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Sample records for cardiac muscle due

  1. Recurrent Muscle Weakness with Rhabdomyolysis, Metabolic Crises, and Cardiac Arrhythmia Due to Bi-allelic TANGO2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R.; Liu, Pengfei; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Watkin, Levi B.; Chiang, Theodore; Leduc, Magalie S.; Zhu, Wenmiao; Ding, Yan; Pan, Shujuan; Vetrini, Francesco; Miyake, Christina Y.; Shinawi, Marwan; Gambin, Tomasz; Eldomery, Mohammad K.; Akdemir, Zeynep Hande Coban; Emrick, Lisa; Wilnai, Yael; Schelley, Susan; Koenig, Mary Kay; Memon, Nada; Farach, Laura S.; Coe, Bradley P.; Azamian, Mahshid; Hernandez, Patricia; Zapata, Gladys; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Muzny, Donna M.; Lotze, Timothy; Clark, Gary; Wilfong, Angus; Northrup, Hope; Adesina, Adekunle; Bacino, Carlos A.; Scaglia, Fernando; Bonnen, Penelope E.; Crosson, Jane; Duis, Jessica; Maegawa, Gustavo H.B.; Coman, David; Inwood, Anita; McGill, Jim; Boerwinkle, Eric; Graham, Brett; Beaudet, Art; Eng, Christine M.; Hanchard, Neil A.; Xia, Fan; Orange, Jordan S.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Yang, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    The underlying genetic etiology of rhabdomyolysis remains elusive in a significant fraction of individuals presenting with recurrent metabolic crises and muscle weakness. Using exome sequencing, we identified bi-allelic mutations in TANGO2 encoding transport and Golgi organization 2 homolog (Drosophila) in 12 subjects with episodic rhabdomyolysis, hypoglycemia, hyperammonemia, and susceptibility to life-threatening cardiac tachyarrhythmias. A recurrent homozygous c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation was found in four unrelated individuals of Hispanic/Latino origin, and a homozygous ∼34 kb deletion affecting exons 3–9 was observed in two families of European ancestry. One individual of mixed Hispanic/European descent was found to be compound heterozygous for c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) and the deletion of exons 3–9. Additionally, a homozygous exons 4–6 deletion was identified in a consanguineous Middle Eastern Arab family. No homozygotes have been reported for these changes in control databases. Fibroblasts derived from a subject with the recurrent c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation showed evidence of increased endoplasmic reticulum stress and a reduction in Golgi volume density in comparison to control. Our results show that the c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation and the exons 3–9 heterozygous deletion in TANGO2 are recurrent pathogenic alleles present in the Latino/Hispanic and European populations, respectively, causing considerable morbidity in the homozygotes in these populations. PMID:26805781

  2. Slow Conduction in Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Melvyn; Kootsey, J. Mailen; Johnson, Edward A.; Sawanobori, Tohru

    1973-01-01

    Mechanisms of slow conduction in cardiac muscle are categorized and the most likely identified. Propagating action potentials were obtained experimentally from a synthetically grown strand of cardiac muscle (around 50 μm by 30 mm) and theoretically from a one-dimensional cable model that incorporated varying axial resistance and membrane properties along its length. Action potentials propagated at about 0.3 m/s, but in some synthetic strands there were regions (approximately 100 μm in length) where the velocity decreased to 0.002 m/s. The electrophysiological behavior associated with this slow conduction was similar to that associated with slow conduction in naturally occurring cardiac muscle (notches, Wenckebach phenomena, and block). Theoretically, reasonable changes in specific membrane capacitance, membrane activity, and various changes in geometry were insufficient to account for the observed slow conduction velocities. Conduction velocities as low as 0.009 m/s, however, could be obtained by increasing the resistance (ri) of connections between the cells in the cable; velocities as low as 0.0005 m/s could be obtained by a further increase in ri made possible by a reduction in membrane activity by one-fourth, which in itself decreased conduction velocity by only a factor of 1/1.4. As a result of these findings, several of the mechanisms that have been postulated, previously, are shown to be incapable of accounting for delays such as those which occur in the synthetic strand as well as in the atrioventricular (VA) node. ImagesFIGURE 1FIGURE 2FIGURE 3FIGURE 4 PMID:4709519

  3. Neonatal multiorgan failure due to ACAD9 mutation and complex I deficiency with mitochondrial hyperplasia in liver, cardiac myocytes, skeletal muscle, and renal tubules.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Nancy; Wang, Xinjian; Peng, Yanyan; Valencia, C Alexander; Khuchua, Zaza; Hata, Jessica; Witte, David; Huang, Taosheng; Bove, Kevin E

    2016-03-01

    Complex I deficiency causes Leigh syndrome, fatal infant lactic acidosis, and neonatal cardiomyopathy. Mutations in more than 100 nuclear DNA and mitochondrial DNA genes miscode for complex I subunits or assembly factors. ACAD9 is an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase with a novel function in assembly of complex I; biallelic mutations cause progressive encephalomyopathy, recurrent Reye syndrome, and fatal cardiomyopathy. We describe the first autopsy in fatal neonatal lethal lactic acidosis due to mutations in ACAD9 that reduced complex I activity. We identified mitochondrial hyperplasia in cardiac myocytes, diaphragm muscle, and liver and renal tubules in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue using immunohistochemistry for mitochondrial antigens. Whole-exome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous variants in the ACAD9 gene: c.187G>T (p.E63*) and c.941T>C (p.L314P). The nonsense mutation causes late infantile lethality; the missense variant is novel. Autopsy-derived fibroblasts had reduced complex I activity (53% of control) with normal activity in complexes II to IV, similar to reported cases of ACAD9 deficiency. PMID:26826406

  4. Cardiac assistance from skeletal muscle: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Salmons, Stanley

    2009-02-01

    Cardiac assistance from skeletal muscle offers an attractive surgical solution to the problem of end-stage heart failure, yet it is widely regarded as a failed approach. I argue here that this is an outdated assessment. Systematic progress has been made over the last 25 years in understanding the relevant basic science. In the light of these advances we should be reconsidering the place of skeletal muscle assist in the surgical armamentarium. PMID:18954996

  5. Cardiac Muscle Studies with Rat Ventricular Strips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitten, Bert K.; Faleschini, Richard J.

    1977-01-01

    Details undergraduate physiology laboratory experiments that demonstrate mechanical properties of cardiac muscle, using strips from the ventricle of a rat heart. Includes procedures for obtaining length-tension curves, demonstrating the role of calcium in excitation-contraction coupling, and showing effects of several cardiovascular drugs…

  6. Stimulating Cardiac Muscle by Light: Cardiac Optogenetics by Cell Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhiheng; Valiunas, Virginijus; Lu, Zongju; Bien, Harold; Liu, Huilin; Wang, Hong-Zhang; Rosati, Barbara; Brink, Peter R.; Cohen, Ira S.; Entcheva, Emilia

    2011-01-01

    Background After the recent cloning of light-sensitive ion channels and their expression in mammalian cells, a new field, optogenetics, emerged in neuroscience, allowing for precise perturbations of neural circuits by light. However, functionality of optogenetic tools has not been fully explored outside neuroscience; and a non-viral, non-embryogenesis based strategy for optogenetics has not been shown before. Methods and Results We demonstrate the utility of optogenetics to cardiac muscle by a tandem cell unit (TCU) strategy, where non-excitable cells carry exogenous light-sensitive ion channels, and when electrically coupled to cardiomyocytes, produce optically-excitable heart tissue. A stable channelrhodopsin2 (ChR2) expressing cell line was developed, characterized and used as a cell delivery system. The TCU strategy was validated in vitro in cell pairs with adult canine myocytes (for a wide range of coupling strengths) and in cardiac syncytium with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. For the first time, we combined optical excitation and optical imaging to capture light-triggered muscle contractions and high-resolution propagation maps of light-triggered electrical waves, found to be quantitatively indistinguishable from electrically-triggered waves. Conclusions Our results demonstrate feasibility to control excitation and contraction in cardiac muscle by light using the TCU approach. Optical pacing in this case uses less energy, offers superior spatiotemporal control, remote access and can serve not only as an elegant tool in arrhythmia research, but may form the basis for a new generation of light-driven cardiac pacemakers and muscle actuators. The TCU strategy is extendable to (non-viral) stem cell therapy and is directly relevant to in vivo applications. PMID:21828312

  7. Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Due to Trauma.

    PubMed

    Kjellemo, Hugo; Hansen, Andreas E; Øines, Dennis A; Nilsen, Thor O; Wik, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Survival from pediatric cardiac arrest due to trauma has been reported to be 0.0%-8.8%. Some argue that resuscitation efforts in the case of trauma-related cardiac arrests are futile. We describe a successful outcome in the case of a child who suffered cardiac arrest caused by external traumatic airway obstruction. Our case illustrates how to deal with pediatric traumatic cardiac arrests in an out-of-hospital environment. It also illustrates how good clinical treatment in these situations may be supported by correct treatment after hospital admission when it is impossible to ventilate the patient to provide sufficient oxygen delivery to vital organs. This case relates to a lifeless child of 3-5 years, blue, and trapped by an electrically operated garage door. The first ambulance arrived to find several men trying to bend the frame and the door apart in order to extricate the child, who was hanging in the air with head and neck squeezed between the horizontally-moving garage door and the vertical door frame. One paramedic found a car jack and used it to push the door and the frame apart, allowing the lifeless child to be extricated. Basic life support was then initiated. Intubation was performed by the anesthesiologist without drugs. With FiO2 1.0 the first documented SaO2 was <50%. Restoration of Spontaneous Circulation was achieved after thirty minutes, and she was transported to the hospital. After a few hours she was put on venous-arterial ECMO for 5.5 days and discharged home after two months. Outpatient examinations during the rest of 2013 were positive, and the child found not to be suffering from any injuries, either physical or mental. The last follow-up in October 2014 demonstrated she had made a 100% recovery and she started school in August 2014. PMID:26930137

  8. The phosphorylation of troponin I from cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, H A; Perry, S V

    1975-01-01

    1. Troponin I isolated from fresh cardiac muscle by affinity chromatography contains about 1.9 mol of covalently bound phosphate/mol. Similar preparations of white-skeletal-muscle troponin I contain about 0.5 mol of phosphate/mol. 2. A 3':5'-cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase and a protein phosphatase are associated with troponin isolated from cardiac muscle. 3. Bovine cardiac 3':5'-cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase catalyses the phosphorylation of cardiac troponin I 30 times faster than white-skeletal-muscle troponin I. 4. Troponin I is the only component of cardiac troponin phosphorylated at a significant rate by the endogenous or a bovine cardiac 3':5'-cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. 5. Phosphorylase kinase catalyses the phosphorylation of cardiac troponin I at similar or slightly faster rates than white-skeletal-muscle troponin I. 6. Troponin C inhibits the phosphorylation of cardiac and skeletal troponin I catalysed by phosphorylase kinase and the phosphorylation of white skeletal troponin I catalysed by 3':5'-cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase; the phosphorylation of cardiac troponin I catalysed by the latter enzyme is not inhibited. Images Fig. 1. PMID:173290

  9. A viscoplastic model for the active component in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Rubin, M B

    2016-08-01

    The HMK model (Hunter et al. in Prog Biophys Mol Biol 69:289-331, 1998) proposes mechanobiological equations for the influence of intracellular calcium concentration [Formula: see text] on the evolution of bound calcium concentration [Formula: see text] and the tropomyosin kinetics parameter z, which model processes in the active component of the tension in cardiac muscle. The inelastic response due to actin-myosin crossbridge kinetics is modeled in the HMK model with a function Q that depends on the history of the rate of total stretch of the muscle fiber. Here, an alternative model is proposed which models the active component of the muscle fiber as a viscoplastic material. In particular, an evolution equation is proposed for the elastic stretch [Formula: see text] in the active component. Specific forms of the constitutive equations are proposed and used to match experimental data. The proposed viscoplastic formulation allows for separate modeling of three processes: the high rate deactivation of crossbridges causing rapid reduction in active tension; the high but lower rate reactivation of crossbridges causing recovery of active tension; and the low rate relaxation effects characterizing the Hill model of muscles. PMID:26476735

  10. Muscle ring finger 1 mediates cardiac atrophy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Willis, Monte S; Rojas, Mauricio; Li, Luge; Selzman, Craig H; Tang, Ru-Hang; Stansfield, William E; Rodriguez, Jessica E; Glass, David J; Patterson, Cam

    2009-04-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy, induced by various etiologies such as high blood pressure and aortic stenosis, develops in response to increased afterload and represents a common intermediary in the development of heart failure. Understandably then, the reversal of pathological cardiac hypertrophy is associated with a significant reduction in cardiovascular event risk and represents an important, yet underdeveloped, target of therapeutic research. Recently, we determined that muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF1), a muscle-specific protein, inhibits the development of experimentally induced pathological; cardiac hypertrophy. We now demonstrate that therapeutic cardiac atrophy induced in patients after left ventricular assist device placement is associated with an increase in cardiac MuRF1 expression. This prompted us to investigate the role of MuRF1 in two independent mouse models of cardiac atrophy: 1) cardiac hypertrophy regression after reversal of transaortic constriction (TAC) reversal and 2) dexamethasone-induced atrophy. Using echocardiographic, histological, and gene expression analyses, we found that upon TAC release, cardiac mass and cardiomyocyte cross-sectional areas in MuRF1(-/-) mice decreased approximately 70% less than in wild type mice in the 4 wk after release. This was in striking contrast to wild-type mice, who returned to baseline cardiac mass and cardiomyocyte size within 4 days of TAC release. Despite these differences in atrophic remodeling, the transcriptional activation of cardiac hypertrophy measured by beta-myosin heavy chain, smooth muscle actin, and brain natriuretic peptide was attenuated similarly in both MuRF1(-/-) and wild-type hearts after TAC release. In the second model, MuRF1(-/-) mice also displayed resistance to dexamethasone-induced cardiac atrophy, as determined by echocardiographic analysis. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that MuRF1 is essential for cardiac atrophy in vivo, both in the setting of therapeutic

  11. Endothelial, cardiac muscle and skeletal muscle exhibit different viscous and elastic properties as determined by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, A. B.; Collinsworth, A. M.; Reichert, W. M.; Kraus, W. E.; Truskey, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluated the hypothesis that, due to functional and structural differences, the apparent elastic modulus and viscous behavior of cardiac and skeletal muscle and vascular endothelium would differ. To accurately determine the elastic modulus, the contribution of probe velocity, indentation depth, and the assumed shape of the probe were examined. Hysteresis was observed at high indentation velocities arising from viscous effects. Irreversible deformation was not observed for endothelial cells and hysteresis was negligible below 1 microm/s. For skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle cells, hysteresis was negligible below 0.25 microm/s. Viscous dissipation for endothelial and cardiac muscle cells was higher than for skeletal muscle cells. The calculated elastic modulus was most sensitive to the assumed probe geometry for the first 60 nm of indentation for the three cell types. Modeling the probe as a blunt cone-spherical cap resulted in variation in elastic modulus with indentation depth that was less than that calculated by treating the probe as a conical tip. Substrate contributions were negligible since the elastic modulus reached a steady value for indentations above 60 nm and the probe never indented more than 10% of the cell thickness. Cardiac cells were the stiffest (100.3+/-10.7 kPa), the skeletal muscle cells were intermediate (24.7+/-3.5 kPa), and the endothelial cells were the softest with a range of elastic moduli (1.4+/-0.1 to 6.8+/-0.4 kPa) depending on the location of the cell surface tested. Cardiac and skeletal muscle exhibited nonlinear elastic behavior. These passive mechanical properties are generally consistent with the function of these different cell types.

  12. Fast skeletal muscle troponin T increases the cooperativity of transgenic mouse cardiac muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qi-Quan; Brozovich, Frank V; Jin, Jian-Ping

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the functional significance of different troponin T (TnT) isoforms in the Ca2+ activation of muscle contraction, transgenic mice have been constructed with a chicken fast skeletal muscle TnT transgene driven by a cardiac α-myosin heavy chain gene promoter. Cardiac muscle-specific expression of the fast skeletal muscle TnT has been obtained with significant myofibril incorporation. Expression of the endogenous cardiac muscle thin filament regulatory proteins, such as troponin I and tropomyosin, was not altered in the transgenic mouse heart, providing an authentic system for the functional characterization of TnT isoforms. Cardiac muscle contractility was analysed for the force vs. Ca2+ relationship in skinned ventricular trabeculae of transgenic mice in comparison with wild-type litter-mates. The results showed unchanged pCa50 values (5.1 ± 0.04 and 5.1 ± 0.1, respectively) but significantly steeper slopes (the Hill coefficient was 2.0 ± 0.2 vs. 1.0 ± 0.2, P < 0.05). The results demonstrate that the structural and functional variation of different TnT isoforms may contribute to the difference in responsiveness and overall cooperativity of the thin filament-based Ca2+ regulation between cardiac and skeletal muscles. PMID:10517814

  13. Prevalence of Rate-Dependent Behaviors in Cardiac Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, G. Martin; Bahar, Sonya; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    1999-04-01

    We explore the rate-dependent dynamic response of periodically paced bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) cardiac muscle. Alternans (2:2 behavior) occur in 35% of animals and 2:1<-->1:1 bistability in 74% of animals. In addition, we observe 2:2<-->2:1 bistablility. We discuss the implications of these results for two map-based models of cardiac dynamics. The high prevalence of bistability suggests that this dynamical behavior must be accounted for in the design of closed-loop feedback protocols to stabilize cardiac dynamics.

  14. Endogenous L-Carnosine Level in Diabetes Rat Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yali; Su, Dan; Zhang, Ling; Wei, Shaofeng; Liu, Kuangyi; Peng, Mi; Li, Hanyun; Song, Yonggui

    2016-01-01

    A novel method for quantitation of cardiac muscle carnosine levels using HPLC-UV is described. In this simple and reliable method, carnosine from the rat cardiac muscle and the internal standard, thymopentin, were extracted by protein precipitation with acetonitrile. The method was linear up to 60.96 μg·mL−1 for L-carnosine. The calibration curve was linear in concentration ranges from 0.5 to 60.96 μg·mL−1. The relative standard deviations obtained for intra- and interday precision were lower than 12% and the recoveries were higher than 90% for both carnosine and internal standard. We successfully applied this method to the analysis of endogenous carnosine in cardiac muscle of the diabetes rats and healthy control rats. The concentration of carnosine was significantly lower in the diabetes rats group, compared to that in the healthy control rats. These results support the usefulness of this method as a means of quantitating carnosine and illustrate the important role of L-carnosine in cardiac muscle. PMID:27190533

  15. Endogenous L-Carnosine Level in Diabetes Rat Cardiac Muscle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yali; Su, Dan; Zhang, Ling; Wei, Shaofeng; Liu, Kuangyi; Peng, Mi; Li, Hanyun; Song, Yonggui

    2016-01-01

    A novel method for quantitation of cardiac muscle carnosine levels using HPLC-UV is described. In this simple and reliable method, carnosine from the rat cardiac muscle and the internal standard, thymopentin, were extracted by protein precipitation with acetonitrile. The method was linear up to 60.96 μg·mL(-1) for L-carnosine. The calibration curve was linear in concentration ranges from 0.5 to 60.96 μg·mL(-1). The relative standard deviations obtained for intra- and interday precision were lower than 12% and the recoveries were higher than 90% for both carnosine and internal standard. We successfully applied this method to the analysis of endogenous carnosine in cardiac muscle of the diabetes rats and healthy control rats. The concentration of carnosine was significantly lower in the diabetes rats group, compared to that in the healthy control rats. These results support the usefulness of this method as a means of quantitating carnosine and illustrate the important role of L-carnosine in cardiac muscle. PMID:27190533

  16. Strategies to Study Desmin in Cardiac Muscle and Culture Systems.

    PubMed

    Diokmetzidou, Antigoni; Tsikitis, Mary; Nikouli, Sofia; Kloukina, Ismini; Tsoupri, Elsa; Papathanasiou, Stamatis; Psarras, Stelios; Mavroidis, Manolis; Capetanaki, Yassemi

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filament (IF) cytoskeleton comprises the fine-tuning cellular machinery regulating critical homeostatic mechanisms. In skeletal and cardiac muscle, deficiency or disturbance of the IF network leads to severe pathology, particularly in the latter. The three-dimensional scaffold of the muscle-specific IF protein desmin interconnects key features of the cardiac muscle cells, including the Z-disks, intercalated disks, plasma membrane, nucleus, mitochondria, lysosomes, and potentially sarcoplasmic reticulum. This is crucial for the highly organized striated muscle, in which effective energy production and transmission as well as mechanochemical signaling are tightly coordinated among the organelles and the contractile apparatus. The role of desmin and desmin-associated proteins in the biogenesis, trafficking, and organelle function, as well as the development, differentiation, and survival of the cardiac muscle begins to be enlightened, but the precise mechanisms remain elusive. We propose a set of experimental tools that can be used, in vivo and in vitro, to unravel crucial new pathways by which the IF cytoskeleton facilitates proper organelle function, homeostasis, and cytoprotection and further understand how its disturbance and deficiency lead to disease. PMID:26795479

  17. Familial cardiac valvulopathy due to filamin A mutation.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Jonathan A; Bernstein, Daniel; Hehr, Ute; Hudgins, Louanne

    2011-09-01

    We report on the clinical findings in siblings affected by the recently characterized X-linked form of hereditary cardiac valvular dystrophy or cardiac valve disease (OMIM 314400) due to mutations in the FLNA gene and review the literature on this condition. Although FLNA related cardiac valve disease is presumed to be a rare disorder, it is likely underdiagnosed. Several features of this condition may aid in its identification. FLNA related valvular disease can be recognized on the basis of its distinctive inheritance, early age of onset, and frequent multi-valve involvement. PMID:21815255

  18. Losartan decreases cardiac muscle fibrosis and improves cardiac function in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Spurney, Christopher F; Sali, Arpana; Guerron, Alfredo D; Iantorno, Micaela; Yu, Qing; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Rayavarapu, Sree; van der Meulen, Jack; Hoffman, Eric P; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2011-03-01

    Recent studies showed that chronic administration of losartan, an angiotensin II type I receptor antagonist, improved skeletal muscle function in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. In this study, C57BL/10ScSn-Dmd(mdx)/J female mice were either untreated or treated with losartan (n = 15) in the drinking water at a dose of 600 mg/L over a 6-month period. Cardiac function was assessed via in vivo high frequency echocardiography and skeletal muscle function was assessed using grip strength testing, Digiscan monitoring, Rotarod timing, and in vitro force testing. Fibrosis was assessed using picrosirius red staining and Image J analysis. Gene expression was evaluated using real-time polymerized chain reaction (RT-PCR). Percentage shortening fraction was significantly decreased in untreated (26.9% ± 3.5%) mice compared to losartan-treated (32.2% ± 4.2%; P < .01) mice. Systolic blood pressure was significantly reduced in losartan-treated mice (56 ± 6 vs 69 ± 7 mm Hg; P < .0005). Percentage cardiac fibrosis was significantly reduced in losartan-treated hearts (P < .05) along with diaphragm (P < .01), extensor digitorum longus (P < .05), and gastrocnemius (P < .05) muscles compared to untreated mdx mice. There were no significant differences in skeletal muscle function between treated and untreated groups. Chronic treatment with losartan decreases cardiac and skeletal muscle fibrosis and improves cardiac systolic function in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. PMID:21304057

  19. Experimental Control of Cardiac Muscle Alternans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, G. Martin; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2002-05-01

    We demonstrate that alternans in small pieces of in vitro paced bullfrog (Rana Catesbeiana) myocardium can be suppressed by making minute adjustments to the pacing period in response to real time measurements of the action potential duration. Control is possible over a large range of physiological conditions over many animals and the self-referencing control protocol can automatically adjust to changes in the pacing interval. Our results suggest the feasibility of developing low-energy methods for maintaining normal cardiac function.

  20. Cardiac autoimmunity in HIV related heart muscle disease

    PubMed Central

    Currie, P; Goldman, J; Caforio, A; Jacob, A; Baig, M; Brettle, R; Haven, A; Boon, N; McKenna, W

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To assess the frequency of circulating cardiac specific autoantibodies in HIV positive patients with and without echocardiographic evidence of left ventricular dysfunction.
Subjects—74 HIV positive patients including 28 with echocardiographic evidence of heart muscle disease, 52 HIV negative people at low risk of HIV infection, and 14 HIV negative drug users who had all undergone non-invasive cardiac assessment were studied along with a group of 200 healthy blood donors.
Results—Cardiac autoantibodies detected by indirect immunofluorescence (serum dilution 1/10) were more common in the HIV positive patients (15%), particularly the HIV heart muscle disease group (21%), than in HIV negative controls (3.5%) (both p < 0.001). By ELISA (dilution 1/320), abnormal anti-α myosin autoantibody concentrations were found more often in HIV patients with heart muscle disease (43%) than in HIV positive patients with normal hearts (19%) or in HIV negative controls (3%) (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively). Anti-α myosin autoantibody concentrations were greater in HIV positive patients than in HIV negative controls, regardless of cardiac status ((mean SD) 0.253 (0.155) v 0.170 (0.076); p = 0.003). In particular the mean antibody concentration was higher in the HIV heart muscle disease patients (0.291 (0.160) v 0.170 (0.076); p = 0.001) than in HIV negative controls. On follow up, six subjects with normal echocardiograms but raised autoantibody concentrations had died after a median of 298 days, three with left ventricular abnormalities at necropsy. This compared with a median survival of 536 days for 21 HIV positive patients with normal cardiological and immunological results.
Conclusions—There is an increased frequency of circulating cardiac specific autoantibodies in HIV positive individuals, particularly those with heart muscle disease. The data support a role for cardiac autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of HIV related heart

  1. Transcriptional activation of muscle atrophy promotes cardiac muscle remodeling during mammalian hibernation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yichi; Aguilar, Oscar A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mammalian hibernation in thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) is characterized by dramatic changes on a physiological and molecular level. During hibernation, mammalian hearts show a propensity to hypertrophy due to the need for increasing contractility to pump colder and more viscous blood. While cardiac hypertrophy is quite often a process characterized by decompensation, the ground squirrel studied is an excellent model of cardiac plasticity and cardioprotection under conditions of hypothermia and ischemia. The forkhead box O (Foxo) family of proteins and myogenin (MyoG) are transcription factors that control protein degradation and muscle atrophy by regulating the expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligases, MAFbx and MuRF1. These ligases are part of the ubiquitin proteasome system by transferring ubiquitin to proteins and targeting these proteins for degradation. Regulation of Foxo1 and 3a occurs through phosphorylation at different residues. The threonine-24 (Thr-24) and serine-319 (Ser-319) residues on Foxo1, and the Thr-32 residue on Foxo3a are phosphorylated by Akt, leading to cytoplasmic localization of Foxo. We propose that the described mechanism contributes to the changes taking place in cardiac muscle throughout hibernation. Methods. Total and phosphorylated protein levels of Foxo1 and Foxo3a, as well as total protein levels of MyoG, MAFbx, and MuRF1, were studied using immunoblotting. Results. Immunoblotting results demonstrated upregulations in Foxo1 and Foxo3a total protein levels (1.3- and 4.5-fold increases relative to euthermic control, for Foxo1 and 3a respectively) during late torpor, and protein levels remained elevated throughout the rest of torpor and at interbout arousal. We also observed decreases in inactive, phosphorylated Foxo1 and 3a proteins during throughout torpor, where levels of p-Foxo1 Ser319 and Thr24, as well as p-Foxo3a Thr32 decreased by at least 45% throughout torpor. MyoG was upregulated only

  2. Transcriptional activation of muscle atrophy promotes cardiac muscle remodeling during mammalian hibernation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yichi; Aguilar, Oscar A; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mammalian hibernation in thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) is characterized by dramatic changes on a physiological and molecular level. During hibernation, mammalian hearts show a propensity to hypertrophy due to the need for increasing contractility to pump colder and more viscous blood. While cardiac hypertrophy is quite often a process characterized by decompensation, the ground squirrel studied is an excellent model of cardiac plasticity and cardioprotection under conditions of hypothermia and ischemia. The forkhead box O (Foxo) family of proteins and myogenin (MyoG) are transcription factors that control protein degradation and muscle atrophy by regulating the expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligases, MAFbx and MuRF1. These ligases are part of the ubiquitin proteasome system by transferring ubiquitin to proteins and targeting these proteins for degradation. Regulation of Foxo1 and 3a occurs through phosphorylation at different residues. The threonine-24 (Thr-24) and serine-319 (Ser-319) residues on Foxo1, and the Thr-32 residue on Foxo3a are phosphorylated by Akt, leading to cytoplasmic localization of Foxo. We propose that the described mechanism contributes to the changes taking place in cardiac muscle throughout hibernation. Methods. Total and phosphorylated protein levels of Foxo1 and Foxo3a, as well as total protein levels of MyoG, MAFbx, and MuRF1, were studied using immunoblotting. Results. Immunoblotting results demonstrated upregulations in Foxo1 and Foxo3a total protein levels (1.3- and 4.5-fold increases relative to euthermic control, for Foxo1 and 3a respectively) during late torpor, and protein levels remained elevated throughout the rest of torpor and at interbout arousal. We also observed decreases in inactive, phosphorylated Foxo1 and 3a proteins during throughout torpor, where levels of p-Foxo1 Ser(319) and Thr(24), as well as p-Foxo3a Thr(32) decreased by at least 45% throughout torpor. MyoG was

  3. Oxidants, antioxidants and alcohol: implications for skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Preedy, V R; Patel, V B; Reilly, M E; Richardson, P J; Falkous, G; Mantle, D

    1999-08-01

    setting. In the rat, circulating troponin-T release increases in the presence of ethanol, a mechanism ascribed to free radical mediated damage, as it is prevented with the xanthine oxidase inhibitor and beta-blocker, propranolol. However, whilst propranolol prevents the release of troponin-T, it does not prevent the fall in whole cardiac protein synthesis, suggestive of localized ischemic damage due to ethanol. PMID:10430553

  4. Transplantation of a tissue-engineered human vascularized cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Lesman, Ayelet; Habib, Manhal; Caspi, Oren; Gepstein, Amira; Arbel, Gil; Levenberg, Shulamit; Gepstein, Lior

    2010-01-01

    Myocardial regeneration strategies have been hampered by the lack of sources for human cardiomyocytes (CMs) and by the significant donor cell loss following transplantation. We assessed the ability of a three-dimensional tissue-engineered human vascularized cardiac muscle to engraft in the in vivo rat heart and to promote functional vascularization. Human embryonic stem cell-derived CMs alone or with human endothelial cells (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) and embryonic fibroblasts (triculture constructs) were seeded onto biodegradable porous scaffolds. The resulting tissue constructs were transplanted to the in vivo rat heart and formed cardiac tissue grafts. Immunostaining studies for human-specific CD31 and alpha-smooth muscle actin demonstrated the formation of both donor (human) and host (rat)-derived vasculature within the engrafted triculture tissue constructs. Intraventricular injection of fluorescent microspheres or lectin resulted in their incorporation by human-derived vessels, confirming their functional integration with host coronary vasculature. Finally, the number of blood vessels was significantly greater in the triculture tissue constructs (60.3 +/- 8/mm(3), p < 0.05) when compared with scaffolds containing only CMs (39.0 +/- 14.4/mm(3)). In conclusion, a tissue-engineered human vascularized cardiac muscle can be established ex vivo and transplanted in vivo to form stable grafts. By utilizing a multicellular preparation we were able to increase biograft vascularization and to show that the preexisting human vessels can become functional and contribute to tissue perfusion. PMID:19642856

  5. Calsequestrins in skeletal and cardiac muscle from adult Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Sandra; Mosole, Simone; Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Argenton, Francesco; Volpe, Pompeo; Nori, Alessandra

    2016-04-01

    Calsequestrin (Casq) is a high capacity, low affinity Ca(2+)-binding protein, critical for Ca(2+)-buffering in cardiac and skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum. All vertebrates have multiple genes encoding for different Casq isoforms. Increasing interest has been focused on mammalian and human Casq genes since mutations of both cardiac (Casq2) and skeletal muscle (Casq1) isoforms cause different, and sometime severe, human pathologies. Danio rerio (zebrafish) is a powerful model for studying function and mutations of human proteins. In this work, expression, biochemical properties cellular and sub-cellular localization of D. rerio native Casq isoforms are investigated. By quantitative PCR, three mRNAs were detected in skeletal muscle and heart with different abundances. Three zebrafish Casqs: Casq1a, Casq1b and Casq2 were identified by mass spectrometry (Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002455). Skeletal and cardiac zebrafish calsequestrins share properties with mammalian Casq1 and Casq2. Skeletal Casqs were found primarily, but not exclusively, at the sarcomere Z-line level where terminal cisternae of sarcoplasmic reticulum are located. PMID:26585961

  6. Sarcoglycans in human skeletal muscle and human cardiac muscle: a confocal laser scanning microscope study.

    PubMed

    Anastasi, G; Cutroneo, G; Trimarchi, F; Rizzo, G; Bramanti, P; Bruschetta, D; Fugazzotto, D; Cinelli, M P; Soscia, A; Santoro, G; Favaloro, A

    2003-01-01

    Sarcoglycans are a subcomplex of transmembrane proteins which are part of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. They are expressed in the skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscle. Although numerous studies have been conducted on the sarcoglycan subcomplex in skeletal and cardiac muscle, the manner of the distribution and localization of these proteins along the nonjunctional sarcolemma is not clear. We therefore carried out an indirect immunofluorescence study on surgical biopsies of normal human skeletal muscle and of healthy human atrial myocardium biopsies of patients affected by valvulopathy. Our results indicate that, in skeletal muscle, sarcoglycans have a costameric distribution and all colocalize with each other. Only in a few cases did the alpha-sarcoglycan not colocalize with other sarcoglycans. In addition, these glycoproteins can be localized in different fibers either in the regions of the sarcolemma over band I or band A. In cardiac muscle, our results show a costameric distribution of all proteins examined and, unlike in skeletal muscle, they show a constant colocalization of all sarcoglycans with each other, along with a consistent localization of these proteins in the region of the sarcolemma over band I. In our opinion, this situation seems to confirm the hypothesis of a correlation between the region of the sarcolemma occupied by costameric proteins and the metabolic type, fast or slow, of the muscular fibers. These data, besides opening a new line of research in understanding interactions between the sarcoglycans and other transmembrane proteins, could also be extended to skeletal and cardiac muscles affected by neuromuscular and cardiovascular pathologies to understand possible structural alterations. PMID:12566627

  7. In utero Undernutrition Programs Skeletal and Cardiac Muscle Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, Brittany; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2016-01-01

    In utero undernutrition is associated with increased risk for insulin resistance, obesity, and cardiovascular disease during adult life. A common phenotype associated with low birth weight is reduced skeletal muscle mass. Given the central role of skeletal muscle in whole body metabolism, alterations in its mass as well as its metabolic characteristics may contribute to disease risk. This review highlights the metabolic alterations in cardiac and skeletal muscle associated with in utero undernutrition and low birth weight. These tissues have high metabolic demands and are known to be sites of major metabolic dysfunction in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Recent research demonstrates that mitochondrial energetics are decreased in skeletal and cardiac muscles of adult offspring from undernourished mothers. These effects apparently lead to the development of a thrifty phenotype, which may represent overall a compensatory mechanism programmed in utero to handle times of limited nutrient availability. However, in an environment characterized by food abundance, the effects are maladaptive and increase adulthood risks of metabolic disease. PMID:26779032

  8. From syncitium to regulated pump: a cardiac muscle cellular update

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to present a basic overview of some key teaching concepts that should be considered for inclusion in an six- to eight-lecture introductory block on the regulation of cardiac performance for graduate students. Within the context of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, this review incorporates information on Ca2+ microdomains and local control theory, with particular emphasis on the role of Ca2+ sparks as a key regulatory component of ventricular myocyte contraction dynamics. Recent information pertaining to local Ca2+ cycling in sinoatrial nodal cells (SANCs) as a mechanism underlying cardiac automaticity is also presented as part of the recently described coupled-clock pacemaker system. The details of this regulation are emerging; however, the notion that the sequestration and release of Ca2+ from internal stores in SANCs (similar to that observed in ventricular myocytes) regulates the rhythmic excitation of the heart (i.e., membrane ion channels) is an important advancement in this area. The regulatory role of cardiac adrenergic receptors on cardiac rate and function is also included, and fundamental concepts related to intracellular signaling are discussed. An important point of emphasis is that whole organ cardiac dynamics can be traced back to cellular events regulating intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and, as such, provides an important conceptual framework from which students can begin to think about whole organ physiology in health and disease. Greater synchrony of Ca2+-regulatory mechanisms between ventricular and pacemaker cells should enhance student comprehension of complex regulatory phenomenon in cardiac muscle. PMID:21385997

  9. Short-range mechanical properties of skeletal and cardiac muscles.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kenneth S

    2010-01-01

    Striated muscles are disproportionately stiff for small movements. This facet of their behavior can be demonstrated by measuring the force produced when the muscle is stretched more than about 1% of its initial length. When this is done, it can be seen that force rises rapidly during the initial phases of the movement and much less rapidly during the latter stages of the stretch. Experiments performed using chemically permeabilized skeletal and cardiac muscles show that the initial stiffness of the preparations increases in proportion with isometric force as the free Ca²(+) concentration in the bathing solution is raised from a minimal to a saturating value. This is strong evidence that the short-range mechanical properties of activated muscle result from stretching myosin cross-bridges that are attached between the thick and thin filaments. Relaxed intact muscles also exhibit short-range mechanical properties but the molecular mechanisms underlying this behavior are less clear. This chapter summarizes some of the interesting features of short-range mechanical properties in different types of muscle preparation, describes some of the likely underlying mechanisms and discusses the potential physiological significance of the behavior. PMID:20824529

  10. Hierarchical Internal Variables Reflecting Microstructural Properties: Application to Cardiac Muscle Contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelbrecht, Jüri; Vendelin, Marko; Maugin, Gérard A.

    2000-09-01

    The formalism of internal state variables is proposed for describing the processes of deformation in muscles. Due to the complicated hierarchical microstructure of soft tissues where macroscopic stress states depend upon the sliding of molecules and ion concentrations, the internal variables are switched in successively forming a certain hierarchy. This hierarchy is a general property for complicated materials with different microscopic processes influencing the macroscopic behaviour. Based on that property a novel concept of hierarchical internal variables is defined (up to the knowledge of authors first time) and embedded into the framework of the existing formalism. The discussion based on an example of cardiac muscle contraction illustrates the advantages of this approach.

  11. The nuclear membranes in hypertrophied human cardiac muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrans, V. J.; Jones, M.; Maron, B. J.; Roberts, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    Nuclear membranes of cardiac muscle cells were studied in 134 patients with cardiac hypertrophy of various causes. Abnormalities observed consisted of: a) increased foldings and convolutions; b) nuclear pseudoinclusions formed by cytoplasmic organelles protruding into saccular invaginations of the nuclear membranes, and c) intranuclear tubules. The increased foldings and convolutions of the nuclear membranes and the nuclear pseudoinclusions appear to result from synthesis of nuclear membranes in excess of that needed to accommodate the increase in nuclear volume which occurs in hypertrophy. Intranuclear tubules were found in 6 patients and consisted of tubular invaginations, 400 to 650 A in diameter, of the inner nuclear membranes into the nucleoplasm. Some of these tubules were straight and cylindrical, and were associated with a peripheral layer of marginated chromatin; others were not associated with chromatin, appeared coiled and followed irregular courses. Intranuclear tubules in cardiac muscle cells probably represent an extreme cellular response to the stimulus of hypertrophy. Images Fig 21 Fig 11 Fig 12 Fig 13 Fig 14 Fig 1 Fig 15 Fig 2 Figs 3 and 4 Fig 5 Fig 16 Fig 17 Fig 6 Fig 18 Fig 7 Fig 8 Fig 9 Fig 10 Fig 19 Fig 20 PMID:164122

  12. Pharyngeal mesoderm regulatory network controls cardiac and head muscle morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Harel, Itamar; Maezawa, Yoshiro; Avraham, Roi; Rinon, Ariel; Ma, Hsiao-Yen; Cross, Joe W.; Leviatan, Noam; Hegesh, Julius; Roy, Achira; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Rechavi, Gideon; Carvajal, Jaime; Tole, Shubha; Kioussi, Chrissa; Quaggin, Susan; Tzahor, Eldad

    2012-01-01

    The search for developmental mechanisms driving vertebrate organogenesis has paved the way toward a deeper understanding of birth defects. During embryogenesis, parts of the heart and craniofacial muscles arise from pharyngeal mesoderm (PM) progenitors. Here, we reveal a hierarchical regulatory network of a set of transcription factors expressed in the PM that initiates heart and craniofacial organogenesis. Genetic perturbation of this network in mice resulted in heart and craniofacial muscle defects, revealing robust cross-regulation between its members. We identified Lhx2 as a previously undescribed player during cardiac and pharyngeal muscle development. Lhx2 and Tcf21 genetically interact with Tbx1, the major determinant in the etiology of DiGeorge/velo-cardio-facial/22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Furthermore, knockout of these genes in the mouse recapitulates specific cardiac features of this syndrome. We suggest that PM-derived cardiogenesis and myogenesis are network properties rather than properties specific to individual PM members. These findings shed new light on the developmental underpinnings of congenital defects. PMID:23112163

  13. [Tolerance of +Gz accelerations in chronic compensated cardiac muscle disease].

    PubMed

    Suvorov, P M; Bykova, Iu I

    1975-01-01

    The functional potentialities of the cardiovascular system were investigated during an exposure of people with compensated chronic diseases of the cardiac muscle to acceleration (+Gz). The test subjects were exposed to acceleration of 3 and 5 g for 30 sec with an interval of 5 min. The parameters of hemodynamics, ECG and visual perception were recorded. The systolic blood volume, cardiac output and specific peripheral resistance were derived from the Bremser-Ranke formula. Seventy one subjects with heart diseases and 23 healthy subjects were examined. The subjects with myocardiodystrophy and myocarditic cardiosclerosis (12+/-16) showed a reduced tolerance to accelerations. During an exposure the subjects with atherosclerotic cardiosclerosis showed a higher pressure in vessels of ear conch than the healthy subjects. The myocardiodystrophic subjects frequently (20%) exhibited an inversion of electrocardiographic T2. The subjects with heart diseases (27-33%) showed extrasystolic disturbances. The results may be used in medical expertise of pilots. PMID:1214489

  14. Impaired cardiac reserve and severely diminished skeletal muscle O₂ utilization mediate exercise intolerance in Barth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Carolyn T; Byrne, Barry J; Bryant, Randall M; Margossian, Renee; Maisenbacher, Melissa; Breitenger, Petar; Benni, Paul B; Redfearn, Sharon; Marcus, Edward; Cade, W Todd

    2011-11-01

    Barth syndrome (BTHS) is a mitochondrial myopathy characterized by reports of exercise intolerance. We sought to determine if 1) BTHS leads to abnormalities of skeletal muscle O(2) extraction/utilization and 2) exercise intolerance in BTHS is related to impaired O(2) extraction/utilization, impaired cardiac function, or both. Participants with BTHS (age: 17 ± 5 yr, n = 15) and control participants (age: 13 ± 4 yr, n = 9) underwent graded exercise testing on a cycle ergometer with continuous ECG and metabolic measurements. Echocardiography was performed at rest and at peak exercise. Near-infrared spectroscopy of the vastus lateralis muscle was continuously recorded for measurements of skeletal muscle O(2) extraction. Adjusting for age, peak O(2) consumption (16.5 ± 4.0 vs. 39.5 ± 12.3 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1), P < 0.001) and peak work rate (58 ± 19 vs. 166 ± 60 W, P < 0.001) were significantly lower in BTHS than control participants. The percent increase from rest to peak exercise in ejection fraction (BTHS: 3 ± 10 vs. control: 19 ± 4%, P < 0.01) was blunted in BTHS compared with control participants. The muscle tissue O(2) saturation change from rest to peak exercise was paradoxically opposite (BTHS: 8 ± 16 vs. control: -5 ± 9, P < 0.01), and the deoxyhemoglobin change was blunted (BTHS: 0 ± 12 vs. control: 10 ± 8, P < 0.09) in BTHS compared with control participants, indicating impaired skeletal muscle extraction in BTHS. In conclusion, severe exercise intolerance in BTHS is due to both cardiac and skeletal muscle impairments that are consistent with cardiac and skeletal mitochondrial myopathy. These findings provide further insight to the pathophysiology of BTHS. PMID:21873497

  15. Complicated axillary lymphadenectomy due to a pectoralis quartus muscle.

    PubMed

    Totlis, T; Iosifidou, R; Pavlidou, F; Sofidis, G; Natsis, K; Bousoulegas, A

    2012-01-01

    During lymphadenectomy in the left axilla of a 38-year-old woman with a 1.4 cm invasive ductal breast carcinoma an accessory muscle was found. Due to the presence of the anomalous muscle the lymphadenectomy was carried out with difficulty through a limited field. Based on its anatomical characteristics, the supernumerary muscle was recognized as the pectoralis quartus. To our knowledge this is the first report of a pectoralis quartus muscle as a surgical finding. The surgeon should be aware of the possible presence of this anomaly as well as its anatomical characteristics in order to avoid any complications. PMID:22844841

  16. Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration: are all mitochondria created equal?

    PubMed Central

    Park, Song-Young; Gifford, Jayson R.; Andtbacka, Robert H. I.; Trinity, Joel D.; Hyngstrom, John R.; Garten, Ryan S.; Diakos, Nikolaos A.; Ives, Stephen J.; Dela, Flemming; Larsen, Steen; Drakos, Stavros

    2014-01-01

    Unlike cardiac and skeletal muscle, little is known about vascular smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration. Therefore, the present study examined mitochondrial respiratory rates in smooth muscle of healthy human feed arteries and compared with that of healthy cardiac and skeletal muscles. Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscles were harvested from a total of 22 subjects (53 ± 6 yr), and mitochondrial respiration was assessed in permeabilized fibers. Complex I + II, state 3 respiration, an index of oxidative phosphorylation capacity, fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (54 ± 1, 39 ± 4, and 15 ± 1 pmol·s−1·mg−1, P < 0.05, respectively). Citrate synthase (CS) activity, an index of mitochondrial density, also fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (222 ± 13, 115 ± 2, and 48 ± 2 μmol·g−1·min−1, P < 0.05, respectively). Thus, when respiration rates were normalized by CS (respiration per mitochondrial content), oxidative phosphorylation capacity was no longer different between the three muscle types. Interestingly, complex I state 2 normalized for CS activity, an index of nonphosphorylating respiration per mitochondrial content, increased progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles, such that the respiratory control ratio, state 3/state 2 respiration, fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (5.3 ± 0.7, 3.2 ± 0.4, and 1.6 ± 0.3 pmol·s−1·mg−1, P < 0.05, respectively). Thus, although oxidative phosphorylation capacity per mitochondrial content in cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscles suggest all mitochondria are created equal, the contrasting respiratory control ratio and nonphosphorylating respiration highlight the existence of intrinsic functional differences between these muscle mitochondria. This likely influences the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation and could potentially alter ROS production. PMID:24906913

  17. Proteomic responses of skeletal and cardiac muscle to exercise

    PubMed Central

    Burniston, Jatin G.; Hoffman, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Regular exercise is effective in the prevention of chronic diseases and confers a lower risk of death in individuals displaying risk factors such as hypertension and dyslipidaemia. Thus, knowledge of the molecular responses to exercise provides a valuable contrast for interpreting investigations of disease and can highlight novel therapeutic targets. While exercise is an everyday experience and can be conceptualized in simple terms, exercise is a complex physiological phenomena and investigation of exercise responses requires sophisticated analytical techniques and careful standardization of the exercise stimulus. Proteomic investigation of exercise is in its infancy but the ability to link changes in function with comprehensive changes in protein expression and post-translational modification holds great promise for advancing physiology. This review highlights recent pioneering work investigating the effects of exercise in skeletal and cardiac muscle that has uncovered novel mechanisms underling the benefits of physical activity. PMID:21679117

  18. Inclusion body myositis, muscle blood vessel and cardiac amyloidosis, and transthyretin Val122Ile allele.

    PubMed

    Askanas, V; Engel, W K; Alvarez, R B; Frangione, B; Ghiso, J; Vidal, R

    2000-04-01

    Typical of sporadic inclusion body myositis muscle biopsies are vacuolated muscle fibers containing intracellular amyloid deposits and accumulations of "Alzheimer-characteristic" proteins. There is no muscle blood vessel or cardiac amyloidosis. We report on a 70-year-old African-American man homozygous for the transthyretin Val122Ile allele who has both sporadic inclusion body myositis and cardiac amyloidosis. His unique pathological features included transthyretin immunoreactivity in prominent muscle blood vessel amyloid and congophilic amyloid deposits within vacuolated muscle fibers. PMID:10762172

  19. A hormone-encoding gene identifies a pathway for cardiac but not skeletal muscle gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Grépin, C; Dagnino, L; Robitaille, L; Haberstroh, L; Antakly, T; Nemer, M

    1994-01-01

    In contrast to skeletal muscle, the mechanisms responsible for activation and maintenance of tissue-specific transcription in cardiac muscle remain poorly understood. A family of hormone-encoding genes is expressed in a highly specific manner in cardiac but not skeletal myocytes. This includes the A- and B-type natriuretic peptide (ANP and BNP) genes, which encode peptide hormones with crucial roles in the regulation of blood volume and pressure. Since these genes are markers of cardiac cells, we have used them to probe the mechanisms for cardiac muscle-specific transcription. Cloning and functional analysis of the rat BNP upstream sequences revealed unexpected structural resemblance to erythroid but not to muscle-specific promoters and enhancers, including a requirement for regulatory elements containing GATA motifs. A cDNA clone corresponding to a member of the GATA family of transcription factors was isolated from a cardiomyocyte cDNA library. Transcription of this GATA gene is restricted mostly to the heart and is undetectable in skeletal muscle. Within the heart, GATA transcripts are localized in ANP- and BNP-expressing myocytes, and forced expression of the GATA protein in heterologous cells markedly activates transcription from the natural cardiac muscle-specific ANP and BNP promoters. This GATA-dependent pathway defines the first mechanism for cardiac muscle-specific transcription. Moreover, the present findings reveal striking similarities between the mechanisms controlling gene expression in hematopoietic and cardiac cells and may have important implications for studies of cardiogenesis. Images PMID:8164667

  20. Cardiac arrest due to airway obstruction in hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Fuse, Takashi; Nakada, Taka-aki; Taniguchi, Masashi; Mizushima, Yasuaki; Matsuoka, Tetsuya

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare genetic disease caused by a deficiency of functional C1 esterase inhibitor that causes swelling attacks in various body tissues. We hereby report a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to airway obstruction in HAE. Cutaneous swelling and abdominal pain attacks caused by gastrointestinal wall swelling are common symptoms in HAE, whereas laryngeal swelling is rare. Emergency physicians may have few chances to experience cases of life-threatening laryngeal edema resulting in a delay from symptom onset to the diagnosis of HAE. Hereditary angioedema is diagnosed by performing complement blood tests. Because safe and effective treatment options are available for the life-threatening swellings in HAE, the diagnosis potentially reduces the risk of asphyxiation in patients and their blood relatives. PMID:25913082

  1. Development of aerobic and anaerobic metabolism in cardiac and skeletal muscles from harp and hooded seals.

    PubMed

    Burns, J M; Skomp, N; Bishop, N; Lestyk, K; Hammill, M

    2010-03-01

    In diving animals, skeletal muscle adaptations to extend underwater time despite selective vasoconstriction include elevated myoglobin (Mb) concentrations, high acid buffering ability (beta) and high aerobic and anaerobic enzyme activities. However, because cardiac muscle is perfused during dives, it may rely less heavily on Mb, beta and anaerobic pathways to support contractile activity. In addition, because cardiac tissue must sustain contractile activity even before birth, it may be more physiologically mature at birth and/or develop faster than skeletal muscles. To test these hypotheses, we measured Mb levels, beta and the activities of citrate synthase (CS), beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HOAD) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in cardiac and skeletal muscle samples from 72 harp and hooded seals, ranging in age from fetuses to adults. Results indicate that in adults cardiac muscle had lower Mb levels (14.7%), beta (55.5%) and LDH activity (36.2%) but higher CS (459.6%) and HOAD (371.3%) activities (all P<0.05) than skeletal muscle. In addition, while the cardiac muscle of young seals had significantly lower [Mb] (44.7%) beta (80.7%) and LDH activity (89.5%) than adults (all P<0.05), it was relatively more mature at birth and weaning than skeletal muscle. These patterns are similar to those in terrestrial species, suggesting that seal hearts do not exhibit unique adaptations to the challenges of an aquatic existence. PMID:20154189

  2. Muscle-derived stem cells isolated as non-adherent population give rise to cardiac, skeletal muscle and neural lineages

    SciTech Connect

    Arsic, Nikola; Mamaeva, Daria; Lamb, Ned J.; Fernandez, Anne

    2008-04-01

    Stem cells with the ability to differentiate in specialized cell types can be extracted from a wide array of adult tissues including skeletal muscle. Here we have analyzed a population of cells isolated from skeletal muscle on the basis of their poor adherence on uncoated or collagen-coated dishes that show multi-lineage differentiation in vitro. When analysed under proliferative conditions, these cells express stem cell surface markers Sca-1 (65%) and Bcrp-1 (80%) but also MyoD (15%), Neuronal {beta} III-tubulin (25%), GFAP (30%) or Nkx2.5 (1%). Although capable of growing as non-attached spheres for months, when given an appropriate matrix, these cells adhere giving rise to skeletal muscle, neuronal and cardiac muscle cell lineages. A similar cell population could not be isolated from either bone marrow or cardiac tissue suggesting their specificity to skeletal muscle. When injected into damaged muscle, these non-adherent muscle-derived cells are retrieved expressing Pax7, in a sublaminar position characterizing satellite cells and participate in forming new myofibers. These data show that a non-adherent stem cell population can be specifically isolated and expanded from skeletal muscle and upon attachment to a matrix spontaneously differentiate into muscle, cardiac and neuronal lineages in vitro. Although competing with resident satellite cells, these cells are shown to significantly contribute to repair of injured muscle in vivo supporting that a similar muscle-derived non-adherent cell population from human muscle may be useful in treatment of neuromuscular disorders.

  3. Modelling diffusive O(2) supply to isolated preparations of mammalian skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Barclay, C J

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use A. V. Hill's equation describing diffusion of O(2) into cylindrical muscles to assess the adequacy of O(2) supply for commonly used isolated preparations of mammalian cardiac and skeletal muscles. The diffusion equation was solved numerically to give the maximum, steady state O(2) diffusion distances (i.e. the distance from the surface of the muscle to the radial location where P(O(2)) is 0) for both resting and contracting muscles and for a range of temperatures. Non-steady state solutions for the rest-to-work transition were also determined to estimate how long contractile activity could be continued before anoxia develops at the muscle centre. The influence on muscle oxygenation of myoglobin-facilitated O(2) diffusion was also assessed. The analysis was performed for typical sized, whole muscles from adult rats and mice, for frog sartorius muscle and for a range of temperatures. Muscle O(2) consumption rates were taken from the literature. The results indicated that (1) diffusive O(2) supply would be adequate to support resting metabolism of soleus and EDL muscles of rat and mouse but may not be adequate to support the transient high resting metabolic rate of papillary muscles shortly after dissection, (2) during steady contractile activity of soleus and EDL muscles, particularly those from the rat, over a reasonable range of duty cycles, adequate O(2) supply could only be ensured if the radii of preparations was substantially smaller than those of whole muscles and (3) for cardiac muscles, diffusive O(2) supply could only support steady-state metabolism at twitch frequencies <1 Hz for whole papillary muscles from rat and <3 Hz for those from mouse. Reducing experimental temperature markedly enhances O(2) supply to skeletal, but not cardiac, muscle. O(2) supply from myoglobin had only minimal effects on oxygenation under typical isolated muscle conditions. PMID:16322911

  4. Mesodermal iPSC–derived progenitor cells functionally regenerate cardiac and skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Quattrocelli, Mattia; Swinnen, Melissa; Giacomazzi, Giorgia; Camps, Jordi; Barthélemy, Ines; Ceccarelli, Gabriele; Caluwé, Ellen; Grosemans, Hanne; Thorrez, Lieven; Pelizzo, Gloria; Muijtjens, Manja; Verfaillie, Catherine M.; Blot, Stephane; Janssens, Stefan; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2015-01-01

    Conditions such as muscular dystrophies (MDs) that affect both cardiac and skeletal muscles would benefit from therapeutic strategies that enable regeneration of both of these striated muscle types. Protocols have been developed to promote induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to differentiate toward cardiac or skeletal muscle; however, there are currently no strategies to simultaneously target both muscle types. Tissues exhibit specific epigenetic alterations; therefore, source-related lineage biases have the potential to improve iPSC-driven multilineage differentiation. Here, we determined that differential myogenic propensity influences the commitment of isogenic iPSCs and a specifically isolated pool of mesodermal iPSC-derived progenitors (MiPs) toward the striated muscle lineages. Differential myogenic propensity did not influence pluripotency, but did selectively enhance chimerism of MiP-derived tissue in both fetal and adult skeletal muscle. When injected into dystrophic mice, MiPs engrafted and repaired both skeletal and cardiac muscle, reducing functional defects. Similarly, engraftment into dystrophic mice of canine MiPs from dystrophic dogs that had undergone TALEN-mediated correction of the MD-associated mutation also resulted in functional striatal muscle regeneration. Moreover, human MiPs exhibited the same capacity for the dual differentiation observed in murine and canine MiPs. The findings of this study suggest that MiPs should be further explored for combined therapy of cardiac and skeletal muscles. PMID:26571398

  5. Effect of swimming on myostatin expression in white and red gastrocnemius muscle and in cardiac muscle of rats.

    PubMed

    Matsakas, Antonios; Bozzo, Cyrille; Cacciani, Nicola; Caliaro, Francesca; Reggiani, Carlo; Mascarello, Francesco; Patruno, Marco

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that swimming training might impact differentially myostatin expression in skeletal muscles, depending on fibre type composition, and in cardiac muscle of rats. Myostatin expression was analysed by real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot and immunohistochemistry of the red deep portion (mainly composed of slow and type II A fibres) and in the superficial, white portion (composed of fast type II X and II B fibres) of the gastrocnemius muscle in adult male Wistar rats: (i) subjected to two consecutive swimming bouts for 3 h; (ii) subjected to intensive swimming training for 4 weeks; and (iii) sedentary control rats. Myostatin mRNA content was in all cases higher in white than in red muscles. Two bouts of swimming did not alter myostatin expression, whereas swimming training for 4 weeks resulted in a significant reduction of myostatin mRNA contents, significant both in white and red muscles but more pronounced in white muscles. Western blot did not detect any change in the amount of myostatin protein. Immunohistochemistry showed that, in control rats, myostatin was localized in presumptive satellite cells of a few muscle fibres. After training, the number of myostatin-positive spots decreased significantly. Myostatin mRNA content in cardiac muscle was lower than in skeletal muscle and was significantly increased by swimming training. In conclusion, the results obtained showed that intense training caused a decreased expression of myostatin mRNA in white and red skeletal muscles but an increase in cardiac muscle. PMID:16873457

  6. E-box sites and a proximal regulatory region of the muscle creatine kinase gene differentially regulate expression in diverse skeletal muscles and cardiac muscle of transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Shield, M A; Haugen, H S; Clegg, C H; Hauschka, S D

    1996-01-01

    Previous analysis of the muscle creatine kinase (MCK) gene indicated that control elements required for transcription in adult mouse muscle differed from those required in cell culture, suggesting that distinct modes of muscle gene regulation occur in vivo. To examine this further, we measured the activity of MCK transgenes containing E-box and promoter deletions in a variety of striated muscles. Simultaneous mutation of three E boxes in the 1,256-bp MCK 5' region, which abolished transcription in muscle cultures, had strikingly different effects in mice. The mutations abolished transgene expression in cardiac and tongue muscle and caused a reduction in expression in the soleus muscle (a muscle with many slow fibers) but did not affect expression in predominantly fast muscles: quadriceps, abdominals, and extensor digitorum longus. Other regulatory sequences with muscle-type-specific activities were found within the 358-bp 5'-flanking region. This proximal region conferred relatively strong expression in limb and abdominal skeletal muscles but was inactive in cardiac and tongue muscles. However, when the 206-bp 5' enhancer was ligated to the 358-bp region, high levels of tissue-specific expression were restored in all muscle types. These results indicate that E boxes and a proximal regulatory region are differentially required for maximal MCK transgene expression in different striated muscles. The overall results also imply that within skeletal muscles, the steady-state expression of the MCK gene and possibly other muscle genes depends on transcriptional mechanisms that differ between fast and slow fibers as well as between the anatomical and physiological attributes of each specific muscle. PMID:8756664

  7. Cardiac arrest due to a missed diagnosis of Boerhaave's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Davies, Jennifer; Spitzer, David; Phylactou, Maria; Glasser, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A 91-year-old presented with a rare cause of cardiac arrest. He was initially admitted with severe back pain following vomiting and diagnosed with probable aspiration pneumonia. On day 3 of admission, he was discovered in cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was started. On intubation, a left-sided pneumothorax and subcutaneous emphysema were noted. Needle decompression showed gastric fluid leaking from the cannula. The patient regained a cardiac output, and a subsequent CT scan confirmed a large pneumomediastinum with air tracking to the neck and chest, and bilateral pneumothoraces. A diagnosis of Boerhaave's syndrome was made. The patient was transferred to the intensive care unit but did not survive. This case demonstrates the importance of looking for and treating the rarer reversible causes of cardiac arrest, and of maintaining a high index of suspicion for Boerhaave's syndrome. Despite its rarity, Boerhaave's syndrome is often misdiagnosed on initial presentation, leading to delayed treatment and poor outcomes. PMID:27154984

  8. Open-Loop Control of Oxidative Phosphorylation in Skeletal and Cardiac Muscle Mitochondria by Ca(2.).

    PubMed

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C; Singhal, Abhishek; Van den Bergh, Françoise; Bagher-Oskouei, Masoumeh; Wiseman, Robert W; Beard, Daniel A

    2016-02-23

    In cardiac muscle, mitochondrial ATP synthesis is driven by demand for ATP through feedback from the products of ATP hydrolysis. However, in skeletal muscle at higher workloads there is an apparent contribution of open-loop stimulation of ATP synthesis. Open-loop control is defined as modulation of flux through a biochemical pathway by a moiety, which is not a reactant or a product of the biochemical reactions in the pathway. The role of calcium, which is known to stimulate the activity of mitochondrial dehydrogenases, as an open-loop controller, was investigated in isolated cardiac and skeletal muscle mitochondria. The kinetics of NADH synthesis and respiration, feedback from ATP hydrolysis products, and stimulation by calcium were characterized in isolated mitochondria to test the hypothesis that calcium has a stimulatory role in skeletal muscle mitochondria not apparent in cardiac mitochondria. A range of respiratory states were obtained in cardiac and skeletal muscle mitochondria utilizing physiologically relevant concentrations of pyruvate and malate, and flux of respiration, NAD(P)H fluorescence, and rhodamine 123 fluorescence were measured over a range of extra mitochondrial calcium concentrations. We found that under these conditions calcium stimulates NADH synthesis in skeletal muscle mitochondria but not in cardiac mitochondria. PMID:26910432

  9. Congenital Heart Defects Are Rarely Caused by Mutations in Cardiac and Smooth Muscle Actin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Khodyuchenko, Tatiana; Zlotina, Anna; Pervunina, Tatiana; Zverev, Dmitry; Malashicheva, Anna; Kostareva, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background. Congenital heart defects (CHDs) often have genetic background due to missense mutations in cardiomyocyte-specific genes. For example, cardiac actin was shown to be involved in pathogenesis of cardiac septum defects and smooth muscle actin in pathogenesis of aortic aneurysm in combination with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). In the present study, we further searched for mutations in human α-cardiac actin (ACTC1) and smooth muscle α-actin (ACTA2) genes as a possible cause of atrial septum defect type II (ASDII) and PDA. Findings. Total genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood of 86 individuals with ASDs and 100 individuals with PDA. Coding exons and flanking intron regions of ACTC1 (NM_005159.4) and ACTA2 (NM_001613) were amplified by PCR with specific primers designed according to the corresponding gene reference sequences. PCR fragments were directly sequenced and analyzed. Sequence analysis of ACTC1 and ACTA2 did not identify any nucleotide changes that altered the coding sense of the genes. In ACTC1 gene, we were able to detect one previously described nucleotide polymorphism (rs2307493) resulting in a synonymous substitution. The frequency of this SNP was similar in the study and control group, thus excluding it from the possible disease-associated variants. Conclusions. Our results confirmed that the mutations in ACTC1 gene are rare (at least <1%) cause of ASDII. Mutations in ACTA2 gene were not detected in patients with PDA, thus being excluded from the list of frequent PDA-associated genetic defects. PMID:25861618

  10. Cardiac function in muscular dystrophy associates with abdominal muscle pathology

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Brandon B.; Swaggart, Kayleigh A.; Kim, Gene; Watson, Sydeaka; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The muscular dystrophies target muscle groups differentially. In mouse models of muscular dystrophy, notably the mdx model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, the diaphragm muscle shows marked fibrosis and at an earlier age than other muscle groups, more reflective of the histopathology seen in human muscular dystrophy. Methods Using a mouse model of limb girdle muscular dystrophy, the Sgcg mouse, we compared muscle pathology across different muscle groups and heart. A cohort of nearly 200 Sgcg mice were studied using multiple measures of pathology including echocardiography, Evans blue dye uptake and hydroxyproline content in multiple muscle groups. Spearman rank correlations were determined among echocardiographic and pathological parameters. Findings The abdominal muscles were found to have more fibrosis than other muscle groups, including the diaphragm muscle. The abdominal muscles also had more Evans blue dye uptake than other muscle groups. The amount of diaphragm fibrosis was found to correlate positively with fibrosis in the left ventricle, and abdominal muscle fibrosis correlated with impaired left ventricular function. Fibrosis in the abdominal muscles negatively correlated with fibrosis in the diaphragm and right ventricles. Together these data reflect the recruitment of abdominal muscles as respiratory muscles in muscular dystrophy, a finding consistent with data from human patients. PMID:26029630

  11. Permeation through the calcium release channel of cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, D; Xu, L; Tripathy, A; Meissner, G; Eisenberg, B

    1997-01-01

    Current voltage (I-V) relations were measured from the calcium release channel (CRC) of the sarcoplasmic reticulum of cardiac muscle in 12 KCl solutions, symmetrical and asymmetrical, from 25 mM to 2 M. I-V curves are nearly linear, in the voltage range +/- 150 mV approximately 12kT/e, even in asymmetrical solutions, e.g., 2 M // 100 mM. It is awkward to describe straight lines as sums of exponentials in a wide range of solutions and potentials, and so traditional barrier models have difficulty fitting this data. Diffusion theories with constant fields predict curvilinear I-V relations, and so they are also unsatisfactory. The Poisson and Nernst-Planck equations (PNP) form a diffusion theory with variable fields. They fit the data by using adjustable parameters for the diffusion constant of each ion and for the effective density of fixed (i.e., permanent) charge P(x) along the channel's "filter" (7-A diameter, 10 A long). If P(x) is described by just one parameter, independent of x (i.e., P(x) = P0 = -4.2 M), the fits are satisfactory (RMS error/RMS current = 6.4/67), and the estimates of diffusion coefficients are reasonable D(K) = 1.3 x 10(-6) cm2/s, D(Cl) = 3.9 x 10(-6) cm2/s. The CRC seems to have a small selectivity filter with a very high density of permanent charge. This may be a design principle of channels specialized for large flux. The Appendix derives barrier models, and their prefactor, from diffusion theories (with variable fields) and argues that barrier models are poor descriptions of CRCs in particular and open channels in general. PMID:9284302

  12. Constitutive properties of adult mammalian cardiac muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zile, M. R.; Richardson, K.; Cowles, M. K.; Buckley, J. M.; Koide, M.; Cowles, B. A.; Gharpuray, V.; Cooper, G. 4th

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to determine whether changes in the constitutive properties of the cardiac muscle cell play a causative role in the development of diastolic dysfunction. METHODS AND RESULTS: Cardiocytes from normal and pressure-hypertrophied cats were embedded in an agarose gel, placed on a stretching device, and subjected to a change in stress (sigma), and resultant changes in cell strain (epsilon) were measured. These measurements were used to examine the passive elastic spring, viscous damping, and myofilament activation. The passive elastic spring was assessed in protocol A by increasing the sigma on the agarose gel at a constant rate to define the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship. Viscous damping was assessed in protocol B from the loop area between the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship during an increase and then a decrease in sigma. In both protocols, myofilament activation was minimized by a reduction in [Ca2+]i. Myofilament activation effects were assessed in protocol C by defining cardiocyte sigma versus epsilon during an increase in sigma with physiological [Ca2+]i. In protocol A, the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship was similar in normal and hypertrophied cells. In protocol B, the loop area was greater in hypertrophied than normal cardiocytes. In protocol C, the sigma-versus-epsilon relation in hypertrophied cardiocytes was shifted to the left compared with normal cells. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in viscous damping and myofilament activation in combination may cause pressure-hypertrophied cardiocytes to resist changes in shape during diastole and contribute to diastolic dysfunction.

  13. Hysteresis and the length dependence of calcium sensitivity in chemically skinned rat cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, S M; Lamont, C; Miller, D J

    1988-01-01

    1. The relationship between pCa (-log10[Ca2+]) and steady-state isometric tension has been investigated in saponin- or Triton-treated (chemically 'skinned') cardiac muscle of rat. 2. Hysteresis exists in the relationship such that the muscle is less sensitive to Ca2+ during increasing activation (as [Ca2+] is stepped upward) than during reducing activation (as [Ca2+] is stepped downward). 3. The extent of the hysteresis is insensitive to interventions that increase overall calcium sensitivity by chemical means, such as caffeine, carnosine or increased pH. 4. The extent of the hysteresis is sensitive to sarcomere length. The phenomenon is virtually absent above sarcomere lengths of about 2.2-2.3 microns but becomes progressively greater at shorter sarcomere lengths. 5. The effect of sarcomere length on calcium sensitivity is restricted to the upward-going (increasing activation) part of the pCa-tension loop below 2.2 microns. The downward-going (decreasing activation) part of the hysteretic relationship is virtually unaffected by sarcomere length up to 2.2 microns. 6. Significant alterations in sarcomere length do not occur during tension development in the experiments described here: the phenomenon is not attributable to experimental artifacts of this kind. 7. Hysteresis develops sufficiently rapidly to be consistent with a physiological relevance during the normal heart beat. 8. The effects of sarcomere length show that the phenomenon is not due to force per se since, for example, greater peak force produces less hysteresis as sarcomere length is increased towards 2.2 microns. 9. Tonicity increase (by high-molecular-weight dextran), which shrinks the myofilament lattice, increases calcium sensitivity but reduces the effect of sarcomere length on calcium sensitivity. 10. The results suggest that lattice shrinkage is the mechanism which accounts for hysteresis in, and the sarcomere length dependence of, calcium sensitivity in cardiac muscle. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 11

  14. Taurine transporter knockout depletes muscle taurine levels and results in severe skeletal muscle impairment but leaves cardiac function uncompromised.

    PubMed

    Warskulat, Ulrich; Flögel, Ulrich; Jacoby, Christoph; Hartwig, Hans-Georg; Thewissen, Michael; Merx, Marc W; Molojavyi, Andrej; Heller-Stilb, Birgit; Schrader, Jürgen; Häussinger, Dieter

    2004-03-01

    Taurine is the most abundant free amino acid in heart and skeletal muscle. In the present study, the effects of hereditary taurine deficiency on muscle function were examined in taurine transporter knockout (taut-/-) mice. These mice show an almost complete depletion of heart and skeletal muscle taurine levels. Treadmill experiments demonstrated that total exercise capacity of taut-/- mice was reduced by >80% compared with wild-type controls. The decreased performance of taut-/- mice correlated with increased lactate levels in serum during exercise. Surprisingly, cardiac function of taut-/- mice as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiography, and isolated heart studies showed a largely normal phenotype under both control and stimulated conditions. However, analysis of taut-/- skeletal muscle revealed electromyographic abnormalities. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of tissue extracts showed that in the heart of taut-/- mice the lack of taurine was compensated by the up-regulation of various organic solutes. In contrast, a deficit of >10 mM in total organic osmolyte concentration was found in skeletal muscle. The present study identifies taurine transport as a crucial factor for the maintenance of skeletal muscle function and total exercise capacity, while cardiac muscle apparently can compensate for the loss of taurine. PMID:14734644

  15. [Postmortem genetic testing in sudden cardiac death due to ion channelopathies].

    PubMed

    Guan, Da-wei; Zhao, Rui

    2010-04-01

    Sudden cardiac death accounts for majority of deaths in human. Evident cardiac lesions that may explain the cause of death can be detected in comprehensive postmortem investigation in most sudden cardiac death. However, no cardiac morphological abnormality is found in a considerable number of cases although the death is highly suspected from cardiac anomaly. With the advances in the modern molecular biology techniques, it has been discovered that many of these sudden deaths are caused by congenital ion channelopathies in myocardial cell, i.e., Brugada syndrome, long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and short QT syndrome, etc. This article presents the molecular genetics, electrocardiographic abnormalities, clinical manifestations, and mechanisms leading to sudden cardiac death with emphasis on the role of postmortem genetic testing in certification of cause of death. It may provide helpful information in investigating sudden cardiac death due to ion channelopathies in medico-legal practice. PMID:20653139

  16. From Syncitium to Regulated Pump: A Cardiac Muscle Cellular Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korzick, Donna H.

