Science.gov

Sample records for cardiac output assessment

  1. Cardiac Output Assessed by Invasive and Minimally Invasive Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Allison J.; Cohn, Jennifer Hochman; Ranasinghe, J. Sudharma

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac output (CO) measurement has long been considered essential to the assessment and guidance of therapeutic decisions in critically ill patients and for patients undergoing certain high-risk surgeries. Despite controversies, complications and inherent errors in measurement, pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) continuous and intermittent bolus techniques of CO measurement continue to be the gold standard. Newer techniques provide less invasive alternatives; however, currently available monitors are unable to provide central circulation pressures or true mixed venous saturations. Esophageal Doppler and pulse contour monitors can predict fluid responsiveness and have been shown to decrease postoperative morbidity. Many minimally invasive techniques continue to suffer from decreased accuracy and reliability under periods of hemodynamic instability, and so few have reached the level of interchangeability with the PAC. PMID:21776254

  2. Constant infusion transpulmonary thermodilution for the assessment of cardiac output in exercising humans.

    PubMed

    Calbet, J A L; Mortensen, S P; Munch, G D W; Curtelin, D; Boushel, R

    2016-05-01

    To determine the accuracy and precision of constant infusion transpulmonary thermodilution cardiac output (CITT-Q) assessment during exercise in humans, using indocyanine green (ICG) dilution and bolus transpulmonary thermodilution (BTD) as reference methods, cardiac output (Q) was determined at rest and during incremental one- and two-legged pedaling on a cycle ergometer, and combined arm cranking with leg pedaling to exhaustion in 15 healthy men. Continuous infusions of iced saline in the femoral vein (n = 41) or simultaneously in the femoral and axillary (n = 66) veins with determination of temperature in the femoral artery were used for CITT-Q assessment. CITT-Q was linearly related to ICG-Q (r = 0.82, CITT-Q = 0.876 × ICG-Q + 3.638, P < 0.001; limits of agreement ranging from -1.43 to 3.07 L/min) and BTD-Q (r = 0.91, CITT-Q = 0.822 × BTD + 4.481 L/min, P < 0.001; limits of agreement ranging from -1.01 to 2.63 L/min). Compared with ICG-Q and BTD-Q, CITT-Q overestimated cardiac output by 1.6 L/min (≈ 10% of the mean ICG and BTD-Q values, P < 0.05). For Q between 20 and 28 L/min, we estimated an overestimation < 5%. The coefficient of variation of 23 repeated CITT-Q measurements was 6.0% (CI: 6.1-11.1%). In conclusion, cardiac output can be precisely and accurately determined with constant infusion transpulmonary thermodilution in exercising humans. PMID:25919489

  3. In vivo validation of cardiac output assessment in non-standard 3D echocardiographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nillesen, M. M.; Lopata, R. G. P.; de Boode, W. P.; Gerrits, I. H.; Huisman, H. J.; Thijssen, J. M.; Kapusta, L.; de Korte, C. L.

    2009-04-01

    Automatic segmentation of the endocardial surface in three-dimensional (3D) echocardiographic images is an important tool to assess left ventricular (LV) geometry and cardiac output (CO). The presence of speckle noise as well as the nonisotropic characteristics of the myocardium impose strong demands on the segmentation algorithm. In the analysis of normal heart geometries of standardized (apical) views, it is advantageous to incorporate a priori knowledge about the shape and appearance of the heart. In contrast, when analyzing abnormal heart geometries, for example in children with congenital malformations, this a priori knowledge about the shape and anatomy of the LV might induce erroneous segmentation results. This study describes a fully automated segmentation method for the analysis of non-standard echocardiographic images, without making strong assumptions on the shape and appearance of the heart. The method was validated in vivo in a piglet model. Real-time 3D echocardiographic image sequences of five piglets were acquired in radiofrequency (rf) format. These ECG-gated full volume images were acquired intra-operatively in a non-standard view. Cardiac blood flow was measured simultaneously by an ultrasound transit time flow probe positioned around the common pulmonary artery. Three-dimensional adaptive filtering using the characteristics of speckle was performed on the demodulated rf data to reduce the influence of speckle noise and to optimize the distinction between blood and myocardium. A gradient-based 3D deformable simplex mesh was then used to segment the endocardial surface. A gradient and a speed force were included as external forces of the model. To balance data fitting and mesh regularity, one fixed set of weighting parameters of internal, gradient and speed forces was used for all data sets. End-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were computed from the segmented endocardial surface. The cardiac output derived from this automatic segmentation was

  4. Assessment of the effect of vasodilators on the distribution of cardiac output by whole-body Thallium imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Juni, J.E.; Wallis, J.; Diltz, E.; Nicholas, J.; Lahti, D.; Pitt, B.

    1985-05-01

    Vasodilator therapy (tx) of congestive heart failure (CHF) has been shown to be effective in increasing cardiac output (CO) and lowering vascular resistance. Unfortunately, these hemodynamic effects are not usually accompanied by improved peripheral circulation of exercise capacity. To assess the effect of a new vasodilator, Cl-914, on the redistribution of CO to the peripheral circulation, the authors performed testing whole-body thallium scanning (WB-Th) on 6 patients (pts) with severe CHF. Immediately following i.v. injection of 1.5 mCi Th-201, WB scanning was performed from anterior and posterior views. Regions of interest were defined for the peripheral (P) muscles (legs and arms), central torso (C), and splanchnic bed (S). The geometric mean of activity in these regions was calculated from both views. Each pt was studied before tx and again, after 1 week on tx. Invasive measurements revealed that all pts had significant improvements in resting cardiac output (mean increase 49%) and vascular resistance (mean decrease 30%). Unlike other vasodilators, all CI-914 pts had a significant improvement in treadmill exercise capacity (mean increase 54%). WB-Th revealed a significant shift in CO to the peripheral circulation with P:C increased 33.2% (rho= .001) and P:S increased 29% (rho=.01). Vasoactive drugs may significantly alter the relative distribution of cardiac output. WB-Th scanning provides a simple quantitative means of following such changes.

  5. Mathematics and the Heart: Understanding Cardiac Output

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champanerkar, Jyoti

    2013-01-01

    This paper illustrates a biological application of the concepts of relative change and area under a curve, from mathematics. We study two biological measures "relative change in cardiac output" and "cardiac output", which are predictors of heart blockages and other related ailments. Cardiac output refers to the quantity of…

  6. Methods in pharmacology: measurement of cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    Geerts, Bart F; Aarts, Leon P; Jansen, Jos R

    2011-01-01

    Many methods of cardiac output measurement have been developed, but the number of methods useful for human pharmacological studies is limited. The ‘holy grail’ for the measurement of cardiac output would be a method that is accurate, precise, operator independent, fast responding, non-invasive, continuous, easy to use, cheap and safe. This method does not exist today. In this review on cardiac output methods used in pharmacology, the Fick principle, indicator dilution techniques, arterial pulse contour analysis, ultrasound and bio-impedance are reviewed. PMID:21284692

  7. Comparing the accuracy of ES-BC, EIS-GS, and ES Oxi on body composition, autonomic nervous system activity, and cardiac output to standardized assessments

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, John E; Tannenbaum, Stacey L; Gao, Jinrun; Melillo, Angelica B; Long, Evan G; Alonso, Yaima; Konefal, Janet; Woolger, Judi M; Leonard, Susanna; Singh, Prabjot K; Chen, Lawrence; Tiozzo, Eduard

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose The Electro Sensor Complex (ESC) is software that combines three devices using bioelectrical impedance, galvanic skin response, and spectrophotometry: (1) ES-BC (Electro Sensor-Body Composition; LD Technology, Miami, FL) to assess body composition, (2) EIS-GS (Electro Interstitial Scan-Galvanic Skin; LD Technology) to predict autonomic nervous system activity, and (3) ES Oxi (Electro Sensor Oxi; LD Technology) to assess cardiac output. The objective of this study was to compare each to a standardized assessment: ES-BC to dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), EIS-GS to heart rate variability, and ES Oxi to BioZ Dx Diagnostic System (BioZ Dx; SonoSite Inc, Bothell, WA). Patients and methods The study was conducted in two waves. Fifty subjects were assessed for body composition and autonomic nervous system activity. Fifty-one subjects were assessed for cardiac output. Results We found adequate relative and absolute agreement between ES-BC and DXA for fat mass (r = 0.97, P < 0.001) with ES-BC overestimating fat mass by 0.1 kg and for body fat percentage (r = 0.92, P < 0.001) with overestimation of fat percentage by 0.4%. For autonomic nervous system activity, we found marginal relative agreement between EIS-GS and heart rate variability by using EIS-GS as the predictor in a linear regression equation (adjusted R2 = 0.56, P = 0.03). For cardiac output, adequate relative and absolute agreement was found between ES Oxi and BioZ Dx at baseline (r = 0.60, P < 0.001), after the first exercise stage (r = 0.79, P < 0.001), and after the second exercise stage (r = 0.86, P < 0.001). Absolute agreement was found at baseline and after both bouts of exercise; ES Oxi overestimated baseline and stage 1 exercise cardiac output by 0.3 L/minute and 0.1 L/minute, respectively, but exactly estimated stage 2 exercise cardiac output. Conclusion ES-BC and ES Oxi accurately assessed body composition and cardiac output compared to standardized instruments, whereas EIS

  8. Evaluation of noninvasive cardiac output methods during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Alan D.; Barrows, Linda H.; Rashid, Michael; Siconolfi, Steven F.

    1992-01-01

    Noninvasive techniques to estimate cardiac output (Qc) will be used during future space flight. This retrospective literature survey compared the Qc techniques of carbon dioxide rebreathing (CO2-R), CO2 single breath (CO2-S), Doppler (DOP), impedance (IM), and inert gas (IG: acetylene or nitrous oxide) to direct (DIR) assessments measured at rest and during exercise.

  9. [Cardiac output monitoring by impedance cardiography in cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, H; Seki, S; Mizuguchi, A; Tsuchida, H; Watanabe, H; Namiki, A

    1990-04-01

    The cardiac output monitoring by impedance cardiography, NCCOM3, was evaluated in adult patients (n = 12) who were subjected to coronary artery bypass grafting. Values of cardiac output measured by impedance cardiography were compared to those by the thermodilution method. Changes of base impedance level used as an index of thoracic fluid volume were also investigated before and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Correlation coefficient (r) of the values obtained by thermodilution with impedance cardiography was 0.79 and the mean difference was 1.29 +/- 16.9 (SD)% during induction of anesthesia. During the operation, r was 0.83 and the mean difference was -14.6 +/- 18.7%. The measurement by impedance cardiography could be carried out through the operation except when electro-cautery was used. Base impedance level before CPB was significantly lower as compared with that after CPB. There was a negative correlation between the base impedance level and central venous pressure (CVP). No patients showed any signs suggesting lung edema and all the values of CVP, pulmonary artery pressure and blood gas analysis were within normal ranges. From the result of this study, it was concluded that cardiac output monitoring by impedance cardiography was useful in cardiac surgery, but further detailed examinations will be necessary on the relationship between the numerical values of base impedance and the clinical state of the patients. PMID:2362347

  10. Methods and apparatus for determining cardiac output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Richard J. (Inventor); Mukkamala, Ramakrishna (Inventor); Sherman, Derin A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for determining a dynamical property of the systemic or pulmonary arterial tree using long time scale information, i.e., information obtained from measurements over time scales greater than a single cardiac cycle. In one aspect, the invention provides a method and apparatus for monitoring cardiac output (CO) from a single blood pressure signal measurement obtained at any site in the systemic or pulmonary arterial tree or from any related measurement including, for example, fingertip photoplethysmography.According to the method the time constant of the arterial tree, defined to be the product of the total peripheral resistance (TPR) and the nearly constant arterial compliance, is determined by analyzing the long time scale variations (greater than a single cardiac cycle) in any of these blood pressure signals. Then, according to Ohm's law, a value proportional to CO may be determined from the ratio of the blood pressure signal to the estimated time constant. The proportional CO values derived from this method may be calibrated to absolute CO, if desired, with a single, absolute measure of CO (e.g., thermodilution). The present invention may be applied to invasive radial arterial blood pressure or pulmonary arterial blood pressure signals which are routinely measured in intensive care units and surgical suites or to noninvasively measured peripheral arterial blood pressure signals or related noninvasively measured signals in order to facilitate the clinical monitoring of CO as well as TPR.

  11. Cardiac Assessment.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Deborah; McKenzie, Patricia

    2015-10-01

    Heart disease remains the number one cause of mortality in both men and women in the United States and patients with heart failure are at high risk for hospitalization. Thirty-day readmission rates have become a benchmark for hospitals and home healthcare agency reimbursement. Physical exam and history taking are essential to evaluate patients with suspected or known heart disease, and to detect early symptoms of worsening heart failure. Home care clinicians have the opportunity to assess the patient in the home environment, identify significant changes in the patient's status, and form a plan of care for effective intervention to prevent the need for emergency department care or rehospitalization. In this second article of a four-part series, the subjective and objective assessment of the cardiovascular system exam is reviewed. PMID:26418104

  12. Newer methods of cardiac output monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Yatin; Arora, Dheeraj

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac output (CO) is the volume of blood ejected by each ventricle per minute and is the product of stroke volume and heart rate. CO can thus be manipulated by alteration in heart rate or rhythm, preload, contractility and afterload. Moreover it gives important information about tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery. CO can be measured by various methods and thermodilution method using pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) is till date considered as gold standard method. Complications associated with PAC led to development of newer methods which are minimally or non-invasive. Newer methods fulfil other properties like continuous and reproducible reading, cost effective, reliable during various physiological states and have fast response time. These methods are validated against the gold standard with good level agreement. In this review we have discussed various newer methods of CO monitoring and their effectiveness in clinical use. PMID:25276302

  13. Regulation of cardiac output in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Siebenmann, Christoph; Lundby, Carsten

    2015-12-01

    This brief review addresses the regulation of cardiac output (Q) at rest and during submaximal exercise in acute and chronic hypoxia. To preserve systemic O2 delivery in acute hypoxia Q is increased by an acceleration of heart rate, whereas stroke volume (SV) remains unchanged. Tachycardia is governed by activation of carotid and aortic chemoreceptors and a concomitant reduction in arterial baroreflex activation, all balancing sympathovagal activity toward sympathetic dominance. As hypoxia extends over several days a combination of different adaptive processes restores arterial O2 content to or beyond sea level values and hence Q normalizes. The latter however occurs as a consequence of a decrease in SV whereas tachycardia persists. The diminished SV reflects a lower left ventricular end-diastolic volume which is primarily related to hypoxia-generated reduction in plasma volume. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction may contribute by increasing right ventricular afterload and thus decreasing its ejection fraction. In summary, the Q response to hypoxia is the result of a complex interplay between several physiological mechanisms. Future studies are encouraged to establish the individual contributions of the different components from an integrative perspective. PMID:26589118

  14. Modelflow underestimates cardiac output in heat-stressed individuals.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Manabu; Wilson, Thad E; Bundgaard-Nielsen, Morten; Seifert, Thomas; Secher, Niels H; Crandall, Craig G

    2011-02-01

    An estimation of cardiac output can be obtained from arterial pressure waveforms using the Modelflow method. However, whether the assumptions associated with Modelflow calculations are accurate during whole body heating is unknown. This project tested the hypothesis that cardiac output obtained via Modelflow accurately tracks thermodilution-derived cardiac outputs during whole body heat stress. Acute changes of cardiac output were accomplished via lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) during normothermic and heat-stressed conditions. In nine healthy normotensive subjects, arterial pressure was measured via brachial artery cannulation and the volume-clamp method of the Finometer. Cardiac output was estimated from both pressure waveforms using the Modeflow method. In normothermic conditions, cardiac outputs estimated via Modelflow (arterial cannulation: 6.1 ± 1.0 l/min; Finometer 6.3 ± 1.3 l/min) were similar with cardiac outputs measured by thermodilution (6.4 ± 0.8 l/min). The subsequent reduction in cardiac output during LBNP was also similar among these methods. Whole body heat stress elevated internal temperature from 36.6 ± 0.3 to 37.8 ± 0.4°C and increased cardiac output from 6.4 ± 0.8 to 10.9 ± 2.0 l/min when evaluated with thermodilution (P < 0.001). However, the increase in cardiac output estimated from the Modelflow method for both arterial cannulation (2.3 ± 1.1 l/min) and Finometer (1.5 ± 1.2 l/min) was attenuated compared with thermodilution (4.5 ± 1.4 l/min, both P < 0.01). Finally, the reduction in cardiac output during LBNP while heat stressed was significantly attenuated for both Modelflow methods (cannulation: -1.8 ± 1.2 l/min, Finometer: -1.5 ± 0.9 l/min) compared with thermodilution (-3.8 ± 1.19 l/min). These results demonstrate that the Modelflow method, regardless of Finometer or direct arterial waveforms, underestimates cardiac output during heat stress and during subsequent reductions in cardiac output via LBNP. PMID:21084673

  15. Noninvasive cardiac output measurements in patients with pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rich, Jonathan D; Archer, Stephen L; Rich, Stuart

    2013-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterised by a progressive decline in cardiac output (CO) and right heart failure. NICOM® (noninvasive cardiac output monitor) is a bioreactance-based technology that has been broadly validated, but its specific application in right heart failure and PH is unknown. Cardiac catheterisation was performed in 50 consecutive patients with PH. CO measurements were performed using three different methods (thermodilution, Fick and NICOM) at baseline and after vasodilator challenge. We compared the precision (coefficient of variation) and accuracy of NICOM compared to thermodilution and Fick. The mean CO (L·min(-1)) at baseline as measured by the three methods was 4.73±1.15 (NICOM), 5.69±1.74 (thermodilution) and 4.84±1.39 (Fick). CO measured by NICOM was more precise than by thermodilution (3.5±0.3% versus 9.6±6.1%, p<0.001). Bland-Altman analyses comparing NICOM to thermodilution and Fick revealed bias and 95% limits of agreement that were comparable to those comparing Fick to thermodilution. All three CO methods detected an increase in CO in response to vasodilator challenge. CO measured via NICOM is precise and reliably measures CO at rest and changes in CO with vasodilator challenge in patients with PH. NICOM may allow for the noninvasive haemodynamic assessment of patients with PH and their response to therapy. PMID:23100501

