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Sample records for cardiac catheterization techniques

  1. Cardiac Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Catheterization? Cardiac catheterization (KATH-eh-ter-ih-ZA-shun) is a ... disease. Doctors also can use ultrasound during cardiac catheterization to see blockages in the coronary arteries. Ultrasound ...

  2. The history of cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, Martial G

    2005-10-01

    The evolution of cardiac catheterization has occurred over at least four centuries. One of the first major steps was the description of the circulation of the blood by William Harvey in 1628. The next milestone was the measurement of arterial pressure by Stephen Hales, one century later. However, the 19th century represented the golden age of cardiovascular physiology, highlighted by the achievements of Carl Ludwig, Etienne-Jules Marey and Claude Bernard, among others. Human cardiac catheterization developed during the 20th century. The first right heart catheterization in a human was performed by Werner Forssmann on himself in 1929. Diagnostic cardiac catheterization was introduced by André Cournand and Dickinson Richards in the early 1940s, and selective coronary angiography was described by Mason Sones in the early 1960s. More recently, with the advent of catheter-based interventions, pioneered by Andreas Gruentzig in the late 1970s, there has been considerable progress in the refinement and expansion of these techniques. Currently, the Sones technique is used only infrequently, and coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention rely mainly on percutaneous femoral and percutaneous radial artery approaches. On the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Montreal Heart Institute, it seems appropriate to highlight the contribution of this institution in these two areas. PMID:16234881

  3. Retinal cholesterol emboli during diagnostic cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Blanco, V R; Morís, C; Barriales, V; González, C

    2000-11-01

    Retinal embolism is a highly infrequent complication of cardiac catheterization of thrombotic, lipidic, and calcific etiology. We provide the first reported clinical case of retinal embolism caused by cholesterol crystal without systemic adverse effects as a severe complication of diagnostic cardiac catheterization. Cathet. Cardiovasc. Intervent. 51:323-325, 2000. PMID:11066118

  4. Reducing distress in pediatric cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Naylor, D; Coates, T J; Kan, J

    1984-08-01

    To examine the efficacy of rehearsal in reducing distress in 3- to 6-year-old children undergoing diagnostic cardiac catheterization, 40 children were assigned randomly to the rehearsal preparation procedure or to usual preparation. The rehearsal program involved the use of behavioral rehearsal in the catheterization laboratory, manuals to explain the procedure to the parents, and coloring books to provide parents and children with a vicarious experience of catheterization. Rehearsed patients cried, yelled for mother, complained of pain less, and showed lower rates of motor activity than did control patients. Rehearsed patients also showed less overt regressive, aggressive, and anxiety behaviors at home following the catheterization than did controls. Parents in the rehearsed group showed less anxiety following the catheterization, and negative reactions in children correlated significantly with parental anxiety. Participants' reactions were uniformly more positive in the rehearsed than in the control patients. PMID:6741887

  5. Complications of Cardiac Catheterization in Structural Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ko Eun; Seo, Yeon Jeong; An, Hyo Soon; Song, Young Hwan; Kwon, Bo Sang; Bae, Eun Jung; Noh, Chung Il

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Cardiac catheterization is used to diagnose structural heart disease (SHD) and perform transcatheter treatment. This study aimed to evaluate complications of cardiac catheterization and the associated risk factors in a tertiary center over 10 years. Subjects and Methods Total 2071 cardiac catheterizations performed at the Seoul National University Children's Hospital from January 2004 to December 2013 were included in this retrospective study. Results The overall complication, severe complication, and mortality rates were 16.2%, 1.15%, and 0.19%, respectively. The factors that significantly increased the risk of overall and severe complications were anticoagulant use before procedure (odds ratio [OR] 1.83, p=0.012 and OR 6.45, p<0.001, respectively), prothrombin time (OR 2.30, p<0.001 and OR 5.99, p<0.001, respectively), general anesthesia use during procedure (OR 1.84, p=0.014 and OR 5.31, p=0.015, respectively), and total procedure time (OR 1.01, p<0.001 and OR 1.02, p<0.001, respectively). Low body weight (OR 0.99, p=0.003), severe SHD (OR 1.37, p=0.012), repetitive procedures (OR 1.7, p=0.009), and total fluoroscopy time (OR 1.01, p=0.005) significantly increased the overall complication risk. High activated partial thromboplastin time (OR 1.04, p=0.001), intensive care unit admission state (OR 14.03, p<0.001), and concomitant electrophysiological study during procedure (OR 3.41, p=0.016) significantly increased severe complication risk. Conclusion Currently, the use of cardiac catheterization in SHD is increasing and becoming more complex; this could cause complications despite the preventive efforts. Careful patient selection for therapeutic catheterization and improved technique and management during the peri-procedural period are required to reduce complications. PMID:27014356

  6. Coronary thrombus detected by cardiac CT angiography before cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Slim, Ahmad M; Slim, Jennifer N; Haney, Brian R; Shry, Eric A

    2010-11-01

    A patient presented with a complaint of pleuritic chest discomfort with elevated cardiac biomarkers. After a cardiac magnetic resonance imaging scan for the suspicion of myopericarditis showed a potential myocardial infarct, a coronary CT scan was performed. This revealed a thrombus of the left anterior descending artery. Cardiac catheterization confirmed the findings, and a small clot was removed. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of coronary thrombus being detected by CT angiography with cardiac catheterization correlation. Coronary CT angiography has been increasingly used to evaluate acute chest pain with a negative predictive value close to 100%. In a young patient with suspicion of myopericarditis, CT angiography proved to be useful in diagnosing thrombus in the coronary tree. PMID:20463613

  7. Radiation Dose Estimation for Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chu

    correction factors for the MOSFET organ dose measurements in the following studies. Minor angular dependence (< +/-20% at all angles tested, < +/-10% at clinically relevant angles in cardiac catheterization) was observed. Second, the cardiac dose for common fluoroscopic imaging techniques for pediatric patients in the two age groups was measured. Imaging technique settings with variations of individual key imaging parameters were tested to observe the quantitative effect of imaging optimization or lack thereof. Along with each measurement, the two standard system output indices, the Air Kerma (AK) and Dose-Area Product (DAP), were also recorded and compared to the measured cardiac and skin doses -- the lack of correlation between the indices and the organ doses shed light to the substantial limitation of the indices in representing patient radiation dose, at least within the scope of this dissertation. Third, the effective dose (ED) for Posterior-Anterior and Lateral fluoroscopic imaging techniques for pediatric patients in the two age groups was determined. In addition, the dosimetric effect of removing the anti-scatter grid was studied, for which a factor-of-two ED rate reduction was observed for the imaging techniques. The Clinical Component involved analytical research to develop a validated retrospective cardiac dose reconstruction formulation and to propose the new Optimization Index which evaluates the level of optimization of the clinician's imaging usage during a procedure; and small sample group of actual procedures were used to demonstrate applicability of these formulations. In its entirety, the research represents a first-of-its-kind comprehensive approach in radiation dosimetry for pediatric cardiac catheterization; and separately, it is also modular enough that each individual section can serve as study templates for small-scale dosimetric studies of similar purposes. The data collected and algorithmic formulations developed can be of use in areas of

  8. Therapeutic Cardiac Catheterizations for Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cardiac Catheterization In the last two decades, tremendous medical advances have been made. These allow congenital heart defects to be treated in the cath lab without surgery. Valvuloplasty or Balloon Valvotomy This procedure is done to open a ...

  9. Patient radiation exposure during pediatric cardiac catheterization

    SciTech Connect

    Fellows, K.E.; Leibovic, S.J.

    1983-08-01

    Exposure air product (EAP) and center field entrance exposure (free-in-air) were measured in seventeen pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. Exposures were recorded separately for biplane fluoroscopy and cine angiocardiography using flat-plate ionization chambers. In the posterior-anterior (PA) projections, median EAP was 425 Roentgen-square centimeter (R-cm/sup 2/), with a range of 90.5-3,882 R-cm/sup 2/; 29-35% of this exposure occurred during cine filming. In the lateral projection, median EAP was 276 R-cm/sup 2/ (range 117-1,173); 52-59% of this exposure was due to cine filming. Median center field entrance exposure in the PA view was 7.86 Roentgens (R) with a range 2.16-73.9 of and in the lateral projection 7.39 R (range 2.64-24.6). As much as 25% of the exposure from the entire examination was contributed by manual ''test'' exposures to set cine radiographic kVp. We recommend use of testing circuits, which determine cine radiographic factors automatically and thus should lower levels of exposure.

  10. Superselective catheterization technique in hepatic angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, V.P.; Soo, C.S.; Carrasco, C.H.; Wallace, S.

    1983-10-01

    The techniques for superselective catheterization of hepatic artery are described. The catheters have five major configurations in various sizes: (1) simple curve, (2) reverse curve, (3) double curve, (4) modified double curve, and (5) hepatic and splenic curves. Since the celiac artery may be directed caudad, horizontally, or cephalad, the techniques vary accordingly. The basic approach of the system described is to tailor the catheter to fit the vascular anatomy. These various techniques have produced a 95% success rate in the hepatic artery catheterization of 1000 patients.

  11. Multimodality 3-Dimensional Image Integration for Congenital Cardiac Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac catheterization procedures for patients with congenital and structural heart disease are becoming more complex. New imaging strategies involving integration of 3-dimensional images from rotational angiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computerized tomography (CT), and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) are employed to facilitate these procedures. We discuss the current use of these new 3D imaging technologies and their advantages and challenges when used to guide complex diagnostic and interventional catheterization procedures in patients with congenital heart disease. PMID:25114757

  12. Development of a charge adjustment model for cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Andrew; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Connor, Jean; O'Connell, Cheryl; David, Sthuthi; Almodovar, Melvin; DiNardo, James; Banka, Puja; Mayer, John E; Marshall, Audrey C; Bergersen, Lisa

    2015-02-01

    A methodology that would allow for comparison of charges across institutions has not been developed for catheterization in congenital heart disease. A single institution catheterization database with prospectively collected case characteristics was linked to hospital charges related and limited to an episode of care in the catheterization laboratory for fiscal years 2008-2010. Catheterization charge categories (CCC) were developed to group types of catheterization procedures using a combination of empiric data and expert consensus. A multivariable model with outcome charges was created using CCC and additional patient and procedural characteristics. In 3 fiscal years, 3,839 cases were available for analysis. Forty catheterization procedure types were categorized into 7 CCC yielding a grouper variable with an R (2) explanatory value of 72.6%. In the final CCC, the largest proportion of cases was in CCC 2 (34%), which included diagnostic cases without intervention. Biopsy cases were isolated in CCC 1 (12%), and percutaneous pulmonary valve placement alone made up CCC 7 (2%). The final model included CCC, number of interventions, and cardiac diagnosis (R (2) = 74.2%). Additionally, current financial metrics such as APR-DRG severity of illness and case mix index demonstrated a lack of correlation with CCC. We have developed a catheterization procedure type financial grouper that accounts for the diverse case population encountered in catheterization for congenital heart disease. CCC and our multivariable model could be used to understand financial characteristics of a population at a single point in time, longitudinally, and to compare populations. PMID:25113520

  13. Catheterization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Mary Bell; Moseley, James L.

    This module is designed to teach the fundamentals of clean intermittent urinary catheterization for the disabled child, particularly in the school setting. The text includes information on proper hand washing techniques, the supplies needed, suggested settings, and the preparations required before and after the catheter is inserted into the…

  14. Cerebral contrast retention after difficult cardiac catheterization: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Ho, David W; Lazar, Jason M; Marmur, JD

    2014-01-01

    Background: We report a diagnostic dilemma in a rare case of cerebral contrast retention after difficult cardiac catheterization in an elderly patient loaded with prasugrel. Summary: Our case report describes a 77-year-old female with history of hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia who presented to emergency department complaining of chest pain. Patient was found to have an inferior wall ST elevation myocardial infarction. The patient was loaded with aspirin and prasugrel and taken for emergent cardiac catheterization. Cardiac catheterization revealed two-vessel coronary artery disease with unsuccessful attempt of percutaneous intervention. Immediately after procedure, patient developed an episode of seizure. Emergent computed tomography scan of the brain revealed hyperdensity in the right frontoparietal region consistent with intracerebral bleed. Repeat computed tomography (24 h later) revealed substantial interval improvement of hyperdensity. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging of the head was normal. Given the lack of magnetic resonance imaging changes, the rate of resolution on computed tomography without expected subacute changes, and the lack of neurologic findings, the initial hyperdensity seen on computed tomography of the brain was believed to be secondary to contrast leakage during cardiac catheterization as opposed to intracranial hemorrhage. PMID:27489644

  15. Radiation exposure to the child during cardiac catheterization

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, J.D.; Rummerfield, P.S.; Gilpin, E.A.; Kirkpatrick, S.E.

    1981-07-01

    Few data are available regarding radiation exposure to children during cardiac catheterization. Using lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters, radiation exposure was measured during precatheterization chest roentgenography, fluoroscopy (hemodynamic assessment phase of catheterization and cineangiography in 30 infants and children, ages 3 days to 21 years. Dosimeters were placed over the eyes, thyroid, anterior chest, posterior chest, anterior abdomen, posterior abdomen and gonads. Average absorbed chest doses were 24.5 mR during chest roentgenography, 5810 mR during catheterization fluoroscopy and 1592 mR during cineangiography. During the complete catheterization, average doses were 26 mR to the eyes, 431 mR to the thyroid area, 150 mR to the abdomen and 11 mR to the gonads. Radiation exposure during pediatric cardiac catheterization is low to the eyes and gonads but high to the chest and thyroid area. To decrease radiation dosage we suggest: (1) low pulse-rate fluoroscopy; (2) substitution of contrast echocardiography for cineangiography; (3) large-plate abdominal/gonadal shielding; (4) a selective shield for thyroid area; (5) a very small field during catheter manipulation. Minimum radiation consistent with accurate diagnosis is optimal; however, erroneous or incomplete diagnosis is more dangerous than radiation-related hazards.

  16. Radiation exposure to the child during cardiac catheterization

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, J.D.; Rummerfield, P.S.; Gilpin, E.A.; Kirkpatrick, S.E.

    1981-07-01

    Few data are available regarding radiation exposure to children during cardiac catheterization. Using lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters, radiation exposure was measured during precatheterization chest roentgenography, fluoroscopy (hemodynamic assessment phase of catheterization) and cineangiography in 30 infants and children, ages 3 days to 21 years. Dosimeters were placed over the eyes, thyroid, anterior chest, posterior chest, anterior abdomen, posterior abdomen and gonads. Average absorbed chest doses were 24.5 mR during chest roentgenography, 5810 mR during catheterization fluoroscopy and 1592 mR during cineangiography. During the complete catheterization, average doses were 26 mR to the eyes, 431 mR to the thyroid area, 150 mR to the abdomen and 11 mR to the gonads. Radiation exposure during pediatric cardiac catheterization is low to the eyes and gonads but high to the chest and thyroid area. To decrease radiation dosage we suggest (1) low pulse-rate fluoroscopy; (2) substitution of contrast echocardiography for cineangiography; (3) large-plate abdominal/gonadal shielding; (4) a selective shield for thyroid area; (5) a very small field during catheter manipulation. Minimum radiation consistent with accurate diagnosis is optimal; however, erroneous or incomplete diagnosis is more dangerous than radiation-related hazards.

  17. Developing Tools to Measure Quality in Congenital Catheterization and Interventions: The Congenital Cardiac Catheterization Project on Outcomes (C3PO)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The broad range of relatively rare procedures performed in pediatric cardiac catheterization laboratories has made the standardization of care and risk assessment in the field statistically quite problematic. However, with the growing number of patients who undergo cardiac catheterization, it has become imperative that the cardiology community overcomes these challenges to study patient outcomes. The Congenital Cardiac Catheterization Project on Outcomes was able to develop benchmarks, tools for measurement, and risk adjustment methods while exploring procedural efficacy. Based on the success of these efforts, the collaborative is pursuing a follow-up project, the Congenital Cardiac Catheterization Project on Outcomes—Quality Improvement, aimed at improving the outcomes for all patients undergoing catheterization for congenital heart disease by reducing radiation exposure. PMID:25114756

  18. Accurate measurement of oxygen consumption in children undergoing cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen consumption (VO(2) ) is an important part of hemodynamics using the direct Fick principle in children undergoing cardiac catheterization. Accurate measurement of VO(2) is vital. Obviously, any error in the measurement of VO(2) will translate directly into an equivalent percentage under- or overestimation of blood flows and vascular resistances. It remains common practice to estimate VO(2) values from published predictive equations. Among these, the LaFarge equation is the most commonly used equation and gives the closest estimation with the least bias and limits of agreement. However, considerable errors are introduced by the LaFarge equation, particularly in children younger than 3 years of age. Respiratory mass spectrometry remains the "state-of-the-art" method, allowing highly sensitive, rapid and simultaneous measurement of multiple gas fractions. The AMIS 2000 quadrupole respiratory mass spectrometer system has been adapted to measure VO(2) in children under mechanical ventilation with pediatric ventilators during cardiac catheterization. The small sampling rate, fast response time and long tubes make the equipment a unique and powerful tool for bedside continuous measurement of VO(2) in cardiac catheterization for both clinical and research purposes. PMID:22488802

  19. Cardiac catheterization laboratory management: the fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Newell, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly, imaging administrators are gaining oversight for the cardiac cath lab as part of imaging services. Significant daily challenges include physician and staff demands, as well as patients who in many cases require higher acuity care. Along with strategic program driven responsibilities, the management role is complex. Critical elements that are the major impacts on cath lab management, as well as the overall success of a cardiac and vascular program, include program quality, patient safety, operational efficiency including inventory management, and customer service. It is critically important to have a well-qualified cath lab manager who acts as a leader by example, a mentor and motivator of the team, and an expert in the organization's processes and procedures. Such qualities will result in a streamlined cath lab with outstanding results. PMID:22720540

  20. Cardiac Arrest in a Heart Transplant Patient Receiving Dexmedetomidine During Cardiac Catheterization.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Lawrence Israel; Miyamoto, Shelley D; Stenquist, Scott; Twite, Mark David

    2016-06-01

    Dexmedetomidine is an α-2 agonist with a sedative and cardiopulmonary profile that makes it an attractive anesthetic in pediatric cardiac patients. Cardiac transplant patients may suffer from acute cellular rejection of the cardiac conduction system and, therefore, are at an increased risk of the electrophysiological effect of dexmedetomidine. We present such a patient who had a cardiac arrest while receiving dexmedetomidine during cardiac catheterization. Because acute cellular rejection of the cardiac conduction system is difficult to diagnose, dexmedetomidine should be used with caution in pediatric heart transplant patients. PMID:26721807

  1. Cardiac surgery and catheterization in patients with haemophilia.

    PubMed

    MacKinlay, N; Taper, J; Renisson, F; Rickard, K

    2000-03-01

    The present study summarizes the results of 12 cardiac surgical procedures performed in a carrier of Haemophilia B and in six patients with Haemophilia A at a single centre from 1979 to 1998. The median age of the patients at the time of intervention was 56 years ranging from 18 years to 73 years. The six patients with Haemophilia A ranged in severity from moderately to mildly affected. Three patients were hepatitis C antibody positive. No patients were HIV antibody or hepatitis B surface antigen positive. The cardiac procedures included cardiac catheterization (n=4), coronary artery bypass surgery (n=2), percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (n=1), cardiac valve replacement (AVR n=1 and AVR/MVR n=2), and closure of an atrial septal defect and subsequent drainage of a pericardial effusion (n=1). No patients had demonstrable inhibitors at the time of surgery. Haemostasis was achieved with AHF in 10/11 procedures and high purity factor IX (Immunine) in one procedure. The initial procedures involved intermittent bolus factor therapy while more recently, AHF was administered by continuous intravenous infusion. All patients demonstrated excellent intra- and post-operative haemostasis. These results, although from a small and varied group of patients, demonstrate that cardiac surgical procedures can be performed safely in patients with Haemophilia. PMID:10781193

  2. Assessing the blalock-hanlon atrioseptectomy at cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Clark, E B; Rosenquist, G C

    1977-01-01

    Blalock-Hanlon atrial septectomy (BH) is performed to increase systemic and pulmonary venous mixing at the atrial level. Failure of clinical improvement may be related to inadequate intraatrial communication. A simple catheterization technique employing a balloon catheter is used to assess the presence or absence of the limbus of the foramen ovale following BH, since persistence of the limbus of the fossa ovalis after BH is associated with significantly smaller percentage of communication (atrial communication area/total atrial area). PMID:603909

  3. [Radiation exposure to personnel in cardiac catheterization laboratories].

    PubMed

    von Boetticher, Heiner; Meenen, Christiane; Lachmund, Jörn; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Engel, Heinz-Jürgen

    2003-01-01

    Radiation exposure in personnel of cardiac catheterization units is based on local dosimetry during patient investigations. In the present study, dose rates were measured at various heights in representative locations, with and without fixed radiation protection shields in place. To determine the effective dose values, TLD measurements were performed using on Alderson phantom to generate radiation scatter and a second phantom in the position of the cardiologist performing the catheterization. Various types of personal radiation protection garment and fixed shields were considered in the calculations. Our results indicate on one hand that good protective standards can be achieved with effective doses below 1 mSv/year under optimized conditions. On the other hand, inappropriate radiation protection equipment can cause substantial increase of radiation doses. Alone the lack of a thyroid shield increases the effective dose of the cardiologist by a factor of 3. For the personnel, effective doses were generally higher than personal doses by a factor between 1.5 and 4.8 depending on the radiation protection situation. PMID:14732954

  4. Optimizing Radiation Safety in the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory: A Practical Approach.

    PubMed

    Christopoulos, Georgios; Makke, Lorenza; Christakopoulos, Georgios; Kotsia, Anna; Rangan, Bavana V; Roesle, Michele; Haagen, Donald; Kumbhani, Dharam J; Chambers, Charles E; Kapadia, Samir; Mahmud, Ehtisham; Banerjee, Subhash; Brilakis, Emmanouil S

    2016-02-01

    Reducing radiation exposure during cardiovascular catheterization is of paramount importance for both patient and staff safety. Over the years, advances in equipment and application of radiation safety protocols have significantly reduced patient dose and operator exposure. This review examines the current status of radiation protection in the cardiac and vascular catheterization laboratory and summarizes best practices for minimizing radiation exposure. PMID:26526181

  5. Near infrared spectroscopy monitoring in the pediatric cardiac catheterization laboratory.

    PubMed

    Tanidir, Ibrahim Cansaran; Ozturk, Erkut; Ozyilmaz, Isa; Saygi, Murat; Kiplapinar, Neslihan; Haydin, Sertac; Guzeltas, Alper; Odemis, Ender

    2014-10-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a noninvasive method used to evaluate tissue oxygenation. We evaluated the relationship between cerebral and renal NIRS parameters during transcatheter intervention and adverse events in the catheterization room. Between January 1 and May 31, 2012, 123 of 163 pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization were followed by NIRS. All were monitored by electrocardiography, noninvasive blood pressure measurement, pulse oxymetry, initial and final blood lactate level measurement. The number of interventional procedures was 73 (59%). During the procedures, 39 patients experienced a total of 41 adverse events: 18 (19.5%) had desaturation, 10 (8.1%) arrhythmia, three (2.4%) had respiratory difficulty, six (4.8%) had a situation calling for cardiopulmonary resuscitation, three (2.4%) had anemia necessitating transfusion, and one (0.8%) had a cyanotic spell. Cranial NIRS values worsened in 12 (9.8%) and renal measurements worsened in 13 (12.5%) patients. The sensitivity and specificity of a 9% impairment of cranial values were 90 and 61%, respectively, while the corresponding calculations for a 21% fall in renal measurements were 54% sensitivity and 90% specificity. When arrhythmia developed, NIRS values fell simultaneously, while the development of a desaturation problem was heralded by NIRS falling 10-15 s earlier than changes in pulse oxymetry; on improving saturation, NIRS returned to earlier values 10-15 s before pulse oxymetry readings. NIRS monitoring may provide an early warning with regard to complications likely to develop during a procedure. A fall of 9% in cranial NIRS values, or of 21% in renal measurements, should raise clinician awareness. PMID:24404951

  6. Transradial Approach for Cardiac Catheterization: The New Frontier of Coronary Intervention

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  7. Pharmacotherapy in the cardiac catheterization laboratory: evolution and recent developments.

    PubMed

    Thind, Guramrinder S; Parida, Raunak; Gupta, Nishant

    2014-01-01

    Many recent innovations have been made in developing new antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs in the last few years, with a total of nine new antithrombotic drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration after the year 2000. This has revolutionized the medical therapy given to manage acute coronary syndrome and support cardiac catheterization. The concept of dual antiplatelet therapy has been emphasized, and clopidogrel has emerged as the most-popular second antiplatelet drug after aspirin. Newer P2Y12 inhibitors like prasugrel and ticagrelor have been extensively studied and compared to clopidogrel. The role of glycoprotein (Gp) IIb/IIIa inhibitors is being redefined. Other alternatives to unfractionated heparin have become available, of which enoxaparin and bivalirudin have been studied the most. Apart from these, many more drugs with novel therapeutic targets are being studied and are currently under development. In this review, current evidence on these drugs is presented and analyzed in a way that would facilitate decision making for the clinician. For this analysis, various high-impact clinical trials, pharmacological studies, meta-analyses, and reviews were accessed through the MEDLINE database. Adopting a unique interdisciplinary approach, an attempt has been made to integrate pharmacological and clinical evidence to better understand and appreciate the pros and cons of each of these classes of drugs. PMID:25364258

  8. Patient Decision Control and the Use of Cardiac Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Paasche-Orlow, Michael K.; Orner, Michelle B.; Stewart, Sabrina K.; Kressin, Nancy R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Shared decision-making is a key determinant of patient-centered care. A lack of patient involvement in treatment decisions may explain persistent racial disparities in rates of cardiac catheterization (CCATH). To date, limited evidence exists to demonstrate whether patients who engage in shared decision-makingare more or less likely to undergo non-emergency CCATH. Objective: To assess the relationship between participation in the decision to undergo a CCATH and the use of CCATH. We also examined whether preference for or actual engagement in decision-making varied by patient race. Methods: We analyzed data from 826 male Veterans Administration patients for whom CCATH was indicated and who participated in the Cardiac Decision Making Study. Results: After controlling for confounders, patients reporting any degree of decision control were more likely to receive CCATH compared with those reporting no control (doctor made decision without patient input) (54% vs 39%, P<.0001). Across racial groups, patients were equally likely to report a preference for control over decision-making (P=.53) as well as to experience discordance between their preference for control and their perception of the actual decision-making process (P=.59). Therefore, these factors did not mediate racial disparities in rates of CCATH use. Conclusion: Shared decision-making is an essential feature of whole-person care. While participation in decision-making may not explain disparities in CCATH rates, further work is required to identify strategies to improve congruence between patients' desire for and actual control over decision-making to actualize patient-centered care. PMID:26331101

  9. Occupational radiation doses to operators performing cardiac catheterization procedures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Pyo; Miller, Donald L; Balter, Stephen; Kleinerman, Ruth A; Linet, Martha S; Kwon, Deukwoo; Simon, Steven L

    2008-03-01

    Cardiac catheterization procedures using fluoroscopy reduce patient morbidity and mortality compared to operative procedures. These diagnostic and therapeutic procedures require radiation exposure to patients and physicians. The objectives of the present investigation were to provide a systematic comprehensive summary of the reported radiation doses received by operators due to diagnostic or interventional fluoroscopically-guided procedures, to identify the primary factors influencing operator radiation dose, and to evaluate whether there have been temporal changes in the radiation doses received by operators performing these procedures. Using PubMed, we identified all English-language journal articles and other published data reporting radiation exposures to operators from diagnostic or interventional fluoroscopically-guided cardiovascular procedures from the early 1970's through the present. We abstracted the reported radiation doses, dose measurement methods, fluoroscopy system used, operational features, radiation protection features, and other relevant data. We calculated effective doses to operators in each study to facilitate comparisons. The effective doses ranged from 0.02-38.0 microSv for DC (diagnostic catheterizations), 0.17-31.2 microSv for PCI (percutaneous coronary interventions), 0.24-9.6 microSv for ablations, and 0.29-17.4 microSv for pacemaker or intracardiac defibrillator implantations. The ratios of doses between various anatomic sites and the thyroid, measured over protective shields, were 0.9 +/- 1.0 for the eye, 1.0 +/- 1.5 for the trunk, and 1.3 +/- 2.0 for the hand. Generally, radiation dose is higher on the left side of an operator's body, because the operator's left side is closer to the primary beam when standing at the patient's right side. Modest operator dose reductions over time were observed for DC and ablation, primarily due to reduction in patient doses due to decreased fluoroscopy/cineradiography time and dose rate by technology

  10. Right Cardiac Catheterization Using the Antecubital Fossa Vein in Korean Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hyun; Lee, Dae Sung; Lee, Soo Yong; Hwang, Jongmin; Chon, Min Ku; Hwang, Ki Won; Kim, Jeong Su; Park, Yong Huyn; Kim, June Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Right heart catheterization is traditionally performed using a femoral vein approach that involves admission, bed rest, and risks of bleeding and hematoma. Recent studies have confirmed safety of the use of forearm vein for right cardiac catheterization. In the present study, we evaluated the feasibility of right cardiac catheterization via the antecubital fossa vein in Korean patients. Subjects and Methods The medical records of all patients who underwent right heart catheterization at our hospital between January 2003 and December 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. Right cardiac catheterizations via the antecubital fossa vein and the femoral vein were compared in terms of demographic data (age, sex, weight, height, and body mass index), indications for right cardiac catheterization, and procedural and outcome data (initial success rate, procedure time, compression to ambulation time, and complications). Results We reviewed 132 cases (antecubital fossa vein approach, n=37; femoral vein approach, n=95). The demographic data, initial success rate (100% vs. 100%) and procedure time (21.6±16.8 min vs. 25.6±12.6 min, p=0.14) were similar in both groups. The antecubital fossa vein group had a shorter mean compression to ambulation time than the femoral vein group (0.0 min vs. 201.2±48.1 min, p<0.01). No complications were observed in either group. Conclusion Our study indicated the ease of performance of right cardiac catheterization via the antecubital fossa vein. Thus, the antecubital fossa vein can be an alternative access site for right cardiac catheterization in Korean patients. PMID:27014351

  11. Physiological assessment of coronary artery disease in the cardiac catheterization laboratory: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association Committee on Diagnostic and Interventional Cardiac Catheterization, Council on Clinical Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Kern, Morton J; Lerman, Amir; Bech, Jan-Willen; De Bruyne, Bernard; Eeckhout, Eric; Fearon, William F; Higano, Stuart T; Lim, Michael J; Meuwissen, Martijn; Piek, Jan J; Pijls, Nico H J; Siebes, Maria; Spaan, Jos A E

    2006-09-19

    With advances in technology, the physiological assessment of coronary artery disease in patients in the catheterization laboratory has become increasingly important in both clinical and research applications, but this assessment has evolved without standard nomenclature or techniques of data acquisition and measurement. Some questions regarding the interpretation, application, and outcome related to the results also remain unanswered. Accordingly, this consensus statement was designed to provide the background and evidence about physiological measurements and to describe standard methods for data acquisition and interpretation. The most common uses and support data from numerous clinical studies for the physiological assessment of coronary artery disease in the cardiac catheterization laboratory are reviewed. The goal of this statement is to provide a logical approach to the use of coronary physiological measurements in the catheterization lab to assist both clinicians and investigators in improving patient care. PMID:16940193

  12. Developing a visualized patient-centered, flow-based and objective-oriented care path of cardiac catheterization examination.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ming Chuan; Chang, Polun

    2009-01-01

    It has been known that visualization is a user-preferred and more meaningful interface of information systems. To reduce the anxiety and uncertainty of patients, we transformed the sophisticated process of cardiac catheterization into visualized information. The Microsoft Visio 2003 and Excel 2003 with the VBA automation tool were used to design a process flow of Cardiac Catheterization. The results show the technical feasibility and potentials helpful for patient to realize the nursing process of cardiac catheterization. PMID:19593031

  13. Modified multipurpose catheter enhances clinical utility for cardiac catheterizations.

    PubMed

    Mannino, S C; Scavina, M; Palmer, S

    1994-10-01

    The Multipurpose technique for coronary arteriography employs a single catheter. The benefits are a reduction in the cost of the procedure and a shorter procedural time by experienced operators. To enhance the performance of these catheters, a modification was made in the materials and tip design, and these modifications were clinically evaluated in a small study. Compared to the control group of patients (n = 41), patients catheterized with the Multipurpose-SM (n = 43) were shown to have a shorter procedural time as measured by a reduced fluoroscopy time (7.08 min vs. 9.52 min, P = .007). This difference is statistically significant at a 95% confidence level and resulted in less radiation exposure to the operator and cath lab staff. The procedural time was significantly reduced by fewer catheter exchanges (19% study vs. 46% control; P = .006), which were needed to successfully complete the procedure. The new Multipurpose-SM catheter also demonstrated enhanced flexibility for cannulating coronary arteries with superior or anterior takeoffs. This study concludes that the utilization of a modified Multipurpose-SM catheter is safe and effective in cannulating both the left and right coronary arteries, bypass grafts, and performing left ventriculography. The primary benefits of using this modified catheter are reduced fluoroscopy time and the need for fewer catheter exchanges. PMID:7834732

  14. Acute kidney injury after using contrast during cardiac catheterization in children with heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Young Ju; Hyun, Myung Chul; Choi, Bong Seok; Chun, So Young; Cho, Min Hyun

    2014-08-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is closely associated with the mortality of hospitalized patients and long-term development of chronic kidney disease, especially in children. The purpose of our study was to assess the evidence of contrast-induced AKI after cardiac catheterization in children with heart disease and evaluate the clinical usefulness of candidate biomarkers in AKI. A total of 26 children undergoing cardiac catheterization due to various heart diseases were selected and urine and blood samples were taken at 0 hr, 6 hr, 24 hr, and 48 hr after cardiac catheterization. Until 48 hr after cardiac catheterization, there was no significant increase in serum creatinine level in all patients. Unlike urine kidney injury molecule-1, IL-18 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, urine liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) level showed biphasic pattern and the significant difference in the levels of urine L-FABP between 24 and 48 hr. We suggest that urine L-FABP can be one of the useful biomarkers to detect subclinical AKI developed by the contrast before cardiac surgery. PMID:25120320

  15. Racial Differences in Cardiac Catheterization as a Function of Patients’ Beliefs

    PubMed Central

    Kressin, Nancy R.; Chang, Bei-Hung; Whittle, Jeff; Peterson, Eric D.; Clark, Jack A.; Rosen, Amy K.; Orner, Michelle; Collins, Tracie C.; Alley, Linda G.; Petersen, Laura A.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives. We examined racial differences in cardiac catheterization rates and reviewed whether patients’ beliefs or other variables were associated with observed disparities. Methods. We did a prospective observational cohort study of 1045 White and African American patients at 5 Veterans Affairs (VA) medical centers whose nuclear imaging studies indicated reversible cardiac ischemia. Results. There were few demographic differences between White and African American patients in our sample. African Americans were less likely than Whites to undergo cardiac catheterization. African Americans were more likely than Whites to indicate a strong reliance on religion and to report racial and social class discrimination and were less likely to indicate a generalized trust in people but did not differ from White patients on numerous other attitudes about health and health care. Neither sociodemographic or clinical characteristics nor patients’ beliefs explained the observed disparities, but physicians’ assessments of the procedure’s importance and patients’ likelihood of coronary disease seemed to account for differences not otherwise explained. Conclusions. Patients’ preferences are not the likely source of racial disparities in the use of cardiac catheterization among veterans using VA care, but physicians’ assessments warrant further attention. PMID:15569959

  16. SU-E-P-10: Imaging in the Cardiac Catheterization Lab - Technologies and Clinical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fetterly, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease in the cardiac catheterization laboratory is often aided by a multitude of imaging technologies. The purpose of this work is to highlight the contributions to patient care offered by the various imaging systems used during cardiovascular interventional procedures. Methods: Imaging technologies used in the cardiac catheterization lab were characterized by their fundamental technology and by the clinical applications for which they are used. Whether the modality is external to the patient, intravascular, or intracavity was specified. Specific clinical procedures for which multiple modalities are routinely used will be highlighted. Results: X-ray imaging modalities include fluoroscopy/angiography and angiography CT. Ultrasound imaging is performed with external, trans-esophageal echocardiography (TEE), and intravascular (IVUS) transducers. Intravascular infrared optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) is used to assess vessel endothelium. Relatively large (>0.5 mm) anatomical structures are imaged with x-ray and ultrasound. IVUS and IVOCT provide high resolution images of vessel walls. Cardiac CT and MRI images are used to plan complex cardiovascular interventions. Advanced applications are used to spatially and temporally merge images from different technologies. Diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease frequently utilizes angiography and intra-vascular imaging, and treatment of complex structural heart conditions routinely includes use of multiple imaging modalities. Conclusion: There are several imaging modalities which are routinely used in the cardiac catheterization laboratory to diagnose and treat both coronary artery and structural heart disease. Multiple modalities are frequently used to enhance the quality and safety of procedures. The cardiac catheterization laboratory includes many opportunities for medical physicists to contribute substantially toward advancing patient care.