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to present a basic overview of some key teaching concepts that should be considered for inclusion in an six- to eight-lecture introductory block on the regulation of cardiac performance for graduate students. Within the context of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, this review incorporates information…

  17. Fast sodium current in cardiac muscle. A quantitative description.

    PubMed Central

    Ebihara, L; Johnson, E A

    1980-01-01

    The voltage and time-dependence of the tetrodotoxin sensitive, fast sodium current in cardiac muscle is described with the Hodgkin-Huxley formalism using two microelectrode, voltage-clamp data obtained by Ebihara et al. (1980, J. Gen. Physiol., 75:437) from small spherical clusters of tissue-cultured 11-d-old embryonic heart cells. The data chosen from that study for quantitative analysis was obtained at 37 degrees C and in standard tissue-culture medium; it was not smoothed, and the capacitive transient was sufficiently brief to make its removal unnecessary. The sodium current, INa, is considered to be given by the following equation: INa = gNa m3h(V - VNa), where gNa is a constant (23 mS), VNa is the sodium equilibrium potential (29 mV), and m and h are independent, first order, dimensionless variables, which can vary between 0 and 1, as defined by the following differential equations, dm/dt = alpha m(1 - m) - beta mm and dh/dt = alpha h(1 - h) - beta hh, where the rate coefficients, alpha m = [0.32 x (V + 47.13)]/[1 - exp(V + 47.13)] and beta m = 0.08 x exp (-V/11). For potentials more positive than -40 mV, alpha h = 0 and beta h = 1/0.13 (exp [(V + 10.66)/ - 11.1] + 1), and for potentials more negative than -40 mV, alpha h = 0.135 x exp [(-80 - V)/6.8] and beta h = 3.56 x exp (0.079V) + 3.1 x 10(5) exp (0.35V). These functions of potential are similar to those of the squid at 15 degrees C, except that their magnitudes are larger (faster). Using these model equations the membrane current in a membrane patch with and without a series resistance was simulated. For the value of series resistance estimated for the preparation from which the analyzed data were obtained, the effects of series resistance on the shape and magnitude of the inward transient current were found to be minimal. It was concluded that their should be no large errors in the data, even in the absence of complete series resistance compensation. PMID:7260301

  18. Impact of aging on mitochondrial function in cardiac and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hepple, R T

    2016-09-01

    Both skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle are subject to marked structural and functional impairment with aging and these changes contribute to the reduced capacity for exercise as we age. Since mitochondria are involved in multiple aspects of cellular homeostasis including energetics, reactive oxygen species signaling, and regulation of intrinsic apoptotic pathways, defects in this organelle are frequently implicated in the deterioration of skeletal and cardiac muscle with aging. On this basis, the purpose of this review is to evaluate the evidence that aging causes dysfunction in mitochondria in striated muscle with a view towards drawing conclusions about the potential of these changes to contribute to the deterioration seen in striated muscle with aging. As will be shown, impairment in respiration and reactive oxygen species emission with aging are highly variable between studies and seem to be largely a consequence of physical inactivity. On the other hand, both skeletal and cardiac muscle mitochondria are more susceptible to permeability transition and this seems a likely cause of the increased recruitment of mitochondrial-mediated pathways of apoptosis seen in striated muscle. The review concludes by examining the role of degeneration of mitochondrial DNA versus impaired mitochondrial quality control mechanisms in the accumulation of mitochondria that are sensitized to permeability transition, whereby the latter mechanism is favored as the most likely cause. PMID:27033952

  19. Intracellular diffusion of adenosine phosphates is locally restricted in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Vendelin, Marko; Eimre, Margus; Seppet, Evelin; Peet, Nadezda; Andrienko, Tatiana; Lemba, Maris; Engelbrecht, Jiiri; Seppet, Enn K; Saks, Valdur A

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed the structural and functional interactions between mitochondria, myofibrils and sarcoplasmic reticulum in cardiac cells. Direct channeling of adenosine phosphates between organelles identified in the experiments indicates that diffusion of adenosine phosphates is limited in cardiac cells due to very specific intracellular structural organization. However, the mode of diffusion restrictions and nature of the intracellular structures in creating the diffusion barriers is still unclear, and, therefore, a subject of active research. The aim of this work is to analyze the possible role of two principally different modes of restriction distribution for adenosine phosphates (a) the uniform diffusion restriction and (b) the localized diffusion limitation in the vicinity of mitochondria, by fitting the experimental data with the mathematical model. The reaction-diffusion model of compartmentalized energy transfer was used to analyze the data obtained from the experiments with the skinned muscle fibers, which described the following processes: mitochondrial respiration rate dependency on exogenous ADP and ATP concentrations; inhibition of endogenous ADP-stimulated respiration by pyruvate kinase (PK) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) system; kinetics of oxygen consumption stabilization after addition of 2 mM MgATP or MgADP; ATPase activity with inhibited mitochondrial respiration; and buildup of MgADP concentration in the medium after addition of MgATP. The analysis revealed that only the second mechanism considered--localization of diffusion restrictions--is able to account for the experimental data. In the case of uniform diffusion restrictions, the model solution was in agreement only with two measurements: the respiration rate as a function of ADP or ATP concentrations and inhibition of respiration by PK + PEP. It was concluded that intracellular diffusion restrictions for adenosine phosphates are not distributed uniformly, but rather are

  20. Passive tension in cardiac muscle: contribution of collagen, titin, microtubules, and intermediate filaments.

    PubMed Central

    Granzier, H L; Irving, T C

    1995-01-01

    The passive tension-sarcomere length relation of rat cardiac muscle was investigated by studying passive (or not activated) single myocytes and trabeculae. The contribution of collagen, titin, microtubules, and intermediate filaments to tension and stiffness was investigated by measuring (1) the effects of KCl/KI extraction on both trabeculae and single myocytes, (2) the effect of trypsin digestion on single myocytes, and (3) the effect of colchicine on single myocytes. It was found that over the working range of sarcomeres in the heart (lengths approximately 1.9-2.2 microns), collagen and titin are the most important contributors to passive tension with titin dominating at the shorter end of the working range and collagen at longer lengths. Microtubules made a modest contribution to passive tension in some cells, but on average their contribution was not significant. Finally, intermediate filaments contributed about 10% to passive tension of trabeculae at sarcomere lengths from approximately 1.9 to 2.1 microns, and their contribution dropped to only a few percent at longer lengths. At physiological sarcomere lengths of the heart, cardiac titin developed much higher tensions (> 20-fold) than did skeletal muscle titin at comparable lengths. This might be related to the finding that cardiac titin has a molecular mass of 2.5 MDa, 0.3-0.5 MDa smaller than titin of mammalian skeletal muscle, which is predicted to result in a much shorter extensible titin segment in the I-band of cardiac muscle. Passive stress plotted versus the strain of the extensible titin segment showed that the stress-strain relationships are similar in cardiac and skeletal muscle. The difference in passive stress between cardiac and skeletal muscle at the sarcomere level predominantly resulted from much higher strains of the I-segment of cardiac titin at a given sarcomere length. By expressing a smaller titin isoform, without changing the properties of the molecule itself, cardiac muscle is able to

  1. Changes in the cardiac muscle electric activity as a result of Coronary Artery Bypass Graft operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grajek, Magdalena; Krzyminiewski, Ryszard; Kalawski, Ryszard; Kulczak, Mariusz

    2008-01-01

    Many bioelectric signals have a complex internal structure that can be a rich source of information on the tissue or cell processes. The structure of such signals can be analysed in detail by applying digital methods of signal processing. Therefore, of substantial use in diagnosis of the coronary arterial disease is the method of digital enhancement of increasing signal resolution ECG (NURSE-ECG), permitting detection of temporary changes in the electric potentials in the cardiac muscle in the process of depolarisation. Thanks to the application of NURSE-ECG it has become possible to detect relatively small changes in the electric activity of particular fragments of the cardiac muscle undetectable by the standard ECG method, caused by ischemia, the effect of a drug or infarct. The aim of this study was to identify and analyse changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle as a result of the Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) operation. In this study the method of NURSE-ECG has been applied in order to identify and analyse changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle as a result of the CABG operation. In the study performed in cooperation of the Institute of Physics Adam Mickiewicz University and the Strus Hospital, Cardiac Surgery Ward, 37 patients with advanced coronary arterial disease were asked to participate. The patients were examined prior to the operation, on the day after the operation and two months after the operation and a year after the operation. The ECG recordings were subjected to a numerical procedure of resolution enhancement by a NURSE-ECG program to reveal the tentative changes in the electric potential of the cardiac muscle on its depolarisation. Results of the study have shown that the NURSE ECG method can be applied to monitor changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle occurring as a result of CABG operation. One the second day after the operation in the majority of patients (70%) a rapid decrease of the total

  2. Evidence of a wide spectrum of cardiac involvement due to ACAD9 mutations: Report on nine patients.

    PubMed

    Dewulf, Joseph P; Barrea, Catherine; Vincent, Marie-Françoise; De Laet, Corinne; Van Coster, Rudy; Seneca, Sara; Marie, Sandrine; Nassogne, Marie-Cécile

    2016-07-01

    Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9 (ACAD9) is a mitochondrial protein involved in oxidative phosphorylation complex I biogenesis. This protein also exhibits acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) activity. ACAD9-mutated patients have been reported to suffer from primarily heart, muscle, liver, and nervous system disorders. ACAD9 mutation is suspected in cases of elevated lactic acid levels combined with complex I deficiency, and confirmed by ACAD9 gene analysis. At least 18 ACAD9-mutated patients have previously been reported, usually displaying severe cardiac involvement. We retrospectively studied nine additional patients from three unrelated families with a wide spectrum of cardiac involvement between the families as well as the patients from the same families. All patients exhibited elevated lactate levels. Deleterious ACAD9 mutations were identified in all patients except one for whom it was not possible to recover DNA. To our knowledge, this is one of the first reports on isolated mild ventricular hypertrophy due to ACAD9 mutation in a family with moderate symptoms during adolescence. This report also confirms that dilated cardiomyopathy may occur in conjunction with ACAD9 mutation and that some patients may respond clinically to riboflavin treatment. Of note, several patients suffered from patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), with one exhibiting a complex congenital heart defect. It is yet unknown whether these cardiac manifestations were related to ACAD9 mutation. In conclusion, this disorder should be suspected in the presence of lactic acidosis, complex I deficiency, and any cardiac involvement, even mild. PMID:27233227

  3. Production of arrays of cardiac and skeletal muscle myofibers by micropatterning techniques on a soft substrate.

    PubMed

    Cimetta, Elisa; Pizzato, Sara; Bollini, Sveva; Serena, Elena; De Coppi, Paolo; Elvassore, Nicola

    2009-04-01

    Micropatterning and microfabrication techniques have been widely used to pattern cells on surfaces and to have a deeper insight into many processes in cell biology such as cell adhesion and interactions with the surrounding environment. The aim of this study was the development of an easy and versatile technique for the in vitro production of arrays of functional cardiac and skeletal muscle myofibers using micropatterning techniques on soft substrates. Cardiomyocytes were used for the production of oriented cardiac myofibers whereas mouse muscle satellite cells for that of differentiated parallel myotubes. We performed micro-contact printing of extracellular matrix proteins on soft polyacrylamide-based hydrogels photopolymerized onto functionalized glass slides. Our methods proved to be simple, repeatable and effective in obtaining an extremely selective adhesion of both cardiomyocytes and satellite cells onto patterned soft hydrogel surfaces. Cardiomyocytes resulted in aligned cardiac myofibers able to exhibit a synchronous contractile activity after 2 days of culture. We demonstrated for the first time that murine satellite cells, cultured on a soft hydrogel substrate, fuse and form aligned myotubes after 7 days of culture. Immunofluorescence analyses confirmed correct expression of cell phenotype, differentiation markers and sarcomeric organization. These results were obtained in myotubes derived from satellite cells from both wild type and MDX mice which are research models for the study of muscle dystrophy. These arrays of both cardiac and skeletal muscle myofibers could be used as in vitro models for pharmacological screening tests or biological studies at the single fiber level. PMID:18987976

  4. Undernutrition during pregnancy in mice leads to dysfunctional cardiac muscle respiration in adult offspring

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, Brittany; Thrush, A. Brianne; Quizi, Jessica; Antoun, Ghadi; McIntosh, Nathan; Al-Dirbashi, Osama Y.; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is associated with an increased risk of developing obesity, insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. However, its effect on energetics in heart remains unknown. In the present study, we examined respiration in cardiac muscle and liver from adult mice that were undernourished in utero. We report that in utero undernutrition is associated with impaired cardiac muscle energetics, including decreased fatty acid oxidative capacity, decreased maximum oxidative phosphorylation rate and decreased proton leak respiration. No differences in oxidative characteristics were detected in liver. We also measured plasma acylcarnitine levels and found that short-chain acylcarnitines are increased with in utero undernutrition. Results reveal the negative impact of suboptimal maternal nutrition on adult offspring cardiac energy metabolism, which may have life-long implications for cardiovascular function and disease risk. PMID:26182362

  5. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase efficiently phosphorylates serine 15 of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain

    SciTech Connect

    Josephson, Matthew P.; Sikkink, Laura A.; Penheiter, Alan R.; Burghardt, Thomas P.; Ajtai, Katalin

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) is phosphorylated at S15. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is a widely believed that MYL2 is a poor substrate for smMLCK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In fact, smMLCK efficiently and rapidly phosphorylates S15 in MYL2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorylation kinetics measured by novel fluorescence method without radioactivity. -- Abstract: Specific phosphorylation of the human ventricular cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) modifies the protein at S15. This modification affects MYL2 secondary structure and modulates the Ca{sup 2+} sensitivity of contraction in cardiac tissue. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase prevalent in uterus and present in other contracting tissues including cardiac muscle. The recombinant 130 kDa (short) smMLCK phosphorylated S15 in MYL2 in vitro. Specific modification of S15 was verified using the direct detection of the phospho group on S15 with mass spectrometry. SmMLCK also specifically phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain S15 in porcine ventricular myosin and chicken gizzard smooth muscle myosin (S20 in smooth muscle) but failed to phosphorylate the myosin regulatory light chain in rabbit skeletal myosin. Phosphorylation kinetics, measured using a novel fluorescence method eliminating the use of radioactive isotopes, indicates similar Michaelis-Menten V{sub max} and K{sub M} for regulatory light chain S15 phosphorylation rates in MYL2, porcine ventricular myosin, and chicken gizzard myosin. These data demonstrate that smMLCK is a specific and efficient kinase for the in vitro phosphorylation of MYL2, cardiac, and smooth muscle myosin. Whether smMLCK plays a role in cardiac muscle regulation or response to a disease causing stimulus is unclear but it should be considered a potentially significant

  6. The tropomyosin binding region of cardiac troponin T modulates crossbridge recruitment dynamics in rat cardiac muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Gollapudi, Sampath K; Gallon, Clare E; Chandra, Murali

    2013-05-13

    The cardiac muscle comprises dynamically interacting components that use allosteric/cooperative mechanisms to yield unique heart-specific properties. An essential protein in this allosteric/cooperative mechanism is cardiac muscle troponin T (cTnT), the central region (CR) and the T2 region of which differ significantly from those of fast skeletal muscle troponin T (fsTnT). To understand the biological significance of such sequence heterogeneity, we replaced the T1 or T2 domain of rat cTnT (RcT1 or RcT2) with its counterpart from rat fsTnT (RfsT1or RfsT2) to generate RfsT1-RcT2 and RcT1-RfsT2 recombinant proteins. In addition to contractile function measurements, dynamic features of RfsT1-RcT2- and RcT1-RfsT2-reconstituted rat cardiac muscle fibers were captured by fitting the recruitment-distortion model to the force response of small-amplitude (0.5%) muscle length changes. RfsT1-RcT2 fibers showed a 40% decrease in tension and a 44% decrease in ATPase activity, but RcT1-RfsT2 fibers were unaffected. The magnitude of length-mediated increase in crossbridge (XB) recruitment (E0) decreased by ~33% and the speed of XB recruitment (b) increased by ~100% in RfsT1-RcT2 fibers. Our data suggest the following: (1) the CR of cTnT modulates XB recruitment dynamics; (2) the N-terminal end region of cTnT has a synergistic effect on the ability of the CR to modulate XB recruitment dynamics; (3) the T2 region is important for tuning the Ca(2+) regulation of cardiac thin filaments. The combined effects of CR-tropomyosin interactions and the modulating effect of the N-terminal end of cTnT on CR-tropomyosin interactions may lead to the emergence of a unique property that tunes contractile dynamics to heart rates. PMID:23357173

  7. Combined electric field and gap junctions on propagation of action potentials in cardiac muscle and smooth muscle in PSpice simulation.

    PubMed

    Sperelakis, Nicholas

    2003-10-01

    Propagation of action potentials in cardiac muscle and smooth muscle were simulated using the PSpice program. Excitation was transmitted from cell to cell along a strand of 6 cells (cardiac muscle) or 10 cells (smooth muscle) either not connected (control) or connected by low-resistance tunnels (gap-junction connexons). A significant negative cleft potential (V(jv) ) develops in the narrow junctional cleft when the pre-JM fires. V(jc) depolarizes the postjunctional membrane (post-JM) to threshold by a patch-clamp action. With few connecting tunnels, cell-to-cell transmission by the EF mechanism was facilitated. With many tunnels, propagation was dominated by the low-resistance mechanism, and propagation velocity (theta) became very fast and nonphysiological. In conclusion, when the 2 mechanisms for cell-to-cell transfer of excitation were combined, the two mechanisms facilitated each other in a synergistic manner. When there were many connecting tunnels, the tunnel mechanism was dominant. PMID:14661164

  8. A novel site in the muscle creatine kinase enhancer is required for expression in skeletal but not cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Fabre-Suver, C; Hauschka, S D

    1996-03-01

    Expression of the muscle creatine kinase (MCK) gene in skeletal and heart muscle is controlled in part by a 5' tissue-specific enhancer. In order to identify new regulatory elements, we designed mutations in a previously untested conserved portion of this enhancer. Transfection analysis of these mutations delineated a new control element, named Trex (Transcriptional regulatory element x), which is required for full transcriptional activity of the MCK enhancer in skeletal but not cardiac muscle cells. Gel mobility shift assays demonstrate that myocyte, myoblast, and fibroblast nuclear extracts but not primary cardiomyocyte nuclear extracts contain a trans-acting factor that binds specifically to Trex. The Trex sequence is similar (7/8 bases) to the TEF-1 consensus DNA-binding site involved in regulating other muscle genes. To determine if TEF-1 interacts with Trex, selected TEF-1 binding sites such as GTIIc and M-CAT and two anti-TEF-1 antisera were used in gel shift assays. These experiments strongly suggest that a factor distinct from TEF-1 binds specifically to Trex. Thus it appears that MCK transcription is regulated in skeletal muscles through a Trex-dependent pathway while Trex is not required for MCK expression in heart. This distinction could account partially for the difference in levels of muscle creatine kinase in these tissues. PMID:8617727

  9. A successful treatment of cardiac tamponade due to an aortic dissection using open-chest massage.

    PubMed

    Keiko, Terasumi; Yanagawa, Youichi; Isoda, Susumu

    2012-05-01

    An 81-year-old woman became unconsciousness after complaining of a backache, and then, an ambulance was called. She was suspected to have an aortic dissection by the emergency medical technicians and was transferred to our department. On arrival, she was in shock. Emergency cardiac ultrasound disclosed good wall motion with cardiac tamponade but no complication of aortic regurgitation. Computed tomography of the trunk revealed a type A aortic dissection with cardiac tamponade. During performance of pericardial drainage, she lapsed into cardiopulmonary arrest. Immediately after sterilization of the patient's upper body with compression of the chest wall, we performed a thoracotomy and dissolved the cardiac tamponade by pericardiotomy and obtained her spontaneous circulation. Fortunately, blood discharge was ceased immediately after controlling her blood pressure aggressively. As she complicated pneumonitis, conservative therapy was performed. Her physical condition gradually improved, and she finally could feed herself and communicate. In cases of acute cardiac tamponade, simple pericardiocentesis often is not effective due to the presence of the clot, and a cardiac tamponade by a Stanford type A aortic dissection is highly possible to complicate cardiac arrest, so emergency physicians should be ready to provide immediate open cardiac massage to treat such patients. PMID:21406318

  10. Cardiac supporting device using artificial rubber muscle: preliminary study to active dynamic cardiomyoplasty.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Goto, Takeshi; Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Minakawa, Masahito; Fukuda, Ikuo

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic cardiomyoplasty is a surgical treatment that utilizes the patient's skeletal muscle to support circulation. To overcome the limitations of autologous skeletal muscles in dynamic cardiomyoplasty, we studied the use of a wrapped-type cardiac supporting device using pneumatic muscles. Four straight rubber muscles (Fluidic Muscle, FESTO, Esslingen, Germany) were used and connected to pressure sensors, solenoid valves, a controller and an air compressor. The driving force was compressed air. A proportional-integral-derivative system was employed to control the device movement. An overflow-type mock circulation system was used to analyze the power and the controllability of this new device. The device worked powerfully with pumped flow against afterload of 88 mmHg, and the beating rate and contraction/dilatation time were properly controlled using simple software. Maximum pressure inside the ventricle and maximum output were 187 mmHg and 546.5 ml/min, respectively, in the setting of 50 beats per minute, a contraction/dilatation ratio of 1:2, a preload of 18 mmHg, and an afterload of 88 mmHg. By changing proportional gain, contraction speed could be modulated. This study showed the efficacy and feasibility of a pneumatic muscle for use in a cardiac supporting device. PMID:26253252

  11. Ca2+-dependent proteolysis of junctophilin-1 and junctophilin-2 in skeletal and cardiac muscle

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, R M; Dutka, T L; Horvath, D; Bell, J R; Delbridge, L M; Lamb, G D

    2013-01-01

    Excessive increases in intracellular [Ca2+] in skeletal muscle fibres cause failure of excitation–contraction coupling by disrupting communication between the dihydropyridine receptors in the transverse tubular system and the Ca2+ release channels (RyRs) in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), but the exact mechanism is unknown. Previous work suggested a possible role of Ca2+-dependent proteolysis in this uncoupling process but found no proteolysis of the dihydropyridine receptors, RyRs or triadin. Junctophilin-1 (JP1; ∼90 kDa) stabilizes close apposition of the transverse tubular system and SR membranes in adult skeletal muscle; its C-terminal end is embedded in the SR and its N-terminal associates with the transverse tubular system membrane. Exposure of skeletal muscle homogenates to precisely set [Ca2+] revealed that JP1 undergoes Ca2+-dependent proteolysis over the physiological [Ca2+] range in tandem with autolytic activation of endogenous μ-calpain. Cleavage of JP1 occurs close to the C-terminal, yielding a ∼75 kDa diffusible fragment and a fixed ∼15 kDa fragment. Depolarization-induced force responses in rat skinned fibres were abolished following 1 min exposure to 40 μm Ca2+, with accompanying loss of full-length JP1. Supraphysiological stimulation of rat skeletal muscle in vitro by repeated tetanic stimulation in 30 mm caffeine also produced marked proteolysis of JP1 (and not RyR1). In dystrophic mdx mice, JP1 proteolysis is seen in limb muscles at 4 and not at 10 weeks of age. Junctophilin-2 in cardiac and skeletal muscle also undergoes Ca2+-dependent proteolysis, and junctophilin-2 levels are reduced following cardiac ischaemia–reperfusion. Junctophilin proteolysis may contribute to skeletal muscle weakness and cardiac dysfunction in a range of circumstances. PMID:23148318

  12. Ca2+-dependent proteolysis of junctophilin-1 and junctophilin-2 in skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Murphy, R M; Dutka, T L; Horvath, D; Bell, J R; Delbridge, L M; Lamb, G D

    2013-02-01

    Excessive increases in intracellular [Ca(2+)] in skeletal muscle fibres cause failure of excitation-contraction coupling by disrupting communication between the dihydropyridine receptors in the transverse tubular system and the Ca(2+) release channels (RyRs) in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), but the exact mechanism is unknown. Previous work suggested a possible role of Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis in this uncoupling process but found no proteolysis of the dihydropyridine receptors, RyRs or triadin. Junctophilin-1 (JP1; ∼90 kDa) stabilizes close apposition of the transverse tubular system and SR membranes in adult skeletal muscle; its C-terminal end is embedded in the SR and its N-terminal associates with the transverse tubular system membrane. Exposure of skeletal muscle homogenates to precisely set [Ca(2+)] revealed that JP1 undergoes Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis over the physiological [Ca(2+)] range in tandem with autolytic activation of endogenous μ-calpain. Cleavage of JP1 occurs close to the C-terminal, yielding a ∼75 kDa diffusible fragment and a fixed ∼15 kDa fragment. Depolarization-induced force responses in rat skinned fibres were abolished following 1 min exposure to 40 μm Ca(2+), with accompanying loss of full-length JP1. Supraphysiological stimulation of rat skeletal muscle in vitro by repeated tetanic stimulation in 30 mm caffeine also produced marked proteolysis of JP1 (and not RyR1). In dystrophic mdx mice, JP1 proteolysis is seen in limb muscles at 4 and not at 10 weeks of age. Junctophilin-2 in cardiac and skeletal muscle also undergoes Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis, and junctophilin-2 levels are reduced following cardiac ischaemia-reperfusion. Junctophilin proteolysis may contribute to skeletal muscle weakness and cardiac dysfunction in a range of circumstances. PMID:23148318

  13. Amphibian ryanodine receptor isoforms are related to those of mammalian skeletal or cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Lai, F A; Liu, Q Y; Xu, L; el-Hashem, A; Kramarcy, N R; Sealock, R; Meissner, G

    1992-08-01

    The ryanodine receptor (RyR)-Ca2+ release channels of frog skeletal muscle have been purified as 30S protein complexes comprised of two high molecular weight polypeptides. The upper and lower bands of the frog doublet comigrated on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacylamide gels with the mammalian skeletal and cardiac RyR polypeptides, respectively. Immunoblot analysis showed that a polyclonal antiserum to the rat skeletal RyR preferentially cross-reacted with the upper band, whereas monoclonal antibodies to the canine cardiac RyR preferentially cross-reacted with the lower band of the frog receptor doublet. Immunoprecipitation studies indicated the presence of two homooligomer 30S RyR complexes comprised of either the lower or upper polypeptide band of the frog doublet, and immunocytochemical staining revealed their colocalization in frog gastrocnemius muscle. After planar lipid bilayer reconstitution of the 30S frog RyR, single-channel currents were observed that exhibited a Na+ and Ca2+ conductance and pharmacological characteristics similar to those of the mammalian skeletal and cardiac Ca2+ release channels. These results suggest that amphibian skeletal muscle expresses two distinct RyR isoforms that share epitopes in common with the mammalian skeletal or cardiac RyR. PMID:1325114

  14. Allosteric interactions of three muscarine antagonists at bovine tracheal smooth muscle and cardiac M2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Roffel, A F; Elzinga, C R; Meurs, H; Zaagsma, J

    1989-03-01

    The kinetics of [3H]dexetimide dissociation from muscarine receptors in bovine cardiac left ventricular and tracheal smooth muscle membranes were studied in the absence and presence of three muscarine antagonists. It was found that [3H]dexetimide dissociation from cardiac muscarine receptors was monophasic and very fast (half life less than 1 min) and was slowed by the cardioselective muscarine antagonists, gallamine, methoctramine and AF-DX 116, concentration dependently. [3H]Dexetimide dissociation from tracheal muscarine receptors was biphasic, with a fast phase (half-life less than 1 min) followed after 4-5 min by a slow phase (half-life = 38.5 min). The fast component, but not the slow component, was slowed by the muscarine antagonists with concentration dependencies very similar to those found in the heart. We conclude from these data that the major population of tracheal smooth muscle muscarine receptors resembles the cardiac M2 type not only with respect to equilibrium binding affinities but also with respect to the secondary, allosteric binding site on the muscarine receptor. The results also imply that the cardiac receptor subtype is much more sensitive to allosteric modulation than the glandular/smooth muscle receptor subtype. PMID:2714370

  15. The GATA-4 transcription factor transactivates the cardiac muscle-specific troponin C promoter-enhancer in nonmuscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ip, H S; Wilson, D B; Heikinheimo, M; Tang, Z; Ting, C N; Simon, M C; Leiden, J M; Parmacek, M S

    1994-01-01

    The unique contractile phenotype of cardiac myocytes is determined by the expression of a set of cardiac muscle-specific genes. By analogy to other mammalian developmental systems, it is likely that the coordinate expression of cardiac genes is controlled by lineage-specific transcription factors that interact with promoter and enhancer elements in the transcriptional regulatory regions of these genes. Although previous reports have identified several cardiac muscle-specific transcriptional elements, relatively little is known about the lineage-specific transcription factors that regulate these elements. In this report, we demonstrate that the slow/cardiac muscle-specific troponin C (cTnC) enhancer contains a specific binding site for the lineage-restricted zinc finger transcription factor GATA-4. This GATA-4-binding site is required for enhancer activity in primary cardiac myocytes. Moreover, the cTnC enhancer can be transactivated by overexpression of GATA-4 in non-cardiac muscle cells such as NIH 3T3 cells. In situ hybridization studies demonstrate that GATA-4 and cTnC have overlapping patterns of expression in the hearts of postimplantation mouse embryos and that GATA-4 gene expression precedes cTnC expression. Indirect immunofluorescence reveals GATA-4 expression in cultured cardiac myocytes from neonatal rats. Taken together, these results are consistent with a model in which GATA-4 functions to direct tissue-specific gene expression during mammalian cardiac development. Images PMID:7935467

  16. Targeting of gene expression to skeletal and cardiac muscle of trangenic animals.

    PubMed

    Sands, A T; DeMayo, F; Lei, X; Schwartz, R J

    1991-01-01

    The tissue restricted and developmental potentiation of transcription by chicken alpha-skeletal actin promoter regions fused to the reporter gene chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) were characterized in transgenic mice. Six of eight expressing transgenic mouse lines containing the chicken alpha-skeletal actin promoter fused to CAT resulted in preferential transgene transcription in skeletal muscle tissue, similar to the endogenous mouse alpha-skeletal actin gene. Two of the eight lines departed from the preferred pattern of skeletal muscle expression with primary expression of the transgene in the heart, a tissue containing primarily cardiac actin isoforms. Developmentally, a transition from embryonic heart to fetal and neonatal skeletal muscle expression was produced by the transgene promoter, a pattern of regulation similar to that of the endogenous alpha-skeletal actin gene. Instances of departure of transgene expression from the endogenous gene implied the existance of higher order muscle gene regulatory mechanisms. PMID:1367249

  17. Different regulatory sequences control creatine kinase-M gene expression in directly injected skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, C K; Gualberto, A; Patel, C V; Walsh, K

    1993-01-01

    Regulatory sequences of the M isozyme of the creatine kinase (MCK) gene have been extensively mapped in skeletal muscle, but little is known about the sequences that control cardiac-specific expression. The promoter and enhancer sequences required for MCK gene expression were assayed by the direct injection of plasmid DNA constructs into adult rat cardiac and skeletal muscle. A 700-nucleotide fragment containing the enhancer and promoter of the rabbit MCK gene activated the expression of a downstream reporter gene in both muscle tissues. Deletion of the enhancer significantly decreased expression in skeletal muscle but had no detectable effect on expression in cardiac muscle. Further deletions revealed a CArG sequence motif at position -179 within the promoter that was essential for cardiac-specific expression. The CArG element of the MCK promoter bound to the recombinant serum response factor and YY1, transcription factors which control expression from structurally similar elements in the skeletal actin and c-fos promoters. MCK-CArG-binding activities that were similar or identical to serum response factor and YY1 were also detected in extracts from adult cardiac muscle. These data suggest that the MCK gene is controlled by different regulatory programs in adult cardiac and skeletal muscle. Images PMID:8423791

  18. cap alpha. -skeletal and. cap alpha. -cardiac actin genes are coexpressed in adult human skeletal muscle and heart

    SciTech Connect

    Gunning, P.; Ponte, P.; Blau, H.; Kedes, L.

    1983-11-01

    The authors determined the actin isotypes encoded by 30 actin cDNA clones previously isolated from an adult human muscle cDNA library. Using 3' untranslated region probes, derived from ..cap alpha.. skeletal, ..beta..- and ..gamma..-actin cDNAs and from an ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin genomic clone, they showed that 28 of the cDNAs correspond to ..cap alpha..-skeletal actin transcripts. Unexpectedly, however, the remaining two cDNA clones proved to derive from ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin mRNA. Sequence analysis confirmed that the two skeletal muscle ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin cDNAs are derived from transcripts of the cloned ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin gene. Comparison of total actin mRNA levels in adult skeletal muscle and adult heart revealed that the steady-state levels in skeletal muscle are about twofold greater, per microgram of total cellular RNA, than those in heart. Thus, in skeletal muscle and in heart, both of the sarcomeric actin mRNA isotypes are quite abundant transcripts. They conclude that ..cap alpha..-skeletal and ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin genes are coexpressed as an actin pair in human adult striated muscles. Since the smooth-muscle actins (aortic and stomach) and the cytoplasmic actins (..beta.. and ..gamma..) are known to be coexpressed in smooth muscle and nonmuscle cells, respectively, they postulate that coexpression of actin pairs may be a common feature of mammalian actin gene expression in all tissues.

  19. Phthalate Exposure Changes the Metabolic Profile of Cardiac Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Luther M.; Kay, Matthew W.; Lee, Norman H.; Sarvazyan, Narine

    2012-01-01

    Background: Phthalates are common plasticizers present in medical-grade plastics and other everyday products. They can also act as endocrine-disrupting chemicals and have been linked to the rise in metabolic disorders. However, the effect of phthalates on cardiac metabolism remains largely unknown. Objectives: We examined the effect of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) on the metabolic profile of cardiomyocytes because alterations in metabolic processes can lead to cell dysfunction. Methods: Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were treated with DEHP at a concentration and duration comparable to clinical exposure (50–100 μg/mL, 72 hr). We assessed the effect of DEHP on gene expression using microarray analysis. Physiological responses were examined via fatty acid utilization, oxygen consumption, mitochondrial mass, and Western blot analysis. Results: Exposure to DEHP led to up-regulation of genes associated with fatty acid transport, esterification, mitochondrial import, and β-oxidation. The functional outcome was an increase in myocyte fatty acid–substrate utilization, oxygen consumption, mitochondrial mass, PPARα (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α) protein expression, and extracellular acidosis. Treatment with a PPARα agonist (Wy-14643) only partially mimicked the effects observed in DEHP-treated cells. Conclusions: Data suggest that DEHP exposure results in metabolic remodeling of cardiomyocytes, whereby cardiac cells increase their dependence on fatty acids for energy production. This fuel switch may be regulated at both the gene expression and posttranscription levels. Our findings have important clinical implications because chronic dependence on fatty acids is associated with an accumulation in lipid intermediates, lactate, protons, and reactive oxygen species. This dependence can sensitize the heart to ischemic injury and ventricular dysfunction. PMID:22672789

  20. [ATRIAL AND BRAIN NATRIURETIC PEPTIDES OF CARDIAC MUSCLE CELLS IN POSTREPERFUSION PERIOD IN RATS].

    PubMed

    Bugrova, M L

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation and release of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) in right atrial cardiac muscle cells has been investigated in rats after 60 minutes and 60 days after the reperfusion start. The total ischemia was simulated by the method of V. G. Korpachev. Immunocytochemical localization of peptides in cardiomyocytes was performed in ultrathin sections using polyclonal antibodies. The intensity of accumulation/excretion of ANP and BNP were analyzed by the method of counting the number of granules (A- and B-types) with immunoreactive labels in 38 x 38 mkm2 visual fields in transmission electron microscope Morgagni 268D (FEI). The results were assessed using Mann-Whitney U-test (p < 0.05). After 60 minutes and 60 days post-reperfusion period, we detected an increase in the synthesis and release of ANP and BNP. The reaction of BNP was more pronounced than ANP. This is due to the fact that ANP is the main hormone of the natriuretic peptide system involved in the regulation of blood pressure in normal conditions, while BNP is the principal regulator of pressure in cardiovascular pathology. PMID:27228659

  1. High incidence and variable clinical outcome of cardiac hypertrophy due to ACAD9 mutations in childhood.

    PubMed

    Collet, Marie; Assouline, Zahra; Bonnet, Damien; Rio, Marlène; Iserin, Franck; Sidi, Daniel; Goldenberg, Alice; Lardennois, Caroline; Metodiev, Metodi Dimitrov; Haberberger, Birgit; Haack, Tobias; Munnich, Arnold; Prokisch, Holger; Rötig, Agnès

    2016-08-01

    Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family, member 9 (ACAD9) mutation is a frequent, usually fatal cause of early-onset cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I deficiency in early childhood. We retrospectively studied a series of 20 unrelated children with cardiac hypertrophy and isolated complex I deficiency and identified compound heterozygosity for missense, splice site or frame shift ACAD9 variants in 8/20 patients (40%). Age at onset ranged from neonatal period to 9 years and 5/8 died in infancy. Heart transplantation was possible in 3/8. Two of them survived and one additional patient improved spontaneously. Importantly, the surviving patients later developed delayed-onset neurologic or muscular symptoms, namely cognitive impairment, seizures, muscle weakness and exercise intolerance. Other organ involvement included proximal tubulopathy, renal failure, secondary ovarian failure and optic atrophy. We conclude that ACAD9 mutation is the most frequent cause of cardiac hypertrophy and isolated complex I deficiency. Heart transplantation in children surviving neonatal period should be considered with caution, as delayed-onset muscle and brain involvement of various severity may occur, even if absent prior to transplantation. PMID:26669660

  2. Sudden unexpected death due to severe pulmonary and cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Ginelliová, Alžbeta; Farkaš, Daniel; Farkašová Iannaccone, Silvia; Vyhnálková, Vlasta

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we report the autopsy findings of a 57 year old woman who died unexpectedly at home. She had been complaining of shortness of breath, episodes of dry coughing, and nausea. Her past medical and social history was unremarkable. She had no previous history of any viral or bacterial disease and no history of oncological disorders. Autopsy revealed multiple grayish-white nodular lesions in the pleura and epicardial fat and areas resembling fibrosis on the cut surface of the anterior and posterior wall of the left ventricle and interventricular septum. Histological examination of the lungs and heart revealed multiple well-formed noncaseating epithelioid cell granulomas with multinucleated giant cells. Death was attributed to myocardial ischemia due to vasculitis of intramural coronary artery branches associated with sarcoidosis. Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disease of unknown etiology characterized by the formation of noncaseating epithelioid cell granulomas in the affected organs and tissues. The diagnosis of sarcoidosis in this case was established when other causes of granulomatous disease such as tuberculosis, berylliosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and giant cell myocarditis had been reasonably excluded. PMID:27379608

  3. Severe papillary muscle dysfunction substantiated by atrial pacing during cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Finn, M C; Bower, P J

    1977-05-01

    A patient experienced episodic pulmonary edema accompanying nocturnal angina pectoris. The symptoms were provoked at cardiac catheterization by atrial pacing. Simultaneous onset of chest pain, shortness of breath, and sudden appearance of a large V wave in the pulmonary artery wedge pressure contour confirmed acute mitral valve regurgitation. Rapid reversal of these changes after nitroglycerin administration supported "papillary muscle dysfunction" as the explanation for these hemodynamic changes. PMID:403754

  4. Cardiac and skeletal muscle scintigraphy in dermato- and polymyositis: clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Buchpiguel, C A; Roizemblatt, S; Pastor, E H; Hironaka, F H; Cossermelli, W

    1996-02-01

    To determine the role of scintigraphy in the detection of skeletal and cardiac involvement in dermato- and polymyositis (DM/PM), we studied 30 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of DM/PM (23 females, 7 males; mean age: 35 years). Technetium-99m pyrophosphate (99mTc-PYP) and gallium-67 scans showed similar sensitivity, specificity and accuracy in the detection of skeletal muscle involvement when compared with serum enzymes (70%, 100% and 80%, respectively). Compared with the clinical parameters, 99mTc-PYP showed 70% and 67Ga 65% accuracy. Abnormal PYP cardiac uptake was observed in 57% of patients, whereas abnormal 67Ga cardiac uptake was seen in only 15%. Electrocardiography was abnormal in 40%, rest gated blood pool study in 23%, and chest X-ray in 13%. In conclusion, both 99mTc-PYP and 67Ga can be useful in the detection of the active phase of muscle disease. However, 99mTc-PYP seems to be more effective than 67Ga in the early diagnosis of cardiac involvement. PMID:8925856

  5. Cardiac Meets Skeletal: What's New in Microfluidic Models for Muscle Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Visone, Roberta; Gilardi, Mara; Marsano, Anna; Rasponi, Marco; Bersini, Simone; Moretti, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years microfluidics and microfabrication technique principles have been extensively exploited for biomedical applications. In this framework, organs-on-a-chip represent promising tools to reproduce key features of functional tissue units within microscale culture chambers. These systems offer the possibility to investigate the effects of biochemical, mechanical, and electrical stimulations, which are usually applied to enhance the functionality of the engineered tissues. Since the functionality of muscle tissues relies on the 3D organization and on the perfect coupling between electrochemical stimulation and mechanical contraction, great efforts have been devoted to generate biomimetic skeletal and cardiac systems to allow high-throughput pathophysiological studies and drug screening. This review critically analyzes microfluidic platforms that were designed for skeletal and cardiac muscle tissue engineering. Our aim is to highlight which specific features of the engineered systems promoted a typical reorganization of the engineered construct and to discuss how promising design solutions exploited for skeletal muscle models could be applied to improve cardiac tissue models and vice versa. PMID:27571058

  6. A quasi-one-dimensional theory for anisotropic propagation of excitation in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J; Johnson, E A; Kootsey, J M

    1996-01-01

    It has been shown that propagation of excitation in cardiac muscle is anisotropic. Compared to propagation at right angles to the long axes of the fibers, propagation along the long axis is faster, the extracellular action potential (AP) is larger in amplitude, and the intracellular AP has a lower maximum rate of depolarization, a larger time constant of the foot, and a lower peak amplitude. These observations are contrary to the predictions of classical one-dimensional (1-D) cable theory and, thus far, no satisfactory theory for them has been reported. As an alternative description of propagation in cardiac muscle, this study provides a quasi-1-D theory that includes a simplified description of the effects of action currents in extracellular space as well as resistive coupling between surface and deeper fibers in cardiac muscle. In terms of classical 1-D theory, this quasi-1-D theory reveals that the anisotropies in the wave form of the AP arise from modifications in the effective membrane ionic current and capacitance. The theory also shows that it is propagation in the longitudinal, not in the transverse direction that deviates from classical 1-D cable theory. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8913583

  7. The declined phosphorylation of Hsp27 in rat cardiac muscle after simulated microgravity induced by hindlimb unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ming; Jiang, Shizhong; Li, Zhili; Yuan, Min; Dong, Weijun

    Many studies have shown that simulated microgravity induced by hindlimb unloading can decrease the contractility of rat cardiac muscle however the mechanisms responsible for which remain unclear Actin polymerization which can be regulated by Hsp27 has important role in the transmission of stress force during the contraction of cardiac muscle In this study western blot analysis was used to detect the expression of Hsp27 and phosphorylated Hsp27 FAK and phosphorylated FAK P38 MAPK and phosphorylated P38 MAPK in rat cardiac muscle after 14d hindlimb unloading The results showed that the phosphorylation levels of both Hsp27 and P38 MAPK were declined significantly which may decrease actin polymerization and inhibit the transmission of stress force during the contraction of rat cardiac muscle after hindlimb unloading However the phosphorylation level of FAK was not declined significantly in cardiac muscle The results suggested that the declined phosphorylation level of Hsp27 which may be ascribable to the decline of contractility of rat cardiac muscle after 14d hindlimb unloading may be induced by the declined phosphorylation level of P38 MAPK but not phosphorylation level of FAK

  8. Effect of hypokinesia on contractile function of cardiac muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyerson, F. Z.; Kapelko, V. I.; Trikhpoyeva, A. M.; Gorina, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    Rats were subjected to hypokinesia for two months and the contractile function of isolated papillary muscle was studied. Hypokinesia reduced significantly the isotonic contraction rate which depended on the ATPase activity of the myofibrils; it also reduced the rate and index of relaxation which depended on the functional capacity of the Ca(++) pump of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The maximum force of isometric contraction determined by the quantity of actomyosin bridges in the myofibrils did not change after hypokinesia. This complex of changes is contrary to that observed in adaptation to exercise when the rate of isotonic contraction and relaxation increases while the force of isometric contraction does not change. The possible mechanism of this stability of the contractile force during adaptation and readaptation of the heart is discussed.

  9. A Cycling Movement Based System for Real-Time Muscle Fatigue and Cardiac Stress Monitoring and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Szi-Wen; Liaw, Jiunn-Woei; Chang, Ya-Ju; Chan, Hsiao-Lung; Chiu, Li-Yu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we defined a new parameter, referred to as the cardiac stress index (CSI), using a nonlinear detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) of heart rate (HR). Our study aimed to incorporate the CSI into a cycling based fatigue monitoring system developed in our previous work so the muscle fatigue and cardiac stress can be both continuously and quantitatively assessed for subjects undergoing the cycling exercise. By collecting electrocardiogram (ECG) signals, the DFA scaling exponent α was evaluated on the RR time series extracted from a windowed ECG segment. We then obtained the running estimate of α by shifting a one-minute window by a step of 20 seconds so the CSI, defined as the percentage of all the less-than-one α values, can be synchronously updated every 20 seconds. Since the rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale is considered as a convenient index which is commonly used to monitor subjective perceived exercise intensity, we then related the Borg RPE scale value to the CSI in order to investigate and quantitatively characterize the relationship between exercise-induced fatigue and cardiac stress. Twenty-two young healthy participants were recruited in our study. Each participant was asked to maintain a fixed pedaling speed at a constant load during the cycling exercise. Experimental results showed that a decrease in DFA scaling exponent α or an increase in CSI was observed during the exercise. In addition, the Borg RPE scale and CSI were positively correlated, suggesting that the factors due to cardiac stress might also contribute to fatigue state during physical exercise. Since the CSI can effectively quantify the cardiac stress status during physical exercise, our system may be used in sports medicine, or used by cardiologists who carried out stress tests for monitoring heart condition in patients with heart diseases. PMID:26115515

  10. Skeletal muscle damage and impaired regeneration due to LPL-mediated lipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tamilarasan, K P; Temmel, H; Das, S K; Al Zoughbi, W; Schauer, S; Vesely, P W; Hoefler, G

    2012-01-01

    According to the concept of lipotoxicity, ectopic accumulation of lipids in non-adipose tissue induces pathological changes. The most prominent effects are seen in fatty liver disease, lipid cardiomyopathy, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance and skeletal muscle myopathy. We used the MCK(m)-hLPL mouse distinguished by skeletal and cardiac muscle-specific human lipoprotein lipase (hLPL) overexpression to investigate effects of lipid overload in skeletal muscle. We were intrigued to find that ectopic lipid accumulation induced proteasomal activity, apoptosis and skeletal muscle damage. In line with these findings we observed reduced Musculus gastrocnemius and Musculus quadriceps mass in transgenic animals, accompanied by severely impaired physical endurance. We suggest that muscle loss was aggravated by impaired muscle regeneration as evidenced by reduced cross-sectional area of regenerating myofibers after cardiotoxin-induced injury in MCK(m)-hLPL mice. Similarly, an almost complete loss of myogenic potential was observed in C2C12 murine myoblasts upon overexpression of LPL. Our findings directly link lipid overload to muscle damage, impaired regeneration and loss of performance. These findings support the concept of lipotoxicity and are a further step to explain pathological effects seen in muscle of obese patients, patients with the metabolic syndrome and patients with cancer-associated cachexia. PMID:22825472

  11. Cardiac-locked bursts of muscle sympathetic nerve activity are absent in familial dysautonomia

    PubMed Central

    Macefield, Vaughan G; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Axelrod, Felicia B; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2013-01-01

    Familial dysautonomia (Riley–Day syndrome) is an hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN type III), expressed at birth, that is associated with reduced pain and temperature sensibilities and absent baroreflexes, causing orthostatic hypotension as well as labile blood pressure that increases markedly during emotional excitement. Given the apparent absence of functional baroreceptor afferents, we tested the hypothesis that the normal cardiac-locked bursts of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) are absent in patients with familial dysautonomia. Tungsten microelectrodes were inserted percutaneously into muscle or cutaneous fascicles of the common peroneal nerve in 12 patients with familial dysautonomia. Spontaneous bursts of MSNA were absent in all patients, but in five patients we found evidence of tonically firing sympathetic neurones, with no cardiac rhythmicity, that increased their spontaneous discharge during emotional arousal but not during a manoeuvre that unloads the baroreceptors. Conversely, skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA), recorded in four patients, appeared normal. We conclude that the loss of phasic bursts of MSNA and the loss of baroreflex modulation of muscle vasoconstrictor drive contributes to the poor control of blood pressure in familial dysautonomia, and that the increase in tonic firing of muscle vasoconstrictor neurones contributes to the increase in blood pressure during emotional excitement. PMID:23165765

  12. Optimizing PANi doped electroactive substrates as patches for the regeneration of cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Borriello, A; Guarino, V; Schiavo, L; Alvarez-Perez, M A; Ambrosio, L

    2011-04-01

    In scaffold aided regeneration of muscular tissue, composite materials are currently utilized as a temporary substrate to stimulate tissue formation by controlled electrochemical signals as well as continuous mechanical stimulation until the regeneration processes are completed. Among them, composites from the blending of conductive (CPs) and biocompatible polymers are powerfully emerging as a successful strategy for the regeneration of myocardium due to their unique conductive and biological recognition properties able to assure a more efficient electroactive stimulation of cells. Here, different composite substrates made of synthesized polyaniline (sPANi) and polycaprolactone (PCL) were investigated as platforms for cardiac tissue regeneration. Preliminary, a comparative analysis of substrates conductivity performed on casted films endowed with synthesized polyaniline (sPANi) short fibres or blended with emeraldine base polyaniline (EBPANi) allows to study the attitude of charge transport, depending on the conducting filler amount, shape and spatial distribution. In particular, conducibility tests indicated that sPANi short fibres provide a more efficient transfer of electric signal due to the spatial organization of electroactive needle-like phases up to form a percolative network. On the basis of this characterization, sPANi/PCL electrospun membranes have been also optimized to mimic either the morphological and functional features of the cardiac muscle ECM. The presence of sPANi does not relevantly affect the fibre architecture as confirmed by SEM/image analysis investigation which shows a broader distribution of fibres with only a slight reduction of the average fibre diameter from 7.1 to 6.4 μm. Meanwhile, biological assays--evaluation of cell survival rate by MTT assay and immunostaining of sarcomeric α-actinin of cardiomyocites-like cells--clearly indicate that conductive signals offered by PANi needles, promote the cardiogenic differentiation of h

  13. Zebrafish Cardiac Muscle Thick Filaments: Isolation Technique and Three-Dimensional Structure

    PubMed Central

    González-Solá, Maryví; AL-Khayat, Hind A.; Behra, Martine; Kensler, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    To understand how mutations in thick filament proteins such as cardiac myosin binding protein-C or titin, cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathies, it is important to determine the structure of the cardiac thick filament. Techniques for the genetic manipulation of the zebrafish are well established and it has become a major model for the study of the cardiovascular system. Our goal is to develop zebrafish as an alternative system to the mammalian heart model for the study of the structure of the cardiac thick filaments and the proteins that form it. We have successfully isolated thick filaments from zebrafish cardiac muscle, using a procedure similar to those for mammalian heart, and analyzed their structure by negative-staining and electron microscopy. The isolated filaments appear well ordered with the characteristic 42.9 nm quasi-helical repeat of the myosin heads expected from x-ray diffraction. We have performed single particle image analysis on the collected electron microscopy images for the C-zone region of these filaments and obtained a three-dimensional reconstruction at 3.5 nm resolution. This reconstruction reveals structure similar to the mammalian thick filament, and demonstrates that zebrafish may provide a useful model for the study of the changes in the cardiac thick filament associated with disease processes. PMID:24739166

  14. Rbfox-regulated alternative splicing is critical for zebrafish cardiac and skeletal muscle function

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Thomas L.; Arribere, Joshua A.; Geurts, Paul A.; Exner, Cameron R. T.; McDonald, Kent L.; Dill, Kariena K.; Marr, Henry L.; Adkar, Shaunak S.; Garnett, Aaron T.; Amacher, Sharon L.; Conboy, John G.

    2012-01-01

    Rbfox RNA binding proteins are implicated as regulators of phylogenetically-conserved alternative splicing events important for muscle function. To investigate the function of rbfox genes, we used morpholino-mediated knockdown of muscle-expressed rbfox1l and rbfox2 in zebrafish embryos. Single and double morphant embryos exhibited changes in splicing of overlapping sets of bioinformatically-predicted rbfox target exons, many of which exhibit a muscle-enriched splicing pattern that is conserved in vertebrates. Thus, conservation of intronic Rbfox binding motifs is a good predictor of Rbfox-regulated alternative splicing. Morphology and development of single morphant embryos was strikingly normal; however, muscle development in double morphants was severely disrupted. Defects in cardiac muscle were marked by reduced heart rate and in skeletal muscle by complete paralysis. The predominance of wavy myofibers and abnormal thick and thin filaments in skeletal muscle revealed that myofibril assembly is defective and disorganized in double morphants. Ultra-structural analysis revealed that although sarcomeres with electron dense M- and Z-bands are present in muscle fibers of rbfox1l/rbox2 morphants, they are substantially reduced in number and alignment. Importantly, splicing changes and morphological defects were rescued by expression of morpholino-resistant rbfox cDNA. Additionally, a target-blocking MO complementary to a single UGCAUG motif adjacent to an rbfox target exon of fxr1 inhibited inclusion in a similar manner to rbfox knockdown, providing evidence that Rbfox regulates the splicing of target exons via direct binding to intronic regulatory motifs. We conclude that Rbfox proteins regulate an alternative splicing program essential for vertebrate heart and skeletal muscle function. PMID:21925157

  15. Rbfox-regulated alternative splicing is critical for zebrafish cardiac and skeletal muscle functions.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Thomas L; Arribere, Joshua A; Geurts, Paul A; Exner, Cameron R T; McDonald, Kent L; Dill, Kariena K; Marr, Henry L; Adkar, Shaunak S; Garnett, Aaron T; Amacher, Sharon L; Conboy, John G

    2011-11-15

    Rbfox RNA binding proteins are implicated as regulators of phylogenetically-conserved alternative splicing events important for muscle function. To investigate the function of rbfox genes, we used morpholino-mediated knockdown of muscle-expressed rbfox1l and rbfox2 in zebrafish embryos. Single and double morphant embryos exhibited changes in splicing of overlapping sets of bioinformatically-predicted rbfox target exons, many of which exhibit a muscle-enriched splicing pattern that is conserved in vertebrates. Thus, conservation of intronic Rbfox binding motifs is a good predictor of Rbfox-regulated alternative splicing. Morphology and development of single morphant embryos were strikingly normal; however, muscle development in double morphants was severely disrupted. Defects in cardiac muscle were marked by reduced heart rate and in skeletal muscle by complete paralysis. The predominance of wavy myofibers and abnormal thick and thin filaments in skeletal muscle revealed that myofibril assembly is defective and disorganized in double morphants. Ultra-structural analysis revealed that although sarcomeres with electron dense M- and Z-bands are present in muscle fibers of rbfox1l/rbox2 morphants, they are substantially reduced in number and alignment. Importantly, splicing changes and morphological defects were rescued by expression of morpholino-resistant rbfox cDNA. Additionally, a target-blocking MO complementary to a single UGCAUG motif adjacent to an rbfox target exon of fxr1 inhibited inclusion in a similar manner to rbfox knockdown, providing evidence that Rbfox regulates the splicing of target exons via direct binding to intronic regulatory motifs. We conclude that Rbfox proteins regulate an alternative splicing program essential for vertebrate heart and skeletal muscle functions. PMID:21925157

  16. Single bout of running exercise changes LC3-II expression in rat cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Yuji; Iemitsu, Motoyuki; Naito, Hisashi; Kakigi, Ryo; Kakehashi, Chiaki; Maeda, Seiji; Akema, Tatsuo

    2011-11-01

    Macroautophagy (autophagy) is an intracellular catalytic process. We examined the effect of running exercise, which stimulates cardiac work physiologically, on the expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-II, an indicator of autophagy, as well as some autophagy-related proteins in rat cardiac muscle. The left ventricles were taken from rats immediately (0 h), and at 0.5h, 1h or 3h after a single bout of running exercise on a treadmill for 30 min and also from rats in a rest condition. In these samples, we evaluated the level of LC3-II and p62, and the phosphorylation level of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), Akt and AMP-activated protein kinase alpha (AMPKα) by Western blotting. The exercise produced a biphasic change in LC3-II, with an initial decrease observed immediately after the exercise and a subsequent increase 1h thereafter. LC3-II then returned to the rest level at 3h after the exercise. A negative correlation was found between the LC3-II expression and mTOR phosphorylation, which plays a role in inhibiting autophagy. The exercise increased phosphorylation of AMPKα, which stimulates autophagy via suppression of mTOR phosphorylation, immediately after exercise. The level of p62 and phosphorylated Akt was not altered significantly by the exercise. These results suggest for the first time that a single bout of running exercise induces a biphasic change in autophagy in the cardiac muscle. The exercise-induced change in autophagy might be partially mediated by mTOR in the cardiac muscle. PMID:22005460

  17. Changes of intracellular milieu with fatigue or hypoxia depress contraction of skinned rabbit skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Godt, R E; Nosek, T M

    1989-01-01

    1. Maximal calcium-activated force (Fmax) and calcium sensitivity were markedly decreased in detergent-skinned fibres from skeletal and cardiac muscle by solutions that mimicked the total milieu changes associated with fatigue and hypoxia. Further experiments determined the relative contribution of each of the individual changes in milieu. 2. Both Ca2+ sensitivity and Fmax of skeletal and cardiac fibres were decreased with increased [H+] or inorganic phosphate (Pi). These effects were greater in cardiac muscle. 3. Decreasing MgATP over the range observed with fatigue and hypoxia (6.8-4.7 mM) had no effect on Fmax or Ca2+ sensitivity of either muscle type. 4. Decreasing phosphocreatine (PCr: 15-1 mM) increased Fmax but had little effect on Ca2+ sensitivity in both muscle types. In cardiac fibres, the effect on Fmax could be mimicked by inhibition of endogenous creatine kinase. 5. ADP (0.7 mM) increased Fmax and Ca2+ sensitivity, while AMP (0.06 mM) slightly increased Fmax but had no effect on Ca2+ sensitivity of either skeletal or cardiac fibres. 6. Creatine (25 mM) had no significant effect on either Ca2+ sensitivity or Fmax of skeletal and cardiac muscle fibres. At higher levels (50 mM), however, creatine depressed Fmax and slightly altered Ca2+ sensitivity. 7. Thiophosphorylation of myosin P light chains (phosphorylatable light chains of myosin) in rabbit psoas fibres had no effect on Ca2+ sensitivity, yet slightly but significantly increased Fmax under fatigue conditions. 8. Reducing the affinity for ATP hydrolysis (by adding ADP, AMP and creatine) over the range calculated for fatigue/hypoxia (60-45 kJ/mol) produced the enhancement in Fmax expected from added ADP and AMP in cardiac but not skeletal muscle, indicating that changes in affinity influence Fmax of skeletal muscle. Reducing affinity produced little change in Ca2+ sensitivity of skeletal muscle. In contrast, the change produced in cardiac muscle was greater than that expected from addition of ADP and

  18. Successful extracorporeal life support in sudden cardiac arrest due to coronary anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Wan; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Ki-Sik; Bang, Duk Won; Hyon, Min-Su; Lee, Min-Ho; Park, Byoung-Won

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) has recently been reported to have a survival benefit in patients with cardiac arrest. It is now used widely as a lifesaving modality. Here, we describe a case of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in a young athlete with an anomalous origin of the right coronary artery from the left coronary sinus. Resuscitation was successful using ECLS before curative bypass surgery. We highlight the efficacy of ECLS for a patient with SCA caused by a rare, unexpected aetiology. In conclusion, ECLS was a lifesaving modality for SCA due to an anomalous coronary artery in this young patient. PMID:27354896

  19. Acute regulation of glucose uptake in cardiac muscle of the American eel Anguilla rostrata.

    PubMed

    Rodnick; Bailey; West; Driedzic

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the effects of anoxia and contractile activity on glucose uptake and the intracellular location of hexokinase in cardiac muscle of the American eel Anguilla rostrata. Uptake of 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) by ventricle strips at 15 °C was increased by 45 % by anoxia and by 85 % by contractile activity over basal conditions. The anoxia- and contraction-induced increase in basal 2-DG uptake was inhibited completely by 25 µmol l-1 cytochalasin B, suggesting that facilitated glucose transporters are involved. Maximal activity of hexokinase in whole homogenates (approximately 10 µmol min-1 g-1 tissue) was 200 times higher than the maximal rate of 2-DG uptake measured in vitro (46 nmol min-1 g-1 tissue). Only 20­25 % of hexokinase activity was localized to the mitochondrial fraction, and this was not altered by perfusion of the hearts with anoxic media. It is therefore unlikely that anoxia-induced stimulation of 2-DG uptake is mediated by intracellular translocation of hexokinase. As in the case of mammalian muscle, glucose 6-phosphate is a potent inhibitor of hexokinase in eel cardiac muscle (IC50=0.44 mmol l-1). In summary, anoxia and contractile activity significantly increase 2-DG uptake in cardiac muscle of American eels, and glucose transport may be rate-limiting for glucose utilization. Increased utilization of glucose during anoxia or contractile activity may involve the recruitment of facilitative glucose transport proteins to the cell surface of myocytes or an increase in the intrinsic activity of glucose transporters already residing at the cell surface. PMID:9344975

  20. Early detection and efficient therapy of cardiac angiosarcoma due to routine transesophageal echocardiography after cerebrovascular stroke

    PubMed Central

    Vogelgesang, Dirk; Dahm, Johannes B; Großmann, Holm; Hippe, Andre; Hummel, Astrid; Lotze, Christian; Vogelgesang, Silke

    2008-01-01

    Primary malignant cardiac tumors (cardiac angiosarcomas) are exceedingly rare. Since there are initially nonspecific or missing symptoms, these tumors are usually diagnosed only in an advanced, often incurable stage, after the large tumor mass elicits hemodynamic obstructive symptoms. A 59-year-old female presented with symptoms of cerebral ischemia. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed changes suggestive of stroke. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed an inhomogeneous, medium-echogenic, floating mass at the roof of the left atrium near the mouth of the right upper pulmonary vein, indicative of a thrombus. At surgery, a solitary tumor was completely enucleated. Histologically, cardiac angiosarcoma was diagnosed. The patient received adjuvant chemotherapy and was free of symptoms and recurrence of disease at 14 months follow-up. Due to the fortuitous appearance of clinical signs indicative of stroke, cardiac angiosarcoma was diagnosed and effectively treated at an early, nonmetastatic, and therefore potentially curable stage. Although cardiac angiosarcoma is a rare disease, it should be taken into consideration as a potential cause of cerebral embolic disease. PMID:19066013

  1. Simultaneous measurement of cerebral and muscle tissue parameters during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosrati, Reyhaneh; Ramadeen, Andrew; Hu, Xudong; Woldemichael, Ermias; Kim, Siwook; Dorian, Paul; Toronov, Vladislav

    2015-03-01

    In this series of animal experiments on resuscitation after cardiac arrest we had a unique opportunity to measure hyperspectral near-infrared spectroscopy (hNIRS) parameters directly on the brain dura, or on the brain through the intact pig skull, and simultaneously the muscle hNIRS parameters. Simultaneously the arterial blood pressure and carotid and femoral blood flow were recorded in real time using invasive sensors. We used a novel hyperspectral signalprocessing algorithm to extract time-dependent concentrations of water, hemoglobin, and redox state of cytochrome c oxidase during cardiac arrest and resuscitation. In addition in order to assess the validity of the non-invasive brain measurements the obtained results from the open brain was compared to the results acquired through the skull. The comparison of hNIRS data acquired on brain surface and through the adult pig skull shows that in both cases the hemoglobin and the redox state cytochrome c oxidase changed in similar ways in similar situations and in agreement with blood pressure and flow changes. The comparison of simultaneously measured brain and muscle changes showed expected differences. Overall the results show feasibility of transcranial hNIRS measurements cerebral parameters including the redox state of cytochrome oxidase in human cardiac arrest patients.

  2. Effects of age and inactivity due to prolonged bed rest on atrophy of trunk muscles.

    PubMed

    Ikezoe, Tome; Mori, Natsuko; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of age and inactivity due to being chronically bedridden on atrophy of trunk muscles. The subjects comprised 33 young women (young group) and 41 elderly women who resided in nursing homes or chronic care institutions. The elderly subjects were divided into two groups: independent elderly group who were able to perform activities of daily living involving walking independently (n = 28) and dependent elderly group who were chronically bedridden (n = 13). The thickness of the following six trunk muscles was measured by B-mode ultrasound: the rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, transversus abdominis, thoracic erector spinae (longissimus) and lumbar multifidus muscles. All muscles except for the transversus abdominis and lumbar multifidus muscles were significantly thinner in the independent elderly group compared with those in the young group. The thicknesses of all muscles in the dependent elderly group was significantly smaller than that in the young group, whereas there were no differences between the dependent elderly and independent elderly groups in the muscle thicknesses of the rectus abdominis and internal oblique muscles. In conclusion, our results suggest that: (1) age-related atrophy compared with young women was less in the deep antigravity trunk muscles than the superficial muscles in the independent elderly women; (2) atrophy associated with chronic bed rest was more marked in the antigravity muscles, such as the back and transversus abdominis. PMID:21472438

  3. Application of MicroRNA in Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle Disease Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhan-Peng; Neppl, Ronald L.; Wang, Da-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small ~22 nt noncoding RNAs. miRNAs regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional levels by destabilization and degradation of the target mRNA or by translational repression. Numerous studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are essential for normal mammalian development and organ function. Deleterious changes in miRNA expression play an important role in human diseases. We and others have previously reported several muscle-specific miRNAs, including miR-1/206, miR-133, and miR-208. These muscle-specific miRNAs are essential for normal myoblast differentiation and proliferation, and they have also been implicated in various cardiac and skeletal muscular diseases. miRNA-based gene therapies hold great potential for the treatment of cardiac and skeletal muscle disease(s). Herein, we introduce the methods commonly applied to study the biological role of miRNAs, as well as the techniques utilized to manipulate miRNA expression. PMID:21194029

  4. Measurement of transmembrane potential and current in cardiac muscle: a new voltage clamp method.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Y; Morad, M

    1977-01-01

    1. A single sucrose gap voltage clamp technique was developed to correct for artifacts of 'leakage' corrent and extracellular resistance making possible improved measurement of membrane current and membrane potential in cardiac muscle. 2. A fourth compartment termed 'guard gap' was added to the sucrose gap. The guard gap is maintained at the same potential as the Reinger pool, so that no extracellular leakage current can flow into the Ringer pool. Comparison of experimental results with the predictions of an idealized cable model indicates that the guard gap is effective in trapping leakage current. 3. The slow charging of membrane capacitance due to extracellular series resistance was accelerated by applying a 'pre-pulse' of the command potential past the final voltage clamp value. 4. A second technique, termed 'chopped current pulse clamp', was used to compensate for the extracellular resistance throughout the voltage clamp step. The applied current was turned on and off at a frequency of 0-5-2 kHz. The membrane potential sampled during the zero current phase was fed back through the clamp loop. 5. With either of these compensation techniques, the voltage and current traces settle to effectively constant values within 2-4 msec after initiation of a hyperpolarizing voltage clamp step from rest. 6. The membrane conductance measured by the prepulse and chopped current-pulse technique are equal and confirm a higher conductance at rest than during the plateau of the action potential. 7. The 'instantaneous' current-voltage relation of the membrane is linear during the plateau of the frog ventricular action potential. PMID:301933

  5. The uptake of cardiac glycosides in relation to their actions in isolated cardiac muscle

    PubMed Central

    Godfraind, T.; Lesne, M.

    1972-01-01

    1. The uptake of 3H-digitoxin, 3H-ouabain and 3H-dihydro-ouabain by isolated guinea-pig atria has been studied and compared with the inhibition of the sodium pump and with the inotropic effect. 2. Analysis of the curve relating the uptake of digitoxin and ouabain at equilibrium to the bath concentration enabled a non-saturable and a saturable binding site to be distinguished. 3. The uptake of inactive doses of dihydro-ouabain was only by a non-saturable mechanism. 4. The uptake of labelled digitoxin and ouabain was reduced in the presence of another glycoside. The amount of bound glycoside was nearly equivalent to the estimated non-saturable uptake. 5. The uptake was reduced at 4° C to the clearance of the non-saturable site. 6. ED50 of digitoxin and of ouabain for inhibition of the sodium pump were measured and compared to the ED50 for inotropic effect and to the concentrations producing a half-saturation of the saturable binding site. 7. It is concluded that binding to the saturable site may be responsible for the cardiac actions of the glycosides. PMID:4656610

  6. Transgenic Overexpression of LARGE Induces α-Dystroglycan Hyperglycosylation in Skeletal and Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Paul S.; Liu, Ke; Cirak, Sebahattin; Brown, Susan C.; Wells, Dominic J.; Muntoni, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Background LARGE is one of seven putative or demonstrated glycosyltransferase enzymes defective in a common group of muscular dystrophies with reduced glycosylation of α-dystroglycan. Overexpression of LARGE induces hyperglycosylation of α-dystroglycan in both wild type and in cells from dystroglycanopathy patients, irrespective of their primary gene defect, restoring functional glycosylation. Viral delivery of LARGE to skeletal muscle in animal models of dystroglycanopathy has identical effects in vivo, suggesting that the restoration of functional glycosylation could have therapeutic applications in these disorders. Pharmacological strategies to upregulate Large expression are also being explored. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to asses the safety and efficacy of long term LARGE over-expression in vivo, we have generated four mouse lines expressing a human LARGE transgene. On observation, LARGE transgenic mice were indistinguishable from the wild type littermates. Tissue analysis from young mice of all four lines showed a variable pattern of transgene expression: highest in skeletal and cardiac muscles, and lower in brain, kidney and liver. Transgene expression in striated muscles correlated with α-dystroglycan hyperglycosylation, as determined by immunoreactivity to antibody IIH6 and increased laminin binding on an overlay assay. Other components of the dystroglycan complex and extracellular matrix ligands were normally expressed, and general muscle histology was indistinguishable from wild type controls. Further detailed muscle physiological analysis demonstrated a loss of force in response to eccentric exercise in the older, but not in the younger mice, suggesting this deficit developed over time. However this remained a subclinical feature as no pathology was observed in older mice in any muscles including the diaphragm, which is sensitive to mechanical load-induced damage. Conclusions/Significance This work shows that potential therapies in the

  7. Comparison of heterologously expressed human cardiac and skeletal muscle sodium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, D W; George, A L; Bennett, P B

    1996-01-01

    In this study we have expressed and characterized recombinant cardiac and skeletal muscle sodium channel alpha subunits in tsA-201 cells under identical experimental conditions. Unlike the Xenopus oocyte expression system, in tsA-201 cells (transformed human embryonic kidney) both channels seem to gate rapidly, as in native tissue. In general, hSkM1 gating seemed faster than hH1 both in terms of rate of inactivation and rate of recovery from inactivation as well as time to peak current. The midpoint of the steady-state inactivation curve was approximately 25 mV more negative for hH1 compared with hSkM1. In both isoforms, the steady-state channel availability relationships ("inactivation curves") shifted toward more negative membrane potentials with time. The cardiac isoform showed a minimal shift in the activation curve as a function of time after whole-cell dialysis, whereas hSkM1 showed a continued and marked negative shift in the activation voltage dependence of channel gating. This observation suggests that the mechanism underlying the shift in inactivation voltage dependence may be similar to the one that is causing the shift in the activation voltage dependence in hSkM1 but that this is uncoupled in the cardiac isoform. These results demonstrate the utility and limitations of measuring cardiac and skeletal muscle recombinant Na+ channels in tsA-201 cells. This baseline characterization will be useful for future investigations on channel mutants and pharmacology. PMID:8770201

  8. Structural and functional aspects of the myosin essential light chain in cardiac muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Muthu, Priya; Wang, Li; Yuan, Chen-Ching; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Huang, Wenrui; Hernandez, Olga M.; Kawai, Masataka; Irving, Thomas C.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2011-01-01

    The myosin essential light chain (ELC) is a structural component of the actomyosin cross-bridge, but its function is poorly understood, especially the role of the cardiac specific N-terminal extension in modulating actomyosin interaction. Here, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the A57G (alanine to glycine) mutation in the cardiac ELC known to cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). The function of the ELC N-terminal extension was investigated with the Tg-Δ43 mouse model, whose myocardium expresses a truncated ELC. Low-angle X-ray diffraction studies on papillary muscle fibers in rigor revealed a decreased interfilament spacing (∼1.5 nm) and no alterations in cross-bridge mass distribution in Tg-A57G mice compared to Tg-WT, expressing the full-length nonmutated ELC. The truncation mutation showed a 1.3-fold increase in I1,1/I1,0, indicating a shift of cross-bridge mass from the thick filament backbone toward the thin filaments. Mechanical studies demonstrated increased stiffness in Tg-A57G muscle fibers compared to Tg-WT or Tg-Δ43. The equilibrium constant for the cross-bridge force generation step was smallest in Tg-Δ43. These results support an important role for the N-terminal ELC extension in prepositioning the cross-bridge for optimal force production. Subtle changes in the ELC sequence were sufficient to alter cross-bridge properties and lead to pathological phenotypes.—Muthu, P., Wang, L., Yuan, C.-C., Kazmierczak, K., Huang, W., Hernandez, O. M., Kawai, M., Irving, T. C., Szczesna-Cordary, D. Structural and functional aspects of the myosin essential light chain in cardiac muscle contraction. PMID:21885653

  9. Laser-patterned stem-cell bridges in a cardiac muscle model for on-chip electrical conductivity analyses

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhen; Liu, Qiuying; Liu, Honghai; Yang, Huaxiao; Yun, Julie X.; Eisenberg, Carol; Borg, Thomas K.; Xu, Meifeng; Gao, Bruce Z.

    2012-01-01

    Following myocardial infarction there is an irreversible loss of cardiomyocytes that results in the alteration of electrical propagation in the heart. Restoration of functional electrical properties of the damaged heart muscle is essential to recover from the infarction. While there are a few reports that demonstrate that fibroblasts can form junctions that transmit electrical signals, a potential alternative using the injection of stem cells has emerged as a promising cellular therapy; however, stem-cell electrical conductivity within the cardiac muscle fiber is unknown. In this study, an in vitro cardiac muscle model was established on an MEA-based biochip with multiple cardiomyocytes that mimic cardiac tissue structure. Using a laser beam, stem cells were inserted adjacent to each muscle fiber (cell bridge model) and allowed to form cell-cell contact as determined by the formation of gap junctions. The electrical conductivity of stem cells was assessed and compared with the electrical conductivities of cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts. Results showed that stem cell-myocyte contacts exhibited higher and more stable conduction velocities than myocyte-fibroblast contacts, which indicated that stem cells have higher electrical compatibility with native cardiac muscle fibers than cardiac fibroblasts. PMID:22170399

  10. Changes of contractile responses due to simulated weightlessness in rat soleus muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkhammari, A.; Noireaud, J.; Léoty, C.

    1994-08-01

    Some contractile and electrophysiological properties of muscle fibers isolated from the slow-twitch soleus (SOL) and fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of rats were compared with those measured in SOL muscles from suspended rats. In suspendede SOL (21 days of tail-suspension) membrane potential (Em), intracellular sodium activity (aiNa) and the slope of the relationship between Em and log [K]o were typical of fast-twitch muscles. The relation between the maximal amplitude of K-contractures vs Em was steeper for control SOL than for EDL and suspended SOL muscles. After suspension, in SOL muscles the contractile threshold and the inactivation curves for K-contractures were shifted to more positive Em. Repriming of K-contractures was unaffected by suspencion. The exposure of isolated fibers to perchlorate (ClO4-)-containing (6-40 mM) solutions resulted ina similar concentration-dependent shift to more negative Em of activation curves for EDL and suspended SOL muscles. On exposure to a Na-free TEA solution, SOL from control and suspended rats, in contrast to EDL muscles, generated slow contractile responses. Suspended SOL showed a reduced sensitivity to the contracture-producing effect of caffeine compared to control muscles. These results suggested that the modification observed due to suspension could be encounted by changes in the characteristics of muscle fibers from slow to fast-twitch type.

  11. Successful use of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest due to amitriptyline and venlafaxine intoxication.