  16. Noninvasive continuous cardiac output monitoring in perioperative and intensive care medicine.

    PubMed

    Saugel, B; Cecconi, M; Wagner, J Y; Reuter, D A

    2015-04-01

    The determination of blood flow, i.e. cardiac output, is an integral part of haemodynamic monitoring. This is a review on noninvasive continuous cardiac output monitoring in perioperative and intensive care medicine. We present the underlying principles and validation data of the following technologies: thoracic electrical bioimpedance, thoracic bioreactance, vascular unloading technique, pulse wave transit time, and radial artery applanation tonometry. According to clinical studies, these technologies are capable of providing cardiac output readings noninvasively and continuously. They, therefore, might prove to be innovative tools for the assessment of advanced haemodynamic variables at the bedside. However, for most technologies there are conflicting data regarding the measurement performance in comparison with reference methods for cardiac output assessment. In addition, each of the reviewed technology has its own limitations regarding applicability in the clinical setting. In validation studies comparing cardiac output measurements using these noninvasive technologies in comparison with a criterion standard method, it is crucial to correctly apply statistical methods for the assessment of a technology's accuracy, precision, and trending capability. Uniform definitions for 'clinically acceptable agreement' between innovative noninvasive cardiac output monitoring systems and criterion standard methods are currently missing. Further research must aim to further develop the different technologies for noninvasive continuous cardiac output determination with regard to signal recording, signal processing, and clinical applicability. PMID:25596280

  17. Sham-feeding decreases cardiac output in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Andersen, H B; Jensen, E W; Madsbad, S; Nielsen, S L; Burcharth, F; Christensen, N J

    1992-07-01

    The cardiovascular effect of sham-feeding was measured in seven healthy non-obese human subjects by the Fick principle using the carbon dioxide rebreathing method. The subjects were resting in the sitting position and were exposed to the sight and smell but not the taste of a breakfast meal. Cardiac output decreased significantly from a mean value of 4.0 1 min-1 to 3.5 1 min-1 during sham-feeding (Friedman, P = 0.004). The cardiac output returned to basal values in all seven subjects when the sensory stimulus was removed. The decrease in cardiac output was due to a decreased stroke volume, whereas heart rate and blood pressure did not change. The mechanism of the decrease in cardiac output during sham-feeding remains to be established. PMID:1505165

  18. Issues in methods and measurement of thermodilution cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Sommers, M S; Woods, S L; Courtade, M A

    1993-01-01

    Criterion-related validity of the thermodilution cardiac output technique for cardiac output measurement has to have a high correlation (r = .91 to .98) with the direct Fick method, the gold standard of cardiac output measurement. Issues that can affect validity of the measurements include the position of the pulmonary artery catheter, the rate of injection of the indicator solution, the volume and temperature of the injectate, the timing of the injection of indicator solution during the respiratory cycle, the position of the subject, and the presence of concomitant infusions. Variation in measurement can be limited by considering the delivery system for the indicator solution, by recording time-temperature cardiac output curves, and by considering normal biologic variations. PMID:8337161

  19. Cardiac output estimation using pulmonary mechanics in mechanically ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The application of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) in mechanically ventilated (MV) patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) decreases cardiac output (CO). Accurate measurement of CO is highly invasive and is not ideal for all MV critically ill patients. However, the link between the PEEP used in MV, and CO provides an opportunity to assess CO via MV therapy and other existing measurements, creating a CO measure without further invasiveness. This paper examines combining models of diffusion resistance and lung mechanics, to help predict CO changes due to PEEP. The CO estimator uses an initial measurement of pulmonary shunt, and estimations of shunt changes due to PEEP to predict CO at different levels of PEEP. Inputs to the cardiac model are the PV loops from the ventilator, as well as the oxygen saturation values using known respiratory inspired oxygen content. The outputs are estimates of pulmonary shunt and CO changes due to changes in applied PEEP. Data from two published studies are used to assess and initially validate this model. The model shows the effect on oxygenation due to decreased CO and decreased shunt, resulting from increased PEEP. It concludes that there is a trade off on oxygenation parameters. More clinically importantly, the model also examines how the rate of CO drop with increased PEEP can be used as a method to determine optimal PEEP, which may be used to optimise MV therapy with respect to the gas exchange achieved, as well as accounting for the impact on the cardiovascular system and its management. PMID:21108836

  20. Cardiac output estimation using pulmonary mechanics in mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, Ashwath; Chase, J Geoffrey; Hann, Christopher E; Shaw, Geoffrey M

    2010-01-01

    The application of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) in mechanically ventilated (MV) patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) decreases cardiac output (CO). Accurate measurement of CO is highly invasive and is not ideal for all MV critically ill patients. However, the link between the PEEP used in MV, and CO provides an opportunity to assess CO via MV therapy and other existing measurements, creating a CO measure without further invasiveness.This paper examines combining models of diffusion resistance and lung mechanics, to help predict CO changes due to PEEP. The CO estimator uses an initial measurement of pulmonary shunt, and estimations of shunt changes due to PEEP to predict CO at different levels of PEEP. Inputs to the cardiac model are the PV loops from the ventilator, as well as the oxygen saturation values using known respiratory inspired oxygen content. The outputs are estimates of pulmonary shunt and CO changes due to changes in applied PEEP. Data from two published studies are used to assess and initially validate this model.The model shows the effect on oxygenation due to decreased CO and decreased shunt, resulting from increased PEEP. It concludes that there is a trade off on oxygenation parameters. More clinically importantly, the model also examines how the rate of CO drop with increased PEEP can be used as a method to determine optimal PEEP, which may be used to optimise MV therapy with respect to the gas exchange achieved, as well as accounting for the impact on the cardiovascular system and its management. PMID:21108836

  1. Evaluation of cardiac output by 5 arterial pulse contour techniques using trend interchangeability method.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Marc-Olivier; Diouf, Momar; Wilde, Robert B P de; Dupont, Hervé; Hanouz, Jean-Luc; Lorne, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac output measurement with pulse contour analysis is a continuous, mini-invasive, operator-independent, widely used, and cost-effective technique, which could be helpful to assess changes in cardiac output. The 4-quadrant plot and the polar plot have been described to compare the changes between 2 measurements performed under different conditions, and the direction of change by using different methods of measurements. However, the 4-quadrant plot and the polar plot present a number of limitations, with a risk of misinterpretation in routine clinical practice. We describe a new trend interchangeability method designed to objectively define the interchangeability of each change of a variable. Using the repeatability of the reference method, we classified each change as either uninterpretable or interpretable and then as either noninterchangeable, in the gray zone or interchangeable. An interchangeability rate can then be calculated by the number of interchangeable changes divided by the total number of interpretable changes. In this observational study, we used this objective method to assess cardiac output changes with 5 arterial pulse contour techniques (Wesseling's method, LiDCO, PiCCO, Hemac method, and Modelflow) in comparison with bolus thermodilution technique as reference method in 24 cardiac surgery patients. A total of 172 cardiac output variations were available from the 199 data points: 88 (51%) were uninterpretable, according to the first step of the method. The second step of the method, based on the 84 (49%) interpretable variations, showed that only 18 (21%) to 30 (36%) variations were interchangeable regardless of the technique used. None of pulse contour cardiac output technique could be interchangeable with bolus thermodilution to assess changes in cardiac output using the trend interchangeability method in cardiac surgery patients. Future studies may consider using this method to assess interchangeability of changes between different methods

  2. Volume and its relationship to cardiac output and venous return.

    PubMed

    Magder, S

    2016-01-01

    Volume infusions are one of the commonest clinical interventions in critically ill patients yet the relationship of volume to cardiac output is not well understood. Blood volume has a stressed and unstressed component but only the stressed component determines flow. It is usually about 30 % of total volume. Stressed volume is relatively constant under steady state conditions. It creates an elastic recoil pressure that is an important factor in the generation of blood flow. The heart creates circulatory flow by lowering the right atrial pressure and allowing the recoil pressure in veins and venules to drain blood back to the heart. The heart then puts the volume back into the systemic circulation so that stroke return equals stroke volume. The heart cannot pump out more volume than comes back. Changes in cardiac output without changes in stressed volume occur because of changes in arterial and venous resistances which redistribute blood volume and change pressure gradients throughout the vasculature. Stressed volume also can be increased by decreasing vascular capacitance, which means recruiting unstressed volume into stressed volume. This is the equivalent of an auto-transfusion. It is worth noting that during exercise in normal young males, cardiac output can increase five-fold with only small changes in stressed blood volume. The mechanical characteristics of the cardiac chambers and the circulation thus ultimately determine the relationship between volume and cardiac output and are the subject of this review. PMID:27613307

  3. Comparison of impedance cardiography and dye dilution method for measuring cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    Spiering, W; van Es, P N; de Leeuw, P W

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To assess the degree of agreement between impedance cardiography, using the NCCOM3-R7 device, and the gold standard—the dye dilution method—both under basal conditions and after stimulation of cardiac output.
Patients—35 paired measurements in five healthy male volunteers.
Interventions—To obtain higher levels of cardiac output, cardiac performance was stimulated with a dopamine infusion.
Results—In 35 paired measurements, the mean of all the impedance values was higher than that of the dye dilution values, at 10.2 v 7.4 l/min (p < 0.0001). The mean discrepancy between the two methods was 3.3 l/min, and the mean bias −2.9 l/min, with limits of agreement of −9.0 and 3.2 l/min. A change in cardiac output could not adequately be predicted by the NCCOM3-R7. In 20 of 25 measurements obtained during continuous intravenous dopamine infusions there was a rise in dye dilution cardiac output (range 0.2 to 5.9 l/min). Neither the magnitude nor the direction of the change in dye dilution values corresponded with the change measured by impedance cardiography. The mean discrepancy here between the two methods was 1.8 l/min, and the mean bias −0.8 l/min, with limits of agreement of −4.9 and 3.3 l/min.
Conclusions—In healthy volunteers, impedance cardiography with NCCOM3-R7 is inadequate for assessing cardiac output when compared with the dye dilution method.

 Keywords: cardiac output;  impedance cardiography;  dye dilution PMID:9659188

  4. Assessing cardiac pumping capability by exercise testing and inotropic stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, L B; Bain, R J; Littler, W A

    1989-01-01

    In heart failure both functional capacity and prognosis are primarily determined by the degree of pump dysfunction. Although data on haemodynamic function at rest may indicate impaired cardiac function, they do not assess the capacity of the heart to respond to stress. Maximal bicycle ergometry and incremental intravenous inotropic stimulation in 31 patients with moderately severe heart failure were evaluated as methods of stressing the heart to determine cardiac pumping capability, which is defined as the cardiac power obtained during maximal stimulation. There was good agreement between the cardiac pumping capabilities assessed by these two methods. Maximal cardiac power output was better than maximal cardiac output and left ventricular stroke work index in representing cardiac pumping capability, because it was less dependent on the type of stimulation used during evaluation. Inotropic challenge is at least as effective as exercise testing in assessing cardiac pumping capability in heart failure, and may be a better method in patients who find physical exercise difficult. PMID:2757870

  5. Measurement of cardiac output from dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Seonghwan; Scalzetti, Ernest M.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To introduce a method of estimating cardiac output from the dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT that is primarily used to determine the optimal time window of CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA). Methods: Dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT series, acquired for eight patients, were retrospectively analyzed. The dynamic CT series was acquired, prior to the main CTPA, in cine mode (1 frame/s) for a single slice at the level of the main pulmonary artery covering the cross sections of ascending aorta (AA) and descending aorta (DA) during the infusion of iodinated contrast. The time series of contrast changes obtained for DA, which is the downstream of AA, was assumed to be related to the time series for AA by the convolution with a delay function. The delay time constant in the delay function, representing the average time interval between the cross sections of AA and DA, was determined by least square error fitting between the convoluted AA time series and the DA time series. The cardiac output was then calculated by dividing the volume of the aortic arch between the cross sections of AA and DA (estimated from the single slice CT image) by the average time interval, and multiplying the result by a correction factor. Results: The mean cardiac output value for the six patients was 5.11 (l/min) (with a standard deviation of 1.57 l/min), which is in good agreement with the literature value; the data for the other two patients were too noisy for processing. Conclusions: The dynamic single-slice pulmonary circulation time CT series also can be used to estimate cardiac output.

  6. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-09-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  7. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-01-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  8. Determination of myocardial energetic output for cardiac rhythm pacing.

    PubMed

    Herman, Dalibor; Prevorovská, Svetlana; Marsík, Frantisek

    2007-12-01

    This research is aimed to the determination of the changes in the cardiac energetic output for three different modes of cardiac rhythm pacing. The clinical investigation of thirteen patients with the permanent dual-chamber pacemaker implantation was carried out. The patients were taken to echocardiography examination conducted by way of three pacing modes (AAI, VVI and DDD). The myocardial energetic parameters-the stroke work index (SWI) and the myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) are not directly measurable, however, their values can be determined using the numerical model of the human cardiovascular system. The 24-segment hemodynamical model (pulsating type) of the human cardiovascular system was used for the numerical simulation of the changes of myocardial workload for cardiac rhythm pacing. The model was fitted by well-measurable parameters for each patient. The calculated parameters were compared using the two-tailed Student's test. The differences of SWI and MVO2 between the modes AAI and VVI and the modes DDD and VVI are statistically significant (P<0.05). On the other hand, the hemodynamic effects for the stimulation modes DDD and AAI are almost identical, i.e. the differences are statistically insignificant (P>0.05). PMID:18080208

  9. Continuous cardiac output monitoring by peripheral blood pressure waveform analysis.

    PubMed

    Mukkamala, Ramakrishna; Reisner, Andrew T; Hojman, Horacio M; Mark, Roger G; Cohen, Richard J

    2006-03-01

    A clinical method for monitoring cardiac output (CO) should be continuous, minimally invasive, and accurate. However, none of the conventional CO measurement methods possess all of these characteristics. On the other hand, peripheral arterial blood pressure (ABP) may be measured reliably and continuously with little or no invasiveness. We have developed a novel technique for continuously monitoring changes in CO by mathematical analysis of a peripheral ABP waveform. In contrast to the previous techniques, our technique analyzes the ABP waveform over time scales greater than a cardiac cycle in which the confounding effects of complex wave reflections are attenuated. The technique specifically analyzes 6-min intervals of ABP to estimate the pure exponential pressure decay that would eventually result if pulsatile activity abruptly ceased (i.e., after the high frequency wave reflections vanish). The technique then determines the time constant of this exponential decay, which equals the product of the total peripheral resistance and the nearly constant arterial compliance, and computes proportional CO via Ohm's law. To validate the technique, we performed six acute swine experiments in which peripheral ABP waveforms and aortic flow probe CO were simultaneously measured over a wide physiologic range. We report an overall CO error of 14.6%. PMID:16532772

  10. Measurement of cardiac output in children by bioreactance.

    PubMed

    Ballestero, Yolanda; López-Herce, Jesús; Urbano, Javier; Solana, Maria José; Botrán, Marta; Bellón, Jose M; Carrillo, Angel

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate a new bioreactance method for noninvasive cardiac output (CO) measurement (NICOM) in children. Ten patients between 1 and 144 months of age and with no hemodynamic disturbances were studied. Using bioreactance, heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and cardiac index (CI) measurements were made every 6-8 h. CI was 2.4 ± 1.03 l/min/1.73 m(2) (range 1-4.9 l/min/1.73 m(2)); There were significant correlations between CI and age (r = 0.50, P = 0.003), weight (r = 0.66, P < 0.001), and MAP (r = 0.369, P = 0.037). Significant differences in CI (P < 0.001) were detected between children weighing <10 kg (1.9 ± 0.73 l/min/1.73 m(2); range 1-3.2), 10-20 kg (2.07 ± 0.7 l/min/1.73 m(2); range 1-3.6), and >20 kg (3.7 ± 0.8 l/min/1.73 m(2); range 2.4-4.9). We conclude that the CI measured by bioreactance in children varies with the age and weight of the patients and is lower than the normal range in a large percentage of measurements. These data suggest that this method is not useful for evaluating CI in small children. PMID:21318463

  11. Physiologic and Clinical Principles behind Noninvasive Resuscitation Techniques and Cardiac Output Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Napoli, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical assessment and vital signs are poor predictors of the overall hemodynamic state. Optimal measurement of the response to fluid resuscitation and hemodynamics has previously required invasive measurement with radial and pulmonary artery catheterization. Newer noninvasive resuscitation technology offers the hope of more accurately and safely monitoring a broader range of critically ill patients while using fewer resources. Fluid responsiveness, the cardiac response to volume loading, represents a dynamic method of improving upon the assessment of preload when compared to static measures like central venous pressure. Multiple new hemodynamic monitors now exist that can noninvasively report cardiac output and oxygen delivery in a continuous manner. Proper assessment of the potential future role of these techniques in resuscitation requires understanding the underlying physiologic and clinical principles, reviewing the most recent literature examining their clinical validity, and evaluating their respective advantages and limitations. PMID:21860802

  12. Minimally invasive or noninvasive cardiac output measurement: an update.

    PubMed

    Sangkum, Lisa; Liu, Geoffrey L; Yu, Ling; Yan, Hong; Kaye, Alan D; Liu, Henry

    2016-06-01

    Although cardiac output (CO) by pulmonary artery catheterization (PAC) has been an important guideline in clinical management for more than four decades, some studies have questioned the clinical efficacy of CO in certain patient populations. Further, the use of CO by PAC has been linked to numerous complications including dysrhythmia, infection, rupture of pulmonary artery, injury to adjacent arteries, embolization, pulmonary infarction, cardiac valvular damage, pericardial effusion, and intracardiac catheter knotting. The use of PAC has been steadily declining over the past two decades. Minimally invasive and noninvasive CO monitoring have been studied in the past two decades with some evidence of efficacy. Several different devices based on pulse contour analysis are available currently, including the uncalibrated FloTrac/Vigileo system and the calibrated PiCCO and LiDCO systems. The pressure-recording analytical method (PRAM) system requires only an arterial line and is commercially available as the MostCare system. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) can measure CO by non-Doppler- or Doppler-based methods. The partial CO2 rebreathing technique, another method to measure CO, is marketed by Novametrix Medical Systems as the NICO system. Thoracic electrical bioimpedance (TEB) and electric bioreactance (EB) are totally noninvasive CO monitoring. Nexfin HD and the newer ClearSight systems are examples of noninvasive CO monitoring devices currently being marketed by Edwards Lifesciences. The developing focus in CO monitoring devices appears to be shifting to tissue perfusion and microcirculatory flow and aimed more at markers that indicate the effectiveness of circulatory and microcirculatory resuscitations. PMID:26961819

  13. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find a Specialist Share Twitter Facebook SCA Risk Assessment Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) occurs abruptly and without ... of all ages and health conditions. Start Risk Assessment The Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment Tool ...

