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Sample records for cardiac electrical storm

  1. Successful treatment of cardiac electrical storm in dilated cardiomyopathy using esmolol: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LI, LI; ZHOU, YUAN-LI; ZHANG, XUE-JING; WANG, HUA-TING

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports a case of electrical storm occurring in a 43-year-old woman with dilated cardiomyopathy. The patient suffered from a cardiac electrical storm, with 98 episodes of ventricular tachycardia rapidly degenerating to ventricular fibrillation in hospital. The patient was converted with a total of 120 defibrillations. Recurrent ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation was initiated by premature ventricular beats. The patient did not respond to the use of amiodaronum. However, the administration of esmolol stabilized the patient's heart rhythm. A moderate dose of the β-blocker esmolol, administered as an 0.5-mg intravenous bolus injection followed by an infusion at a rate of 0.15 mg/kg/min, inhibited the recurrence of ventricular fibrillation and normalized the electrocardiographic pattern. The results suggest that esmolol may be able to improve the survival rate of patients with electrical storm in dilated cardiomyopathy and should be considered as a primary therapy in the management of cardiac electrical storms. PMID:27347024

  2. Severe storm electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, R. T.; Rust, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Successful ground truth support of U-2 overflights was been accomplished. Data have been reduced for 4 June 1984 and some of the results have been integrated into some of MSFC's efforts. Staccato lightning (multiply branched, single stroke flash with no continuing current) is prevalent within the rainfree region around the main storm updraft and this is believed to be important, i.e., staccato flashes might be an important indicator of severe storm electrification. Results from data analysis from two stations appear to indicate that charge center heights can be estimated from a combination of intercept data with data from the fixed laboratory at NSSL. An excellent data base has been provided for determining the sight errors and efficiency of NSSL's LLP system. Cloud structures, observable in a low radar reflectivity region and on a scale smaller than is currently resolved by radar, which appear to be related to electrical activity are studied.

  3. Severe storm electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, W. D.; Macgorman, D. R.; Taylor, W.; Arnold, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    Severe storms and lightning were measured with a NASA U2 and ground based facilities, both fixed base and mobile. Aspects of this program are reported. The following results are presented: (1) ground truth measurements of lightning for comparison with those obtained by the U2. These measurements include flash type identification, electric field changes, optical waveforms, and ground strike location; (2) simultaneous extremely low frequency (ELF) waveforms for cloud to ground (CG) flashes; (3) the CG strike location system (LLP) using a combination of mobile laboratory and television video data are assessed; (4) continued development of analog-to-digital conversion techniques for processing lightning data from the U2, mobile laboratory, and NSSL sensors; (5) completion of an all azimuth TV system for CG ground truth; (6) a preliminary analysis of both IC and CG lightning in a mesocyclone; and (7) the finding of a bimodal peak in altitude lightning activity in some storms in the Great Plains and on the east coast. In the forms on the Great Plains, there was a distinct class of flash what forms the upper mode of the distribution. These flashes are smaller horizontal extent, but occur more frequently than flashes in the lower mode of the distribution.

  4. Severe storm electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, W. D.; Macgorman, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    During FY-85, Researchers conducted a field program and analyzed data. The field program incorporated coordinated measurements made with a NASA U2. Results include the following: (1) ground truth measurements of lightning for comparison with those obtained by the U2; (2) analysis of dual-Doppler radar and dual-VHF lightning mapping data from a supercell storm; (3) analysis of synoptic conditions during three simultaneous storm systems on 13 May 1983 when unusually large numbers of positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) flashes occurred; (4) analysis of extremely low frequency (ELF) wave forms; and (5) an assessment of a cloud -ground strike location system using a combination of mobile laboratory and fixed-base TV video data.

  5. Synergistic application of cardiac sympathetic decentralization and comprehensive psychiatric treatment in the management of anxiety and electrical storm

    PubMed Central

    Khalsa, Sahib S.; Shahabi, Leila; Ajijola, Olujimi A.; Bystritsky, Alexander; Naliboff, Bruce D.; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2014-01-01

    We report here, for the first time, two cases demonstrating a synergistic application of bilateral cardiac sympathetic decentralization and multimodal psychiatric treatment for the assessment and management of anxiety following recurrent Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) shocks. In a first case the combination of bilateral cardiac sympathetic decentralization (BCSD), cognitive behavioral psychotherapy and anxiolytic medication was sufficient to attenuate the patient's symptoms and maladaptive behaviors, with a maintained benefit at 1 year. Among the more prominent subjective changes in the post-lesion state we observed a decrease in aversive interoceptive sensations, particularly of the heartbeat. The patient continued to experience cognitive threat appraisals on a frequent basis, although these were no longer incapacitating. In a second case, we report the effect of BCSD on autonomic tone and subjective state. In the post-lesion state we observed attenuated sympathetic responses to the valsalva maneuver, isometric handgrip and mental arithmetic stressor, including decreased systolic and diastolic blood pressure and, decreased skin conductance. Collectively, these preliminary findings suggest that an integrative, multidisciplinary approach to treating anxiety disorders in the setting of ventricular arrhythmias and recurrent ICD shocks can result in sustained improvements in physical, psychological, and functional status. These findings raise the possibility of a potential role for the stellate ganglion in the modulation of emotional experience and afferent transmission of interoceptive information to the central nervous system. PMID:24427121

  6. A study of severe storm electricity via storm intercept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Roy T.; Horsburgh, Steven D.; Rust, W. David; Burgess, Don

    1985-01-01

    Storm electricity data, radar data, and visual observations were used both to present a case study for a supercell thunderstorm that occurred in the Texas Panhandle on 19 June 1980 and to search for insight into how lightning to ground might be related to storm dynamics in the updraft/downdraft couplet in supercell storms. It was observed that two-thirds of the lightning ground-strike points in the developing and maturing stages of a supercell thunderstorm occurred within the region surrounding the wall cloud (a cloud feature often characteristic of a supercell updraft) and on the southern flank of the precipitation. Electrical activity in the 19 June 1980 storm was atypical in that it was a right-mover. Lightning to ground reached a peak rate of 18/min and intracloud flashes were as frequent as 176/min in the final stages of the storm's life.

  7. Electrical storm: A clinical and electrophysiological overview

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Sergio; Pala, Salvatore; Biagioli, Viviana; Del Giorno, Giuseppe; Zucchetti, Martina; Russo, Eleonora; Marino, Vittoria; Dello Russo, Antonio; Casella, Michela; Pizzamiglio, Francesca; Catto, Valentina; Tondo, Claudio; Carbucicchio, Corrado

    2015-01-01

    Electrical storm (ES) is a clinical condition characterized by three or more ventricular arrhythmia episodes leading to appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapies in a 24 h period. Mostly, arrhythmias responsible of ES are multiple morphologies of monomorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT), but polymorphic VT and ventricular fibrillation can also result in ES. Clinical presentation is very dramatic in most cases, strictly related to the cardiac disease that may worsen electrical and hemodynamic decompensation. Therefore ES management is challenging in the majority of cases and a high mortality is the rule both in the acute and in the long-term phases. Different underlying cardiomyopathies provide significant clues into the mechanism of ES, which can arise in the setting of structural arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies or rarely in patients with inherited arrhythmic syndrome, impacting on pharmacological treatment, on ICD programming, and on the opportunity to apply strategies of catheter ablation. This latter has become a pivotal form of treatment due to its high efficacy in modifying the arrhythmogenic substrate and in achieving rhythm stability, aiming at reducing recurrences of ventricular arrhythmia and at improving overall survival. In this review, the most relevant epidemiological and clinical aspects of ES, with regard to the acute and long-term follow-up implications, were evaluated, focusing on these novel therapeutic strategies of treatment. PMID:26413232

  8. Successful Treatment of Refractory Electrical Storm With Landiolol After More Than 100 Electrical Defibrillations.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Kenta; Aoyagi, Takashi; Mikamo, Takashi; Tsutsui, Kenta; Kunishima, Tomoyuki; Inaba, Hideko; Hayami, Noriyuki; Murakawa, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Electrical storm (ES) was observed in an 82-year-old man with recent myocardial infarction. Conventional therapy, including amiodarone, could not suppress the ES. After more than 100 electrical defibrillations, we were finally able to control the ES with the administration of landiolol. It is known that landiolol can inhibit ES. However, we hesitate to use landiolol in patients with low cardiac output. We would like to emphasize that careful use of landiolol should be considered in patients with refractory ES after myocardial infarction, although cardiac output is severely reduced. PMID:26346519

  9. Electric Dust Devils and Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renno, N. O.; Yana, C.

    2004-12-01

    Electrical fields measurements in terrestrial dust devils show that they maintain tremendous charge separation and that their electric fields exceeds the breakdown potential (~10 kV/m) of the Martian atmosphere (Farrell et al., 2002, 2003; Krauss et al., 2002; Renno et al., 2004). Typical Martian dust devils are be up to 100 times larger and much stronger than the small terrestrial analogues. Martian dust devils have higher dust content and may produce even stronger electrical fields. Indeed, the dust devils observed in the Pathfinder images have about 700 times the dust content of the local background atmosphere (Metzger et al., 1999). Thus, strong charge separations and electric-field breakdown are likely to occur on Martian dust devils and dust storms. Our theory (Renno et al., 2004) and laboratory experiments in a Mars chamber shows that collisions between sand and dust particles produce non-thermal microwave radiation. The non-thermal microwave emission allows not only the indirect detection of electric activity but also the determination of the physical properties of Martian sand and dust by remote sensing. Besides being geologically important, electrically charged Martian dust devils and dust storms are potential hazards to Landers and will be dangerous to future astronauts exploring its surface. Indeed, the design of adequate mechanical and electrical systems for these Landers cannot progress effectively without a better understanding of Martian dust devils and dust storms. Moreover, ancillary phenomena associated with electrically charged vortices can ionize atmospheric gases and might have important implications for atmosphere chemistry and even habitability.

  10. Optimal antiarrhythmic drug therapy for electrical storm

    PubMed Central

    Sorajja, Dan; Munger, Thomas M.; Shen, Win-Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Electrical storm, defined as 3 or more separate episodes of ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation within 24 hours, carries significant morbidity and mortality. These unstable ventricular arrhythmias have been described with a variety of conditions including ischemic heart disease, structural heart disease, and genetic conditions. While implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation and ablation may be indicated and required, antiarrhythmic medication remains an important adjunctive therapy for these persons. PMID:25745472

  11. Electrical Activity in Martian Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, W.

    2015-12-01

    Dust storms on Mars are predicted to be capable of producing electrostatic fields and discharges, even larger than those in dust storms on Earth. Such electrical activity poses serious risks to any Human exploration of the planet and the lack of sufficient data to characterize any such activity has been identified by NASA's MEPAG as a key human safety knowledge gap. There are three key elements in the characterization of Martian electrostatic discharges: dependence on Martian environmental conditions, frequency of occurrence, and the strength of the generated electric fields. We will describe a proposed program using NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) to carry out a long term monitoring campaign to search for and characterize the entire Mars hemisphere for powerful discharges during routine tracking of spacecraft at Mars on an entirely non-interfering basis. The resulting knowledge of Mars electrical activity would allow NASA to plan risk mitigation measures to ensure human safety during Mars exploration. In addition, these measurements will also allow us to place limits on presence of oxidants such as H2O2 that may be produced by such discharges, providing another measurement point for models describing Martian atmospheric chemistry and habitability. Because of the continuous Mars telecommunication needs of NASA's Mars-based assets, the DSN is the only instrument in the world that combines long term, high cadence, observing opportunities with large sensitive telescopes, making it a unique asset worldwide in searching for and characterizing electrostatic activity at Mars from the ground.

  12. Geomagnetic storms: Potential economic impacts on electric utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.R.; Van Dyke, J.W.

    1991-03-20

    Geomagnetic storms associated with sunspot and solar flare activity can disturb communications and disrupt electric power. A very severe geomagnetic storm could cause a major blackout with an economic impact of several billion dollars. The vulnerability of electric power systems in the northeast United States will likely increase during the 1990s because of the trend of transmitting large amounts of power over long distance to meet the electricity demands of this region. A comprehensive research program and a warning satellite to monitor the solar wind are needed to enhance the reliability of electric power systems under the influence of geomagnetic storms. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Reducing uncertainty - responses for electricity utilities to severe solar storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaunt, Charles Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, electricity utilities in mid- and low-latitude regions believed that solar storms had no (or only insignificant) effect on their power systems. Then it was noticed that the onset of damage in several large transformers, leading to their failure, correlated very closely with the Halloween storm of 2003. Since then engineers have started to appreciate that a very severe storm could have serious consequences outside the high-latitude regions. There are many uncertainties in predicting the effects of solar storms on electrical systems. The severity and time of arrival of a storm are difficult to model; so are the geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) expected to flow in the power networks. Published information about the responses of different types of transformers to GICs is contradictory. Measurements of the abnormal power flows in networks during solar storms generally do not take into account the effects of the current distortion and unbalance, potentially giving misleading signals to the operators. The normal requirement for optimum system management, while allowing for the possibility of faults caused by lightning, birds and other causes, limits the capacity of system operators to respond to the threats of GICs, which are not assessed easily by the N - 1 reliability criterion. A utility's response to the threat of damage by GICs depends on the expected frequency and magnitude of solar storms. Approaches to formulating a response are located in a system model incorporating space physics, network analysis, transformer engineering, network reliability and decision support and the benefits are identified. Approaches adopted in high-latitude regions might not be appropriate where fewer storms are expected to reach damaging levels. The risks of an extreme storm cannot be ignored, and understanding the response mechanisms suitable for low-latitude regions has the capacity to inform and reduce the uncertainty for power systems planners and operators

  14. Estimation of interplanetary electric field conditions for historical geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Veenadhari, B.; Tulasi Ram, S.; Selvakumaran, R.; Mukherjee, Shyamoli; Singh, Rajesh; Kadam, B. D.

    2015-09-01

    Ground magnetic measurements provide a unique database in understanding space weather. The continuous geomagnetic records from Colaba-Alibag observatories in India contain historically longest and continuous observations from 1847 to present date. Some of the super intense geomagnetic storms that occurred prior to 1900 have been revisited and investigated in order to understand the probable interplanetary conditions associated with intense storms. Following Burton et al. (1975), an empirical relationship is derived for estimation of interplanetary electric field (IEFy) from the variations of Dst index and ΔH at Colaba-Alibag observatories. The estimated IEFy values using Dst and ΔHABG variations agree well with the observed IEFy, calculated using Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite observations for intense geomagnetic storms in solar cycle 23. This study will provide the uniqueness of each event and provide important insights into possible interplanetary conditions for intense geomagnetic storms and probable frequency of their occurrence.

  15. Oxidant enhancement in martian dust devils and storms: storm electric fields and electron dissociative attachment.

    PubMed

    Delory, Gregory T; Farrell, William M; Atreya, Sushil K; Renno, Nilton O; Wong, Ah-San; Cummer, Steven A; Sentman, Davis D; Marshall, John R; Rafkin, Scot C R; Catling, David C

    2006-06-01

    Laboratory studies, numerical simulations, and desert field tests indicate that aeolian dust transport can generate atmospheric electricity via contact electrification or "triboelectricity." In convective structures such as dust devils and dust storms, grain stratification leads to macroscopic charge separations and gives rise to an overall electric dipole moment in the aeolian feature, similar in nature to the dipolar electric field generated in terrestrial thunderstorms. Previous numerical simulations indicate that these storm electric fields on Mars can approach the ambient breakdown field strength of approximately 25 kV/m. In terrestrial dust phenomena, potentials ranging from approximately 20 to 160 kV/m have been directly measured. The large electrostatic fields predicted in martian dust devils and storms can energize electrons in the low pressure martian atmosphere to values exceeding the electron dissociative attachment energy of both CO2 and H2O, which results in the formation of the new chemical products CO/O- and OH/H-, respectively. Using a collisional plasma physics model, we present calculations of the CO/O- and OH/H- reaction and production rates. We demonstrate that these rates vary geometrically with the ambient electric field, with substantial production of dissociative products when fields approach the breakdown value of approximately 25 kV/m. The dissociation of H2O into OH/H- provides a key ingredient for the generation of oxidants; thus electrically charged dust may significantly impact the habitability of Mars. PMID:16805701

  16. Electrical stimulation systems for cardiac tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Nina; Cannizzaro, Christopher; Chao, Pen-Hsiu Grace; Maidhof, Robert; Marsano, Anna; Au, Hoi Ting Heidi; Radisic, Milica; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    We describe a protocol for tissue engineering of synchronously contractile cardiac constructs by culturing cardiac cells with the application of pulsatile electrical fields designed to mimic those present in the native heart. Tissue culture is conducted in a customized chamber built to allow for cultivation of (i) engineered three-dimensional (3D) cardiac tissue constructs, (ii) cell monolayers on flat substrates or (iii) cells on patterned substrates. This also allows for analysis of the individual and interactive effects of pulsatile electrical field stimulation and substrate topography on cell differentiation and assembly. The protocol is designed to allow for delivery of predictable electrical field stimuli to cells, monitoring environmental parameters, and assessment of cell and tissue responses. The duration of the protocol is 5 d for two-dimensional cultures and 10 d for 3D cultures. PMID:19180087

  17. Exploratory Meeting on Atmospheric Electricity and Severe Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, W. W. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    The meeting was arranged to discuss atmospheric electricity and its relationship to severe storms, the feasibility of developing a set of instruments for either a Space Shuttle or an unmanned satellite, and the scientific rationale which would warrant further in-depth assessment, involvement and development of supporting activities by NASA.

  18. Sudden cardiac arrest as a presentation of Brugada syndrome unmasked by thyroid storm.

    PubMed

    Korte, Anna K M; Derde, Lennie; van Wijk, Jeroen; Tjan, David H

    2015-01-01

    An 18-year-old man suffered a sudden cardiac arrest with ventricular fibrillation and was successfully resuscitated. He had neither a medical nor family history of cardiac disease/sudden death, but was known to have Graves' disease, for which he was treated with radioactive iodine. Recently, block-and-replacement therapy had been discontinued to evaluate thyroid functioning. On admission, thyroid hormone levels were markedly elevated, suggesting thyroid storm due to residual Graves' disease. The patient was treated with propylthiouracil, hydrocortisone and Lugol solution. ECG showed repolarisation patterns suggestive of an underlying type 1 Brugada syndrome (BS). These findings were confirmed by an additional ajmaline test. An implantable cardioverter defibrillator was implanted to prevent future arrhythmias. The patient underwent total thyroidectomy 9 months later and recovered completely. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a sudden cardiac arrest as a presentation of BS unmasked by thyroid storm. PMID:26718704

  19. On the Variations of Electricity, Lightning and Storm Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, M. J.; Deierling, W.; Liu, C.; Mach, D. M.; Kalb, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    Electrified clouds -thunderstorms if lightning is detected, and electrified shower clouds otherwise - produce various currents that contribute to the Global Electric Circuit (GEC). This study aims to use observations of storm properties and lightning characteristics, as well as passive microwave estimates of above-cloud electric fields to compare possible current contributions from a wide variety of storms including isolated thunderstorms, Mesoscale Convective Systems, and otherwise similar storms that occur over land or over the ocean. Variations in Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) optical flash properties are also considered in the context of how they relate to the properties of the parent storm and why they differ substantially between land and ocean. This study relies on observations from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite that include radar profiles from the Precipitation Radar (PR), passive microwave observations from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI), infrared imagery from the Visible and Infrared Scanner (VIRS), and optical lightning observations from LIS. Observations and derived parameters such as rain rates and electric field estimates are integrated into two databases: a Precipitation Feature (PF) database that summarizes the properties of storms defined by near surface rainfall, and an Illuminated Cloud Feature (ICF) database that summarizes the properties of the storm region illuminated by LIS lightning flashes. The ICF database is built to examine factors that are related to how optical energy can be distributed across the flash footprint in different types of clouds and different viewing conditions that will have consequences for the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) onboard the upcoming GOES-R satellite.

  20. Electric Activity in Dust Devils and Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renno, R. O.; Yana, C.; Covert, A.; Renno, K.; Wilson, J.

    2005-12-01

    Terrestrial dust devils produce charge separation and electric fields that exceeds the breakdown potential of the thin Martian atmosphere (Farrell et al., 2002, 2003; Krauss et al., 2002; Renno et al., 2004). Typical Martian dust devils are wider, taller and have larger dust content than terrestrial vortices. Thus, charge separation and electric-field breakdown are likely to occur in Martian dust devils and dust storms. We show that theory, laboratory experiments, and field measurements in Arizona suggests that collisions between sand and dust particles at the bottom of dust devils produce non-thermal microwave radiation. The non-thermal microwave emission allows not only the indirect detection of electric activity but could also allow the determination of the physical properties of Martian sand and dust by remote sensing. Besides being geologically important, electrically charged Martian dust devils and dust storms are potential hazards to Landers and at minimum would be an annoyance to future astronauts exploring the planet. Indeed, the design of adequate mechanical and electrical systems for these Landers cannot progress effectively without a better understanding of Martian dust devils and dust storms. Moreover, ancillary phenomena associated with electrically charged vortices can ionize atmospheric gases and might have important implications for atmosphere chemistry and even habitability.

  1. Surface electric fields for North America during historical geomagnetic storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wei, Lisa H.; Homeier, Nichole; Gannon, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the impact of geomagnetic disturbances on the electric grid, we recreate surface electric fields from two historical geomagnetic storms—the 1989 “Quebec” storm and the 2003 “Halloween” storms. Using the Spherical Elementary Current Systems method, we interpolate sparsely distributed magnetometer data across North America. We find good agreement between the measured and interpolated data, with larger RMS deviations at higher latitudes corresponding to larger magnetic field variations. The interpolated magnetic field data are combined with surface impedances for 25 unique physiographic regions from the United States Geological Survey and literature to estimate the horizontal, orthogonal surface electric fields in 1 min time steps. The induced horizontal electric field strongly depends on the local surface impedance, resulting in surprisingly strong electric field amplitudes along the Atlantic and Gulf Coast. The relative peak electric field amplitude of each physiographic region, normalized to the value in the Interior Plains region, varies by a factor of 2 for different input magnetic field time series. The order of peak electric field amplitudes (largest to smallest), however, does not depend much on the input. These results suggest that regions at lower magnetic latitudes with high ground resistivities are also at risk from the effect of geomagnetically induced currents. The historical electric field time series are useful for estimating the flow of the induced currents through long transmission lines to study power flow and grid stability during geomagnetic disturbances.

  2. Geomagnetic storm environments and effects on electrical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tesche, F.M. , Dallas, TX ); Barnes, P.R. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the behavior of the earth's magnetic field during a geomagnetic storm. Temporal variations of the B-field on the earths surface can induce an electric field in the earth, and this E-field will induce currents to flow in long, grounded conductors. Previous experience with geomagnetic storms indicates that such geomagnetically-induced currents can cause damage to power system components, and at times, can cause power blackouts. This paper presents some recently measured geomagnetic field variations, and illustrates how the induced electric field can be calculated, assuming a simple model of the imperfectly conducting earth. This calculation may be performed either in the time or in the frequency domain. Approximations to the time dependence of the geomagnetic field permit an analytical evaluation of the corresponding E-field in the earth, and this results in a simple expression for the transient Enfield. A knowledge of this Enfield is important in understanding the effects of geomagnetic storms on the power system, and in devising protection methods.

  3. [Future of implantable electrical cardiac devices].

    PubMed

    Daubert, Jean-Claude; Behaghel, Albin; Leclercq, Christophe; Mabo, Philippe

    2014-03-01

    Major improvements in implantable electrical cardiac devices have been made during the last two decades, notably with the advent of automatic internal defibrillation (ICD) to prevent sudden arrhythmic death, and cardiac resynchronisation (CRT) to treat the discoordinated failing heart. They now constitute a major therapeutic option and may eventually supersede drug therapy. The coming era will be marked by a technological revolution, with improvements in treatment delivery, safety and efficacy, and an expansion of clinical indications. Leadless technologyfor cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators is already in the pipeline, endovascular leads currently being responsible for most long-term complications (lead failure, infection, vein thrombosis, etc.). Miniaturized pacemakers based on nanotechnology can now be totally implanted inside the right ventricle through the transvenous route, thus eliminating leads, pockets and scarring In the same way, totally subcutaneous ICD systems are now available, although they are currently only capable of delivering shocks, without pacing (including antitachycardia pacing). In CRT optimised delivery is important to improve clinical responses and to reduce the non-response rate (around 30 % with current technology). Endocardial left ventricular pacing could be a solution if it can be achieved at an acceptable risk. Multisite ventricular pacing is an alternative. Besides CRT neuromodulation, especially by vagal stimulation, is another important field of device researchfor heart failure. Preliminary clinical results are encouraging. PMID:26427291

  4. Atmospheric Electricity Effects of Eastern Mediterranean Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Shai; Yair, Yoav; Yaniv, Roy; Price, Colin

    2016-04-01

    We present atmospheric electrical measurements conducted at the Wise Observatory (WO) in Mizpe-Ramon (30035'N, 34045'E) and Mt. Hermon (30024'N, 35051'E), Israel, during two massive and unique dust storms that occurred over the Eastern Mediterranean region on February 10-11 and September 08-12, 2015. The first event transported Saharan dust from Egypt and the Sinai Peninsula in advance of a warm front of a Cyprus low pressure system. In the second event, dust particles were transported from the Syrian desert, which dominates the north-east border with Iraq, through flow associated with a shallow Persian trough system. In both events the concentrations of PM10 particles measured by the air-quality monitoring network of the Israeli Ministry of the Environment in Beer-Sheba reached values > 2200 μg m-3. Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) obtained from the AERONET station in Sde-Boker reached values up to 4.0. The gradual intensification of the first event reached peak values on the February 11th > 1200 μg m-3 and an AOT ~ 1.8, while the second dust storm commenced on September 8th with a sharp increase reaching peak values of 2225 μg m-3 and AOT of 4.0. Measurements of the fair weather vertical electric field (Ez) and of the vertical current density (Jz) were conducted continuously with a 1 minute temporal resolution. During the February event, very large fluctuations in the electrical parameters were measured at the WO. The Ez values changed between +1000 and +8000 V m-1 while the Jz fluctuated between -10 and +20 pA m-2 (this is an order of magnitude larger compared to the fair weather current density of ~2 pA m-2. In contrast, during the September event, Ez values registered at WO were between -430 and +10 V m-1 while the Jz fluctuated between -6 and +3 pA m2. For the September event the Hermon site showed Ez and Jz values fluctuating between -460 and +570 V m-1 and -14.5 and +18 pA m-2 respectively. The electric field and current variability, amplitude and the

  5. Storm time electric field penetration observed at mid-latitude

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, H.C.; Foster, J.C. ); Rich, F.J.; Swider, W. )

    1991-04-01

    During the height of the February 8-9, 1986, magnetic storm the Millstone Hill radar was in the evening local time sector (1600-2200 MLT). Radar observations indicate that high speed (>1,000 m s{sup {minus}1}) westward ion flow penetrated deeply below 50{degree} invariant latitude ({Lambda}) and persisted for 6 hours between 2100 UT on February 8 and 0300 UT on February 9. The double-peaked ion convection feature was pronounced throughout the period, and the separation in the dual maxima ranged from 4{degree} to 10{degree}. The latitude positions of the high-latitude ion drift peak and the convection reversal varied in unison. The low-latitude ion drift peak ({approximately}49{degree}{Lambda} or L =2.3) did not show significant universal time/magnetic local time (UT/MLT) variation in its latitude location but showed a decrease in magnitude during the initial recovery phase of the storm. Using simultaneous particle (30 eV-30 keV) precipitation data from the DMSP F6 and F7 satellites, the authors find the high-latitude ion drift peak to coincide with the boundary plasma sheet/central plasma sheet transition in the high ionospheric conductivity (>15 mho) region. The low-latitude ion drift peak lay between the equatorward edges of the electron and soft (< 1 keV) ion precipitation in the low conductivity region ({approximately}1 mho). A comparison between the low-altitude observations and simultaneous ring current observations from the high-altitude AMPTE satellite further suggests that the low-altitude ion drift peak is closely related to the maximum of the O{sup +} dominated ring current energy density in magnetic latitude. The low-latitude ion drift peak is the low-altitude signature of the electric field shielding effect associated with ring current penetration into the outer layer of the storm time plasmasphere.

  6. A less aggressive therapeutic option for electrical storm.

    PubMed

    Bertero, G; Agosti, S; Brunelli, C

    2013-01-01

    Electrical storm (ES) describes the rapidly clustering ventricular fibrillation (VF) that requires multiple cardioversions. Emerging evidence suggests that Purkinje arborization and sympathetic nerve regeneration play a major role in initiating malignant arrhythmias. We report the case of two patients who, after having survived an acute myocardial infarction (MI), developed repetitive episodes of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and VF one week after percutaneous revascularization, triggered by monomorphic premature ventricular contractions (PVCs). Owing to repetitive and drug-refractory VF episodes, temporary atrial overdrive pacing was attempted with complete suppression of VF. In the following month, recurrence of ventricular arrhythmia was inversely related to the atrial pacing rate. Although antiarrhythmic drugs other than beta-blockers had been discontinued, neither PVCs nor ventricular arrhythmias recurred at one-month follow-up when the lower pacing rate was set at 60 bpm. In conclusion in these patients, ES was likely related to nerve sprouting after ischemic injury. This chaotic phenomenon occurs early after tissue damage and shows a peak seven days after acute MI with degeneration of superfluous axon branches. High pacing rates can reduce early after depolarizations and suppress PVCs, thus preventing ES. On these grounds, ES patients may be treated with temporary overdrive pacing rather than early radiofrequency ablation. PMID:24217829

  7. Cardiac fibrillation risks with TASER conducted electrical weapons.

    PubMed

    Panescu, Dorin; Kroll, Mark; Brave, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The TASER(®) conducted electrical weapon (CEW) delivers electrical pulses that can temporarily incapacitate subjects. We analyzed the cardiac fibrillation risk with TASER CEWs. Our risk model accounted for realistic body mass index distributions, used a new model of effects of partial or oblique dart penetration and used recent epidemiological CEW statics. PMID:26736265

  8. Combined Aircraft and Satellite-Derived Storm Electric Current and Lightning Rates Measurements and Implications for the Global Electric Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Bateman, Monte G.

    2010-01-01

    Using rotating vane electric field mills and Gerdien capacitors, we measured the electric field profile and conductivity during 850 overflights of electrified shower clouds and thunderstorms spanning regions including the Southeastern United States, the Western Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, Central America and adjacent oceans, Central Brazil, and the South Pacific. The overflights include storms over land and ocean, with and without lightning, and with positive and negative fields above the storms. The measurements were made with the NASA ER-2 and the Altus-II high altitude aircrafts. Peak electric fields, with lightning transients removed, ranged from -1.0 kV/m to 16 kV/m, with a mean value of 0.9 kV/m. The median peak field was 0.29 kV/m. Integrating our electric field and conductivity data, we determined total conduction currents and flash rates for each overpass. With knowledge of the storm location (land or ocean) and type (with or without lightning), we determine the mean currents by location and type. The mean current for ocean storms with lightning is 1.6 A while the mean current for land storms with lightning is 1.0 A. The mean current for oceanic storms without lightning (i.e., electrified shower clouds) is 0.39 A and the mean current for land storms without lightning is 0.13 A. Thus, on average, land storms with or without lightning have about half the mean current as their corresponding oceanic storm counterparts. Over three-quarters (78%) of the land storms had detectable lightning, while less than half (43%) of the oceanic storms had lightning. We did not find any significant regional or latitudinal based patterns in our total conduction currents. By combining the aircraft derived storm currents and flash rates with diurnal lightning statistics derived from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and Optical Transient Detector (OTD) low Earth orbiting satellites, we reproduce the diurnal variation in the global electric circuit (i.e., the Carnegie

  9. Electrical Storm Simulation to Improve the Learning Physics Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martínez Muñoz, Miriam; Jiménez Rodríguez, María Lourdes; Gutiérrez de Mesa, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    This work is part of a research project whose main objective is to understand the impact that the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has on the teaching and learning process on the subject of Physics. We will show that, with the use of a storm simulator, physics students improve their learning process on one hand they understand…

  10. Progress in utilization of a mobile laboratory for making storm electricity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, W. David

    1988-01-01

    A mobile atmospheric science laboratory has been used to intercept and track storms on the Great Plains region of the U.S., with the intention of combining the data obtained with those from Doppler and conventional radars, NASA U-2 aircraft overflights, balloon soundings, and fixed-base storm electricity measurements. The mobile lab has proven to be valuable in the gathering of ground truth verifications for the two commercially operated lightning ground-strike locating systems. Data acquisition has recently been expanded by means of mobile ballooning before and during storms.

  11. [Electromagnetic interference of electrical dental equipment with cardiac pacemakers].

    PubMed

    Brand, H S; van der Hoeff, E V; Schrama, T A M; Entjes, M L; van Nieuw, Amerongen A

    2007-09-01

    Eight different electrical dental appliances were tested at different intervals for their ability to interfere with the function of a contemporary cardiac pacemaker. The normal atrial and ventricular pacing was inhibited by an ultrasonic bath cleaner at a distance of less than 15 cm. In contrast, a dental chair, an electrosurgical unit, an ultrasonic tooth scaler, 2 handpieces, and 2 amalgamators failed to produce electromagnetic interference at the minimum distance of 2.5 cm. In conclusion, the results suggest that normal clinical use of dental electrical equipment does not have any significant effect on the cardiac pacemaker tested. PMID:17937372

  12. Lightning Mapping and Electric Field Change Observations of a Stationary New Mexico Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Hunyady, S. J.; Edens, H. E.; Sonnenfeld, R. G.; Aulich, G. D.

    2010-12-01

    On August 23, 2010 a classic airmass thunderstorm occurred over high plains immediately east of the Langmuir Laboratory mountaintop observatory in central New Mexico. The energetic storm developed around 2:30 pm MDT (2030 UTC) and remained essentially stationary over its complete lifetime of about 2 hours. The complete sequence of lightning was recorded both by the 16-station Langmuir Laboratory Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and by several electrostatic field change stations around and beneath the storm. The LMA and Delta-E data are both of very high quality and sensitivity. In this initial study we report on the lightning-inferred electrical structure of the storm and on estimated charging currents determined from a simple electrodynamic model of the storm. The electric field change measurements, in combination with the detailed 3-D mapping results, can be used to determine the amounts of charge involved in individual strokes and parts of flashes for comparison and improvement of the modeling. The LMA data regularly detected isolated attempted breakdown events at repeated locations at mid- to high altitudes in the storm that were clearly indicative of localized high-field regions. The attempted breakdown events were often exact pre-cursors of the initial breakdown of full-fledged IC flashes typically several seconds up to several tens of seconds later, but also often did not precurse a subsequent discharge. During both IC and CG flashes, numerous recoil-type, fast negative breakdown events were detected along otherwise undetected positive leader channels in the main, mid-level negative charge region. The localized fast events during IC flashes often repeatedly intensified in strength and number prior to upward negative leader K-events, and then temporarily ceased before starting up again prior to the next K-event. Many of the negative CG flashes in the storm produced strokes with long continuing currents (CCs). The overall electric field changes and hence total

  13. Integrative Modeling of Electrical Properties of Pacemaker Cardiac Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, M.; Babich, L.

