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Sample records for cardiac output assessment

  1. Cardiac Output Assessed by Invasive and Minimally Invasive Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Allison J.; Cohn, Jennifer Hochman; Ranasinghe, J. Sudharma

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac output (CO) measurement has long been considered essential to the assessment and guidance of therapeutic decisions in critically ill patients and for patients undergoing certain high-risk surgeries. Despite controversies, complications and inherent errors in measurement, pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) continuous and intermittent bolus techniques of CO measurement continue to be the gold standard. Newer techniques provide less invasive alternatives; however, currently available monitors are unable to provide central circulation pressures or true mixed venous saturations. Esophageal Doppler and pulse contour monitors can predict fluid responsiveness and have been shown to decrease postoperative morbidity. Many minimally invasive techniques continue to suffer from decreased accuracy and reliability under periods of hemodynamic instability, and so few have reached the level of interchangeability with the PAC. PMID:21776254

  2. In vivo validation of cardiac output assessment in non-standard 3D echocardiographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nillesen, M. M.; Lopata, R. G. P.; de Boode, W. P.; Gerrits, I. H.; Huisman, H. J.; Thijssen, J. M.; Kapusta, L.; de Korte, C. L.

    2009-04-01

    Automatic segmentation of the endocardial surface in three-dimensional (3D) echocardiographic images is an important tool to assess left ventricular (LV) geometry and cardiac output (CO). The presence of speckle noise as well as the nonisotropic characteristics of the myocardium impose strong demands on the segmentation algorithm. In the analysis of normal heart geometries of standardized (apical) views, it is advantageous to incorporate a priori knowledge about the shape and appearance of the heart. In contrast, when analyzing abnormal heart geometries, for example in children with congenital malformations, this a priori knowledge about the shape and anatomy of the LV might induce erroneous segmentation results. This study describes a fully automated segmentation method for the analysis of non-standard echocardiographic images, without making strong assumptions on the shape and appearance of the heart. The method was validated in vivo in a piglet model. Real-time 3D echocardiographic image sequences of five piglets were acquired in radiofrequency (rf) format. These ECG-gated full volume images were acquired intra-operatively in a non-standard view. Cardiac blood flow was measured simultaneously by an ultrasound transit time flow probe positioned around the common pulmonary artery. Three-dimensional adaptive filtering using the characteristics of speckle was performed on the demodulated rf data to reduce the influence of speckle noise and to optimize the distinction between blood and myocardium. A gradient-based 3D deformable simplex mesh was then used to segment the endocardial surface. A gradient and a speed force were included as external forces of the model. To balance data fitting and mesh regularity, one fixed set of weighting parameters of internal, gradient and speed forces was used for all data sets. End-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were computed from the segmented endocardial surface. The cardiac output derived from this automatic segmentation was validated quantitatively by comparing it with the CO values measured from the volume flow in the pulmonary artery. Relative bias varied between 0 and -17%, where the nominal accuracy of the flow meter is in the order of 10%. Assuming the CO measurements from the flow probe as a gold standard, excellent correlation (r = 0.99) was observed with the CO estimates obtained from image segmentation.

  3. Assessment of cardiac dynamics during stress echocardiography by the peak power output-to-left ventricular mass ratio.

    PubMed

    Dini, Frank L

    2011-05-01

    Peak cardiac power-to-mass and peak mass-to-power are variables that couple cardiac power output with left ventricular (LV) mass at peak exercise or during maximal inotropic stimulation. Quantitative stress echocardiography enables the calculation of power output according to the formula: 133 × 10(-6) × stroke volume per second (ml) × mean blood pressure (BP; mmHg) × heart rate. Power-to-mass may be calculated as LV power output per 100 g of LV mass: 100 g × LV power output divided by LV mass (W/100 g). Conversely, mass-to-power may be estimated by dividing LV mass index by LV power output (g/m(2)/W). With a little rearrangement of the formulas we can write: power-to-mass (W/100 g) = 0.222 × cardiac output (l/min) × mean BP (mmHg)/LV mass (g) and mass-to-power (g/m(2)/W) = LV mass index/0.00222 × cardiac output (l/min) × mean BP (mmHg). These parameters reflect the energy delivery of ventricular myocardium with respect to potential energy that is stored in LV mass. The assessment of peak power-to-mass and peak mass-to-power indices may be useful to distinguish compensatory versus maladaptive remodeling in patients with LV dysfunction. When the integrity of myocardial structure is compromised, a disproportion becomes apparent between maximal cardiac power output and LV mass and this leads to either a reduction of peak power-to-mass or an increase of peak mass-to-power. Preliminary reports have demonstrated the usefulness and the prognostic value of peak power-to-mass and peak mass-to-power in patients with LV systolic dysfunction and coronary artery disease. PMID:21627476

  4. Mathematics and the Heart: Understanding Cardiac Output

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champanerkar, Jyoti

    2013-01-01

    This paper illustrates a biological application of the concepts of relative change and area under a curve, from mathematics. We study two biological measures "relative change in cardiac output" and "cardiac output", which are predictors of heart blockages and other related ailments. Cardiac output refers to the quantity of…

  5. A Review of Intraoperative Goal-Directed Therapy Using Arterial Waveform Analysis for Assessment of Cardiac Output

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Bustamante, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that goal-directed hemodynamic management can improve outcomes in surgical and intensive care settings. Arterial waveform analysis is one of the different techniques used for guiding goal-directed therapy. Multiple proprietary systems have developed algorithms for obtaining cardiac output from an arterial waveform, including the FloTrac, LiDCO, and PiCCO systems. These systems vary in terms of how they analyze the arterial pressure waveform as well as their requirements for invasive line placement and calibration. Although small-scale clinical trials using these monitors show promising data, large-scale multicenter trials are still needed to better determine how intraoperative goal-directed therapy with arterial waveform analysis can improve patient outcomes. This review provides a comparative analysis of the different arterial waveform monitors for intraoperative goal-directed therapy. PMID:24987744

  6. Reduced cardiac output in imported Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Volume substitution remains subject of controversy in the light of effusions and oedema potentially complicating this highly febrile disease. Understanding the role of myocardial and circulatory function appears to be essential for clinical management. In the present study, cardiac function and cardiac proteins have been assessed and correlated with parasitological and immunologic parameters in patients with imported Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Methods In a prospective case-control study, 28 patients with uncomplicated and complicated P. falciparum malaria were included and findings were compared with 26 healthy controls. Cardiac function parameters were assessed by an innovative non-invasive method based on the re-breathing technique. In addition, cardiac enzymes and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were measured and assessed with respect to clinical symptoms and conditions of malaria. Results Cardiac index (CI) as a measurement of cardiac output (CO) was 21% lower in malaria patients than in healthy controls (2.7 l/min/m2 versus 3.4 l/min/m2; P < 0.001). In contrast, systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) was increased by 29% (32.6 mmHg?m2/(l/min) versus 23.2 mmHg?m2/(l/min); P < 0.001). This correlated with increased cardiac proteins in patients versus controls: pro-BNP 139.3 pg/ml versus 60.4 pg/ml (P = 0.03), myoglobin 43.6 ?g/l versus 27.8 ?g/l (P = < 0.001). All measured cytokines were significantly increased in patients with malaria. CI, SVRI as well as cytokine levels did not correlate with blood parasite density. Conclusions The results support previous reports suggesting impaired cardiac function contributing to clinical manifestations in P. falciparum malaria. Findings may be relevant for fluid management and should be further explored in endemic regions. PMID:21658247

  7. Methods and apparatus for determining cardiac output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Richard J. (Inventor); Mukkamala, Ramakrishna (Inventor); Sherman, Derin A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for determining a dynamical property of the systemic or pulmonary arterial tree using long time scale information, i.e., information obtained from measurements over time scales greater than a single cardiac cycle. In one aspect, the invention provides a method and apparatus for monitoring cardiac output (CO) from a single blood pressure signal measurement obtained at any site in the systemic or pulmonary arterial tree or from any related measurement including, for example, fingertip photoplethysmography.According to the method the time constant of the arterial tree, defined to be the product of the total peripheral resistance (TPR) and the nearly constant arterial compliance, is determined by analyzing the long time scale variations (greater than a single cardiac cycle) in any of these blood pressure signals. Then, according to Ohm's law, a value proportional to CO may be determined from the ratio of the blood pressure signal to the estimated time constant. The proportional CO values derived from this method may be calibrated to absolute CO, if desired, with a single, absolute measure of CO (e.g., thermodilution). The present invention may be applied to invasive radial arterial blood pressure or pulmonary arterial blood pressure signals which are routinely measured in intensive care units and surgical suites or to noninvasively measured peripheral arterial blood pressure signals or related noninvasively measured signals in order to facilitate the clinical monitoring of CO as well as TPR.

  8. Cardiac Risk Assessment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... helpful? Formal name: Cardiac Risk Assessment Related tests: Lipid Profile , VLDL Cholesterol , hs-CRP , Lp(a) Overview | ... on Coronary artery disease: Tests and diagnosis .) The lipid profile is the most important blood test for ...

  9. A Review of Systemic Vasodilators in Low Cardiac Output Syndrome Following Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Mills, Kimberly I; Costello, John M; Almodovar, Melvin C

    2016-01-01

    Following surgery for congenital heart disease, patients develop a predictable and progressive decline in cardiac output known as low cardiac output syndrome. During low cardiac output states, a compensatory response to increase systemic perfusion occurs both innately and as part of the postoperative pharmacologic support strategies intended to increase or sustain adequate oxygen delivery. The result typically involves a rise in systemic vascular resistance and heart rate. These and other responses may actually limit the ability of the recently operated heart to provide sufficient cardiac output to meet the oxygen demands of the body. In order to improve systemic oxygen delivery, clinicians have increasingly employed systemic vasodilator therapy to reduce afterload and improve ventriculoarterial coupling. This review will summarize currently utilized pharmacologic agents that promote systemic vasodilation and improve cardiac output through afterload reduction. This article addresses the fourth of eight topics comprising the special issue entitled "Pharmacologic strategies with afterload reduction in low cardiac output syndrome after pediatric cardiac surgery". PMID:26463987

  10. Noninvasive continuous cardiac output monitoring in perioperative and intensive care medicine.

    PubMed

    Saugel, B; Cecconi, M; Wagner, J Y; Reuter, D A

    2015-04-01

    The determination of blood flow, i.e. cardiac output, is an integral part of haemodynamic monitoring. This is a review on noninvasive continuous cardiac output monitoring in perioperative and intensive care medicine. We present the underlying principles and validation data of the following technologies: thoracic electrical bioimpedance, thoracic bioreactance, vascular unloading technique, pulse wave transit time, and radial artery applanation tonometry. According to clinical studies, these technologies are capable of providing cardiac output readings noninvasively and continuously. They, therefore, might prove to be innovative tools for the assessment of advanced haemodynamic variables at the bedside. However, for most technologies there are conflicting data regarding the measurement performance in comparison with reference methods for cardiac output assessment. In addition, each of the reviewed technology has its own limitations regarding applicability in the clinical setting. In validation studies comparing cardiac output measurements using these noninvasive technologies in comparison with a criterion standard method, it is crucial to correctly apply statistical methods for the assessment of a technology's accuracy, precision, and trending capability. Uniform definitions for 'clinically acceptable agreement' between innovative noninvasive cardiac output monitoring systems and criterion standard methods are currently missing. Further research must aim to further develop the different technologies for noninvasive continuous cardiac output determination with regard to signal recording, signal processing, and clinical applicability. PMID:25596280

  11. Regulation of cardiac output in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Siebenmann, Christoph; Lundby, Carsten

    2015-12-01

    This brief review addresses the regulation of cardiac output (Q) at rest and during submaximal exercise in acute and chronic hypoxia. To preserve systemic O2 delivery in acute hypoxia Q is increased by an acceleration of heart rate, whereas stroke volume (SV) remains unchanged. Tachycardia is governed by activation of carotid and aortic chemoreceptors and a concomitant reduction in arterial baroreflex activation, all balancing sympathovagal activity toward sympathetic dominance. As hypoxia extends over several days a combination of different adaptive processes restores arterial O2 content to or beyond sea level values and hence Q normalizes. The latter however occurs as a consequence of a decrease in SV whereas tachycardia persists. The diminished SV reflects a lower left ventricular end-diastolic volume which is primarily related to hypoxia-generated reduction in plasma volume. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction may contribute by increasing right ventricular afterload and thus decreasing its ejection fraction. In summary, the Q response to hypoxia is the result of a complex interplay between several physiological mechanisms. Future studies are encouraged to establish the individual contributions of the different components from an integrative perspective. PMID:26589118

  12. [Echocardiography in emergency admissions. Recognition of cardiac low-output failure].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J; Maier, A; Christ, M

    2012-10-01

    Detection of acute cardiac dysfunction and differential diagnosis of low cardiac output syndrome is challenging for emergency physicians. For the critical ill patient it is essential to rapidly identify the underlying disease to initiate the correct therapy and optimize patient outcome. Echocardiography is the diagnostic tool of choice for the evaluation of low cardiac output states. In the setting of the emergency department the use of focused echocardiography instead of detailed echocardiographic studies of cardiologists is appropriate and should be provided for emergency care. The differentiation in preserved versus reduced left ventricular ejection fraction as a first assessment is helpful, particularly for physicians not well trained in echocardiography. The structured and focused approach to evaluate or exclude differential diagnoses of cardiac dysfunction is the key for optimal management of acute and critically ill patients with low cardiac output. PMID:23052991

  13. Pulmonary Vasodilators in the Management of Low Cardiac Output Syndrome After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Avila-Alvarez, Alejandro; Del Cerro Marin, Maria Jesus; Bautista-Hernandez, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is among the causes of low cardiac output syndrome after neonatal and pediatric cardiac surgery. In the setting of transient postoperative myocardial dysfunction, even a moderate elevation of pulmonary pressure can result in heart dysfunction and circulatory collapse. Although, specific pharmacological manipulation of pulmonary vascular resistance is frequently required in the perioperative period, there is no widely standardized management. In this review, a systematic literature search of PubMed and MEDLINE databases using relevant terms was performed. All clinical trials and relevant manuscripts, along with important physiological, pharmacological, and evidence-based considerations involving the use of pulmonary vasodilators in the management of low cardiac output syndrome after cardiac surgery were reviewed. This article addresses the fifth of eight topics comprising the special issue entitled "Pharmacologic strategies with afterload reduction in low cardiac output syndrome after pediatric cardiac surgery". PMID:26463986

  14. The relationship between cardiac output and effective renal plasma flow in patients with cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    McGiffin, D; Tauxe, W N; Lewis, C; Karp, R; Mantle, J

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) and cardiac output was examined in 46 patients (22 with congestive heart failure and 24 following cardiac surgical procedures) by simultaneously measuring the global ERPF by the single-injection method and cardiac output by the thermodilution method. Of the patients in the heart-failure group, 21 also had pulmonary artery end diastolic pressure (PAEDP) recorded at the same time. ERPF and cardiac output were found to be related by the regression equation: cardiac output = 2.08 +/- 0.0065 ERPF (r, 0.80), with a SE of estimate of 0.81 l/min. ERPF and PAEDP were related by the regression equation: PAEDP = 45.02-0.0675 ERPF (r, 0.86), with a SE of estimate of 5.5 mm Hg. ERPF may be a useful noninvasive method of estimating cardiac output if it is known that no intrinsic kidney disease is present, and if the error of 0.81 l/min (1 SE of estimate) is within the range of clinical usefulness. The error is principally attributable to the determination of cardiac output by the thermodilution method. PMID:6526053

  15. Comparison of impedance cardiography and dye dilution method for measuring cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    Spiering, W; van Es, P N; de Leeuw, P W

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To assess the degree of agreement between impedance cardiography, using the NCCOM3-R7 device, and the gold standard—the dye dilution method—both under basal conditions and after stimulation of cardiac output.?Patients—35 paired measurements in five healthy male volunteers.?Interventions—To obtain higher levels of cardiac output, cardiac performance was stimulated with a dopamine infusion.?Results—In 35 paired measurements, the mean of all the impedance values was higher than that of the dye dilution values, at 10.2 v 7.4 l/min (p < 0.0001). The mean discrepancy between the two methods was 3.3 l/min, and the mean bias ?2.9 l/min, with limits of agreement of ?9.0 and 3.2 l/min. A change in cardiac output could not adequately be predicted by the NCCOM3-R7. In 20 of 25 measurements obtained during continuous intravenous dopamine infusions there was a rise in dye dilution cardiac output (range 0.2 to 5.9 l/min). Neither the magnitude nor the direction of the change in dye dilution values corresponded with the change measured by impedance cardiography. The mean discrepancy here between the two methods was 1.8 l/min, and the mean bias ?0.8 l/min, with limits of agreement of ?4.9 and 3.3 l/min.?Conclusions—In healthy volunteers, impedance cardiography with NCCOM3-R7 is inadequate for assessing cardiac output when compared with the dye dilution method.?? Keywords: cardiac output;  impedance cardiography;  dye dilution PMID:9659188

  16. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Low Cardiac Output Syndrome after Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Hernandez, Victor; Karamanlidis, Georgios; McCully, James D; Del Nido, Pedro J

    2016-01-01

    Several cellular and molecular mechanisms have been implicated in the development of myocardial dysfunction and low cardiac output in pediatric patients undergoing heart surgery. Ischemia- reperfusion injury with alterations in calcium homeostasis as well as mitochondrial function has been strongly related to myocyte damage and heart failure in this population. In this article, we will review the main mechanisms of postoperative cardiac dysfunction at cellular and molecular levels and the subsequent protective strategies. In addition, we will describe cellular features of the neonatal or immature myocardium and will suggest possible protective management strategies. This article addresses the first of eight topics comprising the special issue entitled "Pharmacologic strategies with afterload reduction in low cardiac output syndrome after pediatric cardiac surgery". PMID:26463990

  17. Cardiac output during excitation of chemoreflexes in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Barer, Gwenda R.; Nüsser, E.

    1958-01-01

    In cats under chloralose anaesthesia the reflex fall of blood pressure and heart rate caused by injection of veratrine, amidines, diphenhydramine, or ethyl acetoacetate was accompanied by a fall in cardiac output. After veratrine and amidines there was a fall in mean pulmonary arterial pressure and after veratrine no significant change in pulmonary vascular resistance. After diphenhydramine and ethyl acetoacetate there was a rise in mean pulmonary arterial pressure and after diphenhydramine an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance. The effects of veratrine and amidines, but not those of diphenhydramine and ethyl acetoacetate, were abolished by section of the vagi. The main change leading to the fall of cardiac output after amidines was bradycardia. PMID:13618538

  18. Measurement of cardiac output from dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Seonghwan; Scalzetti, Ernest M.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To introduce a method of estimating cardiac output from the dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT that is primarily used to determine the optimal time window of CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA). Methods: Dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT series, acquired for eight patients, were retrospectively analyzed. The dynamic CT series was acquired, prior to the main CTPA, in cine mode (1 frame/s) for a single slice at the level of the main pulmonary artery covering the cross sections of ascending aorta (AA) and descending aorta (DA) during the infusion of iodinated contrast. The time series of contrast changes obtained for DA, which is the downstream of AA, was assumed to be related to the time series for AA by the convolution with a delay function. The delay time constant in the delay function, representing the average time interval between the cross sections of AA and DA, was determined by least square error fitting between the convoluted AA time series and the DA time series. The cardiac output was then calculated by dividing the volume of the aortic arch between the cross sections of AA and DA (estimated from the single slice CT image) by the average time interval, and multiplying the result by a correction factor. Results: The mean cardiac output value for the six patients was 5.11 (l/min) (with a standard deviation of 1.57 l/min), which is in good agreement with the literature value; the data for the other two patients were too noisy for processing. Conclusions: The dynamic single-slice pulmonary circulation time CT series also can be used to estimate cardiac output.

  19. Inodilators in the Management of Low Cardiac Output Syndrome After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Barba, Angela; Gonzalez-Rivera, Iria; Bautista-Hernandez, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative low cardiac output syndrome has been shown to have both a central and a peripheral vascular involvement. Therefore, inodilators which provide with a combination of positive inotropic and vasodilating therapy, conceptually should be an ideal form of treatment. However, contradictory data on these drugs exist. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors (e.g. milrinone) and more recently calcium sensitizers (e.g. levosimendan) have been most commonly used groups in the clinical setting. This review will summarize the pharmacology of inodilators with a special foccus on current clinical evidence. This article addresses the sixth of eight topics comprising the special issue entitled "Pharmacologic strategies with afterload reduction in low cardiac output syndrome after pediatric cardiac surgery". PMID:26463985

  20. A fiberoptic reflection densitometer with cardiac output calculator.

    PubMed

    Landsman, M L; Knop, N; Mook, G A; Zijlstra, W G

    1979-02-14

    A catheter-tip densitometer for indocyanine green is described consisting of a cardiac catheter containing optical fibers, an incandescent light source, a light detection unit and a processing unit. Half of the optical fibers guide the light to the blood at the tip of the catheter, the other half the back-scattered (reflected) light to the detection unit. In the detection unit the light is measured by two silicium barrier layer photocells after it has been split into two beams by a beam splitter. In the measuring channel the light passes an 800 nm filter before reaching the photocell. When fiberoptic catheters with glass fibers are employed, the other channel, used for compensation of non-specific effects such as blood flow variations, contains no filter, thus measuring light in a broad spectral band. It is shown that in this way compensation of flow effects may be about two times better than when a 920 nm filter is used. When using plastic optical fibers a 950 nm filter must be used, because above lambda = 850 nm plastic fibers transmit only a band around that wavelength (950 nm). At zero dye concentration the densitometer output or ratio of compensating and measuring photocell output R/R800 is almost insensitive to changes in haemoglobin concentration. When the blood contains dye, however, the influence of haemoglobin concentration is considerable. The densitometer output R/R800 is linearly related to dye concentration up to 50 mg . 1-1, the output R920/R800 up to 30 mg . 1(-1). The output R/R800 decreases with decreasing oxygen saturation; the slope of the calibration line, however, appears to be unaffected. The processing unit also contains an analog cardiac output calculator consisting of an integrator and a divider. Central dye dilution curves recorded from the pulmonary artery after injection of dye into the right atrium or a caval vein come down to the baseline. At this moment the reading of a digital voltmeter displaying the divider output calibrated in 1 . min-1 can be held and the reading taken. PMID:372921

  1. Maximal Cardiac Output Determines 6 Minutes Walking Distance in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Deboeck, Gaël; Taboada, Dolores; Hagan, Guy; Treacy, Carmen; Page, Kathy; Sheares, Karen; Naeije, Robert; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The 6 minutes walk test (6MWT) is often shown to be the best predictor of mortality in pulmonary hypertension (PH) probably because it challenges the failing heart to deliver adequate cardiac output. We hypothesised that the 6MWT elicits maximal cardiac output as measured during a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET). Methods 18 patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (n?=?12) or pulmonary arterial hypertension (n?=?6) and 10 healthy subjects performed a 6MWT and CPET with measurements of cardiac output (non invasive rebreathing device) before and directly after exercise. Heart rate was measured during 6MWT with a cardiofrequence meter. Results Cardiac output and heart rate measured at the end of the 6MWT were linearly related to 6MW distance (mean±SD: 490±87 m). Patients with a high NT-pro-BNP achieve a maximum cardiac output during the 6MWT, while in normal subjects and in patients with a low-normal NT-proBNP, cardiac output at the end of a 6MWT was lower than achieved at maximum exercise during a CPET. In both cases, heart rate is the major determinant of exercise-induced increase in cardiac output. However, stroke volume increased during CPET in healthy subjects, not in PH patients. Conclusion Maximal cardiac output is elicited by 6MWT in PH patients with failing right ventricle. Cardiac output increase is dependent on chronotropic response in patients with PH. PMID:24647561

  2. Thermodynamics of the heart: Relation between cardiac output and oxygen consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Mituo; Sakane, Kumiko K.; Bertolotti, Simone A.

    2008-06-01

    A thermodynamic approach is used to derive a relation between cardiac output and rate of oxygen consumption. As an example, the relation is used to calculate the cardiac output of a young woman exercising on a treadmill. The results can be understood by undergraduates without any previous knowledge of human physiology.

  3. Sarcomere length dependence of power output is increased after PKA treatment in rat cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hanft, Laurin M.; McDonald, Kerry S.

    2009-01-01

    The Frank-Starling relationship of the heart yields increased stroke volume with greater end-diastolic volume, and this relationship is steeper after ?-adrenergic stimulation. The underlying basis for the Frank-Starling mechanism involves length-dependent changes in both Ca2+ sensitivity of myofibrillar force and power output. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that PKA-induced phosphorylation of myofibrillar proteins would increase the length dependence of myofibrillar power output, which would provide a myofibrillar basis to, in part, explain the steeper Frank-Starling relations after ?-adrenergic stimulation. For these experiments, adult rat left ventricles were mechanically disrupted, permeabilized cardiac myocyte preparations were attached between a force transducer and position motor, and the length dependence of loaded shortening and power output were measured before and after treatment with PKA. PKA increased the phosphorylation of myosin binding protein C and cardiac troponin I, as assessed by autoradiography. In terms of myocyte mechanics, PKA decreased the Ca2+ sensitivity of force and increased loaded shortening and power output at all relative loads when the myocyte preparations were at long sarcomere length (?2.30 ?m). PKA had less of an effect on loaded shortening and power output at short sarcomere length (?2.0 ?m). These changes resulted in a greater length dependence of myocyte power output after PKA treatment; peak normalized power output increased ?20% with length before PKA and ?40% after PKA. These results suggest that PKA-induced phosphorylation of myofibrillar proteins explains, in part, the steeper ventricular function curves (i.e., Frank-Starling relationship) after ?-adrenergic stimulation of the left ventricle. PMID:19252095

  4. Validation of stroke volume and cardiac output by electrical interrogation of the brachial artery in normals: assessment of strengths, limitations, and sources of error.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Donald P; Henry, Isaac C; Lemmens, Harry J; Chaltas, Janell L; DeMaria, Anthony N; Moon, James B; Kahn, Andrew M

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this study is to validate a new, continuous, noninvasive stroke volume (SV) method, known as transbrachial electrical bioimpedance velocimetry (TBEV). TBEV SV was compared to SV obtained by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) in normal humans devoid of clinically apparent heart disease. Thirty-two (32) volunteers were enrolled in the study. Each subject was evaluated by echocardiography to assure that no aortic or mitral valve disease was present. Subsequently, each subject underwent electrical interrogation of the brachial artery by means of a high frequency, low amplitude alternating current. A first TBEV SV estimate was obtained. Immediately after the initial TBEV study, subjects underwent cMRI, using steady-state precession imaging to obtain a volumetric estimate of SV. Following cMRI, the TBEV SV study was repeated. Comparing the cMRI-derived SV to that of TBEV, the two TBEV estimates were averaged and compared to the cMRI standard. CO was computed as the product of SV and heart rate. Statistical methods consisted of Bland-Altman and linear regression analysis. TBEV SV and CO estimates were obtained in 30 of the 32 subjects enrolled. Bland-Altman analysis of pre- and post-cMRI TBEV SV showed a mean bias of 2.87 % (2.05 mL), precision of 13.59 % (11.99 mL) and 95 % limits of agreement (LOA) of +29.51 % (25.55 mL) and -23.77 % (-21.45 mL). Regression analysis for pre- and post-cMRI TBEV SV values yielded y = 0.76x + 25.1 and r(2) = 0.71 (r = 0.84). Bland-Altman analysis comparing cMRI SV with averaged TBEV SV showed a mean bias of -1.56 % (-1.53 mL), precision of 13.47 % (12.84 mL), 95 % LOA of +24.85 % (+23.64 mL) and -27.97 % (-26.7 mL) and percent error = 26.2 %. For correlation analysis, the regression equation was y = 0.82x + 19.1 and correlation coefficient r(2) = 0.61 (r = 0.78). Bland-Altman analysis of averaged pre- and post-cMRI TBEV CO versus cMRI CO yielded a mean bias of 5.01 % (0.32 L min(-1)), precision of 12.85 % (0.77 L min(-1)), 95 % LOA of +30.20 % (+0.1.83 L min(-1)) and -20.7 % (-1.19 L min(-1)) and percent error = 24.8 %. Regression analysis yielded y = 0.92x + 0.78, correlation coefficient r(2) = 0.74 (r = 0.86). TBEV is a novel, noninvasive method, which provides satisfactory estimates of SV and CO in normal humans. PMID:25682204

  5. [Low cardiac output following open heart surgery and catecholamine therapy].

    PubMed

    Papp, L; Gombocz, K; Wrana, G; Alotti, N; Varró, M; Feiler, E; Boronyák, A; Simon, J; Kecskés, G; Vígh, A

    1999-01-24

    The authors have studied the possible risk factors and complications of low cardiac output (LCO) following open heart operations. A retrospective analysis of 537 consecutive open heart operations has been performed with regards to the patients past medical and perioperative data. For statistical analysis the authors have applied the Chi-square test, T-probe, Mann-Whitney-test and logistical regression analysis by means of the SPSS software. Occurrence of various types of operations was as follows: coronary bypass (CABG): n = 266, 49.5%, combined CABG: n = 62, 11.5%, aortic valve replacement (AVR): n = 73, 13.6%, mitral valve replacement (MVR): n = 59, 11%, multiple valve replacement: n = 39, 7.3%, adult congenital surgery: n = 25, 4.7%. Aortic dissection repair: n = 6, 1.1%, miscellaneous: n = 7, 1.3%. LCO has developed in 7.3% (n = 39) of the patients. The authors have concluded that in the studied group of patients the independent risk factors of postoperative LCO are as follows: atrial fibrillation in the patient history, mitral valve disease, perioperative myocardial infarction, length of anaesthesia, NYHA stage, number of transfused units of blood, and the perioperative LDH value. Beyond these variables the cause of LCO in some cases was surely an intra or perioperative myocardial necrosis. At least a certain part of this perioperative myocardial damage must have been or might have been caused by the catecholamines given under compulsion for the treatment of LCO. PMID:10047705

  6. Determination of cardiac output in critically ill patients by dual beam Doppler echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Looyenga, D S; Liebson, P R; Bone, R C; Balk, R A; Messer, J V

    1989-02-01

    Recent technology in Doppler echocardiography has produced a dual beam Doppler instrument that is capable of insonating the total cross-sectional area of the ascending aorta. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of this instrument in measuring cardiac output in critically ill patients by comparing results with those of the thermodilution-derived cardiac output. A technically adequate Doppler cardiac output measurement was attained in 71 (91%) of 78 patients. The range of thermodilution-derived cardiac output measurements was from 1.58 to 11.70 liters/min. To maximize thermodilution cardiac output reliability, several measurements were made for each patient. Those patients in whom the difference between the highest and lowest measurement varied by less than 10% from the averaged results were accepted into the 50 patient study. There was significant correlation between dual beam Doppler- and thermodilution-derived cardiac output (r = 0.96, SEE = 0.55 liters/min, p less than 0.0001). This study demonstrates that dual beam Doppler ultrasound is a promising noninvasive method of measuring cardiac output in the critically ill patient. PMID:2913112

  7. Echocardiographic assessment of cardiac disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The physical principles and current applications of echocardiography in assessment of heart diseases are reviewed. Technical considerations and unresolved points relative to the use of echocardiography in various disease states are stressed. The discussion covers normal mitral valve motion, mitral stenosis, aortic regurgitation, atrial masses, mitral valve prolapse, and idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis. Other topics concern tricuspic valve abnormalities, aortic valve disease, pulmonic valve, pericardial effusion, intraventricular septal motion, and left ventricular function. The application of echocardiography to congenital heart disease diagnosis is discussed along with promising ultrasonic imaging systems. The utility of echocardiography in quantitative evaluation of cardiac disease is demonstrated.

  8. Measurement of cardiac output by use of noninvasively measured transient hemodilution curves with photoacoustic technology

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dongyel; Huang, Qiaojian; Li, Youzhi

    2014-01-01

    We present the theoretical basis and experimental verification for cardiac output measurements using noninvasively measured hemodilution curves afforded with an indicator dilution technique and the emerging photoacoustic technology. A photoacoustic system noninvasively tracks a transient hemodilution effect induced by a bolus of isotonic saline as an indicator. As a result, a photoacoustic indicator dilution curve is obtained, which allows to estimate cardiac output from the developed algorithm. The experiments with a porcine blood circulatory phantom system demonstrated the feasibility of this technology towards the development of a noninvasive cardiac output measurement system for patient monitoring. PMID:24877007

  9. Analysis of uncertainty in theoretical methods of cardiac output measurement using the "Monte Carlo" technique.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, R R; Baker, A B

    1993-09-01

    We have developed three models which describe the relationship between cardiac output and the uptake of volatile anaesthetic agents, based on the Fick equation, and determined if these models could provide useful methods of cardiac output measurement. Because many variables are involved in the calculation of cardiac output using these methods, a "Monte Carlo" simulation was performed to investigate the combined effect of uncertainties in several variables on the resultant cardiac output estimate. We found that the single-breath model was most accurate when the inspired concentration was large, while the rebreathing model was better with smaller inspired concentrations. The three-breath model was the least accurate under all conditions studied. Volatile anaesthetics were generally more accurate than nitrous oxide, with both enflurane and halothane more accurate than isoflurane. The "Monte Carlo" technique provides a valuable tool for analysis of errors in measurement methods. PMID:8398524

  10. Non-invasive determination of cardiac output by Doppler echocardiography and electrical bioimpedance.

    PubMed Central

    Northridge, D B; Findlay, I N; Wilson, J; Henderson, E; Dargie, H J

    1990-01-01

    Cardiac output measured by thermodilution in 25 patients within 24 hours of acute myocardial infarction was compared with cardiac output measured by Doppler echocardiography (24 patients) and electrical bioimpedance (25 patients). The mean (range) cardiac outputs measured by Doppler (4.03 (2.2-6.0) 1/min) and electrical bioimpedance (3.79 (1.1-6.2) 1/min) were similar to the mean thermodilution value (3.95 (2.1-6.2) 1/min). Both non-invasive techniques agreed closely with thermodilution in most patients. None the less, three results with each method disagreed with thermodilution by more than 1 1/min. Both non-invasive techniques were reproducible and accurate in most patients with acute myocardial infarction. Doppler echocardiography was time consuming and technically demanding. Electrical bioimpedance was simple to use and had the additional advantage of allowing continuous monitoring of the cardiac output. PMID:2317415

  11. Use of the single-breath method of estimating cardiac output during exercise-stress testing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buderer, M. C.; Rummel, J. A.; Sawin, C. F.; Mauldin, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    The single-breath cardiac output measurement technique of Kim et al. (1966) has been modified for use in obtaining cardiac output measurements during exercise-stress tests on Apollo astronauts. The modifications involve the use of a respiratory mass spectrometer for data acquisition and a digital computer program for data analysis. The variation of the modified method for triplicate steady-state cardiac output measurements was plus or minus 1 liter/min. The combined physiological and methodological variation seen during a set of three exercise tests on a series of subjects was 1 to 2.5 liter/min. Comparison of the modified method with the direct Fick technique showed that although the single-breath values were consistently low, the scatter of data was small and the correlation between the two methods was high. Possible reasons for the low single-breath cardiac output values are discussed.

  12. Cardiac output estimation from arterial blood pressure waveforms using the MIMIC II database

    E-print Network

    Chen, Tiffany

    2009-01-01

    The effect of signal quality on the accuracy of cardiac output (CO) estimation from arterial blood pressure (ABP) was evaluated using data from the Multi-Parameter Intelligent Patient Monitoring for Intensive Care (MIMIC) ...

  13. Redistribution of cardiac output to the kidneys by tertatolol does not involve prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Naeije, R; Degaute, J P

    1989-11-01

    Renal perfusion has been shown to be preserved or improved during treatment by tertatolol in patients with arterial hypertension. The aims of the present study were (1) to document the central and renal hemodynamic effects of tertatolol in normal subjects and (2) to look for a possible interaction between tertatolol and products of the cyclooxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism. Five mg of tertatolol, 1 g aspirin, 5 mg tertatolol together with 1 g aspirin, and placebo were administered to 8 healthy volunteers at 1 week intervals in a random order and in a double-blind fashion. Cardiac output was measured by cardiac Doppler echography and renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate by constant infusion techniques using I123-iodohippurate and Cr51-EDTA respectively. Measurements were performed before and then successively 2 and 4 h after oral intake of drugs or placebo. Tertatolol alone or with aspirin significantly decreased heart rate and cardiac output (P less than .05) without change in blood pressure, renal blood flow or glomerular filtration rate. The renal fraction of cardiac output was increased by tertatolol alone or with aspirin (P less than .05). Either placebo or aspirin alone had no effect. Thus tertatolol redistributes cardiac output to the kidneys in normal subjects as previously reported in hypertensive patients. This favorable effect on renal hemodynamics appers unlikely to be mediated by a local release of vasodilating prostaglandins. PMID:2573371

  14. Continuous cardiac output measurement - Aspects of Doppler frequency analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. S.; Hechtman, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    From the suprasternal notch blood flow velocity in the aorta can be measured non-invasively by a Doppler probe. Integration over systole after frequency analysis gives a measure of stroke volume if a separate diameter observation is incorporated. Frequency analysis by a zero crossing counter or by a set of parallel phaselock loops was less effective than a set of bandpass filters. Observations on dogs, baboons and humans before and after exercise or surgery suggest the indications to be useful. Application to judging heart failure by the effect of introducing a volume load is indicated. Changes in output also are measured in freely moving subjects.

  15. Exercise cardiac output following Skylab missions - The second manned Skylab mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buderer, M. C.; Mauldin, D. G.; Rummel, J. A.; Michel, E. L.; Sawin, C. F.

    1976-01-01

    Cardiac output was measured during preflight and postflight exercise-stress tests on the Skylab astronauts. In the postflight tests immediately following the 28-, 59-, and 84-d earth orbital missions, the astronauts exhibited an approximate 30% decrease in cardiac output coupled with an approximate 50% decrease in cardiac stroke volume during exercise. These changes were accompanied by elevated heart rates and significant increases in total systemic peripheral vascular resistance. Mean arterial pressure was unchanged. All parameters returned to normal preflight values within 30 d of the end of the orbital period. Duration of the zero-G exposure did not appear to influence either the magnitude of the hemodynamic changes or the time-course of their return to normal. These results are discussed in relation to other cardiovascular findings and possible mechanisms responsible for the observations are outlined.

  16. Cardiac output distribution and uteroplacental blood flow in the pregnant rabbit: a comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.L.; Gilbert, M.; Meschia, G.; Battaglia, F.C.

    1985-03-01

    This study presents data on cardiac output distribution and uterine and placental blood flows in pregnant rabbits under chronic steady-state conditions. Ten litters and 67 fetuses were studied at 29 days of gestation, by means of radioactive microspheres. Five nonpregnant female animals were also studied for comparison. Mean cardiac outputs were 747.16 +/- 55.7 and 613.80 +/- 63.76 ml/min in the pregnant and nonpregnant states, respectively. In the pregnant animals, uterine and mammary blood flows were 6.7% +/- 0.7% and 5.1% +/- 0.5% of cardiac output, respectively. Within litters, the highest placental blood flows occurred at the ovarian and vaginal ends of the uterine horn. Placental blood flow per gram of fetus was 0.106 +/- 0.008 ml X min-1 X gm-1. A comparison with analogous data in the guinea pig and sheep demonstrates that toward the end of pregnancy placental blood flow per gram of fetus is approximately 2.5-times higher in sheep than in rabbits and guinea pigs. Expressed as a percentage of cardiac output, near-term uterine blood flow is significantly less in rabbits than in guinea pigs and sheep, whereas mammary blood flow is significantly higher. These interspecies differences are related to differences in placental structure, fetal/maternal mass ratio, and maturity at birth.

  17. Cardiac output and peripheral resistance during larval development in the anuran amphibian Xenopus laevis

    E-print Network

    Burggren, Warren

    Cardiac output and peripheral resistance during larval development in the anuran amphibian Xenopus larval develop- ment in the anuran amphibian Xenopus Zaeuis. Am. J. PhysioZ. 269 (Regulatory Integrative; amphibians SURPRISINGLYLITTLE is known of the early development of cardiovascular function in vertebrates

  18. Effect of Hemorrhage on Cardiac Output, PVP, Alodosterone and Diuresis during Immersion in Men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simanonok, K.; Greenleaf, John E.; Bernauer, E. M.; Wade, C. E.; Keil, L. C.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a reduction in blood volume would attenuate or eliminate immersion-induced increases in cardiac output (Q (sup dot) sub co)) and urine excretion, and to investigate accompanying vasoactive and fluid-electrolyte hormonal responses.

  19. Estimation of cardiac output in patients with congestive heart failure by analysis of right ventricular pressure waveforms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardiac output (CO) is an important determinant of the hemodynamic state in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). We tested the hypothesis that CO can be estimated from the right ventricular (RV) pressure waveform in CHF patients using a pulse contour cardiac output algorithm that considers constant but patient specific RV outflow tract characteristic impedance. Method In 12 patients with CHF, breath-by-breath Fick CO and RV pressure waveforms were recorded utilizing an implantable hemodynamic monitor during a bicycle exercise protocol. These data were analyzed retrospectively to assess changes in characteristic impedance of the RV outflow tract during exercise. Four patients that were implanted with an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) implementing the algorithm were studied prospectively. During a two staged sub-maximal bicycle exercise test conducted at 4 and 16 weeks of implant, COs measured by direct Fick technique and estimated by the ICD were recorded and compared. Results At rest the total pulmonary arterial resistance and the characteristic impedance were 675 ± 345 and 48 ± 18 dyn.s.cm-5, respectively. During sub-maximal exercise, the total pulmonary arterial resistance decreased (? 91 ± 159 dyn.s.cm-5, p < 0.05) but the characteristic impedance was unaffected (? 3 ± 9 dyn.s.cm-5, NS). The algorithm derived cardiac output estimates correlated with Fick CO (7.6 ± 2.5 L/min, R2 = 0.92) with a limit of agreement of 1.7 L/min and tracked changes in Fick CO (R2 = 0.73). Conclusions The analysis of right ventricular pressure waveforms continuously recorded by an implantable hemodynamic monitor provides an estimate of CO and may prove useful in guiding treatment in patients with CHF. PMID:21569499

  20. Quantification of mitral regurgitation by automated cardiac output measurement: experimental and clinical validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, J. P.; Yang, X. S.; Qin, J. X.; Greenberg, N. L.; Zhou, J.; Vazquez, C. J.; Griffin, B. P.; Stewart, W. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop and validate an automated noninvasive method to quantify mitral regurgitation. BACKGROUND: Automated cardiac output measurement (ACM), which integrates digital color Doppler velocities in space and in time, has been validated for the left ventricular (LV) outflow tract but has not been tested for the LV inflow tract or to assess mitral regurgitation (MR). METHODS: First, to validate ACM against a gold standard (ultrasonic flow meter), 8 dogs were studied at 40 different stages of cardiac output (CO). Second, to compare ACM to the LV outflow (ACMa) and inflow (ACMm) tracts, 50 normal volunteers without MR or aortic regurgitation (44+/-5 years, 31 male) were studied. Third, to compare ACM with the standard pulsed Doppler-two-dimensional echocardiographic (PD-2D) method for quantification of MR, 51 patients (61+/-14 years, 30 male) with MR were studied. RESULTS: In the canine studies, CO by ACM (1.32+/-0.3 liter/min, y) and flow meter (1.35+/-0.3 liter/min, x) showed good correlation (r=0.95, y=0.89x+0.11) and agreement (deltaCO(y-x)=0.03+/-0.08 [mean+/-SD] liter/min). In the normal subjects, CO measured by ACMm agreed with CO by ACMa (r=0.90, p < 0.0001, deltaCO=-0.09+/-0.42 liter/min), PD (r=0.87, p < 0.0001, deltaCO=0.12+/-0.49 liter/min) and 2D (r=0.84, p < 0.0001, deltaCO=-0.16+/-0.48 liter/min). In the patients, mitral regurgitant volume (MRV) by ACMm-ACMa agreed with PD-2D (r= 0.88, y=0.88x+6.6, p < 0.0001, deltaMRV=2.68+/-9.7 ml). CONCLUSIONS: We determined that ACM is a feasible new method for quantifying LV outflow and inflow volume to measure MRV and that ACM automatically performs calculations that are equivalent to more time-consuming Doppler and 2D measurements. Additionally, ACM should improve MR quantification in routine clinical practice.

  1. Association of HeartMate II left ventricular assist device flow estimate with thermodilution cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Hasin, Tal; Huebner, Marianne; Li, Zhuo; Brown, Daniel; Stulak, John M; Boilson, Barry A; Joyce, Lyle; Pereira, Naveen L; Kushwaha, Sudhir S; Park, Soon J

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac output (CO) assessment is important in treating patients with heart failure. Durable left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) provide essentially all CO. In currently used LVADs, estimated device flow is generated by a computerized algorithm. However, LVAD flow estimate may be inaccurate in tracking true CO. We correlated LVAD (HeartMate II) flow with thermodilution CO during postoperative care (day 2-10 after implant) in 81 patients (5,616 paired measurements). Left ventricular assist device flow and CO correlated with a low correlation coefficient (r = 0.42). Left ventricular assist device readings were lower than CO measurements by approximately 0.36 L/min, trending for larger difference with higher values. Left ventricular assist device flow measurements showed less temporal variability compared with CO. Grouping for simultaneous measured blood pressure (BP < 60, 60-70, 70-80, 80-90, and ?90), the correlation of CO with LVAD flow differed (R = 0.42, 0.67, 0.48, 0.32, 0.32, respectively). Indicating better correlation when mean blood pressure is 60 to 70 mm Hg. Left ventricular assist device flow generally trends with measured CO, but large variability exists, hence flow measures should not be assumed to equal with CO. Clinicians should take into account variables such as high CO, BP, and opening of the aortic valve when interpreting LVAD flow readout. Direct flow sensors incorporated in the LVAD system may allow for better estimation. PMID:25068779

  2. Validation and application of single breath cardiac output determinations in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Fletcher, E. R.; Myhre, L. G.; Luft, U. C.

    1986-01-01

    The results of a procedure for estimating cardiac output by a single-breath technique (Qsb), obtained in healthy males during supine rest and during exercise on a bicycle ergometer, were compared with the results on cardiac output obtained by the direct Fick method (QF). The single breath maneuver consisted of a slow exhalation to near residual volume following an inspiration somewhat deeper than normal. The Qsb calculations incorporated an equation of the CO2 dissociation curve and a 'moving spline' sequential curve-fitting technique to calculate the instantaneous R from points on the original expirogram. The resulting linear regression equation indicated a 24-percent underestimation of QF by the Qsb technique. After applying a correction, the Qsb-QF relationship was improved. A subsequent study during upright rest and exercise to 80 percent of VO2(max) in 6 subjects indicated a close linear relationship between Qsb and VO2 for all 95 values obtained, with slope and intercept close to those in published studies in which invasive cardiac output measurements were used.

  3. Cardiac Output and Performance during a Marathon Race in Middle-Aged Recreational Runners

    PubMed Central

    Billat, Véronique L.; Petot, Hélène; Landrain, Morgan; Meilland, Renaud; Koralsztein, Jean Pierre; Mille-Hamard, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Despite the increasing popularity of marathon running, there are no data on the responses of stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) to exercise in this context. We sought to establish whether marathon performance is associated with the ability to sustain high fractional use of maximal SV and CO (i.e, cardiac endurance) and/or CO, per meter (i.e., cardiac cost). Methods. We measured the SV, heart rate (HR), CO, and running speed of 14 recreational runners in an incremental, maximal laboratory test and then during a real marathon race (mean performance: 3?hr 30?min ± 45?min). Results. Our data revealed that HR, SV and CO were all in a high but submaximal steady state during the marathon (87.0 ± 1.6%, 77.2 ± 2.6%, and 68.7 ± 2.8% of maximal values, respectively). Marathon performance was inversely correlated with an upward drift in the CO/speed ratio (mL of CO × m?1) (r = ?0.65, P < 0.01) and positively correlated with the runner's ability to complete the race at a high percentage of the speed at maximal SV (r = 0.83, P < 0.0002). Conclusion. Our results showed that marathon performance is inversely correlated with cardiac cost and positively correlated with cardiac endurance. The CO response could be a benchmark for race performance in recreational marathon runners. PMID:22645458

  4. The influence of nonlinear intra-thoracic vascular behaviour and compression characteristics on cardiac output during CPR.

    PubMed

    Koeken, Yvette; Aelen, Paul; Noordergraaf, Gerrit J; Paulussen, Igor; Woerlee, Pierre; Noordergraaf, Abraham

    2011-05-01

    Clinical observations suggest that the assumption of a linear relationship between chest compression pressure and cardiac output may be oversimplified. More complex behaviour may occur when the transmural pressure is large, changing the compliances and resistances in the intra-thoracic vasculature. A fundamental understanding of these compression induced phenomena is required for improving CPR. An extensively used, lumped element computer model (model I) of the circulation was upgraded and refined to include the intrathoracic vasculature (model II). After validation, model II was extended by adding variable compliances and resistances (model III) to the vascular structures. Successively, ranges of compression pressures, frequencies, duty cycles and compression pulse shapes were applied while controlling all other parameters. Cardiac output was then compared. The nonlinearities in compliance and resistance become important, limiting factors in cardiac output, starting in our experimental series at 70 mmHg peak compression pressure, and increasing with higher pressures. This effect is reproducible for sinusoidal and trapezoidal compression forms, resulting in lower cardiac output in all experiments at high compression pressures. Duty cycle and wait time are key parameters for cardiac output. Our data strongly indicate that vascular compliance, especially the ability of vessels to collapse (and potentially the cardiac chambers), can be a central factor in the limited output generated by chest compressions. Just pushing 'harder' or 'faster' is not always better, as an 'optimal' force and frequency may exist. Overly forceful compression can limit blood flow by restricting filling or depleting volume in the cardiac chambers and central great vessels. PMID:21324578

  5. Simulation Evaluation of Quantitative Myocardial Perfusion Assessment from Cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R; La Riviere, Patrick J; Alessio, Adam M

    2014-03-19

    Contrast enhancement on cardiac CT provides valuable information about myocardial perfusion and methods have been proposed to assess perfusion with static and dynamic acquisitions. There is a lack of knowledge and consensus on the appropriate approach to ensure 1) sufficient diagnostic accuracy for clinical decisions and 2) low radiation doses for patient safety. This work developed a thorough dynamic CT simulation and several accepted blood flow estimation techniques to evaluate the performance of perfusion assessment across a range of acquisition and estimation scenarios. Cardiac CT acquisitions were simulated for a range of flow states (Flow = 0.5, 1, 2, 3 ml/g/min, cardiac output = 3,5,8 L/min). CT acquisitions were simulated with a validated CT simulator incorporating polyenergetic data acquisition and realistic x-ray flux levels for dynamic acquisitions with a range of scenarios including 1, 2, 3 sec sampling for 30 sec with 25, 70, 140 mAs. Images were generated using conventional image reconstruction with additional image-based beam hardening correction to account for iodine content. Time attenuation curves were extracted for multiple regions around the myocardium and used to estimate flow. In total, 2,700 independent realizations of dynamic sequences were generated and multiple MBF estimation methods were applied to each of these. Evaluation of quantitative kinetic modeling yielded blood flow estimates with an root mean square error (RMSE) of ?0.6 ml/g/min averaged across multiple scenarios. Semi-quantitative modeling and qualitative static imaging resulted in significantly more error (RMSE = ?1.2 and ?1.2 ml/min/g respectively). For quantitative methods, dose reduction through reduced temporal sampling or reduced tube current had comparable impact on the MBF estimate fidelity. On average, half dose acquisitions increased the RMSE of estimates by only 18% suggesting that substantial dose reductions can be employed in the context of quantitative myocardial blood flow estimation. In conclusion, quantitative model-based dynamic cardiac CT perfusion assessment is capable of accurately estimating MBF across a range of cardiac outputs and tissue perfusion states, outperforms comparable static perfusion estimates, and is relatively robust to noise and temporal subsampling. PMID:25395812

  6. Design and assessment of cardiac SPECT systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chih-Jie

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a modality widely used to detect myocardial ischemia and myocardial infarction. Objectively assessing and comparing different SPECT systems is important so that the best detectability of cardiac defects can be achieved. Whitaker, Clarkson, and Barrett's study on the scanning linear observer (SLO) shows that the SLO can be used to estimate the location and size of signals. One major advantage of the SLO is that it can be used with projection data rather than reconstruction data. Thus, this observer model assesses overall hardware performance independent by any reconstruction algorithm. In addition, we will show that the run time of image-quality studies is significantly reduced. Several systems derived from the GE CZT-based dedicated cardiac SPECT camera Discovery 530c design, which is officially named the Alcyone Technology: Discovery NM 530c, were assessed using the performance of the SLO for the task of detecting cardiac defects and estimating the properties of the defects. Clinically, hearts can be virtually segmented into three coronary artery territories: left anterior descending artery (LAD), left circumflex artery (LCX), and right coronary artery (RCA). One of the most important functions of a cardiac SPECT system is to produce images from which a radiologist can correctly predict in which territory the defect exists. A good estimation of the defect extent from the images is also very helpful for determining the seriousness of the myocardial ischemia. In this dissertation, both locations and extent of defects were estimated by the SLO, and system performance was assessed using localization receiver operating characteristic (LROC) / estimation receiver operating characteristic (EROC) curves. Area under LROC curve (AULC) / area under EROC curve (AUEC) and true positive fraction (TPF) at specific false positive fraction (FPF) can be treated as the gures of merit (FOMs). As the results will show, a combination of the SLO and LROC / EROC curves can determine the configuration that has the most estimation/detection information and thus is a useful method for assessing cardiac SPECT systems.

  7. Bioreactance Is Not Interchangeable with Thermodilution for Measuring Cardiac Output during Adult Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sangbin; Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Gaabsoo; Ko, Justin Sangwook; Choi, Soo Joo; Kwon, Ji Hae; Heo, Burn Young; Gwak, Mi Sook

    2015-01-01

    Background Thermodilution technique using a pulmonary artery catheter is widely used for the assessment of cardiac output (CO) in patients undergoing liver transplantation. However, the unclearness of the risk-benefit ratio of this method has led to an interest in less invasive modalities. Thus, we evaluated whether noninvasive bioreactance CO monitoring is interchangeable with thermodilution technique. Methods Nineteen recipients undergoing adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation were enrolled in this prospective observational study. COs were recorded automatically by the two devices and compared simultaneously at 3-minute intervals. The Bland–Altman plot was used to evaluate the agreement between bioreactance and thermodilution. Clinically acceptable agreement was defined as a percentage error of limits of agreement <30%. The four quadrant plot was used to evaluate concordance between bioreactance and thermodilution. Clinically acceptable concordance was defined as a concordance rate >92%. Results A total of 2640 datasets were collected. The mean CO difference between the two techniques was 0.9 l/min, and the 95% limits of agreement were -3.5 l/min and 5.4 l/min with a percentage error of 53.9%. The percentage errors in the dissection, anhepatic, and reperfusion phase were 50.6%, 56.1%, and 53.5%, respectively. The concordance rate between the two techniques was 54.8%. Conclusion Bioreactance and thermodilution failed to show acceptable interchangeability in terms of both estimating CO and tracking CO changes in patients undergoing liver transplantation. Thus, the use of bioreactance as an alternative CO monitoring to thermodilution, in spite of its noninvasiveness, would be hard to recommend in these surgical patients. PMID:26017364

  8. High flow variant postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome amplifies the cardiac output response to exercise in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pianosi, Paolo T; Goodloe, Adele H; Soma, David; Parker, Ken O; Brands, Chad K; Fischer, Philip R

    2014-08-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is characterized by chronic fatigue and dizziness and affected individuals by definition have orthostatic intolerance and tachycardia. There is considerable overlap of symptoms in patients with POTS and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), prompting speculation that POTS is akin to a deconditioned state. We previously showed that adolescents with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) have excessive heart rate (HR) during, and slower HR recovery after, exercise - hallmarks of deconditioning. We also noted exaggerated cardiac output during exercise which led us to hypothesize that tachycardia could be a manifestation of a high output state rather than a consequence of deconditioning. We audited records of adolescents presenting with long-standing history of any mix of fatigue, dizziness, nausea, who underwent both head-up tilt table test and maximal exercise testing with measurement of cardiac output at rest plus 2-3 levels of exercise, and determined the cardiac output () versus oxygen uptake () relationship. Subjects with chronic fatigue were diagnosed with POTS if their HR rose ?40 beat·min(-1) with head-up tilt. Among 107 POTS patients the distribution of slopes for the , relationship was skewed toward higher slopes but showed two peaks with a split at ~7.0 L·min(-1) per L·min(-1), designated as normal (5.08 ± 1.17, N = 66) and hyperkinetic (8.99 ± 1.31, N = 41) subgroups. In contrast, cardiac output rose appropriately with in 141 patients with chronic fatigue but without POTS, exhibiting a normal distribution and an average slope of 6.10 ± 2.09 L·min(-1) per L·min(-1). Mean arterial blood pressure and pulse pressure from rest to exercise rose similarly in both groups. We conclude that 40% of POTS adolescents demonstrate a hyperkinetic circulation during exercise. We attribute this to failure of normal regional vasoconstriction during exercise, such that patients must increase flow through an inappropriately vasodilated systemic circulation to maintain perfusion pressure. PMID:25168872

  9. High flow variant postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome amplifies the cardiac output response to exercise in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Pianosi, Paolo T.; Goodloe, Adele H.; Soma, David; Parker, Ken O.; Brands, Chad K.; Fischer, Philip R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is characterized by chronic fatigue and dizziness and affected individuals by definition have orthostatic intolerance and tachycardia. There is considerable overlap of symptoms in patients with POTS and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), prompting speculation that POTS is akin to a deconditioned state. We previously showed that adolescents with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) have excessive heart rate (HR) during, and slower HR recovery after, exercise – hallmarks of deconditioning. We also noted exaggerated cardiac output during exercise which led us to hypothesize that tachycardia could be a manifestation of a high output state rather than a consequence of deconditioning. We audited records of adolescents presenting with long?standing history of any mix of fatigue, dizziness, nausea, who underwent both head?up tilt table test and maximal exercise testing with measurement of cardiac output at rest plus 2–3 levels of exercise, and determined the cardiac output () versus oxygen uptake () relationship. Subjects with chronic fatigue were diagnosed with POTS if their HR rose ?40 beat·min?1 with head?up tilt. Among 107 POTS patients the distribution of slopes for the , relationship was skewed toward higher slopes but showed two peaks with a split at ~7.0 L·min?1 per L·min?1, designated as normal (5.08 ± 1.17, N = 66) and hyperkinetic (8.99 ± 1.31, N = 41) subgroups. In contrast, cardiac output rose appropriately with in 141 patients with chronic fatigue but without POTS, exhibiting a normal distribution and an average slope of 6.10 ± 2.09 L·min?1 per L·min?1. Mean arterial blood pressure and pulse pressure from rest to exercise rose similarly in both groups. We conclude that 40% of POTS adolescents demonstrate a hyperkinetic circulation during exercise. We attribute this to failure of normal regional vasoconstriction during exercise, such that patients must increase flow through an inappropriately vasodilated systemic circulation to maintain perfusion pressure. PMID:25168872

  10. Quantification of Cardiac Sac Network Effects on a Movement-Related Parameter of Pyloric Network Output in the Lobster

    E-print Network

    Hooper, Scott

    Output in the Lobster JEFF B. THUMA AND SCOTT L. HOOPER Neuroscience Program, Department of Biological on a movement-related parameter of pyloric network output in the lobster. J Neurophysiol 89: 745­753, 2003; 10 of cardiac sac activity on the OSF of all pyloric neurons in the lobster, Panulirus interruptus

  11. NOTE: Increasing cardiac output and decreasing oxygenation sequence in pump twins of acardiac twin pregnancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gemert, Martin J. C.; Umur, Asli; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P. H. M.; Van Bavel, Ed; Vandenbussche, Frank P. H. A.; Nikkels, Peter G. J.

    2005-02-01

    An acardiac twin pregnancy is a rare but serious complication of monochorionic twinning and consists of an acardiac twin and a pump twin. The acardiac twin is a severely malformed fetus that lacks most organs, particularly a heart, but grows during pregnancy because it is perfused by the developmentally normal pump twin via a set of arterioarterial and venovenous placental anastomoses. Pump twins die intrauterine or neonatally in about 50% of the cases. Because the effects of an acardiac mass on the pump twin's development are incompletely known, methods for outcome prognosis are currently not available. We sought to derive simple relations for the pump twin's excess cardiac output and decreased oxygenation and to use available clinical cases for a preliminary test of the model. As a method, we used a theoretical flow model to represent the fetoplacental circulation of an acardiac twin pregnancy and estimated blood deoxygenation and reoxygenation following perfusion of the two bodies and placentas, respectively. The results show the pump twin's excess cardiac output and decrease of venous oxygen saturation to depend on the ratio of pump twin to acardiac twin umbilical blood flow, whose ratio can be measured by ultrasonography. The clinical cases show a decreasing umbilical flow ratio with gestation. In conclusion, prospective serial study is necessary to test whether measurement of umbilical flow ratios allows monitoring the pump twin's pathophysiologic development, possibly resulting in a guideline for prognosis of pump twin survival.

  12. The Neuromuscular Transform of the Lobster Cardiac System Explains the Opposing Effects of a Neuromodulator on Muscle Output

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Alex H.; Calkins, Andrew; O'Leary, Timothy; Symonds, Renee; Marder, Eve

    2013-01-01

    Motor neuron activity is transformed into muscle movement through a cascade of complex molecular and biomechanical events. This nonlinear mapping of neural inputs to motor behaviors is called the neuromuscular transform (NMT). We examined the NMT in the cardiac system of the lobster Homarus americanus by stimulating a cardiac motor nerve with rhythmic bursts of action potentials and measuring muscle movements in response to different stimulation patterns. The NMT was similar across preparations, which suggested that it could be used to predict muscle movement from spontaneous neural activity in the intact heart. We assessed this possibility across semi-intact heart preparations in two separate analyses. First, we performed a linear regression analysis across 122 preparations in physiological saline to predict muscle movements from neural activity. Under these conditions, the NMT was predictive of contraction duty cycle but was unable to predict contraction amplitude, likely as a result of uncontrolled interanimal variability. Second, we assessed the ability of the NMT to predict changes in motor output induced by the neuropeptide C-type allatostatin. Wiwatpanit et al. (2012) showed that bath application of C-type allatostatin produced either increases or decreases in the amplitude of the lobster heart contractions. We show that an important component of these preparation-dependent effects can arise from quantifiable differences in the basal state of each preparation and the nonlinear form of the NMT. These results illustrate how properly characterizing the relationships between neural activity and measurable physiological outputs can provide insight into seemingly idiosyncratic effects of neuromodulators across individuals. PMID:24133260

  13. Automated non-invasive measurement of cardiac output: comparison of electrical bioimpedance and carbon dioxide rebreathing techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S A; Russell, A E; West, M J; Chalmers, J

    1988-01-01

    Two commercial automated, non-invasive systems for estimation of cardiac output were evaluated. Values of cardiac output obtained by electrical bioimpedance cardiography (BoMed NCCOM3 machine) were compared with values derived from an indirect Fick technique that uses carbon dioxide rebreathing (Gould 9000 IV system) during 103 simultaneous measurements made at rest in 19 randomly selected subjects and on exercise in 11 subjects. Cardiac output values obtained with impedance cardiography were significantly correlated with those measured by the indirect Fick method, although there was a wide scatter with over 73% of the readings lying outside the limits defined by the line of identity +/- 20%. This correlation was greatly reduced when stroke volume index was used instead of cardiac output. Indirect Fick results were linearly related to oxygen uptake both at rest and on exercise, while impedance cardiography results did not correlate with oxygen uptake. Impedance cardiography gave consistently lower results for cardiac output than indirect Fick at all levels of exercise. Both machines were easy to use and produced acceptable mean (SE) coefficients of variation (BoMed NCCOM3 7.7 (1.0)%, Gould 9000 IV 10.6 (1.4)%). Further validation is required before either of these machines can be recommended as an alternative to invasive monitoring in clinical practice. PMID:3128316

  14. Effect of sodium nitroprusside on cardiac output during cross-clamping of the descending thoracic aorta in pigs.

    PubMed

    Aadahl, P; Aakhus, S; Strømholm, T; Saether, O D; Myhre, H O

    1995-01-01

    Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) is used to control proximal hypertension during cross-clamping of the descending thoracic aorta (XC). To assess the haemodynamic effects of SNP on cardiac output (CO) during XC, 21 pigs were anaesthetized with ketamine and fentanyl. In the control group (n = 11), no vasodilating therapy was given. In the investigation group (SNP group), 2 animals died during the surgical preparation and were excluded, leaving 8 animals in the group (n = 8). In these animals, SNP was infused in order to keep the mean arterial pressure (MAP) at about 100 mm Hg during cross-clamping. In both groups, aorta was cross-clamped for 30 min, and cardiac output (CO) was measured by the thermodilution technique. Following cross-clamping, CO increased 107% in the control group and 96% in the SNP group. There was an increase in heart rate (HR) of 77% in the control group and of 110% in the SNP group, and a reduction in systemic vascular resistance of 41% in the SNP group. Stroke volume (SV) was unchanged in both groups. MAP increased 83% in the control-group. No differences were observed between the two groups regarding central venous pressure or pulmonary artery pressure. Four animals in the SNP group died 5-10 min after release of the aortic clamp. In conclusion, we found equal increase in CO in both groups. The increase in CO was related predominantly to increased HR, whereas SV was largely unaltered. Vasodilation with SNP increased the mortality following clamp removal in this experimental model. PMID:7589004

  15. Noninvasive photoacoustic measurement of the composite indicator dilution curve for cardiac output estimation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, DongYel; Huang, Qiaojian; Li, Youzhi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the measurement of indicator dilution curves using a photoacoustic (PA) technology was reported, which showed promising results on the noninvasive estimation of cardiac output (CO) that is an important hemodynamic parameter useful in various clinical situations. However, in clinical practice, measuring PA indicator dilution curves from an arterial blood vessel requires an ultrasound transducer array capable of focusing on the targeted artery. This causes several challenges on the clinical translation of the PA indicator dilution method, such as high sensor cost and complexity. In this paper, we theoretically derived that a composite PA indicator dilution curve simultaneously measured from both arterial and venous blood vessels can be used to estimate CO correctly. The ex-vivo and in-vivo experimental results with a flat ultrasound transducer verified the developed theory. We believe this new concept would overcome the main challenges on the clinical translation of the noninvasive PA indicator dilution technology. PMID:25780743

  16. Reference values for total blood volume and cardiac output in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, L.R.

    1994-09-01

    Much research has been devoted to measurement of total blood volume (TBV) and cardiac output (CO) in humans but not enough effort has been devoted to collection and reduction of results for the purpose of deriving typical or {open_quotes}reference{close_quotes} values. Identification of normal values for TBV and CO is needed not only for clinical evaluations but also for the development of biokinetic models for ultra-short-lived radionuclides used in nuclear medicine (Leggett and Williams 1989). The purpose of this report is to offer reference values for TBV and CO, along with estimates of the associated uncertainties that arise from intra- and inter-subject variation, errors in measurement techniques, and other sources. Reference values are derived for basal supine CO and TBV in reference adult humans, and differences associated with age, sex, body size, body position, exercise, and other circumstances are discussed.

  17. Determination of cardiac output by an angle and diameter independent dual beam Doppler technique in critically ill infants.

    PubMed Central

    Wippermann, C F; Schranz, D; Huth, R; Zepp, F; Oelert, H; Jüngst, B K

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare cardiac output measurements in critically ill infants by the dual beam Doppler and thermodilution techniques. DESIGN--Prospective direct comparison of the two techniques. For statistical evaluation one randomly assigned paired measurement of every patient was used. SETTING--Paediatric intensive care unit in a university hospital. PATIENTS--18 infants after open heart surgery aged 4-25 months (weight 4-10 kg). INTERVENTIONS--Cardiac output measurements by dual beam Doppler and thermodilution techniques were performed within 10 minutes of each other and without knowledge of the results of the other methods. Multiple measurements were performed on some patients with a pharmacological or electrophysiological intervention or with a minimum of six hours between each pair of measurements. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--Three patients were excluded because of an inadequate Doppler signal or a significant residual shunt. Cardiac output measurements ranged from 0.4 to 2.2 l/min for the thermodilution technique and from 0.5 to 2.1 l/min for the dual beam Doppler technique. Agreement between both methods was acceptable. The mean difference between the two methods was 0.026 l/min with two standard deviations ranging from -0.20 to 0.26 l/min. CONCLUSION--The dual beam Doppler technique was shown to have promise for the non-invasive determination of cardiac output in critically ill infants. PMID:1540440

  18. Pulmonary diffusing capacity, capillary blood volume, and cardiac output during sustained microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. K.; Guy, Harold J. B.; Elliott, Ann R.; Deutschman, Robert A., III; West, John B.

    1993-01-01

    We measured pulmonary diffusing capacity (DL), diffusing capacity per unit lung volume, pulmonary capillary blood volume (Vc), membrane diffusing capacity (Dm), pulmonary capillary blood flow or cardiac output (Qc), and cardiac stroke volume (SV) in four subjects exposed to nine days of microgravity. DL in microgravity was elevated compared with preflight standing values and was higher than preflight supine because of the elevation of both Vc and Dm. The elevation in Vc was comparable to that measured supine in 1 G, but the increase in Dm was in sharp contrast to the supine value. We postulate that, in 0 G, pulmonary capillary blood is evenly distributed throughout the lung, providing for uniform capillary filling, leading to an increase in the surface area available for diffusion. By contrast, in the supine 1-G state, the capillaries are less evenly filled, and although a similar increase in blood volume is observed, the corresponding increase in surface area does not occur. DL and its subdivisions showed no adaptive changes from the first measurement 24 h after the start of 0 G to eight days later. Similarly, there were no trends in the postflight data, suggesting that the principal mechanism of these changes was gravitational. The increase in Dm suggests that subclinical pulmonary edema did not result from exposure to 0 G. Qc was modestly increased inflight and decreased postflight compared with preflight standing. Compared with preflight standing, SV was increased 46 percent inflight and decreased 14 percent in the 1st week postflight. There were temporal changes in Qc and SV during 0 G, with the highest values recorded at the first measurement, 24 h into the flight. The lowest values of Qc and SV occurred on the day of return.

  19. Efficacy of Goal-Directed Therapy Using Bioreactance Cardiac Output Monitoring after Valvular Heart Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sak; Lee, Seung Hyun; Chang, Byung-Chul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We compared the efficacy of postoperative hemodynamic goal-directed therapy (GDT) using a pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) and bioreactance-based noninvasive cardiac output monitoring (NICOM) in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing valvular heart surgery. Materials and Methods Fifty eight patients were randomized into two groups of GDT with common goals to maintain a mean arterial pressure of 60-80 mm Hg and cardiac index ?2 L/min/m2: the PAC group (n=29), based on pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and the NICOM group (n=29), based on changes in stroke volume index after passive leg raising. The primary efficacy variable was length of hospital stay. Secondary efficacy variables included resource utilization including vasopressor and inotropic requirement, fluid balance, and major morbidity endpoints. Results Patient characteristics and operative data were similar between the groups, except that significantly more patients underwent double valve replacement in the NICOM group. The lengths of hospital stay were not different between the two groups (12.2±4.8 days vs. 10.8±4.0 days, p=0.239). Numbers of patients requiring epinephrine (5 vs. 0, p=0.019) and ventilator care >24 h (6 vs. 1, p=0.044) were significantly higher in the PAC group. The PAC group also required significantly larger amounts of colloid (1652±519 mL vs. 11430±463 mL, p=0.004). Conclusion NICOM-based postoperative hemodynamic GDT showed promising results in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing valvular heart surgery in terms of resource utilization. PMID:26069111

  20. Combined first pass and gated blood pool radionuclide studies in the hemodynamic-cardiac evaluation of patients with low cardiac output

    SciTech Connect

    Abi-Mansour, P.; Fouad, F.M.; Sheeler, L.R.; Bravo, E.L.; MacIntyre, W.J.; Tarazi, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    Cardiac output (CO) is frequently used in the evaluation of cardiac function but low CO does not necessarily reflect heart failure. Similarly, low ejection fraction (EF) can be present in compensated heart diseases. In order to evaluate cardiac performance in relation to systematic hemodynamics, the authors used a multifactorial approach for the determination of CO, EF, pulmonary mean transit time (MTT), ratio of cardiopulmonary volume over total blood volume (CPV/TBV as an index of venous tone) all obtained from a single injection of 99m Tc-HSA. Four different conditions associated with low CO (less than or equal to 2.1 L/min/m/sup 2/) were evaluated. The combined use of CO, EF, MTT and CPV/TBV allowed a better understanding of the myocardial and peripheral circulatory factors associated with low CO states. This is helpful in the selection and follow-up of appropriate therapeutic intervention.