    PubMed

    Kontio, Terhi; Salo, Ari; Kantola, Teemu; Toivonen, Lauri; Skrifvars, Markus B

    2015-06-01

    The prognosis of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) due to intoxication is dismal. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are widely used in the treatment of depression, but possess significant cardiotoxicity, and are one of the most common medications used in suicide attempts worldwide. TCA poisoning can cause hypotension, seizures, and cardiac conduction disturbances, which can lead to life-threatening arrhythmia. Current guidelines recommend mild therapeutic hypothermia (TH) for unconscious survivors of OHCA, but hypothermia treatment itself can cause disturbances in cardiac conduction, which could aggravate the effect of TCAs on cardiac conduction. We report the successful use of TH in a 19-year-old woman who was resuscitated from ventricular tachycardia after intentional ingestion of amitriptyline and venlafaxine, a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor. The cardiac arrest was witnessed, but no bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was performed. The initial rhythm was ventricular tachycardia with no detectable pulse. Three defibrillations, magnesium sulfate, and sodium bicarbonate were given and her trachea was intubated, after which return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was achieved in 26 minutes. After ROSC, she had seizures and was sedated with propofol. Out-of-hospital TH was initiated with 1500 mL of cold Ringer's acetate. An infusion of norepinephrine was initiated for low blood pressure. On arrival at the university hospital, she was unconscious and had dilated pupils. She was tachycardic with a body temperature of 33.5°C. She was transferred to the intensive care unit and TH was maintained with invasive cooling. During the TH treatment, she did not experience any serious cardiac arrhythmia, transthoracic echocardiogram was normal, and the electrocardiogram (ECG) returned to normal. The patient was extubated 45 hours after the cardiac arrest. After the extubation, she was alert and cooperative, but slightly delusional. She was

  12. A computer simulation study of isometric contraction of latissimus dorsi muscle used for cardiac assistance.

    PubMed

    Minoura, T; Mizuhara, H; Tsutsumi, S; Nishimura, K; Ban, T

    1997-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the feasibility of a skeletal muscle pump employing latissimus dorsi muscle (LDM) for cardiac assistance. We developed and used a 2-dimensional mathematical model for LDM to investigate how the size of pneumatic balloons (30, 38, and 45 ml) and the three different locations (proximal, center, and distal) affect the pressure applied to the balloon by LDM. The computer simulation was performed by coding a visco-elastic and nonlinear 2-dimensional program that employed the finite element method (FEM). The muscle specific parameters of LDM were obtained from animal experiment results. The model is based on Hill's characteristic equation and composed of a contractile component and a passive element. The simulation results indicated that the intermediate and largest sized balloon lead to the highest and the lowest power (volume reduction per unit time interval), respectively. On the other hand, when the balloon is inserted in the distal LDM, the power is lower than in the other two positions, regardless of the balloon size. The above results suggest that the optimal size of the balloon should be selected depending on the muscle specific parameters of the actuator, and that the balloon should be inserted either in the proximal portion or center of the actuator. PMID:9360153

  13. Differential response of rat cardiac and skeletal muscle glycogen to glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Poland, J L; Poland, J W; Honey, R N

    1982-05-01

    Though glucocorticoids were previously implicated in the support of myocardial glycogen supercompensation after exercise, it was unclear why skeletal muscle glycogen did not simultaneously supercompensate since it was also exposed to the exercise-induced glucocorticoid increases. The current study shows that glucocorticoids differentially affect cardiac and skeletal muscle glycogen. Following dexamethasone administration (400 micrograms i.p.) myocardial glycogen peaked at 6 h while glycogen in the soleus, red vastus lateralis, and white vastus lateralis increased more slowly and reached the highest values 17 h postinjection. Concurrently, blood glucose, insulin, and glucagon remained at control levels. Liver glycogen increased within 2 h and continued to rise with a peak value at 17 h. Plasma free fatty acid (FFA) levels increased and remained high throughout the 26-h experimental period. High FFA levels inhibit glycogenolysis and thus could be partially responsible for glucocorticoid-induced glycogen increases. It is postulated that glycogen supercompensation does not readily occur in skeletal muscles after exercise because of the brevity of the corticosterone and FFA increases and the slowness of the skeletal muscle glycogen response to glucocorticoids. PMID:7104851

  14. CARDIAC PATHOLOGY EXCEEDS SKELETAL MUSCLE PATHOLOGY IN TWO CASES OF LIMB-GIRDLE MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY TYPE 2I

    PubMed Central

    Margeta, Marta; Connolly, Anne M.; Winder, Thomas L.; Pestronk, Alan; Moore, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I (LGMD-2I) is caused by mutations in fukutin-related protein gene (FKRP) that lead to abnormal glycosylation of α-dystroglycan in skeletal muscle. Heart involvement in LGMD-2I is common, but little is known about underlying cardiac pathology. Here, we describe two patients with LGMD-2I (homozygous FKRP mutation c.826C>A, p.Leu276Ile) who developed severe congestive heart failure requiring cardiac transplantation. The dystrophic pathology and impairment of α-dystroglycan glycosylation were severe in the heart but mild in the skeletal muscle, underscoring the lack of correlation between cardiac and skeletal muscle involvement in some LGMD-2I patients. PMID:19705481

  15. Measurement of calcium release due to inositol trisphosphate receptors in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Casas, Mariana; Altamirano, Francisco; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Calcium transients elicited by IP(3) receptors upon electrical stimulation of skeletal muscle cells (slow calcium signals) are often hard to visualize due to their relatively small amplitude compared to the large transient originated from ryanodine receptors associated to excitation-contraction coupling. The study of slow calcium transients, however, is relevant due to their function in regulation of muscle gene expression and in the process of excitation-transcription coupling. Discussed here are the procedures used to record slow calcium signals from both cultured mouse myotubes and from cultured adult skeletal muscle fibers. PMID:22130849

  16. Nitric oxide synthase-dependent "on/off" switch and apoptosis in freshwater and aestivating lungfish, Protopterus annectens: skeletal muscle versus cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Amelio, D; Garofalo, F; Wong, W P; Chew, S F; Ip, Y K; Cerra, M C; Tota, B

    2013-08-01

    African lungfishes (Protopterus spp.) are obligate air breathers which enter in a prolonged torpor (aestivation) in association with metabolic depression, and biochemical and morpho-functional readjustments during the dry season. During aestivation, the lungfish heart continues to pump, while the skeletal muscle stops to function but can immediately contract during arousal. Currently, nothing is known regarding the orchestration of the multilevel rearrangements occurring in myotomal and myocardial muscles during aestivation and arousal. Because of its universal role in cardio-circulatory and muscle homeostasis, nitric oxide (NO) could be involved in coordinating these stress-induced adaptations. Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy on cardiac and skeletal muscles of Protopterus annectens (freshwater, 6months of aestivation and 6days after arousal) showed that expression, localization and activity of the endothelial-like nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) isoform and its partners Akt and Hsp-90 are tissue-specifically modulated. During aestivation, phospho-eNOS/eNOS and phospho-Akt/Akt ratios increased in the heart but decreased in the skeletal muscle. By contrast, Hsp-90 increased in both muscle types during aestivation. TUNEL assay revealed that increased apoptosis occurred in the skeletal muscle of aestivating lungfish, but the myocardial apoptotic rate of the aestivating lungfish remained unchanged as compared with the freshwater control. Consistent with the preserved cardiac activity during aestivation, the expression of apoptosis repressor (ARC) also remained unchanged in the heart of aestivating and aroused fish as compared with the freshwater control. Contrarily, ARC expression was strongly reduced in the skeletal muscle of aestivating lungfish. On the whole, our data indicate that changes in the eNOS/NO system and cell turnover are implicated in the morpho-functional readjustments occurring in lungfish cardiac and skeletal muscle during the switch

  17. Measurement of high-resolution mechanical contraction of cardiac muscle by induced eddy current.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Jae; Lee, Kang-Hwi; Kang, Seung-Jin; Kim, Kyeung-Nam; Khang, Seonah; Koo, Hye Ran; Gi, Sunok; Lee, Joo Hyeon; Lee, Jeong-Whan

    2014-01-01

    There are many types of devices which help to manage a personal health conditions such as heartbeat chest belt, pedometer and smart watch. And the most common device has the relationship with heart rate or ECG data. However, users have to attach some electrode or fasten the belt on the bare skin to measure bio-signal information. Therefore, most of people want more convenient and short-ready-time and no-need to attach electrode. In this paper, we proposed the high-resolution measuring system of mechanical activity of cardiac muscle and thereby measure heartbeat. The principle of the proposed measuring method is that the alternating current generate alternating magnetic field around coil. This primary magnetic field induces eddy current which makes magnetic field against primary coil in the nearby objects. To measure high-resolution changes of the induced secondary magnetic fields, we used digital Phase-locked loop(PLL) circuit which provides more high-resolution traces of frequency changes than the previous studies based on digital frequency counter method. As a result of our preliminary experiment, peak-peak intervals of the proposed method showed high correlation with R-R intervals of clinical ECG signals(r=0.9249). Also, from signal traces of the proposed method, we might make a conjecture that the contraction of atrium or ventricle is reflected by changing conductivity of cardiac muscle which is beating ceaselessly. PMID:25571434

  18. Regulation of troponin C synthesis in primary culture of chicken cardiac muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, S B; Bag, J

    1987-01-01

    Cardiac myocyte cell culture from fourteen day old embryonic chicken heart was prepared. This cultured cell system was used to examine the regulation of troponin C (TnC) synthesis in cardiac muscle. To examine the regulation of TnC polypeptide synthesis, cardiac myocyte cells were pulse labelled with 35S-methionine at different days after plating. The synthesis of TnC was measured by determining the amount of radioactivity incorporated into the TnC polypeptide following separation by two dimensional gel electrophoresis. These measurements showed that TnC synthesis was maximum in 36 to 48 h old cultures and reached its lowest level in 4 day old cultures. This was in contrast to the synthesis of actin and tropomyosin. Synthesis of these polypeptides were lowest in 36 to 48 h old cultures and was maximum in 7 day old cultures. To examine whether the synthesis of TnC polypeptide paralleled the levels of TnC mRNA the sequences homologous to quail slow TnC cDNA clone were measured by hybridisation. The results showed that the decrease in the synthesis of troponin C polypeptide cannot be fully explained by the decrease in the steady state level of troponin C mRNA. The possibility of a role of translational control of troponin C mRNA in this process is discussed. PMID:2890096

  19. Cardiomyocytes induce endothelial cells to trans-differentiate into cardiac muscle: implications for myocardium regeneration.

    PubMed

    Condorelli, G; Borello, U; De Angelis, L; Latronico, M; Sirabella, D; Coletta, M; Galli, R; Balconi, G; Follenzi, A; Frati, G; Cusella De Angelis, M G; Gioglio, L; Amuchastegui, S; Adorini, L; Naldini, L; Vescovi, A; Dejana, E; Cossu, G

    2001-09-11

    The concept of tissue-restricted differentiation of postnatal stem cells has been challenged by recent evidence showing pluripotency for hematopoietic, mesenchymal, and neural stem cells. Furthermore, rare but well documented examples exist of already differentiated cells in developing mammals that change fate and trans-differentiate into another cell type. Here, we report that endothelial cells, either freshly isolated from embryonic vessels or established as homogeneous cells in culture, differentiate into beating cardiomyocytes and express cardiac markers when cocultured with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes or when injected into postischemic adult mouse heart. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells also differentiate into cardiomyocytes under similar experimental conditions and transiently coexpress von Willebrand factor and sarcomeric myosin. In contrast, neural stem cells, which efficiently differentiate into skeletal muscle, differentiate into cardiomyocytes at a low rate. Fibroblast growth factor 2 and bone morphogenetic protein 4, which activate cardiac differentiation in embryonic cells, do not activate cardiogenesis in endothelial cells or stimulate trans-differentiation in coculture, suggesting that different signaling molecules are responsible for cardiac induction during embryogenesis and in successive periods of development. The fact that endothelial cells can generate cardiomyocytes sheds additional light on the plasticity of endothelial cells during development and opens perspectives for cell autologous replacement therapies. PMID:11535818

  20. Cardiomyocytes induce endothelial cells to trans-differentiate into cardiac muscle: Implications for myocardium regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Condorelli, G.; Borello, U.; De Angelis, L.; Latronico, M.; Sirabella, D.; Coletta, M.; Galli, R.; Balconi, G.; Follenzi, A.; Frati, G.; Cusella De Angelis, M. G.; Gioglio, L.; Amuchastegui, S.; Adorini, L.; Naldini, L.; Vescovi, A.; Dejana, E.; Cossu, G.

    2001-01-01

    The concept of tissue-restricted differentiation of postnatal stem cells has been challenged by recent evidence showing pluripotency for hematopoietic, mesenchymal, and neural stem cells. Furthermore, rare but well documented examples exist of already differentiated cells in developing mammals that change fate and trans-differentiate into another cell type. Here, we report that endothelial cells, either freshly isolated from embryonic vessels or established as homogenous cells in culture, differentiate into beating cardiomyocytes and express cardiac markers when cocultured with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes or when injected into postischemic adult mouse heart. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells also differentiate into cardiomyocytes under similar experimental conditions and transiently coexpress von Willebrand factor and sarcomeric myosin. In contrast, neural stem cells, which efficiently differentiate into skeletal muscle, differentiate into cardiomyocytes at a low rate. Fibroblast growth factor 2 and bone morphogenetic protein 4, which activate cardiac differentiation in embryonic cells, do not activate cardiogenesis in endothelial cells or stimulate trans-differentiation in coculture, suggesting that different signaling molecules are responsible for cardiac induction during embryogenesis and in successive periods of development. The fact that endothelial cells can generate cardiomyocytes sheds additional light on the plasticity of endothelial cells during development and opens perspectives for cell autologous replacement therapies. PMID:11535818

  1. A muscle powered cardiac assist device for right ventricular support: total assist or partial assist?

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, N; Watanabe, G; Misaki, T; Mukai, A; Tsubota, M; Takemura, H; Ohtake, Y; Iwa, T

    1990-01-01

    A muscle powered cardiac assist device (MCAD) for right ventricular support requires optimized diastolic filling to obtain full stroke and acceptable fluid dynamics. A valved and spring-assembled skeletal muscle ventricle (SMV) was designed as a prototype MCAD, regardless of fluid dynamics. The present study addresses the optimal bypass method for right ventricular support, and predicts the future design for an implantable MCAD. Latissimus dorsi muscle (LDM) of 11 dogs were conditioned electrically for a one year maximum, and transformed into fatigue-resistant muscles (Type I fibers). Superior and inferior vena cavae were anastomosed using one arm of a Y-shaped vascular graft, as an inflow conduit, and the outflow conduit was placed on the main pulmonary artery. SMV was wrapped with transformed LDM and the bypass method was varied by SVC and/or IVC ligation. SMV demonstrated sufficient right ventricular support on total bypass (70% compared with control output), and the maximum pump off-to-on flow ratio (200%) was obtained. Maximum SMV power output was 0.27 X 10(6) erg, which was equivalent to that of canine right ventricle. Right atrial-to-pulmonary artery bypass was also constructed by using SMV in another 14 dogs, and also showed that total bypass was preferable for optimal SMV diastolic filling. In conclusion, specific requirements for a future MCAD include a subsystem assembly such as a spring, magnet, or alternative auxiliary muscle pump assembly for MCAD filling, and total bypass with optimized fluid dynamics and anatomic fitting. PMID:2252702

  2. Anesthesia with propofol induces insulin resistance systemically in skeletal and cardiac muscles and liver of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Fukushima, Yuji; Kaneki, Masao; Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Propofol, as a model anesthetic drug, induced whole body insulin resistance. ► Propofol anesthesia decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. ► Propofol decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscles. ► Propofol increased hepatic glucose output confirming hepatic insulin resistance. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia together with hepatic and muscle insulin resistance are common features in critically ill patients, and these changes are associated with enhanced inflammatory response, increased susceptibility to infection, muscle wasting, and worsened prognosis. Tight blood glucose control by intensive insulin treatment may reduce the morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. Although some anesthetics have been shown to cause insulin resistance, it remains unknown how and in which tissues insulin resistance is induced by anesthetics. Moreover, the effects of propofol, a clinically relevant intravenous anesthetic, also used in the intensive care unit for sedation, on insulin sensitivity have not yet been investigated. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study was performed in rats anesthetized with propofol and conscious unrestrained rats. To evaluate glucose uptake in tissues and hepatic glucose output [{sup 3}H]glucose and 2-deoxy[{sup 14}C]glucose were infused during the clamp study. Anesthesia with propofol induced a marked whole-body insulin resistance compared with conscious rats, as reflected by significantly decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. Insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake was decreased in skeletal muscle and heart, and hepatic glucose output was increased in propofol anesthetized rats. Anesthesia with propofol induces systemic insulin resistance along with decreases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal and heart muscle and attenuation of the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose output in rats.

  3. Endurance training prevents negative effects of the hypoxia mimetic dimethyloxalylglycine on cardiac and skeletal muscle function.

    PubMed

    Favier, Francois B; Britto, Florian A; Ponçon, Benjamin; Begue, Gwenaelle; Chabi, Beatrice; Reboul, Cyril; Meyer, Gregory; Py, Guillaume

    2016-02-15

    Hypoxic preconditioning is a promising strategy to prevent hypoxia-induced damages to several tissues. This effect is related to prior stabilization of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α via inhibition of the prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs), which are responsible for its degradation under normoxia. Although PHD inhibition has been shown to increase endurance performance in rodents, potential side effects of such a therapy have not been explored. Here, we investigated the effects of 1 wk of dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG) treatment (150 mg/kg) on exercise capacity, as well as on cardiac and skeletal muscle function in sedentary and endurance-trained rats. DMOG improved maximal aerobic velocity and endurance in both sedentary and trained rats. This effect was associated with an increase in red blood cells without significant alteration of skeletal muscle contractile properties. In sedentary rats, DMOG treatment resulted in enhanced left ventricle (LV) weight together with impairment in diastolic function, LV relaxation, and pulse pressure. Moreover, DMOG decreased maximal oxygen uptake (state 3) of isolated mitochondria from skeletal muscle. Importantly, endurance training reversed the negative effects of DMOG treatment on cardiac function and restored maximal mitochondrial oxygen uptake to the level of sedentary placebo-treated rats. In conclusion, we provide here evidence that the PHD inhibitor DMOG has detrimental influence on myocardial and mitochondrial function in healthy rats. However, one may suppose that the deleterious influence of PHD inhibition would be potentiated in patients with already poor physical condition. Therefore, the present results prompt us to take into consideration the potential side effects of PHD inhibitors when administrated to patients. PMID:26679609

  4. 32-Channel System to Measure the Electrophysiological Properties of Bioengineered Cardiac Muscle.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Betsy H; Reddy, Anilkumar K; Zewei Tao; Madala, Sridhar; Birla, Ravi K

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop, assess, and validate a custom 32-channel system to analyze the electrical properties of 3-D artificial heart muscle (3D-AHM). In this study, neonatal rat cardiac cells were cultured in a fibrin gel to drive the formation of 3D-AHM. Once the tissues were fully formed, the customized electrocardiogram (EKG) sensing system was used to obtain the different electrophysiological characteristics of the muscle constructs. Additionally, this system was used to evaluate the electrical properties of native rat hearts, for comparison to the fabricated tissues and native values found in the literature. Histological evaluation showed extensive cellularization and cardiac tissue formation. EKG data analysis yielded time delays between the signals ranging from 0 to 7 ms. Optical maps exhibited slight trends in impulse propagation throughout the fabricated tissue. Conduction velocities were calculated longitudinally at 277.81 cm/s, transversely at 300.79 cm/s, and diagonally at 285.68 cm/s for 3D-AHM. The QRS complex exhibited an R-wave amplitude of 438.42 ± 36.96 μV and an average duration of 317.5 ± 16.5 ms for the tissue constructs. The data collected in this study provide a clearer picture about the intrinsic properties of the 3D-AHM while proving our system's efficacy for EKG data procurement. To achieve a viable and permanent solution, the bioengineered heart muscle must physiologically resemble native heart tissue as well as mimic its electrical properties for proper contractile function. This study allows us to monitor such properties and assess the necessary changes that will improve construct development and function. PMID:25667345

  5. Motor imagery muscle contraction strength influences spinal motor neuron excitability and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Bunno, Yoshibumi; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Iwatsuki, Hiroyasu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in spinal motor neuron excitability and autonomic nervous system activity during motor imagery of isometric thenar muscle activity at 10% and 50% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). [Methods] The F-waves and low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) ratio were recorded at rest, during motor imagery, and post-trial. For motor imagery trials, subjects were instructed to imagine thenar muscle activity at 10% and 50% MVC while holding the sensor of a pinch meter for 5 min. [Results] The F-waves and LF/HF ratio during motor imagery at 50% MVC were significantly increased compared with those at rest, whereas those during motor imagery at 10% MVC were not significantly different from those at rest. The relative values of the F/M amplitude ratio during motor imagery at 50% MVC were significantly higher than those at 10% MVC. The relative values of persistence and the LF/HF ratio during motor imagery were similar during motor imagery at the two muscle contraction strengths. [Conclusion] Motor imagery can increase the spinal motor neuron excitability and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity. Motor imagery at 50% MVC may be more effective than motor imagery at 10% MVC. PMID:26834354

  6. Three-dimensional organization of troponin on cardiac muscle thin filaments in the relaxed state.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shixin; Barbu-Tudoran, Lucian; Orzechowski, Marek; Craig, Roger; Trinick, John; White, Howard; Lehman, William

    2014-02-18

    Muscle contraction is regulated by troponin-tropomyosin, which blocks and unblocks myosin binding sites on actin. To elucidate this regulatory mechanism, the three-dimensional organization of troponin and tropomyosin on the thin filament must be determined. Although tropomyosin is well defined in electron microscopy helical reconstructions of thin filaments, troponin density is mostly lost. Here, we determined troponin organization on native relaxed cardiac muscle thin filaments by applying single particle reconstruction procedures to negatively stained specimens. Multiple reference models led to the same final structure, indicating absence of model bias in the procedure. The new reconstructions clearly showed F-actin, tropomyosin, and troponin densities. At the 25 Å resolution achieved, troponin was considerably better defined than in previous reconstructions. The troponin density closely resembled the shape of troponin crystallographic structures, facilitating detailed interpretation of the electron microscopy density map. The orientation of troponin-T and the troponin core domain established troponin polarity. Density attributable to the troponin-I mobile regulatory domain was positioned where it could hold tropomyosin in its blocking position on actin, thus suggesting the underlying structural basis of thin filament regulation. Our previous understanding of thin filament regulation had been limited to known movements of tropomyosin that sterically block and unblock myosin binding sites on actin. We now show how troponin, the Ca(2+) sensor, may control these movements, ultimately determining whether muscle contracts or relaxes. PMID:24559988

  7. Cardiac arrest during radical nephrectomy due to a mass in the right ventricular outflow tract.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Young; Baek, Seung-Hoon; Yoon, Ji Uk; Lee, Dong Hoon; Byeon, Gyeong-Jo; Ahn, Ji Hye

    2016-09-01

    We report cardiac arrest due to obstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) caused by an RVOT mass that was not identified preoperatively. A 62-year-old woman with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) experienced deteriorating hypotension and bradycardia during radical nephrectomy. Hemodynamic stability was maintained on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and after surgery, she was transferred to the intensive care unit. On postoperative day 3, transthoracic echocardiography showed an intracardiac mass obstructing the RVOT, which caused severe functional pulmonary stenosis and moderate resting pulmonary hypertension. Despite maintaining extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, the patient died of cardiac arrest. Our findings suggest that it may be necessary to perform additional tests if RCC has invaded the renal vein and inferior vena cava or if a patient with RCC has abnormal cardiovascular symptoms without definite etiology for exclusion of cardiac metastasis or tumor thrombus. In addition, intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography might be the procedure of choice for the evaluation of these conditions because other diagnostic tests are difficult to perform during surgery. In conclusion, for patients with acute hemodynamic instability for whom other possible causes have been excluded, we recommend that anesthesiologists use transesophageal echocardiography to detect outflow tract obstruction or pulmonary thromboembolism and perform anesthetic management. PMID:27555152

  8. Muscle-Specific Splicing of a Heterologous Exon Mediated by a Single Muscle-Specific Splicing Enhancer from the Cardiac Troponin T Gene

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Thomas A.

    1998-01-01

    The chicken cardiac troponin T (cTNT) gene contains a single 30-nucleotide alternative exon that is included in embryonic striated muscle and skipped in the adult. Transient-transfection analysis of cTNT minigenes in muscle and fibroblast cell cultures previously identified four muscle-specific splicing enhancers (MSEs) that promote exon inclusion specifically in embryonic striated muscle cultures. Three MSEs located in the intron downstream from the alternative exon were sufficient for muscle-specific exon inclusion. In the present study, the boundaries of these MSEs were defined by scanning mutagenesis, allowing analysis of individual elements in gain-of-function experiments. Concatamers of MSE2 were necessary and sufficient to promote muscle-specific inclusion of a heterologous exon, indicating that it is a target for muscle-specific regulation. Sequences present in MSE2 are also found in MSE4, suggesting that these two MSEs act in a similar manner. MSE3 appears to be different from MSE2 and MSE4 yet is able to functionally replace both of these elements, demonstrating functional redundancy of elements that are likely to bind different factors. MSE2 and MSE4 each contain a novel sequence motif that is found adjacent to a number of alternative exons that undergo regulated splicing in striated muscle, suggesting a common role for this element in muscle-specific regulation. PMID:9671461

  9. Autophagic Signaling and Proteolytic Enzyme Activity in Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle of Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats following Chronic Aerobic Exercise

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Elliott M.; Paré, Marie-France; Baechler, Brittany L.; Graham, Drew A.; Rush, James W. E.; Quadrilatero, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a cardiovascular disease associated with deleterious effects in skeletal and cardiac muscle. Autophagy is a degradative process essential to muscle health. Acute exercise can alter autophagic signaling. Therefore, we aimed to characterize the effects of chronic endurance exercise on autophagy in skeletal and cardiac muscle of normotensive and hypertensive rats. Male Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were assigned to a sedentary condition or 6 weeks of treadmill running. White gastrocnemius (WG) of hypertensive rats had higher (p<0.05) caspase-3 and proteasome activity, as well as elevated calpain activity. In addition, skeletal muscle of hypertensive animals had elevated (p<0.05) ATG7 and LC3I protein, LAMP2 mRNA, and cathepsin activity, indicative of enhanced autophagic signaling. Interestingly, chronic exercise training increased (p<0.05) Beclin-1, LC3, and p62 mRNA as well as proteasome activity, but reduced (p<0.05) Beclin-1 and ATG7 protein, as well as decreased (p<0.05) caspase-3, calpain, and cathepsin activity. Left ventricle (LV) of hypertensive rats had reduced (p<0.05) AMPKα and LC3II protein, as well as elevated (p<0.05) p-AKT, p-p70S6K, LC3I and p62 protein, which collectively suggest reduced autophagic signaling. Exercise training had little effect on autophagy-related signaling factors in LV; however, exercise training increased (p<0.05) proteasome activity but reduced (p<0.05) caspase-3 and calpain activity. Our results suggest that autophagic signaling is altered in skeletal and cardiac muscle of hypertensive animals. Regular aerobic exercise can effectively alter the proteolytic environment in both cardiac and skeletal muscle, as well as influence several autophagy-related factors in skeletal muscle of normotensive and hypertensive rats. PMID:25799101

  10. MALADAPTIVE SKELETAL MUSCLE METABOLISM PRECEDES MALADAPTIVE CHANGES IN CARDIAC METABOLISM AND FUNCTION WITH "WESTERN" DIET IN THE WISTAR RAT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity and diabetes are associated with increased fatty acid availability in excess of fatty acid oxidation capacity, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of skeletal muscle insulin resistance and cardiac contractile dysfunction. We tested the hypothesis that a "western" diet induces maladaptati...

  11. Skeletal muscle Na,K-pump concentration in children and its relationship to cardiac glycoside distribution.

    PubMed

    Kjeldsen, K; Grøn, P

    1989-08-01

    Skeletal muscle Na,K-pump (cardiac glycoside receptor) concentration was quantified in 18 0- to 8-year-old human subjects by vanadate facilitated [3H]ouabain binding to intact vastus lateralis samples obtained at autopsy. No age-dependent change in [3H]ouabain binding site concentration was observed. Mean value +/- S.E.M. was 268 +/- 17 pmol/g wet wt. (n = 18), range 182 to 433 pmol/g wet wt. At the age of 1 day, 3.5 month and 8 years and 8 months, unspecific uptake and retention of [3H]ouabain was 1.6, 1.4 and 1.5% of the total uptake and retention; release of specifically bound [3H]ouabain during the washout procedure took place with T 1/2 of 97, 90 and 73 hr; and apparent affinity constants for [3H]ouabain binding (KD) was 1.3 x 10(-8), 0.9 x 10(-8) and 1.2 x 10(-8) mol/l. [3H]Ouabain binding site concentrations and kinetics were in agreement with values from adults except that in children apparent affinity constant (KD) was 1.7 times the value in adults. The observation of no age-dependent changes in human skeletal muscle Na,K-adenosine triphosphatase concentration was at variance with the observations of such changes in animals. The total number of Na,K-pumps in the pool of skeletal muscles increased from 10 to 50 times that in the heart from birth to old age. The skeletal muscle pool of Na,K-pumps seems to constitute a distribution volume of importance during digitalization in children as well as adults.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2547946

  12. Measuring the mechanical efficiency of a working cardiac muscle sample at body temperature using a flow-through calorimeter.

    PubMed

    Taberner, Andrew J; Johnston, Callum M; Pham, Toan; June-Chiew Han; Ruddy, Bryan P; Loiselle, Denis S; Nielsen, Poul M F

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a new `work-loop calorimeter' that is capable of measuring, simultaneously, the work-done and heat production of isolated cardiac muscle samples at body temperature. Through the innovative use of thermoelectric modules as temperature sensors, the development of a low-noise fluid-flow system, and implementation of precise temperature control, the heat resolution of this device is 10 nW, an improvement by a factor of ten over previous designs. These advances have allowed us to conduct the first flow-through measurements of work output and heat dissipation from cardiac tissue at body temperature. The mechanical efficiency is found to vary with peak stress, and reaches a peak value of approximately 15 %, a figure similar to that observed in cardiac muscle at lower temperatures. PMID:26738140

  13. Atomic force microscope observation of branching in single transcript molecules derived from human cardiac muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Jason; Hsueh, Carlin; Mishra, Bud; Gimzewski, James K.

    2008-09-01

    We have used an atomic force microscope to examine a clinically derived sample of single-molecule gene transcripts, in the form of double-stranded cDNA, (c: complementary) obtained from human cardiac muscle without the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. We observed a log-normal distribution of transcript sizes, with most molecules being in the range of 0.4-7.0 kilobase pairs (kb) or 130-2300 nm in contour length, in accordance with the expected distribution of mRNA (m: messenger) sizes in mammalian cells. We observed novel branching structures not previously known to exist in cDNA, and which could have profound negative effects on traditional analysis of cDNA samples through cloning, PCR and DNA sequencing.

  14. Functional coupling with cardiac muscle promotes maturation of hPSC-derived sympathetic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Yohan; Cho, Gun-Sik; Li, Zhe; Hong, Ingie; Zhu, Renjun; Kim, Min-Jeong; Kim, Yong Jun; Tampakakis, Emmanouil; Tung, Leslie; Huganir, Richard; Dong, Xinzhong; Kwon, Chulan; Lee, Gabsang

    2016-01-01

    Summary Neurons derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are powerful tools for studying human neural development and diseases. Robust functional coupling of hPSC-derived neurons with target tissues in vitro is essential for modeling intercellular physiology in a dish and to further translational studies, but has proven difficult to achieve. Here, we derive sympathetic neurons from hPSCs and show they can form physical and functional connections with cardiac muscle cells. Using multiple hPSC reporter lines, we recapitulated human autonomic neuron development in vitro and successfully isolated PHOX2B:eGFP+ neurons that exhibit sympathetic marker expression and electrophysiological properties, and norepinephrine secretion. Upon pharmacologic and optogenetic manipulation, PHOX:eGFP+ neurons controlled beating rates of cardiomyocytes, and the physical interactions between these cells increased neuronal maturation. This study provides a foundation for human sympathetic neuron specification and for hPSC-based neuronal control of organs in a dish. PMID:27320040

  15. The role of the N-terminus of the myosin essential light chain in cardiac muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Xu, Yuanyuan; Jones, Michelle; Guzman, Georgianna; Hernandez, Olga M.; Kerrick, W. Glenn L.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2011-01-01

    Summary To study the regulation of cardiac muscle contraction by the myosin essential light chain (ELC) and the physiological significance of its N-terminal extension, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice partially replacing the endogenous mouse ventricular ELC with either the human ventricular ELC wild type (Tg-WT) or its 43 amino acid N-terminal truncation mutant (Tg-Δ43) in the murine hearts. The mutant protein is similar in sequence to the short ELC variant present in skeletal muscle and the ELC protein distribution in Tg-Δ43 ventricles resembles that of fast skeletal muscle. Cardiac muscle preparations from Tg-Δ43 mice demonstrate reduced force per cross-sectional area of muscle, which is likely caused by a reduced number of force generating myosin cross-bridges and/or by decreased force per cross-bridge. As the mice grow older, the contractile force per cross-sectional area further decreases in Tg-Δ43 mice and the mutant hearts develop a phenotype of non-pathologic hypertrophy while still maintaining normal cardiac performance. The myocardium of older Tg-Δ43 mice also exhibits reduced myosin content. Our results suggest that the role of the N-terminal ELC extension is to maintain the integrity of myosin and to modulate force generation by decreasing myosin neck region compliance and promoting strong cross-bridge formation and/or by enhancing myosin attachment to actin. PMID:19361417

  16. Structural and functional aspects of the myosin essential light chain in cardiac muscle contraction

    SciTech Connect

    Muthu, Priya; Wang, Li; Yuan, Chen-Ching; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Huang, Wenrui; Hernandez, Olga M.; Kawai, Masataka; Irving, Thomas C.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2012-04-02

    The myosin essential light chain (ELC) is a structural component of the actomyosin cross-bridge, but its function is poorly understood, especially the role of the cardiac specific N-terminal extension in modulating actomyosin interaction. Here, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the A57G (alanine to glycine) mutation in the cardiac ELC known to cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). The function of the ELC N-terminal extension was investigated with the Tg-{Delta}43 mouse model, whose myocardium expresses a truncated ELC. Low-angle X-ray diffraction studies on papillary muscle fibers in rigor revealed a decreased interfilament spacing ({approx} 1.5 nm) and no alterations in cross-bridge mass distribution in Tg-A57G mice compared to Tg-WT, expressing the full-length nonmutated ELC. The truncation mutation showed a 1.3-fold increase in I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0}, indicating a shift of cross-bridge mass from the thick filament backbone toward the thin filaments. Mechanical studies demonstrated increased stiffness in Tg-A57G muscle fibers compared to Tg-WT or Tg-{Delta}43. The equilibrium constant for the cross-bridge force generation step was smallest in Tg-{Delta}43. These results support an important role for the N-terminal ELC extension in prepositioning the cross-bridge for optimal force production. Subtle changes in the ELC sequence were sufficient to alter cross-bridge properties and lead to pathological phenotypes.

  17. Early Treatment with Lisinopril and Spironolactone Preserves Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rafael-Fortney, Jill A.; Chimanji, Neeraj S.; Schill, Kevin E.; Martin, Christopher D.; Murray, Jason D.; Ganguly, Ranjit; Stangland, Jenna E.; Tran, Tam; Xu, Ying; Canan, Benjamin D.; Mays, Tessily A.; Delfín, Dawn A.; Janssen, Paul M.L.; Raman, Subha V.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nearly-universal cardiomyopathy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) contributes to heart failure and death. As DMD patients show myocardial fibrosis well before functional impairment, we postulated that earlier treatment using drugs with anti-fibrotic effect may be beneficial. Methods and Results Three groups of 10 utrn+/−;mdx or “het” mice with skeletal myopathy and cardiomyopathy that closely mimics clinical DMD were studied. One het group received spironolactone and lisinopril starting at 8 weeks-of-life (het-treated-8), a second received the same starting at 4 weeks-of-life (het-treated-4), and the third het group was untreated. At 20 weeks, all mice had normal EFs though circumferential strain rate was abnormal (−0.21±0.08) in untreated hets. This improved to −0.40±0.07 in het-treated-8 mice (p=0.003), and further improved to −0.56±0.10 in het-treated-4 mice (p=0.014 for het-treated-4 vs. het-treated-8). Treated mice showed less cardiomyocyte damage, with a 44% reduction in intra-cardiomyocyte serum IgG localization in het-treated-8 mice (p<0.0001), and further 53% reduction in het-treated-4 mice (p=0.0003 vs. het-treated-8); matrix metalloproteinases were similarly reduced. Cardiac, limb and diaphragm function by ex vivo muscle testing remained at 80% of normal with early treatment compared to a decline to 40% of normal skeletal muscle function without treatment. Conclusions These findings offer clinically-available medications with proven anti-fibrotic effect as a new therapeutic strategy in DMD. Early initiation greatly attenuated myocardial disease and, for the first time with these drugs, improved skeletal myopathy. Thus, early initiation of such agents warrants further clinical evaluation to maintain ambulatory, respiratory and cardiac function for DMD and related myopathies. PMID:21768542

  18. The human cardiac muscle ryanodine receptor-calcium release channel: identification, primary structure and topological analysis.

    PubMed

    Tunwell, R E; Wickenden, C; Bertrand, B M; Shevchenko, V I; Walsh, M B; Allen, P D; Lai, F A

    1996-09-01

    Rapid Ca2+ efflux from intracellular stores during cardiac muscle excitation-contraction coupling is mediated by the ryanodine-sensitive calcium-release channel, a large homotetrameric complex present in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. We report here the identification, primary structure and topological analysis of the ryanodine receptor-calcium release channel from human cardiac muscle (hRyR-2). Consistent with sedimentation and immunoblotting studies on the hRyR-2 protein, sequence analysis of ten overlapping cDNA clones reveals an open reading frame of 14901 nucleotides encoding a protein of 4967 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 564 569 Da for hRyR-2. In-frame insertions corresponding to eight and ten amino acid residues were found in two of the ten cDNAs isolated, suggesting that novel, alternatively spliced transcripts of the hRyR-2 gene might exist. Six hydrophobic stretches, which are present within the hRyR-2 C-terminal 500 amino acids and are conserved in all RyR sequences, may be involved in forming the transmembrane domain that constitutes the Ca(2+)-conducting pathway, in agreement with competitive ELISA studies with a RyR-2-specific antibody. Sequence alignment of hRyR-2 with other RyR isoforms indicates a high level of overall identity within the RyR family, with the exception of two important regions that exhibit substantial variability. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the RyR-2 isoform diverged from a single ancestral gene before the RyR-1 and RyR-3 isoforms to form a distinct branch of the RyR family tree. PMID:8809036

  19. Concise Review: Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells and Cardiac Lineage: Potential for Heart Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Narmeen; Tchao, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Valuable and ample resources have been spent over the last two decades in pursuit of interventional strategies to treat the unmet demand of heart failure patients to restore myocardial structure and function. At present, it is clear that full restoration of myocardial structure and function is outside our reach from both clinical and basic research studies, but it may be achievable with a combination of ongoing research, creativity, and perseverance. Since the 1990s, skeletal myoblasts have been extensively investigated for cardiac cell therapy of congestive heart failure. Whereas the Myoblast Autologous Grafting in Ischemic Cardiomyopathy (MAGIC) trial revealed that transplanted skeletal myoblasts did not integrate into the host myocardium and also did not transdifferentiate into cardiomyocytes despite some beneficial effects on recipient myocardial function, recent studies suggest that skeletal muscle-derived stem cells have the ability to adopt a cardiomyocyte phenotype in vitro and in vivo. This brief review endeavors to summarize the importance of skeletal muscle stem cells and how they can play a key role to surpass current results in the future and enhance the efficacious implementation of regenerative cell therapy for heart failure. PMID:24371329

  20. Effects of high-fat mixed-lipid diet and exercise on the antioxidant system in skeletal and cardiac muscles of rats with colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Perse, Martina; Injac, Rade; Strukelj, Borut; Cerar, Anton

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental studies suggest that eating habits and a sedentary lifestyle play a critical role in the incidence of colon carcinoma. In order to investigate the effects of high-fat mixed-lipid (HFML) diet in conjunction with long-term swimming, the antioxidant capacity of skeletal and cardiac muscles were observed in rats with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinoma. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into one control group and four cancer groups: sedentary and swimming groups fed low fat corn oil diet and sedentary and swimming groups, fed a HFML diet. After 6 months of swimming, rats were sacrificed and the blood, cardiac and soleus muscle were taken for analysis. Serum cholesterol, triglyceride and glucose concentrations were measured and the activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase as well as levels of malondialdehyde and glutathione were determined. The results showed that endurance swimming prevented lipid peroxidation in the soleus muscle of HFML diet rats due to elevated activities of antioxidant enzymes. On the other hand, increased lipid peroxidation in the hearts of all cancer groups indicated that DMH-induced colon carcinoma impaired the antioxidant status of the heart. This failure in heart tissue indicated that enhanced antioxidant capacity after regular physical activity is not sufficient to offset oxidative stress caused by DMH-induced colon carcinoma. PMID:19904015

  1. Muscle-specific vascular endothelial growth factor deletion induces muscle capillary rarefaction creating muscle insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Jeffrey S; Lantier, Louise; Hasenour, Clinton M; James, Freyja D; Bracy, Deanna P; Wasserman, David H

    2013-02-01

    Muscle insulin resistance is associated with a reduction in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) action and muscle capillary density. We tested the hypothesis that muscle capillary rarefaction critically contributes to the etiology of muscle insulin resistance in chow-fed mice with skeletal and cardiac muscle VEGF deletion (mVEGF(-/-)) and wild-type littermates (mVEGF(+/+)) on a C57BL/6 background. The mVEGF(-/-) mice had an ~60% and ~50% decrease in capillaries in skeletal and cardiac muscle, respectively. The mVEGF(-/-) mice had augmented fasting glucose turnover. Insulin-stimulated whole-body glucose disappearance was blunted in mVEGF(-/-) mice. The reduced peripheral glucose utilization during insulin stimulation was due to diminished in vivo cardiac and skeletal muscle insulin action and signaling. The decreased insulin-stimulated muscle glucose uptake was independent of defects in insulin action at the myocyte, suggesting that the impairment in insulin-stimulated muscle glucose uptake was due to poor muscle perfusion. The deletion of VEGF in cardiac muscle did not affect cardiac output. These studies emphasize the importance for novel therapeutic approaches that target the vasculature in the treatment of insulin-resistant muscle. PMID:23002035

  2. Isoproterenol directs hair follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells to differentiate in vitro to cardiac muscle cells which can be induced to form beating heart-muscle tissue sheets.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Aiko; Yashiro, Masateru; Mii, Sumiyuki; Aki, Ryoichi; Hamada, Yuko; Arakawa, Nobuko; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Hoffman, Robert M; Amoh, Yasuyuki

    2016-03-01

    Nestin-expressing hair-follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells are located in the bulge area of the follicle. Previous studies have shown that HAP stem cells can differentiate to neurons, glia, keratinocytes, smooth muscle cells, and melanocytes in vitro. HAP stem cells effected nerve and spinal cord regeneration in mouse models. Recently, we demonstrated that HAP stem cells differentiated to beating cardiac muscle cells. The differentiation potential to cardiac muscle cells was greatest in the upper part of the follicle. The beat rate of the cardiac muscle cells was stimulated by isoproterenol. In the present study, we observed that isoproterenol directs HAP stem cells to differentiate to cardiac muscle cells in large numbers in culture compared to HAP stem cells not supplemented with isoproterenol. The addition of activin A, bone morphogenetic protein 4, and basic fibroblast growth factor, along with isoproternal, induced the cardiac muscle cells to form tissue sheets of beating heart muscle cells. These results demonstrate that HAP stem cells have great potential to form beating cardiac muscle cells in tissue sheets. PMID:27104748

  3. The costs of a suburban paramedic program in reducing deaths due to cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Urban, N; Bergner, L; Eisenberg, M S

    1981-04-01

    The marginal costs per averted death of a suburban paramedic program are estimated to be approximately $42,000, when program costs are attributed entirely to cardiac arrest cases due to underlying heart disease, and indirect costs attributable to episode-related hospitalization are included, It is suggested that at $42,000 per cardiac arrest death averted the program is cost-beneficial by two criteria. First, it compares favorably with an estimate obtained from the literature of the value to the average individual of saving the life of a myocardial infarction patient. Second, the people of King County passed a cost-commensurate Paramedic Program Property Tax Levy in 1979, revealing their willingness to support the program. Results of the study should be generalized in accordance with the facts that in King County 1) the population density averages approximately 1,300 per square mile; 2) a basic emergency medical system ensures a 4-minute average response time to initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation; 3) a citizen-training program in cardiopulmonary resuscitation further reduces average time to initiation of basic life support; and 4) the paramedic program is designed to ensure a 10-minute average time to definitive care. PMID:6785539

  4. Artificial aortic valve dysfunction due to pannus and thrombus – different methods of cardiac surgical management

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkiewicz, Anna; Kośmider, Anna; Walczak, Andrzej; Zwoliński, Radosław; Jaszewski, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 60 000 prosthetic valves are implanted annually in the USA. The risk of prosthesis dysfunction ranges from 0.1% to 4% per year. Prosthesis valve dysfunction is usually caused by a thrombus obstructing the prosthetic discs. However, 10% of prosthetic valves are dysfunctional due to pannus formation, and 12% of prostheses are damaged by both fibrinous and thrombotic components. The authors present two patients with dysfunctional aortic prostheses who were referred for cardiac surgery. Different surgical solutions were used in the treatment of each case. Case study 1 The first patient was a 71-year-old woman whose medical history included arterial hypertension, stable coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and hypercholesterolemia; she had previously undergone left-sided mastectomy and radiotherapy. The patient was admitted to the Cardiac Surgery Department due to aortic prosthesis dysfunction. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed complete obstruction of one disc and a severe reduction in the mobility of the second. The mean transvalvular gradient was very high. During the operation, pannus covering the discs’ surface was found. A biological aortic prosthesis was reimplanted without complications. Case study 2 The second patient was an 87-year-old woman with arterial hypertension, persistent atrial fibrillation, and COPD, whose past medical history included gastric ulcer disease and ischemic stroke. As in the case of the first patient, she was admitted due to valvular prosthesis dysfunction. Preoperative transthoracic echocardiography revealed an obstruction of the posterior prosthetic disc and significant aortic regurgitation. Transesophageal echocardiography and fluoroscopy confirmed the prosthetic dysfunction. During the operation, a thrombus growing around a minor pannus was found. The thrombus and pannus were removed, and normal functionality of the prosthetic valve was restored

  5. Three-Dimensional Structure of Vertebrate Muscle Z-Band: The Small-Square Lattice Z-Band in Rat Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Burgoyne, Thomas; Morris, Edward P.; Luther, Pradeep K.

    2015-01-01

    The Z-band in vertebrate striated muscle crosslinks actin filaments of opposite polarity from adjoining sarcomeres and transmits tension along myofibrils during muscular contraction. It is also the location of a number of proteins involved in signalling and myofibrillogenesis; mutations in these proteins lead to myopathies. Understanding the high-resolution structure of the Z-band will help us understand its role in muscle contraction and the role of these proteins in the function of muscle. The appearance of the Z-band in transverse-section electron micrographs typically resembles a small-square lattice or a basketweave appearance. In longitudinal sections, the Z-band width varies more with muscle type than species: slow skeletal and cardiac muscles have wider Z-bands than fast skeletal muscles. As the Z-band is periodic, Fourier methods have previously been used for three-dimensional structural analysis. To cope with variations in the periodic structure of the Z-band, we have used subtomogram averaging of tomograms of rat cardiac muscle in which subtomograms are extracted and compared and similar ones are averaged. We show that the Z-band comprises four to six layers of links, presumably α-actinin, linking antiparallel overlapping ends of the actin filaments from the adjoining sarcomeres. The reconstruction shows that the terminal 5–7 nm of the actin filaments within the Z-band is devoid of any α-actinin links and is likely to be the location of capping protein CapZ. PMID:26362007

  6. Three-Dimensional Structure of Vertebrate Muscle Z-Band: The Small-Square Lattice Z-Band in Rat Cardiac Muscle.

    PubMed

    Burgoyne, Thomas; Morris, Edward P; Luther, Pradeep K

    2015-11-01

    The Z-band in vertebrate striated muscle crosslinks actin filaments of opposite polarity from adjoining sarcomeres and transmits tension along myofibrils during muscular contraction. It is also the location of a number of proteins involved in signalling and myofibrillogenesis; mutations in these proteins lead to myopathies. Understanding the high-resolution structure of the Z-band will help us understand its role in muscle contraction and the role of these proteins in the function of muscle. The appearance of the Z-band in transverse-section electron micrographs typically resembles a small-square lattice or a basketweave appearance. In longitudinal sections, the Z-band width varies more with muscle type than species: slow skeletal and cardiac muscles have wider Z-bands than fast skeletal muscles. As the Z-band is periodic, Fourier methods have previously been used for three-dimensional structural analysis. To cope with variations in the periodic structure of the Z-band, we have used subtomogram averaging of tomograms of rat cardiac muscle in which subtomograms are extracted and compared and similar ones are averaged. We show that the Z-band comprises four to six layers of links, presumably α-actinin, linking antiparallel overlapping ends of the actin filaments from the adjoining sarcomeres. The reconstruction shows that the terminal 5-7nm of the actin filaments within the Z-band is devoid of any α-actinin links and is likely to be the location of capping protein CapZ. PMID:26362007

  7. Characterization of the zebrafish cx36.7 gene promoter: Its regulation of cardiac-specific expression and skeletal muscle-specific repression.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Hisako; Nag, Kakon; Sultana, Naznin; Munakata, Keijiro; Hirose, Shigehisa; Nakamura, Nobuhiro

    2016-02-15

    Zebrafish connexin 36.7 (cx36.7/ecx) has been identified as a key molecule in the early stages of heart development in this species. A defect in cx36.7 causes severe heart malformation due to the downregulation of nkx2.5 expression, a result which resembles congenital heart disease in humans. It has been shown that cx36.7 is expressed specifically in early developing heart cardiomyocytes. However, the regulatory mechanism for the cardiac-restricted expression of cx36.7 remains to be elucidated. In this study we isolated the 5'-flanking promoter region of the cx36.7 gene and characterized its promoter activity in zebrafish embryos. Deletion analysis showed that a 316-bp upstream region is essential for cardiac-restricted expression. This region contains four GATA elements, the proximal two of which are responsible for promoter activation in the embryonic heart and serve as binding sites for gata4. When gata4, gata5 and gata6 were simultaneously knocked down, the promoter activity was significantly decreased. Moreover, the deletion of the region between -316 and -133bp led to EGFP expression in the embryonic trunk muscle. The distal two GATA and A/T-rich elements in this region act as repressors of promoter activity in skeletal muscle. These results suggest that cx36.7 expression is directed by cardiac promoter activation via the two proximal GATA elements as well as by skeletal muscle-specific promoter repression via the two distal GATA elements. PMID:26692140

  8. Fulminant mediastinitis due to extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae: atypical presentation and spreading following cardiac surgery†

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Horacio; Carrascal, Yolanda; Maroto, Laura; Arce, Nuria

    2013-01-01

    Mediastinitis due to Klebsiella pneumoniae, related to thoracic wall contamination after cardiac surgery, has rarely been described. We aim to report a case of fulminant mediastinitis due to extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae, secondary to a disseminated concomitant pulmonary infection. The patient remained pauci-symptomatic until clinical manifestations of sepsis acutely appeared. PMID:23416348

  9. Physical Exercise Regulates p53 Activity Targeting SCO2 and Increases Mitochondrial COX Biogenesis in Cardiac Muscle with Age

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Zhengtang; He, Jie; Su, Yuhui; He, Qiang; Liu, Jingxia; Yu, Lu; Al-Attas, Omar; Hussain, Tajamul; Ding, Shuzhe; Ji, Liu; Qian, Min

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to outline the timelines of mitochondrial function, oxidative stress and cytochrome c oxidase complex (COX) biogenesis in cardiac muscle with age, and to evaluate whether and how these age-related changes were attenuated by exercise. ICR/CD-1 mice were treated with pifithrin-μ (PFTμ), sacrificed and studied at different ages; ICR/CD-1 mice at younger or older ages were randomized to endurance treadmill running and sedentary conditions. The results showed that mRNA expression of p53 and its protein levels in mitochondria increased with age in cardiac muscle, accompanied by increased mitochondrial oxidative stress, reduced expression of COX subunits and assembly proteins, and decreased expression of most markers in mitochondrial biogenesis. Most of these age-related changes including p53 activity targeting cytochrome oxidase deficient homolog 2 (SCO2), p53 translocation to mitochondria and COX biogenesis were attenuated by exercise in older mice. PFTμ, an inhibitor blocking p53 translocation to mitochondria, increased COX biogenesis in older mice, but not in young mice. Our data suggest that physical exercise attenuates age-related changes in mitochondrial COX biogenesis and p53 activity targeting SCO2 and mitochondria, and thereby induces antisenescent and protective effects in cardiac muscle. PMID:21750704

  10. Physical exercise regulates p53 activity targeting SCO2 and increases mitochondrial COX biogenesis in cardiac muscle with age.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhengtang; He, Jie; Su, Yuhui; He, Qiang; Liu, Jingxia; Yu, Lu; Al-Attas, Omar; Hussain, Tajamul; Ding, Shuzhe; Ji, Liu; Qian, Min

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to outline the timelines of mitochondrial function, oxidative stress and cytochrome c oxidase complex (COX) biogenesis in cardiac muscle with age, and to evaluate whether and how these age-related changes were attenuated by exercise. ICR/CD-1 mice were treated with pifithrin-μ (PFTμ), sacrificed and studied at different ages; ICR/CD-1 mice at younger or older ages were randomized to endurance treadmill running and sedentary conditions. The results showed that mRNA expression of p53 and its protein levels in mitochondria increased with age in cardiac muscle, accompanied by increased mitochondrial oxidative stress, reduced expression of COX subunits and assembly proteins, and decreased expression of most markers in mitochondrial biogenesis. Most of these age-related changes including p53 activity targeting cytochrome oxidase deficient homolog 2 (SCO2), p53 translocation to mitochondria and COX biogenesis were attenuated by exercise in older mice. PFTμ, an inhibitor blocking p53 translocation to mitochondria, increased COX biogenesis in older mice, but not in young mice. Our data suggest that physical exercise attenuates age-related changes in mitochondrial COX biogenesis and p53 activity targeting SCO2 and mitochondria, and thereby induces antisenescent and protective effects in cardiac muscle. PMID:21750704

  11. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase-1b (CPT1b) Deficiency Aggravates Pressure-Overload-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy due to Lipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    He, Lan; Kim, Teayoun; Long, Qinqiang; Liu, Jian; Wang, Peiyong; Zhou, Yiqun; Ding, Yishu; Prasain, Jeevan; Wood, Philip A.; Yang, Qinglin

    2012-01-01

    Background Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1(CPT1) is a rate-limiting step of mitochondrial β-oxidation by controlling the mitochondrial uptake of long-chain acyl-CoAs. The muscle isoform, CPT1b, is the predominant isoform expressed in the heart. It has been suggested that inhibiting CPT-1 activity by specific CPT-1 inhibitors exerts protective effects against cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. However, clinical and animal studies have shown mixed results, thereby posting concerns on the safety of this class of drugs. Preclinical studies using genetically modified animal models should provide a better understanding of targeting CPT1 in order to evaluate it as a safe and effective therapeutic approach. Methods and Results Heterozygous CPT1b knockout mice (CPT1b+/−) were subjected to transverse aorta constriction (TAC)-induced pressure-overload. These mice showed overtly normal cardiac structure/function under the basal condition. Under a severe pressure-overload condition induced by two weeks of transverse aorta constriction (TAC), CPT1b+/− mice were susceptible to premature death with congestive heart failure. Under a milder pressure-overload condition, CPT1b+/− mice exhibited exacerbated cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling compared with that in wild-type littermates. There were more pronounced impairments of cardiac contraction with greater eccentric cardiac hypertrophy in CPT1b+/− than in controlled mice. Moreover, the CPT1b+/− heart exhibited exacerbated mitochondrial abnormalities and myocardial lipid accumulation with elevated triglycerides and ceramide content, leading to greater cardiomyocytes apoptosis. Conclusions We conclude that CPT1b deficiency can cause lipotoxicity in the heart under pathological stress, leading to exacerbation of cardiac pathology. Therefore, caution should be applied in the clinical use of CPT-1 inhibitors. PMID:22932257

  12. Relaxin protects cardiac muscle cells from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury: involvement of the Notch-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Boccalini, Giulia; Sassoli, Chiara; Formigli, Lucia; Bani, Daniele; Nistri, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    In animal models, the cardiotropic hormone relaxin has been shown to protect the heart against ischemia and reperfusion-induced damage, acting by multiple mechanisms that primarily involve the coronary vessels. This in vitro study evaluates whether relaxin also has a direct protective action on cardiac muscle cells. H9c2 rat cardiomyoblasts and primary mouse cardiomyocytes were subjected to hypoxia and reoxygenation. In some experiments, relaxin was added preventatively before hypoxia; in others, at reoxygenation. To elucidate its mechanisms of action, we focused on Notch-1, which is involved in heart pre- and postconditioning to ischemia. Inactivated RLX was used as negative control. Relaxin (17 nmol/L, EC50 4.7 nmol/L), added 24 h before hypoxia or at reoxygenation, protected against cardiomyocyte injury. In fact, relaxin significantly increased cell viability (assayed by trypan blue and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide), decreased apoptosis (assayed by TUNEL and bax/bcl-2 ratio), and reduced nitroxidative damage (assayed by nitrotyrosine expression and 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine levels). These effects were partly attributable to the ability of relaxin to upregulate Notch-1 signaling; indeed, blockade of Notch-1 activation with the specific inhibitor DAPT reduced relaxin-induced cardioprotection during hypoxia and reoxygenation. This study adds new mechanistic insights on the cardioprotective role of relaxin on ischemic and oxidative damage. PMID:25342127

  13. High resolution measurement of striation patterns and sarcomere motions in cardiac muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, J W; Denton, A

    1992-01-01

    We describe an extension of the method of Myers et al. (1982) to measure with high precision the uniformity of contractile motions that occur between sarcomeres in the isolated cardiac muscle cell (guinea pig and rat). The image of the striations, observed with modulation contrast microscopy, was detected by a linear array of photodiodes. Sarcomere length was measured greater than 500/s from the frequency of the array's video signal at two selectable regions of the cell. A precision test grating demonstrated that method resolves known differences in the spacing between two contiguous striations to +/- 0.01 micron and that the effects of image translation and microscopic resolution are minor. The distribution of striation spacing appears to be discrete in isolated segments of the cell, and patches of fairly uniform length can be identified that are laterally contiguous. When electrically triggered, contraction is synchronous and the sarcomeres shorten and relengthen smoothly. The contrast between the striations is transiently enhanced during relengthening, an indication that the contracting cell can not be treated as a simple grating. Pauses that occur during late in relengthening (and transient contractile alternans) are characterized by very synchronized activity. These forms of irregular contractile behavior are not explained by desynchronization of a mechanism of release of intracellular calcium. A companion article describes application of the technique to study the nonuniform motions that occur between sarcomeres. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:1540686

  14. Functional Coupling with Cardiac Muscle Promotes Maturation of hPSC-Derived Sympathetic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yohan; Cho, Gun-Sik; Li, Zhe; Hong, Ingie; Zhu, Renjun; Kim, Min-Jeong; Kim, Yong Jun; Tampakakis, Emmanouil; Tung, Leslie; Huganir, Richard; Dong, Xinzhong; Kwon, Chulan; Lee, Gabsang

    2016-07-01

    Neurons derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are powerful tools for studying human neural development and diseases. Robust functional coupling of hPSC-derived neurons with target tissues in vitro is essential for modeling intercellular physiology in a dish and to further translational studies, but it has proven difficult to achieve. Here, we derive sympathetic neurons from hPSCs and show that they can form physical and functional connections with cardiac muscle cells. Using multiple hPSC reporter lines, we recapitulated human autonomic neuron development in vitro and successfully isolated PHOX2B::eGFP+ neurons that exhibit sympathetic marker expression and electrophysiological properties and norepinephrine secretion. Upon pharmacologic and optogenetic manipulation, PHOX2B::eGFP+ neurons controlled beating rates of cardiomyocytes, and the physical interactions between these cells increased neuronal maturation. This study provides a foundation for human sympathetic neuron specification and for hPSC-based neuronal control of organs in a dish. PMID:27320040

  15. Ultrastructure of the cysts of Sarcocystis grueneri from cardiac muscle of reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus).

    PubMed

    Gjerde, B

    1985-01-01

    Cysts of Sarcocystis grueneri from cardiac muscle of reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) in Norway were examined by transmission electron microscopy. The limiting unit membrane of the cyst proper formed regularly spaced invaginations into the cyst at numerous sites coinciding with interruptions in the underlying osmiophilic layer. The primary cyst wall formed numerous strip-like, sinuous protrusions, which were 30-40 nm thick, 150-300 nm wide and up to 4.5 microns long, and were running in parallel with the surface of the cyst. Generally the protrusions were arranged in several closely spaced layers compressed against the cyst. The nature and arrangement of the protrusions render them undetectable by light microscopy. Cyst ground substance divided the interior of the cyst into compartments containing typical sarcosporidian metrocytes and cystozoites. The cysts of S. grueneri from reindeer were ultrastructurally similar to cysts reported from red deer, roe deer and moose by other workers. The possibility that these cervids are hosts for a common Sarcocystis species is discussed. PMID:3922150

  16. Acute cardiac tamponade due to spontaneous bleeding in a child with haemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Goz, Mustafa; Hazar, Abdussemet; Mordeniz, Cengiz; Kocarslan, Aydemir; Demirkol, Abbas Heval; Koc, Ahmet

    2010-08-01

    In severe haemophilia A, patients, start from the first years of life, with spontaneous bleeding and require transfusion. However, cardiac tamponade due to spontaneous pericardial bleeding is rare. An 11-year-old boy receiving haemophilia A treatment was referred to the Department of Paediatric Haematology with pneumonia, fever, dyspnoea, and palpitation. In his PA chest radiograph, pneumonic infiltration in the right lung and enlargement in the pericardial area were found. On his echocardiograph, pericardial effusion reaching 3.9 cm and other findings of tamponade were detected. APTT was outside the measurable range. It was deranged to > 120 seconds. The patient received 1000 U of factor VIII intravenously. A pericardial window was made via left anterior mini thoracotomy due to fluid drained. In his control echocardiograph taken after one month, no pathology was found. At 50th day, the patient showed left pleural serohaemorrhagic effusion, which was treated with tube thoracostomy. In haemophilia A patients, either pericardiocentesis or subxiphoid pericardial drainage or pericardial window creation via thoracotomy may be applied, depending on the primary pathology. In paediatric cases, pericardial window creation via mini thoracotomy can be an alternative treatment of choice considering complications such as recurring bleeding and effusion during pericardiocentesis. PMID:20726209

  17. Evidence for a direct action of Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom on the cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, A L; Fontoura, B F; Freire-Maia, L; Machado, C R; Camargos, E R; Teixeira, M M

    2001-05-01

    The ability of toxins to activate the cardiovascular system plays an important role in the morbidity and lethality of the Tityus serrulatus scorpion envenoming. Most of the actions of the scorpion toxins are indirect and due to the release of adrenergic and cholinergic neurotransmitters. Accordingly, treatment following envenoming is targeted towards inhibition of adrenergic and cholinergic receptors. Here, we have sought evidence for a direct action of T. serrulatus venom on the isolated rat heart (Langendorff's method). We show that the bradycardia induced by T. serrulatus venom was completely blocked by atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist. Similarly, the increase in heart rate that follows the venom-induced bradycardia was totally inhibited by a beta(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist or by chemical sympathetic denervation with 6-hydroxydopamine. In contrast to these findings, the venom-induced increase in contractile force was not modified by beta(1)-adrenoceptor blockade or by chemical sympathetic denervation. The results clearly demonstrate that the chronotropic effects of T. serrulatus are dependent on neurotransmitter release, but the inotropic effects are not. The neurotransmitter-independent increase in contractility seems to be a direct action of the venom on cardiomyocytes. We suggest that this direct effect on cardiac fibers may play a role in the development of cardiac arrhythmias and contractility defects following envenoming with T. serrulatus scorpion. PMID:11072050

  18. Pax3 and Tbx5 specify whether PDGFRα+ cells assume skeletal or cardiac muscle fate in differentiating ES cells

    PubMed Central

    Magli, Alessandro; Schnettler, Erin; Swanson, Scott A; Borges, Luciene; Hoffman, Kirsta; Stewart, Ron; Thomson, James A; Keirstead, Susan A.; Perlingeiro, Rita C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells represent an ideal model to study how lineage decisions are established during embryonic development. Using a doxycycline-inducible mouse ES cell line, we have previously shown that expression of the transcriptional activator Pax3 in early mesodermal cells leads to the robust generation of paraxial mesoderm progenitors that ultimately differentiate into skeletal muscle precursors. Here we show that the ability of this transcription factor to induce the skeletal myogenic cell fate occurs at the expenses of the cardiac lineage. Our results show that the PDGFRα+FLK1− sub-fraction represents the main population affected by Pax3, through down-regulation of several transcripts encoding for proteins involved in cardiac development. We demonstrate that although Nkx2-5, Tbx5 and Gata4 negatively affect Pax3 skeletal myogenic activity, the cardiac potential of embryoid body (EB)-derived cultures is restored solely by forced expression of Tbx5. Taking advantage of this model, we employed an unbiased genome wide approach to identify genes whose expression is rescued by Tbx5, and which could represent important regulators of cardiac development. These findings elucidate mechanisms regulating the commitment of mesodermal cells in the early embryo and identify the Tbx5 cardiac transcriptome. PMID:24677751

  19. Comparison of the calcium release channel of cardiac and skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum by target inactivation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McGrew, S.G.; Inui, Makoto; Chadwick, C.C.; Boucek, R.J. Jr.; Jung, C.Y.; Fleischer, S. )

    1989-02-07

    The calcium release channel of sarcoplasmic reticulum which triggers muscle contraction in excitation-contraction coupling has recently been isolated. The channel has been found to be morphologically identical with the feet structures of the junctional face membrane of terminal cisternae and consists of an oligomer of a unique high molecular weight polypeptide. In this study, the authors compare the target size of the calcium release channel from heart and skeletal muscle using target inactivation analysis. The target molecular weights of the calcium release channel estimated by measuring ryanodine binding after irradiation are similar for heart (139,000) and skeletal muscle (143,000) and are smaller than the monomeric unit (estimated to be about 360,000). The target size, estimated by measuring polypeptide remaining after irradiation, was essentially the same for heart and skeletal muscle, 1,061,000 and 1,070,000, respectively, indicating an oligomeric association of protomers. Thus, the calcium release channel of both cardiac and skeletal muscle reacts uniquely with regard to target inactivation analysis in that (1) the size by ryanodine binding is smaller than the monomeric unit and (2) a single hit leads to destruction of more than one polypeptide, by measuring polypeptide remaining. The target inactivation analysis studies indicate that heart and skeletal muscle receptors are structurally very similar.

  20. REGULATION OF CARDIAC AND SKELETAL MUSCLE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS BY INDIVIDUAL BRANCHED-CHAIN AMINO ACIDS IN NEONATAL PIGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Skeletal muscle grows at a very rapid rate in the neonatal pig, due in part to an enhanced sensitivity of protein synthesis to the postprandial rise in amino acids. An increase in leucine alone stimulates protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of the neonatal pig; however, the effect of isoleucine and...

  1. Regulation of intracellular pH in cardiac muscle during cell shrinkage and swelling in anisosmolar solutions.

    PubMed

    Whalley, D W; Hemsworth, P D; Rasmussen, H H

    1994-02-01

    The effect on intracellular pH (pHi) of exposure to solutions of progressively increasing osmolarity from 418 to 620 mosM and to hyposmolar solutions (240 mosM) was examined in guinea pig ventricular muscle using ion-selective microelectrodes. Exposure of tissue to 418 mosM Tyrode solution (100 mM sucrose added) produced an intracellular alkalosis of approximately 0.1 U, whereas exposure to 620 mosM solution (300 mM sucrose added) caused an intracellular acidosis of approximately 0.1 U. The maximal rate of recovery of pHi from acidosis induced by an NH4Cl prepulse increased progressively as extracellular osmolarity was raised from 310 to 620 mosM. This suggests that the acidosis observed at steady state in 620 mosM solution is not due to inhibition of the Na(+)-H+ exchanger. In the presence of 10 microM ryanodine, exposure to 620 mosM solution produced a sustained intracellular alkalosis. We suggest that the decrease in pHi during exposure to 620 mosM solution is due, at least in part, to the acidifying influence of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. This decrease in pHi is expected to contribute to the negative inotrop reported in studies of cardiac contractility in markedly hyperosmolar solutions. There was no change in pHi when tissue was exposed to hyposmolar solution. However, the maximal rate of recovery of pHi from acidosis was slower in hyposmolar than in isosmolar solution, despite a concomitant decrease in the intracellular buffer capacity. This suggests that osmotic cell swelling results in inhibition of the sarcolemmal Na(+)-H+ exchanger. PMID:8141367

  2. Impact of detubulation on force and kinetics of cardiac muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Ferrantini, Cecilia; Coppini, Raffaele; Sacconi, Leonardo; Tosi, Benedetta; Zhang, Mei Luo; Wang, Guo Liang; de Vries, Ewout; Hoppenbrouwers, Ernst; Pavone, Francesco; Cerbai, Elisabetta; Tesi, Chiara; Poggesi, Corrado; ter Keurs, Henk E D J

    2014-06-01

    Action potential-driven Ca(2+) currents from the transverse tubules (t-tubules) trigger synchronous Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum of cardiomyocytes. Loss of t-tubules has been reported in cardiac diseases, including heart failure, but the effect of uncoupling t-tubules from the sarcolemma on cardiac muscle mechanics remains largely unknown. We dissected intact rat right ventricular trabeculae and compared force, sarcomere length, and intracellular Ca(2+) in control trabeculae with trabeculae in which the t-tubules were uncoupled from the plasma membrane by formamide-induced osmotic shock (detubulation). We verified disconnection of a consistent fraction of t-tubules from the sarcolemma by two-photon fluorescence imaging of FM4-64-labeled membranes and by the absence of tubular action potential, which was recorded by random access multiphoton microscopy in combination with a voltage-sensitive dye (Di-4-AN(F)EPPTEA). Detubulation reduced the amplitude and prolonged the duration of Ca(2+) transients, leading to slower kinetics of force generation and relaxation and reduced twitch tension (1 Hz, 30°C, 1.5 mM [Ca(2+)]o). No mechanical changes were observed in rat left atrial trabeculae after formamide shock, consistent with the lack of t-tubules in rodent atrial myocytes. Detubulation diminished the rate-dependent increase of Ca(2+)-transient amplitude and twitch force. However, maximal twitch tension at high [Ca(2+)]o or in post-rest potentiated beats was unaffected, although contraction kinetics were slower. The ryanodine receptor (RyR)2 Ca-sensitizing agent caffeine (200 µM), which increases the velocity of transverse Ca(2+) release propagation in detubulated cardiomyocytes, rescued the depressed contractile force and the slower twitch kinetics of detubulated trabeculae, with negligible effects in controls. We conclude that partial loss of t-tubules leads to myocardial contractile abnormalities that can be rescued by enhancing and accelerating the

  3. Diastolic scattered light fluctuation, resting force and twitch force in mammalian cardiac muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lakatta, E. G.; Lappé, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    1. When coherent light was passed through isolated isometric cardiac muscles during the diastolic or resting period, intensity fluctuations were observed in the scattered field. The frequency of these intensity fluctuations (f½) varied with many experimental interventions known to enhance Ca2+ flux into the cell. 2. In rat muscles stimulated at low frequencies (0.1 ± 2.0 min-1) stepwise increases (0.4-10 mm) of [Ca2+] in the bathing fluid ([Ca2+]e), or addition of ouabain (10-6-6 × 10-4 m) to the perfusate caused stepwise increases in f½. These were paralleled by increments in resting force (RF) such that the changes in f½ and RF were highly correlated. Substitution of K+ for Na+ in the perfusate resulted in parallel transients in RF and f½. 3. In contrast to the rat, most cat muscles stimulated at low frequencies in the steady state exhibited neither diastolic intensity fluctuations nor Ca2+-dependent changes in RF in [Ca2+]e of 10 mm or less; when [Ca2+]e was increased to 12-32 mm, however, steady-state Ca2+-dependent f½ and RF were observed. In a given [Ca2+]e reduction of [Na+]e increased f½. In the transient state following cessation of regular stimulation at more rapid rates (12-96 min-1) intensity fluctuations were present in all [Ca2+]e and decayed with time (seconds to minutes); the f½ and time course of the decay of the fluctuations were determined by the rate of prior stimulation and [Ca2+]e. 4. Maximum potentiation of twitch force in response to the above inotropic interventions was associated with an optimal level of f½ which was similar in both species; when higher levels of f½ were produced by more intense inotropic intervention, twitch force declined. Over the range of inotropic intervention up to and including that at which maximum twitch potentiation occurred, the increase in diastolic f½ predicted the extent of twitch potentiation with a high degree of accuracy (r > 0.97) both in the transient and steady states. 5. In contrast to the

  4. Calsequestrin and the calcium release channel of skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Beard, N A; Laver, D R; Dulhunty, A F

    2004-05-01

    Calsequestrin is by far the most abundant Ca(2+)-binding protein in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of skeletal and cardiac muscle. It allows the Ca2+ required for contraction to be stored at total concentrations of up to 20mM, while the free Ca2+ concentration remains at approximately 1mM. This storage capacity confers upon muscle the ability to contract frequently with minimal run-down in tension. Calsequestrin is highly acidic, containing up to 50 Ca(2+)-binding sites, which are formed simply by clustering of two or more acidic residues. The Kd for Ca2+ binding is between 1 and 100 microM, depending on the isoform, species and the presence of other cations. Calsequestrin monomers have a molecular mass of approximately 40 kDa and contain approximately 400 residues. The monomer contains three domains each with a compact alpha-helical/beta-sheet thioredoxin fold which is stable in the presence of Ca2+. The protein polymerises when Ca2+ concentrations approach 1mM. The polymer is anchored at one end to ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca2+ release channels either via the intrinsic membrane proteins triadin and junctin or by binding directly to the RyR. It is becoming clear that calsequestrin has several functions in the lumen of the SR in addition to its well-recognised role as a Ca2+ buffer. Firstly, it is a luminal regulator of RyR activity. When triadin and junctin are present, calsequestrin maximally inhibits the Ca2+ release channel when the free Ca2+ concentration in the SR lumen is 1mM. The inhibition is relieved when the Ca2+ concentration alters, either because of small changes in the conformation of calsequestrin or its dissociation from the junctional face membrane. These changes in calsequestrin's association with the RyR amplify the direct effects of luminal Ca2+ concentration on RyR activity. In addition, calsequestrin activates purified RyRs lacking triadin and junctin. Further roles for calsequestrin are indicated by the kinase activity of the protein, its

  5. Increased mitochondrial emission of reactive oxygen species and calpain activation are required for doxorubicin-induced cardiac and skeletal muscle myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kisuk; Kwon, Oh-Sung; Smuder, Ashley J; Wiggs, Michael P; Sollanek, Kurt J; Christou, Demetra D; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Szeto, Hazel H; Kavazis, Andreas N; Powers, Scott K

    2015-01-01

    Although doxorubicin (DOX) is a highly effective anti-tumour agent used to treat a variety of cancers, DOX administration is associated with significant side effects, including myopathy of both cardiac and skeletal muscles. The mechanisms responsible for DOX-mediated myopathy remain a topic of debate. We tested the hypothesis that both increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) emission and activation of the cysteine protease calpain are required for DOX-induced myopathy in rat cardiac and skeletal muscle. Cause and effect was determined by administering a novel mitochondrial-targeted anti-oxidant to prevent DOX-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS emission, whereas a highly-selective pharmacological inhibitor was exploited to inhibit calpain activity. Our findings reveal that mitochondria are a major site of DOX-mediated ROS production in both cardiac and skeletal muscle fibres and the prevention of DOX-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS emission protects against fibre atrophy and contractile dysfunction in both cardiac and skeletal muscles. Furthermore, our results indicate that DOX-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS emission are required to activate calpain in heart and skeletal muscles and, importantly, calpain activation is a major contributor to DOX-induced myopathy. Taken together, these findings show that increased mitochondrial ROS production and calpain activation are significant contributors to the development of DOX-induced myopathy in both cardiac and skeletal muscle fibres. PMID:25643692

  6. Effects of anisosmotic stress on cardiac muscle cell length, diameter, area, and sarcomere length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, R.; Barnes, M. A.; Cooper, G. 4th; Zile, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of anisosmotic stress on adult mammalian cardiac muscle cell (cardiocyte) size. Cardiocyte size and sarcomere length were measured in cardiocytes isolated from 10 normal rats and 10 normal cats. Superfusate osmolarity was decreased from 300 +/- 6 to 130 +/- 5 mosM and increased to 630 +/- 8 mosM. Cardiocyte size and sarcomere length increased progressively when osmolarity was decreased, and there were no significant differences between cat and rat cardiocytes with respect to percent change in cardiocyte area or diameter; however, there were significant differences in cardiocyte length (2.8 +/- 0.3% in cat vs. 6.1 +/- 0.3% in rat, P < 0.05) and sarcomere length (3.3 +/- 0.3% in cat vs. 6.1 +/- 0.3% in rat, P < 0.05). To determine whether these species-dependent differences in length were related to diastolic interaction of the contractile elements or differences in relative passive stiffness, cardiocytes were subjected to the osmolarity gradient 1) during treatment with 7 mM 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM), which inhibits cross-bridge interaction, or 2) after pretreatment with 1 mM ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N, N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), a bivalent Ca2+ chelator. Treatment with EGTA or BDM abolished the differences between cat and rat cardiocytes. Species-dependent differences therefore appeared to be related to the degree of diastolic cross-bridge association and not differences in relative passive stiffness. In conclusion, the osmolarity vs. cell size relation is useful in assessing the cardiocyte response to anisosmotic stress and may in future studies be useful in assessing changes in relative passive cardiocyte stiffness produced by pathological processes.