  17. Cardiac catheterization--before and after. What the patient should understand! What the nurse needs to know!

    PubMed

    Perdue, B

    1990-01-01

    This article provides helpful cardiac catheterization information for nurses preparing patients for this procedure and administering follow-up care. Pre-cath and post-cath teaching information and discharge instructions are included. PMID:2310468

  18. Safety of cardiac catheterization at a center specializing in the care of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac catheterization is important for the management of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). It is used for diagnosis, assessment, and monitoring of PAH patients, as well as to perform interventions such as balloon atrial septostomy and coil embolization of collateral vessels. Although reports on the risks of catheterization in PAH patients are scarce, many centers hesitate to perform these procedures in such fragile patients. We performed a retrospective chart review of all cardiac catheterizations performed in PAH patients over 10 years at our pulmonary hypertension center. Demographic, hemodynamic, and outcome data were collected. Complication rates were determined, and multivariate proportional hazards modeling was performed to identify predictors of catheterization-related complications. There were 1,637 catheterizations performed in 607 patients over 10 years. Pediatric patients accounted for 50% of these cases, 48% were performed in patients with idiopathic PAH, and 49% were performed under general anesthesia. While the overall complication rate was 5.7%, the rate of major complications was only 1.2% (). Although there were 8 deaths during the admission following catheterization, only 4 of these were related to the procedure, yielding a catheterization-related mortality of 0.2%. In conclusion, when performed at a pulmonary hypertension center with expertise in the care of PAH patients, cardiac catheterization is associated with low complication rates and mortality, and it should remain an important tool in the management of these patients. PMID:25006398

  19. Severe papillary muscle dysfunction substantiated by atrial pacing during cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Finn, M C; Bower, P J

    1977-05-01

    A patient experienced episodic pulmonary edema accompanying nocturnal angina pectoris. The symptoms were provoked at cardiac catheterization by atrial pacing. Simultaneous onset of chest pain, shortness of breath, and sudden appearance of a large V wave in the pulmonary artery wedge pressure contour confirmed acute mitral valve regurgitation. Rapid reversal of these changes after nitroglycerin administration supported "papillary muscle dysfunction" as the explanation for these hemodynamic changes. PMID:403754

  20. Renal Insufficiency and Early Bystander CPR Predict In-Hospital Outcomes in Cardiac Arrest Patients Undergoing Mild Therapeutic Hypothermia and Cardiac Catheterization: Return of Spontaneous Circulation, Cooling, and Catheterization Registry (ROSCCC Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Chelvanathan, Anjala; Allen, David; Bews, Hilary; Ducas, John; Minhas, Kunal; Ravandi, Amir; Jassal, Davinder S.; Hussain, Farrukh

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients are a critically ill patient population with high mortality. Combining mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) with early coronary intervention may improve outcomes in this population. The aim of this study was to evaluate predictors of mortality in OHCA patients undergoing MTH with and without cardiac catheterization. Design. A retrospective cohort of OHCA patients who underwent MTH with catheterization (MTH + C) and without catheterization (MTH + NC) between 2006 and 2011 was analyzed at a single tertiary care centre. Predictors of in-hospital mortality and neurologic outcome were determined. Results. The study population included 176 patients who underwent MTH for OHCA. A total of 66 patients underwent cardiac catheterization (MTH + C) and 110 patients did not undergo cardiac catheterization (MTH + NC). Immediate bystander CPR occurred in approximately half of the total population. In the MTH + C and MTH + NC groups, the in-hospital mortality was 48% and 78%, respectively. The only independent predictor of in-hospital mortality for patients with MTH + C, after multivariate analysis, was baseline renal insufficiency (OR = 8.2, 95% CI 1.8–47.1, and p = 0.009). Conclusion. Despite early cardiac catheterization, renal insufficiency and the absence of immediate CPR are potent predictors of death and poor neurologic outcome in patients with OHCA. PMID:26885436

  1. Radiation exposure of pediatric patients and physicians during cardiac catheterization and balloon pulmonary valvuloplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.R.; Huang, T.Y.; Wu, D.K.; Hsu, P.C.; Weng, P.S. )

    1991-07-15

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters were applied to various areas of 61 pediatric patients and physicians to measure radiation doses during routine cardiac catheterization and during 4 cases of balloon pulmonary valvuloplasty. Radiation doses were measured during chest roentgenography, fluoroscopy and cineangiography. Average skin dose to the chest was 121 microGy during chest x-ray, 5,182 microGy during catheterization and 641 mGy during valvuloplasty. For the eyes, thyroid and gonads of the patients, the exposure during routine catheterization was equal to 0.4, 6 and 0.2 chest x-rays, respectively. Radiation dose of the operator was 3 microGy for the eyes and 6 miCroGy in the thyroid. About 56% of the operator's dose could be reduced by thyroid shields, and 80% by lead aprons. The assistant received only 1 microGy outside the thyroid shield. Therefore, the authors have concluded that the patients dose during routine catheterization is largely based on our experimental results, but the dose is acceptable based on the risk factor analysis. The skin dose to the right lateral chest of the patient during valvuloplasty is extremely high, perhaps as high as the equivalent of 1,000 chest x-rays. Besides the clinical benefits of valvuloplasty, the long-term radiation-related hazards to the patient should be carefully monitored.

  2. Risk of Bleeding in End-Stage Liver Disease Patients Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Elgendy, Islam Y.; Choi, Calvin Y.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with end-stage liver disease frequently have baseline coagulopathies. The international normalized ratio is in common use for the estimation of bleeding tendency in such patients, especially those undergoing an invasive procedure like cardiac catheterization. The practice of international normalized ratio measurement—followed by pharmacologic (for example, vitamin K or fresh frozen plasma) or nonpharmacologic intervention—is still debatable. The results of multiple randomized trials have shown the superiority of the radial approach over femoral access in reducing catheterization bleeding. This reduction in bleeding in turn decreases the risk and cost of blood-product transfusion. However, there is little evidence regarding the use of the radial approach in the end-stage liver disease patient population specifically. In this review, we summarize the studies that have dealt with cardiac catheterization in patients who have end-stage liver disease. We also discuss the role of the current measurements that are used to reduce the risk of bleeding in these same patients. PMID:26504433

  3. Sex, Socioeconomic Status, Access to Cardiac Catheterization and Outcomes for Acute Coronary Syndromes in the Context of Universal Healthcare Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Fabreau, Gabriel E.; Leung, Alexander A.; Southern, Danielle A.; Knudtson, Merrill L.; McWilliams, J. Michael; Ayanian, John Z.; Ghali, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sex and neighborhood socioeconomic status (nSES) may independently affect the care and outcomes of acute coronary syndromes (ACS), partly through barriers in timely access to cardiac catheterization. We sought to determine whether sex modifies the association between nSES, and the receipt of cardiac catheterization and mortality following an ACS in a universal healthcare system. Methods and Results We studied 14,012 ACS patients admitted to cardiology services between April 18, 2004 and December 31, 2011 in Southern Alberta, Canada. We used multivariable logistic regression to compare the odds of cardiac catheterization within 2 and 30 days of admission and the odds of 30-day and 1-year mortality for men and women by quintile of neighborhood median household income. Significant relationships between nSES and the receipt of cardiac catheterization and mortality after ACS were detected for women but not men. When examined by nSES, each incremental decrease in neighborhood income quintile for women was associated with a 6% lower odds of receiving cardiac catheterization within 30 days (p=0.01) and a 14% higher odds of 30-day mortality (p=0.03). For men, each decrease in neighborhood income quintile was associated with a 2% lower odds of receiving catheterization within 30 days (p=0.10), and a 5% higher odds of 30-day mortality (p=0.36). Conclusions Associations between nSES and receipt of cardiac catheterization and 30-day mortality were noted for women but not men in a universal healthcare system. Care protocols designed to improve equity of access to care and outcomes are required, especially for low-income women. PMID:24895450

  4. Effects of oral premedication on cognitive status of elderly patients undergoing cardiac catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Javed M; Schweiger, Marc; Vallurupalli, Neelima; Bellantonio, Sandra; Cook, James R

    2015-01-01

    Background Sedatives and analgesics are often administered to achieve conscious sedation for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Appropriate concerns have been raised regarding post procedure delirium related to peri-procedural medication in the elderly. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of premedication on new onset delirium and procedural care in elderly patients. Methods Patients ≥ 70 years old and scheduled for elective cardiac catheterization were randomly assigned to receive either oral diphenhydramine and diazepam (25 mg/5 mg) or no premedication. All patients underwent a mini mental state exam and delirium assessment using confusion assessment method prior to the procedure and repeated at 4 h after the procedure and prior to discharge. Patients' cooperation during the procedure and ease of post-procedure were measured using Visual Analog Scale (VAS). The degree of alertness was assessed immediately on arrival to the floor, and twice hourly afterwards using Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation Scale (OAA/S). Results A total of 93 patients were enrolled. The mean age was 77 years, and 47 patients received premedication prior to the procedure. None of the patients in either group developed delirium. Patients' cooperation and the ease of procedure was greater and pain medication requirement less both during and after the procedure in the pre-medicated group (P < 0.05 for both). Nurses reported an improvement with patient management in the pre-medicated group (P = 0.08). Conclusions In conclusion, premedication did not cause delirium in elderly patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. The reduced pain medication requirement, perceived procedural ease and post procedure management favors premedication in elderly patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. PMID:26089850

  5. Inventory management for cardiac catheterization labs: the Princeton-Baptist Medical Center experience.

    PubMed

    Long, T A

    1993-08-01

    Several issues must be considered for implementation in order to decrease inventories and make them more manageable. Physician consensus on products, strict vendor control by the department manager, setting and maintaining low par levels, inventorying stock daily, negotiating just-in-time deliveries, conservation-minded staff, and working in concert with central supply and materiel management personnel are steps that when employed correctly can lead to more manageable inventories in cardiac catheterization departments. If these steps are implemented, they will enhance the liquidity of the department and ultimately that of the medical center. PMID:10127553

  6. Surgical Treatment of a Catheter-Induced Iatrogenic Dissection of the Right Coronary Artery following Cardiac Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Artemiou, Panagiotis; Lukacin, Stefan; Kirsch, Peter; Ignac, Jan; Bily, Boris; Tohatyova, Alzbeta; Bilecova-Rabajdova, Miroslava; Sabol, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic dissections of the ascending aorta are an uncommon and severe complication during cardiac catheterization. A 68-year-old female patient underwent diagnostic cardiac catheterization due to non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction. During the procedure, a catheter-induced 360° Class I dissection of the right coronary artery occurred. The patient developed severe bradycardia, which was treated with a temporary pacemaker. She underwent an emergency operation with ligation and a saphenous vein graft in the right coronary artery. The postoperative course was uneventful; and on postoperative day 6, she was discharged home. PMID:27403187

  7. Successful Biopsy and Removal of a Tricuspid Valve Papillary Fibroelastoma in Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gollol-Raju, Narasimha Swamy; Joshi, Deepak; Daggubati, Ramesh; Nekkanti, Rajasekhar; Movahed, Assad

    2016-06-01

    Papillary fibroelastomas are rare benign cardiac tumours with a predilection for cardiac valves. Because of the rarity of these tumours, management is individualized, but some recommend surgical removal of all papillary fibroelastomas due to the increased risk of embolization. We report a case of a 71-year-old man who presented with a sessile mass on the tricuspid valve. The mass, a papillary fibroelastoma, was successfully biopsied and removed in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. This report demonstrates a unique minimally invasive way of approaching a cardiac tumour wherein a major surgery was avoided. PMID:26577893

  8. Anaphylactoid reactions to radiocontrast agents: prevention and treatment in the cardiac catheterization laboratory.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Keshav R; White, Andrew A; Cavendish, Jeffrey J; Barker, Colin M; Kandzari, David E

    2009-10-01

    The use of iodinated contrast agents for angiography dates back to the 1920s. The initial prototype has undergone modifications to reduce the toxicity and discomfort associated with the early contrast molecules. More importantly, these changes have dramatically decreased the rate and risk for severe adverse reactions such as hypersensitivity and anaphylaxis. With over 15 million contrast-requiring procedures performed annually in the United States, it is important to understand the risk factors, pathogenesis, diagnosis, prevention and treatment of contrast-induced anaphylactoid reactions. Reviews of adverse reactions are sparse in the cardiology literature, except for a landmark review in 1995 by Goss et al, which has served as the only practice guideline to date for cardiologists. In this report, we review the most recent literature to provide a guide for the general and interventional cardiologist in regards to the pretreatment and management of contrast-related reactions specifically in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. PMID:19805846

  9. Feasible induction of coronary artery vasospasm occurred during cardiac catheterization in a microminipig

    PubMed Central

    MATSUKURA, Suchitra; NAKAMURA, Yuji; OHARA, Hiroshi; CAO, Xin; WADA, Takeshi; IZUMI-NAKASEKO, Hiroko; ANDO, Kentaro; AKASAKA, Yoshikiyo; SUGIYAMA, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    A 14 month-old intact microminipig, weighing 8 kg, showed ST-segment elevation in A-B lead electrocardiogram during cardiac catheterization followed by ventricular tachycardia, which degenerated into ventricular fibrillation. Although a direct current defibrillation of 360 J was applied, ventricular tachycardia re-occurred for another 2 times and the direct defibrillation was repeated. After returning to normal sinus rhythm, a marked ST-segment elevation was still observed on leads II, III and aVF together with a remarkable decrease in contractility of inferior wall. The heart was excised for precise macroscopic and histological examinations, but there was no dissection, embolus or thrombus in the coronary arteries. These findings suggest that right coronary artery vasospasm could have caused the ischemic attack, leading to lethal arrhythmias. PMID:26806564

  10. Radiation exposure to the pediatric patient during cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography. Emphasis on the thyroid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, E.C.; Olson, A.P.; Steeg, C.N.; Casarella, W.J.

    1981-07-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimetry was used to measure the radiation exposure to the skin, thyroid and gonads in 50 consecutive pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography using cine photofluorography. Average exposures were 17.1 R to the skin, 2.3 R to the thyroid and 0.1 R to the gonads. Fluoroscopy accounted for approximately 80% of the skin and thyroid exposure and cine photofluorography for 20-25%. Occasional primary-beam irradiation was the major contributor to gonad exposure. Internal scatter of the incident x-ray beam was primarily responsible for thyroid exposure, so that infants received relatively high exposures; one receiving 7.3 R. The thyroid was not frequently in the primary beam. The significance of high radiation exposure to the thyroid, and in particular its relationship to thyroid carcinoma, are discussed. The results are compared with other series in the literature and relative exposures of cine photofluorography and serial filming are contrasted.

  11. Radiation exposure to the pediatric patient during cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography. Emphasis on the thyroid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, E.C.; Olson, A.P.; Steeg, C.N.; Casarella, W.J.

    1981-07-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimetry was used to measure the radiation exposure to the skin, thyroid and gonads in 50 consecutive pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization and angiocariography using cine photofluorography. Average exposures were 17.1 R to the skin, 2.3 R to the thyroid and 0.1 R to the gonads. Fluoroscopy accounted for approximately 80% of the skin and thyroid exposure and cine photofluorography for 20 to 25%. Occasional primary-beam irradiation was the major contributor to gonad exposure. Internal scatter of the incident x-ray beam was primarily responsible for thyroid exposure, so that infants received relatively high exposures; one receiving 7.3 R. The thyroid was not frequently in the primary beam. The significance of high radiation exposure to the thyroid, and in particular its relationship to thyroid carcinoma, are discussed. The results are compared with other series in the literature and relative exposures of cine photofluorography and serial filming are contrasted.

  12. Feasible induction of coronary artery vasospasm occurred during cardiac catheterization in a microminipig.

    PubMed

    Matsukura, Suchitra; Nakamura, Yuji; Ohara, Hiroshi; Cao, Xin; Wada, Takeshi; Izumi-Nakaseko, Hiroko; Ando, Kentaro; Akasaka, Yoshikiyo; Sugiyama, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    A 14 month-old intact microminipig, weighing 8 kg, showed ST-segment elevation in A-B lead electrocardiogram during cardiac catheterization followed by ventricular tachycardia, which degenerated into ventricular fibrillation. Although a direct current defibrillation of 360 J was applied, ventricular tachycardia re-occurred for another 2 times and the direct defibrillation was repeated. After returning to normal sinus rhythm, a marked ST-segment elevation was still observed on leads II, III and aVF together with a remarkable decrease in contractility of inferior wall. The heart was excised for precise macroscopic and histological examinations, but there was no dissection, embolus or thrombus in the coronary arteries. These findings suggest that right coronary artery vasospasm could have caused the ischemic attack, leading to lethal arrhythmias. PMID:26806564

  13. [Myocardial involvement in diabetic patients evaluated by exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy and cardiac catheterization].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, S; Genda, A; Nakayama, A; Igarashi, Y; Takeda, R

    1985-06-01

    To evaluate myocardial involvement in diabetes mellitus, we studied 39 patients with negative double-Master's test and without hypertension by exercise thallium-201 (T1-201) myocardial scintigraphy using a bicycle ergometer. Among the 39 patients, 12 (30.8%) showed filling defects in the scintigrams (positive cases), including eight with stress-induced defects and four with fixed defects. The positive cases had higher scores of diabetic complications (3.6 +/- 2.4 vs 2.1 +/- 1.8; p less than 0.05) and longer durations of diabetes as compared with those of the negative cases. The frequency of insulin therapy was also greater in the positive cases. Eleven patients (5 positive and 6 negative cases) who underwent cardiac catheterization had no significant stenotic lesions of their coronary arteries. However, all of the positive cases showed abnormal wall motion, mainly hypokinesis, by left ventriculography (LVG). The abnormalities of the LVG corresponded to the findings of the scintigrams (i.e. filling defects and decrease in washout ratios by circumferential profile analysis). These results suggest that in some diabetics myocardial involvement exists in the early stage without overt cardiac disease and exercise T1-201 scintigraphy is useful in detecting pre-clinical cardiomyopathy. Cardiomyopathy in diabetics seems to be due to disturbances of the myocardial microcirculation. PMID:4093624

  14. Cardiac catheterization in children with pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease: consensus statement from the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute, Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Task Forces.

    PubMed

    Del Cerro, Maria Jesus; Moledina, Shahin; Haworth, Sheila G; Ivy, Dunbar; Al Dabbagh, Maha; Banjar, Hanaa; Diaz, Gabriel; Heath-Freudenthal, Alexandria; Galal, Ahmed Nasser; Humpl, Tilman; Kulkarni, Snehal; Lopes, Antonio; Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Puri, G D; Rossouw, Beyra; Harikrishnan, S; Saxena, Anita; Udo, Patience; Caicedo, Lina; Tamimi, Omar; Adatia, Ian

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac catheterization is important in the diagnosis and risk stratification of pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease (PHVD) in children. Acute vasoreactivity testing provides key information about management, prognosis, therapeutic strategies, and efficacy. Data obtained at cardiac catheterization continue to play an important role in determining the surgical options for children with congenital heart disease and clinical evidence of increased pulmonary vascular resistance. The Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Task Forces of the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute met to develop a consensus statement regarding indications for, conduct of, acute vasoreactivity testing with, and pitfalls and risks of cardiac catheterization in children with PHVD. This document contains the essentials of those discussions to provide a rationale for the hemodynamic assessment by cardiac catheterization of children with PHVD. PMID:27076908

  15. Cardiac catheterization in children with pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease: consensus statement from the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute, Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Task Forces

    PubMed Central

    del Cerro, Maria Jesus; Moledina, Shahin; Haworth, Sheila G.; Ivy, Dunbar; Al Dabbagh, Maha; Banjar, Hanaa; Diaz, Gabriel; Heath-Freudenthal, Alexandria; Galal, Ahmed Nasser; Humpl, Tilman; Kulkarni, Snehal; Lopes, Antonio; Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Puri, G. D.; Rossouw, Beyra; Harikrishnan, S.; Saxena, Anita; Udo, Patience; Caicedo, Lina; Tamimi, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac catheterization is important in the diagnosis and risk stratification of pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease (PHVD) in children. Acute vasoreactivity testing provides key information about management, prognosis, therapeutic strategies, and efficacy. Data obtained at cardiac catheterization continue to play an important role in determining the surgical options for children with congenital heart disease and clinical evidence of increased pulmonary vascular resistance. The Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Task Forces of the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute met to develop a consensus statement regarding indications for, conduct of, acute vasoreactivity testing with, and pitfalls and risks of cardiac catheterization in children with PHVD. This document contains the essentials of those discussions to provide a rationale for the hemodynamic assessment by cardiac catheterization of children with PHVD. PMID:27076908

  16. Pediatric cardiac catheterization procedure with dexmedetomidine sedation: Radiographic airway patency assessment

    PubMed Central

    Thimmarayappa, Ashwini; Chandrasekaran, Nivash; Jagadeesh, A. M.; Joshi, Shreedhar S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the study was to measure airway patency objectively during dexmedetomidine sedation under radiographic guidance in spontaneously breathing pediatric patients scheduled for cardiac catheterization procedures. Subjects and Methods: Thirty-five patients in the age group 5–10 years scheduled for cardiac catheterization procedures were enrolled. All study patients were given loading dose of dexmedetomidine at 1 μg/kg/min for 10 min and then maintenance dose of 1.5 μg/kg/h. Radiographic airway patency was assessed at the start of infusion (0 min) and after 30 min. Antero-posterior (AP) diameters were measured manually at the nasopharyngeal and retroglossal levels. Dynamic change in airway between inspiration and expiration was considered a measure of airway collapsibility. Patients were monitored for hemodynamics, recovery time and complications. Statistical Analysis: Student paired t-test was used for data analysis. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Minimum and maximum AP diameters were compared at 0 and 30 min. Nasopharyngeal level showed significant reduction in the minimum (6.27 ± 1.09 vs. 4.26 ± 1.03, P < 0.0001) and maximum (6.51 ± 1.14 vs. 5.99 ± 1.03, P < 0.0001) diameters. Similarly retroglossal level showed significant reduction in the minimum (6.98 ± 1.09 vs. 5.27 ± 1.15, P < 0.0001) and maximum (7.49 ± 1.22 vs. 6.92 ± 1.12, P < 0.0003) diameters. The degree of collapsibility was greater at 30 min than baseline (P < 0.0001). There was a significant decrease in heart rate (P < 0.0001), and the average recovery time was 39.86 ± 12.22 min. Conclusion: Even though airway patency was maintained in all children sedated with dexmedetomidine, there were significant reductions in the upper airway dimensions measured, so all precautions to manage the airway failure should be taken. PMID:25566708

  17. Evaluation of a robotic arm for echocardiography to X-ray image registration during cardiac catheterization procedures.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingliang; Penney, Graeme P; Bos, Dennis; Frissen, Peter; de Fockert, George; King, Andy; Gao, Gang; Yao, Cheng; Totman, John; Ginks, Matthew; Rinaldi, C; Razavi, Reza; Rhode, Kawal S

    2009-01-01

    We present an initial evaluation of a robotic arm for positioning a 3D echo probe during cardiac catheterization procedures. By tracking the robotic arm, X-ray table and X-ray C-arm, we are able to register the 3D echo images with live 2D X-ray images. In addition, we can also use tracking data from the robotic arm combined with system calibrations to create extended field of view 3D echo images. Both these features can be used for roadmapping to guide cardiac catheterization procedures. We have carried out a validation experiment of our registration method using a cross-wire phantom. Results show our method to be accurate to 3.5 mm. We have successfully demonstrated the creation of the extended field of view data on 2 healthy volunteers and the registration of echo and X-ray data on 1 patient undergoing a pacing study. PMID:19964867

  18. Cancer mortality following cardiac catheterization: a preliminary follow-up study on 4,891 irradiated children

    SciTech Connect

    Spengler, R.F.; Cook, D.H.; Clarke, E.A.; Olley, P.M.; Newman, A.M.

    1983-02-01

    A retrospective cohort study was conducted on the risk of radiation-induced cancer mortality following cardiac catheterization. The study included 4,891 children with congenital heart disease who were assessed by cardiac catheterization during 1946 to 1968 at The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto. The cohort was matched against the Ontario cancer death file from 1950 to 1975. The average period of follow-up was 13 years and more than 66,000 person-years have been accrued from the cohort. No deaths from breast cancer or thyroid cancer were identified. Five cancer deaths were observed and compared with 4.8 expected deaths based on Ontario cancer death rates. The five cancer deaths resulted from three leukemias, one Wilms tumor, and one unspecified nervous system tumor. The preliminary findings did not demonstrate a significant leukemia risk arising from diagnostic cardiac catheterizations. Continued follow-up of this cohort is required to evaluate the risk of breast and thyroid cancers which can occur more than 20 years following radiation exposure.

  19. Cancer mortality following cardiac catheterization: a preliminary follow-up study on 4,891 irradiated children

    SciTech Connect

    Spengler, R.F.; Cook, D.H.; Clarke, E.A.; Olley, P.M.; Newman, A.M.

    1983-02-01

    A retrospective cohort study was conducted on the risk of radiation-induced cancer mortality following cardiac catheterization. The study included 4,891 children with congenital heart disease who were assessed by cardiac catheterization during 1946 to 1968 at The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto. The cohort was matched against the Ontario cancer death file from 1950 to 1975. The average period of follow-up was 13 years and more than 66,000 person-years have been accrued from the cohort. No deaths from breast cancer or thyroid cancer were identified. Five cancer deaths were observed and compared with 4.8 expected deaths based on Ontario cancer death rates. The five cancer deaths resulted from three leukemias, one Wilms' tumor, and one unspecified nervous system tumor. The preliminary findings did not demonstrate a significant leukemia risk arising from diagnostic cardiac catheterizations. Continued follow-up of this cohort is required to evaluate the risk of breast and thyroid cancers which can occur more than 20 years following radiation exposure.

  20. Paraplegia following cervical epidural catheterization using loss of resistance technique with air: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Yun Jeong; Park, Hyung Bae; Kim, Chan; Nam, Si Gweon

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of paraplegia without neurologic deficit of upper extremities following cervical epidural catheterization using air during the loss of resistance technique. A 41-year-old woman diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome had upper and lower extremity pain. A thoracic epidural lead was inserted for a trial spinal cord stimulation for treating lower extremity pain and cervical epidural catheterization was performed for treating upper extremity pain. Rapidly progressive paraplegia developed six hours after cervical epidural catheterization. Spine CT revealed air entrapment in multiple thoracic intervertebral foraminal spaces and surrounding epidural space without obvious spinal cord compression before the decompressive operation, which disappeared one day after the decompressive operation. Her paraplegia symptoms were normalized immediately after the operation. The presumed cause of paraplegia was transient interruption of blood supply to the spinal cord through the segmental radiculomedullary arteries feeding the spinal cord at the thoracic level of the intervertebral foramen caused by the air. PMID:26885305

  1. DIAGNOSTIC CARDIAC CATHETERIZATION USING THE MEDRAD AVANTA FLUID MANAGEMENT SYSTEM AS COMPARED TO THE TRADITIONAL MANUAL INJECTION METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Winniford, Michael D

    2013-02-08

    Nearly 4 million patient procedures performed annually in US cardiac catheterization laboratories utilize contrast media to achieve vessel opacification. The amount of contrast media used is variable and depends on the complexity of the procedure, the method of contrast delivery as well as the skill-level of the operator. Since the total amount of contrast used for each procedure can have both patient safety and economic implications, it is essential for cardiologists to have the ability to control contrast delivery such that optimal angiographic image quality is achieved using the least amount of contrast. Although the complication rate associated with cardiac catheterization remains low, the most common serious complication, contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN), is associated with poor prognosis and a high mortality rate. Numerous interventional strategies for preventing and reducing the severity of CIN have demonstrated varying degrees of clinical benefit, but none has been shown to reliably prevent this serious complication. To date, the most effective approach for reducing the risk of CIN is to properly hydrate the patient and to minimize the amount of contrast media administered. Automated injection systems are intended for use in virtually all cardiac catheterization procedures and have numerous features which can provide potential advantages over traditional methods. With automated injection technology the operator is able to control and precisely monitor contrast delivery. Additionally, the MEDRAD Avanta Fluid Management Injection System utilizes a sterile contrast reservoir which eliminates the need to discard unused contrast in individual opened containers following each procedure. Considering that an average of 50% of opened contrast media is wasted using manual injection methods, this savings can provide a substantial economic benefit. Automated systems also facilitate the use of smaller (5 French) catheter sizes. Precise flow control and the use of

  2. [Application of ultrasonography in central venous catheterization; access sites and procedure techniques].

    PubMed

    Czyzewska, Dorota; Ustymowicz, Andrzej; Klukowski, Mark

    2016-08-01

    Central venous catheterization is commonly performed in clinical practice. Traditional procedural technique is based on anatomical landmarks, but is associated with a high risk of failure and complications. To decrease their incidence European and American societies recommend application of ultrasonography. Preliminary ultrasonographic examination allows for assessment of local anatomical relations as well as vessel morphology (diameter, patency), while real-time ultrasonography increases chances of successful needle insertion. This paper presents the most common venous access sites and procedure techniques. PMID:27157792

  3. Referrals in Acute Coronary Events for CARdiac Catheterization: The RACE CAR trial

    PubMed Central

    Kreatsoulas, Catherine; Sloane, Debi; Pogue, Janice; Velianou, James L; Anand, Sonia S

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Women with acute coronary syndromes have lower rates of cardiac catheterization (CC) than men. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether sex/gender, age, risk level and patient preference influence physician decision making to refer patients for CC. METHODS: Twelve clinical scenarios controlling for sex/gender, age (55 or 75 years of age), Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction risk score (low, moderate or high) and patient preference for CC (agreeable or refused/no preference expressed) were designed. Scenarios were administered to specialists across Canada using a web-based computerized survey instrument. Questions were standardized using a five-point Likert scale ranging from 1 (very unlikely to benefit from CC) to 5 (very likely to benefit from CC). Outcomes were assessed using a two-tailed mixed linear regression model. RESULTS: Of 237 scenarios, physicians rated men as more likely to benefit from CC than women (mean [± SE] 4.44±0.07 versus 4.25±0.07, P=0.03), adjusted for age, risk and patient preference. Low-risk men were perceived to benefit more than low-risk women (4.20±0.13 versus 3.54±0.14, P<0.01), and low-risk younger patients were perceived to benefit more than low-risk older patients (4.52±0.17 versus 3.22±0.16, P<0.01). Regardless of risk, patients who agreed to CC were perceived as more likely to benefit from CC than patients who were disagreeable or made no comment at all (5.0±0.23, 3.67±0.21, 2.95±0.14, respectively, P<0.01). CONCLUSION: Canadian specialists’ decisions to refer patients for CC appear to be influenced by sex/gender, age and patient preference in clinical scenarios in which cardiac risk is held constant. Future investigation of possible age and sex/gender biases as proxies for risk is warranted. PMID:20931097

  4. Predicting patient volume in cardiac catheterization laboratory to improve resource management.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianhua; Santangelo, Jennifer; James, Randy; Watters, Coyt D; Orsini, Anthony; Mekhjian, Hagop; Kamal, Jyoti

    2008-01-01

    Using historical data within the Information Warehouse of the Ohio State University Medical Center, prediction on daily patient volume to catheterization laboratory was attempted to facilitate resource management and planning. PMID:18998829

  5. Prognostic utility of the exercise thallium-201 test in ambulatory patients with chest pain: comparison with cardiac catheterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, S.; Lilly, D.R.; Gascho, J.A.; Watson, D.D.; Gibson, R.S.; Oliner, C.A.; Ryan, J.M.; Beller, G.A.