    2016-06-01

    This work represents modeling of electrical properties of pacemaker (sinus) cardiac cells. Special attention is paid to electrical potential arising from transmembrane current of Na+, K+ and Ca2+ ions. This potential is calculated using the NaCaX model. In this respect, molar concentration of ions in the intercellular space which is calculated on the basis of the GENTEX model is essential. Combined use of two different models allows referring this approach to integrative modeling.

  14. Characteristics of Storm-time Electric Fields in the Inner Magnetosphere Derived From Cluster Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, H.; Puhl-Quinn, P. A.; Jordanova, V. K.; Khotyaintsev, Y.; Lindqvist, P.; Torbert, R. B.

    2008-12-01

    We report storm-time electric fields in the inner magnetosphere at L=4-10 and full magnetic local time measured by Cluster. Here we use merged data from the Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) and the Electric Field and Wave (EFW) instrument. Data are analyzed statistically by picking storm periods during March 2001 and November 2007. Superposed epoch analysis with an epoch at Dst minimum is performed to reveal dependence of electric fields on epoch time and spacecraft locations. Strong electric fields are detected right around the Dst minimum for all magnetic local times, even though the data acquisition rate is not always large during these periods. The magnitude of electric fields often increases as L value decreases, although this is not always the case. The data are further examined in terms of the location of the inner edge of plasmasheet electrons and controlling parameters such as geomagnetic indices and interplanetary parameters.

  15. Acute outcome of treating patients admitted with electrical storm in a tertiary care centre

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Mukund A.; Namboodiri, Narayanan; Prasad BV, Srinivas; Abhilash, S.P.; Thajudeen, Anees; Ajith, Kumar V.K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Electrical storm (ES) is a life threatening emergency. There is little data available regarding acute outcome of ES. Aims The study aimed to analyze the acute outcome of ES, various treatment modalities used, and the factors associated with mortality. Methods This is a retrospective observational study involving patients admitted with ES at our centre between 1/1/2007 and 31/12/2013. Results 41 patients (mean age 54.61 ± 12.41 years; 86.7% males; mean ejection fraction (EF) 44.51 ± 16.48%) underwent treatment for ES. Hypokalemia (14.63%) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) (14.63%) were the commonest identifiable triggers. Only 9 (21.95%) patients already had an ICD implanted. Apart from antiarrhythmic drugs (100%), deep sedation (87.8%), mechanical ventilation (24.39%) and neuraxial modulation using left sympathetic cardiac denervation (21.95%) were the common treatment modalities used. Thirty-three (80.49%) patients could be discharged after a mean duration of 14.2 ± 2.31 days. Eight (19.5%) patients died in hospital. The mortality was significantly higher in those with EF < 35% compared to those with a higher EF (8 (42.11% vs 0 (0%), p = 0.03)). There was no significant difference in mortality between those with versus without a structural heart disease (8 (21.1% vs 0 (0%), p = 0.32)). Comparison of mortality an ACS with ES versus ES of other aetiologies (3 (50%) vs 5 (14.29) %, p = 0.076)) showed a trend towards significance. Conclusion With comprehensive treatment, there is reasonable acute survival rate of ES. Hypokalemia and ACS are the commonest triggers of ES. Patients with low EF and ACS have higher mortality.

  16. Electrical stimulation to optimize cardioprotective exosomes from cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Campbell, C R; Berman, A E; Weintraub, N L; Tang, Y L

    2016-03-01

    Injured or ischemic cardiac tissue has limited intrinsic capacity for regeneration. While stem cell transplantation is a promising approach to stimulating cardiac repair, its success in humans has thus far been limited. Harnessing the therapeutic benefits of stem cells requires a better understanding of their mechanisms of action and methods to optimize their function. Cardiac stem cells (CSC) represent a particularly effective cellular source for cardiac repair, and pre-conditioning CSC with electrical stimulation (EleS) was demonstrated to further enhance their function, although the mechanisms are unknown. Recent studies suggest that transplanted stem cells primarily exert their effects through communicating with endogenous tissues via the release of exosomes containing cardioprotective molecules such as miRNAs, which upon uptake by recipient cells may stimulate survival, proliferation, and angiogenesis. Exosomes are also effective therapeutic agents in isolation and may provide a feasible alternative to stem cell transplantation. We hypothesize that EleS enhances CSC-mediated cardiac repair through its beneficial effects on production of cardioprotective exosomes. Moreover, we hypothesize that the beneficial effects of biventricular pacing in patients with heart failure may in part result from EleS-induced preconditioning of endogenous CSC to promote cardiac repair. With future research, our hypothesis may provide applications to optimize stem cell therapy and augment current pacing protocols, which may significantly advance the treatment of patients with heart disease. PMID:26880625

  17. Global Electric Circuit Diurnal Variation Derived from Storm Overflight and Satellite Optical Lightning Datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Bateman, M. J.; Bailey, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    We have combined analyses of over 1000 high altitude aircraft observations of electrified clouds with diurnal lightning statistics from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and Optical Transient Detector (OTD) to produce an estimate of the diurnal variation in the global electric circuit. Using basic assumptions about the mean storm currents as a function of flash rate and location, and the global electric circuit, our estimate of the current in the global electric circuit matches the Carnegie curve diurnal variation to within 4% for all but two short periods of time. The agreement with the Carnegie curve was obtained without any tuning or adjustment of the satellite or aircraft data. Mean contributions to the global electric circuit from land and ocean thunderstorms are 1.1 kA (land) and 0.7 kA (ocean). Contributions to the global electric circuit from ESCs are 0.22 kA for ocean storms and 0.04 kA for land storms. Using our analysis, the mean total conduction current for the global electric circuit is 2.0 kA.

  18. EXOS D observations of enhanced electric fields during the giant magnetic storm in March 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, T.; Hayakawa, H.; Tsuruda, K.; Nishida, A.; Matsuoka, A.

    1993-09-01

    The authors report the observation of intense electric fields in the magnetosphere at altitudes of 2000 to 6000 km during and after the large magnetic storm on March 13-14, 1989. Such large fields are a manifestation of the inability of convecting plasma bodies from storms to penetrate to the earth. The measurements were made by two sets of double probes on the EXOS D satellite. A sharp peak in the poleward field was observed, with a magnitude of roughly 100 mV/m when projected to ionospheric heights.

  19. Global Electric Circuit Implications of Combined Aircraft Storm Electric Current Measurements and Satellite-Based Diurnal Lightning Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Bateman, Monte G.

    2011-01-01

    Using rotating vane electric field mills and Gerdien capacitors, we measured the electric field profile and conductivity during 850 overflights of thunderstorms and electrified shower clouds (ESCs) spanning regions including the Southeastern United States, the Western Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, Central America and adjacent oceans, Central Brazil, and the South Pacific. The overflights include storms over land and ocean, and with positive and negative fields above the storms. Over three-quarters (78%) of the land storms had detectable lightning, while less than half (43%) of the oceanic storms had lightning. Integrating our electric field and conductivity data, we determined total conduction currents and flash rates for each overpass. With knowledge of the storm location (land or ocean) and type (with or without lightning), we determine the mean currents by location and type. The mean current for ocean thunderstorms is 1.7 A while the mean current for land thunderstorms is 1.0 A. The mean current for ocean ESCs 0.41 A and the mean current for land ESCs is 0.13 A. We did not find any significant regional or latitudinal based patterns in our total conduction currents. By combining the aircraft derived storm currents and flash rates with diurnal flash rate statistics derived from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and Optical Transient Detector (OTD) low Earth orbiting satellites, we reproduce the diurnal variation in the global electric circuit (i.e., the Carnegie curve) to within 4% for all but two short periods of time. The agreement with the Carnegie curve was obtained without any tuning or adjustment of the satellite or aircraft data. Given our data and assumptions, mean contributions to the global electric circuit are 1.1 kA (land) and 0.7 kA (ocean) from thunderstorms, and 0.22 kA (ocean) and 0.04 (land) from ESCs, resulting in a mean total conduction current estimate for the global electric circuit of 2.0 kA. Mean storm counts are 1100 for land

  20. In situ measurements and radar observations of a severe storm - Electricity, kinematics, and precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, G. J.; Few, A. A.; Stewart, M. F.; Conrad, A. C.; Torczon, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    Electric field measurements made inside a multicell severe storm in Oklahoma in 1983 with a balloon-borne instrument are presented. The properties of the electric charge regions, such as altitude, thickness, and charge concentrations, are studied. These measurements are analzyed with meteorological measurements of temperature and humidity, and balloon tracking and radar observations. The relation between the electric charge structure and the precipitation and kinematic features of the storm is examined. The data reveal that the cell exhibits a bipolar charge structure with negative charge below positive charge. The average charge concentrations of the two regions are estimated as -1.2 and 0.15 nC/cu m, respectively; the upper positive charge is about 6 km in vertical extent, and the lower negative charge is less than 1 km in vertical extent.

  1. Retrieving Storm Electric Fields From Aircraft Field Mill Data. Part 2; Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, W. J.; Mach, D. M.; Christian, H. J.; Stewart, M. F.; Bateman, M. G.

    2005-01-01

    The Lagrange multiplier theory and "pitch down method" developed in Part I of this study are applied to complete the calibration of a Citation aircraft that is instrumented with six field mill sensors. When side constraints related to average fields are used, the method performs well in computer simulations. For mill measurement errors of 1 V/m and a 5 V/m error in the mean fair weather field function, the 3-D storm electric field is retrieved to within an error of about 12%. A side constraint that involves estimating the detailed structure of the fair weather field was also tested using computer simulations. For mill measurement errors of 1 V/m, the method retrieves the 3-D storm field to within an error of about 8% if the fair weather field estimate is typically within 1 V/m of the true fair weather field. Using this side constraint and data from fair weather field maneuvers taken on 29 June 2001, the Citation aircraft was calibrated. The resulting calibration matrix was then used to retrieve storm electric fields during a Citation flight on 2 June 2001. The storm field results are encouraging and agree favorably with the results obtained from earlier calibration analyses that were based on iterative techniques.

  2. Retrieving Storm Electric Fields from Aircrfaft Field Mill Data: Part II: Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William; Mach, D. M.; Christian H. J.; Stewart, M. F.; Bateman M. G.

    2006-01-01

    The Lagrange multiplier theory developed in Part I of this study is applied to complete a relative calibration of a Citation aircraft that is instrumented with six field mill sensors. When side constraints related to average fields are used, the Lagrange multiplier method performs well in computer simulations. For mill measurement errors of 1 V m(sup -1) and a 5 V m(sup -1) error in the mean fair-weather field function, the 3D storm electric field is retrieved to within an error of about 12%. A side constraint that involves estimating the detailed structure of the fair-weather field was also tested using computer simulations. For mill measurement errors of 1 V m(sup -l), the method retrieves the 3D storm field to within an error of about 8% if the fair-weather field estimate is typically within 1 V m(sup -1) of the true fair-weather field. Using this type of side constraint and data from fair-weather field maneuvers taken on 29 June 2001, the Citation aircraft was calibrated. Absolute calibration was completed using the pitch down method developed in Part I, and conventional analyses. The resulting calibration matrices were then used to retrieve storm electric fields during a Citation flight on 2 June 2001. The storm field results are encouraging and agree favorably in many respects with results derived from earlier (iterative) techniques of calibration.

  3. Summary of Almost 20 Years of Storm Overflight Electric Field, Conductivity, Flash Rate, and Current Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, Richard J.; Mach, Douglas M.; Bateman, Monte J.; Bailey, Jeffrey C.

    2011-01-01

    We present total conduction (Wilson) currents for more than 1000 high-altitude aircraft overflights of electrified clouds acquired over nearly two decades. The overflights include a wide geographical sample of storms over land and ocean, with and without lightning, and with positive (i.e., upward-directed) and negative current. Peak electric field, with lightning transients removed, ranged from -1.0 kV/m to 16. kV/m, with mean (median) of 0.9 kV/m (0.29 kV/m). Total conductivity at flight altitude ranged from 0.6 pS/m to 3.6 pS/m, with mean and median of 2.2 pS/m. Peak current densities ranged from -2.0 nA m(exp -2) to 33.0 nA m(exp -2) with mean (median) of 1.9 nA m(exp -2) (0.6 nA m(exp -2)). Total upward current flow from storms in our dataset ranged from -1.3 to 9.4 A. The mean current for storms with lightning is 1.7 A over ocean and 1.0 A over land. The mean current for electrified shower clouds (i.e. electrified storms without lightning) is 0.41 A for ocean and 0.13 A for land. About 78% (43%) of the land (ocean) storms have detectable lightning. Land storms have 2.8 times the mean flash rate as ocean storms (2.2 versus 0.8 flashes min-1, respectively). Approximately 7% of the overflights had negative current. The mean and median currents for positive (negative) polarity storms are 1.0 and 0.35 A (-0.30 and -0.26 A). We found no regional or latitudinal-based patterns in our storm currents, nor support for simple scaling laws between cloud top height and lightning flash rate.

  4. Electricity Demand Evolution Driven by Storm Motivated Population Movement

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Melissa R; Fernandez, Steven J; Fu, Joshua S; Walker, Kimberly A

    2014-01-01

    Managing the risks posed by climate change to energy production and delivery is a challenge for communities worldwide. Sea Level rise and increased frequency and intensity of natural disasters due to sea surface temperature rise force populations to move locations, resulting in changing patterns of demand for infrastructure services. Thus, Infrastructures will evolve to accommodate new load centers while some parts of the network are underused, and these changes will create emerging vulnerabilities. Combining climate predictions and agent based population movement models shows promise for exploring the universe of these future population distributions and changes in coastal infrastructure configurations. In this work, we created a prototype agent based population distribution model and developed a methodology to establish utility functions that provide insight about new infrastructure vulnerabilities that might result from these patterns. Combining climate and weather data, engineering algorithms and social theory, we use the new Department of Energy (DOE) Connected Infrastructure Dynamics Models (CIDM) to examine electricity demand response to increased temperatures, population relocation in response to extreme cyclonic events, consequent net population changes and new regional patterns in electricity demand. This work suggests that the importance of established evacuation routes that move large populations repeatedly through convergence points as an indicator may be under recognized.

  5. Summary of Almost 20 Years of Storm Overflight Electric Field, Conductivity, Flash Rates, and Electric Current Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, Richard J.; Mach, Douglas M.; Bateman, Monte J.; Bailey, Jeffrey C.

    2011-01-01

    We determined total conduction currents and flash rates for around 900 high-altitude aircraft overflights of electrified clouds over 17 years. The overflights include a wide geographical sample of storms over land and ocean, with and without lightning, and with positive (i.e., upward-directed) and negative current. Peak electric field, with lightning transients removed, ranged from -1.0 kV m(sup -1) to 16. kV m(sup -1), with mean (median) of 0.9 kV m(sup -1) (0.29 kV m(sup -1)). Total conductivity at flight altitude ranged from 0.6 pS m(sup -1) to 3.6 pS m(sup -1), with mean and median of 2.2 pS m(sup -1). Peak current densities ranged from -2.0 nA m(sup -2) to 33.0 nA m(sup -2) with mean (median) of 1.9 nA m(sup -2) (0.6 nA m(sup -2)). Total upward current flow from storms in our dataset ranged from -1.3 to 9.4 A. The mean current for storms with lightning is 1.6 A over ocean and 1.0 A over land. The mean current for electrified shower clouds (i.e. electrified storms without lightning) is 0.39 A for ocean and 0.13 A for land. About 78% (43%) of the land (ocean) storms have detectable lightning. Land storms have 2.8 times the mean flash rate as ocean storms (2.2 versus 0.8 flashes min(sup -1), respectively). Approximately 7% of the overflights had negative current. The mean and median currents for positive (negative) polarity storms are 1.0 and 0.35 A (-0.30 and -0.26 A). We found no regional or latitudinal-based patterns in our storm currents, nor support for simple scaling laws between cloud top height and lightning flash rate.

  6. Electrically Conductive Chitosan/Carbon Scaffolds for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this work, carbon nanofibers were used as doping material to develop a highly conductive chitosan-based composite. Scaffolds based on chitosan only and chitosan/carbon composites were prepared by precipitation. Carbon nanofibers were homogeneously dispersed throughout the chitosan matrix, and the composite scaffold was highly porous with fully interconnected pores. Chitosan/carbon scaffolds had an elastic modulus of 28.1 ± 3.3 KPa, similar to that measured for rat myocardium, and excellent electrical properties, with a conductivity of 0.25 ± 0.09 S/m. The scaffolds were seeded with neonatal rat heart cells and cultured for up to 14 days, without electrical stimulation. After 14 days of culture, the scaffold pores throughout the construct volume were filled with cells. The metabolic activity of cells in chitosan/carbon constructs was significantly higher as compared to cells in chitosan scaffolds. The incorporation of carbon nanofibers also led to increased expression of cardiac-specific genes involved in muscle contraction and electrical coupling. This study demonstrates that the incorporation of carbon nanofibers into porous chitosan scaffolds improved the properties of cardiac tissue constructs, presumably through enhanced transmission of electrical signals between the cells. PMID:24417502

  7. Electrically conductive chitosan/carbon scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Martins, Ana M; Eng, George; Caridade, Sofia G; Mano, João F; Reis, Rui L; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-02-10

    In this work, carbon nanofibers were used as doping material to develop a highly conductive chitosan-based composite. Scaffolds based on chitosan only and chitosan/carbon composites were prepared by precipitation. Carbon nanofibers were homogeneously dispersed throughout the chitosan matrix, and the composite scaffold was highly porous with fully interconnected pores. Chitosan/carbon scaffolds had an elastic modulus of 28.1 ± 3.3 KPa, similar to that measured for rat myocardium, and excellent electrical properties, with a conductivity of 0.25 ± 0.09 S/m. The scaffolds were seeded with neonatal rat heart cells and cultured for up to 14 days, without electrical stimulation. After 14 days of culture, the scaffold pores throughout the construct volume were filled with cells. The metabolic activity of cells in chitosan/carbon constructs was significantly higher as compared to cells in chitosan scaffolds. The incorporation of carbon nanofibers also led to increased expression of cardiac-specific genes involved in muscle contraction and electrical coupling. This study demonstrates that the incorporation of carbon nanofibers into porous chitosan scaffolds improved the properties of cardiac tissue constructs, presumably through enhanced transmission of electrical signals between the cells. PMID:24417502

  8. Electrical Storms in Brugada Syndrome: Review of Pharmacologic and Ablative Therapeutic Options

    PubMed Central

    P, Maury; M, Hocini; M, Haïssaguerre

    2005-01-01

    Electrical storm occurring in a patient with the Brugada syndrome is an exceptional but malignant and potentially lethal event. Efficient therapeutic solutions should be known and urgently applied because of the inability of usual antiarrhythmic means in preventing multiple recurrences of ventricular arrhythmias. Isoproterenol should be immediately infused while oral quinidine should be further administrated when isoproterenol is not effective. In case of failure of these therapeutic options, ablation of the triggering ventricular ectopies should be attempted. PMID:16943940

  9. Time causal operational estimation of electric fields induced in the Earth's lithosphere during magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Swidinsky, Andrei

    2014-04-01

    In support of projects for monitoring geomagnetic hazards for electric power grids, we develop a simple mathematical formalism, consistent with the time causality of deterministic physics, for estimating electric fields that are induced in the Earth's lithosphere during magnetic storms. For an idealized model of the lithosphere, an infinite half-space having uniform electrical conductivity properties described by a galvanic tensor, we work in the Laplace-transformed frequency domain to obtain a transfer function which, when convolved with measured magnetic field time series, gives an estimated electric field time series. Using data collected at the Kakioka, Japan observatory, we optimize lithospheric conductivity parameters by minimizing the discrepancy between model-estimated electric field variation and that actually measured. With our simple model, we can estimate 87% of the variance in storm time Kakioka electric field data; a more complicated model of lithospheric conductivity would be required to estimate the remaining 13% of the variance. We discuss how our estimation formalism might be implemented for geographically coordinated real-time monitoring of geoelectric fields.

  10. Summary of the NASA/MSFC FY-79 Severe Storm and Local Weather research review. [cloud physics, atmospheric electricity, and mesoscale/storm dynamics reserach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Significant acomplishments, current focus of work, plans for FY-80, and recommendations for new research are outlined for 36 research projects proposed for technical monitoring by the Atmospheric Sciences Division at Marshall Space Flight Center. Topics of the investigations, which were reviewed at a two-day meeting, relate to cloud physics, atmospheric electricity, and mesoscale/storm dynamics.

  11. Electrical and Mechanical Strategies to Enable Cardiac Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hung; Kang, Bong Jin; Lee, Chia-An; Shung, K. Kirk; Hsiai, Tzung K.

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate replacement of lost ventricular myocardium from myocardial infarction leads to heart failure. Investigating the regenerative capacity of mammalian hearts represents an emerging direction for tissue engineering and cell-based therapy. Recent advances in stem cells hold promise to restore cardiac functions. However, embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes lack functional phenotypes of the native myocardium, and transplanted tissues are not fully integrated for synchronized electrical and mechanical coupling with the host. In this context, this review highlights the mechanical and electrical strategies to promote cardiomyocyte maturation and integration, and to assess the functional phenotypes of regenerating myocardium. Simultaneous micro-electrocardiogram and high-frequency ultrasound techniques will also be introduced to assess electrical and mechanical coupling for small animal models of heart regeneration. PMID:25974948

  12. Influence of the Convection Electric Field Models on Predicted Plasmapause Positions During Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierrard, V.; Khazanov, G.; Cabrera, J.; Lemaire, J.

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, we determine how three well documented models of the magnetospheric electric field, and two different mechanisms proposed for the formation of the plasmapause influence the radial distance, the shape and the evolution of the plasmapause during the geomagnetic storms of 28 October 2001 and of 17 April 2002. The convection electric field models considered are: Mcllwain's E51) electric field model, Volland-Stern's model and Weimer's statistical model compiled from low-Earth orbit satellite data. The mechanisms for the formation of the plasmapause to be tested are: (i) the MHD theory where the plasmapause should correspond to the last-closed- equipotential (LCE) or last-closed-streamline (LCS), if the E-field distribution is stationary or time-dependent respectively; (ii) the interchange mechanism where the plasmapause corresponds to streamlines tangent to a Zero-Parallel-Force surface where the field-aligned plasma distribution becomes convectively unstable during enhancements of the E-field intensity in the nightside local time sector. The results of the different time dependent simulations are compared with concomitant EUV observations when available. The plasmatails or plumes observed after both selected geomagnetic storms are predicted in all simulations and for all E-field models. However, their shapes are quite different depending on the E-field models and the mechanisms that are used. Despite the partial success of the simulations to reproduce plumes during magnetic storms and substorms, there remains a long way to go before the detailed structures observed in the EUV observations during periods of geomagnetic activity can be accounted for very precisely by the existing E-field models. Furthermore, it cannot be excluded that the mechanisms currently identified to explain the formation of "Carpenter's knee" during substorm events, will', have to be revised or complemented in the cases of geomagnetic storms.

  13. Acute effects of carbon monoxide on cardiac electrical stability

    SciTech Connect

    Verrier, R.L.; Mills, A.K.; Skornik, W.A. )

    1990-10-01

    The objective of this project was to determine the effects of acute carbon monoxide exposure on cardiac electrical stability. To obtain a comprehensive assessment, diverse biological models were employed. These involved cardiac electrical testing in the normal and ischemic heart in anesthetized and conscious dogs. The experimental plan was designed both to examine the direct effects of carbon monoxide exposure on the myocardium and to evaluate possible indirect influences through alterations in platelet aggregability or changes in central nervous system activity in the conscious animal. Our results indicate that exposure to relatively high levels of carbon monoxide, leading to carboxyhemoglobin concentrations of up to 20 percent, is without significant effect on ventricular electrical stability. This appears to be the case in the acutely ischemic heart as well as in the normal heart. It is important to note that the total exposure period was in the range of 90 to 124 minutes. The possibility that longer periods of exposure or exacerbation from nicotine in cigarette smoke could have a deleterious effect cannot be excluded. We also examined whether or not alterations in platelet aggregability due to carbon monoxide exposure could be a predisposing factor for cardiac arrhythmias. A model involving partial coronary artery stenosis was used to simulate the conditions under which platelet plugs could lead to myocardial ischemia and life-threatening arrhythmias. We found no changes either in the cycle frequency of coronary blood flow oscillations or in platelet aggregability during carbon monoxide exposure. Thus, carbon monoxide exposure does not appear to alter platelet aggregability or its effect on coronary blood flow during stenosis. In the final series of experiments, we examined the effects of carbon monoxide exposure in the conscious state.

  14. Atmospheric Electrical Modeling in Support of the NASA F-106 Storm Hazards Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helsdon, John H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A recently developed storm electrification model (SEM) is used to investigate the operating environment of the F-106 airplane during the NASA Storm Hazards Project. The model is 2-D, time dependent and uses a bulkwater microphysical parameterization scheme. Electric charges and fields are included, and the model is fully coupled dynamically, microphysically and electrically. One flight showed that a high electric field was developed at the aircraft's operating altitude (28 kft) and that a strong electric field would also be found below 20 kft; however, this low-altitude, high-field region was associated with the presence of small hail, posing a hazard to the aircraft. An operational procedure to increase the frequency of low-altitude lightning strikes was suggested. To further the understanding of lightning within the cloud environment, a parameterization of the lightning process was included in the SEM. It accounted for the initiation, propagation, termination, and charge redistribution associated with an intracloud discharge. Finally, a randomized lightning propagation scheme was developed, and the effects of cloud particles on the initiation of lightning investigated.

  15. Electric Field Influence on Driving the Storm-Time Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaharia, S. G.; Jordanova, V. K.; MacDonald, E.; Reeves, G. D.

    2013-05-01

    We present initial numerical simulation results of the storm-time near-Earth magnetosphere obtained with our newly improved self-consistent model, RAM-SCB. The model represents a 2-way coupling of the kinetic ring current-atmosphere interactions model (RAM) with an Euler potential-based 3D plasma equilibrium code. In our approach, the magnetic field is computed in force balance with the anisotropic pressures in RAM (anisotropy being critically important for wave excitation), and then returned to RAM to guide the particle dynamics. RAM-SCB thus properly treats both the kinetic drift physics crucial in the inner magnetosphere (where gradient/curvature drifts are important) and the self-consistent interaction between plasma and magnetic field (required due to the strong depressions in the field during storms that affect the plasma evolution). Recent improvements in RAM-SCB are the expansion of the boundary from geosynchronous location to 9 RE from Earth and the first-time inclusion of a self-consistent electric field, obtained by closing the field-aligned currents in the ionosphere. This extension makes RAM-SCB the most physically complete inner magnetosphere model in the community, with fully self-consistent 3D magnetic and electric fields. The presentation will analyze, using storm-time simulations of the near-Earth magnetosphere with the improved model, the effect of the self-consistent electric field on ring current dynamics, in comparison with empirical electric field models such as Weimer 01 and Volland/Stern models. We will also compare model results with observations (including global indices such as Dst, but also plasma and field data from available spacecraft, such as Polar, Cluster, GOES and the recently launched Van Allen Probes).

  16. Electrical Pacing of Cardiac Tissue Including Potassium Inward Rectification

    PubMed Central

    Galappaththige, Suran; Roth, Bradley J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study cardiac tissue is stimulated electrically through a small unipolar electrode. Numerical simulations predict that around an electrode are adjacent regions of depolarization and hyperpolarization. Experiments have shown that during pacing of resting cardiac tissue the hyperpolarization is often inhibited. Our goal is to determine if the inward rectifying potassium current (IK1) causes the inhibition of hyperpolarization. Numerical simulations were carried out using the bidomain model with potassium dynamics specified to be inward rectifying. In the simulations, adjacent regions of depolarization and hyperpolarization were observed surrounding the electrode. For cathodal currents the virtual anode produces a hyperpolarization that decreases over time. For long duration pulses the current-voltage curve is non-linear, with very small hyperpolarization compared to depolarization. For short pulses, the hyperpolarization is more prominent. Without the inward potassium rectification, the current voltage curve is linear and the hyperpolarization is evident for both long and short pulses. In conclusion, the inward rectification of the potassium current explains the inhibition of hyperpolarization for long duration stimulus pulses, but not for short duration pulses. PMID:26057242

  17. Subtle alternating electrocardiographic morphology as an indicator of decreased cardiac electrical stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.; Blue, B.; Clancy, E.; Valeri, C. R.; Cohen, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Observations from finite-element computer models, together with analytic developments based on percolation theory have suggested that subtle fluctuations of ECG morphology might serve as an indicator diminished cardiac electrical stability. With fixed-rate atrial pacing in canines, we have previously observed a pattern of alternation in T wave energy which correlated with cardiac electrical stability. We report here on a series of 20 canine experiments in which cardiac electrical stability (measured via Ventricular Fibrillation Threshold determination) was compared to a non-degenerate, multidimensional measurement of the degree of alternating activity present in the ECG complex morphology. The decrease in cardiac electrical stability brought on by both coronary artery occlusion and systemic hypothermia was consistently accompanied by subtle alternation in ECG morphology, with the absolute degree of alternating activity being significantly (negatively) correlated with cardiac electrical stability.

  18. Effect of Precipitating Electrons on Stormtime Inner Magnetospheric Electric Fields during the 17 March 2013 Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Lemon, C. L.; Sazykin, S. Y.; Wolf, R.; Hecht, J. H.; Walterscheid, R. L.; Boyd, A. J.; Turner, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate how scattering of electrons by waves in the plasma sheet and plasmasphere affects precipitating energy flux distributions and how the precipitating electrons modify the ionospheric conductivity and electric potentials during the large 17 March 2013 magnetic storm. Of particular interest is how electron precipitation in the evening sector affects the development of the Sub-auroral Polarization Stream (SAPS) electric field that is observed at sub-auroral latitudes in that sector. Our approach is to use the magnetically and electrically self-consistent Rice Convection Model - Equilibrium (RCM-E) of the inner magnetosphere to simulate the stormtime precipitating electron distributions and the electric field. We use parameterized rates of whistler-generated electron pitch-angle scattering from Orlova and Shprits [JGR, 2014] that depend on equatorial radial distance, magnetic activity (Kp), and magnetic local time (MLT) outside the simulated plasmasphere. Inside the plasmasphere, parameterized scattering rates due to hiss [Orlova et al., GRL, 2014] are used. We compare simulated trapped and precipitating electron flux distributions with measurements from Van Allen Probes/MagEIS, POES/TED and MEPED, respectively, to validate the electron loss model. Ground-based (SuperDARN) and in-situ (Van Allen Probes/EFW) observations of electric fields are compared with the simulation results. We discuss the effect of precipitating electrons on the SAPS and inner magnetospheric electric field through the data-model comparisons.

  19. Rabbit models of cardiac mechano-electric and mechano-mechanical coupling.

    PubMed

    Quinn, T Alexander; Kohl, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac auto-regulation involves integrated regulatory loops linking electrics and mechanics in the heart. Whereas mechanical activity is usually seen as 'the endpoint' of cardiac auto-regulation, it is important to appreciate that the heart would not function without feed-back from the mechanical environment to cardiac electrical (mechano-electric coupling, MEC) and mechanical (mechano-mechanical coupling, MMC) activity. MEC and MMC contribute to beat-by-beat adaption of cardiac output to physiological demand, and they are involved in various pathological settings, potentially aggravating cardiac dysfunction. Experimental and computational studies using rabbit as a model species have been integral to the development of our current understanding of MEC and MMC. In this paper we review this work, focusing on physiological and pathological implications for cardiac function. PMID:27208698

  20. Retrieving Storm Electric Fields from Aircraft Field Mill Data. Part 1; Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, W. J.

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that the problem of retrieving storm electric fields from an aircraft instrumented with several electric field mill sensors can be expressed in terms of a standard Lagrange multiplier optimization problem. The method naturally removes aircraft charge from the retrieval process without having to use a high voltage stinger and linearly combined mill data values. It allows a variety of user-supplied physical constraints (the so-called side constraints in the theory of Lagrange multipliers) and also helps improve absolute calibration. Additionally, this paper introduces an alternate way of performing the absolute calibration of an aircraft that has some benefits over conventional analyses. It is accomplished by using the time derivatives of mill and pitch data for a pitch down maneuver performed at high (greater than 1 km) altitude. In Part II of this study, the above methods are tested and then applied to complete a full calibration of a Citation aircraft.

  1. Retrieving Storm Electric Fields From Aircraft Field Mill Data. Part I: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, W. J.

    2005-01-01

    It is shown that the problem of retrieving storm electric fields from an aircraft instrumented with several electric field mill sensors can be expressed in terms of a standard Lagrange multiplier optimization problem. The method naturally removes aircraft charge from the retrieval process without having to use a high voltage stinger and linearly combined mill data values. It also allows a variety of user-supplied physical constraints (the so-called side constraints in the theory of Lagrange multipliers). Additionally, this paper introduces a novel way of performing the absolute calibration of an aircraft that has several benefits over conventional analyses. In the new approach, absolute calibration is completed by inspecting the time derivatives of mill and pitch data for a pitch down maneuver performed at high (greater than 1 km) altitude. In Part II of this study, the above methods are tested and then applied to complete a full calibration of a Citation aircraft.