  14. Thermodynamics of the heart: Relation between cardiac output and oxygen consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Mituo; Sakane, Kumiko K.; Bertolotti, Simone A.

    2008-06-01

    A thermodynamic approach is used to derive a relation between cardiac output and rate of oxygen consumption. As an example, the relation is used to calculate the cardiac output of a young woman exercising on a treadmill. The results can be understood by undergraduates without any previous knowledge of human physiology.

  15. Flow-regulated extracorporeal arteriovenous tubing loop for cardiac output measurements by ultrasound velocity dilution: validation in post-cardiac surgery intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Eremenko, Alexsandr A; Safarov, Perviz N

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of cardiac output (CO) is crucial in the management of the critically ill, especially in post cardiac surgery intensive care unit (ICU) patients. In this study, we validated CO measured by the novel ultrasound dilution (COUD) with those measured by pulmonary artery (PA) thermodilution (COTD) in 26 adult post cardiac surgery patients. For COUD, blood was circulated through an extracorporeal arteriovenous (AV) loop from the radial artery catheter to the introducer of PA catheter for 5-8 minutes. Three to four injections of 25 ml body temperature isotonic saline were performed into the venous limb of the AV loop. For COTD, five injections of 10 ml ice cold saline were performed. A total of 77 COUD and COTD measurement sets were compared. Cardiac output measured by thermodilution ranged from 3.28 to 9.4 L/min, whereas COUD ranged from 2.85 to 10.1 L/min. The correlation between the methods was found to be r = 0.91, COUD = 0.93(COTD) + 0.42 L/min. Bias and precision (mean difference ± 2SDs) was -0.004 ± 1.34 L/min between the two methods. The percentage error (2SD/mean) was 22.2%, which is below the clinically acceptable limit (<30%). Cardiac output measured by ultrasound dilution and thermodilution methods agreed well in post cardiac surgery ICU patients and hence can be interchangeably used. PMID:21245798

  16. Oesophageal Doppler monitoring overestimates cardiac output during lumbar epidural anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Leather, H A; Wouters, P F

    2001-06-01

    Oesophageal Doppler monitoring (ODM) has been advocated as a non-invasive means of measuring cardiac output (CO). However, its reliance upon blood flow measurement in the descending aorta to estimate CO is susceptible to error if blood flow is redistributed between the upper and lower body. We hypothesize that lumbar epidural anesthesia (LEA), which causes blood flow redistribution, causes errors in CO estimates. We compared ODM with thermodilution (TD) measurements in fourteen patients under general anaesthesia for radical prostatectomy, who had received an epidural catheter at the intervertebral level L2-L3. Coupled measurements of CO by means of the TD and ODM techniques were performed at baseline (general anaesthetic only) and after epidural administration of 10 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine. The two methods were compared using Bland-Altman analysis: before LEA there was a bias of -0.89 litre min(-1) with limits of agreement ranging between -2.67 and +0.88 litre min(-1). Following lumbar sympathetic block, bias became positive (+0.55 litre min(-1)) and limits of agreement increased to -3.21 and +4.30 litre min(-1). ODM measured a greater increase in CO after LEA (delta=+1.71 (1.19) litre min(-1) (mean (SD)) compared with TD (delta=+0.51 (0.70) litre min(-1)). We conclude that following LEA, measurements with the Oesophageal Doppler Monitor II overestimate CO and show unacceptably high variability. Blood flow redistribution may limit the value of ODM. PMID:11573585

  17. The effect of incomplete acetylene washout on cardiac output measurement using open circuit acetylene uptake.

    PubMed

    Balouch, Jamal; Olfert, I Mark; Wagner, Peter D; Hopkins, Susan R

    2007-02-15

    The open circuit acetylene uptake method is a useful non-invasive means of measuring cardiac output. However, because of accumulation of inhaled acetylene in tissues, the cardiac output uptake is underestimated, if residual acetylene is not allowed to wash out completely in between measurements. We determined the effect of applying a correction factor that estimates mixed venous acetylene concentration from endtidal values to the calculation of cardiac output. This accounts for mixed venous acetylene present during measurements made before complete washout. Six healthy subjects performed steady-state exercise at approximately 30% and 60% of V(O2 max). Cardiac output measurements were made at each exercise intensity using the open circuit acetylene uptake method (inspired [acetylene] approximately 1%), with the first and last measurements having no detectible levels of acetylene in expired gas (reference measurement). Data were also obtained with immediate pre-measurement endtidal concentrations ranging from 3% to 15% of the inspired [acetylene], in random order in between. Oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production and heart rate did not change significantly during testing at each exercise intensity. Reference cardiac output also did not change significantly and averaged 11.1+/-0.8 L/min at 30% of V(O2 max) and 16.5+/-2.0 L/min at 60% of V(O2 max). Uncorrected cardiac output measurements progressively underestimated cardiac output by 15% at the 3% of inspired endtidal [acetylene] and by over 50% at 15% [acetylene] (p<0.0001). However, when corrected for residual endtidal [acetylene], cardiac outputs were not significantly different from the reference measurements. The results of this study suggest that by accounting for residual endtidal acetylene in mixed venous blood, cardiac output can be accurately measured even when washout of acetylene is incomplete, allowing measurements as often as every 10-15 s. PMID:16714151

  18. In vitro evaluation of an ultrasonic cardiac output monitoring (USCOM) device.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Shaun D; Cooney, Helena; Diab, Sara; Anstey, Chris; Thom, Ogilvie; Fraser, John F

    2016-02-01

    Non-invasive cardiac output monitoring techniques provide high yield, low risk mechanisms to identify and individually treat shock in the emergency setting. The non-invasive ultrasonic cardiac output monitoring (USCOM) device uses an ultrasound probe applied externally to the chest; however limitations exist with previous validation strategies. This study presents the in vitro validation of the USCOM device against calibrated flow sensors and compares user variability in simulated healthy and septic conditions. A validated mock circulation loop was used to simulate each condition with a range of cardiac outputs (2-10 l/min) and heart rates (50-95 bpm). Three users with varying degrees of experience using the USCOM device measured cardiac output and heart rate by placing the ultrasound probe on the mock aorta. Users were blinded to the condition, heart rate and cardiac output which were randomly generated. Results were reported as linear regression slope (β). All users estimated heart rate in both conditions with reasonable accuracy (β = 0.86-1.01), while cardiac output in the sepsis condition was estimated with great precision (β = 1.03-1.04). Users generally overestimated the cardiac output in the healthy simulation (β = 1.07-1.26) and reported greater difficulty estimating reduced cardiac output compared with higher values. Although there was some variability between users, particularly in the healthy condition (P < 0.01), all estimations were within a clinically acceptable range. In this study the USCOM provided a suitable measurement of cardiac output and heart rate when compared with our in vitro system. It is a promising technique to assist with the identification and treatment of shock. PMID:25749977

  19. Initial Observations of the Effects of Calcium Chloride Infusions in Pediatric Patients with Low Cardiac Output.

    PubMed

    Averin, Konstantin; Villa, Chet; Krawczeski, Catherine D; Pratt, Jesse; King, Eileen; Jefferies, John L; Nelson, David P; Cooper, David S; Ryan, Thomas D; Sawyer, Jaclyn; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Lorts, Angela

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial contractility and relaxation are highly dependent on calcium homeostasis. Immature myocardium, as in pediatric patients, is thought to be more dependent on extracellular calcium for optimal function. For this reason, intravenous calcium chloride infusions may improve myocardial function in the pediatric patient. The objectives of this study were to report the hemodynamic changes seen after administration of continuous calcium chloride to critically ill children. We retrospectively identified pediatric patients (newborn to 17 years old) with hemodynamic instability admitted to the cardiac ICU between May 2011 and May 2012 who received a continuous infusion of calcium chloride. The primary outcome was improvement in cardiac output, assessed by arterial-mixed venous oxygen saturation (A-V) difference. Sixty-eight patients, mean age 0.87 ± 2.67 years, received a total of 116 calcium infusions. Calcium chloride infusions resulted in significant improvements in primary and secondary measures of cardiac output at 2 and 6 h. Six hours after calcium initiation, A-V oxygen saturation difference decreased by 7.4 % (32.6 ± 2.1 to 25.2 ± 2.0 %, p < 0.001), rSO2 increased by 5.5 % (63.1 vs 68.6 %, p < 0.001), and serum lactate decreased by 0.9 mmol/l (3.3 vs 2.4 mmol/l, p < 0.001) with no change in HR (149.1 vs 145.6 bpm p = 0.07). Urine output increased 0.66 ml/kg/h in the 8-h period after calcium initiation when compared to pre-initiation (p = 0.003). Neonates had the strongest evidence of effectiveness with other age groups trending toward significance. Calcium chloride infusions improve markers of cardiac output in a heterogenous group of pediatric patients in a cardiac ICU. Neonates appear to derive the most benefit from utilization of these infusions. PMID:26687150

  20. Measurement of cardiac output by use of noninvasively measured transient hemodilution curves with photoacoustic technology

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dongyel; Huang, Qiaojian; Li, Youzhi

    2014-01-01

    We present the theoretical basis and experimental verification for cardiac output measurements using noninvasively measured hemodilution curves afforded with an indicator dilution technique and the emerging photoacoustic technology. A photoacoustic system noninvasively tracks a transient hemodilution effect induced by a bolus of isotonic saline as an indicator. As a result, a photoacoustic indicator dilution curve is obtained, which allows to estimate cardiac output from the developed algorithm. The experiments with a porcine blood circulatory phantom system demonstrated the feasibility of this technology towards the development of a noninvasive cardiac output measurement system for patient monitoring. PMID:24877007

  1. Shoshin Beriberi With Low Cardiac Output and Hemodynamic Deterioration Treated Dramatically by Thiamine Administration.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Teruhiko; Kinugawa, Koichiro

    2015-01-01

    "Shoshin beriberi", which is a fulminant form of cardiovascular beriberi accompanied by hemodynamic deterioration with high cardiac output and decreased systemic blood pressure, caused by thiamine deficiency due to alcoholic abuse or malnutrition, is often difficult to address because of its rarity and non-specific symptoms. We here present a patient with a history of alcoholic abuse who had suffered hemodynamic deterioration with extremely low cardiac output refractory to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and intravenous catecholamine support, which was improved dramatically by bolus intravenous thiamine administration. Such a type with low cardiac output would be the most severe form of Shoshin beriberi, and cannot be rescued without diagnostic administration of thiamine. PMID:26346515

  2. Non-invasive determination of cardiac output by Doppler echocardiography and electrical bioimpedance.

    PubMed Central

    Northridge, D B; Findlay, I N; Wilson, J; Henderson, E; Dargie, H J

    1990-01-01

    Cardiac output measured by thermodilution in 25 patients within 24 hours of acute myocardial infarction was compared with cardiac output measured by Doppler echocardiography (24 patients) and electrical bioimpedance (25 patients). The mean (range) cardiac outputs measured by Doppler (4.03 (2.2-6.0) 1/min) and electrical bioimpedance (3.79 (1.1-6.2) 1/min) were similar to the mean thermodilution value (3.95 (2.1-6.2) 1/min). Both non-invasive techniques agreed closely with thermodilution in most patients. None the less, three results with each method disagreed with thermodilution by more than 1 1/min. Both non-invasive techniques were reproducible and accurate in most patients with acute myocardial infarction. Doppler echocardiography was time consuming and technically demanding. Electrical bioimpedance was simple to use and had the additional advantage of allowing continuous monitoring of the cardiac output. PMID:2317415

  3. Use of the single-breath method of estimating cardiac output during exercise-stress testing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buderer, M. C.; Rummel, J. A.; Sawin, C. F.; Mauldin, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    The single-breath cardiac output measurement technique of Kim et al. (1966) has been modified for use in obtaining cardiac output measurements during exercise-stress tests on Apollo astronauts. The modifications involve the use of a respiratory mass spectrometer for data acquisition and a digital computer program for data analysis. The variation of the modified method for triplicate steady-state cardiac output measurements was plus or minus 1 liter/min. The combined physiological and methodological variation seen during a set of three exercise tests on a series of subjects was 1 to 2.5 liter/min. Comparison of the modified method with the direct Fick technique showed that although the single-breath values were consistently low, the scatter of data was small and the correlation between the two methods was high. Possible reasons for the low single-breath cardiac output values are discussed.

  4. Stormy Course of a Huge Submitral Aneurysm Causing Low Cardiac Output State

    PubMed Central

    Gokhroo, Rajendra Kumar; Kishor, Kamal; Ranwa, Bhanwar

    2016-01-01

    Submitral aneurysm is a rare structural abnormality of congenital or acquired aetiology. Most reported cases are from Africa. Unless promptly treated surgically this condition is invariably fatal. We report a case of a young Indian male who presented with dyspnea of recent onset, diagnosed to have a massive submitral aneurysm causing low cardiac output and compression of cardiac structures. PMID:27081448

  5. Quantification of the Impaired Cardiac Output Response to Exercise in Heart Failure: Application of a Non-Invasive Device

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jonathan; Gujja, Pradeep; Neelagaru, Suresh; Hsu, Leon; Burkhoff, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    An impaired cardiac output (CO) response to exercise is a hallmark of chronic heart failure (CHF), and the degree to which CO is impaired is related to the severity of CHF and prognosis. However, practical methods for obtaining cardiac output during exercise are lacking, and what constitutes and impaired response is unclear. Forty six CHF patients and 13 normal subjects underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) while CO and other hemodynamic measurements at rest and during exercise were obtained using a novel, non-invasive, bioreactance device based on assessment of relative phase shifts of electric currents injected across the thorax, heart rate and ventricular ejection time. An abnormal cardiac output response to exercise was defined as achieving ≤ 95% of the confidence limits of the slope of the relationship between CO and oxygen uptake (VO2). An impaired CO slope identified patients with more severe CHF as evidenced by a lower peak VO2, lower peak CO, heightened VE/VCO2 slope, and lower oxygen uptake efficiency slope. CO can be estimated during exercise using a novel bioreactance technique; patients with an impaired response to exercise exhibit reduced exercise capacity and inefficient ventilation typical of more severe CHF. Non- invasive measurement of cardiac performance in response to exercise provides a simple method of identifying patients with more severe CHF and may complement the CPX in identifying CHF patients at high risk. Key points Non-invasive measurement of cardiac output during exercise is feasible in patients with heart failure. Impairment in the CO response to exercise identifies heart failure patients with more severe disease, lower exercise capacity and inefficient ventilation. Non-invasive measurement of cardiac performance during exercise has potentially important applications for the functional and prognostic assessment of patients with heart failure. PMID:24149996

  6. Echocardiographic assessment of cardiac disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The physical principles and current applications of echocardiography in assessment of heart diseases are reviewed. Technical considerations and unresolved points relative to the use of echocardiography in various disease states are stressed. The discussion covers normal mitral valve motion, mitral stenosis, aortic regurgitation, atrial masses, mitral valve prolapse, and idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis. Other topics concern tricuspic valve abnormalities, aortic valve disease, pulmonic valve, pericardial effusion, intraventricular septal motion, and left ventricular function. The application of echocardiography to congenital heart disease diagnosis is discussed along with promising ultrasonic imaging systems. The utility of echocardiography in quantitative evaluation of cardiac disease is demonstrated.

  7. A new closed-system using partially frozen injectate for thermodilution cardiac output determinations.

    PubMed

    Maruta, H; Usuda, Y; Okutsu, Y; Numata, K

    1989-03-01

    The FI (partially frozen injectate) system, a new closed-system devised by the authors for thermodilution cardiac output determinations, has two major features: 1) it needs no ice-filled receptacle to keep injectate cold because it uses partially frozen injectate, and 2) it can go without monitoring the injectate temperatures during the whole process of cardiac output determinations. The author evaluated the accuracy and reproducibility of cardiac output determinations with the FI system in 10 critically ill patients, as compared with another closed-system (which is commercially available) and the standard open method. The injectate temperatures in the FI system were also measured in vitro. The mean injectate temperature in the FI system was 0.71 +/- 0.26 degrees C and 80% of the injectate temperatures were lower than 1.0 degrees C. Even when no monitoring of injectate temperatures was made, the predicated error in the calculated cardiac output resulted as low as 2% with the FI system. The mean cardiac output values were not statistically different between the FI system and the other two systems. PMID:15236053

  8. Hypotension during cemented arthroplasty. Relationship to cardiac output and fat embolism.

    PubMed

    Wheelwright, E F; Byrick, R J; Wigglesworth, D F; Kay, J C; Wong, P Y; Mullen, J B; Waddell, J P

    1993-09-01

    An episode of hypotension is common during cemented joint replacement, and has been associated with circulatory collapse and sudden death. We studied the mechanism of hypotension in two groups of six dogs after simulated bilateral cemented arthroplasty. In one group, with no lavage, the insertion of cement and prosthesis was followed by severe hypotension, elevated pulmonary artery pressure, decreased systemic vascular resistance and a 21% reduction in cardiac output. In the other group, pulsatile intramedullary lavage was performed before the simulated arthroplasties. Hypotension was less, and although systemic vascular resistance decreased, the cardiac output did not change. The severity of the hypotension, the decrease in cardiac output and an increase in prostaglandin metabolites were related to the magnitude of pulmonary fat embolism. Pulsatile lavage prevents much of this fat embolism, and hence the decrease in cardiac output. The relatively mild hypotension after lavage was secondary to transient vasodilation, which may accentuate the hypotension caused by the decreased cardiac output due to a large embolic fat load. We make recommendations for the prevention and management of hypotension during cemented arthroplasty. PMID:8376426

  9. Redistribution of cardiac output in response to heat exposure in the pony.

    PubMed

    McConaghy, F F; Hodgson, D R; Rose, R J; Hales, J R

    1996-07-01

    Radioactive microspheres were used to measure cardiac output and blood flow to most major tissues in 4 ponies at rest in thermoneutral (16 degrees C/60% RH) and mildly hot (41 degrees C/34% RH) environments. In response to heat stress there were increases in cardiac output (2-fold), respiratory frequency (5-fold), blood flow to the skin of the body (3-fold), and limbs (50%), respiratory muscles (2-fold) and the upper respiratory tract (3-fold). Ponies were able to maintain body temperature in the hot environment by increasing blood flow to the tissues involved in heat dissipation, while blood flow to all other tissues remained stable. This was achieved by increasing the cardiac output without need for reduction of blood flow to other tissues. PMID:8894549

  10. Cardiac output is an apparent determinant of nitroglycerin pharmacokinetics in rats.

    PubMed

    Fung, H L; Blei, A; Chong, S

    1986-12-01

    The steady-state pharmacokinetics of nitroglycerin (NTG) were investigated in 11 rats after sequential infusions of either NTG alone (10 micrograms/kg/min) or NTG plus vasopressin (the latter at 5.5 mU/kg/min). Arterial and venous plasma concentrations of NTG in the femoral bed were obtained at 41 and 45 min during each infusion phase. Cardiac output was estimated twice in each animal using 85Sr and 141Ce microspheres. NTG systemic clearance in arterial plasma was found to be strongly correlated with cardiac output (r = 0.784, n = 22, P less than .001). Because NTG distribution between red blood cells and plasma was independent of concentration (up to 150 ng/ml in plasma) and hematocrit (25-48%), the systemic clearance of NTG in arterial blood could be estimated as about 3/4 of cardiac output. Vasopressin co-infusion decreased both the cardiac output and the arterial NTG plasma clearance, but it also increased the arteriovenous extraction of NTG. Thus, vasopressin had not net effect on the venous plasma clearance, of NTG. In animals with NTG infusions alone, cardiac output also significantly correlated with NTG venous plasma clearance (P less than .01) and arteriovenous extraction (P less than .05). These data indicate that, in the absence of vasopressin, NTG pharmacokinetics are dependent on the cardiac output, thus providing an example wherein the systemic clearance of a drug was shown to be related to systemic blood flow. These results support the concept that the vasculature acts as a clearing organ for organic nitrates, and they also provide a hemodynamic explanation for the high variability in NTG plasma concentrations observed under presumed steady-state conditions. PMID:3098960

  11. Measurement of cardiac output using improved chromatographic analysis of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6).

