two age groups. The pre-arrest baseline blood flows were similar in cortex, brainstem and cerebellum between the 6-month and the 24-month old rats; however, the baseline blood flow in hippocampus was significantly lower in the 24-month old group. At 1 h following cardiac arrest and resuscitation, both 6-month and 24-month groups had significantly lower blood flows in all regions than the pre-arrest baseline values; compared to the 6-month old group, the blood flow was significantly lower (about 40% lower) in all regions in the 24-month old group. The 4-day survival rate for the 6-month old rats was 50% (3/6) whereas none of the 24-month old rats (0/10) survived for 4 days. The data suggest that there is an increased vulnerability to brain ischemic-reperfusion injury in the aged rats; the degree of post-recovery hypoperfusion may contribute to the high mortality in the aged rats following cardiac arrest and resuscitation. PMID:26782221

  16. Prehospital therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest--from current concepts to a future standard.

    PubMed

    Kämäräinen, Antti; Hoppu, Sanna; Silfvast, Tom; Virkkunen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome after prehospital cardiac arrest. Existing experimental and clinical evidence supports the notion that delayed cooling results in lesser benefit compared to early induction of mild hypothermia soon after return of spontaneous circulation. Therefore a practical approach would be to initiate cooling already in the prehospital setting. The purpose of this review was to evaluate current clinical studies on prehospital induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Most reported studies present data on cooling rates, safety and feasibility of different methods, but are inconclusive as regarding to outcome effects. PMID:19821967

  17. Prehospital therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest - from current concepts to a future standard

    PubMed Central

    Kämäräinen, Antti; Hoppu, Sanna; Silfvast, Tom; Virkkunen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome after prehospital cardiac arrest. Existing experimental and clinical evidence supports the notion that delayed cooling results in lesser benefit compared to early induction of mild hypothermia soon after return of spontaneous circulation. Therefore a practical approach would be to initiate cooling already in the prehospital setting. The purpose of this review was to evaluate current clinical studies on prehospital induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Most reported studies present data on cooling rates, safety and feasibility of different methods, but are inconclusive as regarding to outcome effects. PMID:19821967

  18. F-MARC: promoting the prevention and management of sudden cardiac arrest in football.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Efraim Benjamin; Dvorak, J; Schmied, C; Meyer, T

    2015-05-01

    Sudden cardiac death is the most common cause of unnatural death in football. To prevent and urgently manage sudden cardiac arrest on the football field-of-play, F-MARC (FIFA Medical and Research Centre) has been fully committed to a programme of research, education, standardisation and practical implementation. This strategy has detected football players at medical risk during mandatory precompetition medical assessments. Additionally, FIFA has (1) sponsored internationally accepted guidelines for the interpretation of an athlete's ECG, (2) developed field-of-play-specific protocols for the recognition, response, resuscitation and removal of a football player having sudden cardiac arrest and (3) introduced and distributed the FIFA medical emergency bag which has already resulted in the successful resuscitation of a football player who had a sudden cardiac arrest on the field-of-play. Recently FIFA, in association with the Institute of Sports and Preventive Medicine in Saarbrücken, Germany, established a worldwide Sudden Death Registry with a view to documenting fatal events on the football field-of-play. These activities by F-MARC are testimony to FIFA's continued commitment to minimising sudden cardiac arrest while playing football. PMID:25878076

  19. The problem of police-related cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Karch, Steven B

    2016-07-01

    The term "positional asphyxia" was originally used to describe the situation in which the upper airways becomes compromised by sharp angulation of the head or neck, or where the chest wall is splinted and the diaphragm is prevented from moving because of an unusual position of the body. The term was redefined in the early 1980s to describe sudden death during physical restraint of an individual who is in a prone position. A large percent of reported victims were overweight males. Most were in early middle age and manifesting psychotic behavior at the time of death. Most were reported to have unremarkable autopsies, save for the finding, in many cases, of cocaine or methamphetamine (more recently synthetic cannabinoids and cathinones as well). As no cause of death was apparent (other than non-specific signs such as pulmonary edema), it became common practice to attribute death to force exerted on the decedent's back. When experimental studies with human volunteers disproved this notion, the term "restraint asphyxia" was substituted for positional asphyxia, but with nearly the exact same meaning. No experimental study has ever determined the actual amount of force necessary to cause asphyxia by force applied to the back (although the range of required static force is known), nor the duration for which it must be applied. This review discusses the epidemiology and the evidence for and against the theory of "restraint/positional" asphyxia. It also considers alternative theories of causation, including the findings of studies suggesting that cardiac channelopathies/cardiomyopathies may explain many cases of ARD. PMID:27126838

  20. From door to recovery: a collaborative approach to the development of a post-cardiac arrest center.

    PubMed

    Williams, Donna; Calder, Shelley; Cocchi, Michael N; Donnino, Michael W

    2013-10-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest remains common and, despite advances in resuscitation practices, continues to carry a high mortality that may be influenced by several factors, including where a patient is cared for after the cardiac arrest. Implementing a post-cardiac arrest care guideline for survivors of out-of-hospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest involves a multidisciplinary approach with short-term and long-term strategies. Physician and nursing leaders must work in synergy to guide the implementation of an evidence-based plan of care. A collaborative approach was used at a hospital to develop processes, build consensus for protocols, and provide support to staff and teams. A joint approach has allowed the hospital to move from traditional silos of individual departmental care to a continuum of patient-focused management after cardiac arrest. This care coordination is initiated in the emergency department and follows the patient through to discharge. PMID:24085827

  1. Prolonged cardiac arrest and resuscitation by extracorporeal life support: favourable outcome without preceding anticoagulation in an experimental setting.

    PubMed

    Foerster, K; D'Inka, M; Beyersdorf, F; Benk, C; Nguyen-Thanh, T; Mader, I; Fritsch, B; Ihling, C; Mueller, K; Heilmann, C; Trummer, G

    2013-11-01

    State-of-the-art cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) restores circulation with inconsistent blood-flow and pressure. Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) following CPR opens the opportunity for "controlled reperfusion". In animal experiments investigating CPR with ECLS, systemic anticoagulation before induced cardiac arrest is normal, but a major point of dispute, since preliminary heparinization in patients undergoing unwitnessed cardiac arrest is impossible. In this study, we investigated options for ECLS after an experimental 15 minutes normothermic cardiac arrest, without preceding anticoagulation, in pigs. Neurological recovery was assessed by a scoring system, electroencephalography and brain magnetic resonance imaging. Additionally, brain histology was performed on day seven after cardiac arrest. We demonstrated that preliminary heparin administration was not necessary for survival or neurological recovery in this setting. Heparin flushing of the cannulae seemed sufficient to avoid thrombus formation. These findings may ease the way to using ECLS in patients with sudden cardiac arrest. PMID:23827862

  2. Pyruvate stabilizes electrocardiographic and hemodynamic function in pigs recovering from cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Brandon H; Nguyen, Anh Q; Hollrah, Roger A; Williams, Arthur G; Hoxha, Besim; Olivencia-Yurvati, Albert H; Mallet, Robert T

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac electromechanical dysfunction may compromise recovery of patients who are initially resuscitated from cardiac arrest, and effective treatments remain elusive. Pyruvate, a natural intermediary metabolite, energy substrate, and antioxidant, has been found to protect the heart from ischemia-reperfusion injury. This study tested the hypothesis that pyruvate-enriched resuscitation restores hemodynamic, metabolic, and electrolyte homeostasis following cardiac arrest. Forty-two Yorkshire swine underwent pacing-induced ventricular fibrillation and, after 6 min pre-intervention arrest, 4 min precordial compressions followed by transthoracic countershocks. After defibrillation and recovery of spontaneous circulation, the pigs were monitored for another 4 h. Sodium pyruvate or NaCl were infused i.v. (0.1 mmol·kg(-1)·min(-1)) throughout precordial compressions and the first 60 min recovery. In 8 of the 24 NaCl-infused swine, the first countershock converted ventricular fibrillation to pulseless electrical activity unresponsive to subsequent countershocks, but only 1 of 18 pyruvate-treated swine developed pulseless electrical activity (relative risk 0.17; 95% confidence interval 0.13-0.22). Pyruvate treatment also lowered the dosage of vasoconstrictor phenylephrine required to maintain systemic arterial pressure at 15-60 min recovery, hastened clearance of excess glucose, elevated arterial bicarbonate, and raised arterial pH; these statistically significant effects persisted up to 3 h after sodium pyruvate infusion, while infusion-induced hypernatremia subsided. These results demonstrate that pyruvate-enriched resuscitation achieves electrocardiographic and hemodynamic stability in swine during the initial recovery from cardiac arrest. Such metabolically based treatment may offer an effective strategy to support cardiac electromechanical recovery immediately after cardiac arrest. PMID:26088865

  3. Critical care ultrasound in cardiac arrest. Technological requirements for performing the SESAME-protocol--a holistic approach.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, Daniel; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2015-01-01