    1988-04-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the prognostic utility of the exercise thallium-201 stress test in ambulatory patients with chest pain who were also referred for cardiac catheterization. Accordingly, 4 to 8 year (mean +/- 1SD, 4.6 +/- 2.6 years) follow-up data were obtained for all but one of 383 patients who underwent both exercise thallium-201 stress testing and cardiac catheterization from 1978 to 1981. Eighty-three patients had a revascularization procedure performed within 3 months of testing and were excluded from analysis. Of the remaining 299 patients, 210 had no events and 89 had events (41 deaths, nine nonfatal myocardial infarctions, and 39 revascularization procedures greater than or equal to 3 months after testing). When all clinical, exercise, thallium-201, and catheterization variables were analyzed by Cox regression analysis, the number of diseased vessels (when defined as greater than or equal to 50% luminal diameter narrowing) was the single most important predictor of future cardiac events (chi 2 = 38.1) followed by the number of segments demonstrating redistribution on delayed thallium-201 images (chi 2 = 16.3), except in the case of nonfatal myocardial infarction, for which redistribution was the most important predictor of future events. When coronary artery disease was defined as 70% or greater luminal diameter narrowing, the number of diseased vessels significantly (p less than .01) lost its power to predict events (chi 2 = 14.5). Other variables found to independently predict future events included change in heart rate from rest to exercise (chi 2 = 13.0), ST segment depression on exercise (chi 2 = 13.0), occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias on exercise (chi 2 = 5.9), and beta-blocker therapy (chi 2 = 4.3).

  6. Left heart catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bonow RO. Cardiac catheterization. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook ... arteriography and intracoronary imaging In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook ...

  7. Ultrasound-guided catheterization of the portal vein in 11 cows using the Seldinger technique.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Camenzind, D; Ossent, P

    2003-02-01

    Catheterization of the portal vein using the Seldinger technique [Acta Radiol. (1958) 38, 368] was performed in 11 cows. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous portocentesis, using a 25-cm, 14-gauge steel cannula, was performed from the 10th, 11th or 12th intercostal space on the right side. A stylet was placed through the cannula, which was then removed, and a polyurethane balloon-tipped catheter was advanced over the stylet into the portal vein and sutured to the skin (Seldinger, 1952). Blood samples were collected from the catheter at least once daily. The catheter was removed 9-15 days later when blood could no longer be aspirated. The cows were then slaughtered and a post-mortem examination was performed. During the study, appetite remained normal in nine of 11 cows. In three cows, the general behaviour and demeanour were mildly, but transiently, abnormal. Four cows had leucopoenia. The most frequently encountered problem was occlusion of the catheter, which usually was resolved by flushing with heparinized saline. The most common post-mortem lesion observed was an increase in fibrous connective tissue at the site of cannulation. In nine of 11cows, there was a thrombus in the portal vein at the site of catheterization. Generally, the severity of the lesions was mild. The results of this study demonstrated that ultrasound-guided percutaneous catheterization of the portal vein, using the Seldinger technique, is possible in cows. The catheter may be left in place for collection of blood samples for up to 15 days. PMID:12650501

  8. Percutaneous Treatment of a Primary Pancreatic Hydatid Cyst Using a Catheterization Technique

    PubMed Central

    Karaman, Bulent; Ustunsoz, Bahri; Ugurel, Mehmet Sahin

    2012-01-01

    Primary pancreatic hydatid cysts are rare and its percutaneous treatment and catheterization technique has, to the best of our knowledge, not been published in literature. A 33-year-old male patient who presented with abdominal pain was evaluated by ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography examinations. Both examinations revealed a cyst in the neck of the pancreas. After the administration of albendazole chemoprophylaxis, the patient underwent diagnostic puncture showing high pressure spring water which harbored the scoleces and was treated percutaneously by the catheterization technique. In this technique, first the cyst was punctured, the fluid content aspirated, the radiocontrast material injected to see possible fistulisation, and then re-aspirated. The 20% hypertonic saline solution was injected and re-aspiration was performed to the best of our abilities, followed by the insertion of a catheter for drainage of the remaining non-aspiratable fluid content. At follow-up examination, the cyst was not visible on US after 6 months. There was no evidence of cyst recurrence or dissemination after 18 months at serologic and imaging follow-up. PMID:22438691

  9. Percutaneous treatment of a primary pancreatic hydatid cyst using a catheterization technique.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Bulent; Battal, Bilal; Ustunsoz, Bahri; Ugurel, Mehmet Sahin

    2012-01-01

    Primary pancreatic hydatid cysts are rare and its percutaneous treatment and catheterization technique has, to the best of our knowledge, not been published in literature. A 33-year-old male patient who presented with abdominal pain was evaluated by ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography examinations. Both examinations revealed a cyst in the neck of the pancreas. After the administration of albendazole chemoprophylaxis, the patient underwent diagnostic puncture showing high pressure spring water which harbored the scoleces and was treated percutaneously by the catheterization technique. In this technique, first the cyst was punctured, the fluid content aspirated, the radiocontrast material injected to see possible fistulisation, and then re-aspirated. The 20% hypertonic saline solution was injected and re-aspiration was performed to the best of our abilities, followed by the insertion of a catheter for drainage of the remaining non-aspiratable fluid content. At follow-up examination, the cyst was not visible on US after 6 months. There was no evidence of cyst recurrence or dissemination after 18 months at serologic and imaging follow-up. PMID:22438691

  10. Cardiac imaging of congenital heart diseases during interventional procedures continues to evolve: Pros and cons of the main techniques.

    PubMed

    Hascoët, Sebastien; Warin-Fresse, Karine; Baruteau, Alban-Elouen; Hadeed, Khaled; Karsenty, Clement; Petit, Jérôme; Guérin, Patrice; Fraisse, Alain; Acar, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac catheterization has contributed to the progress made in the management of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). First, it allowed clarification of the diagnostic assessment of CHD, by offering a better understanding of normal cardiac physiology and the pathophysiology and anatomy of complex malformations. Then, it became an alternative to surgery and a major component of the therapeutic approach for some CHD lesions. Nowadays, techniques have evolved and cardiac catheterization is widely used to percutaneously close intracardiac shunts, to relieve obstructive valvar or vessel lesions, and for transcatheter valve replacement. Accurate imaging is mandatory to guide these procedures. Cardiac imaging during catheterization of CHD must provide accurate images of lesions, surrounding cardiac structures, medical devices and tools used to deliver them. Cardiac imaging has to be 'real-time' with an excellent temporal resolution to ensure 'eyes-hands' synchronization and 'device-target area' accurate positioning. In this comprehensive review, we provide an overview of conventional cardiac imaging tools used in the catheterization laboratory in daily practice, as well as the effect of recent evolution and future imaging modalities. PMID:26858142

  11. Superiority of quantitative exercise thallium-201 variables in determining long-term prognosis in ambulatory patients with chest pain: a comparison with cardiac catheterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, S.; Finkelstein, D.M.; Homma, S.; Leavitt, M.; Okada, R.D.; Boucher, C.A.

    1988-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prognostic utility of quantitative exercise thallium-201 imaging and compare it with that of cardiac catheterization in ambulatory patients. Accordingly, long-term (4 to 9 years) follow-up was obtained in 293 patients who underwent both tests for the evaluation of chest pain: 89 had undergone coronary artery bypass graft surgery within 3 months of testing and were excluded from analysis, 119 experienced no cardiac events and 91 had an event (death in 20, nonfatal myocardial infarction in 21 and coronary artery bypass operations performed greater than 3 months after cardiac catheterization in 50). When all variables were analyzed using Cox regression analysis, the quantitatively assessed lung/heart ratio of thallium-201 activity was the most important predictor of a future cardiac event (chi 2 = 40.21). Other significant predictors were the number of diseased vessels (chi 2 = 17.11), patient gender (chi 2 = 9.43) and change in heart rate from rest to exercise (chi 2 = 4.19). Whereas the number of diseased vessels was an important independent predictor of cardiac events, it did not add significantly to the overall ability of the exercise thallium-201 test to predict events. Furthermore, information obtained from thallium-201 imaging alone was marginally superior to that obtained from cardiac catheterization alone (p = 0.04) and significantly superior to that obtained from exercise testing alone (p = 0.02) in determining the occurrence of events. In addition, unlike the exercise thallium-201 test, which could predict the occurrence of all categories of events, catheterization data were not able to predict the occurrence of nonfatal myocardial infarction. The exclusion of bypass surgery and previous myocardial infarction did not alter the results.

  12. Silent cerebral infarct after cardiac catheterization as detected by diffusion weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging: a randomized comparison of radial and femoral arterial approaches

    PubMed Central

    Hamon, Michèle; Burzotta, Francesco; Oppenheim, Catherine; Morello, Rémy; Viader, Fausto; Hamon, Martial

    2007-01-01

    Background and objective Cerebral microembolism detected by transcranial Doppler (TCD) occurs systematically during cardiac catheterization, but its clinical relevance, remains unknown. Studies suggest that asymptomatic embolic cerebral infarction detectable by diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI might exist after percutaneous cardiac interventions with a frequency as high as 15 to 22% of cases. We have set up, for the first time, a prospective multicenter trial to assess the rate of silent cerebral infarction after cardiac catheterization and to compare the impact of the arterial access site, comparing radial and femoral access, on this phenomenon. Study design This prospective study will be performed in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. To assess the occurrence of cerebral infarction, all patients will undergo cerebral DW-MRI and neurological assessment within 24 hours before, and 48 hours after cardiac catheterization and retrograde catheterization of the aortic valve. Randomization for the access site will be performed before coronary angiography. A subgroup will be monitored by transcranial power M-mode Doppler during cardiac catheterization to observe cerebral blood flow and track emboli. Neuropsychological tests will also be recorded in a subgroup of patients before and after the interventional procedures to assess the impact of silent brain injury on potential cognitive decline. The primary end-point of the study is a direct comparison of ischemic cerebral lesions as detected by serial cerebral DW-MRI between patients explored by radial access and patients explored by femoral access. Secondary end-points include comparison of neuropsychological test performance and number of microembolism signals observed in the two groups. Implications Using serial DW-MRI, silent cerebral infarction rate will be defined and the potential influence of vascular access site will be evaluated. Silent cerebral infarction might be a major concern during cardiac catheterization

  13. Comparative study between the effects of dexmedetomidine and propofol on cerebral oxygenation during sedation at pediatric cardiac catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Cetin, Murat; Birbicer, Handan; Hallioglu, Olgu; Orekeci, Gulhan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays, assessment of brain oxygen saturation, which is simply appliable and noninvasive method, can provide the anesthesia plans to be optimized according to the needs of the brain, which is the main target organ. Brain may be exposed to hypoxia due to supply-demand imbalance of oxygen not only in general anesthesia procedures but also in sedation practices. The aim of the study is to compare the effects of dexmedetomidine and propofol which are widely used agents for pediatric catheterization procedures on brain oxygen saturation using Fore-Sight. Material and Methods: A total of 44 patients undergoing diagnostic cardiac catheterization between 1 and 18 years old were included in the study. All patients, who were randomly divided into two groups, had ASA physical status I-II. In Group Propofol (Group P, n = 22), induction of sedation was made by midazolam (0.5 mg,iv) + propofol (1m/kg,iv), and in Group Dexmedetomidine (Group D, n = 22), induction of sedation was made by midazolam (0.5 mg,iv) +dexmedetomidine (1mcg/kg, iv). Throughout the sedation, cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (SctO2) was recorded by Fore-Sight in addition to routine monitoring. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of demographic data, hemodynamic data and sedation scores. On other hand, statistically significant decreases in cerebral tissue oxygen saturation were detected especially at 5th and 10th minutes, in Group D, while cerebral oxygenation level did not decrease in Group P. Though, statistically significant difference was determined between two groups in terms of cerebral oxygen saturation, the obtained data was not interpreted as cerebral desaturation. Conclusion: As a conclusion, there was a statistically significant but clinically insignificant decrease in cerebral tissue oxygen saturation in dexmedetomidine group compared to propofol group. Although it does not seem to be important in hemodynamic stabilization, we

  14. Assessment of DNA double-strand breaks induced by intravascular iodinated contrast media following in vitro irradiation and in vivo, during paediatric cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Gould, Richard; McFadden, Sonyia L; Horn, Simon; Prise, Kevin M; Doyle, Philip; Hughes, Ciara M

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric cardiac catheterizations may result in the administration of substantial amounts of iodinated contrast media and ionizing radiation. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of iodinated contrast media in combination with in vitro and in vivo X-ray radiation on lymphocyte DNA. Six concentrations of iodine (15, 17.5, 30, 35, 45, and 52.5 mg of iodine per mL blood) represented volumes of iodinated contrast media used in the clinical setting. Blood obtained from healthy volunteers was mixed with iodinated contrast media and exposed to radiation doses commonly used in paediatric cardiac catheterizations (0 mGy, 70 mGy, 140 mGy, 250 mGy and 450 mGy). Control samples contained no iodine. For in vivo experimentation, pre and post blood samples were collected from children undergoing cardiac catheterization, receiving iodine concentrations of up to 51 mg of iodine per mL blood and radiation doses of up to 400 mGy. Fluorescence microscopy was performed to assess γH2AX-foci induction, which corresponded to the number of DNA double-strand breaks. The presence of iodine in vitro resulted in significant increases of DNA double-strand breaks beyond that induced by radiation for ≥ 17.5 mg/mL iodine to blood. The in vivo effects of contrast media on children undergoing cardiac catheterization resulted in a 19% increase in DNA double-strand breaks in children receiving an average concentration of 19 mg/mL iodine to blood. A larger investigation is required to provide further information of the potential benefit of lowering the amount of iodinated contrast media received during X-ray radiation investigations. PMID:26549792

  15. The influence of patient size on dose conversion coefficients: a hybrid phantom study for adult cardiac catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry; Lee, Choonsik; Johnson, Kevin; Siragusa, Daniel; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2009-06-01

    In this study, the influence of patient size on organ and effective dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) was investigated for a representative interventional fluoroscopic procedure—cardiac catheterization. The study was performed using hybrid phantoms representing an underweight, average and overweight American adult male. Reference body sizes were determined using the NHANES III database and parameterized based on standing height and total body mass. Organ and effective dose conversion coefficients were calculated for anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left anterior oblique and right anterior oblique projections using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX 2.5.0 with the metric dose area product being used as the normalization factor. Results show body size to have a clear influence on DCCs which increased noticeably when body size decreased. It was also shown that if patient size is neglected when choosing a DCC, the organ and effective dose will be underestimated to an underweight patient and will be overestimated to an underweight patient, with errors as large as 113% for certain projections. Results were further compared with those published for a KTMAN-2 Korean patient-specific tomographic phantom. The published DCCs aligned best with the hybrid phantom which most closely matched in overall body size. These results highlighted the need for and the advantages of phantom-patient matching, and it is recommended that hybrid phantoms be used to create a more diverse library of patient-dependent anthropomorphic phantoms for medical dose reconstruction.

  16. Complexity of cardiac signals for predicting changes in alpha-waves after stress in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hung-Chih; Lin, Yen-Hung; Lo, Men-Tzung; Tang, Sung-Chun; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Lu, Hung-Chun; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Ma, Hsi-Pin; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-08-01

    The hierarchical interaction between electrical signals of the brain and heart is not fully understood. We hypothesized that the complexity of cardiac electrical activity can be used to predict changes in encephalic electricity after stress. Most methods for analyzing the interaction between the heart rate variability (HRV) and electroencephalography (EEG) require a computation-intensive mathematical model. To overcome these limitations and increase the predictive accuracy of human relaxing states, we developed a method to test our hypothesis. In addition to routine linear analysis, multiscale entropy and detrended fluctuation analysis of the HRV were used to quantify nonstationary and nonlinear dynamic changes in the heart rate time series. Short-time Fourier transform was applied to quantify the power of EEG. The clinical, HRV, and EEG parameters of postcatheterization EEG alpha waves were analyzed using change-score analysis and generalized additive models. In conclusion, the complexity of cardiac electrical signals can be used to predict EEG changes after stress.

  17. Complexity of cardiac signals for predicting changes in alpha-waves after stress in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Hung-Chih; Lin, Yen-Hung; Lo, Men-Tzung; Tang, Sung-Chun; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Lu, Hung-Chun; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Ma, Hsi-Pin; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-01-01

    The hierarchical interaction between electrical signals of the brain and heart is not fully understood. We hypothesized that the complexity of cardiac electrical activity can be used to predict changes in encephalic electricity after stress. Most methods for analyzing the interaction between the heart rate variability (HRV) and electroencephalography (EEG) require a computation-intensive mathematical model. To overcome these limitations and increase the predictive accuracy of human relaxing states, we developed a method to test our hypothesis. In addition to routine linear analysis, multiscale entropy and detrended fluctuation analysis of the HRV were used to quantify nonstationary and nonlinear dynamic changes in the heart rate time series. Short-time Fourier transform was applied to quantify the power of EEG. The clinical, HRV, and EEG parameters of postcatheterization EEG alpha waves were analyzed using change-score analysis and generalized additive models. In conclusion, the complexity of cardiac electrical signals can be used to predict EEG changes after stress. PMID:26286628

  18. Complexity of cardiac signals for predicting changes in alpha-waves after stress in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hung-Chih; Lin, Yen-Hung; Lo, Men-Tzung; Tang, Sung-Chun; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Lu, Hung-Chun; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Ma, Hsi-Pin; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-01-01

    The hierarchical interaction between electrical signals of the brain and heart is not fully understood. We hypothesized that the complexity of cardiac electrical activity can be used to predict changes in encephalic electricity after stress. Most methods for analyzing the interaction between the heart rate variability (HRV) and electroencephalography (EEG) require a computation-intensive mathematical model. To overcome these limitations and increase the predictive accuracy of human relaxing states, we developed a method to test our hypothesis. In addition to routine linear analysis, multiscale entropy and detrended fluctuation analysis of the HRV were used to quantify nonstationary and nonlinear dynamic changes in the heart rate time series. Short-time Fourier transform was applied to quantify the power of EEG. The clinical, HRV, and EEG parameters of postcatheterization EEG alpha waves were analyzed using change-score analysis and generalized additive models. In conclusion, the complexity of cardiac electrical signals can be used to predict EEG changes after stress. PMID:26286628

  19. Percutaneous Transhepatic Catheterization of the Portal Vein: A Combined CT- and Fluoroscopy-Guided Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Weimar, Bernd; Rauber, Klaus; Brendel, Mathias D.; Bretzel, Reinhard G.; Rau, Wigbert S.

    1999-07-15

    Combined CT- and fluoroscopy-guided transhepatic portal vein catheterization was performed in 44 patients selected for pancreatic islet cell transplantation. The method allowed catheterization with a single puncture attempt in 39 patients. In four patients two attempts and in one patient four attempts were necessary. One minor hematoma of the liver capsule occurred that required no further treatment. Compared with other methods the average number of puncture attempts was reduced.

  20. Helicopter scene response for a STEMI patient transported directly to the cardiac catheterization laboratory.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Christopher; McMullan, Jason; Knight, William; Gunderman, Matt; Hinckley, William

    2011-01-01

    At 2:10 pm, a 40-year-old Caucasian woman with no known medical history called 911 complaining of substernal, crushing chest pain that had started 2 to 3 hours before she called emergency medical services (EMS). EMS arrived at 2:24 pm and obtained a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) diagnostic of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) at 2:36 pm. University Air Care was requested by local EMS at 2:42 pm to respond directly to the cardiac scene in rural Ohio for rapid transport to a facility capable of performing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The closest PCI-capable facility was approximately 35 minutes away by ground or 13 minutes by air. The closest non-PCI hospital was approximately 20 minutes away by ground (Fig. 1). PMID:22055170

  1. Medical iPad use in the cardiac catheterization and echo laboratories.

    PubMed

    Lavi, Ifat; Malki, Guy; Kornowski, Ran

    2014-02-01

    The present study aims to describe a dedicated cardiac imaging application on a tablet and to assess the accuracy and reproducibility of this novel application for measurement on angiography and echocardiography data sets. Tablet devices have recently been used in radiological image interpretation and enable transfer of images. It allows the clinician to look up clinical information, search the Internet and communicate with colleagues and family. The study group consisted of 30 patients who had both echocardiographic and angiographic examinations. For each patient, a few measurements (i.e. length, area and angle) were performed using the iPad, and compared to the McKesson workstation, which is routinely used in the hospital. In order to show the equivalence between these two methods, a linear regression was fitted and the distribution of differences between measurements was examined. In addition, the variability of the measurements was compared between two different reviewers (inter-observer test) and between the measurements of the same reviewer at two different time settings (intra-observer test) by calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). In all comparisons, the linear regression showed high correlation coefficient (r > 0.9), and the distribution of differences was around zero, implying that the two methods lead to equivalent results. The absolute mean difference between the two different observers demonstrated high agreement between the two observers' repeated measurements. The same conclusions can be deduced from the same observer's repeated measurements. The ICC indicates the resemblance between the two sets, and could be considered almost perfect (ICC > 0.968 for all cases). The newly developed cardiology iPad application offers the opportunity to accurately present the cardiac procedure in a visual, clear and professional manner. PMID:24337922

  2. Reducing bed rest time from five to three hours does not increase complications after cardiac catheterization: the THREE CATH Trial 1

    PubMed Central

    Matte, Roselene; Hilário, Thamires de Souza; Reich, Rejane; Aliti, Graziella Badin; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to compare the incidence of vascular complications in patients undergoing transfemoral cardiac catheterization with a 6F introducer sheath followed by 3-hour versus 5-hour rest. Methods: randomized clinical trial. Subjects in the intervention group (IG) ambulated 3 hours after sheath removal, versus 5 hours in the control group (CG). All patients remained in the catheterization laboratory for 5 hours and were assessed hourly, and were contacted 24, 48, and 72 h after hospital discharge. Results: the sample comprised 367 patients in the IG and 363 in the GC. During cath lab stay, hematoma was the most common complication in both groups, occurring in 12 (3%) IG and 13 (4%) CG subjects (P=0.87). Bleeding occurred in 4 (1%) IG and 6 (2%) CG subjects (P=0.51), and vasovagal reaction in 5 (1.4%) IG and 4 (1.1%) CG subjects (P=0.75). At 24-h, 48-h, and 72-h bruising was the most commonly reported complication in both groups. None of the comparisons revealed any significant between-group differences. Conclusion: the results of this trial show that reducing bed rest time to 3 hours after elective cardiac catheterization is safe and does not increase complications as compared with a 5-hour rest. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT-01740856 PMID:27463113

  3. Elevation of urinary liver-type fatty acid binding protein after cardiac catheterization related to cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Hashimoto, Nobuyuki; Sugaya, Takeshi; Matsui, Katsuomi; Hisamichi, Mikako; Shibagaki, Yugo; Miyake, Fumihiko; Kimura, Kenjiro

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Contrast medium (CM) induces tubular hypoxia via endothelial damage due to direct cytotoxicity or viscosity. Urinary liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) increases along with tubular hypoxia and may be a detector of systemic circulation injury. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of detecting increases in urinary L-FABP levels due to administration of CM, as a prognostic biomarker for cardiovascular disease in patients without occurrence of CM-induced nephropathy undergoing cardiac catheterization procedure (CCP). Methods Retrospective longitudinal analyses of the relationship between urinary L-FABP levels and occurrence of cardiovascular events were performed (n=29). Urinary L-FABP was measured by ELISA before CCP, and at 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after CCP. Results Urinary L-FABP levels were significantly higher at 12 hours (P<0.05) and 24 hours (P<0.005) after CCP compared with before CCP, only in the patients with occurrence of cardiovascular events (n=17), but not in those without cardiovascular events (n=12). The parameter with the largest area under the curve (0.816) for predicting the occurrence of cardiovascular events was the change in urinary L-FABP at 24 hours after CCP. The difference in urinary L-FABP levels (ΔL-FABP ≥11.0 μg/g creatinine) between before CCP and at 24 hours after CCP was a risk factor for the occurrence of cardiovascular events (hazard ratio, 4.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.27–19.13; P=0.021). Conclusion Measurement of urinary L-FABP before CCP and at 24 hours after CCP in patients with mild to moderate renal dysfunction may be an important indicator for risk stratification of onset of cardiovascular events. PMID:26316797

  4. Do Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Severity and Complexity of Coronary Atherosclerosis Predict Aortic Pulse Pressure during Cardiac Catheterization?

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Hemal; Sanghani, Dharmesh; Apergis, George; Fernaine, George

    2016-06-01

    Pulse pressure (PP), estimated from the peripheral blood pressure measurements, has been linked with adverse cardiovascular events. But, the association of PP and coronary artery disease is not well studied. There is a lack of data on the association of invasively measured aortic PP and cardiovascular risk factors and severity of coronary atherosclerosis. We determined the predictive factors of aortic PP during cardiac catheterization. Electronic medical records from 2010 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 368 patients were eligible. The data on demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, coronary lesion characteristics, and medication use was collected. On multivariable regression analysis, aging (β = 0.34, p = 0.001, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14-0.53) and prior aspirin use (β = 5.09, p = 0.015, 95% CI 0.99-9.18) were associated with higher aortic PP. Increasing estimated glomerular filtration rate (β = - 0.52, p = 0.040, 95% CI -0.90 to -0.23) was associated with lower aortic PP. Severity and complexity of coronary lesions, SYNTAX score, and number of obstructed vessels were not associated with aortic PP. Aging, prior aspirin use, and declining renal function were associated with an increase in aortic PP. Aortic PP may not predict the severity and complexity of coronary atherosclerosis. Therefore, the risk of adverse cardiovascular events associated with an elevated aortic PP may not be mediated by the severity of coronary atherosclerosis. PMID:27231423

  5. Cardiac catheterization - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... thrombosis. 9th ed. American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines. Chest . 2012;141:e637S-68S. Read More Angina Heart bypass surgery Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive High blood cholesterol ...

  6. Cardiac Catheterization (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Butterflies? Read This Chloe & Nurb Meet The Brain (Movie) Quiz: Do You Need a Flu Shot? Got ... I Had Heart Surgery: Noah's Story Heart Murmurs Movie: Heart & Circulatory System Heart-Healthy Recipes Contact Us ...

  7. Safety after cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Huber, Charlotte

    2009-08-01

    The Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority's reporting system is a confidential, statewide Internet reporting system to which all Pennsylvania hospitals, outpatient-surgery facilities, and birthing centers, as well as some abortion facilities, must file information on medical errors. Safety Monitor is a column from the authority that informs nurses on issues that can affect patient safety and presents strategies they can easily integrate into practice. For more information on the authority, visit www.patientsafetyauthority.org. For the original article discussed in this column or for other articles on patient safety, click on "Patient Safety Advisories" and then "Advisory Library" in the left-hand navigation menu. PMID:19641415

  8. Urine culture - catheterized specimen

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - urine - catheterized specimen; Urine culture - catheterization; Catheterized urine specimen culture ... urinary tract infections may be found in the culture. This is called a contaminant. You may not ...

  9. The Mercy unique device identifier demonstration project: Implementing point of use product identification in the cardiac catheterization laboratories of a regional health system.

    PubMed

    Drozda, Joseph P; Dudley, Curtis; Helmering, Paul; Roach, James; Hutchison, Lisa

    2016-06-01

    Mercy, a 4 state health system, conducted an FDA-sponsored demonstration whereby prototype unique device identifiers (UDIs) of coronary stents were implemented in its electronic information systems for safety surveillance and research. To accomplish this, a multi-disciplinary team implemented a point of use barcode scanning inventory management system in all 5 Mercy cardiac catheterization laboratories. The system's potential for improving inventory management and tracking Cath Lab supplies was felt to be sufficiently compelling for system deployment outside of the context of the demonstration. Further, it was felt to be useful for all Cath Lab renewable supplies and not just coronary stents. Benefits included preventing procedure delays, lowering costs, and increasing revenue. Finally, the system is extensible to all implanted medical devices and generalizable to most hospitals. PMID:27343161

  10. Safety and tolerability of iopromide in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization: real-world multicenter experience with 17,513 patients from the TRUST trial.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji-Yan; Liu, Yong; Zhou, Ying-Ling; Tan, Ning; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Ping-Yan; Chen, Li-Bing

    2015-10-01

    To assess the incidence of and risk factors for acute adverse drug reactions (ADRs) (occurring within 1 h) following iopromide administration in cardiac catheterization in Chinese 'real-world' practice. Acute ADRs following iopromide administration during coronary angiography or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) have not been systematically evaluated in China. TRUST was a prospective, multicenter, observational study conducted at 63 centers in China. Patients received iopromide (300 or 370 mgI/mL) during coronary angiography or PCI (n = 17,513). Acute ADRs occurred in 66 patients (0.38%); ADRs were mild in 58 patients (0.33%) and severe in two patients (0.01%). Most acute ADRs manifested as allergy-like symptoms such as nausea/vomiting [39 patients (0.22%)] and/or rash [15 patients (0.09%)]. The rate of acute ADRs was lower among patients who received premedication (6/3349; 0.18 %) than those who did not (60/14,164; 0.42%; p = 0.0379), and among those who did receive pre-procedural hydration (10/7993; 0.13%) compared with those who did not (56/9520; 0.59%; p < 0.0001). Age <50 years, left main coronary disease and history of ADRs to contrast media increased the risk of ADRs, while premedication with corticosteroids, pre-procedural hydration and contrast volume <100 mL versus ≥100 mL reduced the risk. Contrast quality was rated as 'Excellent' in 99.1% of patients. The incidence of acute ADRs was very low with iopromide in cardiac catheterization in China. The risk of acute ADRs increased in patients <50 years and in those with a history of ADRs to contrast media. Premedication with corticosteroids and pre-procedural hydration may prevent acute ADRs in at-risk patients. PMID:26058857

  11. Comparison of two noninvasive devices for measurement of central systolic blood pressure with invasive measurement during cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Ott, Christian; Haetinger, Siegberto; Schneider, Markus P; Pauschinger, Matthias; Schmieder, Roland E

    2012-09-01

    Recently, a new device for noninvasive assessment of central systolic blood pressure (cSBP) (BPro device with A-Pulse) was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, but available data are limited. In 52 patients undergoing invasive elective cardiac evaluation, central hemodynamics were measured invasively. Immediately thereafter, radial artery waveforms were sampled by two noninvasive techniques, the BPro and, as a comparator, the SphygmoCor System. Then, central hemodynamics were measured invasively for a second time. The invasively recorded cSBP (137 ± 27 mm Hg) did not differ with both noninvasively assessed cSBP by BPro (136 ± 21 mm Hg, P = .627 vs invasive cSBP) and by SphygmoCor (136 ± 23 mm Hg, P=.694 vs invasive cSBP) and correlated highly between invasively recorded and both noninvasively assessed cSBP. However, using Bland-Altman plots, spreading of compared data of both devices can be found (BPro: 0.87 ± 13 mm Hg vs invasive cSBP; SphygmoCor: 0.77 ± 14 mm Hg vs invasive cSBP). There was an excellent correlation of both noninvasive devices for the calculation of cSBP (r=0.961, P<.001). cSBP differed by only 0.1 ± 6 mm Hg (P=.913) between the two noninvasive devices. Therefore, both noninvasive devices showed an accurate agreement in cSBP compared with invasively measured cSBP. PMID:22947354

  12. Physiologic and Clinical Principles behind Noninvasive Resuscitation Techniques and Cardiac Output Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Napoli, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical assessment and vital signs are poor predictors of the overall hemodynamic state. Optimal measurement of the response to fluid resuscitation and hemodynamics has previously required invasive measurement with radial and pulmonary artery catheterization. Newer noninvasive resuscitation technology offers the hope of more accurately and safely monitoring a broader range of critically ill patients while using fewer resources. Fluid responsiveness, the cardiac response to volume loading, represents a dynamic method of improving upon the assessment of preload when compared to static measures like central venous pressure. Multiple new hemodynamic monitors now exist that can noninvasively report cardiac output and oxygen delivery in a continuous manner. Proper assessment of the potential future role of these techniques in resuscitation requires understanding the underlying physiologic and clinical principles, reviewing the most recent literature examining their clinical validity, and evaluating their respective advantages and limitations. PMID:21860802

  13. [Assessment of cardiac function by left heart catheterization: an analysis of left ventricular pressure-volume (length) loops].

    PubMed

    Sasayama, S; Nonogi, H; Sakurai, T; Kawai, C; Fujita, M; Eiho, S; Kuwahara, M

    1984-01-01

    The mechanical property of the cardiac muscle has been classically analyzed in two ways; shortening of muscle fiber, and the development of tension within the muscle. In the ejecting ventricle, left ventricular (LV) function can be analyzed by the analogous two-dimensional framework of pressure-volume loops, which are provided by plotting the instantaneous volume against corresponding LV pressure. The integral pressure with respect to volume allows to assess a total external ventricular work during ejection. The diastolic pressure-volume relations reflect a chamber stiffness of the ventricle. Force-velocity relations also provide an useful conceptual framework for understanding how the ventricle contracts under given afterload, with modification of preload. In the presence of coronary artery disease, the regional nature of left ventricular contractile function should be defined as well as the global ventricular function as described above, because the latter is determined by the complex interaction of dysfunction of the ischemic myocardium and of compensatory augmentation of shortening of the normally perfused myocardium. We utilized a computer technique to analyze the local wall motion of the ischemic heart by cineventriculography. The boundaries of serial ventricular images are automatically traced and superimposed using the external reference system. Radial grids are drawn from the center of gravity of the end-diastolic image. Measurement of length of each radial grid throughout cardiac cycle provides the analysis of movement of the ventricle at a particular point on the circumference. Using phasic pressure obtained simultaneously with opacification as the common parameter, segmental pressure-length loops are constructed simultaneously at various segments. The loops are similar over the entire circumference in the normal heart, being rectangular in morphology and with synchronous behavior during contraction and relaxation. However, the marked distortion of

  14. Association of Roadway Proximity with Fasting Plasma Glucose and Metabolic Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in a Cross-Sectional Study of Cardiac Catheterization Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, William E.; Blach, Colette; Haynes, Carol S.; Dowdy, Elaine; Miranda, Marie Lynn; Devlin, Robert B.; Diaz-Sanchez, David; Cascio, Wayne E.; Mukerjee, Shaibal; Stallings, Casson; Smith, Luther A.; Gregory, Simon G.; Shah, Svati H.; Hauser, Elizabeth R.; Neas, Lucas M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The relationship between traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) and risk factors for cardiovascular disease needs to be better understood in order to address the adverse impact of air pollution on human health. Objective We examined associations between roadway proximity and traffic exposure zones, as markers of TRAP exposure, and metabolic biomarkers for cardiovascular disease risk in a cohort of patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 2,124 individuals residing in North Carolina (USA). Roadway proximity was assessed via distance to primary and secondary roadways, and we used residence in traffic exposure zones (TEZs) as a proxy for TRAP. Two categories of metabolic outcomes were studied: measures associated with glucose control, and measures associated with lipid metabolism. Statistical models were adjusted for race, sex, smoking, body mass index, and socioeconomic status (SES). Results An interquartile-range (990 m) decrease in distance to roadways was associated with higher fasting plasma glucose (β = 2.17 mg/dL; 95% CI: –0.24, 4.59), and the association appeared to be limited to women (β = 5.16 mg/dL; 95% CI: 1.48, 8.84 compared with β = 0.14 mg/dL; 95% CI: –3.04, 3.33 in men). Residence in TEZ 5 (high-speed traffic) and TEZ 6 (stop-and-go traffic), the two traffic zones assumed to have the highest levels of TRAP, was positively associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C; β = 8.36; 95% CI: –0.15, 16.9 and β = 5.98; 95% CI: –3.96, 15.9, for TEZ 5 and 6, respectively). Conclusion Proxy measures of TRAP exposure were associated with intermediate metabolic traits associated with cardiovascular disease, including fasting plasma glucose and possibly HDL-C. Citation Ward-Caviness CK, Kraus WE, Blach C, Haynes CS, Dowdy E, Miranda ML, Devlin RB, Diaz-Sanchez D, Cascio WE, Mukerjee S, Stallings C, Smith LA, Gregory SG, Shah SH, Hauser ER, Neas LM. 2015. Association of roadway

  15. [5th Report of the German Association of Cardiologists in Private Practice (BNK) on Quality Assurance in Cardiac Catheterization and Coronary Intervention 2003-2005].

