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Sample records for cardiac blood pool

  1. Design of an automated algorithm for labeling cardiac blood pool in gated SPECT images of radiolabeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hebert, T.J. |; Moore, W.H.; Dhekne, R.D.; Ford, P.V.; Wendt, J.A.; Murphy, P.H.; Ting, Y.

    1996-08-01

    The design of an automated computer algorithm for labeling the cardiac blood pool within gated 3-D reconstructions of the radiolabeled red blood cells is investigated. Due to patient functional abnormalities, limited resolution, and noise, certain spatial and temporal features of the cardiac blood pool that one would anticipate finding in every study are not present in certain frames or with certain patients. The labeling of the cardiac blood pool requires an algorithm that only relies upon features present in all patients. The authors investigate the design of a fully-automated region growing algorithm for this purpose.

  2. ECG-gated emission computed tomography of the cardiac blood pool

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.L.; Murphy, P.H.; Burdine, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    ECG-gated cross-sectional images of the cardiac blood pool were produced using a specially constructed emission computed tomographic scanner. A pair of large-field-of-view cameras were mounted in opposition in a gantry that rotates 360/sup 0/ about the patient. The coordinates of each detected event, the output of a physiological synchronizer, and the position of the camera heads were input to a dedicated minicomputer which was used to produce the images. Display as a movie permitted evaluation of regional and global wall motion in cross section without the disadvantages of superimposed blood pools as obtained in nontomographic views.

  3. Cinematic three-dimensional surface display of cardiac blood pool tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, N.; Machida, K.; Takishima, T.; Mamiya, T.; Takahashi, T.; Kamano, T.; Tamaki, S.; Ban, R. )

    1991-02-01

    A method of three-dimensional cinematic display (3D cine) of cardiac blood pool tomography is described. ECG-gated transaxial blood pool imaging was obtained from a set of projection images that were collected from 32 images with 10 ECG-gated images per projection during a 180 degrees arc of a rotating gamma camera. A surface contour of the blood pool was determined by a set of isocount lines (40-55% of the maximum pixel counts) of the transaxial images. 3D cine was made by a depth-shading method, in which brightness of a given point on the contour was set proportional to the distance between the viewing plane and the point and to the incident angle formed by the viewing line and the surface of the point. In 15 patients, 3D cine showed hypokinesia, akinesia, dyskinesia, ventricular aneurysm, and opposite motions of the atria and ventricles. Diagnoses of left ventricular motion by 3D cine agreed well with those by echocardiography and contrast left ventriculography.

  4. Adaptive volume rendering of cardiac 3D ultrasound images: utilizing blood pool statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åsen, Jon Petter; Steen, Erik; Kiss, Gabriel; Thorstensen, Anders; Rabben, Stein Inge

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we introduce and investigate an adaptive direct volume rendering (DVR) method for real-time visualization of cardiac 3D ultrasound. DVR is commonly used in cardiac ultrasound to visualize interfaces between tissue and blood. However, this is particularly challenging with ultrasound images due to variability of the signal within tissue as well as variability of noise signal within the blood pool. Standard DVR involves a global mapping of sample values to opacity by an opacity transfer function (OTF). While a global OTF may represent the interface correctly in one part of the image, it may result in tissue dropouts, or even artificial interfaces within the blood pool in other parts of the image. In order to increase correctness of the rendered image, the presented method utilizes blood pool statistics to do regional adjustments of the OTF. The regional adaptive OTF was compared with a global OTF in a dataset of apical recordings from 18 subjects. For each recording, three renderings from standard views (apical 4-chamber (A4C), inverted A4C (IA4C) and mitral valve (MV)) were generated for both methods, and each rendering was tuned to the best visual appearance by a physician echocardiographer. For each rendering we measured the mean absolute error (MAE) between the rendering depth buffer and a validated left ventricular segmentation. The difference d in MAE between the global and regional method was calculated and t-test results are reported with significant improvements for the regional adaptive method (dA4C = 1.5 +/- 0.3 mm, dIA4C = 2.5 +/- 0.4 mm, dMV = 1.7 +/- 0.2 mm, d.f. = 17, all p < 0.001). This improvement by the regional adaptive method was confirmed through qualitative visual assessment by an experienced physician echocardiographer who concluded that the regional adaptive method produced rendered images with fewer tissue dropouts and less spurious structures inside the blood pool in the vast majority of the renderings. The algorithm has been

  5. Comparison of technetium-99m IgG with technetium-99m red blood cells labeling in cardiac blood-pool scintigraphy: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Javadi, Hamid; Asli, Isa Neshandar; Semnani, Shahriar; Jallalat, Sara; Ansari, Mojtaba; Amini, Abdullatif; Barekat, Maryam; Assadi, Majid

    2011-01-01

    This first clinical prospective study was conducted to use of technetium-99m immunoglobulin G ((99m)Tc-IgG) as compared with autologous (99m)Tc-red blood cells (RBC) in gated blood pool ventriculography. We studied 12 patients who referred to us for a possible diagnosis of liver hemangioma or infection. Six patients underwent gated planar blood pool (GPBP) acquisition using (99m)Tc-RBC and 6 GPBP acquisition using (99m)Tc-IgG. The use of (99m)Tc-IgG in cardiac blood pool studies provided comparable images to (99m)Tc-RBC. In conclusion, (99m)Tc-IgG, which is readily available and needs only a single injection, may be an attractive alternative to (99m)Tc-RBC for the estimation of various cardiac function parameters like left ventricular function. PMID:21512662

  6. Cardiac blood-pool scintigraphy in rats and hamsters: comparison of five radiopharmaceuticals and three pinhole collimator apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Pieri, P.; Fischman, A.J.; Ahmad, M.; Moore, R.H.; Callahan, R.J.; Strauss, H.W. )

    1991-05-01

    Preclinical evaluation of cardiac drugs may require evaluation of cardiac function in intact animals. To optimize the quality of radionuclide measurements of ventricular function in small animals, a comparison was made of gated blood-pool scans recorded with five blood-pool radiopharmaceuticals ({sup 99}mTc-labeled human polyclonal IgG, {sup 99}mTc-human serum albumin labeled by two methods, and red blood cells radiolabeled with {sup 99}mTc via in vivo and in vitro methods) in rats and three pinhole apertures in hamsters. The quality of the radiopharmaceuticals was evaluated by comparing count density ratios (LV/BACKGROUND and LV/LIVER) and ejection fractions recorded with each agent. The edge definition of the left ventricle and count rate performance of the 1-, 2-, and 3-mm apertures was evaluated in hamsters. In general, the images obtained with the radiolabeled cells were superior to those obtained with the labeled proteins and no significant differences between the protein preparations were detected. Left ventricular ejection fractions calculated with all five radiopharmaceuticals were not significantly different. The best quality images were obtained with the 1-mm pinhole collimator. Ejection fraction and acquisition time were inversely related to aperture size. A good compromise between resolution and sensitivity was obtained with the 2-mm pinhole collimator.

  7. Multimodality evaluation of ventricular function: comparison of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiography, and planar and SPECT blood pool imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiglin, David H.; Krol, Andrzej; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen M.; Szeverenyi, Nikolaus M.; Thomas, Frank D.

    2001-05-01

    Fifteen patients underwent resting echocardiography (EC), ECG gated cardiac MR ventriculography (MRV) and blood pool planar and SPECT ventriculography (SPV) sequentially on the same day. In addition, 36 patients had sequential ECG gated blood pool and SPV and 20 normal volunteers, age > 18 years, had sequential ECG gated cardiac MRI performed on both Siemens closed, 1.5T, and open, 0.2T, magnets. Echocardiography was performed using a HP 5500 system equipped with an S4 transducer in 2D mode. MRV at 0.2T and 1.5T used a circular polarized body coil. Nuclear Medicine studies used 25 mCi Tc- 99m labeled red blood cells. Gated planar and SPV were acquired on a dual head Siemens E-Cam system. We have found that MRV affords the most accurate measurement of ventricular function. SPV and MRV provide similar estimations of left ventricular function (LVEF). Further, SPV consistently provides higher LVEF, as compared to the planar data simultaneously acquired. Observed significant differences in intermodality measurements indicate that follow up studies in patients, especially in patients whose management is critically dependent on functional measurement changes, should be monitored by one modality only.

  8. Blood Pool Segmentation Results in Superior Virtual Cardiac Models than Myocardial Segmentation for 3D Printing.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, Kanwal M; Lengua, Carlos Gonzalez; Weinberg, Alan D; Nielsen, James C; Sanz, Javier

    2016-08-01

    The method of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) three-dimensional (3D) image acquisition and post-processing which should be used to create optimal virtual models for 3D printing has not been studied systematically. Patients (n = 19) who had undergone CMR including both 3D balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) were retrospectively identified. Post-processing for the creation of virtual 3D models involved using both myocardial (MS) and blood pool (BP) segmentation, resulting in four groups: Group 1-bSSFP/MS, Group 2-bSSFP/BP, Group 3-MRA/MS and Group 4-MRA/BP. The models created were assessed by two raters for overall quality (1-poor; 2-good; 3-excellent) and ability to identify predefined vessels (1-5: superior vena cava, inferior vena cava, main pulmonary artery, ascending aorta and at least one pulmonary vein). A total of 76 virtual models were created from 19 patient CMR datasets. The mean overall quality scores for Raters 1/2 were 1.63 ± 0.50/1.26 ± 0.45 for Group 1, 2.12 ± 0.50/2.26 ± 0.73 for Group 2, 1.74 ± 0.56/1.53 ± 0.61 for Group 3 and 2.26 ± 0.65/2.68 ± 0.48 for Group 4. The numbers of identified vessels for Raters 1/2 were 4.11 ± 1.32/4.05 ± 1.31 for Group 1, 4.90 ± 0.46/4.95 ± 0.23 for Group 2, 4.32 ± 1.00/4.47 ± 0.84 for Group 3 and 4.74 ± 0.56/4.63 ± 0.49 for Group 4. Models created using BP segmentation (Groups 2 and 4) received significantly higher ratings than those created using MS for both overall quality and number of vessels visualized (p < 0.05), regardless of the acquisition technique. There were no significant differences between Groups 1 and 3. The ratings for Raters 1 and 2 had good correlation for overall quality (ICC = 0.63) and excellent correlation for the total number of vessels visualized (ICC = 0.77). The intra-rater reliability was good for Rater A (ICC = 0.65). Three models were successfully printed

  9. [Left ventricular early diastolic filling and atrial contribution assessed by ECG-gated cardiac blood pool scintigraphy].

    PubMed

    Kondo, T; Hishida, H; Furuta, T; Sawano, T; Kurokawa, H; Kiriyama, T; Kato, Y; Watanabe, Y; Mizuno, Y; Takeuchi, A

    1986-01-01

    This study evaluated early diastolic left ventricular (LV) filling and the atrial contribution to ventricular filling in patients (pts) with various heart diseases using ECG-gated cardiac blood pool scintigraphy. Conventional equilibrium list mode ECG-gated cardiac blood pool scintigraphy was performed for 19 normal subjects (N) as controls, 104 pts with old myocardial infarction (OMI), 19 pts with essential hypertension (HT), seven pts with idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS), three pts with non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), 19 pts with pure mitral stenosis (MS) and one pt with both MS and aortic regurgitation to evaluate early diastolic LV filling. The LV stroke counts corresponding to stroke volume and the early diastolic LV peak filling rate (DdV/dt) were obtained from the LV time-activity curve and its first derivative. Then the DdV/dt was normalized by stroke counts. The DdV/dt was significantly lower in pts with OMI (4.34 +/- 1.02/sec, p less than 0.001), HT (3.93 +/- 0.70/sec, p less than 0.001), IHSS (4.23 +/- 1.59/sec, p less than 0.01) and MS (4.56 +/- 1.05/sec, p less than 0.01) than in N (5.93 +/- 1.26/sec). Then, in OMI, the DdV/dt correlated significantly (r = -0.45, p less than 0.05) with infarct size (% abnormal contracting segment = %ACS) obtained by contrast left ventriculography. Furthermore, in pts with HT, the DdV/dt correlated significantly (r = -0.59, p less than 0.02) with the left ventricular mean wall thickness obtained by M-mode echocardiography. In pts with MS, the DdV/dt also correlated significantly (r = 0.73, p less than 0.001) with the mitral orifice area obtained by two-dimensional echocardiography. However, it has been difficult to assess the atrial contribution to ventricular filling by conventional ECG-gated cardiac blood pool scintigraphy, because the LV time-activity curve in the late diastolic phase was distorted and unreliable, whenever a minimal variation of the R-R interval occurred

  10. Combined first pass and gated blood pool radionuclide studies in the hemodynamic-cardiac evaluation of patients with low cardiac output

    SciTech Connect

    Abi-Mansour, P.; Fouad, F.M.; Sheeler, L.R.; Bravo, E.L.; MacIntyre, W.J.; Tarazi, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    Cardiac output (CO) is frequently used in the evaluation of cardiac function but low CO does not necessarily reflect heart failure. Similarly, low ejection fraction (EF) can be present in compensated heart diseases. In order to evaluate cardiac performance in relation to systematic hemodynamics, the authors used a multifactorial approach for the determination of CO, EF, pulmonary mean transit time (MTT), ratio of cardiopulmonary volume over total blood volume (CPV/TBV as an index of venous tone) all obtained from a single injection of 99m Tc-HSA. Four different conditions associated with low CO (less than or equal to 2.1 L/min/m/sup 2/) were evaluated. The combined use of CO, EF, MTT and CPV/TBV allowed a better understanding of the myocardial and peripheral circulatory factors associated with low CO states. This is helpful in the selection and follow-up of appropriate therapeutic intervention.

  11. Hemophilic bleeding evaluated by blood pool scanning.

    PubMed

    Green, D; Spies, S M; Rana, N A; Milgram, J W; Mintzer, R

    1981-06-30

    The technique of blood pool scanning was used to examine 15 hemophilic subjects. Employing an in vivo method for erythrocyte labeling with Technetium-99 m, a dynamic perfusion sequence is obtained using a scintillation camera positioned over the area to be examined. This demonstrates the vascularity of the tissue. Subsequently, equilibrium blood pool images of the area are obtained and analyzed with a densitometer to assess relative regional blood volume. In patients who were not bleeding but had chronic arthropathy, vascularity was not increased, and the blood volume of comparable joints was similar. By contrast, marked increases in vascularity and image density were observed in studies of acutely bleeding joints. Chronic hemarthroses were associated with persistent, but less marked increases in joint perfusion. Transient increases in joint vascularity were demonstrated after insertion of knee prostheses. In a patient with a thigh hematoma, the dimensions of the hemorrhage were clearly delineated. Since only a tracer dose of nuclide is infused intravenously, there are no allergic reactions or other side effects of the procedure. Blood pool scanning is a safe, non-invasive technique that augments clinical and radiographic evaluations, and provides a new dimension in the assessment of the hemophilic patient. PMID:6269248

  12. Use of blood products in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Renton, M C; McClelland, D B; Sinclair, C J

    1997-05-01

    The quantity of blood products used perioperatively during cardiac surgery is known to vary widely between institutions. This study looked at the amount of blood products used perioperatively in 74 consecutive elective cardiac operations in one institution. The results are compared with those from other European centres and a cost analysis carried out. On average 2.33 +/- 0.74 (95% confidence interval 1.93-2.77) units of red cell concentrate were transfused perioperatively per patient. Six (8%) patients received no blood products. In addition a number of preoperative factors were studied in an attempt to identify predictors of transfusion requirements. Age, preoperative haemoglobin, female sex and red cell mass were all found to have some predictive value. In the face of increasing demands on a limited supply of blood products we question the need for cross matching more than four units of red cell concentrate in elective cardiac surgery. PMID:9226702

  13. /sup 99m/Tc dextran: a new blood-pool-labeling agent for radionuclide angiocardiography

    SciTech Connect

    Henze, E.; Robinson, G.D.; Kuhl, D.E.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1982-04-01

    We have explored the possibility of imaging the cardiac blood pool with dextran (Dx) labeled with /sup 99m/Tc (Tc) after Sn2+ reduction. Stannous dextran (SnDx) kits were prepared in advance and labeling was performed by adding /sup 99m/Tc. The labeling efficiency was greater than 95%. /sup 99m/Tc dextran (TcDx) was highly stable both in vivo and in vitro. In seven dogs we compared the quality of blood-pool images obtained with TcDx of different molecular weights (4 X 10(4) . Dx-40; 5 X 10(5) . Dx-500; 2 X 10(6) . Dx-2000) and with /sup 99m/Tc red blood cells (TcRBC) labeled in vitro, and determined the organ distribution of this new agent by whole-body scanning and blood sampling. TcDx provided high-quality cardiac blood-pool images up to 60 min after injection. The heart-to-lung ratios averaged 3.7 for TcDx-40, 3.9 for TcDx-500, and 5.4 for TcRBC at 60 min. Whereas TcDx-40 showed a relatively rapid initial urinary excretion and TcDx-2000 was degraded rapidly, TcDx-500 demonstrated the best kinetics for blood-pool imaging. Thus, TcDx is a new radiopharmaceutical with high labeling efficiency and stability. It overcomes a number of the limitations of currently used blood-labeling agents and may become useful for blood-pool imaging in man.

  14. Portal vein aneurysm demonstrated by blood pool SPECT.

    PubMed

    Fukui, H; Kashiwagi, T; Kimura, K; Goto, M; Takei, Y; Kasahara, A; Kawano, S; Fusamoto, H; Kozuka, T; Kamada, T

    1992-11-01

    Portal vein aneurysms are rare and are occasionally suggested by ultrasound and usually confirmed by invasive angiography. Such a case was diagnosed by scintigraphic studies, most importantly blood pool SPECT, which clearly separates it from hepatic cysts. PMID:1424375

  15. Fourier analysis of a gated blood-pool study during atrial flutter

    SciTech Connect

    Makler, P.T. Jr.; McCarthy, D.M.; London, J.W.; Sandler, M.S.; Alavi, A.

    1983-08-01

    First-harmonic Fourier analysis of a gated blood-pool study is based on the assumption that the cardiac chambers contract once per cardiac cycle. In atrial arrhythmias this condition may not exist for the atria. We recently studied a patient with atrial flutter and 2:1 artioventricular conduction. There were predictable alterations in the first-harmonic Fourier phase and amplitude images. The observed changes from first-harmonic Fourier analysis were: (a) very low atrial amplitude values, and (b) absence of identifiable atrial regions on the phase image.

  16. Tc-99m dextran: a new blood-pool-labeling agent for radionuclide angiocardiography

    SciTech Connect

    Henze, E.; Robinson, G.D.; Kuhl, D.E.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1982-04-01

    We have explored the possibility of imaging the cadiac blood pool with dextran (Dx) labeled with Tc-99m (Tc) after Sn/sup 2 +/ reduction. Stannous dextrane (SnDx) kits were prepared in advance and labeling was performed by adding Tc-99m. The labeling efficiency was greater than 95%. Technetium-99m dextran (TcDx) was highly stable both in vivo and in vitro. In seven dogs we compared the quality of blood-pool images obtained with TcDx of different molecular weights ( 4 x 10/sup 4/ = Dx-40; 5 x 10/sup 5/ = Dx-500; 1 x 10/sup 6/ = Dx-2000) and with Tc-99m red blood cells (TcRBC) labeled in vitro, and determined the organ distribution of this new agent by whole-body scanning and blood sampling. TcDx provided high-quality cardiac blood-pool images up to 60 min after injection. The heart-to-lung ratios averaged 3.7 for TcDx-40, 3.9 for TcDx-500, and 5.4 for TcRBC at 60 min. Whereas TcDx-40 showed a relatively rapid initial urinary excretion and TcDx-2000 was degraded rapidly, TcDx-500 demonstrated the best kinetics for blood-pool imaging. Thus, TcDx is a new radiopharmaceutical with high labeling efficiency and stability. It overcomes a number of the limitations of currently used blood-labeling agents and may become useful for blood-pool imaging in man.

  17. Detection of varicocele by radionuclide blood-pool scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, J.; Handelsman, D.J.; Bautovich, G.J.; Conway, A.J.; Morris, J.G.

    1980-10-01

    Varicocele is a common and treatable cause of male subfertility. The authors describe a new technique for varicocele detection using radionuclide blood-pool imaging of the scrotum. The results indicate that this technique detects unilateral varicoceles with high sensitivity, including some which are subclinical. There may be significant implications for treatment of infertility.

  18. Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, as inferred from lung areas in gated blood-pool scintigrams: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Urbina, A.; Okada, R.D.; Palacios, I.; Osbakken, M.; Strauss, H.W.

    1981-11-01

    To determine whether the apex-to-base distribution of pulmonary blood volume, as obtained from gated cardiac blood-pool scans, could be used as a noninvasive method to estimate mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), gated blood-pool scans were analyzed in 77 patients who also had PCWP measurements at cardiac catheterization. Ten of these patients had gated cardiac blood-pool scans and PCWP measurements both at rest and during exercise. The apex-to-base distribution of pulmonary blood volume was determined from the end-systolic frame of the left anterior oblique view by placing equal-sized regions of interest over the apex and base of the right lung. The ratio of apex counts over base counts (A/B ratio) was considered abnormal if greater than unity. The mean A/B ratio was 1.15 +/- 0.27 (1 s.d.) for the 32 studies associated with an abnormal mean PCWP (greater than 12 mm Hg). The mean A/B ratio was 0.85 +/- 0.23 for the 55 studies associated with a normal mean PCWP (p less than 0.01 comparing normal group with abnormal). The sensitivity of the A/B ratio for a mean PCWP greater than 12 mm Hg was 81%R (26/32). The specificity of the A/B ratio for a mean PCWP greater than or equal to 12 mm Hg was 89% (49/55). Thus, noninvasive determination of the pulmonary apex-to-base ratio from gated cardiac blood-pool scans appears to differentiate subjects with normal and abnormal mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressures.

  19. Synthetic copolymer kit for radionuclide blood-pool imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, A.A. Jr.; Callahan, R.J.; Wilkinson, R.A.

    1994-11-01

    A synthetic blood pool imaging agent labeled with {sup 99m}Tc is reported. The agent, methoxypolyethylene glycolpoly-L-Iysyl-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate monoamide was synthesized from a covalent graft copolymer of methoxypolyethylene glycol succinate (molecular weight 5.1 kD) with subsequent modification of the product with diethylenetriamineacetyl residues. The polymer was formulated into a kit that contained Sn(II) and sodium acetate for radiolabeling with {sup 99m}Tc. Biodistribution studies were performed in rats. Blood-pool imaging and blood clearance determination was carried out in rabbits and in a rhesus monkey. The {sup 99m}Tc-labeled agent [specific activity greater than 3.7 GBq/mg; radiochemical purity more than 98% by thin-layer and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)] demonstrated remarkable stability in solution (pH 5.5-6.5) with no radioactive products of degradation detectable by HPLC even at 24 hr postlabeling. The agent exhibited prolonged circulation in the blood with a half-life of 31.5 hr in rabbits. Bio-distribution in rats showed a lack of substantial accumulation of the agent in the reticuloendothelial system. Sequential acquisitions were performed in a rhesus monkey. The {sup 99m}Tc-labeled polymer kit was compared with the {sup 99m}Tc-red blood cells (RBCs) labeled in vitro. Both methods produced similar heart-to-lung ratios. The ratios remained essentially unchanged for up to 15 hr postinjection. The {sup 99m}Tc-labeled methaxypolyethylene glycol-poly-L-lysyl-diethylenetriamine pentaacetate monoamide is an attractive alternative to radiolabeled RBCs for blood pool imaging applications. 33 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Patterns of ventricular emptying by Fourier analysis of gated blood-pool studies

    SciTech Connect

    Links, J.M.; Douglass, K.H.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1980-10-01

    Temporal Fourier analysis was applied to the processing of ECG-gated cardiac blood-pool studies on a pixel-by-pixel basis, to yield information about the pattern of ventricular emptying in normal hearts and in others with conduction abnormalities. The transform data at the fundamental frequency (the heart rate) were used to construct two types of display: (a) a distribution histogram of the pixel phase values, and (b) a cinematic display of the wave of emptying as it spread over the cardiac chambers. Preliminary results indicate that temporal Fourier analysis permits visualization of the pattern of ventricular emptying, which may prove useful in the study of motion abnormalities and asynergies, including those resulting from myocardial hypertrophy or conduction abnormalities, and as an aid in the optimum placement of pacemakers.

  1. Slower Lower Limb Blood Pooling Increases Orthostatic Tolerance in Women with Vasovagal Syncope

    PubMed Central

    Skoog, Johan; Zachrisson, Helene; Länne, Toste; Lindenberger, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: Slower lower limb blood pooling and associated blunted sympathetic activation has been detected in healthy women prone to orthostatic syncope. Whether these findings are true also for patients with vasovagal syncope (VVS) is unknown. The aim was to investigate initial blood pooling time (poolingtime, time to 50% of total blood pooling) together with hemodynamic responses and orthostatic tolerance during lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in VVS and healthy controls. Methods and Results: Fourteen VVS women (25.7 ± 1.3 years) and 15 healthy women (22.8 ± 0.8 years) were subjected to single-step and graded LBNP to pre-syncope. Lower limb blood pooling (ml · 100 ml−1), poolingtime (s), hemodynamic responses and LBNP-tolerance were evaluated. LBNP induced comparable lower limb blood pooling in both groups (controls, 3.1 ± 0.3; VVS, 2.9 ± 0.3 ml · 100 ml−1, P = 0.70). In controls, shorter poolingtime correlated to higher LBNP-tolerance (r = –0.550, P < 0.05) as well as better maintained stroke volume (r = –0.698, P < 0.01) and cardiac output (r = –0.563, P < 0.05). In contrast, shorter poolingtime correlated to lower LBNP-tolerance in VVS (r = 0.821, P < 0.001) and larger decline in stroke volume (r = 0.611, P < 0.05). Furthermore, in controls, shorter poolingtime correlated to baroreflex-mediated hemodynamic changes during LBNP, e.g., increased vasoconstriction (P < 0.001). In VVS, poolingtime was not correlated with LBNP-induced baroreceptor unloading, but rather highly correlated to resting calf blood flow (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Shorter poolingtime seems to elicit greater sympathetic activation with a concomitant higher orthostatic tolerance in healthy women. The contrasting findings in VVS indicate a deteriorated vascular sympathetic control suggesting well-defined differences already in the initial responses during orthostatic stress. PMID:27378941

  2. Extracardiac applications of MR blood pool contrast agent in children.

    PubMed

    Farmakis, Shannon G; Khanna, Geetika

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) angiography has significantly reduced the need for diagnostic conventional angiography and is preferred over CT angiography in children because of its lack of ionizing radiation. The availability of gadofosveset trisodium (the only clinically approved blood pool MR contrast agent) has led to an increase in applications of MR for vascular imaging and an improvement in diagnostic quality of MR angiography. Gadofosveset is a gadolinium-based contrast agent that binds reversibly to albumin, resulting in increased paramagnetic effect and longer intravascular residence. This allows for high-resolution arterial and venous MR angiography, assessment of flow characteristics of vascular malformations, dynamic vascular imaging, and multi-station imaging with a single low-dose gadolinium contrast injection. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to facilitate understanding of the kinetics and safety profile of gadofosveset trisodium, discuss technical aspects of imaging, and illustrate advantages and extracardiac applications in pediatric body imaging. PMID:25408135

  3. Factors affecting postoperative blood loss in children undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Faraoni, David; Van der Linden, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that the influence of cyanotic disease on postoperative blood loss is closely related to age in children undergoing cardiac surgery. Here, we demonstrate that the presence of a cyanotic disease is associated with increased postoperative blood loss in children aged 1 to 6 months. Children with cyanotic disease and aged<1 month who received fresh frozen plasma during cardiopulmonary bypass had less postoperative blood loss and higher maximal clot firmness on FIBTEM than cyanotic children from all other groups. Additional studies are needed to define optimal pathophysiology-based management in children undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:24512988

  4. Cerebral blood flow in humans following resuscitation from cardiac arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Cohan, S.L.; Mun, S.K.; Petite, J.; Correia, J.; Tavelra Da Silva, A.T.; Waldhorn, R.E.

    1989-06-01

    Cerebral blood flow was measured by xenon-133 washout in 13 patients 6-46 hours after being resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Patients regaining consciousness had relatively normal cerebral blood flow before regaining consciousness, but all patients who died without regaining consciousness had increased cerebral blood flow that appeared within 24 hours after resuscitation (except in one patient in whom the first measurement was delayed until 28 hours after resuscitation, by which time cerebral blood flow was increased). The cause of the delayed-onset increase in cerebral blood flow is not known, but the increase may have adverse effects on brain function and may indicate the onset of irreversible brain damage.

  5. The importance of exercise gated blood pool imaging in Chagas Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Meneguetti, J.C.; Neto, J.E.; Hironaka, F.H.; Netto, M.P.; Gomes, J.R.; Goldbaum, M.; Pileggi, F.; Camargo, E.E.

    1984-01-01

    Myocardial involvement in Chagas Disease (CD) often leads to cardiomyopathy and heart failure. Patients (pts) with the indeterminate form (IF) have positive complement fixation test as the only abnormality. Cardiac form (CF) pts have positive serology, abnormal ECG with or without clinical symptoms. To investigate the degree of cardiac involvement in IF pts, exercise (handgrip) gated blood pool (EGBP) was performed on 77 CD male workers (46 IF, 17-50 yrs; 31 CF, 24-61 yrs) and 28 male (22-46 yrs) normal volunteers (NV). Regional wall motion (RWM), ventricular volumes (VV) and percent EF variation (..delta..%) were analysed. NV group shoed ..delta..% - 3.51 +- 4.86 with normal RWM and VV. IF pts showed ..delta..% - 4.27 +- 7.46 with >-10% drop in 22% of pts; RWM and VV were abnormal in 43% and 30%, respectively; at least one parameter was abnormal in 59% of pts. CF pts showed ..delta..%-10.52 +- 7.37 with >-10% drop in 59%; RWM and VV were abnormal in 79% and 83%, respectively; at least one parameter was abnormal in 86% of pts. No ..delta..% difference was found between NV and IF groups, but there was a significant difference between these two groups and CF pts. When EGBP is considered, only 41% of IF pts are normal. Also, 14% CF pts with ECG and serologic abnormalities have no cardiac dysfunction. This suggests that EGBP study should be included as a routine procedure in CD pts and used as a basis for a new classification of the disease.

  6. Limiting excessive postoperative blood transfusion after cardiac procedures. A review.

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, V A; Ferraris, S P

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of blood product use after cardiac operations reveals that a few patients (< or = 20%) consume the majority of blood products (> 80%). The risk factors that predispose a minority of patients to excessive blood use include patient-related factors, transfusion practices, drug-related causes, and procedure-related factors. Multivariate studies suggest that patient age and red blood cell volume are independent patient-related variables that predict excessive blood product transfusion after cardiac procedures. Other factors include preoperative aspirin ingestion, type of operation, over- or underutilization of heparin during cardiopulmonary bypass, failure to correct hypothermia after cardiopulmonary bypass, and physician overtransfusion. A survey of the currently available blood conservation techniques reveals 5 that stand out as reliable methods: 1) high-dose aprotinin therapy, 2) preoperative erythropoietin therapy when time permits adequate dosage before operation, 3) hemodilution by harvest of whole blood immediately before cardiopulmonary bypass, 4) autologous predonation of blood, and 5) salvage of oxygenator blood after cardiopulmonary bypass. Other methods, such as the use of epsilon-aminocaproic acid or desmopressin, cell saving devices, reinfusion of shed mediastinal blood, and hemofiltration have been reported to be less reliable and may even be harmful in some high-risk patients. Consideration of the available data allows formulation of a 4-pronged plan for limiting excessive blood transfusion after surgery: 1) recognize the causes of excessive transfusion, including the importance of red blood cell volume, type of procedure being performed, preoperative aspirin ingestion, etc.; 2) establish a quality management program, including a survey of transfusion practices that emphasizes physician education and availability of real-time laboratory testing to guide transfusion therapy; 3) adopt a multimodal approach using institution-proven techniques; and

  7. Nanoparticle encapsulation in red blood cells enables blood-pool magnetic particle imaging hours after injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmer, J.; Antonelli, A.; Sfara, C.; Tiemann, B.; Gleich, B.; Magnani, M.; Weizenecker, J.; Borgert, J.

    2013-06-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new medical imaging approach that is based on the nonlinear magnetization response of super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) injected into the blood stream. To date, real-time MPI of the bolus passage of an approved MRI SPIO contrast agent injected into the tail vein of living mice has been demonstrated. However, nanoparticles are rapidly removed from the blood stream by the mononuclear phagocyte system. Therefore, imaging applications for long-term monitoring require the repeated administration of bolus injections, which complicates quantitative comparisons due to the temporal variations in concentration. Encapsulation of SPIOs into red blood cells (RBCs) has been suggested to increase the blood circulation time of nanoparticles. This work presents first evidence that SPIO-loaded RBCs can be imaged in the blood pool of mice several hours after injection using MPI. This finding is supported by magnetic particle spectroscopy performed to quantify the iron concentration in blood samples extracted from the mice 3 and 24 h after injection of SPIO-loaded RBCs. Based on these results, new MPI applications can be envisioned, such as permanent 3D real-time visualization of the vessel tree during interventional procedures, bleeding monitoring after stroke, or long-term monitoring and treatment control of cardiovascular diseases.

  8. The cardiac blood supply-workload balance in children.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tomoaki; Takeda, Atsuhito; Takei, Kohta; Tateno, Shigeru; Kawasoe, Yasutaka; Niwa, Koichiro

    2015-09-01

    It is well known that the reflected pressure wave in small children returns earlier than that in adolescent. The reason of early return of the reflected pressure wave in infancy is their height. The short distance between heart and reflection point makes the reflected pressure wave returning to the heart earlier. In adult, the early return (during systole) of the reflected pressure wave means disadvantage to cardiac blood supply-workload balance. The purpose of this study was to clarify whether the early return of the reflected pressure wave in small children impairs the cardiac blood supply-workload balance. This study enrolled 37 small left-to-right shunt patients with normal aortic circulation below 15 years of age. The aortic pressure waveform was recorded using a pressure sensor mounted catheter, and augmentation index and subendocardial viability ratio were calculated. The age of patients was 6.1 ± 3.2 years. The augmentation index was 8.7 ± 14.3 % and the index had a negative correlation with patients' age (r = -0.6243, p < 0.0001). The subendocardial viability ratio, which means the cardiac blood supply-workload balance, was 0.92 ± 0.14 and the index had a positive relationship with patients' age (r = 0.6435, p < 0.0001). The cardiac blood supply-workload balance gradually improves from infancy to young adulthood. One of the causes of the unfavorable cardiac blood supply-workload balance in infancy would be the accelerated aortic pressure wave reflection due to their short height. PMID:24989969

  9. Abnormal Myocardial Blood Flow Reserve Observed in Cardiac Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Nel, Karen; Senior, Roxy; Greaves, Kim

    2016-01-01

    We performed real-time myocardial contrast echocardiography on a patient with cardiac amyloidosis and previous normal coronary angiography presenting with atypical chest pain to assess myocardial blood flow reserve (MBFR). Myocardial contrast echocardiography was performed and flash microbubble destruction and replenishment analysis was used to calculate myocardial blood flow. Dipyridamole was used to achieve hyperemia. MBFR was derived from the ratio of peak myocardial blood flow at hyperemia and rest. The results show a marked reduction in MBFR in our patient. Previous reports of luminal obstruction of intramyocardial rather than epicardial vessels by amyloid deposition may be causing microvascular dysfunction. PMID:27081447

  10. Impact of pooling on accuracy of hepatitis B virus surface antigen screening of blood donations.

    PubMed

    Novack, L; Sarov, B; Goldman-Levi, R; Yahalom, V; Safi, J; Soliman, H; Orgel, M; Yaari, A; Galai, N; Pliskin, J S; Shinar, E

    2008-08-01

    Expenditure on screening blood donations in developing countries can be reduced by testing donations in pools. This study evaluated serological screening in pools for hepatitis B virus (HBV) at the Israeli national blood bank and a hospital blood bank in Gaza, the Palestinian Authority. The accuracy of HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) enzyme immunoassay performed on pools of 3-24 samples was compared with individual tests. Delay in detecting positive samples due to dilution in pools and the possibility of antibody-antigen neutralization were analyzed. The sensitivity of pooled testing for HBsAg was 93-99%, prolonging the window period by 5 days (8.3%). Neutralization of HBsAg by hepatitis B surface antibodies (anti-HBs) could be minimized by testing immediately after pooling. Serological testing for HBsAg in pools may be performed using manually created pools of up to six samples, with 5% loss in sensitivity and a risk of neutralization by anti-HBs present in the donor population. Pooling can therefore be considered as an option only in countries with a low prevalence of HBV. PMID:18486172

  11. Perfusionist strategies for blood conservation in pediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Durandy, Yves

    2010-02-26

    There is increasing concern about the safety of homologous blood transfusion during cardiac surgery, and a restrictive transfusion practice is associated with improved outcome. Transfusion-free pediatric cardiac surgery is unrealistic for the vast majority of procedures in neonates or small infants; however, considerable progress has been made by using techniques that decrease the need for homologous blood products or even allow bloodless surgery in older infants and children. These techniques involve a decrease in prime volume by downsizing the bypass circuit with the help of vacuum-assisted venous drainage, microplegia, autologous blood predonation with or without infusion of recombinant (erythropoietin), cell salvaging, ultrafiltration and retrograde autologous priming. The three major techniques which are simple, safe, efficient, and cost-effective are: a prime volume as small as possible, cardioplegia with negligible hydric balance and circuit residual blood salvaged without any alteration. Furthermore, these three techniques can be used for all the patients, including emergencies and small babies. In every pediatric surgical unit, a strategy to decrease or avoid blood bank transfusion must be implemented. A strategy to minimize transfusion requirement requires a combined effort involving the entire surgical team with pre-, peri-, and postoperative planning and management. PMID:21160681

  12. When blood runs cold: cold agglutinins and cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Findlater, Rhonda R; Schnell-Hoehn, Karen N

    2011-01-01

    Cold agglutinins are particular cold-reactive antibodies that react with red blood cells when the blood temperature drops below normal body temperature causing increased blood viscosity and red blood cell clumping. Most individuals with cold agglutinins are not aware of their presence, as these antibodies have little effect on daily living, often necessitating no treatment. However, when those with cold agglutinins are exposed to hypothermic situations or undergo procedures such as cardiopulmonary bypass with hypothermia during cardiac surgery, lethal complications of hemolysis, microvascular occlusion and organ failure can occur. By identifying those suspected of possessing cold agglutinins through a comprehensive nursing assessment and patient history, cold agglutinin screening can be performed prior to surgery to determine a diagnosis of cold agglutinin disease. With a confirmed diagnosis of cold agglutinin disease, the plan of care can be focused on measures to maintain the patient's blood temperature above the thermal amplitude throughout their hospitalization including the use of normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass with warm myocardial preservation techniques to prevent these fatal complications. Using a case report approach, the authors review the mechanism, clinical manifestations, detection and nursing management of a patient with cold agglutinins undergoing scheduled cardiac surgery. Cold agglutinin disease is rare. However, the risk to patients warrants an increased awareness of cold agglutinins and screening for those who are suspected of carrying these antibodies. PMID:21630629

  13. Congestive cardiac failure: central role of the arterial blood pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, P

    1987-01-01

    A review of the history of our knowledge and understanding of the peripheral oedema of congestive cardiac failure points to the conclusion that an inability of the heart to maintain the arterial pressure is of central importance in this condition. Although the function of the circulation is to perfuse the tissues, the body monitors the adequacy of its perfusion, not not through metabolic messengers carried from the tissues in the blood stream, but by sensing the arterial pressure; and the mechanisms evoked act to maintain the arterial pressure. In the short term this is achieved by autonomic regulation of the heart and blood vessels; in the longer term the arterial pressure is maintained through an increase in the blood volume by a retention of salt and water by the kidney. To support the latter process, intrinsic renal mechanisms are successively magnified by the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and by the activities of the sympathetic system and vasopressin. The natriuretic influence mediated through volume receptors and the release of atrial peptide is overruled by the arterial baroreceptors, so that the body maintains the arterial pressure at the expense of an increase in blood volume. In these ways the syndrome of congestive cardiac failure may be regarded as one which arises when the heart becomes chronically unable to maintain an appropriate arterial pressure without support. PMID:3311096

  14. Low-Dose Sevoflurane May Reduce Blood Loss and Need for Blood Products After Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhaoxia; Zhou, Li; Qin, Zhen; Luo, Ming; Chen, Hao; Xiong, Jiyue; Li, Jian; Liu, Ting; Du, Lei; Zhou, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients undergoing cardiac surgery often experience abnormal bleeding, due primarily to cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB)-induced activation of platelets. Sevoflurane may inhibit platelet activation, raising the possibility that administering it during CPB may reduce blood loss. Patients between 18 and 65 years old who were scheduled for cardiac surgery under CPB at our hospital were prospectively enrolled and randomized to receive intravenous anesthetics alone (control group, n = 77) or together with sevoflurane (0.5–1.0 vol/%) from an oxygenator (sevoflurane group, n = 76). The primary outcome was postoperative blood loss, the secondary outcome was postoperative need for blood products. Volume of blood loss was 48% lower in the sevoflurane group than the control group at 4 hours after surgery, and 33% lower at 12 hours after surgery. Significantly fewer patients in the sevoflurane group lost >700 mL blood within 24 hours (9 of 76 vs 28 of 77, P < 0.001). As a result, the sevoflurane group received significantly smaller volumes of packed red blood cells (1.25 ± 2.36 vs 2.23 ± 3.75 units, P = 0.011) and fresh frozen plasma (97 ± 237 vs 236 ± 344 mL, P = 0.004). Thus the sevoflurane group was at significantly lower risk of requiring complex blood products after surgery (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.17–0.68, P = 0.002). Sevoflurane inhalation from an oxygenator during CPB may reduce blood loss and need for blood products after cardiac surgery. PMID:27124028

  15. Feasibility and cost-benefit of implementing pooled screening for HCVAg in small blood bank settings.

    PubMed

    Sarov, B; Novack, L; Beer, N; Safi, J; Soliman, H; Pliskin, J S; Litvak, E; Yaari, A; Shinar, E

    2007-12-01

    To examine the accuracy, feasibility and benefits of screening for hepatitis C virus core antigen (HCVAg) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test in pools. Many countries cannot afford to test blood donations for hepatitis C using molecular methods. Screening individual units using the ELISA HCVAg test is an acceptable, yet still expensive, alternative, especially for small blood bank settings. This study evaluated the option of screening for HCVAg in pools. The sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) of HCVAg in pools of three and six antibody-negative samples were estimated and compared with polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The feasibility and cost-benefit of the assay was assessed on 960 routine samples collected at a hospital blood bank in Gaza. Based on results for 50 PCR-positive pools and 50 and 110 PCR-negative pools of three and six, the Se of testing in pools of three and six samples is 80-82% [95% confidence interval (CI): 66.3-91.4] and Sp >or=98% (95% CI: 89.4-100.0) compared with PCR. The incidence of antigen in donors in Gaza was 0.1% (95% CI: 0-0.56). Cost analyses suggested significant benefits from implementing screening blood donations for HCVAg when the incidence rate is >4.2/10,000, leading to reduction in the expenditures needed to treat patients infected with HCV. The risk of transfusion-transmitted hepatitis C in resource-deprived developing countries can be efficiently reduced by additional screening of antibody-negative blood donations for HCVAg in pools of six. PMID:17727618

  16. ECG-gated blood-pool study of carotid arterial pulsation as a sign of stenosis: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Winston, M.A.; Cohen, S.N.

