Science.gov

Sample records for cardiac arrest cases

  1. Cardiac arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment for cardiac arrest. It is a medical device that gives an electrical shock to the heart. The shock can get the heart beating normally again. Small, portable defibrillators are often available in public areas for ...

  2. A Unique Case of Cardiac Arrest following K2 Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Wannenburg, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) accounts for up to 450,000 deaths every year in the United States (Zipes et al. (2006)). Most cases of sudden cardiac death occur in subjects with no prior history of heart disease (Myerburg et al. (1998)). The incidence of sudden death in a general population has been shown to increase contemporaneously with substance abuse (Phillips et al. (1999)). The causative association of sudden death with cocaine, methadone, and volatile agents is well established (Adgey et al. (1995) and Isner et al. (1986)). We describe a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest temporally related to abuse of the synthetic cannabinoid street drug known as K2. To our knowledge, there are no previously documented cases of sudden cardiac death associated with synthetic cannabinoids although they have been linked to myocardial infarction in teenagers despite normal coronary angiography (Mir et al. (2011)). PMID:24963415

  3. [RESUSCITATION MEASURES IN CASE OF CARDIAC ARREST].

    PubMed

    Lamhaut, Lionel; Cariou, Alain

    2015-09-01

    Improving the survival rate of sudden cardiac death victims mainly relies in the prompt activation of the "chain of survival", resulting in efficient performance at basic life support maneuvers by bystanders. Among these maneuvers, cardiac compressions and use of automated external defibrillation are the most important components. Since basic life support is easy to learn, spreading its practice throughout the general population should be a priority for public health policy. Following initial resuscitation, the last step of the "chain of survival" is ensured by expert pre-hospital and ICU teams, which are able to provide appropriate care. Organization and sequence of these different steps are the object of regularly updated guidelines, summarized in the form of algorithms that facilitate their application. PMID:26619726

  4. Sports Induced Cardiac Arrest: A Case of Missed Rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Parshotam L; Nain, Prabhdeep Singh

    2015-01-01

    Exercise induced rhabdomyolysis although uncommon, is well known in strenuous and exhaustive sports like marathons, cycling and wrestlers. But it is not known in Kabaddi players. We report a case of nearly fatal rhabdomyolysis which was missed during early resuscitation in emergency room and lead to cardiac arrest due to catastrophic metabolic acidosis and severe -hyperkalemia. After high quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation and return of spontaneous rhythm, emergency resuscitative exploratory laparotomy was performed for suspected bladder injury which was negative. He had remarkable recovery over 24 h following diagnosis and aggressive supportive management including peritoneal dialysis. Heat stroke and rhabdomyolysis should be suspected early in players playing strenuous sports in tropical countries even during winter. High degree of suspicion and early aggressive general support is the key to success for unusual clinical presentation of any such clinical entity. PMID:26500986

  5. Sports Induced Cardiac Arrest: A Case of Missed Rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Parshotam L; Luthra, Neeru; Nain, Prabhdeep Singh

    2015-09-01

    Exercise induced rhabdomyolysis although uncommon, is well known in strenuous and exhaustive sports like marathons, cycling and wrestlers. But it is not known in Kabaddi players. We report a case of nearly fatal rhabdomyolysis which was missed during early resuscitation in emergency room and lead to cardiac arrest due to catastrophic metabolic acidosis and severe -hyperkalemia. After high quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation and return of spontaneous rhythm, emergency resuscitative exploratory laparotomy was performed for suspected bladder injury which was negative. He had remarkable recovery over 24 h following diagnosis and aggressive supportive management including peritoneal dialysis. Heat stroke and rhabdomyolysis should be suspected early in players playing strenuous sports in tropical countries even during winter. High degree of suspicion and early aggressive general support is the key to success for unusual clinical presentation of any such clinical entity. PMID:26500986

  6. [Thoracic lavage and open cardiac massage as treatment of hypothermic cardiac arrest--case report].

    PubMed

    Koponen, Timo; Vänni, Ville; Kettunen, Minna; Reinikainen, Matti; Hakala, Tapio

    2016-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass is the treatment of choice for a severely hypothermic patient with cardiac arrest. However, the treatment is not always available. We describe a successful three-and-a-half hour resuscitation of a hypothermic cardiac arrest patient with manual chest compressions followed by open cardiac massage and rewarming with thoracic lavage. PMID:27188092

  7. Therapeutic Hypothermia after Prolonged Cardiac Arrest: Case Report with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Sankalp; Garg, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    Patients who survive cardiac arrest often develop severe neurological dysfunction due to the hypoxic brain injury and reperfusion induced cell death. Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) has become a standard therapy of cerebral protection following the successful return of spontaneous circulation in patients of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, according to American heart association guidelines. This is a case report of a 30-year-old patient who developed in-hospital cardiac arrest and was revived after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and also required primary angioplasty. TH was then established with local measures for 24 hours for cerebral protection. The patient was gradually and successfully weaned off from ventilator with no neurological impairment. There is an increasing evidence of TH and its protective mechanisms in patients with non-shockable arrest rhythms with particular emphasis on neurological outcomes. This article emphasizes the role of TH in every successful CPR irrespective of the cardiac rhythm. PMID:26500937

  8. Cardiac arrest in children.

    PubMed

    Tress, Erika E; Kochanek, Patrick M; Saladino, Richard A; Manole, Mioara D

    2010-07-01

    Major advances in the field of pediatric cardiac arrest (CA) were made during the last decade, starting with the publication of pediatric Utstein guidelines, the 2005 recommendations by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, and culminating in multicenter collaborations. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of in-hospital and out-of-hospital CA are now well described. Four phases of CA are described and the term "post-cardiac arrest syndrome" has been proposed, along with treatment goals for each of its four phases: immediate post-arrest, early post-arrest, intermediate and recovery phase. Hypothermia is recommended to be considered as a therapy for post-CA syndrome in comatose patients after CA, and large multicenter prospective studies are underway. We reviewed landmark articles related to pediatric CA published during the last decade. We present the current knowledge of epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of CA relevant to pre-hospital and acute care health practitioners. PMID:20930971

  9. Back pain, leg swelling and a cardiac arrest: an interesting case of endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Joseph; Hatcher, James; Riddell, Anna; Tiberi, Simon

    2014-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman with a history of tissue aortic valve replacement and chronic back pain presented to the emergency department with a suspected right leg deep vein thrombosis. A recent outpatient MRI had revealed discitis. A ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest occurred in the emergency department. Cardiac output was restored on the fifth defibrillation. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed large aortic valve vegetations. Clinical impression was of infective endocarditis with cardiac arrest secondary to coronary artery embolisation. Peripheral blood cultures grew Cardiobacterium hominis, and appropriate intravenous antibiotic therapy was administered. The infected prosthetic valve was excised. The patient experienced postoperative complete heart block and a right hemisphere cerebrovascular accident, however she is now recovering well. This case describes an unusual case of infective endocarditis secondary to C. hominis, with disc, leg, coronary artery and brain septic embolisation. Infective endocarditis is an important differential diagnosis in multisystem presentations. PMID:24859548

  10. Cardiac arrest during dipyridamole imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, M.S.; McCauley, C.S.

    1988-05-01

    A case of cardiac arrest and subsequent acute myocardial infarction occurring during thallium-201 imaging with oral dipyridamole augmentation is presented. Previous reports emphasizing the safety of this procedure are briefly reviewed and a recommendation for close hemodynamic and arrhythmia monitoring during the study is made. Large doses of oral dipyridamole may be contraindicated in patients with unstable angina.

  11. [A Successful Case of Recovery from the Amniotic Fluid Embolism with Cardiac Arrest during the Operation].

    PubMed

    Oi, Chikako; Hori, Yasuo; Sano, Hiroaki; Yamama, Yoshihiro; Nakatani, Keiji

    2015-11-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is a disorder with a high mortality rate. We present a case of AFE with cardiac arrest during the cesarean section who recovered sequela. A 28-year-old woman was diagnosed as low lying placenta and planned to undergo cesarean section in 38th gestational week. She had atypical genital bleeding in 32nd gestational weeks and she received emergency cesarean section under general anesthesia. After expulsion of her fetus, she lost many blood. We suspected obstetric DIC and started therapy immediately, but cardiac arrest occurred suddenly. She was resuscitated, and we decided to suspend the operation with temporary gauze-packing. After in better general condition, we removed the packed gauze from her abdomen. She could leave the intensive care unit 7 days after the first operation. In this case, the crucial points for successful resuscitation were prompt obstetric anesthesiologist involvement and good communication with obstetricians. PMID:26689072

  12. [Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest].

    PubMed

    Virkkunen, Ilkka; Hoppu, Sanna; Kämäräinen, Antti

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac arrest as the first symptom of coronary artery disease is not uncommon. Some of previously healthy people with sudden cardiac arrest may be saved by effective resuscitation and post-resuscitative therapy. The majority of cardiac arrest patients experience the cardiac arrest outside of the hospital, in which case early recognition of lifelessness, commencement of basic life support and entry to professional care without delay are the prerequisites for recovery. After the heart has started beating again, the clinical picture of post-resuscitation syndrome must be recognized and appropriate treatment utilized. PMID:22204143

  13. A Case of Survival after Cardiac Arrest and 3½ Hours of Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Nusbaum, Derek M.; Bassett, Scott T.; Gregoric, Igor D.; Kar, Biswajit

    2014-01-01

    Although survival rates after cardiac arrest remain low, new techniques are improving patients' outcomes. We present the case of a 40-year-old man who survived a cardiac arrest that lasted approximately 3½ hours. Resuscitation was performed with strict adherence to American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology Advanced Cardiac Life Support guidelines until bedside extracorporeal membrane oxygenation could be placed. A hypothermia protocol was initiated immediately afterwards. The patient had a full neurologic recovery and was bridged from dual ventricular assist devices to a total artificial heart. On hospital day 160, he underwent orthotopic heart and cadaveric kidney transplantation. On day 179, he was discharged from the hospital in ambulatory condition. To our knowledge, this is the only reported case in which a patient survived with good neurologic outcomes after a resuscitation that lasted as long as 3½ hours. Documented cases of resuscitation with good recovery after prolonged arrest give hope for improved overall outcomes in the future. PMID:24808789

  14. Ibogaine-associated cardiac arrest and death: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Meisner, Jessica A.; Wilcox, Susan R.; Richards, Jeremy B.

    2016-01-01

    A naturally occurring hallucinogenic plant alkaloid, ibogaine has been used as an adjuvant for opiate withdrawal for the past 50 years. In the setting of an escalating nationwide opiate epidemic, use of substances such as ibogaine may also increase. Therefore, familiarity with the mechanisms and potential adverse effects of ibogaine is important for clinicians. We present the case report of a man whose use of ibogaine resulted in cardiac arrest and death, complemented by a review of the literature regarding ibogaine’s clinical effects. A 40-year-old man who used ibogaine for symptoms of heroin withdrawal suffered acute cardiac arrest leading to cerebral edema and brain death. His presentation was consistent with ibogaine-induced cardiotoxicity and ibogaine-induced cardiac arrest, and a review of the literature regarding the history, mechanisms, risks and clinical outcomes associated with ibogaine is presented. The case presented underscores the significant potential clinical risks of ibogaine. It is important the healthcare community be aware of the possible effects of ibogaine such that clinicians can provide informed counseling to their patients regarding the risks of attempting detoxification with ibogaine. PMID:27141291

  15. Ibogaine-associated cardiac arrest and death: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Meisner, Jessica A; Wilcox, Susan R; Richards, Jeremy B

    2016-04-01

    A naturally occurring hallucinogenic plant alkaloid, ibogaine has been used as an adjuvant for opiate withdrawal for the past 50 years. In the setting of an escalating nationwide opiate epidemic, use of substances such as ibogaine may also increase. Therefore, familiarity with the mechanisms and potential adverse effects of ibogaine is important for clinicians. We present the case report of a man whose use of ibogaine resulted in cardiac arrest and death, complemented by a review of the literature regarding ibogaine's clinical effects. A 40-year-old man who used ibogaine for symptoms of heroin withdrawal suffered acute cardiac arrest leading to cerebral edema and brain death. His presentation was consistent with ibogaine-induced cardiotoxicity and ibogaine-induced cardiac arrest, and a review of the literature regarding the history, mechanisms, risks and clinical outcomes associated with ibogaine is presented. The case presented underscores the significant potential clinical risks of ibogaine. It is important the healthcare community be aware of the possible effects of ibogaine such that clinicians can provide informed counseling to their patients regarding the risks of attempting detoxification with ibogaine. PMID:27141291

  16. Cardiac Arrest and Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Case of Medical Heuristics

    PubMed Central

    Ajayi, Tokunbo; Okudo, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient clinical data from patients is a major cause of errors in medical diagnostics. In an attempt to make a diagnosis, initial clinical information provided to the physician may be overly relied on as the only information required in making diagnosis leading to anchoring. Failure to rely on differential diagnoses in spite of new signs and symptoms or rethinking of initial hypothesis may lead to fixation on a certain diagnosis, which may lead to significant morbidity and mortality. In the event that there is an anchoring heuristic, like in our patient, it is important to consider differential diagnoses; however, it is not wrong to rely on some form of anchor. We report a case of a 62-year-old male with a history of multiple medical conditions and a history of acetaminophen overdose who presented to the hospital with large amounts of coffee ground emesis. He was subsequently transferred to the liver transplant center on discovery that he was in fulminant hepatic failure and died two days later in spite of aggressive medical treatment. PMID:27366152

  17. Asystolic Cardiac Arrest of Unknown Duration in Profound Hypothermia and Polysubstance Overdose: A Case Report of Complete Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Lubana, Sandeep Singh; Genin, Dennis Iilya; Singh, Navdeep; De La Cruz, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 20 Final Diagnosis: Asystolic cardiac arrest in profound hypothermia and poly-substance overdose Symptoms: Cardiac arrestcardiac arrhythmia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Endotracheal intubation • hemodialysis Specialty: Critical Care Medicine Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Opioid addiction and overdose is a serious problem worldwide. Fatal overdoses from opioids are responsible for numerous deaths and are increasing, especially if taken in combination with other psychoactive substances. Combined with environmental exposure, opioid overdose can cause profound hypothermia. Opioid abuse and other drugs of abuse impair thermoregulation, leading to severe hypothermia. Both drug overdose and severe hypothermia can cause cardiac arrest. Case Report: We report a case of 20-year-old man with history of polysubstance abuse presenting with severe hypothermia and asystole of unknown duration with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) achieved after 28 minutes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Urine toxicology was positive for cocaine, heroin, and benzodiazepine, along with positive blood alcohol level. The patient was rewarmed using non-invasive techniques. Hospital course was complicated by acute renal failure (ARF), severe rhabdomyolysis, severe hyperkalemia, ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), shock liver, coagulopathy, and aspiration pneumonia. Conclusions: Survival with full cardiovascular and neurologic recovery after a cardiac arrest caused by drug overdose in the setting of severe hypothermia is still possible, even if the cardiac arrest is of unknown or prolonged duration. Patients with severe hypothermia experiencing cardiac arrest/hemodynamic instability can be rewarmed using non-invasive methods and may not necessarily need invasive rewarming techniques. PMID:26054008

  18. Cardiac arrest and pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Tabitha A; Sanson, Tracy G

    2009-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary arrest in pregnancy is rare occurring in 1 in 30,000 pregnancies. When it does occur, it is important for a clinician to be familiar with the features peculiar to the pregnant state. Knowledge of the anatomic and physiologic changes of pregnancy is helpful in the treatment and diagnosis. Although the main focus should be on the mother, it should not be forgotten that there is another potential life at stake. Resuscitation of the mother is performed in the same manner as in any other patient, except for a few minor adjustments because of the changes of pregnancy. The specialties of obstetrics and neonatology should be involved early in the process to ensure appropriate treatment of both mother and the newborn. This article will explore the changes that occur in pregnancy and their impact on treatment. The common causes of maternal cardiac arrest will be discussed briefly. PMID:19561954

  19. [Diagnosis of essential thrombocythemia after myocardial infarction and cardiac arrest: A case report].

    PubMed

    Cartigny, G; Faivre, V; Stamboul, K; Aulagne, J; Cottin, Y

    2015-09-01

    Acute coronary syndrome is now a well-known disease, with codified treatments. The main presentation is chest pain, but more and more cases are revealed by cardiorespiratory arrest thanks to pre-hospital care. And, depending on the evolution in such situations, cardiocirculatory support techniques like extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can be implemented. If the more common cause of SCA is atherosclerosis, consequence of the combination of one or more cardiovascular risk factors, there are rare aetiologies, which include myeloproliferative syndromes, in particular essential thrombocythemia. We describe the case of a 34-year-old man presenting with anterior ST-elevation myocardial infarction complicated by an initial cardiac arrest, whose aetiology is unknown essential thrombocythemia, and its therapeutic management requiring circulatory support by ECMO and IMPELLA(®) techniques. PMID:26044307

  20. Registry of Unexplained Cardiac Arrest

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-16

    Cardiac Arrest; Long QT Syndrome; Brugada Syndrome; Catecholaminergi Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia; Idiopathic VentricularFibrillation; Early Repolarization Syndrome; Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy

  1. Neuroprognostication After Pediatric Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Kirschen, Matthew P.; Topjian, Alexis A.; Hammond, Rachel; Illes, Judy; Abend, Nicholas S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Management decisions and parental counseling after pediatric cardiac arrest depend on the ability of physicians to make accurate and timely predictions regarding neurological recovery. We evaluated neurologists and intensivists performing neuroprognostication after cardiac arrest to determine prediction agreement, accuracy, and confidence. METHODS Pediatric neurologists (n = 10) and intensivists (n = 9) reviewed 18 cases of children successfully resuscitated from a cardiac arrest and managed in the pediatric intensive care unit. Cases were sequentially presented (after arrest day 1, days 2–4, and days 5–7), with updated examinations, neurophysiologic data, and neuroimaging data. At each time period, physicians predicted outcome by Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category and specified prediction confidence. RESULTS Predicted discharge Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category versus actual hospital discharge Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category outcomes were compared. Exact (Predicted Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category – Actual Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category = 0) and close (Predicted Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category – Actual Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category = ±1) outcome prediction accuracies for all physicians improved over successive periods (P < 0.05). Prediction accuracy did not differ significantly between physician groups at any period or overall. Agreement improved over time among neurologists (day 1 Kappa [κ], 0.28; days 2–4 κ, 0.43; days 5–7 κ, 0.68) and among intensivists (day 1 κ, 0.30; days 2–4 κ, 0.44; days 5–7 κ, 0.57). Prediction confidence increased over time (P < 0.001) and did not differ between physician groups. CONCLUSIONS Inter-rater agreement among neurologists and among intensivists improved over time and reached moderate levels. For all physicians, prediction accuracy and confidence improved over time. Further prospective research is needed to better characterize how physicians

  2. Recovery of brain function after cardiac arrest, case report and review.

    PubMed

    Nekoui, A; Tresierra, del Carmen Escalante; Abdolmohammadi, S; Charbonneau, S; Blaise, G

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral hypoxia during cardiac arrest is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in survival victims. To reduce cerebral damage, studies focus on finding effective treatments during the resuscitation period. Our report focuses on a 36-year-old police officer who had had two cardiac arrests (one at home and one at the hospital). After acute treatment, his cardiac and brain functions recovered impressively. Neuropsychological results were normal except for mild anomia. He also reported some retrograde memory loss. Surprisingly, he also reported an improvement in a very specific capacity, his episodic memory. We here review the possible causes and mechanisms that may have affected his memory abilities. PMID:27363214

  3. Spontaneous defibrillation after cessation of resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a case of Lazarus phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Kämäräinen, Antti; Virkkunen, Ilkka; Holopainen, Leevi; Erkkilä, Elja-Pekka; Yli-Hankala, Arvi; Tenhunen, Jyrki

    2007-12-01

    This report describes a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with spontaneous defibrillation and subsequent return of circulation after cessation of resuscitative efforts. A 47-year-old man was found in cardiac arrest and resuscitation was initiated. As no response was achieved, the efforts were withdrawn and final registered cardiac rhythm was ventricular fibrillation. Fifteen minutes later the patient was found to be normotensive and breathing spontaneously. The patient made a poor neurological recovery and died 3 months after the arrest. The authors are unable to give an explanation to the event, but suspect the effect of adrenaline combined with mild hypothermia to have contributed to the self-defibrillation of the myocardium. PMID:17629389

  4. Successful Resuscitation of a Cardiac Arrest following Slit Neck and Carotid Artery Injury: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Sayyed Ehtesham Hussain; Ali, Eram; Beg, Mohammed Haneef; Varshney, Saurav

    2016-06-01

    Carotid artery injuries constitute a specific and relatively small group of vascular trauma among the traumatic injuries to neck. They have the potential of killing the patients within minutes to hours due to haemodynamic instability if not managed by the specialist team within time. Central Neurologic deficit from cerebral hypoxia either resulting primarily from trauma or secondarily from surgery is a major concern. We hereby present a case of a 22-year-old man who presented to emergency department with alleged assault and vascular trauma to neck in a state of cardiac arrest. On exploration patient had injuries to external and internal carotid arteries and external jugular vein. Combined effort of trauma team lead to successful resuscitation and saved the life of the patient. PMID:27504354

  5. Successful Resuscitation of a Cardiac Arrest following Slit Neck and Carotid Artery Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Eram; Beg, Mohammed Haneef; Varshney, Saurav

    2016-01-01

    Carotid artery injuries constitute a specific and relatively small group of vascular trauma among the traumatic injuries to neck. They have the potential of killing the patients within minutes to hours due to haemodynamic instability if not managed by the specialist team within time. Central Neurologic deficit from cerebral hypoxia either resulting primarily from trauma or secondarily from surgery is a major concern. We hereby present a case of a 22-year-old man who presented to emergency department with alleged assault and vascular trauma to neck in a state of cardiac arrest. On exploration patient had injuries to external and internal carotid arteries and external jugular vein. Combined effort of trauma team lead to successful resuscitation and saved the life of the patient. PMID:27504354

  6. Malignant Course of Anomalous Left Coronary Artery Causing Sudden Cardiac Arrest: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Anantha Narayanan, Mahesh; DeZorzi, Christopher; Akinapelli, Abhilash; Mahfood Haddad, Toufik; Smer, Aiman; Baskaran, Janani; Biddle, William P.

    2015-01-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest has been reported to occur in patients with congenital anomalous coronary artery disease. About 80% of the anomalies are benign and incidental findings at the time of catheterization. We present a case of sudden cardiac arrest caused by anomalous left anterior descending artery. 61-year-old African American female was brought to the emergency department after sudden cardiac arrest. Initial EKG showed sinus rhythm with RBBB and LAFB with nonspecific ST-T wave changes. Coronary angiogram revealed no atherosclerotic disease. The left coronary artery was found to originate from the right coronary cusp. Cardiac CAT scan revealed similar findings with interarterial and intramural course. Patient received one-vessel arterial bypass graft to her anomalous coronary vessel along with a defibrillator for secondary prevention. Sudden cardiac arrest secondary to congenital anomalous coronary artery disease is characterized by insufficient coronary flow by the anomalous left coronary artery to meet elevated left ventricular (LV) myocardial demand. High risk defects include those involved with the proximal coronary artery or coursing of the anomalous artery between the aorta and pulmonary trunk. Per guidelines, our patient received one vessel bypass graft to her anomalous vessel. It is important for clinicians to recognize such presentations of anomalous coronary artery. PMID:26257964

  7. Cardiac arrest during spinal anesthesia for cervical conization: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Ikuko; Numata, Masahiro; Ikegami, Atsushi; Teramoto, Katsuhiro; Hirata, Shuji

    2016-05-01

    Spinal anesthesia is regularly performed worldwide and is an integral part of the modern day anesthesia practice. Although unexpected cardiac arrests during this procedure are very rare, medical professionals should be aware of the potential for this complication. In making the decision to use spinal anesthesia, judicious patient selection, adequate preventive measures, and strict monitoring are important. PMID:27190608

  8. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... from American Heart Association Aneurysms and Dissections Angina Arrhythmia Bundle Branch Block Cardiomyopathy Carotid Artery Disease Chronic ... terms: SCA, sudden cardiac death (SCD), sudden death, arrhythmias, ... ventricular fibrillation, defibrillator, automatic cardiac defibrillator ( ...

  9. Neurological prognostication after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Sandroni, Claudio; Geocadin, Romergryko G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Prediction of neurological prognosis in patients who are comatose after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest remains difficult. Previous guidelines recommended ocular reflexes, somatosensory evoked potentials and serum biomarkers for predicting poor outcome within 72h from cardiac arrest. However, these guidelines were based on patients not treated with targeted temperature management and did not appropriately address important biases in literature. Recent findings Recent evidence reviews detected important limitations in prognostication studies, such as low precision and, most importantly, lack of blinding, which may have caused a self-fulfilling prophecy and overestimated the specificity of index tests. Maintenance of targeted temperature using sedatives and muscle relaxants may interfere with clinical examination, making assessment of neurological status before 72 h or more after cardiac arrest unreliable. Summary No index predicts poor neurological outcome after cardiac arrest with absolute certainty. Prognostic evaluation should start not earlier than 72 h after ROSC and only after major confounders have been excluded so that reliable clinical examination can be made. Multimodality appears to be the most reasonable approach for prognostication after cardiac arrest. PMID:25922894

  10. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation with assisted extracorporeal life support during cardiac arrest caused by drug-eluting stent thrombosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Hyun; Song, In Ae

    2014-01-01

    Discontinuation of dual antiplatelet therapy within 12 months after drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation increases the possibility of stent thrombosis. We now report the case of a 66-year-old man who suffered a cardiac arrest due to stent thrombosis after an elective laparoscopic anterior resection. Ten month ago, he underwent DES implantation and then had been taking dual antiplatelet therapy. Nine days prior to the surgery, he discontinued dual antiplatelet therapy. Forty minutes after intensive care unit admission, cardiac arrest occurred. However, his cardiac rhythm did not restore in spite of resuscitation, so immediately veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was implanted. Four days after the surgery, he was weaned from ECMO support, recovered completely, with no cardiopulmonary or neurological sequelae. PMID:24910731

  11. Vasovagal cardiac arrest during spinal anesthesia for Cesarean section -A case report-.

    PubMed

    Jang, Young-Eun; Do, Sang-Hwan; Song, In-Ae

    2013-01-01

    The vasovagal response is characterized by an inappropriate combination of bradycardia and paradoxical vasodilation. During a general or neuraxial anesthesia-induced sympathectomy, a sudden vagal activation and/or an acute reduction in sympathetic tone can cause serious vasovagal responses. Neuraxial anesthesia for Cesarean section may trigger vasovagal response, due to multiple risk factors; high neuraxial block, sudden hemorrhage, aortocarval compression, peritoneal manipulation, and emotional stress. A 39-year-old pregnant woman, at 38 weeks of gestation with episodes of non-sustained ventricular arrhythmia and newly developed vasovagal syncope during pregnancy, was scheduled to undergo a spinal anesthesia for an elective Cesarean section. Immediately after the placental expulsion, a sudden severe bradycardia, followed by a cardiac arrest occurred. The patient fully recovered after prompt cardiopulmonary resuscitation with chest compression, manual ventilation with oxygen, rapid injection of epinephrine and hydration. This case illustrates a serious potential risk of vasovagal response superimposed on neuraxial anesthesia, during a Cesarean section, especially during placental expulsion. PMID:23372892

  12. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find a Specialist Share Twitter Facebook SCA Risk Assessment Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) occurs abruptly and without ... of all ages and health conditions. Start Risk Assessment The Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment Tool ...

  13. Men Face Greater Risk of Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159651.html Men Face Greater Risk of Cardiac Arrest: Study Heart disease tends to develop earlier than ... About one in nine men will suffer a cardiac arrest before the age of 70, compared to about ...

  14. [The neuroprotective effect of mild therapeutic hypothermia after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with successful reanimation - a case report].

    PubMed

    Szczygieł, Jarosław; Mazurek, Justyna; Świątkowski, Andrzej; Broniec-Siekaniec, Katarzyna; Czapnik, Marta; Średniawa, Beata; Opara, Józef; Oleszczyk, Krystian

    2016-03-01

    The use of mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) in adult patients remaining in a coma following cardiac arrest, regardless of its mechanism and location, is recommended by the European Resuscitation Council. The study presents a case of a 52-year-old man in whom MTH was used following successfully resuscitated out-of- hospital sudden cardiac arrest caused by ventricular fibrillation. On the basis of this case it was indicated that the use of low temperatures may be an effective method of neuroprotective treatment since such activity is compatible with later observed great possibility of the brain to compensate and with the maintenance of brain plasticity which is crucial for neuropsychological rehabilitation. PMID:27088200

  15. Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Scheller, RoseAnn L; Johnson, Laurie; Lorts, Angela; Ryan, Thomas D

    2016-09-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in the pediatric population is a rare and potentially devastating occurrence. An understanding of the differential diagnosis for the etiology of the cardiac arrest allows for the most effective emergency care and provides the patient with the best possible outcome. Pediatric SCA can occur with or without prodromal symptoms and may occur during exercise or rest. The most common cause is arrhythmia secondary to an underlying channelopathy, cardiomyopathy, or myocarditis. After stabilization, evaluation should include electrocardiogram, chest radiograph, and echocardiogram. Management should focus on decreasing the potential for recurring arrhythmia, maintaining cardiac preload, and thoughtful medication use to prevent exacerbation of the underlying condition. The purpose of this review was to provide the emergency physician with a concise and current review of the incidence, differential diagnosis, and management of pediatric patients presenting with SCA. PMID:27585126

  16. Sudden Cardiac Arrest in a Patient With Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Case Report and a Brief Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Tanush; Paul, Neha; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Balasubramaniyam, Nivas; Aronow, Wilbert S; Kolte, Dhaval; Khera, Sahil; Shah, Amar B; Gass, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a phenotypic variant of nonobstructive HCM, in which hypertrophy of the myocardium predominantly involves the left ventricular apex. It is common in Japanese and other Asian populations but is rare in the United States. Apical HCM has a relatively benign prognosis in terms of cardiovascular mortality; however, morbid events such as ventricular aneurysms, apical thrombi, diastolic dysfunction, atrial fibrillation, and myocardial infarction are not uncommon. We report a case of an 18-year-old white man who presented to our hospital after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The patient had a witnessed collapse while playing basketball in the field. He was found to be pulseless and unresponsive by his coach, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was immediately started. Upon arrival of emergency medical services, an automated external defibrillator advised shock and he was defibrillated thrice. Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved in 15 minutes. He was intubated for airway protection and was brought to the hospital. Therapeutic hypothermia was initiated. He demonstrated good neurological status after active rewarming. Subsequent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was suggestive of apical HCM with right ventricular involvement. The patient underwent an implantable cardioverter defibrillator placement for secondary prevention and was subsequently discharged. In conclusion, apical HCM can rarely be associated with adverse cardiovascular events. The diagnosis may be missed on transthoracic 2-dimensional cardiac echocardiogram, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging should be considered to exclude apical HCM in young patients who present after sudden cardiac arrest. PMID:25923227

  17. Risk of Diabetes Mellitus on Incidence of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Young Sun; Song, Kyoung Jun; Kim, Joo Yeong; Lee, Eui Jung; Lee, Yu Jin; Ahn, Ki Ok; Hong, Ki Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to determine the risk of diabetes mellitus (DM) on incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and to investigate whether difference in effects of DM between therapeutic methods was observed. Methods This study was a case-control study using the Cardiac Arrest Pursuit Trial with Unique Registration and Epidemiologic Surveillance (CAPTURES) project database and 2013 Korean Community Health Survey (CHS). Cases were defined as EMS-treated adult (18 year old and older) OHCA patients with presumed cardiac etiology collected at 27 emergency departments from January to December 2014. OHCA patients whose arrest occurred at nursing homes or clinics and cases with unknown information on DM were excluded. Four controls were matched to one case with strata including age, gender, and county from the Korean CHS database. Multivariable conditional logistic regression analysis was conducted to estimate the risk of DM and treatment modality on incidence of OHCA. Results Total 1,386 OHCA patients and 5,544 community-based controls were analyzed. A total of 370 (26.7%) among cases and 860 (15.5%) among controls were diagnosed with DM. DM was associated with increasing risk of OHCA (AOR: 1.92 (1.65–2.24)). By DM treatment modality comparing with non-DM group, AOR (95% CI) was the highest in non-pharmacotherapy only group (4.65 (2.00–10.84)), followed by no treatment group (4.17 (2.91–5.96)), insulin group (2.69 (1.82–3.96)), and oral hypoglycemic agent group (1.55 (1.31–1.85)). Conclusion DM increased the risk of OHCA, which was the highest in the non-pharmacotherapy group and decreased in magnitude with pharmacotherapy. PMID:27105059

  18. [A Case of Cardiac Arrest Caused by Coronary Spasm Related to Induction of General Anesthesia before Carotid Endarterectomy].

    PubMed

    Sato, Kimitoshi; Abe, Katsutoshi; Kosaka, Yasuharu; Ohuchi, Takeshi; Okamoto, Hirotsugu; Ako, Junya; Kumabe, Toshihiro

    2016-07-01

    Coronary vasospasm(CV)can cause severe arrhythmia and myocardial infarction(MI). Intraoperative CV is not limited to cardiac surgery alone. We report the case of a patient who experienced cardiac arrest after the induction of general anesthesia, but did not demonstrate any abnormalities on preoperative examination. The patient was a 60-year-old man with no history of ischemic heart disease, with NASCET 80% asymptomatic left internal carotid stenosis(ICS). We decided to perform carotid endarterectomy(CEA). Preoperative stress myocardial scintigraphy did not reveal decreased local uptake. General anesthesia was rapidly induced with propofol and remifentanil, and maintained with sevoflurane. Shortly before the start of CEA, systolic blood pressure dropped to 80 mmHg. Electrocardiography indicated decreased ST, followed by an increase, after which complete atrioventricular block occurred. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was initiated immediately as the patient's pulse was not palpable;heart beat resumed quickly. CEA was canceled. CV was suspected by the test of nitrate administration to coronary artery performed afterwards. A temporary pacemaker was inserted and carotid artery stenting was performed under local anesthesia. Hence, no pacemaker was used intraoperatively and no abnormality was observed on electrocardiography. In the present case, CV in the coronary artery caused complete atrioventricular block, leading to cardiac arrest after inducing general anesthesia. For ICS treatment performed under general anesthesia, care must be taken regarding the possibility of the occurrence of CV. PMID:27384120

  19. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Diagnosis of Cor Triatriatum Sinistrum in Pediatric Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Kehrl, Thompson; Dagen, Callie T.; Becker, Brent A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac arrest in the adolescent population secondary to congenital heart disease (CHD) is rare. Focused cardiac ultrasound (FoCUS) in the emergency department (ED) can yield important clinical information, aid in resuscitative efforts during cardiac arrest and is commonly integrated into the evaluation of patients with pulseless electrical activity (PEA). We report a case of pediatric cardiac arrest in which FoCUS was used to diagnose a critical CHD known as cor triatriatum sinistrum as the likely cause for PEA cardiac arrest and help direct ED resuscitation. PMID:26587102

  20. [A Case of Cardiac Arrest following Intra-articular Administration of Levobupivacaine during Total Knee Arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Tomita, Asami; Satani, Makoto; Suzuki, Keitaro; Kaji, Arito; Urushitani, Shinji

    2016-02-01

    A 73-year-old woman with normal cardiac function underwent an elective total knee arthroplasty. After skin closure, levobupivacaine 225 mg was injected into the knee and 25 mg was injected subcutaneously. The patient recovered from general anesthesia 5 min after the surgery. Thirty five min after surgery, while in general radiology department her carotid arterial pulses were not palpable. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was initiated with intravenous (i.v.) administration of adrenaline 1 mg. Circulation was rapidly restored. Coronary angiography demonstrated no coronary stenosis; however, left ventriculography demonstrated takotsubo cardiomyopathy. The patient regained consciousness, but pulmonary edema and renal failure became worse. On postoperative day 2, continuous hemodialysis was instituted. Weaning from ventilatory support was completed on postoperative day 3; hemodialysis was stopped on day 14; and the patient left the intensive care unit on day 15. We believe cardiac arrest may have been precipitated by local anesthetic systemic toxicity (LAST), and administration of i. v. adrenaline 1 mg may have resulted in pulmonary edema. Patients should be carefully observed following local anesthetic with attention given to the side-effects of i. v. adrenaline. PMID:27017777

  1. Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Due to Trauma.

    PubMed

    Kjellemo, Hugo; Hansen, Andreas E; Øines, Dennis A; Nilsen, Thor O; Wik, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Survival from pediatric cardiac arrest due to trauma has been reported to be 0.0%-8.8%. Some argue that resuscitation efforts in the case of trauma-related cardiac arrests are futile. We describe a successful outcome in the case of a child who suffered cardiac arrest caused by external traumatic airway obstruction. Our case illustrates how to deal with pediatric traumatic cardiac arrests in an out-of-hospital environment. It also illustrates how good clinical treatment in these situations may be supported by correct treatment after hospital admission when it is impossible to ventilate the patient to provide sufficient oxygen delivery to vital organs. This case relates to a lifeless child of 3-5 years, blue, and trapped by an electrically operated garage door. The first ambulance arrived to find several men trying to bend the frame and the door apart in order to extricate the child, who was hanging in the air with head and neck squeezed between the horizontally-moving garage door and the vertical door frame. One paramedic found a car jack and used it to push the door and the frame apart, allowing the lifeless child to be extricated. Basic life support was then initiated. Intubation was performed by the anesthesiologist without drugs. With FiO2 1.0 the first documented SaO2 was <50%. Restoration of Spontaneous Circulation was achieved after thirty minutes, and she was transported to the hospital. After a few hours she was put on venous-arterial ECMO for 5.5 days and discharged home after two months. Outpatient examinations during the rest of 2013 were positive, and the child found not to be suffering from any injuries, either physical or mental. The last follow-up in October 2014 demonstrated she had made a 100% recovery and she started school in August 2014. PMID:26930137

  2. Myocardial Dysfunction and Shock after Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Jentzer, Jacob C.; Chonde, Meshe D.; Dezfulian, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    Postarrest myocardial dysfunction includes the development of low cardiac output or ventricular systolic or diastolic dysfunction after cardiac arrest. Impaired left ventricular systolic function is reported in nearly two-thirds of patients resuscitated after cardiac arrest. Hypotension and shock requiring vasopressor support are similarly common after cardiac arrest. Whereas shock requiring vasopressor support is consistently associated with an adverse outcome after cardiac arrest, the association between myocardial dysfunction and outcomes is less clear. Myocardial dysfunction and shock after cardiac arrest develop as the result of preexisting cardiac pathology with multiple superimposed insults from resuscitation. The pathophysiology involves cardiovascular ischemia/reperfusion injury and cardiovascular toxicity from excessive levels of inflammatory cytokine activation and catecholamines, among other contributing factors. Similar mechanisms occur in myocardial dysfunction after cardiopulmonary bypass, in sepsis, and in stress-induced cardiomyopathy. Hemodynamic stabilization after resuscitation from cardiac arrest involves restoration of preload, vasopressors to support arterial pressure, and inotropic support if needed to reverse the effects of myocardial dysfunction and improve systemic perfusion. Further research is needed to define the role of postarrest myocardial dysfunction on cardiac arrest outcomes and identify therapeutic strategies. PMID:26421284

  3. Cognitive and Functional Consequence of Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Perez, Claudia A; Samudra, Niyatee; Aiyagari, Venkatesh

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac arrest is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Better-quality bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation training, cardiocerebral resuscitation principles, and intensive post-resuscitation hospital care have improved survival. However, cognitive and functional impairment after cardiac arrest remain areas of concern. Research focus has shifted beyond prognostication in the immediate post-arrest period to identification of mechanisms for long-term brain injury and implementation of promising protocols to reduce neuronal injury. These include therapeutic temperature management (TTM), as well as pharmacologic and psychological interventions which also improve overall neurological function. Comprehensive assessment of cognitive function post-arrest is hampered by heterogeneous measures among studies. However, the domains of attention, long-term memory, spatial memory, and executive function appear to be affected. As more patients survive cardiac arrest for longer periods of time, there needs to be a greater focus on interventions that can enhance cognitive and psychosocial function post-arrest. PMID:27311306

  4. Circadian variation in witnessed out of hospital cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Soo, L; Gray, D; Young, T; Hampton, J

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To examine the effect on circadian variation of out of hospital cardiac arrest according to the underlying aetiology and presenting rhythm of arrest, and to explore strategies that might help to improve survival outcome using circadian variation.
DESIGN—Population based retrospective study.
SETTING—County of Nottinghamshire with a total population of 993 914 and an area of 2183 km2.
SUBJECTS—Between 1 January 1991 and 3 December 1994, all witnessed cardiac arrests attended by the Nottinghamshire Ambulance Service, of which 1196 patients had a cardiac cause for their arrest (ICD, 9th revision, codes 390-414 and 420-429) and 339 had a non-cardiac cause.
RESULTS—The circadian variation of the cardiac cases was not significantly different from that of non-cardiac cases (p = 0.587), even when adjusted for age, sex, or presenting rhythm of arrest. For cardiac cases, the circadian variation of those who presented with ventricular fibrillation was significantly different from those presenting with a rhythm other than ventricular fibrillation (p = 0.005), but was similar to the circadian variation of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (p = 0.306) and survivors (p = 0.542). Ambulance response time was also found to have a circadian variation.
CONCLUSIONS—There is a common circadian variation of out of hospital cardiac arrest, irrespective of underlying aetiology, where the presenting rhythm is other than ventricular fibrillation. This is different from the circadian variation of cases of cardiac aetiology presenting with ventricular fibrillation. The circadian variation of ventricular fibrillation, and consequently survival, may be affected by the availability of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the speed of ambulance response.


Keywords: out of hospital; cardiac arrest; circadian variation PMID:10995402

  5. Abulia following an episode of cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Naik, Vismay Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    The word 'abulia' means a lack of will, initiative or drive. The symptoms of abulia include lack of spontaneous action and speech, reduced emotional responsiveness and social interaction, poor attention and easy distractibility. These symptoms are independent of reduced levels of consciousness or cognitive impairment. We describe a case of a socially active 72-year-old female patient who presented with symptoms of abulia which may have occurred due to damage of the frontosubcortical circuits following an episode of cardiac arrest. The patient's symptoms improved dramatically following treatment with bromocriptine. PMID:26135487

  6. Essentials in cardiac arrest during cesarean section.

    PubMed

    van Liempt, Susan W J D; Stoecklein, Katrin; Tjiong, Ming Y; Schwarte, Lothar A; de Groot, Christianne J M; Teunissen, Pim W

    2015-01-28

    Cardiac arrest during cesarean section is very rare. Obstetrical teams have low exposure to these critical situations necessitating frequent rehearsal and knowledge of its differential diagnosis and treatment. A 40-year-old woman pregnant with triplets underwent cesarean sections because of vaginal bleeding due to a placenta previa at 35.2 weeks of gestation. Spinal anesthesia was performed. Asystole occurred during uterotomy. Immediate resuscitation and delivery of the neonates eventually resulted in good maternal and neonatal outcomes. The differential diagnosis is essential and should include obstetric and non-obstetric causes. We describe the consideration of Bezold Jarisch reflex and amniotic fluid embolism as most appropriate in this case. PMID:25918626

  7. A Patient With Blunt Trauma and Cardiac Arrest Arriving Pulseless at the Emergency Department; is that Enough Reason to Stop Resuscitation? Review of Literature and Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hamidian Jahromi, Alireza; Northcutt, Ashley; Youssef, Asser M

    2013-01-01

    The decision to stop or continue resuscitation in a patient with blunt trauma and cardiac arrest arriving pulseless to the hospital has always been controversial. While many authors still believe that it is a futile effort, with no chance of success for complete neurological recovery, some recent reports have challenged the idea. Here we report complete recovery of a severely injured patient following a motor vehicle accident who lost vital signs completely before arrival at our trauma center. No cardiac motion was detected on ultrasound examination on arrival. Emergency department thoracotomy, open cardiac massage, massive blood transfusion, damage control laparotomy with abdominal and pelvic packing, followed by angio-embolization of pelvic bleeding, and staged abdominal exploration were performed. This case is an example showing that resuscitation of patients with blunt trauma and cardiac arrest arriving pulseless to the hospital is not always futile. PMID:24693385

  8. Traumatic cardiac arrest: a unique approach.

    PubMed

    Harris, Tim; Masud, Syed; Lamond, Anna; Abu-Habsa, Mamoun

    2015-04-01

    Resuscitation of patients who sustain a cardiac arrest as a result of trauma (traumatic cardiac arrest) has previously been described as 'futile'. Several published series have since contradicted this claim and reported survival-to-discharge data ranging from 0 to 35%. International resuscitation guidelines (European Resuscitation Council and American Heart Association) promote a consistent approach to cardiopulmonary resuscitation on the basis of up-to-date evidence and consensus opinions. This minimizes de-novo decision-making under high-stress situations, promotes a rational approach and reduces the burden on an individual clinician. This narrative review sets out to highlight the differences in aetiology of traumatic cardiac arrest as compared with medical cardiac arrest and the consequent priorities in resuscitation. PMID:25163026

  9. Understand Your Risk for Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. The first six months after a heart attack is a particularly high-risk period for sudden cardiac arrest in patients with atherosclerotic heart disease . ...

  10. Men Face Greater Risk of Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159651.html Men Face Greater Risk of Cardiac Arrest: Study Heart ... 30, 2016 THURSDAY, June 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Men are significantly more likely to have their heart ...

  11. Cerebral oximetry and cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Skhirtladze-Dworschak, Keso; Dworschak, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Cerebral oximetry is a Food and Drug Administration-approved technology that allows monitoring of brain oxygen saturation in accessible superficial brain cortex regions, which are amongst the most vulnerable in regard to ischemic or hypoxic injury. Since most oxygen in the area of interest is located in the venous compartment, the determined regional brain oxygen saturation approximately reflects the local balance between oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption. Major systemic alterations in blood oxygen content and oxygen delivery will be accompanied by corresponding changes in regional brain saturation. This systematic review, which is based on a Medline search, focuses on the characteristic changes in regional cerebral oxygen saturation that occur, when global oxygen supply to the brain ceases. It further highlights the potential application of cerebral oximetry in the management of cardiac arrest victims, the predictability of clinical outcome after global cerebral ischemia, and it also indicates possible potentials for the management of cerebral reperfusion after having instituted return of spontaneous circulation. PMID:23782549

  12. Intra-arrest hypothermia during cardiac arrest: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Therapeutic hypothermia is largely used to protect the brain following return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after cardiac arrest (CA), but it is unclear whether we should start therapeutic hypothermia earlier, that is, before ROSC. Methods We performed a systematic search of PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and Ovid/Medline databases using "arrest" OR "cardiac arrest" OR "heart arrest" AND "hypothermia" OR "therapeutic hypothermia" OR "cooling" as keywords. Only studies using intra-arrest therapeutic hypothermia (IATH) were selected for this review. Three authors independently assessed the validity of included studies and extracted data regarding characteristics of the studied cohort (animal or human) and the main outcomes related to the use of IATH: Mortality, neurological status and cardiac function (particularly, rate of ROSC). Results A total of 23 animal studies (level of evidence (LOE) 5) and five human studies, including one randomized controlled trial (LOE 1), one retrospective and one prospective controlled study (LOE 3), and two prospective studies without a control group (LOE 4), were identified. IATH improved survival and neurological outcomes when compared to normothermia and/or hypothermia after ROSC. IATH was also associated with improved ROSC rates and with improved cardiac function, including better left ventricular function, and reduced myocardial infarct size, when compared to normothermia. Conclusions IATH improves survival and neurological outcome when compared to normothermia and/or conventional hypothermia in experimental models of CA. Clinical data on the efficacy of IATH remain limited. PMID:22397519

  13. Surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nick

    2016-05-01

    Emergency care nurses have been urged to play their part in Scotland's push to revolutionise care for cardiac arrest patients - by teaching others how to save a life. This article discusses the Scottish out-of-hospital cardiac arrest strategy, with particular focus on the drive to increase bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) rates, and on how emergency nurses are being enlisted to help promote the training of members of the public. PMID:27165393

  14. Cardiac arrest equipment to support circulation.

    PubMed

    Aldridge, Matthew; Jevon, Phil

    Cardiac arrest trolleys must be equipped with all the instruments and medication needed to deal with an acute adult cardiac arrest. Nurses must not only be familiar with these contents but also know how to use, check and maintain them. This first part of this two-part series looked at equipment to aid airway and breathing; this second part focuses on circulation. Note that drug doses mentioned here relate to the adult patient and will be different for children. PMID:25223000

  15. Cardiac arrest equipment to support airway.

    PubMed

    Aldridge, Matthew; Jevon, Phil

    Each hospital should have standardised cardiac arrest trolleys equipped with all the instruments and medication needed to deal with an acute adult cardiac arrest. Nurses must know the contents of these trolleys and how to use them to fulfil their common role as first responder. This first article in a two-part series looks at equipment to aid airway management and breathing; part two will focus on circulation. PMID:25174131

  16. Intravascular access in pediatric cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Brunette, D D; Fischer, R

    1988-11-01

    All cases of patients aged less than 48 months who presented in cardiac arrest to the Hennepin County Medical Center's emergency department (ED) during the years 1984 to 1986 were reviewed retrospectively. The ED record, initial and subsequent chest radiographs, hospital charts, and autopsy reports were analyzed. A total of 33 cases were reviewed. The average patient age was 5 months. The average time needed to establish intravascular access was 7.9 +/- 4.2 minutes. Success rates were 77% for central venous catheterization, 81% for surgical vein cutdown, 83% for intraosseous infusion, and 17% for percutaneous peripheral catheterization. Percutaneous peripheral catheterization, when successful, and bone marrow needle placement were the fastest methods of obtaining intravascular access. There were no major immediate complications, and delayed complications were minimal. Attempts at peripheral intravenous catheter placement should be brief, with rapid progression to intraosseous infusion if peripheral attempts are not successful. PMID:3178949

  17. Cardiac arrest due to a missed diagnosis of Boerhaave's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Davies, Jennifer; Spitzer, David; Phylactou, Maria; Glasser, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A 91-year-old presented with a rare cause of cardiac arrest. He was initially admitted with severe back pain following vomiting and diagnosed with probable aspiration pneumonia. On day 3 of admission, he was discovered in cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was started. On intubation, a left-sided pneumothorax and subcutaneous emphysema were noted. Needle decompression showed gastric fluid leaking from the cannula. The patient regained a cardiac output, and a subsequent CT scan confirmed a large pneumomediastinum with air tracking to the neck and chest, and bilateral pneumothoraces. A diagnosis of Boerhaave's syndrome was made. The patient was transferred to the intensive care unit but did not survive. This case demonstrates the importance of looking for and treating the rarer reversible causes of cardiac arrest, and of maintaining a high index of suspicion for Boerhaave's syndrome. Despite its rarity, Boerhaave's syndrome is often misdiagnosed on initial presentation, leading to delayed treatment and poor outcomes. PMID:27154984

  18. Recovery of consciousness and an injured ascending reticular activating system in a patient who survived cardiac arrest: A case report.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sung Ho; Hyun, Yi Ji; Lee, Han Do

    2016-06-01

    We report on a patient who survived cardiac arrest and showed recovery of consciousness and an injured ARAS at the early stage of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HI- BI) for 3 weeks, which was demonstrated by diffusion tensor tractography (DTT).A 52-year-old male patient who had suffered cardiac arrest caused by acute coronary syndrome was resuscitated immediately by a layman and paramedics for ∼25 minutes. He was then transferred immediately to the emergency room of a local medical center. When starting rehabilitation at 2 weeks after onset, his consciousness was impaired, with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 8 and Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (GRS-R) score of 8. He underwent comprehensive rehabilitative therapy, including drugs for recovery of consciousness. He recovered well and rapidly so that his consciousness had recovered to full scores in terms of GCS:15 and GRS-R:23 at 5 weeks after onset.The left lower dorsal and right lower ventral ARAS had become thicker on 5-week DTT compared with 2-week DTT (Fig. 1B). Regarding the change of neural connectivity of the thalamic ILN, increased neural connectivity to the basal forebrain and prefrontal cortex was observed in both hemispheres on 5-week DTT compared with 2-week DTT.Recovery of an injured ARAS was demonstrated in a patient who survived cardiac arrest and his consciousness showed rapid and good recovery for 3 weeks at the early stage of HI-BI. PMID:27368033

  19. Management of cardiac arrest in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jeejeebhoy, Farida; Windrim, Rory

    2014-05-01

    Cardiac arrest in pregnancy is a rare event in routine obstetric practice, but is increasing in frequency. Resuscitation of cardiac arrest is more complex for pregnant women because of a number of factors unique to pregnancy: the altered physiologic state induced by pregnancy; the requirement to consider both maternal and fetal issues during resuscitation; and the consequent possibility of perimortem caesarean section during resuscitation. These extra considerations create a unique clinical emergency and decision pathway requiring the co-ordinated response of medical, obstetric, and neonatal teams. Although many research questions remain in this area, recent consensus has been reached on appropriate resuscitation of a pregnant woman. Centres offering care for birthing women need to be aware of the changing demographics and resuscitation guidelines in this important area, and implement measures to ensure dependable and optimal team responses to maternal cardiac arrest. PMID:24797653

  20. [Changes in the management of cardiac arrest].

    PubMed

    Genest, Marc; Pochmalicki, Gilbert

    2004-05-22

    NEW RECOMMENDATIONS: for cardio-pulmonary resuscitation Methods such as mouth to mouth or the search for a pulse, until now the fundamental preliminaries, have now become second line. Everything must be organised to allow for defibrillation as rapidly as possible. NEW MODALITIES FOR CARDIAC MASSAGE: The frequency of compressions recommended is currently 100 per minute in the adult with a rhythm of compression-ventilation reaching 15/2 before intubation. Concerning the haemodynamic agents for cardiac arrest, the efficacy of high doses of adrenalin is not greater than with conventional doses. Vasopressin is not superior to intravenous adrenalin regarding survival at 24 hrs exepet in case of asystoly. Dopamine at a "renal" dose is no longer used. ANTIARRYTHMICS: Amiodarone is part of the decisional tree in the case of ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia without a pulse. Semi-automatic defibrillator accessibility should be generalized. INFUSED SOLUTIONS: Sodium bicarbonate does not improve the survival except in particular cases. Physiological serum should be preferred to glucosed serum during reanimation. PMID:15226695

  1. Long QT Syndrome Leading to Multiple Cardiac Arrests After Posaconazole Administration in an Immune-Compromised Patient with Sepsis: An Unusual Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Panos, George; Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vasilios; Matzaroglou, Charalampos; Tyllianakis, Minos

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 26 Final Diagnosis: Sepsis • drug induced long QT syndrome Symptoms: Cardiac arrestcardiac arrhythmia • fever • Qt prolongation Medication: Posaconazole Clinical Procedure: Pacemaker insertion Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: We present the case of a septic patient with severe immunodeficiency, who developed QT interval prolongation followed by episodes of lethal cardiac arrhythmia. Cardiac events occurred after posaconazole administration, incriminating posaconazole use, alone or in combination with voriconazole, as the culpable agent. Case Report: A 26-year-old female patient underwent orthopedic surgery to remove ectopic calcifications in her left hip joint. On the first post-operative day she became septic due to a surgical wound infection. Despite being treated according to the therapeutic protocols for sepsis, no clinical improvement was noticed and further assessment revealed an underlying immunodeficiency. Considering the underlying immunodeficiency and to that point poor clinical response, an antifungal agent was added to the antibiotic regiment. Following discontinuation of multiple antifungal agents due to adverse effects, posaconazole was administered. Posaconazole oral intake was followed by episodes of bradycardia and QT interval prolongation. The patient suffered continuous incidents of cardiac arrest due to polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (torsades des pointes) that degenerated to lethal ventricular fibrillation. Posaconazole was immediately discontinued and a temporary pacemaker was installed. The patient finally recovered without any neurological deficit, and was discharged in a good clinical status. Conclusions: Close cardiac monitoring is recommended in cases where posaconazole administration is combined with coexisting risk factors, as they may lead to severe ECG abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias such as long QT interval syndrome and torsades de pointes. Posaconazole

  2. Women Get Worse Cardiac Arrest Care Than Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_159505.html Women Get Worse Cardiac Arrest Care Than Men: Study They need to be ... June 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women who survive cardiac arrest are less likely than men to get aggressive, ...

  3. Out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest due to penetrating cardiac injury treated by percutaneous cardiopulmonary support in the emergency room: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kurimoto, Yoshihiko; Kano, Hitoshi; Yama, Naoya; Nara, Satoshi; Hase, Mamoru; Asai, Yasufumi

    2007-01-01

    Penetrating cardiac injury tends to generally be repaired without cardiopulmonary bypass in the operating room. We herein report the case of penetrating cardiac injury repaired using percutaneous cardiopulmonary support in an emergency room. A 57-year-old man attempted suicide by stabbing himself in the left anterior chest with a knife. Although the patient suffered cardiopulmonary arrest for 7 min in the ambulance, spontaneous circulation was restored following pericardiotomy through emergency left thoracotomy in the emergency room. To prevent coronary artery injury and control the massive bleeding, percutaneous cardiopulmonary support was instituted without systemic heparinization and the cardiac injury was repaired in the emergency room. The patient was then transferred to another hospital on day 46 for further rehabilitation. Percutaneous cardiopulmonary support might be helpful for treating critical patients in an emergency room, even in the case of trauma patients. PMID:17342366

  4. MedlinePlus: Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Journal Articles References and abstracts from MEDLINE/PubMed (National Library of Medicine) Article: A Prospective Study of Sudden Cardiac Death ... Players MedlinePlus Connect for EHRs For Developers U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department ...

  5. Treatment of cardiac arrest in the hyperbaric environment: key steps on the sequence of care--case reports.

    PubMed

    Wright, K T; Praske, S P; Bhatt, N A; Magalhaes, R M; Quast, T M

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. territory of Guam attracts thousands of military and civilian divers annually and is home to the only recompression facility within a 5,000-km radius that accepts critically injured dive casualties. As recompression chambers are confined spaces and standard use of electrical cardioversion cannot be used, cardiac resuscitation at depth must deviate from advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS) algorithms. Furthermore, many hyperbaric chambers that accept dive casualties are in remote locations, a situation that requires providers to approach cardiac resuscitation in a different way when compared to an in-hospital or ICU setting. This presents a challenge to trained medical and diving professionals. We present two contrasting vignettes of diving injuries initially responsive to appropriate treatment but then deteriorating during recompression therapy and ultimately requiring resuscitation at depth. Additionally, we explore the physiologic basis of resuscitation in a hyperbaric environment as it relates to the treatment of cardiac arrest at depth. This review critically examines the current guidelines in place for emergency cardiac resuscitation in a hyperbaric chamber followed by recommendations for the key steps in the sequence of care. PMID:27000016

  6. Drug therapy in cardiac arrest: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Andreas; Djärv, Therese; Engdahl, Johan; Hollenberg, Jacob; Nordberg, Per; Ravn-Fischer, Annika; Ringh, Mattias; Rysz, Susanne; Svensson, Leif; Herlitz, Johan; Lundgren, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the literature on human studies of drug therapy in cardiac arrest during the last 25 years. In May 2015, a systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and CRD databases. Prospective interventional and observational studies evaluating a specified drug therapy in human cardiac arrest reporting a clinical endpoint [i.e. return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or survival] and published in English 1990 or later were included, whereas animal studies, case series and reports, studies of drug administration, drug pharmacology, non-specified drug therapies, preventive drug therapy, drug administration after ROSC, studies with primarily physiological endpoints, and studies of traumatic cardiac arrest were excluded. The literature search identified a total of 8936 articles. Eighty-eight articles met our inclusion criteria and were included in the review. We identified no human study in which drug therapy, compared with placebo, improved long-term survival. Regarding adrenaline and amiodarone, the drugs currently recommended in cardiac arrest, two prospective randomized placebo-controlled trials, were identified for adrenaline, and one for amiodarone, but they were all underpowered to detect differences in survival to hospital discharge. Of all reviewed studies, only one recent prospective study demonstrated improved neurological outcome with one therapy over another using a combination of vasopressin, steroids, and adrenaline as the intervention compared with standard adrenaline administration. The evidence base for drug therapy in cardiac arrest is scarce. However, many human studies on drug therapy in cardiac arrest have not been powered to identify differences in important clinical outcomes such as survival to hospital discharge and favourable neurological outcome. Efforts are needed to initiate large multicentre prospective randomized clinical trials to evaluate both currently recommended and

  7. Hypothermia improves outcome from cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Bernard, S A

    2005-12-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is common and patients who are initially resuscitated by ambulance officers and transported to hospital are usually admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). In the past, the treatment in the ICU consisted of supportive care only, and most patients remained unconscious due to the severe anoxic neurological injury. It was this neurological injury rather than cardiac complications that caused the high rate of morbidity and mortality. However, in the early 1990's, a series of animal experiments demonstrated convincingly that mild hypothermia induced after return of spontaneous circulation and maintained for several hours dramatically reduced the severity of the anoxic neurological injury. In the mid-1990's, preliminary human studies suggested that mild hypothermia could be induced and maintained in post-cardiac arrest patients without an increase in the rate of cardiac or other complications. In the late 1990's, two prospective, randomised, controlled trials were conducted and the results confirmed the animal data that mild hypothermia induced after resuscitation and maintained for 12 - 24 hours dramatically improved neurological and overall outcomes. On the basis of these studies, mild hypothermia was endorsed in 2003 by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation as a recommended treatment for comatose patients with an initial cardiac rhythm of ventricular fibrillation. However, the application of this therapy into routine clinical critical care practice has been slow. The reasons for this are uncertain, but may relate to the relative complexity of the treatment, unfamiliarity with the pathophysiology of hypothermia, lack of clear protocols and/or uncertainty of benefit in particular patients. Therefore, recent research in this area has focused on the development of feasible, inexpensive techniques for the early, rapid induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Currently, the most promising strategy is a rapid

  8. Cardiac arrest: first presentation of anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Ewan, Sian-Lee; Moynihan, Patricia C

    2013-01-01

    A 16-year-old girl collapsed in cardiac arrest in a hospital car park. Investigations revealed a potassium level of 1.8. Following a 5-day intensive care unit admission she described behaviours consistent with restrictive-purging type anorexia nervosa, which had been concealed from her parents and health professionals. Long-term management has been difficult due to poor patient engagement. Further, recurrent episodes of hypokalaemia continue to feature. Here we explore the cardiac complications of anorexia nervosa and challenges with long-term management of this condition. PMID:24092611

  9. Maternal Cardiac Arrest: A Practical and Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Jeejeebhoy, Farida M.; Morrison, Laurie J.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrest during pregnancy is a dedicated chapter in the American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care; however, a robust maternal cardiac arrest knowledge translation strategy and emergency response plan is not usually the focus of institutional emergency preparedness programs. Although maternal cardiac arrest is rare, the emergency department is a high-risk area for receiving pregnant women in either prearrest or full cardiac arrest. It is imperative that institutions review and update emergency response plans for a maternal arrest. This review highlights the most recent science, guidelines, and recommended implementation strategies related to a maternal arrest. The aim of this paper is to increase the understanding of the important physiological differences of, and management strategies for, a maternal cardiac arrest, as well as provide institutions with the most up-to-date literature on which they can build emergency preparedness programs for a maternal arrest. PMID:23956861

  10. Modeling cardiac arrest and resuscitation in the domestic pig

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Brandon H; Nguyen, Anh Q; Hollrah, Roger A; Olivencia-Yurvati, Albert H; Mallet, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac arrest remains a leading cause of death and permanent disability worldwide. Although many victims are initially resuscitated, they often succumb to the extensive ischemia-reperfusion injury inflicted on the internal organs, especially the brain. Cardiac arrest initiates a complex cellular injury cascade encompassing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, Ca2+ overload, ATP depletion, pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins, mitochondrial dysfunction, and neuronal glutamate excitotoxity, which injures and kills cells, compromises function of internal organs and ignites a destructive systemic inflammatory response. The sheer complexity and scope of this cascade challenges the development of experimental models of and effective treatments for cardiac arrest. Many experimental animal preparations have been developed to decipher the mechanisms of damage to vital internal organs following cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and to develop treatments to interrupt the lethal injury cascades. Porcine models of cardiac arrest and resuscitation offer several important advantages over other species, and outcomes in this large animal are readily translated to the clinical setting. This review summarizes porcine cardiac arrest-CPR models reported in the literature, describes clinically relevant phenomena observed during cardiac arrest and resuscitation in pigs, and discusses numerous methodological considerations in modeling cardiac arrest/CPR. Collectively, published reports show the domestic pig to be a suitable large animal model of cardiac arrest which is responsive to CPR, defibrillatory countershocks and medications, and yields extensive information to foster advances in clinical treatment of cardiac arrest. PMID:25685718

  11. Multimodal Imaging after Sudden Cardiac Arrest in an 18-Year-Old Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Mobeen Ur; Atalay, Michael K.; Broderick, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a previously healthy 18-year-old male athlete who twice presented with sudden cardiac arrest. Our use of electrocardiography, echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance, coronary angiography, coronary computed tomographic angiography, and nuclear stress testing enabled the diagnoses of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and anomalous origin of the right coronary artery. We discuss the patient's treatment and note the useful role of multiple cardiovascular imaging methods in cases of sudden cardiac arrest. PMID:26664308

  12. Multimodal Imaging after Sudden Cardiac Arrest in an 18-Year-Old Athlete.

    PubMed

    Afari, Maxwell E; Rehman, Mobeen Ur; Atalay, Michael K; Broderick, Ryan J

    2015-12-01

    We report the case of a previously healthy 18-year-old male athlete who twice presented with sudden cardiac arrest. Our use of electrocardiography, echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance, coronary angiography, coronary computed tomographic angiography, and nuclear stress testing enabled the diagnoses of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and anomalous origin of the right coronary artery. We discuss the patient's treatment and note the useful role of multiple cardiovascular imaging methods in cases of sudden cardiac arrest. PMID:26664308

  13. Long QT Syndrome Leading to Multiple Cardiac Arrests After Posaconazole Administration in an Immune-Compromised Patient with Sepsis: An Unusual Case Report.

    PubMed

    Panos, George; Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vasilios; Matzaroglou, Charalampos; Tylianakis, Minos

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We present the case of a septic patient with severe immunodeficiency, who developed QT interval prolongation followed by episodes of lethal cardiac arrhythmia. Cardiac events occurred after posaconazole administration, incriminating posaconazole use, alone or in combination with voriconazole, as the culpable agent. CASE REPORT A 26-year-old female patient underwent orthopedic surgery to remove ectopic calcifications in her left hip joint. On the first post-operative day she became septic due to a surgical wound infection. Despite being treated according to the therapeutic protocols for sepsis, no clinical improvement was noticed and further assessment revealed an underlying immunodeficiency. Considering the underlying immunodeficiency and to that point poor clinical response, an antifungal agent was added to the antibiotic regiment. Following discontinuation of multiple antifungal agents due to adverse effects, posaconazole was administered. Posaconazole oral intake was followed by episodes of bradycardia and QT interval prolongation. The patient suffered continuous incidents of cardiac arrest due to polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (torsades des pointes) that degenerated to lethal ventricular fibrillation. Posaconazole was immediately discontinued and a temporary pacemaker was installed. The patient finally recovered without any neurological deficit, and was discharged in a good clinical status. CONCLUSIONS Close cardiac monitoring is recommended in cases where posaconazole administration is combined with coexisting risk factors, as they may lead to severe ECG abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias such as long QT interval syndrome and torsades de pointes. Posaconazole interactions with medications metabolized via the CYP3A4 pathway should be considered an additional risk factor for lethal cardiac incidents. PMID:27125217

  14. Therapeutic hypothermia after in-hospital cardiac arrest: a critique.

    PubMed

    Hessel, Eugene A

    2014-06-01

    More than 210,000 in-hospital cardiac arrests occur annually in the United States. Use of moderate therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in comatose survivors after return of spontaneous circulation following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOH-CA) caused by ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia is recommended strongly by many professional organizations and societies. The use of TH after cardiac arrest associated with nonshockable rhythms and after in-hospital cardiac arrest (IH-CA) is recommended to be considered by these same organizations and is being applied widely. The use in these latter circumstances is based on an extrapolation of the data supporting its use after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest associated with shockable rhythms. The purpose of this article is to review the limitations of existing data supporting these extended application of TH after cardiac arrest and to suggest approaches to this dilemma. The data supporting its use for OOH-CA appear to this author, and to some others, to be rather weak, and the data supporting the use of TH for IH-CA appear to be even weaker and to include no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or supportive observational studies. The many reasons why TH might be expected to be less effective following IH-CA are reviewed. The degree of neurologic injury may be more severe in many of these cases and, thus, may not be responsive to TH as currently practiced following OOH-CA. The potential adverse consequences of the routine use of TH for IH-CA are listed and include complications associated with TH, interference with diagnostic and interventional therapy, and use of scarce personnel and financial resources. Most importantly, it inhibits the ability of researchers to conduct needed RCTs. The author believes that the proper method of providing TH in these cases needs to be better defined. Based on this analysis the author concludes that TH should not be used indiscriminantly following most cases of IH-CA, and

  15. Modes of induced cardiac arrest: hyperkalemia and hypocalcemia - Literature review

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Marcos Aurélio Barboza; Brandi, Antônio Carlos; dos Santos, Carlos Alberto; Botelho, Paulo Henrique Husseini; Cortez, José Luis Lasso; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2014-01-01

    The entry of sodium and calcium play a key effect on myocyte subjected to cardiac arrest by hyperkalemia. They cause cell swelling, acidosis, consumption of adenosine triphosphate and trigger programmed cell death. Cardiac arrest caused by hypocalcemia maintains intracellular adenosine triphosphate levels, improves diastolic performance and reduces oxygen consumption, which can be translated into better protection to myocyte injury induced by cardiac arrest. PMID:25372919

  16. CRITICAL CARE ECHO ROUNDS: Echo in cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Asrress, Kaleab; Redwood, Simon; Gillon, Stuart; Walker, David

    2014-01-01

    Management of medical cardiac arrest is challenging. The internationally agreed approach is highly protocolised with therapy and diagnosis occurring in parallel. Early identification of the precipitating cause increases the likelihood of favourable outcome. Echocardiography provides an invaluable diagnostic tool in this context. Acquisition of echo images can be challenging in cardiac arrest and should occur in a way that minimises disruption to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In this article, the reversible causes of cardiac arrest are reviewed with associated echocardiography findings. Case A 71-year-old patient underwent right upper lobectomy for lung adenocarcinoma. On the 2nd post-operative day, he developed respiratory failure with rising oxygen requirement and right middle and lower lobe collapse and consolidation on chest X-ray. He was commenced on high-flow oxygen therapy and antibiotics. His condition continued to deteriorate and on the 3rd post-operative day he was intubated and mechanically ventilated. Six hours after intubation, he became suddenly hypotensive with a blood pressure of 50 systolic and then lost cardiac output. ECG monitoring showed pulseless electrical activity. CPR was commenced and return of circulation occurred after injection of 1 mg of adrenaline. Focused echocardiography was performed, which demonstrated signs of massive pulmonary embolism. Thrombolytic therapy with tissue plasminogen activator was given and his condition stabilised. PMID:26693304

  17. Pediatric defibrillation after cardiac arrest: initial response and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio; López-Herce, Jesús; García, Cristina; Domínguez, Pedro; Carrillo, Angel; Bellón, Jose María

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Shockable rhythms are rare in pediatric cardiac arrest and the results of defibrillation are uncertain. The objective of this study was to analyze the results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation that included defibrillation in children. Methods Forty-four out of 241 children (18.2%) who were resuscitated from inhospital or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest had been treated with manual defibrillation. Data were recorded according to the Utstein style. Outcome variables were a sustained return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and one-year survival. Characteristics of patients and of resuscitation were evaluated. Results Cardiac disease was the major cause of arrest in this group. Ventricular fibrillation (VF) or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (PVT) was the first documented electrocardiogram rhythm in 19 patients (43.2%). A shockable rhythm developed during resuscitation in 25 patients (56.8%). The first shock (dose, 2 J/kg) terminated VF or PVT in eight patients (18.1%). Seventeen children (38.6%) needed more than three shocks to solve VF or PVT. ROSC was achieved in 28 cases (63.6%) and it was sustained in 19 patients (43.2%). Only three patients (6.8%), however, survived at 1-year follow-up. Children with VF or PVT as the first documented rhythm had better ROSC, better initial survival and better final survival than children with subsequent VF or PVT. Children who survived were older than the finally dead patients. No significant differences in response rate were observed when first and second shocks were compared. The survival rate was higher in patients treated with a second shock dose of 2 J/kg than in those who received higher doses. Outcome was not related to the cause or the location of arrest. The survival rate was inversely related to the duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Conclusion Defibrillation is necessary in 18% of children who suffer cardiac arrest. Termination of VF or PVT after the first defibrillation dose is achieved in a low

  18. Unicuspid aortic valve presenting with cardiac arrest in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Tara; Kolcow, Walenty; Smyth, Yvonne; Veerasingham, David

    2015-01-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) is a rare congenital anomaly typically affecting patients in their fourth and fifth decades and presenting with signs of heart failure. Our case is one of a previously asymptomatic teenage girl with a UAV, who presented with cardiac arrest and was successfully treated. Only two other similar cases have been reported in the literature, both were of slightly older male patients. Our case highlights the morbidity associated with the anomaly supporting the need for careful assessment of the valve in cases where UAV is suspected. PMID:26178230

  19. Early Recognition of Foreign Body Aspiration as the Cause of Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Talib Hashmi, Hafiz Rizwan; Khaja, Misbahuddin

    2016-01-01

    Foreign body aspiration (FBA) is uncommon in the adult population but can be a life-threatening condition. Clinical manifestations vary according to the degree of airway obstruction, and, in some cases, making the correct diagnosis requires a high level of clinical suspicion combined with a detailed history and exam. Sudden cardiac arrest after FBA may occur secondary to asphyxiation. We present a 48-year-old male with no history of cardiac disease brought to the emergency department after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The patient was resuscitated after 15 minutes of cardiac arrest. He was initially managed with therapeutic hypothermia (TH). Subsequent history suggested FBA as a possible etiology of the cardiac arrest, and fiberoptic bronchoscopy demonstrated a piece of meat and bone lodged in the left main stem bronchus. The foreign body was removed with the bronchoscope and the patient clinically improved with full neurological recovery. Therapeutic hypothermia following cardiac arrest due to asphyxia has been reported to have high mortality and poor neurological outcomes. This case highlights the importance of early identification of FBA causing cardiac arrest, and we report a positive neurological outcome for postresuscitation therapeutic hypothermia following cardiac arrest due to asphyxia. PMID:27006837

  20. Women Get Worse Cardiac Arrest Care Than Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Women Get Worse Cardiac Arrest Care Than Men: Study They need to be treated as aggressively as men when their hearts stop, experts say To use ... who survive cardiac arrest are less likely than men to get aggressive, lifesaving care at the hospital, ...