    PubMed

    Levenson, B; Albrecht, A; Göhring, St; Haerer, W; Herholz, H; Reifart, N; Sauer, G; Troger, B

    2007-02-01

    On behalf of the German Association of Cardiologists in Private Practice (BNK) the Steering Committee of the QuIK Registry reports on the results of the voluntary quality assurance in invasive cardiology in 2003-2005 and compares it to other data collections. In 2005 more than 70% of diagnostic (LHK) and 78% of therapeutic (PCI) cardiac catheterization procedures in private practice were entered into the registry. Altogether 229,462 LHK and 64,818 PCI were documented over the 3 years. In the reported period age of patients, percentage of acute coronary syndromes and three-vessel coronary artery disease increased in LHK as well as in PCI while consumption of contrast media and fluoroscopy time decreased. By implemented possibility of follow-up, a high rate of external auditing (monitoring) and certification QuIK remains a worldwide unique quality assurance project in cardiology. On a stable data basis over 10 years the QuIK Registry enables the implementation of quality indicators for future quality assurance purposes. PMID:17323039

  16. Virtual-Reality Simulator System for Double Interventional Cardiac Catheterization Using Fractional-Order Vascular Access Tracker and Haptic Force Producer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guan-Chun; Lin, Chia-Hung; Li, Chien-Ming; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Du, Yi-Chun; Chen, Tainsong

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes virtual-reality (VR) simulator system for double interventional cardiac catheterization (ICC) using fractional-order vascular access tracker and haptic force producer. An endoscope or a catheter for diagnosis and surgery of cardiovascular disease has been commonly used in minimally invasive surgery. It needs specific skills and experiences for young surgeons or postgraduate year (PGY) students to operate a Berman catheter and a pigtail catheter in the inside of the human body and requires avoiding damaging vessels. To improve the training in inserting catheters, a double-catheter mechanism is designed for the ICC procedures. A fractional-order vascular access tracker is used to trace the senior surgeons' consoled trajectories and transmit the frictional feedback and visual feedback during the insertion of catheters. Based on the clinical feeling through the aortic arch, vein into the ventricle, or tortuous blood vessels, haptic force producer is used to mock the elasticity of the vessel wall using voice coil motors (VCMs). The VR establishment with surgeons' consoled vessel trajectories and hand feeling is achieved, and the experimental results show the effectiveness for the double ICC procedures. PMID:26171419

  17. Virtual-Reality Simulator System for Double Interventional Cardiac Catheterization Using Fractional-Order Vascular Access Tracker and Haptic Force Producer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guan-Chun; Lin, Chia-Hung; Li, Chien-Ming; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Du, Yi-Chun; Chen, Tainsong

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes virtual-reality (VR) simulator system for double interventional cardiac catheterization (ICC) using fractional-order vascular access tracker and haptic force producer. An endoscope or a catheter for diagnosis and surgery of cardiovascular disease has been commonly used in minimally invasive surgery. It needs specific skills and experiences for young surgeons or postgraduate year (PGY) students to operate a Berman catheter and a pigtail catheter in the inside of the human body and requires avoiding damaging vessels. To improve the training in inserting catheters, a double-catheter mechanism is designed for the ICC procedures. A fractional-order vascular access tracker is used to trace the senior surgeons' consoled trajectories and transmit the frictional feedback and visual feedback during the insertion of catheters. Based on the clinical feeling through the aortic arch, vein into the ventricle, or tortuous blood vessels, haptic force producer is used to mock the elasticity of the vessel wall using voice coil motors (VCMs). The VR establishment with surgeons' consoled vessel trajectories and hand feeling is achieved, and the experimental results show the effectiveness for the double ICC procedures. PMID:26171419

  18. Single-blind and Double-blind Randomized Controlled Trials of Palmtherapy®, an Alternative Medical Approach, for Anxiety before Cardiac Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Jamal; Podberezsky, Anna; David, Tamar; Reizin, Leonardo; Benjamin, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Alternative medicine is widely used, but lacks consensus regarding its amenability to scientific investigation. Anxiety increases morbidity and mortality in ischemic heart disease. We performed two studies of Palmtherapy®, an alternative treatment, for anxiety before cardiac catheterization. In the first study, patients were randomized to receive pressure at particular points on the palm, or at incorrect locations, for about 50 min, while the therapist conversed with them. In the second study, the conversation was conducted by a second, ‘blind’ investigator. In both studies, patients and nurses, all blind to treatment assignment, completed visual analog scale and National Institute of Mental Health measures of anxiety, respectively. Twenty-three subjects completed study 1, and 17 completed study 2. In study 1, palm therapy was superior to sham therapy for both outcome measures. In study 2, palm therapy was superior for self-reported anxiety, but not for nurses’ assessments of anxiety. Future studies should attempt to separate possible mechanistic effects of Palmtherapy® from therapist-related variables. Whether alternative medicine deserves to be studied at all remains controversial. Palmtherapy® may offer anxiolytic benefit without the harm attributable to drugs. PMID:18317556

  19. Genetic determination of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-1 plasma levels in a family study of cardiac catheterization patients

    SciTech Connect

    Prenger, V.L.; Beaty, T.H.; Kwiterovich, P.O. )

    1992-11-01

    Plasma levels of two lipoprotein risk factors, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein A-1 (apo A-1), have been shown to be negatively associated with the risk of developing coronary artery disease, and several reports have examined familial factors in HDL-C and apo A-1 levels. A number of studies suggest that shared genes influence familial resemblance of these lipoprotein levels far more than do shared environments. Possible mechanisms for the inheritance of these risk factors (HDL-C and apo A-1 plasma levels) are explored using data from 390 individuals in 69 families ascertained through probands undergoing diagnostic cardiac catheterization. Segregation analysis was used to test a series of specific models of inheritance. Evidence for single-locus control of apo A-1 levels, with Mendelian transmission of a dominant allele leading to elevated apo A-1 levels, was seen in these families, although there was additional correlation among sibs present. This locus accounted for 48.6% and 37.2% of the total variation in apo A-1 levels in males and females, respectively. Similar evidence of segregation at a single locus controlling HDL-C levels was not seen in these families. 27 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Survival with good neurological outcome in a patient with prolonged ischemic cardiac arrest--utility of automated chest compression systems in the cardiac catheterization laboratory.

    PubMed

    Psaltis, Peter J; Meredith, Ian T; Ahmar, Walid

    2014-11-15

    The management of refractory cardiac arrest during invasive coronary procedures has substantial logistical challenges and is typically associated with disappointing outcomes. We describe the case of a young woman with recalcitrant ventricular fibrillation due to acute anterior ST-elevation myocardial infarction caused by occlusion of her proximal left anterior descending artery. Survival without neurological deficit or organ failure was achieved following primary percutaneous reperfusion and a total of 52 min of intra-procedural chest compression support, made possible by the use of an automated chest compression device. PMID:24403102

  1. Bladder catheterization, male (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization is accomplished by inserting a catheter (a hollow tube, often with and inflatable balloon tip) into ... catheter in place for a duration of time. Catheterization in males is slightly more difficult and uncomfortable ...

  2. Multicenter long-term validation of a minicourse in radiation-reducing techniques in the catheterization laboratory.

    PubMed

    Kuon, Eberhard; Weitmann, Kerstin; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Dörr, Marcus; Hummel, Astrid; Riad, Alexander; Busch, Mathias C; Felix, Stephan B; Empen, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Patient radiation exposure in invasive cardiology is considerable. We aimed to investigate, in a multicenter field study, the long-term efficacy of an educational 90-minute workshop in cardiac invasive techniques with reduced irradiation. Before and at a median period of 2.5 months and 2.0 years after the minicourse (periods I, II, and III, respectively) at 5 German cardiac centers, 18 interventionalists documented various radiation parameters for 10 coronary angiographies. The median patient dose area product (DAP) for periods I, II, and III amounted to 26.6, 12.2, and 9.6 Gy × cm(2), respectively. The short-term and long-term effects were related to shorter median fluoroscopy times (180, 138, and 114 seconds), fewer radiographic frames (745, 553, and 417) because of fewer (11, 11, and 10) and shorter (64, 52, and 44 frames/run) runs, consistent collimation, and restriction to an adequate image quality; both radiographic DAP/frame (27.7, 17.3, and 18.4 mGy × cm(2)) and fluoroscopic DAP/second (26.6, 12.9, and 14.9 mGy × cm(2)) decreased significantly. Multivariate analysis over time indicated increasing efficacy of the minicourse itself (-55% and -64%) and minor influence of interventionist experience (-4% and -3% per 1,000 coronary angiographies, performed lifelong until the minicourse and until period III). In conclusion, autonomous self-surveillance of various dose parameters and feedback on individual radiation safety efforts supported the efficacy of a 90-minute course program toward long-lasting and ongoing patient dose reduction. PMID:25579886

  3. Cardiac extracellular matrix proteomics: Challenges, techniques, and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia Wei; Dalgliesh, Ailsa J; López, Javier E; Griffiths, Leigh G

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) has emerged as a dynamic tissue component, providing not only structural support, but also functionally participating in a wide range of signaling events during development, injury, and disease remodeling. Investigation of dynamic changes in cardiac ECM proteome is challenging due to the relative insolubility of ECM proteins, which results from their macromolecular nature, extensive post-translational modification (PTM), and tendency to form protein complexes. Finally, the relative abundance of cellular and mitochondrial proteins in cardiac tissue further complicates cardiac ECM proteomic approaches. Recent developments of various techniques to enrich and analyze ECM proteins are playing a major role in overcoming these challenges. Application of cardiac ECM proteomics in disease tissues can further provide spatial and temporal information relevant to disease diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and engineering of therapeutic candidates for cardiac repair and regeneration. PMID:26200932

  4. An integrated bioimpedance—ECG gating technique for respiratory and cardiac motion compensation in cardiac PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivumäki, Tuomas; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Fürst, Sebastian; Loher, Simone; Vauhkonen, Marko; Schwaiger, Markus; Hakulinen, Mikko A.

    2014-10-01

    Respiratory motion may degrade image quality in cardiac PET imaging. Since cardiac PET studies often involve cardiac gating by ECG, a separate respiratory monitoring system is required increasing the logistic complexity of the examination, in case respiratory gating is also needed. Thus, we investigated the simultaneous acquisition of both respiratory and cardiac gating signals using II limb lead mimicking electrode configuration during cardiac PET scans of 11 patients. In addition to conventional static and ECG-gated images, bioimpedance technique was utilized to generate respiratory- and dual-gated images. The ability of the bioimpedance technique to monitor intrathoracic respiratory motion was assessed estimating cardiac displacement between end-inspiration and -expiration. The relevance of dual gating was evaluated in left ventricular volume and myocardial wall thickness measurements. An average 7.6  ±  3.3 mm respiratory motion was observed in the study population. Dual gating showed a small but significant increase (4 ml, p = 0.042) in left ventricular myocardial volume compared to plain cardiac gating. In addition, a thinner myocardial wall was observed in dual-gated images (9.3  ±  1.3 mm) compared to cardiac-gated images (11.3  ±  1.3 mm, p = 0.003). This study shows the feasibility of bioimpedance measurements for dual gating in a clinical setting. The method enables simultaneous acquisition of respiratory and cardiac gating signals using a single device with standard ECG electrodes.

  5. Fallopian Tube Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Thurmond, Amy Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Fallopian tube catheterization is used for treatment of infertility caused by proximal tubal occlusion, and has replaced surgical treatment for this condition. More recently, fallopian tube catheterization has been used for tubal sterilization. Interventional radiologists tested numerous methods for tubal occlusion using the rabbit as an animal model. As a result, a tubal device has recently been Food and Drug Administration approved for permanent sterilization using hysteroscopic guidance; it can also be placed fluoroscopically by fallopian tube catheterization as an “off-label” procedure. This is a 5-year continuation and update on a procedure that has been done by interventional radiologists for 25 years; history of the development of fallopian tube catheterization in women has been published in detail in this journal. Highlighted in this article will be description of the basic components needed for fallopian tube catheterization. PMID:24436565

  6. Left heart catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - left heart ... to help guide the catheters up into your heart and arteries. Dye will be injected into your ... in the blood vessels that lead to your heart. The catheter is then moved through the aortic ...

  7. Bladder catheterization, male (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... kept empty (decompressed) and urinary flow assured. The balloon holds the catheter in place for a duration of time. Catheterization in males is slightly more difficult and uncomfortable than in females because of the longer urethra.

  8. Swine model of chronic postcapillary pulmonary hypertension with right ventricular remodeling: long-term characterization by cardiac catheterization, magnetic resonance, and pathology.

    PubMed

    Pereda, Daniel; García-Alvarez, Ana; Sánchez-Quintana, Damián; Nuño, Mario; Fernández-Friera, Leticia; Fernández-Jiménez, Rodrigo; García-Ruíz, José Manuel; Sandoval, Elena; Aguero, Jaume; Castellá, Manuel; Hajjar, Roger J; Fuster, Valentín; Ibáñez, Borja

    2014-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is prevalent and carries high morbidity and mortality, mostly due to right ventricular (RV) dysfunction. Postcapillary PH is the most frequent form but there are no large-animal models available. We developed and characterized a porcine model of postcapillary PH by non-restrictive banding of the confluent of both inferior pulmonary veins (n = 10; sham controls n = 3). Right heart catheterization and magnetic resonance were performed before the procedure and monthly during 4 months. All banded animals developed PH. Compared to controls, banded animals presented higher mean pulmonary artery pressure [median (first to third quartile) 30 mmHg (25-37) vs. 20 mmHg (18-23); p = 0.018] and higher pulmonary vascular resistance [5.2 WU (3.8-7.1) vs. 2.3 WU (2.1-3.5); p = 0.028] after 2 months. Differences in indexed RV end-systolic volume [42 mL/m(2) (36-53) vs. 24 mL/m(2) (24-33); p = 0.028] and RV ejection fraction [59 % (54-63) vs. 66 % (64-68); p = 0.028] were also significant after 2 months. Differences remained significant throughout the study. Histopathology revealed increased lung weight and fibrosis but no increase in average water content. Also, remodeling on pulmonary arteries including increased medial and intimal thickness and fibrosis and RV myocardial disarray and fibrosis was demonstrated. Lung remodeling findings were similar in all pulmonary lobes. PMID:24771313

  9. Cardiac Output Assessed by Invasive and Minimally Invasive Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Allison J.; Cohn, Jennifer Hochman; Ranasinghe, J. Sudharma

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac output (CO) measurement has long been considered essential to the assessment and guidance of therapeutic decisions in critically ill patients and for patients undergoing certain high-risk surgeries. Despite controversies, complications and inherent errors in measurement, pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) continuous and intermittent bolus techniques of CO measurement continue to be the gold standard. Newer techniques provide less invasive alternatives; however, currently available monitors are unable to provide central circulation pressures or true mixed venous saturations. Esophageal Doppler and pulse contour monitors can predict fluid responsiveness and have been shown to decrease postoperative morbidity. Many minimally invasive techniques continue to suffer from decreased accuracy and reliability under periods of hemodynamic instability, and so few have reached the level of interchangeability with the PAC. PMID:21776254

  10. Clean intermittent catheterization revisited.

    PubMed

    Lamin, Eliza; Newman, Diane K

    2016-06-01

    Catheterization is the insertion of a hollow flexible tube (called a catheter) to drain the urine from the bladder and is probably one of the oldest urologic procedures, dating back 3000 years. Since 1972, when urologist Dr Jack Lapides described a procedure for performing clean intermittent catheterization, this method of bladder management has become lifesaving for an individual who cannot empty their bladder independently. If the bladder is not emptied regularly, elevated storage pressures can develop which may put the upper tracts at risk of subsequent deterioration. Intermittent catheterization (IC) has become the first-line and preferred method of drainage in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, as long as dexterity or available caregiver support and body habitus allow access. However, over the past 20 years, an evolution has occurred in the technology of catheters used for IC. But with these advances, so has controversy arisen. This article is a review of the current application of IC, the current technology in catheter material and systems, differences between reusable and one-time, or single-use catheters, the cost benefit of doing IC, and the infectious benefit. PMID:26956983

  11. N-acetylcysteine and/or ascorbic acid versus placebo to prevent contrast-induced nephropathy in patients undergoing elective cardiac catheterization: The NAPCIN trial; A single-center, prospective, randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Habib, Mohammed; Hillis, Alaa; Hammad, Amen

    2016-01-01

    Several protective measures have been described to prevent contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN). This study is aimed to evaluate the effect of a high dose of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) plus hydration, a low dose of NAC plus ascorbic acid and hydration or hydration alone on the prevention of CIN in high-risk patients undergoing elective coronary artery intervention. We conducted a randomized, prospective, placebo-controlled trial of 105 high-risk patients undergoing elective cardiac catheterization. The patients were divided into three different groups: Group A (n=30), NAC 1200 mg orally before angiography and 1200 mg orally twice daily for three doses along with good hydration; Group B (n=30), NAC 600 mg before angiography and 600 mg orally twice daily for three doses plus ascorbic acid (3000 mg one dose) before angiography and 2000 mg two doses after angiography and good hydration; and Group C (n=45), hydration with 0.9% saline started just before contrast media injection and continued for 12 h at a rate 1.0 mL/kg//min after angiography or 0.5 mL/kg/h in cases with overt heart failure for 12 h. CIN was defined as an increase in serum creatinine of >25% of baseline or an absolute increase of 0.5 mg/dL above baseline after 48 h. The incidence of CIN was significantly lower in Group A (6.66%) compared with Group B (16.66%) or Group C (17.77%). The difference between Groups A and B and between Groups A and C was also highly significant (P=0.001). In contrast, the difference between Groups B and C was not statistically significant (P=0.37). Our study indicates that high doses of NAC plus hydration provide better protection against CIN than combination therapy of NAC and ascorbic acid plus hydration, or hydration alone. PMID:26787567

  12. An Extraperitoneal Technique for Murine Heterotopic Cardiac Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nowocin, A K; Brown, K; Edwards, L A; Meader, L; Hill, J I; Wong, W

    2015-09-01

    The mouse heterotopic cardiac transplantation model has been used extensively by investigators in the field of organ transplantation to study the rejection process, test new antirejection treatments, tolerance induction protocols or to understand basic immunological principles. Due to its extensive use, any small refinement of the technique would have a major impact on replacement, reduction and refinement (commonly known as the 3Rs). Here, we describe a novel approach to refine this model. The donor aorta and pulmonary artery are anastomosed peripherally to the femoral artery and vein of the recipient, respectively. The technical success rate is comparable to the conventional abdominal site, but it avoids a laparotomy and handling of the bowels making it less invasive method. As a result, recipients recover faster and require less postoperative analgesia. It is a major refinement under one of the 3Rs and would represent an advance in animal welfare in scientific research. PMID:25997384

  13. Validation of the use of photogrammetry to register pre-procedure MR images to intra-procedure patient position for image-guided cardiac catheterization procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Gang; Tarte, Segolene; King, Andy; Ma, Yingliang; Chinchapatnam, Phani; Schaeffter, Tobias; Razavi, Reza; Hawkes, Dave; Hill, Derek; Rhode, Kawal

    2008-03-01

    A hybrid X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging system (XMR) has been proposed as an interventional guidance for cardiovascular catheterisation procedure. However, very few hospitals can benefit from the XMR system because of its limited availability. In this paper we describe a new guidance strategy for cardiovascular catheterisation procedure. In our technique, intra-operative patient position is estimated by using a chest surface reconstructed from a photogrammetry system. The chest surface is then registered with the same surface derived from pre-procedure magnetic resonance (MR) images. The catheterisation procedure can therefore be guided by a roadmap derived from the MR images. Patients were required to hold the breath at end expiration during MRI acquisition. The surface matching accuracy is improved by using a robust trimmed iterative closest point (ICP) matching algorithm, which is especially designed for incomplete surface matching. Compared to the XMR system, the proposed guidance strategy is low cost and easy to set up. Experimental data were acquired from 6 volunteers and 1 patient. The patient data were collected during an electrophysiology procedure. In 6 out of 7 subjects, the experimental results show our method is accurate in term of reciprocal residual error (range from 1.66m to 3.75mm) and constant (closed-loop TREs range from 1.49mm to 3.55mm). For one subject, trimmed ICP failed to find the optimal transform matrix (residual = 4.89, TRE = 9.32) due to the poor quality of the photogrammetry-reconstructed surface. More studies are being carried on in clinical trials.

  14. MRI Catheterization in Cardiopulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Toby; Ratnayaka, Kanishka

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognostication in patients with complex cardiopulmonary disease can be a clinical challenge. A new procedure, MRI catheterization, involves invasive right-sided heart catheterization performed inside the MRI scanner using MRI instead of traditional radiographic fluoroscopic guidance. MRI catheterization combines simultaneous invasive hemodynamic and MRI functional assessment in a single radiation-free procedure. By combining both modalities, the many individual limitations of invasive catheterization and noninvasive imaging can be overcome, and additional clinical questions can be addressed. Today, MRI catheterization is a clinical reality in specialist centers in the United States and Europe. Advances in medical device design for the MRI environment will enable not only diagnostic but also interventional MRI procedures to be performed within the next few years. PMID:24394821

  15. Cardiac Limited Ultrasound Examination Techniques to Augment the Bedside Cardiac Physical Examination.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Bruce J; Shaw, David J; Amundson, Stan A; Phan, James N; Blanchard, Daniel G; DeMaria, Anthony N

    2015-09-01

    The current practice of physical diagnosis is dependent on physician skills and biases, inductive reasoning, and time efficiency. Although the clinical utility of echocardiography is well known, few data exist on how to integrate 2-dimensional screening "quick-look" ultrasound applications into a novel, modernized cardiac physical examination. We discuss the evidence basis behind ultrasound "signs" pertinent to the cardiovascular system and elemental in synthesis of bedside diagnoses and propose the application of a brief cardiac limited ultrasound examination based on these signs. An ultrasound-augmented cardiac physical examination can be taught in traditional medical education and has the potential to improve bedside diagnosis and patient care. PMID:26269293

  16. A Review of Current Analgesic Techniques in Cardiac Surgery. Is Epidural Worth it?

    PubMed Central

    Ziyaeifard, Mohsen; Azarfarin, Rasoul; Golzari, Samad EJ

    2014-01-01

    In this review we addressed the various analgesic techniques in cardiac surgery, especially regional methods such as thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA). There are many techniques available for management of postoperative pain after cardiac operation including intravenous administration of analgesic drugs, infiltration of local anesthetics, nerve blocks, and neuroaxial techniques. Although there are many evidences declaring the benefits of neuroaxial blockade in improving postoperative well-being and quality of care in these patients, some studies have revealed limited effect of TEA on overall morbidity and mortality after cardiac surgery. On the other hand, some investigators have raised the concern about epidural hematoma in altered coagulation and risks of infection and local anesthetics toxicity during and after cardiac procedures. In present review, we tried to discuss the most recent arguments in the field of this controversial issue. The final conclusion about either using regional anesthesia in cardiac surgery or not has been assigned to the readers. PMID:25320659

  17. Clean intermittent self-catheterization in neuro-urology.

    PubMed

    Di Benedetto, P

    2011-12-01

    Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) is commonly encountered in rehabilitation settings, and is caused by a variety of pathologies. The management of spinal cord injury (SCI) has been the model of reference for the management of other pathologies with NLUTD. The introduction of intermittent catheterization (IC) led to decline in renal related mortality in SCI patients and allowed an improvement of quality of life (QoL) in all neurogenic patients with NLUTD. IC could be sterile, aseptic or clean. Sterile intermittent catheterization (SIC) is the preferred method of bladder drainage in emergency medicine units and during spinal shock in SCI patients, but it is costly and time-consuming. Catheterizations performed in institutions, such as rehabilitation hospitals and nursing homes, are done aseptically. Clean intermittent catheterization (CIC), i.e. self-catheterization (CISC) or third party catheterization, represents the "gold standard" method for bladder emptying in all neuropathic patients with NLUTD: the technique is safe and effective and results in improved kidney and upper urinary tract status, lessening of vesico-ureteral reflux and amelioration of urinary continence. CISC is mandatory in patients with NLUTD secondary to detrusor areflexia/hypocontractility and in patients suffering from neurogenic detrusor overactivity with detrusor external sphincter dyssynergia and high post void residual of urine, often in combination with antimuscarinics/bladder relaxants. The review summarizes the most important aspects of IC and CISC. Attention was focused on the history of urethral catheterization, aims, materials, advantages, indications, and present-day techniques of CISC, emphasizing the importance of teaching in order to perform correctly the catheterization technique. PMID:22222962

  18. Evaluation of cardiac output by 5 arterial pulse contour techniques using trend interchangeability method.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Marc-Olivier; Diouf, Momar; Wilde, Robert B P de; Dupont, Hervé; Hanouz, Jean-Luc; Lorne, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac output measurement with pulse contour analysis is a continuous, mini-invasive, operator-independent, widely used, and cost-effective technique, which could be helpful to assess changes in cardiac output. The 4-quadrant plot and the polar plot have been described to compare the changes between 2 measurements performed under different conditions, and the direction of change by using different methods of measurements. However, the 4-quadrant plot and the polar plot present a number of limitations, with a risk of misinterpretation in routine clinical practice. We describe a new trend interchangeability method designed to objectively define the interchangeability of each change of a variable. Using the repeatability of the reference method, we classified each change as either uninterpretable or interpretable and then as either noninterchangeable, in the gray zone or interchangeable. An interchangeability rate can then be calculated by the number of interchangeable changes divided by the total number of interpretable changes. In this observational study, we used this objective method to assess cardiac output changes with 5 arterial pulse contour techniques (Wesseling's method, LiDCO, PiCCO, Hemac method, and Modelflow) in comparison with bolus thermodilution technique as reference method in 24 cardiac surgery patients. A total of 172 cardiac output variations were available from the 199 data points: 88 (51%) were uninterpretable, according to the first step of the method. The second step of the method, based on the 84 (49%) interpretable variations, showed that only 18 (21%) to 30 (36%) variations were interchangeable regardless of the technique used. None of pulse contour cardiac output technique could be interchangeable with bolus thermodilution to assess changes in cardiac output using the trend interchangeability method in cardiac surgery patients. Future studies may consider using this method to assess interchangeability of changes between different methods

  19. Modified sonourethrography assists urethral catheterization.

    PubMed

    Minagawa, Tomonori; Suzuki, Toshiro; Domen, Takahisa; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Masakuni; Hirakata, Shiro; Nagai, Takashi; Nakazawa, Masaki; Ogawa, Teruyuki; Ishizuka, Osamu

    2016-07-01

    Sonourethrography (SUG) is an infrequently used modality to observe the male urethra. We modified SUG to examine the reasons for difficulty in urethral catheterization and to determine a safe approach to resolve these problems. Following retrograde urethral jelly injection, modified SUG (mSUG) was performed in male patients with difficulty in urethral catheterization. mSUG was performed using transcutaneous ultrasonography in patients for whom the catheter became lodged in the penile urethra. In other patients, mSUG was performed using transrectal ultrasonography. We divided the causes of difficult indwelling urethral catheterization into physiological and pathological conditions. With regard to physiological conditions, the urethral catheter became stuck in the bulbous portion, membranous urethra, and prostatic urethra. mSUG distinguished the problematic part of the urethra in real time, and it assisted in overcoming the problem. With regard to pathological conditions, urethral stricture after trauma or surgery was clearly demonstrated in the penile and prostatic portions of the urethra. As with physiological conditions, mSUG images assisted in navigating the catheter through the problematic pathological areas or demonstrated the need to abandon the catheterization. mSUG can visualize the male urethra clearly during urethral catheterization and provide real-time assistance with the procedure. PMID:26847624

  20. Myocardial blood flow: Roentgen videodensitometry techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H. C.; Robb, R. A.; Wood, E. H.

    1975-01-01

    The current status of roentgen videodensitometric techniques that provide an objective assessment of blood flow at selected sites within the coronary circulation were described. Roentgen videodensitometry employs conventional radiopaque indicators, radiological equipment and coronary angiographic techniques. Roentgen videodensitometry techniques developed in the laboratory during the past nine years, and for the past three years were applied to analysis of angiograms in the clinical cardiac catheterization laboratory.

  1. Pathophysiology and prevention of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Vineet; Jassal, Davinder S; Dhalla, Naranjan S

    2016-03-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is known to occur in individuals with diverse diseases. Each disease state has a specific etiology and pathophysiology, and is diagnosed and treated differently. Etiologies for SCD include cardiac arrhythmias, coronary artery disease, congenital coronary artery anomalies, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, dilated cardiomyopathy, and aortic valve stenosis. A potential unifying mechanism of SCD in these diseases involves a massive stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system's stress response and the subsequent elevation of circulating catecholamines. The diagnosis of cardiac diseases that contribute to an increased risk for SCD is accomplished by a combination of different techniques including electrocardiography, echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and invasive cardiac catheterization. Several therapies including anti-arrhythmic drugs, β-blockers, and antiplatelet agents may be used as medical treatment in patients for the prevention of SCD. Invasive therapies including percutaneous angioplasty, coronary artery bypass surgery, and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators are also used in the clinical management of SCD. PMID:26651385

  2. Interventional catheterization in surgically treated patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Friedli, B; Oberhänsli, I; Faidutti, B

    2000-12-01

    Interventional catheterization is an alternative to surgery for some congenital heart defects. For other malformations, the surgeon and the interventionist will join in an effort to obtain an optimal result: the typical example is pulmonary atresia with VSD and aortopulmonary collaterals. In other cases, the cardiologist may be called upon to intervene with catheter techniques to correct sequelae or residual lesions after surgical correction, avoiding redo surgery. Most often, the task consists of opening stenoses by balloon dilatation and/or stenting the main targets being pulmonary artery branch stenoses, venous obstructions after Mustard procedure, and recoarctations. Whereas simple balloon dilatation of recoarctation often brings good results, stents are often needed to obtain optimal results in pulmonary branch stenoses. Stenting of pulmonary veins has been disappointing. Closing unwanted vessels and defects is another task for the interventional cardiologist after cardiac surgery. Here, the most frequent procedure is closing aortopulmonary collaterals in pulmonary atresia and VSD after corrective surgery. Advantages and limitations of these procedures are discussed. PMID:11145397

  3. Swan-Ganz - right heart catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003870.htm Swan-Ganz - right heart catheterization To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Swan-Ganz catheterization is the passing of a thin ...