    1983-06-01

    The large elastic arteries, such as the carotids, pulsate (expand and contract) in synchrony with the heart beat. These pulsations should be reduced by significant stenosis. This hypothesis was studied in 15 men by obtaining sequential ECG-gated labeled blood-pool images of these vessels in anterior and lateral oblique views. These were computer processed by a functional program that displays each pixel with an intensity proportional to its change in activity level during the cardiac cycle. Blank areas indicated lack of pulsation and were correlated with angiographic studies. The blank skip areas were present when there was 50% or greater narrowing in arterial diameter (94% sensitivity) but were not seen in patients with normal or minimally diseased vessels (25% or less narrowing). They were present inconsistently in the four vessels with 25 to 50% narrowing.

  17. Assessment of the site of ventricular activation by Fourier analysis of gated blood-pool studies

    SciTech Connect

    Links, J.M.; Raichlen, J.S.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Reid, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    The authors studied the use of first-harmonic Fourier analysis of gated blood-pool images to assess the site of ventricular activation in a group of 12 patients undergoing electrophysiologic pacing studies. They acquired gated blood-pool studies during pacing at up to four sites at each of two different rates. A total of 50 studies were made. At a pacing rate of 100 beats/min, when the pacing electrode was the right-ventricular outflow tract, 7/8; at the anterolateral left-ventricular wall, 4/4. When the Fourier activation site was at the right-ventricular apex, 9/9 times the pacing electrode was there; at the right-ventricular outflow tract, 7/10; in the left ventricle, 4/4. Fourier analysis of gated blood-pool studies can help identify the site of ventricular activation but is not sufficiently accurate to fully replace endocardial mapping.

  18. Cardiac risk factors: new cholesterol and blood pressure management guidelines.

    PubMed

    Anthony, David; George, Paul; Eaton, Charles B

    2014-06-01

    The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association cholesterol guidelines depart from low-density lipoprotein (LDL) treatment targets and recommend treating four specific patient groups with statins. Statins are the only cholesterol-lowering drugs with randomized trial evidence of benefit for preventing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). The groups are patients with clinical ASCVD; patients ages 40 to 75 years with diabetes and LDL of 70 to 189 mg/dL but no clinical ASCVD; patients 21 years or older with LDL levels of 190 mg/dL or higher; and patients ages 40 to 75 years with LDL of 70 to 189 mg/dL without clinical ASCVD or diabetes but with 10-year ASCVD risk of 7.5% or higher. Ten-year ASCVD risk may be calculated using the Pooled Cohort Equations. The Eighth Joint National Committee (JNC 8) guidelines for blood pressure management recommend a blood pressure goal of less than 140/90 mm Hg for all adults except those 60 years or older. For the latter group, the JNC 8 recommends a systolic blood pressure goal of less than 150 mm Hg. In another notable change from prior guidelines, the JNC 8 recommends relaxing the systolic blood pressure goal for patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease to less than 140 mm Hg from less than 130 mm Hg. PMID:24936717

  19. Continuous cardiac output monitoring by peripheral blood pressure waveform analysis.

    PubMed

    Mukkamala, Ramakrishna; Reisner, Andrew T; Hojman, Horacio M; Mark, Roger G; Cohen, Richard J

    2006-03-01

    A clinical method for monitoring cardiac output (CO) should be continuous, minimally invasive, and accurate. However, none of the conventional CO measurement methods possess all of these characteristics. On the other hand, peripheral arterial blood pressure (ABP) may be measured reliably and continuously with little or no invasiveness. We have developed a novel technique for continuously monitoring changes in CO by mathematical analysis of a peripheral ABP waveform. In contrast to the previous techniques, our technique analyzes the ABP waveform over time scales greater than a cardiac cycle in which the confounding effects of complex wave reflections are attenuated. The technique specifically analyzes 6-min intervals of ABP to estimate the pure exponential pressure decay that would eventually result if pulsatile activity abruptly ceased (i.e., after the high frequency wave reflections vanish). The technique then determines the time constant of this exponential decay, which equals the product of the total peripheral resistance and the nearly constant arterial compliance, and computes proportional CO via Ohm's law. To validate the technique, we performed six acute swine experiments in which peripheral ABP waveforms and aortic flow probe CO were simultaneously measured over a wide physiologic range. We report an overall CO error of 14.6%. PMID:16532772

  20. Visualization of hypertrophied papillary muscle mimicking left ventricular mass on gated blood pool and T1-201 myocardial perfusion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bunko, H.; Nakajima, K.; Tonami, N.; Asanoi, H.; Hisada, K.

    1981-12-01

    A sixty-year old man with acute myocardial infarction was incidentally found to have a hypertrophied anterolateral papillary muscle (ALPPM) of the left ventricle on gated blood pool (GBP) and T1-201 myocardial perfusion images. Hypertrophy of the ALPPM was visualized as a movable defect in the lateral basal area on GBP imaging throughout the cardiac cycle and on the TI-201 study as a radionuclide accumulating structure, consistent with the defect in the GBP. A combination of these findings may suggest the presence of a hypertrophied papillary muscle of the left ventricle.

  1. Diagnosis of Popliteal Venous Entrapment Syndrome by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Blood-Pool Contrast Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Beitzke, Dietrich Wolf, Florian; Juelg, Gregor; Lammer, Johannes; Loewe, Christian

    2011-02-15

    Popliteal vascular entrapment syndrome is caused by aberrations or hypertrophy of the gastrocnemius muscles, which compress the neurovascular structures of the popliteal fossa, leading to symptoms of vascular and degeneration as well as aneurysm formation. Imaging of popliteal vascular entrapment may be performed with ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography angiography, and conventional angiography. The use of blood-pool contrast agents in MRI when popliteal vascular entrapment is suspected offers the possibility to perform vascular imaging with first-pass magnetic resonance angiographic, high-resolution, steady-state imaging and allows functional tests all within one examination with a single dose of contrast agent. We present imaging findings in a case of symptomatic popliteal vein entrapment diagnosed by the use of blood pool contrast-enhanced MRI.

  2. Prolonged in vivo circulation time by zwitterionic modification of magnetite nanoparticles for blood pool contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wangchuan; Lin, Jiang; Li, Mingli; Ma, Yongjie; Chen, Yuxin; Zhang, Chunfu; Li, Dan; Gu, Hongchen

    2012-01-01

    Long circulation time is critical for blood pool contrast agents used in high-resolution magnetic resonance angiography. For iron oxide particle contrast agents, size and surface properties significantly influence their in vivo performance. We developed a novel long-circulating blood pool contrast agent by introducing zwitterionic structure onto the particle surface. Zwitterionic structure was fabricated by 3-(diethylamino)propylamine (DEAPA) grafted onto the surface of ployacrylic acid coated magnetite nanoparticles via EDC/NHS [N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbo-diimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide] coupling chemistry. Zwitterionic particles demonstrated five times lower macrophage cell uptake than the original particles and low cell toxicity. Magnetic resonance angiography indicated that zwitterionic nanoparticles had much longer in vivo circulation time than the original particles and were an ideal candidate for blood pool contrast agent. We suppose that zwitterionic modification by DEAPA and EDC/NHS can be used generally for coating nanoparticles with carboxyl surface and to prolong their circulating time. PMID:22539402

  3. Use of blood-pool imaging in evaluation of diffuse activity patterns in technetium-99m pyrophosphate myocardial scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Cowley, M J; Mantle, J A; Rogers, W J; Russell, R O; Rackley, C E; Logic, J R

    1979-06-01

    It has been suggested that diffuse Tc-99m pyrophosphate precordial activity may be due to persistent blood-pool activity in routine delayed views during myocardial imaging. To answer this question, we reviewed myocardial scintigrams recorded 60--90 min following the injection of 12--15 mCi of Tc-99m pyrophosphate for the presence of diffuse precordial activity, and compared these with early images of the blood pool in 265 patients. Diffuse activity in the delayed images was identified in 48 patients: in 20 with acute myocardial infarction and in 28 with no evidence of it. Comparison of these routine delayed images with early views of the blood pool revealed two types of patterns. In patients with acute infarction, 95% had delayed images that were distinguishable from blood pool either because the activity was smaller than the early blood pool, or by the presence of localized activity superimposed on diffuse activity identical to blood pool. In those without infarction, 93% had activity distribution in routine delayed views matching that in the early blood-pool images. The usefulness of the diffuse TcPPi precordial activity in myocardial infarction is improved when early blood-pool imaging is used to exclude persistence of blood-pool activity as its cause. Moreover, it does not require additional amounts of radioactivity nor complex computer processing, a feature that may be of value in the community hospital using the technique to "rule out" infarction 24--72 hr after onset of suggestive symptoms. PMID:231644

  4. Cells Expressing Early Cardiac Markers Reside in the Bone Marrow and Are Mobilized Into the Peripheral Blood After Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kucia, Magda; Dawn, Buddhadeb; Hunt, Greg; Guo, Yiru; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Majka, Marcin; Ratajczak, Janina; Rezzoug, Francine; Ildstad, Suzanne T.; Bolli, Roberto; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z.

    2013-01-01

    The concept that bone marrow (BM)– derived cells participate in cardiac regeneration remains highly controversial and the identity of the specific cell type(s) involved remains unknown. In this study, we report that the postnatal BM contains a mobile pool of cells that express early cardiac lineage markers (Nkx2.5/Csx, GATA-4, and MEF2C). These cells are present in significant amounts in BM harvested from young mice but their abundance decreases with age; in addition, the responsiveness of these cells to gradients of motomorphogens SDF-1, HGF, and LIF changes with age. FACS analysis, combined with analysis of early cardiac markers at the mRNA and protein levels, revealed that cells expressing these markers reside in the nonadherent, nonhematopoietic CXCR4+/Sca-1+/lin−/CD45− mononuclear cell (MNC) fraction in mice and in the CXCR4+/CD34+/AC133+/CD45− BMMNC fraction in humans. These cells are mobilized into the peripheral blood after myocardial infarction and chemoattracted to the infarcted myocardium in an SDF-1-CXCR4 −, HGF-c-Met−, and LIF-LIF-R− dependent manner. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that the postnatal BM harbors a nonhematopoietic population of cells that express markers for cardiac differentiation. We propose that these potential cardiac progenitors may account for the myocardial regenerative effects of BM. The present findings provide a novel paradigm that could reconcile current controversies and a rationale for investigating the use of BM-derived cardiac progenitors for myocardial regeneration. PMID:15550692

  5. Effect of Vanadate on Elevated Blood Glucose and Depressed Cardiac Performance of Diabetic Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyliger, Clayton E.; Tahiliani, Arun G.; McNeill, John H.

    1985-03-01

    The trace element vanadium has an unclear biological function. Vanadate, an oxidized form of vanadium, appears to have an insulin-like action. The effect of vanadate on blood glucose and cardiac performance was assessed in female Wistar rats 6 weeks after they were made diabetic with streptozotocin. When vanadate was administered for a 4-week period to the diabetic rats, their blood glucose was not significantly different from that of nondiabetic controls despite a low serum insulin. In contrast, blood glucose was increased about threefold in the diabetic rats that were not treated with vanadate; these rats also had low insulin levels. Cardiac performance was depressed in the untreated diabetic animals, but the cardiac performance of the vanadate-treated diabetic animals was not significantly different from that of nondiabetic controls. Thus vanadate controlled the high blood glucose and prevented the decline in cardiac performance due to diabetes.

  6. Dynamic circular buffering: a technique for equilibrium gated blood pool imaging.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, J J; Rahms, H; Green, M V; Del Pozo, F

    1996-03-01

    We have devised a software technique called "dynamic circular buffering" (DCB) with which we create a gated blood pool image sequence of the heart in real time using the best features of LIST and FRAME mode methods of acquisition/processing. The routine is based on the concept of independent "agents" acting on the timing and position data continuously written into the DCB. This approach allows efficient asynchronous operation on PC-type machines and enhanced capability on systems capable of true multiprocessing and multithreading. PMID:8904285

  7. REGIONAL CARDIAC BLOOD FLOW WITH AIR PARTICLE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This proposal offers the unique application of novel techniques to improve understanding of the mechanisms whereby ambient particulate exerts deleterious influences on the heart and circulation. Enhanced ischemia has broad implications for cardiac morbidity and mor...

  8. Accuracy and cost-benefit of pooled versus singleton screening blood donations for anti-HIV: impact on different blood bank set-ups.

    PubMed

    Novack, Lena; Pliskin, Joseph S; Shinar, Eilat; Safi, Jamal; Sarov, Batia

    2006-10-01

    This study evaluates the accuracy and cost-benefit of implementing a pooled screening procedure in blood banks in general and especially in developing countries. The sensitivity of pooled testing was found to be relatively high, with the lowest levels estimated at about 98% for pools consisting of three, six, and 12 samples. Screening in pools of up to 12 samples is expected to be economically beneficial in countries with HIV prevalence rates of 8-10%, which cannot afford the cost of care for an HIV-infected patient. PMID:17034705

  9. Perfluorooctyl bromide traces self-assembled with polymeric nanovesicles for blood pool ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xuan; Yin, Tinghui; Zhou, Guofu; Shuai, Xintao; Zheng, Rongqin

    2016-06-24

    A novel perfluorooctyl bromide (PFOB)-loaded nanovesicle with a size of about 500 nm was prepared by self-assembly of an amphiphilic block copolymer, poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(d,l-lactic acid) (PEG-PDLLA), for blood pool ultrasound imaging. The excellent compatibility of PFOB with the hydrophobic PDLLA block makes PFOB uniformly distribute and integrate well within the nanovesicle shell. In theory, both the compressibility and shell density of the nanovesicle as ultrasound scatterers are enhanced, resulting in much higher echo intensity compared to the other PFOB nanoparticles. In vitro and in vivo imaging results illustrate that these polymeric nanovesicles with extremely low content of PFOB show quite a good contrast-enhancing effect even if highly diluted in blood. Therefore this PFOB-loaded polymeric nanovesicle is anticipated to be applicable as an ultrasound contrast agent for normal angiography and specific imaging of capillary-abundant organs or tissues (e.g. tumors). PMID:27121357

  10. Three dimensional quantification of left ventricular wall motion by ECG-gated blood pool emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, S.R.; Walton, S.; Laming, P.J.; Jarritt, P.H.; Ell, P.J.; Emanuel, R.W.; Swanton, R.H.

    1985-05-01

    ECG-gated blood pool emission tomography is a relatively new technique, and this study establishes a simple method for displaying the three dimensional data obtained, determines a normal range for ejection fraction in all regions of the left ventricle, and compares wall motion in abnormal subjects with that determined by X-ray contrast ventriculography. The short axis sections dividing the ventricle in slices from apex to base, were used to calculate ejection fraction for all parts of the ventricle and the results were plotted on a single colour coded circular image. The apex was represented in the centre, the base around the circumference, and all other parts of the ventricle were represented in between. The image was divided into 15 segments, and normal segmental ejection fraction was defined as within two standard deviations of the mean in a group of 10 normal subjects. In 25 subjects with coronary artery disease, motion of the anterior, apical, and inferior walls agreed in every case with the right anterior oblique contrast ventriculogram, but in 12 of these, the three dimensional ejection fraction image showed abnormal septal motion, and in a further 3, abnormal lateral wall motion in addition. In the 12 subjects there was disease of the left anterior descending coronary artery, and in the further 3 there was left circumflex disease. ECG-gated blood pool emission tomography thus provides an accurate quantitative assessment of left ventricular wall motion in three dimensions, and has significant advantages over conventional planar techniques.

  11. Modern Perforator Flap Imaging with High-Resolution Blood Pool MR Angiography.

    PubMed

    Kagen, Alexander C; Hossain, Rydhwana; Dayan, Erez; Maddula, Soumya; Samson, William; Dayan, Joseph; Smith, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    Advances in microsurgical techniques have improved autologous reconstructions by providing new donor site options while decreasing donor site morbidity. Various preoperative imaging modalities have been studied to assess the relevant vascular anatomic structures, with magnetic resonance (MR) angiography traditionally lagging behind computed tomography (CT) with respect to spatial resolution. Blood pool MR angiography with gadofosveset trisodium, a gadolinium-based contrast agent with extended intravascular retention, has allowed longer multiplanar acquisitions with resultant voxel sizes similar to or smaller than those of CT and with improved signal-to-noise ratio and soft-tissue contrast while maintaining the ability to depict flow with time-resolved imaging. The resultant vascular detail enables precise evaluation of the relevant vascular anatomic structures, including the vessel course, size, and branching pattern, as well as the venous arborization pattern. In addition, any architectural distortion, vessel alteration, or injury from prior surgery can be depicted. The reporting radiologist should be aware of pertinent and incidental findings relevant to the planned surgery and the patient's disease so that he or she can assist the microsurgeon in flap design as a member of the multidisciplinary team. Given the lack of ionizing radiation exposure in patients who often have an elevated body mass index, high-spatial-resolution blood pool MR angiography has become the imaging reference standard for the preoperative assessment of perforator flap vascular and soft-tissue morphology in our practice. PMID:25884098

  12. Anemia and red blood cell transfusion in critically ill cardiac patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Anemia and red blood cell (RBC) transfusion occur frequently in hospitalized patients with cardiac disease. In this narrative review, we report the epidemiology of anemia and RBC transfusion in hospitalized adults and children (excluding premature neonates) with cardiac disease, and on the outcome of anemic and transfused cardiac patients. Both anemia and RBC transfusion are common in cardiac patients, and both are associated with mortality. RBC transfusion is the only way to rapidly treat severe anemia, but is not completely safe. In addition to hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, the determinant(s) that should drive a practitioner to prescribe a RBC transfusion to cardiac patients are currently unclear. In stable acyanotic cardiac patients, Hb level above 70 g/L in children and above 70 to 80 g/L in adults appears safe. In cyanotic children, Hb level above 90 g/L appears safe. The appropriate threshold Hb level for unstable cardiac patients and for children younger than 28 days is unknown. The optimal transfusion strategy in cardiac patients is not well characterized. The threshold at which the risk of anemia outweighs the risk of transfusion is not known. More studies are needed to determine when RBC transfusion is indicated in hospitalized patients with cardiac disease. PMID:25024880

  13. Thiotepa-associated cardiomyopathy during blood or marrow transplantation: association with the female sex and cardiac risk factors.

    PubMed

    Alidina, A; Lawrence, D; Ford, L A; Baer, M R; Bambach, B; Bernstein, S H; Czuczman, M S; Slack, J L; Spangenthal, E; Wetzler, M; Barcos, M P; Proulx, G M; Anderson, B; McCarthy, P L

    1999-01-01

    Thiotepa (TT) has not been reported to cause cardiomyopathy, whereas cyclophosphamide (Cy)-related cardiomyopathy is well characterized. To search for cases of acute onset cardiomyopathy associated with TT, we retrospectively reviewed 171 patients who received TT-containing conditioning regimens for blood or marrow transplantation (BMT). Nine of 171 patients (5.3%) developed clinical congestive heart failure in the post-BMT period. The median time to onset of heart failure was 15 days after BMT (range 5-30). The median pre-BMT left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 50% (range 42-65%) as determined by two-dimensional echocardiogram, or gated blood pool scan. At the time of cardiomyopathy onset, LVEF was 30%. Six patients died of causes unrelated to heart failure. All affected patients who developed congestive heart failure following administration of TT had some evidence of cardiac dysfunction prior to transplantation. Significant risk factors for the development of cardiomyopathy included low pre-BMT-LVEF and female sex--particularly in females receiving allogeneic transplantation. The incidence of congestive heart failure with TT-containing regimens was similar to the incidence using other regimens with and without Cy. The mean time to clinical evidence of TT-associated cardiomyopathy was longer than the mean time reported with Cy. We recommend caution in using high-dose TT-containing regimens for patients with histories of cardiac dysfunction. PMID:10534063

  14. Synthesis of Fluorine-18 Radio-labeled Serum Albumins for PET Blood Pool Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Basuli, Falguni; Li, Changhui; Xu, Biying; Williams, Mark; Wong, Karen; Coble, Vincent L; Vasalatiy, Olga; Seidel, Jurgen; Green, Michael V.; Griffiths, Gary L.; Choyke, Peter L.; Jagoda, Elaine M.

    2015-01-01

    We sought to develop a practical, reproducible and clinically translatable method of radiolabeling serum albumins with fluorine-18 for use as a PET blood pool imaging agent in animals and man. Fluorine-18 radiolabeled fluoronicotinic acid-2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl ester, [18F]F-Py-TFP was prepared first by the reaction of its quaternary ammonium triflate precursor with [18F]tetrabutylammonium fluoride ([18F]TBAF) according to a previously published method for peptides, with minor modifications. The incubation of [18F]F-Py-TFP with rat serum albumin (RSA) in phosphate buffer (pH 9) for 15 min at 37–40 °C produced fluorine-18-radiolabeled RSA and the product was purified using a mini-PD MiniTrap G-25 column. The overall radiochemical yield of the reaction was 18–35% (n = 30, uncorrected) in a 90-min synthesis. This procedure, repeated with human serum albumin (HSA), yielded similar results. Fluorine-18-radiolabeled RSA demonstrated prolonged blood retention (biological half-life of 4.8 hours) in healthy awake rats. The distribution of major organ radioactivity remained relatively unchanged during the 4 hour observation periods either by direct tissue counting or by dynamic PET whole-body imaging except for a gradual accumulation of labeled metabolic products in the bladder. This manual method for synthesizing radiolabeled serum albumins uses fluorine-18, a widely available PET radionuclide, and natural protein available in both pure and recombinant forms which could be scaled up for widespread clinical applications. These preclinical biodistribution and PET imaging results indicate that [18F]RSA is an effective blood pool imaging agent in rats and might, as [18F]HSA, prove similarly useful as a clinical imaging agent. PMID:25533724

  15. Characteristics of the rat cardiac sphingolipid pool in two mitochondrial subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Monette, Jeffrey S; Gómez, Luis A; Moreau, Régis F; Bemer, Brett A; Taylor, Alan W; Hagen, Tory M

    2010-07-23

    Mitochondrial sphingolipids play a diverse role in normal cardiac function and diseases, yet a precise quantification of cardiac mitochondrial sphingolipids has never been performed. Therefore, rat heart interfibrillary mitochondria (IFM) and subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) were isolated, lipids extracted, and sphingolipids quantified by LC-tandem mass spectrometry. Results showed that sphingomyelin (approximately 10,000 pmol/mg protein) was the predominant sphingolipid regardless of mitochondrial subpopulation, and measurable amounts of ceramide (approximately 70 pmol/mg protein) sphingosine, and sphinganine were also found in IFM and SSM. Both mitochondrial populations contained similar quantities of sphingolipids except for ceramide which was much higher in SSM. Analysis of sphingolipid isoforms revealed ten different sphingomyelins and six ceramides that differed from 16- to 24-carbon units in their acyl side chains. Sub-fractionation experiments further showed that sphingolipids are a constituent part of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Furthermore, inner membrane ceramide levels were 32% lower versus whole mitochondria (45 pmol/mg protein). Three ceramide isotypes (C20-, C22-, and C24-ceramide) accounted for the lower amounts. The concentrations of the ceramides present in the inner membranes of SSM and IFM differed greatly. Overall, mitochondrial sphingolipid content reflected levels seen in cardiac tissue, but the specific ceramide distribution distinguished IFM and SSM from each other. PMID:20599536

  16. Characteristics of the Rat Cardiac Sphingolipid Pool in Two Mitochondrial Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Monette, Jeffrey S.; Gómez, Luis A.; Moreau, Régis F.; Bemer, Brett A.; Taylor, Alan W.; Hagen, Tory M.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial sphingolipids play a diverse role in normal cardiac function and diseases, yet a precise quantification of cardiac mitochondrial sphingolipids has never been performed. Therefore, rat heart interfibrillary (IFM) and subsarcolemmal (SSM) mitochondria were isolated, lipids extracted, and sphingolipids quantified by LC-tandem mass spectrometry. Results showed that sphingomyelin (~10,000 pmols/mg protein) was the predominant sphingolipid regardless of mitochondrial subpopulation, and measurable amounts of ceramide (~70 pmols/mg protein) sphingosine, and sphinganine were also found in IFM and SSM. Both mitochondrial populations contained similar quantities of sphingolipids except for ceramide which was much higher in SSM. Analysis of sphingolipid isoforms revealed ten different sphingomyelins and six ceramides that differed from 16 to 24 carbon units in their acyl side-chains. Sub-fractionation experiments further showed that sphingolipids are a constituent part of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Furthermore, inner membrane ceramide levels were 32% lower versus whole mitochondria (45 pmols/mg protein). Three ceramide isotypes (C20-, C22-, and C24-ceramide) accounted for the lower amounts. The concentrations of the ceramides present in the inner membranes of SSM and IFM differed greatly. Overall, mitochondrial sphingolipid content reflected levels seen in cardiac tissue, but the specific ceramide distribution distinguished IFM and SSM from each other. PMID:20599536

  17. Inclusion body myositis, muscle blood vessel and cardiac amyloidosis, and transthyretin Val122Ile allele.

    PubMed

    Askanas, V; Engel, W K; Alvarez, R B; Frangione, B; Ghiso, J; Vidal, R

    2000-04-01

    Typical of sporadic inclusion body myositis muscle biopsies are vacuolated muscle fibers containing intracellular amyloid deposits and accumulations of "Alzheimer-characteristic" proteins. There is no muscle blood vessel or cardiac amyloidosis. We report on a 70-year-old African-American man homozygous for the transthyretin Val122Ile allele who has both sporadic inclusion body myositis and cardiac amyloidosis. His unique pathological features included transthyretin immunoreactivity in prominent muscle blood vessel amyloid and congophilic amyloid deposits within vacuolated muscle fibers. PMID:10762172

  18. Hemodynamic and ADH responses to central blood volume shifts in cardiac-denervated humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Thompson, C. A.; Benjamin, B. A.; Keil, L. C.; Savin, W. M.; Gordon, E. P.; Haskell, W. L.; Schroeder, J. S.; Sandler, H.

    1990-01-01

    Hemodynamic responses and antidiuretic hormone (ADH) were measured during body position changes designed to induce blood volume shifts in ten cardiac transplant recipients to assess the contribution of cardiac and vascular volume receptors in the control of ADH secretion. Each subject underwent 15 min of a control period in the seated posture, then assumed a lying posture for 30 min at 6 deg head down tilt (HDT) followed by 20 min of seated recovery. Venous blood samples and cardiac dimensions (echocardiography) were taken at 0 and 15 min before HDT, 5, 15, and 30 min of HDT, and 5, 15, and 30 min of seated recovery. Blood samples were analyzed for hematocrit, plasma osmolality, plasma renin activity (PRA), and ADH. Resting plasma volume (PV) was measured by Evans blue dye and percent changes in PV during posture changes were calculated from changes in hematocrit. Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were recorded every 2 min. Results indicate that cardiac volume receptors are not the only mechanism for the control of ADH release during acute blood volume shifts in man.

  19. Detection of deep vein thrombosis: combined flow and blood pool radionuclide venography vs contrast venography.

    PubMed

    Caner, B; Ozmen, M; Dincer, A; Kapucu, O; Bekdik, C

    1991-10-01

    This study was performed to validate the combined study of flow radionuclide venography (FRV) with subsequent 99mTc-red blood cell(RBC) blood pool radionuclide venography(BRV) for the detection of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Findings in 32 patients with suspected DVT of lower extremities (n = 52) were compared with those of corresponding contrast venograms (CV) serving as a reference method. FRV was performed by using three separate doses of a large 99mTc04-bolus (10-12 cc) injection. The findings were as follows: concerning the detection of DVT in calf veins, agreement between FRV and CV, FRV+BRV and CV, and BRV and CV were 67%, 73% and 60%, respectively. For femoral veins, agreement between FRV and CV was 96%, while it was 87% between BRV and CV. When FRV and BRV of femoral veins were evaluated in combination, 100% agreement between radionuclide and radiologic method was observed. For iliac veins there was no disagreement in comparison of the methods either singly or in combination. In 7.6% of the extremities, collaterals not demonstrated by CV and BRV were visualized only by FRV. Although the radioactive agent was injected in a relatively large volume, all of the calf veins could not be filled even when they were completely patent. It was concluded that a combined study of FRV with BRV improved the diagnostic value of radionuclide venography for the detection of DVT in calf and femoral veins. PMID:1659257

  20. Nano Liposomes Labeled with 99mTc-HMPAO, a Novel Agent for Blood Pool Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sadri, Kayvan; Momenypoor, Salimeh; Dabbagh Kakhki, Vahid Reza; Sadeghi, Ramin; Aryana, Kamran; Johari Daha, Fariba; Zakavi, Seyed Rasoul; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2015-01-01

    In-vitro labeling of RBC with 99mTc is an intricate procedure and there is always a need for an alternate blood pool imaging agent. The aim of this study was to prepare an effective nano sized liposome (NLs) similar to human RBC for blood pool scintigraphy. This study formulates PEG-NLs and non-PEG-NLs using film method plus high pressure homogenization technique. Biodistribution studies were performed on BALB/C mice 1, 4 and 24 h after tail vein injection of labeled NLs with 99mTc hexamethylpropylene-amine-oxime (99mTc-HMPAO). Planar images were acquired using a 256 × 256 matrix following99m Tc-HMPAO-NLs injection into ear vein of rabbits 1, 2 and 24 h later. SPECT images were obtained 15 minutes after the injection (64 slices, 30 second/projection). The mean diameter, zeta potential and polydispersity index (PDI) of the PEG-NLs and the NLs were (80.88 ± 0.594 nm, -12.5 ± 0.56 mv, 0.158 ± 0.025) and (94.14 ± 0.114 nm, -35.5 ± 0.67 mv and 0.198 ± 0.007), respectively. 99mTc-HMPAO-PEG-NLs showed a significant circulation tracer activity (7.74 ± 1.63%ID/g at 1 h and 4.9 ± 0.77 %ID/g at 4 h), with low liver accumulation (12.07 ± 3.66 %ID/g at 1 h and 14.85 ± 1.3 %ID/g at 4 h). Heart to liver, spleen and background ROIs (region of interests) for 99m Tc-HMPAO-PEG-NLs were 1.25, 4 and 4.28 respectively at 2 h which changed to 1.06, 1.75 and 2.51 respectively at 24 h. The 99mTc-HMPAO-PEG-NLs with a prolonged blood circulation time could be an excellent RBC alternative for scintigraphy and gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26664365

  1. Do deficits in cardiac care influence high mortality rates in schizophrenia? A systematic review and pooled analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Alex J; Lord, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    We have previously documented inequalities in the quality of medical care provided to those with mental ill health but the implications for mortality are unclear. We aimed to test whether disparities in medical treatment of cardiovascular conditions, specifically receipt of medical procedures and receipt of prescribed medication, are linked with elevated rates of mortality in people with schizophrenia and severe mental illness. We undertook a systematic review of studies that examined medical procedures and a pooled analysis of prescribed medication in those with and without comorbid mental illness, focusing on those which recruited individuals with schizophrenia and measured mortality as an outcome. From 17 studies of treatment adequacy in cardiovascular conditions, eight examined cardiac procedures and nine examined adequacy of prescribed cardiac medication. Six of eight studies examining the adequacy of cardiac procedures found lower than average provision of medical care and two studies found no difference. Meta-analytic pooling of nine medication studies showed lower than average rates of prescribing evident for the following individual classes of medication; angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (n = 6, aOR = 0.779, 95% CI = 0.638–0.950, p = 0.0137), beta-blockers (n = 9, aOR = 0.844, 95% CI = 0.690–1.03, p = 0.1036) and statins (n = 5, aOR = 0.604, 95% CI = 0.408–0.89, p = 0.0117). No inequality was evident for aspirin (n = 7, aOR = 0.986, 95% CI = 0.7955–1.02, p = 0.382). Interestingly higher than expected prescribing was found for older non-statin cholesterol-lowering agents (n = 4, aOR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.04–2.32, p = 0.0312). A search for outcomes in this sample revealed ten studies linking poor quality of care and possible effects on mortality in specialist settings. In half of the studies there was significantly higher mortality in those with mental ill health

  2. Femoral Blood Flow and Cardiac Output During Blood Flow Restricted Leg Press Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, M. E.; Hackney, K.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.

    2011-01-01

    Low load blood flow restricted resistance exercise (LBFR) causes muscle hypertrophy that may be stimulated by the local ischemic environment created by the cuff pressure. However, local blood flow (BF) during such exercise is not well understood. PURPOSE: To characterize femoral artery BF and cardiac output (CO) during leg press exercise (LP) performed at a high load (HL) and low load (LL) with different levels of cuff pressure. METHODS: Eleven subjects (men/women 4/7, age 31.4+/-12.8 y, weight 68.9+/-13.2 kg, mean+/-SD) performed 3 sets of supine left LP to fatigue with 90 s of rest in 4 conditions: HL (%1-RM/cuff pressure: 80%/0); LL (20%/0); LBFR(sub DBP) (20%/1.3 x diastolic blood pressure, BP); LBFR(sub SBP) (20%/1.3 x supine systolic BP). The cuff remained inflated throughout the LBFR exercise sessions. Artery diameter, velocity time integral (VTI), and stroke volume (SV) were measured using Doppler ultrasound at rest and immediately after each set of exercise. Heart rate (HR) was monitored using a 3-lead ECG. BF was calculated as VTI x vessel cross-sectional area. CO was calculated as HR x SV. The data obtained after each set of exercise were averaged and used for analyses. Multi-level modeling was used to determine the effect of exercise condition on dependent variables. Statistical significance was set a priori at p< 0.05. RESULTS: Artery diameter did not change from baseline. BF increased (p<0.05) after exercise in each condition except LBFR(sub SBP) in the order of HL (12.73+/-1.42 cm3,mean+/-SE) > LL (9.92+/-0.82 cm3) > LBFR(sub dBP)(6.47+/-0.79 cm3) > LBFR(sub SBP) (3.51+/-0.59 cm3). Blunted exercise induced increases occurred in HR, SV, and CO after LBFR compared to HL and LL. HR increased 45% after HL and LL and 28% after LBFR (p<0.05), but SV increased (p<0.05) only after HL. Consequently, the increase (p<0.05) in CO was greater in HL and LL (approximately 3 L/min) than in LBFR (approximately 1 L/min). CONCLUSION: BF during LBFR(sub SBP) was 1/3 of

  3. Echo motion imaging with adaptive clutter filter for assessment of cardiac blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    Visualization of the vortex blood flow in the cardiac chamber is a potential diagnostic tool for the evaluation of cardiac function. In the present study, a method for automatic selection of the desirable cutoff frequency of a moving target indicator filter, namely, a clutter filter, was proposed in order to visualize complex blood flows by the ultrahigh-frame-rate imaging of echoes from blood particles while suppressing clutter echoes. In this method, the cutoff frequency was adaptively changed as a function of the velocity of the heart wall (clutter source) in each frame. The feasibility of the proposed method was examined through the measurement of a healthy volunteer using parallel receive beamforming with a single transmission of a non-steered diverging beam. Using the moving target indicator filter as above with the cutoff frequency determined by the proposed method, the vortex-like blood flow in the cardiac chamber was visualized as movements of echoes from blood particles at a very high frame rate of 6024 Hz while suppressing clutter echoes.

  4. Effective High-Throughput Blood Pooling Strategy before DNA Extraction for Detection of Malaria in Low-Transmission Settings

    PubMed Central

    Nyunt, Myat Htut; Kyaw, Myat Phone; Thant, Kyaw Zin; Shein, Thinzer; Han, Soe Soe; Zaw, Ni Ni; Han, Jin-Hee; Lee, Seong-Kyun; Muh, Fauzi; Kim, Jung-Yeon; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Lee, Sang-Eun; Yang, Eun-Jeong; Chang, Chulhun L.; Han, Eun-Taek

    2016-01-01

    In the era of (pre) elimination setting, the prevalence of malaria has been decreasing in most of the previously endemic areas. Therefore, effective cost- and time-saving validated pooling strategy is needed for detection of malaria in low transmission settings. In this study, optimal pooling numbers and lowest detection limit were assessed using known density samples prepared systematically, followed by genomic DNA extraction and nested PCR. Pooling strategy that composed of 10 samples in 1 pool, 20 µl in 1 sample, was optimal, and the parasite density as low as 2 p/µl for both falciparum and vivax infection was enough for detection of malaria. This pooling method showed effectiveness for handling of a huge number of samples in low transmission settings (<9% positive rate). The results indicated that pooling of the blood samples before DNA extraction followed by usual nested PCR is useful and effective for detection of malaria in screening of hidden cases in low-transmission settings. PMID:27417078

  5. Effective High-Throughput Blood Pooling Strategy before DNA Extraction for Detection of Malaria in Low-Transmission Settings.

    PubMed

    Nyunt, Myat Htut; Kyaw, Myat Phone; Thant, Kyaw Zin; Shein, Thinzer; Han, Soe Soe; Zaw, Ni Ni; Han, Jin-Hee; Lee, Seong-Kyun; Muh, Fauzi; Kim, Jung-Yeon; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Lee, Sang-Eun; Yang, Eun-Jeong; Chang, Chulhun L; Han, Eun-Taek

    2016-06-01

    In the era of (pre) elimination setting, the prevalence of malaria has been decreasing in most of the previously endemic areas. Therefore, effective cost- and time-saving validated pooling strategy is needed for detection of malaria in low transmission settings. In this study, optimal pooling numbers and lowest detection limit were assessed using known density samples prepared systematically, followed by genomic DNA extraction and nested PCR. Pooling strategy that composed of 10 samples in 1 pool, 20 µl in 1 sample, was optimal, and the parasite density as low as 2 p/µl for both falciparum and vivax infection was enough for detection of malaria. This pooling method showed effectiveness for handling of a huge number of samples in low transmission settings (<9% positive rate). The results indicated that pooling of the blood samples before DNA extraction followed by usual nested PCR is useful and effective for detection of malaria in screening of hidden cases in low-transmission settings. PMID:27417078

  6. Cardiac morphology and blood pressure in the adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hu, N; Yost, H J; Clark, E B

    2001-09-01

    Zebrafish has become a popular model for the study of cardiovascular development. We performed morphologic analysis on 3 months postfertilization zebrafish hearts (n > or = 20) with scanning electron microscopy, hematoxylin and eosin staining and Masson's trichrome staining, and morphometric analysis on cell organelles with transmission electron photomicrographs. We measured atrial, ventricular, ventral, and dorsal aortic blood pressures (n > or = 5) with a servonull system. The atrioventricular orifice was positioned on the dorsomedial side of the anterior ventricle, surmounted by the single-chambered atrium. The atrioventricular valve was free of tension apparati but supported by papillary bands to prevent retrograde flow. The ventricle was spanned with fine trabeculae perpendicular to the compact layer and perforated with a subepicardial network of coronary arteries, which originated from the efferent branchial arteries by means of the main coronary vessel. Ventricular myocytes were larger than those in the atrium (P < 0.05) with abundant mitochondria close to the sarcolemmal. Sarcoplasmic reticulum was sparse in zebrafish ventricle. Bulbus arteriosus was located anterior to the ventricle, and functioned as an elastic reservoir to absorb the rapid rise of pressure during ventricular contraction. The dense matrix of collagen interspersed across the entire bulbus arteriosus exemplified the characteristics of vasculature smooth muscle. There were pressure gradients from atrium to ventricle, and from ventral to dorsal aorta, indicating that the valves and the branchial arteries, respectively, were points of resistance to blood flow. These data serve as a framework for structure-function investigations of the zebrafish cardiovascular system. PMID:11505366

  7. Stability of echogenic liposomes as a blood pool ultrasound contrast agent in a physiologic flow phantom

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Haworth, Kevin J.; Huang, Shao-Ling; Klegerman, Melvin E.; McPherson, David D.; Holland, Christy K.