    PubMed

    Klocke, F J; Roberts, D L; Farhi, E R; Naughton, B J; Sekovski, B; Klocke, R A

    1977-06-01

    A constant current variable frequency pulsed electron capture detector has been incorporated into the gas chromatographic analysis of trace amounts of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) in water and blood. The resulting system offers a broader effective operating range than more conventional electron capture units and has been utilized for measurements of cardiac output employing constant-rate infusion of dissolved SF6. The SF6 technique has been validated against direct volumetric measurements of cardiac output in a canine right-heart bypass preparation and used subsequently for rapidly repeated measurements in conscious animals and man. PMID:877454

  12. Continuous cardiac output measurement - Aspects of Doppler frequency analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. S.; Hechtman, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    From the suprasternal notch blood flow velocity in the aorta can be measured non-invasively by a Doppler probe. Integration over systole after frequency analysis gives a measure of stroke volume if a separate diameter observation is incorporated. Frequency analysis by a zero crossing counter or by a set of parallel phaselock loops was less effective than a set of bandpass filters. Observations on dogs, baboons and humans before and after exercise or surgery suggest the indications to be useful. Application to judging heart failure by the effect of introducing a volume load is indicated. Changes in output also are measured in freely moving subjects.

  13. A multiple-input multiple-output system for modeling the cardiac dynamics.

    PubMed

    Monzon, Jorge E; Picaza, Carlos Alvarez; Pisarello, Maria I

    2011-01-01

    We describe the dynamics of the cardiovascular system by finding the input-output relationships in the state space of a functional cardiac model, based on state equations and observability criteria of control theory. The unit step response of the multiple-input multiple-output system model illustrates the damping effect of the arterial wall to the pulsatility of the heart. Our results show that hypertensive patients exhibit a lower inertia of the blood flow. PMID:22254491

  14. Effect of Hemorrhage on Cardiac Output, PVP, Alodosterone and Diuresis during Immersion in Men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simanonok, K.; Greenleaf, John E.; Bernauer, E. M.; Wade, C. E.; Keil, L. C.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a reduction in blood volume would attenuate or eliminate immersion-induced increases in cardiac output (Q (sup dot) sub co)) and urine excretion, and to investigate accompanying vasoactive and fluid-electrolyte hormonal responses.

  15. Exercise cardiac output following Skylab missions - The second manned Skylab mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buderer, M. C.; Mauldin, D. G.; Rummel, J. A.; Michel, E. L.; Sawin, C. F.

    1976-01-01

    Cardiac output was measured during preflight and postflight exercise-stress tests on the Skylab astronauts. In the postflight tests immediately following the 28-, 59-, and 84-d earth orbital missions, the astronauts exhibited an approximate 30% decrease in cardiac output coupled with an approximate 50% decrease in cardiac stroke volume during exercise. These changes were accompanied by elevated heart rates and significant increases in total systemic peripheral vascular resistance. Mean arterial pressure was unchanged. All parameters returned to normal preflight values within 30 d of the end of the orbital period. Duration of the zero-G exposure did not appear to influence either the magnitude of the hemodynamic changes or the time-course of their return to normal. These results are discussed in relation to other cardiovascular findings and possible mechanisms responsible for the observations are outlined.

  16. Investigations concerning the application of the cross-correlation method in cardiac output measurements

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In spite of numerous non-invasive examinations the “gold clinical standard” of cardiac output measurements is the invasive pulmonary artery catheterization by means of the Swan-Ganz catheter and the application of the thermodilution method to estimate the blood flow. The results obtained by means of thermodilution are sensitive to many physical and biological disturbances. The unreliability of this method amounts to 20-45% and depends on the given variant of the method. Therefore some other method, more accurate and resistant to disturbances, was looked for. This paper presents a new approach to cardiac output measurements, based on cross-correlation signal analysis. The goal of investigations was to verify experimentally the application of the cross-correlation method of cardiac output measurements. Results In 99.2% of the examined cases the extreme of the cross-correlation function was easy to be estimated by numerical algorithms. In 0,8% of the remaining cases (with a plateau region adjacent to the maximum point) numerical detection of the extreme was inaccurate. The typical unreliability of the investigated method amounted o 5.1% (9.8% in the worst case). Investigations performed on a physical model revealed that the unreliability of cardiac output measurements by means of the cross-correlation method is 3–5 times better than in the case of thermodilution. Conclusions The performed investigations and theoretical analysis have shown, that the cross-correlation method may be applied in cardiac output measurements. This kind of measurements seems to be more accurate and disturbance-resistant than clinically applied thermodilution. PMID:22607380

  17. Cardiac risk assessment: decreasing postoperative complications.

    PubMed

    Thanavaro, Joanne L

    2015-02-01

    Preoperative cardiac assessment helps identify patients undergoing noncardiac surgery who are at risk for significant postoperative cardiac complications and those who may benefit from additional preoperative evaluation and perioperative care. Advanced practice nurses can identify surgery- and patient-related risks by conducting a thorough health history and physical examination. Multiple risk indices and evidence-based guidelines are available to inform health care providers regarding patient evaluation and strategies to reduce postoperative cardiac risk. In general, preoperative tests are recommended only if the findings will influence medical therapy or perioperative monitoring or will require postponement of surgery until a cardiac condition can be corrected or stabilized. Medication management is a crucial component of the preoperative assessment; providers may need to initiate the use of beta-blockers and make decisions regarding continuing or withholding antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy. Preoperative cardiac risk stratification, medication reconciliation, and device management are essential for providing safe care for patients. PMID:25645037

  18. Comparison of dynamic measurements of pulse contour with pulsed heat continuous cardiac output in postoperative cardiac surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Martin; Lawrence, John; Belessis, Andrew; Murgo, Margherita; Shehabi, Yahya

    2007-02-01

    Cardiac output (CO) can be measured using bolus thermodilution via a pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) and as continuous cardiac output (CCO), using pulsed heat thermoditution. Pulse contour cardiac output (PCCO) measures continuous CO by analysis of the arterial waveform after calibration with thermodilution CO. The Pulsion Medical Systems (PiCCO system) achieves this by transpulmonary aortic thermodilution (TDtpa). There is uncertainty regarding the agreement between TDtpa, CCO, and PCCO CO measurements in situations of rapid haemodynamic changes. We studied the agreement of the measures by comparing digital recordings of cardiac index (CI) determined by PCCO and CCO (PCCI and CCI, respectively) made during periods of haemodynamic instability. After ethics committee approval we studied four post-coronary artery bypass graft patients, in the immediate postoperative period. Each patient had a 7.5F CCO catheter (Edwards Lifesciences) and a 5F, 20cm PCCO femoral artery catheter. Digital recordings were obtained for the first 12-18 postoperative hours. Six epochs of instability were identified in the first two to three postoperative hours, and at the commencement of inotropic or vasoactive drugs. Notable features, despite frequent PCCO calibrations, were the marked difference of PCCI compared to CCI. In contradistinction, they tracked very closely during a period of stability. Limitations of both methods were noted. Whilst PCCO responded to rapid change, it developed significant error during haemodynmamic instability and requires frequent recalibration. CCO on the other hand has a considerable time lag in responding to changes in CO. The way a monitor measures CO must be taken into account when using the data in clinical management. PMID:17424793

  19. Influence of electrode positioning on accuracy and reproducibility of electrical velocimetry cardiac output measurements.

    PubMed

    Trinkmann, Frederik; Berger, Manuel; Michels, Julia D; Doesch, Christina; Weiss, Christel; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Akin, Ibrahim; Borggrefe, Martin; Papavassiliu, Theano; Saur, Joachim

    2016-09-01

    Electrical velocimetry (EV) is one of the most recent adaptions of impedance cardiography. Previous studies yielded diverging results identifying several factors negatively influencing accuracy. Although electrode arrangement is suspected to be an influencing factor for impedance cardiography in general, no data for EV is available. We aimed to prospectively assess the influence of electrode position on the accuracy and reproducibility of cardiac output (CO) measurements obtained by EV. Two pairs of standard electrocardiographic electrodes were placed at predefined positions of the thorax in 81 patients. The inter-electrode gap was varied between either 5 or 15 cm by caudal movement of the lowest electrode. Measurements were averaged over 20 s and performed twice at each electrode position. Reference values were determined using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). Mean bias was 1.2  ±  1.6 l min(-1) (percentage error 22  ±  28%) between COCMR and COEV at the 5 cm gap significantly improving to 0.5  ±  1.6 l min(-1) (8  ±  28%) when increasing the gap (p  <  0.0001). The mean difference between repeated measurements was 0.0  ±  0.3 l min(-1) for the 5 cm and 0.1  ±  0.3 l min(-1) for the 15 cm gap, respectively (p  =  0.3). The accuracy of EV can be significantly improved when increasing the lower inter-electrode gap still exceeding the Critchley and Critchley recommendations. Therefore, absolute values should not be used interchangeably in clinical routine. As the reproducibility was not negatively affected, serial hemodynamic measurements can be reliably acquired in stable patients when the electrode position remains unchanged. PMID:27480359

  20. Comparison of electrical velocimetry and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for the non-invasive determination of cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Trinkmann, Frederik; Berger, Manuel; Doesch, Christina; Papavassiliu, Theano; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Borggrefe, Martin; Kaden, Jens J; Saur, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    A novel algorithm of impedance cardiography referred to as electrical velocimetry (EV) has been introduced for non-invasive determination of cardiac output (CO). Previous validation studies yielded diverging results and no comparison with the non-invasive gold standard cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) has been performed. We therefore aimed to prospectively assess the accuracy and reproducibility of EV compared to CMR. 152 consecutive stable patients undergoing CMR were enrolled. EV measurements were taken twice before or after CMR in supine position and averaged over 20 s (AESCULON(®), Osypka Medical, Berlin, Germany). Bland-Altman analysis showed insufficient agreement of EV and CMR with a mean bias of 1.2 ± 1.4 l/min (bias 23 ± 26 %, percentage error 51 %). Reproducibility was high with 0.0 ± 0.3 l/min (bias 0 ± 8 %, percentage error 15 %). Outlier analysis revealed gender, height, CO and stroke volume (SV) by CMR as independent predictors for larger variation. Stratification of COCMR in quintiles demonstrated a good agreement for low values (<4.4 l/min) with bias increasing significantly with quintile as high as 3.1 ± 1.1 l/min (p < 0.001). Reproducibility was not affected (p = 0.71). Subgroup analysis in patients with arrhythmias (p = 0.19), changes in thoracic fluid content (p = 0.51) or left heart failure (p = 0.47) could not detect significant differences in accuracy. EV showed insufficient agreement with CMR and good reproducibility. Gender, height and increasing CO and SV were associated with increased bias while not affecting reproducibility. Therefore, absolute values should not be used interchangeably in clinical routine. EV yet may find its place for clinical application with further investigation on its trending ability pending. PMID:26115774

  1. Quantification of mitral regurgitation by automated cardiac output measurement: experimental and clinical validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, J. P.; Yang, X. S.; Qin, J. X.; Greenberg, N. L.; Zhou, J.; Vazquez, C. J.; Griffin, B. P.; Stewart, W. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop and validate an automated noninvasive method to quantify mitral regurgitation. BACKGROUND: Automated cardiac output measurement (ACM), which integrates digital color Doppler velocities in space and in time, has been validated for the left ventricular (LV) outflow tract but has not been tested for the LV inflow tract or to assess mitral regurgitation (MR). METHODS: First, to validate ACM against a gold standard (ultrasonic flow meter), 8 dogs were studied at 40 different stages of cardiac output (CO). Second, to compare ACM to the LV outflow (ACMa) and inflow (ACMm) tracts, 50 normal volunteers without MR or aortic regurgitation (44+/-5 years, 31 male) were studied. Third, to compare ACM with the standard pulsed Doppler-two-dimensional echocardiographic (PD-2D) method for quantification of MR, 51 patients (61+/-14 years, 30 male) with MR were studied. RESULTS: In the canine studies, CO by ACM (1.32+/-0.3 liter/min, y) and flow meter (1.35+/-0.3 liter/min, x) showed good correlation (r=0.95, y=0.89x+0.11) and agreement (deltaCO(y-x)=0.03+/-0.08 [mean+/-SD] liter/min). In the normal subjects, CO measured by ACMm agreed with CO by ACMa (r=0.90, p < 0.0001, deltaCO=-0.09+/-0.42 liter/min), PD (r=0.87, p < 0.0001, deltaCO=0.12+/-0.49 liter/min) and 2D (r=0.84, p < 0.0001, deltaCO=-0.16+/-0.48 liter/min). In the patients, mitral regurgitant volume (MRV) by ACMm-ACMa agreed with PD-2D (r= 0.88, y=0.88x+6.6, p < 0.0001, deltaMRV=2.68+/-9.7 ml). CONCLUSIONS: We determined that ACM is a feasible new method for quantifying LV outflow and inflow volume to measure MRV and that ACM automatically performs calculations that are equivalent to more time-consuming Doppler and 2D measurements. Additionally, ACM should improve MR quantification in routine clinical practice.

  2. Diltiazem restores cardiac output and improves renal function after hemorrhagic shock and crystalloid resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, P; Ba, Z F; Meldrum, D R; Chaudry, I H

    1992-05-01

    Although calcium antagonists produce salutary effects after shock and ischemia, it is unknown whether such agents restore the depressed cardiac output (CO) and renal function in a nonheparinized model of trauma-hemorrhage and resuscitation. To study this, rats underwent a midline laparotomy (i.e., trauma induced) and were bled to and maintained at a mean arterial pressure of 40 mmHg until 40% of the maximum bleedout was returned in the form of Ringer lactate (RL). They were then resuscitated with four times the volume of shed blood with RL over 60 min. Diltiazem (400 micrograms/kg body wt) or an equal volume of saline was infused intravenously over 95 min. This infusion was started during the last 15 min of resuscitation. CO was determined by indocyanine green dilution. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was assessed with [3H]inulin clearance, and cortical microcirculation was examined by laser Doppler flowmetry. Results indicate that crystalloid resuscitation alone transiently restored but did not maintain CO after hemorrhage. Diltiazem infusion in conjunction with crystalloid resuscitation, however, restored and maintained CO and cortical microcirculation. Although GFR decreased in both groups, the values in diltiazem-treated animals were significantly higher than those in the sham-operated animals. Furthermore, diltiazem markedly decreased tissue water content. Thus diltiazem appears to be a promising adjunct in the treatment of hemorrhagic shock even in the absence of blood resuscitation. PMID:1590448

  3. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: postpartum decompensation and use of non-invasive cardiac output monitoring.