  1. Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest: outcome predictors

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Rodrigo Nazário; Ávila, Paulo; Cavaco, Raquel; Germano, Nuno; Bento, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Objective The determination of coma patient prognosis after cardiac arrest has clinical, ethical and social implications. Neurological examination, imaging and biochemical markers are helpful tools accepted as reliable in predicting recovery. With the advent of therapeutic hypothermia, these data need to be reconfirmed. In this study, we attempted to determine the validity of different markers, which can be used in the detection of patients with poor prognosis under hypothermia. Methods Data from adult patients admitted to our intensive care unit for a hypothermia protocol after cardiac arrest were recorded prospectively to generate a descriptive and analytical study analyzing the relationship between clinical, neurophysiological, imaging and biochemical parameters with 6-month outcomes defined according to the Cerebral Performance Categories scale (good 1-2, poor 3-5). Neuron-specific enolase was collected at 72 hours. Imaging and neurophysiologic exams were carried out in the 24 hours after the rewarming period. Results Sixty-seven patients were included in the study, of which 12 had good neurological outcomes. Ventricular fibrillation and electroencephalographic theta activity were associated with increased likelihood of survival and improved neurological outcomes. Patients who had more rapid cooling (mean time of 163 versus 312 minutes), hypoxic-ischemic brain injury on magnetic resonance imaging or neuron-specific enolase > 58ng/mL had poor neurological outcomes (p < 0.05). Conclusion Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury on magnetic resonance imaging and neuron-specific enolase were strong predictors of poor neurological outcomes. Although there is the belief that early achievement of target temperature improves neurological prognoses, in our study, there were increased mortality and worse neurological outcomes with earlier target-temperature achievement. PMID:26761469

  2. Management of cardiac arrest in a parturient with Eisenmenger's syndrome and complete atrioventricular block during Cesarean section: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gaab Soo; Chang, Choo Hoon; Lee, Eun Kyung; Choi, Jeong Yeon

    2015-01-01

    A 26-year-old parturient with Eisenmenger's syndrome and complete atrioventricular block was presented for emergency Cesarean section due to preterm labor. Ventricular tachycardia (VT), which progressed to ventricular fibrillation (VF), started immediately after the incision. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation with electric shocks was given by anesthesiologists while the obstetrician delivered the baby between the shocks. A cardiac surgeon was ready for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation institution in case of emergency but spontaneous circulation of the patient returned after the 3rd shock and the delivery of the baby. The newborn's Apgar score was 4 at 1 minute and 8 at 5 minutes. An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator was inserted before the discharge because the patient had recurrent episodes of VT and VF postoperatively. PMID:26634088

  3. Education for cardiac arrest--Treatment or prevention?

    PubMed

    Smith, Gary B; Welch, John; DeVita, Michael A; Hillman, Ken M; Jones, Daryl

    2015-07-01

    In-hospital cardiac arrests (IHCA) occur infrequently and individual staff members working on general wards may only rarely encounter one. Mortality following IHCA is high and the evidence for the benefits of many advanced life support (ALS) interventions is scarce. Nevertheless, regular, often frequent, ALS training is mandatory for many hospital medical staff and nurses. The incidence of pre-cardiac arrest deterioration is much higher than that of cardiac arrests, and there is evidence that intervention prior to cardiac arrest can reduce the incidence of IHCA. This article discusses a proposal to reduce the emphasis on widespread ALS training and to increase education in the recognition and response to pre-arrest clinical deterioration. PMID:25921543

  4. Office and operating room management of cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Sabiston, W R; Hicks, J N

    1982-02-01

    Management of cardiac arrest depends on a four-minute period of potential reversibility. Success depends on immediate diagnosis, documentation of the onset of cardiac arrest, and establishment of treatment priorities. Pupillary dilation, complete in two minutes, serves to verify the onset and duration of cardiac arrest. Treatment involves two phases--the emergency phase of oxygenation and perfusion and the definitive phase of restoring the spontaneous effective heartbeat. The two mechanisms of cardiac arrest, ventricular fibrillation and asystole, are characterized, and the conditions necessary for each to occur are listed. The treatment of ventricular fibrillation is defibrillation, whereas ventricular asystole responds to cardiac stimuli--a precordial blow, epinephrine, or calcium. The mnemonic "SALT CAN ADD GOOD TIME" is suggested as a guide for drug dosage, and a treatment flowchart is outlined. PMID:7036965

  5. Isolation Syndrome after Cardiac Arrest and Therapeutic Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Forgacs, Peter B.; Fridman, Esteban A.; Goldfine, Andrew M.; Schiff, Nicholas D.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the first description of an isolation syndrome in a patient who suffered prolonged cardiac arrest and underwent a standard therapeutic hypothermia protocol. Two years after the arrest, the patient demonstrated no motor responses to commands, communication capabilities, or visual tracking at the bedside. However, resting neuronal metabolism and electrical activity across the entire anterior forebrain was found to be normal despite severe structural injuries to primary motor, parietal, and occipital cortices. In addition, using quantitative electroencephalography, the patient showed evidence for willful modulation of brain activity in response to auditory commands revealing covert conscious awareness. A possible explanation for this striking dissociation in this patient is that altered neuronal recovery patterns following therapeutic hypothermia may lead to a disproportionate preservation of anterior forebrain cortico-thalamic circuits even in the setting of severe hypoxic injury to other brain areas. Compared to recent reports of other severely brain-injured subjects with such dissociation of clinically observable (overt) and covert behaviors, we propose that this case represents a potentially generalizable mechanism producing an isolation syndrome of blindness, motor paralysis, and retained cognition as a sequela of cardiac arrest and therapeutic hypothermia. Our findings further support that highly-preserved anterior cortico-thalamic integrity is associated with the presence of conscious awareness independent from the degree of injury to other brain areas. PMID:27375420

  6. Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest –Optimal Management

    PubMed Central

    Frõhlich, Georg M.; Lyon, Richard M; Sasson, Comilla; Crake, Tom; Whitbread, Mark; Indermuehle, Andreas; Timmis, Adam; Meier, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has attracted increasing attention over the past years because outcomes have improved impressively lately. The changes for neurological intact outcomes has been poor but several areas have achieved improving survival rates after adjusting their cardiac arrest care. The pre-hospital management is certainly key and decides whether a cardiac arrest patient can be brought back into a spontaneous circulation. However, the whole chain of resuscitation including the in-hospital care have improved also. This review describes aetiologies of OHCA, risk and potential protective factors and recent advances in the pre-hospital and in-hospital management of these patients. PMID:23228073

  7. Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia (PAID) syndrome following cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Dheeraj; Singla, Deepak; Singh, Jasveer; Jindal, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia (PAID) appears to be a unique syndrome following brain injury. It can echo many life-threatening conditions, making its early recognition and management a challenge for intensivists. A delay in early recognition and subsequent management may result in increased morbidity, which is preventable in affected patients. Herein, we report the case of a patient who was diagnosed with PAID syndrome following prolonged cardiac arrest, and discuss the pathophysiology, clinical presentation and management of this rare and under-recognised clinical entity. PMID:25189311

  8. Experience with bretylium tosylate by a hospital cardiac arrest team.

    PubMed

    Holder, D A; Sniderman, A D; Fraser, G; Fallen, E L

    1977-03-01

    The effect of bretylium tosylate (BT) was determined in 27 consecutive cases of resistant ventricular fibrillation (VF) encountered by a hospital cardiac arrest team. The VF was sustained and completely resistant to multiple injections of lidocaine, sequential DC shocks at 400 watt-sec and one or a combination of intravenous propranolol, diphenylhydantoin or procainamide. Following 30 min of sustained cardiac massage, BT (5 mg/kg i.v.) was administered. In 20 patients, VF was terminated within 9-12 min after DC shock. Eight of these patients failed to recover while 12 (44%) of all patients resuscitated survived to be discharged from hospital. Eleven out of 20 (55%) of all patients who had a cardiac arrest outside the CCU were survivors; only one out of seven in the CCU were successfully resuscitated. While receiving maintanance BT post-resuscitation (5 mg/kg i.m. q 8-12 hrs x 48 hrs), half the patients developed hypotension and three required vasopressors and/or fluid replacement. The data indicate that BT is a useful agent in patients with sustained VF refractory to repeated lidocaine injections, some other antiarrhythmic agents, and multiple DC shocks. PMID:837490

  9. Therapeutic Hypothermia and Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in a Child with Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Spurkeland, Nancy; Bennett, Gregory; Alexander, Chandran; Chang, Dennis; Ceneviva, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Neurologic outcomes following pediatric cardiac arrest are consistently poor. Early initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation has been shown to have positive effects on both survival to hospital discharge, and improved neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest. Additionally, the use of therapeutic hypothermia may improve survival in pediatric cardiac arrest patients admitted to the intensive care unit. We report a child with congenital hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, in whom the early initiation of effective prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation and subsequent administration of therapeutic hypothermia contributed to a positive outcome with no gross neurologic sequelae. Continuing efforts should be made to promote and employ high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which likely contributed to the positive outcome of this case. Further research will be necessary to develop and solidify national guidelines for the implementation of therapeutic hypothermia in selected subpopulations of children with OHCA. PMID:25861505

  10. Emergency Neurological Life Support: Resuscitation Following Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Rittenberger, Jon C; Friess, Stuart; Polderman, Kees H

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac arrest is the most common cause of death in North America. Neurocritical care interventions, including targeted temperature management (TTM), have significantly improved neurological outcomes in patients successfully resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Therefore, resuscitation following cardiac arrest was chosen as an emergency neurological life support protocol. Patients remaining comatose following resuscitation from cardiac arrest should be considered for TTM. This protocol will review induction, maintenance, and re-warming phases of TTM, along with management of TTM side effects. Aggressive shivering suppression is necessary with this treatment to ensure the maintenance of a target temperature. Ancillary testing, including electrocardiography, computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, continuous electroencephalography monitoring, and correction of electrolyte, blood gas, and hematocrit changes, are also necessary to optimize outcomes. PMID:26438463

  11. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for pediatric cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Jennie

    2015-02-01

    Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) remains a promising treatment for pediatric patients in cardiac arrest unresponsive to traditional cardiopulmonary resuscitation. With venoarterial extracorporeal support, blood is drained from the right atrium, oxygenated through the extracorporeal circuit, and transfused back to the body, bypassing the heart and lungs. The use of artificial oxygenation and perfusion thus provides the body a period of hemodynamic stability, while allowing resolution of underlying disease processes. Survival rates for ECPR patients are higher than those for traditional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), although neurological outcomes require further investigation. The impact of duration of CPR and length of treatment with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation vary in published reports. Furthermore, current guidelines for the initiation and use of ECPR are limited and may lead to confusion about appropriate use of this support. Many ethical concerns arise with this advanced form of life support. More often than not, the dilemma is not whether to withhold ECPR, but rather when to withdraw it. Although clinicians must decide if ECPR is appropriate and when further intervention is futile, the ultimate burden of choice is left to the patient's caregivers. Offering support and guidance to the patient's family as well as the patient is essential. PMID:25639578

  12. Cardiac arrest due to intracranial hypotension following pseudohypoxic brain swelling induced by negative suction drainage in a cranioplasty patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyun-Soo; Lee, Soo Kyung; Kim, Su Ryun; Kim, Seon Ju

    2016-06-01

    Pseudohypoxic brain swelling (PHBS) is known to be an uncommon event that may occur during and following an uneventful brain surgery, when negative suction drainage is used. The cerebrospinal fluid loss related to suction drainage can evoke intracranial hypotension that progress to PHBS. The main presentations of PHBS are sudden unexpected circulatory collapses, such as severe bradycardia, hypotension, cardiac arrest, consciousness deterioration and diffuse brain swelling as seen with brain computerized tomography (CT). We present a stuporous 22-year-old patient who underwent cranioplasty under general anesthesia. The entire course of the general anesthesia and operation progressed favorably. However, the time of scalp suture completion, sudden bradycardia and hypotension occurred, followed by cardiac arrest immediately after initiation of subgaleal and epidural suction drainage. After successful resuscitation, the comatose patient was transferred to the neurosurgical intensive care unit and PHBS was confirmed using brain CT. PMID:27274378

  13. Cardiac arrest due to intracranial hypotension following pseudohypoxic brain swelling induced by negative suction drainage in a cranioplasty patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Ryun; Kim, Seon Ju

    2016-01-01

    Pseudohypoxic brain swelling (PHBS) is known to be an uncommon event that may occur during and following an uneventful brain surgery, when negative suction drainage is used. The cerebrospinal fluid loss related to suction drainage can evoke intracranial hypotension that progress to PHBS. The main presentations of PHBS are sudden unexpected circulatory collapses, such as severe bradycardia, hypotension, cardiac arrest, consciousness deterioration and diffuse brain swelling as seen with brain computerized tomography (CT). We present a stuporous 22-year-old patient who underwent cranioplasty under general anesthesia. The entire course of the general anesthesia and operation progressed favorably. However, the time of scalp suture completion, sudden bradycardia and hypotension occurred, followed by cardiac arrest immediately after initiation of subgaleal and epidural suction drainage. After successful resuscitation, the comatose patient was transferred to the neurosurgical intensive care unit and PHBS was confirmed using brain CT. PMID:27274378

  14. Post-resuscitation care for survivors of cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Mangla, Ashvarya; Daya, Mohamud R.; Gupta, Saurabh

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest can occur following a myriad of clinical conditions. With advancement of medical science and improvements in Emergency Medical Services systems, the rate of return of spontaneous circulation for patients who suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) continues to increase. Managing these patients is challenging and requires a structured approach including stabilization of cardiopulmonary status, early consideration of neuroprotective strategies, identifying and managing the etiology of arrest and initiating treatment to prevent recurrence. This requires a closely coordinated multidisciplinary team effort. In this article, we will review the initial management of survivors of OHCA, highlighting advances and ongoing controversies. PMID:24568821

  15. Double Bolus Thrombolysis for Suspected Massive Pulmonary Embolism during Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Gerard; Fitzpatrick, Gareth; El-Gammal, Ayman; Gilligan, Peadar

    2015-01-01

    More than 70% of cardiac arrest cases are caused by acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or pulmonary embolism (PE). Although thrombolytic therapy is a recognised therapy for both AMI and PE, its indiscriminate use is not routinely recommended during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We present a case describing the successful use of double dose thrombolysis during cardiac arrest caused by pulmonary embolism. Notwithstanding the relative lack of high-level evidence, this case suggests a scenario in which recombinant tissue Plasminogen Activator (rtPA) may be beneficial in cardiac arrest. In addition to the strong clinical suspicion of pulmonary embolism as the causative agent of the patient's cardiac arrest, the extremely low end-tidal CO2 suggested a massive PE. The absence of dilatation of the right heart on subxiphoid ultrasound argued against the diagnosis of PE, but not conclusively so. In the context of the circulatory collapse induced by cardiac arrest, this aspect was relegated in terms of importance. The second dose of rtPA utilised in this case resulted in return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and did not result in haemorrhage or an adverse effect. PMID:26664765

  16. Double Bolus Thrombolysis for Suspected Massive Pulmonary Embolism during Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Gerard; Fitzpatrick, Gareth; Gilligan, Peadar

    2015-01-01

    More than 70% of cardiac arrest cases are caused by acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or pulmonary embolism (PE). Although thrombolytic therapy is a recognised therapy for both AMI and PE, its indiscriminate use is not routinely recommended during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We present a case describing the successful use of double dose thrombolysis during cardiac arrest caused by pulmonary embolism. Notwithstanding the relative lack of high-level evidence, this case suggests a scenario in which recombinant tissue Plasminogen Activator (rtPA) may be beneficial in cardiac arrest. In addition to the strong clinical suspicion of pulmonary embolism as the causative agent of the patient's cardiac arrest, the extremely low end-tidal CO2 suggested a massive PE. The absence of dilatation of the right heart on subxiphoid ultrasound argued against the diagnosis of PE, but not conclusively so. In the context of the circulatory collapse induced by cardiac arrest, this aspect was relegated in terms of importance. The second dose of rtPA utilised in this case resulted in return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and did not result in haemorrhage or an adverse effect. PMID:26664765

  17. Cardiac arrest due to airway obstruction in hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Fuse, Takashi; Nakada, Taka-aki; Taniguchi, Masashi; Mizushima, Yasuaki; Matsuoka, Tetsuya

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare genetic disease caused by a deficiency of functional C1 esterase inhibitor that causes swelling attacks in various body tissues. We hereby report a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to airway obstruction in HAE. Cutaneous swelling and abdominal pain attacks caused by gastrointestinal wall swelling are common symptoms in HAE, whereas laryngeal swelling is rare. Emergency physicians may have few chances to experience cases of life-threatening laryngeal edema resulting in a delay from symptom onset to the diagnosis of HAE. Hereditary angioedema is diagnosed by performing complement blood tests. Because safe and effective treatment options are available for the life-threatening swellings in HAE, the diagnosis potentially reduces the risk of asphyxiation in patients and their blood relatives. PMID:25913082

  18. Oral Phenytoin Toxicity Causing Sinus Arrest: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Thimmisetty, Ravi K.; Gorthi, Janardhana Rao

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of sinus node arrest leading to symptomatic junctional bradycardia from oral phenytoin toxicity, which is a rare presentation. Our patient had no prior cardiac history and was on phenytoin therapy for seizure disorder. Although bradycardia is more commonly associated with intravenous phenytoin and there were few case reports of bradycardia with oral phenytoin reported, the literature is limited. In this case report, we also reviewed the pathophysiology of phenytoin-induced cardiac toxicity. PMID:25343048

  19. Functional Outcomes: One Year after a Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Ketki D.; Rittenberger, Jon C.; Holm, Margo B.; Callaway, Clifton W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The study aim was to characterize the time-course of recovery in impairments, activity limitations, participation restrictions, disability, and quality of life during the first year after cardiac arrest. Secondarily, the study described the associations between the instruments used to measure each of these domains. Methods. Measures of global disability (Cerebral Performance Category, CPC, Modified Rankin Scale, mRS), quality of life, activity limitations, participation restrictions, and affective and cognitive impairments were administered to 29 participants 1, 6, and 12 months after cardiac arrest. Results. Global measures of disability indicated recovery between one month and one year after cardiac arrest (mean CPC: 2.1 versus 1.69,  P < 0.05; mean mRS: 2.55 versus 1.83, P < 0.05). While global measures of disability were moderately associated with participation, they were poorly associated with other measures. The cohort endorsed depressive symptomatology throughout the year but did not have detectable cognitive impairment. Conclusions. Recovery from cardiac arrest is multifaceted and recovery continues for months depending upon the measures being used. Measures of global disability, reintegration into the community, and quality of life yield different information. Future clinical trials should include a combination of measures to yield the most complete representation of recovery after cardiac arrest. PMID:26421282

  20. Swedish ambulance nurses' experiences of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Ricard; Engström, Åsa

    2013-04-01

    Effective pre-hospital treatment of a person suffering cardiac arrest is a challenging task for the ambulance nurses. The aim of this study was to describe ambulance nurses' experiences of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrest. Qualitative personal interviews were conducted during 2011 in Sweden with seven ambulance nurses with experience of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrests. The interview texts were analyzed using qualitative thematic content analysis, which resulted in the formulation of one theme with six categories. Mutual preparation, regular training and education were important factors in the nursing of patients suffering cardiac arrest. Ambulance nurses are placed in ethically demanding situations regarding if and for how long they should continue cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to accord with pre-hospital cardiac guidelines and patients' wishes. When a cardiac arrest patient is nursed their relatives also need the attention of ambulance nurses. Reflection is one way for ambulance nurses to learn from, and talk about, their experiences. This study provides knowledge of ambulance nurses' experiences in the care of people with cardiac arrest. Better feedback about the care given by the ambulance nurses, and about the diagnosis and nursing care the patients received after they were admitted to the hospital are suggested as improvements that would allow ambulance nurses to learn more from their experience. Further development and research concerning the technical equipment might improve the situation for both the ambulance nurses and the patients. Ambulance nurses need regularly training and education to be prepared for saving people's lives and also to be able to make the right decisions. PMID:23577977

  1. Management of survivors of cardiac arrest - the importance of genetic investigation.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Peter J; Dagradi, Federica

    2016-09-01

    Management of survivors of cardiac arrest is largely based on a traditional approach. However, during the past decade, arrhythmias of genetic origin have increasingly been recognized as contributing to many more cases than previously appreciated. This realization is forcing physicians managing the survivors of cardiac arrest also to consider family members. In this Perspectives article, we examine the appropriate management approaches for survivors of cardiac arrests related to channelopathies, cardiomyopathies, or ischaemic heart disease, and for their families. Important implications for families of individuals who have experienced sudden cardiac death as part of sudden infant death syndrome or during sport activity are also discussed. Congenital long QT syndrome provides a paradigm of the logical sequence of the steps that should be performed. When a diagnosis of the cause of the cardiac arrest is certain or probable, every effort should be made to identify the genetic basis of disease, because this approach will enable the identification and early protection of similarly affected family members. Accordingly, the availability in hospitals of at least one cardiologist with cardiovascular genetics expertise would improve the management of survivors of cardiac arrest as well as of their families. PMID:27383078

  2. Extracorporeal life support for cardiac arrest in a 13-year-old girl caused by Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyoung Hwan; Lee, Byung Kook; Jeung, Kyung Woon; Lee, Dong Hun

    2015-10-01

    Generally, Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome presents good prognosis. However, several case reports demonstrated malignant arrhythmia or sudden cardiac death as WPW syndrome's first presentation. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation using extracorporeal life support is a therapeutic option in refractory cardiac arrest. We present a WPW syndrome patient who had sudden cardiac arrest as the first presentation of the disease and treated it using extracorporeal life support with good neurologic outcome. PMID:26314214

  3. Ventilation and gas exchange management after cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Sutherasan, Yuda; Raimondo, Pasquale; Pelosi, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    For several decades, physicians had integrated several interventions aiming to improve the outcomes in post-cardiac arrest patients. However, the mortality rate after cardiac arrest is still as high as 50%. Post-cardiac arrest syndrome is associated with high morbidity and mortality due to not only poor neurological outcome and cardiovascular failure but also respiratory dysfunction. To minimize ventilator-associated lung injury, protective mechanical ventilation by using low tidal volume ventilation and driving pressure may decrease pulmonary complications and improve survival. Low level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) can be initiated and titrated with careful cardiac output and respiratory mechanics monitoring. Furthermore, optimizing gas exchange by avoiding hypoxia and hyperoxia as well as maintaining normocarbia may improve neurological and survival outcome. Early multidisciplinary cardiac rehabilitation intervention is recommended. Minimally invasive monitoring techniques, that is, echocardiography, transpulmonary thermodilution method measuring extravascular lung water, as well as transcranial Doppler ultrasound, might be useful to improve appropriate management of post-cardiac arrest patients. PMID:26670813

  4. Anaphylactic shock and cardiac arrest caused by thiamine infusion.

    PubMed

    Juel, Jacob; Pareek, Manan; Langfrits, Christian Sigvald; Jensen, Svend Eggert

    2013-01-01

    Parenteral thiamine has a very high safety profile. The most common adverse effect is local irritation; however, anaphylactic or anaphylactoid reactions may occur, mostly related to intravenous administration. We describe a 44-year-old man, a chronic alcoholic, who was admitted with alcohol intoxication and developed cardiac arrest due to anaphylactic shock following intravenous thiamine infusion. The patient was successfully resuscitated after 15 min and repeated epinephrine administrations. He was discharged in good health after 14 days. This case report emphasises both the importance of recognising the symptoms of anaphylaxis and the fact that facilities for treating anaphylaxis and cardiopulmonary resuscitation should be available when thiamine or for that matter, any drug is given in-hospital. PMID:23853017

  5. Cardiac Arrest During Medically-Supervised Exercise Training: A Report of Fifteen Successful Defibrillations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyfer, Howard R.; And Others

    The Cardio-Pulmonary Research Institute conducted an exercise program for men with a history of coronary heart disease. Over 7 years, there were 15 cases of cardiac arrest during exercise (one for every 6,000 man-hours of exercise). Trained medical personnel were present in all cases, and all were resuscitated by electrical defibrillation with no…

  6. The Practice of Therapeutic Hypothermia after Cardiac Arrest in France: A National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Orban, Jean-Christophe; Cattet, Florian; Lefrant, Jean-Yves; Leone, Marc; Jaber, Samir; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Allaouchiche, Bernard; Ichai, Carole

    2012-01-01

    Aims Cardiac arrest is a major health concern worldwide accounting for 375,000 cases per year in Europe with a survival rate of <10%. Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve patients’ neurological outcome and is recommended by scientific societies. Despite these guidelines, different surveys report a heterogeneous application of this treatment. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical practice of therapeutic hypothermia in cardiac arrest patients. Methods This self-declarative web based survey was proposed to all registered French adult intensive care units (ICUs) (n = 357). Paediatrics and neurosurgery ICUs were excluded. The different questions addressed the structure, the practical modalities of therapeutic hypothermia and the use of prognostic factors in patients admitted after cardiac arrest. Results One hundred and thirty-two out of 357 ICUs (37%) answered the questionnaire. Adherence to recommendations regarding the targeted temperature and hypothermia duration were 98% and 94% respectively. Both guidelines were followed in 92% ICUs. During therapeutic hypothermia, sedative drugs were given in 99% ICUs, mostly midazolam (77%) and sufentanil (59%). Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA) were used in 97% ICUs, mainly cisatracurium (77%). Numerous prognostic factors were used after cardiac arrest such as clinical factors (95%), biomarkers (53%), electroencephalography (78%) and evoked potentials (35%). Conclusions In France, adherence to recommendations for therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest is higher than those previously reported in other countries. Numerous prognostic factors are widely used even if their reliability remains controversial. PMID:23049783

  7. Out of hospital cardiac arrest and associated injury.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, A I; Stuart, M J; Gray, A J

    1998-01-01

    Three patients are described who sustained injuries around the time of a collapse that led to out of hospital cardiac arrest. In this group of patients the importance of taking a complete medical history and recording the circumstances of the syncopal episode cannot be overemphasised. If cardiac output is successfully restored the possibility of occult traumatic injury must be considered in high risk patients. PMID:9639185

  8. Validation of the Pittsburgh Cardiac Arrest Category illness severity score

    PubMed Central

    Coppler, Patrick J.; Elmer, Jonathan; Calderon, Luis; Sabedra, Alexa; Doshi, Ankur A.; Callaway, Clifton W.; Rittenberger, Jon C.; Dezfulian, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to validate the ability of an early post-cardiac arrest illness severity classification to predict patient outcomes. Methods The Pittsburgh Cardiac Arrest Category (PCAC) is a 4-level illness severity score that was found to be strongly predictive of outcomes in the initial derivation study. We assigned PCAC scores to consecutive in and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest subjects treated at two tertiary care centers between January 2011 and September 2013. We made assignments prospectively at Site 1 and retrospectively at Site 2. Our primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge. Inter-rater reliability of retrospective PCAC assessments was assessed. Secondary outcomes were favorable discharge disposition (home or acute rehabilitation), Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at hospital discharge. We tested the association of PCAC with each outcome using unadjusted and multivariable logistic regression. Results We included 607 cardiac arrest patients during the study (393 at Site 1 and 214 at Site 2). Site populations differed in age, arrest location, rhythm, use of hypothermia and distribution of PCAC. Inter-rater reliability of retrospective PCAC assignments was excellent (κ=0.81). PCAC was associated with survival (unadjusted odds ratio (OR) for Site 1: 0.33 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.27–0.41)) Site 2: 0.32 (95%CI 0.24–0.43)) even after adjustment for other clinical variables (adjusted OR Site 1: 0.32 (95%CI 0.25–0.41)) Site 2: 0.31 (95%CI 0.22–0.44)). PCAC was predictive of secondary outcomes. Conclusions Our results confirm that PCAC is strongly predictive of survival and good functional outcome after cardiac arrest. PMID:25636896

  9. Use of cold intravenous fluid to induce hypothermia in a comatose child after cardiac arrest due to a lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Min; Jeong, Ju-Hwan; Kyong, Yeon-Young; Kim, Han-Joon; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Park, Jeong-Ho; Park, Kyu-Nam

    2008-11-01

    We report a case in which mild hypothermia was induced successfully using a cold intravenous fluid infusion in a 12-year-old boy who was comatose following 21 min of cardiac arrest caused by a lightning strike. PMID:18805616

  10. The UK Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Outcome (OHCAO) project

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Gavin D; Brace-McDonnell, Samantha J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Reducing premature death is a key priority for the UK National Health Service (NHS). NHS Ambulance services treat approximately 30 000 cases of suspected cardiac arrest each year but survival rates vary. The British Heart Foundation and Resuscitation Council (UK) have funded a structured research programme—the Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Outcomes (OHCAO) programme. The aim of the project is to establish the epidemiology and outcome of OHCA, explore sources of variation in outcome and establish the feasibility of setting up a national OHCA registry. Methods and analysis This is a prospective observational study set in UK NHS Ambulance Services. The target population will be adults and children sustaining an OHCA who are attended by an NHS ambulance emergency response and where resuscitation is attempted. The data collected will be characterised broadly as system characteristics, emergency medical services (EMS) dispatch characteristics, patient characteristics and EMS process variables. The main outcome variables of interest will be return of spontaneous circulation and medium—long-term survival (30 days to 10-year survival). Ethics and dissemination Ethics committee permissions were gained and the study also has received approval from the Confidentiality Advisory Group Ethics and Confidentiality committee which provides authorisation to lawfully hold identifiable data on patients without their consent. To identify the key characteristics contributing to better outcomes in some ambulance services, reliable and reproducible systems need to be established for collecting data on OHCA in the UK. Reports generated from the registry will focus on data completeness, timeliness and quality. Subsequent reports will summarise demographic, patient, process and outcome variables with aim of improving patient care through focus quality improvement initiatives. PMID:26428332

  11. Thyroid Levels in High-Normal Range May Be Linked to Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... in High-Normal Range May Be Linked to Cardiac Arrest Study isn't cause for alarm, cardiologist says, ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Cardiac Arrest Thyroid Tests Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health ...

  12. Exercise-related sudden cardiac arrest in London: incidence, survival and bystander response

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Melanie J; Fothergill, Rachael T

    2015-01-01

    Objective The study aimed to (1) establish the incidence of exercise-related sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in London, (2) investigate survival from exercise-related SCA and (3) examine factors related to survival. Method This retrospective observational study examined 2 years’ data from the London Ambulance Service (LAS) cardiac arrest registry for patients in whom resuscitation was attempted following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), a cardiac cause was presumed and the arrest occurred during or within 1 h of exercise. Results The incidence of exercise-related SCA in London was estimated to be 0.6 per 100 000 person-years which equated to 0.5% of all OHCA, and 1.5% of all OHCA with presumed cardiac aetiology and resuscitation attempted. The majority of cases were male and the incidence increased from age 40 years. Just under one-third of patients survived to hospital discharge. Survival in the Utstein comparator group (cases with presumed cardiac aetiology, resuscitation attempted, bystander witnessed and a presenting cardiac rhythm of ventricular fibrillation or tachycardia) was higher at 42%. Survival was significantly associated with initial cardiac rhythm (χ2=17.5, df=2, p<0.001) and bystander defibrillation (Fisher's exact test, p<0.05). Conclusions Incidence of exercise-related SCA in the general population in London is rare. Survival following exercise-related SCA was considerably higher than survival for all OHCA with presumed cardiac aetiology and resuscitation attempted attended by the LAS during the same period. The major limitation of the study is the likely under identification of cases of exercise-related SCA. PMID:26468401

  13. Successful extracorporeal life support in sudden cardiac arrest due to coronary anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Wan; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Ki-Sik; Bang, Duk Won; Hyon, Min-Su; Lee, Min-Ho; Park, Byoung-Won

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) has recently been reported to have a survival benefit in patients with cardiac arrest. It is now used widely as a lifesaving modality. Here, we describe a case of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in a young athlete with an anomalous origin of the right coronary artery from the left coronary sinus. Resuscitation was successful using ECLS before curative bypass surgery. We highlight the efficacy of ECLS for a patient with SCA caused by a rare, unexpected aetiology. In conclusion, ECLS was a lifesaving modality for SCA due to an anomalous coronary artery in this young patient. PMID:27354896

  14. Heart Attack or Sudden Cardiac Arrest: How Are They Different?

    MedlinePlus

    ... a person loses consciousness and has no pulse. Death occurs within minutes if the victim does not receive treatment. What is the link? These two distinct heart conditions are linked. Sudden cardiac arrest can occur after a heart attack, or during recovery. Heart attacks increase the risk ...

  15. Warning Signs of Heart Attack, Stroke and Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... head up and check for at least five seconds. Learn more about cardiac arrest If these signs are ... CPR with breaths. Watch the demo video and learn how to save a life in 60 seconds. Login or Sign Up to save and share ...

  16. [Refractory cardiac arrest patients in prehospital care, potential organ donors].

    PubMed

    Le Jan, Arnaud; Dupin, Aurélie; Garrigue, Bruno; Sapir, David

    2016-09-01

    Under the authority of the French Biomedicine Agency, a new care pathway integrates refractory cardiac arrest patients into a process of organ donation. It is a medical, logistical and ethical challenge for the staff of the mobile emergency services. PMID:27596502

  17. Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest and myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Michael; Behringer, Wilhelm

    2008-12-01

    About 17 million people worldwide die from cardiovascular diseases each year. Impaired neurologic function after sudden cardiac arrest is a major cause of death in these patients. Up to now, no specific post-arrest therapy was available to improve outcome. Recently, two randomized clinical trials of mild therapeutic hypothermia after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest showed improvement of neurological outcome and reduced mortality. A broad implementation of this new therapy could save thousands of lives worldwide, as only 6 patients have to be treated to get one additional patient with favourable neurological recovery. At present, myocardial reperfusion by thrombolytic therapy or primary PCI as early as possible is the most effective therapy in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Mild therapeutic hypothermia might be a promising new therapy to prevent reperfusion injury after myocardial infarction, but its use in daily clinical routine cannot be recommended with the available evidence. PMID:19137812

  18. Cardiac Arrest in a Heart Transplant Patient Receiving Dexmedetomidine During Cardiac Catheterization.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Lawrence Israel; Miyamoto, Shelley D; Stenquist, Scott; Twite, Mark David

    2016-06-01

    Dexmedetomidine is an α-2 agonist with a sedative and cardiopulmonary profile that makes it an attractive anesthetic in pediatric cardiac patients. Cardiac transplant patients may suffer from acute cellular rejection of the cardiac conduction system and, therefore, are at an increased risk of the electrophysiological effect of dexmedetomidine. We present such a patient who had a cardiac arrest while receiving dexmedetomidine during cardiac catheterization. Because acute cellular rejection of the cardiac conduction system is difficult to diagnose, dexmedetomidine should be used with caution in pediatric heart transplant patients. PMID:26721807

  19. Sudden Cardiac Arrest During Sports Activity in Middle Age

    PubMed Central

    Marijon, Eloi; Uy-Evanado, Audrey; Reinier, Kyndaron; Teodorescu, Carmen; Narayanan, Kumar; Jouven, Xavier; Gunson, Karen; Jui, Jonathan; Chugh, Sumeet S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sports-associated sudden cardiac arrests (SCAs) occur mostly during middle age. We sought to determine burden, characteristics, and outcomes of SCA during sports among middle aged residents of a large US community. Methods and Results SCA cases aged 35–65 years were identified in a large, prospective, population-based study (2002–2013), with systematic and comprehensive assessment of their lifetime medical history. Of the 1,247 SCA cases, 63 (5%) occurred during sports activities at a mean age of 51.1±8.8 years, yielding an incidence of 21.7 (95%CI 8.1–35.4) per million per year. The incidence varied significantly based on sex, with a higher incidence among men (RR 18.68 95%CI 2.50–139.56) for sports SCA, as compared to all other SCA (RR 2.58, 95%CI 2.12–3.13). Sports SCA was also more likely to be a witnessed event (87 vs. 53%, P<0.001), with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (44 vs. 25%, P=0.001) and ventricular fibrillation (84 vs. 51%, P<0.0001). Survival to hospital discharge was higher for sports-associated SCA (23.2 vs. 13.6%, P=0.04). Sports SCA cases presented with known pre-existing cardiac disease in 16%, ≥1 cardiovascular risk factor in 56%, and overall, 36% of cases had typical cardiovascular symptoms during the week preceding SCA. Conclusions Sports-associated SCA in middle age represents a relatively small proportion of the overall SCA burden, reinforcing the idea of the high benefit-low risk nature of sports activity. Especially in light of current population aging trends, our findings emphasize that targeted education could maximize both safety and acceptance of sports activity in the older athlete. PMID:25847988

  20. High Schools Help Conquer Cardiac Arrest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyle, James

    1998-01-01

    A class of devices known as automated external defibrillators (AEDs) enable nonmedical professionals to respond to cardiac emergencies. The Jackson County School District, West Virginia, is the first in the country to have AEDs at high school sporting events. AEDs are proven to be safe, accurate, and easy to use. (MLF)

  1. Sudden cardiac arrest during anesthesia in a 30-month-old boy with syndactyly: a case of genetically proven Timothy syndrome.

    PubMed

    An, Hyo Soon; Choi, Eun Young; Kwon, Bo Sang; Kim, Gi Beom; Bae, Eun Jung; Noh, Chung Il; Choi, Jung Yun; Park, Sung Sup

    2013-05-01

    Timothy syndrome, long QT syndrome type 8, is highly malignant with ventricular tachyarrhythmia. A 30-month-old boy had sudden cardiac arrest during anesthesia induction before plastic surgery for bilateral cutaneous syndactyly. After successful resuscitation, prolonged QT interval (QTc, 0.58-0.60 sec) and T-wave alternans were found in his electrocardiogram. Starting β-blocker to prevent further tachycardia and collapse event, then there were no more arrhythmic events. The genes KCNQ1, KCNH2, KCNE1 and 2, and SCN5A were negative for long QT syndrome. The mutation p.Gly406Arg was confirmed in CACNA1C, which maintains L-type calcium channel depolarization in the heart and other systems. PMID:23678275

  2. [Amniotic fluid embolism: report of the successful outcome of a case with inaugural cardiac arrest and early DIVC complicated by hemoperitoneum of iatrogen origin and bleeding of an hepatic adenoma].

    PubMed

    Falzone, E; Ricard, J-D; Pachy, F; Mandelbrot, L; Keïta, H

    2012-10-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism is a relatively rare clinical entity and with difficult medical recognition. However, it is the second leading cause of maternal mortality. We report here the case of a 32-year-old patient who underwent elective caesarean section complicated by an amniotic fluid embolism with cardiac arrest. The presence of a major disseminated intravascular coagulation favored the occurrence of a retroperitoneal hematoma of iatrogenic origin on attempt of femoral venous catheterization and that of hemoperitoneum on bleeding of an hepatic adenoma. The diagnostic of amniotic fluid embolism was confirmed by the presence of amniotic cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage. The patient survived without sequelae. PMID:22925937

  3. Successful Management of Aluminium Phosphide Poisoning Resulting in Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Hakimoğlu, Sedat; Dikey, İsmail; Sarı, Ali; Kekeç, Leyla; Tuzcu, Kasım; Karcıoğlu, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum phosphide has high toxicity when it is ingested, and in case of contact with moisture, phosphine gas is released. Aluminum phosphide poisoning causes metabolic acidosis, arrhythmia, acute respiratory distress syndrome and shock, and there is no specific antidote. A 17-year-old male patient was referred to our hospital because of aluminum phosphide poisoning with 1500 mg of aluminum phosphide tablets. The patient’s consciousness was clear but he was somnolent. Vital parameters were as follows: blood pressure: 85/56 mmHg, pulse: 88 beats/min, SpO2: 94%, temperature: 36.4°C. Because of hypotension, noradrenaline and dopamine infusions were started. The patient was intubated because of respiratory distress and loss of consciousness. Severe metabolic acidosis was determined in the arterial blood gas, and metabolic acidosis was corrected by sodium bicarbonate treatment. In addition to supportive therapy of the poisoning, haemodialysis was performed. Cardiac arrest occurred during follow-ups in the intensive care unit, and sinus rhythm was achieved after 10 min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The patient was discharged after three sessions of haemodialysis on the ninth day. As a result, haemodialysis contributed to symptomatic treatment of aluminum phosphide poisoning in this case report. PMID:27366514

  4. Successful Management of Aluminium Phosphide Poisoning Resulting in Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Hakimoğlu, Sedat; Dikey, İsmail; Sarı, Ali; Kekeç, Leyla; Tuzcu, Kasım; Karcıoğlu, Murat

    2015-08-01

    Aluminum phosphide has high toxicity when it is ingested, and in case of contact with moisture, phosphine gas is released. Aluminum phosphide poisoning causes metabolic acidosis, arrhythmia, acute respiratory distress syndrome and shock, and there is no specific antidote. A 17-year-old male patient was referred to our hospital because of aluminum phosphide poisoning with 1500 mg of aluminum phosphide tablets. The patient's consciousness was clear but he was somnolent. Vital parameters were as follows: blood pressure: 85/56 mmHg, pulse: 88 beats/min, SpO2: 94%, temperature: 36.4°C. Because of hypotension, noradrenaline and dopamine infusions were started. The patient was intubated because of respiratory distress and loss of consciousness. Severe metabolic acidosis was determined in the arterial blood gas, and metabolic acidosis was corrected by sodium bicarbonate treatment. In addition to supportive therapy of the poisoning, haemodialysis was performed. Cardiac arrest occurred during follow-ups in the intensive care unit, and sinus rhythm was achieved after 10 min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The patient was discharged after three sessions of haemodialysis on the ninth day. As a result, haemodialysis contributed to symptomatic treatment of aluminum phosphide poisoning in this case report. PMID:27366514

  5. Mechanisms Linking Advanced Airway Management and Cardiac Arrest Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Justin L.; Prince, David K.; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced airway management – such as endotracheal intubation (ETI) or supraglottic airway (SGA) insertion – is one of the most prominent interventions in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) resuscitation. While randomized controlled trials are currently in progress to identify the best advanced airway technique in OHCA, the mechanisms by which airway management may influence OHCA outcomes remain unknown. We provide a conceptual model describing potential mechanisms linking advanced airway management with OHCA outcomes. PMID:26073275

  6. Out-of-hospital therapeutic hypothermia in cardiac arrest victims

    PubMed Central

    Behringer, Wilhelm; Arrich, Jasmin; Holzer, Michael; Sterz, Fritz

    2009-01-01

    Despite many years of research, outcome after cardiac arrest is dismal. Since 2005, the European Resuscitation Council recommends in its guidelines the use of mild therapeutic hypothermia (32-34°) for 12 to 24 hours in patients successfully resuscitated from cardiac arrest. The benefit of resuscitative mild hypothermia (induced after resuscitation) is well established, while the benefit of preservative mild to moderate hypothermia (induced during cardiac arrest) needs further investigation before recommending it for clinical routine. Animal data and limited human data suggest that early and fast cooling might be essential for the beneficial effect of resuscitative mild hypothermia. Out-of-hospital cooling has been shown to be feasible and safe by means of intravenous infusion with cold fluids or non-invasively with cooling pads. A combination of these cooling methods might further improve cooling efficacy. If out-of-hospital cooling will further improve functional outcome as compared with in-hospital cooling needs to be determined in a prospective, randomised, sufficiently powered clinical trial. PMID:19821966

  7. Hyperoxia toxicity after cardiac arrest: What is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Llitjos, Jean-François; Mira, Jean-Paul; Duranteau, Jacques; Cariou, Alain

    2016-12-01

    This review gives an overview of current knowledge on hyperoxia pathophysiology and examines experimental and human evidence of hyperoxia effects after cardiac arrest. Oxygen plays a pivotal role in critical care management as a lifesaving therapy through the compensation of the imbalance between oxygen requirements and supply. However, growing evidence sustains the hypothesis of reactive oxygen species overproduction-mediated toxicity during hyperoxia, thus exacerbating organ failure by various oxidative cellular injuries. In the cardiac arrest context, evidence of hyperoxia effects on outcome is fairly conflicting. Although prospective data are lacking, retrospective studies and meta-analysis suggest that hyperoxia could be associated with an increased mortality. However, data originate from retrospective, heterogeneous and inconsistent studies presenting various biases that are detailed in this review. Therefore, after an original and detailed analysis of all experimental and clinical studies, we herein provide new ideas and concepts that could participate to improve knowledge on oxygen toxicity and help in developing further prospective controlled randomized trials on this topic. Up to now, the strategy recommended by international guidelines on cardiac arrest (i.e., targeting an oxyhemoglobin saturation of 94-98 %) should be applied in order to avoid deleterious hypoxia and potent hyperoxia. PMID:27003426

  8. Out-of-Hospital Perimortem Cesarean Section as Resuscitative Hysterotomy in Maternal Posttraumatic Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Gatti, Francesca; Zerbi, Simone Maria; Colombo, Dario; Landriscina, Mario; Kette, Fulvio

    2014-01-01

    The optimal treatment of a severe hemodynamic instability from shock to cardiac arrest in late term pregnant women is subject to ongoing studies. However, there is an increasing evidence that early “separation” between the mother and the foetus may increase the restoration of the hemodynamic status and, in the cardiac arrest setting, it may raise the likelihood of a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in the mother. This treatment, called Perimortem Cesarean Section (PMCS), is now termed as Resuscitative Hysterotomy (RH) to better address the issue of an early Cesarean section (C-section). This strategy is in contrast with the traditional treatment of cardiac arrest characterized by the maintenance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) maneuvers without any emergent surgical intervention. We report the case of a prehospital perimortem delivery by Caesarean (C) section of a foetus at 36 weeks of gestation after the mother's traumatic cardiac arrest. Despite the negative outcome of the mother, the choice of performing a RH seems to represent up to date the most appropriate intervention to improve the outcome in both mother and foetus. PMID:25530891

  9. Post-Cardiac Arrest Syndrome: Focus on the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Manole, Mioara D.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Fink, Ericka L.; Clark, Robert S. B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review The field of pediatric cardiac arrest (CA) experienced recent advances secondary to multicenter collaborations. This review summarizes developments during the last year and identifies areas for further research. Recent findings A large retrospective review demonstrated important differences in etiology, severity and outcome of in-hospital versus out-of-hospital pediatric CA. This distinction is relevant to interpretation of retrospective studies that may not distinguish between these entities, and in planning therapeutic clinical trials. Hypothermia was further evaluated as a treatment strategy after neonatal hypoxia and leaders in the field of neonatology recommend universal use of hypothermia in term neonates. In infants and children after CA, there are inadequate data to make a specific recommendation. Two retrospectives studies evaluating hypothermia in children after CA found that it tended to be administered more frequently to sicker patients. However, similar or worse outcomes of patients treated with hypothermia were observed. Use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is another emerging area of research in pediatric CA, and surprisingly good outcomes have been seen with this modality in some cases. Summary Therapeutic hypothermia and ECMO continue to be the only treatment modalities over and above conventional care for pediatric CA. New approaches to monitoring, treatment and rehabilitation after CA remain to be explored. PMID:19726989

  10. Intravenous ranitidine: Rapid bolus can lead to cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Kamlesh J; Parmar, Sarita J; Parikh, Rohan Pravinbhai; Gauswami, Prashant K; Dadhaniya, Nikunj; Surela, Abhilash

    2015-01-01

    This is a rare case report of a 30-year-old male, who was admitted to the Maxillofacial Surgery Department of the Dental College for a malunited fracture of the mandible and zygomatic bones. He was given oral medications namely, cefixime, metronidazole, ondansetron, and ranitidine for three days prior to the operation with complete normal preoperative workup. He had no significant past medical or family history. On the day of the operation, he was given injectable dexamethasone, cefotaxime, ondansetron, ranitidine, and metronidazole half-an-hour prior to the operation. In less than five minutes of giving a bolus ranitidine injection, the patient developed a cardiac arrest and was resuscitated by the anesthetist team on duty. He was transferred to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) on a ventilator, which was soon removed and the patient was off vasopressors, with stable vitals for 24 hours after the event. He was then transferred to the general ward of Medicine Department and observed for a further two days during which the patient remained uneventful and was finally transferred back to the Dental Department. PMID:25969659

  11. Intravenous ranitidine: Rapid bolus can lead to cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Kamlesh J; Parmar, Sarita J; Parikh, Rohan Pravinbhai; Gauswami, Prashant K; Dadhaniya, Nikunj; Surela, Abhilash

    2015-01-01

    This is a rare case report of a 30-year-old male, who was admitted to the Maxillofacial Surgery Department of the Dental College for a malunited fracture of the mandible and zygomatic bones. He was given oral medications namely, cefixime, metronidazole, ondansetron, and ranitidine for three days prior to the operation with complete normal preoperative workup. He had no significant past medical or family history. On the day of the operation, he was given injectable dexamethasone, cefotaxime, ondansetron, ranitidine, and metronidazole half-an-hour prior to the operation. In less than five minutes of giving a bolus ranitidine injection, the patient developed a cardiac arrest and was resuscitated by the anesthetist team on duty. He was transferred to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) on a ventilator, which was soon removed and the patient was off vasopressors, with stable vitals for 24 hours after the event. He was then transferred to the general ward of Medicine Department and observed for a further two days during which the patient remained uneventful and was finally transferred back to the Dental Department. PMID:25969659

  12. Outcomes After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Treated by Basic vs Advanced Life Support

    PubMed Central

    Sanghavi, Prachi; Jena, Anupam B.; Newhouse, Joseph P.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Most out-of-hospital cardiac arrests receiving emergency medical services in the United States are treated by ambulance service providers trained in advanced life support (ALS), but supporting evidence for the use of ALS over basic life support (BLS) is limited. OBJECTIVE To compare the effects of BLS and ALS on outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Observational cohort study of a nationally representative sample of traditional Medicare beneficiaries from nonrural counties who experienced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between January 1, 2009, and October 2, 2011, and for whom ALS or BLS ambulance services were billed to Medicare (31 292 ALS cases and 1643 BLS cases). Propensity score methods were used to compare the effects of ALS and BLS on patient survival, neurological performance, and medical spending after cardiac arrest. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Survival to hospital discharge, to 30 days, and to 90 days; neurological performance; and incremental medical spending per additional survivor to 1 year. RESULTS Survival to hospital discharge was greater among patients receiving BLS (13.1% vs 9.2% for ALS; 4.0 [95% CI, 2.3–5.7] percentage point difference), as was survival to 90 days (8.0% vs 5.4% for ALS; 2.6 [95% CI, 1.2–4.0] percentage point difference). Basic life support was associated with better neurological functioning among hospitalized patients (21.8% vs 44.8% with poor neurological functioning for ALS; 23.0 [95% CI, 18.6–27.4] percentage point difference). Incremental medical spending per additional survivor to 1 year for BLS relative to ALS was $154 333. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who received BLS had higher survival at hospital discharge and at 90 days compared with those who received ALS and were less likely to experience poor neurological functioning. PMID:25419698

  13. Sudden cardiac arrest as a presentation of Brugada syndrome unmasked by thyroid storm.

    PubMed

    Korte, Anna K M; Derde, Lennie; van Wijk, Jeroen; Tjan, David H

    2015-01-01

    An 18-year-old man suffered a sudden cardiac arrest with ventricular fibrillation and was successfully resuscitated. He had neither a medical nor family history of cardiac disease/sudden death, but was known to have Graves' disease, for which he was treated with radioactive iodine. Recently, block-and-replacement therapy had been discontinued to evaluate thyroid functioning. On admission, thyroid hormone levels were markedly elevated, suggesting thyroid storm due to residual Graves' disease. The patient was treated with propylthiouracil, hydrocortisone and Lugol solution. ECG showed repolarisation patterns suggestive of an underlying type 1 Brugada syndrome (BS). These findings were confirmed by an additional ajmaline test. An implantable cardioverter defibrillator was implanted to prevent future arrhythmias. The patient underwent total thyroidectomy 9 months later and recovered completely. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a sudden cardiac arrest as a presentation of BS unmasked by thyroid storm. PMID:26718704

  14. Recurrent Syncope and Cardiac Arrest in a Patient with Systemic Light Chain Amyloidosis Treated with Bortezomib.

    PubMed

    Jaipaul, Navin; Pi, Alexander; Zhang, Zhiwei

    2016-05-10

    About 10-15% of patients with multiple myeloma develop light chain (AL) amyloidosis. AL amyloidosis is a systemic disease that may involve multiple organs, often including the heart. It may present clinically with bradyarrhythmia and syncope. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib has been used with clinical efficacy in treating patients with AL amyloidosis but also implicated as a possible cause of cardiomyocyte injury. We report a case of a 48-year-old man with AL amyloidosis and increased frequency of syncope and cardiac arrest after starting bortezomib. The biologic and clinical plausibility of a heightened risk for cardiac arrest in patients with cardiac AL amyloidosis and history of syncope being treated with bortezomib is a possibility that is not well documented in the medical literature and warrants further investigation. PMID:27499835

  15. Recurrent Syncope and Cardiac Arrest in a Patient with Systemic Light Chain Amyloidosis Treated with Bortezomib

    PubMed Central

    Jaipaul, Navin; Pi, Alexander; Zhang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    About 10-15% of patients with multiple myeloma develop light chain (AL) amyloidosis. AL amyloidosis is a systemic disease that may involve multiple organs, often including the heart. It may present clinically with bradyarrhythmia and syncope. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib has been used with clinical efficacy in treating patients with AL amyloidosis but also implicated as a possible cause of cardiomyocyte injury. We report a case of a 48-year-old man with AL amyloidosis and increased frequency of syncope and cardiac arrest after starting bortezomib. The biologic and clinical plausibility of a heightened risk for cardiac arrest in patients with cardiac AL amyloidosis and history of syncope being treated with bortezomib is a possibility that is not well documented in the medical literature and warrants further investigation. PMID:27499835

  16. Cardiac Arrests in Patients Undergoing Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: A Retrospective Analysis of 73,029 Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Goudra, Basavana; Nuzat, Ahmad; Singh, Preet M.; Gouda, Gowri B.; Carlin, Augustus; Manjunath, Amit K.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Airway difficulties leading to cardiac arrest are frequently encountered during propofol sedation in patients undergoing gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. With a noticeable increase in the use of propofol for endoscopic sedation, we decided to examine the incidence and outcome of cardiac arrests in patients undergoing gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy with sedation. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective study, cardiac arrest data obtained from the clinical quality improvement and local registry over 5 years was analyzed. The information of patients who sustained cardiac arrest attributable to sedation was studied in detail. Analysis included comparison of cardiac arrests due to all causes until discharge (or death) versus the cardiac arrests and death occurring during the procedure and in the recovery area. Results: The incidence of cardiac arrest and death (all causes, until discharge) was 6.07 and 4.28 per 10,000 in patients sedated with propofol, compared with non–propofol-based sedation (0.67 and 0.44). The incidence of cardiac arrest during and immediately after the procedure (recovery area) for all endoscopies was 3.92 per 10,000; of which, 72% were airway management related. About 90.0% of all peri-procedural cardiac arrests occurred in patients who received propofol. Conclusions: The incidence of cardiac arrest and death is about 10 times higher in patients receiving propofol-based sedation compared with those receiving midazolam–fentanyl sedation. More than two thirds of these events occur during EGD and ERCP. PMID:26655137

  17. Sudden cardiac arrest during pregnancy: a rare complication of acquired maternal diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, R; Honore, P M; Hosseinpour, N; Nieboer, K; Spapen, H D

    2012-01-01

    Acute cardiac arrest during pregnancy is a rare but devastating event. Major causes are haemorrhagic, septic or anaphylactic shock, trauma, pulmonary or amniotic fluid embolism, and congenital or acquired cardiac disease. We present a case of massive intrathoracic migration of viscera through a left diaphragmatic hernia in a pregnant multipara, causing acute obstructive shock and cardiac arrest. Complications of intrathoracic herniation occur when the intruding viscera cause left lung and cardiac compression or mediastinal "tamponade" with decreased venous return. Intrathoracic strangulation of viscera is also common and may cause ischaemia, gangrene and eventual perforation. Sudden cardiac arrest as first sign of left diaphragmatic rupture during pregnancy, however, has rarely been described. In contrast with our patient, this catastrophic event is mostly seen in nulli- and primipara with a known congenital left diaphragmatic defect. Management of a diaphragmatic hernia depends on the clinical presentation and the period of gestation during which it is detected. Despite prolonged resuscitation with more than 1 hour of chest compressions, our patient recovered completely. PMID:22897068

  18. Massive transfusion and hyperkalaemic cardiac arrest in craniofacial surgery in a child.

    PubMed

    Buntain, S G; Pabari, M

    1999-10-01

    Hyperkalaemia is a recognised complication of massive blood transfusion. We present a case of hyperkalaemic cardiac arrest in a male infant of 12 months, who was undergoing craniofacial surgery for sagittal craniosynostosis. At the time of arrest the patient had received a massive transfusion of predominantly irradiated packed red cells over a two-hour period, and had a measured plasma potassium concentration of 10.1 mmol/l. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was successful after 15 minutes. On the basis of our laboratory data and a review of the available literature, we recommend the use of fresh, non-irradiated packed red cells whenever possible in paediatric surgery. PMID:10520398

  19. [Cardiac arrest following blunt chest injury. Emergency thoracotomy without ifs or buts?].

    PubMed

    Leidel, B A; Kanz, K G; Kirchhoff, C; Bürklein, D; Wismüller, A; Mutschler, W

    2007-10-01

    In German-speaking countries, most serious thoracic injuries are attributable to the impact of blunt force; they are the second most frequent result of injury after head injury in polytrauma patients with multiple injuries. Almost one in every three polytraumatized patients with significant chest injury develops acute lung failure, and one in every four, acute circulatory failure. The acute circulatory arrest following serious chest injury involves a high mortality rate, and in most cases it reflects a tension pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade, or hemorrhagic shock resulting from injury to the heart or one of the large vessels close to it. Brisk drainage of tension pneumothorax and adequate volume restoration are therefore particularly important in resuscitation of multiply traumatized patients, as are rapid resuscitative thoracotomy to allow direct heart massage, drainage of pericardial tamponade, and control of hemorrhage. However the probability of survival described in the literature is very low for patients sustaining severe chest trauma with acute cardiac arrest. The case report presented here describes a female polytrauma patient who suffered an acute cardiac arrest following cardiac tamponade after admission in the emergency department and who survived without neurological deficits after an emergency thoracotomy. Selections from the topical literature can help the treating physician in the emergency department in making decisions on whether an emergency thoracotomy is indicated after a blunt chest injury and on the procedure itself. PMID:17909734

  20. Calmodulin Mutations Associated with Recurrent Cardiac Arrest in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Crotti, Lia; Johnson, Christopher N.; Graf, Elisabeth; De Ferrari, Gaetano M.; Cuneo, Bettina F.; Ovadia, Marc; Papagiannis, John; Feldkamp, Michael D.; Rathi, Subodh G.; Kunic, Jennifer D.; Pedrazzini, Matteo; Wieland, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Clark, Travis; Shaffer, Christian; Benson, D. Woodrow; Kääb, Stefan; Meitinger, Thomas; Strom, Tim M.; Chazin, Walter J.; Schwartz, Peter J.; George, Alfred L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Life-threatening disorders of heart rhythm may arise during infancy and can result in the sudden and tragic death of a child. We performed exome sequencing on two unrelated infants presenting with recurrent cardiac arrest to discover a genetic cause. Methods and Results We ascertained two unrelated infants (probands) with recurrent cardiac arrest and dramatically prolonged QTc interval who were both born to healthy parents. The two parent-child trios were investigated using exome sequencing to search for de novo genetic variants. We then performed follow-up candidate gene screening on an independent cohort of 82 subjects with congenital long-QT syndrome without an identified genetic cause. Biochemical studies were performed to determine the functional consequences of mutations discovered in two genes encoding calmodulin. We discovered three heterozygous de novo mutations in either CALM1 or CALM2, two of the three human genes encoding calmodulin, in the two probands and in two additional subjects with recurrent cardiac arrest. All mutation carriers were infants who exhibited life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias combined variably with epilepsy and delayed neurodevelopment. Mutations altered residues in or adjacent to critical calcium binding loops in the calmodulin carboxyl-terminal domain. Recombinant mutant calmodulins exhibited several fold reductions in calcium binding affinity. Conclusions Human calmodulin mutations disrupt calcium ion binding to the protein and are associated with a life-threatening condition in early infancy. Defects in calmodulin function will disrupt important calcium signaling events in heart affecting membrane ion channels, a plausible molecular mechanism for potentially deadly disturbances in heart rhythm during infancy. PMID:23388215

  1. In-hospital versus out-of-hospital pediatric cardiac arrest: A multicenter cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Moler, Frank W.; Meert, Kathleen; Donaldson, Amy E.; Nadkarni, Vinay; Brilli, Richard J.; Dalton, H.J.; Clark, Robert S. B.; Shaffner, D. H.; Schleien, Charles L.; Statler, Kimberly; Tieves, Kelly S.; Hackbarth, Richard; Pretzlaff, Robert; van der Jagt, Elise W.; Levy, Fiona; Hernan, Lynn; Silverstein, Faye S.; Dean, J Michael

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To describe a large multicenter cohort of pediatric cardiac arrest (CA) with return of circulation (ROC) from either the in-hospital (IH) or out-of-hospital (OH) setting in order to determine if significant differences related to pre-event, arrest event, early post-arrest event characteristics and outcomes exist that would be critical in planning a clinical trial of therapeutic hypothermia (TH). Design Retrospective cohort study Setting Fifteen Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) sites. Patients Patients from 24 hours (h) to 18 years with either IH or OH CA who had a history of at least 1 minute of chest compressions and ROC for at least 20 minutes were eligible. Interventions None Measurements and Main Results A total of 491 patients met study entry criteria with 353 IH cases and 138 OH cases. Major differences between the IH and OH cohorts were observed for patient pre-arrest characteristics; arrest event initial rhythm described; and arrest medication use. Several post-arrest interventions were utilized differently, however, the use of TH was similar (<5%) in both cohorts. During the 0–12 h interval following ROC, OH cases had lower minimum temperature and pH, and higher maximum serum glucose recorded. Mortality was greater in the OH cohort (62% vs. 51%, p=0.04) with the cause attributed to a neurological indication much more frequent in the OH than IH cohort (69% vs. 20%; p < 0.01). Conclusions For pediatric CA with ROC, several major differences exist between IH and OH cohorts. The finding that the etiology of death was attributed to neurological indications much more frequently in OH arrests has important implications for future research. Investigators planning to evaluate the efficacy of new interventions such as TH should be aware that the IH and OH populations differ greatly and require independent clinical trials. PMID:19455024

  2. Incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Rea, Thomas D; Pearce, Rachel M; Raghunathan, Trivellore E; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Jouven, Xavier; Siscovick, David S

    2004-06-15

    Estimates of the incidence of out-of-hospital primary cardiac arrest (CA) have typically relied solely upon emergency medical service or death certificate records and have not investigated incidence in clinical subgroups. Overall and temporal patterns of CA incidence were investigated in clinically defined groups using systematic methods to ascertain CA. Estimates of incidence were derived from a population-based case-control study in a large health plan from 1986 to 1994. Subjects were enrollees aged 50 to 79 years who had had CA (n = 1,275). A stratified random sample of enrollees who had not had CA was used to estimate the population at risk with various clinical characteristics (n = 2,323). Poisson's regression was used to estimate incidence overall and for 3-year time periods (1986 to 1988, 1989 to 1991, and 1992 to 1994). The overall CA incidence was 1.89/1,000 subject-years and varied up to 30-fold across clinical subgroups. For example, incidence was 5.98/1,000 subject-years in subjects with any clinically recognized heart disease compared with 0.82/1,000 subject-years in subjects without heart disease. In subgroups with heart disease, incidence was 13.69/1,000 subject-years in subjects with prior myocardial infarction and 21.87/1,000 subject-years in subjects with heart failure. Risk decreased by 20% from the initial to the final time period, with a greater decrease observed in those with (25%) compared with those without (12%) clinical heart disease. Thus, CA incidence varied considerably across clinical groups. The results provide insights regarding absolute and population-attributable risk in clinically defined subgroups, information that may aid strategies aimed at reducing mortality from CA. PMID:15194012

  3. Venoarterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Adults With Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jignesh K; Schoenfeld, Elinor; Parnia, Sam; Singer, Adam J; Edelman, Norman

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the use of conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), rates of return of spontaneous circulation and survival with minimal neurologic impairment remain low. Utilization of venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for CA in adults is steadily increasing. Propensity-matched cohort studies have reported outcomes associated with ECMO use to be superior to that of conventional CPR alone in in-hospital patients with CA. In this review, we discuss the mechanism, indications, complications, and evidence for ECMO in CA in adults. PMID:25922385

  4. A young mountaineer surviving sudden cardiac arrest at high altitude

    PubMed Central

    Indermuehle, Andreas; Cook, Stéphan; Marty, Hans

    2010-01-01

    A young mountaineer suffered from sudden cardiac arrest at high altitude. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was initiated immediately. After 30 min a rescue team arrived and successfully defibrillated ventricular fibrillation upon which spontaneous circulation returned. The subsequent ECG was suggestive of extensive anterior myocardial infarction. Therefore, the patient was thrombolysed and transferred for primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Echocardiography revealed severely reduced left ventricular function with antero-septo-apical akinesia. However, angiography showed unobstructed coronary arteries. The patient fully recovered and left ventricular function normalised within 2 weeks. It may be speculated that exposure to high altitude resulted in acute coronary thrombosis which dissolved by rapid thrombolysis. PMID:22778291

  5. Cerebral blood flow in humans following resuscitation from cardiac arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Cohan, S.L.; Mun, S.K.; Petite, J.; Correia, J.; Tavelra Da Silva, A.T.; Waldhorn, R.E.

    1989-06-01

    Cerebral blood flow was measured by xenon-133 washout in 13 patients 6-46 hours after being resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Patients regaining consciousness had relatively normal cerebral blood flow before regaining consciousness, but all patients who died without regaining consciousness had increased cerebral blood flow that appeared within 24 hours after resuscitation (except in one patient in whom the first measurement was delayed until 28 hours after resuscitation, by which time cerebral blood flow was increased). The cause of the delayed-onset increase in cerebral blood flow is not known, but the increase may have adverse effects on brain function and may indicate the onset of irreversible brain damage.

  6. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and post-cardiac arrest brain injury].

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    One of the most important topics in the field of resuscitation at present is the drafting of the 2015 version of the Consensus on Science and Treatment Recommendation (CoSTR) by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation. The Japan Resuscitation Council is preparing its 2015 Guideline based on this CoSTR and plans to release it in October 2015. A critical change in the upcoming CoSTR is the adoption of the GRADE system. The new Guideline incorporating the GRADE system will surely be more scientific than the previous Guideline issued in 2010. Meanwhile, an important finding appeared in a report from Nielsen et al.: hypothermia at a targeted temperature of 33 degrees C did not confer a benefit versus 36 degrees in unconscious survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac cause. PMID:26915250

  7. Genetic Deletion of NOS3 Increases Lethal Cardiac Dysfunction Following Mouse Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Beiser, David G.; Orbelyan, Gerasim A.; Inouye, Brendan T.; Costakis, James G.; Hamann, Kimm J.; McNally, Elizabeth M.; Hoek, Terry L. Vanden

    2010-01-01

    Study Aims Cardiac arrest mortality is significantly affected by failure to obtain return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) despite cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Severe myocardial dysfunction and cardiovascular collapse further affects mortality within hours of initial ROSC. Recent work suggests that enhancement of nitric oxide (NO) signaling within minutes of CPR can improve myocardial function and survival. We studied the role of NO signaling on cardiovascular outcomes following cardiac arrest and resuscitation using endothelial NO synthase knockout (NOS3-/-) mice. Methods Adult female wild-type (WT) and NOS3-/- mice were anesthetized, intubated, and instrumented with left-ventricular pressure-volume catheters. Cardiac arrest was induced with intravenous potassium chloride. CPR was performed after 8 min of untreated arrest. ROSC rate, cardiac function, whole-blood nitrosylhemoglobin (HbNO) concentrations, heart NOS3 content and phosphorylation (p-NOS3), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), and phospho-troponin I (p-TnI) were measured. Results Despite equal quality CPR, NOS3-/- mice displayed lower rates of ROSC compared to WT (47.6% [10/21] vs. 82.4% [14/17], p<0.005). Among ROSC animals, NOS3-/- versus WT mice exhibited increased left-ventricular dysfunction and 120 min mortality. Prior to ROSC, myocardial effectors of NO signaling including cGMP and p-TnI were decreased in NOS3-/- vs. WT mice (p<0.05). Following ROSC in WT mice, significant NOS3-dependent increases in circulating HbNO were seen by 120 min. Significant increases in cardiac p-NOS3 occurred between end-arrest and 15 min post-ROSC, while total NOS3 content was increased by 120 min post-ROSC (p<0.05). Conclusions Genetic deletion of NOS3 decreases ROSC rate and worsens post-ROSC left-ventricular function. Poor cardiovascular outcomes are associated with differences in NOS3-dependent myocardial cGMP signaling and circulating NO metabolites. PMID:20951489

  8. Epidemiology and Outcomes from Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children: The ROC Epistry-Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Dianne L.; Everson-Stewart, Siobhan; Sears, Gena K.; Daya, Mohamud; Osmond, Martin H.; Warden, Craig R.; Berg, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Population-based data for pediatric cardiac arrest are scant and largely from urban areas. The Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC) Epistry-Cardiac Arrest is a population-based emergency medical services (EMS) registry of out-of-hospital non-traumatic cardiac arrest (OHCA). This study examined age-stratified incidence and outcomes of pediatric OHCA. We hypothesized that survival to hospital discharge is less frequent from pediatric OHCA than adult OHCA. METHODS AND RESULTS Design Prospective population-based cohort study. Setting Eleven US and Canadian ROC sites. Population Persons <20 years who a) receive CPR or defibrillation by emergency medical services (EMS) providers and/or receive bystander AED shock or b) pulseless but receive no EMS resuscitation between December 2005 and March 2007. Patients were a priori stratified into 3 groups: <1 year (infants, n = 277), 1–11 years (children, n = 154), and 12–19 years (adolescents, n = 193). The incidence of pediatric OHCA was 8.04/100,000 person-years (72.71 in infants, 3.73 in children, and 6.37 in adolescents) versus 126.52 for adults. Survival for all pediatric OHCA was 6.4% (3.3% for infants, 9.1% for children and 8.9% for adolescents) versus 4.5% for adults (P=0.03). Unadjusted odds ratio (95% CI) for pediatric survival to discharge compared with adults was 0.71 (0.37, 1.39) for infants, 2.11 (1.21, 3.66) for children, and 2.04 (1.24, 3.38) for adolescents. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates that the incidence of OHCA in infants approaches that observed in adults but is lower among children and adolescents. Survival to discharge was more common among children and adolescents than infants or adults. PMID:19273724

  9. Effect of electroconvulsive stimulation on morphological and physiological aspects of post-cardiac arrest cerebral microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Sheleg, Sergey; Hixon, Hugh; Aizberg, Oleg R; Korotkevich, Alexander E; Nedzved, Mikhail K

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the effect of electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS) on cerebral circulation in vivo using the method for measuring microcirculation in real time with the photosensitizer dye Photosense and the fiber optic spectrofluorometer LESA-01-BIOSPEC. We have found that electroconvulsive stimulation significantly improved cerebral microcirculation (fourfold higher comparing to the control cerebral perfusion) after 30 min of room-temperature cardiac arrest. Morphologic study of the brain tissue showed the absence of rouleaux formation of erythrocytes ("sludged blood") in the cerebral cortex microcirculation after the application of electrical stimulus. Electroconvulsive stimulation may be useful for improving cerebral microcirculation (blood flow) in cases of long-term brain hypoxia/anoxia after prolonged cardiac arrest. PMID:18586374

  10. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in high-rise buildings: delays to patient care and effect on survival

    PubMed Central

    Drennan, Ian R.; Strum, Ryan P.; Byers, Adam; Buick, Jason E.; Lin, Steve; Cheskes, Sheldon; Hu, Samantha; Morrison, Laurie J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The increasing number of people living in high-rise buildings presents unique challenges to care and may cause delays for 911-initiated first responders (including paramedics and fire department personnel) responding to calls for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We examined the relation between floor of patient contact and survival after cardiac arrest in residential buildings. Methods: We conducted a retrospective observational study using data from the Toronto Regional RescuNet Epistry database for the period January 2007 to December 2012. We included all adult patients (≥ 18 yr) with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of no obvious cause who were treated in private residences. We excluded cardiac arrests witnessed by 911-initiated first responders and those with an obvious cause. We used multivariable logistic regression to determine the effect on survival of the floor of patient contact, with adjustment for standard Utstein variables. Results: During the study period, 7842 cases of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest met the inclusion criteria, of which 5998 (76.5%) occurred below the third floor and 1844 (23.5%) occurred on the third floor or higher. Survival was greater on the lower floors (4.2% v. 2.6%, p = 0.002). Lower adjusted survival to hospital discharge was independently associated with higher floor of patient contact, older age, male sex and longer 911 response time. In an analysis by floor, survival was 0.9% above floor 16 (i.e., below the 1% threshold for futility), and there were no survivors above the 25th floor. Interpretation: In high-rise buildings, the survival rate after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest was lower for patients residing on higher floors. Interventions aimed at shortening response times to treatment of cardiac arrest in high-rise buildings may increase survival. PMID:26783332

  11. Student perceptions of sudden cardiac arrest: a qualitative inquiry.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Annette; Callan, Krista; Egizio, Katelyn; Kenney, Kaye; Gray, Gillian; Mundry, Gillian; Re, Gillian

    Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is the number one cause of death in young athletes in high school and university settings. Survival and outcomes of SCA is dependent on appropriate recognition of symptoms and immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), along with a shock from an automatic external defibrillator (AED). The three aims of the authors' study presented in this article were: to describe university students' perceptions and beliefs about sudden cardiac arrest, to describe university students' understanding of an AED and their level of preparedness to recognize and respond to a life threatening emergency event, and to identify university students' experiences of responding to handling life-threatening emergency events. Qualitative methodology was employed using semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis. Three major themes emerged from data analysis: confusion, uncertainty, and fear/uncomfortableness. These themes characterised participant's perceptions about SCA. The authors concluded that a lack of understanding of what SCA is and participants' inability to respond to an emergency event was evident. PMID:22585265

  12. Electrophysiological Monitoring of Brain Injury and Recovery after Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ruoxian; Xiong, Wei; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Reliable prognostic methods for cerebral functional outcome of post cardiac-arrest (CA) patients are necessary, especially since therapeutic hypothermia (TH) as a standard treatment. Traditional neurophysiological prognostic indicators, such as clinical examination and chemical biomarkers, may result in indecisive outcome predictions and do not directly reflect neuronal activity, though they have remained the mainstay of clinical prognosis. The most recent advances in electrophysiological methods—electroencephalography (EEG) pattern, evoked potential (EP) and cellular electrophysiological measurement—were developed to complement these deficiencies, and will be examined in this review article. EEG pattern (reactivity and continuity) provides real-time and accurate information for early-stage (particularly in the first 24 h) hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury patients with high sensitivity. However, the signal is easily affected by external stimuli, thus the measurements of EP should be combined with EEG background to validate the predicted neurologic functional result. Cellular electrophysiology, such as multi-unit activity (MUA) and local field potentials (LFP), has strong potential for improving prognostication and therapy by offering additional neurophysiologic information to understand the underlying mechanisms of therapeutic methods. Electrophysiology provides reliable and precise prognostication on both global and cellular levels secondary to cerebral injury in cardiac arrest patients treated with TH. PMID:26528970

  13. Cardiac arrest in a 21-year-old man after ingestion of 1,3-DMAA-containing workout supplement.

    PubMed

    Karnatovskaia, Lioudmila V; Leoni, Juan C; Freeman, Michelle L

    2015-01-01

    Dietary supplements containing 1,3-dimethylamylamine (DMAA) have been determined to be illegal by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA); although banned, the products are still widely available for purchase. Adverse effects reported include cardiac arrest, hemorrhagic stroke, and death. Nonetheless, such products remain popular among young people because of advertised claims of exercise performance enhancement and fat burning. We describe a case of a young man who took such a supplement and suffered a cardiac arrest. Notably, the product consumed was not on the FDA list of substances containing DMAA. This case highlights the importance for clinicians to be aware of the potential harm of the DMAA-containing products by maintaining a high index of suspicion in otherwise healthy individuals presenting with cardiac arrest. It is of particular importance to sports medicine physicians who are most involved in education and counseling of patients potentially at risk of taking such products. PMID:24878759

  14. [Drowning versus cardiac ischemia: Cardiac arrest of an 11-year-old boy at a swimming lake].