  1. Assessing Depression in Cardiac Patients: What Measures Should Be Considered?

    PubMed Central

    Ceccarini, M.; Manzoni, G. M.; Castelnuovo, G.

    2014-01-01

    It is highly recommended to promptly assess depression in heart disease patients as it represents a crucial risk factor which may result in premature deaths following acute cardiac events and a more severe psychopathology, even in cases of subsequent nonfatal cardiac events. Patients and professionals often underestimate or misjudge depressive symptomatology as cardiac symptoms; hence, quick, reliable, and early mood changes assessments are warranted. Failing to detect depressive signals may have detrimental effects on these patients' wellbeing and full recovery. Choosing gold-standard depression investigations in cardiac patients that fit a hospitalised cardiac setting well is fundamental. This paper will examine eight well established tools following Italian and international guidelines on mood disorders diagnosis in cardiac patients: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Cognitive Behavioural Assessment Hospital Form (CBA-H), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the two and nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2, PHQ-9), the Depression Interview and Structured Hamilton (DISH), the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D/HRSD), and the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). Though their strengths and weaknesses may appear to be homogeneous, the BDI-II and the PHQ are more efficient towards an early depression assessment within cardiac hospitalised patients. PMID:24649359

  2. A computational model-based validation of Guyton's analysis of cardiac output and venous return curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Cohen, R. J.; Mark, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    Guyton developed a popular approach for understanding the factors responsible for cardiac output (CO) regulation in which 1) the heart-lung unit and systemic circulation are independently characterized via CO and venous return (VR) curves, and 2) average CO and right atrial pressure (RAP) of the intact circulation are predicted by graphically intersecting the curves. However, this approach is virtually impossible to verify experimentally. We theoretically evaluated the approach with respect to a nonlinear, computational model of the pulsatile heart and circulation. We developed two sets of open circulation models to generate CO and VR curves, differing by the manner in which average RAP was varied. One set applied constant RAPs, while the other set applied pulsatile RAPs. Accurate prediction of intact, average CO and RAP was achieved only by intersecting the CO and VR curves generated with pulsatile RAPs because of the pulsatility and nonlinearity (e.g., systemic venous collapse) of the intact model. The CO and VR curves generated with pulsatile RAPs were also practically independent. This theoretical study therefore supports the validity of Guyton's graphical analysis.

  3. May-Thurner syndrome: High output cardiac failure as a result of iatrogenic iliac fistula

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shantanu; Singh, Shivank; Jyothimallika, Juthika; Lynch, Teresa J

    2015-01-01

    May-Thurner syndrome (MTS) also termed iliocaval compression or Cockett-Thomas syndrome is a common, although rarely diagnosed, condition in which the patient has an anatomical variant wherein the right common iliac artery overlies and compresses the left common iliac vein against the fifth lumbar spine resulting in increased risk of iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis. This variant has been shown to be present in over 23% of the population but most go undetected. We present a patient with MTS who developed high output cardiac failure due to an iatrogenic iliac fistula. The patient underwent an extensive workup for a left to right shunt including MRI and arterial duplex in the vascular lab. He was ultimately found to have a 2.1 cm left common iliac artery aneurysm and history of common iliac stent. We took the patient to the operating room for aortogram with placement of an endovascular plug of the left internal iliac artery and aorto-bi-iliac stent graft placement with CO2 and IV contrast. Subsequently the patient underwent successful stent placement in the area that was compressed followed by 6 mo of anticoagulation with warfarin. The flow from the fistula decreased significantly. PMID:25789305

  4. Retinal venous oxygen saturation and cardiac output during controlled hemorrhage and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Denninghoff, Kurt R; Smith, Matthew H; Lompado, Art; Hillman, Lloyd W

    2003-03-01

    The objective was to test calibration of an eye oximeter (EOX) in a vitiligo swine eye and correlate retinal venous oxygen saturation (Srv(O(2))), mixed venous oxygen saturation (Sv(O(2))), and cardiac output (CO) during robust changes in blood volume. Ten anesthetized adult Sinclair swine with retinal vitiligo were placed on stepwise decreasing amounts of oxygen. At each oxygen level, femoral artery oxygen saturation (Sa(O(2))) and retinal artery oxygen saturation (Sra(O(2))) were obtained. After equilibration on 100% O(2), subjects were bled at 1.4 ml. kg(-1). min(-1) for 20 min. Subsequently, anticoagulated shed blood was reinfused at the same rate. During graded hypoxia, exsanguination, and reinfusion, Sra(O(2)) and Srv(O(2)) were measured by using the EOX, and CO and Sv(O(2)) were measured by using a pulmonary artery catheter. During graded hypoxia, Sra(O(2)) correlated with Sa(O(2)) (r = 0.92). Srv(O(2)) correlated with Sv(O(2)) (r = 0.89) during exsanguination and reinfusion. Sv(O(2)) and Srv(O(2)) correlated with CO during blood removal and resuscitation (r = 0.92). Use of vitiligo retinas improved the calibration of EOX measurements. In this robust hemorrhage model, Srv(O(2)) correlates with CO and Sv(O(2)) across the range of exsanguination and resuscitation. PMID:12571124

  5. Numerical observer for cardiac motion assessment using machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Thibault; Kalayeh, Mahdi M.; Pretorius, P. H.; Wernick, Miles N.; Yang, Yongyi; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2011-03-01

    In medical imaging, image quality is commonly assessed by measuring the performance of a human observer performing a specific diagnostic task. However, in practice studies involving human observers are time consuming and difficult to implement. Therefore, numerical observers have been developed, aiming to predict human diagnostic performance to facilitate image quality assessment. In this paper, we present a numerical observer for assessment of cardiac motion in cardiac-gated SPECT images. Cardiac-gated SPECT is a nuclear medicine modality used routinely in the evaluation of coronary artery disease. Numerical observers have been developed for image quality assessment via analysis of detectability of myocardial perfusion defects (e.g., the channelized Hotelling observer), but no numerical observer for cardiac motion assessment has been reported. In this work, we present a method to design a numerical observer aiming to predict human performance in detection of cardiac motion defects. Cardiac motion is estimated from reconstructed gated images using a deformable mesh model. Motion features are then extracted from the estimated motion field and used to train a support vector machine regression model predicting human scores (human observers' confidence in the presence of the defect). Results show that the proposed method could accurately predict human detection performance and achieve good generalization properties when tested on data with different levels of post-reconstruction filtering.

  6. Non-Invasive Determination of Cardiac Output in Pre-Capillary Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lador, Frédéric; Hervé, Philippe; Bringard, Aurélien; Günther, Sven; Garcia, Gilles; Savale, Laurent; Ferretti, Guido; Soccal, Paola M.; Chemla, Denis; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Sitbon, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac output (CO) is a major diagnostic and prognostic factor in pre-capillary pulmonary hypertension (PH). Reference methods for CO determination, like thermodilution (TD), require invasive procedures and allow only steady-state measurements. The Modelflow (MF) method is an appealing technique for this purpose as it allows non-invasive and beat-by-beat determination of CO. Methods We aimed to compare CO values obtained simultaneously from non-invasive pulse wave analysis by MF (COMF) and by TD (COTD) to determine its precision and accuracy in pre-capillary PH. The study was performed on 50 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) or chronic thrombo-embolic PH (CTEPH). CO was determined at rest in all patients (n = 50) and during nitric oxide vasoreactivity test, fluid challenge or exercise (n = 48). Results Baseline COMF and COTD were 6.18 ± 1.95 and 5.46 ± 1.95 L·min-1, respectively. Accuracy and precision were 0.72 and 1.04 L·min-1, respectively. Limits of agreement (LoA) ranged from -1.32 to 2.76 L·min-1. Percentage error (PE) was ±35.7%. Overall sensitivity and specificity of COMF for directional change were 95.2% and 82.4%, (n = 48) and 93.3% and 100% for directional changes during exercise (n = 16), respectively. After application of a correction factor (1.17 ± 0.25), neither proportional nor fixed bias was found for subsequent CO determination (n = 48). Accuracy was -0.03 L·min?1 and precision 0.61 L·min?1. LoA ranged from -1.23 to 1.17 L·min?1 and PE was ±19.8%. Conclusions After correction against a reference method, MF is precise and accurate enough to determine absolute values and beat-by-beat relative changes of CO in pre-capillary PH. PMID:26226280

  7. Measurement of cardiac output during exercise by open-circuit acetylene uptake.

    PubMed

    Barker, R C; Hopkins, S R; Kellogg, N; Olfert, I M; Brutsaert, T D; Gavin, T P; Entin, P L; Rice, A J; Wagner, P D

    1999-10-01

    Noninvasive measurement of cardiac output (QT) is problematic during heavy exercise. We report a new approach that avoids unpleasant rebreathing and resultant changes in alveolar PO(2) or PCO(2) by measuring short-term acetylene (C(2)H(2)) uptake by an open-circuit technique, with application of mass balance for the calculation of QT. The method assumes that alveolar and arterial C(2)H(2) pressures are the same, and we account for C(2)H(2) recirculation by extrapolating end-tidal C(2)H(2) back to breath 1 of the maneuver. We correct for incomplete gas mixing by using He in the inspired mixture. The maneuver involves switching the subject to air containing trace amounts of C(2)H(2) and He; ventilation and pressures of He, C(2)H(2), and CO(2) are measured continuously (the latter by mass spectrometer) for 20-25 breaths. Data from three subjects for whom multiple Fick O(2) measurements of QT were available showed that measurement of QT by the Fick method and by the C(2)H(2) technique was statistically similar from rest to 90% of maximal O(2) consumption (VO(2 max)). Data from 12 active women and 12 elite male athletes at rest and 90% of VO(2 max) fell on a single linear relationship, with O(2) consumption (VO(2)) predicting QT values of 9.13, 15.9, 22.6, and 29.4 l/min at VO(2) of 1, 2, 3, and 4 l/min. Mixed venous PO(2) predicted from C(2)H(2)-determined QT, measured VO(2), and arterial O(2) concentration was approximately 20-25 Torr at 90% of VO(2 max) during air breathing and 10-15 Torr during 13% O(2) breathing. This modification of previous gas uptake methods, to avoid rebreathing, produces reasonable data from rest to heavy exercise in normal subjects. PMID:10517785

  8. Effects of ventilation on cardiac output determined by inert gas rebreathing.

    PubMed

    Damgaard, Morten; Norsk, Peter

    2005-05-01

    One of the most important methodological problems of the foreign gas rebreathing technique is that outcome of the measurements depends on procedural variables such as rebreathing frequency (RF), rebreathing bag volume (V(reb)), lung volume at start of rebreathing and intervals between measurements. Therefore, in 10 healthy males we investigated the effects of changes in ventilation pattern on cardiac output (CO) estimated by an N(2)O-rebreathing technique. Reducing the rebreathing volume (V(reb)) from 1.5 to 1.0 l diminished CO by 0.5 +/- 0.2 l min(-1), whereas an increase in V(reb) from 1.5 to 2.5 l had no effects. CO was 1.0 +/- 0.2 l min(-1) higher when, rebreathing was performed after a forced expiration than following a normal tidal expiration. Serial determinations of CO required a 3-min interval between the measurements to avoid effects of recirculation of N(2)O. Changing RF from 15 to 30 breaths min(-1) or adding serial dead space by up to 600 ml did not affect the determination of CO. In conclusion, the rebreathing procedure for determination of CO at rest should be performed following a normal tidal expiration with a rebreathing bag volume of between 1.5 and 2.5 l and with manoeuvres separated by at least 3-5 min. Variations in RF within the physiological range from 15 to 30 breaths min(-1) do not affect outcome of the measurements. PMID:15888093

  9. AN ASSESSMENT OF DATA ON OUTPUT INDUSTRIAL SUB-SECTORS

    E-print Network

    AN ASSESSMENT OF DATA ON OUTPUT FOR INDUSTRIAL SUB-SECTORS Prepared for Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation Prepared by John Nyboer Alison Bailie of the Canadian Industry Energy End changes in energy intensity for each of CIPEC's 15 industrial [sub-]sectors.1 The analysis includes

  10. Echocardiographic assessment of cardiac involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Shazzad, M N; Islam, M N; Ara, R; Ahmed, C M; Fatema, N; Azad, A K; Salimulla, S M; Haider, M S; Haq, S A

    2013-10-01

    This study was designed to assess cardiac abnormalities in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) by echocardiography. It was an analytic type of cross sectional study, conducted in lupus clinic, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka, Bangladesh from July 2008 to June 2009. Fifty lupus patients, diagnosed on the basis of ACR criteria, without cardiovascular symptoms, were enrolled in the study and were evaluated by standard echocardiography with color Doppler. SLEDAI was applied for assessment of disease activity. Out of 50 patients 80% had abnormal echocardiographic findings. Pericardial thickening was found in 38% patients, pericardial effusion 20%, diastolic dysfunction 72%, hypokinesia of ventricular wall 8%, overall valvular abnormalities 20%, commonest being aortic regurgitation (12%), followed by mitral regurgitation (8%), and 6% had pulmonary hypertension. Males (100%) were more vulnerable to cardiac involvement than females (68.2%) and later age of disease onset (31-40 years) was associated with higher (87.5%) chance of echo abnormalities. The differences, however, were not statistically significant (p>0.05). There was significant relationship between disease duration and cardiac abnormalities (p<0.01). Active disease (80.08%) was associated with higher frequency of cardiac involvement than disease in remission (62.50%) but the result was not statistically significant (p=0.151). Cardiac abnormalities are very common in lupus patients even when clinically asymptomatic from cardiac aspect. Echocardiography is an excellent non-invasive tool for cardiac evaluation. These observations emphasize a need for further assessment of early intervention to reduce subsequent cardiac morbidity and mortality among the lupus patients. PMID:24292305

  11. Pulmonary Artery Catheter (PAC) Accuracy and Efficacy Compared with Flow Probe and Transcutaneous Doppler (USCOM): An Ovine Cardiac Output Validation

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Robert A.; Hood, Sally G.; Jacobson, Beverley M.; West, Malcolm J.; Wan, Li; May, Clive N.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) is an accepted clinical method of measuring cardiac output (CO) despite no prior validation. The ultrasonic cardiac output monitor (USCOM) is a noninvasive alternative to PAC using Doppler ultrasound (CW). We compared PAC and USCOM CO measurements against a gold standard, the aortic flow probe (FP), in sheep at varying outputs. Methods. Ten conscious sheep, with implanted FPs, had measurements of CO by FP, USCOM, and PAC, at rest and during intervention with inotropes and vasopressors. Results. CO measurements by FP, PAC, and USCOM were 4.0 ± 1.2?L/min, 4.8 ± 1.5?L/min, and 4.0 ± 1.4?L/min, respectively, (n = 280, range 1.9?L/min to 11.7?L/min). Percentage bias and precision between FP and PAC, and FP and USCOM was ?17 and 47%, and 1 and 36%, respectively. PAC under-measured Dobutamine-induced CO changes by 20% (relative 66%) compared with FP, while USCOM measures varied from FP by 3% (relative 10%). PAC reliably detected ?30% but not +40% CO changes, as measured by receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC), while USCOM reliably detected ±5% changes in CO (AUC > 0.70). Conclusions. PAC demonstrated poor accuracy and sensitivity as a measure of CO. USCOM provided equivalent measurements to FP across a sixfold range of outputs, reliably detecting ±5% changes. PMID:22649718

  12. Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiac Output vs. Heart Rate in Patients with an Implanted Pacemaker Based on Electric Impedance Method Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukup, Ladislav; Vondra, Vlastimil; Viš?or, Ivo; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef

    2013-04-01

    The methods and device for estimation of cardiac output and measurement of pulse wave velocity simultaneously is presented here. The beat-to-beat cardiac output as well as pulse wave velocity measurement is based on application of electrical impedance method on the thorax and calf. The results are demonstrated in a study of 24 subjects. The dependence of pulse wave velocity and cardiac output on heart rate during rest in patients with an implanted pacemaker was evaluated. The heart rate was changed by pacemaker programming while neither exercise nor drugs were applied. The most important result is that the pulse wave velocity, cardiac output and blood pressure do not depend significantly on heart rate, while the stroke volume is reciprocal proportionally to the heart rate.

  13. Urine Output Assessment as a Clinical Quality Measure.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    Urine output (UO) is a relevant marker of kidney function and an independent marker of serum creatinine. Although oliguria can be the result of transitory changes in volume status or due to external influences, such as drug administration, UO is currently included as a criterion to diagnose and stage acute kidney injury (AKI). In clinical practice, the potential of earlier alert of kidney injury with frequent assessment of UO can help patient screening and risk assessment. In this review, we will discuss recent studies applying UO for AKI diagnosis and prognostication and propose methods to assess UO and improve quality of care. PMID:26673635

  14. Effect of hemorrhage on cardiac output, vasopressin, aldosterone, and diuresis during immersion in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Simanonok, K.; Bernauer, E. M.; Wade, C. E.; Keil, L. C.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to test the hypotesis that a reduction in blood volume would attenuate or eliminate immersion-induced increases in cardiac output (Q(sub co)) and urine excretion, and to investigate accompanying vasoactive and fluid-electrolyte hormonal responses. Eight men (19-23 yr) were supine during a 2-hr control period in air, and then sat for 5-hr test periods in air at 20 C (dry control, DC); water at 34.5 C (wet control, WC); and water (34.5 C) after hemorrhage (WH) of 14.8 plus or minus 0.3 percent of their blood volume. Blood volume was -11.6 plus or minus 0.6 percent at immersion (time 0). Mean (bar-X hrs 1-5) Q(sub co) was unchanged in WC (5.3 plus or minus 0.01 l/min) and in WH (4.5 plus or minus 0.1 l/min), but decreased (P less than 0.05) in DC to 3.6 plus or minus 0.1 l/min. Mean urine excretion rates were 1.0 plus or minus 0.2 ml/min for DC and 1.1 plus or minus 0.2 ml/min for WH; both were lower (P less than 0.05) than that for WC of 2.0 plus or minus 0.4 ml/min. Plasma (Na+) and (Osm) were unchanged in all experiments. Mean plasma vasopressin (PVP) (bar-X hrs 1-5) was 1.1 plus or minus 0.1 pg/ml in WC, and higher (P less than 0.05) in DC (2.1 plus or minus 0.2 pg/ml)and WH (2.1 plus or minus 0.1 pg/ml); it was unchanged during air and water test periods. Thus, hemorrhage attenuated the immersion-induced increase in Q(sub co), eliminated the WC diuresis, maintained plasma renin activity and PVP at DC levels and did not change immersion-induced aldosterone suppression; the osmotic diuresis during control immersion is apparently not due to either aldosterone suppression or vasopressin suppression.

  15. Assessment of Cardiac Sarcoidosis with Advanced Imaging Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Akasaka, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic systemic disease of unknown etiology that is characterized by the presence of noncaseating epithelioid granulomas, usually in multiple organs. Several studies have shown that sarcoidosis might be the result of an exaggerated granulomatous reaction after exposure to unidentified antigens in genetically susceptible individuals. Cardiac involvement may occur and lead to an adverse outcome: the heart mechanics will be affected and that causes ventricular failure, and the cardiac electrical system will be disrupted and lead to third degree atrioventricular block, malignant ventricular tachycardia, and sudden cardiac death. Thus, early diagnosis and treatment of this potentially devastating disease is critically important. However, sensitive and accurate imaging modalities have not been established. Recent studies have demonstrated the promising potential of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) in the diagnosis and assessment of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS). In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, etiology, histological findings, and clinical features of sarcoidosis. We also introduce advanced imaging including 18F-FDG PET and cardiac MRI as more reliable diagnostic modalities for CS. PMID:25250336

  16. Derivation of cardiac output and alveolar ventilation rate based on energy expenditure measurements in healthy males and females.

    PubMed

    Brochu, Pierre; Brodeur, Jules; Krishnan, Kannan

    2012-08-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling and occupational exposure assessment studies often use minute ventilation rates (VE), alveolar ventilation rates (VA) and cardiac outputs (Q) that are not reflective of the physiological variations encountered during the aggregate daytime activities of individuals from childhood to adulthood. These variations of VE, VA and Q values were determined for healthy normal-weight individuals aged 5-96?years by using two types of published individual data that were measured in the same subjects (n?=?902), namely indirect calorimetry measurements and the disappearance rates of oral doses of deuterium (²H) and heavy-oxygen (¹?O) in urine monitored by gas-isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. Arteriovenous oxygen content differences (0.051-0.082?ml of O? consumed ml?¹ of blood) and ratios of the physiological dead space to the tidal volume (0.232-0.419) were determined for oxygen consumption rates (0.157-0.806?l min?¹) required by minute energy expenditures ranging from 0.76 to 3.91?kcal min?¹. Generally higher values for the 2.5th up to the 99th percentile for VE (0.132-0.774?l kg?¹ min?¹, 4.42-21.69?l m?² min?¹), VA (0.093-0.553?l kg?¹ min?¹, 3.09-15.53?l m?² min?¹), Q (0.065-0.330?l kg?¹ min?¹, 2.17 to 9.46?l m?² min?¹) and ventilation-perfusion ratios (1.12-2.16) were found in children and teenagers aged 5-<16.5?years compared with older individuals. The distributions of cardiopulmonary parameters developed in this study should be useful in facilitating a scientifically sound characterization of the inter-individual differences in the uptake and health risks of lipophilic air pollutants, particularly as they relate to younger children. PMID:21365669

  17. Environmental risk assessments for transgenic crops producing output trait enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Tuttle, Ann; Shore, Scott; Stone, Terry

    2009-01-01

    The environmental risks from cultivating crops producing output trait enzymes can be rigorously assessed by testing conservative risk hypotheses of no harm to endpoints such as the abundance of wildlife, crop yield and the rate of degradation of crop residues in soil. These hypotheses can be tested with data from many sources, including evaluations of the agronomic performance and nutritional quality of the crop made during product development, and information from the scientific literature on the mode-of-action, taxonomic distribution and environmental fate of the enzyme. Few, if any, specific ecotoxicology or environmental fate studies are needed. The effective use of existing data means that regulatory decision-making, to which an environmental risk assessment provides essential information, is not unnecessarily complicated by evaluation of large amounts of new data that provide negligible improvement in the characterization of risk, and that may delay environmental benefits offered by transgenic crops containing output trait enzymes. PMID:19924556

  18. At high cardiac output, diesel exhaust exposure increases pulmonary vascular resistance and decreases distensibility of pulmonary resistive vessels.

    PubMed

    Wauters, Aurélien; Vicenzi, Marco; De Becker, Benjamin; Riga, Jean-Philippe; Esmaeilzadeh, Fatemeh; Faoro, Vitalie; Vachiéry, Jean-Luc; van de Borne, Philippe; Argacha, Jean-François

    2015-12-15

    Air pollution has recently been associated with the development of acute decompensated heart failure, but the underlying biological mechanisms remain unclear. A pulmonary vasoconstrictor effect of air pollution, combined with its systemic effects, may precipitate decompensated heart failure. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of acute exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) on pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) under resting and stress conditions but also to determine whether air pollution may potentiate acquired pulmonary hypertension. Eighteen healthy male volunteers were exposed to ambient air (AA) or dilute DE with a particulate matter of <2.5 ?m concentration of 300 ?g/m(3) for 2 h in a randomized, crossover study design. The effects of DE on PVR, on the coefficient of distensibilty of pulmonary vessels (?), and on right and left ventricular function were evaluated at rest (n = 18), during dobutamine stress echocardiography (n = 10), and during exercise stress echocardiography performed in hypoxia (n = 8). Serum endothelin-1 and fractional exhaled nitric oxide were also measured. At rest, exposure to DE did not affect PVR. During dobutamine stress, the slope of the mean pulmonary artery pressure-cardiac output relationship increased from 2.8 ± 0.5 mmHg·min·l(-1) in AA to 3.9 ± 0.5 mmHg·min·l(-1) in DE (P < 0.05) and the ? coefficient decreased from 0.96 ± 0.15 to 0.64 ± 0.12%/mmHg (P < 0.01). DE did not further enhance the hypoxia-related upper shift of the mean pulmonary artery pressure-cardiac output relationship. Exposure to DE did not affect serum endothelin-1 concentration or fractional exhaled nitric oxide. In conclusion, acute exposure to DE increased pulmonary vasomotor tone by decreasing the distensibility of pulmonary resistive vessels at high cardiac output. PMID:26497960

  19. Quality assessment of cardiac surgery in Britain.

    PubMed

    Treasure, T; Bridgewater, B; Gallivan, S

    2009-10-01

    Data are available for every Cardiac Surgery unit in Britain and in 70 % are identifiable by surgeon. The data are linked to registration of deaths so survival for a range of operations, and associated patient or procedure related factors, can be evaluated. The choice of statistical triggers (outside 99.99 % confidence intervals) and the time frames of reported data (averaged over three years) (See P.285/353 of the report http://www.scts.org/documents/PDF/5thBlueBook2003.pdf) reduces its value as an early warning system but the rigour of data collecting systems and the level of scrutiny required probably ensure that poor performance will be detected. PMID:19834854

  20. Femoral Blood Flow and Cardiac Output During Blood Flow Restricted Leg Press Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, M. E.; Hackney, K.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.

    2011-01-01

    Low load blood flow restricted resistance exercise (LBFR) causes muscle hypertrophy that may be stimulated by the local ischemic environment created by the cuff pressure. However, local blood flow (BF) during such exercise is not well understood. PURPOSE: To characterize femoral artery BF and cardiac output (CO) during leg press exercise (LP) performed at a high load (HL) and low load (LL) with different levels of cuff pressure. METHODS: Eleven subjects (men/women 4/7, age 31.4+/-12.8 y, weight 68.9+/-13.2 kg, mean+/-SD) performed 3 sets of supine left LP to fatigue with 90 s of rest in 4 conditions: HL (%1-RM/cuff pressure: 80%/0); LL (20%/0); LBFR(sub DBP) (20%/1.3 x diastolic blood pressure, BP); LBFR(sub SBP) (20%/1.3 x supine systolic BP). The cuff remained inflated throughout the LBFR exercise sessions. Artery diameter, velocity time integral (VTI), and stroke volume (SV) were measured using Doppler ultrasound at rest and immediately after each set of exercise. Heart rate (HR) was monitored using a 3-lead ECG. BF was calculated as VTI x vessel cross-sectional area. CO was calculated as HR x SV. The data obtained after each set of exercise were averaged and used for analyses. Multi-level modeling was used to determine the effect of exercise condition on dependent variables. Statistical significance was set a priori at p< 0.05. RESULTS: Artery diameter did not change from baseline. BF increased (p<0.05) after exercise in each condition except LBFR(sub SBP) in the order of HL (12.73+/-1.42 cm3,mean+/-SE) > LL (9.92+/-0.82 cm3) > LBFR(sub dBP)(6.47+/-0.79 cm3) > LBFR(sub SBP) (3.51+/-0.59 cm3). Blunted exercise induced increases occurred in HR, SV, and CO after LBFR compared to HL and LL. HR increased 45% after HL and LL and 28% after LBFR (p<0.05), but SV increased (p<0.05) only after HL. Consequently, the increase (p<0.05) in CO was greater in HL and LL (approximately 3 L/min) than in LBFR (approximately 1 L/min). CONCLUSION: BF during LBFR(sub SBP) was 1/3 of that observed in LL, which supports the hypothesis that local ischemia stimulates the LBFR hypertrophic response. As the cuff did not compress the artery, the ischemia may have occurred because of the blunted rise in CO or because arterial BP cannot overcome the cuff pressure. As LBFR(sub DBP) effectively reduced BF and CO with cuff pressures less than systolic BP, future studies should investigate the hypertrophic potential of LBFR at even lower cuff pressures.

  1. ECG patch monitors for assessment of cardiac rhythm abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Lobodzinski, S Suave

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of long-term monitoring is the improvement of diagnostic yield. Despite the clear utility of Holter monitoring in clinical cardiology, issues of relatively low diagnostic yield, cost and inconvenience have motivated the development of ultra-portable devices referred to as ECG patch monitors. Although the "gold standard" for assessing cardiac rhythm abnormalities remains a 12-lead Holter, there is an increasing interest in portable monitoring devices that provide the opportunity for evaluating cardiac rhythm in real-world environments such as the workplace or home. To facilitate patient acceptance these monitors underwent a radical miniaturization and redesign to include wireless communication, water proofing and a patch carrier for attaching devices directly to the skin. We review recent developments in the field of "patch" devices primarily designed for very long-term monitoring of cardiac arrhythmic events. As the body of supporting clinical validation data grows, these devices hold promise for a variety of cardiac monitoring applications. From a clinical and research standpoint, the capacity to obtain longitudinal cardiac activity data by patch devices may have significant implications for device selection, monitoring duration, and care pathways for arrhythmia evaluation and atrial fibrillation surveillance. From a research standpoint, the new devices may allow for the development of novel diagnostic algorithms with the goal of finding patterns and correlations with exercise and drug regimens. PMID:24215754

  2. Evaluating cardiac physiology through echocardiography in bottlenose dolphins: using stroke volume and cardiac output to estimate systolic left ventricular function during rest and following exercise.

    PubMed

    Miedler, Stefan; Fahlman, Andreas; Valls Torres, Mónica; Álvaro Álvarez, Teresa; Garcia-Parraga, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Heart-rate (fH) changes during diving and exercise are well documented for marine mammals, but changes in stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) are much less known. We hypothesized that both SV and CO are also modified following intense exercise. Using transthoracic ultrasound Doppler at the level of the aortic valve, we compared blood flow velocities in the left ventricle and cardiac frequencies during rest and at 1, 3 and 4?min after a bout of exercise in 13 adult bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus, six male and seven female, body mass range 143-212?kg). Aortic cross-sectional area and ventricle blood velocity at the aortic valve were used to calculate SV, which together with fH provided estimates of left CO at rest and following exercise. fH and SV stabilized approximately 4-7?s following the post-respiratory tachycardia, so only data after the fH had stabilized were used for analysis and comparison. There were significant increases in fH, SV and CO associated with each breath. At rest, fH, SV and CO were uncorrelated with body mass, and averaged 41±9 beats min(-1), 136±19?ml and 5514±1182 l min(-1), respectively. One minute following high intensity exercise, the cardiac variables had increased by 104±43%, 63±11% and 234±84%, respectively. All variables remained significantly elevated in all animals for at least 4?min after the exercise. These baseline values provide the first data on SV and CO in awake and unrestrained cetaceans in water. PMID:26385334

  3. Rapid assessment of cardiac contractility on a home bathroom scale.

    PubMed

    Etemadi, Mozziyar; Inan, Omer T; Giovangrandi, Laurent; Kovacs, Gregory T A

    2011-11-01

    Analyzing systolic time intervals-specifically the preejection-period (PEP)-is widely accepted as one of the few methods for the noninvasive assessment of cardiac contractility. In this paper, we investigated the ballistocardiogram (BCG) as a way to noninvasively measure myocardial contractility when combined with the ECG. Specifically, we derived a parameter from the BCG and ECG that we hypothesized would be highly correlated to PEP. This is the time delay between the J-wave peak of the BCG and the R-wave of the ECG, which we refer to as the RJ interval. The RJ interval was correlated to PEP (r(2) = 0.86) for 2126 heartbeats across ten subjects, with a y-intercept of 138 ms and slope of 1.05. This suggests that the RJ interval can be reliably used as a noninvasive assessment of cardiac contractility. PMID:21843998

  4. Influence of heart motion on cardiac output estimation by means of electrical impedance tomography: a case study.

    PubMed

    Proença, Martin; Braun, Fabian; Rapin, Michael; Solà, Josep; Adler, Andy; Grychtol, Bart?omiej; Bohm, Stephan H; Lemay, Mathieu; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a non-invasive imaging technique that can measure cardiac-related intra-thoracic impedance changes. EIT-based cardiac output estimation relies on the assumption that the amplitude of the impedance change in the ventricular region is representative of stroke volume (SV). However, other factors such as heart motion can significantly affect this ventricular impedance change. In the present case study, a magnetic resonance imaging-based dynamic bio-impedance model fitting the morphology of a single male subject was built. Simulations were performed to evaluate the contribution of heart motion and its influence on EIT-based SV estimation. Myocardial deformation was found to be the main contributor to the ventricular impedance change (56%). However, motion-induced impedance changes showed a strong correlation (r = 0.978) with left ventricular volume. We explained this by the quasi-incompressibility of blood and myocardium. As a result, EIT achieved excellent accuracy in estimating a wide range of simulated SV values (error distribution of 0.57 ± 2.19 ml (1.02 ± 2.62%) and correlation of r = 0.996 after a two-point calibration was applied to convert impedance values to millilitres). As the model was based on one single subject, the strong correlation found between motion-induced changes and ventricular volume remains to be verified in larger datasets. PMID:26006113

  5. Scintigraphic assessment of regional cardiac adrenergic innervation

    SciTech Connect

    Dae, M.W.; O'Connell, J.W.; Botvinick, E.H.; Ahearn, T.; Yee, E.; Huberty, J.P.; Mori, H.; Chin, M.C.; Hattner, R.S.; Herre, J.M.

    1989-03-01

    To assess the feasibility of noninvasively imaging the regional distribution of myocardial sympathetic innervation, we evaluated the distribution of sympathetic nerve endings, using 123I metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), and compared this with the distribution of myocardial perfusion, using 201Tl. Twenty dogs were studied: 11 after regional denervation, and nine as controls. Regional denervation was done by left stellate ganglion removal, right stellate ganglion removal, and application of phenol to the epicardial surface. Computer-processed functional maps displayed the relative distribution of MIBG and thallium in multiple projections in vivo and excised heart slices in all animals. In six animals, dual isotope emission computed tomograms were acquired in vivo. Tissue samples taken from innervated and denervated regions of the MIBG images were analyzed for norepinephrine content to validate image findings. Normal controls showed homogeneous and parallel distributions of MIBG and thallium in the major left ventricular mass. In the left stellectomized hearts, MIBG was reduced relative to thallium in the posterior left ventricle; whereas in right stellectomized hearts, reduced MIBG was in the anterior left ventricle. Phenol-painted hearts showed a broad area of decreased MIBG extending beyond the area of phenol application. In both stellectomized and phenol-painted hearts, thallium distribution remained homogeneous and normal. Norepinephrine content was greater in regions showing normal MIBG (550 +/- 223 ng/g) compared with regions showing reduced MIBG (39 +/- 44 ng/g) (p less than 0.001), confirming regional denervation. Combined MIBG-thallium functional maps display the regional distribution of sympathetic innervation.

  6. Role of cardiac output and the autonomic nervous system in the antinatriuretic response to acute constriction of the thoracic superior vena cava.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrier, R. W.; Humphreys, M. H.; Ufferman, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the differential characteristics of hepatic congestion and decreased cardiac output in terms of potential afferent stimuli in the antinatriuretic effect of acute thoracic inferior vena cava (TIVC) constriction. An attempt is made to see if the autonomic nervous system is involved in the antinatriuretic effect of acute TIVC or thoracic superior vena cava constriction.

  7. Differential acute effects of carbohydrate- and protein-rich drinks compared with water on cardiac output during rest and exercise in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Rontoyanni, Victoria G; Werner, Kristin; Sanders, Thomas A B; Hall, Wendy L

    2015-08-01

    The acute effects of drinks rich in protein (PRO) versus carbohydrate (CHO) on cardiovascular hemodynamics and reactivity are uncertain. A randomized crossover design was used to compare 400-mL isoenergetic (1.1 MJ) drinks containing whey protein (PRO; 44 g) or carbohydrate (CHO; 57 g) versus 400 mL of water in 14 healthy men. The primary and secondary outcomes were changes in cardiac output, blood pressure, systemic vascular resistance (SVR) and digital volume pulse measured prior to and 30 min following consumption at rest, during 12 min of multi-stage bicycle ergometry, and 15 min postexercise. The mean change (95% confidence interval (CI)) in resting cardiac output at 30 min was greater for CHO than for PRO or water: 0.7 (0.4 to 1.0), 0.1 (-0.2 to 0.40), and 0.0 (-0.3 to 0.3) L/min (P < 0.001), respectively; the higher cardiac output following CHO was accompanied by an increase in stroke volume and a lower SVR. The mean increments (95% CI) in cardiac output during exercise were CHO 4.7 (4.4 to 5.0), PRO 4.9 (4.6 to 5.2), and water 4.6 (4.3 to 4.9) L/min with the difference between PRO versus water being significant (P < 0.025). There were no other statistically significant differences. In summary, a CHO-rich drink increased cardiac output and lowered SVR in the resting state compared with a PRO-rich drink or water but the effect size of changes in these variables did not differ during or after exercise between CHO and PRO. Neither protein nor carbohydrate affected blood pressure reactivity to exercise. PMID:26244599

  8. Estimation of cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance using a multivariate regression model with features selected from the finger photoplethysmogram and routine cardiovascular measurements

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiac output (CO) and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) are two important parameters of the cardiovascular system. The ability to measure these parameters continuously and noninvasively may assist in diagnosing and monitoring patients with suspected cardiovascular diseases, or other critical illnesses. In this study, a method is proposed to estimate both the CO and SVR of a heterogeneous cohort of intensive care unit patients (N=48). Methods Spectral and morphological features were extracted from the finger photoplethysmogram, and added to heart rate and mean arterial pressure as input features to a multivariate regression model to estimate CO and SVR. A stepwise feature search algorithm was employed to select statistically significant features. Leave-one-out cross validation was used to assess the generalized model performance. The degree of agreement between the estimation method and the gold standard was assessed using Bland-Altman analysis. Results The Bland-Altman bias ±precision (1.96 times standard deviation) for CO was -0.01 ±2.70 L min-1 when only photoplethysmogram (PPG) features were used, and for SVR was -0.87 ±412 dyn.s.cm-5 when only one PPG variability feature was used. Conclusions These promising results indicate the feasibility of using the method described as a non-invasive preliminary diagnostic tool in supervised or unsupervised clinical settings. PMID:23452705

  9. Cardiac output by Doppler echocardiography in the premature baboon: Comparison with radiolabeled microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, J.P.; Morrow, W.R.; Gerstmann, D.R.; Taylor, A.F.; deLemos, R.A. )

    1991-04-01

    Pulsed-Doppler echocardiography (PDE) is a useful noninvasive method for determining left ventricular output (LVO). However, despite increasingly widespread use in neonatal intensive care units, validation studies in prematures with cardiopulmonary disease are lacking. The purpose of this study was to compare radiolabeled microsphere (RLM) and PDE measurements of LVO, using the critically ill premature baboon as a model of the human neonate. Twenty-two paired RLM and PDE measurements of LVO were obtained in 14 animals between 3 and 24 h of age. Average PDE LVO was 152 ml/min/kg (range, 40-258 ml/min/kg) compared to 158 ml/min/kg (range, 67-278 ml/min/kg) measured by RLM. Linear regression analysis of the paired measurements showed good correlation with a slope near unity (gamma = 0.94x + 4.20, r = 0.91, SEE = 25.7 ml). The authors conclude that PDE determinations of LVO compare well with those measured by RLM in the premature baboon. PDE appears to provide a valid estimate of LVO and should be useful in human prematures with cardiopulmonary distress.

  10. Diesel Exhaust Inhalation Increases Cardiac Output, Bradyarrhythmias, and Parasympathetic Tone in Aged Heart Failure-Prone Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute air pollutant inhalation is linked to adverse cardiac events and death, and hospitalizations for heart failure. Diesel exhaust (DE) is a major air pollutant suspected to exacerbate preexisting cardiac conditions, in part, through autonomic and electrophysiologic disturbance...

  11. Continuous measurement of cardiac output with the electrical velocimetry method in patients under spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanhong; Pian-Smith, May C M; Leffert, Lisa R; Minehart, Rebecca D; Torri, Andrea; Coté, Charles; Kacmarek, Robert M; Jiang, Yandong

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we aimed to continuously measure cardiac output (CO) with the electrical velocimetry (EV) method and characterize the hemodynamic profile of patients undergoing spinal anesthesia for elective cesarean delivery (CD), and to discuss the potential benefit of using real time CO monitoring to guide patient management. Forty-two patients scheduled for elective CD under spinal anesthesia were enrolled in this observational study. A non-invasive CO monitor incorporating the electrical velocimetry algorithm, ICON(®) (Cardiotronic(®), La Jolla, California, USA), was used to measure CO and stroke volume (SV) continuously. Peripheral venous pressure was measured intermittently at pre-defined time points. Systemic vascular resistance was calculated retrospectively after completion of the study. Hemodynamic changes at pre-defined time points and caused by phenylephrine administration were analyzed. Hypotension (MAP reduction more than 20% from baseline values) occurred in 71.1% of patients after spinal anesthesia, while the coinstantaneous CO was increased ?20% from baseline in the majority of patients (76.3%) at the same time. Significant increase in CO took place at 3-2 min before the administration of phenylephrine bolus. Treatment of hypotension with phenylephrine was associated with significant decrease in CO. Continuous CO monitoring with EV enables clinicians to determine CO and SV changes prior to onset of hypotension and to better understand patients' hemodynamics. It is an important addition to the current monitoring. The benefit of routinely using this technique remains to be determined in term of the patient outcomes. PMID:25510959

  12. Evaluation of a morphological filter in mean cardiac output determination: application to left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Michael Charles; Bradley, Andrew P; Wilson, Stephen J; Mason, David Glen

    2013-08-01

    A morphological filter (MF) is presented for the determination of beat-to-beat mean rotary left ventricular assist device (LVAD) flow rate, measured using an implanted flow probe. The performance of this non-linear filter was assessed using LVAD flow rate (QLVAD) data sets obtained from in silico and in vivo sources. The MF was compared with a third-order Butterworth filter (BWF) and a 10-s moving average filter (MAF). Performance was assessed by calculating the response time and steady state error across a range of heart rates and levels of noise. The response time of the MF was 3.5 times faster than the MAF, 0.5 s slower than the BWF, and had a steady state error of 2.61 %. It completely removed pulsatile signal components caused by residual ventricular function, and tracked sharp transient changes in QLVAD better than the BWF. The use of a two-stage MF improved the noise immunity compared to the single-stage MF. This study showed that the good performance characteristics of the non-linear MF make it a more suitable candidate for embedded real-time processing of QLVAD than linear filters. PMID:23526415

  13. The effects of methoxamine and epinephrine on survival and regional distribution of cardiac output in dogs with prolonged ventricular fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D; Landolfo, K; Dobson, K; Light, R B

    1990-10-01

    This study compares the effects of methoxamine, a pure alpha 1-agonist, and epinephrine on cerebral and myocardial blood flow, central hemodynamics, and survival in a randomized placebo-controlled fashion during prolonged ventricular fibrillation (VF) in a canine model. Twenty-four anesthetized and ventilated adult mongrel dogs were instrumented for regional blood flow determinations using radio-labeled microspheres. The dogs were randomized to receive either 20 mg of methoxamine as a single intravenous bolus or repeated boluses of 0.02 mg/kg of epinephrine, 0.2 mg/kg of epinephrine, or normal saline solution placebo beginning at three minutes following induction of VF and initiation of closed chest cardiac massage (CCCM). Organ blood flow measurements were determined during normal sinus rhythm and after five and 20 minutes of VF. All six dogs receiving methoxamine were successfully resuscitated in contrast to only one in each of the epinephrine-treated groups and none of the dogs receiving placebo (p less than .01). Although epinephrine was associated with significantly higher blood pressures than placebo during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), blood pressures achieved with methoxamine were significantly higher than those observed in the other three treatment groups (p less than .001). Cerebral blood flow was significantly higher with both methoxamine and high-dose epinephrine (p less than .05). Mean left and right ventricular myocardial flows were highest with methoxamine but this did not achieve statistical significance. In contrast, organ flows measured in the animals receiving the lowest dose of epinephrine were not significantly higher than those associated with placebo. Cardiac output after 20 minutes of CPR was significantly lower with high-dose epinephrine than with methoxamine or placebo (p less than .05). Our results suggest that methoxamine significantly improves regional cerebral blood flow and survival during CPR and although high-dose epinephrine is associated with comparable improvements in regional cerebral blood flow, this treatment is associated with deterioration in central hemodynamics during prolonged VF and does not enhance survival. PMID:2209164

  14. Early predictors of acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis and bacterial infection: urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and cardiac output as reliable tools

    PubMed Central

    Ximenes, Rafael O.; Farias, Alberto Q.; Helou, Claudia M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hemodynamic abnormalities and acute kidney injury (AKI) are often present in infected cirrhotic patients. Hence, an early diagnosis of AKI is necessary, which might require the validation of new predictors as the determinations of urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (uNGAL) and cardiac output. Methods We evaluated 18 infected cirrhotic patients subdivided into two groups at admission (0 hours). In Group I, we collected urine samples at 0 hours, 6 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours for uNGAL and fractional excretion of sodium determinations. In Group II, we measured cardiac output using echocardiography. Results The age of patients was 55.0±1.9 years, and 11 patients were males. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score was 21±1, whereas the Child–Pugh score was C in 11 patients and B in 7 patients. Both patients in Group I and Group II showed similar baseline characteristics. In Group I, we diagnosed AKI in 5 of 9 patients, and the mean time to this diagnosis by measuring serum creatinine was 5.4 days. Patients with AKI showed higher uNGAL levels than those without AKI from 6 hours to 48 hours. The best accuracy using the cutoff values of 68 ng uNGAL/mg creatinine was achieved at 48 hours when we distinguished patients with and without AKI in all cases. In Group II, we diagnosed AKI in 4 of 9 patients, and cardiac output was significantly higher in patients who developed AKI at 0 hours. Conclusion Both uNGAL and cardiac output determinations allow the prediction of AKI in infected cirrhotic patients earlier than increments in serum creatinine. PMID:26484038

  15. Pharmacokinetics, hemodynamic and metabolic effects of epinephrine to prevent post-operative low cardiac output syndrome in children

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The response to exogenous epinephrine (Ep) is difficult to predict given the multitude of factors involved such as broad pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic between-subject variabilities, which may be more pronounced in children. We investigated the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of Ep, co-administered with milrinone, in children who underwent open heart surgical repair for congenital defects following cardiopulmonary bypass, including associated variability factors. Methods Thirty-nine children with a high risk of low cardiac output syndrome were prospectively enrolled. Ep pharmacokinetics, hemodynamic and metabolic effects were analyzed using the non-linear mixed effects modeling software MONOLIX. According to the final model, an Ep dosing simulation was suggested. Results Ep dosing infusions ranged from 0.01 to 0.23 ?g.kg-1.min-1 in children whose weight ranged from 2.5 to 58 kg. A one-compartment open model with linear elimination adequately described the Ep concentration-time courses. Bodyweight (BW) was the main covariate influencing clearance (CL) and endogenous Ep production rate (q0) via an allometric relationship: CL(BWi)?=??CL x (BWi)3/4 and q0(BWi)?=??q0 x (BWi )3/4. The increase in heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) as a function of Ep concentration were well described using an Emax model. The effect of age was significant on HR and MAP basal level parameters. Assuming that Ep stimulated the production rate of plasma glucose, the increases in plasma glucose and lactate levels were well described by turnover models without any significant effect of age, BW or exogenous glucose supply. Conclusions According to this population analysis, the developmental effects of BW and age explained a part of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics between-subject variabilities of Ep administration in critically ill children. This approach ultimately leads to a valuable Ep dosing simulation which should help clinicians to determine an appropriate a priori dosing regimen. PMID:24456639

  16. The effects of cardiac output and pulmonary arterial hypertension on volumetric capnography derived-variables during normoxia and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Mosing, Martina; Kutter, Annette P N; Iff, Samuel; Raszplewicz, Joanna; Mauch, Jacqueline; Bohm, Stephan H; Tusman, Gerardo

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effect of cardiac output (CO) and pulmonary artery hypertension (PHT) on volumetric capnography (VCap) derived-variables. Nine pigs were mechanically ventilated using fixed ventilatory settings. Two steps of PHT were induced by IV infusion of a thromboxane analogue: PHT25 [mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP) of 25 mmHg] and PHT40 (MPAP of 40 mmHg). CO was increased by 50% from baseline (COup) with an infusion of dobutamine?5 ?g kg(-1) min(-1) and decreased by 40% from baseline (COdown) infusing sodium nitroglycerine?30 ?g kg(-1) min(-1) plus esmolol 500 ?g kg(-1) min(-1). Another state of PHT and COdown was induced by severe hypoxemia (FiO2 0.07). Invasive hemodynamic data and VCap were recorded and compared before and after each step using a mixed random effects model. Compared to baseline, the normalized slope of phase III (SnIII) increased by 32% in PHT25 and by 22% in PHT40. SnIII decreased non-significantly by 4% with COdown. A combination of PHT and COdown associated with severe hypoxemia increased SnIII by 28% compared to baseline. The elimination of CO2 per breath decreased by 7% in PHT40 and by 12% in COdown but increased only slightly with COup. Dead space variables did not change significantly along the protocol. At constant ventilation and body metabolism, pulmonary artery hypertension and decreases in CO had the biggest effects on the SnIII of the volumetric capnogram and on the elimination of CO2. PMID:24908108

  17. 78 FR 36787 - Rechanneling the Current Cardiac Risk Paradigm: Arrhythmia Risk Assessment During Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Rechanneling the Current Cardiac Risk Paradigm: Arrhythmia Risk... Cardiac Risk Paradigm: Arrhythmia Risk Assessment During Drug Development Without the Thorough QT...

  18. Modifications to the accuracy assessment analysis routine MLTCRP to produce an output file

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnes, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    Modifications are described that were made to the analysis program MLTCRP in the accuracy assessment software system to produce a disk output file. The output files produced by this modified program are used to aggregate data for regions greater than a single segment.

  19. Quantitative assessment of cardiac load-responsiveness during extracorporeal life support: case and rationale

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We describe a case of a patient assisted by extracorporeal life support, in which we obtained the dynamic filling index, a measure for venous volume during extracorporeal life support, and used this index to assess cardiac load-responsiveness during acute reloading. While reloading, the obtained findings on cardiac pump function by the dynamic filling index were supported by trans-esophageal echocardiography and standard pressure measurement. This suggests that the dynamic filling index can be used to assess cardiac load-responsiveness during extracorporeal life support. PMID:20423482

  20. Imminent Cardiac Risk Assessment via Optical Intravascular Biochemical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, D.; Wetzel, L; Wetzel, M; Lodder, R

    2009-01-01

    Heart disease is by far the biggest killer in the United States, and type II diabetes, which affects 8% of the U.S. population, is on the rise. In many cases, the acute coronary syndrome and/or sudden cardiac death occurs without warning. Atherosclerosis has known behavioral, genetic and dietary risk factors. However, our laboratory studies with animal models and human post-mortem tissue using FT-IR microspectroscopy reveal the chemical microstructure within arteries and in the arterial walls themselves. These include spectra obtained from the aortas of ApoE-/- knockout mice on sucrose and normal diets showing lipid deposition in the former case. Also pre-aneurysm chemical images of knockout mouse aorta walls, and spectra of plaque excised from a living human patient are shown for comparison. In keeping with the theme of the SPEC 2008 conference Spectroscopic Diagnosis of Disease this paper describes the background and potential value of a new catheter-based system to provide in vivo biochemical analysis of plaque in human coronary arteries. We report the following: (1) results of FT-IR microspectroscopy on animal models of vascular disease to illustrate the localized chemical distinctions between pathological and normal tissue, (2) current diagnostic techniques used for risk assessment of patients with potential unstable coronary syndromes, and (3) the advantages and limitations of each of these techniques illustrated with patent care histories, related in the first person, by the physician coauthors. Note that the physician comments clarify the contribution of each diagnostic technique to imminent cardiac risk assessment in a clinical setting, leading to the appreciation of what localized intravascular chemical analysis can contribute as an add-on diagnostic tool. The quality of medical imaging has improved dramatically since the turn of the century. Among clinical non-invasive diagnostic tools, laboratory tests of body fluids, EKG, and physical examination are still the first line of defense. However, with the fidelity of 64-slice CT imaging, this technique has recently become an option when the patient presents with symptoms of reduced arterial flow. Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) treadmill exercise testing is a standard non-invasive test for decreased perfusion of heart muscle, but is time consuming and not suited for emergent evaluation. Once the invasive clinical option of catherization is chosen, this provides the opportunity for intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging. As the probe is pulled through the artery, the diameter at different parts is measurable, and monochrome contrast in the constricted area reveals the presence of tissue with a different ultrasonic response. Also, via an optical catheter with a fiber-optic conductor, the possibly of spectroscopic analysis of arterial walls is now a reality. In this case, the optical transducer is coupled to a near-infrared spectrometer. Revealing the arterial chemical health means that plaque vulnerability and imminent risk could be assessed by the physician. The classical emergency use of catherization involves a contrast agent and dynamic X-ray imaging to locate the constriction, determine its severity, and possibly perform angioplasty, and stent placement.

  1. Comparison of ergonomic risk assessment output in four sawmill jobs.

    PubMed

    Jones, Troy; Kumar, Shrawan

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the agreement between 5 ergonomic risk assessment methods calculated on the basis of quantitative exposure measures and to examine the ability of the methods to correctly classify 4 at risk jobs. Surface electromyography and electrogoniometry were used to record the physical exposures of 87 sawmill workers performing 4 repetitive jobs. Five ergonomic risk assessment tools (rapid upper limb assessment [RULA], rapid entire body assessment [REBA], American conference of governmental industrial hygienist's threshold limit value for mono-task hand work [ACGIH TLV], strain index [SI], and concise exposure index [OCRA]) were calculated. Dichotomization of risk to no risk and at risk resulted in high agreement between methods. Percentage of perfect agreement between methods when 3 levels of risk were considered was moderate and varied by job. Of the methods examined, the RULA and SI were best (correct classification rates of 99 and 97% respectively). The quantitative ACGIH-TLV for mono-task hand work and Borg scale were worst (misclassification rates of 86 and 28% respectively). PMID:20331923

  2. Improving cardiac assessment and monitoring in methadone prescribing at an addiction service

    PubMed Central

    Ramage, Mark; Fadaka, Kate

    2014-01-01

    The assessment and monitoring of cardiac risk in patients prescribed methadone is important for patient safety. Although uncommon, QTc interval prolongation is potentially life-threatening. Known risk factors for QTc prolongation include methadone, particularly at doses above 100 milligrams daily. This project aimed to improve the cardiac assessment and monitoring at Barnet Drug and Alcohol Service through raising the awareness of this clinically importance issue as well as through amending the medical assessment guidance to promote the comprehensive assessment of QTc prolongation risk factors and ensure the identification of cardiac risk in patients prescribed methadone. The project also provided guidance on QTc prolongation management and monitoring (including performance of an electrocardiogram) at the service to provide a baseline measurement and arrangement of annual monitoring. Prior to the intervention, a randomised sample of 26 patients that had been prescribed methadone revealed no comprehensive cardiac risk assessments. Analysing 52 medical assessments in the month following the intervention suggested an improvement in assessment and management of QTc interval prolongation risk, with seven comprehensive cardiac risks assessments performed and one patient having QTc interval prolongation identified following an electrocardiogram and appropriately managed. This project was limited by small sample sizes and the relatively low incidence of QTc prolongation. The poor rate of attendance for requested electrocardiograms in this population was noted as a challenge that needed further consideration.

  3. Economic Input-Output Life Cycle Assessment of Water Reuse Strategies in Residential Buildings

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper evaluates the environmental sustainability and economic feasibility of four water reuse designs through economic input-output life cycle assessments (EIO-LCA) and benefit/cost analyses. The water reuse designs include: 1. Simple Greywater Reuse System for Landscape Ir...

  4. Short-Term Effects of Transjugular Intrahepatic Shunt on Cardiac Function Assessed by Cardiac MRI: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kovacs, A.; Schepke, M.; Heller, J.; Schild, H. H.; Flacke, S.

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess short-term effects of transjugular intrahepatic shunt (TIPS) on cardiac function with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with liver cirrhosis. Eleven patients (six males and five females) with intractable esophageal varices or refractory ascites were imaged with MRI at 1.5 T prior to, within 24 h after, and 4-6 months after TIPS creation (n = 5). Invasive pressures were registered during TIPS creation. MRI consisted of a stack of contiguous slices as well as phase contrast images at all four valve planes and perpendicular to the portal vein. Imaging data were analyzed through time-volume curves and first derivatives. The portoatrial pressure gradient decreased from 19.8 {+-} 2.3 to 6.6 {+-} 2.3, accompanied by a nearly two fold increase in central pressures and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure immediately after TIPS creation. Left and right end diastolic volumes and stroke volumes increased by 11, 13, and 24%, respectively (p < 0.001), but dropped back to baseline at follow-up. End systolic volumes remained unchanged. E/A ratios remained within normal range. During follow-up the left ventricular mass was larger than baseline values in all patients, with an average increase of 7.9 g (p < 0.001). In conclusion, the increased volume load shunted to the heart after TIPS creation transiently exceeded the preload reserve of the right and left ventricle, leading to significantly increased pulmonary wedge pressures and persistent enlargement of the left and right atria. Normalization of cardiac dimensions was observed after months together with mild left ventricular hypertrophy.

  5. Assessment of Cardiac Motion Effects on the Fiber Architecture of the Human Heart In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Viallon, Magalie; Delattre, Benedicte M. A.; Wang, Lihui; Pai, Vinay M.; Wen, Han; Xue, Hui; Guetter, Christoph; Croisille, Pierre; Zhu, Yuemin

    2015-01-01

    The use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for studying the human heart in vivo is very challenging due to cardiac motion. This paper assesses the effects of cardiac motion on the human myocardial fiber architecture. To this end, a model for analyzing the effects of cardiac motion on signal intensity is presented. A Monte-Carlo simulation based on polarized light imaging data is then performed to calculate the diffusion signals obtained by the displacement of water molecules, which generate diffusion weighted (DW) images. Rician noise and in vivo motion data obtained from DENSE acquisition are added to the simulated cardiac DW images to produce motion-induced datasets. An algorithm based on principal components analysis filtering and temporal maximum intensity projection (PCATMIP) is used to compensate for motion-induced signal loss. Diffusion tensor parameters derived from motion-reduced DW images are compared to those derived from the original simulated DW images. Finally, to assess cardiac motion effects on in vivo fiber architecture, in vivo cardiac DTI data processed by PCATMIP are compared to those obtained from one trigger delay (TD) or one single phase acquisition. The results showed that cardiac motion produced overestimated fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity as well as a narrower range of fiber angles. The combined use of shifted TD acquisitions and postprocessing based on image registration and PCATMIP effectively improved the quality of in vivo DW images and subsequently, the measurement accuracy of fiber architecture properties. This suggests new solutions to the problems associated with obtaining in vivo human myocardial fiber architecture properties in clinical conditions. PMID:23797241

  6. Assessment of Regional Myocardial Strain using Cardiac Elastography: Distinguishing Infarcted from Non-Infarcted Myocardium

    E-print Network

    Konofagou, Elisa E.

    Assessment of Regional Myocardial Strain using Cardiac Elastography: Distinguishing Infarcted from in a patient with a known myocardial infarction. Envelope- detected sonographic data was used to estimate Non-Infarcted Myocardium Elisa E. Konofagou', Timothy Harrigan2 and Scott Solomon3 'Focused Ultrasound

  7. The feasibility and applications of non-invasive cardiac output monitoring, thromboelastography and transit-time flow measurement in living-related renal transplantation surgery: results of a prospective pilot observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Delayed graft function (DGF) remains a significant and detrimental postoperative phenomenon following living-related renal allograft transplantation, with a published incidence of up to 15%. Early therapeutic vasodilatory interventions have been shown to improve DGF, and modifications to immunosuppressive regimens may subsequently lessen its impact. This pilot study assesses the potential applicability of perioperative non-invasive cardiac output monitoring (NICOM), transit-time flow monitoring (TTFM) of the transplant renal artery and pre-/perioperative thromboelastography (TEG) in the early prediction of DGF and perioperative complications. Methods Ten consecutive living-related renal allograft recipients were studied. Non-invasive cardiac output monitoring commenced immediately following induction of anaesthesia and was maintained throughout the perioperative period. Doppler-based TTFM was performed during natural haemostatic pauses in the transplant surgery: immediately following graft reperfusion and following ureteric implantation. Central venous blood sampling for TEG was performed following induction of anaesthesia and during abdominal closure. Results A single incidence of DGF was seen within the studied cohort and one intra-operative (thrombotic) complication noted. NICOM confirmed a predictable trend of increased cardiac index (CI) following allograft reperfusion (mean CI - clamped: 3.17?±?0.29 L/min/m2, post-reperfusion: 3.50?±?0.35 L/min/m2; P?

  8. Using climate model output to assess the impacts of climate change on water resources

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    The use of general circulation models (GCMs) to provide climate data for regional assessments of the impacts of changing climate on water resources stretches the limits of what the models were designed for. Problems that must be addressed include disagreement on a regional scale among GCMs and between the modeled and observed climate; coarse spatial resolution of the models; and simplistic representation of surface hydrology. It is important that continued progress be made in developing the methodology for using GCM output in climate-impact assessments. 18 refs.

  9. Effects of active chronic cocaine use on cardiac sympathetic neuronal function assessed by carbon-11-hydroxyephedrine

    SciTech Connect

    Melon, P.G.; Boyd, C.J.; McVey, S. |

    1997-03-01

    Cardiac toxicity of cocaine has been linked to its inhibitory effect on norepinephrine reuptake by sympathetic nerve terminals of the heart. Carbon-11-hydroxyephedrine is a positron-emitting tracer that has been validated as a highly specific marker for norepinephrine transporter activity of the sympathetic nerve terminals and thus makes possible in vivo assessment of the effect of cocaine on norepinephrine reuptake and storage in the cardiac sympathetic nerve terminals. The aim of the study was to use the catecholamine analog {sup 11}C-hydroxyephedrine with PET to determine whether active chronic use of cocaine in women modifies the function of sympathetic nerve terminals of the heart. Six normal female volunteers and nine female active chronic cocaine users were studied. Cardiac regional {sup 11}C-hydroxyephedrine uptake and blood flow, as assessed with {sup 13}N-ammonia, were determined using semi-quantitative polar map analysis of myocardial tracer distribution. Carbon-11-hydroxyephedrine cardiac retention was quantified using dynamic data acquisition and kinetic analysis of blood and tissue activity. 27 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. A Simplified and Rapid Screening Assay using Zebrafish to Assess Cardiac Effects of Air Pollution-derived Particulate Matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative toxicity assessment of particulate matter (PM) from different sources will potentially inform the understanding of regional differences in PM-induced cardiac health effects by identifying PM sources linked to highest potency components. Conventional low-throughput in...

  11. Evaluation of optical imaging and spectroscopy approaches for cardiac tissue depth assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, B; Matthews, D; Chernomordik, V; Gandjbakhche, A; Lane, S; Demos, S G

    2008-02-13

    NIR light scattering from ex vivo porcine cardiac tissue was investigated to understand how imaging or point measurement approaches may assist development of methods for tissue depth assessment. Our results indicate an increase of average image intensity as thickness increases up to approximately 2 mm. In a dual fiber spectroscopy configuration, sensitivity up to approximately 3 mm with an increase to 6 mm when spectral ratio between selected wavelengths was obtained. Preliminary Monte Carlo results provided reasonable fit to the experimental data.

  12. Functional Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the Assessment of Myocardial Viability and Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness safety and cost-effectiveness of using functional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of myocardial viability and perfusion in patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction. Results Functional MRI has become increasingly investigated as a noninvasive method for assessing myocardial viability and perfusion. Most patients in the published literature have mild to moderate impaired LV function. It is possible that the severity of LV dysfunction may be an important factor that can alter the diagnostic accuracy of imaging techniques. There is some evidence of comparable or better performance of functional cardiac MRI for the assessment of myocardial viability and perfusion compared with other imaging techniques. However limitations to most of the studies included: Functional cardiac MRI studies that assess myocardial viability and perfusion have had small sample sizes. Some studies assessed myocardial viability/perfusion in patients who had already undergone revascularization, or excluded patients with a prior MI (Schwitter et al., 2001). Lack of explicit detail of patient recruitment. Patients with LVEF >35%. Interstudy variability in post MI imaging time(including acute or chronic MI), when patients with a prior MI were included. Poor interobserver agreement (kappa statistic) in the interpretation of the results. Traditionally, 0.80 is considered “good”. Cardiac MRI measurement of myocardial perfusion to as an adjunct tool to help diagnose CAD (prior to a definitive coronary angiography) has also been examined in some studies, with methodological limitations, yielding comparable results. Many studies examining myocardial viability and perfusion report on the accuracy of imaging methods with limited data on long-term patient outcome and management. Kim et al. (2000) revealed that the transmural extent of hyperenhancement was significantly related to the likelihood of improvement in contractility after revascularization. However, the LVEF in the patient population was 43% prior to revascularization. It is important to know whether the technique has the same degree of accuracy in patients who have more severe LV dysfunction and who would most benefit from an assessment of myocardial viability. “Substantial” viability used as a measure of a patient’s ability to recover after revascularization has not been definitively reported (how much viability is enough?). Patients with severe LV dysfunction are more likely to have mixtures of surviving myocardium, including normal, infarcted, stunned and hibernating myocardium (Cowley et al., 1999). This may lead to a lack of homogeneity of response to testing and to revascularization and contribute to inter- and intra-study differences. There is a need for a large prospective study with adequate follow-up time for patients with CAD and LV dysfunction (LVEF<35%) comparing MRI and an alternate imaging technique. There is some evidence that MRI has comparable sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to PET for determining myocardial viability. However, there is a lack of evidence comparing the accuracy of these two techniques to predict LV function recovery. In addition, some studies refer to PET as the gold standard for the assessment of myocardial viability. Therefore, PET may be an ideal noninvasive imaging comparator to MRI for a prospective study with follow-up. To date, there is a lack of cost-effectiveness analyses (or any economic analyses) of functional cardiac MRI versus an alternate noninvasive imaging method for the assessment of myocardial viability/perfusion. Conclusion There is some evidence that the accuracy of functional cardiac MRI compares favourably with alternate imaging techniques for the assessment of myocardial viability and perfusion. There is insufficient evidence whether functional cardiac MRI can better select which patients [who have CAD and severe LV dysfuncti

  13. MRI assessment of cardiac tumours: part 1, multiparametric imaging protocols and spectrum of appearances of histologically benign lesions

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Muhammad; Ganeshan, Arul; Baijal, Shobhit; Simpson, Helen; Watkin, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the reference standard technique for assessment and characterization of a suspected cardiac tumour. It provides an unrestricted field of view, high temporal resolution and non-invasive tissue characterization based on multi-parametric assessment of the chemical micro-environment. MRI exploits differences in hydrogen proton density in conjunction with T1 and T2 relaxation properties of different tissues to help differentiation normal from abnormal and benign from malignant lesions. In this article we review specific cardiac MRI techniques, tumour protocol design and the appearance of the spectrum of histologically benign tumours. PMID:25525581

  14. Validation of On-Orbit Methodology for the Assessment of Cardiac Function and Changes in the Circulating Volume Using Ultrasound and Braslet-M Occlusion Cuffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Douglas; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Ebert, Douglas; Duncan, Michael; Bogomolov, Valery V.; Alferova, Irina V.; Matveev, Vladimir P.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this joint U.S. - Russian project was the development and validation of an in-flight methodology to assess a number of cardiac and vascular parameters associated with circulating volume and its manipulation in long-duration space flight. Responses to modified Valsalva and Mueller maneuvers were measured by cardiac and vascular ultrasound (US) before, during, and after temporary volume reduction by means of Braslet-M thigh occlusion cuffs (Russia). Materials and Methods: The study protocol was conducted in 14 sessions on 9 ISS crewmembers, with an average exposure to microgravity of 122 days. Baseline cardiovascular measurements were taken by echocardiography in multiple modes (including tissue Doppler of both ventricles) and femoral and jugular vein imaging on the International Space Station (ISS). The Braslet devices were then applied and measurements were repeated after >10 minutes. The cuffs were then released and the hemodynamic recovery process was monitored. Modified Valsalva and Mueller maneuvers were used throughout the protocol. All US data were acquired by the HDI-5000 ultrasound system aboard the ISS (ATL/Philips, USA) during remotely guided sessions. The study protocol, including the use of Braslet-M for this purpose, was approved by the ISS Human Research Multilateral Review Board (HRMRB). Results: The effects of fluid sequestration on a number of echocardiographic and vascular parameters were readily detectable by in-flight US, as were responses to respiratory maneuvers. The overall volume status assessment methodology appears to be valid and practical, with a decrease in left heart lateral E (tissue Doppler) as one of the most reliable measures. Increase in the femoral vein cross-sectional areas was consistently observed with Braslet application. Other significant differences and trends within the extensive cardiovascular data were also observed. (Decreased - RV and LV preload indices, Cardiac Output, LV E all maneuvers, LV Stroke Volume). Conclusions: This Study: 1) Addressed specific aspects of operational space medicine and space physiology, including assessment of circulating volume disturbances 2) Expanded the applications of diagnostic ultrasound imaging and Doppler techniques in microgravity. 3) Used respiratory maneuvers against the background of acute circulating volume manipulations which appear to enhance our ability to noninvasively detect volume-dependency in a number of cardiac and vascular parameters. 4) Determined that Tei index is not clinically changed therefore contractility not altered in the face of reduced preload. 5) Determined that increased Femoral Vein Area indicating blood being sequestered in lower extremities correlates with reduced preload and cardiac output. 6) That Braslet may be the only feasible means of acutely treating high pressure pulmonary edema in reduced gravity environments.

  15. The left ventricle as a mechanical engine: from Leonardo da Vinci to the echocardiographic assessment of peak power output-to-left ventricular mass.

    PubMed

    Dini, Frank L; Guarini, Giacinta; Ballo, Piercarlo; Carluccio, Erberto; Maiello, Maria; Capozza, Paola; Innelli, Pasquale; Rosa, Gian M; Palmiero, Pasquale; Galderisi, Maurizio; Razzolini, Renato; Nodari, Savina

    2013-03-01

    The interpretation of the heart as a mechanical engine dates back to the teachings of Leonardo da Vinci, who was the first to apply the laws of mechanics to the function of the heart. Similar to any mechanical engine, whose performance is proportional to the power generated with respect to weight, the left ventricle can be viewed as a power generator whose performance can be related to left ventricular mass. Stress echocardiography may provide valuable information on the relationship between cardiac performance and recruited left ventricular mass that may be used in distinguishing between adaptive and maladaptive left ventricular remodeling. Peak power output-to-mass, obtained during exercise or pharmacological stress echocardiography, is a measure that reflects the number of watts that are developed by 100 g of left ventricular mass under maximal stimulation. Power output-to-mass may be calculated as left ventricular power output per 100 g of left ventricular mass: 100× left ventricular power output divided by left ventricular mass (W/100 g). A simplified formula to calculate power output-to-mass is as follows: 0.222 × cardiac output (l/min) × mean blood pressure (mmHg)/left ventricular mass (g). When the integrity of myocardial structure is compromised, a mismatch becomes apparent between maximal cardiac power output and left ventricular mass; when this occurs, a reduction of the peak power output-to-mass index is observed. PMID:21934524

  16. Heart mass and the maximum cardiac output of birds and mammals: implications for estimating the maximum aerobic power input of flying animals

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, C. M.