  2. Nanowires and Electrical Stimulation Synergistically Improve Functions of hiPSC Cardiac Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Richards, Dylan J; Tan, Yu; Coyle, Robert; Li, Yang; Xu, Ruoyu; Yeung, Nelson; Parker, Arran; Menick, Donald R; Tian, Bozhi; Mei, Ying

    2016-07-13

    The advancement of human induced pluripotent stem-cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hiPSC-CM) technology has shown promising potential to provide a patient-specific, regenerative cell therapy strategy to treat cardiovascular disease. Despite the progress, the unspecific, underdeveloped phenotype of hiPSC-CMs has shown arrhythmogenic risk and limited functional improvements after transplantation. To address this, tissue engineering strategies have utilized both exogenous and endogenous stimuli to accelerate the development of hiPSC-CMs. Exogenous electrical stimulation provides a biomimetic pacemaker-like stimuli that has been shown to advance the electrical properties of tissue engineered cardiac constructs. Recently, we demonstrated that the incorporation of electrically conductive silicon nanowires to hiPSC cardiac spheroids led to advanced structural and functional development of hiPSC-CMs by improving the endogenous electrical microenvironment. Here, we reasoned that the enhanced endogenous electrical microenvironment of nanowired hiPSC cardiac spheroids would synergize with exogenous electrical stimulation to further advance the functional development of nanowired hiPSC cardiac spheroids. For the first time, we report that the combination of nanowires and electrical stimulation enhanced cell-cell junction formation, improved development of contractile machinery, and led to a significant decrease in the spontaneous beat rate of hiPSC cardiac spheroids. The advancements made here address critical challenges for the use of hiPSC-CMs in cardiac developmental and translational research and provide an advanced cell delivery vehicle for the next generation of cardiac repair. PMID:27328393

  3. Electrical stimulation of cardiac adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells modulates cell phenotype and genetic machinery.

    PubMed

    Llucià-Valldeperas, A; Sanchez, B; Soler-Botija, C; Gálvez-Montón, C; Prat-Vidal, C; Roura, S; Rosell-Ferrer, J; Bragos, R; Bayes-Genis, A

    2015-11-01

    A major challenge of cardiac tissue engineering is directing cells to establish the physiological structure and function of the myocardium being replaced. Our aim was to examine the effect of electrical stimulation on the cardiodifferentiation potential of cardiac adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells (cardiac ATDPCs). Three different electrical stimulation protocols were tested; the selected protocol consisted of 2 ms monophasic square-wave pulses of 50 mV/cm at 1 Hz over 14 days. Cardiac and subcutaneous ATDPCs were grown on biocompatible patterned surfaces. Cardiomyogenic differentiation was examined by real-time PCR and immunocytofluorescence. In cardiac ATDPCs, MEF2A and GATA-4 were significantly upregulated at day 14 after stimulation, while subcutaneous ATDPCs only exhibited increased Cx43 expression. In response to electrical stimulation, cardiac ATDPCs elongated, and both cardiac and subcutaneous ATDPCs became aligned following the linear surface pattern of the construct. Cardiac ATDPC length increased by 11.3%, while subcutaneous ATDPC length diminished by 11.2% (p = 0.013 and p = 0.030 vs unstimulated controls, respectively). Compared to controls, electrostimulated cells became aligned better to the patterned surfaces when the pattern was perpendicular to the electric field (89.71 ± 28.47º for cardiac ATDPCs and 92.15 ± 15.21º for subcutaneous ATDPCs). Electrical stimulation of cardiac ATDPCs caused changes in cell phenotype and genetic machinery, making them more suitable for cardiac regeneration approaches. Thus, it seems advisable to use electrical cell training before delivery as a cell suspension or within engineered tissue. PMID:23420554

  4. Network of observations on the atmospheric electrical parameters during geomagnetic storm on 5 April 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victor, N. Jeni; Manu, S.; Frank-Kamenetsky, A. V.; Panneerselvam, C.; Anil Kumar, C. P.; Elango, P.

    2016-03-01

    The effects of a geomagnetic storm on the variation of the atmospheric electric field over Maitri (70°45'S, 11°44'E), Dome C (75°06'S, 123°20'E), and Vostok (78°27'S, 106°52'E) Antarctic research stations are presented in this paper. For the first time, the paper reports the simultaneous observations of the atmospheric electric field/potential gradient (PG) over the three high-latitude stations at the Southern Hemisphere, and its associated changes due to a substorm phenomenon. PG data obtained from these three stations under fair-weather conditions on 5 April 2010 are analyzed. The duration of geomagnetic disturbance is classified into three intervals, which contains three consecutive substorms based on the magnetic records of the Maitri station. The substorm is directly related to an enhancement of the magnetospheric convective electric field at high latitude, generally controlled by the solar wind parameters. It is found that the variation in the amplitude of PG depends on the magnetic latitude during substorm onset. During the substorm expansion phase, when the convection cell is at overhead, PG is significantly enhanced due to the downward mapping of the ionospheric horizontal electric field. The present observation demonstrated the changes on PG due to the spatial extension of the convection cell from high latitudes up to middle latitudes.

  5. Martian dust devil and storm electric fields: The formation of an O- plasma and new local chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, W.; Delory, G.; Sentmann, D.; Renno, N.; Atreya, S.; Wong, A.; Cummer, S.; Marshall, J.; Rafkin, S.; Catling, D.

    2005-12-01

    It has been demonstrated via laboratory studies, numerical simulations and desert field tests that dust devils and possibly larger dust storms contain significant electrical energy, with electric fields in excess of 20 kV/m. Such fields in Martian dust devils and storms will accelerate electrons (i.e., increase the electron drift speed) thereby creating secondary electrons via impact ionization, the formation of negative ions via dissociative attachment, and new chemical pathway in subsequent recombination. In this presentation, we discuss the nature of the collisional CO2+/O- plasma that may form in the dust devil and storm, the possibility of glow emissions, and the implications for stability of important species such as methane.

  6. Reproducing Electric Field Observations during Magnetic Storms by means of Rigorous 3-D Modelling and Distortion Matrix Co-estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Püthe, Christoph; Manoj, Chandrasekharan; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2015-04-01

    Electric fields induced in the conducting Earth during magnetic storms drive currents in power transmission grids, telecommunication lines or buried pipelines. These geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) can cause severe service disruptions. The prediction of GIC is thus of great importance for public and industry. A key step in the prediction of the hazard to technological systems during magnetic storms is the calculation of the geoelectric field. To address this issue for mid-latitude regions, we developed a method that involves 3-D modelling of induction processes in a heterogeneous Earth and the construction of a model of the magnetospheric source. The latter is described by low-degree spherical harmonics; its temporal evolution is derived from observatory magnetic data. Time series of the electric field can be computed for every location on Earth's surface. The actual electric field however is known to be perturbed by galvanic effects, arising from very local near-surface heterogeneities or topography, which cannot be included in the conductivity model. Galvanic effects are commonly accounted for with a real-valued time-independent distortion matrix, which linearly relates measured and computed electric fields. Using data of various magnetic storms that occurred between 2000 and 2003, we estimated distortion matrices for observatory sites onshore and on the ocean bottom. Strong correlations between modellings and measurements validate our method. The distortion matrix estimates prove to be reliable, as they are accurately reproduced for different magnetic storms. We further show that 3-D modelling is crucial for a correct separation of galvanic and inductive effects and a precise prediction of electric field time series during magnetic storms. Since the required computational resources are negligible, our approach is suitable for a real-time prediction of GIC. For this purpose, a reliable forecast of the source field, e.g. based on data from satellites

  7. Blunt cardiac rupture with prehospital pulseless electrical activity: a rare successful experience.

    PubMed

    Lu, Li-Hua; Choi, Wai-Mau; Wu, Hsueh-Ru; Liu, Hung-Chang; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Tsai, Shin-Han

    2005-12-01

    Blunt cardiac rupture is highly associated with mortality. In the recent literature, the reported mortality rates of cardiac rupture ranged from 59.7% to 100%. The probability of survival for those with prehospital pulseless electrical activity was extremely low. This case report describes a rare example of survival of a female patient with life-threatening cardiac rupture and cardiac tamponade after a major car accident. The victim developed pulseless electrical activity at admission. She recovered from the accident, however, without developing any signs of neurologic deficits. This case study emphasizes the value of the primary survey of patients and prompt and accurate interventions, including focused abdominal sonography for trauma, pericardiocentesis, and an urgent thoracotomy in the operating room for primary repair of cardiac rupture without applying a cardiopulmonary bypass system. The study showed that early diagnosis and aggressive interventions are crucial factors to the successful outcome of patient's survival. PMID:16394928

  8. The Electric Field and Waves Instruments on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wygant, J. R.; Bonnell, J. W.; Goetz, K.; Ergun, R. E.; Mozer, F. S.; Bale, S. D.; Ludlam, M.; Turin, P.; Harvey, P. R.; Hochmann, R.; Harps, K.; Dalton, G.; McCauley, J.; Rachelson, W.; Gordon, D.; Donakowski, B.; Shultz, C.; Smith, C.; Diaz-Aguado, M.; Fischer, J.; Heavner, S.; Berg, P.; Malsapina, D. M.; Bolton, M. K.; Hudson, M.; Strangeway, R. J.; Baker, D. N.; Li, X.; Albert, J.; Foster, J. C.; Chaston, C. C.; Mann, I.; Donovan, E.; Cully, C. M.; Cattell, C. A.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Kersten, K.; Brenneman, A.; Tao, J. B.

    2013-11-01

    The Electric Fields and Waves (EFW) Instruments on the two Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) spacecraft (recently renamed the Van Allen Probes) are designed to measure three dimensional quasi-static and low frequency electric fields and waves associated with the major mechanisms responsible for the acceleration of energetic charged particles in the inner magnetosphere of the Earth. For this measurement, the instrument uses two pairs of spherical double probe sensors at the ends of orthogonal centripetally deployed booms in the spin plane with tip-to-tip separations of 100 meters. The third component of the electric field is measured by two spherical sensors separated by ˜15 m, deployed at the ends of two stacer booms oppositely directed along the spin axis of the spacecraft. The instrument provides a continuous stream of measurements over the entire orbit of the low frequency electric field vector at 32 samples/s in a survey mode. This survey mode also includes measurements of spacecraft potential to provide information on thermal electron plasma variations and structure. Survey mode spectral information allows the continuous evaluation of the peak value and spectral power in electric, magnetic and density fluctuations from several Hz to 6.5 kHz. On-board cross-spectral data allows the calculation of field-aligned wave Poynting flux along the magnetic field. For higher frequency waveform information, two different programmable burst memories are used with nominal sampling rates of 512 samples/s and 16 k samples/s. The EFW burst modes provide targeted measurements over brief time intervals of 3-d electric fields, 3-d wave magnetic fields (from the EMFISIS magnetic search coil sensors), and spacecraft potential. In the burst modes all six sensor-spacecraft potential measurements are telemetered enabling interferometric timing of small-scale plasma structures. In the first burst mode, the instrument stores all or a substantial fraction of the high frequency

  9. Non-invasive determination of cardiac output by Doppler echocardiography and electrical bioimpedance.

    PubMed Central

    Northridge, D B; Findlay, I N; Wilson, J; Henderson, E; Dargie, H J

    1990-01-01

    Cardiac output measured by thermodilution in 25 patients within 24 hours of acute myocardial infarction was compared with cardiac output measured by Doppler echocardiography (24 patients) and electrical bioimpedance (25 patients). The mean (range) cardiac outputs measured by Doppler (4.03 (2.2-6.0) 1/min) and electrical bioimpedance (3.79 (1.1-6.2) 1/min) were similar to the mean thermodilution value (3.95 (2.1-6.2) 1/min). Both non-invasive techniques agreed closely with thermodilution in most patients. None the less, three results with each method disagreed with thermodilution by more than 1 1/min. Both non-invasive techniques were reproducible and accurate in most patients with acute myocardial infarction. Doppler echocardiography was time consuming and technically demanding. Electrical bioimpedance was simple to use and had the additional advantage of allowing continuous monitoring of the cardiac output. PMID:2317415

  10. Preliminary Optical And Electric Field Pulse Statistics From Storm Overflights During The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, D. A.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Bailey, J. C.; Farrell, W. M.; Goldberg, R. A.; Desch, M. D.; Houser, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES) was conducted during the month of August, 2002 in an area near Key West, Florida. One of the goals of this uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) study was to collect high resolution optical pulse and electric field data from thunderstorms. During the month long campaign, we acquired 5294 lightning generated optical pulses with associated electric field changes. Most of these observations were made while close to the top of the storms. We found filtered mean and median 10-10% optical pulse widths of 875 and 830 microns respectively while the 50-50% mean and median optical pulse widths are 422 and 365 microns respectively. These values are similar to previous results as are the 10-90% mean and median rise times of 327 and 265 microns. The peak electrical to optical pulse delay mean and median were 209 and 145 microns which is longer than one would expect from theoretical results. The results of the pulse analysis will contribute to further validation of the Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) satellites. Pre-launch estimates of the flash detection efficiency were based on a small sample of optical pulse measurements associated with less than 350 lightning discharges collected by NASA U-2 aircraft in the early 1980s. Preliminary analyses of the ACES measurements show that we have greatly increased the number of optical pulses available for validation of the LIS and other orbital lightning optical sensors. Since the Altus was often close to the cloud tops, many of the optical pulses are from low-energy pulses. From these low-energy pulses, we can determine the fraction of optical lightning pulses below the thresholds of LIS, OTD, and any future satellite-based optical sensors such as the geostationary Lightning Mapping Sensor.

  11. Thyroid storm

    MedlinePlus

    Thyrotoxic storm; Hyperthyroid storm; Accelerated hyperthyroidism; Thyroid crisis; Thyrotoxicosis - thyroid storm ... thyroid storm can be caused by treatment of hyperthyroidism with radioiodine therapy.

  12. Control of cardiac alternans by mechanical and electrical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapari, Felicia; Deshpande, Dipen; Belhamadia, Youssef; Dubljevic, Stevan

    2014-07-01

    A persistent alternation in the cardiac action potential duration has been linked to the onset of ventricular arrhythmia, which may lead to sudden cardiac death. A coupling between these cardiac alternans and the intracellular calcium dynamics has also been identified in previous studies. In this paper, the system of PDEs describing the small amplitude of alternans and the alternation of peak intracellular Ca2+ are stabilized by optimal boundary and spatially distributed actuation. A simulation study demonstrating the successful annihilation of both alternans on a one-dimensional cable of cardiac cells by utilizing the full-state feedback controller is presented. Complimentary to these studies, a three variable Nash-Panfilov model is used to investigate alternans annihilation via mechanical (or stretch) perturbations. The coupled model includes the active stress which defines the mechanical properties of the tissue and is utilized in the feedback algorithm as an independent input from the pacing based controller realization in alternans annihilation. Simulation studies of both control methods demonstrate that the proposed methods can successfully annihilate alternans in cables that are significantly longer than 1 cm, thus overcoming the limitations of earlier control efforts.

  13. Vortex shedding as a precursor of turbulent electrical activity in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Cabo, C; Pertsov, A M; Davidenko, J M; Baxter, W T; Gray, R A; Jalife, J

    1996-01-01

    In cardiac tissue, during partial blockade of the membrane sodium channels, or at high frequencies of excitation, inexcitable obstacles with sharp edges may destabilize the propagation of electrical excitation waves, causing the formation of self-sustained vortices and turbulent cardiac electrical activity. The formation of such vortices, which visually resembles vortex shedding in hydrodynamic turbulent flows, was observed in sheep epicardial tissue using voltage-sensitive dyes in combination with video-imaging techniques. Vortex shedding is a potential mechanism leading to the spontaneous initiation of uncontrolled high-frequency excitation of the heart. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:8785270

  14. Wave trains induced by circularly polarized electric fields in cardiac tissues.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xia; Gao, Xiang; Tang, Juan-Mei; Pan, Jun-Ting; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Clinically, cardiac fibrillation caused by spiral and turbulent waves can be terminated by globally resetting electric activity in cardiac tissues with a single high-voltage electric shock, but it is usually associated with severe side effects. Presently, a promising alternative uses wave emission from heterogeneities induced by a sequence of low-voltage uniform electric field pulses. Nevertheless, this method can only emit waves locally near obstacles in turbulent waves and thereby requires multiple obstacles to globally synchronize myocardium and thus to terminate fibrillation. Here we propose a new approach using wave emission from heterogeneities induced by a low-voltage circularly polarized electric field (i.e., a rotating uniform electric field). We find that, this approach can generate circular wave trains near obstacles and they propagate outwardly. We study the characteristics of such circular wave trains and further find that, the higher-frequency circular wave trains can effectively suppress spiral turbulence. PMID:26302781

  15. Wave trains induced by circularly polarized electric fields in cardiac tissues

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xia; Gao, Xiang; Tang, Juan-Mei; Pan, Jun-Ting; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Clinically, cardiac fibrillation caused by spiral and turbulent waves can be terminated by globally resetting electric activity in cardiac tissues with a single high-voltage electric shock, but it is usually associated with severe side effects. Presently, a promising alternative uses wave emission from heterogeneities induced by a sequence of low-voltage uniform electric field pulses. Nevertheless, this method can only emit waves locally near obstacles in turbulent waves and thereby requires multiple obstacles to globally synchronize myocardium and thus to terminate fibrillation. Here we propose a new approach using wave emission from heterogeneities induced by a low-voltage circularly polarized electric field (i.e., a rotating uniform electric field). We find that, this approach can generate circular wave trains near obstacles and they propagate outwardly. We study the characteristics of such circular wave trains and further find that, the higher-frequency circular wave trains can effectively suppress spiral turbulence. PMID:26302781

  16. Electrical stimulation of human embryonic stem cells: cardiac differentiation and the generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Serena, Elena; Figallo, Elisa; Tandon, Nina; Cannizzaro, Christopher; Gerecht, Sharon; Elvassore, Nicola; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-12-10

    Exogenous electric fields have been implied in cardiac differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this work, we explored the effects of electrical field stimulation on ROS generation and cardiogenesis in embryoid bodies (EBs) derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC, line H13), using a custom-built electrical stimulation bioreactor. Electrical properties of the bioreactor system were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and analysis of electrical currents. The effects of the electrode material (stainless steel, titanium-nitride-coated titanium, titanium), length of stimulus (1 and 90 s) and age of EBs at the onset of electrical stimulation (4 and 8 days) were investigated with respect to ROS generation. The amplitude of the applied electrical field was 1 V/mm. The highest rate of ROS generation was observed for stainless steel electrodes, for signal duration of 90 s and for 4-day-old EBs. Notably, comparable ROS generation was achieved by incubation of EBs with 1 nM H(2)O(2). Cardiac differentiation in these EBs was evidenced by spontaneous contractions, expression of troponin T and its sarcomeric organization. These results imply that electrical stimulation plays a role in cardiac differentiation of hESCs, through mechanisms associated with the intracellular generation of ROS. PMID:19720058

  17. An evaluation of two conducted electrical weapons using a swine comparative cardiac safety model.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Donald M; Ho, Jeffrey D; Moore, Johanna C; Laudenbach, Andrew P; Reardon, Robert F; Miner, James R

    2014-09-01

    Arrest-related deaths proximate to the use of a conducted electrical weapon (CEW) continue to generate controversy despite a better understanding of the multi-factorial nature of many of these deaths. With the rapid adoption of this technology by law enforcement, and the proliferation of companies entering the marketplace, it is important to have a method to assess the relative safety of these weapons. We had previously developed a model to assess the relative cardiac safety of CEWs. In this study, we use this model to compare the TASER X2 and the Karbon Arms MPID. Our results suggest that the TASER X2 may have an improved cardiac safety margin over the Karbon Arms MPID as determined by a smaller area of cardiac pacing on the anterior chest in our model. This model seems to offer a reproducible means of comparing the cardiac effects of CEWs. PMID:24895072

  18. Dynamic subauroral ionospheric electric fields observed by the Falkland Islands radar during the course of a geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grocott, A.; Milan, S. E.; Baker, J. B. H.; Freeman, M. P.; Lester, M.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2011-11-01

    We present an analysis of ionospheric electric field data observed during a geomagnetic storm by the recently deployed HF radar located on the Falkland Islands. On 3 August 2010 at ˜1800 UT evidence of the onset of a geomagnetic storm was observed in ground magnetometer data in the form of a decrease in the Sym-H index of ˜100 nT. The main phase of the storm was observed to last ˜24 hours before a gradual recovery lasting ˜3 days. On 4 August, during the peak magnetic disturbance of the storm, a high velocity (>1000 m s-1) channel of ionospheric plasma flow, which we interpret as a subauroral ion drift (SAID), located between 53° and 58° magnetic south and lasting ˜6.5 hours, was observed by the Falkland Islands radar in the pre-midnight sector. Coincident flow data from the DMSP satellites and the magnetically near-conjugate northern hemisphere Blackstone HF radar reveal that the SAID was embedded within the broader subauroral polarization streams (SAPS). DMSP particle data indicate that the SAID location closely followed the equatorward edge of the auroral electron precipitation boundary, while remaining generally poleward of the equatorward boundary of the ion precipitation. The latitude of the SAID varied throughout the interval on similar timescales to variations in the interplanetary magnetic field and auroral activity, while variations in its velocity were more closely related to ring current dynamics. These results are consistent with SAID electric fields being generated by localized charge separation in the partial ring current, but suggest that their location is more strongly governed by solar wind driving and associated large-scale magnetospheric dynamics.

  19. Effect of Cardiac Tissue Anisotropy on Three-Dimensional Electrical Action Potential Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi Zhu; Liu, Jing

    A three-dimensional (3D) electrical action potential propagation model is developed to characterize the integrated effect of cardiac tissue structure using a homogenous function with a spatial inhomogeneity. This method may be more effective for bridging the gap between computational models and experimental data for cardiac tissue anisotropy. A generalized 3D eikonal relation considering anisotropy and a self-similar evolution solution of such a relation are derived to identify the effect of anisotropy and predict the anisotropy-induced electrical wave propagation instabilities. Furthermore, the phase field equation is introduced to obtain the complex three-dimensional numerical solution of the new correlation. The present results are expected to be valuable for better understanding the physiological behavior of cardiac tissues.

  20. Changes in the cardiac muscle electric activity as a result of Coronary Artery Bypass Graft operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grajek, Magdalena; Krzyminiewski, Ryszard; Kalawski, Ryszard; Kulczak, Mariusz

    2008-01-01

    Many bioelectric signals have a complex internal structure that can be a rich source of information on the tissue or cell processes. The structure of such signals can be analysed in detail by applying digital methods of signal processing. Therefore, of substantial use in diagnosis of the coronary arterial disease is the method of digital enhancement of increasing signal resolution ECG (NURSE-ECG), permitting detection of temporary changes in the electric potentials in the cardiac muscle in the process of depolarisation. Thanks to the application of NURSE-ECG it has become possible to detect relatively small changes in the electric activity of particular fragments of the cardiac muscle undetectable by the standard ECG method, caused by ischemia, the effect of a drug or infarct. The aim of this study was to identify and analyse changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle as a result of the Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) operation. In this study the method of NURSE-ECG has been applied in order to identify and analyse changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle as a result of the CABG operation. In the study performed in cooperation of the Institute of Physics Adam Mickiewicz University and the Strus Hospital, Cardiac Surgery Ward, 37 patients with advanced coronary arterial disease were asked to participate. The patients were examined prior to the operation, on the day after the operation and two months after the operation and a year after the operation. The ECG recordings were subjected to a numerical procedure of resolution enhancement by a NURSE-ECG program to reveal the tentative changes in the electric potential of the cardiac muscle on its depolarisation. Results of the study have shown that the NURSE ECG method can be applied to monitor changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle occurring as a result of CABG operation. One the second day after the operation in the majority of patients (70%) a rapid decrease of the total

  1. Fractional diffusion models of cardiac electrical propagation: role of structural heterogeneity in dispersion of repolarization

    PubMed Central

    Bueno-Orovio, Alfonso; Kay, David; Grau, Vicente; Rodriguez, Blanca; Burrage, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Impulse propagation in biological tissues is known to be modulated by structural heterogeneity. In cardiac muscle, improved understanding on how this heterogeneity influences electrical spread is key to advancing our interpretation of dispersion of repolarization. We propose fractional diffusion models as a novel mathematical description of structurally heterogeneous excitable media, as a means of representing the modulation of the total electric field by the secondary electrical sources associated with tissue inhomogeneities. Our results, analysed against in vivo human recordings and experimental data of different animal species, indicate that structural heterogeneity underlies relevant characteristics of cardiac electrical propagation at tissue level. These include conduction effects on action potential (AP) morphology, the shortening of AP duration along the activation pathway and the progressive modulation by premature beats of spatial patterns of dispersion of repolarization. The proposed approach may also have important implications in other research fields involving excitable complex media. PMID:24920109

  2. Learning the Cardiac Cycle: Simultaneous Observations of Electrical and Mechanical Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Richard Alec; Frey, Mary Anne Bassett

    1980-01-01

    Described is a method for integrating electrical and mechanical events of the cardiac cycle by measuring systolic time intervals, which involves simultaneous recording of the ECG, a phonocardiogram, and the contour of the carotid pulse. Both resting and stress change data are provided as bases for class discussion. (CS)

  3. ALTERATION OF CARDIAC ELECTRICAL ACTIVITY BY WATER-LEACHABLE COMPONENTS OF RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH (ROFA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alteration of cardiac electrical activity by water-leachable components
    of residual oil fly ash (ROFA)

    Desuo Wang, Yuh-Chin T. Huang*, An Xie, Ting Wang

    *Human Studies Division, NHEERL, US EPA
    104 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill, NC 27599
    Department of Basic ...

  4. Evolution of ring current and radiation belt particles under the influence of storm-time electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Y.; Shinbori, A.; Ono, T.; Iizima, M.; Kumamoto, A.

    2007-06-01

    Electric field and potential distributions in the inner magnetosphere during geomagnetic storms have been investigated using the Akebono/EFD data. Using this electric field, we study injection of ring current particles and acceleration of radiation belt electrons by single-particle calculations. During the main phase, the dawn-dusk electric field is intensified especially in a range of 2 < L < 5 with a maximum amplitude of 6 mV/m on the duskside, and a two-cell convection pattern with a potential difference of 180 kV is identified. The convection pattern on the equatorial plane is significantly distorted with a large potential drop of 70 kV on the dawn and dusk sectors, indicating an intrinsic source of large-scale electric field in the inner magnetosphere. The plasma sheet ions are gathered into the dusk to premidnight sector in the inner magnetosphere in the region of enhanced electric field due to the strong E × B drift. The ions are transported into around 4 RE with an acceleration of more than 1 order of magnitude within 40 min, conserving the first adiabatic invariants. Relativistic electrons with initial energy of some hundreds of kiloelectron volts at 5 RE are energized to more than 100 keV for 3 hours. The energy spectrum during the recovery phase of 9 October 1990 geomagnetic storm observed by the CRRES satellite is reproduced without the radial diffusion or nonadiabatic acceleration by plasma waves. It is possible that this acceleration process is the inhomogeneity of the large-scale electric field, which corresponds to the ∇ × E term along orbits of electrons around the Earth.

  5. Dynamic separation of pulmonary and cardiac changes in electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Deibele, J M; Luepschen, H; Leonhardt, S

    2008-06-01

    In spontaneously breathing or ventilated subjects, it is difficult to image cardiac-related conductivity changes using electrical impedance tomography (EIT) due to the high amplitude of the ventilation component. Previous attempts to separate these components included either electrocardiogram-gated averaging, frequency domain filtering or holding the breath while performing the measurements. However, such methods are either not able to produce continuous real-time images or to fully separate cardiac and pulmonary changes. The aim of this work was to develop a new dynamic filtering method for the online separation of pulmonary and cardiac changes avoiding the drawbacks of the previous attempts. The approach is based on estimating template functions for the pulmonary and cardiac components by means of principal component analysis and frequency domain filtering. Then, these templates are fitted into the input signals. The new method enables an observer to examine the variation of the cardiac signal beat-by-beat after a one-time setup period of 20 s. Preliminary in vivo results of two healthy subjects are presented. The results are superior to frequency domain filtering and in good agreement with signals averaged over several cardiac cycles. The method does not depend on ECG or other a priori knowledge. The apparent validity of the method's ability to separate cardiac and pulmonary changes in EIT images was shown and has to be confirmed in future studies. The algorithm opens up new possibilities for future clinical trials on continuous monitoring by means of EIT and for the examination of the relation between the cardiac component and lung perfusion. PMID:18544813

  6. Advanced computer techniques for inverse modeling of electric current in cardiac tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, S.A.; Romero, L.A.; Diegert, C.F.

    1996-08-01

    For many years, ECG`s and vector cardiograms have been the tools of choice for non-invasive diagnosis of cardiac conduction problems, such as found in reentrant tachycardia or Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. Through skillful analysis of these skin-surface measurements of cardiac generated electric currents, a physician can deduce the general location of heart conduction irregularities. Using a combination of high-fidelity geometry modeling, advanced mathematical algorithms and massively parallel computing, Sandia`s approach would provide much more accurate information and thus allow the physician to pinpoint the source of an arrhythmia or abnormal conduction pathway.

  7. Thyroid storm

    MedlinePlus

    Thyrotoxic storm; Hyperthyroid storm; Accelerated hyperthyroidism ... Thyroid storm occurs in people with untreated hyperthyroidism. It is usually brought on by a major stress such as trauma, heart attack, or infection. Thyroid storm is very rare.

  8. Erbb2 Is Required for Cardiac Atrial Electrical Activity during Development

    PubMed Central

    Tenin, Gennadiy; Clowes, Christopher; Wolton, Kathryn; Krejci, Eliska; Wright, Jayne A.; Lovell, Simon C.; Sedmera, David; Hentges, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    The heart is the first organ required to function during embryonic development and is absolutely necessary for embryo survival. Cardiac activity is dependent on both the sinoatrial node (SAN), which is the pacemaker of heart's electrical activity, and the cardiac conduction system which transduces the electrical signal though the heart tissue, leading to heart muscle contractions. Defects in the development of cardiac electrical function may lead to severe heart disorders. The Erbb2 (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2) gene encodes a member of the EGF receptor family of receptor tyrosine kinases. The Erbb2 receptor lacks ligand-binding activity but forms heterodimers with other EGF receptors, stabilising their ligand binding and enhancing kinase-mediated activation of downstream signalling pathways. Erbb2 is absolutely necessary in normal embryonic development and homozygous mouse knock-out Erbb2 embryos die at embryonic day (E)10.5 due to severe cardiac defects. We have isolated a mouse line, l11Jus8, from a random chemical mutagenesis screen, which carries a hypomorphic missense mutation in the Erbb2 gene. Homozygous mutant embryos exhibit embryonic lethality by E12.5-13. The l11Jus8 mutants display cardiac haemorrhage and a failure of atrial function due to defects in atrial electrical signal propagation, leading to an atrial-specific conduction block, which does not affect ventricular conduction. The l11Jus8 mutant phenotype is distinct from those reported for Erbb2 knockout mouse mutants. Thus, the l11Jus8 mouse reveals a novel function of Erbb2 during atrial conduction system development, which when disrupted causes death at mid-gestation. PMID:25269082

  9. In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: An Update on Pulseless Electrical Activity and Asystole.

    PubMed

    Attin, Mina; Tucker, Rebecca G; Carey, Mary G

    2016-09-01

    Nonshockable rhythms, including pulseless electrical activity (PEA) and asystole, precede more than 70% of in-hospital cardiac arrests (I-HCA). Compared with shockable rhythms (ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia), nonshockable rhythms have higher mortality and morbidity. Therefore, investigating the underlying mechanisms of these arrhythmias to improve the quality of care and outcome for patients who suffer cardiac arrest is a priority. As the first responders to I-HCA, nurses must have the proper knowledge and training to provide timely and efficient cardiopulmonary resuscitation therapy. This article provides an overview of nonshockable cardiac arrhythmias preceding I-HCA as a means of addressing the gap between science and clinical practice. PMID:27484665

  10. Magnetospheric Convection Electric Field Dynamics and Stormtime Particle Energization: Case Study of the Magnetic Storm of May 4,1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.; Liemohn, Michael W.; Newman, Tim S.; Fok, Mei-Ching; Ridley, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    It is shown that narrow channels of high electric field are an effective mechanism for injecting plasma into the inner magnetosphere. Analytical expressions for the electric field cannot produce these channels of intense plasma flow, and thus result in less entry and energization of the plasma sheet into near-Earth space. For the ions, omission of these channels leads to an underprediction of the strength of the stormtime ring current and therefore an underestimation of the geoeffectiveness of the storm event. For the electrons, omission of these channels leads to the inability to create a seed population of 10-100 keV electrons deep in the inner magnetosphere. These electrons can eventually be accelerated into MeV radiation belt particles.

  11. Prompt penetration electric fields and the extreme topside ionospheric response to the June 22-23, 2015 geomagnetic storm as seen by the Swarm constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafyeva, Elvira; Zakharenkova, Irina; Alken, Patrick

    2016-09-01

    Using data from the three Swarm satellites, we study the ionospheric response to the intense geomagnetic storm of June 22-23, 2015. With the minimum SYM-H excursion of -207 nT, this storm is so far the second strongest geomagnetic storm in the current 24th solar cycle. A specific configuration of the Swarm satellites allowed investigation of the evolution of the storm-time ionospheric alterations on the day- and the nightside quasi-simultaneously. With the development of the main phase of the storm, a significant dayside increase of the vertical total electron content (VTEC) and electron density Ne was first observed at low latitudes on the dayside. From ~22 UT of 22 June to ~1 UT of 23 June, the dayside experienced a strong negative ionospheric storm, while on the nightside an extreme enhancement of the topside VTEC occurred at mid-latitudes of the northern hemisphere. Our analysis of the equatorial electrojet variations obtained from the magnetic Swarm data indicates that the storm-time penetration electric fields were, most likely, the main driver of the observed ionospheric effects at the initial phase of the storm and at the beginning of the main phase. The dayside ionosphere first responded to the occurrence of the strong eastward equatorial electric fields. Further, penetration of westward electric fields led to gradual but strong decrease of the plasma density on the dayside in the topside ionosphere. At this stage, the disturbance dynamo could have contributed as well. On the nightside, the observed extreme enhancement of the Ne and VTEC in the northern hemisphere (i.e., the summer hemisphere) in the topside ionosphere was most likely due to the combination of the prompt penetration electric fields, disturbance dynamo and the storm-time thermospheric circulation. From ~2.8 UT, the ionospheric measurements from the three Swarm satellites detected the beginning of the second positive storm on the dayside, which was not clearly associated with electrojet

  12. Biomimetic perfusion and electrical stimulation applied in concert improved the assembly of engineered cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Maidhof, Robert; Tandon, Nina; Lee, Eun Jung; Luo, Jianwen; Duan, Yi; Yeager, Keith; Konofagou, Elisa; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2012-11-01

    Maintenance of normal myocardial function depends intimately on synchronous tissue contraction, driven by electrical activation and on adequate nutrient perfusion in support thereof. Bioreactors have been used to mimic aspects of these factors in vitro to engineer cardiac tissue but, due to design limitations, previous bioreactor systems have yet to simultaneously support nutrient perfusion, electrical stimulation and unconstrained (i.e. not isometric) tissue contraction. To the best of our knowledge, the bioreactor system described herein is the first to integrate these three key factors in concert. We present the design of our bioreactor and characterize its capability in integrated experimental and mathematical modelling studies. We then cultured cardiac cells obtained from neonatal rats in porous, channelled elastomer scaffolds with the simultaneous application of perfusion and electrical stimulation, with controls excluding either one or both of these two conditions. After 8 days of culture, constructs grown with simultaneous perfusion and electrical stimulation exhibited substantially improved functional properties, as evidenced by a significant increase in contraction amplitude (0.23 ± 0.10% vs 0.14 ± 0.05%, 0.13 ± 0.08% or 0.09 ± 0.02% in control constructs grown without stimulation, without perfusion, or either stimulation or perfusion, respectively). Consistently, these constructs had significantly improved DNA contents, cell distribution throughout the scaffold thickness, cardiac protein expression, cell morphology and overall tissue organization compared to control groups. Thus, the simultaneous application of medium perfusion and electrical conditioning enabled by the use of the novel bioreactor system may accelerate the generation of fully functional, clinically sized cardiac tissue constructs. PMID:22170772

  13. Comparison of cardiac and 60 Hz magnetically induced electric fields measured in anesthetized rats

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.L.; Creim, J.A.