  7. Titin-based modulation of active tension and interfilament lattice spacing in skinned rat cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Norio; Wu, Yiming; Farman, Gerrie; Irving, Thomas C; Granzier, Henk

    2005-02-01

    The effect of titin-based passive tension on Ca2+ sensitivity of active tension and interfilament lattice spacing was studied in skinned rat ventricular trabeculae by measuring the sarcomere length (SL)-dependent change in Ca2+ sensitivity and performing small angle X-ray diffraction studies. To vary passive tension, preparations were treated with trypsin at a low concentration (0.31 mug/ml) for a short period (13 min) at 20 degrees C, that resulted in approximately 40% degradation of the I-band region of titin, with a minimal effect on A-band titin. We found that the effect of trypsin on titin-based passive tension was significantly more pronounced immediately after stretch than at steady state, 30 min after stretch (i.e., trypsin has a greater effect on viscosity than on elasticity of passive cardiac muscle). Ca2+ sensitivity was decreased by trypsin treatment at SL 2.25 microm, but not at SL 1.9 microm, resulting in marked attenuation of the SL-dependent increase in Ca2+ sensitivity. The SL-dependent change in Ca2+ sensitivity was significantly correlated with titin-based passive tension. Small-angle X-ray diffraction experiments revealed that the lattice spacing expands after trypsin treatment, especially at SL 2.25 microm, providing an inverse linear relationship between the lattice spacing and Ca2+ sensitivity. These results support the view that titin-based passive tension promotes actomyosin interaction and that the mechanism includes interfilament lattice spacing modulation. PMID:15688246

  8. Repression of the cardiac myosin light chain‐2 gene in skeletal muscle requires site‐specific association of antithetic regulator, Nished, and HDACs

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Sumy; Galatioto, Josephine; Mascareno, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The transcriptional activation mechanisms that regulate tissue‐specific expression of cardiac muscle genes have been extensively investigated, but little is known of the regulatory events involved in repression of cardiac‐specific genes in non‐cardiac cells. We have previously reported that Nished, a ubiquitous transcription factor, interacts with a positive sequence element, the Intron Regulatory Element (IRE) as well as a negatively acting element, the Cardiac‐Specific Sequence (CSS), in myosin light chain‐2 (MLC2v) gene to promote activation and repression of the gene in cardiac and skeletal muscle cells respectively. Here, we show that the negative regulation of cardiac MLC2v gene in skeletal muscle cells is mediated via the interaction of Nished with histone deacetylase (HDAC) co‐repressor. Treatment of cells with the HDAC inhibitor, Trichostatin A (TSA), alleviates the repressor activity of Nished in a dose‐dependent manner. Co‐transfection studies in primary muscle cells in culture and in Nished expressing stable skeletal muscle cell line demonstrate that Nished down‐regulates the cardiac MLC2 gene expression when its association is restricted to CSS alone. Chromatin immunoprecipitation data suggest that the CSS‐mediated repression of cardiac MLC2v gene in skeletal muscle cells excludes the participation of the positive element IRE despite the presence of an identical Nished binding site. Taken together, it appears that the negative control of MLC2v transcription is based on a dual mode of regulations, one that affords inaccessibility of IRE to Nished and second that promotes the formation of the transcription repression complex at the inhibitory CSS site to silence the cardiac gene in skeletal muscle cell. PMID:19604314

  9. A case of cerebral embolism due to cardiac myxoma presenting with multiple cerebral microaneurysms detected on first MRI scans.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takahiro; Saji, Naoki; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Shibazaki, Kensaku; Kimura, Kazumi

    2016-03-01

    A 64-year-old man developed right arm weakness and dysarthria, and was admitted to our hospital. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a high intensity area in the frontal lobe. T2*-weighted images showed multiple spotty low intensity lesions in bilateral cerebral hemispheres, mimicking cerebral microbleeds. Cerebral angiography showed multiple aneurysms in the anterior, middle, posterior cerebral arteries and cerebellar arteries. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a floating structure in the left atrial chamber, indicating cardiac myxoma. We diagnosed cardioembolic ischemic stroke due to left atrial myxoma. Cardiac surgery for excision of a left atrial myxoma was performed on the 3rd hospital day. Multiple aneurysms should be taken into account for differential diagnosis in patients with cardiac myxoma and with atypical spotty low intensity on T2*-weighted images. PMID:26797485

  10. Dynamics of cross-bridge cycling, ATP hydrolysis, force generation, and deformation in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Shivendra G; Bugenhagen, Scott M; Palmer, Bradley M; Beard, Daniel A

    2016-07-01

    Despite extensive study over the past six decades the coupling of chemical reaction and mechanical processes in muscle dynamics is not well understood. We lack a theoretical description of how chemical processes (metabolite binding, ATP hydrolysis) influence and are influenced by mechanical processes (deformation and force generation). To address this need, a mathematical model of the muscle cross-bridge (XB) cycle based on Huxley's sliding filament theory is developed that explicitly accounts for the chemical transformation events and the influence of strain on state transitions. The model is identified based on elastic and viscous moduli data from mouse and rat myocardial strips over a range of perturbation frequencies, and MgATP and inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentrations. Simulations of the identified model reproduce the observed effects of MgATP and MgADP on the rate of force development. Furthermore, simulations reveal that the rate of force re-development measured in slack-restretch experiments is not directly proportional to the rate of XB cycling. For these experiments, the model predicts that the observed increase in the rate of force generation with increased Pi concentration is due to inhibition of cycle turnover by Pi. Finally, the model captures the observed phenomena of force yielding suggesting that it is a result of rapid detachment of stretched attached myosin heads. PMID:25681584

  11. Nandrolone decanoate negatively reverses the beneficial effects of exercise on cardiac muscle via sarcolemmal, but not mitochondrial KATP channel.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Gholamreza; Javan, Mohammad; Safari, Fatemeh; Khalili, Azadeh; Shokri, Saeed; Goudarzvand, Mahdi; Salimi, Mehdi; Hajizadeh, Sohrab

    2016-03-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium channels are supposed to have a substantial role in improvement of cardiac performance. This study was performed to evaluate whether nandrolone decanoate (ND) and (or) exercise training could affect the expression of cardiac KATP channel subunits. Thirty-five male albino Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 groups, including sedentary control (SC), sedentary vehicle (SV), sedentary ND (SND), exercise control (EC), and exercise and ND (E+ND). Exercise training was performed on a treadmill 5 times per week. ND was injected (10 mg/kg/week, i.m.) to the rats in the SND and E+ND groups. Following cardiac isolation, the expression of both sarcolemmal and mitochondrial subunits of KATP channel was measured using Western blot method. The expression of sarcolemmal, but not mitochondrial, subunits of KATP channel (Kir6.2 and SUR2) of EC group was significantly higher compared with SC group while ND administration (SND group) did not show any change in their expression. In the E+ND group, ND administration led to decrease of the over-expression of sarcolemmal Kir6.2 and SUR2 which was previously induced by exercise. There was no significant association between the mitochondrial expression of either Kir6.2 or SUR2 proteins and administration of ND or exercise. Supra-physiological dosage of ND negatively reverses the effects of exercise on the cardiac muscle expression of sarcolemmal, but not mitochondrial, KATP channel subunits. PMID:26909616

  12. Cooperative cross-bridge activation of thin filaments contributes to the Frank-Starling mechanism in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Smith, L; Tainter, C; Regnier, M; Martyn, D A

    2009-05-01

    Myosin cross-bridges play an important role in the regulation of thin-filament activation in cardiac muscle. To test the hypothesis that sarcomere length (SL) modulation of thin-filament activation by strong-binding cross-bridges underlies the Frank-Starling mechanism, we inhibited force and strong cross-bridge binding to intermediate levels with sodium vanadate (Vi). Force and stiffness varied proportionately with [Ca(2+)] and [Vi]. Increasing [Vi] (decreased force) reduced the pCa(50) of force-[Ca(2+)] relations at 2.3 and 2.0 microm SL, with little effect on slope (n(H)). When maximum force was inhibited to approximately 40%, the effects of SL on force were diminished at lower [Ca(2+)], whereas at higher [Ca(2+)] (pCa < 5.6) the relative influence of SL on force increased. In contrast, force inhibition to approximately 20% significantly reduced the sensitivity of force-[Ca(2+)] relations to changes in both SL and myofilament lattice spacing. Strong cross-bridge binding cooperatively induced changes in cardiac troponin C structure, as measured by dichroism of 5' iodoacetamido-tetramethylrhodamine-labeled cardiac troponin C. This apparent cooperativity was reduced at shorter SL. These data emphasize that SL and/or myofilament lattice spacing modulation of the cross-bridge component of cardiac thin-filament activation contributes to the Frank-Starling mechanism. PMID:19413974

  13. Cardiac conduction system

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals to the heart muscle causing it to contract. The main components ... the cardiac conduction system’s electrical activity in the heart.

  14. Nanostructured, highly aligned poly(hydroxy butyrate) electrospun fibers for differentiation of skeletal and cardiac muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ricotti, Leonardo; Polini, Alessandro; Genchi, Giada G; Ciofani, Gianni; Iandolo, Donata; Mattoli, Virgilio; Menciassi, Arianna; Dario, Paolo; Pisignano, Dario

    2011-01-01

    The influence of novel nanostructured anisotropically electrospun poly(hydroxy butyrate) matrices on skeletal and cardiac muscle-like cell proliferation and differentiation was investigated, in comparison with isotropic and no-topographically cues-provided substrates. After the matrix characterization, in terms of surface SEM imaging and mechanical properties, cell differentiation on the different substrates was evaluated. Myogenin and F-actin staining at several differentiation time-points suggested that aligned nanofibers promote differentiation of both cell types. Moreover, quantitative parameters for each cell line are provided to clarify which aspects of the differentiation process are influenced by the different matrix topographies. PMID:22255117

  15. Cardiac expression of a mini-dystrophin that normalizes skeletal muscle force only partially restores heart function in aged Mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Bostick, Brian; Yue, Yongping; Long, Chun; Marschalk, Nate; Fine, Deborah M; Chen, Jing; Duan, Dongsheng

    2009-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) affects both skeletal and cardiac muscle. It is currently unclear whether the strategies developed for skeletal muscle can ameliorate cardiomyopathy. Synthetic mini-/micro-dystrophin genes have yielded impressive skeletal muscle protection in animal models. The 6-kb DeltaH2-R19 minigene is particularly promising because it completely restores skeletal muscle force to wild-type levels. Here, we examined whether expressing this minigene in the heart, but not skeletal muscle, could normalize cardiac function in the mdx model of DMD cardiomyopathy. Transgenic mdx mice were generated to express the DeltaH2-R19 minigene under the control of the alpha-myosin heavy-chain promoter. Heart structure and function were examined in adult and very old mice. The DeltaH2-R19 minigene enhanced cardiomyocyte sarcolemmal strength and prevented myocardial fibrosis. It also restored the dobutamine response and enhanced treadmill performance. Surprisingly, heart-restricted DeltaH2-R19 minigene expression did not completely normalize electrocardiogram and hemodynamic abnormalities. Overall, systolic function and ejection fraction were restored to normal levels but stroke volume and cardiac output remained suboptimal. Our results demonstrate that the skeletal muscle-proven DeltaH2-R19 minigene can correct cardiac histopathology but cannot fully normalize heart function. Novel strategies must be developed to completely restore heart function in DMD. PMID:19066599

  16. Skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  17. Activation Kinetics of Skinned Cardiac Muscle by Laser Photolysis of Nitrophenyl-EGTA

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Hunter; Bell, Marcus G.; Ellis-Davies, Graham C. R.; Barsotti, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    The kinetics of Ca2+-induced contractions of chemically skinned guinea pig trabeculae was studied using laser photolysis of NP-EGTA. The amount of free Ca2+ released was altered by varying the output from a frequency-doubled ruby laser focused on the trabeculae, while maintaining constant total [NP-EGTA] and [Ca2+]. The time courses of the rise in stiffness and tension were biexponential at 23°C, pH 7.1, and 200 mM ionic strength. At full activation (pCa < 5.0), the rates of the rapid phase of the stiffness and tension rise were 56 ± 7 s−1 (n = 7) and 48 ± 6 s−1 (n = 11) while the amplitudes were 21 ± 2 and 23 ± 3%, respectively. These rates had similar dependencies on final [Ca2+] achieved by photolysis: 43 and 50 s−1 per pCa unit, respectively, over a range of [Ca2+] producing from 15% to 90% of maximal isometric tension. At all [Ca2+], the rise in stiffness initially was faster than that of tension. The maximal rates for the slower components of the rise in stiffness and tension were 4.1 ± 0.8 and 6.2 ± 1.0 s−1. The rate of this slower phase exhibited significantly less Ca2+ sensitivity, 1 and 4 s−1 per pCa unit for stiffness and tension, respectively. These data, along with previous studies indicating that the force-generating step in the cross-bridge cycle of cardiac muscle is marginally sensitive to [Ca2+], suggest a mechanism of regulation in which Ca2+ controls the attachment step in the cross-bridge cycle via a rapid equilibrium with the thin filament activation state. Myosin kinetics sets the time course for the rise in stiffness and force generation with the biexponential nature of the mechanical responses to steps in [Ca2+] arising from a shift to slower cross-bridge kinetics as the number of strongly bound cross-bridges increases. PMID:14747333

  18. Gel stretch method: a new method to measure constitutive properties of cardiac muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zile, M. R.; Cowles, M. K.; Buckley, J. M.; Richardson, K.; Cowles, B. A.; Baicu, C. F.; Cooper G, I. V.; Gharpuray, V.

    1998-01-01

    Diastolic dysfunction is an important cause of congestive heart failure; however, the basic mechanisms causing diastolic congestive heart failure are not fully understood, especially the role of the cardiac muscle cell, or cardiocyte, in this process. Before the role of the cardiocyte in this pathophysiology can be defined, methods for measuring cardiocyte constitutive properties must be developed and validated. Thus this study was designed to evaluate a new method to characterize cardiocyte constitutive properties, the gel stretch method. Cardiocytes were isolated enzymatically from normal feline hearts and embedded in a 2% agarose gel containing HEPES-Krebs buffer and laminin. This gel was cast in a shape that allowed it to be placed in a stretching device. The ends of the gel were held between a movable roller and fixed plates that acted as mandibles. Distance between the right and left mandibles was increased using a stepper motor system. The force applied to the gel was measured by a force transducer. The resultant cardiocyte strain was determined by imaging the cells with a microscope, capturing the images with a CCD camera, and measuring cardiocyte and sarcomere length changes. Cardiocyte stress was characterized with a finite-element method. These measurements of cardiocyte stress and strain were used to determine cardiocyte stiffness. Two variables affecting cardiocyte stiffness were measured, the passive elastic spring and viscous damping. The passive spring was assessed by increasing the force on the gel at 1 g/min, modeling the resultant stress vs. strain relationship as an exponential [sigma = A/k(ekepsilon - 1)]. In normal cardiocytes, A = 23.0 kN/m2 and k = 16. Viscous damping was assessed by examining the loop area between the stress vs. strain relationship during 1 g/min increases and decreases in force. Normal cardiocytes had a finite loop area = 1.39 kN/m2, indicating the presence of viscous damping. Thus the gel stretch method provided accurate

  19. Dysautonomia Due to Reduced Cholinergic Neurotransmission Causes Cardiac Remodeling and Heart Failure ▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Aline; Damasceno, Denis D.; Pires, Rita; Gros, Robert; Gomes, Enéas R.; Gavioli, Mariana; Lima, Ricardo F.; Guimarães, Diogo; Lima, Patricia; Bueno, Carlos Roberto; Vasconcelos, Anilton; Roman-Campos, Danilo; Menezes, Cristiane A. S.; Sirvente, Raquel A.; Salemi, Vera M.; Mady, Charles; Caron, Marc G.; Ferreira, Anderson J.; Brum, Patricia C.; Resende, Rodrigo R.; Cruz, Jader S.; Gomez, Marcus Vinicius; Prado, Vania F.; de Almeida, Alvair P.; Prado, Marco A. M.; Guatimosim, Silvia

    2010-01-01

    Overwhelming evidence supports the importance of the sympathetic nervous system in heart failure. In contrast, much less is known about the role of failing cholinergic neurotransmission in cardiac disease. By using a unique genetically modified mouse line with reduced expression of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) and consequently decreased release of acetylcholine, we investigated the consequences of altered cholinergic tone for cardiac function. M-mode echocardiography, hemodynamic experiments, analysis of isolated perfused hearts, and measurements of cardiomyocyte contraction indicated that VAChT mutant mice have decreased left ventricle function associated with altered calcium handling. Gene expression was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and Western blotting, and the results indicated that VAChT mutant mice have profound cardiac remodeling and reactivation of the fetal gene program. This phenotype was attributable to reduced cholinergic tone, since administration of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine for 2 weeks reversed the cardiac phenotype in mutant mice. Our findings provide direct evidence that decreased cholinergic neurotransmission and underlying autonomic imbalance cause plastic alterations that contribute to heart dysfunction. PMID:20123977

  20. Effects of ACE2 deficiency on physical performance and physiological adaptations of cardiac and skeletal muscle to exercise.

    PubMed

    Motta-Santos, Daisy; Dos Santos, Robson Augusto Souza; Oliveira, Marilene; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Poglitsch, Marko; Mosienko, Valentina; Kappes Becker, Lenice; Campagnole-Santos, Maria Jose; M Penninger, Joseph; Alenina, Natalia; Bader, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is related to physiological adaptations induced by exercise. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) 2 is a major regulator of the RAS in tissues, as it metabolizes angiotensin (Ang) II to Ang-(1-7). The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ACE2 deficiency on physical performance and physiological adaptations induced by voluntary running. Physical performance, body composition and plasma angiotensin levels, as well as tissue morphology and gene expression of RAS components in the left ventricle (LV) and skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius), were evaluated in ACE2-deficient (ACE2(-/y)) and wild-type (ACE2(+/y)) mice after 6 weeks of voluntary wheel running. ACE2(-/y) mice run less than ACE2(+/y) mice (19±4.7 vs. 26±12.6 revolutions per day × 100, P<0.01). The ACE2(+/y) group presented a lower fat mass (15±1.1%) and higher muscle mass (76.6±1.6%) after 6 weeks of voluntary running compared with the sedentary control group (fat mass: 18.3±2.1%; muscle mass: 72.7±2.2). However, no change in body composition was observed in ACE2(-/y) mice after exercise. Heart and skeletal muscle hypertrophy was observed only in trained ACE2(+/y) mice. Besides a small decrease in Ang I in ACE2(-/y) mice, plasma levels of angiotensin peptides remained unchanged by exercise or ACE2 deficiency. In the LV of trained animals, AT2 gene expression was higher in ACE2(+/y) compared with ACE2(-/y) mice. ACE2 deficiency leads to an increase in AT1 gene expression in skeletal muscle. ACE expression in soleus was increased in all exercised groups. ACE2 deficiency affects physical performance and impairs cardiac and skeletal muscle adaptations to exercise. PMID:27053009

  1. Recurrent proptotic diplopia due to congestive expansion of cavernous haemangioma with relapsing right-sided cardiac failure

    PubMed Central

    O'Mahony, D.; O'Neill, E.

    1999-01-01

    A 75-year-old man with a recent history of pulmonary embolism, presented with collapse followed by a gran mal seizure and right-sided non-pulsatile proptosis. On recovery, he had diplopia on lateral and upward gaze and signs of congestive cardiac failure. Further pulmonary embolism was proven by lung scintigraphy. Computed tomography of his orbits confirmed a contrast-enhancing space-occupying lesion of the medial wall of the right orbit, with no intracranial abnormality. The patient was investigated for metastatic tumour as a possible cause of the space-occupying lesion and the unprovoked thromboembolic event, but no evidence of malignancy was found. The orbital lesion was not biopsied because of the risk of bleeding from anticoagulation. Three weeks later, the patient re-presented with recurrent cardiac failure, proptosis, and diplopia. A transorbital ultrasound confirmed an encapsulated, well-defined vascular lesion, with typical appearances and Doppler flow characteristics of a cavernous haemangioma. Diuretic therapy abolished the proptosis and diplopia in tandem with relief of the cardiac failure. This is the first description of recurrent proptosis with diplopia due to recurrent congestive expansion of an orbital cavernous haemangioma.


Keywords: haemangioma; proptosis; diplopia; cardiac failure PMID:10621902

  2. Internal jugular vein cannulation complications and elimination of the muscular triangle of the neck due to aberrant infrahyoid muscles.

    PubMed

    Raikos, Athanasios; Agnihotri, Ashwin; Yousif, Saif; Kordali, Panagiota; Saberi, Minu; Brand-Saberi, Beate

    2014-01-01

    We report on a rare case of anatomical variations of the infrahyoid muscles with prominent clinical significance. The aberrant anatomy was on the right side of the neck and involved the omohyoid and sternohyoid muscles. The superior belly of the omohyoid was duplicated in width due to an aberrant belly anteriorly and merged with fibers of the inferior belly inferiorly and the sternohyoid muscle medially. An additional aberrant muscle slip extended between the inferior third of the sternohyoid muscle and united with the inferior belly of the omohyoid. The intermediate tendon between the two bellies of the omohyoid was absent, whereas the so-called muscular triangle of the neck was diminished. Due to the arrangement and fusion of myofibers the muscle could be termed as omo-sternohyoid muscle. A profound hematoma was noted in the aberrant muscle at the area overlying the internal jugular vein indicating difficulty in obtaining jugular venous access for catheter placement. Clinicians and surgeons should be aware of muscular anatomic variations when intervening in the lateral neck area as the classical anatomical landmarks might be misinterpreted and confuse. PMID:25329135

  3. Orientation of the N- and C-terminal lobes of the myosin regulatory light chain in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Kampourakis, Thomas; Sun, Yin-Biao; Irving, Malcolm

    2015-01-20

    The orientations of the N- and C-terminal lobes of the cardiac isoform of the myosin regulatory light chain (cRLC) in the fully dephosphorylated state in ventricular trabeculae from rat heart were determined using polarized fluorescence from bifunctional sulforhodamine probes. cRLC mutants with one of eight pairs of surface-accessible cysteines were expressed, labeled with bifunctional sulforhodamine, and exchanged into demembranated trabeculae to replace some of the native cRLC. Polarized fluorescence data from the probes in each lobe were combined with RLC crystal structures to calculate the lobe orientation distribution with respect to the filament axis. The orientation distribution of the N-lobe had three distinct peaks (N1-N3) at similar angles in relaxation, isometric contraction, and rigor. The orientation distribution of the C-lobe had four peaks (C1-C4) in relaxation and isometric contraction, but only two of these (C2 and C4) remained in rigor. The N3 and C4 orientations are close to those of the corresponding RLC lobes in myosin head fragments bound to isolated actin filaments in the absence of ATP (in rigor), but also close to those of the pair of heads folded back against the filament surface in isolated thick filaments in the so-called J-motif conformation. The N1 and C1 orientations are close to those expected for actin-bound myosin heads with their light chain domains in a pre-powerstroke conformation. The N2 and C3 orientations have not been observed previously. The results show that the average change in orientation of the RLC region of the myosin heads on activation of cardiac muscle is small; the RLC regions of most heads remain in the same conformation as in relaxation. This suggests that the orientation of the dephosphorylated RLC region of myosin heads in cardiac muscle is primarily determined by an interaction with the thick filament surface. PMID:25606679

  4. Early cardiac tamponade due to tension pneumopericardium after bilateral lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lasocki, Sigismond; Castier, Yves; Geffroy, Arnaud; Mal, Hervé; Brugière, Olivier; Lesèche, Guy; Montravers, Philippe

    2007-10-01

    We report the case of a 42-year-old woman who developed severe hemodynamic instability with marked arterial pulsed pressure variation in the early course of bilateral lung transplantation. The diagnosis of tension pneumopericardium was made on Day 2 post-operatively based on chest X-ray and echocardiography. Transoesophageal echocardiography revealed both a cardiac tamponade and a right-to-left shunt via a patent foramen ovale. The treatment and mechanisms of these two rare complications are discussed. PMID:17919630

  5. Sudden Cardiac Death Due to Deficiency of the Mitochondrial Inorganic Pyrophosphatase PPA2.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Hannah; Haack, Tobias B; Hartill, Verity; Mataković, Lavinija; Baumgartner, E Regula; Potter, Howard; Mackay, Richard; Alston, Charlotte L; O'Sullivan, Siobhan; McFarland, Robert; Connolly, Grainne; Gannon, Caroline; King, Richard; Mead, Scott; Crozier, Ian; Chan, Wandy; Florkowski, Chris M; Sage, Martin; Höfken, Thomas; Alhaddad, Bader; Kremer, Laura S; Kopajtich, Robert; Feichtinger, René G; Sperl, Wolfgang; Rodenburg, Richard J; Minet, Jean Claude; Dobbie, Angus; Strom, Tim M; Meitinger, Thomas; George, Peter M; Johnson, Colin A; Taylor, Robert W; Prokisch, Holger; Doudney, Kit; Mayr, Johannes A

    2016-09-01

    We have used whole-exome sequencing in ten individuals from four unrelated pedigrees to identify biallelic missense mutations in the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPA2) that are associated with mitochondrial disease. These individuals show a range of severity, indicating that PPA2 mutations may cause a spectrum of mitochondrial disease phenotypes. Severe symptoms include seizures, lactic acidosis, cardiac arrhythmia, and death within days of birth. In the index family, presentation was milder and manifested as cardiac fibrosis and an exquisite sensitivity to alcohol, leading to sudden arrhythmic cardiac death in the second decade of life. Comparison of normal and mutant PPA2-containing mitochondria from fibroblasts showed that the activity of inorganic pyrophosphatase was significantly reduced in affected individuals. Recombinant PPA2 enzymes modeling hypomorphic missense mutations had decreased activity that correlated with disease severity. These findings confirm the pathogenicity of PPA2 mutations and suggest that PPA2 is a cardiomyopathy-associated protein, which has a greater physiological importance in mitochondrial function than previously recognized. PMID:27523597

  6. Combined analyses of creatine kinase MB, cardiac troponin I and myoglobin in pericardial and cerebrospinal fluids to investigate myocardial and skeletal muscle injury in medicolegal autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Michiue, Tomomi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Zhu, Bao-Li; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2011-09-01

    Creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB), cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and myoglobin (Mb) are biochemical markers of myocardial injury; however, Mb is more abundant in skeletal muscles. The present study involved analysis of these markers in pericardial and cerebrospinal fluids (PCF and CSF) from serial medicolegal autopsy cases (n=295, within 48h) to examine their efficacy in determining the cause of death. Although these markers showed a slight postmortem time-dependent elevation, except for CK-MB in CSF, the distribution depended on the cause of death. Mb levels in PCF and CSF were higher in fatal hyperthermia (heat stroke) and methamphetamine abuse, and CK-MB in both fluids was also higher in the latter. In psychotropic drug intoxication, CK-MB, cTnI and Mb were higher in PCF, but only cTnI was elevated in CSF. In electrocution and cerebrovascular disease, each marker was higher in PCF and also relatively high in CSF. PCF cTnI level was higher in acute pulmonary embolism without significant elevation of any other markers, whereas CSF CK-MB was higher in acute blunt brain injury death and methamphetamine abuse. In most cases of delayed brain injury death, hypothermia (cold exposure) and pneumonia, these markers were low or intermediate in both PCF and CSF; however, sudden cardiac death, asphyxiation and fire fatality cases showed few characteristic findings. These observations suggest that combined analyses of these markers in postmortem PCF and CSF, in addition to blood samples, are helpful for evaluating the severity of myocardial and/or skeletal muscle damage in death processes, in particular for investigating deaths due to hyperthermia, hypothermia, electrocution and intoxication. PMID:21683643

  7. Evidence of an association between cardiac-locomotor synchronization and lower leg muscle blood perfusion during walking

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Shinta; Nishida, Yusuke; Mizushima, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the occurrence of cardiac-locomotor synchronization (CLS) improves lower leg muscle blood perfusion during walking. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven healthy men were studied while performing two treadmill protocols. The CLS protocol involved subjects walking at the frequency of their heart rate (HR) to induce CLS. The free protocol (reference) involved subjects walking at a self-selected cadence. The treadmill load was identical in the two protocols. Electrocardiographic signals for HR, foot switch signals for step rate and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) signals for total haemoglobin (total Hb) in the lower leg muscles were measured continuously for 10 min after HR reached a steady state. [Results] The mean HR and mean step rate did not differ between the CLS and free protocols. However, total Hb was significantly higher in the CLS protocol than in the free protocol. The rate of increase in total Hb positively correlated with the strength of CLS. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the occurrence of CLS enhances lower leg muscle blood perfusion by increasing the strength of CLS during walking. PMID:26180328

  8. Isotonic contractile impairment due to genetic CLC-1 chloride channel deficiency in myotonic mouse diaphragm muscle.

    PubMed

    van Lunteren, Erik; Pollarine, Jennifer; Moyer, Michelle

    2007-07-01

    The hallmark of genetic CLC-1 chloride channel deficiency in myotonic humans, goats and mice is delayed muscle relaxation resulting from persistent electrical discharges. In addition to the ion channel defect, muscles from myotonic humans and mice also have major changes in fibre type and myosin isoform composition, but the extent to which this affects isometric contractions remains controversial. Many muscles, including the diaphragm, shorten considerably during normal activities, but shortening contractions have never been assessed in myotonic muscle. The present study tested the hypothesis that CLC-1 deficiency leads to an impairment of muscle isotonic contractile performance. This was tested in vitro on diaphragm muscle from SWR/J-Clcn1(adr-mto)/J myotonic mice. The CLC-1-deficient muscle demonstrated delayed relaxation, as expected. During the contractile phase, there were significant reductions in power and work across a number of stimulation frequencies and loads in CLC-1-deficient compared with normal muscle, the magnitude of which in many instances exceeded 50%. Reductions in shortening and velocity of shortening occurred, and were more pronounced when calculated as a function of absolute than relative load. However, the maximal unloaded shortening velocity calculated from Hill's equation was not altered significantly. The impaired isotonic contractile performance of CLC-1-deficient muscle persisted during fatigue-inducing stimulation. These data indicate that genetic CLC-1 chloride channel deficiency in mice not only produces myotonia but also substantially worsens the isotonic contractile performance of diaphragm muscle. PMID:17483199

  9. Inappropriate shocks delivered by implantable cardiac defibrillators during oversensing of activity of diaphagmatic muscle

    PubMed Central

    Babuty, D; Fauchier, L; Cosnay, P

    1999-01-01

    Two cases are reported (both men, one 72 and one 54 years old) of inappropriate shocks delivered by an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) device, which oversensed the myopotentials induced by deep breathing and Valsalva manoeuvre. No damage to leads was associated with the oversensing of myopotentials. The mechanism of the inappropriate shocks was determined using real time electrograms. Modification of the duration of ventricular detection and decrease in sensitivity made it possible to avoid the oversensing of myopotentials and to deliver ICD treatment.

 Keywords: implantable cardiac defibrillator;  inappropriate shocks;  myopotentials PMID:10220554

  10. Vortex shedding as a precursor of turbulent electrical activity in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Cabo, C; Pertsov, A M; Davidenko, J M; Baxter, W T; Gray, R A; Jalife, J

    1996-01-01

    In cardiac tissue, during partial blockade of the membrane sodium channels, or at high frequencies of excitation, inexcitable obstacles with sharp edges may destabilize the propagation of electrical excitation waves, causing the formation of self-sustained vortices and turbulent cardiac electrical activity. The formation of such vortices, which visually resembles vortex shedding in hydrodynamic turbulent flows, was observed in sheep epicardial tissue using voltage-sensitive dyes in combination with video-imaging techniques. Vortex shedding is a potential mechanism leading to the spontaneous initiation of uncontrolled high-frequency excitation of the heart. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:8785270

  11. Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced cardiac and skeletal muscle disease.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, R M; Rinehart, J E; Wollmann, R; Roos, R P

    1996-01-01

    The DA strain of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus, a member of the cardiovirus genus of picornaviruses, induces a restricted and persistent infection associated with a demyelinating process following intracerebral inoculation of mice; both virus infection and the immune response are believed to contribute to the late white matter disease. We now report that intraperitoneal inoculation with DA produces an acute myositis that progresses to a chronic inflammatory muscle disease in CD-1 mice as well as several inbred mouse strains. Some mouse strains also develop central nervous system white matter disease and a focal myocarditis. Infectious virus in skeletal muscle falls to undetectable levels 3 weeks postinoculation (p.i.), although viral genome persists for at least 12 weeks p.i., the longest period of observation. Severe combined immunodeficient animals have evidence of muscle pathology as long as 5 weeks p.i., suggesting that DA virus is capable of inducing chronic muscle disease in the absence of an immune response. The presence in immunocompetent mice, however, of prominent muscle inflammation in the absence of infectious virus suggests that the immune system also contributes to the pathology. T lymphocytes are the predominant cell type infiltrating the skeletal muscle during the chronic disease. This murine model may further our understanding of virus-induced chronic myositis and help to clarify the pathogenesis of human inflammatory myopathies. PMID:8971022

  12. Healthy older humans exhibit augmented carotid-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity with aspirin during muscle mechanoreflex and metaboreflex activation.

    PubMed

    Drew, Rachel C; Blaha, Cheryl A; Herr, Michael D; Stocker, Sean D; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2015-10-01

    Low-dose aspirin inhibits thromboxane production and augments the sensitivity of carotid baroreflex (CBR) control of heart rate (HR) during concurrent muscle mechanoreflex and metaboreflex activation in healthy young humans. However, it is unknown how aging affects this response. Therefore, the effect of low-dose aspirin on carotid-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity during muscle mechanoreflex with and without metaboreflex activation in healthy older humans was examined. Twelve older subjects (6 men and 6 women, mean age: 62 ± 1 yr) performed two trials during two visits preceded by 7 days of low-dose aspirin (81 mg) or placebo. One trial involved 3 min of passive calf stretch (mechanoreflex) during 7.5 min of limb circulatory occlusion (CO). In another trial, CO was preceded by 1.5 min of 70% maximal voluntary contraction isometric calf exercise (mechanoreflex and metaboreflex). HR (ECG) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP; Finometer) were recorded. CBR function was assessed using rapid neck pressure application (+40 to -80 mmHg). Aspirin significantly decreased baseline thromboxane B2 production by 83 ± 4% (P < 0.05) but did not affect 6-keto-PGF1α. After aspirin, CBR-HR maximal gain and operating point gain were significantly higher during stretch with metabolite accumulation compared with placebo (maximal gain: -0.23 ± 0.03 vs. -0.14 ± 0.02 and operating point gain: -0.11 ± 0.03 vs. -0.04 ± 0.01 beats·min(-1)·mmHg(-1) for aspirin and placebo, respectively, P < 0.05). In conclusion, these findings suggest that low-dose aspirin augments CBR-HR sensitivity during concurrent muscle mechanoreflex and metaboreflex activation in healthy older humans. This increased sensitivity appears linked to reduced thromboxane sensitization of muscle mechanoreceptors, which consequently improves CBR-HR control. PMID:26371168

  13. An investigation of fatigue phenomenon in the upper limb muscle due to short duration pulses in an FES system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, Jannatul; Wong Azman, Amelia; Khan, Sheroz; Mohd Mustafah, Yasir

    2013-12-01

    Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) is a method of artificially stimulating muscles or nerves in order to result in contraction or relaxation of muscles. Many studies have shown that FES system has helped patients to live a better lives especially those who are suffering from physical mobility. Unfortunately, one of the main limitations of an FES system besides of its high cost is largely due to muscle fatigue. Muscle fatigue will affect the training duration which could delay patients' recovery rate. In this paper, we analyzed the occurrence of this fatigue phenomenon in terms of stimulator parameters such as amplitude, frequency, pulse width and pulse shape. The objective of this investigation is to identify other key features of the FES system parameters in order to prolong the training duration among patients. The experiment has been done on a healthy person for the duration of one minute and later the muscles response will be observed. Resultant muscle response is recorded as force using force resistive sensor. The experimental results show muscles will get fatigue at a different rate as the frequency increases. The experiment also shows that the duty cycle is reciprocal to the resultant force.

  14. Sexual Dimorphism in the Alterations of Cardiac Muscle Mitochondrial Bioenergetics Associated to the Ageing Process.

    PubMed

    Colom, Bartomeu; Oliver, Jordi; Garcia-Palmer, Francisco J

    2015-11-01

    The incidence of cardiac disease is age and sex dependent, but the mechanisms governing these associations remain poorly understood. Mitochondria are the organelles in charge of producing energy for the cells, and their malfunction has been linked to cardiovascular disease and heart failure. Interestingly, heart mitochondrial content and functionality are also age and sex dependent. Here we investigated the combinatory effects of age and sex in mitochondrial bioenergetics that could help to understand their role on cardiac disease. Cardiac mitochondria from 6- and 24-month-old male and female Wistar rats were isolated, and the enzymatic activities of the oxidative-phosphorylative complexes I, III, and IV and ATPase, as well as the protein levels of complex IV, β-ATPase, and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), were measured. Furthermore, heart DNA content, citrate synthase activity, mitochondrial protein content, oxygen consumption, and H2O2 generation were also determined. Results showed a reduction in heart mitochondrial mass and functionality with age that correlated with increased H2O2 generation. Moreover, sex-dependent differences were found in several of these parameters. In particular, old females exhibited a significant loss of mitochondrial function and increased relative H2O2 production compared with their male counterparts. The results demonstrate a sex dimorphism in the age-associated defects on cardiac mitochondrial function. PMID:24682352

  15. [An autopsy case of progressive generalized muscle atrophy over 14 years due to post-polio syndrome].

    PubMed

    Oki, Ryosuke; Uchino, Akiko; Izumi, Yuishin; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Murayama, Shigeo; Kaji, Ryuji

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 72-year-old man who had contracted acute paralytic poliomyelitis in his childhood. Thereafter, he had suffered from paresis involving the left lower limb, with no relapse or progression of the disease. He began noticing slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy in the upper and lower extremities in his 60s. At the age of 72, muscle weakness developed rapidly, and he demonstrated dyspnea on exertion and dysphagia. He died after about 14 years from the onset of muscle weakness symptoms. Autopsy findings demonstrated motoneuron loss and glial scars not only in the plaque-like lesions in the anterior horns, which were sequelae of old poliomyelitis, but also throughout the spine. No Bunina bodies, TDP-43, and ubiquitin inclusions were found. Post-polio syndrome is rarely fatal due to rapid progressive dyspnea and dysphagia. Thus, the pathological findings in the patient are considered to be related to the development of muscle weakness. PMID:26616485

  16. [Cardiac Angiosarcoma with Acute Myocardial Infarction due to Tumor Embolism;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Date, Yusuke; Miyazu, Katsuyuki; Ikeda, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    We report the case of a 28-year-old man with a rare angiosarcoma complicated by acute myocardial infarction secondary to tumor embolism. He was transported to our emergency unit because of sudden onset of chest pain. The echocardiography showed a 42×60 mm mass in the left ventricle, and the coronary angiography showed embolic occlusion of the proximal left anterior descending and circumflex arteries. Emergent surgical removal of the mass was attempted under cardiopulmonary bypass, concomitant with double coronary artery bypass grafting and mitral valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. However, complete tumor excision was impossible. The postoperative pathological examination revealed undifferentiated angiosarcoma. Twenty days after the operation, the patient suffered acute cerebral hemorrhage from a metastatic tumor in the brain. He died at 37 days after the initial cardiac surgery. PMID:27586319

  17. Calcium Alternans is Due to an Order-Disorder Phase Transition in Cardiac Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Lacalle, Enrique; Echebarria, Blas; Spalding, Jon; Shiferaw, Yohannes

    2015-03-01

    Electromechanical alternans is a beat-to-beat alternation in the strength of contraction of a cardiac cell, which can be caused by an instability of calcium cycling. Using a distributed model of subcellular calcium we show that alternans occurs via an order-disorder phase transition which exhibits critical slowing down and a diverging correlation length. We apply finite size scaling along with a mapping to a stochastic coupled map model, to show that this transition in two dimensions is characterized by critical exponents consistent with the Ising universality class. These findings highlight the important role of cooperativity in biological cells, and suggest novel approaches to investigate the onset of the alternans instability in the heart.

  18. Chiral recognition of pinacidil and its 3-pyridyl isomer by canine cardiac and smooth muscle: Antagonism by sulfonylureas

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.I.; Wiest, S.A.; Zimmerman, K.M.; Ertel, P.J.; Bemis, K.G.; Robertson, D.W. )

    1991-01-01

    Pinacidil, a potassium channel opener (PCO), relaxes vascular smooth muscle by increasing potassium ion membrane conductance, thereby causing membrane hyperpolarization. PCOs also act on cardiac muscle to decrease action potential duration (APD) selectively. To examine the enantiomeric selectivity of pinacidil, the stereoisomers of pinacidil (a 4-pyridylcyanoguanidine) and its 3-pyridyl isomer (LY222675) were synthesized and studied in canine Purkinje fibers and cephalic veins. The (-)-enantiomers of both pinacidil and LY222675 were more potent in relaxing phenylephrine-contracted cephalic veins and decreasing APD than were their corresponding (+)-enantiomers. The EC50 values for (-)-pinacidil and (-)-LY222675 in relaxing cephalic veins were 0.44 and 0.09 microM, respectively. In decreasing APD, the EC50 values were 3.2 microM for (-)-pinacidil and 0.43 microM for (-)-LY222675. The eudismic ratio was greater for the 3-pyridyl isomer than for pinacidil in both cardiac (71 vs. 22) and vascular (53 vs. 17) tissues. (-)-LY222675 and (-)-pinacidil (0.1-30 microM) also increased 86Rb efflux from cephalic veins to a greater extent than did their respective optical antipodes. The antidiabetic sulfonylurea, glyburide (1-30 microM), shifted the vascular concentration-response curve of (-)-pinacidil to the right by a similar extent at each inhibitor concentration. Glipizide also antagonized the response to (-)-pinacidil, but was about 1/10 as potent with a maximal shift occurring at 10 and 30 microM. Glyburide antagonized the vascular relaxant effects of 0.3 microM (-)-LY222675 (EC50, 2.3 microM) and reversed the decrease in APD caused by 3 microM (-)-LY222675 (EC50, 1.9 microM). Nitroprusside did not alter 86Rb efflux, and vascular relaxation induced by sodium nitroprusside was unaffected by sulfonylureas.

  19. Cardiac and aortic structural alterations due to surgically-induced menopause associated with renovascular hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Leonardo de Souza; Fernandes-Santos, Caroline; Mandarim-de-Lacerda, Carlos Alberto

    2007-08-01

    Menopause and hypertension independently alter cardiovascular remodelling, but little is known about their effect on left ventricular and aortic wall remodelling. Eight-weeks-old Wistar rats were divided into four groups of six animals each: Sham group, OVX group (ovariectomized rats), 2K1C (two-kidneys, one-clip rats) and OVX + 2K1C group and kept until 19 weeks. Blood pressure (BP) increased 12% in OVX group, 35% in 2K1C and OVX + 2K1C groups compared with sham group. Vaginal cytology showed Sham and 2K1C rats cycling normally, whereas OVX and OVX + 2K1C rats were persistently in dioestrus or proestrus. At euthanasia, left ventricle (LV) and thoracic aorta were removed and analysed (immunohistochemistry and stereology). LV mass/tibia length ratio and cross-sectional area of cardiomyocytes increased in all groups except Sham. The intramyocardial vascularization reduced 30% in comparison with Sham group, with no difference among OVX, 2K1C and OVX + 2K1C groups. The cardiac interstitium increased more than 45% in both 2K1C and OVX + 2K1C groups compared with Sham, but there was no significant difference between Sham and OVX groups. Nuclei number of LV cardiomyocyte diminished in OVX group, followed by 2K1C group and OVX + 2K1C group, with no difference between the 2K1C and the OVX + 2K1C groups. There was positive immunostaining for angiotensin II AT1 receptor in smooth muscle cell layer of aortic tunica media in all groups. These results show that both ovariectomy and renovascular hypertension enhance BP as a single stimulus and therefore produce adverse cardiac remodelling. However, renovascular hypertension exerts a far greater influence than surgically-induced menopause in this parameter. PMID:17696911

  20. Types of muscle tissue (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The 3 types of muscle tissue are cardiac, smooth, and skeletal. Cardiac muscle cells are located in the walls of the heart, appear striated, and are under involuntary control. Smooth muscle fibers are located in walls of hollow ...

  1. Changes in Tibiofemoral Forces due to Variations in Muscle Activity during Walking

    PubMed Central

    DeMers, Matthew S.; Pal, Saikat; Delp, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    Muscles induce large forces in the tibiofemoral joint during walking and thereby influence the health of tissues like articular cartilage and menisci. It is possible to walk with a wide variety of muscle coordination patterns, but the effect of varied muscle coordination on tibiofemoral contact forces remains unclear. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of varied muscle coordination on tibiofemoral contact forces. We developed a musculoskeletal model of a subject walking with an instrumented knee implant. Using an optimization framework, we calculated the tibiofemoral forces resulting from muscle coordination that reproduced the subject’s walking dynamics. We performed a large set of optimizations in which we systematically varied the coordination of muscles to determine the influence on tibiofemoral force. Model-predicted tibiofemoral forces arising with minimum muscle activation matched in vivo forces measured during early stance, but were greater than in vivo forces during late stance. Peak tibiofemoral forces during late stance could be reduced by increasing the activation of the gluteus medius, uniarticular hip flexors, and soleus, and by decreasing the activation of the gastrocnemius and rectus femoris. These results suggest that retraining of muscle coordination could substantially reduce tibiofemoral forces during late stance. PMID:24615885

  2. Stretch of Contracting Cardiac Muscle Abruptly Decreases the Rate of Phosphate Release at High and Low Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, Catherine; West, Tim G.; Curtin, Nancy A.; Ferenczi, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    The contractile performance of the heart is linked to the energy that is available to it. Yet, the heart needs to respond quickly to changing demands. During diastole, the heart fills with blood and the heart chambers expand. Upon activation, contraction of cardiac muscle expels blood into the circulation. Early in systole, parts of the left ventricle are being stretched by incoming blood, before contraction causes shrinking of the ventricle. We explore here the effect of stretch of contracting permeabilized cardiac trabeculae of the rat on the rate of inorganic phosphate (Pi) release resulting from ATP hydrolysis, using a fluorescent sensor for Pi with millisecond time resolution. Stretch immediately reduces the rate of Pi release, an effect observed both at full calcium activation (32 μmol/liter of Ca2+), and at a physiological activation level of 1 μmol/liter of Ca2+. The results suggest that stretch redistributes the actomyosin cross-bridges toward their Pi-containing state. The redistribution means that a greater fraction of cross-bridges will be poised to rapidly produce a force-generating transition and movement, compared with cross-bridges that have not been subjected to stretch. At the same time stretch modifies the Pi balance in the cytoplasm, which may act as a cytoplasmic signal for energy turnover. PMID:22692210

  3. Host-Derived Smooth Muscle Cells Accumulate in Cardiac Allografts: Role of Inflammation and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Bojakowski, Krzysztof; Soin, Joanna; Nozynski, Jerzy; Zakliczynski, Michal; Gaciong, Zbigniew; Zembala, Marian; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is characterized by inflammation and intimal thickening caused by accumulation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) both from donor and recipient. We assessed the relationship between clinical factors and the presence of host-derived SMCs in 124 myocardial biopsies from 26 consecutive patients who received hearts from opposite-sex donors. Clinical and demographic information was obtained from the patients' medical records. Host-derived SMCs accounted for 3.35±2.3% of cells in arterioles (range, 0.08–12.51%). As shown by linear regression analysis, an increased number of SMCs was associated with rejection grade (mean, 1.41±1.03, p = 0.034) and the number of leukocytes (19.1±12.7 per 20 high-power fields, p = 0.01). The accumulation of host-derived SMCs was associated with an increased number of leukocytes in the allografts. In vitro, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) released from leukocytes was crucial for SMC migration. After heart allotransplantion, mice treated with MCP-1-specific antibodies had significantly fewer host-derived SMCs in the grafts than mice treated with isotypic antibody controls. We conclude that the number of host-derived SMCs in human cardiac allografts is associated with the rejection grade and that MCP-1 may play pivotal role in recruiting host-derived SMCs into cardiac allografts. PMID:19142231

  4. Delineating the role of alterations in lipid metabolism to the pathogenesis of inherited skeletal and cardiac muscle disorders

    PubMed Central

    Saini-Chohan, Harjot K.; Mitchell, Ryan W.; Vaz, Frédéric M.; Zelinski, Teresa; Hatch, Grant M.

    2012-01-01

    As the specific composition of lipids is essential for the maintenance of membrane integrity, enzyme function, ion channels, and membrane receptors, an alteration in lipid composition or metabolism may be one of the crucial changes occurring during skeletal and cardiac myopathies. Although the inheritance (autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked traits) and underlying/defining mutations causing these myopathies are known, the contribution of lipid homeostasis in the progression of these diseases needs to be established. The purpose of this review is to present the current knowledge relating to lipid changes in inherited skeletal muscle disorders, such as Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy, myotonic muscular dystrophy, limb-girdle myopathic dystrophies, desminopathies, rostrocaudal muscular dystrophy, and Dunnigan-type familial lipodystrophy. The lipid modifications in familial hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies, as well as Barth syndrome and several other cardiac disorders associated with abnormal lipid storage, are discussed. Information on lipid alterations occurring in these myopathies will aid in the design of improved methods of screening and therapy in children and young adults with or without a family history of genetic diseases. PMID:22065858

  5. Mechanical regulation of cardiac muscle by coupling calcium kinetics with cross-bridge cycling: a dynamic model.

    PubMed

    Landesberg, A; Sideman, S

    1994-08-01

    This study describes the regulation of mechanical activity in the intact cardiac muscle, the effects of the free calcium transients and the mechanical constraints, and emphasizes the central role of the troponin complex in regulating muscle activity. A "loose coupling" between calcium binding to troponin and cross-bridge cycling is stipulated, allowing the existence of cross bridges in the strong conformation without having bound calcium on the neighboring troponin. The model includes two feedback mechanisms: 1) a positive feedback, or cooperativity, in which the cycling cross bridges affect the affinity of troponin for calcium, and 2) a negative mechanical feedback, where the filament-sliding velocity affects cross-bridge cycling. The model simulates the reported experimental force-length and force-velocity relationships at different levels of activation. The dependence of the shortening velocity on calcium concentration, sarcomere length, internal load, and rate of cross-bridge cycling is described analytically in agreement with reported data. Furthermore, the model provides an analytic solution for Hill's equation of the force-velocity relationship and for the phenomena of unloaded shortening velocity and force deficit. The model-calculated changes in free calcium in various mechanical conditions are in good agreement with the available experimental results. PMID:8067434

  6. The Role of Inspiratory Muscle Training in Sickle Cell Anemia Related Pulmonary Damage due to Recurrent Acute Chest Syndrome Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Camcıoğlu, Burcu; Boşnak-Güçlü, Meral; Karadallı, Müşerrefe Nur; Akı, Şahika Zeynep; Türköz-Sucak, Gülsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The sickling of red blood cells causes a constellation of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and pulmonary manifestations. A 32-year-old gentleman with sickle cell anemia (SCA) had been suffering from recurrent acute chest syndrome (ACS). Aim. To examine the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on pulmonary functions, respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, and quality of life in this patient with SCA. Methods. Functional exercise capacity was evaluated using six-minute walk test, respiratory muscle strength using mouth pressure device, hand grip strength using hand-held dynamometer, pain using Visual Analogue Scale, fatigue using Fatigue Severity Scale, dyspnea using Modified Medical Research Council Scale, and health related quality of life using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL measurement. Results. A significant improvement has been demonstrated in respiratory muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life. There was no admission to emergency department due to acute chest syndrome in the following 12 months after commencing regular erythrocytapheresis. Conclusion. This is the first report demonstrating the beneficial effects of inspiratory muscle training on functional exercise capacity, respiratory muscle strength, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life in a patient with recurrent ACS. PMID:26060589

  7. The Role of Inspiratory Muscle Training in Sickle Cell Anemia Related Pulmonary Damage due to Recurrent Acute Chest Syndrome Attacks.

    PubMed

    Camcıoğlu, Burcu; Boşnak-Güçlü, Meral; Karadallı, Müşerrefe Nur; Akı, Şahika Zeynep; Türköz-Sucak, Gülsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The sickling of red blood cells causes a constellation of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and pulmonary manifestations. A 32-year-old gentleman with sickle cell anemia (SCA) had been suffering from recurrent acute chest syndrome (ACS). Aim. To examine the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on pulmonary functions, respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, and quality of life in this patient with SCA. Methods. Functional exercise capacity was evaluated using six-minute walk test, respiratory muscle strength using mouth pressure device, hand grip strength using hand-held dynamometer, pain using Visual Analogue Scale, fatigue using Fatigue Severity Scale, dyspnea using Modified Medical Research Council Scale, and health related quality of life using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL measurement. Results. A significant improvement has been demonstrated in respiratory muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life. There was no admission to emergency department due to acute chest syndrome in the following 12 months after commencing regular erythrocytapheresis. Conclusion. This is the first report demonstrating the beneficial effects of inspiratory muscle training on functional exercise capacity, respiratory muscle strength, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life in a patient with recurrent ACS. PMID:26060589

  8. Miniaturized iPS-Cell-Derived Cardiac Muscles for Physiologically Relevant Drug Response Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Huebsch, Nathaniel; Loskill, Peter; Deveshwar, Nikhil; Spencer, C. Ian; Judge, Luke M.; Mandegar, Mohammad A.; B. Fox, Cade; Mohamed, Tamer M.A.; Ma, Zhen; Mathur, Anurag; Sheehan, Alice M.; Truong, Annie; Saxton, Mike; Yoo, Jennie; Srivastava, Deepak; Desai, Tejal A.; So, Po-Lin; Healy, Kevin E.; Conklin, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering approaches have the potential to increase the physiologic relevance of human iPS-derived cells, such as cardiomyocytes (iPS-CM). However, forming Engineered Heart Muscle (EHM) typically requires >1 million cells per tissue. Existing miniaturization strategies involve complex approaches not amenable to mass production, limiting the ability to use EHM for iPS-based disease modeling and drug screening. Micro-scale cardiospheres are easily produced, but do not facilitate assembly of elongated muscle or direct force measurements. Here we describe an approach that combines features of EHM and cardiospheres: Micro-Heart Muscle (μHM) arrays, in which elongated muscle fibers are formed in an easily fabricated template, with as few as 2,000 iPS-CM per individual tissue. Within μHM, iPS-CM exhibit uniaxial contractility and alignment, robust sarcomere assembly, and reduced variability and hypersensitivity in drug responsiveness, compared to monolayers with the same cellular composition. μHM mounted onto standard force measurement apparatus exhibited a robust Frank-Starling response to external stretch, and a dose-dependent inotropic response to the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Based on the ease of fabrication, the potential for mass production and the small number of cells required to form μHM, this system provides a potentially powerful tool to study cardiomyocyte maturation, disease and cardiotoxicology in vitro. PMID:27095412

  9. Miniaturized iPS-Cell-Derived Cardiac Muscles for Physiologically Relevant Drug Response Analyses.

    PubMed

    Huebsch, Nathaniel; Loskill, Peter; Deveshwar, Nikhil; Spencer, C Ian; Judge, Luke M; Mandegar, Mohammad A; B Fox, Cade; Mohamed, Tamer M A; Ma, Zhen; Mathur, Anurag; Sheehan, Alice M; Truong, Annie; Saxton, Mike; Yoo, Jennie; Srivastava, Deepak; Desai, Tejal A; So, Po-Lin; Healy, Kevin E; Conklin, Bruce R

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering approaches have the potential to increase the physiologic relevance of human iPS-derived cells, such as cardiomyocytes (iPS-CM). However, forming Engineered Heart Muscle (EHM) typically requires >1 million cells per tissue. Existing miniaturization strategies involve complex approaches not amenable to mass production, limiting the ability to use EHM for iPS-based disease modeling and drug screening. Micro-scale cardiospheres are easily produced, but do not facilitate assembly of elongated muscle or direct force measurements. Here we describe an approach that combines features of EHM and cardiospheres: Micro-Heart Muscle (μHM) arrays, in which elongated muscle fibers are formed in an easily fabricated template, with as few as 2,000 iPS-CM per individual tissue. Within μHM, iPS-CM exhibit uniaxial contractility and alignment, robust sarcomere assembly, and reduced variability and hypersensitivity in drug responsiveness, compared to monolayers with the same cellular composition. μHM mounted onto standard force measurement apparatus exhibited a robust Frank-Starling response to external stretch, and a dose-dependent inotropic response to the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Based on the ease of fabrication, the potential for mass production and the small number of cells required to form μHM, this system provides a potentially powerful tool to study cardiomyocyte maturation, disease and cardiotoxicology in vitro. PMID:27095412

  10. Influence of menstrual cycle phase on muscle metaboreflex control of cardiac baroreflex sensitivity, heart rate and blood pressure in humans.

    PubMed

    Hartwich, Doreen; Aldred, Sarah; Fisher, James P

    2013-01-01

    We sought to determine whether menstrual cycle phase influences muscle metaboreflex control of spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (cBRS), blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). Twenty-three young women not taking oral contraceptives were studied during the early (EF; low oestrogen, low progesterone) and late follicular menstrual phases (LF; high oestrogen, low progesterone). Protocol 1 consisted of leg cycling at low (21 ± 2 W) and moderate workloads (71 ± 3 W) in free-flow conditions and with partial flow restriction (bilateral thigh-cuff inflation at 100 mmHg) to activate the muscle metaboreflex. Protocol 2 consisted of rhythmic hand-grip exercise with incremental upper arm-cuff inflation (0, 80, 100 and 120 mmHg) to elicit graded metaboreflex activation. Both protocols were followed by post-exercise ischaemia. Leg cycling decreased cBRS (EF, 20 ± 5, 6 ± 1 and 1 ± 0.1 ms mmHg(-1); and LF, 19 ± 3, 6 ± 0.4, 1 ± 0.1 ms mmHg(-1) during rest, low- and moderate-intensity leg cycling, respectively) and increased HR in an intensity-dependent manner, while BP remained unchanged. Partial flow restriction during leg cycling decreased cBRS, and increased HR and BP. During post-exercise ischaemia, HR and BP remained elevated, while cBRS remained suppressed (EF, 4.2 ± 0.6 ms mmHg(-1); and LF, 4.7 ± 0.5 ms mmHg(-1); P < 0.05 versus rest). Cardiac baroreflex sensitivity was unchanged during hand-grip with and without partial flow restriction and post-exercise ischaemia. No differences in cBRS, HR or BP responses were observed between EF and LF at any time during either protocol. These data indicate that endogenous fluctuations in oestrogen between the EF and LF phases of the menstrual cycle do not influence muscle metaboreflex control of cBRS, BP or HR in young women. PMID:22613743

  11. Relationship between adductor pollicis muscle thickness and subjective global assessment in a cardiac intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Karst, Fernanda Pickrodt; Vieira, Renata Monteiro; Barbiero, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Objective To verify the relationship between the adductor pollicis muscle thickness test and the subjective global assessment and to correlate it with other anthropometric methods. Methods This observational cross-sectional study was conducted in the intensive care unit of a cardiology hospital in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The hospitalized patients underwent subjective global assessment and adductor pollicis muscle thickness tests on both hands, along with measurement of the right calf circumference. Laboratory parameters, length of stay, vital signs and electronic medical record data and tests were all collected. Results The study population included 83 patients, of whom 62% were men. The average age was 68.6 ± 12.5 years. The most common reason for hospitalization was acute myocardial infarction (34.9%), and the most common pathology was systolic blood pressure (63.9%), followed by diabetes mellitus (28.9%). According to subjective global assessment classifications, 62.7% of patients presented no nutritional risk, 20.5% were moderately malnourished and 16.9% were severely malnourished. Women had a higher nutritional risk, according to both the subjective global assessment and the adductor pollicis muscle thickness test, the cutoff for which was < 6.5mm (54.8%; p = 0.001). The pathology presenting the greatest nutritional risk was congestive heart failure (p = 0.001). Evaluation of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve between adductor pollicis muscle thickness and subjective global assessment showed the accuracy of the former, with an area of 0.822. Conclusion Adductor pollicis muscle thickness proved to be a good method for evaluating nutritional risk. PMID:26761475

  12. Image reconstruction in higher dimensions: myocardial perfusion imaging of tracer dynamics with cardiac motion due to deformation and respiration

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shrestha, Uttam M.; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2015-10-09

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using slow rotating large field of view cameras requires spatiotemporal reconstruction of dynamically acquired data to capture the time variation of the radiotracer concentration. In vivo, MPI contains additional degrees of freedom involving unavoidable motion of the heart due to quasiperiodic beating and the effects of respiration, which can severely degrade the quality of the images. This work develops a technique for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that reconstructs the distribution of the radiotracer concentration in the myocardium using a tensor product of different sets of basis functions that approximately describe the spatiotemporal variationmore » of the radiotracer concentration and the motion of the heart. In this study the temporal B-spline basis functions are chosen to reflect the dynamics of the radiotracer, while the intrinsic deformation and the extrinsic motion of the heart are described by a product of a discrete set of Gaussian basis functions. Reconstruction results are presented showing the dynamics of the tracer in the myocardium as it deforms due to cardiac beating, and is displaced due to respiratory motion. We find these results are compared with the conventional 4D-spatiotemporal reconstruction method that models only the temporal changes of the tracer activity. The higher dimensional reconstruction method proposed here improves bias, yet the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases slightly due to redistribution of the counts over the cardiac-respiratory gates. Additionally, there is a trade-off between the number of gates and the number of projections per gate to achieve high contrast images.« less

  13. Image Reconstruction in Higher Dimensions: Myocardial Perfusion Imaging of Tracer Dynamics with Cardiac Motion Due to Deformation and Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Uttam M.; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using slow rotating large field of view cameras requires spatiotemporal reconstruction of dynamically acquired data to capture the time variation of the radiotracer concentration. In vivo, MPI contains additional degrees of freedom involving unavoidable motion of the heart due to quasiperiodic beating and the effects of respiration, which can severely degrade the quality of the images. This work develops a technique for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that reconstructs the distribution of the radiotracer concentration in the myocardium using a tensor product of different sets of basis functions that approximately describe the spatiotemporal variation of the radiotracer concentration and the motion of the heart. In this study the temporal B-spline basis functions are chosen to reflect the dynamics of the radiotracer, while the intrinsic deformation and the extrinsic motion of the heart are described by a product of a discrete set of Gaussian basis functions. Reconstruction results are presented showing the dynamics of the tracer in the myocardium as it deforms due to cardiac beating, and is displaced due to respiratory motion. These results are compared with the conventional 4D-spatiotemporal reconstruction method that models only the temporal changes of the tracer activity. The higher dimensional reconstruction method proposed here improves bias, yet the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases due to redistribution of the counts over the cardiac-respiratory gates. However, there is a trade-off between the number of gates and the number of projections per gate to achieve high contrast images. PMID:26450115

  14. Image reconstruction in higher dimensions: myocardial perfusion imaging of tracer dynamics with cardiac motion due to deformation and respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Uttam M.; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2015-10-09

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using slow rotating large field of view cameras requires spatiotemporal reconstruction of dynamically acquired data to capture the time variation of the radiotracer concentration. In vivo, MPI contains additional degrees of freedom involving unavoidable motion of the heart due to quasiperiodic beating and the effects of respiration, which can severely degrade the quality of the images. This work develops a technique for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that reconstructs the distribution of the radiotracer concentration in the myocardium using a tensor product of different sets of basis functions that approximately describe the spatiotemporal variation of the radiotracer concentration and the motion of the heart. In this study the temporal B-spline basis functions are chosen to reflect the dynamics of the radiotracer, while the intrinsic deformation and the extrinsic motion of the heart are described by a product of a discrete set of Gaussian basis functions. Reconstruction results are presented showing the dynamics of the tracer in the myocardium as it deforms due to cardiac beating, and is displaced due to respiratory motion. We find these results are compared with the conventional 4D-spatiotemporal reconstruction method that models only the temporal changes of the tracer activity. The higher dimensional reconstruction method proposed here improves bias, yet the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases slightly due to redistribution of the counts over the cardiac-respiratory gates. Additionally, there is a trade-off between the number of gates and the number of projections per gate to achieve high contrast images.

  15. Image reconstruction in higher dimensions: myocardial perfusion imaging of tracer dynamics with cardiac motion due to deformation and respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Uttam M.; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2015-11-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using slow rotating large field of view cameras requires spatiotemporal reconstruction of dynamically acquired data to capture the time variation of the radiotracer concentration. In vivo, MPI contains additional degrees of freedom involving unavoidable motion of the heart due to quasiperiodic beating and the effects of respiration, which can severely degrade the quality of the images. This work develops a technique for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that reconstructs the distribution of the radiotracer concentration in the myocardium using a tensor product of different sets of basis functions that approximately describe the spatiotemporal variation of the radiotracer concentration and the motion of the heart. In this study the temporal B-spline basis functions are chosen to reflect the dynamics of the radiotracer, while the intrinsic deformation and the extrinsic motion of the heart are described by a product of a discrete set of Gaussian basis functions. Reconstruction results are presented showing the dynamics of the tracer in the myocardium as it deforms due to cardiac beating, and is displaced due to respiratory motion. These results are compared with the conventional 4D-spatiotemporal reconstruction method that models only the temporal changes of the tracer activity. The higher dimensional reconstruction method proposed here improves bias, yet the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases slightly due to redistribution of the counts over the cardiac-respiratory gates. Additionally, there is a trade-off between the number of gates and the number of projections per gate to achieve high contrast images.

  16. Image reconstruction in higher dimensions: myocardial perfusion imaging of tracer dynamics with cardiac motion due to deformation and respiration.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Uttam M; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H; Gullberg, Grant T

    2015-11-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using slow rotating large field of view cameras requires spatiotemporal reconstruction of dynamically acquired data to capture the time variation of the radiotracer concentration. In vivo, MPI contains additional degrees of freedom involving unavoidable motion of the heart due to quasiperiodic beating and the effects of respiration, which can severely degrade the quality of the images. This work develops a technique for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that reconstructs the distribution of the radiotracer concentration in the myocardium using a tensor product of different sets of basis functions that approximately describe the spatiotemporal variation of the radiotracer concentration and the motion of the heart. In this study the temporal B-spline basis functions are chosen to reflect the dynamics of the radiotracer, while the intrinsic deformation and the extrinsic motion of the heart are described by a product of a discrete set of Gaussian basis functions. Reconstruction results are presented showing the dynamics of the tracer in the myocardium as it deforms due to cardiac beating, and is displaced due to respiratory motion. These results are compared with the conventional 4D-spatiotemporal reconstruction method that models only the temporal changes of the tracer activity. The higher dimensional reconstruction method proposed here improves bias, yet the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases slightly due to redistribution of the counts over the cardiac-respiratory gates. Additionally, there is a trade-off between the number of gates and the number of projections per gate to achieve high contrast images. PMID:26450115

  17. Distinct gene expression patterns in skeletal and cardiac muscle are dependent on common regulatory sequences in the MLC1/3 locus.

    PubMed Central

    McGrew, M J; Bogdanova, N; Hasegawa, K; Hughes, S H; Kitsis, R N; Rosenthal, N

    1996-01-01

    The myosin light-chain 1/3 locus (MLC1/3) is regulated by two promoters and a downstream enhancer element which produce two protein isoforms in fast skeletal muscle at distinct stages of mouse embryogenesis. We have analyzed the expression of transcripts from the internal MLC3 promoter and determined that it is also expressed in the atria of the heart. Expression from the MLC3 promoter in these striated muscle lineages is differentially regulated during development. In transgenic mice, the MLC3 promoter is responsible for cardiac-specific reporter gene expression while the downstream enhancer augments expression in skeletal muscle. Examination of the methylation status of endogenous and transgenic promoter and enhancer elements indicates that the internal promoter is not regulated in a manner similar to that of the MLC1 promoter or the downstream enhancer. A GATA protein consensus sequence in the proximal MLC3 promoter but not the MLC1 promoter binds with high affinity to GATA-4, a cardiac muscle- and gut-specific transcription factor. Mutation of either the MEF2 or GATA motifs in the MLC3 promoter attenuates its activity in both heart and skeletal muscles, demonstrating that MLC3 expression in these two diverse muscle types is dependent on common regulatory elements. PMID:8754853

  18. Effects of nutritional supplementation with l-arginine on repair of injuries due to muscle strain: experimental study on rats☆

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Lauren Izabel Medeiros; Wuicik, William Luiz; Kuhn, Ivan; Capriotti, Juan Rodolfo Vilela; Repka, João Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the influence of oral supplementation with arginine on regeneration of injuries due to straining of the anterior tibial muscle of rats. Methods Twenty-four Wistar rats of weight 492.5 ± 50.45 g were used. Injuries were induced through straining the anterior tibial muscles. The rats were separated into three groups of eight rats each. In the untreated group (UTG), after induction of injuries, the rats were observed for 24 h. In the simulation group (SG) and the arginine group (AG) respectively, the rats received isotonic saline solution and arginine solution via direct gavage, over a seven-day period. At the end of the period, blood samples were collected for serum evaluations of creatine kinase (CK), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and C-reactive protein (CRP). The right and left anterior tibial muscles were resected for histopathological evaluations on the muscle injuries, investigating edema, hemorrhage and disorganization or morphometric alteration of the muscle fibers. The tissue repair was investigated in terms of proliferation of adipose tissue, angiogenesis and collagen fibers. The ANOVA and Student's t methods were used and p ≤ 0.05 was taken to be statistically significant. Results In the serum evaluations, the AG showed lower CK assay values and higher AST values. In the histopathological evaluation, the UTG presented edema and hemorrhage compatible with injuries due to strain; the SG presented edema and hemorrhage with proliferation of adipose tissue and collagen fibers; and the AG presented not only the findings of the SG but also, especially, intense angiogenesis. Conclusion Oral supplementation with arginine did not cause any significant metabolic alterations that would contraindicate its use and it induced angiogenesis during the repair of muscles injured due to strain. PMID:26401505

  19. Control of cardiac muscle cell function by an endogenous nitric oxide signaling system.

    PubMed Central

    Balligand, J L; Kelly, R A; Marsden, P A; Smith, T W; Michel, T

    1993-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) synthesized from L-arginine is a ubiquitous intracellular chemical messenger and is involved in signal transduction in diverse mammalian cells, including vascular endothelium and neuronal tissues. The role of the NO-signaling pathway in the direct modulation of cardiac function is less well characterized. In this report, the effects of inhibitors of NO synthase (NOS) were examined in isolated neonatal and adult rat ventricular myocytes exposed to either muscarinic or adrenergic agonists. Carbachol (10 microM) caused a 91% inhibition of the spontaneous beating rate of cultured neonatal rat cardiac myocytes. N omega-monomethyl-L-arginine, an L-arginine analog that inhibits NOS, and methylene blue, an inhibitor of NO, blocked the negative chronotropic effect of carbachol but had no effect on the basal beating rate of these cells. The inhibition by N omega-monomethyl-L-arginine of the negative chronotropic effect of carbachol was reversed by adding excess L-arginine. The negative chronotropic effect of carbachol was also mimicked by analogs of cGMP, a second messenger implicated in mediating the action of NO in other cell types. Production of NO could be detected directly in carbachol-stimulated neonatal myocytes by using a reporter cell bioassay. The regulation of adrenergic responsiveness by the NO signaling system was also documented in studies of adult cardiac myocyte contractility. The NOS inhibitor N omega-nitro-L-arginine significantly increased the inotropic effect of the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol on electrically stimulated adult rat ventricular myocytes, whereas this inhibitor had no effect on basal contractility. Inhibition of NO production by N omega-monomethyl-L-arginine in these cells, as measured by reporter cell bioassay, was also reversible with excess L-arginine. Thus, the physiologic response of isolated neonatal and adult ventricular myocytes to both muscarinic cholinergic and beta-adrenergic stimulation is mediated, at

  20. Endothelial cells are progenitors of cardiac pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Yang; Adams, Susanne; Eilken, Hanna; Stehling, Martin; Corada, Monica; Dejana, Elisabetta; Zhou, Bin; Adams, Ralf H.