    1997-01-01

    Empirical studies of cardiovascular variables suggest that relative heart muscle mass (relative Mh) is a good indicator of the degree of adaptive specialization for prolonged locomotor activities, for both birds and mammals. Reasonable predictions for the maximum oxygen consumption of birds during flight can be obtained by assuming that avian heart muscle has the same maximum physiological and biomechanical performance as that of terrestrial mammals. Thus, data on Mh can be used to provide quantitative estimates for the maximum aerobic power input (aerobic Pi,max) available to animals during intense levels of locomotor activity. The maximum cardiac output of birds and mammals is calculated to scale with respect to Mh (g) as 213 Mh0.88+-0.04 (ml min-1), while aerobic Pi,max is estimated to scale approximately as 11 Mh0.88+-0.09 (W). In general, estimated inter-species aerobic Pi,max, based on Mh for all bird species (excluding hummingbirds), is calculated to scale with respect to body mass (Mb in kg) as 81 Mb0.82+-0.11 (W). Comparison of family means for Mh indicate that there is considerable diversity in aerobic capacity among birds and mammals, for example, among the medium to large species of birds the Tinamidae have the smallest relative Mh (0.25 per cent) while the Otidae have unusually large relative Mh (1.6 per cent). Hummingbirds have extremely large relative Mh (2.28 per cent), but exhibit significant sexual dimorphism in their scaling of Mh and flight muscle mass, so that when considering hummingbird flight performance it may be useful to control for sexual differences in morphology. The estimated scaling of aerobic Pi,max (based on Mh and Mb in g) for male and female hummingbirds is 0.51 Mb0.83 +/-0.07 and 0.44 Mb0.85+- 0.11 (W), respectively. Locomotory muscles are dynamic structures and it might be anticipated that where additional energetic 'costs' occur seasonally (e.g. due to migratory fattening or the development of large secondary sexual characteristics) then the relevant cardiac and locomotor musculature might also be regulated seasonally. This is an important consideration, both due to the intrinsic interest of studying muscular adaptation to changes in energy demand, but also as a confounding variable in the practical use of heart rate to estimate the energetics of animals. Haemoglobin concentration (or haematocrit) may also be a confounding variable. Thus, it is concluded that data on the cardiovascular and flight muscle morphology of animals provides essential information regarding the behavioural, ecological and physiological significance of the flight performance of animals.

  17. Computerized assessment of motion-contaminated calcified plaques in cardiac multidetector CT

    SciTech Connect

    King, Martin; Giger, Maryellen L.; Suzuki, Kenji; Bardo, Dianna M. E.; Greenberg, Brent; Lan Li; Pan Xiaochuan

    2007-12-15

    An automated method for evaluating the image quality of calcified plaques with respect to motion artifacts in noncontrast-enhanced cardiac computed tomography (CT) images is introduced. This method involves using linear regression (LR) and artificial neural network (ANN) regression models for predicting two patient-specific, region-of-interest-specific, reconstruction-specific and temporal phase-specific image quality indices. The first is a plaque motion index, which is derived from the actual trajectory of the calcified plaque and is represented on a continuous scale. The second is an assessability index, which reflects the degree to which a calcified plaque is affected by motion artifacts, and is represented on an ordinal five-point scale. Two sets of assessability indices were provided independently by two radiologists experienced in evaluating cardiac CT images. Inputs for the regression models were selected from 12 features characterizing the dynamic, morphological, and intensity-based properties of the calcified plaques. Whereas LR-velocity (LR-V) used only a single feature (three-dimensional velocity), the LR-multiple (LR-M) and ANN regression models used the same subset of these 12 features selected through stepwise regression. The regression models were parameterized and evaluated using a database of simulated calcified plaque images from the dynamic NCAT phantom involving nine heart rate/multi-sector gating combinations and 40 cardiac phases covering two cardiac cycles. Six calcified plaques were used for the plaque motion indices and three calcified plaques were used for both sets of assessability indices. In one configuration, images from the second cardiac cycle were used for feature selection and regression model parameterization, whereas images from the first cardiac cycle were used for testing. With this configuration, repeated measures concordance correlation coefficients (CCCs) and associated 95% confidence intervals for the LR-V, LR-M, and ANN were 0.817 [0.785, 0.848], 0.894 [0.869, 0.916], and 0.917 [0.892, 0.936] for the plaque motion indices. For the two sets of assessability indices, CCC values for the ANN model were 0.843 [0.791, 0.877] and 0.793 [0.747, 0.828]. These two CCC values were statistically greater than the CCC value of 0.689 [0.648, 0.727], which was obtained by comparing the two sets of assessability indices with each other. These preliminary results suggest that the variabilities of assessability indices provided by regression models can lie within the variabilities of the indices assigned by independent observers. Thus, the potential exists for using regression models and assessability indices for determining optimal phases for cardiac CT image interpretation.

  18. Acute Coronary Syndrome and Cardiac Arrest: Using Simulation to Assess Resident Performance and Program Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Opar, Susan P.; Short, Matthew W.; Jorgensen, Jennifer E.; Blankenship, Robert B.; Roth, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Simulation training has emerged as an effective method of educating residents in cardiac emergencies. Few studies have used emergency simulation scenarios as an outcome measure to identify training deficiencies within residency programs. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate postgraduate year-1 (PGY-1) residents on their ability to manage an acute coronary syndrome and cardiac arrest scenario before and after internship in order to provide outcome data to improve program performance. Methods A total of 58 PGY-1 residents from 10 medical specialties were evaluated using a human patient simulator before and after internship. They were given 12 minutes to manage a patient with acute coronary syndrome and ventricular fibrillation due to hyperkalemia. An objective checklist following basic and advanced cardiac life support guidelines was used to assess performance. Results A total of 58 interns (age, 25 to 44 years [mean, 29.1]; 38 [65.6%] men; 41 [70.7%] allopathic medical school graduates) participated in both the incoming and outgoing examination. Overall chest pain scores increased from a mean of 60.0% to 76.1% (P < .01). Medical knowledge performance improved from 51.1% to 76.1% (P < .01). Systems-based practice performance improved from 40.9% to 71.0% (P < .01). However, patient care performance declined from 93.4% to 80.2% (P < .01). Conclusions A simulated acute coronary syndrome and cardiac arrest scenario can evaluate incoming PGY-1 competency performance and test for interval improvement. This assessment tool can measure resident competency performance and evaluate program effectiveness. PMID:21976090

  19. Risk Assessment of Mortality Following Intraoperative Cardiac Arrest Using POSSUM and P-POSSUM in Adults Undergoing Non-Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shin Hyung; Kil, Hae Keum; Kim, Hye Jin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Physiological and Operative Severity Score for enUmeration of Mortality and morbidity (POSSUM) and its Portsmouth modification (P-POSSUM) are comprehensive assessment methods for evaluating patient and surgical factors widely used to predict 30-day mortality rates. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the usefulness of POSSUM and P-POSSUM in predicting 30-day mortality after intraoperative cardiac arrests in adult patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery. Materials and Methods Among 190486 patients who underwent anesthesia, 51 experienced intraoperative cardiac arrest as defined in our study protocol. Predicted mortality rates were calculated using POSSUM and P-POSSUM equations and were compared with actual outcomes using exponential and linear analyses. In addition, a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was undertaken, and area-under-the-curve (AUC) values with confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for POSSUM and P-POSSUM. Results Among the 51 patients with intraoperative cardiac arrest, 32 (62.7%) died within 30 days postoperatively. The overall predicted 30-day mortality rates using POSSUM and P-POSSUM were 65.5% and 57.5%, respectively. The observed-to-predicted (O:E) ratio for the POSSUM 30-day mortality was 1.07, with no significant difference between the observed and predicted values (?2=4.794; p=0.779). P-POSSUM predicted mortality equally well, with an O:E ratio of 1.10 (?2=8.905; p=0.350). AUC values (95% CI) were 0.771 (0.634-0.908) and 0.785 (0.651-0.918) for POSSUM and P-POSSUM, respectively. Conclusion Both POSSUM and P-POSSUM performed well to predict overall 30-day mortality following intraoperative cardiac arrest in adults undergoing non-cardiac surgery at a university teaching hospital in Korea. PMID:26256987

  20. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among Cardiac Patients: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Considerations for Assessment and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tulloch, Heather; Greenman, Paul S.; Tassé, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing awareness of the impact of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on physical health, particularly cardiovascular disease. We review the literature on the role of trauma in the development of cardiovascular risk factors and disease, aftermath of a cardiac event, and risk for recurrence in cardiac patients. We explore possible mechanisms to explain these relationships, as well as appropriate assessment and treatment strategies for this population. Our main conclusion is that screening and referral for appropriate treatments are important given the high prevalence rates of PTSD in cardiac populations and the associated impact on morbidity and mortality. PMID:25545708

  1. In vivo assessment of cardiac metabolism and function in the abdominal aortic banding model of compensated cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Anne-Marie L.; Giles, Lucia; Ball, Vicky; Miller, Jack J.; Clarke, Kieran; Carr, Carolyn A.; Tyler, Damian J.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Left ventricular hypertrophy is an adaptive response of the heart to chronic mechanical overload and can lead to functional deterioration and heart failure. Changes in cardiac energy metabolism are considered as key to the hypertrophic remodelling process. The concurrence of obesity and hypertrophy has been associated with contractile dysfunction, and this work therefore aimed to investigate the in vivo structural, functional, and metabolic remodelling that occurs in the hypertrophied heart in the setting of a high-fat, high-sucrose, Western diet (WD). Methods and results Following induction of cardiac hypertrophy through abdominal aortic banding, male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to either a standard diet or a WD (containing 45% fat and 16% sucrose) for up to 14 weeks. Cardiac structural and functional characteristics were determined by CINE MRI, and in vivo metabolism was investigated using hyperpolarized 13C-labelled pyruvate. Cardiac hypertrophy was observed at all time points, irrespective of dietary manipulation, with no evidence of cardiac dysfunction. Pyruvate dehydrogenase flux was unchanged in the hypertrophied animals at any time point, but increased incorporation of the 13C label into lactate was observed by 9 weeks and maintained at 14 weeks, indicative of enhanced glycolysis. Conclusion Hypertrophied hearts revealed little evidence of a switch towards increased glucose oxidation but rather an uncoupling of glycolytic metabolism from glucose oxidation. This was maintained under conditions of dietary stress provided by a WD but, at this compensated phase of hypertrophy, did not result in any contractile dysfunction. PMID:25750189

  2. Wearable seismocardiography for the beat-to-beat assessment of cardiac intervals during sleep.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo, Marco; Vaini, Emanuele; Castiglioni, Paolo; Lombardi, Prospero; Parati, Gianfranco; Lombardi, Carolina; Meriggi, Paolo; Rizzo, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Seismocardiogram (SCG) can be detected during sleep by a textile-based wearable system. This pilot study preliminarily explores the feasibility of a beat-to-beat estimation of cardiac mechanical features (RR interval, RRI, Pre-Ejection Period, PEP, Isovolumic Contraction Time, ICT, Left Ventricular Ejection Time, LVET, Isovolumic Relaxation Time, IRT) from the joint ECG and SCG assessment during sleep. The analysis of two 30-min sleep data segments from one healthy subject, indicated that 1) respiration largely influence the dynamics of most of the parameters; 2) variability of cardiac intervals is only marginally influenced by the RRI variability; 3) appreciable spectral power at frequencies ? 0.1 is only observed in the RRI spectrum and not in the spectra of the other indexes; 4) IRT has a broadband variability, that is clearly different from the dynamics of the other indexes. These findings represent the very first description of the beat-to-beat variability of cardiac mechanical indexes. Further investigations on a larger population are in progress to confirm the present results. PMID:25571386

  3. Motion corrected LV quantification based on 3D modelling for improved functional assessment in cardiac MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Y. M.; McLaughlin, R. A.; Chan, B. T.; Aziz, Y. F. Abdul; Chee, K. H.; Ung, N. M.; Tan, L. K.; Lai, K. W.; Ng, S.; Lim, E.

    2015-04-01

    Cine MRI is a clinical reference standard for the quantitative assessment of cardiac function, but reproducibility is confounded by motion artefacts. We explore the feasibility of a motion corrected 3D left ventricle (LV) quantification method, incorporating multislice image registration into the 3D model reconstruction, to improve reproducibility of 3D LV functional quantification. Multi-breath-hold short-axis and radial long-axis images were acquired from 10 patients and 10 healthy subjects. The proposed framework reduced misalignment between slices to subpixel accuracy (2.88 to 1.21?mm), and improved interstudy reproducibility for 5 important clinical functional measures, i.e. end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, ejection fraction, myocardial mass and 3D-sphericity index, as reflected in a reduction in the sample size required to detect statistically significant cardiac changes: a reduction of 21-66%. Our investigation on the optimum registration parameters, including both cardiac time frames and number of long-axis (LA) slices, suggested that a single time frame is adequate for motion correction whereas integrating more LA slices can improve registration and model reconstruction accuracy for improved functional quantification especially on datasets with severe motion artefacts.

  4. Assessing impacts of climate change in a semi arid watershed using downscaled IPCC climate output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, S.; Dominguez, F.; Gupta, H. V.; Troch, P. A.; Castro, C. L.

    2009-12-01

    This presentation discusses our research aimed at helping water managers at Salt River Project (SRP), Phoenix, assess long term climate change impacts for the Salt and Verde River basins, and make informed policy decisions. Our goal is to assess the change in future 100 year water balance variables in comparison to past observations by development, application and testing of a physically based distributed hydrologic model forced by downscaled IPCC climate information. The variable infiltration capacity (VIC) model is set up to simulate historical observed streamflow at the outlet of Salt and Verde River basins using gridded observed precipitation and temperature data. The model is calibrated using the Shuffled Complex Evolution (SCE-UA) method incorporating observed climate elasticities of the Salt and Verde River basins. The MPI-ECHAM5, UK-HADCM3 model output for three emission scenarios used in the IPCC fourth assessment were chosen and statistically downscaled to be incorporated with the VIC model. This forcing dataset was used to analyze the basin scale responses to climate change. In this presentation, the scenarios based on future climate forcing data will be presented. In addition results from a synthetic study using downscaled future temperature and past precipitation and vice versa will be presented to check the robustness of the model to non-stationary input.

  5. Developing a genetic fuzzy system for risk assessment of mortality after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Nouei, Mahyar Taghizadeh; Kamyad, Ali Vahidian; Sarzaeem, MahmoodReza; Ghazalbash, Somayeh

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac events could be taken into account as the leading causes of death throughout the globe. Such events also trigger an undesirable increase in what treatment procedures cost. Despite the giant leaps in technological development in heart surgery, coronary surgery still carries the high risk of the mortality. Besides, there is still a long way ahead to accurately predict and assess the mortality risk. This study is an attempt to develop an expert system for the risk assessment of mortality following the cardiac surgery. The developed system involves three main steps. In the first step, a filtering feature selection method is applied to select the best features. In the second step, an ad hoc data-driven method is utilized to generate the preliminary fuzzy inference system. Finally, a hybrid optimization method is presented to select the optimum subset of the rules. The study relies on 1,811 samples to evaluate the diagnosis performance of the proposed system. The obtained classification accuracy is very promising with regard to other benchmark classification methods including binary logistic regression (LR) and multilayer perceptron neural network (MLP) with the same attributes. The developed system leads to 100% sensitivity and 84.7% specificity, while LR and MLP methods statistically come up with lower figures (65, 78.6 and 65%, 75.8%), respectively. Now, a fuzzy supportive tool can be potentially taken as an alternative for the current mortality risk assessment system that are applied in coronary surgeries, and are chiefly based on crisp database. PMID:25119238

  6. Cardiac Coordination and Mechanics 1 CARDIAC ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY*

    E-print Network

    Prestwich, Ken

    of the sympathetic nervous system. We will also see how to found cardiac output using A. The purpose of the heart's electrical system is to initiate muscle cells and does not come from the nervous system. Likewise, we can

  7. High-fat diet induces cardiac remodelling and dysfunction: assessment of the role played by SIRT3 loss

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Heng; Vaka, Venkata Ramana; He, Xiaochen; Booz, George W; Chen, Jian-Xiong

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in obesity-induced cardiac impairment. SIRT3 is a mitochondrial protein associated with increased human life span and metabolism. This study investigated the functional role of SIRT3 in obesity-induced cardiac dysfunction. Wild-type (WT) and SIRT3 knockout (KO) mice were fed a normal diet (ND) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 16 weeks. Body weight, fasting glucose levels, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, myocardial capillary density, cardiac function and expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1?/-2? were assessed. HFD resulted in a significant reduction in SIRT3 expression in the heart. Both HFD and SIRT3 KO mice showed increased ROS formation, impaired HIF signalling and reduced capillary density in the heart. HFD induced cardiac hypertrophy and impaired cardiac function. SIRT3 KO mice fed HFD showed greater ROS production and a further reduction in cardiac function compared to SIRT3 KO mice on ND. Thus, the adverse effects of HFD on cardiac function were not attributable to SIRT3 loss alone. However, HFD did not further reduce capillary density in SIRT3 KO hearts, implicating SIRT3 loss in HFD-induced capillary rarefaction. Our study demonstrates the importance of SIRT3 in preserving heart function and capillary density in the setting of obesity. Thus, SIRT3 may be a potential therapeutic target for obesity-induced heart failure. PMID:25782072

  8. Cardiac gated ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, C.W. III; Hoffman, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. The authors evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50 msec scan aperture. Multi slice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. The authors observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a non-failing model of the heart.

  9. Cardiac gated ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, C. William, III; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1995-05-01

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. We evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50msec scan aperture. Multislice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. We observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a nonfailing model of the heart.

  10. ASSESSMENT OF A NEW SIMULATION APPROACH FOR ESTIMATING PV OUTPUT VARIABILITY FROM SATELLITE IMAGERY

    E-print Network

    to estimate one-minute power output from fleets of large PV plants. The method relies on generating artificial of this study, SNL developed a method to produce time-synchronized, one-minute time series of power output of power output to estimate increases in regulation and load following reserves at various levels

  11. Assessment of cardiac single-photon emission computed tomography performance using a scanning linear observer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chih-Jie; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Volokh, Lana

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is widely used to detect myocardial ischemia and myocardial infarction. It is important to assess and compare different SPECT system designs in order to achieve the highest detectability of cardiac defects. Methods: Whitaker et al.'s study ['Estimating random signal parameters from noisy images with nuisance parameters: linear and scanning-linear methods,' Opt. Express 16(11), 8150-8173 (2008)] on the scanning linear observer (SLO) shows that the SLO can be used to estimate the location and size of signals. One major advantage of the SLO is that it can be used with projection data rather than with reconstruction data. Thus, this observer model assesses the overall hardware performance independent of any reconstruction algorithm. In addition, the computation time of image quality studies is significantly reduced. In this study, three systems based on the design of the GE cadmium zinc telluride-based dedicated cardiac SPECT camera Discovery 530c were assessed. This design, which is officially named the Alcyone Technology: Discovery NM 530c, was commercialized in August, 2009. The three systems, GE27, GE19, and GE13, contain 27, 19, and 13 detectors, respectively. Clinically, a human heart can be virtually segmented into three coronary artery territories: the left-anterior descending artery, left-circumflex artery, and right coronary artery. One of the most important functions of a cardiac SPECT system is to produce images from which a radiologist can accurately predict in which territory the defect exists [http://www.asnc.org/media/PDFs/PPReporting081511.pdf, Guideline from American Society of Nuclear Cardiology]. A good estimation of the extent of the defect from the projection images is also very helpful for determining the seriousness of the myocardial ischemia. In this study, both the location and extent of defects were estimated by the SLO, and the system performance was assessed by localization receiver operating characteristic (LROC) [P. Khurd and G. Gindi, 'Decision strategies maximizing the area under the LROC curve,' Proc. SPIE 5749, 150-161 (2005)] or estimation receiver operating characteristic (EROC) [E. Clarkson, 'Estimation receiver operating characteristic curve and ideal observers for combined detection/estimation tasks,' J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 24, B91-B98 (2007)] curves. Results: The area under the LROC/EROC curve (AULC/AUEC) and the true positive fraction (TPF) at a specific false positive fraction (FPF) can be treated as the figures of merit. For radii estimation with a 1 mm tolerance, the AUEC values of the GE27, GE19, and GE13 systems are 0.8545, 0.8488, and 0.8329, and the TPF at FPF = 5% are 77.1%, 76.46%, and 73.55%, respectively. The assessment of all three systems revealed that the GE19 system yields estimated information and cardiac defect detectability very close to those of the GE27 system while using eight fewer detectors. Thus, 30% of the expensive detector units can be removed with confidence. Conclusions: As the results show, a combination of the SLO and LROC/EROC curves can determine the configuration that yields the most relevant estimation/detection information. Thus, this is a useful method for assessing cardiac SPECT systems.

  12. Life Cycle Assessment of Mixed Municipal Solid Waste: Multi-input versus multi-output perspective.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, G; Ripa, M; Protano, G; Hornsby, C; Ulgiati, S

    2015-12-01

    This paper analyses four strategies for managing the Mixed Municipal Solid Waste (MMSW) in terms of their environmental impacts and potential advantages by means of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology. To this aim, both a multi-input and a multi-output approach are applied to evaluate the effect of these perspectives on selected impact categories. The analyzed management options include direct landfilling with energy recovery (S-1), Mechanical-Biological Treatment (MBT) followed by Waste-to-Energy (WtE) conversion (S-2), a combination of an innovative MBT/MARSS (Material Advanced Recovery Sustainable Systems) process and landfill disposal (S-3), and finally a combination of the MBT/MARSS process with WtE conversion (S-4). The MARSS technology, developed within an European LIFE PLUS framework and currently implemented at pilot plant scale, is an innovative MBT plant having the main goal to yield a Renewable Refined Biomass Fuel (RRBF) to be used for combined heat and power production (CHP) under the regulations enforced for biomass-based plants instead of Waste-to-Energy systems, for increased environmental performance. The four scenarios are characterized by different resource investment for plant and infrastructure construction and different quantities of matter, heat and electricity recovery and recycling. Results, calculated per unit mass of waste treated and per unit exergy delivered, under both multi-input and multi-output LCA perspectives, point out improved performance for scenarios characterized by increased matter and energy recovery. Although none of the investigated scenarios is capable to provide the best performance in all the analyzed impact categories, the scenario S-4 shows the best LCA results in the human toxicity and freshwater eutrophication categories, i.e. the ones with highest impacts in all waste management processes. PMID:26257056

  13. CMR Imaging With Rapid Visual T1 Assessment Predicts Mortality in Patients Suspected of Cardiac Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    White, James A.; Kim, Han W.; Shah, Dipan; Fine, Nowell; Kim, Ki-Young; Wendell, David C.; Al-Jaroudi, Wael; Parker, Michele; Patel, Manesh; Gwadry-Sridhar, Femida; Judd, Robert M.; Kim, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study tested the diagnostic and prognostic utility of a rapid, visual T1 assessment method for identification of cardiac amyloidosis (CA) in a “real-life” referral population undergoing cardiac magnetic resonance for suspected CA. BACKGROUND In patients with confirmed CA, delayed-enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance (DE-CMR) frequently shows a diffuse, global hyperenhancement (HE) pattern. However, imaging is often technically challenging, and the prognostic significance of diffuse HE is unclear. METHODS Ninety consecutive patients referred for suspected CA and 64 hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) were prospectively enrolled and underwent a modified DE-CMR protocol. After gadolinium administration a method for rapid, visual T1 assessment was used to identify the presence of diffuse HE during the scan, allowing immediate optimization of settings for the conventional DE-CMR that followed. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality. RESULTS Among patients with suspected CA, 66% (59 of 90) demonstrated HE, with 81% (48 of 59) of these meeting pre-specified visual T1 assessment criteria for diffuse HE. Among hypertensive LVH patients, 6% (4 of 64) had HE, with none having diffuse HE. During 29 months of follow-up (interquartile range: 12 to 44 months), there were 50 (56%) deaths in patients with suspected CA and 4 (6%) in patients with hypertensive LVH. Multivariable analysis demonstrated that the presence of diffuse HE was the most important predictor of death in the group with suspected CA (hazard ratio: 5.5, 95% confidence interval: 2.7 to 11.0; p < 0.0001) and in the population as a whole (hazard ratio: 6.0, 95% confidence interval 3.0 to 12.1; p < 0.0001). Among 25 patients with myocardial histology obtained during follow-up, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of diffuse HE in the diagnosis of CA were 93%, 70%, and 84%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Among patients suspected of CA, the presence of diffuse HE by visual T1 assessment accurately identifies patients with histologically-proven CA and is a strong predictor of mortality. PMID:24412191

  14. Cardiac index assessment using bioreactance in patients undergoing cytoreductive surgery in ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kober, David; Trepte, Constantin; Petzoldt, Martin; Nitzschke, Rainer; Herich, Lena; Reuter, Daniel A; Haas, Sebastian

    2013-12-01

    This clinical study compared the cardiac index (CI) assessed by the totally non-invasive method of bioreactance (CIBR) (NICOM™, Cheetah Medical, Vancouver, USA) to transpulmonary thermodilution (CITD) during cytoreductive surgery in ovarian carcinoma. The hypothesis was that CI could be assessed by bioreactance in an accurate and precise manner including accurate trending ability when compared to transpulmonary thermodilution. In 15 patients CIBR and CITD were assessed after induction of anesthesia, after opening of the peritoneum, hourly during the operative procedure, and 30 min after extubation. Trending ability was assessed between the described timepoints. In total 84 points of measurement were analyzed. Concordance correlation coefficient for repeated measures correlating the CIBR and CITD was 0.32. Bias was 0.26 l/min/m(2) (limits of agreement -1.39 and 1.92 l/min/m(2)). The percentage error was 50.7 %. Trending ability quantified by the mean of angles ? which are made by the ?CI vector and the line of identity (y = x) showed a value for CIBR of ? = 23.4°. CI assessment by bioreactance showed acceptable accuracy and trending ability. However, its precision was poor. Therefore, CI measurement can not be solely based on bioreactance in patients undergoing cytoreductive surgery in ovarian carcinoma. PMID:23689837

  15. Can general circulation models be assessed and their output enhanced with drifter data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, M.; Kirwan, A. D.; Kantha, L. H.; Choi, J. K.

    2001-09-01

    Drifter data from the Gulf of Mexico are used to assess and enhance the output of a primitive equation general circulation model. The analysis is made in a 450 km × 450 km open subdomain encompassing a Loop Current ring. The model velocity field is compared with position data from four drifters at the drogue depth of 50 m using geometrical orthogonal functions (GOF). An Eulerian velocity field is reconstructed from the model velocity field and drifter velocities. This reconstructed velocity improves 8-day numerical trajectories relative to the model field by at least an order of magnitude, as quantified by two Lagrangian error metrics referenced to the real drifter paths. An Eulerian metric that compares the two fields, however, does not exceed 7% for the 20-day assessment period. Thus the drifter data may be reproduced with modest impact on the model velocity. Enhancement of the model velocity field is determined by two tests: the ability of the GOF velocity field to (1) improve the forecast of drifter positions using only a posteriori data and (2) improve the forecast of withheld drifter data. Using a posteriori data, the 20-day temporal mean of the position error is improved for all drifters by 87-89% for 6-hour and 26-38% for 30-hour forecasts. For 6 days, a withheld drifter is 35-40 km from a drifter whose velocity is used in the reconstructed velocity field. The temporal mean of the position error during this period is improved by 20% for 6-hour and 26% for 30-hour forecasts.

  16. Spatiotemporal Downscaling of Global Climate Model Output for Assessing Soil Erosion and Crop Production Under Climate Change.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spatial and temporal mismatches between coarse resolution output of General Circulation Models (GCMs) and fine resolution data requirements of ecosystems models are the major obstacles for assessing the site-specific climatic impacts of climate change on natural resources and ecosystems. The object...

  17. Productivity in Academia: An Assessment of Causal Linkages between Output and Outcome Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wamala, Robert; Ssembatya, Vincent A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate causal linkages between output and outcome indicators of productivity in academia. Design/methodology/approach: The duration of teaching service and the number of graduate students supervised to completion were adopted as output indicators of productivity. Equivalent outcome indicators were the…

  18. Considerations for assessing the potential effects of antidiabetes drugs on cardiac ventricular repolarization: A report from the Cardiac Safety Research Consortium.

    PubMed

    Heller, Simon; Darpö, Börje; Mitchell, Malcolm I; Linnebjerg, Helle; Leishman, Derek J; Mehrotra, Nitin; Zhu, Hao; Koerner, John; Fiszman, Mónica L; Balakrishnan, Suchitra; Xiao, Shen; Todaro, Thomas G; Hensley, Ingrid; Guth, Brian D; Michelson, Eric L; Sager, Philip

    2015-07-01

    Thorough QT studies conducted according to the International Council on Harmonisation E14 guideline are required for new nonantiarrhythmic drugs to assess the potential to prolong ventricular repolarization. Special considerations may be needed for conducting such studies with antidiabetes drugs as changes in blood glucose and other physiologic parameters affected by antidiabetes drugs may prolong the QT interval and thus confound QT/corrected QT assessments. This review discusses potential mechanisms for QT/corrected QT interval prolongation with antidiabetes drugs and offers practical considerations for assessing antidiabetes drugs in thorough QT studies. This article represents collaborative discussions among key stakeholders from academia, industry, and regulatory agencies participating in the Cardiac Safety Research Consortium. It does not represent regulatory policy. PMID:26093861

  19. Optimized Heart Sampling and Systematic Evaluation of Cardiac Therapies in Mouse Models of Ischemic Injury: Assessment of Cardiac Remodeling and Semi-Automated Quantification of Myocardial Infarct Size.

    PubMed

    Valente, Mariana; Araújo, Ana; Esteves, Tiago; Laundos, Tiago L; Freire, Ana G; Quelhas, Pedro; Pinto-do-Ó, Perpétua; Nascimento, Diana S

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac therapies are commonly tested preclinically in small-animal models of myocardial infarction. Following functional evaluation, post-mortem histological analysis is essential to assess morphological and molecular alterations underlying the effectiveness of treatment. However, non-methodical and inadequate sampling of the left ventricle often leads to misinterpretations and variability, making direct study comparisons unreliable. Protocols are provided for representative sampling of the ischemic mouse heart followed by morphometric analysis of the left ventricle. Extending the use of this sampling to other types of in situ analysis is also illustrated through the assessment of neovascularization and cellular engraftment in a cell-based therapy setting. This is of interest to the general cardiovascular research community as it details methods for standardization and simplification of histo-morphometric evaluation of emergent heart therapies. © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26629776

  20. Assessment of aortic and mitral annuli dynamics during the cardiac cycle using speckle tracking echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Wenjuan; Li, Hui; Tang, Hong; Zhang, Qing; Zhu, Ye

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were i) to evaluate mitral and aortic annuli excursion, and aortomitral angle (AMA) during the cardiac cycle in healthy adults using two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography, ii) to assess two annuli dynamics and coupling behaviors as an integral, and iii) to detect the relation between two annuli and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). A total of 74 healthy adults underwent transthoracic echocardiography. In the parasternal long-axis view, a number of points were extracted, including right coronary aortic annular, aortomitral fibrous junction, and posterior mitral annular points. The annuli excursion and AMA were measured using a speckle tracking-derived software during the cardiac cycle. During the isovolumic contraction and the isovolumic relaxation phase, annuli excursion and AMA remain stable for a short time. During the systole, annuli excursion increased sharply to the maximum, while AMA narrowed quickly to the minimum value. During the diastole, there are three patterns of decrease in annuli excursion and AMA expansion in different phases. The annuli excursion of three points correlates well with the LVEF (right coronary aortic annulus excursion, r=0.71, P<0.05; non-coronary aortic annulus excursion, r=0.70, P<0.05; posterior mitral annulus excursion, r=0.82, P<0.05). Moreover, there are positive correlations between annuli excursion and the variation of AMA (r=0.60, P<0.05). The annuli excursion and AMA have various regular patterns in healthy adults. The interactions of mitral and aortic annuli correlate with the left ventricular function. Our findings may have relevance to the evaluation of left ventricular function and presurgical planning of patients with valvular diseases.

  1. Cardiac risk in the treatment of breast cancer: assessment and management

    PubMed Central

    Valachis, Antonis; Nilsson, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    As the number of long-term breast cancer survivors has increased, the side effects of adjuvant cancer therapy, such as cardiac toxicity, remain clinically important. Although the cardiac toxicity due to anthracyclines, radiotherapy, or trastuzumab is well-documented, several issues need to be clarified and are the subjects of extensive ongoing clinical research. This review summarizes the incidence of cardiac toxicity due to breast cancer adjuvant therapy and highlights the current trends in early detection and management of cardiac toxicities. PMID:25653554

  2. Regional assessment of LV wall in infarcted heart using tagged MRI and cardiac modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahanzad, Zeinab; Miin Liew, Yih; Bilgen, Mehmet; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Onn Leong, Chen; Chee, Kok Han; Aziz, Yang Faridah Abdul; Ung, Ngie Min; Lai, Khin Wee; Ng, Siew-Cheok; Lim, Einly

    2015-05-01

    A segmental two-parameter empirical deformable model is proposed for evaluating regional motion abnormality of the left ventricle. Short-axis tagged MRI scans were acquired from 10 healthy subjects and 10 postinfarct patients. Two motion parameters, contraction and rotation, were quantified for each cardiac segment by fitting the proposed model using a non-rigid registration algorithm. The accuracy in motion estimation was compared to a global model approach. Motion parameters extracted from patients were correlated to infarct transmurality assessed with delayed-contrast-enhanced MRI. The proposed segmental model allows markedly improved accuracy in regional motion analysis as compared to the global model for both subject groups (1.22-1.40?mm versus 2.31-2.55?mm error). By end-systole, all healthy segments experienced radial displacement by ~25-35% of the epicardial radius, whereas the 3 short-axis planes rotated differently (basal: 3.3° mid:??-1° and apical:??-4.6°) to create a twisting motion. While systolic contraction showed clear correspondence to infarct transmurality, rotation was nonspecific to either infarct location or transmurality but could indicate the presence of functional abnormality. Regional contraction and rotation derived using this model could potentially aid in the assessment of severity of regional dysfunction of infarcted myocardium.

  3. ICT Expenditures and Education Outputs/Outcomes in Selected Developed Countries: An Assessment of Relative Efficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aristovnik, Aleksander

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the paper is to review some previous researches examining ICT efficiency and the impact of ICT on educational output/outcome as well as different conceptual and methodological issues related to performance measurement. Design/methodology/approach: This paper adopts a non-parametric methodology, i.e. data envelopment analysis…

  4. Cardiac shock wave therapy: assessment of safety and new insights into mechanisms of tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Di Meglio, Franca; Nurzynska, Daria; Castaldo, Clotilde; Miraglia, Rita; Romano, Veronica; De Angelis, Antonella; Piegari, Elena; Russo, Sergio; Montagnani, Stefania

    2012-04-01

    Although low-energy extracorporeal cardiac shock wave (ECSW) therapy represents an attractive non-invasive treatment option for ischaemic heart disease, the precise mechanisms of its action and influence on the cardiac tissue remain obscure. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of SW application on cardiac function and structure. Four-month-old Fisher 344 rats were subjected to ECSW therapy. Echocardiographic measurements of cardiac function were performed at baseline and at 1 and 3 months after treatment. Signs of inflammation, apoptosis and fibrosis were evaluated by immunohistochemistry in the control and treated hearts. ECSW application did not provoke arrhythmia or increase the troponin-I level. At all time points, the left ventricular ejection fraction and fractional shortening remained stable. Histological analysis revealed neither differences in the extracellular matrix collagen content nor the presence of fibrosis; similarly, there were no signs of inflammation. Moreover, a population of cardiac cells that responded eagerly to ECSW application in the adult heart was identified; c-kit-positive, Ki67-positive, orthochromatic cells, corresponding to cardiac primitive cells, were 2.65-fold more numerous in the treated myocardium. In conclusion, non-invasive ECSW therapy is a safe and effective way of activating cardiac stem cells and myocardial regeneration. Because many factors influence cellular turnover in the ischaemic myocardium during the course of ischaemic heart disease, cardiac remodelling, and heart failure progression, studies to identify the optimal treatment time are warranted. PMID:21790971

  5. Use of biomarkers for the assessment of chemotherapy-induced cardiac toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Christenson, Eric S.; James, Theodore; Agrawal, Vineet; Park, Ben H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To review the evidence for the use of various biomarkers in the detection of chemotherapy associated cardiac damage. Design and methods Pubmed.gov was queried using the search words chemotherapy and cardiac biomarkers with the filters of past 10 years, humans, and English language. An emphasis was placed on obtaining primary research articles looking at the utility of biomarkers for the detection of chemotherapy-mediated cardiac injury. Results Biomarkers may help identify patients undergoing treatment who are at high risk for cardiotoxicity and may assist in identification of a low risk cohort that does not necessitate continued intensive screening. cTn assays are the best studied biomarkers in this context and may represent a promising and potentially valuable modality for detecting cardiac toxicity in patients undergoing chemotherapy. Monitoring cTnI levels may provide information regarding the development of cardiac toxicity before left ventricular dysfunction becomes apparent on echocardiography or via clinical symptoms. A host of other biomarkers have been evaluated for their utility in the field of chemotherapy related cardiac toxicity with intermittent success; further trials are necessary to determine what role they may end up playing for prediction and prognostication in this setting. Conclusions Biomarkers represent an exciting potential complement or replacement for echocardiographic monitoring of chemotherapy related cardiac toxicity which may allow for earlier realization of the degree of cardiac damage occurring during treatment, creating the opportunity for more timely modulation of therapy. PMID:25445234

  6. Wearable seismocardiography: towards a beat-by-beat assessment of cardiac mechanics in ambulant subjects.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo, M; Vaini, E; Castiglioni, P; Merati, G; Meriggi, P; Parati, G; Faini, A; Rizzo, F

    2013-11-01

    Seismocardiogram (SCG) is the measure of the micro-vibrations produced by the heart contraction and blood ejection into the vascular tree. Over time, a large body of evidence has been collected on the ability of SCG to reflect cardiac mechanical events such as opening and closure of mitral and aortic valves, atrial filling and point of maximal aortic blood ejection. We recently developed a smart garment, named MagIC-SCG, that allows the monitoring of SCG, electrocardiogram (ECG) and respiration out of the laboratory setting in ambulant subjects. The present pilot study illustrates the results of two different experiments performed to obtain a first evaluation on whether a dynamical assessment of indexes of cardiac mechanics can be obtained from SCG recordings obtained by MagIC-SCG. In the first experiment, we evaluated the consistency of the estimates of two indexes of cardiac contractility, the pre-ejection period, PEP, and the left ventricular ejection time, LVET. This was done in the lab, by reproducing an experimental protocol well known in literature, so that our measures derived from SCG could have been compared with PEP and LVET reference values obtained by traditional techniques. Six healthy subjects worn MagIC-SCG while assuming two different postures (supine and standing); PEP was estimated as the time interval between the Q wave in ECG and the SCG wave corresponding to the opening of aortic valve; LVET was the time interval between the SCG waves corresponding to the opening and closure of the aortic valve. The shift from supine to standing posture produced a significant increase in PEP and PEP/LVET ratio, a reduction in LVET and a concomitant rise in the LF/HF ratio in the RR interval (RRI) power spectrum. These results are in line with data available in literature thus providing a first support to the validity of our estimates. In the second experiment, we evaluated in one subject the feasibility of the beat-by-beat assessment of LVET during spontaneous behavior. The subject was continuously monitored by the smart garment from 8 am to 8 pm during a workday. From the whole recording, three data segments were selected: while the subject was traveling to work (M1), during work in the office (O) and while traveling back home (M2). LVET was estimated on a beat-by-beat basis from SCG and the RRI influence was removed by regression analysis. The LVET series displayed marked beat-by-beat fluctuations at the respiratory frequency. The amplitude of these fluctuations changed in the three periods and was lower when the LF/HF RRI power ratio was higher, at O, thus suggesting a possible influence of the autonomic nervous system on LVET short-term variability. To the best of our knowledge this case report provides for the first time a representation of the beat-by-beat dynamics of a systolic time interval during daily activity. The statistical characterization of these findings remains to be explored on a larger population. PMID:23664242

  7. Statistical Downscaling and Bias Correction of Climate Model Outputs for Climate Change Impact Assessment in the U.S. Northeast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Kazi Farzan; Wang, Guiling; Silander, John; Wilson, Adam M.; Allen, Jenica M.; Horton, Radley; Anyah, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Statistical downscaling can be used to efficiently downscale a large number of General Circulation Model (GCM) outputs to a fine temporal and spatial scale. To facilitate regional impact assessments, this study statistically downscales (to 1/8deg spatial resolution) and corrects the bias of daily maximum and minimum temperature and daily precipitation data from six GCMs and four Regional Climate Models (RCMs) for the northeast United States (US) using the Statistical Downscaling and Bias Correction (SDBC) approach. Based on these downscaled data from multiple models, five extreme indices were analyzed for the future climate to quantify future changes of climate extremes. For a subset of models and indices, results based on raw and bias corrected model outputs for the present-day climate were compared with observations, which demonstrated that bias correction is important not only for GCM outputs, but also for RCM outputs. For future climate, bias correction led to a higher level of agreements among the models in predicting the magnitude and capturing the spatial pattern of the extreme climate indices. We found that the incorporation of dynamical downscaling as an intermediate step does not lead to considerable differences in the results of statistical downscaling for the study domain.

  8. A Delay Vector Variance based Marker for an Output-Only Assessment of Structural Changes in Tension Leg Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaksic, V.; Wright, C.; Mandic, D. P.; Murphy, J.; Pakrashi, V.

    2015-07-01

    Although aspects of power generation of many offshore renewable devices are well understood, their dynamic responses under high wind and wave conditions are still to be investigated to a great detail. Output only statistical markers are important for these offshore devices, since access to the device is limited and information about the exposure conditions and the true behaviour of the devices are generally partial, limited, and vague or even absent. The markers can summarise and characterise the behaviour of these devices from their dynamic response available as time series data. The behaviour may be linear or nonlinear and consequently a marker that can track the changes in structural situations can be quite important. These markers can then be helpful in assessing the current condition of the structure and can indicate possible intervention, monitoring or assessment. This paper considers a Delay Vector Variance based marker for changes in a tension leg platform tested in an ocean wave basin for structural changes brought about by single column dampers. The approach is based on dynamic outputs of the device alone and is based on the estimation of the nonlinearity of the output signal. The advantages of the selected marker and its response with changing structural properties are discussed. The marker is observed to be important for monitoring the as- deployed structural condition and is sensitive to changes in such conditions. Influence of exposure conditions of wave loading is also discussed in this study based only on experimental data.

  9. Detecting drug-induced prolongation of the QRS complex: New insights for cardiac safety assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Cros, C.; Skinner, M.; Moors, J.; Lainee, P.; Valentin, J.P.

    2012-12-01

    Background: Drugs slowing the conduction of the cardiac action potential and prolonging QRS complex duration by blocking the sodium current (I{sub Na}) may carry pro-arrhythmic risks. Due to the frequency-dependent block of I{sub Na}, this study assesses whether activity-related spontaneous increases in heart rate (HR) occurring during standard dog telemetry studies can be used to optimise the detection of class I antiarrhythmic-induced QRS prolongation. Methods: Telemetered dogs were orally dosed with quinidine (class Ia), mexiletine (class Ib) or flecainide (class Ic). QRS duration was determined standardly (5 beats averaged at rest) but also prior to and at the plateau of each acute increase in HR (3 beats averaged at steady state), and averaged over 1 h period from 1 h pre-dose to 5 h post-dose. Results: Compared to time-matched vehicle, at rest, only quinidine and flecainide induced increases in QRS duration (E{sub max} 13% and 20% respectively, P < 0.01–0.001) whereas mexiletine had no effect. Importantly, the increase in QRS duration was enhanced at peak HR with an additional effect of + 0.7 ± 0.5 ms (quinidine, NS), + 1.8 ± 0.8 ms (mexiletine, P < 0.05) and + 2.8 ± 0.8 ms (flecainide, P < 0.01) (calculated as QRS at basal HR-QRS at high HR). Conclusion: Electrocardiogram recordings during elevated HR, not considered during routine analysis optimised for detecting QT prolongation, can be used to sensitise the detection of QRS prolongation. This could prove useful when borderline QRS effects are detected. Analysing during acute increases in HR could also be useful for detecting drug-induced effects on other aspects of cardiac function. -- Highlights: ? We aimed to improve detection of drug-induced QRS prolongation in safety screening. ? We used telemetered dogs to test class I antiarrhythmics at low and high heart rate. ? At low heart rate only quinidine and flecainide induced an increase in QRS duration. ? At high heart rate the effects of two out of three antiarrhythmics were enhanced. ? Detection of a drug-induced prolongation of QRS was improved at high heart rate.

  10. The Hirsch-index: a simple, new tool for the assessment of scientific output of individual scientists

    PubMed Central

    Opthof, T.; Wilde, A.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this brief paper we explore the Hirsch-index together with a couple of other bibliometric parameters for the assessment of the scientific output of 29 Dutch professors in clinical cardiology. It appears that even within such a homogeneous group there is large interindividual variability. Although the differences are quite remarkable, it remains undetermined what they mean; at least it is premature to interpret them as differences in scientific quality. It goes without saying that even more prudence is required when different fields of medicine and life sciences are compared (for example within University Medical Centres). Recent efforts to produce an amalgam of scientific ‘productivity’, ‘relevance’ and ‘viability’ as a surrogate parameter for the assessment of scientific quality, as for example performed in the AMC in Amsterdam, should be discouraged in the absence of a firm scientific base. Unfortunately for politicians and ‘managers of science’ only reading papers and studying are suitable for quality assessment of scientific output. Citations analyses can't substitute that. (Neth Heart J 2009;17:145-54.19421360) PMID:19421360

  11. Cardiac disease in mucopolysaccharidosis type I attributed to catecholaminergic and hemodynamic deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Palpant, Nathan J.; Bedada, Fikru B.; Peacock, Brandon; Blazar, Bruce R.; Metzger, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction is a common cause of death among pediatric patients with mutations in the lysosomal hydrolase ?-l-iduronidase (IDUA) gene, which causes mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS-I). The purpose of this study was to analyze adrenergic regulation of cardiac hemodynamic function in MPS-I. An analysis of murine heart function was performed using conductance micromanometry to assess in vivo cardiac hemodynamics. Although MPS-I (IDUA?/?) mice were able to maintain normal cardiac output and ejection fraction at baseline, this cohort had significantly compromised systolic and diastolic function compared with IDUA+/? control mice. During dobutamine infusion MPS-I mice did not significantly increase cardiac output from baseline, indicative of blunted cardiac reserve. Autonomic tone, measured functionally by ?-blockade, indicated that MPS-I mice required catecholaminergic stimulation to maintain baseline hemodynamics. Survival analysis showed mortality only among MPS-I mice. Linear regression analysis revealed that heightened end-systolic volume in the resting heart is significantly correlated with susceptibility to mortality in MPS-I hearts. This study reveals that cardiac remodeling in the pathology of MPS-I involves heightened adrenergic tone at the expense of cardiac reserve with cardiac decompensation predicted on the basis of increased baseline systolic volumes. PMID:21076027

  12. Utility of three-dimensional echocardiography in assessing and predicting response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Ching; Abdel-Qadir, Husam M; Lashevsky, Ilan; Hansen, Mark; Crystal, Eugene; Joyner, Campbell

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) can be a valuable treatment for heart failure. However, there are high nonresponse rates using current CRT inclusion criteria. OBJECTIVE To assess the value of three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) in predicting response to CRT. METHODS Functional assessments and 3DE were performed in heart failure patients pre-CRT, 24 h post-CRT and six to 12 months after CRT. The dyssynchrony index (DI) was calculated as the SD of the time to minimum volume in 16 left ventricle segments corrected by heart rate. Response to CRT was defined as functional improvement (alive at late follow-up with improvement by one New York Heart Association class) and a decrease in left ventricular end-systolic volume by 15% or greater at six to 12 months follow-up. RESULTS A total of 53 patients were enrolled. Average 3DE acquisition time was less than 5 min. Seventy-two per cent of patients showed functional improvement, while 43% showed functional and echocardiographic evidence of response. Baseline DI and the decrease in DI at 24 h were both correlated with reverse remodelling. Responders had higher baseline DI values compared with nonresponders (mean 16.8 versus 7.1, P<0.001), and showed a greater decrease in DI values at 24 h (mean decrease 7.9 versus 0.7, P<0.001). All responders had baseline DI values of greater than 10 (negative predictive value of 100%). A decrease in the DI value by more than 5 at 24 h in patients with a baseline DI of greater than 10 identified responders with a positive predictive value of 83%. CONCLUSIONS 3DE may be valuable in predicting response to CRT. A baseline DI cut-off of greater than 10 in our patients excluded reverse remodelling to CRT. In addition, the decrease in DI at 24 h had a high positive predictive value for long-term response to CRT. PMID:21076720

  13. Echocardiographic assessment of cardiac morphology and function in mutant dwarf rats.

    PubMed

    Longobardi, S; Cittadini, A; Strömer, H; Katz, S E; Grossman, J D; Clark, R G; Morgan, J P; Douglas, P S

    2000-10-01

    Although the mutant dwarf rat has been proposed as a model of growth hormone (GH) deficiency, few studies have addressed its cardiovascular abnormalities. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate cardiac structure and function in mutant dwarf rats in vivo before and after chronic GH administration, by means of transthoracic Doppler echocardiography. To this purpose, forty 90-day-old female dwarf rats were randomized to receive either GH treatment or placebo. Twenty age-and sex-matched Lewis rats (200-250 g) served as the control group. All rats underwent echocardiograms before receiving any drug and after 3 weeks of therapy. Echocardiographically detected left ventricular mass indexed to tibial length was reduced by 41% in dwarf rats compared to the control group. Such relative cardiac atrophy was also evident at the myocyte level, and was fully reversible after GH therapy. In contrast to the control group, dwarf rats also showed a reduction of left ventricular diastolic volumes normalized to tibial length and impaired cardiac performance as suggested by the reduction of cardiac index, abnormal stress-shortening relations, and a significant elevation of total peripheral vascular resistance. All these abnormalities were reversible upon GH therapy for 3 weeks. In conclusion, GH plays an important role in maintaining a normal cardiac structure and function. Since the observed changes are similar to those seen in GH-deficient men, the mutant dwarf rat represents a faithful animal model of GH deficiency. PMID:11042020

  14. Missed cardiac tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Thomson-Moore, Alexandra Louise

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade can have an insidious onset, becoming life threatening when an adequate cardiac output can no longer be maintained. This case provides an example of a presentation where all the classic signs were present but unfortunately they were missed, in this way providing good revision of what these signs are. It gives some anaesthetic and procedure based perspectives for this rare presentation. It is noteworthy for the speed at which symptoms and signs resolved after the tamponade was relieved. PMID:22679253

  15. Cardiac Coordination and Mechanics 1 CIRCULATORY PHYSIOLOGY SECTION 3: CARDIAC MECHANICS*

    E-print Network

    Prestwich, Ken

    Cardiac Coordination and Mechanics 1 CIRCULATORY PHYSIOLOGY SECTION 3 nervous system. We will also see how to found cardiac output using the Fick of a sausage. However, a system of valves allows blood to move in one direction

  16. [Cardiovascular assessment and management prior to non-cardiac surgery : Comment on the new 2014 ESC/ESA guidelines].

    PubMed

    Kehmeier, E S; Schulze, V T

    2015-12-01

    In 2014 the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA) published an update of the guidelines on "non-cardiac surgery: cardiovascular assessment and management". Epidemiological data underline the relevance of these guidelines: a total of 5.7 million surgical procedures are performed per year in patients with increased cardiac risk and approximately 167,000 cardiac complications occur per year in Europe of which 19,000 are life-threatening. This new version of the guidelines highlights the patient characteristics, such as functional capacity and comorbidities and procedure-specific aspects for perioperative risk stratification. Decision-making for preoperative stress tests and coronary angiography has been simplified, procedure-specific risks have been revised and the role of multidisciplinary teamwork for high risk procedures is emphasized. A standardized stepwise approach on how to stratify patient-specific and procedure-associated risks has been established. For the first time, the guidelines recommend perioperative regimens on dual antiplatelet therapy and the new oral anticoagulants (NOAC). PMID:26612057

  17. Noninvasive Assessment of Cardiac Abnormalities in Experimental Autoimmune Myocarditis by Magnetic Resonance Microscopy Imaging in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Massilamany, Chandirasegaran; Khalilzad-Sharghi, Vahid; Gangaplara, Arunakumar; Steffen, David; Othman, Shadi F.; Reddy, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Myocarditis is an inflammation of the myocardium, but only ~10% of those affected show clinical manifestations of the disease. To study the immune events of myocardial injuries, various mouse models of myocarditis have been widely used. This study involved experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) induced with cardiac myosin heavy chain (Myhc)-? 334–352 in A/J mice; the affected animals develop lymphocytic myocarditis but with no apparent clinical signs. In this model, the utility of magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) as a non-invasive modality to determine the cardiac structural and functional changes in animals immunized with Myhc-? 334–352 is shown. EAM and healthy mice were imaged using a 9.4 T (400 MHz) 89 mm vertical core bore scanner equipped with a 4 cm millipede radio-frequency imaging probe and 100 G/cm triple axis gradients. Cardiac images were acquired from anesthetized animals using a gradient-echo-based cine pulse sequence, and the animals were monitored by respiration and pulse oximetry. The analysis revealed an increase in the thickness of the ventricular wall in EAM mice, with a corresponding decrease in the interior diameter of ventricles, when compared with healthy mice. The data suggest that morphological and functional changes in the inflamed hearts can be non-invasively monitored by MRM in live animals. In conclusion, MRM offers an advantage of assessing the progression and regression of myocardial injuries in diseases caused by infectious agents, as well as response to therapies. PMID:24998332

  18. Noninvasive assessment of cardiac abnormalities in experimental autoimmune myocarditis by magnetic resonance microscopy imaging in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Massilamany, Chandirasegaran; Khalilzad-Sharghi, Vahid; Gangaplara, Arunakumar; Steffen, David; Othman, Shadi F; Reddy, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Myocarditis is an inflammation of the myocardium, but only -10% of those affected show clinical manifestations of the disease. To study the immune events of myocardial injuries, various mouse models of myocarditis have been widely used. This study involved experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) induced with cardiac myosin heavy chain (Myhc)-? 334-352 in A/J mice; the affected animals develop lymphocytic myocarditis but with no apparent clinical signs. In this model, the utility of magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) as a non-invasive modality to determine the cardiac structural and functional changes in animals immunized with Myhc-? 334-352 is shown. EAM and healthy mice were imaged using a 9.4 T (400 MHz) 89 mm vertical core bore scanner equipped with a 4 cm millipede radio-frequency imaging probe and 100 G/cm triple axis gradients. Cardiac images were acquired from anesthetized animals using a gradient-echo-based cine pulse sequence, and the animals were monitored by respiration and pulse oximetry. The analysis revealed an increase in the thickness of the ventricular wall in EAM mice, with a corresponding decrease in the interior diameter of ventricles, when compared with healthy mice. The data suggest that morphological and functional changes in the inflamed hearts can be non-invasively monitored by MRM in live animals. In conclusion, MRM offers an advantage of assessing the progression and regression of myocardial injuries in diseases caused by infectious agents, as well as response to therapies. PMID:24998332

  19. Preoperative levosimendan decreases mortality and the development of low cardiac output in high-risk patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Ricardo; Degrange, Marcela; Del Mazo, Carlos; Tanus, Eduardo; Porcile, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The calcium sensitizer levosimendan has been used in cardiac surgery for the treatment of postoperative low cardiac output syndrome (LCOS) and difficult weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of preoperative treatment with levosimendan on 30-day mortality, the risk of developing LCOS and the requirement for inotropes, vasopressors and intra-aortic balloon pumps in patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction. METHODS: Patient with severe left ventricular dysfunction and an ejection fraction <25% undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with CPB were admitted 24 h before surgery and were randomly assigned to receive levosimendan (loading dose 10 ?g/kg followed by a 23 h continuous infusion of 0.1?g/kg/min) or a placebo. RESULTS: From December 1, 2002 to June 1, 2008, a total of 252 patients were enrolled (127 in the levosimendan group and 125 in the control group). Individuals treated with levosimendan exhibited a lower incidence of complicated weaning from CPB (2.4% versus 9.6%; P<0.05), decreased mortality (3.9% versus 12.8%; P<0.05) and a lower incidence of LCOS (7.1% versus 20.8%; P<0.05) compared with the control group. The levosimendan group also had a lower requirement for inotropes (7.9% versus 58.4%; P<0.05), vasopressors (14.2% versus 45.6%; P<0.05) and intra-aortic balloon pumps (6.3% versus 30.4%; P<0.05). CONCLUSION: Patients with severe left ventricle dysfunction (ejection fraction <25%) undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with CPB who were pretreated with levosimendan exhibited lower mortality, a decreased risk for developing LCOS and a reduced requirement for inotropes, vasopressors and intra-aortic balloon pumps. Studies with a larger number of patients are required to confirm whether these findings represent a new strategy to reduce the operative risk in this high-risk patient population. PMID:23620700

  20. Assessing Impacts of Climate Change in a Semi-Arid Watershed Using Downscaled IPCC Climate Output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, F.; Rajagopal, S.; Gupta, H. V.; Troch, P. A.; Durcik, M.

    2008-12-01

    This presentation discusses our research aimed at helping water managers at Salt River Project (SRP), Phoenix, assess long term climate change impacts for the Salt and Verde River basins, and make informed policy decisions. Our goal is to assess the future 100 year water balance by development, application and testing of a physically based distributed hydrologic model forced by downscaled IPCC climate information. The variable infiltration capacity (VIC) model is set up to simulate historical observed streamflow at the outlet of Salt and Verde River basins using gridded observed precipitation and temperature data. The model is calibrated using the Shuffled Complex Evolution (SCE-UA) method incorporating observed climate elasticities of the Salt and Verde River basins. The most appropriate models and emission scenarios from the Global Climate Model's (GCM's) participating in the IPCC fourth assessment were then chosen and statistically downscaled to incorporate ENSO variability. The forcing dataset created using the downscaled data was used to analyze the basin scale responses to climate change. In this poster, the scenarios based on future climate forcing data will be presented.

  1. A microchip-based multianalyte assay system for the assessment of cardiac risk.

    PubMed

    Christodoulides, Nick; Tran, Maiyen; Floriano, Pierre N; Rodriguez, Marc; Goodey, Adrian; Ali, Mehnaaz; Neikirk, Dean; McDevitt, John T

    2002-07-01

    The development of a novel chip-based multianalyte detection system with a cardiac theme is reported. This work follows the initial reports of "electronic taste chips" whereby multiple solution-phase analytes such as acids, bases, metal cations, and biological cofactors were detected and quantitated. The newly fashioned "cardiac chip" exploits a geometry that allows for isolation and entrapment of single polymeric spheres in micromachined pits while providing to each bead the rapid introduction of a series of reagents/washes through microfluidic structures. The combination of these miniaturized components fosters the completion of complex assays with short analysis times using small sample volumes. Optical signals derived from single beads are used to complete immunological tests that yield outstanding assay characteristics. The power and utility of this new methodology is demonstrated here for the simultaneous detection of the cardiac risk factors, C-reactive protein and interleukin-6, in human serum samples. This demonstration represents the first important step toward the development of a useful cardiac chip that targets numerous risk factors concurrently and one that can be customized readily for specific clinical settings. PMID:12141661

  2. Optogenetics-enabled assessment of viral gene and cell therapy for restoration of cardiac excitability

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, Christina M.; Boyle, Patrick M.; Chen, Kay; Trayanova, Natalia A.; Entcheva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    Multiple cardiac pathologies are accompanied by loss of tissue excitability, which leads to a range of heart rhythm disorders (arrhythmias). In addition to electronic device therapy (i.e. implantable pacemakers and cardioverter/defibrillators), biological approaches have recently been explored to restore pacemaking ability and to correct conduction slowing in the heart by delivering excitatory ion channels or ion channel agonists. Using optogenetics as a tool to selectively interrogate only cells transduced to produce an exogenous excitatory ion current, we experimentally and computationally quantify the efficiency of such biological approaches in rescuing cardiac excitability as a function of the mode of application (viral gene delivery or cell delivery) and the geometry of the transduced region (focal or spatially-distributed). We demonstrate that for each configuration (delivery mode and spatial pattern), the optical energy needed to excite can be used to predict therapeutic efficiency of excitability restoration. Taken directly, these results can help guide optogenetic interventions for light-based control of cardiac excitation. More generally, our findings can help optimize gene therapy for restoration of cardiac excitability. PMID:26621212

  3. Optogenetics-enabled assessment of viral gene and cell therapy for restoration of cardiac excitability.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Christina M; Boyle, Patrick M; Chen, Kay; Trayanova, Natalia A; Entcheva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    Multiple cardiac pathologies are accompanied by loss of tissue excitability, which leads to a range of heart rhythm disorders (arrhythmias). In addition to electronic device therapy (i.e. implantable pacemakers and cardioverter/defibrillators), biological approaches have recently been explored to restore pacemaking ability and to correct conduction slowing in the heart by delivering excitatory ion channels or ion channel agonists. Using optogenetics as a tool to selectively interrogate only cells transduced to produce an exogenous excitatory ion current, we experimentally and computationally quantify the efficiency of such biological approaches in rescuing cardiac excitability as a function of the mode of application (viral gene delivery or cell delivery) and the geometry of the transduced region (focal or spatially-distributed). We demonstrate that for each configuration (delivery mode and spatial pattern), the optical energy needed to excite can be used to predict therapeutic efficiency of excitability restoration. Taken directly, these results can help guide optogenetic interventions for light-based control of cardiac excitation. More generally, our findings can help optimize gene therapy for restoration of cardiac excitability. PMID:26621212

  4. MIBG scintigraphic assessment of cardiac adrenergic activity in response to altitude hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Richalet, J.P.; Merlet, P.; Bourguignon, M.; Le-Trong, J.L.; Keromes, A.; Rathat, C.; Jouve, B.; Hot, M.A.; Castaigne, A.; Syrota, A. )

    1990-01-01

    High altitude hypoxia induces a decrease in the cardiac chronotropic function at maximal exercise or in response to isoproterenol infusion, suggesting an alteration in the cardiac sympathetic activation. Iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (({sup 123}I)MIBG) was used to map scintigraphically the cardiac sympathetic neuronal function in six male subjects (aged 32 {plus minus} 7 yr) after an exposure to high altitude that created hypoxic conditions. Results obtained just after return to sea level (RSL) were compared with the normal values obtained after 2 or 3 mo of normoxia (N). A static image was created as the sum of the 16-EKG gated images recorded for 10 min in the anterior view of the chest at 20, 60, 120, and 240 min after injection. Regions of interest were located over the heart (H), lungs (L), and mediastinum (M) regions. There was a significant decrease in the H/M and the L/M ratios in RSL compared to N condition. Plasma norepinephrine concentration was elevated during the stay at altitude but not significantly different in RSL compared to N. In conclusion, cardiac ({sup 123}I)MIBG uptake is reduced after an exposure to altitude hypoxia, supporting the hypothesis of an hypoxia-induced reduction of adrenergic neurotransmitter reserve in the myocardium. Furthermore, the observed significant decrease in pulmonary MIBG uptake suggests an alteration of endothelial cell function after exposure to chronic hypoxia.

  5. Sympathetic restraint of respiratory sinus arrhythmia: implications for vagal-cardiac tone assessment in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. A.; Myers, C. W.; Halliwill, J. R.; Seidel, H.; Eckberg, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    Clinicians and experimentalists routinely estimate vagal-cardiac nerve traffic from respiratory sinus arrhythmia. However, evidence suggests that sympathetic mechanisms may also modulate respiratory sinus arrhythmia. Our study examined modulation of respiratory sinus arrhythmia by sympathetic outflow. We measured R-R interval spectral power in 10 volunteers that breathed sequentially at 13 frequencies, from 15 to 3 breaths/min, before and after beta-adrenergic blockade. We fitted changes of respiratory frequency R-R interval spectral power with a damped oscillator model: frequency-dependent oscillations with a resonant frequency, generated by driving forces and modified by damping influences. beta-Adrenergic blockade enhanced respiratory sinus arrhythmia at all frequencies (at some, fourfold). The damped oscillator model fit experimental data well (39 of 40 ramps; r = 0.86 +/- 0.02). beta-Adrenergic blockade increased respiratory sinus arrhythmia by amplifying respiration-related driving forces (P < 0.05), without altering resonant frequency or damping influences. Both spectral power data and the damped oscillator model indicate that cardiac sympathetic outflow markedly reduces heart period oscillations at all frequencies. This challenges the notion that respiratory sinus arrhythmia is mediated simply by vagal-cardiac nerve activity. These results have important implications for clinical and experimental estimation of human vagal cardiac tone.

  6. Assessment of Myocardial Infarction by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Long-Term Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Petriz, João Luiz Fernandes; Gomes, Bruno Ferraz de Oliveira; Rua, Braulio Santos; Azevedo, Clério Francisco; Hadlich, Marcelo Souza; Mussi, Henrique Thadeu Periard; Taets, Gunnar de Cunto; do Nascimento, Emília Matos; Pereira, Basílio de Bragança; e Silva, Nelson Albuquerque de Souza

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging provides detailed anatomical information on infarction. However, few studies have investigated the association of these data with mortality after acute myocardial infarction. Objective To study the association between data regarding infarct size and anatomy, as obtained from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging after acute myocardial infarction, and long-term mortality. Methods A total of 1959 reports of “infarct size” were identified in 7119 cardiac magnetic resonance imaging studies, of which 420 had clinical and laboratory confirmation of previous myocardial infarction. The variables studied were the classic risk factors – left ventricular ejection fraction, categorized ventricular function, and location of acute myocardial infarction. Infarct size and acute myocardial infarction extent and transmurality were analyzed alone and together, using the variable named “MET-AMI”. The statistical analysis was carried out using the elastic net regularization, with the Cox model and survival trees. Results The mean age was 62.3 ± 12 years, and 77.3% were males. During the mean follow-up of 6.4 ± 2.9 years, there were 76 deaths (18.1%). Serum creatinine, diabetes mellitus and previous myocardial infarction were independently associated with mortality. Age was the main explanatory factor. The cardiac magnetic resonance imaging variables independently associated with mortality were transmurality of acute myocardial infarction (p = 0.047), ventricular dysfunction (p = 0.0005) and infarcted size (p = 0.0005); the latter was the main explanatory variable for ischemic heart disease death. The MET-AMI variable was the most strongly associated with risk of ischemic heart disease death (HR: 16.04; 95%CI: 2.64-97.5; p = 0.003). Conclusion The anatomical data of infarction, obtained from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging after acute myocardial infarction, were independently associated with long-term mortality, especially for ischemic heart disease death. PMID:25424161

  7. Assessing impacts of climate change in a semi arid watershed using downscaled IPCC climate output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, S.; Dominguez, F.; Gupta, H. V.; Troch, P. A.; Castro, C. L.

    2010-12-01

    This presentation discusses our research aimed at helping water managers at Salt River Project (SRP), Phoenix, assess long term climate change impacts for the Salt and Verde River basins, and make informed policy decisions. Our goal was to assess the future 100 year water balance by development, application and testing of a physically based distributed hydrologic model forced by downscaled IPCC climate information. The variable infiltration capacity (VIC) model was set up to simulate historical observed streamflow at the outlet of Salt and Verde River basins using gridded observed precipitation and temperature data. The model was calibrated using the Shuffled Complex Evolution (SCE-UA) optimization algorithm. The models found to best simulate the climatology of the region, (UK-HADCM3, MPI-ECHAM5, NCAR-CCSM3) and emission scenarios (A1B, A2, B1) from the Global Climate Model’s (GCM’s) participating in the IPCC fourth assessment were obtained from the bias-corrected and spatially downscaled climate projections derived from the World Climate Research Programme's (WCRP's) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 multi-model dataset. The data was then temporally downscaled to serve as forcing for the VIC model. This downscaled forcing dataset was used to analyze the basin scale responses to climate change. Based on stakeholder feedback two additional GCM's one that represents a wet scenario and one that represents a dry scenario, were also downscaled as mentioned above and run through the hydrologic model. All the models show a statistically significant increase in temperature over the 21st century. Due to increased winter temperatures the multi-model mean shows a significant decrease in storage capacity in the basin, viz. snow water equivalent. This decrease is already evident in observed SNOTEL records of the basin. Since these watersheds are snow dominated, the cold season multi-model mean streamflow shows a decreasing trend by the end of the century though the warm season streamflow tends to increase in response to increased summer precipitation. Increased summer streamflow does not compensate for the decrease in winter streamflow. In addition to the above analysis a synthetic study was performed to quantify the uncertainty in coupled GCM-Hydrologic model predictions.

  8. Cardiac developmental toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Mahler, Gretchen J.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is a highly prevalent problem with mostly unknown origins. Many cases of CHD likely involve an environmental exposure coupled with genetic susceptibility, but practical and ethical considerations make nongenetic causes of CHD difficult to assess in humans. The development of the heart is highly conserved across all vertebrate species, making animal models an excellent option for screening potential cardiac teratogens. This review will discuss exposures known to cause cardiac defects, stages of heart development that are most sensitive to teratogen exposure, benefits and limitations of animal models of cardiac development, and future considerations for cardiac developmental toxicity research. PMID:22271678

  9. Coronary artery vasculitis: assessment with cardiac multi-detector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Chang Ho; Kim, Yeo Koon; Chun, Eun Ju; Kim, Jeong A; Yong, Hwan Seok; Doo, Kyung Won; Choi, Sang Il

    2015-06-01

    Coronary artery vasculitis is rare and comprises an array of inflammatory diseases. It often results in severe and life-threatening complications, including coronary artery aneurysm, coronary artery stenosis, intraluminal thrombosis, and microcirculation abnormalities. These may occur at a young age and are often silent in the early phases. Invasive coronary angiography is the gold standard for diagnosing coronary artery disease (CAD); however, multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) is now widely regarded as a powerful non-invasive tool for the detection of CAD. It is important for clinicians to recognize the various CT findings associated with coronary artery vasculitis in order to promote accurate diagnosis and proper patient management. The purpose of this article is to present an overview of the conditions associated with coronary artery vasculitis, with an emphasis on etiology and cardiac MDCT diagnosis of CAD. Cardiac MDCT is clinically useful and can provide information for the accurate diagnosis and treatment of coronary vasculitis. PMID:25841665

  10. Assessing quality in cardiac surgery: why this is necessary in the twenty-first century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swain, J. A.; Hartz, R. S.

    2000-01-01

    The cost and high-profile nature of coronary surgery means that this is an area of close public scrutiny. As much pioneering work in data collection and risk analyses has been carried out by cardiac surgeons, substantial information exists and the correct interpretation of that data is identified as an important issue. This paper considers the background and history of risk-adjustment in cardiac surgery, the uses of quality data, examines the observed/expected mortality ratio and looks at issues such as cost and reactions to outliers. The conclusion of the study is that the continuation of accurate data collection by the whole operative team and a strong commitment to constantly improving quality is crucial to its meaningful application.

  11. Age-related normal structural and functional ventricular values in cardiac function assessed by magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The heart is subject to structural and functional changes with advancing age. However, the magnitude of cardiac age-dependent transformation has not been conclusively elucidated. Methods This retrospective cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) study included 183 subjects with normal structural and functional ventricular values. End systolic volume (ESV), end diastolic volume (EDV), and ejection fraction (EF) were obtained from the left and the right ventricle in breath-hold cine CMR. Patients were classified into four age groups (20–29, 30–49, 50–69, and ?70 years) and cardiac measurements were compared using Pearson’s rank correlation over the four different groups. Results With advanced age a slight but significant decrease in ESV (r=?0.41 for both ventricles, P<0.001) and EDV (r=?0.39 for left ventricle, r=?0.35 for right ventricle, P<0.001) were observed associated with a significant increase in left (r=0.28, P<0.001) and right (r=0.27, P<0.01) ventricular EF reaching a maximal increase in EF of +8.4% (P<0.001) for the left and +6.1% (P<0.01) for the right ventricle in the oldest compared to the youngest patient group. Left ventricular myocardial mass significantly decreased over the four different age groups (P<0.05). Conclusions The aging process is associated with significant changes in left and right ventricular EF, ESV and EDV in subjects with no cardiac functional and structural abnormalities. These findings underline the importance of using age adapted values as standard of reference when evaluating CMR studies. PMID:23391039

  12. Echo motion imaging with adaptive clutter filter for assessment of cardiac blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    Visualization of the vortex blood flow in the cardiac chamber is a potential diagnostic tool for the evaluation of cardiac function. In the present study, a method for automatic selection of the desirable cutoff frequency of a moving target indicator filter, namely, a clutter filter, was proposed in order to visualize complex blood flows by the ultrahigh-frame-rate imaging of echoes from blood particles while suppressing clutter echoes. In this method, the cutoff frequency was adaptively changed as a function of the velocity of the heart wall (clutter source) in each frame. The feasibility of the proposed method was examined through the measurement of a healthy volunteer using parallel receive beamforming with a single transmission of a non-steered diverging beam. Using the moving target indicator filter as above with the cutoff frequency determined by the proposed method, the vortex-like blood flow in the cardiac chamber was visualized as movements of echoes from blood particles at a very high frame rate of 6024 Hz while suppressing clutter echoes.