  4. Lead positioning for cardiac resynchronization therapy: techniques and priorities.

    PubMed

    Morgan, John M; Delgado, Victoria

    2009-11-01

    Although cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has demonstrated to be an effective treatment for heart failure patients, up to 30-40% of the patients do not show a favourable response. Implantation of the left ventricular (LV) pacing lead is one of the determinants of CRT response. This procedure includes several challenging technical issues and strongly depends on the highly variable anatomy of the coronary sinus and tributaries. In addition, the final position of the LV pacing lead may target the latest activated areas of the left ventricle in order to obtain effective resynchronization. Furthermore, the presence of transmural myocardial scar at the region targeted by the LV lead may also determine the response to CRT. This review discusses all the issues related to LV lead implantation and the role of multimodality imaging to anticipate the implantation strategy. Finally, alternative LV pacing sites and their effect on clinical outcome and LV performance will be discussed. PMID:19861387

  5. Current cardiac imaging techniques for detection of left ventricular mass

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Estimation of left ventricular (LV) mass has both prognostic and therapeutic value independent of traditional risk factors. Unfortunately, LV mass evaluation has been underestimated in clinical practice. Assessment of LV mass can be performed by a number of imaging modalities. Despite inherent limitations, conventional echocardiography has fundamentally been established as most widely used diagnostic tool. 3-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) is now feasible, fast and accurate for LV mass evaluation. 3DE is also superior to conventional echocardiography in terms of LV mass assessment, especially in patients with abnormal LV geometry. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and cardiovascular computed tomography (CCT) are currently performed for LV mass assessment and also do not depend on cardiac geometry and display 3-dimensional data, as well. Therefore, CMR is being increasingly employed and is at the present standard of reference in the clinical setting. Although each method demonstrates advantages over another, there are also disadvantages to receive attention. Diagnostic accuracy of methods will also be increased with the introduction of more advanced systems. It is also likely that in the coming years new and more accurate diagnostic tests will become available. In particular, CMR and CCT have been intersecting hot topic between cardiology and radiology clinics. Thus, good communication and collaboration between two specialties is required for selection of an appropriate test. PMID:20515461

  6. [Anesthetic management for laparoscopic sigmoidectomy in a patient with impaired ventricular function caused by cardiac sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Nagata, Hirofumi; Sato, Yoshiharu; Oouchi, Sueko; Wakimoto, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Ko; Suzuki, Kenji

    2012-08-01

    It has been demonstrated that laparoscopic surgery can reduce surgical trauma and postoperative pain, allowing earlier recovery and hospital discharge. However, because patients with severe cardiac depression may not tolerate the adverse respiratory and cardiovascular effects of pneumoperitoneum with a head-up or head-down tilt position, laparoscopic surgery has been avoided in these patients. The present case with low ventricular function (ejection fraction=23-27%) due to cardiac sarcoidosis could successfully undergo laparoscopic sigmoidectomy by using pulmonary artery catheterization. Therefore, laparoscopic surgery can be performed in patients with cardiac dysfunction if the cardiopulmonary responses caused by pneumoperitoneum with a head-up or head-down tilt are sufficiently considered and adverse hemodynamic responses appropriately detected and treated through invasive monitoring techniques such as pulmonary artery catheterization and/or transesophageal echocardiography. PMID:22991812

  7. Construction of cardiac tissue rings using a magnetic tissue fabrication technique.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Hirokazu; Ito, Akira; Sato, Masanori; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2010-01-01

    Here we applied a magnetic force-based tissue engineering technique to cardiac tissue fabrication. A mixture of extracellular matrix precursor and cardiomyocytes labeled with magnetic nanoparticles was added into a well containing a central polycarbonate cylinder. With the use of a magnet, the cells were attracted to the bottom of the well and allowed to form a cell layer. During cultivation, the cell layer shrank towards the cylinder, leading to the formation of a ring-shaped tissue that possessed a multilayered cell structure and contractile properties. These results indicate that magnetic tissue fabrication is a promising approach for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:21152282

  8. Production of arrays of cardiac and skeletal muscle myofibers by micropatterning techniques on a soft substrate.

    PubMed

    Cimetta, Elisa; Pizzato, Sara; Bollini, Sveva; Serena, Elena; De Coppi, Paolo; Elvassore, Nicola

    2009-04-01

    Micropatterning and microfabrication techniques have been widely used to pattern cells on surfaces and to have a deeper insight into many processes in cell biology such as cell adhesion and interactions with the surrounding environment. The aim of this study was the development of an easy and versatile technique for the in vitro production of arrays of functional cardiac and skeletal muscle myofibers using micropatterning techniques on soft substrates. Cardiomyocytes were used for the production of oriented cardiac myofibers whereas mouse muscle satellite cells for that of differentiated parallel myotubes. We performed micro-contact printing of extracellular matrix proteins on soft polyacrylamide-based hydrogels photopolymerized onto functionalized glass slides. Our methods proved to be simple, repeatable and effective in obtaining an extremely selective adhesion of both cardiomyocytes and satellite cells onto patterned soft hydrogel surfaces. Cardiomyocytes resulted in aligned cardiac myofibers able to exhibit a synchronous contractile activity after 2 days of culture. We demonstrated for the first time that murine satellite cells, cultured on a soft hydrogel substrate, fuse and form aligned myotubes after 7 days of culture. Immunofluorescence analyses confirmed correct expression of cell phenotype, differentiation markers and sarcomeric organization. These results were obtained in myotubes derived from satellite cells from both wild type and MDX mice which are research models for the study of muscle dystrophy. These arrays of both cardiac and skeletal muscle myofibers could be used as in vitro models for pharmacological screening tests or biological studies at the single fiber level. PMID:18987976

  9. The development of a validated checklist for femoral venous catheterization: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Riesenberg, Lee Ann; Berg, Katherine; Berg, Dale; Davis, Joshua; Schaeffer, Arielle; Justice, Ellen M; Tinkoff, Glen

    2014-01-01

    Femoral venous catheterization is a common, invasive procedure, which may lead to serious complications. Validated checklists are central to teaching and assessing procedural skills and may result in improved health care quality. The results of the first step of the validation of a femoral venous catheterization checklist are described. A comprehensive literature review of articles published on femoral venous catheterization did not yield a checklist validated by the Delphi method. A modified Delphi technique, involving a panel of 8 interdisciplinary, interinstitutional experts, was used to develop a femoral venous catheterization checklist. The internal consistency coefficient using Cronbach α was .99. Developing a 29-item checklist for teaching and assessing femoral venous catheterization is the first step in the validation process. For this checklist to become further validated, it should be implemented and studied in the simulation and clinical environments. PMID:24045368

  10. Contemporary Mapping Techniques of Complex Cardiac Arrhythmias - Identifying and Modifying the Arrhythmogenic Substrate.

    PubMed

    Koutalas, Emmanuel; Rolf, Sascha; Dinov, Borislav; Richter, Sergio; Arya, Arash; Bollmann, Andreas; Hindricks, Gerhard; Sommer, Philipp

    2015-05-01

    Cardiac electrophysiology has moved a long way forward during recent decades in the comprehension and treatment of complex cardiac arrhythmias. Contemporary electroanatomical mapping systems, along with state-of-the-art technology in the manufacture of electrophysiology catheters and cardiac imaging modalities, have significantly enriched our armamentarium, enabling the implementation of various mapping strategies and techniques in electrophysiology procedures. Beyond conventional mapping strategies, ablation of complex fractionated electrograms and rotor ablation in atrial fibrillation ablation procedures, the identification and modification of the underlying arrhythmogenic substrate has emerged as a strategy that leads to improved outcomes. Arrhythmogenic substrate modification also has a major role in ventricular tachycardia ablation procedures. Optimisation of contact between tissue and catheter and image integration are a further step forward to augment our precision and effectiveness. Hybridisation of existing technologies with a reasonable cost should be our goal over the next few years. PMID:26835095

  11. Contemporary Mapping Techniques of Complex Cardiac Arrhythmias – Identifying and Modifying the Arrhythmogenic Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Koutalas, Emmanuel; Rolf, Sascha; Dinov, Borislav; Richter, Sergio; Arya, Arash; Bollmann, Andreas; Hindricks, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac electrophysiology has moved a long way forward during recent decades in the comprehension and treatment of complex cardiac arrhythmias. Contemporary electroanatomical mapping systems, along with state-of-the-art technology in the manufacture of electrophysiology catheters and cardiac imaging modalities, have significantly enriched our armamentarium, enabling the implementation of various mapping strategies and techniques in electrophysiology procedures. Beyond conventional mapping strategies, ablation of complex fractionated electrograms and rotor ablation in atrial fibrillation ablation procedures, the identification and modification of the underlying arrhythmogenic substrate has emerged as a strategy that leads to improved outcomes. Arrhythmogenic substrate modification also has a major role in ventricular tachycardia ablation procedures. Optimisation of contact between tissue and catheter and image integration are a further step forward to augment our precision and effectiveness. Hybridisation of existing technologies with a reasonable cost should be our goal over the next few years. PMID:26835095

  12. A practical approach to difficult urinary catheterizations.

    PubMed

    Ghaffary, Cameron; Yohannes, Amanuel; Villanueva, Carlos; Leslie, Stephen W

    2013-12-01

    Routine placement of transurethral catheters can be challenging in some situations, such as urethral strictures, severe phimosis and false passages. Intravaginal retraction of the urethral meatus can complicate Foley placement in postmenopausal females. In men, blind urethral procedures with mechanical or metal sounds without visual guidance or guidewire assistance are now discouraged due to the increased risk of urethral trauma and false passages. Newer techniques of urethral catheterization including guidewires, directed hydrophilic mechanical dilators, urethral balloon dilation, and direct vision endoscopic catheter systems are discussed, along with the new standardized protocol for difficult transurethral catheter insertions. Suprapubic catheter placement techniques, including percutaneous trocars and the use of the curved Lowsley tractor for initial suprapubic catheter insertion, are reviewed. Prevention and management of common catheter-related problems such as encrustation, leakage, Foley malposition, balloon cuffing and frequent blockages are discussed. PMID:23959835

  13. Zebrafish Cardiac Muscle Thick Filaments: Isolation Technique and Three-Dimensional Structure

    PubMed Central

    González-Solá, Maryví; AL-Khayat, Hind A.; Behra, Martine; Kensler, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    To understand how mutations in thick filament proteins such as cardiac myosin binding protein-C or titin, cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathies, it is important to determine the structure of the cardiac thick filament. Techniques for the genetic manipulation of the zebrafish are well established and it has become a major model for the study of the cardiovascular system. Our goal is to develop zebrafish as an alternative system to the mammalian heart model for the study of the structure of the cardiac thick filaments and the proteins that form it. We have successfully isolated thick filaments from zebrafish cardiac muscle, using a procedure similar to those for mammalian heart, and analyzed their structure by negative-staining and electron microscopy. The isolated filaments appear well ordered with the characteristic 42.9 nm quasi-helical repeat of the myosin heads expected from x-ray diffraction. We have performed single particle image analysis on the collected electron microscopy images for the C-zone region of these filaments and obtained a three-dimensional reconstruction at 3.5 nm resolution. This reconstruction reveals structure similar to the mammalian thick filament, and demonstrates that zebrafish may provide a useful model for the study of the changes in the cardiac thick filament associated with disease processes. PMID:24739166

  14. Catheterization of the Hepatic Artery Via the Left Common Carotid Artery in Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiao; Wang Yixiang, J.; Zhou Xiangping Guan Yongsong; Tang Chengwei

    2006-12-15

    The commonly used approach for rat hepatic artery catheterization is via the gastroduodenal artery, which is ligated after the procedure. A new method of rat hepatic artery catheterization via the left common carotid artery (LCCA) is described. The LCCA is repaired after catheterization. The catheterization procedures included the following: (1) opening the rat's abdominal cavity and exposing the portion of abdominal aorta at the level of the celiac trunk; (2) separating and exposing the LCCA; inserting a microguidewire and microcatheter set into the LCCA via an incision; after placement into the descending aorta, the microguidewire and microcatheter are maneuvered into the hepatic artery under direct vision; (3) after transcatheter therapy, the catheter is withdrawn and the incision at the LCCA is repaired. This technique was employed on 60 male Sprague-Dawley rats with diethylnitrosamine-induced liver cancer, using a 3F microguidewire and microcatheter set. Selective hepatic artery catheterization was successfully performed in 57 rats. One rat died during the operation and five rats died within 7 days after the procedure. It is envisaged that as experience increases, the catheterization success rate will increase and the death rate will decrease. A new approach for selective hepatic artery catheterization via the LCCA in rats is introduced, which makes repeat catheterization of this artery possible and allows large embolization particles to be delivered by using a 3F catheter.

  15. Techniques for High-speed Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Rats and Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Rehwald, Wolfgang G.; Reeder, Scott B.; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Judd, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    Progress in research on hypertension, heart failure, aging, post-infarct remodeling, and the molecular basis of cardiovascular diseases in general has been greatly facilitated in recent years by the development of specialized small-mammal models by selective breeding and/or genetic alteration. Routine noninvasive evaluation of cardiac function and perfusion in these animals models, however, is difficult using existing methods. In principle, MRI can be used for this purpose, but in practice this is difficult because of problems related to RF coils, cardiac gating, and imaging pulse sequences. In this article, solutions to these problems are described that have allowed us to use MRI to routinely image the hearts of rats and rabbits. Specifically described are four RF coils, cardiac gating schemes, and an imaging pulse sequence specially designed for cardiac imaging in these animals on a 4.7 T Omega chemical-shift imaging (CSI) spectrometer. These techniques can be used to obtain, within 2 min, eight double-oblique short-axis images of the rat at different cardiac phases with 200 × 400 μm in-plane resolution and a slice thickness of 2 mm. Moreover, myocardial tissue tagging can be performed with tag thicknesses and separations comparable to those used routinely in humans. The technical information is presented in sufficient detail to allow researchers at other sites to reproduce the results. This information should facilitate the use of MRI for the noninvasive examination of cardiac function and perfusion, which can be combined with other established techniques for the study of cardiovascular disease in specialized animal models. PMID:8978641

  16. Detection of quiescent cardiac phases in echocardiography data using nonlinear filtering and boundary detection techniques.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Lakshminarayan; Wick, Carson A; McClellan, James H; Liu, Tian; Tridandapani, Srini

    2014-10-01

    We describe an algorithm to detect cardiac quiescence within a heartbeat using nonlinear filtering and boundary detection techniques in echocardiography images. The motivation for detection of these quiescent phases is to provide improved cardiac gating to obtain motion-artifact-free images of the heart at cardiac computed tomography (CT). Currently, cardiac gating is provided through electrocardiography (ECG), which does not provide information about the instantaneous mechanical state of the heart. Our goal is to test if information about the actual mechanical motion of the heart obtained from B-mode echocardiographic data could potentially be used for gating purposes. The nonlinear filtering algorithm presented involves anisotropic diffusion to smoothen the homogeneous regions of the B-mode images while preserving image edges that represent myocardial boundaries. Following this, we detect the boundary of a particular region of interest (ROI) using a thresholding step. The positional changes of this ROI are then observed for quiescent phases over multiple cardiac cycles using the ECG's R-R interval. In a pilot study, seven subjects were imaged in the apical, four-chamber view, and quiescence of the interventricular septum was primarily observed in the diastolic region of the ECG signal. However, the position and length of quiescence vary across multiple heartbeats for the same individual and for different individuals as well. The center of quiescence for the seven patients ranged from 51 to 84 % and did not show a trend with heart rates, which ranged from 54 to 83 beats per minute. The gating intervals based on such analysis of echocardiographic signals could potentially optimize cardiac CT gating. PMID:24859726

  17. Mechanography: a non-invasive technique for the evaluation of cardiac function in children

    PubMed Central

    Spitaels, Silja; Fouron, Jean-Claude; Davignon, André

    1972-01-01

    Experience in the pediatric age group with mechanography, an indirect method of cardiovascular investigation, is described with emphasis on the recording technique and on the analysis of the tracings. A few examples are presented with comments on the morphological aspects and the time characteristics of the pulse curves, showing how much information about cardiac disease and especially myocardial function in children may be obtained. PMID:4640813

  18. Real-time MRI-guided right heart catheterization in adults using passive catheters

    PubMed Central

    Ratnayaka, Kanishka; Faranesh, Anthony Z.; Hansen, Michael S.; Stine, Annette M.; Halabi, Majdi; Barbash, Israel M.; Schenke, William H.; Wright, Victor J.; Grant, Laurie P.; Kellman, Peter; Kocaturk, Ozgur; Lederman, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Real-time MRI creates images with superb tissue contrast that may enable radiation-free catheterization. Simple procedures are the first step towards novel interventional procedures. We aim to perform comprehensive transfemoral diagnostic right heart catheterization in an unselected cohort of patients entirely using MRI guidance. Methods and results We performed X-ray and MRI-guided transfemoral right heart catheterization in consecutive patients undergoing clinical cardiac catheterization. We sampled both cavae and both pulmonary arteries. We compared success rate, time to perform key steps, and catheter visibility among X-ray and MRI procedures using air-filled or gadolinium-filled balloon-tipped catheters. Sixteen subjects (four with shunt, nine with coronary artery disease, three with other) underwent paired X-ray and MRI catheterization. Complete guidewire-free catheterization was possible in 15 of 16 under both. MRI using gadolinium-filled balloons was at least as successful as X-ray in all procedure steps, more successful than MRI using air-filled balloons, and better than both in entering the left pulmonary artery. Total catheterization time and individual procedure steps required approximately the same amount of time irrespective of image guidance modality. Catheter conspicuity was best under X-ray and next-best using gadolinium-filled MRI balloons. Conclusion In this early experience, comprehensive transfemoral right heart catheterization appears feasible using only MRI for imaging guidance. Gadolinium-filled balloon catheters were more conspicuous than air-filled ones. Further workflow and device enhancement are necessary for clinical adoption. PMID:22855740

  19. Imaging Techniques in Percutaneous Cardiac Structural Interventions: Atrial Septal Defect Closure and Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Fernández, Antonio; Bethencourt González, Armando

    2016-08-01

    Because of advances in cardiac structural interventional procedures, imaging techniques are playing an increasingly important role. Imaging studies show sufficient anatomic detail of the heart structure to achieve an excellent outcome in interventional procedures. Up to 98% of atrial septal defects at the ostium secundum can be closed successfully with a percutaneous procedure. Candidates for this type of procedure can be identified through a systematic assessment of atrial septum anatomy, locating and measuring the size and shape of all defects, their rims, and the degree and direction of shunting. Three dimensional echocardiography has significantly improved anatomic assessments and the end result itself. In the future, when combined with other imaging techniques such as cardiac computed tomography and fluoroscopy, 3-dimensional echocardiography will be particularly useful for procedure guidance. Percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage offers an alternative for treating patients with atrial fibrillation and contraindication for oral anticoagulants. In the future, the clinical focus may well turn to stroke prevention in selected patients. Percutaneous closure is effective and safe; device implantation is successful in 94% to 99% of procedures. However, the procedure requires an experienced cardiac structural interventional team. At present, 3-dimensional echocardiography is the most appropriate imaging technique to assess anatomy suitability, select device type and size, guide the procedure alongside fluoroscopy, and to follow-up the patient afterwards. PMID:27354151

  20. Venous catheterization with ultrasound navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Kasatkin, A. A. Nigmatullina, A. R.; Urakov, A. L.

    2015-11-17

    By ultrasound scanning it was determined that respiratory movements made by chest of healthy and sick person are accompanied by respiratory chest rise of internal jugular veins. During the exhalation of an individual diameter of his veins increases and during the breath it decreases down to the complete disappearing if their lumen. Change of the diameter of internal jugular veins in different phases can influence significantly the results of vein puncture and cauterization in patients. The purpose of this research is development of the method increasing the efficiency and safety of cannulation of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound visualization. We suggested the method of catheterization of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound navigation during the execution of which the puncture of venous wall by puncture needle and the following conduction of J-guide is carried out at the moment of patient’s exhalation. This method decreases the risk of complications development during catheterization of internal jugular vein due to exclusion of perforating wound of vein and subjacent tissues and anatomical structures.

  1. Venous catheterization with ultrasound navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasatkin, A. A.; Urakov, A. L.; Nigmatullina, A. R.

    2015-11-01

    By ultrasound scanning it was determined that respiratory movements made by chest of healthy and sick person are accompanied by respiratory chest rise of internal jugular veins. During the exhalation of an individual diameter of his veins increases and during the breath it decreases down to the complete disappearing if their lumen. Change of the diameter of internal jugular veins in different phases can influence significantly the results of vein puncture and cauterization in patients. The purpose of this research is development of the method increasing the efficiency and safety of cannulation of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound visualization. We suggested the method of catheterization of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound navigation during the execution of which the puncture of venous wall by puncture needle and the following conduction of J-guide is carried out at the moment of patient's exhalation. This method decreases the risk of complications development during catheterization of internal jugular vein due to exclusion of perforating wound of vein and subjacent tissues and anatomical structures.

  2. Early ambulation following 6 French diagnostic left heart catheterization: a prospective randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Wood, R A; Lewis, B K; Harber, D R; Kovack, P J; Bates, E R; Stomel, R J

    1997-09-01

    Outpatient cardiac catheterization is frequently performed, but the optimal recovery time after sheath removal has not been defined. Left heart catheterization was performed via the femoral artery utilizing 6 French catheters on 323 outpatients. One hundred thirty-five patients were randomized to ambulate at a mean of 2.5 hr (group 1) after puncture site compression, whereas 188 patients were randomized to ambulate at a mean of 4.1 hr (group 2). Telephone follow-up occurred within 48 hr. A small hematoma (< 5 cm) occurred in 2 (1.6%) patients in group 1 and in 4 (2.4%) patients in group 2. These results indicate that it is safe to ambulate patients 2.5 hr following 6 French diagnostic heart catheterization. PMID:9286529

  3. Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) for parallel imaging reconstruction of undersampled radial data: Application to cardiac cine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu; Chan, Cheong; Stockmann, Jason P.; Tagare, Hemant; Adluru, Ganesh; Tam, Leo K.; Galiana, Gigi; Constable, R. Todd; Kozerke, Sebastian; Peters, Dana C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) for parallel imaging reconstruction of radial data, applied to accelerated cardiac cine. Methods A GPU-accelerated ART reconstruction was implemented and applied to simulations, point spread functions (PSF) and in twelve subjects imaged with radial cardiac cine acquisitions. Cine images were reconstructed with radial ART at multiple undersampling levels (192 Nr x Np = 96 to 16). Images were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed for sharpness and artifacts, and compared to filtered back-projection (FBP), and conjugate gradient SENSE (CG SENSE). Results Radial ART provided reduced artifacts and mainly preserved spatial resolution, for both simulations and in vivo data. Artifacts were qualitatively and quantitatively less with ART than FBP using 48, 32, and 24 Np, although FBP provided quantitatively sharper images at undersampling levels of 48-24 Np (all p<0.05). Use of undersampled radial data for generating auto-calibrated coil-sensitivity profiles resulted in slightly reduced quality. ART was comparable to CG SENSE. GPU-acceleration increased ART reconstruction speed 15-fold, with little impact on the images. Conclusion GPU-accelerated ART is an alternative approach to image reconstruction for parallel radial MR imaging, providing reduced artifacts while mainly maintaining sharpness compared to FBP, as shown by its first application in cardiac studies. PMID:24753213

  4. Continuous use of intermittent bladder catheterization - can social support contribute?

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Marjoyre Anne Lindozo; Lima, Elenice Dias Ribeiro de Paula

    2014-01-01

    Objective to investigate the factors affecting the adequate continuous use of intermittent catheterization and its relation with social support. Method sectional, descriptive and correlational study involving 49 patients with neuropathic bladder caused by spinal cord injury. Results almost all (92%) participants continued the intermittent catheterization, but 46.9% made some changes in the technique. The complications (28.6% of the sample) were mainly infection and vesicolithiasis. There were high scores for social support in relation to people that were part of the patient's social support. Conclusion All of them noticed great support from the family, but not from the society in general. The difficulties were related to the lack of equipment and inadequate infrastructure, leading to changes that increased urologic complications. PMID:25029058

  5. Intractable chest pain in cardiomyopathy: treatment by a novel technique of cardiac cryodenervation with quantitative immunohistochemical assessment of success.

    PubMed Central

    Gaer, J A; Gordon, L; Wharton, J; Polak, J M; Taylor, K M; McKenna, W; Parker, D J

    1993-01-01

    A novel method of cardiac denervation by cryoablation has been developed experimentally. The technique uses liquid nitrogen delivered under pressure to ablate the principal sources of cardiac innervation--namely, the adventitia surrounding the aorta, pulmonary arteries, and veins. The technique has been verified experimentally both in vivo by physiological means and in vitro by quantitative immunohistochemistry and the measurement of myocardial noradrenaline concentrations. A 35 year old woman presented with intractable precordial pain, normal epicardial coronary arteries, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Her symptoms were refractory to maximal medical treatment and she was thought to be unsuitable for either conventional myocardial revascularisation, autotransplantation, or allografting with the concomitant risk of transplant coronary artery disease. She therefore underwent cardiac denervation by the method developed in the laboratory. There was quantitative immunohistochemical evidence of extrinsic cardiac denervation associated with a considerable improvement in her symptoms. This improvement persisted during a follow up period of over 16 months. Images PMID:8280529

  6. Guide wire migration during femoral vein catheterization.

    PubMed

    Khatami, Mohammad Reza; Abbasi, Rozita; Sadigh, Gelareh

    2010-10-01

    Central vein catheterization is a routine and relatively safe procedure in critically ill patients. Complications with this procedure depend to the site of catheterization and the skill of the operator. In addition to the common complications with femoral vein catheterization there are some rare usually preventable side effects related to guide wire and catheter. In our patient who underwent femoral catheterization for acute hemodialysis, we report migration of guide wire through the systemic circulation from the femoral vein to the jugular vein. This is a very rare complication that is a human error and is totally preventable by doing the procedure by a skilled doctor and considering the standards described for central vein catheter insertion. PMID:20852377

  7. Estimating Cardiac Substructures Exposure From Diverse Radiotherapy Techniques in Treating Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Mei, Xin; Chen, Xingxing; Hu, Weigang; Hu, Silong; Zhang, Yingjian; Shao, Zhimin; Guo, Xiaomao; Tuan, Jeffrey; Yu, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The study compares the physical and biologically effective doses (BED) received by the heart and cardiac substructures using three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and simple IMRT (s-IMRT) in postoperative radiotherapy for patients with left-sided breast cancer. From October 2008 to February 2009, 14 patients with histologically confirmed left-sided breast cancer were enrolled and underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) simulation and 18F-FDG positron emission tomography-CT to outline the left cardiac ventricle (LV) and other substructures. The linear-quadratic model was used to convert the physical doses received by critical points of inner heart to BED. The maximal dose, minimum dose, dose received by 99% of volume (D99) and dose received by 95% of volume (D95) in target areas were significantly better using IMRT and s-IMRT when compared with 3D-CRT (P < 0.05). IMRT and s-IMRT significantly reduced the maximal cardiac dose (5038.98 vs 5346.47 cGy, P = 0.002; 5146.66 vs 5346.47 cGy, P = 0.03). IMRT reduced the maximal dose to LV by 4% (P = 0.05) in comparison with 3D-CRT. The average doses to heart and LV in 3D-CRT plan were significantly lower than those in IMRT plan (P < 0.05). The average cardiac volumes receiving ≥25 Gy (V25 Gy) in IMRT, s-IMRT, and 3D-CRT plans were 73.98, 76.75, and 60.34 cm3, respectively. The average LV volumes receiving ≥25 Gy (V25 Gy) in IMRT, s-IMRT and 3D-CRT plans were 23.37, 24.68, and 17.61 cm3, respectively. In the IMRT plan, the mean BED to the critical points of inner heart located within the high physical dose area were substantially lower than in 3D-CRT or s-IMRT. Compared with 3D-CRT technique, IMRT and s-IMRT had superior target dose coverage and dose uniformity. IMRT significantly reduced the maximal RT dose to heart and LV. IMRT and s-IMRT techniques did not reduce the volume of heart and LV receiving high doses. PMID

  8. X-Ray Magnetic Resonance Fusion to Internal Markers and Utility in Congenital Heart Disease Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Dori, Yoav; Sarmiento, Marily; Glatz, Andrew C.; Gillespie, Matthew J.; Jones, Virginia M.; Harris, Matthew A.; Whitehead, Kevin K.; Fogel, Mark A.; Rome, Jonathan J.

    2012-01-01

    Background X-ray magnetic resonance fusion (XMRF) allows for use of 3D data during cardiac catheterization. However, to date, technical requirements have limited the use of this modality in clinical practice. We report on a new internal-marker XMRF method that we have developed and describe how we used XMRF during cardiac catheterization in congenital heart disease. Methods and Results XMRF was performed in a phantom and in 23 patients presenting for cardiac catheterization who also needed cardiac MRI for clinical reasons. The registration process was performed in <5 minutes per patient, with minimal radiation (0.004 to 0.024 mSv) and without contrast. Registration error was calculated in a phantom and in 8 patients using the maximum distance between angiographic and 3D model boundaries. In the phantom, the measured error in the anteroposterior projection had a mean of 1.15 mm (standard deviation, 0.73). The measured error in patients had a median of 2.15 mm (interquartile range, 1.65 to 2.56 mm). Internal markers included bones, airway, image artifact, calcifications, and the heart and vessel borders. The MRI data were used for road mapping in 17 of 23 (74%) cases and camera angle selection in 11 of 23 (48%) cases. Conclusions Internal marker–based registration can be performed quickly, with minimal radiation, without the need for contrast, and with clinically acceptable accuracy using commercially available software. We have also demonstrated several potential uses for XMRF in routine clinical practice. This modality has the potential to reduce radiation exposure and improve catheterization outcomes. PMID:21536785

  9. Mechanical chest compressions in the coronary catheterization laboratory - do not hesitate to go step further!

    PubMed

    Bělohlávek, Jan; Kovárník, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Authors Wagner et al. in your journal demonstrated effectiveness of mechanical chest compressions in the coronary catheterization laboratory to facilitate coronary intervention and survival in patients requiring prolonged resuscitation efforts. We dare to comment on this article and advocate to use mechanical chest compressions only as a bridge to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation to completely substitute failed circulation and enable percutaneous coronary intervention or other procedures to treat the cause of cardiac arrest. PMID:27530540

  10. Techniques for identification of left ventricular asynchrony for cardiac resynchronization therapy in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Peter; Faerestrand, Svein

    2005-01-01

    The most recent treatment option of medically refractory heart failure includes cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) by biventricular pacing in selected patients in NYHA functional class III or IV heart failure. The widely used marker to indicate left ventricular (LV) asynchrony has been the surface ECG, but seems not to be a sufficient marker of the mechanical events within the LV and prediction of clinical response. This review presents an overview of techniques for identification of left ventricular intra- and interventricular asynchrony. Both manuscripts for electrical and mechanical asynchrony are reviewed, partly predicting response to CRT. In summary there is still no gold standard for assessment of LV asynchrony for CRT, but both traditional and new echocardiographic methods have shown asynchronous LV contraction in heart failure patients, and resynchronized LV contraction during CRT and should be implemented as additional methods for selecting patients to CRT. PMID:16943866

  11. Coil Embolization Treatment in Pulmonary Artery Branch Rupture During Swan-Ganz Catheterization

    SciTech Connect

    Gottwalles, Yannick; Wunschel-Joseph, Marie-Eve; Hanssen, Michel

    2000-11-15

    Rupture of the pulmonary artery or one of its branches during Swan-Ganz catheterization is a complication that is rare but remains fatal in almost 50% of cases. The risk factors and mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of this accident have been widely reported. Management is twofold: resuscitation procedures and specific medical or even surgical treatment. We report a case of pulmonary artery rupture occurring during Swan-Ganz catheterization that was treated by coil embolization. This technique, which is quick and simple to use, would appear to be very promising. This is the first case of successful emergency treatment of pulmonary artery rupture using an endovascular technique.

  12. A robust automated left ventricle region of interest localization technique using a cardiac cine MRI atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zikri, Yehuda Kfir; Linte, Cristian A.

    2016-03-01

    Region of interest detection is a precursor to many medical image processing and analysis applications, including segmentation, registration and other image manipulation techniques. The optimal region of interest is often selected manually, based on empirical knowledge and features of the image dataset. However, if inconsistently identified, the selected region of interest may greatly affect the subsequent image analysis or interpretation steps, in turn leading to incomplete assessment during computer-aided diagnosis or incomplete visualization or identification of the surgical targets, if employed in the context of pre-procedural planning or image-guided interventions. Therefore, the need for robust, accurate and computationally efficient region of interest localization techniques is prevalent in many modern computer-assisted diagnosis and therapy applications. Here we propose a fully automated, robust, a priori learning-based approach that provides reliable estimates of the left and right ventricle features from cine cardiac MR images. The proposed approach leverages the temporal frame-to-frame motion extracted across a range of short axis left ventricle slice images with small training set generated from les than 10% of the population. This approach is based on histogram of oriented gradients features weighted by local intensities to first identify an initial region of interest depicting the left and right ventricles that exhibits the greatest extent of cardiac motion. This region is correlated with the homologous region that belongs to the training dataset that best matches the test image using feature vector correlation techniques. Lastly, the optimal left ventricle region of interest of the test image is identified based on the correlation of known ground truth segmentations associated with the training dataset deemed closest to the test image. The proposed approach was tested on a population of 100 patient datasets and was validated against the ground truth

  13. 21 CFR 870.1310 - Vessel dilator for percutaneous catheterization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vessel dilator for percutaneous catheterization... Vessel dilator for percutaneous catheterization. (a) Identification. A vessel dilator for percutaneous catheterization is a device which is placed over the guide wire to enlarge the opening in the vessel, and which...

  14. Mycobacterium abscessus: Causing fatal endocarditis after cardiac catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, S; Mishra, V; Sorabjee, J

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is an unusual cause of infection in immunocompetent patients. The intrinsic and acquired resistance of this organism to multiple antibiotics is a major issue in planning treatment regimens. We report a case of M. abscessus endocarditis of the native aortic valve in an immunocompetent patient following coronary angiography with a fatal outcome. The case highlights an unfortunate intervention – related nosocomial infection and the difficulties in chemotherapeutic options for this organism, particularly in the presence of renal failure. PMID:25766351

  15. Vendor agreements offer cost savings for cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Abramson, D

    1997-01-01

    Hospitals continue to search for ways to save money at the same time they provide their physicians and clinical staffs with the variety and quality of supplies needed to do their jobs. St. Joseph's Medical Center in Stockton, Calif. watched expenditures for its cath lab increase while its activity stabilized. They looked at their high-volume use of balloon catheters, says Gary Boyd, service director. At a cost of $600 to $700 apiece, it made sense to carefully manage their supply. Choosing a prime vendor was the first step in controlling inventory. Materials management, which had previously had a hands-off policy in the cath lab, took an active role in determining choices for this product. Through a lengthy selection process, medical center management and physicians reached a consensus for a single vendor. Having a prime vendor policy may increase the vendor's commitment to the hospital and provide added advantages. For St. Joseph's, selecting a prime vendor has better positioned the hospital to arrange for inventory to be stocked on consignment: the vendor owns the shelved supplies, which the hospital pays for only as they are used. However, some vendors may reduce their discounts when they enter into a consignment agreement. The best way is to get the maximum discount on the invoice price first, and then work with the vendor to manage inventories at the lowest level possible. Smaller facilities have less leverage and less flexibility, but they can often piggy-back onto large bargaining agreements by partnering with a larger institution. PMID:10168253

  16. Mycobacterium abscessus: causing fatal endocarditis after cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, S; Mishra, V; Sorabjee, J

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is an unusual cause of infection in immunocompetent patients. The intrinsic and acquired resistance of this organism to multiple antibiotics is a major issue in planning treatment regimens. We report a case of M. abscessus endocarditis of the native aortic valve in an immunocompetent patient following coronary angiography with a fatal outcome. The case highlights an unfortunate intervention-related nosocomial infection and the difficulties in chemotherapeutic options for this organism, particularly in the presence of renal failure. PMID:25766351

  17. Finding the Gatekeeper to the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Marwick, Thomas H.; Cho, Iksung; Hartaigh, Bríain ó; Min, James K.