    The use of ultrasound has gained its place in critical care as part of our day-to-day monitoring tools. A better understanding of ultrasound techniques and recent publications including protocols for the lungs, the abdomen and the blood vessels has introduced ultrasound to the bedside of our ICU patients. However, we will prove in this paper that early machines, dating back more than 25 years, were perfectly able to do the job as compared to modern laptop machines with more features but few additional advantages. Ultrasound is not only a diagnostic tool, but should also be seen as an extension of the traditional physical examination. This paper will focus on the use of the SESAME-protocol in cardiac arrest. The SESAME-protocol suggests starting with a lung scan to rule out possible causes leading to cardiac arrest. Firstly, pneumothorax needs to be ruled out. Secondly, a partial diagnosis of pulmonary embolism is done following the BLUE-protocol. Thirdly, fluid therapy can be guided, following the FALLS-protocol. The SESAME-protocol continues by scanning the lower femoral veins to check for signs of deep venous thrombosis, followed by (or before, in case of trauma) the abdomen to detect massive bleeding. Next comes the pericardium, to exclude pericardial tamponade. Finally, a transthoracic cardiac ultrasound is performed to check for other (cardiac) causes leading to cardiac arrest. The emphasis is on a holistic approach, where ultrasound can be seen as the modern stethoscope needed by clinicians to complete the full physiological examination of their critically ill unstable patients. PMID:26578398

  4. Traumatic cardiac arrests - the action or the provider, what makes the difference?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic cardiac arrest resuscitation is considered a heroic and futile endeavor. However, newer articles have more promising statistics and divide between prehospital ground and helicopter transport. Here we discuss why there might be a difference in the survivability of this subset of trauma patients. PMID:23786921

  5. Should prehospital resuscitative thoracotomy be incorporated in advanced life support after traumatic cardiac arrest?

    PubMed

    Chalkias, A; Xanthos, T

    2014-06-01

    The survival of traumatic cardiac arrest patients poses a challenge for Emergency Medical Services initiating advanced life support on-scene, especially with regard to having to decide immediately whether to initiate prehospital emergency thoracotomy. Although the necessity for carrying out the procedure remains a cause for debate, it can be life-saving when performed with the correct indications and approaches. PMID:26816077

  6. The School Nurse Role in Preparing for Sudden Cardiac Arrest in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Warna K.; Ficca, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) were introduced for first responders in 1992 to manage adult cardiac arrest and are now common in many public places. Today AEDs are capable of shocking children under 8 years of age, or less than 55 pounds. This presents a challenge for school nurses, particularly as the prevalence of chronic medical…

  7. Antipsychotics and associated risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Weeke, P; Jensen, A; Folke, F; Gislason, G H; Olesen, J B; Fosbøl, E L; Wissenberg, M; Lippert, F K; Christensen, E F; Nielsen, S L; Holm, E; Kanters, J K; Poulsen, H E; Køber, L; Torp-Pedersen, C

    2014-10-01

    Antipsychotic drugs have been associated with sudden cardiac death, but differences in the risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) associated with different antipsychotic drug classes are not clear. We identified all OHCAs in Denmark (2001-2010). The risk of OHCA associated with antipsychotic drug use was evaluated by conditional logistic regression analysis in case-time-control models. In total, 2,205 (7.6%) of 28,947 OHCA patients received treatment with an antipsychotic drug at the time of the event. Overall, treatment with any antipsychotic drug was associated with OHCA (odds ratio (OR) = 1.53, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.23-1.89), as was use with typical antipsychotics (OR = 1.66, CI: 1.27-2.17). By contrast, overall, atypical antipsychotic drug use was not (OR = 1.29, CI: 0.90-1.85). Two individual typical antipsychotic drugs, haloperidol (OR = 2.43, CI: 1.20-4.93) and levomepromazine (OR = 2.05, CI: 1.18-3.56), were associated with OHCA, as was one atypical antipsychotic drug, quetiapine (OR = 3.64, CI: 1.59-8.30). PMID:24960522

  8. Probabilistic Linkage of Prehospital and Outcomes Data in Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Mumma, Bryn E.; Diercks, Deborah B.; Danielsen, Beate; Holmes, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Lack of longitudinal patient outcome data is an important barrier in emergency medical services (EMS) research. We aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of linking prehospital data from the California EMS Information Systems (CEMSIS) database to outcomes data from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD) database for patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Methods We included patients age 18 years or older who sustained non-traumatic OHCA and were included in the 2010–2011 CEMSIS databases. The CEMSIS database is a unified EMS data collection system for California. The OSHPD database is a comprehensive data collection system for patient-level inpatient and emergency department encounters in California. OHCA patients were identified in the CEMSIS database using cardiac rhythm, procedures, medications, and provider impression. Probabilistic linkage blocks were created using in hospital death or one of the following primary or secondary diagnoses (I CD-9-CM) in the OSHPD databases: cardiac arrest (427.5), sudden death (798), ventricular tachycardia (427.1), ventricular fibrillation (427.4), and acute myocardial infarction (410.xx). Blocking variables included incident date, gender, date of birth, age, and/or destination facility. Due to the volume of cases, match thresholds were established based on clerical record review for each block individually. Match variables included incident date, destination facility, date of birth, sex, race, and ethnicity. Results Of the 14,603 cases of OHCA we identified in the prehospital databases, 91 (0.6%) duplicate records were excluded. Overall, 46% of the data used in the linkage algorithm were missing in CEMSIS. We linked 4,961/14,512 (34.2%) records. Linkage rates varied significantly by local EMS agency, ranging from 1.4% to 61.1% (OR for linkage 0.009–0.76; p<0.0001). After excluding the local EMS agency with the outlying low linkage rate, we linked 4,934/12,596 (39

  9. The school nurse role in preparing for sudden cardiac arrest in the school setting.

    PubMed

    Evans, Warna K; Ficca, Michelle

    2012-12-01

    Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) were introduced for first responders in 1992 to manage adult cardiac arrest and are now common in many public places. Today AEDs are capable of shocking children under 8 years of age, or less than 55 pounds. This presents a challenge for school nurses, particularly as the prevalence of chronic medical conditions of school children continues to increase. Preparing for a cardiac emergency for a person of any age is stressful and requires a coordinated approach to best manage sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). The school nurse's responsibility is to assess the school setting and the need for an AED, and when indicated, determine the best AED guidelines in schools that accommodate people of all ages. PMID:22733830

  10. In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: An Update on Pulseless Electrical Activity and Asystole.

    PubMed

    Attin, Mina; Tucker, Rebecca G; Carey, Mary G

    2016-09-01

    Nonshockable rhythms, including pulseless electrical activity (PEA) and asystole, precede more than 70% of in-hospital cardiac arrests (I-HCA). Compared with shockable rhythms (ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia), nonshockable rhythms have higher mortality and morbidity. Therefore, investigating the underlying mechanisms of these arrhythmias to improve the quality of care and outcome for patients who suffer cardiac arrest is a priority. As the first responders to I-HCA, nurses must have the proper knowledge and training to provide timely and efficient cardiopulmonary resuscitation therapy. This article provides an overview of nonshockable cardiac arrhythmias preceding I-HCA as a means of addressing the gap between science and clinical practice. PMID:27484665

  11. Capillary leakage in post-cardiac arrest survivors during therapeutic hypothermia - a prospective, randomised study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fluids are often given liberally after the return of spontaneous circulation. However, the optimal fluid regimen in survivors of cardiac arrest is unknown. Recent studies indicate an increased fluid requirement in post-cardiac arrest patients. During hypothermia, animal studies report extravasation in several organs, including the brain. We investigated two fluid strategies to determine whether the choice of fluid would influence fluid requirements, capillary leakage and oedema formation. Methods 19 survivors with witnessed cardiac arrest of primary cardiac origin were allocated to either 7.2% hypertonic saline with 6% poly (O-2-hydroxyethyl) starch solution (HH) or standard fluid therapy (Ringer's Acetate and saline 9 mg/ml) (control). The patients were treated with the randomised fluid immediately after admission and continued for 24 hours of therapeutic hypothermia. Results During the first 24 hours, the HH patients required significantly less i.v. fluid than the control patients (4750 ml versus 8010 ml, p = 0.019) with comparable use of vasopressors. Systemic vascular resistance was significantly reduced from 0 to 24 hours (p = 0.014), with no difference between the groups. Colloid osmotic pressure (COP) in serum and interstitial fluid (p < 0.001 and p = 0.014 respectively) decreased as a function of time in both groups, with a more pronounced reduction in interstitial COP in the crystalloid group. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain did not reveal vasogenic oedema. Conclusions Post-cardiac arrest patients have high fluid requirements during therapeutic hypothermia, probably due to increased extravasation. The use of HH reduced the fluid requirement significantly. However, the lack of brain oedema in both groups suggests no superior fluid regimen. Cardiac index was significantly improved in the group treated with crystalloids. Although we do not associate HH with the renal failures that developed, caution should be taken when using hypertonic

  12. Survival of patients with spinal cord injury after cardiac arrest in Department of Veterans Affairs hospital: Pilot study.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Deborah; Carter, William E; Cifu, David X; Carne, William

    2014-01-01

    Survivability characteristics after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the population with spinal cord injury (SCI) are unclear but may be useful for advanced care planning discussions with patients. Retrospective evaluation from records of all SCI patients over 10 yr at a Department of Veterans Affairs medical center who experienced in-hospital cardiac arrest was performed. Demographic data and other common measurements were recorded. Thirty-six male subjects were identified, and only two patients survived to discharge (5.5% survival rate), both of whom were admitted for nonacute issues and were asymptomatic shortly before the cardiac arrest. The mean age at the time of cardiopulmonary arrest was 62.4 yr, with a mean time from cardiac arrest to death of 3.02 d. No significant demographic parameters were identified. Overall, SCI likely portends worse outcome for acutely ill patients in the situation of a cardiac arrest. Conclusions are limited by sample size. PMID:25436984