    2016-01-01

    Mural cells of the vessel wall, namely pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells, are essential for vascular integrity. The developmental sources of these cells and molecular mechanisms controlling their progenitors in the heart are only partially understood. Here we show that endocardial endothelial cells are progenitors of pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells in the murine embryonic heart. Endocardial cells undergo endothelial–mesenchymal transition and convert into primitive mesenchymal progenitors expressing the platelet-derived growth factor receptors, PDGFRα and PDGFRβ. These progenitors migrate into the myocardium, differentiate and assemble the wall of coronary vessels, which requires canonical Wnt signalling involving Frizzled4, β-catenin and endothelial cell-derived Wnt ligands. Our findings identify a novel and unexpected population of progenitors for coronary mural cells with potential relevance for heart function and disease conditions. PMID:27516371

  1. Endothelial cells are progenitors of cardiac pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Yang; Adams, Susanne; Eilken, Hanna; Stehling, Martin; Corada, Monica; Dejana, Elisabetta; Zhou, Bin; Adams, Ralf H

    2016-01-01

    Mural cells of the vessel wall, namely pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells, are essential for vascular integrity. The developmental sources of these cells and molecular mechanisms controlling their progenitors in the heart are only partially understood. Here we show that endocardial endothelial cells are progenitors of pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells in the murine embryonic heart. Endocardial cells undergo endothelial-mesenchymal transition and convert into primitive mesenchymal progenitors expressing the platelet-derived growth factor receptors, PDGFRα and PDGFRβ. These progenitors migrate into the myocardium, differentiate and assemble the wall of coronary vessels, which requires canonical Wnt signalling involving Frizzled4, β-catenin and endothelial cell-derived Wnt ligands. Our findings identify a novel and unexpected population of progenitors for coronary mural cells with potential relevance for heart function and disease conditions. PMID:27516371

  2. Aspirin augments carotid-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity during muscle mechanoreflex and metaboreflex activation in humans.

    PubMed

    Drew, Rachel C; Muller, Matthew D; Blaha, Cheryl A; Mast, Jessica L; Herr, Michael D; Stocker, Sean D; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2013-10-15

    Muscle mechanoreflex activation decreases the sensitivity of carotid baroreflex (CBR)-heart rate (HR) control during local metabolite accumulation in humans. However, the contribution of thromboxane A2 (TXA2) toward this response is unknown. Therefore, the effect of inhibiting TXA2 production via low-dose aspirin on CBR-HR sensitivity during muscle mechanoreflex and metaboreflex activation in humans was examined. Twelve young subjects performed two trials during two visits, preceded by 7 days' low-dose aspirin (81 mg) or placebo. One trial involved 3-min passive calf stretch (mechanoreflex) during 7.5-min limb circulatory occlusion (CO). In another trial, CO was preceded by 1.5 min of 70% maximal voluntary contraction isometric calf exercise to accumulate metabolites during CO and stretch (mechanoreflex and metaboreflex). HR (ECG) and mean arterial pressure (Finometer) were recorded. CBR function was assessed using rapid neck pressures ranging from +40 to -80 mmHg. Aspirin significantly decreased baseline thromboxane B2 production by 84 ± 4% (P < 0.05) but did not affect 6-keto prostaglandin F1α. Following aspirin, stretch with metabolite accumulation significantly augmented maximal gain (GMAX) and operating point gain (GOP) of CBR-HR (GMAX; -0.71 ± 0.14 vs. -0.37 ± 0.08 and GOP; -0.69 ± 0.13 vs. -0.35 ± 0.12 beats·min(-1)·mmHg(-1) for aspirin and placebo, respectively; P < 0.05). CBR-HR function curves were reset similarly with aspirin and placebo during stretch with metabolite accumulation. In conclusion, these findings suggest that low-dose aspirin augments CBR-HR sensitivity during concurrent muscle mechanoreflex and metaboreflex activation in humans. This increased sensitivity appears linked to reduced TXA2 production, which likely plays a role in metabolite sensitization of muscle mechanoreceptors. PMID:23970529

  3. The cardiac muscle duplex as a method to study myocardial heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Solovyova, O.; Katsnelson, L.B.; Konovalov, P.V.; Kursanov, A.G.; Vikulova, N.A.; Kohl, P.; Markhasin, V.S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the development and application of paired muscle preparations, called duplex, for the investigation of mechanisms and consequences of intra-myocardial electro-mechanical heterogeneity. We illustrate the utility of the underlying combined experimental and computational approach for conceptual development and integration of basic science insight with clinically relevant settings, using previously published and new data. Directions for further study are identified. PMID:25106702

  4. Cardiac myofibroblasts express alpha smooth muscle actin during right ventricular pressure overload in the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, K. O.; Taatjes, D. J.; Schwarz, J.; vonTurkovich, M.; Low, R. B.

    1991-01-01

    A number of changes occur in contractile proteins and mechanical performance of the heart within 2 weeks of right ventricular pressure overload in 8- to 12-week-old rabbits. These changes are accompanied by increases in collagen concentration and the ratio of type I to type III collagen. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the evolution of these connective tissue changes morphologically and to characterize the interstitial cells that might be responsible. The myocardium is infiltrated by mononuclear inflammatory cells 2 days after banding, accompanied by focal myocyte necrosis. By 7 days, the inflammatory infiltrates subside and the damaged myocytes seen at 2 days are replaced by new collagen and a population of spindle-shaped cells, with ultrastructural features of myofibroblasts. A significant proportion of these cells contain alpha smooth muscle actin by immunohistochemical analysis. At 14 days, there is a large increase in stainable collagen with complex remodeling and reduplication of the collagen fiber network of the interstitium. Alpha smooth muscle actin-containing myofibroblasts persist, but their immunoreactivity appears reduced compared with day 7. The authors hypothesize that the interstitial fibroblasts that acquire smooth-muscle-like features in this model play a critical role in the heart's response to severe and sudden mechanical stress and are at least partly responsible for the changes in connective tissue that occur as a result of pressure overload in this model. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1853934

  5. Abundance, distribution, mobility and oligomeric state of M₂ muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in live cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Nenasheva, Tatiana A; Neary, Marianne; Mashanov, Gregory I; Birdsall, Nigel J M; Breckenridge, Ross A; Molloy, Justin E

    2013-04-01

    M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors modulate cardiac rhythm via regulation of the inward potassium current. To increase our understanding of M2 receptor physiology we used Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy to visualize individual receptors at the plasma membrane of transformed CHO(M2) cells, a cardiac cell line (HL-1), primary cardiomyocytes and tissue slices from pre- and post-natal mice. Receptor expression levels between individual cells in dissociated cardiomyocytes and heart slices were highly variable and only 10% of murine cardiomyocytes expressed muscarinic receptors. M2 receptors were evenly distributed across individual cells and their density in freshly isolated embryonic cardiomyocytes was ~1μm(-2), increasing at birth (to ~3μm(-2)) and decreasing back to ~1μm(-2) after birth. M2 receptors were primarily monomeric but formed reversible dimers. They diffused freely at the plasma membrane, moving approximately 4-times faster in heart slices than in cultured cardiomyocytes. Knowledge of receptor density and mobility has allowed receptor collision rate to be modeled by Monte Carlo simulations. Our estimated encounter rate of 5-10 collisions per second, may explain the latency between acetylcholine application and GIRK channel opening. PMID:23357106

  6. Abundance, distribution, mobility and oligomeric state of M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in live cardiac muscle

    PubMed Central

    Nenasheva, Tatiana A.; Neary, Marianne; Mashanov, Gregory I.; Birdsall, Nigel J.M.; Breckenridge, Ross A.; Molloy, Justin E.

    2013-01-01

    M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors modulate cardiac rhythm via regulation of the inward potassium current. To increase our understanding of M2 receptor physiology we used Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy to visualize individual receptors at the plasma membrane of transformed CHOM2 cells, a cardiac cell line (HL-1), primary cardiomyocytes and tissue slices from pre- and post-natal mice. Receptor expression levels between individual cells in dissociated cardiomyocytes and heart slices were highly variable and only 10% of murine cardiomyocytes expressed muscarinic receptors. M2 receptors were evenly distributed across individual cells and their density in freshly isolated embryonic cardiomyocytes was ~ 1 μm− 2, increasing at birth (to ~ 3 μm− 2) and decreasing back to ~ 1 μm− 2 after birth. M2 receptors were primarily monomeric but formed reversible dimers. They diffused freely at the plasma membrane, moving approximately 4-times faster in heart slices than in cultured cardiomyocytes. Knowledge of receptor density and mobility has allowed receptor collision rate to be modeled by Monte Carlo simulations. Our estimated encounter rate of 5–10 collisions per second, may explain the latency between acetylcholine application and GIRK channel opening. PMID:23357106

  7. Irreversible muscle damage in bodybuilding due to long-term intramuscular oil injection.

    PubMed

    Banke, I J; Prodinger, P M; Waldt, S; Weirich, G; Holzapfel, B M; Gradinger, R; Rechl, H

    2012-10-01

    Intramuscular oil injections generating slowly degrading oil-based depots represent a controversial subject in bodybuilding and fitness. However they seem to be commonly reported in a large number of non-medical reports, movies and application protocols for 'site-injections'. Surprisingly the impact of long-term (ab)use on the musculature as well as potential side-effects compromising health and sports ability are lacking in the medical literature. We present the case of a 40 year old male semi-professional bodybuilder with systemic infection and painful reddened swellings of the right upper arm forcing him to discontinue weightlifting. Over the last 8 years he daily self-injected sterilized sesame seed oil at numerous intramuscular locations for the purpose of massive muscle building. Whole body MRI showed more than 100 intramuscular rather than subcutaneous oil cysts and loss of normal muscle anatomy. 2-step septic surgery of the right upper arm revealed pus-filled cystic scar tissue with the near-complete absence of normal muscle. MRI 1 year later revealed the absence of relevant muscle regeneration. Persistent pain and inability to perform normal weight training were evident for at least 3 years post-surgery. This alarming finding indicating irreversible muscle mutilation may hopefully discourage people interested in bodybuilding and fitness from oil-injections. The impact of such chronic tissue stress on other diseases like malignancy remains to be determined. PMID:22592548

  8. Role of sarcomere mechanics and Ca2+ overload in Ca2+ waves and arrhythmias in rat cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    ter Keurs, Henk E D J; Wakayama, Yuji; Sugai, Yoshinao; Price, Guy; Kagaya, Yutaka; Boyden, Penelope A; Miura, Masahito; Stuyvers, Bruno D M

    2006-10-01

    Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) depends on the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) load and the cytosolic Ca(2+) level. Arrhythmogenic Ca(2+) waves underlying triggered propagated contractions arise from Ca(2+) overloaded regions near damaged areas in the cardiac muscle. Ca(2+) waves can also be induced in undamaged muscle, in regions with nonuniform excitation-contraction (EC) coupling by the cycle of stretch and release in the border zone between the damaged and intact regions. We hypothesize that rapid shortening of sarcomeres in the border zone during relaxation causes Ca(2+) release from troponin C (TnC) on thin filaments and initiates Ca(2+) waves. Elimination of this shortening will inhibit the initiation of Ca(2+) waves, while SR Ca(2+) overload will enhance the waves. Force, sarcomere length (SL), and [Ca(2+)](i) were measured and muscle length was controlled. A small jet of Hepes solution with an extracellular [Ca(2+)] 10 mM (HC), or HC containing BDM, was used to weaken a 300 mum long muscle segment. Trains of electrical stimuli were used to induce Ca(2+) waves. The effects of small exponential stretches on triggered propagatory contraction (TPC) amplitude and propagation velocity of Ca(2+) waves (V(prop)) were studied. Sarcomere shortening was uniform prior to activation. HC induced spontaneous diastolic sarcomere contractions in the jet region and attenuated twitch sarcomere shortening; HC+ butanedione monoxime (BDM) caused stretch only in the jet region. Stimulus trains induced Ca(2+) waves, which started inside the HC jet region during twitch relaxation. Ca(2+) waves started in the border zone of the BDM jet. The initial local [Ca(2+)](i) rise of the waves by HC was twice that by BDM. The waves propagated at a V(prop) of 2.0 +/- 0.2 mm/sec. Arrhythmias occurred frequently in trabeculae following exposure to the HC jet. Stretch early during relaxation, which reduced sarcomere shortening in the weakened regions, substantially

  9. Animal models of cardiac cachexia.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Francesca; Malara, Natalia; Mollace, Vincenzo; Rosano, Giuseppe; Ferraro, Elisabetta

    2016-09-15

    Cachexia is the loss of body weight associated with several chronic diseases including chronic heart failure (CHF). The cachectic condition is mainly due to loss of skeletal muscle mass and adipose tissue depletion. The majority of experimental in vivo studies on cachexia rely on animal models of cancer cachexia while a reliable and appropriate model for cardiac cachexia has not yet been established. A critical issue in generating a cardiac cachexia model is that genetic modifications or pharmacological treatments impairing the heart functionality and used to obtain the heart failure model might likely impair the skeletal muscle, this also being a striated muscle and sharing with the myocardium several molecular and physiological mechanisms. On the other hand, often, the induction of heart damage in the several existing models of heart failure does not necessarily lead to skeletal muscle loss and cachexia. Here we describe the main features of cardiac cachexia and illustrate some animal models proposed for cardiac cachexia studies; they include the genetic calsequestrin and Dahl salt-sensitive models, the monocrotaline model and the surgical models obtained by left anterior descending (LAD) ligation, transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and ascending aortic banding. The availability of a specific animal model for cardiac cachexia is a crucial issue since, besides the common aspects of cachexia in the different syndromes, each disease has some peculiarities in its etiology and pathophysiology leading to cachexia. Such peculiarities need to be unraveled in order to find new targets for effective therapies. PMID:27317993

  10. Reorganised anticipatory postural adjustments due to experimental lower extremity muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Shiozawa, Shinichiro; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Automated movements adjusting postural control may be hampered during musculoskeletal pain leaving a risk of incomplete control of balance. This study investigated the effect of experimental muscle pain on anticipatory postural adjustments by reaction task movements. While standing, nine healthy males performed two reaction time tasks (shoulder flexion of dominant side and bilateral heel lift) before, during and after experimental muscle pain. On two different days experimental pain was induced in the m. vastus medialis (VM) or the m. tibialis anterior (TA) of the dominant side by injections of hypertonic saline (1ml, 5.8%). Isotonic saline (1ml, 0.9%) was used as control injection. Electromyography (EMG) was recorded from 13 muscles. EMG onset, EMG amplitude, and kinematic parameters (shoulder and ankle joint) were extracted. During shoulder flexion and VM pain the onset of the ipsilateral biceps femoris was significantly faster than baseline and post injection sessions. During heels lift in the VM and TA pain conditions the onset of the contralateral TA was significantly faster than baseline and post injection sessions in bilateral side. VM pain significantly reduced m. quadriceps femoris activity and TA pain significantly reduced ipsilateral VM activity and TA activity during bilateral heel lift. The EMG reaction time was delayed in bilateral soleus muscles during heels lift with VM and TA pain. The faster onset of postural muscle activity during anticipatory postural adjustments may suggest a compensatory function to maintain postural control whereas the reduced postural muscle activity during APAs may indicate a pain adaptation strategy to avoid secondary damage. PMID:24071550

  11. Diet-induced Lethality Due to Deletion of the Hdac3 Gene in Heart and Skeletal Muscle*♦

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zheng; Singh, Nikhil; Mullican, Shannon E.; Everett, Logan J.; Li, Li; Yuan, Lijun; Liu, Xi; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2011-01-01

    Many human diseases result from the influence of the nutritional environment on gene expression. The environment interacts with the genome by altering the epigenome, including covalent modification of nucleosomal histones. Here, we report a novel and dramatic influence of diet on the phenotype and survival of mice in which histone deacetylase 3 (Hdac3) is deleted postnatally in heart and skeletal muscle. Although embryonic deletion of myocardial Hdac3 causes major cardiomyopathy that reduces survival, we found that excision of Hdac3 in heart and muscle later in development leads to a much milder phenotype and does not reduce survival when mice are fed normal chow. Remarkably, upon switching to a high fat diet, the mice begin to die within weeks and display signs of severe hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and heart failure. Down-regulation of myocardial mitochondrial bioenergetic genes, specifically those involved in lipid metabolism, precedes the full development of cardiomyopathy, suggesting that HDAC3 is important in maintaining proper mitochondrial function. These data suggest that loss of the epigenomic modifier HDAC3 causes dietary lethality by compromising the ability of cardiac mitochondria to respond to changes of nutritional environment. In addition, this study provides a mouse model for diet-inducible heart failure. PMID:21808063

  12. Length-dependent changes in contractile dynamics are blunted due to cardiac myosin binding protein-C ablation

    PubMed Central

    Mamidi, Ranganath; Gresham, Kenneth S.; Stelzer, Julian E.

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced cardiac contractile function with increased sarcomere length (SL) is, in part, mediated by a decrease in the radial distance between myosin heads and actin. The radial disposition of myosin heads relative to actin is modulated by cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C), suggesting that cMyBP-C contributes to the length-dependent activation (LDA) in the myocardium. However, the precise roles of cMyBP-C in modulating cardiac LDA are unclear. To determine the impact of cMyBP-C on LDA, we measured isometric force, myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity (pCa50) and length-dependent changes in kinetic parameters of cross-bridge (XB) relaxation (krel), and recruitment (kdf) due to rapid stretch, as well as the rate of force redevelopment (ktr) in response to a large slack-restretch maneuver in skinned ventricular multicellular preparations isolated from the hearts of wild-type (WT) and cMyBP-C knockout (KO) mice, at SL's 1.9 μm or 2.1 μm. Our results show that maximal force was not significantly different between KO and WT preparations but length-dependent increase in pCa50 was attenuated in the KO preparations. pCa50 was not significantly different between WT and KO preparations at long SL (5.82 ± 0.02 in WT vs. 5.87 ± 0.02 in KO), whereas pCa50 was significantly different between WT and KO preparations at short SL (5.71 ± 0.02 in WT vs. 5.80 ± 0.01 in KO; p < 0.05). The ktr, measured at half-maximal Ca2+-activation, was significantly accelerated at short SL in WT preparations (8.74 ± 0.56 s−1 at 1.9 μm vs. 5.71 ± 0.40 s−1 at 2.1 μm, p < 0.05). Furthermore, krel and kdf were accelerated by 32% and 50%, respectively at short SL in WT preparations. In contrast, ktr was not altered by changes in SL in KO preparations (8.03 ± 0.54 s−1 at 1.9 μm vs. 8.90 ± 0.37 s−1 at 2.1 μm). Similarly, KO preparations did not exhibit length-dependent changes in krel and kdf. Collectively, our data implicate cMyBP-C as an important regulator of LDA via its impact on

  13. [Time costs cardiac muscle tissue--prehospital therapy of acute myocardial infarct--a case report].

    PubMed

    Eschenburg, G; Pappert, D; Ohlmeier, H

    2003-01-01

    Symptoms of an acute myocardial infarction are a common reason for calling the emergency physician. Pre-hospital mortality caused by cardiac infarction is constantly high. The main potential for decreasing infarction mortality lies in the pre-hospital period. The problems and prospects of treatment in the early period are described in the case of a 73-year-old patient with an acute anterior infarction. The diagnostic and therapeutic approach is shown and discussed in this concrete case, taking into consideration the guidelines for diagnostics and therapy of acute myocardial infarction in the pre-hospital period of the German Society for Cardiology. A particular focus is the management of pre-hospital thrombolysis, the preconditions, realization and risks of which are described. In this context, the experience and competence of the emergency physician is prerequisite for the exact diagnosis and therapy. Furthermore, the importance of a smooth transition from pre-hospital therapy to intensive care is emphasized. PMID:12666508

  14. Cardiac Electrophysiological Alterations in Heart/Muscle-Specific Manganese-Superoxide Dismutase-Deficient Mice: Prevention by a Dietary Antioxidant Polyphenol

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Akio; Tagashira, Motoyuki; Kanda, Tomomasa; Nakaya, Haruaki

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac electrophysiological alterations induced by chronic exposure to reactive oxygen species and protective effects of dietary antioxidant have not been thoroughly examined. We recorded surface electrocardiograms (ECG) and evaluated cellular electrophysiological abnormalities in enzymatically-dissociated left ventricular (LV) myocytes in heart/muscle-specific manganese-superoxide dismutase-deficient (H/M-Sod2−/−) mice, which exhibit dilated cardiomyopathy due to increased oxidative stress. We also investigated the influences of intake of apple polyphenols (AP) containing mainly procyanidins with potent antioxidant activity. The QRS and QT intervals of ECG recorded in H/M-Sod2−/− mice were prolonged. The effective refractory period in the LV myocardium of H/M-Sod2−/− mice was prolonged, and susceptibility to ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation induced by rapid ventricular pacing was increased. Action potential duration in H/M-Sod2−/− LV myocytes was prolonged, and automaticity was enhanced. The density of the inwardly rectifier K+ current (IK1) was decreased in the LV cells of H/M-Sod2−/− mice. The AP intake partially improved these electrophysiological alterations and extended the lifespan in H/M-Sod2−/− mice. Thus, chronic exposure of the heart to oxidative stress produces a variety of electrophysiological abnormalities, increased susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias, and action potential changes associated with the reduced density of IK1. Dietary intake of antioxidant nutrients may prevent oxidative stress-induced electrophysiological disturbances. PMID:24772433

  15. Task Failure during Exercise to Exhaustion in Normoxia and Hypoxia Is Due to Reduced Muscle Activation Caused by Central Mechanisms While Muscle Metaboreflex Does Not Limit Performance

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Peralta, Rafael; Morales-Alamo, David; González-Izal, Miriam; Losa-Reyna, José; Pérez-Suárez, Ismael; Izquierdo, Mikel; Calbet, José A. L.

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether task failure during incremental exercise to exhaustion (IE) is principally due to reduced neural drive and increased metaboreflex activation eleven men (22 ± 2 years) performed a 10 s control isokinetic sprint (IS; 80 rpm) after a short warm-up. This was immediately followed by an IE in normoxia (Nx, PIO2:143 mmHg) and hypoxia (Hyp, PIO2:73 mmHg) in random order, separated by a 120 min resting period. At exhaustion, the circulation of both legs was occluded instantaneously (300 mmHg) during 10 or 60 s to impede recovery and increase metaboreflex activation. This was immediately followed by an IS with open circulation. Electromyographic recordings were obtained from the vastus medialis and lateralis. Muscle biopsies and blood gases were obtained in separate experiments. During the last 10 s of the IE, pulmonary ventilation, VO2, power output and muscle activation were lower in hypoxia than in normoxia, while pedaling rate was similar. Compared to the control sprint, performance (IS-Wpeak) was reduced to a greater extent after the IE-Nx (11% lower P < 0.05) than IE-Hyp. The root mean square (EMGRMS) was reduced by 38 and 27% during IS performed after IE-Nx and IE-Hyp, respectively (Nx vs. Hyp: P < 0.05). Post-ischemia IS-EMGRMS values were higher than during the last 10 s of IE. Sprint exercise mean (IS-MPF) and median (IS-MdPF) power frequencies, and burst duration, were more reduced after IE-Nx than IE-Hyp (P < 0.05). Despite increased muscle lactate accumulation, acidification, and metaboreflex activation from 10 to 60 s of ischemia, IS-Wmean (+23%) and burst duration (+10%) increased, while IS-EMGRMS decreased (−24%, P < 0.05), with IS-MPF and IS-MdPF remaining unchanged. In conclusion, close to task failure, muscle activation is lower in hypoxia than in normoxia. Task failure is predominantly caused by central mechanisms, which recover to great extent within 1 min even when the legs remain ischemic. There is dissociation between the

  16. Double muscling in cattle due to mutations in the myostatin gene

    PubMed Central

    McPherron, Alexandra C.; Lee, Se-Jin

    1997-01-01

    Myostatin (GDF-8) is a member of the transforming growth factor β superfamily of secreted growth and differentiation factors that is essential for proper regulation of skeletal muscle mass in mice. Here we report the myostatin sequences of nine other vertebrate species and the identification of mutations in the coding sequence of bovine myostatin in two breeds of double-muscled cattle, Belgian Blue and Piedmontese, which are known to have an increase in muscle mass relative to conventional cattle. The Belgian Blue myostatin sequence contains an 11-nucleotide deletion in the third exon which causes a frameshift that eliminates virtually all of the mature, active region of the molecule. The Piedmontese myostatin sequence contains a missense mutation in exon 3, resulting in a substitution of tyrosine for an invariant cysteine in the mature region of the protein. The similarity in phenotypes of double-muscled cattle and myostatin null mice suggests that myostatin performs the same biological function in these two species and is a potentially useful target for genetic manipulation in other farm animals. PMID:9356471

  17. Solubilization and characterization of a ouabain-sensitive protein from transverse tubule membrane-junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum complexes (TTM-JSR) in cat cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Fujino, S; Satoh, K; Bando, T; Kurokawa, T; Nakai, T; Takashima, K; Fujino, M

    1989-05-15

    A new glycoprotein of 31,500 dalton, which has a high affinity for ouabain, and is independent of (Na+-K+)-ATPase, was solubilized from transverse tubule membrane and junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum complexes (TTM-JSR) of cat cardiac muscle. This protein could be extracted only in small amounts from sarcolemma-plasma membrane (SLM-PL) fragments, suggesting that it indeed originates from the TTM-JSR. PMID:2721638

  18. Long-term administration of the TNF blocking drug Remicade (cV1q) to mdx mice reduces skeletal and cardiac muscle fibrosis, but negatively impacts cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Ermolova, N V; Martinez, L; Vetrone, S A; Jordan, M C; Roos, K P; Sweeney, H L; Spencer, M J

    2014-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a degenerative skeletal muscle disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin (DYS). Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been implicated in the pathogenesis since short-term treatment of mdx mice with TNF blocking drugs proved beneficial; however, it is not clear whether long-term treatment will also improve long-term outcomes of fibrosis and cardiac health. In this investigation, short and long-term dosing studies were carried out using the TNF blocking drug Remicade and a variety of outcome measures were assessed. Here we show no demonstrable benefit to muscle strength or morphology with 10mg/kg or 20mg/kg Remicade; however, 3mg/kg produced positive strength benefits. Remicade treatment correlated with reductions in myostatin mRNA in the heart, and concomitant reductions in cardiac and skeletal fibrosis. Surprisingly, although Remicade treated mdx hearts were less fibrotic, reductions in LV mass and ejection fraction were also observed, and these changes coincided with reductions in AKT phosphorylation on threonine 308. Thus, TNF blockade benefits mdx skeletal muscle strength and fibrosis, but negatively impacts AKT activation, leading to deleterious changes to dystrophic heart function. These studies uncover a previously unknown relationship between TNF blockade and alteration of muscle growth signaling pathways. PMID:24844454

  19. Reduced ability to release adenosine by diabetic rat cardiac fibroblasts due to altered expression of nucleoside transporters

    PubMed Central

    Podgorska, Marzena; Kocbuch, Katarzyna; Grden, Marzena; Szutowicz, Andrzej; Pawelczyk, Tadeusz

    2006-01-01

    Adenosine produced by cardiac cells is known to attenuate the proliferation of cardiac fibroblasts (CFs), inhibit collagen synthesis, and protect the myocardium against ischaemic and reperfusion injury. Diabetic patients' hearts exhibit ventricular hypertrophy and demonstrate reduced tolerance to hypoxia or ischaemia. In this study, we characterize the effects of glucose and insulin on processes that determine the release of adenosine from CFs. We showed that during ATP depletion, rat CFs cultured in the absence of insulin release significantly less adenosine compared to cells grown in the presence of insulin. Moreover, under both conditions the quantity of released adenosine depends on glucose concentration. We demonstrate that this is due to altered expression of nucleoside transporters. High glucose (25 mm) induced 85% decrease in nucleoside transporter ENT1 mRNA levels. Decrease of the insulin level below 10−11m resulted in over 3-fold increase in the nucleoside transporter CNT2 mRNA content. Measurements of adenosine transport in CFs cultured in the presence of 5 mm glucose and 10 nm insulin showed that the bidirectional equilibrative adenosine transport accounted for 70% of the overall adenosine uptake. However, cells grown in the presence of high glucose (25 mm) demonstrated 65% decrease of the bidirectional equilibrative adenosine transport. Experiments on CFs cultured in the absence of insulin showed that the unidirectional Na+-dependent adenosine uptake rose in these cells more than 4-fold. These results indicate that the development of diabetes may result in an increased uptake of interstitial adenosine by CFs, and reduction of the ability of these cells to release adenosine during ATP deprivation. PMID:16873415

  20. Isolation and characterization of a Streptococcus pyogenes protein that binds to basal laminae of human cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Winters, B D; Ramasubbu, N; Stinson, M W

    1993-01-01

    A 9-kDa glycosaminoglycan-binding protein (GAG-BP) was isolated from Streptococcus pyogenes and purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography on heparin-agarose. The protein selectively bound to the basal laminae of human cardiac muscle and had an apparent dissociation constant of 2.5 x 10(-7) M. Chemical analyses indicated that the GAG-BP was rich in alanine, lysine, and arginine (pI 9.5) and devoid of tyrosine, methionine, histidine, and half-cystine. There were no detectable carbohydrate or phosphate substituents. The amino acid sequence of the N terminus of GAG-BP showed homology with those of histone-like DNA-binding proteins of several other bacteria. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that the protein was made up of 50% beta-sheet and 50% beta-turn and random coil in aqueous solution; however, when the protein complexed with heparin, it adopted a more ordered structure containing 25% alpha-helix, 50% beta-sheet, and 25% beta-turn and random coil. The GAG-BP cross-reacted serologically with a component of similar size in extracts of other group A streptococci and was present in the culture medium during late logarithmic growth. Images PMID:8335359

  1. Bispyridinium non-oximes: An evaluation of cardiac effects in isolated hearts and smooth muscle relaxing effects in jejunum.

    PubMed

    Neumaier, Katharina; Worek, Franz; Thiermann, Horst; Wille, Timo

    2016-09-01

    Bispyridinium non-oximes seem to be promising candidates for the generic treatment of nerve agent poisoning as they interact with nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. The lead compound MB327 showed therapeutic effectiveness in vitro and in vivo but was toxic at higher doses. In the present study, the effect of various bispyridinium non-oximes on isolated heart and small intestine function was investigated. Bispyridinium non-oximes and oximes were tested in at least seven different concentrations in rat jejunum preparations pre-treated with carbachol. All bispyridinium non-oximes showed classical dose response curves with MB327 being the most effective (EC50=6.6μM) and MB782 being slightly less effective (EC50=10.4μM). Neither the bispyridinium non-oximes nor the oximes showed cardiotoxic effects in the isolated Langendorff heart. The tested bispyridinum compounds showed no direct cardiac effect but had variable smooth muscle relaxing effects. Further in vivo studies are required to get more insight into potential toxic mechanisms of these promising nerve agent antidotes. PMID:27184650

  2. Isoforms of α-Actinin from Cardiac, Smooth, and Skeletal Muscle Form Polar Arrays of Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Kenneth A.; Taylor, Dianne W.; Schachat, Fred

    2000-01-01

    We have used a positively charged lipid monolayer to form two-dimensional bundles of F-actin cross-linked by α-actinin to investigate the relative orientation of the actin filaments within them. This method prevents growth of the bundles perpendicular to the monolayer plane, thereby facilitating interpretation of the electron micrographs. Using α-actinin isoforms isolated from the three types of vertebrate muscle, i.e., cardiac, skeletal, and smooth, we have observed almost exclusively cross-linking between polar arrays of filaments, i.e., actin filaments with their plus ends oriented in the same direction. One type of bundle can be classified as an Archimedian spiral consisting of a single actin filament that spirals inward as the filament grows and the bundle is formed. These spirals have a consistent hand and grow to a limiting internal diameter of 0.4–0.7 μm, where the filaments appear to break and spiral formation ceases. These results, using isoforms usually characterized as cross-linkers of bipolar actin filament bundles, suggest that α-actinin is capable of cross-linking actin filaments in any orientation. Formation of specifically bipolar or polar filament arrays cross-linked by α-actinin may require additional factors that either determine the filament orientation or restrict the cross-linking capabilities of α-actinin. PMID:10791977

  3. Center of Pressure Displacement of Standing Posture during Rapid Movements Is Reorganised Due to Experimental Lower Extremity Muscle Pain

    PubMed Central

    Shiozawa, Shinichiro; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Postural control during rapid movements may be impaired due to musculoskeletal pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of experimental knee-related muscle pain on the center of pressure (CoP) displacement in a reaction time task condition. Methods Nine healthy males performed two reaction time tasks (dominant side shoulder flexion and bilateral heel lift) before, during, and after experimental pain induced in the dominant side vastus medialis or the tibialis anterior muscles by hypertonic saline injections. The CoP displacement was extracted from the ipsilateral and contralateral side by two force plates and the net CoP displacement was calculated. Results Compared with non-painful sessions, tibialis anterior muscle pain during the peak and peak-to-peak displacement for the CoP during anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) of the shoulder task reduced the peak-to-peak displacement of the net CoP in the medial-lateral direction (P<0.05). Tibialis anterior and vastus medialis muscle pain during shoulder flexion task reduced the anterior-posterior peak-to-peak displacement in the ipsilateral side (P<0.05). Conclusions The central nervous system in healthy individuals was sufficiently robust in maintaining the APA characteristics during pain, although the displacement of net and ipsilateral CoP in the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior directions during unilateral fast shoulder movement was altered. PMID:26680777

  4. Cardiac conduction system

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... signals to the heart muscle causing it to contract. The main components of the cardiac conduction system ... the sequence by causing the atrial muscles to contract. From there, the signal travels to the AV ...

  5. Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain controls myosin head conformation in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Kampourakis, Thomas; Irving, Malcolm

    2015-08-01

    The effect of phosphorylation on the conformation of the regulatory light chain (cRLC) region of myosin in ventricular trabeculae from rat heart was determined by polarized fluorescence from thiophosphorylated cRLCs labelled with bifunctional sulforhodamine (BSR). Less than 5% of cRLCs were endogenously phosphorylated in this preparation, and similarly low values of basal cRLC phosphorylation were measured in fresh intact ventricle from both rat and mouse hearts. BSR-labelled cRLCs were thiophosphorylated by a recombinant fragment of human cardiac myosin light chain kinase, which was shown to phosphorylate cRLCs specifically at serine 15 in a calcium- and calmodulin-dependent manner, both in vitro and in situ. The BSR-cRLCs were exchanged into demembranated trabeculae, and polarized fluorescence intensities measured for each BSR-cRLC in relaxation, active isometric contraction and rigor were combined with RLC crystal structures to calculate the orientation distribution of the C-lobe of the cRLC in each state. Only two of the four C-lobe orientation populations seen during relaxation and active isometric contraction in the unphosphorylated state were present after cRLC phosphorylation. Thus cRLC phosphorylation alters the equilibrium between defined conformations of the cRLC regions of the myosin heads, rather than simply disordering the heads as assumed previously. cRLC phosphorylation also changes the orientation of the cRLC C-lobe in rigor conditions, showing that the orientation of this part of the myosin head is determined by its interaction with the thick filament even when the head is strongly bound to actin. These results suggest that cRLC phosphorylation controls the contractility of the heart by modulating the interaction of the cRLC region of the myosin heads with the thick filament backbone. PMID:26057075

  6. Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain controls myosin head conformation in cardiac muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kampourakis, Thomas; Irving, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    The effect of phosphorylation on the conformation of the regulatory light chain (cRLC) region of myosin in ventricular trabeculae from rat heart was determined by polarized fluorescence from thiophosphorylated cRLCs labelled with bifunctional sulforhodamine (BSR). Less than 5% of cRLCs were endogenously phosphorylated in this preparation, and similarly low values of basal cRLC phosphorylation were measured in fresh intact ventricle from both rat and mouse hearts. BSR-labelled cRLCs were thiophosphorylated by a recombinant fragment of human cardiac myosin light chain kinase, which was shown to phosphorylate cRLCs specifically at serine 15 in a calcium- and calmodulin-dependent manner, both in vitro and in situ. The BSR-cRLCs were exchanged into demembranated trabeculae, and polarized fluorescence intensities measured for each BSR-cRLC in relaxation, active isometric contraction and rigor were combined with RLC crystal structures to calculate the orientation distribution of the C-lobe of the cRLC in each state. Only two of the four C-lobe orientation populations seen during relaxation and active isometric contraction in the unphosphorylated state were present after cRLC phosphorylation. Thus cRLC phosphorylation alters the equilibrium between defined conformations of the cRLC regions of the myosin heads, rather than simply disordering the heads as assumed previously. cRLC phosphorylation also changes the orientation of the cRLC C-lobe in rigor conditions, showing that the orientation of this part of the myosin head is determined by its interaction with the thick filament even when the head is strongly bound to actin. These results suggest that cRLC phosphorylation controls the contractility of the heart by modulating the interaction of the cRLC region of the myosin heads with the thick filament backbone. PMID:26057075

  7. Distinct functions of the laminin β LN domain and collagen IV during cardiac extracellular matrix formation and stabilization of alary muscle attachments revealed by EMS mutagenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Drosophila heart (dorsal vessel) is a relatively simple tubular organ that serves as a model for several aspects of cardiogenesis. Cardiac morphogenesis, proper heart function and stability require structural components whose identity and ways of assembly are only partially understood. Structural components are also needed to connect the myocardial tube with neighboring cells such as pericardial cells and specialized muscle fibers, the so-called alary muscles. Results Using an EMS mutagenesis screen for cardiac and muscular abnormalities in Drosophila embryos we obtained multiple mutants for two genetically interacting complementation groups that showed similar alary muscle and pericardial cell detachment phenotypes. The molecular lesions underlying these defects were identified as domain-specific point mutations in LamininB1 and Cg25C, encoding the extracellular matrix (ECM) components laminin β and collagen IV α1, respectively. Of particular interest within the LamininB1 group are certain hypomorphic mutants that feature prominent defects in cardiac morphogenesis and cardiac ECM layer formation, but in contrast to amorphic mutants, only mild defects in other tissues. All of these alleles carry clustered missense mutations in the laminin LN domain. The identified Cg25C mutants display weaker and largely temperature-sensitive phenotypes that result from glycine substitutions in different Gly-X-Y repeats of the triple helix-forming domain. While initial basement membrane assembly is not abolished in Cg25C mutants, incorporation of perlecan is impaired and intracellular accumulation of perlecan as well as the collagen IV α2 chain is detected during late embryogenesis. Conclusions Assembly of the cardiac ECM depends primarily on laminin, whereas collagen IV is needed for stabilization. Our data underscore the importance of a correctly assembled ECM particularly for the development of cardiac tissues and their lateral connections. The mutational

  8. Development of antibody-siRNA conjugate targeted to cardiac and skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Sugo, Tsukasa; Terada, Michiko; Oikawa, Tatsuo; Miyata, Kenichi; Nishimura, Satoshi; Kenjo, Eriya; Ogasawara-Shimizu, Mari; Makita, Yukimasa; Imaichi, Sachiko; Murata, Shumpei; Otake, Kentaro; Kikuchi, Kuniko; Teratani, Mika; Masuda, Yasushi; Kamei, Takayuki; Takagahara, Shuichi; Ikeda, Shota; Ohtaki, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Hirokazu

    2016-09-10

    Despite considerable efforts to develop efficient carriers, the major target organ of short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) remains limited to the liver. Expanding the application outside the liver is required to increase the value of siRNAs. Here we report on a novel platform targeted to muscular organs by conjugation of siRNAs with anti-CD71 Fab' fragment. This conjugate showed durable gene-silencing in the heart and skeletal muscle for one month after intravenous administration in normal mice. In particular, 1μg siRNA conjugate showed significant gene-silencing in the gastrocnemius when injected intramuscularly. In a mouse model of peripheral artery disease, the treatment with myostatin-targeting siRNA conjugate by intramuscular injection resulted in significant silencing of myostatin and hypertrophy of the gastrocnemius, which was translated into the recovery of running performance. These data demonstrate the utility of antibody conjugation for siRNA delivery and the therapeutic potential for muscular diseases. PMID:27369865

  9. Effect of exercise training and anabolic androgenic steroids on hemodynamics, glycogen content, angiogenesis and apoptosis of cardiac muscle in adult male rats

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Asmaa F.; Kamal, Manal M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effects of exercise training and anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) on hemodynamics, glycogen content, angiogenesis, apoptosis and histology of cardiac muscle. Methods Forty rats were divided into 4 groups; control, steroid, exercise-trained and exercise-trained plus steroid groups. The exercise-trained and trained plus steroid groups, after one week of water adaptation, were exercised by jumping into water for 5 weeks. The steroid and trained plus steroid groups received nandrolone decanoate, for 5 weeks. Systolic blood pressure and heart rate (HR) were monitored weekly. Heart weight/body weight ratio (HW/BW ratio) were determined. Serum testosterone, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), cardiac caspase-3 activity and glycogen content were measured. Results Compared with control, the steroid group had significantly higher blood pressure, HR, sympathetic nerve activity, testosterone level, HW/BW and cardiac caspase-3 activity. Histological examination revealed apoptotic changes and hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes. In exercise-trained group, cardiac glycogen, VEGF and testosterone levels were significantly higher while HR was significantly lower than control. HW/BW was more than control confirmed by hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes with angiogenesis on histological examination. Trained plus steroid group, had no change in HR, with higher blood pressure and HW/BW than control, cardiac glycogen and serum VEGF were higher than control but lower than exercise-trained group. Histological examination showed hypertrophy of cardiomyoctes with mild angiogenesis rather than apoptosis. Conclusion When exercise is augmented with AAS, exercise-associated cardiac benefits may not be fully gained with potential cardiac risk from AAS if used alone or combined with exercise. PMID:23559905

  10. Selective control of fibroblast proliferation and its effect on cardiac muscle differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Clark, W A

    1976-09-01

    The stability of the differentiated state of cardiac myocytes in vitro was examined under culture conditions which selectively stimulated or inhibited proliferation of fibroblasts. Regulation of fibroblast proliferation in cultures of myocardial cells from 8-day embryonic chicks was achieved by adjustment of the glutamine (Gln) concentration in the culture medium (Ham's F-12 medium containing 2 x amino acids and 5% fetal calf serum). Myocardial cells, when plated at 80 cells/mm2 in Gln- medium, maintained a stable density of approximately 40% of the plating density for more than 30 days. When Gln was added to the medium (292 micrograms/ml) fibroblast proliferation was stimulated, and by 5-6 days after this addition cell densities had increased to confluency. The selective action of glutamine on fibroblast proliferation was determined by labeling cultures with tritiated thymidine ([3H]TdR) and scoring its incorporation into myocytes and fibroblasts by radioautography. After 2 weeks in Gln- medium, the mitotic index was 0.3% and the [3H]TdR-labeling index (1.5-hr pulse) was 6.4%. In addition, the proportion of myocytes in the population was constant at 64.2% for at least 30 days in vitro, and contractile activity was observed for up to 6 months. After 5 days of Gln replacement, the cells exhibited a labeling index of 25%, the proportion of myocytes decreased to less than 10% and contractile activity was rarely observed. Although the [3H]TdR-labeling index of fibroblasts and myocytes was nearly identical in Gln- medium, the addition of Gln produced a fivefold stimulation in the fibroblast labeling index, but did not affect myocyte proliferation or DNA synthesis. A unique phenomenon of myocyte congregation was observed only in Gln- medium which resulted in the formation of myocyte colonies from which fibroblasts were largely absent. It is suggested that this process with the resultant establishment of a functional electrical syncytium plays a significant role in the

  11. Acquired torticollis due to primary pyomyositis of the paraspinal muscles in an 11-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Ray, S; Iyer, A; Avula, S; Kneen, R

    2016-01-01

    Torticollis is characterised by tilting and rotation of the cervical spine in opposite directions. Causes can be congenital or acquired. Primary pyomyositis is a rare subacute deep bacterial infection of skeletal muscles that typically affects individuals under 20 years of age from tropical countries. Infrequently, pyomyositis occurs in individuals from temperate regions, usually in immunocompromised adults, and this is defined as secondary pyomyositis. We report a case of acquired torticollis due to primary pyomyositis of the paraspinal muscles in a previously healthy boy from the UK. A prolonged course of antibiotics and physiotherapy led to a complete resolution of his illness. We review how to differentiate pyomyositis from focal myositis, a more common inflammatory muscular cause of acquired torticollis. PMID:26994045

  12. The role of tropomyosin isoforms and phosphorylation in force generation in thin-filament reconstituted bovine cardiac muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoying; Heeley, David H.; Smillie, Lawrence B.

    2011-01-01

    The thin filament extraction and reconstitution protocol was used to investigate the functional roles of tropomyosin (Tm) isoforms and phosphorylation in bovine myocardium. The thin filament was extracted by gelsolin, reconstituted with G-actin, and further reconstituted with cardiac troponin together with one of three Tm varieties: phosphorylated αTm (αTm.P), dephosphorylated αTm (αTm.deP), and dephosphorylated βTm (βTm.deP). The effects of Ca, phosphate, MgATP and MgADP concentrations were examined in the reconstituted fibres at pH 7.0 and 25°C. Our data show that Ca2+ sensitivity (pCa50: half saturation point) was increased by 0.19 ± 0.07 units when βTm.deP was used instead of αTm.deP (P < 0.05), and by 0.27 ± 0.06 units when phosphorylated αTm was used (P < 0.005). The cooperativity (Hill factor) decreased (but insignificantly) from 3.2 ± 0.3 (5) to 2.8 ± 0.2 (7) with phosphorylation. The cooperativity decreased significantly from 3.2 ± 0.3 (5) to 2.1 ± 0.2 (9) with isoform change from αTm.deP to βTm.deP. There was no significant difference in isometric tension or stiffness between αTm.P, αTm.deP, and βTm.deP muscle fibres at saturating [Ca2+] or after rigor induction. Based on the six-state cross-bridge model, sinusoidal analysis indicated that the equilibrium constants of elementary steps differed up to 1.7x between αTm.deP and βTm.deP, and up to 2.0x between αTm.deP and αTm.P. The rate constants differed up to 1.5x between αTm.deP and βTm.deP, and up to 2.4x between αTm.deP and αTm.P. We conclude that tension and stiffness per cross-bridge are not significantly different among the three muscle models. PMID:20559861

  13. Autophagy plays an important role in Sunitinib-mediated cell death in H9c2 cardiac muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Yuqin; Xue Tao; Yang Xiaochun; Zhu Hong; Ding Xiaofei; Lou Liming; Lu Wei; Yang Bo; He Qiaojun

    2010-10-01

    Sunitinib, which is a multitargeted tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, exhibits antiangiogenic and antitumor activity, and extends survival of patients with metastatic renal-cell carcinoma (mRCC) and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). This molecule has also been reported to be associated with cardiotoxicity at a high frequency, but the mechanism is still unknown. In the present study, we observed that Sunitinib showed high anti-proliferative effect on H9c2 cardiac muscle cells measured by PI staining and the MTT assay. But apoptotic markers (PARP cleavage, caspase 3 cleavage and chromatin condensation) were uniformly negative in H9c2 cells after Sunitinib treatment for 48 h, indicating that another cell death pathway may be involved in Sunitinib-induced cardiotoxicity. Here we found Sunitinib dramatically increased autophagic flux in H9c2 cells. Acidic vesicle fluorescence and high expression of LC3-II in H9c2 cells identified autophagy as a Sunitinib-induced process that might be associated with cytotoxicity. Furthermore, knocking down Beclin 1 by RNA-interference to block autophagy in H9c2 cells revealed that the death rate was decreased when treated with Sunitinib in comparison to control cells. These results confirmed that autophagy plays an important role in Sunitinib-mediated H9c2 cells cytotoxicity. Taken together, the data presented here strongly suggest that autophagy is associated with Sunitinib-induced cardiotoxicity, and that inhibition of autophagy constitutes a viable strategy for reducing Sunitinib-induced cardiomyocyte death thereby alleviating Sunitinib cardiotoxicity.

  14. Effects of pressure- or volume-overload hypertrophy on passive stiffness in isolated adult cardiac muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, S.; Koide, M.; Cooper, G. 4th; Zile, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the changes in myocardial stiffness induced by chronic hemodynamic overloading are dependent on changes in the passive stiffness of the cardiac muscle cell (cardiocyte). However, no previous studies have examined the passive constitutive properties of cardiocytes isolated from animals with myocardial hypertrophy. Accordingly, changes in relative passive stiffness of cardiocytes isolated from animals with chronic pressure- or volume-overload hypertrophy were determined by examining the effects of anisosmotic stress on cardiocyte size. Anisosmotic stress was produced by altering superfusate osmolarity. Hypertrophied cardiocytes were enzymatically isolated from 16 adult cats with right ventricular (RV) pressure-overload hypertrophy induced by pulmonary artery banding (PAB) and from 6 adult cats with RV volume-overload hypertrophy induced by creating an atrial septal defect (ASD). Left ventricular (LV) cardiocytes from each cat served as nonhypertrophied, normally loaded, same-animal controls. Superfusate osmolarity was decreased from 305 +/- 3 to 135 +/- 5 mosM and increased to 645 +/- 4 mosM. During anisosmotic stress, there were no significant differences between hypertrophied RV and normal LV cardiocytes in pressure overload PAB cats with respect to percent change in cardiocyte area (47 +/- 2% in RV vs. 48 +/- 2% in LV), diameter (46 +/- 3% in RV vs. 48 +/- 2% in LV), or length (2.4 +/- 0.2% in RV vs. 2.0 +/- 0.3% in LV), or sarcomere length (1.5 +/- 0.1% in RV vs. 1.3 +/- 0.3% in LV). Likewise, there were no significant differences in cardiocyte strain between hypertrophied RV and normal LV cardiocytes from ASD cats. In conclusion, chronic pressure-overload hypertrophy and chronic volume-overload hypertrophy did not alter the cardiocyte response to anisosmotic stress. Thus chronic overload hypertrophy did not alter relative passive cardiocyte stiffness.

  15. Salt-induced cardiac hypertrophy and interstitial fibrosis are due to a blood pressure-independent mechanism in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Daniele N; Katayama, Isis A; Oliveira, Ivone B; Rosa, Kaleizu T; Furukawa, Luzia N S; Coelho, Michella S; Casarini, Dulce E; Heimann, Joel C

    2010-10-01

    High salt intake is a known cardiovascular risk factor and is associated with cardiac alterations. To better understand this effect, male Wistar rats were fed a normal (NSD: 1.3% NaCl), high 4 (HSD4: 4%), or high 8 (HSD8: 8%) salt diet from weaning until 18 wk of age. The HSD8 group was subdivided into HSD8, HSD8+HZ (15 mg . kg(-1) . d(-1) hydralazine in the drinking water), and HSD8+LOS (20 mg . kg(-1) . d(-1) losartan in the drinking water) groups. The cardiomyocyte diameter was greater in the HSD4 and HSD8 groups than in the HSD8+LOS and NSD groups. Interstitial fibrosis was greater in the HSD4 and HSD8 groups than in the HSD8+HZ and NSD groups. Hydralazine prevented high blood pressure (BP) and fibrosis, but not cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Losartan prevented high BP and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, but not fibrosis. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT(1)) protein expression in both ventricles was greater in the HSD8 group than in the NSD group. Losartan, but not hydralazine, prevented this effect. Compared with the NSD group, the binding of an AT(1) conformation-specific antibody that recognizes the activated form of the receptor was lower in both ventricles in all other groups. Losartan further lowered the binding of the anti-AT(1) antibody in both ventricles compared with all other experimental groups. Angiotensin II was greater in both ventricles in all groups compared with the NSD group. Myocardial structural alterations in response to HSD are independent of the effect on BP. Salt-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and interstitial fibrosis possibly are due to different mechanisms. Evidence from the present study suggests that salt-induced AT(1) receptor internalization is probably due to angiotensin II binding. PMID:20724490

  16. Use of cold intravenous fluid to induce hypothermia in a comatose child after cardiac arrest due to a lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Min; Jeong, Ju-Hwan; Kyong, Yeon-Young; Kim, Han-Joon; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Park, Jeong-Ho; Park, Kyu-Nam

    2008-11-01

    We report a case in which mild hypothermia was induced successfully using a cold intravenous fluid infusion in a 12-year-old boy who was comatose following 21 min of cardiac arrest caused by a lightning strike. PMID:18805616

  17. The relation between cardiac output kinetics and skeletal muscle oxygenation during moderate exercise in moderately impaired patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Spee, Ruud F; Niemeijer, Victor M; Schoots, Thijs; Wijn, Pieter F; Doevendans, Pieter A; Kemps, Hareld M

    2016-07-01

    Oxygen uptake (V̇o2) kinetics are prolonged in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). This may be caused by impaired oxygen delivery or skeletal muscle derangements. We investigated whether impaired cardiac output (Q̇) kinetics limit skeletal muscle oxygen delivery relative to the metabolic demands at submaximal exercise in CHF patients by evaluating the relation between Q̇ kinetics and skeletal muscle deoxygenation. Forty-three CHF patients, NYHA II-III, performed a constant-load exercise test at 80% of the ventilatory aerobic threshold (VAT) to assess V̇o2 kinetics (τV̇o2). Q̇ kinetics (τQ̇) were assessed by a radial artery pulse contour analysis method. Skeletal muscle deoxygenation was assessed by near infrared spectroscopy at the m. vastus lateralis, using the minimal value of the tissue saturation index during onset of exercise (TSImin). Patients were categorized in slow and normal Q̇ responders relative to metabolic demands (τQ̇/V̇o2 ≥1 and τQ̇/V̇o2 <1, respectively), τQ̇ (62 ± 29 s), and τV̇o2 (60 ± 21 s) were significantly related (r = 0.66, P = 0.001). There was a significant correlation between τQ̇ and TSImin in the slow Q̇ responders [rs= -0.57, P = 0.005, n = 22 (51%)]. In conclusion, in moderately impaired CHF patients with relatively slow Q̇ kinetics, central hemodynamics may limit skeletal muscle oxygenation during moderate-intensity exercise. PMID:27283909

  18. Segmenting the papillary muscles and the trabeculae from high resolution cardiac CT through restoration of topological handles.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingchen; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Shaoting; Qian, Zhen; Metaxas, Dimitris; Axel, Leon

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a novel algorithm for segmenting the high resolution CT images of the left ventricle (LV), particularly the papillary muscles and the trabeculae. High quality segmentations of these structures are necessary in order to better understand the anatomical function and geometrical properties of LV. These fine structures, however, are extremely challenging to capture due to their delicate and complex nature in both geometry and topology. Our algorithm computes the potential missing topological structures of a given initial segmentation. Using techniques from computational topology, e.g. persistent homology, our algorithm find topological handles which are likely to be the true signal. To further increase accuracy, these proposals are measured by the saliency and confidence from a trained classifier. Handles with high scores are restored in the final segmentation, leading to high quality segmentation results of the complex structures. PMID:24683968

  19. Estrogen-Related Receptor α Directs Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α Signaling in the Transcriptional Control of Energy Metabolism in Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Huss, Janice M.; Torra, Inés Pineda; Staels, Bart; Giguère, Vincent; Kelly, Daniel P.

    2004-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptors (ERRs) are orphan nuclear receptors activated by the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), a critical regulator of cellular energy metabolism. However, metabolic target genes downstream of ERRα have not been well defined. To identify ERRα-regulated pathways in tissues with high energy demand such as the heart, gene expression profiling was performed with primary neonatal cardiac myocytes overexpressing ERRα. ERRα upregulated a subset of PGC-1α target genes involved in multiple energy production pathways, including cellular fatty acid transport, mitochondrial and peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation, and mitochondrial respiration. These results were validated by independent analyses in cardiac myocytes, C2C12 myotubes, and cardiac and skeletal muscle of ERRα−/− mice. Consistent with the gene expression results, ERRα increased myocyte lipid accumulation and fatty acid oxidation rates. Many of the genes regulated by ERRα are known targets for the nuclear receptor PPARα, and therefore, the interaction between these regulatory pathways was explored. ERRα activated PPARα gene expression via direct binding of ERRα to the PPARα gene promoter. Furthermore, in fibroblasts null for PPARα and ERRα, the ability of ERRα to activate several PPARα targets and to increase cellular fatty acid oxidation rates was abolished. PGC-1α was also shown to activate ERRα gene expression. We conclude that ERRα serves as a critical nodal point in the regulatory circuitry downstream of PGC-1α to direct the transcription of genes involved in mitochondrial energy-producing pathways in cardiac and skeletal muscle. PMID:15456881

  20. Tropomyosin flexural rigidity and single ca(2+) regulatory unit dynamics: implications for cooperative regulation of cardiac muscle contraction and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Loong, Campion K P; Badr, Myriam A; Chase, P Bryant

    2012-01-01

    Striated muscle contraction is regulated by dynamic and cooperative interactions among Ca(2+), troponin, and tropomyosin on the thin filament. While Ca(2+) regulation has been extensively studied, little is known about the dynamics of individual regulatory units and structural changes of individual tropomyosin molecules in relation to their mechanical properties, and how these factors are altered by cardiomyopathy mutations in the Ca(2+) regulatory proteins. In this hypothesis paper, we explore how various experimental and analytical approaches could broaden our understanding of the cooperative regulation of cardiac contraction in health and disease. PMID:22493584

  1. Evaluation of copper concentration in subclinical cases of white muscle disease and its relationship with cardiac troponin I.

    PubMed

    Ataollahi, Forough; Mohri, Mehrdad; Seifi, Hesam A; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the serum level of copper (Cu) in lambs suffering from subclinical forms of white muscle disease (WMD) and its relationship with cardiac troponin I (cTn-I) as a novel biomarker of cardiovascular disorders. Ten milliliters of jugular blood were taken from 200 lambs less than one year old to measure serum concentrations of Cu, selenium (Se), and cTn-I. The subjects were divided into 2 groups, namely, the deficient group which included 36 lambs, and the control group which included 164 lambs according to the reference serum Se concentration (50 ng/mL). Serum Se levels in the deficient group were lower than 50 ng/mL. By contrast, the control group showed Se levels higher than 50 ng/mL. Differences among the serum Cu and cTn-I levels were determined in both groups. The mean ±SD and median of serum Cu and cTn-I levels in the deficient group were lower and higher than those in the control group, respectively. A significant positive correlation was observed between serum Cu and Se levels, and also serum Cu and Se levels showed a negative correlation with serum cTn-I concentrations. Stepwise linear regression analysis showed that serum Cu levels were correlated positively with serum Se levels (p<0.05). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis indicated that the area under curve (AUC) of Cu was significantly higher than that of cTn-I based on the reference diagonal line. It is important to keep in mind that the value of AUC for the ROC curve is between 0.5 and 1.00, in which the lowest accuracy is related to the reference diagonal line with AUC of 0.5. A cut-off was determined to indicate which Cu level can discriminate between affected and healthy lambs. The cut-off level, sensitivity, and specificity of Cu in this study were 144.5 ng/mL, 74%, and 61%, respectively. PMID:23409147

  2. Topographic Mapping and Compression Elasticity Analysis of Skinned Cardiac Muscle Fibers in Vitro with Atomic Force Microscopy and Nanoindentation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jie; Sabharwal, Tanya; Kalyanasundaram, Aruna; Guo, Lianhong; Wang, Guodong

    2010-01-01

    Surface topography and compression elasticity of bovine cardiac muscle fibers in rigor and relaxing state has been studied with atomic force microscopy. Characteristic sarcomere patterns running along the longitudinal axis of the fibers were clearly observed, and Z-lines, M-lines, I-bands, and A-bands can be distinguished through comparing with TEM images and force curves. AFM height images of fibers had shown a sarcomere length of 1.22±0.02μm (n=5) in rigor with a significant 9% increase in sarcomere length in relaxing state (1.33±0.03μm, n=5), indicating that overlap move with the changing physiological conditions. Compression elasticity curves along with sarcomere locations have been taken by AFM compression processing. Coefficient of Z-line, I-band, Overlap, and M-line are 25±2pN/nm, 8±1pN/nm, 10±1pN/nm, and 17±1.5pN/nm respectively in rigor state, and 18±2.5pN/nm, 4±0.5pN/nm, 6±1pN/nm, and 11±0.5pN/nm respectively in relaxing state. Young’s Modulus in Z-line, I-band, Overlap, and M-line are 115±12kPa, 48±9kPa, 52±8kPa, and 90±12kPa respectively in rigor, and 98±10kPa, 23±4kPa, 42±4kPa, and 65±7kPa respectively in relaxing state. The elasticity curves has shown a similar appearance to the section analysis profile of AFM height images of sarcomere and the distance between adjacent largest coefficient and Young’s Modulus is equal to the sarcomere length measured from the AFM height images using section analysis, indicating that mechanic properties of fibers have a similar periodicity to the topography of fibers. PMID:19640539

  3. Evidence towards Improved Estimation of Respiratory Muscle Effort from Diaphragm Mechanomyographic Signals with Cardiac Vibration Interference Using Sample Entropy with Fixed Tolerance Values

    PubMed Central

    Sarlabous, Leonardo; Torres, Abel; Fiz, José A.; Jané, Raimon

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of amplitude parameters of the diaphragm mechanomyographic (MMGdi) signal is a non-invasive technique to assess respiratory muscle effort and to detect and quantify the severity of respiratory muscle weakness. The amplitude of the MMGdi signal is usually evaluated using the average rectified value or the root mean square of the signal. However, these estimations are greatly affected by the presence of cardiac vibration or mechanocardiographic (MCG) noise. In this study, we present a method for improving the estimation of the respiratory muscle effort from MMGdi signals that is robust to the presence of MCG. This method is based on the calculation of the sample entropy using fixed tolerance values (fSampEn), that is, with tolerance values that are not normalized by the local standard deviation of the window analyzed. The behavior of the fSampEn parameter was tested in synthesized mechanomyographic signals, with different ratios between the amplitude of the MCG and clean mechanomyographic components. As an example of application of this technique, the use of fSampEn was explored also in recorded MMGdi signals, with different inspiratory loads. The results with both synthetic and recorded signals indicate that the entropy parameter is less affected by the MCG noise, especially at low signal-to-noise ratios. Therefore, we believe that the proposed fSampEn parameter could improve estimates of respiratory muscle effort from MMGdi signals with the presence of MCG interference. PMID:24586436

  4. Evidence towards improved estimation of respiratory muscle effort from diaphragm mechanomyographic signals with cardiac vibration interference using sample entropy with fixed tolerance values.

    PubMed

    Sarlabous, Leonardo; Torres, Abel; Fiz, José A; Jané, Raimon

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of amplitude parameters of the diaphragm mechanomyographic (MMGdi) signal is a non-invasive technique to assess respiratory muscle effort and to detect and quantify the severity of respiratory muscle weakness. The amplitude of the MMGdi signal is usually evaluated using the average rectified value or the root mean square of the signal. However, these estimations are greatly affected by the presence of cardiac vibration or mechanocardiographic (MCG) noise. In this study, we present a method for improving the estimation of the respiratory muscle effort from MMGdi signals that is robust to the presence of MCG. This method is based on the calculation of the sample entropy using fixed tolerance values (fSampEn), that is, with tolerance values that are not normalized by the local standard deviation of the window analyzed. The behavior of the fSampEn parameter was tested in synthesized mechanomyographic signals, with different ratios between the amplitude of the MCG and clean mechanomyographic components. As an example of application of this technique, the use of fSampEn was explored also in recorded MMGdi signals, with different inspiratory loads. The results with both synthetic and recorded signals indicate that the entropy parameter is less affected by the MCG noise, especially at low signal-to-noise ratios. Therefore, we believe that the proposed fSampEn parameter could improve estimates of respiratory muscle effort from MMGdi signals with the presence of MCG interference. PMID:24586436

  5. Mifepristone is a Vasodilator Due to the Inhibition of Smooth Muscle Cells L-Type Ca2+ Channels.

    PubMed

    Mariana, Melissa; Feiteiro, Joana; Cairrao, Elisa; Verde, Ignacio

    2016-06-01

    Derived from the estrane progestins, mifepristone was the first synthetic steroid of this class employed as abortifacient in the first months of pregnancy. Mifepristone reduces high potassium-induced contraction and prevents calcium-induced contraction. At the vascular level, mifepristone induces direct relaxation in rat and human arteries, and this effect seems to be endothelium- and NO independent, suggesting that the vascular smooth muscle is its target. Moreover, mifepristone's effect could involve the modulation of different calcium channels. The aim of the present study is to analyze the involvement of calcium channels in the relaxation induced by mifepristone on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Planar cell surface area (PCSA) technique was used to analyze the effect of mifepristone on the VSMC contractility, and the whole cell configuration of patch-clamp technique to measure the activity of L-type Ca(2+) channels (LTCC) in A7r5 cells. Regarding the PCSA technique, mifepristone induced relaxation of the VSMC previously contracted by different agents. Also, a rapid inhibitory effect on basal and BAY K8644-stimulated calcium current was observed, which indicates that this drug has the ability to block LTCC. These results suggest that mifepristone induces relaxation on the VSMCs due to the inhibition of the calcium channels. PMID:26543162

  6. Study of the function of sarcoplasmic reticulum of vascular smooth muscle during activation due to depolarization-induced calcium influx

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, K.S.

    1987-01-01

    The role of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in vascular smooth muscle was evaluated with respect to regulation of myoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} during the Ca{sup 2+} entry induced by depolarization. Calcium agonist, Bay K8644, stimulated Ca{sup 2+} influx as well as tension in physiological salt solution, (PSS) in contrast to the priming effects due to the depolarization originally reported. Disparity, however, was found between the Ca{sup 2+} entered and tension developed. Correlation between the tension and {sup 45}Ca influx showed a typical threshold phenomenon; the basal Ca{sup 2+} influx can be raised to a certain level (25%) without tension induction, after which a minor increase in Ca{sup 2+} influx produced significant tension. This subthreshold Ca{sup 2+} influx was found accumulated in the caffeine-sensitive Ca stores, the SR. This confirmed the dependency of tension on the rate of Ca{sup 2+} entry demonstrated by a previous report.

  7. The cardiac-restricted protein ADP-ribosylhydrolase-like 1 is essential for heart chamber outgrowth and acts on muscle actin filament assembly.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stuart J; Towers, Norma; Saldanha, José W; Shang, Catherine A; Mahmood, S Radma; Taylor, William R; Mohun, Timothy J

    2016-08-15

    Adprhl1, a member of the ADP-ribosylhydrolase protein family, is expressed exclusively in the developing heart of all vertebrates. In the amphibian Xenopus laevis, distribution of its mRNA is biased towards actively growing chamber myocardium. Morpholino oligonucleotide-mediated knockdown of all Adprhl1 variants inhibits striated myofibril assembly and prevents outgrowth of the ventricle. The resulting ventricles retain normal electrical conduction and express markers of chamber muscle differentiation but are functionally inert. Using a cardiac-specific Gal4 binary expression system, we show that the abundance of Adprhl1 protein in tadpole hearts is tightly controlled through a negative regulatory mechanism targeting the 5'-coding sequence of Xenopus adprhl1. Over-expression of full length (40kDa) Adprhl1 variants modified to escape such repression, also disrupts cardiac myofibrillogenesis. Disarrayed myofibrils persist that show extensive branching, with sarcomere division occurring at the actin-Z-disc boundary. Ultimately, Adprhl1-positive cells contain thin actin threads, connected to numerous circular branch points. Recombinant Adprhl1 can localize to stripes adjacent to the Z-disc, suggesting a direct role for Adprhl1 in modifying Z-disc and actin dynamics as heart chambers grow. Modelling the structure of Adprhl1 suggests this cardiac-specific protein is a pseudoenzyme, lacking key residues necessary for ADP-ribosylhydrolase catalytic activity. PMID:27217161

  8. Upregulation of cardiac NOS due to endotoxemia and vagal overactivity contributes to the hypotensive effect of chronic ethanol in female rats.

    PubMed

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M; Fan, Ming; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A

    2011-01-10

    We previously reported that chronic ethanol lowers blood pressure in female rats. In this study, hemodynamic, biochemical, and immunoblot analyses were performed to investigate: (i) the roles of cardiac contractility and autonomic activity in the hypotensive action of ethanol, and (ii) whether endotoxemia-induced upregulation of cardiac and/or vascular nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms underlies the hypotensive and cardiac effects of ethanol. Telemetric monitoring of blood pressure, heart rate, and myocardial contractility (dP/dt(max)) was performed in female rats receiving liquid diet with or without ethanol (5% w/v, 13weeks). Autonomic control was assessed by frequency domain analysis of interbeat intervals (IBI) and systolic blood pressure (SBP). Compared with pair-fed controls, ethanol caused sustained reductions in blood pressure, heart rate, and+dP/dt(max). Ethanol feeding increased the spectral power of high-frequency band (IBI(HF), 0.75-3Hz) and decreased the low-frequency band (IBI(LF), 0.25-0.75Hz) and IBI(LF/HF) ratio, suggesting increased cardiac parasympathetic dominance. In contrast, vascular tone was not affected by ethanol because SBP spectral bands and plasma norepinephrine remained unchanged. Myocardial expressions of eNOS and its upstream regulators, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt, and plasma endotoxin and nitrite/nitrate were increased by ethanol. Myocardial iNOS was also increased by ethanol whereas nNOS remained unchanged and aortic levels of all NOS isoforms were not altered by ethanol. These findings suggest that facilitation of myocardial PI3K/Akt/eNOS and iNOS pathways, due possibly to ethanol-induced endotoxemia and/or increased cardiac parasympathetic dominance, might constitute a cellular mechanism for the reduced myocardial contractility and hypotension caused by ethanol in female rats. PMID:20970417

  9. Upregulation of cardiac NOS due to endotoxemia and vagal overactivity contribute to the hypotensive effect of chronic ethanol in female rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M.; Fan, Ming; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A.

    2010-01-01

    We previously reported that chronic ethanol lowers blood pressure in female rats. In this study, hemodynamic, biochemical, and immunoblot analyses were performed to investigate: (i) the roles of cardiac contractility and autonomic activity in the hypotensive action of ethanol, and (ii) whether endotoxemia-induced upregulation of cardiac and/or vascular nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms underlies the hypotensive and cardiac effects of ethanol. Telemetric monitoring of blood pressure, heart rate, and myocardial contractility (dP/dtmax) was performed in female rats receiving liquid diet with or without ethanol (5% w/v, 13 weeks). Autonomic control was assessed by frequency domain analysis of interbeat intervals (IBI) and systolic blood pressure (SBP). Compared with pair-fed controls, ethanol caused sustained reductions in blood pressure, heart rate, and +dP/dtmax. Ethanol feeding increased the spectral power of high-frequency band (IBIHF, 0.75–3 Hz) and decreased the low-frequency band (IBILF, 0.25–0.75 Hz) and IBILF/HF ratio, suggesting increased cardiac parasympathetic dominance. In contrast, vascular tone was not affected by ethanol because SBP spectral bands and plasma norepinephrine remained unchanged. Myocardial expressions of eNOS and its upstream regulators, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase(PI3K) and Akt, and plasma endotoxin and nitrite/nitrate were increased by ethanol. Myocardial iNOS was also increased by ethanol whereas nNOS remained unchanged and aortic levels of all NOS isoforms were not altered by ethanol. These findings suggest that facilitation of myocardial PI3K/Akt/eNOS and iNOS pathways, due possibly to ethanol-induced endotoxemia and/or increased cardiac parasympathetic dominance, might constitute a cellular mechanism for the reduced myocardial contractility and hypotension caused by ethanol in female rats. PMID:20970417

  10. Development of endothermy and concomitant increases in cardiac and skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration in the precocial Pekin duck (Anas platyrhynchos domestica).