  13. The Effects That Cardiac Motion has on Coronary Hemodynamics and Catheter Trackability Forces for the Treatment of Coronary Artery Disease: An In Vitro Assessment.

    PubMed

    Morris, Liam; Fahy, Paul; Stefanov, Florian; Finn, Ronan

    2015-12-01

    The coronary arterial tree experiences large displacements due to the contraction and expansion of the cardiac muscle and may influence coronary haemodynamics and stent placement. The accurate measurement of catheter trackability forces within physiological relevant test systems is required for optimum catheter design. The effects of cardiac motion on coronary flowrates, pressure drops, and stent delivery has not been previously experimentally assessed. A cardiac simulator was designed and manufactured which replicates physiological coronary flowrates and cardiac motion within a patient-specific geometry. A motorized delivery system delivered a commercially available coronary stent system and monitored the trackability forces along three phantom patient-specific thin walled compliant coronary vessels supported by a dynamic cardiac phantom model. Pressure drop variation is more sensitive to cardiac motion than outlet flowrates. Maximum pressure drops varied from 7 to 49 mmHg for a stenosis % area reduction of 56 to 90%. There was a strong positive linear correlation of cumulative trackability force with the cumulative curvature. The maximum trackability forces and curvature ranged from 0.24 to 0.87 N and 0.06 to 0.22 mm(-1) respectively for all three vessels. There were maximum and average percentage differences in trackability forces of (23-49%) and (1.9-5.2%) respectively when comparing a static pressure case with the inclusion of pulsatile flow and cardiac motion. Cardiac motion with pulsatile flow significantly altered (p value <0.001) the trackability forces along the delivery pathways with high local percentage variations and pressure drop measurements. PMID:26577477

  14. SVM-based classification of LV wall motion in cardiac MRI with the assessment of STE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilla, Juan; Garreau, Mireille; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Paredes, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an automated method to classify normal/abnormal wall motion in Left Ventricle (LV) function in cardiac cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), taking as reference, strain information obtained from 2D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography (STE). Without the need of pre-processing and by exploiting all the images acquired during a cardiac cycle, spatio-temporal profiles are extracted from a subset of radial lines from the ventricle centroid to points outside the epicardial border. Classical Support Vector Machines (SVM) are used to classify features extracted from gray levels of the spatio-temporal profile as well as their representations in the Wavelet domain under the assumption that the data may be sparse in that domain. Based on information obtained from radial strain curves in 2D-STE studies, we label all the spatio-temporal profiles that belong to a particular segment as normal if the peak systolic radial strain curve of this segment presents normal kinesis, or abnormal if the peak systolic radial strain curve presents hypokinesis or akinesis. For this study, short-axis cine- MR images are collected from 9 patients with cardiac dyssynchrony for which we have the radial strain tracings at the mid-papilary muscle obtained by 2D STE; and from one control group formed by 9 healthy subjects. The best classification performance is obtained with the gray level information of the spatio-temporal profiles using a RBF kernel with 91.88% of accuracy, 92.75% of sensitivity and 91.52% of specificity.

  15. Assessment of use of music by patients participating in cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Metzger, L Kay

    2004-01-01

    The primary cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States is heart disease. It is a costly and pervasive group of disorders that effect all ages, races, and genders. Behavioral medicine and health psychology have focused on prevention and psychosocial influences of cardiovascular diseases for the past 30 years. Music therapy is a viable collaborative method in the psychosocial arena for alleviating risks and motivating rehabilitation from cardiac events. There is research to support the use of music to modulate heart health measurements such as heart rate and blood pressure, to enhance exercise programs, and to relieve stress symptoms. However, inconsistencies in the results of this research warrant continued collaboration of social scientists to find scientific means of establishing interventions with measurable outcomes. This project involved administering a music therapy survey in order to determine current use and preference for music in a cardiac rehabilitation program. Patients who were attending rehabilitation sessions in a large city hospital completed a survey on which they rated their level of use of music for exercise, relaxation, and enjoyment. The researcher also gathered information about musical preferences, musical experiences, and pertinent demographics. Patients, mostly white males over the age of 60, showed positive responses to the aesthetically pleasurable aspects of music. The use of music as a stimulus cue for exercise was decidedly absent. Nursing staff members were receptive to the project, and both staff and patients showed some interest for learning about music for therapeutic purposes. The results suggest that education about and development of music therapy in a cardiac rehabilitation program is warranted. PMID:15157124

  16. Real time assessment of RF cardiac tissue ablation with optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Sharareh, S

    2008-03-20

    An optical spectroscopy approach is demonstrated allowing for critical parameters during RF ablation of cardiac tissue to be evaluated in real time. The method is based on incorporating in a typical ablation catheter transmitting and receiving fibers that terminate at the tip of the catheter. By analyzing the spectral characteristics of the NIR diffusely reflected light, information is obtained on such parameters as, catheter-tissue proximity, lesion formation, depth of penetration of the lesion, formation of char during the ablation, formation of coagulum around the ablation site, differentiation of ablated from healthy tissue, and recognition of micro-bubble formation in the tissue.

  17. Outpatient Use of Focused Cardiac Ultrasound to Assess the Inferior Vena Cava in Patients With Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Saha, Narayan M; Barbat, Julian J; Fedson, Savitri; Anderson, Allen; Rich, Jonathan D; Spencer, Kirk T

    2015-10-15

    Accurate assessment of volume status is critical in the management of patients with heart failure (HF). We studied the utility of a pocket-sized ultrasound device in an outpatient cardiology clinic as a tool to guide volume assessment. Inferior vena cava (IVC) size and collapsibility were assessed in 95 patients by residents briefly trained in focused cardiac ultrasound (FCU). Cardiologist assessment of volume status and changes in diuretic medication were also recorded. Patients were followed for occurrence of 30-day events. There was a 94% success rate of obtaining IVC size and collapsibility, and agreement between visual and calculated IVC parameters was excellent. Most patients were euvolemic by both FCU IVC and clinical bedside assessment (51%) and had no change in diuretic dose. Thirty-two percent had discrepant FCU IVC and clinical volume assessments. In clinically hypervolemic patients, the FCU evaluation of the IVC suggested that the wrong diuretic management plan might have been made 46% of the time. At 30 days, 14 events occurred. The incidence of events increased significantly with FCU IVC imaging categorization, from 11% to 23% to 36% in patients with normal, intermediate, and plethoric IVCs. By comparison, when grouped in a binary manner, there was no significant difference in event rates for patients who were deemed to be clinically volume overloaded. Assessment of volume status in an outpatient cardiology clinic using FCU imaging of the IVC is feasible in a high percentage of patients. A group of patients were identified with volume status discordant between FCU IVC and routine clinic assessment, suggesting that IVC parameters may provide a valuable supplement to the in-office physical examination. PMID:26279108

  18. A textile-based wearable system for the prolonged assessment of cardiac mechanics in daily life.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo, Marco; Vaini, Emanuele; Castiglioni, Paolo; Lombardi, Prospero; Meriggi, Paolo; Rizzo, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Seismocardiogram, SCG, can be detected over the 24 hours in ambulant subjects by a textile-based wearable system together with the electrocardiogram, ECG and respiration. In this pilot study we explored the possibility to derive 24 h profiles of cardiac time intervals, i.e. indexes of heart mechanical function, from the SCG recordings performed in daily life conditions by the above wearable system. Two healthy subjects were recruited for the study. They worn the system for 24 hours during a working day. From each recording, every 30 minutes the following parameters were derived from the ECG and SCG signals: RR interval, RRI, Pre-Ejection Period, PEP, Isovolumic Contraction Time, ICT, Left Ventricular Ejection Time, LVET, Isovolumic Relaxation Time, IRT. From the analysis it appears that 1) all parameters are characterized by a coefficient of variation in the same order of magnitude, and 2) 24 h LVET time profiles mirrors the long term RRI behavior. Common trends in PEP and ICT profiles were observed in one subject. This study indicates that indexes of cardiac mechanics can be derived from SCG recordings performed over the 24 hours. The obtained positive results encourage further studies to refine this methodology and confirm the present findings. PMID:25571581

  19. The Role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Cardiac Computed Tomography in the Assessment of Left Atrial Anatomy, Size, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kuchynka, Petr; Podzimkova, Jana; Masek, Martin; Lambert, Lukas; Cerny, Vladimir; Danek, Barbara; Palecek, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, there has been increasing evidence that comprehensive evaluation of the left atrium is of utmost importance. Numerous studies have clearly demonstrated the prognostic value of left atrial volume for long-term outcome. Furthermore, advances in catheter ablation procedures used for the treatment of drug-refractory atrial fibrillation require the need for detailed knowledge of left atrial and pulmonary venous morphology as well of atrial wall characteristics. This review article discusses the role of cardiac magnetic resonance and computed tomography in assessment of left atrial size, its normal and abnormal morphology, and function. Special interest is paid to the utility of these rapidly involving noninvasive imaging methods before and after atrial fibrillation ablation. PMID:26221583

  20. Assessment of nonpenetrating captive bolt stunning followed by electrical induction of cardiac arrest in veal calves.

    PubMed

    Bartz, B; Collins, M; Stoddard, G; Appleton, A; Livingood, R; Sobcynski, H; Vogel, K D

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of nonpenetrating captive bolt stunning followed by electrical induction of cardiac arrest on veal calf welfare, veal quality, and blood yield. Ninety calves from the same farm were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups in a balanced unpaired comparison design. The first treatment group (the "head-only" method-application of the pneumatic nonpenetrating stun to the frontal plate of the skull at the intersection of 2 imaginary lines extending from the lateral canthus to the opposite poll [CONTROL]) was stunned with a nonpenetrating captive bolt gun ( = 45). The second group ( = 45) was stunned with a nonpenetrating captive bolt gun followed by secondary electrical induction of cardiac arrest (the "head/heart" method-initial application of the pneumatic nonpenetrating captive bolt stun followed by 1 s application of an electrical stun to the ventral region of the ribcage directly caudal to the junction of the humerus and scapula while the stunned calf was in lateral recumbence [HEAD/HEART]). Stunning efficacy was the indicator of animal welfare used in this study. All calves were instantly rendered insensible by the initial stun and did not display common indicators of return to consciousness. For meat quality evaluation, all samples were collected from the 12th rib region of the longissimus thoracis. Meat samples were evaluated for color, drip loss, ultimate pH, cook loss, and Warner-Bratzler shear force. The L* values (measure of meat color lightness) were darker ( < 0.05) in the HEAD/HEART group (45.08 ± 0.72) than the CONTROL group (47.10 ± 0.72). There were no differences ( > 0.05) observed in a* (redness) and b* (yellowness) values between treatments. No differences ( > 0.05) were observed in drip loss, ultimate pH, cook loss, and Warner-Bratzler shear force. The blood yield from the CONTROL group (7,217.9 ± 143.5 g) was greater ( < 0.05) than that from the HEAD/HEART group (6,656.4 ± 143.5 g). Overall, the data indicated no difference between the CONTROL and HEAD/HEART groups with regard to animal welfare because the initial stun was effective in all calves. However, longissimus thoracis L* and blood yield were negatively impacted by the HEAD/HEART method. The data in this study suggest that secondary induction of cardiac arrest is not necessary with effective nonpenetrating captive bolt stunning in veal calves. PMID:26440354

  1. An Electricity-focused Economic Input-output Model: Life-cycle Assessment and Policy Implications of Future Electricity Generation Scenarios

    E-print Network

    An Electricity-focused Economic Input-output Model: Life-cycle Assessment and Policy Implications of Future Electricity Generation Scenarios Joe Marriott Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements and the Electric Power Research Institute under grants to the Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center. #12;i

  2. Evaluation of Hemoglobin A1c Criteria to Assess Preoperative Diabetes Risk in Cardiac Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Sima; Zrull, Christina A.; Patil, Preethi V.; Jha, Leena; Kling-Colson, Susan C.; Gandia, Kenia G.; DuBois, Elizabeth C.; Plunkett, Cynthia D.; Bodnar, Tim W.; Pop-Busui, Rodica

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective Hemoglobin A1c (A1C) has recently been recommended for diagnosing diabetes mellitus and diabetes risk (prediabetes). Its performance compared with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2-h post-glucose load (2HPG) is not well delineated. We compared the performance of A1C with that of FPG and 2HPG in preoperative cardiac surgery patients. Methods Data from 92 patients without a history of diabetes were analyzed. Patients were classified with diabetes or prediabetes using established cutoffs for FPG, 2HPG, and A1C. Sensitivity and specificity of the new A1C criteria were evaluated. Results All patients diagnosed with diabetes by A1C also had impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or diabetes by other criteria. Using FPG as the reference, sensitivity and specificity of A1C for diagnosing diabetes were 50% and 96%, and using 2HPG as the reference they were 25% and 95%. Sensitivity and specificity for identifying prediabetes with FPG as the reference were 51% and 51%, respectively, and with 2HPG were 53% and 51%, respectively. One-third each of patients with prediabetes was identified using FPG, A1C, or both. When testing A1C and FPG concurrently, the sensitivity of diagnosing dysglycemia increased to 93% stipulating one or both tests are abnormal; specificity increased to 100% if both tests were required to be abnormal. Conclusions In patients before cardiac surgery, A1C criteria identified the largest number of patients with diabetes and prediabetes. For diagnosing prediabetes, A1C and FPG were discordant and characterized different groups of patients, therefore altering the distribution of diabetes risk. Simultaneous measurement of FGP and A1C may be a more sensitive and specific tool for identifying high-risk individuals with diabetes and prediabetes. PMID:21854260

  3. Cardiac fiber unfolding by semidefinite programming.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongying; Robini, Marc C; Yang, Feng; Magnin, Isabelle; Zhu, Yuemin

    2015-02-01

    Diffusion-tensor imaging allows noninvasive assessment of the myocardial fiber architecture, which is fundamental in understanding the mechanics of the heart. In this context, tractography techniques are often used for representing and visualizing cardiac fibers, but their output is only qualitative. We introduce here a new framework toward a more quantitative description of the cardiac fiber architecture from tractography results. The proposed approach consists in taking three-dimensional (3-D) fiber tracts as inputs, and then unfolding these fibers in the Euclidean plane under local isometry constraints using semidefinite programming. The solution of the unfolding problem takes the form of a Gram matrix which defines the two-dimensional (2-D) embedding of the fibers and whose spectrum provides quantitative information on their organization. Experiments on synthetic and real data show that unfolding makes it easier to observe and to study the cardiac fiber architecture. Our conclusion is that 2-D embedding of cardiac fibers is a promising approach to supplement 3-D rendering for understanding the functioning of the heart. PMID:25291787

  4. Absorbed dose assessment of cardiac and other tissues around the cardiovascular system in brachytherapy with 90Sr/90Y source by Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Saghamanesh, S; Karimian, A; Abdi, M

    2011-09-01

    Cardiac disease is one of the most important causes of death in the world. Coronary artery stenosis is a very common cardiac disease. Intravascular brachytherapy (IVBT) is one of the radiotherapy methods which have been used recently in coronary artery radiation therapy for the treatment of restenosis. (90)Sr/(90)Y, a beta-emitting source, is a proper option for cardiovascular brachytherapy. In this research, a Monte Carlo simulation was done to calculate dosimetry parameters and effective equivalent doses to the heart and its surrounding tissues during IVBT. The results of this study were compared with the published experimental data and other simulations performed by different programs but with the same source of radiation. A very good agreement was found between results of this work and the published data. An assessment of the risk for cardiac and other sensitive soft tissues surrounding the treated vessel during (90)Sr/(90)Y IVBT was also performed in the study. PMID:21831866

  5. Predictive Value of Assessing Diastolic Strain Rate on Survival in Cardiac Amyloidosis Patients with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Störk, Stefan; Herrmann, Sebastian; Kramer, Bastian; Cikes, Maja; Gaudron, Philipp Daniel; Knop, Stefan; Ertl, Georg; Bijnens, Bart; Weidemann, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Since diastolic abnormalities are typical findings of cardiac amyloidosis (CA), we hypothesized that speckle-tracking-imaging (STI) derived longitudinal early diastolic strain rate (LSRdias) could predict outcome in CA patients with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF >50%). Background Diastolic abnormalities including altered early filling are typical findings and are related to outcome in CA patients. Reduced longitudinal systolic strain (LSsys) assessed by STI predicts increased mortality in CA patients. It remains unknown if LSRdias also related to outcome in these patients. Methods Conventional echocardiography and STI were performed in 41 CA patients with preserved LVEF (25 male; mean age 65±9 years). Global and segmental LSsys and LSRdias were obtained in six LV segments from apical 4-chamber views. Results Nineteen (46%) out of 41 CA patients died during a median of 16 months (quartiles 5–35 months) follow-up. Baseline mitral annular plane systolic excursion (MAPSE, 6±2 vs. 8±3 mm), global LSRdias and basal-septal LSRdias were significantly lower in non-survivors than in survivors (all p<0.05). NYHA class, number of non-cardiac organs involved, MAPSE, mid-septal LSsys, global LSRdias, basal-septal LSRdias and E/LSRdias were the univariable predictors of all-cause death. Multivariable analysis showed that number of non-cardiac organs involved (hazard ratio [HR] ?=?1.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17–3.26, P?=?0.010), global LSRdias (HR?=?7.30, 95% CI 2.08–25.65, P?=?0.002), and E/LSRdias (HR?=?2.98, 95% CI 1.54–5.79, P?=?0.001) remained independently predictive of increased mortality risk. The prognostic performance of global LSRdias was optimal at a cutoff value of 0.85 S?1 (sensitivity 68%, specificity 67%). Global LSRdias <0.85 S?1 predicted a 4-fold increased mortality in CA patients with preserved LVEF. Conclusions STI-derived early diastolic strain rate is a powerful independent predictor of survival in CA patients with preserved LVEF. PMID:25542015

  6. A thorough QT study to assess the effects of tbo-filgrastim on cardiac repolarization in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Adar, Liat; Avisar, Noa; Lammerich, Andreas; Kleiman, Robert B; Spiegelstein, Ofer

    2015-01-01

    Tbo-filgrastim is a recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to reduce the duration of severe neutropenia in patients with nonmyeloid malignancies receiving myelosuppressive anticancer drugs associated with a clinically significant incidence of febrile neutropenia. We assessed the effect of tbo-filgrastim on cardiac conduction and repolarization in healthy subjects. A three-arm, parallel-group, active- and placebo-controlled, double-blind study randomized healthy adults to a single 5 ?g/kg intravenous tbo-filgrastim infusion, a single intravenous placebo infusion, or a single 400 mg moxifloxacin oral dose. The primary end point was placebo-corrected time-matched change from baseline in QT interval corrected using a QT individual correction (QTcI) method. Secondary end points included heart rate, PR interval, QRS duration, change in electrocardiogram patterns, correlation between QTcI change from baseline (milliseconds) and tbo-filgrastim serum concentrations, and safety variables. A total of 145 subjects were enrolled (50 tbo-filgrastim, 50 placebo, 45 moxifloxacin). Peak placebo-corrected change from baseline for QTcI with tbo-filgrastim was 3.5 milliseconds, with a two-sided 95% upper confidence interval of 7.2 milliseconds, demonstrating no signal for any tbo-filgrastim effect on QTc. Concentration-effect modeling showed no evidence of an effect of tbo-filgrastim on cardiac repolarization. Tbo-filgrastim produced no clinically significant changes in other electrocardiogram parameters. Tbo-filgrastim was well tolerated. PMID:26028962

  7. Uterine Intravenous Leiomyomatosis with Cardiac Extension: Radiologic Assessment with Surgical and Pathologic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Nakai, Go; Maeda, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Takashi; Hirose, Yoshinobu; Terai, Yoshito; Ohmichi, Masahide; Katsumata, Takahiro; Narumi, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-01

    We present the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of a 71-year-old woman with a cardiac extension of intravenous leiomyoma (IVL) that arose from the uterus, extended to the inferior vena cava (IVC), and reached the right ventricle through the right ovarian vein. Radiologic-pathologic correlation showed that the intravascular cord-like mass originating from the IVC and extending to the right ventricle was composed of degenerated smooth muscle cells with a number of large vessels that were regarded as arteries; moreover, the arteries within the cord-like mass appeared to be looping internally. Given the disappearance of the right ovarian venous wall around the IVL pathologically, extracting the tumor from the ovarian vein during an operation is considered to be impossible retrospectively. Also it was difficult to identify even the intravenous extension of the uterine leiomyoma histopathologically. Therefore, contrast-enhanced CT, in particular arterial phase imaging, provided important information that revealed the mass, range, and path of the lesion, ensuring that an appropriate operative plan could be drawn up and the tumor completely excised. PMID:26236515

  8. Cardiac Assessment Risk Evaluation (Care Study) of African American College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sandra C.; Geiselman, Paula J.; Copeland, Amy L.; Gordon, Carol; Dudley, Mary; Manogin, Toni; Backstedt, Carol; Pourciau, Cathi; Ghebretatios, Ghenet

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To identify physiological and psychosocial variables of young African American women that may serve as a risk factor for heart disease and to assess their health promotion programme preferences. Method: A descriptive design was used to assess the cardiovascular risk factors of 100 African American women ages 18 to 40 years, enrolled in…

  9. Assessment of the role of the renin-angiotensin system in cardiac contractility utilizing the renin inhibitor remikiren.

    PubMed Central

    van Kats, J. P.; Sassen, L. M.; Danser, A. H.; Polak, M. P.; Soei, L. K.; Derkx, F. H.; Schalekamp, M. A.; Verdouw, P. D.

    1996-01-01

    1. The role of the renin-angiotensin system in the regulation of myocardial contractility is still debated. In order to investigate whether renin inhibition affects myocardial contractility and whether this action depends on intracardiac rather than circulating angiotensin II, the regional myocardial effects of systemic (i.v.) and intracoronary (i.c.) infusions of the renin inhibitor remikiren, were compared and related to the effects on systemic haemodynamics and circulating angiotensin II in open-chest anaesthetized pigs (25-30 kg). The specificity of the remikiren-induced effects was tested (1) by studying its i.c. effects after administration of the AT1-receptor antagonist L-158,809 and (2) by measuring its effects on contractile force of porcine isolated cardiac trabeculae. 2. Consecutive 10 min i.v. infusions of remikiren were given at 2, 5, 10 and 20 mg min-1. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO), heart rate (HR), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) and left ventricular (LV) dP/dtmax were not affected by remikiren at 2 and 5 mg min-1, and were lowered at higher doses. At the highest dose, MAP decreased by 48%, CO by 13%, HR by 14%, SVR by 40%, MVO2 by 28% and LV dp/dtmax by 52% (mean values; P < 0.05 for difference from baseline, n = 5). The decrease in MVO2 was accompanied by a decrease in myocardial work (MAP x CO), but the larger decline in work (55% vs. 28%; P < 0.05) implies a reduced myocardial efficiency ((MAP x CO)/MVO2). 3. Consecutive 10 min i.c. infusions of remikiren were given at 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 5 and 10 mg min-1. MAP, CO, MVO2 and LV dP/dtmax were not affected by remikiren at 0.2, 0.5 and 1 mg min-1, and were reduced at higher doses. At the highest dose, MAP decreased by 31%, CO by 26%, MVO2 by 46% and LV dP/dtmax by 43% (mean values; P < 0.05 for difference from baseline, n = 6). HR and SVR did not change at any dose. 4. Thirty minutes after a 10 min i.v. infusion of the AT1 receptor antagonist, L-158,809 at 1 mg min-1, consecutive 10 min i.c. infusions (n = 5) of remikiren at 2, 5 and 10 mg min-1 no longer affected CO and MVO2, and decreased LV dP/dtmax by maximally 27% (P < 0.05) and MAP by 14% (P < 0.05), which was less than without AT1-receptor blockade (P < 0.05). HR and SVR remained unaffected. 5. Plasma renin activity and angiotensin I and II were reduced to levels at or below the detection limit at doses of remikiren that were not high enough to affect systemic haemodynamics or regional myocardial function, both after i.v. and i.c. infusion. 6. Remikiren (10(-10) to 10(-4) M) did not affect contractile force of porcine isolated cardiac trabeculae precontracted with noradrenaline. In trabeculae that were not precontracted no decrease in baseline contractility was observed with remikiren in concentrations up to 10(-5) M, whereas at 10(-4) M baseline contractility decreased by 19% (P < 0.05). 7. Results show that with remikiren i.v., at the doses we used, blood pressure was lowered primarily by vasodilation and with remikiren i.c. by cardiac depression. The blood levels of remikiren required for its vasodilator action are lower than the levels affecting cardiac contractile function. A decrease in circulating angiotensin II does not appear to be the sole explanation for these haemodynamic responses. Data support the contention that myocardial contractility is increased by renin-dependent angiotensin II formation in the heart. PMID:8851507

  10. [Left ventricular early diastolic filling and atrial contribution assessed by ECG-gated cardiac blood pool scintigraphy].

    PubMed

    Kondo, T; Hishida, H; Furuta, T; Sawano, T; Kurokawa, H; Kiriyama, T; Kato, Y; Watanabe, Y; Mizuno, Y; Takeuchi, A

    1986-01-01

    This study evaluated early diastolic left ventricular (LV) filling and the atrial contribution to ventricular filling in patients (pts) with various heart diseases using ECG-gated cardiac blood pool scintigraphy. Conventional equilibrium list mode ECG-gated cardiac blood pool scintigraphy was performed for 19 normal subjects (N) as controls, 104 pts with old myocardial infarction (OMI), 19 pts with essential hypertension (HT), seven pts with idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS), three pts with non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), 19 pts with pure mitral stenosis (MS) and one pt with both MS and aortic regurgitation to evaluate early diastolic LV filling. The LV stroke counts corresponding to stroke volume and the early diastolic LV peak filling rate (DdV/dt) were obtained from the LV time-activity curve and its first derivative. Then the DdV/dt was normalized by stroke counts. The DdV/dt was significantly lower in pts with OMI (4.34 +/- 1.02/sec, p less than 0.001), HT (3.93 +/- 0.70/sec, p less than 0.001), IHSS (4.23 +/- 1.59/sec, p less than 0.01) and MS (4.56 +/- 1.05/sec, p less than 0.01) than in N (5.93 +/- 1.26/sec). Then, in OMI, the DdV/dt correlated significantly (r = -0.45, p less than 0.05) with infarct size (% abnormal contracting segment = %ACS) obtained by contrast left ventriculography. Furthermore, in pts with HT, the DdV/dt correlated significantly (r = -0.59, p less than 0.02) with the left ventricular mean wall thickness obtained by M-mode echocardiography. In pts with MS, the DdV/dt also correlated significantly (r = 0.73, p less than 0.001) with the mitral orifice area obtained by two-dimensional echocardiography. However, it has been difficult to assess the atrial contribution to ventricular filling by conventional ECG-gated cardiac blood pool scintigraphy, because the LV time-activity curve in the late diastolic phase was distorted and unreliable, whenever a minimal variation of the R-R interval occurred. Therefore, to produce a more reliable late diastolic LV volume curve, a "two-beat LV volume curve" was constructed using a new method; namely, each cardiac cycle was divided into 20 msec segments in two different ways, i.e., backward and forward of the R wave, and the backward LV volume curve and forward LV volume curve (conventional method) were connected at the R wave. Then, to estimate the atrial contribution, an increment of counts after the beginning of the P wave divided by counts corresponding to the stroke volume (A(P)/SV) was calculated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3722878

  11. Intensity-level assessment of lower body plyometric exercises based on mechanical output of lower limb joints.

    PubMed

    Sugisaki, Norihide; Okada, Junichi; Kanehisa, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to quantify the intensity of lower extremity plyometric exercises by determining joint mechanical output. Ten men (age, 27.3 ± 4.1 years; height, 173.6 ± 5.4 cm; weight, 69.4 ± 6.0 kg; 1-repetition maximum [1RM] load in back squat 118.5 ± 12.0 kg) performed the following seven plyometric exercises: two-foot ankle hop, repeated squat jump, double-leg hop, depth jumps from 30 and 60 cm, and single-leg and double-leg tuck jumps. Mechanical output variables (torque, angular impulse, power, and work) at the lower limb joints were determined using inverse-dynamics analysis. For all measured variables, ANOVA revealed significant main effects of exercise type for all joints (P < 0.05) along with significant interactions between joint and exercise (P < 0.01), indicating that the influence of exercise type on mechanical output varied among joints. Paired comparisons revealed that there were marked differences in mechanical output at the ankle and hip joints; most of the variables at the ankle joint were greatest for two-foot ankle hop and tuck jumps, while most hip joint variables were greatest for repeated squat jump or double-leg hop. The present results indicate the necessity for determining mechanical output for each joint when evaluating the intensity of plyometric exercises. PMID:23327555

  12. Paving the Route to Plasma miR-208a-3p as an Acute Cardiac Injury Biomarker: Preclinical Rat Data Supports Its Use in Drug Safety Assessment.

    PubMed

    Glineur, Stéphanie F; De Ron, Pierrette; Hanon, Etienne; Valentin, Jean-Pierre; Dremier, Sarah; Nogueira da Costa, André

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced cardiac injury (DICI) detection remains a major safety issue in drug development. While circulating microRNAs (miRs) have emerged as promising translational biomarkers, novel early detection biomarkers of cardiotoxicity are needed. This work aims at evaluating whether a panel of putative cardiac injury plasma miRs could serve as early DICI biomarkers in a 4-day rat preclinical model. Out of a panel of 68 selected targets, we identified plasma miR-208a-3p as being significantly upregulated after single administration with either isoproterenol (ISO) or allylamine (AAM). This provides the first evidence of miR-208a-3p detection after AAM administration. Moreover, similarly to cardiac troponins (cTn), plasma miR-208a-3p expression profile appears to be compound-specific with most significant early changes occurring in ISO-treated rats. Overall, miR-208a-3p performance in detecting the severity of myocardial injury, as well as the magnitude of miR-208a-3p increase after ISO or AAM administration, were comparable to that of cTn. Our results highlight the importance of assessing the whole time-dependent profiles of miR expression. Hence, time course evaluation revealed plasma miR candidates whose expression was not stable across the duration of the study in the vehicle group, restricting their utility as cardiac injury-specific biomarkers. In light of these findings, miR-208a-3p has a potential to complement the existing biomarkers of cardiac injury specifically in the context of evaluating toxicity in a time-dependant manner. Assessment of miR-208a-3p in other DICI settings would strengthen its robustness as an early detection biomarker leading to a warranted extensive and rigorous validation. PMID:26454886

  13. Pediatric cardiac emergencies.

    PubMed

    Lee, C; Mason, L J

    2001-06-01

    Successful management of pediatric cardiac emergencies requires an accurate diagnosis to institute an appropriate plan of therapy. The diagnosis, however, is not always straightforward, as evidenced by the nonspecific clinical picture that can be presented by congenital heart defects. Entertaining the possibility of a cardiac problem in neonates with pulmonary symptoms unresponsive to standard therapies is crucial for successful management of patients with congenital heart disease. In addition to ventilatory support, prostaglandin E1 infusions or emergency interventional cardiac catheterization is often a life-saving initial measure in patients with acutely decompensated congenital cardiac lesions that require a patent ductus arteriosus for survival. Pericardial tamponade is associated with various acquired and iatrogenic causes. Emergent pericardiocentesis is mandatory when cardiovascular compromise occurs. The goal of anesthetic management is to maintain cardiac output. With the increasing use of central venous catheters in neonatal ICUs and the high mortality rate for central venous catheter-related cardiac tamponade, the diagnosis must be considered in any patient with a central venous catheter in situ who acutely develops unexplained hypotension, bradycardia, and diminished pulses. Arrhythmias also can cause hemodynamic instability in infants and children. Supraventricular tachycardia is by far the most common emergently presenting arrhythmia in the pediatric population. Unstable patients require immediate intravenous adenosine or synchronized cardioversion. Complete heart block is rare, but it can lead to congestive heart failure and occasionally to cardiovascular collapse and sudden death. Emergency treatment of complete heart block includes pharmacologic support and temporary or permanent pacemaker placement as indicated. In infants, congestive heart failure usually is related to congenital heart disease, whereas in older children, it tends to be secondary to an acquired cause. Supportive measures, fluid restriction, and inotropic support are the principles of initial treatment. Prompt recognition and initiation of appropriate therapy in pediatric cardiac emergencies are essential for favorable outcomes. PMID:11469066

  14. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Assessment of Interstitial Myocardial Fibrosis and Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy in Hypertensive Mice Treated With Spironolactone

    PubMed Central

    Coelho?Filho, Otavio R.; Shah, Ravi V.; Neilan, Tomas G.; Mitchell, Richard; Moreno, Heitor; Kwong, Raymond; Jerosch?Herold, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Nearly 50% of patients with heart failure (HF) have preserved LV ejection fraction, with interstitial fibrosis and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy as early manifestations of pressure overload. However, methods to assess both tissue characteristics dynamically and noninvasively with therapy are lacking. We measured the effects of mineralocorticoid receptor blockade on tissue phenotypes in LV pressure overload using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods and Results Mice were randomized to l?nitro???methyl ester (l?NAME, 3 mg/mL in water; n=22), or l?NAME with spironolactone (50 mg/kg/day in subcutaneous pellets; n=21). Myocardial extracellular volume (ECV; marker of diffuse interstitial fibrosis) and the intracellular lifetime of water (?ic; marker of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy) were determined by CMR T1 imaging at baseline and after 7 weeks of therapy alongside histological assessments. Administration of l?NAME induced hypertensive heart disease in mice, with increases in mean arterial pressure, LV mass, ECV, and ?ic compared with placebo?treated controls, while LV ejection fraction was preserved (>50%). In comparison, animals receiving both spironolactone and l?NAME (“l?NAME+S”) showed less concentric remodeling, and a lower myocardial ECV and ?ic, indicating decreased interstitial fibrosis and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy (ECV: 0.43±0.09 for l?NAME versus 0.25±0.03 for l?NAME+S, P<0.001; ?ic: 0.42±0.11 for l?NAME groups versus 0.12±0.05 for l?NAME+S group). Mice treated with a combination of l?NAME and spironolactone were similar to placebo?treated controls at 7 weeks. Conclusions Spironolactone attenuates interstitial fibrosis and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in hypertensive heart disease. CMR can phenotype myocardial tissue remodeling in pressure?overload, furthering our understanding of HF progression. PMID:24965024

  15. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David; Ha, Andrew C T; Gula, Lorne J; Chakrabarti, Santabhanu; Beanlands, Rob S B; Nery, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Studies suggest clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in 5% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis. The principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Data indicate that an 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic (clinically silent) cardiac involvement. An international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS recommends that patients be screened for cardiac involvement. Most studies suggest a benign prognosis for patients with clinically silent CS. Immunosuppression therapy is advocated for clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, with implantable cardioverter defibrillators, is recommended for some patients. PMID:26593140

  16. Monte Carlo simulations to assess differentiation between defects in cardiac SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysanthou-Baustert, I.; Parpottas, Y.; Demetriadou, O.; Christofides, S.; Yiannakkaras, Ch; Kaolis, D.; Wasilewska-Radwanska, M.

    2011-09-01

    Differentiating between various types of lesions in nuclear cardiology is a challenge. This work assesses the level of differentiation achievable between various low contrast lesions, as encountered in nuclear cardiology. The parameters investigated are defect extend, defect thickness and perfusion reduction of the defect. The images have been obtained through Monte Carlo Simulations with the program SIMIND. Results show that acceptable size resolution is obtained for defects with an extend over 25×25mm. When thickness and perfusion reduction are both unknown, the imaging results are confounding. In this work, thickness and perfusion reduction cannot be differentiated. If one of the variables is known (thickness or perfusion reduction), imaging results can differentiate between the other unknown variable.

  17. Anti-addiction drug ibogaine inhibits voltage-gated ionic currents: A study to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, Xaver; Kovar, Michael; Rubi, Lena; Mike, Agnes K.; Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S.; Todt, Hannes; Hilber, Karlheinz; Sandtner, Walter

    2013-12-01

    The plant alkaloid ibogaine has promising anti-addictive properties. Albeit not licenced as a therapeutic drug, and despite hints that ibogaine may perturb the heart rhythm, this alkaloid is used to treat drug addicts. We have recently reported that ibogaine inhibits human ERG (hERG) potassium channels at concentrations similar to the drugs affinity for several of its known brain targets. Thereby the drug may disturb the heart's electrophysiology. Here, to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile in more detail, we studied the effects of ibogaine and its congener 18-Methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) on various cardiac voltage-gated ion channels. We confirmed that heterologously expressed hERG currents are reduced by ibogaine in low micromolar concentrations. Moreover, at higher concentrations, the drug also reduced human Na{sub v}1.5 sodium and Ca{sub v}1.2 calcium currents. Ion currents were as well reduced by 18-MC, yet with diminished potency. Unexpectedly, although blocking hERG channels, ibogaine did not prolong the action potential (AP) in guinea pig cardiomyocytes at low micromolar concentrations. Higher concentrations (? 10 ?M) even shortened the AP. These findings can be explained by the drug's calcium channel inhibition, which counteracts the AP-prolonging effect generated by hERG blockade. Implementation of ibogaine's inhibitory effects on human ion channels in a computer model of a ventricular cardiomyocyte, on the other hand, suggested that ibogaine does prolong the AP in the human heart. We conclude that therapeutic concentrations of ibogaine have the propensity to prolong the QT interval of the electrocardiogram in humans. In some cases this may lead to cardiac arrhythmias. - Highlights: • We study effects of anti-addiction drug ibogaine on ionic currents in cardiomyocytes. • We assess the cardiac ion channel profile of ibogaine. • Ibogaine inhibits hERG potassium, sodium and calcium channels. • Ibogaine’s effects on ion channels are a potential source of cardiac arrhythmias. • 18-Methoxycoronaridine has a lower affinity for cardiac ion channels than ibogaine.

  18. Radiation dose assessment in a 320-detector-row CT scanner used in cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goma, Carles; Ruiz, Agustin; Jornet, Nuria; Latorre, Artur; Pallerol, Rosa M.; Carrasco, Pablo; Eudaldo, Teresa; Ribas, Montserrat

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: In the present era of cone-beam CT scanners, the use of the standardized CTDI{sub 100} as a surrogate of the idealized CTDI is strongly discouraged and, consequently, so should be the use of the dose-length product (DLP) as an estimate of the total energy imparted to the patient. However, the DLP is still widely used as a reference quantity to normalize the effective dose for a given scan protocol mainly because the CTDI{sub 100} is an easy-to-measure quantity. The aim of this article is therefore to describe a method for radiation dose assessment in large cone-beam single axial scans, which leads to a straightforward estimation of the total energy imparted to the patient. The authors developed a method accessible to all medical physicists and easy to implement in clinical practice in an attempt to update the bridge between CT dosimetry and the estimation of the effective dose. Methods: The authors used commercially available material and a simple mathematical model. The method described herein is based on the dosimetry paradigm introduced by the AAPM Task Group 111. It consists of measuring the dose profiles at the center and the periphery of a long body phantom with a commercial solid-state detector. A weighted dose profile is then calculated from these measurements. To calculate the CT dosimetric quantities analytically, a Gaussian function was fitted to the dose profile data. Furthermore, the Gaussian model has the power to condense the z-axis information of the dose profile in two parameters: The single-scan central dose, f(0), and the width of the profile, {sigma}. To check the energy dependence of the solid-state detector, the authors compared the dose profiles to measurements made with a small volume ion chamber. To validate the overall method, the authors compared the CTDI{sub 100} calculated analytically to the measurement made with a 100 mm pencil ion chamber. Results: For the central and weighted dose profiles, the authors found a good agreement between the measured dose profile data and the fitted Gaussian functions. The solid-state detector had no energy dependence--within the energy range of interest--and the analytical model succeeded in reproducing the absolute dose values obtained with the pencil ion chamber. For the case of large cone-beam single axial scans, the quantity that better characterizes the total energy imparted to the patient is the weighted dose profile integral (DPI{sub w}). The DPI{sub w} can be easily determined from the two parameters that define the Gaussian functions: f(0) and {sigma}. The authors found that the DLP underestimated the total energy imparted to the patient by more than 20%. The authors also found that the calculated CT dosimetric quantities were higher than those displayed on the scanner console. Conclusions: The authors described and validated a method to assess radiation dose in large cone-beam single axial scans. This method offers a simple and more accurate estimation of the total energy imparted to the patient, thus offering the possibility to update the bridge between CT dosimetry and the estimation of the effective dose for cone-beam CT examinations in radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiation therapy.

  19. Mission-Driven Expected Impact: Assessing Scholarly Output for 2013 Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulet, Laurel R.; Lopes, Kevin J.; White, John Bryan

    2016-01-01

    As of the 2016-2017 academic year, all schools undergoing Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business accreditation will be assessed on the new standards that were ratified in 2013, which include the assessment of the impact of portfolios of intellectual contributions. The authors discuss key ideas underlying a business school's research…

  20. Assessment of phase based dose modulation for improved dose efficiency in cardiac CT on an anthropomorphic motion phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budde, Adam; Nilsen, Roy; Nett, Brian

    2014-03-01

    State of the art automatic exposure control modulates the tube current across view angle and Z based on patient anatomy for use in axial full scan reconstructions. Cardiac CT, however, uses a fundamentally different image reconstruction that applies a temporal weighting to reduce motion artifacts. This paper describes a phase based mA modulation that goes beyond axial and ECG modulation; it uses knowledge of the temporal view weighting applied within the reconstruction algorithm to improve dose efficiency in cardiac CT scanning. Using physical phantoms and synthetic noise emulation, we measure how knowledge of sinogram temporal weighting and the prescribed cardiac phase can be used to improve dose efficiency. First, we validated that a synthetic CT noise emulation method produced realistic image noise. Next, we used the CT noise emulation method to simulate mA modulation on scans of a physical anthropomorphic phantom where a motion profile corresponding to a heart rate of 60 beats per minute was used. The CT noise emulation method matched noise to lower dose scans across the image within 1.5% relative error. Using this noise emulation method to simulate modulating the mA while keeping the total dose constant, the image variance was reduced by an average of 11.9% on a scan with 50 msec padding, demonstrating improved dose efficiency. Radiation dose reduction in cardiac CT can be achieved while maintaining the same level of image noise through phase based dose modulation that incorporates knowledge of the cardiac reconstruction algorithm.

  1. [Design and application of cardiac stimulator for rapid atrial pacing animal model].

    PubMed

    Qin, Yong; Yu, Jiahui; Zhou, Zhen; Wei, Hongming

    2014-01-01

    A cardiac stimulator for rapid atrial pacing animal model was designed in this paper. According to the needs of clinical research, output pulse parameters of the cardiac stimulator can be designed. The cardiac stimulator will be controlled through magnet. Efficiency of the cardiac stimulator was validated by animal experiments. PMID:24839845

  2. Assessment of Left Ventricular Function in Cardiac MSCT Imaging by a 4D Hierarchical Surface-Volume Matching Process.

    PubMed

    Garreau, Mireille; Simon, Antoine; Boulmier, Dominique; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis; Le Breton, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) scanners offer new perspectives for cardiac kinetics evaluation with 4D dynamic sequences of high contrast and spatiotemporal resolutions. A new method is proposed for cardiac motion extraction in multislice CT. Based on a 4D hierarchical surface-volume matching process, it provides the detection of the heart left cavities along the acquired sequence and the estimation of their 3D surface velocity fields. A Markov random field model is defined to find, according to topological descriptors, the best correspondences between a 3D mesh describing the left endocardium at one time and the 3D acquired volume at the following time. The global optimization of the correspondences is realized with a multiresolution process. Results obtained on simulated and real data show the capabilities to extract clinically relevant global and local motion parameters and highlight new perspectives in cardiac computed tomography imaging. PMID:23165027

  3. Necessity of angiotensin-converting enzyme-related gene for cardiac functions and longevity of Drosophila melanogaster assessed by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Fang-Tsu; Chang, Cheng-Yi; Su, Ming-Tsan; Kuo, Wen-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Prior studies have established the necessity of an angiotensin-converting enzyme-related (ACER) gene for heart morphogenesis of Drosophila. Nevertheless, the physiology of ACER has yet to be comprehensively understood. Herein, we employed RNA interference to down-regulate the expression of ACER in Drosophila's heart and swept source optical coherence tomography to assess whether ACER is required for cardiac functions in living adult flies. Several contractile parameters of Drosophila heart, including the heart rate (HR), end-diastolic diameter (EDD), end-systolic diameter (ESD), percent fractional shortening (%FS), and stress-induced cardiac performance, are shown, which are age dependent. These age-dependent cardiac functions declined significantly when ACER was down-regulated. Moreover, the lifespans of ACER knock-down flies were significantly shorter than those of wild-type control flies. Thus, we posit that ACER, the Drosophila ortholog of mammalian angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), is essential for both heart physiology and longevity of animals. Since mammalian ACE2 controls many cardiovascular physiological features and is implicated in cardiomyopathies, our findings that ACER plays conserved roles in genetically tractable animals will pave the way for uncovering the genetic pathway that controls the renin-angiotensin system.

  4. 123I-MIBG Scintigraphy as a Powerful Tool to Plan an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator and to Assess Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stefanelli, Antonella; Treglia, Giorgio; Giordano, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine (123I-MIBG) scintigraphy is a nuclear medicine technique which describes the functional status of the cardiac sympathetic nervous system. It is well known that an autonomic dysfunction is present in heart failure setting as a neuronal uptake of norepinephrine is impaired in the failing myocardium. Reduction in sympathetic nervous function in the heart, measured by reduced myocardial uptake of 123I-MIBG, is an indicator of poor prognosis for heart failure patients. The aim of this paper was to investigate the role of 123I-MIBG scintigraphy in evaluating the need of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and the response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in heart failure patients. For this purpose scientific literature data on these topics were reviewed. Based on literature data, 123I-MIBG scintigraphy seems to be a useful tool to assess which patients may benefit most from an ICD implantation to reduce the risk of ventricular arrhythmia or sudden cardiac death. Furthermore, 123I-MIBG scintigraphy seems to predict which patients will response to CRT with an improvement in left ventricular function. PMID:23056938

  5. Assessing the long-term performance of terrestrial ecosystem models in northeastern United States: linking model structure and output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Matthes, J. H.; Moore, D. J.; Dietze, M.; Arellano, A. F.; Dawson, A.; Fox, A. M.; Goring, S. J.; McLachlan, J. S.; Montane, F.; Moreno, G.; Poulter, B.; Quaife, T. L.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Schaefer, K. M.; Steinkamp, J.; Williams, J. W.; Team, P.

    2014-12-01

    Terrestrial biosphere models are being used to forecast ecosystem response to future climate change. However, the predictions of these models do not agree, and their ability to accurately represent decadal- and longer-scale ecological processes has rarely been tested. Here we investigate how the structure of the terrestrial biosphere models affects their ability to accurately simulate vegetation dynamics over the past 1000 years. Six models and model variations are involved, including the Ecosystem Demography 2 model (ED2), the Community Land Model (CLM4.0, CLM4.5, CLM4.5-dynamic vegetation), and the Lund-Postdam-Jena models (LPJ-GUESS and LPJ-wsl). Using common paleoclimatic drivers and modeling protocols, we simulated vegetation changes in the northeastern US with these models for the past 1000 years. We compared the model outputs with paleoecological/historical benchmark datasets (paleo-vegetation data reconstructed from fossil pollen records and pre-EuroAmerican vegetation data from the Public Land Survey and Town Proprietor Surveys) to evaluate model performance. We characterized the models based on how they represented photosynthesis, water relations, soil, biogeochemical cycling, and vegetation dynamics. Models with similar structures behaved more similarly over time; we found that model attributes of both fast (e.g. photosynthesis) and slow processes (e.g. vegetation dynamics) affect model long-term predictions. However, the effect of model attributes varies among regions and across time. In addition to model structure, parameter uncertainty among models also appears to contribute to the differences in model output. We are currently working on assimilating paleoecological data into a subset of the terrestrial biosphere models to constrain the key model parameters and state variables, and in turn, to better evaluate the effect of model structure alone on model performance.

  6. Databases for assessing the outcomes of the treatment of patients with congenital and paediatric cardiac disease--the perspective of cardiology.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Kathy J; Beekman Iii, Robert H; Bergersen, Lisa J; Everett, Allen D; Forbes, Thomas J; Franklin, Rodney C G; Klitzner, Thomas S; Krogman, Otto N; Martin, Gerard R; Webb, Catherine L

    2008-12-01

    This review includes a brief discussion, from the perspective of the pediatric cardiologist, of the rationale for creation and maintenance of multi-institutional databases of outcomes of the treatment of patients with congenital and paediatric cardiac disease, together with a history of the evolution of such databases, and a description of the current state of the art. A number of projects designed to have broad-based impact are currently in the design phase, or have already been implemented. Not surprisingly, most of the efforts thus far have focused on catheterization procedures and interventions, although some work examining other aspects of paediatric cardiology practice is also beginning. This review briefly describes several European and North American initiatives related to databases for pediatric and congenital cardiology including the Central Cardiac Audit Database of the United Kingdom, national database initiatives for pediatric cardiology in Switzerland and Germany, various database initiatives under the leadership of the Working Groups of The Association for European Paediatric Cardiology, the IMPACT Registry (IMproving Pediatric and Adult Congenital Treatment) of the National Cardiovascular Data Registry of The American College of Cardiology Foundation and The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI), the Mid-Atlantic Group of Interventional Cardiology (MAGIC) Catheterization Outcomes Project, the Congenital Cardiac Catheterization Project on Outcomes (C3PO), the Congenital Cardiovascular Interventional Study Consortium (CCISC), and the Joint Council on Congenital Heart Disease (JCCHD) National Quality Improvement Initiative. These projects, each leveraging multicentre data and collaboration, demonstrate the enormous progress that has occurred over the last several years to improve the quality and consistency of information about nonsurgical treatment for congenital cardiac disease. The paediatric cardiology field is well-poised to move quickly beyond outcome assessment and benchmarking, to collaborative quality improvement. PMID:19063781

  7. Cardiac Catheterization

    MedlinePLUS

    ... done during a cardiac catheterization include: closing small holes inside the heart repairing leaky or narrow heart ... bandage. It's normal for the site to be black and blue, red, or slightly swollen for a ...

  8. ASSESSMENT OF MATHEMATICAL MODELS FOR STORM AND COMBINED SEWER MANAGEMENT. APPENDIX F: SELECTED COMPUTER INPUT AND OUTPUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mathematical models for the nonsteady simulation of urban runoff were evaluated to determine their suitability for the engineering assessment, planning, design and control of storm and combined sewerage systems. The models were evaluated on the basis of information published by t...

  9. Cardiac factors in orthostatic hypotension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löllgen, H.; Dirschedl, P.; Koppenhagen, K.; Klein, K. E.

    Cardiac function is determined by preload, afterload, heart rate and contractility. During orthostatic stress, the footward blood shift is compensated for by an increase of afterload. LBNP is widely used to analyze effects of volume displacement during orthostatic stress. Comparisons of invasive ( right heart catheterization) and non-invasive approach (echocardiography) yielded similar changes. Preload and afterload change with graded LBNP, heart rate increases, and stroke volume and cardiac output decrease. Thus, the working point on the left ventricular function curve is shifted to the left and downward, similar to hypovolemia. However, position on the Frank-Starling curve, the unchanged ejection fraction, and the constant Vcf indicate a normal contractile state during LBNP. A decrease of arterial oxygen partial pressure during LBNP shwos impaired ventilation/perfusion ratio. Finally, LBNP induced cardiac and hemodynamic changes can be effectively countermeasured by dihydroergotamine, a potent venoconstrictor. Comparison of floating catheter data with that of echocardiography resulted in close correlation for cardiac output and stroke volume. In addition, cardiac dimensions changed in a similar way during LBNP. From our findings, echocardiography as a non-invasive procedure can reliably used in LBNP and orthostatic stress tests. Some informations can be obtained on borderline values indicating collaps or orthostatic syncope. Early fainters can be differentiated from late fainters by stroke volume changes.

  10. Assessment of Mitral Valve Adaptation with Gated Cardiac Computed Tomography: Validation with Three-Dimensional Echocardiography and Mechanistic Insight to Functional Mitral Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Beaudoin, Jonathan; Thai, Wai-Ee; Wai, Bryan; Handschumacher, Mark D.; Levine, Robert A.; Truong, Quynh A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitral valve (MV) enlargement is a compensatory mechanism capable of preventing functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) in dilated ventricles. Total leaflet area and its relation with closure area measured by 3D-echocardiography have been related to FMR. Whether these parameters can be assessed with other imaging modalities is not known. Our objectives are to compare cardiac CT-based measurements of MV leaflets with 3D-echocardiography and determine the relationship of these metrics to the presence of FMR. Methods and Results We used two cohorts of patients who had cardiac CT to measure MV total leaflet, closure and annulus areas. In cohort 1 (26 patients), we validated these CT metrics to 3D-echocardiography. In cohort 2 (66 patients), we assessed the relation of MV size with the presence of FMR in three populations: heart failure with FMR, heart failure without FMR, and normal controls. Cardiac CT and 3D-echocardiography produced similar results for total leaflet (R2=0.97), closure (R2=0.89) and annulus areas (R2=0.84). MV size was largest in heart failure without FMR compared with controls and FMR patients (9.1±1.7 vs 7.5±1.0 vs 8.1±0.9 cm2/m2, p<0.01). FMR patients had reduced ratios of total leaflet:closure areas and total leaflet:annulus areas when compared to patients without FMR (p<0.01). Conclusions MV size measured by CT is comparable to 3D-echocardiography. MV enlargement in cardiomyopathy suggests leaflet adaptation. Patients with FMR have inadequate adaptation as reflected by decreased ratios of leaflet area and areas determined by ventricle size (annulus and closure areas). These measurements provide additional insight into the mechanism of FMR. PMID:23873402

  11. Cardiac applications of PET.

    PubMed

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-10-01

    Routine use of cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) applications has been increasing but has not replaced cardiac single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) studies yet. The majority of cardiac PET tracers, with the exception of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG), are not widely available, as they require either an onsite cyclotron or a costly generator for their production. 18F-FDG PET imaging has high sensitivity for the detection of hibernating/viable myocardium and has replaced Tl-201 SPECT imaging in centers equipped with a PET/CT camera. PET myocardial perfusion imaging with various tracers such as Rb-82, N-13 ammonia, and O-15 H2O has higher sensitivity and specificity than myocardial perfusion SPECT for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD). In particular, quantitative PET measurements of myocardial perfusion help identify subclinical coronary stenosis, better define the extent and severity of CAD, and detect ischemia when there is balanced reduction in myocardial perfusion due to three-vessel or main stem CAD. Fusion images of PET perfusion and CT coronary artery calcium scoring or CT coronary angiography provide additional complementary information and improve the detection of CAD. PET studies with novel 18F-labeled perfusion tracers such as 18F-flurpiridaz and 18F-FBnTP have yielded high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of CAD. These tracers are still being tested in humans, and, if approved for clinical use, they will be commercially and widely available. In addition to viability studies, 18F-FDG PET can also be utilized to detect inflammation/infection in various conditions such as endocarditis, sarcoidosis, and atherosclerosis. Some recent series have obtained encouraging results for the detection of endocarditis in patients with intracardiac devices and prosthetic valves. PET tracers for cardiac neuronal imaging, such as C-11 HED, help assess the severity of heart failure and post-transplant cardiac reinnervation, and understand the pathogenesis of arrhytmias. The other uncommon applications of cardiac PET include NaF imaging to identify calcium deposition in atherosclerotic plaques and ?-amyloid imaging to diagnose cardiac amyloid involvement. 18F-FDG imaging with a novel PET/MR camera has been reported to be very sensitive and specific for the differentiation between malignant and nonmalignant cardiac masses. The other potential applications of PET/MR are cardiac infectious/inflammatory conditions such as endocarditis. PMID:26035516

  12. Echocardiographic assessment of left ventricular function in thyrotoxicosis and implications for the therapeutics of thyrotoxic cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Anakwue, Raphael C; Onwubere, Basden J; Ikeh, Vincent; Anisiuba, Benedict; Ike, Samuel; Anakwue, Angel-Mary C

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Thyrotoxicosis is an endocrine disorder with prominent cardiovascular manifestations. Thyroid hormone acts through genomic and non-genomic mechanisms to regulate cardiac function. Echocardiography is a useful, non-invasive, easily accessible, and affordable tool for studying the structural and physiological function of the heart. Aim We studied thyrotoxicosis patients in a Nigerian Teaching Hospital and employed trans-thoracic echocardiography to find out if there were abnormalities in the hearts of these patients. Methods Fifty adult thyrotoxicosis patients diagnosed with clinical and thyroid function tests in the medical out-patient unit of the hospital were recruited and we performed transthoracic echocardiography with a Sonos 2000 HP machine. Results We documented the presence of abnormalities in the following proportion of thyrotoxicosis patients: left ventricular enhanced systolic function in 30%, enhanced diastolic function in 34%, diastolic dysfunction in 34%, heart failure with preserved ejection fraction in10%, heart failure with reduced ejection fraction in 6%, and left ventricular hypertrophy in 34%. Conclusion Echocardiography was useful in the stratification of cardiac function abnormalities and is indispensable as a guide in the choice of therapeutic options in patients with thyrocardiac disease. The finding of left ventricular enhanced systolic and diastolic functions signify early echocardiographic detectable cardiac abnormalities in thyrotoxicosis, and the clinical management includes the use of anti-thyroid drugs and ?-adrenoceptor blockade. Diastolic dysfunction in thyrotoxicosis patients asymptomatic for cardiac disease should be treated with anti-thyroid drugs, and ?-adrenoceptor blockade. The judicious application of clinical therapeutics will guide the use of anti-thyroid drugs, diuretics, digoxin, angiotensin inhibitors, and ?-adrenoceptor blockade in the successful management of thyrotoxicosis patients with heart failure and reduced, preserved, or increased ejection fraction: parameters which are derived from echocardiography. PMID:25709461

  13. Magnetic Resonance Elastography as a Method for the Assessment of Effective Myocardial Stiffness throughout the Cardiac Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kolipaka, Arunark; Araoz, Philip A.; McGee, Kiaran P.; Manduca, Armando; Ehman, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a noninvasive technique in which images of externally generated waves propagating in tissue are used to measure stiffness. The first aim is to determine, from a range of driver configurations the optimal driver for the purpose of generating waves within the heart in vivo. The second aim is to quantify the shear stiffness of normal myocardium throughout the cardiac cycle using MRE and to compare MRE stiffness to left ventricular (LV) chamber pressure in an in vivo pig model. MRE was performed in 6-pigs with 6-different driver setups including no motion, 3-noninvasive drivers and 2-invasive drivers. MRE wave displacement amplitudes were calculated for each driver. During the same MRI examination, LV pressure and MRI-measured LV volume were obtained, and MRE myocardial stiffness was calculated for 20 phases of the cardiac cycle. No discernible waves were imaged when no external motion was applied, and a single pneumatic drum driver produced higher amplitude waves than the other noninvasive drivers (P <0.05). Pressure-volume loops overlaid onto stiffness-volume loops showed good visual agreement. Pressure and MRE-measured effective stiffness showed good correlation (R2 = 0.84). MRE shows potential as a noninvasive method for estimating effective myocardial stiffness throughout the cardiac cycle. PMID:20578052

  14. Bibliometric Assessment of European and Sub-Saharan African Research Output on Poverty-Related and Neglected Infectious Diseases from 2003 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Gurney, Karen A.; Mgone, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The European & Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP) is a partnership of European and sub-Saharan African countries that aims to accelerate the development of medical interventions against poverty-related diseases (PRDs). A bibliometric analysis was conducted to 1) measure research output from European and African researchers on PRDs, 2) describe collaboration patterns, and 3) assess the citation impact of clinical research funded by EDCTP. Methodology/Principal Findings Disease-specific research publications were identified in Thomson Reuters Web of Science using search terms in titles, abstracts and keywords. Publication data, including citation counts, were extracted for 2003–2011. Analyses including output, share of global papers, normalised citation impact (NCI), and geographical distribution are presented. Data are presented as five-year moving averages. European EDCTP member countries accounted for ~33% of global research output in PRDs and sub-Saharan African countries for ~10% (2007–2011). Both regions contributed more to the global research output in malaria (43.4% and 22.2%, respectively). The overall number of PRD papers from sub-Saharan Africa increased markedly (>47%) since 2003, particularly for HIV/AIDS (102%) and tuberculosis (TB) (81%), and principally involving Southern and East Africa. For 2007–2011, European and sub-Saharan African research collaboration on PRDs was highly cited compared with the world average (NCI in brackets): HIV/AIDS 1.62 (NCI: 1.16), TB 2.11 (NCI: 1.06), malaria 1.81 (NCI: 1.22), and neglected infectious diseases 1.34 (NCI: 0.97). The NCI of EDCTP-funded papers for 2003–2011 was exceptionally high for HIV/AIDS (3.24), TB (4.08) and HIV/TB co-infection (5.10) compared with global research benchmarks (1.14, 1.05 and 1.35, respectively). Conclusions The volume and citation impact of papers from sub-Saharan Africa has increased since 2003, as has collaborative research between Europe and sub-Saharan Africa. >90% of publications from EDCTP-funded research were published in high-impact journals and are highly cited. These findings corroborate the benefit of collaborative research on PRDs. PMID:26262756

  15. Cardiac emergencies in children.

    PubMed

    Schamberger, M S

    1996-06-01

    Pediatric cardiac emergencies require very specific treatment in the emergency room setting. Considering the possibility of a cardiac problem as the cause for the presenting symptoms is the initial step in successful management. Many patients present with what is initially considered a primary pulmonary disorder such as pneumonia, asthma, or bronchiolitis. Airway stabilization and ventilatory support, if needed, remain the first steps in stabilizing the patient. Many neonates with acutely decompensating heart disease may require the patency of the ductus arteriosus for survival. Prostaglandin E given as continuous infusion is the treatment of choice. Congestive heart failure can present at any age. In older patients, it is often due to myocarditis and is characterized by low cardiac output. Supportive measures, fluid restriction, and inotropic support are the basic concepts for initial treatment. Supraventricular tachycardia is a frequent arrhythmia, especially in young children. If the patient is unstable, immediate intravenous administration of adenosine or synchronized cardioversion are the initial interventions. In stable patients, vagal maneuvers may be attempted to abort the arrhythmia. PMID:8793920

  16. Methods for reducing biases and errors in regional photochemical model outputs for use in emission reduction and exposure assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, P. Steven; Rao, S. Trivikrama; Hogrefe, Christian; Gego, Edith; Mathur, Rohit

    2015-07-01

    In the United States, regional-scale photochemical models are being used to design emission control strategies needed to meet the relevant National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) within the framework of the attainment demonstration process. Previous studies have shown that the current generation of regional photochemical models can have large biases and errors in simulating absolute levels of pollutant concentrations. Studies have also revealed that regional air quality models were not always accurately reproducing even the relative changes in ozone air quality stemming from changes in emissions. This paper introduces four approaches to adjust for model bias and errors in order to provide greater confidence for their use in estimating future concentrations as well as using modeled pollutant concentrations in exposure assessments. The four methods considered here are a mean and variance (MV) adjustment, temporal component decomposition (TC) adjustment of modeled concentrations, and two variants of cumulative distribution function (CDF) mapping. These methods were compared against each other as well as against unadjusted model concentrations and a version of the relative response approach based on unadjusted model predictions. The analysis uses ozone concentrations simulated by the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model for the northeastern United States domain for the years 1996-2005. Ensuring that base case conditions are adequately represented through the combined use of observations and model simulations is shown to result in improved estimates of future air quality under changing emissions and meteorological conditions.

  17. Assessment of the dose distribution inside a cardiac cath lab using TLD measurements and Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, M.; Teles, P.; Cardoso, G.; Vaz, P.

    2014-11-01

    Over the last decade, there was a substantial increase in the number of interventional cardiology procedures worldwide, and the corresponding ionizing radiation doses for both the medical staff and patients became a subject of concern. Interventional procedures in cardiology are normally very complex, resulting in long exposure times. Also, these interventions require the operator to work near the patient and, consequently, close to the primary X-ray beam. Moreover, due to the scattered radiation from the patient and the equipment, the medical staff is also exposed to a non-uniform radiation field that can lead to a significant exposure of sensitive body organs and tissues, such as the eye lens, the thyroid and the extremities. In order to better understand the spatial variation of the dose and dose rate distributions during an interventional cardiology procedure, the dose distribution around a C-arm fluoroscopic system, in operation in a cardiac cath lab at Portuguese Hospital, was estimated using both Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and dosimetric measurements. To model and simulate the cardiac cath lab, including the fluoroscopic equipment used to execute interventional procedures, the state-of-the-art MC radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.0 was used. Subsequently, Thermo-Luminescent Detector (TLD) measurements were performed, in order to validate and support the simulation results obtained for the cath lab model. The preliminary results presented in this study reveal that the cardiac cath lab model was successfully validated, taking into account the good agreement between MC calculations and TLD measurements. The simulated results for the isodose curves related to the C-arm fluoroscopic system are also consistent with the dosimetric information provided by the equipment manufacturer (Siemens). The adequacy of the implemented computational model used to simulate complex procedures and map dose distributions around the operator and the medical staff is discussed, in view of the optimization principle (and the associated ALARA objective), one of the pillars of the international system of radiological protection.

  18. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... prevent future heart problems and even death. Exercise training as part of cardiac rehab might not be safe for all patients. For example, if you have very high blood pressure or severe heart disease, you might not be ready for exercise. However, ...

  19. Myocardial Dysfunction and Shock after Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Jentzer, Jacob C.; Chonde, Meshe D.; Dezfulian, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    Postarrest myocardial dysfunction includes the development of low cardiac output or ventricular systolic or diastolic dysfunction after cardiac arrest. Impaired left ventricular systolic function is reported in nearly two-thirds of patients resuscitated after cardiac arrest. Hypotension and shock requiring vasopressor support are similarly common after cardiac arrest. Whereas shock requiring vasopressor support is consistently associated with an adverse outcome after cardiac arrest, the association between myocardial dysfunction and outcomes is less clear. Myocardial dysfunction and shock after cardiac arrest develop as the result of preexisting cardiac pathology with multiple superimposed insults from resuscitation. The pathophysiology involves cardiovascular ischemia/reperfusion injury and cardiovascular toxicity from excessive levels of inflammatory cytokine activation and catecholamines, among other contributing factors. Similar mechanisms occur in myocardial dysfunction after cardiopulmonary bypass, in sepsis, and in stress-induced cardiomyopathy. Hemodynamic stabilization after resuscitation from cardiac arrest involves restoration of preload, vasopressors to support arterial pressure, and inotropic support if needed to reverse the effects of myocardial dysfunction and improve systemic perfusion. Further research is needed to define the role of postarrest myocardial dysfunction on cardiac arrest outcomes and identify therapeutic strategies. PMID:26421284

  20. Robotic cardiac surgery: an anaesthetic challenge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Gao, Changqing

    2014-08-01

    Robotic cardiac surgery with the da Vinci robotic surgical system offers the benefits of a minimally invasive procedure, including a smaller incision and scar, reduced risk of infection, less pain and trauma, less bleeding and blood transfusion requirements, shorter hospital stay and decreased recovery time. Robotic cardiac surgery includes extracardiac and intracardiac procedures. Extracardiac procedures are often performed on a beating heart. Intracardiac procedures require the aid of peripheral cardiopulmonary bypass via a minithoracotomy. Robotic cardiac surgery, however, poses challenges to the anaesthetist, as the obligatory one-lung ventilation (OLV) and CO2 insufflation may reduce cardiac output and increase pulmonary vascular resistance, potentially resulting in hypoxaemia and haemodynamic compromise. In addition, surgery requires appropriate positioning of specialised cannulae such as an endopulmonary vent, endocoronary sinus catheter, and endoaortic clamp catheter under the guidance of transoesophageal echocardiography. Therefore, cardiac anaesthetists should have a working knowledge of these systems, OLV and haemodynamic support. PMID:24958894

  1. Cardiac mechanics: Physiological, clinical, and mathematical considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirsky, I. (editor); Ghista, D. N.; Sandler, H.

    1974-01-01

    Recent studies concerning the basic physiological and biochemical principles underlying cardiac muscle contraction, methods for the assessment of cardiac function in the clinical situation, and mathematical approaches to cardiac mechanics are presented. Some of the topics covered include: cardiac ultrastructure and function in the normal and failing heart, myocardial energetics, clinical applications of angiocardiography, use of echocardiography for evaluating cardiac performance, systolic time intervals in the noninvasive assessment of left ventricular performance in man, evaluation of passive elastic stiffness for the left ventricle and isolated heart muscle, a conceptual model of myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock, application of Huxley's sliding-filament theory to the mechanics of normal and hypertrophied cardiac muscle, and a rheological modeling of the intact left ventricle. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  2. The Localization and Characterization of Ischemic Scars in relation to the Infarct Related Coronary Artery Assessed by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance and a Novel Automatic Postprocessing Method

    PubMed Central

    Woie, Leik; Engan, Kjersti; Eftestøl, Trygve; Larsen, Alf Inge; Ørn, Stein

    2015-01-01

    Aims. The correspondence between the localization and morphology of ischemic scars and the infarct related artery (IRA) by use of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and a novel automatic postprocessing method. Methods and Results. Thirty-four patients with one-year-old single IRA myocardial infarction were examined. Endocardium, epicardium, and the point where right and left ventricles are coinciding were manually marked. All measurements were automatically assessed by the method. The following are results with manual assessments of scar properties in parenthesis: mean scar size (FWHM criterion): 7.8 ± 5.5 as %LV (17.4 ± 8.6%); mean endocardial extent of infarction: 44 ± 26° (124 ± 47°); mean endocardial extent of infarction as %LV circumference: 9.7 ± 7.0% (34.6 ± 13.0%); and mean transmurality: 52 ± 20% of LV wall thickness (77 ± 23%). Scars located in segments 1, 2, 7, 8, 13, and 14 by use of the automatic method were 96–100% specific for LAD occlusion. The highest specificities of RCA and LCX occlusions were segment 4 with 93% and segment 6 with 64%, respectively. The scar localization assessed automatically or manually was without major differences. Conclusion. The automatic method is applicable and able to assess localization, size, transmurality, and endocardial extent of ischemic scars. PMID:26543661

  3. Cardiac cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manzke, Robert . E-mail: robert.manzke@philips.com

    2005-10-15

    This doctoral thesis addresses imaging of the heart with retrospectively gated helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT). A thorough review of the CT reconstruction literature is presented in combination with a historic overview of cardiac CT imaging and a brief introduction to other cardiac imaging modalities. The thesis includes a comprehensive chapter about the theory of CT reconstruction, familiarizing the reader with the problem of cone-beam reconstruction. The anatomic and dynamic properties of the heart are outlined and techniques to derive the gating information are reviewed. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, a new approach is presented for the heart-rate-adaptive gated helical cardiac cone-beam CT reconstruction. Reconstruction assessment criteria such as the temporal resolution, the homogeneity in terms of the cardiac phase, and the smoothness at cycle-to-cycle transitions are developed. Several reconstruction optimization approaches are described: An approach for the heart-rate-adaptive optimization of the temporal resolution is presented. Streak artifacts at cycle-to-cycle transitions can be minimized by using an improved cardiac weighting scheme. The optimal quiescent cardiac phase for the reconstruction can be determined automatically with the motion map technique. Results for all optimization procedures applied to ECR are presented and discussed based on patient and phantom data. The ECR algorithm is analyzed for larger detector arrays of future cone-beam systems throughout an extensive simulation study based on a four-dimensional cardiac CT phantom. The results of the scientific work are summarized and an outlook proposing future directions is given. The presented thesis is available for public download at www.cardiac-ct.net.