    2015-01-01

    Functional capacity is a robust predictor of clinical outcomes, and stress testing is used in current practice paradigms to guide referral to invasive coronary angiography. However, invasive coronary angiography is driven by ongoing symptoms, as well as risk of adverse outcomes. The limitations of current functional testing-based paradigms might be avoided by using coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) for exclusion of obstructive coronary artery disease. The growth of CCTA has been supported by comparative prognostic evidence with CCTA and functional testing, as well as radiation dose reduction. Use of CCTA for physiological evaluation of coronary lesion-specific ischemia may facilitate evaluation of moderate stenoses, designation of the culprit lesion, and prediction of benefit from revascularization. The potential of CCTA to serve as an effective gatekeeper to invasive coronary angiography will depend, in part, on the adoption of these new developments, as well as definition of the benefit of detecting high-risk plaque for guiding the management of selected patients. PMID:26112200

  18. Transient Cortical Blindness after Cardiac Catheterization with Iobitridol

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, Mehmet; Ozhan, Hakan; Kinay, Ozan; Kilicaslan, Baris; Karaca, Mustafa; Cece, Hasan; Biceroglu, Serdar; Ergene, Oktay

    2007-01-01

    The occurrence rate of transient cortical blindness after contrast media exposure has been reported to be as high as 1% to 4% after cerebral or vertebral angiography, but such blindness has been described in only a few cases of coronary angiography with modern, non-ionic, low-osmolality radio-contrast agents. In this study, we present a case of abrupt cortical blindness after exposure to contrast media during diagnostic coronary angiography; to our knowledge, this is the 1st report in the medical literature that describes transient cortical blindness after iobitridol use. PMID:17948092

  19. Transient cortical blindness after cardiac catheterization with iobitridol.

    PubMed

    Yazici, Mehmet; Ozhan, Hakan; Kinay, Ozan; Kilicaslan, Baris; Karaca, Mustafa; Cece, Hasan; Biceroglu, Serdar; Ergene, Oktay

    2007-01-01

    The occurrence rate of transient cortical blindness after contrast media exposure has been reported to be as high as 1% to 4% after cerebral or vertebral angiography, but such blindness has been described in only a few cases of coronary angiography with modern, non-ionic, low-osmolality radio-contrast agents. In this study, we present a case of abrupt cortical blindness after exposure to contrast media during diagnostic coronary angiography; to our knowledge, this is the 1st report in the medical literature that describes transient cortical blindness after iobitridol use. PMID:17948092

  20. Clean Intermittent Catheterization in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katrancha, Elizabeth D.

    2008-01-01

    Spina bifida (SB) is a neural tube defect that causes many physical and mental disabilities. Bowel and bladder incontinence is the disability seen most often in these students that requires the school nurse's attention. Clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) provides the student with SB a vehicle to reach a satisfactory level of continence,…

  1. Automated non-invasive measurement of cardiac output: comparison of electrical bioimpedance and carbon dioxide rebreathing techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S A; Russell, A E; West, M J; Chalmers, J

    1988-01-01

    Two commercial automated, non-invasive systems for estimation of cardiac output were evaluated. Values of cardiac output obtained by electrical bioimpedance cardiography (BoMed NCCOM3 machine) were compared with values derived from an indirect Fick technique that uses carbon dioxide rebreathing (Gould 9000 IV system) during 103 simultaneous measurements made at rest in 19 randomly selected subjects and on exercise in 11 subjects. Cardiac output values obtained with impedance cardiography were significantly correlated with those measured by the indirect Fick method, although there was a wide scatter with over 73% of the readings lying outside the limits defined by the line of identity +/- 20%. This correlation was greatly reduced when stroke volume index was used instead of cardiac output. Indirect Fick results were linearly related to oxygen uptake both at rest and on exercise, while impedance cardiography results did not correlate with oxygen uptake. Impedance cardiography gave consistently lower results for cardiac output than indirect Fick at all levels of exercise. Both machines were easy to use and produced acceptable mean (SE) coefficients of variation (BoMed NCCOM3 7.7 (1.0)%, Gould 9000 IV 10.6 (1.4)%). Further validation is required before either of these machines can be recommended as an alternative to invasive monitoring in clinical practice. PMID:3128316

  2. The influence of novel CT reconstruction technique and ECG-gated technique on image quality and patient dose of cardiac computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Dyakov, I; Stoinova, V; Groudeva, V; Vassileva, J

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare image quality and patient dose in cardiac computed tomography angiography (CTA) in terms of volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI vol), dose length product (DLP) and effective dose, when changing from filtered back projection (FBP) to adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR) reconstruction techniques. Further aim was to implement prospective electrocardiogram (ECG) gating for patient dose reduction. The study was performed with Aquilion ONE 320-row CT of Toshiba Medical Systems. Analysis of cardiac CT protocols was performed before and after integration of the new software. The AIDR technique showed more than 50 % reduction in CTDIvol values and 57 % in effective dose. The subjective evaluation of clinical images confirmed the adequate image quality acquired by the AIDR technique. The preliminary results indicated significant dose reduction when using prospective ECG gating by keeping the adequate diagnostic quality of clinical images. PMID:25836680

  3. Measurement of cardiac function using pressure–volume conductance catheter technique in mice and rats

    PubMed Central

    Pacher, Pál; Nagayama, Takahiro; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Bátkai, Sándor; Kass, David A

    2008-01-01

    Ventricular pressure–volume relationships have become well established as the most rigorous and comprehensive ways to assess intact heart function. Thanks to advances in miniature sensor technology, this approach has been successfully translated to small rodents, allowing for detailed characterization of cardiovascular function in genetically engineered mice, testing effects of pharmacotherapies and studying disease conditions. This method is unique for providing measures of left ventricular (LV) performance that are more specific to the heart and less affected by vascular loading conditions. Here we present descriptions and movies for procedures employing this method (anesthesia, intubation and surgical techniques, calibrations). We also provide examples of hemodynamics measurements obtained from normal mice/rats, and from animals with cardiac hypertrophy/heart failure, and describe values for various useful load-dependent and load-independent indexes of LV function obtained using different types of anesthesia. The completion of the protocol takes 1–4 h (depending on the experimental design/end points). PMID:18772869

  4. Assessment of cardiac function using myocardial perfusion imaging technique on SPECT with 99mTc sestamibi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gani, M. R. A.; Nazir, F.; Pawiro, S. A.; Soejoko, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    Suspicion on coronary heart disease can be confirmed by observing the function of left ventricle cardiac muscle with Myocardial Perfusion Imaging techniques. The function perfusion itself is indicated by the uptake of radiopharmaceutical tracer. The 31 patients were studied undergoing the MPI examination on Gatot Soebroto Hospital using 99mTc-sestamibi radiopharmaceutical with stress and rest conditions. Stress was stimulated by physical exercise or pharmacological agent. After two hours, the patient did rest condition on the same day. The difference of uptake percentage between stress and rest conditions will be used to determine the malfunction of perfusion due to ischemic or infarct. Degradation of cardiac function was determined based on the image-based assessment of five segments of left ventricle cardiac. As a result, 8 (25.8%) patients had normal myocardial perfusion and 11 (35.5%) patients suspected for having partial ischemia. Total ischemia occurred to 8 (25.8%) patients with reversible and irreversible ischemia and the remaining 4 (12.9%) patients for partial infarct with characteristic the percentage of perfusion ≤50%. It is concluded that MPI technique of image-based assessment on uptake percentage difference between stress and rest conditions can be employed to predict abnormal perfusion as complementary information to diagnose the cardiac function.

  5. Complete guidewire retention after femoral vein catheterization.

    PubMed

    Cat, Bahar Gulcay; Guler, Sertac; Soyuduru, Murat; Guven, Ibrahim; Ramadan, Hayri

    2015-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are often used for various purposes in the emergency departments (ED). The main uses of CVCs in the EDs are emergent hemodialysis, in situations where peripheral vein catheterization cannot be achieved, and continuous invasive hemodynamic monitoring. The complications related to CVC insertion are usually mechanical and observed in the near term after the procedure. Retained CVC guidewire after catheterization is a rare complication in the published reports and usually related with intra- or postoperative settings and jugular or subclavian vein. The present study reported a young female patient who underwent left femoral vein catheterization 6 months earlier in an intensive care unit of another hospital and was diagnosed with complete guidewire retention in the ED. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case in published reports with a diagnosis of retained CVC guidewire with retrograde migration into the femoral vein. Surprisingly, the patient developed no thrombotic or embolic complication during this 6-month period. PMID:26657235

  6. Ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization in prone position

    PubMed Central

    Sofi, Khalid; Arab, Samer

    2010-01-01

    Central venous catheterization (CVC) is a commonly performed intraoperative procedure. Traditionally, CVC placement is performed blindly using anatomic landmarks as a guide to vessel position. Real-time ultrasound provides the operator the benefit of visualizing the target vein and the surrounding anatomic structures prior to and during the catheter insertion, thereby minimizing complications and increasing speed of placement. A 22-year-old male underwent open reduction and internal fixation of acetabulum fracture in prone position. Excessive continuous bleeding intraoperatively warranted placement of CVC in right internal jugular vein (IJV), which was not possible in prone position without the help of ultrasound. Best view of right IJV was obtained and CVC was placed using real-time ultrasound without complications. Ultrasound-guided CVC placement can be done in atypical patient positions where traditional anatomic landmark technique has no role. Use of ultrasound not only increases the speed of placement but also reduces complications known with the traditional blind technique. PMID:20668564

  7. Role of Imaging Techniques for Diagnosis, Prognosis and Management of Heart Failure Patients: Cardiac Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Jorge A.; Kramer, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (CMR) has evolved into a major tool for the diagnosis and assessment of prognosis of patients suffering from heart failure. Anatomical and structural imaging, functional assessment, T1 and T2 mapping tissue characterization and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) have provided clinicians with tools to distinguish between non-ischemic and ischemic cardiomyopathies and to identify the etiology of non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. LGE is a useful tool to predict the likelihood of functional recovery after revascularization in patients with CAD and to guide the LV lead placement in those who qualify for cardiac resynchronization (CRT) therapy. In addition, the presence of LGE and its extent in myocardial tissue relates to overall cardiovascular outcomes. Emerging roles for cardiac imaging in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction (HFpEF) are being studied and CMR continues to be among the most promising noninvasive imaging alternatives in the diagnosis of this disease. PMID:26041670

  8. Cardiac imaging: New technologies and clinical applications. Vol. 17, No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kotler, M.N.; Steiner, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Imaging of the cardiovascular system has made much progress during the past several years. This book addresses the issues surrounding development and clinical utilization of techniques for diagnosis in valvular, coronary artery, and congenital heart disease. Included among the evaluation modalities are Doppler ultrasound, contrast 2-D echocardiography, thallium scintigraphy, nuclear magnetic resonance and emission tomography (CT, ECT, SPECT, PET). Advantages and disadvantages of these modes are discussed, and compared to each other and to older methods such as cardiac catheterization and angiography. Consideration is given to the use of the computer as an aid to the cardiologist.

  9. Transcervical catheterization and cervical patency during the oestrous cycle in domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Chatdarong, K; Lohachit, C; Ponglowhapan, S; Linde-Forsberg, C

    2001-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to develop a device for vaginal and transcervical catheterization in domestic cats, and to study cervical patency during the various stages of the oestrous cycle. Seventeen queens submitted for routine spaying were included in the study. A vaginal catheter was designed from a urinary catheter for dogs, to fit into the ventral vaginal fornix, and a 3.5 French tomcat catheter was used as an inner transcervical catheter. Cervical patency was studied by infusing 0.5 ml Urografin into the cranial vagina and taking X-rays of the queens after 5 min. The Urografin did not enter the uterus, even in the oestrous queens. Transcervical catheterization was then attempted. The correct placement of the intrauterine catheter was confirmed by injecting green food colour mixed with penicillin G and observing the presence of stain in the uterine horns during surgery. Catheterization was successful in 13 of 17 queens: six of nine in interoestrus, three of three in oestrus, one of two in metoestrus and three of three in the postpartum period. Transcervical catheterization is a non-invasive technique that is likely to improve the success rate of assisted feline reproduction, and is potentially a useful non-surgical technique for diagnosis and therapy of uterine diseases. PMID:11787175

  10. Preferred tools and techniques for implantation of cardiac electronic devices in Europe: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Proclemer, Alessandro; Dobreanu, Dan; Marinskis, Germanas; Pison, Laurent; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to assess clinical practice in relation to the tools and techniques used for cardiac implantable electronic devices procedures in the European countries. Responses to the questionnaire were received from 62 members of the EHRA research network. The survey involved high-, medium-, and low-volume implanting centres, performing, respectively, more than 200, 100-199 and under 100 implants per year. The following topics were explored: the side approach for implantation, surgical techniques for pocket incision, first venous access for lead implantation, preference of lead fixation, preferred coil number for implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) leads, right ventricular pacing site, generator placement site, subcutaneous ICD implantation, specific tools and techniques for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), lead implantation sequence in CRT, coronary sinus cannulation technique, target site for left ventricular lead placement, strategy in left ventricular lead implant failure, mean CRT implantation time, optimization of the atrioventricular (AV) and ventriculo-ventricular intervals, CRT implants in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation, AV node ablation in patients with permanent AF. This panoramic view allows us to find out the operator preferences regarding the techniques and tools for device implantation in Europe. The results showed different practices in all the fields we investigated, nevertheless the survey also outlines a good adherence to the common standards and recommendations. PMID:24170423

  11. Advanced computer techniques for inverse modeling of electric current in cardiac tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, S.A.; Romero, L.A.; Diegert, C.F.

    1996-08-01

    For many years, ECG`s and vector cardiograms have been the tools of choice for non-invasive diagnosis of cardiac conduction problems, such as found in reentrant tachycardia or Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. Through skillful analysis of these skin-surface measurements of cardiac generated electric currents, a physician can deduce the general location of heart conduction irregularities. Using a combination of high-fidelity geometry modeling, advanced mathematical algorithms and massively parallel computing, Sandia`s approach would provide much more accurate information and thus allow the physician to pinpoint the source of an arrhythmia or abnormal conduction pathway.

  12. Role of imaging in the diagnosis and management of patients with cardiac amyloidosis: state of the art review and focus on emerging nuclear techniques.

    PubMed

    Aljaroudi, Wael A; Desai, Milind Y; Tang, W H Wilson; Phelan, Dermot; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Jaber, Wael A

    2014-04-01

    Amyloidosis is an infiltrative disease characterized by deposition of amyloid fibrils within the extracellular tissue of one or multiple organs. Involvement of the heart, cardiac amyloidosis, is recognized as a common cause of restrictive cardiomyopathy and heart failure. The two major types of cardiac amyloidosis are cardiac amyloid light-chain (AL) and transthyretin-related cardiac amyloidosis (ATTR, mutant and wild types) (Nat Rev Cardiol 2010;7:398-408). While early recognition of cardiac amyloidosis is of major clinical importance, so is the ability to differentiate between subtypes. Indeed, both prognosis and therapeutic options vary drastically depending on the subtype. While endomyocardial biopsy with immunostaining is considered the gold standard, advances in imaging provide an attractive non-invasive alternative. Currently, electrocardiography, echocardiography, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging are all used in the evaluation of cardiac amyloidosis with varying diagnostic and prognostic accuracy. Yet, none of these modalities can effectively differentiate the cardiac amyloid subtypes. Recent data with (99m)Tc-phosphate derivatives, previously used as bone seeking radioactive tracers, have shown promising results; these radiotracers selectively bind ATTR, but not AL subtype, and can differentiate subtypes with high diagnostic accuracy. This review will initially present the non-radionuclide imaging techniques and then focus on the radionuclide imaging techniques, particularly (99m)Tc-DPD and (99m)Tc-PYP, mechanism of action, performance and interpretation of the study, diagnostic accuracy, prognostic value, future clinical perspective, and outlook. PMID:24347127

  13. Incidence and Predictors of Radial Artery Occlusion Associated Transradial Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Tuncez, Abdullah; Kaya, Zeynettin; Aras, Dursun; Yıldız, Abdulkadir; Gül, Enes Elvin; Tekinalp, Mehmet; Karakaş, Mehmet Fatih; Kısacık, Halil Lütfü

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we sought to assess the incidence and predictors of radial artery occlusion (RAO), which is a significant complication of transradial cardiac catheterization. We prospectively evaluated the results of 106 patients who underwent coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) via the transradial approach (TRA). At the 3rd h of intervention, the radial artery was checked by palpation; color doppler ultrasonography was performed at the 24th h. Fluoroscopy duration, procedure success, and complications of the radial artery were recorded. The procedure was successfully completed in all patients. RAO was detected in eight female and two male patients. In terms of RAO, there was a statistically significant difference between males and females (p=0.019). Other parameters did not show a significant correlation with RAO. Altough did not have any effect on procedural success, eight patients developed transient radial artery spasm. Gender was not associated with radial arterial spasms (p=0.19). TRA in the diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease has shown high procedural success and low complication rates; it addition, it presents a low economic burden. It should be used widely and be involved in the routine cardiology residency program. PMID:24151442

  14. Noninvasive external cardiac pacing for thallium-201 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, M.D.; Warren, S.E.; Gervino, E.V.; Aroesty, J.M.; Royal, H.D.; Parker, J.A.; Silverman, K.J.; Kolodny, G.M.; Zoll, P.M.; McKay, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    Improvements in noninvasive external cardiac pacing have led to a technique with reliable electrical capture and tolerable patient discomfort. To assess the use of this modality of pacing in combination with thallium scintigraphy as a noninvasive pacing stress test, we applied simultaneous noninvasive cardiac pacing, hemodynamic monitoring, and thallium-201 scintigraphy in 14 patients undergoing cardiac catheterization for chest pain syndromes. Two patients had normal coronary arteries, while the remaining 12 had significant coronary artery disease. Thallium scintigraphic responses to pacing were compared to routine exercise thallium stress testing in nine of these 14 patients. All patients were noninvasively paced to more than 85% of the age-predicted maximum heart rate. Twelve patients demonstrated reversible thallium defects, which corresponded in 11 cases to significant lesions seen on coronary angiography. Of nine patients who underwent both pacing and exercise thallium stress tests, comparable maximal rate-pressure products were achieved. Moreover, thallium imaging at peak pacing and during delayed views did not differ significantly from exercise thallium scintigraphy. A limiting factor associated with the technique was local patient discomfort, which occurred to some degree in all patients. We conclude that noninvasive external cardiac pacing together with thallium scintigraphy is capable of detecting significant coronary artery disease and may be comparable to routine exercise thallium stress testing. This new modality of stress testing could be useful in patients unable to undergo the exercise required for standard exercise tolerance testing, particularly if improvements in the technology can be found to reduce further the local discomfort.

  15. Evaluation of ventricular function with gated cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Osbakken, M; Yuschok, T

    1986-01-01

    To determine the feasibility of using planar images obtained with gated cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to evaluate ventricular contractile function, cardiac chamber volume (V), and ejection fraction (EF) were calculated using MR images obtained in five previously catheterized patients. Patients were imaged with a .15-Tesla 55-cm bore magnet using the ECG to gate the images. Spin echo pulse sequences (30/500, TE/TR) were used to produce images in the transverse (T), coronal (C), and sagittal (S) planes at end diastole (ED) and end systole (ES). Slice thickness was 1.5 cm, with 2-mm resolution. A calibration grid was imaged in each plane to determine correction factors. Cardiac chamber areas were determined via planimetry. An area-length-volume algorithm was used to obtain EDV and ESV. Three combinations of biplane images in ES and ED were used (T/C, T/S, C/S). Volume data were used to calculate EF. Contrast ventriculogram volumes tended to be greater than MRI volumes, but EFs were similar with both techniques. In conclusion, gated cardiac MR images can be used to evaluate the ventricular function parameters of volume and ejection fraction. PMID:3731263

  16. Catheterization of the urethra in female pigs.

    PubMed

    Musk, G C; Zwierzchoniewska, M; He, B

    2015-10-01

    Female pigs are commonly utilized as an animal model for biomedical research and require urethral catheterization. Sixteen pigs were anaesthetized for research purposes and required the placement of a urethral catheter. Post-mortem examination of the vaginas revealed the urethral opening to be consistently halfway from the mucocutaneous junction of the vulva to the cervix. A shallow diverticulum was also observed on the ventral floor of the urethral opening. To optimize conditions for success the pig should be carefully positioned supine, a vaginal speculum and light source should be used, the pig should be adequately anaesthetized, and the anatomy of the vagina should be reviewed. PMID:25977261

  17. Techniques for automated local activation time annotation and conduction velocity estimation in cardiac mapping.

    PubMed

    Cantwell, C D; Roney, C H; Ng, F S; Siggers, J H; Sherwin, S J; Peters, N S

    2015-10-01

    Measurements of cardiac conduction velocity provide valuable functional and structural insight into the initiation and perpetuation of cardiac arrhythmias, in both a clinical and laboratory context. The interpretation of activation wavefronts and their propagation can identify mechanistic properties of a broad range of electrophysiological pathologies. However, the sparsity, distribution and uncertainty of recorded data make accurate conduction velocity calculation difficult. A wide range of mathematical approaches have been proposed for addressing this challenge, often targeted towards specific data modalities, species or recording environments. Many of these algorithms require identification of activation times from electrogram recordings which themselves may have complex morphology or low signal-to-noise ratio. This paper surveys algorithms designed for identifying local activation times and computing conduction direction and speed. Their suitability for use in different recording contexts and applications is assessed. PMID:25978869

  18. Techniques for automated local activation time annotation and conduction velocity estimation in cardiac mapping

    PubMed Central

    Cantwell, C.D.; Roney, C.H.; Ng, F.S.; Siggers, J.H.; Sherwin, S.J.; Peters, N.S.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of cardiac conduction velocity provide valuable functional and structural insight into the initiation and perpetuation of cardiac arrhythmias, in both a clinical and laboratory context. The interpretation of activation wavefronts and their propagation can identify mechanistic properties of a broad range of electrophysiological pathologies. However, the sparsity, distribution and uncertainty of recorded data make accurate conduction velocity calculation difficult. A wide range of mathematical approaches have been proposed for addressing this challenge, often targeted towards specific data modalities, species or recording environments. Many of these algorithms require identification of activation times from electrogram recordings which themselves may have complex morphology or low signal-to-noise ratio. This paper surveys algorithms designed for identifying local activation times and computing conduction direction and speed. Their suitability for use in different recording contexts and applications is assessed. PMID:25978869

  19. Frozen Elephant Trunk Technique in a Patient with Multiple Previous Cardiac Procedures: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Christ, Torsten; Lembcke, Alexander; Laule, Michael; Dohmen, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Background We present the case of a 69-year-old female patient with giant aortic aneurysm who underwent previously multiple cardiac surgeries or interventions. Case Report Ross procedure was performed in 2006 due to aortic valve regurgitation and aneurysm of the ascending aorta. In 2010 the patient was re-admitted for pulmonary valve insufficiency and a transcatheter pulmonary valve was implanted. Recently, the patient presented with an aortic arch aneurysm, maximum diameter 78 mm, which was treated by a hybrid approach, implanting a frozen elephant trunk and a covered stent graft. Conclusions The current case report demonstrates a suitable hybrid option for an extremely demanding procedure by multiple previous cardiac procedures. PMID:27357920

  20. Frozen Elephant Trunk Technique in a Patient with Multiple Previous Cardiac Procedures: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Christ, Torsten; Lembcke, Alexander; Laule, Michael; Dohmen, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We present the case of a 69-year-old female patient with giant aortic aneurysm who underwent previously multiple cardiac surgeries or interventions. CASE REPORT Ross procedure was performed in 2006 due to aortic valve regurgitation and aneurysm of the ascending aorta. In 2010 the patient was re-admitted for pulmonary valve insufficiency and a transcatheter pulmonary valve was implanted. Recently, the patient presented with an aortic arch aneurysm, maximum diameter 78 mm, which was treated by a hybrid approach, implanting a frozen elephant trunk and a covered stent graft. CONCLUSIONS The current case report demonstrates a suitable hybrid option for an extremely demanding procedure by multiple previous cardiac procedures. PMID:27357920

  1. Echocardiography of the normal camel (Camelus dromedaries) heart: technique and cardiac dimensions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Echocardiography and intra-cardiac dimensions have not previously been reported in adult camels despite its potential application for medical purpose. The aim of this study was to describe the results of a prospective study, aiming to report normal cardiac appearance and normal chamber dimensions in adult camels (Camelus dromedarius). Results On the right side, when the probe was placed in the 5th or 4th intercostal space (ICS), the caudal long-axis four-chamber view of the ventricles, atria, and the interventricular septum was obtained. Placing the probe slightly more cranially in the 4th ICS, the caudal long-axis four-chamber view and the caudal long-axis view of the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) were imaged. In 7 camels, a hybrid view between a “four-chamber” and “LVOT view” was imaged from the same position. The short-axis view of the ventricles was obtained in the 4th ICS where the transducer was rotated between 0° and 25°. Placement of the transducer in the 3rd ICS allowed visualisation of the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT). On the left side, when the probe was placed in the 5th or 4th ICS, a four-chamber view was obtained. The LVOT is imaged in the 4th ICS and the RVOT was seen from the 3rd ICS. Conclusions This study showed that it is possible to obtain good-quality echocardiograms in adult camels and provide normal cardiac dimensions. This study could be used as a reference for further studies concerning camels with cardiac diseases. PMID:22862855

  2. Catheterization: A Review of Various Methods for Catheterization of Handicapped Students in the School System. A Technical Assistance Publication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Marilyn

    The manual is intended to provide technical assistance to South Carolina local education agencies (LEAs)in regard to provision of catheterization services to students with disabilities in the school system. The first section defines catheterization and briefly discusses the basic need for this specialized health care service. Recent relevant…

  3. Patterning human stem cells and endothelial cells with laser printing for cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gaebel, Ralf; Ma, Nan; Liu, Jun; Guan, Jianjun; Koch, Lothar; Klopsch, Christian; Gruene, Martin; Toelk, Anita; Wang, Weiwei; Mark, Peter; Wang, Feng; Chichkov, Boris; Li, Wenzhong; Steinhoff, Gustav

    2011-12-01

    Recent study showed that mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) could inhibit apoptosis of endothelial cells in hypoxic condition, increase their survival, and stimulate the angiogenesis process. In this project we applied Laser-Induced-Forward-Transfer (LIFT) cell printing technique and prepared a cardiac patch seeded with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human MSC (hMSC) in a defined pattern for cardiac regeneration. We seeded HUVEC and hMSC in a defined pattern on a Polyester urethane urea (PEUU) cardiac patch. On control patches an equal amount of cells was randomly seeded without LIFT. Patches were cultivated in vitro or transplanted in vivo to the infarcted zone of rat hearts after LAD-ligation. Cardiac performance was measured by left ventricular catheterization 8 weeks post infarction. Thereafter hearts were perfused with fluorescein tomato lectin for the assessment of functional blood vessels and stored for histology analyses. We demonstrated that LIFT-derived cell seeding pattern definitely modified growth characteristics of co-cultured HUVEC and hMSC leading to increased vessel formation and found significant functional improvement of infarcted hearts following transplantation of a LIFT-tissue engineered cardiac patch. Further, we could show enhanced capillary density and integration of human cells into the functionally connected vessels of murine vascular system. LIFT-based Tissue Engineering of cardiac patches for the treatment of myocardial infarction might improve wound healing and functional preservation. PMID:21911255

  4. A Voluntary Breath-Hold Treatment Technique for the Left Breast With Unfavorable Cardiac Anatomy Using Surface Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gierga, David P.; Turcotte, Julie C.; Sharp, Gregory C.; Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts ; Sedlacek, Daniel E.; Cotter, Christopher R.; Taghian, Alphonse G.; Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Breath-hold (BH) treatments can be used to reduce cardiac dose for patients with left-sided breast cancer and unfavorable cardiac anatomy. A surface imaging technique was developed for accurate patient setup and reproducible real-time BH positioning. Methods and Materials: Three-dimensional surface images were obtained for 20 patients. Surface imaging was used to correct the daily setup for each patient. Initial setup data were recorded for 443 fractions and were analyzed to assess random and systematic errors. Real time monitoring was used to verify surface placement during BH. The radiation beam was not turned on if the BH position difference was greater than 5 mm. Real-time surface data were analyzed for 2398 BHs and 363 treatment fractions. The mean and maximum differences were calculated. The percentage of BHs greater than tolerance was calculated. Results: The mean shifts for initial patient setup were 2.0 mm, 1.2 mm, and 0.3 mm in the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions, respectively. The mean 3-dimensional vector shift was 7.8 mm. Random and systematic errors were less than 4 mm. Real-time surface monitoring data indicated that 22% of the BHs were outside the 5-mm tolerance (range, 7%-41%), and there was a correlation with breast volume. The mean difference between the treated and reference BH positions was 2 mm in each direction. For out-of-tolerance BHs, the average difference in the BH position was 6.3 mm, and the average maximum difference was 8.8 mm. Conclusions: Daily real-time surface imaging ensures accurate and reproducible positioning for BH treatment of left-sided breast cancer patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy.

  5. Application of radionuclide ventriculography to cardiac screening

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, J. Jr.; Milner, M.R.; Chandeysson, P.L.; Rodman, D.J.; Okin, P.M.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1989-05-01

    Screening asymptomatic individuals for latent coronary disease often requires sequential testing because exercise electrocardiography typically produces more false positive than true positive results in a population with a low prevalence of coronary disease. Cardiac scintigraphy is a technique that may be employed as a confirmatory test in lieu of coronary arteriography to further evaluate the significance of a positive exercise electrocardiogram. Radionuclide ventriculography was employed in 98 asymptomatic individuals who were considered to be at moderate risk of heart disease after risk factor analysis and exercise electrocardiography. Seventeen (17%) patients had an abnormal study and underwent cardiac catheterization. Seven had coronary artery disease, two had cardiomyopathy, and eight were normal. Eighty-one (83%) patients had a normal study. Because the sensitivity of radionuclide ventriculography is 63-80%, it was postulated that 2 to 5 individuals with disease were missed. Thus, from a population with an 11-14% prevalence of disease, two subsets were identified. A large subset in which a prevalence of 2-6% could be estimated was separated from a much smaller one in which a prevalence of approximately 50% was demonstrated.

  6. [Cardiac tamponade after withdrawal of a peripheral access central catheter].

    PubMed

    García-Galiana, E; Sanchis-Gil, V; Martínez-Navarrete, M Á

    2015-03-01

    Central venous catheterization is a very common technique, although its complications can be multiple and sometimes fatal. A case is presented of cardiac tamponade by parenteral nutrition a few hours after moving a central venous catheter peripherally inserted a few days before. The diagnosis was made by echocardiography, and an emergency pericardiocentesis was performed, achieving complete recovery of the patient. Peripherally inserted central venous catheters are more likely to change their position secondary to the movements of the patient's arm, thus it is important to use soft catheters, make sure the tip lies above the carina to avoid perforation of the pericardial reflexion, and fix it well to the skin. Diagnosis must be made as soon as possible, given the high mortality rate of this complication, and the essential diagnostic tool is echocardiography. Elective treatment consists of early catheter withdrawal and emergency pericardiocentesis. PMID:24929256

  7. Intravascular access in pediatric cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Brunette, D D; Fischer, R

    1988-11-01

    All cases of patients aged less than 48 months who presented in cardiac arrest to the Hennepin County Medical Center's emergency department (ED) during the years 1984 to 1986 were reviewed retrospectively. The ED record, initial and subsequent chest radiographs, hospital charts, and autopsy reports were analyzed. A total of 33 cases were reviewed. The average patient age was 5 months. The average time needed to establish intravascular access was 7.9 +/- 4.2 minutes. Success rates were 77% for central venous catheterization, 81% for surgical vein cutdown, 83% for intraosseous infusion, and 17% for percutaneous peripheral catheterization. Percutaneous peripheral catheterization, when successful, and bone marrow needle placement were the fastest methods of obtaining intravascular access. There were no major immediate complications, and delayed complications were minimal. Attempts at peripheral intravenous catheter placement should be brief, with rapid progression to intraosseous infusion if peripheral attempts are not successful. PMID:3178949

  8. Taking the perfect nuclear image: quality control, acquisition, and processing techniques for cardiac SPECT, PET, and hybrid imaging.