    1997-06-01

    Extremely low frequency magnetic fields interact with an animal by inducing internal electric fields, which are in addition to the normal endogenous fields present in living animals. Male rats weighing about 560 g each were anesthetized with ketamine and xylazine. Small incisions were made in the ventral body wall at the chest and upper abdomen to position a miniature probe for measuring internal electric fields. The calibration constant for the probe size was 5.7 mm, with a flat response from at least 12 Hz to 20 kHz. A cardiac signal, similar to the normal electrocardiogram with a heart rate of about 250 bpm, was readily obtained at the chest. Upon analysis of its spectrum, the cardiac field detected by the probe had a broad maximum at 32--95 Hz. When the rates were exposed to a 1 mT, 60 Hz magnetic field, a spike appeared in the spectrum at 60 Hz. The peak-to-peak magnitudes of electric fields associated with normal heart function were comparable to fields induced by a 1 mT magnetic field at 60 Hz for those positions measured on the body surface. Within the body, or in different directions relative to the applied field, the induced fields were reduced. The cardiac field increased near the heart, becoming much larger than the induced field. Thus, the cardiac electric field, together with the other endogenous fields, combine with induced electric fields and help to provide reference levels for the induced-field dosimetry of ELF magnetic field exposures of living animals.

  14. Numerically simulated cardiac exposure to electric current densities induced by TASER X-26 pulses in adult men

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitgeb, N.; Niedermayr, F.; Neubauer, R.; Loos, G.

    2010-10-01

    There is still an ongoing debate whether or not electronic stun devices (ESDs) induce cardiac fibrillation. To assess the ventricular fibrillation risk of law enforcing electronic control devices, quantitative estimates of cardiac electric current densities induced by delivered electric pulses are essential. Numerical simulations were performed with the finite integration technique and the anatomical model of a standardized European man (NORMAN) segmented into 2 mm voxels and 35 different tissues. The load-dependent delivery of TASER X-26 pulses has been taken into account. Cardiac exposure to electric current densities of vertically and horizontally aligned dart electrodes was quantified and different hit scenarios compared. Since fibrillation thresholds critically depend on exposed volume, the provided quantitative data are essential for risk assessment. The maximum cardiac rms current densities amounted to 7730 A m-2. Such high current densities and exposed cardiac volumes do not exclude ventricular fibrillation.

  15. Decomposition method of an electrical bio-impedance signal into cardiac and respiratory components.

    PubMed

    Krivoshei, A; Kukk, V; Min, M

    2008-06-01

    The paper presents a method for adaptive decomposition of an electrical bio-impedance (BI) signal into two components: cardiac and respiratory. The decomposition of a BI signal is not a trivial process because of the non-stationarity of the signal components and overlapping of their harmonic spectra. An application specific orthonormal basis (ASOB) was designed to solve the decomposition task using the Jacobi weighting function in the standard Gram-Schmidt process. The key element of the bio-impedance signal decomposer (BISD) is a model of the cardiac BI signal, which is constructed from the components of the ASOB and is intended for use in the BISD for on-line tracking of the cardiac BI signal. It makes it possible to separate the cardiac and respiratory components of the total BI signal in non-stationary conditions. In combination with the signal-shape locked loop (SSLL), the BISD allows us to decompose the BI signals with partially overlapping spectra. The proposed BISD based method is accomplished as a PC software digital system, but it is oriented towards applications in portable and stationary cardiac devices and in clinical settings. PMID:18544800

  16. Biomimetic scaffold combined with electrical stimulation and growth factor promotes tissue engineered cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyoungshin; Larson, Benjamin L; Kolewe, Martin E; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Freed, Lisa E

    2014-02-15

    Toward developing biologically sound models for the study of heart regeneration and disease, we cultured heart cells on a biodegradable, microfabricated poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) scaffold designed with micro-structural features and anisotropic mechanical properties to promote cardiac-like tissue architecture. Using this biomimetic system, we studied individual and combined effects of supplemental insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and electrical stimulation (ES). On culture day 8, all tissue constructs could be paced and expressed the cardiac protein troponin-T. IGF-1 reduced apoptosis, promoted cell-to-cell connectivity, and lowered excitation threshold, an index of electrophysiological activity. ES promoted formation of tissue-like bundles oriented in parallel to the electrical field and a more than ten-fold increase in matrix metalloprotease-2 (MMP-2) gene expression. The combination of IGF-1 and ES increased 2D projection length, an index of overall contraction strength, and enhanced expression of the gap junction protein connexin-43 and sarcomere development. This culture environment, designed to combine cardiac-like scaffold architecture and biomechanics with molecular and biophysical signals, enabled functional assembly of engineered heart muscle from dissociated cells and could serve as a template for future studies on the hierarchy of various signaling domains relative to cardiac tissue development. PMID:24240126

  17. A cardiac electrical activity model based on a cellular automata system in comparison with neural network model.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Sadiq Ali; Yousuf, Sidrah

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac Electrical Activity is commonly distributed into three dimensions of Cardiac Tissue (Myocardium) and evolves with duration of time. The indicator of heart diseases can occur randomly at any time of a day. Heart rate, conduction and each electrical activity during cardiac cycle should be monitor non-invasively for the assessment of "Action Potential" (regular) and "Arrhythmia" (irregular) rhythms. Many heart diseases can easily be examined through Automata model like Cellular Automata concepts. This paper deals with the different states of cardiac rhythms using cellular automata with the comparison of neural network also provides fast and highly effective stimulation for the contraction of cardiac muscles on the Atria in the result of genesis of electrical spark or wave. The specific formulated model named as "States of automaton Proposed Model for CEA (Cardiac Electrical Activity)" by using Cellular Automata Methodology is commonly shows the three states of cardiac tissues conduction phenomena (i) Resting (Relax and Excitable state), (ii) ARP (Excited but Absolutely refractory Phase i.e. Excited but not able to excite neighboring cells) (iii) RRP (Excited but Relatively Refractory Phase i.e. Excited and able to excite neighboring cells). The result indicates most efficient modeling with few burden of computation and it is Action Potential during the pumping of blood in cardiac cycle. PMID:27087101

  18. Acute effects of carbon monoxide on cardiac electrical stability. Research report, Sep 85-Jul 88

    SciTech Connect

    Verrier, R.L.; Mills, A.K.; Skornik, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the project was to determine the effects of acute carbon monoxide exposure on cardiac electrical stability in the normal and ischemic heart of anesthetized and conscious dogs. Exposure (90 to 120 minutes) to relatively high levels of carbon monoxide, leading to carboxyhemoglobin concentrations of up to 20 percent, was without significant effect on ventricular electrical stability in laboratory dogs. This appears to be the case in the acutely ischemic heart as well as in the normal heart. Using a model involving partial coronary artery stenosis, no changes were found in either the cycle frequency of coronary blood flow oscillations or in platelet aggregability during carbon monoxide exposure. Also examined were the effects of carbon monoxide exposure in the conscious state in order to take into consideration possible adverse consequences mediated by the central nervous system. The study found no adverse effects on the cardiac-excitable properties in response to either a 2-hour- or 24-hour-exposure paradigm.

  19. The induction of reentry in cardiac tissue. The missing link: How electric fields alter transmembrane potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Bradley J.; Krassowska, Wanda

    1998-03-01

    This review examines the initiation of reentry in cardiac muscle by strong electric shocks. Specifically, it concentrates on the mechanisms by which electric shocks change the transmembrane potential of the cardiac membrane and create the physiological substrate required by the critical point theory for the initiation of rotors. The mechanisms examined include (1) direct polarization of the tissue by the stimulating current, as described by the one-dimensional cable model and its two- and three-dimensional extensions, (2) the presence of virtual anodes and cathodes, as described by the bidomain model with unequal anisotropy ratios of the intra- and extracellular spaces, (3) polarization of the tissue due to changing orientation of cardiac fibers, and (4) polarization of individual cells or groups of cells by the electric field ("sawtooth potential"). The importance of these mechanisms in the initiation of reentry is examined in two case studies: the induction of rotors using successive stimulation with a unipolar electrode, and the induction of rotors using cross-field stimulation. These cases reveal that the mechanism by which a unipolar stimulation induces arrhythmias can be explained in the framework of the bidomain model with unequal anisotropy ratios. In contrast, none of the examined mechanisms provide an adequate explanation for the induction of rotors by cross-field stimulation. Hence, this study emphasizes the need for further experimental and theoretical work directed toward explaining the mechanism of field stimulation.

  20. Remodeling of cardiac passive electrical properties and susceptibility to ventricular and atrial arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Dhein, Stefan; Seidel, Thomas; Salameh, Aida; Jozwiak, Joanna; Hagen, Anja; Kostelka, Martin; Hindricks, Gerd; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Coordinated electrical activation of the heart is essential for the maintenance of a regular cardiac rhythm and effective contractions. Action potentials spread from one cell to the next via gap junction channels. Because of the elongated shape of cardiomyocytes, longitudinal resistivity is lower than transverse resistivity causing electrical anisotropy. Moreover, non-uniformity is created by clustering of gap junction channels at cell poles and by non-excitable structures such as collagenous strands, vessels or fibroblasts. Structural changes in cardiac disease often affect passive electrical properties by increasing non-uniformity and altering anisotropy. This disturbs normal electrical impulse propagation and is, consequently, a substrate for arrhythmia. However, to investigate how these structural changes lead to arrhythmias remains a challenge. One important mechanism, which may both cause and prevent arrhythmia, is the mismatch between current sources and sinks. Propagation of the electrical impulse requires a sufficient source of depolarizing current. In the case of a mismatch, the activated tissue (source) is not able to deliver enough depolarizing current to trigger an action potential in the non-activated tissue (sink). This eventually leads to conduction block. It has been suggested that in this situation a balanced geometrical distribution of gap junctions and reduced gap junction conductance may allow successful propagation. In contrast, source-sink mismatch can prevent spontaneous arrhythmogenic activity in a small number of cells from spreading over the ventricle, especially if gap junction conductance is enhanced. Beside gap junctions, cell geometry and non-cellular structures strongly modulate arrhythmogenic mechanisms. The present review elucidates these and other implications of passive electrical properties for cardiac rhythm and arrhythmogenesis. PMID:25404918

  1. Unpinning of rotating spiral waves in cardiac tissues by circularly polarized electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xia; Gao, Xiang; Pan, De-Bei; Li, Bing-Wei; Zhang, Hong

    2014-04-01

    Spiral waves anchored to obstacles in cardiac tissues may cause lethal arrhythmia. To unpin these anchored spirals, comparing to high-voltage side-effect traditional therapies, wave emission from heterogeneities (WEH) induced by the uniform electric field (UEF) has provided a low-voltage alternative. Here we provide a new approach using WEH induced by the circularly polarized electric field (CPEF), which has higher success rate and larger application scope than UEF, even with a lower voltage. And we also study the distribution of the membrane potential near an obstacle induced by CPEF to analyze its mechanism of unpinning. We hope this promising approach may provide a better alternative to terminate arrhythmia.

  2. Data-driven estimation of cardiac electrical diffusivity from 12-lead ECG signals.

    PubMed

    Zettinig, Oliver; Mansi, Tommaso; Neumann, Dominik; Georgescu, Bogdan; Rapaka, Saikiran; Seegerer, Philipp; Kayvanpour, Elham; Sedaghat-Hamedani, Farbod; Amr, Ali; Haas, Jan; Steen, Henning; Katus, Hugo; Meder, Benjamin; Navab, Nassir; Kamen, Ali; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2014-12-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is challenging due to a large variety of causes and disease stages. Computational models of cardiac electrophysiology (EP) can be used to improve the assessment and prognosis of DCM, plan therapies and predict their outcome, but require personalization. In this work, we present a data-driven approach to estimate the electrical diffusivity parameter of an EP model from standard 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECG). An efficient forward model based on a mono-domain, phenomenological Lattice-Boltzmann model of cardiac EP, and a boundary element-based mapping of potentials to the body surface is employed. The electrical diffusivity of myocardium, left ventricle and right ventricle endocardium is then estimated using polynomial regression which takes as input the QRS duration and electrical axis. After validating the forward model, we computed 9500 EP simulations on 19 different DCM patients in just under three seconds each to learn the regression model. Using this database, we quantify the intrinsic uncertainty of electrical diffusion for given ECG features and show in a leave-one-patient-out cross-validation that the regression method is able to predict myocardium diffusion within the uncertainty range. Finally, our approach is tested on the 19 cases using their clinical ECG. 84% of them could be personalized using our method, yielding mean prediction errors of 18.7ms for the QRS duration and 6.5° for the electrical axis, both values being within clinical acceptability. By providing an estimate of diffusion parameters from readily available clinical data, our data-driven approach could therefore constitute a first calibration step toward a more complete personalization of cardiac EP. PMID:24857832

  3. Comparison of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation and Parasternal Block for Postoperative Pain Management after Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Nilgun Kavrut; Baki, Elif Dogan; Kavakli, Ali Sait; Sahin, Ayca Sultan; Ayoglu, Raif Umut; Karaveli, Arzu; Emmiler, Mustafa; Inanoglu, Kerem; Karsli, Bilge

    2016-01-01

    Background. Parasternal block and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) have been demonstrated to produce effective analgesia and reduce postoperative opioid requirements in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Objectives. To compare the effectiveness of TENS and parasternal block on early postoperative pain after cardiac surgery. Methods. One hundred twenty patients undergoing cardiac surgery were enrolled in the present randomized, controlled prospective study. Patients were assigned to three treatment groups: parasternal block, intermittent TENS application, or a control group. Results. Pain scores recorded 4 h, 5 h, 6 h, 7 h, and 8 h postoperatively were lower in the parasternal block group than in the TENS and control groups. Total morphine consumption was also lower in the parasternal block group than in the TENS and control groups. It was also significantly lower in the TENS group than in the control group. There were no statistical differences among the groups regarding the extubation time, rescue analgesic medication, length of intensive care unit stay, or length of hospital stay. Conclusions. Parasternal block was more effective than TENS in the management of early postoperative pain and the reduction of opioid requirements in patients who underwent cardiac surgery through median sternotomy. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov number NCT02725229. PMID:27445610

  4. Atmospheric electrical modeling in support of the NASA F106 Storm Hazards Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helsdon, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    With the use of composite (non-metallic) and microelectronics becoming more prevalent in the construction of both military and commercial aircraft, the control systems have become more susceptible to damage or failure from electromagnetic transients. One source of such transients is the lightning discharge. In order to study the effects of the lightning discharge on the vital components of an aircraft, NASA Langley Research Center has undertaken a Storm Hazards Program in which a specially instrumented F106B jet aircraft is flown into active thunderstorms with the intention of being struck by lightning. One of the specific purposes of the program is to quantify the environmental conditions which are conductive to aircraft lightning strikes.

  5. Coordinating Electrical Activity of the Heart: Ankyrin Polypeptides in Human Cardiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Jerry; Mohler, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Over the past ten years, ankyrin polypeptides have emerged as critical players in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. Once thought to solely play only a structural role, loss-of-function variants in genes encoding ankyrin polypeptides have highlighted how this protein mediates the proper subcellular localization of the various electrical components of the excitation-contraction coupling machinery. A large body of evidence has revealed how the disruption of this localization is the primary cause of various cardiomyopathies, ranging from long QT syndrome 4, to sinus node disease, to more common forms of arrhythmias. Areas Covered This review details the varied roles that ankyrin polypeptides play in excitation-contraction coupling in the heart and the development of ankyrin-specific cardiomyopathies. It will further discuss how ankyrin polypeptides may be involved in structural and electrical remodeling of the heart, post-myocardial infarct. Attention is given to how ankyrin interactions with membrane bound ion channels may regulate these channels’ response to stimuli. Special attention is given to exciting new data, which may offer the potential for unique therapies, for not only combating heart disease, but which also holds promise for wider applications to various disease states. Expert Opinion The ankyrin family of adapter proteins is emerging as an intimate player in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. Until recently, these proteins have gone largely unappreciated for their importance in proper cardiac function. New insights into how these proteins function within the heart are offering potentially new avenues for therapies against cardiomyopathy. PMID:21457127

  6. Myocardial Scaffold-based Cardiac Tissue Engineering: Application of Coordinated Mechanical and Electrical Stimulations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Guangjun; To, Filip; Butler, J. Ryan; Claude, Andrew; McLaughlin, Ronald M.; Williams, Lakiesha N.; de Jongh Curry, Amy L.; Liao, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have developed an optimal decellularization protocol to generate 3D porcine myocardial scaffolds, which preserved natural extracellular matrix structure, mechanical anisotropy, and vasculature templates, and also showed good cell recellularization and differentiation potential. In this study, a multi-stimulation bioreactor was built to provide coordinated mechanical and electrical stimulations for facilitating stem cell differentiation and cardiac construct development. The acellular myocardial scaffolds were seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (106 cells/ml) by needle injection and subjected to 5-azacytidine treatment (3 μmol/L, 24 h) and various bioreactor conditioning protocols. We found that, after 2-day culture with mechanical (20% strain) and electrical stimulation (5 V, 1 Hz), high cell density and good cell viability were observed in the reseeded scaffold. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the differentiated cells showed cardiomyocyte-like phenotype, by expressing sarcomeric α-actinin, myosin heavy chain, cardiac troponin T, connexin-43, and N-cadherin. Biaxial mechanical testing demonstrated that positive tissue remodeling took place after 2-day bioreactor conditioning (20% strain + 5 V, 1 Hz); passive mechanical properties of the 2-day and 4-day tissue constructs were comparable to the tissue constructs produced by stirring reseeding followed by 2-week static culture, implying the effectiveness and efficiency of the coordinated simulations in promoting tissue remodeling. In short, the synergistic stimulations might be beneficial not only for the quality of cardiac construct development, but also for patients by reducing the waiting time in future clinical scenarios. PMID:23923967

  7. Storm time equatorial plasma bubble zonal drift reversal due to disturbance Hall electric field over the Brazilian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. M.; Abdu, M. A.; Souza, J. R.; Sobral, J. H. A.; Batista, I. S.; Denardini, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of equatorial ionospheric plasma bubbles over Brazilian sector during two magnetic storm events are investigated in this work. The observations were made at varying phases of magnetic disturbances when the bubble zonal drift velocity was found to reverse westward from its normally eastward velocity. Calculation of the zonal drift based on a realistic low-latitude ionosphere modeled by the Sheffield University Plasmasphere-Ionosphere Model showed on a quantitative basis a clear competition between vertical Hall electric field and disturbance zonal winds on the variations observed in the zonal velocity of the plasma bubble. The Hall electric field arising from enhanced ratio of field line-integrated conductivities, ΣH/ΣP, is most often generated by an increase in the integrated Hall conductivity, arising from enhanced energetic particle precipitation in the South American Magnetic Anomaly region for which evidence is provided from observation of anomalous sporadic E layers over Cachoeira Paulista and Fortaleza. Such sporadic E layers are also by themselves evidence for the development of the Hall electric field that modifies the zonal drift.

  8. Laser-patterned stem-cell bridges in a cardiac muscle model for on-chip electrical conductivity analyses

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhen; Liu, Qiuying; Liu, Honghai; Yang, Huaxiao; Yun, Julie X.; Eisenberg, Carol; Borg, Thomas K.; Xu, Meifeng; Gao, Bruce Z.

    2012-01-01

    Following myocardial infarction there is an irreversible loss of cardiomyocytes that results in the alteration of electrical propagation in the heart. Restoration of functional electrical properties of the damaged heart muscle is essential to recover from the infarction. While there are a few reports that demonstrate that fibroblasts can form junctions that transmit electrical signals, a potential alternative using the injection of stem cells has emerged as a promising cellular therapy; however, stem-cell electrical conductivity within the cardiac muscle fiber is unknown. In this study, an in vitro cardiac muscle model was established on an MEA-based biochip with multiple cardiomyocytes that mimic cardiac tissue structure. Using a laser beam, stem cells were inserted adjacent to each muscle fiber (cell bridge model) and allowed to form cell-cell contact as determined by the formation of gap junctions. The electrical conductivity of stem cells was assessed and compared with the electrical conductivities of cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts. Results showed that stem cell-myocyte contacts exhibited higher and more stable conduction velocities than myocyte-fibroblast contacts, which indicated that stem cells have higher electrical compatibility with native cardiac muscle fibers than cardiac fibroblasts. PMID:22170399

  9. Mechanisms of Electrical Activation and Conduction in the Gastrointestinal System: Lessons from Cardiac Electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Tse, Gary; Lai, Eric Tsz Him; Yeo, Jie Ming; Tse, Vivian; Wong, Sunny Hei

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is an electrically excitable organ system containing multiple cell types, which coordinate electrical activity propagating through this tract. Disruption in its normal electrophysiology is observed in a number of GI motility disorders. However, this is not well characterized and the field of GI electrophysiology is much less developed compared to the cardiac field. The aim of this article is to use the established knowledge of cardiac electrophysiology to shed light on the mechanisms of electrical activation and propagation along the GI tract, and how abnormalities in these processes lead to motility disorders and suggest better treatment options based on this improved understanding. In the first part of the article, the ionic contributions to the generation of GI slow wave and the cardiac action potential (AP) are reviewed. Propagation of these electrical signals can be described by the core conductor theory in both systems. However, specifically for the GI tract, the following unique properties are observed: changes in slow wave frequency along its length, periods of quiescence, synchronization in short distances and desynchronization over long distances. These are best described by a coupled oscillator theory. Other differences include the diminished role of gap junctions in mediating this conduction in the GI tract compared to the heart. The electrophysiology of conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease and gastroparesis, and functional problems such as irritable bowel syndrome are discussed in detail, with reference to ion channel abnormalities and potential therapeutic targets. A deeper understanding of the molecular basis and physiological mechanisms underlying GI motility disorders will enable the development of better diagnostic and therapeutic tools and the advancement of this field. PMID:27303305

  10. Development and characterization of novel electrically conductive PANI-PGS composites for cardiac tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Qazi, Taimoor H; Rai, Ranjana; Dippold, Dirk; Roether, Judith E; Schubert, Dirk W; Rosellini, Elisabetta; Barbani, Niccoletta; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases, especially myocardial infarction, are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world, also resulting in huge economic burdens on national economies. A cardiac patch strategy aims at regenerating an infarcted heart by providing healthy functional cells to the injured region via a carrier substrate, and providing mechanical support, thereby preventing deleterious ventricular remodeling. In the present work, polyaniline (PANI) was doped with camphorsulfonic acid and blended with poly(glycerol-sebacate) at ratios of 10, 20 and 30vol.% PANI content to produce electrically conductive composite cardiac patches via the solvent casting method. The composites were characterized in terms of their electrical, mechanical and physicochemical properties. The in vitro biodegradability of the composites was also evaluated. Electrical conductivity increased from 0Scm(-1) for pure PGS to 0.018Scm(-1) for 30vol.% PANI-PGS samples. Moreover, the conductivities were preserved for at least 100h post fabrication. Tensile tests revealed an improvement in the elastic modulus, tensile strength and elasticity with increasing PANI content. The degradation products caused a local drop in pH, which was higher in all composite samples compared with pure PGS, hinting at a buffering effect due to the presence of PANI. Finally, the cytocompatibility of the composites was confirmed when C2C12 cells attached and proliferated on samples with varying PANI content. Furthermore, leaching of acid dopants from the developed composites did not have any deleterious effect on the viability of C2C12 cells. Taken together, these results confirm the potential of PANI-PGS composites for use as substrates to modulate cellular behavior via electrical stimulation, and as biocompatible scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering applications. PMID:24561709

  11. Mechanisms of Electrical Activation and Conduction in the Gastrointestinal System: Lessons from Cardiac Electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Gary; Lai, Eric Tsz Him; Yeo, Jie Ming; Tse, Vivian; Wong, Sunny Hei

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is an electrically excitable organ system containing multiple cell types, which coordinate electrical activity propagating through this tract. Disruption in its normal electrophysiology is observed in a number of GI motility disorders. However, this is not well characterized and the field of GI electrophysiology is much less developed compared to the cardiac field. The aim of this article is to use the established knowledge of cardiac electrophysiology to shed light on the mechanisms of electrical activation and propagation along the GI tract, and how abnormalities in these processes lead to motility disorders and suggest better treatment options based on this improved understanding. In the first part of the article, the ionic contributions to the generation of GI slow wave and the cardiac action potential (AP) are reviewed. Propagation of these electrical signals can be described by the core conductor theory in both systems. However, specifically for the GI tract, the following unique properties are observed: changes in slow wave frequency along its length, periods of quiescence, synchronization in short distances and desynchronization over long distances. These are best described by a coupled oscillator theory. Other differences include the diminished role of gap junctions in mediating this conduction in the GI tract compared to the heart. The electrophysiology of conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease and gastroparesis, and functional problems such as irritable bowel syndrome are discussed in detail, with reference to ion channel abnormalities and potential therapeutic targets. A deeper understanding of the molecular basis and physiological mechanisms underlying GI motility disorders will enable the development of better diagnostic and therapeutic tools and the advancement of this field. PMID:27303305

  12. A guide to modelling cardiac electrical activity in anatomically detailed ventricles.

    PubMed

    Clayton, R H; Panfilov, A V

    2008-01-01

    One of the most recent trends in cardiac electrophysiology is the development of integrative anatomically accurate models of the heart, which include description of cardiac activity from sub-cellular and cellular level to the level of the whole organ. In order to construct this type of model, a researcher needs to collect a wide range of information from books and journal articles on various aspects of biology, physiology, electrophysiology, numerical mathematics and computer programming. The aim of this methodological article is to survey recent developments in integrative modelling of electrical activity in the ventricles of the heart, and to provide a practical guide to the resources and tools that are available for work in this exciting and challenging area. PMID:17825362

  13. Study of Electrical Activity in Martian Dust Storms with the Deep Space Network antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, S.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Majid, W. A.; Garcia-Miro, C.; Tamppari, L. K.; Renno, N. O.; Ruf, C.; Trinh, J. T.

    2012-09-01

    Evidence for non-thermal emission produced by electrostatic discharges in a deep Martian dust storm has been reported by Ruf et al. 2009 [1]. Such discharges had been detected with an innovative kurtosis detector installed in a 34m radio telescope of the Deep Space Network (DSN) in June of 2006. The kurtosis (the fourth central moment of the signal normalized by the square of the second central moment) is extremely sensitive to the presence of non-thermal radiation, but is insensitive to variations in the intensity of the thermal radiation and instrument gain. The non-thermal radiation was detected while a 35 Km deep Martian dust storm was within the field of view of the radio telescope and presented signatures of modulation by the Martian Schumann Resonance. Encouraged by this discovery, several attempts have been made within the DSN to confirm the detection using the R&D antenna (DSS-13) and other antennas in the Madrid and Goldstone complexes, but using a very limited receiver, in terms of recorded data rates, the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Science Receiver (VSR). We are planning to initiate an extensive monitoring of Mars emission in a noninterfering basis while our antennas are tracking various Mars probes, using the Wideband Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Science Receiver (WVSR). The WVSR is a very flexible open-loop digital backend that is used for radio science and spacecraft navigation support in the DSN. This instrument allows us to sample a larger bandwidth than with previously used detectors. The processing to look for the kurtosis signature will be performed in software, limited only by the computer capacity. Additionally there are plans to develop an even more powerful custom-built detector based in CASPER technology and Graphic Processing Units for enhance computational power. This contribution will describe how we plan to select the target Mars tracking passes from the DSN schedule. An automated process will generate

  14. Van Allen Probes based investigation of storm time enhancements in the duskward electric field to lower L shells and its effect on ring current formation and plasmasphere erosion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaller, S. A.; Wygant, J. R.; Dai, L.; Breneman, A. W.; Kersten, K.; Kletzing, C.; Kurth, W. S.; De Pascuale, S.; Bonnell, J. W.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gkioulidou, M.; Fennell, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    The large scale convection electric field plays a central role in the dynamics of the inner magnetosphere; among which processes are ring current particle injection and plasmasphere erosion. Both of these are important for radiation belt dynamics. The ring current affects magnetic field geometry which in turn affects particle drift paths and plasmasphere erosion shrinks the region characterized by plasmaspheric hiss which would otherwise be present to scatter population of radiation belt seed electrons. Using the Van Allen Probes we investigate enhancements in the duskward electric field to lower L shells (L < 4 RE) and its role in ring current particle energization and erosion of the plasmasphere during two major storms; June 1, 2013 and February 19, 2014. During these storms, the electric field enhanced to low L shells with magnitudes ~1-2 mV/m in the co-rotating frame. The corresponding storm time ring current enhancements and plasmasphere erosions are examined in the context of these electric fields. The intensification in the duskward electric field is of long enough duration to transport particles from locations characteristic of the earthward edge of the plasma sheet (L shells ~ 8-10 RE) to the observed location of the ring current while energizing them though conservation of the first adiabatic invariant to energies typical of the ring current. It is also observed that the range in L shell over which the most intense nightside, duskward, electric field is observed is also that over which the higher pressure region of the ring current is located.

  15. Comparison of electrical velocimetry and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for the non-invasive determination of cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Trinkmann, Frederik; Berger, Manuel; Doesch, Christina; Papavassiliu, Theano; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Borggrefe, Martin; Kaden, Jens J; Saur, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    A novel algorithm of impedance cardiography referred to as electrical velocimetry (EV) has been introduced for non-invasive determination of cardiac output (CO). Previous validation studies yielded diverging results and no comparison with the non-invasive gold standard cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) has been performed. We therefore aimed to prospectively assess the accuracy and reproducibility of EV compared to CMR. 152 consecutive stable patients undergoing CMR were enrolled. EV measurements were taken twice before or after CMR in supine position and averaged over 20 s (AESCULON(®), Osypka Medical, Berlin, Germany). Bland-Altman analysis showed insufficient agreement of EV and CMR with a mean bias of 1.2 ± 1.4 l/min (bias 23 ± 26 %, percentage error 51 %). Reproducibility was high with 0.0 ± 0.3 l/min (bias 0 ± 8 %, percentage error 15 %). Outlier analysis revealed gender, height, CO and stroke volume (SV) by CMR as independent predictors for larger variation. Stratification of COCMR in quintiles demonstrated a good agreement for low values (<4.4 l/min) with bias increasing significantly with quintile as high as 3.1 ± 1.1 l/min (p < 0.001). Reproducibility was not affected (p = 0.71). Subgroup analysis in patients with arrhythmias (p = 0.19), changes in thoracic fluid content (p = 0.51) or left heart failure (p = 0.47) could not detect significant differences in accuracy. EV showed insufficient agreement with CMR and good reproducibility. Gender, height and increasing CO and SV were associated with increased bias while not affecting reproducibility. Therefore, absolute values should not be used interchangeably in clinical routine. EV yet may find its place for clinical application with further investigation on its trending ability pending. PMID:26115774

  16. Electrically conductive gold nanoparticle-chitosan thermosensitive hydrogels for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Baei, Payam; Jalili-Firoozinezhad, Sasan; Rajabi-Zeleti, Sareh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Baharvand, Hossein; Aghdami, Nasser

    2016-06-01

    Injectable hydrogels that resemble electromechanical properties of the myocardium are crucial for cardiac tissue engineering prospects. We have developed a facile approach that uses chitosan (CS) to generate a thermosensitive conductive hydrogel with a highly porous network of interconnected pores. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were evenly dispersed throughout the CS matrix in order to provide electrical cues. The gelation response and electrical conductivity of the hydrogel were controlled by different concentrations of GNPs. The CS-GNP hydrogels were seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and cultivated for up to 14days in the absence of electrical stimulations. CS-GNP scaffolds supported viability, metabolism, migration and proliferation of MSCs along with the development of uniform cellular constructs. Immunohistochemistry for early and mature cardiac markers showed enhanced cardiomyogenic differentiation of MSCs within the CS-GNP compared to the CS matrix alone. The results of this study demonstrate that incorporation of nanoscale electro-conductive GNPs into CS hydrogels enhances the properties of myocardial constructs. These constructs could find utilization for regeneration of other electroactive tissues. PMID:27040204

  17. Portable bioreactor for perfusion and electrical stimulation of engineered cardiac tissue

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Nina; Taubman, Alanna; Cimetta, Elisa; Saccenti, Laetitia; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering aims to create functional tissue constructs that can reestablish the structure and function of injured myocardium. Although bioreactors have facilitated the engineering of cardiac patches of clinically relevant size in vitro, a major drawback remains the transportation of the engineered tissues from a production facility to a medical operation facility while maintaining tissue viability and preventing contamination. Furthermore, after implantation, most of the cells are endangered by hypoxic conditions that exist before vascular flow is established. We developed a portable device that provides the perfusion and electrical stimulation necessary to engineer cardiac tissue in vitro, and to transport it to the site where it will be implantated. The micropump-powered perfusion apparatus may additionally function as an extracorporeal active pumping system providing nutrients and oxygen supply to the graft post-implantation. Such a system, through perfusion of oxygenated media and bioactive molecules (e.g. growth factors), could transiently support the tissue construct until it connects to the host vasculature and heart muscle, after which it could be taken away or let biodegrade. PMID:24111161

  18. Reconstructing three-dimensional reentrant cardiac electrical wave dynamics using data assimilation.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, M J; LaVigne, N S; Scorse, S T; Fenton, F H; Cherry, E M

    2016-01-01

    For many years, reentrant scroll waves have been predicted and studied as an underlying mechanism for cardiac arrhythmias using numerical techniques, and high-resolution mapping studies using fluorescence recordings from the surfaces of cardiac tissue preparations have confirmed the presence of visible spiral waves. However, assessing the three-dimensional dynamics of these reentrant waves using experimental techniques has been limited to verifying stable scroll-wave dynamics in relatively thin preparations. We propose a different approach to recovering the three-dimensional dynamics of reentrant waves in the heart. By applying techniques commonly used in weather forecasting, we combine dual-surface observations from a particular experiment with predictions from a numerical model to reconstruct the full three-dimensional time series of the experiment. Here, we use model-generated surrogate observations from a numerical experiment to evaluate the performance of the ensemble Kalman filter in reconstructing such time series for a discordant alternans state in one spatial dimension and for scroll waves in three dimensions. We show that our approach is able to recover time series of both observed and unobserved variables matching the truth. Where nearby observations are available, the error is reduced below the synthetic observation error, with a smaller reduction with increased distance from observations. Our findings demonstrate that state reconstruction for spatiotemporally complex cardiac electrical dynamics is possible and will lead naturally to applications using real experimental data. PMID:26826859

  19. Reconstructing three-dimensional reentrant cardiac electrical wave dynamics using data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, M. J.; LaVigne, N. S.; Scorse, S. T.; Fenton, F. H.; Cherry, E. M.