    2016-01-01

    investigations will be needed to evaluate the optimal usage of ELIP as blood pool contrast agents. PMID:22929652

  8. Comprehensive kinetics of triiodothyronine production, distribution, and metabolism in blood and tissue pools of the rat using optimized blood-sampling protocols.

    PubMed

    DiStefano, J J; Jang, M; Malone, T K; Broutman, M

    1982-01-01

    We have determined estimates for 24 physiological parameters of production, interpool transport, distribution, and metabolism of T3 in the major T3 pools of the unanesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rat, from blood-borne data and a comprehensive model and analysis of this system. Most of these indices have previously been unavailable. Whereas only 3% (2 ng/100 g BW) of the total body T3 pool (74 ng/100 g BW) is in plasma, the composite of slowly equilibrating (slow) tissue pools (e.g. muscle, skin, and brain) appears to contain most of the T3, 76% (57 ng/100 g BW) of the total. The composite of rapidly equilibrating (fast) tissue pools (e.g. liver and kidney) contains the remaining 19% (16 ng/100 g BW). The total body T3 production rate is 0.12 ng/100 g BW . min, and we estimate that about half of this emanates directly from T4 in the slow pools, whereas the remainder is derived from both thyroidal secretion and T4 to T3 conversion in the fast pools. Our results also indicate that T3 molecules spend an average of only 0.5 min in transit each time through plasma, whereas the single pass mean transit times in fast and slow tissue pools (the times available for hormone action) are 10 times and 200 times greater. In contrast, the mean residence time for T3 in the entire system is greater than 12 h despite the extremely rapid early disappearance of injected T3 from plasma. To obtain the required accuracy, we used a novel optimization approach for choosing blood-sampling schedules (1, 4, 44, 202, and 600 min), a remarkably small number of sample times, and each was adjustable by about +/- 20% without effect on optimized parameter accuracies. PMID:7053984

  9. Cardiac Morphology and Function, and Blood Gas Transport in Aquaporin-1 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Al-Samir, Samer; Wang, Yong; Meissner, Joachim D.; Gros, Gerolf; Endeward, Volker

    2016-01-01

    We have studied cardiac and respiratory functions of aquaporin-1-deficient mice by the Pressure-Volume-loop technique and by blood gas analysis. In addition, the morphological properties of the animals' hearts were analyzed. In anesthesia under maximal dobutamine stimulation, the mice exhibit a moderately elevated heart rate of < 600 min−1 and an O2 consumption of ~0.6 ml/min/g, which is about twice the basal rate. In this state, which is similar to the resting state of the conscious animal, all cardiac functions including stroke volume and cardiac output exhibited resting values and were identical between deficient and wildtype animals. Likewise, pulmonary and peripheral exchange of O2 and CO2 were normal. In contrast, several morphological parameters of the heart tissue of deficient mice were altered: (1) left ventricular wall thickness was reduced by 12%, (2) left ventricular mass, normalized to tibia length, was reduced by 10–20%, (3) cardiac muscle fiber cross sectional area was decreased by 17%, and (4) capillary density was diminished by 10%. As the P-V-loop technique yielded normal end-diastolic and end-systolic left ventricular volumes, the deficient hearts are characterized by thin ventricular walls in combination with normal intraventricular volumes. The aquaporin-1-deficient heart thus seems to be at a disadvantage compared to the wild-type heart by a reduced left-ventricular wall thickness and an increased diffusion distance between blood capillaries and muscle mitochondria. While under the present quasi-resting conditions these morphological alterations have no consequences for cardiac function, we expect that the deficient hearts will show a reduced maximal cardiac output. PMID:27252655

  10. Risks of packed red blood cell transfusion in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Gerber, David R

    2012-12-01

    Packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusion is common in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Evidence has accumulated demonstrating that such patients can tolerate relatively low hemoglobins, and an extensive body of literature has developed demonstrating that patients undergoing such surgery who receive PRBC are at risk for several adverse outcomes including increased mortality, atrial fibrillation, and more postoperative infections, as well as numerous other complications. The PubMed database was searched for the English language literature on the topic of PRBC transfusion and outcomes in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, as well as alternatives to this intervention. Data were reviewed to assess the impact of transfusion in patients undergoing cardiac surgery on mortality, cardiac, infectious, and pulmonary, as well as a variety of miscellaneous complications. Patients receiving PRBC were consistently identified as being at higher risk for complications in all categories. The limited prospective data were consistent with the retrospective data, which comprised most of the literature. The preponderance of the literature suggests that patients undergoing cardiac surgery can tolerate lower hemoglobin/hematocrit values than traditionally appreciated. Most published data also indicate that PRBC transfusion should be reserved for patients with an identifiable clinical/physiologic indication fir this intervention, consistent with recent specialty society guidelines. PMID:22762927

  11. Tomographic gated blood pool studies: The parameters for collection and reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, P.W.; King, M.A.; Schwinger, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    Because of the acquisition time and data processing load problems associated with the collection and analysis of multiple gated views required to obtain cine tomographic sections, the authors attempted to document the minimum data requirement for a high quality study. An idealized study (64 views over 360/sup 0/, 32 frames per R-R interval) with an ultra high resolution collimator, and a 20% asymmetric energy window was obtained and analyzed using multiple combinations of views, frames per view, and total count. Optimal image quality was maintained while using 16 views over 180/sup 0/ (RAO 45/sup 0/ to LPO 33.75/sup 0/), 16 frames per view, and an acquisition time of 2 minutes per view which with a 25 mCi dose of Tc-99m provided approximately 10/sup 6/ counts per view. These were the parameters utilized in subsequent patient studies. Using several different types of pre and post reconstruction filtering, optimum image quality was obtained with Metz spatial and low-pass temporal domain prefiltering and a ramp reconstruction filter. As an alternative to cine display, functional images of the transverse sections based on pixel by pixel time activity curves were generated. These included ejection fraction, phase, and maximum positive and negative first derivative image sets. The overall processing time for such studies is 20 minutes with the aid of an array processor, with a patient through-put time of 45 minutes. The authors conclude that good quality gated blood pool studies can be acquired in a clinically acceptable time frame. However, there persists a significant problem with data storage, handling and image interpretation.

  12. Sensitivity of nested-PCR for plasmodium detection in pooled whole blood samples and its usefulness to blood donor screening in endemic areas.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Daniel Roberto Coradi; Gomes, Luciano Teixeira; Fontes, Cor Jesus F; Tauil, Pedro Luiz; Pang, Lorrin W; Duarte, Elisabeth Carmen

    2014-04-01

    Transfusion-transmitted malaria is a severe disease with high fatality rate. Most Brazilian blood banks in the Amazon region perform malaria screening using microscopic examination (thick smears). Since low parasite concentrations are expected in asymptomatic blood donors a high sensitivity test should be used for donor screening. This study determined the sensitivity of a nested-PCR for plasmodium detection in pooled samples. We performed a one-stage criterion validation study with 21 positive samples pooled with samples from ten negative volunteer until three different concentrations were reached (0.33; 0.25; 0.20 parasites/μL - p/μL). Nested PCR was performed as described by Snounou et al. (1993). Sensitivities (and confidence intervals) were determined by stratum of final parasite concentration on the pooled samples. All samples with parasitemia values of 0.33 and 0.25 p/μL had 100% sensitivity (95%CI=86.3-100). One negative result was obtained from a sample with 0.20 p/μL sensitivity=95.2% (95%CI=76.2-99.9). Compared to parasitemia detectable under ideal conditions of thick smear, this nested-PCR in pooled sample was able to detect 40 times more parasites per microliter. Nested-PCR in pooled samples should be considered as a high sensitive alternative to thick smear for donor screening in blood banks at endemic regions. Local authorities need to assess cost:benefit advantages of this method compared to alternatives. PMID:24508148

  13. ECG-gated blood pool tomography in the determination of left ventricular volume, ejection fraction, and wall motion

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, S.R.; Ell, P.J.; Jarritt, P.H.; Emanuel, R.W.; Swanton, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    ECG-gated blood pool tomography promises to provide a ''gold standard'' for noninvasive measurement of left ventricular volume, ejection fraction, and wall motion. This study compares these measurements with those from planar radionuclide imaging and contrast ventriculography. End diastolic and end systolic blood pool images were acquired tomographically using an IGE400A rotating gamma camera and Star computer, and slices were reconstructed orthogonal to the long axis of the heart. Left ventricular volume was determined by summing the areas of the slices, and wall motion was determined by comparison of end diastolic and end systolic contours. In phantom experiments this provided an accurate measurement of volume (r=0.98). In 32 subjects who were either normal or who had coronary artery disease left ventricular volume (r=0.83) and ejection fraction (r=0.89) correlated well with those using a counts based planar technique. In 16 of 18 subjects who underwent right anterior oblique X-ray contrast ventriculography, tomographic wall motion agreed for anterior, apical, and inferior walls, but abnormal septal motion which was not apparent by contrast ventriculography, was seen in 12 subjects tomographically. All 12 had disease of the left anterior descending coronary artery and might have been expected to have abnormal septal motion. ECG-gated blood pool tomography can thus determine left ventricular volume and ejection fraction accurately, and provides a global description of wall motion in a way that is not possible from any single planar image.

  14. Utilisation of Blood Components in Cardiac Surgery: A Single-Centre Retrospective Analysis with Regard to Diagnosis-Related Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, Raoul Georg; Rotering, Heinrich; Buddendick, Hubert; Franz, Dominik; Bunzemeier, Holger; Roeder, Norbert; Kwiecien, Robert; Sibrowski, Walter; Scheld, Hans H.; Martens, Sven; Schlenke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background More blood components are required in cardiac surgery than in most other medical disciplines. The overall blood demand may increase as a function of the total number of cardiothoracic and vascular surgical interventions and their level of complexity, and also when considering the demographic ageing. Awareness has grown with respect to adverse events, such as transfusion-related immunomodulation by allogeneic blood supply, which can contribute to morbidity and mortality. Therefore, programmes of patient blood management (PBM) have been implemented to avoid unnecessary blood transfusions and to standardise the indication of blood transfusions more strictly with aim to improve patients' overall outcomes. Methods A comprehensive retrospective analysis of the utilisation of blood components in the Department of Cardiac Surgery at the University Hospital of Münster (UKM) was performed over a 4-year period. Based on a medical reporting system of all medical disciplines, which was established as part of a PBM initiative, all transfused patients in cardiac surgery and their blood components were identified in a diagnosis- and medical procedure-related system, which allows the precise allocation of blood consumption to interventional procedures in cardiac surgery, such as coronary or valve surgery. Results This retrospective single centre study included all in-patients in cardiac surgery at the UKM from 2009 to 2012, corresponding to a total of 1,405-1,644 cases per year. A blood supply was provided for 55.6-61.9% of the cardiac surgery patients, whereas approximately 9% of all in-patients at the UKM required blood transfusions. Most of the blood units were applied during cardiac valve surgery and during coronary surgery. Further surgical activities with considerable use of blood components included thoracic surgery, aortic surgery, heart transplantations and the use of artificial hearts. Under the measures of PBM in 2012 a noticeable decrease in the number of

  15. In Vivo Interactions Between Cobalt or Ferric Compounds and the Pools of Sulphide in the Blood During and After H2S Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Haouzi, Philippe; Sonobe, Takashi; Torsell-Tubbs, Nicole; Prokopczyk, Bogdan; Chenuel, Bruno; Klingerman, Candice M.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S), a chemical hazard in oil and gas production, has recently become a dreadful method of suicide, posing specific risks and challenges for the first responders. Currently, there is no proven effective treatment against H2S poisoning and its severe neurological, respiratory or cardiac after-effects. We have recently described that H2S is present in various compartments, or pools, in the body during sulphide exposure, which have different levels of toxicity. The general goals of our study were to (1) determine the concentrations and kinetics of the various pools of hydrogen sulphide in the blood, i.e., gaseous (CgH2S) versus total sulphide, i.e., reacting with monobromobimane (CMBBH2S), during and following H2S exposure in a small and large mammal and (2) establish the interaction between the pools of H2S and a methemoglobin (MetHb) solution or a high dose of hydroxocobalamin (HyCo). We found that CgH2S during and following H2S infusion was similar in sedated sheep and rats at any given rate of infusion/kg and provoked symptoms, i.e., hyperpnea and apnea, at the same CgH2S. After H2S administration was stopped, CgH2S disappeared within 1 min. CMBBH2S also dropped to 2–3μM, but remained above baseline levels for at least 30 min. Infusion of a MetHb solution during H2S infusion produced an immediate reduction in the free/soluble pool of H2S only, whereas CMBBH2S increased by severalfold. HyCo (70 mg/kg) also decreased the concentrations of free/soluble H2S to almost zero; CgH2S returned to pre-HyCo levels within a maximum of 20 min, if H2S infusion is maintained. These results are discussed in the context of a relevant scenario, wherein antidotes can only be administered after H2S exposure. PMID:25015662

  16. Greater Volume of Acute Normovolemic Hemodilution May Aid in Reducing Blood Transfusions After Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Joshua; Paugh, Paugh; Dickinson, Timothy A.; Fuller, John; Paone, Gaetano; Theurer, Patty F.; Shann, Kenneth G.; Sundt, Thoralf M.; Prager, Richard L.; Likosky, Donald S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Perioperative red blood cell transfusions (RBC) are associated with increased morbidity and mortality after cardiac surgery. Acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH) is recommended to reduce perioperative transfusions; however, supporting data are limited and conflicting. We describe the relationship between ANH and RBC transfusions after cardiac surgery using a multi-center registry. Methods We analyzed 13,534 patients undergoing cardiac surgery between 2010 and 2014 at any of the 26 hospitals participating in a prospective cardiovascular perfusion database. The volume of ANH (no ANH, <400mL, 400–799mL, ≥800mL) was recorded and linked to each center’s surgical data. We report adjusted relative risks reflecting the association between the use and amount of ANH and the risk of perioperative RBC transfusion. Results were adjusted for preoperative risk factors, procedure, BSA, preoperative HCT, and center. Results ANH was used in 17% of the patients. ANH was associated with a reduction in RBC transfusions (RRadj 0.74, p <0.001). Patients having ≥800mL of ANH had the most profound reduction in RBC transfusions (RRadj 0.57, p<0.001). Platelet and plasma transfusions were also significantly lower with ANH. The ANH population had superior postoperative morbidity and mortality compared to the no ANH population. Conclusions There is a significant association between ANH and reduced perioperative RBC transfusion in cardiac surgery. Transfusion reduction is most profound with larger volumes of ANH. Our findings suggest the volume of ANH, rather than just its use, may be an important feature of a center’s blood conservation strategy. PMID:26206721

  17. Pheochromocytoma Crisis With Severe Cyclic Blood Pressure Fluctuations in a Cardiac Pheochromocytoma Patient Successfully Resuscitated by Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Dawei; Su, Longxiang; Long, Yun; Du, Wei; Miao, Qi; Li, Fang; Jin, Zhengyu; Zeng, Zhengpei; Luo, Ailun; Huang, Yuguang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac pheochromocytoma is relatively rare. Few reports describe the intraoperative and postoperative progression of patients experiencing a life-threatening pheochromocytoma crisis treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). A 35-year-old man was referred to our facility for paroxysmal hypertension with a 10-year history of sweating, headaches, cardiac palpitations, and postexercise dyspnea. The patient initially underwent urine catecholamine measurement and an isotope scan, somatostatin receptor scintigraphy, and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography (CT), which indicated a multiple, cardiac pheochromocytoma. Echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), CT reconstruction, and a coronary CT angiography revealed several lesions at the aortic root and along the cardiac vasculature. Multifocal cardiac pheochromocytoma was diagnosed and pheochromocytoma crisis with severe cyclic blood pressure fluctuation occurred during surgery. Surgical resection of multiple pheochromocytomas in the right medial carotid sheath, mediastinum between the main and pulmonary arteries, and between the abdominal aorta and inferior vena artery was performed. To ensure cardiac perfusion and avoid severe circulatory fluctuation, the cardiac paraganglioma resection was prioritized. After resecting the cardiac pheochromocytoma, a severe pheochromocytoma crisis with rapid cyclic blood pressure fluctuation developed. ECMO and intraaortic balloon pump (IABP) were initiated to stabilize circulation and perfusion. Phenoxybenzamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and fluid resuscitation were administered to support cardiovascular function. The magnitude of blood pressure fluctuation steadily decreased with treatment. IABP was discontinued after 3 days, and ECMO was discontinued after 16 days. The patient was discharged 3 months postoperatively. This case indicates that mechanical life support with ECMO is a valuable option for

  18. Correlation-based discrimination between cardiac tissue and blood for segmentation of 3D echocardiographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saris, Anne E. C. M.; Nillesen, Maartje M.; Lopata, Richard G. P.; de Korte, Chris L.

    2013-03-01

    Automated segmentation of 3D echocardiographic images in patients with congenital heart disease is challenging, because the boundary between blood and cardiac tissue is poorly defined in some regions. Cardiologists mentally incorporate movement of the heart, using temporal coherence of structures to resolve ambiguities. Therefore, we investigated the merit of temporal cross-correlation for automated segmentation over the entire cardiac cycle. Optimal settings for maximum cross-correlation (MCC) calculation, based on a 3D cross-correlation based displacement estimation algorithm, were determined to obtain the best contrast between blood and myocardial tissue over the entire cardiac cycle. Resulting envelope-based as well as RF-based MCC values were used as additional external force in a deformable model approach, to segment the left-ventricular cavity in entire systolic phase. MCC values were tested against, and combined with, adaptive filtered, demodulated RF-data. Segmentation results were compared with manually segmented volumes using a 3D Dice Similarity Index (3DSI). Results in 3D pediatric echocardiographic images sequences (n = 4) demonstrate that incorporation of temporal information improves segmentation. The use of MCC values, either alone or in combination with adaptive filtered, demodulated RF-data, resulted in an increase of the 3DSI in 75% of the cases (average 3DSI increase: 0.71 to 0.82). Results might be further improved by optimizing MCC-contrast locally, in regions with low blood-tissue contrast. Reducing underestimation of the endocardial volume due to MCC processing scheme (choice of window size) and consequential border-misalignment, could also lead to more accurate segmentations. Furthermore, increasing the frame rate will also increase MCC-contrast and thus improve segmentation.

  19. [Single-donor (apheresis) platelets and pooled whole-blood-derived platelets--significance and assessment of both blood products].

    PubMed

    Hitzler, Walter E

    2014-01-01

    The transfusion efficacy of ATK, which contain fully functional platelets, is beyond all doubt. The equivalence of ATK and PTK has been subject of many studies. Some of those studies show the superiority of ATK's, while others do not, but there have been no studies that demonstrated a superiority of PTK's. The superiority of platelets stored in plasma and in third generation additive solution was demonstrated in clinical studies; therefore, it cannot be said that all the platelet concentrates on the German market are equivalent in efficacy. Of decisive importance, above all, is the risk of transfusion-transmitted infections with known pathogens, or those not yet discovered. This risk is different for ATK compared to PTK. Taking this difference in risk and the difference in donor exposure of transfused patients into account, it can definitely be said that ATK and PTK are not equivalent. In 2012, the Robert-Koch-Institute (RKI) published a mathematical risk model for different platelet concentrates and assessed the risk of transmitting known pathogens such as HIV, HCV, and HBV. The risk was higher for PTK compared to ATK. The relative risks for PTK derived from 4BCs were 2.2 (95%--CI: 2.1-2.4) for HIV, 2.7 (95%--CI: 2.5-3.0) for HCV, and 2.2 (95%--CI: 2.8-3.7) for HBV. At the present time, these are the relative risks of transfusion-transmitted infections with the traditional pathogens for PTK compared to ATK. In addition to the RKI assessed risks, there is the theoretical risk of a new, unknown agent, transmitted through blood exposure. The magnitude of this risk is hardly predictable for PTK. The experience gathered so far, especially in the last three decades, with the emergence of HIV, prions, and West Nil virus, shows that the biological nature of a next transfusion-transmissible infectious agent cannot be predictable. This agent, if we think at a conventional sexually transmissible agent with nucleic acid and long latent period, would spread first in areas with

  20. Clinical Assessment of Intraventricular Blood Transport in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossini, Lorenzo; Martinez-Legazpi, P.; Benito, Y.; Perez Del Villar, C.; Gonzalez-Mansilla, A.; Barrio, A.; Yotti, R.; Kahn, A. M.; Shadden, S. C.; Fernandez-Aviles, F.; Bermejo, J.; Del Alamo, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    In the healthy heart, left ventricular (LV) filling generates flow patterns which have been proposed to optimize blood transport by coupling diastole and systole phases. We present a novel image-based method to assess how flow patterns influence LV blood transport in patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Solving the advection equation with time-varying inflow boundary conditions allows to track the transport of blood entering the LV in the different filling waves, as well as the transport barriers which couple filling and ejection. The velocity fields were obtained using echocardiographic color Doppler velocimetry, which provides two-dimensional time-resolved flow maps in the apical long axis three-chamber view of the LV. We analyze flow transport in a group of patients with CRT devices as well as in healthy volunteers. In the patients under CRT, the device programming was varied to analyze flow transport under different values of the atrioventricular (AV) conduction delay and to model tachycardia. This analysis illustrates how CRT influences the transit of blood inside the LV, contributes to conserving kinetic energy and favors the generation of hemodynamic forces that accelerate blood in the direction of the LV outflow tract.

  1. Post-extrasystolic Blood Pressure Potentiation as a Risk Predictor in Cardiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    Steger, Alexander; Sinnecker, Daniel; Barthel, Petra; Müller, Alexander; Gebhardt, Josef; Schmidt, Georg

    2016-01-01

    For more than 100 years physicians have observed that heartbeats following extrasystolic beats are characterised by augmented myocardial contractility. This phenomenon was termed post-extrasystolic potentiation (PESP). In the 1970s it was first noted that PESP measured at the blood pressure level is typically pronounced in heart failure patients. Only recently, it was shown that PESP measured non-invasively as post-extrasystolic blood pressure potentiation was a strong and independent predictor of death in survivors of myocardial infarction and in patients with chronic heart failure. A similar parameter (PESPAfib) can be also assessed in patients with atrial fibrillation. PESP and PESPAfib can be understood as non-invasive parameters that indicate myocardial dysfunction. They have the potential to improve risk stratification strategies for cardiac patients. PMID:27403290

  2. Pulmonary diffusing capacity, capillary blood volume, and cardiac output during sustained microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. K.; Guy, Harold J. B.; Elliott, Ann R.; Deutschman, Robert A., III; West, John B.

    1993-01-01

    We measured pulmonary diffusing capacity (DL), diffusing capacity per unit lung volume, pulmonary capillary blood volume (Vc), membrane diffusing capacity (Dm), pulmonary capillary blood flow or cardiac output (Qc), and cardiac stroke volume (SV) in four subjects exposed to nine days of microgravity. DL in microgravity was elevated compared with preflight standing values and was higher than preflight supine because of the elevation of both Vc and Dm. The elevation in Vc was comparable to that measured supine in 1 G, but the increase in Dm was in sharp contrast to the supine value. We postulate that, in 0 G, pulmonary capillary blood is evenly distributed throughout the lung, providing for uniform capillary filling, leading to an increase in the surface area available for diffusion. By contrast, in the supine 1-G state, the capillaries are less evenly filled, and although a similar increase in blood volume is observed, the corresponding increase in surface area does not occur. DL and its subdivisions showed no adaptive changes from the first measurement 24 h after the start of 0 G to eight days later. Similarly, there were no trends in the postflight data, suggesting that the principal mechanism of these changes was gravitational. The increase in Dm suggests that subclinical pulmonary edema did not result from exposure to 0 G. Qc was modestly increased inflight and decreased postflight compared with preflight standing. Compared with preflight standing, SV was increased 46 percent inflight and decreased 14 percent in the 1st week postflight. There were temporal changes in Qc and SV during 0 G, with the highest values recorded at the first measurement, 24 h into the flight. The lowest values of Qc and SV occurred on the day of return.

  3. Deoxycorticosterone Acetate/Salt-Induced Cardiac But Not Renal Injury Is Mediated By Endothelial Mineralocorticoid Receptors Independently From Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Lother, Achim; Fürst, David; Bergemann, Stella; Gilsbach, Ralf; Grahammer, Florian; Huber, Tobias B; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Bode, Christoph; Moser, Martin; Hein, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease has a tremendously increasing prevalence and requires novel therapeutic approaches. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists have proven highly beneficial in the therapy of cardiac disease. The cellular and molecular events leading to cardiac inflammation and remodeling are proposed to be similar to those mediating renal injury. Thus, this study was designed to evaluate and directly compare the effect of MR deletion in endothelial cells on cardiac and renal injury in a model of deoxycorticosterone acetate-induced hypertension. Endothelial MR deletion ameliorated deoxycorticosterone acetate/salt-induced cardiac remodeling. This was associated with a reduced expression of the vascular cell adhesion molecule Vcam1 in MR-deficient cardiac endothelial cells. Ambulatory blood pressure telemetry revealed that the protective effect of MR deletion was independent from blood pressure. Similar to the heart, deoxycorticosterone acetate/salt-induced severe renal injury, including inflammation, fibrosis, glomerular injury, and proteinuria. However, no differences in renal injury were observed between genotypes. In conclusion, MR deletion from endothelial cells ameliorated deoxycorticosterone acetate/salt-induced cardiac inflammation and remodeling independently from alterations in blood pressure but it did not affect renal injury. These findings suggest that the anti-inflammatory mechanism mediating organ protection after endothelial cell MR deletion is specific for the heart versus the kidney. PMID:26553231

  4. Blood pool ventriculography with a new technetium-labelled complex (99mTc-DEPIC): a clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Brigden, G; Zanelli, G; Lahiri, A; Raftery, E

    1990-01-01

    A new, single bolus method of in vivo blood pool imaging using a technetium Tc99m phosphine isocyanide complex (DEPIC) which binds to pre-albumin was evaluated in volunteers (n = 4) and patients (n = 20). DEPIC was assessed for its safety and possible drug interactions. Its duration of action and quality of ventriculography were compared with imaging using standard in vivo red cell labelling (PYP) during two 3-h scanning periods 1 week apart. DEPIC had a mean plasma half-life of 3.3 h. The count rate over the left ventricle was initially 42% higher with DEPIC than with PYP. However, removal of DEPIC by the liver resulted in equivalent count rates by 1 h, and by 3 h PYP count rates were 22% higher than DEPIC. Immediately post injection mean (SD) difference in the left ventricular ejection fraction between the two methods was 2.4% (7.7%). Satisfactory DEPIC scans were obtained up to 2 h post injection, but by 3 h there was a mean difference of 13% (11.3%). DEPIC was found to be a safe alternative to red all labelling for blood pool angiography, suitable for routine work. The single bolus methodology and high initial count rates offer improved efficiency and a capability for truly emergency scanning. PMID:2209648

  5. Ultrastable polyethyleneimine-stabilized gold nanoparticles modified with polyethylene glycol for blood pool, lymph node and tumor CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongxing; Wen, Shihui; Zhao, Lingzhou; Li, Du; Liu, Changcun; Jiang, Wenbin; Gao, Xiang; Gu, Wentao; Ma, Nan; Zhao, Jinhua; Shi, Xiangyang; Zhao, Qinghua

    2016-03-14

    Development of new long-circulating contrast agents for computed tomography (CT) imaging of different biological systems still remains a great challenge. Here, we report the design and synthesis of branched polyethyleneimine (PEI)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au PSNPs) modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) for blood pool, lymph node, and tumor CT imaging. In this study, thiolated PEI was first synthesized and used as a stabilizing agent to form AuNPs. The formed Au PSNPs were then grafted with PEG monomethyl ether via PEI amine-enabled conjugation chemistry, followed by acetylation of the remaining PEI surface amines. The formed PEGylated Au PSNPs were characterized via different methods. We show that the PEGylated Au PSNPs with an Au core size of 5.1 nm have a relatively long half-decay time (7.8 h), and display a better X-ray attenuation property than conventionally used iodine-based CT contrast agents (e.g., Omnipaque), and are hemocompatible and cytocompatible in a given concentration range. These properties of the Au PSNPs afford their uses as a contrast agent for effective CT imaging of the blood pool and major organs of rats, lymph node of rabbits, and the xenografted tumor model of mice. Importantly, the PEGylated Au PSNPs could be excreted out of the body with time and also showed excellent in vivo stability. These findings suggest that the formed PEGylated Au PSNPs may be used as a promising contrast agent for CT imaging of different biological systems. PMID:26890691

  6. Telomere length in white blood cell DNA and lung cancer: a pooled analysis of three prospective cohorts.

    PubMed

    Seow, Wei Jie; Cawthon, Richard M; Purdue, Mark P; Hu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Huang, Wen-Yi; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Ji, Bu-Tian; Virtamo, Jarmo; Hosgood, H Dean; Bassig, Bryan A; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cai, Qiuyin; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Min, Shen; Chow, Wong-Ho; Berndt, Sonja I; Kim, Christopher; Lim, Unhee; Albanes, Demetrius; Caporaso, Neil E; Chanock, Stephen; Zheng, Wei; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the relationship between telomere length and lung cancer in a pooled analysis from three prospective cohort studies: the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial, conducted among men and women in the United States, and previously published data from the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Trial conducted among male smokers in Finland, and the Shanghai Women's Health Study (SWHS), which is comprised primarily of never-smokers. The pooled population included 847 cases and 847 controls matched by study, age, and sex. Leukocyte telomere length was measured by a monochrome multiplex qPCR assay. We used conditional logistic regression models to calculate ORs and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between telomere length and lung cancer risk, adjusted for age and pack-years of smoking. Longer telomere length was associated with increased lung cancer risk in the pooled analysis [OR (95% CI) by quartile: 1.00; 1.24 (0.90-1.71); 1.27 (0.91-1.78); and 1.86 (1.33-2.62); P trend = 0.000022]. Findings were consistent across the three cohorts and strongest for subjects with very long telomere length, i.e., lung cancer risks for telomere length [OR (95% CI)] in the upper half of the fourth quartile were 2.41 (1.28-4.52), 2.16 (1.11-4.23), and 3.02(1.39-6.58) for the PLCO trial, the ATBC trial, and the SWHS, respectively. In addition, the association persisted among cases diagnosed more than 6 years after blood collection and was particularly evident for female adenocarcinoma cases. Telomere length in white blood cell DNA may be a biomarker of future increased risk of lung cancer in diverse populations. PMID:24853549

  7. Reference values for total blood volume and cardiac output in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, L.R.

    1994-09-01

    Much research has been devoted to measurement of total blood volume (TBV) and cardiac output (CO) in humans but not enough effort has been devoted to collection and reduction of results for the purpose of deriving typical or {open_quotes}reference{close_quotes} values. Identification of normal values for TBV and CO is needed not only for clinical evaluations but also for the development of biokinetic models for ultra-short-lived radionuclides used in nuclear medicine (Leggett and Williams 1989). The purpose of this report is to offer reference values for TBV and CO, along with estimates of the associated uncertainties that arise from intra- and inter-subject variation, errors in measurement techniques, and other sources. Reference values are derived for basal supine CO and TBV in reference adult humans, and differences associated with age, sex, body size, body position, exercise, and other circumstances are discussed.

  8. Ultrastable polyethyleneimine-stabilized gold nanoparticles modified with polyethylene glycol for blood pool, lymph node and tumor CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongxing; Wen, Shihui; Zhao, Lingzhou; Li, Du; Liu, Changcun; Jiang, Wenbin; Gao, Xiang; Gu, Wentao; Ma, Nan; Zhao, Jinhua; Shi, Xiangyang; Zhao, Qinghua

    2016-03-01

    Development of new long-circulating contrast agents for computed tomography (CT) imaging of different biological systems still remains a great challenge. Here, we report the design and synthesis of branched polyethyleneimine (PEI)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au PSNPs) modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) for blood pool, lymph node, and tumor CT imaging. In this study, thiolated PEI was first synthesized and used as a stabilizing agent to form AuNPs. The formed Au PSNPs were then grafted with PEG monomethyl ether via PEI amine-enabled conjugation chemistry, followed by acetylation of the remaining PEI surface amines. The formed PEGylated Au PSNPs were characterized via different methods. We show that the PEGylated Au PSNPs with an Au core size of 5.1 nm have a relatively long half-decay time (7.8 h), and display a better X-ray attenuation property than conventionally used iodine-based CT contrast agents (e.g., Omnipaque), and are hemocompatible and cytocompatible in a given concentration range. These properties of the Au PSNPs afford their uses as a contrast agent for effective CT imaging of the blood pool and major organs of rats, lymph node of rabbits, and the xenografted tumor model of mice. Importantly, the PEGylated Au PSNPs could be excreted out of the body with time and also showed excellent in vivo stability. These findings suggest that the formed PEGylated Au PSNPs may be used as a promising contrast agent for CT imaging of different biological systems.Development of new long-circulating contrast agents for computed tomography (CT) imaging of different biological systems still remains a great challenge. Here, we report the design and synthesis of branched polyethyleneimine (PEI)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au PSNPs) modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) for blood pool, lymph node, and tumor CT imaging. In this study, thiolated PEI was first synthesized and used as a stabilizing agent to form AuNPs. The formed Au PSNPs were then grafted with PEG

  9. Assessment of skin ulcer healing capability by technetium-99m phosphate angiogram and blood-pool images

    SciTech Connect

    Alazraki, N.; Dries, D.; Lawrence, P.; Morton, K.; Datz, F.; Taylor, A.

    1985-06-01

    The accuracy of radionuclide angiography and blood-pool imaging using (/sup 99m/Tc)-phosphate to assess skin ulcer perfusion as an indicator of healing capacity was determined in 50 studies performed on 45 patients with nonhealing ulcers of the lower extremities. Two nuclear medicine physicians without clinical bias, graded the perfusion of the ulcer on the images as normal, increased or reduced with respect to the opposite limb. Patients were followed closely with aggressive local wound care for at least 14 days. Of the 31 ulcers which healed, the radionuclide study correctly predicted 30; of the 19 ulcers which did not heal, 14 were correctly predicted. Eight patients had osteomyelitis; four of those healed and four did not. The radionuclide study predicted healing in seven. This technique is a simple, reliable way to predict the microcirculatory adequacy for ulcer healing. Specificity is diminished in the presence of osteomyelitis.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of PEGylated polyethylenimine-entrapped gold nanoparticles for blood pool and tumor CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Benqing; Zheng, Linfeng; Peng, Chen; Li, Du; Li, Jingchao; Wen, Shihui; Shen, Mingwu; Zhang, Guixiang; Shi, Xiangyang

    2014-10-01

    The synthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) entrapped within polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified polyethylenimine (PEI) for blood pool and tumor computed tomography (CT) imaging are reported. In this approach, partially PEGylated PEI was used as a template for AuNP synthesis, followed by acetylating the PEI remaining surface amines. The synthesized PEGylated PEI-entrapped AuNPs (Au PENPs) were characterized via different methods. Our results reveal that the synthesized Au PENPs can be tuned to have an Au core size in a range of 1.9-4.6 nm and to be water-soluble, stable, and noncytotoxic in a studied concentration range. With a demonstrated better X-ray attenuation property than that of clinically used iodinated small molecular contrast agent (e.g., Omnipaque) and the prolonged half-decay time (11.2 h in rat) confirmed by pharmacokinetics studies, the developed PEGylated Au PENPs enabled efficient and enhanced blood pool CT imaging with imaging time up to 75 min. Likewise, thanks to the enhanced permeability and retention effect, the PEGylated Au PENPs were also able to be used as a contrast agent for effective CT imaging of a tumor model. With the proven organ biocompatibility by histological studies, the designed PEGylated Au PENPs may hold great promise to be used as contrast agents for CT imaging of a variety of biological systems. The significance of this study is that rather than the use of dendrimers as templates, cost-effective branched polymers (e.g., PEI) can be used as templates to generate functionalized AuNPs for CT imaging applications. PMID:25208617

  11. Hemodynamic and regional blood flow distribution responses to dextran, hydralazine, isoproterenol and amrinone during experimental cardiac tamponade

    SciTech Connect

    Millard, R.W.; Fowler, N.O.; Gabel, M.

    1983-06-01

    Four different interventions were examined in dogs with cardiac tamponade. Infusion of 216 to 288 ml saline solution into the pericardium reduced cardiac output from 3.5 +/- 0.3 to 1.7 +/- 0.2 liters/min as systemic vascular resistance increased from 4,110 +/- 281 to 6,370 +/- 424 dynes . s . cm-5. Left ventricular epicardial and endocardial blood flows were 178 +/- 13 and 220 +/- 12 ml/min per 100 g, respectively, and decreased to 72 +/- 14 and 78 +/- 11 ml/min per 100 g with tamponade. Reductions of 25 to 65% occurred in visceral and brain blood flows and in a composite brain sample. Cardiac output during tamponade was significantly increased by isoproterenol, 0.5 microgram/kg per min intravenously; hydralazine, 40 mg intravenously; dextran infusion or combined hydralazine and dextran, but not by amrinone. Total systemic vascular resistance was reduced by all interventions. Left ventricular epicardial flow was increased by isoproterenol, hydralazine and the hydralazine-dextran combination. Endocardial flow was increased by amrinone and the combination of hydralazine and dextran. Right ventricular myocardial blood flow increased with all interventions except dextran. Kidney cortical and composite brain blood flows were increased by both dextran alone and by the hydralazine-dextran combinations. Blood flow to small intestine was increased by all interventions as was that to large intestine by all except amrinone and hydralazine. Liver blood flow response was variable. The most pronounced hemodynamic and tissue perfusion improvements during cardiac tamponade were effected by combined vasodilation-blood volume expansion with a hydralazine-dextran combination. Isoproterenol had as dramatic an effect but it was short-lived. Amrinone was the least effective intervention.

  12. Acute hemodynamic effects and blood pool kinetics of polystyrene microspheres following intravenous administration

    SciTech Connect

    Slack, J.D.; Kanke, M.; Simmons, G.H.; DeLuca, P.P.

    1981-06-01

    The acute hemodynamic effect of intravenous administration of polystyrene microspheres was investigated and correlated with their distribution pattern and kinetics. Microspheres of three diameters (3.4, 7.4, and 11.6 micrometer) were administered. The 7.4- and 11.6-micrometer diameter microspheres were filtered by the pulmonary capillary network following intravenous administration, the majority during the first pass. There was no significant hemodynamic effect following administrations of the 7.4- and 11.6-micrometer diameter microspheres in doses as high as 3.0 X 10(9) and 6.1 X 10(8) respectively (total cross-sectional area of 1.3 X 10(11) and 6.4 X 10(10) micrometer2, respectively). Intravenous administration of 3.4-micrometer diameter microspheres produced significant dose-dependent systemic hypotension and depression of myocardial performance at dosages as slow as 1.0 X 10(10) (cross-sectional area of 9.1 X 10(10) micrometer2). These differences in acute hemodynamic effect from the 7.4- and 11.6-micrometer diameter microspheres may be due to the differences in distribution kinetics and fate of the 3.4-micrometer diameter microspheres, which readily pass through the lungs to the spleen. Although elimination of the smaller spheres from the blood during the first 6-8 min was rapid, i.e., t 1/2 . 1.62 and 1.72 min from the venous and arterial blood circulation, respectively, levels of 10(3) spheres/g of blood were present in the circulation for greater than 1 hr. These findings must be considered in the planning of intravenous administration of microspheres as a drug delivery system to target organs.

  13. Recent Stem Cell Advances: Cord Blood and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell for Cardiac Regeneration- a Review.