    PubMed

    Case, James A; Bateman, Timothy M

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear Cardiology for the past 40 years has distinguished itself in its ability to non-invasively assess regional myocardial blood flow and identify obstructive coronary disease. This has led to advances in managing the diagnosis, risk stratification, and prognostic assessment of cardiac patients. These advances have all been predicated on the collection of high quality nuclear image data. National and international professional societies have established guidelines for nuclear laboratories to maintain high quality nuclear cardiology services. In addition, laboratory accreditation has further advanced the goal of the establishing high quality standards for the provision of nuclear cardiology services. This article summarizes the principles of nuclear cardiology single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and techniques for maintaining quality: from the calibration of imaging equipment to post processing techniques. It also will explore the quality considerations of newer technologies such as cadmium zinc telleride (CZT)-based SPECT systems and absolute blood flow measurement techniques using PET. PMID:23868070

  9. Successful surgical repair of a triple cardiac rupture using modified cohesive double patch technique.

    PubMed

    Dorobantu, Lucian Florin; Stiru, Ovidiu; Iliescu, Vlad Anton

    2016-02-01

    Introduction The association between both left and right ventricular free wall ruptures (FWR) and post-infarction anterior ventricular septal defect (VSD) is an exceptional situation. Case report We present the case of a patient who developed a VSD and two FWRs (of the left and right ventricle, respectively) shortly after the onset of an anterior AMI. We surgically closed this complex rupture using the cohesive double patch technique with two Teflon patches combined with an infarct exclusion technique. The left and right ventricular patches were attached cohesively to the septal wall and the infarcted area was excluded without reducing the left ventricular cavity. Conclusion Association between post-infarction ventricular septal rupture and both left and right free wall ruptures are a very rare and dangerous situation. The modified cohesive double patch technique associated the modified Cooley technique seems to be the correct surgical solution. PMID:27385145

  10. Treatment Techniques to Reduce Cardiac Irradiation for Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation Therapy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Robert E.; Kim, Leonard; Yue, Ning J.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Khan, Atif J.; Goyal, Sharad

    2014-01-01

    Thousands of women diagnosed with breast cancer each year receive breast-conserving surgery followed by adjuvant radiation therapy. For women with left-sided breast cancer, there is risk of potential cardiotoxicity from the radiation therapy. As data have become available to quantify the risk of cardiotoxicity from radiation, strategies have also developed to reduce the dose of radiation to the heart without compromising radiation dose to the breast. Several broad categories of techniques to reduce cardiac radiation doses include breath hold techniques, prone positioning, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, and accelerated partial breast irradiation, as well as many small techniques to improve traditional three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy. This review summarizes the published scientific literature on the various techniques to decrease cardiac irradiation in women treated to the left breast for breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery. PMID:25452938

  11. Cardiac emission tomography in patients using 201thallium. A new technique for perfusion scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Dymond, D S; Stone, D L; Elliott, A T; Britton, K E; Spurrell, R A

    1979-06-01

    The distribution of 201thallium (Tl) in the myocardium has been studied by the new technique of emission tomography, and compared with standard gamma camera images in 5 patients. Tomographic imaging was carried out using a dual-detector scanner operated under the single-photon technique. Initial results have been promising, with visualisation of resting perfusion defects in patients with recent infarction and those with ventricular aneurysms. Emission tomography has also been performed at exercise, and has shown tracer deficits in the distribution of significant coronary stenoses. This new approach to myocardial perfusion scintigraphy may lead to improved sensitivity for detecting apical and inferior wall abnormalities by providing depth information not available from a conventional two-dimensional image. PMID:315854

  12. Geometric and Dosimetric Approach to Determine Probability of Late Cardiac Mortality in Left Tangential Breast Irradiation: Comparison Between Wedged Beams and Field-in-Field Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Pili, Giorgio; Grimaldi, Luca; Fidanza, Christian; Florio, Elena T.; Petruzzelli, Maria F.; D'Errico, Maria P.; De Tommaso, Cristina; Tramacere, Francesco; Musaio, Francesca; Castagna, Roberta; Francavilla, Maria C.; Gianicolo, Emilio A.L.; Portaluri, Maurizio

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the probability of late cardiac mortality resulting from left breast irradiation planned with tangential fields and to compare this probability between the wedged beam and field-in-field (FIF) techniques and to investigate whether some geometric/dosimetric indicators can be determined to estimate the cardiac mortality probability before treatment begins. Methods and Materials: For 30 patients, differential dose-volume histograms were calculated for the wedged beam and FIF plans, and the corresponding cardiac mortality probabilities were determined using the relative seriality model. As a comparative index of the dose distribution uniformity, the planning target volume (PTV) percentages involved in 97-103% of prescribed dose were determined for the two techniques. Three geometric parameters were measured for each patient: the maximal length, indicates how much the heart contours were displaced toward the PTV, the angle subtended at the center of the computed tomography slice by the PTV contour, and the thorax width/thickness ratio. Results: Evaluating the differential dose-volume histograms showed that the gain in uniformity between the two techniques was about 1.5. With the FIF technique, the mean dose sparing for the heart, the left anterior descending coronary artery, and the lung was 15% (2.5 Gy vs. 2.2 Gy), 21% (11.3 Gy vs. 9.0 Gy), and 42% (8.0 Gy vs. 4.6 Gy) respectively, compared with the wedged beam technique. Also, the cardiac mortality probability decreased by 40% (from 0.9% to 0.5%). Three geometric parameters, the maximal length, angle subtended at the center of the computed tomography slice by the PTV contour, and thorax width/thickness ratio, were the determining factors (p = .06 for FIF, and p = .10 for wedged beam) for evaluating the cardiac mortality probability. Conclusion: The FIF technique seemed to yield a lower cardiac mortality probability than the conventional wedged beam technique. However, although our study

  13. Addressing Assumptions for the Use of Non-invasive Cardiac Output Measurement Techniques During Exercise in COPD.

    PubMed

    Perrault, Hélène; Richard, Ruddy; Kapchinsky, Sophia; Baril, Jacinthe; Bourbeau, Jean; Taivassalo, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    The multifactorial functional limitation of COPD increasingly demonstrates the need for an integrated circulatory assessment. In this study cardiac output (Qc) derived from non-inert (CO2-RB), inert (N2O-RB) gas rebreathing approaches and bioimpedance were compared to examine the limitations of currently available non-invasive techniques for exercise Qc determination in patients with chronic lung disease. Thirteen COPD patients (GOLD II-III) completed three constant cycling bouts at 20, 35, and 50% of peak work on two occasions to assess Qc with bioimpedance as well as using CO2-RB and N2O-RB for all exercise tests. Results showed significantly lower Qc using the N2O-RB or end-tidal CO2-derived Qc compared to the PaCO2-derived CO2-RB or the bioimpedance at rest and for all exercise intensities. End-tidal CO2-derived values are however not statistically different from those obtained using inert-gas rebreathing. This study show that in COPD patients, CO2-rebreathing Qc values obtained using PaCO2 contents which account for any gas exchange impairment or inadequate gas mixing are similar to those obtained using thoracic bioimpedance. Alternately, the lower values for N2O rebreathing derived Qc indicates the inability of this technique to account for gas exchange impairment in the computation of Qc. These findings indicate that the choice of a gas rebreathing technique to measure Qc in patients must be dictated by the ability to include in the derived computations a correction for either gas exchange inadequacies and/or a vascular shunt. PMID:26408087

  14. Turner syndrome strategies to improve care outcomes--cardiac evaluation using new imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, Laura; Lovato, Luigi; Prandstraller, Daniela; Scarano, Emanuela; Tamburrino, Federica; Montanari, Francesca; Mineo, Gian Gaspero; Perri, Annamaria; Vestrucci, Benedetta; Giardini, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is at high risk for congenital heart diseases (CHD), aortic dilatation (AoDil) and dissection. New imaging techniques such as MRI have revealed the presence of vascular anomalies (VA) undetected at echo. MR angiography has shown a high prevalence of aortic and venous anomalies. The VA often coexist and interact to increase the risk of premature death in adulthood. AoDil and VA have been found also in asymptomatic individuals with no predisposing factors, but the prevalence is still unknown. We evaluated 100 TS subjects (15-35 yrs) with no aortic CHD at echocardiography with transthoracic MRA; 42 of them showed VA and 58 did not. Aortic diameters were indexed on BSA. At the sinuses of Valsalva a higher prevalence of AoDil was found in subjects with VA than without; 57% of them showed AoDil. The presence of VA (elongation of the transverse arch, bovine arch, left superior vena cava, PAPVD etc.) increased their relative risk of AoDil by more than 2 times. Excluding BSA influence, a severe phenotype influenced positively ascending AoDil. New imaging techniques enhance our ability to provide a prognosis for their adult age and in particular before they seek to become pregnant. PMID:22946280

  15. Comparison of Estimations Versus Measured Oxygen Consumption at Rest in Patients With Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction Who Underwent Right-Sided Heart Catheterization.

    PubMed

    Chase, Paul J; Davis, Paul G; Wideman, Laurie; Starnes, Joseph W; Schulz, Mark R; Bensimhon, Daniel R

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac output during right-sided heart catheterization is an important variable for patient selection of advanced therapies (cardiac transplantation and left ventricular assist device implantation). The Fick method to determine cardiac output is commonly used and typically uses estimated oxygen consumption (VO2) from 1 of 3 published empirical formulas. However, these estimation equations have not been validated in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). The objectives of the present study were to determine the accuracy of 3 equations for estimating VO2 compared with direct measurement of VO2 and determine the extent clinically significant error occurred in calculating cardiac output of patients with HFrEF. Breath-by-breath measurements of VO2 from 44 patients who underwent cardiac catheterization (66% men; age, 65 ± 11 years, left ventricular ejection fraction, 22 ± 6%) were compared with the derived estimations of LaFarge and Miettinen, Dehmer et al, and Bergstra et al. Single-sample t tests found only the mean difference between the estimation of LaFarge and Miettinen and the measured VO2 to be nonsignificant (-10.3 ml/min ± 6.2 SE, p = 0.053). Bland-Altman plots demonstrated unacceptably large limits of agreement for all equations. The rate of ≥25% error in the equations by LaFarge and Miettinen, Dehmer et al, and Bergstra et al occurred in 11%, 23%, and 45% of patients, respectively. Misclassification of cardiac index derived from each equation for 2 clinically important classifications: cardiogenic shock-21%, 23%, and 32% and hypoperfusion-16%, 16%, and 25%; respectively. In conclusion, these findings do not support the use of these empiric formulas to estimate the VO2 at rest in patients with HFrEF who underwent right-sided heart catheterization. PMID:26443561

  16. A projection-driven pre-correction technique for iterative reconstruction of helical cone-beam cardiac CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Synho; Liang, Zhuangli; Karl, William Clem; Brady, Thomas; Pien, Homer

    2008-03-01

    Modern CT systems have advanced at a dramatic rate. Algebraic iterative reconstruction techniques have shown promising and desirable image characteristics, but are seldom used due to their high computational cost for complete reconstruction of large volumetric datasets. In many cases, however, interest in high resolution reconstructions is restricted to smaller regions of interest within the complete volume. In this paper we present an implementation of a simple and practical method to produce iterative reconstructions of reduced-sized ROI from 3D helical tomographic data. We use the observation that the conventional filtered back-projection reconstruction is generally of high quality throughout the entire volume to predict the contributions to ROI-related projections arising from volumes outside the ROI. These predictions are then used to pre-correct the data to produce a tomographic inversion problem of substantially reduced size and memory demands. Our work expands on those of other researchers who have observed similar potential computational gains by exploiting FBP results. We demonstrate our approach using cardiac CT cone-beam imaging, illustrating our results with both ex vivo and in vivo multi-cycle EKG-gated examples.

  17. Measurement of Mean Cardiac Dose for Various Breast Irradiation Techniques and Corresponding Risk of Major Cardiovascular Event

    PubMed Central

    Merino Lara, Tomas Rodrigo; Fleury, Emmanuelle; Mashouf, Shahram; Helou, Joelle; McCann, Claire; Ruschin, Mark; Kim, Anthony; Makhani, Nadiya; Ravi, Ananth; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    After breast conserving surgery, early stage breast cancer patients are currently treated with a wide range of radiation techniques including whole breast irradiation (WBI), accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, or 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). This study compares the mean heart’s doses for a left breast irradiated with different breast techniques. An anthropomorphic Rando phantom was modified with gelatin-based breast of different sizes and tumors located medially or laterally. The breasts were treated with WBI, 3D-CRT, or HDR APBI. The heart’s mean doses were measured with Gafchromic films and controlled with optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters. Following the model reported by Darby (1), major cardiac were estimated assuming a linear risk increase with the mean dose to the heart of 7.4% per gray. WBI lead to the highest mean heart dose (2.99 Gy) compared to 3D-CRT APBI (0.51 Gy), multicatheter (1.58 Gy), and balloon HDR (2.17 Gy) for a medially located tumor. This translated into long-term coronary event increases of 22, 3.8, 11.7, and 16% respectively. The sensitivity analysis showed that the tumor location had almost no effect on the mean heart dose for 3D-CRT APBI and a minimal impact for HDR APBI. In case of WBI large breast size and set-up errors lead to sharp increases of the mean heart dose. Its value reached 10.79 Gy for women with large breast and a set-up error of 1.5 cm. Such a high value could increase the risk of having long-term coronary events by 80%. Comparison among different irradiation techniques demonstrates that 3D-CRT APBI appears to be the safest one with less probability of having cardiovascular events in the future. A sensitivity analysis showed that WBI is the most challenging technique for patients with large breasts or when significant set-up errors are anticipated. In those cases, additional heart shielding techniques are required. PMID:25374841

  18. A national clinical quality program for Veterans Affairs catheterization laboratories (from the Veterans Affairs clinical assessment, reporting, and tracking program).

    PubMed

    Maddox, Thomas M; Plomondon, Mary E; Petrich, Megan; Tsai, Thomas T; Gethoffer, Hans; Noonan, Gregory; Gillespie, Brian; Box, Tamara; Fihn, Stephen D; Jesse, Robert L; Rumsfeld, John S

    2014-12-01

    A "learning health care system", as outlined in a recent Institute of Medicine report, harnesses real-time clinical data to continuously measure and improve clinical care. However, most current efforts to understand and improve the quality of care rely on retrospective chart abstractions complied long after the provision of clinical care. To align more closely with the goals of a learning health care system, we present the novel design and initial results of the Veterans Affairs (VA) Clinical Assessment, Reporting, and Tracking (CART) program-a national clinical quality program for VA cardiac catheterization laboratories that harnesses real-time clinical data to support clinical care and quality-monitoring efforts. Integrated within the VA electronic health record, the CART program uses a specialized software platform to collect real-time patient and procedural data for all VA patients undergoing coronary procedures in VA catheterization laboratories. The program began in 2005 and currently contains data on 434,967 catheterization laboratory procedures, including 272,097 coronary angiograms and 86,481 percutaneous coronary interventions, performed by 801 clinicians on 246,967 patients. We present the initial data from the CART program and describe 3 quality-monitoring programs that use its unique characteristics-procedural and complications feedback to individual labs, coronary device surveillance, and major adverse event peer review. The VA CART program is a novel approach to electronic health record design that supports clinical care, quality, and safety in VA catheterization laboratories. Its approach holds promise in achieving the goals of a learning health care system. PMID:25439452

  19. Practical Considerations In Digital Cardiac Angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeley, J. P.; Vannier, M. W.; Gutierrez, F. R.; Von Behren, P. L.

    1983-05-01

    Digital fluoroscopic image acquisition, processing and storage for ventriculography, coronary artery and bypass graft imaging involves many practical considerations. Issues of sufficiency in terms of spatial, temporal, gray scale resolution and intravascular contrast sensitivity arise when 35mm cineradiographic film acquisition is replaced by digital fluoroscopy as the primary imaging modality. We have qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated and compared digital fluoroscopic and cineradiographic systems for cardiovascular image acquisition, storage and display in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. A digital fluoroscopic system (Siemens Digitron I) was evaluated and compared favorably to 35mm cineradiography in temporal resolution. Spatial resolution of the digital system was poorer, but contrast sensitivity (with digital subtraction) far exceeded the capabilities of cineradiography. As further modifications are made to adapt digital systems to the cardiac catheterization laboratory, complete replacement of 35mm cineradiography by digital vascular imaging systems is likely in the near future.

  20. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program ... be designed to meet your needs. The Cardiac Rehabilitation Team Cardiac rehab involves a long-term commitment ...

  1. [First annual report of practitioners of interventional cardiology in private practice in Germany. Results of procedures of left heart catheterization and coronary interventions in the year 1996].

    PubMed

    Silber, S; Albrecht, A; Göhring, S; Kaltenbach, M; Kneissl, D; Kokott, N; Levenson, B; Mathey, D; Pöhler, E; Reifart, N; Sauer, G; Schofer, J; Schwarzbach, F

    1998-02-01

    The German Society for Cardiac Angiography and Interventions in Private Practice has started a registry of cardiac procedures since 1996 in order to establish a standard for performance. Although quality management for the cath lab makes sense and is also legally required, there is no generally recommended infrastructure for quality assurance existing in Germany at this time. Therefore, the German Society of Cardiologists in Private Practice (BNK) initiated a project in 1994 to develop a computer program for paperless documentation of diagnostic cardiac catheterizations and coronary interventions (PTCA) using a minimal data set. In 1996, 8 private associated groups participated in this project. The (anonymous) analysis of 10,316 diagnostic cardiac catheterizations and 2597 PTCA yielded the following results: In 95% of the patients, diagnostic cardiac catheterization was performed using the femoral and in 5% the brachial/radial approach. The mean volume of administered contrast medium was 164 +/- 138 ml/patient. The mean LV-EF was greater than 50% in 58.4% of the patients and between 30% and 50% in 10.1%. Coronary artery disease was diagnosed in 69.6% of the patients and valvular/congenital heart disease in 8.5%. In 18.4% of the patients undergoing diagnostic cardiac catheterizations no significant heart disease was identified. Mortality in the cath lab as well as the rate of cerebral insults was 0.05%. In 22.9% and 19% of the patients PTCA and cardiac surgery respectively was recommended. In patients undergoing PTCA, stable angina was present in 74.4% and unstable angina in 13.1%. Of the total number of PTCA procedures, 5.8% were performed in the setting of acute myocardial infarction. The PTCA lesion success rate was 96%, the mean diameter stenosis was 81% pre and 6% post-intervention. The mortality rate at 1 month post-PTCA was 0.4%, and myocardial infarction 1.0%. An acute occlusion occurred in 1.3% of the PTCA patients; 0.6% had to be transferred for emergency

  2. Noninvasive aortic bloodflow by Pulsed Doppler Echocardiography (PDE) compared to cardiac output by the direct Fick procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Left ventricular stroke volume was estimated from the systolic velocity integral in the ascending aorta by pulsed Doppler Echocardiography (PDE) and the cross sectional area of the aorta estimated by M mode echocardiography on 15 patients with coronary disease undergoing right catheterization for diagnostic purposes. Cardiac output was calculated from stroke volume and heart volume using the PDE method as well as the Fick procedure for comparison. The mean value for the cardiac output via the PDE method (4.42 L/min) was only 6% lower than for the cardiac output obtained from the Fick procedure (4.69 L/min) and the correlation between the two methods was excellent (r=0.967, p less than .01). The good agreement between the two methods demonstrates that the PDE technique offers a reliable noninvasive alternative for estimating cardiac output, requiring no active cooperation by the subject. It was concluded that the Doppler method is superior to the Fick method in that it provides beat by beat information on cardiac performance.

  3. Teaching Self-Catheterization Skills to a Child with Myelomeningocele in a Preschool Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Jo; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Simulation training and a prompt hierarchy were found to facilitate acquisition of clean intermittent self-catheterization skills by a four-year-old male with myelomeningocele. The child was first taught to perform catheterization on a doll, then on himself. Skills were clustered into three tasks of diapering, cleansing, and catheterization.…

  4. Vasoreactivity of the radial artery after transradial catheterization.

    PubMed

    Sanmartin, Marcelo; Goicolea, Javier; Ocaranza, Raymundo; Cuevas, Diogenes; Calvo, Francisco

    2004-11-01

    The vasomotor response was used to assess the degree of radial artery injury after transradial catheterization. Vasoreactivity was studied by ultrasound before catheterization, 24 hours after, at 1 week and at 1 month in 18 patients. Mean radial artery diameter increased from 2.56+/-0.45 mm before catheterization to 2.86+/-0.48 mm at 24 hours (p=0.001) and returned to baseline values at 1-month (2.60+/-0.27 mm; p=0.95). Hyperemia-induced vasodilation did not change significantly (2.7+/-4.7% at baseline; 3.4+/-3.7% at 24 hours, 3.5+/-3.9% at 1 week and 4.8+/-4.7% at 1 month; p=0.59). Nitroglycerin-induced vasodilation was significantly attenuated at 24 hours (from 14.1+/-7.9% at baseline to 6.5+/-8.4% at 24 hours; p=0.01), but improved after 1 week (9.8+/-8.5%; p=0.1, compared to baseline) and after 1 month (13.0+/-8.9%; p=0.51, compared to baseline). Thus, soon after transradial catheterization vasoreactivity is impaired, but generally recovers as early as 1 month after the procedure. PMID:15550733

  5. Teaching Intermittent Self-Catheterization Skills to Mentally Retarded Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarnowski, Kenneth J.; Drabman, Ronald S.

    1987-01-01

    In an A-B design with replication, the efficacy of a behavioral training program for teaching two mildly retarded six-year-old children intermittent self-catheterization skills was demonstrated. Component skills were task-analyzed and trained via a graduated prompting procedure. (Author/DB)

  6. Dose-modeling study to compare external beam techniques from protocol NSABP B-39/RTOG 0413 for patients with highly unfavorable cardiac anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Hiatt, Jessica R.; Evans, Suzanne B.; Price, Lori Lyn; Cardarelli, Gene A.; Di Petrillo, Thomas A.; Wazer, David E. . E-mail: dwazer@tufts-nemc.org

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to select patients with heart anatomy that is specifically unfavorable for tangential irradiation in whole-breast radiotherapy (WBRT), to be used as an experimental cohort to compare cardiac dosimetric and radiobiological parameters of three-dimensional conformal external beam accelerated partial breast irradiation (3D-CRT APBI) to WBRT with techniques as defined by the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0413 clinical trial. Methods and Materials: A dosimetric modeling study that compared WBRT and 3D-CRT APBI was performed on CT planning data from 8 patients with left-sided breast cancer. Highly unfavorable cardiac anatomy was defined by the measured contact of the myocardium with the anterior chest wall in the axial and para-sagittal planes. Treatment plans of WBRT and 3D-CRT APBI were generated for each patient in accordance with NSABP B-39/RTOG 0413 protocol. Dose-volume relationships of the heart, including the V{sub 5}min (minimum dose delivered to 5% of the cardiac volume), biological effective dose (BED) of the V{sub 5}min, and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were analyzed and compared. Results: Despite expected anatomic variation, significantly large differences were found favoring 3D-CRT APBI in cumulative dose-volume histograms (p < 0.01), dose to the entire heart (mean difference 3.85 Gy, p < 0.01), NTCP (median difference, 1.00 Gy; p < 0.01), V{sub 5}min (mean difference, 24.53 Gy; p < 0.01), and proportional reduction in radiobiological effect on the V{sub 5}min (85%, p < 0.01). Conclusions: Use of 3D-CRT APBI can demonstrate improved sparing of the heart in select patients with highly unfavorable cardiac anatomy for WBRT, and may result in reduced risk of cardiac morbidity and mortality.

  7. Transcatheter intervention for the treatment of congenital cardiac defects.

    PubMed Central

    Grifka, R G

    1997-01-01

    Cardiac catheterization has an illustrious history, originating in 1929 when Werner Forsmann, a surgical resident, performed a heart catheterization on himself. Transcatheter interventional procedures have been performed since the 1960s. The 1st intracardiac procedure to become standard therapy was a balloon atrial septostomy. Skeptics attacked this innovative procedure. However, the balloon septostomy procedure soon became the standard emergency procedure for certain congenital heart defects, and was the impetus for other investigators in the field of transcatheter intervention. We will discuss transcatheter treatment for congenital vascular stenoses and vascular occlusion. Images PMID:9456482

  8. In situ cephalic vein bypasses from axillary to the brachial artery after catheterization injuries.

    PubMed

    Hudorovic, Narcis; Lovricevic, Ivo; Ahel, Zaky

    2010-07-01

    The need to bypass to the brachial artery is rare. Over a five-year period, 16 patients had suffered iatrogenic post-catheterization injuries of the upper extremity. We have performed 16 bypasses, in 16 patients, mean age was 65 years (range 47-75), to the brachial artery originating from an artery proximal to the shoulder joint. In all cases, the axillary artery was the donor artery. All bypasses were created by using the cephalic vein with the in situ technique and distal anastomoses were made to a distance-free section of brachial artery. No operative mortality, neurological complications or major upper-extremity amputation was associated with the procedure. Life-long-conduit analysis showed 75% patency in the five-year period. After iatrogenic post-catheterization trauma of arterial system of upper extremity, bypasses from axillary to brachial artery with the cephalic vein with the in situ technique is a safe operation with satisfactory long-term patency. PMID:20395248

  9. Septic and technical complications of central venous catheterization. A prospective study of 200 consecutive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Sitzmann, J V; Townsend, T R; Siler, M C; Bartlett, J G

    1985-01-01

    The results of central venous catheterization for total parenteral nutrition were prospectively evaluated in 200 consecutive patients. All catheters were fabricated of polyurethane tubing inserted by the Seldinger technique. Two hundred sixty-three lines were inserted in 200 patients for a total of 4103 days. Major complications occurred in 2.3% patients. Twenty-four per cent of catheters were associated with suspected sepsis; of these, 52% were removed directly and 48% were changed over a guidewire. The total catheter sepsis rate was 5.7%. The incidence of sepsis correlated with the number of attempts to insert the line and with positive skin cultures. These data indicate that: use of the Seldinger technique to insert nonthrombogenic flexible catheters results in lower technical morbidity; the incidence of established infection is much lower than the incidence of suspected sepsis; guidewire change may be performed without risk to the patient or interruption of therapy; sepsis rates can be decreased by reducing the number of attempts to catheterize the subclavian vein; and sepsis rates correlate with positive skin cultures at the insertion site. PMID:3935062

  10. [How to do: central vein catheterization].

    PubMed

    Allgäuer, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    The cannulation of a central vein is a standard acces to the vascular system of critically ill patients. It can be used for administration of medication and parenteral nutrition, haemodynamic monitoring as well as hemodialsis via Shaldon catheter.The technique of implantation of a central venous catheter is described step by step in this article. Moreover, advantages and disadvantages of the different techniques and puncture sites as well as indications and contraindications are critically discussed regarding the most recent literature. PMID:26939103

  11. Thallium cardiac stressing by esophageal pacing

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.L.; Vacek, J.L.; Preston, D.F.; Robinson, R.G.; Feldkamp, M.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Forty-three patients were examined with the transesophageal pacing method of cardiac stressing and thallium imaging. Transesophageal cardiac pacing, using a pill electrode or a permanent pacemaker lead, is a safe alternative for patients who are physically unable to exercise. Prior studies suggest that transvenous right atrial pacing with thallium injection is equivalent to physical exercise thallium studies in the detection of coronary artery disease. The esophageal pacing bipolar electrode similarly increases heart rate without the necessity of transvenous pacing or fluoroscopy and without the adverse side effects often seen when using pharmacologic stressing agents (i.e., dipyridamole). The results compare well with cardiac catheterization, echocardiographic, and electrocardiographic results. Cardiac paced stress testing requires no sedation, is performed on an out-patient basis, and causes little if any discomfort for the patient.

  12. An integrated platform for image-guided cardiac resynchronization therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ying Liang; Shetty, Anoop K.; Duckett, Simon; Etyngier, Patrick; Gijsbers, Geert; Bullens, Roland; Schaeffter, Tobias; Razavi, Reza; Rinaldi, Christopher A.; Rhode, Kawal S.

    2012-05-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective procedure for patients with heart failure but 30% of patients do not respond. This may be due to sub-optimal placement of the left ventricular (LV) lead. It is hypothesized that the use of cardiac anatomy, myocardial scar distribution and dyssynchrony information, derived from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), may improve outcome by guiding the physician for optimal LV lead positioning. Whole heart MR data can be processed to yield detailed anatomical models including the coronary veins. Cine MR data can be used to measure the motion of the LV to determine which regions are late-activating. Finally, delayed Gadolinium enhancement imaging can be used to detect regions of scarring. This paper presents a complete platform for the guidance of CRT using pre-procedural MR data combined with live x-ray fluoroscopy. The platform was used for 21 patients undergoing CRT in a standard catheterization laboratory. The patients underwent cardiac MRI prior to their procedure. For each patient, a MRI-derived cardiac model, showing the LV lead targets, was registered to x-ray fluoroscopy using multiple views of a catheter looped in the right atrium. Registration was maintained throughout the procedure by a combination of C-arm/x-ray table tracking and respiratory motion compensation. Validation of the registration between the three-dimensional (3D) roadmap and the 2D x-ray images was performed using balloon occlusion coronary venograms. A 2D registration error of 1.2 ± 0.7 mm was achieved. In addition, a novel navigation technique was developed, called Cardiac Unfold, where an entire cardiac chamber is unfolded from 3D to 2D along with all relevant anatomical and functional information and coupled to real-time device detection. This allowed more intuitive navigation as the entire 3D scene was displayed simultaneously on a 2D plot. The accuracy of the unfold navigation was assessed off-line using 13 patient data sets

  13. Cardiac factors in orthostatic hypotension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löllgen, H.; Dirschedl, P.; Koppenhagen, K.; Klein, K. E.

    Cardiac function is determined by preload, afterload, heart rate and contractility. During orthostatic stress, the footward blood shift is compensated for by an increase of afterload. LBNP is widely used to analyze effects of volume displacement during orthostatic stress. Comparisons of invasive ( right heart catheterization) and non-invasive approach (echocardiography) yielded similar changes. Preload and afterload change with graded LBNP, heart rate increases, and stroke volume and cardiac output decrease. Thus, the working point on the left ventricular function curve is shifted to the left and downward, similar to hypovolemia. However, position on the Frank-Starling curve, the unchanged ejection fraction, and the constant Vcf indicate a normal contractile state during LBNP. A decrease of arterial oxygen partial pressure during LBNP shwos impaired ventilation/perfusion ratio. Finally, LBNP induced cardiac and hemodynamic changes can be effectively countermeasured by dihydroergotamine, a potent venoconstrictor. Comparison of floating catheter data with that of echocardiography resulted in close correlation for cardiac output and stroke volume. In addition, cardiac dimensions changed in a similar way during LBNP. From our findings, echocardiography as a non-invasive procedure can reliably used in LBNP and orthostatic stress tests. Some informations can be obtained on borderline values indicating collaps or orthostatic syncope. Early fainters can be differentiated from late fainters by stroke volume changes.

  14. Ensuring patient adherence to clean intermittent self-catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Jai H; Haslam, Collette; Panicker, Jalesh N

    2014-01-01

    Patient performance of clean intermittent self-catheterization is a crucial component of the management of incomplete bladder emptying, which can arise from a variety of conditions. This allows patients to have more control over their bladder emptying, and avoids the inconveniences that come with an indwelling urethral catheter. There are, however, barriers that patients face when performing this task which may ultimately limit adherence. In this article, these barriers are discussed in more detail with potential solutions to counter them. PMID:24611001

  15. [Indications for central veinous catheterism in psychiatric patients (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    König, P; Strickner, M

    1978-03-01

    Based on cases of a Psychiatric Intensive Care Unit specific indications and applications of catheterism of central-veins in these special instances are presented, the psychiatric indications and contraindications for such measures are submitted in addition to those known from other medical fields. The mode of insertion, duration, infusionregimen and rates of complications are reviewed in 102 cases. Two of the common veinous-catheter systems are compared as for practicability. PMID:417008

  16. Dissection of the posterior wall by guide-wire during internal jugular vein catheterization.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Eriko; Shimamoto, Yoko; Tokumine, Joho

    2015-04-01

    We report a case of posterior wall hematoma formation in the internal jugular vein after the puncture of central vein. An 82-year-old woman was scheduled for laparotomy for an abdominal incisional hernia. After induction of general anesthesia, we performed central venous catheterization via the right internal jugular vein under ultrasound guidance in the short-axis view and out-of plane technique. The ultrasound view after insertion of a guide-wire revealed a hematoma-like space on the posterior wall of the vein. We removed and reinserted the guide-wire. This time, insertion of the wire and catheter was uneventful. Seven days after the surgery, no hematoma-like space was found in the vein. The malposition of the guide-wire was detected before dilation, which enabled us to avoid complications in this case. We should note that the confirmation of guide-wire placement in the vein is important during ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization. PMID:25138819

  17. Peak Cardiac Power Measured Non-Invasively with a Bioreactance Technique is a Predictor of Adverse Outcomes in Patients with Advanced Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Hannah; Helmke, Stephen; Williams, Paula; Teruya, Sergio; Jones, Margaret; Burkhoff, Daniel; Mancini, Donna; Maurer, Mathew S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Peak oxygen consumption (VO2) during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) is a powerful predictor of survival, providing an indirect assessment of cardiac output (CO). Hypothesis Non-invasive indices of CO derived from bioreactance methodology would add significantly to peak VO2 as a means of risk stratifying patients with heart failure. Methods 127 patients (53±14 years of age, 66% male) with heart failure and an average EF = 31±15 underwent a symptom-limited CPET using a bicycle ergometer while measuring CO noninvasively by a bioreactance technique. Peak cardiac power was derived from the product of the peak mean arterial blood pressure and CO divided by 451. Results Follow-up averaged 404±179 days (median, 366 days) to assess end points including death (n=3), heart transplant (n=10), or left ventricular assisted device (LVAD) implantation (n=2). Peak VO2 and peak power had similar area under the curves (0.77 and 0.76), which increased to 0.83 when combined. Kaplan-Meier cumulative survival curves demonstrated different outcomes in the subgroup with a VO2 <14 ml*kg-1*min-1 when stratified by a cardiac power above or below 1.5 Watts (92.2% vs. 82.1% at 1 year and 81.6% vs. 58.3% at last follow-up, p=0.02 by log-rank test). Conclusions Among patients with heart failure, peak cardiac power measured with bioreactance methodology and peak VO2 had similar associations with adverse outcomes and peak power added independent prognostic information to peak VO2 in subjects with advanced disease (e.g. VO2 < 14 ml*kg-1*min-1). PMID:21091609

  18. Cardiac optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetics is an emerging technology for optical interrogation and control of biological function with high specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. Mammalian cells and tissues can be sensitized to respond to light by a relatively simple and well-tolerated genetic modification using microbial opsins (light-gated ion channels and pumps). These can achieve fast and specific excitatory or inhibitory response, offering distinct advantages over traditional pharmacological or electrical means of perturbation. Since the first demonstrations of utility in mammalian cells (neurons) in 2005, optogenetics has spurred immense research activity and has inspired numerous applications for dissection of neural circuitry and understanding of brain function in health and disease, applications ranging from in vitro to work in behaving animals. Only recently (since 2010), the field has extended to cardiac applications with less than a dozen publications to date. In consideration of the early phase of work on cardiac optogenetics and the impact of the technique in understanding another excitable tissue, the brain, this review is largely a perspective of possibilities in the heart. It covers the basic principles of operation of light-sensitive ion channels and pumps, the available tools and ongoing efforts in optimizing them, overview of neuroscience use, as well as cardiac-specific questions of implementation and ideas for best use of this emerging technology in the heart. PMID:23457014

  19. Evaluation of Cardiac Mitochondrial Function by a Nuclear Imaging Technique using Technetium-99m-MIBI Uptake Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Shinro; Nakajima, Kenichi; Kinuya, Seigo

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria play an important role in energy production for the cell. The proper function of a myocardial cell largely depends on the functional capacity of the mitochondria. Therefore it is necessary to establish a novel and reliable method for a non-invasive assessment of mitochondrial function and metabolism in humans. Although originally designed for evaluating myocardial perfusion, 99mTc-MIBI can be also used to evaluate cardiac mitochondrial function. In a clinical study on ischemic heart disease, reverse redistribution of 99mTc-MIBI was evident after direct percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. The presence of increased washout of 99mTc-MIBI was associated with the infarct-related artery and preserved left ventricular function. In non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, an increased washout rate of 99mTc-MIBI, which correlated inversely with left ventricular ejection fraction, was observed in patients with congestive heart failure. Increased 99mTc-MIBI washout was also observed in mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) and in doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy. Noninvasive assessment of cardiac mitochondrial function could be greatly beneficial in monitoring possible cardiotoxic drug use and in the evaluation of cardiac damage in clinical medicine.

  20. Idiopathic unilateral hypoplasia of internal jugular vein and coagulopathy: Unusual case for central venous catheterization.

    PubMed

    Nama, Rajnish K; Bhosale, Guruprasad P; Shah, Veena R

    2015-01-01

    Central venous catheterization (CVC) is routinely done procedure in ICU or during surgery for various indications. Right Internal jugular vein (IJV) is preferred vessel among different routes for CVC. Anatomic variations of neck vessels are not uncommon and may increase the complication rate especially in patients with altered coagulation profile. Anatomic landmark technique is commonly used for CVC but not without possibility of complications. Ultrasound (US) guided IJV Cannulation provides high success rate, less access time and lesser complications. Superiority of US over anatomic landmark technique has been established, but use of US in clinical practice is still limited. We report a case of idiopathic unilateral hypoplastic IJV in a patient with altered coagulation profile who required CVC, we also tried to find out the barriers for limited use of US. PMID:26712993

  1. Catheterization-Doppler discrepancies in nonsimultaneous evaluations of aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Aghassi, Payam; Aurigemma, Gerard P; Folland, Edward D; Tighe, Dennis A

    2005-05-01

    Prior validation studies have established that simultaneously measured catheter (cath) and Doppler mean pressure gradients (MPG) correlate closely in evaluation of aortic stenosis (AS). In clinical practice, however, cath and Doppler are rarely performed simultaneously; which may lead to discrepant results. Accordingly, our aim was to ascertain agreement between these methods and investigate factors associated with discrepant results. We reviewed findings in 100 consecutive evaluations for AS performed in 97 patients (mean age 72 +/- 10 yr) in which cath and Doppler were performed within 6 weeks. We recorded MPG, aortic valve area (AVA), cardiac output, and ejection fraction (EF) by both methods. Aortic root diameter, left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (LVIDd) and posterior wall thickness (PWT) were measured by echocardiography and gender, heart rate, and heart rhythm were also recorded. An MPG discrepancy was defined as an intrapatient difference > 10 mmHg. Mean pressure gradients by cath and Doppler were 36 +/- 22 mmHg and 37 +/- 20 mmHg, respectively (P = 0.73). Linear regression showed good correlation (r = 0.82) between the techniques. An MPG discrepancy was found in 36 (36%) of 100 evaluations; in 19 (53%) of 36 evaluations MPG by Doppler was higher than cath, and in 17 (47%) of 36, it was lower. In 33 evaluations, EF differed by >10% between techniques. Linear regression analyses revealed that EF difference between studies was a significant predictor of MPG discrepancy (P = 0.004). Women had significantly higher MPG than men by both cath and Doppler (43 +/- 25 mmHg versus 29 +/- 15 mmHg [P = 0.001]; 42 +/- 23 mmHg versus 32 +/- 15 mmHg [P = 0.014], respectively). Women exhibited discrepant results in 23 (47%) of 49 evaluations versus 13 (25%) of 51 evaluations in men (P = 0.037). After adjustment for women's higher MPG, there was no statistically significant difference in MPG discrepancy between genders (P = 0.22). No significant interactions between

  2. Cardiac imaging in adults

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority.