  4. Cardiac lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Imtiaz; Al-Khafaji, Khalid; Mutyala, Monica; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Cotter, William; Hakim, Hosam; Khosla, Sandeep; Arora, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Lipomas of the heart are encapsulated tumors that are composed primarily of mature fat cells. Cardiac lipomas can originate either from subendocardium (approximately 50%), subpericardium (25%), or from the myocardium (25%) and may be located more frequently in left ventricle or right atrium. We report a 74-year-old female who presented with dyspnea on exertion and was found to have 5×5 cm mass occupying most of the right atrium on a transesophageal echocardiogram. PMID:26486106

  5. Cardiac optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetics is an emerging technology for optical interrogation and control of biological function with high specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. Mammalian cells and tissues can be sensitized to respond to light by a relatively simple and well-tolerated genetic modification using microbial opsins (light-gated ion channels and pumps). These can achieve fast and specific excitatory or inhibitory response, offering distinct advantages over traditional pharmacological or electrical means of perturbation. Since the first demonstrations of utility in mammalian cells (neurons) in 2005, optogenetics has spurred immense research activity and has inspired numerous applications for dissection of neural circuitry and understanding of brain function in health and disease, applications ranging from in vitro to work in behaving animals. Only recently (since 2010), the field has extended to cardiac applications with less than a dozen publications to date. In consideration of the early phase of work on cardiac optogenetics and the impact of the technique in understanding another excitable tissue, the brain, this review is largely a perspective of possibilities in the heart. It covers the basic principles of operation of light-sensitive ion channels and pumps, the available tools and ongoing efforts in optimizing them, overview of neuroscience use, as well as cardiac-specific questions of implementation and ideas for best use of this emerging technology in the heart. PMID:23457014

  6. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  7. Renal Perfusion Index Reflects Cardiac Systolic Function in Chronic Cardio-Renal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lubas, Arkadiusz; Ryczek, Robert; Kade, Grzegorz; Niemczyk, Stanis?aw

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac dysfunction can modify renal perfusion, which is crucial to maintain sufficient kidney tissue oxygenation. Renal cortex perfusion assessed by dynamic ultrasound method is related both to renal function and cardiac hemodynamics. The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that Renal Perfusion Index (RPI) can more closely reflect cardiac hemodynamics and differentiate etiology of chronic cardio-renal syndrome. Material/Methods Twenty-four patients with hypertension and chronic kidney disease (CKD) at 2–4 stage (12 with hypertensive nephropathy and 12 with CKD prior to hypertension) were enrolled in the study. Blood tests, 24-h ABPM, echocardiography, and ultrasonography with estimation of Total renal Cortical Perfusion intensity and Renal Perfusion Index (RPI) were performed. Results In the group of all patients, RPI correlated with left ventricular stoke volume (LVSV), and cardiac index, but not with markers of renal function. In multiple stepwise regression analysis CKD-EPI(Cys-Cr) (b=?0.360), LVSV (b=0.924) and MAP (b=0.376) together independently influenced RPI (R2=0.74; p<0.0001). RPI<0.567 allowed for the identification of patients with chronic cardio-renal syndrome with sensitivity of 41.7% and specificity of 83.3%. Conclusions Renal perfusion index relates more strongly to cardiac output than to renal function, and could be helpful in recognizing chronic cardio-renal syndrome. Applicability of RPI in diagnosing early abnormalities in the cardio-renal axis requires further investigation. PMID:25881555

  8. Comparisons of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry based on physical input-output life-cycle assessment model.

    PubMed

    Liang, Sai; Zhang, Tianzhu; Xu, Yijian

    2012-03-01

    Waste recycling for paper production is an important component of waste management. This study constructs a physical input-output life-cycle assessment (PIO-LCA) model. The PIO-LCA model is used to investigate environmental impacts of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry: crop straws, bagasse, textile wastes and scrap paper. Crop straw recycling and wood utilization for paper production have small total intensity of environmental impacts. Moreover, environmental impacts reduction of crop straw recycling and wood utilization benefits the most from technology development. Thus, using crop straws and wood (including wood wastes) for paper production should be promoted. Technology development has small effects on environmental impacts reduction of bagasse recycling, textile waste recycling and scrap paper recycling. In addition, bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling have big total intensity of environmental impacts. Thus, the development of bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Other pathways for reusing bagasse and textile wastes should be explored and evaluated. Moreover, imports of scrap paper should be encouraged to reduce large indirect impacts of scrap paper recycling on domestic environment. PMID:22100716

  9. Comparisons of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry based on physical input-output life-cycle assessment model

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Sai; Zhang, Tianzhu; Xu Yijian

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using crop straws and wood wastes for paper production should be promoted. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bagasse and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Imports of scrap paper should be encouraged. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sensitivity analysis, uncertainties and policy implications are discussed. - Abstract: Waste recycling for paper production is an important component of waste management. This study constructs a physical input-output life-cycle assessment (PIO-LCA) model. The PIO-LCA model is used to investigate environmental impacts of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry: crop straws, bagasse, textile wastes and scrap paper. Crop straw recycling and wood utilization for paper production have small total intensity of environmental impacts. Moreover, environmental impacts reduction of crop straw recycling and wood utilization benefits the most from technology development. Thus, using crop straws and wood (including wood wastes) for paper production should be promoted. Technology development has small effects on environmental impacts reduction of bagasse recycling, textile waste recycling and scrap paper recycling. In addition, bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling have big total intensity of environmental impacts. Thus, the development of bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Other pathways for reusing bagasse and textile wastes should be explored and evaluated. Moreover, imports of scrap paper should be encouraged to reduce large indirect impacts of scrap paper recycling on domestic environment.

  10. Cardiac Vagal Regulation and Early Peer Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graziano, Paulo A.; Keane, Susan P.; Calkins, Susan D.

    2007-01-01

    A sample of 341 5 1/2-year-old children participating in an ongoing longitudinal study was the focus of a study on the relation between cardiac vagal regulation and peer status. To assess cardiac vagal regulation, resting measures of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and RSA change (suppression) to 3 cognitively and emotionally challenging tasks…

  11. Partial scan artifact reduction (PSAR) for the assessment of cardiac perfusion in dynamic phase-correlated CT

    SciTech Connect

    Stenner, Philip; Schmidt, Bernhard; Bruder, Herbert; Allmendinger, Thomas; Haberland, Ulrike; Flohr, Thomas; Kachelriess, Marc

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Cardiac CT achieves its high temporal resolution by lowering the scan range from 2{pi} to {pi} plus fan angle (partial scan). This, however, introduces CT-value variations, depending on the angular position of the {pi} range. These partial scan artifacts are of the order of a few HU and prevent the quantitative evaluation of perfusion measurements. The authors present the new algorithm partial scan artifact reduction (PSAR) that corrects a dynamic phase-correlated scan without a priori information. Methods: In general, a full scan does not suffer from partial scan artifacts since all projections in [0, 2{pi}] contribute to the data. To maintain the optimum temporal resolution and the phase correlation, PSAR creates an artificial full scan p{sub n}{sup AF} by projectionwise averaging a set of neighboring partial scans p{sub n}{sup P} from the same perfusion examination (typically N{approx_equal}30 phase-correlated partial scans distributed over 20 s and n=1,...,N). Corresponding to the angular range of each partial scan, the authors extract virtual partial scans p{sub n}{sup V} from the artificial full scan p{sub n}{sup AF}. A standard reconstruction yields the corresponding images f{sub n}{sup P}, f{sub n}{sup AF}, and f{sub n}{sup V}. Subtracting the virtual partial scan image f{sub n}{sup V} from the artificial full scan image f{sub n}{sup AF} yields an artifact image that can be used to correct the original partial scan image: f{sub n}{sup C}=f{sub n}{sup P}-f{sub n}{sup V}+f{sub n}{sup AF}, where f{sub n}{sup C} is the corrected image. Results: The authors evaluated the effects of scattered radiation on the partial scan artifacts using simulated and measured water phantoms and found a strong correlation. The PSAR algorithm has been validated with a simulated semianthropomorphic heart phantom and with measurements of a dynamic biological perfusion phantom. For the stationary phantoms, real full scans have been performed to provide theoretical reference values. The improvement in the root mean square errors between the full and the partial scans with respect to the errors between the full and the corrected scans is up to 54% for the simulations and 90% for the measurements. Conclusions: The phase-correlated data now appear accurate enough for a quantitative analysis of cardiac perfusion.

  12. Cardiac Signatures of Personality

    PubMed Central

    Koelsch, Stefan; Enge, Juliane; Jentschke, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Background There are well-established relations between personality and the heart, as evidenced by associations between negative emotions on the one hand, and coronary heart disease or chronic heart failure on the other. However, there are substantial gaps in our knowledge about relations between the heart and personality in healthy individuals. Here, we investigated whether amplitude patterns of the electrocardiogram (ECG) correlate with neurotisicm, extraversion, agreeableness, warmth, positive emotion, and tender-mindedness as measured with the Neuroticism-Extraversion-Openness (NEO) personality inventory. Specifically, we investigated (a) whether a cardiac amplitude measure that was previously reported to be related to flattened affectivity (referred to as values) would explain variance of NEO scores, and (b) whether correlations can be found between NEO scores and amplitudes of the ECG. Methodology/Principal Findings NEO scores and rest ECGs were obtained from 425 healthy individuals. Neuroticism and positive emotion significantly differed between individuals with high and low values. In addition, stepwise cross-validated regressions indicated correlations between ECG amplitudes and (a) agreeableness, as well as (b) positive emotion. Conclusions/Significance These results are the first to demonstrate that ECG amplitude patterns provide information about the personality of an individual as measured with NEO personality scales and facets. These findings open new perspectives for a more efficient personality assessment using cardiac measures, as well as for more efficient risk-stratification and pre-clinical diagnosis of individuals at risk for cardiac, affective and psychosomatic disorders. PMID:22363649

  13. Assessing the Impacts of Climate Change on the Distribution of Trout Species in the Sierra Nevada Region of California Using Output from a Landscape Scale Hydrological Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, M. M.; Ficklin, D. L.; Stewart, I. T.; Knouft, J.

    2014-12-01

    Species distribution models (SDMs) are statistical tools that combine data on the locations where a species is known to occur with data on the environment. The resulting species-environment relationships are then used to identify regions a species could occupy and are often used to make predictions about how a species will respond to climate change. The data used in SDMs generally exhibit a pattern known as spatial autocorrelation (SAC), which is the positive association between the proximity of sample locations. The presence of SAC violates the statistical assumptions that must be met for unbiased estimation of species-environment relationships and can cause traditional SDMs to exhibit low predictive accuracy. To determine the effects of SAC on predicting species' responses to climate change, the distributions of three species of trout were predicted throughout the Sierra Nevada mountain range in California. Measures of contemporary streamflow, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, and sediment concentration are based on model outputs from the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) landscape scale hydrological model. SWAT-derived future hydrological conditions driven by downscaled General Circulation Models (GCMs) indicate that increasing temperatures and changes in precipitation will alter these variables across the region, all of which have the ability to negatively impact the distribution of trout species. Trout distribution data along with data on contemporary stream flow, water temperature, dissolved oxygen and sediment concentration from the years 1990 to 1999 were used to develop both spatial and non-spatial SDMs for each species. These species-environment relationships along with data on future environmental conditions for the years 2050-2059 derived from three separate GCM scenarios were then used to predict the future distribution of each species. Predictions from spatial and non-spatial models will be discussed with a focus on the difference in area and the amount of overlap between current and future distributions of each species.

  14. Assessing the early changes of cerebral glucose metabolism via dynamic (18)FDG-PET/CT during cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-Qing; Liao, Xiao-Xing; Lu, Jian-Hua; Liu, Rong; Hu, Chun-Lin; Dai, Gang; Zhang, Xiang-Song; Shi, Xin-Chong; Li, Xin

    2015-08-01

    To study the changes of cerebral glucose metabolism (CGM) during the phase of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after cardiac arrest (CA), we used 18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)FDG-PET/CT) to measure the CGM changes in six beagle canine models. After the baseline (18)FDG-PET/CT was recorded, ventricular fibrillation (VF) was induced for 6 min, followed by close-chest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in conjunction with intravenous (IV) administration of epinephrine and external defibrillator shocks until ROSC was achieved, within 30 min. The (18)FDG was recorded prior to intravenous administration at 0 h (baseline), and at 4, 24, and 48 h after CA with ROSC. We evaluated the expression of two key control factors in canine CGM, hexokinase I (HXK I) and HXK II, by immunohistochemistry at the four above mentioned time points. Electrically induced VF of 6 min duration was successfully induced in the dogs. Resuscitation was then performed to maintain blood pressure stability. Serial (18)FDG-PET/CT scans found that the CGM decreased at 4 h after ROSC and remained lower than the baseline even at 48 h. The expression of HXK I and II levels were consistent with the changes in CGM. These data from our present work showed that (18)FDG-PET/CT imaging can be used to detect decreased CGM during CA and was consistent with the results of CMRgl. Furthermore, there were also concomitant changes in the expression of HXK I and HXK II. The decrease in CGM may be an early sign of hyperacute global cerebral ischemia. PMID:25703241

  15. Using MERRA, AMIP II, CMIP5 Outputs to Assess Actual and Potential Building Climate Zone Change and Variability From the Last 30 Years Through 2100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stackhouse, P. W.; Westberg, D. J.; Hoell, J. M., Jr.; Chandler, W.; Zhang, T.

    2014-12-01

    In the US, residential and commercial building infrastructure combined consumes about 40% of total energy usage and emits about 39% of total CO2emission (DOE/EIA "Annual Energy Outlook 2013"). Thus, increasing the energy efficiency of buildings is paramount to reducing energy costs and emissions. Building codes, as used by local and state enforcement entities are typically tied to the dominant climate within an enforcement jurisdiction classified according to various climate zones. These climates zones are based upon a 30-year average of local surface observations and are developed by DOE and ASHRAE (formerly known as the American Society of Hearting, Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Engineers). A significant shortcoming of the methodology used in constructing such maps is the use of surface observations (located mainly near airports) that are unequally distributed and frequently have periods of missing data that need to be filled by various approximation schemes. This paper demonstrates the usefulness of using NASA's Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) atmospheric data assimilation to derive the ASHRAE climate zone maps and then using MERRA to define the last 30 years of variability in climate zones. These results show that there is a statistically significant increase in the area covered by warmer climate zones and some tendency for a reduction of area in colder climate zones that require longer time series to confirm. Using the uncertainties of the basic surface temperature and precipitation parameters from MERRA as determined by comparison to surface measurements, we first compare patterns and variability of ASHRAE climate zones from MERRA relative to present day climate model runs from AMIP simulations to establish baseline sensitivity. Based upon these results, we assess the variability of the ASHRAE climate zones according to CMIP runs through 2100 using an ensemble analysis that classifies model output changes by percentiles. Estimates of statistical significance are then compared to original model variability during the AMIP period. This work quantifies and tests for significance the changes seen in the various US regions that represent a potential contribution by NASA to the ongoing National Climate Assessment.

  16. [Cardiac rehabilitation after myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Ghannem, M; Ghannem, L; Ghannem, L

    2015-12-01

    Although the proofs of the benefits of cardiac rehabilitation accumulate, many patients are not sent to rehabilitation units, especially younger and very elderly patients. As the length of stay in acute care units decreases, rehabilitation offers more time to fully assess the patients' conditions and needs. Meta-analyses of randomised trials suggest that mortality can be improved by as much as 20-30%. In addition, rehabilitation helps managing risk factors, including hyperlipidemia, diabetes, smoking and sedentary behaviours. Physical training also helps improving exercise capacity. Because of all of these effects, cardiac rehabilitation for post-myocardial infarction patients has been given a class IA recommendation in current guidelines. PMID:26548984

  17. Role of breathing in cardiac performance: experimental and mathematical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Binh Q.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1999-05-01

    Due to the close proximity of the heart and lungs within a closed chest environment, we expect breathing to affect various cardiac performance parameters and hence cardiac output. We present an integrative approach to study heart-lung interactions, combining a mathematical formulation of the circulation system with imaging techniques using echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging (EPI) and dynamic x-ray CT (EBCT). We hypothesize that appropriate synchronization of mechanical ventilation to cardiac-cycle specific events can improve cardiac function, i.e. stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO). Computational and experimental results support the notion that heart-lung interaction, leading to altered cardiac output associated with inspiration/expiration, is not directly associated with lung inflation/deflation and thus is felt to be more influenced by pleural pressure changes. The mathematical model of the circulation demonstrates the importance of cardiac-cycle specific timing of ventilation on cardiac function and matches with experimentally observed relationships found in animal models studied via EBCT and human studies using EPI. Results show that positive pressure mechanical ventilation timed to systolic events may increase SV and CO by up to 30%, mainly by increased filling of the ventricles during diastole. Similarly, negative pressure (spontaneous) respiration has its greatest effect on ventricular diastolic filling. Cardiac-gated mechanical ventilation may provide sufficient cardiac augmentation to warrant further investigation as a minimally-invasive technique for temporary cardiac assist. Through computational modeling and advanced imaging protocols, we were able to uniquely study heart-lung interactions within the intact milieu of the never-invaded thorax.

  18. Assessment of dedicated low-dose cardiac micro-CT reconstruction algorithms using the left ventricular volume of small rodents as a performance measure

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, Joscha; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Phase-correlated microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) imaging plays an important role in the assessment of mouse models of cardiovascular diseases and the determination of functional parameters as the left ventricular volume. As the current gold standard, the phase-correlated Feldkamp reconstruction (PCF), shows poor performance in case of low dose scans, more sophisticated reconstruction algorithms have been proposed to enable low-dose imaging. In this study, the authors focus on the McKinnon-Bates (MKB) algorithm, the low dose phase-correlated (LDPC) reconstruction, and the high-dimensional total variation minimization reconstruction (HDTV) and investigate their potential to accurately determine the left ventricular volume at different dose levels from 50 to 500 mGy. The results were verified in phantom studies of a five-dimensional (5D) mathematical mouse phantom. Methods: Micro-CT data of eight mice, each administered with an x-ray dose of 500 mGy, were acquired, retrospectively gated for cardiac and respiratory motion and reconstructed using PCF, MKB, LDPC, and HDTV. Dose levels down to 50 mGy were simulated by using only a fraction of the projections. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was evaluated as a measure of image quality. Left ventricular volume was determined using different segmentation algorithms (Otsu, level sets, region growing). Forward projections of the 5D mouse phantom were performed to simulate a micro-CT scan. The simulated data were processed the same way as the real mouse data sets. Results: Compared to the conventional PCF reconstruction, the MKB, LDPC, and HDTV algorithm yield images of increased quality in terms of CNR. While the MKB reconstruction only provides small improvements, a significant increase of the CNR is observed in LDPC and HDTV reconstructions. The phantom studies demonstrate that left ventricular volumes can be determined accurately at 500 mGy. For lower dose levels which were simulated for real mouse data sets, the HDTV algorithm shows the best performance. At 50 mGy, the deviation from the reference obtained at 500 mGy were less than 4%. Also the LDPC algorithm provides reasonable results with deviation less than 10% at 50 mGy while PCF and MKB reconstruction show larger deviations even at higher dose levels. Conclusions: LDPC and HDTV increase CNR and allow for quantitative evaluations even at dose levels as low as 50 mGy. The left ventricular volumes exemplarily illustrate that cardiac parameters can be accurately estimated at lowest dose levels if sophisticated algorithms are used. This allows to reduce dose by a factor of 10 compared to today's gold standard and opens new options for longitudinal studies of the heart.

  19. Off-patient assessment of pre-cordial impact mechanics among medical professionals in North-East Italy involved in emergency cardiac resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Pellis, Tommaso; Pausler, Daniele; Gaiarin, Martina; Franceschino, Eliana; Epstein, Avi; Boulin, Christian; Kohl, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Pre-cordial thump (PT) relies on cardiac mechano-electric transduction to transform mechanically-delivered energy into an electrophysiologically relevant stimulus. Its use for emergency resuscitation has declined recent years, amidst concerns about effectiveness and side-effects. In addition, there is insufficient knowledge about bio-mechanical properties and mechanisms of PT. Using a PT-mechanics recorder, we measured PT off-patient among healthcare professionals (n = 58) in North-East Italy, and related this to retrospective information on self-reported PT outcomes. Impact-speed and peak-force were 4.7 ± 1.3 m s?¹ (2.2-7.8 m s?¹) and 394 ± 110 N (202-648 N), respectively. Average self-reported cardioversion rate by PT was 35%. No adverse events were stated. All but 3 of PT providers with self-reported cardioversion rates ?50% had pre-impact fist-speeds of ?3.7 m s?¹. In comparison with previously-reported data from UK and US (n = 22 each), self-reported success-rates and pre-impact fist-speeds were more similar to US (PT-induced cardioversion rate 27.7%; fist-speed 4.17 ± 1.68 m s?¹) than to UK participants (PT-induced cardioversion rate 13.3%; fist-speed 1.55 ± 0.68 m s?¹). Small cohort-size, retrospective nature of data-gathering, and 'self-selection bias' (participants who have used PT on patients) limits the extent to which firm conclusions can be drawn. Observations are compatible, though, with the possibility that pre-impact fist-speed may affect success-rate of PT. Thus, where PT is used for acute resuscitation, it is delivered because it is immediately 'at hand'. Negative side effects are rare or absent in witnessed cardiac arrest cases. Pre-impact fist-speed may be a determinant of outcome, and this could be trained using devices suitable for self-assessment. PMID:22910435

  20. Cardiac Mass and Function Decrease in Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome after Lung Transplantation: Relationship to Physical Activity?

    PubMed Central

    Hinrichs, Jan B.; Renne, Julius; Schoenfeld, Christian; Gutberlet, Marcel; Haverich, Axel; Warnecke, Gregor; Welte, Tobias; Wacker, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Rationale There is a need to expand knowledge on cardio-pulmonary pathophysiology of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) following lung transplantation (LTx). Objectives The purpose of this study was to assess MRI-derived biventricular cardiac mass and function parameters as well as flow hemodynamics in patients with and without BOS after LTx. Methods Using 1.5T cardiac MRI, measurements of myocardial structure and function as well as measurements of flow in the main pulmonary artery and ascending aorta were performed in 56 lung transplant patients. The patients were dichotomized into two gender matched groups of comparable age range: one with BOS (BOS stages 1–3) and one without BOS (BOS 0/0p). Measurements and Main Results Significantly lower biventricular cardiac mass, right and left ventricular end-diastolic volume, biventricular stroke volume, flow hemodynamics and significant higher heart rate but preserved cardiac output were observed in patients with BOS 1–3 compared to the BOS 0/0p group (p<0.05). In a stepwise logistic regression analysis global cardiac mass (p?=?0.046) and days after LTx (p?=?0.0001) remained independent parameters to predict BOS. In a second model an indicator for the physical fitness level - walking number of stairs - was added to the logistic regression model. In this second model, time after LTx (p?=?0.005) and physical fitness (p?=?0.01) remained independent predictors for BOS. Conclusion The observed changes in biventricular cardiac mass and function as well as changes in hemodynamic flow parameters in the pulmonary trunk and ascending aorta are likely attributed to the physical fitness level of patients after lung transplantation, which in turn is strongly related to lung function. PMID:25479016

  1. Cardiac Mechanics Evaluated by Speckle Tracking Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Abduch, Maria Cristina Donadio; Alencar, Adriano Mesquita; Mathias, Wilson; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz de Campos

    2014-01-01

    Natural myocardial markers, or speckles, originated from constructive and destructive interference of ultrasound in the tissues may provide early diagnosis of myocardial changes and be used in the prediction of some cardiac events. Due to its relatively temporal stability, speckles can be tracked by dedicated software along the cardiac cycle, enabling the analysis of the systolic and diastolic function. They are identified by either conventional 2D grey scale and by 3D echo, conferring independence of the insonation angle, thus allowing assessment of cardiac mechanics in the three spatial planes: longitudinal, circumferential, and radial. The purposes of the present paper are: to discuss the role and the meaning of cardiac strain obtained by speckle tracking during the evaluation of cardiac physiology and to discuss clinical applications of this novel echocardiographic technology. PMID:24844877

  2. CARDIAC MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Joachim R.; Johnson, Edward A.

    1968-01-01

    With light and electron microscopy a comparison has been made of the morphology of ventricular (V) and Purkinje (P) fibers of the hearts of guinea pig, rabbit, cat, dog, goat, and sheep. The criteria, previously established for the rabbit heart, that V fibers are distinguished from P fibers by the respective presence and absence of transverse tubules is shown to be true for all animals studied. No evidence was found of a permanent connection between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the extracellular space. The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of V fibers formed couplings with the sarcolemma of a transverse tubule (interior coupling) and with the peripheral sarcolemma (peripheral coupling), whereas in P fibers the SR formed only peripheral couplings. The forms of the couplings were identical. The significance, with respect to excitation-contraction coupling, of the difference in the form of the couplings in cardiac versus skeletal muscle is discussed together with the electrophysiological implications of the differing geometries of bundles of P fibers from different animals. PMID:5645545

  3. Cardiac pacing in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Furman, S; Young, D

    1977-04-01

    Nineteen patients aged 1 month to 18 years underwent implantation of a cardiac pacemaker and were followed up for up to 9 years (average duration of pacing 54 months). Complete heart block was present in 16 patients and sinus nodal dysfunction in 3. Heart block was presumably of congenital orgin in eight, secendary to cardiac surgery in seven and subsequent to cardiac catheterization in one. Sinus nodal dysfunction was of presumed congenital origin in one and occurred after cardiac surgery in two. Pacing was required because of syncopal attacks in eight patients, three of whom had congestive heart failure or low cardiac output on physiologic studies. It was required in four because of congestive heart failure, in two because of low cardiac output (one with a wide QRS complex), and in five for postoperative rhythm control. With return of sinus rhythm after 2 and 3 months, respectively, pacing was discontinued in two patients. One child was partially corrected disease died within 3 months, one died of wound breakdown and sepsis after 10 months of pacing and one died suddenly 4 years after implantation. All others have returned to normal activity; only one requires cardiac medication. The degree of emotional stability has been striking. Asynchronous and atrial synchronous pacing are of equal therapeutic value. The very small radiofrequency implanted receiver has been useful in younger children. The major problems have been caused by the large size and short longevity of the generators and the child's growth stressing the lead system. Transvenously implanted pacemakers have presented no greater management problems than those placed during thoracotomy. PMID:848440

  4. Cardiac AAV9 Gene Delivery Strategies in Adult Canines: Assessment by Long-term Serial SPECT Imaging of Sodium Iodide Symporter Expression.

    PubMed

    Moulay, Gilles; Ohtani, Tomohito; Ogut, Ozgur; Guenzel, Adam; Behfar, Atta; Zakeri, Rosita; Haines, Philip; Storlie, Jimmy; Bowen, Lorna; Pham, Linh; Kaye, David; Sandhu, Gurpreet; O'Connor, Michael; Russell, Stephen; Redfield, Margaret

    2015-07-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, and cardiac gene delivery has the potential to provide novel therapeutic approaches. Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) transduces the rodent heart efficiently, but cardiotropism, immune tolerance, and optimal delivery strategies in large animals are unclear. In this study, an AAV9 vector encoding canine sodium iodide symporter (NIS) was administered to adult immunocompetent dogs via epicardial injection, coronary infusion without and with cardiac recirculation, or endocardial injection via a novel catheter with curved needle and both end- and side-holes. As NIS mediates cellular uptake of clinical radioisotopes, expression was tracked by single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) imaging in addition to Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Direct epicardial or endocardial injection resulted in strong cardiac expression, whereas expression after intracoronary infusion or cardiac recirculation was undetectable. A threshold myocardial injection dose that provides robust nonimmunogenic expression was identified. The extent of transmural myocardial expression was greater with the novel catheter versus straight end-hole needle delivery. Furthermore, the authors demonstrate that cardiac NIS reporter gene expression and duration can be quantified using serial noninvasive SPECT imaging up to 1 year after vector administration. These data are relevant to efforts to develop cardiac gene delivery as heart failure therapy. PMID:25915925

  5. Quantitative Assessment of Cardiac Function in Fetuses of Women with Maternal Gestational Thyroid Dysfunction Using VVI Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meixin; Yu, Jing; Fu, Xiuxiu; Wan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background The study aimed to investigate the clinical value of velocity vector imaging (VVI) in assessing heart function in fetuses of pregnant women with thyroid dysfunction. The inter-observer and intra-observer variability was assessed for all VVI parameters observed. Material/Methods The participants were enrolled from singleton pregnant women with gestational ages ranging 24+0 to 40+1 weeks who visited the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, China, for prenatal care from July 2011 to February 2014. Digital 2-dimensional (2D) dynamic 4-chamber images of the heart were collected. A total of qualified 226 images from 125 fetuses of pregnant women with normal thyroid (control group), 64 fetuses of pregnant women with hypothyroidism (hypothyroidism group), and 37 fetuses of pregnant women with hyperthyroidism (hyperthyroidism group) were interrogated offline using VVI software. The echocardiographic parameters including the myocardium peak systolic velocity (Vs), peak diastolic velocity (Vd), peak systolic strain (S), peak systolic strain rate (SRs), peak diastolic strain rate (SRd) of RV and LV, were obtained from the velocity curves of 2D myocardial motion. The heart rate was measured using a virtual M-mode algorithm built into the software. Results The study found that the longitudinal Vs and Vd of both ventricles in the control group gradually decreased from basal segments to apical segments and significantly increased over the gestation. S, SRs, and SRd of both ventricles remained stable after middle gestation. Compared with the control group, the hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism groups exhibited significantly reduced S, SRs, and SRd, even for fetuses at 24-weeks gestation. There were no significant differences in global Vs and global Vd between the control group and the hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism groups. Conclusions The thyroid dysfunction of pregnant women may damage fetal heart function, and VVI could be a sensitive technique to measure the variation of fetal heart function. PMID:26427319

  6. Influence of cirrhosis in cardiac surgery outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Delgado, Juan C; Esteve, Francisco; Javierre, Casimiro; Ventura, Josep L; Mañez, Rafael; Farrero, Elisabet; Torrado, Herminia; Rodríguez-Castro, David; Carrio, Maria L

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis has evolved an important risk factor for cardiac surgery due to the higher morbidity and mortality that these patients may suffer compared with general cardiac surgery population. The presence of contributing factors for a poor outcome, such as coagulopathy, a poor nutritional status, an adaptive immune dysfunction, a degree of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, and a degree of renal and pulmonary dysfunction, have to be taken into account for surgical evaluation when cardiac surgery is needed, together with the degree of liver disease and its primary complications. The associated pathophysiological characteristics that liver cirrhosis represents have a great influence in the development of complications during cardiac surgery and the postoperative course. Despite the population of cirrhotic patients who are referred for cardiac surgery is small and recommendations come from small series, since liver cirrhotic patients have increased their chance of survival in the last 20 years due to the advances in their medical care, which includes liver transplantation, they have been increasingly considered for cardiac surgery. Indeed, there is an expected rise of cirrhotic patients within the cardiac surgical population due to the increasing rates of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, especially in western countries. In consequence, a more specific approach is needed in the assessment of care of these patients if we want to improve their management. In this article, we review the pathophysiology and outcome prediction of cirrhotic patients who underwent cardiac surgery. PMID:25914775

  7. Estimates of Embodied Global Energy and Air-Emission Intensities of Japanese Products for Building a Japanese Input–Output Life Cycle Assessment Database with a Global System Boundary

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    To build a life cycle assessment (LCA) database of Japanese products embracing their global supply chains in a manner requiring lower time and labor burdens, this study estimates the intensity of embodied global environmental burden for commodities produced in Japan. The intensity of embodied global environmental burden is a measure of the environmental burden generated globally by unit production of the commodity and can be used as life cycle inventory data in LCA. The calculation employs an input–output LCA method with a global link input–output model that defines a global system boundary grounded in a simplified multiregional input–output framework. As results, the intensities of embodied global environmental burden for 406 Japanese commodities are determined in terms of energy consumption, greenhouse-gas emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, perfluorocarbons, hydrofluorocarbons, sulfur hexafluoride, and their summation), and air-pollutant emissions (nitrogen oxide and sulfur oxide). The uncertainties in the intensities of embodied global environmental burden attributable to the simplified structure of the global link input–output model are quantified using Monte Carlo simulation. In addition, by analyzing the structure of the embodied global greenhouse-gas intensities we characterize Japanese commodities in the context of LCA embracing global supply chains. PMID:22881452

  8. Estimates of embodied global energy and air-emission intensities of Japanese products for building a Japanese input-output life cycle assessment database with a global system boundary.

    PubMed

    Nansai, Keisuke; Kondo, Yasushi; Kagawa, Shigemi; Suh, Sangwon; Nakajima, Kenichi; Inaba, Rokuta; Tohno, Susumu

    2012-08-21

    To build a life cycle assessment (LCA) database of Japanese products embracing their global supply chains in a manner requiring lower time and labor burdens, this study estimates the intensity of embodied global environmental burden for commodities produced in Japan. The intensity of embodied global environmental burden is a measure of the environmental burden generated globally by unit production of the commodity and can be used as life cycle inventory data in LCA. The calculation employs an input-output LCA method with a global link input-output model that defines a global system boundary grounded in a simplified multiregional input-output framework. As results, the intensities of embodied global environmental burden for 406 Japanese commodities are determined in terms of energy consumption, greenhouse-gas emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, perfluorocarbons, hydrofluorocarbons, sulfur hexafluoride, and their summation), and air-pollutant emissions (nitrogen oxide and sulfur oxide). The uncertainties in the intensities of embodied global environmental burden attributable to the simplified structure of the global link input-output model are quantified using Monte Carlo simulation. In addition, by analyzing the structure of the embodied global greenhouse-gas intensities we characterize Japanese commodities in the context of LCA embracing global supply chains. PMID:22881452

  9. The China PEACE (Patient-centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events) Retrospective Study of Acute Myocardial Infarction: Study Design China PEACE-Retrospective AMI Study Design

    PubMed Central

    Dharmarajan, Kumar; Li, Jing; Li, Xi; Lin, Zhenqiu; Krumholz, Harlan; Jiang, Lixin

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases are rising as a cause of death and disability in China. To improve outcomes for patients with these conditions, the Chinese government, academic researchers, clinicians, and more than 200 hospitals have created China Patient-centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events (China-PEACE), a national network for research and performance improvement. The first study from China PEACE, the Retrospective Study of Acute Myocardial Infarction (China PEACE-Retrospective AMI Study), is designed to promote improvements in AMI quality of care by generating knowledge about the characteristics, treatments, and outcomes of patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) across a representative sample of Chinese hospitals over the last decade. Methods and Results The China PEACE-Retrospective AMI Study will examine more than 18,000 patient records from 162 hospitals identified using a 2-stage cluster sampling design within economic-geographic regions. Records were chosen from 2001, 2006, and 2011 to identify temporal trends. Data quality will be monitored by a central coordinating center and will, in particular, address case ascertainment, data abstraction, and data management. Analyses will examine patient characteristics, diagnostic testing patterns, in-hospital treatments, in-hospital outcomes, and variation in results by time and site of care. In addition to publications, data will be shared with participating hospitals and the Chinese government to develop strategies to promote quality improvement. Conclusions The China PEACE-Retrospective AMI Study is the first to leverage the China PEACE platform to better understand AMI across representative sites of care and over the last decade in China. The China PEACE collaboration between government, academicians, clinicians and hospitals is poised to translate research about trends and patterns of AMI practices and outcomes into improved care for patients. PMID:24221838

  10. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePLUS

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...

  11. Cardiac conduction system

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals to the heart muscle causing it to contract. The main components ... the cardiac conduction system’s electrical activity in the heart.

  12. An integrated bioimpedance—ECG gating technique for respiratory and cardiac motion compensation in cardiac PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivumäki, Tuomas; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Fürst, Sebastian; Loher, Simone; Vauhkonen, Marko; Schwaiger, Markus; Hakulinen, Mikko A.

    2014-10-01

    Respiratory motion may degrade image quality in cardiac PET imaging. Since cardiac PET studies often involve cardiac gating by ECG, a separate respiratory monitoring system is required increasing the logistic complexity of the examination, in case respiratory gating is also needed. Thus, we investigated the simultaneous acquisition of both respiratory and cardiac gating signals using II limb lead mimicking electrode configuration during cardiac PET scans of 11 patients. In addition to conventional static and ECG-gated images, bioimpedance technique was utilized to generate respiratory- and dual-gated images. The ability of the bioimpedance technique to monitor intrathoracic respiratory motion was assessed estimating cardiac displacement between end-inspiration and -expiration. The relevance of dual gating was evaluated in left ventricular volume and myocardial wall thickness measurements. An average 7.6? ± ?3.3?mm respiratory motion was observed in the study population. Dual gating showed a small but significant increase (4?ml, p = 0.042) in left ventricular myocardial volume compared to plain cardiac gating. In addition, a thinner myocardial wall was observed in dual-gated images (9.3? ± ?1.3?mm) compared to cardiac-gated images (11.3? ± ?1.3?mm, p = 0.003). This study shows the feasibility of bioimpedance measurements for dual gating in a clinical setting. The method enables simultaneous acquisition of respiratory and cardiac gating signals using a single device with standard ECG electrodes.

  13. Adaptive detection of missed text areas in OCR outputs: application to the automatic assessment of OCR quality in mass digitization projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Salah, Ahmed; Ragot, Nicolas; Paquet, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    The French National Library (BnF*) has launched many mass digitization projects in order to give access to its collection. The indexation of digital documents on Gallica (digital library of the BnF) is done through their textual content obtained thanks to service providers that use Optical Character Recognition softwares (OCR). OCR softwares have become increasingly complex systems composed of several subsystems dedicated to the analysis and the recognition of the elements in a page. However, the reliability of these systems is always an issue at stake. Indeed, in some cases, we can find errors in OCR outputs that occur because of an accumulation of several errors at different levels in the OCR process. One of the frequent errors in OCR outputs is the missed text components. The presence of such errors may lead to severe defects in digital libraries. In this paper, we investigate the detection of missed text components to control the OCR results from the collections of the French National Library. Our verification approach uses local information inside the pages based on Radon transform descriptors and Local Binary Patterns descriptors (LBP) coupled with OCR results to control their consistency. The experimental results show that our method detects 84.15% of the missed textual components, by comparing the OCR ALTO files outputs (produced by the service providers) to the images of the document.

  14. Cardiac tamponade: atypical presentations after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kirti, Ravi; Karadi, Rangaprasad

    2012-01-01

    We present two cases of cardiac tamponade presenting in the aftermath of cardiac surgery. We have briefly discussed the aetiology, presentation, diagnosis and management of the condition with emphasis on its atypical presentation in postoperative patients. A high index of suspicion and early access to echocardiography is necessary for prompt recognition and treatment of this life threatening emergency. PMID:22860267

  15. Cardiac electrophysiology in mice: a matter of size

    PubMed Central

    Kaese, Sven; Verheule, Sander

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, mouse models have become a popular instrument for studying cardiac arrhythmias. This review assesses in which respects a mouse heart is a miniature human heart, a suitable model for studying mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias in humans and in which respects human and murine hearts differ. Section I considers the issue of scaling of mammalian cardiac (electro) physiology to body mass. Then, we summarize differences between mice and humans in cardiac activation (section II) and the currents underlying the action potential in the murine working myocardium (section III). Changes in cardiac electrophysiology in mouse models of heart disease are briefly outlined in section IV, while section V discusses technical considerations pertaining to recording cardiac electrical activity in mice. Finally, section VI offers general considerations on the influence of cardiac size on the mechanisms of tachy-arrhythmias. PMID:22973235

  16. Open- versus closed-chest cardiac compressions in a canine model of pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Fleisher, G; Sagy, M; Swedlow, D B; Belani, K

    1985-07-01

    Whether or not the principles of adult resuscitation apply to the pediatric population remains unknown. In order to study this issue, a pediatric animal model was developed using puppies 6-12 weeks of age and 2-8 kg in weight. Hemodynamic status was assessed using standard methods, and measured global cerebral blood flow was assessed using the nitrous oxide (Kety-Schmidt) technique after placement of a catheter in the sagittal sinus. In this initial study, five puppies resuscitated with closed-chest cardiac compression (CCCC) were compared with five receiving open-chest cardiac compression (OCCC). Although mean systolic arterial pressures were equal with both methods during resuscitation (40 versus 49 mm Hg, P = 0.19), OCCC produced a greater cardiac output and a higher cerebral blood flow (5 versus 18 ml/100 g/min, P = 0.008). Only one of five dogs treated with CCCC had a blood flow during resuscitation greater than 15 ml/100 g/min, as compared with four of five receiving OCCC. Finally, three of five dogs in the CCCC group experienced liver lacerations, while none who were resuscitated by OCCC sustained any gross visceral injuries. PMID:4004999

  17. Validation of On-Orbit Methodology for the Assessment of Cardiac Function and Changes in the Circulating Volume Using "Braslet-M" Occlusion Cuffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, D. R.; Sargsyan, A. E.; Garcia, K. M.; Ebert, D.; Feiveson, A. H.; Alferova, I. V.; Dulchavsky, S. A.; Matveev, V. P.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Duncan, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The transition to microgravity eliminates the hydrostatic gradients in the vascular system. The resulting fluid redistribution commonly manifests as facial edema, engorgement of the external neck veins, nasal congestion, and headache. This experiment examined the responses to modified Valsalva and Mueller maneuvers as measured by cardiac and vascular ultrasound in a baseline microgravity steady state, and under the influence of thigh occlusion cuffs (Braslet cuffs). METHODS: Nine International Space Station crewmember subjects (Expeditions 16 - 20) were examined in 15 experiment sessions 101 46 days after launch (mean SD; 33 - 185). 27 cardiac and vascular parameters were obtained under three respiratory conditions (baseline, Valsalva, and Mueller) before and after tightening of the Braslet cuffs for a total of 162 data points per session. The quality of cardiac and vascular ultrasound examinations was assured through remote monitoring and guidance by Investigators from the NASA Telescience Center in Houston, TX, USA. RESULTS: Fourteen of the 81 measured conditions were significantly different with Braslet application and were apparently related to cardiac preload reduction or increase in the venous volume sequestered in the lower extremity. These changes represented 10 of the 27 parameters measured. In secondary analysis, 7 of the 27 parameters were found to respond differently to respiratory maneuvers depending on the presence or absence of thigh compression, with a total of 11 differences. CONCLUSIONS: Acute application of Braslet occlusion cuffs causes lower extremity fluid sequestration and exerts proportionate measurable effects on cardiac performance in microgravity. Ultrasound techniques measuring the hemodynamic effects of thigh cuffs in combination with respiratory maneuvers may serve as an effective tool in determining the volume status of a cardiac or hemodynamically compromised patient in microgravity.

  18. Controlled Cardiac Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenglin; Liu, Ying; Wang, Ge

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has been a hot topic for years because of the clinical importance of cardiac diseases and the rapid evolution of CT systems. In this paper, we propose a novel strategy for controlled cardiac CT that may effectively reduce image artifacts due to cardiac and respiratory motions. Our approach is radically different from existing ones and is based on controlling the X-ray source rotation velocity and powering status in reference to the cardiac motion. We theoretically show that by such a control-based intervention the data acquisition process can be optimized for cardiac CT in the cases of periodic and quasiperiodic cardiac motions. Specifically, we formulate the corresponding coordination/control schemes for either exact or approximate matches between the ideal and actual source positions, and report representative simulation results that support our analytic findings. PMID:23165017

  19. Curcumin prevents and reverses murine cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Liang; Liu, Chen; de Couto, Geoffrey; Ouzounian, Maral; Sun, Mei; Wang, Ai-Bing; Huang, Yue; He, Cheng-Wei; Shi, Yu; Chen, Xin; Nghiem, Mai P.; Liu, Youan; Chen, Manyin; Dawood, Fayez; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Maekawa, Yuichiro; Zhang, Liyong; Leask, Andrew; Ghosh, Asish K.; Kirshenbaum, Lorrie A.; Liu, Peter P.

    2008-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling, particularly histone acetylation, plays a critical role in the progression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. We hypothesized that curcumin, a natural polyphenolic compound abundant in the spice turmeric and a known suppressor of histone acetylation, would suppress cardiac hypertrophy through the disruption of p300 histone acetyltransferase–dependent (p300-HAT–dependent) transcriptional activation. We tested this hypothesis using primary cultured rat cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts as well as two well-established mouse models of cardiac hypertrophy. Curcumin blocked phenylephrin-induced (PE-induced) cardiac hypertrophy in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, curcumin both prevented and reversed mouse cardiac hypertrophy induced by aortic banding (AB) and PE infusion, as assessed by heart weight/BW and lung weight/BW ratios, echocardiographic parameters, and gene expression of hypertrophic markers. Further investigation demonstrated that curcumin abrogated histone acetylation, GATA4 acetylation, and DNA-binding activity through blocking p300-HAT activity. Curcumin also blocked AB-induced inflammation and fibrosis through disrupting p300-HAT–dependent signaling pathways. Our results indicate that curcumin has the potential to protect against cardiac hypertrophy, inflammation, and fibrosis through suppression of p300-HAT activity and downstream GATA4, NF-?B, and TGF-?–Smad signaling pathways. PMID:18292803

  20. Inherent force-dependent properties of ?-cardiac myosin contribute to the force-velocity relationship of cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Michael J; Shuman, Henry; Ostap, E Michael

    2014-12-16

    The heart adjusts its power output to meet specific physiological needs through the coordination of several mechanisms, including force-induced changes in contractility of the molecular motor, the ?-cardiac myosin (?CM). Despite its importance in driving and regulating cardiac power output, the effect of force on the contractility of a single ?CM has not been measured. Using single molecule optical-trapping techniques, we found that ?CM has a two-step working stroke. Forces that resist the power stroke slow the myosin-driven contraction by slowing the rate of ADP release, which is the kinetic step that limits fiber shortening. The kinetic properties of ?CM are affected by load, suggesting that the properties of myosin contribute to the force-velocity relationship in intact muscle and play an important role in the regulation of cardiac power output. PMID:25517169

  1. Primary Cardiac Allograft Dysfunction—Validation of a Clinical Definition

    PubMed Central

    Dronavalli, Vamsidhar B.; Rogers, Chris A.; Banner, Nicholas R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart transplantation is an established treatment for advanced heart failure. Primary allograft dysfunction (PGD) is reported in up to 40% of transplants and is associated with a poor outcome. Methods As part of Heart Evaluation and Retrieval for Transplantation study, an investigation of the assessment of donor hearts for transplantation, we proposed a clinical definition for cardiac PGD comprising severely impaired systolic function affecting one or both ventricles accompanied by hypotension, low cardiac output, and high filling pressures occurring in the first 72 hours (in the absence of hyper acute rejection and technical surgical factors, such as cardiac tamponade). Here, we examine the prospective application of this definition to 290 heart transplants. We compared the clinical outcome of PGD and non-PGD cases. Results Ninety-four of 290 transplants developed PGD (32.4%). Inotrope use (score) was higher in the PGD group at 24, 48, and 72 hours after transplantation (P < 0.01). In the PGD group, there was a greater requirement for, intra-aortic balloon pump (50% vs 15%, P < 0.01), mechanical support (27% vs 0%, P < 0.01), and renal replacement therapy (61% vs 26%, P < 0.01). Intensive care stay was longer for recipients with PGD (median 14 vs 5 days, P < 0.01) and early mortality was higher (37% vs 4% at 30 days, 42% vs 8% at 1 year, P < 0.01). Conclusions In conclusion, our definition of PGD could be applied in a national multicenter study, and the cases it defined had more frequent complications and higher mortality. PMID:25742423

  2. The Relationship of Chronic and Momentary Work Stress to Cardiac Reactivity in Women Managers: Feasibility of a Smart PhoneYAssisted Assessment System

    E-print Network

    Shi, Weisong

    ongoing heart rate (HR) and HR-triggered participant reports of momentary stress when HR is elevated, smoking, caffeine, and alcohol use, and for momentary physical activity levels. More importantly, chronic manager, cardiac reactivity, wireless sensor technology, smart phone. BPM = beats per minute; HR = heart

  3. Cardiac-state-driven CT image reconstruction algorithm for cardiac imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesmeli, Erdogan; Edic, Peter M.; Iatrou, Maria; Hsieh, Jiang; Gupta, Rajiv; Pfoh, Armin H.

    2002-05-01

    Multi-slice CT scanners use EKG gating to predict the cardiac phase during slice reconstruction from projection data. Cardiac phase is generally defined with respect to the RR interval. The implicit assumption made is that the duration of events in a RR interval scales linearly when the heart rate changes. Using a more detailed EKG analysis, we evaluate the impact of relaxing this assumption on image quality. We developed a reconstruction algorithm that analyzes the associated EKG waveform to extract the natural cardiac states. A wavelet transform was used to decompose each RR-interval into P, QRS, and T waves. Subsequently, cardiac phase was defined with respect to these waves instead of a percentage or time delay from the beginning or the end of RR intervals. The projection data was then tagged with the cardiac phase and processed using temporal weights that are function of their cardiac phases. Finally, the tagged projection data were combined from multiple cardiac cycles using a multi-sector algorithm to reconstruct images. The new algorithm was applied to clinical data, collected on a 4-slice (GE LightSpeed Qx/i) and 8-slice CT scanner (GE LightSpeed Plus), with heart rates of 40 to 80 bpm. The quality of reconstruction is assessed by the visualization of the major arteries, e.g. RCA, LAD, LC in the reformat 3D images. Preliminary results indicate that Cardiac State Driven reconstruction algorithm offers better image quality than their RR-based counterparts.

  4. Stimulating endogenous cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Amanda; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration, a combination of these approaches could ameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation of multiple cellular players. PMID:26484341

  5. Increase in cardiac myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) alpha protein isoform in hibernating ground squirrels, with echocardiographic visualization of ventricular wall hypertrophy and prolonged contraction

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, O. Lynne; Rourke, Bryan C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Deep hibernators such as golden-mantled ground squirrels (Callospermophilus lateralis) have multiple challenges to cardiac function during low temperature torpor and subsequent arousals. As heart rates fall from over 300 beats min?1 to less than 10, chamber dilation and reduced cardiac output could lead to congestive myopathy. We performed echocardiography on a cohort of individuals prior to and after several months of hibernation. The left ventricular chamber exhibited eccentric and concentric hypertrophy during hibernation and thus calculated ventricular mass was ~30% greater. Ventricular ejection fraction was mildly reduced during hibernation but stroke volumes were greater due to the eccentric hypertrophy and dramatically increased diastolic filling volumes. Globally, the systolic phase in hibernation was ~9.5 times longer, and the diastolic phase was 28× longer. Left atrial ejection generally was not observed during hibernation. Atrial ejection returned weakly during early arousal. Strain echocardiography assessed the velocity and total movement distance of contraction and relaxation for regional ventricular segments in active and early arousal states. Myocardial systolic strain during early arousal was significantly greater than the active state, indicating greater total contractile movement. This mirrored the increased ventricular ejection fraction noted with early arousal. However, strain rates were slower during early arousal than during the active period, particularly systolic strain, which was 33% of active, compared with the rate of diastolic strain, which was 67% of active. As heart rate rose during the arousal period, myocardial velocities and strain rates also increased; this was matched closely by cardiac output. Curiously, though heart rates were only 26% of active heart rates during early arousal, the cardiac output was nearly 40% of the active state, suggesting an efficient pumping system. We further analyzed proportions of cardiac myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) isoforms in a separate cohort of squirrels over 5 months, including time points before hibernation, during hibernation and just prior to emergence. Hibernating individuals were maintained in both a 4°C cold room and a 20°C warm room. Measured by SDS-PAGE, relative percentages of cardiac MyHC alpha were increased during hibernation, at both hibernacula temperatures. A potential increase in contractile speed, and power, from more abundant MyHC alpha may aid force generation at low temperature and at low heart rates. Unlike many models of cardiomyopathies where the alpha isoform is replaced by the beta isoform in order to reduce oxygen consumption, ground squirrels demonstrate a potential cardioprotective mechanism to maintain cardiac output during torpor. PMID:24072796

  6. Cardiac magnetic resonance 'virtual catheterization' for the quantification of valvular regurgitations and cardiac shunt.

    PubMed

    Aquaro, Giovanni Donato; Barison, Andrea; Todiere, Giancarlo; Festa, Pierluigi; Ait-Ali, Lamia; Lombardi, Massimo; Di Bella, Gianluca

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is considered the gold-standard noninvasive technique for the quantification of ventricular volumes by cine-imaging and of vascular flows by velocity-encoded phase contrast (VENC). In routine CMR scans, it is common to found clinical conditions, as valve regurgitations and cardiac shunts, producing a volume overload and significant mismatch between the right and left ventricular stroke volumes (RSV and LSV). In the presence of a valve regurgitation, the volume overload involves the respective ventricular chamber, whereas in cardiac shunts, the location of the volume overload depends on the site of the anatomic defect. Moreover, when a cardiac shunt is present, pulmonary and systemic cardiac outputs are different (Qp/Qs??1), whereas in the presence of valve regurgitation, Qp/Qs?=?1. Therefore, by combining the cine-imaging with the VENC technique, it is possible to investigate the cardiac physiology underlying different pathological conditions producing volume overload, and to quantify this overload (the regurgitant volume and/or shunt volume). In this report, we discussed the technical, theoretical and methodological aspects of this sort of 'virtual catheterization' by CMR, providing a simple algorithm to make the correct diagnosis. PMID:25643193

  7. Cardiac innervation and sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Keiichi; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Ardell, Jeffrey L; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2015-06-01

    Afferent and efferent cardiac neurotransmission via the cardiac nerves intricately modulates nearly all physiological functions of the heart (chronotropy, dromotropy, lusitropy, and inotropy). Afferent information from the heart is transmitted to higher levels of the nervous system for processing (intrinsic cardiac nervous system, extracardiac-intrathoracic ganglia, spinal cord, brain stem, and higher centers), which ultimately results in efferent cardiomotor neural impulses (via the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves). This system forms interacting feedback loops that provide physiological stability for maintaining normal rhythm and life-sustaining circulation. This system also ensures that there is fine-tuned regulation of sympathetic-parasympathetic balance in the heart under normal and stressed states in the short (beat to beat), intermediate (minutes to hours), and long term (days to years). This important neurovisceral/autonomic nervous system also plays a major role in the pathophysiology and progression of heart disease, including heart failure and arrhythmias leading to sudden cardiac death. Transdifferentiation of neurons in heart failure, functional denervation, cardiac and extracardiac neural remodeling has also been identified and characterized during the progression of disease. Recent advances in understanding the cellular and molecular processes governing innervation and the functional control of the myocardium in health and disease provide a rational mechanistic basis for the development of neuraxial therapies for preventing sudden cardiac death and other arrhythmias. Advances in cellular, molecular, and bioengineering realms have underscored the emergence of this area as an important avenue of scientific inquiry and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26044253

  8. The endogenous peptide apelin potently improves cardiac contractility and reduces cardiac loading in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ashley, Euan A.; Powers, Jennifer; Chen, Mary; Kundu, Ramendra; Finsterbach, Tom; Caffarelli, Anthony; Deng, Alicia; Eichhorn, Jens; Mahajan, Raina; Agrawal, Rani; Greve, Joan; Robbins, Robert; Patterson, Andrew J; Bernstein, Daniel; Quertermous, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Objective The endogenous peptide apelin is differentially regulated in cardiovascular disease but the nature of its role in cardiac function remains unclear. Methods We investigated the functional relevance of this pathway using ECG and respiration gated magnetic resonance imaging, conductance catheter pressure-volume hemodynamic measurements, and echocardiography in vivo. In addition, we carried out histology and immunohistochemistry to assess cardiac hypertrophy and to localize apelin and APJ in the adult and embryonic mouse heart. Results Intraperitoneal injection of apelin12 (300µg/kg) resulted in a decrease in left ventricular end diastolic area (pre: 0.122±0.007; post: 0.104±0.005 cm2, p=0.006) and an increase in heart rate (pre: 537±20; post 559±19 beats per minute, p=0.03). Hemodynamic measurements revealed a marked increase in ventricular elastance (pre: 3.7±0.9; post: 6.5±1.4 mmHg/RVU, p=0.018) and preload recruitable stroke work (pre: 27.4±8.0; post: 51.8±3.1, p=0.059) with little change in diastolic parameters following acute infusion of apelin. Chronic infusion (2mg/kg/day) resulted in significant increases in the velocity of circumferential shortening (baseline: 5.36±0.401; 14 days: 6.85±0.358 circ/sec, p=0.049) and cardiac output (baseline: 0.142±0.019; 14 days: 0.25±0.019 l/min, p=0.001) as determined by 15MHz echocardiography. Post mortem corrected heart weights were not different between apelin and saline groups (p=0.5) and histology revealed no evidence of cellular hypertrophy in the apelin group (nuclei per unit area, p=0.9). Immunohistochemistry studies revealed APJ staining of myocardial cells in all regions of the adult mouse heart. Antibody staining, as well as quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction identified expression of both APJ and apelin in embryonic myocardium as early as embryonic day 13.5. Conclusions Apelin reduces left ventricular preload and afterload, and increases contractile reserve without evidence of hypertrophy. These results associate apelin with a positive hemodynamic profile and suggest it as an attractive target for pharmacotherapy in the setting of heart failure. PMID:15621035

  9. New approach for simultaneous respiratory and cardiac motion correction in cardiac PET (NAMC-CPET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mohamed A. A.; Xiao, Peng; Xie, Qingguo

    2015-10-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions are inevitable during the relatively long acquisition time of cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) scan. The correction of the resultant motion blur has become a significant challenge due to recent spatial resolution improvement of the PET scanners. The majority of current motion compensation algorithms are based on gating as a primary step. A new approach based on temporal basis functions is developed to correct respiratory and cardiac motion simultaneously in cardiac PET within the normal scanning time (NAMC-CPET). Simulation and experimental studies are conducted to evaluate and validate the final outputs in comparison to the existing gating methods. A dynamic digital phantom is used to simulate realistic human thorax and abdomen with respiratory and cardiac motions. GATE simulation was run at China National Grid Center to obtain realistic PET data in a reasonable time. Moreover, Tibet minipig experiments were conducted using a preclinical small animal PET scanner developed at HUST to validate the performance of the NAMC-CPET in real data. The results reveal that NAMC-CPET outperformed the existing gating methods (respiratory, cardiac, and dual) in cardiac imaging in term of noise reduction and contrast, especially in short acquisition duration. NAMC-CPET obtained better results in the conducted experiments in terms of contrast and the visibility of the heart. In contrast, the dual gating failed to obtain valuable images in the normal scan time due to the low 18F-FDG uptake. NAMC-CPET is advantageous in the low-statistic situation. The results are promising with great potential implications in cardiac PET imaging in terms of the radioactive dose and scan time reduction.

  10. An updated model for nitrate uptake modelling in plants. II. Assessment of active root involvement in nitrate uptake based on integrated root system age: measured versus modelled outputs

    PubMed Central

    Malagoli, Philippe; Le Deunff, Erwan

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims An updated version of a mechanistic structural–functional model was developed to predict nitrogen (N) uptake throughout the growth cycle by a crop of winter oilseed rape, Brassica napus, grown under field conditions. Methods The functional component of the model derives from a revisited conceptual framework that combines the thermodynamic Flow–Force interpretation of nitrate uptake isotherms and environmental and in planta effects on nitrate influx. Estimation of the root biomass (structural component) is based upon a combination of root mapping along the soil depth profile in the field and a relationship between the specific root length and external nitrate concentration. The root biomass contributing actively to N uptake was determined by introduction of an integrated root system age that allows assignment of a root absorption capacity at a specific age of the root. Key Results Simulations were well matched to measured data of N taken up under field conditions for three levels of N fertilization. The model outputs indicated that the two topsoil layers (0–30 and 30–60 cm) contained 75–88 % of the total root length and biomass, and accounted for 90–95 % of N taken up at harvest. Conclusions This conceptual framework provides a model of nitrate uptake that is able to respond to external nitrate fluctuations at both functional and structural levels. PMID:24709791

  11. Assessment of cardiac safety during fingolimod treatment initiation in a real-world relapsing multiple sclerosis population: a phase 3b, open-label study.

    PubMed

    Gold, Ralf; Comi, Giancarlo; Palace, Jacqueline; Siever, Arno; Gottschalk, Rebecca; Bijarnia, Mahendra; von Rosenstiel, Philipp; Tomic, Davorka; Kappos, Ludwig

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate short-term safety and tolerability of fingolimod in a real-world population with relapsing multiple sclerosis, focusing on cardiac safety during treatment initiation. Patients received fingolimod 0.5 mg once daily for four months. Patients excluded from the pivotal studies with certain pre-existing cardiac conditions or baseline cardiac findings (PCCs), and those receiving beta blockers (BBs) and/or calcium channel blockers (CCBs), were eligible. Heart rate (HR) and electrical conduction events were monitored using ambulatory electrocardiography for at least 6 h after the first dose. Of 2,417 enrolled patients, 2,282 (94.4 %) completed the study. Fingolimod initiation was associated with a transient, mostly asymptomatic decrease in HR. Bradycardia adverse events occurred in 0.6 % of patients and were more frequent in individuals receiving BBs/CCBs (3.3 %) than in other patient subgroups (0.5-1.4 %); most events were asymptomatic, and all patients recovered without pharmacological intervention. In the 6 h post-dose, the incidences of Mobitz type I second-degree atrioventricular block (AVB) and 2:1 AVB were higher in patients with PCCs (4.1 and 2.0 %, respectively) than in those without (0.9 and 0.3 %, respectively); at pre-dose screening, patients with PCCs had the same incidence of Mobitz type I second-degree AVB (4.1 %) and a slightly lower incidence of 2:1 AVB (0.7 %) than 6 h post-dose. All recorded conduction abnormalities were asymptomatic. This study adds to the evidence showing that cardiac effects during fingolimod initiation remain consistent with those known from previous, controlled studies, even if patients with PCCs are included. PMID:24221641

  12. Expression of SGLT1 in Human Hearts and Impairment of Cardiac Glucose Uptake by Phlorizin during Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Yusuke; Nagoshi, Tomohisa; Yoshino, Takuya; Tanaka, Toshikazu D.; Ito, Keiichi; Harada, Tohru; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Ikegami, Masahiro; Anzawa, Ryuko; Yoshimura, Michihiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective Sodium-glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) is thought to be expressed in the heart as the dominant isoform of cardiac SGLT, although more information is required to delineate the subtypes of SGLTs in human hearts. Moreover, the functional role of SGLTs in the heart remains to be fully elucidated. We herein investigated whether SGLT1 is expressed in human hearts and whether SGLTs significantly contribute to cardiac energy metabolism during ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) via enhanced glucose utilization in mice. Methods and Results We determined that SGLT1 was highly expressed in both human autopsied hearts and murine perfused hearts, as assessed by immunostaining and immunoblotting with membrane fractionation. To test the functional significance of the substantial expression of SGLTs in the heart, we studied the effects of a non-selective SGLT inhibitor, phlorizin, on the baseline cardiac function and its response to ischemia-reperfusion using the murine Langendorff model. Although phlorizin perfusion did not affect baseline cardiac function, its administration during IRI significantly impaired the recovery in left ventricular contractions and rate pressure product, associated with an increased infarct size, as demonstrated by triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining and creatine phosphokinase activity released into the perfusate. The onset of ischemic contracture, which indicates the initiation of ATP depletion in myocardium, was earlier with phlorizin. Consistent with this finding, there was a significant decrease in the tissue ATP content associated with reductions in glucose uptake, as well as lactate output (indicating glycolytic flux), during ischemia-reperfusion in the phlorizin-perfused hearts. Conclusions Cardiac SGLTs, possibly SGLT1 in particular, appear to provide an important protective mechanism against IRI by replenishing ATP stores in ischemic cardiac tissues via enhancing availability of glucose. The present findings provide new insight into the significant role of SGLTs in optimizing cardiac energy metabolism, at least during the acute phase of IRI. PMID:26121582

  13. Diodes stabilize LED output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deters, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Small-signal diodes are placed in series with light-emitting diodes (LED's) to stabilize LED output against temperature fluctuations. Simple inexpensive method compensates for thermal fluctuations over a broad temperature range. Requiring few components, technique is particularly useful where circuit-board space is limited.

  14. Development lifts Egyptian output

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    Oil revenue is now the largest source of foreign exchange for the Arab Republic of Egypt, and, as such, is of vital importance to the country's plans for industrial and social development. Last year oil exports earned Egypt $2.9 billion, playing a key role in keeping the nation's economy in the black. Oil production in 1980 averaged 585,000 bpd, up from 510,000 bpd in 1979. This year oil output should average 650,000 bpd. While output is increasing, it does not appear to be doing so at a sufficient rate to meet the 1984 government target of 1 million bpd. However, the oil industry view in Egypt is that this target is achievable, though not until the mid to late 1980s. Development work scheduled for completion by 1984 only seems set to lift output to between 750,000 and 800,000 bpd. At the same time, if expansions plans for gas production are taken into account, then total hydrocarbon output measured in oil equivalents will not be too far short of the 1-million-bpd figure.

  15. AN INTEGRATEDMICROELECTROMECHANICALRESONANT OUTPUT GYROSCOPE -

    E-print Network

    Chen, Zhongping

    AN INTEGRATEDMICROELECTROMECHANICALRESONANT OUTPUT GYROSCOPE - Ashwin A. Seshia*,Roger T. Howe vibratory rate gyroscope based on resonant sensing of the Coriolis force. The new design has several advantages over rate gyroscopes that utilize open-loop displacement sensing for rotation rate measurement

  16. Functional cardiac magnetic resonance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brau, Anja Christina Sophie

    2003-07-01

    The study of small animal models of human cardiovascular disease is critical to our understanding of the origin, progression, and treatment of this pervasive disease. Complete analysis of disease pathophysiology in these animal models requires measuring structural and functional changes at the level of the whole heart---a task for which an appropriate non-invasive imaging method is needed. The purpose of this work was thus to develop an imaging technique to support in vivo characterization of cardiac structure and function in rat and mouse models of cardiovascular disease. Whereas clinical cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides accurate assessment of the human heart, the extension of cardiac MRI from humans to rodents presents several formidable scaling challenges. Acquiring images of the mouse heart with organ definition and fluidity of contraction comparable to that achieved in humans requires an increase in spatial resolution by a factor of 3000 and an increase in temporal resolution by a factor of ten. No single technical innovation can meet the demanding imaging requirements imposed by the small animal. A functional cardiac magnetic resonance microscopy technique was developed by integrating improvements in physiological control, imaging hardware, biological synchronization of imaging, and pulse sequence design to achieve high-quality images of the murine heart with high spatial and temporal resolution. The specific methods and results from three different sets of imaging experiments are presented: (1) 2D functional imaging in the rat with spatial resolution of 175 mum2 x 1 mm and temporal resolution of 10 ms; (2) 3D functional imaging in the rat with spatial resolution of 100 mum 2 x 500 mum and temporal resolution of 30 ms; and (3) 2D functional imaging in the mouse with spatial resolution down to 100 mum2 x 1 mm and temporal resolution of 10 ms. The cardiac microscopy technique presented here represents a novel collection of technologies capable of acquiring routine high-quality images of murine cardiac structure and function with minimal artifacts and markedly higher spatial resolution compared to conventional techniques. This work is poised to serve a valuable role in the evaluation of cardiovascular disease and should find broad application in studies ranging from basic pathophysiology to drug discovery.

  17. [Cardiac involvement in polymyositis].

    PubMed

    Romdhane, M B; Mahdhaoui, A; Khelifa, M B; Lagren, A; Hajri, S E; Bouraoui, H; Trimeche, B; Ghannouchi, N; Jeridi, G; Bahri, F

    2012-08-01

    Cardiovascular involvement in polymyositis constitutes a major cause of death. However, the cardiac location is rarely symptomatic and does not usually represent the principle clinical feature at the time of the initial presentation. We present here an unusual case of polymyositis with severe and polymorph cardiac disturbances that predominant the muscular signs. PMID:20709312

  18. An electricity-focused economic input-output model: Life-cycle assessment and policy implications of future electricity generation scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marriott, Joe

    The electricity industry is extremely important to both our economy and our environment. We would like to be able to examine the economic, environmental and policy implications of both future electricity scenarios which include advanced generation technologies such as gasified coal, and of the products and processes which will use them, along with the interaction of this industry with the rest of the economy. This work builds upon an existing economic input-output framework, by adding detail about the electricity industry, specifically by differentiating among the various functions of the sector, and the different means of generating power. The mix of electricity consumed at any stage in the life-cycle of a product, process or industrial sector has a significant effect on the associated inventory of emissions. Fossil fuel or nuclear generators, large-scale hydroelectric, and renewable options such as geothermal, wind and solar each have a unique set of issues---both in the production of electricity at the plant and throughout the supply chain. Decision makers need better information regarding the environmental and economic impact of the electricity industry, including full supply chain details---the interaction of the electricity industry with the other 500 sectors of the economy. A systematic method for creating updated state level and sector generation mixes is developed. The results show that most sector mixes are very close to the U.S. average due to geographic dispersion of industries, but that some sectors are different, and they tend to be important raw material extraction or primary manufacturing industries. We then build a flexible framework for creating new sectors, supply chains and emission factors for the generation, transmission and distribution portions of the electricity industry. We look at scenarios of the present and future, for electricity and for particular products, and develop results which show environmental impacts split up by generation type, and with full supply chain detail. For analyses of the current electricity system and products, economic and environmental results match well with external verification sources, but for analyses of the future, there is significant uncertainty.

  19. Functional cardiac tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liau, Brian; Zhang, Donghui; Bursac, Nenad

    2013-01-01

    Heart attack remains the leading cause of death in both men and women worldwide. Stem cell-based therapies, including the use of engineered cardiac tissues, have the potential to treat the massive cell loss and pathological remodeling resulting from heart attack. Specifically, embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells are a promising source for generation of therapeutically relevant numbers of functional cardiomyocytes and engineering of cardiac tissues in vitro. This review will describe methodologies for successful differentiation of pluripotent stem cells towards the cardiovascular cell lineages as they pertain to the field of cardiac tissue engineering. The emphasis will be placed on comparing the functional maturation in engineered cardiac tissues and developing heart and on methods to quantify cardiac electrical and mechanical function at different spatial scales. PMID:22397609

  20. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... prescribed exercise, cardiac risk factor modification, psychosocial assessment, and outcomes assessment... the program and at the end of the program. (ii) Objective clinical measures of exercise performance... osteopathy as defined in section 1861(r)(1) of the Act. Physician-prescribed exercise means aerobic...

  1. Assessment of a Multiple Model Based Parametric Method for Output-Only Vibration-Based Damage Detection for a Population of Like Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vamvoudakis-Stefanou, Kyriakos J.; Sakellariou, John S.; Fassois, Spilios D.

    2015-07-01

    This study focuses on the problem of vibration-based damage detection for a population of like structures. Although nominally identical, like structures exhibit variability in their characteristics due to variability in the materials and manufacturing. This inevitably leads to variability in the dynamics, which may be so significant as to mask deviations due to damage. Damage detection via conventional vibration-based methods, using a common threshold in the decision making mechanism thus becomes highly challenging. The study presents a detailed assessment of a recently introduced Multiple Model (MM) based AutoRegressive (AR) model parameter method aiming at addressing this problem. The assessment is based on high numbers of experimental test/inspection cases using composite beams damaged via impact, as well as comparisons with the corresponding conventional (single model based) method. The results confirm significant improvement over the method's conventional counterpart. A sensitivity analysis additionally indicates that the method is relatively insensitive to the model order, but sensitive to the specific beams selected as baseline (training) ones; in fact their selection may lead to excellent results.

  2. Liver Abnormalities in Cardiac Diseases and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Alicia M.; Mukherjee, Debabrata

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is characterized by the inability of systemic perfusion to meet the body's metabolic demands and is usually caused by cardiac pump dysfunction and may occasionally present with symptoms of a noncardiac disorder such as hepatic dysfunction. The primary pathophysiology involved in hepatic dysfunction from HF is either passive congestion from increased filling pressures or low cardiac output and the consequences of impaired perfusion. Passive hepatic congestion due to increased central venous pressure may cause elevations of liver enzymes and both direct and indirect serum bilirubin. Impaired perfusion from decreased cardiac output may be associated with acute hepatocellular necrosis with marked elevations in serum aminotransferases. Cardiogenic ischemic hepatitis (“shock liver”) may ensue following an episode of profound hypotension in patients with acute HF. We discuss pathophysiology and identification of liver abnormalities that are commonly seen in patients with HF. PMID:22942628

  3. Micromolded gelatin hydrogels for extended culture of engineered cardiac tissues

    E-print Network

    Parker, Kevin Kit

    Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Cardiotoxicity is a leading cause of market withdrawal- diotoxicity is usually identified in animal models, such as mice [5,6] or dogs [7], that are exposed of cardiac output. Furthermore, studies with animals and animal cells are not always relevant to humans due

  4. [Cardiac involvement in systemic autoimmune disease].

    PubMed

    Dropi?ski, Jerzy; Szczeklik, Wojciech; Rubi?, Pawe?