    PubMed

    Medhekar, Sheetal Kashinath; Shende, Vikas Suresh; Chincholkar, Anjali Baburao

    2016-05-30

    Stem cells are primitive self renewing undifferentiated cell that can be differentiated into various types of specialized cells like nerve cell, skin cells, muscle cells, intestinal tissue, and blood cells. Stem cells live in bone marrow where they divide to make new blood cells and produces peripheral stem cells in circulation. Under proper environment and in presence of signaling molecules stem cells begin to develop into specialized tissues and organs. These unique characteristics make them very promising entities for regeneration of damaged tissue. Day by day increase in incidence of heart diseases including left ventricular dysfunction, ischemic heart disease (IHD), congestive heart failure (CHF) are the major cause of morbidity and mortality. However infracted tissue cannot regenerate into healthy tissue. Heart transplantation is only the treatment for such patient. Due to limitation of availability of donor for organ transplantation, a focus is made for alternative and effective therapy to treat such condition. In this review we have discussed the new advances in stem cells such as use of cord stem cells and iPSC technology in cardiac repair. Future approach of CB cells was found to be used in tissue repair which is specifically observed for improvement of left ventricular function and myocardial infarction. Here we have also focused on how iPSC technology is used for regeneration of cardiomyocytes and intiating neovascularization in myocardial infarction and also for study of pathophysiology of various degenerative diseases and genetic disease in research field. PMID:27426082

  14. Recent Stem Cell Advances: Cord Blood and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell for Cardiac Regeneration- a Review

    PubMed Central

    Medhekar, Sheetal Kashinath; Shende, Vikas Suresh; Chincholkar, Anjali Baburao

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are primitive self renewing undifferentiated cell that can be differentiated into various types of specialized cells like nerve cell, skin cells, muscle cells, intestinal tissue, and blood cells. Stem cells live in bone marrow where they divide to make new blood cells and produces peripheral stem cells in circulation. Under proper environment and in presence of signaling molecules stem cells begin to develop into specialized tissues and organs. These unique characteristics make them very promising entities for regeneration of damaged tissue. Day by day increase in incidence of heart diseases including left ventricular dysfunction, ischemic heart disease (IHD), congestive heart failure (CHF) are the major cause of morbidity and mortality. However infracted tissue cannot regenerate into healthy tissue. Heart transplantation is only the treatment for such patient. Due to limitation of availability of donor for organ transplantation, a focus is made for alternative and effective therapy to treat such condition. In this review we have discussed the new advances in stem cells such as use of cord stem cells and iPSC technology in cardiac repair. Future approach of CB cells was found to be used in tissue repair which is specifically observed for improvement of left ventricular function and myocardial infarction. Here we have also focused on how iPSC technology is used for regeneration of cardiomyocytes and intiating neovascularization in myocardial infarction and also for study of pathophysiology of various degenerative diseases and genetic disease in research field. PMID:27426082

  15. Measurement of the Red Blood Cell Distribution Width Improves the Risk Prediction in Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Boros, András Mihály; Perge, Péter; Jenei, Zsigmond; Karády, Júlia; Zima, Endre; Molnár, Levente; Becker, Dávid; Gellér, László; Prohászka, Zoltán; Merkely, Béla; Széplaki, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Increases in red blood cell distribution width (RDW) and NT-proBNP (N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide) predict the mortality of chronic heart failure patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). It was hypothesized that RDW is independent of and possibly even superior to NT-proBNP from the aspect of long-term mortality prediction. Design. The blood counts and serum NT-proBNP levels of 134 patients undergoing CRT were measured. Multivariable Cox regression models were applied and reclassification analyses were performed. Results. After separate adjustment to the basic model of left bundle branch block, beta blocker therapy, and serum creatinine, both the RDW > 13.35% and NT-proBNP > 1975 pg/mL predicted the 5-year mortality (n = 57). In the final model including all variables, the RDW [HR = 2.49 (1.27–4.86); p = 0.008] remained a significant predictor, whereas the NT-proBNP [HR = 1.18 (0.93–3.51); p = 0.07] lost its predictive value. On addition of the RDW measurement, a 64% net reclassification improvement and a 3% integrated discrimination improvement were achieved over the NT-proBNP-adjusted basic model. Conclusions. Increased RDW levels accurately predict the long-term mortality of CRT patients independently of NT-proBNP. Reclassification analysis revealed that the RDW improves the risk stratification and could enhance the optimal patient selection for CRT. PMID:26903690

  16. Preparation and radiochemical control of 99mTc labeled blood pool agent for in vivo labelling of the red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Israr; Amir, Noshad; Durr-E-Sabih; Bin Asad, Muhammad Hassham Hassan; Rahim, Muhammad Kashif; Hussain, Muhammad Shahzad; Murtaza, Ghulam; Shah, Syed Nisar Hussaian

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to prepare cheap blood pool imaging kits by simplified method to overcome the burden on purchase department of MINAR, Nishtar Hospital, Multan, Pakistan. Secondarily, prompt supply of kits should save the time of patient during transportation. A total of 24 subjects selected for this study were equally divided into two groups. Mixture of stannous chloride and sodium pyrophosphate solution at pH 7 was injected to these subjects. Various concentrations (ranging from 200 to 800 microg) of stannous chloride dihydrate were injected to group one, followed by intravenous administration of technetium-99m (99mTc) pertechnetate at 30 min interval in 12 subjects. Labeling percentage of each sample was calculated afterwards followed by imaging under gamma camera. Each parameter was tested on three different patients and average of these three was calculated. In second set of experiments done on group two the same procedure was repeated in another 12 subjects, while keeping the concentration of Sn PYP constant at 400 microg. In this case, 99mTc was administered at different time intervals in different subjects ranging from 15 to 120 min (15, 30, 60 and 120 min) followed by calculation of labeling percentage and imaging under gamma camera. In group one, average percentage values of binding of red blood cells with 99mTc were 23.24, 84.88, 83.78 and 60.33% for concentrations of 200, 400, 600 and 800 microg, respectively. In group two, average percentage binging values of 22.26, 84.36. 55.54 and 28.67% were calculated at time intervals of 15, 30, 60 and 120 min, respectively. It is concluded from the results that the best blood pool imaging under gamma camera was observed for the concentration of 400 microg and the time interval of 30 min. The maximum percentage binding of red blood cells with 99mTc was calculated at concentration of 400 microg after 30 min interval that also correlated with imaging results. PMID:25272643

  17. Salt-induced cardiac hypertrophy is independent of blood pressure and endothelin in obese, heart failure-prone SHHF rats.

    PubMed

    Radin, M Judith; Holycross, Bethany J; Hoepf, Toni M; McCune, Sylvia A

    2008-10-01

    The interaction of salt sensitivity and obesity in development of cardiac hypertrophy is incompletely understood. The SHHF/Mcc-fa(cp) (SHHF) rat model was used to examine the effect of high salt on cardiac hypertrophy and expression of endothelin (ET) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms. Homozygous lean (+/+) and obese (fa(cp)/fa(cp)) SHHF were fed a low-salt diet (0.3% NaCl) for seven days followed by a high-salt diet (8.0% NaCl) for seven days. To assess the role of ET in mediating cardiac hypertrophy and gene expression with high salt, additional groups were treated with an ET(A)/ET(B) receptor antagonist (bosentan) while on high salt. Obese SHHF showed an increase in systolic blood pressure and cardiac hypertrophy in response to the high-salt diet. High salt resulted in decreased expression of preproET as well as all three NOS isoforms in the Obese, while cytokine induced NOS (iNOS) and neuronal NOS (nNOS) increased in Leans. Though the salt-sensitive component of the hypertension observed in the Obese was prevented by bosentan, cardiac hypertrophy still occurred and expression of all NOS isoforms remained lower in Obese compared to Lean. Endothelial NOS (eNOS) expression increased in the Lean with bosentan. These studies suggest that cardiac hypertrophy is independent of the level of hypertension and may be mediated by altered production of NOS isoforms in salt-sensitive, obese SHHF. PMID:18855258

  18. Radionuclide angiography and blood pool imaging to assess skin ulcer healing prognosis in patients with peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Alazraki, N.; Lawrence, P.F.; Syverud, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Several non-invasive diagnostic techniques including segmental limb blood pressures, skin fluoresence, and photo plethysmography, have been evaluated as predictors of skin ulcer healing in patients with peripheral vascular disease, but none are widely used. Using 20mCi of Tc-99m phosphate compounds, four phase bone scans were obtained, including (1) radionuclide angiogram (2) blood pool image (3) 2 hour and 4-6 hour static images and (4) 24 hour static delayed images. The first two phases were used to assess vacularity to the region of distal extremity ulceration; the last two phases evaluated presence or absence of osteomyelitis. Studies were performed in 30 patients with non-healing ulcers of the lower extremities. Perfusion to the regions of ulceration on images was graded as normal, increased, or reduced with respect to the opposite (presumed normal) limb or some other normal reference area. Hypervascular response was interpreted as good prognosis for healing unless osteomyelitis was present. Clinicians followed patients for 14 days to assess limb healing with optimum care. If there was no improvement, angiography and/or surgery (reconstructive surgery, sympathectomy, or amputation) was done. Results showed: sensitivity for predicting ulcer healing was 94%, specificity 89%. Patients who failed to heal their ulcers showed reduced perfusion, no hypervascular response, or osteomyelitis. Microcirculatory adequacy for ulcer healing appear predictable by this technique.

  19. Development and optimization of SPECT gated blood pool cluster analysis for the prediction of CRT outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Lalonde, Michel Wassenaar, Richard; Wells, R. Glenn; Birnie, David; Ruddy, Terrence D.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Phase analysis of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radionuclide angiography (RNA) has been investigated for its potential to predict the outcome of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). However, phase analysis may be limited in its potential at predicting CRT outcome as valuable information may be lost by assuming that time-activity curves (TAC) follow a simple sinusoidal shape. A new method, cluster analysis, is proposed which directly evaluates the TACs and may lead to a better understanding of dyssynchrony patterns and CRT outcome. Cluster analysis algorithms were developed and optimized to maximize their ability to predict CRT response. Methods: About 49 patients (N = 27 ischemic etiology) received a SPECT RNA scan as well as positron emission tomography (PET) perfusion and viability scans prior to undergoing CRT. A semiautomated algorithm sampled the left ventricle wall to produce 568 TACs from SPECT RNA data. The TACs were then subjected to two different cluster analysis techniques, K-means, and normal average, where several input metrics were also varied to determine the optimal settings for the prediction of CRT outcome. Each TAC was assigned to a cluster group based on the comparison criteria and global and segmental cluster size and scores were used as measures of dyssynchrony and used to predict response to CRT. A repeated random twofold cross-validation technique was used to train and validate the cluster algorithm. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to calculate the area under the curve (AUC) and compare results to those obtained for SPECT RNA phase analysis and PET scar size analysis methods. Results: Using the normal average cluster analysis approach, the septal wall produced statistically significant results for predicting CRT results in the ischemic population (ROC AUC = 0.73;p < 0.05 vs. equal chance ROC AUC = 0.50) with an optimal operating point of 71% sensitivity and 60% specificity. Cluster

  20. Echocardiographic evaluation of pulmonary venous blood flow and cardiac function changes during one-lung ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su Hyun; Kim, Namo; Kim, Hyun IL; Oh, Young Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The intra-pulmonary shunt induced by one-lung ventilation (OLV), is alleviated by increased pulmonary blood flow by gravitational redistribution and hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. We investigated the changes of pulmonary venous blood flow (PVBF) and biventricular function during OLV with echocardiography. And the correlation between PVBF and intra-pulmonary shunt fraction (Qs/Qt) was evaluated. Methods: PVBF of the left upper pulmonary vein and cardiac function were measured with echocardiography in twenty-five patients who underwent elective thoracic surgery in left lateral decubitus. Qs/Qt and PaO2 were measured with blood gas analysis. Data was obtained at 10 min after two-lung ventilation in supine (TLV-S) and lateral decubitus position (TLV-L), and at 10, 20 and 30 min after OLV in lateral decubitus position (OLV-10, -20 and -30). Results: There were significant changes in PVBF among TLV-S, TLV-L and OLV-10 (959.5±280.8, 1416.9±489.7 and 1999.9±670.5 ml/min; P<0.05, respectively). There were not differences in PVBF, Qs/Qt and PaO2 among OLV-10, -20 and -30. There were an inverse correlation between percent change of PVBF and change of Qs/Qt (r2 = 0.5; P<0.0001) and positive correlations between the percent change of PVBF and change of PaO2 (r2 = 0.4; P<0.0001) during OLV over TLV-L. No significant changes in biventricular systolic and diastolic function were observed during positional change and OLV. Conclusions: A remarkable change of PVBF relevant to gravitational distribution and hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction was proved by echocardiography. And PVBF changes could represent the changes of Qs/Qt and PaO2 during OLV. However, biventricular function was not impaired during OLV. PMID:26550232

  1. Role of blood gas analysis during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youn-Jung; Lee, You Jin; Ryoo, Seung Mok; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Ahn, Shin; Seo, Dong-Woo; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Won Young

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To determine the relationship between acid–base findings, such as pH, pCO2, and serum lactate levels, obtained immediately after starting cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). A prospective observational study of adult, nontraumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients was conducted at an urban academic teaching institution between April 1, 2013 and March 31, 2015. Arterial blood sample for acid–base data was taken from all OHCA patients on arrival to the emergency department. Of 224 OHCA patients, 88 patients with unavailable blood samples or delayed blood sampling or ROSC within 4 minutes were excluded, leaving 136 patients for analysis. The pH in the ROSC group was significantly higher than in the non-ROSC group (6.96 vs. 6.85; P = 0.009). pCO2 and lactate levels in the ROSC group were significantly lower than those in the non-ROSC group (74.0 vs. 89.5 mmHg, P < 0.009; 11.6 vs. 13.6 mmol/L, P = 0.044, respectively). In a multivariate regression analysis, pCO2 was the only independent biochemical predictor for sustained ROSC (OR 0.979; 95% CI 0.960–0.997; P = 0.025) and pCO2 of <75 mmHg was 3.3 times more likely to achieve ROSC (OR 0.302; 95% CI 0.146–0.627; P = 0.001). pCO2 levels obtained during cardiopulmonary resuscitation on ER arrival was associated with ROSC in OHCA patients. It might be a potentially marker for reflecting the status of the ischemic insult. These preliminary results need to be confirmed in a larger population. PMID:27336894

  2. Elevated intracellular Ca2+ reveals a functional membrane nucleotide pool in intact human red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Tiffert, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Elevated intracellular calcium generates rapid, profound, and irreversible changes in the nucleotide metabolism of human red blood cells (RBCs), triggered by the adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity of the powerful plasma membrane calcium pump (PMCA). In the absence of glycolytic substrates, Ca2+-induced nucleotide changes are thought to be determined by the interaction between PMCA ATPase, adenylate kinase, and AMP-deaminase enzymes, but the extent to which this three-enzyme system can account for the Ca2+-induced effects has not been investigated in detail before. Such a study requires the formulation of a model incorporating the known kinetics of the three-enzyme system and a direct comparison between its predictions and precise measurements of the Ca2+-induced nucleotide changes, a precision not available from earlier studies. Using state-of-the-art high-performance liquid chromatography, we measured the changes in the RBC contents of ATP, ADP, AMP, and IMP during the first 35 min after ionophore-induced pump-saturating Ca2+ loads in the absence of glycolytic substrates. Comparison between measured and model-predicted changes revealed that for good fits it was necessary to assume mean ATPase Vmax values much higher than those ever measured by PMCA-mediated Ca2+ extrusion. These results suggest that the local nucleotide concentrations generated by ATPase activity at the inner membrane surface differed substantially from those measured in bulk cell extracts, supporting previous evidence for the existence of a submembrane microdomain with a distinct nucleotide metabolism. PMID:21948947

  3. The IGF-1 Receptor Identifies a Pool of Human Cardiac Stem Cells with Superior Therapeutic Potential for Myocardial Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    D’Amario, Domenico; Cabral-Da-Silva, Mauricio; Zheng, Hanqiao; Fiorini, Claudia; Goichberg, Polina; Steadman, Elisabeth; Ferreira-Martins, João; Sanada, Fumihiro; Piccoli, Marco; Cappetta, Donato; D’Alessandro, David A.; Michler, Robert E.; Hosoda, Toru; Anastasia, Luigi; Rota, Marcello; Leri, Annarosa; Anversa, Piero; Kajstura, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Age and coronary artery disease may negatively affect the function of human cardiac stem cells (hCSCs) and their potential therapeutic efficacy for autologous cell transplantation in the failing heart. Objective Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and 2 (IGF-2), and angiotensin II (Ang II) and their receptors, IGF-1R, IGF-2R and AT1R, were characterized in c-kit-positive-hCSCs to establish whether these systems would allow us to separate hCSC classes with different growth reserve in the aging and diseased myocardium. Methods and Results C-kit-positive-hCSCs were collected from myocardial samples obtained from 24 patients, 48 to 86 years of age, undergoing elective cardiac surgery for coronary artery disease. The expression of IGF-1R in hCSCs recognized a young cell phenotype defined by long telomeres, high telomerase activity, enhanced cell proliferation and attenuated apoptosis. In addition to IGF-1, IGF-1R-positive-hCSCs secreted IGF-2 that promoted myocyte differentiation. Conversely, the presence of IGF-2R and AT1R, in the absence of IGF-1R, identified senescent hCSCs with impaired growth reserve and increased susceptibility to apoptosis. The ability of IGF-1R-positive-hCSCs to regenerate infarcted myocardium was then compared with that of unselected c-kit-positive-hCSCs. IGF-1R-positive-hCSCs improved cardiomyogenesis and vasculogenesis. Pretreatment of IGF-1R-positive-hCSCs with IGF-2 resulted in the formation of more mature myocytes and superior recovery of ventricular structure. Conclusions hCSCs expressing only IGF-1R synthesize both IGF-1 and IGF-2, which are potent modulators of stem cell replication, commitment to the myocyte lineage and myocyte differentiation, pointing to this hCSC subset as the ideal candidate cell for the management of human heart failure. PMID:21546606

  4. Therapeutic options to minimize allogeneic blood transfusions and their adverse effects in cardiac surgery: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Antônio Alceu; da Silva, José Pedro; da Silva, Luciana da Fonseca; de Sousa, Alexandre Gonçalves; Piotto, Raquel Ferrari; Baumgratz, José Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Introdution Allogeneic blood is an exhaustible therapeutic resource. New evidence indicates that blood consumption is excessive and that donations have decreased, resulting in reduced blood supplies worldwide. Blood transfusions are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, as well as higher hospital costs. This makes it necessary to seek out new treatment options. Such options exist but are still virtually unknown and are rarely utilized. Objective To gather and describe in a systematic, objective, and practical way all clinical and surgical strategies as effective therapeutic options to minimize or avoid allogeneic blood transfusions and their adverse effects in surgical cardiac patients. Methods A bibliographic search was conducted using the MeSH term “Blood Transfusion” and the terms “Cardiac Surgery” and “Blood Management.” Studies with titles not directly related to this research or that did not contain information related to it in their abstracts as well as older studies reporting on the same strategies were not included. Results Treating anemia and thrombocytopenia, suspending anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, reducing routine phlebotomies, utilizing less traumatic surgical techniques with moderate hypothermia and hypotension, meticulous hemostasis, use of topical and systemic hemostatic agents, acute normovolemic hemodilution, cell salvage, anemia tolerance (supplementary oxygen and normothermia), as well as various other therapeutic options have proved to be effective strategies for reducing allogeneic blood transfusions. Conclusion There are a number of clinical and surgical strategies that can be used to optimize erythrocyte mass and coagulation status, minimize blood loss, and improve anemia tolerance. In order to decrease the consumption of blood components, diminish morbidity and mortality, and reduce hospital costs, these treatment strategies should be incorporated into medical practice worldwide. PMID:25714216

  5. Are There Benefits to a Fresh Whole Blood vs. Packed Red Blood Cell Cardiopulmonary Bypass Prime on Outcomes in Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiac Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Valleley, Melinda S.; Buckley, Klayton W.; Hayes, Kylie M.; Fortuna, Randall R.; Geiss, Dale M.; Holt, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: Techniques for pediatric cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) have significantly improved over the years. The use of fresh whole blood (FWB) and pre-bypass ultrafiltration (PBUF) has been suggested as means for improving perioperative and postoperative outcomes. It is the intent of this study to show that fresh whole blood along with PBUF will result in balanced CPB prime that can offer a reduction in blood product exposures and blood loss along with improving several measured postoperative outcomes. After institutional review board approval, a retrospective review was conducted on 100 patients to analyze the benefits of FWB and PBUF on outcomes in neonatal and pediatric cardiac surgery. Data analysis included preoperative and CPB data, perioperative inotrope and blood product exposure, and postoperative blood loss and blood product exposure measured for up to a 12-hour period in the intensive care unit (ICU). The three groups compared were FWB prime vs. packed red blood cell (PRBC) prime, <5 kg FWB prime vs. <5 kg PRBC prime, and 5+ kg FWB prime and 5+ kg PRBC prime. Cumulative blood product exposures for the FWB prime group found 62% received one blood exposure for the operative and postoperative period (p < .0001). The majority of patients who received a PRBC prime (64%) received three or more cumulative exposures (p < .0003). The <5 kg FWB group also received significantly less cumulative blood exposure, with 64% receiving just one exposure. Comparatively, 85% of the <5 kg PRBC patients received three or more blood product exposures perioperatively and postoperatively (p < .0001). Perioperative inotrope and postoperative blood loss did not differ among the groups. Outcomes for intraoperative death, intraoperative extubation, delayed sternal closure, and mediastinal reexploration were also not statistically different. The results of this study found that FWB leads to significantly less blood exposure, specifically in the <5-kg

  6. Mitochondrial respiratory dysfunctions of blood mononuclear cells link with cardiac disturbance in patients with early-stage heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Wang, Bin; Sun, Fang; Li, Yingsha; Li, Qiang; Lang, Hongmei; Zhao, Zhigang; Gao, Peng; Zhao, Yu; Shang, Qianhui; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2015-01-01

    Patients with cardiometabolic risk factors and asymptomatic cardiac hypertrophy are hallmarks of early-stage heart failure (HF). We hypothesized that mitochondrial respiratory dysfunctions of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) may be associated with inflammation and oxidative stress in early-stage HF patients complicated with cardiometabolic risk factors. Totally 49 subjects were enrolled with 25 early-stage HF patients (stages A and B) having cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction and 24 healthy controls. It showed that excessive inflammation and reduced antioxidant capacity were closely associated with cardiac abnormalities in early-stage HF patients. Furthermore, the values of mitochondrial respiratory functional parameters R, CIOXPHOS, CIIOXPHOS, CI+IIOXPHOS, CI+IIETS and CIIETS were significantly lowered in early-stage HF patients. Interestingly, these respiratory parameters were correlated with inflammation and antioxidant capacity in participants. Finally, cardiometabolic risk factors such as salt intake and blood pressure were related to the mitochondrial respiratory dysfunctions, which were further validated by in vitro experiments. Our study indicated that cardiometabolic risk factor-mediated mitochondrial respiratory dysfunctions of PBMCs link with the cellular inflammation / oxidative stress and cardiac disturbance in early-stage HF. PMID:26018291

  7. Desmopressin acetate is a mild vasodilator that does not reduce blood loss in uncomplicated cardiac surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Reich, D L; Hammerschlag, B C; Rand, J H; Weiss-Bloom, L; Perucho, H; Galla, J; Thys, D M

    1991-04-01

    Desmopressin acetate (DA) is a synthetic analog of vasopressin that may improve perioperative coagulation in cardiac surgical patients. Twenty-seven adult patients with good left ventricular function and normal preoperative coagulation profiles scheduled to undergo elective cardiac surgery participated in the double-blinded, placebo-controlled study. The 14 patients in the DA group received the drug over 10 minutes (starting 15 minutes after protamine administration). The 13 patients in the placebo group received an equal volume of saline. Preoperative template bleeding time was longer in the placebo group (P = 0.04). Otherwise, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups in demographics, coagulation variables, renal concentrating function, blood loss, or transfusion requirements at any study interval. The only significant hemodynamic differences detected were an increase in cardiac output in the DA group and a corresponding decrease in systemic vascular resistance. Five of 13 patients who received DA required treatment for hypotension, whereas none of 12 patients who received placebo required treatment during the infusion (P = 0.008). The authors conclude that DA causes mild vasodilation, but does not reduce blood loss or transfusion requirements in patients undergoing primary uncomplicated cardiac surgical procedures. PMID:1863725

  8. Inadequate Blood Pressure Control in Hypertensive Patients Referred for Cardiac Stress Test.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Tarek M; Akinseye, Oluwaseun A; Kerwin, Todd C

    2015-09-01

    The current study examined the degree of blood pressure (BP) control and incidence of myocardial ischemia in hypertensive patients (n=2039) referred for cardiac stress test. Patients were categorized into well-controlled (<140/90 mm Hg), poorly controlled (140-160/90-100 mm Hg), and very poorly controlled (>160/100 mm Hg) groups according to their resting BP. The mean age[±standard error of the mean] of the patients was 68±13 years, and 885 (43.4%) were men. The prevalence of well-controlled hypertension (HTN) was 47.2%, poorly controlled HTN was 29.5%, and very poorly controlled HTN was 23.3%. Evidence of ischemia was seen in 19.8% and 19.3% of the well-controlled and poorly controlled groups, respectively. The very poorly controlled group had the lowest incidence of ischemia (14.3%) (P<.05) compared with the other two groups. Symptoms that mimic ischemic heart disease in hypertensive patients may be partly explained by poorly controlled BP. Quality of care might be improved by optimally controlling BP in patients with angina symptoms prior to ordering diagnostic testing associated with radiation exposure and cost. PMID:26011137

  9. Blood pressure lowering, vasodilator and cardiac-modulatory potential of Carum roxburghianum seed extract.

    PubMed

    Khan, Munasib; Khan, Arif-ullah; Najeeb-ur-Rehman; Gilani, Anwarul-Hassan

    2015-01-01

    In current study, we describe blood pressure (BP)-lowering, endothelium-dependent, and independent vasodilator and cardio-modulatory actions of Carum roxburghianum seed. The crude extract of C. roxburghianum seed (Cr.Cr) induced dose-dependent (10-100 mg/kg) fall in arterial BP of anaesthetized rats. In isolated rabbit aorta, Cr.Cr (0.3-10 mg/mL) inhibited high K+ (80 mM) and phenylephrine (PE, 1 µM)-induced contractions, like verapamil and papaverine. In endothelium-intact rat aortic preparations, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride-sensitive vasodilator activity was observed with Cr.Cr, which also relaxed endothelium-denuded aorta tissues. In guinea-pig atria, Cr.Cr initially caused mild cardiac stimulation, followed by inhibition, as shown by papaverine. These results reveal that cardiovascular effects of C. roxburghianum seed extract are mediated possibly through combination of Ca++ antagonist, nitric oxide modulating and phosphodiesterase inhibitory mechanisms, though further in-depth studies are required for elucidating precise mode of action. PMID:24785464

  10. Blood brain barrier is impermeable to solutes and permeable to water after experimental pediatric cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Tress, Erika E; Clark, Robert S B; Foley, Lesley M; Alexander, Henry; Hickey, Robert W; Drabek, Tomas; Kochanek, Patrick M; Manole, Mioara D

    2014-08-22

    Pediatric asphyxial cardiac arrest (CA) results in unfavorable neurological outcome in most survivors. Development of neuroprotective therapies is contingent upon understanding the permeability of intravenously delivered medications through the blood brain barrier (BBB). In a model of pediatric CA we sought to characterize BBB permeability to small and large molecular weight substances. Additionally, we measured the percent brain water after CA. Asphyxia of 9 min was induced in 16-18 day-old rats. The rats were resuscitated and the BBB permeability to small (sodium fluorescein and gadoteridol) and large (immunoglobulin G, IgG) molecules was assessed at 1, 4, and 24 h after asphyxial CA or sham surgery. Percent brain water was measured post-CA and in shams using wet-to-dry brain weight. Fluorescence, gadoteridol uptake, or IgG staining at 1, 4h and over the entire 24 h post-CA did not differ from shams, suggesting absence of BBB permeability to these solutes. Cerebral water content was increased at 3h post-CA vs. sham. In conclusion, after 9 min of asphyxial CA there is no BBB permeability over 24h to conventional small or large molecule tracers despite the fact that cerebral water content is increased early post-CA indicating the development of brain edema. Evaluation of novel therapies targeting neuronal death after pediatric CA should include their capacity to cross the BBB. PMID:24937271

  11. Effects of heme oxygenase-1 upregulation on blood pressure and cardiac function in an animal model of hypertensive myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tian-Meng; Li, Jian; Liu, Lin; Fan, Li; Li, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Yu-Tang; Abraham, Nader G; Cao, Jian

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we evaluate the effect of HO-1 upregulation on blood pressure and cardiac function in the new model of infarct spontaneous hypertensive rats (ISHR). Male spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR) at 13 weeks (n = 40) and age-matched male Wistar (WT) rats (n = 20) were divided into six groups: WT (sham + normal saline (NS)), WT (sham + Co(III) Protoporphyrin IX Chloride (CoPP)), SHR (myocardial infarction (MI) + NS), SHR (MI + CoPP), SHR (MI + CoPP + Tin Mesoporphyrin IX Dichloride (SnMP)), SHR (sham + NS); CoPP 4.5 mg/kg, SnMP 15 mg/kg, for six weeks, one/week, i.p., n = 10/group. At the sixth week, echocardiography (UCG) and hemodynamics were performed. Then, blood samples and heart tissue were collected. Copp treatment in the SHR (MI + CoPP) group lowered blood pressure, decreased infarcted area, restored cardiac function (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), left ventricular fraction shortening (LVFS), +dp/dt(max), (-dp/dt(max))/left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP)), inhibited cardiac hypertrophy and ventricular enlargement (downregulating left ventricular end-systolic diameter (LVEDD), left ventricular end-systolic diameter (LVESD) and heart weight/body weight (HW/BW)), lowered serum CRP, IL-6 and Glu levels and increased serum TB, NO and PGI2 levels. Western blot and immunohistochemistry showed that HO-1 expression was elevated in the SHR (MI + CoPP) group, while co-administration with SnMP suppressed the benefit functions mentioned above. In conclusion, HO-1 upregulation can lower blood pressure and improve post-infarct cardiac function in the ISHR model. These functions may be involved in the inhibition of inflammation and the ventricular remodeling process and in the amelioration of glucose metabolism and endothelial dysfunction. PMID:23358254

  12. Are there two functionally distinguished Neu5Gc pools with respect to rouleau formation on the bovine red blood cell?

    PubMed

    Musielak, Malgorzata

    2004-01-01

    Bovine red blood cells (RBCs) do not exhibit any aggregation tendency in autologous plasma and, therefore, all bovine rouleaux obtained in vitro are regarded as artificial. The present study reports the bovine RBC rouleau formation by either bovine or human fibrinogen and Ca2+ ions. The phenomenon was induced through two-step cell incubation: in 0.9% NaCl and 1% bovine albumin at 37 degrees C for 30 min followed by 20 hrs incubation at 30 degrees C in the fresh solution supplemented with 10 mM glucose. Its mechanism is unknown. During the incubation the number of N-glycolylneuraminic acid molecules per cell decreased from 48.1 to 44.9 amoles, which accounted for 7%. The treatment of RBCs with V. cholerae sialidase under the same conditions resulted in a 94% drop in the Neu5Gc quantity and did not induce the rouleau formation in the same fibrinogen preparation. The preliminary results rise a question whether the bulk of sialic acid is required in the aggregation of bovine erythrocytes under static conditions. Only a minor pool of Neu5Gc seems to be responsible for suppression of the phenomenon. PMID:15258381

  13. Myocardial function after polarizing versus depolarizing cardiac arrest with blood cardioplegia in a porcine model of cardiopulmonary bypass†

    PubMed Central

    Aass, Terje; Stangeland, Lodve; Moen, Christian Arvei; Salminen, Pirjo-Riitta; Dahle, Geir Olav; Chambers, David J.; Markou, Thomais; Eliassen, Finn; Urban, Malte; Haaverstad, Rune; Matre, Knut; Grong, Ketil

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Potassium-based depolarizing St Thomas' Hospital cardioplegic solution No 2 administered as intermittent, oxygenated blood is considered as a gold standard for myocardial protection during cardiac surgery. However, the alternative concept of polarizing arrest may have beneficial protective effects. We hypothesize that polarized arrest with esmolol/adenosine/magnesium (St Thomas' Hospital Polarizing cardioplegic solution) in cold, intermittent oxygenated blood offers comparable myocardial protection in a clinically relevant animal model. METHODS Twenty anaesthetized young pigs, 42 ± 2 (standard deviation) kg on standardized tepid cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were randomized (10 per group) to depolarizing or polarizing cardiac arrest for 60 min with cardioplegia administered in the aortic root every 20 min as freshly mixed cold, intermittent, oxygenated blood. Global and local baseline and postoperative cardiac function 60, 120 and 180 min after myocardial reperfusion was evaluated with pressure–conductance catheter and strain by Tissue Doppler Imaging. Regional tissue blood flow, cleaved caspase-3 activity, GRK2 phosphorylation and mitochondrial function and ultrastructure were evaluated in myocardial tissue samples. RESULTS Left ventricular function and general haemodynamics did not differ between groups before CPB. Cardiac asystole was obtained and maintained during aortic cross-clamping. Compared with baseline, heart rate was increased and left ventricular end-systolic and end-diastolic pressures decreased in both groups after weaning. Cardiac index, systolic pressure and radial peak systolic strain did not differ between groups. Contractility, evaluated as dP/dtmax, gradually increased from 120 to 180 min after declamping in animals with polarizing cardioplegia and was significantly higher, 1871 ± 160 (standard error) mmHg/s, compared with standard potassium-based cardioplegic arrest, 1351 ± 70 mmHg/s, after 180 min of reperfusion (P = 0

  14. Interactions between breathing rate and low-frequency fluctuations in blood pressure and cardiac intervals.

    PubMed

    Horsman, H M; Peebles, K C; Tzeng, Y C

    2015-10-01

    Evidence derived from spontaneous measures of cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) suggests that slow breathing at 6 breaths/min augments BRS. However, increases in BRS associated with slow breathing may simply reflect the frequency-dependent nature of the baroreflex rather than the modulation of baroreflex function by changes in breathing rate per se. To test this hypothesis we employed a crossover study design (n = 14) wherein breathing rate and systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP) oscillation induced via the application of oscillating lower body negative pressure (OLBNP) were independently varied at fixed frequencies. Breathing rate was controlled at 6 or 10 breaths/min with the aid of a metronome, and SAP oscillations were driven at 0.06 Hz and 0.1 Hz using OLBNP. The magnitudes of SAP and R-R interval (cardiac period) oscillations were quantified using power spectral analysis, and the transfer function gain between SAP and R-R interval was used to estimate BRS. Linear mixed-effects models were used to examine the main effects and interactions between breathing rate and OLBNP frequency. There was no statistical interaction between breathing and OLBNP frequency (P = 0.59), indicating that the effect of breathing rate on BRS did not differ according to OLBNP frequency (and vice versa). Additionally, there was no main effect for breathing rate (P = 0.28). However, we observed a significant main effect for OLBNP frequency (P = 0.01) consistent with the frequency-dependent nature of baroreflex. These findings suggest that increases in spectral indices of BRS reflect the frequency dependence of the baroreflex and are not due to slow breathing per se. PMID:26205543

  15. PEGylated dendrimer-entrapped gold nanoparticles for in vivo blood pool and tumor imaging by computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chen; Zheng, Linfeng; Chen, Qian; Shen, Mingwu; Guo, Rui; Wang, Han; Cao, Xueyan; Zhang, Guixiang; Shi, Xiangyang

    2012-02-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of dendrimer-entrapped gold nanoparticles (Au DENPs) modified by polyethylene glycol (PEG) with enhanced biocompatibility for computed tomography (CT) imaging applications. In this study, amine-terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers of generation 5 (G5.NH(2)) modified by PEG monomethyl ether (G5.NH(2)-mPEG(20)) were used as templates to synthesize Au DENPs, followed by acetylation of the remaining dendrimer terminal amines to generate PEGylated Au DENPs. The partial PEGylation modification of dendrimer terminal amines allows high loading of Au within the dendrimer interior, and consequently by simply varying the Au salt/dendrimer molar ratio, the size of the PEGylated Au DENPs can be controlled at a range of 2-4 nm with a narrow size distribution. The formed PEGylated Au DENPs are water-dispersible, stable in a pH range of 5-8 and a temperature range of 0-50 °C, and non-cytotoxic at a concentration as high as 100 μm. X-ray absorption coefficient measurements show that the attenuation intensity of the PEGylated Au DENPs is much higher than that of Omnipaque with iodine concentration similar to Au. With the sufficiently long half-decay time demonstrated by pharmacokinetics studies, the PEGylated Au DENPs enabled not only X-ray CT blood pool imaging of mice and rats after intravenous injection of the particles, but also effective CT imaging of a xenograft tumor model in nude mice. These findings suggest that the designed PEGylated Au DENPs can be used as a promising contrast agent with enhanced biocompatibility for CT imaging of various biological systems, especially in cancer diagnosis. PMID:22061490

  16. Short-term effects of oral dronedarone administration on cardiac function, blood pressure and electrocardiogram in conscious telemetry dogs

    PubMed Central

    SAENGKLUB, Nakkawee; YOUNGBLOOD, Brad; DEL RIO, Carlos; SAWANGKOON, Suwanakiet; HAMLIN, Robert L.; KIJTAWORNRAT, Anusak

    2016-01-01

    Dronedarone is a multichannel blocking antiarrhythmic drug that has been used for management of atrial fibrillation in humans, but the data in veterinary medicine are inadequate. The objective of this study was to determine the short-term effects of oral dronedarone on cardiac inotropy and lusitropy, blood pressure and electrocardiogram (ECG) in healthy dogs. A total of 6 beagle dogs were instrumented with telemetry units and sono-micrometry crystals to obtain left ventricular pressure-volume relationship, mean blood pressure (MBP) and ECG. Dogs were given orally dronedarone (20 mg/kg, twice per day) for 7 days. All parameters were obtained hourly at 4–8 hr after the first dose and at 12-, 96- (day 4) and 168-hr (day 7) after dosing. The results showed that dronedarone had no effect on inotropy and lusitropy, while it significantly lengthened PQ interval (P<0.001) and lowered MBP (P<0.05). Dronedarone also tended to reduce cardiac output (P=0.237) and heart rate (P=0.057). These results suggested that short-term effects of oral dronedarone administration at a dose of 20 mg/kg, twice per day, produced negative dromotropy with minimal effect on cardiac function in conscious dogs. PMID:26922916

  17. Short-term effects of oral dronedarone administration on cardiac function, blood pressure and electrocardiogram in conscious telemetry dogs.

    PubMed

    Saengklub, Nakkawee; Youngblood, Brad; Del Rio, Carlos; Sawangkoon, Suwanakiet; Hamlin, Robert L; Kijtawornrat, Anusak

    2016-07-01

    Dronedarone is a multichannel blocking antiarrhythmic drug that has been used for management of atrial fibrillation in humans, but the data in veterinary medicine are inadequate. The objective of this study was to determine the short-term effects of oral dronedarone on cardiac inotropy and lusitropy, blood pressure and electrocardiogram (ECG) in healthy dogs. A total of 6 beagle dogs were instrumented with telemetry units and sono-micrometry crystals to obtain left ventricular pressure-volume relationship, mean blood pressure (MBP) and ECG. Dogs were given orally dronedarone (20 mg/kg, twice per day) for 7 days. All parameters were obtained hourly at 4-8 hr after the first dose and at 12-, 96- (day 4) and 168-hr (day 7) after dosing. The results showed that dronedarone had no effect on inotropy and lusitropy, while it significantly lengthened PQ interval (P<0.001) and lowered MBP (P<0.05). Dronedarone also tended to reduce cardiac output (P=0.237) and heart rate (P=0.057). These results suggested that short-term effects of oral dronedarone administration at a dose of 20 mg/kg, twice per day, produced negative dromotropy with minimal effect on cardiac function in conscious dogs. PMID:26922916

  18. Blood glucose management in the patient undergoing cardiac surgery: A review

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Pingle; Duggar, Brian; Butterworth, John

    2014-01-01

    Both diabetes mellitus and hyperglycemia per se are associated with negative outcomes after cardiac surgery. In this article, we review these associations, the possible mechanisms that lead to adverse outcomes, and the epidemiology of diabetes focusing on those patients requiring cardiac surgery. We also examine outpatient and perioperative management of diabetes with the same focus. Finally, we discuss our own efforts to improve glycemic management of patients undergoing cardiac surgery at our institution, including keys to success, results of implementation, and patient safety concerns. PMID:25429332

  19. Using high resolution cardiac CT data to model and visualize patient-specific interactions between trabeculae and blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kulp, Scott; Gao, Mingchen; Zhang, Shaoting; Qian, Zhen; Voros, Szilard; Metaxas, Dimitris; Axel, Leon

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method to simulate and visualize blood flow through the human heart, using the reconstructed 4D motion of the endocardial surface of the left ventricle as boundary conditions. The reconstruction captures the motion of the full 3D surfaces of the complex features, such as the papillary muscles and the ventricular trabeculae. We use visualizations of the flow field to view the interactions between the blood and the trabeculae in far more detail than has been achieved previously, which promises to give a better understanding of cardiac flow. Finally, we use our simulation results to compare the blood flow within one healthy heart and two diseased hearts. PMID:22003651

  20. The effect of intravenous epoprostenol (prostacyclin, PGI2) on cerebral blood flow and cardiac output in man.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, P J; Maidment, C G; Dandona, P; Hutton, R A; James, I M

    1983-01-01

    Epoprostenol (prostacyclin, PGI2) was given intravenously to seven healthy volunteers in a dose of 4 ng kg-1 min-1 over a 30 min period. Diastolic blood pressure fell but there was no change in cardiac output. The mean PGI2 concentration at the end of the infusion was 0.43 ng/ml (1.1 nM) and a significant inhibition of ADP-induced platelet aggregation occurred. Although obvious facial flushing occurred in all subjects and some subjects complained of headache, cerebral blood flow tended to fall. The results do not support the hypothesis that PGI2 acts as a physiological vasodilator involved in the homeostasis of normal cerebral blood flow. PMID:6362696

  1. [Twenty-four hour automatic recording of blood pressure and cardiac rhythm in patients with borderline hypertension].