    PubMed

    Sirsat, Sarah K G; Sirsat, Tushar S; Faber, Alan; Duquaine, Allison; Winnick, Sarah; Sotherland, Paul R; Dzialowski, Edward M

    2016-04-15

    Attaining endothermic homeothermy occurs at different times post-hatching in birds and is associated with maturation of metabolic and aerobic capacity. Simultaneous measurements at the organism, organ and cellular levels during the transition to endothermy reveal means by which this change in phenotype occurs. We examined development of endothermy in precocial Pekin ducks ( ITALIC! Anas platyrhynchos domestica) by measuring whole-animal O2consumption ( ITALIC! V̇O2 ) as animals cooled from 35 to 15°C. We measured heart ventricle mass, an indicator of O2delivery capacity, and mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized skeletal and cardiac muscle to elucidate associated changes in mitochondrial capacities at the cellular level. We examined animals on day 24 of incubation through 7 days post-hatching. ITALIC! V̇O2  of embryos decreased when cooling from 35 to 15°C; ITALIC! V̇O2  of hatchlings, beginning on day 0 post-hatching, increased during cooling with a lower critical temperature of 32°C. Yolk-free body mass did not change between internal pipping and hatching, but the heart and thigh skeletal muscle grew at faster rates than the rest of the body as the animals transitioned from an externally pipped paranate to a hatchling. Large changes in oxidative phosphorylation capacity occurred during ontogeny in both thigh muscles, the primary site of shivering, and cardiac ventricles. Thus, increased metabolic capacity necessary to attain endothermy was associated with augmented metabolic capacity of the tissue and augmented increasing O2delivery capacity, both of which were attained rapidly at hatching. PMID:26896549

  11. Cardiac muscle cell cytoskeletal protein 4.1: analysis of transcripts and subcellular location--relevance to membrane integrity, microstructure, and possible role in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Harris, Pamela M; Keating, Lisa A; Maggs, Alison M; Phillips, Gareth W; Birks, Emma J; Franklin, Rodney C G; Yacoub, Magdi H; Baines, Anthony J; Pinder, Jennifer C

    2005-03-01

    The spectrin-based cytoskeleton assembly has emerged as a major player in heart functioning; however, cardiac protein 4.1, a key constituent, is uncharacterized. Protein 4.1 evolved to protect cell membranes against mechanical stresses and to organize membrane microstructure. 4.1 Proteins are multifunctional and, among other activities, link integral/signaling proteins on the plasma and internal membranes with the spectrin-based cytoskeleton. Four genes, EPB41, EPB41L1, EPB41L2, and EPB41L3 encode proteins 4.1R, 4.1N, 4.1G, and 4.1B, respectively. All are extensively spliced. Different isoforms are expressed according to tissue and developmental state, individual function being controlled through inclusion/exclusion of interactive domains. We have defined mouse and human cardiac 4.1 transcripts; other than 4. 1B in humans, all genes show activity. Cardiac transcripts constitutively include conserved FERM and C-terminal domains; both interact with membrane-bound signaling/transport/cell adhesion molecules. Variable splicing within and adjacent to the central spectrin/actin-binding domain enables regulation of cytoskeleton-binding activity. A novel heart-specific exon occurs in human 4.1G, but not in mouse. Immunofluorescence reveals 4.1 staining within mouse cardiomyocytes; thus, both at the plasma membrane and, interdigitated with sarcomeric myosin, across myofibrils in regions close to the sarcoplasmic reticulum. These are all regions to which spectrin locates. 4.1R in human heart shows similar distribution; however, there is limited plasma membrane staining. We conclude that cardiac 4.1s are highly regulated in their ability to crosslink plasma/integral cell membranes with the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton. We speculate that over the repetitive cycles of heart muscle contraction and relaxation, 4.1s are likely to locate, support, and coordinate functioning of key membrane-bound macromolecular assemblies. PMID:15834631

  12. Endovascular Stenting under Cardiac and Cerebral Protection for Subclavian Steal after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Due to Right Subclavian Artery Origin Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shigeyuki; Kiura, Yoshihiro; Okazaki, Takahito; Ichinose, Nobuhiko; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2015-03-01

    Coronary-subclavian steal (CSS) can occur after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) using the internal thoracic artery (ITA). Subclavian artery (SA) stenosis proximal to the ITA graft causes CSS. We describe a technique for cardiac and cerebral protection during endovascular stenting for CSS due to right SA origin stenosis after CABG. A 64-year-old man with a history of CABG using the right ITA presented with exertional right arm claudication. Angiogram showed a CSS and retrograde blood flow in the right vertebral artery (VA) due to severe stenosis of the right SA origin. Endovascular treatment of the right SA stenosis was planned. For cardiac and cerebral protection, distal balloon protection by inflating a 5.2-F occlusion balloon catheter in the SA proximal to the origin of the right VA and ITA through the right brachial artery approach and distal filter protection of the right internal carotid artery (ICA) through the left femoral artery (FA) approach were performed. Endovascular stenting for SA stenosis from the right FA approach was performed under cardiac and cerebral protection by filter-protection of the ICA and balloon-protection of the VA and ITA. Successful treatment of SA severe stenosis was achieved with no complications. PMID:25874182

  13. Endovascular Stenting under Cardiac and Cerebral Protection for Subclavian Steal after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Due to Right Subclavian Artery Origin Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kiura, Yoshihiro; Okazaki, Takahito; Ichinose, Nobuhiko; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Coronary-subclavian steal (CSS) can occur after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) using the internal thoracic artery (ITA). Subclavian artery (SA) stenosis proximal to the ITA graft causes CSS. We describe a technique for cardiac and cerebral protection during endovascular stenting for CSS due to right SA origin stenosis after CABG. A 64-year-old man with a history of CABG using the right ITA presented with exertional right arm claudication. Angiogram showed a CSS and retrograde blood flow in the right vertebral artery (VA) due to severe stenosis of the right SA origin. Endovascular treatment of the right SA stenosis was planned. For cardiac and cerebral protection, distal balloon protection by inflating a 5.2-F occlusion balloon catheter in the SA proximal to the origin of the right VA and ITA through the right brachial artery approach and distal filter protection of the right internal carotid artery (ICA) through the left femoral artery (FA) approach were performed. Endovascular stenting for SA stenosis from the right FA approach was performed under cardiac and cerebral protection by filter-protection of the ICA and balloon-protection of the VA and ITA. Successful treatment of SA severe stenosis was achieved with no complications. PMID:25874182

  14. Inhibitory mechanism of tranilast in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells proliferation, due to blockade of PDGF-BB-receptors

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shinji; Matsuda, Akihisa; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kazunao; Ikeda, Yasuhiko; Hashimoto, Hisakuni; Umemura, Kazuo

    2000-01-01

    We have previously reported that tranilast, an anti-allergic drug, prevented the experimental intimal thickening in the rat and mouse femoral arteries and its effect may be exerted through the inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. However, its inhibitory mechanism has yet to be understood. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of tranilast on platelet-derived growth factor BB-homodimer (PDGF-BB) mediated signal transduction pathways in cultured human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (CASMCs). Growth responses to PDGF-BB were measured by [3H]-thymidine incorporation or cell counting. Activation of DNA synthesis and augmentation of cell proliferation stimulated by PDGF-BB in quiescent cultures of CASMCs were inhibited by tranilast in a concentration-dependent manner. Western blot analysis of lysates from CASMCs with an anti-activated mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase antibody revealed that tranilast (10–300 μM) inhibited MAP kinase activation by PDGF-BB in a concentration-dependent manner. Tranilast also reduced PDGF-BB-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of a 180 kDa band, corresponding in mass to the PDGF β-receptor, as shown by immunoblots using an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody. Receptor-binding study with [125I]-PDGF-BB on CASMCs showed that tranilast (10–1000 μM) inhibited the specific binding of PDGF-BB to cell surface receptors in a concentration-dependent manner. Scatchard analysis revealed that pretreatment with 300 μM tranilast decreased the maximum binding capacity (Bmax) from 27.6 to 18.0 fmol 106 cells−1 without affecting binding affinity (Kd≈0.15 nM), indicating a non-competitive inhibition of the receptor binding. These results suggest that the suppression of human CASMC growth by tranilast might be at least partly due to blockade of PDGF-BB-receptor binding. PMID:10807667

  15. The emergence of Pax7-expressing muscle stem cells during vertebrate head muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Julia Meireles; Hawrot, Katarzyna; Sharpe, Colin; Noble, Anna; Wood, William M.; Jorge, Erika C.; Goldhamer, David J.; Kardon, Gabrielle; Dietrich, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Pax7 expressing muscle stem cells accompany all skeletal muscles in the body and in healthy individuals, efficiently repair muscle after injury. Currently, the in vitro manipulation and culture of these cells is still in its infancy, yet muscle stem cells may be the most promising route toward the therapy of muscle diseases such as muscular dystrophies. It is often overlooked that muscular dystrophies affect head and body skeletal muscle differently. Moreover, these muscles develop differently. Specifically, head muscle and its stem cells develop from the non-somitic head mesoderm which also has cardiac competence. To which extent head muscle stem cells retain properties of the early head mesoderm and might even be able to switch between a skeletal muscle and cardiac fate is not known. This is due to the fact that the timing and mechanisms underlying head muscle stem cell development are still obscure. Consequently, it is not clear at which time point one should compare the properties of head mesodermal cells and head muscle stem cells. To shed light on this, we traced the emergence of head muscle stem cells in the key vertebrate models for myogenesis, chicken, mouse, frog and zebrafish, using Pax7 as key marker. Our study reveals a common theme of head muscle stem cell development that is quite different from the trunk. Unlike trunk muscle stem cells, head muscle stem cells do not have a previous history of Pax7 expression, instead Pax7 expression emerges de-novo. The cells develop late, and well after the head mesoderm has committed to myogenesis. We propose that this unique mechanism of muscle stem cell development is a legacy of the evolutionary history of the chordate head mesoderm. PMID:26042028

  16. Regulation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase pump expression and its relevance to cardiac muscle physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Periasamy, Muthu; Bhupathy, Poornima; Babu, Gopal J

    2008-01-15

    Cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA2a) plays a central role in myocardial contractility. SERCA2a actively transports Ca(2+) into the SR and regulates cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, SR Ca(2+) load, and the rate of contraction and relaxation of the heart. In the heart, SERCA pump activity is regulated by two small molecular weight proteins: phospholamban (PLB) and sarcolipin (SLN). Decreases in the expression levels of SERCA2a have been observed in a variety of pathological conditions. In addition, altered expression of PLB and SLN has been reported in many cardiac diseases. Thus, SERCA2a is a major regulator of intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis, and changes in the expression and activity of the SERCA pump contribute to the decreased SR Ca(2+) content and cardiac dysfunction during pathogenesis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms controlling SERCA pump expression and activity both during normal physiology and under pathological states. PMID:18006443

  17. Cardiac amyloidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way electrical signals move through the heart (conduction system). This can lead to abnormal heart beats ( ... due to medication) Sick sinus syndrome Symptomatic cardiac conduction system disease (arrhythmias related to abnormal conduction of ...

  18. Single Myosin Cross-Bridge Orientation in Cardiac Papillary Muscle Detects Lever-Arm Shear Strain in Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Burghardt, Thomas P.; Josephson, Matthew P.; Ajtai, Katalin

    2011-01-01

    Myosin motors transduce ATP free energy into mechanical work. Transduction models allocate specific functions to motor structural domains beginning with ATP hydrolysis in the active site and ending in a lever-arm rotating power-stroke. Myosin light chains, regulatory (RLC) and essential (ELC), bind IQ-domains on the lever-arm and track its movement. Strong evidence exists that light chains stabilize the lever-arm and that light chain mutation undermines stability. Human ventricular RLC tagged with photoactivatable GFP (HCRLC-PAGFP) replaces native RLC in porcine papillary muscle fibers, restores native contractility, and situates PAGFP for single molecule orientation tracking within the crowded fiber lattice. The spatial emission pattern from single photoactivated PAGFP tagged myosins was observed in z-stacks fitted simultaneously to maximize accuracy in estimated dipole orientation. Emitter dipole polar and azimuthal angle pair scatter plots identified an area where steric and molecular crowding constraints depopulated orientations unfavorable for actin interaction. Transitions between pre- and post-power-stroke states represent the lever-arm trajectory sampled by the data and quantify lever-arm shear strain in transduction at three tension levels. These data identify forces acting on myosin in the in situ fiber system due to crowding, steric hindrance, and actomyosin interaction. They induce lever-arm shear strain observed with single molecule orientation detection. A single myosin work histogram reveals discretized power-stroke substates reminiscent of the Huxley–Simmons model for myosin based contraction [Huxley and Simmons (1971) Nature 233, 533]. RLC or ELC mutation, should it impact lever-arm shear strain, will be detected as changes in single myosin shear strain or power-stroke substate distribution. PMID:21819137

  19. Mechanical Chest Compressions in Prolonged Cardiac Arrest due to ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction Can Cause Myocardial Contusion.

    PubMed

    Stechovsky, Cyril; Hajek, Petr; Cipro, Simon; Veselka, Josef

    2016-09-01

    Acute coronary syndrome is a common cause of sudden cardiac death. We present a case report of a 60-year-old man without a history of coronary artery disease who presented with ST-elevation myocardial infarction. During transportation to the hospital, he developed ventricular fibrillation (VF) and later pulseless electrical activity. Chest compressions with LUCAS 2 (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) automated mechanical compression-decompression device were initiated. Coronary angiography showed total occlusion of the left main coronary artery and primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was performed. After the PCI, his heart started to generate effective contractions and LUCAS could be discontinued. Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved after 90 minutes of cardiac arrest. The patient died of cardiogenic shock 11 hours later. An autopsy revealed a transmural anterolateral myocardial infarction but also massive subepicardial hemorrhage and interstitial edema and hemorrhages on histologic samples from regions of the myocardium outside the infarction itself and also from the right ventricle. These lesions were concluded to be a myocardial contusion. The true incidence of myocardial contusion as a consequence of mechanical chest compressions is not known. We speculate that severe myocardial contusion might have influenced outcome of our patient. PMID:27574387

  20. Cross-talk between glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and p38MAPK regulates myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) activity in skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Dionyssiou, M G; Nowacki, N B; Hashemi, S; Zhao, J; Kerr, A; Tsushima, R G; McDermott, J C

    2013-01-01

    Characterizing the signaling network that controls MEF2 transcription factors is crucial for understanding skeletal and cardiac muscle gene expression. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) regulates MEF2 activity indirectly through reciprocal regulation of p38MAPK. Cross-talk between GSK3β and p38MAPK regulates MEF2 activity in skeletal and cardiac muscle. Understanding cross-talk in the signaling network converging at MEF2 control has therapeutic implications in cardiac and skeletal muscle pathology. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) is a known regulator of striated muscle gene expression suppressing both myogenesis and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Since myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) proteins are key transcriptional regulators in both systems, we assessed whether MEF2 is a target for GSK3β. Pharmacological inhibition of GSK3β resulted in enhanced MEF2A/D expression and transcriptional activity in skeletal myoblasts and cardiac myocytes. Even though in silico analysis revealed GSK3β consensus (S/T)XXX(S/T) sites on MEF2A, a subsequent in vitro kinase assay revealed that MEF2A is only a weak substrate. However, we did observe a posttranslational modification in MEF2A in skeletal myoblasts treated with a GSK3β inhibitor which coincided with increased p38MAPK phosphorylation, a potent MEF2A activator, indicating that GSK3β inhibition may de-repress p38MAPK. Heart specific excision of GSK3β in mice also resulted in up-regulation of p38MAPK activity. Interestingly, upon pharmacological p38MAPK inhibition (SB203580), GSK3β inhibition loses its effect on MEF2 transcriptional activity suggesting potent cross-talk between the two pathways. Thus we have documented that cross-talk between p38MAPK and GSK3β signaling converges on MEF2 activity having potential consequences for therapeutic modulation of cardiac and skeletal muscle gene expression. PMID:23137781

  1. The protective effects of Chinese herb-Taikong Yangxin Prescription on the atrophic remodeling of cardiac muscle in rats induced by hindlimb unloading through activating Akt/GSK-3beta signaling pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Yuan; Min, Yuan; Jianfeng, Zhang; Zhili, Li; Huijuan, Wang; Desheng, Wang; Yinghui, Li; Yongzhi, Li; Shizhong, Jiang

    Objective To test the hypothesis that traditional Chinese herb-TaiKong Yangxin Prescrip-tion can activate the Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathway and alleviate the atrophic remodeling of cardiac muscle in rats induced by hindlimb unloading. Methods The physiological effects of simulated microgravity was induced by 7d hindlimb unloading in rats. TaiKong Yangxin Pre-scription was given daily by gastric irrigation as countermeasure against effects of simulated microgravity. The frozen sections of left ventricular cardiac muscles were stained by FITC la-beled lectin and visualized by laser scanning confocal microscopy, the cross section areas(CSA) of cardiomyocytes were calculated by IPP6.0 Image software. The protein expression of TnI, phosphorylation level of Akt and GSK-3β were measured by Western blot. Results Simulated microgravity decreased the CSA of cardiomyocytes and protein expression of TnI in left ven-tricular cardiac muscles, inhibited the phosphorylation level of Akt at serine 473 and GSK-3β at serine 9. The traditional Chinese herb-TaiKong Yangxin Prescription alleviated the atrophic remodeling of cardiac muscles, reversed the declined protein expression of TnI and phosphoryla-tion levels of Akt at serine 473 and GSK-3β at serine 9 in hindlimb-unloading rats. Conclusion The traditional Chinese herb-TaiKong Yangxin Prescription has significant countermeasure effects on the atrophic remodeling of cardiac muscle induced by hindlimb unloading in rats, in which activating Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathway plays an important role.(Funded by Advanced space medico-engineering research project of China, grant NO. 2005SY5206005 and SJ200801)

  2. Cellular trafficking determines the exon skipping activity of Pip6a-PMO in mdx skeletal and cardiac muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Lehto, Taavi; Castillo Alvarez, Alejandra; Gauck, Sarah; Gait, Michael J.; Coursindel, Thibault; Wood, Matthew J. A.; Lebleu, Bernard; Boisguerin, Prisca

    2014-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptide-mediated delivery of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) has shown great promise for exon-skipping therapy of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Pip6a-PMO, a recently developed conjugate, is particularly efficient in a murine DMD model, although mechanisms responsible for its increased biological activity have not been studied. Here, we evaluate the cellular trafficking and the biological activity of Pip6a-PMO in skeletal muscle cells and primary cardiomyocytes. Our results indicate that Pip6a-PMO is taken up in the skeletal muscle cells by an energy- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis. Interestingly, its cellular distribution is different in undifferentiated and differentiated skeletal muscle cells (vesicular versus nuclear). Likewise, Pip6a-PMO mainly accumulates in cytoplasmic vesicles in primary cardiomyocytes, in which clathrin-mediated endocytosis seems to be the pre-dominant uptake pathway. These differences in cellular trafficking correspond well with the exon-skipping data, with higher activity in myotubes than in myoblasts or cardiomyocytes. These differences in cellular trafficking thus provide a possible mechanistic explanation for the variations in exon-skipping activity and restoration of dystrophin protein in heart muscle compared with skeletal muscle tissues in DMD models. Overall, Pip6a-PMO appears as the most efficient conjugate to date (low nanomolar EC50), even if limitations remain from endosomal escape. PMID:24366877

  3. Molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways of angiotensin II-induced muscle wasting: potential therapeutic targets for cardiac cachexia.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tadashi; Tabony, A Michael; Galvez, Sarah; Mitch, William E; Higashi, Yusuke; Sukhanov, Sergiy; Delafontaine, Patrice

    2013-10-01

    Cachexia is a serious complication of many chronic diseases, such as congestive heart failure (CHF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Many factors are involved in the development of cachexia, and there is increasing evidence that angiotensin II (Ang II), the main effector molecule of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), plays an important role in this process. Patients with advanced CHF or CKD often have increased Ang II levels and cachexia, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor treatment improves weight loss. In rodent models, an increase in systemic Ang II leads to weight loss through increased protein breakdown, reduced protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and decreased appetite. Ang II activates the ubiquitin-proteasome system via generation of reactive oxygen species and via inhibition of the insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling pathway. Furthermore, Ang II inhibits 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and disrupts normal energy balance. Ang II also increases cytokines and circulating hormones such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, serum amyloid-A, glucocorticoids and myostatin, which regulate muscle protein synthesis and degradation. Ang II acts on hypothalamic neurons to regulate orexigenic/anorexigenic neuropeptides, such as neuropeptide-Y, orexin and corticotropin-releasing hormone, leading to reduced appetite. Also, Ang II may regulate skeletal muscle regenerative processes. Several clinical studies have indicated that blockade of Ang II signaling via ACE inhibitors or Ang II type 1 receptor blockers prevents weight loss and improves muscle strength. Thus the RAS is a promising target for the treatment of muscle atrophy in patients with CHF and CKD. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting. PMID:23769949

  4. Stem cell sources for cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Roccio, M; Goumans, M J; Sluijter, J P G; Doevendans, P A

    2008-03-01

    Cell-based cardiac repair has the ambitious aim to replace the malfunctioning cardiac muscle developed after myocardial infarction, with new contractile cardiomyocytes and vessels. Different stem cell populations have been intensively studied in the last decade as a potential source of new cardiomyocytes to ameliorate the injured myocardium, compensate for the loss of ventricular mass and contractility and eventually restore cardiac function. An array of cell types has been explored in this respect, including skeletal muscle, bone marrow derived stem cells, embryonic stem cells (ESC) and more recently cardiac progenitor cells. The best-studied cell types are mouse and human ESC cells, which have undisputedly been demonstrated to differentiate into cardiomyocyte and vascular lineages and have been of great help to understand the differentiation process of pluripotent cells. However, due to their immunogenicity, risk of tumor development and the ethical challenge arising from their embryonic origin, they do not provide a suitable cell source for a regenerative therapy approach. A better option, overcoming ethical and allogenicity problems, seems to be provided by bone marrow derived cells and by the recently identified cardiac precursors. This report will overview current knowledge on these different cell types and their application in cardiac regeneration and address issues like implementation of delivery methods, including tissue engineering approaches that need to be developed alongside. PMID:18427385

  5. Studies of the voltage-sensitive calcium channels in smooth muscle, neuronal, and cardiac tissues using 1,4-dihydropyridine calcium channel antagonists and activators

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, X.

    1988-01-01

    This study describes the investigation of the voltage-sensitive Ca{sup +} channels in vascular and intestinal smooth muscle, chick neural retina cells and neonatal rat cardiac myocytes using 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca{sup 2+} channel antagonists and activators. In rat aorta, the tumor promoting phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) produced Ca{sup 2+}-dependent contractile responses. The responses to TPA were blocked by the Ca{sup 2+} channel antagonists. The effects of the enantiomers of Bay K 8644 and 202-791 were characterized in both rat tail artery and guinea pig ileal longitudinal smooth muscle preparations using pharmacologic and radioligand binding assays. The (S)-enantiomers induced contraction and potentiated the responses to K{sup +} depolarization. The (R)-enantiomers inhibited the tension responses to K{sup +}. All the enantiomers inhibited specific ({sup 3}H)nitrendipine binding. The pharmacologic activities of both activator and antagonist ligands correlated on a 1:1 basis with the binding affinities. In chick neural retina cells the (S)-enantiomers of Bay K 8644 and 202-791 enhanced Ca{sup 2+} influx. In contrast, the (R)-enantiomers inhibited Ca{sup 2+} influx. The enantiomers of Bay K 8644 and 202-791 inhibited specific ({sup 3}H)PN 200-110 binding competitively. Binding of 1,4-dihydropyridines was characterized in neonatal rat heart cells.

  6. Imaging of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Erthal, Fernanda; Juneau, Daniel; Lim, Siok P; Dwivedi, Girish; Nery, Pablo B; Birnie, David; Beanlands, Rob S

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease. Cardiac involvement is described in up to 50% of the cases. The disease spectrum is wide and cardiac manifestations ranges from being asymptomatic to heart failure, arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. The diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis can be challenging due to its non-specific nature and the focal involvement of the heart. In this review, we discuss the utility of a stepwise approach with multimodality cardiac imaging in the diagnosis and management of CS. PMID:27225318

  7. Hypoglycaemia induced by Trichinella infection is due to the increase of glucose uptake in infected muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z; Nagano, I; Kajita, K; Nishina, M; Takahashi, Y

    2009-03-01

    The present study investigates how Trichinella infection induces host hypoglycaemia and explores a potential relationship between infection and the insulin signalling pathway. The results showed that mice infected with Trichinella spiralis or Trichinella pseudospiralis exhibited a temporary decrease in blood glucose level between 8 and 28 days p.i. and the kinetics of the glucose levels corresponded to the process of muscle larval growth and development. Histochemical results showed that glycogen accumulation increased in infected muscle cells during the period of hypoglycaemia. Analysis of gene expression profiles with quantitative PCR demonstrated that insulin signalling pathway-related genes, such as insulin receptor (IR), insulin receptor substance 1 (IRS-1), IRS-2, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) and V-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homologue 2 (Akt2) were up-regulated in infected muscle cells during infection and these expression changes correlated with the kinetics of blood glucose level, glycogen accumulation and the process of larval growth and development in infected muscle cells. Western blot analysis clarified that the expression of IR and Akt2 proteins increased in muscle tissues infected with both species of Trichinella. This study suggests that hypoglycaemia induced by Trichinella infection is the result of an increase in glucose uptake by infected muscle cells via up-regulation of insulin signalling pathway factors. PMID:18838075

  8. Cerebral infarction due to cardiac myxoma developed with the loss of consciousness immediately after defecation-a case report.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Toshimasa; Oomura, Masahiro; Sato, Chikako; Anan, Chise; Yamada, Kentaro; Kamimoto, Kaoru

    2016-05-31

    A 74-year-old man lost consciousness immediately after defecation. The loss of consciousness lasted for several minutes, and he experienced difficulty in walking when he regained consciousness. He was transferred to our hospital via an ambulance. Upon neurological examination, nystagmus and ataxia in the left arm and leg were noted. An MRI of the brain revealed multiple acute infarcts mainly in the bilateral cerebellum. Intravenous thrombolytic therapy with alteplase was initiated 3 h and 20 min after the onset of symptoms, and an improvement in neurological symptoms was observed. Echocardiography displayed a mobile mass in the left atrium, suggesting myxoma. After 14 days from the onset of symptoms, the tumor was surgically resected, and a pathological diagnosis of myxoma was established. Because of the unique event surrounding the onset in this case, we considered that there was a potential detachment of myxoma and/or thrombi fragments triggered by an increase in intrathoracic pressure induced by the action of defecation. This present case suggests that clinicians should consider cardiac myxoma in patients with cerebral infarction if the stroke is preceded by a Valsalva maneuver-like action and accompanied by the loss of consciousness. PMID:27151226

  9. mTOR Complexes Repress Hypertrophic Agonist-Stimulated Expression of Connective Tissue Growth Factor in Adult Cardiac Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Sundararaj, Kamala; Pleasant, Dorea L; Moschella, Phillip C; Panneerselvam, Kavin; Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Kuppuswamy, Dhandapani

    2016-02-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a fibrogenic cytokine that promotes fibrosis in various organs. In the heart, both cardiomyocytes (CM) and cardiac fibroblasts have been reported as a source of CTGF expression, aiding cardiac fibrosis. Although the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) forms 2 distinct complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, and plays a central role in integrating biochemical signals for protein synthesis and cellular homeostasis, we explored its role in CTGF expression in adult feline CM. CM were stimulated with 10 μM phenylephrine (PE), 200 nM angiotensin (Ang), or 100 nM insulin for 24 hours. PE and Ang, but not insulin, caused an increase in CTGF mRNA expression with the highest expression observed with PE. Inhibition of mTOR with torin1 but not rapamycin significantly enhanced PE-stimulated CTGF expression. Furthermore, silencing of raptor and rictor using shRNA adenoviral vectors to suppress mTORC1 and mTORC2, respectively, or blocking phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling with LY294002 (LY) or Akt signaling by dominant-negative Akt expression caused a substantial increase in PE-stimulated CTGF expression as measured by both mRNA and secreted protein levels. However, studies with dominant-negative delta isoform of protein kinase C demonstrate that delta isoform of protein kinase C is required for both agonist-induced CTGF expression and mTORC2/Akt-mediated CTGF suppression. Finally, PE-stimulated CTGF expression was accompanied with a corresponding increase in Smad3 phosphorylation and pretreatment of cells with SIS3, a Smad3 specific inhibitor, partially blocked the PE-stimulated CTGF expression. Therefore, a PI3K/mTOR/Akt axis plays a suppressive role on agonist-stimulated CTGF expression where the loss of this mechanism could be a contributing factor for the onset of cardiac fibrosis in the hypertrophying myocardium. PMID:26371948

  10. Changes in the activation and function of the ankle plantar flexor muscles due to gait retraining in chronic stroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A common goal of persons post-stroke is to regain community ambulation. The plantar flexor muscles play an important role in propulsion generation and swing initiation as previous musculoskeletal simulations have shown. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that simulation results quantifying changes in plantar flexor activation and function in individuals post-stroke were consistent with (1) the purpose of an intervention designed to enhance plantar flexor function and (2) expected muscle function during gait based on previous literature. Methods Three-dimensional, forward dynamic simulations were created to determine the changes in model activation and function of the paretic ankle plantar flexor muscles for eight patients post-stroke after a 12-weeks FastFES gait retraining program. Results An median increase of 0.07 (Range [−0.01,0.22]) was seen in simulated activation averaged across all plantar flexors during the double support phase of gait from pre- to post-intervention. A concurrent increase in walking speed and plantar flexor induced forward center of mass acceleration by the plantar flexors was seen post-intervention for seven of the eight subject simulations. Additionally, post-training, the plantar flexors had an simulated increase in contribution to knee flexion acceleration during double support. Conclusions For the first time, muscle-actuated musculoskeletal models were used to simulate the effect of a gait retraining intervention on post-stroke muscle model predicted activation and function. The simulations showed a new pattern of simulated activation for the plantar flexor muscles after training, suggesting that the subjects activated these muscles with more appropriate timing following the intervention. Functionally, simulations calculated that the plantar flexors provided greater contribution to knee flexion acceleration after training, which is important for increasing swing phase knee flexion and foot clearance. PMID

  11. High-Dose Polymerized Hemoglobin Fails to Alleviate Cardiac Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury due to Induction of Oxidative Damage in Coronary Artery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Wu, Wei; Li, Qian; Chen, Chan; Zhou, Ronghua; Qiu, Yanhua; Luo, Ming; Tan, Zhaoxia; Li, Shen; Chen, Gang; Zhou, Wentao; Liu, Jiaxin; Yang, Chengmin; Liu, Jin; Li, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is an unavoidable event for patients in cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). This study was designed to investigate whether glutaraldehyde-polymerized human placenta hemoglobin (PolyPHb), a hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier (HBOC), can protect heart against CPB-induced I/R injury or not and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Methods and Results. A standard dog CPB model with 2-hour cardiac arrest and 2-hour reperfusion was established. The results demonstrated that a low-dose PolyPHb (0.1%, w/v) provided a significant protection on the I/R heart, whereas the high-dose PolyPHb (3%, w/v) did not exhibit cardioprotective effect, as evidenced by the impaired cardiac function, decreased myocardial oxygen utilization, and elevated enzymes release and pathological changes. Further study indicated that exposure of isolated coronary arteries or human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to a high-dose PolyPHb caused impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation, which was companied with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and elevated malonaldehyde (MDA) formation. Consistent with the increased oxidative stress, the NAD(P)H oxidase activity and subunits expression, including gp91(phox), p47(phox), p67(phox), and Nox1, were greatly upregulated. Conclusion. The high-dose PolyPHb fails to protect heart from CPB-induced I/R injury, which was due to overproduction of NAD(P)H oxidase-induced ROS and resultant endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26161234

  12. High-Dose Polymerized Hemoglobin Fails to Alleviate Cardiac Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury due to Induction of Oxidative Damage in Coronary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qian; Wu, Wei; Li, Qian; Chen, Chan; Zhou, Ronghua; Qiu, Yanhua; Luo, Ming; Tan, Zhaoxia; Li, Shen; Chen, Gang; Zhou, Wentao; Liu, Jiaxin; Yang, Chengmin; Liu, Jin; Li, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is an unavoidable event for patients in cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). This study was designed to investigate whether glutaraldehyde-polymerized human placenta hemoglobin (PolyPHb), a hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier (HBOC), can protect heart against CPB-induced I/R injury or not and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Methods and Results. A standard dog CPB model with 2-hour cardiac arrest and 2-hour reperfusion was established. The results demonstrated that a low-dose PolyPHb (0.1%, w/v) provided a significant protection on the I/R heart, whereas the high-dose PolyPHb (3%, w/v) did not exhibit cardioprotective effect, as evidenced by the impaired cardiac function, decreased myocardial oxygen utilization, and elevated enzymes release and pathological changes. Further study indicated that exposure of isolated coronary arteries or human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to a high-dose PolyPHb caused impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation, which was companied with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and elevated malonaldehyde (MDA) formation. Consistent with the increased oxidative stress, the NAD(P)H oxidase activity and subunits expression, including gp91phox, p47phox, p67phox, and Nox1, were greatly upregulated. Conclusion. The high-dose PolyPHb fails to protect heart from CPB-induced I/R injury, which was due to overproduction of NAD(P)H oxidase-induced ROS and resultant endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26161234

  13. Skeletal muscle involvement in cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Limongelli, Giuseppe; D'Alessandro, Raffaella; Maddaloni, Valeria; Rea, Alessandra; Sarkozy, Anna; McKenna, William J

    2013-12-01

    The link between heart and skeletal muscle disorders is based on similar molecular, anatomical and clinical features, which are shared by the 'primary' cardiomyopathies and 'primary' neuromuscular disorders. There are, however, some peculiarities that are typical of cardiac and skeletal muscle disorders. Skeletal muscle weakness presenting at any age may indicate a primary neuromuscular disorder (associated with creatine kinase elevation as in dystrophinopathies), a mitochondrial disease (particularly if encephalopathy, ocular myopathy, retinitis, neurosensorineural deafness, lactic acidosis are present), a storage disorder (progressive exercise intolerance, cognitive impairment and retinitis pigmentosa, as in Danon disease), or metabolic disorders (hypoglycaemia, metabolic acidosis, hyperammonaemia or other specific biochemical abnormalities). In such patients, skeletal muscle weakness usually precedes the cardiomyopathy and dominates the clinical picture. Nevertheless, skeletal involvement may be subtle, and the first clinical manifestation of a neuromuscular disorder may be the occurrence of heart failure, conduction disorders or ventricular arrhythmias due to cardiomyopathy. ECG and echocardiogram, and eventually, a more detailed cardiovascular evaluation may be required to identify early cardiac involvement. Paediatric and adult cardiologists should be proactive in screening for neuromuscular and related disorders to enable diagnosis in probands and evaluation of families with a focus on the identification of those at risk of cardiac arrhythmia and emboli who may require specific prophylactic treatments, for example, pacemaker, implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and anticoagulation. PMID:24149064

  14. Finite element modelling predicts changes in joint shape and cell behaviour due to loss of muscle strain in jaw development

    PubMed Central

    Brunt, Lucy H.; Norton, Joanna L.; Bright, Jen A.; Rayfield, Emily J.; Hammond, Chrissy L.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal joint morphogenesis is linked to clinical conditions such as Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH) and to osteoarthritis (OA). Muscle activity is known to be important during the developmental process of joint morphogenesis. However, less is known about how this mechanical stimulus affects the behaviour of joint cells to generate altered morphology. Using zebrafish, in which we can image all joint musculoskeletal tissues at high resolution, we show that removal of muscle activity through anaesthetisation or genetic manipulation causes a change to the shape of the joint between the Meckel's cartilage and Palatoquadrate (the jaw joint), such that the joint develops asymmetrically leading to an overlap of the cartilage elements on the medial side which inhibits normal joint function. We identify the time during which muscle activity is critical to produce a normal joint. Using Finite Element Analysis (FEA), to model the strains exerted by muscle on the skeletal elements, we identify that minimum principal strains are located at the medial region of the joint and interzone during mouth opening. Then, by studying the cells immediately proximal to the joint, we demonstrate that biomechanical strain regulates cell orientation within the developing joint, such that when muscle-induced strain is removed, cells on the medial side of the joint notably change their orientation. Together, these data show that biomechanical forces are required to establish symmetry in the joint during development. PMID:26253758

  15. Determination of cardiac size following space missions of different durations - The second manned Skylab mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, A.; Hoffler, G. W.; Johnson, R. L.; Gowen, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    A simple method to estimate cardiac size from single frontal plane chest roentgenograms has been described. Pre- and postflight chest X-rays from Apollo 17, and Skylab 2 and 3 have been analyzed for changes in the cardiac silhouette size. The data obtained from the computed cardiothoracic areal ratios compared well with the clinical cardiothoracic diametral ratios (r = .86). Though an overall postflight decrease in cardiac size is evident, the mean difference was not statistically significant (n = 8). The individual decreases in the cardiac silhouette size postflight are thought to be due to decrements in intracardiac chamber volumes rather than in myocardial muscle mass.

  16. The Dilated Cardiomyopathy-Causing Mutation ACTC E361G in Cardiac Muscle Myofibrils Specifically Abolishes Modulation of Ca2+ Regulation by Phosphorylation of Troponin I

    PubMed Central

    Vikhorev, Petr G.; Song, Weihua; Wilkinson, Ross; Copeland, O’Neal; Messer, Andrew E.; Ferenczi, Michael A.; Marston, Steven B.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylation of troponin I by protein kinase A (PKA) reduces Ca2+ sensitivity and increases the rate of Ca2+ release from troponin C and the rate of relaxation in cardiac muscle. In vitro experiments indicate that mutations that cause dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) uncouple this modulation, but this has not been demonstrated in an intact contractile system. Using a Ca2+-jump protocol, we measured the effect of the DCM-causing mutation ACTC E361G on the equilibrium and kinetic parameters of Ca2+ regulation of contractility in single transgenic mouse heart myofibrils. We used propranolol treatment of mice to reduce the level of troponin I and myosin binding protein C (MyBP-C) phosphorylation in their hearts before isolating the myofibrils. In nontransgenic mouse myofibrils, the Ca2+ sensitivity of force was increased, the fast relaxation phase rate constant, kREL, was reduced, and the length of the slow linear phase, tLIN, was increased when the troponin I phosphorylation level was reduced from 1.02 to 0.3 molPi/TnI (EC50 P/unP = 1.8 ± 0.2, p < 0.001). Native myofibrils from ACTC E361G transgenic mice had a 2.4-fold higher Ca2+ sensitivity than nontransgenic mouse myofibrils. Strikingly, the Ca2+ sensitivity and relaxation parameters of ACTC E361G myofibrils did not depend on the troponin I phosphorylation level (EC50 P/unP = 0.88 ± 0.17, p = 0.39). Nevertheless, modulation of the Ca2+ sensitivity of ACTC E361G myofibrils by sarcomere length or EMD57033 was indistinguishable from that of nontransgenic myofibrils. Overall, EC50 measured in different conditions varied over a 7-fold range. The time course of relaxation, as defined by tLIN and kREL, was correlated with EC50 but varied by just 2.7- and 3.3-fold, respectively. Our results confirm that troponin I phosphorylation specifically alters the Ca2+ sensitivity of isometric tension and the time course of relaxation in cardiac muscle myofibrils. Moreover, the DCM-causing mutation ACTC E361G blunts this

  17. Noninvasive, near infrared spectroscopic-measured muscle pH and PO2 indicate tissue perfusion for cardiac surgical patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soller, Babs R.; Idwasi, Patrick O.; Balaguer, Jorge; Levin, Steven; Simsir, Sinan A.; Vander Salm, Thomas J.; Collette, Helen; Heard, Stephen O.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether near infrared spectroscopic measurement of tissue pH and Po2 has sufficient accuracy to assess variation in tissue perfusion resulting from changes in blood pressure and metabolic demand during cardiopulmonary bypass. DESIGN: Prospective clinical study. SETTING: Academic medical center. SUBJECTS: Eighteen elective cardiac surgical patients. INTERVENTION: Cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: A near infrared spectroscopic fiber optic probe was placed over the hypothenar eminence. Reference Po2 and pH sensors were inserted in the abductor digiti minimi (V). Data were collected every 30 secs during surgery and for 6 hrs following cardiopulmonary bypass. Calibration equations developed from one third of the data were used with the remaining data to investigate sensitivity of the near infrared spectroscopic measurement to physiologic changes resulting from cardiopulmonary bypass. Near infrared spectroscopic and reference pH and Po2 measurements were compared for each subject using standard error of prediction. Near infrared spectroscopic pH and Po2 at baseline were compared with values during cardiopulmonary bypass just before rewarming commenced (hypotensive, hypothermic), after rewarming (hypotensive, normothermic) just before discontinuation of cardiopulmonary bypass, and at 6 hrs following cardiopulmonary bypass (normotensive, normothermic) using mixed-model analysis of variance. Near infrared spectroscopic pH and Po2 were well correlated with the invasive measurement of pH (R2 =.84) and Po2 (R 2 =.66) with an average standard error of prediction of 0.022 +/- 0.008 pH units and 6 +/- 3 mm Hg, respectively. The average difference between the invasive and near infrared spectroscopic measurement was near zero for both the pH and Po2 measurements. Near infrared spectroscopic Po2 significantly decreased 50% on initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass and remained depressed throughout the bypass and

  18. Excitation of skeletal muscle is a self-limiting process, due to run-down of Na+, K+ gradients, recoverable by stimulation of the Na+, K+ pumps

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Torben

    2015-01-01

    The general working hypothesis of this study was that muscle fatigue and force recovery depend on passive and active fluxes of Na+ and K+. This is tested by examining the time-course of excitation-induced fluxes of Na+ and K+ during 5–300 sec of 10–60 Hz continuous electrical stimulation in rat extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles in vitro and in vivo using 22Na and flame photometric determination of Na+ and K+. 60 sec of 60 Hz stimulation rapidly increases 22Na influx, during the initial phase (0–15 sec) by 0.53 μmol(sec)−1(g wet wt.)−1, sixfold faster than in the later phase (15–60 sec). These values agree with flame photometric measurements of Na+ content. The progressive reduction in the rate of excitation-induced Na+ uptake is likely to reflect gradual loss of excitability due to accumulation of K+ in the extracellular space and t-tubules leading to depolarization. This is in keeping with the concomitant progressive loss of contractile force previously demonstrated. During electrical stimulation rat muscles rapidly reach high rates of active Na+, K+-transport (in EDL muscles a sevenfold increase and in soleus muscles a 22-fold increase), allowing efficient and selective compensation for the large excitation-induced passive Na+, K+-fluxes demonstrated over the latest decades. The excitation-induced changes in passive fluxes of Na+ and K+ are both clearly larger than previously observed. The excitation-induced reduction in [Na+]o contributes considerably to the inhibitory effect of elevated [K+]o. In conclusion, excitation-induced passive and active Na+ and K+ fluxes are important causes of muscle fatigue and force recovery, respectively. PMID:25862098

  19. Muscle weakness in TPM3-myopathy is due to reduced Ca2+-sensitivity and impaired acto-myosin cross-bridge cycling in slow fibres.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Michaela; Cooper, Sandra T; Marston, Steve B; Nowak, Kristen J; McNamara, Elyshia; Mokbel, Nancy; Ilkovski, Biljana; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Rendu, John; de Winter, Josine M; Klinge, Lars; Beggs, Alan H; North, Kathryn N; Ottenheijm, Coen A C; Clarke, Nigel F

    2015-11-15

    Dominant mutations in TPM3, encoding α-tropomyosinslow, cause a congenital myopathy characterized by generalized muscle weakness. Here, we used a multidisciplinary approach to investigate the mechanism of muscle dysfunction in 12 TPM3-myopathy patients. We confirm that slow myofibre hypotrophy is a diagnostic hallmark of TPM3-myopathy, and is commonly accompanied by skewing of fibre-type ratios (either slow or fast fibre predominance). Patient muscle contained normal ratios of the three tropomyosin isoforms and normal fibre-type expression of myosins and troponins. Using 2D-PAGE, we demonstrate that mutant α-tropomyosinslow was expressed, suggesting muscle dysfunction is due to a dominant-negative effect of mutant protein on muscle contraction. Molecular modelling suggested mutant α-tropomyosinslow likely impacts actin-tropomyosin interactions and, indeed, co-sedimentation assays showed reduced binding of mutant α-tropomyosinslow (R168C) to filamentous actin. Single fibre contractility studies of patient myofibres revealed marked slow myofibre specific abnormalities. At saturating [Ca(2+)] (pCa 4.5), patient slow fibres produced only 63% of the contractile force produced in control slow fibres and had reduced acto-myosin cross-bridge cycling kinetics. Importantly, due to reduced Ca(2+)-sensitivity, at sub-saturating [Ca(2+)] (pCa 6, levels typically released during in vivo contraction) patient slow fibres produced only 26% of the force generated by control slow fibres. Thus, weakness in TPM3-myopathy patients can be directly attributed to reduced slow fibre force at physiological [Ca(2+)], and impaired acto-myosin cross-bridge cycling kinetics. Fast myofibres are spared; however, they appear to be unable to compensate for slow fibre dysfunction. Abnormal Ca(2+)-sensitivity in TPM3-myopathy patients suggests Ca(2+)-sensitizing drugs may represent a useful treatment for this condition. PMID:26307083

  20. Altered properties of volume-sensitive osmolyte and anion channels (VSOACs) and membrane protein expression in cardiac and smooth muscle myocytes from Clcn3−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto-Mizuma, Shintaro; Wang, Ge-Xin; Liu, Luis L; Schegg, Kathleen; Hatton, William J; Duan, Dayue; Horowitz, Burton; Lamb, Fred S; Hume, Joseph R

    2004-01-01

    ClC-3, a member of the large superfamily of ClC voltage-dependent Cl– channels, has been proposed as a molecular candidate responsible for volume-sensitive osmolyte and anion channels (VSOACs) in some cells, including heart and vascular smooth muscle. However, the reported presence of native VSOACs in at least two cell types from transgenic ClC-3 disrupted (Clcn3−/−) mice casts considerable doubt on this proposed role for ClC-3. We compared several properties of native VSOACs and examined mRNA transcripts and membrane protein expression profiles in cardiac and pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells from Clcn3+/+ and Clcn3−/− mice to: (1) test the hypothesis that native VSOACs are unaltered in cells from Clcn3−/− mice, and (2) test the possibility that targeted inactivation of the Clcn3 gene using a conventional murine global knock-out approach may result in compensatory changes in expression of other membrane proteins. Our experiments demonstrate that VSOAC currents in myocytes from Clcn3+/+ and Clcn3−/− mice are remarkably similar in terms of activation and inactivation kinetics, steady-state current densities, rectification, anion selectivity (I− > Cl− ≫ Asp−) and sensitivity to block by glibenclamide, niflumic acid, DIDS and extracellular ATP. However, additional experiments revealed several significant differences in other fundamental properties of native VSOACs recorded from atrial and smooth muscle cells from Clcn3−/− mice, including: differences in regulation by endogenous protein kinase C, differential sensitivity to block by anti-ClC-3 antibodies, and differential sensitivities to [ATP]i and free [Mg2+]i. These results suggest that in response to Clcn3 gene deletion, there may be compensatory changes in expression of other proteins that alter VSOAC channel subunit composition or associated regulatory subunits that give rise to VSOACs with different properties. Consistent with this hypothesis, in atria from Clcn3−/− mice

  1. Shortening and intracellular Ca2+ in ventricular myocytes and expression of genes encoding cardiac muscle proteins in early onset type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    PubMed

    Salem, K A; Adrian, T E; Qureshi, M A; Parekh, K; Oz, M; Howarth, F C

    2012-12-01

    There has been a spectacular rise in the global prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Cardiovascular complications are the major cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. Contractile dysfunction, associated with disturbances in excitation-contraction coupling, has been widely demonstrated in the diabetic heart. The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of cardiac muscle genes that are involved in the process of excitation-contraction coupling in the hearts of early onset (8-10 weeks of age) type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats. Gene expression was assessed in ventricular muscle with real-time RT-PCR; shortening and intracellular Ca(2+) were measured in ventricular myocytes with video edge detection and fluorescence photometry, respectively. The general characteristics of the GK rats included elevated fasting and non-fasting blood glucose and blood glucose at 120 min following a glucose challenge. Expression of genes encoding cardiac muscle proteins (Myh6/7, Mybpc3, Myl1/3, Actc1, Tnni3, Tnn2, Tpm1/2/4 and Dbi) and intercellular proteins (Gja1/4/5/7, Dsp and Cav1/3) were unaltered in GK ventricle compared with control ventricle. The expression of genes encoding some membrane pumps and exchange proteins was unaltered (Atp1a1/2, Atp1b1 and Slc8a1), whilst others were either upregulated (Atp1a3, relative expression 2.61 ± 0.69 versus 0.84 ± 0.23) or downregulated (Slc9a1, 0.62 ± 0.07 versus 1.08 ± 0.08) in GK ventricle compared with control ventricle. The expression of genes encoding some calcium (Cacna1c/1g, Cacna2d1/2d2 and Cacnb1/b2), sodium (Scn5a) and potassium channels (Kcna3/5, Kcnj3/5/8/11/12, Kchip2, Kcnab1, Kcnb1, Kcnd1/2/3, Kcne1/4, Kcnq1, Kcng2, Kcnh2, Kcnk3 and Kcnn2) were unaltered, whilst others were either upregulated (Cacna1h, 0.95 ± 0.16 versus 0.47 ± 0.09; Scn1b, 1.84 ± 0.16 versus 1.11 ± 0.11; and Hcn2, 1.55 ± 0.15 versus 1.03 ± 0.08) or downregulated (Hcn4, 0.16 ± 0.03 versus 0.37 ± 0.08; Kcna2, 0.35 ± 0

  2. Cancer Causes Cardiac Atrophy and Autophagy in a Sexually Dimorphic Manner

    PubMed Central

    Cosper, Pippa F.; Leinwand, Leslie A.

    2010-01-01

    Approximately one-third of cancer deaths are caused by cachexia, a severe form of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue wasting that affects men more than women. The heart also undergoes atrophy in cancer patients but the mechanisms and the basis for apparent sex differences are unclear. In a mouse colon-adenocarcinoma model, cancer causes a loss of cardiac mass due to a decrease in cardiac myocyte size that is associated with reduced levels of all sarcomeric proteins. Unlike skeletal muscle cachexia, atrophic hearts do not upregulate the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) or its activity but increase autophagy. Thus, cancer causes cardiac atrophy by a mechanism distinct from that in skeletal muscle. Male tumor-bearing mice have a more severe phenotype than females, including greater cardiac mass loss and mortality, a more robust pro-inflammatory response to the tumor, and greater cardiac autophagy. In females, estrogen protects against cancer-induced cardiac atrophy and body weight loss by signaling through its receptor. Sex differences in cardiac atrophy need to be considered during the treatment of patients suffering from chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy to prevent exacerbation of cardiac dysfunction. PMID:21163868

  3. Dosimetric perturbations due to an implanted cardiac pacemaker in MammoSite{sup Registered-Sign} treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Wonmo; Kim, Siyong; Kim, Jung-in; Lee, Jae-gi; Shin, Young-Joo; Jung, Jae-Yong; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate dose perturbations for pacemaker-implanted patients in partial breast irradiation using high dose rate (HDR) balloon brachytherapy. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed to calculate dose distributions involving a pacemaker in Ir-192 HDR balloon brachytherapy. Dose perturbations by varying balloon-to-pacemaker distances (BPD = 50 or 100 mm) and concentrations of iodine contrast medium (2.5%, 5.0%, 7.5%, and 10.0% by volume) in the balloon were investigated for separate parts of the pacemaker (i.e., battery and substrate). Relative measurements using an ion-chamber were also performed to confirm MC results. Results: The MC and measured results in homogeneous media without a pacemaker agreed with published data within 2% from the balloon surface to 100 mm BPD. Further their dose distributions with a pacemaker were in a comparable agreement. The MC results showed that doses over the battery were increased by a factor of 3, compared to doses without a pacemaker. However, there was no significant dose perturbation in the middle of substrate but up to 70% dose increase in the substrate interface with the titanium capsule. The attenuation by iodine contrast medium lessened doses delivered to the pacemaker by up to 9%. Conclusions: Due to inhomogeneity of pacemaker and contrast medium as well as low-energy photons in Ir-192 HDR balloon brachytherapy, the actual dose received in a pacemaker is different from the homogeneous medium-based dose and the external beam-based dose. Therefore, the dose perturbations should be considered for pacemaker-implanted patients when evaluating a safe clinical distance between the balloon and pacemaker.

  4. Depotentiation of intact rat cardiac muscle unmasks an Epac-dependent increase in myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sarbjot; Kong, Cherrie H T; Cannell, Mark B; Ward, Marie-Louise

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors have been identified in many cell types as important effectors of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophospahte (cAMP) signalling that is independent of protein kinase A (PKA). In the heart, investigation of exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) has yielded conflicting results. Since cAMP is an important regulator of cardiac contractility, this study aimed to examine whether Epac activation modulates excitation-contraction coupling in ventricular preparations from rat hearts. The study used 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2'-O-methyladenosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (cpTOME), an analogue of cAMP that activates Epac, but not PKA. In isolated myocytes, cpTOME increased Ca(2+) spark frequency from about 7 to 32/100 μm(3)/s (n = 10), P = 0.05 with a reduction in the peak amplitude of the sparks. Simultaneous measurements of intracellular Ca(2+) and isometric force in multicellular trabeculae (n = 7, 1.5 mmol/L [Ca(2+)]o) revealed no effect of Epac activation on either the amplitude of Ca(2+) transients (Control 0.7 ± 0.1 vs cpTOME 0.7 ± 0.1; 340/380 fura-2 ratio, P = 0.35) or on peak stress (Control 24 ± 5 mN/mm(2) vs cpTOME 23 ± 5 mN/mm(2), P = 0.20). However, an effect of Epac in trabeculae was unmasked by lowering extracellular [Ca(2+)]o. In these depotentiated trabeculae, activation of the Epac pathway increased myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity, an effect that was blocked by addition of KN-93, a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK-II) inhibitor. This study suggests that Epac activation may be a useful therapeutic target to increase the strength of contraction during low inotropic states. PMID:26466753

  5. Muscle-specific deletion of comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) causes muscle steatosis but improves insulin sensitivity in male mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping; Kadegowda, Anil K G; Ma, Yinyan; Guo, Feng; Han, Xianlin; Wang, Miao; Groban, Leanne; Xue, Bingzhong; Shi, Hang; Li, Huihua; Yu, Liqing

    2015-05-01

    Intramyocellular accumulation of lipids is often associated with insulin resistance. Deficiency of comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) causes cytosolic deposition of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipid droplets in most cell types, including muscle due to defective TG hydrolysis. It was unclear, however, whether CGI-58 deficiency-induced lipid accumulation in muscle influences insulin sensitivity. Here we show that muscle-specific CGI-58 knockout mice relative to their controls have increased glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity on a Western-type high-fat diet, despite TG accumulation in both heart and oxidative skeletal muscle and cholesterol deposition in heart. Although the intracardiomyocellular lipid deposition results in cardiac ventricular fibrosis and systolic dysfunction, muscle-specific CGI-58 knockout mice show increased glucose uptake in heart and soleus muscle, improved insulin signaling in insulin-sensitive tissues, and reduced plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, and cholesterol. Hepatic contents of TG and cholesterol are also decreased in these animals. Cardiac steatosis is attributable, at least in part, to decreases in cardiac TG hydrolase activity and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1-dependent mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. In conclusion, muscle CGI-58 deficiency causes cardiac dysfunction and fat deposition in oxidative muscles but induces a series of favorable metabolic changes in mice fed a high-fat diet. PMID:25751639

  6. Doxorubicin-induced expression of LOX-1 in H9c2 cardiac muscle cells and its role in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Spallarossa, Paolo; Fabbi, Patrizia; Manca, Valeria; Garibaldi, Silvano; Ghigliotti, Giorgio; Barisione, Chiara; Altieri, Paola; Patrone, Franco; Brunelli, Claudio; Barsotti, Antonio

    2005-09-16

    Up-regulation of LOX-1 is implicated in apoptosis in both vascular smooth muscle cells and in endothelial cells. We examined the effects of doxorubicin on LOX-1 expression in H9c2 cardiomyocytes and the role played by LOX-1 up-regulation in doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation was assessed by DCF flow cytometry. LOX-1 mRNA and protein expression was assessed by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry with annexin/PI double staining. Doxorubicin-induced LOX-1 expression in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion. The doxorubicin-induced ROS formation and the LOX-1 expression were significantly attenuated by pre-treatment with antioxidants. By exposing cells that had been pre-treated with doxorubicin to oxidized-LDL, a LOX-1 agonist, in the presence or in the absence of k-carrageenan, a LOX-1 receptor antagonist, we documented that doxorubicin-induced LOX-1 expression plays a role in inducing apoptosis. These findings suggest that LOX-1 up-regulation is redox-sensitive and may contribute to doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:16055083

  7. The pathogenesis and treatment of cardiac atrophy in cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kate T

    2016-02-15

    Cancer cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome characterized by a progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass associated with significant functional impairment. In addition to a loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, many patients with cancer cachexia also experience cardiac atrophy, remodeling, and dysfunction, which in the field of cancer cachexia is described as cardiac cachexia. The cardiac alterations may be due to underlying heart disease, the cancer itself, or problems initiated by the cancer treatment and, unfortunately, remains largely underappreciated by clinicians and basic scientists. Despite recent major advances in the treatment of cancer, little progress has been made in the treatment of cardiac cachexia in cancer, and much of this is due to lack of information regarding the mechanisms. This review focuses on the cardiac atrophy associated with cancer cachexia, describing some of the known mechanisms and discussing the current and future therapeutic strategies to treat this condition. Above all else, improved awareness of the condition and an increased focus on identification of mechanisms and therapeutic targets will facilitate the eventual development of an effective treatment for cardiac atrophy in cancer cachexia. PMID:26718971

  8. Signaling mechanisms for the activation of an embryonic gene program during the hypertrophy of cardiac ventricular muscle.

    PubMed

    Chien, R

    1992-01-01

    To study the signaling mechanisms which mediate ventricular hypertrophy, we utilized the induction of the ANF gene as a marker of the hypertrophic response. The induction of the atrial natriuretic factor gene (ANF) is one of the most conserved features of ventricular hypertrophy, occurring in multiple species (mouse, rat, hamster, canine, and human) in response to diverse stimuli (hormonal, mechanical, pressure/volume overload, genetic, IHSS, hypertension, etc.). The ANF gene is expressed in both the atrial and ventricular compartments during embryonic development, but shortly after birth ANF expression is down-regulated to negligible levels in the adult myocardium. Since the reactivation of ANF gene expression in the hypertrophied ventricle is a hallmark of the activation of an embryonic gene program, it has also become of interest to determine if similar mechanisms activate ANF expression during hypertrophy and the initial stages of cardiogenesis. A combination of cotransfection, microinjection, and transgenic approaches has been coupled to well characterized cultured cell systems and in vivo murine models employing normal and transgenic mice. The microinjection of oncogenic RAS proteins into living myocardial cells does not lead to the activation of cell proliferation, but activates ANF gene expression, as assessed by immunofluorescence. Co-transfection of mutant and wild-type RAS expression vectors with a ANF-luciferase fusion gene supports a direct effect of activated RAS on ANF gene transcription. Co-transfection of a dominant negative RAS vector effectively inhibits the induction of the ANF gene during alpha adrenergic mediated hypertrophy of ventricular muscle cells, thereby establishing that a RAS-mediated pathway is required for ANF induction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1299210

  9. Calcium modulatory properties of 2,6-dibutylbenzylamine (B25) in rat isolated vas deferens, cardiac and smooth muscle preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Pirisino, R.; Banchelli, G.; Ignesti, G.; Mantelli, L.; Matucci, R.; Raimondi, L.; Buffoni, F.

    1993-01-01

    1. In rat isolated vas deferens the new compound 2,6-dibutylbenzylamine (B25) evoked a series of repeating rhythmic contractions. Concentration-response curves constructed for this effect were bell-shaped, indicating a biphasic effect for this compound. By contrast, B25 depressed heart contractility without any visible positive inotropic or chronotropic activity. 2. Experiments with tetrodotoxin, reserpine, capsaicin, alpha-adrenoceptor blocking compounds and other agents permit us to exclude a release of neuromediators or a direct stimulation of post-synaptic receptors to account for the rhythmic effect of B25 in the rat vas deferens. 3. In the same tissue, the increase in 45Ca2+ uptake, the voltage-dependency as well as the dependence of the B25-induced rhythmic activity upon the external calcium concentration indicate a direct activation of voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCC). 4. Verapamil paradoxically stimulated the rhythmic effect of B25 in the rat vas deferens. La3+ was inactive while nifedipine was a weak inhibitor. By contrast Ni2+ and Mn2+ ions were good inhibitors (IC50 < 10(-4) M), suggesting that a possible opening of T-type VSCC underlies rhythmic effect of B25. 5. In radioligand binding studies competition experiments with [3H]-nitrendipine indicated that only at high concentrations was B25 able to interact with dihydropyridine-sensitive binding sites of heart and vas deferens smooth muscle. 6. B25 (3-30 microM) counteracted the inhibitory effects of omega-conotoxin GVIA in field-stimulated rat vas deferens. PMID:8401916

  10. Smooth muscle cells of the coronary arterial tunica media express tumor necrosis factor-alpha and proliferate during acute rejection of rabbit cardiac allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, H.; Swanson, S. J.; Sukhova, G.; Schoen, F. J.; Libby, P.

    1995-01-01

    Graft coronary arteriosclerosis (GCA) frequently limits the long-term success of cardiac transplantation. The pathogenic mechanisms of and stimuli that provoke GCA remain uncertain. Whatever the initiating factors, deranged control of smooth muscle cells (SMC) proliferation likely contributes to the intimal hyperplasia that produces obstructive lesions. To identify mediators that may contribute to ongoing modulation of SMC functions during acute rejection and to explore the mechanisms of the pathogenesis of graft coronary arteriosclerosis, we studied the kinetics of proliferation and the expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), a proinflammatory and SMC growth-promoting cytokine, in coronary arterial SMCs in rabbit hearts transplanted heterotopically without immunosuppression. Hearts were harvested at 2 (n = 5), 5 (n = 5), and 8.2 +/- 0.4 (mean +/- SD, n = 5) days after transplantation, just before graft failure as judged clinically. SMC proliferation was assessed by continuous bromodeoxyuridine labeling (BrdU 10 mg/kg/d. s.q.). Whole heart cross sections were stained immunohistochemically with monoclonal antibodies that recognize TNF-alpha, BrdU, and SMCs (muscle alpha-actin). Major epicardial coronary arteries (five to nine profiles in each animal) were evaluated. Histological rejection grades by the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation scale at 2, 5, and 10 days were 1.6 +/- 0.9, 2.8 +/- 1.1, and 4.0 +/- 0.0, respectively. Medial SMCs in normal hearts and 2 days after transplant expressed little or no TNF-alpha and displayed negligible BrdU incorporation. At 5 days after transplantation, some medial SMCs stained for TNF-alpha and had a low BrdU labeling index (0.5 +/- 0.8%). At 8.2 days after transplant, almost all medial SMCs expressed TNF-alpha intensely and had a high labeling index (29.8 +/- 8.0%). These results demonstrate that acute rejection activates medial SMCs in coronary arteries to express TNF-alpha and that SMC

  11. Postherpetic pseudohernia: delayed onset of paresis of abdominal muscles due to herpes zoster causing an ipsilateral abdominal bulge.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Shunsuke; Togawa, Yasuhiro; Chiku, Tsuyoshi; Sano, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Postherpetic pseudohernia causes an abdominal bulge as well as an abdominal wall herniation. This disease is one of the neurological complications of herpes zoster and essentially consists of paresis of ipsilateral abdominal muscles. Postherpetic pseudohernia may be mistaken for abdominal wall herniation because it is not well known. We describe two cases presenting an abdominal bulge. The ipsilateral abdominal bulge appeared after recovery from abdominal zoster. Abdominal CT showed no evidence of a herniation or mass. We diagnosed a postherpetic pseudohernia. One of the patients recovered spontaneously 4 months after the onset, and the other partially recovered after 2 months. This disease can be expected to disappear spontaneously, unlike abdominal herniation requiring surgery. It has been reported that 79.3% of patients eventually recovered spontaneously. For surgeons and general practitioners, it is beneficial to keep this disease in mind when examining a patient presenting an abdominal bulge. PMID:27229900

  12. A false positive case due to matrix interference in the analysis of ronidazole residues in muscle tissue using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen; Rúbies, Antoni; Centrich, Francesc; Companyó, Ramon

    2014-06-01

    In contrast with the information of the inspection body concerning the use of ronidazole, several non compliant muscle samples were detected using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method in accordance with confirmation criteria of Decision 2002/657/EC. This led to the suspicion that non compliance could be due to false positive results. In this context, a liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) method was developed and sample extracts were re-analyzed, resolving the co eluting isobaric interfering peak, which also has an interfering product ion with the transition product (m/z 201>140). PMID:24583330

  13. Cardiac involvement in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Khalighi, Koroush; Kodali, Archana; Thapamagar, Suman B.; Walker, Stanley R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an inherited progressive muscle disorder caused by defects in muscle proteins. As the incidence of this condition is low, not many are familiar with the multisystem involvement. At times, cardiac disease may even be the predominant manifestation in the form of arrhythmias, conduction defects, and cardiomyopathies. The progression of the disease can lead to sudden, unpredictable death. Thus, it is important to identify this subgroup and treat accordingly. Objective To identify patients with DM and assess their risk for sudden cardiac death. Methods Nine patients previously diagnosed with muscular dystrophy were evaluated by cardiologists for various reasons, from a general follow-up to cardiac arrest. All of them had electrocardiograms (EKG) and 2-D echocardiograms, and seven of them had further electrophysiological (EP) studies. Results Of the nine patients with DM, eight had EKG evidence of conduction abnormalities ranging from first-degree heart block to complete heart block. Of the seven who had EP studies, five had inducible ventricular tachycardia requiring immediate cardioversion and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implant. Two of them underwent permanent pacemaker placement due to complete heart block and infra-Hissian block. The remaining two patients opted for a conservative approach with yearly EKG monitoring. Conclusion Because one-third of the cardiac deaths in patients with DM are sudden, there is a strong need to identify these patients and intervene in those at high risk. Prophylactic pacemaker placement is recommended even in those with minimal conduction system abnormality. However, the common practice is to identify patients at high risk of conduction abnormalities by EP studies and then provide them with prophylactic invasive strategies. PMID:25656662

  14. Antiplatelet efficacy of P2Y12 inhibitors (prasugrel, ticagrelor, clopidogrel) in patients treated with mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest due to acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Bednar, Frantisek; Kroupa, Josef; Ondrakova, Martina; Osmancik, Pavel; Kopa, Milos; Motovska, Zuzana

    2016-05-01

    Survivors after cardiac arrest (CA) due to AMI undergo PCI and then receive dual antiplatelet therapy. Mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) is recommended for unconscious patients after CA to improve neurological outcomes. MTH can attenuate the effectiveness of P2Y12 inhibitors by reducing gastrointestinal absorption and metabolic activation. The combined effect of these conditions on the efficacy of P2Y12 inhibitors is unknown. We compared the antiplatelet efficacies of new P2Y12 inhibitors in AMI patients after CA treated with MTH. Forty patients after CA for AMI treated with MTH and received one P2Y12 inhibitor (clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor) were enrolled in a prospective observational single-center study. Platelet inhibition was measured by VASP (PRI) on days 1, 2, and 3 after drug administration. In-hospital clinical data and 1-year survival data were obtained. The proportion of patients with ineffective platelet inhibition (PRI > 50 %, high on-treatment platelet reactivity) for clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor was 77 vs. 19 vs. 1 % on day 1; 77 vs. 17 vs. 0 % on day 2; and 85 vs. 6 vs. 0 % on day 3 (P < 0.001). The platelet inhibition was significantly worse in clopidogrel group than in prasugrel or ticagrelor group. Prasugrel and ticagrelor are very effective for platelet inhibition in patients treated with MTH after CA due to AMI, but clopidogrel is not. Using prasugrel or ticagrelor seems to be a more suitable option in this high-risk group of acute patients. PMID:26340851

  15. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program ... be designed to meet your needs. The Cardiac Rehabilitation Team Cardiac rehab involves a long-term commitment ...

  16. [Effect of gravitation loading and retabolil on development of atrophy in muscles and bones of rats due to suspension].

    PubMed

    KaplanskiI, A S; Il'ina-Kakueva, E I; Durnova, G N; Alekseev, E A; Loginov, V I

    1999-01-01

    In a 3-wk experiment with tail-suspended rats histological and histomorphometric methods were used to determine the effects of graded gravitational loading (GGL) and anabolic steroid retabolil (nortestosterone decanoate) on the course of atrophy in soleus m. (SM), gastrocnemius m. (GM), tibia and humerus, and functioning of somatotrophic hormones (STH) of the pituitary and thyrocytes of the thyroid. Suspension was found to produce atrophy in SM and, to a less degree, in GM, partial transformation of SM slow fibers into the fast ones, suppression of the tibial longitudinal growth, demineralization of the tibial and humeral spongious metaphyses; besides, functional activities of STH-cells and thyrocytes were inhibited. Graded gravitational loading of rats by intermittence of suspension for 2 hrs slowed down atrophy in both muscles and osteopenia in tibia, stimulated the synthetic and secretory functions of STH-cells without any marked effect on thyrocytes or humeral osteopenia. GGL failed to influence the slow-to-fast transformation of SM fibers. Two injections of retabolil at the total dose of 3 mg/kg of the body mass somewhat interfered with the SM atrophy and humoral osteopenia, and were favorable to the synthetic but not secretory activity of STH-cells. Neither SM and tibial atrophies nor thyroid activity of the gland were improved. The prophylactic action of GGL upon the SM and humeral atrophies was significantly higher when combined with retabolil, whereas GM and tibia were not noticeably cured by retabolil. Inhibition of the SM atrophy and humeral osteopenia in rats treated with GGL and retabolil concurred with elevated activities of STH-cells and thyrocytes indirectly suggesting their more intensive production of the growth hormone and thyroid hormones, respectively. PMID:10590810

  17. The effect of cardiomyopathy mutation (R97L) in mouse cardiac troponin T on the muscle length-mediated recruitment of crossbridges is modified divergently by α- and β-myosin heavy chain.

    PubMed

    Gollapudi, Sampath K; Chandra, Murali

    2016-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutations in cardiac troponin T (TnT) lead to sudden cardiac death. Augmented myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity is a common feature in TnT mutants, but such observations fail to provide a rational explanation for severe cardiac phenotypes. To better understand the mutation-induced effect on the cardiac phenotype, it is imperative to determine the effects on dynamic contractile features such as the muscle length (ML)-mediated activation against α- and β-myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. α- and β-MHC are not only differentially expressed in rodent and human hearts, but they also modify ML-mediated activation differently. Mouse analog of human TnTR94L (TnTR97L) or wild-type TnT was reconstituted into de-membranated muscle fibers from normal (α-MHC) and transgenic (β-MHC) mouse hearts. TnTR97L augmented myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity by a similar amount in α- and β-MHC fibers. However, TnTR97L augmented the negative impact of strained crossbridges on other crossbridges (γ) by 22% in α-MHC fibers, but attenuated γ by 21% in β-MHC fibers. TnTR97L decreased the magnitude of ML-mediated recruitment of crossbridges (ER) by 37% in α-MHC fibers, but increased ER by 35% in β-MHC fibers. We provide a mechanistic basis for the TnTR97L-induced effects in α- and β-MHC fibers and discuss the relevance to human hearts. PMID:26792537

  18. Posttraumatic stress due to an acute coronary syndrome increases risk of 42-month major adverse cardiac events and all-cause mortality.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Donald; Rieckmann, Nina; Shaffer, Jonathan A; Schwartz, Joseph E; Burg, Matthew M; Davidson, Karina W; Clemow, Lynn; Shimbo, Daichi; Kronish, Ian M

    2011-12-01

    Approximately 15% of patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) due to their ACS event. We assessed whether ACS-induced PTSD symptoms increase risk for major adverse cardiac events (MACE) and all-cause mortality (ACM) in an observational cohort study of 247 patients (aged 25-93 years; 45% women) hospitalized for an ACS at one of 3 academic medical centers in New York and Connecticut between November 2003 and June 2005. Within 1 week of admission, patient demographics, Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events risk score, Charlson comorbidity index, left ventricular ejection fraction, and depression status were obtained. At 1-month follow-up, ACS-induced PTSD symptoms were assessed with the Impact of Events Scale-Revised. The primary endpoint was combined MACE (hospitalization for myocardial infarction, unstable angina or urgent/emergency coronary revascularization procedures) and ACM, which were actively surveyed for 42 months after index event. Thirty-six (15%) patients had elevated intrusion symptoms, 32 (13%) elevated avoidance symptoms, and 21 (9%) elevated hyperarousal symptoms. Study physicians adjudicated 21 MACEs and 15 deaths during the follow-up period. In unadjusted Cox proportional hazards regression analyses, and analyses adjusted for sex, age, clinical characteristics and depression, high intrusion symptoms were associated with the primary endpoint (adjusted hazard ratio, 3.38; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-9.02; p = .015). Avoidance and hyperarousal symptoms were not associated with the primary endpoint. The presence of intrusion symptoms is a strong and independent predictor of elevated risk for MACE and ACM, and should be considered in the risk stratification of ACS patients. PMID:21807378

  19. SMOOTH MUSCLE STEM CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) originate from multiple types of progenitor cells. In the embryo, the most well-studied SMC progenitor is the cardiac neural crest stem cell. Smooth muscle differentiation in the neural crest lineage is controlled by a combination of cell intrinsic factors, includ...

  20. Out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest due to penetrating cardiac injury treated by percutaneous cardiopulmonary support in the emergency room: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kurimoto, Yoshihiko; Kano, Hitoshi; Yama, Naoya; Nara, Satoshi; Hase, Mamoru; Asai, Yasufumi

    2007-01-01

    Penetrating cardiac injury tends to generally be repaired without cardiopulmonary bypass in the operating room. We herein report the case of penetrating cardiac injury repaired using percutaneous cardiopulmonary support in an emergency room. A 57-year-old man attempted suicide by stabbing himself in the left anterior chest with a knife. Although the patient suffered cardiopulmonary arrest for 7 min in the ambulance, spontaneous circulation was restored following pericardiotomy through emergency left thoracotomy in the emergency room. To prevent coronary artery injury and control the massive bleeding, percutaneous cardiopulmonary support was instituted without systemic heparinization and the cardiac injury was repaired in the emergency room. The patient was then transferred to another hospital on day 46 for further rehabilitation. Percutaneous cardiopulmonary support might be helpful for treating critical patients in an emergency room, even in the case of trauma patients. PMID:17342366

  1. Age-associated impairement in endpoint accuracy of goal-directed contractions performed with two fingers is due to altered activation of the synergistic muscles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Ting; Pinto Neto, Osmar; de Miranda Marzullo, Ana Carolina; Kennedy, Deanna M; Fox, Emily J; Christou, Evangelos A

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether older adults compared with young adults exhibit impaired end-point accuracy during a two-finger task due to altered activation of the contributing synergistic muscles. Nine young (21.3 years ± 1.6 years, 4 men) and 9 older (73.1 years ± 6.4 years, 5 men) were instructed to accurately match the center of a target with concurrent abduction of the index and little fingers (synergistic two-finger task). The target comprised of 20% MVC and 200 ms. Visual feedback of the force trajectory and target was provided 1s after each trial. Subjects completed 40 trials and the last 10 were used for analysis. Endpoint accuracy was quantified as the normalized deviation from the target in terms of peak force (peak force error), time-to-peak force (time-to-peak force error), and a combination of the two (overall error). Motor output variability was quantified as the standard deviation and coefficient of variation (CV) of peak force and time to peak force. The neural activation of the involved synergist muscles (first dorsal interosseus (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM)) was quantified with the electromyography (EMG) amplitude (root mean square) and its frequency structure (wavelet analysis). Older adults exhibited significantly greater peak force (46.7 ± 10% vs. 24.9 ± 3.2%) and overall endpoint error (68.5 ± 9.7% vs. 41.7 ± 4.3%), whereas the time to peak force error was similar for the two age groups. Older adults also exerted greater peak force variability than young adults, as quantified by the CV of peak force (34.3 ± 3.5% vs. 24.1 ± 2.3%). The greater peak force error in older adults was associated with changes in the activation of the ADM muscle but not the FDI. Specifically, greater peak force error was associated with greater power from 13-30 Hz and lesser power from 30-60 Hz. These results, therefore, suggest that older adults compared with young adults exhibit impaired endpoint force accuracy during a two

  2. Cardiac mechanoenergetics in silico.

    PubMed

    Vendelin, Marko; Bovendeerd, Peter H M; Saks, Valdur; Engelbrecht, Jüri

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate the link between biochemical intracellular processes and mechanical contraction of the cardiac muscle. First, the regulation of intracellular energy fluxes between mitochondria and myofibrils is studied. It is shown, that the experimentally observed metabolic stability of the cardiac muscle is reproducible by a simple feedback regulation mechanism, i.e., ATP consumption in myofibrils and ATP production in mitochondria are balanced by the changes of the high energy phosphate concentrations. Second, an important property of energy transformation from biochemical form to mechanical work in the cardiac muscle, the linear relationship between the oxygen consumption and the stress-strain area, is replicated by a cross-bridge model. Third, by using the developed cross-bridge model, the correlation between ejection fraction of the left ventricle and heterogeneity of sarcomere strain, developed stress and ATP consumption in the left ventricular wall is established. Fourth, an experimentally observed linear relationship between oxygen consumption and the pressure-volume area can be predicted theoretically from a linear relationship between the oxygen consumption and the stress-strain area. Summing up, it is shown how the macrovariables of a cardiac muscle are interwoven with intracellular physiological processes into a whole. PMID:11880857

  3. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-01-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  4. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-09-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  5. Cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ehsani, A A

    1984-02-01

    Exercise training is a major, and the most important, component of cardiac rehabilitation. Besides providing psychological benefits and promoting a "sense of well being," it elicits a number of adaptations in patients with ischemic heart disease. Among the clinically important adaptations are changes in the trained skeletal muscles and autonomic nervous system, resulting not only in increased maximum exercise capacity but also a slower heart rate and, at times, a lower systolic blood pressure during submaximal exercise. The reduction in the rate pressure product decreases myocardial O2 demand at any given submaximal exercise intensity and may thus alleviate myocardial ischemia and angina in patients with coronary artery disease. These adaptive responses occur even with a relatively modest exercise intensity. Although short-term exercise training of moderate intensity has not been reported to result in improvement in left ventricular performance, recent data suggest that exercise training of higher intensity and longer duration (12 months or longer) than has conventionally been used in cardiac rehabilitation programs may favorably affect the heart. This is characterized by improvements in left ventricular function, diminished electrocardiographic criteria of myocardial ischemia and increased stroke volume during exercise. Modest weight reduction accompanies regularly performed prolonged exercise training. It is important, however, to recognize that high-intensity exercise programs are suitable for only some patients with coronary artery disease who are stable and should be used only under strict medical supervision. PMID:6400004

  6. Cardiac toxicities of antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, H R; Parker, J L; Durrett, L R

    1978-01-01

    Isolated heart muscle preparations are useful in the study of cardiac toxicities of drugs and environmental chemicals: such tissues allow assessment of chemical effects on heart muscle that is free from indirect in vivo influences that can mask or even accentuate cardiac responses measured in the intact animal. In the present study, left atria of guinea pigs were used to demonstrate a direct cardiac depressant effect of greater-than-therapeutic concentrations of several aminoglycoside antibiotics. The toxic effect of these antibiotics seems to be a calcium-dependent event, and may prove useful to characterize contractile responses of the heart. Other antibiotic agents can also depress cardiovascular function, as summarized in this report, but mechanisms of action have not been clearly defined. PMID:720315

  7. Orofacial pain of cardiac origin: Review literature and clinical cases

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Vicente, Laia; Jané-Salas, Enric; Estrugo-Devesa, Albert; Chimenos-Küstner, Eduardo; Roca-Elias, Josep

    2012-01-01

    The most common types of orofacial pain originate at the dental or periodontal level or in the musculoskeletal structures. However, the patient may present pain in this region even though the source is located elsewhere in the body. One possible source of heterotopic pain is of cardiac origin. Objectives: Report two cases of orofacial pain of cardiac origin and review the clinical cases described in the literature. Study Design: Description of clinical cases and review of clinical cases. Results and conclusions: Nine cases of atypical pain of cardiac origin are recorded, which include 5 females and 4 males. In craniofacial structures, pain of cardiac origin is usually bilateral. At the craniofacial level, the most frequent location described is in the throat and jaw. Pain of cardiac origin is considered atypical due to its location, although roughly 10% of the cases of cardiac ischemia manifest primarily in craniofacial structures. Finally, the differential diagnosis of pain of odontogenic origin must be taken into account with pain of non-odontogenic origin (muscle, psychogenic, neuronal, cardiac, sinus and neurovascular pain) in order to avoid diagnostic errors in the dental practice as well as unnecessary treatments. Key words:Orofacial pain, ischemic heart disease, heterotopic pain, odontalgia. PMID:22322488

  8. The effect of moderate-intensity exercise on the expression of HO-1 mRNA and activity of HO in cardiac and vascular smooth muscle of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Cailing; Qi, Jie; Li, Wanwei; Zhang, Jun

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to observe the effects of moderate-intensity training on the activity of heme oxygenase (HO) and expression of HO-1 mRNA in the aorta and the cardiac muscle of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). After 9 weeks of swimming exercise, the activity of HO and expression of HO-1 mRNA in the SHRs were measured. The resting blood pressure in the exercise group was increased by 1.7% (P > 0.05), whereas it was significantly elevated by 10.3% (P < 0.01) in the SHR rats. Compared with animals in the control and sedentary groups, the expression level of HO-1 mRNA of aorta and cardiac muscle in the exercise group was significantly enhanced (P < 0.01). The HO activity and the content of plasma carbon monoxide (CO) in the sedentary group were dramatically decreased (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively) compared with the control group. HO activity and content of plasma CO in the exercise group were significantly higher compared with those in the sedentary group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). The HO/CO metabolic pathway might be involved in the regulation of blood pressure of the SHR models. PMID:26928589

  9. Gender Differences in Non-Ischemic Myocardial Remodeling: Are They Due to Estrogen Modulation of Cardiac Mast Cells and/or Membrane Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase

    PubMed Central

    Janicki, Joseph S.; Spinale, Francis G.; Levick, Scott P.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY This review is focused on gender differences in cardiac remodeling secondary to sustained increases in cardiac volume (VO) and generated pressure (PO). Estrogen has been shown to favorably alter the course of VO-induced remodeling. That is, the VO-induced increased extracellular matrix proteolytic activity and mast cell degranulation responsible for the adverse cardiac remodeling in males and ovariectomized rodents do not occur in intact premenopausal females. While less is known regarding the mechanisms responsible for female cardioprotection in PO-induced stress, gender differences in remodeling have been reported indicating the ability of premenopausal females to adequately compensate. In view of the fact that, in male mice with PO, mast cells have been shown to play a role in the adverse remodeling suggests favorable estrogen modification of mast cell phenotype may also be responsible for cardioprotection in females with PO. Thus, while evidence is accumulating regarding premenopausal females being cardioprotected; there remains the need for in-depth studies to identify critical downstream molecular targets that are under the regulation of estrogen and relevant to cardiac remodeling. Such studies would result in the development of therapy which provides cardioprotection while avoiding the adverse effects of systemic estrogen delivery. PMID:23417570

  10. Cardiac Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Catheterization? Cardiac catheterization (KATH-eh-ter-ih-ZA-shun) is a ... disease. Doctors also can use ultrasound during cardiac catheterization to see blockages in the coronary arteries. Ultrasound ...