    2003-04-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases form a diverse group which includes: systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), scleroderma, dermato-polymyositis, Wegener's granulomatosis, Sjögren syndrome. Although multisystem involvement is the hallmark of these diseases, the heart seems to be less affected than other organ systems. The aim of the study was to study possible cardiac abnormalities in patients with documented systemic autoimmune diseases and to assess whether there was any relation between antiphospholipid, anti-dsDNA antibodies and myocardial dysfunction findings. 76 patients (53 with SLE, 9 with MCTD, 8 with scleroderma, 6 with Wegener's granulomatosis) were subjected to our study, 69% of these patients manifested cardiac involvement, based on two-dimentional echocardiografic examination (36%--post-inflammatory valvular thickening, 20%--pericardial effusions, 15%--valvular regurgitation, 7%--left atrial enlargement, 5%--left ventricular hypertrophy, 4%--left ventricular dysfunction). None of the patients showed characteristic, acute Libman-Sacks endocarditis, which probably can be explained by chronic corticosteroid-treatment. Clinical evidence of cardiac abnormalities has been observed, in as many as 58% of cases with positive echocardiographic findings. The frequency and extend of cardiac pathology positively correlated with the detection of antiphospholipid antibodies. No such relationship was observed in patients with the presence of very high titers of antinuclear antibodies (anti-dsDNA). In conclusion, our results indicate that echocardiography is a useful method for assessment and monitoring cardiac involvement in the systemic autoimmune diseases. PMID:12931489

  5. Cardiac Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Although not available to all patients with narrowed arteries, balloon angioplasty has expanded dramatically since its introduction with an estimated further growth to 562,000 procedures in the U.S. alone by 1992. Growth has fueled demand for higher quality imaging systems that allow the cardiologist to be more accurate and increase the chances of a successful procedure. A major advance is the Digital Cardiac Imaging (DCI) System designed by Philips Medical Systems International, Best, The Netherlands and marketed in the U.S. by Philips Medical Systems North America Company. The key benefit is significantly improved real-time imaging and the ability to employ image enhancement techniques to bring out added details. Using a cordless control unit, the cardiologist can manipulate images to make immediate assessment, compare live x-ray and roadmap images by placing them side-by-side on monitor screens, or compare pre-procedure and post procedure conditions. The Philips DCI improves the cardiologist's precision by expanding the information available to him.

  6. Climate Model Output Rewriter

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-06-21

    CMOR comprises a set of FORTRAN 90 dunctions that can be used to produce CF-compliant netCDF files. The structure of the files created by CMOR and the metadata they contain fulfill the requirements of many of the climate community?s standard model experiments (which are referred to here as "MIPS", which stands for "model intercomparison project", including, for example, AMIP, CMIP, CFMIP, PMIP, APE, and IPCC scenario runs), CMOR was not designed to serve as anmore »all-purpose wfiter of CF-compliant netCDF files, but simply to reduce the effort required to prepare and manage MIP data. Although MIPs encourage systematic analysis of results across models, this is only easy to do if the model output is written in a common format with files structured similarly and with sufficient metadata uniformly stored according to a common standard. Individual modeling groups store their data in different ways. but if a group can read its own data with FORTRAN, then it should easily be able to transform the data, using CMOR, into the common format required by the MIPs, The adoption of CMOR as a standard code for exchanging climate data will facilitate participation in MIPs because after learning how to satisfy the output requirements of one MIP, it will be easy to prepare output for the other MIPs.« less

  7. Assessment of radiochromic gel dosimeter based on Turnbull Blue dye for relative output factor measurements of the Leksell Gamma Knife® PerfexionTM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozubikova, P.; Solc, J.; Novotny, J., Jr.; Pilarova, K.; Pipek, J.; Koncekova, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to perform assessment of radiochromic gel dosimeter based on Turnbull blue dye formed by irradiation (TB gel dosimeter) for measurement of ROFs for 4 mm and 8 mm collimators for the Leksell Gamma Knife PerfexionTM. All measurements have been carried out using home-made spherical Perspex glass phantom of diameter 160 mm. TB gel dosimeters were scanned using homemade optical CT scanner. The results are compared with vendor recommended Monte Carlo calculated ROFs values of 0.814 and 0.900 for 4 mm and 8 mm collimators, respectively. The comparisons between the gel measurements and the treatment planning system (TPS) calculation are presented in the form of 2D isodoses for the central slices and 1D profile. Measured ROF 0.746 and 0.874 for 4 mm and 8 mm collimators respectively are in a reasonable agreement with vendor recommended values and measured relative dose distribution in a central slice and measured profiles of all shots show excellent correspondence with TPS.

  8. Quantitative assessment of brain tissue oxygenation in porcine models of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation using hyperspectral near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfabadi, Shahin S.; Toronov, Vladislav; Ramadeen, Andrew; Hu, Xudong; Kim, Siwook; Dorian, Paul; Hare, Gregory M. T.

    2014-03-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a non-invasive tool to measure real-time tissue oxygenation in the brain. In an invasive animal experiment we were able to directly compare non-invasive NIRS measurements on the skull with invasive measurements directly on the brain dura matter. We used a broad-band, continuous-wave hyper-spectral approach to measure tissue oxygenation in the brain of pigs under the conditions of cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and defibrillation. An additional purpose of this research was to find a correlation between mortality due to cardiac arrest and inadequacy of the tissue perfusion during attempts at resuscitation. Using this technique we measured the changes in concentrations of oxy-hemoglobin [HbO2] and deoxy-hemoglobin [HHb] to quantify the tissue oxygenation in the brain. We also extracted cytochrome c oxidase changes ?[Cyt-Ox] under the same conditions to determine increase or decrease in cerebral oxygen delivery. In this paper we proved that applying CPR, [HbO2] concentration and tissue oxygenation in the brain increase while [HHb] concentration decreases which was not possible using other measurement techniques. We also discovered a similar trend in changes of both [Cyt-Ox] concentration and tissue oxygen saturation (StO2). Both invasive and non-invasive measurements showed similar results.

  9. Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Guyette, Francis X; Reynolds, Joshua C; Frisch, Adam

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac arrest is a dynamic disease that tests the multitasking and leadership abilities of emergency physicians. Providers must simultaneously manage the logistics of resuscitation while searching for the cause of cardiac arrest. The astute clinician will also realize that he or she is orchestrating only one portion of a larger series of events, each of which directly affects patient outcomes. Resuscitation science is rapidly evolving, and emergency providers must be familiar with the latest evidence and controversies surrounding resuscitative techniques. This article reviews evidence, discusses controversies, and offers strategies to provide quality cardiac arrest resuscitation. PMID:26226873

  10. Cardiac tumors: leiomyosarcoma – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Syska-Sumi?ska, Joanna; Zieli?ski, Piotr; D?u?niewski, Miros?aw; Sadowski, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    We present a case report of a 60-year-old woman with a long history of leiomyosarcoma in different locations. She was admitted to the clinic due to a left ventricular tumor diagnosed in ECHO examination. The patient was qualified for radical tumor resection. The early postoperative period was complicated due to low cardiac output syndrome and bradyarrhythmia requiring temporary cardiac pacing. Optimized pharmacological therapy resulted in a gradual reduction of symptoms and a clinical improvement of congestive heart failure (NYHA III – NYHA II). Due to the radical nature of the surgery, the patient was not referred for supplementary treatment. The follow-up currently exceeds 12 months – no new metastases have been found. This case provides an example of how to diagnose and treat heart tumors. PMID:26702284

  11. Cardiac function of the naked mole-rat: ecophysiological responses to working underground

    PubMed Central

    Grimes, Kelly M.; Voorhees, Andrew; Chiao, Ying Ann; Han, Hai-Chao; Lindsey, Merry L.

    2013-01-01

    The naked mole-rat (NMR) is a strictly subterranean rodent with a low resting metabolic rate. Nevertheless, it can greatly increase its metabolic activity to meet the high energetic demands associated with digging through compacted soils in its xeric natural habitat where food is patchily distributed. We hypothesized that the NMR heart would naturally have low basal function and exhibit a large cardiac reserve, thereby mirroring the species' low basal metabolism and large metabolic scope. Echocardiography showed that young (2–4 yr old) healthy NMRs have low fractional shortening (28 ± 2%), ejection fraction (43 ± 2%), and cardiac output (6.5 ± 0.4 ml/min), indicating low basal cardiac function. Histology revealed large NMR cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area (216 ± 10 ?m2) and cardiac collagen deposition of 2.2 ± 0.4%. Neither of these histomorphometric traits was considered pathological, since biaxial tensile testing showed no increase in passive ventricular stiffness. NMR cardiomyocyte fibers showed a low degree of rotation, contributing to the observed low NMR cardiac contractility. Interestingly, when the exercise mimetic dobutamine (3 ?g/g ip) was administered, NMRs showed pronounced increases in fractional shortening, ejection fraction, cardiac output, and stroke volume, indicating an increased cardiac reserve. The relatively low basal cardiac function and enhanced cardiac reserve of NMRs are likely to be ecophysiological adaptations to life in an energetically taxing environment. PMID:24363308

  12. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cardiac Arrest ( SCA ) occurs when the heart stops beating, abruptly and without warning. If this happens, blood ... when SCA occurs. During SCA , the heart stops beating and no blood is pumped to the rest ...

  13. Cardiac ablation procedures

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for performing cardiac ablation: Radiofrequency ablation uses heat energy to eliminate the problem area. Cryoablation uses very ... is used to send electrical (or sometimes cold) energy to the problem area. This creates a small ...

  14. Cardiac tissue engineering using perfusion bioreactor systems

    PubMed Central

    Radisic, Milica; Marsano, Anna; Maidhof, Robert; Wang, Yadong; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    This protocol describes tissue engineering of synchronously contractile cardiac constructs by culturing cardiac cell populations on porous scaffolds (in some cases with an array of channels) and bioreactors with perfusion of culture medium (in some cases supplemented with an oxygen carrier). The overall approach is ‘biomimetic’ in nature as it tends to provide in vivo-like oxygen supply to cultured cells and thereby overcome inherent limitations of diffusional transport in conventional culture systems. In order to mimic the capillary network, cells are cultured on channeled elastomer scaffolds that are perfused with culture medium that can contain oxygen carriers. The overall protocol takes 2–4 weeks, including assembly of the perfusion systems, preparation of scaffolds, cell seeding and cultivation, and on-line and end-point assessment methods. This model is well suited for a wide range of cardiac tissue engineering applications, including the use of human stem cells, and high-fidelity models for biological research. PMID:18388955

  15. Declarative Output by Ordering Text Pieces 1 Declarative Output by

    E-print Network

    Brass, Stefan

    Brass University of Halle, Germany Stefan Brass ICLP 2011 #12;Declarative Output by Ordering Text Pieces and important part. Stefan Brass ICLP 2011 #12;Declarative Output by Ordering Text Pieces 3 Motivation (2) Aren). Stefan Brass ICLP 2011 #12;Declarative Output by Ordering Text Pieces 4 Motivation (3) Problems

  16. Influence of Cardiac Decentralization on Cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Kingma, John G.; Simard, Denys; Voisine, Pierre; Rouleau, Jacques R.

    2013-01-01

    The role of cardiac nerves on development of myocardial tissue injury after acute coronary occlusion remains controversial. We investigated whether acute cardiac decentralization (surgical) modulates coronary flow reserve and myocardial protection in preconditioned dogs subject to ischemia-reperfusion. Experiments were conducted on four groups of anesthetised, open-chest dogs (n?=?32): 1- controls (CTR, intact cardiac nerves), 2- ischemic preconditioning (PC; 4 cycles of 5-min IR), 3- cardiac decentralization (CD) and 4- CD+PC; all dogs underwent 60-min coronary occlusion and 180-min reperfusion. Coronary blood flow and reactive hyperemic responses were assessed using a blood volume flow probe. Infarct size (tetrazolium staining) was related to anatomic area at risk and coronary collateral blood flow (microspheres) in the anatomic area at risk. Post-ischemic reactive hyperemia and repayment-to-debt ratio responses were significantly reduced for all experimental groups; however, arterial perfusion pressure was not affected. Infarct size was reduced in CD dogs (18.6±4.3; p?=?0.001, data are mean±1SD) compared to 25.2±5.5% in CTR dogs and was less in PC dogs as expected (13.5±3.2 vs. 25.2±5.5%; p?=?0.001); after acute CD, PC protection was conserved (11.6±3.4 vs. 18.6±4.3%; p?=?0.02). In conclusion, our findings provide strong evidence that myocardial protection against ischemic injury can be preserved independent of extrinsic cardiac nerve inputs. PMID:24236106

  17. Cardiac Applications of Optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, Christina M.; Klimas, Aleksandra; Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    In complex multicellular systems, such as the brain or the heart, the ability to selectively perturb and observe the response of individual components at the cellular level and with millisecond resolution in time, is essential for mechanistic understanding of function. Optogenetics uses genetic encoding of light sensitivity (by the expression of microbial opsins) to provide such capabilities for manipulation, recording, and control by light with cell specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. As an optical approach, it is inherently scalable for remote and parallel interrogation of biological function at the tissue level; with implantable miniaturized devices, the technique is uniquely suitable for in vivo tracking of function, as illustrated by numerous applications in the brain. Its expansion into the cardiac area has been slow. Here, using examples from published research and original data, we focus on optogenetics applications to cardiac electrophysiology, specifically dealing with the ability to manipulate membrane voltage by light with implications for cardiac pacing, cardioversion, cell communication, and arrhythmia research, in general. We discuss gene and cell delivery methods of inscribing light sensitivity in cardiac tissue, functionality of the light-sensitive ion channels within different types of cardiac cells, utility in probing electrical coupling between different cell types, approaches and design solutions to all-optical electrophysiology by the combination of optogenetic sensors and actuators, and specific challenges in moving towards in vivo cardiac optogenetics. PMID:25035999

  18. Cardiac applications of optogenetics.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Christina M; Klimas, Aleksandra; Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-08-01

    In complex multicellular systems, such as the brain or the heart, the ability to selectively perturb and observe the response of individual components at the cellular level and with millisecond resolution in time, is essential for mechanistic understanding of function. Optogenetics uses genetic encoding of light sensitivity (by the expression of microbial opsins) to provide such capabilities for manipulation, recording, and control by light with cell specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. As an optical approach, it is inherently scalable for remote and parallel interrogation of biological function at the tissue level; with implantable miniaturized devices, the technique is uniquely suitable for in vivo tracking of function, as illustrated by numerous applications in the brain. Its expansion into the cardiac area has been slow. Here, using examples from published research and original data, we focus on optogenetics applications to cardiac electrophysiology, specifically dealing with the ability to manipulate membrane voltage by light with implications for cardiac pacing, cardioversion, cell communication, and arrhythmia research, in general. We discuss gene and cell delivery methods of inscribing light sensitivity in cardiac tissue, functionality of the light-sensitive ion channels within different types of cardiac cells, utility in probing electrical coupling between different cell types, approaches and design solutions to all-optical electrophysiology by the combination of optogenetic sensors and actuators, and specific challenges in moving towards in vivo cardiac optogenetics. PMID:25035999

  19. Diagnostic Performance of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Echocardiography in Evaluation of Cardiac and Paracardiac Masses.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rima; Lim, Ruth P; Saric, Muhamed; Nayar, Ambika; Babb, James; Ettel, Mark; Axel, Leon; Srichai, Monvadi B

    2016-01-01

    Echocardiography is the preferred initial imaging method for assessment of cardiac masses. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging, with its excellent tissue characterization and wide field of view, may provide additional unique information. We evaluated the predictive value of echocardiography and CMR imaging parameters to identify tumors and malignancy and to provide histopathologic diagnosis of cardiac masses. Fifty patients who underwent CMR evaluation of a cardiac mass with subsequent histopathologic diagnosis were identified. Echocardiography was available in 44 of 50 cases (88%). Echocardiographic and CMR characteristics were evaluated for predictive value in distinguishing tumor versus nontumor and malignant versus nonmalignant lesions using histopathology as the gold standard. The Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to compare the 2 imaging methods' ability to provide the correct histopathologic diagnosis. Parameters associated with tumor included location outside the right atrium, T2 hyperintensity, and contrast enhancement. Parameters associated with malignancy included location outside the cardiac chambers, nonmobility, pericardial effusion, myocardial invasion, and contrast enhancement. CMR identified 6 masses missed on transthoracic echocardiography (4 of which were outside the heart) and provided significantly more correct histopathologic diagnoses compared to echocardiography (77% vs 43%, p <0.0001). In conclusion, CMR offers the advantage of identifying paracardiac masses and providing crucial information on histopathology of cardiac masses. PMID:26552505

  20. Cardiac ferroportin regulates cellular iron homeostasis and is important for cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Lakhal-Littleton, Samira; Wolna, Magda; Carr, Carolyn A.; Miller, Jack J. J.; Christian, Helen C.; Ball, Vicky; Santos, Ana; Diaz, Rebeca; Biggs, Daniel; Stillion, Richard; Holdship, Philip; Clarke, Kieran; Davies, Benjamin; Robbins, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential to the cell. Both iron deficiency and overload impinge negatively on cardiac health. Thus, effective iron homeostasis is important for cardiac function. Ferroportin (FPN), the only known mammalian iron-exporting protein, plays an essential role in iron homeostasis at the systemic level. It increases systemic iron availability by releasing iron from the cells of the duodenum, spleen, and liver, the sites of iron absorption, recycling, and storage respectively. However, FPN is also found in tissues with no known role in systemic iron handling, such as the heart, where its function remains unknown. To explore this function, we generated mice with a cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of Fpn. We show that these animals have severely impaired cardiac function, with a median survival of 22 wk, despite otherwise unaltered systemic iron status. We then compared their phenotype with that of ubiquitous hepcidin knockouts, a recognized model of the iron-loading disease hemochromatosis. The phenotype of the hepcidin knockouts was far milder, with normal survival up to 12 mo, despite far greater iron loading in the hearts. Histological examination demonstrated that, although cardiac iron accumulates within the cardiomyocytes of Fpn knockouts, it accumulates predominantly in other cell types in the hepcidin knockouts. We conclude, first, that cardiomyocyte FPN is essential for intracellular iron homeostasis and, second, that the site of deposition of iron within the heart determines the severity with which it affects cardiac function. Both findings have significant implications for the assessment and treatment of cardiac complications of iron dysregulation. PMID:25713362

  1. Microfabricated perfusable cardiac biowire: a platform that mimics native cardiac bundle

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yun; Zhang, Boyang; Liu, Haijiao; Miklas, Jason W.; Gagliardi, Mark; Pahnke, Aric; Thavandiran, Nimalan; Sun, Yu; Simmons, Craig; Keller, Gordon; Radisic, Milica

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering enables the generation of three-dimensional (3D) functional cardiac tissue for pre-clinical testing in vitro, which is critical for new drug development. However, current tissue engineering methods poorly recapitulate the architecture of oriented cardiac bundles with supporting capillaries. In this study, we designed a microfabricated bioreactor to generate 3D micro-tissues, termed biowires, using both primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes and human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derived cardiomyocytes. Perfusable cardiac biowires were generated with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tubing template, and were integrated with electrical field stimulation using carbon rod electrodes. To demonstrate the feasibility of this platform for pharmaceutical testing, nitric oxide (NO) was released from perfused sodium nitroprusside (SNP) solution and diffused through the tubing. The NO treatment slowed down the spontaneous beating of cardiac biowires based on hESC derived cardiomyocytes and degraded the myofibrillar cytoskeleton of the cardiomyocytes within the biowires. The biowires were also integrated with electrical stimulation using carbon rod electrodes to further improve phenotype of cardiomyocytes, as indicated by organized contractile apparatus, higher Young`s modulus, and improved electrical properties. This microfabricated platform provides a unique opportunity to assess pharmacological effects on cardiac tissue in vitro by perfusion in a cardiac bundle model, which could provide improved physiological relevance. PMID:24352498

  2. The role of cardiac sympathetic innervation and skin thermoreceptors on cardiac responses during heat stress.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Manabu; Umemoto, Yasunori; Kinoshita, Tokio; Kouda, Ken; Ito, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Takeshi; Crandall, Craig G; Tajima, Fumihiro

    2015-06-01

    The mechanism(s) for the changes in cardiac function during heat stress remain unknown. This study tested two unique hypotheses. First, sympathetic innervation to the heart is required for increases in cardiac systolic function during heat stress. This was accomplished by comparing responses during heat stress between paraplegics versus tetraplegics, with tetraplegics having reduced/absent cardiac sympathetic innervation. Second, stimulation of skin thermoreceptors contributes to cardiovascular adjustments that occur during heat stress in humans. This was accomplished by comparing responses during leg only heating between paraplegic versus able-bodied individuals. Nine healthy able-bodied, nine paraplegics, and eight tetraplegics participated in this study. Lower body (i.e., nonsensed area for para/tetraplegics) was heated until esophageal temperature had increased by ~1.0°C. Echocardiographic indexes of diastolic and systolic function were performed before and at the end of heat stress. The heat stress increased cardiac output in all groups, but the magnitude of this increase was attenuated in the tetraplegics relative to the able-bodied (1.3 ± 0.4 vs. 2.3 ± 1.0 l/min; P < 0.05). Diastolic function was maintained in all groups. Indexes of left atrial and ventricular systolic function were enhanced in the able-bodied, but did not change in tetraplegics, while these changes in paraplegics were attenuated relative to the able-bodied. These data suggest that the cardiac sympathetic innervation is required to achieve normal increases in cardiac systolic function during heat stress but not required to maintain diastolic function during this exposure. Second, elevated systolic function during heat stress primarily occurs as a result of increases in internal temperature, although stimulation of skin thermoreceptors may contribute. PMID:25795714

  3. A Search for Mental Health Output Measures

    PubMed Central

    Black, Gordon C.; Saveanu, Traian I.

    1980-01-01

    This paper is a summary of our initial efforts to identify mental health output measures: (1) for estimating change in mental health status (incidence and prevalence) in a given population, (2) for use in monitoring, planning, evaluating and/or assessing quality of programs; and (3) possibly for use in controlling mental health costs. This preliminary work is centered on the concept that routinely generated operational data can be used to develop output measures of mental health service programs and thereby provide a basis for controlling programs through output monitoring. A conceptual framework, study design and methodology are discussed. Patient analysis includes: (1) patterns and trends over time, (2) population at risk and (3) patient outcome. The study concludes that routinely generated data can provide much needed information for managers in these turbulent times. Also, the author's suggested areas that need further study.

  4. Management of Complex Cardiac Issues in the Pregnant Patient.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huayong; Pasca, Ioana

    2016-01-01

    Management of peripartum heart disease in the intensive care unit requires optimization of maternal hemodynamics and maintenance of fetal perfusion. This requires fetal monitoring and should address the parturient's oxygen saturation, hemoglobin, and cardiac output as it relates to uterine blood flow. Pharmacologic strategies have limited evidence pertaining to hemodynamic stabilization and fetal perfusion. There is some evidence that surgical management of critical mitral stenosis should be percutaneous when possible because cardiac bypass is associated with increased fetal mortality. Fetal monitoring strategies should address central organ perfusion because peripheral scalp pH has not been associated with improved fetal outcomes. PMID:26600447

  5. A new algorithm for segmentation of cardiac quiescent phases and cardiac time intervals using seismocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari Tadi, Mojtaba; Koivisto, Tero; Pänkäälä, Mikko; Paasio, Ari; Knuutila, Timo; Teräs, Mika; Hänninen, Pekka

    2015-03-01

    Systolic time intervals (STI) have significant diagnostic values for a clinical assessment of the left ventricle in adults. This study was conducted to explore the feasibility of using seismocardiography (SCG) to measure the systolic timings of the cardiac cycle accurately. An algorithm was developed for the automatic localization of the cardiac events (e.g. the opening and closing moments of the aortic and mitral valves). Synchronously acquired SCG and electrocardiography (ECG) enabled an accurate beat to beat estimation of the electromechanical systole (QS2), pre-ejection period (PEP) index and left ventricular ejection time (LVET) index. The performance of the algorithm was evaluated on a healthy test group with no evidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD). STI values were corrected based on Weissler's regression method in order to assess the correlation between the heart rate and STIs. One can see from the results that STIs correlate poorly with the heart rate (HR) on this test group. An algorithm was developed to visualize the quiescent phases of the cardiac cycle. A color map displaying the magnitude of SCG accelerations for multiple heartbeats visualizes the average cardiac motions and thereby helps to identify quiescent phases. High correlation between the heart rate and the duration of the cardiac quiescent phases was observed.

  6. A Spatial Analysis of Multivariate Output from Regional Climate Models

    E-print Network

    Sain, Steve

    to assess the impact of human intervention. While climate models are deterministic, the output generated is to characterize the distribution of the model output. To that end, we have developed a multivariate hierarchical regional and local impacts of climate and climate change, the computational demands of climate modeling

  7. Motor vehicle output and GDP, 1968-2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Santini, D. J.; Poyer, D. A.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we assess the performance of the BEA series 'value of motor vehicle output' as an indicator of the business cycle over the period 1968-2007. We statistically assess the causal relationship between real motor vehicle output (RMVO) and real gross domestic product (RGDP). This is accomplished by standard estimation and statistical methods used to assess vector autoregressive models. This assessment represents the initial results of a more encompassing research project, the intent of which is to determine the dynamic interaction of the transport sector with the overall economy. It's a start to a more comprehensive assessment of how transport and economic activity interrelate.

  8. Radiation from Cardiac Imaging Tests

    MedlinePLUS

    ... User Name Password Sign In Cardiology Patient Page Radiation From Cardiac Imaging Tests Questions You Should Ask ... cardiac imaging techniques computed tomography imaging nuclear medicine radiation Next Section Introduction Many patients are referred by ...

  9. High Throughput Measurement of Ca++ Dynamics in Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes by Kinetic Image Cytometery: A Cardiac Risk Assessment Characterization Using a Large Panel of Cardioactive and Inactive Compounds.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hua Rong; Whittaker, Ross; Price, Jeffrey H; Vega, Raquel; Pfeiffer, Emily R; Cerignoli, Fabio; Towart, Rob; Gallacher, David J

    2015-12-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CMs) are emerging as a powerful in vitro model for cardiac safety assessment which may allow for better identification of compounds with poor arrhythmogenic liability profiles early in the drug discovery process. Here, we describe our examination of the Kinetic Image Cytometer (KIC) system's ability to predict adverse compound effects using hiPS-CMs and a library of 53 compounds, the majority of which are known to be cardioactive compounds, and several negative controls. The KIC provides a high throughput method for analyzing intracellular calcium transients. In the cardiomyocyte, intracellular calcium transients integrate the electrochemical signals of the action potential (AP) with the molecular signaling pathways regulating contraction. Drug-induced alterations in the shape and duration of AP result in changes to the shape and duration of the intracellular calcium transient. By examining calcium transient dynamics in hiPS-CMs, KIC can be used as a phenotypic screen to assess compound effects across multiple ion channel types (MITs), detecting MITs, calcium handling and signaling effects. The results of this blinded study indicate that using hiPS-CMs, KIC is able to accurately detect drug-induced changes in Ca(2+) transient dynamics (ie, duration and beat rate) and therefore, may be useful in predicting drug-induced arrhythmogenic liabilities in early de-risking within the drug discovery phase. PMID:26358003

  10. Cardiac Safety Research Consortium: can the thorough QT/QTc study be replaced by early QT assessment in routine clinical pharmacology studies? Scientific update and a research proposal for a path forward.

    PubMed

    Darpo, Borje; Garnett, Christine; Benson, Charles T; Keirns, James; Leishman, Derek; Malik, Marek; Mehrotra, Nitin; Prasad, Krishna; Riley, Steve; Rodriguez, Ignacio; Sager, Philip; Sarapa, Nenad; Wallis, Robert

    2014-09-01

    The International Conference on Harmonization E14 guidance for the clinical evaluation of QT/QTc interval prolongation requires almost all new drugs to undergo a dedicated clinical study, primarily in healthy volunteers, the so-called TQT study. Since 2005, when the E14 guidance was implemented in United States and Europe, close to 400 TQT studies have been conducted. In February 2012, the Cardiac Safety Research Consortium held a think tank meeting at Food and Drug Administration's White Oak campus to discuss whether "QT assessment" can be performed as part of routine phase 1 studies. Based on these discussions, a group of experts convened to discuss how to improve the confidence in QT data from early clinical studies, for example, the First-Time-in-Human trial, through collection of serial electrocardiograms and pharmacokinetic samples and the use of exposure response analysis. Recommendations are given on how to design such "early electrocardiogram assessment," and the limitation of not having a pharmacologic-positive control in these studies is discussed. A research path is identified toward collecting evidence to replace or provide an alternative to the dedicated TQT study. PMID:25173536

  11. Fetal cardiac scanning today.

    PubMed

    Allan, Lindsey

    2010-07-01

    The ability to examine the structure of the fetal heart in real-time started over 30 years ago now. The field has seen very great advances since then, both in terms of technical improvements in ultrasound equipment and in dissemination of operator skills. A great deal has been learnt about normal cardiac function in the human fetus throughout gestation and how it is affected by pathologies of pregnancy. There is increasing recognition of abnormal heart structure during routine obstetric scanning, allowing referral for specialist diagnosis and counselling. It is now possible to make accurate diagnosis of cardiac malformations as early as 12 weeks of gestation. Early diagnosis of a major cardiac malformation in the fetus can provide the parents with a comprehensive prognosis, enabling them to make the most informed choice about the management of the pregnancy. PMID:20572107

  12. Cardiac Autonomic Nerve Stimulation in the Treatment of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Mariko; Massiello, Alex; Karimov, Jamshid H.; Van Wagoner, David R.; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2014-01-01

    Research on the therapeutic modulation of cardiac autonomic tone by electrical stimulation has yielded encouraging early clinical results. Vagus nerve stimulation has reduced the rates of morbidity and sudden death from heart failure, but therapeutic vagus nerve stimulation is limited by side effects of hypotension and bradycardia. Sympathetic nerve stimulation that has been implemented in the experiment may exacerbate the sympathetic-dominated autonomic imbalance. In contrast, concurrent stimulation of both sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiac nerves increases myocardial contractility without increasing heart rate. This review assesses the current state of electrical stimulation of the cardiac autonomic nervous system to treat heart failure. PMID:23747176

  13. Influence of gravity on cardiac performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pantalos, G. M.; Sharp, M. K.; Woodruff, S. J.; O'Leary, D. S.; Lorange, R.; Everett, S. D.; Bennett, T. E.; Shurfranz, T.

    1998-01-01

    Results obtained by the investigators in ground-based experiments and in two parabolic flight series of tests aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft with a hydraulic simulator of the human systemic circulation have confirmed that a simple lack of hydrostatic pressure within an artificial ventricle causes a decrease in stroke volume of 20%-50%. A corresponding drop in stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) was observed over a range of atrial pressures (AP), representing a rightward shift of the classic CO versus AP cardiac function curve. These results are in agreement with echocardiographic experiments performed on space shuttle flights, where an average decrease in SV of 15% was measured following a three-day period of adaptation to weightlessness. The similarity of behavior of the hydraulic model to the human system suggests that the simple physical effects of the lack of hydrostatic pressure may be an important mechanism for the observed changes in cardiac performance in astronauts during the weightlessness of space flight.

  14. Giant Cardiac Cavernous Hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Unger, Eric; Costic, Joseph; Laub, Glenn

    2015-07-01

    We report the case of an asymptomatic giant cardiac cavernous hemangioma in a 71-year-old man. The intracardiac mass was discovered incidentally during surveillance for his prostate cancer; however, the patient initially declined intervention. On presentation to our institution 7 years later, the lesion had enlarged significantly, and the patient consented to excision. At surgery, an 8 × 6.5 × 4.8 cm intracardiac mass located on the inferior heart border was excised with an intact capsule through a median sternotomy approach. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course. We discuss the diagnostic workup, treatment, and characteristics of this rare cardiac tumor. PMID:26140782

  15. Cardiac Syndrome X: Update.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Shilpa; Mehta, Puja K; Bairey Merz, C Noel

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac Syndrome X (CSX), characterized by angina-like chest discomfort, ST segment depression during exercise, and normal epicardial coronary arteries at angiography, is highly prevalent in women. CSX is not benign, and linked to adverse cardiovascular outcomes and a poor quality of life. Coronary microvascular and endothelial dysfunction and abnormal cardiac nociception have been implicated in the pathogenesis of CSX. Treatment includes life-style modification, anti-anginal, anti-atherosclerotic, and anti-ischemic medications. Non-pharmacological options include cognitive behavioral therapy, enhanced external counterpulsation, neurostimulation, and stellate ganglionectomy. Studies have shown the efficacy of individual treatments but guidelines outlining the best course of therapy are lacking. PMID:26567981

  16. Cardiac disease in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Nqayana, T; Moodley, J; Naidoo, DP

    2008-01-01

    Summary Summary This study was a retrospective review of patient charts of a relatively large number of patients with cardiac disease in pregnancy in a developing country. Ninety-five patients were evaluated; the majority (n = 36) were in the age group 21?25 years. Rheumatic heart disease was the commonest aetiology; eight women required balloon mitral valvuloplasty and one had a valve replacement at 32 weeks’ gestation. There were no maternal deaths but morbidity was high; 13 patients were admitted in cardiac failure, nine had atrial fibrillation and three required intensive-care management. There were 86 live births of the 97 deliveries. PMID:18568175

  17. Endogenous cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Barile, Lucio; Messina, Elisa; Giacomello, Alessandro; Marbán, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    In the past few years it has been established that the heart contains a reservoir of stem and progenitor cells. These cells are positive for various stem/progenitor cell markers (Kit, Sca-1, Isl-1, and Side Population (SP) properties). The relationship between the various cardiac stem cells (CSC) and progenitor cells described awaits clarification. Furthermore, they may open a new therapeutic strategies of cardiac repair based on the regeneration potential of cardiac stem cells. Currently, cellular cardiomyoplasty is actively explored as means of regenerating damaged myocardium using several different cell types. CSCs seem a logical cell source to exploit for cardiac regeneration therapy. Their presence into the heart, the frequent co-expression of early cardiac progenitor transcription factors, and the capability for ex vivo and in vivo differentiation toward the cardiac lineages offer promise of enhanced cardiogenicity compared to other cell sources. CSCs, when isolated from various animal models by selection based on c-Kit, Sca-1, and/or MDR1, have shown cardiac regeneration potential in vivo following injection in the infracted myocardium. Recently, we have successfully isolated CSCs from small biopsies of human myocardium and expanded them ex vivo by many folds without losing differentiation potential into cardiomyocytes and vascular cells, bringing autologous transplantation of CSCs closer to clinical evaluation. These cells are spontaneously shed from human surgical specimens and murine heart samples in primary culture. This heterogeneous population of cells forms multi-cellular clusters, dubbed cardiospheres (CSs), in suspension culture. CSs are composed of clonally-derived cells, consist of proliferating c-Kit positive cells primarily in their core and differentiating cells expressing cardiac and endothelial cell markers on their periphery. Although the intracardiac origin of adult myocytes has been unequivocally documented, the potential of an extracardiac source of cells, able to repopulate the lost CSCs in pathological conditions (infarct) cannot be excluded and will be discussed in this review. The delivery of human CSs or of CSs-derived cells into the injured heart of the SCID mouse resulted in engraftment, migration, myocardial regeneration and improvement of left ventricular function. Our method for ex vivo expansion of resident CSCs for subsequent autologous transplantation back into the heart, may give these cell populations, the resident and the transplanted one, the combined ability to mediate myocardial regeneration to an appreciable degree, and may change the way in which cardiovascular disease will be approached in the future. PMID:17631436

  18. Health Risk Assessment for Air Pollutants: Alterations in Lung and Cardiac Gene Expression in Mice Exposed to Milano Winter Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5)

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia, Cristina; Cifola, Ingrid; Mangano, Eleonora; Mantecca, Paride; Camatini, Marina; Palestini, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress, pulmonary and systemic inflammation, endothelial cell dysfunction, atherosclerosis and cardiac autonomic dysfunction have been linked to urban particulate matter exposure. The chemical composition of airborne pollutants in Milano is similar to those of other European cities though with a higher PM2.5 fraction. Milano winter fine particles (PM2.5win) are characterized by the presence of nitrate, organic carbon fraction, with high amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and elements such as Pb, Al, Zn, V, Fe, Cr and others, with a negligible endotoxin presence. In BALB/c mice, we examined, at biochemical and transcriptomic levels, the adverse effects of repeated Milano PM2.5win exposure in lung and heart. We found that ET-1, Hsp70, Cyp1A1, Cyp1B1 and Hsp-70, HO-1, MPO respectively increased within lung and heart of PM2.5win-treated mice. The PM2.5win exposure had a strong impact on global gene expression of heart tissue (181 up-regulated and 178 down-regulated genes) but a lesser impact on lung tissue (14 up-regulated genes and 43 down-regulated genes). Focusing on modulated genes, in lung we found two- to three-fold changes of those genes related to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exposure and calcium signalling. Within heart the most striking aspect is the twofold to threefold increase in collagen and laminin related genes as well as in genes involved in calcium signaling. The current study extends our previous findings, showing that repeated instillations of PM2.5win trigger systemic adverse effects. PM2.5win thus likely poses an acute threat primarily to susceptible people, such as the elderly and those with unrecognized coronary artery or structural heart disease. The study of genomic responses will improve understanding of disease mechanisms and enable future clinical testing of interventions against the toxic effects of air pollutant. PMID:25296036

  19. Body size and work output.

    PubMed

    Satyanarayana, K; Naidu, A N; Chatterjee, B; Rao, N

    1977-03-01

    The relationship between work output and anthropometric, biochemical, and socioeconomic varables was studied in 57 male industrial workers engaged in the production of detonator fuses. These workers were studied for 3 months and their daily work output was carefully measured. Work output was measured in terms of the number of fuses produced per day. Clinical and biochemical examination indicated that their current nutritional status was adequate. Among the parameters studied only body weight, height, and lean body weight were significantly correlated with work output. Body weight and lean body weight were significantly correlated (P less than 0.001) with work output even after removing the influence of height by partial correlation. Total daily work output was significantly higher (P less than 0.01) in those with higher body weight and lean body weight. The rate of work was also higher in the higher body weight group PMID:842484

  20. Clinical cardiac safety profile of nilotinib

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Theo D.; le Coutre, Philipp; Schwarz, Michaela; Grille, Peggy; Levitin, Michal; Fateh-Moghadam, Suzanne; Giles, Francis J.; Dörken, Bernd; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Köhncke, Clemens

    2012-01-01

    Background Nilotinib is a second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor with significant efficacy as first- or second-line treatment in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. Despite preclinical evidence indicating a risk of prolongation of the QT interval, which was confirmed in clinical trials, detailed information on nilotinib’s cardiac safety profile is lacking. Design and Methods Here, we retrospectively assessed cardiovascular risk factors in 81 patients who were being or had previously been treated with nilotinib therapy and evaluated cardiovascular parameters by longitudinal monitoring of the QT interval and left ventricular ejection fraction. Detailed information on the occurrence and management of defined cardiac adverse events was extracted. Results The median duration of nilotinib therapy was 26 months (range, 1–72). The median QT interval at baseline was 413 msec (range, 368–499 msec). During follow-up, the median QT was not significantly different from the baseline value at any time-point. Sixteen of 81 patients (20%) had new electrocardiographic changes. Cardiac function, as assessed by measurement of left ventricular ejection fraction, did not change significantly from baseline at any time-point. During a median follow-up of 44 months (range, 2–73), seven patients (9%), all of whom had received prior imatinib therapy, developed 11 clinical cardiac adverse events requiring treatment. The median time from the start of nilotinib therapy to an event was 14.5 months (range, 2–68). Five of seven patients were able to continue nilotinib therapy with only one brief interruption. Conclusions Whereas new electrocardiographic abnormalities were recorded in 20% of all patients and some of them developed severe or even life-threatening coronary artery disease, QT prolongation, changes in left ventricular ejection fraction, and clinical cardiac adverse events were uncommon in patients treated with nilotinib. PMID:22271904

  1. Moore's law, Dabbawalas, and pediatric cardiac care in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Samarasinghe, Duminda

    2015-01-01

    Sri Lanka is an island nation in Indian Ocean that provides free healthcare to all citizens through government healthcare system. It has commendable health indices in the region. Pediatric cardiac services have rapidly progressed over past few years helping to further bring down infant and under-five mortality rates. Lady Ridgeway Hospital for Children (LRH) is the only tertiary care referral center for children with heart disease in the country. Currently it performs approximately 1,000 cardiac catheterizations and 1,000 cardiac surgeries every year. Target is to double the surgical output to treat all children with heart diseases in a timely and appropriate manner. Being a middle-income country, this is not an easy task. Technology used in diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart diseases is rapidly advancing with its price tag. In such a setting, it is challenging to proceed to achieve this target in a resource-limited environment. PMID:26085764

  2. Moore's law, Dabbawalas, and pediatric cardiac care in Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Samarasinghe, Duminda

    2015-01-01

    Sri Lanka is an island nation in Indian Ocean that provides free healthcare to all citizens through government healthcare system. It has commendable health indices in the region. Pediatric cardiac services have rapidly progressed over past few years helping to further bring down infant and under-five mortality rates. Lady Ridgeway Hospital for Children (LRH) is the only tertiary care referral center for children with heart disease in the country. Currently it performs approximately 1,000 cardiac catheterizations and 1,000 cardiac surgeries every year. Target is to double the surgical output to treat all children with heart diseases in a timely and appropriate manner. Being a middle-income country, this is not an easy task. Technology used in diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart diseases is rapidly advancing with its price tag. In such a setting, it is challenging to proceed to achieve this target in a resource-limited environment. PMID:26085764

  3. Advanced Cardiac Life Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document contains materials for an advanced college course in cardiac life support developed for the State of Iowa. The course syllabus lists the course title, hours, number, description, prerequisites, learning activities, instructional units, required text, six references, evaluation criteria, course objectives by units, course…

  4. 3D cardiac microtissues encapsulated with the co-culture of cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Saini, Harpinder; Navaei, Ali; Van Putten, Alison; Nikkhah, Mehdi

    2015-09-16

    Cardiac tissue engineering has major applications in regenerative medicine, disease modeling and biological studies. Despite the significance, numerous questions still need to be explored to enhance the functionalities of engineered tissue substitutes. In this study, 3D cardiac microtissues are developed through encapsulation of cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibroblasts, as the main cellular constituents of native myocardium. The geometries of the constructs are precisely controlled and assessed for their role on synchronous contraction of the cells. Cardiomyocytes exhibit a native-like phenotype when co-cultured with cardiac fibroblasts as compared to the monoculture condition. Particularly, elongated F-actin fibers with abundance of sarcomeric ?-actinin and troponin-I are observed within all layers of the constructs. Higher expressions of connexin-43 and integrin-?1 indicate improved cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Amongst co-culture conditions, 2:1 (cardiomyocytes: cardiac fibroblasts) ratio exhibits enhanced functionalities, whereas decreasing the construct size adversely affects the synchronous contraction of the cells. Overall, the study here indicates that the cell-cell ratio and the construct geometry are crucial parameters, which need to be optimized to enhance the functionalities of the engineered tissue substitutes. PMID:26129820

  5. Cardiac metabolic alterations in hypertensive obese pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Li, Zi-Lun; Eirin, Alfonso; Ebrahimi, Behzad; Pawar, Aditya S; Zhu, Xiang-Yang; Lerman, Amir; Lerman, Lilach O

    2015-08-01

    Obesity and hypertension are major risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, and their growing coexistence accounts for an increase in adverse cardiac events, but the mechanisms are yet to be determined. We hypothesized that obesity exacerbates mitochondrial dysregulation imposed by hypertension and augments left ventricular dysfunction. Obesity-prone Ossabaw pigs were randomized to lean (standard diet) and obese (high-fat diet), without (Lean-sham and Obese-sham) or with renovascular hypertension (Lean-hypertension and Obese-hypertension), induced after 12 weeks of diet (n=7 each). Cardiac function, myocardial perfusion and oxygenation, and microvascular remodeling were assessed 4 weeks later. Mitochondrial biogenesis signals and structural proteins, respiratory chain complex activities, and mitochondrial self-degradation were examined, as was fibrosis. Obesity alone exerted no apparent effect on mitochondrial dynamics, but aggravated in hypertensive hearts the reduction of mitochondrial proteins, deoxyribonucleic acid content, and respiratory chain complex IV subunits activity, and amplified mitochondrial self-degradation. Synergistic interaction of obesity with hypertension also exacerbated myocardial fibrosis and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. Mitochondrial content, respiratory chain complex IV subunits activity, and mitophagy were correlated with myocardial fibrosis. These findings suggest that obesity aggravates in renovascular hypertension cardiac mitochondrial aberrations. Mitochondrial function may regulate the progression of cardiac injury and functional deterioration in hypertension concomitant with obesity. PMID:26077566

  6. Hypereosinophilic syndrome: cardiac diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Mankad, Rekha; Bonnichsen, Crystal; Mankad, Sunil

    2016-01-15

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is a heterogeneous group of conditions that is defined at its core by hypereosinophilia (HE) (blood eosinophil count of >1.5×10(9)/L) and organ damage directly attributable to the HE. Cardiac dysfunction occurs frequently in all forms of HES and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Once a significantly elevated eosinophil count is identified, it must be confirmed on repeat testing and the aetiology for the HE must be rigorously sought out with a focus on identifying whether organ dysfunction is occurring. Echocardiography is routinely performed to assess for cardiac involvement, looking for evidence of left ventricular and/or right ventricular apical obliteration or thrombi or a restrictive cardiomyopathy. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and CT are often useful adjuncts to establish the diagnosis but endomyocardial biopsy remains the gold standard. To decrease the degree of eosinophilia, treatment can include corticosteroids and/or imatinib based on the aetiology. Anticoagulation, standard heart failure therapy for a restrictive cardiomyopathy and finally cardiac transplantation may be indicated in the treatment algorithm. PMID:26567231

  7. Evidence for increased cardiac compliance during exposure to simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, S. C.; Convertino, V. A.; Fanton, J. W.; Reister, C. A.; Gaffney, F. A.; Ludwig, D. A.; Krotov, V. P.; Trambovetsky, E. V.; Latham, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    We measured hemodynamic responses during 4 days of head-down tilt (HDT) and during graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in invasively instrumented rhesus monkeys to test the hypotheses that exposure to simulated microgravity increases cardiac compliance and that decreased stroke volume, cardiac output, and orthostatic tolerance are associated with reduced left ventricular peak dP/dt. Six monkeys underwent two 4-day (96 h) experimental conditions separated by 9 days of ambulatory activities in a crossover counterbalance design: 1) continuous exposure to 10 degrees HDT and 2) approximately 12-14 h per day of 80 degrees head-up tilt and 10-12 h supine (control condition). Each animal underwent measurements of central venous pressure (CVP), left ventricular and aortic pressures, stroke volume, esophageal pressure (EsP), plasma volume, alpha1- and beta1-adrenergic responsiveness, and tolerance to LBNP. HDT induced a hypovolemic and hypoadrenergic state with reduced LBNP tolerance compared with the control condition. Decreased LBNP tolerance with HDT was associated with reduced stroke volume, cardiac output, and peak dP/dt. Compared with the control condition, a 34% reduction in CVP (P = 0.010) and no change in left ventricular end-diastolic area during HDT was associated with increased ventricular compliance (P = 0.0053). Increased cardiac compliance could not be explained by reduced intrathoracic pressure since EsP was unaltered by HDT. Our data provide the first direct evidence that increased cardiac compliance was associated with headward fluid shifts similar to those induced by exposure to spaceflight and that reduced orthostatic tolerance was associated with lower cardiac contractility.

  8. Serial Input Output

    SciTech Connect

    Waite, Anthony; /SLAC

    2011-09-07

    Serial Input/Output (SIO) is designed to be a long term storage format of a sophistication somewhere between simple ASCII files and the techniques provided by inter alia Objectivity and Root. The former tend to be low density, information lossy (floating point numbers lose precision) and inflexible. The latter require abstract descriptions of the data with all that that implies in terms of extra complexity. The basic building blocks of SIO are streams, records and blocks. Streams provide the connections between the program and files. The user can define an arbitrary list of streams as required. A given stream must be opened for either reading or writing. SIO does not support read/write streams. If a stream is closed during the execution of a program, it can be reopened in either read or write mode to the same or a different file. Records represent a coherent grouping of data. Records consist of a collection of blocks (see next paragraph). The user can define a variety of records (headers, events, error logs, etc.) and request that any of them be written to any stream. When SIO reads a file, it first decodes the record name and if that record has been defined and unpacking has been requested for it, SIO proceeds to unpack the blocks. Blocks are user provided objects which do the real work of reading/writing the data. The user is responsible for writing the code for these blocks and for identifying these blocks to SIO at run time. To write a collection of blocks, the user must first connect them to a record. The record can then be written to a stream as described above. Note that the same block can be connected to many different records. When SIO reads a record, it scans through the blocks written and calls the corresponding block object (if it has been defined) to decode it. Undefined blocks are skipped. Each of these categories (streams, records and blocks) have some characteristics in common. Every stream, record and block has a name with the condition that each stream, record or block name must be unique in its category (i.e. all streams must have different names, but a stream can have the same name as a record). Each category is an arbitrary length list which is handled by a 'manager' and there is one manager for each category.

  9. Assessment of cardiac function using global and regional left ventricular endomyocardial and epimyocardial peak systolic strain and strain rate in healthy Labrador retriever dogs.

    PubMed

    Carnabuci, C; Hanås, S; Ljungvall, I; Tidholm, A; Bussadori, C; Häggström, J; Höglund, K

    2013-08-01

    Speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) is based on tracking of natural acoustic myocardial markers. The study aimed at quantifying global and regional endomyocardial and epimyocardial left ventricular longitudinal, circumferential and radial peak systolic strain and strain rate, including feasibility and variability; and assessing synchronicity and torsion, in healthy dogs. Cineloops were acquired from left apical 4-chamber, basal and apical right parasternal short-axis views in 22 healthy Labrador retrievers. A general epimyocardial to endomyocardial strain gradient was found. Strain was higher at apex compared to base. A strain longitudinal base to apex gradient was found. Left ventricular synchronicity could be assessed in all dogs and torsion in 1/3. Short axis apical view had highest variability. Dog and operator contributed most to overall variance. In conclusion, STE allows assessment of myocardial function in healthy Labrador retrievers. A longitudinal base to apex gradient was found and a new synchronicity index for use in dogs was introduced. PMID:23481140

  10. Evaluation of respiratory and cardiac motion correction schemes in dual gated PET/CT cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lamare, F. Fernandez, P.; Le Maitre, A.; Visvikis, D.; Dawood, M.; Schäfers, K. P.; Rimoldi, O. E.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Cardiac imaging suffers from both respiratory and cardiac motion. One of the proposed solutions involves double gated acquisitions. Although such an approach may lead to both respiratory and cardiac motion compensation there are issues associated with (a) the combination of data from cardiac and respiratory motion bins, and (b) poor statistical quality images as a result of using only part of the acquired data. The main objective of this work was to evaluate different schemes of combining binned data in order to identify the best strategy to reconstruct motion free cardiac images from dual gated positron emission tomography (PET) acquisitions. Methods: A digital phantom study as well as seven human studies were used in this evaluation. PET data were acquired in list mode (LM). A real-time position management system and an electrocardiogram device were used to provide the respiratory and cardiac motion triggers registered within the LM file. Acquired data were subsequently binned considering four and six cardiac gates, or the diastole only in combination with eight respiratory amplitude gates. PET images were corrected for attenuation, but no randoms nor scatter corrections were included. Reconstructed images from each of the bins considered above were subsequently used in combination with an affine or an elastic registration algorithm to derive transformation parameters allowing the combination of all acquired data in a particular position in the cardiac and respiratory cycles. Images were assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, image profile, coefficient-of-variation (COV), and relative difference of the recovered activity concentration. Results: Regardless of the considered motion compensation strategy, the nonrigid motion model performed better than the affine model, leading to higher SNR and contrast combined with a lower COV. Nevertheless, when compensating for respiration only, no statistically significant differences were observed in the performance of the two motion models considered. Superior image SNR and contrast were seen using the affine respiratory motion model in combination with the diastole cardiac bin in comparison to the use of the whole cardiac cycle. In contrast, when simultaneously correcting for cardiac beating and respiration, the elastic respiratory motion model outperformed the affine model. In this context, four cardiac bins associated with eight respiratory amplitude bins seemed to be adequate. Conclusions: Considering the compensation of respiratory motion effects only, both affine and elastic based approaches led to an accurate resizing and positioning of the myocardium. The use of the diastolic phase combined with an affine model based respiratory motion correction may therefore be a simple approach leading to significant quality improvements in cardiac PET imaging. However, the best performance was obtained with the combined correction for both cardiac and respiratory movements considering all the dual-gated bins independently through the use of an elastic model based motion compensation.

  11. Rubicon deficiency enhances cardiac autophagy and protects mice from lipopolysaccharide-induced lethality and reduction in stroke volume.

    PubMed

    Zi, Zhenguo; Song, Zongpei; Zhang, Shasha; Ye, Yong; Li, Can; Xu, Mingqing; Zou, Yunzeng; He, Lin; Zhu, Hongxin

    2015-03-01

    : Rubicon has been suggested to suppress autophagosome maturation by negatively regulating PI3KC3/Vps34 activity. However, the physiological function of Rubicon remains elusive. We hypothesized that Rubicon deficiency enhances autophagic flux in the heart and affects cardiac function. Rubicon knockout (KO) mice were generated by piggyBac transposition. Loss of Rubicon was demonstrated at both mRNA and protein levels. Rubicon KO mice were born in Mendelian ratios. Autophagic flux, assessed by bafilomycin A1-induced changes in LC3 II protein abundance, was enhanced in the heart of Rubicon KO mice compared with wild-type (WT) controls. Hematoxylin-eosin staining and picrosirius red staining showed that Rubicon KO mice exhibited normal baseline cardiac morphology. Echocardiography revealed that ejection fraction and fractional shortening, 2 indices of cardiac function, were comparable between Rubicon KO mice at 2, 8, and 12 months of age (n = 6-8 for each age group) and the corresponding WT controls (n = 6-8 for each age group). In a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis, the survival time of LPS-treated Rubicon KO mice (n = 10) was prolonged compared with LPS-treated WT controls (n = 11). Echocardiography revealed that Rubicon deficiency partially normalized LPS-induced reduction in stroke volume and cardiac output 12 hours after LPS administration compared with LPS-treated WT controls (n = 6 for each group). Autophagic flux was enhanced in Rubicon-deficient hearts 12 hours after LPS treatment compared with LPS-treated WT controls. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction suggested that proinflammatory cytokine expression was not significantly different between LPS-treated Rubicon KO mice and WT controls (n = 3 for each group). Our data demonstrate for the first time that Rubicon deficiency enhances autophagic flux in the heart and protects mice from lethality and reduction in stroke volume induced by LPS. PMID:25502307

  12. Cardiac monitoring of patients receiving arsenic trioxide therapy.

    PubMed

    Unnikrishnan, Dilip; Dutcher, Janice P; Garl, Susan; Varshneya, Nikita; Lucariello, Richard; Wiernik, Peter H

    2004-03-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is approved for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukaemia and is under investigation for other malignancies. We report the cardiac findings in 18 patients with haematologic malignancies treated with ATO and assess the role of cardiac factors in fluid retention syndrome observed during ATO therapy. Based on initial observations in 10 patients treated with ATO, cardiac functions in the subsequent eight patients were evaluated prospectively. Evaluation included pre- and during-treatment electrocardiograms, Holter monitoring, echocardiograms, multigated acquisition scan and cardiac stress tests if indicated. All eight patients developed fluid retention during ATO, evidenced by pulmonary congestion, oedema and pleural/pericardial effusions. No cardiac factors were identified that contributed to fluid retention. Six patients had prolonged corrected QT (QTc) compared with baseline, three developed ventricular tachycardia. Sinus tachycardia, ventricular premature contractions, and non-sustained ventricular/supraventricular tachycardia were seen during ATO treatment. Fluid retention and cardiac events did not correlate with the dose or total amount of ATO or prior anthracycline therapy. In summary, fluid overload during ATO therapy does not appear to be cardiac in origin but appears to be drug-related, and may reflect cytokine-induced capillary leak. QTc prolongation, transient arrhythmias and clinically significant arrhythmias were seen with therapeutic doses of ATO. PMID:14871247

  13. Perspectives on the Value of Biomarkers in Acute Cardiac Care and Implications for Strategic Management

    PubMed Central

    Kossaify, Antoine; Garcia, Annie; Succar, Sami; Ibrahim, Antoine; Moussallem, Nicolas; Kossaify, Mikhael; Grollier, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    Biomarkers in acute cardiac care are gaining increasing interest given their clinical benefits. This study is a review of the major conditions in acute cardiac care, with a focus on biomarkers for diagnostic and prognostic assessment. Through a PubMed search, 110 relevant articles were selected. The most commonly used cardiac biomarkers (cardiac troponin, natriuretic peptides, and C-reactive protein) are presented first, followed by a description of variable acute cardiac conditions with their relevant biomarkers. In addition to the conventional use of natriuretic peptides, cardiac troponin, and C-reactive protein, other biomarkers are outlined in variable critical conditions that may be related to acute cardiac illness. These include ST2 and chromogranin A in acute dyspnea and acute heart failure, matrix metalloproteinase in acute chest pain, heart-type fatty acid binding protein in acute coronary syndrome, CD40 ligand and interleukin-6 in acute myocardial infarction, blood ammonia and lactate in cardiac arrest, as well as tumor necrosis factor-alpha in atrial fibrillation. Endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress and inflammation are involved in the physiopathology of most cardiac diseases, whether acute or chronic. In summary, natriuretic peptides, cardiac troponin, C-reactive protein are currently the most relevant biomarkers in acute cardiac care. Point-of-care testing and multi-markers use are essential for prompt diagnostic approach and tailored strategic management. PMID:24046510

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cardiac pacemakers: era of "MR Conditional" designs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Advances in cardiac device technology have led to the first generation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) conditional devices, providing more diagnostic imaging options for patients with these devices, but also new controversies. Prior studies of pacemakers in patients undergoing MRI procedures have provided groundwork for design improvements. Factors related to magnetic field interactions and transfer of electromagnetic energy led to specific design changes. Ferromagnetic content was minimized. Reed switches were modified. Leads were redesigned to reduce induced currents/heating. Circuitry filters and shielding were implemented to impede or limit the transfer of certain unwanted electromagnetic effects. Prospective multicenter clinical trials to assess the safety and efficacy of the first generation of MR conditional cardiac pacemakers demonstrated no significant alterations in pacing parameters compared to controls. There were no reported complications through the one month visit including no arrhythmias, electrical reset, inhibition of generator output, or adverse sensations. The safe implementation of these new technologies requires an understanding of the well-defined patient and MR system conditions. Although scanning a patient with an MR conditional device following the strictly defined patient and MR system conditions appears straightforward, issues related to patients with pre-existing devices remain complex. Until MR conditional devices are the routine platform for all of these devices, there will still be challenging decisions regarding imaging patients with pre-existing devices where MRI is required to diagnose and manage a potentially life threatening or serious scenario. A range of other devices including ICDs, biventricular devices, and implantable physiologic monitors as well as guidance of medical procedures using MRI technology will require further biomedical device design changes and testing. The development and implementation of cardiac MR conditional devices will continue to require the expertise and collaboration of multiple disciplines and will need to prove safety, effectiveness, and cost effectiveness in patient care. PMID:22032338

  15. Maximal exercise limitation in functionally overreached triathletes: role of cardiac adrenergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Le Meur, Yann; Louis, Julien; Aubry, Anaël; Guéneron, Jacques; Pichon, Aurélien; Schaal, Karine; Corcuff, Jean-Benoît; Hatem, Stéphane N; Isnard, Richard; Hausswirth, Christophe

    2014-08-01

    Functional overreaching (F-OR) induced by heavy load endurance training programs has been associated with reduced heart rate values both at rest and during exercise. Because this phenomenon may reflect an impairment of cardiac response, this research was conducted to test this hypothesis. Thirty-five experienced male triathletes were tested (11 control and 24 overload subjects) before overloading (Pre), immediately after overloading (Mid), and after a 2-wk taper period (Post). Physiological responses were assessed during an incremental cycling protocol to volitional exhaustion, including catecholamines release, oxygen uptake (V?o2), arteriovenous O2 difference, cardiac output (Q?), and systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). Twelve subjects of the overload group developed signs of F-OR at Mid (decreased performance with concomitant high perceived fatigue), while 12 others did not [acute fatigue group (AF)]. V?o2max was reduced only in F-OR subjects at Mid. Lower Q? and SBP values with greater arteriovenous O2 difference were reported in F-OR subjects at all exercising intensities, while no significant change was observed in the control and AF groups. A concomitant decrease in epinephrine excretion was reported only in the F-OR group. All values returned to baseline at Post. Following an overload endurance training program leading to F-OR, the cardiac response to exhaustive exercise is transiently impaired, possibly due to reduced epinephrine excretion. This finding is likely to explain the complex process of underperformance syndrome experienced by F-OR endurance athletes during heavy load programs. PMID:24925979

  16. Pharmacological Manipulation of Peripheral Vascular Resistance in Special Clinical Situations after Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Moga, Michael-Alice; Nguyen, Nguyenvu; Mazwi, Mjaye L; Costello, John M

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric cardiac surgery patients commonly suffer from alterations in vascular tone in the early post-operative period. Pharmacologic manipulation of systemic vascular resistance (SVR) can be complex in a variety of special patient situations including extremes of age, presence of left sided valvar lesions and the use of mechanical circulatory support. Familiarity with how these special circumstances alter SVR and the response to pharmacologic intervention will allow for tailored therapy and hopefully, optimized outcomes. This article addresses the eighth topic of the special issue entitled "Pharmacologic strategies with afterload reduction in low cardiac output syndrome after pediatric cardiac surgery". PMID:26463983

  17. Design of a specialized computer for on-line monitoring of cardiac stroke volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, J. A., Jr.; Gebben, V. D.

    1972-01-01

    The design of a specialized analog computer for on-line determination of cardiac stroke volume by means of a modified version of the pressure pulse contour method is presented. The design consists of an analog circuit for computation and a timing circuit for detecting necessary events on the pressure waveform. Readouts of arterial pressures, systolic duration, heart rate, percent change in stroke volume, and percent change in cardiac output are provided for monitoring cardiac patients. Laboratory results showed that computational accuracy was within 3 percent, while animal experiments verified the operational capability of the computer. Patient safety considerations are also discussed.

  18. “Lung packing” in breath hold-diving: An impressive case of pulmo–cardiac interaction

    PubMed Central

    Schipke, Jochen D.; Kelm, Malte; Siegmund, Klaus; Muth, Thomas; Sievers, Burkhard; Steiner, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    There is a complex interaction between the heart and the lungs. We report on a healthy female who performs breath hold diving at a high, international level. In order to optimize pressure equalization during diving and to increase oxygen available, apneists employed a special breathing maneuver, so called “lung packing”. Based on cardiac MRI we could demonstrate impressive effects of this maneuver on left ventricular geometry and hemodynamics. Beyond the fact, that our findings support the concept of pulmonary –cardiac interrelationship, it should be emphasized, that the reported, extreme breathing maneuver could have detrimental consequences due to reduction of stroke volume and cardiac output.

  19. Enhanced performance CCD output amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Dunham, Mark E. (Los Alamos, NM); Morley, David W. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1996-01-01

    A low-noise FET amplifier is connected to amplify output charge from a che coupled device (CCD). The FET has its gate connected to the CCD in common source configuration for receiving the output charge signal from the CCD and output an intermediate signal at a drain of the FET. An intermediate amplifier is connected to the drain of the FET for receiving the intermediate signal and outputting a low-noise signal functionally related to the output charge signal from the CCD. The amplifier is preferably connected as a virtual ground to the FET drain. The inherent shunt capacitance of the FET is selected to be at least equal to the sum of the remaining capacitances.

  20. Pericardial Effusion After Pediatric Cardiac Surgeries: A Single Center Observation

    PubMed Central

    Dalili, Mohammad; Zamani, Hassan; Aarabi-Moghaddam, Mohammadyousef

    2012-01-01

    Background: Development of fibrinous pericarditis after pericardiotomy is a well-recognized reaction. Within a few post-operative days, the inflammated surface of pericardium begins to fuse to the overlying sternum. Objectives: Our aim was to assess the prevalence, risk factors, time course and therapy response of pericardial effusion (PE) after cardiac surgeries in children. Patients and Methods: PE occurrence was assessed prospectively in 486 children who underwent cardiac surgery for congenital heart diseases by serial echocardiography. Clinical manifestations were observed and response to different therapies was analyzed. Results: The prevalence of PE was about 10% for all cardiac surgeries. Symptoms were exclusively seen in patients who had moderate to large effusions. The mean onset of pericardial effusion was 11 (± 8) days after surgery procedure, with 87 % (42 of 48) of cases being diagnosed on or before day 13 after operation. The prevalence of effusion after Fontan-type procedures and AVSD repair (29 %, 5 of 17 for both) was significantly higher than other types of cardiac surgeries. Aspirin administration was effective in 77 % and prednisone in 90 % of the cases. Conclusions: PE may be developed as late as weeks after cardiac surgeries. PE after palliative cardiac surgeries is not uncommon. Low doses of aspirin and corticosteroids are usually effective for treating this complication. PMID:25478485

  1. Prediction of cardiac risk in patients undergoing vascular surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Morise, A.P.; McDowell, D.E.; Savrin, R.A.; Goodwin, C.A.; Gabrielle, O.F.; Oliver, F.N.; Nullet, F.R.; Bekheit, S.; Jain, A.C.

    1987-03-01

    In an attempt to determine whether noninvasive cardiac testing could be used to assess cardiac risk in patients undergoing surgery for vascular disease, the authors studied 96 patients. Seventy-seven patients eventually underwent major vascular surgery with 11 (14%) experiencing a significant cardiac complication. Thallium imaging was much more likely to be positive (p less than 0.01) in patients with a cardiac complication; however, there was a significant number of patients with cardiac complications who had a positive history or electrocardiogram for myocardial infarction. When grouped by complication and history of infarction, thallium imaging, if negative, correctly predicted low cardiac risk in the group with a history of infarction. Thallium imaging, however, did not provide a clear separation of risk in those without a history of infarction. Age and coronary angiography, on the other hand, did reveal significant differences within the group without a history of infarction. The resting radionuclide ejection fraction followed a similar pattern to thallium imaging. It is concluded that a positive history of myocardial infarction at any time in the past is the strongest risk predictor in this population and that the predictive value of noninvasive testing is dependent on this factor. Considering these findings, a proposed scheme for assessing risk that will require further validation is presented.

  2. How to improve the overall quality of cardiac morphometric data.

    PubMed

    Gerdes, A Martin

    2015-07-01

    By the mid-1990s, experts realized that drugs leading to improved ventricular remodeling were doing something remarkable in cardiac patients. The "age of cardiac remodeling" had begun. This created an experimental need for high-quality assessment of changes in cardiac tissue composition, including myocyte shape, myocardial fibrosis/collagen, and vascular remodeling. Many working in the field today have little or no training related to recognition of fixation artifacts or common errors associated with quantitative morphology. Unfortunately, such skills had become somewhat of a lost art during the ages of cardiac physiology in the mid-20th century and molecular biology, gaining prominence by the mid-1970s. Consequently, cardiac remodeling studies today are often seriously flawed to the point where data are not reproducible and subsequent researchers may be chasing the molecular basis of a nonexistent or erroneous phenotype. The current unacceptably high incidence of irreproducible data is a serious waste of time and resources as recently noted in comments by the National Institutes of Health director. The goal of this "how to" article is to share some lessons I have learned during nearly 40 years of assessing morphological changes in the heart. It is possible for any laboratory to routinely publish highly reproducible morphological data that stand the test of time and contribute to our fundamental knowledge of cardiac remodeling and the molecular mechanisms that drive it. PMID:25957219

  3. Cardiac auscultatory recording database: delivering heart sounds through the Internet.

    PubMed Central

    Tuchinda, C.; Thompson, W. R.

    2001-01-01

    The clinical skill of cardiac auscultation, while known to be sensitive, specific, and inexpensive in screening for cardiac disease among children, has recently been shown to be deficient among residents in training. This decline in clinical skill is partly due to the difficulty in teaching auscultation. Standardization, depth, and breadth of experience has been difficult to reproduce for students due to time constraints and the impracticality of examining large numbers of patients with cardiac pathology. We have developed a web-based multimedia platform that delivers complete heart sound recordings from over 800 different patients seen at the Johns Hopkins Outpatient Pediatric Cardiology Clinic. The database represents more than twenty significant cardiac lesions as well as normal and innocent murmurs. Each patient record is complete with a gold standard echo for diagnostic confirmation and a gold standard auscultatory assessment provided by a pediatric cardiology attending. PMID:11825279

  4. [Cardiac auscultation in children].

    PubMed

    Ratti, Carlo; Grassi, Laura; De Maria, Elia; Bonetti, Lorenzo; Borghi, Adriana; Cappelli, Stefano

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac auscultation permits to distinguish between the innocent heart murmurs and pathologic murmurs; characteristics of pathologic murmurs include a holosystolic or diastolic murmur, maximal murmur intensity at the upper left sternal border and increased intensity when the patient stands. Murmurs should be described by their timing in the cardiac cycle, intensity, shape, pitch, location, radiation, and response to dynamic maneuvers. When the medical history and physical examination support the diagnosis of innocent heart murmur, neither further investigation nor referal is indicated. On the contrary, echocardiography is recommended for patients with any other abnormal physical examination findings that increase the likelihood of structural heart disease. In this review we discuss the definition and classification of murmurs, how to evaluate it. PMID:25533235

  5. Acoustic output measured by thermal and mechanical indices during fetal echocardiography at the time of the first trimester scan.