    PubMed

    Födinger, A; Wöss, C; Semsroth, S; Stadlbauer, K H; Wenzel, V

    2015-11-01

    This report describes a case of sudden cardiac arrest and subsequent attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation of an 11-year-old child on the shores of a swimming lake. Reports of eyewitnesses excluded the obviously suspected diagnosis of a drowning accident. The result of the autopsy was sudden cardiac death due to a congenital coronary anomaly (abnormal left coronary artery, ALCA). Favored by vigorous physical activity, this anomaly can lead to malignant arrhythmias because the ectopic coronary artery with its intramural course through the aortic wall is compressed during every systole. This pathology was not known to the boy or his family; in fact he liked sports but had suffered of a syncope once which was not followed up. Without a strong suspicion it is difficult to diagnose a coronary artery anomaly and it is often missed even in college athletes. Tragically, sudden cardiac arrest may be the first symptom of an undiagnosed abnormal coronary artery. Following syncope or chest pain during exercise with a normal electrocardiogram (ECG) cardiac imaging, such as computed tomography (CT) or angiography should be initiated in order to enable surgical repair of an abnormal coronary artery. PMID:26423258

  15. Hypothermic cardiac arrest: an 11 year review of ED management and outcome.

    PubMed

    Brunette, D D; McVaney, K

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the emergency department (ED) management of hypothermic cardiac arrest and its outcome. The medical records of all patients with hypothermic cardiac arrest treated in the ED from January 1, 1988 to January 31, 1999 were retrospectively reviewed. Data collected included initial body temperature, serum potassium, methods of rewarming, return of perfusing rhythm, and morbidity and mortality. Data were analyzed by descriptive methods. Eleven patients were treated in the ED resuscitation room for hypothermic cardiac arrest. Six patients were found in cardiac arrest in the field, one patient arrested during transport, and four patients arrested after ED arrival. The average initial temperature was 79.1 degrees F (range 69.0 degrees F to 86.7 degrees F). Seven patients received an ED thoracotomy with internal cardiac massage and warm mediastinal irrigation. Four patients had airway management in the ED and then direct transport to the operating room for cardiac bypass rewarming. Three of the seven patients who received an ED thoracotomy subsequently went to intraoperative cardiac bypass rewarming. Five of the seven (71.4%) patients who received an ED thoracotomy survived, versus none of the four patients (0%) who went directly to intraoperative cardiac bypass. A direct comparison of immediate ED thoracotomy versus intraoperative cardiac bypass without ED thoracotomy is cautiously made as this was an unmatched and nonrandomized study. Three of the surviving patients underwent intraoperative cardiac bypass rewarming after receiving an ED thoracotomy. In two of these patients a perfusing rhythm had been established after thoracotomy in the ED and before transport to the operating room for cardiac bypass. Only one of seven (14.3%) patients who arrested prehospital survived versus four of four (100%) who arrested in the ED. ED thoracotomy with internal cardiac massage and mediastinal irrigation rewarming is effective in the management

  16. The science of reperfusion injury post cardiac arrest--Implications for emergency nurses.

    PubMed

    Baker, Edward; Lee, Geraldine

    2016-01-01

    Survival following cardiac arrest in the developed world remains below 10%. In those who survive the initial cardiac arrest, prognosis remains poor due to the onset of multi-organ failure with both significant cardiac and neurological dysfunction. Nurses have demonstrated good understanding of cardiac arrest/post arrest guidelines and have good technical skills but deficits remain in their understanding of pathophysiological processes involved in post cardiac arrest syndromes. This article aims to provide an overview of these pathophysiological processes involved in the post cardiac arrest phase, potential treatment options and the nursing interventions that may be required within the emergency department setting. This article will focus emergency nurses to become more involved in patient management at this critical phase of treatment and highlight potential early signs of deterioration. Although return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) is crucial in the process of recovery from cardiac arrest, it is only the first of many complex stages. Given the complexity of post cardiac arrest syndrome and its impact on the patient, healthcare professionals need to understand the cellular changes associated with reperfusion injuries in order to improve outcomes. It is only through effective nursing care and medical management that improved outcomes will become more common in the future. PMID:26385262

  17. Neuropsychological, Academic, and Adaptive Functioning in Children Who Survive In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Resuscitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Robin D.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This study of 25 children, ages 2-15, who survived a cardiac arrest while hospitalized, found that a majority of subjects exhibited low-average to deficient levels of performance on neuropsychologic, achievement, and adaptive behavior measures. Duration of cardiac arrest and a medical risk score were significantly correlated with decreased…

  18. How Cool It Is: Targeted Temperature Management for Brain Protection Post-Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Rabinstein, Alejandro A

    2016-02-01

    Neurological recovery often determines outcome in patients resuscitated after cardiac arrest. Temperature control as a neuroprotective strategy has become standard of care. The first randomized trials showing improved neurological outcomes in patients treated with hypothermia with a target temperature of 33°C over a decade ago led to the inclusion of this intervention in practice guidelines and the broad adoption of hypothermia protocols across the world. More recently, large randomized trials showed no difference from targeting a temperature of 33 or 36°C and no benefit from pre-hospital induction of hypothermia. Temperature control remains a crucial part of post-cardiac arrest care. However, the optimal temperature target, timing of induction, duration of temperature control, and speed of rewarming are unclear. Similarly, the value of targeted temperature management in cases of in-hospital arrest and non-shockable rhythms is unknown. This article reviews the neuroprotective mechanisms of hypothermia, the evidence supporting targeted temperature management after cardiac resuscitation, areas of persistent uncertainty and controversy, and future research directions. PMID:26820272

  19. Simultaneous measurement of cerebral and muscle tissue parameters during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosrati, Reyhaneh; Ramadeen, Andrew; Hu, Xudong; Woldemichael, Ermias; Kim, Siwook; Dorian, Paul; Toronov, Vladislav

    2015-03-01

    In this series of animal experiments on resuscitation after cardiac arrest we had a unique opportunity to measure hyperspectral near-infrared spectroscopy (hNIRS) parameters directly on the brain dura, or on the brain through the intact pig skull, and simultaneously the muscle hNIRS parameters. Simultaneously the arterial blood pressure and carotid and femoral blood flow were recorded in real time using invasive sensors. We used a novel hyperspectral signalprocessing algorithm to extract time-dependent concentrations of water, hemoglobin, and redox state of cytochrome c oxidase during cardiac arrest and resuscitation. In addition in order to assess the validity of the non-invasive brain measurements the obtained results from the open brain was compared to the results acquired through the skull. The comparison of hNIRS data acquired on brain surface and through the adult pig skull shows that in both cases the hemoglobin and the redox state cytochrome c oxidase changed in similar ways in similar situations and in agreement with blood pressure and flow changes. The comparison of simultaneously measured brain and muscle changes showed expected differences. Overall the results show feasibility of transcranial hNIRS measurements cerebral parameters including the redox state of cytochrome oxidase in human cardiac arrest patients.

  20. Improving neurological outcome after cardiac arrest: Therapeutic hypothermia the best treatment

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Suchitra; Dhama, Satyavir S.; Kumar, Mohinder; Jain, Gaurav

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrest, irrespective of its etiology, has a high mortality. This event is often associated with brain anoxia which frequently causes severe neurological damage and persistent vegetative state. Only one out of every six patients survives to discharge following in-hospital cardiac arrest, whereas only 2-9% of patients who experience out of hospital cardiac arrest survive to go home. Functional outcomes of survival are variable, but poor quality survival is common, with only 3-7% able to return to their previous level of functioning. Therapeutic hypothermia is an important tool for the treatment of post-anoxic coma after cardiopulmonary resuscitation. It has been shown to reduce mortality and has improved neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest. Nevertheless, hypothermia is underused in critical care units. This manuscript aims to review the mechanism of hypothermia in cardiac arrest survivors and to propose a simple protocol, feasible to be implemented in any critical care unit. PMID:25885714

  1. Post-resuscitation care following out-of-hospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Girotra, Saket; Chan, Paul S; Bradley, Steven M

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in developed countries. Although a majority of cardiac arrest patients die during the acute event, a substantial proportion of cardiac arrest deaths occur in patients following successful resuscitation and can be attributed to the development of post-cardiac arrest syndrome. There is growing recognition that integrated post-resuscitation care, which encompasses targeted temperature management (TTM), early coronary angiography and comprehensive critical care, can improve patient outcomes. TTM has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome in patients who remain comatose especially following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to ventricular arrhythmias. Early coronary angiography and revascularisation if needed may also be beneficial during the post-resuscitation phase, based on data from observational studies. In addition, resuscitated patients usually require intensive care, which includes mechanical ventilator, haemodynamic support and close monitoring of blood gases, glucose, electrolytes, seizures and other disease-specific intervention. Efforts should be taken to avoid premature withdrawal of life-supporting treatment, especially in patients treated with TTM. Given that resources and personnel needed to provide high-quality post-resuscitation care may not exist at all hospitals, professional societies have recommended regionalisation of post-resuscitation care in specialised 'cardiac arrest centres' as a strategy to improve cardiac arrest outcomes. Finally, evidence for post-resuscitation care following in-hospital cardiac arrest is largely extrapolated from studies in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Future studies need to examine the effectiveness of different post-resuscitation strategies, such as TTM, in patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest. PMID:26385451

  2. Standardized EEG interpretation accurately predicts prognosis after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, Andrea O.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Wesenberg Kjaer, Troels; Horn, Janneke; Ullén, Susann; Friberg, Hans; Nielsen, Niklas; Rosén, Ingmar; Åneman, Anders; Erlinge, David; Gasche, Yvan; Hassager, Christian; Hovdenes, Jan; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Kuiper, Michael; Pellis, Tommaso; Stammet, Pascal; Wanscher, Michael; Wetterslev, Jørn; Wise, Matt P.; Cronberg, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify reliable predictors of outcome in comatose patients after cardiac arrest using a single routine EEG and standardized interpretation according to the terminology proposed by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society. Methods: In this cohort study, 4 EEG specialists, blinded to outcome, evaluated prospectively recorded EEGs in the Target Temperature Management trial (TTM trial) that randomized patients to 33°C vs 36°C. Routine EEG was performed in patients still comatose after rewarming. EEGs were classified into highly malignant (suppression, suppression with periodic discharges, burst-suppression), malignant (periodic or rhythmic patterns, pathological or nonreactive background), and benign EEG (absence of malignant features). Poor outcome was defined as best Cerebral Performance Category score 3–5 until 180 days. Results: Eight TTM sites randomized 202 patients. EEGs were recorded in 103 patients at a median 77 hours after cardiac arrest; 37% had a highly malignant EEG and all had a poor outcome (specificity 100%, sensitivity 50%). Any malignant EEG feature had a low specificity to predict poor prognosis (48%) but if 2 malignant EEG features were present specificity increased to 96% (p < 0.001). Specificity and sensitivity were not significantly affected by targeted temperature or sedation. A benign EEG was found in 1% of the patients with a poor outcome. Conclusions: Highly malignant EEG after rewarming reliably predicted poor outcome in half of patients without false predictions. An isolated finding of a single malignant feature did not predict poor outcome whereas a benign EEG was highly predictive of a good outcome. PMID:26865516

  3. Successful use of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest due to amitriptyline and venlafaxine intoxication.

    PubMed

    Kontio, Terhi; Salo, Ari; Kantola, Teemu; Toivonen, Lauri; Skrifvars, Markus B

    2015-06-01

    The prognosis of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) due to intoxication is dismal. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are widely used in the treatment of depression, but possess significant cardiotoxicity, and are one of the most common medications used in suicide attempts worldwide. TCA poisoning can cause hypotension, seizures, and cardiac conduction disturbances, which can lead to life-threatening arrhythmia. Current guidelines recommend mild therapeutic hypothermia (TH) for unconscious survivors of OHCA, but hypothermia treatment itself can cause disturbances in cardiac conduction, which could aggravate the effect of TCAs on cardiac conduction. We report the successful use of TH in a 19-year-old woman who was resuscitated from ventricular tachycardia after intentional ingestion of amitriptyline and venlafaxine, a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor. The cardiac arrest was witnessed, but no bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was performed. The initial rhythm was ventricular tachycardia with no detectable pulse. Three defibrillations, magnesium sulfate, and sodium bicarbonate were given and her trachea was intubated, after which return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was achieved in 26 minutes. After ROSC, she had seizures and was sedated with propofol. Out-of-hospital TH was initiated with 1500 mL of cold Ringer's acetate. An infusion of norepinephrine was initiated for low blood pressure. On arrival at the university hospital, she was unconscious and had dilated pupils. She was tachycardic with a body temperature of 33.5°C. She was transferred to the intensive care unit and TH was maintained with invasive cooling. During the TH treatment, she did not experience any serious cardiac arrhythmia, transthoracic echocardiogram was normal, and the electrocardiogram (ECG) returned to normal. The patient was extubated 45 hours after the cardiac arrest. After the extubation, she was alert and cooperative, but slightly delusional. She was

  4. Variation in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation and Transport Practices in the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium: ROC Epistry–Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Zive, Dana; Koprowicz, Kent; Schmidt, Terri; Stiell, Ian; Sears, Gena; Van Ottingham, Lois; Idris, Ahamed; Stephens, Shannon; Daya, Mohamud

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To identify variation in patient, event, and scene characteristics of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA) patients assessed by emergency medical services (EMS), and to investigate variation in transport practices in relation to documented prehospital return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) within eight regional clinical centers participating in the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC) Epistry–Cardiac Arrest. Methods OOHCA patient, event, and scene characteristics were compared to identify variation in treatment and transport practices across sites. Findings were adjusted for site and standard Utstein covariates. Using logistic regression, these covariates were modeled to identify factors related to the initiation of transport without documented prehospital ROSC as well as survival in these patients. Setting: Eight US and Canadian sites participating in the ROC Epistry–Cardiac Arrest. Population: Persons ≥ 20 years with OOHCA who a) received compressions or shock by EMS providers and/or received bystander AED shock or b) were pulseless but received no EMS compressions or shock between December 2005 and May 2007. Results 23,233 OOHCA cases were assessed by EMS in the defined period. Resuscitation (treatment) was initiated by EMS in 13,518 cases (58%, site range: 36-69%, p<0.0001). Of treated cases, 59% were transported (site range: 49-88%, p<0.0001). Transport was initiated in the absence of documented ROSC for 58% of transported cases (site range: 14-95%, p<0.0001). Of these transported cases, 8% achieved ROSC before hospital arrival (site range: 5-21%, p<0.0001) and 4% survived to hospital discharge (site range: 1-21%, p<0.0001). In cases with transport from the scene initiated after documented ROSC, 28% survived to hospital discharge (site range: 18-44%, p<0.0001). Conclusion Initiation of resuscitation and transport of OOHCA and the reporting of ROSC prior to transport markedly varies among ROC sites. This variation may help clarify

  5. Care for Cardiac Arrest on Golf Courses: Still Not up to Par?

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Leisa; Paternoster, Ryan; Putman, Kevin; Fales, William; Swor, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction. Early CPR and use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) have been shown to improve cardiac arrest (CA) outcomes. Placement of AEDs on golf courses has been advocated for more than a decade, with many trade golf publications calling for their use. Objective. To describe the incidence and treatment of CAs at Michigan golf courses and assess the response readiness of their staff. Methods. We performed a retrospective study of CA on Michigan golf courses from 2010 to 2012. Cases were identified from the Michigan EMS Information (MI-EMSIS) database. Cases with "golf" or "country club" were manually reviewed and location type was confirmed using Google Maps. We conducted a structured telephone survey capturing demographics, course preparedness, including CPR training and AED placement, and a description of events, including whether CPR was performed and if an AED was used. Our primary area of interest was the process of care. We also recorded return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) as an outcome measure. EMS Utstein data were collected from MI-EMSIS. Descriptive data are presented. Results. During the study period, there were 14,666 CAs, of which 40 (0.18%) occurred on 39 golf courses (1 arrest/64 courses/year). Of these, 38 occurred between May and October, yielding a rate of 1 arrest/33.5 courses/golf season. Almost all (96.2%) patients were male, mean age 66.3 (range 45-85), 68% had VT/VF, and 7 arrested after EMS arrival. Mean interval from 9-1-1 call to EMS arrival at the patient was 9:45 minutes (range 3-20). Of all cases, 24 (72.3%) patients received CPR with 2 patients having CPR performed by course staff. Although AEDs were available at 9 (22.5%) courses, they were only placed on 2 patients prior to EMS arrival. Sustained ROSC was obtained in 12 (30.0%) patients. Only 7, (17.9%) courses required CPR/AED training of staff. Conclusion. When seasonally adjusted, the rate of cardiac arrest on Michigan golf courses is similar to that of

  6. Code Blue on Orbit: Treating Cardiac Arrest on the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacal, Kira; Redmond, Melissa

    2004-01-01

    As a result of the Columbia tragedy on February 1,2003, the International Space Station (ISS) crew size has been temporarily reduced from three to two. This change forces adaptations in many operational procedures used by the crew, including medical protocols which were designed for scenarios involving one casualty and two caregivers. The Office of Space Medicine directed that the procedure for the resuscitation of a crewmember in cardiac arrest be rewritten for use by a single care provider. Methods: Adaptation of this procedure made use of current American Heart Association Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) procedures and reflects necessary compromises between the realities of the operational environment and prompt provision of medical care. Results: Numerous changes were incorporated due to the diminution in available personnel, including substitution of endotracheal rather than intravenous delivery of drugs, more rapid defibrillation, addition of a precordial thump, removal of transcutaneous pacing, streamlining of procedural steps, and clarification of termination criteria. Discussion: The on-orbit care available to the ISS crewmembers is constrained by numerous factors, including crew medical training, minimal medical assets, limited air/ground communication , and a single caregiver for the foreseeable future. All of these combine to make a successful resuscitation unlikely, however, this procedure must ultimately deal with not only the patient's welfare, but also that of the caregiver, the mission, and the program.

  7. Cardiac Arrest during Hospitalization for Delivery in the United States, 1998–2011

    PubMed Central

    Mhyre, Jill M.; Tsen, Lawrence C.; Einav, Sharon; Kuklina, Elena V.; Leffert, Lisa R.; Bateman, Brian T.

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the frequency, distribution of potential etiologies, and survival rates of maternal cardiopulmonary arrest during the hospitalization for delivery in the United States. Methods By using data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample during the years 1998 through 2011, the authors obtained weighted estimates of the number of U.S. hospitalizations for delivery complicated by maternal cardiac arrest. Clinical and demographic risk factors, potential etiologies, and outcomes were identified and compared in women with and without cardiac arrest. The authors tested for temporal trends in the occurrence and survival associated with maternal arrest. Results Cardiac arrest complicated 1 in 12,000 or 8.5 per 100,000 hospitalizations for delivery (99% CI, 7.7 to 9.3 per 100,000). The most common potential etiologies of arrest included hemorrhage, heart failure, amniotic fluid embolism, and sepsis. Among patients with cardiac arrest, 58.9% of patients (99% CI, 54.8 to 63.0%) survived to hospital discharge. Conclusions Approximately 1 in 12,000 hospitalizations for delivery is complicated by cardiac arrest, most frequently due to hemorrhage, heart failure, amniotic fluid embolism, or sepsis. Survival depends on the underlying etiology of arrest. PMID:24694844

  8. Survival to admission after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Seoul, South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Hue; Uhm, Tai-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) data derived according to the Utstein Style guidelines was used to try to determine factors influencing survival to admission (STA) and epidemiological rates of OHCA. Patients and methods This was an observational study of all age groups based on data from prehospital care reports in Seoul, South Korea. The collected data were reported according to the Utstein Style template for OHCA and analyzed in order to compare STA with non-STA. Univariate analysis was conducted using a binomial logistic regression model to identify predictors associated with trauma patients. Results Eighty-three (4.8%) OHCA survivors were admitted to the emergency department with carotid pulse. The median time from arrest to emergency medical personnel defibrillation was statistically significantly shorter in STA cases (8.0 minutes) than in non-STA cases (12.0 minutes; P<0.001). Factors independently associated with better prognosis in terms of trauma patients were female sex (odds ratio [OR]: 0.67; 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.50–0.91; P=0.01), arrest at home (OR: 0.36; 95% CI: 0.27–0.49; P<0.001), and witnessed arrest (OR: 2.64; 95% CI: 1.94–3.39; P<0.001). Conclusion Early basic life support, performed by either a layperson or emergency medical personnel, had a positive effect on STA. Male sex, arrest outside of the home, and witnessed arrest are significantly associated with trauma. PMID:27147881

  9. Year in review 2010: Critical Care--Cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Jeffery C; Eastman, Alexander L; Pepe, Paul E

    2011-01-01

    This review will summarize some of the data published in 2010 and focus on papers published in Critical Care in regard to cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. In particular, we discuss the latest research in therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest, including methods of inducing hypothermia, potential protective mechanisms, spontaneous hypothermia versus therapeutic hypothermia, and several predictors of outcome. Furthermore, we will discuss the effects of bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in patients with physician-assisted advanced cardiac life support, the role of hypercapnea in near-death experiences during cardiac arrest, markers of endothelial injury and endothelial repair after CPR, and the prognostic value of cell-free plasma DNA as a marker of poor outcome after cardiac arrest. PMID:22146697

  10. Plasma thioredoxin levels during post-cardiac arrest syndrome: relationship with severity and outcome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Despite experimental evidence, clinical demonstration of acute state of oxidative stress and inflammation during post-cardiac arrest syndrome is lacking. Plasma level of thioredoxin (TRX), a redox-active protein induced under conditions of oxidative stress and inflammation, is increased in various critical care conditions. We determined plasma TRX concentrations after cardiac arrest and assessed relationships with severity and outcome. Methods Retrospective study of consecutive patients admitted to a single academic intensive care unit (ICU) for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (between July 2006 and March 2008). Plasma levels of TRX were measured at admission, day (D) 1, 2 and 3. Results Of 176 patients included, median TRX values measured in ICU survivors and non-survivors were, respectively: 22 ng/mL (7.8 to 77) vs. 72.4 (21.9 to 117.9) at admission (P < 0.001); 5.9 (3.5 to 25.5) vs. 23.2 (5.8 to 81.4) at D1 (P = 0.003); 10.8 (3.6 to 50.8) vs. 11.7 (4.5 to 66.4) at D2 (P = 0.22); and 16.7 (5.3 to 68.3) vs. 17 (4.3 to 62.9) at D3 (P = 0.96). Patients dying within 24 hours had significantly (P < 0.001) higher TRX levels (118.6 ng/mL (94.8 to 280)) than those who died after 24 hours or survived (50.8 (13.9 to 95.7) and 22 (7.8 to 77)). The area under the ROC curve to predict early death was 0.84 (0.76 to 0.91). TRX levels on admission were significantly correlated with 'low-flow' duration (P = 0.003), sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score (P < 0.001), and blood lactate concentration (P < 0.001), but not with 'no-flow' duration or simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II score. TRX levels and admission arterial pO2 correlated negatively (r = -0.17, P = 0.03). Finally, cardiac arrest with cardiac etiology exhibited lower levels of TRX than in cases of extra-cardiac cause (46 ng/mL (11 to 104) vs. 68 (42 to 137), P = 0.01). Conclusions Our data show for the first time that TRX levels were elevated early following cardiac arrest, suggestive of

  11. Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest and return of spontaneous circulation: it's complicated.

    PubMed

    Beseda, Ryan; Smith, Susan; Veenstra, Amy

    2014-12-01

    Providing evidence-based care to patients with return of spontaneous circulation after a cardiac arrest is a recent complex innovation. Once resuscitated patients must be assessed for appropriateness for therapeutic hypothermia, be cooled in a timely manner, maintained while hypothermic, rewarmed within a specified time frame, and then assessed for whether hypothermia was successful for the patient through neuroprognostication. Nurses caring for therapeutic hypothermia patients must be knowledgeable and prepared to provide care to the patient and family. This article provides an overview of the complexity of therapeutic hypothermia for patients with return of spontaneous circulation in the form of a case study. PMID:25438893

  12. Study regarding the survival of patients suffering a traumatic cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Georgescu, V; Tudorache, O; Nicolau, M; Strambu, V

    2015-01-01

    Severe trauma is the most frequent cause of death in young people, in civilized countries with major social and vital costs. The speed of diagnostic decision making and the precocity of treatment approaches are both essential and depend on the specialists’ colaboration. The present study aims to emphasize the actual situation of medical interventions in case of cardiorespiratory arrest due to trauma. 1387 patients who suffered a cardio respiratory arrest both traumatic and non-traumatic were included in order to point out the place of traumatic arrest. Resuscitation of such patients is considered useless and resource consumer by many trauma practitioners who are reporting survival rates of 0%-3.5%. As the determinant of lesions, trauma etiology was as it follows car accidents – 43%, high falls – 30%, suicidal attempts – 3%, domestic violence – 3%, other causes – 21%. Hypovolemia remains the major cause of cardiac arrest and death and that is why the efforts of emergency providers (trauma team) must be oriented towards “hidden death” in order to avoid it. This condition could be revealed and solved easier with minimal diagnostic and therapeutic maneuvers in the emergency department. PMID:26366226

  13. Use of Sodium Bicarbonate in Cardiac Arrest: Current Guidelines and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vassilios; Pierrakos, Charalampos; Koniari, Ioanna; Apostolopoulou, Christina; Karanikolas, Menelaos

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the review was to summarize the literature over the last 25 years regarding bicarbonate administration in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. A PubMed search was conducted using the terms "bicarbonates" and "cardiac arrest", limited to human studies and reviews published in English (or at least with a meaningful abstract in English) in the last 25 years. Clinical and experimental data raised questions regarding the safety and effectiveness of sodium bicarbonate (SB) administration during cardiac arrest. Earlier advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) guidelines recommended routine bicarbonate administration as part of the ACLS algorithm, but recent guidelines no longer recommend its use. The debate in the literature is ongoing, but at the present time, SB administration is only recommended for cardiac arrest related to hypokalemia or overdose of tricyclic antidepressants. Several studies challenge the assumption that bicarbonate administration is beneficial for treatment of acidosis in cardiac arrest. At the present time, there is a trend against using bicarbonates in cardiac arrest, and this trend is supported by guidelines published by professional societies and organizations. PMID:26985247

  14. Survival of 1476 patients initially resuscitated from out of hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed Central

    Cobbe, S. M.; Dalziel, K.; Ford, I.; Marsden, A. K.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine the short and long term outcome of patients admitted to hospital after initially successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest out of hospital. DESIGN--Review of ambulance and hospital records. Follow up of mortality by "flagging" with the registrar general. Cox proportional hazards analysis of predictors of mortality in patients discharged alive from hospital. SETTING--Scottish Ambulance Service and acute hospitals throughout Scotland. SUBJECTS--1476 patients admitted to a hospital ward, of whom 680 (46%) were discharged alive. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Survival to hospital discharge, neurological status at discharge, time to death, and cause of death after discharge. RESULTS--The median duration of hospital stay was 10 days (interquartile range 8-15) in patients discharged alive and 1 (1-4) day in those dying in hospital. Neurological status at discharge in survivors was normal or mildly impaired in 605 (89%), moderately impaired in 58 (8.5%), and severely impaired in 13 (2%); one patient was comatose. Direct discharge to home occurred in 622 (91%) cases. The 680 discharged survivors were followed up for a median of 25 (range 0-68) months. There were 176 deaths, of which 81 were sudden cardiac deaths, 55 were non-sudden cardiac deaths, and 40 were due to other causes. The product limit estimate of 4 year survival after discharge was 68%. The independent predictors of mortality on follow up were increased age, treatment for heart failure, and cardiac arrest not due to definite myocardial infarction. CONCLUSION--About 40% of initial survivors of resuscitation out of hospital are discharged home without major neurological disability. Patients at high risk of subsequent cardiac death can be identified and may benefit from further cardiological evaluation. PMID:8664715

  15. Clinical review: Beyond immediate survival from resuscitation – long-term outcome considerations after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Arawwawala, Dilshan; Brett, Stephen J

    2007-01-01

    A substantial body of literature concerning resuscitation from cardiac arrest now exists. However, not surprisingly, the greater part concerns the cardiac arrest event itself and optimising survival and outcome at relatively proximal time points. The aim of this review is to present the evidence base for interventions and therapeutic strategies that might be offered to patients surviving the immediate aftermath of a cardiac arrest, excluding components of resuscitation itself that may lead to benefits in long-term survival. In addition, this paper reviews the data on long-term impact, physical and neuropsychological, on patients and their families, revealing a burden that is often underestimated and underappreciated. As greater numbers of patients survive cardiac arrest, outcome measures more sophisticated than simple survival are required. PMID:18177512

  16. Effect of a pharmacologically induced decrease in core temperature in rats resuscitated from cardiac arrest

    EPA Science Inventory

    Targeted temperature management is recommended to reduce brain damage after resuscitation from cardiac arrest in humans although the optimal target temperature remains controversial. 1 4 The American Heart Association (AHA) and the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation...

  17. Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Patients with Preserved Left Ventricular Systolic Function: A Clinical Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, Navinder; Narayan, Sanjiv M.

    2009-01-01

    Stratifying the risk for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in individuals with preserved systolic function remains a pressing public health problem. Current guidelines for the implantation of cardiac defibrillators largely ignore patients with preserved systolic function, even though they account for the majority of cases. However, risk stratification for such individuals is increasingly feasible. Notably, most individuals who experience SCA have structural heart disease, even if undiagnosed. Thus, clinical risk scores have been developed to identify high risk. Moreover, there are now promising data that T-Wave Alternans (TWA), alone and in combination with other indices, effectively predicts SCA in this population. This article presents our current understanding of SCA due to ventricular arrhythmias in patients with preserved LV systolic function, and attempts to build a framework to predict risk in this population. PMID:19251226

  18. Use of Sodium Bicarbonate in Cardiac Arrest: Current Guidelines and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vassilios; Pierrakos, Charalampos; Koniari, Ioanna; Apostolopoulou, Christina; Karanikolas, Menelaos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the review was to summarize the literature over the last 25 years regarding bicarbonate administration in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. A PubMed search was conducted using the terms “bicarbonates” and “cardiac arrest”, limited to human studies and reviews published in English (or at least with a meaningful abstract in English) in the last 25 years. Clinical and experimental data raised questions regarding the safety and effectiveness of sodium bicarbonate (SB) administration during cardiac arrest. Earlier advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) guidelines recommended routine bicarbonate administration as part of the ACLS algorithm, but recent guidelines no longer recommend its use. The debate in the literature is ongoing, but at the present time, SB administration is only recommended for cardiac arrest related to hypokalemia or overdose of tricyclic antidepressants. Several studies challenge the assumption that bicarbonate administration is beneficial for treatment of acidosis in cardiac arrest. At the present time, there is a trend against using bicarbonates in cardiac arrest, and this trend is supported by guidelines published by professional societies and organizations. PMID:26985247

  19. Late Gadolinium Enhancement Among Survivors of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Neilan, Tomas G.; Farhad, Hoshang; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Shah, Ravi V.; Dodson, John A.; Abbasi, Siddique A.; Danik, Stephan B.; Verdini, Daniel J.; Tokuda, Michifumi; Tedrow, Usha B.; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Hoffmann, Udo; Ghoshhajra, Brian B.; Stevenson, William G.; Kwong, Raymond Y.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to describe the role of contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in the workup of patients with aborted sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and in the prediction of long-term outcomes. BACKGROUND Myocardial fibrosis is a key substrate for SCA, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) on a CMR study is a robust technique for imaging of myocardial fibrosis. METHODS We performed a retrospective review of all survivors of SCA who were referred for CMR studies and performed follow-up for the subsequent occurrence of an adverse event (death and appropriate defibrillator therapy). RESULTS After a workup that included a clinical history, electrocardiogram, echocardiography, and coronary angiogram, 137 patients underwent CMR for workup of aborted SCA (66% male; mean age 56 ± 11 years; left ventricular ejection fraction 43 ± 12%). The presenting arrhythmias were ventricular fibrillation (n = 105 [77%]) and ventricular tachycardia (n = 32 [23%]). Overall, LGE was found in 98 patients (71%), with an average extent of 9.9 ± 5% of the left ventricular myocardium. CMR imaging provided a diagnosis or an arrhythmic substrate in 104 patients (76%), including the presence of an infarct-pattern LGE in 60 patients (44%), noninfarct LGE in 21 (15%), active myocarditis in 14 (10%), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 3 (2%), sarcoidosis in 3, and arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy in 3. In a median follow-up of 29 months (range 18 to 43 months), there were 63 events. In a multivariable analysis, the strongest predictors of recurrent events were the presence of LGE (adjusted hazard ratio: 6.7; 95% CI: 2.38 to 18.85; p < 0.001) and the extent of LGE (hazard ratio: 1.15; 95% CI: 1.11 to 1.19; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Among patients with SCA, CMR with contrast identified LGE in 71% and provided a potential arrhythmic substrate in 76%. In follow-up, both the presence and extent of LGE identified a group at markedly increased risk of future adverse events. PMID

  20. Therapeutic hypothermia impacts leukocyte kinetics after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Dufner, Matthias C.; Andre, Florian; Stiepak, Jan; Zelniker, Thomas; Chorianopoulos, Emmanuel; Preusch, Michael; Katus, Hugo A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients admitted to the hospital after primarily successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are at a very high risk for neurologic deficits and death. Targeted temperature management (TTM) for mild therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve survival compared to standard treatment. Acute cardiovascular events, such as myocardial infarction (MI), are a major cause for cardiac arrest (CA) in patients who undergo CPR. Recent findings have demonstrated the importance and impact of the leukocyte response following acute MI. Methods In this retrospective, single center study we enrolled 169 patients with CA due to non-traumatic causes and primarily successful CPR. A total of 111 subjects (66%) underwent TTM aiming for a target temperature of 32–34 °C. Results Analysis of 30 day follow up showed a significantly improved survival of all patients who received TTM compared to patients without hypothermia (P=0.0001). Furthermore TTM was an independent variable of good neurological outcome after 6 months (P=0.0030). Therapeutic hypothermia was found to be beneficial independent of differences in age and sex between both groups. While a higher rate of pneumonia was observed with TTM, this diagnosis had no additional impact on survival or neurological outcome. The beneficial effect on mortality remained significant in patients with the diagnosis of an acute cardiac event (P=0.0145). Next, we evaluated the kinetics of leukocytes in this group over the course of 7 days after CA. At presentation, patients showed a mean level of 16.5±6.7 of leukocytes per microliter. While this level stayed stable in the group of patients without hypothermia, patients who received TTM showed a significant decline of leukocyte levels resulting in significantly lower numbers of leukocytes on days 3 and 5 after CPR. Interestingly, these differences in leukocyte counts remained beyond the time period of TTM while C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were suppressed only during

  1. Clinical investigation: thyroid function test abnormalities in cardiac arrest associated with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Iltumur, Kenan; Olmez, Gonul; Arıturk, Zuhal; Taskesen, Tuncay; Toprak, Nizamettin

    2005-01-01

    Introduction It is known that thyroid homeostasis is altered during the acute phase of cardiac arrest. However, it is not clear under what conditions, how and for how long these alterations occur. In the present study we examined thyroid function tests (TFTs) in the acute phase of cardiac arrest caused by acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and at the end of the first 2 months after the event. Method Fifty patients with cardiac arrest induced by ACS and 31 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) who did not require cardioversion or cardiopulmonary resuscitation were enrolled in the study, as were 40 healthy volunteers. The patients were divided into three groups based on duration of cardiac arrest (<5 min, 5–10 min and >10 min). Blood samples were collected for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), tri-iodothyronine (T3), free T3, thyroxine (T4), free T4, troponin-I and creatine kinase-MB measurements. The blood samples for TFTs were taken at 72 hours and at 2 months after the acute event in the cardiac arrest and AMI groups, but only once in the control group. Results The T3 and free T3 levels at 72 hours in the cardiac arrest group were significantly lower than in both the AMI and control groups (P < 0.0001). On the other hand, there were no significant differences between T4, free T4 and TSH levels between the three groups (P > 0.05). At the 2-month evaluation, a dramatic improvement was observed in T3 and free T3 levels in the cardiac arrest group (P < 0.0001). In those patients whose cardiac arrest duration was in excess of 10 min, levels of T3, free T3, T4 and TSH were significantly lower than those in patients whose cardiac arrest duration was under 5 min (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.005 and P < 0.05, respectively). Conclusion TFTs are significantly altered in cardiac arrest induced by ACS. Changes in TFTs are even more pronounced in patients with longer periods of resuscitation. The changes in the surviving patients were characterized by euthyroid sick

  2. Electrocardiogram characteristics prior to in-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Attin, Mina; Feld, Gregory; Lemus, Hector; Najarian, Kayvan; Shandilya, Sharad; Wang, Lu; Sabouriazad, Pouya; Lin, Chii-Dean

    2015-06-01

    Survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest (I-HCA) remains < 30 %. There is very limited literature exploring the electrocardiogram changes prior to I-HCA. The purpose of the study was to determine demographics and electrocardiographic predictors prior to I-HCA. A retrospective study was conducted among 39 cardiovascular subjects who had cardiopulmonary resuscitation from I-HCA with initial rhythms of pulseless electrical activity (PEA) and asystole. Demographics including medical history, ejection fraction, laboratory values, and medications were examined. Electrocardiogram (ECG) parameters from telemetry were studied to identify changes in heart rate, QRS duration and morphology, and time of occurrence and location of ST segment changes prior to I-HCA. Increased age was significantly associated with failure to survive to discharge (p < 0.05). Significant change was observed in heart rate including a downtrend of heart rate within 15 min prior to I-HCA (p < 0.05). There was a significant difference in heart rate and QRS duration during the last hour prior to I-HCA compared to the previous hours (p < 0.05). Inferior ECG leads showed the most significant changes in QRS morphology and ST segments prior to I-HCA (p < 0.05). Subjects with an initial rhythm of asystole demonstrated significantly greater ECG changes including QRS morphology and ST segment changes compared to the subjects with initial rhythms of PEA (p < 0.05). Diagnostic ECG trends can be identified prior to I-HCA due to PEA and asystole and can be further utilized for training a predictive machine learning model for I-HCA. PMID:25236259

  3. The Effects of a Rapid Response Team on Decreasing Cardiac Arrest Rates and Improving Outcomes for Cardiac Arrests Outside Critical Care Areas.

    PubMed

    Angel, Melissa; Ghneim, Mira; Song, Juhee; Brocker, Jason; Tipton, Phyllis Hart; Davis, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to determine the effects of a well-functioning rapid response team (RRT) within one facility. A well-functioning RRT was associated with fewer cardiac arrests outside critical care settings and decreased critical care length of stay. PMID:27522841

  4. The costs of a suburban paramedic program in reducing deaths due to cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Urban, N; Bergner, L; Eisenberg, M S

    1981-04-01

    The marginal costs per averted death of a suburban paramedic program are estimated to be approximately $42,000, when program costs are attributed entirely to cardiac arrest cases due to underlying heart disease, and indirect costs attributable to episode-related hospitalization are included, It is suggested that at $42,000 per cardiac arrest death averted the program is cost-beneficial by two criteria. First, it compares favorably with an estimate obtained from the literature of the value to the average individual of saving the life of a myocardial infarction patient. Second, the people of King County passed a cost-commensurate Paramedic Program Property Tax Levy in 1979, revealing their willingness to support the program. Results of the study should be generalized in accordance with the facts that in King County 1) the population density averages approximately 1,300 per square mile; 2) a basic emergency medical system ensures a 4-minute average response time to initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation; 3) a citizen-training program in cardiopulmonary resuscitation further reduces average time to initiation of basic life support; and 4) the paramedic program is designed to ensure a 10-minute average time to definitive care. PMID:6785539

  5. Biallelic PPA2 Mutations Cause Sudden Unexpected Cardiac Arrest in Infancy.

    PubMed

    Guimier, Anne; Gordon, Christopher T; Godard, François; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Oufadem, Myriam; Vasnier, Christelle; Rambaud, Caroline; Nitschke, Patrick; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Masson, Cécile; Dauger, Stéphane; Longman, Cheryl; Laing, Nigel G; Kugener, Béatrice; Bonnet, Damien; Bouvagnet, Patrice; Di Filippo, Sylvie; Probst, Vincent; Redon, Richard; Charron, Philippe; Rötig, Agnès; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Dautant, Alain; de Pontual, Loïc; di Rago, Jean-Paul; Delahodde, Agnès; Amiel, Jeanne

    2016-09-01

    Sudden unexpected death in infancy occurs in apparently healthy infants and remains largely unexplained despite thorough investigation. The vast majority of cases are sporadic. Here we report seven individuals from three families affected by sudden and unexpected cardiac arrest between 4 and 20 months of age. Whole-exome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous missense mutations in PPA2 in affected infants of each family. PPA2 encodes the mitochondrial pyrophosphatase, which hydrolyzes inorganic pyrophosphate into two phosphates. This is an essential activity for many biosynthetic reactions and for energy metabolism of the cell. We show that deletion of the orthologous gene in yeast (ppa2Δ) compromises cell viability due to the loss of mitochondria. Expression of wild-type human PPA2, but not PPA2 containing the mutations identified in affected individuals, preserves mitochondrial function in ppa2Δ yeast. Using a regulatable (doxycycline-repressible) gene expression system, we found that the pathogenic PPA2 mutations rapidly inactivate the mitochondrial energy transducing system and prevent the maintenance of a sufficient electrical potential across the inner membrane, which explains the subsequent disappearance of mitochondria from the mutant yeast cells. Altogether these data demonstrate that PPA2 is an essential gene in yeast and that biallelic mutations in PPA2 cause a mitochondrial disease leading to sudden cardiac arrest in infants. PMID:27523598

  6. In-hospital resuscitation: recognising and responding to adults in cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Elizabeth

    2016-08-17

    Survival rates following in-hospital cardiac arrest remain low. The majority of patients who survive a cardiac arrest will be in a monitored environment, have a witnessed cardiac arrest and present with a shockable rhythm, usually ventricular fibrillation. Nurses have a responsibility to preserve safety, which requires the ability to accurately assess patients for signs of deterioration in physical health, and to provide assistance when an emergency arises in practice. Nurses must work within the limits of their competence and be able to establish the urgency of a situation. Nurses in all areas of practice must be able to recognise the signs of cardiac arrest and know the prompt response sequence required to improve the patient's chances of survival. This article focuses on inpatient resuscitation in acute healthcare environments and is aimed at staff who may be the first to respond to an in-hospital cardiac arrest. This does not include specialist units such as neurosurgery, intensive therapy units and cardiac catheterisation laboratories, where medical experts are available and clinical priorities may differ. PMID:27533415

  7. Is It Possible to Maintain Consciousness and Spontaneous Ventilation with Chest Compression in the Early Phase of Cardiac Arrest?

    PubMed Central

    Oksar, Menekse; Turhanoglu, Selim

    2016-01-01

    Chest compression is important in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. However, life support algorithms do not specify when chest compression should be initiated in patients with persistent spontaneous normal breathing in the early phase after cardiac arrest. Here we describe the case of a 69-year-old man who underwent femoral bypass surgery and was extubated at the end of the procedure. After extubation, the patient's breathing pattern and respiratory rate were normal. The patient subsequently developed ventricular fibrillation, evident on two monitors. Because defibrillation was ineffective, chest compression was initiated even though the patient had spontaneous normal breathing and defensive motor reflexes, which were continued throughout resuscitation. He regained consciousness and underwent tracheal extubation without neurological sequelae on postoperative day 1. This case highlights the necessity of chest compression in the early phase of cardiac arrest. PMID:26981288

  8. Number needed to treat = six: therapeutic hypothermia following cardiac arrest – an effective and cheap approach to save lives

    PubMed Central

    Böttiger, Bernd W; Schneider, Andreas; Popp, Erik

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) guidelines stated: Unconscious adult patients with spontaneous circulation after out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest should be cooled to 32 to 34°C for 12 to 24 hours. Patients with cardiac arrest from a non-shockable rhythm, in-hospital patients and children may also benefit from hypothermia. There is no argument to wait. We have to treat the next unconscious cardiac arrest patient with hypothermia. PMID:17850681

  9. Prolonged cardiac arrest complicating a massive ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction associated with marijuana consumption.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Jose; Blaak, Christa; Rajayer, Salil; Gurung, Vikash; Tam, Eric; Morante, Joaquin; Shamian, Ben; Malik, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Recreational substance use and misuse constitute a major public health issue. The annual rate of recreational drug overdose-related deaths is increasing exponentially, making unintentional overdose as the leading cause of injury-related deaths in the United States. Marijuana is the most widely used recreational illicit drug, with approximately 200 million users worldwide. Although it is generally regarded as having low acute toxicity, heavy marijuana usage has been associated with life-threatening consequences. Marijuana is increasingly becoming legal in the United States for both medical and recreational use. Although the most commonly seen adverse effects resulting from its consumption are typically associated with neurobehavioral and gastrointestinal symptoms, cases of severe toxicity involving the cardiovascular system have been reported. In this report, the authors describe a case of cannabis-associated ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction leading to a prolonged cardiac arrest. PMID:27609717

  10. Interdisciplinary ICU Cardiac Arrest Debriefing Improves Survival Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Heather; Zebuhr, Carleen; Topjian, Alexis A.; Nishisaki, Akira; Niles, Dana E.; Meaney, Peter A.; Boyle, Lori; Giordano, Rita T.; Davis, Daniela; Priestley, Margaret; Apkon, Michael; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Sutton, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective In-hospital cardiac arrest is an important public health problem. High-quality resuscitation improves survival but is difficult to achieve. Our objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of a novel, interdisciplinary, postevent quantitative debriefing program to improve survival outcomes after in-hospital pediatric chest compression events. Design, Setting, and Patients Single-center prospective interventional study of children who received chest compressions between December 2008 and June 2012 in the ICU. Interventions Structured, quantitative, audiovisual, interdisciplinary debriefing of chest compression events with front-line providers. Measurements and Main Results Primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge. Secondary outcomes included survival of event (return of spontaneous circulation for ≥ 20 min) and favorable neurologic outcome. Primary resuscitation quality outcome was a composite variable, termed “excellent cardiopulmonary resuscitation,” prospectively defined as a chest compression depth ≥ 38 mm, rate ≥ 100/min, ≤ 10% of chest compressions with leaning, and a chest compression fraction > 90% during a given 30-second epoch. Quantitative data were available only for patients who are 8 years old or older. There were 119 chest compression events (60 control and 59 interventional). The intervention was associated with a trend toward improved survival to hospital discharge on both univariate analysis (52% vs 33%, p = 0.054) and after controlling for confounders (adjusted odds ratio, 2.5; 95% CI, 0.91–6.8; p = 0.075), and it significantly increased survival with favorable neurologic outcome on both univariate (50% vs 29%, p = 0.036) and multivariable analyses (adjusted odds ratio, 2.75; 95% CI, 1.01–7.5; p = 0.047). Cardiopulmonary resuscitation epochs for patients who are 8 years old or older during the debriefing period were 5.6 times more likely to meet targets of excellent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (95% CI, 2.9–10

  11. Impact of advanced cardiac life support‐skilled paramedics on survival from out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest in a statewide emergency medical service

    PubMed Central

    Woodall, John; McCarthy, Molly; Johnston, Trisha; Tippett, Vivienne

    2007-01-01

    Background Prehospital research has found little evidence in support of advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) for out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest. However, these studies generally examine city‐based emergency medical services (EMS) systems. The training and experience of ACLS‐skilled paramedics differs internationally, and this may also contribute to negative findings. Additionally, the frequency of negative outcome in out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest suggests that it is difficult to establish sufficient numbers to detect an effect. Purpose To examine the effect of ACLS on cardiac arrest in Queensland, Australia. Queensland has a population of 3.8 million and an area of over 1.7 million km2, and is served by a statewide EMS system, which deploys resources using a two‐tier model. Advanced treatments such as intubation and cardioactive drug administration are provided by extensively trained intensive care paramedics. Methods An observational, retrospective design was used to examine all cases of cardiac arrest attended by the Queensland Ambulance Service from January 2000 to December 2002. Logistic regression was used to examine the effect of the presence of an intensive care paramedic on survival to hospital discharge, adjusting for age, sex, initial rhythm, the presence of a witness and bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Results The presence of an intensive care paramedic had a significant effect on survival (OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.02 to 1.99). Conclusions Highly trained ACLS‐skilled paramedics provide added survival benefit in EMS systems not optimised for early defibrillation. The reasons for this benefit are multifactorial, but may be the result of greater skill level and more informed use of the full range of prehospital interventions. PMID:17251628

  12. Emergency dispatch process and patient outcome in bystander-witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with a shockable rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Silfvast, Tom O.; Jäntti, T. Helena; Kuisma, Markku J.; Kurola, Jouni O.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the dispatch process for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in bystander-witnessed patients with initial shockable rhythm, and to evaluate whether recognition of OHCA by the emergency medical dispatcher (EMD) has an effect on the outcome. Methods This study was part of the FINNRESUSCI study focusing on the epidemiology and outcome of OHCA in Finland. Witnessed [not by Emergency Medical Service (EMS)] OHCA patients with initial shockable rhythm in the southern and the eastern parts of Finland during a 6-month period from March 1 to August 31 2010, were electronically collected from eight dispatch centres and from paper case reports filled out by EMS crews. Results Of the 164 patients, 82.3% (n=135) were correctly recognized by the EMD as cardiac arrests. The majority of all calls (90.7%) were dispatched within 2 min. Patients were more likely to survive and be discharged from the hospital if the EMS response time was within 8 min (P<0.001). Telephone-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation (T-CPR) was given in 53 cases (32.3%). Overall survival to hospital discharge was 43.4% (n=71). Survival to hospital discharge was 44.4% (n=60) when the EMD recognized OHCA and 37.9% (n=11) when OHCA was not recognized. The difference was not statistically significant (P=0.521). Conclusion The rate of recognition of cardiac arrest by EMD was high, but EMD recognition did not affect the outcome. The survival rate was high in both groups. Recognized cardiac arrest patients received bystander CPR more frequently than those for whom OHCA remained unrecognized. PMID:24809817

  13. Surviving Sudden Cardiac Arrest: A Pilot Qualitative Survey Study of Survivors.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Kelly N; Brown, Frances; Christensen, Roxanne; Damino, Colleen; Newman, Mary M; Kurz, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    Research describing survivors of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) has centered on quantifying functional ability, perceived quality of life, and neurocognitive assessment. Many gaps remain, however, regarding survivors' psychosocial perceptions of life in the aftermath of cardiac arrest. An important influence upon those perceptions is the presence of support and its role in a survivor's life. An Internet-based pilot survey study was conducted to gather data from SCA survivors and friends and/or family members (FFMs) representing their support system. The survey was distributed to members of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation (SCAF) via the Internet by SCAF leadership. Questions included both discrete multiple-choice and open-ended formats. Inductive thematic analyses were completed by three independent researchers trained in qualitative research methodology to identify primary themes consistent among study participants until thematic saturation was achieved. No statistical inferences were made. A total of 205 surveys were returned over the 5-month study period (July to November 2013); nine were received blank, leaving 196 surveys available for review. Major themes identified for survivors (N = 157) include the significance of and desire to share experiences with others; subculture identification (unique experience from those suffering a heart attack); and the need to seek a new normal, both personally and inter-personally. Major themes identified for FFMs (N = 39) include recognition of loved one's memory loss; a lack of information at discharge, including expectations after discharge; and concern for the patient experiencing another cardiac arrest. This pilot, qualitative survey study suggests several common themes important to survivors, and FFMs, of cardiac arrest. These themes may serve as a basis for future patient-centered focus groups and the development of patient-centered guidelines for patients and support persons of those surviving cardiac arrest

  14. Remote ischemic preconditioning improves post resuscitation cerebral function via overexpressing neuroglobin after cardiac arrest in rats.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ran; Yu, Tao; Lin, Jia-Li; Ren, Guang-Dong; Li, Yi; Liao, Xiao-Xing; Huang, Zi-Tong; Jiang, Chong-Hui

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of remote ischemic preconditioning on post resuscitation cerebral function in a rat model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation. The animals were randomized into six groups: 1) sham operation, 2) lateral ventricle injection and sham operation, 3) cardiac arrest induced by ventricular fibrillation, 4) lateral ventricle injection and cardiac arrest, 5) remote ischemic preconditioning initiated 90min before induction of ventricular fibrillation, and 6) lateral ventricle injection and remote ischemic preconditioning before cardiac arrest. Reagent of Lateral ventricle injection is neuroglobin antisense oligodeoxynucleotides which initiated 24h before sham operation, cardiac arrest or remote ischemic preconditioning. Remote ischemic preconditioning was induced by four cycles of 5min of limb ischemia, followed by 5min of reperfusion. Ventricular fibrillation was induced by current and lasted for 6min. Defibrillation was attempted after 6min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The animals were then monitored for 2h and observed for an additionally maximum 70h. Post resuscitation cerebral function was evaluated by neurologic deficit score at 72h after return of spontaneous circulation. Results showed that remote ischemic preconditioning increased neurologic deficit scores. To investigate the neuroprotective effects of remote ischemic preconditioning, we observed neuronal injury at 48 and 72h after return of spontaneous circulation and found that remote ischemic preconditioning significantly decreased the occurrence of neuronal apoptosis and necrosis. To further comprehend mechanism of neuroprotection induced by remote ischemic preconditioning, we found expression of neuroglobin at 24h after return of spontaneous circulation was enhanced. Furthermore, administration of neuroglobin antisense oligodeoxynucleotides before induction of remote ischemic preconditioning showed that the level of neuroglobin was decreased then partly abrogated

  15. Aging Effect on Post-recovery Hypofusion and Mortality Following Cardiac Arrest and Resuscitation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kui; Puchowicz, Michelle A; LaManna, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of aging on brain blood flow following transient global ischemia. Male Fisher rats (6 and 24 months old) underwent cardiac arrest (15 min) and resuscitation. Regional brain (cortex, hippocampus, brainstem and cerebellum) blood flow was measured in non-arrested rats and 1-h recovery rats using [14C] iodoantipyrene (IAP) autoradiography; the 4-day survival rate was determined in the two age groups. The pre-arrest baseline blood flows were similar in cortex, brainstem and cerebellum between the 6-month and the 24-month old rats; however, the baseline blood flow in hippocampus was significantly lower in the 24-month old group. At 1 h following cardiac arrest and resuscitation, both 6-month and 24-month groups had significantly lower blood flows in all regions than the pre-arrest baseline values; compared to the 6-month old group, the blood flow was significantly lower (about 40% lower) in all regions in the 24-month old group. The 4-day survival rate for the 6-month old rats was 50% (3/6) whereas none of the 24-month old rats (0/10) survived for 4 days. The data suggest that there is an increased vulnerability to brain ischemic-reperfusion injury in the aged rats; the degree of post-recovery hypoperfusion may contribute to the high mortality in the aged rats following cardiac arrest and resuscitation. PMID:26782221

  16. Prehospital therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest--from current concepts to a future standard.

    PubMed

    Kämäräinen, Antti; Hoppu, Sanna; Silfvast, Tom; Virkkunen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome after prehospital cardiac arrest. Existing experimental and clinical evidence supports the notion that delayed cooling results in lesser benefit compared to early induction of mild hypothermia soon after return of spontaneous circulation. Therefore a practical approach would be to initiate cooling already in the prehospital setting. The purpose of this review was to evaluate current clinical studies on prehospital induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Most reported studies present data on cooling rates, safety and feasibility of different methods, but are inconclusive as regarding to outcome effects. PMID:19821967

  17. Prehospital therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest - from current concepts to a future standard

    PubMed Central

    Kämäräinen, Antti; Hoppu, Sanna; Silfvast, Tom; Virkkunen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome after prehospital cardiac arrest. Existing experimental and clinical evidence supports the notion that delayed cooling results in lesser benefit compared to early induction of mild hypothermia soon after return of spontaneous circulation. Therefore a practical approach would be to initiate cooling already in the prehospital setting. The purpose of this review was to evaluate current clinical studies on prehospital induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Most reported studies present data on cooling rates, safety and feasibility of different methods, but are inconclusive as regarding to outcome effects. PMID:19821967

  18. F-MARC: promoting the prevention and management of sudden cardiac arrest in football.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Efraim Benjamin; Dvorak, J; Schmied, C; Meyer, T

    2015-05-01

    Sudden cardiac death is the most common cause of unnatural death in football. To prevent and urgently manage sudden cardiac arrest on the football field-of-play, F-MARC (FIFA Medical and Research Centre) has been fully committed to a programme of research, education, standardisation and practical implementation. This strategy has detected football players at medical risk during mandatory precompetition medical assessments. Additionally, FIFA has (1) sponsored internationally accepted guidelines for the interpretation of an athlete's ECG, (2) developed field-of-play-specific protocols for the recognition, response, resuscitation and removal of a football player having sudden cardiac arrest and (3) introduced and distributed the FIFA medical emergency bag which has already resulted in the successful resuscitation of a football player who had a sudden cardiac arrest on the field-of-play. Recently FIFA, in association with the Institute of Sports and Preventive Medicine in Saarbrücken, Germany, established a worldwide Sudden Death Registry with a view to documenting fatal events on the football field-of-play. These activities by F-MARC are testimony to FIFA's continued commitment to minimising sudden cardiac arrest while playing football. PMID:25878076

  19. The problem of police-related cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Karch, Steven B

    2016-07-01

    The term "positional asphyxia" was originally used to describe the situation in which the upper airways becomes compromised by sharp angulation of the head or neck, or where the chest wall is splinted and the diaphragm is prevented from moving because of an unusual position of the body. The term was redefined in the early 1980s to describe sudden death during physical restraint of an individual who is in a prone position. A large percent of reported victims were overweight males. Most were in early middle age and manifesting psychotic behavior at the time of death. Most were reported to have unremarkable autopsies, save for the finding, in many cases, of cocaine or methamphetamine (more recently synthetic cannabinoids and cathinones as well). As no cause of death was apparent (other than non-specific signs such as pulmonary edema), it became common practice to attribute death to force exerted on the decedent's back. When experimental studies with human volunteers disproved this notion, the term "restraint asphyxia" was substituted for positional asphyxia, but with nearly the exact same meaning. No experimental study has ever determined the actual amount of force necessary to cause asphyxia by force applied to the back (although the range of required static force is known), nor the duration for which it must be applied. This review discusses the epidemiology and the evidence for and against the theory of "restraint/positional" asphyxia. It also considers alternative theories of causation, including the findings of studies suggesting that cardiac channelopathies/cardiomyopathies may explain many cases of ARD. PMID:27126838

  20. Prolonged cardiac arrest and resuscitation by extracorporeal life support: favourable outcome without preceding anticoagulation in an experimental setting.

    PubMed

    Foerster, K; D'Inka, M; Beyersdorf, F; Benk, C; Nguyen-Thanh, T; Mader, I; Fritsch, B; Ihling, C; Mueller, K; Heilmann, C; Trummer, G

    2013-11-01

    State-of-the-art cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) restores circulation with inconsistent blood-flow and pressure. Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) following CPR opens the opportunity for "controlled reperfusion". In animal experiments investigating CPR with ECLS, systemic anticoagulation before induced cardiac arrest is normal, but a major point of dispute, since preliminary heparinization in patients undergoing unwitnessed cardiac arrest is impossible. In this study, we investigated options for ECLS after an experimental 15 minutes normothermic cardiac arrest, without preceding anticoagulation, in pigs. Neurological recovery was assessed by a scoring system, electroencephalography and brain magnetic resonance imaging. Additionally, brain histology was performed on day seven after cardiac arrest. We demonstrated that preliminary heparin administration was not necessary for survival or neurological recovery in this setting. Heparin flushing of the cannulae seemed sufficient to avoid thrombus formation. These findings may ease the way to using ECLS in patients with sudden cardiac arrest. PMID:23827862

  1. From door to recovery: a collaborative approach to the development of a post-cardiac arrest center.

    PubMed

    Williams, Donna; Calder, Shelley; Cocchi, Michael N; Donnino, Michael W

    2013-10-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest remains common and, despite advances in resuscitation practices, continues to carry a high mortality that may be influenced by several factors, including where a patient is cared for after the cardiac arrest. Implementing a post-cardiac arrest care guideline for survivors of out-of-hospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest involves a multidisciplinary approach with short-term and long-term strategies. Physician and nursing leaders must work in synergy to guide the implementation of an evidence-based plan of care. A collaborative approach was used at a hospital to develop processes, build consensus for protocols, and provide support to staff and teams. A joint approach has allowed the hospital to move from traditional silos of individual departmental care to a continuum of patient-focused management after cardiac arrest. This care coordination is initiated in the emergency department and follows the patient through to discharge. PMID:24085827

  2. Pyruvate stabilizes electrocardiographic and hemodynamic function in pigs recovering from cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Brandon H; Nguyen, Anh Q; Hollrah, Roger A; Williams, Arthur G; Hoxha, Besim; Olivencia-Yurvati, Albert H; Mallet, Robert T

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac electromechanical dysfunction may compromise recovery of patients who are initially resuscitated from cardiac arrest, and effective treatments remain elusive. Pyruvate, a natural intermediary metabolite, energy substrate, and antioxidant, has been found to protect the heart from ischemia-reperfusion injury. This study tested the hypothesis that pyruvate-enriched resuscitation restores hemodynamic, metabolic, and electrolyte homeostasis following cardiac arrest. Forty-two Yorkshire swine underwent pacing-induced ventricular fibrillation and, after 6 min pre-intervention arrest, 4 min precordial compressions followed by transthoracic countershocks. After defibrillation and recovery of spontaneous circulation, the pigs were monitored for another 4 h. Sodium pyruvate or NaCl were infused i.v. (0.1 mmol·kg(-1)·min(-1)) throughout precordial compressions and the first 60 min recovery. In 8 of the 24 NaCl-infused swine, the first countershock converted ventricular fibrillation to pulseless electrical activity unresponsive to subsequent countershocks, but only 1 of 18 pyruvate-treated swine developed pulseless electrical activity (relative risk 0.17; 95% confidence interval 0.13-0.22). Pyruvate treatment also lowered the dosage of vasoconstrictor phenylephrine required to maintain systemic arterial pressure at 15-60 min recovery, hastened clearance of excess glucose, elevated arterial bicarbonate, and raised arterial pH; these statistically significant effects persisted up to 3 h after sodium pyruvate infusion, while infusion-induced hypernatremia subsided. These results demonstrate that pyruvate-enriched resuscitation achieves electrocardiographic and hemodynamic stability in swine during the initial recovery from cardiac arrest. Such metabolically based treatment may offer an effective strategy to support cardiac electromechanical recovery immediately after cardiac arrest. PMID:26088865

  3. Critical care ultrasound in cardiac arrest. Technological requirements for performing the SESAME-protocol--a holistic approach.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, Daniel; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2015-01-01

    The use of ultrasound has gained its place in critical care as part of our day-to-day monitoring tools. A better understanding of ultrasound techniques and recent publications including protocols for the lungs, the abdomen and the blood vessels has introduced ultrasound to the bedside of our ICU patients. However, we will prove in this paper that early machines, dating back more than 25 years, were perfectly able to do the job as compared to modern laptop machines with more features but few additional advantages. Ultrasound is not only a diagnostic tool, but should also be seen as an extension of the traditional physical examination. This paper will focus on the use of the SESAME-protocol in cardiac arrest. The SESAME-protocol suggests starting with a lung scan to rule out possible causes leading to cardiac arrest. Firstly, pneumothorax needs to be ruled out. Secondly, a partial diagnosis of pulmonary embolism is done following the BLUE-protocol. Thirdly, fluid therapy can be guided, following the FALLS-protocol. The SESAME-protocol continues by scanning the lower femoral veins to check for signs of deep venous thrombosis, followed by (or before, in case of trauma) the abdomen to detect massive bleeding. Next comes the pericardium, to exclude pericardial tamponade. Finally, a transthoracic cardiac ultrasound is performed to check for other (cardiac) causes leading to cardiac arrest. The emphasis is on a holistic approach, where ultrasound can be seen as the modern stethoscope needed by clinicians to complete the full physiological examination of their critically ill unstable patients. PMID:26578398

  4. Traumatic cardiac arrests - the action or the provider, what makes the difference?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic cardiac arrest resuscitation is considered a heroic and futile endeavor. However, newer articles have more promising statistics and divide between prehospital ground and helicopter transport. Here we discuss why there might be a difference in the survivability of this subset of trauma patients. PMID:23786921

  5. Should prehospital resuscitative thoracotomy be incorporated in advanced life support after traumatic cardiac arrest?

    PubMed

    Chalkias, A; Xanthos, T

    2014-06-01

    The survival of traumatic cardiac arrest patients poses a challenge for Emergency Medical Services initiating advanced life support on-scene, especially with regard to having to decide immediately whether to initiate prehospital emergency thoracotomy. Although the necessity for carrying out the procedure remains a cause for debate, it can be life-saving when performed with the correct indications and approaches. PMID:26816077

  6. The School Nurse Role in Preparing for Sudden Cardiac Arrest in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Warna K.; Ficca, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) were introduced for first responders in 1992 to manage adult cardiac arrest and are now common in many public places. Today AEDs are capable of shocking children under 8 years of age, or less than 55 pounds. This presents a challenge for school nurses, particularly as the prevalence of chronic medical…

  7. Antipsychotics and associated risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Weeke, P; Jensen, A; Folke, F; Gislason, G H; Olesen, J B; Fosbøl, E L; Wissenberg, M; Lippert, F K; Christensen, E F; Nielsen, S L; Holm, E; Kanters, J K; Poulsen, H E; Køber, L; Torp-Pedersen, C

    2014-10-01

    Antipsychotic drugs have been associated with sudden cardiac death, but differences in the risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) associated with different antipsychotic drug classes are not clear. We identified all OHCAs in Denmark (2001-2010). The risk of OHCA associated with antipsychotic drug use was evaluated by conditional logistic regression analysis in case-time-control models. In total, 2,205 (7.6%) of 28,947 OHCA patients received treatment with an antipsychotic drug at the time of the event. Overall, treatment with any antipsychotic drug was associated with OHCA (odds ratio (OR) = 1.53, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.23-1.89), as was use with typical antipsychotics (OR = 1.66, CI: 1.27-2.17). By contrast, overall, atypical antipsychotic drug use was not (OR = 1.29, CI: 0.90-1.85). Two individual typical antipsychotic drugs, haloperidol (OR = 2.43, CI: 1.20-4.93) and levomepromazine (OR = 2.05, CI: 1.18-3.56), were associated with OHCA, as was one atypical antipsychotic drug, quetiapine (OR = 3.64, CI: 1.59-8.30). PMID:24960522

  8. Probabilistic Linkage of Prehospital and Outcomes Data in Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Mumma, Bryn E.; Diercks, Deborah B.; Danielsen, Beate; Holmes, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Lack of longitudinal patient outcome data is an important barrier in emergency medical services (EMS) research. We aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of linking prehospital data from the California EMS Information Systems (CEMSIS) database to outcomes data from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD) database for patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Methods We included patients age 18 years or older who sustained non-traumatic OHCA and were included in the 2010–2011 CEMSIS databases. The CEMSIS database is a unified EMS data collection system for California. The OSHPD database is a comprehensive data collection system for patient-level inpatient and emergency department encounters in California. OHCA patients were identified in the CEMSIS database using cardiac rhythm, procedures, medications, and provider impression. Probabilistic linkage blocks were created using in hospital death or one of the following primary or secondary diagnoses (I CD-9-CM) in the OSHPD databases: cardiac arrest (427.5), sudden death (798), ventricular tachycardia (427.1), ventricular fibrillation (427.4), and acute myocardial infarction (410.xx). Blocking variables included incident date, gender, date of birth, age, and/or destination facility. Due to the volume of cases, match thresholds were established based on clerical record review for each block individually. Match variables included incident date, destination facility, date of birth, sex, race, and ethnicity. Results Of the 14,603 cases of OHCA we identified in the prehospital databases, 91 (0.6%) duplicate records were excluded. Overall, 46% of the data used in the linkage algorithm were missing in CEMSIS. We linked 4,961/14,512 (34.2%) records. Linkage rates varied significantly by local EMS agency, ranging from 1.4% to 61.1% (OR for linkage 0.009–0.76; p<0.0001). After excluding the local EMS agency with the outlying low linkage rate, we linked 4,934/12,596 (39

  9. In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: An Update on Pulseless Electrical Activity and Asystole.

    PubMed

    Attin, Mina; Tucker, Rebecca G; Carey, Mary G

    2016-09-01

    Nonshockable rhythms, including pulseless electrical activity (PEA) and asystole, precede more than 70% of in-hospital cardiac arrests (I-HCA). Compared with shockable rhythms (ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia), nonshockable rhythms have higher mortality and morbidity. Therefore, investigating the underlying mechanisms of these arrhythmias to improve the quality of care and outcome for patients who suffer cardiac arrest is a priority. As the first responders to I-HCA, nurses must have the proper knowledge and training to provide timely and efficient cardiopulmonary resuscitation therapy. This article provides an overview of nonshockable cardiac arrhythmias preceding I-HCA as a means of addressing the gap between science and clinical practice. PMID:27484665

  10. The school nurse role in preparing for sudden cardiac arrest in the school setting.

    PubMed

    Evans, Warna K; Ficca, Michelle

    2012-12-01

    Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) were introduced for first responders in 1992 to manage adult cardiac arrest and are now common in many public places. Today AEDs are capable of shocking children under 8 years of age, or less than 55 pounds. This presents a challenge for school nurses, particularly as the prevalence of chronic medical conditions of school children continues to increase. Preparing for a cardiac emergency for a person of any age is stressful and requires a coordinated approach to best manage sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). The school nurse's responsibility is to assess the school setting and the need for an AED, and when indicated, determine the best AED guidelines in schools that accommodate people of all ages. PMID:22733830

  11. Capillary leakage in post-cardiac arrest survivors during therapeutic hypothermia - a prospective, randomised study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fluids are often given liberally after the return of spontaneous circulation. However, the optimal fluid regimen in survivors of cardiac arrest is unknown. Recent studies indicate an increased fluid requirement in post-cardiac arrest patients. During hypothermia, animal studies report extravasation in several organs, including the brain. We investigated two fluid strategies to determine whether the choice of fluid would influence fluid requirements, capillary leakage and oedema formation. Methods 19 survivors with witnessed cardiac arrest of primary cardiac origin were allocated to either 7.2% hypertonic saline with 6% poly (O-2-hydroxyethyl) starch solution (HH) or standard fluid therapy (Ringer's Acetate and saline 9 mg/ml) (control). The patients were treated with the randomised fluid immediately after admission and continued for 24 hours of therapeutic hypothermia. Results During the first 24 hours, the HH patients required significantly less i.v. fluid than the control patients (4750 ml versus 8010 ml, p = 0.019) with comparable use of vasopressors. Systemic vascular resistance was significantly reduced from 0 to 24 hours (p = 0.014), with no difference between the groups. Colloid osmotic pressure (COP) in serum and interstitial fluid (p < 0.001 and p = 0.014 respectively) decreased as a function of time in both groups, with a more pronounced reduction in interstitial COP in the crystalloid group. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain did not reveal vasogenic oedema. Conclusions Post-cardiac arrest patients have high fluid requirements during therapeutic hypothermia, probably due to increased extravasation. The use of HH reduced the fluid requirement significantly. However, the lack of brain oedema in both groups suggests no superior fluid regimen. Cardiac index was significantly improved in the group treated with crystalloids. Although we do not associate HH with the renal failures that developed, caution should be taken when using hypertonic