    PubMed

    Lorello, G; Cubillos, J; McDonald, M; Balki, M

    2014-02-01

    The utility of a non-invasive cardiac output monitor (NICOM™) in guiding the peripartum management and identification of postpartum complications in a patient with severe peripartum cardiomyopathy is reported. A 31-year-old nulliparous woman at 35 weeks of gestation presented with a three-week history of worsening dyspnea and progressive functional deterioration. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction with an ejection fraction <20%. Cardiac status was monitored using NICOM™ during labor and delivery. The baseline values were: cardiac output 5.3 L/min, total peripheral resistance 1549 dynes.sec/cm(5), stroke volume 42.1 mL and stroke volume variation 18%. She received early epidural analgesia during labor, titrated slowly with a loading dose of 0.0625% bupivacaine 10 mL and fentanyl 25 μg, followed by patient-controlled epidural analgesia (0.0625% bupivacaine with fentanyl 2 μg/mL, infusion at 10 mL/h, bolus dose 5 mL and lockout interval 10 min). After epidural drug administration, total peripheral resistance decreased, cardiac output increased, and satisfactory analgesia was obtained. She had an uneventful vaginal delivery with a forceps-assisted second stage after prophylactic administration of furosemide 20 mg. NICOM™ was discontinued after delivery. Fifteen hours post-delivery, the patient developed cardiogenic shock, which resolved after aggressive therapy with inotropes and furosemide. NICOM™ can be used to guide treatment during labor and delivery in patients with critical peripartum cardiomyopathy. We suggest that use of NICOM™ be extended into the postpartum period to detect signs of cardiac decompensation in such patients. PMID:24360329

  4. Pre-liver transplantation, cardiac assessment.

    PubMed

    Rugină, M; Predescu, L; Sălăgean, M; Gheorghe, L; Gheorghe, C; Tulbure, D; Popescu, I; Bubenek-Turconi, S

    2012-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is a stressful condition for the cardiovascular system of patients with advanced hepatic disease. The underlying hemodynamic and cardiac status of patients with cirrhosis is crucial to determine which patients should became recipients. In addition to advanced age and the presence of comorbidities, there are specific cardiovascular responses in cirrhosis that can be detrimental to the LT candidate. Patients with cirrhosis requiring LT usually demonstrate increased cardiac output, a compromised ventricular response to stress, low systemic vascular resistance and bradycardia. Post-transplant reperfusion may result in cardiac death due to a multitude of causes, including arrhythmia, acute heart failure and myocardial infarction. This review examines screening strategies for transplant candidates and details the prognostic value of common test used to identify ischemic heart disease, heart failure, portopulmonary hypertension. There are discused evidence-based recommendations for their evaluation and management. PMID:22844825

  5. Continuous noninvasive cardiac output determination using the CNAP system: evaluation of a cardiac output algorithm for the analysis of volume clamp method-derived pulse contour.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Julia Y; Grond, Julian; Fortin, Jürgen; Negulescu, Ileana; Schöfthaler, Miriam; Saugel, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    The CNAP system (CNSystems Medizintechnik AG, Graz, Austria) provides noninvasive continuous arterial pressure measurements by using the volume clamp method. Recently, an algorithm for the determination of cardiac output by pulse contour analysis of the arterial waveform recorded with the CNAP system became available. We evaluated the agreement of the continuous noninvasive cardiac output (CNCO) measurements by CNAP in comparison with cardiac output measurements invasively obtained using transpulmonary thermodilution (TDCO). In this proof-of-concept analysis we studied 38 intensive care unit patients from a previously set up database containing CNAP-derived arterial pressure data and TDCO values obtained with the PiCCO system (Pulsion Medical Systems SE, Feldkirchen, Germany). We applied the new CNCO algorithm retrospectively to the arterial pressure waveforms recorded with CNAP and compared CNCO with the corresponding TDCO values (criterion standard). Analyses were performed separately for (1) CNCO calibrated to the first TDCO (CNCO-cal) and (2) CNCO autocalibrated to biometric patient data (CNCO-auto). We did not perform an analysis of trending capabilities because the patients were hemodynamically stable. The median age and APACHE II score of the 22 male and 16 female patients was 63 years and 18 points, respectively. 18 % were mechanically ventilated and in 29 % vasopressors were administered. Mean ± standard deviation for CNCO-cal, CNCO-auto, and TDCO was 8.1 ± 2.7, 6.4 ± 1.9, and 7.8 ± 2.4 L/min, respectively. For CNCO-cal versus TDCO, Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated a mean difference of +0.2 L/min (standard deviation 1.0 L/min; 95 % limits of agreement -1.7 to +2.2 L/min, percentage error 25 %). For CNCO-auto versus TDCO, the mean difference was -1.4 L/min (standard deviation 1.8 L/min; 95 % limits of agreement -4.9 to +2.1 L/min, percentage error 45 %). This pilot analysis shows that CNCO determination is feasible in critically

  6. Validation and application of single breath cardiac output determinations in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Fletcher, E. R.; Myhre, L. G.; Luft, U. C.

    1986-01-01

    The results of a procedure for estimating cardiac output by a single-breath technique (Qsb), obtained in healthy males during supine rest and during exercise on a bicycle ergometer, were compared with the results on cardiac output obtained by the direct Fick method (QF). The single breath maneuver consisted of a slow exhalation to near residual volume following an inspiration somewhat deeper than normal. The Qsb calculations incorporated an equation of the CO2 dissociation curve and a 'moving spline' sequential curve-fitting technique to calculate the instantaneous R from points on the original expirogram. The resulting linear regression equation indicated a 24-percent underestimation of QF by the Qsb technique. After applying a correction, the Qsb-QF relationship was improved. A subsequent study during upright rest and exercise to 80 percent of VO2(max) in 6 subjects indicated a close linear relationship between Qsb and VO2 for all 95 values obtained, with slope and intercept close to those in published studies in which invasive cardiac output measurements were used.

  7. Cardiac output variations in supine resting subjects during head-out cold water immersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelaere, P.; Deklunder, G.; Lecroart, J.

    1995-03-01

    Five men, aged 31.2 years (SD 2.3), under semi-nude conditions and resting in a dorsal reclining position, were exposed to thermoneutral air for 30 min, followed immediately by a cold water (15°C) immersion for 60 min. Cardiac output was measured using a dualbeam Doppler flow meter. During immersion in cold water, cardiac frequency ( f c) showed an initial bradycardia. The lowest values were reached at about 10 min after immersion, 58.3 (SD 2.5) to 48.3 (SD 7.8) beats min-1 ( P < 0.05). By the 20th min of exposure, f c had gradually risen to 70.0 beats min-1 (SD 6.6, P < 0.05). This change could be due to the inhibition of the initial vagal reflex by increased catecholamine concentration. Stroke volume ( V s) was significantly increased ( P < 0.05) during the whole cold immersion period. Cardiac output, increased from 3.57 (SD 0.50) to 6.26 (SD 1.33)1 min-1 ( P < 0.05) and its change with time was a function of both V s and f c. On the other hand, systolic flow acceleration was unchanged during the period of immersion. The changes in the respiratory variables (ventilation, oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide output and respiratory exchange ratio) during immersion showed an initial hyperventilation followed, as immersion proceeded, by a slower metabolic increase due to shivering.

  8. Cardiac output variations in supine resting subjects during head-out cold water immersion.

    PubMed

    Vogelaere, P; Deklunder, G; Lecroart, J

    1995-08-01

    Five men, aged 31.2 years (SD 2.3), under semi-nude conditions and resting in a dorsal reclining position, were exposed to thermoneutral air for 30 min, followed immediately by a cold water (15 degrees C) immersion for 60 min. Cardiac output was measured using a dual-beam Doppler flow meter. During immersion in cold water, cardiac frequency (fc) showed an initial bradycardia. The lowest values were reached at about 10 min after immersion, 58.3 (SD 2.5) to 48.3 (SD 7.8) beats min-1 (P < 0.05). By the 20th min of exposure, fc had gradually risen to 70.0 beats min-1 (SD 6.6, P < 0.05). This change could be due to the inhibition of the initial vagal reflex by increased catecholamine concentration. Stroke volume (Vs) was significantly increased (P < 0.05) during the whole cold immersion period. Cardiac output, increased from 3.57 (SD 0.50) to 6.26 (SD 1.33) l min-1 (P < 0.05) and its change with time was a function of both Vs and fc. On the other hand, systolic flow acceleration was unchanged during the period of immersion. The changes in the respiratory variables (ventilation, oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide output and respiratory exchange ratio) during immersion showed an initial hyperventilation followed, as immersion proceeded, by a slower metabolic increase due to shivering. PMID:7558407

  9. Cardiac Output and Performance during a Marathon Race in Middle-Aged Recreational Runners

    PubMed Central

    Billat, Véronique L.; Petot, Hélène; Landrain, Morgan; Meilland, Renaud; Koralsztein, Jean Pierre; Mille-Hamard, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Despite the increasing popularity of marathon running, there are no data on the responses of stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) to exercise in this context. We sought to establish whether marathon performance is associated with the ability to sustain high fractional use of maximal SV and CO (i.e, cardiac endurance) and/or CO, per meter (i.e., cardiac cost). Methods. We measured the SV, heart rate (HR), CO, and running speed of 14 recreational runners in an incremental, maximal laboratory test and then during a real marathon race (mean performance: 3 hr 30 min ± 45 min). Results. Our data revealed that HR, SV and CO were all in a high but submaximal steady state during the marathon (87.0 ± 1.6%, 77.2 ± 2.6%, and 68.7 ± 2.8% of maximal values, respectively). Marathon performance was inversely correlated with an upward drift in the CO/speed ratio (mL of CO × m−1) (r = −0.65, P < 0.01) and positively correlated with the runner's ability to complete the race at a high percentage of the speed at maximal SV (r = 0.83, P < 0.0002). Conclusion. Our results showed that marathon performance is inversely correlated with cardiac cost and positively correlated with cardiac endurance. The CO response could be a benchmark for race performance in recreational marathon runners. PMID:22645458

  10. The effects of long-term aerobic exercise on cardiac structure, stroke volume of the left ventricle, and cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bo-Ae; Oh, Deuk-Ja

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the long-term aerobic exercises on cardiac structure, left ventricular stroke volume, and cardiac output. To achieve the purpose of the study, a total of 22 volunteers—including 10 people who have continued regular exercises and 12 people as the control group—were selected as subjects. With regard to data processing, the IBM SPSS Statistics ver. 21.0 was used to calculate the mean and standard deviation, and the difference of the means between the groups was verified through an independent t-test. As a result, there were significant differences between groups in the left ventricular end-diastolic internal dimension, left ventricular end-systolic internal dimension, left ventricular end-diastolic septum thickness. There were significant differences between groups in left ventricular end-diastolic volume, left ventricular mass, and left ventricular mass index per body surface area. However, in cardiac function, only left ventricular stroke volume showed a significant difference between groups. PMID:26933658

  11. The effects of long-term aerobic exercise on cardiac structure, stroke volume of the left ventricle, and cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bo-Ae; Oh, Deuk-Ja

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the long-term aerobic exercises on cardiac structure, left ventricular stroke volume, and cardiac output. To achieve the purpose of the study, a total of 22 volunteers-including 10 people who have continued regular exercises and 12 people as the control group-were selected as subjects. With regard to data processing, the IBM SPSS Statistics ver. 21.0 was used to calculate the mean and standard deviation, and the difference of the means between the groups was verified through an independent t-test. As a result, there were significant differences between groups in the left ventricular end-diastolic internal dimension, left ventricular end-systolic internal dimension, left ventricular end-diastolic septum thickness. There were significant differences between groups in left ventricular end-diastolic volume, left ventricular mass, and left ventricular mass index per body surface area. However, in cardiac function, only left ventricular stroke volume showed a significant difference between groups. PMID:26933658

  12. Urine Output During Cardiopulmonary Bypass Predicts Acute Kidney Injury After Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young; Kim, Dong Wook; Kwak, Young Lan; Kim, Beom Seok; Joo, Hyung Min; Ju, Jin Woo; Yoo, Young Chul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Urine output is closely associated with renal function and has been used as a diagnostic criterion for acute kidney injury (AKI). However, urine output during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) has never been identified as a predictor of postoperative AKI. Considering altered renal homeostasis during CPB, we made a comprehensible approach to CPB urine output and evaluated its predictability for AKI. Patients undergoing cardiovascular surgery with the use of CPB, between January 2009 and December 2011, were retrospectively reviewed. AKI was defined as an increase in serum creatinine ≥0.3 mg/dL in the first postoperative 48 hours. We extrapolated a possible optimal amount of urine output from the plot of probability of AKI development according to CPB urine output. After separating patients by the predicted optimal value, we performed stepwise logistic regression analyses to find potential predictors of AKI in both subgroups. A total of 696 patients were analyzed. The amount of CPB urine output had a biphasic association with the incidence of AKI using 4 mL/kg/h as a boundary value. In a multivariate logistic regression to find predictors for AKI in entire patients, CPB urine output did not show statistical significance. After separating patients into subgroups with CPB urine output below and over 4 mL/kg/h, it was identified as an independent predictor for AKI with the odds ratio of 0.43 (confidence interval 0.30–0.61) and 1.11 (confidence interval 1.02–1.20), respectively. The amount of urine output during CPB with careful analysis may serve as a simple and feasible method to predict the development of AKI after cardiac surgery at an early time point. PMID:27258505

  13. Caveolae protect endothelial cells from membrane rupture during increased cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jade P.X.; Mendoza-Topaz, Carolina; Howard, Gillian; Chadwick, Jessica; Shvets, Elena; Cowburn, Andrew S.; Dunmore, Benjamin J.; Crosby, Alexi; Morrell, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Caveolae are strikingly abundant in endothelial cells, yet the physiological functions of caveolae in endothelium and other tissues remain incompletely understood. Previous studies suggest a mechanoprotective role, but whether this is relevant under the mechanical forces experienced by endothelial cells in vivo is unclear. In this study we have sought to determine whether endothelial caveolae disassemble under increased hemodynamic forces, and whether caveolae help prevent acute rupture of the plasma membrane under these conditions. Experiments in cultured cells established biochemical assays for disassembly of caveolar protein complexes, and assays for acute loss of plasma membrane integrity. In vivo, we demonstrate that caveolae in endothelial cells of the lung and cardiac muscle disassemble in response to acute increases in cardiac output. Electron microscopy and two-photon imaging reveal that the plasma membrane of microvascular endothelial cells in caveolin 1−/− mice is much more susceptible to acute rupture when cardiac output is increased. These data imply that mechanoprotection through disassembly of caveolae is important for endothelial function in vivo. PMID:26459598

  14. The Prognostic Value of Peak Cardiac Power Output in Chinese Patients with Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenlin; Gong, Zhu; Ni, Yi; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Xu, Wenjun; Jiang, Jinfa; Che, Lin; Xu, Jiahong; Yan, Wenwen; Zhou, Lin; Li, Guanghe; Zhang, Qiping; Wang, Lemin

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiopulmonary exercise testing has been widely used to risk stratify patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Peak oxygen consumption (peakVO2) was regarded as a powerful predictor of survival, as it is a surrogate for peak cardiac output (CO), which by most is considered the “true” measure of heart failure. Therefore, it is reasonable to hypothesize that CO is an even stronger predictor than peak VO2. The present study is aimed to investigate the prognostic value of peak cardiac power output (peak CPO) in comparison with peakVO2 in Chinese patients with CHF. Methods Participants provided written informed consent to participate in this study. Totally 129 patients with CHF underwent symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET), with mean age 59.1±11.4 years, 87.6% male, 57.4% ischemic etiology, body mass index (BMI) 24.7±3.7 kg/m2 and LVEF 38±9%. CO was measured using an inert gas rebreathing method. The primary endpoints are cardiac deaths. Results Over median 33.7-month follow-up, 19 cardiac deaths were reported. Among peak VO2,VE/VCO2 slope and Peak CPO, their area under ROC were 0.64, 0.67, 0.68, respectively (Ρ<0.05).The optimal thresholds for predicting cardiac deaths were peak VO2≤13.4 ml.kg-1.min-1, and VE/VCO2 slope≥39.3 and peak CPO≤ 1.1 respectively by ROC analysis. Finally, in patients with a peak VO2≤13.4 ml.kg-1.min-1 those with peak CPO>1.1W had better survival than those with peak CPO ≤ 1.1W. However, by multivariate analysis adjusted for age, sex, BMI, resting heart rate, LVMI, LVEF, Peak CPO was not an independent predictor of cardiac deaths (P> 0.05). Conclusions Peak CPO was not a predictor of cardiac death in Chinese CHF patients. PMID:26808510

  15. High flow variant postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome amplifies the cardiac output response to exercise in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Pianosi, Paolo T.; Goodloe, Adele H.; Soma, David; Parker, Ken O.; Brands, Chad K.; Fischer, Philip R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is characterized by chronic fatigue and dizziness and affected individuals by definition have orthostatic intolerance and tachycardia. There is considerable overlap of symptoms in patients with POTS and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), prompting speculation that POTS is akin to a deconditioned state. We previously showed that adolescents with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) have excessive heart rate (HR) during, and slower HR recovery after, exercise – hallmarks of deconditioning. We also noted exaggerated cardiac output during exercise which led us to hypothesize that tachycardia could be a manifestation of a high output state rather than a consequence of deconditioning. We audited records of adolescents presenting with long‐standing history of any mix of fatigue, dizziness, nausea, who underwent both head‐up tilt table test and maximal exercise testing with measurement of cardiac output at rest plus 2–3 levels of exercise, and determined the cardiac output () versus oxygen uptake () relationship. Subjects with chronic fatigue were diagnosed with POTS if their HR rose ≥40 beat·min−1 with head‐up tilt. Among 107 POTS patients the distribution of slopes for the , relationship was skewed toward higher slopes but showed two peaks with a split at ~7.0 L·min−1 per L·min−1, designated as normal (5.08 ± 1.17, N = 66) and hyperkinetic (8.99 ± 1.31, N = 41) subgroups. In contrast, cardiac output rose appropriately with in 141 patients with chronic fatigue but without POTS, exhibiting a normal distribution and an average slope of 6.10 ± 2.09 L·min−1 per L·min−1. Mean arterial blood pressure and pulse pressure from rest to exercise rose similarly in both groups. We conclude that 40% of POTS adolescents demonstrate a hyperkinetic circulation during exercise. We attribute this to failure of normal regional vasoconstriction during exercise, such that patients must increase

  16. Validation study of PulseCO system for continuous cardiac output measurement.

    PubMed

    Berberian, George; Quinn, T Alexander; Vigilance, Deon W; Park, David Y; Cabreriza, Santos E; Curtis, Lauren J; Spotnitz, Henry M

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasonic flow probes have been used to optimize biventricular pacing immediately after cardiopulmonary bypass, improving cardiac output (CO) by 10%; however, flow probes must be removed with chest closure. The PulseCO system (LiDCO Limited, Cambridge, UK) may extend optimization into the postoperative period, but controlled validations have not been reported. Six anesthetized pigs were instrumented for right heart bypass. Flow was varied from 3 to 1 L/min and then back to 3 in 0.5 L/min increments for 60 second intervals. CO was measured by ultrasonic flow probe on the aorta and by PulseCO using a femoral arterial line. PulseCO and flow probe accurately measured CO (PulseCO R2: 0.79-0.95; flow probe R2: 0.96-0.99). At flow of 2 L/min, when the heart was paced 30 bpm over the sinus rate, PulseCO falsely indicated an increase in CO (2.13 vs. 2.30 L/min, p = 0.014). When mean arterial pressure was increased by 20% using a phenylephrine infusion, PulseCO falsely indicated an increase in CO (2.13 vs. 2.47 L/min, p = 0.014). When mean arterial pressure was decreased by 20% using a nitroprusside infusion, PulseCO falsely indicated a decrease in CO (2.13 vs. 1.79 L/min, p = 0.003). PulseCO appears to be useful for assessing acute changes in CO if its limitations are recognized. PMID:15745132

  17. Bioreactance Is Not Interchangeable with Thermodilution for Measuring Cardiac Output during Adult Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sangbin; Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Gaabsoo; Ko, Justin Sangwook; Choi, Soo Joo; Kwon, Ji Hae; Heo, Burn Young; Gwak, Mi Sook

    2015-01-01

    Background Thermodilution technique using a pulmonary artery catheter is widely used for the assessment of cardiac output (CO) in patients undergoing liver transplantation. However, the unclearness of the risk-benefit ratio of this method has led to an interest in less invasive modalities. Thus, we evaluated whether noninvasive bioreactance CO monitoring is interchangeable with thermodilution technique. Methods Nineteen recipients undergoing adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation were enrolled in this prospective observational study. COs were recorded automatically by the two devices and compared simultaneously at 3-minute intervals. The Bland–Altman plot was used to evaluate the agreement between bioreactance and thermodilution. Clinically acceptable agreement was defined as a percentage error of limits of agreement <30%. The four quadrant plot was used to evaluate concordance between bioreactance and thermodilution. Clinically acceptable concordance was defined as a concordance rate >92%. Results A total of 2640 datasets were collected. The mean CO difference between the two techniques was 0.9 l/min, and the 95% limits of agreement were -3.5 l/min and 5.4 l/min with a percentage error of 53.9%. The percentage errors in the dissection, anhepatic, and reperfusion phase were 50.6%, 56.1%, and 53.5%, respectively. The concordance rate between the two techniques was 54.8%. Conclusion Bioreactance and thermodilution failed to show acceptable interchangeability in terms of both estimating CO and tracking CO changes in patients undergoing liver transplantation. Thus, the use of bioreactance as an alternative CO monitoring to thermodilution, in spite of its noninvasiveness, would be hard to recommend in these surgical patients. PMID:26017364

  18. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation enhances stroke volume and cardiac output during dynamic exercise.