    2016-01-01

    For many years, reentrant scroll waves have been predicted and studied as an underlying mechanism for cardiac arrhythmias using numerical techniques, and high-resolution mapping studies using fluorescence recordings from the surfaces of cardiac tissue preparations have confirmed the presence of visible spiral waves. However, assessing the three-dimensional dynamics of these reentrant waves using experimental techniques has been limited to verifying stable scroll-wave dynamics in relatively thin preparations. We propose a different approach to recovering the three-dimensional dynamics of reentrant waves in the heart. By applying techniques commonly used in weather forecasting, we combine dual-surface observations from a particular experiment with predictions from a numerical model to reconstruct the full three-dimensional time series of the experiment. Here, we use model-generated surrogate observations from a numerical experiment to evaluate the performance of the ensemble Kalman filter in reconstructing such time series for a discordant alternans state in one spatial dimension and for scroll waves in three dimensions. We show that our approach is able to recover time series of both observed and unobserved variables matching the truth. Where nearby observations are available, the error is reduced below the synthetic observation error, with a smaller reduction with increased distance from observations. Our findings demonstrate that state reconstruction for spatiotemporally complex cardiac electrical dynamics is possible and will lead naturally to applications using real experimental data.

  20. Magnetospheric electric field variations caused by storm-time shock fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokorowski, M.; Bering, E. A.; Ruohoniemi, M.; Sample, J. G.; Holzworth, R. H.; Bale, S. D.; Blake, J. B.; Collier, A. B.; Hughes, A. R. W.; Lay, E. H.; Lin, R. P.; McCarthy, M. P.; Millan, R. M.; Moraal, H.; O'Brien, T. P.; Parks, G. K.; Pulupa, M.; Reddell, B. D.; Smith, D. M.; Stoker, P. H.; Woodger, L.

    2008-07-01

    On January 20, 2005 there was an X 7.1 solar flare at 0636 UT with an accompanied halo coronal mass ejection (CME). The resultant interplanetary shock impacted earth ˜36 h later. Near earth, the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft observed two impulses with a staircase structure in density and pressure. The estimated earth-arrival times of these impulses were 1713 UT and 1845 UT on January 21, 2005. Three MINIature Spectrometer (MINIS) balloons were aloft on January 21st; one in the northern polar stratosphere and two in the southern polar stratosphere. MeV relativistic electron precipitation (REP) observed by all three balloons is coincident (<3 min) with the impulse arrivals and magnetospheric compression observed by both GOES 10 and 12. Balloon electric field data from the southern hemisphere show no signs of the impulse electric field directly reaching the ionosphere. Enhancement of the balloon-observed convection electric field by as much as 40 mV/m in less than 20 min during this time period is consistent with typical substorm growth. Precipitation-induced ionospheric conductivity enhancements are suggested to be (a) the result of both shock arrival and substorm activity and (b) the cause of rapid (<6 min) decreases in the observed electric field (by as much as 40 mV/m). There is poor agreement between peak cross polar cap potential in the northern hemisphere calculated from Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) echoes and horizontal electric field at the MINIS balloon locations in the southern hemisphere. Possible reasons for this poor agreement include (a) a true lack of north-south conjugacy between measurement sites, (b) an invalid comparison between global (SuperDARN radar) and local (MINIS balloon) measurements and/or (c) radar absorption resulting from precipitation-induced D-region ionosphere density enhancements.

  1. The link between abnormal calcium handling and electrical instability in acquired long QT syndrome - Does calcium precipitate arrhythmic storms?

    PubMed

    Němec, Jan; Kim, Jong J; Salama, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Release of Ca(2+) ions from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) into myocyte cytoplasm and their binding to troponin C is the final signal form myocardial contraction. Synchronous contraction of ventricular myocytes is necessary for efficient cardiac pumping function. This requires both shuttling of Ca(2+) between SR and cytoplasm in individual myocytes, and organ-level synchronization of this process by means of electrical coupling among ventricular myocytes. Abnormal Ca(2+) release from SR causes arrhythmias in the setting of CPVT (catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia) and digoxin toxicity. Recent optical mapping data indicate that abnormal Ca(2+) handling causes arrhythmias in models of both repolarization impairment and profound bradycardia. The mechanisms involve dynamic spatial heterogeneity of myocardial Ca(2+) handling preceding arrhythmia onset, cell-synchronous systolic secondary Ca(2+) elevation (SSCE), as well as more complex abnormalities of intracellular Ca(2+) handling detected by subcellular optical mapping in Langendorff-perfused hearts. The regional heterogeneities in Ca(2+) handling cause action potential (AP) heterogeneities through sodium-calcium exchange (NCX) activation and eventually overwhelm electrical coupling of the tissue. Divergent Ca(2+) dynamics among different myocardial regions leads to temporal instability of AP duration and - on the patient level - in T wave lability. Although T-wave alternans has been linked to cardiac arrhythmias, non-alternans lability is observed in pre-clinical models of the long QT syndrome (LQTS) and CPVT, and in LQTS patients. Analysis of T wave lability may provide a real-time window on the abnormal Ca(2+) dynamics causing specific arrhythmias such as Torsade de Pointes (TdP). PMID:26631594

  2. Duskside enhancement of equatorial zonal electric field response to convection electric fields during the St. Patrick's Day storm on 17 March 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulasi Ram, S.; Yokoyama, T.; Otsuka, Y.; Shiokawa, K.; Sripathi, S.; Veenadhari, B.; Heelis, R.; Ajith, K. K.; Gowtam, V. S.; Gurubaran, S.; Supnithi, P.; Le Huy, M.

    2016-01-01

    The equatorial zonal electric field responses to prompt penetration of eastward convection electric fields (PPEF) were compared at closely spaced longitudinal intervals at dusk to premidnight sectors during the intense geomagnetic storm of 17 March 2015. At dusk sector (Indian longitudes), a rapid uplift of equatorial F layer to >550 km and development of intense equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) were observed. These EPBs were found to extend up to 27.13°N and 25.98°S magnetic dip latitudes indicating their altitude development to ~1670 km at apex. In contrast, at few degrees east in the premidnight sector (Thailand-Indonesian longitudes), no significant height rise and/or EPB activity has been observed. The eastward electric field perturbations due to PPEF are greatly dominated at dusk sector despite the existence of background westward ionospheric disturbance dynamo (IDD) fields, whereas they were mostly counter balanced by the IDD fields in the premidnight sector. In situ observations from SWARM-A and SWARM-C and Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System satellites detected a large plasma density depletion near Indian equatorial region due to large electrodynamic uplift of F layer to higher than satellite altitudes. Further, this large uplift is found to confine to a narrow longitudinal sector centered on sunset terminator. This study brings out the significantly enhanced equatorial zonal electric field in response to PPEF that is uniquely confined to dusk sector. The responsible mechanisms are discussed in terms of unique electrodynamic conditions prevailing at dusk sector in the presence of convection electric fields associated with the onset of a substorm under southward interplanetary magnetic field Bz.

  3. The left ventricular lead electrical delay predicts response to cardiac resynchronisation therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hang; Dai, Zhenlin; Xiao, Pinxi; Pan, Chang; Zhang, Juan; Hu, Zuoying; Chen, Shaoliang

    2014-10-01

    Up to one-third of patients who undergo cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) are not responders. To identify potential responders to CRT may be sometimes difficult and time-consuming. Forty-five patients who had undergone CRT implantation for standard indications were evaluated. Electrical left ventricular (LV) lead location was assessed by left ventricular activation time (LVAT), LV lead electrical delay (LVLED), and RV-LV interlead electrical delay (RVsense-LVsense). Anatomic LV pacing location was assessed as basal or mid-ventricular between 3:00 to 5:00 (traditionally optimal site), and all the other positions (traditionally non-optimal site). CRT response was defined as a decrease in LV end-systolic volume (LVESV) exceeding 15% at six months. LVLED was larger in the responder group than that in the non-responder group (67.3 ± 8.5% vs. 55.3 ± 8.1%, P< 0.001). In the multivariate analysis, LVLED and cLBBB morphology were the two independent predictors of positive echocardiographic response to CRT (OR=1.180, P=0.003; OR=7.497, P=0.04, respectively). A cutoff value of LVLED> 54.82% predicted responders with 96.3% sensitivity and 75.2% specificity and the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.844 for LVLED (P=0.002). No relationship was found between the anatomic LV pacing sites and response to CRT (P=0.188). The larger left ventricular lead electrical delay may predict response to cardiac resynchronisation therapy. PMID:24996391

  4. Remote Sensing of Electric Atmospheric Field Produced by Storm Cloud With an Instrumented Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroche, P. A.; Delannoy, A.; Blanchet, P.; Lalande, P.

    2010-12-01

    Sensing the 3 components of the atmospheric field is an efficient way to diagnose the electrification of convective cloud. This is currently done by rocket (Win and Moore 1971), balloon (Stolzenburg et al. 2007) and instrumented aircraft (Win 1993, Koshak et al. 2006). Intra cloud measurement can help to evidence electrification process (Sonnenfeld et al. 2006) or revealed local charged region in CB anvil (Dye et al. 2007). In 2010 a Falcon 20 jet aircraft has been instrumented to retrieve the value of electrostatic field in the vicinity of convective cloud. Instrumentation consists in 8 field mill mounted flush on aircraft surface. Each sensor delivers a linear measurement of the field at the surface of the aircraft from 10 V/m up to 80 kV/m. Calibration of the atmospheric electric field retrieving method has been done by using Koshak’s method and computation on a numerical meshing of the aircraft. With the present setting, the field mill network saturation occurs for an atmospheric field magnitude close to 12 kV/m. Several flights were performed close to and inside deep convective cloud at altitude ranging between 1500 and 6000 m AMSL. We present and discuss the observations obtained during this field experiment. Horizontal Atmospheric Electric Field along the trajectory of the aircraft

  5. Statistical analysis of storm electrical discharges reconstituted from a lightning mapping system, a lightning location system, and an acoustic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallin, Louis-Jonardan; Farges, Thomas; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François; Defer, Eric; Rison, William; Schulz, Wolfgang; Nuret, Mathieu

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the European Hydrological Cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment project, a field campaign devoted to the study of electrical activity during storms took place in the south of France in 2012. An acoustic station composed of four microphones and four microbarometers was deployed within the coverage of a Lightning Mapping Array network. On the 26 October 2012, a thunderstorm passed just over the acoustic station. Fifty-six natural thunder events, due to cloud-to-ground and intracloud flashes, were recorded. This paper studies the acoustic reconstruction, in the low frequency range from 1 to 40 Hz, of the recorded flashes and their comparison with detections from electromagnetic networks. Concurrent detections from the European Cooperation for Lightning Detection lightning location system were also used. Some case studies show clearly that acoustic signal from thunder comes from the return stroke but also from the horizontal discharges which occur inside the clouds. The huge amount of observation data leads to a statistical analysis of lightning discharges acoustically recorded. Especially, the distributions of altitudes of reconstructed acoustic detections are explored in detail. The impact of the distance to the source on these distributions is established. The capacity of the acoustic method to describe precisely the lower part of nearby cloud-to-ground discharges, where the Lightning Mapping Array network is not effective, is also highlighted.

  6. Rapid electrical immunoassay of the cardiac biomarker troponin I through dielectrophoretic concentration using imbedded electrodes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Abhinav; Han, Chang-Ho; Jang, Jaesung

    2016-08-15

    Rapidity and high sensitivity are critical factors for the diagnoses of heart attacks, and cardiac troponin I (cTnI) is at present a clinical standard for its diagnosis. Here we report a rapid, label-free, and highly sensitive single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) electrical immunosensor, featuring two pairs of electrodes. Two concentration electrodes (gaps: 25 and 80µm) and two detection electrodes (source and drain; gap: 20µm; width: 50µm) were used for dielectrophoretic concentration of cTnI on the SWCNT channels and resistance measurements of the dielectrophoresis (DEP)-concentrated cTnI, respectively. The two concentration electrodes were imbedded between upper and lower dielectric layers, facing each other, underneath the -COOH-functionalized SWCNT channels deposited between the detection electrodes. Therefore, the gap between these imbedded concentration electrodes can be reduced to maximize the electric field intensity for DEP-mediated concentration of cTnI, thereby greatly reducing the detection time (1min) and enhancing the limit of detection (0.7-0.8pgmL(-)(1)). Relative resistance changes of the SWCNTs were measured as cTnI concentration in Tris-Borate-EDTA (TBE; 0.0025×) and human serum diluted 500-fold with 0.0025× TBE decreased from 100ngmL(-)(1) to 1pgmL(-1), and they were shown to be linear with the logarithm of cTnI concentration (R(2)=0.99 and 0.97, respectively). These immunosensors also showed high specificity over another cardiac biomarker, myoglobin, TBE medium (0.0025×), and 500-fold diluted human serum. The DEP-capture of cTnI depended on the frequency of the applied electric field, demonstrating the qualitative nature of the real part of the Clausius-Mossotti factor for cTnI. PMID:27043478

  7. Effect of Twisted Fiber Anisotropy in Cardiac Tissue on Ablation with Pulsed Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Fei; Zemlin, Christian W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ablation of cardiac tissue with pulsed electric fields is a promising alternative to current thermal ablation methods, and it critically depends on the electric field distribution in the heart. Methods We developed a model that incorporates the twisted anisotropy of cardiac tissue and computed the electric field distribution in the tissue. We also performed experiments in rabbit ventricles to validate our model. We find that the model agrees well with the experimentally determined ablation volume if we assume that all tissue that is exposed to a field greater than 3 kV/cm is ablated. In our numerical analysis, we considered how tissue thickness, degree of anisotropy, and electrode configuration affect the geometry of the ablated volume. We considered two electrode configurations: two parallel needles inserted into the myocardium (“penetrating needles” configuration) and one circular electrode each on epi- and endocardium, opposing each other (“epi-endo” configuration). Results For thick tissues (10 mm) and moderate anisotropy ratio (a = 2), we find that the geometry of the ablated volume is almost unaffected by twisted anisotropy, i.e. it is approximately translationally symmetric from epi- to endocardium, for both electrode configurations. Higher anisotropy ratio (a = 10) leads to substantial variation in ablation width across the wall; these variations were more pronounced for the penetrating needle configuration than for the epi-endo configuration. For thinner tissues (4 mm, typical for human atria) and higher anisotropy ratio (a = 10), the epi-endo configuration yielded approximately translationally symmetric ablation volumes, while the penetrating electrodes configuration was much more sensitive to fiber twist. Conclusions These results suggest that the epi-endo configuration will be reliable for ablation of atrial fibrillation, independently of fiber orientation, while the penetrating electrode configuration may experience problems when the

  8. Assessment of nonpenetrating captive bolt stunning followed by electrical induction of cardiac arrest in veal calves.

    PubMed

    Bartz, B; Collins, M; Stoddard, G; Appleton, A; Livingood, R; Sobcynski, H; Vogel, K D

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of nonpenetrating captive bolt stunning followed by electrical induction of cardiac arrest on veal calf welfare, veal quality, and blood yield. Ninety calves from the same farm were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups in a balanced unpaired comparison design. The first treatment group (the "head-only" method-application of the pneumatic nonpenetrating stun to the frontal plate of the skull at the intersection of 2 imaginary lines extending from the lateral canthus to the opposite poll [CONTROL]) was stunned with a nonpenetrating captive bolt gun ( = 45). The second group ( = 45) was stunned with a nonpenetrating captive bolt gun followed by secondary electrical induction of cardiac arrest (the "head/heart" method-initial application of the pneumatic nonpenetrating captive bolt stun followed by 1 s application of an electrical stun to the ventral region of the ribcage directly caudal to the junction of the humerus and scapula while the stunned calf was in lateral recumbence [HEAD/HEART]). Stunning efficacy was the indicator of animal welfare used in this study. All calves were instantly rendered insensible by the initial stun and did not display common indicators of return to consciousness. For meat quality evaluation, all samples were collected from the 12th rib region of the longissimus thoracis. Meat samples were evaluated for color, drip loss, ultimate pH, cook loss, and Warner-Bratzler shear force. The L* values (measure of meat color lightness) were darker ( < 0.05) in the HEAD/HEART group (45.08 ± 0.72) than the CONTROL group (47.10 ± 0.72). There were no differences ( > 0.05) observed in a* (redness) and b* (yellowness) values between treatments. No differences ( > 0.05) were observed in drip loss, ultimate pH, cook loss, and Warner-Bratzler shear force. The blood yield from the CONTROL group (7,217.9 ± 143.5 g) was greater ( < 0.05) than that from the HEAD/HEART group (6,656.4 ± 143.5 g

  9. Can the direct cardiac effects of the electric pulses generated by the TASER X26 cause immediate or delayed sudden cardiac arrest in normal adults?

    PubMed

    Ideker, Raymond E; Dosdall, Derek J

    2007-09-01

    There is only a small amount of experimental data about whether the TASER X26, a nonlethal weapon that delivers a series of brief electrical pulses to cause involuntary muscular contraction to temporarily incapacitate an individual, can initiate ventricular fibrillation to cause sudden cardiac arrest either immediately or sometime after its use. Therefore, this paper uses the fundamental law of electrostimulation and experimental data from the literature to estimate the likelihood of such events. Because of the short duration of the TASER pulses, the large duration of the cardiac cell membrane time constant, the small fraction of current from electrodes on the body surface that passes through the heart, and the resultant high pacing threshold from the body surface, the fundamental law of electrostimulation predicts that the TASER pulses will not stimulate an ectopic beat in the large majority of normal adults. Since the immediate initiation of ventricular fibrillation in a normal heart requires a very premature stimulated ectopic beat and the threshold for such premature beats is higher than less premature beats, it is unlikely that TASER pulses can immediately initiate ventricular fibrillation in such individuals through the direct effect of the electric field generated through the heart by the TASER. In the absence of preexisting heart disease, the delayed development of ventricular fibrillation requires the electrical stimuli to cause electroporation or myocardial necrosis. However, the electrical thresholds for electroporation and necrosis are many times higher than that required to stimulate an ectopic beat. Therefore, it is highly unlikely that the TASER X26 can cause ventricular fibrillation minutes to hours after its use through direct cardiac effects of the electric field generated by the TASER. PMID:17721165

  10. Model-based imaging of cardiac electrical function in human atria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modre, Robert; Tilg, Bernhard; Fischer, Gerald; Hanser, Friedrich; Messnarz, Bernd; Schocke, Michael F. H.; Kremser, Christian; Hintringer, Florian; Roithinger, Franz

    2003-05-01

    Noninvasive imaging of electrical function in the human atria is attained by the combination of data from electrocardiographic (ECG) mapping and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An anatomical computer model of the individual patient is the basis for our computer-aided diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias. Three patients suffering from Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, from paroxymal atrial fibrillation, and from atrial flutter underwent an electrophysiological study. After successful treatment of the cardiac arrhythmia with invasive catheter technique, pacing protocols with stimuli at several anatomical sites (coronary sinus, left and right pulmonary vein, posterior site of the right atrium, right atrial appendage) were performed. Reconstructed activation time (AT) maps were validated with catheter-based electroanatomical data, with invasively determined pacing sites, and with pacing at anatomical markers. The individual complex anatomical model of the atria of each patient in combination with a high-quality mesh optimization enables accurate AT imaging, resulting in a localization error for the estimated pacing sites within 1 cm. Our findings may have implications for imaging of atrial activity in patients with focal arrhythmias.

  11. Dust Storm

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  Massive Dust Storm over Australia     View ... at JPL September 22, 2009 - Massive dust storm over Australia. project:  MISR category:  ... Sep 22, 2009 Images:  Dust Storm location:  Australia and New Zealand ...

  12. Noninvasive functional cardiac electrical source imaging: combining MRI and ECG mapping for imaging electrical function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilg, Bernhard; Modre, Robert; Fischer, Gerald; Hanser, Friedrich; Messnarz, Bernd; Schocke, Michael F. H.; Kremser, Christian; Roithinger, Franz

    2002-04-01

    Inverse electrocardiography has been developing for several years. By coupling electrocardiographic mapping and 3D+time anatomical data, the electrical excitation sequence can be imaged completely noninvasively in the human heart. In this study, a bidomain theory based surface heart model activation time imaging approach was applied to single beat data of atrial and ventricular depolarization. For sinus and paced rhythms, the sites of early activation and the areas with late activation were estimated with sufficient accuracy. In particular for focal arrhythmias, this model-based imaging approach might allow the guidance and evaluation of antiarrhythmic interventions, for instance, in case of catheter ablation or drug therapy.

  13. Bioreactor for modulation of cardiac microtissue phenotype by combined static stretch and electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Miklas, Jason W; Nunes, Sara S; Sofla, Aarash; Reis, Lewis A; Pahnke, Aric; Xiao, Yun; Laschinger, Carol; Radisic, Milica

    2014-01-01

    We describe here a bioreactor capable of simultaneously applying mechanical and electrical field stimulation in conjunction with static strain and on-line force of contraction measurements. It consisted of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) tissue chamber and a pneumatically driven stretch platform. The chamber contained eight tissue microwells (8.05 mm in length and 2.5 mm in width) with a pair of posts (2.78 mm in height and 0.8 mm in diameter) in each well to serve as fixation points and for measurements of contraction force. Carbon rods, stimulating electrodes, were placed into the PDMS chamber such that one pair stimulated four microwells. For feasibility studies, neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were seeded in collagen gels into the microwells. Following three days of gel compaction, electrical field stimulation at 3–4 V/cm and 1Hz, mechanical stimulation of 5% static strain or electromechanical stimulation (field stimulation at 3–4 V/cm, 1Hz and 5% static strain) were applied for 3 days. Cardiac microtissues subjected to electromechanical stimulation exhibited elevated amplitude of contraction and improved sarcomere structure as evidenced by sarcomeric α-actinin, actin and troponin T staining compared to microtissues subjected to electrical or mechanical stimulation alone or non-stimulated controls. The expression of atrial natriuretic factor and brain natriuretic peptide was also elevated in the electromechanically stimulated group. PMID:24876342

  14. Electrical stimulation directs engineered cardiac tissue to an age-matched native phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Lasher, Richard A; Pahnke, Aric Q; Johnson, Jeffrey M; Sachse, Frank B

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying structural features of native myocardium in engineered tissue is essential for creating functional tissue that can serve as a surrogate for in vitro testing or the eventual replacement of diseased or injured myocardium. We applied three-dimensional confocal imaging and image analysis to quantitatively describe the features of native and engineered cardiac tissue. Quantitative analysis methods were developed and applied to test the hypothesis that environmental cues direct engineered tissue toward a phenotype resembling that of age-matched native myocardium. The analytical approach was applied to engineered cardiac tissue with and without the application of electrical stimulation as well as to age-matched and adult native tissue. Individual myocytes were segmented from confocal image stacks and assigned a coordinate system from which measures of cell geometry and connexin-43 spatial distribution were calculated. The data were collected from 9 nonstimulated and 12 electrically stimulated engineered tissue constructs and 5 postnatal day 12 and 7 adult hearts. The myocyte volume fraction was nearly double in stimulated engineered tissue compared to nonstimulated engineered tissue (0.34 ± 0.14 vs 0.18 ± 0.06) but less than half of the native postnatal day 12 (0.90 ± 0.06) and adult (0.91 ± 0.04) myocardium. The myocytes under electrical stimulation were more elongated compared to nonstimulated myocytes and exhibited similar lengths, widths, and heights as in age-matched myocardium. Furthermore, the percentage of connexin-43-positive membrane staining was similar in the electrically stimulated, postnatal day 12, and adult myocytes, whereas it was significantly lower in the nonstimulated myocytes. Connexin-43 was found to be primarily located at cell ends for adult myocytes and irregularly but densely clustered over the membranes of nonstimulated, stimulated, and postnatal day 12 myocytes. These findings support our hypothesis and reveal that the

  15. The relationship between ventricular electrical delay and left ventricular remodelling with cardiac resynchronization therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Michael R.; Birgersdotter-Green, Ulrika; Singh, Jagmeet P.; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A.; Yu, Yinghong; Meyer, Timothy E.; Seth, Milan; Tchou, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Aims The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between left ventricular (LV) electrical delay, as measured by the QLV interval, and outcomes in a prospectively designed substudy of the SMART-AV Trial. Methods and results This was a multicentre study of patients with advanced heart failure undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) defibrillator implantation. In 426 subjects, QLV was measured as the interval from the onset of the QRS from the surface ECG to the first large peak of the LV electrogram. Left ventricular volumes were measured by echocardiography at baseline and after 6 months of CRT by a blinded core laboratory. Quality of life (QOL) was assessed by a standardized questionnaire. When separated by quartiles based on QLV duration, reverse remodelling response rates (>15% reduction in LV end systolic volume) increased progressively from 38.7 to 68.4% and QOL response rate (>10 points reduction) increased from 50 to 72%. Patients in the highest quartile of QLV had a 3.21-fold increase (1.58–6.50, P = 0.001) in their odds of a reverse remodelling response after correcting for QRS duration, bundle branch block type, and clinical characteristics by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Conclusion Electrical dyssynchrony, as measured by QLV, was strongly and independently associated with reverse remodelling and QOL with CRT. Acute measurements of QLV may be useful to guide LV lead placement. PMID:21875862

  16. Study of simultaneous presence of DD and PP electric fields during the geomagnetic storm of November 7-8, 2004 and resultant TEC variation over the Indian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galav, P.; Sharma, Shweta; Rao, S. S.; Veenadhari, B.; Nagatsuma, T.; Pandey, R.

    2014-04-01

    During very intense geomagnetic storm of November 7-8, 2004 simultaneous presence of storm time disturbance dynamo and eastward and westward directed prompt penetration electric fields inferred from the ground based magnetometer data in the 75∘ E sector is presented. Magnetometer observations show that, on the whole, average Δ H variation on 8 November remains below the night time level compared to its quiet day variation. A number of upward and downward excursions have been observed between 0130 UT and 0800 UT in the Δ H variation on 8 November. These excursions in Δ H have been attributed to the episodes of eastward and westward prompt penetrating electric fields. Ionospheric response in the equatorial ionization anomaly region along 75∘ E has also been studied using the total electron content data recorded at five GPS stations, namely Udaipur, Bengaluru (IISC), Hyderabad (HYDE), Maldives (MALD) and Diego Garcia (DGAR). Observation of markedly suppressed EIA, in conjunction with Δ H variation which was m negative during the daytime on 8 November, indicates the presence of an external field of opposite polarity (the disturbance dynamo electric field) that either undermined, or overshadowed the daytime ambient (eastward) electric field to the extent that the equatorial plasma fountain could not become effective.

  17. Influence of electrode positioning on accuracy and reproducibility of electrical velocimetry cardiac output measurements.

    PubMed

    Trinkmann, Frederik; Berger, Manuel; Michels, Julia D; Doesch, Christina; Weiss, Christel; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Akin, Ibrahim; Borggrefe, Martin; Papavassiliu, Theano; Saur, Joachim

    2016-09-01

    Electrical velocimetry (EV) is one of the most recent adaptions of impedance cardiography. Previous studies yielded diverging results identifying several factors negatively influencing accuracy. Although electrode arrangement is suspected to be an influencing factor for impedance cardiography in general, no data for EV is available. We aimed to prospectively assess the influence of electrode position on the accuracy and reproducibility of cardiac output (CO) measurements obtained by EV. Two pairs of standard electrocardiographic electrodes were placed at predefined positions of the thorax in 81 patients. The inter-electrode gap was varied between either 5 or 15 cm by caudal movement of the lowest electrode. Measurements were averaged over 20 s and performed twice at each electrode position. Reference values were determined using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). Mean bias was 1.2  ±  1.6 l min(-1) (percentage error 22  ±  28%) between COCMR and COEV at the 5 cm gap significantly improving to 0.5  ±  1.6 l min(-1) (8  ±  28%) when increasing the gap (p  <  0.0001). The mean difference between repeated measurements was 0.0  ±  0.3 l min(-1) for the 5 cm and 0.1  ±  0.3 l min(-1) for the 15 cm gap, respectively (p  =  0.3). The accuracy of EV can be significantly improved when increasing the lower inter-electrode gap still exceeding the Critchley and Critchley recommendations. Therefore, absolute values should not be used interchangeably in clinical routine. As the reproducibility was not negatively affected, serial hemodynamic measurements can be reliably acquired in stable patients when the electrode position remains unchanged. PMID:27480359

  18. Magnetic storms and induction hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Rigler, E. Joshua; Pulkkinen, Antti; Balch, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic storms are potentially hazardous to the activities and technological infrastructure of modern civilization. This reality was dramatically demonstrated during the great magnetic storm of March 1989, when surface geoelectric fields, produced by the interaction of the time-varying geomagnetic field with the Earth's electrically conducting interior, coupled onto the overlying Hydro-Québec electric power grid in Canada. Protective relays were tripped, the grid collapsed, and about 9 million people were temporarily left without electricity [Bolduc, 2002].

  19. Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Kamide, Y.

    1996-01-01

    This talk provides a brief summary of the first conference devoted entirely to magnetic storms. Topics cover the relevant phenomena at the Sun/corona, propogation of these structures through interplanetary space, the response of the magnetosphere to interaction with these interplanetary structures, the formation of the storm time ring current (in particular the oxygen content of the ring-current), and storm ionospheric effects and ground based effects.

  20. Differences between left and right ventricular chamber geometry affect cardiac vulnerability to electric shocks.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Blanca; Li, Li; Eason, James C; Efimov, Igor R; Trayanova, Natalia A

    2005-07-22

    Although effects of shock strength and waveform on cardiac vulnerability to electric shocks have been extensively documented, the contribution of ventricular anatomy to shock-induced polarization and postshock propagation and thus, to shock outcome, has never been quantified; this is caused by lack of experimental methodology capable of mapping 3-D electrical activity. The goal of this study was to use optical imaging experiments and 3-D bidomain simulations to investigate the role of structural differences between left and right ventricles in vulnerability to electric shocks in rabbit hearts. The ventricles were paced apically, and uniform-field, truncated-exponential, monophasic shocks of reversed polarity were applied over a range of coupling intervals (CIs) in experiment and model. Experiments and simulations revealed that reversing the direction of externally-applied field (RV- or LV- shocks) alters the shape of the vulnerability area (VA), the 2-D grid encompassing episodes of arrhythmia induction. For RV- shocks, VA was nearly rectangular indicating little dependence of postshock arrhythmogenesis on CI. For LV- shocks, the probability of arrhythmia induction was higher for longer than for shorter CIs. The 3-D simulations demonstrated that these effects stem from the fact that reversal of field direction results in relocation of the main postshock excitable area from LV wall (RV- shocks) to septum (LV- shocks). Furthermore, the effect of septal (but not LV) excitable area in postshock propagation was found to strongly depend on preshock state. Knowledge regarding the location of the main postshock excitable area within the 3-D ventricular volume could be important for improving defibrillation efficacy. PMID:15976315

  1. Modeling the response of normal and ischemic cardiac tissue to electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Sunil Mani

    Heart disease, the leading cause of death worldwide, is often caused by ventricular fibrillation. A common treatment for this lethal arrhythmia is defibrillation: a strong electrical shock that resets the heart to its normal rhythm. To design better defibrillators, we need a better understanding of both fibrillation and defibrillation. Fundamental mysteries remain regarding the mechanism of how the heart responds to a shock, particularly anodal shocks and the resultant hyperpolarization. Virtual anodes play critical roles in defibrillation, and one cannot build better defibrillators until these mechanisms are understood. We are using mathematical modeling to numerically simulate observed phenomena, and are exploring fundamental mechanisms responsible for the heart's electrical behavior. Such simulations clarify mechanisms and identify key parameters. We investigate how systolic tissue responds to an anodal shock and how refractory tissue reacts to hyperpolarization by studying the dip in the anodal strength-interval curve. This dip is due to electrotonic interaction between regions of depolarization and hyperpolarization following a shock. The dominance of the electrotonic mechanism over calcium interactions implies the importance of the spatial distribution of virtual electrodes. We also investigate the response of localized ischemic tissue to an anodal shock by modeling a regional elevation of extracellular potassium concentration. This heterogeneity leads to action potential instability, 2:1 conduction block (alternans), and reflection-like reentry at the boarder of the normal and ischemic regions. This kind of reflection (reentry) occurs due to the delay between proximal and distal segments to re-excite the proximal segment. Our numerical simulations are based on the bidomain model, the state-of-the-art mathematical description of how cardiac tissue responds to shocks. The dynamic LuoRudy model describes the active properties of the membrane. To model ischemia

  2. How the effects of winds and electric fields in F2-layer storms vary with latitude and longitude - A theoretical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendillo, M.; He, X.-Q.; Rishbeth, H.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of thermospheric winds and electric fields on the ionospheric F2-layer are controlled by the geometry of the magnetic field, and so vary with latitude and longitude. A simple model of the daytime F2-layer is adopted and the effects at midlatitudes (25-65 deg geographic) of three processes that accompany geomagnetic storms: (1) thermospheric changes due to auroral heating; (2) equatorward winds that tend to cancel the quiet-day poleward winds; and (3) the penetration of magnetospheric electric fields are studied. At +/- 65 deg, the effects of heating and electric fields are strongest in the longitudes toward which the geomagnetic dipole is tilted, i.e., the North American and the South Indian Ocean sectors. Because of the proximity of the geomagnetic equator to the East Asian and South American sectors, the reverse is true at +/- 25 deg.