  12. Survival of patients with spinal cord injury after cardiac arrest in Department of Veterans Affairs hospital: Pilot study.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Deborah; Carter, William E; Cifu, David X; Carne, William

    2014-01-01

    Survivability characteristics after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the population with spinal cord injury (SCI) are unclear but may be useful for advanced care planning discussions with patients. Retrospective evaluation from records of all SCI patients over 10 yr at a Department of Veterans Affairs medical center who experienced in-hospital cardiac arrest was performed. Demographic data and other common measurements were recorded. Thirty-six male subjects were identified, and only two patients survived to discharge (5.5% survival rate), both of whom were admitted for nonacute issues and were asymptomatic shortly before the cardiac arrest. The mean age at the time of cardiopulmonary arrest was 62.4 yr, with a mean time from cardiac arrest to death of 3.02 d. No significant demographic parameters were identified. Overall, SCI likely portends worse outcome for acutely ill patients in the situation of a cardiac arrest. Conclusions are limited by sample size. PMID:25436984

  13. Carbon Monoxide Improves Neurologic Outcomes by Mitochondrial Biogenesis after Global Cerebral Ischemia Induced by Cardiac Arrest in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Yao, Lan; Zhou, Li-Li; Liu, Yuan-Shan; Chen, Ming-di; Wu, Hai-Dong; Chang, Rui-Ming; Li, Yi; Zhou, Ming-Gen; Fang, Xiang-Shao; Yu, Tao; Jiang, Long-Yuan; Huang, Zi-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to brain injury following global cerebral ischemia after cardiac arrest. Carbon monoxide treatment has shown potent cytoprotective effects in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to investigate the effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules on brain mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury following resuscitation after cardiac arrest in rats. A rat model of cardiac arrest was established by asphyxia. The animals were randomly divided into the following 3 groups: cardiac arrest and resuscitation group, cardiac arrest and resuscitation plus carbon monoxide intervention group, and sham control group (no cardiac arrest). After the return of spontaneous circulation, neurologic deficit scores (NDS) and S-100B levels were significantly decreased at 24, 48, and 72 h, but carbon monoxide treatment improved the NDS and S-100B levels at 24 h and the 3-day survival rates of the rats. This treatment also decreased the number of damaged neurons in the hippocampus CA1 area and increased the brain mitochondrial activity. In addition, it increased mitochondrial biogenesis by increasing the expression of biogenesis factors including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor-1, nuclear respiratory factor-2 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Thus, this study showed that carbon monoxide treatment alleviated brain injury after cardiac arrest in rats by increased brain mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:27489503

  14. Carbon Monoxide Improves Neurologic Outcomes by Mitochondrial Biogenesis after Global Cerebral Ischemia Induced by Cardiac Arrest in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Yao, Lan; Zhou, Li-li; Liu, Yuan-shan; Chen, Ming-di; Wu, Hai-dong; Chang, Rui-ming; Li, Yi; Zhou, Ming-gen; Fang, Xiang-shao; Yu, Tao; Jiang, Long-yuan; Huang, Zi-tong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to brain injury following global cerebral ischemia after cardiac arrest. Carbon monoxide treatment has shown potent cytoprotective effects in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to investigate the effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules on brain mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury following resuscitation after cardiac arrest in rats. A rat model of cardiac arrest was established by asphyxia. The animals were randomly divided into the following 3 groups: cardiac arrest and resuscitation group, cardiac arrest and resuscitation plus carbon monoxide intervention group, and sham control group (no cardiac arrest). After the return of spontaneous circulation, neurologic deficit scores (NDS) and S-100B levels were significantly decreased at 24, 48, and 72 h, but carbon monoxide treatment improved the NDS and S-100B levels at 24 h and the 3-day survival rates of the rats. This treatment also decreased the number of damaged neurons in the hippocampus CA1 area and increased the brain mitochondrial activity. In addition, it increased mitochondrial biogenesis by increasing the expression of biogenesis factors including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor-1, nuclear respiratory factor-2 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Thus, this study showed that carbon monoxide treatment alleviated brain injury after cardiac arrest in rats by increased brain mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:27489503

  15. Sudden Unexplained Cardiac Arrest in Apparently Healthy Children: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Alapati, Srilatha; Strobel, Nathaniel; Hashmi, Sharukh; Bricker, John T.; Gupta-Malhotra, Monesha

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the causes of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in apparently healthy children in a single center in the era of primary prevention (screening questionnaire, SQ) and secondary prevention (automated external defibrillator, AED and automated implantable cardioverter defibrillator, AICD). Study Design Any child (0–18 year’s age) without prior known disease except for attention deficit disorder who underwent out-of-the hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation was included in the study as SCA. Using retrospective chart review we evaluated the efficacy of the SQ, electrocardiogram (EKG), chest roentgenogram (CXR) and an echocardiogram. Results We found 44 out of 6,656 children admitted to intensive care with SCA; an AED was used in 39%, AICD placed in 18% and survival to hospital discharge was 50%. The etiology for SCA was identified in 57% of the cases, mostly in those above one year of age and among these the majority of had a cardiac etiology (50%) while 7% had rupture of an arteriovenous malformation. Stimulant medication use was seen in 11% of the SCA. In the best case scenario of hypothesized primary prevention, a prior SQ, CXR, EKG and echocardiogram may have detected 18%, 9%, 23% and 16% of at-risk cases respectively and 32% may have been detected with EKG and SQ together. Based on a historical control cohort, a positive EKG was significantly higher in children with SCA (p = 0.014). Conclusion An EKG along with a screening SQ may be more effective in identifying children who are potentially at-risk for SCA than a SQ alone. PMID:23052663

  16. Prognostic factors associated with hospital survival in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Sathianathan, Kushaharan; Tiruvoipati, Ravindranath; Vij, Sanjiv

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify patient, cardiac arrest and management factors associated with hospital survival in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. METHODS: A retrospective, single centre study of comatose patients admitted to our intensive care unit (ICU) following cardiac arrest during the twenty year period between 1993 and 2012. This study was deemed by the Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) of Monash Health to be a quality assurance exercise, and thus did not require submission to the Monash Health HREC (Research Project Application, No. 13290Q). The study population included all patients admitted to our ICU between 1993 and 2012, with a discharge diagnosis including “cardiac arrest”. Patients were excluded if they did not have a cardiac arrest prior to ICU admission (i.e., if their primary arrest was during their admission to ICU), or were not comatose on arrival to ICU. Our primary outcome measure was survival to hospital discharge. Secondary outcome measures were ICU and hospital length of stay (LOS), and factors associated with survival to hospital discharge. RESULTS: Five hundred and eighty-two comatose patients were admitted to our ICU following cardiac arrest, with 35% surviving to hospital discharge. The median ICU and hospital LOS was 3 and 5 d respectively. There was no survival difference between in-hospital and out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. Males made up 62% of our cardiac arrest population, were more likely to have a shockable rhythm (56% vs 37%, P < 0.001), and were more likely to survive to hospital discharge (40% vs 28%, P = 0.006). On univariate analysis, therapeutic hypothermia, regardless of method used (e.g., rapid infusion of ice cold fluids, topical ice, “Arctic Sun”, passive rewarming, “Bair Hugger”) and location initiated (e.g., pre-hospital, emergency department, intensive care) was associated with increased survival. There was however no difference in survival associated with target temperature, time at target temperature

  17. Cardiac arrest and ventricular arrhythmia in patients taking antipsychotic drugs: cohort study using administrative data

    PubMed Central

    Hennessy, Sean; Bilker, Warren B; Knauss, Jill S; Margolis, David J; Kimmel, Stephen E; Reynolds, Robert F; Glasser, Dale B; Morrison, Mary F; Strom, Brian L

    2002-01-01

    Objective To examine the rates of cardiac arrest and ventricular arrhythmia in patients with treated schizophrenia and in non-schizophrenic controls. Design Cohort study of outpatients using administrative data. Setting 3 US Medicaid programmes. Participants Patients with schizophrenia treated with clozapine, haloperidol, risperidone, or thioridazine; a control group of patients with glaucoma; and a control group of patients with psoriasis. Main outcome measure Diagnosis of cardiac arrest or ventricular arrhythmia. Results Patients with treated schizophrenia had higher rates of cardiac arrest and ventricular arrhythmia than controls, with rate ratios ranging from 1.7 to 3.2. Overall, thioridazine was not associated with an increased risk compared with haloperidol (rate ratio 0.9, 95% confidence interval 0.7 to 1.2). However, thioridazine showed an increased risk of events at doses ⩾600 mg (2.6, 1.0 to 6.6; P=0.049) and a linear dose-response relation (P=0.038). Conclusions The increased risk of cardiac arrest and ventricular arrhythmia in patients with treated schizophrenia could be due to the disease or its treatment. Overall, the risk with thioridazine was no worse than that with haloperidol. Thioridazine may, however, have a higher risk at high doses, although this finding could be due to chance. To reduce cardiac risk, thioridazine should be prescribed at the lowest dose needed to obtain an optimal therapeutic effect. What is already known on this topicThioridazine seems to prolong the electrocardiographic QT interval more than haloperidolAlthough QT prolongation is used as a marker of arrhythmogenicity, it is unknown whether thioridazine is any worse than haloperidol with regard to cardiac safetyWhat this study addsPatients taking antipsychotic drugs had higher risks of cardiac events than control patients with glaucoma or psoriasisOverall, the risk of cardiac arrest and ventricular arrhythmia was not higher with thioridazine than haloperidolThioridazine may

  18. Mild hypothermia during advanced life support: a preliminary study in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Bruel, Cédric; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Marie, William; Arrot, Xavier; Daubin, Cédric; Du Cheyron, Damien; Massetti, Massimo; Charbonneau, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest may confer neuroprotection. We assessed the feasibility, safety and effectiveness of therapeutic infusion of 2 l of normal saline at 4°C before return of spontaneous circulation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation after out of hospital cardiac arrest. Methods This was a prospective, observational, multicenter clinical trial conducted in Emergency Medical Services units and in a medical intensive care unit at Caen University Hospital, Cen, France. Results In patients who had suffered out of hospital cardiac arrest, hypothermia was induced by infusing 2 l of 4°C NaCl 0.9% over 30 minutes during advanced life support prior to arrival at the hospital. A total of 33 patients were included in the study. Eight patients presented with ventricular fibrillation as the initial cardiac rhythm. Mild hypothermia was achieved after a median of 16 minutes (interquartile range 11.5 to 25.0 minutes) after return of spontaneous circulation. After intravenous cooling, the temperature decreased by 2.1°C (P < 0.0001) to a mean body temperature of 33.3°C (interquartile range 32.3 to 34.3°C). The only observed adverse event was pulmonary oedema, which occurred in one patient. Conclusion We concluded that prehospital induction of therapeutic hypothermia using infusion of 2 l of 4°C normal saline during advanced life support was feasible, effective and safe. Larger studies are required to assess the impact that this early cooling has on neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest. PMID:18312676

  19. Survival with good neurological outcome in a patient with prolonged ischemic cardiac arrest--utility of automated chest compression systems in the cardiac catheterization laboratory.

    PubMed

    Psaltis, Peter J; Meredith, Ian T; Ahmar, Walid

    2014-11-15

    The management of refractory cardiac arrest during invasive coronary procedures has substantial logistical challenges and is typically associated with disappointing outcomes. We describe the case of a young woman with recalcitrant ventricular fibrillation due to acute anterior ST-elevation myocardial infarction caused by occlusion of her proximal left anterior descending artery. Survival without neurological deficit or organ failure was achieved following primary percutaneous reperfusion and a total of 52 min of intra-procedural chest compression support, made possible by the use of an automated chest compression device. PMID:24403102

  20. Therapeutic Hypothermia after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children

    PubMed Central

    Moler, Frank W.; Silverstein, Faye S.; Holubkov, Richard; Slomine, Beth S.; Christensen, James R.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Meert, Kathleen L.; Clark, Amy E.; Browning, Brittan; Pemberton, Victoria L.; Page, Kent; Shankaran, Seetha; Hutchison, Jamie S.; Newth, Christopher J.L.; Bennett, Kimberly S.; Berger, John T.; Topjian, Alexis; Pineda, Jose A.; Koch, Joshua D.; Schleien, Charles L.; Dalton, Heidi J.; Ofori-Amanfo, George; Goodman, Denise M.; Fink, Ericka L.; McQuillen, Patrick; Zimmerman, Jerry J.; Thomas, Neal J.; van der Jagt, Elise W.; Porter, Melissa B.; Meyer, Michael T.; Harrison, Rick; Pham, Nga; Schwarz, Adam J.; Nowak, Jeffrey E.; Alten, Jeffrey; Wheeler, Derek S.; Bhalala, Utpal S.; Lidsky, Karen; Lloyd, Eric; Mathur, Mudit; Shah, Samir; Wu, Theodore; Theodorou, Andreas A.; Sanders, Ronald C.; Dean, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia is recommended for comatose adults after witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but data about this intervention in children are limited. Methods We conducted this trial of two targeted temperature interventions at 38 children’s hospitals involving children who remained unconscious after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Within 6 hours after the return of circulation, comatose patients who were older than 2 days and younger than 18 years of age were randomly assigned to therapeutic hypothermia (target temperature, 33.0°C) or therapeutic normothermia (target temperature, 36.8°C). The primary efficacy outcome, survival at 12 months after cardiac arrest with a Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, second edition (VABS-II), score of 70 or higher (on a scale from 20 to 160, with higher scores indicating better function), was evaluated among patients with a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest. Results A total of 295 patients underwent randomization. Among the 260 patients with data that could be evaluated and who had a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest, there was no significant difference in the primary outcome between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (20% vs. 12%; relative likelihood, 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86 to 2.76; P = 0.14). Among all the patients with data that could be evaluated, the change in the VABS-II score from baseline to 12 months was not significantly different (P = 0.13) and 1-year survival was similar (38% in the hypothermia group vs. 29% in the normothermia group; relative likelihood, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.93 to 1.79; P = 0.13). The groups had similar incidences of infection and serious arrhythmias, as well as similar use of blood products and 28-day mortality. Conclusions In comatose children who survived out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, therapeutic hypothermia, as compared with therapeutic normothermia, did not confer a significant benefit in survival with a

  1. Prehospital intranasal evaporative cooling for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a pilot, feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Richard M; Van Antwerp, Jerry; Henderson, Charles; Weaver, Anne; Davies, Gareth; Lockey, David

    2014-10-01

    Intranasal evaporative cooling presents a novel means of initiating therapeutic hypothermia after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Few studies have evaluated the use of intranasal therapeutic hypothermia using the Rhinochill device in the prehospital setting. We sought to evaluate the use of Rhinochill in the Physician Response Unit of London's Air Ambulance, aiming to describe the feasibility of employing it during prehospital resuscitation for OHCA. We prospectively evaluated the Rhinochill device over a 7-month period. Inclusion criteria for deployment included: age above 18 years, Physician Response Unit on-scene within maximum of 10 min after return-of-spontaneous circulation (ROSC), witnessed OHCA or unwitnessed downtime of less than 10 min, pregnancy not suspected, normal nasal anatomy, and likely ICU candidate if ROSC were to be achieved. Thirteen patients were included in the evaluation. The average time from the 999 call to initiation of cooling was 39.5 min (range 22-61 min). The average prehospital temperature change in patients who achieved ROSC was -1.9°C. Patients were cooled for an average of 38 min prehospital. In all cases, the doctor and paramedic involved with the resuscitation reported that the Rhinochill was easy to set up and use during resuscitation and that it did not interfere with standard resuscitation practice. Intranasal evaporative cooling using the Rhinochill system is feasible in an urban, prehospital, doctor/paramedic response unit. Cooling with Rhinochill was not found to interfere with prehospital resuscitation and resulted in significant core body temperature reduction. Further research on the potential benefit of intra-arrest and early initiation of intranasal evaporative cooling is warranted. PMID:24300245

  2. Code Blue: methodology for a qualitative study of teamwork during simulated cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Samuel; Carolina Apesoa-Varano, Ester; Barton, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) is a particularly vexing entity from the perspective of preparedness, as it is neither common nor truly rare. Survival from IHCA requires the coordinated efforts of multiple providers with different skill sets who may have little prior experience working together. Survival rates have remained low despite advances in therapy, suggesting that human factors may be at play. Methods and analysis This qualitative study uses a quasiethnographic data collection approach combining focus group interviews with providers involved in IHCA resuscitation as well as analysis of video recordings from in situ-simulated cardiac arrest events. Using grounded theory-based analysis, we intend to understand the organisational, interpersonal, cognitive and behavioural dimensions of IHCA resuscitation, and to build a descriptive model of code team functioning. Ethics and dissemination This ongoing study has been approved by the IRB at UC Davis Medical Center. Results The results will be disseminated in a subsequent manuscript. PMID:26758258

  3. Advantages of a cohort study on cardiac arrest conducted by nurses.

    PubMed

    Campanharo, Cássia Regina Vancini; Vancini, Rodrigo Luiz; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag; Atallah, Álvaro Nagib; Góis, Aécio Flávio Teixeira de

    2015-10-01

    OBJECTIVEIdentifying factors associated to survival after cardiac arrest.METHODAn experience report of a cohort study conducted in a university hospital, with a consecutive sample comprised of 285 patients. Data were collected for a year by trained nurses. The training strategy was conducted through an expository dialogue lecture. Collection monitoring was carried out by nurses via telephone calls, visits to the emergency room and by medical record searches. The neurological status of survivors was evaluated at discharge, after six months and one year.RESULTSOf the 285 patients, 16 survived until hospital discharge, and 13 remained alive after one year, making possible to identify factors associated with survival. There were no losses in the process.CONCLUSIONCohort studies help identify risks and disease outcomes. Considering cardiac arrest, they can subsidize public policies, encourage future studies and training programs for CPR, thereby improving the prognosis of patients. PMID:26516745

  4. [Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. A cold intravenous fluid, a cooling helmet and a cooling blanket efficiently reduce body temperature].

    PubMed

    Friberg, Hans; Nielsen, Niklas; Karlsson, Torbjörn; Cronberg, Tobias; Widner, Håkan; Englund, Elisabet; Ersson, Anders

    2004-07-22

    Two controlled randomized trials have shown that mild systemic hypothermia after cardiac arrest is beneficial for neurological outcome and one of the studies shows an improved survival rate. A pilot study was performed to evaluate a model of induced hypothermia after cardiac arrest, using cold intravenous fluids and surface cooling with a cold helmet and a coldwater blanket (Thermowrap). The main purpose was to evaluate our cooling method regarding efficacy, safety and usability. Five unconscious patients after cardiac arrest were treated with induced hypothermia of whom three survived with good recovery to six-month follow up. Two patients died in the ICU without regaining consciousness. There were no adverse events during treatment. We conclude that our method is reasonably fast compared to other published methods, it is easy to perform and it offers a good temperature control during cooling and rewarming. Routines for evaluating prognosis and neurological outcome after cardiac arrest and hypothermia treatment need to be revised. PMID:15314936

  5. A pilot study of cerebrovascular reactivity autoregulation after pediatric cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jennifer K.; Brady, Ken M.; Chung, Shang-En; Jennings, Jacky M.; Whitaker, Emmett E.; Aganga, Devon; Easley, Ronald B.; Heitmiller, Kerry; Jamrogowicz, Jessica L.; Larson, Abby C.; Lee, Jeong-Hoo; Jordan, Lori C.; Hogue, Charles W.; Lehmann, Christoph U.; Bembea, Mela M.; Hunt, Elizabeth A.; Koehler, Raymond C.; Shaffner, Donald H.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Improved survival after cardiac arrest has placed greater emphasis on neurologic resuscitation. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the relationship between cerebrovascular autoregulation and neurologic outcomes after pediatric cardiac arrest. Methods Children resuscitated from cardiac arrest had autoregulation monitoring during the first 72 hours after return of circulation with an index derived from near-infrared spectroscopy in a pilot study. The range of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) with optimal vasoreactivity (MAPOPT) was identified. The area under the curve (AUC) of the time spent with MAP below MAPOPT and MAP deviation below MAPOPT was calculated. Neurologic outcome measures included placement of a new tracheostomy or gastrostomy, death from a primary neurologic etiology (brain death or withdrawal of support for neurologic futility), and change in the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category score (ΔPCPC). Results Thirty-six children were monitored. Among children who did not require extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), children who received a tracheostomy/gastrostomy had greater AUC during the second 24 hours after resuscitation than those who did not (P=0.04; n=19). Children without ECMO who died from a neurologic etiology had greater AUC during the first 48 hours than did those who lived or died from cardiovascular failure (P=0.04; n=19). AUC below MAPOPT was not associated with ΔPCPC when children with or without ECMO were analyzed separately. Conclusions Deviation from the blood pressure with optimal autoregulatory vasoreactivity may predict poor neurologic outcomes after pediatric cardiac arrest. This experimental autoregulation monitoring technique may help individualize blood pressure management goals after resuscitation. PMID:25046743

  6. Readmission Rates and Long-Term Hospital Costs Among Survivors of In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Paul S.; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Curtis, Lesley H.; Li, Yan; Hammill, Bradley G.; Spertus, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although in-hospital cardiac arrest is common, little is known about readmission patterns and inpatient resource use among survivors of in-hospital cardiac arrest. Methods and Results Within a large national registry, we examined long-term inpatient utilization among 6972 adults ≥65 years who survived an in-hospital cardiac arrest. We examined 30-day and 1-year readmission rates and inpatient costs, overall and by patient demographics, hospital disposition (discharge destination), and neurological status at discharge. The mean age was 75.8 ± 7.0 years, 56% were men, and 12% were black. There were a total of 2005 readmissions during the first 30 days (cumulative incidence rate: 35 readmissions/100 patients [95% CI: 33–37]) and 8751 readmissions at 1 year (cumulative incidence rate: 185 readmissions/100 patients [95% CI: 177–190]). Overall, mean inpatient costs were $7,741 ± $2323 at 30 days and $18,629 ± $9411 at 1 year. Thirty-day inpatient costs were higher in patients of younger age (≥85 years: $6052 [reference]; 75–84 years: $7444 [adjusted cost ratio, 1.23 [1.06–1.42]; 65–74 years: $8291 [adjusted cost ratio, 1.37 [1.19–1.59]; both P<0.001]) and black race (whites: $7413; blacks: $9044; adjusted cost ratio, 1.22 [1.05–1.42]; P<0.001), as well as those discharged with severe neurological disability or to skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities. These differences in resource use persisted at 1 year and were largely due to higher readmission rates. Conclusion Survivors of in-hospital cardiac arrest have frequent readmissions and high follow-up inpatient costs. Readmissions and inpatient costs were higher in certain subgroups, including patients of younger age and black race. PMID:25351479

  7. Sudden cardiac arrest following ventricular fibrillation attributed to anabolic steroid use in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Lichtenfeld, Jana; Deal, Barbara J; Crawford, Susan

    2016-06-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids are synthetic derivatives of testosterone that promote the growth of skeletal muscles and have many recognised cardiovascular effects. We report the clinical presentation and pathological findings of an adolescent male whose sudden cardiac arrest following ventricular fibrillation was attributed to anabolic androgenic steroid use. The age of our patient reflects the usage of anabolic androgenic steroids among younger athletes and highlights the need for increased awareness among practitioners. PMID:26980272

  8. Early Head CT Findings Are Associated With Outcomes After Pediatric Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Starling, Rebecca M.; Shekdar, Karuna; Licht, Dan; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Berg, Robert A.; Topjian, Alexis A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Head CT after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is often obtained to evaluate intracranial pathology. Among children admitted to the PICU following pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, we hypothesized that loss of gray-white matter differentiation and basilar cistern and sulcal effacement are associated with mortality and unfavorable neurologic outcome. Design Retrospective, cohort study. Setting Single, tertiary-care center PICU. Patients Seventy-eight patients less than 18 years old who survived out-of-hospital cardiac arrest to PICU admission and had a head CT within 24 hours of return of spontaneous circulation were evaluated from July 2005 through May 2012. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Median time to head CT from return of spontaneous circulation was 3.3 hours (1.0, 6.0). Median patient age was 2.3 years (0.4, 9.5). Thirty-nine patients (50%) survived, of whom 29 (74%) had favorable neurologic outcome. Nonsurvivors were more likely than survivors to have 1) loss of gray-white matter differentiation (Hounsfield unit ratios, 0.96 [0.88, 1.07] vs 1.1 [1.07, 1.2]; p < 0.001), 2) basilar cistern effacement (93% vs 7%; p = 0.001; positive predictive value, 94%; negative predictive value, 59%), and 3) sulcal effacement (100% vs 0%; p ≤ 0.001; positive predictive value, 100%; negative predictive value, 68%). All patients with poor gray-white matter differentiation or sulcal effacement had unfavorable neurologic outcomes. Only one patient with basilar cistern effacement had favorable outcome. Conclusions Loss of gray-white matter differentiation and basilar cistern effacement and sulcal effacement are associated with poor outcome after pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Select patients may have favorable outcomes despite these findings. PMID:25844694

  9. Early Absent Pupillary Light Reflexes After Cardiac Arrest in Patients Treated with Therapeutic Hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Laxmi P; Sen, Ayan; Stanko, Carlene M; Rawal, Bhupendra; Heckman, Michael G; Hoyne, Jonathan B; Dimberg, Elliot L; Freeman, Michelle L; Ng, Lauren K; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Freeman, William D

    2016-08-01

    Loss of pupillary light reactivity is one recognized indicator of poor prognosis after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, drug overdose, low cardiac output, and/or resuscitation drugs can lead to impaired pupillary light reflex. To investigate pupillary light reflex status before therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in relation to neurological outcome, we retrospectively reviewed the data of a prospectively implemented TH protocol in patients with cardiac arrest (CA) at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida (January 2006-January 2012), and Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona (August 2010-March 2014). During this period, all CA patients who underwent hypothermia were included. These patients were selected from an institutional database and hypothermia data set. The Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) at time of discharge was our primary outcome measure. A CPC of 1 to 2 was defined as good outcome and a CPC from 3 to 5 was defined as poor outcome. We identified 99 patients who had CA treated with TH. Twenty-nine patients (29%) had pupils that were nonreactive to light on admission examination before TH, eight of whom later had return of pupil reactivity by day 3. Two of these 29 patients (6.9%) had good outcome, compared to 24 of 70 patients (34.3%) with pupils that were reactive to light (p = 0.005). Both of these patients had CA after illicit drug overdose. Early nonreactive pupils occurred in almost a third of patients after CPR and before TH in our patient population. Recovery of pupillary light reactivity is possible, and in a small minority of those cases (particularly when CA is preceded by the use of illicit drugs), a good outcome can be achieved. PMID:27135180

  10. Immediate prehospital hypothermia protocol in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Laure; Vitrat, François; Savary, Dominique; Debaty, Guillaume; Santre, Charles; Durand, Michel; Dessertaine, Geraldine; Timsit, Jean-François

    2009-06-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) improves the outcomes of cardiac arrest (CA) survivors. The aim of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the efficacy and safety of an immediate prehospital cooling procedure implemented just after the return of spontaneous circulation with a prehospital setting. During 30 months, the case records of comatose survivors of out-of-hospital CA presumably due to a cardiac disease were studied. A routine protocol of immediate postresuscitation cooling had been tested by an emergency team, which consisted of an infusion of large-volume, ice-cold intravenous saline. We decided to assess the efficacy and tolerance of this procedure. A total of 99 patients were studied; 22 were treated with prehospital TH, and 77 consecutive patients treated with prehospital standard resuscitation served as controls. For all patients, TH was maintained for 12 to 24 hours. The demographic, clinical, and biological characteristics of the patients were similar in the 2 groups. The rate of patients with a body temperature of less than 35 degrees C upon admission was 41% in the cooling group and 18% in the control group. Rapid infusion of fluid was not associated with pulmonary edema. After 1 year of follow-up, 6 (27%) of 22 patients in the cooling group and 30 (39%) of 77 patients in the control group had a good outcome. Our preliminary observation suggests that in comatose survivors of CA, prehospital TH with infusion of large-volume, ice-cold intravenous saline is feasible and can be used safely by mobile emergency and intensive care units. PMID:19497463

  11. Factors Affecting the Occurrence of Out-of-Hospital Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Bartkiewicz, Wiesław; Sowizdraniuk, Jarosław; Rosińczuk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This paper aims to discover the risk factors for sudden cardiac arrest (out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest (OHSCA)) which significantly affect the decision about prioritizing emergency interventions before dispatching medical emergency teams, risk of deterioration of the patient's condition at the scene, and emergency procedures. Methods. A retrospective study taking into account the international classification of diseases ICD-10 based on an analysis of medical records of Emergency Medical Service in Wroclaw (Poland). Results. The main risk factor of OHSCA is coexistence of external cause leading to illness or death (ICD Group V-10) as well as the occurrence of diseases from the group of endocrine disorders (group E), in particular diabetes. The increase in the risk of OHSCA incidence is affected by nervous system diseases (group G), especially epilepsy of various etiologies, respiratory diseases (group J), mainly COPD, and bronchial asthma or mental and behavioral disorders (group F), with particular emphasis on the drugs issue. The procedure for receiving calls for Emergency Notification Centre does not take into account clinical risk factors for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Conclusion. Having knowledge of OHSCA risk factors can increase the efficiency of rescue operations from rapid assessment and provision of appropriate medical team, through effective performance of medical emergency treatment and prevention of SCA or finally reducing the costs. PMID:25705520

  12. [Recent treatment of postischaemic anoxic brain damage after cardiac arrest by using therapeutic hypothermia].

    PubMed

    Andjelić, Sladjana

    2008-01-01

    Organ injury caused by ischaemia and anoxia during prolonged cardiac arrest is compounded by reperfusion injury that occurs when spontaneous circulation is restored. Mild hypothermia (32-35 degrees C) is neuroprotective through several mechanisms, including suppression of apoptosis, reduced production of excitotoxins and free radicals, and anti-inflammatory actions. Experimental studies show that hypothermia is more effective the earlier it is started after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Two randomised clinical trials show improved survival and neurological outcome in adults who remained comatose after initial resuscitation from prehospital VF cardiac arrest, and who were cooled after ROSC. Different strategies can be used to induce hypothermia. Optimal timing of therapeutic hypothermia for cardiac ischaemia is unknown. In patients who failed to respond to standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation, intra-arrest cooling using ice-cold intravenous (i.v.) fluid improved the chance of survival. Recently, fasudil, a Rho kinase inhibitor, was reported to prevent cerebral ischaemia in vivo by increasing cerebral blood flow and inhibiting inflammatory responses. In future, two different kinds of protective therapies, BCL-2 overexpression and hypothermia,will both inhibit aspects of apoptotic cell death cascades, and that combination treatment can prolong the temporal "therapeutic window" for gene therapy. PMID:19069351

  13. Prediction of the potential clinical outcomes for post-resuscitated patients after cardiac arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sungmin; Kwon, Bojun; Yun, Il Dong; Lee, Sang Uk; Kim, Kyuseok; Kim, Joonghee

    2013-02-01

    Cerebral injuries after cardiac arrest are serious causes for morbidity. Many previous researches in the medical society have been proposed to prognosticate the functional recoveries of post-resuscitated patients after cardiac arrest, but the validity of suggested features and the automation of prognostication have not been made yet. This paper presents the automatic classification method which predicts the potential clinical outcomes of post-resuscitated patients who suffered from cardiac arrest. The global features and the local features are adapted from the researches from the medical society. The global features, which are consisted of the percentage of the partial volume under the uniformly increasing thresholds, represent the global tendency of apparent diffusion coefficient value in a DWI. The local features are localized and measured on the refined local apparent diffusion coefficient minimal points. The local features represent the ischemic change of small areas in a brain. The features are trained and classified by the random forest method, which have been widely used in the machine learning society for classification. The validity of features is automatically evaluated during the classification process. The proposed method achieved the 0.129 false-positive rate while maintaining the perfect true-positive rate. The area-under-curve of the proposed method was 0.9516, which showed the feasibility and the robustness of the proposed method.

  14. [Emergent coronary artery bypass grafting in a survivor of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, M; Suehiro, K; Kubo, H; Morimoto, N; Shiraishi, K; Kasai, S; Hagioka, S; Naito, H; Nagae, M

    2007-02-01

    We report a case of emergent coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in a survivor of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. A 64-year-old male driver lost consciousness and collapsed in a rice paddy field. A bystander placed him in a car and immediately started cardiopulmonary resuscitation after confirming the presence of pulselessness and apnea. Emergency medical service providers performed a defibrillation of ventricular fibrillation by using an automated external defibrillator (AED), and the patient was transferred to the critical care center in our hospital. Coronary angiography revealed a thrombus in the left main trunk (LMT), total occlusion of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and the right coronary artery (RCA), and 90% stenosis of the left circumflex artery (Cx). Since the patient recovered consciousness 1 hour after admission and did not undergo any critical trauma, an on-pump CABG was performed for 3 vessels. He was discharged on the postoperative day 23, and he resumed a normal life. PMID:17305073

  15. Year in review 2009: Critical Care--cardiac arrest, trauma and disasters.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Jeffery C; Eastman, Alexander L; Pepe, Paul E

    2010-01-01

    During 2009, Critical Care published nine papers on various aspects of resuscitation, prehospital medicine, trauma care and disaster response. One article demonstrated that children as young as 9 years of age can learn cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) effectively, although, depending on their size, some may have difficulty performing it. Another paper showed that while there was a trend toward mild therapeutic hypothermia reducing S-100 levels, there was no statistically significant change. Another predictor study also showed a strong link between acute kidney injury and neurologic outcome while another article described a program in which kidneys were harvested from cardiac arrest patients and showed an 89% graft survival rate. One experimental investigation indicated that when a pump-less interventional lung assist device is present, leaving the device open (unclamped) while performing CPR has no harmful effects on mean arterial pressures and it may have positive effects on blood oxygenation and CO2 clearance. One other study, conducted in the prehospital environment, found that end-tidal CO2 could be useful in diagnosing pulmonary embolism. Three articles addressed disaster medicine, the first of which described a triage system for use during pandemic influenza that demonstrated high reliability in delineating patients with a good chance of survival from those likely to die. The other two studies, both drawn from the 2008 Sichuan earthquake experience, showed success in treating crush injured patients in an on-site tent ICU and, in the second case, how the epidemiology of earthquake injuries and related factors predicted mortality. PMID:21122166

  16. Predicting the outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients using multiple biomarkers and suspension microarray assays.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Hua; Tsai, Min-Shan; Chien, Kuo-Liong; Chang, Wei-Tien; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chen, Shyr-Chyr; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Hsu, Hsin-Yun; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the prognosis for cardiac arrest is still challenging. Combining biomarkers from diverse pathophysiological pathways may provide reliable indicators for the severity of injury and predictors of long-term outcomes. We investigated the feasibility of using a multimarker strategy with key independent biomarkers to improve the prediction of outcomes in cardiac arrest. Adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients with sustained return of spontaneous circulation were prospectively enrolled in this study. Blood samples were taken at 2 and 24 hours after cardiac arrest. Suspension microarray assays were used to test 21 different biomarkers. A total of 99 patients were enrolled, 45 of whom survived to hospital discharge. We identified 11 biomarkers that, when combined with clinical variables and factors of APACHE II score and history of arrhythmia, were independent determinants for outcome of in-hospital mortality (concordance = 0.9249, standard error = 0.0779). Three biomarkers combined with APACHE II and age were independent determinants for favorable neurological outcome at hospital discharge (area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve, 0.938; 95% confidence interval, 0.854 ~ 1.0). In conclusion, a systemic multiple biomarker approach using suspension microarray assays can identify independent predictors and model the outcomes of cardiac arrest patients during the post-cardiac arrest period. PMID:27256246

  17. Predicting the outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients using multiple biomarkers and suspension microarray assays

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chien-Hua; Tsai, Min-Shan; Chien, Kuo-Liong; Chang, Wei-Tien; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chen, Shyr-Chyr; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Hsu, Hsin-Yun; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the prognosis for cardiac arrest is still challenging. Combining biomarkers from diverse pathophysiological pathways may provide reliable indicators for the severity of injury and predictors of long-term outcomes. We investigated the feasibility of using a multimarker strategy with key independent biomarkers to improve the prediction of outcomes in cardiac arrest. Adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients with sustained return of spontaneous circulation were prospectively enrolled in this study. Blood samples were taken at 2 and 24 hours after cardiac arrest. Suspension microarray assays were used to test 21 different biomarkers. A total of 99 patients were enrolled, 45 of whom survived to hospital discharge. We identified 11 biomarkers that, when combined with clinical variables and factors of APACHE II score and history of arrhythmia, were independent determinants for outcome of in-hospital mortality (concordance = 0.9249, standard error = 0.0779). Three biomarkers combined with APACHE II and age were independent determinants for favorable neurological outcome at hospital discharge (area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve, 0.938; 95% confidence interval, 0.854 ~ 1.0). In conclusion, a systemic multiple biomarker approach using suspension microarray assays can identify independent predictors and model the outcomes of cardiac arrest patients during the post-cardiac arrest period. PMID:27256246

  18. Arginine vasopressin in advanced cardiovascular failure during the post-resuscitation phase after cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Viktoria; Luckner, Günter; Jochberger, Stefan; Wenzel, Volker; Ulmer, Hanno; Pajk, Werner; Knotzer, Hans; Friesenecker, Barbara; Lindner, Karl; Hasibeder, Walter; Dünser, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) has been employed successfully during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, but there exist only few data about the effects of AVP infusion for cardiovascular failure during the post-cardiac arrest period. Cardiovascular failure is one of the main causes of death after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Although the "post-resuscitation syndrome" has been described as a "sepsis-like" syndrome, there is little information about the haemodynamic response to AVP in advanced cardiovascular failure after cardiac arrest. In this retrospective study, haemodynamic and laboratory variables in 23 patients with cardiovascular failure unresponsive to standard haemodynamic therapy during the post-cardiac arrest period were obtained before, and 30 min, 1, 4, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after initiation of a supplementary AVP infusion (4 IU/h). During the observation period, AVP significantly increased mean arterial blood pressure (58+/-14 to 75+/-19 mmHg, p < 0.001), and decreased noradrenaline (norepinephrine) (1.31+/-2.14 to 0.23+/-0.3 microg/kg/min, p = 0.03), adrenaline (epinephrine) (0.58+/-0.23 to 0.04+/-0.03 microg/kg/min, p = 0.001), and milrinone requirements (0.46+/-0.15 to 0.33+/-0.22 microg/kg/min, p < 0.001). Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure changed significantly (p < 0.001); an initial increase being followed by a decrease below baseline values. While arterial lactate concentrations (95+/-64 to 21+/-18 mg/dL, p < 0.001) and pH (7.27+/-0.14 to 7.4+/-0.14, p < 0.001) improved significantly, total bilirubin concentrations (1.12+/-0.95 to 3.04+/-3.79 mg/dL, p = 0.001) increased after AVP. There were no differences in the haemodynamic or laboratory response to AVP between survivors and non-survivors. In this study, advanced cardiovascular failure that was unresponsive to standard therapy could be reversed successfully with supplementary AVP infusion in >90% of patients surviving cardiac arrest. PMID:17069952

  19. Protective Effect of Dl-3-n-Butylphthalide on Recovery from Cardiac Arrest and Resuscitation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le; Puchowicz, Michelle A; LaManna, Joseph C; Xu, Kui

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of Dl-3-n-butylphthalide (NBP), a clinically used drug for stroke patients in China, on the recovery following cardiac arrest and resuscitation in rats. Male Wistar rats (3-month old) underwent cardiac arrest (12 min) and resuscitation. Rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: sham non-arrested group, vehicle group (vehicle-treated, 7 days before cardiac arrest and 4 days post-resuscitation), NBP pre-treated group (NBP-treated, 7 days before cardiac arrest), and NBP post-treated group (NBP-treated, 4 days post-resuscitation). Overall survival rates and hippocampal neuronal counts were determined in each group at 4 days post-resuscitation. Results showed that NBP pre-treated group (80 %) and NBP post-treated group (86 %) had significantly higher survival rates compared to that of the vehicle group (50 %). At 4 days of recovery, only about 20 % of hippocampal neurons were preserved in the vehicle group compared to the sham non-arrested group. The hippocampal CA1 cell counts in the NBP pre-treated group and NBP post-treated group were significantly higher than the counts in the vehicle group, about 50-60 % of the counts of non-arrested rats. The data suggest that NBP has both preventive and therapeutic effect on improving outcome following cardiac arrest and resuscitation, and NBP might be a potential early phase treatment for patients recovered from cardiac arrest and resuscitation. PMID:27526121

  20. Effect of Cardiac Arrest on Cognitive Impairment and Hippocampal Plasticity in Middle-Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Kunjan R.; Alekseyenko, Aleksey; Binkert, Marc; Stransky, Kenneth; Lin, Hung Wen; Barnes, Carol A.; Wright, Clinton B.; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary arrest is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States that usually occurs in the aged population. Cardiac arrest (CA) induces global ischemia, disrupting global cerebral circulation that results in ischemic brain injury and leads to cognitive impairments in survivors. Ischemia-induced neuronal damage in the hippocampus following CA can result in the impairment of cognitive function including spatial memory. In the present study, we used a model of asphyxial CA (ACA) in nine month old male Fischer 344 rats to investigate cognitive and synaptic deficits following mild global cerebral ischemia. These experiments were performed with the goals of 1) establishing a model of CA in nine month old middle-aged rats; and 2) to test the hypothesis that learning and memory deficits develop following mild global cerebral ischemia in middle-aged rats. To test this hypothesis, spatial memory assays (Barnes circular platform maze and contextual fear conditioning) and field recordings (long-term potentiation and paired-pulse facilitation) were performed. We show that following ACA in nine month old middle-aged rats, there is significant impairment in spatial memory formation, paired-pulse facilitation n dysfunction, and a reduction in the number of non-compromised hippocampal Cornu Ammonis 1 and subiculum neurons. In conclusion, nine month old animals undergoing cardiac arrest have impaired survival, deficits in spatial memory formation, and synaptic dysfunction. PMID:25933411

  1. Epidemiology of traumatic cardiac arrest in patients presenting to emergency department at a level 1 trauma center

    PubMed Central

    Bhoi, Sanjeev; Mishra, Prakash Ranjan; Soni, Kapil Dev; Baitha, Upendra; Sinha, Tej Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: There is a paucity of literature on prehospital care and epidemiology of traumatic cardiac arrest (TCA) in India. This study highlights the profile and characteristics of TCA. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted to study epidemiological profile of TCA patients ≥1 year presenting to a level 1 trauma center of India. Results: One thousand sixty-one patients were recruited in the study. The median age (interquartile range) was 32 (23–45) years (male:female ratio of 5.9:1). Asystole (253), pulseless electrical activity (11), ventricular fibrillation (six), and ventricular tachycardia (five) were initial arrest rhythm. Road traffic crash (RTC) (57.16%), fall from height (18.52%), and assault (10.51%) were modes of injury. Prehospital care was provided by police (36.59%), ambulance (10.54%), relatives (45.40%), and bystanders (7.47% cases). Return of spontaneous circulation was seen in 69 patients, of which only three survived to hospital discharge. Conclusion: RTC in young males was a major cause of TCA. Asystole was the most common arrest rhythm. Police personnel were major prehospital service provider. Prehospital care needs improvement including the development of robust TCA registry.

  2. Potential cardiac arrest – an observational study of pre-hospital medical response

    PubMed Central

    Zakariassen, Erik; Hunskaar, Steinar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A previous study showed that Norwegian GPs on call attended around 40% of out-of-hospital medical emergencies. We wanted to investigate the alarms of prehospital medical resources and the doctors' responses in situations of potential cardiac arrests. Design and setting A three-month prospective data collection was undertaken from three emergency medical communication centres, covering a population of 816,000 residents. From all emergency medical events, a sub-group of patients who received resuscitation, or who were later pronounced dead at site, was selected for further analysis. Results 5,105 medical emergencies involving 5,180 patients were included, of which 193 met the inclusion criteria. The GP on call was alarmed in 59 %, and an anaesthesiologist in 43 % of the cases. When alarmed, a GP attended in 84 % and an anaesthesiologist in 87 % of the cases. Among the patients who died, the GP on call was alarmed most frequently. Conclusion Events involving patients in need of resuscitation are rare, but medical response in the form of the attendance of prehospital personnel is significant. Norwegian GPs have a higher call-out rate for patients in severe situations where resuscitation was an option of treatment, compared with other “red-response” situations. Key pointsThis study investigates alarms of and call-outs among GPs and anaesthesiologists on call, in the most acute clinical situations:Medical emergencies involving patients in need of resuscitation were rare.The health care contribution by pre-hospital personnel being called out was significant.Compared with other acute situations, the GP had a higher attendance rate to patients in life-threatening situations. PMID:27092724

  3. Good neurologic recovery after cardiac arrest using hypothermia through continuous renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yu-jie; Ning, Bo; Cao, Wei-hong; Liu, Tao; Liu, Lei

    2013-12-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is becoming a standard of care to mitigate neurologic injury in cardiac arrest survivors. Several cooling methods are available for use in TH. For maintaining a target temperature, intravascular cooling is superior to, more efficacious than, and safer than surface cooling methods. The use of an intravenous cooling catheter is independently associated with a higher odds ratio for survival. However, many techniques use commercially developed equipment that is expensive to purchase and use. The application and popularization of the intravascular cooling method have been difficult. In patients with pulmonary edema or cardiac insufficiency, liquid is restricted, so intravascular cooling systems cannot be used. Studies have shown abnormalities mimicking the immunologic and coagulation disorders observed in severe sepsis. Continuous renal replacement therapy has been widely used in the intensive care unit to improve clinical parameters and survival in patients with multiple-organ dysfunction of septic origin. Continuous renal replacement therapy can also be used as another type of core cooling method. We used continuous renal replacement therapy as a cooling method to induce TH in a patient who had a cardiac arrest, and the patient regained consciousness 52 hours later. PMID:23953774

  4. Cardiac arrest during radical nephrectomy due to a mass in the right ventricular outflow tract.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Young; Baek, Seung-Hoon; Yoon, Ji Uk; Lee, Dong Hoon; Byeon, Gyeong-Jo; Ahn, Ji Hye

    2016-09-01

    We report cardiac arrest due to obstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) caused by an RVOT mass that was not identified preoperatively. A 62-year-old woman with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) experienced deteriorating hypotension and bradycardia during radical nephrectomy. Hemodynamic stability was maintained on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and after surgery, she was transferred to the intensive care unit. On postoperative day 3, transthoracic echocardiography showed an intracardiac mass obstructing the RVOT, which caused severe functional pulmonary stenosis and moderate resting pulmonary hypertension. Despite maintaining extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, the patient died of cardiac arrest. Our findings suggest that it may be necessary to perform additional tests if RCC has invaded the renal vein and inferior vena cava or if a patient with RCC has abnormal cardiovascular symptoms without definite etiology for exclusion of cardiac metastasis or tumor thrombus. In addition, intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography might be the procedure of choice for the evaluation of these conditions because other diagnostic tests are difficult to perform during surgery. In conclusion, for patients with acute hemodynamic instability for whom other possible causes have been excluded, we recommend that anesthesiologists use transesophageal echocardiography to detect outflow tract obstruction or pulmonary thromboembolism and perform anesthetic management. PMID:27555152

  5. A rare combination of undiagnosed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy revealed by intraoperative anaphylaxis resulting in acute left ventricular outflow obstruction and cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Smith, Bradford B; Nickels, Andrew S; Sviggum, Hans P

    2016-06-01

    A 75-year-old female presented for left total hip reimplantation and suffered pulseless electrical activity arrest upon lateral positioning and administering vancomycin. Resuscitation was achieved according to Advanced Cardiac Life Support protocol. Post-event echocardiography showed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with asymmetrical septal thickening, an under-filled left ventricle, dynamic left ventricular outflow obstruction, and severe mitral regurgitation related to systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve. Laboratory analysis showed a tryptase level of 209 ng/mL. After multispecialty evaluation, it was concluded that the patient's arrest was due to vancomycin anaphylaxis in the setting of previously undiagnosed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy leading to acute left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. After medical optimization of the patient's cardiomyopathy and an evaluation of potential intraoperative allergic triggers, the patient underwent a successful hip reimplantation without incident. This case presents a novel combination of events leading to intraoperative cardiac arrest. Rapid identification and an understanding of the cause(s) of cardiac arrest in this setting are critical for effective perioperative care. PMID:27185714

  6. Influence of Chest Compressions on Circulation during the Peri-Cardiac Arrest Period in Porcine Models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Walline, Joseph; Zheng, Liangliang; Fu, Yangyang; Yao, Dongqi; Zhu, Huadong; Liu, Xiaohe; Chai, Yanfen; Wang, Zhong; Yu, Xuezhong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Starting chest compressions immediately after a defibrillation shock might be harmful, if the victim already had a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and yet was still being subjected to external compressions at the same time. The objective of this study was to study the influence of chest compressions on circulation during the peri-cardiac arrest period. Design Prospective, randomized controlled study. Setting Animal experimental center in Peking Union Medical Collage Hospital, Beijing, China. Subjects Healthy 3-month-old male domestic pigs. Interventions 44 pigs (28±2 kg) were randomly assigned to three groups: Group I (non-arrested with compressions) (n = 12); Group II (arrested with compressions only) (n = 12); Group III (ROSC after compressions and defibrillation) (n = 20). In Groups I and II, compressions were performed to a depth of 5cm (Ia and IIa, n = 6) or a depth of 3cm (Ib and IIb, n = 6) respectively, while in Group III, the animals which had just achieved ROSC (n = 18) were compressed to a depth of 5cm (IIIa, n = 6), a depth of 3cm (IIIb, n = 6), or had no compressions (IIIc, n = 6). Hemodynamic parameters were collected and analyzed. Measurements and Findings Hemodynamics were statistically different between Groups Ia and Ib when different depths of compressions were performed (p < 0.05). In Group II, compressions were beneficial and hemodynamics correlated with the depth of compressions (p < 0.05). In Group III, compressions that continued after ROSC produced a reduction in arterial pressure (p < 0.05). Conclusions Chest compressions might be detrimental to hemodynamics in the early post-ROSC stage. The deeper the compressions were, the better the effect on hemodynamics during cardiac arrest, but the worse the effect on hemodynamics after ROSC. PMID:27168071

  7. Drug administration in animal studies of cardiac arrest does not reflect human clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Joshua C.; Rittenberger, Jon C.; Menegazzi, James J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction To date, there is no evidence showing a benefit from any advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) medication in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA), despite animal data to the contrary. One explanation may be a difference in the time to first drug administration. Our previous work has shown the mean time to first drug administration in clinical trials is 19.4 minutes. We hypothesized that the average time to drug administration in large animal experiments occurs earlier than in OOHCA clinical trials. Methods We conducted a literature review between 1990 and 2006 in MEDLINE using the following MeSH headings: swine, dogs, resuscitation, heart arrest, EMS, EMT, ambulance, ventricular fibrillation, drug therapy, epinephrine, vasopressin, amiodarone, lidocaine, magnesium, and sodium bicarbonate. We reviewed the abstracts of 331 studies and 197 full manuscripts. Exclusion criteria included: non-peer reviewed, all without primary animal data, and traumatic models. From these, we identified 119 papers that contained unique information on time to medication administration. The data are reported as mean, ranges, and 95% confidence intervals. Mean time to first drug administration in animal laboratory studies and clinical trials was compared with a t-test. Regression analysis was performed to determine if time to drug predicted ROSC. Results Mean time to first drug administration in 2378 animals was 9.5 minutes (range 3.0–28.0; 95% CI around mean 2.78, 16.22). This is less than the time reported in clinical trials (19.4 min, p<0.001). Time to drug predicted ROSC (Odds Ratio 0.844; 95% CI 0.738, 0.966). Conclusion Shorter drug delivery time in animal models of cardiac arrest may be one reason for the failure of animal studies to translate successfully into the clinical arena. PMID:17360097

  8. Identification of high-risk communities for unattended out-of-hospital cardiac arrests using GIS.

    PubMed

    Semple, Hugh M; Cudnik, Michael T; Sayre, Michael; Keseg, David; Warden, Craig R; Sasson, Comilla

    2013-04-01

    Improving survival rates for out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) at the neighborhood level is increasingly seen as priority in US cities. Since wide disparities exist in OHCA rates at the neighborhood level, it is necessary to locate neighborhoods where people are at elevated risk for cardiac arrest and target these for educational outreach and other mitigation strategies. This paper describes a GIS-based methodology that was used to identify communities with high risk for cardiac arrests in Franklin County, Ohio during the period 2004-2009. Prior work in this area used a single criterion, i.e., the density of OHCA events, to define the high-risk areas, and a single analytical technique, i.e., kernel density analysis, to identify the high-risk communities. In this paper, two criteria are used to identify the high-risk communities, the rate of OHCA incidents and the level of bystander CPR participation. We also used Local Moran's I combined with traditional map overlay techniques to add robustness to the methodology for identifying high-risk communities for OHCA. Based on the criteria established for this study, we successfully identified several communities that were at higher risk for OHCA than neighboring communities. These communities had incidence rates of OHCA that were significantly higher than neighboring communities and bystander rates that were significantly lower than neighboring communities. Other risk factors for OHCA were also high in the selected communities. The methodology employed in this study provides for a measurement conceptualization of OHCA clusters that is much broader than what has been previously offered. It is also statistically reliable and can be easily executed using a GIS. PMID:22983677

  9. Relation of Obesity to Survival After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Tanush; Kolte, Dhaval; Mohananey, Divyanshu; Khera, Sahil; Goel, Kashish; Mondal, Pratik; Aronow, Wilbert S; Jain, Diwakar; Cooper, Howard A; Iwai, Sei; Frishman, William H; Bhatt, Deepak L; Fonarow, Gregg C; Panza, Julio A

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that obesity is paradoxically associated with improved outcomes in many cardiovascular (CV) disease states; however, whether obesity affects survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) has not been well examined. We queried the 2003 to 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases to identify all patients aged ≥18 years who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation for IHCA. Obese patients were identified using the co-morbidity variable for obesity, as defined in Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases. Survival to hospital discharge was compared between obese and nonobese patients using multivariate regression models. Of 836,289 patients with IHCA, 67,216 (8.0%) were obese. Obese patients were younger and more likely to be women compared with nonobese patients. Despite being younger, obese patients had significantly higher prevalence of most CV co-morbidities such as dyslipidemia, coronary artery disease, previous myocardial infarction, heart failure, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, and chronic renal failure (p <0.001 for all). Obese patients were more likely to have ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation as the initial cardiac arrest rhythm (22.3% vs 20.9%; p <0.001). After multivariate risk adjustment, obese patients had improved survival to hospital discharge compared with nonobese patients (31.4% vs 24.1%; unadjusted odds ratio 1.44, 95% CI 1.42 to 1.47, p <0.001; adjusted odds ratio 1.15, 95% CI 1.13 to 1.17, p <0.001). Similar results were seen in patients with CV or non-CV conditions as the primary diagnosis and in those with ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation or pulseless electrical activity/asystole as the cardiac arrest rhythm. In conclusion, this large retrospective analysis of a nationwide cohort of patients with IHCA demonstrated higher risk-adjusted odds of survival in obese patients, consistent with an "obesity paradox." PMID:27381664

  10. The impact of the code drugs: cardioactive medications in cardiac arrest resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Kelly; Breed, Meghan; Alibertis, Kostas; Brady, William J

    2012-02-01

    The goal of treating patients who present with cardiac arrest is to intervene as quickly as possible to affect the best possible outcome. The mainstays of these interventions, including early activation of the emergency response team, early initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and early defibrillation, are essential components with demonstrated positive impact on resuscitation outcomes. Conversely, the use of the code drugs as a component of advanced life support has not benefited these patients to the same extent as the basic interventions in a general. Although short-term outcomes are improved as a function of these medications, the final outcome has not been altered significantly in most instances. PMID:22107975

  11. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: 10 years of progress in research and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hollenberg, J; Svensson, L; Rosenqvist, M

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac disease is the most common cause of mortality in Western countries, with most deaths due to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). In Sweden, 5000-10 000 OHCAs occur annually. During the last decade, the time from cardiac arrest to start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation has increased, whereas survival has remained unchanged or even increased. Resuscitation of OHCA patients is based on the 'chain-of-survival' concept, including early (i) access, (ii) CPR, (iii) defibrillation, (iv) advanced cardiac life support and (v) post-resuscitation care. Regarding early access, agonal breathing, telephone-guided CPR and the use of 'track and trigger systems' to detect deterioration in patients' condition prior to an arrest are all important. The use of compression-only CPR by bystanders as an alternative to standard CPR in OHCA has been debated. Based on recent findings, guidelines recommend telephone-guided chest compression-only CPR for untrained rescuers, but trained personnel are still advised to give standard CPR with both compressions and ventilation, and the method of choice for this large group remains unclear and demands for a randomized study. Data have shown the benefit of public access defibrillation for dispatched rescuers (e.g. police and fire fighters) but data are not as strong for the use of automated defibrillators (AEDs) by trained or untrained rescuers. Postresuscitation, use of therapeutic hypothermia, the importance of specific prognostic survival factors in the intensive care unit and the widespread use of percutaneous coronary intervention have all been considered. Despite progress in research and improved treatment regimens, most patients do not survive OHCA. Particular areas of interest for improving survival include (i) identification of high-risk patients prior to their arrest (e.g. early warning symptoms and genes); (ii) increased use of bystander CPR training (e.g. in schools) and simplified CPR techniques; (iii

  12. Acute hemodynamic effects of angiotensin- converting enzyme inhibition after prolonged cardiac arrest with Bretschneider's solution.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Alexandro; Kempfert, Jörg; Pritzwald-Stegmann, Patrick; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Dhein, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Evidence as to how ACE inhibitors attenuate ischemia-reperfusion injury (IR) after cardioplegic arrest remains scarce. Twenty-four rabbit hearts were perfused on a Langendorff apparatus. Control hearts (n = 6) were arrested with pure histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate (HTK)-Bretschneider. Treatment groups received added to the cardioplegic solution (n = 6) captopril (100 μmol/l) and losartan (100 μmol/l) for selective AT1-receptor antagonism or BQ123 (100 nmol/l) for selective ETA-receptor antagonism. Pre-ischemic equilibration of 45 min was followed by 90 min of cardioplegic arrest and 30 min of reperfusion. Indices of myocardial contractility (LVP, dp/dt max, dp/dt min), coronary flow, heart rate, and O2 consumption were recorded before and after ischemic arrest. Tissue adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents were measured to evaluate energy content and oxidative stress, respectively. After selective cardiac arrest with Bretschneider, captopril-treated hearts showed improved hemodynamics compared to control and the other treatment groups. Oxygen consumption was significantly decreased during early reperfusion in captopril-treated hearts (34 ± 3 μmol/min/g/mmHg) compared to controls and losartan- and BQ123-treated hearts (controls: 77 ± 9 μmol/min/g/mmHg, p = 0.003; losartan: 54 ± 9 μmol/min/g/mmHg, p = 0.015; BQ123: 64 ± 13 μmol/min/g/mmHg, p = 0.046). The ATP content of the reperfused tissue was significantly elevated after captopril treatment compared to control group (24 ± 2 vs. 16 ± 2 μmol/g, p = 0.033), whereas the level of MDA was substantially decreased (0.58 ± 0.163 vs. 1.5 ± 0.28 μmol/g, p = 0.009). ACE inhibition leads to a significantly greater and faster recovery of myocardial contractility after prolonged cardiac arrest with Bretschneider solution. Due to decreased oxygen consumption, myocardial protection is enhanced. The association between ACE and ischemia cannot be clarified by selective blockade of

  13. Cardiac arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... right away to get the heart started again. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) . This is often the first type of treatment ... done by anyone who has been trained in CPR. It can help keep oxygen flowing in the ...

  14. Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Outcomes of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Caused by Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Tatsuma; Ohashi-Fukuda, Naoko; Kondo, Yutaka; Sera, Toshiki; Doi, Kent; Yahagi, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Limited information is available regarding stroke-related out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We aimed to assess the clinical characteristics of stroke-related OHCA and to identify the factors associated with patient outcomes. We conducted a nationwide population-based study of adult OHCA patients in Japan from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2009. We examined the epidemiology, risk factors, and outcomes of stroke-related OHCA compared with cardiogenic OHCA. The primary outcome was neurologically favorable survival. Of the 243,140 eligible patients, 18,682 (7.7%) were diagnosed with stroke-related OHCA. Compared to OHCA with a presumed cardiac etiology, stroke-related OHCA patients had a greater chance of prehospital return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) (9.9% vs 5.9%, P < 0.0001) but a reduced chance of 1-month survival (3.6% vs 4.9%, P < 0.0001) or favorable neurological outcomes (1.2% vs 2.6%, P < 0.0001). After adjusting for a variety of confounding factors, the prehospital ROSC rates were higher (adjusted OR 2.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.34–2.62), but the neurologically favorable survival rates were lower (adjusted OR 0.66, 95%CI 0.57–0.76), among the stroke-related OHCA patients. In stroke-related OHCA cases, having a younger age, witness, and shockable 1st documented rhythm were associated with improved outcomes. Men had more favorable neurological outcomes. Seasonal or circadian factors had no critical impact on favorable neurological outcomes. Prehospital advanced life support techniques (i.e., epinephrine administration or advanced airway management) were not associated with favorable neurological outcomes. Although stroke-related OHCA had lower 1-month survival rates and poorer neurological outcomes than cardiogenic OHCA, the rates were not considered to be medically futile. Characteristically, sex differences might impact neurologically favorable survival. PMID:27057834

  15. Development of a Web GIS Application for Visualizing and Analyzing Community Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patterns.

    PubMed

    Semple, Hugh; Qin, Han; Sasson, Comilla

    2013-01-01

    Improving survival rates at the neighborhood level is increasingly seen as a priority for reducing overall rates of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in the United States. Since wide disparities exist in OHCA rates at the neighborhood level, it is important for public health officials and residents to be able to quickly locate neighborhoods where people are at elevated risk for cardiac arrest and to target these areas for educational outreach and other mitigation strategies. This paper describes an OHCA web mapping application that was developed to provide users with interactive maps and data for them to quickly visualize and analyze the geographic pattern of cardiac arrest rates, bystander CPR rates, and survival rates at the neighborhood level in different U.S. cities. The data comes from the CARES Registry and is provided over a period spanning several years so users can visualize trends in neighborhood out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patterns. Users can also visualize areas that are statistical hot and cold spots for cardiac arrest and compare OHCA and bystander CPR rates in the hot and cold spots. Although not designed as a public participation GIS (PPGIS), this application seeks to provide a forum around which data and maps about local patterns of OHCA can be shared, analyzed and discussed with a view of empowering local communities to take action to address the high rates of OHCA in their vicinity. PMID:23923097

  16. Development of a Web GIS Application for Visualizing and Analyzing Community Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Hugh; Qin, Han; Sasson, Comilla

    2013-01-01

    Improving survival rates at the neighborhood level is increasingly seen as a priority for reducing overall rates of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in the United States. Since wide disparities exist in OHCA rates at the neighborhood level, it is important for public health officials and residents to be able to quickly locate neighborhoods where people are at elevated risk for cardiac arrest and to target these areas for educational outreach and other mitigation strategies. This paper describes an OHCA web mapping application that was developed to provide users with interactive maps and data for them to quickly visualize and analyze the geographic pattern of cardiac arrest rates, bystander CPR rates, and survival rates at the neighborhood level in different U.S. cities. The data comes from the CARES Registry and is provided over a period spanning several years so users can visualize trends in neighborhood out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patterns. Users can also visualize areas that are statistical hot and cold spots for cardiac arrest and compare OHCA and bystander CPR rates in the hot and cold spots. Although not designed as a public participation GIS (PPGIS), this application seeks to provide a forum around which data and maps about local patterns of OHCA can be shared, analyzed and discussed with a view of empowering local communities to take action to address the high rates of OHCA in their vicinity. PMID:23923097

  17. Cardiac arrest in an 18-year-old man caused by anomalous right coronary artery origin.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Heather; Curtin, Ronan

    2016-01-01

    An 18-year-old man presented to hospital following an out of hospital ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest, with successful resuscitation at the scene. The incident happened during a competitive football match in which the man was playing. In the course of an extensive work up, a CT coronary angiogram demonstrated an anomalous right coronary artery (RCA) origin in the left coronary sinus. The RCA followed an initial intramural and subsequent interarterial course between the ascending aorta and pulmonary artery trunk. Cardiac MRI showed a small subendocardial area of delayed gadolinium enhancement in the inferoseptal wall, consistent with a small infarct. Treatment involved elective coronary artery bypass of the RCA with a right internal mammary artery graft. The patient made a full recovery. An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator was not inserted and he was advised not to return to competitive sports. PMID:26961556

  18. Usefulness of the Myocardial Infarction and Cardiac Arrest Calculator as a Discriminator of Adverse Cardiac Events After Elective Hip and Knee Surgery.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Brandon; Ghahramani, Mehrdad; Harris, Stephanie; Suchniak-Mussari, Kristen; Bedi, Gurneet; Bulathsinghala, Charles; Foy, Andrew

    2016-06-15

    The 2014 American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association guidelines on perioperative evaluation recommend differentiating patients at low risk (<1%) versus elevated risk (≥1%) for cardiac complications to guide appropriate preoperative testing. Among the tools recommended for estimating perioperative risk is the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) Myocardial Infarction and Cardiac Arrest (MICA) risk calculator. We investigated whether the NSQIP MICA risk calculator would accurately discriminate adverse cardiac events in a cohort of adult patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgery. We retrospectively reviewed 1,098 consecutive, elective orthopedic surgeries performed at Hershey Medical Center from January 1, 2013, to December 31, 2014. Adverse cardiac events were defined as myocardial infarction or cardiac arrest within 30 days of surgery. The mean estimated risk for adverse cardiac events using the NSQIP MICA risk calculator was 0.54%, which was not significantly different (p = 1) compared with the observed incidence of 0.64% (7 of 1,098 procedures). The c-statistic for discriminating adverse cardiac events was 0.85 (95% CI 0.67 to 1) for the NSQIP MICA risk calculator and 0.9 (95% CI 0.75 to 1) for the Revised Cardiac Risk Index. In conclusion, the NSQIP MICA risk calculator is a good discriminator of adverse cardiac events in patients undergoing elective hip and knee surgery, performing comparably to the Revised Cardiac Risk Index. PMID:27131613

  19. The optimum timing of resuscitative thoracotomy for non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Takino, M; Okada, Y

    1993-08-01

    Open-chest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a promising method for non-traumatic cardiac arrest. In this preliminary study, we investigated the optimum timing of thoracotomy which brings high rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and keeps the incidence of unnecessary thoracotomy minimal. Ninety-five adult patients with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were analyzed. Of those, 26 patients were treated by the open-chest CPR in a prospective consecutive fashion. In this group, the ROSC rate was investigated in connection with the interval from hospital arrival, or ambulance call, to thoracotomy. Another 69 patients were treated by standard CPR. In this uncontrolled group, the interval from arrival at hospital to ROSC was investigated to define the 'natural hospital course' by the conventional treatment. Patient characteristics in the open-chest CPR group and the standard CPR group were similar. In the open-chest CPR group, 15 patients obtained ROSC. There was a tendency that the ROSC rate was highest in the patients with thoracotomy within 5 min of hospital arrival and declined as the timing of thoracotomy was delayed. Similar tendency was noted when the timing of thoracotomy was counted from the ambulance call. In the standard CPR group, only two patients obtained ROSC during the initial 5 min of hospital course. These results suggest that thoracotomy within 5 min of hospital arrival brings the highest ROSC rate while keeps the incidence of unnecessary thoracotomy acceptable. PMID:8210734

  20. Dual kidney transplantation from uncontrolled deceased donors after cardiac arrest: a possible option.

    PubMed

    Hanf, William; Petruzzo, Palmina; Meas-Yedid, Vannary; Berthiller, Julien; Martin, Xavier; Morelon, Emmanuel; Badet, Lionel; Codas, Ricardo

    2014-02-01

    Organ shortage is a major problem in organ transplantation. For this reason, transplantation teams have found it necessary to revisit their organ acceptance criteria. Uncontrolled deceased donors after cardiac arrest could increase the donor pool by 20%, but at the same time there is a greater risk of delayed graft function and primary non-function. Dual kidney transplantation is an option when single kidney transplantation cannot be carried out because of lack of organ quality. We report for the first time our four first dual kidney transplantation from uncontrolled deceased donors after cardiac arrest with a follow up longer than 1 year. We described graft outcomes until 5 years, and histology at 3 and 12 months after transplantation. All organs were machine perfused in order to assess their quality leading to a single kidney transplantation or dual kidney transplantation decision. After 1 year of follow up, all grafts were functional with a mean estimated glomerular filtration rate of 44.5 ± 3.3 mL/min/1.73 m(2), and a mean inulin clearance of 43.7 ± 13.6 mL/mn/1.73 m(2). These findings suggest that dual kidney transplantation can represent a viable option for kidneys unsuitable for single kidney transplantation without increasing the rate of surgical complications. Successful transplantation is linked to histological, biological and donor clinical criteria, as well as perfusion parameters. PMID:23944687

  1. Protective effects of NHE1 inhibition with sabiporide in an experimental model of asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest in piglets.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xinchun; Lee, Dongwon; Wu, Dongmei

    2013-04-01

    The present study investigated the protective effects of a novel NHE1 selective inhibitor, sabiporide, in a porcine model of asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest. Asphyxial cardiac arrest was induced by endotracheal tube clamping (ETC). The animals remained untreated for 3 min after loss of aortic pulsations (LOAP), and followed by chest compression and defibrillation. Sixteen of eighteen pigs had return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and were randomly assigned to two study groups. Group 1: vehicle control. Group 2: 3mg/kg sabiporide was given at 15 min after ROSC. Post-arrest myocardial dysfunction was present in both groups, and progressed over hours. Animals treated with sabiporide had less wall motion abnormality and higher left ventricular ejection fraction than control animals (33% in control group vs. 47% in sabiporide group). Sabopiride treatment also significantly improved post-arrest arterial blood pressure by 25% and cardiac stroke volume by 44%, and improved mixed-venous blood oxygen saturation by 38% and oxygen delivery by 118%. Furthermore, compared to the control group, the sabiporide group also had higher blood flows in the brain, heart, kidney, liver and spleen at 30 min after ROSC. There was no significant blood flow difference in distal ileum mucosa between control and sabiporide groups. In addition, sabiporide treatment significantly reduced cardiac myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity by 53% and cardiac troponin I by 51%, and reduced the plasma level of TNF-α by 52% and IL-6 by 41%. This study shows that post-arrest pharmacological conditioning with sabiporide affords protection from whole body ischemia-reperfusion injury in this model of asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest and resuscitation. PMID:22989728

  2. Prehospital randomised assessment of a mechanical compression device in cardiac arrest (PaRAMeDIC) trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is closely linked to the quality of CPR, but in real life, resuscitation during prehospital care and ambulance transport is often suboptimal. Mechanical chest compression devices deliver consistent chest compressions, are not prone to fatigue and could potentially overcome some of the limitations of manual chest compression. However, there is no high-quality evidence that they improve clinical outcomes, or that they are cost effective. The Prehospital Randomised Assessment of a Mechanical Compression Device In Cardiac Arrest (PARAMEDIC) trial is a pragmatic cluster randomised study of the LUCAS-2 device in adult patients with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Methods/design The primary objective of this trial is to evaluate the effect of chest compression using LUCAS-2 on mortality at 30 days post out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, compared with manual chest compression. Secondary objectives of the study are to evaluate the effects of LUCAS-2 on survival to 12 months, cognitive and quality of life outcomes and cost-effectiveness. Methods: Ambulance service vehicles will be randomised to either manual compression (control) or LUCAS arms. Adult patients in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, attended by a trial vehicle will be eligible for inclusion. Patients with traumatic cardiac arrest or who are pregnant will be excluded. The trial will recruit approximately 4000 patients from England, Wales and Scotland. A waiver of initial consent has been approved by the Research Ethics Committees. Consent will be sought from survivors for participation in the follow-up phase. Conclusion The trial will assess the clinical and cost effectiveness of the LUCAS-2 mechanical chest compression device. Trial Registration: The trial is registered on the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Registry (ISRCTN08233942). PMID:21054860

  3. Establishing the Aus-ROC Australian and New Zealand out-of-hospital cardiac arrest Epistry

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Janet; Smith, Karen; Walker, Tony; Grantham, Hugh; Hein, Cindy; Thorrowgood, Melanie; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Tony; Dicker, Bridget; Swain, Andy; Bailey, Mark; Bosley, Emma; Pemberton, Katherine; Cameron, Peter; Nichol, Graham; Finn, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a global health problem with low survival. Regional variation in survival has heightened interest in combining cardiac arrest registries to understand and improve OHCA outcomes. While individual OHCA registries exist in Australian and New Zealand ambulance services, until recently these registries have not been combined. The aim of this protocol paper is to describe the rationale and methods of the Australian Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (Aus-ROC) OHCA epidemiological registry (Epistry). Methods and analysis The Aus-ROC Epistry is designed as a population-based cohort study. Data collection started in 2014. Six ambulance services in Australia (Ambulance Victoria, SA Ambulance Service, St John Ambulance Western Australia and Queensland Ambulance Service) and New Zealand (St John New Zealand and Wellington Free Ambulance) currently contribute data. All OHCA attended by ambulance, regardless of aetiology or patient age, are included in the Epistry. The catchment population is approximately 19.3 million persons, representing 63% of the Australian population and 100% of the New Zealand population. Data are collected using Utstein-style definitions. Information incorporated into the Epistry includes demographics, arrest features, ambulance response times, treatment and patient outcomes. The primary outcome is ‘survival to hospital discharge’, with ‘return of spontaneous circulation’ as a key secondary outcome. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval was independently sought by each of the contributing registries. Overarching ethics for the Epistry was provided by Monash University HREC (Approval No. CF12/3938—2012001888). A population-based OHCA registry capturing the majority of Australia and New Zealand will allow risk-adjusted outcomes to be determined, to enable benchmarking across ambulance providers, facilitate the identification of system-wide strategies associated with survival from OHCA, and

  4. Algorithm for the resuscitation of traumatic cardiac arrest patients in a physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Survival rates following traumatic cardiac arrest (TCA) are known to be poor but resuscitation is not universally futile. There are a number of potentially reversible causes to TCA and a well-defined group of survivors. There are distinct differences in the pathophysiology between medical cardiac arrests and TCA. The authors present some of the key differences and evidence related to resuscitation in TCA, and suggest a separate algorithm for the management of out-of-hospital TCA attended by a highly trained physician and paramedic team. PMID:23510195

  5. The Influence of Mandatory Arrest Policies, Police Organizational Characteristics, and Situational Variables on the Probability of Arrest in Domestic Violence Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eitle, David

    2005-01-01

    Prior research into factors predicting arrest in domestic violence cases is limited in three regards: (a) no examination of whether mandatory arrest policies are associated with increased risk of arrest across multiple jurisdictions; (b) little consideration of whether police organizational characteristics influence arrest in such cases; and (c)…

  6. Recreational drug overdose-related cardiac arrests: Break on through to the other side

    PubMed Central

    Elmer, Jonathan; Lynch, Michael J.; Kristan, Jeffery; Morgan, Patrick; Gerstel, Stacy J.; Callaway, Clifton W.; Rittenberger, Jon C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The annual rate of recreational overdose (OD)-related death is increasing exponentially, making unintentional overdose the leading cause of injury-related death in America. Unfortunately, little attention in the resuscitation community has focused on the post-arrest care of this rapidly growing population. Methods We included patients presenting between January 2009 and February 2014 after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and abstracted baseline clinical characteristics and neurological outcomes. We considered an arrest to be an OD OHCA if toxicology screens were positive and not explained by therapeutic medication administration or home medications; or if there was a history strongly suggestive of OD. We compared the baseline clinical characteristics and outcomes between the OD and non-OD cohorts. Results In total, 591 OHCA patients were admitted, of which 85 (14%) arrests were OD-related. OD OHCA patients were significantly younger, had fewer medical comorbdities, were more likely to present with non-shockable rhythms and had worse baseline neurological function. However, overall survival, neurological outcomes and length of stay did not vary between groups. OD OHCA patients who survived to discharge had a significantly higher rate of favorable discharge dispositions (83% of OD OHCA survivors discharged to home or acute rehabilitation vs 62% of non-OD OHCA (P=0.03)). Conclusion Patients who have suffered an OD OHCA make up a significant proportion of the overall OHCA population. Despite poor baseline prognostic factors, survival after OD OHCA was no worse than after non-OD OHCA, and among survivors a majority had a good neurological outcome. PMID:25660953

  7. Effect of lipid emulsion during resuscitation of a patient with cardiac arrest after overdose of chlorpromazine and mirtazapine.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hisatake; Ohnishi, Mitsuo; Takegawa, Ryosuke; Hirose, Tomoya; Hattori, Yuji; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2015-10-01

    No specific treatment exists for poisoning with most fat-soluble drugs. Intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) may be effective therapy against such drugs, but effects of ILE treatment are unclear. A 24-year-old woman with depression seen sleeping in the morning was found comatose in the evening, and an emerging lifesaving technologies service was called. After emerging lifesaving technologies departure to hospital, she stopped breathing, became pulseless, and cardiopulmonary life support was started immediately. Electrocardiographic monitoring showed asystole during resuscitation even after arrival at hospital. Empty packaging sheets of 60-tablet chlorpromazine (CPZ) (50 mg/tablet) and 66-tablet mirtazapine (MZP) (15 mg/tablet) found at the scene suggested drug-related cardiopulmonary arrest. Along with conventional administration of adrenaline (total dose, 5 mg), 20% Intralipid 100 mLwas given intravenously 8 minutes after hospital arrival and readministered 27 minutes after hospital arrival because of continued asystole. Return of spontaneous circulation occurred 29 minutes after arrival (70 minutes after cardiac arrest). The patient recovered without any major complications and was transferred to another hospital for psychiatric treatment 70 days after admission. Concentrations of CPZ and MZP were still high when return of spontaneous circulation was achieved with ILE. This case suggested the possible benefit of ILE in treating life threatening cardiotoxicity from CPZ and MZP overdose. PMID:26314213

  8. Addressing Disparities in Sudden Cardiac Arrest Care and the Under-Utilization of Effective Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Melissa H.; Peterson, Eric D.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Sanders, Gillian D.; Yancy, Clyde W.; Russo, Andrea M.; Curtis, Anne B.; Sears, Samuel F.; Thomas, Kevin L.; Campbell, Susan; Carlson, Mark D.; Chiames, Chris; Cook, Nakela L.; Hayes, David L.; LaRue, Michelle; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Lyons, Edward L.; Al-Khatib, Sana M.