  3. History of Nocturia May Guide Urinary Catheterization for Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Rana, Sumit; Woolson, Steven T; Giori, Nicholas J

    2016-07-01

    Urinary tract infection is a common complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and can be related to urethral catheterization. This study attempted to determine whether nocturia could be used as an indicator of risk for postoperative urinary retention to limit the need for prophylactic catheterization in men undergoing TKA. A retrospective study was performed in a consecutive series of men undergoing TKA at a single Veterans Affairs medical center. Patients reporting 0 episodes or 1 episode of nocturia per night were not catheterized prophylactically, and patients reporting 2 or more episodes of nocturia each night were catheterized preoperatively. Of 100 consecutive patients, 51 reported no more than 1 episode of nocturia and did not undergo preoperative catheterization. Of these patients, 10 required 1 postoperative straight catheterization for urinary retention. In the 49 patients who were catheterized prophylactically, all catheters were removed on postoperative day 1. Only 1 of these patients required reinsertion of a catheter. No patient in either group was discharged with a catheter or had a urinary tract infection. Previously, the authors' standard protocol was to use a prophylactic urinary catheter for all men after TKA. In this 100-patient cohort, with this new protocol, 41 patients were not catheterized at all and 10 patients had only 1 straight catheterization. In this study, the frequency of nocturia in men undergoing TKA was an effective screening tool that safely reduced the need for an indwelling catheter in 51% of patients. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e749-e752.]. PMID:27111076

  4. Major depressive disorder predicts cardiac events in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Carney, R M; Rich, M W; Freedland, K E; Saini, J; teVelde, A; Simeone, C; Clark, K

    1988-01-01

    Fifty-two patients undergoing cardiac catheterization and subsequently found to have significant coronary artery disease (CAD) were given structured psychiatric interviews before catheterization. Nine of these patients met criteria for major depressive disorder. All 52 patients were contacted 12 months after catheterization, and the occurrence of myocardial infarction, angioplasty, coronary bypass surgery and death was determined. Results of the study show that major depressive disorder was the best predictor of these major cardiac events during the 12 months following catheterization. The predictive effect was independent of the severity of CAD, left ventricular ejection fraction, and the presence of smoking. Furthermore, with the exception of smoking, there were no statistically significant differences between those patients with major depressive disorder and the remaining patients on any variable studied. The possible mechanisms relating major depressive disorder to subsequent cardiac events are discussed. It is concluded that major depressive disorder is an important independent risk factor for the occurrence of major cardiac events in patients with CAD. PMID:2976950

  5. Early right ventricular fibrosis and reduction in biventricular cardiac reserve in the dystrophin-deficient mdx heart.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Tatyana A; Townsend, DeWayne

    2015-02-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive disease of striated muscle deterioration. Respiratory and cardiac muscle dysfunction are particularly clinically relevant because they result in the leading causes of death in DMD patients. Despite the clinical and physiological significance of these systems, little has been done to understand the cardiorespiratory interaction in DMD. We show here that prior to the onset of global cardiac dysfunction, dystrophin-deficient mdx mice have increased cardiac fibrosis with the right ventricle being particularly affected. Using a novel biventricular cardiac catheterization technique coupled with cardiac stress testing, we demonstrate that both the right and left ventricles have significant reductions in both systolic and diastolic function in response to dobutamine. Unstimulated cardiac function is relatively normal except for a significant reduction in the ventricular pressure transient duration compared with controls. These biventricular analyses also reveal the absence of a dobutamine-induced increase in isovolumic relaxation in the right ventricle of control hearts. Simultaneous assessment of biventricular pressure demonstrates a dobutamine-dependent enhancement of coupling between the ventricles in control mice, which is absent in mdx mice. Furthermore, studies probing the passive-extension properties of the left ventricle demonstrate that the mdx heart is significantly more compliant compared with age-matched C57BL/10 hearts, which have an age-dependent stiffening that is completely absent from dystrophic hearts. These new results indicate that right ventricular fibrosis is an early indicator of the development of dystrophic cardiomyopathy, suggesting a mechanism by which respiratory insufficiency may accelerate the development of heart failure in DMD. PMID:25485898

  6. [Cardiac Rehabilitation 2015].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Andreas

    2015-11-25

    The goals of cardiac rehabilitation are (re-)conditioning and secondary prevention in patients with heart disease or an elevated cardiovascular risk profile. Rehabilitation is based on motivation through education, on adapted physical activity, instruction of relaxation techniques, psychological support and optimized medication. It is performed preferably in groups either in outpatient or inpatient settings. The Swiss working group on cardiac rehabilitation provides a network of institutions with regular quality auditing. Positive effects of rehabilitation programs on mortality and morbidity have been established by numerous studies. Although a majority of patients after cardiac surgery are being referred to rehabilitation, these services are notoriously underused after catheter procedures. PMID:26602848

  7. Urinary catheterization may not adversely impact quality of life in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    James, Rebecca; Frasure, Heidi E; Mahajan, Sangeeta T

    2014-01-01

    Background. Multiple sclerosis (MS) healthcare providers (HCP) have undergone considerable educational efforts regarding the importance of evaluating and treating pelvic floor disorders, specifically, urinary dysfunction. However, limited data are available to determine the impact of catheterization on patient quality of life (QoL). Objectives. To describe the use of urinary catheterization among MS patients and determine the differences between those who report positive versus negative impact of this treatment on QoL. Methods. Patients were queried as part of the 2010 North American Research Committee On Multiple Sclerosis survey; topics included 1) urinary/bladder, bowel, or sexual problems; 2) current urine leakage; 3) current catheter use; 4) catheterizing and QoL. Results. Respondents with current urine leakage were 5143 (54.7%), of which 1201 reported current catheter use (12.8%). The types of catheters (intermittent self-catheterization and Foley catheter (indwelling and suprapubic)) did not differ significantly. Of the current catheter users, 304 (25.35%) respondents reported catheterization negatively impacting QoL, 629 (52.4%) reported a positive impact on QoL, and 223 (18.6%) reported neutral QoL. Conclusions. A large proportion of catheterized MS patients report negative or positive changes in QoL associated with urinary catheterization. Urinary catheterization does not appear to have a universally negative impact on patient QoL. PMID:25006498

  8. The effect of anesthetization and urinary bladder catheterization on renal function of rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunn, J.B.; Willford, W.A.

    1970-01-01

    1. Rainbow trout were anesthetized with MS-222 (Sandoz) or methylpentynol and catheterized. Urine was collected at selected intervals up to 48 hr. 2. Effects of MS-222 anesthesia on urine flow and composition were isolated from the stress of catheterization by re-anesthetizing the fish 18 to 20 hr post catheterization. 3. Urine output patterns were similar following MS-222 or methylpentynol anesthesia and catheterization. Highest urine flows were measured 4 to 8 hr post treatment. The highest urine output after re-anesthetization with MS-222 was observed 2 to 4 hr post-anesthesia. 4. Highest concentrations of Na2+, K+, Ca2+, Cl- and inorganic PO4 in the urine were measured in the first 2 hr after anesthesia and catheterization. 5. Flow rates and chemical composition of urine indicate that "normal" renal function is re-established 12 to 24 hr post-treatment.

  9. Finding the Gatekeeper to the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory: Coronary CT Angiography or Stress Testing?

    PubMed

    Marwick, Thomas H; Cho, Iksung; Ó Hartaigh, Bríain; Min, James K

    2015-06-30

    Functional capacity is a robust predictor of clinical outcomes, and stress testing is used in current practice paradigms to guide referral to invasive coronary angiography. However, invasive coronary angiography is driven by ongoing symptoms, as well as risk of adverse outcomes. The limitations of current functional testing-based paradigms might be avoided by using coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) for exclusion of obstructive coronary artery disease. The growth of CCTA has been supported by comparative prognostic evidence with CCTA and functional testing, as well as radiation dose reduction. Use of CCTA for physiological evaluation of coronary lesion-specific ischemia may facilitate evaluation of moderate stenoses, designation of the culprit lesion, and prediction of benefit from revascularization. The potential of CCTA to serve as an effective gatekeeper to invasive coronary angiography will depend, in part, on the adoption of these new developments, as well as definition of the benefit of detecting high-risk plaque for guiding the management of selected patients. PMID:26112200

  10. Stored-fluorography mode reduces radiation dose during cardiac catheterization measured with OSLD dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Chien-Yi; Chen, Zhih-Cherng; Tang, Kuo-Ting; Liu, Wei-Chung; Lin, Chun-Chih; Wang, Hsin-Ell

    2015-12-01

    Coronary angiogram is an imperative tool for diagnosis of coronary artery diseases, in which cine-angiography is a commonly used method. Although the angiography proceeds under radiation, the potential risk of radiation exposure for both the patients and the operators was seldom noticed. In this study, the absorbed radiation dose in stored-fluorography mode was compared with that in cine-angiography mode by using optically simulated luminescent dosimeters to realize their effects on radiation dose. Patients received coronary angiogram via radial artery approach were randomized into the stored-fluorography group (N=30) or the cine-angiography group (N=30). The excluded criteria were: 1. women at pregnancy or on breast feeding, 2. chronic kidney diseases with glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min. During the coronary angiogram, absorbed dose of the patients and the operator radiation exposure was measured with optically simulated luminescent dosimeter (OSLD). The absorbed dose of the patients in the stored-fluorography group (3.13±0.25 mGy) was apparently lower than that in the cine-angiography group (65.57±5.37 mGy; P<0.001). For the operator, a statistical difference (P<0.001) was also found between the stored-fluorography group (0.09163 μGy) and the cine-angiography (0.6519μGy). Compared with traditional cine-angiography mode, the stored-fluorography mode can apparently reduce radiation exposure of the patients and the operator in coronary angiogram.

  11. Simulation in cardiac catheterization laboratory: Need of the hour to improve the clinical skills.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Shivani; Choudhury, Erin; Ladha, Suruchi; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra; Kiran, Usha

    2016-01-01

    Simulation is an effective teaching tool to decrease the learning curve for novices without compromising patient safety. Simulation helps interventionalist in mentally translating a two dimentional, black and white image into a usable three dimentional model. It also bridges the gap in training diverse team members on new procedures and products. All simulators have collision detection, i.e., virtual contact forces generated from collision which updates haptic output with new calculations. PMID:27397459

  12. Simulation in cardiac catheterization laboratory: Need of the hour to improve the clinical skills

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Shivani; Choudhury, Erin; Ladha, Suruchi; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra; Kiran, Usha

    2016-01-01

    Simulation is an effective teaching tool to decrease the learning curve for novices without compromising patient safety. Simulation helps interventionalist in mentally translating a two dimentional, black and white image into a usable three dimentional model. It also bridges the gap in training diverse team members on new procedures and products. All simulators have collision detection, i.e., virtual contact forces generated from collision which updates haptic output with new calculations. PMID:27397459

  13. Long-Term Catheterization of the Intestinal Lymph Trunk and Collection of Lymph in Neonatal Pigs.

    PubMed

    Uwiera, Richard R; Mangat, Rabban; Kelly, Sandra; Uwiera, Trina C; Proctor, Spencer D

    2016-01-01

    Catheterization of the intestinal lymph trunk in neonatal pigs is a technique allowing for the long-term collection of large quantities of intestinal (central) efferent lymph. Importantly, the collection of central lymph from the intestine enables researchers to study both the mechanisms and lipid constitutes associated with lipid metabolism, intestinal inflammation and cancer metastasis, as well as cells involved in immune function and immunosurveillance. A ventral mid-line surgical approach permits excellent surgical exposure to the cranial abdomen and relatively easy access to the intestinal lymph trunk vessel that lies near the pancreas and the right ventral segment of the portal vein underneath the visceral aspect of the right liver lobe. The vessel is meticulously dissected and released from the surrounding fascia and then dilated with sutures allowing for insertion and subsequent securing of the catheter into the vessel. The catheter is exteriorized and approximately 1 L/24 hr of lymph is collected over a 7 day period. While this technique enables the collection of large quantities of central lymph over an extended period of time, the success depends on careful surgical dissection, tissue handling and close attention to proper surgical technique. This is particularly important with surgeries in young animals as the lymph vessels can easily tear, potentially leading to surgical and experimental failure. The video demonstrates an excellent surgical technique for the collection of intestinal lymph. PMID:27023826

  14. Neonatal Cardio-pulmonary Arrest: Emergency Catheterization of Umbilical Vein

    PubMed Central

    Paes, Bosco A.; Blatz, Susan; Kraftcheck, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    In an emergency, the physician responsible for neonatal care must be skilled in umbilical catheterization. Several drugs can be given through an endotracheal tube, but some require intravenous administration. The umbilical vein is a better route of administration than peripheral veins because it is easily located and can be entered readily. It allows immediate access to the central circulation, enhancing drug distribution. The authors outline the procedure in a step-by-step description. This pictorial article can be used as a handy reference by physicians needing to administer fluids and drugs during cardio-pulmonary arrest in neonates. Imagesp1136-ap1136-bp1136-cp1136-dp1137-ap1137-bp1137-cp1137-dp1137-ep1138-ap1138-bp1138-cp1138-dp1139-ap1139-bp1139-cp1139-dp1140-ap1140-bp1140-cp1140-d PMID:21233982

  15. Which Fingers Should We Perform Two-Finger Chest Compression Technique with When Performing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation on an Infant in Cardiac Arrest?

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Sinn; Oh, Je Hyeok; Kim, Chan Woong; Kim, Sung Eun; Lee, Dong Hoon; Hong, Jun Young

    2016-06-01

    This study compared the effectiveness two-finger chest compression technique (TFCC) performed using the right vs. left hand and the index-middle vs. middle-ring fingers. Four different finger/hand combinations were tested randomly in 30 healthcare providers performing TFCC (Test 1: the right index-middle fingers; Test 2: the left index-middle fingers; Test 3: the right middle-ring fingers; Test 4: the left middle-ring fingers) using two cross-over trials. The "patient" was a 3-month-old-infant-sized manikin. Each experiment consisted of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) consisting of 2 minutes of 30:2 compression: ventilation performed by one rescuer on a manikin lying on the floor as if in cardiac arrest. Ventilations were performed using the mouth-to-mouth method. Compression and ventilation data were collected during the tests. The mean compression depth (MCD) was significantly greater in TFCC performed with the index-middle fingers than with the middle-ring fingers regardless of the hand (95% confidence intervals; right hand: 37.8-40.2 vs. 35.2-38.6 mm, P = 0.002; left hand: 36.9-39.2 vs. 35.5-38.1 mm, P = 0.003). A deeper MCD was achieved with the index-middle fingers of the right versus the left hand (P = 0.004). The ratio of sufficiently deep compressions showed the same patterns. There were no significant differences in the other data. The best performance of TFCC in simulated 30:2 compression: ventilation CPR performed by one rescuer on an infant in cardiac arrest lying on the floor was obtained using the index-middle fingers of the right hand. Clinical Trial Registry at the Clinical Research Information Service (KCT0001515). PMID:27247512

  16. Which Fingers Should We Perform Two-Finger Chest Compression Technique with When Performing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation on an Infant in Cardiac Arrest?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness two-finger chest compression technique (TFCC) performed using the right vs. left hand and the index-middle vs. middle-ring fingers. Four different finger/hand combinations were tested randomly in 30 healthcare providers performing TFCC (Test 1: the right index-middle fingers; Test 2: the left index-middle fingers; Test 3: the right middle-ring fingers; Test 4: the left middle-ring fingers) using two cross-over trials. The “patient” was a 3-month-old-infant-sized manikin. Each experiment consisted of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) consisting of 2 minutes of 30:2 compression: ventilation performed by one rescuer on a manikin lying on the floor as if in cardiac arrest. Ventilations were performed using the mouth-to-mouth method. Compression and ventilation data were collected during the tests. The mean compression depth (MCD) was significantly greater in TFCC performed with the index-middle fingers than with the middle-ring fingers regardless of the hand (95% confidence intervals; right hand: 37.8–40.2 vs. 35.2–38.6 mm, P = 0.002; left hand: 36.9–39.2 vs. 35.5–38.1 mm, P = 0.003). A deeper MCD was achieved with the index-middle fingers of the right versus the left hand (P = 0.004). The ratio of sufficiently deep compressions showed the same patterns. There were no significant differences in the other data. The best performance of TFCC in simulated 30:2 compression: ventilation CPR performed by one rescuer on an infant in cardiac arrest lying on the floor was obtained using the index-middle fingers of the right hand. Clinical Trial Registry at the Clinical Research Information Service (KCT0001515). PMID:27247512

  17. Vestibular system paresis due to emergency endovascular catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Simoceli, Lucinda; Sguillar, Danilo Anunciatto; Santos, Henrique Mendes Paiva; Caputti, Camilla

    2012-01-01

    Summary Objective: The objective of this story of case is to describe an uncommon cause of associated peripheral Vestibulopathy to the unilateral auditory loss in aged patient after catheterization of urgency. Story of case: Patient of the masculine sort, 82 years, submitted to the correction of abdominal ragged aneurism of aorta, in the intra-operative suffered heart attack acute from the myocardium needing primary angioplasty. High after hospital it relates to complaint of accented hearing loss to the right and crippling vertigo, without focal neurological signals. To the otorhinolaryngological clinical examination it presented: Test of Weber lateralized for the left, spontaneous nystagmus for the left, marches rocking, has taken normal disbasia and ataxia, index-nose and diadochokinesia, Test of Romberg with oscillation without fall and Fukuda with lateral shunting line for the right. The audiometric examination evidenced deafness to the right and sensorineural loss to the left in sharps, areflexia initial to the right in caloric test e, the computerized tomography of the secular bones and brainstem, presence of metallic connecting rod crossing the right secular bone, from the vein internal jugular vein and bulb jugular vein, crossing the posterior, superior and vestibule semicircular canals, projecting itself in temporal lobe. The radiological diagnoses was traumatic injury for guide to endovascular metallic during catheterization of urgency and the behavior, considering that the patient had not compensated the balance, it was vestibular rehabilitation. Conclusion: Complaints of giddiness in the aged patient must be closely evaluated of its pathological clinical description because the antecedents of illnesses and previous treatments, in general, direct the diagnostic hypotheses however they can bring unexpected alterations. PMID:25991947

  18. Transcatheter Thrombolysis with High-Dose Bolus Tissue Plasminogen Activator in Iatrogenic Arterial Occlusion after Femoral Arterial Catheterization

    SciTech Connect

    Tsetis, Dimitrios K.; Kochiadakis, George E.; Hatzidakis, Adam A.; Skalidis, Emannuel I.; Chryssou, Evangelia G.; Tritou, Ioanna N.; Vardas, Panos E.; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas C.

    2002-01-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of percutaneous local thrombolysis with high-dose bolus recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) in patients with acute limb ischemia due to arterial thrombosis after cardiac catheterization.Methods: We treated eight patients (7 men; mean age 56 years) with thrombotic occlusion of both the common femoral artery (CFA) and external iliac artery (EIA) in six patients and of the CFA only in two patients. Two 5 mg boluses of rt-PA were injected into the proximal clot through a 5 Fr end-hole catheter and subsequently two additional boluses of 5 mg rt-PA were given through a catheter with multiple side-holes. In case of a significant amount of residual thrombus, a continuous infusion of 2.5 mg/hr of rt-PA was started.Results: Successful lysis was achieved in all patients. The mean duration of lysis was 2 hr 41 min. The mean total amount of rt-PA delivered was 23.16 mg. In four patients unmasked flow-limited dissections confined to the CFA were managed by prolonged balloon dilatation, while in the remaining four patients with extension of the dissection to the external iliac artery one or two Easy Wallstents were implanted. There was prompt relief of lower limb ischemic symptoms and signs in all patients. Two groin hematomas were conservatively treated.Clinical and color Doppler flow imaging follow-up with a mean duration of 15 months, showed no reappearance of ischemic symptoms or development of restenosis in any of the patients. One patient died 6 months after thrombolysis.Conclusions: Transcatheter thrombolysis with high-dose bolus rt-PA is a safe and effective treatment inpatients with iatrogenic arterial occlusion after femoral catheterization. Underlying dissections should be treated by prolonged balloon dilatation but stent implantation is often required.

  19. Minimally invasive or noninvasive cardiac output measurement: an update.

    PubMed

    Sangkum, Lisa; Liu, Geoffrey L; Yu, Ling; Yan, Hong; Kaye, Alan D; Liu, Henry

    2016-06-01

    Although cardiac output (CO) by pulmonary artery catheterization (PAC) has been an important guideline in clinical management for more than four decades, some studies have questioned the clinical efficacy of CO in certain patient populations. Further, the use of CO by PAC has been linked to numerous complications including dysrhythmia, infection, rupture of pulmonary artery, injury to adjacent arteries, embolization, pulmonary infarction, cardiac valvular damage, pericardial effusion, and intracardiac catheter knotting. The use of PAC has been steadily declining over the past two decades. Minimally invasive and noninvasive CO monitoring have been studied in the past two decades with some evidence of efficacy. Several different devices based on pulse contour analysis are available currently, including the uncalibrated FloTrac/Vigileo system and the calibrated PiCCO and LiDCO systems. The pressure-recording analytical method (PRAM) system requires only an arterial line and is commercially available as the MostCare system. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) can measure CO by non-Doppler- or Doppler-based methods. The partial CO2 rebreathing technique, another method to measure CO, is marketed by Novametrix Medical Systems as the NICO system. Thoracic electrical bioimpedance (TEB) and electric bioreactance (EB) are totally noninvasive CO monitoring. Nexfin HD and the newer ClearSight systems are examples of noninvasive CO monitoring devices currently being marketed by Edwards Lifesciences. The developing focus in CO monitoring devices appears to be shifting to tissue perfusion and microcirculatory flow and aimed more at markers that indicate the effectiveness of circulatory and microcirculatory resuscitations. PMID:26961819

  20. A Rat Model of Ventricular Fibrillation and Resuscitation by Conventional Closed-chest Technique.

    PubMed

    Lamoureux, Lorissa; Radhakrishnan, Jeejabai; Gazmuri, Raúl J

    2015-01-01

    A rat model of electrically-induced ventricular fibrillation followed by cardiac resuscitation using a closed chest technique that incorporates the basic components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in humans is herein described. The model was developed in 1988 and has been used in approximately 70 peer-reviewed publications examining a myriad of resuscitation aspects including its physiology and pathophysiology, determinants of resuscitability, pharmacologic interventions, and even the effects of cell therapies. The model featured in this presentation includes: (1) vascular catheterization to measure aortic and right atrial pressures, to measure cardiac output by thermodilution, and to electrically induce ventricular fibrillation; and (2) tracheal intubation for positive pressure ventilation with oxygen enriched gas and assessment of the end-tidal CO2. A typical sequence of intervention entails: (1) electrical induction of ventricular fibrillation, (2) chest compression using a mechanical piston device concomitantly with positive pressure ventilation delivering oxygen-enriched gas, (3) electrical shocks to terminate ventricular fibrillation and reestablish cardiac activity, (4) assessment of post-resuscitation hemodynamic and metabolic function, and (5) assessment of survival and recovery of organ function. A robust inventory of measurements is available that includes - but is not limited to - hemodynamic, metabolic, and tissue measurements. The model has been highly effective in developing new resuscitation concepts and examining novel therapeutic interventions before their testing in larger and translationally more relevant animal models of cardiac arrest and resuscitation. PMID:25938619

  1. Health Instruction Packages: Cardiac Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Gwen; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these five learning modules to instruct nurses, students, and other health care professionals in cardiac anatomy and functions and in fundamental electrocardiographic techniques. The first module, "Cardiac Anatomy and Physiology: A Review" by Gwen Phillips, teaches the learner to draw and label…

  2. [Cardiac tumor, constrictive pericarditis and pulmonary thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Takano, Tamaki; Amano, Jun

    2011-07-01

    Cardiac tumors are rare, and 3-quarters of these tumors are benign and nearly half of the benign tumors are myxomas. Metastases to the heart are more common than primary cardiac tumors. Cardiac tumors present obstructive, constitutional and embolic signs and symptoms. Echocardiograms, chest computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan are very useful for diagnosis. Surgery is indicated in patients with benign tumor, and chemo/radio-therapy in patients with malignant tumors. Prognosis after surgery is good, instead poor prognosis for patients with malignancy. Constrictive pericarditis is mainly result of idiopathic, previous cardiac surgery and radiation in recent years. Diagnosis is made by echo cardiography and cardiac catheterization along with clinical presentation. Thickened pericardium is directly diagnosed by currently advanced transesophageal echocardiography, CT and MRI although normal thickness of the pericardium with constrictive pericarditis is observed in some patients. Pericardiectomy is the only treatment for permanent constriction. The incidence of pulmonary thromboembolism is currently increasing in Japan. Guidelines for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of pulmonary thromboembolism and deep vein thrombosis (JCS 2009) is helpful for diagnosis and treatment decision. Anticoagulant is initial treatment for acute pulmonary thromboembolism, and intravenous thrombolysis is performed in hemodynamically unstable cases. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertention is treated by pulmonary endarterectomy whereas anticoagulant and vasodilator are used for peripheral type and mild cases. PMID:21916175

  3. Structuring: A Successful Counseling Technique in a Medical Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Doris; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Examined the effect of structuring (providing procedural and sensation information) on anxiety responses of hospitalized individuals (N=30) undergoing diagnostic cardiac catheterization. Results showed structuring that provided information regarding both procedures and physical sensations lessened anxiety more than procedural information alone.…

  4. Cardiac Applications of Optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, Christina M.; Klimas, Aleksandra; Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    In complex multicellular systems, such as the brain or the heart, the ability to selectively perturb and observe the response of individual components at the cellular level and with millisecond resolution in time, is essential for mechanistic understanding of function. Optogenetics uses genetic encoding of light sensitivity (by the expression of microbial opsins) to provide such capabilities for manipulation, recording, and control by light with cell specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. As an optical approach, it is inherently scalable for remote and parallel interrogation of biological function at the tissue level; with implantable miniaturized devices, the technique is uniquely suitable for in vivo tracking of function, as illustrated by numerous applications in the brain. Its expansion into the cardiac area has been slow. Here, using examples from published research and original data, we focus on optogenetics applications to cardiac electrophysiology, specifically dealing with the ability to manipulate membrane voltage by light with implications for cardiac pacing, cardioversion, cell communication, and arrhythmia research, in general. We discuss gene and cell delivery methods of inscribing light sensitivity in cardiac tissue, functionality of the light-sensitive ion channels within different types of cardiac cells, utility in probing electrical coupling between different cell types, approaches and design solutions to all-optical electrophysiology by the combination of optogenetic sensors and actuators, and specific challenges in moving towards in vivo cardiac optogenetics. PMID:25035999

  5. High Court Requires Schools to Provide Catheterization Services under 94-142.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flygare, Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    The United States Supreme Court requires school districts to provide catheterization services for handicapped students, in accordance with Public Law 94-142, the Education for All Handicapped Children Act. (DCS)

  6. Left Ventricular Aneurysm and Ventricular Tachycardia as Initial Presentation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Jmeian, Ashraf; Thawabi, Mohammad; Goldfarb, Irvin; Shamoon, Fayez

    2015-01-01

    Context: Cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) is a rare, potentially fatal disease. It has a wide range of clinical presentations that range from asymptomatic electrocardiogram changes to sudden cardiac death. Ventricular aneurysms and ventricular tachycardia are seen late in the disease, and are rarely the presenting manifestation of the disease. Diagnosis of CS is challenging and often missed or delayed. Case Report: We report a 35-year-old patient who presented with sustained ventricular tachycardia and ST-elevation on electrocardiogram. Cardiac catheterization showed normal coronaries and left ventricular aneurysm. Subsequent 2D-echocardiography showed an infiltrative disease pattern. Cardiac MRI was done and showed late gadolinium enhancement in the septum, apex and lateral wall. The patient was diagnosed with cardiac sarcoidosis and treated with immune suppression and antiarrhythmic agent. In addition underwent AICD implantation. Conclusion: Our case highlights the importance of suspecting cardiac sarcoidosis in young patients presenting with electrocardiogram changes, and present an atypical presentation of this disease. PMID:25839003

  7. Cardiac metastases

    PubMed Central

    Bussani, R; De‐Giorgio, F; Abbate, A; Silvestri, F

    2007-01-01

    Tumours metastatic to the heart (cardiac metastases) are among the least known and highly debated issues in oncology, and few systematic studies are devoted to this topic. Although primary cardiac tumours are extremely uncommon (various postmortem studies report rates between 0.001% and 0.28%), secondary tumours are not, and at least in theory, the heart can be metastasised by any malignant neoplasm able to spread to distant sites. In general, cardiac metastases are considered to be rare; however, when sought for, the incidence seems to be not as low as expected, ranging from 2.3% and 18.3%. Although no malignant tumours are known that diffuse preferentially to the heart, some do involve the heart more often than others—for example, melanoma and mediastinal primary tumours. This paper attempts to review the pathophysiology of cardiac metastatic disease, epidemiology and clinical presentation of cardiac metastases, and pathological characterisation of the lesions. PMID:17098886

  8. Noninvasive Ambient Pressure Estimation using Ultrasound Contrast Agents -- Invoking Subharmonics for Cardiac and Hepatic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, Jaydev K.

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are encapsulated microbubbles that provide a source for acoustic impedance mismatch with the blood, due to difference in compressibility between the gas contained within these microbubbles and the blood. When insonified by an ultrasound beam, these UCAs act as nonlinear scatterers and enhance the echoes of the incident pulse, resulting in scattering of the incident ultrasound beam and emission of fundamental (f0), subharmonic (f0/2), harmonic (n*f0; n ∈ N) and ultraharmonic (((2n-1)/2)*f0; n ∈ N & n > 1) components in the echo response. A promising approach to monitor in vivo pressures revolves around the fact that the ultrasound transmit and receive parameters can be selected to induce an ambient pressure amplitude dependent subharmonic signal. This subharmonic signal may be used to estimate ambient pressure amplitude; such technique of estimating ambient pressure amplitude is referred to as subharmonic aided pressure estimation or SHAPE. This project develops and evaluates the feasibility of SHAPE to noninvasively monitor cardiac and hepatic pressures (using commercially available ultrasound scanners and UCAs) because invasive catheter based pressure measurements are used currently for these applications. Invasive catheter based pressure measurements pose risk of introducing infection while the catheter is guided towards the region of interest in the body through a percutaneous incision, pose risk of death due to structural or mechanical failure of the catheter (which has also triggered product recalls by the USA Food and Drug Administration) and may potentially modulate the pressures that are being measured. Also, catheterization procedures require fluoroscopic guidance to advance the catheter to the site of pressure measurements and such catheterization procedures are not performed in all clinical centers. Thus, a noninvasive technique to obtain ambient pressure values without the catheterization process is clinically

  9. Cardiac chamber volumes by echocardiography using a new mathematical method: A promising technique for zero-G use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckey, J. C.; Beattie, J. M.; Gaffney, F. A.; Nixon, J. V.; Blomqvist, C. G.

    1984-01-01

    Accurate, reproducible, and non-invasive means for ventricular volume determination are needed for evaluating cardiovascular function zero-gravity. Current echocardiographic methods, particularly for the right ventricle, suffer from a large standard error. A new mathematical approach, recently described by Watanabe et al., was tested on 1 normal formalin-fixed human hearts suspended in a mineral oil bath. Volumes are estimated from multiple two-dimensional echocardiographic views recorded from a single point at sequential angles. The product of sectional cavity area and center of mass for each view summed over the range of angles (using a trapezoidal rule) gives volume. Multiple (8-14) short axis right ventricle and left ventricle views at 5.0 deg intervals were videotaped. The images were digitized by two independent observers (leading-edge to leading-edge technique) and analyzed using a graphics tablet and microcomputer. Actual volumes were determined by filling the chambers with water. These data were compared to the mean of the two echo measurements.

  10. Puncture point-traction method: A novel method applied for right internal jugular vein catheterization

    PubMed Central

    WU, TIANLIANG; ZANG, HONGCHENG

    2016-01-01

    The ultrasound probe and advancement of the needle during real-time ultrasound-assisted guidance of catheterization of the right internal jugular vein (RIJV) tend to collapse the vein, which reduces the success rate of the procedure. We have developed a novel puncture point-traction method (PPTM) to facilitate RIJV cannulation. The present study examined whether this method facilitated the performance of RIJV catheterization in anesthetized patients. In this study, 120 patients were randomly assigned to a group in which PPTM was performed (PPTM group, n=60) or a group in which it was not performed (non-PPTM group, n=60). One patient was excluded because of internal carotid artery puncture and 119 patients remained for analysis. The cross-sectional area (CSA), anteroposterior diameter (AD) and transverse diameter (TD) of the RIJV at the cricoid cartilage level following the induction of anesthesia and during catheterization were measured, and the number with obvious loss of resistance (NOLR), the number with easy aspiration of blood into syringe (NEABS) during advancement of the needle, and the number of first-pass punctures (NFPP) during catheterization were determined. In the non-PPTM group, the CSA was smaller during catheterization compared with that following the induction of anesthesia (P<0.01). In the PPTM group compared with the non-PPTM group during catheterization, the CSA was larger (P<0.01) and the AD (P<0.01) and TD (P<0.05) were wider; NOLR (P<0.01), NEABS (P<0.01) and NFPP (P<0.01) increased significantly. The findings from this study confirmed that the PPTM facilitated catheterization of the RIJV and improved the success rate of RIJV catheterization in anesthetized patients in the supine position. PMID:27347054