    PubMed

    Cybulska, I; Popławska, W; Niegowska, J; Makowiecka-Cieśla, M; Kabat, M; Borowiecka, E; Sznajderman, M

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of 24-hour automatic recording of blood pressure and cardiac rhythm in patients with borderline hypertension. The study was performed in 50 patients aged 38.8 +/- 13.1 using the Del Mar Avionics device. Mean time of recordings was 21.3 hours, and the mean number of blood pressure measurements per one patient was 52.4. Great fluctuations of systolic blood pressure (from 92.1 +/- 12.6 to 191 +/- 37.0 mm Hg) and diastolic one (from 57.3 +/- 11.4 to 118.9 +/- 13.8 mm Hg) were observed. Mean systolic blood pressure (125.6 +/- 10.6 mm Hg) was significantly lower than the mean value of last three ambulatory measurements (141.9 +/- 9.8; p less than 0.001). Also mean diastolic pressure was lower than that obtained in the out patient clinic (84.7 +/- 9.7 vs 91.9 +/- 3.2 mm Hg; p less than 0.001). Mean heart rate during the day was 86.2 +/- 10.7 and at night 69.7 +/- 10.5 beats per minute. Ventricular and/or supraventricular cardiac arrhythmias were observed in 14 (28%) of examined patients. Results of the study indicate, that 24-hour automatic blood pressure recording is the valuable method, affording possibilities for more precise estimation of blood pressure and its 24-hour fluctuations in patients with borderline hypertension. PMID:2639977

  2. Pulmonary Hemorrhage: Imaging with a New Magnetic Resonance Blood Pool Agent in Conjunction with Breathheld Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Weishaupt, Dominik; Hilfiker, Paul R.; Schmidt, Michaela; Debatin, Joerg F.

    1999-07-15

    Purpose: To describe the three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography (3D MRA) imaging appearance of the pulmonary arteries following administration of a superparamagnetic iron oxide blood pool agent to human volunteers, and to demonstrate in an animal model (pigs) how this technique can be used to detect pulmonary parenchymal hemorrhage. Methods: Two volunteers were examined following the intravenous administration of a superparamagnetic iron oxide blood pool agent (NC100150 Injection, Nycomed Amersham Imaging, Wayne, PA, USA). T1-weighted 3D gradient recalled echo (GRE) image sets (TR/TE 5.1/1.4 msec, flip angle 30 deg.) were acquired breathheld over 24 sec. To assess the detectability of pulmonary bleeding with intravascular MR contrast, pulmonary parenchymal injuries were created in two animals under general anesthesia, and fast T1-weighted 3D GRE image sets collected before and after the injury. Results: Administration of the intravascular contrast in the two volunteers resulted in selective enhancement of the pulmonary vasculature permitting complete visualization and excellent delineation of central, segmental, and subsegmental arteries. Following iatrogenic injury in the two animals, pulmonary hemorrhage was readily detected on the 3D image sets. Conclusion: The data presented illustrate that ultrafast 3D GRE MR imaging in conjunction with an intravenously administered intravascular blood pool agent can be used to perform high-quality pulmonary MRA as well as to detect pulmonary hemorrhage.

  3. Blood flow dynamics of one cardiac cycle and relationship to mechanotransduction and trabeculation during heart looping

    PubMed Central

    Garita, Barbara; Jenkins, Michael W.; Han, Mingda; Zhou, Chao; VanAuker, Michael; Rollins, Andrew M.; Watanabe, Michiko; Fujimoto, J. G.

    2011-01-01

    Analyses of form-function relationships during heart looping are directly related to technological advances. Recent advances in four-dimensional optical coherence tomography (OCT) permit observations of cardiac dynamics at high-speed acquisition rates and high resolution. Real-time observation of the avian stage 13 looping heart reveals that interactions between the endocardial and myocardial compartments are more complex than previously depicted. Here we applied four-dimensional OCT to elucidate the relationships of the endocardium, myocardium, and cardiac jelly compartments in a single cardiac cycle during looping. Six cardiac levels along the longitudinal heart tube were each analyzed at 15 time points from diastole to systole. Using image analyses, the organization of mechanotransducing molecules, fibronectin, tenascin C, α-tubulin, and nonmuscle myosin II was correlated with specific cardiac regions defined by OCT data. Optical coherence microscopy helped to visualize details of cardiac architectural development in the embryonic mouse heart. Throughout the cardiac cycle, the endocardium was consistently oriented between the midline of the ventral floor of the foregut and the outer curvature of the myocardial wall, with multiple endocardial folds allowing high-volume capacities during filling. The cardiac area fractional shortening is much higher than previously published. The in vivo profile captured by OCT revealed an interaction of the looping heart with the extra-embryonic splanchnopleural membrane providing outside-in information. In summary, the combined dynamic and imaging data show the developing structural capacity to accommodate increasing flow and the mechanotransducing networks that organize to effectively facilitate formation of the trabeculated four-chambered heart. PMID:21239637

  4. Autologous blood donation in support of cardiac surgery: a preliminary report on a hospital-based autologous donor programme.

    PubMed

    Pinkerton, P H

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the success or otherwise of the introduction of an autologous blood programme in support of cardiac surgery in reducing patient exposure to allogeneic blood products and to assess the guideline of two units as the collection schedule for such patients. Sixty-six patients were enrolled in the programme provided they met defined clinical conditions and donated one, two or three units of blood at seven-day intervals, using isovolaemic conditions. One minor vasovagal adverse reaction was recorded. Of the 66 patients, 51 (77%) avoided allogeneic red cells and 42 (64%) received no allogeneic product. If each patient deposited two units, 51 (77%) would have required no allogeneic red cells; if three units were deposited, 57 (86%) patients would have required no allogeneic red cells, but 60 units would be surplus to requirements. Comparison of 52 patients for coronary artery bypass grafting who were autologous donors, with 130 patients undergoing the procedure before the availability of autologous blood, supports the suggestions that there is increased readiness to initiate transfusion of autologous blood and that exposure to allogeneic red cells is reduced. However, exposure to allogeneic products of all kinds is not reduced. It is concluded that the collection of two units of autologous blood is appropriate for most eligible patients and that this reduces exposure to allogeneic red cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7828248

  5. Clinically suspected acute myopericarditis with cardiac tamponade associated with peripheral blood eosinophilia presenting in early pregnancy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The clinical presentation of eosinophilic myocarditis may vary from asymptomatic to the manifestation of severe symptoms, including cardiac tamponade and arrhythmias. In pregnant patients with this condition, drugs must be used cautiously up to approximately the 4th month of pregnancy because drug use should be limited during the period of fetal organogenesis. Case presentation A 30-year-old Asian woman at 14 weeks of pregnancy with progressive malaise was hospitalized. The electrocardiogram revealed ST elevation and low QRS voltage. Echocardiography revealed massive pericardial effusion and myocardial swelling. A laboratory examination revealed an increase in her white blood cell count, with a predominance of neutrophils. Pericardial drainage was performed for relief of the cardiac tamponade. The pericardial effusion revealed an abundance of eosinophils. Subsequently, the peripheral blood eosinophil count began to rise, and the patient was clinically diagnosed with eosinophilic myopericarditis. The patient’s condition improved rapidly following the initiation of prednisolone treatment, and she finally delivered a full-term normal infant. Conclusions A patient with clinically suspected myopericarditis in the early stage of pregnancy who improved rapidly with pericardial drainage and prednisolone therapy, and successfully delivered a normal full-term infant; the diagnosis was made in the early stage of the disease, based on the detection of an abundance of eosinophils in the pericardial effusion preceding the subsequent development of peripheral blood eosinophilia. PMID:23668918

  6. Computational Modeling of Open-Irrigated Electrodes for Radiofrequency Cardiac Ablation Including Blood Motion-Saline Flow Interaction.

    PubMed

    González-Suárez, Ana; Berjano, Enrique; Guerra, Jose M; Gerardo-Giorda, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is a routine treatment for cardiac arrhythmias. During RFCA, the electrode-tissue interface temperature should be kept below 80 °C to avoid thrombus formation. Open-irrigated electrodes facilitate power delivery while keeping low temperatures around the catheter. No computational model of an open-irrigated electrode in endocardial RFCA accounting for both the saline irrigation flow and the blood motion in the cardiac chamber has been proposed yet. We present the first computational model including both effects at once. The model has been validated against existing experimental results. Computational results showed that the surface lesion width and blood temperature are affected by both the electrode design and the irrigation flow rate. Smaller surface lesion widths and blood temperatures are obtained with higher irrigation flow rate, while the lesion depth is not affected by changing the irrigation flow rate. Larger lesions are obtained with increasing power and the electrode-tissue contact. Also, larger lesions are obtained when electrode is placed horizontally. Overall, the computational findings are in close agreement with previous experimental results providing an excellent tool for future catheter research. PMID:26938638

  7. Computational Modeling of Open-Irrigated Electrodes for Radiofrequency Cardiac Ablation Including Blood Motion-Saline Flow Interaction

    PubMed Central

    González-Suárez, Ana; Berjano, Enrique; Guerra, Jose M.; Gerardo-Giorda, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is a routine treatment for cardiac arrhythmias. During RFCA, the electrode-tissue interface temperature should be kept below 80°C to avoid thrombus formation. Open-irrigated electrodes facilitate power delivery while keeping low temperatures around the catheter. No computational model of an open-irrigated electrode in endocardial RFCA accounting for both the saline irrigation flow and the blood motion in the cardiac chamber has been proposed yet. We present the first computational model including both effects at once. The model has been validated against existing experimental results. Computational results showed that the surface lesion width and blood temperature are affected by both the electrode design and the irrigation flow rate. Smaller surface lesion widths and blood temperatures are obtained with higher irrigation flow rate, while the lesion depth is not affected by changing the irrigation flow rate. Larger lesions are obtained with increasing power and the electrode-tissue contact. Also, larger lesions are obtained when electrode is placed horizontally. Overall, the computational findings are in close agreement with previous experimental results providing an excellent tool for future catheter research. PMID:26938638

  8. Plasma haemostatic markers, endothelial function and ambulatory blood pressure changes with home versus hospital cardiac rehabilitation: the Birmingham Rehabilitation Uptake Maximisation Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K W; Blann, A D; Jolly, K; Lip, G Y H

    2006-01-01

    Background Cardiac rehabilitation is an accepted therapeutic intervention in patients after myocardial infarction or coronary revascularisation. The effects of cardiac rehabilitation programmes, whether home based or hospital based, on haemostatic indices (as reflected by fibrinogen, plasma viscosity, fibrin D‐dimer (an index of thrombogenesis), von Willebrand factor (vWf, an index of endothelial damage/dysfunction), soluble P‐selectin (an index of platelet activation)), vasomotor function (using flow‐mediated dilatation (FMD)) and ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) in patients with coronary heart disease are unknown. Methods 81 patients (66 men, mean (SD) 59 (11) years) after myocardial infarction or coronary revascularisation were randomised to comprehensive hospital‐based (n = 40) or home‐based (n = 41) cardiac rehabilitation. Plasma levels of vWf, D‐dimer, fibrinogen, soluble P‐selectin and plasma viscosity, as well as FMD and 24‐h ABP, were measured at baseline and after 3 months of cardiac rehabilitation. Results In patients who completed cardiac rehabilitation, levels of vWf, fibrinogen and D‐dimer were significantly lower and FMD improved (all p⩽0.001), whereas levels were unchanged in controls. Significant reductions were also observed in 24‐h mean systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and mean aortic pressure after completion of cardiac rehabilitation (all p<0.05). No significant differences were observed between the hospital‐based and home‐based cardiac rehabilitation programmes on these indices. Conclusions Cardiac rehabilitation improves haemostasis, endothelial function and ABP in patients with coronary heart disease, with no significant differences between home‐based and hospital‐based cardiac rehabilitation programmes. These effects may contribute to the beneficial effects of cardiac rehabilitation programmes on CV outcomes. PMID:16807272

  9. Open-loop (feed-forward) and feedback control of coronary blood flow during exercise, cardiac pacing, and pressure changes.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Ranjan K; Feigl, Eric O; Gorman, Mark W; Brengelmann, George L; Beard, Daniel A

    2016-06-01

    A control system model was developed to analyze data on in vivo coronary blood flow regulation and to probe how different mechanisms work together to control coronary flow from rest to exercise, and under a variety of experimental conditions, including cardiac pacing and with changes in coronary arterial pressure (autoregulation). In the model coronary flow is determined by the combined action of a feedback pathway signal that is determined by the level of plasma ATP in coronary venous blood, an adrenergic open-loop (feed-forward) signal that increases with exercise, and a contribution of pressure-mediated myogenic control. The model was identified based on data from exercise experiments where myocardial oxygen extraction, coronary flow, cardiac interstitial norepinephrine concentration, and arterial and coronary venous plasma ATP concentrations were measured during control and during adrenergic and purinergic receptor blockade conditions. The identified model was used to quantify the relative contributions of open-loop and feedback pathways and to illustrate the degree of redundancy in the control of coronary flow. The results indicate that the adrenergic open-loop control component is responsible for most of the increase in coronary blood flow that occurs during high levels of exercise. However, the adenine nucleotide-mediated metabolic feedback control component is essential. The model was evaluated by predicting coronary flow in cardiac pacing and autoregulation experiments with reasonable fits to the data. The analysis shows that a model in which coronary venous plasma adenine nucleotides are a signal in local metabolic feedback control of coronary flow is consistent with the available data. PMID:27037372

  10. Correlation-based discrimination between cardiac tissue and blood for segmentation of the left ventricle in 3-D echocardiographic images.

    PubMed

    Saris, Anne E C M; Nillesen, Maartje M; Lopata, Richard G P; de Korte, Chris L

    2014-03-01

    For automated segmentation of 3-D echocardiographic images, incorporation of temporal information may be helpful. In this study, optimal settings for calculation of temporal cross-correlations between subsequent time frames were determined, to obtain the maximum cross-correlation (MCC) values that provided the best contrast between blood and cardiac tissue over the entire cardiac cycle. Both contrast and boundary gradient quality measures were assessed to optimize MCC values with respect to signal choice (radiofrequency or envelope data) and axial window size. Optimal MCC values were incorporated into a deformable model to automatically segment the left ventricular cavity. MCC values were tested against, and combined with, filtered, demodulated radiofrequency data. Results reveal that using envelope data in combination with a relatively small axial window (0.7-1.25 mm) at fine scale results in optimal contrast and boundary gradient between the two tissues over the entire cardiac cycle. Preliminary segmentation results indicate that incorporation of MCC values has additional value for automated segmentation of the left ventricle. PMID:24412178

  11. Functional properties of cells obtained from human cord blood CD34+ stem cells and mouse cardiac myocytes in coculture.

    PubMed

    Orlandi, Alessia; Pagani, Francesca; Avitabile, Daniele; Bonanno, Giuseppina; Scambia, Giovanni; Vigna, Elisa; Grassi, Francesca; Eusebi, Fabrizio; Fucile, Sergio; Pesce, Maurizio; Capogrossi, Maurizio C

    2008-04-01

    Prior in vitro studies suggested that different types of hematopoietic stem cells may differentiate into cardiomyocytes. The present work examined whether human CD34(+) cells from the human umbilical cord blood (hUCB), cocultured with neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes, acquire the functional properties of myocardial cells and express human cardiac genes. hUCB CD34(+) cells were cocultured onto cardiomyocytes following an infection with a lentivirus-encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). After 7 days, mononucleated EGFP(+) cells were tested for their electrophysiological features by patch clamp and for cytosolic [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)](i)) homeostasis by [Ca(2+)](i) imaging of X-rhod1-loaded cells. Human Nkx2.5 and GATA-4 expression was examined in cocultured cell populations by real-time RT-PCR. EGFP(+) cells were connected to surrounding cells by gap junctions, acquired electrophysiological properties similar to those of cardiomyocytes, and showed action potential-associated [Ca(2+)](i) transients. These cells also exhibited spontaneous sarcoplasmic reticulum [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations and the associated membrane potential depolarization. However, RT-PCR of both cell populations showed no upregulation of human-specific cardiac genes. In conclusion, under our experimental conditions, hUCB CD34(+) cells cocultured with murine cardiomyocytes formed cells that exhibited excitation-contraction coupling features similar to those of cardiomyocytes. However, the expression of human-specific cardiac genes was undetectable by RT-PCR. PMID:18223188

  12. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Delivery System Modulates Ischemic Cardiac Remodeling With an Increase of Coronary Artery Blood Flow.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Sook; Joo, Wan Seok; Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Sung Wan

    2016-04-01

    Ways for extending the longevity of stem cells are imperative to attain diverse expected therapeutic effects. Here, we constructed a three-dimentional (3D) scaffold system for human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) delivery. Intramyocardial injections of porous PEI1.8k blended with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) (PLGA/PEI1.8k) (PPP) microparticles by physical electrostatic conjugation and structural entrapment of hMSCs demonstrated enhanced functional and geometric improvements on post-infarct cardiac remodeling in rats. In the hMSC-loaded PPP delivery, increases of coronary artery blood flow rate and in vivo engraftment rate as well as time-dependent functional, geometric, and pathologic findings reversing post-infarct cardiac remodeling account for improved left ventricular (LV) systolic function up to the level of sham thoracotomy group. This study expands our understanding by proving that increase of coronary artery blood flow augmented functional recovery of hMSC-loaded PPP delivery system after myocardial infarction (MI). PMID:26782638

  13. Feasibility of measuring superior mesenteric artery blood flow during cardiac surgery under hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass using transesophageal echocardiography: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Naveen G.; Nagaraja, P. S.; Gopal, Divya; Manjunath, V.; Nagesh, K. S.; Manjunatha, N.; Patel, Guru Police; Mishra, Satish Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Abdominal complications being rare but results in high mortality, commonly due to splanchnic organ hypoperfusion during the perioperative period of cardiac surgery. There are no feasible methods to monitor intraoperative superior mesenteric artery blood flow (SMABF). Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and to measure SMABF using transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) during cardiac surgery under hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Methodology: Thirty-five patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery under CPB were enrolled. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO), SMABF, superior mesenteric artery (SMA) diameter, superior mesentric artery blood flow over cardiac output (SMA/CO) ratio and arterial blood lactates were recorded at three time intervals. T0: before sternotomy, T1: 30 min after initiation of CPB and T2: after sternal closure. Results: SMA was demonstrated in 32 patients. SMABF, SMA diameter, SMA/CO, MAP and CO decreased significantly (P < 0.0001) between T0 and T1, increased significantly (P ≤ 0.001) between T0 and T2. Lactates increased progressively from T0 to T2. Conclusion: Study shows that there is decrease in SMABF during CPB and returns to baseline after CPB. Hence, it is feasible to measure SMABF using TEE in patients undergoing cardiac surgery under hypothermic CPB. TEE can be a promising tool in detecting and preventing splanchnic hypoperfusion during perioperative period. PMID:27397442

  14. Rotational artifact in phase imaging of cardiac scans: potential pitfalls in diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.W.; Getchell, J.; Foster, J.E.; Salzman, L.; Plehn, J.

    1987-10-01

    In the past few years, we have occasionally observed linear bands in the phase images of gated cardiac blood-pool scans along the interventricular septum region among patients with normal septal motions. Our retrospective study investigated the cause of out-of-phase bands of 12 patients. We documented through review of cines, computer analysis of gated cardiac blood-pool scintigraphy data, and correlation with echocardiograms that this phenomenon was artifact introduced by rotational movements of the heart. It is important for nuclear physicians to recognize this rotational artifact on the phase analysis image in order to avoid the erroneous misdiagnosis of wall motion abnormalities of the septum.

  15. Synthesis, relaxation properties and in vivo assessment of a carborane-GdDOTA-monoamide conjugate as an MRI blood pool contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Lalit N; Cai, Quanyu; Ma, Lixin; Jalisatgi, Satish S; Hawthorne, M Frederick

    2015-09-01

    The synthesis, relaxivity measurements and in vivo assessment of a carborane-GdDOTA-monoamide (CB-GdDOTA-MA) amphiphilic conjugate as a blood pool contrast agent (BPCA) is reported. This BPCA exhibited excellent binding (87.4%) with human serum albumin (HSA) and showed a higher relaxivity value (r1 = 6.8 mM(-1) s(-1), 7 T) as compared to the clinically used BPCA, MS-325 (r1 = 5.1 mM(-1) s(-1), 9.4 T) in PBS. The blood pool contrast enhancement (CE) capability of CB-GdDOTA-MA was evaluated by performing MR angiography (MRA) in CF1 mice (n = 4) at a Gd dose of 0.1 mmol per kg body weight. The significant CE of blood vessels persisted for about 3-4 min post-injection (p.i.) and quickly diminishes over time. The significant CE of the bladder for up to 3 h p.i. indicated that the renal system is the primary clearance pathway for CB-GdDOTA-MA. However, the CE of liver tissues and intestine (up to 24 h p.i.) is suggestive of a significant hepatic uptake of the CB-GdDOTA-MA. PMID:26204958

  16. Redistribution of regional and organ blood volume and effect on cardiac function in relation to upright exercise intensity in healthy human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Flamm, S.D.; Taki, J.; Moore, R.; Lewis, S.F.; Keech, F.; Maltais, F.; Ahmad, M.; Callahan, R.; Dragotakes, S.; Alpert, N. )

    1990-05-01

    To determine the effect of relative exercise intensity on organ blood volume and its relation to cardiac function, changes in relative blood volume and cardiac function were monitored with radionuclide techniques in 14 healthy volunteers. After labeling the subject's red cells with technetium 99m, we acquired data at rest, zero-load cycling, and at 50%, 75%, and 100% of maximal oxygen uptake. From rest to zero-load cycling, leg blood volume decreased 32 +/- 2% (mean +/- SEM), whereas relative end-diastolic blood volume increased 9.6 +/- 1.2%, and lung blood volume increased 18 +/- 2%, suggesting that the lungs may act as a blood volume buffer during periods of acutely increased venous return. With relative increasing exercise, leg blood volume stabilized, and then the blood volume in the abdominal organs decreased, further augmenting cardiopulmonary blood volume; leg blood volume and abdominal blood volume decreased by 23 +/- 2% and 19 +/- 2% from baseline, respectively, whereas thoracic blood volume increased 38 +/- 4%. In the abdomen, large decreases in blood volume were observed in the spleen (46 +/- 2%), kidney (24 +/- 4%), and liver (18 +/- 4%). In contrast, lung blood volume increased 50 +/- 4%, with the upper lung fields increasing more than the lower. Blood sampling revealed an increase in the hematocrit level by 4.3 +/- 0.4 units at peak exercise that paralleled the decrease in splenic blood volume (r2 = -0.64, p less than 0.001), suggesting a role for the spleen in augmenting cardiovascular performance by the release of concentrated red blood cells into general circulation. We conclude that upright exercise results in marked blood volume shifts from the legs and abdominal organs to the heart and lungs in a dynamic process correlating closely with oxygen consumption.

  17. The effects of residual pump blood on patient plasma free haemoglobin levels post cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    H, Schotola; Aj, Wetz; Af, Popov; I, Bergmann; Bc, Danner; Fa, Schöndube; M, Bauer; A, Bräuer

    2016-09-01

    At the end of cardiopulmonary bypass, there are invariably several hundred millilitres of residual pump blood in the reservoir, which can either be re-transfused or discarded. The objective of this prospective observational study was to investigate the quality of the residual pump blood, focusing on plasma free haemoglobin (pfHb) and blood cell counts. Fifty-one consecutive patients were included in the study. Forty-nine units of residual pump blood and 58 units of transfused red blood cell (RBC) concentrates were analysed. The mean preoperative pfHb of the patients was 0.057 ± 0.062 g/l, which increased gradually to 0.55 ± 0.36 g/l on arrival in the intensive care unit postoperatively. On the first postoperative day, the mean pfHb had returned to within the normal range. Our data showed that haemoglobin, haematocrit, and erythrocyte counts of residual pump blood were approximately 40% of the values in standardised RBC concentrates. Plasma free haemoglobin was significantly higher in residual pump blood compared to RBC concentrates, and nearly twice as high as the pfHb in patient blood samples taken contemporaneously. Our findings indicate that residual pump blood pfHb levels are markedly higher compared to patients' blood and RBC concentrates, but that its administration does not significantly increase patients' pfHb levels. PMID:27608341

  18. Swimming Pools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Housing and Local Government, London (England).

    Technical and engineering data are set forth on the design and construction of swimming pools. Consideration is given to site selection, pool construction, the comparative merits of combining open air and enclosed pools, and alternative uses of the pool. Guidelines are presented regarding--(1) pool size and use, (2) locker and changing rooms, (3)…

  19. Magnetic Particle / Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In-Vitro MPI-Guided Real Time Catheter Tracking and 4D Angioplasty Using a Road Map and Blood Pool Tracer Approach

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Caroline; Kaul, Michael Gerhard; Werner, Franziska; Them, Kolja; Reimer, Rudolph; Nielsen, Peter; vom Scheidt, Annika; Adam, Gerhard; Knopp, Tobias; Ittrich, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In-vitro evaluation of the feasibility of 4D real time tracking of endovascular devices and stenosis treatment with a magnetic particle imaging (MPI) / magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) road map approach and an MPI-guided approach using a blood pool tracer. Materials and Methods A guide wire and angioplasty-catheter were labeled with a thin layer of magnetic lacquer. For real time MPI a custom made software framework was developed. A stenotic vessel phantom filled with saline or superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MM4) was equipped with bimodal fiducial markers for co-registration in preclinical 7T MRI and MPI. In-vitro angioplasty was performed inflating the balloon with saline or MM4. MPI data were acquired using a field of view of 37.3×37.3×18.6 mm3 and a frame rate of 46 volumes/sec. Analysis of the magnetic lacquer-marks on the devices were performed with electron microscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry and micro-computed tomography. Results Magnetic marks allowed for MPI/MRI guidance of interventional devices. Bimodal fiducial markers enable MPI/MRI image fusion for MRI based roadmapping. MRI roadmapping and the blood pool tracer approach facilitate MPI real time monitoring of in-vitro angioplasty. Successful angioplasty was verified with MPI and MRI. Magnetic marks consist of micrometer sized ferromagnetic plates mainly composed of iron and iron oxide. Conclusions 4D real time MP imaging, tracking and guiding of endovascular instruments and in-vitro angioplasty is feasible. In addition to an approach that requires a blood pool tracer, MRI based roadmapping might emerge as a promising tool for radiation free 4D MPI-guided interventions. PMID:27249022

  20. The Importance of Intraoperative Selenium Blood Levels on Organ Dysfunction in Patients Undergoing Off-Pump Cardiac Surgery: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Stevanovic, Ana; Coburn, Mark; Menon, Ares; Rossaint, Rolf; Heyland, Daren; Schälte, Gereon; Werker, Thilo; Wonisch, Willibald; Kiehntopf, Michael; Goetzenich, Andreas; Rex, Steffen; Stoppe, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac surgery is accompanied by an increase of oxidative stress, a significantly reduced antioxidant (AOX) capacity, postoperative inflammation, all of which may promote the development of organ dysfunction and an increase in mortality. Selenium is an essential co-factor of various antioxidant enzymes. We hypothesized a less pronounced decrease of circulating selenium levels in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) surgery due to less intraoperative oxidative stress. Methods In this prospective randomised, interventional trial, 40 patients scheduled for elective coronary artery bypass grafting were randomly assigned to undergo either on-pump or OPCAB-surgery, if both techniques were feasible for the single patient. Clinical data, myocardial damage assessed by myocard specific creatine kinase isoenzyme (CK-MB), circulating whole blood levels of selenium, oxidative stress assessed by asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) levels, antioxidant capacity determined by glutathionperoxidase (GPx) levels and perioperative inflammation represented by interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were measured at predefined perioperative time points. Results At end of surgery, both groups showed a comparable decrease of circulating selenium concentrations. Likewise, levels of oxidative stress and IL-6 were comparable in both groups. Selenium levels correlated with antioxidant capacity (GPx: r = 0.720; p<0.001) and showed a negative correlation to myocardial damage (CK-MB: r = −0.571, p<0.001). Low postoperative selenium levels had a high predictive value for the occurrence of any postoperative complication. Conclusions OPCAB surgery is not associated with less oxidative stress and a better preservation of the circulating selenium pool than on-pump surgery. Low postoperative selenium levels are predictive for the development of complications. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01409057 PMID:25118980

  1. Evaluation of right and left ventricular function by quantitative blood-pool SPECT (QBS): comparison with conventional methods and quantitative gated SPECT (QGS).

    PubMed

    Odagiri, Keiichi; Wakabayashi, Yasushi; Tawarahara, Kei; Kurata, Chinori; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Hideharu

    2006-10-01

    Though quantitative ECG-gated blood-pool SPECT (QBS) has become a popular tool in research settings, more verification is necessary for its utilization in clinical medicine. To evaluate the reliability of the measurements of left and right ventricular functions with QBS, we performed QBS, as well as first-pass pool (FPP) and ECG-gated blood-pool (GBP) studies on planar images in 41 patients and 8 healthy volunteers. Quantitative ECG-gated myocardial perfusion SPECT (QGS) was also performed in 30 of 49 subjects. First, we assessed the reproducibility of the measurements of left and right ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, RVEF) and left and right ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV, RVEDV) with QBS. Second, LVEF and RVEF obtained from QBS were compared with those from FPP and GBP, respectively. Third, LVEF and LVEDV obtained from QBS were compared with those from QGS, respectively. The intra- and inter-observer reproducibilities were excellent for LVEF, LVEDV, RVEF and RVEDV measured with QBS (r = 0.88 to 0.96, p < 0.01), while the biases in the measurements of RVEF and RVEDV were relatively large. LVEF obtained from QBS correlated significantly with those from FPP and GBP, while RVEF from QBS did not. LVEF and LVEDV obtained from QBS were significantly correlated with those from QGS, but the regression lines were not close to the lines of identity. In conclusion, the measurements of LVEF and LVEDV with QBS have good reproducibility and are useful clinically, while those of RVEF and RVEDV are less useful compared with LVEF and LVEDV. The algorithm of QBS for the measurements of RVEF and RVEDV remains to be improved. PMID:17134018

  2. Influence of a hyperlipidic diet on the composition of the non-membrane lipid pool of red blood cells of male and female rats

    PubMed Central

    Remesar, Xavier; Antelo, Arantxa; Llivina, Clàudia; Albà, Emma; Berdié, Lourdes; Agnelli, Silvia; Arriarán, Sofía; Fernández-López, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives. Red blood cells (RBC) are continuously exposed to oxidative agents, affecting their membrane lipid function. However, the amount of lipid in RBCs is higher than the lipids of the cell membrane, and includes triacylglycerols, which are no membrane components. We assumed that the extra lipids originated from lipoproteins attached to the cell surface, and we intended to analyse whether the size and composition of this lipid pool were affected by sex or diet. Experimental design. Adult male and female Wistar rats were fed control or cafeteria diets. Packed blood cells and plasma lipids were extracted and analysed for fatty acids by methylation and GC-MS, taking care of not extracting membrane lipids. Results. The absence of ω3-PUFA in RBC extracts (but not in plasma) suggest that the lipids extracted were essentially those in the postulated lipid surface pool and not those in cell membrane. In cells’ extracts, there was a marked depletion of PUFA (and, in general, of insaturation). Fatty acid patterns were similar for all groups studied, with limited effects of sex and no effects of diet in RBC (but not in plasma) fatty acids. Presence of trans fatty acids was small but higher in RBC lipids, and could not be justified by dietary sources. Conclusions. The presence of a small layer of lipid on the RBC surface may limit oxidative damage to the cell outer structures, and help explain its role in the transport of lipophilic compounds. However, there may be other, so far uncovered, additional functions for this lipid pool. PMID:26213652

  3. Influence of a hyperlipidic diet on the composition of the non-membrane lipid pool of red blood cells of male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Remesar, Xavier; Antelo, Arantxa; Llivina, Clàudia; Albà, Emma; Berdié, Lourdes; Agnelli, Silvia; Arriarán, Sofía; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Alemany, Marià

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives. Red blood cells (RBC) are continuously exposed to oxidative agents, affecting their membrane lipid function. However, the amount of lipid in RBCs is higher than the lipids of the cell membrane, and includes triacylglycerols, which are no membrane components. We assumed that the extra lipids originated from lipoproteins attached to the cell surface, and we intended to analyse whether the size and composition of this lipid pool were affected by sex or diet. Experimental design. Adult male and female Wistar rats were fed control or cafeteria diets. Packed blood cells and plasma lipids were extracted and analysed for fatty acids by methylation and GC-MS, taking care of not extracting membrane lipids. Results. The absence of ω3-PUFA in RBC extracts (but not in plasma) suggest that the lipids extracted were essentially those in the postulated lipid surface pool and not those in cell membrane. In cells' extracts, there was a marked depletion of PUFA (and, in general, of insaturation). Fatty acid patterns were similar for all groups studied, with limited effects of sex and no effects of diet in RBC (but not in plasma) fatty acids. Presence of trans fatty acids was small but higher in RBC lipids, and could not be justified by dietary sources. Conclusions. The presence of a small layer of lipid on the RBC surface may limit oxidative damage to the cell outer structures, and help explain its role in the transport of lipophilic compounds. However, there may be other, so far uncovered, additional functions for this lipid pool. PMID:26213652

  4. Cardiac and blood pressure responses to mental stress in reactive hypertensives.

    PubMed

    Pannarale, G; Isea, J E; Coats, A J; Conway, J; Sleight, P

    1991-01-01

    To study the haemodynamic response to a standardized mental stress, we measured ascending aorta velocity using Doppler ultrasonography in 20 reactive ("white-coat") hypertensives and 20 age and sex matched normal controls (NC) familiar with the hospital setting. Reactive hypertensives (RH) had 3 office diastolic BP recordings between 90-110 mmHg and ambulatory BP less than 140/90 mmHg. The cardiac response to mental arithmetic was greater in RH than NC (minute distance, RH: +36.7 +/- 40.2% vs NC: +10.3 +/- 19%, p less than 0.05; peak velocity, RH: +8.4 +/- 16.5% vs NC: -1.4 +/- 11.9%, p less than 0.05), and there was a different peripheral resistance response (RH: -12.2 +/- 24.2% vs NC: +6.5 +/- 22%, p less than 0.05). We suggest that subjects with reactive hypertension have a strong cardiac response to mental stress and this could be a characteristic of this condition. PMID:2022068

  5. Olmesartan Inhibits Cardiac Hypertrophy in Mice Overexpressing Renin Independently of Blood Pressure: Its Beneficial Effects on ACE2/Ang(1-7)/Mas Axis and NADPH Oxidase Expression.

    PubMed

    Tanno, Tomohiro; Tomita, Hirofumi; Narita, Ikuyo; Kinjo, Takahiko; Nishizaki, Kimitaka; Ichikawa, Hiroaki; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Makoto; Osanai, Tomohiro; Okumura, Ken

    2016-06-01

    Enhanced renin-angiotensin activity causes hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. The angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme (ACE)2/Ang(1-7)/Mas axis pathway functions against Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) signaling. We investigated whether olmesartan (Olm), an AT1R blocker, inhibits cardiac hypertrophy independently of blood pressure, and evaluated the potential mechanisms. The 3- to 4-month-old male mice overexpressing renin in the liver (Ren-Tg) were given Olm (5 mg/kg/d) and hydralazine (Hyd) (3.5 mg/kg/d) orally for 2 months. Systolic blood pressure was higher in the Ren-Tg mice than in wild-type littermates. Olm and Hyd treatments lowered systolic blood pressure to the same degree. However, cardiac hypertrophy, evaluated by echocardiography, heart weight, cross-sectional area of cardiomyocytes, and gene expression, was inhibited by only Olm treatment, but not by Hyd. Olm treatment reversed decreased gene expressions of ACE2 and Mas receptor of Ren-Tg mice and inhibited enhanced NADPH oxidase (Nox)4 expression and reactive oxygen species, whereas Hyd treatment had no influence on them. These findings indicate that Olm treatment inhibits cardiac hypertrophy independently of blood pressure, not only through its original AT1R blockade but partly through enhancement of ACE2/Ang(1-7)/Mas axis and suppression of Nox4 expression. PMID:26886190

  6. Beat-by-beat analysis of cardiac output and blood pressure responses to short-term barostimulation in different body positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, Wulf; Schütze, Harald; Stegemann, J.

    Rapid quantification of the human baro-reflex control of heart rate has been achieved on a beat-by-beat basis using a neck-chamber with quick ECG-triggered pressure changes. Referring to recent findings on heart rate and stroke volume, the present study uses this technique to compare cardiac output as well as blood pressure changes in supine and upright position to investigate feedback effects and to confirm postural reflex modifications not revealed by RR-interval changes. A suction profile starting at +40 mmHg and running 7 steps of pressure decrease down to -65 mmHg was examined in 0° and 90° tilting position while beat-by-beat recordings were done of heart rate, stroke volume (impedance-cardiography) and blood pressure (Finapres tm) (n=16). The percentual heart rate decrease failed to be significantly different between positions. A suction-induced stroke volume increase led to a cardiac output almost maintained when supine and significantly increased when upright. A decrease in all blood pressure values was found during suction, except for systolic values in upright position which increased. Conclusively, (a) it is confirmed that different inotropy accounts for the seen gravitational effect on the cardiac output not represented by heart rate; (b) identical suction levels in different positions lead to different stimuli at the carotid receptor. This interference has to be considered in microgravity studies by beat-by-beat measurement of cardiac output and blood pressure.

  7. The effect of changes in cardiac output on middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity at rest and during exercise

    PubMed Central

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Brothers, R Matthew; Barnes, Quinton; Eubank, Wendy L; Hawkins, Megan N; Purkayastha, Sushmita; O-Yurvati, Albert; Raven, Peter B

    2005-01-01

    We examined the relationship between changes in cardiac output and middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA Vmean) in seven healthy volunteer men at rest and during 50% maximal oxygen uptake steady-state submaximal cycling exercise. Reductions in were accomplished using lower body negative pressure (LBNP), while increases in were accomplished using infusions of 25% human serum albumin. Heart rate (HR), arterial blood pressure and MCA Vmean were continuously recorded. At each stage of LBNP and albumin infusion was measured using an acetylene rebreathing technique. Arterial blood samples were analysed for partial pressure of carbon dioxide tension (Pa,CO2. During exercise HR and were increased above rest (P < 0.001), while neither MCA Vmean nor Pa,CO2 was altered (P > 0.05). The MCA Vmean and were linearly related at rest (P < 0.001) and during exercise (P = 0.035). The slope of the regression relationship between MCA Vmean and at rest was greater (P = 0.035) than during exercise. In addition, the phase and gain between MCA Vmean and mean arterial pressure in the low frequency range were not altered from rest to exercise indicating that the cerebral autoregulation was maintained. These data suggest that the associated with the changes in central blood volume influence the MCA Vmean at rest and during exercise and its regulation is independent of cerebral autoregulation. It appears that the exercise induced sympathoexcitation and the change in the distribution of between the cerebral and the systemic circulation modifies the relationship between MCA Vmean and . PMID:16210355

  8. In utero intra-cardiac tomato-lectin injections on mouse embryos to gauge renal blood flow.

    PubMed

    Rymer, Christopher C; Sims-Lucas, Sunder

    2015-01-01

    The formation and perfusion of developing renal blood vessels (apart from glomeruli) are greatly understudied. As vasculature develops via angiogenesis (which is the branching off of major vessels) and vasculogenesis (de novo vessel formation), perfusion mapping techniques such as resin casts, in vivo ultrasound imaging, and micro-dissection have been limited in demonstrating the intimate relationships between these two processes and developing renal structures within the embryo. Here, we describe the procedure of in utero intra-cardiac ultrasound-guided FITC-labeled tomato lectin microinjections on mouse embryos to gauge the ontogeny of renal perfusion. Tomato lectin (TL) was perfused throughout the embryo and kidneys harvested. Tissues were co-stained for various kidney structures including: nephron progenitors, nephron structures, ureteric epithelium, and vasculature. Starting at E13.5 large caliber vessels were perfused, however peripheral vessels remained unperfused. By E15.5 and E17.5, small peripheral vessels as well as glomeruli started to become perfused. This experimental technique is critical for studying the role of vasculature and blood flow during embryonic development. PMID:25741893

  9. In Utero Intra-cardiac Tomato-lectin Injections on Mouse Embryos to Gauge Renal Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Rymer, Christopher C.; Sims-Lucas, Sunder

    2016-01-01

    The formation and perfusion of developing renal blood vessels (apart from glomeruli) are greatly understudied. As vasculature develops via angiogenesis (which is the branching off of major vessels) and vasculogenesis (de novo vessel formation), perfusion mapping techniques such as resin casts, in vivo ultrasound imaging, and micro-dissection have been limited in demonstrating the intimate relationships between these two processes and developing renal structures within the embryo. Here, we describe the procedure of in utero intra-cardiac ultrasound-guided FITC-labeled tomato lectin microinjections on mouse embryos to gauge the ontogeny of renal perfusion. Tomato lectin (TL) was perfused throughout the embryo and kidneys harvested. Tissues were co-stained for various kidney structures including: nephron progenitors, nephron structures, ureteric epithelium, and vasculature. Starting at E13.5 large caliber vessels were perfused, however peripheral vessels remained unperfused. By E15.5 and E17.5, small peripheral vessels as well as glomeruli started to become perfused. This experimental technique is critical for studying the role of vasculature and blood flow during embryonic development. PMID:25741893

  10. Evidence of an association between cardiac-locomotor synchronization and lower leg muscle blood perfusion during walking

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Shinta; Nishida, Yusuke; Mizushima, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the occurrence of cardiac-locomotor synchronization (CLS) improves lower leg muscle blood perfusion during walking. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven healthy men were studied while performing two treadmill protocols. The CLS protocol involved subjects walking at the frequency of their heart rate (HR) to induce CLS. The free protocol (reference) involved subjects walking at a self-selected cadence. The treadmill load was identical in the two protocols. Electrocardiographic signals for HR, foot switch signals for step rate and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) signals for total haemoglobin (total Hb) in the lower leg muscles were measured continuously for 10 min after HR reached a steady state. [Results] The mean HR and mean step rate did not differ between the CLS and free protocols. However, total Hb was significantly higher in the CLS protocol than in the free protocol. The rate of increase in total Hb positively correlated with the strength of CLS. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the occurrence of CLS enhances lower leg muscle blood perfusion by increasing the strength of CLS during walking. PMID:26180328

  11. Cardiac Reactivity and Elevated Blood Pressure Levels among Young African Americans: The Importance of Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Ivor Lensworth; Marshall, Ronald J.