    2010-01-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is the most common cause of death in the Unites States. Despite its major impact on public health, significant challenges exist at the patient, provider, public, and policy levels with respect to raising more widespread awareness and understanding of SCA risks, identifying patients at risk for SCA, addressing barriers to SCA care, and eliminating disparities in SCA care and outcomes. To address many of these challenges, the Duke Center for the Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death at the Duke Clinical Research Institute (Durham, NC) held a think tank meeting on December 7, 2009, convening experts on this issue from clinical cardiology, cardiac electrophysiology, health policy and economics, the US Food and Drug Administration, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality, and device and pharmaceutical manufacturers. The specific goals of the meeting were to examine existing educational tools on SCA for patients, health care providers and the public and explore ways to enhance and disseminate these tools, to propose a framework for improved identification of patients at risk of SCA, and to review the latest data on disparities in SCA care and explore ways to reduce these disparities. This paper summarizes the discussions that occurred at the meeting. PMID:20934553

  9. [Cardiac arrest in dialysis patients: Risk factors, preventive measures and management in 2015].

    PubMed

    Luque, Yosu; Bataille, Aurélien; Taldir, Guillaume; Rondeau, Éric; Ridel, Christophe

    2016-02-01

    Patients undergoing hemodialysis have a 10 to 20 times higher risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) than the general population. Sudden cardiac death is a rare event (approximately 1 event per 10,000 sessions) but has a very high mortality rate. Epidemiological data comes almost exclusively from North American studies; there is a great lack of European data on the subject. Ventricular arrhythmia is the main mechanism of sudden cardiac deaths in dialysis patients. These patients develop increased sensitivity mainly due to a high prevalence of severe ischemic heart disease and left ventricular hypertrophy and to a frequent trigger event: electrolytic and plasma volume shifts during dialysis sessions. Unfortunately, accurate predictive markers of SCA do not exist, however some primary prevention trials using beta-blockers or angiotensin II receptor blockers are encouraging, while the use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators in the population of chronic dialysis patients remains controversial. Identification of patients at risk, minimizing trigger events such as electrolytic shifts and improving team skills in the diagnosis and initial resuscitation with the latest recommendations from 2010 seem necessary to reduce incidence and improve survival in this high risk population. Organization of European studies would also allow a more accurate view of this reality in our dialysis units. PMID:26547563

  10. Assessment of nonpenetrating captive bolt stunning followed by electrical induction of cardiac arrest in veal calves.

    PubMed

    Bartz, B; Collins, M; Stoddard, G; Appleton, A; Livingood, R; Sobcynski, H; Vogel, K D

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of nonpenetrating captive bolt stunning followed by electrical induction of cardiac arrest on veal calf welfare, veal quality, and blood yield. Ninety calves from the same farm were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups in a balanced unpaired comparison design. The first treatment group (the "head-only" method-application of the pneumatic nonpenetrating stun to the frontal plate of the skull at the intersection of 2 imaginary lines extending from the lateral canthus to the opposite poll [CONTROL]) was stunned with a nonpenetrating captive bolt gun ( = 45). The second group ( = 45) was stunned with a nonpenetrating captive bolt gun followed by secondary electrical induction of cardiac arrest (the "head/heart" method-initial application of the pneumatic nonpenetrating captive bolt stun followed by 1 s application of an electrical stun to the ventral region of the ribcage directly caudal to the junction of the humerus and scapula while the stunned calf was in lateral recumbence [HEAD/HEART]). Stunning efficacy was the indicator of animal welfare used in this study. All calves were instantly rendered insensible by the initial stun and did not display common indicators of return to consciousness. For meat quality evaluation, all samples were collected from the 12th rib region of the longissimus thoracis. Meat samples were evaluated for color, drip loss, ultimate pH, cook loss, and Warner-Bratzler shear force. The L* values (measure of meat color lightness) were darker ( < 0.05) in the HEAD/HEART group (45.08 ± 0.72) than the CONTROL group (47.10 ± 0.72). There were no differences ( > 0.05) observed in a* (redness) and b* (yellowness) values between treatments. No differences ( > 0.05) were observed in drip loss, ultimate pH, cook loss, and Warner-Bratzler shear force. The blood yield from the CONTROL group (7,217.9 ± 143.5 g) was greater ( < 0.05) than that from the HEAD/HEART group (6,656.4 ± 143.5 g

  11. Long-term increase in coherence between the basal ganglia and motor cortex after asphyxial cardiac arrest and resuscitation in developing rats

    PubMed Central

    Aravamuthan, Bhooma R.; Shoykhet, Michael

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The basal ganglia are vulnerable to injury during cardiac arrest. Movement disorders are a common morbidity in survivors. Yet, neuronal motor network changes post-arrest remain poorly understood. METHODS We compared function of the motor network in adult rats that, during postnatal week 3, underwent 9.5 min of asphyxial cardiac arrest (n = 9) or sham intervention (n = 8). Six months after injury, we simultaneously recorded local field potentials (LFP) from the primary motor cortex (MCx) and single neuron firing and LFP from the rat entopeduncular nucleus (EPN), which corresponds to the primate globus pallidus pars interna. Data were analyzed for firing rates, power, and coherence between MCx and EPN spike and LFP activity. RESULTS Cardiac arrest survivors display chronic motor deficits. EPN firing rate is lower in cardiac arrest survivors (19.5 ± 2.4 Hz) compared with controls (27.4 ± 2.7 Hz; P < 0.05). Cardiac arrest survivors also demonstrate greater coherence between EPN single neurons and MCx LFP (3—100 Hz; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS This increased coherence indicates abnormal synchrony in the neuronal motor network after cardiac arrest. Increased motor network synchrony is thought to be antikinetic in primary movement disorders. Characterization of motor network synchrony after cardiac arrest may help guide management of post-hypoxic movement disorders. PMID:26083760

  12. Coach, Are You Ready to Save a Life? Injury and Care Knowledge Check for Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plos, Jennifer M.; Polubinsky, Renee L.

    2014-01-01

    Coaches need to become familiar with foundational knowledge on sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), while becoming confident, competent, and proficient in their emergency action plans for using CPR [cardiopulmonary resuscitation] and an AED [automated external defibrillators] to provide immediate and appropriate care to athletes. This article refers to a…

  13. Troponin Marker for Acute Coronary Occlusion and Patient Outcome Following Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, David A.; Wares, Catherine M.; Mayer, Katherine A.; Runyon, Michael S.; Studnek, Jonathan R.; Ward, Shana L.; Kraft, Kathi M.; Heffner, Alan C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The utility of troponin as a marker for acute coronary occlusion and patient outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is unclear. We sought to determine whether initial or peak troponin was associated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), OHCA survival or neurological outcome. Methods Single-center retrospective-cohort study of OHCA patients treated in a comprehensive clinical pathway from November 2007 to October 2012. Troponin I levels were acquired at presentation, four and eight hours after arrest, and then per physician discretion. Cardiac catheterization was at the cardiologist’s discretion. Survival and outcome were determined at hospital discharge, with cerebral performance category score 1–2 defined as a good neurological outcome. Results We enrolled 277 patients; 58% had a shockable rhythm, 44% survived, 41% good neurological outcome. Of the 107 (38%) patients who underwent cardiac catheterization, 30 (28%) had PCI. Initial ED troponin (median, ng/mL) was not different in patients requiring PCI vs no PCI (0.32 vs 0.09, p=0.06), although peak troponin was higher (4.19 versus 1.57, p=0.02). Of the 85 patients who underwent cardiac catheterization without STEMI (n=85), there was no difference in those who received PCI vs no PCI in initial troponin (0.22 vs 0.06, p=0.40) or peak troponin (2.58 vs 1.43, p=0.27). Regarding outcomes, there was no difference in initial troponin in survivors versus non-survivors (0.09 vs 0.22, p=0.11), or those with a good versus poor neurological outcome (0.09 vs 0.20, p=0.11). Likewise, there was no difference in peak troponin in survivors versus non-survivors (1.64 vs 1.23, p=0.07), or in those with a good versus poor neurological outcome (1.57 vs 1.26, p=0.14). Conclusion In our single-center patient cohort, peak troponin, but not initial troponin, was associated with higher likelihood of PCI, while neither initial nor peak troponin were associated with survival or neurological outcome in

  14. Breakthrough in cardiac arrest: reports from the 4th Paris International Conference.

    PubMed

    Kudenchuk, Peter J; Sandroni, Claudio; Drinhaus, Hendrik R; Böttiger, Bernd W; Cariou, Alain; Sunde, Kjetil; Dworschak, Martin; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Deye, Nicolas; Friberg, Hans; Laureys, Steven; Ledoux, Didier; Oddo, Mauro; Legriel, Stéphane; Hantson, Philippe; Diehl, Jean-Luc; Laterre, Pierre-Francois

    2015-12-01

    Jean-Luc Diehl The French Intensive Care Society organized on 5th and 6th June 2014 its 4th "Paris International Conference in Intensive Care", whose principle is to bring together the best international experts on a hot topic in critical care medicine. The 2014 theme was "Breakthrough in cardiac arrest", with many high-quality updates on epidemiology, public health data, pre-hospital and in-ICU cares. The present review includes short summaries of the major presentations, classified into six main chapters: Epidemiology of CA Pre-hospital management Post-resuscitation management: targeted temperature management Post-resuscitation management: optimizing organ perfusion and metabolic parameters Neurological assessment of brain damages Public healthcare. PMID:26380990

  15. Protocol for meta‐analysis of temperature reduction in animal models of cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Olai, H.; Thornéus, G.; Macleod, M.R.; Friberg, H.; Rhodes, J.; Nielsen, N.; Cronberg, T.; Deierborg, T.

    2016-01-01

    Targeted temperature management (TTM) of 32–34 °C has been the standard treatment for out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest since clinical trials in 2002 showed benefits to survival and neurological outcome. Recently, this treatment has been challenged by another clinical trial showing no difference in outcome between TTM of 33 °C and 36 °C. This protocol describes the methodology for a meta‐analysis detailing temperature‐reducing interventions to treat global ischaemia in animal models. By combining relevant data sets in the literature, we will explore the experimental evidence for TTM. Our aims are to explain possible translational gaps and provide methodological considerations for future experimental research and clinical trials. PMID:27610239

  16. Implementation of near-infrared spectroscopy in a rat model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Juan G.; Xiao, Feng; Ferrara, Davon; Ewing, Jennifer; Zhang, Shu; Alexander, Steven; Battarbee, Harold

    2002-07-01

    Transient global cerebral ischemia accompanying cardiac arrest (CA) often leads to permanent brain damage with poor neurological outcome. The precise chain of events underlying the cerebral damage after CA is still not fully understood. Progress in this area may profit from the development of new non-invasive tools that provide real-time information on the vascular and cellular processes preceding the damage. One way to assess these processes is through near-IR spectroscopy, which has demonstrated the ability to quantify changes in blood volume, hemoglobin oxygenation, cytochrome oxidase redox state, and tissue water content. Here we report on the successful implementation of this form of spectroscopy in a rat model of asphyxial CA and resuscitation, under hypothermic and normothermic conditions. Preliminary results are shown that provide a new temporal insight into the cerebral circulation during CA and post-resuscitation.

  17. Nonextensive entropy measure of EEG following brain injury from cardiac arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, S.; Bezerianos, A.; Paul, J.; Zhu, Y.; Thakor, N.

    2002-03-01

    The nonextensive entropy measure is developed to study the electroencephalogram (EEG) during the recovery of the brain's electrical function from asphyxic cardiac arrest (ACA) injury. The statistical characteristics of the Tsallis-like time-dependent entropy (TDE) for different signal distributions are investigated. Both the mean and the variance of TDE show good specificity to the ACA brain injury and its recovery. ACA brain injury results in a decrease in entropy while a good electrophysiological recovery shows a rapid return to a higher entropy level. There is a reduction in the mean and increase in the variance of TDE after brain injury followed by a gradual recovery upon resuscitation. The nonextensive TDE is expected to provide a novel quantitative EEG strategy for monitoring the brain states.

  18. Long range correlations in the heart rate variability following the injury of cardiac arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Shanbao; Jiang, Dineng; Wang, Ziming; Zhu, Yisheng; Geocadin, Romeryko G.; Thakor, Nitish V.

    2007-07-01

    Cardiovascular and neurological recovery following cardiac arrest (CA) largely influence the morbidity and mortality of the patients. Monitoring the cardiovascular system has been an important clinical issue in intensive care unit (ICU). On the other hand, the rhythms of the heart rate variability following CA are still not fully understood, and there are limited number of literatures reporting the cardiovascular function recovery following CA. In this paper, we studied the scaling properties of heart rate variability (HRV) after CA by centered-moving-average-based detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). Our results showed that the scaling factor of the baseline HRV is close to that of Brownian motion, and after a CA event it shifts to a 1/f noise-like rhythm. DFA could be a promising tool in evaluating the cardiovascular long term recovery following CA injury.

  19. Activation of mitochondrial STAT-3 and reduced mitochondria damage during hypothermia treatment for post-cardiac arrest myocardial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Hua; Tsai, Min-Shan; Chiang, Chih-Yen; Su, Yu-Jen; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chang, Wei-Tien; Chen, Huei-Wen; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2015-11-01

    While therapeutic hypothermia improves the outcomes of individuals in cardiac arrest, the hemodynamic responses and mechanisms which underlie hypothermia-induced cardioprotection are not fully understood. Therefore, we investigated the mechanism by which induced hypothermia preserves cardiac function and protects against mitochondrial damage following cardiac arrest. Cardiac arrest was induced in adult male Wistar rats by asphyxiation for 8.5 min. Following resuscitation, the animals were randomly assigned to a hypothermia (32 °C) or normothermia (37 °C) group. Monitoring results showed that cardiac output at the fourth hour after resuscitation was significantly better in rats treated with hypothermia when compared to rats treated with normothermia (P < 0.01). Examinations by transmission electron microscopy showed that mitochondria in the left ventricle of rats in the hypothermia group were significantly less swollen compared to such mitochondria in the normothermia group (P < 0.001). Additionally, opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pores occurred less frequently in the hypothermic group. While complex I/III activity in the electron transport reaction was damaged after cardiac arrest and resuscitation, the degree of injury was ameliorated by hypothermia treatment (P < 0.05). The amount of STAT-3 phosphorylated at tyrosine 705 and its expression in mitochondria were significantly higher under hypothermia treatment compared to normothermia treatment. In vitro studies showed that inhibition STAT-3 activation abolished the ability of hypothermia to protect H9C2 cardiomyocytes against injury produced by simulated ischemia and reperfusion. Therapeutic hypothermia treatment can ameliorate cardiac dysfunction and help preserve both mitochondrial integrity and electron transport activity. PMID:26471891

  20. Mechanical Chest Compressions in Prolonged Cardiac Arrest due to ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction Can Cause Myocardial Contusion.

    PubMed

    Stechovsky, Cyril; Hajek, Petr; Cipro, Simon; Veselka, Josef

    2016-09-01

    Acute coronary syndrome is a common cause of sudden cardiac death. We present a case report of a 60-year-old man without a history of coronary artery disease who presented with ST-elevation myocardial infarction. During transportation to the hospital, he developed ventricular fibrillation (VF) and later pulseless electrical activity. Chest compressions with LUCAS 2 (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) automated mechanical compression-decompression device were initiated. Coronary angiography showed total occlusion of the left main coronary artery and primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was performed. After the PCI, his heart started to generate effective contractions and LUCAS could be discontinued. Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved after 90 minutes of cardiac arrest. The patient died of cardiogenic shock 11 hours later. An autopsy revealed a transmural anterolateral myocardial infarction but also massive subepicardial hemorrhage and interstitial edema and hemorrhages on histologic samples from regions of the myocardium outside the infarction itself and also from the right ventricle. These lesions were concluded to be a myocardial contusion. The true incidence of myocardial contusion as a consequence of mechanical chest compressions is not known. We speculate that severe myocardial contusion might have influenced outcome of our patient. PMID:27574387

  1. When, where and how to initiate hypothermia after adult cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Taccone, F S; Donadello, K; Beumier, M; Scolletta, S

    2011-09-01

    Therapeutich hypothermia (TH) has been shown to improve neurological outcome and survival after witnessed cardiac arrest (CA) that is due to ventricular fibrillation. Although TH is widely used following witnessed CA as well as all forms of initial rhythm, the mortality rate after CA remains unacceptably high, and additional study is needed to understand when and how to implement hypothermia in the post-resuscitation phase. Experimental studies have emphasized the importance of initiating cooling soon after the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or even during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Clinical studies have shown that pre-hospital induction of hypothermia is feasible and has no major adverse events-even when used intra-arrest-and may provide some additional benefits compared to delayed in-hospital cooling. Thus, hypothermia use should not be limited to the Intensive Care Unit but can be initiated in the field/ambulance or in the Emergency Department, then continued after hospital admission- even during specific procedures such as coronary angiography-as part of the global management of CA patients. Various methods (both non-invasive and invasive) are available to achieve and maintain the target temperature; however, only some of these methods-which include cold fluids, ice packs, iced pads and helmet and trans-nasal cooling- are easily deployed in the pre-hospital setting. PMID:21878875

  2. Impact of a novel, resource appropriate resuscitation curriculum on Nicaraguan resident physician’s management of cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Project Strengthening Emergency Medicine, Investing in Learners in Latin America (SEMILLA) created a novel, language and resource appropriate course for the resuscitation of cardiac arrest for Nicaraguan resident physicians. We hypothesized that participation in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation program would significantly improve the physician’s management of simulated code scenarios. Methods: Thirteen Nicaraguan resident physicians were evaluated while managing simulated cardiac arrest scenarios before, immediately, and at 6 months after participating in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation program. This project was completed in 2014 in Leon, Nicaragua. The Cardiac Arrest Simulation Test (CASTest), a validated scoring system, was used to evaluate performance on a standardized simulated cardiac arrest scenario. Mixed effect logistic regression models were constructed to assess outcomes. Results: On the pre-course simulation exam, only 7.7% of subjects passed the test. Immediately post-course, the subjects achieved a 30.8% pass rate and at 6 months after the course, the pass rate was 46.2%. Compared with pre-test scores, the odds of passing the CASTest at 6 months after the course were 21.7 times higher (95% CI 4.2 to 112.8, P<0.001). Statistically significant improvement was also seen on the number of critical items completed (OR=3.75, 95% CI 2.71-5.19), total items completed (OR=4.55, 95% CI 3.4-6.11), and number of “excellent” scores on a Likert scale (OR=2.66, 95% CI 1.85-3.81). Conclusions: Nicaraguan resident physicians demonstrate improved ability to manage simulated cardiac arrest scenarios after participation in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation course and retain these skills. PMID:27378010

  3. Calmodulin 2 Mutation N98S Is Associated with Unexplained Cardiac Arrest in Infants Due to Low Clinical Penetrance Electrical Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Jáimez, Juan; Palomino Doza, Julián; Ortega, Ángeles; Macías-Ruiz, Rosa; Perin, Francesca; Rodríguez-Vázquez del Rey, M. Mar; Ortiz-Genga, Martín; Monserrat, Lorenzo; Barriales-Villa, Roberto; Blanca, Enrique; Álvarez, Miguel; Tercedor, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background Calmodulin 1, 2 and 3 (CALM) mutations have been found to cause cardiac arrest in children at a very early age. The underlying aetiology described is long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) and idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (IVF). Little phenotypical data about CALM2 mutations is available. Objectives The aim of this paper is to describe the clinical manifestations of the Asn98Ser mutation in CALM2 in two unrelated children in southern Spain with apparently unexplained cardiac arrest/death. Methods Two unrelated children aged 4 and 7, who were born to healthy parents, were studied. Both presented with sudden cardiac arrest. The first was resuscitated after a VF episode, and the second died suddenly. In both cases the baseline QTc interval was within normal limits. Peripheral blood DNA was available to perform targeted gene sequencing. Results The surviving 4-year-old girl had a positive epinephrine test for LQTS, and polymorphic ventricular ectopic beats were seen on a previous 24-hour Holter recording from the deceased 7-year-old boy, suggestive of a possible underlying CPVT phenotype. A p.Asn98Ser mutation in CALM2 was detected in both cases. This affected a highly conserved across species residue, and the location in the protein was adjacent to critical calcium binding loops in the calmodulin carboxyl-terminal domain, predicting a high pathogenic effect. Conclusions Human calmodulin 2 mutation p.Asn98Ser is associated with sudden cardiac death in childhood with a variable clinical penetrance. Our results provide new phenotypical information about clinical behaviour of this mutation. PMID:27100291

  4. Effects of Intraosseous Tibial vs. Intravenous Vasopressin in a Hypovolemic Cardiac Arrest Model

    PubMed Central

    Fulkerson, Justin; Lowe, Robert; Anderson, Tristan; Moore, Heather; Craig, William; Johnson, Don

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study compared the effects of vasopressin via tibial intraosseous (IO) and intravenous (IV) routes on maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), the time to maximum concentration (Tmax), return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and time to ROSC in a hypovolemic cardiac arrest model. Methods This study was a randomized prospective, between-subjects experimental design. A computer program randomly assigned 28 Yorkshire swine to one of four groups: IV (n=7), IO tibia (n=7), cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) + defibrillation (n=7), and a control group that received just CPR (n=7). Ventricular fibrillation was induced, and subjects remained in arrest for two minutes. CPR was initiated and 40 units of vasopressin were administered via IO or IV routes. Blood samples were collected at 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, and 4 minutes. CPR and defibrillation were initiated for 20 minutes or until ROSC was achieved. We measured vasopressin concentrations using high-performance liquid chromatography. Results There was no significant difference between the IO and IV groups relative to achieving ROSC (p=1.0) but a significant difference between the IV compared to the CPR+ defibrillation group (p=0.031) and IV compared to the CPR-only group (p=0.001). There was a significant difference between the IO group compared to the CPR+ defibrillation group (p=0.031) and IO compared to the CPR-only group (p=0.001). There was no significant difference between the CPR + defibrillation group and the CPR group (p=0.127). There was no significant difference in Cmax between the IO and IV groups (p=0.079). The mean ± standard deviation of Cmax of the IO group was 58,709±25, 463pg/mL compared to the IV group, which was 106,198±62, 135pg/mL. There was no significant difference in mean Tmax between the groups (p=0.084). There were no significant differences in odds of ROSC between the tibial IO and IV groups. Conclusion Prompt access to the vascular system using the IO route can circumvent

  5. Physician presence in an ambulance car is associated with increased survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a prospective cohort analysis.

    PubMed

    Hagihara, Akihito; Hasegawa, Manabu; Abe, Takeru; Nagata, Takashi; Nabeshima, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    The presence of a physician seems to be beneficial for pre-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. However, the effectiveness of a physician's presence during CPR before hospital arrival has not been established. We conducted a prospective, non-randomized, observational study using national data from out-of-hospital cardiac arrests between 2005 and 2010 in Japan. We performed a propensity analysis and examined the association between a physician's presence during an ambulance car ride and short- and long-term survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Specifically, a full non-parsimonious logistic regression model was fitted with the physician presence in the ambulance as the dependent variable; the independent variables included all study variables except for endpoint variables plus dummy variables for the 47 prefectures in Japan (i.e., 46 variables). In total, 619,928 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases that met the inclusion criteria were analyzed. Among propensity-matched patients, a positive association was observed between a physician's presence during an ambulance car ride and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) before hospital arrival, 1-month survival, and 1-month survival with minimal neurological or physical impairment (ROSC: OR = 1.84, 95% CI 1.63-2.07, p = 0.00 in adjusted for propensity and all covariates); 1-month survival: OR = 1.29, 95% CI 1.04-1.61, p = 0.02 in adjusted for propensity and all covariates); cerebral performance category (1 or 2): OR = 1.54, 95% CI 1.03-2.29, p = 0.04 in adjusted for propensity and all covariates); and overall performance category (1 or 2): OR = 1.50, 95% CI 1.01-2.24, p = 0.05 in adjusted for propensity and all covariates). A prospective observational study using national data from out-of-hospital cardiac arrests shows that a physician's presence during an ambulance car ride was independently associated with increased

  6. Cerebral resuscitation after cardiac arrest using hetastarch hemodilution, hyperbaric oxygenation and magnesium ion.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, E; Brunette, D D; Robinson, E P; Tomlinson, M J; Lange, J; Wieland, M J; Sherman, R

    1986-12-01

    This study was done to investigate the effects of hemodilution, hyperbaric oxygenation, and magnesium sulfate on cerebral resuscitation. Sixteen mongrel dogs were anesthetized, and monitored via pulmonary artery catheter, arterial catheter and electrocardiogram. A left lateral thoracotomy was done. Ventricular fibrillation was obtained by application of a 6-volt AC current. Mechanical ventilation was stopped. Total arrest time was 12 min. All dogs were cardiac resuscitated within 6 min using internal massage, ventilation, bicarbonate, epinephrine and internal defibrillation. The animals were then randomized into three groups. Group I represented controls, and were not treated. Group II dogs received normvolemic hemodilution using hetastarch (Hespan) containing magnesium sulfate (2000 mg/l), resulting in a hematocrit of 20%-30%. Group III dogs received the above hemodilution plus compression in a hyperbaric oxygen chamber to 2 atmospheres absolute. Critical care management and hourly neurologic scoring was performed for 7 days by blinded observers. All dogs at the time of death underwent autopsies for gross study. Data analysis revealed no statistical difference among the three groups with respect to survival time, cardiac function or neurologic scoring. PMID:2433721

  7. Cerebral performance category at hospital discharge predicts long-term survival of cardiac arrest survivors receiving targeted temperature management

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Cindy H.; Li, Jiaqi; Cinousis, Marisa J.; Sheak, Kelsey R.; Gaieski, David F.; Abella, Benjamin S.; Leary, Marion

    2014-01-01

    Objective Despite recent advancements in post-cardiac arrest resuscitation, the optimal measurement of post-arrest outcome remains unclear. We hypothesized that cerebral performance category (CPC) score can predict the long-term outcome of post- arrest survivors who received targeted temperature management (TTM) during their post-arrest hospital care. Design Retrospective chart review. Setting Two academic medical centers from May, 2005 to December, 2012. Patients The medical records of 2,417 out-of-hospital and in-hospital post-cardiac arrest patients were reviewed to identify 140 out of 582 survivors who received TTM. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results The CPC scores at hospital discharge were determined by three independent abstractors. The 1-month, 6-month, and 12-month survival of these patients were determined by reviewing hospital records, querying the Social Security Death Index, and follow-up telephone calls. The unadjusted long-term survival and adjusted survival association with CPC were calculated. Of the 2,417 identified cardiac arrest patients, 24.1% (582/2417) were successfully resuscitated, of whom 24.1% (140/582) received post-arrest TTM. Overall, 42.9% (60/140) were discharged with CPC 1, 27.1% (38/140) with CPC 2, 18.6% (26/140) with CPC 3, and 11.4% (16/140) with CPC 4. CPC 1 survivors had the highest long-term survival followed by CPC 2 and 3, with CPC 4 having the lowest long-term survival (p < 0.001, log-rank test). We found that CPC 3 (hazard ratio = 3.62, p < 0.05) and CPC 4 (hazard ratio = 12.73, p <0.001) remained associated with worse survival after adjusting for age, gender, race, shockable rhythm, time to TTM initiation, total duration of resuscitation, withdrawal of care, and location of arrest. Conclusion Patients with different CPC scores at discharge have significantly different survival trajectories. Favorable CPC at hospital discharge predicts better long-term outcomes of cardiac arrest survivors who received TTM

  8. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Use in Cardiac Arrest Secondary to Fulminant Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Yousuf, Tariq; Brinton, Taylor; Ahmed, Khansa; Iskander, Joy; Woznicka, Daniel; Kramer, Jason; Kopiec, Adam; Chadaga, Amar R.; Ortiz, Kathia

    2016-01-01

    Background Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is used emergently to dissolve thrombi in the treatment of fulminant pulmonary embolism. Currently, there is a relative contraindication to tPA in the setting of traumatic or prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation > 10 minutes because of the risk of massive hemorrhage. Methods Our single-center, retrospective study investigated patients experiencing cardiac arrest (CA) secondary to pulmonary embolus. We compared the effectiveness of advanced cardiac life support with the administration of tPA vs. the standard of care consisting of advanced cardiac life support without thrombolysis. The primary endpoint was survival to discharge. Secondary endpoints were return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), major bleeding, and minor bleeding. Results We analyzed 42 patients, of whom 19 received tPA during CA. Patients who received tPA were not associated with a statistically significant increase in survival to discharge (10.5% vs. 8.7%, P = 1.00) or ROSC (47.4% vs. 47.8%, P = 0.98) compared to the control group. We observed no statistically significant difference between the groups in major bleeding events (5.3% in the tPA group vs. 4.3% in the control group, P = 1.00) and minor bleeding events (10.5% in the tPA group vs. 0.0% in the control group, P = 0.11). Conclusion This study did not find a statistically significant difference in survival to discharge or in ROSC in patients treated with tPA during CA compared to patients treated with standard therapy. However, because no significant difference was found in major or minor bleeding, we suggest that the potential therapeutic benefits of this medication should not be limited by the potential for massive hemorrhage. Larger prospective studies are warranted to define the efficacy and safety profile of thrombolytic use in this population. PMID:26858790

  9. Chemoreflexsensitivity in patients with survived sudden cardiac arrest and prior myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hennersdorf, M G; Perings, C; Niebch, V; Hillebrand, S; Vester, E G; Strauer, B E

    2000-04-01

    For evaluation of patients with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death, the analyses of ventricular late potentials, heart rate variability, and baroreflexsensitivity are helpful. But so far, the prediction of a malignant arrhythmic event is not possible with sufficient accuracy. For a better risk stratification other methods are necessary. In this study the importance of the ChRS for the identification of patients at risk for ventricular tachyarrhythmic events should be investigated. Of 41 patients included in the study, 26 were survivors of sudden cardiac arrest. Fifteen patients were not resuscitated, of whom 6 patients had documented monomorphic ventricular tachycardia and 9 had no ventricular tachyarrhythmias in their prior history. All patients had a history of an old myocardial infarction (> 1 year ago). For determination of the ChRS the ratio between the difference of the RR intervals in the ECG and the venous pO2 before and after a 5-minute oxygen inhalation via a nose mask was measured (ms/mmHg). The 26 patients with survived sudden cardiac death showed a significantly decreased ChRS compared to those patients without a tachyarrhythmic event (1.74 +/- 1.02 vs 6.97 +/- 7.14 ms/mmHg, P < 0.0001). The sensitivity concerning a survived sudden cardiac death amounted to 88% for a ChRS below 3.0 ms/mmHg. During a 12-month follow-up period, the ChRS was significantly different between patients with and without an arrhythmic event (1.64 +/- 1.06 vs 4.82 +/- 5.83 ms/mmHg, P < 0.01). As a further method for evaluation of patients with increased risk of sudden cardiac death after myocardial infarction the analysis of ChRS seems to be suitable and predicts arrhythmias possibly more sensitive than other tests of neurovegetative imbalance. The predictive importance has to be examined by prospective investigations in larger patient populations. PMID:10793434

  10. Quantifying the effect of cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality on cardiac arrest outcome: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Sarah K; Abella, Benjamin S; Becker, Lance B

    2013-03-01

    Background- Evidence has accrued that cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality affects cardiac arrest outcome. However, the relative contributions of chest compression components (such as rate and depth) to successful resuscitation remain unclear. Methods and Results- We sought to measure the effect of cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality on cardiac arrest outcome through systematic review and meta-analysis. We searched for any clinical study assessing cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance on adult cardiac arrest patients in which survival was a reported outcome, either return of spontaneous circulation or survival to admission or discharge. Of 603 identified abstracts, 10 studies met inclusion criteria. Effect sizes were reported as mean differences. Missing data were resolved by author contact. Estimates were segregated by cardiopulmonary resuscitation metric (chest compression rate, depth, no-flow fraction, and ventilation rate), and a random-effects model was applied to estimate an overall pooled effect. Arrest survivors were significantly more likely to have received deeper chest compressions than nonsurvivors (mean difference, 2.44 mm; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-3.69 [P<0.001]; n=6 studies; I(2)=0.0%; P for heterogeneity=0.9). Likewise, survivors were significantly more likely to have received chest compression rates closer to 85 to 100 compressions per minute (cpm) than nonsurvivors (absolute mean difference from 85 cpm, -4.81 cpm; 95% confidence interval, -8.19 to -1.43 [P=0.005]; from 100 cpm, -5.04 cpm; 95% confidence interval, -8.44 to -1.65 [P=0.004]; n=6 studies; I(2)<49%; P for heterogeneity >0.2). No significant difference in no-flow fraction (n=7 studies) or ventilation rate (n=4 studies) was detected between survivors and nonsurvivors. Conclusions- Deeper chest compressions and rates closer to 85 to 100 cpm are significantly associated with improved survival from cardiac arrest. PMID:23481533

  11. Sonography in Hypotension and Cardiac Arrest (SHoC): Rates of Abnormal Findings in Undifferentiated Hypotension and During Cardiac Arrest as a Basis for Consensus on a Hierarchical Point of Care Ultrasound Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Milne, James; Lewis, David; Fraser, Jacqueline; Diegelmann, Laura; Olszynski, Paul; Stander, Melanie; Lamprecht, Hein

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Point of care ultrasound (PoCUS) has become an established tool in the initial management of patients with undifferentiated hypotension. Current established protocols (RUSH and ACES) were developed by expert user opinion, rather than objective, prospective data. PoCUS also provides invaluable information during resuscitation efforts in cardiac arrest by determining presence/absence of cardiac activity and identifying reversible causes such as pericardial tamponade. There is no agreed guideline on how to safely and effectively incorporate PoCUS into the advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) algorithm. We wished to report disease incidence as a basis to develop a hierarchical approach to PoCUS in hypotension and during cardiac arrest. Methods We summarized the recorded incidence of PoCUS findings from the initial cohort during the interim analysis of two prospective studies. We propose that this will form the basis for developing a modified Delphi approach incorporating this data to obtain the input of a panel of international experts associated with five professional organizations led by the International Federation of Emergency Medicine (IFEM). The modified Delphi tool will be developed to reach an international consensus on how to integrate PoCUS for hypotensive emergency department patients as well as into cardiac arrest algorithms. Results Rates of abnormal PoCUS findings from 151 patients with undifferentiated hypotension included left ventricular dynamic changes (43%), IVC abnormalities (27%), pericardial effusion (16%), and pleural fluid (8%). Abdominal pathology was rare (fluid 5%, AAA 2%). During cardiac arrest there were no pericardial effusions, however abnormalities of ventricular contraction (45%) and valvular motion (39%) were common among the 43 patients included. Conclusions A prospectively collected disease incidence-based hierarchy of scanning can be developed based on the reported findings. This will inform an international consensus

  12. Effect of Crew Size on Objective Measures of Resuscitation for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Gill, Christian; Guyette, Francis X.; Rittenberger, Jon C.

    2010-01-01

    Background There is no consensus among emergency medical services (EMS) systems as to the optimal numbers and training of EMS providers who respond to the scene of prehospital cardiac arrests. Increased numbers of providers may improve the performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), but this has not been studied as part of a comprehensive resuscitation scenario. Objective To compare different all-paramedic crew size configurations on objective measures of patient resuscitation using a high-fidelity human simulator. Methods We compared two-, three-, and four- person all-paramedic crew configurations in the effectiveness and timeliness of performing basic life support (BLS) and advanced life support (ALS) skills during the first 8 minutes of a simulated cardiac arrest scenario. Crews were compared to determine differences in no-flow fraction (NFF) as a measure of effectiveness of CPR and time to defibrillation, endotracheal intubation, establishment of intravenous access, and medication administration. Results There was no significant difference in mean NFF among the two-, three-, and four-provider crew configurations (0.32, 0.26, and 0.27, respectively; p = 0.105). More three- and four-person groups completed ALS procedures during the scenario, but there was no significant difference in time to performance of BLS or ALS procedures among the crew size configurations for completed procedures. There was a trend toward lower time to intubation with increasing group size, though this was not significant using a Bonferroni-corrected p-value of 0.01 (379, 316, and 263 seconds, respectively; p = 0.018). Conclusion This study found no significant difference in effectiveness of CPR or in time to performance of BLS or ALS procedures among crew size configurations, though there was a trend toward decreased time to intubation with increased crew size. Effectiveness of CPR may be hindered by distractions related to the performance of ALS procedures with increasing group

  13. Coronary Perfusion Pressure and Return of Spontaneous Circulation after Prolonged Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Joshua C.; Salcido, David D.; Menegazzi, James J.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The amount of myocardial perfusion required for successful defibrillation after prolonged cardiac arrest is not known. Coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) is a surrogate for myocardial perfusion. One limited clinical study reported that a threshold of 15 mmHg was necessary for return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and that CPP was predictive of ROSC. A distinction between threshold and dose of CPP has not been reported. Objective To test the hypothesis that swine achieving ROSC will have higher preshock mean CPP and higher preshock area under the CPP curve (AUC) than swine not attaining ROSC. Methods Data from four similar swine cardiac arrest studies were retrospectively pooled. Animals had undergone 8–11 minutes of untreated ventricular fibrillation, 2 minutes of mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), administration of drugs, and 3 more minutes of CPR prior to the first shock. Mean CPP ± standard error of the mean (SEM) was derived from the last 20 compressions of each 30-second epoch of CPR and compared between ROSC/no-ROSC groups by repeated-measures analysis of variance (RM-ANOVA). AUC for all compressions delivered over the 5 minutes was calculated by direct summation and compared by Kruskal-Wallis test. Prediction of ROSC was assessed by logistic regression. Results Throughout the first 5 minutes of CPR (n = 80), mean CPP ± SEM was consistently higher in animals with ROSC (n = 63) (maximum CPP 41.2 ± 0.6 mmHg) than animals with no ROSC (maximum CPP 20.1 ± 0.3 mmHg) (p = 0.0001). Animals with ROSC received more total reperfusion (43.9 ± 17.6 mmHg × 102) than animals without ROSC (21.4 ± 13.7 mmHg × 102) (p < 0.001). Two regression models identified CPP (odds ratio [OR] 1.11; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05, 1.18) and AUC (OR 1.10; 95% CI 1.05, 1.16) as predictors of ROSC. Experimental study also predicted ROSC in each model (OR 1.70; 95% CI 1.15, 2.50; and OR 1.59; 95% CI 1.12, 2.25, respectively). Conclusion Higher CPP

  14. Dextrose containing intravenous fluid impairs outcome and increases death after eight minutes of cardiac arrest and resuscitation in dogs.

    PubMed

    D'Alecy, L G; Lundy, E F; Barton, K J; Zelenock, G B

    1986-09-01

    Use of dextrose in intravenous resuscitation fluids is common practice; however, this study indicates that 5% dextrose solutions, even if administered in physiologic quantities, greatly worsens the outcome of survivable cardiac arrest. Twelve adult male mongrel dogs were premedicated with morphine, anesthetized with halothane, instrumented, intubated, and ventilated. Each dog was first given 500 ml of either lactated Ringer's (LR) (n = 6) or 5% dextrose in LR (D5LR) (n = 6). Halothane was stopped and fibrillation was induced (60 Hz). Blood glucose just before cardiac arrest was 129 mg/dl in the LR dogs and was increased to 335 mg/dl in the D5LR dogs. After eight minutes of arrest, resuscitation, including internal cardiac massage and standard advanced cardiac life support drug protocols (modified for dogs), was begun. When stable cardiac rhythm was obtained, the chest was closed, and LR or D5LR continued until a total of 1L was given. A neurologic score (0 = normal to 100 = dead) was assigned at 1, 2, 6, and 24 hours. The LR group did not differ statistically from the D5LR group in operative time, number of defibrillatory shocks, time to spontaneous ventilation, time to extubation, or drugs required. Resuscitation was successful in all six LR and five of six D5LR group; however, by 2 hours after resuscitation and thereafter, D5LR group had a significantly greater neurologic deficit (p less than 0.05) than did the LR group. By 9 hours, four of six D5LR dogs displayed convulsive activity and died. At 24 hours the D5LR group had a greater (p less than 0.008) neurologic deficit (82 +/- 11) than did the LR group (21 +/- 7), which walked and ate. We conclude that the addition of 5% dextrose to standard intravenous fluids greatly increases the morbidity and mortality associated with cardiac resuscitation. PMID:3738770

  15. Short-term Exposure to Microgravity and the Associated Risk of Sudden Cardiac Arrest: Implications for Commercial Spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laing, Kevin J. C.; Russamono, Thais

    2013-02-01

    The likelihood of trained astronauts developing a life threatening cardiac event during spaceflight is relatively rare, whilst the incidence in untrained individuals is unknown. Space tourists who live a sedentary lifestyle have reduced cardiovascular function, but the associated danger of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) during a suborbital spaceflight (SOSF) is unclear. Risk during SOSF was examined by reviewing several microgravity studies and methods of determining poor cardiovascular condition. Accurately assessing cardiovascular function and improving baroreceptor sensitivity through exercise is suggested to reduce the incidence of SCA during future SOSFs. Future studies will benefit from past participants sharing medical history; allowing creation of risk profiles and suitable guidelines.

  16. The Use of Pre-Hospital Mild Hypothermia after Resuscitation from Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Olsufka, Michele; Nichol, Graham; Copass, Michael K.; Cobb, Leonard A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Hypothermia has emerged as a potent neuroprotective modality following resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Although delayed hospital cooling has been demonstrated to improve outcome after cardiac arrest, in-field cooling begun immediately following the return of spontaneous circulation may be more beneficial. Cooling in the field following resuscitation, however, presents new challenges, in that the cooling method has to be portable, safe, and effective. Rapid infusion of intravenous fluid at 4°C, the use of a cooling helmet, and cooling plates have all been proposed as methods for field cooling, and are all in various stages of clinical and animal testing. Whether field cooling will improve survival and neurologic outcome remains an important unanswered clinical question. PMID:19072587

  17. The use of pre-hospital mild hypothermia after resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Kim, Francis; Olsufka, Michele; Nichol, Graham; Copass, Michael K; Cobb, Leonard A

    2009-03-01

    Hypothermia has emerged as a potent neuroprotective modality following resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Although delayed hospital cooling has been demonstrated to improve outcome after cardiac arrest, in-field cooling begun immediately following the return of spontaneous circulation may be more beneficial. Cooling in the field following resuscitation, however, presents new challenges, in that the cooling method has to be portable, safe, and effective. Rapid infusion of intravenous fluid at 4 degrees C, the use of a cooling helmet, and cooling plates have all been proposed as methods for field cooling, and are all in various stages of clinical and animal testing. Whether field cooling will improve survival and neurologic outcome remains an important unanswered clinical question. PMID:19072587

  18. “Reading Between the Lines” of Flowsheet Data: Nurses' Optional Documentation Associated with Cardiac Arrest Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Sarah A.; Vawdrey, David K.

    2011-01-01

    Historically, short ‘comments’ on paper-based flowsheets conveyed the patient's overall clinical state. We analyzed the content and documentation patterns of electronic health record flowsheets for 201 cardiac arrest patients. Free-text comments were associated with the abnormality of clinical measurements (p<0.05). The documentation of 3 or more comments for acute care patients was associated with a greater likelihood of dying by discharge (p<0.01). Documentation of ICU vital signs greater than the minimum hourly requirement was associated with increased survival of a cardiac arrest (p<0.05). Further analysis of such patterns may be useful for the measurement of nursing knowledge and surveillance activities, interdisciplinary communication tools, and clinical decision making. PMID:22079746

  19. Feasibility of Cognitive Functional Assessment in Cardiac Arrest Survivors Using an Abbreviated Laptop-Based Neurocognitive Battery

    PubMed Central

    Iannacone, Stephen; Esposito, Emily C.; Ruparel, Kosha; Savitt, Adam; Mott, Allison; Richard, Jan A.; Gur, Ruben C.; Abella, Benjamin S.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest survivors exhibit varying degrees of neurological recovery even in the setting of targeted temperature management (TTM) use, ranging from severe impairments to making a seemingly full return to neurologic baseline function. We sought to explore the feasibility of utilizing a laptop-based neurocognitive battery to identify more subtle cognitive deficits in this population. In a convenience sample of cardiac arrest survivors discharged with a cerebral performance category (CPC) of 1, we evaluated the use of a computerized neurocognitive battery (CNB) in this group compared to a healthy control normative population. The CNB was designed to test 11 specific neurocognitive domains, including such areas as working memory and spatial processing. Testing was scored for both accuracy and speed. In a feasibility convenience sample of 29 cardiac arrest survivors, the mean age was 52.9±16.7 years; 12 patients received postarrest TTM and 17 did not receive TTM. Patients tolerated the battery well and performed at normative levels for both accuracy and speed on most of the 11 domains, but showed reduced accuracy of working memory and speed of spatial memory with large magnitudes (>1 SD), even among those receiving TTM. Across all domains, including those using speed and accuracy, 7 of the 29 subjects (24%) achieved statistically significant scores lower from the normative population in two or more domains. In this population of CPC 1 cardiac arrest survivors, a sensitive neurocognitive battery was feasible and suggests that specific cognitive deficits can be detected compared to a normative population, despite CPC 1 designation. Such testing might allow improved measurement of outcomes following TTM interventions in future trials. PMID:25010524

  20. A novel mouse model of pediatric cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation reveals age-dependent neuronal sensitivities to ischemic injury

    PubMed Central

    Deng, G; Yonchek, JC; Quillinan, N; Strnad, FA; Exo, J; Herson, PS; Traystman, RJ

    2014-01-01

    Background Pediatric sudden cardiac arrest (CA) is an unfortunate and devastating condition, often leading to poor neurologic outcomes. However, little experimental data on the pathophysiology of pediatric CA is currently available due to the scarcity of animal models. New Method We developed a novel experimental model of pediatric cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CA/CPR) using postnatal day 20–25 mice. Adult (8–12 weeks) and pediatric (P20–25) mice were subjected to 6 min CA/CPR. Hippocampal CA1 and striatal neuronal injury were quantified 3 days after resuscitation by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Fluoro-Jade B staining, respectively. Results Pediatric mice exhibited less neuronal injury in both CA1 hippocampal and striatal neurons compared to adult mice. Increasing ischemia time to 8 min CA/CPR resulted in an increase in hippocampal injury in pediatric mice, resulting in similar damage in adult and pediatric brains. In contrast, striatal injury in the pediatric brain following 6 or 8 min CA/CPR remained extremely low. As observed in adult mice, cardiac arrest causes delayed neuronal death in pediatric mice, with hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage maturing at 72 hours after insult. Finally, mild therapeutic hypothermia reduced hippocampal CA1 neuronal injury after pediatric CA/CPR. Comparison with Existing Method This is the first report of a cardiac arrest and CPR model of global cerebral ischemia in mice Conclusions Therefore, the mouse pediatric CA/CPR model we developed is unique and will provide an important new tool to the research community for the study of pediatric brain injury. PMID:24192226

  1. Management of Maternal Cardiac Arrest in the Third Trimester of Pregnancy: A Simulation-Based Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jacquelyn; Cepeda Brito, Jose R.; Baker, Lauren; Hughes, Patrick G.; Gothard, M. David; Davis, Jocelyn; Silber, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate confidence, knowledge, and competence after a simulation-based curriculum on maternal cardiac arrest in an Obstetrics & Gynecologic (OBGYN) residency program. Methods. Four simulations with structured debriefing focusing on high yield causes and management of maternal cardiac arrest were executed. Pre- and post-individual knowledge tests (KT) and confidence surveys (CS) were collected along with group scores of critical performance steps evaluated by content experts for the first and final simulations. Results. Significant differences were noted in individual KT scores (pre: 58.9 ± 8.9 versus post: 72.8 ± 6.1, p = 0.01) and CS total scores (pre: 22.2 ± 6.4 versus post: 29.9 ± 3.4, p = 0.007). Significant differences were noted in airway management, p = 0.008; appropriate cycles of drug/shock-CPR, p = 0.008; left uterine displacement, p = 0.008; and identifying causes of cardiac arrest, p = 0.008. Nonsignificant differences were noted for administration of appropriate drugs/doses, p = 0.074; chest compressions, p = 0.074; bag-mask ventilation before intubation, p = 0.074; and return of spontaneous circulation identification, p = 0.074. Groups remained noncompetent in team leader tasks and considering therapeutic hypothermia. Conclusion. This study demonstrated improved OBGYN resident knowledge, confidence, and competence in the management of third trimester maternal cardiac arrest. Several skills, however, will likely require more longitudinal curricular exposure and training to develop and maintain proficiency. PMID:27555967

  2. Management of Maternal Cardiac Arrest in the Third Trimester of Pregnancy: A Simulation-Based Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jacquelyn; Cepeda Brito, Jose R; Baker, Lauren; Hughes, Patrick G; Gothard, M David; McCarroll, Michele L; Davis, Jocelyn; Silber, Angela; Ahmed, Rami A

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate confidence, knowledge, and competence after a simulation-based curriculum on maternal cardiac arrest in an Obstetrics & Gynecologic (OBGYN) residency program. Methods. Four simulations with structured debriefing focusing on high yield causes and management of maternal cardiac arrest were executed. Pre- and post-individual knowledge tests (KT) and confidence surveys (CS) were collected along with group scores of critical performance steps evaluated by content experts for the first and final simulations. Results. Significant differences were noted in individual KT scores (pre: 58.9 ± 8.9 versus post: 72.8 ± 6.1, p = 0.01) and CS total scores (pre: 22.2 ± 6.4 versus post: 29.9 ± 3.4, p = 0.007). Significant differences were noted in airway management, p = 0.008; appropriate cycles of drug/shock-CPR, p = 0.008; left uterine displacement, p = 0.008; and identifying causes of cardiac arrest, p = 0.008. Nonsignificant differences were noted for administration of appropriate drugs/doses, p = 0.074; chest compressions, p = 0.074; bag-mask ventilation before intubation, p = 0.074; and return of spontaneous circulation identification, p = 0.074. Groups remained noncompetent in team leader tasks and considering therapeutic hypothermia. Conclusion. This study demonstrated improved OBGYN resident knowledge, confidence, and competence in the management of third trimester maternal cardiac arrest. Several skills, however, will likely require more longitudinal curricular exposure and training to develop and maintain proficiency. PMID:27555967

  3. Cardiac arrest triggers hippocampal neuronal death through autophagic and apoptotic pathways.

    PubMed

    Cui, Derong; Shang, Hanbing; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jiang, Wei; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of neuronal death induced by ischemic injury remains unknown. We investigated whether autophagy and p53 signaling played a role in the apoptosis of hippocampal neurons following global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, in a rat model of 8-min asphyxial cardiac arrest (CA) and resuscitation. Increased autophagosome numbers, expression of lysosomal cathepsin B, cathepsin D, Beclin-1, and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) suggested autophagy in hippocampal cells. The expression of tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53) and its target genes: Bax, p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA), and damage-regulated autophagy modulator (DRAM) were upregulated following CA. The p53-specific inhibitor pifithrin-α (PFT-α) significantly reduced the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax and PUMA) and autophagic proteins (LC3-II and DRAM) that generally increase following CA. PFT-α also reduced hippocampal neuronal damage following CA. Similarly, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), which inhibits autophagy and bafilomycin A1 (BFA), which inhibits lysosomes, significantly inhibited hippocampal neuronal damage after CA. These results indicate that CA affects both autophagy and apoptosis, partially mediated by p53. Autophagy plays a significant role in hippocampal neuronal death induced by cerebral I/R following asphyxial-CA. PMID:27273382

  4. Can video mobile phones improve CPR quality when used for dispatcher assistance during simulated cardiac arrest?

    PubMed Central

    BOLLE, S R; SCHOLL, J; GILBERT, M

    2009-01-01

    Background Because mobile telephones may support video calls, emergency medical dispatchers may now connect visually with bystanders during pre-hospital cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We studied the quality of simulated dispatcher-assisted CPR when guidance was delivered to rescuers by video calls or audio calls from mobile phones. Methods One hundred and eighty high school students were randomly assigned in groups of three to communicate via video calls or audio calls with experienced nurse dispatchers at a Hospital Emergency Medical Dispatch Center. CPR was performed on a recording resuscitation manikin during simulated cardiac arrest. Quality of CPR and time factors were compared depending on the type of communication used. Results The median CPR time without chest compression (‘hands-off time’) was shorter in the video-call group vs. the audio-call group (303 vs. 331 s; P=0.048), but the median time to first compression was not shorter (104 vs. 102 s; P=0.29). The median time to first ventilation was insignificantly shorter in the video-call group (176 vs. 205 s; P=0.16). This group also had a slightly higher proportion of ventiliations without error (0.11 vs. 0.06; P=0.30). Conclusion Video communication is unlikely to improve telephone CPR (t-CPR) significantly without proper training of dispatchers and when using dispatch protocols written for audio-only calls. Improved dispatch procedures and training for handling video calls require further investigation. PMID:19032569

  5. Mild hypothermia inhibits systemic and cerebral complement activation in a swine model of cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ping; Zhao, Hong; Hua, Rong; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Ziren; Mei, Xue; Cui, Juan; Li, Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation has been implicated in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to determine whether mild hypothermia (HT) inhibits systemic and cerebral complement activation after resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Sixteen minipigs resuscitated from 8 minutes of untreated ventricular fibrillation were randomized into two groups: HT group (n=8), treated with HT (33°C) for 12 hours; and normothermia group (n=8), treated similarly as HT group except for cooling. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 0.5, 6, 12, and 24 hours after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). The brain cortex was harvested 24 hours after ROSC. Complement and pro-inflammatory markers were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neurologic deficit scores were evaluated 24 hours after ROSC. C1q, Bb, mannose-binding lectin (MBL), C3b, C3a, C5a, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were significantly increased under normothermia within 24 hours after ROSC. However, these increases were significantly reduced by HT. Hypothermia decreased brain C1q, MBL, C3b, and C5a contents 24 hours after ROSC. Hypothermic pigs had a better neurologic outcome than normothermic pigs. In conclusion, complement is activated through classic, alternative, and MBL pathways after ROSC. Hypothermia inhibits systemic and cerebral complement activation, which may provide an additional mechanism of cerebral protection. PMID:25757755

  6. Automated analysis of background EEG and reactivity during therapeutic hypothermia in comatose patients after cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Noirhomme, Quentin; Lehembre, Rémy; Lugo, Zulay Del Rosario; Lesenfants, Damien; Luxen, André; Laureys, Steven; Oddo, Mauro; Rossetti, Andrea O

    2014-01-01

    Visual analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) background and reactivity during therapeutic hypothermia provides important outcome information, but is time-consuming and not always consistent between reviewers. Automated EEG analysis may help quantify the brain damage. Forty-six comatose patients in therapeutic hypothermia, after cardiac arrest, were included in the study. EEG background was quantified with burst-suppression ratio (BSR) and approximate entropy, both used to monitor anesthesia. Reactivity was detected through change in the power spectrum of signal before and after stimulation. Automatic results obtained almost perfect agreement (discontinuity) to substantial agreement (background reactivity) with a visual score from EEG-certified neurologists. Burst-suppression ratio was more suited to distinguish continuous EEG background from burst-suppression than approximate entropy in this specific population. Automatic EEG background and reactivity measures were significantly related to good and poor outcome. We conclude that quantitative EEG measurements can provide promising information regarding current state of the patient and clinical outcome, but further work is needed before routine application in a clinical setting. PMID:24452769

  7. Early computed tomography in victims of non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Christ, Martin; von Auenmueller, Katharina Isabel; Noelke, Jan Peter; Sasko, Benjamin; Amirie, Scharbanu; Trappe, Hans-Joachim

    2016-03-01

    Although early cranial and thoracic computed tomography (CT) is recommended in the early in-hospital treatment of victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), hardly anything is known regarding the proportions of therapy-relevant findings with this method. Victims of OHCA who were admitted to our hospital between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2014 were studied. CT was classified as early if performed within the first 4 h following hospital admission. There were 32 (12.7 %) cranial, 31 (12.3 %) thoracic and 15 (6.0 %) abdominal CT. The major findings and associated number of patients were: intracranial bleeding in two patients (0.8 %), acute cerebral ischemia in two (0.8 %), cerebral oedema in four (1.6 %), pulmonary emboli in three (1.2 %), hemothorax in two (0.8 %), tracheal rupture in one (0.4 %), pneumonia in 11 (4.4 %), paralytic ileus in one (0.4 %), ascites in three (1.2 %), pneumoperitoneum in one (0.4 %), acute cholecystitis in two (0.8 %), mesenteric vascular occlusion in one (0.4 %) and ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm in one (0.4 %). In victims of OHCA, early diagnostic CT provides therapy-relevant findings in a high proportion (42.3 %) of patients examined. PMID:26597877

  8. Blood brain barrier is impermeable to solutes and permeable to water after experimental pediatric cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Tress, Erika E; Clark, Robert S B; Foley, Lesley M; Alexander, Henry; Hickey, Robert W; Drabek, Tomas; Kochanek, Patrick M; Manole, Mioara D

    2014-08-22

    Pediatric asphyxial cardiac arrest (CA) results in unfavorable neurological outcome in most survivors. Development of neuroprotective therapies is contingent upon understanding the permeability of intravenously delivered medications through the blood brain barrier (BBB). In a model of pediatric CA we sought to characterize BBB permeability to small and large molecular weight substances. Additionally, we measured the percent brain water after CA. Asphyxia of 9 min was induced in 16-18 day-old rats. The rats were resuscitated and the BBB permeability to small (sodium fluorescein and gadoteridol) and large (immunoglobulin G, IgG) molecules was assessed at 1, 4, and 24 h after asphyxial CA or sham surgery. Percent brain water was measured post-CA and in shams using wet-to-dry brain weight. Fluorescence, gadoteridol uptake, or IgG staining at 1, 4h and over the entire 24 h post-CA did not differ from shams, suggesting absence of BBB permeability to these solutes. Cerebral water content was increased at 3h post-CA vs. sham. In conclusion, after 9 min of asphyxial CA there is no BBB permeability over 24h to conventional small or large molecule tracers despite the fact that cerebral water content is increased early post-CA indicating the development of brain edema. Evaluation of novel therapies targeting neuronal death after pediatric CA should include their capacity to cross the BBB. PMID:24937271

  9. Cardiac arrest triggers hippocampal neuronal death through autophagic and apoptotic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Derong; Shang, Hanbing; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jiang, Wei; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of neuronal death induced by ischemic injury remains unknown. We investigated whether autophagy and p53 signaling played a role in the apoptosis of hippocampal neurons following global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, in a rat model of 8-min asphyxial cardiac arrest (CA) and resuscitation. Increased autophagosome numbers, expression of lysosomal cathepsin B, cathepsin D, Beclin-1, and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) suggested autophagy in hippocampal cells. The expression of tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53) and its target genes: Bax, p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA), and damage-regulated autophagy modulator (DRAM) were upregulated following CA. The p53-specific inhibitor pifithrin-α (PFT-α) significantly reduced the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax and PUMA) and autophagic proteins (LC3-II and DRAM) that generally increase following CA. PFT-α also reduced hippocampal neuronal damage following CA. Similarly, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), which inhibits autophagy and bafilomycin A1 (BFA), which inhibits lysosomes, significantly inhibited hippocampal neuronal damage after CA. These results indicate that CA affects both autophagy and apoptosis, partially mediated by p53. Autophagy plays a significant role in hippocampal neuronal death induced by cerebral I/R following asphyxial-CA. PMID:27273382

  10. Inflammatory mechanisms involved in brain injury following cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    XIANG, YANXIAO; ZHAO, HUA; WANG, JIALI; ZHANG, LUETAO; LIU, ANCHANG; CHEN, YUGUO

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) is a leading cause of fatality and long-term disability worldwide. Recent advances in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) have improved survival rates; however, the survivors are prone to severe neurological injury subsequent to successful CPR following CA. Effective therapeutic options to protect the brain from CA remain limited, due to the complexities of the injury cascades caused by global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Although the precise mechanisms of neurological impairment following CA-initiated I/R injury require further clarification, evidence supports that one of the key cellular pathways of cerebral injury is inflammation. The inflammatory response is orchestrated by activated glial cells in response to I/R injury. Increased release of danger-associated molecular pattern molecules and cellular dysfunction in activated microglia and astrocytes contribute to ischemia-induced cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory cytokines generation, and ultimately to delayed death of neurons. Furthermore, cytokines and adhesion molecules generated within activated microglia, as well as astrocytes, are involved in the innate immune response; modulate influx of peripheral immune and inflammatory cells into the brain, resulting in neurological injury. The present review discusses the molecular aspects of immune and inflammatory mechanisms in global cerebral I/R injury following CA and CPR, and the potential therapeutic strategies that target neuroinflammation and the innate immune system. PMID:27330748

  11. Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Outcomes of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Caused by Stroke: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Tatsuma; Ohashi-Fukuda, Naoko; Kondo, Yutaka; Sera, Toshiki; Doi, Kent; Yahagi, Naoki

    2016-04-01

    Limited information is available regarding stroke-related out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We aimed to assess the clinical characteristics of stroke-related OHCA and to identify the factors associated with patient outcomes.We conducted a nationwide population-based study of adult OHCA patients in Japan from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2009. We examined the epidemiology, risk factors, and outcomes of stroke-related OHCA compared with cardiogenic OHCA. The primary outcome was neurologically favorable survival.Of the 243,140 eligible patients, 18,682 (7.7%) were diagnosed with stroke-related OHCA. Compared to OHCA with a presumed cardiac etiology, stroke-related OHCA patients had a greater chance of prehospital return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) (9.9% vs 5.9%, P < 0.0001) but a reduced chance of 1-month survival (3.6% vs 4.9%, P < 0.0001) or favorable neurological outcomes (1.2% vs 2.6%, P < 0.0001). After adjusting for a variety of confounding factors, the prehospital ROSC rates were higher (adjusted OR 2.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.34-2.62), but the neurologically favorable survival rates were lower (adjusted OR 0.66, 95%CI 0.57-0.76), among the stroke-related OHCA patients. In stroke-related OHCA cases, having a younger age, witness, and shockable 1st documented rhythm were associated with improved outcomes. Men had more favorable neurological outcomes. Seasonal or circadian factors had no critical impact on favorable neurological outcomes. Prehospital advanced life support techniques (i.e., epinephrine administration or advanced airway management) were not associated with favorable neurological outcomes.Although stroke-related OHCA had lower 1-month survival rates and poorer neurological outcomes than cardiogenic OHCA, the rates were not considered to be medically futile. Characteristically, sex differences might impact neurologically favorable survival. PMID:27057834

  12. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy in a 34-year-old patient with eating disorders and after the third sudden cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Piotrowicz, Ewa; Orzechowski, Piotr; Bilinska, Maria; Przybylski, Andrzej; Szumowski, Lukasz; Piotrowicz, Ryszard

    2015-03-01

    Eating disorders (ED) such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia are psychiatric diseases associated with the highest mortality rate of any other psychiatric disorders. More recently, long-term outcome studies with follow-up of over 20 years report a mortality of between 15% and 18% (Casiero and Frishman, Cardiol Rev 14(5), 227, 2006). The sudden death secondary to arrhythmias is often the cause of death in these patients (Casiero and Frishman, Cardiol Rev 14(5), 227, 2006). A case of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia (VA) in a patient with ED is presented. Clinical records (cardiologic, psychiatric), electrocardiograms, echocardiogram, coronary angiogram, cardiac magnetic resonance, and endocrine diagnostics were performed. Finally a cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) was implanted in the patient after her third cardiac arrest. An optimal approach to antiarrhythmic therapy in such patients is a real challenge for a cardiologist. PMID:24535846

  13. Study of Cardiac Arrest Caused by Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism and Thrombolytic Resuscitation in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lian-Xing; Li, Chun-Sheng; Yang, Jun; Tong, Nan; Xiao, Hong-Li; An, Le

    2016-01-01

    Background: The success rate of resuscitation in cardiac arrest (CA) caused by pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) is low. Furthermore, there are no large animal models that simulate clinical CA. The aim of this study was to establish a porcine CA model caused by PTE and to investigate the pathophysiology of CA and postresuscitation. Methods: This model was induced in castrated male pigs (30 ± 2 kg; n = 21) by injecting thrombi (10–15 ml) via the left external jugular vein. Computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) was performed at baseline, CA, and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). After CTPA during CA, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with thrombolysis (recombinant tissue plasminogen activator 50 mg) was initiated. Hemodynamic, respiratory, and blood gas data were monitored. Cardiac troponins T, cardiac troponin I, creatine kinase-MB, myoglobin, and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Data were compared between baseline and CA with paired-sample t-test and compared among different time points for survival animals with repeated measures analysis of variance. Results: Seventeen animals achieved CA after emboli injection, while four achieved CA after 5–8 ml more thrombi. Nine animals survived 6 h after CPR. CTPA showed obstruction of the pulmonary arteries. Mean aortic pressure data showed occurrence of CA caused by PTE (Z = −2.803, P = 0.002). The maximal rate of mean increase of left ventricular pressure (dp/dtmax) was statistically decreased (t = 6.315, P = 0.000, variation coefficient = 0.25), and end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure (PetCO2) decreased to the lowest value (t = 27.240, P = 0.000). After ROSC (n = 9), heart rate (HR) and mean right ventricular pressure (MRVP) remained different versus baseline until 2 h after ROSC (HR, P = 0.036; MRVP, P = 0.027). Myoglobin was statistically increased from CA to 1 h after ROSC (P = 0.036, 0.026, 0.009, respectively), and BNP was increased

  14. Recovery of consciousness and an injured ascending reticular activating system in a patient who survived cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung Ho; Hyun, Yi Ji; Lee, Han Do

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report on a patient who survived cardiac arrest and showed recovery of consciousness and an injured ARAS at the early stage of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HI- BI) for 3 weeks, which was demonstrated by diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). A 52-year-old male patient who had suffered cardiac arrest caused by acute coronary syndrome was resuscitated immediately by a layman and paramedics for ∼25 minutes. He was then transferred immediately to the emergency room of a local medical center. When starting rehabilitation at 2 weeks after onset, his consciousness was impaired, with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 8 and Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (GRS-R) score of 8. He underwent comprehensive rehabilitative therapy, including drugs for recovery of consciousness. He recovered well and rapidly so that his consciousness had recovered to full scores in terms of GCS:15 and GRS-R:23 at 5 weeks after onset. The left lower dorsal and right lower ventral ARAS had become thicker on 5-week DTT compared with 2-week DTT (Fig. 1B). Regarding the change of neural connectivity of the thalamic ILN, increased neural connectivity to the basal forebrain and prefrontal cortex was observed in both hemispheres on 5-week DTT compared with 2-week DTT. Recovery of an injured ARAS was demonstrated in a patient who survived cardiac arrest and his consciousness showed rapid and good recovery for 3 weeks at the early stage of HI-BI. PMID:27368033

  15. One-year follow-up of neurological status of patients after cardiac arrest seen at the emergency room of a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Vancini-Campanharo, Cássia Regina; Vancini, Rodrigo Luiz; de Lira, Claudio Andre Barbosa; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag; Atallah, Álvaro Nagib; de Góis, Aécio Flávio Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe neurological status and associated factors of survivors after cardiac arrest, upon discharge, and at 6 and 12 month follow-up. Methods: A cohort, prospective, descriptive study conducted in an emergency room. Patients who suffered cardiac arrest and survived were included. A one-year consecutive sample, comprising 285 patients and survivors (n=16) followed up for one year after discharge. Neurological status was assessed by the Cerebral Performance Category before the cardiac arrest, upon discharge, and at 6 and 12 months after discharge. The following factors were investigated: comorbidities, presence of consciousness upon admission, previous cardiac arrest, witnessed cardiac arrest, location, cause and initial rhythm of cardiac arrest, number of cardiac arrests, interval between collapse and start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and between collapse and end of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Results: Of the patients treated, 4.5% (n=13) survived after 6 and 12 months follow-up. Upon discharge, 50% of patients remained with previous Cerebral Performance Category of the cardiac arrest and 50% had worsening of Cerebral Performance Category. After 6 months, 53.8% remained in the same Cerebral Performance Category and 46.2% improved as compared to discharge. After 12 months, all patients remained in the same Cerebral Performance Category of the previous 6 months. There was no statistically significant association between neurological outcome during follow-up and the variables assessed. Conclusion: There was neurological worsening at discharge but improvement or stabilization in the course of a year. There was no association between Cerebral Performance Category and the variables assessed. PMID:26154538

  16. Sudden cardiac arrest in sports - need for uniform registration: A Position Paper from the Sport Cardiology Section of the European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Solberg, E E; Borjesson, M; Sharma, S; Papadakis, M; Wilhelm, M; Drezner, J A; Harmon, K G; Alonso, J M; Heidbuchel, H; Dugmore, D; Panhuyzen-Goedkoop, N M; Mellwig, K-P; Carre, F; Rasmusen, H; Niebauer, J; Behr, E R; Thiene, G; Sheppard, M N; Basso, C; Corrado, D