  11. An interesting case of cryptogenic stroke in a young man due to left ventricular non-compaction: role of cardiac MRI in the accurate diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Arun; Das, Anindita; Janardhanan, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    A 28-year-old man arrived for an outpatient cardiac MRI (CMR) study to evaluate cardiac structure. At the age of 24 the patient presented with acute onset expressive aphasia and was diagnosed with ischaemic stroke. Echocardiography at that time was reported as ‘apical wall thickening consistent with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy’. CMR revealed a moderately dilated left ventricle with abnormal appearance of the left ventricular (LV) apical segments. Further evaluation was consistent with a diagnosis of LV non­compaction (LVNC) cardiomyopathy with a ratio of non­compacted to compacted myocardium measuring 3. There was extensive delayed hyperenhancement signal involving multiple segments representing a significant myocardial scar which is shown to have a prognostic role. Our patient, with no significant cerebrovascular risk factors, would likely have had an embolic stroke. This case demonstrates the role of CMR in accurately diagnosing LVNC in a patient with young stroke where prior echocardiography was non­diagnostic. PMID:24962593

  12. Cardiac arrest due to intracranial hypotension following pseudohypoxic brain swelling induced by negative suction drainage in a cranioplasty patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyun-Soo; Lee, Soo Kyung; Kim, Su Ryun; Kim, Seon Ju

    2016-06-01

    Pseudohypoxic brain swelling (PHBS) is known to be an uncommon event that may occur during and following an uneventful brain surgery, when negative suction drainage is used. The cerebrospinal fluid loss related to suction drainage can evoke intracranial hypotension that progress to PHBS. The main presentations of PHBS are sudden unexpected circulatory collapses, such as severe bradycardia, hypotension, cardiac arrest, consciousness deterioration and diffuse brain swelling as seen with brain computerized tomography (CT). We present a stuporous 22-year-old patient who underwent cranioplasty under general anesthesia. The entire course of the general anesthesia and operation progressed favorably. However, the time of scalp suture completion, sudden bradycardia and hypotension occurred, followed by cardiac arrest immediately after initiation of subgaleal and epidural suction drainage. After successful resuscitation, the comatose patient was transferred to the neurosurgical intensive care unit and PHBS was confirmed using brain CT. PMID:27274378

  13. Cardiac arrest due to intracranial hypotension following pseudohypoxic brain swelling induced by negative suction drainage in a cranioplasty patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Ryun; Kim, Seon Ju

    2016-01-01

    Pseudohypoxic brain swelling (PHBS) is known to be an uncommon event that may occur during and following an uneventful brain surgery, when negative suction drainage is used. The cerebrospinal fluid loss related to suction drainage can evoke intracranial hypotension that progress to PHBS. The main presentations of PHBS are sudden unexpected circulatory collapses, such as severe bradycardia, hypotension, cardiac arrest, consciousness deterioration and diffuse brain swelling as seen with brain computerized tomography (CT). We present a stuporous 22-year-old patient who underwent cranioplasty under general anesthesia. The entire course of the general anesthesia and operation progressed favorably. However, the time of scalp suture completion, sudden bradycardia and hypotension occurred, followed by cardiac arrest immediately after initiation of subgaleal and epidural suction drainage. After successful resuscitation, the comatose patient was transferred to the neurosurgical intensive care unit and PHBS was confirmed using brain CT. PMID:27274378

  14. Calmodulin 2 Mutation N98S Is Associated with Unexplained Cardiac Arrest in Infants Due to Low Clinical Penetrance Electrical Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Jáimez, Juan; Palomino Doza, Julián; Ortega, Ángeles; Macías-Ruiz, Rosa; Perin, Francesca; Rodríguez-Vázquez del Rey, M. Mar; Ortiz-Genga, Martín; Monserrat, Lorenzo; Barriales-Villa, Roberto; Blanca, Enrique; Álvarez, Miguel; Tercedor, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background Calmodulin 1, 2 and 3 (CALM) mutations have been found to cause cardiac arrest in children at a very early age. The underlying aetiology described is long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) and idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (IVF). Little phenotypical data about CALM2 mutations is available. Objectives The aim of this paper is to describe the clinical manifestations of the Asn98Ser mutation in CALM2 in two unrelated children in southern Spain with apparently unexplained cardiac arrest/death. Methods Two unrelated children aged 4 and 7, who were born to healthy parents, were studied. Both presented with sudden cardiac arrest. The first was resuscitated after a VF episode, and the second died suddenly. In both cases the baseline QTc interval was within normal limits. Peripheral blood DNA was available to perform targeted gene sequencing. Results The surviving 4-year-old girl had a positive epinephrine test for LQTS, and polymorphic ventricular ectopic beats were seen on a previous 24-hour Holter recording from the deceased 7-year-old boy, suggestive of a possible underlying CPVT phenotype. A p.Asn98Ser mutation in CALM2 was detected in both cases. This affected a highly conserved across species residue, and the location in the protein was adjacent to critical calcium binding loops in the calmodulin carboxyl-terminal domain, predicting a high pathogenic effect. Conclusions Human calmodulin 2 mutation p.Asn98Ser is associated with sudden cardiac death in childhood with a variable clinical penetrance. Our results provide new phenotypical information about clinical behaviour of this mutation. PMID:27100291

  15. Cardiac mechanics: Physiological, clinical, and mathematical considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirsky, I. (Editor); Ghista, D. N.; Sandler, H.

    1974-01-01

    Recent studies concerning the basic physiological and biochemical principles underlying cardiac muscle contraction, methods for the assessment of cardiac function in the clinical situation, and mathematical approaches to cardiac mechanics are presented. Some of the topics covered include: cardiac ultrastructure and function in the normal and failing heart, myocardial energetics, clinical applications of angiocardiography, use of echocardiography for evaluating cardiac performance, systolic time intervals in the noninvasive assessment of left ventricular performance in man, evaluation of passive elastic stiffness for the left ventricle and isolated heart muscle, a conceptual model of myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock, application of Huxley's sliding-filament theory to the mechanics of normal and hypertrophied cardiac muscle, and a rheological modeling of the intact left ventricle. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  16. Relationship between deoxyribonucleic acid content and nucleoli in human heart muscle cells and estimation of cell number during cardiac growth and hyperfunction.

    PubMed

    Adler, C P

    1975-01-01

    In the myocardium of 30 human hearts of all age groups quantitative deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) measurements were performed and the results of the measurements were correlated with the pure myocardium weight. By means of the diphenylamine reaction the total amount of DNA (DNA concentration and DNA amount) in the myocardium was estimated. By means of Feulgen cytophotometry the DNA amount exclusively in the heart muscle cell nuclei was measured. With the use of myocardial tissue spread on slides, the nuclear areas of the heart muscle nuclei were planimetrically measured. After preparation with DNase and staining with gallocyanine chromalumn the nucleoli in heart muscle nuclei were specifically presented and their number per nucleus as well as their area values were demonstrated. From the biochemical and cytophotometric results of the myocardial DNA content it was possible to estimate the absolute cell number of the hearts, keeping the pure myocardium weight in consideration. The investigations led to the following results. In growing childrens' hearts the DNA concentration decreases to a constant level of 0.3-0.4 mg/g. The amount of DNA rises with increasing heart weight. During the growth of the heart of a child between the ages of 8 and 12 the DNA amount doubles in the heart muscle nuclei, and most of the muscle nuclei of an adult have a tetraploid DNA content. In pathological heart hypertrophy a further polyploidization of the heart muscle nuclei occurs. The areas of the nuclei increases with growing polyploidization. The nuclear areas form the same grouping as the ploidy classes. With growing nuclear areas, the total areas of the nucleoli and their number per nucleus also increase. Right after birth an increase in the number of connective tissue and heart muscle cells follows. A normal heart contains about 2 x 10(9) muscle cells. In hypertrophic hearts the number of muscle cells can double. PMID:129834

  17. Cardiomyocyte-specific perilipin 5 overexpression leads to myocardial steatosis and modest cardiac dysfunction1[S

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Sreenivasan, Urmila; Gong, Da-Wei; O'Connell, Kelly A.; Dabkowski, Erinne R.; Hecker, Peter A.; Ionica, Nicoleta; Konig, Manige; Mahurkar, Anup; Sun, Yezhou; Stanley, William C.; Sztalryd, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Presence of ectopic lipid droplets (LDs) in cardiac muscle is associated to lipotoxicity and tissue dysfunction. However, presence of LDs in heart is also observed in physiological conditions, such as when cellular energy needs and energy production from mitochondria fatty acid β-oxidation are high (fasting). This suggests that development of tissue lipotoxicity and dysfunction is not simply due to the presence of LDs in cardiac muscle but due at least in part to alterations in LD function. To examine the function of cardiac LDs, we obtained transgenic mice with heart-specific perilipin 5 (Plin5) overexpression (MHC-Plin5), a member of the perilipin protein family. Hearts from MHC-Plin5 mice expressed at least 4-fold higher levels of plin5 and exhibited a 3.5-fold increase in triglyceride content versus nontransgenic littermates. Chronic cardiac excess of LDs was found to result in mild heart dysfunction with decreased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α target genes, decreased mitochondria function, and left ventricular concentric hypertrophia. Lack of more severe heart function complications may have been prevented by a strong increased expression of oxidative-induced genes via NF-E2-related factor 2 antioxidative pathway. Perilipin 5 regulates the formation and stabilization of cardiac LDs, and it promotes cardiac steatosis without major heart function impairment. PMID:23345411

  18. Green tea polyphenols improve cardiac muscle mRNA, and protein levels of signal pathways related to insulin and lipid metabolism and inflammation in insulin-resistant rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that the consumption of green tea polyphenols (GTP) may reduce the risk of coronary artery disease. To explore the underlying mechanisms of action at the molecular level, we examined the effects of GTP on cardiac mRNA and protein levels of genes involved in insulin an...

  19. Fibulin-4 deficiency increases TGF-β signalling in aortic smooth muscle cells due to elevated TGF-β2 levels

    PubMed Central

    Ramnath, N. W. M.; Hawinkels, L. J. A. C.; van Heijningen, P. M.; Riet, L. te; Paauwe, M.; Vermeij, M.; Danser, A. H. J.; Kanaar, R.; ten Dijke, P.; Essers, J.

    2015-01-01

    Fibulins are extracellular matrix proteins associated with elastic fibres. Homozygous Fibulin-4 mutations lead to life-threatening abnormalities such as aortic aneurysms. Aortic aneurysms in Fibulin-4 mutant mice were associated with upregulation of TGF-β signalling. How Fibulin-4 deficiency leads to deregulation of the TGF-β pathway is largely unknown. Isolated aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from Fibulin-4 deficient mice showed reduced growth, which could be reversed by treatment with TGF-β neutralizing antibodies. In Fibulin-4 deficient SMCs increased TGF-β signalling was detected using a transcriptional reporter assay and by increased SMAD2 phosphorylation. Next, we investigated if the increased activity was due to increased levels of the three TGF-β isoforms. These data revealed slightly increased TGF-β1 and markedly increased TGF-β2 levels. Significantly increased TGF-β2 levels were also detectable in plasma from homozygous Fibulin-4R/R mice, not in wild type mice. TGF-β2 levels were reduced after losartan treatment, an angiotensin-II type-1 receptor blocker, known to prevent aortic aneurysm formation. In conclusion, we have shown increased TGF-β signalling in isolated SMCs from Fibulin-4 deficient mouse aortas, not only caused by increased levels of TGF-β1, but especially TGF-β2. These data provide new insights in the molecular interaction between Fibulin-4 and TGF-β pathway regulation in the pathogenesis of aortic aneurysms. PMID:26607280

  20. Changes in upper-extremity muscle activities due to head position in subjects with a forward head posture and rounded shoulders

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jung Won; Son, Sung Min; Lee, Na Kyung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated upper-extremity muscle activities in natural, ideal, and corrected head positions. [Subjects and Methods] Forty subjects with a forward head posture and rounded shoulder were recruited and randomly assigned to the natural head position group (n = 13), ideal head position group (n = 14), or corrected head position group (n = 13). Muscle activities were measured using a four-channel surface electromyography system at the sternocleidomastoideus, upper and lower trapezius, and serratus anterior muscles on the right side during an overhead reaching task. [Results] The muscle activities of the upper trapezius and serratus anterior differed significantly among head positions. Post hoc tests revealed significant differences between natural and ideal head positions, and natural and ideal head positions for both the upper trapezius and serratus anterior. [Conclusion] Recovery of normal upper trapezius and serratus anterior muscle functions plays an important role in correcting forward head posture and rounded shoulders. PMID:26180310

  1. Paracrine Effects of IGF-1 Overexpression on the Functional Decline Due to Skeletal Muscle Disuse: Molecular and Functional Evaluation in Hindlimb Unloaded MLC/mIgf-1 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cannone, Maria; Liantonio, Antonella; De Bellis, Michela; Digennaro, Claudio; Gramegna, Gianluca; De Luca, Annamaria; Germinario, Elena; Danieli-Betto, Daniela; Betto, Romeo; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; Rizzuto, Emanuele; Musarò, Antonio; Desaphy, Jean-François; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2013-01-01

    Slow-twitch muscles, devoted to postural maintenance, experience atrophy and weakness during muscle disuse due to bed-rest, aging or spaceflight. These conditions impair motion activities and can have survival implications. Human and animal studies demonstrate the anabolic role of IGF-1 on skeletal muscle suggesting its interest as a muscle disuse countermeasure. Thus, we tested the role of IGF-1 overexpression on skeletal muscle alteration due to hindlimb unloading (HU) by using MLC/mIgf-1 transgenic mice expressing IGF-1 under the transcriptional control of MLC promoter, selectively activated in skeletal muscle. HU produced atrophy in soleus muscle, in terms of muscle weight and fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) reduction, and up-regulation of atrophy gene MuRF1. In parallel, the disuse-induced slow-to-fast fiber transition was confirmed by an increase of the fast-type of the Myosin Heavy Chain (MHC), a decrease of PGC-1α expression and an increase of histone deacetylase-5 (HDAC5). Consistently, functional parameters such as the resting chloride conductance (gCl) together with ClC-1 chloride channel expression were increased and the contractile parameters were modified in soleus muscle of HU mice. Surprisingly, IGF-1 overexpression in HU mice was unable to counteract the loss of muscle weight and the decrease of fiber CSA. However, the expression of MuRF1 was recovered, suggesting early effects on muscle atrophy. Although the expression of PGC-1α and MHC were not improved in IGF-1-HU mice, the expression of HDAC5 was recovered. Importantly, the HU-induced increase of gCl was fully contrasted in IGF-1 transgenic mice, as well as the changes in contractile parameters. These results indicate that, even if local expression does not seem to attenuate HU-induced atrophy and slow-to-fast phenotype transition, it exerts early molecular effects on gene expression which can counteract the HU-induced modification of electrical and contractile properties. MuRF1 and HDAC5

  2. Cardiac myofilaments: mechanics and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Tombe, Pieter P.; Bers, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the cardiac myofilament are an important determinant of pump function of the heart. This report is focused on the regulation of myofilament function in cardiac muscle. Calcium ions form the trigger that induces activation of the thin filament which, in turn, allows for cross-bridge formation, ATP hydrolysis, and force development. The structure and protein-protein interactions of the cardiac sarcomere that are responsible for these processes will be reviewed. The molecular mechanism that underlies myofilament activation is incompletely understood. Recent experimental approaches have been employed to unravel the mechanism and regulation of myofilament mechanics and energetics by activator calcium and sarcomere length, as well as contractile protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinase A. Central to these studies is the question whether such factors impact on muscle function simply by altering thin filament activation state, or whether modulation of cross-bridge cycling also plays a part in the responses of muscle to these stimuli.

  3. Cardiac Hegemony of Senescence.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Sailay; Sussman, Mark A

    2013-12-01

    Cardiac senescence and age-related disease development have gained general attention and recognition in the past decades due to increased accessibility and quality of health care. The advancement in global civilization is complementary to concerns regarding population aging and development of chronic degenerative diseases. Cardiac degeneration has been rigorously studied. The molecular mechanisms of cardiac senescence are on multiple cellular levels and hold a multilayer complexity level, thereby hampering development of unambiguous treatment protocols. In particular, the synergistic exchange of the senescence phenotype through a senescence secretome between myocytes and stem cells appears complicated and is of great future therapeutic value. The current review article will highlight hallmarks of senescence, cardiac myocyte and stem cell senescence, and the mutual exchange of senescent secretome. Future cardiac cell therapy approaches require a comprehensive understanding of myocardial senescence to improve therapeutic efficiency as well as efficacy. PMID:24349878

  4. Cardiac Hegemony of Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, Sailay; Sussman, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac senescence and age-related disease development have gained general attention and recognition in the past decades due to increased accessibility and quality of health care. The advancement in global civilization is complementary to concerns regarding population aging and development of chronic degenerative diseases. Cardiac degeneration has been rigorously studied. The molecular mechanisms of cardiac senescence are on multiple cellular levels and hold a multilayer complexity level, thereby hampering development of unambiguous treatment protocols. In particular, the synergistic exchange of the senescence phenotype through a senescence secretome between myocytes and stem cells appears complicated and is of great future therapeutic value. The current review article will highlight hallmarks of senescence, cardiac myocyte and stem cell senescence, and the mutual exchange of senescent secretome. Future cardiac cell therapy approaches require a comprehensive understanding of myocardial senescence to improve therapeutic efficiency as well as efficacy. PMID:24349878

  5. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Your Muscles KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Muscles Print A A ... and skeletal (say: SKEL-uh-tul) muscle. Smooth Muscles Smooth muscles — sometimes also called involuntary muscles — are ...

  6. Cardiac Imaging In Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Asaad A.; Safi, Lucy; Wood, Malissa

    2016-01-01

    Athletic heart syndrome refers to the physiological and morphological changes that occur in a human heart after repetitive strenuous physical exercise. Examples of exercise-induced changes in the heart include increases in heart cavity dimensions, augmentation of cardiac output, and increases in heart muscle mass. These cardiac adaptations vary based on the type of exercise performed and are often referred to as sport-specific cardiac remodeling. The hemodynamic effects of endurance and strength training exercise lead to these adaptations. Any abnormalities in chamber dilatation and left ventricular function usually normalize with cessation of exercise. Athletic heart syndrome is rare and should be differentiated from pathologic conditions such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia when assessing a patient for athletic heart syndrome. This paper describes specific adaptations that occur in athletic heart syndrome and tools to distinguish between healthy alterations versus underlying pathology. PMID:27486490

  7. Enteral leucine supplementation increases protein synthesis in skeletal and cardiac muscles and visceral tissues of neonatal pigs through mTORC1-dependent pathways

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leucine activates mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) to upregulate protein synthesis (PS). To examine enteral Leu effects on PS and signaling activation, 5-d-old piglets were fed for 24 h diets containing: (i) LP, (ii) LP+L, or (iii) HP. PS in skeletal muscles, heart, liver, pancreas, and jejunum...

  8. Contractures and muscle disease.

    PubMed

    Walters, R Jon

    2016-08-01

    Contractures are one of a handful of signs in muscle disease, besides weakness and its distribution, whose presence can help guide us diagnostically, a welcome star on the horizon. Contractures are associated with several myopathies, some with important cardiac manifestations, and consequently are important to recognise; their presence may also provide us with a potential satisfying 'penny dropping' diagnostic moment. PMID:26867558

  9. Reduced Cardiac Contractile Force Due to Sympathovagal Dysfunction Mediates the Additive Hypotensive Effects of Limited-Access Regimens of Ethanol and Clonidine in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M.

    2010-01-01

    Our previous attempts to investigate the long-term hemodynamic interaction between ethanol and clonidine in telemetered spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) were hampered by the lack of a sustained hypotensive response to continuous clonidine exposure. This limitation was circumvented when we adopted a limited-access clonidine (8:30 AM–4:30 PM) paradigm in a recent study. The latter paradigm was employed here to evaluate the ethanol-clonidine interaction and possible roles of myocardial function and autonomic control in this interaction. Changes in blood pressure (BP), heart rate, maximum rate of rise in BP wave (+dP/dtmax), and spectral cardiovascular autonomic profiles were measured by radiotelemetry in pair-fed SHRs receiving clonidine (150 μg/kg/day), ethanol [2.5% (w/v)], or their combination during the day for 12 weeks. Ethanol or clonidine elicited long-term decreases in BP, and their combination caused additive hypotensive response. Significant reductions in +dP/dtmax were observed upon concurrent treatment with ethanol and clonidine, in contrast to no effect for individual treatment. In addition, the combined treatment increased the high-frequency (HF) spectral band of interbeat interval (IBI-HFnu, 0.75–3 Hz) and decreased low-frequency (IBI-LFnu, 0.2–0.75 Hz) bands and IBILF/HF ratios. Clonidine-evoked reductions in plasma and urine norepinephrine and BP-LF spectral power (measure of vasomotor sympathetic tone) were not affected by ethanol. In conclusion, concurrent treatment with ethanol and clonidine shifts the sympathovagal balance toward parasympathetic dominance and elicits exaggerated hypotension as a result of a reduction in cardiac contractile force. PMID:20864507

  10. Risk factors influencing bruising and high muscle pH in Colombian cattle carcasses due to transport and pre-slaughter operations.

    PubMed

    Romero, M H; Uribe-Velásquez, L F; Sánchez, J A; Miranda-de la Lama, G C

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was investigate risk factors as possible causes for bruising and high muscle pH under commercial operating conditions in Colombia. Data was recorded for 86 journeys referring to 1179 animals. Carcasses were analyzed in terms of muscle pH and bruises (site, size, severity and shape). Our results indicate that truck load density, stops during transportation of cattle and the lairage time at the plant increased the risk of bruises appearing on carcasses. A lairage time of 18 to 24h at the plant increased the prevalence of bruises 2.1 times compared to lairage periods of between 12 and 18 h. Furthermore, intermittent stops during transit are a risk factor for the increase in the incidence of bruises. However, the transport time (up to 4h) was not related to the presence of bruises and high muscle pH. Finally, steers were found to have less risk of presenting a high muscle pH. PMID:23747620

  11. Effect of tighter glycemic control on cardiac function, exercise capacity, and muscle strength in heart failure patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Roni; Wiggers, Henrik; Thomsen, Henrik Holm; Bovin, Ann; Refsgaard, Jens; Abrahamsen, Jan; Møller, Niels; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Nørrelund, Helene

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and heart failure (HF), the optimal glycemic target is uncertain, and evidence-based data are lacking. Therefore, we performed a randomized study on the effect of optimized glycemic control on left ventricular function, exercise capacity, muscle strength, and body composition. Design and methods 40 patients with T2D and HF (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 35±12% and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) 8.4±0.7% (68±0.8 mmol/mol)) were randomized to either 4-month optimization (OPT group) or non-optimization (non-OPT group) of glycemic control. Patients underwent dobutamine stress echocardiography, cardiopulmonary exercise test, 6 min hall-walk test (6-MWT), muscle strength examination, and dual X-ray absorptiometry scanning at baseline and at follow-up. Results 39 patients completed the study. HbA1c decreased in the OPT versus the non-OPT group (8.4±0.8% (68±9 mmol/mol) to 7.6±0.7% (60±7 mmol/mol) vs 8.3±0.7% (67±10 mmol/mol) to 8.4±1.0% (68±11 mmol/mol); p<0.001). There was no difference between the groups with respect to changes in myocardial contractile reserve (LVEF (p=0.18)), oxygen consumption (p=0.55), exercise capacity (p=0.12), and 6-MWT (p=0.84). Muscle strength decreased in the non-OPT compared with the OPT group (37.2±8.1 to 34.8±8.3 kg vs 34.9±10.2 to 35.4±10.7 kg; p=0.01), in line with a non-significant decrease in lean (p=0.07) and fat (p=0.07) tissue mass in the non-OPT group. Hypoglycemia and fluid retention did not differ between groups. Conclusions 4 months of optimization of glycemic control was associated with preserved muscle strength and lean body mass in patients with T2D and HF compared with lenient control, and had no deleterious effect on left ventricular contractile function and seemed to be safe. Trial registration number NCT01213784; pre-results. PMID:27158520

  12. Protective effects of Labisia pumila var. alata on biochemical and histopathological alterations of cardiac muscle cells in isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction rats.

    PubMed

    Dianita, Roza; Jantan, Ibrahim; Amran, Athirah Z; Jalil, Juriyati

    2015-01-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the cardioprotective effects of the standardized aqueous and 80% ethanol extracts of Labisia pumila var. alata (LPva) in isoproterenol (ISO)-induced myocardial infarction (MI) in rats. The extracts were administered to Wistar rats orally for 28 days with three doses (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg of body weight) prior to ISO (85 mg/kg)-induced MI in two doses on day 29 and 30. The sera and hearts were collected for biochemical and histopathological analysis after the rats were sacrificed 48 h after the first induction. The main components of the extracts, gallic acid, alkylresorcinols and flavonoids were identified and quantitatively analyzed in the extracts by using a validated reversed phase HPLC method. The extracts showed significant protective effects as pretreated rats showed a significant dose-dependent decrease (p < 0.05) in cardiac enzyme activities, i.e., cardiac troponin I (cTnI), creatine kinase MB isoenzyme (CK-MB), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST), when compared with ISO-control rats. There were significant rises (p < 0.05) in the activity of oxidase enzymes, i.e., glutathione peroxide (GPx), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) of the pretreated rats, when compared with ISO-control group. Histopathological examination showed an improvement in membrane cell integrity in pre-treated rats compared to untreated rats. The major components of LPva extracts can be used as their biomarkers and contributed to the cardioprotective effects against ISO-induced MI rats. PMID:25786162

  13. Use of flow, electrical, and mechanical stimulation to promote engineering of striated muscles

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, Swathi; Madden, Lauran; Bursac, Nenad

    2014-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering involves design of high-fidelity tissue substitutes for predictive experimental assays in vitro and cell-based regenerative therapies in vivo. Design of striated muscle tissues, such as cardiac and skeletal muscle, has been particularly challenging due to a high metabolic demand and complex cellular organization and electromechanical function of the native tissues. Successful engineering of highly functional striated muscles may thus require creation of biomimetic culture conditions involving medium perfusion, electrical and mechanical stimulation. When optimized, these external cues are expected to synergistically and dynamically activate important intracellular signaling pathways leading to accelerated muscle growth and development. This review will discuss the use of different types of tissue culture bioreactors aimed at providing conditions for enhanced structural and functional maturation of engineered striated muscles. PMID:24366526

  14. Effects of tension and stiffness due to reduced pH in mammalian fast- and slow-twitch skinned skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, J M; Moss, R L

    1990-01-01

    1. The pH dependence of the Ca2+ sensitivities of isometric tension and stiffness was investigated at 10 and 15 degrees C in skinned single fibres from rat and rabbit fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles. Stiffness was determined by recording the tension responses to sinusoidal length changes (3.3 kHz); peak-to-peak amplitude of the length change was monitored by laser diffraction and averaged approximately 1.3 nm (half-sarcomere)-1. We have assumed that stiffness provides a measure of the number of cross-bridge attachments to actin. 2. At maximal Ca2+ activation, stiffness was depressed by 22 +/- 2% (mean +/- S.E.M.) in fast-twitch fibres but was unchanged in slow-twitch fibres when pH was lowered from 7.00 to 6.20. As reported previously, maximum tension was depressed by 20-45% at low pH, with the effect being greater in fast-twitch compared to slow-twitch fibres. 3. In fast-twitch fibres at 10 and 15 degrees C the Ca2+ concentrations for half-maximal activation of tension and stiffness were increased at low pH. In slow-twitch fibres, similar effects were observed at 15 degrees C, but at 10 degrees C there were no changes in the Ca2+ sensitivities of tension and stiffness when pH was lowered. 4. Linear relationships between relative tension and relative stiffness were obtained at all temperatures, with slopes of 1.04 +/- 0.01 at pH 7.00 and 0.76 +/- 0.01 at pH 6.20 in fast- and slow-twitch fibres, indicating that force per cross-bridge attachment is similarly reduced at low pH in both types of fibres. 5. In both fast- and slow-twitch fibres, rigor tension (no added ATP or creatine phosphate; pCa 9.0) was depressed by 35 +/- 7% and stiffness by 12 +/- 4% when pH was reduced from 7.00 to 6.20. Since cross-bridge cycling is inhibited in rigor the effect of low pH to depress rigor tension suggests that pH directly modulates the strength of the bond formed between actin and myosin. 6. The effect of low pH to reduce the apparent number of cross-bridge attachments

  15. Characterization of human cardiac myosin heavy chain genes

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi-Takihara, K.; Sole, M.J.; Liew, J.; Ing, D.; Liew, C.C. )

    1989-05-01

    The authors have isolated and analyzed the structure of the genes coding for the {alpha} and {beta} forms of the human cardiac myosin heavy chain (MYHC). Detailed analysis of four overlapping MYHC genomic clones shows that the {alpha}-MYHC and {beta}-MYHC genes constitute a total length of 51 kilobases and are tandemly linked. The {beta}-MYHC-encoding gene, predominantly expressed in the normal human ventricle and also in slow-twitch skeletal muscle, is located 4.5 kilobases upstream of the {alpha}-MYHC-encoding gene, which is predominantly expressed in normal human atrium. The authors have determined the nucleotide sequences of the {beta} form of the MYHC gene, which is 100% homologous to the cardiac MYHC cDNA clone (pHMC3). It is unlikely that the divergence of a few nucleotide sequences from the cardiac {beta}-MYHC cDNA clone (pHMC3) reported in a MYHC cDNA clone (PSMHCZ) from skeletal muscle is due to a splicing mechanism. This finding suggests that the same {beta} form of the cardiac MYHC gene is expressed in both ventricular and slow-twitch skeletal muscle. The promoter regions of both {alpha}- and {beta}-MYHC genes, as well as the first four coding regions in the respective genes, have also been sequenced. The sequences in the 5{prime}-flanking region of the {alpha}- and {beta}-MYHC-encoding genes diverge extensively from one another, suggesting that expression of the {alpha}- and {beta}-MYHC genes is independently regulated.

  16. Cardiac cell proliferation assessed by EdU, a novel analysis of cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Bin; Tong, Suiyang; Ren, Xiaofeng; Xia, Hao

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that mammalian hearts maintain the capacity for cardiac regeneration. Rapid and sensitive identification of cardiac cellular proliferation is prerequisite for understanding the underlying mechanisms and strategies of cardiac regeneration. The following immunologically related markers of cardiac cells were analyzed: cardiac transcription factors Nkx2.5 and Gata 4; specific marker of cardiomyocytes TnT; endothelial cell marker CD31; vascular smooth muscle marker smooth muscle myosin IgG; cardiac resident stem cells markers IsL1, Tbx18, and Wt1. Markers were co-localized in cardiac tissues of embryonic, neonatal, adult, and pathological samples by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) staining. EdU was also used to label isolated neonatal cardiomyocytes in vitro. EdU robustly labeled proliferating cells in vitro and in vivo, co-immunostaining with different cardiac cells markers. EdU can rapidly and sensitively label proliferating cardiac cells in developmental and pathological states. Cardiac cell proliferation assessed by EdU is a novel analytical tool for investigating the mechanism and strategies of cardiac regeneration in response to injury. PMID:25480318

  17. Mechanical analysis of Drosophila indirect flight and jump muscles

    PubMed Central

    Swank, Douglas M.

    2011-01-01

    The genetic advantages of Drosophila make it a very appealing choice for investigating muscle development, muscle physiology and muscle protein structure and function. To take full advantage of this model organism, it has been vital to develop isolated Drosophila muscle preparations that can be mechanically evaluated. We describe techniques to isolate, prepare and mechanically analyze skinned muscle fibers from two Drosophila muscle types, the indirect flight muscle and the jump muscle. The function of the indirect flight muscle is similar to vertebrate cardiac muscle, to generate power in an oscillatory manner. The indirect flight muscle is ideal for evaluating the influence of protein mutations on muscle and cross-bridge stiffness, oscillatory power, and deriving cross-bridge rate constants. Jump muscle physiology and structure are more similar to skeletal vertebrate muscle than indirect flight muscle, and it is ideal for measuring maximum shortening velocity, force-velocity characteristics and steady-state power generation. PMID:22079350

  18. Mechanical analysis of Drosophila indirect flight and jump muscles.

    PubMed

    Swank, Douglas M

    2012-01-01

    The genetic advantages of Drosophila make it a very appealing choice for investigating muscle development, muscle physiology and muscle protein structure and function. To take full advantage of this model organism, it has been vital to develop isolated Drosophila muscle preparations that can be mechanically evaluated. We describe techniques to isolate, prepare and mechanically analyze skinned muscle fibers from two Drosophila muscle types, the indirect flight muscle and the jump muscle. The function of the indirect flight muscle is similar to vertebrate cardiac muscle, to generate power in an oscillatory manner. The indirect flight muscle is ideal for evaluating the influence of protein mutations on muscle and cross-bridge stiffness, oscillatory power, and deriving cross-bridge rate constants. Jump muscle physiology and structure are more similar to skeletal vertebrate muscle than indirect flight muscle, and it is ideal for measuring maximum shortening velocity, force-velocity characteristics and steady-state power generation. PMID:22079350

  19. Depletion of lamina-associated polypeptide 1 from cardiomyocytes causes cardiac dysfunction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ji-Yeon; Le Dour, Caroline; Sera, Fusako; Iwata, Shinichi; Homma, Shunichi; Joseph, Leroy C; Morrow, John P; Dauer, William T; Worman, Howard J

    2014-01-01

    We previously showed that striated muscle-selective depletion of lamina-associated polypeptide 1 (LAP1), an integral inner nuclear membrane protein, leads to profound muscular dystrophy with premature death in mice. As LAP1 is also depleted in hearts of these mice, we examined their cardiac phenotype. Striated muscle-selective LAP1 knockout mice display ventricular systolic dysfunction with abnormal induction of genes encoding cardiomyopathy related proteins. To eliminate possible confounding effects due to skeletal muscle pathology, we generated a new mouse line in which LAP1 is deleted in a cardiomyocyte-selective manner. These mice had no skeletal muscle pathology and appeared overtly normal at 20 weeks of age. However, cardiac echocardiography revealed that they developed left ventricular systolic dysfunction and cardiac gene expression analysis revealed abnormal induction of cardiomyopathy-related genes. Our results demonstrate that LAP1 expression in cardiomyocytes is required for normal left ventricular function, consistent with a report of cardiomyopathy in a human subject with mutation in the gene encoding LAP1. PMID:24859316

  20. Muscle disease.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Chang-Yong

    2014-02-01

    On the basis of strong research evidence, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common severe childhood form of muscular dystrophy, is an X-linked recessive disorder caused by out-of-frame mutations of the dystrophin gene. Thus, it is classified asa dystrophinopathy. The disease onset is before age 5 years. Patients with DMD present with progressive symmetrical limb-girdle muscle weakness and become wheelchair dependent after age 12 years. (2)(3). On the basis of some research evidence,cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure are usually seen in the late teens in patients with DMD. Progressive scoliosis and respiratory in sufficiency often develop once wheelchair dependency occurs. Respiratory failure and cardiomyopathy are common causes of death, and few survive beyond the third decade of life. (2)(3)(4)(5)(6)(7). On the basis of some research evidence, prednisone at 0.75 mg/kg daily (maximum dose, 40 mg/d) or deflazacort at 0.9 mg/kg daily (maximum dose, 39 mg/d), a derivative of prednisolone (not available in the United States), as a single morning dose is recommended for DMD patients older than 5 years, which may prolong independent walking from a few months to 2 years. (2)(3)(16)(17). Based on some research evidence, treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, b-blockers, and diuretics has been reported to be beneficial in DMD patients with cardiac abnormalities. (2)(3)(5)(18). Based on expert opinion, children with muscle weakness and increased serum creatine kinase levels may be associated with either genetic or acquired muscle disorders (Tables 1 and 3). (14)(15) PMID:24488829

  1. Cardiac metastases

    PubMed Central

    Bussani, R; De‐Giorgio, F; Abbate, A; Silvestri, F

    2007-01-01

    Tumours metastatic to the heart (cardiac metastases) are among the least known and highly debated issues in oncology, and few systematic studies are devoted to this topic. Although primary cardiac tumours are extremely uncommon (various postmortem studies report rates between 0.001% and 0.28%), secondary tumours are not, and at least in theory, the heart can be metastasised by any malignant neoplasm able to spread to distant sites. In general, cardiac metastases are considered to be rare; however, when sought for, the incidence seems to be not as low as expected, ranging from 2.3% and 18.3%. Although no malignant tumours are known that diffuse preferentially to the heart, some do involve the heart more often than others—for example, melanoma and mediastinal primary tumours. This paper attempts to review the pathophysiology of cardiac metastatic disease, epidemiology and clinical presentation of cardiac metastases, and pathological characterisation of the lesions. PMID:17098886

  2. Exercise training reduces insulin resistance and upregulates the mTOR/p70S6k pathway in cardiac muscle of diet-induced obesity rats.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Cleber; Frederico, Marisa J; da Luz, Gabrielle; Pauli, José R; Silva, Adelino S R; Pinho, Ricardo A; Velloso, Lício A; Ropelle, Eduardo R; De Souza, Cláudio T

    2011-03-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are rapidly expanding public health problems. These disturbances are related to many diseases, including heart pathology. Acting through the Akt/mTOR pathway, insulin has numerous and important physiological functions, such as the induction of growth and survival of many cell types and cardiac hypertrophy. However, obesity and insulin resistance can alter mTOR/p70S6k. Exercise training is known to induce this pathway, but never in the heart of diet-induced obesity subjects. To evaluate the effect of exercise training on mTOR/p70S6k in the heart of obese Wistar rats, we analyzed the effects of 12 weeks of swimming on obese rats, induced by a high-fat diet. Exercise training reduced epididymal fat, fasting serum insulin and plasma glucose disappearance. Western blot analyses showed that exercise training increased the ability of insulin to phosphorylate intracellular molecules such as Akt (2.3-fold) and Foxo1 (1.7-fold). Moreover, reduced activities and expressions of proteins, induced by the high-fat diet in rats, such as phospho-JNK (1.9-fold), NF-kB (1.6-fold) and PTP-1B (1.5-fold), were observed. Finally, exercise training increased the activities of the transduction pathways of insulin-dependent protein synthesis, as shown by increases in Raptor phosphorylation (1.7-fold), p70S6k phosphorylation (1.9-fold), and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation (1.4-fold) and a reduction in atrogin-1 expression (2.1-fold). Results demonstrate a pivotal regulatory role of exercise training on the Akt/mTOR pathway, in turn, promoting protein synthesis and antagonizing protein degradation. PMID:20717955

  3. Non-Ischemic Perfusion Defects due to Delayed Arrival of Contrast Material on Stress Perfusion Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeo Koon; Park, Sang Joon; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung

    2014-01-01

    Herein we report about the adenosine stress perfusion MR imaging findings of a 50-year-old man who exhibited two different perfusion defects resulting from two different mechanisms after a coronary artery bypass surgery. An invasive coronary angiography confirmed that one perfusion defect at the mid-anterior wall resulted from an ischemia due to graft stenosis. However, no stenosis was detected on the graft responsible for the mid-inferior wall showing the other perfusion defect. It was assumed that the perfusion defect at the mid-inferior wall resulted from delayed perfusion owing to the long pathway of the bypass graft. The semiquantitative analysis of corrected signal-time curves supported our speculation, demonstrating that the rest-to-stress ratio index of the maximal slope of the myocardial territory in question was similar to those of normal myocardium, whereas that of myocardium with the stenotic graft showed a typical ischemic pattern. A delayed perfusion during long graft pathway in a post-bypass graft patient can mimick a true perfusion defect on myocardial stress MR imaging. Radiologists should be aware of this knowledge to avoid misinterpretation of graft and myocardial status in post bypass surgery patients. PMID:24644408

  4. Bepridil facilitates early termination of spiral-wave reentry in two-dimensional cardiac muscle through an increase of intercellular electrical coupling.

    PubMed

    Takanari, Hiroki; Honjo, Haruo; Takemoto, Yoshio; Suzuki, Tomoyuki; Kato, Sara; Harada, Masahide; Okuno, Yusuke; Ashihara, Takashi; Opthof, Tobias; Sakuma, Ichiro; Kamiya, Kaichiro; Kodama, Itsuo

    2011-01-01

    Bepridil is effective for conversion of atrial fibrillation to sinus rhythm and in the treatment of drug-refractory ventricular tachyarrhythmias. We investigated the effects of bepridil on electrophysiological properties and spiral-wave (SW) reentry in a 2-dimensional ventricular muscle layer of isolated rabbit hearts by optical mapping. Ventricular tachycardia (VT) induced in the presence of bepridil (1 µM) terminated earlier than in the control. Bepridil increased action potential duration (APD) by 5% - 8% under constant pacing and significantly increased the space constant. There was a linear relationship between the wavefront curvature (κ) and local conduction velocity: LCV = LCV₀ - D·κ (D, diffusion coefficient; LCV₀, LCV at κ = 0). Bepridil significantly increased D and LCV₀. The regression lines with and without bepridil crossed at κ = 20 - 40 cm⁻¹, resulting in a paradoxical decrease of LCV at κ > 40 cm⁻¹. Dye transfer assay in cultured rat cardiomyocytes confirmed that bepridil increased intercellular coupling. SW reentry in the presence of bepridil was characterized by decremental conduction near the rotation center, prominent drift, and self-termination by collision with boundaries. These results indicate that bepridil causes an increase of intercellular coupling and a moderate APD prolongation, and this combination compromises wavefront propagation near the rotation center of SW reentry, leading to its drift and early termination. PMID:21157118

  5. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy. Disuse atrophy occurs from a lack of physical activity. In most people, muscle atrophy is caused by not using the ...

  6. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  7. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy: disuse and neurogenic. Disuse atrophy is caused by not using the muscles enough . This type of atrophy can often be ...

  8. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after exercise or at night, ... to several minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves ...

  9. Ichthyophonus-induced cardiac damage: a mechanism for reduced swimming stamina in salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, R.; LaPatra, S.; Gregg, J.; Winton, J.; Hershberger, P.

    2006-01-01

    Swimming stamina, measured as time-to-fatigue, was reduced by approximately two-thirds in rainbow trout experimentally infected with Ichthyophonus. Intensity of Ichthyophonus infection was most severe in cardiac muscle but multiple organs were infected to a lesser extent. The mean heart weight of infected fish was 40% greater than that of uninfected fish, the result of parasite biomass, infiltration of immune cells and fibrotic (granuloma) tissue surrounding the parasite. Diminished swimming stamina is hypothesized to be due to cardiac failure resulting from the combination of parasite-damaged heart muscle and low myocardial oxygen supply during sustained aerobic exercise. Loss of stamina in Ichthyophonus-infected salmonids could explain the poor performance previously reported for wild Chinook and sockeye salmon stocks during their spawning migration. ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Cardiac Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jeudy, Jean; Burke, Allen P; Frazier, Aletta Ann

    2016-07-01

    Lymphoma of the heart and pericardium may develop in up to 25% of patients with disseminated nodal disease, but primary cardiac lymphoma is rare. The majority are diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, which arise in immunocompetent older individuals, men twice as often as women. Subsets are found in immunocompromised patients, including those with HIV-AIDS or allograft recipients. Cardiac lymphomas tend to arise in the wall of the right heart, especially right atrium, with contiguous infiltration of epicardium and pericardium. Pericardial implants and effusions are common. The disease is often multifocal in the heart, but cardiac valves are usually spared. PMID:27265603

  11. Change in vascular smooth muscle response to 5-HT due to short- or long-term endothelial denudation of the bovine digital vein.

    PubMed

    Punzi, Simona; Belloli, Chiara; Gogny, Marc; Desfontis, Jean-Claude; Mallem, Mohamed Y

    2016-01-01

    Several chronic progressive vascular diseases, such as laminitis, show vasocontractile dysfunction that might evolve into reperfusion injury and/or vessel structural remodelling, which may be traced back to aberrant endothelial function. In the present study, the vasomotor responses of bovine digital veins (BDVs) to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) were investigated in blood vessels, with and without endothelium present, and in samples deprived of endothelium before or after overnight incubation in tissue culture medium, to evaluate the effects of short- and long-term endothelial damage on vascular smooth muscle (VSM) reactivity. No significant effects were observed in the blood vessels tested immediately after the removal of endothelium. In contrast, a significant increase in VSM reactivity to 5-HT was seen in vessels incubated without endothelium. This long-term change in smooth muscle reactivity was prevented by exposure to the nitric oxide (NO) donor nitroprusside (P < 0.01), suggesting that the long-term lack of inhibitory control exerted by endothelium-derived NO is involved in increased VSM reactivity. The RhoA/ROCK pathway inhibitor fasudil reduced VSM hyper-contractility to ~65% (P < 0.001), the superoxide dismutase-mimetic tempol normalised the vascular response and the non-selective COX-inhibitor indomethacin exerted a moderate inhibitory effect (P < 0.05). Thus, over-activation of the RhoA/ROCK pathway and production of reactive oxygen species could account for VSM hyper-reactivity, triggered by long-term endothelium-deprivation in BDVs, suggesting that these biochemical mechanisms are potential targets for controlling the progressive vasocontractile dysfunction of digital veins in animals affected with laminitis. PMID:26670334

  12. Limited Expression of Slow Tonic Myosin Heavy Chain in Human Cranial Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Sokoloff, Alan J.; Li, Haiyan; Burkholder, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent reports of slow tonic myosin heavy chain (MHCst) in human masticatory and laryngeal muscles suggest that MHCst may have a wider distribution in humans than previously thought. Because of the novelty of this finding, we sought to confirm the presence of MHCst in human masticatory and laryngeal muscles by reacting tissue from these muscles and controls from extraocular, intrafusal, cardiac, appendicular and developmental muscle with antibodies (Abs) ALD-58 and S46 considered highly specific for MHCst. At Ab dilutions producing minimal reaction to muscle fibers positive for MHCI, only extraocular, intrafusal and fetal tongue tissue reacted with Ab S46 had strong immunoreaction in an appreciable number of muscle fibers. In immunoblots Ab S46, but not Ab ALD-58, labeled adult extraocular muscles; no other muscles were labeled with either Ab. We conclude that, in humans, Ab S46 has greater specificity for MHCst than does Ab ALD-58. We suggest that reports of MHCst in human masticatory and laryngeal muscles reflect false-positive identification of MHCst due to cross-reactivity of Ab ALD-58 with another MHC isoform. PMID:17486578

  13. Cardiac arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment for cardiac arrest. It is a medical device that gives an electrical shock to the heart. The shock can get the heart beating normally again. Small, portable defibrillators are often available in public areas for ...

  14. Cardiac rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... 123-210. Thomas PD. Exercise-Based, Comprehensive Cardiac Rehabilitation. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2011: ...

  15. Cardiac rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... goal of cardiac rehab is to: Improve your cardiovascular function Improve your overall health and quality of ... E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015: ...

  16. Cardiac Sarcoidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Cardiac Sarcoidosis? Sarcoidosis is a poorly understood disease that commonly affects the lungs. It can also involve the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, eyes, skin, bones, salivary glands and heart. ...

  17. Bound potassium in muscle II.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Z

    1980-01-01

    Experiments were performed to decide between the alternatives a) the ionized K+ is in a dissolved state in the muscle water, or b) a part of the muscle potassium is in a "bound' state. Sartorius muscles of Rana esculenta were put into glicerol for about one hour at 0-2 degrees C. Most of muscle water came out, but most of muscle potassium remained in the muscles. In contrast to this: from muscle in heat rigor more potassium was released due to glicerol treating than from the intact ones. 1. Supposition a) is experimentally refuted. 2. Supposition b) corresponds to the experimental results. PMID:6969511

  18. Cardiac atrophy after bed rest and spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perhonen, M. A.; Franco, F.; Lane, L. D.; Buckey, J. C.; Blomqvist, C. G.; Zerwekh, J. E.; Peshock, R. M.; Weatherall, P. T.; Levine, B. D.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac muscle adapts well to changes in loading conditions. For example, left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy may be induced physiologically (via exercise training) or pathologically (via hypertension or valvular heart disease). If hypertension is treated, LV hypertrophy regresses, suggesting a sensitivity to LV work. However, whether physical inactivity in nonathletic populations causes adaptive changes in LV mass or even frank atrophy is not clear. We exposed previously sedentary men to 6 (n = 5) and 12 (n = 3) wk of horizontal bed rest. LV and right ventricular (RV) mass and end-diastolic volume were measured using cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 2, 6, and 12 wk of bed rest; five healthy men were also studied before and after at least 6 wk of routine daily activities as controls. In addition, four astronauts were exposed to the complete elimination of hydrostatic gradients during a spaceflight of 10 days. During bed rest, LV mass decreased by 8.0 +/- 2.2% (P = 0.005) after 6 wk with an additional atrophy of 7.6 +/- 2.3% in the subjects who remained in bed for 12 wk; there was no change in LV mass for the control subjects (153.0 +/- 12.2 vs. 153.4 +/- 12.1 g, P = 0.81). Mean wall thickness decreased (4 +/- 2.5%, P = 0.01) after 6 wk of bed rest associated with the decrease in LV mass, suggesting a physiological remodeling with respect to altered load. LV end-diastolic volume decreased by 14 +/- 1.7% (P = 0.002) after 2 wk of bed rest and changed minimally thereafter. After 6 wk of bed rest, RV free wall mass decreased by 10 +/- 2.7% (P = 0.06) and RV end-diastolic volume by 16 +/- 7.9% (P = 0.06). After spaceflight, LV mass decreased by 12 +/- 6.9% (P = 0.07). In conclusion, cardiac atrophy occurs during prolonged (6 wk) horizontal bed rest and may also occur after short-term spaceflight. We suggest that cardiac atrophy is due to a physiological adaptation to reduced myocardial load and work in real or simulated microgravity and demonstrates the plasticity

  19. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Expression in Normal and Diseased Human Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oronzi Scott, M.; Sylvester, J. E.; Heiman-Patterson, T.; Shi, Y.-J.; Fieles, W.; Stedman, H.; Burghes, A.; Ray, P.; Worton, R.; Fischbeck, K. H.

    1988-03-01

    A probe for the 5' end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene was used to study expression of the gene in normal human muscle, myogenic cell cultures, and muscle from patients with DMD. Expression was found in RNA from normal fetal muscle, adult cardiac and skeletal muscle, and cultured muscle after myoblast fusion. In DMD muscle, expression of this portion of the gene was also revealed by in situ RNA hybridization, particularly in regenerating muscle fibers.

  20. Peptide-enhanced mRNA transfection in cultured mouse cardiac fibroblasts and direct reprogramming towards cardiomyocyte-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kunwoo; Yu, Pengzhi; Lingampalli, Nithya; Kim, Hyun Jin; Tang, Richard; Murthy, Niren

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of myocardial infarction is a major challenge in medicine due to the inability of heart tissue to regenerate. Direct reprogramming of endogenous cardiac fibroblasts into functional cardiomyocytes via the delivery of transcription factor mRNAs has the potential to regenerate cardiac tissue and to treat heart failure. Even though mRNA delivery to cardiac fibroblasts has the therapeutic potential, mRNA transfection in cardiac fibroblasts has been challenging. Herein, we develop an efficient mRNA transfection in cultured mouse cardiac fibroblasts via a polyarginine-fused heart-targeting peptide and lipofectamine complex, termed C-Lipo and demonstrate the partial direct reprogramming of cardiac fibroblasts towards cardiomyocyte cells. C-Lipo enabled the mRNA-induced direct cardiac reprogramming due to its efficient transfection with low toxicity, which allowed for multiple transfections of Gata4, Mef2c, and Tbx5 (GMT) mRNAs for a period of 2 weeks. The induced cardiomyocyte-like cells had α-MHC promoter-driven GFP expression and striated cardiac muscle structure from α-actinin immunohistochemistry. GMT mRNA transfection of cultured mouse cardiac fibroblasts via C-Lipo significantly increased expression of the cardiomyocyte marker genes, Actc1, Actn2, Gja1, Hand2, and Tnnt2, after 2 weeks of transfection. Moreover, this study provides the first direct evidence that the stoichiometry of the GMT reprogramming factors influence the expression of cardiomyocyte marker genes. Our results demonstrate that mRNA delivery is a potential approach for cardiomyocyte generation. PMID:25834424

  1. Berberine regulates proliferation, collagen synthesis and cytokine secretion of cardiac fibroblasts via AMPK-mTOR-p70S6K signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Fen; Chen, Manhua; Yu, Bo; Yang, Yang; Xu, Guizhong; Gui, Feng; Liu, Zhenxing; Bai, Xiangyan; Chen, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The traditional Chinese medicinal berberine has long been used to treat cardiovascular diseases; however, the mechanism underlying its effects remains unclear. Here, this study would to investigate the effects of berberine on proliferation, collagen synthesis and cytokine secretion of cardiac fibroblasts. Methods: We assessed proliferation, collagen synthesis and cytokine secretion in cardiac fibroblasts subjected to angiotensin II (Ang II) subsequent to the consumption of berberine or a control treatment. And then we detected the role of AMPK/mTOR signaling pathway in berberine treatment of cardiac fibroblasts. Results: In the present study, the cellular behaviors of cardiac fibroblasts induced by Ang II were significantly activated including proliferation, transformation into myofibroblasts and collagen synthesis. Additionally, the ability of cytokine secretion was enhanced obviously. It was demonstrated that treatment of cardiac fibroblasts with berberine resulted in deceased proliferation, and attenuated fibroblast α-smooth muscle actin expression and collagen synthesis. And the protein secretion of TGFβ1 was inhibited; however, the protein secretion of IL-10 was increased in cardiac fibroblasts with berberine treatment. Mechanistically, the phosphorylation level of AMPK was increased; and the phosphorylation levels of mTOR and p70S6K were decreased in berberine treatment group. Conclusion: These results illustrated that the protective effects of berberine on cellular behaviors of cardiac fibroblasts were at least in part due to activate AMPK signaling pathway and downregulate mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway. Berberine might become a new strategy for treating cardiac fibrosis in the future. PMID:26722438

  2. Cardiac applications of PET.

    PubMed

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-10-01

    Routine use of cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) applications has been increasing but has not replaced cardiac single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) studies yet. The majority of cardiac PET tracers, with the exception of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG), are not widely available, as they require either an onsite cyclotron or a costly generator for their production. 18F-FDG PET imaging has high sensitivity for the detection of hibernating/viable myocardium and has replaced Tl-201 SPECT imaging in centers equipped with a PET/CT camera. PET myocardial perfusion imaging with various tracers such as Rb-82, N-13 ammonia, and O-15 H2O has higher sensitivity and specificity than myocardial perfusion SPECT for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD). In particular, quantitative PET measurements of myocardial perfusion help identify subclinical coronary stenosis, better define the extent and severity of CAD, and detect ischemia when there is balanced reduction in myocardial perfusion due to three-vessel or main stem CAD. Fusion images of PET perfusion and CT coronary artery calcium scoring or CT coronary angiography provide additional complementary information and improve the detection of CAD. PET studies with novel 18F-labeled perfusion tracers such as 18F-flurpiridaz and 18F-FBnTP have yielded high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of CAD. These tracers are still being tested in humans, and, if approved for clinical use, they will be commercially and widely available. In addition to viability studies, 18F-FDG PET can also be utilized to detect inflammation/infection in various conditions such as endocarditis, sarcoidosis, and atherosclerosis. Some recent series have obtained encouraging results for the detection of endocarditis in patients with intracardiac devices and prosthetic valves. PET tracers for cardiac neuronal imaging, such as C-11 HED, help assess the severity of heart failure and post-transplant cardiac

  3. Automated cardiac sarcomere analysis from second harmonic generation images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Canadilla, Patricia; Gonzalez-Tendero, Anna; Iruretagoyena, Igor; Crispi, Fatima; Torre, Iratxe; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Bijnens, Bart H.; Gratacos, Eduard

    2014-05-01

    Automatic quantification of cardiac muscle properties in tissue sections might provide important information related to different types of diseases. Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging provides a stain-free microscopy approach to image cardiac fibers that, combined with our methodology of the automated measurement of the ultrastructure of muscle fibers, computes a reliable set of quantitative image features (sarcomere length, A-band length, thick-thin interaction length, and fiber orientation). We evaluated the performance of our methodology in computer-generated muscle fibers modeling some artifacts that are present during the image acquisition. Then, we also evaluated it by comparing it to manual measurements in SHG images from cardiac tissue of fetal and adult rabbits. The results showed a good performance of our methodology at high signal-to-noise ratio of 20 dB. We conclude that our automated measurements enable reliable characterization of cardiac fiber tissues to systematically study cardiac tissue in a wide range of conditions.

  4. Multifunctional protein: cardiac ankyrin repeat protein*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Na; Xie, Xiao-jie; Wang, Jian-an

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP) not only serves as an important component of muscle sarcomere in the cytoplasm, but also acts as a transcription co-factor in the nucleus. Previous studies have demonstrated that CARP is up-regulated in some cardiovascular disorders and muscle diseases; however, its role in these diseases remains controversial now. In this review, we will discuss the continued progress in the research related to CARP, including its discovery, structure, and the role it plays in cardiac development and heart diseases. PMID:27143260

  5. Smoking after cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Botha, P; Peaston, R; White, K; Forty, J; Dark, J H; Parry, G

    2008-04-01

    Although smoking cessation is a prerequisite prior to listing for cardiac transplantation, some patients return to smoking after recovery. We have covertly assessed the smoking habits of our cardiac transplant recipients (with ethical approval) since 1993 by measuring urinary cotinine: a level of >500 ng/mL signifying continued tobacco use. We retrospectively analyzed survival, causes of death and the development of graft coronary artery disease (GCAD) with respect to the number of positive and negative cotinine levels. One hundred four of 380 (27.4%) patients tested positive for active smoking at some point posttransplant, and 57 (15.0%) tested positive repeatedly. Smokers suffered significantly more deaths due to GCAD (21.2% vs. 12.3%, p < 0.05), and due to malignancy (16.3% vs. 5.8%, p < 0.001). In univariate analysis, smoking after heart transplantation shortened median survival from 16.28 years to 11.89 years. After correcting for the effects of pretransplant smoking in time-dependent multivariate analysis, posttransplant smoking remained the most significant determinant of overall mortality (p < 0.00001). We conclude that tobacco smoking after cardiac transplantation significantly impacts survival by accelerating the development of graft vasculopathy and malignancy. We hope that this information will deter cardiac transplant recipients from relapsing, and intensify efforts in improving cessation rates. PMID:18324978

  6. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David H; Nery, Pablo B; Ha, Andrew C; Beanlands, Rob S B

    2016-07-26

    Clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in perhaps 5% of patients with sarcoidosis. The 3 principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. An estimated 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic cardiac involvement (clinically silent disease). In 2014, the first international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS was published. In patients with clinically manifest CS, the extent of left ventricular dysfunction seems to be the most important predictor of prognosis. There is controversy in published reports as to the outcome of patients with clinically silent CS. Despite a paucity of data, immunosuppression therapy (primarily with corticosteroids) has been advocated for the treatment of clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, primarily with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, is often recommended for patients with clinically manifest disease. PMID:27443438

  7. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  8. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs of a muscle disorder, tests such as an electromyogram , ...

  9. Muscle aches

    MedlinePlus

    ... common cause of muscle aches and pain is fibromyalgia , a condition that causes tenderness in your muscles ... imbalance, such as too little potassium or calcium Fibromyalgia Infections, including the flu, Lyme disease , malaria , muscle ...

  10. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  11. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Smedema, J.P.; Zondervan, P.E.; van Hagen, P.; ten Cate, F.J.; Bresser, P.; Doubell, A.F.; Pattynama, P.; Hoogsteden, H.C.; Balk, A.H.M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system granulomatous disorder of unknown aetiology. Symptomatic cardiac involvement occurs in approximately 5% of patients. The prevalence of sarcoidosis in the Netherlands is unknown, but estimated to be approximately 20 per 100,000 population (3200 patients). We report on five patients who presented with different manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis, and give a brief review on the current management of this condition. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be of great help in diagnosing this condition as well as in the follow-up of the response to therapy. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:25696121

  12. Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Cardiac Repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei-Zhong; Hauch, Kip; Xu, Chunhui; Laflamme, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The muscle lost after a myocardial infarction is replaced with non-contractile scar tissue, often initiating heart failure. Whole-organ cardiac transplantation is the only currently available clinical means of replacing the lost muscle, but this option is limited by the inadequate supply of donor hearts. Thus, cell-based cardiac repair has attracted considerable interest as an alternative means of ameliorating cardiac injury. Because of their tremendous capacity for expansion and unquestioned cardiac potential, pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an attractive candidate cell source for obtaining cardiomyocytes and other useful mesenchymal cell types for such therapies. hESC-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) exhibit a committed cardiac phenotype and robust proliferative capacity, and recent testing in rodent infarct models indicates that they can partially remuscularize injured hearts and improve contractile function. Although the latter successes give good reason for optimism, considerable challenges remain to the successful application of hESCs to cardiac repair, including the need for preparations of high cardiac purity, improved methods of delivery, and approaches to overcome immune rejection and other causes of graft cell death. This review will describe the phenotype of hESC-CMs and preclinical experience with these cells and will consider strategies to overcoming the aforementioned challenges. PMID:18657407

  13. The Physics of Cardiac Fibrillation: Strings that kill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2009-03-01

    Fibrillation is a state of spatio-temporal chaos in a 3d-biological excitable medium, namely the heart muscle. The building blocks are wave-emitting three-dimensional topological singularities in the electric excitation field of the tissue. These string like singularities send out a rotating wave fields with very fast frequencies (up to 10 times normal heart rate) and thus dominate over the pacemaker. The incoherent electrical excitation of the spatio-temporal chaotic dynamics leads to an unsynchronized contraction of the cardiac muscle and to the loss of the pumping action, and if untreated to death. Due to the topological nature of the spatio-temporal chaotic state it is very difficult to control. Current defibrillation technologies use strong electric field pulses (1 kV, 30 A, 12 ms) to reset the whole muscle. Here we report that natural muscle heterogeneities act as wave emitting sites when a weak electric field pulse is applied across the tissue. We report theoretical predictions on the physics and support the findings by results from experiment. This work was conducted in collaboration with Stefan Luther (MPIDS), Falvio Fenton ( Cornell), Amgad Squires (Cornell), Robert Gilmour (Cornell), Valentin Krinsky (MPIDS), Alain Pumir (NIce).

  14. Quantitative analysis of cardiac lesions in chronic canine chagasic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Caliari, Marcelo Vidigal; do Pilar Machado, Raquel; de Lana, Marta; Caja, Rosângela Aparecida França; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Bahia, Maria Teresinha; dos Santos, César Augusto Bueno; Magalhaes, Gustavo Albergaria; Sampaio, Ivan Barbosa Machado; Tafuri, Washington Luiz

    2002-01-01

    Lesions observed in chronic chagasic cardiopathy frequently produce electrocardiographic alterations and affect cardiac function. Through a computerized morphometrical analysis we quantified the areas occupied by cardiac muscle, connective and adipose tissues in the right atrium of dogs experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. All of the infected dogs showed chronic myocarditis with variable reduction levels of cardiac muscle, fibrosis and adipose tissue replacement. In the atrial myocardium of dogs infected with Be78 and Be62 cardiac muscle represented 34 and 50%, fibrosis 28 and 32% and adipose tissue 38 and 18%, respectively. The fibrosis observed was both diffuse and focal and mostly intrafascicular, either partially or completely interrupting the path of muscle bundles. Such histological alterations probably contributed to the appearance of electrocardiographic disturbances verified in 10 out 11 dogs which are also common in human chronic chagasic cardiopathy. Fibrosis was the most important microscopic occurrence found since it produces rearrangements of collagen fibers in relation to myocardiocytes which causes changes in anatomical physiognomy and mechanical behavior of the myocardium. These abnormalities can contribute to the appearance of cardiac malfunction, arrythmias and congestive cardiac insufficiency as observed in two of the analyzed dogs. Strain Be78 caused destruction of atrial cardiac muscle higher than that induced by strain Be62. PMID:12436168

  15. Dual gated nuclear cardiac images

    SciTech Connect

    Zubal, I.G.; Bennett, G.W.; Bizais, Y.; Brill, A.B.

    1984-02-01

    A data acquisition system has been developed to collect camera events simultaneously with continually digitized electrocardiograph signals and respiratory flow measurements. Software processing of the list mode data creates more precisely gated cardiac frames. Additionally, motion blur due to heart movement during breathing is reduced by selecting events within a specific respiratory phase. Thallium myocardium images of a healthy volunteer show increased definition. This technique of combined cardiac and respiratory gating has the potential of improving the detectability of small lesions, and the characterization of cardiac wall motion.

  16. MUSCLE INJURIES IN ATHLETES

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Guilherme Campos; Thiele, Edilson Schwansee

    2015-01-01

    This article had the aim of demonstrating the physiology, diagnosis and treatment of muscle injuries, focusing on athletes and their demands and expectations. Muscle injuries are among the most common complaints in orthopedic practice, occurring both among athletes and among non-athletes. These injuries present a challenge for specialists, due to the slow recovery, during which time athletes are unable to take part in training and competitions, and due to frequent sequelae and recurrences of the injuries. Most muscle injuries (between 10% and 55% of all injuries) occur during sports activities. The muscles most commonly affected are the ischiotibial, quadriceps and gastrocnemius. These muscles go across two joints and are more subject to acceleration and deceleration forces. The treatment for muscle injuries varies from conservative treatment to surgery. New procedures are being used, like the hyperbaric chamber and the use of growth factors. However, there is still a high rate of injury recurrence. Muscle injury continues to be a topic of much controversy. New treatments are being researched and developed, but prevention through muscle strengthening, stretching exercises and muscle balance continues to be the best “treatment”. PMID:27027021

  17. Calcium versus strontium handling by the heart muscle.

    PubMed

    Hendrych, Michal; Olejnickova, Veronika; Novakova, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Calcium plays a crucial role in numerous processes in living systems, from both intracellular and intercellular signalling to blood clotting. Calcium can be replaced by strontium in various intracellular processes due to high level of their similarity and strontium thus may serve as a valuable tool for different experimental studies. On the other hand, strontium is also used in clinical medicine and is commonly taken to the human body with food and water. The negative cardiac side effects of strontium therapy of osteoporosis and bone metastases are well known, but still not fully explained. This fact explains enhanced interest in this element and its impact on human body. This article reviews effects of calcium and strontium on several biochemical and physiological processes, with special emphasis on cardiac muscle. PMID:26612918

  18. Neurological prognostication after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Sandroni, Claudio; Geocadin, Romergryko G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Prediction of neurological prognosis in patients who are comatose after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest remains difficult. Previous guidelines recommended ocular reflexes, somatosensory evoked potentials and serum biomarkers for predicting poor outcome within 72h from cardiac arrest. However, these guidelines were based on patients not treated with targeted temperature management and did not appropriately address important biases in literature. Recent findings Recent evidence reviews detected important limitations in prognostication studies, such as low precision and, most importantly, lack of blinding, which may have caused a self-fulfilling prophecy and overestimated the specificity of index tests. Maintenance of targeted temperature using sedatives and muscle relaxants may interfere with clinical examination, making assessment of neurological status before 72 h or more after cardiac arrest unreliable. Summary No index predicts poor neurological outcome after cardiac arrest with absolute certainty. Prognostic evaluation should start not earlier than 72 h after ROSC and only after major confounders have been excluded so that reliable clinical examination can be made. Multimodality appears to be the most reasonable approach for prognostication after cardiac arrest. PMID:25922894

  19. Does Resistance Training Stimulate Cardiac Muscle Hypertrophy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomer, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the left ventricular structural adaptations induced by resistance/strength exercise, focusing on human work, particularly well-trained strength athletes engaged in regular, moderate- to high-intensity resistance training (RT). The article discusses both genders and examines the use of anabolic-androgenic steroids in…

  20. Hepato-cardiac disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, Yasser Mahrous; Yehia, Reem

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mutual relationship between the liver and the heart is important for both hepatologists and cardiologists. Hepato-cardiac diseases can be classified into heart diseases affecting the liver, liver diseases affecting the heart, and conditions affecting the heart and the liver at the same time. Differential diagnoses of liver injury are extremely important in a cardiologist’s clinical practice calling for collaboration between cardiologists and hepatologists due to the many other diseases that can affect the liver and mimic haemodynamic injury. Acute and chronic heart failure may lead to acute ischemic hepatitis or chronic congestive hepatopathy. Treatment in these cases should be directed to the primary heart disease. In patients with advanced liver disease, cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may develop including hemodynamic changes, diastolic and systolic dysfunctions, reduced cardiac performance and electrophysiological abnormalities. Cardiac evaluation is important for patients with liver diseases especially before and after liver transplantation. Liver transplantation may lead to the improvement of all cardiac changes and the reversal of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. There are systemic diseases that may affect both the liver and the heart concomitantly including congenital, metabolic and inflammatory diseases as well as alcoholism. This review highlights these hepatocardiac diseases PMID:24653793

  1. Cardiac and skeletal myopathy in Fabry disease: a clinicopathologic correlative study.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, Cristina; Padua, Luca; Pazzaglia, Costanza; Morgante, Emanuela; Centurion, Carlos; Antuzzi, Daniela; Russo, Matteo A; Frustaci, Andrea

    2012-09-01

    Skeletal muscle disturbances are commonly reported in patients with Fabry disease. Whether they derive from cardiac dysfunction or direct muscle involvement is still unclear. Clinical, noninvasive, and invasive cardiac and muscle studies, including an endomyocardial and muscle biopsy, were obtained in 12 patients (mean age, 42.1 ± 12.6 years; range, 24-58 years) with Fabry disease. In the youngest patients (group A, 4 men aged <35 years), results of cardiac and skeletal noninvasive studies were normal, except for reduced velocities in tissue Doppler imaging. Histologic examination indicated that muscle myocytes were unaffected, whereas muscle vessels showed the presence of mild glycosphingolipid accumulation in endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In the heart, cardiomyocytes and endothelial and smooth muscle cells of intramural cardiac vessels were involved by the disease. The oldest patients (group B, 6 men and 2 women aged >35 years) showed ultrasound muscle disarray and electromyography signs of myopathy, increased left ventricular mass, and normal cardiac function. Histologic examination showed that muscle myocytes contained mild glycosphingolipid accumulation compared with severe engulfment of cardiomyocytes. Moreover, similar infiltration of myocardial and muscle intramural vessels, causing lumen narrowing and fibrofatty tissue replacement, was observed. Direct muscle involvement occurs in patients with Fabry disease. It is milder and delayed compared with that in the heart. The difference in organ function and the need of residual α-galactosidase A activity are the likely causes. PMID:22406371

  2. [Cardiac surgery: within the revolution!].

    PubMed

    Raanani, Ehud

    2007-11-01

    Cardiac surgery is undergoing major changes. Until recently, coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) constituted the majority of cardiac surgery cases that were performed. The sharp rise in percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) mainly due to the development of drug eluting stents resulted in a drop in the worldwide number of CABG cases. The cardiac surgery community reacted by developing several new surgical procedures and techniques to better treat cardiac patients. Some of those procedures are demonstrated in this special issue of the Harefuah journal. Those procedures include better techniques to repair the aortic and mitral valves, minimally invasive techniques including video assisted methodology for valves and CABG surgery, surgery for congestive heart failure including new axial flow assist devices, surgery for the treatment of atrial fibrillation and more. The excellent results in cardiac surgery caused older and sicker patients to be referred to surgery. All these are creating a "revolution" in cardiac surgery. Those new technologies, surgical techniques and high risk patients require special financing. In order to complete the revolution and continue providing advanced "state of the art" cardiac surgery procedures for the patients, there is a need for special long term economic planning by the government and the Ministry of Health. PMID:18087831

  3. Mechanical Properties of Respiratory Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Sieck, Gary C.; Ferreira, Leonardo F.; Reid, Michael B.; Mantilla, Carlos B.