    PubMed

    Nemescu, Dragos; Berescu, Anca

    2015-01-01

    We measured acoustic output, expressed as the thermal index (TI) and mechanical index (MI), during fetal echocardiography at the time of the first trimester scan. TI and MI were retrieved from the saved displays during gray-mode, high-definition color flow Doppler and pulsed-wave Doppler (tricuspid flow) ultrasound examinations of the fetal heart and from the ductus venosus assessment. A total of 399 fetal cardiac examinations were evaluated. There was a significant increase in TI values from B-mode studies (0.07 ± 0.04 [mean ± SD]) to color flow mapping (0.2 ± 0.0) and pulsed-wave Doppler studies (0.36 ± 0.05). The TI from ductus venosus assessment (0.1 ± 0.01) was significantly lower than those from Doppler examinations of the heart. MI values from B-mode scans (0.65 ± 0.12) and color flow mapping (0.71 ± 0.11) were comparable, although different, and both values were higher than those from pulsed-wave Doppler tricuspid evaluation (0.39 ± 0.03). There were no differences in MI values from power Doppler assessment between the tricuspid flow and ductus venosus. Safety indices were remarkably stable and were largely constant, especially for color Doppler (TI), tricuspid flow (MI) and ductus venosus assessment (TI, MI). We acquired satisfactory Doppler images and/or signals at acoustic levels that were lower than the actual recommendations and never reached a TI of 0.5. PMID:25438839

  6. Cardiac outflow tract anomalies.

    PubMed

    Neeb, Zachary; Lajiness, Jacquelyn D; Bolanis, Esther; Conway, Simon J

    2013-07-01

    The mature outflow tract (OFT) is, in basic terms, a short conduit. It is a simple, although vital, connection situated between contracting muscular heart chambers and a vast embryonic vascular network. Unfortunately, it is also a focal point underlying many multifactorial congenital heart defects (CHDs). Through the use of various animal models combined with human genetic investigations, we are beginning to comprehend the molecular and cellular framework that controls OFT morphogenesis. Clear roles of neural crest cells (NCC) and second heart field (SHF) derivatives have been established during OFT formation and remodeling. The challenge now is to determine how the SHF and cardiac NCC interact, the complex reciprocal signaling that appears to be occurring at various stages of OFT morphogenesis, and finally how endocardial progenitors and primary heart field (PHF) communicate with both these colonizing extra-cardiac lineages. Although we are beginning to understand that this dance of progenitor populations is wonderfully intricate, the underlying pathogenesis and the spatiotemporal cell lineage interactions remain to be fully elucidated. What is now clear is that OFT alignment and septation are independent processes, invested via separate SHF and cardiac neural crest (CNC) lineages. This review will focus on our current understanding of the respective contributions of the SHF and CNC lineage during OFT development and pathogenesis. PMID:24014420

  7. Cardiac surgery for arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cox, James L

    2004-02-01

    Cardiac arrhythmia surgery was initiated in 1968 with the first successful division of an accessory AV connection for the Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome. Subsequent surgical procedures included the left atrial isolation procedure and the right atrial isolation procedure for automatic atrial tachycardias, discrete cryosurgery of the AV node for AV nodal reentry tachycardia, the atrial transection procedure, corridor procedure and Maze procedure for atrial fibrillation, the right ventricular disconnection procedure for arrhythmogenic right ventricular tachycardia, the encircling endocardial ventriculotomy, subendocardial resection procedure, endocardial cryoablation, the Jatene procedure, and the Dor procedure for ischemic ventricular tachycardia. Because of monumental strides in the treatment of most refractory arrhythmias by endocardial catheter techniques during the past decade, the only remaining viable surgical procedures for cardiac arrhythmias are the Maze procedure for atrial fibrillation and the Dor procedure for ischemic ventricular tachycardia. Nevertheless, the 25-30 years of intense activity in the field of cardiac arrhythmia surgery provided the essential foundation for the development of these catheter techniques and represent one of the most exciting and productive eras in the history of medicine. In one short professional career, we have witnessed the birth of arrhythmia surgery, its adolescence as an "esoteric" specialty, its prime as an enlightening yet exhausting period, and finally its waning years as a source of knowledge and wisdom on which better methods of treatment have been founded. One could hardly ask for a more rewarding experience. PMID:14764186

  8. Cardiac surgery for arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cox, James L

    2004-02-01

    Cardiac arrhythmia surgery was initiated in 1968 with the first successful division of an accessory AV connection for the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Subsequent surgical procedures included the left atrial isolation procedure and right atrial isolation procedure for automatic atrial tachycardias, discrete cryosurgery of the AV node for AV nodal reentrant tachycardia, the atrial transection procedure, the corridor procedure, and the maze procedure for atrial fibrillation, the right ventricular disconnection procedure for arrhythmogenic right ventricular tachycardia, and the encircling endocardial ventriculotomy, subendocardial resection procedure, endocardial cryoablation, the Jatene procedure, and the Dor procedure for ischemic ventricular tachycardia. Because of monumental strides in the treatment of most refractory arrhythmias by endocardial catheter techniques during the past decade, the only remaining viable surgical procedures for cardiac arrhythmias are the maze procedure for atrial fibrillation and the Dor procedure for ischemic ventricular tachycardia. Nevertheless, the 25 to 30 years of intense activity in the field of cardiac arrhythmia surgery provided the essential foundation for the development of these catheter techniques and represent one of the most exciting and productive eras in the history of medicine. In one short professional career, we have witnessed the birth of arrhythmia surgery, its adolescence as an "esoteric" specialty, its prime as an enlightening yet exhausting period, and finally its waning years as a source of knowledge and wisdom upon which better methods of treatment have been founded. One could hardly ask for a more rewarding experience. PMID:15028063

  9. Cardiac surgery for arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cox, James L

    2004-11-01

    Cardiac arrhythmia surgery was initiated in 1968 with the first successful division of an accessory AV connection for the Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome. Subsequent surgical procedures included the left atrial isolation procedure and the right atrial isolation procedure for automatic atrial tachycardias, discrete cryosurgery of the AV node for AV nodal reentry tachycardia, the atrial transection procedure, corridor procedure and Maze procedure for atrial fibrillation, the right ventricular disconnection procedure for arrhythmogenic right ventricular tachycardia, the encircling endocardial ventriculotomy, subendocardial resection procedure, endocardial cryoablation, the Jatene procedure, and the Dor procedure for ischemic ventricular tachycardia. Because of monumental strides in the treatment of most refractory arrhythmias by endocardial catheter techniques during the past decade, the only remaining viable surgical procedures for cardiac arrhythmias are the Maze procedure for atrial fibrillation and the Dor procedure for ischemic ventricular tachycardia. Nevertheless, the 25-30 years of intense activity in the field of cardiac arrhythmia surgery provided the essential foundation for the development of these catheter techniques and represent one of the most exciting and productive eras in the history of medicine. In one short professional career, we have witnessed the birth of arrhythmia surgery, its adolescence as an "esoteric" specialty, its prime as an enlightening yet exhausting period, and finally its waning years as a source of knowledge and wisdom on which better methods of treatment have been founded. One could hardly ask for a more rewarding experience. PMID:23570110

  10. Cardiac surgery 2014 reviewed.

    PubMed

    Doenst, Torsten; Strüning, Constanze; Moschovas, Alexandros; Gonzalez-Lopez, David; Valchanov, Ilija; Kirov, Hristo; Diab, Mahmoud; Faerber, Gloria

    2015-12-01

    For the year 2014, more than 17,000 published references can be found in Pubmed when entering the search term "cardiac surgery". The last year has been characterized by a vivid discussion in the fields where classic cardiac surgery and modern interventional techniques overlap. Specifically, there have been important contributions in the field of coronary revascularization with either percutaneous coronary intervention or bypass surgery as well as in the fields of interventional valve therapy. Here, the US core valve trial with the first demonstration of a survival advantage at 1 year with transcatheter valves compared to surgical aortic valve replacement or the 5-year outcome of the SYNTAX trial with significant advantages for bypass surgery has been the landmark. However, in addition to these most visible publications, there have been several highly relevant and interesting contributions. This review article will summarize the most pertinent publications in the fields of coronary revascularization, surgical treatment of valve disease, heart failure (i.e., transplantation and ventricular assist devices) and aortic surgery. This condensed summary will provide the reader with "solid ground" for up-to-date decision-making in cardiac surgery. PMID:26404007

  11. Blunt Cardiac Injury in the Severely Injured – A Retrospective Multicentre Study

    PubMed Central

    Hanschen, Marc; Kanz, Karl-Georg; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Khalil, Philipe N.; Wierer, Matthias; van Griensven, Martijn; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Biberthaler, Peter; Lefering, Rolf; Huber-Wagner, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background Blunt cardiac injury is a rare trauma entity. Here, we sought to evaluate the relevance and prognostic significance of blunt cardiac injury in severely injured patients. Methods In a retrospective multicentre study, using data collected from 47,580 patients enrolled to TraumaRegister DGU (1993-2009), characteristics of trauma, prehospital / hospital trauma management, and outcome analysis were correlated to the severity of blunt cardiac injury. The severity of cardiac injury was assessed according to the abbreviated injury score (AIS score 1-6), the revised injury severity score (RISC) allowed comparison of expected outcome with injury severity-dependent outcome. N = 1.090 had blunt cardiac trauma (AIS 1-6) (2.3% of patients). Results Predictors of blunt cardiac injury could be identified. Sternal fractures indicate a high risk of the presence of blunt cardiac injury (AIS 0 [control]: 3.0%; AIS 1: 19.3%; AIS 2-6: 19.1%). The overall mortality rate was 13.9%, minor cardiac injury (AIS 1) and severe cardiac injury (AIS 2-6) are associated with higher rates. Severe blunt cardiac injury (AIS 4 and AIS 5-6) is associated with a higher mortality (OR 2.79 and 4.89, respectively) as compared to the predicted average mortality (OR 2.49) of the study collective. Conclusion Multiple injured patients with blunt cardiac trauma are at high risk to be underestimated. Careful evaluation of trauma patients is able to predict the presence of blunt cardiac injury. The severity of blunt cardiac injury needs to be stratified according to the AIS score, as the patients’ outcome is dependent on the severity of cardiac injury. PMID:26136126

  12. Nuclear imaging for cardiac amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Noordzij, Walter; Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Longhi, Simone; Slart, Riemer H J A; Lorenzini, Massimiliano; Hazenberg, Bouke P C; Rapezzi, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    Histological analysis of endomyocardial tissue is still the gold standard for the diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis, but has its limitations. Accordingly, there is a need for non-invasive modalities to diagnose cardiac amyloidosis. Echocardiography and ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging can show characteristics which may not be very specific for cardiac amyloid. Nuclear medicine has gained a precise role in this context: several imaging modalities have become available for the diagnosis and prognostic stratification of cardiac amyloidosis during the last two decades. The different classes of radiopharmaceuticals have the potential to bind different constituents of the amyloidotic infiltrates, with some relevant differences among the various aetiologic types of amyloidosis and the different organs and tissues involved. This review focuses on the background of the commonly used modalities, their present clinical applications, and future clinical perspectives in imaging patients with (suspected) cardiac amyloidosis. The main focus is on conventional nuclear medicine (bone scintigraphy, cardiac sympathetic innervation) and positron emission tomography. PMID:25424887

  13. Cardiac sarcoidosis: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Sekhri, Vishal; Sanal, Shireen; DeLorenzo, Lawrence J.; Aronow, Wilbert S.; Maguire, George P.

    2011-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease of unknown etiology characterized by noncaseating granulomas in involved organs. Organs involved with sarcoidosis include lymph nodes, skin, lung, central nervous system, and eye. Only 40-50% of patients with cardiac sarcoidosis diagnosed at autopsy have the diagnosis made during their lifetime. Cardiac sarcoidosis can manifest itself as complete heart block, ventricular arrhythmias, congestive heart failure, pericardial effusion, pulmonary hypertension, and ventricular aneurysms. Diagnostic tests such as the electrocardiogram, two-dimensional echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography scan, radionuclide scan, and endomyocardial biopsy can be helpful in the early detection of cardiac sarcoidosis. Considering the increased risk of sudden death, cardiac sarcoidosis is an indication for early treatment with corticosteroids or other immunosuppressive agents. Other treatments include placement of a pacemaker or implantable defibrillator to prevent sudden death. In refractory cases, cardiac transplantation should be considered. PMID:22291785

  14. Sudden cardiac death and obesity.

    PubMed

    Plourde, Benoit; Sarrazin, Jean-François; Nault, Isabelle; Poirier, Paul

    2014-09-01

    For individuals and the society as a whole, the increased risk of sudden cardiac death in obese patients is becoming a major challenge, especially since obesity prevalence has been increasing steadily around the globe. Traditional risk factors and obesity often coexist. Hypertension, diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea and metabolic syndrome are well-known risk factors for CV disease and are often present in the obese patient. Although the bulk of evidence is circumstantial, sudden cardiac death and obesity share common traditional CV risk factors. Structural, functional and metabolic factors modulate and influence the risk of sudden cardiac death in the obese population. Other risk factors such as left ventricular hypertrophy, increased number of premature ventricular complexes, altered QT interval and reduced heart rate variability are all documented in both obese and sudden cardiac death populations. The present review focuses on out-of-hospital sudden cardiac death and potential mechanisms leading to sudden cardiac death in this population. PMID:25160995

  15. [Sudden cardiac death in athletes].

    PubMed

    Parikka, Hannu

    2013-01-01

    Sudden deaths occurring during exercise are rare and are most commonly due to cardiac arrest. It is most commonly underlain by symptomless cardiomyopathy or coronary artery disease. Preventive work comes up against a diagnostic problem in distinguishing adaptational changes of the athletic heart from a heart disorder. To reveal the danger of cardiac arrest and reduce human tragedies international sports organizations and cardiologic expert groups recommend screening of cardiac disorders among competing athletes. PMID:24163971

  16. Measuring Air-Ionizer Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lonborg, J. O.

    1985-01-01

    Test apparatus checks ion content of airstream from commercial air ionizer. Apparatus ensures ion output is sufficient to neutralize static charges in electronic assembly areas and concentrations of positive and negative ions are balanced.

  17. Output optics for laser velocimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, Dana H. (inventor); Gunter, William D. (inventor); Mcalister, Kenneth W. (inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Space savings are effected in the optical output system of a laser velocimeter. The output system is comprised of pairs of optical fibers having output ends from which a beam of laser light emerges, a transfer lens for each light beam, and at least one final (LV) lens for receiving the light passing through the transfer lenses and for focussing that light at a common crossing point or area. In order to closely couple the transfer lenses to the final lens, each transfer lens is positioned relative to the final lens receiving light therefrom such that the output waist of the corresponding beam received by the final lens from the transfer lens is a virtual waist located before the transfer lens.

  18. Registry of Unexplained Cardiac Arrest

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-13

    Cardiac Arrest; Long QT Syndrome; Brugada Syndrome; Catecholaminergi Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia; Idiopathic VentricularFibrillation; Early Repolarization Syndrome; Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy

  19. Sudden cardiac death – Historical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Abhilash, S.P.; Namboodiri, Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is an unexpected death due to cardiac causes that occurs in a short time period (generally within 1 h of symptom onset) in a person with known or unknown cardiac disease. It is believed to be involved in nearly a quarter of human deaths, with ventricular fibrillation being the most common mechanism. It is estimated that more than 7 million lives per year are lost to SCD worldwide. Historical perspectives of SCD are analyzed with a brief description on how the developments in the management of sudden cardiac arrest evolved over time. PMID:24568828

  20. Epicardial adipose tissue thickness is an indicator for coronary artery stenosis in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients: its assessment by cardiac magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We used cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) to investigate the association between epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) thickness and silent myocardial ischemia, as well as coronary artery stenosis, in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients. Methods The study included 100 type 2 diabetic subjects (51 male and 49 female; mean age: 56 ± 7 years). Silent myocardial ischemia, as determined by CMR, was defined as evidence of inducible ischemia or myocardial infarction. Signal reduction or stenosis of ? 50% in the vessel diameter was used as the criteria for significant coronary artery stenosis on coronary magnetic resonance (MR) angiography. Results EAT thickness was positively correlated with body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio, systolic blood pressure, postprandial glucose, fasting/postprandial triglyceride (TG), serum glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) score. Significant coronary artery stenosis was found in 24 patients, while 14 patients had silent myocardial ischemia in CMR (1 with silent myocardial infarction, 11 with inducible ischemia, and 2 with both). EAT thickness was greater in patients who had coronary artery stenosis (13.0 ± 2.6 mm vs. 11.5 ± 2.1 mm, p = 0.01), but did not differ between the subjects with or without silent myocardial ischemia on CMR images (12.8 ± 2.1 vs. 11.7 ± 2.3 mm, p = 0.11). Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that EAT thickness was an independent indicator for significant coronary artery stenosis after adjusting for traditional risk factors (OR 1.403, p = 0.026). Conclusions Increased EAT thickness assessed by CMR is an independent risk factor for significant coronary artery stenosis in asymptomatic type 2 diabetes. However, EAT thickness was not associated with silent myocardial ischemia. PMID:22809408

  1. Validation of On-Orbit Methodology for the Assessment of Cardiac Function and Changes in the Circulating Volume Using Ultrasound and "Braslet-M" Occlusion Cuffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogomolov, V. V.; Duncan, J. M.; Alferova, I. V.; Dulchavsky, S. A.; Ebert, D.; Hamilton, D. R.; Matveev, V. P.; Sargsyan, A. E.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in remotely guided imaging techniques on ISS allow the acquisition of high quality ultrasound data using crewmember operators with no medical background and minimal training. However, ongoing efforts are required to develop and validate methodology for complex imaging protocols to ensure their repeatability, efficiency, and suitability for use aboard the ISS. This Station Developmental Test Objective (SDTO) tests a cardiovascular evaluation methodology that takes advantage of the ISS Ultrasound capability, the Braslet-M device, and modified respiratory maneuvers (Valsalva and Mueller), to broaden the spectrum of anatomical and functional information on human cardiovascular system during long-duration space missions. The proposed methodology optimizes and combines new and previously demonstrated methods, and is expected to benefit medically indicated assessments, operational research protocols, and data collections for science. Braslet-M is a current Russian operational countermeasure that compresses the upper thigh to impede the venous return from lower extremities. The goal of the SDTO is to establish and validate a repeatable ultrasound-based methodology for the assessment of a number of cardiovascular criteria in microgravity. Braslet-M device is used as a means to acutely alter volume distribution while focused ultrasound measurements are performed. Modified respiratory maneuvers are done upon volume manipulations to record commensurate changes in anatomical and functional parameters. The overall cardiovascular effects of the Braslet-M device are not completely understood, and although not a primary objective of this SDTO, this effort will provide pilot data regarding the suitability of Braslet-M for its intended purpose, effects, and the indications for its use.

  2. Ultrasound and Cadaveric Prosections as Methods for Teaching Cardiac Anatomy: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griksaitis, Michael J.; Sawdon, Marina A.; Finn, Gabrielle M.

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy of two cardiac anatomy teaching modalities, ultrasound imaging and cadaveric prosections, for learning cardiac gross anatomy. One hundred and eight first-year medical students participated. Two weeks prior to the teaching intervention, students completed a pretest to assess their prior knowledge and to ensure that…

  3. Topical minoxidil: cardiac effects in bald man.

    PubMed Central

    Leenen, F H; Smith, D L; Unger, W P

    1988-01-01

    Systemic cardiovascular effects during chronic treatment with topical minoxidil vs placebo were evaluated using a double-blind, randomized design for two parallel groups (n = 20 for minoxidil, n = 15 for placebo). During 6 months of follow-up, blood pressure did not change, whereas minoxidil increased heart rate by 3-5 beats min-1. Compared with placebo, topical minoxidil caused significant increases in LV end-diastolic volume, in cardiac output (by 0.751 min-1) and in LV mass (by 5 g m-2). We conclude that in healthy subjects short-term use of topical minoxidil is likely not to be detrimental. However, safety needs to be established regarding ischaemic symptoms in patients with coronary artery disease as well as for the possible development of LV hypertrophy in healthy subjects during years of therapy. PMID:3191000

  4. Automatic classification of scar tissue in late gadolinium enhancement cardiac MRI for the assessment of left-atrial wall injury after radiofrequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Daniel; Morris, Alan; Burgon, Nathan; McGann, Christopher; MacLeod, Robert; Cates, Joshua

    2012-03-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is a promising procedure for treating atrial fibrillation (AF) that relies on accurate lesion delivery in the left atrial (LA) wall for success. Late Gadolinium Enhancement MRI (LGE MRI) at three months post-ablation has proven effective for noninvasive assessment of the location and extent of scar formation, which are important factors for predicting patient outcome and planning of redo ablation procedures. We have developed an algorithm for automatic classification in LGE MRI of scar tissue in the LA wall and have evaluated accuracy and consistency compared to manual scar classifications by expert observers. Our approach clusters voxels based on normalized intensity and was chosen through a systematic comparison of the performance of multivariate clustering on many combinations of image texture. Algorithm performance was determined by overlap with ground truth, using multiple overlap measures, and the accuracy of the estimation of the total amount of scar in the LA. Ground truth was determined using the STAPLE algorithm, which produces a probabilistic estimate of the true scar classification from multiple expert manual segmentations. Evaluation of the ground truth data set was based on both inter- and intra-observer agreement, with variation among expert classifiers indicating the difficulty of scar classification for a given a dataset. Our proposed automatic scar classification algorithm performs well for both scar localization and estimation of scar volume: for ground truth datasets considered easy, variability from the ground truth was low; for those considered difficult, variability from ground truth was on par with the variability across experts.

  5. Clinical assessment and C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin (Hp), and cardiac troponin I (cTnI) values of brachycephalic dogs with upper airway obstruction before and after surgery

    PubMed Central

    Planellas, Marta; Cuenca, Rafaela; Tabar, Maria-Dolores; Bertolani, Coralie; Poncet, Cyrill; Closa, Josep M.; Lorente, Juan; Cerón, José J.; Pastor, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Brachycephalic dogs have unique upper respiratory anatomy with abnormal breathing patterns that are similar to those in humans with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The objectives of this multicenter prospective study were to assess the effects of surgical correction on clinical signs in dogs with brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome (BAOS) and to evaluate the levels of several biomarkers [C-reactive protein (CRP); haptoglobin (Hp), and cardiac troponin I (cTnI)] used to determine systemic inflammation and myocardial damage. This study was conducted on 33 dogs with BAOS that were evaluated before and 1 to 2 mo after surgical correction. Palatoplasty was carried out by means of 2 different surgical techniques: carbon dioxide (CO2) laser (n = 12) and electrical scalpel (n = 21). Biomarker levels (CRP, Hp, and cTnI) were determined before and after surgery. There was a significant reduction in respiratory and gastrointestinal signs in dogs with BAOS after surgical treatment (P < 0.001). A greater reduction in respiratory signs (P < 0.002) was obtained using the CO2 laser. No statistical differences were found between CRP and cTnI levels, either before or after surgical correction. Haptoglobin concentration did increase significantly in the postsurgical period (P < 0.008). Surgical treatment in dogs with BAOS reduces clinical signs, regardless of the anatomical components present. Surgical treatment for BAOS is not useful to reduce CRP and Hp levels, probably because BAOS does not induce as obvious an inflammatory process in dogs as in human patients with OSAS. No reduction in cTnI levels was observed 1 mo after surgery in dogs with BAOS, which suggests that some degree of myocardial damage remains. PMID:25673910

  6. Depression and cardiac disease: epidemiology, mechanisms, and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Huffman, Jeff C; Celano, Christopher M; Beach, Scott R; Motiwala, Shweta R; Januzzi, James L

    2013-01-01

    In patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD), depression is common, persistent, and associated with worse health-related quality of life, recurrent cardiac events, and mortality. Both physiological and behavioral factors-including endothelial dysfunction, platelet abnormalities, inflammation, autonomic nervous system dysfunction, and reduced engagement in health-promoting activities-may link depression with adverse cardiac outcomes. Because of the potential impact of depression on quality of life and cardiac outcomes, the American Heart Association has recommended routine depression screening of all cardiac patients with the 2- and 9-item Patient Health Questionnaires. However, despite the availability of these easy-to-use screening tools and effective treatments, depression is underrecognized and undertreated in patients with CVD. In this paper, we review the literature on epidemiology, phenomenology, comorbid conditions, and risk factors for depression in cardiac disease. We outline the associations between depression and cardiac outcomes, as well as the mechanisms that may mediate these links. Finally, we discuss the evidence for and against routine depression screening in patients with CVD and make specific recommendations for when and how to assess for depression in this high-risk population. PMID:23653854

  7. Depression and Cardiac Disease: Epidemiology, Mechanisms, and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, Jeff C.; Celano, Christopher M.; Beach, Scott R.; Motiwala, Shweta R.; Januzzi, James L.

    2013-01-01

    In patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD), depression is common, persistent, and associated with worse health-related quality of life, recurrent cardiac events, and mortality. Both physiological and behavioral factors—including endothelial dysfunction, platelet abnormalities, inflammation, autonomic nervous system dysfunction, and reduced engagement in health-promoting activities—may link depression with adverse cardiac outcomes. Because of the potential impact of depression on quality of life and cardiac outcomes, the American Heart Association has recommended routine depression screening of all cardiac patients with the 2- and 9-item Patient Health Questionnaires. However, despite the availability of these easy-to-use screening tools and effective treatments, depression is underrecognized and undertreated in patients with CVD. In this paper, we review the literature on epidemiology, phenomenology, comorbid conditions, and risk factors for depression in cardiac disease. We outline the associations between depression and cardiac outcomes, as well as the mechanisms that may mediate these links. Finally, we discuss the evidence for and against routine depression screening in patients with CVD and make specific recommendations for when and how to assess for depression in this high-risk population. PMID:23653854

  8. Complete valvular heart apparatus model from 4D cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Grbi?, Sasa; Ionasec, Razvan; Vitanovski, Dime; Voigt, Ingmar; Wang, Yang; Georgescu, Bogdan; Navab, Nassir; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2010-01-01

    The cardiac valvular apparatus, composed of the aortic, mitral, pulmonary and tricuspid valve, is an essential part of the anatomical, functional and hemodynamic mechanism of the heart and the cardiovascular system as a whole. Valvular heart diseases often involve multiple dysfunctions and require joint assessment and therapy of the valves. In this paper, we propose a complete and modular patient-specific model of the cardiac valvular apparatus estimated from 4D cardiac CT data. A new constrained Multi-linear Shape Model (cMSM), conditioned by anatomical measurements, is introduced to represent the complex spatiotemporal variation of the heart valves. The cMSM is exploited within a learning-based framework to efficiently estimate the patient-specific valve parameters from cine images. Experiments on 64 4D cardiac CT studies demonstrate the performance and clinical potential of the proposed method. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time cardiologists and cardiac surgeons can benefit from an automatic quantitative evaluation of the complete valvular apparatus based on non-invasive imaging techniques. In conjunction with existent patient-specific chamber models, the presented valvular model enables personalized computation modeling and realistic simulation of the entire cardiac system. PMID:20879234

  9. Clinical significance of lactate in acute cardiac patients

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Valente, Serafina; Chiostri, Marco; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2015-01-01

    Lactate, as a metabolite of easy and quick assessment, has been studied over time in critically ill patients in order to evaluate its prognostic ability. The present review is focused on the prognostic role of lactate levels in acute cardiac patients (that is with acute coronary syndrome, cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest, non including post cardiac surgery patients). In patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with mechanical revascularization, hyperlactatemia identified a subset of patients at higher risk for early death and in-hospital complications, being strictly related mainly to hemodynamic derangement. The prognostic impact of hyperlactatemia on mortality has been documented in patients with cardiogenic shock and in those with cardiac arrest even if there is no cut-off value of lactate to be associated with worse outcome or to guide resuscitation or hemodynamic management. Therapeutic hypothermia seems to affect per se lactate values which have been shown to progressively decrease during hypothermia. The mechanism(s) accounting for lactate levels during hypothemia seem to be multiple ranging from the metabolic effects of reduced temperatures to the hemodynamic effects of hypothermia (i.e., reduced need of vasopressor agents). Serial lactate measurements over time, or lactate clearance, have been reported to be clinically more reliable than lactate absolute value also in acute cardiac patients. Despite differences in study design, timing of lactate measurements and type of acute cardiac conditions (i.e., cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest, refractory cardiac arrest), available evidence strongly suggests that higher lactate levels can be observed on admission in non-survivors and that higher lactate clearance is associated with better outcome. PMID:26322188

  10. Health Instruction Packages: Cardiac Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Gwen; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these five learning modules to instruct nurses, students, and other health care professionals in cardiac anatomy and functions and in fundamental electrocardiographic techniques. The first module, "Cardiac Anatomy and Physiology: A Review" by Gwen Phillips, teaches the learner to draw and label…

  11. GPCR signaling and cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Capote, Leany A; Mendez Perez, Roberto; Lymperopoulos, Anastasios

    2015-09-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), such as ?-adrenergic and angiotensin II receptors, located in the membranes of all three major cardiac cell types, i.e. myocytes, fibroblasts and endothelial cells, play crucial roles in regulating cardiac function and morphology. Their importance in cardiac physiology and disease is reflected by the fact that, collectively, they represent the direct targets of over a third of the currently approved cardiovascular drugs used in clinical practice. Over the past few decades, advances in elucidation of their structure, function and the signaling pathways they elicit, specifically in the heart, have led to identification of an increasing number of new molecular targets for heart disease therapy. Here, we review these signaling modalities employed by GPCRs known to be expressed in the cardiac myocyte membranes and to directly modulate cardiac contractility. We also highlight drugs and drug classes that directly target these GPCRs to modulate cardiac function, as well as molecules involved in cardiac GPCR signaling that have the potential of becoming novel drug targets for modulation of cardiac function in the future. PMID:25981298

  12. Redox Control of Cardiac Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nitin T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with various human diseases, and considerable attention has been paid to investigate their physiological effects. Various ROS are synthesized in the mitochondria and accumulate in the cytoplasm if the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism fails. The critical balance of this ROS synthesis and antioxidant defense systems is termed the redox system of the cell. Various cardiovascular diseases have also been affected by redox to different degrees. ROS have been indicated as both detrimental and protective, via different cellular pathways, for cardiac myocyte functions, electrophysiology, and pharmacology. Mostly, the ROS functions depend on the type and amount of ROS synthesized. While the literature clearly indicates ROS effects on cardiac contractility, their effects on cardiac excitability are relatively under appreciated. Cardiac excitability depends on the functions of various cardiac sarcolemal or mitochondrial ion channels carrying various depolarizing or repolarizing currents that also maintain cellular ionic homeostasis. ROS alter the functions of these ion channels to various degrees to determine excitability by affecting the cellular resting potential and the morphology of the cardiac action potential. Thus, redox balance regulates cardiac excitability, and under pathological regulation, may alter action potential propagation to cause arrhythmia. Understanding how redox affects cellular excitability may lead to potential prophylaxis or treatment for various arrhythmias. This review will focus on the studies of redox and cardiac excitation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 432–468. PMID:22897788

  13. Reoperation for bleeding in cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Katrine Lawaetz; Rauer, Line Juul; Mortensen, Poul Erik; Kjeldsen, Bo Juel

    2012-01-01

    At Odense University Hospital (OUH), 5–9% of all unselected cardiac surgical patients undergo reoperation due to excessive bleeding. The reoperated patients have an approximately three times greater mortality than non-reoperated. To reduce the rate of reoperations and mortality due to postoperative bleeding, we aim to identify risk factors that predict reoperation. A total of 1452 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery using extracorporeal circulation (ECC) between November 2005 and December 2008 at OUH were analysed. Statistical tests were used to identify risk factors for reoperation. We performed a case-note review on propensity-matched patients to assess the outcome of reoperation for bleeding regarding morbidity and mortality. In total, 101 patients (7.0%) underwent surgical re-exploration due to excessive postoperative bleeding. Significant risk factors for reoperation for bleeding after cardiac surgery was low ejection fraction, high EuroSCORE, procedures other than isolated CABG, elongated time on ECC, low body mass index, diabetes mellitus and preoperatively elevated s-creatinine. Reoperated patients significantly had a greater increase in postoperative s-creatinine and higher mortality. Surviving reoperated patients significantly had a lower EuroSCORE and a shorter time on ECC compared with non-survivors. The average time to re-exploration was 155 min longer for non-survivors when compared with survivors. PMID:22368106

  14. [No compression of cardiac cavities in transthoracic ultrasound does not exclude cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed

    Juhl-Olsen, Peter; Frederiksen, Christina Alcaraz; Sloth, Erik

    2014-11-24

    The clinical presentation of cardiac tamponade is difficult to distinguish from other causes of shock. Pericardial fluid is easy to visualize with cardiac ultrasound and a key sign of overt cardiac tamponade is the compression of right side cavities. We present two cases in which cardiac tamponade was present, but where compression of cardiac cavities could not be demon-strated with transthoracic cardiac ultrasound. This emphasizes that cardiac tamponade is still a clinical diagnosis. PMID:25430575

  15. Leadership in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Rao, Christopher; Patel, Vanash; Ibrahim, Michael; Ahmed, Kamran; Wong, Kathie A; Darzi, Ara; von Segesser, Ludwig K; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2011-06-01

    Despite the efficacy of cardiac surgery, less invasive interventions with more uncertain long-term outcomes are increasingly challenging surgery as first-line treatment for several congenital, degenerative and ischemic cardiac diseases. The specialty must evolve if it is to ensure its future relevance. More importantly, it must evolve to ensure that future patients have access to treatments with proven long-term effectiveness. This cannot be achieved without dynamic leadership; however, our contention is that this is not enough. The demands of a modern surgical career and the importance of the task at hand are such that the serendipitous emergence of traditional charismatic leadership cannot be relied upon to deliver necessary change. We advocate systematic analysis and strategic leadership at a local, national and international level in four key areas: Clinical Care, Research, Education and Training, and Stakeholder Engagement. While we anticipate that exceptional individuals will continue to shape the future of our specialty, the creation of robust structures to deliver collective leadership in these key areas is of paramount importance. PMID:20884217

  16. Cardiac Remodeling in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    ABEL, E. DALE; LITWIN, SHELDON E.; SWEENEY, GARY

    2010-01-01

    The dramatic increase in the prevalence of obesity and its strong association with cardiovascular disease have resulted in unprecedented interest in understanding the effects of obesity on the cardiovascular system. A consistent, but puzzling clinical observation is that obesity confers an increased susceptibility to the development of cardiac disease, while at the same time affording protection against subsequent mortality (termed the obesity paradox). In this review we focus on evidence available from human and animal model studies and summarize the ways in which obesity can influence structure and function of the heart. We also review current hypotheses regarding mechanisms linking obesity and various aspects of cardiac remodeling. There is currently great interest in the role of adipokines, factors secreted from adipose tissue, and their role in the numerous cardiovascular complications of obesity. Here we focus on the role of leptin and the emerging promise of adiponectin as a cardioprotective agent. The challenge of understanding the association between obesity and heart failure is complicated by the multifaceted interplay between various hemodynamic, metabolic, and other physiological factors that ultimately impact the myocardium. Furthermore, the end result of obesity-associated changes in the myocardial structure and function may vary at distinct stages in the progression of remodeling, may depend on the individual pathophysiology of heart failure, and may even remain undetected for decades before clinical manifestation. Here we summarize our current knowledge of this complex yet intriguing topic. PMID:18391168

  17. Decoding the Cardiac Message

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Gerald W

    2012-01-01

    This review reflects and expands upon the contents of the author’s presentation at The Thomas W. Smith Memorial Lecture at AHA Scientific Sessions, 2011. “Decoding the cardiac message” refers to accumulating results from ongoing microRNA research that is altering longstanding concepts of the mechanisms for, and consequences of, messenger RNA (mRNA) regulation in the heart. First, I provide a brief historical perspective of the field of molecular genetics, touching upon seminal research that paved the way for modern molecular cardiovascular research and helped establish the foundation for current concepts of mRNA regulation in the heart. I follow with some interesting details about the specific research that led to the discovery and appreciation of microRNAs as highly conserved pivotal regulators of RNA expression and translation. Finally, I provide a personal viewpoint as to how agnostic genome-wide techniques for measuring microRNAs, their mRNA targets, and their protein products can be applied in an integrated multi-systems approach to uncover direct and indirect effects of microRNAs. Experimental designs integrating next-generation sequencing and global proteomics have the potential to address unanswered questions regarding microRNA-mRNA interactions in cardiac disease, how disease alters mRNA targeting by specific microRNAs, and how mutational and polymorphic nucleotide variation in microRNAs can affect end-organ function and stress-response. PMID:22383710

  18. Apocynin Attenuates Cardiac Injury in Type 4 Cardiorenal Syndrome via Suppressing Cardiac Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 With Oxidative Stress Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Yu; Liu, Xun; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Kun; Huang, Feifei; Wang, Jing-Feng; Tang, Wanchun; Huang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background Type 4 cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) refers to the cardiac injury induced by chronic kidney disease. We aimed to assess oxidative stress and cardiac injury in patients with type 4 CRS, determine whether the antioxidant apocynin attenuated cardiac injury in rats with type 4 CRS, and explore potential mechanisms. Methods and Results A cross-sectional study was conducted among patients with type 4 CRS (n=17) and controls (n=16). Compared with controls, patients with type 4 CRS showed elevated oxidative stress, which was significantly correlated with cardiac hypertrophy and decreased ejection fraction. In vivo study, male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 5/6 subtotal nephrectomy and sham surgery, followed with apocynin or vehicle treatment for 8 weeks. Eight weeks after surgery, the 5/6 subtotal nephrectomy rats mimicked type 4 CRS, showing increased serum creatinine, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, and decreased ejection fraction compared with sham-operated animals. Cardiac malondialdehyde, NADPH oxidase activity, fibroblast growth factor-2, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation increased significantly in the 5/6 subtotal nephrectomy rats. These changes were significantly attenuated by apocynin. In vitro study showed that apocynin reduced angiotensin II–induced NADPH oxidase–dependent oxidative stress, upregulation of fibroblast growth factor-2 and fibrosis biomarkers, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in cardiac fibroblasts. Importantly, the ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 reduced the upregulation of fibroblast growth factor-2 and fibrosis biomarkers in angiotensin II–treated fibroblasts. Conclusions Oxidative stress is a candidate mediator for type 4 CRS. Apocynin attenuated cardiac injury in type 4 CRS rats via inhibiting NADPH oxidase–dependent oxidative stress-activated ERK1/2 pathway and subsequent fibroblast growth factor-2 upregulation. Our study added evidence to the beneficial effect of apocynin in type 4 CRS. PMID:26109504

  19. Effect of hypokinesia on cardiac contractile function and nervous regulation of the heart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyerson, F. Z.; Kapelko, V. I.; Gorina, M. S.; Shchegolkov, A. N.; Larinov, N. P.

    1980-01-01

    Longterm hypokinesia caused cardiac deadaptation in rabbits, which resulted in the diminishing of the left ventricular rate of contraction and relaxation, joined later by decreased vascular resistance. As a results, the ejection rate as well as stroke volume and cardiac output were normal. The decrease of the relaxation speed was more obvious at a high heart rate and results in shortening of the diastolic pause and diminishing of cardiac output. Hearts of the hypokinetic animals were characterized by normal maximal pressure developed by a unit of muccardial mass aorta clamping, decreased adrenoreactivity, and increased cholinoreactivity. This complex of changes is contrary to changes observed in adaptation to exercise, but is similar to changes observed in compensatory hypertrophy of the heart.

  20. Accurate automatic analysis of cardiac cine images.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Fahmi; Beache, Garth M; Gimel'farb, Georgy; Giridharan, Guruprasad A; El-Baz, Ayman

    2012-02-01

    Acquisition of noncontrast agent cine cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) gated images through the cardiac cycle is, at present, a well-established part of examining cardiac global function. However, regional quantification is less well established. We propose a new automated framework for analyzing the wall thickness and thickening function on these images that consists of three main steps. First, inner and outer wall borders are segmented from their surrounding tissues with a geometric deformable model guided by a special stochastic speed relationship. The latter accounts for Markov-Gibbs shape and appearance models of the object-of-interest and its background. In the second step, point-to-point correspondences between the inner and outer borders are found by solving the Laplace equation and provide initial estimates of the local wall thickness and the thickening function index. Finally, the effects of the segmentation error is reduced and a continuity analysis of the LV wall thickening is performed through iterative energy minimization using a generalized Gauss-Markov random field (GGMRF) image model. The framework was evaluated on 26 datasets from clinical cine CMR images that have been collected from patients with eleven independent studies, with chronic ischemic heart disease and heart damage. The performance evaluation of the proposed segmentation approach, based on the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) between manually drawn and automatically segmented contours, confirmed a high robustness and accuracy of the proposed segmentation approach. Furthermore, the Bland-Altman plot is used to assess the limit of agreement of our measurements of the global function parameters compared to the ground truth. Importantly, comparative results on the publicly available database (MICCAI 2009 Cardiac MR Left Ventricle Segmentation) demonstrated a superior performance of the proposed segmentation approach over published methods. PMID:22057040

  1. CRITICAL CARE ECHO ROUNDS: Echo in cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Asrress, Kaleab; Redwood, Simon; Gillon, Stuart; Walker, David

    2014-01-01

    Management of medical cardiac arrest is challenging. The internationally agreed approach is highly protocolised with therapy and diagnosis occurring in parallel. Early identification of the precipitating cause increases the likelihood of favourable outcome. Echocardiography provides an invaluable diagnostic tool in this context. Acquisition of echo images can be challenging in cardiac arrest and should occur in a way that minimises disruption to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In this article, the reversible causes of cardiac arrest are reviewed with associated echocardiography findings. Case A 71-year-old patient underwent right upper lobectomy for lung adenocarcinoma. On the 2nd post-operative day, he developed respiratory failure with rising oxygen requirement and right middle and lower lobe collapse and consolidation on chest X-ray. He was commenced on high-flow oxygen therapy and antibiotics. His condition continued to deteriorate and on the 3rd post-operative day he was intubated and mechanically ventilated. Six hours after intubation, he became suddenly hypotensive with a blood pressure of 50 systolic and then lost cardiac output. ECG monitoring showed pulseless electrical activity. CPR was commenced and return of circulation occurred after injection of 1 mg of adrenaline. Focused echocardiography was performed, which demonstrated signs of massive pulmonary embolism. Thrombolytic therapy with tissue plasminogen activator was given and his condition stabilised. PMID:26693304

  2. Mesothelial/monocytic incidental cardiac excrescence mimicking cardiac tumor.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Saumyaranjan; Arava, Sudheer; Muthukumaran, Subramanian; Sharma, Bhavna; Choudhary, Shiv Kumar; Ray, Ruma

    2016-01-01

    Mesothelial incidental cardiac excrescence is a non-neoplastic tumor-like lesion commonly occurring in the intracardiac region. The exact etiology is unclear. A 32-year-old woman presented with respiratory distress on exertion. Echocardiography showed severe aortic, mitral, and tricuspid regurgitation, for which triple-valve replacement was performed. A small cardiac excrescence was found over the aortic valve, measuring 0.6?×?0.3?×?0.3-cm, which on microscopy showed features of mesothelial/monocytic incidental cardiac excrescence. This condition is very rare but it must be recognized because it mimics a metastatic malignancy. PMID:24838237

  3. Cardiac Rehabilitation. A Handbook for Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brammell, H. L.; And Others

    Basic information about heart disease and functional capacity assessment and its application to activity/job counseling are presented in this handbook for vocational rehabilitation counselors. Sections include the following: impact of heart disease; basic anatomy and physiology (e.g., the heart, pulmonary circulation, causes of cardiac pain, and…

  4. Cardiac Autonomic Control in Individuals With Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulopoulou, Styliani; Baynard, Tracy; Collier, Scott; Giannopoulou, Ifigenia; Figueroa, Arturo; Beets, Michael; Pitetti, Kenneth; Fernhall, Bo

    2006-01-01

    Our goal in this study was to compare cardiac autonomic control at rest between 50 individuals with Down syndrome and 24 control participants without disabilities. Resting autonomic function was assessed using analysis of heart rate variability. Participants with Down syndrome had reduced total heart rate variability, which indicates possible…

  5. World Input-Output Network

    PubMed Central

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries. PMID:26222389

  6. Output Interference in Recognition Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criss, Amy H.; Malmberg, Kenneth J.; Shiffrin, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Dennis and Humphreys (2001) proposed that interference in recognition memory arises solely from the prior contexts of the test word: Interference does not arise from memory traces of other words (from events prior to the study list or on the study list, and regardless of similarity to the test item). We evaluate this model using output

  7. World Input-Output Network.

    PubMed

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries. PMID:26222389

  8. Coral Mortality and Bleaching Output

    EPA Science Inventory

    COMBO is a spreadsheet-based model for the use of managers, conservationists, and biologists for projecting the effects of climate change on coral reefs at local-to-regional scales. The COMBO (Coral Mortality and Bleaching Output) model calculates the impacts to coral reefs from...

  9. Magnolia Bioactive Constituent 4-O-Methylhonokiol Prevents the Impairment of Cardiac Insulin Signaling and the Cardiac Pathogenesis in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiguo; Chen, Jing; Zhou, Shanshan; Wang, Shudong; Cai, Xiaohong; Conklin, Daniel J.; Kim, Ki-Soo; Kim, Ki Ho; Tan, Yi; Zheng, Yang; Kim, Young Heui; Cai, Lu

    2015-01-01

    In obesity, cardiac insulin resistance is a putative cause of cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction. In our previous study, we observed that Magnolia extract BL153 attenuated high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced cardiac pathogenic changes. In this study, we further investigated the protective effects of the BL153 bioactive constituent, 4-O-methylhonokiol (MH), against HFD-induced cardiac pathogenesis and its possible mechanisms. C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal diet or a HFD with gavage administration of vehicle, BL153, or MH (low or high dose) daily for 24 weeks. Treatment with MH attenuated HFD-induced obesity, as evidenced by body weight gain, and cardiac pathogenesis, as assessed by the heart weight and echocardiography. Mechanistically, MH treatment significantly reduced HFD-induced impairment of cardiac insulin signaling by preferentially augmenting Akt2 signaling. MH also inhibited cardiac expression of the inflammatory factors tumor necrosis factor-? and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and increased the phosphorylation of nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2) as well as the expression of a Nrf2 downstream target gene heme oxygenase-1. The increased Nrf2 signaling was associated with decreased oxidative stress and damage, as reflected by lowered malondialdehyde and 3-nitrotyrosine levels. Furthermore, MH reduced HFD-induced cardiac lipid accumulation along with lowering expression of cardiac fatty acid translocase/CD36 protein. These results suggest that MH, a bioactive constituent of Magnolia, prevents HFD-induced cardiac pathogenesis by attenuating the impairment of cardiac insulin signaling, perhaps via activation of Nrf2 and Akt2 signaling to attenuate CD36-mediated lipid accumulation and lipotoxicity. PMID:26157343

  10. Trends in Cardiac Pacemaker Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Mallela, Venkateswara Sarma; Ilankumaran, V; Rao, N.Srinivasa

    2004-01-01

    Batteries used in Implantable cardiac pacemakers-present unique challenges to their developers and manufacturers in terms of high levels of safety and reliability. In addition, the batteries must have longevity to avoid frequent replacements. Technological advances in leads/electrodes have reduced energy requirements by two orders of magnitude. Micro-electronics advances sharply reduce internal current drain concurrently decreasing size and increasing functionality, reliability, and longevity. It is reported that about 600,000 pacemakers are implanted each year worldwide and the total number of people with various types of implanted pacemaker has already crossed 3 million. A cardiac pacemaker uses half of its battery power for cardiac stimulation and the other half for housekeeping tasks such as monitoring and data logging. The first implanted cardiac pacemaker used nickel-cadmium rechargeable battery, later on zinc-mercury battery was developed and used which lasted for over 2 years. Lithium iodine battery invented and used by Wilson Greatbatch and his team in 1972 made the real impact to implantable cardiac pacemakers. This battery lasts for about 10 years and even today is the power source for many manufacturers of cardiac pacemakers. This paper briefly reviews various developments of battery technologies since the inception of cardiac pacemaker and presents the alternative to lithium iodine battery for the near future. PMID:16943934

  11. Repair of a Complex Congenital Cardiac Defect

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... 00:00:14 ANNOUNCER: Over the next hour, live from Children's Hospital Boston's cardiac OR, see cardiac surgeons repair a complex congenital cardiac defect. Each year the pediatric cardiac surgery program provides surgical care to approximately 1,100 patients, including more than 700 cases of open ...

  12. Pulmonary Haemodynamics in Sickle Cell Disease Are Driven Predominantly by a High-Output State Rather Than Elevated Pulmonary Vascular Resistance: A Prospective 3-Dimensional Echocardiography/Doppler Study

    PubMed Central

    Mushemi-Blake, Sitali; Melikian, Narbeh; Drasar, Emma; Bhan, Amit; Lunt, Alan; Desai, Sujal R.; Greenough, Anne; Monaghan, Mark J.; Thein, Swee Lay; Shah, Ajay M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Patients with sickle cell disease have significant morbidity and mortality. Pulmonary hypertension is suggested to be an important contributor but its nature and severity in these patients and how best to non-invasively assess it are controversial. We hypothesised that a high-output state rather than primary pulmonary vascular pathology may be the major abnormality in sickle cell disease. This study aimed to evaluate the characteristics and severity of pulmonary hypertension in patients with sickle cell disease using detailed echocardiography. Methods and Results We undertook a prospective study in 122 consecutive stable outpatients with sickle cell disease and 30 age, gender and ethnicity-matched healthy controls. Echocardiographic evaluation included 3D ventricular volumes, sphericity, tissue Doppler, and non-invasive estimation of pulmonary vascular resistance. 36% of patients had a tricuspid regurgitant velocity ?2.5 m.s-1 but only 2% had elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and the prevalence of right ventricular dysfunction was very low. Patients with raised tricuspid regurgitant velocity had significantly elevated biventricular volumes and globular left ventricular remodelling, related primarily to anaemia. In a subgroup of patients who underwent cardiac catheterization, invasive pulmonary haemodynamics confirmed the echocardiographic findings. Conclusions Elevated cardiac output and left ventricular volume overload secondary to chronic anaemia may be the dominant factor responsible for abnormal cardiopulmonary haemodynamics in patients with sickle cell disease. 3D echocardiography with non-invasive estimation of pulmonary vascular resistance represents a valuable approach for initial evaluation of cardiopulmonary haemodynamics in sickle cell disease. PMID:26270484

  13. FoxO1 mediates TGF-beta1-dependent cardiac myofibroblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Vivar, Raúl; Humeres, Claudio; Muñoz, Claudia; Boza, Pía; Bolivar, Samir; Tapia, Felipe; Lavandero, Sergio; Chiong, Mario; Diaz-Araya, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac fibroblast differentiation to myofibroblast is a crucial process in the development of cardiac fibrosis and is tightly dependent on transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-?1). The transcription factor forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) regulates many cell functions, including cell death by apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. However, several aspects of this process remain unclear, including the role of FoxO1 in cardiac fibroblast differentiation and the regulation of FoxO1 by TGF-?1. Here, we report that TGF-?1 stimulates FoxO1 expression, promoting its dephosphorylation, nuclear localization and transcriptional activity in cultured cardiac fibroblasts. TGF-?1 also increases differentiation markers such as ?-smooth muscle actin, connective tissue growth factor, and pro-collagen I, whereas it decreases cardiac fibroblast proliferation triggered by fetal bovine serum. TGF-?1 also increases levels of p21waf/cip-cycle inhibiting factor protein, a cytostatic factor promoting cell cycle arrest and cardiac fibroblast differentiation. In addition, TGF-?1 increases cardiac fibroblast contractile capacity as assessed by collagen gel contraction assay. The effect of TGF-?1 on cardiac fibroblast differentiation was prevented by FoxO1 down-regulation and enhanced by FoxO1 overexpression. Thus, our findings reveal that FoxO1 is regulated by TGF-?1 and plays a critical role in cardiac fibroblast differentiation. We propose that FoxO1 is an attractive new target for anti-fibrotic therapy. PMID:26518453

  14. Physics of Cardiac Arrhythmogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karma, Alain

    2013-04-01

    A normal heartbeat is orchestrated by the stable propagation of an excitation wave that produces an orderly contraction. In contrast, wave turbulence in the ventricles, clinically known as ventricular fibrillation (VF), stops the heart from pumping and is lethal without prompt defibrillation. I review experimental, computational, and theoretical studies that have shed light on complex dynamical phenomena linked to the initiation, maintenance, and control of wave turbulence. I first discuss advances made to understand the precursor state to a reentrant arrhythmia where the refractory period of cardiac tissue becomes spatiotemporally disordered; this is known as an arrhythmogenic tissue substrate. I describe observed patterns of transmembrane voltage and intracellular calcium signaling that can contribute to this substrate, and symmetry breaking instabilities to explain their formation. I then survey mechanisms of wave turbulence and discuss novel methods that exploit electrical pacing stimuli to control precursor patterns and low-energy pulsed electric fields to control turbulence.

  15. Cardiac action potential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qinghai; Lipp, Peter; Kaestner, Lars

    2013-06-01

    Action potentials in cardiac myocytes have durations in the order of magnitude of 100 milliseconds. In biomedical investigations the documentation of the occurrence of action potentials is often not sufficient, but a recording of the shape of an action potential allows a functional estimation of several molecular players. Therefore a temporal resolution of around 500 images per second is compulsory. In the past such measurements have been performed with photometric approaches limiting the measurement to one cell at a time. In contrast, imaging allows reading out several cells at a time with additional spatial information. Recent developments in camera technologies allow the acquisition with the required speed and sensitivity. We performed action potential imaging on isolated adult cardiomyocytes of guinea pigs utilizing the fluorescent membrane potential sensor di-8-ANEPPS and latest electron-multiplication CCD as well as scientific CMOS cameras of several manufacturers. Furthermore, we characterized the signal to noise ratio of action potential signals of varying sets of cameras, dye concentrations and objective lenses. We ensured that di-8-ANEPPS itself did not alter action potentials by avoiding concentrations above 5 ?M. Based on these results we can conclude that imaging is a reliable method to read out action potentials. Compared to conventional current-clamp experiments, this optical approach allows a much higher throughput and due to its contact free concept leaving the cell to a much higher degree undisturbed. Action potential imaging based on isolated adult cardiomyocytes can be utilized in pharmacological cardiac safety screens bearing numerous advantages over approaches based on heterologous expression of hERG channels in cell lines.

  16. Videoscope-assisted cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Robert Jeen-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Videoscope-assisted cardiac surgery (VACS) offers a minimally invasive platform for most cardiac operations such as coronary and valve procedures. It includes robotic and thoracoscopic approaches and each has strengths and weaknesses. The success depends on appropriate hardware setup, staff training, and troubleshooting efficiency. In our institution, we often use VACS for robotic left-internal-mammary-artery takedown, mitral valve repair, and various intra-cardiac operations such as tricuspid valve repair, combined Maze procedure, atrial septal defect repair, ventricular septal defect repair, etc. Hands-on reminders and updated references are provided for reader’s further understanding of the topic. PMID:24455172

  17. Videoscope-assisted cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Kuan-Ming; Chen, Robert Jeen-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Videoscope-assisted cardiac surgery (VACS) offers a minimally invasive platform for most cardiac operations such as coronary and valve procedures. It includes robotic and thoracoscopic approaches and each has strengths and weaknesses. The success depends on appropriate hardware setup, staff training, and troubleshooting efficiency. In our institution, we often use VACS for robotic left-internal-mammary-artery takedown, mitral valve repair, and various intra-cardiac operations such as tricuspid valve repair, combined Maze procedure, atrial septal defect repair, ventricular septal defect repair, etc. Hands-on reminders and updated references are provided for reader's further understanding of the topic. PMID:24455172

  18. Epigenetic regulation in cardiac fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li-Ming; Xu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis represents an adoptive response in the heart exposed to various stress cues. While resolution of the fibrogenic response heralds normalization of heart function, persistent fibrogenesis is usually associated with progressive loss of heart function and eventually heart failure. Cardiac fibrosis is regulated by a myriad of factors that converge on the transcription of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins, a process the epigenetic machinery plays a pivotal role. In this mini-review, we summarize recent advances regarding the epigenetic regulation of cardiac fibrosis focusing on the role of histone and DNA modifications and non-coding RNAs. PMID:26635926

  19. Device-related atypical pressure ulcer after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Glasgow, D; Millen, I S; Nzewi, O C; Varadarajaran, B

    2014-08-01

    Medical devices must be closely monitored to prevent harm to patients. Pressure ulcers secondary to medical devices present a significant health burden in terms of length of stay in hospital and cost. Intensivists, anaesthetists and other professionals involved in managing critically ill patients following cardiac surgery need to be aware that pressure ulcers may develop in atypical sites and present at a later stage of the hospital stay. This case report highlights the important issue of device-related pressure ulcers in the cardiac surgical intensive care setting, particularly when the clinical status of the patient may preclude routine assessment and prophylaxis. An algorithm for preventing such pressure ulcers is suggested. PMID:25139595

  20. Nuclear Image-Guided Approaches for Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weihua; Garcia, Ernest V

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a standard treatment for patients with heart failure. However, 30-40 % of the patients having CRT do not respond to CRT with improved clinical symptom and cardiac functions. It is important for CRT response that left ventricular (LV) lead is placed away from scar and at or near the site of the latest mechanical activation. Nuclear image-guided approaches for CRT have shown significant clinical value to assess LV myocardial viability and mechanical dyssynchrony, recommend the optimal LV lead position, and navigate the LV lead to the target coronary venous site. All these techniques, once validated and implemented, should impact the current clinical practice. PMID:26714813

  1. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound to evaluate changes in renal cortical perfusion around cardiac surgery: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is a new technique that might enable portable and non-invasive organ perfusion quantification at the bedside. However, it has not yet been tested in critically ill patients. We sought to establish CEUS's feasibility, safety, reproducibility and potential diagnostic value in the assessment of renal cortical perfusion in the peri-operative period in cardiac surgery patients. Methods We recruited twelve patients deemed at risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) planned for elective cardiac surgery. We performed renal CEUS with destruction-replenishment sequences before the operation, on ICU arrival and the day following the admission. Enhancement was obtained with Sonovue® (Bracco, Milano, Italy) at an infusion rate of 1 ml/min. We collected hemodynamic parameters before, during and after contrast agent infusion. At each study time, we obtained five video sequences, which were analysed using dedicated software by two independent radiologists blinded to patient and time. The main output was a perfusion index (PI), corresponding to the ratio of relative blood volume (RBV) over mean transit time (mTT). Results All 36 renal CEUS studies, including 24 in the immediate post-operative period could be performed and were well tolerated. Correlation between readers for PI was excellent (R2 = 0.96, P < 0.0001). Compared with baseline, there was no overall difference in median PI's on ICU admission. However, the day after surgery, median PI's had decreased by 50% (P < 0.01) (22% decrease in RBV (P = 0.09); 48% increase in mTT (P = 0.04), both suggestive of decreased perfusion). These differences persisted after correction for haemoglobin; vasopressors use and mean arterial pressure. Four patients developed AKI in the post-operative period. Conclusions CEUS appears feasible and well-tolerated in patients undergoing cardiac surgery even immediately after ICU admission. CEUS derived-parameters suggest a decrease in renal perfusion occurring within 24 hours of surgery. PMID:23849270

  2. Adaptive Neural Output Feedback Control of Output-Constrained Nonlinear Systems With Unknown Output Nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi; Lai, Guanyu; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Chun Lung Philip

    2015-08-01

    This paper addresses the problem of adaptive neural output-feedback control for a class of special nonlinear systems with the hysteretic output mechanism and the unmeasured states. A modified Bouc-Wen model is first employed to capture the output hysteresis phenomenon in the design procedure. For its fusion with the neural networks and the Nussbaum-type function, two key lemmas are established using some extended properties of this model. To avoid the bad system performance caused by the output nonlinearity, a barrier Lyapunov function technique is introduced to guarantee the prescribed constraint of the tracking error. In addition, a robust filtering method is designed to cancel the restriction that all the system states require to be measured. Based on the Lyapunov synthesis, a new neural adaptive controller is constructed to guarantee the prescribed convergence of the tracking error and the semiglobal uniform ultimate boundedness of all the signals in the closed-loop system. Simulations are implemented to evaluate the performance of the proposed neural control algorithm in this paper. PMID:25915964

  3. Identification of cardiac stem cells within mature cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Belostotskaya, Galina; Nevorotin, Alexey; Galagudza, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac stem cells are described in a number of mammalian species including humans. Cardiac stem cell clusters consisting of both lineage-negative and partially committed cells are generally identified between contracting cardiac myocytes. In the present study, c-kit(+), Sca(+), and Isl1(+) stem cells were revealed to be located inside the sarcoplasm of cardiac myocytes in myocardial cell cultures derived from newborn, 20-, and 40-day-old rats. Intracellularly localized cardiac stem cells had a coating or capsule with a few pores that opened into the host cell sarcoplasm. The similar structures were also identified in the suspension of freshly isolated myocardial cells (ex vivo) of 20- and 40-day-old rats. The results from this study provide direct evidence for the replicative division of encapsulated stem cells, followed by their partial cardiomyogenic differentiation. The latter is substantiated by the release of multiple transient amplifying cells following the capsule rupture. In conclusion, functional cardiac stem cells can reside not only exterior to but also within cardiomyocytes. PMID:26280107

  4. A meta-analysis of in vivo vertebrate cardiac performance: implications for cardiovascular support in the evolution of endothermy.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Stanley S; Hedrick, Michael S

    2015-04-15

    Endothermy in birds and mammals is associated with high body temperatures, and high rates of metabolism that are aerobically supported by elevated rates of cardiovascular O2 transport. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to examine cardiovascular data from ectothermic and endothermic vertebrates, at rest and during exercise, with the goal of identifying key variables that may have contributed to the role of the cardiovascular system in supporting high rates of O2 transport associated with endothermy. Vascular conductance, cardiac power and stroke work were summarized and calculated from a variety of studies at rest and during exercise for five classes of vertebrates where data were available. Conductance and cardiac power were linearly related to cardiac output from rest to exercise and also interspecifically. Exercise cardiac power and stroke work were greater in the endothermic species, owing to increased flow resulting from increased heart rate and increased pressure. Increased relative ventricle mass (RVM) was related to increased stroke volume in both groups. However, the increased RVM of endotherms was related to the increased pressure, as stroke work per gram of ventricle during exercise was equivalent between the groups. Cardiac power was linearly related to aerobic metabolic power, with 158?mW aerobic power output achieved per mW of cardiac power input. This analysis indicates that the greatly increased heart rate and cardiac stroke work leading to increased blood flow rate and blood pressure was necessary to support the metabolic requirements of endothermy. PMID:25911732

  5. Cardiac responses to hypoxia and reoxygenation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zarndt, Rachel; Piloto, Sarah; Powell, Frank L; Haddad, Gabriel G; Bodmer, Rolf; Ocorr, Karen

    2015-12-01

    An adequate supply of oxygen is important for the survival of all tissues, but it is especially critical for tissues with high-energy demands, such as the heart. Insufficient tissue oxygenation occurs under a variety of conditions, including high altitude, embryonic and fetal development, inflammation, and thrombotic diseases, often affecting multiple organ systems. Responses and adaptations of the heart to hypoxia are of particular relevance in human cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, in which the effects of hypoxic exposure can range in severity from transient to long-lasting. This study uses the genetic model system Drosophila to investigate cardiac responses to acute (30 min), sustained (18 h), and chronic (3 wk) hypoxia with reoxygenation. Whereas hearts from wild-type flies recovered quickly after acute hypoxia, exposure to sustained or chronic hypoxia significantly compromised heart function upon reoxygenation. Hearts from flies with mutations in sima, the Drosophila homolog of the hypoxia-inducible factor alpha subunit (HIF-?), exhibited exaggerated reductions in cardiac output in response to hypoxia. Heart function in hypoxia-selected flies, selected over many generations for survival in a low-oxygen environment, revealed reduced cardiac output in terms of decreased heart rate and fractional shortening compared with their normoxia controls. Hypoxia-selected flies also had smaller hearts, myofibrillar disorganization, and increased extracellular collagen deposition, consistent with the observed reductions in contractility. This study indicates that longer-duration hypoxic insults exert deleterious effects on heart function that are mediated, in part, by sima and advances Drosophila models for the genetic analysis of cardiac-specific responses to hypoxia and reoxygenation. PMID:26377557

  6. Promoting patient uptake and adherence in cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Philippa; Taylor, Fiona; Beswick, Andrew; Wise, Frances; Moxham, Tiffany; Rees, Karen; Ebrahim, Shah

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac rehabilitation is an important component of recovery from coronary events but uptake and adherence to such programmes are below the recommended levels. This aim is to update a previous non-Cochrane systematic review which examined interventions that may potentially improve cardiac patient uptake and adherence in rehabilitation or its components and concluded that there is insufficient evidence to make specific recommendations. Objectives To determine the effects of interventions to increase patient uptake of, and adherence to, cardiac rehabilitation. Search methods A previous systematic review identified studies published prior to June 2001. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library (Issue 4 2007), MEDLINE (2001 to January 2008), EMBASE (2001 to January 2008), CINAHL (2001 to January 2008), PsycINFO (2001 to January 2008), Web of Science: ISI Proceedings (2001 to April 2008), and NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (CRD) databases (Health Technology Assessment (HTA) and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE)) from 2001 to January 2008. Reference lists of identified systematic reviews and randomised control trials (RCTs) were also checked for additional studies. Selection criteria Adults with myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass graft, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, heart failure, angina, or coronary heart disease eligible for cardiac rehabilitation and randomised or quasi-randomised trials of interventions to increase uptake or adherence to cardiac rehabilitation or any of its component parts. Only studies reporting a measure of adherence were included. Data collection and analysis Titles and abstracts of all identified references were screened for eligibility by two reviewers independently and full papers of potentially relevant trials were obtained and checked. Included studies were assessed for risk of bias by two reviewers. Main results Ten studies were identified, three of interventions to improve uptake of cardiac rehabilitation and seven of interventions to increase adherence. Meta-analysis was not possible due to multiple sources of heterogeneity. All three interventions targeting uptake of cardiac rehabilitation were effective. Two of seven studies intended to increase adherence had a significant effect. Only one study reported the non-significant effects of the intervention on cardiovascular risk factors and no studies reported data on mortality, morbidities, costs or health care resource utilisation. Authors’ conclusions There is some evidence to suggest that interventions to increase the uptake of cardiac rehabilitation can be effective. Few practice recommendations for increasing adherence to cardiac rehabilitation can be made at this time. Interventions targeting patient identified barriers may increase the likelihood of success. Further high quality research is needed. PMID:20614453

  7. Shensongyangxin protects against pressure overload?induced cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Di-Fei; Wu, Qing-Qing; Ni, Jian; Deng, Wei; Wei, Cong; Jia, Zhen-Hua; Zhou, Heng; Zhou, Meng-Qiao; Bian, Zhou-Yan; Tang, Qi-Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Shensongyangxin (SSYX) is a medicinal herb, which has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine. Various pharmacological activities of SSYX have been identified. However, the role of SSYX in cardiac hypertrophy remains to be fully elucidated. In present study, aortic banding (AB) was performed to induce cardiac hypertrophy in mice. SSYX (520 mg/kg) was administered by daily gavage between 1 and 8 weeks following surgery. The extent of cardiac hypertrophy was then evaluated by pathological and molecular analyses of heart tissue samples. In addition, in vitro experiments were performed to confirm the in vivo results. The data of the present study demonstrated that SSYX prevented the cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis induced by AB, as assessed by measurements of heart weight and gross heart size, hematoxylin and eosin staining, cross?sectional cardiomyocyte area and the mRNA expression levels of hypertrophic markers. SSYX also inhibited collagen deposition and suppressed the expression of transforming growth factor ? (TGF?), connective tissue growth factor, fibronectin, collagen ?? and collagen ??, which was mediated by the inhibition of the TGF?/small mothers against decapentaplegic (Smad) signaling pathway. The inhibitory action of SSYX on cardiac hypertrophy was mediated by the inhibition of Akt signaling. In vitro investigations in the rat H9c2 cardiac cells also demonstrated that SSYX attenuated angiotensin II?induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. These findings suggested that SSYX attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in the pressure overloaded mouse heart. Therefore, the cardioprotective effect of SSYX is associated with inhibition of the Akt and TGF?/Smad signaling pathways. PMID:26648261

  8. Microgyroscope with closed loop output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor); Tang, Tony K. (Inventor); Cargille, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A micro-gyroscope (10) having closed loop operation by a control voltage (V.sub.TY), that is demodulated by an output signal of the sense electrodes (S1, S2), providing Coriolis torque rebalance to prevent displacement of the micro-gyroscope (10) on the output axis (y-axis). The present invention provides wide-band, closed-loop operation for a micro-gyroscope (10) and allows the drive frequency to be closely tuned to a high Q sense axis resonance. A differential sense signal (S1-S2) is compensated and fed back by differentially changing the voltage on the drive electrodes to rebalance Coriolis torque. The feedback signal is demodulated in phase with the drive axis signal (K.sub..omega..crclbar..sub.x) to produce a measure of the Coriolis force.

  9. UFO - The Universal FEYNRULES Output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degrande, Céline; Duhr, Claude; Fuks, Benjamin; Grellscheid, David; Mattelaer, Olivier; Reiter, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    We present a new model format for automatized matrix-element generators, the so-called Universal FEYNRULES Output (UFO). The format is universal in the sense that it features compatibility with more than one single generator and is designed to be flexible, modular and agnostic of any assumption such as the number of particles or the color and Lorentz structures appearing in the interaction vertices. Unlike other model formats where text files need to be parsed, the information on the model is encoded into a PYTHON module that can easily be linked to other computer codes. We then describe an interface for the MATHEMATICA package FEYNRULES that allows for an automatic output of models in the UFO format.

  10. Standardized multiple output power supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragusa, E. V.

    1975-01-01

    A comprehensive program to develop a prototype model of a standardized multiple output power supply for use in space flight applications is described. The prototype unit was tested and evaluated to assure that the design would provide near optimum performance for the planned application. The prototype design used a dc-to-dc converter incorporating reqenerative current feedback with a time-ratio controlled duty cycle to achieve high efficiency over a wide variation of input voltage and output loads. The packaging concept uses a mainframe capable of accommodating up to four inverter/regulator modules with one common input filter and housekeeping module. Each inverter/regulator module provides a maximum of 100 watts or 10 amperes. Each module is adaptable to operate at any voltage between 4.0 volts and 108 volts. The prototype unit contains +5, + or - 15 and +28 volt modules.

  11. Image guidance in cardiac electrophysiology

    E-print Network

    Malchano, Zachary John

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are characterized by a disruption or abnormal conduction of electrical signals within the heart. Treatment of arrhythmias has dramatically evolved over the past half-century, and today, minimally-invasive ...

  12. Blood Conservation in Cardiac Surgery 

    E-print Network

    Slight, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac surgery is traditionally a heavy user of blood and blood products. Until recently, the benefits of transfusion have been largely assumed and the risks relatively ignored. This has prompted us to examine new ways ...

  13. Robot-assisted cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Norihiko; Watanabe, Go

    2015-01-01

    Recognition of the significant advantages of minimizing surgical trauma has resulted in the development of minimally invasive surgical procedures. Endoscopic surgery offers patients the benefits of minimally invasive surgery, and surgical robots have enhanced the ability and precision of surgeons. Consequently, technological advances have facilitated totally endoscopic robotic cardiac surgery, which has allowed surgeons to operate endoscopically rather than through a median sternotomy during cardiac surgery. Thus, repairs for structural heart conditions, including mitral valve plasty, atrial septal defect closure, multivessel minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass grafting (MIDCAB), and totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), can be totally endoscopic. Robot-assisted cardiac surgery as minimally invasive cardiac surgery is reviewed. PMID:26134073

  14. Symptoms of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... you need to protect your health. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Cardiac Arrest About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs ... Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page ...

  15. Computational cardiac anatomy using MRI.

    PubMed

    Beg, Mirza Faisal; Helm, Patrick A; McVeigh, Elliot; Miller, Michael I; Winslow, Raimond L

    2004-11-01

    Ventricular geometry and fiber orientation may undergo global or local remodeling in cardiac disease. However, there are as yet no mathematical and computational methods for quantifying variation of geometry and fiber orientation or the nature of their remodeling in disease. Toward this goal, a landmark and image intensity-based large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping (LDDMM) method to transform heart geometry into common coordinates for quantification of shape and form was developed. Two automated landmark placement methods for modeling tissue deformations expected in different cardiac pathologies are presented. The transformations, computed using the combined use of landmarks and image intensities, yields high-registration accuracy of heart anatomies even in the presence of significant variation of cardiac shape and form. Once heart anatomies have been registered, properties of tissue geometry and cardiac fiber orientation in corresponding regions of different hearts may be quantified. PMID:15508155

  16. Output gear of automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Ideta, Y.; Miida, S.

    1986-12-16

    An automatic transmission is described for a front engine, front wheel drive vehicle, comprising: a torque converter; a main power train comprising a rotatory terminal member, the main power train being connected with the torque converter for transmitting a driving torque from the torque converter to the terminal member; housing means enclosing the main power train, the housing means having a cylindrical bore and at least one oil feed passage opening in a cylindrical surface of the bore, and an output gear rotatably supported by the housing means and connected detachably with the terminal member of the main power train for transmitting the driving torque from the main power train to front wheels of the vehicle. The main power train is placed between the torque converter and the output gear, the output gear having a hub which is splined detachably to the terminal member, and which is fitting in the bore of the housing means in such a manner that the hub can rotate in the bore. The hub has an annular groove formed on an outer cylindrical surface of the hub, the output gear being formed with lubricating means extending from the annular groove for conveying oil from the annular groove, the oil feed passage of the housing means opening into the annular groove for supplying oil into the lubricating means through the annular groove. The annular groove has sufficient depth and width within a range permitted by a strength of the hub to prevent a shortage of the oil supply through the annular groove to the lubricating means due to a centrifugal force of the oil rotating in the annular groove together with walls of the annular groove.

  17. Cardiac manifestations in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lambova, Sevdalina

    2014-01-01

    Primary cardiac involvement, which develops as a direct consequence of systemic sclerosis (SSc), may manifest as myocardial damage, fibrosis of the conduction system, pericardial and, less frequently, as valvular disease. In addition, cardiac complications in SSc may develop as a secondary phenomenon due to pulmonary arterial hypertension and kidney pathology. The prevalence of primary cardiac involvement in SSc is variable and difficult to determine because of the diversity of cardiac manifestations, the presence of subclinical periods, the type of diagnostic tools applied, and the diversity of patient populations. When clinically manifested, cardiac involvement is thought to be an important prognostic factor. Profound microvascular disease is a pathognomonic feature of SSc, as both vasospasm and structural alterations are present. Such alterations are thought to predict macrovascular atherosclerosis over time. There are contradictory reports regarding the prevalence of atherosclerosis in SSc. According to some authors, the prevalence of atherosclerosis of the large epicardial coronary arteries is similar to that of the general population, in contrast with other rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. However, the level of inflammation in SSc is inferior. Thus, the atherosclerotic process may not be as aggressive and not easily detectable in smaller studies. Echocardiography (especially tissue Doppler imaging), single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and cardiac computed tomography are sensitive techniques for earlier detection of both structural and functional scleroderma-related cardiac pathologies. Screening for subclinical cardiac involvement via modern, sensitive tools provides an opportunity for early diagnosis and treatment, which is of crucial importance for a positive outcome. PMID:25276300

  18. [The athletes' ECG and the exercise related sudden cardiac death].