    2016-04-01

    There are large variations in the incidence, registration methods and reported causes of sudden cardiac arrest/sudden cardiac death (SCA/SCD) in competitive and recreational athletes. A crucial question is to which degree these variations are genuine or partly due to methodological incongruities. This paper discusses the uncertainties about available data and provides comprehensive suggestions for standard definitions and a guide for uniform registration parameters of SCA/SCD. The parameters include a definition of what constitutes an 'athlete', incidence calculations, enrolment of cases, the importance of gender, ethnicity and age of the athlete, as well as the type and level of sporting activity. A precise instruction for autopsy practice in the case of a SCD of athletes is given, including the role of molecular samples and evaluation of possible doping. Rational decisions about cardiac preparticipation screening and cardiac safety at sport facilities requires increased data quality concerning incidence, aetiology and management of SCA/SCD in sports. Uniform standard registration of SCA/SCD in athletes and leisure sportsmen would be a first step towards this goal. PMID:26285770

  17. The Responses of Tissues from the Brain, Heart, Kidney, and Liver to Resuscitation following Prolonged Cardiac Arrest by Examining Mitochondrial Respiration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junhwan; Perales Villarroel, José Paul; Zhang, Wei; Yin, Tai; Shinozaki, Koichiro; Hong, Angela; Lampe, Joshua W.; Becker, Lance B.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrest induces whole-body ischemia, which causes damage to multiple organs. Understanding how each organ responds to ischemia/reperfusion is important to develop better resuscitation strategies. Because direct measurement of organ function is not practicable in most animal models, we attempt to use mitochondrial respiration to test efficacy of resuscitation on the brain, heart, kidney, and liver following prolonged cardiac arrest. Male Sprague-Dawley rats are subjected to asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest for 30 min or 45 min, or 30 min cardiac arrest followed by 60 min cardiopulmonary bypass resuscitation. Mitochondria are isolated from brain, heart, kidney, and liver tissues and examined for respiration activity. Following cardiac arrest, a time-dependent decrease in state-3 respiration is observed in mitochondria from all four tissues. Following 60 min resuscitation, the respiration activity of brain mitochondria varies greatly in different animals. The activity after resuscitation remains the same in heart mitochondria and significantly increases in kidney and liver mitochondria. The result shows that inhibition of state-3 respiration is a good marker to evaluate the efficacy of resuscitation for each organ. The resulting state-3 respiration of brain and heart mitochondria following resuscitation reenforces the need for developing better strategies to resuscitate these critical organs following prolonged cardiac arrest. PMID:26770657

  18. Myocardial function after polarizing versus depolarizing cardiac arrest with blood cardioplegia in a porcine model of cardiopulmonary bypass†

    PubMed Central

    Aass, Terje; Stangeland, Lodve; Moen, Christian Arvei; Salminen, Pirjo-Riitta; Dahle, Geir Olav; Chambers, David J.; Markou, Thomais; Eliassen, Finn; Urban, Malte; Haaverstad, Rune; Matre, Knut; Grong, Ketil

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Potassium-based depolarizing St Thomas' Hospital cardioplegic solution No 2 administered as intermittent, oxygenated blood is considered as a gold standard for myocardial protection during cardiac surgery. However, the alternative concept of polarizing arrest may have beneficial protective effects. We hypothesize that polarized arrest with esmolol/adenosine/magnesium (St Thomas' Hospital Polarizing cardioplegic solution) in cold, intermittent oxygenated blood offers comparable myocardial protection in a clinically relevant animal model. METHODS Twenty anaesthetized young pigs, 42 ± 2 (standard deviation) kg on standardized tepid cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were randomized (10 per group) to depolarizing or polarizing cardiac arrest for 60 min with cardioplegia administered in the aortic root every 20 min as freshly mixed cold, intermittent, oxygenated blood. Global and local baseline and postoperative cardiac function 60, 120 and 180 min after myocardial reperfusion was evaluated with pressure–conductance catheter and strain by Tissue Doppler Imaging. Regional tissue blood flow, cleaved caspase-3 activity, GRK2 phosphorylation and mitochondrial function and ultrastructure were evaluated in myocardial tissue samples. RESULTS Left ventricular function and general haemodynamics did not differ between groups before CPB. Cardiac asystole was obtained and maintained during aortic cross-clamping. Compared with baseline, heart rate was increased and left ventricular end-systolic and end-diastolic pressures decreased in both groups after weaning. Cardiac index, systolic pressure and radial peak systolic strain did not differ between groups. Contractility, evaluated as dP/dtmax, gradually increased from 120 to 180 min after declamping in animals with polarizing cardioplegia and was significantly higher, 1871 ± 160 (standard error) mmHg/s, compared with standard potassium-based cardioplegic arrest, 1351 ± 70 mmHg/s, after 180 min of reperfusion (P = 0

  19. Etiology of Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Patients with Epilepsy: Experience of Tertiary Referral Hospital in Sapporo City, Japan.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Kei; Ochi, Satoko; Enatsu, Rei; Wanibuchi, Masahiko; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Uemura, Shuji; Tanno, Katsuhiko; Narimatsu, Eichi; Maekawa, Kunihiko; Usui, Keiko; Mizobuchi, Masahiro

    2016-05-15

    It has been reported that epilepsy patients had higher risk of sudden death than that of the general population. However, in Japan, there is very little literature on the observational research conducted on sudden fatal events in epilepsy. We performed a single-center, retrospective study on all the out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients treated in our emergency department between 2007 and 2013. Among the OHCA patients, we extracted those with a history of epilepsy and then analyzed the characteristics of the fatal events and the background of epilepsy. From 1,823 OHCA patients, a total of 10 cases were enrolled in our study. The median age was 34 years at the time of the incident [9-52 years; interquartile range (IQR), 24-45]. We determined that half of our cases resulted from external causes of death such as drowning and suffocation and the other half were classified as sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). In addition, asphyxia was implicated as the cause in eight cases. Only the two near-drowning patients were immediately resuscitated, but the remaining eight patients died. The median age of first onset of epilepsy was 12 years (0.5-30; IQR, 3-21), and the median disease duration was 25 years (4-38; IQR, 6-32). Patients with active epilepsy accounted for half of our series and they were undergoing poly anti-epileptic drug therapy. The fatal events related to epilepsy tended to occur in the younger adult by external causes. An appropriate therapeutic intervention and a thorough observation were needed for its prevention. PMID:26948699

  20. Etiology of Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Patients with Epilepsy: Experience of Tertiary Referral Hospital in Sapporo City, Japan

    PubMed Central

    MIYATA, Kei; OCHI, Satoko; ENATSU, Rei; WANIBUCHI, Masahiko; MIKUNI, Nobuhiro; INOUE, Hiroyuki; UEMURA, Shuji; TANNO, Katsuhiko; NARIMATSU, Eichi; MAEKAWA, Kunihiko; USUI, Keiko; MIZOBUCHI, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that epilepsy patients had higher risk of sudden death than that of the general population. However, in Japan, there is very little literature on the observational research conducted on sudden fatal events in epilepsy. We performed a single-center, retrospective study on all the out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients treated in our emergency department between 2007 and 2013. Among the OHCA patients, we extracted those with a history of epilepsy and then analyzed the characteristics of the fatal events and the background of epilepsy. From 1,823 OHCA patients, a total of 10 cases were enrolled in our study. The median age was 34 years at the time of the incident [9–52 years; interquartile range (IQR), 24–45]. We determined that half of our cases resulted from external causes of death such as drowning and suffocation and the other half were classified as sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). In addition, asphyxia was implicated as the cause in eight cases. Only the two near-drowning patients were immediately resuscitated, but the remaining eight patients died. The median age of first onset of epilepsy was 12 years (0.5–30; IQR, 3–21), and the median disease duration was 25 years (4–38; IQR, 6–32). Patients with active epilepsy accounted for half of our series and they were undergoing poly anti-epileptic drug therapy. The fatal events related to epilepsy tended to occur in the younger adult by external causes. An appropriate therapeutic intervention and a thorough observation were needed for its prevention. PMID:26948699

  1. The Cardiocerebral Resuscitation protocol for treatment of out-of-hospital primary cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a significant public health problem in most westernized industrialized nations. In spite of national and international guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and emergency cardiac care, the overall survival of patients with OHCA was essentially unchanged for 30 years--from 1978 to 2008 at 7.6%. Perhaps a better indicator of Emergency Medical System (EMS) effectiveness in treating patients with OHCA is to focus on the subgroup that has a reasonable chance of survival, e.g., patients found to be in ventricular fibrillation (VF). But even in this subgroup, the average survival rate was 17.7% in the United States, unchanged between 1980 and 2003, and 21% in Europe, unchanged between 1980 and 2004. Prior to 2003, the survival of patients with OHCA, in VF in Tucson, Arizona was less than 9% in spite of incorporating previous guideline recommendations. An alternative (non-guidelines) approach to the therapy of patients with OHCA and a shockable rhythm, called Cardiocerebral Resuscitation, based on our extensive physiologic laboratory studies, was introduced in Tucson in 2003, in rural Wisconsin in 2004, and in selected EMS areas in the metropolitan Phoenix area in 2005. Survival of patients with OHCA due to VF treated with Cardiocerebral Resuscitation in rural Wisconsin increased to 38% and in 60 EMS systems in Arizona to 39%. In 2004, we began a statewide program to advocate chest compression-only CPR for bystanders of witnessed primary OHCA. Over the next five years, we found that survival of patients with a shockable rhythm was 17.7% in those treated with standard bystander CPR (mouth-to-mouth ventilations plus chest compression) compared to 33.7% for those who received bystander chest-compression-only CPR. This article on Cardiocerebral Resuscitation, by invitation following a presentation at the 2011 Danish Society Emergency Medical Conference, summarizes the results of therapy of patients with primary OHCA treated with

  2. Relationship between post-cardiac arrest myocardial oxidative stress and myocardial dysfunction in the rat

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reperfusion after resuscitation from cardiac arrest (CA) is an event that increases reactive oxygen species production leading to oxidative stress. More specifically, myocardial oxidative stress may play a role in the severity of post-CA myocardial dysfunction. This study investigated the relationship between myocardial oxidative stress and post-CA myocardial injury and dysfunction in a rat model of CA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Ventricular fibrillation was induced in 26 rats and was untreated for 6 min. CPR, including mechanical chest compression, ventilation, and epinephrine, was then initiated and continued for additional 6 min prior to defibrillations. Resuscitated animals were sacrificed at two h (n = 9), 4 h (n = 6) and 72 h (n = 8) following resuscitation, and plasma collected for assessment of: high sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT), as marker of myocardial injury; isoprostanes (IsoP), as marker of lipid peroxidation; and 8-hydroxyguanosine (8-OHG), as marker of DNA oxidative damage. Hearts were also harvested for measurement of tissue IsoP and 8-OHG. Myocardial function was assessed by echocardiography at the corresponding time points. Additional 8 rats were not subjected to CA and served as baseline controls. Results Compared to baseline, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was reduced at 2 and 4 h following resuscitation (p < 0.01), while it was similar at 72 h. Inversely, plasma hs-cTnT increased, compared to baseline, at 2 and 4 h post-CA (p < 0.01), and then recovered at 72 h. Similarly, plasma and myocardial tissue IsoP and 8-OHG levels increased at 2 and 4 h post-resuscitation (p < 0.01 vs. baseline), while returned to baseline 72 h later. Myocardial IsoP were directly related to hs-cTnT levels (r = 0.760, p < 0.01) and inversely related to LVEF (r = -0.770, p < 0.01). Myocardial 8-OHG were also directly related to hs-cTnT levels (r = 0.409, p < 0.05) and

  3. Spatial Variation and Resuscitation Process Affecting Survival after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests (OHCA)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Chou; Chen, Chao-Wen; Ho, Chi-Kung; Liu, I-Chuan; Lin, Bo-Cheng; Chan, Ta-Chien

    2015-01-01

    Background Ambulance response times and resuscitation efforts are critical predictors of the survival rate after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA). On the other hand, rural-urban differences in the OHCA survival rates are an important public health issue. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the January 2011–December 2013 OHCA registry data of Kaohsiung City, Taiwan. With particular focus on geospatial variables, we aimed to unveil risk factors predicting the overall OHCA survival until hospital admission. Spatial analysis, network analysis, and the Kriging method by using geographic information systems were applied to analyze spatial variations and calculate the transport distance. Logistic regression was used to identify the risk factors for OHCA survival. Results Among the 4,957 patients, the overall OHCA survival to hospital admission was 16.5%. In the multivariate analysis, female sex (adjusted odds ratio:, AOR, 1.24 [1.06–1.45]), events in public areas (AOR: 1.30 [1.05–1.61]), exposure to automated external defibrillator (AED) shock (AOR: 1.70 [1.30–2.23]), use of laryngeal mask airway (LMA) (AOR: 1.35 [1.16–1.58]), non-trauma patients (AOR: 1.41 [1.04–1.90]), ambulance bypassed the closest hospital (AOR: 1.28 [1.07–1.53]), and OHCA within the high population density areas (AOR: 1.89 [1.55–2.32]) were positively associated with improved OHCA survival. By contrast, a prolonged total emergency medical services (EMS) time interval was negatively associated with OHCA survival (AOR: 0.98 [0.96–0.99]). Conclusions Resuscitative efforts, such as AED or LMA use, and a short total EMS time interval improved OHCA outcomes in emergency departments. The spatial heterogeneity of emergency medical resources between rural and urban areas might affect survival rate. PMID:26659851

  4. Ubiquitous protective effects of cyclosporine A in preventing cardiac arrest-induced multiple organ failure.

    PubMed

    Cour, Martin; Abrial, Maryline; Jahandiez, Vincent; Loufouat, Joseph; Belaïdi, Elise; Gharib, Abdallah; Varennes, Annie; Monneret, Guillaume; Thibault, Hélène; Ovize, Michel; Argaud, Laurent

    2014-10-15

    Opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) appears to be a pivotal event in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Resuscitated cardiac arrest (CA) leads to the post-CA syndrome that encompasses, not only myocardial dysfunction, but also brain injury, failure of other organs (kidney, liver, or lung), and systemic response to I/R. We aimed to determine whether cyclosporine A (CsA) might prevent multiple organ failure following CA through a ubiquitous mPTP inhibition in each distant vital organ. Anesthetized New Zealand White rabbits were subjected to 15 min of CA and 120 min of reperfusion. At the onset of resuscitation, the rabbits received CsA, its non-immunosuppressive derivative NIM811, or vehicle (controls). Survival, hemodynamics, brain damage, organ injuries, and systemic I/R response were analyzed. Fresh mitochondria were isolated from the brain, heart, kidney, liver, and lung to assess both oxidative phosphorylation and permeability transition. CsA analogs significantly improved short-term survival and prevented multiple organ failure, including brain damage and myocardial dysfunction (P < 0.05 vs. controls). Susceptibility of mPTP opening was significantly increased in heart, brain, kidney, and liver mitochondria isolated from controls, while mitochondrial respiration was impaired (P < 0.05 vs. sham). CsA analogs prevented these mitochondrial dysfunctions (P < 0.05 vs. controls). These results suggest that CsA and NIM811 can prevent the post-CA syndrome through a ubiquitous mitochondrial protective effect at the level of each major distant organ. PMID:25213634

  5. Persistently Altered Brain Mitochondrial Bioenergetics After Apparently Successful Resuscitation From Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Kilbaugh, Todd J; Sutton, Robert M; Karlsson, Michael; Hansson, Magnus J; Naim, Maryam Y; Morgan, Ryan W; Bratinov, George; Lampe, Joshua W; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Becker, Lance B; Margulies, Susan S; Berg, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Background Although advances in cardiopulmonary resuscitation have improved survival from cardiac arrest (CA), neurologic injury persists and impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics may be critical for targeted neuroresuscitation. The authors sought to determine if excellent cardiopulmonary resuscitation and postresuscitation care and good traditional survival rates result in persistently disordered cerebral mitochondrial bioenergetics in a porcine pediatric model of asphyxia-associated ventricular fibrillation CA. Methods and Results After 7 minutes of asphyxia, followed by ventricular fibrillation, 5 female 1-month-old swine (4 sham) received blood pressure–targeted care: titration of compression depth to systolic blood pressure of 90 mm Hg and vasopressor administration to a coronary perfusion pressure >20 mm Hg. All animals received protocol-based vasopressor support after return of spontaneous circulation for 4 hours before they were killed. The primary outcome was integrated mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) function. CA animals displayed significantly decreased maximal, coupled oxidative phosphorylating respiration (OXPHOSCI+CII) in cortex (P<0.02) and hippocampus (P<0.02), as well as decreased phosphorylation and coupling efficiency (cortex, P<0.05; hippocampus, P<0.05). Complex I– and complex II–driven respiration were both significantly decreased after CA (cortex: OXPHOSCI P<0.01, ETSCII P<0.05; hippocampus: OXPHOSCI P<0.03, ETSCII P<0.01). In the hippocampus, there was a significant decrease in maximal uncoupled, nonphosphorylating respiration (ETSCI+CII), as well as a 30% reduction in citrate synthase activity (P<0.04). Conclusions Mitochondria in both the cortex and hippocampus displayed significant alterations in respiratory function after CA despite excellent cardiopulmonary resuscitation and postresuscitation care in asphyxia-associated ventricular fibrillation CA. Analysis of integrated ETS function identifies mitochondrial

  6. Endothelin-1 elevates regional cerebral perfusion during prolonged ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest in pigs.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Michael; Sterz, Fritz; Behringer, Wilhelm; Oschatz, Elisabeth; Kofler, Julia; Eisenburger, Philip; Kittler, Harald; Konschitzky, Reinhard; Laggner, Anton N

    2002-12-01

    Since adrenaline (epinephrine) also has negative effects during and after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) a non-adrenergic vasoconstrictor like endothelin might be an alternative to increase vital organ blood flow. We studied the effect of different doses of endothelin-1 compared with adrenaline on the ability to resuscitate, cerebral and myocardial blood flow (MBF) in a closed chest cardiac arrest pig model. After 5 min of ventricular fibrillation, CPR with a ventilator and a mechanical compression device was started. At 10 min, 31 pigs were randomized to receive a single dose of endothelin-1 50, 100 or 200 microg or repeated doses of adrenaline 0.04 mg kg(-1) or saline every 3 min. After 25 min, the pigs were defibrillated to achieve restoration of spontaneous circulation. Blood flow was measured with the fluorescent microsphere method. In animals receiving endothelin-1 50, 100 and 200 microg the cerebral blood flow (CBF) increased from median 28 (25th; 75th quartile: 16; 40), 32 (15; 48) and 17 (4; 65) to 36 (31; 54), 47 (39; 57) and 63 (35; 83) ml min(-1) per 100 g, respectively, 6 min after drug administration (P<0.05 endothelin-1 50 microg vs. Control, P<0.01 endothelin-1 100 and 200 microg vs. Control). At the same time CBF decreased in the control and adrenaline group from 36 (21; 41) and 39 (15; 50) to 12 (2; 25) and 24 (15; 26) ml min(-1) per 100 g, respectively, (P<0.05 adrenaline vs. endothelin-1 200 microg). There was no difference in MBF between the treatment groups despite a higher coronary perfusion pressure (CoPP) in the endothelin-1 groups. Restoration of spontaneous circulation could be only achieved in the endothelin-1 50 microg (3 of 7; 43%) and 100 microg (5 of 7; 71%) group. This study suggests that endothelin-1 enhances CBF during CPR better than adrenaline and increases resuscitation success. PMID:12458069

  7. Using Vascular Closure Devices Following Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest?

    PubMed Central

    Christ, Martin; von Auenmueller, Katharina Isabel; Liebeton, Jeanette; Grett, Martin; Dierschke, Wolfgang; Noelke, Jan Peter; Breker, Irini Maria; Trappe, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives and Background: Despite a generally broad use of vascular closure devices (VCDs), it remains unclear whether they can also be used in victims from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) treated with mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH). Methods: All victims from OHCA who received immediate coronary angiography after OHCA between January 1st 2008 and December 31st 2013 were included in this study. The operator decided to either use a VCD (Angio-Seal™) or manual compression for femoral artery puncture. The decision to induce MTH was based on the clinical circumstances. Results: 76 patients were included in this study, 46 (60.5%) men and 30 (39.5%) women with a mean age of 64.2 ± 12.8 years. VCDs were used in 26 patients (34.2%), and 48 patients (63.2%) were treated with MTH. While there were significantly more overall vascular complications in the group of patients treated with MTH (12.5% versus 0.0%; p=0.05), vascular complications were similar between patients with VCD or manual compression, regardless of whether or not they were treated with MTH. Conclusion: In our study, the overall rate of vascular complications related to coronary angiography was higher in patients treated with mild therapeutic hypothermia, but was not affected by the application of a vascular closure device. Therefore, our data suggest that the use of VCDs in victims from OHCA might be feasible and safe in patients treated with MTH as well, at least if the decision to use them is individually carefully determined. PMID:25897291

  8. Role of blood gas analysis during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youn-Jung; Lee, You Jin; Ryoo, Seung Mok; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Ahn, Shin; Seo, Dong-Woo; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Won Young

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To determine the relationship between acid–base findings, such as pH, pCO2, and serum lactate levels, obtained immediately after starting cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). A prospective observational study of adult, nontraumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients was conducted at an urban academic teaching institution between April 1, 2013 and March 31, 2015. Arterial blood sample for acid–base data was taken from all OHCA patients on arrival to the emergency department. Of 224 OHCA patients, 88 patients with unavailable blood samples or delayed blood sampling or ROSC within 4 minutes were excluded, leaving 136 patients for analysis. The pH in the ROSC group was significantly higher than in the non-ROSC group (6.96 vs. 6.85; P = 0.009). pCO2 and lactate levels in the ROSC group were significantly lower than those in the non-ROSC group (74.0 vs. 89.5 mmHg, P < 0.009; 11.6 vs. 13.6 mmol/L, P = 0.044, respectively). In a multivariate regression analysis, pCO2 was the only independent biochemical predictor for sustained ROSC (OR 0.979; 95% CI 0.960–0.997; P = 0.025) and pCO2 of <75 mmHg was 3.3 times more likely to achieve ROSC (OR 0.302; 95% CI 0.146–0.627; P = 0.001). pCO2 levels obtained during cardiopulmonary resuscitation on ER arrival was associated with ROSC in OHCA patients. It might be a potentially marker for reflecting the status of the ischemic insult. These preliminary results need to be confirmed in a larger population. PMID:27336894

  9. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies GPC5 as a Novel Genetic Locus Protective against Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Post, Wendy; Jui, Jonathan; Hilton, Gina; O'Connor, Ashley; Prineas, Ronald J.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Psaty, Bruce M.; Tomaselli, Gordon F.; Rea, Thomas; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Siscovick, David S.; Burke, Gregory L.; Marban, Eduardo; Spooner, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Existing studies indicate a significant genetic component for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) provide an unbiased approach for identification of novel genes. We performed a GWAS to identify genetic determinants of SCA. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a case-control design within the ongoing Oregon Sudden Unexpected Death Study (Oregon-SUDS). Cases (n = 424) were SCAs with coronary artery disease (CAD) among residents of Portland, OR (2002–07, population ∼1,000,000) and controls (n = 226) were residents with CAD, but no history of SCA. All subjects were of White-European ancestry and GWAS was performed using Affymetrix 500K/5.0 and 6.0 arrays. High signal markers were genotyped in SCA cases (n = 521) identified from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC) and the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) (combined n = 19,611). No SNPs reached genome-wide significance (p<5×10−8). SNPs at 6 loci were prioritized for follow-up primarily based on significance of p<10−4 and proximity to a known gene (CSMD2, GPR37L1, LIN9, B4GALNT3, GPC5, and ZNF592). The minor allele of GPC5 (GLYPICAN 5, rs3864180) was associated with a lower risk of SCA in Oregon-SUDS, an effect that was also observed in ARIC/CHS whites (p<0.05) and blacks (p<0.04). In a combined Cox proportional hazards model analysis that adjusted for race, the minor allele exhibited a hazard ratio of 0.85 (95% CI 0.74 to 0.98; p<0.01). Conclusions/Significance A novel genetic locus for SCA, GPC5, was identified from Oregon-SUDS and successfully validated in the ARIC and CHS cohorts. Three other members of the Glypican family have been previously implicated in human disease, including cardiac conditions. The mechanism of this specific association requires further study. PMID:20360844

  10. The need to immobilise the cervical spine during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and electric shock administration in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Desroziers, Milene; Mole, Sophie; Jost, Daniel; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    In cases of out-of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), falling to the ground can cause brain and neck trauma to the patient. We present a case of a man in his mid-60s who suffered from an OHCA resulting in a violent collapse. The patient received immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation, but his spine was immobilised only after a large frontal haematoma was found. The resuscitation efforts resulted in return of spontaneous circulation and discharge from hospital. After this, doctors performed angioplasty, followed by a cardiopulmonary bypass. Later, CT scan examination reported a displaced and unstable fracture of the 6th vertebra without bone marrow involvement. The patient underwent a second operation. 40 days later, he was able to return home without sequela. This case shows the importance of analysing the circumstances of a fall, considering the possibility of two concomitant diagnoses and prioritising investigations and treatment. PMID:27298289

  11. Cardiac hydatid cyst: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Ustünsoy, Haşim; Akdemir, Ilyas; Sivrikoz, M Cumhur; Tahtaci, Nursan; Aksoy, Mehmet; Tunçözgür, Bülent

    2002-01-01

    Cardiac hydatid cyst is life threatening but rare. It is usually asymptomatic and has potentially lethal complications, so early diagnosis with definitive treatment is life-saving. In the present article, we report two cases. The first is a 30-year-old woman with a primary large multivesicular hydatid cyst in the left ventricle. The second is a 17-year-old woman who had multivisceral involvement with a cardiac hydatid cyst, a congenital cardiac anomaly that was an atrial septal defect complicated by pulmonary hypertension. 2-D echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the diagnosis. Surgical treatment was performed using extracorporeal circulation and adjunctive albendazol therapy. PMID:16352080

  12. Sudden Cardiac Arrest at the Finish Line: In Coronary Ectopia, the Cause of Ischemia Is from Intramural Course, Not Ostial Location

    PubMed Central

    Joggerst, Steven; Monge, Jorge; Uribe, Carlo; Sherron, Scott; Angelini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old woman, a well-trained runner, had a sudden cardiac arrest just before crossing the finish line of a marathon. She was rapidly resuscitated and was later found to have an ectopic origin of the left coronary artery. This anomaly was surgically repaired by translocating the ostium from the right to the left sinus of Valsalva. Her difficult postoperative course prompted further coronary evaluation, which revealed severe stenosis of the neoostium. The patient underwent a second operation: this time, the stenosis was bypassed via a left internal mammary artery-to-left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) graft. Hypoplasia of the LAD and spasm during manipulation caused the graft to fail, necessitating double-stent angioplasty of the left main ostium and the LAD 2 months later. At the patient's 6-month follow-up examination, she had no further evidence of functional ischemia, and she resumed jogging. Because the mode and mechanism of the patient's condition and events were documented in unusual detail, this case furthers our understanding of sudden cardiac arrest in athletes who have rare coronary anomalies. We conclude that ectopia of a coronary artery does not itself cause potentially fatal ischemia. Rather, these events are due to the ectopic artery's intramural proximal course within the aortic media, which might result in critical stenosis by means of hypoplasia or lateral compression of the artery. PMID:24808787

  13. Epidemiological and Survival Trends of Pediatric Cardiac Arrests in Emergency Departments in Korea: A Cross-sectional, Nationwide Report.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae Yun; Lee, Mi Jin; Kim, Hyun; Yoon, Han Deok; Jang, Hye Young

    2015-09-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) in children is associated with high mortality rates. In Korea, cohort studies regarding the outcomes of pediatric CAs are lacking, especially in emergency departments (EDs) or in-hospital settings. This study was conducted to examine the trends in epidemiology and survival outcomes in children with resuscitation-attempted CAs using data from a cross-sectional, national, ED-based clinical registry. We extracted cases in which cardiopulmonary resuscitation and/or manual defibrillation were performed according to treatment codes using the National Emergency Department Information System (NEDIS) from 2008 to 2012. The total number of ED visits registered in the NEDIS during the 5-yr evaluation period was 20,424,530; among these, there were 2,970 resuscitation-attempted CAs in children. The annual rates of pediatric CAs per 1,000 ED visits showed an upward trend from 2.81 in 2009 to 3.62 in 2012 (P for trend = 0.045). The median number of estimated pediatric CAs at each ED was 7.8 (25th to 75th percentile, 4 to 13) per year. The overall rates for admission survival and discharge survival were 35.2% and 12.8%, respectively. The survival outcome of adults increased substantially over the past 5 yr (11.8% in 2008, 11.7% in 2010, and 13.6% in 2012; P for trend = 0.001); however, the results for children did not improve (13.6% in 2008, 11.4% in 2010, and 13.7% in 2012; P for trend = 0.870). Conclusively, we found that the overall incidence of pediatric CAs in EDs increased substantially over the past 5 yr, but without significantly higher survival outcomes. PMID:26339179

  14. Eccentric apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy unmasked by multimodality imaging: an uncommon but missed cause of out of hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Towe, Eric; Sharma, Saurabh; Geske, Jeffrey; Ackerman, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    A woman in her late 50s experienced a witnessed, sudden out of hospital cardiac arrest. Initial workup included coronary angiography, transthoracic echocardiogram and a CT scan of the chest to rule out pulmonary embolus. She was subsequently discharged home without an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) or a life vest. On follow-up at another facility, an ICD was placed and a Holter monitor showed no ventricular ectopy. Further transthoracic echocardiographic images were obtained, which were suggestive of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. A limited transthoracic echocardiogram with contrast was performed, which did not elucidate the hypertrophy. However, eccentric left ventricular apical wall hypertrophy was visualised by a coronary CT scan. PMID:26153133

  15. The Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology consensus statement on the management of cardiac arrest in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lipman, Steven; Cohen, Sheila; Einav, Sharon; Jeejeebhoy, Farida; Mhyre, Jill M; Morrison, Laurie J; Katz, Vern; Tsen, Lawrence C; Daniels, Kay; Halamek, Louis P; Suresh, Maya S; Arafeh, Julie; Gauthier, Dodi; Carvalho, Jose C A; Druzin, Maurice; Carvalho, Brendan

    2014-05-01

    This consensus statement was commissioned in 2012 by the Board of Directors of the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology to improve maternal resuscitation by providing health care providers critical information (including point-of-care checklists) and operational strategies relevant to maternal cardiac arrest. The recommendations in this statement were designed to address the challenges of an actual event by emphasizing health care provider education, behavioral/communication strategies, latent systems errors, and periodic testing of performance. This statement also expands on, interprets, and discusses controversial aspects of material covered in the American Heart Association 2010 guidelines. PMID:24781570

  16. Effects of large volume, ice-cold intravenous fluid infusion on respiratory function in cardiac arrest survivors.

    PubMed

    Jacobshagen, Claudius; Pax, Anja; Unsöld, Bernhard W; Seidler, Tim; Schmidt-Schweda, Stephan; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Maier, Lars S

    2009-11-01

    International guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation recommend mild hypothermia (32-34 degrees C) for 12-24h in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. To induce therapeutic hypothermia a variety of external and intravascular cooling devices are available. A cheap and effective method for inducing hypothermia is the infusion of large volume, ice-cold intravenous fluid. There are concerns regarding the effects of rapid infusion of large volumes of fluid on respiratory function in cardiac arrest survivors. We have retrospectively studied the effects of high volume cold fluid infusion on respiratory function in 52 resuscitated cardiac arrest patients. The target temperature of 32-34 degrees C was achieved after 4.1+/-0.5h (cooling rate 0.48 degrees C/h). During this period 3427+/-210 mL ice-cold fluid was infused. Despite significantly reduced LV-function (EF 35.8+/-2.2%) the respiratory status of these patients did not deteriorate significantly. On intensive care unit admission the mean PaO(2) was 231.4+/-20.6 mmHg at a F(i)O(2) of 0.82+/-0.03 (PaO(2)/F(i)O(2)=290.0+/-24.1) and a PEEP level of 7.14+/-0.31 mbar. Until reaching the target temperature of cardiac arrest is associated with a deterioration in respiratory function. The infusion of large volumes of cold fluid does not cause a statistically significant further deterioration in respiratory function. A larger, randomized and prospective study is required to assess the efficacy and safety of ice-cold fluid infusion for

  17. Alignment of Do-Not-Resuscitate Status with Patients' Likelihood of Favorable Neurological Survival After In-hospital Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Fendler, Timothy J.; Spertus, John A.; Kennedy, Kevin F.; Chen, Lena M.; Perman, Sarah M.; Chan, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Importance After patients survive an in-hospital cardiac arrest, discussions should occur about prognosis and preferences for future resuscitative efforts. Objective To assess whether patients' decisions for Do-Not-Resuscitate (DNR) orders after a successful resuscitation from in-hospital cardiac arrest are aligned with their expected prognosis. Design, Setting, Participants Within Get With The Guidelines®-Resuscitation, we identified 26,327 patients with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after in-hospital cardiac arrest between April 2006 and September 2012 at 406 U.S. hospitals. Using a previously validated prognostic tool, each patient's likelihood of favorable neurological survival (i.e., without severe neurological disability) was calculated. The proportion of patients with DNR orders within each prognosis score decile and the association between DNR status and actual favorable neurological survival were examined. Exposure DNR orders within 12 hours of ROSC. Main Outcome Likelihood of favorable neurological survival. Results Overall, 5,944 (22.6% [95% CI: 22.1%, 23.1%]) patients had DNR orders within 12 hours of ROSC. This group was older and had higher rates of comorbidities (all P <0.05) than patients without DNR orders. Among patients with the best prognosis (decile 1), 7.1% (95% CI: 6.1%, 8.1%) had DNR orders even though their predicted rate of favorable neurological survival was 64.7% (62.8%, 66.6%). Among patients with the worst expected prognosis (decile 10), 36.0% (34.2%, 37.8%) had DNR orders even though their predicted rate for favorable neurological survival was 4.0% (3.3%, 4.7%) (P for both trends <0.001). This pattern was similar when DNR orders were re-defined as within 24 hours, 72 hours, and 5 days of ROSC. The actual rate of favorable neurological survival was higher for patients without DNR orders (30.5% [95% CI: 29.9%, 31.1%]) compared with those with DNR orders (1.8% [95% CI: 1.6%, 2.0%]), and this pattern of lower survival among

  18. Unique brain region-dependent cytokine signatures after prolonged hypothermic cardiac arrest in rats.

    PubMed

    Drabek, Tomas; Wilson, Caleb D; Janata, Andreas; Stezoski, Jason P; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Garman, Robert H; Tisherman, Samuel A; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2015-03-01

    We previously showed that prolonged cardiac arrest (CA) produces neuronal death with microglial proliferation. Microglial proliferation, but not neuronal death, was attenuated by deeper hypothermia. Microglia are reportedly a major source of cytokines. In this study, we tested the hypotheses that (1) CA will result in highly specific regional and temporal increases in brain cytokines; and (2) these increases will be attenuated by deep hypothermia. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to rapid exsanguination. After 6 minutes of normothermic no-flow, different levels of hypothermia were induced by either ice-cold (IC) or room-temperature (RT) aortic flush. After 20 minutes CA, rats were resuscitated with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and sacrificed at 6 or 24 hours. Rats subjected to CPB only (without CA) and shams (no CPB or CA) served as controls (n=6 per group). Cytokines were analyzed in cerebellum, cortex, hippocampus, and striatum. Immunofluorescence was used to identify cell types associated with individual cytokines. Intra-CA temperature was lower after IC versus RT flush (21°C vs. 28°C, p<0.05). At 6 hours, striatum showed a massive increase in interleukin (IL)-1α and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) (>100-fold higher than in hippocampus), which was attenuated by deeper hypothermia in the IC versus RT group. In contrast, IL-12 was 50-fold higher in hippocampus versus striatum. At 24 hours, cytokines decreased. In striatum, IL-1α colocalized with astrocytes while TNF-α colocalized with neurons. In hippocampus, IL-12 colocalized with hippocampal hilar neurons, the only region where neuronal degeneration was observed at 24 hours at both IC and RT groups. We report important temporo-spatial differences in the brain cytokine response to hypothermic CA, with a novel role of striatum. Astrocytes and neurons, but not microglia colocalized with individual cytokines. Hypothermia showed protective effects. These neuroinflammatory reactions precede

  19. Long-term survival following in-hospital cardiac arrest: A matched cohort study☆

    PubMed Central

    Feingold, Paul; Mina, Michael J.; Burke, Rachel M.; Hashimoto, Barry; Gregg, Sara; Martin, Greg S.; Leeper, Kenneth; Buchman, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Background Each year, 200,000 patients undergo an in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA), with approximately 15–20% surviving to discharge. Little is known, however, about the long-term prognosis of these patients after discharge. Previous efforts to describe out-of-hospital survival of IHCA patients have been limited by small sample sizes and narrow patient populations Methods A single institution matched cohort study was undertaken to describe mortality following IHCA. Patients surviving to discharge following an IHCA between 2008 and 2010 were matched on age, sex, race and hospital admission criteria with non-IHCA hospital controls and follow-up between 9 and 45 months. Kaplan–Meier curves and Cox PH models assessed differences in survival. Results Of the 1262 IHCAs, 20% survived to hospital discharge. Of those discharged, survival at 1 year post-discharge was 59% for IHCA patients and 82% for controls (p < 0.0001). Hazard ratios (IHCA vs. controls) for mortality were greatest within the 90 days following discharge (HR = 2.90, p < 0.0001) and decreased linearly thereafter, with those surviving to one year post-discharge having an HR for mortality below 1.0. Survival after discharge varied amongst IHCA survivors. When grouped by discharge destination, out of hospital survival varied; in fact, IHCA patients discharged home without services demonstrated no survival difference compared to their non-IHCA controls (HR 1.10, p = 0.72). IHCA patients discharged to long-term hospital care or hospice, however, had a significantly higher mortality compared to matched controls (HR 3.91 and 20.3, respectively; p < 0.0001). Conclusion Among IHCA patients who survive to hospital discharge, the highest risk of death is within the first 90 days after discharge. Additionally, IHCA survivors overall have increased long-term mortality vs. controls. Survival rates were varied widely with different discharge destinations, and those discharged to home, skilled nursing facilities or to

  20. Extracranial Hypothermia During Cardiac Arrest and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Is Neuroprotective In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fujiyoshi, Tetsuhiro; Koerner, Ines P.; Herson, Paco S.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that ischemic brain injury is modulated by peripheral signaling. Peripheral organ ischemia can induce brain inflammation and injury. We therefore hypothesized that brain injury sustained after cardiac arrest (CA) is influenced by peripheral organ ischemia and that peripheral organ protection can reduce brain injury after CA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Male C57Bl/6 mice were subjected to CA/CPR. Brain temperature was maintained at 37.5°C±0.0°C in all animals. Body temperature was maintained at 35.1°C±0.1°C (normothermia) or 28.8°C±1.5°C (extracranial hypothermia [ExHy]) during CA. Body temperature after resuscitation was maintained at 35°C in all animals. Behavioral testing was performed at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days after CA/CPR. Either 3 or 7 days after CA/CPR, blood was analyzed for serum urea nitrogen, creatinine, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and interleukin-1β; mice were euthanized; and brains were sectioned. CA/CPR caused peripheral organ and brain injury. ExHy animals experienced transient reduction in brain temperature after resuscitation (2.1°C±0.5°C for 4 minutes). Surprisingly, ExHy did not change peripheral organ damage. In contrast, hippocampal injury was reduced at 3 days after CA/CPR in ExHy animals (22.4%±6.2% vs. 45.7%±9.1%, p=0.04, n=15/group). This study has two main findings. Hypothermia limited to CA does not reduce peripheral organ injury. This unexpected finding suggests that after brief ischemia, such as during CA/CPR, signaling or events after reperfusion may be more injurious than those during the ischemic period. Second, peripheral organ hypothermia during CA reduces hippocampal injury independent of peripheral organ protection. While it is possible that this protection is due to subtle differences in brain temperature during early reperfusion, we speculate that additional mechanisms may be involved. Our findings add to the growing understanding of brain-body cross

  1. Sex and Age Aspects in Patients Suffering From Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Piegeler, Tobias; Thoeni, Nils; Kaserer, Alexander; Brueesch, Martin; Sulser, Simon; Mueller, Stefan M.; Seifert, Burkhardt; Spahn, Donat R.; Ruetzler, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is indicated in patients suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Several studies suggest a sex- and age-based bias in the treatment of these patients. This particular bias may have a significant impact on the patient's outcome. However, the reasons for these findings are still unclear and discussed controversially. Therefore, the aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze treatment and out-of-hospital survival rates for potential sex- and age-based differences in patients requiring out-of-hospital CPR provided by an emergency physician in the city of Zurich, Switzerland. A total of 3961 consecutive patients (2003–2009) were included in this retrospective analysis to determine the frequency of out-of-hospital CPR and prehospital survival rate, and to identify potential sex- and age-based differences regarding survival and treatment of the patients. Seven hundred fifty-seven patients required CPR during the study period. Seventeen patients had to be excluded because of incomplete or inconclusive documentation, resulting in 743 patients (511 males, 229 females) undergoing further statistical analysis. Female patients were significantly older, compared with male patients (68 ± 18 [mean ± SD] vs 64 ± 18 years, P = .012). Men were resuscitated slightly more often than women (86.4% vs 82.1%). Overall out-of-hospital mortality rate was found to be 81.2% (492/632 patients) with no differences between sexes (82.1% for males vs 79% for females, odds ratio 1.039, 95% confidence interval 0.961–1.123). No sex differences were detected in out-of-hospital treatment, as assessed by the different medications administered, initial prehospital Glasgow Coma Scale, and prehospital suspected leading diagnosis. The data of our study demonstrate that there was no sex-based bias in treating patients requiring CPR in the prehospital setting in our physician-led emergency ambulance service. PMID:27149475

  2. Cardiac arrest refractory to standard intervention in atypical Timothy syndrome (LQT8 type 2).

    PubMed

    Philipp, Lucas R; Rodriguez, Fred H

    2016-04-01

    Timothy syndrome (TS) is a rare, multisystem disorder most commonly associated with profound QTc prolongation and cutaneous dysmorphia arising from mutations of the L-type calcium channel. We present a case of a 12-day-old newborn who presented with respiratory distress and cyanosis. Diagnostic workup was notable for multiple cardiac abnormalities, and genetic analysis was consistent with an exon 8 mutation of the CACNA1C gene, which is diagnostic for TS type 2 (atypical TS). This patient presented with a novel constellation of symptoms, without dysmorphic features, and with a more moderate QTc interval. The heterogeneity of phenotypes suggests that this disorder may be characterized by variable expressivity or a spectrum of disease rather than a clearly defined syndrome. PMID:27034553

  3. Cardiac arrest refractory to standard intervention in atypical Timothy syndrome (LQT8 type 2)

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Fred H.

    2016-01-01

    Timothy syndrome (TS) is a rare, multisystem disorder most commonly associated with profound QTc prolongation and cutaneous dysmorphia arising from mutations of the L-type calcium channel. We present a case of a 12-day-old newborn who presented with respiratory distress and cyanosis. Diagnostic workup was notable for multiple cardiac abnormalities, and genetic analysis was consistent with an exon 8 mutation of the CACNA1C gene, which is diagnostic for TS type 2 (atypical TS). This patient presented with a novel constellation of symptoms, without dysmorphic features, and with a more moderate QTc interval. The heterogeneity of phenotypes suggests that this disorder may be characterized by variable expressivity or a spectrum of disease rather than a clearly defined syndrome. PMID:27034553

  4. A novel pharmacological strategy by PTEN inhibition for improving metabolic resuscitation and survival after mouse cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Wang, Huashan; Zhong, Qiang; Zhu, Xiangdong; Chen, Sy-Jou; Qian, Yuanyu; Costakis, Jim; Bunney, Gabrielle; Beiser, David G.; Leff, Alan R.; Lewandowski, E. Douglas; ÓDonnell, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is a leading cause of death in the United States. Despite return of spontaneous circulation, patients die due to post-SCA syndrome that includes myocardial dysfunction, brain injury, impaired metabolism, and inflammation. No medications improve SCA survival. Our prior work suggests that optimal Akt activation is critical for cooling protection and SCA recovery. Here, we investigate a small inhibitor of PTEN, an Akt-related phosphatase present in heart and brain, as a potential therapy in improving cardiac and neurological recovery after SCA. Anesthetized adult female wild-type C57BL/6 mice were randomized to pretreatment of VO-OHpic (VO) 30 min before SCA or vehicle control. Mice underwent 8 min of KCl-induced asystolic arrest followed by CPR. Resuscitated animals were hemodynamically monitored for 2 h and observed for 72 h. Outcomes included heart pressure-volume loops, energetics (phosphocreatine and ATP from 31P NMR), protein phosphorylation of Akt, GSK3β, pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and phospholamban, circulating inflammatory cytokines, plasma lactate, and glucose as measures of systemic metabolic recovery. VO reduced deterioration of left ventricular maximum pressure, maximum rate of change in the left ventricular pressure, and Petco2 and improved 72 h neurological intact survival (50% vs. 10%; P < 0.05). It reduced plasma lactate, glucose, IL-1β, and Pre-B cell colony enhancing factor, while increasing IL-10. VO increased phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3β in both heart and brain, and cardiac phospholamban phosphorylation while reducing p-PDH. Moreover, VO improved cardiac bioenergetic recovery. We concluded that pharmacologic PTEN inhibition enhances Akt activation, improving metabolic, cardiovascular, and neurologic recovery with increased survival after SCA. PTEN inhibitors may be a novel pharmacologic strategy for treating SCA. PMID:25795713

  5. A novel pharmacological strategy by PTEN inhibition for improving metabolic resuscitation and survival after mouse cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wang, Huashan; Zhong, Qiang; Zhu, Xiangdong; Chen, Sy-Jou; Qian, Yuanyu; Costakis, Jim; Bunney, Gabrielle; Beiser, David G; Leff, Alan R; Lewandowski, E Douglas; ÓDonnell, J Michael; Vanden Hoek, Terry L

    2015-06-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is a leading cause of death in the United States. Despite return of spontaneous circulation, patients die due to post-SCA syndrome that includes myocardial dysfunction, brain injury, impaired metabolism, and inflammation. No medications improve SCA survival. Our prior work suggests that optimal Akt activation is critical for cooling protection and SCA recovery. Here, we investigate a small inhibitor of PTEN, an Akt-related phosphatase present in heart and brain, as a potential therapy in improving cardiac and neurological recovery after SCA. Anesthetized adult female wild-type C57BL/6 mice were randomized to pretreatment of VO-OHpic (VO) 30 min before SCA or vehicle control. Mice underwent 8 min of KCl-induced asystolic arrest followed by CPR. Resuscitated animals were hemodynamically monitored for 2 h and observed for 72 h. Outcomes included heart pressure-volume loops, energetics (phosphocreatine and ATP from (31)P NMR), protein phosphorylation of Akt, GSK3β, pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and phospholamban, circulating inflammatory cytokines, plasma lactate, and glucose as measures of systemic metabolic recovery. VO reduced deterioration of left ventricular maximum pressure, maximum rate of change in the left ventricular pressure, and Petco2 and improved 72 h neurological intact survival (50% vs. 10%; P < 0.05). It reduced plasma lactate, glucose, IL-1β, and Pre-B cell colony enhancing factor, while increasing IL-10. VO increased phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3β in both heart and brain, and cardiac phospholamban phosphorylation while reducing p-PDH. Moreover, VO improved cardiac bioenergetic recovery. We concluded that pharmacologic PTEN inhibition enhances Akt activation, improving metabolic, cardiovascular, and neurologic recovery with increased survival after SCA. PTEN inhibitors may be a novel pharmacologic strategy for treating SCA. PMID:25795713

  6. Guidelines for indications for the use of extracorporeal life support in refractory cardiac arrest. French Ministry of Health.

    PubMed

    2009-02-01

    Around 50,000 cardiac arrests (CA) occur each year in France and survival remains as low as 3 to 5%. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) includes several treatment techniques for CA that are regularly updated in French, European, and international guidelines. Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) has been suggested as a therapeutic option in refractory CA since 1976. However, the use of this technique has remained limited to hypothermic CA and to CA occurring during the perioperative period of cardiothoracic surgery, mainly because the results of the initial trials were deceptive. The ease of use of more recent miniaturized ECLS devices has permitted a wider use of the technique in cardiac surgery departments and intensive care units (ICU). Encouraging results have been published recently by several teams in France and Taiwan, in single centre retrospective and prospective cohorts. In these studies, most CA were from toxic or cardiac causes and occurred in the hospital. In these highly selected cohorts, survival with good neurological outcome has been observed in up to 20 to 30% of cases. Nevertheless, the preliminary results of the use of ECLS in out-of-hospital CA in France are very poor, with less than 1% survival being observed. It should be emphasized that the time delay to commencing ECLS in out-of-hospital CA was far greater than that previously reported in in-hospital CA. These contrasting results lead physicians who perform CPR to question the indications and contra-indications of ECLS in these conditions and the French health authorities to question the value of such costly techniques (real cost as well as use of important and highly specialized human resources). The authors shared the following concerns that require emphasis: that an uncontrolled development of ECLS in out-of-hospital CA may lead to its abandonment because of very poor favourable outcome; that ECLS may lead to the survival of patients with poor neurological recovery and the associated

  7. Therapeutic hypothermia protects against ischemia-induced impairment of synaptic plasticity following juvenile cardiac arrest in sex-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Dietz, R M; Deng, G; Orfila, J E; Hui, X; Traystman, R J; Herson, P S

    2016-06-14

    Pediatric cardiac arrest (CA) often leads to poor neurologic outcomes, including deficits in learning and memory. The only approved treatment for CA is therapeutic hypothermia, although its utility in the pediatric population remains unclear. This study analyzed the effect of mild therapeutic hypothermia after CA in juvenile mice on hippocampal neuronal injury and the cellular model of learning and memory, termed long-term potentiation (LTP). Juvenile mice were subjected to cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CA/CPR) followed by normothermia (37°C) and hypothermia (30°C, 32°C). Histological injury of hippocampal CA1 neurons was performed 3days after resuscitation using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Field excitatory post-synaptic potentials (fEPSPs) were recorded from acute hippocampal slices 7days after CA/CPR to determine LTP. Synaptic function was impaired 7days after CA/CPR. Mice exposed to hypothermia showed equivalent neuroprotection, but exhibited sexually dimorphic protection against ischemia-induced impairment of LTP. Hypothermia (32°C) protects synaptic plasticity more effectively in females, with males requiring a deeper level of hypothermia (30°C) for equivalent protection. In conclusion, male and female juvenile mice exhibit equivalent neuronal injury following CA/CPR and hypothermia protects both males and females. We made the surprising finding that juvenile mice have a sexually dimorphic response to mild therapeutic hypothermia protection of synaptic function, where males may need a deeper level of hypothermia for equivalent synaptic protection. PMID:27033251

  8. Detection of Electrographic Seizures by Critical Care Providers Using Color Density Spectral Array After Cardiac Arrest is Feasible

    PubMed Central

    Topjian, Alexis A; Fry, Michael; Jawad, Abbas F.; Herman, Susan T; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Ichord, Rebecca; Berg, Robert A; Dlugos, Dennis J.; Abend, Nicholas S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the accuracy and reliability of electroencephalographic seizure detection by critical care providers using color density spectral array (CDSA) electroencephalography (EEG). Participants Critical care providers (attending physicians, fellow trainees and nurses.) Interventions A standardized powerpoint CDSA tutorial followed by classification of 200 CDSA images as displaying seizures or not displaying seizures. Measurements and Main Results Using conventional EEG recordings obtained from patients who underwent EEG monitoring after cardiac arrest, we created 100 CDSA images, 30% of which displayed seizures. The gold standard for seizure category was electroencephalographer determination from the full montage conventional EEG. Participants did not have access to the conventional EEG tracings. After completing a standardized CDSA tutorial, images were presented to participants in duplicate and in random order. Twenty critical care physicians (12 attendings and 8 fellows) and 19 critical care nurses classified the CDSA images as having any seizure(s) or no seizures. The 39 critical care providers had a CDSA seizure detection sensitivity of 70% [95% CI: 67%, 73%], specificity of 68% [95% CI: 67%, 70%], positive predictive value of 46%, and negative predictive value of 86%. The sensitivity of CDSA detection of status epilepticus was 72% [95% CI: 69%, 74%]. Conclusion Determining which post-cardiac arrest patients experience electrographic seizures by critical care providers is feasible after a brief training. There is moderate sensitivity for seizure and status epilepticus detection and a high negative predictive value. PMID:25651050

  9. The use of cytosolic enzyme increase in cerebrospinal fluid of patients resuscitated after cardiac arrest. Brain Resuscitation Clinical Trial I Study Group.

    PubMed

    Vaagenes, P; Mullie, A; Fodstad, D T; Abramson, N; Safar, P

    1994-11-01

    Levels of brain creatine phosphokinase (CPK), glutamic oxalic transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, and lactate in lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were analyzed as an adjunctive study in a randomized clinical trial evaluating the effects of thiopental loading intravenously in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. Three hospitals participated and a total of 62 cases of enzyme changes were studied. Enzyme levels but not lactate were higher at 48 hours than at 24 hours after restoration of spontaneous circulation. All enzymes were highly correlated with one another at 24 and 48 hours (P < .001). There was a significant negative correlation between cerebral recovery and increased CPK levels at 24 hours (P < .05), and a highly significant correlation with all three enzyme levels at 48 hours (P < .0001). The increase of cytosolic enzyme activity in lumbar CSF reflects permanent brain damage, and there is a relationship between activity levels and cerebral outcome. PMID:7945601

  10. A survey of factors associated with the successful recognition of agonal breathing and cardiac arrest by 9-1-1 call takers: design and methodology

    PubMed Central

    Vaillancourt, Christian; Jensen, Jan L; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Brehaut, Jamie C; Charette, Manya; Kasaboski, Ann; Osmond, Martin; Wells, George A; Stiell, Ian G

    2009-01-01

    Background Cardiac arrest victims most often collapse at home, where only a modest proportion receives life-saving bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation. As many as 40% of all sudden cardiac arrest victims have agonal or abnormal breathing in the first minutes following cardiac arrest. 9-1-1 call takers may wrongly interpret agonal breathing as a sign of life, and not initiate telephone cardiopulmonary resuscitation instructions. Improving 9-1-1 call takers' ability to recognize agonal breathing as a sign of cardiac arrest could result in improved bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival rates for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims. Methods/Design The overall goal of this study is to design and conduct a survey of 9-1-1 call takers in the province of Ontario to better understand the factors associated with the successful identification of cardiac arrest (including patients with agonal breathing) over the phone, and subsequent administration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation instructions to callers. This study will be conducted in three phases using the Theory of Planned Behaviour. In Phase One, we will conduct semi-structured qualitative interviews with a purposeful selection of 9-1-1 call takers from Ontario, and identify common themes and belief categories. In Phase Two, we will use the qualitative interview results to design and pilot a quantitative survey. In Phase Three, a final version of the quantitative survey will be administered via an electronic medium to all registered call takers in the province of Ontario. We will perform qualitative thematic analysis (Phase One) and regression modelling (Phases Two and Three), to determine direct and indirect relationship of behavioural constructs with intentions to provide cardiopulmonary resuscitation instructions. Discussion The results of this study will provide valuable insight into the factors associated with the successful recognition of agonal breathing and cardiac arrest by 9-1-1 call takers

  11. Impact of Building Height and Volume on Cardiac Arrest Response Time.

    PubMed

    Conway, Anders B; McDavid, Andrew; Emert, Jamie M; Kudenchuk, Peter J; Stubbs, Benjamin A; Rea, Thomas D; Yin, Lihua; Olsufka, Michele; McCoy, Andrew M; Sayre, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) care may be delayed when out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) occurs in tall or large buildings. We hypothesized that larger building height and volume were related to a longer curb-to-defibrillator activation interval. We retrospectively evaluated 3,065 EMS responses to OHCA in a large city between 2003-13 that occurred indoors, prior to EMS arrival, and without prior deployment of a defibrillator. The two-tiered EMS system uses automated external defibrillator-equipped basic life support firefighters followed by paramedics dispatched from a single call center. We calculated three time intervals obtained from the computerized dispatch report and time-synchronized defibrillators: initial 911 call to address curb arrival by first unit (call-to-curb), curb arrival to defibrillator power on (curb-to-defib on), and the combined call-to-defib on interval. Building height and surface area were measured with a validated program based on aerial photography. Buildings were categorized by height as short (<25 ft), medium (26-64 ft) and tall (>64 ft). Volume was categorized as small (<60,000 ft(3)), midsize (60,000-1,202,600 ft(3)) and large (>1,202,600 ft(3)). Intervals were compared using the two-tailed Mann-Whitney test. EMS responded to 1,673 OHCA events in short, 1,134 in medium, and 258 in tall buildings. There was a 1.14 minute increase in median curb-to-defib on interval from 1.97 in short to 3.11 minutes in tall buildings (p < 0.01). Taller buildings, however, had a shorter call-to-curb interval (4.73 for short vs 3.96 minutes for tall, p < 0.01), such that the difference in call-to-defib on interval was only 0.27 minutes: 6.87 for short and 7.14 for tall buildings. A similar relationship was observed for small-volume compared to large-volume building: longer curb-to-AED (1.90 vs. 3.01 minutes, p < 0.01), but shorter call-to-curb (4.87 vs. 4.05, p < 0.01); the difference in call-to-defib on was 0.18 minutes. Both taller and larger

  12. Cardiac cephalalgia: case reports and review.

    PubMed

    Wei, J-H; Wang, H-F

    2008-08-01

    Diagnosis of myocardial infarction or acute coronary syndrome is difficult, especially in atypical presentation at an emergency department, and sometimes results in serious legal issues. Symptoms of atypical presentation include shortness of breath, dyspnoea on exertion, toothache, abdominal pain, back pain and throat pain. As of now, reports of a headache, especially exertional headache, as the only presentation of acute cardiac ischaemia are rare and only have case reports. We present two patients with a cardiac source of headache and analyse 32 patients with similar situations from MEDLINE search from 1966 to the present. Cardiac cephalalgia is benign in general, but potential risks for death should be considered. If the patient has increased risk of atherosclerosis with exertional headache, anginal headache should be highly suspected and further work-up should be undertaken. PMID:18505457

  13. A Case of Arteriovenous Type Cardiac Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Jin; Shin, Jin Ho; Choi, Jung Hye; Lee, Jai; Kim, Tae Young; Lee, Jae Ung; Kim, Kyung Soo; Kim, Soon Kil; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Lim, Heon Kil; Lee, Bang Hun; Lee, Chung Kyun

    1998-01-01

    Cardiac hemangiomas are rare primary tumors of the heart and constitute only 2.8% of primary cardiac tumors. They are classified into capillary, cavernous, epitheloid and arteriovenous type and the last one is the most uncommon type. We experienced a case of cardiac hemangioma which was diagnosed as arteriovenous type for the first time in Korea in the literature. The patient was a 54-year-old woman who presented with palpitation and anterior chest pain. The diagnosis was based upon coronary angiography which showed two tumor blushings located in the interatrial and interventricular septum with venous drainage to the coronary sinus and right atrium. Associated atrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular response was controlled with digitalis. PMID:9735668

  14. An unusual case of cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed

    Braconi, Lucio; Pretelli, Paola; Calamai, Giancarlo; Montesi, Gianfranco; Romagnoli, Stefano; Gelsomino, Sandro; Bevilacqua, Sergio; Stefàno, Pierluigi; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2006-03-01

    A case of a 67-year-old woman with cardiac tamponade caused by toothpick ingestion is presented. At clinical presentation, it mimicked postinfarction ventricular free wall rupture and the diagnosis was not made until the operation. Ingested toothpicks have often been reported as a cause of intestinal injuries, but in this rare case the toothpick migrated into the pericardium and caused laceration of the right coronary artery. PMID:16645390

  15. Association between hemoglobin levels and clinical outcomes in adult patients after in-hospital cardiac arrest: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Hung; Huang, Chien-Hua; Chang, Wei-Tien; Tsai, Min-Shan; Yu, Ping-Hsun; Wang, An-Yi; Chen, Nai-Chuan; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2016-08-01

    In addition to cardiac output, oxygen delivery is determined by the amount of oxygen carried by hemoglobin, which is estimated by the product of hemoglobin level and peripheral hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SpO2). Optimal hemoglobin concentration for post-cardiac arrest syndrome (PCAS) has not yet been investigated thoroughly. We conducted a retrospective observational study in a single medical center. We included adult patients between 2006 and 2012 who experienced in-hospital cardiac arrest, and achieved sustained return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). We used multivariable logistic regression analysis to identify factors associated with favorable neurological status at hospital discharge, defined as a score of 1 or 2 on the Cerebral Performance Category scale. Minimum hemoglobin concentration and SpO2 during the initial 24 h after ROSC were used for analysis. Anemia was defined by the World Health Organization criteria as a hemoglobin concentration <12 g/dL in women and <13 g/dL in men. Of the 426 patients included in our analysis, 387 patients (90.8 %) met the criteria for anemia. The mean minimum hemoglobin concentration among all the patients was 9.2 g/dL. The product of hemoglobin × SpO2 was correlated with a favorable neurological outcome (odds ratio 1.003, 95 % confidence interval 1.002-1.004). According to recommended SpO2 by resuscitation guidelines (94-98 %), we calculated the corresponding range of minimum required hemoglobin concentration to be 8.6-9.0 g/dL for a favorable neurological outcome. Anemia common among PCAS patients. Neurological outcome in PCAS might be correlated with hemoglobin concentration following resuscitation. PMID:26758060

  16. Regional health expenditure and health outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Japan: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Tsugawa, Yusuke; Hasegawa, Kohei; Hiraide, Atsushi; Jha, Ashish K

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Japan is considering policies to set the target health expenditure level for each region, a policy approach that has been considered in many other countries. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between regional health expenditure and health outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), which incorporates the qualities of prehospital, in-hospital and posthospital care systems. Design We examined the association between prefecture-level per capita health expenditure and patients’ health outcomes after OHCA. Setting We used a nationwide, population-based registry system of OHCAs that captured all cases with OHCA resuscitated by emergency responders in Japan from 2005 to 2011. Participants All patients with OHCA aged 1–100 years were analysed. Outcome measures The patients’ 1-month survival rate, and favourable neurological outcome (defined as cerebral performance category 1–2) at 1-month. Results Among 618 154 cases with OHCA, the risk-adjusted 1-month survival rate varied from 3.3% (95% CI 2.9% to 3.7%) to 8.4% (95% CI 7.7% to 9.1%) across prefectures. The risk-adjusted probabilities of favourable neurological outcome ranged from 1.6% (95% CI 1.4% to 1.9%) to 3.7% (95% CI 3.4% to 3.9%). Compared with prefectures with lowest tertile health expenditure, 1-month survival rate was significantly higher in medium-spending (adjusted OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.66, p=0.03) and high-spending prefectures (adjusted OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.64, p=0.02), after adjusting for patient characteristics. There was no difference in the survival between medium-spending and high-spending regions. We observed similar patterns for favourable neurological outcome. Additional adjustment for regional per capita income did not affect our overall findings. Conclusions We observed a wide variation in the health outcomes after OHCA across regions. Low-spending regions had significantly worse health outcomes compared with medium-spending or high

  17. Intracellular pH in Gastric and Rectal Tissue Post Cardiac Arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Elaine M.; Steiner, Richard P.; LaManna, Joseph C.

    We directly measured pHi using the pH sensitive dye, neutral red. We defined pHi for rectal and gastric tissue in whole tissue and by layer under control and arrest conditions. Fifteen minutes of arrest was not sufficient time to alter the pHi at the rectal or gastric site. On initial inspection, the stomach may be more sensitive to ischemic changes than the rectum. Understanding the mechanism by which PCO2 generation is used to track clinical changes is vital to the early detection of tissue dysoxia in order to effectively treat and manage critically ill patients.

  18. Severity of injury and the decision to arrest in cases of intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    McLaughry, Charlotte; Chang, Brandon; Kirsten, Charlotte; Hirschel, David; Buzawa, Eve; Patavina, April; Doyle, Shevaun; Cullinane, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    From a victim's physical health perspective, at the centre of any case of intimate partner violence (IPV) is the degree of trauma imparted on that victim by the offender. Yet, the implementations of state-level 'Mandatory Arrest' and 'Preferred Arrest' laws encourage arrests decisions in cases of IPV typically without regard to the level of trauma severity found in each case. And, despite these well-meaning implementations and the gravity of their consequences, the importance of evaluating trauma severity in victims of IPV remains largely overlooked. The goal of this study was to correlate police arrest decisions in cases of IPV to a trauma severity score generated from established clinical protocols in the treatment of trauma. A Trauma Severity Quantification Table (TSQT) was created in order to quantify the major factors of an incident of IPV: anatomical location of attack, method of attack, facilitating weapon/object and resulting trauma. A total of 256 cases of IPV reported to six police departments in Idaho, a state with a discretionary arrest law in domestic violence cases, in the calendar year 2000 were processed using the TSQT. A statistically significant difference was found between arrests (mean 17.96, standard deviation [SD] 5.90) versus no arrest (mean 16.13, SD 5.67) outcomes (P = 0.03). It is suggested that trauma severity is a factor in police arrest decisions in a discretionary state sample, but that more attention needs to be brought to this method of analysis and its implications for future arrest decisions. PMID:22977197

  19. A managed protocol for treatment of deceased potential donors reduces the incidence of cardiac arrest before organ explant

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Glauco Adrieno; Zaclikevis, Viviane Renata; Vieira, Kalinca Daberkow; Cordeiro, Rodrigo de Brito; Horner, Marina Borges W.; de Oliveira, Thamy Pellizzaro; Duarte, Robson; Sperotto, Geonice; da Silveira, Georgiana; Caldeira, Milton; Coll, Elisabeth; Yus-Teruel, Santiago

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of the application of a managed protocol for the maintenance care of deceased potential multiple organ donors at two hospitals. Methods A before (Phase 1)/after (Phase 2) study conducted at two general hospitals, which included consecutively potential donors admitted to two intensive care units. In Phase 1 (16 months), the data were collected retrospectively, and the maintenance care measures of the potential donors were instituted by the intensivists. In Phase 2 (12 months), the data collection was prospective, and a managed protocol was used for maintenance care. The two phases were compared in terms of their demographic variables, physiological variables at diagnosis of brain death and the end of the process, time to performance of brain death confirmatory test and end of the process, adherence to bundles of maintenance care essential measures, losses due to cardiac arrest, family refusal, contraindications, and the conversion rate of potential into actual donors. Student's t- and chi-square tests were used, and p-value < 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results A total of 42 potential donors were identified (18 in Phase 1 and 24 in Phase 2). The time interval between the first clinical assessment and the recovery decreased in Phase 2 (Phase 1: 35.0±15.5 hours versus Phase 2: 24.6±6.2 hours; p = 0.023). Adherence increased to 10 out of the 19 essential items of maintenance care, and losses due to cardiac arrest also decreased in Phase 2 (Phase 1: 27.8 versus 0% in Phase 2; p = 0.006), while the convertion rate increased (Phase 1: 44.4 versus 75% in Phase 2; p = 0.044). The losses due to family refusal and medical contraindication did not vary. Conclusion The adoption of a managed protocol focused on the application of essential measures for the care of potential deceased donors might reduce the loss of potential donors due to cardiac arrest. PMID:23917929

  20. Early administration of epinephrine (adrenaline) in patients with cardiac arrest with initial shockable rhythm in hospital: propensity score matched analysis

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Lars W; Kurth, Tobias; Chase, Maureen; Berg, Katherine M; Cocchi, Michael N; Callaway, Clifton

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate whether patients who experience cardiac arrest in hospital receive epinephrine (adrenaline) within the two minutes after the first defibrillation (contrary to American Heart Association guidelines) and to evaluate the association between early administration of epinephrine and outcomes in this population. Design Prospective observational cohort study. Setting Analysis of data from the Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation registry, which includes data from more than 300 hospitals in the United States. Participants Adults in hospital who experienced cardiac arrest with an initial shockable rhythm, including patients who had a first defibrillation within two minutes of the cardiac arrest and who remained in a shockable rhythm after defibrillation. Intervention Epinephrine given within two minutes after the first defibrillation. Main outcome measures Survival to hospital discharge. Secondary outcomes included return of spontaneous circulation and survival to hospital discharge with a good functional outcome. A propensity score was calculated for the receipt of epinephrine within two minutes after the first defibrillation, based on multiple characteristics of patients, events, and hospitals. Patients who received epinephrine at either zero, one, or two minutes after the first defibrillation were then matched on the propensity score with patients who were “at risk” of receiving epinephrine within the same minute but who did not receive it. Results 2978patients were matched on the propensity score, and the groups were well balanced. 1510 (51%) patients received epinephrine within two minutes after the first defibrillation, which is contrary to current American Heart Association guidelines. Epinephrine given within the first two minutes after the first defibrillation was associated with decreased odds of survival in the propensity score matched analysis (odds ratio 0.70, 95% confidence interval 0.59 to 0.82; P<0.001). Early epinephrine

  1. An evaluation of potential signals for ventricular arrhythmia and cardiac arrest with dolasetron, ondansetron, and granisetron in the fda combined spontaneous reporting system/adverse event reporting system

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Frederick M.; Coop, Andrew J.