    2014-01-01

    Striated respiratory muscles are necessary for lung ventilation and to maintain the patency of the upper airway. The basic structural and functional properties of respiratory muscles are similar to those of other striated muscles (both skeletal and cardiac). The sarcomere is the fundamental organizational unit of striated muscles and sarcomeric proteins underlie the passive and active mechanical properties of muscle fibers. In this respect, the functional categorization of different fiber types provides a conceptual framework to understand the physiological properties of respiratory muscles. Within the sarcomere, the interaction between the thick and thin filaments at the level of cross-bridges provides the elementary unit of force generation and contraction. Key to an understanding of the unique functional differences across muscle fiber types are differences in cross-bridge recruitment and cycling that relate to the expression of different myosin heavy chain isoforms in the thick filament. The active mechanical properties of muscle fibers are characterized by the relationship between myoplasmic Ca2+ and cross-bridge recruitment, force generation and sarcomere length (also cross-bridge recruitment), external load and shortening velocity (cross-bridge cycling rate), and cross-bridge cycling rate and ATP consumption. Passive mechanical properties are also important reflecting viscoelastic elements within sarcomeres as well as the extracellular matrix. Conditions that affect respiratory muscle performance may have a range of underlying pathophysiological causes, but their manifestations will depend on their impact on these basic elemental structures. PMID:24265238

  4. Cardiac optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetics is an emerging technology for optical interrogation and control of biological function with high specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. Mammalian cells and tissues can be sensitized to respond to light by a relatively simple and well-tolerated genetic modification using microbial opsins (light-gated ion channels and pumps). These can achieve fast and specific excitatory or inhibitory response, offering distinct advantages over traditional pharmacological or electrical means of perturbation. Since the first demonstrations of utility in mammalian cells (neurons) in 2005, optogenetics has spurred immense research activity and has inspired numerous applications for dissection of neural circuitry and understanding of brain function in health and disease, applications ranging from in vitro to work in behaving animals. Only recently (since 2010), the field has extended to cardiac applications with less than a dozen publications to date. In consideration of the early phase of work on cardiac optogenetics and the impact of the technique in understanding another excitable tissue, the brain, this review is largely a perspective of possibilities in the heart. It covers the basic principles of operation of light-sensitive ion channels and pumps, the available tools and ongoing efforts in optimizing them, overview of neuroscience use, as well as cardiac-specific questions of implementation and ideas for best use of this emerging technology in the heart. PMID:23457014

  5. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  6. Numerical Investigation of Macroscopic Cardiac Mechanics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxton, Gavin; Balazs, Anna

    2003-03-01

    In order to gain insight into the complex interactions between electrical excitation of the myocardial tissue, the mechanical contraction of the heart muscles and cardiac fluid dynamics, three computational techniques are successfully coupled. A Gerhardt-Schuster-Tyson Cellular Automata algorithm enables the excitation kinetics of myocardial tissue to be simulated in a computationally efficient manner. The cardiac excitation spreading is then coupled with a dynamic Born Lattice Spring Model which enables the contraction of the heart muscles and their subsequent relaxation to be modelled. The velocities at the inner surfaces of the heart can then be transferred to a Lattice Boltzmann simulation of blood flow within the cardiac chambers. The interactions (and complex feedback mechanisms) between electrical excitation, mechanical deformation, and fluid flow in the heart are explored through these three-dimensional models and the regular functionality of the whole heart is visualised.

  7. [Overactive muscles: it can be more serious than common myalgia or cramp].

    PubMed

    Molenaar, J P F; Snoeck, M M J; Voermans, N C; van Engelen, B G M

    2016-01-01

    Positive muscle phenomena are due to muscle overactivity. Examples are cramp, myalgia, and stiffness. These manifestations have mostly acquired causes, e.g. side-effects of medication, metabolic disorders, vitamin deficiency, excessive caffeine intake or neurogenic disorders. We report on three patients with various positive muscle phenomena, to illustrate the clinical signs that indicate an underlying myopathy. Patient A, a 56-year-old man, was diagnosed with muscle cramp in the context of excessive coffee use and previous lumbosacral radiculopathy. Patient B, a 71-year-old man, was shown to have RYR1-related myopathy. Patient C, a 42-year-old man, suffered from Brody myopathy. We propose for clinicians to look out for a number of 'red flags' that can point to an underlying myopathy, and call for referral to neurology if indicated. Red flags include second wind phenomenon, familial occurrence of similar complaints, marked muscle stiffness, myotonia, muscle weakness, muscle hypertrophy, and myoglobinuria. Establishing a correct diagnosis is important for proper treatment. Certain myopathies call for cardiac or respiratory screening. PMID:27122070

  8. Effect of Statins on Skeletal Muscle: Exercise, Myopathy, and Muscle Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Beth A.; Thompson, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    Statins are effective for reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and cardiac events, but can produce muscle side effects. We have hypothesized that statin-related muscle complaints are exacerbated by exercise and influenced by factors including mitochondrial dysfunction, membrane disruption and/or calcium handling. The interaction between statins, exercise and muscle symptoms may be more effectively diagnosed and treated as rigorous scientific studies accumulate. PMID:23000957

  9. The interplay of protein kinase A and perilipin 5 regulates cardiac lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Nina M; Jaeger, Doris; Kolleritsch, Stephanie; Zimmermann, Robert; Zechner, Rudolf; Lass, Achim; Haemmerle, Guenter

    2015-01-16

    Defective lipolysis in mice lacking adipose triglyceride lipase provokes severe cardiac steatosis and heart dysfunction, markedly shortening life span. Similarly, cardiac muscle (CM)-specific Plin5 overexpression (CM-Plin5) leads to severe triglyceride (TG) accumulation in cardiomyocytes via impairing TG breakdown. Interestingly, cardiac steatosis due to overexpression of Plin5 is compatible with normal heart function and life span indicating a more moderate impact of Plin5 overexpression on cardiac lipolysis and energy metabolism. We hypothesized that cardiac Plin5 overexpression does not constantly impair cardiac lipolysis. In line with this assumption, TG levels decreased in CM of fasted compared with nonfasted CM-Plin5 mice indicating that fasting may lead to a diminished barrier function of Plin5. Recent studies demonstrated that Plin5 is phosphorylated, and activation of adenylyl cyclase leads to phosphorylation of Plin5, suggesting that Plin5 is a substrate for PKA. Furthermore, any significance of Plin5 phosphorylation by PKA in the regulation of TG mobilization from lipid droplets (LDs) is unknown. Here, we show that the lipolytic barrier of Plin5-enriched LDs, either prepared from cardiac tissue of CM-Plin5 mice or Plin5-transfected cells, is abrogated by incubation with PKA. Notably, PKA-induced lipolysis of LDs enriched with Plin5 carrying a single mutation at serine 155 (PlinS155A) of the putative PKA phosphorylation site was substantially impaired revealing a critical role for PKA in Plin5-regulated lipolysis. The strong increase in protein levels of phosphorylated PKA in CM of Plin5 transgenic mice may partially restore fatty acid release from Plin5-enriched LDs, rendering these hearts compatible with normal heart function despite massive steatosis. PMID:25418045

  10. Respiratory muscle weakness in the Zucker diabetic fatty rat.

    PubMed

    Allwood, Melissa A; Foster, Andrew J; Arkell, Alicia M; Beaudoin, Marie-Soleil; Snook, Laelie A; Romanova, Nadya; Murrant, Coral L; Holloway, Graham P; Wright, David C; Simpson, Jeremy A

    2015-10-01

    The obesity epidemic is considered one of the most serious public health problems of the modern world. Physical therapy is the most accessible form of treatment; however, compliance is a major obstacle due to exercise intolerance and dyspnea. Respiratory muscle atrophy is a cause of dyspnea, yet little is known of obesity-induced respiratory muscle dysfunction. Our objective was to investigate whether obesity-induced skeletal muscle wasting occurs in the diaphragm, the main skeletal muscle involved in inspiration, using the Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat. After 14 wk, ZDF rats developed obesity, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance, compared with lean controls. Hemodynamic analysis revealed ZDF rats have impaired cardiac relaxation (P = 0.001) with elevated end-diastolic pressure (P = 0.006), indicative of diastolic dysfunction. Assessment of diaphragm function revealed weakness (P = 0.0296) in the absence of intrinsic muscle impairment in ZDF rats. Diaphragm morphology revealed increased fibrosis (P < 0.0001), atrophy (P < 0.0001), and reduced myosin heavy-chain content (P < 0.001), compared with lean controls. These changes are accompanied by activation of the myostatin signaling pathway with increased serum myostatin (P = 0.017), increased gene expression (P = 0.030) in the diaphragm and retroperitoneal adipose (P = 0.033), and increased SMAD2 phosphorylation in the diaphragm (P = 0.048). Here, we have confirmed the presence of respiratory muscle atrophy and weakness in an obese, diabetic model. We have also identified a pathological role for myostatin signaling in obesity, with systemic contributions from the adipose tissue, a nonskeletal muscle source. These findings have significant implications for future treatment strategies of exercise intolerance in an obese, diabetic population. PMID:26246509

  11. Epigenetic repression of cardiac progenitor gene expression by Ezh2 is required for postnatal cardiac homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Olguín, Paul; Huang, Yu; Li, Xue; Christodoulou, Danos; Seidman, Christine E.; Seidman, J.G.; Tarakhovsky, Alexander; Bruneau, Benoit G.

    2011-01-01

    Adult-onset diseases can be associated with in utero events, but mechanisms for this remain unknown1,2. The polycomb histone methyltransferase, Ezh2, stabilizes transcription by depositing repressive marks during development that persist into adulthood3–9, but its function in postnatal organ homeostasis is unknown. We show that Ezh2 stabilizes cardiac gene expression and prevents cardiac pathology by repressing the homeodomain transcription factor Six1, which functions in cardiac progenitors but is stably silenced upon cardiac differentiation10. Ezh2 deletion in cardiac progenitors caused postnatal myocardial pathology and destabilized cardiac gene expression with activation of Six1-dependent skeletal muscle genes. Six1 induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and skeletal muscle gene expression. Furthermore, genetically reducing Six1 levels rescued the pathology of Ezh2-deficient hearts. Thus, Ezh2-mediated repression of Six1 in differentiating cardiac progenitors is essential for stable postnatal heart gene expression and homeostasis. Our results suggest that epigenetic dysregulation in embryonic progenitor cells predisposes to adult disease and dysregulated stress responses. PMID:22267199

  12. [Pharmaca Induced Cardiac Injury].

    PubMed

    Haen, Ekkehard

    2016-01-01

    Many drugs influence vital functions via the sympathetic and the parasympathetic system. Besides that hypersensitivity reactions and reactions by chemical radicals that arise in drug metabolism may directly harm the heart muscle cell. Cardiac adverse drug reactions (ADR) result in disturbances of the heart rhythm, negative inotropic effects, direct damage to the heart muscle cell, and reduced perfusion of heart tissue. Their importance is often neglected because pharmacologically similar drugs are licensed for completely different indications. This is of particular interest if more drugs are prescribed in combination. Now these effects may add up to pharmacodynamic drug-drug-interactions. Data banks like PSIAConline (www.psiac.de), individualization of drug prescription by therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) combined with a clinical pharmacological report (www.konbest.de), as well as drug information systems such as AGATE (www.amuep-agate.de) are today of help not just to recognize such drug risks, but also to find professional and evidence based solutions for it. PMID:26800070

  13. Muscle Abscess due to Salmonella Enterica

    PubMed Central

    Akkoyunlu, Yasemin; Ceylan, Bahadir; Iraz, Meryem; Elmadag, Nuh Mehmet; Aslan, Turan

    2013-01-01

    Non typhoidal Salmonellae spp. causes clinical symptoms especially in neonates, infants, aged and immunocompromised patients. Hematogenous dissemination may occur in complicated cases whereas the formation of abscess is rare. A 61-year old woman presented to our hospital with pain and a mass in her left arm, without fever and leukocytosis. She was using methotrexate, corticosteroids and quinine for rheumatoid arthritis. She had a history of cervix cancer and was given radiotherapy and chemotherapy 3 years ago. Upon physical examination and magnetic resonance imaging, the mass was considered as an abscess and was surgically drained. Salmonella enterica spp. enterica was yielded in the culture of the drainage material. Ceftriaxon 2g/day was started intramuscularly and continued for 4 weeks. Salmonellosis is usually a self-limited disease, generally restricted to gastrointestinal tract and acquired following food poisoning. Management of Salmonella abscess requires a combination of antibiotherapy, surgical drainage and eradication of primary foci. PMID:24396582

  14. Murine Muscle Engineered from Dermal Precursors: An In Vitro Model for Skeletal Muscle Generation, Degeneration, and Fatty Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    García-Parra, Patricia; Naldaiz-Gastesi, Neia; Maroto, Marcos; Padín, Juan Fernando; Goicoechea, María; Aiastui, Ana; Fernández-Morales, José Carlos; García-Belda, Paula; Lacalle, Jaione; Álava, Jose Iñaki; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; García, Antonio G.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle can be engineered by converting dermal precursors into muscle progenitors and differentiated myocytes. However, the efficiency of muscle development remains relatively low and it is currently unclear if this is due to poor characterization of the myogenic precursors, the protocols used for cell differentiation, or a combination of both. In this study, we characterized myogenic precursors present in murine dermospheres, and evaluated mature myotubes grown in a novel three-dimensional culture system. After 5–7 days of differentiation, we observed isolated, twitching myotubes followed by spontaneous contractions of the entire tissue-engineered muscle construct on an extracellular matrix (ECM). In vitro engineered myofibers expressed canonical muscle markers and exhibited a skeletal (not cardiac) muscle ultrastructure, with numerous striations and the presence of aligned, enlarged mitochondria, intertwined with sarcoplasmic reticula (SR). Engineered myofibers exhibited Na+- and Ca2+-dependent inward currents upon acetylcholine (ACh) stimulation and tetrodotoxin-sensitive spontaneous action potentials. Moreover, ACh, nicotine, and caffeine elicited cytosolic Ca2+ transients; fiber contractions coupled to these Ca2+ transients suggest that Ca2+ entry is activating calcium-induced calcium release from the SR. Blockade by d-tubocurarine of ACh-elicited inward currents and Ca2+ transients suggests nicotinic receptor involvement. Interestingly, after 1 month, engineered muscle constructs showed progressive degradation of the myofibers concomitant with fatty infiltration, paralleling the natural course of muscular degeneration. We conclude that mature myofibers may be differentiated on the ECM from myogenic precursor cells present in murine dermospheres, in an in vitro system that mimics some characteristics found in aging and muscular degeneration. PMID:23631552

  15. Multiscale models of skeletal muscle reveal the complex effects of muscular dystrophy on tissue mechanics and damage susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Virgilio, Kelley M.; Martin, Kyle S.; Peirce, Shayn M.; Blemker, Silvia S.

    2015-01-01

    Computational models have been increasingly used to study the tissue-level constitutive properties of muscle microstructure; however, these models were not created to study or incorporate the influence of disease-associated modifications in muscle. The purpose of this paper was to develop a novel multiscale muscle modelling framework to elucidate the relationship between microstructural disease adaptations and modifications in both mechanical properties of muscle and strain in the cell membrane. We used an agent-based model to randomly generate new muscle fibre geometries and mapped them into a finite-element model representing a cross section of a muscle fascicle. The framework enabled us to explore variability in the shape and arrangement of fibres, as well as to incorporate disease-related changes. We applied this method to reveal the trade-offs between mechanical properties and damage susceptibility in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). DMD is a fatal genetic disease caused by a lack of the transmembrane protein dystrophin, leading to muscle wasting and death due to cardiac or pulmonary complications. The most prevalent microstructural variations in DMD include: lack of transmembrane proteins, fibrosis, fatty infiltration and variation in fibre cross-sectional area. A parameter analysis of these variations and case study of DMD revealed that the nature of fibrosis and density of transmembrane proteins strongly affected the stiffness of the muscle and susceptibility to membrane damage. PMID:25844152

  16. Genetic dissection of cardiac growth control pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLellan, W. R.; Schneider, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac muscle cells exhibit two related but distinct modes of growth that are highly regulated during development and disease. Cardiac myocytes rapidly proliferate during fetal life but exit the cell cycle irreversibly soon after birth, following which the predominant form of growth shifts from hyperplastic to hypertrophic. Much research has focused on identifying the candidate mitogens, hypertrophic agonists, and signaling pathways that mediate these processes in isolated cells. What drives the proliferative growth of embryonic myocardium in vivo and the mechanisms by which adult cardiac myocytes hypertrophy in vivo are less clear. Efforts to answer these questions have benefited from rapid progress made in techniques to manipulate the murine genome. Complementary technologies for gain- and loss-of-function now permit a mutational analysis of these growth control pathways in vivo in the intact heart. These studies have confirmed the importance of suspected pathways, have implicated unexpected pathways as well, and have led to new paradigms for the control of cardiac growth.

  17. Muscle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... that affect the muscles (such as trichinosis or toxoplasmosis ) Muscle disorders such as muscular dystrophy or congenital ... nodosa Polymyalgia rheumatica Polymyositis - adult Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis Toxoplasmosis Trichinosis Update Date 9/8/2014 Updated by: ...

  18. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause weakness, pain or even paralysis. Causes of muscle disorders include Injury or overuse, such as sprains or strains, cramps or tendinitis A genetic disorder, such as muscular dystrophy Some ... muscles Infections Certain medicines Sometimes the cause is not ...

  19. Sudden cardiac death – Historical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Abhilash, S.P.; Namboodiri, Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is an unexpected death due to cardiac causes that occurs in a short time period (generally within 1 h of symptom onset) in a person with known or unknown cardiac disease. It is believed to be involved in nearly a quarter of human deaths, with ventricular fibrillation being the most common mechanism. It is estimated that more than 7 million lives per year are lost to SCD worldwide. Historical perspectives of SCD are analyzed with a brief description on how the developments in the management of sudden cardiac arrest evolved over time. PMID:24568828

  20. Cardiac regeneration: epicardial mediated repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The hearts of lower vertebrates such as fish and salamanders display scarless regeneration following injury, although this feature is lost in adult mammals. The remarkable capacity of the neonatal mammalian heart to regenerate suggests that the underlying machinery required for the regenerative process is evolutionarily retained. Recent studies highlight the epicardial covering of the heart as an important source of the signalling factors required for the repair process. The developing epicardium is also a major source of cardiac fibroblasts, smooth muscle, endothelial cells and stem cells. Here, we examine animal models that are capable of scarless regeneration, the role of the epicardium as a source of cells, signalling mechanisms implicated in the regenerative process and how these mechanisms influence cardiomyocyte proliferation. We also discuss recent advances in cardiac stem cell research and potential therapeutic targets arising from these studies. PMID:26702046

  1. Modeling Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  2. Physiological and pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Ippei; Minamino, Tohru

    2016-08-01

    The heart must continuously pump blood to supply the body with oxygen and nutrients. To maintain the high energy consumption required by this role, the heart is equipped with multiple complex biological systems that allow adaptation to changes of systemic demand. The processes of growth (hypertrophy), angiogenesis, and metabolic plasticity are critically involved in maintenance of cardiac homeostasis. Cardiac hypertrophy is classified as physiological when it is associated with normal cardiac function or as pathological when associated with cardiac dysfunction. Physiological hypertrophy of the heart occurs in response to normal growth of children or during pregnancy, as well as in athletes. In contrast, pathological hypertrophy is induced by factors such as prolonged and abnormal hemodynamic stress, due to hypertension, myocardial infarction etc. Pathological hypertrophy is associated with fibrosis, capillary rarefaction, increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and cellular dysfunction (impairment of signaling, suppression of autophagy, and abnormal cardiomyocyte/non-cardiomyocyte interactions), as well as undesirable epigenetic changes, with these complex responses leading to maladaptive cardiac remodeling and heart failure. This review describes the key molecules and cellular responses involved in physiological/pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27262674

  3. Thyrotoxic muscle disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Ian

    1968-01-01

    Evidence suggests that most hyperthyroid patients have a proximal myopathy. The more severe this is the more frequently are distal muscles, and ultimately, bulbar muscles involved. Probably acute thyrotoxic myopathy or encephalopathy supervenes on a previous chronic background or occurs concurrently with skeletal muscle involvement. Using careful electromyographic techniques evidence of myopathy may be found in most thyrotoxics; it disappears with adequate treatment of the primary disease. Myasthenia gravis and periodic paralysis are also associated with thyrotoxicosis and their differentiation is discussed. Infiltrative ophthalmopathy is not related to the effects of excess thyroid hormone, but is possibly due to EPS working in conjunction with LATS. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:4871773

  4. Mathematical Models of Cardiac Pacemaking Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pan; Lines, Glenn T.; Maleckar, Mary M.; Tveito, Aslak

    2013-10-01

    Over the past half century, there has been intense and fruitful interaction between experimental and computational investigations of cardiac function. This interaction has, for example, led to deep understanding of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling; how it works, as well as how it fails. However, many lines of inquiry remain unresolved, among them the initiation of each heartbeat. The sinoatrial node, a cluster of specialized pacemaking cells in the right atrium of the heart, spontaneously generates an electro-chemical wave that spreads through the atria and through the cardiac conduction system to the ventricles, initiating the contraction of cardiac muscle essential for pumping blood to the body. Despite the fundamental importance of this primary pacemaker, this process is still not fully understood, and ionic mechanisms underlying cardiac pacemaking function are currently under heated debate. Several mathematical models of sinoatrial node cell membrane electrophysiology have been constructed as based on different experimental data sets and hypotheses. As could be expected, these differing models offer diverse predictions about cardiac pacemaking activities. This paper aims to present the current state of debate over the origins of the pacemaking function of the sinoatrial node. Here, we will specifically review the state-of-the-art of cardiac pacemaker modeling, with a special emphasis on current discrepancies, limitations, and future challenges.

  5. Cardiac manifestations in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lambova, Sevdalina

    2014-01-01

    Primary cardiac involvement, which develops as a direct consequence of systemic sclerosis (SSc), may manifest as myocardial damage, fibrosis of the conduction system, pericardial and, less frequently, as valvular disease. In addition, cardiac complications in SSc may develop as a secondary phenomenon due to pulmonary arterial hypertension and kidney pathology. The prevalence of primary cardiac involvement in SSc is variable and difficult to determine because of the diversity of cardiac manifestations, the presence of subclinical periods, the type of diagnostic tools applied, and the diversity of patient populations. When clinically manifested, cardiac involvement is thought to be an important prognostic factor. Profound microvascular disease is a pathognomonic feature of SSc, as both vasospasm and structural alterations are present. Such alterations are thought to predict macrovascular atherosclerosis over time. There are contradictory reports regarding the prevalence of atherosclerosis in SSc. According to some authors, the prevalence of atherosclerosis of the large epicardial coronary arteries is similar to that of the general population, in contrast with other rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. However, the level of inflammation in SSc is inferior. Thus, the atherosclerotic process may not be as aggressive and not easily detectable in smaller studies. Echocardiography (especially tissue Doppler imaging), single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and cardiac computed tomography are sensitive techniques for earlier detection of both structural and functional scleroderma-related cardiac pathologies. Screening for subclinical cardiac involvement via modern, sensitive tools provides an opportunity for early diagnosis and treatment, which is of crucial importance for a positive outcome. PMID:25276300

  6. Cap disease due to mutation of the beta-tropomyosin gene (TPM2).

    PubMed

    Clarke, Nigel F; Domazetovska, Ana; Waddell, Leigh; Kornberg, Andrew; McLean, Catriona; North, Kathryn N

    2009-05-01

    Cap disease or cap myopathy is a form of congenital myopathy in which peripheral, well-demarcated 'caps' of disorganised thin filaments are seen in muscle fibres. Mutation of the TPM2 gene, that encodes beta-tropomyosin, is the first reported genetic cause. In this paper, we describe a further case of cap disease due to a mutation in TPM2, confirming the importance of this genetic association. This is the first report of cardiac dysfunction due to a mutation in TPM2. Our patient has an identical TPM2 mutation to the first genetically diagnosed cap disease patient, a denovo heterozygous three base pair deletion that removes glutamic acid 139 from the centre of beta-tropomyosin (p.E139del). 2D-gel electrophoresis studies show that the shortened mutant protein incorporates into sarcomeric structures, where it likely imposes a dominant-negative effect to cause muscle weakness. PMID:19345583

  7. Circulating Extracellular Vesicles Contain miRNAs and are Released as Early Biomarkers for Cardiac Injury.

    PubMed

    Deddens, Janine C; Vrijsen, Krijn R; Colijn, Johanna M; Oerlemans, Martinus I; Metz, Corina H G; van der Vlist, Els J; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N M; den Ouden, Krista; Jansen Of Lorkeers, Sanne J; van der Spoel, Tycho I G; Koudstaal, Stefan; Arkesteijn, Ger J; Wauben, Marca H M; van Laake, Linda W; Doevendans, Pieter A; Chamuleau, Steven A J; Sluijter, Joost P G

    2016-08-01

    Plasma-circulating microRNAs have been implicated as novel early biomarkers for myocardial infarction (MI) due to their high specificity for cardiac injury. For swift clinical translation of this potential biomarker, it is important to understand their temporal and spatial characteristics upon MI. Therefore, we studied the temporal release, potential source, and transportation of circulating miRNAs in different models of ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury. We demonstrated that extracellular vesicles are released from the ischemic myocardium upon I/R injury. Moreover, we provided evidence that cardiac and muscle-specific miRNAs are transported by extracellular vesicles and are rapidly detectable in plasma. Since these vesicles are enriched for the released miRNAs and their detection precedes traditional damage markers, they hold great potential as specific early biomarkers for MI. PMID:27383837

  8. On bone adaptation due to venous stasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liyun; Fritton, Susannah P.; Weinbaum, Sheldon; Cowin, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of whether or not interstitial fluid flow due to the blood circulation accounts for the observed periosteal bone formation associated with comprised venous return (venous stasis). Increased interstitial fluid flow induced by increased intramedullary pressure has been proposed to account for the periosteal response in venous stasis. To investigate the shear stresses acting on bone cell processes due to the blood circulation-driven interstitial fluid flow, a poroelastic model is extended to the situation in which the interstitial fluid flow in an osteon is driven by the pulsatile extravascular pressure in the osteonal canal as well as by the applied cyclic mechanical loading. Our results show that under normal conditions, the pulsatile extravascular pressure in the osteonal canal due to cardiac contraction (10mm Hg at 2 Hz) and skeletal muscle contraction (30mm Hg at 1 Hz) induce peak shear stresses on the osteocyte cell processes that are two orders of magnitude lower than those induced by physiological mechanical loading (100 microstrain at 1 Hz). In venous stasis the induced peak shear stress is reduced further compared to the normal conditions because, although the mean intramedullary pressure is increased, the amplitude of its pulsatile component is decreased. These results suggest that the interstitial fluid flow is unlikely to cause the periosteal bone formation in venous stasis. However, the mean interstitial fluid pressure is found to increase in venous stasis, which may pressurize the periosteum and thus play a role in periosteal bone formation. PMID:14499293

  9. Long-Term Overexpression of Hsp70 Does Not Protect against Cardiac Dysfunction and Adverse Remodeling in a MURC Transgenic Mouse Model with Chronic Heart Failure and Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Bianca C; Sapra, Geeta; Patterson, Natalie L; Cemerlang, Nelly; Kiriazis, Helen; Ueyama, Tomomi; Febbraio, Mark A; McMullen, Julie R

    2015-01-01

    Previous animal studies had shown that increasing heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) using a transgenic, gene therapy or pharmacological approach provided cardiac protection in models of acute cardiac stress. Furthermore, clinical studies had reported associations between Hsp70 levels and protection against atrial fibrillation (AF). AF is the most common cardiac arrhythmia presenting in cardiology clinics and is associated with increased rates of heart failure and stroke. Improved therapies for AF and heart failure are urgently required. Despite promising observations in animal studies which targeted Hsp70, we recently reported that increasing Hsp70 was unable to attenuate cardiac dysfunction and pathology in a mouse model which develops heart failure and intermittent AF. Given our somewhat unexpected finding and the extensive literature suggesting Hsp70 provides cardiac protection, it was considered important to assess whether Hsp70 could provide protection in another mouse model of heart failure and AF. The aim of the current study was to determine whether increasing Hsp70 could attenuate adverse cardiac remodeling, cardiac dysfunction and episodes of arrhythmia in a mouse model of heart failure and AF due to overexpression of Muscle-Restricted Coiled-Coil (MURC). Cardiac function and pathology were assessed in mice at approximately 12 months of age. We report here, that chronic overexpression of Hsp70 was unable to provide protection against cardiac dysfunction, conduction abnormalities, fibrosis or characteristic molecular markers of the failing heart. In summary, elevated Hsp70 may provide protection in acute cardiac stress settings, but appears insufficient to protect the heart under chronic cardiac disease conditions. PMID:26660322

  10. Long-Term Overexpression of Hsp70 Does Not Protect against Cardiac Dysfunction and Adverse Remodeling in a MURC Transgenic Mouse Model with Chronic Heart Failure and Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Bianca C.; Sapra, Geeta; Patterson, Natalie L.; Cemerlang, Nelly; Kiriazis, Helen; Ueyama, Tomomi; Febbraio, Mark A.; McMullen, Julie R.

    2015-01-01

    Previous animal studies had shown that increasing heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) using a transgenic, gene therapy or pharmacological approach provided cardiac protection in models of acute cardiac stress. Furthermore, clinical studies had reported associations between Hsp70 levels and protection against atrial fibrillation (AF). AF is the most common cardiac arrhythmia presenting in cardiology clinics and is associated with increased rates of heart failure and stroke. Improved therapies for AF and heart failure are urgently required. Despite promising observations in animal studies which targeted Hsp70, we recently reported that increasing Hsp70 was unable to attenuate cardiac dysfunction and pathology in a mouse model which develops heart failure and intermittent AF. Given our somewhat unexpected finding and the extensive literature suggesting Hsp70 provides cardiac protection, it was considered important to assess whether Hsp70 could provide protection in another mouse model of heart failure and AF. The aim of the current study was to determine whether increasing Hsp70 could attenuate adverse cardiac remodeling, cardiac dysfunction and episodes of arrhythmia in a mouse model of heart failure and AF due to overexpression of Muscle-Restricted Coiled-Coil (MURC). Cardiac function and pathology were assessed in mice at approximately 12 months of age. We report here, that chronic overexpression of Hsp70 was unable to provide protection against cardiac dysfunction, conduction abnormalities, fibrosis or characteristic molecular markers of the failing heart. In summary, elevated Hsp70 may provide protection in acute cardiac stress settings, but appears insufficient to protect the heart under chronic cardiac disease conditions. PMID:26660322

  11. Cardiac-specific miRNA in cardiogenesis, heart function, and cardiac pathology (with focus on myocardial infarction).

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-05-01

    Cardiac miRNAs (miR-1, miR133a, miR-208a/b, and miR-499) are abundantly expressed in the myocardium. They play a central role in cardiogenesis, heart function and pathology. While miR-1 and miR-133a predominantly control early stages of cardiogenesis supporting commitment of cardiac-specific muscle lineage from embryonic stem cells and mesodermal precursors, miR-208 and miR-499 are involved in the late cardiogenic stages mediating differentiation of cardioblasts to cardiomyocytes and fast/slow muscle fiber specification. In the heart, miR-1/133a control cardiac conductance and automaticity by regulating all phases of the cardiac action potential. miR-208/499 located in introns of the heavy chain myosin genes regulate expression of sarcomeric contractile proteins. In cardiac pathology including myocardial infarction (MI), expression of cardiac miRNAs is markedly altered that leads to deleterious effects associated with heart wounding, arrhythmia, increased apoptosis, fibrosis, hypertrophy, and tissue remodeling. In acute MI, circulating levels of cardiac miRNAs are significantly elevated making them to be a promising diagnostic marker for early diagnosis of acute MI. Great cardiospecific capacity of these miRNAs is very helpful for enhancing regenerative properties and survival of stem cell and cardiac progenitor transplants and for reprogramming of mature non-cardiac cells to cardiomyocytes. PMID:27056419

  12. Aging and Cardiac Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Biernacka, Anna; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G

    2011-01-01

    The aging heart is characterized by morphological and structural changes that lead to its functional decline and are associated with diminished ability to meet increased demand. Extensive evidence, derived from both clinical and experimental studies suggests that the aging heart undergoes fibrotic remodeling. Age-dependent accumulation of collagen in the heart leads to progressive increase in ventricular stiffness and impaired diastolic function. Increased mechanical load, due to reduced arterial compliance, and direct senescence-associated fibrogenic actions appear to be implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis in the elderly. Evolving evidence suggests that activation of several distinct molecular pathways may contribute to age-related fibrotic cardiac remodeling. Reactive oxygen species, chemokine-mediated recruitment of mononuclear cells and fibroblast progenitors, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β activation, endothelin-1 and angiotensin II signaling mediate interstitial and perivascular fibrosis in the senescent heart. Reduced collagen degradation may be more important than increased de novo synthesis in the pathogenesis of aging-associated fibrosis. In contrast to the baseline activation of fibrogenic pathways in the senescent heart, aging is associated with an impaired reparative response to cardiac injury and defective activation of reparative fibroblasts in response to growth factors. Because these reparative defects result in defective scar formation, senescent hearts are prone to adverse dilative remodeling following myocardial infarction. Understanding the pathogenesis of interstitial fibrosis in the aging heart and dissecting the mechanisms responsible for age-associated healing defects following cardiac injury are critical in order to design new strategies for prevention of adverse remodeling and heart failure in elderly patients. PMID:21837283

  13. Fibroblast growth factor 21 is induced upon cardiac stress and alters cardiac lipid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Brahma, Manoja K.; Adam, Rene C.; Pollak, Nina M.; Jaeger, Doris; Zierler, Kathrin A.; Pöcher, Nadja; Schreiber, Renate; Romauch, Matthias; Moustafa, Tarek; Eder, Sandra; Ruelicke, Thomas; Preiss-Landl, Karina; Lass, Achim; Zechner, Rudolf; Haemmerle, Guenter

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a PPARα-regulated gene elucidated in the liver of PPARα-deficient mice or PPARα agonist-treated mice. Mice globally lacking adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) exhibit a marked defect in TG catabolism associated with impaired PPARα-activated gene expression in the heart and liver, including a drastic reduction in hepatic FGF21 mRNA expression. Here we show that FGF21 mRNA expression is markedly increased in the heart of ATGL-deficient mice accompanied by elevated expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers, which can be reversed by reconstitution of ATGL expression in cardiac muscle. In line with this assumption, the induction of ER stress increases FGF21 mRNA expression in H9C2 cardiomyotubes. Cardiac FGF21 expression was also induced upon fasting of healthy mice, implicating a role of FGF21 in cardiac energy metabolism. To address this question, we generated and characterized mice with cardiac-specific overexpression of FGF21 (CM-Fgf21). FGF21 was efficiently secreted from cardiomyocytes of CM-Fgf21 mice, which moderately affected cardiac TG homeostasis, indicating a role for FGF21 in cardiac energy metabolism. Together, our results show that FGF21 expression is activated upon cardiac ER stress linked to defective lipolysis and that a persistent increase in circulating FGF21 levels interferes with cardiac and whole body energy homeostasis. PMID:25176985

  14. Laser-inflicted injury of zebrafish embryonic skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Otten, Cécile; Abdelilah-Seyfried, Salim

    2013-01-01

    , intensity, and number of pulses. Due to its transparency and external embryonic development, the zebrafish embryo is highly amenable for both laser-induced injury and for studying the subsequent recovery. Between 1 and 2 days post-fertilization, somitic skeletal muscle cells progressively undergo maturation from anterior to posterior due to the progression of somitogenesis from the trunk to the tail. At these stages, embryos spontaneously twitch and initiate swimming. The zebrafish has recently been recognized as an important vertebrate model organism for the study of tissue regeneration, as many types of tissues (cardiac, neuronal, vascular etc.) can be regenerated after injury in the adult zebrafish. PMID:23407156

  15. Intracellular energetic units in red muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Saks, V A; Kaambre, T; Sikk, P; Eimre, M; Orlova, E; Paju, K; Piirsoo, A; Appaix, F; Kay, L; Regitz-Zagrosek, V; Fleck, E; Seppet, E

    2001-01-01

    The kinetics of regulation of mitochondrial respiration by endogenous and exogenous ADP in muscle cells in situ was studied in skinned cardiac and skeletal muscle fibres. Endogenous ADP production was initiated by addition of MgATP; under these conditions the respiration rate and ADP concentration in the medium were dependent on the calcium concentration, and 70-80% of maximal rate of respiration was achieved at ADP concentration below 20 microM in the medium. In contrast, when exogenous ADP was added, maximal respiration rate was observed only at millimolar concentrations. An exogenous ADP-consuming system consisting of pyruvate kinase (PK; 20-40 units/ml) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP; 5 mM), totally suppressed respiration activated by exogenous ADP, but the respiration maintained by endogenous ADP was not suppressed by more than 20-40%. Creatine (20 mM) further activated respiration in the presence of ATP and PK+PEP. Short treatment with trypsin (50-500 nM for 5 min) decreased the apparent K(m) for exogenous ADP from 300-350 microM to 50-60 microM, increased inhibition of respiration by PK+PEP system up to 70-80%, with no changes in MgATPase activity and maximal respiration rates. Electron-microscopic observations showed detachment of mitochondria and disordering of the regular structure of the sarcomere after trypsin treatment. Two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed a group of at least seven low-molecular-mass proteins in cardiac skinned fibres which were very sensitive to trypsin and not present in glycolytic fibres, which have low apparent K(m) for exogenous ADP. It is concluded that, in oxidative muscle cells, mitochondria are incorporated into functional complexes ('intracellular energetic units') with adjacent ADP-producing systems in myofibrils and in sarcoplasmic reticulum, probably due to specific interaction with cytoskeletal elements responsible for mitochondrial distribution in the cell. It is suggested that these complexes represent the basic

  16. Factors controlling cardiac neural crest cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Hutson, Mary R

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac neural crest cells originate as part of the postotic caudal rhombencephalic neural crest stream. Ectomesenchymal cells in this stream migrate to the circumpharyngeal ridge and then into the caudal pharyngeal arches where they condense to form first a sheath and then the smooth muscle tunics of the persisting pharyngeal arch arteries. A subset of the cells continues migrating into the cardiac outflow tract where they will condense to form the aorticopulmonary septum. Cell signaling, extracellular matrix and cell-cell contacts are all critical for the initial migration, pauses, continued migration and condensation of these cells. This Review elucidates what is currently known about these factors. PMID:20890117

  17. Functional and Morphological Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Mice Using a Cryogenic Quadrature Radiofrequency Coil

    PubMed Central

    Dieringer, Matthias Alexander; Els, Antje; Waiczies, Helmar; Waiczies, Sonia; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac morphology and function assessment by magnetic resonance imaging is of increasing interest for a variety of mouse models in pre-clinical cardiac research, such as myocardial infarction models or myocardial injury/remodeling in genetically or pharmacologically induced hypertension. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) constraints, however, limit image quality and blood myocardium delineation, which crucially depend on high spatial resolution. Significant gains in SNR with a cryogenically cooled RF probe have been shown for mouse brain MRI, yet the potential of applying cryogenic RF coils for cardiac MR (CMR) in mice is, as of yet, untapped. This study examines the feasibility and potential benefits of CMR in mice employing a 400 MHz cryogenic RF surface coil, compared with a conventional mouse heart coil array operating at room temperature. The cryogenic RF coil affords SNR gains of 3.0 to 5.0 versus the conventional approach and hence enables an enhanced spatial resolution. This markedly improved image quality – by better deliniation of myocardial borders and enhanced depiction of papillary muscles and trabeculae – and facilitated a more accurate cardiac chamber quantification, due to reduced intraobserver variability. In summary the use of a cryogenically cooled RF probe represents a valuable means of enhancing the capabilities of CMR of mice. PMID:22870323

  18. Molecular and Functional Effects of a Splice Site Mutation in the MYL2 Gene Associated with Cardioskeletal Myopathy and Early Cardiac Death in Infants.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhiqun; Huang, Wenrui; Liang, Jingsheng; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2016-01-01

    The homozygous appearance of the intronic mutation (IVS6-1) in the MYL2 gene encoding for myosin ventricular/slow-twitch skeletal regulatory light chain (RLC) was recently linked to the development of slow skeletal muscle fiber type I hypotrophy and early cardiac death. The IVS6-1 (c403-1G>C) mutation resulted from a cryptic splice site in MYL2 causing a frameshift and replacement of the last 32 codons by 19 different amino acids in the RLC mutant protein. Infants who were IVS6-1(+∕+)-positive died between 4 and 6 months of age due to cardiomyopathy and heart failure. In this report we have investigated the molecular mechanism and functional consequences associated with the IVS6-1 mutation using recombinant human cardiac IVS6-1 and wild-type (WT) RLC proteins. Recombinant proteins were reconstituted into RLC-depleted porcine cardiac muscle preparations and subjected to enzymatic and functional assays. IVS6-1-RLC showed decreased binding to the myosin heavy chain (MHC) compared with WT, and IVS6-1-reconstituted myosin displayed reduced binding to actin in rigor. The IVS6-1 myosin demonstrated a significantly lower Vmax of the actin-activated myosin ATPase activity compared with WT. In stopped-flow experiments, IVS6-1 myosin showed slower kinetics of the ATP induced dissociation of the acto-myosin complex and a significantly reduced slope of the kobs-[MgATP] relationship compared to WT. In skinned porcine cardiac muscles, RLC-depleted and IVS6-1 reconstituted muscle strips displayed a significant decrease in maximal contractile force and a significantly increased Ca(2+) sensitivity, both hallmarks of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-associated mutations in MYL2. Our results showed that the amino-acid changes in IVS6-1 were sufficient to impose significant conformational alterations in the RLC protein and trigger a series of abnormal protein-protein interactions in the cardiac muscle sarcomere. Notably, the mutation disrupted the RLC-MHC interaction and the steady

  19. Molecular and Functional Effects of a Splice Site Mutation in the MYL2 Gene Associated with Cardioskeletal Myopathy and Early Cardiac Death in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhiqun; Huang, Wenrui; Liang, Jingsheng; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2016-01-01

    The homozygous appearance of the intronic mutation (IVS6-1) in the MYL2 gene encoding for myosin ventricular/slow-twitch skeletal regulatory light chain (RLC) was recently linked to the development of slow skeletal muscle fiber type I hypotrophy and early cardiac death. The IVS6-1 (c403-1G>C) mutation resulted from a cryptic splice site in MYL2 causing a frameshift and replacement of the last 32 codons by 19 different amino acids in the RLC mutant protein. Infants who were IVS6-1+∕+-positive died between 4 and 6 months of age due to cardiomyopathy and heart failure. In this report we have investigated the molecular mechanism and functional consequences associated with the IVS6-1 mutation using recombinant human cardiac IVS6-1 and wild-type (WT) RLC proteins. Recombinant proteins were reconstituted into RLC-depleted porcine cardiac muscle preparations and subjected to enzymatic and functional assays. IVS6-1-RLC showed decreased binding to the myosin heavy chain (MHC) compared with WT, and IVS6-1-reconstituted myosin displayed reduced binding to actin in rigor. The IVS6-1 myosin demonstrated a significantly lower Vmax of the actin-activated myosin ATPase activity compared with WT. In stopped-flow experiments, IVS6-1 myosin showed slower kinetics of the ATP induced dissociation of the acto-myosin complex and a significantly reduced slope of the kobs-[MgATP] relationship compared to WT. In skinned porcine cardiac muscles, RLC-depleted and IVS6-1 reconstituted muscle strips displayed a significant decrease in maximal contractile force and a significantly increased Ca2+ sensitivity, both hallmarks of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-associated mutations in MYL2. Our results showed that the amino-acid changes in IVS6-1 were sufficient to impose significant conformational alterations in the RLC protein and trigger a series of abnormal protein-protein interactions in the cardiac muscle sarcomere. Notably, the mutation disrupted the RLC-MHC interaction and the steady-state and

  20. Diagnostic approach to cardiac amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Amin, Hilman Zulkifli; Mori, Shumpei; Sasaki, Naoto; Hirata, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a relatively rare disease that may be underdiagnosed and could affect the entire human body. Many organs may be affected, which could increase the morbidity and mortality. Cardiac involvement is the leading cause of poor prognosis. Patients with cardiac amyloidosis are usually admitted with heart failure. The clinical presentation varies greatly, and using the correct approach is important in identifying cardiac amyloidosis. A 51-year-old man was diagnosed with chronic heart failure. He had increased brain natriuretic peptide levels, a low ejection fraction, and left and right ventricular hypertrophy with granular sparkling as seen by echocardiography. These findings led us to perform a cardiac biopsy that confirmed the diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis. Further investigation revealed that the patient had amyloid light-chain type amyloidosis due to multiple myeloma. He is now undergoing the 3rd phase of chemotherapy. Congo-red stain is usually used by physicians to histologically confirm amyloidosis, with which apple-green birefringence indicates amyloid deposits. Other stains such as direct fast scarlet (DFS) and hematoxylin-eosin (HE) can also confirm the presence of amyloid deposits. In the present case, DFS and HE were used, both of which suggested amyloid deposits surrounding myocardial cells. The use of a combination of stains can increase the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of amyloidosis. However, the typical echocardiographic appearances would be enough to diagnose cardiac amyloidosis when it is impossible for the patient to undergo a cardiac biopsy, if an additional histological specimen from another tissue such as abdominal fat confirms amyloidosis. PMID:25011639

  1. Expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and downstream muscle-specific proteins in ground squirrel skeletal and heart muscle during hibernation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yichi; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-01-01

    The thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) undergoes remarkable adaptive changes during hibernation. Interestingly, skeletal muscle remodelling occurs during the torpor-arousal cycle of hibernation to prevent net muscle loss despite inactivity. Reversible cardiomyocyte hypertrophy occurs in cardiac muscle, allowing the heart to preserve cardiac output during hibernation, while avoiding chronic maladaptive hypertrophy post-hibernation. We propose that calcium signalling proteins [calcineurin (Cn), calmodulin (CaM), and calpain], the nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT) family of transcription factors, and the NFAT targets myoferlin and myomaker contribute significantly to adaptations taking place in skeletal and cardiac muscle during hibernation. Protein-level analyses were performed over several conditions: euthermic room temperature (ER), euthermic cold room (EC), entrance into (EN), early (ET), and late torpor (LT) time points, in addition to early (EA), interbout (IA), and late arousal (LA) time points using immunoblotting and DNA-protein interaction (DPI) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISAs). In skeletal and cardiac muscle, NFATc2 protein levels were elevated during torpor. NFATc4 increased throughout the torpor-arousal cycle in both tissues, and NFATc1 showed this trend in cardiac muscle only. NFATc3 showed an elevation in DNA-binding activity but not expression during torpor. Myoferlin protein levels dramatically increased during torpor in both skeletal and cardiac muscle. Myomaker levels also increased significantly in cardiac muscle during torpor. Cardiac Cn levels remained stable, whereas CaM and calpain decreased throughout the torpor-arousal cycle. Activation and/or upregulation of NFATc2, c3, myoferlin, and myomaker at torpor could be part of a stress-response mechanism to preserve skeletal muscle mass, whereas CaM and calpain appear to initiate the rapid reversal of cardiac hypertrophy during arousal through

  2. Erbb2 Is Required for Cardiac Atrial Electrical Activity during Development

    PubMed Central

    Tenin, Gennadiy; Clowes, Christopher; Wolton, Kathryn; Krejci, Eliska; Wright, Jayne A.; Lovell, Simon C.; Sedmera, David; Hentges, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    The heart is the first organ required to function during embryonic development and is absolutely necessary for embryo survival. Cardiac activity is dependent on both the sinoatrial node (SAN), which is the pacemaker of heart's electrical activity, and the cardiac conduction system which transduces the electrical signal though the heart tissue, leading to heart muscle contractions. Defects in the development of cardiac electrical function may lead to severe heart disorders. The Erbb2 (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2) gene encodes a member of the EGF receptor family of receptor tyrosine kinases. The Erbb2 receptor lacks ligand-binding activity but forms heterodimers with other EGF receptors, stabilising their ligand binding and enhancing kinase-mediated activation of downstream signalling pathways. Erbb2 is absolutely necessary in normal embryonic development and homozygous mouse knock-out Erbb2 embryos die at embryonic day (E)10.5 due to severe cardiac defects. We have isolated a mouse line, l11Jus8, from a random chemical mutagenesis screen, which carries a hypomorphic missense mutation in the Erbb2 gene. Homozygous mutant embryos exhibit embryonic lethality by E12.5-13. The l11Jus8 mutants display cardiac haemorrhage and a failure of atrial function due to defects in atrial electrical signal propagation, leading to an atrial-specific conduction block, which does not affect ventricular conduction. The l11Jus8 mutant phenotype is distinct from those reported for Erbb2 knockout mouse mutants. Thus, the l11Jus8 mouse reveals a novel function of Erbb2 during atrial conduction system development, which when disrupted causes death at mid-gestation. PMID:25269082

  3. Cardiac perception and cardiac control. A review.

    PubMed

    Carroll, D

    1977-12-01

    The evidence regarding specific cardiac perception and discrimination, and its relationship to voluntary cardiac control, is critically reviewed. Studies are considered in three sections, depending on the method used to assess cardiac perception: questionnaire assessment, discrimination procedures, and heartbeat tracking. The heartbeat tracking procedure would appear to suffer least from interpretative difficulties. Recommendations are made regarding the style of analysis used to assess heartbeat perception in such tracking tasks. PMID:348240

  4. Skeletal muscle metabolism in hypokinetic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Muscle growth, protein metabolism, and amino acid metabolism were studied in various groups of rats. Certain groups were adrenaliectomized; some rats were suspended while others (the controls) were weight bearing. Results show that: (1) metabolic changes in the extensor digitorum longus muscle of suspended rats are due primarily to increased circulating glucocorticoids; (2) metabolic changes in the soleus muscle due to higher steroid levels are probably potentiated by greater numbers of steroid receptors; and (3) not all metabolic responses of the soleus muscle to unloading are due to the elevated levels of glucocorticoids or the increased sensitivity of this muscle to these hormones.

  5. Exploring cardiac biophysical properties

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Younss Ait; Bollensdorff, Christian; Cazorla, Olivier; Magdi, Yacoub; de Tombe, Pieter P.

    2015-01-01

    The heart is subject to multiple sources of stress. To maintain its normal function, and successfully overcome these stresses, heart muscle is equipped with fine-tuned regulatory mechanisms. Some of these mechanisms are inherent within the myocardium itself and are known as intrinsic mechanisms. Over a century ago, Otto Frank and Ernest Starling described an intrinsic mechanism by which the heart, even ex vivo, regulates its function on a beat-to-beat basis. According to this phenomenon, the higher the ventricular filling is, the bigger the stroke volume. Thus, the Frank-Starling law establishes a direct relationship between the diastolic and systolic function of the heart. To observe this biophysical phenomenon and to investigate it, technologic development has been a pre-requisite to scientific knowledge. It allowed for example to observe, at the cellular level, a Frank-Starling like mechanism and has been termed: Length Dependent Activation (LDA). In this review, we summarize some experimental systems that have been developed and are currently still in use to investigate cardiac biophysical properties from the whole heart down to the single myofibril. As a scientific support, investigation of the Frank-Starling mechanism will be used as a case study. PMID:26779498

  6. The regulation and function of the striated muscle activator of rho signaling (STARS) protein

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Marita A.; Lamon, Séverine; Russell, Aaron P.

    2012-01-01

    Healthy living throughout the lifespan requires continual growth and repair of cardiac, smooth, and skeletal muscle. To effectively maintain these processes muscle cells detect extracellular stress signals and efficiently transmit them to activate appropriate intracellular transcriptional programs. The striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) protein, also known as Myocyte Stress-1 (MS1) protein and Actin-binding Rho-activating protein (ABRA) is highly enriched in cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle. STARS binds actin, co-localizes to the sarcomere and is able to stabilize the actin cytoskeleton. By regulating actin polymerization, STARS also controls an intracellular signaling cascade that stimulates the serum response factor (SRF) transcriptional pathway; a pathway controlling genes involved in muscle cell proliferation, differentiation, and growth. Understanding the activation, transcriptional control and biological roles of STARS in cardiac, smooth, and skeletal muscle, will improve our understanding of physiological and pathophysiological muscle development and function. PMID:23248604

  7. Cardiac torsion and electromagnetic fields: the cardiac bioinformation hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Burleson, Katharine O; Schwartz, Gary E

    2005-01-01

    Although in physiology the heart is often referred to as a simple piston pump, there are in fact two additional features that are integral to cardiac physiology and function. First, the heart as it contracts in systole, also rotates and produces torsion due to the structure of the myocardium. Second, the heart produces a significant electromagnetic field with each contraction due to the coordinated depolarization of myocytes producing a current flow. Unlike the electrocardiogram, the magnetic field is not limited to volume conduction and extends outside the body. The therapeutic potential for interaction of this cardioelectromagnetic field both within and outside the body is largely unexplored. It is our hypothesis that the heart functions as a generator of bioinformation that is central to normative functioning of body. The source of this bioinformation is based on: (1) vortex blood flow in the left ventricle; (2) a cardiac electromagnetic field and both; (3) heart sounds; and (4) pulse pressure which produce frequency and amplitude information. Thus, there is a multidimensional role for the heart in physiology and biopsychosocial dynamics. Recognition of these cardiac properties may result in significant implications for new therapies for cardiovascular disease based on increasing cardiac energy efficiency (coherence) and bioinformation from the cardioelectromagnetic field. Research studies to test this hypothesis are suggested. PMID:15823696

  8. Muscle cramps.

    PubMed

    Miller, Timothy M; Layzer, Robert B

    2005-10-01

    Muscle cramps are a common problem characterized by a sudden, painful, involuntary contraction of muscle. These true cramps, which originate from peripheral nerves, may be distinguished from other muscle pain or spasm. Medical history, physical examination, and a limited laboratory screen help to determine the various causes of muscle cramps. Despite the "benign" nature of cramps, many patients find the symptom very uncomfortable. Treatment options are guided both by experience and by a limited number of therapeutic trials. Quinine sulfate is an effective medication, but the side-effect profile is worrisome, and other membrane-stabilizing drugs are probably just as effective. Patients will benefit from further studies to better define the pathophysiology of muscle cramps and to find more effective medications with fewer side-effects. PMID:15902691

  9. Dipyridamole cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Heo, J.; Askenase, A.; Segal, B.L.; Auerbach, N.

    1988-02-01

    Dipyridamole cardiac imaging is a useful alternative technique to exercise stress testing in the evaluation of patients with ischemic heart disease. Intravenous dipyridamole is still in the investigational phase, while oral dipyridamole is widely available. The hemodynamic effects of dipyridamole include an increase in coronary blood flow (due to coronary vasodilation) which is in excess of the increase in myocardial oxygen consumption and cardiac output. The disparity in the increase in coronary blood flow relative to the cardiac output results in an increase in myocardial thallium activity and an increase in the myocardial/background activity ratio. The quality of the thallium images is better or similar to that of exercise thallium images. The optimal dose of intravenous dipyridamole is 0.56 mg/kg, and of the oral dose it is 300 to 400 mg, although higher doses may be necessary in some patients. Analysis of the thallium images has been to a large extent based on visual inspection of the planar images. Delayed images are helpful to establish the nature of the perfusion abnormalities (transient or fixed). The process of redistribution is based on disparate rates of washout from the normal and abnormal zones. The sensitivity and specificity of dipyridamole thallium imaging, whether intravenous or oral, have been shown in a number of studies to be quite adequate and comparable to that achieved during exercise thallium imaging. Dipyridamole two-dimensional echocardiography has also been used in the detection of coronary artery disease; transient (new or worsening of preexisting) wall motion abnormalities have been found to be a specific marker of coronary artery disease. Transmural as well as regional coronary steal phenomena have been postulated as the mechanism for dipyridamole-induced regional wall motion abnormalities. 65 references.

  10. Distilling complexity to advance cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ogle, Brenda M; Bursac, Nenad; Domian, Ibrahim; Huang, Ngan F; Menasché, Philippe; Murry, Charles E; Pruitt, Beth; Radisic, Milica; Wu, Joseph C; Wu, Sean M; Zhang, Jianyi; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-06-01

    The promise of cardiac tissue engineering is in the ability to recapitulate in vitro the functional aspects of a healthy heart and disease pathology as well as to design replacement muscle for clinical therapy. Parts of this promise have been realized; others have not. In a meeting of scientists in this field, five central challenges or "big questions" were articulated that, if addressed, could substantially advance the current state of the art in modeling heart disease and realizing heart repair. PMID:27280684

  11. Myosin filament 3D structure in mammalian cardiac muscle☆

    PubMed Central

    AL-Khayat, Hind A.; Morris, Edward P.; Kensler, Robert W.; Squire, John M.

    2008-01-01

    A number of cardiac myopathies (e.g. familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy) are linked to mutations in cardiac muscle myosin filament proteins, including myosin and myosin binding protein C (MyBP-C). To understand the myopathies it is necessary to know the normal 3D structure of these filaments. We have carried out 3D single particle analysis of electron micrograph images of negatively stained isolated myosin filaments from rabbit cardiac muscle. Single filament images were aligned and divided into segments about 2 × 430 Å long, each of which was treated as an independent ‘particle’. The resulting 40 Å resolution 3D reconstruction showed both axial and azimuthal (no radial) myosin head perturbations within the 430 Å repeat, with successive crown rotations of approximately 60°, 60° and 0°, rather than the regular 40° for an unperturbed helix. However, it is shown that the projecting density peaks appear to start at low radius from origins closer to those expected for an unperturbed helical filament, and that the azimuthal perturbation especially increases with radius. The head arrangements in rabbit cardiac myosin filaments are very similar to those in fish skeletal muscle myosin filaments, suggesting a possible general structural theme for myosin filaments in all vertebrate striated muscles (skeletal and cardiac). PMID:18472277

  12. Development of Bipotent Cardiac/Skeletal Myogenic Progenitors from MESP1+ Mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Sunny Sun-Kin; Hagen, Hannah R.; Swanson, Scott A.; Stewart, Ron; Boll, Karly A.; Aho, Joy; Thomson, James A.; Kyba, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Summary The branchiomeric skeletal muscles co-evolved with new chambers of the heart to enable predatory feeding in chordates. These co-evolved tissues develop from a common population in anterior splanchnic mesoderm, referred to as cardiopharyngeal mesoderm (CPM). The regulation and development of CPM are poorly understood. We describe an embryonic stem cell-based system in which MESP1 drives a PDGFRA+ population with dual cardiac and skeletal muscle differentiation potential, and gene expression resembling CPM. Using this system, we investigate the regulation of these bipotent progenitors, and find that cardiac specification is governed by an antagonistic TGFβ-BMP axis, while skeletal muscle specification is enhanced by Rho kinase inhibition. We define transcriptional signatures of the first committed CPM-derived cardiac and skeletal myogenic progenitors, and discover surface markers to distinguish cardiac (PODXL+) from the skeletal muscle (CDH4+) CPM derivatives. These tools open an accessible window on this developmentally and evolutionarily important population. PMID:26771351

  13. Cardiac amyloidosis: updates in diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Mohty, Dania; Damy, Thibaud; Cosnay, Pierre; Echahidi, Najmeddine; Casset-Senon, Danielle; Virot, Patrice; Jaccard, Arnaud

    2013-10-01

    Amyloidosis is a severe systemic disease. Cardiac involvement may occur in the three main types of amyloidosis (acquired monoclonal light-chain, hereditary transthyretin and senile amyloidosis) and has a major impact on prognosis. Imaging the heart to characterize and detect early cardiac involvement is one of the major aims in the assessment of this disease. Electrocardiography and transthoracic echocardiography are important diagnostic and prognostic tools in patients with cardiac involvement. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging better characterizes myocardial involvement, functional abnormalities and amyloid deposition due to its high spatial resolution. Nuclear imaging has a role in the diagnosis of transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy. Cardiac biomarkers are now used for risk stratification and staging of patients with light-chain systemic amyloidosis. Different types of cardiac complications may occur, including diastolic followed by systolic heart failure, atrial and/or ventricular arrhythmias, conduction disturbances, embolic events and sometimes sudden death. Senile amyloid and hereditary transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy have better prognoses than light-chain amyloidosis. Cardiac treatment of heart failure is usually ineffective and is often poorly tolerated because of its hypotensive and bradycardiac effects. The three main types of amyloid disease, despite their similar cardiac appearance, have specific new aetiological treatments that may change the prognosis of this disease. Cardiologists should be aware of this disease to allow early treatment. PMID:24070600

  14. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePlus

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...

  15. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... from American Heart Association Aneurysms and Dissections Angina Arrhythmia Bundle Branch Block Cardiomyopathy Carotid Artery Disease Chronic ... terms: SCA, sudden cardiac death (SCD), sudden death, arrhythmias, ... ventricular fibrillation, defibrillator, automatic cardiac defibrillator ( ...

  16. Skeletal Muscle Homeostasis in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Modulating Autophagy as a Promising Therapeutic Strategy

    PubMed Central

    De Palma, Clara; Perrotta, Cristiana; Pellegrino, Paolo; Clementi, Emilio; Cervia, Davide

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a group of genetic and heterogeneous neuromuscular disorders characterized by the primary wasting of skeletal muscle. In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most severe form of these diseases, the mutations in the dystrophin gene lead to muscle weakness and wasting, exhaustion of muscular regenerative capacity, and chronic local inflammation leading to substitution of myofibers by connective and adipose tissue. DMD patients suffer from continuous and progressive skeletal muscle damage followed by complete paralysis and death, usually by respiratory and/or cardiac failure. No cure is yet available, but several therapeutic approaches aiming at reversing the ongoing degeneration have been investigated in preclinical and clinical settings. Autophagy is an important proteolytic system of the cell and has a crucial role in the removal of proteins, aggregates, and organelles. Autophagy is constantly active in skeletal muscle and its role in tissue homeostasis is complex: at high levels, it can be detrimental and contribute to muscle wasting; at low levels, it can cause weakness and muscle degeneration, due to the unchecked accumulation of damaged proteins and organelles. The causal relationship between DMD pathogenesis and dysfunctional autophagy has been recently investigated. At molecular level, the Akt axis is one of the key dysregulated pathways, although the molecular events are not completely understood. The aim of this review is to describe and discuss the clinical relevance of the recent advances dissecting autophagy and its signaling pathway in DMD. The picture might pave the way for the development of interventions that are able to boost muscle growth and/or prevent muscle wasting. PMID:25104934

  17. The Effects That Cardiac Motion has on Coronary Hemodynamics and Catheter Trackability Forces for the Treatment of Coronary Artery Disease: An In Vitro Assessment.

    PubMed

    Morris, Liam; Fahy, Paul; Stefanov, Florian; Finn, Ronan

    2015-12-01

    The coronary arterial tree experiences large displacements due to the contraction and expansion of the cardiac muscle and may influence coronary haemodynamics and stent placement. The accurate measurement of catheter trackability forces within physiological relevant test systems is required for optimum catheter design. The effects of cardiac motion on coronary flowrates, pressure drops, and stent delivery has not been previously experimentally assessed. A cardiac simulator was designed and manufactured which replicates physiological coronary flowrates and cardiac motion within a patient-specific geometry. A motorized delivery system delivered a commercially available coronary stent system and monitored the trackability forces along three phantom patient-specific thin walled compliant coronary vessels supported by a dynamic cardiac phantom model. Pressure drop variation is more sensitive to cardiac motion than outlet flowrates. Maximum pressure drops varied from 7 to 49 mmHg for a stenosis % area reduction of 56 to 90%. There was a strong positive linear correlation of cumulative trackability force with the cumulative curvature. The maximum trackability forces and curvature ranged from 0.24 to 0.87 N and 0.06 to 0.22 mm(-1) respectively for all three vessels. There were maximum and average percentage differences in trackability forces of (23-49%) and (1.9-5.2%) respectively when comparing a static pressure case with the inclusion of pulsatile flow and cardiac motion. Cardiac motion with pulsatile flow significantly altered (p value <0.001) the trackability forces along the delivery pathways with high local percentage variations and pressure drop measurements. PMID:26577477

  18. Usefulness of cardiac resynchronisation therapy devices and implantable cardioverter defibrillators in the treatment of heart failure due to severe systolic dysfunction: systematic review of clinical trials and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    García García, M A; Rosero Arenas, M A; Ruiz Granell, R; Chorro Gascó, F J; Martínez Cornejo, A

    2016-01-01

    Aim To assess the effectiveness of cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT), implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy, and the combination of these devices (CRT+ICD) in adult patients with left ventricular dysfunction and symptomatic heart failure. Methods A comprehensive systematic review of randomised clinical trials was conducted. Several electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, Ovid, Cochrane, ClinicalTrials.gov) were reviewed. The mortality rates between treatments were compared. A network was established comparing the various options, and direct, indirect and mixed comparisons were made using multivariate meta-regression. The degree of clinical and statistical homogeneity was assessed. Results 43 trials involving 13 017 patients were reviewed. Resynchronisation therapy, defibrillators, and combined devices (CRT+ICD) are clearly beneficial compared to optimal medical treatment, showing clear benefit in all of these cases. In a theoretical order of efficiency, the first option is combined therapy (CRT+ICD), the second is CRT, and the third is defibrillator implantation (ICD). Given the observational nature of these comparisons, and the importance of the overlapping CIs, we cannot state that the combined option (CRT+ICD) offers superior survival benefit compared to the other two options. Conclusions The combined option of CRT+ICD seems to be better than the option of CRT alone, although no clear improvement in survival was found for the combined option. It would be advisable to perform a direct comparative study of these two options. PMID:27326223

  19. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in cardiac tissues.

    PubMed

    Page, C; Doubell, A F

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) has recently emerged as a prominent role player in intracellular signalling in the ventricular myocyte with attention being focussed on its possible role in the development of ventricular hypertrophy. It is becoming clear that MAPK is also active in other cells of cardiac origin such as cardiac fibroblasts and possible functions of this signalling pathway in the heart have yet to be explored. In this report the mammalian MAPK pathway is briefly outlined, before reviewing current knowledge of the MAPK pathway in cardiac tissue (ventricular myocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells and cardiac fibroblasts). New data is also presented on the presence and activity of MAPK in two additional cardiac celltypes namely atrial myocytes and vascular endothelial cells from the coronary microcirculation. PMID:8739228

  20. Lineage Reprogramming of Fibroblasts into Proliferative Induced Cardiac Progenitor Cells by Defined Factors.

    PubMed

    Lalit, Pratik A; Salick, Max R; Nelson, Daryl O; Squirrell, Jayne M; Shafer, Christina M; Patel, Neel G; Saeed, Imaan; Schmuck, Eric G; Markandeya, Yogananda S; Wong, Rachel; Lea, Martin R; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Hacker, Timothy A; Crone, Wendy C; Kyba, Michael; Garry, Daniel J; Stewart, Ron; Thomson, James A; Downs, Karen M; Lyons, Gary E; Kamp, Timothy J

    2016-03-01

    Several studies have reported reprogramming of fibroblasts into induced cardiomyocytes; however, reprogramming into proliferative induced cardiac progenitor cells (iCPCs) remains to be accomplished. Here we report that a combination of 11 or 5 cardiac factors along with canonical Wnt and JAK/STAT signaling reprogrammed adult mouse cardiac, lung, and tail tip fibroblasts into iCPCs. The iCPCs were cardiac mesoderm-restricted progenitors that could be expanded extensively while maintaining multipotency to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells in vitro. Moreover, iCPCs injected into the cardiac crescent of mouse embryos differentiated into cardiomyocytes. iCPCs transplanted into the post-myocardial infarction mouse heart improved survival and differentiated into cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells. Lineage reprogramming of adult somatic cells into iCPCs provides a scalable cell source for drug discovery, disease modeling, and cardiac regenerative therapy. PMID:26877223

  1. Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Seventh cranial nerve palsy due to birth trauma ... these factors do not lead to facial nerve palsy or birth trauma. ... The most common form of facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma ... This part controls the muscles around the lips. The muscle ...

  2. Cardiac Extracellular Vesicles in Normal and Infarcted Heart

    PubMed Central

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.

    2016-01-01

    Heart is a complex assembly of many cell types constituting myocardium, endocardium and epicardium that intensively communicate to each other in order to maintain the proper cardiac function. There are many types of intercellular intracardiac signals, with a prominent role of extracellular vesicles (EVs), such as exosomes and microvesicles, for long-distant delivering of complex messages. Cardiomyocytes release EVs, whose content could significantly vary depending on the stimulus. In stress, such as hypoxia, inflammation or injury, cardiomyocytes increase secretion of EVs. In hypoxic conditions, cardiac EVs are enriched with angiogenic and prosurvival factors. In acute myocardial infarction (AMI), damaged cardiac muscle cells produce EVs with increased content of angiogenic, anti-apoptotic, mitogenic and growth factors in order to induce repair and healing of the infarcted myocardium. Exosomal microRNAs play a central role in cardiac regeneration. In AMI, circulating cardiac EVs abundantly contain cardiac-specific miRNAs that serve as indicators of cardiac damage and have a big diagnostic potential as AMI biomarkers. Cardioprotective and regenerative properties of exosomes derived from cardiac and non-cardiac stem/progenitor cells are very helpful to be used in cell-free cardiotherapy and regeneration of post-infarct myocardium. PMID:26742038

  3. Cardiac Biomarkers: a Focus on Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Forough, Reza; Scarcello, Catherine; Perkins, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Historically, biomarkers have been used in two major ways to maintain and improve better health status: first, for diagnostic purposes, and second, as specific targets to treat various diseases. A new era in treatment and even cure for the some diseases using reprograming of somatic cells is about to be born. In this approach, scientists are successfully taking human skin cells (previously considered terminally-differentiated cells) and re-programming them into functional cardiac myocytes and other cell types in vitro. A cell reprograming approach for treatment of cardiovascular diseases will revolutionize the field of medicine and significantly expand the human lifetime. Availability of a comprehensive catalogue for cardiac biomarkers is necessary for developing cell reprograming modalities to treat cardiac diseases, as well as for determining the progress of reprogrammed cells as they become cardiac cells. In this review, we present a comprehensive survey of the cardiac biomarkers currently known. PMID:23074366

  4. Physiology and metabolism of tissue-engineered skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cindy S; Davis, Brittany N J; Madden, Lauran; Bursac, Nenad; Truskey, George A

    2014-09-01

    Skeletal muscle is a major target for tissue engineering, given its relative size in the body, fraction of cardiac output that passes through muscle beds, as well as its key role in energy metabolism and diabetes, and the need for therapies for muscle diseases such as muscular dystrophy and sarcopenia. To date, most studies with tissue-engineered skeletal muscle have utilized murine and rat cell sources. On the other hand, successful engineering of functional human muscle would enable different applications including improved methods for preclinical testing of drugs and therapies. Some of the requirements for engineering functional skeletal muscle include expression of adult forms of muscle proteins, comparable contractile forces to those produced by native muscle, and physiological force-length and force-frequency relations. This review discusses the various strategies and challenges associated with these requirements, specific applications with cultured human myoblasts, and future directions. PMID:24912506

  5. Physiology and Metabolism of Tissue Engineered Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Cindy S.; Davis, Brittany N.J.; Madden, Lauran; Bursac, Nenad; Truskey, George A.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a major target for tissue engineering, given its relative size in the body, fraction of cardiac output that passes through muscle beds, as well as its key role in energy metabolism and diabetes, and the need for therapies for muscle diseases such as muscular dystrophy and sarcopenia. To date, most studies with tissue-engineered skeletal muscle have utilized murine and rat cell sources. On the other hand, successful engineering of functional human muscle would enable different applications including improved methods for preclinical testing of drugs and therapies. Some of the requirements for engineering functional skeletal muscle include expression of adult forms of muscle proteins, comparable contractile forces to those produced by native muscle, and physiological force-length and force-frequency relations. This review discusses the various strategies and challenges associated with these requirements, specific applications with cultured human myoblasts, and future directions. PMID:24912506

  6. Regulation of muscle growth in neonates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review reports recent findings on the multiple factors that regulate skeletal muscle growth in neonates. Skeletal muscle is the fastest growing protein mass in neonates. The high rate of neonatal muscle growth is due to accelerated rates of protein synthesis accompanied by the rapid accumulatio...

  7. Hypertrophy and hyperplasia of smooth muscle cells of small intramyocardial arteries in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Amann, K; Gharehbaghi, H; Stephen, S; Mall, G

    1995-01-01

    Hearts of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were investigated by means of stereology and were compared with those of normotensive. Wistar-Kyoto controls. At the age of 9 months, hypertensive rats showed cardiac hypertrophy, marked myocardial fibrosis, activation of nonvascular interstitium, focal myocytial degeneration, reduction of capillarization, and microarteriopathy of small intramyocardial arteries. Stereologically, a significant increase in the total left ventricular arterial wall volume (+180% versus controls) was found in SHR hearts. By using new stereological techniques, the orientator and the nucleator, we investigated whether this significant increase in total left ventricular arterial wall volume was due to hyperplasia of smooth muscle cells in addition to the process of vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy that is common in SHR. Additionally, the nuclear size and ratio of cell volume to nuclear volume were determined using another new stereological technique, the selector. The stereological data indicate a significant increase in mean cell and nuclear volumes as well as in the total number of left ventricular arterial smooth muscle cells of SHR. Additionally, the total length of intramyocardial arteries was also significantly increased in hypertensive rats. The volume and number of arterial smooth muscle cells per arterial length were significantly (P < .001 and P < .05, respectively) higher in SHR than in normotensive controls. Thus, we conclude that hypertrophy and hyperplasia of smooth muscle cells are involved in intramyocardial arterial growth processes in hypertensive heart remodeling.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7843743

  8. Primary cardiac lymphoma mimicking infiltrative cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ga Yeon; Kim, Won Seog; Ko, Young-Hyeh; Choi, Jin-Oh; Jeon, Eun-Seok

    2013-05-01

    Primary cardiac lymphoma is a rare malignancy which has been described as thickened myocardium due to the infiltration of atypical lymphocytes and accompanying intracardiac masses. Here, we report a case of a primary cardiac lymphoma without demonstrable intracardiac masses, mimicking infiltrative cardiomyopathy. A 40-year-old male presented with exertional dyspnoea and was diagnosed as having restrictive cardiomyopathy with severely decreased LV systolic function. Endomyocardial biopsy was performed and the diagnosis of primary cardiac lymphoma was confirmed. After appropriate chemotherapy, he recovered his systolic function fully. PMID:23248217

  9. Cardiac Amyloidosis Presenting With Cardiogenic Shock.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Ashwad; Brener, Sorin J; Narula, Navneet; Worku, Berhane; Gulkarov, Iosif

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac amyloidosis is an infiltrative disorder of the myocardium. It is the result of one of 4 types of amyloidosis: primary systemic (immunoglobulin light chain), secondary, familial (hereditary), or senile. Cardiac amyloidosis ultimately causes congestive heart failure due to irreversible restrictive cardiomyopathy. Because of the rapid progression of the disease, early recognition and determination of underlying etiology are important for tailored therapy. Current interventions range from conservative heart failure management to autologous stem cell and heart transplantation. We present a case of cardiac amyloidosis accompanying undiagnosed multiple myeloma to illustrate the rapid progression of the disease and the complexities of diagnosing and treating this disorder. PMID:26177555

  10. Muscle cramps

    MedlinePlus

    ... The most common cause of muscle cramps during sports activity is not getting enough fluids. Often, drinking ... alone does not always help. Salt tablets or sports drinks, which also replenish lost minerals, can be ...