  13. Carbon Monoxide Improves Neurologic Outcomes by Mitochondrial Biogenesis after Global Cerebral Ischemia Induced by Cardiac Arrest in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Yao, Lan; Zhou, Li-Li; Liu, Yuan-Shan; Chen, Ming-di; Wu, Hai-Dong; Chang, Rui-Ming; Li, Yi; Zhou, Ming-Gen; Fang, Xiang-Shao; Yu, Tao; Jiang, Long-Yuan; Huang, Zi-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to brain injury following global cerebral ischemia after cardiac arrest. Carbon monoxide treatment has shown potent cytoprotective effects in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to investigate the effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules on brain mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury following resuscitation after cardiac arrest in rats. A rat model of cardiac arrest was established by asphyxia. The animals were randomly divided into the following 3 groups: cardiac arrest and resuscitation group, cardiac arrest and resuscitation plus carbon monoxide intervention group, and sham control group (no cardiac arrest). After the return of spontaneous circulation, neurologic deficit scores (NDS) and S-100B levels were significantly decreased at 24, 48, and 72 h, but carbon monoxide treatment improved the NDS and S-100B levels at 24 h and the 3-day survival rates of the rats. This treatment also decreased the number of damaged neurons in the hippocampus CA1 area and increased the brain mitochondrial activity. In addition, it increased mitochondrial biogenesis by increasing the expression of biogenesis factors including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor-1, nuclear respiratory factor-2 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Thus, this study showed that carbon monoxide treatment alleviated brain injury after cardiac arrest in rats by increased brain mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:27489503

  14. Carbon Monoxide Improves Neurologic Outcomes by Mitochondrial Biogenesis after Global Cerebral Ischemia Induced by Cardiac Arrest in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Yao, Lan; Zhou, Li-li; Liu, Yuan-shan; Chen, Ming-di; Wu, Hai-dong; Chang, Rui-ming; Li, Yi; Zhou, Ming-gen; Fang, Xiang-shao; Yu, Tao; Jiang, Long-yuan; Huang, Zi-tong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to brain injury following global cerebral ischemia after cardiac arrest. Carbon monoxide treatment has shown potent cytoprotective effects in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to investigate the effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules on brain mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury following resuscitation after cardiac arrest in rats. A rat model of cardiac arrest was established by asphyxia. The animals were randomly divided into the following 3 groups: cardiac arrest and resuscitation group, cardiac arrest and resuscitation plus carbon monoxide intervention group, and sham control group (no cardiac arrest). After the return of spontaneous circulation, neurologic deficit scores (NDS) and S-100B levels were significantly decreased at 24, 48, and 72 h, but carbon monoxide treatment improved the NDS and S-100B levels at 24 h and the 3-day survival rates of the rats. This treatment also decreased the number of damaged neurons in the hippocampus CA1 area and increased the brain mitochondrial activity. In addition, it increased mitochondrial biogenesis by increasing the expression of biogenesis factors including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor-1, nuclear respiratory factor-2 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Thus, this study showed that carbon monoxide treatment alleviated brain injury after cardiac arrest in rats by increased brain mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:27489503

  15. Sudden Unexplained Cardiac Arrest in Apparently Healthy Children: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Alapati, Srilatha; Strobel, Nathaniel; Hashmi, Sharukh; Bricker, John T.; Gupta-Malhotra, Monesha

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the causes of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in apparently healthy children in a single center in the era of primary prevention (screening questionnaire, SQ) and secondary prevention (automated external defibrillator, AED and automated implantable cardioverter defibrillator, AICD). Study Design Any child (0–18 year’s age) without prior known disease except for attention deficit disorder who underwent out-of-the hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation was included in the study as SCA. Using retrospective chart review we evaluated the efficacy of the SQ, electrocardiogram (EKG), chest roentgenogram (CXR) and an echocardiogram. Results We found 44 out of 6,656 children admitted to intensive care with SCA; an AED was used in 39%, AICD placed in 18% and survival to hospital discharge was 50%. The etiology for SCA was identified in 57% of the cases, mostly in those above one year of age and among these the majority of had a cardiac etiology (50%) while 7% had rupture of an arteriovenous malformation. Stimulant medication use was seen in 11% of the SCA. In the best case scenario of hypothesized primary prevention, a prior SQ, CXR, EKG and echocardiogram may have detected 18%, 9%, 23% and 16% of at-risk cases respectively and 32% may have been detected with EKG and SQ together. Based on a historical control cohort, a positive EKG was significantly higher in children with SCA (p = 0.014). Conclusion An EKG along with a screening SQ may be more effective in identifying children who are potentially at-risk for SCA than a SQ alone. PMID:23052663

  16. Prognostic factors associated with hospital survival in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Sathianathan, Kushaharan; Tiruvoipati, Ravindranath; Vij, Sanjiv

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify patient, cardiac arrest and management factors associated with hospital survival in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. METHODS: A retrospective, single centre study of comatose patients admitted to our intensive care unit (ICU) following cardiac arrest during the twenty year period between 1993 and 2012. This study was deemed by the Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) of Monash Health to be a quality assurance exercise, and thus did not require submission to the Monash Health HREC (Research Project Application, No. 13290Q). The study population included all patients admitted to our ICU between 1993 and 2012, with a discharge diagnosis including “cardiac arrest”. Patients were excluded if they did not have a cardiac arrest prior to ICU admission (i.e., if their primary arrest was during their admission to ICU), or were not comatose on arrival to ICU. Our primary outcome measure was survival to hospital discharge. Secondary outcome measures were ICU and hospital length of stay (LOS), and factors associated with survival to hospital discharge. RESULTS: Five hundred and eighty-two comatose patients were admitted to our ICU following cardiac arrest, with 35% surviving to hospital discharge. The median ICU and hospital LOS was 3 and 5 d respectively. There was no survival difference between in-hospital and out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. Males made up 62% of our cardiac arrest population, were more likely to have a shockable rhythm (56% vs 37%, P < 0.001), and were more likely to survive to hospital discharge (40% vs 28%, P = 0.006). On univariate analysis, therapeutic hypothermia, regardless of method used (e.g., rapid infusion of ice cold fluids, topical ice, “Arctic Sun”, passive rewarming, “Bair Hugger”) and location initiated (e.g., pre-hospital, emergency department, intensive care) was associated with increased survival. There was however no difference in survival associated with target temperature, time at target temperature

  17. Cardiac arrest and ventricular arrhythmia in patients taking antipsychotic drugs: cohort study using administrative data

    PubMed Central

    Hennessy, Sean; Bilker, Warren B; Knauss, Jill S; Margolis, David J; Kimmel, Stephen E; Reynolds, Robert F; Glasser, Dale B; Morrison, Mary F; Strom, Brian L

    2002-01-01

    Objective To examine the rates of cardiac arrest and ventricular arrhythmia in patients with treated schizophrenia and in non-schizophrenic controls. Design Cohort study of outpatients using administrative data. Setting 3 US Medicaid programmes. Participants Patients with schizophrenia treated with clozapine, haloperidol, risperidone, or thioridazine; a control group of patients with glaucoma; and a control group of patients with psoriasis. Main outcome measure Diagnosis of cardiac arrest or ventricular arrhythmia. Results Patients with treated schizophrenia had higher rates of cardiac arrest and ventricular arrhythmia than controls, with rate ratios ranging from 1.7 to 3.2. Overall, thioridazine was not associated with an increased risk compared with haloperidol (rate ratio 0.9, 95% confidence interval 0.7 to 1.2). However, thioridazine showed an increased risk of events at doses ⩾600 mg (2.6, 1.0 to 6.6; P=0.049) and a linear dose-response relation (P=0.038). Conclusions The increased risk of cardiac arrest and ventricular arrhythmia in patients with treated schizophrenia could be due to the disease or its treatment. Overall, the risk with thioridazine was no worse than that with haloperidol. Thioridazine may, however, have a higher risk at high doses, although this finding could be due to chance. To reduce cardiac risk, thioridazine should be prescribed at the lowest dose needed to obtain an optimal therapeutic effect. What is already known on this topicThioridazine seems to prolong the electrocardiographic QT interval more than haloperidolAlthough QT prolongation is used as a marker of arrhythmogenicity, it is unknown whether thioridazine is any worse than haloperidol with regard to cardiac safetyWhat this study addsPatients taking antipsychotic drugs had higher risks of cardiac events than control patients with glaucoma or psoriasisOverall, the risk of cardiac arrest and ventricular arrhythmia was not higher with thioridazine than haloperidolThioridazine may

  18. Mild hypothermia during advanced life support: a preliminary study in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Bruel, Cédric; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Marie, William; Arrot, Xavier; Daubin, Cédric; Du Cheyron, Damien; Massetti, Massimo; Charbonneau, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest may confer neuroprotection. We assessed the feasibility, safety and effectiveness of therapeutic infusion of 2 l of normal saline at 4°C before return of spontaneous circulation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation after out of hospital cardiac arrest. Methods This was a prospective, observational, multicenter clinical trial conducted in Emergency Medical Services units and in a medical intensive care unit at Caen University Hospital, Cen, France. Results In patients who had suffered out of hospital cardiac arrest, hypothermia was induced by infusing 2 l of 4°C NaCl 0.9% over 30 minutes during advanced life support prior to arrival at the hospital. A total of 33 patients were included in the study. Eight patients presented with ventricular fibrillation as the initial cardiac rhythm. Mild hypothermia was achieved after a median of 16 minutes (interquartile range 11.5 to 25.0 minutes) after return of spontaneous circulation. After intravenous cooling, the temperature decreased by 2.1°C (P < 0.0001) to a mean body temperature of 33.3°C (interquartile range 32.3 to 34.3°C). The only observed adverse event was pulmonary oedema, which occurred in one patient. Conclusion We concluded that prehospital induction of therapeutic hypothermia using infusion of 2 l of 4°C normal saline during advanced life support was feasible, effective and safe. Larger studies are required to assess the impact that this early cooling has on neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest. PMID:18312676

  19. Survival with good neurological outcome in a patient with prolonged ischemic cardiac arrest--utility of automated chest compression systems in the cardiac catheterization laboratory.