    2005-01-01

    arrhythmias and cardiac arrest. The PRR, used as a parameter to detect a potential signal within the database, was 3.23, 1.31, and 1.13 for dolasetron, ondansetron, and granisetron, respectively. The number of observed ventricular arrhythmias and cardiac arrests was ∼3-fold higher with dolasetron compared with the expected value (calculated by dividing the individual agent's total number of events reported by the proportion of adverse events for all agents combined). The results for dolasetron fulfilled the criteria we used to define a potential signal. Conclusions: This analysis detected a potential signal for ventricular arrhythmiasand cardiac arrest with dolasetron, but not with ondansetron or granisetron. However, there are limitations of a PRR analysis, which include only measuring cases that have been reported, providing relative frequencies instead of actual rates, and not providing information on the severity of adverse events or causal relationships. In addition, our analysis does not include consideration of concomitant medications, and only 2 search terms were used. Errors in identifying potential signals may also include confounding factors, such as the underlying disease, potential confusion with reporting under trade and generic names, and potential multiple reporting of the same case. PMID:24790242

  2. Cardiac tumors: leiomyosarcoma – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Syska-Sumińska, Joanna; Zieliński, Piotr; Dłużniewski, Mirosław; Sadowski, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    We present a case report of a 60-year-old woman with a long history of leiomyosarcoma in different locations. She was admitted to the clinic due to a left ventricular tumor diagnosed in ECHO examination. The patient was qualified for radical tumor resection. The early postoperative period was complicated due to low cardiac output syndrome and bradyarrhythmia requiring temporary cardiac pacing. Optimized pharmacological therapy resulted in a gradual reduction of symptoms and a clinical improvement of congestive heart failure (NYHA III – NYHA II). Due to the radical nature of the surgery, the patient was not referred for supplementary treatment. The follow-up currently exceeds 12 months – no new metastases have been found. This case provides an example of how to diagnose and treat heart tumors. PMID:26702284

  3. ‘Stand still … , and move on’, a new early intervention service for cardiac arrest survivors and their caregivers: rationale and description of the intervention

    PubMed Central

    Moulaert, Véronique RMP; Verbunt, Jeanine A; Bakx, Wilbert GM; Gorgels, Anton PM; de Krom, Marc CFTM; Heuts, Peter HTG; Wade, Derick T; van Heugten, Caroline M

    2011-01-01

    This series of articles for rehabilitation in practice aims to cover a knowledge element of the rehabilitation medicine curriculum. Nevertheless they are intended to be of interest to a multidisciplinary audience. The competency addressed in this article is ‘The trainee demonstrates a knowledge of diagnostic approaches for specific impairments including cognitive dysfunction as a result of cardiac arrest.’ Abstract Objective: To describe a new early intervention service for survivors of cardiac arrest and their caregivers, and to explain the evidence and rationale behind it. Rationale: A cardiac arrest may cause hypoxic–ischaemic brain injury, which often results in cognitive impairments. Survivors of cardiac arrest can also encounter emotional problems, limitations in daily life, reduced participation in society and a decreased quality of life. A new early intervention service was designed based on literature study, expert opinion and patient experiences. Description of the intervention: The early intervention service is an individualized programme, consisting of one to six consultations by a specialized nurse for the patient and their caregiver. The intervention starts soon after discharge from the hospital and can last up to three months. The intervention consists of screening for cognitive and emotional problems, provision of information and support, promotion of self-management strategies and can include referral to further specialized care if indicated. Discussion: This intervention is assumed to reduce future problems related to hypoxic–ischaemic brain injury in the patient and caregiver, and its effectiveness is currently being investigated in a randomized controlled multicentre trial. PMID:21565869

  4. High resolution ECG-aided early prognostic model for comatose survivors of out of hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Rauber, Martin; Štajer, Dušan; Noč, Marko; Schlegel, Todd T; Starc, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has a high mortality despite modern treatment. Reliable early prognosis in OHCA could significantly improve clinical decision making. We explored prognostic utility of advanced ECG parameters, obtained from high-resolution ECG, in combination with clinical and OHCA-related parameters during treatment with mild induced hypothermia (MIH) and after rewarming in unconscious survivors of OHCA. Ninety-two patients during MIH and 66 after rewarming were included. During MIH, a score based on initial rhythm, QRS-upslope and systolic pressure resulted in an area under curve (AUC) of 0.82 and accuracy of 80% for survival. After rewarming, a score based on admission rhythm, sum of 12 lead QRS voltages, and mean lateral ST segment level in leads I and V6 resulted in an AUC of 0.88 and accuracy of 85% for survival. ECG can assist with early prognostication in unconscious survivors of OHCA during MIH and after rewarming. PMID:25911585

  5. Induction of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest in prehospital patients using ice-cold Ringer's solution: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Virkkunen, Ilkka; Yli-Hankala, Arvi; Silfvast, Tom

    2004-09-01

    The cooling and haemodynamic effects of prehospital infusion of ice-cold Ringer's solution were studied in 13 adult patients after successful resuscitation from non-traumatic cardiac arrest. After haemodynamics stabilisation, 30 ml/kg of Ringer's solution was infused at a rate of 100ml/min into the antecubital vein. Arterial blood pressure and blood gases, pulse rate, end-tidal CO(2) and oesophageal temperature were monitored closely. The mean core temperature decreased from 35.8 +/- 0.9 degrees C at the start of infusion to 34.0 +/- 1.2 degrees C on arrival at hospital (P < 0.0001). No serious adverse haemodynamic effects occurred. It is concluded that the induction of therapeutic hypothermia using this technique in the prehospital setting is feasible. PMID:15325449

  6. The Effect of Compressor-administered Defibrillation on Peri-shock Pauses in a Simulated Cardiac Arrest Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Glick, Joshua; Lehman, Erik; Terndrup, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Coordination of the tasks of performing chest compressions and defibrillation can lead to communication challenges that may prolong time spent off the chest. The purpose of this study was to determine whether defibrillation provided by the provider performing chest compressions led to a decrease in peri-shock pauses as compared to defibrillation administered by a second provider, in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario. Methods This was a randomized, controlled study measuring pauses in chest compressions for defibrillation in a simulated cardiac arrest model. We approached hospital providers with current CPR certification for participation between July, 2011 and October, 2011. Volunteers were randomized to control (facilitator-administered defibrillation) or experimental (compressor-administered defibrillation) groups. All participants completed one minute of chest compressions on a mannequin in a shockable rhythm prior to administration of defibrillation. We measured and compared pauses for defibrillation in both groups. Results Out of 200 total participants, we analyzed data from 197 defibrillations. Compressor-initiated defibrillation resulted in a significantly lower pre-shock hands-off time (0.57 s; 95% CI: 0.47–0.67) compared to facilitator-initiated defibrillation (1.49 s; 95% CI: 1.35–1.64). Furthermore, compressor-initiated defibrillation resulted in a significantly lower peri-shock hands-off time (2.77 s; 95% CI: 2.58–2.95) compared to facilitator-initiated defibrillation (4.25 s; 95% CI: 4.08–4.43). Conclusion Assigning the responsibility for shock delivery to the provider performing compressions encourages continuous compressions throughout the charging period and decreases total time spent off the chest. However, as this was a simulation-based study, clinical implementation is necessary to further evaluate these potential benefits. PMID:24672620

  7. Trends in Outcomes for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest by Age in Japan: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Tatsuma; Ohashi-Fukuda, Naoko; Matsubara, Takehiro; Doi, Kent; Kitsuta, Yoichi; Nakajima, Susumu; Yahagi, Naoki

    2015-12-01

    Population aging has rapidly advanced throughout the world and the elderly accounting for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has increased yearly.We identified all adults who experienced an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the All-Japan Utstein Registry of the Fire and Disaster Management Agency, a prospective, population-based clinical registry, between 2005 and 2010. Using multivariable regression, we examined temporal trends in outcomes for OHCA patients by age, as well as the influence of advanced age on outcomes. The primary outcome was a favorable neurological outcome at 1 month after OHCA.Among 605,505 patients, 454,755 (75.1%) were the elderly (≥65 years), and 154,785 (25.6%) were the oldest old (≥85 years). Although neurological outcomes were worse as the age group was older (P < 0.0001 for trend), there was a significant trend toward improved neurological outcomes during the study period by any age group (P < 0.005 for trend). After adjustment for temporal trends in various confounding variables, neurological outcomes improved yearly in all age groups (18-64 years: adjusted OR per year 1.15 [95% CI 1.13-1.18]; 65-84 years: adjusted OR per year 1.12 [95% CI 1.10-1.15]; and ≥85 years: adjusted OR per year 1.08 [95% CI 1.04-1.13]). Similar trends were found in the secondary outcomes.Although neurological outcomes from OHCA ware worse as the age group was older, the rates of favorable neurological outcomes have substantially improved since 2005 even in the elderly, including the oldest old. Careful consideration may be necessary in limiting treatment on OHCA solely for the reason of advanced age. PMID:26656330

  8. Decreased Monocyte HLA-DR Expression in Patients After Non-Shockable out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Venet, Fabienne; Cour, Martin; Demaret, Julie; Monneret, Guillaume; Argaud, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) constitutes a major health care problem with the development in immediate survivors of a post-cardiac arrest syndrome including systemic inflammatory response as observed in sepsis. As a decreased monocyte HLA-DR expression (mHLA-DR) has been repeatedly described in septic patients in association with an increased risk of death and nosocomial infections, we tested whether this immune alteration could also be observed after OHCA. Fifty-five non-shockable OHCA patients sampled at Day 0 (D0: within 4 h after OHCA), D1 (the next day), and D3: (after 2 additional days) were included. CD4+ lymphocyte count and mHLA-DR were evaluated by flow cytometry. We observed a marked decrease in mHLA-DR as early as D0 in patients compared with normal values. This decrease persisted till D3 and was associated with a moderate decrease in the number of circulating CD4+ lymphocytes. No correlations were identified between mHLA-DR and usual prognostic markers after OHCA. However, overtime evolution in mHLA-DR values appeared different between survivors and non-survivors with a quasisystematic decrease between D1 and D3 in non-survivors versus an increased expression in survivors. In conclusion, this preliminary pilot study describes the occurrence of OHCA-induced immune alterations as illustrated by a decreased mHLA-DR and CD4+ lymphopenia. Furthermore, we show for the first time the differential overtime evolution in mHLA-DR between survivors and non-survivors without association with usual prognostic markers and multiple organ failure. These initial results should now be confirmed in a larger cohort of OHCA patients. PMID:26796574

  9. Microdialysis Assessment of Cerebral Perfusion during Cardiac Arrest, Extracorporeal Life Support and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Rats – A Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schober, Andreas; Warenits, Alexandra M.; Testori, Christoph; Weihs, Wolfgang; Hosmann, Arthur; Högler, Sandra; Sterz, Fritz; Janata, Andreas; Scherer, Thomas; Magnet, Ingrid A. M.; Ettl, Florian; Laggner, Anton N.; Herkner, Harald; Zeitlinger, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral metabolic alterations during cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and extracorporeal cardiopulmonary life support (ECLS) are poorly explored. Markers are needed for a more personalized resuscitation and post—resuscitation care. Aim of this study was to investigate early metabolic changes in the hippocampal CA1 region during ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest (VF-CA) and ECLS versus conventional CPR. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (350g) underwent 8min untreated VF-CA followed by ECLS (n = 8; bloodflow 100ml/kg), mechanical CPR (n = 18; 200/min) until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Shams (n = 2) were included. Glucose, glutamate and lactate/pyruvate ratio were compared between treatment groups and animals with and without ROSC. Ten animals (39%) achieved ROSC (ECLS 5/8 vs. CPR 5/18; OR 4,3;CI:0.7–25;p = 0.189). During VF-CA central nervous glucose decreased (0.32±0.1mmol/l to 0.04±0.01mmol/l; p<0.001) and showed a significant rise (0.53±0.1;p<0.001) after resuscitation. Lactate/pyruvate (L/P) ratio showed a 5fold increase (31 to 164; p<0.001; maximum 8min post ROSC). Glutamate showed a 3.5-fold increase to (2.06±1.5 to 7.12±5.1μmol/L; p<0.001) after CA. All parameters normalized after ROSC with no significant differences between ECLS and CPR. Metabolic changes during ischemia and resuscitation can be displayed by cerebral microdialysis in our VF-CA CPR and ECLS rat model. We found similar microdialysate concentrations and patterns of normalization in both resuscitation methods used. Institutional Protocol Number: GZ0064.11/3b/2011 PMID:27175905

  10. A survey of attitudes and factors associated with successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) knowledge transfer in an older population most likely to witness cardiac arrest: design and methodology

    PubMed Central

    Vaillancourt, Christian; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Brehaut, Jamie C; Osmond, Martin; Charette, Manya L; Wells, George A; Stiell, Ian G

    2008-01-01

    Background Overall survival rates for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest rarely exceed 5%. While bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can increase survival for cardiac arrest victims by up to four times, bystander CPR rates remain low in Canada (15%). Most cardiac arrest victims are men in their sixties, they usually collapse in their own home (85%) and the event is witnessed 50% of the time. These statistics would appear to support a strategy of targeted CPR training for an older population that is most likely to witness a cardiac arrest event. However, interest in CPR training appears to decrease with advancing age. Behaviour surrounding CPR training and performance has never been studied using well validated behavioural theories. Methods/Design The overall goal of this study is to conduct a survey to better understand the behavioural factors influencing CPR training and performance in men and women 55 years of age and older. The study will proceed in three phases. In phase one, semi-structured qualitative interviews will be conducted and recorded to identify common categories and themes regarding seeking CPR training and providing CPR to a cardiac arrest victim. The themes identified in the first phase will be used in phase two to develop, pilot-test, and refine a survey instrument based upon the Theory of Planned Behaviour. In the third phase of the project, the final survey will be administered to a sample of the study population over the telephone. Analyses will include measures of sampling bias, reliability of the measures, construct validity, as well as multiple regression analyses to identify constructs and beliefs most salient to seniors' decisions about whether to attend CPR classes or perform CPR on a cardiac arrest victim. Discussion The results of this survey will provide valuable insight into factors influencing the interest in CPR training and performance among a targeted group of individuals most susceptible to witnessing a victim in cardiac

  11. Effects of nimodipine on cerebral blood flow and cerebrospinal fluid pressure after cardiac arrest: correlation with neurologic outcome.

    PubMed

    Forsman, M; Aarseth, H P; Nordby, H K; Skulberg, A; Steen, P A

    1989-04-01

    Fifty-one patients were included in a blind randomized study to evaluate whether the Ca-blocker nimodipine could influence cerebral blood flow (CBF) or cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) during the cerebral hypoperfusion period that follows resuscitation from cardiac arrest and to determine whether changes in CBF correlate with neurologic outcome. CBF measured 1 to 4 hours after arrest with the use of 133Xe intravenous was significantly greater with nimodipine than with placebo (27 +/- 3 versus 13 +/- 1 ml.100 g-1.min-1 at 3 hours), but with no significant difference at 24 hours. There was no clinical evidence of seriously increased CSFP in any patient in either group the first 48 hours. Mean arterial pressure was significantly lower (86 +/- 4 versus 101 +/- 4 mm Hg at 3 hours), and antiarrhythmic drugs were used significantly less frequently in the nimodipine group than in the placebo group. Twelve patients in each group eventually regained consciousness. There was no significant difference in neurologic status between the two groups at any point, and no positive correlation between CBF in the hypoperfusion period and neurologic outcome. PMID:2929976

  12. PD98059 Protects Brain against Cells Death Resulting from ROS/ERK Activation in a Cardiac Arrest Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen Thi, Phuong Anh; Chen, Meng-Hua; Li, Nuo; Zhuo, Xiao-Jun; Xie, Lu

    2016-01-01

    The clinical and experimental postcardiac arrest treatment has not reached therapeutic success. The present study investigated the effect of PD98059 (PD) in rats subjected to cardiac arrest (CA)/cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Experimental rats were divided randomly into 3 groups: sham, CA, and PD. The rats except for sham group were subjected to CA for 5 min followed by CPR operation. Once spontaneous circulation was restored, saline and PD were injected in CA and PD groups, respectively. The survival rates and neurologic deficit scores (NDS) were observed, and the following indices of brain tissue were evaluated: ROS, MDA, SOD, p-ERK1/2/ERK1/2, caspase-3, Bax, Bcl-2, TUNEL positive cells, and double fluorescent staining of p-ERK/TUNEL. Our results indicated that PD treatment significantly reduced apoptotic neurons and improved the survival rates and NDS. Moreover, PD markedly downregulated the ROS, MDA, p-ERK, and caspase-3, Bax and upregulated SOD and Bcl-2 levels. Double staining p-ERK/TUNEL in choroid plexus and cortex showed that cell death is dependent on ERK activation. The findings in present study demonstrated that PD provides neuroprotection via antioxidant activity and antiapoptosis in rats subjected to CA/CPR. PMID:27069530

  13. Prognostic factors for death and survival with or without complications in cardiac arrest patients receiving CPR within 24 hours of anesthesia for emergency surgery

    PubMed Central

    Siriphuwanun, Visith; Punjasawadwong, Yodying; Lapisatepun, Worawut; Charuluxananan, Somrat; Uerpairojkit, Ketchada

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine prognostic factors for death and survival with or without complications in cardiac arrest patients who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) within 24 hours of receiving anesthesia for emergency surgery. Patients and methods A retrospective cohort study approved by the Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai University Hospital Ethical Committee. Data used were taken from records of 751 cardiac arrest patients who received their first CPR within 24 hours of anesthesia for emergency surgery between January 1, 2003 and October 31, 2011. The reviewed data included patient characteristics, surgical procedures, American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA) physical status classification, anesthesia information, the timing of cardiac arrest, CPR details, and outcomes at 24 hours after CPR. Univariate and polytomous logistic regression analyses were used to determine prognostic factors associated with the outcome variable. P-values of less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results The outcomes at 24 hours were death (638/751, 85.0%), survival with complications (73/751, 9.7%), and survival without complications (40/751, 5.3%). The prognostic factors associated with death were: age between 13–34 years (OR =3.08, 95% CI =1.03–9.19); ASA physical status three and higher (OR =6.60, 95% CI =2.17–20.13); precardiopulmonary comorbidity (OR =3.28, 95% CI =1.09–9.90); the condition of patients who were on mechanical ventilation prior to receiving anesthesia (OR =4.11, 95% CI =1.17–14.38); surgery in the upper abdominal site (OR =14.64, 95% CI =2.83–75.82); shock prior to cardiac arrest (OR =6.24, 95% CI =2.53–15.36); nonshockable electrocardiography (EKG) rhythm (OR =5.67, 95% CI =1.93–16.62); cardiac arrest occurring in postoperative period (OR =7.35, 95% CI =2.89–18.74); and duration of CPR more than 30 minutes (OR =4.32, 95% CI =1.39–13.45). The prognostic factors associated with survival with complications were being greater

  14. Early Activation of the Kynurenine Pathway Predicts Early Death and Long‐term Outcome in Patients Resuscitated From Out‐of‐Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Ristagno, Giuseppe; Latini, Roberto; Vaahersalo, Jukka; Masson, Serge; Kurola, Jouni; Varpula, Tero; Lucchetti, Jacopo; Fracasso, Claudia; Guiso, Giovanna; Montanelli, Alessandro; Barlera, Simona; Gobbi, Marco; Tiainen, Marjaana; Pettilä, Ville; Skrifvars, Markus B.

    2014-01-01

    Background The kynurenine pathway (KP) is the major route of tryptophan (TRP) catabolism and is activated by inflammation and after cardiac arrest in animals. We hypothesized that the KP activation level correlates with severity of post–cardiac arrest shock, early death, and long‐term outcome. Methods and Results Plasma was obtained from 245 patients enrolled in a prospective multicenter observational study in 21 intensive care units in Finland. Time to return of spontaneous circulation, lowest systolic arterial pressure, and bicarbonate during the first 24 hours were collected. A cerebral performance category of 3 to 5 defined 12‐month poor outcome. Plasma TRP and KP metabolites, kynurenine (KYN), kynurenic acid, 3‐hydroxyanthranilic acid, and the ratio of KYN to TRP were measured by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. All KP metabolites at intensive care unit admission were significantly higher in cardiac arrest patients with a nonshockable rhythm compared to those with a shockable rhythm, and kynurenic acid and 3‐hydroxyanthranilic acid correlated with time to return of spontaneous circulation. Patients with higher levels of KYN, KYN to TRP, kynurenic acid, and 3‐hydroxyanthranilic acid had lower 24‐hour systolic arterial pressure and bicarbonate. All KP metabolites and the ratio of KYN to TRP, but not TRP, were significantly higher in patients who died in the intensive care unit in comparison to those who survived. Multivariable logistic regression showed that high kynurenic acid (odds ratio: 1.004; 95% confidence interval: 1.001 to 1.008; P=0.014), and 3‐hydroxyanthranilic acid (odds ratio: 1.011; 95% confidence interval: 1.001 to 1.022; P=0.03) were independently associated with 12‐month poor outcome and significantly improved risk reclassification. Conclusions KP is activated early after cardiac arrest and is associated with severity of post–cardiac arrest shock, early death, and poor long‐term outcome. PMID:25092787

  15. Spontaneous chylous cardiac tamponade: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chylous cardiac tamponade is a rare condition with little known cause. Case presentation A case of an otherwise healthy woman who admitted with dyspnea and palpitations is presented. She had a history of a painful flexion-hyperextension of the spine. Diagnostic evaluation proved a chylous pericardial effusion with a disruption of the anterior longitudinal spinal ligament. Video-assisted thoracic surgery with mass supradiaphragmatic ligation of the thoracic duct and pericardial window formation was carried out successfully and resulted in the complete cure of the patient's condition. Conclusion Chylous pericardial effusion and subsequent tamponade is a rare entity. Endoscopic surgery is offering a safe and effective treatment. PMID:20236535

  16. Fever After Rewarming: Incidence of Pyrexia in Post-Cardiac Arrest Patients who have Undergone Mild Therapeutic Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Cocchi, Michael N.; Boone, Myles D.; Giberson, Brandon; Giberson, Tyler; Farrell, Emily; Salciccioli, Justin D.; Talmor, Daniel; Williams, Donna; Donnino, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Induction of mild therapeutic hypothermia, or TH (temperature 32–34°C), has become standard of care in many hospitals for comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. Pyrexia, or fever, is known to be detrimental in patients with neurologic injuries such as stroke or trauma. The incidence of pyrexia in the post-rewarming phase of TH is unknown. We attempted to determine the incidence of fever after TH, and hypothesized that those patients who were febrile after rewarming would have worse clinical outcomes than those who maintained normothermia in the post-rewarming period. Methods Retrospective data analysis of survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) over a period of 29 months (12/2007–4/2010). Inclusion criteria: OHCA, age > 18, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and treatment with TH. Exclusion criteria: traumatic arrest, pregnancy. Data collected included age, sex, neurologic outcome, mortality, and whether the patient developed a fever (temperature > 100.4°F, 38°C) within 24 hours after being fully rewarmed to a normal core body temperature after TH. We used simple descriptive statistics and Fisher’s exact test to report our findings. Results A total of 149 patients were identified; of these, 82 (55%) underwent TH. The mean age of the TH cohort was 66 years, and 28 (31%) were female. 54 patients survived for > 24 hours after rewarming and were included in the analysis. Among the analyzed cohort, 28/54 (52 %) developed fever within 24 hours after being rewarmed. Outcome measures included in-hospital mortality, as well as neurologic outcome as defined by a dichotomized Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) score. 1, 2 When comparing neurologic outcomes between the groups, 16/28 (57%) in the post-rewarming fever group had a poor outcome (CPC score 3–5), while 15/26 (58%) in the no-fever group had a favorable outcome (P=0.62). In the fever group, 15/28 (52%) died, while in the no-fever group, 14/26 (54%) died (P=0.62). Conclusion

  17. Assessment of cardiopulmonary resuscitation practices in emergency departments for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Noureddine, Samar; Avedissian, Tamar; Isma’eel, Hussain; El Sayed, Mazen J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The survival rate of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) victims in Lebanon is low. A national policy on resuscitation practice is lacking. This survey explored the practices of emergency physicians related to the resuscitation of OHCA victims in Lebanon. Methods: A sample of 705 physicians working in emergency departments (EDs) was recruited and surveyed using the LimeSurvey software (Carsten Schmitz, Germany). Seventy-five participants responded, yielding 10.64% response rate. Results: The most important factors in the participants’ decision to initiate or continue resuscitation were presence of pulse on arrival (93.2%), underlying cardiac rhythm (93.1%), the physician’s ethical duty to resuscitate (93.2%), transport time to the ED (89%), and down time (84.9%). The participants were optimistic regarding the survival of OHCA victims (58.1% reporting > 10% survival) and reported frequent resuscitation attempts in medically futile situations. The most frequently reported challenges during resuscitation decisions were related to pressure or presence of victim’s family (38.8%) and lack of policy (30%). Conclusion: In our setting, physicians often rely on well-established criteria for initiating/continuing resuscitation; however, their decisions are also influenced by cultural factors such as victim’s family wishes. The findings support the need for a national policy on resuscitation of OHCA victims. PMID:27512333

  18. Neurological outcomes in patients transported to hospital without a prehospital return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction As emergency medical services (EMS) personnel in Japan are not allowed to perform termination of resuscitation in the field, most patients experiencing an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) are transported to hospitals without a prehospital return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). As the crucial prehospital factors for outcomes are not clear in patients who had an OHCA without a prehospital ROSC, we aimed to determine the prehospital factors associated with 1-month favorable neurological outcomes (Cerebral Performance Category scale 1 or 2 (CPC 1–2)). Methods We analyzed the data of 398,121 adult OHCA patients without a prehospital ROSC from a prospectively recorded nationwide Utstein-style Japanese database from 2007 to 2010. The primary endpoint was 1-month CPC 1–2. Results The rate of 1-month CPC 1–2 was 0.49%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that the independent variables associated with CPC 1–2 were the following nine prehospital factors: (1) initial non-asystole rhythm (ventricular fibrillation (VF): adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 9.37; 95% confidence interval (CI), 7.71 to 11.4; pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT): aOR, 8.50; 95% CI, 5.36 to 12.9; pulseless electrical activity (PEA): aOR, 2.75; 95% CI, 2.40 to 3.15), (2) age <65 years (aOR, 3.90; 95% CI, 3.28 to 4.67), (3) arrest witnessed by EMS personnel (aOR, 2.82; 95% CI, 2.48 to 3.19), (4) call-to-hospital arrival time <24 minutes (aOR, 2.58; 95% CI, 2.22 to 3.01), (5) arrest witnessed by any layperson, (6) physician-staffed ambulance, (7) call-to-response time <5 minutes, (8) prehospital shock delivery, and (9) presumed cardiac cause. When four crucial key factors (with an aOR >2.0 in the regression model: initial non-asystole rhythm, age <65 years, EMS-witnessed arrest, and call-to-hospital arrival time <24 minutes) were present, the rates of 1-month CPC 1–2 and 1-month survival were 16.1% and 23.2% in initial VF, 8.3% and 16.7% in pulseless VT, and 3

  19. Can the direct cardiac effects of the electric pulses generated by the TASER X26 cause immediate or delayed sudden cardiac arrest in normal adults?

    PubMed

    Ideker, Raymond E; Dosdall, Derek J

    2007-09-01

    There is only a small amount of experimental data about whether the TASER X26, a nonlethal weapon that delivers a series of brief electrical pulses to cause involuntary muscular contraction to temporarily incapacitate an individual, can initiate ventricular fibrillation to cause sudden cardiac arrest either immediately or sometime after its use. Therefore, this paper uses the fundamental law of electrostimulation and experimental data from the literature to estimate the likelihood of such events. Because of the short duration of the TASER pulses, the large duration of the cardiac cell membrane time constant, the small fraction of current from electrodes on the body surface that passes through the heart, and the resultant high pacing threshold from the body surface, the fundamental law of electrostimulation predicts that the TASER pulses will not stimulate an ectopic beat in the large majority of normal adults. Since the immediate initiation of ventricular fibrillation in a normal heart requires a very premature stimulated ectopic beat and the threshold for such premature beats is higher than less premature beats, it is unlikely that TASER pulses can immediately initiate ventricular fibrillation in such individuals through the direct effect of the electric field generated through the heart by the TASER. In the absence of preexisting heart disease, the delayed development of ventricular fibrillation requires the electrical stimuli to cause electroporation or myocardial necrosis. However, the electrical thresholds for electroporation and necrosis are many times higher than that required to stimulate an ectopic beat. Therefore, it is highly unlikely that the TASER X26 can cause ventricular fibrillation minutes to hours after its use through direct cardiac effects of the electric field generated by the TASER. PMID:17721165

  20. CHANGES IN SUBLINGUAL MICROCIRCULATION IS CLOSELY RELATED WITH THAT OF BULBAR CONJUNCTIVAL MICROCIRCULATION IN A RAT MODEL OF CARDIAC ARREST.

    PubMed

    Yin, Lu; Yang, Zhengfei; Yu, Haifang; Qian, Jie; Zhao, Shen; Wang, Jiangang; Wu, Xiaobo; Cahoon, Jena; Tang, Wanchun

    2016-04-01

    Following successful resuscitation, a significantly impaired microcirculation has been identified. The severity of the impairment of microcirculation is closely related to that of vital organ dysfunction. Sublingual microcirculation is a traditional site for the measurement of tissue perfusion. In the present study, we investigated the bulbar conjunctival microcirculatory alterations following CPR and its relationship with the changes of sublingual microcirculation in a rat model of cardiac arrest.Male Sprague-Dawley rats (450-550 g) were utilized. Ventricular fibrillation was induced and untreated for 8 min followed by 8 min of CPR. Sublingual and bulbar conjunctival microcirculatory blood flow was visualized by a sidestream dark-field imaging device at baseline, 30 min, 1, 2, 4, and 8 h post-resuscitation. Both perfused vessel density (PVD) and microcirculatory flow index (MFI) were recorded.The post-resuscitation PVD and MFI were significantly decreased in both sublingual and bulbar conjunctival sites. Sublingual PVD decreased from baseline of 5.9 ± 0.3 to 3.1 ± 0.4 n/mm at 30 min post-resuscitation and MFI from 3.0 ± 0.0 to 1.5 ± 0.3 (both P < 0.05 vs. baseline). Bulbar conjunctival PVD was significantly reduced from baseline of 6.5 ± 0.6 to 3.9 ± 0.5 n/mm at 30 min post-resuscitation and MFI from 3.0 ± 0.0 to 1.2 ± 0.4 (both P < 0.05 vs. baseline). PVD, MFI, and cardiac function did not change significantly from the 30-min measurements in the surviving rats throughout the remainder of the study (both P > 0.05 vs. 30-min post-resuscitation). The decreases in sublingual microcirculatory blood flow were closely correlated with the reductions of bulbar conjunctival microcirculatory blood flow (PVD: r = 0.87, P < 0.05; MFI: r = 0.92, P < 0.05). Myocardial function was significantly impaired in all animals after resuscitation when compared with baseline values (P < 0.05). The impairments of both sublingual and bulbar conjunctival microcirculation were

  1. Status epilepticus and cardiopulmonary arrest in a patient with carbon monoxide poisoning with full recovery after using a neuroprotective strategy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Carbon monoxide poisoning can be associated with life-threatening complications, including significant and disabling cardiovascular and neurological sequelae. Case presentation We report a case of carbon monoxide poisoning in a 25-year-old Saudi woman who presented to our facility with status epilepticus and cardiopulmonary arrest. Her carboxyhemoglobin level was 21.4 percent. She made a full recovery after we utilized a neuroprotective strategy and normobaric oxygen therapy, with no delayed neurological sequelae. Conclusions Brain protective modalities are very important for the treatment of complicated cases of carbon monoxide poisoning when they present with neurological toxicities or cardiac arrest. They can be adjunctive to normobaric oxygen therapy when the use of hyperbaric oxygen is not feasible. PMID:23241416

  2. [Emphysematous Pyelonephritis with Cardio-Pulmonary Arrest : A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Yamamichi, Gaku; Tsutahara, Koichi; Kuribayashi, Sohei; Kawamura, Masataka; Nakano, Kosuke; Kishimoto, Nozomu; Tanigawa, Go; Matsushima, Asako; Fujimi, Satoshi; Takao, Tetsuya; Yamaguchi, Seiji

    2016-08-01

    A 40-year-old woman withuntreated type II diabetes mellitus was discovered withcardiopulmonary arrest in her room. On admission, she had ventricular fibrillation. After cardiopulmonary resuscitation, her own pulse restarted. The plasma glucose was 722 mg/dl and venous PH was 6.704. Abdominal computed tomography revealed gas within the parenchyma of the left kidney. We diagnosed her with emphysematous pyelonephritis and conducted emergency nephrectomy. Urinary and blood cultures were positive for Escherichia coli. Antibiotic therapy was initiated with doripenem and she was restrictively treated with intravenous insulin to control her plasma glucose. On the 8th day of hospital stay, she underwent resection of the small intestine because of necrosis. After multidisciplinary therapy, she was discharged with complete resolution of the infection. PMID:27624108

  3. APPLES TO APPLES OR APPLES TO ORANGES? INTERNATIONAL VARIATION IN REPORTING OF PROCESS AND OUTCOME OF CARE FOR OUT-OF-HOSPITAL CARDIAC ARREST

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Chika; Brown, Siobhan P; May, Susanne J; Iwami, Taku; Koster, Rudolph W.; Beesems, Stefanie G.; Kuisma, Markku; Salo, Ari; Jacobs, Ian; Finn, Judith; Sterz, Fritz; Nürnberger, Alexander; Smith, Karen; Morrison, Laurie; Olasveengen, Theresa M.; Callaway, Clifton W.; Shin, Sang Do; Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten; Daya, Mohamud; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Herlitz, Johan; Strömsöe, Anneli; Aufderheide, Tom P.; Masterson, Siobhán; Wang, Henry; Christenson, Jim; Stiell, Ian; Davis, Dan; Huszti, Ella; Nichol, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) varies between communities, due in part to variation in the methods of measurement. The Utstein template was disseminated to standardize comparisons of risk factors, quality of care and outcomes in patients with OHCA. We sought to assess whether OHCA registries are able to collate common data using the Utstein template. A subsequent study will assess whether the Utstein factors explain differences in survival between emergency medical services (EMS) systems. Study design Retrospective study. Setting This retrospective analysis of prospective cohorts included adults treated for OHCA, regardless of the etiology of arrest. Data describing the baseline characteristics of patients, and the process and outcome of their care were grouped by EMS system, de-identified then collated. Included were core Utstein variables and timed event data from each participating registry. This study was classified as exempt from human subjects’ research by a research ethics committee. Measurements and Main Results Twelve registries with 265 first-responding EMS agencies in 14 countries contributed data describing 125,840 cases of OHCA. Variation in inclusion criteria, definition, coding, and process of care variables were observed. Contributing registries collected 61.9% of recommended core variables and 42.9% of timed event variables. Among core variables, the proportion of missingness was mean 1.9 ± 2.2%. The proportion of unknown was mean 4.8 ± 6.4%. Among time variables, missingness was mean 9.0 ± 6.3%. Conclusions International differences in measurement of care after OHCA persist. Greater consistency would facilitate improved resuscitation care and comparison within and between communities. PMID:25010784

  4. Pre-hospital cooling of patients following cardiac arrest is effective using even low volumes of cold saline

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Pre-hospital induction of therapeutic mild hypothermia (TH) may reduce post-cardiac arrest brain injury in patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Most often, it is induced by a rapid intravenous administration of as much as 30 ml/kg of cold crystalloids. We decided to assess the pre-hospital cooling effectivity of this approach by using a target dose of 15-20 ml/kg of 4°C cold normal saline in the setting of the physician-staffed Emergency Medical Service. The safety and impact on the clinical outcome have also been analyzed. Methods We performed a prospective observational study with a retrospective control group. A total of 40 patients were cooled by an intravenous administration of 15-20 ml/kg of 4°C cold normal saline during transport to the hospital (TH group). The pre-hospital decrease of tympanic temperature (TT) was analyzed as the primary endpoint. Patients in the control group did not undergo any pre-hospital cooling. Results In the TH group, administration of 12.6 ± 6.4 ml/kg of 4°C cold normal saline was followed by a pre-hospital decrease of TT of 1.4 ± 0.8°C in 42.8 ± 19.6 min (p < 0.001). The most effective cooling was associated with a transport time duration of 38-60 min and with an infusion of 17 ml/kg of cold saline. In the TH group, a trend toward a reduced need for catecholamines during transport was detected (35.0 vs. 52.5%, p = 0.115). There were no differences in demographic variables, comorbidities, parameters of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation and in other post-resuscitation characteristics. The coupling of pre-hospital cooling with subsequent in-hospital TH predicted a favorable neurological outcome at hospital discharge (OR 4.1, CI95% 1.1-18.2, p = 0.046). Conclusions Pre-hospital induction of TH by the rapid intravenous administration of cold normal saline has been shown to be efficient even with a lower dose of coolant than reported in previous studies. This dose can be associated with a

  5. Implementation of Ultraportable Echocardiography in an Adolescent Sudden Cardiac Arrest Screening Program

    PubMed Central

    Vanhecke, Thomas E; Weber, James E; Ebinger, Matthew; Bonzheim, Kimberly; Tilli, Frank; Rao, Sunilkumar; Osman, Abdulfatah; Silver, Marc; Fliegner, Karsten; Almany, Steve; Haines, David

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Over a 12-month period, adolescent heart-screening programs were performed for identifying at-risk adolescents for sudden cardiac death (SCD) in our community. Novel to our study, all adolescents received an abbreviated, ultraportable echocardiography (UPE). In this report, we describe the use of UPE in this screening program. METHODS AND RESULTS Four hundred thirty-two adolescents underwent cardiac screening with medical history questionnaire, physical examination, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG), and an abbreviated transthoracic echocardiographic examination. There were 11 abnormalities identified with uncertain/varying clinical risk significance. In this population, 75 adolescents had a murmur or high ECG voltage, of which only three had subsequent structural abnormalities on echocardiography that may pose risk. Conversely, UPE discovered four adolescents who had a cardiovascular structural abnormality that was not signaled by the 12-lead ECG, medical history questionnaire, and/or physical examination. CONCLUSIONS The utilization of ultraportable, handheld echocardiography is feasible in large-scale adolescent cardiovascular screening programs. UPE appears to be useful for finding additional structural abnormalities and for risk-stratifying abnormalities of uncertain potential of adolescents’ sudden death. PMID:25249762

  6. Kidney retrieval after sudden out of hospital refractory cardiac arrest: a cohort of uncontrolled non heart beating donors

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction To counter the shortage of kidney grafts in France, a non heart beating donor (NHBD) program has recently been implemented. The aim of this study was to describe this pilot program for kidney retrieval from "uncontrolled" NHBD meaning those for whom attempts of resuscitation after a witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (CA) have failed (Maastricht 1 and 2), in a centre previously trained for retrieval from brain dead donors. Methods A prospective, monocentric, descriptive study concerning NHBD referred to our institution from February 2007 to June 2008. The protocol includes medical transport of refractory CA under mechanical ventilation and external cardiac massage, kidney protection by insertion of an intraaortic double-balloon catheter (DBC) with perfusion of a hypothermic solution, kidney retrieval and kidney preservation in a hypothermic pulsatile perfusion machine. Results 122 potential NHBD were referred to our institution after a mean resuscitation attempt of 35 minutes (20–95). Regarding the contraindications, 63 were finally accepted and 56 had the DBC inserted. Organ retrieval was performed in 27 patients (43%) and 31 kidneys out of the 54 procured (57%) have been transplanted. Kidney transplantation exclusion was related to family refusal (n = 15), past medical history, time constraints, viral serology, high vascular ex vivo resistance of the graft and macroscopic abnormalities. The 31 kidneys exhibited an expected high delayed graft function rate (92%). Despite these initial results transplanted kidney had good creatinine clearance at six months (66 ± 24 ml/min) with a 89% graft survival rate at six months. Conclusions This study shows the feasibility and efficacy of an organ procurement program targeting NHBD allowing a 10% increase in the kidney transplantation rate over 17 months. With a six months follow-up period, the results of transplanted kidney function were excellent. PMID:19715564

  7. Prevalence of troponin elevations in patients with cardiac arrest and implications for assessing quality of care in hypothermia centers.

    PubMed

    Kontos, Michael C; Ornato, Joseph P; Kurz, Michael C; Roberts, Charlotte S; Gossip, Michelle; Dhindsa, Harinder S; Reid, Renee D; Peberdy, Mary A

    2013-10-01

    The prevalence of troponin elevations in patients with cardiac arrest (CA) using newer generation troponin assays when the ninety-ninth percentile is used has not been well described. We studied patients admitted with CA without ST elevation myocardial infarction (MI). Treatment included a multidisciplinary protocol that included routine use of hypothermia for appropriate patients. Serial assessment of cardiac biomarkers, including troponin I was obtained over the initial 24 to 36 hours. Patients were classified into 1 of 5 groups on the basis of multiples of the ninety-ninth percentile (upper reference limit [URL]), using the peak troponin I value: <1×, 1 to 3×, 3 to 5×, 5 to 10×, and >10×. Serial changes between the initial and second troponin I values were also assessed. A total of 165 patients with CA (mean age 58 ± 16, 67% men) were included. Troponin I was detectable in all but 2 patients (99%); all others had peak troponin I values that were greater than or equal to the URL. Most patients had peak troponin I values >10× URL, including patients with ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia (85%), asystole (50%), and pulseless electrical activity (59%). Serial changes in troponin I were present in almost all patients: ≥20% change in 162 (98%), ≥30% change in 159 (96%), and an absolute increase of ≥0.02 ng/ml in 85% of patients. In conclusion, almost all patients with CA who survived to admission had detectable troponin I, most of whom met biomarker guideline criteria for MI. Given the high mortality of these patients, these data have important implications for MI mortality reporting at CA treatment centers. PMID:23800547

  8. [Prognostic value of S-100B protein plasma measurement after cardiac arrest].

    PubMed

    Ziani, S; Bertho, N; Atlan, G; Fievet, M-L; Ecollan, P; Beaudeux, J-L

    2010-01-01

    S-100B protein is selectively synthesized by glial cells, and is released in biological fluids after acute brain damage. We analyzed initial levels and evolution of plasma S-100B protein concentrations after resuscitated cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA). S-100B levels were determined in 27 subjects at the time of CPA (H0) then 12, 24 and 48 h after resuscitation. Initial levels of S-100B and kinetics revealed that: 1) 95% the of subjects with a concentration of protein S-100B greater than 0.80 microg/L at H0 did not survive; 2) 62% of subjects with a concentration of protein S-100B lower than 0.80 microg/L at H0 survived; 3) 100% of subjects with a protein S-100B level lower than 0.80 microg/L at H0 and whose evolution kinetics of S-100B levels showed a decrease survived; 4) 100% of the subjects whose S-100B levels increased from H12 died. In summary, this study suggests that the threshold of 0.80 microg/L for S-100B plasma levels at H0 could be predictive for the outcome of the CPA, when associated with the kinetic study of S-100B plasma concentration. PMID:20146976

  9. To blow or not to blow: a randomised controlled trial of compression-only and standard telephone CPR instructions in simulated cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Woollard, Malcolm; Smith, Anna; Whitfield, Richard; Chamberlain, Douglas; West, Robert; Newcombe, Robert; Clawson, Jeff

    2003-10-01

    This randomised controlled trial used a manikin model of cardiac arrest to compare skill performance in untrained lay persons randomised to receive either compression-only telephone CPR (Compression-only tel., n=29) or standard telephone CPR instructions (Standard tel., n=30). Performance was evaluated during standardised 10 min cardiac arrest simulations using a video recording and data from a laptop computer connected to the training manikin. A number of subjects in both groups did not open the airway. More than 75% in the Standard tel. group failed to deliver two effective initial rescue breaths, and only 17% provided an adequate inflation volume for subsequent breaths, delivering a median of only five inflations during the entire scenario. Most subjects in both groups gave chest compressions that were too shallow and at an inappropriately rapid rate. Hand position was also poor, but was worse in the group given simplified instructions. There was a significant delay to first compression in both groups, although this interval was shortened by over a minute when ventilations were eliminated from the telephone instruction algorithm (245 vs. 184 s, P<0.001). Over two-and-a-half times as many chest compressions were delivered during an average ambulance response time with compression-only telephone directions compared with standard CPR (461 vs. 186, P<0.001). These variables may be critical in predicting survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Further research is necessary to establish if modifications to scripted telephone instructions can remedy the identified performance deficiencies. Eliminating instructions for rescue breaths from scripted telephone directions will have little impact on the ventilation of most patients. Research is required to determine if the consequent reduction in the delay to starting chest compressions and the significant increase in the number of compressions delivered can increase survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. PMID

  10. Multiscale Entropy Analysis of EEG for Assessment of Post-Cardiac Arrest Neurological Recovery Under Hypothermia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xiaoxu; Jia, Xiaofeng; Geocadin, Romergryko G.; Maybhate, Anil

    2011-01-01

    Neurological complications after cardiac arrest (CA) can be fatal. Although hypothermia has been shown to be beneficial, understanding the mechanism and establishing neurological outcomes remains challenging because effects of CA and hypothermia are not well characterized. This paper aims to analyze EEG (and the α-rhythms) using multiscale entropy (MSE) to demonstrate the ability of MSE in tracking changes due to hypothermia and compare MSE during early recovery with long-term neurological examinations. Ten Wistar rats, upon post-CA resuscitation, were randomly subjected to hypothermia (32 °C–34 °C, N = 5) or normothermia (36.5 °C–37.5 °C, N = 5). EEG was recorded and analyzed using MSE during seven recovery phases for each experiment: baseline, CA, and five early recovery phases (R1–R5). Postresuscitation neurological examination was performed at 6, 24, 48, and 72 h to obtain neurological deficit scores (NDSs). Results showed MSE to be a sensitive marker of changes in α-rhythms. Significant difference (p < 0.05) was found between the MSE for two groups during recovery, suggesting that MSE can successfully reflect temperature modulation. A comparison of short-term MSE and long-term NDS suggested that MSE could be used for predicting favorability of long-term outcome. These experiments point to the role of cortical rhythms in reporting early neurological response to ischemia and therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:19174339

  11. Multiscale entropy analysis of EEG for assessment of post-cardiac arrest neurological recovery under hypothermia in rats.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiaoxu; Jia, Xiaofeng; Geocadin, Romergryko G; Thakor, Nitish V; Maybhate, Anil

    2009-04-01

    Neurological complications after cardiac arrest (CA) can be fatal. Although hypothermia has been shown to be beneficial, understanding the mechanism and establishing neurological outcomes remains challenging because effects of CA and hypothermia are not well characterized. This paper aims to analyze EEG (and the alpha-rhythms) using multiscale entropy (MSE) to demonstrate the ability of MSE in tracking changes due to hypothermia and compare MSE during early recovery with long-term neurological examinations. Ten Wistar rats, upon post-CA resuscitation, were randomly subjected to hypothermia (32 degrees C-34 degrees C, N = 5) or normothermia (36.5 degrees C-37.5 degrees C, N = 5). EEG was recorded and analyzed using MSE during seven recovery phases for each experiment: baseline, CA, and five early recovery phases (R1-R5). Postresuscitation neurological examination was performed at 6, 24, 48, and 72 h to obtain neurological deficit scores (NDSs). Results showed MSE to be a sensitive marker of changes in alpha-rhythms. Significant difference (p < 0.05) was found between the MSE for two groups during recovery, suggesting that MSE can successfully reflect temperature modulation. A comparison of short-term MSE and long-term NDS suggested that MSE could be used for predicting favorability of long-term outcome. These experiments point to the role of cortical rhythms in reporting early neurological response to ischemia and therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:19174339

  12. Successful rescue from cardiac arrest in a patient with postinfarction left ventricular blow-out rupture: "extra-pericardial aortic cannulation" for establishment total cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Suguru; Yaku, Hitoshi; Nakajima, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Akihiko

    2014-08-01

    We report a quick and simple technique to establish cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in a left ventricular (LV) blow-out rupture. A 74-year-old woman with a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction suddenly collapsed and lost consciousness. A venous-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) device was inserted by femoral cannulation. Emergent median sternotomy was performed. The pericardium was not opened first, and the thymus was divided to expose the ascending aorta just above the pericardial reflection. After placing two purse-string sutures on the distal ascending aorta, a 7-mm aortic cannula (Terumo, Tokyo, Japan) was inserted. The pericardium was then incised. A large volume of blood was expelled from the pericardial space, and CPB was initiated with suction drainage. A two-stage venous drainage cannula was then inserted from the right atrial appendage without hemodynamic collapse. After cardiac arrest, closure of ruptured LV wall and concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting were performed. The patient was weaned from CPB with an intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) and the previously inserted venous-arterial ECMO. Extra-pericardial aortic cannulation is an effective and reproducible method to prepare for CPB in emergent cases of LV rupture. PMID:25179976

  13. Short Duration Combined Mild Hypothermia Improves Resuscitation Outcomes in a Porcine Model of Prolonged Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tao; Yang, Zhengfei; Li, Heng; Ding, Youde; Huang, Zitong; Li, Yongqin

    2015-01-01

    Objective. In this study, our aim was to investigate the effects of combined hypothermia with short duration maintenance on the resuscitation outcomes in a porcine model of ventricular fibrillation (VF). Methods. Fourteen porcine models were electrically induced with VF and untreated for 11 mins. All animals were successfully resuscitated manually and then randomized into two groups: combined mild hypothermia (CH group) and normothermia group (NT group). A combined hypothermia of ice cold saline infusion and surface cooling was implemented in the animals of the CH group and maintained for 4 hours. The survival outcomes and neurological function were evaluated every 24 hours until a maximum of 96 hours. Neuron apoptosis in hippocampus was analyzed. Results. There were no significant differences in baseline physiologies and primary resuscitation outcomes between both groups. Obvious improvements of cardiac output were observed in the CH group at 120, 180, and 240 mins following resuscitation. The animals demonstrated better survival at 96 hours in the CH group when compared to the NT group. In comparison with the NT group, favorable neurological functions were observed in the CH group. Conclusion. Short duration combined cooling initiated after resuscitation improves survival and neurological outcomes in a porcine model of prolonged VF. PMID:26558261

  14. Minocycline attenuates brain tissue levels of TNF-α produced by neurons after prolonged hypothermic cardiac arrest in rats

    PubMed Central

    Drabek, Tomas; Janata, Andreas; Wilson, Caleb D.; Stezoski, Jason; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Tisherman, Samuel A.; Foley, Lesley M.; Verrier, Jonathan; Kochanek, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Neuro-cognitive disabilities are a well-recognized complication of hypothermic circulatory arrest. We and others have reported that prolonged cardiac arrest (CA) produces neuronal death and microglial proliferation and activation that are only partially mitigated by hypothermia. Microglia, and possibly other cells, are suggested to elaborate tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) which can trigger neuronal death cascades and exacerbate edema after CNS insults. Minocycline is neuroprotective in some brain ischemia models in part by blunting the microglial response. We tested the hypothesis that minocycline would attenuate neuroinflammation as reflected by brain tissue levels of TNF-α after hypothermic CA in rats. Rats were subjected to rapid exsanguination, followed by a 6 min normothermic CA. Hypothermia (30 °C) was then induced by an aortic saline flush. After a total of 20 min CA, resuscitation was achieved via cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). After 5 min reperfusion, minocycline (90 mg/kg; n=6) or vehicle (PBS; n=6) were given. Hypothermia (34 °C) was maintained for 6 h. Rats were sacrificed at 6 or 24 h. TNF-α was quantified (ELISA) in four brain regions (cerebellum, CEREB; cortex, CTX; hippocampus, HIP; striatum, STRI). Naïve rats (n=6) and rats subjected to the same anesthesia and CPB but no CA served as controls (n=6). Immunocytochemistry was used to localize TNF-α. Naïve rats and CPB controls had no detectable TNF-α in any brain region. CA markedly increased brain TNF-α. Regional differences were seen, with the highest TNF-α levels in striatum in CA groups (10-fold higher, P<0.05 vs. all other brain regions). TNF-α was undetectable at 24 h. Minocycline attenuated TNF-α levels in CTX, HIP and STRI (P<0.05). TNF-α showed unique co-localization with neurons. In conclusion, we report region-dependent early increases in brain TNF-α levels after prolonged hypothermic CA, with maximal increases in striatum. Surprisingly, TNF-α co-localized in neurons and

  15. Microglial depletion using intrahippocampal injection of liposome-encapsulated clodronate in prolonged hypothermic cardiac arrest in rats.

    PubMed

    Drabek, Tomas; Janata, Andreas; Jackson, Edwin K; End, Brad; Stezoski, Jason; Vagni, Vincent A; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Wilson, Caleb D; van Rooijen, Nico; Tisherman, Samuel A; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2012-04-01

    Trauma patients who suffer cardiac arrest (CA) from exsanguination rarely survive. Emergency preservation and resuscitation using hypothermia was developed to buy time for resuscitative surgery and delayed resuscitation with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), but intact survival is limited by neuronal death associated with microglial proliferation and activation. Pharmacological modulation of microglia may improve outcome following CA. Systemic injection of liposome-encapsulated clodronate (LEC) depletes macrophages. To test the hypothesis that intrahippocampal injection of LEC would attenuate local microglial proliferation after CA in rats, we administered LEC or PBS into the right or left hippocampus, respectively. After rapid exsanguination and 6min no-flow, hypothermia was induced by ice-cold (IC) or room-temperature (RT) flush. Total duration of CA was 20min. Pre-treatment (IC, RTpre) and post-treatment (RTpost) groups were studied, along with shams (cannulation only) and CPB controls. On day 7, shams and CPB groups showed neither neuronal death nor microglial activation. In contrast, the number of microglia in hippocampus in each individual group (IC, RTpre, RTpost) was decreased with LEC vs. PBS by ∼34-46% (P<0.05). Microglial proliferation was attenuated in the IC vs. RT groups (P<0.05). Neuronal death did not differ between hemispheres or IC vs. RT groups. Thus, intrahippocampal injection of LEC attenuated microglial proliferation by ∼40%, but did not alter neuronal death. This suggests that microglia may not play a pivotal role in mediating neuronal death in prolonged hypothermic CA. This novel strategy provides us with a tool to study the specific effects of microglia in hypothermic CA. PMID:21970817

  16. Mechanical versus manual chest compressions for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lu; Gu, Wan-Jie; Wang, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence regarding mechanical chest compressions in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is conflicting. The objective of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to compare the effect of mechanical versus manual chest compressions on resuscitation outcomes in OHCA. PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the ClinicalTrials.gov registry were searched. In total, five RCTs with 12,510 participants were included. Compared with manual chest compressions, mechanical chest compressions did not significantly improve survival with good neurological outcome to hospital discharge (relative risks (RR) 0.80, 95% CI 0.61-1.04, P = 0.10; I(2) = 65%), return of spontaneous circulation (RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.95-1.09, P = 0.59; I(2) = 0%), or long-term (≥6 months) survival (RR 0.96, 95% CI 0.79-1.16, P = 0.65; I(2) = 16%). In addition, mechanical chest compressions were associated with worse survival to hospital admission (RR 0.94, 95% CI 0.89-1.00, P = 0.04; I(2) = 0%) and to hospital discharge (RR 0.88, 95% CI 0.78-0.99, P = 0.03; I(2) = 0%). Based on the current evidence, widespread use of mechanical devices for chest compressions in OHCA cannot be recommended. PMID:26503429

  17. The influence of body composition on therapeutic hypothermia: a prospective observational study of patients after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Jimmink, Joost J; Binnekade, Jan M; Paulus, Frederique; Mathus-Vliegen, Elisebeth MH; Schultz, Marcus J; Vroom, Margreeth B

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) benefit from therapeutic hypothermia for 24 hours. The time needed to reach hypothermia (target temperature of 32°C to 34°C) varies widely. In this study, we explore the relation between measures of body composition and the time needed to reach target temperature with hypothermia. Method We conducted a prospective observational study in patients treated with hypothermia after OHCA. Data collected included weight and height, body composition by anthropometric measures and by single-frequency body impedance, and waist-to-hip ratio. Analysis of concordance between impedance and anthropometric measures and hazard ratios of achieving target temperature (event) corrected for different body composition measures. Results Twenty-seven patients were included. The median (interquartile range) time to reach target temperature after admission to the intensive care unit was 191 (105 to 382) minutes. Intraclass correlation for total body fat (TBF) measures was 0.94 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.89 to 0.97). Only TBF percentage (anthropometrics by the Durnin's table) appeared to be associated with time to reach target temperature: 0.93 (95% CI 0.87 to 0.99; P = 0.03). Conclusion The body composition measures from single-frequency impedance and anthropometrics appear to be very concordant. Only TBF percentage (anthropometrics) showed a significant but clinically irrelevant influence on time needed to achieve target temperature with hypothermia. We conclude that there are no indications to adjust current cooling practice toward the body composition of patients. PMID:18616810

  18. Improving neurological outcomes post-cardiac arrest in a rat model: immediate hypothermia and quantitative EEG monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiaofeng; Koenig, Matthew A.; Shin, Hyun-Chool; Zhen, Gehua; Pardo, Carlos A.; Hanley, Daniel F.; Thakor, Nitish V.; Geocadin, Romergryko G.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Objectives Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) after cardiac arrest (CA) improves outcomes in a fraction of patients. To enhance the administration of TH, we studied brain electrophysiological monitoring in determining the benefit of early initiation of TH compared to conventional administration in a rat model. Methods Using an asphyxial CA model, we compared the benefit of immediate hypothermia (IH, T=33°C, immediately post-resuscitation, maintained 6 hours) to conventional hypothermia (CH, T=33°C, starting 1 hour post-resuscitation, maintained 12 hours) via surface cooling. We tracked quantitative EEG using relative entropy (qEEG) with outcome verification by serial Neurological Deficit Score (NDS) and quantitative brain histopathological damage scoring (HDS). Thirty-two rats were divided into 4 groups based on CH/IH and 7/9-minute duration of asphyxial CA. Four sham rats were included for evaluation of the effect of hypothermia on qEEG. Results The 72-hour NDS of the IH group was significantly better than the CH group for both 7-minute (74/63; Median, IH/CH, p<0.001) and 9-minute (54/47, p=0.022) groups. qEEG showed greater recovery with IH (p<0.001) and significantly less neuronal cortical injury by HDS (IH: 18.9±2.5% versus CH: 33.2±4.4%, p=0.006). The 1-hour post-resuscitation qEEG correlated well with 72-hour NDS (p<0.05) and 72-hour behavioral subgroup of NDS (p<0.01). No differences in qEEG were noted in the sham group. Conclusions Immediate but shorter hypothermia compared to CH leads to better functional outcome in rats after 7- and 9- minute CA. The beneficial effect of IH was readily detected by neuro-electrophysiological monitoring and histological changes supported the value of this observation. PMID:17936492

  19. The association between a quantitative computed tomography (CT) measurement of cerebral edema and outcomes in post-cardiac arrest – a validation study

    PubMed Central

    Cristia, Cristal; Ho, Mai-Lan; Levy, Sean; Andersen, Lars W.; Perman, Sarah M.; Giberson, Tyler; Salciccoli, Justin; Saindon, Brian Z.; Cocchi, Michael N.; Donnino, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Previous studies have examined the association between quantitative computed tomography (CT) measures of cerebral edema and patient outcomes. It has been reported that a calculated gray matter to white matter attenuation ratio (GWR) of < 1.2 indicates a near 100% non-survivable injury post-cardiac arrest. The objective of the current study was to validate whether a GWR < 1.2 reliably indicates poor survival post-cardiac arrest. We also sought to determine the inter-rater variability among reviewers, and examine the utility of a novel GWR measurement to facilitate easier practical use. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of post-cardiac arrest patients admitted to a single center from 2008 to 2012. Inclusion criteria were age ≥ 18 years, non-traumatic arrest, and available CT imaging within 24 hours after ROSC. Three independent physician reviewers from different specialties measured CT attenuation of pre-specified gray and white matter areas for GWR calculations. Results Out of 171 consecutive patients, 90 met the study inclusion criteria. Thirteen patients were excluded for technical reasons and/or significant additional pathology, leaving 77 head CT scans for evaluation. Median age was 66 years and 63% were male. In-hospital mortality was 65% and 70% of patients received therapeutic hypothermia. For the validation measurement, the intra-class correlation coefficient was 0.70. In our dataset, a GWR below 1.2 did not accurately predict mortality or poor neurological outcome (sensitivity 0.56–0.62 and specificity 0.63–0.81). A score below 1.1 predicted a near 100% mortality but was not a sensitive metric (sensitivity 0.14–0.20 and specificity 0.96–1.00). Similar results were found for the exploratory model. Conclusion A GWR < 1.2 on CT imaging within 24 hours after cardiac arrest was moderately specific for poor neurologic outcome and mortality. Based on our data, a threshold GWR < 1.1 may be a safer cut-off to identify patients with low

  20. Orofacial pain of cardiac origin: Review literature and clinical cases

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Vicente, Laia; Jané-Salas, Enric; Estrugo-Devesa, Albert; Chimenos-Küstner, Eduardo; Roca-Elias, Josep

    2012-01-01

    The most common types of orofacial pain originate at the dental or periodontal level or in the musculoskeletal structures. However, the patient may present pain in this region even though the source is located elsewhere in the body. One possible source of heterotopic pain is of cardiac origin. Objectives: Report two cases of orofacial pain of cardiac origin and review the clinical cases described in the literature. Study Design: Description of clinical cases and review of clinical cases. Results and conclusions: Nine cases of atypical pain of cardiac origin are recorded, which include 5 females and 4 males. In craniofacial structures, pain of cardiac origin is usually bilateral. At the craniofacial level, the most frequent location described is in the throat and jaw. Pain of cardiac origin is considered atypical due to its location, although roughly 10% of the cases of cardiac ischemia manifest primarily in craniofacial structures. Finally, the differential diagnosis of pain of odontogenic origin must be taken into account with pain of non-odontogenic origin (muscle, psychogenic, neuronal, cardiac, sinus and neurovascular pain) in order to avoid diagnostic errors in the dental practice as well as unnecessary treatments. Key words:Orofacial pain, ischemic heart disease, heterotopic pain, odontalgia. PMID:22322488

  1. Effects of humeral intraosseous versus intravenous epinephrine on pharmacokinetics and return of spontaneous circulation in a porcine cardiac arrest model: A randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Don; Garcia-Blanco, Jose; Burgert, James; Fulton, Lawrence; Kadilak, Patrick; Perry, Katherine; Burke, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), defibrillation, and epinephrine administration are pillars of advanced cardiac life support (ACLS). Intraosseous (IO) access is an alternative route for epinephrine administration when intravenous (IV) access is unobtainable. Previous studies indicate the pharmacokinetics of epinephrine administration via IO and IV routes differ, but it is not known if the difference influences return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). The purpose of this prospective, experimental study was to determine the effects of humeral IO (HIO) and IV epinephrine administration during cardiac arrest on pharmacokinetics, ROSC, and odds of survival. Swine (N = 21) were randomized into 3 groups: humeral IO (HIO), peripheral IV (IV) and CPR/defibrillation control. Cardiac arrest was induced under general anesthesia. The swine remained in arrest for 2 min without intervention. Chest compressions were initiated and continued for 2 min. Epinephrine was administered and serial blood samples collected for pharmacokinetic analysis over 4 min. Defibrillation and epinephrine administration proceeded according to ACLS guidelines continuing for 20 min or until ROSC. Seven HIO swine, 4 IV swine, and no control swine had ROSC. There were no significant differences in ROSC, maximum concentration; except at 30 s, and time-to-concentration-maximum between the HIO and IV groups. Significant differences existed between the experimental groups and the control. The HIO delivers a higher concentration of epinephrine than the IV route at 30 s which may be a survival advantage. Clinicians may consider using the IO route to administer epinephrine during CA when there is no preexisting IV access or when IV access is unobtainable. PMID:26468375

  2. Effects of humeral intraosseous versus intravenous epinephrine on pharmacokinetics and return of spontaneous circulation in a porcine cardiac arrest model: A randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Don; Garcia-Blanco, Jose; Burgert, James; Fulton, Lawrence; Kadilak, Patrick; Perry, Katherine; Burke, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), defibrillation, and epinephrine administration are pillars of advanced cardiac life support (ACLS). Intraosseous (IO) access is an alternative route for epinephrine administration when intravenous (IV) access is unobtainable. Previous studies indicate the pharmacokinetics of epinephrine administration via IO and IV routes differ, but it is not known if the difference influences return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). The purpose of this prospective, experimental study was to determine the effects of humeral IO (HIO) and IV epinephrine administration during cardiac arrest on pharmacokinetics, ROSC, and odds of survival. Swine (N = 21) were randomized into 3 groups: humeral IO (HIO), peripheral IV (IV) and CPR/defibrillation control. Cardiac arrest was induced under general anesthesia. The swine remained in arrest for 2 min without intervention. Chest compressions were initiated and continued for 2 min. Epinephrine was administered and serial blood samples collected for pharmacokinetic analysis over 4 min. Defibrillation and epinephrine administration proceeded according to ACLS guidelines continuing for 20 min or until ROSC. Seven HIO swine, 4 IV swine, and no control swine had ROSC. There were no significant differences in ROSC, maximum concentration; except at 30 s, and time-to-concentration-maximum between the HIO and IV groups. Significant differences existed between the experimental groups and the control. The HIO delivers a higher concentration of epinephrine than the IV route at 30 s which may be a survival advantage. Clinicians may consider using the IO route to administer epinephrine during CA when there is no preexisting IV access or when IV access is unobtainable. PMID:26468375

  3. Better management of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest increases survival rate and improves neurological outcome in the Swiss Canton Ticino

    PubMed Central

    Mauri, Romano; Burkart, Roman; Benvenuti, Claudio; Caputo, Maria Luce; Moccetti, Tiziano; Del Bufalo, Alessandro; Gallino, Augusto; Casso, Carlo; Anselmi, Luciano; Cassina, Tiziano; Klersy, Catherine; Auricchio, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Aim To determine the incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) fulfilling Utstein criteria in the Canton Ticino, Switzerland, the survival rate of OHCA patients and their neurological outcome. Methods and results All OHCAs treated in Canton Ticino between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2014 were followed until either death or hospital discharge. The survival and neurological outcome of those OHCA fulfilling Utstein criteria are reported. A total of 3367 OHCAs occurred in the Canton Ticino over a 10-year period. Resuscitation was attempted in 2298 patients; of those 1492 (65%) were of presumed cardiac origin, 454 fulfilling the Utstein comparator criteria. About 69% [95% confidence interval (CI), 66.6–71.4%] of the patients had a bystander-witnessed arrest; a dispatched cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) steadily and significantly increased from 2005 to 2014. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest occurred prevalently home (67%), in men (71%) of a mean age of 71 ± 13 years. There were no statistically significant differences either in demographic characteristics of OHCA victims over these years or in presenting rhythm. There was a progressive increase in the survival at discharge from 15% in 2005 to 55% in 2014; overall 96% (95% CI, 93.3–99.9%) of the survivors had a good neurological outcome. Conclusion The significant increase in Utstein comparator survival rates and improved neurological outcome in OHCA victims in Canton Ticino are the result of an effective OHCA management programme which includes large-scale public education, a coordinated fast EMS response, high density of external defibrillators, and advances in clinical interventions for OHCAs. PMID:26346920

  4. Impact of Hospital Teaching Status on Mortality, Length of Stay and Cost Among Patients With Cardiac Arrest in the United States.

    PubMed

    Dolmatova, Elena V; Moazzami, Kasra; Klapholz, Marc; Kothari, Neil; Feurdean, Mirela; Waller, Alfonso H

    2016-09-01

    Limited data exist regarding the in-hospital outcomes in patients with cardiac arrest (CA) in teaching versus nonteaching hospital settings. Using the Nationwide (National) Inpatient Sample (2008 to 2012), 731,107 cases of CA were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition codes. Among these patients, 348,368 (47.6%) were managed in teaching hospitals and 376,035 (51.4%) in nonteaching hospitals. Patients in teaching hospitals with CA were younger (62.42 vs 68.08 years old), had less co-morbidities (p <0.001), were less likely to be white (54.6% vs 65.5%) and more likely to be uninsured (9.1% vs 7.6%). Mortality in patients with CA was significantly lower in teaching hospitals than in nonteaching hospitals (55.3% vs 58.8%; all p <0.001). The mortality remained significantly lower after adjusting for baseline patient and hospital characteristics (odds ratio 0.917, CI 0.899 to 0.937, p <0.001). However, the survival benefit was no longer present after adjusting for in-hospital procedures (OR 0.997, CI 0.974 to 1.02, p = 0.779). In conclusion, teaching status of the hospital was associated with decreased in-hospital mortality in patients with CA. The differences in mortality disappeared after adjusting for in-hospital procedures, indicating that routine application of novel therapeutic methods in patients with CA in teaching hospitals could translate into improved survival outcomes. PMID:27378144

  5. Regional TNFα mapping in the brain reveals the striatum as a neuroinflammatory target after ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest in rats☆

    PubMed Central

    Janata, Andreas; Magnet, Ingrid A.M.; Uray, Thomas; Stezoski, Jason P.; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Tisherman, Samuel A.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Drabek, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) triggers neuroinflammation that could play a role in a delayed neuronal death. In our previously established rat model of ventricular fibrillation (VF) CA characterized by extensive neuronal death, we tested the hypothesis that individual brain regions have specific neuroinflammatory responses, as reflected by regional brain tissue levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α and other cytokines. In a prospective study, rats were randomized to 6 min (CA6), 8 min (CA8) or 10 min (CA10) of VF CA, or sham group. Cortex, striatum, hippocampus and cerebellum were evaluated for TNFα and interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and interferon gamma at 3 h, 6 h or 14 d after CA by ELISA and Luminex. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the cell source of TNFα. CA resulted in a selective TNFα response with significant regional and temporal differences. At 3 h after CA, TNFα-levels increased in all regions depending on the duration of the insult. The most pronounced increase was observed in striatum that showed 20-fold increase in CA10 vs. sham, and 3-fold increase vs. CA6 or CA8 group, respectively (p < 0.01). TNFα levels in striatum decreased between 3 h and 6 h, but increased in other regions between 3 h and 14 d. TNFα levels remained twofold higher in CA6 vs. shams across brain regions at 14 d (p < 0.01). In contrast to pronounced TNFα response, other cytokines showed only a minimal increase in CA6 and CA8 groups vs. sham in all brain regions with the exception that IL-1β increased twofold in cerebellum and striatum (p < 0.01). TNFα colocalized with neurons. In conclusion, CA produced a duration-dependent acute TNFα response, with dramatic increase in the striatum where TNFα colocalized with neurons. Increased TNFα levels persist for at least two weeks. This TNFα surge contrasts the lack of an acute increase in other cytokines in brain after CA. Given that striatum is a selectively vulnerable brain region, our data

  6. Prehospital Lactated Ringer's Solution Treatment and Survival in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Prospective Cohort Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hagihara, Akihito; Hasegawa, Manabu; Abe, Takeru; Wakata, Yoshifumi; Nagata, Takashi; Nabeshima, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Background No studies have evaluated whether administering intravenous lactated Ringer's (LR) solution to patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) improves their outcomes, to our knowledge. Therefore, we examined the association between prehospital use of LR solution and patients' return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), 1-month survival, and neurological or physical outcomes at 1 month after the event. Methods and Findings We conducted a prospective, non-randomized, observational study using national data of all patients with OHCA from 2005 through 2009 in Japan. We performed a propensity analysis and examined the association between prehospital use of LR solution and short- and long-term survival. The study patients were ≥18 years of age, had an OHCA before arrival of EMS personnel, were treated by EMS personnel, and were then transported to hospitals. A total of 531,854 patients with OHCA met the inclusion criteria. Among propensity-matched patients, compared with those who did not receive pre-hospital intravenous fluids, prehospital use of LR solution was associated with an increased likelihood of ROSC before hospital arrival (odds ratio [OR] adjusted for all covariates [95% CI] = 1.239 [1.146–1.339] [p<0.001], but with a reduced likelihood of 1-month survival with minimal neurological or physical impairment (cerebral performance category 1 or 2, OR adjusted for all covariates [95% CI] = 0.764 [0.589–0.992] [p = 0.04]; and overall performance category 1 or 2, OR adjusted for all covariates [95% CI] = 0.746 [0.573–0.971] [p = 0.03]). There was no association between prehospital use of LR solution and 1-month survival (OR adjusted for all covariates [95% CI] = 0.960 [0.854–1.078]). Conclusion In Japanese patients experiencing OHCA, the prehospital use of LR solution was independently associated with a decreased likelihood of a good functional outcome 1 month after the event, but with an increased likelihood of ROSC

  7. Early Quantitative Gamma-Band EEG Marker is Associated with Outcomes after Cardiac Arrest and Targeted Temperature Management

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ruoxian; Koenig, Matthew A.; Young, Leanne Moon; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Background Brain recovery after cardiac arrest (CA) is sensitive to temperature. Yet the effect of temperature management on different EEG frequency bands has not been elucidated. A novel quantitative EEG algorithm, sub-band information quantity (SIQ), was applied to evaluate EEG recovery and outcomes after CA. Methods 24 Wistar rats undergoing 7-min CA were randomly assigned to immediate hypothermia (32–34°C), normothermia (36.5–37.5°C), or hyperthermia (38.5–39.5°C) (N=8). EEG was recorded continuously for the first 8 hrs and then for serial 30-min epochs daily. The Neurologic Deficit score (NDS) at 72-hr was the primary functional outcome. Another 4 rats without brain injury were added as a control. Results Better recovery of gamma-band SIQ was found in the hypothermia group (0.60±0.03) compared with the normothermia group (0.40±0.03) (p<0.01) and in the normothermia group compared with the hyperthermia group (0.34±0.03) (p<0.05). The NDS was also improved in the lower temperature groups: hypothermia [median (25th, 75th), 74 (61, 74)] versus normothermia [49 (47, 61)] versus hyperthermia [43 (0, 50)] (p<0.01). Throughout the 72-hr experiment, the gamma-band SIQ showed the strongest correlation at every time point (ranging 0.520–0.788 from 30-min to 72-hr post-resuscitation, all p<0.05) whereas the delta-band SIQ had poor correlation with the 72-hr NDS. No significant difference of subband EEG was found with temperature manipulation alone. Conclusions Recovery of gamma-band SIQ-qEEG was strongly associated with functional outcomes after CA. Induced hypothermia was associated with faster recovery of gamma-band SIQ and improved functional outcomes. Targeted temperature management primarily affected gamma frequency oscillations but not delta rhythm. PMID:26130405

  8. Blinded Evaluation of Combination Drug Therapy for Prolonged Ventricular Fibrillation Using a Swine Model of Sudden Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Mader, Timothy J; Coute, Ryan A; Kellogg, Adam R; Nathanson, Brian H

    2016-01-01

    Despite experimental evidence supporting the use of resuscitation drugs in the treatment of sudden cardiac arrest (CA), there are no good human clinical data to support the decades-old practice of giving these medications during out-of-hospital CA resuscitation. We hypothesized that the lack of efficacy in clinical practice in ventricular fibrillation (VF) is the failure-based manner in which resuscitation drugs have historically been administered (one at a time interspersed with chest compressions and a defibrillation attempt, giving the next only if the previous one was ineffective). The aim of this study was to determine if giving and circulating a combination of commonly available, historically used resuscitation drugs together, prior to the first defibrillation attempt after prolonged VF, might improve short-term outcomes compared with the failure-based serial drug approach used in the past. We used a well-established swine model of sudden prolonged untreated VF. Animals were randomized to receive epinephrine (0.01 mg/kg), vasopressin (0.5 U/kg), amiodarone (4 mg/kg), and sodium bicarbonate (1.0 mEq/kg) in series (SERIES group [n = 53]) or a combination of epinephrine (0.01 mg/kg), vasopressin (0.5 U/kg), amiodarone (4 mg/kg), sodium bicarbonate (1.0 mEq/kg), and metoprolol (0.2 mg/kg) (COCKTAIL group) delivered in rapid succession at the beginning of the attempted resuscitation (n = 27). Data were analyzed descriptively. Baseline characteristics and chemistries between the two groups were the same. Termination of VF was statistically similar in the two groups: 88.7% (47/53) versus 85.2% (23/27) p = 0.66, with an adjusted relative risk ratio (RRR) of 0.94 (0.37, 1.15). However, ROSC was higher in the SERIES group (56.6% [30/53] versus 22.2% [6/27], adjusted RRR = 2.83; [1.16, 3.84] p = 0.029) as was 20-minute survival (52.8% [28/53] versus 18.5% [5/27], adjusted RRR = 3.15 [1.14, 4.54] p = 0.032). The combination of drugs studied, at these dosages

  9. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search: Education & Meetings Scientific Sessions Certified Education Courses & Online Learning Heart Rhythm On Demand Co-Sponsored & Endorsed Events ... Education & Meetings less Scientific Sessions Certified Education Courses & Online Learning Heart Rhythm On Demand Co-Sponsored & Endorsed Events ...

  10. About Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Insight magazine and monthly e-newsletter Our digital magazine delivers helpful articles and the latest news on keeping your heart healthy. ... Our Interactive Cardiovascular Library has detailed animations and illustrations to help you ...

  11. [A case of a syndrome resembling PSP after aortic arch replacement under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest].