  3. Automated non-invasive measurement of cardiac output: comparison of electrical bioimpedance and carbon dioxide rebreathing techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S A; Russell, A E; West, M J; Chalmers, J

    1988-01-01

    Two commercial automated, non-invasive systems for estimation of cardiac output were evaluated. Values of cardiac output obtained by electrical bioimpedance cardiography (BoMed NCCOM3 machine) were compared with values derived from an indirect Fick technique that uses carbon dioxide rebreathing (Gould 9000 IV system) during 103 simultaneous measurements made at rest in 19 randomly selected subjects and on exercise in 11 subjects. Cardiac output values obtained with impedance cardiography were significantly correlated with those measured by the indirect Fick method, although there was a wide scatter with over 73% of the readings lying outside the limits defined by the line of identity +/- 20%. This correlation was greatly reduced when stroke volume index was used instead of cardiac output. Indirect Fick results were linearly related to oxygen uptake both at rest and on exercise, while impedance cardiography results did not correlate with oxygen uptake. Impedance cardiography gave consistently lower results for cardiac output than indirect Fick at all levels of exercise. Both machines were easy to use and produced acceptable mean (SE) coefficients of variation (BoMed NCCOM3 7.7 (1.0)%, Gould 9000 IV 10.6 (1.4)%). Further validation is required before either of these machines can be recommended as an alternative to invasive monitoring in clinical practice. PMID:3128316

  4. Abnormal sodium current properties contribute to cardiac electrical and contractile dysfunction in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Algalarrondo, Vincent; Wahbi, Karim; Sebag, Frédéric; Gourdon, Geneviève; Beldjord, Chérif; Azibi, Kamel; Balse, Elise; Coulombe, Alain; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Eymard, Bruno; Duboc, Denis; Hatem, Stéphane N

    2015-04-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is the most common neuromuscular disorder and is associated with cardiac conduction defects. However, the mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias in DM1 are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that abnormalities in the cardiac sodium current (INa) are involved, and used a transgenic mouse model reproducing the expression of triplet expansion observed in DM1 (DMSXL mouse). The injection of the class-I antiarrhythmic agent flecainide induced prominent conduction abnormalities and significantly lowered the radial tissular velocities and strain rate in DMSXL mice compared to WT. These abnormalities were more pronounced in 8-month-old mice than in 3-month-old mice. Ventricular action potentials recorded by standard glass microelectrode technique exhibited a lower maximum upstroke velocity [dV/dt](max) in DMSXL. This decreased [dV/dt](max) was associated with a 1.7 fold faster inactivation of INa in DMSXL myocytes measured by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Finally in the DMSXL mouse, no mutation in the Scn5a gene was detected and neither cardiac fibrosis nor abnormalities of expression of the sodium channel protein were observed. Therefore, alterations in the sodium current markedly contributed to electrical conduction block in DM1. This result should guide pharmaceutical and clinical research toward better therapy for the cardiac arrhythmias associated with DM1. PMID:25613807

  5. Alternative approach for management of an electrical storm in Brugada syndrome:Importance of primary ablation within a narrow time window.

    PubMed

    Talib, Ahmed Karim; Yui, Yoshiaki; Kaneshiro, Takashi; Sekiguchi, Yukio; Nogami, Akihiko; Aonuma, Kazutaka

    2016-06-01

    Placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is the only powerful treatment modality for Brugada syndrome in patients presenting with ventricular fibrillation (VF). For those whose first presentation is an electrical storm, pharmacologic therapy is typically used to control VF followed by ICD implantation. We report an alternative approach whereby, before ICD implantation, emergency catheter ablation of the VF-triggering premature ventricular contraction (PVC) resulted in long-term VF-free survival. The results suggest that, because VF triggers appear in a narrow time window, ablation of the culprit PVCs that initiate VF before the index PVCs subside is a reasonable alternative approach. PMID:27354869

  6. Cardiac arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment for cardiac arrest. It is a medical device that gives an electrical shock to the heart. The shock can get the heart beating normally again. Small, portable defibrillators are often available in public areas for ...

  7. Cardiac amyloidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way electrical signals move through the heart (conduction system). This can lead to abnormal heart beats ( ... due to medication) Sick sinus syndrome Symptomatic cardiac conduction system disease (arrhythmias related to abnormal conduction of ...

  8. Cocaine Intoxication and Thyroid Storm

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Cocaine, a widely used sympathomimetic drug, causes thermoregulatory and cardiac manifestations that can mimic a life-threatening thyroid storm. Case. A man presented to the emergency department requesting only cocaine detoxification. He reported symptoms over the last few years including weight loss and diarrhea, which he attributed to ongoing cocaine use. On presentation he had an elevated temperature of 39.4°C and a heart rate up to 130 beats per minute. Examination revealed the presence of an enlarged, nontender goiter with bilateral continuous bruits. He was found to have thyrotoxicosis by labs and was treated for thyroid storm and cocaine intoxication concurrently. The patient was ultimately diagnosed with Graves’ disease and treated with iodine-131 therapy. Conclusion. Cocaine use should be considered a possible trigger for thyroid storm. Recognition of thyroid storm is critical because of the necessity for targeted therapy and the significant mortality associated with the condition if left untreated. PMID:26425625

  9. Combining wet and dry research: experience with model development for cardiac mechano-electric structure-function studies.

    PubMed

    Quinn, T Alexander; Kohl, Peter

    2013-03-15

    Since the development of the first mathematical cardiac cell model 50 years ago, computational modelling has become an increasingly powerful tool for the analysis of data and for the integration of information related to complex cardiac behaviour. Current models build on decades of iteration between experiment and theory, representing a collective understanding of cardiac function. All models, whether computational, experimental, or conceptual, are simplified representations of reality and, like tools in a toolbox, suitable for specific applications. Their range of applicability can be explored (and expanded) by iterative combination of 'wet' and 'dry' investigation, where experimental or clinical data are used to first build and then validate computational models (allowing integration of previous findings, quantitative assessment of conceptual models, and projection across relevant spatial and temporal scales), while computational simulations are utilized for plausibility assessment, hypotheses-generation, and prediction (thereby defining further experimental research targets). When implemented effectively, this combined wet/dry research approach can support the development of a more complete and cohesive understanding of integrated biological function. This review illustrates the utility of such an approach, based on recent examples of multi-scale studies of cardiac structure and mechano-electric function. PMID:23334215

  10. Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Gonzalez, Walter D.

    1998-01-01

    One of the oldest mysteries in geomagnetism is the linkage between solar and geomagnetic activity. The 11-year cycles of both the numbers of sunspots and Earth geomagnetic storms were first noted by Sabine. A few years later, speculation on a causal relationship between flares and storms arose when Carrington reported that a large magnetic storm followed the great September 1859 solar flare. However, it was not until this century that a well-accepted statistical survey on large solar flares and geomagnetic storms was performed, and a significant correlation between flares and geomagnetic storms was noted. Although the two phenomena, one on the Sun and the other on the Earth, were statistically correlated, the exact physical linkage was still an unknown at this time. Various hypotheses were proposed, but it was not until interplanetary spacecraft measurements were available that a high-speed plasma stream rich in helium was associated with an intense solar flare. The velocity of the solar wind increased just prior to and during the helium passage, identifying the solar ejecta for the first time. Space plasma measurements and Skylab's coronagraph images of coronal mass elections (CMES) from the Sun firmly established the plasma link between the Sun and the Earth. One phenomenon associated with magnetic storms is brilliant "blood" red auroras, as shown.

  11. Removal of pinned scroll waves in cardiac tissues by electric fields in a generic model of three-dimensional excitable media

    PubMed Central

    Pan, De-Bei; Gao, Xiang; Feng, Xia; Pan, Jun-Ting; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Spirals or scroll waves pinned to heterogeneities in cardiac tissues may cause lethal arrhythmias. To unpin these life-threatening spiral waves, methods of wave emission from heterogeneities (WEH) induced by low-voltage pulsed DC electric fields (PDCEFs) and circularly polarized electric fields (CPEFs) have been used in two-dimensional (2D) cardiac tissues. Nevertheless, the unpinning of scroll waves in three-dimensional (3D) cardiac systems is much more difficult than that of spiral waves in 2D cardiac systems, and there are few reports on the removal of pinned scroll waves in 3D cardiac tissues by electric fields. In this article, we investigate in detail the removal of pinned scroll waves in a generic model of 3D excitable media using PDCEF, AC electric field (ACEF) and CPEF, respectively. We find that spherical waves can be induced from the heterogeneities by these electric fields in initially quiescent excitable media. However, only CPEF can induce spherical waves with frequencies higher than that of the pinned scroll wave. Such higher-frequency spherical waves induced by CPEF can be used to drive the pinned scroll wave out of the cardiac systems. We hope this remarkable ability of CPEF can provide a better alternative to terminate arrhythmias caused by pinned scroll waves. PMID:26905367

  12. Removal of pinned scroll waves in cardiac tissues by electric fields in a generic model of three-dimensional excitable media.

    PubMed

    Pan, De-Bei; Gao, Xiang; Feng, Xia; Pan, Jun-Ting; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Spirals or scroll waves pinned to heterogeneities in cardiac tissues may cause lethal arrhythmias. To unpin these life-threatening spiral waves, methods of wave emission from heterogeneities (WEH) induced by low-voltage pulsed DC electric fields (PDCEFs) and circularly polarized electric fields (CPEFs) have been used in two-dimensional (2D) cardiac tissues. Nevertheless, the unpinning of scroll waves in three-dimensional (3D) cardiac systems is much more difficult than that of spiral waves in 2D cardiac systems, and there are few reports on the removal of pinned scroll waves in 3D cardiac tissues by electric fields. In this article, we investigate in detail the removal of pinned scroll waves in a generic model of 3D excitable media using PDCEF, AC electric field (ACEF) and CPEF, respectively. We find that spherical waves can be induced from the heterogeneities by these electric fields in initially quiescent excitable media. However, only CPEF can induce spherical waves with frequencies higher than that of the pinned scroll wave. Such higher-frequency spherical waves induced by CPEF can be used to drive the pinned scroll wave out of the cardiac systems. We hope this remarkable ability of CPEF can provide a better alternative to terminate arrhythmias caused by pinned scroll waves. PMID:26905367

  13. On extreme geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid, Consuelo; Palacios, Judith; Saiz, Elena; Guerrero, Antonio; Cerrato, Yolanda

    2014-10-01

    Extreme geomagnetic storms are considered as one of the major natural hazards for technology-dependent society. Geomagnetic field disturbances can disrupt the operation of critical infrastructures relying on space-based assets, and can also result in terrestrial effects, such as the Quebec electrical disruption in 1989. Forecasting potential hazards is a matter of high priority, but considering large flares as the only criterion for early-warning systems has demonstrated to release a large amount of false alarms and misses. Moreover, the quantification of the severity of the geomagnetic disturbance at the terrestrial surface using indices as Dst cannot be considered as the best approach to give account of the damage in utilities. High temporal resolution local indices come out as a possible solution to this issue, as disturbances recorded at the terrestrial surface differ largely both in latitude and longitude. The recovery phase of extreme storms presents also some peculiar features which make it different from other less intense storms. This paper goes through all these issues related to extreme storms by analysing a few events, highlighting the March 1989 storm, related to the Quebec blackout, and the October 2003 event, when several transformers burnt out in South Africa.

  14. Groundwater discharge to wetlands driven by storm and flood events: Quantification using continuous Radon-222 and electrical conductivity measurements and dynamic mass-balance modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfedder, B. S.; Frei, S.; Hofmann, H.; Cartwright, I.

    2015-09-01

    The dynamic response of groundwater discharge to external influences such as rainfall is an often neglected part of water and solute balances in wetlands. Here we develop a new field platform for long-term continuous 222Rn and electrical conductivity (EC) measurements at Sale Wetland, Australia to study the response of groundwater discharge to storm and flood events. The field measurements, combined with dynamic mass-balance modelling, demonstrate that the groundwater flux can increase from 3 to ∼20 mm d-1 following storms and up to 5 mm d-1 on the receding limb of floods. The groundwater pulses are likely produced by activation of local groundwater flow paths by water ponding on the surrounding flood plains. While 222Rn is a sensitive tracer for quantifying transient groundwater discharge, the mass-balance used to estimate fluxes is sensitive to parameterisation of gas exchange (k) with the atmosphere. Comparison of six equations for calculating k showed that, based on parameterisation of k alone, the groundwater flux estimate could vary by 58%. This work shows that neglecting transient processes will lead to errors in water and solute flux estimates based on infrequent point measurements. This could be particularly important for surface waters connected to contaminated or saline groundwater systems.

  15. Effects of magnetospheric electric fields and neutral winds on the low-middle latitude ionosphere during the March 20-21, 1990, Storm

    SciTech Connect

    Buonsanto, M.J.; Foster, J.C.

    1993-11-01

    During the geomagnetic storm of March 20-21, 1990, substorm activity is clearly evident in magnetometer data collected during the night at the middle- and low-latitude stations Fredericksburg (38.2{degrees}N, 282.6{degrees}E) and San Juan (18.1{degrees}N, 293.8{degrees}E). At the same time, incoherent scatter radars at Millstone Hill (42.6{degrees}N, 288.5{degrees}E) and Arecibo (18.3{degrees}N, 293.25{degrees}E) observed ionospheric storm effects, which included the penetration of magnetospheric electric fields and disturbance neutral winds to the latitude of Arecibo. The eastward electric fields associated with the substorm disturbances result in increases in the F2 peak height (hmF2) at Arecibo. Decreases in hmF2 follow as a result of increased downward diffusion and/or the effects of an ion drag induced poleward wind. During the intervals between the electric field penetration events, equatorward surges in the neutral wind result in westward electric fields by the disturbance dynamo mechanism. At these times the horizontal ionization drifts are not as strong as the neutral winds, apparently because of a partial shorting out of the dynamo electric fields as a result of some E region conductivity. The anticorrelation between the components of ion drift parallel (V{sub {parallel}}) and perpendicular to the magnetic field in the northward direction (V{sub {perpendicular}}N) results in approximately horizontal (constant altitude) ion drift motion throughout the interval. Calculations of spatial gradients in the electron density and in the components of the ion velocity are carried out using the multi-directional incoherent scatter observations at Arecibo. The results show that the variations in electron density during the disturbed interval follow closely the motion term in the F2 region continuity equation, with both advection of spatial gradients and divergence of the ion flow important at times. 28 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Cardiac conduction system

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals to the heart muscle causing it to contract. The main components ... the cardiac conduction system’s electrical activity in the heart.

  17. An evaluation of two conducted electrical weapons and two probe designs using a swine comparative cardiac safety model.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Donald Murray; Ho, Jeffrey D; Moore, Johanna C; Miner, James R

    2013-09-01

    Despite human laboratory and field studies that have demonstrated a reasonable safety profile for TASER brand conducted electrical weapons (CEW), the results of some swine studies and arrest related deaths temporal to the use of the CEWs continue to raise questions regarding cardiac safety. TASER International, Inc., has released a new CEW, the TASER X2, touted to have a better safety profile than its long-standing predecessor, the TASER X26. We have developed a model to assess the relative cardiac safety of CEWs and used it to compare the TASER X2 and the TASER X26. This safety model was also used to assess the relative safety of an experimental probe design as compared to the standard steel probe. Our results suggest that the TASER X2 has an improved safety margin over the TASER X26. The new probe design also has promise for enhanced cardiac safety, although may have some disadvantages when compared to the existing design which would make field use impractical. PMID:23543462

  18. Label-free electrical detection of cardiac biomarker with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor-compatible silicon nanowire sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Chua, Jay Huiyi; Chee, Ru-Ern; Agarwal, Ajay; Wong, She Mein; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2009-08-01

    Arrays of highly ordered silicon nanowire (SiNW) clusters are fabricated using complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) field effect transistor-compatible technology, and the ultrasensitive, label-free, electrical detection of cardiac biomarker in real time using the array sensor is presented. The successful detection of human cardiac troponin-T (cTnT) has been demonstrated in an assay buffer solution of concentration down to 1 fg/mL, as well as in an undiluted human serum environment of concentration as low as 30 fg/mL. The high specificity, selectivity, and swift response time of the SiNWs to the presence of ultralow concentrations of a target protein in a biological analyte solution, even in the presence of a high total protein concentration, paves the way for the development of a medical diagnostic system for point-of-care application that is able to provide an early and accurate indication of cardiac cellular necrosis. PMID:20337397

  19. Electrical Wave Propagation in an Anisotropic Model of the Left Ventricle Based on Analytical Description of Cardiac Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Pravdin, Sergey F.; Dierckx, Hans; Katsnelson, Leonid B.; Solovyova, Olga; Markhasin, Vladimir S.; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a numerical approach based on our recent analytical model of fiber structure in the left ventricle of the human heart. A special curvilinear coordinate system is proposed to analytically include realistic ventricular shape and myofiber directions. With this anatomical model, electrophysiological simulations can be performed on a rectangular coordinate grid. We apply our method to study the effect of fiber rotation and electrical anisotropy of cardiac tissue (i.e., the ratio of the conductivity coefficients along and across the myocardial fibers) on wave propagation using the ten Tusscher–Panfilov (2006) ionic model for human ventricular cells. We show that fiber rotation increases the speed of cardiac activation and attenuates the effects of anisotropy. Our results show that the fiber rotation in the heart is an important factor underlying cardiac excitation. We also study scroll wave dynamics in our model and show the drift of a scroll wave filament whose velocity depends non-monotonically on the fiber rotation angle; the period of scroll wave rotation decreases with an increase of the fiber rotation angle; an increase in anisotropy may cause the breakup of a scroll wave, similar to the mother rotor mechanism of ventricular fibrillation. PMID:24817308

  20. Electrical wave propagation in an anisotropic model of the left ventricle based on analytical description of cardiac architecture.

    PubMed

    Pravdin, Sergey F; Dierckx, Hans; Katsnelson, Leonid B; Solovyova, Olga; Markhasin, Vladimir S; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2014-01-01

    We develop a numerical approach based on our recent analytical model of fiber structure in the left ventricle of the human heart. A special curvilinear coordinate system is proposed to analytically include realistic ventricular shape and myofiber directions. With this anatomical model, electrophysiological simulations can be performed on a rectangular coordinate grid. We apply our method to study the effect of fiber rotation and electrical anisotropy of cardiac tissue (i.e., the ratio of the conductivity coefficients along and across the myocardial fibers) on wave propagation using the ten Tusscher-Panfilov (2006) ionic model for human ventricular cells. We show that fiber rotation increases the speed of cardiac activation and attenuates the effects of anisotropy. Our results show that the fiber rotation in the heart is an important factor underlying cardiac excitation. We also study scroll wave dynamics in our model and show the drift of a scroll wave filament whose velocity depends non-monotonically on the fiber rotation angle; the period of scroll wave rotation decreases with an increase of the fiber rotation angle; an increase in anisotropy may cause the breakup of a scroll wave, similar to the mother rotor mechanism of ventricular fibrillation. PMID:24817308

  1. Efficient simulation of cardiac electrical propagation using high order finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthurs, Christopher J.; Bishop, Martin J.; Kay, David

    2012-05-01

    We present an application of high order hierarchical finite elements for the efficient approximation of solutions to the cardiac monodomain problem. We detail the hurdles which must be overcome in order to achieve theoretically-optimal errors in the approximations generated, including the choice of method for approximating the solution to the cardiac cell model component. We place our work on a solid theoretical foundation and show that it can greatly improve the accuracy in the approximation which can be achieved in a given amount of processor time. Our results demonstrate superior accuracy over linear finite elements at a cheaper computational cost and thus indicate the potential indispensability of our approach for large-scale cardiac simulation.

  2. Dust Storm

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... contrast strongly with the dust storm that swept across Iraq and Saudi Arabia on May 13, 2004 (bottom panels). These data products from ... as yellowish ripples that obscure a large part of southern Iraq. The dust is easy to discern over the dark waters of the teardrop-shaped ...

  3. 30 CFR 56.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 56.6604 Section 56... Extraneous Electricity § 56.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm, blasting operations shall be suspended and persons withdrawn from the blast area or to a...

  4. 30 CFR 56.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 56.6604 Section 56... Extraneous Electricity § 56.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm, blasting operations shall be suspended and persons withdrawn from the blast area or to a...

  5. 30 CFR 56.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 56.6604 Section 56... Extraneous Electricity § 56.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm, blasting operations shall be suspended and persons withdrawn from the blast area or to a...

  6. 30 CFR 56.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 56.6604 Section 56... Extraneous Electricity § 56.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm, blasting operations shall be suspended and persons withdrawn from the blast area or to a...

  7. 30 CFR 56.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 56.6604 Section 56... Extraneous Electricity § 56.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm, blasting operations shall be suspended and persons withdrawn from the blast area or to a...

  8. Geomagnetic storms: historical perspective to modern view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhina, Gurbax S.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    2016-12-01

    The history of geomagnetism is more than 400 years old. Geomagnetic storms as we know them were discovered about 210 years ago. There has been keen interest in understanding Sun-Earth connection events, such as solar flares, CMEs, and concomitant magnetic storms in recent times. Magnetic storms are the most important component of space weather effects on Earth. We give an overview of the historical aspects of geomagnetic storms and the progress made during the past two centuries. Super magnetic storms can cause life-threatening power outages and satellite damage, communication failures and navigational problems. The data for such super magnetic storms that occurred in the last 50 years during the space era is sparce. Research on historical geomagnetic storms can help to create a database for intense and super magnetic storms. New knowledge of interplanetary and solar causes of magnetic storms gained from spaceage observations will be used to review the super magnetic storm of September 1-2, 1859. We discuss the occurrence probability of such super magnetic storms, and the maximum possible intensity for the effects of a perfect ICME: extreme super magnetic storm, extreme magnetospheric compression, and extreme magnetospheric electric fields.

  9. Total Storm Currents in Relation to Storm Type and Lifecycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deierling, W.; Kalb, C. P.; Mach, D. M.; Liu, C.

    2013-12-01

    Electrified lightning and non-lightning producing clouds of various types are thought to play a major role in supplying current to the global electric circuit (GEC). However, the contribution of storm conduction currents of different cloud types to the GEC is still not entirely known. Estimates of storm total conduction currents for different electrified clouds for the general categories of oceanic and continental electrified clouds were recently estimated from data collected over two decades during multiple field campaigns involving the NASA ER-2 and Altus-II aircraft. Building on this previous work, in this study we differentiate cloud categories into more specific cloud types (e.g. convective and stratiform partitions, severe versus ordinary single cell storms) and investigate on a case by case basis their underlying microphysical and dynamical structure. We also investigate the temporal evolution of storm total conduction currents during the lifecycle of electrified clouds.

  10. Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiac Output vs. Heart Rate in Patients with an Implanted Pacemaker Based on Electric Impedance Method Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukup, Ladislav; Vondra, Vlastimil; Viščor, Ivo; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef

    2013-04-01

    The methods and device for estimation of cardiac output and measurement of pulse wave velocity simultaneously is presented here. The beat-to-beat cardiac output as well as pulse wave velocity measurement is based on application of electrical impedance method on the thorax and calf. The results are demonstrated in a study of 24 subjects. The dependence of pulse wave velocity and cardiac output on heart rate during rest in patients with an implanted pacemaker was evaluated. The heart rate was changed by pacemaker programming while neither exercise nor drugs were applied. The most important result is that the pulse wave velocity, cardiac output and blood pressure do not depend significantly on heart rate, while the stroke volume is reciprocal proportionally to the heart rate.

  11. Deletion of Kvβ1.1 subunit leads to electrical and haemodynamic changes causing cardiac hypertrophy in female murine hearts

    PubMed Central

    Tur, Jared; Chapalamadugu, Kalyan C.; Padawer, Timothy; Badole, Sachin L.; Kilfoil, Peter J.; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Tipparaju, Srinivas M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and debility in women in the USA, and cardiac arrhythmias are a major concern. Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels along with the binding partners; Kvβ subunits are major regulators of the action potential (AP) shape and duration (APD). The regulation of Kv channels by the Kvβ1 subunit is unknown in female hearts. In the present study, we hypothesized that the Kvβ1 subunit is an important regulator of female cardiac physiology. To test this hypothesis, we ablated (knocked out; KO) the KCNAB1 isoform 1 (Kvβ1.1) subunit in mice and evaluated cardiac function and electrical activity by using ECG, monophasic action potential recordings and echocardiography. Our results showed that the female Kvβ1.1 KO mice developed cardiac hypertrophy, and the hearts were structurally different, with enlargement and increased area. The electrical derangements caused by Kvβ1.1 KO in female mice included long QTc and QRS intervals along with increased APD (APD20–90% repolarization). The male Kvβ1.1 KO mice did not develop cardiac hypertrophy, but they showed long QTc and prolonged APD. Molecular analysis showed that several genes that support cardiac hypertrophy were significantly altered in Kvβ1.1 KO female hearts. In particular, myosin heavy chain αexpression was significantly elevated in Kvβ1.1 KO mouse heart. Using a small interfering RNA strategy, we identified that knockdown of Kvβ1 increases myosin heavy chain αexpression in H9C2 cells. Collectively, changes in molecular and cell signalling pathways clearly point towards a distinct electrical and structural remodelling consistent with cardiac hypertrophy in the Kvβ1.1 KO female mice. PMID:27038296

  12. Nanosecond pulsed platelet-rich plasma (nsPRP) improves mechanical and electrical cardiac function following myocardial reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Hargrave, Barbara; Varghese, Frency; Barabutis, Nektarios; Catravas, John; Zemlin, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) of the heart is associated with biochemical and ionic changes that result in cardiac contractile and electrical dysfunction. In rabbits, platelet-rich plasma activated using nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPRP) has been shown to improve left ventricular pumping. Here, we demonstrate that nsPRP causes a similar improvement in mouse left ventricular function. We also show that nsPRP injection recovers electrical activity even before reperfusion begins. To uncover the mechanism of nsPRP action, we studied whether the enhanced left ventricular function in nsPRP rabbit and mouse hearts was associated with increased expression of heat-shock proteins and altered mitochondrial function under conditions of oxidative stress. Mouse hearts underwent 30 min of global ischemia and 1 h of reperfusion in situ. Rabbit hearts underwent 30 min of ischemia in vivo and were reperfused for 14 days. Hearts treated with nsPRP expressed significantly higher levels of Hsp27 and Hsp70 compared to hearts treated with vehicle. Also, pretreatment of cultured H9c2 cells with nsPRP significantly enhanced the "spare respiratory capacity (SRC)" also referred to as "respiratory reserve capacity" and ATP production in response to the uncoupler FCCP. These results suggest a cardioprotective effect of nsPRP on the ischemic heart during reperfusion. PMID:26908713

  13. Pilocarpine modulates the cellular electrical properties of mammalian hearts by activating a cardiac M3 receptor and a K+ current

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huizhen; Shi, Hong; Lu, Yanjie; Yang, Baofeng; Wang, Zhiguo

    1999-01-01

    Pilocarpine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) agonist, is widely used for treatment of xerostomia and glaucoma. It can also cause many other cellular responses by activating different subtypes of mAChRs in different tissues. However, the potential role of pilocarpine in modulating cardiac function remained unstudied.We found that pilocarpine produced concentration-dependent (0.1–10 μM) decrease in sinus rhythm and action potential duration, and hyperpolarization of membrane potential in guinea-pig hearts. The effects were nearly completely reversed by 1 μM atropine or 2 nM 4DAMP methiodide (an M3-selective antagonist).Patch-clamp recordings in dispersed myocytes from guinea-pig and canine atria revealed that pilocarpine induces a novel K+ current with delayed rectifying properties. The current was suppressed by low concentrations of M3-selective antagonists 4DAMP methiodide (2–10 nM), 4DAMP mustard (4–20 nM, an ackylating agent) and p-F-HHSiD (20–200 nM). Antagonists towards other subtypes (M1, M2 or M4) all failed to alter the current.The affinity of pilocarpine (KD) at mAChRs derived from displacement binding of [3H]-NMS in the homogenates from dog atria was 2.2 μM (65% of the total binding) and that of 4DAMP methiodide was 2.8 nM (70% of total binding), consistent with the concentration of pilocarpine needed for the current induction and for the modulation of the cardiac electrical activity and the concentration of 4DAMP to block pilocarpine effects.Our data indicate, for the first time, that pilocarpine modulates the cellular electrical properties of the hearts, likely by activating a K+ current mediated by M3 receptors. PMID:10372814

  14. Fluorescence imaging of electrical activity in cardiac cells using an all-solid-state system.

    PubMed

    Entcheva, Emilia; Kostov, Yordan; Tchernev, Elko; Tung, Leslie

    2004-02-01

    Tracking spatial and temporal determinants of cardiac arrhythmogenesis at the cellular level presents challenges to the optical mapping techniques employed. In this paper, we describe a compact system combining two nontraditional low-cost solutions for excitation light sources and emission filters in fluorescence measurements of transmembrane potentials, Vm, or intracellular calcium, [Ca2+]i in cardiac cell networks. This is the first reported use of high-power blue and green light emitting diodes (LEDs), to excite cell monolayers stained with Vm - (di-8-ANEPPS) or [Ca2+]i - (Fluo-3) sensitive dyes. In addition, we use simple techniques for fabrication of suitable thin emission filters with uniform properties, no auto-fluorescence, high durability and good flexibility for imaging Vm or [Ca2+]i. The battery-operated LEDs and the fabricated emission filters, integrated with a fiber-optic system for contact fluorescence imaging, were used as tools to characterize conduction velocity restitution at the macro-scale. The versatility of the LEDs for illumination is further emphasized through 1) demonstration of their usage for epi-illumination recordings at the single-cell level, and 2) demonstration of their unique high-frequency light modulation ability. The LEDs showed excellent stability as excitation light sources for fluorescence measurements; acceptable signal-to-noise ratio and negligible cell photodamage and indicator dye photobleaching were observed. PMID:14765706

  15. Ion channel modifying agents influence the electrical activity generated by canine intrinsic cardiac neurons in situ.

    PubMed

    Thompson, G W; Horackova, M; Armour, J A

    2000-04-01

    This study was designed to establish whether agents known to modify neuronal ion channels influence the behavior of mammalian intrinsic cardiac neurons in situ and, if so, in a manner consistent with that found previously in vitro. The activity generated by right atrial neurons was recorded extracellularly in varying numbers of anesthetized dogs before and during continuous local arterial infusion of several neuronal ion channel modifying agents. Veratridine (7.5 microM), the specific modifier of Na+-selective channels, increased neuronal activity (95% above control) in 80% of dogs tested (n = 25). The membrane depolarizing agent potassium chloride (40 mM) reduced neuronal activity (43% below control) in 84% of dogs tested (n = 19). The inhibitor of voltage-sensitive K+ channels, tetraethylammonium (10 mM), decreased neuronal activity (42% below control) in 73% of dogs tested (n = 11). The nonspecific potassium channel inhibitor barium chloride (5 mM) excited neurons (47% above control) in 13 of 19 animals tested. Cadmium chloride (200 microM), which inhibits Ca2+-selective channels and Ca2+-dependent K+ channels, increased neuronal activity (65% above control) in 79% of dogs tested (n = 14). The specific L-type Ca2+ channel blocking agent nifedipine (5 microM) reduced neuronal activity (52% blow control in 72% of 11 dogs tested), as did the nonspecific inhibitor of L-type Ca2+ channels, nickel chloride (5 mM) (36% below control in 69% of 13 dogs tested). Each agent induced either excitatory or inhibitory responses, depending on the agent tested. It is concluded that specific ion channels (I(Na), I(CaL), I(Kv), and I(KCa)) that have been associated with intrinsic cardiac neurons in vitro are involved in their capacity to generate action potentials in situ. PMID:10772056

  16. Lumped Element Electrical Model based on Three Resistors for Electrical Impedance in Radiofrequency Cardiac Ablation: Estimations from Analytical Calculations and Clinical Data

    PubMed Central

    Berjano, Enrique; d'Avila, Andre

    2013-01-01

    The electrical impedance measured during radiofrequency cardiac ablation (RFCA) is widely used in clinical studies to predict the heating evolution and hence the success of the procedure. We hypothesized that a model based on three resistors in series can mimic the total electrical impedance measured during RFCA. The three resistors or impedances are given by: impedance associated with the tissue around the active electrode (myocardium and circulating blood) (Z-A), that associated with the tissue around the dispersive electrode (Z-DE) and that associated with the rest of the body (Z-B). Our objective was to quantify the values associated with these three impedance types by an analytical method, after which the values obtained would be compared to those estimated from clinical data from previous studies. The results suggest that an RFCA using a 7 Fr 4-mm electrode would give a Z-A of around 75 ohms, a Z-DE around 20 ohms, and Z-B would be 15±10 ohms (for body surface area variations between 1.5 and 2.5 m^2). Finally, adaptations of the proposed model were used to explain the results of previous clinical studies using a different electrode arrangement, such as in bipolar ablation of the ventricular septum. PMID:23961299

  17. Current understanding of magnetic storms: Storm-substorm relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Kamide, Y.; Gonzalez, W.D.; Baumjohann, W.; Daglis, I.A.; Grande, M.; Joselyn, J.A.; Singer, H.J.; McPherron, R.L.; Phillips, J.L.; Reeves, E.G.; Rostoker, G.; Sharma, A.S.; Tsurutani, B.T.