    PubMed

    Psaltis, Peter J; Meredith, Ian T; Ahmar, Walid

    2014-11-15

    The management of refractory cardiac arrest during invasive coronary procedures has substantial logistical challenges and is typically associated with disappointing outcomes. We describe the case of a young woman with recalcitrant ventricular fibrillation due to acute anterior ST-elevation myocardial infarction caused by occlusion of her proximal left anterior descending artery. Survival without neurological deficit or organ failure was achieved following primary percutaneous reperfusion and a total of 52 min of intra-procedural chest compression support, made possible by the use of an automated chest compression device. PMID:24403102

  20. Therapeutic Hypothermia after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children

    PubMed Central

    Moler, Frank W.; Silverstein, Faye S.; Holubkov, Richard; Slomine, Beth S.; Christensen, James R.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Meert, Kathleen L.; Clark, Amy E.; Browning, Brittan; Pemberton, Victoria L.; Page, Kent; Shankaran, Seetha; Hutchison, Jamie S.; Newth, Christopher J.L.; Bennett, Kimberly S.; Berger, John T.; Topjian, Alexis; Pineda, Jose A.; Koch, Joshua D.; Schleien, Charles L.; Dalton, Heidi J.; Ofori-Amanfo, George; Goodman, Denise M.; Fink, Ericka L.; McQuillen, Patrick; Zimmerman, Jerry J.; Thomas, Neal J.; van der Jagt, Elise W.; Porter, Melissa B.; Meyer, Michael T.; Harrison, Rick; Pham, Nga; Schwarz, Adam J.; Nowak, Jeffrey E.; Alten, Jeffrey; Wheeler, Derek S.; Bhalala, Utpal S.; Lidsky, Karen; Lloyd, Eric; Mathur, Mudit; Shah, Samir; Wu, Theodore; Theodorou, Andreas A.; Sanders, Ronald C.; Dean, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia is recommended for comatose adults after witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but data about this intervention in children are limited. Methods We conducted this trial of two targeted temperature interventions at 38 children’s hospitals involving children who remained unconscious after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Within 6 hours after the return of circulation, comatose patients who were older than 2 days and younger than 18 years of age were randomly assigned to therapeutic hypothermia (target temperature, 33.0°C) or therapeutic normothermia (target temperature, 36.8°C). The primary efficacy outcome, survival at 12 months after cardiac arrest with a Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, second edition (VABS-II), score of 70 or higher (on a scale from 20 to 160, with higher scores indicating better function), was evaluated among patients with a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest. Results A total of 295 patients underwent randomization. Among the 260 patients with data that could be evaluated and who had a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest, there was no significant difference in the primary outcome between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (20% vs. 12%; relative likelihood, 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86 to 2.76; P = 0.14). Among all the patients with data that could be evaluated, the change in the VABS-II score from baseline to 12 months was not significantly different (P = 0.13) and 1-year survival was similar (38% in the hypothermia group vs. 29% in the normothermia group; relative likelihood, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.93 to 1.79; P = 0.13). The groups had similar incidences of infection and serious arrhythmias, as well as similar use of blood products and 28-day mortality. Conclusions In comatose children who survived out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, therapeutic hypothermia, as compared with therapeutic normothermia, did not confer a significant benefit in survival with a

  1. Prehospital intranasal evaporative cooling for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a pilot, feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Richard M; Van Antwerp, Jerry; Henderson, Charles; Weaver, Anne; Davies, Gareth; Lockey, David

    2014-10-01

    Intranasal evaporative cooling presents a novel means of initiating therapeutic hypothermia after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Few studies have evaluated the use of intranasal therapeutic hypothermia using the Rhinochill device in the prehospital setting. We sought to evaluate the use of Rhinochill in the Physician Response Unit of London's Air Ambulance, aiming to describe the feasibility of employing it during prehospital resuscitation for OHCA. We prospectively evaluated the Rhinochill device over a 7-month period. Inclusion criteria for deployment included: age above 18 years, Physician Response Unit on-scene within maximum of 10 min after return-of-spontaneous circulation (ROSC), witnessed OHCA or unwitnessed downtime of less than 10 min, pregnancy not suspected, normal nasal anatomy, and likely ICU candidate if ROSC were to be achieved. Thirteen patients were included in the evaluation. The average time from the 999 call to initiation of cooling was 39.5 min (range 22-61 min). The average prehospital temperature change in patients who achieved ROSC was -1.9°C. Patients were cooled for an average of 38 min prehospital. In all cases, the doctor and paramedic involved with the resuscitation reported that the Rhinochill was easy to set up and use during resuscitation and that it did not interfere with standard resuscitation practice. Intranasal evaporative cooling using the Rhinochill system is feasible in an urban, prehospital, doctor/paramedic response unit. Cooling with Rhinochill was not found to interfere with prehospital resuscitation and resulted in significant core body temperature reduction. Further research on the potential benefit of intra-arrest and early initiation of intranasal evaporative cooling is warranted. PMID:24300245

  2. Advantages of a cohort study on cardiac arrest conducted by nurses.

    PubMed

    Campanharo, Cássia Regina Vancini; Vancini, Rodrigo Luiz; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag; Atallah, Álvaro Nagib; Góis, Aécio Flávio Teixeira de

    2015-10-01

    OBJECTIVEIdentifying factors associated to survival after cardiac arrest.METHODAn experience report of a cohort study conducted in a university hospital, with a consecutive sample comprised of 285 patients. Data were collected for a year by trained nurses. The training strategy was conducted through an expository dialogue lecture. Collection monitoring was carried out by nurses via telephone calls, visits to the emergency room and by medical record searches. The neurological status of survivors was evaluated at discharge, after six months and one year.RESULTSOf the 285 patients, 16 survived until hospital discharge, and 13 remained alive after one year, making possible to identify factors associated with survival. There were no losses in the process.CONCLUSIONCohort studies help identify risks and disease outcomes. Considering cardiac arrest, they can subsidize public policies, encourage future studies and training programs for CPR, thereby improving the prognosis of patients. PMID:26516745

  3. Code Blue: methodology for a qualitative study of teamwork during simulated cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Samuel; Carolina Apesoa-Varano, Ester; Barton, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) is a particularly vexing entity from the perspective of preparedness, as it is neither common nor truly rare. Survival from IHCA requires the coordinated efforts of multiple providers with different skill sets who may have little prior experience working together. Survival rates have remained low despite advances in therapy, suggesting that human factors may be at play. Methods and analysis This qualitative study uses a quasiethnographic data collection approach combining focus group interviews with providers involved in IHCA resuscitation as well as analysis of video recordings from in situ-simulated cardiac arrest events. Using grounded theory-based analysis, we intend to understand the organisational, interpersonal, cognitive and behavioural dimensions of IHCA resuscitation, and to build a descriptive model of code team functioning. Ethics and dissemination This ongoing study has been approved by the IRB at UC Davis Medical Center. Results The results will be disseminated in a subsequent manuscript. PMID:26758258

  4. [Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. A cold intravenous fluid, a cooling helmet and a cooling blanket efficiently reduce body temperature].

    PubMed

    Friberg, Hans; Nielsen, Niklas; Karlsson, Torbjörn; Cronberg, Tobias; Widner, Håkan; Englund, Elisabet; Ersson, Anders

    2004-07-22

    Two controlled randomized trials have shown that mild systemic hypothermia after cardiac arrest is beneficial for neurological outcome and one of the studies shows an improved survival rate. A pilot study was performed to evaluate a model of induced hypothermia after cardiac arrest, using cold intravenous fluids and surface cooling with a cold helmet and a coldwater blanket (Thermowrap). The main purpose was to evaluate our cooling method regarding efficacy, safety and usability. Five unconscious patients after cardiac arrest were treated with induced hypothermia of whom three survived with good recovery to six-month follow up. Two patients died in the ICU without regaining consciousness. There were no adverse events during treatment. We conclude that our method is reasonably fast compared to other published methods, it is easy to perform and it offers a good temperature control during cooling and rewarming. Routines for evaluating prognosis and neurological outcome after cardiac arrest and hypothermia treatment need to be revised. PMID:15314936

  5. Sudden cardiac arrest following ventricular fibrillation attributed to anabolic steroid use in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Lichtenfeld, Jana; Deal, Barbara J; Crawford, Susan

    2016-06-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids are synthetic derivatives of testosterone that promote the growth of skeletal muscles and have many recognised cardiovascular effects. We report the clinical presentation and pathological findings of an adolescent male whose sudden cardiac arrest following ventricular fibrillation was attributed to anabolic androgenic steroid use. The age of our patient reflects the usage of anabolic androgenic steroids among younger athletes and highlights the need for increased awareness among practitioners. PMID:26980272