    PubMed

    Walser, Buddy; Stebbins, Charles L

    2008-10-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have beneficial effects on cardiovascular function. We tested the hypotheses that dietary supplementation with DHA (2 g/day) + EPA (3 g/day) enhances increases in stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) and decreases in systemic vascular resistance (SVR) during dynamic exercise. Healthy subjects received DHA + EPA (eight men, four women) or safflower oil (six men, three women) for 6 weeks. Both groups performed 20 min of bicycle exercise (10 min each at a low and moderate work intensity) before and after DHA + EPA or safflower oil treatment. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), SV, CO, and SVR were assessed before exercise and during both workloads. HR was unaffected by DHA + EPA and MAP was reduced, but only at rest (88 +/- 5 vs. 83 +/- 4 mm Hg). DHA + EPA augmented increases in SV (14.1 +/- 6.3 vs. 32.3 +/- 8.7 ml) and CO (8.5 +/- 1.0 vs. 10.3 +/- 1.2 L/min) and tended to attenuate decreases in SVR (-7.0 +/- 0.6 vs. -10.1 +/- 1.6 mm Hg L(-1) min(-1)) during the moderate workload. Safflower oil treatment had no effects on MAP, HR, SV, CO or SVR at rest or during exercise. DHA + EPA-induced increases in SV and CO imply that dietary supplementation with these fatty acids can increase oxygen delivery during exercise, which may have beneficial clinical implications for individuals with cardiovascular disease and reduced exercise tolerance. PMID:18563435

  19. Cardiac Output Monitoring Managing Intravenous Therapy (COMMIT) to Treat Emergency Department Patients with Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Peter C.; Filbin, Michael R.; Napoli, Anthony; Feldman, Joseph; Pang, Peter S.; Sankoff, Jeffrey; Lo, Bruce M.; Dickey-White, Howard; Birkhahn, Robert H.; Shapiro, Nathan I.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Fluid responsiveness is proposed as a physiology-based method to titrate fluid therapy based on preload dependence. The objectives of this study were to determine if a fluid responsiveness protocol would decrease progression of organ dysfunction, and a fluid responsiveness protocol would facilitate a more aggressive resuscitation. Methods: Prospective, 10-center, randomized interventional trial. Inclusion criteria: suspected sepsis and lactate 2.0 to 4.0 mmol/L. Exclusion criteria (abbreviated): systolic blood pressure more than 90 mmHg, and contraindication to aggressive fluid resuscitation. Intervention: fluid responsiveness protocol using Non-Invasive Cardiac Output Monitor (NICOM) to assess for fluid responsiveness (>10% increase in stroke volume in response to 5 mL/kg fluid bolus) with balance of a liter given in responsive patients. Control: standard clinical care. Outcomes: primary—change in Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score at least 1 over 72 h; secondary—fluids administered. Trial was initially powered at 600 patients, but stopped early due to a change in sponsor's funding priorities. Results: Sixty-four patients were enrolled with 32 in the treatment arm. There were no significant differences between arms in age, comorbidities, baseline vital signs, or SOFA scores (P > 0.05 for all). Comparing treatment versus Standard of Care—there was no difference in proportion of increase in SOFA score of at least 1 point (30% vs. 33%) (note bene underpowered, P = 1.0) or mean preprotocol fluids 1,050 mL (95% confidence interval [CI]: 786–1,314) vs. 1,031 mL (95% CI: 741–1,325) (P = 0.93); however, treatment patients received more fluids during the protocol (2,633 mL [95% CI: 2,264–3,001] vs. 1,002 mL [95% CI: 707–1,298]) (P < 0.001). Conclusions: In this study of a “preshock” population, there was no change in progression of organ dysfunction with a fluid responsiveness protocol

  20. Negative pressure breathing increases cardiac output and nitrogen elimination in seated subjects.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Claes E G; Eckhardt, Lukas G; Senf, Curtis J; Bowdwin, Melina R; Pendergast, David R

    2013-01-01

    During denitrogenation for rescue, crew members of an internally pressurized disabled submarine (DISSUB) must sit upright, which may hamper venous return, cardiac output and peripheral circulation. Since negative pressure breathing (NPB) might counteract this problem, denitrogenation was measured in sitting subjects performing NPB. Seven male subjects completed 125-minute nitrogen (N2) washouts breathing either 100% oxygen (O2) or a normoxic gas (21% O2 in argon) in control conditions and intermittent (I: inspirations only) or continuous (C) NPB at -10 or -15 cmH2O. N2 elimination was measured using a closed rebreathing system. INPB (intermittent) (-15cmH2O) and CNPB (continous breathing) (-10 and -15cmH2O) increased cardiac output (CO) 9% during both O2 and normoxic breathing. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were unaffected by the CO increase, suggesting a peripheral vasodilatation and enhanced tissue perfusion leading to increased N2 elimination. With the CO boost, N2 washout increased 6% breathing O2 at -15 cmH2O CNPB and INPB, while during normoxic breathing there were 6% and 12% increases due to CNBP, -10 and -15 respectively and 6% with -15cmH2O INPB; breathing 100% O2 yielding 5% to 15% less N2 washout than normoxic breathing. Negative pressure breathing during denitrogenation may facilitate decompression in divers and in crew members being rescued from a DISSUB. PMID:24224284

  1. Cardiac output during cardiopulmonary resuscitation at various compression rates and durations.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, K R; Babbs, C F; Frissora, H A; Davis, R W; Silver, D I

    1981-09-01

    Cardiac output during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was measured by a modified indicator-dilution technique in 20 anesthetized dogs (6-12 kg), during repeated 1- to 2-min episodes of electrically induced ventricular fibrillation, by a mechanical chest compressor and ventilator. With compression rates from 20 to 140/min and compression durations (duty cycles) from 10 to 90% of cycle time, cardiac output (CO) was predicted by the equation: CO = CR . SVmax . [DC/(k1 . CR + DC)] . [(1 -- DC)/k2 . CR + 1 - DC)], where CR is compression rate, DC is duty cycle, SVmax (19 ml) is the effective capacity of the pumping chamber, and k1 (0.00207 min) and k2 (0.00707 min) are ejection and filling constants. This expression predicts maximal CO for DC = 0.40 and cR = 126/min and 90-100% of maximal CO for 0.3 less than DC less than 0.5 and 70 less than CR less than 150/min. Such mathematical analysis may prove useful in the optimization of CPR. PMID:7282953

  2. Cardiac output and vasodilation in the vasovagal response: An analysis of the classic papers.

    PubMed

    Wieling, Wouter; Jardine, David L; de Lange, Frederik J; Brignole, Michele; Nielsen, Henning B; Stewart, Julian; Sutton, Richard

    2016-03-01

    The simple faint is secondary to hypotension and bradycardia resulting in transient loss of consciousness. According to Ohm's law applied to the circulation, BP = SVR × CO, hypotension can result from a decrease in systemic vascular resistance (SVR), cardiac output (CO), or both. It is important to understand that when blood pressure (BP) is falling, SVR and CO do not change reciprocally as they do in the steady state. In 1932, Lewis, assuming that decreased SVR alone accounted for hypotension, defined "the vasovagal response" along pathophysiologic lines to denote the association of vasodilation with vagal-induced bradycardia in simple faint. Studies performed by Barcroft and Sharpey-Schafer between 1940 and 1950 used volume-based plethysmography to demonstrate major forearm vasodilation during extreme hypotension and concluded that the main mechanism for hypotension was vasodilation. Plethysmographic measurements were intermittent and not frequent enough to capture rapid changes in blood flow during progressive hypotension. However, later investigations by Weissler, Murray, and Stevens performed between 1950 and 1970 used invasive beat-to-beat BP measurements and more frequent measurements of CO using the Fick principle. They demonstrated that CO significantly fell before syncope, and little vasodilation occurred until very late in the vasovagal reaction Thus, since the 1970s, decreasing cardiac output rather than vasodilation has been regarded as the principal mechanism for the hypotension of vasovagal syncope. PMID:26598322

  3. Automated non-invasive measurement of cardiac output: comparison of electrical bioimpedance and carbon dioxide rebreathing techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S A; Russell, A E; West, M J; Chalmers, J

    1988-01-01

    Two commercial automated, non-invasive systems for estimation of cardiac output were evaluated. Values of cardiac output obtained by electrical bioimpedance cardiography (BoMed NCCOM3 machine) were compared with values derived from an indirect Fick technique that uses carbon dioxide rebreathing (Gould 9000 IV system) during 103 simultaneous measurements made at rest in 19 randomly selected subjects and on exercise in 11 subjects. Cardiac output values obtained with impedance cardiography were significantly correlated with those measured by the indirect Fick method, although there was a wide scatter with over 73% of the readings lying outside the limits defined by the line of identity +/- 20%. This correlation was greatly reduced when stroke volume index was used instead of cardiac output. Indirect Fick results were linearly related to oxygen uptake both at rest and on exercise, while impedance cardiography results did not correlate with oxygen uptake. Impedance cardiography gave consistently lower results for cardiac output than indirect Fick at all levels of exercise. Both machines were easy to use and produced acceptable mean (SE) coefficients of variation (BoMed NCCOM3 7.7 (1.0)%, Gould 9000 IV 10.6 (1.4)%). Further validation is required before either of these machines can be recommended as an alternative to invasive monitoring in clinical practice. PMID:3128316

  4. Minimally invasive cardiac output monitoring: agreement of oesophageal Doppler, LiDCOrapid™ and Vigileo FloTrac™ monitors in non-cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Phan, T D; Kluger, R; Wan, C

    2016-05-01

    There is lack of data about the agreement of minimally invasive cardiac output monitors, which make it impossible to determine if they are interchangeable or differ objectively in tracking physiological trends. We studied three commonly used devices: the oesophageal Doppler and two arterial pressure-based devices, the Vigileo FloTrac™ and LiDCOrapid™. The aim of this study was to compare the agreement of these three monitors in adult patients undergoing elective non-cardiac surgery. Measurements were taken at baseline and after predefined clinical interventions of fluid, metaraminol or ephedrine bolus. From 24 patients, 131 events, averaging 5.2 events per patient, were analysed. The cardiac index of LiDCOrapid versus FloTrac had a mean bias of -6.0% (limits of agreement from -51% to 39%) and concordance of over 80% to the three clinical interventions. The cardiac index of Doppler versus LiDCOrapid and Doppler versus FloTrac, had an increasing negative bias at higher mean cardiac outputs and there was significantly poorer concordance to all interventions. Of the preload-responsive parameters, Doppler stroke volume index, Doppler systolic flow time and FloTrac stroke volume variation were fair at predicting fluid responsiveness while other parameters were poor. While there is reasonable agreement between the two arterial pressure-derived cardiac output devices (LiDCOrapid and Vigileo FloTrac), these two devices differ significantly to the oesophageal Doppler technology in response to common clinical intraoperative interventions, representing a limitation to how interchangeable these technologies are in measuring cardiac output. PMID:27246939

  5. Improved noninvasive method for measurement of cardiac output and evaluation of left-sided cardiac valve incompetence

    SciTech Connect

    Kelbaek, H.

    1989-05-01

    A time-saving method was developed to label red blood cells in vitro with /sup 99m/Tc while avoiding centrifugation. After tin incubation, extracellular tin was oxidized by sodium hypochlorite, and EDTA was added for stabilizing the complex prior to /sup 99m/Tc incubation. Labeling yields were 95%, and in vivo decay showed a high stability with a mean biologic half-life of eleven hours. The first-passage radionuclide technique for determination of cardiac output using the above-mentioned tracer was evaluated by using the left ventricle as area-of-interest with individual background correction after complete mixing of the tracer. This technique showed a high level of agreement with invasive methods. By combining this method for measurement of the forward stroke volume with the multigated equilibrium principle for determination of the total left ventricular stroke volume using similar background corrections, an exact evaluation of regurgitation fractions was obtained. In patients with aortic and mitral valve disease the noninvasive radionuclide technique gave similar but probably more accurate results as compared with contrast aortography and ventriculography. The radionuclide technique may be suitable for monitoring and selecting patients for surgical treatment.

  6. Design and assessment of cardiac SPECT systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chih-Jie

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a modality widely used to detect myocardial ischemia and myocardial infarction. Objectively assessing and comparing different SPECT systems is important so that the best detectability of cardiac defects can be achieved. Whitaker, Clarkson, and Barrett's study on the scanning linear observer (SLO) shows that the SLO can be used to estimate the location and size of signals. One major advantage of the SLO is that it can be used with projection data rather than reconstruction data. Thus, this observer model assesses overall hardware performance independent by any reconstruction algorithm. In addition, we will show that the run time of image-quality studies is significantly reduced. Several systems derived from the GE CZT-based dedicated cardiac SPECT camera Discovery 530c design, which is officially named the Alcyone Technology: Discovery NM 530c, were assessed using the performance of the SLO for the task of detecting cardiac defects and estimating the properties of the defects. Clinically, hearts can be virtually segmented into three coronary artery territories: left anterior descending artery (LAD), left circumflex artery (LCX), and right coronary artery (RCA). One of the most important functions of a cardiac SPECT system is to produce images from which a radiologist can correctly predict in which territory the defect exists. A good estimation of the defect extent from the images is also very helpful for determining the seriousness of the myocardial ischemia. In this dissertation, both locations and extent of defects were estimated by the SLO, and system performance was assessed using localization receiver operating characteristic (LROC) / estimation receiver operating characteristic (EROC) curves. Area under LROC curve (AULC) / area under EROC curve (AUEC) and true positive fraction (TPF) at specific false positive fraction (FPF) can be treated as the gures of merit (FOMs). As the results will show, a

  7. Low Cardiac Output Secondary to a Malpositioned Umbilical Venous Catheter: Value of Targeted Neonatal Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, Dany E.; Poon, Wei Bing; James, Andrew; McNamara, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic hypotension is common in very low birthweight preterm infants but the nature of the precipitating cause may be unclear. Targeted neonatal echocardiography (TnEcho) is being increasingly used to support hemodynamic decisions in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), including identifying impairments in the transitional circulation of preterm infants, providing timely re-evaluation after institution of therapies and evaluating the placement of indwelling catheters. We present a case of a preterm infant with systemic hypotension and low cardiac output secondary to a large transatrial shunt induced by a malpositioned umbilical venous catheter. Repositioning of the line led to resolution of the hemodynamic disturbance and clinical instability, highlighting the utility of TnEcho in the NICU. PMID:25032055

  8. Noninvasive photoacoustic measurement of the composite indicator dilution curve for cardiac output estimation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, DongYel; Huang, Qiaojian; Li, Youzhi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the measurement of indicator dilution curves using a photoacoustic (PA) technology was reported, which showed promising results on the noninvasive estimation of cardiac output (CO) that is an important hemodynamic parameter useful in various clinical situations. However, in clinical practice, measuring PA indicator dilution curves from an arterial blood vessel requires an ultrasound transducer array capable of focusing on the targeted artery. This causes several challenges on the clinical translation of the PA indicator dilution method, such as high sensor cost and complexity. In this paper, we theoretically derived that a composite PA indicator dilution curve simultaneously measured from both arterial and venous blood vessels can be used to estimate CO correctly. The ex-vivo and in-vivo experimental results with a flat ultrasound transducer verified the developed theory. We believe this new concept would overcome the main challenges on the clinical translation of the noninvasive PA indicator dilution technology. PMID:25780743

  9. Reference values for total blood volume and cardiac output in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, L.R.

    1994-09-01

    Much research has been devoted to measurement of total blood volume (TBV) and cardiac output (CO) in humans but not enough effort has been devoted to collection and reduction of results for the purpose of deriving typical or {open_quotes}reference{close_quotes} values. Identification of normal values for TBV and CO is needed not only for clinical evaluations but also for the development of biokinetic models for ultra-short-lived radionuclides used in nuclear medicine (Leggett and Williams 1989). The purpose of this report is to offer reference values for TBV and CO, along with estimates of the associated uncertainties that arise from intra- and inter-subject variation, errors in measurement techniques, and other sources. Reference values are derived for basal supine CO and TBV in reference adult humans, and differences associated with age, sex, body size, body position, exercise, and other circumstances are discussed.