    1998-08-01

    This paper attempts to summarize the current understanding of the storm/substorm relationship by clearing up a considerable amount of controversy and by addressing the question of how solar wind energy is deposited into and is dissipated in the constituent elements that are critical to magnetospheric and ionospheric processes during magnetic storms. (1) Four mechanisms are identified and discussed as the primary causes of enhanced electric fields in the interplanetary medium responsible for geomagnetic storms. It is pointed out that in reality, these four mechanisms, which are not mutually exclusive, but interdependent, interact differently from event to event. Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and corotating interaction regions (CIRs) are found to be the primary phenomena responsible for the main phase of geomagnetic storms. The other two mechanisms, i.e., HILDCAA (high-intensity, long-duration, continuous auroral electrojet activity) and the so-called Russell-McPherron effect, work to make the ICME and CIR phenomena more geoeffective. The solar cycle dependence of the various sources in creating magnetic storms has yet to be quantitatively understood. (2) A serious controversy exists as to whether the successive occurrence of intense substorms plays a direct role in the energization of ring current particles or whether the enhanced electric field associated with southward IMF enhances the effect of substorm expansions. While most of the {ital Dst} variance during magnetic storms can be solely reproduced by changes in the large-scale electric field in the solar wind and the residuals are uncorrelated with substorms, recent satellite observations of the ring current constituents during the main phase of magnetic storms show the importance of ionospheric ions. This implies that ionospheric ions, which are associated with the frequent occurrence of intense substorms, are accelerated upward along magnetic field lines, contributing to the energy density of

  18. Correlations between the signal complexity of cerebral and cardiac electrical activity: a multiscale entropy analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pei-Feng; Lo, Men-Tzung; Tsao, Jenho; Chang, Yi-Chung; Lin, Chen; Ho, Yi-Lwun

    2014-01-01

    The heart begins to beat before the brain is formed. Whether conventional hierarchical central commands sent by the brain to the heart alone explain all the interplay between these two organs should be reconsidered. Here, we demonstrate correlations between the signal complexity of brain and cardiac activity. Eighty-seven geriatric outpatients with healthy hearts and varied cognitive abilities each provided a 24-hour electrocardiography (ECG) and a 19-channel eye-closed routine electroencephalography (EEG). Multiscale entropy (MSE) analysis was applied to three epochs (resting-awake state, photic stimulation of fast frequencies (fast-PS), and photic stimulation of slow frequencies (slow-PS)) of EEG in the 1-58 Hz frequency range, and three RR interval (RRI) time series (awake-state, sleep and that concomitant with the EEG) for each subject. The low-to-high frequency power (LF/HF) ratio of RRI was calculated to represent sympatho-vagal balance. With statistics after Bonferroni corrections, we found that: (a) the summed MSE value on coarse scales of the awake RRI (scales 11-20, RRI-MSE-coarse) were inversely correlated with the summed MSE value on coarse scales of the resting-awake EEG (scales 6-20, EEG-MSE-coarse) at Fp2, C4, T6 and T4; (b) the awake RRI-MSE-coarse was inversely correlated with the fast-PS EEG-MSE-coarse at O1, O2 and C4; (c) the sleep RRI-MSE-coarse was inversely correlated with the slow-PS EEG-MSE-coarse at Fp2; (d) the RRI-MSE-coarse and LF/HF ratio of the awake RRI were correlated positively to each other; (e) the EEG-MSE-coarse at F8 was proportional to the cognitive test score; (f) the results conform to the cholinergic hypothesis which states that cognitive impairment causes reduction in vagal cardiac modulation; (g) fast-PS significantly lowered the EEG-MSE-coarse globally. Whether these heart-brain correlations could be fully explained by the central autonomic network is unknown and needs further exploration. PMID:24498375

  19. Correlations between the Signal Complexity of Cerebral and Cardiac Electrical Activity: A Multiscale Entropy Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pei-Feng; Lo, Men-Tzung; Tsao, Jenho; Chang, Yi-Chung; Lin, Chen; Ho, Yi-Lwun

    2014-01-01

    The heart begins to beat before the brain is formed. Whether conventional hierarchical central commands sent by the brain to the heart alone explain all the interplay between these two organs should be reconsidered. Here, we demonstrate correlations between the signal complexity of brain and cardiac activity. Eighty-seven geriatric outpatients with healthy hearts and varied cognitive abilities each provided a 24-hour electrocardiography (ECG) and a 19-channel eye-closed routine electroencephalography (EEG). Multiscale entropy (MSE) analysis was applied to three epochs (resting-awake state, photic stimulation of fast frequencies (fast-PS), and photic stimulation of slow frequencies (slow-PS)) of EEG in the 1–58 Hz frequency range, and three RR interval (RRI) time series (awake-state, sleep and that concomitant with the EEG) for each subject. The low-to-high frequency power (LF/HF) ratio of RRI was calculated to represent sympatho-vagal balance. With statistics after Bonferroni corrections, we found that: (a) the summed MSE value on coarse scales of the awake RRI (scales 11–20, RRI-MSE-coarse) were inversely correlated with the summed MSE value on coarse scales of the resting-awake EEG (scales 6–20, EEG-MSE-coarse) at Fp2, C4, T6 and T4; (b) the awake RRI-MSE-coarse was inversely correlated with the fast-PS EEG-MSE-coarse at O1, O2 and C4; (c) the sleep RRI-MSE-coarse was inversely correlated with the slow-PS EEG-MSE-coarse at Fp2; (d) the RRI-MSE-coarse and LF/HF ratio of the awake RRI were correlated positively to each other; (e) the EEG-MSE-coarse at F8 was proportional to the cognitive test score; (f) the results conform to the cholinergic hypothesis which states that cognitive impairment causes reduction in vagal cardiac modulation; (g) fast-PS significantly lowered the EEG-MSE-coarse globally. Whether these heart-brain correlations could be fully explained by the central autonomic network is unknown and needs further exploration. PMID:24498375

  20. Effects of acupuncture at the acupoints of 12 meridians on gastrointestinal and cardiac electricity in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiao-Rong; Yan, Jie; Shen, Jing; Liu, Mi; Wang, Xiao-Juan

    2010-09-01

    The effect of acupuncture at the acupoints of 12 meridians on gastrointestinal and cardiac electricity in healthy adults was studied. Specific regulation between meridian points and viscera was also investigated. An electrogastrogram (EGG), electrointestinogram (EIG), carotid pulse graph, phonocardiogram and electrocardiogram were obtained in 30 healthy adults before and after acupuncture at various acupoints of 12 meridians. The effects of acupuncture on the amplitude and frequency of the EGG, EIG, pre-ejection period and the left ventricular ejection time were then analyzed. Acupuncture revealed that LR3 decreased the amplitude of the EGG while LI11 (Quchi), SJ5 (Waiguan), ST36 (Zusanli), SP9 (Yinlingquan) and SI6 (Yanglao) increased the amplitude. Multiple comparisons among the latter five acupoints indicated that there were significant differences between SP9, LI11, SJ5 and ST36 (p < 0.01, p < 0.01, p < 0.05) and SI6, LI11 and SJ5 (p < 0.01, p < 0.05). SP9 effected EGG amplitude the most, followed by SI6, ST36, SJ5 and LI11. Four acupoints increased the amplitude of the EIG (p < 0.05), including HT5 (Tongli), GB34 (Yanglingquan), SP9 and SI6. No significant differences were observed between these acupoints, but SI6 showed the most obvious effect on EIG amplitude, followed by GB34, SP9 and HT5. No significant effects on the frequency of the gastrointestinal slow wave or on cardiac function indexes were observed. Effects were observed, however, on pre-ejection period and left ventricular ejection time. Routine acupuncture had no detrimental effects on the stomach, intestine and heart in healthy adults, but instead regulated physiological function within a normal range. These findings demonstrate the existence of specific connections between the meridian points and the viscera. The results suggest that multiple meridians control the same viscus, and the same meridian can regulate the functions of multiple viscera. PMID:20869017

  1. Cardiac histopathological and immunohistochemical changes due to electric injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Ghandour, Nagwa M; Refaiy, Abeer E; Omran, Ghada Ali

    2014-03-01

    It has been a puzzling forensic task to determine the cause of death as a result of electric shock in the absence of recognizable skin marks or definite postmortem morphological findings. In forensic pathology, while classical macroscopic and microscopic morphology remain core procedures to investigate deaths, a variety of subsidiary measures has been developed and incorporated to detail that pathology. C-fos, one of a small group of genes called primary response genes and its protein product, fos, are crucial elements of complex signaling mechanisms believed to be responsible for cell response to stimulation. It has been found that c-fos plays a significant role in myocardial lesions, and has close relation to injury repair of the molecule. The aim of this study was to detect the histopathological findings in the myocardium after fatal and non-fatal electrical injury in rats and to investigate the potential role of c-fos expression using immunohistochemistry to distinguish antemortem from postmortem electrocution. Forty adult female rats were implemented and randomly divided into four groups (A, B, C and D). Group (A) rats were subjected to instantaneous antemortem electricity and their hearts were collected either immediately (A₁) or after an hour (A₂) before being subjected to cervical dislocation. Group (B) rats were electrically injured instantaneously postmortem, hearts were collected immediately (B₁) or an hour later (B₂) while Group (C) rats were electrified up to death, and their hearts were also gathered either immediately (C₁) or after an hour (C₂) from electrocution. Lastly, another group of rats served as a control group (Group D). Subgroup (D₁): rats were clamped but not electrified, before death and another group of rats were clamped but not electrified, after being killed by cervical dislocation. Sections from the hearts of all groups were fixed in formalin and routinely processed. The c-fos oncogene expression was evaluated in all

  2. Vulnerability to re-entry in simulated two-dimensional cardiac tissue: Effects of electrical restitution and stimulation sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Diana X.; Yang, Ming-Jim; Weiss, James N.; Garfinkel, Alan; Qu, Zhilin

    2007-12-01

    Ventricular fibrillation is a lethal arrhythmia characterized by multiple wavelets usually starting from a single or figure-of-eight re-entrant circuit. Understanding the factors regulating vulnerability to the re-entry is essential for developing effective therapeutic strategies to prevent ventricular fibrillation. In this study, we investigated how pre-existing tissue heterogeneities and electrical restitution properties affect the initiation of re-entry by premature extrastimuli in two-dimensional cardiac tissue models. We studied two pacing protocols for inducing re-entry following the "sinus" rhythm (S1) beat: (1) a single premature (S2) extrastimulus in heterogeneous tissue; (2) two premature extrastimuli (S2 and S3) in homogeneous tissue. In the first case, the vulnerable window of re-entry is determined by the spatial dimension and extent of the heterogeneity, and is also affected by electrical restitution properties and the location of the premature stimulus. The vulnerable window first increases as the action potential duration (APD) difference between the inside and outside of the heterogeneous region increases, but then decreases as this difference increases further. Steeper APD restitution reduces the vulnerable window of re-entry. In the second case, electrical restitution plays an essential role. When APD restitution is flat, no re-entry can be induced. When APD restitution is steep, re-entry can be induced by an S3 over a range of S1S2 intervals, which is also affected by conduction velocity restitution. When APD restitution is even steeper, the vulnerable window is reduced due to collision of the spiral tips.

  3. Overview of midlatitude ionospheric storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kintner, Paul; Coster, Anthea; Fuller-Rowell, Tim; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections erupting from the roiling Sun can smash into the Earth's magnetosphere causing geomagnetic storms that penetrate deep into the atmosphere, which can short out satellites, upset radio communications, disrupt navigation, and even damage terrestrial electrical power grids. Though effects on other regions of the atmosphere have been analyzed, the mechanism by which geomagnetic storms influence the ionosphere's middle latitudes remains poorly understood.This brief report provides an overview of current knowledge in midlatitude ionospheric dynamics and disturbances, from the historic record to recent discoveries presented at a January AGU Chapman Conference.

  4. Intense geomagnetic storms: A study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silbergleit, Virginia

    In the pipes and the lines of the transmission of the electrical energy, the route of the currents through them, causes a diminution of the life utility of the same one. The intense storms are studied, because these are induced quickly to the ionospheric systems that they change, obtaining great induced telluric currents (or GICs). Also the Akasofús parameter based on the time for periods of strong and moderate magnetic storms during the last 10 years is calculated. The method also standardizes the parameters of the storm: electron flow between 30-300 KeV, z component of the magnetic field (Bz), the solar Wind velocity (v), indices AE and AL. Also, the decay time of the ring current (which is different during the main and the recovery phase from of the geomagnetic disturbances) are calculated.

  5. Effects of trimebutine maleate on electrical activities of isolated mammalian cardiac preparations.

    PubMed

    Igawa, O; Kotake, H; Hirai, S; Hisatome, I; Hasegawa, J; Mashiba, H

    1989-05-01

    The effects of trimebutine maleate on electrical activity in guinea-pig isolated papillary muscles and rabbit sino-atrial nodes have been studied by means of a standard microelectrode method. In papillary muscles, trimebutine (above 10 microM) decreased the maximum rate of rise (Vmax) and the action potential duration at 90% repolarization (APD90), whereas the resting potential was not significantly altered. As to a decrease in Vmax, trimebutine produced a negative shift of the curve relating Vmax to the resting potential along the voltage axis. Trimebutine also depressed the slow action potentials of papillary muscles produced by 27 mM K and 0.2 mM Ba. In spontaneously beating sino-atrial node preparations, trimebutine (above 10 microM) decreased the heart rate, Vmax and the rate of diastolic depolarization. These results indicate that trimebutine maleate possesses a depressant action on the electrical activities of the fast- and slow-response fibres of the heart mainly due to inhibitions of both fast Na+ and slow Ca2+ channels. PMID:2569517

  6. The influence of anatomical and physiological parameters on the interference voltage at the input of unipolar cardiac pacemakers in low frequency electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joosten, S.; Pammler, K.; Silny, J.

    2009-02-01

    The problem of electromagnetic interference of electronic implants such as cardiac pacemakers has been well known for many years. An increasing number of field sources in everyday life and occupational environment leads unavoidably to an increased risk for patients with electronic implants. However, no obligatory national or international safety regulations exist for the protection of this patient group. The aim of this study is to find out the anatomical and physiological worst-case conditions for patients with an implanted pacemaker adjusted to unipolar sensing in external time-varying electric fields. The results of this study with 15 volunteers show that, in electric fields, variation of the interference voltage at the input of a cardiac pacemaker adds up to 200% only because of individual factors. These factors should be considered in human studies and in the setting of safety regulations.

  7. A coupled 3D-1D numerical monodomain solver for cardiac electrical activation in the myocardium with detailed Purkinje network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Christian; Lange, Matthias; Palamara, Simone; Lassila, Toni; Frangi, Alejandro F.; Quarteroni, Alfio

    2016-03-01

    We present a model for the electrophysiology in the heart to handle the electrical propagation through the Purkinje system and in the myocardium, with two-way coupling at the Purkinje-muscle junctions. In both the subproblems the monodomain model is considered, whereas at the junctions a resistor element is included that induces an orthodromic propagation delay from the Purkinje network towards the heart muscle. We prove a sufficient condition for convergence of a fixed-point iterative algorithm to the numerical solution of the coupled problem. Numerical comparison of activation patterns is made with two different combinations of models for the coupled Purkinje network/myocardium system, the eikonal/eikonal and the monodomain/monodomain models. Test cases are investigated for both physiological and pathological activation of a model left ventricle. Finally, we prove the reliability of the monodomain/monodomain coupling on a realistic scenario. Our results underlie the importance of using physiologically realistic Purkinje-trees with propagation solved using the monodomain model for simulating cardiac activation.

  8. Electroactive polyurethane/siloxane derived from castor oil as a versatile cardiac patch, part II: HL-1 cytocompatibility and electrical characterizations.

    PubMed

    Baheiraei, Nafiseh; Gharibi, Reza; Yeganeh, Hamid; Miragoli, Michele; Salvarani, Nicolò; Di Pasquale, Elisa; Condorelli, Gianluigi

    2016-06-01

    In first part of this experiment, biocompatibility of the newly developed electroactive polyurethane/siloxane films containing aniline tetramer moieties was demonstrated with proliferation and differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts. Here we further assessed the cytocompatibility of the prepared samples with HL1-cell line, the electrophysiological properties and the patch clamp recording of the seeded cells over the selected electroactive sample. Presence of electroactive aniline tetramer in the structure of polyurethane/siloxane led to the increased expression of cardiac-specific genes of HL-1 cells involved in muscle contraction and electrical coupling. Our results showed that expression of Cx43, TrpT-2, and SERCA genes was significantly increased in conductive sample compared to tissue culture plate and the corresponding non-conductive analogous. The prepared materials were not only biocompatible in terms of cellular toxicity, but did not alter the intrinsic electrical characteristics of HL-1 cells. Embedding the electroactive moiety into the prepared films improved the properties of these polymeric cardiac construct through the enhanced transmission of electrical signals between the cells. Based on morphological observation, calcium imaging and electrophysiological recordings, we demonstrated the potential applicability of these materials for cardiac tissue engineering. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1398-1407, 2016. PMID:26822463

  9. Impact of Additional Transthoracic Electrical Cardioversion on Cardiac Function and Atrial Fibrillation Recurrence in Patients with Persistent Atrial Fibrillation Who Underwent Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Deguo; Zhang, Fengxiang; Wang, Ancai

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds and Objective. During the procession of radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) in persistent atrial fibrillation (AF), transthoracic electrical cardioversion (ECV) is required to terminate AF. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of additional ECV on cardiac function and recurrence of AF. Methods and Results. Persistent AF patients received extensive encircling pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) and additional line ablation. Patients were divided into two groups based on whether they need transthoracic electrical cardioversion to terminate AF: electrical cardioversion (ECV group) and nonelectrical cardioversion (NECV group). Among 111 subjects, 35 patients were returned to sinus rhythm after ablation by ECV (ECV group) and 76 patients had AF termination after the ablation processions (NECV group). During the 12-month follow-ups, the recurrence ratio of patients was comparable in ECV group (15/35) and NECV group (34/76) (44.14% versus 44.74%, P = 0.853). Although left atrial diameters (LAD) decreased significantly in both groups, there were no significant differences in LAD and left ventricular cardiac function between ECV group and NECV group. Conclusions. This study revealed that ECV has no significant impact on the maintenance of SR and the recovery of cardiac function. Therefore, ECV could be applied safely to recover SR during the procedure of catheter ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation. PMID:27022500

  10. Iron Deposition following Chronic Myocardial Infarction as a Substrate for Cardiac Electrical Anomalies: Initial Findings in a Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xunzhang; Yang, Hsin-Jung; Tang, Richard L. Q.; Thajudeen, Anees; Shehata, Michael; Amorn, Allen M.; Liu, Enzhao; Stewart, Brian; Bennett, Nathan; Harlev, Doron; Tsaftaris, Sotirios A.; Jackman, Warren M.; Chugh, Sumeet S.; Dharmakumar, Rohan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Iron deposition has been shown to occur following myocardial infarction (MI). We investigated whether such focal iron deposition within chronic MI lead to electrical anomalies. Methods Two groups of dogs (ex-vivo (n = 12) and in-vivo (n = 10)) were studied at 16 weeks post MI. Hearts of animals from ex-vivo group were explanted and sectioned into infarcted and non-infarcted segments. Impedance spectroscopy was used to derive electrical permittivity () and conductivity (). Mass spectrometry was used to classify and characterize tissue sections with (IRON+) and without (IRON-) iron. Animals from in-vivo group underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) for estimation of scar volume (late-gadolinium enhancement, LGE) and iron deposition (T2*) relative to left-ventricular volume. 24-hour electrocardiogram recordings were obtained and used to examine Heart Rate (HR), QT interval (QT), QT corrected for HR (QTc) and QTc dispersion (QTcd). In a fraction of these animals (n = 5), ultra-high resolution electroanatomical mapping (EAM) was performed, co-registered with LGE and T2* CMR and were used to characterize the spatial locations of isolated late potentials (ILPs). Results Compared to IRON- sections, IRON+ sections had higher, but no difference in. A linear relationship was found between iron content and (p<0.001), but not (p = 0.34). Among two groups of animals (Iron (<1.5%) and Iron (>1.5%)) with similar scar volumes (7.28%±1.02% (Iron (<1.5%)) vs 8.35%±2.98% (Iron (>1.5%)), p = 0.51) but markedly different iron volumes (1.12%±0.64% (Iron (<1.5%)) vs 2.47%±0.64% (Iron (>1.5%)), p = 0.02), QT and QTc were elevated and QTcd was decreased in the group with the higher iron volume during the day, night and 24-hour period (p<0.05). EAMs co-registered with CMR images showed a greater tendency for ILPs to emerge from scar regions with iron versus without iron. Conclusion The electrical behavior of infarcted hearts with iron appears to

  11. Noninvasive reconstruction of cardiac electrical activity: update on current methods, applications and challenges.

    PubMed

    Cluitmans, M J M; Peeters, R L M; Westra, R L; Volders, P G A

    2015-06-01

    Electrical activity at the level of the heart muscle can be noninvasively reconstructed from body-surface electrocardiograms (ECGs) and patient-specific torso-heart geometry. This modality, coined electrocardiographic imaging, could fill the gap between the noninvasive (low-resolution) 12-lead ECG and invasive (high-resolution) electrophysiology studies. Much progress has been made to establish electrocardiographic imaging, and clinical studies appear with increasing frequency. However, many assumptions and model choices are involved in its execution, and only limited validation has been performed. In this article, we will discuss the technical details, clinical applications and current limitations of commonly used methods in electrocardiographic imaging. It is important for clinicians to realise the influence of certain assumptions and model choices for correct and careful interpretation of the results. This, in combination with more extensive validation, will allow for exploitation of the full potential of noninvasive electrocardiographic imaging as a powerful clinical tool to expedite diagnosis, guide therapy and improve risk stratification. PMID:25896779

  12. Propagation of Electrical Excitation in a Ring of Cardiac Cells: A Computer Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogan, B. Y.; Karplus, W. J.; Karpoukhin, M. G.; Roizen, I. M.; Chudin, E.; Qu, Z.

    1996-01-01

    The propagation of electrical excitation in a ring of cells described by the Noble, Beeler-Reuter (BR), Luo-Rudy I (LR I), and third-order simplified (TOS) mathematical models is studied using computer simulation. For each of the models it is shown that after transition from steady-state circulation to quasi-periodicity achieved by shortening the ring length (RL), the action potential duration (APD) restitution curve becomes a double-valued function and is located below the original ( that of an isolated cell) APD restitution curve. The distributions of APD and diastolic interval (DI) along a ring for the entire range of RL corresponding to quasi-periodic oscillations remain periodic with the period slightly different from two RLs. The 'S' shape of the original APD restitution curve determines the appearance of the second steady-state circulation region for short RLs. For all the models and the wide variety of their original APD restitution curves, no transition from quasi-periodicity to chaos was observed.

  13. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program ... be designed to meet your needs. The Cardiac Rehabilitation Team Cardiac rehab involves a long-term commitment ...

  14. 30 CFR 57.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 57.6604 Section 57... Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm— (a) Surface blasting operations shall be suspended and persons...

  15. 30 CFR 57.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 57.6604 Section 57... Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm— (a) Surface blasting operations shall be suspended and persons...

  16. 30 CFR 57.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 57.6604 Section 57... Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm— (a) Surface blasting operations shall be suspended and persons...

  17. 30 CFR 57.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 57.6604 Section 57... Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm— (a) Surface blasting operations shall be suspended and persons...

  18. 30 CFR 57.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 57.6604 Section 57... Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm— (a) Surface blasting operations shall be suspended and persons...

  19. Tropical Storm Bud

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  A Strengthening Eastern Pacific Storm     View Larger Image ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) show then Tropical Storm Bud as it was intensifying toward hurricane status, which it acquired ...

  20. Nuclear magnetohydrodynamic EMP, solar storms, and substorms

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, M. ); Meliopoulous, A.P.S.; Glytsis, E.N. . School of Electrical Engineering); Cokkinides, G.J. )

    1992-10-20

    In addition to a fast electromagnetic pulse (EMP), a high altitude nuclear burst produces a relatively slow magnetohydrodynamic EMP (MHD EMP), whose effects are like those from solar storm geomagnetically induced currents (SS-GIC). The MHD EMP electric field E [approx lt] 10[sup [minus] 1] V/m and lasts [approx lt] 10[sup 2] sec, whereas for solar storms E [approx gt] 10[sup [minus] 2] V/m and lasts [approx gt] 10[sup 3] sec. Although the solar storm electric field is lower than MHD EMP, the solar storm effects are generally greater due to their much longer duration. Substorms produce much smaller effects than SS-GIC, but occur much more frequently. This paper describes the physics of such geomagnetic disturbances and analyzes their effects.

  1. Geomagnetic storm fields near a synchronous satellite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawasaki, K.; Akasofu, S. I.

    1971-01-01

    An apparent early recovery of the main phase of geomagnetic storms at the distance of the synchronous satellite is examined in terms of changing electric current distributions in the magnetosphere during magnetic storms. It is suggested that a rapid recession of the edge of the plasma sheet (after the advance toward the earth during an early epoch of the main phase) is partly responsible for the early recovery. Relevant plasma sheet variations during geomagnetic storms are found to be in agreement with the inferred variations.

  2. Electrical injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... damage, especially to the heart, muscles, or brain. Electric current can cause injury in three ways: Cardiac arrest ... How long you were in contact with the electricity How the electricity moved through your body Your ...

  3. Storms in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, John W.

    2012-11-01

    Introduction; The cast of characters; Vignettes of the storm; 1. Two kinds of weather; 2. The saga of the storm; 3. Weather stations in space; 4. Lights in the night: the signature of the storm; 5. A walking tour of the magnetosphere; 6. The sun: where it all begins; 7. Nowcasting and forecasting storms in space; 8. Technology and the risks from storms in space; 9. A conversation with Joe Allen; 10. Manned exploration and space weather hazards; 11. The present and future of space weather forecasting; Mathematical appendix. A closer look; Glossary; Figure captions.

  4. Utilities weather the storm

    SciTech Connect

    Lihach, N.

    1984-11-01

    Utilities must restore power to storm-damaged transmission and distribution systems, even if it means going out in ice storms or during lightning and hurricane conditions. Weather forecasting helps utilities plan for possible damage as well as alerting them to long-term trends. Storm planning includes having trained repair personnel available and adjusting the system so that less power imports are needed. Storm damage response requires teamwork and cooperation between utilities. Utilities can strengthen equipment in storm-prone or vulnerable areas, but good data are necessary to document the incidence of lighning strikes, hurricanes, etc. 2 references, 8 figures.

  5. Metabolic Determinants of Electrical Failure in Ex-Vivo Canine Model of Cardiac Arrest: Evidence for the Protective Role of Inorganic Pyrophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Shibayama, Junko; Taylor, Tyson G.; Venable, Paul W.; Rhodes, Nathaniel L.; Gil, Ryan B.; Warren, Mark; Wende, Adam R.; Abel, E. Dale; Cox, James; Spitzer, Kenneth W.; Zaitsev, Alexey V.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Deterioration of ventricular fibrillation (VF) into asystole or severe bradycardia (electrical failure) heralds a fatal outcome of cardiac arrest. The role of metabolism in the timing of electrical failure remains unknown. Objective To determine metabolic factors of early electrical failure in an Ex-vivo canine model of cardiac arrest (VF+global ischemia). Methods and Results Metabolomic screening was performed in left ventricular biopsies collected before and after 0.3, 2, 5, 10 and 20 min of VF and global ischemia. Electrical activity was monitored via plunge needle electrodes and pseudo-ECG. Four out of nine hearts exhibited electrical failure at 10.1±0.9 min (early-asys), while 5/9 hearts maintained VF for at least 19.7 min (late-asys). As compared to late-asys, early-asys hearts had more ADP, less phosphocreatine, and higher levels of lactate at some time points during VF/ischemia (all comparisons p<0.05). Pre-ischemic samples from late-asys hearts contained ∼25 times more inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) than early-asys hearts. A mechanistic role of PPi in cardioprotection was then tested by monitoring mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ) during 20 min of simulated-demand ischemia using potentiometric probe TMRM in rabbit adult ventricular myocytes incubated with PPi versus control group. Untreated myocytes experienced significant loss of ΔΨ while in the PPi-treated myocytes ΔΨ was relatively maintained throughout 20 min of simulated-demand ischemia as compared to control (p<0.05). Conclusions High tissue level of PPi may prevent ΔΨm loss and electrical failure at the early phase of ischemic stress. The link between the two protective effects may involve decreased rates of mitochondrial ATP hydrolysis and lactate accumulation. PMID:23520482

  6. Tropical Storm Frances Situation Report, September 7, 2004 (10:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect

    2004-09-07

    The report provides highlights related to impacts of Tropical Storm Frances in the Florida area. Sections on electric information, oil and gas information, storm track, and county outage data are provided.

  7. Cardiac optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetics is an emerging technology for optical interrogation and control of biological function with high specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. Mammalian cells and tissues can be sensitized to respond to light by a relatively simple and well-tolerated genetic modification using microbial opsins (light-gated ion channels and pumps). These can achieve fast and specific excitatory or inhibitory response, offering distinct advantages over traditional pharmacological or electrical means of perturbation. Since the first demonstrations of utility in mammalian cells (neurons) in 2005, optogenetics has spurred immense research activity and has inspired numerous applications for dissection of neural circuitry and understanding of brain function in health and disease, applications ranging from in vitro to work in behaving animals. Only recently (since 2010), the field has extended to cardiac applications with less than a dozen publications to date. In consideration of the early phase of work on cardiac optogenetics and the impact of the technique in understanding another excitable tissue, the brain, this review is largely a perspective of possibilities in the heart. It covers the basic principles of operation of light-sensitive ion channels and pumps, the available tools and ongoing efforts in optimizing them, overview of neuroscience use, as well as cardiac-specific questions of implementation and ideas for best use of this emerging technology in the heart. PMID:23457014

  8. Subtropical Storm Andrea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The circling clouds of an intense low-pressure system sat off the southeast coast of the United States on May 8, 2007, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image. By the following morning, the storm developed enough to be classified as a subtropical storm, a storm that forms outside of the tropics, but has many of the characteristics--hurricane-force winds, driving rains, low pressure, and sometimes an eye--of a tropical storm. Although it arrived several weeks shy of the official start of the hurricane season (June 1), Subtropical Storm Andrea became the first named storm of the 2007 Atlantic hurricane season. The storm has the circular shape of a tropical cyclone in this image, but lacks the tight organization seen in more powerful storms. By May 9, the storm's winds reached 75 kilometers per hour (45 miles per hour), and the storm was not predicted to get any stronger, said the National Hurricane Center. Though Subtropical Storm Andrea was expected to remain offshore, its strong winds and high waves pummeled coastal states, prompting a tropical storm watch. The winds fueled wild fires (marked with red boxes) in Georgia and Florida. The wind-driven flames generated thick plumes of smoke that concentrated in a gray-brown mass over Tampa Bay, Florida. Unfortunately for Georgia and Florida, which are experiencing moderate to severe drought, Subtropical Storm Andrea was not predicted to bring significant rain to the region right away, according to reports on the Washington Post Website.

  9. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 1

    SciTech Connect

    2006-12-15

    Severe wind and snow storms hit the Pacific Northwest region on December 14 – 15, 2006, following severe flooding during the past few days. The severe weather resulted in major power outages through the region. At peak there were 1.8 million customers without power which included BC Hydro in Canada. Currently, there are over 1.5 million outages in the region as a result of the Pacific Northwest Storms. This represents about 42 percent of customers in affected utility service areas in Oregon and Washington. See table below. Because the current wind and snow storms are coming on the heels of extensive flooding in the region, electric utilities are experiencing damage. Wind gusts reached close to 100 mph in some areas of the region. The storm is expected to bring its strong winds and heavy snow into Idaho, Montana and Wyoming Friday and into the weekend. There are currently no reported major impacts to the petroleum and natural gas infrastructure.

  10. Cardiac Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Catheterization? Cardiac catheterization (KATH-eh-ter-ih-ZA-shun) is a ... disease. Doctors also can use ultrasound during cardiac catheterization to see blockages in the coronary arteries. Ultrasound ...

  11. Transplantation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells improves cardiac contractile function and electrical stability in a rat myocardial infarction model.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Milan; Fujita, Daiki; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Ichikawa, Hinako; Izawa, Atsushi; Hirose, Masamichi; Kashihara, Toshihide; Yamada, Mitsuhiko; Takahashi, Masafumi; Ikeda, Uichi; Shiba, Yuji

    2015-04-01

    The transplantation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) improves cardiac contractility after myocardial infarction (MI); however, little is known about the electrophysiological consequences of transplantation. The purpose of this study was to clarify whether the transplantation of ADSCs increases or decreases the incidence of ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT) in a rat model of MI. MI was induced experimentally by permanent occlusion of the left anterior descending artery of Lewis rats. ADSCs were harvested from GFP-transgenic rats, and were cultured until passage four. ADSCs (10×10(6)) resuspended in 100μL saline or pro-survival cocktail (PSC), which enhances cardiac graft survival, were injected directly into syngeneic rat hearts 1week after MI. The recipients of ADSCs suspended in PSC had a larger graft area compared with those receiving ASDCs suspended in saline at 1week post-transplantation (number of graft cells/section: 148.7±10.6 vs. 22.4±3.4, p<0.05, n=5/group). Thereafter, all ADSC recipients were transplanted with ASDCs in PSC. ADSCs were transplanted into infarcted hearts, and the mechanical and electrophysiological functions were assessed. Echocardiography revealed that ADSC recipients had improved contractile function compared with those receiving PSC vehicle (fractional shortening: 21.1±0.9 vs. 14.1±1.2, p<0.05, n≥12/group). Four weeks post-transplantation, VT was induced via in vivo programmed electrical stimulation. The recipients of ADSCs showed a significantly lower incidence of induced VT compared with the control (31.3% vs. 83.3%, p<0.05, n≥12/group). To understand the electrical activity following transplantation, we performed ex vivo optical mapping using a voltage sensitive dye, and found that ADSC transplantation decreased conduction velocity and its dispersion in the peri-infarct area. These results suggest that ADSC transplantation improved cardiac mechanical and electrophysiological functions in subacute MI. PMID

  12. Activation of peripheral delta opioid receptors eliminates cardiac electrical instability in a rat model of post-infarction cardiosclerosis via mitochondrial ATP-dependent K+ channels.

    PubMed

    Maslov, L N; Lishmanov, Yu B; Solenkova, N V; Gross, G J; Stefano, G B; Tam, S W

    2003-07-01

    The effects of the selective delta-1 (delta(1)) opioid receptor agonist, DPDPE, and the selective delta(2) opioid receptor agonist, DSLET, have been studied on the ventricular fibrillation threshold (VFT) in rats with an experimental post-infarction cardiosclerosis (CS). It has been found that CS induced a significant decrease in VFT. This CS-induced decrease in VFT was significantly reversed by intravenous administration of DPDPE (0.1 mg/kg) 10 min before VFT measurement. On the contrary, intravenous injection of DSLET (0.5 mg/kg) exacerbated the CS-induced cardiac electrical instability. Pretreatment with the selective delta opioid receptor antagonist, ICI 174,864 (0.5 mg/kg), completely abolished the changes in VFT produced by both DPDPE and DSLET. Previous administration of a nonselective peripherally acting opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone methiodide (5 mg/kg) also completely reversed the antifibrillatory action of DPDPE. Naloxone methiodide and ICI 174,864 alone had no effect on VFT. Pretreatment with the nonselective K(ATP) channel blocker, glibenclamide (0.3 mg/kg), or with the mitochondrial selective K(ATP) channel blocker, 5-hydroxydecanoic acid (5-HD, 5 mg/kg), completely abolished the DPDPE-induced increase in cardiac electrical stability. Glibenclamide and 5-HD alone had no effect on VFT. These results demonstrate that the delta opioid receptor plays an important role in the regulation of electrical stability in rats with post-infarction cardiosclerosis. We propose that peripheral delta(1) opioid receptor stimulation reverses CS-induced electrical instability via mitochondrial K(ATP) channels. On the contrary, delta(2) opioid receptor stimulation may exacerbate the CS-induced decrease in VFT. Further studies are necessary to determine the delta opioid receptor subtype which mediates the antifibrillatory effect of DPDPE and pro-fibrillatory effect of DSLET. PMID:12798419

  13. The mechanism of PDT-induced electrical blockade: the dependence of time-lapse localization of talaporfin sodium on the cell death phenotypes in rat cardiac myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, A.; Matsuo, H.; Suenari, T.; Miyoshi, S.; Takatsuki, S.; Ogawa, S.; Arai, T.