  6. Early Head CT Findings Are Associated With Outcomes After Pediatric Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Starling, Rebecca M.; Shekdar, Karuna; Licht, Dan; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Berg, Robert A.; Topjian, Alexis A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Head CT after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is often obtained to evaluate intracranial pathology. Among children admitted to the PICU following pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, we hypothesized that loss of gray-white matter differentiation and basilar cistern and sulcal effacement are associated with mortality and unfavorable neurologic outcome. Design Retrospective, cohort study. Setting Single, tertiary-care center PICU. Patients Seventy-eight patients less than 18 years old who survived out-of-hospital cardiac arrest to PICU admission and had a head CT within 24 hours of return of spontaneous circulation were evaluated from July 2005 through May 2012. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Median time to head CT from return of spontaneous circulation was 3.3 hours (1.0, 6.0). Median patient age was 2.3 years (0.4, 9.5). Thirty-nine patients (50%) survived, of whom 29 (74%) had favorable neurologic outcome. Nonsurvivors were more likely than survivors to have 1) loss of gray-white matter differentiation (Hounsfield unit ratios, 0.96 [0.88, 1.07] vs 1.1 [1.07, 1.2]; p < 0.001), 2) basilar cistern effacement (93% vs 7%; p = 0.001; positive predictive value, 94%; negative predictive value, 59%), and 3) sulcal effacement (100% vs 0%; p ≤ 0.001; positive predictive value, 100%; negative predictive value, 68%). All patients with poor gray-white matter differentiation or sulcal effacement had unfavorable neurologic outcomes. Only one patient with basilar cistern effacement had favorable outcome. Conclusions Loss of gray-white matter differentiation and basilar cistern effacement and sulcal effacement are associated with poor outcome after pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Select patients may have favorable outcomes despite these findings. PMID:25844694

  7. A pilot study of cerebrovascular reactivity autoregulation after pediatric cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jennifer K.; Brady, Ken M.; Chung, Shang-En; Jennings, Jacky M.; Whitaker, Emmett E.; Aganga, Devon; Easley, Ronald B.; Heitmiller, Kerry; Jamrogowicz, Jessica L.; Larson, Abby C.; Lee, Jeong-Hoo; Jordan, Lori C.; Hogue, Charles W.; Lehmann, Christoph U.; Bembea, Mela M.; Hunt, Elizabeth A.; Koehler, Raymond C.; Shaffner, Donald H.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Improved survival after cardiac arrest has placed greater emphasis on neurologic resuscitation. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the relationship between cerebrovascular autoregulation and neurologic outcomes after pediatric cardiac arrest. Methods Children resuscitated from cardiac arrest had autoregulation monitoring during the first 72 hours after return of circulation with an index derived from near-infrared spectroscopy in a pilot study. The range of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) with optimal vasoreactivity (MAPOPT) was identified. The area under the curve (AUC) of the time spent with MAP below MAPOPT and MAP deviation below MAPOPT was calculated. Neurologic outcome measures included placement of a new tracheostomy or gastrostomy, death from a primary neurologic etiology (brain death or withdrawal of support for neurologic futility), and change in the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category score (ΔPCPC). Results Thirty-six children were monitored. Among children who did not require extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), children who received a tracheostomy/gastrostomy had greater AUC during the second 24 hours after resuscitation than those who did not (P=0.04; n=19). Children without ECMO who died from a neurologic etiology had greater AUC during the first 48 hours than did those who lived or died from cardiovascular failure (P=0.04; n=19). AUC below MAPOPT was not associated with ΔPCPC when children with or without ECMO were analyzed separately. Conclusions Deviation from the blood pressure with optimal autoregulatory vasoreactivity may predict poor neurologic outcomes after pediatric cardiac arrest. This experimental autoregulation monitoring technique may help individualize blood pressure management goals after resuscitation. PMID:25046743

  8. Readmission Rates and Long-Term Hospital Costs Among Survivors of In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Paul S.; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Curtis, Lesley H.; Li, Yan; Hammill, Bradley G.; Spertus, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although in-hospital cardiac arrest is common, little is known about readmission patterns and inpatient resource use among survivors of in-hospital cardiac arrest. Methods and Results Within a large national registry, we examined long-term inpatient utilization among 6972 adults ≥65 years who survived an in-hospital cardiac arrest. We examined 30-day and 1-year readmission rates and inpatient costs, overall and by patient demographics, hospital disposition (discharge destination), and neurological status at discharge. The mean age was 75.8 ± 7.0 years, 56% were men, and 12% were black. There were a total of 2005 readmissions during the first 30 days (cumulative incidence rate: 35 readmissions/100 patients [95% CI: 33–37]) and 8751 readmissions at 1 year (cumulative incidence rate: 185 readmissions/100 patients [95% CI: 177–190]). Overall, mean inpatient costs were $7,741 ± $2323 at 30 days and $18,629 ± $9411 at 1 year. Thirty-day inpatient costs were higher in patients of younger age (≥85 years: $6052 [reference]; 75–84 years: $7444 [adjusted cost ratio, 1.23 [1.06–1.42]; 65–74 years: $8291 [adjusted cost ratio, 1.37 [1.19–1.59]; both P<0.001]) and black race (whites: $7413; blacks: $9044; adjusted cost ratio, 1.22 [1.05–1.42]; P<0.001), as well as those discharged with severe neurological disability or to skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities. These differences in resource use persisted at 1 year and were largely due to higher readmission rates. Conclusion Survivors of in-hospital cardiac arrest have frequent readmissions and high follow-up inpatient costs. Readmissions and inpatient costs were higher in certain subgroups, including patients of younger age and black race. PMID:25351479

  9. Early Absent Pupillary Light Reflexes After Cardiac Arrest in Patients Treated with Therapeutic Hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Laxmi P; Sen, Ayan; Stanko, Carlene M; Rawal, Bhupendra; Heckman, Michael G; Hoyne, Jonathan B; Dimberg, Elliot L; Freeman, Michelle L; Ng, Lauren K; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Freeman, William D

    2016-08-01

    Loss of pupillary light reactivity is one recognized indicator of poor prognosis after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, drug overdose, low cardiac output, and/or resuscitation drugs can lead to impaired pupillary light reflex. To investigate pupillary light reflex status before therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in relation to neurological outcome, we retrospectively reviewed the data of a prospectively implemented TH protocol in patients with cardiac arrest (CA) at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida (January 2006-January 2012), and Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona (August 2010-March 2014). During this period, all CA patients who underwent hypothermia were included. These patients were selected from an institutional database and hypothermia data set. The Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) at time of discharge was our primary outcome measure. A CPC of 1 to 2 was defined as good outcome and a CPC from 3 to 5 was defined as poor outcome. We identified 99 patients who had CA treated with TH. Twenty-nine patients (29%) had pupils that were nonreactive to light on admission examination before TH, eight of whom later had return of pupil reactivity by day 3. Two of these 29 patients (6.9%) had good outcome, compared to 24 of 70 patients (34.3%) with pupils that were reactive to light (p = 0.005). Both of these patients had CA after illicit drug overdose. Early nonreactive pupils occurred in almost a third of patients after CPR and before TH in our patient population. Recovery of pupillary light reactivity is possible, and in a small minority of those cases (particularly when CA is preceded by the use of illicit drugs), a good outcome can be achieved. PMID:27135180

  10. Immediate prehospital hypothermia protocol in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Laure; Vitrat, François; Savary, Dominique; Debaty, Guillaume; Santre, Charles; Durand, Michel; Dessertaine, Geraldine; Timsit, Jean-François

    2009-06-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) improves the outcomes of cardiac arrest (CA) survivors. The aim of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the efficacy and safety of an immediate prehospital cooling procedure implemented just after the return of spontaneous circulation with a prehospital setting. During 30 months, the case records of comatose survivors of out-of-hospital CA presumably due to a cardiac disease were studied. A routine protocol of immediate postresuscitation cooling had been tested by an emergency team, which consisted of an infusion of large-volume, ice-cold intravenous saline. We decided to assess the efficacy and tolerance of this procedure. A total of 99 patients were studied; 22 were treated with prehospital TH, and 77 consecutive patients treated with prehospital standard resuscitation served as controls. For all patients, TH was maintained for 12 to 24 hours. The demographic, clinical, and biological characteristics of the patients were similar in the 2 groups. The rate of patients with a body temperature of less than 35 degrees C upon admission was 41% in the cooling group and 18% in the control group. Rapid infusion of fluid was not associated with pulmonary edema. After 1 year of follow-up, 6 (27%) of 22 patients in the cooling group and 30 (39%) of 77 patients in the control group had a good outcome. Our preliminary observation suggests that in comatose survivors of CA, prehospital TH with infusion of large-volume, ice-cold intravenous saline is feasible and can be used safely by mobile emergency and intensive care units. PMID:19497463

  11. Factors Affecting the Occurrence of Out-of-Hospital Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Bartkiewicz, Wiesław; Sowizdraniuk, Jarosław; Rosińczuk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This paper aims to discover the risk factors for sudden cardiac arrest (out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest (OHSCA)) which significantly affect the decision about prioritizing emergency interventions before dispatching medical emergency teams, risk of deterioration of the patient's condition at the scene, and emergency procedures. Methods. A retrospective study taking into account the international classification of diseases ICD-10 based on an analysis of medical records of Emergency Medical Service in Wroclaw (Poland). Results. The main risk factor of OHSCA is coexistence of external cause leading to illness or death (ICD Group V-10) as well as the occurrence of diseases from the group of endocrine disorders (group E), in particular diabetes. The increase in the risk of OHSCA incidence is affected by nervous system diseases (group G), especially epilepsy of various etiologies, respiratory diseases (group J), mainly COPD, and bronchial asthma or mental and behavioral disorders (group F), with particular emphasis on the drugs issue. The procedure for receiving calls for Emergency Notification Centre does not take into account clinical risk factors for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Conclusion. Having knowledge of OHSCA risk factors can increase the efficiency of rescue operations from rapid assessment and provision of appropriate medical team, through effective performance of medical emergency treatment and prevention of SCA or finally reducing the costs. PMID:25705520

  12. [Recent treatment of postischaemic anoxic brain damage after cardiac arrest by using therapeutic hypothermia].