    1990-01-01

    Explores the racial differences in elevated arterial blood pressure between African American youth, especially adolescents, and their White counterparts. Argues that African American adolescents' perception of day-to-day stress is an important contributor to this condition. Considers a conceptual model of the sociopsychophysiological stress…

  12. Validation of Perfusion Quantification with 3D Gradient Echo Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using a Blood Pool Contrast Agent in Skeletal Swine Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hindel, Stefan; Sauerbrey, Anika; Maaß, Marc; Maderwald, Stefan; Schlamann, Marc; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to validate perfusion quantification in a low-perfused tissue by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) with shared k-space sampling using a blood pool contrast agent. Perfusion measurements were performed in a total of seven female pigs. An ultrasonic Doppler probe was attached to the right femoral artery to determine total flow in the hind leg musculature. The femoral artery was catheterized for continuous local administration of adenosine to increase blood flow up to four times the baseline level. Three different stable perfusion levels were induced. The MR protocol included a 3D gradient-echo sequence with a temporal resolution of approximately 1.5 seconds. Before each dynamic sequence, static MR images were acquired with flip angles of 5°, 10°, 20°, and 30°. Both static and dynamic images were used to generate relaxation rate and baseline magnetization maps with a flip angle method. 0.1 mL/kg body weight of blood pool contrast medium was injected via a central venous catheter at a flow rate of 5 mL/s. The right hind leg was segmented in 3D into medial, cranial, lateral, and pelvic thigh muscles, lower leg, bones, skin, and fat. The arterial input function (AIF) was measured in the aorta. Perfusion of the different anatomic regions was calculated using a one- and a two-compartment model with delay- and dispersion-corrected AIFs. The F-test for model comparison was used to decide whether to use the results of the one- or two-compartment model fit. Total flow was calculated by integrating volume-weighted perfusion values over the whole measured region. The resulting values of delay, dispersion, blood volume, mean transit time, and flow were all in physiologically and physically reasonable ranges. In 107 of 160 ROIs, the blood signal was separated, using a two-compartment model, into a capillary and an arteriolar signal contribution, decided by the F-test. Overall flow in hind leg muscles, as measured by the

  13. Validation of Perfusion Quantification with 3D Gradient Echo Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using a Blood Pool Contrast Agent in Skeletal Swine Muscle.

    PubMed

    Hindel, Stefan; Sauerbrey, Anika; Maaß, Marc; Maderwald, Stefan; Schlamann, Marc; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to validate perfusion quantification in a low-perfused tissue by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) with shared k-space sampling using a blood pool contrast agent. Perfusion measurements were performed in a total of seven female pigs. An ultrasonic Doppler probe was attached to the right femoral artery to determine total flow in the hind leg musculature. The femoral artery was catheterized for continuous local administration of adenosine to increase blood flow up to four times the baseline level. Three different stable perfusion levels were induced. The MR protocol included a 3D gradient-echo sequence with a temporal resolution of approximately 1.5 seconds. Before each dynamic sequence, static MR images were acquired with flip angles of 5°, 10°, 20°, and 30°. Both static and dynamic images were used to generate relaxation rate and baseline magnetization maps with a flip angle method. 0.1 mL/kg body weight of blood pool contrast medium was injected via a central venous catheter at a flow rate of 5 mL/s. The right hind leg was segmented in 3D into medial, cranial, lateral, and pelvic thigh muscles, lower leg, bones, skin, and fat. The arterial input function (AIF) was measured in the aorta. Perfusion of the different anatomic regions was calculated using a one- and a two-compartment model with delay- and dispersion-corrected AIFs. The F-test for model comparison was used to decide whether to use the results of the one- or two-compartment model fit. Total flow was calculated by integrating volume-weighted perfusion values over the whole measured region. The resulting values of delay, dispersion, blood volume, mean transit time, and flow were all in physiologically and physically reasonable ranges. In 107 of 160 ROIs, the blood signal was separated, using a two-compartment model, into a capillary and an arteriolar signal contribution, decided by the F-test. Overall flow in hind leg muscles, as measured by the

  14. Low toxicity and long circulation time of Polyampholyte-coated magnetic nanoparticles for blood pool contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Shen, Ming; Zhao, Tao; Xu, Yuanyuan; Lin, Jiang; Duan, Yourong; Gu, Hongchen

    2015-01-01

    Polyampholyte-coated (poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)-co-3-(diethylamino)-propylamine (DEAPA)) magnetite nanoparticles (PAMNPs) have been prepared as contrasting agent used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Excellent biocompatibility is required for contrasting agents used in high-resolution magnetic resonance angiography. To evaluate the biocompatibility of PAMNPs, some experiments have been conducted. The hemolysis, plasma recalcification, dynamic blood clotting, prothrombin time, inflammatory cytokine release and complement system activation assays were carried out to investigate the hemocompatibility. To evaluate the toxicity to vessel, MTT test and vascular irritation tests were conducted. Tissue toxicity test was also performed to investigate the biocompability in vivo. We also looked into the biodistribution. The results showed that PAMNPs at the working concentration (0.138 mM) present similar hemocompatibility with negative control, thus have no significant effect to vessels. PAMNPs were mainly distributed in the liver and the blood. The circulation time in blood was considerably long, with the half-time of 3.77 h in plasma. This property is advantageous for PAMNPs' use in angiography. PAMNPs could be metabolized rapidly in mice and were not observed to cause any toxic or adverse effect. In short, these results suggest that the PAMNPs have great potential to serve as safe contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

  15. Low toxicity and long circulation time of Polyampholyte-coated magnetic nanoparticles for blood pool contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Shen, Ming; Zhao, Tao; Xu, Yuanyuan; Lin, Jiang; Duan, Yourong; Gu, Hongchen

    2015-01-01

    Polyampholyte-coated (poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)-co-3-(diethylamino)-propylamine (DEAPA)) magnetite nanoparticles (PAMNPs) have been prepared as contrasting agent used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Excellent biocompatibility is required for contrasting agents used in high-resolution magnetic resonance angiography. To evaluate the biocompatibility of PAMNPs, some experiments have been conducted. The hemolysis, plasma recalcification, dynamic blood clotting, prothrombin time, inflammatory cytokine release and complement system activation assays were carried out to investigate the hemocompatibility. To evaluate the toxicity to vessel, MTT test and vascular irritation tests were conducted. Tissue toxicity test was also performed to investigate the biocompability in vivo. We also looked into the biodistribution. The results showed that PAMNPs at the working concentration (0.138 mM) present similar hemocompatibility with negative control, thus have no significant effect to vessels. PAMNPs were mainly distributed in the liver and the blood. The circulation time in blood was considerably long, with the half-time of 3.77 h in plasma. This property is advantageous for PAMNPs' use in angiography. PAMNPs could be metabolized rapidly in mice and were not observed to cause any toxic or adverse effect. In short, these results suggest that the PAMNPs have great potential to serve as safe contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PMID:25585607

  16. Cardiac hypertrophy and telemetered blood pressure 6 wk after baroreceptor denervation in normotensive rats.

    PubMed

    Van Vliet, B N; Hu, L; Scott, T; Chafe, L; Montani, J P

    1996-12-01

    We investigated cardiac morphometry 6 wk after sinoaortic baroreceptor denervation (SAD) in Long-Evans rats. SAD (n = 19) was associated with an 11% increase in the weight of the left ventricle (LV) plus septum (P < 0.001) and a 39% increase in that of the right ventricular (RV) free wall (P < 0.001), relative to sham-operated rats (n = 18). RV wall thickness was significantly increased in SAD animals, but there was no difference in the LV wall thickness and volumes of the RV and LV between groups. Constrictor responses to methoxamine and dilation responses to acetylcholine were assessed in an in vitro perfused mesenteric circulation preparation, but neither response was affected by SAD. Baroreceptor denervation was associated with marked and significant increases in the variability (2.8-fold) and daily peak (39 mmHg) levels of telemetered mean arterial pressure (MAP) and small (5%) but significant increases in the daily mean MAP level. Our results are consistent with an effect of increased MAP variability on ventricular weight but cannot rule out possible contributions from other mechanisms. PMID:8997380

  17. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red blood cells (RBC) deliver oxygen from your lungs to your tissues and organs. White blood cells (WBC) fight infection and are part of your ...

  18. Improved red blood cell survival after cardiac operations with administration of urea during cardiopulmonary bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.; Bake, B.; William-Olsson, G.

    1985-01-01

    The plasma hemoglobin and red blood cell survival (half-life of /sup 51/Cr) was studied in 48 patients undergoing single valve replacement or coronary artery bypass graft. Urea or placebo was administered during cardiopulmonary bypass in a prospective, randomized, double-blind manner to test the potential effect on mechanical hemolysis. The mean plasma hemoglobin level at the end of extracorporeal circulation was significantly lower in the urea-treated groups (coronary artery bypass 342 mg/L; valve replacement 364 mg/L) than in the control groups (coronary artery bypass 635 mg/L, valve replacement 518 mg/L. The half-life of /sup 51/Cr was significantly longer in the urea-treated patients (coronary artery bypass 18 days; valve replacement 16 days) than in the control groups (coronary artery bypass 12.4 days; valve replacement 12.7 days) but still below the normal reference value (29 +/- 4 days). The plasma hemoglobin returned to near normal values (50 mg/L) the day after operation (day 1) and remained low with no differences between control and urea-treated groups. The total blood hemoglobin was followed for 2 weeks after operation and showed significantly less anemia in the urea-treated group. The lowest mean blood hemoglobin level was noted between days 5 and 9-114 (coronary artery bypass) and 107 (valve replacement) gm/L in the urea-treated patients compared to 92.3 gm/L in the control subjects. The reduction in the severity of the anemia led to less transfusion in the urea-treated patients (approximately 0.5 unit/patient) than in the control subjects (approximately 1 unit/patient) between days 3 and 14.

  19. Longer red blood cell storage duration is associated with increased post-operative infections in pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cholette, Jill M.; Pietropaoli, Anthony P.; Henrichs, Kelly F.; Alfieris, George M.; Powers, Karen S.; Phipps, Richard; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Swartz, Michael; Gensini, Francisco; Daugherty, L. Eugene; Nazarian, Emily; Rubenstein, Jeffrey S.; Sweeney, Dawn; Eaton, Michael; Blumberg, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Background Infants and children undergoing open heart surgery routinely require multiple red blood cell (RBC) transfusions. Children receiving greater numbers of RBC transfusions have increased post-operative complications and mortality. Longer RBC storage age is also associated with increased morbidity and mortality in critically ill children. Whether the association of increased transfusions and worse outcomes can be ameliorated by use of fresh RBCs in pediatric cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease is unknown. Methods 128 consecutively transfused children undergoing repair or palliation of congenital heart disease with cardiopulmonary bypass who were participating in a randomized trial of washed v. standard RBC transfusions were evaluated for an association of RBC storage age and clinical outcomes. To avoid confounding with dose of transfusions and timing of infection versus timing of transfusion, a subgroup analysis of patients only transfused 1–2 units on the day of surgery was performed. Results Mortality was low (4.9%) with no association between RBC storage duration and survival. The post-operative infection rate was significantly higher in children receiving the oldest blood (25–38 days) compared to those receiving the freshest RBCs (7–15 days); (34% v. 7%; p = 0.004). Subgroup analysis of subjects receiving only 1–2 RBC transfusions on the day of surgery (n=74) also demonstrates a greater incidence of infections in subjects receiving the oldest RBC units [0 of 33 (0%) with 7–15 day storage, 1 of 21 (5%) with 16–24 day storage and 4 of 20 (20%) with 25–38 day storage; (p=0.01)]. In multivariate analysis, RBC storage age and corticosteroid administration were the only predictors of post-operative infection. Washing the oldest RBCs (>27 days) was associated with a higher infection rate and increased morbidity compared with unwashed RBCs. Discussion Longer RBC storage duration was associated with increased postoperative nosocomial

  20. Functional Flow Patterns and Static Blood Pooling in Tumors Revealed by Combined Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bar-Zion, Avinoam; Yin, Melissa; Adam, Dan; Foster, F Stuart

    2016-08-01

    Alterations in tumor perfusion and microenvironment have been shown to be associated with aggressive cancer phenotypes, raising the need for noninvasive methods of tracking these changes. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCEUS) and photoacoustic (PA) imaging serve as promising candidates-one has the ability to measure tissue perfusion, whereas the other can be used to monitor tissue oxygenation and hemoglobin concentration. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the different functional parameters measured with DCEUS and PA imaging, using two morphologically different hind-limb tumor models and drug-induced alterations in an orthotopic breast tumor model. Imaging results showed some correlation between perfusion and oxygen saturation maps and the ability to sensitively monitor antivascular treatment. In addition, DCEUS measurements revealed different vascular densities in the core of specific tumors compared with their rims. Noncorrelated perfusion and hemoglobin concentration measurements facilitated discrimination between blood lakes and necrotic areas. Taken together, our results illustrate the utility of a combined contrast-enhanced ultrasound method with photoacoustic imaging to visualize blood flow patterns in tumors. Cancer Res; 76(15); 4320-31. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27325651

  1. Cardiac-Gated En Face Doppler Measurement of Retinal Blood Flow Using Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography at 100,000 Axial Scans per Second

    PubMed Central

    Lee, ByungKun; Choi, WooJhon; Liu, Jonathan J.; Lu, Chen D.; Schuman, Joel S.; Wollstein, Gadi; Duker, Jay S.; Waheed, Nadia K.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To develop and demonstrate a cardiac gating method for repeatable in vivo measurement of total retinal blood flow (TRBF) in humans using en face Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) at commercially available imaging speeds. Methods. A prototype swept-source OCT system operating at 100-kHz axial scan rate was developed and interfaced with a pulse oximeter. Using the plethysmogram measured from the earlobe, Doppler OCT imaging of a 1.5- × 2-mm area at the optic disc at 1.8 volumes/s was synchronized to cardiac cycle to improve sampling of pulsatile blood flow. Postprocessing algorithms were developed to achieve fully automatic calculation of TRBF. We evaluated the repeatability of en face Doppler OCT measurement of TRBF in 10 healthy young subjects using three methods: measurement at 100 kHz with asynchronous acquisition, measurement at 100 kHz with cardiac-gated acquisition, and a control measurement using a 400-kHz instrument with asynchronous acquisition. Results. The median intrasubject coefficients of variation (COV) of the three methods were 8.0%, 4.9%, and 6.1%, respectively. All three methods correlated well, without a significant bias. Mean TRBF measured at 100 kHz with cardiac-gated acquisition was 40.5 ± 8.2 μL/min, and the range was from 26.6 to 55.8 μL/min. Conclusions. Cardiac-gated en face Doppler OCT can achieve smaller measurement variability than previously reported methods. Although further validation in older subjects and diseased subjects is required, precise measurement of TRBF using cardiac-gated en face Doppler OCT at commercially available imaging speeds should be feasible. PMID:25744974

  2. Does Preinterventional Flat-Panel Computer Tomography Pooled Blood Volume Mapping Predict Final Infarct Volume After Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Cerebral Artery Occlusion?

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Marlies; Kyriakou, Yiannis; Mesnil de Rochemont, Richard du; Singer, Oliver C.; Berkefeld, Joachim

    2013-08-01

    PurposeDecreased cerebral blood volume is known to be a predictor for final infarct volume in acute cerebral artery occlusion. To evaluate the predictability of final infarct volume in patients with acute occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) or the distal internal carotid artery (ICA) and successful endovascular recanalization, pooled blood volume (PBV) was measured using flat-panel detector computed tomography (FPD CT).Materials and MethodsTwenty patients with acute unilateral occlusion of the MCA or distal ACI without demarcated infarction, as proven by CT at admission, and successful Thrombolysis in cerebral infarction score (TICI 2b or 3) endovascular thrombectomy were included. Cerebral PBV maps were acquired from each patient immediately before endovascular thrombectomy. Twenty-four hours after recanalization, each patient underwent multislice CT to visualize final infarct volume. Extent of the areas of decreased PBV was compared with the final infarct volume proven by follow-up CT the next day.ResultsIn 15 of 20 patients, areas of distinct PBV decrease corresponded to final infarct volume. In 5 patients, areas of decreased PBV overestimated final extension of ischemia probably due to inappropriate timing of data acquisition and misery perfusion.ConclusionPBV mapping using FPD CT is a promising tool to predict areas of irrecoverable brain parenchyma in acute thromboembolic stroke. Further validation is necessary before routine use for decision making for interventional thrombectomy.

  3. Increased All-Cause, Liver, and Cardiac Mortality among Hepatitis C Virus-seropositive Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Guiltinan, Anne M.; Kaidarova, Zhanna; Custer, Brian; Orland, Jennie; Strollo, Angela; Cyrus, Sherri; Busch, Michael P.; Murphy, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    Hospital-based studies suggest that hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection causes frequent cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and mortality, but epidemiologic studies have shown less morbidity and mortality. The authors performed a retrospective cohort study of 10,259 recombinant immunoblot assay-confirmed, HCV antibody-positive (HCV+), allogeneic blood donors from 1991 to 2002 and 10,259 HCV antibody-negative (HCV−) donors matched for year of donation, age, gender, and Zone Improvement Plan Code (ZIP Code). Vital status through 2003 was obtained from the US National Death Index, and hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated by survival analysis. After a mean follow-up of 7.7 years, there were 601 (2.92%) deaths: 453 HCV+ and 148 HCV− (hazard ratio (HR) = 3.13, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.60, 3.76). Excess mortality in the HCV+ group was greatest in liver-related (HR = 45.99, 95% CI: 11.32, 186.74), drug- or alcohol-related (HR = 10.81, 95% CI: 4.68, 24.96), and trauma/suicide (HR = 2.99, 95% CI: 2.05, 4.36) causes. There was also an unexpected increase in cardiovascular mortality among the HCV+ donors (HR = 2.21, 95% CI: 1.41, 3.46). HCV infection is associated with a significant, threefold increase in overall mortality among former blood donors, including significantly increased mortality from liver and cardiovascular causes. High rates of mortality from drug/alcohol and trauma/suicide causes are likely due to lifestyle factors and may be at least partially preventable. PMID:18203734

  4. Thoracic epidural anesthesia during coronary artery bypass surgery: effects on cardiac sympathetic activity, myocardial blood flow and metabolism, and central hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Kirnö, K; Friberg, P; Grzegorczyk, A; Milocco, I; Ricksten, S E; Lundin, S

    1994-12-01

    The effects of high thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity, myocardial blood flow and metabolism, and central hemodynamics were studied in 20 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). In 10 of the patients, TEA (T1-5 block) was used as an adjunct to a standardized fentanyl-nitrous oxide anesthesia. Hemodynamic measurements and blood sampling were performed after induction of anesthesia but prior to skin incision and after sternotomy. Assessment of total and cardiac sympathetic activity was performed by means of the norepinephrine kinetic approach. Prior to surgery, mean arterial pressure (MAP), great cardiac vein flow (GCVF), and regional myocardial oxygen consumption (Reg-MVO2) were lower in the TEA group compared to the control group. During sternotomy there was a pronounced increase in cardiac norepinephrine spillover, MAP, systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI), pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), GCVF, and Reg-MVO2 in the control group. These changes were clearly attenuated in the TEA group. None of the patients in the TEA group had metabolic (lactate) or electrocardiographic signs of myocardial ischemia. Three patients in the control group had indices of myocardial ischemia prior to and/or during surgery. We conclude that TEA attenuates the surgically mediated sympathetic stress response to sternotomy, thereby preventing the increase in myocardial oxygen demand in the pre-bypass period without jeopardizing myocardial perfusion. PMID:7978429

  5. Comparison of two noninvasive devices for measurement of central systolic blood pressure with invasive measurement during cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Ott, Christian; Haetinger, Siegberto; Schneider, Markus P; Pauschinger, Matthias; Schmieder, Roland E

    2012-09-01

    Recently, a new device for noninvasive assessment of central systolic blood pressure (cSBP) (BPro device with A-Pulse) was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, but available data are limited. In 52 patients undergoing invasive elective cardiac evaluation, central hemodynamics were measured invasively. Immediately thereafter, radial artery waveforms were sampled by two noninvasive techniques, the BPro and, as a comparator, the SphygmoCor System. Then, central hemodynamics were measured invasively for a second time. The invasively recorded cSBP (137 ± 27 mm Hg) did not differ with both noninvasively assessed cSBP by BPro (136 ± 21 mm Hg, P = .627 vs invasive cSBP) and by SphygmoCor (136 ± 23 mm Hg, P=.694 vs invasive cSBP) and correlated highly between invasively recorded and both noninvasively assessed cSBP. However, using Bland-Altman plots, spreading of compared data of both devices can be found (BPro: 0.87 ± 13 mm Hg vs invasive cSBP; SphygmoCor: 0.77 ± 14 mm Hg vs invasive cSBP). There was an excellent correlation of both noninvasive devices for the calculation of cSBP (r=0.961, P<.001). cSBP differed by only 0.1 ± 6 mm Hg (P=.913) between the two noninvasive devices. Therefore, both noninvasive devices showed an accurate agreement in cSBP compared with invasively measured cSBP. PMID:22947354

  6. Effects of nimodipine on cerebral blood flow and cerebrospinal fluid pressure after cardiac arrest: correlation with neurologic outcome.

    PubMed

    Forsman, M; Aarseth, H P; Nordby, H K; Skulberg, A; Steen, P A

    1989-04-01

    Fifty-one patients were included in a blind randomized study to evaluate whether the Ca-blocker nimodipine could influence cerebral blood flow (CBF) or cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) during the cerebral hypoperfusion period that follows resuscitation from cardiac arrest and to determine whether changes in CBF correlate with neurologic outcome. CBF measured 1 to 4 hours after arrest with the use of 133Xe intravenous was significantly greater with nimodipine than with placebo (27 +/- 3 versus 13 +/- 1 ml.100 g-1.min-1 at 3 hours), but with no significant difference at 24 hours. There was no clinical evidence of seriously increased CSFP in any patient in either group the first 48 hours. Mean arterial pressure was significantly lower (86 +/- 4 versus 101 +/- 4 mm Hg at 3 hours), and antiarrhythmic drugs were used significantly less frequently in the nimodipine group than in the placebo group. Twelve patients in each group eventually regained consciousness. There was no significant difference in neurologic status between the two groups at any point, and no positive correlation between CBF in the hypoperfusion period and neurologic outcome. PMID:2929976

  7. Preclinical Evaluation of the Immunomodulatory Properties of Cardiac Adipose Tissue Progenitor Cells Using Umbilical Cord Blood Mesenchymal Stem Cells: A Direct Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Perea-Gil, Isaac; Monguió-Tortajada, Marta; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Borràs, Francesc E.; Roura, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based strategies to regenerate injured myocardial tissue have emerged over the past decade, but the optimum cell type is still under scrutiny. In this context, human adult epicardial fat surrounding the heart has been characterized as a reservoir of mesenchymal-like progenitor cells (cardiac ATDPCs) with potential clinical benefits. However, additional data on the possibility that these cells could trigger a deleterious immune response following implantation are needed. Thus, in the presented study, we took advantage of the well-established low immunogenicity of umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCBMSCs) to comparatively assess the immunomodulatory properties of cardiac ATDPCs in an in vitro allostimulatory assay using allogeneic mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). Similar to UCBMSCs, increasing amounts of seeded cardiac ATDPCs suppressed the alloproliferation of T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (IL6, TNFα, and IFNγ) was also specifically modulated by the different numbers of cardiac ATDPCs cocultured. In summary, we show that cardiac ATDPCs abrogate T cell alloproliferation upon stimulation with allogeneic mature MDDCs, suggesting that they could further regulate a possible harmful immune response in vivo. Additionally, UCBMSCs can be considered as valuable tools to preclinically predict the immunogenicity of prospective regenerative cells. PMID:25861626

  8. Quantitative trait locus mapping in chickens by selective DNA pooling with dinucleotide microsatellite markers by using purified DNA and fresh or frozen red blood cells as applied to marker-assisted selection.

    PubMed

    Lipkin, E; Fulton, J; Cheng, H; Yonash, N; Soller, M

    2002-03-01

    Many large, half-sib sire families are an integral component of chicken genetic improvement programs. These family structures include a sufficient number of individuals for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) at high statistical power. However, realizing this statistical power through individual or selective genotyping is yet too costly to be feasible under current genotyping methodologies. Genotyping costs can be greatly reduced through selective DNA pooling, involving densitometric estimates of marker allele frequencies in pooled DNA samples. When using dinucleotide microsatellite markers, however, such estimates are often confounded by overlapping "shadow" bands and can be confounded further by differential amplification of alleles. In the present study a shadow correction procedure provided accurate densitometric estimates of allele frequency for dinucleotide microsatellite markers in pools made from chicken purified DNA samples, fresh blood samples, and frozen-thawed blood samples. In a retrospective study, selective DNA pooling with thawed blood samples successfully identified two QTL previously shown by selective genotyping to affect resistance in chickens to Marek's disease. It is proposed that use of selective DNA pooling can provide relatively low-cost mapping and use in marker-assisted selection of QTL that affect production traits in chickens. PMID:11902402

  9. Lactotripeptides effect on office and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure, blood pressure stress response, pulse wave velocity and cardiac output in patients with high-normal blood pressure or first-degree hypertension: a randomized double-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Cicero, Arrigo F G; Rosticci, Martina; Gerocarni, Beatrice; Bacchelli, Stefano; Veronesi, Maddalena; Strocchi, Enrico; Borghi, Claudio

    2011-09-01

    Contrasting data partially support a certain antihypertensive efficacy of lactotripeptides (LTPs) derived from enzymatic treatment of casein hydrolysate. Our aim was to evaluate this effect on a large number of hemodynamic parameters. We conducted a prospective double-blind randomized clinical trial, which included 52 patients affected by high-normal blood pressure (BP) or first-degree hypertension. We investigated the effect of a 6-week treatment with the LTPs isoleucine-proline-proline and valine-proline-proline at 3 mg per day, assumed to be functional food, on office BP, 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) values, stress-induced BP increase and cardiac output-related parameters. In the LTP-treated subjects, we observed a significant reduction in office systolic BP (SBP; -5±8 mm Hg, P=0.013) and a significant improvement in pulse wave velocity (PWV; -0.66±0.81 m s(-1), P=0.001; an instrumental biomarker of vascular rigidity). No effect on 24-h ABPM parameters and BP reaction to stress was observed from treatment with the combined LTPs. LTPs, but not placebo, were associated with a mild but significant change in the stroke volume (SV), SV index (markers of cardiac flow), the acceleration index (ACI) and velocity index (VI) (markers of cardiac contractility). No effect was observed on parameters related to fluid dynamics or vascular resistance. LTPs positively influenced the office SBP, PWV, SV, SV index, ACI and VI in patients with high-normal BP or first-degree hypertension. PMID:21753776

  10. Ultra High-Resolution In vivo Computed Tomography Imaging of Mouse Cerebrovasculature Using a Long Circulating Blood Pool Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Starosolski, Zbigniew; Villamizar, Carlos A.; Rendon, David; Paldino, Michael J.; Milewicz, Dianna M.; Ghaghada, Ketan B.; Annapragada, Ananth V.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormalities in the cerebrovascular system play a central role in many neurologic diseases. The on-going expansion of rodent models of human cerebrovascular diseases and the need to use these models to understand disease progression and treatment has amplified the need for reproducible non-invasive imaging methods for high-resolution visualization of the complete cerebral vasculature. In this study, we present methods for in vivo high-resolution (19 μm isotropic) computed tomography imaging of complete mouse brain vasculature. This technique enabled 3D visualization of large cerebrovascular networks, including the Circle of Willis. Blood vessels as small as 40 μm were clearly delineated. ACTA2 mutations in humans cause cerebrovascular defects, including abnormally straightened arteries and a moyamoya-like arteriopathy characterized by bilateral narrowing of the internal carotid artery and stenosis of many large arteries. In vivo imaging studies performed in a mouse model of Acta2 mutations demonstrated the utility of this method for studying vascular morphometric changes that are practically impossible to identify using current histological methods. Specifically, the technique demonstrated changes in the width of the Circle of Willis, straightening of cerebral arteries and arterial stenoses. We believe the use of imaging methods described here will contribute substantially to the study of rodent cerebrovasculature. PMID:25985192

  11. Influence of menstrual cycle phase on muscle metaboreflex control of cardiac baroreflex sensitivity, heart rate and blood pressure in humans.

    PubMed

    Hartwich, Doreen; Aldred, Sarah; Fisher, James P

    2013-01-01

    We sought to determine whether menstrual cycle phase influences muscle metaboreflex control of spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (cBRS), blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). Twenty-three young women not taking oral contraceptives were studied during the early (EF; low oestrogen, low progesterone) and late follicular menstrual phases (LF; high oestrogen, low progesterone). Protocol 1 consisted of leg cycling at low (21 ± 2 W) and moderate workloads (71 ± 3 W) in free-flow conditions and with partial flow restriction (bilateral thigh-cuff inflation at 100 mmHg) to activate the muscle metaboreflex. Protocol 2 consisted of rhythmic hand-grip exercise with incremental upper arm-cuff inflation (0, 80, 100 and 120 mmHg) to elicit graded metaboreflex activation. Both protocols were followed by post-exercise ischaemia. Leg cycling decreased cBRS (EF, 20 ± 5, 6 ± 1 and 1 ± 0.1 ms mmHg(-1); and LF, 19 ± 3, 6 ± 0.4, 1 ± 0.1 ms mmHg(-1) during rest, low- and moderate-intensity leg cycling, respectively) and increased HR in an intensity-dependent manner, while BP remained unchanged. Partial flow restriction during leg cycling decreased cBRS, and increased HR and BP. During post-exercise ischaemia, HR and BP remained elevated, while cBRS remained suppressed (EF, 4.2 ± 0.6 ms mmHg(-1); and LF, 4.7 ± 0.5 ms mmHg(-1); P < 0.05 versus rest). Cardiac baroreflex sensitivity was unchanged during hand-grip with and without partial flow restriction and post-exercise ischaemia. No differences in cBRS, HR or BP responses were observed between EF and LF at any time during either protocol. These data indicate that endogenous fluctuations in oestrogen between the EF and LF phases of the menstrual cycle do not influence muscle metaboreflex control of cBRS, BP or HR in young women. PMID:22613743

  12. Pool Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Caribbean Clear, Inc. used NASA's silver ion technology as a basis for its automatic pool purifier. System offers alternative approach to conventional purification chemicals. Caribbean Clear's principal markets are swimming pool owners who want to eliminate chlorine and bromine. Purifiers in Caribbean Clear System are same silver ions used in Apollo System to kill bacteria, plus copper ions to kill algae. They produce spa or pool water that exceeds EPA Standards for drinking water.

  13. Cardiac biomarkers in blood, and pericardial and cerebrospinal fluids of forensic autopsy cases: A reassessment with special regard to postmortem interval.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Hua; Inamori-Kawamoto, Osamu; Michiue, Tomomi; Ikeda, Sayuko; Ishikawa, Takaki; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies suggested possible application of postmortem biochemistry of myocardial biomarkers to the investigation of sudden cardiac death; however, differences from clinical findings should be considered in autopsy materials. The present study involved a comprehensive investigation of cardiac troponin T and I (cTnT and cTnI), and creatine kinase MB (CK-MB) in cardiac and peripheral external iliac venous blood, pericardial fluid (PCF) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for reassessment, with special regard to the estimated postmortem interval in relation to the cause of death, reviewing a large number of forensic autopsy cases (n=1923). These cardiac biomarkers showed cause-of-death- and postmortem-time-dependent differences: blood and PCF levels of each marker were higher in hyperthermia (heatstroke), bathwater drowning and chronic congestive heart disease in cases of postmortem interval (PMI) <12h. After 12h postmortem, these markers were also higher in fatal drug abuse, spontaneous cerebral/subarachnoid bleeding, electrocution and pulmonary embolism. In addition, most other causes of death, including ischemic heart disease, showed substantial elevations, while these markers remained low in acute hemorrhagic death from sharp instrument injury, hypothermia (cold exposure) and sea-/freshwater drowning during PMI of <48h. CSF cTnI and CK-MB showed similar findings. There was no difference between myocardial infarction and other causes of death to be discriminated, including asphyxiation, drowning and fire fatality. These findings are similar to clinical observations in critical ill patients, suggesting that elevated cardiac biomarkers cannot be a specific finding for death from acute ischemic heart disease, but indicate the severity of myocardial injury in postmortem investigation. PMID:26052007

  14. Are lower levels of red blood cell transfusion more cost-effective than liberal levels after cardiac surgery? Findings from the TITRe2 randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, E A; Wordsworth, S; Bargo, D; Pike, K; Rogers, C A; Brierley, R C M; Angelini, G D; Murphy, G J; Reeves, B C

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the incremental cost and cost-effectiveness of a restrictive versus a liberal red blood cell transfusion threshold after cardiac surgery. Design A within-trial cost-effectiveness analysis with a 3-month time horizon, based on a multicentre superiority randomised controlled trial from the perspective of the National Health Service (NHS) and personal social services in the UK. Setting 17 specialist cardiac surgery centres in UK NHS hospitals. Participants 2003 patients aged >16 years undergoing non-emergency cardiac surgery with a postoperative haemoglobin of <9 g/dL. Interventions Restrictive (transfuse if haemoglobin <7.5 g/dL) or liberal (transfuse if haemoglobin <9 g/dL) threshold during hospitalisation after surgery. Main outcome measures Health-related quality of life measured using the EQ-5D-3L to calculate quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Results The total costs from surgery up to 3 months were £17 945 and £18 127 in the restrictive and liberal groups (mean difference is −£182, 95% CI −£1108 to £744). The cost difference was largely attributable to the difference in the cost of red blood cells. Mean QALYs to 3 months were 0.18 in both groups (restrictive minus liberal difference is 0.0004, 95% CI −0.0037 to 0.0045). The point estimate for the base-case cost-effectiveness analysis suggested that the restrictive group was slightly more effective and slightly less costly than the liberal group and, therefore, cost-effective. However, there is great uncertainty around these results partly due to the negligible differences in QALYs gained. Conclusions We conclude that there is no clear difference in the cost-effectiveness of restrictive and liberal thresholds for red blood cell transfusion after cardiac surgery. Trial registration number ISRCTN70923932; Results. PMID:27481621

  15. Salt-induced cardiac hypertrophy and interstitial fibrosis are due to a blood pressure-independent mechanism in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Daniele N; Katayama, Isis A; Oliveira, Ivone B; Rosa, Kaleizu T; Furukawa, Luzia N S; Coelho, Michella S; Casarini, Dulce E; Heimann, Joel C

    2010-10-01

    High salt intake is a known cardiovascular risk factor and is associated with cardiac alterations. To better understand this effect, male Wistar rats were fed a normal (NSD: 1.3% NaCl), high 4 (HSD4: 4%), or high 8 (HSD8: 8%) salt diet from weaning until 18 wk of age. The HSD8 group was subdivided into HSD8, HSD8+HZ (15 mg . kg(-1) . d(-1) hydralazine in the drinking water), and HSD8+LOS (20 mg . kg(-1) . d(-1) losartan in the drinking water) groups. The cardiomyocyte diameter was greater in the HSD4 and HSD8 groups than in the HSD8+LOS and NSD groups. Interstitial fibrosis was greater in the HSD4 and HSD8 groups than in the HSD8+HZ and NSD groups. Hydralazine prevented high blood pressure (BP) and fibrosis, but not cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Losartan prevented high BP and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, but not fibrosis. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT(1)) protein expression in both ventricles was greater in the HSD8 group than in the NSD group. Losartan, but not hydralazine, prevented this effect. Compared with the NSD group, the binding of an AT(1) conformation-specific antibody that recognizes the activated form of the receptor was lower in both ventricles in all other groups. Losartan further lowered the binding of the anti-AT(1) antibody in both ventricles compared with all other experimental groups. Angiotensin II was greater in both ventricles in all groups compared with the NSD group. Myocardial structural alterations in response to HSD are independent of the effect on BP. Salt-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and interstitial fibrosis possibly are due to different mechanisms. Evidence from the present study suggests that salt-induced AT(1) receptor internalization is probably due to angiotensin II binding. PMID:20724490

  16. Endothelial cell mineralocorticoid receptors regulate deoxycorticosterone/salt-mediated cardiac remodeling and vascular reactivity but not blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Rickard, Amanda J; Morgan, James; Chrissobolis, Sophocles; Miller, Alyson A; Sobey, Christopher G; Young, Morag J

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies have identified novel pathological roles for mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) in specific cell types in cardiovascular disease. The mechanisms by which MR promotes inflammation and fibrosis involve multiple cell-specific events. To identify the role of MR in endothelial cells (EC-MR), the current study explored the vascular responses to aldosterone in wild-type (WT) and EC-null mice (EC-MRKO). Nitric oxide function was impaired in the thoracic aorta and mesenteric arteries of aldosterone-treated WT mice. Although endothelial nitric oxide function was equivalently impaired in the mesenteric arteries of aldosterone-treated EC-MRKO mice, endothelial function was unaffected in the aorta, suggesting a differential role for EC-MR depending on the vascular bed. Second, the contribution of EC-MR to cardiovascular inflammation, fibrosis, and hypertension was determined in WT and EC-MRKO treated with deoxycorticosterone/salt for 8 days or 8 weeks. At 8 days, loss of EC-MR prevented macrophage infiltration and the expression of proinflammatory genes in the myocardium. Increased cardiac fibrosis was not detected in either genotype at this time, mRNA levels of profibrotic genes were significantly lower in EC-MRKO mice versus WT. At 8 weeks, deoxycorticosterone/salt treatment increased macrophage recruitment and proinflammatory gene expression in WT but not in EC-MRKO. Collagen deposition and connective tissue growth factor expression were significantly reduced in EC-MRKO versus WT. Interestingly, systolic blood pressure was equivalently elevated in deoxycorticosterone/salt treated WT and EC-MRKO. Our data demonstrate that (1) EC-MR signaling contributes to vascular nitric oxide function in large conduit arteries but not in resistance vessels and (2) an independent role for EC-MR in the inflammatory and profibrotic response to deoxycorticosterone/salt. PMID:24566081

  17. Impact of High-Normal Blood Pressure Measured in Emergency Room on Adverse Cardiac Events in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Nam Sik; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Jong Hyun; Chae, Shung Chull; Kim, Young Jo; Hur, Seung Ho; Seong, In Whan; Hong, Taek Jong; Choi, Donghoon; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Chong Jin; Seung, Ki Bae; Chung, Wook Sung; Jang, Yang Soo; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Park, Seung Jung

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Prehypertension according to JNC7 is common and is associated with increased vascular mortality. The importance of management in high-normal blood pressure (BP) is underemphasized. Subjects and Methods We analyzed major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry in normal BP (group I) and high-normal BP (group II) patients. Results Among 14871 patients, 159 (61±12.3 years, 122 males) satisfied the study indication. Six-month and one-year clinical follow-up rate was 88.9% and 85.8%, respectively. Group I had 78 patients (60.9±12.4 years). Group II had 81 patients (61.6±12.5 years). Demographics of patients were not different between groups. Treatment strategy was not different. Initial Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction flow grade 0 was less frequent in group II (n=32, 47.1%) than in group I (n=16, 21.9%) (p=0.001). Successful intervention rate was not different between group II (93.8%) and group I (97.1%) (p=0.590). Six-month MACE occurred in 3 patients in group I (4.4%) and 10 in group II (15.6%) (p=0.031). Compared with normal BP, the odds ratio for patients with high-normal BP was 1.147 (p=0.045, 95% confidence interval 1.011-1.402) for 6-month MACE. Conclusion Even though high-normal BP patients had a better baseline clinical status, the prognosis was poorer than patients with normal BP. Therapeutic BP target goal for the patients with acute myocardial infarction should be <140/90 mm Hg, which is recommended in JNC7. PMID:22701132

  18. [Cardiac arrhythmias in hypertensive subjects with and without left ventricular hypertrophy compared to the circadian profile of the blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Novo, S; Barbagallo, M; Abrignani, M G; Alaimo, G; Longo, B; Corrao, S; Nardi, E; Liquori, M; Forte, G; Raineri, A

    1990-08-01

    To evaluate possible correlations between cardiac arrhythmias and circadian pattern of blood pressure (BP) and of heart rate (HR), we studied 2 groups of 20 males with stable arterial hypertension of mild to moderate entity, with (Group I) or without (Group II) left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). In patients with LVH the mean age (56 vs 46 years), the duration of the hypertensive state (48.1 vs 15.7 months), the thickening of interventricular septum (IVS; 13.7 vs 9.6 mm) and of the posterior wall of the left ventricle (13.2 vs 9.2 mm) and the mass of LV (149.8 vs 99.7 g/m2) were significantly greater (p less than 0.01). On the contrary, the 2 groups did not show significant differences concerning casual BP determined in the morning (178.3/108.4 vs 171.5/106.2 mmHg). After a pharmacological washout of 2 weeks, patients underwent a noninvasive, intermittent, monitoring of BP (every 15 min during daytime and every 30 min from 11 pm to 7 am), using a pressure meter II Del Mar Avionics, and a continuous monitoring of ECG for 24 hours, employing an instrument 445/B Del Mar Avionics. Mean 24-hour BP was not different in the 2 groups of patients (161.7/99.0 vs 158.2/98.3 mmHg); however, patients with LVH showed a significantly greater variability of BP in the morning (7 am-3 pm), while mean 24-hour HR was significantly less (71.6 vs 78.2 b/min).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2150345

  19. Detection of Type II Endoleak After Endovascular Aortic Repair: Comparison Between Magnetic Resonance Angiography and Blood-Pool Contrast Agent and Dual-Phase Computed Tomography Angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Wieners, Gero; Meyer, Frank; Halloul, Zuhir; Peters, Nils; Ruehl, Ricarda; Dudeck, Oliver; Tautenhahn, Joerg; Ricke, Jens; Pech, Maciej

    2010-12-15

    PurposeThis prospective study was designed to assess the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) with blood-pool contrast agent (gadofosveset) in the detection of type-II endoleak after endovascular aortic repair (EVAR).MethodsThirty-two patients with aortic aneurysms who had undergone EVAR were included in this study. All patients were examined by dual-phase computed tomography angiography (CTA) as well as MRA with gadofosveset in the first-pass and steady-state phases. Two independent readers evaluated the images of CTA and MRA in terms of endoleak type II, feeding vessel, and image quality.ResultsMedian follow-up-time after EVAR was 22 months (range 4 to 59). Endoleak type II was detected by CTA in 12 of 32 patients (37.5%); MRA detected endoleak in all of these patients as well as in another 9 patients (n = 21, 65.6%), of whom the endoleaks in 6 patients showed an increasing diameter. Most endoleaks were detected in the steady-state phase (n = 14). The decrease in diameter of the aneurysmal sac was significantly greater in the patients without a visible endoleak that was visible on MRA (P = 0.004). In the overall estimation of diagnostic accuracy, MRA was judged superior to CTA in 66% of all examinations.ConclusionMRA with gadofosveset appeared superior to CTA, and has higher diagnostic accuracy, in the detection of endoleak after EVAR.