  10. Rowing increases stroke volume and cardiac output to a greater extent than cycling.

    PubMed

    Horn, P; Ostadal, P; Ostadal, B

    2015-01-01

    Exercise stimulates increases in heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO). These adaptive mechanisms are strongly dependent on the type of exercise. Both rowing and cycling are widely used for physical training worldwide; however, evidence regarding the differences in major hemodynamic parameters during rowing and cycling remains insufficient. Ten healthy male volunteers were randomly assigned to perform either a rowing or cycling exercise. After 20 min rest, the group who had rowed first performed the cycling exercise and vice versa. Exercise was performed at a power-to-weight ratio of 2 W/kg for 2 min. HR, SV, CO and blood pressure (BP) were measured noninvasively using pulse-wave analysis at baseline and immediately after each exercise. HR, SV and CO were significantly higher after exercise than at rest. Whereas HR was comparable between rowing and cycling, SV and CO were significantly higher after rowing than after cycling. BP was comparable among all three measurements. Rowing increased SV and CO to a greater extent than cycling, whereas HR and BP were not influenced by the type of exercise. Our data suggest that rowing leads to more extensive stimulation of cardiac contractility and/or decreases in peripheral vascular resistance compared with cycling. PMID:25317691

  11. Sildenafil improves cardiac output and exercise performance during acute hypoxia, but not normoxia.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Andrew R; Barnholt, Kimberly E; Grundmann, Nicolas K; Lin, Joseph H; McCallum, Stewart W; Friedlander, Anne L

    2006-06-01

    Sildenafil causes pulmonary vasodilation, thus potentially reducing impairments of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension on exercise performance at altitude. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of sildenafil during normoxic and hypoxic exercise. We hypothesized that 1) sildenafil would have no significant effects on normoxic exercise, and 2) sildenafil would improve cardiac output, arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), and performance during hypoxic exercise. Ten trained men performed one practice and three experimental trials at sea level (SL) and simulated high altitude (HA) of 3,874 m. Each cycling test consisted of a set-work-rate portion (55% work capacity: 1 h SL, 30 min HA) followed immediately by a time trial (10 km SL, 6 km HA). Double-blinded capsules (placebo, 50, or 100 mg) were taken 1 h before exercise in a randomly counterbalanced order. For HA, subjects also began breathing hypoxic gas (12.8% oxygen) 1 h before exercise. At SL, sildenafil had no effects on any cardiovascular or performance measures. At HA, sildenafil increased stroke volume (measured by impedance cardiography), cardiac output, and SaO2 during set-work-rate exercise. Sildenafil lowered 6-km time-trial time by 15% (P<0.05). SaO2 was also higher during the time trial (P<0.05) in response to sildenafil, despite higher work rates. Post hoc analyses revealed two subject groups, sildenafil responders and nonresponders, who improved time-trial performance by 39% (P<0.05) and 1.0%, respectively. No dose-response effects were observed. During cycling exercise in acute hypoxia, sildenafil can greatly improve cardiovascular function, SaO2, and performance for certain individuals. PMID:16455814

  12. Age and sex influence the balance between maximal cardiac output and peripheral vascular reserve.

    PubMed

    Ridout, Samuel J; Parker, Beth A; Smithmyer, Sandra L; Gonzales, Joaquin U; Beck, Kenneth C; Proctor, David N

    2010-03-01

    We evaluated the influence of age and sex on the relationship between central and peripheral vasodilatory capacity. Healthy men (19 younger, 12 older) and women (17 younger, 17 older) performed treadmill and knee extensor exercise to fatigue on separate days while maximal cardiac output (Q, acetylene uptake) and peak femoral blood flow (FBF, Doppler ultrasound) were measured, respectively. Maximal Q was reduced with age similarly in men (Y: 23.6 +/- 2.7 vs. O: 17.4 +/- 3.5 l/min; P < 0.05) and women (Y: 17.7 +/- 1.9 vs. O: 12.3 +/- 1.6 l/min; P < 0.05). Peak FBF was similar between younger (Y) and older (O) men (Y: 2.1 +/- 0.5 vs. O: 2.2 +/- 0.7 l/min) but was lower in older women compared with younger women (Y: 1.9 +/- 0.4 vs. O: 1.4 +/- 0.4 l/min; P < 0.05). Maximal Q was positively correlated with peak FBF in men (Y: r = 0.55, O: r = 0.74; P < 0.05) but not in women (Y: r = 0.34, O: r = 0.10). Normalization of cardiac output to appendicular muscle mass and peak FBF to quadriceps mass reduced the correlation between these variables in younger men (r = 0.30), but the significant association remained in older men (r = 0.68; P < 0.05), with no change in women. These data suggest that 1) aerobic capacity is associated with peripheral vascular reserve in men but not women, and 2) aging is accompanied by a more pronounced sex difference in this relationship. PMID:19959767

  13. Noninvasive aortic bloodflow by Pulsed Doppler Echocardiography (PDE) compared to cardiac output by the direct Fick procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Left ventricular stroke volume was estimated from the systolic velocity integral in the ascending aorta by pulsed Doppler Echocardiography (PDE) and the cross sectional area of the aorta estimated by M mode echocardiography on 15 patients with coronary disease undergoing right catheterization for diagnostic purposes. Cardiac output was calculated from stroke volume and heart volume using the PDE method as well as the Fick procedure for comparison. The mean value for the cardiac output via the PDE method (4.42 L/min) was only 6% lower than for the cardiac output obtained from the Fick procedure (4.69 L/min) and the correlation between the two methods was excellent (r=0.967, p less than .01). The good agreement between the two methods demonstrates that the PDE technique offers a reliable noninvasive alternative for estimating cardiac output, requiring no active cooperation by the subject. It was concluded that the Doppler method is superior to the Fick method in that it provides beat by beat information on cardiac performance.

  14. Influence of water immersion, water gymnastics and swimming on cardiac output in patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Jean‐Paul; Noveanu, Markus; Morger, Cyrill; Gaillet, Raymond; Capoferri, Mauro; Anderegg, Matthias; Saner, Hugo

    2007-01-01

    Background Whole‐body water immersion leads to a significant shift of blood from the periphery to the intrathoracic circulation, followed by an increase in central venous pressure and heart volume. In patients with severely reduced left ventricular function, this hydrostatically induced volume shift might overstrain the cardiovascular adaptive mechanisms and lead to cardiac decompensation. Aim To assess the haemodynamic response to water immersion, gymnastics and swimming in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Methods 10 patients with compensated CHF (62.9 (6.3) years, ejection fraction 31.5% (4.1%), peak oxygen consumption (V̇o2) 19.4 (2.8) ml/kg/min), 10 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) but preserved left ventricular function (57.2 (5.6) years, ejection fraction 63.9% (5.5%), peak V̇o2 28 (6.3) ml/kg/min), and 10 healthy controls (32.8 (7.2) years, peak V̇o2 45.6 (6) ml/kg/min) were examined. Haemodynamic response to thermoneutral (32°C) water immersion and exercise was measured using a non‐invasive foreign gas rebreathing method during stepwise water immersion, water gymnastics and swimming. Results Water immersion up to the chest increased cardiac index by 19% in controls, by 21% in patients with CAD and by 16% in patients with CHF. Although some patients with CHF showed a decrease of stroke volume during immersion, all subjects were able to increase cardiac index (by 87% in healthy subjects, by 77% in patients with CAD and by 53% in patients with CHF). V̇o2 during swimming was 9.7 (3.3) ml/kg/min in patients with CHF, 12.4 (3.5) ml/kg/min in patients with CAD and 13.9 (4) ml/kg/min in controls. Conclusions Patients with severely reduced left ventricular function but stable clinical conditions and a minimal peak V̇o2 of at least 15 ml/kg/min during a symptom‐limited exercise stress test tolerate water immersion and swimming in thermoneutral water well. Although cardiac index and V̇o2 are lower than in patients

  15. Accuracy of thermodilution measurement of cardiac output in low flows applicable to feline and small canine patients.

    PubMed

    Dyson, D H; McDonnell, W N; Horne, J A

    1984-10-01

    A model system of feline or small canine cardiac output was used to produce known liquid flow rates in the range of 100 to 750 mL/min for comparison against a thermodilution technique of flow measurement. Thermal indicator size was decided by the thermal time concentration curve detected by the Edwards 9520A cardiac output computer. Ten consecutive readings for each flow were made. Regression analysis and Student's t-test were used to evaluate the results. The computer was found to give good correlation with the accurate flow measured by a graduated cylinder over a period of time (r = 0.99). An error of less than 7% overestimation of flow by thermodilution was found with flows greater than 200 mL/min (p less than 0.05). A significant error of more than 20% overestimation of the actual flow occurred with flows less than 200 mL/min (p less than 0.05). The Edwards 9520A computer was compared to the older Edwards 9510A model by averaged triplicate measurements at six different cardiac outputs in an anesthetized cat. The measurements were not significantly different (p less than 0.01). Thermodilution using an Edwards computer proves to be a promising tool in the measurement of low flows applicable to feline and small canine cardiac outputs. PMID:6509371

  16. Pulse contour analysis: Is it able to reliably detect changes in cardiac output in the haemodynamically unstable patient?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Three pulse contour systems for monitoring cardiac output - LiDCO Plus™, PiCCO Plus™ and FloTrac™ - were compared in postcardiac surgery patients. None of the three methods demonstrated good trending ability according to concordance analysis. Pulse contour systems remain unreliable in the haemodynamically unstable patient. PMID:21349140

  17. Use of electroconvulsive therapy in an elderly after 5 weeks of myocardial infraction with 30% cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Grover, Sandeep; Suchendra, K; Mehra, Aseem; Parkash, Vijay; Saini, Vikas; Bagga, Shiv

    2015-01-01

    There is limited literature on the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in patients with recent myocardial infarction and in those with reduced cardiac output. In this report, we describe the safe use of ECT in a 70-year-male suffering from severe depressive episode with psychotic symptoms. He had a history of poor response to adequate pharmacotherapy and had suffered from myocardial infraction (MI), about 3 weeks prior to admission to the psychiatric unit. In view of severe depression associated with marked anxiety, agitation, psychotic symptoms, and poor food intake he was started on ECT after 5 weeks of MI when his cardiac output was only 30%. He received nine sessions of ECT without any cardiac complications and his depression remitted with ECT. PMID:27212828

  18. Pulmonary diffusing capacity, capillary blood volume, and cardiac output during sustained microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. K.; Guy, Harold J. B.; Elliott, Ann R.; Deutschman, Robert A., III; West, John B.

    1993-01-01

    We measured pulmonary diffusing capacity (DL), diffusing capacity per unit lung volume, pulmonary capillary blood volume (Vc), membrane diffusing capacity (Dm), pulmonary capillary blood flow or cardiac output (Qc), and cardiac stroke volume (SV) in four subjects exposed to nine days of microgravity. DL in microgravity was elevated compared with preflight standing values and was higher than preflight supine because of the elevation of both Vc and Dm. The elevation in Vc was comparable to that measured supine in 1 G, but the increase in Dm was in sharp contrast to the supine value. We postulate that, in 0 G, pulmonary capillary blood is evenly distributed throughout the lung, providing for uniform capillary filling, leading to an increase in the surface area available for diffusion. By contrast, in the supine 1-G state, the capillaries are less evenly filled, and although a similar increase in blood volume is observed, the corresponding increase in surface area does not occur. DL and its subdivisions showed no adaptive changes from the first measurement 24 h after the start of 0 G to eight days later. Similarly, there were no trends in the postflight data, suggesting that the principal mechanism of these changes was gravitational. The increase in Dm suggests that subclinical pulmonary edema did not result from exposure to 0 G. Qc was modestly increased inflight and decreased postflight compared with preflight standing. Compared with preflight standing, SV was increased 46 percent inflight and decreased 14 percent in the 1st week postflight. There were temporal changes in Qc and SV during 0 G, with the highest values recorded at the first measurement, 24 h into the flight. The lowest values of Qc and SV occurred on the day of return.

  19. Age and cardiac output during cycle exercise in thermoneutral and warm environments.

    PubMed

    Minson, C T; Kenney, W L

    1997-01-01

    To determine whether chronological age, independent of changes in aerobic capacity, alters cardiac output (Qc), the central hemodynamic responses to intermittent incremental cycle exercise were studied in two groups of men. Qc was measured at rest and during exercise at 35%, 60%, 75%, and 85% peak aerobic capacity (VO2peak) using a CO2 rebreathing method in seven trained older (65 +/- 2 yr) and eight normally active but untrained young men (26 +/- 1 yr) matched for VO2peak and anthropometric measures. Subjects were tested in both a thermoneutral (22 degrees C) and a warm (36 degrees C) environment to investigate possible differential cardiovascular responses to exercise in the heat. Only subjects with no history of pulmonary, cardiac, neuromuscular, or endocrine disease and a normal electrocardiogram were studied. The older men had significantly lower (P < 0.05) Qc relative to the younger men at intensities greater than 60% VO2peak in both environmental conditions. At these higher intensities, the older men had a significantly higher stroke volume (SV) and lower heart rate (HR) (P < 0.05). A higher arteriovenous oxygen difference ((a-v)O2)) compared with their younger counterparts enabled the older men to exercise at the same absolute intensity, most likely because of training induced changes in left-ventricular performance and oxygen extraction. The addition of an exogenous heat source did not alter the Qc response in either group of men; however, a higher HR (P < 0.05) and smaller SV (P > 0.05) were observed in the young men during exercise in the heat. This may reflect previously reported differences in the skin blood flow response of VO2peak-matched young and older men during exercise. It is suggested that endurance trained older men can enhance left-ventricular performance to augment SV, but not sufficiently to maintain Qc in light of an attenuated HR response during exercise at intensities above 60% VO2peak. PMID:9000158

  20. Left ventricular atrioventricular plane displacement is preserved with lifelong endurance training and is the main determinant of maximal cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Steding-Ehrenborg, Katarina; Boushel, Robert C; Calbet, José A; Åkeson, Per; Mortensen, Stefan P

    2015-12-01

    Age-related decline in cardiac function can be prevented or postponed by lifelong endurance training. However, effects of normal ageing as well as of lifelong endurance exercise on longitudinal and radial contribution to stroke volume are unknown. The aim of this study was to determine resting longitudinal and radial pumping in elderly athletes, sedentary elderly and young sedentary subjects. Furthermore, we aimed to investigate determinants of maximal cardiac output in elderly. Eight elderly athletes (63 ± 4 years), seven elderly sedentary (66 ± 4 years) and ten young sedentary subjects (29 ± 4 years) underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. All subjects underwent maximal exercise testing and for elderly subjects maximal cardiac output during cycling was determined using a dye dilution technique. Longitudinal and radial contribution to stroke volume did not differ between groups (longitudinal left ventricle (LV) 52-65%, P = 0.12, right ventricle (RV) 77-87%, P = 0.16, radial 7.9-8.6%, P = 1.0). Left ventricular atrioventricular plane displacement (LVAVPD) was higher in elderly athletes and young sedentary compared with elderly sedentary subjects (14 ± 3, 15 ± 2 and 11 ± 1 mm, respectively, P < 0.05). There was no difference between groups for RVAVPD (P = 0.2). LVAVPD was an independent predictor of maximal cardiac output (R(2) = 0.61, P < 0.01, β = 0.78). Longitudinal and radial contributions to stroke volume did not differ between groups. However, how longitudinal pumping was achieved differed; elderly athletes and young sedentary subjects showed similar AVPD whereas this was significantly lower in elderly sedentary subjects. Elderly sedentary subjects achieved longitudinal pumping through increased short-axis area of the ventricle. Large AVPD was a determinant of maximal cardiac output and exercise capacity. PMID:26496146

  1. Assumed oxygen consumption based on calculation from dye dilution cardiac output: an improved formula.

    PubMed

    Bergstra, A; van Dijk, R B; Hillege, H L; Lie, K I; Mook, G A

    1995-05-01

    This study was performed because of observed differences between dye dilution cardiac output and the Fick cardiac output, calculated from estimated oxygen consumption according to LaFarge and Miettinen, and to find a better formula for assumed oxygen consumption. In 250 patients who underwent left and right heart catheterization, the oxygen consumption VO2 (ml.min-1) was calculated using Fick's principle. Either pulmonary or systemic flow, as measured by dye dilution, was used in combination with the concordant arteriovenous oxygen concentration difference. In 130 patients, who matched the age of the LaFarge and Miettinen population, the obtained values of oxygen consumption VO2(dd) were compared with the estimated oxygen consumption values VO2(lfm), found using the LaFarge and Miettinen formulae. The VO2(lfm) was significantly lower than VO2(dd); -21.8 +/- 29.3 ml.min-1 (mean +/- SD), P < 0.001, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) -26.9 to -16.7, limits of agreement (LA) -80.4 to 36.9. A new regression formula for the assumed oxygen consumption VO2(ass) was derived in 250 patients by stepwise multiple regression analysis. The VO2(dd) was used as a dependent variable, and body surface area BSA (m2). Sex (0 for female, 1 for male), Age (years), Heart rate (min-1) and the presence of a left to right shunt as independent variables. The best fitting formula is expressed as: VO2(ass) = (157.3 x BSA + 10.0 x Sex - 10.5 x In Age + 4.8) ml.min-1, where ln Age = the natural logarithm of the age. This formula was validated prospectively in 60 patients. A non-significant difference between VO2(ass) and VO2(dd) was found; mean 2.0 +/- 23.4 ml.min-1, P = 0.771, 95% Cl = -4.0 to +8.0, LA -44.7 to +48.7. In conclusion, assumed oxygen consumption values, using our new formula, are in better agreement with the actual values than those found according to LaFarge and Miettinen's formulae. PMID:7588904

  2. Cardiac cell proliferation assessed by EdU, a novel analysis of cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Bin; Tong, Suiyang; Ren, Xiaofeng; Xia, Hao

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that mammalian hearts maintain the capacity for cardiac regeneration. Rapid and sensitive identification of cardiac cellular proliferation is prerequisite for understanding the underlying mechanisms and strategies of cardiac regeneration. The following immunologically related markers of cardiac cells were analyzed: cardiac transcription factors Nkx2.5 and Gata 4; specific marker of cardiomyocytes TnT; endothelial cell marker CD31; vascular smooth muscle marker smooth muscle myosin IgG; cardiac resident stem cells markers IsL1, Tbx18, and Wt1. Markers were co-localized in cardiac tissues of embryonic, neonatal, adult, and pathological samples by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) staining. EdU was also used to label isolated neonatal cardiomyocytes in vitro. EdU robustly labeled proliferating cells in vitro and in vivo, co-immunostaining with different cardiac cells markers. EdU can rapidly and sensitively label proliferating cardiac cells in developmental and pathological states. Cardiac cell proliferation assessed by EdU is a novel analytical tool for investigating the mechanism and strategies of cardiac regeneration in response to injury. PMID:25480318

  3. A computational model-based validation of Guyton's analysis of cardiac output and venous return curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Cohen, R. J.; Mark, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    Guyton developed a popular approach for understanding the factors responsible for cardiac output (CO) regulation in which 1) the heart-lung unit and systemic circulation are independently characterized via CO and venous return (VR) curves, and 2) average CO and right atrial pressure (RAP) of the intact circulation are predicted by graphically intersecting the curves. However, this approach is virtually impossible to verify experimentally. We theoretically evaluated the approach with respect to a nonlinear, computational model of the pulsatile heart and circulation. We developed two sets of open circulation models to generate CO and VR curves, differing by the manner in which average RAP was varied. One set applied constant RAPs, while the other set applied pulsatile RAPs. Accurate prediction of intact, average CO and RAP was achieved only by intersecting the CO and VR curves generated with pulsatile RAPs because of the pulsatility and nonlinearity (e.g., systemic venous collapse) of the intact model. The CO and VR curves generated with pulsatile RAPs were also practically independent. This theoretical study therefore supports the validity of Guyton's graphical analysis.