    PubMed

    Sakiyama, Yusuke; Michizono, Kumiko; Tomari, Shinya; Watanabe, Osamu; Nakahara, Keiichi; Takashima, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    A 57-year-old man presented with acute signs and symptoms mimicking PSP (bradykinesia, supranuclear ocular palsy, dysphagia, neck dystonia, and apraxic gait) on the day after a graft replacement surgery, which was performed for aortic arch aneurysm under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (rectal temperature, 18 degrees C). Dysphagia improved temporarily, but relapsed after a few months. Symptoms did not change during 2 years of antiparkinsonian drug administration. Brain images obtained before the surgery revealed slight atrophy of the midbrain tegmentum and frontal lobes, but the patient was asymptomatic. No findings of cerebral vascular disease and hypoxic encephalopathy were observed on brain images after the surgery. These clinical features resembling PSP might have been caused by deep hypothermia and the patient's predisposition for PSP. This is the first case report in Japan of a syndrome resembling PSP that occurred after aortic arch replacement under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. PMID:21387699

  12. Renal Insufficiency and Early Bystander CPR Predict In-Hospital Outcomes in Cardiac Arrest Patients Undergoing Mild Therapeutic Hypothermia and Cardiac Catheterization: Return of Spontaneous Circulation, Cooling, and Catheterization Registry (ROSCCC Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Chelvanathan, Anjala; Allen, David; Bews, Hilary; Ducas, John; Minhas, Kunal; Ravandi, Amir; Jassal, Davinder S.; Hussain, Farrukh

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients are a critically ill patient population with high mortality. Combining mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) with early coronary intervention may improve outcomes in this population. The aim of this study was to evaluate predictors of mortality in OHCA patients undergoing MTH with and without cardiac catheterization. Design. A retrospective cohort of OHCA patients who underwent MTH with catheterization (MTH + C) and without catheterization (MTH + NC) between 2006 and 2011 was analyzed at a single tertiary care centre. Predictors of in-hospital mortality and neurologic outcome were determined. Results. The study population included 176 patients who underwent MTH for OHCA. A total of 66 patients underwent cardiac catheterization (MTH + C) and 110 patients did not undergo cardiac catheterization (MTH + NC). Immediate bystander CPR occurred in approximately half of the total population. In the MTH + C and MTH + NC groups, the in-hospital mortality was 48% and 78%, respectively. The only independent predictor of in-hospital mortality for patients with MTH + C, after multivariate analysis, was baseline renal insufficiency (OR = 8.2, 95% CI 1.8–47.1, and p = 0.009). Conclusion. Despite early cardiac catheterization, renal insufficiency and the absence of immediate CPR are potent predictors of death and poor neurologic outcome in patients with OHCA. PMID:26885436

  13. Amiloride but Not Memantine Reduces Neurodegeneration, Seizures and Myoclonic Jerks in Rats with Cardiac Arrest-Induced Global Cerebral Hypoxia and Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Kwok Keung; Truong, Daniel D.

    2013-01-01

    It has been reported that both activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and acid-sensing ion channels during cerebral ischemic insult contributed to brain injury. But which of these two molecular targets plays a more pivotal role in hypoxia-induced brain injury during ischemia is not known. In this study, the neuroprotective effects of an acid-sensing cation channel blocker and an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blocker were evaluated in a rat model of cardiac arrest-induced cerebral hypoxia. We found that intracisternal injection of amiloride, an acid-sensing ion channel blocker, dose-dependently reduced cerebral hypoxia-induced neurodegeneration, seizures, and audiogenic myoclonic jerks. In contrast, intracisternal injection of memantine, a selective uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blocker, had no significant effect on cerebral hypoxia-induced neurodegeneration, seizure and audiogenic myoclonic jerks. Intracisternal injection of zoniporide, a specific sodium-hydrogen exchanger inhibitor, before cardiac arrest-induced cerebral hypoxia, also did not reduce cerebral hypoxia-induced neurodegeneration, seizures and myoclonic jerks. These results suggest that acid-sensing ion channels play a more pivotal role than N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in mediating cerebral hypoxia-induced brain injury during ischemic insult. PMID:23593189

  14. Quantitative assessment of brain tissue oxygenation in porcine models of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation using hyperspectral near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfabadi, Shahin S.; Toronov, Vladislav; Ramadeen, Andrew; Hu, Xudong; Kim, Siwook; Dorian, Paul; Hare, Gregory M. T.

    2014-03-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a non-invasive tool to measure real-time tissue oxygenation in the brain. In an invasive animal experiment we were able to directly compare non-invasive NIRS measurements on the skull with invasive measurements directly on the brain dura matter. We used a broad-band, continuous-wave hyper-spectral approach to measure tissue oxygenation in the brain of pigs under the conditions of cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and defibrillation. An additional purpose of this research was to find a correlation between mortality due to cardiac arrest and inadequacy of the tissue perfusion during attempts at resuscitation. Using this technique we measured the changes in concentrations of oxy-hemoglobin [HbO2] and deoxy-hemoglobin [HHb] to quantify the tissue oxygenation in the brain. We also extracted cytochrome c oxidase changes Δ[Cyt-Ox] under the same conditions to determine increase or decrease in cerebral oxygen delivery. In this paper we proved that applying CPR, [HbO2] concentration and tissue oxygenation in the brain increase while [HHb] concentration decreases which was not possible using other measurement techniques. We also discovered a similar trend in changes of both [Cyt-Ox] concentration and tissue oxygen saturation (StO2). Both invasive and non-invasive measurements showed similar results.

  15. Is Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests Worse During Days of National Academic Meetings in Japan? A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Matsuyama, Tasuku; Hatakeyama, Toshihiro; Shimamoto, Tomonari; Izawa, Junichi; Nishiyama, Chika; Iwami, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Background Outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) might be worse during academic meetings because many medical professionals attend them. Methods This nationwide population-based observation of all consecutively enrolled Japanese adult OHCA patients with resuscitation attempts from 2005 to 2012. The primary outcome was 1-month survival with a neurologically favorable outcome. Calendar days at three national meetings (Japanese Society of Intensive Care Medicine, Japanese Association for Acute Medicine, and Japanese Circulation Society) were obtained for each year during the study period, because medical professionals who belong to these academic societies play an important role in treating OHCA patients after hospital admission, and we identified two groups: the exposure group included OHCAs that occurred on meeting days, and the control group included OHCAs that occurred on the same days of the week 1 week before and after meetings. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for confounding variables. Results A total of 20 143 OHCAs that occurred during meeting days and 38 860 OHCAs that occurred during non-meeting days were eligible for our analyses. The proportion of patients with favorable neurologic outcomes after whole arrests did not differ during meeting and non-meeting days (1.6% [324/20 143] vs 1.5% [596/38 855]; adjusted odds ratio 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 0.88–1.19). Regarding bystander-witnessed ventricular fibrillation arrests of cardiac origin, the proportion of patients with favorable neurologic outcomes also did not differ between the groups. Conclusions In this population, there were no significant differences in outcomes after OHCAs that occurred during national meetings of professional organizations related to OHCA care and those that occurred during non-meeting days. PMID:26639754

  16. A case of cardiac beriberi: a forgotten but memorable disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Sun; Lee, Seung-Ah; Shin, Hyo-Sun; Choi, Hong-Mi; Kim, Soo-Jung; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Park, Young-Bae

    2013-08-01

    Thiamine (vitamin B1) serves as an important cofactor in body metabolism and energy production. It is related with the biosynthesis of neurotransmitters and the production of substances used in defense against oxidant stress. Thus, a lack of thiamine affects several organ systems, in particular the cardiovascular and nervous system. The cardiac insufficiency caused by thiamine deficiency is known as cardiac beriberi, with this condition resulting from unbalanced nutrition and chronic excessive alcohol intake. Given that the disease is now very rare in developed nations such as Korea, it is frequently missed by cardiologists, with potentially fatal consequences. Herein, we present a case study in order to draw attention to cardiac beriberi. We believe that this case will be helpful for young cardiologists, reminding them of the importance of this forgotten but memorable disease. PMID:24044018

  17. Recording signs of deterioration in acute patients: The documentation of vital signs within electronic health records in patients who suffered in-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Jean E; Israelsson, Johan; Nilsson, Gunilla C; Petersson, Göran I; Bath, Peter A

    2016-03-01

    Vital sign documentation is crucial to detecting patient deterioration. Little is known about the documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. This study aimed to examine documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. We examined the vital signs documented in the electronic health records of patients who had suffered an in-hospital cardiac arrest and on whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation was attempted between 2007 and 2011 (n = 228), in a 372-bed district general hospital. We assessed the completeness of vital sign data compared to VitalPAC™ Early Warning Score and the location of vital signs within the electronic health records. There was a noticeable lack of completeness of vital signs. Vital signs were fragmented through various sections of the electronic health records. The study identified serious shortfalls in the representation of vital signs in the electronic health records, with consequential threats to patient safety. PMID:24782478

  18. Which Fingers Should We Perform Two-Finger Chest Compression Technique with When Performing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation on an Infant in Cardiac Arrest?

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Sinn; Oh, Je Hyeok; Kim, Chan Woong; Kim, Sung Eun; Lee, Dong Hoon; Hong, Jun Young

    2016-06-01

    This study compared the effectiveness two-finger chest compression technique (TFCC) performed using the right vs. left hand and the index-middle vs. middle-ring fingers. Four different finger/hand combinations were tested randomly in 30 healthcare providers performing TFCC (Test 1: the right index-middle fingers; Test 2: the left index-middle fingers; Test 3: the right middle-ring fingers; Test 4: the left middle-ring fingers) using two cross-over trials. The "patient" was a 3-month-old-infant-sized manikin. Each experiment consisted of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) consisting of 2 minutes of 30:2 compression: ventilation performed by one rescuer on a manikin lying on the floor as if in cardiac arrest. Ventilations were performed using the mouth-to-mouth method. Compression and ventilation data were collected during the tests. The mean compression depth (MCD) was significantly greater in TFCC performed with the index-middle fingers than with the middle-ring fingers regardless of the hand (95% confidence intervals; right hand: 37.8-40.2 vs. 35.2-38.6 mm, P = 0.002; left hand: 36.9-39.2 vs. 35.5-38.1 mm, P = 0.003). A deeper MCD was achieved with the index-middle fingers of the right versus the left hand (P = 0.004). The ratio of sufficiently deep compressions showed the same patterns. There were no significant differences in the other data. The best performance of TFCC in simulated 30:2 compression: ventilation CPR performed by one rescuer on an infant in cardiac arrest lying on the floor was obtained using the index-middle fingers of the right hand. Clinical Trial Registry at the Clinical Research Information Service (KCT0001515). PMID:27247512

  19. Metabolic Determinants of Electrical Failure in Ex-Vivo Canine Model of Cardiac Arrest: Evidence for the Protective Role of Inorganic Pyrophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Shibayama, Junko; Taylor, Tyson G.; Venable, Paul W.; Rhodes, Nathaniel L.; Gil, Ryan B.; Warren, Mark; Wende, Adam R.; Abel, E. Dale; Cox, James; Spitzer, Kenneth W.; Zaitsev, Alexey V.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Deterioration of ventricular fibrillation (VF) into asystole or severe bradycardia (electrical failure) heralds a fatal outcome of cardiac arrest. The role of metabolism in the timing of electrical failure remains unknown. Objective To determine metabolic factors of early electrical failure in an Ex-vivo canine model of cardiac arrest (VF+global ischemia). Methods and Results Metabolomic screening was performed in left ventricular biopsies collected before and after 0.3, 2, 5, 10 and 20 min of VF and global ischemia. Electrical activity was monitored via plunge needle electrodes and pseudo-ECG. Four out of nine hearts exhibited electrical failure at 10.1±0.9 min (early-asys), while 5/9 hearts maintained VF for at least 19.7 min (late-asys). As compared to late-asys, early-asys hearts had more ADP, less phosphocreatine, and higher levels of lactate at some time points during VF/ischemia (all comparisons p<0.05). Pre-ischemic samples from late-asys hearts contained ∼25 times more inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) than early-asys hearts. A mechanistic role of PPi in cardioprotection was then tested by monitoring mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ) during 20 min of simulated-demand ischemia using potentiometric probe TMRM in rabbit adult ventricular myocytes incubated with PPi versus control group. Untreated myocytes experienced significant loss of ΔΨ while in the PPi-treated myocytes ΔΨ was relatively maintained throughout 20 min of simulated-demand ischemia as compared to control (p<0.05). Conclusions High tissue level of PPi may prevent ΔΨm loss and electrical failure at the early phase of ischemic stress. The link between the two protective effects may involve decreased rates of mitochondrial ATP hydrolysis and lactate accumulation. PMID:23520482

  20. Reactions and coping strategies in lay rescuers who have provided CPR to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Mathiesen, Wenche Torunn; Bjørshol, Conrad Arnfinn; Braut, Geir Sverre; Søreide, Eldar

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) provided by community citizens is of paramount importance for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) victims' survival. Fortunately, CPR rates by community citizens seem to be rising. However, the experience of providing CPR is rarely investigated. The aim of this study was to explore reactions and coping strategies in lay rescuers who have provided CPR to OHCA victims. Methods, participants This is a qualitative study of 20 lay rescuers who have provided CPR to 18 OHCA victims. We used a semistructured interview guide focusing on their experiences after providing CPR. Setting The study was conducted in the Stavanger region of Norway, an area with very high bystander CPR rates. Results Three themes emerged from the interview analysis: concern, uncertainty and coping strategies. Providing CPR had been emotionally challenging for all lay rescuers and, for some, had consequences in terms of family and work life. Several lay rescuers experienced persistent mental recurrences of the OHCA incident and had concerns about the outcome for the cardiac arrest victim. Unknown or fatal outcomes often caused feelings of guilt and were particularly difficult to handle. Several reported the need to be acknowledged for their CPR attempts. Health-educated lay rescuers seemed to be less affected than others. A common coping strategy was confiding in close relations, preferably the health educated. However, some required professional help to cope with the OHCA incident. Conclusions Lay rescuers experience emotional and social challenges, and some struggle to cope in life after providing CPR in OHCA incidents. Experiencing a positive patient outcome and being a health-educated lay rescuer seem to mitigate concerns. Common coping strategies are attempts to reduce uncertainty towards patient outcome and own CPR quality. Further studies are needed to determine whether an organised professional follow-up can mitigate the concerns and uncertainty

  1. Which Fingers Should We Perform Two-Finger Chest Compression Technique with When Performing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation on an Infant in Cardiac Arrest?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness two-finger chest compression technique (TFCC) performed using the right vs. left hand and the index-middle vs. middle-ring fingers. Four different finger/hand combinations were tested randomly in 30 healthcare providers performing TFCC (Test 1: the right index-middle fingers; Test 2: the left index-middle fingers; Test 3: the right middle-ring fingers; Test 4: the left middle-ring fingers) using two cross-over trials. The “patient” was a 3-month-old-infant-sized manikin. Each experiment consisted of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) consisting of 2 minutes of 30:2 compression: ventilation performed by one rescuer on a manikin lying on the floor as if in cardiac arrest. Ventilations were performed using the mouth-to-mouth method. Compression and ventilation data were collected during the tests. The mean compression depth (MCD) was significantly greater in TFCC performed with the index-middle fingers than with the middle-ring fingers regardless of the hand (95% confidence intervals; right hand: 37.8–40.2 vs. 35.2–38.6 mm, P = 0.002; left hand: 36.9–39.2 vs. 35.5–38.1 mm, P = 0.003). A deeper MCD was achieved with the index-middle fingers of the right versus the left hand (P = 0.004). The ratio of sufficiently deep compressions showed the same patterns. There were no significant differences in the other data. The best performance of TFCC in simulated 30:2 compression: ventilation CPR performed by one rescuer on an infant in cardiac arrest lying on the floor was obtained using the index-middle fingers of the right hand. Clinical Trial Registry at the Clinical Research Information Service (KCT0001515). PMID:27247512

  2. Design of preservation solutions for universal tissue preservation in vivo: demonstration of efficacy in preclinical models of profound hypothermic cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M J; Rhee, P; Chen, Z; Alam, H B

    2005-01-01

    The design of new solutions for the universal preservation of tissues is a quest that would facilitate multiple-organ harvesting from organ donors since current preservation solutions do not provide optimum preservation for all organs. In contrast, a new approach to bloodless surgery using hypothermic blood substitution (HBS) to protect the whole body during profound hypothermic circulatory arrest (clinical suspended animation) has focused on the development of a hybrid solution design with the objective of providing universal tissue preservation. In this study, a porcine model of uncontrolled lethal hemorrhage was employed. A combination of two new solutions, maintenance and purge, was used in a cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) technique to affect profound hypothermia and prolonged cardiac arrest (60 min), with resuscitation after surgical repair of the vascular deficit induced to affect exsanguination. After rewarming and recovery, pigs were monitored for 6 weeks for neurological deficits, cognitive function (learning new skills), and organ dysfunction. All the normothermic control animals died (n = 10), whereas 90% (9 of 10) in the HBS group survived (P < .05). Moreover, all of the survivors were neurologically intact, displayed normal learning and memory capability, and had no long-term organ dysfunction. Histology of brains after 6 weeks revealed no ischemic damage in marked contrast to control animals, which all showed diffuse ischemic damage. The demonstrated efficacy of these synthetic, acellular HBS solutions for protection of all the tissues in the body during clinical suspended animation justifies their consideration for multiple-organ harvesting from cadaveric and living donors. PMID:15808626

  3. Cerebral contrast retention after difficult cardiac catheterization: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Ho, David W; Lazar, Jason M; Marmur, JD

    2014-01-01

    Background: We report a diagnostic dilemma in a rare case of cerebral contrast retention after difficult cardiac catheterization in an elderly patient loaded with prasugrel. Summary: Our case report describes a 77-year-old female with history of hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia who presented to emergency department complaining of chest pain. Patient was found to have an inferior wall ST elevation myocardial infarction. The patient was loaded with aspirin and prasugrel and taken for emergent cardiac catheterization. Cardiac catheterization revealed two-vessel coronary artery disease with unsuccessful attempt of percutaneous intervention. Immediately after procedure, patient developed an episode of seizure. Emergent computed tomography scan of the brain revealed hyperdensity in the right frontoparietal region consistent with intracerebral bleed. Repeat computed tomography (24 h later) revealed substantial interval improvement of hyperdensity. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging of the head was normal. Given the lack of magnetic resonance imaging changes, the rate of resolution on computed tomography without expected subacute changes, and the lack of neurologic findings, the initial hyperdensity seen on computed tomography of the brain was believed to be secondary to contrast leakage during cardiac catheterization as opposed to intracranial hemorrhage. PMID:27489644

  4. Decompressive craniectomy arrests pulsatile aqueductal CSF flux: An in vivo demonstration using phase-contrast MRI. Case report.

    PubMed

    Scollato, Antonio; Gallina, Pasquale; Bahl, Gautam; Di Lorenzo, Nicola

    2015-06-01

    We give a case study demonstration, using aqueductal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) stroke volume quantification with phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging, of a large opening in the rigid cranium by a decompressive craniectomy and its subsequent closure by bone flap repositioning resulted in the arrest and subsequent restoration of aqueductal CSF flow. PMID:25958958

  5. Robotic totally endoscopic triple coronary artery bypass grafting on the arrested heart: report of the first successful clinical case.

    PubMed

    Bonatti, Johannes; Rehman, Atiq; Schwartz, Kimberly; Deshpande, Seema; Kon, Zachary; Lehr, Eric; Zimrin, David; Griffith, Bartley

    2010-12-01

    Robotic technology enables "port only" totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass grafting (TECAB). During early procedure development only single bypass grafts were feasible. Because current referral practice for coronary bypass surgery mostly includes multivessel disease, performance of multiple endoscopic bypass grafts is desirable. We report a case in which a patient received a right internal mammary artery bypass graft to the left anterior descending artery and a left internal mammary artery jump graft to 2 obtuse marginal branches. The procedure was performed through 5 ports on the arrested heart using the daVinci S robotic surgical system. This is the first reported triple bypass grafting procedure using an arrested heart approach. PMID:21169151

  6. Case of combined paratracheal air cyst and accessory cardiac bronchus.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Tamaki; Ono, Shun; Mori, Naoko; Sekiguchi, Tatsuya; Koizumi, Jun; Imai, Yutaka

    2014-07-01

    Paratracheal air cyst (PTAC) is rather frequently detected on thoracic multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) in daily practice. Accessory cardiac bronchus (ACB) is a rare anomaly; however, the incidence rate is increasing with the use of recent high quality MDCT scanners. We report a case of combined PTAC and ACB that was incidentally detected by MDCT. Three dimensional CT images revealed anatomical details. PMID:25027253

  7. Better lactate clearance associated with good neurologic outcome in survivors who treated with therapeutic hypothermia after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Several methods have been proposed to evaluate neurological outcome in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. Blood lactate has been recognized as a reliable prognostic marker for trauma, sepsis, or cardiac arrest. The objective of this study was to examine the association between initial lactate level or lactate clearance and neurologic outcome in OHCA survivors who were treated with therapeutic hypothermia. Methods This retrospective cohort study included patients who underwent protocol-based 24-hour therapeutic hypothermia after OHCA between January 2010 and March 2012. Serum lactate levels were measured at the start of therapy (0 hours), and after 6 hours, 12 hours, 24 hours, 48 hours and 72 hours. The 6 hour and 12 hour lactate clearance were calculated afterwards. Patients’ neurologic outcome was assessed at one month after cardiac arrest; good neurological outcome was defined as Cerebral Performance Category one or two. The primary outcome was an association between initial lactate level and good neurologic outcome. The secondary outcome was an association between lactate clearance and good neurologic outcome in patients with initial lactate level >2.5 mmol/l. Results Out of the 76 patients enrolled, 34 (44.7%) had a good neurologic outcome. The initial lactate level showed no significant difference between good and poor neurologic outcome groups (6.07 ±4 .09 mmol/L vs 7.13 ± 3.99 mmol/L, P = 0.42), However, lactate levels at 6 hours, 12 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours in the good neurologic outcome group were lower than in the poor neurologic outcome group (3.81 ± 2.81 vs 6.00 ± 3.22 P <0.01, 2.95 ± 2.07 vs 5.00 ± 3.49 P <0.01, 2.17 ± 1.24 vs 3.86 ± 3.92 P <0.01, 1.57 ± 1.02 vs 2.21 ± 1.35 P = 0.03, respectively). The secondary analysis showed that the 6-hour and 12-hour lactate clearance was higher for good neurologic outcome patients (35.3 ± 34.6% vs 6.89

  8. Capecitabine-induced ventricular fibrillation arrest: Possible Kounis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kido, Kazuhiko; Adams, Val R; Morehead, Richard S; Flannery, Alexander H

    2016-04-01

    We report the case of capecitabine-induced ventricular fibrillation arrest, possibly secondary to type I Kounis syndrome. A 47-year-old man with a history of T3N1 moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the colon, status-post sigmoid resection, was started on adjuvant capecitabine approximately five months prior to presentation of cardiac arrest secondary to ventricular fibrillation. An electrocardiogram (EKG) revealed ST segment elevation on the lateral leads and the patient was taken emergently to the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The catheterization revealed no angiographically significant stenosis and coronary artery disease was ruled out. After ruling out other causes of cardiac arrest, the working diagnosis was capecitabine-induced ventricular fibrillation arrest. As such, an inflammatory work up was sent to evaluate for the possibility of a capecitabine hypersensitivity, or Kounis syndrome, and is the first documented report in the literature to do so when evaluating Kounis syndrome. Immunoglobulin E (IgE), tryptase, and C-reactive protein were normal but histamine, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-10 were elevated. Histamine elevation supports the suspicion that our patient had type I Kounis syndrome. Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicates a probable adverse effect due to capecitabine with seven points. A case of capecitabine-induced ventricular fibrillation arrest is reported, with a potential for type 1 Kounis syndrome as an underlying pathology supported by immunologic work up. PMID:25870182

  9. The System-Wide Effect of Real-Time Audiovisual Feedback and Postevent Debriefing for In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: The Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Quality Improvement Initiative*

    PubMed Central

    Couper, Keith; Kimani, Peter K.; Abella, Benjamin S.; Chilwan, Mehboob; Cooke, Matthew W.; Davies, Robin P.; Field, Richard A.; Gao, Fang; Quinton, Sarah; Stallard, Nigel; Woolley, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of implementing real-time audiovisual feedback with and without postevent debriefing on survival and quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality at in-hospital cardiac arrest. Design: A two-phase, multicentre prospective cohort study. Setting: Three UK hospitals, all part of one National Health Service Acute Trust. Patients: One thousand three hundred and ninety-five adult patients who sustained an in-hospital cardiac arrest at the study hospitals and were treated by hospital emergency teams between November 2009 and May 2013. Interventions: During phase 1, quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and patient outcomes were measured with no intervention implemented. During phase 2, staff at hospital 1 received real-time audiovisual feedback, whereas staff at hospital 2 received real-time audiovisual feedback supplemented by postevent debriefing. No intervention was implemented at hospital 3 during phase 2. Measurements and Main Results: The primary outcome was return of spontaneous circulation. Secondary endpoints included other patient-focused outcomes, such as survival to hospital discharge, and process-focused outcomes, such as chest compression depth. Random-effect logistic and linear regression models, adjusted for baseline patient characteristics, were used to analyze the effect of the interventions on study outcomes. In comparison with no intervention, neither real-time audiovisual feedback (adjusted odds ratio, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.31–1.22; p = 0.17) nor real-time audiovisual feedback supplemented by postevent debriefing (adjusted odds ratio, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.35–1.21; p = 0.17) was associated with a statistically significant improvement in return of spontaneous circulation or any process-focused outcome. Despite this, there was evidence of a system-wide improvement in phase 2, leading to improvements in return of spontaneous circulation (adjusted odds ratio, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.06–3.30; p = 0.03) and process

  10. Global and regional differences in cerebral blood flow after asphyxial versus ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest in rats using ASL-MRI.

    PubMed

    Drabek, Tomas; Foley, Lesley M; Janata, Andreas; Stezoski, Jason; Hitchens, T Kevin; Manole, Mioara D; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2014-07-01

    Both ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest (VFCA) and asphyxial cardiac arrest (ACA) are frequent causes of CA. However, only isolated reports compared cerebral blood flow (CBF) reperfusion patterns after different types of CA, and even fewer reports used methods that allow serial and regional assessment of CBF. We hypothesized that the reperfusion patterns of CBF will differ between individual types of experimental CA. In a prospective block-randomized study, fentanyl-anesthetized adult rats were subjected to 8min VFCA or ACA. Rats were then resuscitated with epinephrine, bicarbonate, manual chest compressions and mechanical ventilation. After the return of spontaneous circulation, CBF was then serially assessed via arterial spin-labeling magnetic resonance imaging (ASL-MRI) in cortex, thalamus, hippocampus and amygdala/piriform complex over 1h resuscitation time (RT). Both ACA and VFCA produced significant temporal and regional differences in CBF. All regions in both models showed significant changes over time (p<0.01), with early hyperperfusion and delayed hypoperfusion. ACA resulted in early hyperperfusion in cortex and thalamus (both p<0.05 vs. amygdala/piriform complex). In contrast, VFCA induced early hyperperfusion only in cortex (p<0.05 vs. other regions). Hyperperfusion was prolonged after ACA, peaking at 7min RT (RT7; 199% vs. BL, Baseline, in cortex and 201% in thalamus, p<0.05), then returning close to BL at ∼RT15. In contrast, VFCA model induced mild hyperemia, peaking at RT7 (141% vs. BL in cortex). Both ACA and VFCA showed delayed hypoperfusion (ACA, ∼30% below BL in hippocampus and amygdala/piriform complex, p<0.05; VFCA, 34-41% below BL in hippocampus and amygdala/piriform complex, p<0.05). In conclusion, both ACA and VFCA in adult rats produced significant regional and temporal differences in CBF. In ACA, hyperperfusion was most pronounced in cortex and thalamus. In VFCA, the changes were more modest, with hyperperfusion seen only in cortex

  11. Regional Pericarditis Status Post Cardiac Ablation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Orme, Joseph; Eddin, Moneer; Loli, Akil

    2014-01-01

    Context: Regional pericarditis is elusive and difficult to diagnosis. Healthcare providers should be familiar with post-cardiac ablation complications as this procedure is now widespread and frequently performed. The management of regional pericarditis differs greatly from that of acute myocardial infarction. Case report: A 52 year-old male underwent atrial fibrillation ablation and developed severe mid-sternal chest pain the following day with electrocardiographic findings suggestive of acute myocardial infarction, and underwent coronary angiography, a left ventriculogram, and 2D transthoracic echocardiogram, all of which were unremarkable without evidence of obstructive coronary disease, wall motion abnormalities, or pericardial effusions. Ultimately, the patient was diagnosed with regional pericarditis. After diagnosis, the patient's presenting symptoms resolved with treatment including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and colchicine. Conclusion: This is the first reported case study of regional pericarditis status post cardiac ablation. Electrocardiographic findings were classic for an acute myocardial infarction; however, coronary angiography and left ventriculogram demonstrated no acute coronary occlusion or ventricular wall motion abnormalities. Healthcare professionals must remember that the electrocardiographic findings in pericarditis are not always classic and that pericarditis can occur status post cardiac ablation. PMID:25317395

  12. Incidence, prognosis, and factors associated with cardiac arrest in patients hospitalized with acute coronary syndromes (the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events Registry)

    PubMed Central

    McManus, David D.; Aslam, Farhan; Goyal, Parag; Goldberg, Robert J.; Huang, Wei; Gore, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Contemporary data are lacking with respect to the incidence rates of, factors associated with, and impact of cardiac arrest from ventricular fibrillation or tachycardia (VF-CA) on hospital survival in patients admitted with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The objectives of this multinational study were to characterize trends in the magnitude of in-hospital VF-CA complicating an ACS and to describe its impact over time on hospital prognosis. Methods In 59 161 patients enrolled in the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events Study between 2000 and 2007, we determined the incidence, prognosis, and factors associated with VF-CA. Results Overall, 3618 patients (6.2%) developed VF-CA during their hospitalization for an ACS. Incidence rates of VF-CA declined over time. Patients who experienced VF-CA were on average older and had a greater burden of cardiovascular disease, yet were less likely to receive evidence-based cardiac therapies than patients in whom VF-CA did not occur. Hospital death rates were 55.3% and 1.5% in patients with and without VF-CA, respectively. There was a greater than 50% decline in the hospital death rates associated with VF-CA during the years under study. Patients with a VF-CA occurring after 48 h were at especially high risk for dying during hospitalization (82.8%). Conclusion Despite reductions in the magnitude of, and short-term mortality from, VF-CA, VF-CA continues to exert an adverse effect on survival among patients hospitalized with an ACS. Opportunities exist to improve the identification and treatment of ACS patients at risk for VF-CA to reduce the incidence of, and mortality from, this serious arrhythmic disturbance. PMID:22157357

  13. Impact of Different Initial Epinephrine Treatment Time Points on the Early Postresuscitative Hemodynamic Status of Children With Traumatic Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yan-Ren; Syue, Yuan-Jhen; Buddhakosai, Waradee; Lu, Huai-En; Chang, Chin-Fu; Chang, Chih-Yu; Chen, Cheng Hsu; Chen, Wen-Liang; Li, Chao-Jui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The postresuscitative hemodynamic status of children with traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) might be impacted by the early administration of epinephrine, but this topic has not been well addressed. The aim of this study was to analyze the early postresuscitative hemodynamics, survival, and neurologic outcome according to different time points of first epinephrine treatment among children with traumatic OHCA. Information on 388 children who presented to the emergency departments of 3 medical centers and who were treated with epinephrine for traumatic OHCA during the study period (2003–2012) was retrospectively collected. The early postresuscitative hemodynamic features (cardiac functions, end-organ perfusion, and consciousness), survival, and neurologic outcome according to different time points of first epinephrine treatment (early: <15, intermediate: 15–30, and late: >30 minutes after collapse) were analyzed. Among 165 children who achieved sustained return of spontaneous circulation, 38 children (9.8%) survived to discharge and 12 children (3.1%) had good neurologic outcomes. Early epinephrine increased the postresuscitative heart rate and blood pressure in the first 30 minutes, but ultimately impaired end-organ perfusion (decreased urine output and initial creatinine clearance) (all P < 0.05). Early epinephrine treatment increased the chance of achieving sustained return of spontaneous circulation, but did not increase the rates of survival and good neurologic outcome. Early epinephrine temporarily increased heart rate and blood pressure in the first 30 minutes of the postresuscitative period, but impaired end-organ perfusion. Most importantly, the rates of survival and good neurologic outcome were not significantly increased by early epinephrine administration. PMID:27015217

  14. D-cycloserine 24 and 48 hours after asphyxial cardiac arrest has no effect on hippocampal CA1 neuropathology

    PubMed Central

    Combs, Vélvá M; Crispell, Heather D; Drew, Kelly L

    2014-01-01

    Stimulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) contributes to regenerative neuroplasticity following the initial excitotoxic insult during cerebral ischemia. Stimulation of NMDAR with the partial NMDAR agonist D-cycloserine (DCS) improves outcome and restores hippocampal synaptic plasticity in models of closed head injury. We thus hypothesized that DCS would improve outcome following restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) from cardiac arrest (CA). DCS (10 mg/kg, IP) was administered to Sprague-Dawley rats (male, 250–330 g; 63–84 days old) 24 and 48 hours after 6 or 8 minutes of asphyxial CA. Heart rate and blood pressure declined similarly in all groups. Animals showed neurological deficits after 6 and 8 minutes CA (P<0.05, Tukey) and these deficits recovered more quickly after 6 minutes than after 8 minutes of CA. CA decreased the number of healthy neurons within CA1 with no difference between 6 and 8 minutes duration of CA (180.8±27.6 (naïve, n=5) versus 46.3±33.8 (all CA groups, n=27) neurons per mm CA1). DCS had no effect on neurological deficits or CA1 hippocampal cell counts (P>0.05, Tukey). PMID:25099755

  15. Pro-inflammatory T-Lymphocytes rapidly infiltrate into the brain and contribute to neuronal injury following cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Guiying; Carter, Jessica; Traystman, Richard J.; Wagner, David H.; Herson, Paco S.

    2014-01-01

    Although inflammatory mechanisms have been linked to neuronal injury following global cerebral ischemia, the presence of infiltrating peripheral immune cells remains understudied. We performed flow cytometry of single cell suspensions obtained from the brains of mice at varying time points after global cerebral ischemia induced by cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CA/CPR) to characterize the influx in lymphocytes into the injured brain. We observed that CA/CPR caused a large influx of lymphocytes within 3 hours of resuscitation that was maintained for the 3 day duration of our experiments. Using cell staining flow cytometry we observed that the large majority of infiltrating lymphocytes were CD4+ T cells. Intracellular stains revealed a large proportion of pro-inflammatory T cells expressing either TNFα or INFγ. Importantly, the lack of functional T cells in TCRα knockout mice reduced neuronal injury following CA/CPR, implicating pro-inflammatory T cells in the progression of ischemic neuronal injury. Finally, we made the remarkable observation that the novel CD4+CD40+ (Th40) population of pro-inflammatory T cells that are strongly associated with autoimmunity are present in large numbers in the injured brain. These data indicate that studies investigating the neuro-immune response after global cerebral ischemia should consider the role of infiltrating T cells in orchestrating the acute and sustained immune response. PMID:25084739

  16. First autologous cell therapy of cerebral palsy caused by hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in a child after cardiac arrest-individual treatment with cord blood.

    PubMed

    Jensen, A; Hamelmann, E

    2013-01-01

    Each year, thousands of children incur brain damage that results in lifelong sequelae. Therefore, based on experimental evidence, we explored the therapeutic potential of human cord blood, known to contain stem cells, to examine the functional neuroregeneration in a child with cerebral palsy after cardiac arrest. The boy, whose cord blood was stored at birth, was 2.5 years old and normally developed when global ischemic brain damage occurred resulting in a persistent vegetative state. Nine weeks later, he received autologous cord blood (91.7 mL, cryopreserved, 5.75 × 10e8 mononuclear cells) intravenously. Active rehabilitation (physio- and ergotherapy) was provided daily, follow-up at 2, 5, 12, 24, 30, and 40 months. At 2-months follow-up the boy's motor control improved, spastic paresis was largely reduced, and eyesight was recovered, as did the electroencephalogram. He smiled when played with, was able to sit and to speak simple words. At 40 months, independent eating, walking in gait trainer, crawling, and moving from prone position to free sitting were possible, and there was significantly improved receptive and expressive speech competence (four-word sentences, 200 words). This remarkable functional neuroregeneration is difficult to explain by intense active rehabilitation alone and suggests that autologous cord blood transplantation may be an additional and causative treatment of pediatric cerebral palsy after brain damage. PMID:23762741

  17. Early-Onset Pneumonia in Non-Traumatic Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients with Special Focus on Prehospital Airway Management.

    PubMed

    Christ, Martin; von Auenmueller, Katharina Isabel; Amirie, Scharbanu; Sasko, Benjamin Michel; Brand, Michael; Trappe, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND More than half of all non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients die in the hospital. Early-onset pneumonia (EOP) has been described as one of the most common complications after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation. However, the expanded use of alternative airway devices (AAD) might influence the incidence of EOP following OHCA. MATERIAL AND METHODS We analyzed data from all OHCA patients admitted to our hospital between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2014. EOP was defined as proof of the presence of a pathogenic microorganism in samples of respiratory secretions within the first 5 days after hospital admission. RESULTS There were 252 patients admitted: 155 men (61.5%) and 97 women (38.5%), with a mean age of 69.1±13.8 years. Of these, 164 patients (77.6%) were admitted with an endotracheal tube (ET) and 62 (27.4%) with an AAD. We found that 36 out of a total of 80 respiratory secretion samples (45.0%) contained pathogenic microorganisms, with Staphylococcus aureus as the most common bacteria. Neither bacterial detection (p=0.765) nor survival rates (p=0.538) differed between patients admitted with ET and those with AAD. CONCLUSIONS Irrespective of increasing use of AAD, the incidence of EOP remains high. PMID:27295123

  18. Mild therapeutic hypothermia in patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Villablanca, Pedro A.; Makkiya, Mohammed; Einsenberg, Evann; Briceno, David F.; Panagiota, Christia; Menegus, Mark; Garcia, Mario; Sims, Daniel; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Guidelines recommend mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) for survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However, there is little literature demonstrating a survival benefit. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the efficacy of MTH in patients successfully resuscitated from OHCA. Materials and Methods: Electronic databases were searched for RCT involving MTH in survivors of OHCA, and the results were put through a meta-analysis. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality, and the secondary endpoint was favorable neurological function. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed using the Mantel–Haenszel method. A fixed-effect model was used and, if heterogeneity (I2) was >40, effects were analyzed using a random model. Results: Six RCT (n = 1400 patients) were included. Overall survival was 50.7%, and favorable neurological recovery was 45.5%. Pooled data demonstrated no significant all-cause mortality (OR, 0.81; 95% CI 0.55–1.21) or neurological recovery (OR, 0.77; 95% CI 0.47–1.24). No evidence of publication bias was observed. Conclusion: This meta-analysis demonstrated that MTH did not confer benefit on overall survival rate and neurological recovery in patients resuscitated from OHCA. PMID:26750667

  19. Influence of pre-, post-, and simultaneous perfusion of elevated calcium on the effect of ascending concentrations of lead on digoxin-induced cardiac arrest in isolated frog heart

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamoorthy, M.S.; Muthu, P.; Parthiban, N.

    1995-10-01

    Cardiotoxicity of lead, a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, has already been documented as a potentially lethal, although rarely recognized, complication of lead intoxication. Further, it has already been reported from this laboratory that lead acetate (LA) preperfusion potentiated cardiotoxicity of digoxin (DGN) in isolated frog heart preparation and that exposure to elevated calcium (elev. Ca{sup 2+}) prior to, and simultaneously with LA at 10{sup {minus}7} M concentration, attenuated this potentiation. As an extension of this work, it was considered of interest to study the effect of perfusion of elev. Ca{sup 2+} (6.5 mM) prior to, after and simultaneously with ascending concentrations of lead (10{sup {minus}9}, 10{sup {minus}7} and 10{sup {minus}5}M) on DGN induced cardiac arrest (CA) in isolated frog heart, since Pb{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+} ions are known to compete with each other for the same target sites at the cellular level, an instance of competitive mass action effect. 15 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Early-Onset Pneumonia in Non-Traumatic Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients with Special Focus on Prehospital Airway Management

    PubMed Central

    Christ, Martin; von Auenmueller, Katharina Isabel; Amirie, Scharbanu; Sasko, Benjamin Michel; Brand, Michael; Trappe, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Background More than half of all non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients die in the hospital. Early-onset pneumonia (EOP) has been described as one of the most common complications after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation. However, the expanded use of alternative airway devices (AAD) might influence the incidence of EOP following OHCA. Material/Methods We analyzed data from all OHCA patients admitted to our hospital between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2014. EOP was defined as proof of the presence of a pathogenic microorganism in samples of respiratory secretions within the first 5 days after hospital admission. Results There were 252 patients admitted: 155 men (61.5%) and 97 women (38.5%), with a mean age of 69.1±13.8 years. Of these, 164 patients (77.6%) were admitted with an endotracheal tube (ET) and 62 (27.4%) with an AAD. We found that 36 out of a total of 80 respiratory secretion samples (45.0%) contained pathogenic microorganisms, with Staphylococcus aureus as the most common bacteria. Neither bacterial detection (p=0.765) nor survival rates (p=0.538) differed between patients admitted with ET and those with AAD. Conclusions Irrespective of increasing use of AAD, the incidence of EOP remains high. PMID:27295123

  1. Crystalloid flush with backward unclamping may decrease post-reperfusion cardiac arrest and improve short-term graft function when compared to portal blood flush with forward unclamping during liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fukazawa, Kyota; Nishida, Seigo; Hibi, Taizo; Pretto, Ernesto A

    2013-01-01

    During liver transplant (LT), the release of vasoactive substances into the systemic circulation is associated with severe hemodynamic instability that is injurious to the recipient and/or the post-ischemic graft. Crystalloid flush with backward unclamping (CB) and portal blood flush with forward unclamping (PF) are two reperfusion methods to reduce reperfusion-related cardiovascular perturbations in our center. The primary aim of this study was to compare these two methods. After institutional review board (IRB) approval, cadaveric whole LT cases performed between 2003 and 2008 were reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups based on reperfusion methods: CB or PF. After background matching with propensity score, the effect of each method on post-operative graft function was assessed in detail. In our cohort of 478 patients, CB was used in 313 grafts and PF in 165. Thirty-day graft survival was lower, and risk of retransplantation was higher in PF. Multivariable model showed that CB is an independent factor to reduce primary non-function, cardiac arrest and improve 30-d graft survival. Also, the incidence of ischemic-type biliary lesions was significantly higher in the PF group. Reperfusion methods affect intraoperative hemodynamics and post-transplant outcome. CB allows for control over temperature and composition of the perfusate, perfusion pressure, and the rate of infusion. PMID:23656400

  2. Management of a Wilms' tumor with intracardiac extension using extracorporeal circulation and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Erginel, Basak; Ugurlucan, Murat; Basaran, Murat; Buget, Mehmet; Yuksel, Secil; Celik, Alaattin; Salman, Tansu

    2016-02-01

    Wilms' tumor is a relatively common malignancy among childhood cancers. However, intracardiac extension of the lesion is rare and challenging. In this report, the authors present a successful management of intracardiac extension of Wilms' tumor in a 3-year-old child using cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. The authors also reviewed the published literature on Wilms' tumor with cardiac extension, which were managed by cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest to provide an optimum management plan in this challenging condition. PMID:26901125

  3. Cardiac beriberi: morphological findings in two fatal cases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular beriberi is categorized into two main groups, according to its cause: alcoholic and non-alcoholic (dietary). Cardiovascular beriberi can also be divided into a fulminant form (Shoshin beriberi) and a chronic form. Shoshin beriberi is characterized by hypotension, tachycardia, and lactic acidosis and is mainly encountered in non-alcoholic patients in Asian countries, although it has also been seen in alcoholics in Western countries. Due to the complex clinical presentation and to the lack of diagnostic tests, thiamine deficiency is still being missed, especially among non-alcoholics patients. We present two fatal cases of non - alcohol associated cardiac beriberi. An acute myocardial infarction was observed in one case; extensive colliquative myocytolisis (grade 2) was described in the second case respectively. Morphologically, myocardial necrosis and colliquative myocytolysis are the histologic hallmarks of this acute, rare clinical entity. An increase in apoptotic myocytes was demonstrated probably sustaining the cardiogenic shock. PMID:21244717

  4. Exercise-induced cardiopulmonary arrest in a child with aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Saiki, Hirofumi; Sugimoto, Masaya; Senzaki, Hideaki

    2016-06-01

    The beneficial effect of exercise restriction in preventing sudden cardiac death in children with aortic stenosis remains unclear. We report the case of a 15-year-old boy with congenital aortic stenosis who was resuscitated after sudden cardiac arrest during exercise. The case led to the new concept that exercise restriction may prevent not only unpredictable ventricular ischaemic events and associated arrhythmias but also progressive ventricular hypertrophy. PMID:27161031

  5. Disentangling the Effects of Racial Self-identification and Classification by Others: The Case of Arrest.

    PubMed

    Penner, Andrew M; Saperstein, Aliya

    2015-06-01

    Scholars of race have stressed the importance of thinking about race as a multidimensional construct, yet research on racial inequality does not routinely take this multidimensionality into account. We draw on data from the U.S. National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to disentangle the effects of self-identifying as black and being classified by others as black on subsequently being arrested. Results reveal that the odds of arrest are nearly three times higher for people who were classified by others as black, even if they did not identify themselves as black. By contrast, we find no effect of self-identifying as black among people who were not seen by others as black. These results suggest that racial perceptions play an important role in racial disparities in arrest rates and provide a useful analytical approach for disentangling the effects of race on other outcomes. PMID:26012845

  6. Computed Tomography Evaluation of the Brain and Upper Cervical Spine in Patients With Traumatic Cardiac Arrest Who Achieved Return of Spontaneous Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Inamasu, Joji; Nakatsukasa, Masashi; Hirose, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    The outcomes of patients with traumatic cardiac arrest (TCA) have been dismal. However, imaging modalities are improving rapidly and are expected to play a role in treatment of patients with TCA. In this retrospective study, whether obtaining computed tomography (CT) immediately after resuscitation had any clinical value was evaluated. Among 145 patients with TCA admitted to our institution during 4 years, hemodynamically stable return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was achieved in 38 (26%). Brain and cervical spine CT was obtained prospectively, and the frequency and type of traumatic brain injury (TBI)/upper cervical spine injury (UCSI) were investigated. CT was performed uneventfully in all patients with an average door-to-CT time of 51.5 ± 18.6 min. Twenty (53%) had CT evidence of TBI. However, no patients underwent brain surgery because of lack of return of brainstem functions. Among the 18 patients without TBI, CT signs of hypoxia were present in 15 patients (39%), and CT was considered intact in 3 patients (8%). None of the 35 patients with abnormal CT findings survived, and the presence of such findings predicted fatality with high sensitivity and specificity. While 13 of the 38 patients (34%) had CT evidence of UCSI, concomitant TBI and USCI were uncommon. None of the 13 patients with UCSI underwent spine surgery because of lack of return of brainstem functions, and the presence of USCI might also be associated with fatality. Although obtaining CT was useful in the prognostication of TCA patients with ROSC, it did not have much impact in therapeutic decision making. PMID:24067768

  7. Inhibiting High-Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1) Attenuates Inflammatory Cytokine Expression and Neurological Deficit in Ischemic Brain Injury Following Cardiac Arrest in Rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mei; Zhou, Gui-Ming; Wang, Li-Hua; Zhu, Li; Liu, Jin-Mei; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Li, Hong-Tao; Chen, Lei

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA), if untreated for more than 5 min, can induce severe brain damage, the underlying mechanism of which is still unclear. Previous studies have indicated that high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a nuclear protein implicated in several inflammatory disorders, is involved in the inflammatory processes following brain ischemia. However, the role of HMGB1 in brain dysfunction after CA is yet to be determined. In a rat CA model, HMGB1 protein expression was higher at 1, 3, and 7 days post-CA, compared to that in naïve and sham-treated rats. Following injection of HMGB1 antibody (anti-HMGB1) into the cerebral ventricles, neurological deficit scores were significantly decreased in the CA group as compared to that in the naïve and sham group. Nissl staining showed significant neuronal loss in the hippocampal CA1 region following CA, which was significantly attenuated by anti-HMGB1-treatment (10 and 50 μg) in comparison with the vehicle-injected control. CA induced a significant increase in the levels of the cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in the hippocampus as revealed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Treatment with anti-HMGB1 significantly inhibited IL-1β and TNF-α expression. Our study suggests that HMGB1 contributes significantly to CA-induced brain dysfunction and that inhibiting HMGB1 function and expression may be an effective therapeutic approach to CA-induced ischemic brain injury. PMID:27363991

  8. Hospital costs of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients treated in intensive care; a single centre evaluation using the national tariff-based system

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, J; Easton, S; Naik, V; Lockie, C; Brett, S J; Stümpfle, R

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There is a scarcity of literature reporting hospital costs for treating out of hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA) survivors, especially within the UK. This is essential for assessment of cost-effectiveness of interventions necessary to allow just allocation of resources within the National Health Service. We set out primarily to calculate costs stratified against hospital survival and neurological outcomes. Secondarily, we estimated cost effectiveness based on estimates of survival and utility from previous studies to calculate costs per quality adjusted life year (QALY). Setting We performed a single centre (London) retrospective review of in-hospital costs of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) following return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after OOHCA over 18 months from January 2011 (following widespread introduction of targeted temperature management and primary percutaneous intervention). Participants Of 69 successive patients admitted over an 18-month period, survival and cerebral performance category (CPC) outcomes were obtained from review of databases and clinical notes. The Trust finance department supplied ICU and hospital costs using the Payment by Results UK system. Results Of those patients with ROSC admitted to ICU, survival to hospital discharge (any CPC) was 33/69 (48%) with 26/33 survivors in CPC 1–2 at hospital discharge. Cost per survivor to hospital discharge (including total cost of survivors and non-survivors) was £50 000, cost per CPC 1–2 survivor was £65 000. Cost and length of stay of CPC 1–2 patients was considerably lower than CPC 3–4 patients. The majority of the costs (69%) related to intensive care. Estimated cost per CPC 1–2 survivor per QALY was £16 000. Conclusions The costs of in-hospital patient care for ICU admissions following ROSC after OOHCA are considerable but within a reasonable threshold when assessed from a QALY perspective. PMID:25838503

  9. Antiplatelet efficacy of P2Y12 inhibitors (prasugrel, ticagrelor, clopidogrel) in patients treated with mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest due to acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Bednar, Frantisek; Kroupa, Josef; Ondrakova, Martina; Osmancik, Pavel; Kopa, Milos; Motovska, Zuzana

    2016-05-01

    Survivors after cardiac arrest (CA) due to AMI undergo PCI and then receive dual antiplatelet therapy. Mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) is recommended for unconscious patients after CA to improve neurological outcomes. MTH can attenuate the effectiveness of P2Y12 inhibitors by reducing gastrointestinal absorption and metabolic activation. The combined effect of these conditions on the efficacy of P2Y12 inhibitors is unknown. We compared the antiplatelet efficacies of new P2Y12 inhibitors in AMI patients after CA treated with MTH. Forty patients after CA for AMI treated with MTH and received one P2Y12 inhibitor (clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor) were enrolled in a prospective observational single-center study. Platelet inhibition was measured by VASP (PRI) on days 1, 2, and 3 after drug administration. In-hospital clinical data and 1-year survival data were obtained. The proportion of patients with ineffective platelet inhibition (PRI > 50 %, high on-treatment platelet reactivity) for clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor was 77 vs. 19 vs. 1 % on day 1; 77 vs. 17 vs. 0 % on day 2; and 85 vs. 6 vs. 0 % on day 3 (P < 0.001). The platelet inhibition was significantly worse in clopidogrel group than in prasugrel or ticagrelor group. Prasugrel and ticagrelor are very effective for platelet inhibition in patients treated with MTH after CA due to AMI, but clopidogrel is not. Using prasugrel or ticagrelor seems to be a more suitable option in this high-risk group of acute patients. PMID:26340851

  10. An investigation of a hypothermic to ischemic ratio in patients following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest presenting with a shockable rhythm.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Kelly N; Kurz, Michael C; Elswick, R K

    2014-06-01

    Targeted temperature management (TTM) improves outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We hypothesized that there may be a significant relationship between the dose of hypothermia, the time to return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and survival to discharge. Retrospective pilot investigation on 99 consecutive OHCA patients with initial shockable rhythm, surviving to admission, and undergoing TTM between 2008 and 2011. Dose of hypothermia was defined as the sum of the induction interval (time to target temperature [from ROSC to 33°C]); the controlled hypothermia interval (from reaching 33°C until rewarming); and the rewarming interval (from 33°C to 37°C). Time to ROSC was measured from pulselessness or 911 call time to ROSC. The ratio between the two was termed the hypothermic to ischemic ratio. Purposeful variable selection for logistic regression modeling was used to assess the influence of the hypothermic/ischemic ratio on survival. Odds ratios (OR) were used to examine the effects of predictor variables on survival. Of 99 patients, eight were excluded for deviation from protocol, death during protocol, or missing data. From the univariate models, survivors were more likely to be younger, have a shorter time to ROSC, and have a larger hypothermic/ischemic ratio. Survivors also had a nonsignificant trend toward a longer time to target temperature. In multivariable modeling, the hypothermic/ischemic ratio was the most significant predictor for survival (OR 2.161 [95% confidence interval 1.371, 3.404]). In this pilot study, the hypothermic to ischemic ratio was significantly associated with survival to discharge for patients with an initial shockable rhythm. Further investigation of the relationship between the dose of hypothermia and time to ROSC for postresuscitation TTM is needed. PMID:24679188

  11. Mild hypothermia attenuates post-resuscitation brain injury through a V-ATPase mechanism in a rat model of cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J C; Lu, W; Xie, X M; Pan, H; Wu, Z Q; Yang, G T

    2016-01-01

    Although therapeutic hypothermia is an effective treatment for post-resuscitation brain injury after cardiac arrest (CA), the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) plays a key role in cellular adaption to a hypoxic environment. This study sought to evaluate the effect of mild hypothermia on V-ATPase and its involvement in neuroprotection after CA. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a 6-min CA, resuscitated successfully, and then assigned to either the normothermia (NT) group or the hypothermia (HT) group. Rats were further divided into 2 subgroups based on the time of euthanasia, either 3 or 24 h after CA (NT-3 h, HT-3 h; NT-24 h, HT-24 h). Mild hypothermia was induced following CA and maintained at 33°C for 2 h. Neurologic deficit scores were used to determine the status of neurological function. Brain specimens were analyzed by TUNEL assay, western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. V-ATPase activity was estimated by subtracting total ATP hydrolysis from the bafilomycin-sensitive activity. Mild hypothermia improved the neurological outcome (HT-24 h: 34.3 ± 16.4 vs NT-24 h: 50.3 ± 17.4) and significantly decreased neurocyte apoptosis 24 h after resuscitation. Mild hypothermia significantly increased V0a1 compared to NT-3 h; V0a1 expression was associated with a decrease in the cleaved caspase 3 expression. These findings suggested that mild hypothermia inhibits CA-induced apoptosis in the hippocampus, which may be associated with reduced V-ATPase impairment. These data provide new insights into the protective effects of hypothermia in vivo. PMID:27323115

  12. Barriers and Facilitators to Learning and Performing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) in Neighborhoods with Low Bystander CPR Prevalence and High Rates of Cardiac Arrest in Columbus, Ohio

    PubMed Central

    Sasson, Comilla; Haukoos, Jason S.; Bond, Cindy; Rabe, Marilyn; Colbert, Susan H.; King, Renee; Sayre, Michael; Heisler, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Background Residents who live in neighborhoods that are primarily African-American, Latino, or poor are more likely to have an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), less likely to receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and less likely to survive. No prior studies have been conducted to understand the contributing factors that may decrease the likelihood of residents learning and performing CPR in these neighborhoods. The goal of this study was to identify barriers and facilitators to learning and performing CPR in three low-income, “high-risk” predominantly African American, neighborhoods in Columbus, Ohio. Methods and Results Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) approaches were used to develop and conduct six focus groups in conjunction with community partners in three target high-risk neighborhoods in Columbus, Ohio in January-February 2011. Snowball and purposeful sampling, done by community liaisons, was used to recruit participants. Three reviewers analyzed the data in an iterative process to identify recurrent and unifying themes. Three major barriers to learning CPR were identified and included financial, informational, and motivational factors. Four major barriers were identified for performing CPR and included fear of legal consequences, emotional issues, knowledge, and situational concerns. Participants suggested that family/self-preservation, emotional, and economic factors may serve as potential facilitators in increasing the provision of bystander CPR. Conclusion The financial cost of CPR training, lack of information, and the fear of risking one's own life must be addressed when designing a community-based CPR educational program. Using data from the community can facilitate improved design and implementation of CPR programs. PMID:24021699

  13. Combining Amplitude Spectrum Area with Previous Shock Information Using Neural Networks Improves Prediction Performance of Defibrillation Outcome for Subsequent Shocks in Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients

    PubMed Central

    He, Mi; Lu, Yubao; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Hehua; Gong, Yushun; Li, Yongqin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Quantitative ventricular fibrillation (VF) waveform analysis is a potentially powerful tool to optimize defibrillation. However, whether combining VF features with additional attributes that related to the previous shock could enhance the prediction performance for subsequent shocks is still uncertain. Methods A total of 528 defibrillation shocks from 199 patients experienced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were analyzed in this study. VF waveform was quantified using amplitude spectrum area (AMSA) from defibrillator's ECG recordings prior to each shock. Combinations of AMSA with previous shock index (PSI) or/and change of AMSA (ΔAMSA) between successive shocks were exercised through a training dataset including 255shocks from 99patientswith neural networks. Performance of the combination methods were compared with AMSA based single feature prediction by area under receiver operating characteristic curve(AUC), sensitivity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and prediction accuracy (PA) through a validation dataset that was consisted of 273 shocks from 100patients. Results A total of61 (61.0%) patients required subsequent shocks (N = 173) in the validation dataset. Combining AMSA with PSI and ΔAMSA obtained highest AUC (0.904 vs. 0.819, p<0.001) among different combination approaches for subsequent shocks. Sensitivity (76.5% vs. 35.3%, p<0.001), NPV (90.2% vs. 76.9%, p = 0.007) and PA (86.1% vs. 74.0%, p = 0.005)were greatly improved compared with AMSA based single feature prediction with a threshold of 90% specificity. Conclusion In this retrospective study, combining AMSA with previous shock information using neural networks greatly improves prediction performance of defibrillation outcome for subsequent shocks. PMID:26863222

  14. Neurogenic stunned myocardium and cardiac transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Caballero, C; Martín-Bermúdez, R; Revuelto-Rey, J; Aguilar-Cabello, M; Villar-Gallardo, J

    2012-09-01

    We present the case of a 46-year-old woman referred to our center for urgent heart transplantation assessment, initially diagnosed as having cardiogenic shock of uncertain etiology. Some hours before she had suffered syncope without regaining consciousness. When she arrived at our hospital, the objective examination revealed bilateral unreactive mydriasis and absent brain-stem reflexes, and echocardiography showed global left ventricle wall hypokinesis sparing the apex. An urgent computed tomography (CT) imaging of the head was performed, which showed a massive subarachnoid hemorrhage and extensive cerebral edema. In the following hours, she fulfilled the criteria of brain-stem death and indeed became a multiorgan donor. The heart was rejected for transplantation because of the existence of left ventricle wall motion abnormalities associated with neurogenic stunned myocardium. Neurogenic stunned myocardium is a stress-related cardiomyopathy that occurs after an acute brain injury. It is especially frequent in subarachnoid hemorrhage, where it reaches an incidence of up to 40% of patients. It is characterized by acute electrocardiographic changes and regional hypokinesis of the left ventricle wall not consistent with the coronary artery distribution, and is thought to be a transient condition. For this reason it should not constitute an absolute contraindication to cardiac donation in young donors with no previous cardiac disease. In our hospital during the last year one third of the potential heart donors had regional left ventricle wall motion abnormalities compatible with neurogenic stunned myocardium. With the aim of improving the number of cardiac donors, several strategies have been described to try to demonstrate the reversibility of this entity, such as dobutamine stress echocardiography. PMID:22974925

  15. [A case of cardiac angiosarcoma successfully treated with docetaxel].

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Naoya; Mitachi, Yasushi; Sugawara, Shigeo; Shinozaki, Shigeru; Miura, Makoto; Fukuju, Takeo; Katahira, Yoshiaki; Koyama, Kaneki; Fujikawa, Nanako; Kato, Taizo; Murakami, Kazuhiro

    2007-11-01

    We report a case of angiosarcoma of the right atrium presenting superior vena cava syndrome. The patient was a 61-year-old man. Echocardiography, CT and MRI revealed a tumor arising in the anterior wall of the right atrium. The tumor was hen-egg sized and unresectable because of the invasion of the pericardium, the right ventricular wall and the superior vena cava. An open biopsy and left brachiocephalic vein-right atrium bypass grafting were performed. The pathological diagnosis was angiosarcoma. The patient agreed to chemotherapy with docetaxel, which is known to be often effective against angiosarcoma of the scalp or face. After 5 courses of docetaxel administration (30 mg/m2 on day 1, 8 and 15 followed by 14 days. rest as one course), echocardiography and CT showed a remarkable tumor reduction, which was evaluated as a partial response. The chemotherapy was suspended for 8 months because of neutropenia and general fatigue as side effects of docetaxel. The administration of docetaxel was resumed and 4 courses were performed. The tumor, however, became resistant to docetaxel and formed metastatic involvements in the liver. Following treatments with paclitaxel, IL-2 and CPT-11 were ineffective for the primary tumor and liver metastases. He died of cardiac tamponade caused by massive hemorrhage into the pericardiac space from the tumor surface. He had long-term survival 31 months after the diagnosis. An effective treatment for cardiac angiosarcoma has not yet been established. Chemotherapy with docetaxel should be considered in the treatment of patients with cardiac angiosarcoma. PMID:18030022

  16. Return to flight status after cardiac rehabilitation: three case histories.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, J

    2001-01-01

    A pilot's license to operate aircraft is not valid unless it is accompanied by a medical certificate. This certificate is revoked if a pilot is diagnosed with a cardiovascular illness. After a lengthy waiting period, the medical certificate may be reinstated if the pilot meets rigid standards. For many pilots, participation in a cardiac rehabilitation program is essential to achieve the minimal functional capacity in exercise testing (10.0 metabolic equivalents), document tolerance of medications, and achieve successful rehabilitation. Our staff has assisted 11 pilots in their quest to resume commercial or recreational flying after heart surgery, pacemaker implantation, or angioplasty. This article summarizes the case histories of three pilots who returned to fight status, in three Federal Aviation Administration categories (FAA), after a cardiac illness. The principle goals of our rehabilitation program for pilots are: (1) to achieve the highest possible outcome of the rehabilitation process; (2) to establish a safe and effective independent exercise program; (3) to obtain measures of compliance and success with the independent exercise program; (4) to document tolerance of medications and ensure that medications are acceptable to the FAA; (5) to document stability of the serum glucose in diabetic patients engaged in rigorous, prolonged exercise; and (6) prepare the patient for performance of a treadmill test in which 100% predicted maximum heart rate is achieved without symptoms of cardiovascular distress. An inherent effect of pursuing these goals is dramatic risk factor modification including improved blood pressure and lipid status and reduced body mass index. After resumption of flying, none of our pilot-patients have experienced cardiac symptoms during flight, nor have they required emergency department visits or hospitalization for any reason. PMID:11591042

  17. Respiratory arrest in patients undergoing arteriovenous graft placement with supraclavicular brachial plexus block: a case series.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Anoushka; Beilin, Yaakov

    2013-06-01

    Supraclavicular brachial plexus block is commonly used for upper extremity surgery. Respiratory arrest in three patients with end-stage renal disease after ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block for creation of an arteriovenous graft over a 6-month period is presented. Patients with renal failure may represent a group at particular risk for respiratory failure following supraclavicular brachial plexus block. PMID:23830847

  18. Enigma: infection or allergy? Vancomycin-induced DRESS syndrome with dialysis-dependent renal failure and cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Webb, Philip Simon; Al-Mohammad, Abdallah

    2016-01-01

    A man aged 73 years with infective endocarditis presented with septic shock and was started on immediate antimicrobial therapy. His blood culture yielded no organism. Subsequently, he developed a severe allergic reaction to prolonged empirical vancomycin therapy. This manifested as fever, widespread maculopapular rash and severe progressive acute kidney injury ultimately requiring dialysis. In the context of eosinophilia, this was determined to be drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome. Deciphering this complication as allergy in the context of severe infection required extreme caution due to the polarity of treatment with immunosuppression. Ultimately, this was used, with improvement of renal function, resolution of symptoms and absence of recurrence of infection. In summary, we present a case of vancomycin-related DRESS syndrome leading to dialysis-which is unique in the literature-complicating the treatment of culture-negative infective endocarditis. PMID:27571915

  19. Temperature Management After Cardiac Arrest: An Advisory Statement by the Advanced Life Support Task Force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation and the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee and the Council on Cardiopulmonary, Critical Care, Perioperative and Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Donnino, Michael W; Andersen, Lars W; Berg, Katherine M; Reynolds, Joshua C; Nolan, Jerry P; Morley, Peter T; Lang, Eddy; Cocchi, Michael N; Xanthos, Theodoros; Callaway, Clifton W; Soar, Jasmeet

    2015-12-22

    For more than a decade, mild induced hypothermia (32 °C-34 °C) has been standard of care for patients remaining comatose after resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with an initial shockable rhythm, and this has been extrapolated to survivors of cardiac arrest with initially nonshockable rhythms and to patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest. Two randomized trials published in 2002 reported a survival and neurological benefit with mild induced hypothermia. One recent randomized trial reported similar outcomes in patients treated with targeted temperature management at either 33 °C or 36 °C. In response to these new data, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation Advanced Life Support Task Force performed a systematic review to evaluate 3 key questions: (1) Should mild induced hypothermia (or some form of targeted temperature management) be used in comatose post-cardiac arrest patients? (2) If used, what is the ideal timing of the intervention? (3) If used, what is the ideal duration of the intervention? The task force used Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology to assess and summarize the evidence and to provide a consensus on science statement and treatment recommendations. The task force recommends targeted temperature management for adults with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with an initial shockable rhythm at a constant temperature between 32 °C and 36 °C for at least 24 hours. Similar suggestions are made for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with a nonshockable rhythm and in-hospital cardiac arrest. The task force recommends against prehospital cooling with rapid infusion of large volumes of cold intravenous fluid. Additional and specific recommendations are provided in the document. PMID:26434495

  20. Temperature Management After Cardiac Arrest: An Advisory Statement by the Advanced Life Support Task Force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation and the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee and the Council on Cardiopulmonary, Critical Care, Perioperative and Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Donnino, Michael W; Andersen, Lars W; Berg, Katherine M; Reynolds, Joshua C; Nolan, Jerry P; Morley, Peter T; Lang, Eddy; Cocchi, Michael N; Xanthos, Theodoros; Callaway, Clifton W; Soar, Jasmeet

    2016-01-01

    For more than a decade, mild induced hypothermia (32 °C-34 °C) has been standard of care for patients remaining comatose after resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with an initial shockable rhythm, and this has been extrapolated to survivors of cardiac arrest with initially nonshockable rhythms and to patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest. Two randomized trials published in 2002 reported a survival and neurological benefit with mild induced hypothermia. One recent randomized trial reported similar outcomes in patients treated with targeted temperature management at either 33 °C or 36 °C. In response to these new data, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation Advanced Life Support Task Force performed a systematic review to evaluate 3 key questions: (1) Should mild induced hypothermia (or some form of targeted temperature management) be used in comatose post-cardiac arrest patients? (2) If used, what is the ideal timing of the intervention? (3) If used, what is the ideal duration of the intervention? The task force used Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology to assess and summarize the evidence and to provide a consensus on science statement and treatment recommendations. The task force recommends targeted temperature management for adults with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with an initial shockable rhythm at a constant temperature between 32 °C and 36 °C for at least 24 hours. Similar suggestions are made for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with a nonshockable rhythm and in-hospital cardiac arrest. The task force recommends against prehospital cooling with rapid infusion of large volumes of cold intravenous fluid. Additional and specific recommendations are provided in the document. PMID:26449873

  1. Essential features of designating out-of-hospital cardiac arrest as a reportable event: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee; Council on Cardiopulmonary, Perioperative, and Critical Care; Council on Cardiovascular Nursing; Council on Clinical Cardiology; and Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Interdisciplinary Working Group.

    PubMed

    Nichol, Graham; Rumsfeld, John; Eigel, Brian; Abella, Benjamin S; Labarthe, Darwin; Hong, Yuling; O'Connor, Robert E; Mosesso, Vincent N; Berg, Robert A; Leeper, Barbara Bobbi; Weisfeldt, Myron L

    2008-04-29

    The 2010 impact goal of the American Heart Association is to reduce death rates from heart disease and stroke by 25% and to lower the prevalence of the leading risk factors by the same proportion. Much of the burden of acute heart disease is initially experienced out of hospital and can be reduced by timely delivery of effective prehospital emergency care. Many patients with an acute myocardial infarction die from cardiac arrest before they reach the hospital. A small proportion of those with cardiac arrest who reach the hospital survive to discharge. Current health surveillance systems cannot determine the burden of acute cardiovascular illness in the prehospital setting nor make progress toward reducing that burden without improved surveillance mechanisms. Accordingly, the goals of this article provide a brief overview of strategies for managing out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We review existing surveillance systems for monitoring progress in reducing the burden of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the United States and make recommendations for filling significant gaps in these systems, including the following: 1. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests and their outcomes through hospital discharge should be classified as reportable events as part of a heart disease and stroke surveillance system. 2. Data collected on patients' encounters with emergency medical services systems should include descriptions of the performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation by bystanders and defibrillation by lay responders. 3. National annual reports on key indicators of progress in managing acute cardiovascular events in the out-of-hospital setting should be developed and made publicly available. Potential barriers to action on cardiac arrest include concerns about privacy, methodological challenges, and costs associated with designating cardiac arrest as a reportable event. PMID:18413503

  2. Mechanical thrombectomy in cardiac myxoma stroke: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yoon Sang; Lee, Woong Jae; Hong, Joonhwa; Byun, Jun Soo; Kim, Jae Kyun; Chae, Soo Ahn

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac myxoma is the most common primary tumor of the heart. It is a rare cause of acute ischemic stroke and commonly not detected until after the stroke. There is no current guideline for the treatment of cardiac myxoma stroke and only a few cases of mechanical thrombectomy have been reported. We present a case of cardiac myxoma stroke in a 4-year-old boy treated with a stent-retrieval device and review the literature describing the safety and efficacy of mechanical thrombectomy in cardiac myxoma stroke. We also describe imaging features of the myxoma clot on susceptibility weighted images. PMID:27040551

  3. Case report on effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a pregnant woman

    PubMed Central

    Sharan, Radhe; Madan, Anita; Makkar, Vega; Attri, Joginder Pal

    2016-01-01

    The management of cardiac arrest in pregnancy is an important task for the emergency physicians. Some reasons for cardiac arrest are reversible and should be recognized and managed promptly. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation follows general advanced cardiac life support guidelines with several modifications for pregnant women, taking into account the lives of both mother and fetus. Here, we present the case of 23-year-old pregnant patient who came to Guru Nanak Dev Hospital, Amritsar; in shock, had a cardiac arrest, successfully resuscitated in Intensive Care Unit (ICU), delivered by emergency cesarean section and was discharged from ICU on 9th day in healthy state. PMID:26957705

  4. The Secular Trends in the Incidence Rate and Outcomes of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Taiwan—A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng-Yi; Wang, Jen-Yu; Teng, Nai-Chi; Chao, Ting-Ting; Tsai, Shu-Ling; Chen, Chi-Liang; Hsu, Jeng-Yuan; Wu, Chin-Pyng; Lai, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Likwang

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the trends in incidence and mortality of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), as well as factors associated with OHCA outcomes in Taiwan. Methods Our study included OHCA patients requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) upon arrival at the hospital. We used national time-series data on annual OHCA incidence rates and mortality rates from 2000 to 2012, and individual demographic and clinical data for all OHCA patients requiring mechanical ventilation (MV) care from March of 2010 to September of 2011. Analytic techniques included the time-series regression and the logistic regression. Results There were 117,787 OHCAs in total. The overall incidence rate during the 13 years was 51.1 per 100,000 persons, and the secular trend indicates a sharp increase in the early 2000s and a decrease afterwards. The trend in mortality was also curvilinear, revealing a substantial increase in the early 2000s, a subsequent steep decline and finally a modest increase. Both the 30-day and 180-day mortality rates had a long-term decreasing trend over the period (p<0.01). For both incidence and mortality rates, a significant second-order autoregressive effect emerged. Among OHCA patients with MV, 1-day, 30-day and 180-day mortality rates were 31.3%, 75.8%, and 86.0%, respectively. In this cohort, older age, the female gender, and a Charlson comorbidity index score ≥ 2 were associated with higher 180-day mortality; patients delivered to regional hospitals and those residing in non-metropolitan areas had higher death risk. Conclusions Overall, both the 30-day and the 180-day mortality rates after OHCA had a long-term decreasing trend, while the 1-day mortality had no long-term decline. Among OHCA patients requiring MV, those delivered to regional hospitals and those residing in non-metropolitan areas tended to have higher mortality, suggesting a need for effort to further standardize and improve in-hospital care across hospitals and to advance pre

  5. Cardiac Arrest-Induced Global Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia during Development Affects Spontaneous Activity Organization in Rat Sensory and Motor Thalamocortical Circuits during Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Shoykhet, Michael; Middleton, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    Normal maturation of sensory information processing in the cortex requires patterned synaptic activity during developmentally regulated critical periods. During early development, spontaneous synaptic activity establishes required patterns of synaptic input, and during later development it influences patterns of sensory experience-dependent neuronal firing. Thalamocortical neurons occupy a critical position in regulating the flow of patterned sensory information from the periphery to the cortex. Abnormal thalamocortical inputs may permanently affect the organization and function of cortical neuronal circuits, especially if they occur during a critical developmental window. We examined the effect of cardiac arrest (CA)-associated global brain hypoxia-ischemia in developing rats on spontaneous and evoked firing of somatosensory thalamocortical neurons and on large-scale correlations in the motor thalamocortical circuit. The mean spontaneous and sensory-evoked firing rate activity and variability were higher in CA injured rats. Furthermore, spontaneous and sensory-evoked activity and variability were correlated in uninjured rats, but not correlated in neurons from CA rats. Abnormal activity patterns of ventroposterior medial nucleus (VPm) neurons persisted into adulthood. Additionally, we found that neurons in the entopeduncular nucleus (EPN) in the basal ganglia had lower firing rates yet had higher variability and higher levels of burst firing after injury. Correlated levels of power in local field potentials (LFPs) between the EPN and the motor cortex (MCx) were also disrupted by injury. Our findings indicate that hypoxi