  20. Defective mitochondrial respiration, altered dNTP pools and reduced AP endonuclease 1 activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Alzheimer's disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, Scott; Hejl, Anne-Mette; Dinh, Thuan-Son T.; Keijzers, Guido; Hansen, Åse M.; Desler, Claus; Moreno-Villanueva, Maria; Bürkle, Alexander; Rasmussen, Lene J.; Waldemar, Gunhild; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2015-01-01

    AIMS Accurate biomarkers for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are badly needed. Recent reports suggest that dysfunctional mitochondria and DNA damage are associated with AD development. In this report, we measured various cellular parameters, related to mitochondrial bioenergetics and DNA damage, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of AD and control participants, for biomarker discovery. METHODS PBMCs were isolated from 53 patients with AD of mild to moderate degree and 30 age-matched healthy controls. Tests were performed on the PBMCs from as many of these participants as possible. We measured glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration fluxes using the Seahorse Bioscience flux analyzer, mitochondrial ROS production using flow cytometry, dNTP levels by way of a DNA polymerization assay, DNA strand breaks using the Fluorometric detection of Alkaline DNA Unwinding (FADU) assay, and APE1 incision activity (in cell lysates) on a DNA substrate containing an AP site (to estimate DNA repair efficiency). RESULTS In the PBMCs of AD patients, we found reduced basal mitochondrial oxygen consumption, reduced proton leak, higher dATP level, and lower AP endonuclease 1 activity, depending on adjustments for gender and/or age. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals impaired mitochondrial respiration, altered dNTP pools and reduced DNA repair activity in PBMCs of AD patients, thus suggesting that these biochemical activities may be useful as biomarkers for AD. PMID:26539816

  1. The interactive effects of a gradual temperature decrease and long-term food deprivation on cardiac and hepatic blood flows in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Petersen, L H; Dzialowski, E; Huggett, D B

    2011-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the extent to which the fish liver is perfused with blood. Transonic® flow probes were therefore implanted around the ventral aorta and hepatic vein(s) to record baseline blood flows in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) previously held under two different feeding regimes (food-deprived or fed to satiation, 8-12 weeks). Fish from both groups were exposed to a gradual temperature decrease (12°C to 5°C) and physical disturbance. Cardiac output (Q), stroke volume (Sv) and hepatic venous blood flow (HVBF) were significantly reduced in food-deprived trout at 12°C. Heart rate was not significantly affected by nutritional status, but was significantly reduced when temperature was decreased to 5°C. Physically disturbing each fish at 12°C and 5°C showed that the performance capacity of the heart was not affected by food deprivation as the capacity to increase Q and Sv was not reduced in the food-deprived group. Overall this study showed that food deprivation in rainbow trout reduced cardiac and hepatic blood flows. However, long-term food deprivation did not affect the capacity of the heart to acutely increase performance. PMID:21601001

  2. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... fight infection and are part of your body's defense system. Platelets help blood to clot when you have a cut or wound. Bone marrow, the spongy material inside your bones, makes new blood cells. Blood cells ...

  3. Cardiac remodelling, blood chemistry, haematology and oxygen consumption of Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua L., induced by experimental haemolytic anaemia with phenylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    Powell, Mark D; Burke, Melissa S; Dahle, Dalia

    2011-03-01

    Anaemia is a common pathology associated with many infectious and non-infectious diseases. The effects of haemolytic anaemia induced by i.p. injection of phenylhydrazine (PHZ) were studied in Atlantic cod. Phenylhydrazine injection (0.3 mg kg(-1)) in a DMSO and saline vehicle induced a reproducible and stable anaemia reducing haematocrit, (Hct) by 62% over 3 weeks. Controls consisted of fish injected with saline and DMSO/saline vehicle with minimal effects on Hct or whole blood haemoglobin (Hb). Although anaemia resulted in reduced blood lactate and glucose in PHZ injected fish, there were no effects of anaemia on blood, sodium, chloride or potassium. Similarly, there were no changes in the relative proportions of leucocytes in the blood although an increase in the number of immature erythrocytes was observed in the anaemic fish. Anaemic fish showed a 29 and 22% increase in cardiac somatic index (CSI) relative to saline and vehicle controls, respectively, although there were no significant differences in the linear dimensions of the ventricle. Changes in cardiac somatic and ventricular somatic index correlated positively and significantly with Hct but not with whole blood Hb concentration. Anaemic fish had significantly reduced resting routine oxygen consumption compared with vehicle controls but were not able to increase oxygen consumption following a bout of exhaustive exercise. Plasma lactate concentrations increased significantly after exercise to a greater extent in anaemic fish compared with vehicle control fish. Phenylhydrazine is a useful model for studying haemolytic anaemia in Atlantic cod with minimal effects on blood biochemistry and haematology and clearly reduces the aerobic capacity in Atlantic cod. PMID:20585853

  4. Regulation of central blood volume and cardiac filling in endurance athletes: the Frank-Starling mechanism as a determinant of orthostatic tolerance.

    PubMed

    Levine, B D

    1993-06-01

    Orthostatic intolerance may result from either an abnormally large postural decrease in central blood volume, cardiac filling pressures, and stroke volume, or inadequate neurohumoral responses to orthostasis. Endurance athletes have been reported as having a high incidence of orthostatic intolerance, which has been attributed primarily to abnormalities in baroreflex regulation of heart rate and peripheral resistance. In this review, we present evidence that athletes also have structural changes in the cardiovascular system that although beneficial during exercise, lead to an excessively large decrease in stroke volume during orthostasis and contribute to orthostatic intolerance. A unifying hypothesis based on cardiac mechanics that may explain the divergence of findings in conditions such as bed rest or spaceflight, and short- and long-term endurance training is presented. PMID:8321111

  5. Regulation of central blood volume and cardiac filling in endurance athletes: the Frank-Starling mechanism as a determinant of orthostatic tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, B. D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance may result from either an abnormally large postural decrease in central blood volume, cardiac filling pressures, and stroke volume, or inadequate neurohumoral responses to orthostasis. Endurance athletes have been reported as having a high incidence of orthostatic intolerance, which has been attributed primarily to abnormalities in baroreflex regulation of heart rate and peripheral resistance. In this review, we present evidence that athletes also have structural changes in the cardiovascular system that although beneficial during exercise, lead to an excessively large decrease in stroke volume during orthostasis and contribute to orthostatic intolerance. A unifying hypothesis based on cardiac mechanics that may explain the divergence of findings in conditions such as bed rest or spaceflight, and short- and long-term endurance training is presented.

  6. Deletion of interleukin-6 prevents cardiac inflammation, fibrosis and dysfunction without affecting blood pressure in angiotensin II-high salt-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    González, Germán E.; Rhaleb, Nour-Eddine; D’ambrosio, Martin A.; Nakagawa, Pablo; Liu, Yunhe; Leung, Pablo; Dai, Xiangguo; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Peterson, Edward L.; Carretero, Oscar A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Inflammation has been proposed as a key component in the development of hypertension and cardiac remodeling associated with different cardiovascular diseases. However, the role of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 in the chronic stage of hypertension is not well defined. Here, we tested the hypothesis that deletion of interleukin-6 protects against the development of hypertension, cardiac inflammation, fibrosis, remodeling and dysfunction induced by high salt diet and angiotensin II (Ang II). Methods Male C57BL/6J and interleukin-6-knock out (KO) mice were implanted with telemetry devices for blood pressure (BP) measurements, fed a 4% NaCl diet, and infused with either vehicle or Ang II (90 ng/min per mouse subcutaneously) for 8 weeks. We studied BP and cardiac function by echocardiography at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks. Results Myocyte cross-sectional area (MCSA), macrophage infiltration, and myocardial fibrosis were also assessed. BP increased similarly in both strains when treated with Ang II and high salt (Ang II-high salt); however, C57BL/6J mice developed a more severe decrease in left ventricle ejection fraction, fibrosis, and macrophage infiltration compared with interleukin-6-KO mice. No differences between strains were observed in MCSA, capillary density and MCSA to capillary density ratio. Conclusion In conclusion, absence of interleukin -6 did not alter the development of Ang II-high salt-induced hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy, but it prevented the development of cardiac dysfunction, myocardial inflammation, and fibrosis. This indicates that interleukin-6 plays an important role in hypertensive heart damage but not in the development of hypertension. PMID:25304471

  7. Mapping of quantitative trait loci for blood pressure and cardiac mass in the rat by genome scanning of recombinant inbred strains.

    PubMed Central

    Pravenec, M; Gauguier, D; Schott, J J; Buard, J; Kren, V; Bila, V; Szpirer, C; Szpirer, J; Wang, J M; Huang, H

    1995-01-01

    In the HXB and BXH recombinant inbred strains derived from the spontaneously hypertensive rat and the normotensive Brown Norway rat, we determined the strain distribution patterns of 500 genetic markers to scan the rodent genome for quantitative trait loci regulating cardiac mass and blood pressure. The markers spanned approximately 1,139 cM of the genome and were tested for correlations with left ventricular mass adjusted for body weight, and with systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures. The marker for the dopamine 1A receptor (Drd1a) on chromosome 17 showed the strongest correlation with left ventricular heart weight (P = .00038, r = -0.59) and the relationship to heart weight was independent of blood pressure. The markers showing the strongest correlations with systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure were D19Mit7 on chromosome 19 (P = .0012, r = .55), D2N35 on chromosome 2 (P = .0008, r = .56), and Il6 on chromosome 4 (P = .0018, r = .53), respectively. These studies demonstrate that the HXB and BXH strains can be effectively used for genome scanning studies of complex traits and have revealed several chromosome regions that may be involved in the genetic control of blood pressure and cardiac mass in the rat. PMID:7560090

  8. Antimyosin imaging in cardiac transplant rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.L.; Cannon, P.J. )

    1991-09-01

    Fab fragments of antibodies specific for cardiac myosin have been labeled with indium-111 and injected intravenously into animals and into patients with heart transplants. The antibodies, developed by Khaw, Haber, and co-workers, localize in cardiac myocytes that have been damaged irreversibly by ischemia, myocarditis, or the rejection process. After clearance of the labeled antibody from the cardiac blood pool, planar imaging or single photon emission computed tomography is performed. Scintigrams reveal the uptake of the labeled antimyosin in areas of myocardium undergoing transplant rejection. In animal studies, the degree of antimyosin uptake appears to correlate significantly with the degree of rejection assessed at necropsy. In patients, the correlation between scans and pathologic findings from endomyocardial biopsy is not as good, possibly because of sampling error in the endomyocardial biopsy technique. The scan results at 1 year correlate with either late complications (positive) or benign course (negative). Current limitations of the method include slow blood clearance, long half-life of indium-111, and hepatic uptake. Overcoming these limitations represents a direction for current research. It is possible that from these efforts a noninvasive approach to the diagnosis and evaluation of cardiac transplantation may evolve that will decrease the number of endomyocardial biopsies required to evaluate rejection. This would be particularly useful in infants and children. 31 references.

  9. Bone Scintigraphy in the Diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis: Is There Additional Value of Bone Scintigraphy with Blood Pool Phase over Conventional Bone Scintigraphy?

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Choi, Yun Young; Kim, Chan Woo; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Yoo, Dae-Hyun

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to investigate the value of bone scintigraphy with additional blood pool phase (BSBP), compared with conventional bone scintigraphy (CBS), in the assessment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A total of 242 patients (43 males, 199 females; 14-78 years) with arthralgia, and underwent BSBP were retrospectively analyzed. On the first physical examination, active arthritis was found in 128 of the 242 patients. Clinical diagnosis was made by a rheumatologist on the basis of the 1987 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, which are considered to be the gold standard. The diagnostic performances and prognostic value of BSBP and CBS were analyzed in the total patients with arthralgia and in the patients with arthritis. The sensitivity of BSBP (84.2%, 80/95) were significantly higher than that of CBS (74.8%, 72/95) in the patients with arthralgia (P = 0.039). When BSBP was interpreted with the results of elevated/positive anti-CCP antibody, its accuracy over CBS also became significantly higher (86.0%, 208/242 vs. 83.1%, 201/242 respectively, P = 0.021). The diagnostic odds ratio of BSBP positivity was higher than CBS positivity in the patients with arthralgia (26.0, 12.9-52.4 vs. 21.1, 10.8-41.3) and with arthritis (12.0, 4.9-29.4 vs. 10.0, 4.2-23.4). Both BSBP and CBS appear to provide acceptable accuracy and comparable diagnostic performance for diagnosis of RA. However, in the patients with arthralgia, BSBP was found to be more sensitive than CBS and more accurate when interpreted with the result of anti-CCP antibody. This could help physicians diagnose RA in daily clinical practice. PMID:27051232

  10. Bone Scintigraphy in the Diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis: Is There Additional Value of Bone Scintigraphy with Blood Pool Phase over Conventional Bone Scintigraphy?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the value of bone scintigraphy with additional blood pool phase (BSBP), compared with conventional bone scintigraphy (CBS), in the assessment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A total of 242 patients (43 males, 199 females; 14–78 years) with arthralgia, and underwent BSBP were retrospectively analyzed. On the first physical examination, active arthritis was found in 128 of the 242 patients. Clinical diagnosis was made by a rheumatologist on the basis of the 1987 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, which are considered to be the gold standard. The diagnostic performances and prognostic value of BSBP and CBS were analyzed in the total patients with arthralgia and in the patients with arthritis. The sensitivity of BSBP (84.2%, 80/95) were significantly higher than that of CBS (74.8%, 72/95) in the patients with arthralgia (P = 0.039). When BSBP was interpreted with the results of elevated/positive anti-CCP antibody, its accuracy over CBS also became significantly higher (86.0%, 208/242 vs. 83.1%, 201/242 respectively, P = 0.021). The diagnostic odds ratio of BSBP positivity was higher than CBS positivity in the patients with arthralgia (26.0, 12.9-52.4 vs. 21.1, 10.8-41.3) and with arthritis (12.0, 4.9-29.4 vs. 10.0, 4.2-23.4). Both BSBP and CBS appear to provide acceptable accuracy and comparable diagnostic performance for diagnosis of RA. However, in the patients with arthralgia, BSBP was found to be more sensitive than CBS and more accurate when interpreted with the result of anti-CCP antibody. This could help physicians diagnose RA in daily clinical practice. PMID:27051232

  11. Urinary Proteome and Systolic Blood Pressure as Predictors of 5-Year Cardiovascular and Cardiac Outcomes in a General Population.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Thijs, Lutgarde; Petit, Thibault; Gu, Yu-Mei; Jacobs, Lotte; Yang, Wen-Yi; Liu, Yan-Ping; Koeck, Thomas; Zürbig, Petra; Jin, Yu; Verhamme, Peter; Voigt, Jens-Uwe; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Mischak, Harald; Staessen, Jan A

    2015-07-01

    In a previous cross-sectional study, we identified a multidimensional urinary classifier (HF1), which was associated with left ventricular dysfunction. We investigated whether HF1 predicts cardiovascular end points over and beyond traditional risk factors. In 791 randomly recruited Flemish (mean age, 51.2 years; 50.6% women), we quantified HF1 by capillary electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry. In addition, we measured cardiovascular risk factors. HF1 averaged -0.97 U (range, -3.26 to 2.60). Over 6.1 years (median), 35 participants died and 63, 45, and 22 experienced fatal or nonfatal cardiovascular, cardiac, or coronary events, respectively. The incidence of fatal combined with nonfatal cardiovascular and cardiac end points, standardized for sex and age, increased across thirds of the HF1 distribution (P≤0.014), whereas trends for all-cause mortality and coronary events were nonsignificant (P≥0.10). The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (+1-SD) were 1.30 (95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.65; P=0.029) and 1.39 (1.06-1.84; P=0.018) for cardiovascular and cardiac events in relation to HF1. For systolic pressure, the corresponding estimates were 0.97 (0.74-1.28; P=0.85) and 0.93 (0.67-1.29; P=0.66), respectively. The HF1 upper thresholds optimized by maximizing Younden's index were -0.50 and -0.36 U for cardiovascular and cardiac end points, respectively. Prognostic accuracy significantly (P≤0.006) improved by adding HF1 to Cox models already including the other baseline predictors. Sensitivity analyses, from which we excluded 71 participants with previous cardiovascular disease, were confirmatory. In conclusion, over a 6-year period, the urinary proteome, but not systolic pressure, predicted cardiovascular and cardiac disease. PMID:26063667

  12. First autologous cell therapy of cerebral palsy caused by hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in a child after cardiac arrest-individual treatment with cord blood.

    PubMed

    Jensen, A; Hamelmann, E

    2013-01-01

    Each year, thousands of children incur brain damage that results in lifelong sequelae. Therefore, based on experimental evidence, we explored the therapeutic potential of human cord blood, known to contain stem cells, to examine the functional neuroregeneration in a child with cerebral palsy after cardiac arrest. The boy, whose cord blood was stored at birth, was 2.5 years old and normally developed when global ischemic brain damage occurred resulting in a persistent vegetative state. Nine weeks later, he received autologous cord blood (91.7 mL, cryopreserved, 5.75 × 10e8 mononuclear cells) intravenously. Active rehabilitation (physio- and ergotherapy) was provided daily, follow-up at 2, 5, 12, 24, 30, and 40 months. At 2-months follow-up the boy's motor control improved, spastic paresis was largely reduced, and eyesight was recovered, as did the electroencephalogram. He smiled when played with, was able to sit and to speak simple words. At 40 months, independent eating, walking in gait trainer, crawling, and moving from prone position to free sitting were possible, and there was significantly improved receptive and expressive speech competence (four-word sentences, 200 words). This remarkable functional neuroregeneration is difficult to explain by intense active rehabilitation alone and suggests that autologous cord blood transplantation may be an additional and causative treatment of pediatric cerebral palsy after brain damage. PMID:23762741

  13. Cardiac dilatation index as an indicator of terminal central congestion evaluated using postmortem CT and forensic autopsy data.

    PubMed

    Michiue, Tomomi; Sogawa, Nozomi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies demonstrated possible application of postmortem quantitative CT data analysis of the heart and lung in situ to investigate terminal cardiopulmonary pathophysiology. The present study analyzed virtual CT morphometric and autopsy data of the heart to investigate terminal central congestion in forensic autopsy cases (n=113, within 3 days postmortem); the virtual total heart weight in situ was estimated using CT morphometry, and the difference from and ratio to the measured weight at autopsy were calculated as indicators of heart blood pooling and the cardiac dilatation index (CDI) before dissection, respectively. There were substantial differences between the estimated heart blood pooling in situ and volume recovered at autopsy, including a characteristic decrease in drowning, alcohol/sedative-hypnotic intoxication and sudden cardiac death (SCD), possibly due to blood redistribution after thoracic dissection. The estimated in situ heart blood pool and CDI values were higher in SCD but lower in fatal hemorrhage and hemopericardium, as well as in acute mechanical asphyxiation and hyperthermia (heatstroke). In addition, there was a significant difference in heart blood pooling between mechanical asphyxiation or drowning and SCD. The CDI was significantly lower in fatal hyperthermia (heatstroke) than in drowning, fatal methamphetamine abuse, alcohol/sedative-hypnotic intoxication and SCD. These findings suggest the usefulness of applying the CDI and postmortem heart blood volume in situ as supplementary indicators of terminal central congestion, especially for investigating deaths from hemorrhage, hemopericardium, hyperthermia (heatstroke) and SCD. PMID:27115507

  14. Cardiac gated ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, C.W. III; Hoffman, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. The authors evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50 msec scan aperture. Multi slice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. The authors observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a non-failing model of the heart.

  15. Cardiac gated ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, C. William, III; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1995-05-01

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. We evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50msec scan aperture. Multislice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. We observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a nonfailing model of the heart.

  16. Detection of rejection of canine orthotopic cardiac allografts with indium-111 lymphocytes and gamma scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Eisen, H.J.; Rosenbloom, M.; Laschinger, J.C.; Saffitz, J.E.; Cox, J.L.; Sobel, B.E.; Bolman, R.M. III; Bergmann, S.R.

    1988-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the feasibility of detecting canine heterotopic cardiac allograft rejection scintigraphically after administration of 111In lymphocytes. To determine whether the approach is capable of detecting rejection in orthotopic cardiac transplants in which labeled lymphocytes circulating in the blood pool may reduce sensitivity, the present study was performed in which canine orthotopic cardiac transplants were evaluated in vivo. Immunosuppression was maintained with cyclosporine A (10-20 mg/kg/day) and prednisone (1 mg/kg/day) for 2 wk after transplantation. Subsequently, therapy was tapered. Five successful allografts were evaluated scintigraphically every 3 days after administration of 100-350 microCi 111In autologous lymphocytes. Correction for labeled lymphocytes circulating in the blood pool, but not actively sequestered in the allografts was accomplished by administering 3-6 mCi 99mTc autologous erythrocytes and employing a previously validated blood-pool activity correction technique. Cardiac infiltration of labeled lymphocytes was quantified as percent indium excess (%IE), scintigraphically detectable 111In in the transplant compared with that in blood, and results were compared with those of concomitantly performed endomyocardial biopsy. Scintigraphic %IE for hearts not undergoing rejection manifest histologically was 0.7 +/- 0.4. Percent IE for rejecting hearts was 6.8 +/- 4.0 (p less than 0.05). Scintigraphy detected each episode of rejection detected by biopsy. Scintigraphic criteria for rejection (%IE greater than 2 s.d. above normal) were not manifest in any study in which biopsies did not show rejection. Since scintigraphic results with 111In-labeled lymphocytes were concordant with biopsy results in orthotopic cardiac transplants, noninvasive detection of graft rejection in patients should be attainable with the approach developed.

  17. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program ... be designed to meet your needs. The Cardiac Rehabilitation Team Cardiac rehab involves a long-term commitment ...

  18. Short-Term Effects and Safety Analysis of Retrograde Autologous Blood Priming for Cardiopulmonary Bypass in Patients with Cardiac Valve Replacement Surgery.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ming; Li, Jun-Quan; Wu, Tian-Chi; Tian, Wei-Chen

    2015-11-01

    This randomized, double-blind study evaluated the short-term effects and safety of perioperative retrograde autologous priming (RAP) for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in patients with cardiac replacement surgery to determine if this approach is a better substitute for crystal liquids priming in patients with valvular heart disease. We observed that RAP significantly decreased the actual priming volume, preserved the hematocrit and hemoglobin level during CPB to a certain degree, and decreased lactate accumulation in CPB period. Moreover, RAP lowered the volume of transfusion and dosage blood products. Thus, our results showed that RAP approach effectively improved tissue perfusion and lowered intraoperative Lac levels, by reducing the hemodilution, which safely and reliably improve the microcirculation perfusion. PMID:27352335

  19. Coronary Sinus Biomarker Sampling Compared to Peripheral Venous Blood for Predicting Outcomes In Patients with Severe Heart Failure Undergoing Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy: The BIOCRT Study

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Quynh A.; Januzzi, James L.; Szymonifka, Jackie; Thai, Wai-ee; Wai, Bryan; Lavender, Zachary; Sharma, Umesh; Sandoval, Ryan M.; Grunau, Zachary S.; Basnet, Sandeep; Babatunde, Adefolakemi; Ajijola, Olujimi A.; Min, James K.; Singh, Jagmeet P.

    2014-01-01

    Background A significant minority of patients receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) remain non-responsive to this intervention. Objective To determine whether coronary sinus (CS) or baseline peripheral venous (PV) levels of established and emerging heart failure (HF) biomarkers are predictive of CRT outcomes. Methods In 73 patients (age 68±12; 83% male; ejection fraction 27 7%) with CS and PV blood drawn simultaneously at the time of CRT implantation, we measured amino-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), galectin-3 (gal-3), and soluble (s)ST2 levels. NT-proBNP concentrations>2000 pg/mL, gal-3>25.9 ng/mL, and sST2>35 ng/mL were considered positive, based on established PV cutpoints for identifying “high risk” individuals with HF. CRT response was adjudicated by HF Clinical Composite Score. Major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE) was defined as the composite endpoint of death, cardiac transplant, left ventricular assist device, and HF hospitalization at 2 years. Results NT-proBNP concentrations were 20% higher in the CS than periphery, while gal-3 and sST2 were 10% higher in periphery than CS (all p<0.001). There were 45% CRT non-responders at 6 months and 22% MACE. Triple positive CS values yielded the highest specificity of 95% for predicting CRT non-response. Consistently, CS strategies identified patients at higher risk for developing MACE, with over 11-fold adjusted increase for triple positive CS patients compared to triple negative patients (all p≤0.04). PV strategies were not predictive of MACE. Conclusions Our findings suggest that coronary sinus sampling of HF biomarkers may be better than peripheral venous blood levels for predicting CRT outcomes. Larger studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:25014756

  20. Ambulatory 24-hour cardiac oxygen consumption and blood pressure-heart rate variability: effects of nebivolol and valsartan alone and in combination.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Joseph L; Khan, Safi U; Saleem, Osman; Osmond, Peter J

    2015-07-01

    We compared an angiotensin receptor blocker (valsartan; VAL), a beta-blocker (nebivolol; NEB) and the combination of NEB/VAL with respect to 24-hour myocardial oxygen consumption (determined by 24-hour ambulatory heart rate-central systolic pressure product [ACRPP]) and its components. Subjects with hypertension (systolic blood pressure >140 or diastolic blood pressure >90; n = 26) were studied in a double-blinded, double-dummy, forced-titration, crossover design with 3 random-order experimental periods: VAL 320 mg, NEB 40 mg, and NEB/VAL 320/40 mg daily. After 4 weeks of each drug, ambulatory pulse wave analysis (MobilOGraph) was performed every 20 minutes for 24 hours. All three treatments resulted in nearly identical brachial and central systolic blood pressures. NEB alone or in combination with VAL resulted in lower ACRPP (by 11%-14%; P < .001 each) and heart rate (by 18%-20%; P < .001 each) compared with VAL, but stroke work (ACRPP per beat) was lower with VAL. Relative and adjusted variability (standard deviation and coefficient of variation) of heart rate were also lower with NEB and NEB/VAL than VAL. Results in African Americans, the majority subpopulation, were similar to those of the entire treatment group. We conclude that the rate-slowing effects of NEB cause ambulatory cardiac myocardial oxygen consumption to be lower with NEB monotherapy or NEB/VAL combination therapy than with VAL monotherapy. NEB/VAL is not superior to NEB alone in controlling heart rate, blood pressure, or ACRPP. Heart rate variability but not ACRPP variability is reduced by NEB or the combination NEB/VAL. There is no attenuation of beta-blocker-induced rate-slowing effects of in African Americans. PMID:26116459

  1. End-expiration respiratory gating for a high-resolution stationary cardiac SPECT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chung; Harris, Mark; Le, Max; Biondi, James; Grobshtein, Yariv; Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2014-10-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions can degrade myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) image quality and reduce defect detection and quantitative accuracy. In this study, we developed a dual respiratory and cardiac gating system for a high-resolution fully stationary cardiac SPECT scanner in order to improve the image quality and defect detection. Respiratory motion was monitored using a compressive sensor pillow connected to a dual respiratory-cardiac gating box, which sends cardiac triggers only during end-expiration phases to the single cardiac trigger input on the SPECT scanners. The listmode data were rebinned retrospectively into end-expiration frames for respiratory motion reduction or eight cardiac gates only during end-expiration phases to compensate for both respiratory and cardiac motions. The proposed method was first validated on a motion phantom in the presence and absence of multiple perfusion defects, and then applied on 11 patient studies with and without perfusion defects. In the normal phantom studies, the end-expiration gated SPECT (EXG-SPECT) reduced respiratory motion blur and increased myocardium to blood pool contrast by 51.2% as compared to the ungated images. The proposed method also yielded an average of 11.2% increase in myocardium to defect contrast as compared to the ungated images in the phantom studies with perfusion defects. In the patient studies, EXG-SPECT significantly improved the myocardium to blood pool contrast (p < 0.005) by 24% on average as compared to the ungated images, and led to improved perfusion uniformity across segments on polar maps for normal patients. For a patient with defect, EXG-SPECT improved the defect contrast and definition. The dual respiratory-cardiac gating further reduced the blurring effect, increased the myocardium to blood pool contrast significantly by 36% (p < 0.05) compared to EXG-SPECT, and further improved defect characteristics and visualization of fine structures at the expense of increased noise on

  2. End-expiration Respiratory Gating for a High Resolution Stationary Cardiac SPECT system

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chung; Harris, Mark; Le, Max; Biondi, James; Grobshtein, Yariv; Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions can degrade myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) image quality and reduce defect detection and quantitative accuracy. In this study, we developed a dual-respiratory and cardiac gating system for a high resolution fully stationary cardiac SPECT scanner in order to improve the image quality and defect detection. Respiratory motion was monitored using a compressive sensor pillow connected to a dual respiratory-cardiac gating box, which sends cardiac triggers only during end-expiration phases to the single cardiac trigger input on the SPECT scanners. The listmode data were rebinned retrospectively into end-expiration frames for respiratory motion reduction or 8 cardiac gates only during end-expiration phases to compensate for both respiratory and cardiac motions. The proposed method was first validated on a motion phantom in the presence and absence of multiple perfusion defects, and then applied on 11 patient studies with and without perfusion defects. In the normal phantom studies, the end-expiration gated SPECT (EXG-SPECT) reduced respiratory motion blur and increased myocardium to blood pool contrast by 51.2% as compared to the ungated images. The proposed method also yielded an average of 11.2% increase in myocardium to defect contrast as compared to the ungated images in the phantom studies with perfusion defects. In the patient studies, EXG-SPECT significantly improved the myocardium to blood pool contrast (p<0.005) by 24% on average as compared to the ungated images, and led to improved perfusion uniformity across segments on polar maps for normal patients. For a patient with defect, EXG-SPECT improved the defect contrast and definition. The dual respiratory-cardiac gating further reduced the blurring effect, increased the myocardium to blood pool contrast significantly by 36% (p<0.05) compared to EXG SPECT, and further improved defect characteristics and visualization of fine structures at the expense of increased noise on the

  3. Changes in cerebral blood flow in patients with severe congestive cardiac failure before and after captopril treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopalan, B.; Raine, A.E.; Cooper, R.; Ledingham, J.G.

    1984-05-31

    The intravenous /sup 133/xenon injection method was used to estimate global cerebral blood flow before and after treatment with captopril in nine patients with severe heart failure. The pretreatment mean blood pressure was 94.9 mm Hg (S.D. 13.9) and fell to 85.1 mm Hg (S.D. 18.1) after treatment with captopril for between four and 15 days. The cerebral blood flow before captopril was 61.1 ml/100 g per minute (S.D. 6.9), which was less than the value of 75.8 ml/100 g per minute found in control subjects. After treatment with captopril the cerebral blood flow increased to 73.8 ml/100 g per minute (S.D. 11.8, p less than 0.01). The fraction of carbon dioxide in the expired air was not significantly different in the two studies (4.1 +/- 0.88 versus 3.97 +/- 0.65). It is concluded that cerebral blood flow is reduced in severe heart failure and can be restored by treatment with captopril, but the reasons for the reduced flow and its improvement after converting enzyme inhibition are not known.

  4. Electromagnetic Interference in a Private Swimming Pool

    PubMed Central

    Iskandar, Sandia; Lavu, Madhav; Atoui, Moustapha; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya

    2016-01-01

    Although current lead design and filtering capabilities have greatly improved, Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) from environmental sources has been increasingly reported in patients with Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device (CIED) [1]. Few cases of inappropriate intracardiac Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) associated with swimming pool has been described [2]. Here we present a case of 64 year old male who presented with an interesting EMI signal that was subsequently identified to be related to AC current leak in his swimming pool. PMID:27479205

  5. TU-A-12A-09: Absolute Blood Flow Measurement in a Cardiac Phantom Using Low Dose CT

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemer, B; Hubbard, L; Lipinski, J; Molloi, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate a first pass analysis technique to measure absolute flow from low dose CT images in a cardiac phantom. This technique can be combined with a myocardial mass assignment to yield absolute perfusion using only two volume scans and reduce the radiation dose to the patient. Methods: A four-chamber cardiac phantom and perfusion chamber were constructed from poly-acrylic and connected with tubing to approximate anatomical features. The system was connected to a pulsatile pump, input/output reservoirs and power contrast injector. Flow was varied in the range of 1-2.67 mL/s with the pump operating at 60 beats/min. The system was imaged once a second for 14 seconds with a 320-row scanner (Toshiba Medical Systems) using a contrast-enhanced, prospective-gated cardiac perfusion protocol. Flow was calculated by the following steps: subsequent images of the perfusion volume were subtracted to find the contrast entering the volume; this was normalized by an upstream, known volume region to convert Hounsfield (HU) values to concentration; this was divided by the subtracted images time difference. The technique requires a relatively stable input contrast concentration and no contrast can leave the perfusion volume before the flow measurement is completed. Results: The flow calculated from the images showed an excellent correlation with the known rates. The data was fit to a linear function with slope 1.03, intercept 0.02 and an R{sup 2} value of 0.99. The average root mean square (RMS) error was 0.15 mL/s and the average standard deviation was 0.14 mL/s. The flow rate was stable within 7.7% across the full scan and served to validate model assumptions. Conclusion: Accurate, absolute flow rates were measured from CT images using a conservation of mass model. Measurements can be made using two volume scans which can substantially reduce the radiation dose compared with current dynamic perfusion techniques.

  6. Sustained mild hypergravity reduces spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yanagida, Ryo; Ogawa, Yojiro; Ueda, Kaname; Aoki, Ken; Iwasaki, Ken-ichi

    2014-10-01

    Head-to-foot gravitational force >1G (+Gz hypergravity) augments venous pooling in the lower body and reduces central blood volume during exposure, compared with 1Gz. Central hypovolemia has been reported to reduce spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity. However, no investigations have examined spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity during exposure to sustained mild +Gz hypergravity. We therefore hypothesized that mild +Gz hypergravity would reduce spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity, compared with 1Gz. To test this hypothesis, we examined spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity in 16 healthy men during exposure to mild +Gz hypergravity using a short-arm centrifuge. Beat-to-beat arterial blood pressure (tonometry) and R-R interval (electrocardiography) were obtained during 1Gz and 1.5Gz exposures. Spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity was assessed by sequence slope and transfer function gain. Stroke volume was calculated from the arterial pressure waveform using a three-element model. All indices of spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity decreased significantly (up slope: 18.6±2.3→12.7±1.6ms/mmHg, P<0.001; down slope: 19.0±2.5→13.2±1.3ms/mmHg, P=0.002; transfer function gain in low frequency: 14.4±2.2→10.1±1.1ms/mmHg, P=0.004; transfer function gain in high frequency: 22.2±7.5→12.4±3.5ms/mmHg, P<0.001). Stroke volume decreased significantly (88±5→80±6ml, P=0.025). Moreover, although systolic arterial pressure variability increased, R-R interval variability did not increase. These results suggest that even mild +Gz hypergravity reduces spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disturbance during the exposure. PMID:25156804

  7. Mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Blood circulation is the result of the beating of the heart, which provides the mechanical force to pump oxygenated blood to, and deoxygenated blood away from, the peripheral tissues. This depends critically on the preceding electrical activation. Disruptions in the orderly pattern of this propagating cardiac excitation wave can lead to arrhythmias. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying their generation and maintenance requires knowledge of the ionic contributions to the cardiac action potential, which is discussed in the first part of this review. A brief outline of the different classification systems for arrhythmogenesis is then provided, followed by a detailed discussion for each mechanism in turn, highlighting recent advances in this area. PMID:27092186

  8. Obesity-Related Alterations in Cardiac Lipid Profile and Nondipping Blood Pressure Pattern during Transition to Diastolic Dysfunction in Male db/db Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ford, David A.; Henriksen, Erik J.; Aroor, Annayya R.; Johnson, Megan S.; Habibi, Javad; Ma, Lixin; Yang, Ming; Albert, Carolyn J.; Lally, John W.; Ford, Caleb A.; Prasannarong, Mujalin; Hayden, Melvin R.; Whaley-Connell, Adam T.; Sowers, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and a nondipping circadian blood pressure (BP) pattern are associated with diastolic dysfunction. Ectopic lipid accumulation is increasingly recognized as an important metabolic abnormality contributing to diastolic dysfunction. However, little is known about the contribution of different lipids and the composition of lipid analytes to diastolic dysfunction. We have performed functional and structural studies and analyzed cardiac lipid profile at two time points during progression to diastolic dysfunction in a genetic model of obesity. Serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and telemetric measures of BP between 12 and 15 wk of age in obese male db/db mice indicated a nondipping circadian BP pattern and normal diastolic function at 12 wk that progressed to a deteriorating nondipping pattern and onset of diastolic dysfunction at 15 wk of age. Lipidomic analysis demonstrated elevated fatty acids and ceramides in db/db at 12 wk, but their levels were decreased at 15 wk, and this was accompanied by persistent mitochondrial ultrastructural abnormalities in concert with evidence of increased fatty acid oxidation and enhanced production of reactive oxygen species. Triacylglyceride and diacylglyceride levels were elevated at both 12 and 15 wk, but their composition changed to consist of more saturated and less unsaturated fatty acyl at 15 wk. An increase in the lipid droplets was apparent at both time points, and this was associated with increases in phosphatidycholine. In conclusion, a distinct pattern of myocardial lipid remodeling, accompanied by oxidative stress, is associated with the onset of diastolic dysfunction in obese, insulin-resistant db/db mice. PMID:23142808

  9. In vivo MRI measurement of fetal blood oxygen saturation in cardiac ventricles of fetal sheep: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Wedegärtner, Ulrike; Kooijman, Hendrik; Yamamura, Jin; Frisch, Michael; Weber, Christoph; Buchert, Ralph; Huff, Anna; Hecher, Kurt; Adam, Gerhard

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility to determine fetal blood oxygen saturation (sO(2)) with T(2)-weighted MR sequences using a fetal sheep model. T(2) measurements were performed on a 1.5-T scanner using a T(2) preparation pulse in combination with a three-dimensional balanced steady-state free precession sequence repeated at different echo times. Eight sheep fetuses were examined during a control, hypoxic, and recovery phase to perform T(2)-weighted scans of the fetal blood in the heart. Signal intensities in the left and right ventricle were measured to calculate the MR blood sO(2). During each phase, fetal carotid artery sO(2) was directly measured and correlated with MR sO(2). A Bland-Altman plot was performed. Fetal carotid artery sO(2) was 69% sO(2) during control, 16% sO(2) during hypoxemia, and 67% sO(2) during recovery. Mean values of the MR sO(2) were 49% sO(2) and 40% sO(2) for control, 6% sO(2) and 3% sO(2) for hypoxemia, and 51% sO(2) and 43% sO(2) for recovery in left ventricle and right ventricle, respectively. Mean values of fetal carotid artery sO(2) and MR sO(2) were highly correlated (left ventricle: r = 0.87, right ventricle: r = 0.89). According to the Bland-Altman plot, MR sO(2) was lower compared to fetal carotid artery sO(2) (left ventricle: 15%, right ventricle: 20%). Based on our preliminary results, it seems to be possible to assess fetal sO(2) with MR oximetry. PMID:20572133

  10. Cardiac Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Catheterization? Cardiac catheterization (KATH-eh-ter-ih-ZA-shun) is a ... disease. Doctors also can use ultrasound during cardiac catheterization to see blockages in the coronary arteries. Ultrasound ...