    PubMed

    Trachsel, Lukas-Daniel; Wilhelm, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    Regular physical activity induces structural, electrical and functional cardiac adaptations. The main challenge for the athletes' physician is to distinguish abnormal structural changes of the heart from training-induced adaptations (so-called “athlete's heart”). In athletes with underlying cardiac disease, physical activity may be a trigger, not the cause of exercise-induced tachyarrhythmia's and sudden cardiac death (SCD). To identify athletes with cardiac diseases and increased risk for an SCD, the European society of cardiology (ESC) recommends a pre-participation screening in elite athletes which was adopted by the Swiss society of sports medicine. The screening includes a specific medical history, cardiac auscultation and a resting ECG. Due to the high number of false-positive cases of athletes' ECGs based on traditional criteria, the ESC assessment criteria were adjusted to account for training-related changes of the ECG. The sensitivity and especially the specificity could be improved in the “revised Seattle criteria” in 2014. During the last years main attention has been shifted to the early repolarization pattern: additionally to (endurance-) training there is a clear association with male gender, ethnicity, changes in autonomic nervous system activity and high QRS-voltage criteria PMID:26098068

  19. Mammalian enabled (Mena) is a critical regulator of cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Frédérick; Belmonte, Stephen L.; Ram, Rashmi; Noujaim, Sami F.; Dunaevsky, Olga; Protack, Tricia L.; Jalife, Jose; Todd Massey, H.; Gertler, Frank B.

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian enabled (Mena) of the Drosophila enabled/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein gene family is a cytoskeletal protein implicated in actin regulation and cell motility. Cardiac Mena expression is enriched in intercalated discs (ICD), the critical intercellular communication nexus between adjacent muscle cells. We previously identified Mena gene expression to be a key predictor of human and murine heart failure (HF). To determine the in vivo function of Mena in the heart, we assessed Mena protein expression in multiple HF models and characterized the effects of genetic Mena deletion on cardiac structure and function. Immunoblot analysis revealed significant upregulation of Mena protein expression in left ventricle tissue from patients with end-stage HF, calsequestrin-overexpressing mice, and isoproterenol-infused mice. Characterization of the baseline cardiac function of adult Mena knockout mice (Mena?/?) via echocardiography demonstrated persistent cardiac dysfunction, including a significant reduction in percent fractional shortening compared with wild-type littermates. Electrocardiogram PR and QRS intervals were significantly prolonged in Mena?/? mice, manifested by slowed conduction on optical mapping studies. Ultrastructural analysis of Mena?/? hearts revealed disrupted organization and widening of ICD structures, mislocalization of the gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43) to the lateral borders of cardiomyoycytes, and increased Cx43 expression. Furthermore, the expression of vinculin (an adherens junction protein) was significantly reduced in Mena?/? mice. We report for the first time that genetic ablation of Mena results in cardiac dysfunction, highlighted by diminished contractile performance, disrupted ICD structure, and slowed electrical conduction. PMID:21335464

  20. Measure of synchrony in the activity of intrinsic cardiac neurons

    PubMed Central

    Longpré, Jean-Philippe; Salavatian, Siamak; Beaumont, Eric; Armour, J. Andrew; Ardell, Jeffrey L.; Jacquemet, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Recent multielectrode array recordings in ganglionated plexi of canine atria have opened the way to the study of population dynamics of intrinsic cardiac neurons. These data provide critical insights into the role of local processing that these ganglia play in the regulation of cardiac function. Low firing rates, marked non-stationarity, interplay with the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems and artifacts generated by myocardial activity create new constraints not present in brain recordings for which almost all neuronal analysis techniques have been developed. We adapted and extended the jitter-based synchrony index (SI) to (1) provide a robust and computationally-efficient tool for assessing the level and statistical significance of SI between cardiac neurons, (2) estimate the bias on SI resulting from neuronal activity possibly hidden in myocardial artifacts, (3) quantify the synchrony or anti-synchrony between neuronal activity and the phase in the cardiac and respiratory cycles. The method was validated on firing time series from a total of 98 individual neurons identified in 8 dog experiments. SI ranged from ?0.14 to 0.66, with 23 pairs of neurons with SI>0.1. The estimated bias due to artifacts was typically < 1%. Strongly cardiovascular- and pulmonary-related neurons (SI>0.5) were found. Results support the use of jitter-based synchrony index in the context of intrinsic cardiac neurons. PMID:24621585

  1. FGF21 and Cardiac Physiopathology

    PubMed Central

    Planavila, Anna; Redondo-Angulo, Ibon; Villarroya, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    The heart is not traditionally considered either a target or a site of fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21) production. However, recent findings indicate that FGF21 can act as a cardiomyokine; that is, it is produced by cardiac cells at significant levels and acts in an autocrine manner on the heart itself. The heart is sensitive to the effects of FGF21, both systemic and locally generated, owing to the expression in cardiomyocytes of ?-Klotho, the key co-receptor known to confer specific responsiveness to FGF21 action. FGF21 has been demonstrated to protect against cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac inflammation, and oxidative stress. FGF21 expression in the heart is induced in response to cardiac insults, such as experimental cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial infarction in rodents, as well as in failing human hearts. Intracellular mechanisms involving PPAR? and Sirt1 mediate transcriptional regulation of the FGF21 gene in response to exogenous stimuli. In humans, circulating FGF21 levels are elevated in coronary heart disease and atherosclerosis, and are associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes. These findings provide new insights into the role of FGF21 in the heart and may offer potential therapeutic strategies for cardiac disease. PMID:26379627

  2. Cardiac Regeneration and Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Mignone, John; MacLellan, W Robb

    2015-10-01

    After decades of believing the heart loses the ability to regenerate soon after birth, numerous studies are now reporting that the adult heart may indeed be capable of regeneration, although the magnitude of new cardiac myocyte formation varies greatly. While this debate has energized the field of cardiac regeneration and led to a dramatic increase in our understanding of cardiac growth and repair, it has left much confusion in the field as to the prospects of regenerating the heart. Studies applying modern techniques of genetic lineage tracing and carbon-14 dating have begun to establish limits on the amount of endogenous regeneration after cardiac injury, but the underlying cellular mechanisms of this regeneration remained unclear. These same studies have also revealed an astonishing capacity for cardiac repair early in life that is largely lost with adult differentiation and maturation. Regardless, this renewed focus on cardiac regeneration as a therapeutic goal holds great promise as a novel strategy to address the leading cause of death in the developed world. PMID:26269526

  3. Drosophila Models of Cardiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Nicole; Wessells, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has emerged as a useful model for cardiac diseases, both developmental abnormalities and adult functional impairment. Using the tools of both classical and molecular genetics, the study of the developing fly heart has been instrumental in identifying the major signaling events of cardiac field formation, cardiomyocyte specification, and the formation of the functioning heart tube. The larval stage of fly cardiac development has become an important model system for testing isolated preparations of living hearts for the effects of biological and pharmacological compounds on cardiac activity. Meanwhile, the recent development of effective techniques to study adult cardiac performance in the fly has opened new uses for the Drosophila model system. The fly system is now being used to study long-term alterations in adult performance caused by factors such as diet, exercise, and normal aging. The fly is a unique and valuable system for the study of such complex, long-term interactions, as it is the only invertebrate genetic model system with a working heart developmentally homologous to the vertebrate heart. Thus, the fly model combines the advantages of invertebrate genetics (such as large populations, facile molecular genetic techniques, and short lifespan) with physiological measurement techniques that allow meaningful comparisons with data from vertebrate model systems. As such, the fly model is well situated to make important contributions to the understanding of complicated interactions between environmental factors and genetics in the long-term regulation of cardiac performance. PMID:21377627

  4. Cardiac reactivity to and recovery from acute stress: temporal associations with implicit anxiety.

    PubMed

    Verkuil, Bart; Brosschot, Jos F; Thayer, Julian F

    2014-05-01

    Excessive cardiac responses to stressful events are a risk factor for morbidity and mortality. Adverse cardiac responses are usually attributed to conscious negative stress and emotions. Yet, cardiac responses might also be affected by emotions that are not consciously reported. Here we tested this hypothesis. Sixty participants were randomly allocated to an evaluated speaking stressor or control condition. Trait, state and implicit anxiety were assessed with the State Trait Anxiety Inventory, visual analog scales and the Implicit Association Test for assessing anxiety, with the latter two assessed before and after the stressor. Results showed that the stressor did not significantly affect implicit anxiety. Yet, participants with high implicit anxiety after the stressor had an overall enhanced heart rate and larger stressor-induced decreases in heart rate variability. These associations were independent of conscious anxiety. The implications of the results for a better understanding of excessive cardiac activity are discussed. PMID:24632102

  5. National Quality Assessment Evaluating Spironolactone Use During Hospitalization for Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) in China: China Patient-centered Evaluation Assessment of Cardiac Events (PEACE)-Retrospective AMI Study, 2001, 2006, and 2011

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Wenchi; Murugiah, Karthik; Downing, Nicholas; Li, Jing; Wang, Qing; Ross, Joseph S; Desai, Nihar R; Masoudi, Frederick A; Spertus, John A; Li, Xi; Krumholz, Harlan M; Jiang, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    Background Spironolactone, the only aldosterone antagonist available in China, improves outcomes in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) among patients with systolic dysfunction and either diabetes or heart failure (HF). However, national practice patterns in the use of spironolactone in China are unknown. Methods and Results From a nationally representative sample of AMI patients from in 2001, 2006, and 2011, we identified 6906 patients with either diabetes or HF and classified them into 1 of 4 groups according to their eligibility for spironolactone—“ideal”(left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF] ?40% and without contraindications), “contraindicated,” “not indicated” (neither ideal nor contraindicated), and “unknown indications” (LVEF unmeasured)—to determine how frequently patient eligibility for this drug is assessed in the hospital, how it is used in several groups, and to identify factors associated with the use in these groups. From 2001 to 2011, the proportion of patients whose eligibility for spironolactone was not assessed decreased (66.9% in 2001 to 32.8% in 2011). Spironolactone use significantly increased among ideal patients over this period (28.6% to 72.4%; P<0.001 for trend), but also in contraindicated patients (11.4% to 27.5%; P=0.002 for trend) and in other patients groups (not indicated: 27.5% to 38.3%; unknown indications: 21.3% to 35.1%; both P<0.01 for trend). In all 4 groups, patients presenting with HF on admission were more likely to receive spironolactone. Conclusions Although the appropriate use of spironolactone and assessment of eligibility increased in China over the past decade, there remains marked opportunities for improvement. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov Unique identifier: NCT01624883. PMID:26071031

  6. Early detection of cardiac involvement in thalassemia: From bench to bedside perspective

    PubMed Central

    Koonrungsesomboon, Nut; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Fucharoen, Suthat; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial siderosis is known as the major cause of death in thalassemia major (TM) patients since it can lead to iron overload cardiomyopathy. Although this condition can be prevented if timely effective intensive chelation is given to patients, the mortality rate of iron overload cardiomyopathy still remains high due to late detection of this condition. Various direct and indirect methods of iron assessment, including serum ferritin level, echocardiogram, non-transferrin-bound iron, cardiac magnetic resonance T2*, heart rate variability, and liver biopsy and myocardial biopsy, have been proposed for early detection of cardiac iron overload in TM patients. However, controversial evidence and limitations of their use in clinical practice exist. In this review article, all of these iron assessment methods that have been proposed or used to directly or indirectly determine the cardiac iron status in TM reported from both basic and clinical studies are comprehensively summarized and presented. Since there has been growing evidence in the past decades that cardiac magnetic resonance imaging as well as cardiac autonomic status known as the heart rate variability can provide early detection of cardiac involvement in TM patients, these two methods are also presented and discussed. The existing controversy regarding the assessment of cardiac involvement in thalassemia is also discussed. PMID:24009816

  7. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Scar Imaging for Sudden Cardiac Death Risk Stratification in Patients with Non-Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Kyoung; Chattranukulchai, Pairoj

    2015-01-01

    In patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM), risk stratification for sudden cardiac death (SCD) and selection of patients who would benefit from prophylactic implantable cardioverter-defibrillators remains challenging. We aim to discuss the evidence of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR)-derived myocardial scar for the prediction of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in NICM. From the 15 studies analyzed, with a total of 2747 patients, the average prevalence of myocardial scar was 41%. In patients with myocardial scar, the risk for adverse cardiac events was more than 3-fold higher, and risk for arrhythmic events 5-fold higher, as compared to patients without scar. Based on the available observational, single center studies, CMR scar assessment may be a promising new tool for SCD risk stratification, which merits further investigation. PMID:26175568

  8. The impact of cardiac perception on emotion experience and cognitive performance under mental stress.

    PubMed

    Kindermann, Nicole K; Werner, Natalie S

    2014-12-01

    Mental stress evokes several physiological responses such as the acceleration of heart rate, increase of electrodermal activity and the release of adrenaline. Moreover, physiological stress responses interact with emotional and behavioral stress responses. In the present study we provide evidence that viscero-sensory feedback from the heart (cardiac perception) is an important factor modulating emotional and cognitive stress responses. In our study, we compared participants with high versus low cardiac perception using a computerized mental stress task, in which they had to respond to rapidly presented visual and acoustic stimuli. Additionally, we assessed physiological responses (heart rate, skin conductance). Participants high in cardiac perception reported more negative emotions and showed worse task performance under the stressor than participants low in cardiac perception. These results were not moderated by physiological responses. We conclude that cardiac perception modulates stress responses by intensifying negative emotions and by impairing cognitive performance. PMID:24719221

  9. The power output and sprinting performance of young swimmers.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Tiago M; Morais, Jorge E; Marques, Mário C; Costa, Mário J; Marinho, Daniel A

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this article was to compare swimming power output between boys and girls and to model the relationship between swimming power output and sprinting performance in young swimmers. One hundred young swimmers (49 boys and 51 girls, aged between 11 and 13 years) underwent a test battery including anthropometrics (body mass, height, arm span [AS], and trunk transverse surface area), kinematic and efficiency (velocity, stroke frequency, stroke length, speed fluctuation, normalized speed fluctuation, stroke index, and Froude efficiency), hydrodynamics (active drag and active drag coefficient), and power output (power to overcome drag, power to transfer kinetic energy to water, and external power) assessments and sprinting performance (official 100 freestyle race). All variables but the trunk transverse surface area, stroke length normalize to AS, speed fluctuation, active drag coefficient, and Froude efficiency were significantly higher in boys than in girls with moderate-strong effects. Comparing both sexes but controlling the effect of the sprinting performance, most variables presented a no-significant variation. There was a significant and strong relationship between power output and sprinting performance: y = 24.179x (R = 0.426; standard error of estimation = 0.485; p < 0.001). As a conclusion, boys presented better performances than girls because of their higher power output. There is a cubed relationship between power output and sprinting performance in young swimmers. PMID:25029007

  10. Overload protection circuit for output driver

    DOEpatents

    Stewart, Roger G. (Neshanic Station, NJ)

    1982-05-11

    A protection circuit for preventing excessive power dissipation in an output transistor whose conduction path is connected between a power terminal and an output terminal. The protection circuit includes means for sensing the application of a turn on signal to the output transistor and the voltage at the output terminal. When the turn on signal is maintained for a period of time greater than a given period without the voltage at the output terminal reaching a predetermined value, the protection circuit decreases the turn on signal to, and the current conduction through, the output transistor.

  11. Women's compliance with cardiac rehabilitation programs.

    PubMed

    Ginzel, A R

    1996-01-01

    As the incidence of cardiovascular disease in women increases, the process of cardiac rehabilitation in women is becoming increasingly important to nurses. Specifically, the issue of women's compliance with cardiac rehabilitation needs to be addressed by nurses. Most past and current research on cardiac rehabilitation and compliance with rehabilitation programs has been conducted on male subjects and cannot be accurately generalized to the female population. This article reviews current literature which addresses the issues of heart disease in women, cardiac rehabilitation and compliance in the general population, gender differences in cardiac rehabilitation, and compliance of women in cardiac rehabilitation. PMID:8657707

  12. Post-hypothermic cardiac left ventricular systolic dysfunction after rewarming in an intact pig model

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction We developed a minimally invasive, closed chest pig model with the main aim to describe hemodynamic function during surface cooling, steady state severe hypothermia (one hour at 25°C) and surface rewarming. Methods Twelve anesthetized juvenile pigs were acutely catheterized for measurement of left ventricular (LV) pressure-volume loops (conductance catheter), cardiac output (Swan-Ganz), and for vena cava inferior occlusion. Eight animals were surface cooled to 25°C, while four animals were kept as normothermic time-matched controls. Results During progressive cooling and steady state severe hypothermia (25°C) cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), mean arterial pressure (MAP), maximal deceleration of pressure in the cardiac cycle (dP/dtmin), indexes of LV contractility (preload recruitable stroke work, PRSW, and maximal acceleration of pressure in the cardiac cycle, dP/dtmax) and LV end diastolic and systolic volumes (EDV and ESV) were significantly reduced. Systemic vascular resistance (SVR), isovolumetric relaxation time (Tau), and oxygen content in arterial and mixed venous blood increased significantly. LV end diastolic pressure (EDP) remained constant. After rewarming all the above mentioned hemodynamic variables that were depressed during 25°C remained reduced, except for CO that returned to pre-hypothermic values due to an increase in heart rate. Likewise, SVR and EDP were significantly reduced after rewarming, while Tau, EDV, ESV and blood oxygen content normalized. Serum levels of cardiac troponin T (TnT) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) were significantly increased. Conclusions Progressive cooling to 25°C followed by rewarming resulted in a reduced systolic, but not diastolic left ventricular function. The post-hypothermic increase in heart rate and the reduced systemic vascular resistance are interpreted as adaptive measures by the organism to compensate for a hypothermia-induced mild left ventricular cardiac failure. A post-hypothermic increase in TnT indicates that hypothermia/rewarming may cause degradation of cardiac tissue. There were no signs of inadequate global oxygenation throughout the experiments. PMID:21092272

  13. HYPOTHALAMIC DYSFUNCTION—A Review of Experimental and Clinical Observations of Cardiac and Renal Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, S. J.

    1952-01-01

    The nuclear cell masses of the hypothalamus act as autonomic regulators for visceromotor function. Through the correlation of impulses arising in or about the hypothalamus with the changes in cellular chemistry, there is provided, by mediation of the endocrines, a balanced control of water metabolism, renal function and cardiac action. Derangement of hypothalamic regulation causes specific clinical syndromes described by the general term “diencephalohypophyseal dystrophy.” Cardiac abnormalities attributable to hypothalamic dysfunction include alterations in rate and various arrhythmias. Alteration in renal function includes hematuria, polyuria or relative anuria, and specific effects on electrolyte and nitrogen output. PMID:13009469

  14. Cardiac motion compensation and resolution modeling in simultaneous PET-MR: a cardiac lesion detection study.

    PubMed

    Petibon, Y; Ouyang, J; Zhu, X; Huang, C; Reese, T G; Chun, S Y; Li, Q; El Fakhri, G

    2013-04-01

    Cardiac motion and partial volume effects (PVE) are two of the main causes of image degradation in cardiac PET. Motion generates artifacts and blurring while PVE lead to erroneous myocardial activity measurements. Newly available simultaneous PET-MR scanners offer new possibilities in cardiac imaging as MRI can assess wall contractility while collecting PET perfusion data. In this perspective, we develop a list-mode iterative reconstruction framework incorporating both tagged-MR derived non-rigid myocardial wall motion and position dependent detector point spread function (PSF) directly into the PET system matrix. In this manner, our algorithm performs both motion 'deblurring' and PSF deconvolution while reconstructing images with all available PET counts. The proposed methods are evaluated in a beating non-rigid cardiac phantom whose hot myocardial compartment contains small transmural and non-transmural cold defects. In order to accelerate imaging time, we investigate collecting full and half k-space tagged MR data to obtain tagged volumes that are registered using non-rigid B-spline registration to yield wall motion information. Our experimental results show that tagged-MR based motion correction yielded an improvement in defect/myocardium contrast recovery of 34-206% as compared to motion uncorrected studies. Likewise, lesion detectability improved by respectively 115-136% and 62-235% with MR-based motion compensation as compared to gating and no motion correction and made it possible to distinguish non-transmural from transmural defects, which has clinical significance given the inherent limitations of current single modality imaging in identifying the amount of residual ischemia. The incorporation of PSF modeling within the framework of MR-based motion compensation significantly improved defect/myocardium contrast recovery (5.1-8.5%, p < 0.01) and defect detectability (39-56%, p < 0.01). No statistical difference was found in PET contrast and lesion detectability based on motion fields obtained with half and full k-space tagged data. PMID:23470288

  15. Cardiac motion compensation and resolution modeling in simultaneous PET-MR: a cardiac lesion detection study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petibon, Y.; Ouyang, J.; Zhu, X.; Huang, C.; Reese, T. G.; Chun, S. Y.; Li, Q.; El Fakhri, G.

    2013-04-01

    Cardiac motion and partial volume effects (PVE) are two of the main causes of image degradation in cardiac PET. Motion generates artifacts and blurring while PVE lead to erroneous myocardial activity measurements. Newly available simultaneous PET-MR scanners offer new possibilities in cardiac imaging as MRI can assess wall contractility while collecting PET perfusion data. In this perspective, we develop a list-mode iterative reconstruction framework incorporating both tagged-MR derived non-rigid myocardial wall motion and position dependent detector point spread function (PSF) directly into the PET system matrix. In this manner, our algorithm performs both motion ‘deblurring’ and PSF deconvolution while reconstructing images with all available PET counts. The proposed methods are evaluated in a beating non-rigid cardiac phantom whose hot myocardial compartment contains small transmural and non-transmural cold defects. In order to accelerate imaging time, we investigate collecting full and half k-space tagged MR data to obtain tagged volumes that are registered using non-rigid B-spline registration to yield wall motion information. Our experimental results show that tagged-MR based motion correction yielded an improvement in defect/myocardium contrast recovery of 34-206% as compared to motion uncorrected studies. Likewise, lesion detectability improved by respectively 115-136% and 62-235% with MR-based motion compensation as compared to gating and no motion correction and made it possible to distinguish non-transmural from transmural defects, which has clinical significance given the inherent limitations of current single modality imaging in identifying the amount of residual ischemia. The incorporation of PSF modeling within the framework of MR-based motion compensation significantly improved defect/myocardium contrast recovery (5.1-8.5%, p < 0.01) and defect detectability (39-56%, p < 0.01). No statistical difference was found in PET contrast and lesion detectability based on motion fields obtained with half and full k-space tagged data.

  16. Model-Based Assessment of Cardiovascular Autonomic Control in Children with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Chaicharn, Jarree; Lin, Zheng; Chen, Maida L.; Ward, Sally L.D.; Keens, Thomas; Khoo, Michael C. K.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: To quantitatively assess daytime autonomic cardiovascular control in pediatric subjects with and without obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Design: Respiration, R-R intervals, and noninvasive continuous blood pressure were monitored in awake subjects in the supine and standing postures, as well as during cold face stimulation. Setting: Sleep disorders laboratory in a hospital setting. Participants: Ten pediatric patients (age 11.4 ± 3.6 years) with moderate to severe OSAS (obstructive apnea-hypopnea index = 21.0 ± 6.6/ h) before treatment and 10 age-matched normal control subjects (age 11.5 ± 3.7 years). Measurements and Results: Spectral analysis of heart rate variability revealed that high-frequency power was similar and the ratio of low- to high-frequency power was lower in subjects with OSAS vs control subjects. The closed-loop minimal model allowed heart rate variability to be partitioned into a component mediated by respiratory-cardiac coupling and a baroreflex component, whereas blood pressure variability was assumed to result from the direct effects of respiration and fluctuations in cardiac output. Baroreflex gain was lower in subjects with OSAS vs control subjects. Under orthostatic stress, respiratory-cardiac coupling gain decreased in both subject groups, but baroreflex gain decreased only in controls. The model was extended to incorporate time-varying parameter changes for analysis of the data collected during cold face stimulation: cardiac output gain increased in controls but remained unchanged in OSAS. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that vagal modulation of the heart remains relatively normal in pediatric subjects with OSAS. However, baseline cardiovascular sympathetic activity is elevated, and reactivity to autonomic challenges is impaired. Citation: Chaicharn J; Lin Z; Chen ML; Ward SLD; Keens T; Khoo MCK. Model-based assessment of cardiovascular autonomic control in children with obstructive sleep apnea. SLEEP 2009;32(7):927-938. PMID:19639756

  17. Cold ischemia with selective anterograde in situ pulmonary perfusion preserves gas exchange and mitochondrial homeostasis and curbs inflammation in an experimental model of donation after cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Pottecher, Julien; Santelmo, Nicola; Noll, Eric; Charles, Anne-Laure; Benahmed, Malika; Canuet, Matthieu; Frossard, Nelly; Namer, Izzie J; Geny, Bernard; Massard, Gilbert; Diemunsch, Pierre

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the functional preservation of the lung graft with anterograde lung perfusion in a model of donation after cardiac death. Thirty minutes after cardiac arrest, in situ anterograde selective pulmonary cold perfusion was started in six swine. The alveolo-capillary membrane was challenged at 3, 6, and 8 h with measurements of the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), the pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), the PaO2 /FiO2 ratio, the transpulmonary oxygen output (tpVO2 ), and the transpulmonary CO2 clearance (tpCO2 ). Mitochondrial homeostasis was investigated by measuring maximal oxidative capacity (Vmax ) and the coupling of phosphorylation to oxidation (ACR, acceptor control ratio) in lung biopsies. Inflammation and induction of primary immune response were assessed by measurement of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF?), interleukine-6 (IL-6) and receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Data were compared using repeated measures Anova. Pulmonary hemodynamics (mPAP: P = 0.69; PVR: P = 0.46), oxygenation (PaO2 /FiO2 : P = 0.56; tpVO2 : P = 0.46), CO2 diffusion (tpCO2 : P = 0.24), mitochondrial homeostasis (Vmax : P = 0.42; ACR: P = 0.8), and RAGE concentrations (P = 0.24) did not significantly change up to 8 h after cardiac arrest. TNF? and IL-6 were undetectable. Unaffected pulmonary hemodynamics, sustained oxygen and carbon dioxide diffusion, preserved mitochondrial homeostasis, and lack of inflammation suggest a long-lasting functional preservation of the graft with selective anterograde in situ pulmonary perfusion. PMID:23895147

  18. Assessment of vasomotor oscillations with Fourier analysis of biological tissue impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterov, A.; Gavrilov, I.; Selector, L.; Mudraya, I.; Revenko, S.

    2010-04-01

    Fourier analysis revealed a number of periodicities in small variations of bioimpedance of human finger including the major spectrum peaks at the frequencies of heart beats, respiration, and Mayer wave (0.1 Hz). These periodic variations of bioimpedance were detected under the normal conditions and during blood flow arrest in the hand by a pneumatic cuff placed on the arm. They are explained by periodic variations in systemic blood pressure and by oscillations of regional vascular tone resulted from neural vasomotor control. During normal blood flow, the greatest variations in bioimpedance were observed at the heart rate, and their amplitude surpassed by an order of magnitude the amplitudes of respiratory oscillations and Mayer wave. In contrast, during blood arrest, the largest amplitude of rhythmical changes of the impedance characterized the oscillations at respiration rate, while the amplitude of oscillations at the heart rate was the smallest. During normal respiration and circulation, two side cardiac peaks were revealed in bioimpedance amplitude spectrum which disappeared during respiration arrest and thought to reflect the amplitude respiratory modulation of the cardiac output via sympathetic influences. During normal breathing, the second and the third harmonics of the cardiac spectrum peak were split reflecting frequency respiratory modulation of the heart rate by parasympathetic influences. The results favour applicability of Fourier analysis of bioimpedance variations in assessment of regional neural influences and neurogenic modulation of cardiac activity.

  19. Direct Cardiac Reprogramming: From Developmental Biology to Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Li; Srivastava, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Heart disease affects millions worldwide and is a progressive condition involving loss of cardiomyocytes. The human heart has limited endogenous regenerative capacity and is thus an important target for novel regenerative medicine approaches. While cell-based regenerative therapies hold promise, cellular reprogramming of endogenous cardiac fibroblasts, which represent more than half of the cells in the mammalian heart, may be an attractive alternative strategy for regenerating cardiac muscle. Recent advances leveraging years of developmental biology point to the feasibility of generating de novo cardiomyocyte-like cells from terminally differentiated non-myocytes in the heart in situ after ischemic damage. Here, we review the progress in cardiac reprogramming methods and consider the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead in refining this technology for regenerative medicine. PMID:24030021

  20. Cardiac pacing and aviation.

    PubMed

    Toff, W D; Edhag, O K; Camm, A J

    1992-12-01

    Certain applicants with stable disturbances of rhythm or conduction requiring cardiac pacing, in whom no other disqualifying condition is present, may be considered fit for medical certification restricted to multi-crew operations. The reliability of modern pacing systems appears adequate to permit restricted certification even in pacemaker dependent subjects except for certain models of pacemakers and leads known to be at increased risk of failure. These are to be avoided. There is little evidence to suggest that newer devices are any more reliable than their predecessors. Single and dual chamber systems appear to have similar reliability up to 4 years, after which time significant attrition of dual chamber devices occurs, principally due to battery depletion. All devices require increased scrutiny as they approach their end of life as predicted from longevity data and pacing characteristics. Unipolar and bipolar leads are of similar reliability, apart from a number of specific bipolar polyurethane leads which have been identified. Atrial leads, particularly those without active fixation, are less secure than ventricular leads and applicants who are dependent on atrial sensing or pacing should be denied certification. Bipolar leads are to be preferred due to the lower risk of myopotential and exogenous EMI. Sensor-driven adaptive-rate pacing systems using active sensors may have reduced longevity and require close scrutiny. Activity-sensing devices using piezoelectric crystal sensors may be subject to significant rate rises in rotary wing aircraft. The impracticality of restricted certification in helicopters will, in any event, preclude certification. Such devices would best be avoided in hovercraft (air cushioned vehicle) pilots. Only minor rate rises are likely in fixed-wing aircraft which are unlikely to be of significance. Anti-tachycardia devices and implanted defibrillators are inconsistent with any form of certification to fly. PMID:1493823

  1. Preoperative and perioperative use of levosimendan in cardiac surgery: European expert opinion.

    PubMed

    Toller, W; Heringlake, M; Guarracino, F; Algotsson, L; Alvarez, J; Argyriadou, H; Ben-Gal, T; ?erný, V; Cholley, B; Eremenko, A; Guerrero-Orriach, J L; Järvelä, K; Karanovic, N; Kivikko, M; Lahtinen, P; Lomivorotov, V; Mehta, R H; Muši?, Š; Pollesello, P; Rex, S; Riha, H; Rudiger, A; Salmenperä, M; Szudi, L; Tritapepe, L; Wyncoll, D; Öwall, A

    2015-04-01

    In cardiac surgery, postoperative low cardiac output has been shown to correlate with increased rates of organ failure and mortality. Catecholamines have been the standard therapy for many years, although they carry substantial risk for adverse cardiac and systemic effects, and have been reported to be associated with increased mortality. On the other hand, the calcium sensitiser and potassium channel opener levosimendan has been shown to improve cardiac function with no imbalance in oxygen consumption, and to have protective effects in other organs. Numerous clinical trials have indicated favourable cardiac and non-cardiac effects of preoperative and perioperative administration of levosimendan. A panel of 27 experts from 18 countries has now reviewed the literature on the use of levosimendan in on-pump and off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting and in heart valve surgery. This panel discussed the published evidence in these various settings, and agreed to vote on a set of questions related to the cardioprotective effects of levosimendan when administered preoperatively, with the purpose of reaching a consensus on which patients could benefit from the preoperative use of levosimendan and in which kind of procedures, and at which doses and timing should levosimendan be administered. Here, we present a systematic review of the literature to report on the completed and ongoing studies on levosimendan, including the newly commenced LEVO-CTS phase III study (NCT02025621), and on the consensus reached on the recommendations proposed for the use of preoperative levosimendan. PMID:25734940

  2. Peri-operative Levosimendan in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery: An Overview of the Evidence.

    PubMed

    Shi, William Y; Li, Sheila; Collins, Nicholas; Cottee, David B; Bastian, Bruce C; James, Allen N; Mejia, Ross

    2015-07-01

    Levosimendan, a calcium sensitiser, has recently emerged as a valuable agent in the peri-operative management of cardiac surgery patients. Levosimendan is a calcium-sensitising ionodilator. By binding to cardiac troponin C and reducing its calcium-binding co-efficient, it enhances myofilament responsiveness to calcium and thus enhances myocardial contractility without increasing oxygen demand. Current evidence suggests that levosimendan enhances cardiac function after cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with both normal and reduced left ventricular function. In addition to being used as post-operative rescue therapy for low cardiac output syndrome, a pre-operative levosimendan infusion in high risk patients with poor cardiac function may reduce inotropic requirements, the need for mechanical support, the duration of intensive care admissions as well as post-operative mortality. Indeed, it is these higher-risk patients who may experience a greater degree of benefit. Larger, multicentre randomised trials in cardiac surgery will help to elucidate the full potential of this agent. PMID:25862519

  3. The Network Structure of Economic Output

    E-print Network

    Hidalgo, Cesar A.

    Much of the analysis of economic growth has focused on the study of aggregate output. Here, we deviate from this tradition and look instead at the structure of output embodied in the network connecting countries to the ...

  4. Cardiac phosphocreatine deficiency induced by GPA during postnatal development in rat.

    PubMed

    Pelouch, V; Kolár, F; Khuchua, Z A; Elizarova, G V; Milerová, M; Ost'ádal, B; Saks, V A

    1996-01-01

    The effect of chronic administration of beta-guanidinopropionic acid (GPA) on the protein profiling, energy metabolism and right ventricular (RV) function was studied in the rat heart during the weaning and adolescence period. GPA was given in tap water (1-1.5%) using pair drink controls. The feeding of animals with GPA solution for a six week period resulted in elevation of heart to body weight ratio due to body growth retardation. GPA accumulated in the myocardium up to 67.37 +/- 5.3 mumoles.g dry weight and the tissue content of total creatine, phosphocreatine and ATP was significantly decreased to 15%, 9% and 65% of control values respectively. Total activity of creatine kinase (CK) was not changed, but the proportion of mitochondrial (Mi) CK isoenzyme was decreased; the percentage of MB isoenzyme of CK was significantly higher. GPA treatment resulted in an elevation of the content of cardiac collagenous proteins and decrease of non-collagenous proteins in the heart; in parallel, a decrease of the collagen I to collagen III ratio was detected. The function of the RV was assessed using an isolated perfused heart with RV performing pressure-volume work. As compared to pair-drink controls, RV function was significantly impaired the GPA group: at any given right atrial filling pressure, the RV systolic pressure and the rate of pressure development were decreased by almost a factor of two. Elevation of the RV diastolic pressure with increasing pulmonary artery diastolic pressure was also significantly steeper in the GPA group which also showed decrease of cardiac output, especially at high outflow resistance. It may be assumed that chronic administration of GPA deeply influenced metabolic parameters, protein profiles and contractile function of the developing heart. On the other hand, concentrations of glucose, total lipids and triglycerides in blood plasma were not affected. All these data confirm the concept that the CK system is of central importance both for heart function and for the regulation of normal growth of cardiac myocytes. PMID:8974041

  5. Automated segmentation of cardiac visceral fat in low-dose non-contrast chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Liang, Mingzhu; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac visceral fat was segmented from low-dose non-contrast chest CT images using a fully automated method. Cardiac visceral fat is defined as the fatty tissues surrounding the heart region, enclosed by the lungs and posterior to the sternum. It is measured by constraining the heart region with an Anatomy Label Map that contains robust segmentations of the lungs and other major organs and estimating the fatty tissue within this region. The algorithm was evaluated on 124 low-dose and 223 standard-dose non-contrast chest CT scans from two public datasets. Based on visual inspection, 343 cases had good cardiac visceral fat segmentation. For quantitative evaluation, manual markings of cardiac visceral fat regions were made in 3 image slices for 45 low-dose scans and the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) was computed. The automated algorithm achieved an average DSC of 0.93. Cardiac visceral fat volume (CVFV), heart region volume (HRV) and their ratio were computed for each case. The correlation between cardiac visceral fat measurement and coronary artery and aortic calcification was also evaluated. Results indicated the automated algorithm for measuring cardiac visceral fat volume may be an alternative method to the traditional manual assessment of thoracic region fat content in the assessment of cardiovascular disease risk.

  6. Naringenin attenuates pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, NING; YANG, ZHENG; YUAN, YUAN; LI, FANGFANG; LIU, YUAN; MA, ZHENGUO; LIAO, HAIHAN; BIAN, ZHOUYAN; ZHANG, YAO; ZHOU, HENG; DENG, WEI; ZHOU, MENGQIAO; TANG, QIZHU

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by abnormal enlargement of cardiomyocytes and disproportionate accumulation of extracellular interstitial fibrosis, which are major predictors of the development of coronary artery disease and heart failure. Naringenin is a bitter principle component of grapefruit that has numerous pharmacological effects, including anti-inflammatory, hypolipidemic, antithrombotic and antiatherogenic properties. In order to investigate whether naringenin is able to exert a protective effect against cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload, aortic banding (AB) was performed to induce cardiac hypertrophy in mice, and naringenin was administered for 7 weeks. A total of 60 mice were allocated into four groups: Sham + vehicle, AB + vehicle, sham + naringenin and AB + naringenin. Naringenin treatment attenuated cardiac dysfunction, as indicated by the results of echocardiography and catheter-based measurements at 8 weeks post-surgery. The extent of cardiac hypertrophy was assessed by the heart weight/body weight, heart weight/tibial length and lung weight/body weight ratios, in addition to the cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area and the mRNA expression levels of hypertrophic maker, all of which were mitigated by naringenin administration. Naringenin also inhibited the expression of transforming growth factor-?1, connective tissue growth factor, collagen I? and collagen III?, and attenuated interstitial fibrosis. In addition, naringenin downregulated the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathways. In conclusion, naringenin attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and interstitial fibrosis, in addition to improving left ventricular function in pressure-overloaded mice. The cardioprotective effect exerted by naringenin may be associated with the inhibition of PI3K/Akt, ERK and JNK signaling pathways.

  7. Cardiac manifestations in Behcet's disease

    PubMed Central

    Demirelli, Selami; Degirmenci, Husnu; Inci, Sinan; Arisoy, Arif

    2015-01-01

    Summary Behcet's disease (BD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder, with vasculitis underlying the pathophysiology of its multisystemic effects. Venous pathology and thrombotic complications are hallmarks of BD. However, it has been increasingly recognised that cardiac involvement and arterial complications are also important aspects of the course of the disease. Cardiac lesions include pericarditis, endocarditis, intracardiac thrombosis, myocardial infarction, endomyocardial fibrosis, and myocardial aneurysm. Treatment of cardiovascular involvement in BD is largely empirical, and is aimed towards suppressing the vasculitis. The most challenging aspect seems to be the treatment of arterial aneurysms and thromboses due to the associated risk of bleeding. When the prognosis of cardiac involvement in BD is not good, recovery can be achieved through oral anticoagulation, immunosuppressive therapy, and colchicine use. In this review, we summarise the cardiovascular involvement, different manifestations, and treatment of BD. PMID:25984424

  8. Cardiac myofilaments: mechanics and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Tombe, Pieter P.; Bers, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the cardiac myofilament are an important determinant of pump function of the heart. This report is focused on the regulation of myofilament function in cardiac muscle. Calcium ions form the trigger that induces activation of the thin filament which, in turn, allows for cross-bridge formation, ATP hydrolysis, and force development. The structure and protein-protein interactions of the cardiac sarcomere that are responsible for these processes will be reviewed. The molecular mechanism that underlies myofilament activation is incompletely understood. Recent experimental approaches have been employed to unravel the mechanism and regulation of myofilament mechanics and energetics by activator calcium and sarcomere length, as well as contractile protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinase A. Central to these studies is the question whether such factors impact on muscle function simply by altering thin filament activation state, or whether modulation of cross-bridge cycling also plays a part in the responses of muscle to these stimuli.

  9. Mechanical regulation of cardiac development

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephanie E.; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Yalcin, Huseyin C.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical forces are essential contributors to and unavoidable components of cardiac formation, both inducing and orchestrating local and global molecular and cellular changes. Experimental animal studies have contributed substantially to understanding the mechanobiology of heart development. More recent integration of high-resolution imaging modalities with computational modeling has greatly improved our quantitative understanding of hemodynamic flow in heart development. Merging these latest experimental technologies with molecular and genetic signaling analysis will accelerate our understanding of the relationships integrating mechanical and biological signaling for proper cardiac formation. These advances will likely be essential for clinically translatable guidance for targeted interventions to rescue malforming hearts and/or reconfigure malformed circulations for optimal performance. This review summarizes our current understanding on the levels of mechanical signaling in the heart and their roles in orchestrating cardiac development. PMID:25191277

  10. [Pathophysiology of ischemic cardiac pain.].

    PubMed

    Münzel, T; Bassenge, E

    1988-09-01

    Cardiac pain is a conscious experience that can be explored only indirectly with experimental approaches. The exact machanisms eliciting cardiac pain still remain obscure. The afferent fibres running in the cardiac sympathetic nerves are regarded as the essential pathway for the transmission of cardiac pain. Atria and ventricle are abundantly supplied with sympathetic sensory innervation. In the spinal cord, impulses transmitted by the sympathetic pathway converge with impulses from somatic thoracic structures onto the same ascending spinothalamic neuron which probably explains the mechanism of referred pain (=projection of pain to another organ). Two hypotheses have been put forward to explain the peripheral mechanism for nociception. The intensity mechanism assumes that pain results from an excessive stimulation of receptive structures normally stimulated at lower levels whereas a specific sensation is considered to result from an excitation of a well defined nociceptive apparatus. Ventricular sympathetic afferent fibres whether myelinated or unmyelinated, always possess some mechanosensitivity and respond to normal chemical and mechanical stimuli, thus displaying properties of polymodal receptors. Afferent vagal fibres may contribute to the mechanisms of cardiac nociception by modulating the threshold and characteristics of pain. Experimental studies identified three main mechanisms, which may be responsible for eliciting cardiac pain during ischemic periods in humans: a) nonphysiological motion of the ischemic left ventricular wall (bulging) and an excitation of mechanical receptors by passive stretching. b) The excitation of free sensory nerve endings by chemicals such as bradykinin, PGE(2), adenosin, histamin or potassium. c) A combination of a and b: algogenic chemicals may sensitize mechanical receptors and therefore lower their threshold for nociception. PMID:18415323

  11. Digital plus analog output encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafle, R. S. (inventor)

    1976-01-01

    The disclosed encoder is adapted to produce both digital and analog output signals corresponding to the angular position of a rotary shaft, or the position of any other movable member. The digital signals comprise a series of binary signals constituting a multidigit code word which defines the angular position of the shaft with a degree of resolution which depends upon the number of digits in the code word. The basic binary signals are produced by photocells actuated by a series of binary tracks on a code disc or member. The analog signals are in the form of a series of ramp signals which are related in length to the least significant bit of the digital code word. The analog signals are derived from sine and cosine tracks on the code disc.

  12. Regeneration of infarcted myocardium with resveratrol-modified cardiac stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gorbunov, Nikolai; Petrovski, Goran; Gurusamy, Narasimman; Ray, Diptarka; Kim, Do Han; Das, Dipak K

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The major problem in stem cell therapy includes viability and engraftment efficacy of stem cells after transplantation. Indeed, the vast majority of host-transfused cells do not survive beyond 24–72 hrs. To increase the survival and engraftment of implanted cardiac stem cells in the host, we developed a technique of treating these cells with resveratrol, and tested it in a rat model of left anterior descending (LAD) occlusion. Multi-potent clonogenic cardiac stem cells isolated from rat heart and stably transfected with EGFP were pre-treated with 2.5 ?M resveratrol for 60 min. Rats were anaesthetized, hearts opened and the LAD occluded to induce heart attack. One week later, the cardiac reduced environment was confirmed in resveratrol treated rat hearts by the enhanced expression of nuclear factor-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) and redox effector factor-1 (Ref-1). M-mode echocardiography after stem cell therapy, showed improvement in cardiac function (left ventricular ejection fraction, fractional shortening and cardiac output) in both, the treated and control group after 7 days, but only resveratrol-modified stem cell group revealed improvement in cardiac function at the end of 1, 2 and 4 months time. The improvement of cardiac function was accompanied by enhanced stem cell survival and engraftment as demonstrated by the expression of cell proliferation marker Ki67 and differentiation of stem cells towards the regeneration of the myocardium as demonstrated by the expression of EGFP up to 4 months after LAD occlusion in the resveratrol-treated stem cell group. Expression of stromal cell-derived factor and myosin conclusively demonstrated homing of stem cells in the infarcted myocardium, its regeneration leading to improvement of cardiac function. PMID:21352470

  13. Alterations in cardiac structure and function in a modified rat model of myocardial hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wen-Jun; Dong, Qi; Chen, Min-Sheng; Zhao, Lu-Ning; Chen, Ai-Lan; Li, Zhen-Ci; Liu, Shi-Ming

    2014-10-01

    This study was aimed to establish a stable animal model of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) to provide theoretical and experimental basis for understanding the development of LVH. The abdominal aorta of male Wistar rats (80-100 g) was constricted to a diameter of 0.55 mm between the branches of the celiac and anterior mesenteric arteries. Echocardiography using a linear phased array probe was performed as well as pathological examination and plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) measurement at 3, 4 and 6 weeks after abdominal aortic constriction (AAC). The results showed that the acute mortality rate (within 24 h) of this modified rat model was 8%. Animals who underwent AAC demonstrated significantly increased interventricular septal (IVS), LV posterior wall (LVPWd), LV mass index (LVMI), cross-sectional area (CSA) of myocytes, and perivascular fibrosis; the ejection fraction (EF), fractional shortening (FS), and cardiac output (CO) were consistently lower at each time point after AAC. Notably, differences in these parameters between AAC group and sham group were significant by 3 weeks and reached peaks at 4th week. Following AAC, the plasma BNP was gradually elevated compared with the sham group at 3rd and 6th week. It was concluded that this modified AAC model can develop LVH, both stably and safely, by week four post-surgery; echocardiography is able to assess changes in chamber dimensions and systolic properties accurately in rats with LVH. PMID:25318869

  14. Health Literacy Predicts Cardiac Knowledge Gains in Cardiac Rehabilitation Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Colleen C.; Rawson, Katherine; Hughes, Joel W.; Waechter, Donna; Rosneck, James

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Health literacy is increasingly recognised as a potentially important patient characteristic related to patient education efforts. We evaluated whether health literacy would predict gains in knowledge after completion of patient education in cardiac rehabilitation. Method: This was a re-post observational analysis study design based on…

  15. Changes in cardiac output and tibial artery flow during and after progressive LBNP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A 3.0 MHz Pulsed Doppler velocity meter (PD) was used to determine blood velocities in the ascending aorta from the suprasternal notch before, during and after progressive 5 min stages of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in 7 subjects. Changes in stroke volume were calculated from the systolic velocity integrals. A unique 20 MHz PD was used to estimate bloodflow in the posterior tibial artery. With -20 torr mean stroke volume fell 11% and then continued to decline by 48% before LBNP was terminated. Mean tibial flow fell progressively with LBNP stress, due to an increase in reverse flow component and a reduction in peak forward flow and diameter. Stroke volume increased and heart rate fell dramatically during the first 15 sec of recovery. The LBNP was terminated early in 2 subjects because of vasovagal symptons (V). During V the stroke volume rose 86% which more than compensated for the drop in heart rate. This implies that V is accompanied by a paradoxical increase in venous return and that the reduction in HR is the primary cardiovascular event. During the first 15 sec of recovery these 2 subjects had a distinctive marked rise to heart rate reminiscent of the Bainbridge reflex.

  16. Relating Noninvasive Cardiac Output and Total Peripheral Resistance Estimates to Physical Activity in an Ambulatory Setting

    E-print Network

    Haslam, Bryan Todd

    The prevalence and cost of heart disease indicate the need for better methods of detecting, diagnosing and treating this pervasive problem. Appropriate monitoring outside of the hospital can potentially lead to earlier ...

  17. Pulmonary tissue volume, cardiac output, and diffusing capacity in sustained microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verbanck, S.; Larsson, H.; Linnarsson, D.; Prisk, G. K.; West, J. B.; Paiva, M.

    1997-01-01

    In microgravity (microG) humans have marked changes in body fluids, with a combination of an overall fluid loss and a redistribution of fluids in the cranial direction. We investigated whether interstitial pulmonary edema develops as a result of a headward fluid shift or whether pulmonary tissue fluid volume is reduced as a result of the overall loss of body fluid. We measured pulmonary tissue volume (Vti), capillary blood flow, and diffusing capacity in four subjects before, during, and after 10 days of exposure to microG during spaceflight. Measurements were made by rebreathing a gas mixture containing small amounts of acetylene, carbon monoxide, and argon. Measurements made early in flight in two subjects showed no change in Vti despite large increases in stroke volume (40%) and diffusing capacity (13%) consistent with increased pulmonary capillary blood volume. Late in-flight measurements in four subjects showed a 25% reduction in Vti compared with preflight controls (P < 0.001). There was a concomittant reduction in stroke volume, to the extent that it was no longer significantly different from preflight control. Diffusing capacity remained elevated (11%; P < 0.05) late in flight. These findings suggest that, despite increased pulmonary perfusion and pulmonary capillary blood volume, interstitial pulmonary edema does not result from exposure to microG.

  18. Reduced Heart Rate and Cardiac Output Differentially Affect Angiogenesis, Growth, and Development in Early

    E-print Network

    Burggren, Warren

    vs. de- velopment) have differential sensitivities to altered convective blood flow. Introduction and flow (Isogai et al. 2003; le Noble et al. 2008). Blood pressure creates both an absolute transmural

  19. DISTRIBUTION OF CARDIAC OUTPUT DURING DIURNAL CHANGES IN ACTIVITY IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hepatotoxicity of carbon tetrachloride and chloroform in rats is increased when exposure occurs during the dark part of the lighting cycle when rats are more active. ats are used as surrogates for humans in toxicology, but have opposite activity patterns, with humans being ac...

  20. Cardiovascular physiologists have long assumed that the initiation of cardiac output in the developing embryo occurs

    E-print Network

    Burggren, Warren

    in the developing embryo occurs concomitant with the need for convective delivery of nutrients and oxygen. Recent data from lower vertebrate embryos indicate that the heart may begin to generate blood flow well heart development) in salamander (Ambystoma mexicanum) embryos (Mellish et al., 1994, 2000

  1. Elevations in energy expenditure are accompanied by increments in both ventilation and cardiac output to maintain

    E-print Network

    Bennett, Albert F.

    and Diamond, 1995, 1997). The increase in metabolic rate generated from the mechanical and physiological- to tenfold increment they experience during vigorous crawling (Secor and Diamond, 1995) or while rapidly as the heart rate, systemic blood flow and stroke volume of Burmese pythons (Python molurus) while fasting

  2. Impact of Altitude on Power Output during Cycling Stage Racing

    PubMed Central

    Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Clark, Bradley; Martin, David T.; Schumacher, Yorck Olaf; McDonald, Warren; Stephens, Brian; Ma, Fuhai; Thompson, Kevin G.; Gore, Christopher J.; Menaspà, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of moderate-high altitude on power output, cadence, speed and heart rate during a multi-day cycling tour. Methods Power output, heart rate, speed and cadence were collected from elite male road cyclists during maximal efforts of 5, 15, 30, 60, 240 and 600 s. The efforts were completed in a laboratory power-profile assessment, and spontaneously during a cycling race simulation near sea-level and an international cycling race at moderate-high altitude. Matched data from the laboratory power-profile and the highest maximal mean power output (MMP) and corresponding speed and heart rate recorded during the cycling race simulation and cycling race at moderate-high altitude were compared using paired t-tests. Additionally, all MMP and corresponding speeds and heart rates were binned per 1000m (<1000m, 1000–2000, 2000–3000 and >3000m) according to the average altitude of each ride. Mixed linear modelling was used to compare cycling performance data from each altitude bin. Results Power output was similar between the laboratory power-profile and the race simulation, however MMPs for 5–600 s and 15, 60, 240 and 600 s were lower (p ? 0.005) during the race at altitude compared with the laboratory power-profile and race simulation, respectively. Furthermore, peak power output and all MMPs were lower (? 11.7%, p ? 0.001) while racing >3000 m compared with rides completed near sea-level. However, speed associated with MMP 60 and 240 s was greater (p < 0.001) during racing at moderate-high altitude compared with the race simulation near sea-level. Conclusion A reduction in oxygen availability as altitude increases leads to attenuation of cycling power output during competition. Decrement in cycling power output at altitude does not seem to affect speed which tended to be greater at higher altitudes. PMID:26629912

  3. Relationship between spontaneous sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity and cardiac baroreflex sensitivity in healthy young individuals.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Chloe E; Witter, Trevor; El Sayed, Khadigeh; Hissen, Sarah L; Johnson, Aaron W; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2015-11-01

    Low baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is associated with elevated cardiovascular risk. However, the evidence is based primarily on measurements of cardiac BRS. It cannot be assumed that cardiac or sympathetic BRS alone represent a true reflection of baroreflex control of blood pressure. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between spontaneous sympathetic and cardiac BRS in healthy, young individuals. Continuous measurements of blood pressure, heart rate, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were made under resting conditions in 50 healthy individuals (18-28 years). Sympathetic BRS was quantified by plotting MSNA burst incidence against diastolic pressure (sympathetic BRSinc), and by plotting total MSNA against diastolic pressure (sympathetic BRStotal). Cardiac BRS was quantified by plotting R-R interval against systolic pressure using the sequence method. Significant sympathetic BRSinc and cardiac BRS slopes were obtained for 42 participants. A significant positive correlation was found between sympathetic BRSinc and cardiac BRS (r = 0.31, P = 0.049). Among this group, significant sympathetic baroreflex slopes were obtained for 39 participants when plotting total MSNA against diastolic pressure. In this subset, a significant positive correlation was observed between sympathetic BRStotal and cardiac BRS (r = 0.40, P = 0.012). When males and females were assessed separately, these modest relationships only remained significant in females. Analysis by gender revealed correlations in the females between sympathetic BRSinc and cardiac BRS (r = 0.49, P = 0.062), and between sympathetic BRStotal and cardiac BRS (r = 0.57, P = 0.025). These findings suggest that gender interactions exist in baroreflex control of blood pressure, and that cardiac BRS is not appropriate for estimating overall baroreflex function in healthy, young populations. This relationship warrants investigation in aging and clinical populations. PMID:26564059

  4. Relationship between spontaneous sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity and cardiac baroreflex sensitivity in healthy young individuals

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Chloe E; Witter, Trevor; El Sayed, Khadigeh; Hissen, Sarah L; Johnson, Aaron W; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2015-01-01

    Low baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is associated with elevated cardiovascular risk. However, the evidence is based primarily on measurements of cardiac BRS. It cannot be assumed that cardiac or sympathetic BRS alone represent a true reflection of baroreflex control of blood pressure. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between spontaneous sympathetic and cardiac BRS in healthy, young individuals. Continuous measurements of blood pressure, heart rate, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were made under resting conditions in 50 healthy individuals (18–28 years). Sympathetic BRS was quantified by plotting MSNA burst incidence against diastolic pressure (sympathetic BRSinc), and by plotting total MSNA against diastolic pressure (sympathetic BRStotal). Cardiac BRS was quantified by plotting R-R interval against systolic pressure using the sequence method. Significant sympathetic BRSinc and cardiac BRS slopes were obtained for 42 participants. A significant positive correlation was found between sympathetic BRSinc and cardiac BRS (r = 0.31, P = 0.049). Among this group, significant sympathetic baroreflex slopes were obtained for 39 participants when plotting total MSNA against diastolic pressure. In this subset, a significant positive correlation was observed between sympathetic BRStotal and cardiac BRS (r = 0.40, P = 0.012). When males and females were assessed separately, these modest relationships only remained significant in females. Analysis by gender revealed correlations in the females between sympathetic BRSinc and cardiac BRS (r = 0.49, P = 0.062), and between sympathetic BRStotal and cardiac BRS (r = 0.57, P = 0.025). These findings suggest that gender interactions exist in baroreflex control of blood pressure, and that cardiac BRS is not appropriate for estimating overall baroreflex function in healthy, young populations. This relationship warrants investigation in aging and clinical populations. PMID:26564059

  5. Optical Waveguide Output Couplers Fabricated in Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Abushagur, Mustafa A. G.; Ashley, Paul R.; Johnson-Cole, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Waveguide output couplers fabricated in Norland Optical Adhesive (NOA) #81 and AMOCO Ultradel 9020D polyimide are investigated. The output couplers are implemented using periodic relief gratings on a planar waveguide. Design theory of the couplers is based on the perturbation approach. Coupling of light from waveguide propagation modes to output radiation modes is described by coupled mode theory and the transmission line approximation of the perturbed area (grating structure). Using these concepts, gratings can be accurately designed to output a minimum number of modes at desired output angles. Waveguide couplers were designed using these concepts. These couplers were fabricated and analyzed for structural accuracy, output beam accuracy, and output efficiency. The results for the two different materials are compared.

  6. Good outcomes from cardiac surgery in the over 70s

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, A; Fitzpatrick, A; Keenan, D; Odom, N; Grotte, G

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine the early mortality and major morbidity associated with cardiac surgery in the elderly.?DESIGN—Retrospective case record review study of 575 patients ? 70 years old who underwent cardiac surgery at the Manchester Heart Centre between January 1990 and December 1996.?SETTING—Regional cardiothoracic centre.?SUBJECTS—Patients ? 70 years old who underwent cardiac surgery.?MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Comparison of 30 day mortality and incidence of major morbidity between patients ? 70 years old and patients < 70 years old.?RESULTS—Of 4395 cardiac surgical operations, 575 operations (13.1%) were in patients aged ? 70 years (mean (SD) 73.1 (3.2) years). The proportion of elderly patients rose progressively from 7.9% in 1990 to 16.5% in 1996. 334 patients (58.1%) had coronary artery bypass grafting alone, 91 patients (15.8%) had valve surgery alone, and 129 patients (22.4%) had combined valve surgery and bypass grafting. For isolated coronary artery bypass grafting, 30 day mortality in patients ? 70 years was 3.9% compared with 1.3% in patients < 70 years (p < 0.001). 30 day mortality for isolated valve surgery in patients ? 70 years was 7.7%. Isolated aortic valve replacement was the most common valvar procedure in patients ? 70 years and carried the lowest mortality (4.3%). Additional coronary artery bypass grafting increased the mortality rate in patients ? 70 years to 9.3% for all valve surgery and to 8.0% for aortic valve replacement. Major morbidity in patients ? 70 years was low for all procedure types (stroke 1.9%, acute renal failure requiring dialysis 1.6%, perioperative myocardial infarction 0.5%).?CONCLUSIONS—Early mortality and major morbidity is low for cardiac surgery in elderly patients. Concerns over the risk of cardiac surgery in the elderly should not prevent referral, and elderly patients usually do well. However, unconscious rationing of health care may affect referral patterns, and studies that assess the cost effectiveness of cardiac surgery versus conservative management in such patients are lacking.???Keywords: cardiac surgery; elderly; mortality; coronary artery bypass grafting; valve replacement PMID:10409524

  7. Phenomics of Cardiac Chloride Channels

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Dayue Darrel

    2014-01-01

    Forward genetic studies have identified several chloride (Cl?) channel genes, including CFTR, ClC-2, ClC-3, CLCA, Bestrophin, and Ano1, in the heart. Recent reverse genetic studies using gene targeting and transgenic techniques to delineate the functional role of cardiac Cl? channels have shown that Cl? channels may contribute to cardiac arrhythmogenesis, myocardial hypertrophy and heart failure, and cardioprotection against ischemia reperfusion. The study of physiological or pathophysiological phenotypes of cardiac Cl? channels, however, is complicated by the compensatory changes in the animals in response to the targeted genetic manipulation. Alternatively, tissue-specific conditional or inducible knockout or knockin animal models may be more valuable in the phenotypic studies of specific Cl? channels by limiting the effect of compensation on the phenotype. The integrated function of Cl? channels may involve multiprotein complexes of the Cl? channel subproteome. Similar phenotypes can be attained from alternative protein pathways within cellular networks, which are influenced by genetic and environmental factors. The phenomics approach, which characterizes phenotypes as a whole phenome and systematically studies the molecular changes that give rise to particular phenotypes achieved by modifying the genotype under the scope of genome/proteome/phenome, may provide more complete understanding of the integrated function of each cardiac Cl? channel in the context of health and disease. PMID:23720326

  8. Bifurcation theory and cardiac arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Karagueuzian, Hrayr S; Stepanyan, Hayk; Mandel, William J

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we review two types of dynamic behaviors defined by the bifurcation theory that are found to be particularly useful in describing two forms of cardiac electrical instabilities that are of considerable importance in cardiac arrhythmogenesis. The first is action potential duration (APD) alternans with an underlying dynamics consistent with the period doubling bifurcation theory. This form of electrical instability could lead to spatially discordant APD alternans leading to wavebreak and reentrant form of tachyarrhythmias. Factors that modulate the APD alternans are discussed. The second form of bifurcation of importance to cardiac arrhythmogenesis is the Hopf-homoclinic bifurcation that adequately describes the dynamics of the onset of early afterdepolarization (EAD)-mediated triggered activity (Hopf) that may cause ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF respectively). The self-termination of the triggered activity is compatible with the homoclinic bifurcation. Ionic and intracellular calcium dynamics underlying these dynamics are discussed using available experimental and simulation data. The dynamic analysis provides novel insights into the mechanisms of VT/VF, a major cause of sudden cardiac death in the US. PMID:23459417

  9. Cardiac arrest during dipyridamole imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, M.S.; McCauley, C.S.

    1988-05-01

    A case of cardiac arrest and subsequent acute myocardial infarction occurring during thallium-201 imaging with oral dipyridamole augmentation is presented. Previous reports emphasizing the safety of this procedure are briefly reviewed and a recommendation for close hemodynamic and arrhythmia monitoring during the study is made. Large doses of oral dipyridamole may be contraindicated in patients with unstable angina.

  10. Device Assists Cardiac Chest Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichstadt, Frank T.

    1995-01-01

    Portable device facilitates effective and prolonged cardiac resuscitation by chest compression. Developed originally for use in absence of gravitation, also useful in terrestrial environments and situations (confined spaces, water rescue, medical transport) not conducive to standard manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques.

  11. Molecular Modeling of Cardiac Troponin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Edward P.

    The cardiac thin filament regulates interactions of actin and myosin, the force-generating elements of muscular contraction. Over the past several decades many details have been discovered regarding the structure and function of the cardiac thin filament and its components, including cardiac troponin (cTn). My hypothesis is that signal propagation occurs between distant ends of the cardiac troponin complex through calcium-dependent alterations in the dynamics of cTn and tropomyosin (Tm). I propose a model of the thin filament that encompasses known structures of cTn, Tm and actin to gain insight into cardiac troponin's allosteric regulation of thin filament dynamics. By performing molecular dynamics simulations of cTn in conjunction with overlapping Tm in two conditions, with and without calcium bound to site II of cardiac troponin C (cTnC), I found a combination of calcium-dependent changes in secondary structure and dynamics throughout the cTn-Tm complex. I then applied this model to investigate familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC), a disease of the sarcomere that is one of the most commonly occurring genetic causes of heart disease. Approximately 15% of known FHC-related mutations are found in cardiac troponin T (cTnT), most of which are in or flank the alpha-helical N-tail domain TNT1. TNT1 directly interacts with overlapping Tm coiled coils. Using this model I identified effects of TNT1 mutations that propagate to the cTn core where site II of cTnC, the regulatory site of calcium binding in the thin filament, is located. Specifically, I found that mutations in TNT1 alter the flexibility of TNT1 and that the flexibility of TNT1 is inversely proportional to the cooperativity of calcium activation of the thin filament. Further, I identified a pathway of propagation of structural and dynamic changes linking TNT1 to site II of cTnC. Mutation-induced changes at site II cTnC alter calcium coordination which corresponds to biophysical measurements of calcium sensitivity. I compared this pathway of mutational propagation with the pathway of the calcium activation of the thin filament and found that they are identical in terms of location but opposite in direction.

  12. A portable cadmium telluride multidetector probe for cardiac function monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arntz, Y.; Chambron, J.; Dumitresco, B.; Eclancher, B.; Prat, V.

    1999-06-01

    A new nuclear stethoscope based on a matrix of small CdTe semiconductor detectors has been developed for studying the cardiac performance by gamma ventriculography at the equilibrium, in rest and stress conditions, in the early and recovery phases of the coronary disease and to follow the long-term therapy. The light-weight probe consists of an array of 64 detectors 5×5×2 mm grouped in 16 independent units in a lead shielded aluminum box including 16 preamplifiers. The probe is connected to an electronic box containing DC power supply, 16 channel amplifiers, discriminators and counters, two analog-triggering ECG channels, and interface to a PC. The left ventricle activity is, preferentially, detected by using a low-resolution matching convergent collimator. A physical evaluation of the probe has been performed, both with static tests and dynamically with a hydraulic home-built model of beating heart ventricle paced by a rhythm simulator. The sum of the 16 detectors activity provided a radiocardiogram (RCG) which well depicted the filling and ejection of the cardiac beats, allowing to compare the clinically relevant parameters of the cardiac performance, proportional variables of the stroke volume (SV), ejection fraction (EF) and ventricular flow-rate with the known absolute values programmed on the model. The portable system is now in operation for clinical assessment of cardiac patients.

  13. Model output: fact or artefact?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melsen, Lieke

    2015-04-01

    As a third-year PhD-student, I relatively recently entered the wonderful world of scientific Hydrology. A science that has many pillars that directly impact society, for example with the prediction of hydrological extremes (both floods and drought), climate change, applications in agriculture, nature conservation, drinking water supply, etcetera. Despite its demonstrable societal relevance, hydrology is often seen as a science between two stools. Like Klemeš (1986) stated: "By their academic background, hydrologists are foresters, geographers, electrical engineers, geologists, system analysts, physicists, mathematicians, botanists, and most often civil engineers." Sometimes it seems that the engineering genes are still present in current hydrological sciences, and this results in pragmatic rather than scientific approaches for some of the current problems and challenges we have in hydrology. Here, I refer to the uncertainty in hydrological modelling that is often neglected. For over thirty years, uncertainty in hydrological models has been extensively discussed and studied. But it is not difficult to find peer-reviewed articles in which it is implicitly assumed that model simulations represent the truth rather than a conceptualization of reality. For instance in trend studies, where data is extrapolated 100 years ahead. Of course one can use different forcing datasets to estimate the uncertainty of the input data, but how to prevent that the output is not a model artefact, caused by the model structure? Or how about impact studies, e.g. of a dam impacting river flow. Measurements are often available for the period after dam construction, so models are used to simulate river flow before dam construction. Both are compared in order to qualify the effect of the dam. But on what basis can we tell that the model tells us the truth? Model validation is common nowadays, but validation only (comparing observations with model output) is not sufficient to assume that a model reflects reality. E.g. due to nonuniqueness or so called equifinality; different model construction lead to same output (Oreskes et al., 1994, Beven, 2005). But also because validation only does not provide us information on whether we are 'right for the wrong reasons' (Kirchner, 2006; Oreskes et al., 1994). We can never know how right or wrong our models are, because we do not fully understand reality. But we can estimate the uncertainty from the model and the input data itself. Many techniques have been developed that help in estimating model uncertainty. E.g. model structural uncertainty, studied in the FUSE framework (Clark et al., 2008), parameter uncertainty with GLUE (Beven and Binley, 1992) and DREAM (Vrugt et al., 2008), input data uncertainty using BATEA (Kavetski et al., 2006). These are just some examples that pop-up in a first search. But somehow, these techniques are only used and applied in studies that focus on the model uncertainty itself, and hardly ever occur in studies that have a research question outside of the uncertainty-region. We know that models don't tell us the truth, but we have the tendency to claim they are, based on validation only. A model is always a simplification of reality, which by definition leads to uncertainty when model output and observations of reality are compared. The least we could do is estimate the uncertainty of the model and the data itself. My question therefore is: As a scientist, can we accept that we believe things of which we know they might not be true? And secondly: How to deal with this? How should model uncertainty change the way we communicate scientific results? References Beven, K., and A. Binley, The future of distributed models: Model calibration and uncertainty prediction, HP 6 (1992). Beven, K., A manifesto for the equifinality thesis, JoH 320 (2006). Clark, M.P., A.G. Slater, D.E. Rupp, R.A. Woods, J.A. Vrugt, H.V. Gupta, T. Wagener and L.E. Hay, Framework for Understanding Structural Errors (FUSE): A modular framework to diagnose differences between hydrological models, WRR 44 (20

  14. Treadmill performance and cardiac function in selected patients with coronary heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    McKirnan, M.D.; Sullivan, M.; Jensen, D.; Froelicher, V.F.

    1984-02-01

    To investigate the cardiac determinants of treadmill performance in patients able to exercise to volitional fatigue, 88 patients with coronary heart disease free of angina pectoris were tested. The exercise tests included supine bicycle radionuclide ventriculography, thallium scintigraphy and treadmill testing with expired gas analysis. The number of abnormal Q wave locations, ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, cardiac output, exercise-induced ST segment depression and thallium scar and ischemia scores were the cardiac variables considered. Rest and exercise ejection fractions were highly correlated to thallium scar score (r . -0.72 to -0.75, p less than 0.001), but not to maximal oxygen consumption (r . 0.19 to 0.25, p less than 0.05). Fifty-five percent of the variability in predicting treadmill time or estimated maximal oxygen consumption was explained by treadmill test-induced change in heart rate (39%), thallium ischemia score (12%) and cardiac output at rest (4%). The change in heart rate induced by the treadmill test explained only 27% of the variability in measured maximal oxygen consumption. Myocardial damage predicted ejection fraction at rest and the ability to increase heart rate with treadmill exercise appeared as an essential component of exercise capacity. Exercise capacity was only minimally affected by asymptomatic ischemia and was relatively independent of ventricular function.

  15. Fast automatic delineation of cardiac volume of interest in MSCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Cristian; Lessick, Jonathan; Lavi, Guy; Bulow, Thomas; Renisch, Steffen

    2004-05-01

    Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) is an emerging modality for assessing cardiac anatomy. The delineation of the cardiac volume of interest (VOI) is a pre-processing step for subsequent visualization or image processing. It serves the suppression of anatomic structures being not in the primary focus of the cardiac application, such as sternum, ribs, spinal column, descending aorta and pulmonary vasculature. These structures obliterate standard visualizations such as direct volume renderings or maximum intensity projections. In addition, outcome and performance of post-processing steps such as ventricle suppression, coronary artery segmentation or the detection of short and long axes of the heart can be improved. The structures being part of the cardiac VOI (coronary arteries and veins, myocardium, ventricles and atria) differ tremendously in appearance. In addition, there is no clear image feature associated with the contour (or better cut-surface) distinguishing between cardiac VOI and surrounding tissue making the automatic delineation of the cardiac VOI a difficult task. The presented approach locates in a first step chest wall and descending aorta in all image slices giving a rough estimate of the location of the heart. In a second step, a Fourier based active contour approach delineates slice-wise the border of the cardiac VOI. The algorithm has been evaluated on 41 multi-slice CT data-sets including cases with coronary stents and venous and arterial bypasses. The typical processing time amounts to 5-10s on a 1GHz P3 PC.

  16. Myocardial perfusion imaging and infarct characterization using multidetector cardiac computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Granillo, Gastón A; Ingino, Carlos A; Lylyk, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Until recently, computed tomography coronary angiography was restricted to the anatomical assessment of coronary stenosis, whereas the functional significance of coronary lesions remained outside of its scope. Nevertheless, the kinetics of iodinated contrast is similar to gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid used in contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, allowing assessment of myocardial perfusion and viability by cardiac computed tomography. PMID:21160751

  17. Myocardial perfusion imaging and infarct characterization using multidetector cardiac computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Granillo, Gastón A; Ingino, Carlos A; Lylyk, Pedro

    2010-07-26

    Until recently, computed tomography coronary angiography was restricted to the anatomical