    PubMed

    Andjelić, Sladjana

    2008-01-01

    Organ injury caused by ischaemia and anoxia during prolonged cardiac arrest is compounded by reperfusion injury that occurs when spontaneous circulation is restored. Mild hypothermia (32-35 degrees C) is neuroprotective through several mechanisms, including suppression of apoptosis, reduced production of excitotoxins and free radicals, and anti-inflammatory actions. Experimental studies show that hypothermia is more effective the earlier it is started after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Two randomised clinical trials show improved survival and neurological outcome in adults who remained comatose after initial resuscitation from prehospital VF cardiac arrest, and who were cooled after ROSC. Different strategies can be used to induce hypothermia. Optimal timing of therapeutic hypothermia for cardiac ischaemia is unknown. In patients who failed to respond to standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation, intra-arrest cooling using ice-cold intravenous (i.v.) fluid improved the chance of survival. Recently, fasudil, a Rho kinase inhibitor, was reported to prevent cerebral ischaemia in vivo by increasing cerebral blood flow and inhibiting inflammatory responses. In future, two different kinds of protective therapies, BCL-2 overexpression and hypothermia,will both inhibit aspects of apoptotic cell death cascades, and that combination treatment can prolong the temporal "therapeutic window" for gene therapy. PMID:19069351

  13. Prediction of the potential clinical outcomes for post-resuscitated patients after cardiac arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sungmin; Kwon, Bojun; Yun, Il Dong; Lee, Sang Uk; Kim, Kyuseok; Kim, Joonghee

    2013-02-01

    Cerebral injuries after cardiac arrest are serious causes for morbidity. Many previous researches in the medical society have been proposed to prognosticate the functional recoveries of post-resuscitated patients after cardiac arrest, but the validity of suggested features and the automation of prognostication have not been made yet. This paper presents the automatic classification method which predicts the potential clinical outcomes of post-resuscitated patients who suffered from cardiac arrest. The global features and the local features are adapted from the researches from the medical society. The global features, which are consisted of the percentage of the partial volume under the uniformly increasing thresholds, represent the global tendency of apparent diffusion coefficient value in a DWI. The local features are localized and measured on the refined local apparent diffusion coefficient minimal points. The local features represent the ischemic change of small areas in a brain. The features are trained and classified by the random forest method, which have been widely used in the machine learning society for classification. The validity of features is automatically evaluated during the classification process. The proposed method achieved the 0.129 false-positive rate while maintaining the perfect true-positive rate. The area-under-curve of the proposed method was 0.9516, which showed the feasibility and the robustness of the proposed method.

  14. Year in review 2009: Critical Care--cardiac arrest, trauma and disasters.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Jeffery C; Eastman, Alexander L; Pepe, Paul E

    2010-01-01

    During 2009, Critical Care published nine papers on various aspects of resuscitation, prehospital medicine, trauma care and disaster response. One article demonstrated that children as young as 9 years of age can learn cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) effectively, although, depending on their size, some may have difficulty performing it. Another paper showed that while there was a trend toward mild therapeutic hypothermia reducing S-100 levels, there was no statistically significant change. Another predictor study also showed a strong link between acute kidney injury and neurologic outcome while another article described a program in which kidneys were harvested from cardiac arrest patients and showed an 89% graft survival rate. One experimental investigation indicated that when a pump-less interventional lung assist device is present, leaving the device open (unclamped) while performing CPR has no harmful effects on mean arterial pressures and it may have positive effects on blood oxygenation and CO2 clearance. One other study, conducted in the prehospital environment, found that end-tidal CO2 could be useful in diagnosing pulmonary embolism. Three articles addressed disaster medicine, the first of which described a triage system for use during pandemic influenza that demonstrated high reliability in delineating patients with a good chance of survival from those likely to die. The other two studies, both drawn from the 2008 Sichuan earthquake experience, showed success in treating crush injured patients in an on-site tent ICU and, in the second case, how the epidemiology of earthquake injuries and related factors predicted mortality. PMID:21122166

  15. [Emergent coronary artery bypass grafting in a survivor of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, M; Suehiro, K; Kubo, H; Morimoto, N; Shiraishi, K; Kasai, S; Hagioka, S; Naito, H; Nagae, M

    2007-02-01

    We report a case of emergent coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in a survivor of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. A 64-year-old male driver lost consciousness and collapsed in a rice paddy field. A bystander placed him in a car and immediately started cardiopulmonary resuscitation after confirming the presence of pulselessness and apnea. Emergency medical service providers performed a defibrillation of ventricular fibrillation by using an automated external defibrillator (AED), and the patient was transferred to the critical care center in our hospital. Coronary angiography revealed a thrombus in the left main trunk (LMT), total occlusion of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and the right coronary artery (RCA), and 90% stenosis of the left circumflex artery (Cx). Since the patient recovered consciousness 1 hour after admission and did not undergo any critical trauma, an on-pump CABG was performed for 3 vessels. He was discharged on the postoperative day 23, and he resumed a normal life. PMID:17305073

  16. Predicting the outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients using multiple biomarkers and suspension microarray assays.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Hua; Tsai, Min-Shan; Chien, Kuo-Liong; Chang, Wei-Tien; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chen, Shyr-Chyr; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Hsu, Hsin-Yun; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the prognosis for cardiac arrest is still challenging. Combining biomarkers from diverse pathophysiological pathways may provide reliable indicators for the severity of injury and predictors of long-term outcomes. We investigated the feasibility of using a multimarker strategy with key independent biomarkers to improve the prediction of outcomes in cardiac arrest. Adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients with sustained return of spontaneous circulation were prospectively enrolled in this study. Blood samples were taken at 2 and 24 hours after cardiac arrest. Suspension microarray assays were used to test 21 different biomarkers. A total of 99 patients were enrolled, 45 of whom survived to hospital discharge. We identified 11 biomarkers that, when combined with clinical variables and factors of APACHE II score and history of arrhythmia, were independent determinants for outcome of in-hospital mortality (concordance = 0.9249, standard error = 0.0779). Three biomarkers combined with APACHE II and age were independent determinants for favorable neurological outcome at hospital discharge (area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve, 0.938; 95% confidence interval, 0.854 ~ 1.0). In conclusion, a systemic multiple biomarker approach using suspension microarray assays can identify independent predictors and model the outcomes of cardiac arrest patients during the post-cardiac arrest period. PMID:27256246

  17. Predicting the outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients using multiple biomarkers and suspension microarray assays

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chien-Hua; Tsai, Min-Shan; Chien, Kuo-Liong; Chang, Wei-Tien; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chen, Shyr-Chyr; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Hsu, Hsin-Yun; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the prognosis for cardiac arrest is still challenging. Combining biomarkers from diverse pathophysiological pathways may provide reliable indicators for the severity of injury and predictors of long-term outcomes. We investigated the feasibility of using a multimarker strategy with key independent biomarkers to improve the prediction of outcomes in cardiac arrest. Adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients with sustained return of spontaneous circulation were prospectively enrolled in this study. Blood samples were taken at 2 and 24 hours after cardiac arrest. Suspension microarray assays were used to test 21 different biomarkers. A total of 99 patients were enrolled, 45 of whom survived to hospital discharge. We identified 11 biomarkers that, when combined with clinical variables and factors of APACHE II score and history of arrhythmia, were independent determinants for outcome of in-hospital mortality (concordance = 0.9249, standard error = 0.0779). Three biomarkers combined with APACHE II and age were independent determinants for favorable neurological outcome at hospital discharge (area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve, 0.938; 95% confidence interval, 0.854 ~ 1.0). In conclusion, a systemic multiple biomarker approach using suspension microarray assays can identify independent predictors and model the outcomes of cardiac arrest patients during the post-cardiac arrest period. PMID:27256246

  18. Arginine vasopressin in advanced cardiovascular failure during the post-resuscitation phase after cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Viktoria; Luckner, Günter; Jochberger, Stefan; Wenzel, Volker; Ulmer, Hanno; Pajk, Werner; Knotzer, Hans; Friesenecker, Barbara; Lindner, Karl; Hasibeder, Walter; Dünser, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) has been employed successfully during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, but there exist only few data about the effects of AVP infusion for cardiovascular failure during the post-cardiac arrest period. Cardiovascular failure is one of the main causes of death after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Although the "post-resuscitation syndrome" has been described as a "sepsis-like" syndrome, there is little information about the haemodynamic response to AVP in advanced cardiovascular failure after cardiac arrest. In this retrospective study, haemodynamic and laboratory variables in 23 patients with cardiovascular failure unresponsive to standard haemodynamic therapy during the post-cardiac arrest period were obtained before, and 30 min, 1, 4, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after initiation of a supplementary AVP infusion (4 IU/h). During the observation period, AVP significantly increased mean arterial blood pressure (58+/-14 to 75+/-19 mmHg, p < 0.001), and decreased noradrenaline (norepinephrine) (1.31+/-2.14 to 0.23+/-0.3 microg/kg/min, p = 0.03), adrenaline (epinephrine) (0.58+/-0.23 to 0.04+/-0.03 microg/kg/min, p = 0.001), and milrinone requirements (0.46+/-0.15 to 0.33+/-0.22 microg/kg/min, p < 0.001). Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure changed significantly (p < 0.001); an initial increase being followed by a decrease below baseline values. While arterial lactate concentrations (95+/-64 to 21+/-18 mg/dL, p < 0.001) and pH (7.27+/-0.14 to 7.4+/-0.14, p < 0.001) improved significantly, total bilirubin concentrations (1.12+/-0.95 to 3.04+/-3.79 mg/dL, p = 0.001) increased after AVP. There were no differences in the haemodynamic or laboratory response to AVP between survivors and non-survivors. In this study, advanced cardiovascular failure that was unresponsive to standard therapy could be reversed successfully with supplementary AVP infusion in >90% of patients surviving cardiac arrest. PMID:17069952