  11. The relative risk of myocardial infarction in patients who have high blood pressure and non-cardiac pain.

    PubMed

    Psaty, B M; Koepsell, T D; LoGerfo, J P; Wagner, E H; Inui, T S

    1987-01-01

    The authors conducted a population-based case--control study to determine the risk of myocardial infarction in patients who reported angina-like symptoms. The cases studied were those of patients who had high blood pressure and had sought treatment in 1984 with myocardial infarction as the first manifestation of coronary artery disease. Controls, a random sample of patients who had hypertension, were frequency-matched to cases by age and gender. Blind to case--control status, the authors reviewed the medical records of the 32 cases and 64 controls for reports of angina-like symptoms. While controls reported such symptoms at a constant rate, the events for the cases clustered near their infarctions. When a patient with hypertension sought medical advice for angina-like symptoms, the risk of infarction within 30 days was 14.2 (95% confidence interval, 2.8 to 71), and after 30 days it fell to 1.03. Among patients who have high blood pressure but no history of angina, presentations with prodromal symptoms in the primary care setting are so common that only about one in 100 such visits actually heralds myocardial infarction. PMID:3694297

  12. Multilayer out-of-plane overlap electrostatic energy harvesting structure actuated by blood pressure for powering intra-cardiac implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deterre, M.; Risquez, S.; Bouthaud, B.; Dal Molin, R.; Woytasik, M.; Lefeuvre, E.

    2013-12-01

    We present an innovative multilayer out-of-plane electrostatic energy harvesting device conceived in view of scavenging energy from regular blood pressure in the heart. This concept involves the use of a deformable packaging for the implant in order to transmit the blood pressure to the electrostatic transducer. As shown in previous work, this is possible by using thin metal micro-bellows structure, providing long term hermeticity and high flexibility. The design of the electrostatic device has overcome several challenges such as the very low frequency of the mechanical excitation (1 to 2 Hz) and the small available room in the medical implant. Analytical and numerical models have been used to maximize the capacitance variation, and hence to optimize the energy conversion. We have theoretically shown that a 25-layer transducer with 6-mm diameter and 1-mm thickness could harvest at least 20 mJ per heart beat in the left ventricle under a maximum voltage of 75 V. These results show that the proposed concept is promising and could power the next generation of leadless pacemakers.

  13. Cardiac phase: Amplitude analysis using macro programming

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, K.W.; Hickey, K.A.

    1981-11-01

    The analysis of EKG gated radionuclide cardiac imaging data with Fourier amplitude and phase images is becoming a valuable clinical technique, demonstrating location, size, and severity of regional ventricular abnormalities. Not all commercially available nuclear medicine computer systems offer software for phase and amplitude analysis; however, many systems do have the capability of linear image arithmetic using simple macro commands which can easily be sequenced into stored macro-strings or programs. Using simple but accurate series approximations for the Fourier operations, macro programs have been written for a Digital Equipment Corporation Gamma-11 system to obtain phase and amplitude images from routine gated cardiac studies. In addition, dynamic cine-mode presentation of the onset of mechanical systole is generated from the phase data, using only a second set of macro programs. This approach is easily adapted to different data acquisition protocols, and can be used on any system with macro commands for image arithmetic. Key words: Fourier analysis, cardiac cycle, gated blood pool imaging, amplitude image, phase image

  14. Swimming Pool Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... insist that the following rules are followed: Keep toys away from the pool when the pool is ... after each use. No tricycles or other riding toys at poolside. No electrical appliances near the pool. ...

  15. Cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ehsani, A A

    1984-02-01

    Exercise training is a major, and the most important, component of cardiac rehabilitation. Besides providing psychological benefits and promoting a "sense of well being," it elicits a number of adaptations in patients with ischemic heart disease. Among the clinically important adaptations are changes in the trained skeletal muscles and autonomic nervous system, resulting not only in increased maximum exercise capacity but also a slower heart rate and, at times, a lower systolic blood pressure during submaximal exercise. The reduction in the rate pressure product decreases myocardial O2 demand at any given submaximal exercise intensity and may thus alleviate myocardial ischemia and angina in patients with coronary artery disease. These adaptive responses occur even with a relatively modest exercise intensity. Although short-term exercise training of moderate intensity has not been reported to result in improvement in left ventricular performance, recent data suggest that exercise training of higher intensity and longer duration (12 months or longer) than has conventionally been used in cardiac rehabilitation programs may favorably affect the heart. This is characterized by improvements in left ventricular function, diminished electrocardiographic criteria of myocardial ischemia and increased stroke volume during exercise. Modest weight reduction accompanies regularly performed prolonged exercise training. It is important, however, to recognize that high-intensity exercise programs are suitable for only some patients with coronary artery disease who are stable and should be used only under strict medical supervision. PMID:6400004

  16. Selenoprotein P and apolipoprotein E receptor-2 interact at the blood-brain barrier and also within the brain to maintain an essential selenium pool that protects against neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Burk, Raymond F.; Hill, Kristina E.; Motley, Amy K.; Winfrey, Virginia P.; Kurokawa, Suguru; Mitchell, Stuart L.; Zhang, Wanqi

    2014-01-01

    Selenoprotein P (Sepp1) and its receptor, apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (apoER2), account for brain retaining selenium better than other tissues. The primary sources of Sepp1 in plasma and brain are hepatocytes and astrocytes, respectively. ApoER2 is expressed in varying amounts by tissues; within the brain it is expressed primarily by neurons. Knockout of Sepp1 or apoER2 lowers brain selenium from ∼120 to ∼50 ng/g and leads to severe neurodegeneration and death in mild selenium deficiency. Interactions of Sepp1 and apoER2 that protect against this injury have not been characterized. We studied Sepp1, apoER2, and brain selenium in knockout mice. Immunocytochemistry showed that apoER2 mediates Sepp1 uptake at the blood-brain barrier. When Sepp1−/− or apoER2−/− mice developed severe neurodegeneration caused by mild selenium deficiency, brain selenium was ∼35 ng/g. In extreme selenium deficiency, however, brain selenium of ∼12 ng/g was tolerated when both Sepp1 and apoER2 were intact in the brain. These findings indicate that tandem Sepp1-apoER2 interactions supply selenium for maintenance of brain neurons. One interaction is at the blood-brain barrier, and the other is within the brain. We postulate that Sepp1 inside the blood-brain barrier is taken up by neurons via apoER2, concentrating brain selenium in them.—Burk, R. F., Hill, K. E., Motley, A. K., Winfrey, V. P., Kurokawa, S., Mitchell, S. L., Zhang, W. Selenoprotein P and apolipoprotein E receptor-2 interact at the blood-brain barrier and also within the brain to maintain an essential selenium pool that protects against neurodegeneration. PMID:24760755

  17. Gene Expression Profiles of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Reveal Transcriptional Signatures as Novel Biomarkers for Cardiac Remodeling in Rats with Aldosteronism and Hypertensive Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gerling, Ivan C.; Ahokas, Robert A.; Kamalov, German; Zhao, Wenyuan; Bhattacharya, Syamal K.; Sun, Yao; Weber, Karl T.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives In searching for a noninvasive surrogate tissue having mimicry with the prooxidant/-proinflammatory hypertensive heart disease (HHD) phenotype, we turned to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). We tested whether iterations in [Ca2+]i, [Zn2+]i and oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes and PBMC would complement each other eliciting similar shifts in gene expression profiles in these tissues demonstrable during preclinical (wk 1) and pathologic (wk 4) stages of aldosterone/salt treatment (ALDOST). Background Inappropriate neurohormonal activation contributes to pathologic remodeling of myocardium in HHD associated with aldosteronism. In rats receiving chronic ALDOST, evidence of reparative fibrosis replacing necrotic cardiomyocytes and coronary vasculopathy appears at wk 4 associated with the induction of oxidative stress by mitochondria that overwhelms endogenous, largely Zn2+-based, antioxidant defenses. Biomarker-guided prediction of risk prior to the appearance of cardiac pathology would prove invaluable. Methods In PBMC and cardiomyocytes, quantitation of cytoplasmic free Ca2+ and Zn2+, H2O2 and 8-iosprostane levels, as well as isolation of RNA and gene expression, together with statistical and clustering analyses, and confirmation of genes by in situ hybridization and RT-PCR, were performed. Results Compared to controls, at wk 1 and 4 ALDOST, we found comparable: increments in [Ca2+]i, [Zn2+]i and 8-isoprotane coupled to increased H2O2 production in cardiac mitochondria and PBMC, together with the common networks of expression profiles dominated by genes involved in oxidative stress, inflammation and repair. These included three central Ingenuity pathway-linked genes: p38MAPK, a stress-responsive protein; NFκB, a redox-sensitive transcription factor and a proinflammatory cascade it regulates; and TGF-β1, a fibrogenic cytokine involved in tissue repair. Conclusions Significant overlapping demonstrated in the molecular mimicry of PBMC and

  18. Differential role of endothelial versus neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the regulation of coronary blood flow during pacing-induced increases in cardiac workload

    PubMed Central

    Shabeeh, Husain; Melikian, Narbeh; Dworakowski, Rafal; Casadei, Barbara; Chowienczyk, Phil

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was assumed to be the only source of nitric oxide (NO) involved in the regulation of human coronary blood flow (CBF). However, our recent first-in-human study using the neuronal NOS (nNOS)-selective inhibitor S-methyl-L-thiocitrulline (SMTC) showed that nNOS-derived NO also plays a role. In this study, we investigated the relative contribution of nNOS and eNOS to the CBF response to a pacing-induced increase in cardiac workload. Incremental right atrial pacing was undertaken in patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries during intracoronary infusion of saline vehicle and then either SMTC or NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA; which inhibits both eNOS and nNOS). Intracoronary SMTC (0.625 μmol/min) and l-NMMA (25 μmol/min) reduced basal CBF to a similar extent (−19.2 ± 3.2% and 25.0 ± 2.7%, respectively; n = 10 per group). Pacing-induced increases in CBF were significantly blunted by l-NMMA (maximum CBF: 83.5 ± 14.2 ml/min during saline vs. 61.6 ± 9.5 ml/min during l-NMMA; P < 0.01). By contrast, intracoronary SMTC had no effect on the maximum CBF during pacing (98.5 ± 12.9 ml/min during saline vs. 102.1 ± 16.6 ml/min during SMTC; P = not significant). l-NMMA also blunted the pacing-induced increase in coronary artery diameter (P < 0.001 vs. saline), whereas SMTC had no effect. Our results confirm a role of nNOS in the regulation of basal CBF in humans but show that coronary vasodilation in response to a pacing-induced increase in cardiac workload is exclusively mediated by eNOS-derived NO. PMID:23479261

  19. Global and regional differences in cerebral blood flow after asphyxial versus ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest in rats using ASL-MRI.

    PubMed

    Drabek, Tomas; Foley, Lesley M; Janata, Andreas; Stezoski, Jason; Hitchens, T Kevin; Manole, Mioara D; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2014-07-01

    Both ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest (VFCA) and asphyxial cardiac arrest (ACA) are frequent causes of CA. However, only isolated reports compared cerebral blood flow (CBF) reperfusion patterns after different types of CA, and even fewer reports used methods that allow serial and regional assessment of CBF. We hypothesized that the reperfusion patterns of CBF will differ between individual types of experimental CA. In a prospective block-randomized study, fentanyl-anesthetized adult rats were subjected to 8min VFCA or ACA. Rats were then resuscitated with epinephrine, bicarbonate, manual chest compressions and mechanical ventilation. After the return of spontaneous circulation, CBF was then serially assessed via arterial spin-labeling magnetic resonance imaging (ASL-MRI) in cortex, thalamus, hippocampus and amygdala/piriform complex over 1h resuscitation time (RT). Both ACA and VFCA produced significant temporal and regional differences in CBF. All regions in both models showed significant changes over time (p<0.01), with early hyperperfusion and delayed hypoperfusion. ACA resulted in early hyperperfusion in cortex and thalamus (both p<0.05 vs. amygdala/piriform complex). In contrast, VFCA induced early hyperperfusion only in cortex (p<0.05 vs. other regions). Hyperperfusion was prolonged after ACA, peaking at 7min RT (RT7; 199% vs. BL, Baseline, in cortex and 201% in thalamus, p<0.05), then returning close to BL at ∼RT15. In contrast, VFCA model induced mild hyperemia, peaking at RT7 (141% vs. BL in cortex). Both ACA and VFCA showed delayed hypoperfusion (ACA, ∼30% below BL in hippocampus and amygdala/piriform complex, p<0.05; VFCA, 34-41% below BL in hippocampus and amygdala/piriform complex, p<0.05). In conclusion, both ACA and VFCA in adult rats produced significant regional and temporal differences in CBF. In ACA, hyperperfusion was most pronounced in cortex and thalamus. In VFCA, the changes were more modest, with hyperperfusion seen only in cortex

  20. In vitro synthesis of IgE by human peripheral blood leucocytes: V. Functional heterogeneity within the IgE-B-cell pool.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, K J; Holt, P G; Holt, B J; Cameron, K J; Hobday, J D; Thompson, P; Phillips, M

    1987-01-01

    Fractionation of human peripheral blood leucocytes (PBL) B cells by differential sedimentation on a discontinuous Percoll gradient separates B cell subpopulations which vary markedly in rates of spontaneous IgE synthesis, often revealing the presence of active IgE secreting cells which are totally suppressed within unfractionated PBL B cell preparations. The production in vitro of IgE by separated B cell populations from the same individual may respond disparately to an identical population of autologous T cells and to pokeweed mitogen. Kinetic studies revealed major differences in both the rates of release of cell-associated IgE between these B cell populations, and their rates of de novo IgE synthesis. From a methodological viewpoint, the use of this B cell fractionation technique is demonstrated to improve greatly the efficiency of detection of T cell-responsive IgE producing B cells in peripheral blood from atopics, and from a mechanistic standpoint raises the possibility that B cell heterogeneity may modulate the functional expression of IgE-regulatory T cells signals. PMID:3498575

  1. The Coagulative Profile of Cyanotic Children Undergoing Cardiac Surgery: The Role of Whole Blood Preoperative Thromboelastometry on Postoperative Transfusion Requirement.

    PubMed

    Vida, Vladimiro L; Spiezia, Luca; Bortolussi, Giacomo; Marchetti, Marta E; Campello, Elena; Pittarello, Demetrio; Gregori, Dario; Stellin, Giovanni; Simioni, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the preoperative coagulation pattern and its association to postoperative blood products transfusion in children with congenital heart disease (CHD), focusing on cyanotic patients (oxygen saturation, SATO 2  < 85%). From January to August 2014, preoperative standard coagulation tests and rotational thromboelastometry assays were performed on 81 pediatric patients (<16 years old) who underwent surgery for CHD with the aid of cardiopulmonary bypass. Sixty patients (74%) were acyanotic and 21 (26%) cyanotic. Mean age at time of surgery was 7.9 months (interquartile range 2.9-43.6 months). Cyanotic patients had a significantly higher hematocrit (P < 0.001), a reduced prothrombin activity (PT) (P = 0.01) level, and a lower platelet count (P = 0.02) than acyanotic patients. An inverse linear association was found between patient's SATO2 and clot formation time (CFT) (INTEM, P = 0.001, and EXTEM, P < 0.0001). A direct linear association was found between patient's SATO2 and maximum clot firmness (MCF) (INTEM, P = 0.04, and EXTEM, P = 0.05). Preoperative cyanosis was also associated with a lower median MCF in FIBTEM (P = 0.02). Cyanotic patients required more frequent postoperative transfusions of fibrinogen (7/21 patients, 33% vs. 4/60 patients, 6.7%, P = 0.01) and fresh frozen plasma (14/21, 67% vs. 25/60, 42%, P = 0.08). Patients with a lower presurgery PT and platelet count subsequently required more fibrinogen transfusion P = 0.02 and P = 0.003, respectively); the same goes for patients with a longer CFT (INTEM, P = 0.01 and EXTEM, P = 0.03) and a reduced MCF (INTEM, P = 0.02 and FIBTEM, P = 0.01) as well. Cyanotic patients showed significant preoperative coagulation anomalies and required a higher postoperative fibrinogen supplementation. The preoperative MCF FIBTEM has become an important factor in our postoperative thromboelastometry-guided transfusion

  2. Sympathetic Activation Does Not Affect the Cardiac and Respiratory Contribution to the Relationship between Blood Pressure and Pial Artery Pulsation Oscillations in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Winklewski, Pawel J.; Tkachenko, Yurii; Mazur, Kamila; Kot, Jacek; Gruszecki, Marcin; Guminski, Wojciech; Czuszynski, Krzysztof; Wtorek, Jerzy; Frydrychowski, Andrzej F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Using a novel method called near-infrared transillumination backscattering sounding (NIR-T/BSS) that allows for the non-invasive measurement of pial artery pulsation (cc-TQ) and subarachnoid width (sas-TQ) in humans, we assessed the influence of sympathetic activation on the cardiac and respiratory contribution to blood pressure (BP) cc-TQ oscillations in healthy subjects. Methods The pial artery and subarachnoid width response to handgrip (HGT) and cold test (CT) were studied in 20 healthy subjects. The cc-TQ and sas-TQ were measured using NIR-T/BSS; cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) was measured using Doppler ultrasound of the left internal carotid artery; heart rate (HR) and beat-to-beat mean BP were recorded using a continuous finger-pulse photoplethysmography; respiratory rate (RR), minute ventilation (MV), end-tidal CO2 (EtCO2) and end-tidal O2 (EtO2) were measured using a metabolic and spirometry module of the medical monitoring system. Wavelet transform analysis was used to assess the relationship between BP and cc-TQ oscillations. Results HGT evoked an increase in BP (+15.9%; P<0.001), HR (14.7; P<0.001), SaO2 (+0.5; P<0.001) EtO2 (+2.1; P<0.05) RR (+9.2%; P = 0.05) and MV (+15.5%; P<0.001), while sas-TQ was diminished (-8.12%; P<0.001), and a clear trend toward cc-TQ decline was observed (-11.0%; NS). CBFV (+2.9%; NS) and EtCO2 (-0.7; NS) did not change during HGT. CT evoked an increase in BP (+7.4%; P<0.001), sas-TQ (+3.5%; P<0.05) and SaO2(+0.3%; P<0.05). HR (+2.3%; NS), CBFV (+2.0%; NS), EtO2 (-0.7%; NS) and EtCO2 (+0.9%; NS) remained unchanged. A trend toward decreased cc-TQ was observed (-5.1%; NS). The sas-TQ response was biphasic with elevation during the first 40 seconds (+8.8% vs. baseline; P<0.001) and subsequent decline (+4.1% vs. baseline; P<0.05). No change with respect to wavelet coherence and wavelet phase coherence was found between the BP and cc-TQ oscillations. Conclusions Short sympathetic activation does not affect the

  3. Human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells activate the survival protein Akt in cardiac myocytes and endothelial cells that limits apoptosis and necrosis during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Henning, Robert J; Dennis, Steve; Sawmiller, Darrell; Hunter, Lorynn; Sanberg, Paul; Miller, Leslie

    2012-06-01

    We have previously reported that human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (HUCBC), which contain hematopoietic, mesenchymal, and endothelial stem cells, can significantly reduce acute myocardial infarction size. To determine the mechanism whereby HUCBC increase myocyte and vascular endothelial cell survival, we treated cardiac myocytes and coronary artery endothelial cells in separate experiments with HUCBC plus culture media or culture media alone and subjected the cells to 24 h of hypoxia or normoxia. We then determined in myocytes and endothelial cells activation of the cell survival protein Akt by Western blots. We also determined in these cells apoptosis by annexin V staining and necrosis by propidium iodide staining. Thereafter, we inhibited with API, a specific and sensitive Akt inhibitor, Akt activation in myocytes and endothelial cells cultured with HUCBC during hypoxia and determined cell apoptosis and necrosis. In cells cultured without HUCBC, hypoxia only slightly activated Akt. Moreover, hypoxia increased myocyte apoptosis by ≥ 226% and necrosis by 58% in comparison with myocytes in normoxia. Hypoxic treatment of endothelial cells without HUCBC increased apoptosis by 94% and necrosis by 59%. In contrast, hypoxia did not significantly affect HUCBC. Moreover, in myocyte + HUCBC cultures in hypoxia, HUCBC induced a ≥ 135% increase in myocyte phospho-Akt. Akt activation decreased myocyte apoptosis by 76% and necrosis by 35%. In endothelial cells, HUCBC increased phospho-Akt by 116%. HUCBC also decreased endothelial cell apoptosis by 58% and necrosis by 42%. Inhibition of Akt with API in myocytes and endothelial cells cultured with HUCBC during hypoxia nearly totally prevented the HUCBC-induced decrease in apoptosis and necrosis. We conclude that HUCBC can significantly decrease hypoxia-induced myocyte and endothelial cell apoptosis and necrosis by activating Akt in these cells and in this manner HUCBC can limit myocardial ischemia and injury. PMID

  4. Blood pressure and fasting lipid changes after 24 weeks’ treatment with vildagliptin: a pooled analysis in >2,000 previously drug-naïve patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Marc; Schweizer, Anja; Foley, James E

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We have previously shown modest weight loss with vildagliptin treatment. Since body weight balance is associated with changes in blood pressure (BP) and fasting lipids, we have assessed these parameters following vildagliptin treatment. Methods Data were pooled from all double-blind, randomized, controlled, vildagliptin mono-therapy trials on previously drug-naïve patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who received vildagliptin 50 mg once daily (qd) or twice daily (bid; n=2,108) and wherein BP and fasting lipid data were obtained. Results Data from patients receiving vildagliptin 50 mg qd or bid showed reductions from baseline to week 24 in systolic BP (from 132.5±0.32 to 129.8±0.34 mmHg; P<0.0001), diastolic BP (from 81.2±0.18 to 79.6±0.19 mmHg; P<0.0001), fasting triglycerides (from 2.00±0.02 to 1.80±0.02 mmol/L; P<0.0001), very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (from 0.90±0.01 to 0.83±0.01 mmol/L; P<0.0001), and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (from 3.17±0.02 to 3.04±0.02 mmol/L; P<0.0001), whereas high density lipoprotein cholesterol increased (from 1.19±0.01 to 1.22±0.01 mmol/L; P<0.001). Weight decreased by 0.48±0.08 kg (P<0.001). Conclusion This large pooled analysis demonstrated that vildagliptin shows a significant reduction in BP and a favorable fasting lipid profile that are associated with modest weight loss. PMID:27574437

  5. Comparison of three dimensional magnetic resonance imaging in conjunction with a blood pool contrast agent and nuclear scintigraphy for the detection of experimentally induced gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Hilfiker, P; Weishaupt, D; Kacl, G; Hetzer, F; Griff, M; Ruehm, S; Debatin, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—To compare the performance of 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in conjunction with an intravascular contrast agent with that of scintigraphy, with respect to detection and localisation of gastrointestinal haemorrhage in vivo in pigs.
METHODS—Intraluminal bleeding sites were surgically created in the small bowel and colon of six pigs. The animals underwent scintigraphy with 99mTc labelled red blood cells and 3D MRI following administration of an intravascular contrast agent (NC100150) at five minute intervals over 30 minutes. For analysis, the intestinal tract was divided into six segments. Based on the two evaluated methods, each segment was characterised on a five point scale regarding the presence of a bleed. At autopsy, the surgically manipulated bowel segments were inspected for the presence of haemorrhage.
RESULTS—Bleeding was confirmed at autopsy in 18/36 segments. Contrast extravasation with subsequent movement through the bowel could be documented on MRI data sets. All segments were correctly characterised, resulting in 100% sensitivity and specificity for MRI. Based on scintigraphy, interpretation of seven segments (19%) was false (sensitivity/specificity of 78%/72%). Differences in diagnostic performance were evident in the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis, with an area under the MRI curve of 0.99 and under the scintigraphy curve of 0.85.
CONCLUSION—In conjunction with an intravascular contrast agent, 3D MRI permits accurate detection and localisation of gastrointestinal bleeding. The extent and evolution of intestinal bleeding can be determined with repeated data acquisition.


Keywords: gastrointestinal tract; haemorrhage; scintigraphy; magnetic resonance; contrast agent PMID:10486369

  6. Determinants of exercise peak arterial blood pressure, circulatory power, and exercise cardiac power in a population based sample of Finnish male and female aged 30 to 47 years: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Novel parameters derived from peak maximal oxygen uptake (VO2) and exercise arterial blood pressure, such as peak circulatory power (CP) and exercise cardiac power (ECP), can be used in the risk assessment of cardiovascular disease and stroke. However, the determinants of these factors are poorly characterized in the general population. Methods We assessed peak arterial blood pressure, CP and ECP with standardized cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) on 281 female and 257 male participants of the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study. The subjects were aged 30–47 years. Peak VO2 as well as systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressures were measured to calculate peak mean arterial pressure, CP and ECP. These parameters were assessed for correlation with sex, age, height, weight, waist-to-hip ratio, smoking, physical activity index (PAI), fasting insulin and glucose levels as well as the use of antihypertensive treatment. Results Sex, age and weight explained 36% of the variation in peak systolic blood pressure, and these factors in combination with height and the use of antihypertensive treatment explained 13% of the variation in peak diastolic blood pressure. Sex, height, weight, waist-to-hip ratio, PAI and smoking explained 49% − 52% of the variation in peak CP. Sex, age, height, weight, waist-to-hip ratio, PAI, smoking and insulin levels explained 21% − 49% of variation in ECP. Conclusions Subject demographics and lifestyle-related factors should be taken into account when exercise blood pressure response, CP and ECP are used to evaluate patients’ cardiac function in CPET. PMID:24621399

  7. Swimming pool cleaner poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Swimming pool cleaner poisoning occurs when someone swallows this type of cleaner, touches it, or breathes in ... The harmful substances in swimming pool cleaner are: Bromine ... copper Chlorine Soda ash Sodium bicarbonate Various mild acids

  8. Swimming pool granuloma

    MedlinePlus

    A swimming pool granuloma is a long-term (chronic) skin infection. It is caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium marinum . ... A swimming pool granuloma occurs when water containing Mycobacterium marinum bacteria enters a break in the skin. Signs of ...

  9. Red blood cell distribution width independently predicts medium-term mortality and major adverse cardiac events after an acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Turcato, Gianni; Serafini, Valentina; Dilda, Alice; Bovo, Chiara; Caruso, Beatrice; Ricci, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Background The value of red blood cell distribution width (RDW), a simple and inexpensive measure of anisocytosis, has been associated with the outcome of many human chronic disorders. Therefore, this retrospective study was aimed to investigate whether RDW may be associated with medium-term mortality and major adverse cardiac events (MACE) after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Methods A total number of 979 patients diagnosed with ACS were enrolled from June 2014 to November 2014, and followed-up until June 2015. Results The RDW value in patients with 3-month MACE and in those who died was significantly higher than that of patients without 3-month MACE (13.3% vs. 14.0%; P<0.001) and those who were still alive at the end of follow-up (13.4% vs. 14.4%; P<0.001). In univariate analysis, RDW was found to be associated with 3-month MACE [odds ratio (OR), 1.70; 95% CI, 1.44–2.00, P<0.001]. In multivariate analysis, RDW remained independently associated with 3-month MACE (adjusted OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.19–1.55; P<0.001) and death (adjusted OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.05–1.71; P=0.020). The accuracy of RDW for predicting 3-month MACE was 0.67 (95% CI, 0.66–0.72; P<0.001). The most efficient discriminatory RDW value was 14.8%, which was associated with 3.8 (95% CI, 2.6–5.7; P<0.001) higher risk of 3-month MACE. Patients with RDW >14.8% exhibited a significantly short survival than those with RDW ≤14.8% (331 vs. 465 days; P<0.001). Conclusions The results of this study confirm that RDW may be a valuable, easy and inexpensive parameter for stratifying the medium-term risk in patients with ACS. PMID:27500155

  10. The science of pooling

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.

    1995-10-01

    The pooling of data from radon studies is described. Pooling refers to the analysis of original data from several studies, not meta-analysis in which summary measures from published data are analyzed. A main objective for pooling is to reduce uncertainty and to obtain more precise estimates of risk than would be available from any single study.

  11. Endothelin A Receptor Antagonist, Atrasentan, Attenuates Renal and Cardiac Dysfunction in Dahl Salt-Hypertensive Rats in a Blood Pressure Independent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Samad, Mohammed A.; Kim, Ui Kyoung; Kang, Joshua J.; Ke, Qingen; Kang, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinuria is a hallmark of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD), and a good predictor of clinical outcome. Selective endothelin A (ETA) receptor antagonist used with renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors prevents development of proteinuria in CKD. However, whether the improvement in proteinuria would have beneficial effects on CVD, independent of RAS inhibition, is not well understood. In this study, we investigated whether atrasentan, an ETA receptor antagonist, has renal and cardiovascular effects independent of RAS inhibition. Male Dahl salt sensitive (DSS) rats, at six weeks of age, received water with or without different doses of atrasentan and/or enalapril under high salt (HS) diet or normal diet (ND) for 6 weeks. At the end of 12th week, atrasentan at a moderate dose significantly attenuated proteinuria and serum creatinine without reducing mean arterial pressure (MAP), thereby preventing cardiac hypertrophy and improving cardiac function. ACE inhibitor enalapril at a dose that did not significantly lowered BP, attenuated cardiac hypertrophy while moderately improving cardiac function without reducing proteinuria and serum creatinine level. Nonetheless, combined therapy of atrasentan and enalapril that does not altering BP exerted additional cardioprotective effect. Based on these findings, we conclude that BP independent monotherapy of ETA receptor antagonist attenuates the progression of CKD and significantly mitigates CVD independent of RAS inhibition. PMID:25775254

  12. Endothelin A receptor antagonist, atrasentan, attenuates renal and cardiac dysfunction in Dahl salt-hypertensive rats in a blood pressure independent manner.

    PubMed

    Samad, Mohammed A; Kim, Ui Kyoung; Kang, Joshua J; Ke, Qingen; Kang, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Proteinuria is a hallmark of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD), and a good predictor of clinical outcome. Selective endothelin A (ETA) receptor antagonist used with renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors prevents development of proteinuria in CKD. However, whether the improvement in proteinuria would have beneficial effects on CVD, independent of RAS inhibition, is not well understood. In this study, we investigated whether atrasentan, an ETA receptor antagonist, has renal and cardiovascular effects independent of RAS inhibition. Male Dahl salt sensitive (DSS) rats, at six weeks of age, received water with or without different doses of atrasentan and/or enalapril under high salt (HS) diet or normal diet (ND) for 6 weeks. At the end of 12th week, atrasentan at a moderate dose significantly attenuated proteinuria and serum creatinine without reducing mean arterial pressure (MAP), thereby preventing cardiac hypertrophy and improving cardiac function. ACE inhibitor enalapril at a dose that did not significantly lowered BP, attenuated cardiac hypertrophy while moderately improving cardiac function without reducing proteinuria and serum creatinine level. Nonetheless, combined therapy of atrasentan and enalapril that does not altering BP exerted additional cardioprotective effect. Based on these findings, we conclude that BP independent monotherapy of ETA receptor antagonist attenuates the progression of CKD and significantly mitigates CVD independent of RAS inhibition. PMID:25775254

  13. Platelet lysate from whole blood-derived pooled platelet concentrates and apheresis-derived platelet concentrates for the isolation and expansion of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells: production process, content and identification of active components

    PubMed Central

    Fekete, Natalie; Gadelorge, Mélanie; Fürst, Daniel; Maurer, Caroline; Dausend, Julia; Fleury-Cappellesso, Sandrine; Mailänder, Volker; Lotfi, Ramin; Ignatius, Anita; Sensebé, Luc; Bourin, Philippe; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Rojewski, Markus Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background aims The clinical use of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) requires ex vivo expansion in media containing supplements such as fetal bovine serum or, alternatively, human platelet lysate (PL). Methods Platelet concentrates were frozen, quarantine stored, thawed and sterile filtered to obtain PL. PL content and its effect on fibroblast-colony-forming unit (CFU-F) formation, MSC proliferation and large-scale expansion were studied. Results PL contained high levels of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), soluble CD40L (sCD40L), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), platelet-derived growth factor AA (PDGF-AA), platelet-derived growth factor AB/BB (PDGF-AB/BB), chemokine (C-C) ligand 5 (CCL5; RANTES) transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and chemokine (C-X-C) ligand 1/2/3 (GRO), with low batch-to-batch variability, and most were stable for up to 14 days. Inhibition of PDGF-BB and bFGF decreased MSC proliferation by about 20% and 50%, respectively. The strongest inhibition (about 75%) was observed with a combination of anti-bFGF + anti-PDGF-BB and anti-bFGF + anti-TGF-β1 + anti-PDGF-BB. Interestingly, various combinations of recombinant PDGF-BB, bFGF and TGF-β1 were not sufficient to promote cell proliferation. PL from whole blood-derived pooled platelet concentrates and apheresis platelet concentrates did not differ significantly in their growth-promoting activity on MSC. Conclusions PL enhances MSC proliferation and can be regarded as a safe tool for MSC expansion for clinical purposes. \\in particular, PDGF-BB and bFGF are essential components for the growth-promoting effect of PL, but are not sufficient for MSC proliferation. PMID:22296115

  14. Cold pool dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Leah D.; Heever, Susan C.

    2016-02-01

    The mechanisms by which sensible heat fluxes (SHFs) alter cold pool characteristics and dissipation rates are investigated in this study using idealized two-dimensional numerical simulations and an environment representative of daytime, dry, continental conditions. Simulations are performed with no SHFs, SHFs calculated using a bulk formula, and constant SHFs for model resolutions with horizontal (vertical) grid spacings ranging from 50 m (25 m) to 400 m (200 m). In the highest resolution simulations, turbulent entrainment of environmental air into the cold pool is an important mechanism for dissipation in the absence of SHFs. Including SHFs enhances cold pool dissipation rates, but the processes responsible for the enhanced dissipation differ depending on the SHF formulation. The bulk SHFs increase the near-surface cold pool temperatures, but their effects on the overall cold pool characteristics are small, while the constant SHFs influence the near-surface environmental stability and the turbulent entrainment rates into the cold pool. The changes to the entrainment rates are found to be the most significant of the SHF effects on cold pool dissipation. SHFs may also influence the timing of cold pool-induced convective initiation by altering the environmental stability and the cold pool intensity. As the model resolution is coarsened, cold pool dissipation is found to be less sensitive to SHFs. Furthermore, the coarser resolution simulations not only poorly but sometimes wrongly represent the SHF impacts on the cold pools. Recommendations are made regarding simulating the interaction of cold pools with convection and the land surface in cloud-resolving models.

  15. Cardiac function and rejection following transplantation of the heart

    SciTech Connect

    Schober, O.; Schuler, S.; Gratz, K.; Warnecke, H.; Lang, W.; Hetzer, R.; Creutzig, H.

    1985-05-01

    It was the purpose of the study to evaluate the noninvasive detection of rejection following cardiac transplantation. Multigated cardiac blood pool imaging (MUGA) at rest with assessment of ejection fraction (EF) and regional wall motion was determined prospectively in 14 patients with 180 studies (follow up 5.1 +- 3.2 months) following orthotopic cardiac transplantation. The results were compared with histological examination of a percutaneous endocardial biopsy specimen (EMB) from the right ventricle. Diagnosis of rejection by EF measurement was defined by a decrease of 10% if EF < 70%, and 15% if EF > 70%. In 152 studies a normal MUGA study correlated with none rejection as defined by EMB. In 14 of 22 studies with moderate or severe rejection decrease of EF followed the rejection with a delay of 5 days. Septal wall motion abnormalities were typical. In 6 studies an abnormal temporal course of EF was not related to a similar finding in EMB. A sensitivity of 69% and a specifity of 96% can be estimated in the investigated group, in which all patients survived during the period of the study. It is concluded that rejection can be excluded by noninvasive MUGA (specifity 96%) and that MUGA is predictive of rejection (sensitivity 67%) mostly with a delay of 5 days.

  16. Cardiac metastases

    PubMed Central

    Bussani, R; De‐Giorgio, F; Abbate, A; Silvestri, F

    2007-01-01

    Tumours metastatic to the heart (cardiac metastases) are among the least known and highly debated issues in oncology, and few systematic studies are devoted to this topic. Although primary cardiac tumours are extremely uncommon (various postmortem studies report rates between 0.001% and 0.28%), secondary tumours are not, and at least in theory, the heart can be metastasised by any malignant neoplasm able to spread to distant sites. In general, cardiac metastases are considered to be rare; however, when sought for, the incidence seems to be not as low as expected, ranging from 2.3% and 18.3%. Although no malignant tumours are known that diffuse preferentially to the heart, some do involve the heart more often than others—for example, melanoma and mediastinal primary tumours. This paper attempts to review the pathophysiology of cardiac metastatic disease, epidemiology and clinical presentation of cardiac metastases, and pathological characterisation of the lesions. PMID:17098886

  17. 13 CFR 120.611 - Pools backing Pool Certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pools backing Pool Certificates. 120.611 Section 120.611 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Secondary Market Certificates § 120.611 Pools backing Pool Certificates. (a) Pool characteristics. As...

  18. Diagnosis of enzootic bovine leucosis in single and pooled samples.

    PubMed

    Hoff-Jørgensen, R

    1990-12-01

    Diagnosis of enzootic bovine leucosis is based on detection of antibodies against bovine leukemia virus, BLV. Some ELISA modifications have proved sensitive enough for use in the examination of pooled blood samples from slaughterhouses, milk and pooled milk samples. Suggestions for the standardisation of different ELISA modifications using a common reference serum are presented. PMID:1966753

  19. Cardiac Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jeudy, Jean; Burke, Allen P; Frazier, Aletta Ann

    2016-07-01

    Lymphoma of the heart and pericardium may develop in up to 25% of patients with disseminated nodal disease, but primary cardiac lymphoma is rare. The majority are diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, which arise in immunocompetent older individuals, men twice as often as women. Subsets are found in immunocompromised patients, including those with HIV-AIDS or allograft recipients. Cardiac lymphomas tend to arise in the wall of the right heart, especially right atrium, with contiguous infiltration of epicardium and pericardium. Pericardial implants and effusions are common. The disease is often multifocal in the heart, but cardiac valves are usually spared. PMID:27265603

  20. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, depression, and diabetes. Being overweight or obese, smoking, and not exercising are other risk factors. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  1. Swimming pool. View of aisle between swimming pool and seating ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Swimming pool. View of aisle between swimming pool and seating area. Non-original spa pool is partially visible on right. - Jewish Community Center of San Francisco, 3200 California Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  2. Cardiac rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... 123-210. Thomas PD. Exercise-Based, Comprehensive Cardiac Rehabilitation. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2011: ...

  3. Cardiac rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... goal of cardiac rehab is to: Improve your cardiovascular function Improve your overall health and quality of ... E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015: ...

  4. Cardiac arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment for cardiac arrest. It is a medical device that gives an electrical shock to the heart. The shock can get the heart beating normally again. Small, portable defibrillators are often available in public areas for ...

  5. Cardiac amyloidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way electrical signals move through the heart (conduction system). This can lead to abnormal heart beats ( ... due to medication) Sick sinus syndrome Symptomatic cardiac conduction system disease (arrhythmias related to abnormal conduction of ...

  6. Cardiac Sarcoidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Cardiac Sarcoidosis? Sarcoidosis is a poorly understood disease that commonly affects the lungs. It can also involve the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, eyes, skin, bones, salivary glands and heart. ...

  7. Vitamin D Pooling Project

    Cancer.gov

    The Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers brought together investigators from 10 cohorts to conduct a large prospective epidemiologic study of the association between vitamin D status and seven rarer cancers.

  8. Pools for the Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Three institutions in Ohio now stress hydrotherapy and water recreation as important parts of individual educational programs for the handicapped. Specially designed and adapted pools provide freedom of movement and ego building as well as physical education and recreation. (Author)

  9. Weld pool phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Zacharia, T.; DebRoy, T.

    1994-09-01

    During welding, the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure are affected by the interaction of the heat source with the metal. The interaction affects the fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transfer in the weld pool, and the solidification behavior of the weld metal. In recent years, there has been a growing recognition of the importance of the weld pool transport processes and the solid state transformation reactions in determining the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure. The relation between the weld pool transport processes and the composition and structure is reviewed. Recent applications of various solidification theories to welding are examined to understand the special problems of weld metal solidification. The discussion is focussed on the important problems and issues related to weld pool transport phenomena and solidification. Resolution of these problems would be an important step towards a science based control of composition, structure and properties of the weld metal.

  10. Swimming pool granuloma

    MedlinePlus

    Aquarium granuloma; Fish tank granuloma ... Risks include exposure to swimming pools, salt water aquariums, or ocean fish. ... Wash hands and arms thoroughly after cleaning aquariums. Or, wear rubber gloves when cleaning.