    2009-02-01

    We have proposed a new type of atrial fibrillation treatment with the early state photodynamic therapy (PDT), in which the interval time between the photosensitizer injection and irradiation is shorter than that in conventional way. We had demonstrated the acute electrical blockade by the PDT with talaporfin sodium and a red (670 nm) diode laser in ex vivo and in vivo experiment using rat normal myocardial tissue. The previous study of intracellular Ca2+ concentration measurement in rat cardiac myocytes during the PDT indicated that Ca2+ influx induced by the plasma membrane damage might be the main cause of the acute reaction of myocardial tissue. We found that the cell damage of cardiac myocytes triggered by the PDT was mainly influenced by the site where the photosensitizer exists. In this study, we examined the relationship between the sites of talaporfin sodium existing and cell death phenotypes in response to the PDT, in order to clarify the mechanism of the acute electrical blockade induced by the PDT in myocardial tissue. The talaporfin sodium fluorescence was observed after the various incubation times to visualize the time-lapse intracellular photosensitizer localization. The distribution of the photosensitizer was dependent on the incubation time. The change in intracellular Ca2+ concentration during the PDT was examined with a fluorescent Ca2+ indicator by a high-speed Nipkow confocal laser microscope (CSU-X1, Yokogawa Electric Company). We obtained the Ca2+ dynamics during the PDT which can explain the PDT-induced cell death pathways. We concluded that the Ca2+ influx induced by plasma membrane damage is the possible mechanism of the electrical blockade by the early state PDT.

  14. Storm-to-storm main phase repeatability of the local time variation of disturbed low-latitude vertical ion drifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chao-Song

    2015-07-01

    Penetration electric field can be very strong during magnetic storms. However, the variation of penetration electric field with local time (LT) has not been well understood. The Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite measures the plasma drift/electric field over all local times within ~100 min. In this paper, we present the first nearly simultaneous observations of the dependence of penetration electric field on local time. The meridional ion drift measured by C/NOFS during the main phase of five magnetic storms in 2012 is analyzed. The storm time ion drift shows a large enhancement around 1900 LT, a relatively small enhancement during daytime, and a deep decrease in the postmidnight sector with a peak around 0500 LT. The observed storm time variation of the meridional ion drift with local time represents the variation of the penetration electric field. The averaged ion drifts are in remarkable agreement with recent simulations.

  15. Ionospheric data assimilation and forecasting during storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartier, Alex T.; Matsuo, Tomoko; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Collins, Nancy; Hoar, Timothy J.; Lu, Gang; Mitchell, Cathryn N.; Coster, Anthea J.; Paxton, Larry J.; Bust, Gary S.

    2016-01-01

    Ionospheric storms can have important effects on radio communications and navigation systems. Storm time ionospheric predictions have the potential to form part of effective mitigation strategies to these problems. Ionospheric storms are caused by strong forcing from the solar wind. Electron density enhancements are driven by penetration electric fields, as well as by thermosphere-ionosphere behavior including Traveling Atmospheric Disturbances and Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances and changes to the neutral composition. This study assesses the effect on 1 h predictions of specifying initial ionospheric and thermospheric conditions using total electron content (TEC) observations under a fixed set of solar and high-latitude drivers. Prediction performance is assessed against TEC observations, incoherent scatter radar, and in situ electron density observations. Corotated TEC data provide a benchmark of forecast accuracy. The primary case study is the storm of 10 September 2005, while the anomalous storm of 21 January 2005 provides a secondary comparison. The study uses an ensemble Kalman filter constructed with the Data Assimilation Research Testbed and the Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model. Maps of preprocessed, verticalized GPS TEC are assimilated, while high-latitude specifications from the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics and solar flux observations from the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Experiment are used to drive the model. The filter adjusts ionospheric and thermospheric parameters, making use of time-evolving covariance estimates. The approach is effective in correcting model biases but does not capture all the behavior of the storms. In particular, a ridge-like enhancement over the continental USA is not predicted, indicating the importance of predicting storm time electric field behavior to the problem of ionospheric forecasting.

  16. [Interactions of peripheral mu-opioid receptors and K(ATP)-channels in regulation of cardiac electrical stability in ischemia, reperfusion, and postinfarction cardiosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Maslov, L N; Krylatov, A V; Naryzhaia, N V; Solenkova, N V; Lishmanov, A Iu; Bogomaz, S A; Gross, G J; Stefano, J B; Loktiushina, B A

    2002-07-01

    It has been shown that mu-opioid receptor stimulation by intravenous administration of the selective mu receptor agonist DALDA in a dose of 0.1 mg/kg prevented ischemic and reperfusion arrhythmias in rats subjected to coronary artery occlusion (10 min) and reperfusion (10 min), and also increased the ventricular fibrillation threshold in rats with postinfarction cardiac fibrosis. These effects were abolished by pre-treatment with the selective mu receptor antagonist CTAP in a dose of 0.5 mg/kg or by prior injection of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone methiodide (2 mg/kg) which does not penetrate the blood-braib barrier. Both antagonists by themselves had no effect on the incidence of occlusion or reperfusion-induced arrhythmias or on the ventricular fibrillation threshold. Pre-treatment with ATP-sensitive K+ channel (KATP channel) blocker glibenclamide in a dose of 0.3 mg/kg completely abolished the antiarrhythmic effect of DALDA. We believe that DALDA prevents occurrence of electrical instability during ischemia and reperfusion and increases the ventricular fibrillation threshold in rats with postinfarction cardiac fibrosis via stimulation of peripheral mu-opioid receptor which appear to be coupled to the KATP channel. PMID:12238351

  17. The equatorial electrojet during geomagnetic storms and substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Yosuke; Kosch, Michael J.

    2015-03-01

    The climatology of the equatorial electrojet during periods of enhanced geomagnetic activity is examined using long-term records of ground-based magnetometers in the Indian and Peruvian regions. Equatorial electrojet perturbations due to geomagnetic storms and substorms are evaluated using the disturbance storm time (Dst) index and auroral electrojet (AE) index, respectively. The response of the equatorial electrojet to rapid changes in the AE index indicates effects of both prompt penetration electric field and disturbance dynamo electric field, consistent with previous studies based on F region equatorial vertical plasma drift measurements at Jicamarca. The average response of the equatorial electrojet to geomagnetic storms (Dst<-50 nT) reveals persistent disturbances during the recovery phase, which can last for approximately 24 h after the Dst index reaches its minimum value. This "after-storm" effect is found to depend on the magnitude of the storm, solar EUV activity, season, and longitude.

  18. Responses of equatorial F region to different geomagnetic storms observed by GPS in the African sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adewale, A. O.; Oyeyemi, E. O.; Adeloye, A. B.; Ngwira, C. M.; Athieno, R.

    2011-12-01

    This article presents the first results regarding the investigation of the response of the equatorial ionospheric F region in the African sector during geomagnetic storm periods between April 2000 and November 2007 using GPS-derived vertical total electron content observed at Libreville, Gabon (0.35°N, 9.67°E, dip latitude -8.05°S). We performed a superposed epoch analysis of the storms by defining the start time of the epoch as the storm onset time. During geomagnetic storms, the altered electric fields contribute significantly to the occurrence of negative and positive ionospheric storm effects. Our results showed that the positive storm effects are more prevalent than the negative storm effects and generally last longer irrespective of storm onset times. Also, the positive storm effects are most pronounced in the daytime than in the premidnight and postmidnight periods.

  19. A semi-implantable multichannel telemetry system for continuous electrical, mechanical and hemodynamical recordings in animal cardiac research.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wei; Huang, Jian; Rollins, Dennis L; Ideker, Raymond E; Smith, William M

    2007-03-01

    We have developed an eight-channel telemetry system for studying experimental models of chronic cardiovascular disease. The system is an extension of a previous device that has been miniaturized, reduced in power consumption and provided with increased functionality. We added sensors for ventricular dimension, and coronary artery blood flow and arterial blood pressure that are suitable for use with the system. The telemetry system consists of a front end, a backpack and a host PC. The front end is a watertight stainless steel case with all sensor electronics sealed inside; it acquires dimension, flow, pressure and five cardiac electrograms from selected locations on the heart. The backpack includes a control unit, Bluetooth radio, and batteries. The control unit digitizes eight channels of data from the front end and forwards them to the host PC via Bluetooth link. The host PC has a receiving Bluetooth radio and Labview programs to store and display data. The whole system was successfully tested on the bench and in an animal model. This telemetry system will greatly enhance the ability to study events leading to spontaneous sudden cardiac arrest. PMID:17322590

  20. Combined electric field and gap junctions on propagation of action potentials in cardiac muscle and smooth muscle in PSpice simulation.

    PubMed

    Sperelakis, Nicholas

    2003-10-01

    Propagation of action potentials in cardiac muscle and smooth muscle were simulated using the PSpice program. Excitation was transmitted from cell to cell along a strand of 6 cells (cardiac muscle) or 10 cells (smooth muscle) either not connected (control) or connected by low-resistance tunnels (gap-junction connexons). A significant negative cleft potential (V(jv) ) develops in the narrow junctional cleft when the pre-JM fires. V(jc) depolarizes the postjunctional membrane (post-JM) to threshold by a patch-clamp action. With few connecting tunnels, cell-to-cell transmission by the EF mechanism was facilitated. With many tunnels, propagation was dominated by the low-resistance mechanism, and propagation velocity (theta) became very fast and nonphysiological. In conclusion, when the 2 mechanisms for cell-to-cell transfer of excitation were combined, the two mechanisms facilitated each other in a synergistic manner. When there were many connecting tunnels, the tunnel mechanism was dominant. PMID:14661164

  1. Effects of a geomagnetic storm on thermospheric circulation. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    The motions of the thermosphere and its interactions with the ionosphere during a geomagnetic storm are of current interest to space scientists. A two-dimensional model was used to simulate the thermospheric response to the impulsive high-latitude heating associated with a geomagnetic storm. The storm-induced motions can be characterized by an initial period of transient waves followed by the development of a mean circulation. These motions generate an electrical-current system that is on the same order of magnitude as, and in the opposite sense to the normal s/sub q/ current system. Model-simulated winds and electrical currents were then compared to observations.

  2. Tropical Storm Dolly Develops

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation from NOAA's GOES-East satellite from Aug. 31-Sept. 2 shows the movement of a low pressure area from the western Caribbean Sea over the Yucatan Peninsula as it becomes Tropical Storm ...

  3. Tropical Storm Don

    NASA Video Gallery

    GOES-13 data was compiled into an animation by the NASA GOES Project at NASA Goddard that shows the development of Tropical Storm Don in the southern Gulf of Mexico, west of Cuba. The animation run...

  4. Tropical Storm Faxai

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA/JAXA's TRMM Satellite provided data of developing Tropical Storm Faxai to make this 3-D image that showed some towering thunderstorms in the area were reaching altitudes of up to 15.5km/~9.6 m...

  5. Powerful Midwest Storm System

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of imagery from NOAA’s GOES-13 satellite shows themovement of storm systems in the south central United States on May 20,2013. Warm, moist gulf air flowing across Texas, Oklahoma...

  6. Thyroid Echography-induced Thyroid Storm and Exacerbation of Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Keisuke; Nakazawa, Naomi; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Asano, Ryotaro; Saito, Hideki; Nomura, Hidekimi; Isomura, Daichi; Okada, Hisayuki; Sugiura, Ryo; Oka, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism and thyroid storm affect cardiac circulation in some conditions. Several factors including trauma can induce thyroid storms. We herein describe the case of a 57-year-old woman who experienced a thyroid storm and exacerbation of acute heart failure on thyroid echography. She initially demonstrated a good clinical course after medical rate control for atrial fibrillation; however, thyroid echography for evaluating hyperthyroidism led to a thyroid storm and she collapsed. A multidisciplinary approach stabilized her thyroid hormone levels and hemodynamics. Thus, the medical staff should be prepared for a deterioration in the patient's condition during thyroid echography in heart failure patients with hyperthyroidism. PMID:27522996

  7. Ionospheric Storms in Equatorial Region: Digisonde Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paznukhov, V.; Altadill, D.; Blanch, E.

    2011-12-01

    We present a study of the ionospheric storms observed in the low-latitude and equatorial ionosphere at several digisonde stations: Jicamarca (Geomagnetic Coordinates: 2.0 S, 355.3 E), Kwajalein Island (3.8 N, 238.2 E), Ascension Island (2.5 S, 56.8 E), Fortaleza (4.8 N, 33.7 W), and Ramey (28.6 N, 5.2 E). The strongest geomagnetic storms from years 1995-2009 have been analyzed. The main ionospheric characteristics, hmF2 and foF2 were used in the study, making it possible to investigate the changes in the ionosphere peak density and height during the storms. All digisonde data were manually processed to assure the accuracy of the measurements. Solar wind data, geomagnetic field variations, and auroral activity indices have been used to characterize the geomagnetic environment during the events. It was found in our analysis that the major drivers for the ionospheric storms, electric field and neutral wind have approximately equal importance at the low-latitude and equatorial latitudes. This is noticeably different from the behavior of the ionsphere in the middle latitudes, where the neutral wind is usually a dominant factor. It was found that the auroral index, AE is the best precursor of the ionospheric effects observed during the storms in this region. We analyze the difference between time delays of the storm effects observed at the stations located in different local time sectors. The overall statistics of the time delays of the storms as a function of the local time at the stations is also presented. Several very interesting cases of sudden very strong ionospheric uplifting and their possible relation to the equatorial super fountain effect are investigated in greater details.

  8. Cardiac effects of the extract and active components of Radix stephaniae tetrandrae. I. Electrically-induced intracellular calcium transient and protein release during the calcium paradox.

    PubMed

    Wu, S; Yu, X C; Shan, J; Wong, T M; Chen, C F; Pang, K T

    2001-05-11

    The present study was designed to compare the cardiac actions of the extract and individual components, tetrandrine (Tet) and fangchinoline (Fan), of Radix stephaniae tetrandrae (RST). We measured the electrically induced [Ca2+]i transient in single rat ventricular myocytes and protein release following perfusion with a Ca2+ free solution (the Ca2+ paradox) from the isolated perfused rat heart, both of which are known to relate to Ca2+ influx. We found that Tet inhibited both electrically induced [Ca2+]i transient and protein release during the Ca2+ paradox, while Fan had no significant effects. The RST extract containing 9% Tet and 6% Fan by weight also affected the [Ca2+]i transient, and was only slightly, though significantly, less effective/potent than Tet alone. On the other hand, RST extract had a significantly greater inhibitory effect on protein release during the Ca2+ paradox than Tet alone. The observations suggest that the RST extract, which contains a mixture of components, may have more potent effects in the heart than its main active component. PMID:11432451

  9. Ligands for opioid and sigma-receptors improve cardiac electrical stability in rat models of post-infarction cardiosclerosis and stress.

    PubMed

    Lishmanov YuB; Maslov, L N; Naryzhnaya, N V; Tam, S W

    1999-01-01

    The effects of the extremely selective mu-opioid receptor agonist, [D-Arg2,Lys4]-dermorphin-(1-4)-amide (DALDA), the mu-opioid receptor agonist morphine, the mu/delta agonist D-Ala2, Leu5, Arg6-enkephalin (dalargin), the kappa-opioid receptor agonist spiradoline, and the sigma1-receptor antagonist DuP 734 on ventricular fibrillation threshold (VFT) was investigated in an experimental post-infarction cardiosclerosis model and an immobilization stress-induced model in rats. Both models produced a significant decrease in VFT. The postinfarction cardiosclerosis-induced decrease in VFT was significantly reversed by intravenous administration of dalargin (0.1 mg/kg), DALDA (0.1 mg/kg), or morphine HCl (1.5 mg/kg). Pretreatment with naloxone (0.2 mg/kg) completely eliminated the increase in cardiac electrical stability produced by DALDA. Both spiradoline (8 mg/kg, i.p.) and DuP 734 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) produced a significant increase in VFT in rats with post-infarction cardiosclerosis. This effect of spiradoline was blocked by nor-binaltorphimine. The immobilization stress-induced decrease in VFT was significantly reversed by administration of either DALDA, spiradoline or DuP 734. In conclusion, activation of either mu- or kappa1-opioid receptors or blockade of sigma1-receptors reversed the decrease in VFT in both cardiac compromised models. Since DALDA and dalargin essentially do not cross blood brain barriers, their effects on VFT may be mediated through peripheral mu-opioid receptors. PMID:10403501

  10. Detection of optimal PEEP for equal distribution of tidal volume by volumetric capnography and electrical impedance tomography during decreasing levels of PEEP in post cardiac-surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Blankman, P.; Shono, A.; Hermans, B. J. M.; Wesselius, T.; Hasan, D.; Gommers, D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Homogeneous ventilation is important for prevention of ventilator-induced lung injury. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) has been used to identify optimal PEEP by detection of homogenous ventilation in non-dependent and dependent lung regions. We aimed to compare the ability of volumetric capnography and EIT in detecting homogenous ventilation between these lung regions. Methods Fifteen mechanically-ventilated patients after cardiac surgery were studied. Ventilator settings were adjusted to volume-controlled mode with a fixed tidal volume (Vt) of 6–8 ml kg−1 predicted body weight. Different PEEP levels were applied (14 to 0 cm H2O, in steps of 2 cm H2O) and blood gases, Vcap and EIT were measured. Results Tidal impedance variation of the non-dependent region was highest at 6 cm H2O PEEP, and decreased significantly at 14 cm H2O PEEP indicating decrease in the fraction of Vt in this region. At 12 cm H2O PEEP, homogenous ventilation was seen between both lung regions. Bohr and Enghoff dead space calculations decreased from a PEEP of 10 cm H2O. Alveolar dead space divided by alveolar Vt decreased at PEEP levels ≤6 cm H2O. The normalized slope of phase III significantly changed at PEEP levels ≤4 cm H2O. Airway dead space was higher at higher PEEP levels and decreased at the lower PEEP levels. Conclusions In postoperative cardiac patients, calculated dead space agreed well with EIT to detect the optimal PEEP for an equal distribution of inspired volume, amongst non-dependent and dependent lung regions. Airway dead space reduces at decreasing PEEP levels. PMID:27199318

  11. Lightning parameterization in a storm electrification model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helsdon, John H., Jr.; Farley, Richard D.; Wu, Gang

    1988-01-01

    The parameterization of an intracloud lightning discharge has been implemented in our Storm Electrification Model. The initiation, propagation direction, termination and charge redistribution of the discharge are approximated assuming overall charge neutrality. Various simulations involving differing amounts of charge transferred have been done. The effects of the lightning-produced ions on the hydrometeor charges, electric field components and electrical energy depend strongly on the charge transferred. A comparison between the measured electric field change of an actual intracloud flash and the field change due to the simulated discharge show favorable agreement.

  12. Should we revisit anticoagulation guidelines during thyroid storm?

    PubMed

    Petersen, Andrew W; Puig-Carrión, Gisela D; López-Candales, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare but potentially catastrophic disease expression of thyrotoxicosis with well-recognized cardiovascular manifestations such as heart failure and atrial fibrillation. Even through some studies have found an increased risk of cardiac thrombus formation and subsequent thromboembolism in these patients, the use of anticoagulation to prevent thromboembolic sequelae of thyrotoxic atrial fibrillation remains unclear. We present a patient presenting with new onset dilated cardiomyopathy and resistant atrial fibrillation with thyroid storm that had a large left atrial appendage clot. Case particulars are discussed and the literature reviewed. PMID:26035989

  13. The ionospheric storm effects at low latitudes and equatorial regions during the 2015 St. Patrick's Day storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuai, Jiawei; Liu, Libo

    2016-04-01

    Ionospheric storms manifest an extreme state of the ionosphere caused by geomagnetic storms, and the complicated ionospheric storm effects are always a research focus for the ionospheric community. The geomagnetic storm occurring on 17-20 March 2015, which is characterized by the minimum SYM-H value -233 nT, is an extremely event of space weather in the current 24th solar cycle. In this report, multiple observations including GPS total electron content (TEC), ionospheric parameters from ionosondes, and magnetometer data are used to investigate the profound ionospheric disturbances at low latitudes and equatorial regions during this geomagnetic storm. Through observation and analysis, the disturbed electric fields, which comprise penetration electric fields (PEFs) and disturbance dynamo electric fields (DDEFs), are closely related to the ionospheric storm effects at low latitudes and equatorial regions during this event. The decisive role of electrodynamics at equatorial regions are focused in view of these observations to understand the complete process of the low-latitude and equatorial ionospheric response during the great geomagnetic storm.

  14. Coastal storm monitoring in Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wicklein, Shaun M.; Bennett, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Coastal communities in Virginia are prone to flooding, particularly during hurricanes, nor’easters, and other coastal low-pressure systems. These weather systems affect public safety, personal and public property, and valuable infrastructure, such as transportation, water and sewer, and electric-supply networks. Local emergency managers, utility operators, and the public are tasked with making difficult decisions regarding evacuations, road closures, and post-storm recovery efforts as a result of coastal flooding. In coastal Virginia these decisions often are made on the basis of anecdotal knowledge from past events or predictions based on data from monitoring sites located far away from the affected area that may not reflect local conditions. Preventing flood hazards, such as hurricane-induced storm surge, from becoming human disasters requires an understanding of the relative risks that flooding poses to specific communities. The risk to life and property can be very high if decisions about evacuations and road closures are made too late or not at all.

  15. [Temporary restoration of synchronous electrical cardiac activity in a human being after ventricular fibrillation lasting more than 3 hours].

    PubMed

    Stefanov, G; Mikhaĭlova, R; Dorosiev, D

    1975-01-01

    The authors report the results from a continuous reanimation of a patient, aged 68 with thyrotoxicosis and hypertonic heart and frequent ventricular extrasystoles, in clinical death with ventricular fibrillation. The immediate and well performed measures--external hear massage and respiration with Ambu-kept the patient with manifested signs of reanimation: pupil reactions, rosy skin and muscle resistance for more than 80 minutes. The broad wave character of the ventricular fibrillation was kept during the same period. After that the waves became lower and almost receded after three hours and 20 minutes. Electric defibrillation, due to technical reasons, was carried out after that period. It was followed by a restoration of the electric activity of both ventricle and auricle with the presence of AV block--I stage and more severe changes in repolarization, but the mechanical heart work was not restored and the patient died in asystolia. PMID:1224571

  16. Storm Warning Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A Huntsville meteorologist of Baron Services, Inc. has formed a commercial weather advisory service. Weather information is based on data from Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) collected from antennas in Alabama and Tennessee. Bob Baron refines and enhances MSFC's real time display software. Computer data is changed to audio data for radio transmission, received by clients through an antenna and decoded by computer for display. Using his service, clients can monitor the approach of significant storms and schedule operations accordingly. Utilities and emergency management officials are able to plot a storm's path. A recent agreement with two other companies will promote continued development and marketing.

  17. Potassium Channel Interacting Protein 2 (KChIP2) is not a transcriptional regulator of cardiac electrical remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Winther, Sine V.; Tuomainen, Tomi; Borup, Rehannah; Tavi, Pasi; Antoons, Gudrun; Thomsen, Morten B.

    2016-01-01

    The heart-failure relevant Potassium Channel Interacting Protein 2 (KChIP2) augments CaV1.2 and KV4.3. KChIP3 represses CaV1.2 transcription in cardiomyocytes via interaction with regulatory DNA elements. Hence, we tested nuclear presence of KChIP2 and if KChIP2 translocates into the nucleus in a Ca2+ dependent manner. Cardiac biopsies from human heart-failure patients and healthy donor controls showed that nuclear KChIP2 abundance was significantly increased in heart failure; however, this was secondary to a large variation of total KChIP2 content. Administration of ouabain did not increase KChIP2 content in nuclear protein fractions in anesthetized mice. KChIP2 was expressed in cell lines, and Ca2+ ionophores were applied in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The cell lines had KChIP2-immunoreactive protein in the nucleus in the absence of treatments to modulate intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Neither increasing nor decreasing intracellular Ca2+ concentrations caused translocation of KChIP2. Microarray analysis did not identify relief of transcriptional repression in murine KChIP2−/− heart samples. We conclude that although there is a baseline presence of KChIP2 in the nucleus both in vivo and in vitro, KChIP2 does not directly regulate transcriptional activity. Moreover, the nuclear transport of KChIP2 is not dependent on Ca2+. Thus, KChIP2 does not function as a conventional transcription factor in the heart. PMID:27349185

  18. Potassium Channel Interacting Protein 2 (KChIP2) is not a transcriptional regulator of cardiac electrical remodeling.

    PubMed

    Winther, Sine V; Tuomainen, Tomi; Borup, Rehannah; Tavi, Pasi; Antoons, Gudrun; Thomsen, Morten B

    2016-01-01

    The heart-failure relevant Potassium Channel Interacting Protein 2 (KChIP2) augments CaV1.2 and KV4.3. KChIP3 represses CaV1.2 transcription in cardiomyocytes via interaction with regulatory DNA elements. Hence, we tested nuclear presence of KChIP2 and if KChIP2 translocates into the nucleus in a Ca(2+) dependent manner. Cardiac biopsies from human heart-failure patients and healthy donor controls showed that nuclear KChIP2 abundance was significantly increased in heart failure; however, this was secondary to a large variation of total KChIP2 content. Administration of ouabain did not increase KChIP2 content in nuclear protein fractions in anesthetized mice. KChIP2 was expressed in cell lines, and Ca(2+) ionophores were applied in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The cell lines had KChIP2-immunoreactive protein in the nucleus in the absence of treatments to modulate intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Neither increasing nor decreasing intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations caused translocation of KChIP2. Microarray analysis did not identify relief of transcriptional repression in murine KChIP2(-/-) heart samples. We conclude that although there is a baseline presence of KChIP2 in the nucleus both in vivo and in vitro, KChIP2 does not directly regulate transcriptional activity. Moreover, the nuclear transport of KChIP2 is not dependent on Ca(2+). Thus, KChIP2 does not function as a conventional transcription factor in the heart. PMID:27349185

  19. Cardiac Applications of Optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, Christina M.; Klimas, Aleksandra; Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    In complex multicellular systems, such as the brain or the heart, the ability to selectively perturb and observe the response of individual components at the cellular level and with millisecond resolution in time, is essential for mechanistic understanding of function. Optogenetics uses genetic encoding of light sensitivity (by the expression of microbial opsins) to provide such capabilities for manipulation, recording, and control by light with cell specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. As an optical approach, it is inherently scalable for remote and parallel interrogation of biological function at the tissue level; with implantable miniaturized devices, the technique is uniquely suitable for in vivo tracking of function, as illustrated by numerous applications in the brain. Its expansion into the cardiac area has been slow. Here, using examples from published research and original data, we focus on optogenetics applications to cardiac electrophysiology, specifically dealing with the ability to manipulate membrane voltage by light with implications for cardiac pacing, cardioversion, cell communication, and arrhythmia research, in general. We discuss gene and cell delivery methods of inscribing light sensitivity in cardiac tissue, functionality of the light-sensitive ion channels within different types of cardiac cells, utility in probing electrical coupling between different cell types, approaches and design solutions to all-optical electrophysiology by the combination of optogenetic sensors and actuators, and specific challenges in moving towards in vivo cardiac optogenetics. PMID:25035999

  20. Tropical Storm Lee to Newfoundland

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows Tropical Storm Lee as it made landfall in Louisiana and Mississippi on September 4, 2011. This storm produced flooding and tornadoes to the southern states all the way to flooding ...

  1. Stories from the Storm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smoczynski, Carol

    2007-01-01

    For four months, St. Paul's Episcopal School in the Lakeview neighborhood of New Orleans, Louisiana remained closed after Hurricane Katrina ravaged the entire city in August 2005. The storm left St. Paul's campus under nine feet of water for two weeks, destroying many buildings and the entire first floor of the campus. As the only remaining art…

  2. California's Perfect Storm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, David

    2010-01-01

    The United States today faces an economic crisis worse than any since the Great Depression of the 1930s. Nowhere is it sharper than in the nation's schools. Last year, California saw a perfect storm of protest in virtually every part of its education system. K-12 teachers built coalitions with parents and students to fight for their jobs and their…

  3. STORM INLET FILTRATION DEVICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five field tests were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the Storm and Groundwater Enhancement Systems (SAGES) device for removing contaminants from stormwater. The SAGES device is a three-stage filtering system that could be used as a best management practices (BMP) retr...

  4. Tropical Storm Katrina

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... Because air currents are influenced by the Coriolis force (caused by the rotation of the Earth), Northern Hemisphere hurricanes are ... nadir (vertical-viewing) camera. Both the counter-clockwise motion for the lower-level storm clouds and the clockwise motion for the upper ...

  5. Desert Storm environmental effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimball, E. W.

    It is noted that after more than six months of operation of the Patriot launch station in the Saudi Arabian desert no problems that were attributed to high temperature occurred. The environmental anomalies that did occur were cosmetic in nature and related to dust and salt fog. It was concluded that the Desert Storm environmental effects were typical of worldwide hot, dry climates.

  6. Mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Blood circulation is the result of the beating of the heart, which provides the mechanical force to pump oxygenated blood to, and deoxygenated blood away from, the peripheral tissues. This depends critically on the preceding electrical activation. Disruptions in the orderly pattern of this propagating cardiac excitation wave can lead to arrhythmias. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying their generation and maintenance requires knowledge of the ionic contributions to the cardiac action potential, which is discussed in the first part of this review. A brief outline of the different classification systems for arrhythmogenesis is then provided, followed by a detailed discussion for each mechanism in turn, highlighting recent advances in this area. PMID:27092186

  7. Mars Atmospheric Chemistry in Electrified Dust Devils and Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Delory, G. T.; Atreya, S. K.; Wong, A.-S.; Renno, N. O.; Sentmann, D. D.; Marshall, J. G.; Cummer, S. A.; Rafkin, S.; Catling, D.

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory studies, simulations and desert field tests all indicate that aeolian mixing dust can generate electricity via contact electrification or "triboelectricity". In convective structures like dust devils or storms, grain stratification (or charge separation) occurs giving rise to an overall electric dipole moment to the aeolian feature, similar in nature to the dipolar electric field generated in terrestrial thunderstorms. Previous simulation studies [1] indicate that this storm electric field on Mars can approach atmospheric breakdown field strength of 20 kV/m. In terrestrial dust devils, coherent dipolar electric fields exceeding 20 kV/m have been measured directly via electric field instrumentation. Given the expected electrostatic fields in Martian dust devils and storms, electrons in the low pressure CO2 gas can be energized via the electric field to values exceeding the electron dissociative attachment energy of both CO2 and H2O, resulting in the formation of new chemical products CO and O- and OH and H- within the storm. Using a collisional plasma physics model we present a calculation of the CO/O- and OH/H- reaction and production rates. We demonstrate that these rates vary geometrically with ambient electric field, with substantial production of dissociative products when fields approach breakdown levels of 20-30 kV/m.

  8. Enhancing model based forecasting of geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Alla G.

    Modern society is increasingly dependent on the smooth operation of large scale technology supporting Earth based activities such as communication, electricity distribution, and navigation. This technology is potentially threatened by global geomagnetic storms, which are caused by the impact of plasma ejected from the Sun upon the protective magnetic field that surrounds the Earth. Forecasting the timing and magnitude of these geomagnetic storms is part of the emerging discipline of space weather. The most severe geomagnetic storms are caused by magnetic clouds, whose properties and characteristics are important variables in space weather forecasting systems. The methodology presented here is the development of a new statistical approach to characterize the physical properties (variables) of the magnetic clouds and to examine the extent to which theoretical models can be used in describing both of these physical properties, as well as their evolution in space and time. Since space weather forecasting is a complex system, a systems engineering approach is used to perform analysis, validation, and verification of the magnetic cloud models (subsystem of the forecasting system) using a model-based methodology. This research demonstrates that in order to validate magnetic cloud models, it is important to categorize the data by physical parameters such as velocity and distance travelled. This understanding will improve the modeling accuracy of magnetic clouds in space weather forecasting systems and hence increase forecasting accuracy of geomagnetic storms and their impact on earth systems.

  9. Historic and Future Ice Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klima, K.; Morgan, M. G.

    2014-12-01

    Ice storm losses from business interruption as well as transportation and health damages can range into billions of dollars. For instance, the December 2008 New England and Upstate New York ice storm caused four deaths and monetary damages between 2.5 and 3.7 billion, and the 2008 Chinese winter storms resulted in over 130 deaths and over 20 billion in damages. Informal discussions with ice storm experts indicate that due to competing temperature and precipitation effects as well as local topographic effects, it is unclear how exactly climate change will affect ice storms. Here we ask how incident frequencies might change in a future climate at four weather stations prone to ice storms. Using historical atmospheric soundings, we conduct a thought experiment where we perturb the temperatures as might be expected in a future climate. We then discuss changes in monthly frequency of ice storms.

  10. Storm water pollution prevention plans

    SciTech Connect

    Rossmiller, R.L. )

    1993-03-01

    National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) general permit applications for industrial storm water discharge were to have been filed by October 1992. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies are now issuing permits based on these applications. One compliance aspect of the permits is the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWP3). The plan must identify the facility's potential sources of storm water pollution and develop and implement best management practices (BMPs) to reduce pollutants in storm water runoff. The objectives of the NPDES storm water program are to eliminate illegal dumping and illicit connections, and to reduce pollutants in industrial storm water discharge. These regulations require industry to develop detailed facility site maps, and describe the types, amounts and locations of potential pollutants. Based on this information, industry can develop and implement best management practices to reduce pollutants in storm water runoff.