  19. Protective Effect of Dl-3-n-Butylphthalide on Recovery from Cardiac Arrest and Resuscitation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le; Puchowicz, Michelle A; LaManna, Joseph C; Xu, Kui

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of Dl-3-n-butylphthalide (NBP), a clinically used drug for stroke patients in China, on the recovery following cardiac arrest and resuscitation in rats. Male Wistar rats (3-month old) underwent cardiac arrest (12 min) and resuscitation. Rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: sham non-arrested group, vehicle group (vehicle-treated, 7 days before cardiac arrest and 4 days post-resuscitation), NBP pre-treated group (NBP-treated, 7 days before cardiac arrest), and NBP post-treated group (NBP-treated, 4 days post-resuscitation). Overall survival rates and hippocampal neuronal counts were determined in each group at 4 days post-resuscitation. Results showed that NBP pre-treated group (80 %) and NBP post-treated group (86 %) had significantly higher survival rates compared to that of the vehicle group (50 %). At 4 days of recovery, only about 20 % of hippocampal neurons were preserved in the vehicle group compared to the sham non-arrested group. The hippocampal CA1 cell counts in the NBP pre-treated group and NBP post-treated group were significantly higher than the counts in the vehicle group, about 50-60 % of the counts of non-arrested rats. The data suggest that NBP has both preventive and therapeutic effect on improving outcome following cardiac arrest and resuscitation, and NBP might be a potential early phase treatment for patients recovered from cardiac arrest and resuscitation. PMID:27526121

  20. Effect of Cardiac Arrest on Cognitive Impairment and Hippocampal Plasticity in Middle-Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Kunjan R.; Alekseyenko, Aleksey; Binkert, Marc; Stransky, Kenneth; Lin, Hung Wen; Barnes, Carol A.; Wright, Clinton B.; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary arrest is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States that usually occurs in the aged population. Cardiac arrest (CA) induces global ischemia, disrupting global cerebral circulation that results in ischemic brain injury and leads to cognitive impairments in survivors. Ischemia-induced neuronal damage in the hippocampus following CA can result in the impairment of cognitive function including spatial memory. In the present study, we used a model of asphyxial CA (ACA) in nine month old male Fischer 344 rats to investigate cognitive and synaptic deficits following mild global cerebral ischemia. These experiments were performed with the goals of 1) establishing a model of CA in nine month old middle-aged rats; and 2) to test the hypothesis that learning and memory deficits develop following mild global cerebral ischemia in middle-aged rats. To test this hypothesis, spatial memory assays (Barnes circular platform maze and contextual fear conditioning) and field recordings (long-term potentiation and paired-pulse facilitation) were performed. We show that following ACA in nine month old middle-aged rats, there is significant impairment in spatial memory formation, paired-pulse facilitation n dysfunction, and a reduction in the number of non-compromised hippocampal Cornu Ammonis 1 and subiculum neurons. In conclusion, nine month old animals undergoing cardiac arrest have impaired survival, deficits in spatial memory formation, and synaptic dysfunction. PMID:25933411

  1. Epidemiology of traumatic cardiac arrest in patients presenting to emergency department at a level 1 trauma center

    PubMed Central

    Bhoi, Sanjeev; Mishra, Prakash Ranjan; Soni, Kapil Dev; Baitha, Upendra; Sinha, Tej Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: There is a paucity of literature on prehospital care and epidemiology of traumatic cardiac arrest (TCA) in India. This study highlights the profile and characteristics of TCA. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted to study epidemiological profile of TCA patients ≥1 year presenting to a level 1 trauma center of India. Results: One thousand sixty-one patients were recruited in the study. The median age (interquartile range) was 32 (23–45) years (male:female ratio of 5.9:1). Asystole (253), pulseless electrical activity (11), ventricular fibrillation (six), and ventricular tachycardia (five) were initial arrest rhythm. Road traffic crash (RTC) (57.16%), fall from height (18.52%), and assault (10.51%) were modes of injury. Prehospital care was provided by police (36.59%), ambulance (10.54%), relatives (45.40%), and bystanders (7.47% cases). Return of spontaneous circulation was seen in 69 patients, of which only three survived to hospital discharge. Conclusion: RTC in young males was a major cause of TCA. Asystole was the most common arrest rhythm. Police personnel were major prehospital service provider. Prehospital care needs improvement including the development of robust TCA registry.

  2. Potential cardiac arrest – an observational study of pre-hospital medical response

    PubMed Central

    Zakariassen, Erik; Hunskaar, Steinar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A previous study showed that Norwegian GPs on call attended around 40% of out-of-hospital medical emergencies. We wanted to investigate the alarms of prehospital medical resources and the doctors' responses in situations of potential cardiac arrests. Design and setting A three-month prospective data collection was undertaken from three emergency medical communication centres, covering a population of 816,000 residents. From all emergency medical events, a sub-group of patients who received resuscitation, or who were later pronounced dead at site, was selected for further analysis. Results 5,105 medical emergencies involving 5,180 patients were included, of which 193 met the inclusion criteria. The GP on call was alarmed in 59 %, and an anaesthesiologist in 43 % of the cases. When alarmed, a GP attended in 84 % and an anaesthesiologist in 87 % of the cases. Among the patients who died, the GP on call was alarmed most frequently. Conclusion Events involving patients in need of resuscitation are rare, but medical response in the form of the attendance of prehospital personnel is significant. Norwegian GPs have a higher call-out rate for patients in severe situations where resuscitation was an option of treatment, compared with other “red-response” situations. Key pointsThis study investigates alarms of and call-outs among GPs and anaesthesiologists on call, in the most acute clinical situations:Medical emergencies involving patients in need of resuscitation were rare.The health care contribution by pre-hospital personnel being called out was significant.Compared with other acute situations, the GP had a higher attendance rate to patients in life-threatening situations. PMID:27092724

  3. Good neurologic recovery after cardiac arrest using hypothermia through continuous renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yu-jie; Ning, Bo; Cao, Wei-hong; Liu, Tao; Liu, Lei

    2013-12-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is becoming a standard of care to mitigate neurologic injury in cardiac arrest survivors. Several cooling methods are available for use in TH. For maintaining a target temperature, intravascular cooling is superior to, more efficacious than, and safer than surface cooling methods. The use of an intravenous cooling catheter is independently associated with a higher odds ratio for survival. However, many techniques use commercially developed equipment that is expensive to purchase and use. The application and popularization of the intravascular cooling method have been difficult. In patients with pulmonary edema or cardiac insufficiency, liquid is restricted, so intravascular cooling systems cannot be used. Studies have shown abnormalities mimicking the immunologic and coagulation disorders observed in severe sepsis. Continuous renal replacement therapy has been widely used in the intensive care unit to improve clinical parameters and survival in patients with multiple-organ dysfunction of septic origin. Continuous renal replacement therapy can also be used as another type of core cooling method. We used continuous renal replacement therapy as a cooling method to induce TH in a patient who had a cardiac arrest, and the patient regained consciousness 52 hours later. PMID:23953774

  4. Cardiac arrest during radical nephrectomy due to a mass in the right ventricular outflow tract.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Young; Baek, Seung-Hoon; Yoon, Ji Uk; Lee, Dong Hoon; Byeon, Gyeong-Jo; Ahn, Ji Hye

    2016-09-01

    We report cardiac arrest due to obstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) caused by an RVOT mass that was not identified preoperatively. A 62-year-old woman with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) experienced deteriorating hypotension and bradycardia during radical nephrectomy. Hemodynamic stability was maintained on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and after surgery, she was transferred to the intensive care unit. On postoperative day 3, transthoracic echocardiography showed an intracardiac mass obstructing the RVOT, which caused severe functional pulmonary stenosis and moderate resting pulmonary hypertension. Despite maintaining extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, the patient died of cardiac arrest. Our findings suggest that it may be necessary to perform additional tests if RCC has invaded the renal vein and inferior vena cava or if a patient with RCC has abnormal cardiovascular symptoms without definite etiology for exclusion of cardiac metastasis or tumor thrombus. In addition, intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography might be the procedure of choice for the evaluation of these conditions because other diagnostic tests are difficult to perform during surgery. In conclusion, for patients with acute hemodynamic instability for whom other possible causes have been excluded, we recommend that anesthesiologists use transesophageal echocardiography to detect outflow tract obstruction or pulmonary thromboembolism and perform anesthetic management. PMID:27555152

  5. A rare combination of undiagnosed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy revealed by intraoperative anaphylaxis resulting in acute left ventricular outflow obstruction and cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Smith, Bradford B; Nickels, Andrew S; Sviggum, Hans P

    2016-06-01

    A 75-year-old female presented for left total hip reimplantation and suffered pulseless electrical activity arrest upon lateral positioning and administering vancomycin. Resuscitation was achieved according to Advanced Cardiac Life Support protocol. Post-event echocardiography showed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with asymmetrical septal thickening, an under-filled left ventricle, dynamic left ventricular outflow obstruction, and severe mitral regurgitation related to systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve. Laboratory analysis showed a tryptase level of 209 ng/mL. After multispecialty evaluation, it was concluded that the patient's arrest was due to vancomycin anaphylaxis in the setting of previously undiagnosed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy leading to acute left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. After medical optimization of the patient's cardiomyopathy and an evaluation of potential intraoperative allergic triggers, the patient underwent a successful hip reimplantation without incident. This case presents a novel combination of events leading to intraoperative cardiac arrest. Rapid identification and an understanding of the cause(s) of cardiac arrest in this setting are critical for effective perioperative care. PMID:27185714

  6. Influence of Chest Compressions on Circulation during the Peri-Cardiac Arrest Period in Porcine Models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Walline, Joseph; Zheng, Liangliang; Fu, Yangyang; Yao, Dongqi; Zhu, Huadong; Liu, Xiaohe; Chai, Yanfen; Wang, Zhong; Yu, Xuezhong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Starting chest compressions immediately after a defibrillation shock might be harmful, if the victim already had a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and yet was still being subjected to external compressions at the same time. The objective of this study was to study the influence of chest compressions on circulation during the peri-cardiac arrest period. Design Prospective, randomized controlled study. Setting Animal experimental center in Peking Union Medical Collage Hospital, Beijing, China. Subjects Healthy 3-month-old male domestic pigs. Interventions 44 pigs (28±2 kg) were randomly assigned to three groups: Group I (non-arrested with compressions) (n = 12); Group II (arrested with compressions only) (n = 12); Group III (ROSC after compressions and defibrillation) (n = 20). In Groups I and II, compressions were performed to a depth of 5cm (Ia and IIa, n = 6) or a depth of 3cm (Ib and IIb, n = 6) respectively, while in Group III, the animals which had just achieved ROSC (n = 18) were compressed to a depth of 5cm (IIIa, n = 6), a depth of 3cm (IIIb, n = 6), or had no compressions (IIIc, n = 6). Hemodynamic parameters were collected and analyzed. Measurements and Findings Hemodynamics were statistically different between Groups Ia and Ib when different depths of compressions were performed (p < 0.05). In Group II, compressions were beneficial and hemodynamics correlated with the depth of compressions (p < 0.05). In Group III, compressions that continued after ROSC produced a reduction in arterial pressure (p < 0.05). Conclusions Chest compressions might be detrimental to hemodynamics in the early post-ROSC stage. The deeper the compressions were, the better the effect on hemodynamics during cardiac arrest, but the worse the effect on hemodynamics after ROSC. PMID:27168071

  7. Identification of high-risk communities for unattended out-of-hospital cardiac arrests using GIS.

    PubMed

    Semple, Hugh M; Cudnik, Michael T; Sayre, Michael; Keseg, David; Warden, Craig R; Sasson, Comilla

    2013-04-01

    Improving survival rates for out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) at the neighborhood level is increasingly seen as priority in US cities. Since wide disparities exist in OHCA rates at the neighborhood level, it is necessary to locate neighborhoods where people are at elevated risk for cardiac arrest and target these for educational outreach and other mitigation strategies. This paper describes a GIS-based methodology that was used to identify communities with high risk for cardiac arrests in Franklin County, Ohio during the period 2004-2009. Prior work in this area used a single criterion, i.e., the density of OHCA events, to define the high-risk areas, and a single analytical technique, i.e., kernel density analysis, to identify the high-risk communities. In this paper, two criteria are used to identify the high-risk communities, the rate of OHCA incidents and the level of bystander CPR participation. We also used Local Moran's I combined with traditional map overlay techniques to add robustness to the methodology for identifying high-risk communities for OHCA. Based on the criteria established for this study, we successfully identified several communities that were at higher risk for OHCA than neighboring communities. These communities had incidence rates of OHCA that were significantly higher than neighboring communities and bystander rates that were significantly lower than neighboring communities. Other risk factors for OHCA were also high in the selected communities. The methodology employed in this study provides for a measurement conceptualization of OHCA clusters that is much broader than what has been previously offered. It is also statistically reliable and can be easily executed using a GIS. PMID:22983677

  8. Drug administration in animal studies of cardiac arrest does not reflect human clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Joshua C.; Rittenberger, Jon C.; Menegazzi, James J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction To date, there is no evidence showing a benefit from any advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) medication in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA), despite animal data to the contrary. One explanation may be a difference in the time to first drug administration. Our previous work has shown the mean time to first drug administration in clinical trials is 19.4 minutes. We hypothesized that the average time to drug administration in large animal experiments occurs earlier than in OOHCA clinical trials. Methods We conducted a literature review between 1990 and 2006 in MEDLINE using the following MeSH headings: swine, dogs, resuscitation, heart arrest, EMS, EMT, ambulance, ventricular fibrillation, drug therapy, epinephrine, vasopressin, amiodarone, lidocaine, magnesium, and sodium bicarbonate. We reviewed the abstracts of 331 studies and 197 full manuscripts. Exclusion criteria included: non-peer reviewed, all without primary animal data, and traumatic models. From these, we identified 119 papers that contained unique information on time to medication administration. The data are reported as mean, ranges, and 95% confidence intervals. Mean time to first drug administration in animal laboratory studies and clinical trials was compared with a t-test. Regression analysis was performed to determine if time to drug predicted ROSC. Results Mean time to first drug administration in 2378 animals was 9.5 minutes (range 3.0–28.0; 95% CI around mean 2.78, 16.22). This is less than the time reported in clinical trials (19.4 min, p<0.001). Time to drug predicted ROSC (Odds Ratio 0.844; 95% CI 0.738, 0.966). Conclusion Shorter drug delivery time in animal models of cardiac arrest may be one reason for the failure of animal studies to translate successfully into the clinical arena. PMID:17360097

  9. Relation of Obesity to Survival After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Tanush; Kolte, Dhaval; Mohananey, Divyanshu; Khera, Sahil; Goel, Kashish; Mondal, Pratik; Aronow, Wilbert S; Jain, Diwakar; Cooper, Howard A; Iwai, Sei; Frishman, William H; Bhatt, Deepak L; Fonarow, Gregg C; Panza, Julio A

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that obesity is paradoxically associated with improved outcomes in many cardiovascular (CV) disease states; however, whether obesity affects survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) has not been well examined. We queried the 2003 to 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases to identify all patients aged ≥18 years who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation for IHCA. Obese patients were identified using the co-morbidity variable for obesity, as defined in Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases. Survival to hospital discharge was compared between obese and nonobese patients using multivariate regression models. Of 836,289 patients with IHCA, 67,216 (8.0%) were obese. Obese patients were younger and more likely to be women compared with nonobese patients. Despite being younger, obese patients had significantly higher prevalence of most CV co-morbidities such as dyslipidemia, coronary artery disease, previous myocardial infarction, heart failure, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, and chronic renal failure (p <0.001 for all). Obese patients were more likely to have ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation as the initial cardiac arrest rhythm (22.3% vs 20.9%; p <0.001). After multivariate risk adjustment, obese patients had improved survival to hospital discharge compared with nonobese patients (31.4% vs 24.1%; unadjusted odds ratio 1.44, 95% CI 1.42 to 1.47, p <0.001; adjusted odds ratio 1.15, 95% CI 1.13 to 1.17, p <0.001). Similar results were seen in patients with CV or non-CV conditions as the primary diagnosis and in those with ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation or pulseless electrical activity/asystole as the cardiac arrest rhythm. In conclusion, this large retrospective analysis of a nationwide cohort of patients with IHCA demonstrated higher risk-adjusted odds of survival in obese patients, consistent with an "obesity paradox." PMID:27381664

  10. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: 10 years of progress in research and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hollenberg, J; Svensson, L; Rosenqvist, M

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac disease is the most common cause of mortality in Western countries, with most deaths due to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). In Sweden, 5000-10 000 OHCAs occur annually. During the last decade, the time from cardiac arrest to start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation has increased, whereas survival has remained unchanged or even increased. Resuscitation of OHCA patients is based on the 'chain-of-survival' concept, including early (i) access, (ii) CPR, (iii) defibrillation, (iv) advanced cardiac life support and (v) post-resuscitation care. Regarding early access, agonal breathing, telephone-guided CPR and the use of 'track and trigger systems' to detect deterioration in patients' condition prior to an arrest are all important. The use of compression-only CPR by bystanders as an alternative to standard CPR in OHCA has been debated. Based on recent findings, guidelines recommend telephone-guided chest compression-only CPR for untrained rescuers, but trained personnel are still advised to give standard CPR with both compressions and ventilation, and the method of choice for this large group remains unclear and demands for a randomized study. Data have shown the benefit of public access defibrillation for dispatched rescuers (e.g. police and fire fighters) but data are not as strong for the use of automated defibrillators (AEDs) by trained or untrained rescuers. Postresuscitation, use of therapeutic hypothermia, the importance of specific prognostic survival factors in the intensive care unit and the widespread use of percutaneous coronary intervention have all been considered. Despite progress in research and improved treatment regimens, most patients do not survive OHCA. Particular areas of interest for improving survival include (i) identification of high-risk patients prior to their arrest (e.g. early warning symptoms and genes); (ii) increased use of bystander CPR training (e.g. in schools) and simplified CPR techniques; (iii