  4. [A dye densitometry analysis method for noninvasive measurement of cardiac output based on NIRS].

    PubMed

    Lu, Meng-Meng; Wang, Hong-Xuan; Liu, Guang-Da; Xin, Gui-Jie; Yu, Yong; Zha, Yu-Tong

    2013-12-01

    Currently, there exist technology problems in cardiac output (CO) parameter detection clinically, such as invasive and complex operation, as well as possibility of infection and death for patients. In order to solve these problems, a noninvasive and continuous method based on NIRS for CO detection was presented. In this way, the concentration changing of indocyanine green (ICG) dye in the patient's arterial blood was dynamically measured and analyzed, so that the CO could be noninvasively and continuously measured according to the characteristic parameters of dye densitometry curve. While the ICG dye was injected into the patient's body by the median cubital vein, block of photoelectric pulse dye densitometry measurement system as the lower machine acquired pulse wave data and uploaded the data to upper computer. In the scheme, two specialized light sources of LED at 940 and 805 nm were used to capture the signals of sufferer's fingertip pulse wave synchronously and successively. The CO value could then be successfully calculated through drawing complete ICG concentration variation of dye dilution and excretion process and computing mean transmission time (MTT) by upper computer. Compared with the "gold standard" method of thermodilution, the maximum relative error of this method was below 9. 76%, and the mean relative error was below 4. 39%. The result indicates that the method can be used as a kind of convenient operation, noninvasive and continuous solution for clinical CO measurement. PMID:24611365

  5. High Output Cardiac Failure Resolving after Repair of AV Fistula in a Six-Month-Old.

    PubMed

    Teomete, Uygar; Gugol, Rubee Anne; Neville, Holly; Dandin, Ozgur; Young, Ming-Lon

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acquired AVF in pediatrics are commonly caused by iatrogenic means, including arterial or venous punctures. These fistulae can cause great hemodynamic stress on the heart as soon as they are created. Case. A six-month-old 25-week gestation infant was referred for respiratory distress. Initial exam revealed tachypnea, tachycardia, and hypertension. There was a bruit noted on her left arm. An ultrasound showed an arteriovenous fistula. Its location, however, precluded intervention because of the high risk for limb-loss. An echocardiogram showed evidence of pulmonary hypertension that was treated with sildenafil and furosemide. However, no improvement was seen. On temporary manual occlusion of the fistula, the patient was noted to have increased her blood pressure and decreased her heart rate, suggesting significant hemodynamic effect of the fistula. The fistula was subsequently ligated and the patient clinically and echocardiographically improved. Conclusion. A patient in high output cardiac failure or pulmonary artery hypertension, especially prematüre patients with preexisting lung disease, should be probed for history of multiple punctures, trauma, or surgery and should have prompt evaluation for AVF. If it can be diagnosed and repaired, most of the cases have been shown to decrease the stress on the heart and reverse the pathologic hemodynamics. PMID:26885434

  6. A novel continuous cardiac output monitor based on pulse wave transit time.

    PubMed

    Sugo, Yoshihiro; Ukawa, Teiji; Takeda, Sunao; Ishihara, Hironori; Kazama, Tomiei; Takeda, Junzo

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring cardiac output (CO) is important for the management of patient circulation in an operation room (OR) or intensive care unit (ICU). We assumed that the change in pulse wave transit time (PWTT) obtained from an electrocardiogram (ECG) and a pulse oximeter wave is correlated with the change in stroke volume (SV), from which CO is derived. The present study reports the verification of this hypothesis using a hemodynamic analysis theory and animal study. PWTT consists of a pre-ejection period (PEP), the pulse transit time through an elasticity artery (T(1)), and the pulse transit time through peripheral resistance arteries (T(2)). We assumed a consistent negative correlation between PWTT and SV under all conditions of varying circulatory dynamics. The equation for calculating SV from PWTT was derived based on the following procedures. 1. Approximating SV using a linear equation of PWTT. 2. The slope and y-intercept of the above equation were determined under consideration of vessel compliance (SV was divided by Pulse Pressure (PP)), animal type, and the inherent relationship between PP and PWTT. Animal study was performed to verify the above-mentioned assumption. The correlation coefficient of PWTT and SV became r = -0.710 (p 〈 0.001), and a good correlation was admitted. It has been confirmed that accurate continuous CO and SV measurement is only possible by monitoring regular clinical parameters (ECG, SpO2, and NIBP). PMID:21095971

  7. High Output Cardiac Failure Resolving after Repair of AV Fistula in a Six-Month-Old

    PubMed Central

    Teomete, Uygar; Gugol, Rubee Anne; Neville, Holly; Dandin, Ozgur; Young, Ming-Lon

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acquired AVF in pediatrics are commonly caused by iatrogenic means, including arterial or venous punctures. These fistulae can cause great hemodynamic stress on the heart as soon as they are created. Case. A six-month-old 25-week gestation infant was referred for respiratory distress. Initial exam revealed tachypnea, tachycardia, and hypertension. There was a bruit noted on her left arm. An ultrasound showed an arteriovenous fistula. Its location, however, precluded intervention because of the high risk for limb-loss. An echocardiogram showed evidence of pulmonary hypertension that was treated with sildenafil and furosemide. However, no improvement was seen. On temporary manual occlusion of the fistula, the patient was noted to have increased her blood pressure and decreased her heart rate, suggesting significant hemodynamic effect of the fistula. The fistula was subsequently ligated and the patient clinically and echocardiographically improved. Conclusion. A patient in high output cardiac failure or pulmonary artery hypertension, especially prematüre patients with preexisting lung disease, should be probed for history of multiple punctures, trauma, or surgery and should have prompt evaluation for AVF. If it can be diagnosed and repaired, most of the cases have been shown to decrease the stress on the heart and reverse the pathologic hemodynamics. PMID:26885434

  8. Thermal dilution measurement of cardiac output in dogs using an analog computer.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, F F; Schipperheyn, J J; Quanjer, P H

    1978-01-01

    Thermal dilution cardiac output determinations in dogs were compared to simultaneously performed Fick oxygen measurements. The purpose of this study was to validate in dog experiments a method for thermal dilution measurement which employs a double-thermistor catheter combined with an automatic computer as described by Olsson et al. Dilution and injectate temperature are entered directly into the calculation. The method does not employ logarithmic extrapolation, integration of the dilution signal being terminated when a preset cut-off level is reached. Errors due to recirculation, thermal capacitance of the right heart and heat exchange with the catheter's dead space require the use of an empirically derived correction factor, which in dogs was found to be significantly different from the factor used for human thermal dilution curves. With the appropriate cut-off level and correction factor a good agreement was found between the results of the thermal dilution and the Fick method. The regression equation for 47 experiments was found to be COtd = 0.95 COFick + 0.08; the correlation coefficient was 0.94. PMID:728031

  9. May-Thurner syndrome: High output cardiac failure as a result of iatrogenic iliac fistula

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shantanu; Singh, Shivank; Jyothimallika, Juthika; Lynch, Teresa J

    2015-01-01

    May-Thurner syndrome (MTS) also termed iliocaval compression or Cockett-Thomas syndrome is a common, although rarely diagnosed, condition in which the patient has an anatomical variant wherein the right common iliac artery overlies and compresses the left common iliac vein against the fifth lumbar spine resulting in increased risk of iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis. This variant has been shown to be present in over 23% of the population but most go undetected. We present a patient with MTS who developed high output cardiac failure due to an iatrogenic iliac fistula. The patient underwent an extensive workup for a left to right shunt including MRI and arterial duplex in the vascular lab. He was ultimately found to have a 2.1 cm left common iliac artery aneurysm and history of common iliac stent. We took the patient to the operating room for aortogram with placement of an endovascular plug of the left internal iliac artery and aorto-bi-iliac stent graft placement with CO2 and IV contrast. Subsequently the patient underwent successful stent placement in the area that was compressed followed by 6 mo of anticoagulation with warfarin. The flow from the fistula decreased significantly. PMID:25789305

  10. Cardiac output, at rest and during exercise, before and during myocardial ischemia, reperfusion, and infarction in conscious mice.

    PubMed

    Lujan, Heidi L; DiCarlo, Stephen E

    2013-02-15

    Multiple systems and regulatory strategies interact to control cardiac homeostasis. In fact, regulated systems, feedback controls, and redundant control mechanisms dominate in whole animals. Accordingly, molecular and cellular tools and techniques must be utilized in complex models with multiple systems and regulatory strategies to fully appreciate the physiological context. Currently, these techniques are mainly performed under conditions remote from the normal in vivo condition; thus, the extrapolation of molecular changes to the in vivo situation and the facilitation of translational aspect of the findings are limited. A major obstacle has been the reliance on preparations that do not mimic the clinical or physiological situation. This is particularly true regarding measurements of cardiac function in mice. To address these concerns, we used a permanently implanted Doppler ultrasonic flow probe on the ascending aorta and coronary artery occluder for repeated measurements of ascending aortic blood flow (cardiac output) in conscious mice, at rest and during exercise, before and during coronary artery occlusion/reperfusion and infarction. The conscious mouse model permits detailed monitoring of within-animal changes in cardiac function during myocardial ischemia, reperfusion, and infarction in an intact, complex model free of the confounding influences of anesthetics, surgical trauma, and restraint stress. Results from this study suggest that previous protocols may have overestimated resting baseline values and underestimated cardiac output reserve. Using these procedures in currently available spontaneous or engineered mouse mutants has the potential to be of major importance for advancing the concepts and methods that drive cardiovascular research. PMID:23302959

  11. Assessment of Electrosurgery Burns in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jalali, Seyyed Mehdi; Moradi, Mohammad; Khalaj, Alireza; Pazouki, Alireza; Tamannaie, Zeinab; Ghanbari, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Monopolar surgery is applied mostly in major operations, while bipolar is used in delicate ones. Attention must be paid in electrosurgery application to avoid electrical burns. Objectives: We aimed to assess factors associated with electrosurgery burns in cardiac surgery operating rooms. Patients and Methods: This was a case-control study in which two groups of 150 patients undergoing cardiac surgery in Imam Khomeini Hospital were recruited. Several factors like gender, age, operation duration, smoking, diseases, infection, atopia, , immunosuppressive drugs use, hepatic cirrhosis, and pulmonary diseases were compared between the two groups. Patients were observed for 24 hours for development of any burn related to the operation. Data was analyzed using SPSS v.11.5, by Chi square and T-test. Results: Patients in the two groups were similar except for two factors. DM and pulmonary diseases which showed significant differences (P = 0.005 and P = 0.002 respectively). Seventy-five patients from controls and 35 from the study group developed burns, which was significant (P ˂ 0.0001). Conclusions: None of the factors were significantly related to developing burns. The differences between the two groups highlights the importance of systems modifications to lessen the incidence of burns. PMID:26839854

  12. Combined first pass and gated blood pool radionuclide studies in the hemodynamic-cardiac evaluation of patients with low cardiac output

    SciTech Connect

    Abi-Mansour, P.; Fouad, F.M.; Sheeler, L.R.; Bravo, E.L.; MacIntyre, W.J.; Tarazi, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    Cardiac output (CO) is frequently used in the evaluation of cardiac function but low CO does not necessarily reflect heart failure. Similarly, low ejection fraction (EF) can be present in compensated heart diseases. In order to evaluate cardiac performance in relation to systematic hemodynamics, the authors used a multifactorial approach for the determination of CO, EF, pulmonary mean transit time (MTT), ratio of cardiopulmonary volume over total blood volume (CPV/TBV as an index of venous tone) all obtained from a single injection of 99m Tc-HSA. Four different conditions associated with low CO (less than or equal to 2.1 L/min/m/sup 2/) were evaluated. The combined use of CO, EF, MTT and CPV/TBV allowed a better understanding of the myocardial and peripheral circulatory factors associated with low CO states. This is helpful in the selection and follow-up of appropriate therapeutic intervention.

  13. Health insurance and outcomes: comprehensive assessment of health system outputs.

    PubMed

    Perkins, N A

    1991-01-01

    Outcomes analysis in health care has historically meant the examination of clinical results of inpatient hospitalization. In response to climbing health care and health insurance costs, the organization of health care providers, the location of service delivery and reimbursement mechanisms have changed. As the health care industry changes, so too must the definition of outcomes. This article presents a conceptual framework for the analysis of health outcomes as health industry outputs, with an emphasis on the ways in which such outputs are being assessed and improved. PMID:10116955

  14. Low Cardiac Output Leads Hepatic Fibrosis in Right Heart Failure Model Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Yoshitaka; Urashima, Takashi; Shimura, Daisuke; Ito, Reiji; Kawachi, Sadataka; Kajimura, Ichige; Akaike, Toru; Kusakari, Yoichiro; Fujiwara, Masako; Ogawa, Kiyoshi; Goda, Nobuhito; Ida, Hiroyuki; Minamisawa, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatic fibrosis progresses with right heart failure, and becomes cardiac cirrhosis in a severe case. Although its causal factor still remains unclear. Here we evaluated the progression of hepatic fibrosis using a pulmonary artery banding (PAB)-induced right heart failure model and investigated whether cardiac output (CO) is responsible for the progression of hepatic fibrosis. Methods and Results Five-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats divided into the PAB and sham-operated control groups. After 4 weeks from operation, we measured CO by echocardiography, and hepatic fibrosis ratio by pathological examination using a color analyzer. In the PAB group, CO was significantly lower by 48% than that in the control group (78.2±27.6 and 150.1±31.2 ml/min, P<0.01). Hepatic fibrosis ratio and serum hyaluronic acid, an index of hepatic fibrosis, were significantly increased in the PAB group than those in the control group (7.8±1.7 and 1.0±0.2%, P<0.01, 76.2±27.5 and 32.7±7.5 ng/ml, P<0.01). Notably, the degree of hepatic fibrosis significantly correlated a decrease in CO. Immunohistological analysis revealed that hepatic stellate cells were markedly activated in hypoxic areas, and HIF-1α positive hepatic cells were increased in the PAB group. Furthermore, by real-time PCR analyses, transcripts of profibrotic and fibrotic factors (TGF-β1, CTGF, procollargen I, procollargen III, MMP 2, MMP 9, TIMP 1, TIMP 2) were significantly increased in the PAB group. In addition, western blot analyses revealed that the protein level of HIF-1α was significantly increased in the PAB group than that in the control group (2.31±0.84 and 1.0±0.18 arbitrary units, P<0.05). Conclusions Our study demonstrated that low CO and tissue hypoxia were responsible for hepatic fibrosis in right failure heart model rats. PMID:26863419

  15. Use of cardiac output to improve measurement of input function in quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jeff L.; Rusinek, Henry; Bokacheva, Louisa; Chen, Qun; Storey, Pippa; Lee, Vivian S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To validate a new method for converting MR arterial signal intensity versus time curves to arterial input functions (AIF). Materials and Methods: The method constrains AIF with patient's cardiac output (Q). Monte Carlo simulations of MR renography and tumor perfusion protocols were carried out for comparison with two alternative methods: direct measurement and population-averaged input function. MR renography was performed to assess the method's inter- and intra-day reproducibility for renal parameters. Results: In simulations of tumor perfusion, the precision of the parameters (Ktrans and ve) computed using the proposed method was improved by at least a factor of three compared to direct measurement. Similar improvements were obtained in simulations of MR renography. Volunteer study for testing inter-day reproducibility confirmed the improvement of precision in renal parameters when using the proposed method, compared to conventional methods. In another patient study (two injections within one session), the proposed method significantly increased the correlation coefficient (R) between GFR of the two exams (0.92 vs. 0.83), compared to direct measurement. Conclusion: A new method significantly improves the precision of DCE parameters. The method may be especially useful for analyzing repeated DCE examinations, such as monitoring tumor therapy or ACE-inhibitor renography. PMID:19711414

  16. First in vivo application and evaluation of a novel method for non-invasive estimation of cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Theodore G; Soulis, Dimitrios; Vardoulis, Orestis; Protogerou, Athanase; Sfikakis, Petros P; Stergiopulos, Nikolaos; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2014-10-01

    Surgical or critically ill patients often require continuous assessment of cardiac output (CO) for diagnostic purposes or for guiding therapeutic interventions. A new method of non-invasive CO estimation has been recently developed, which is based on pressure wave analysis. However, its validity has been examined only in silico. Aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo the reproducibility and accuracy of the "systolic volume balance" method (SVB). Twenty two subjects underwent 2-D transthoracic echocardiography for CO measurement (reference value of CO). The application of SVB method required aortic pressure wave analysis and estimation of total arterial compliance. Aortic pulses were derived by mathematical transformation of radial pressure waves recorded by applanation tonometry. Total compliance was estimated by the "pulse pressure" method. The agreement, association, variability, bias and precision between Doppler and SVB measures of CO were evaluated by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), mean difference, SD of differences, percentage error (PR) and Bland-Altman analysis. SVB yielded very reproducible CO estimates (ICC=0.84, mean difference 0.27 ± 0.73 L/min, PR = 16.7%). SVB-derived CO was comparable with Doppler measurements, indicating a good agreement and accuracy (ICC = 0.74, mean difference = -0.22 ± 0.364 L/min, PR ≈ 15). The basic mathematical and physical principles of the SVB method provide highly reproducible and accurate estimates of CO compared with echocardiography. PMID:25108554

  17. Methodology of method comparison studies evaluating the validity of cardiac output monitors: a stepwise approach and checklist.

    PubMed

    Montenij, L J; Buhre, W F; Jansen, J R; Kruitwagen, C L; de Waal, E E

    2016-06-01

    The validity of each new cardiac output (CO) monitor should be established before implementation in clinical practice. For this purpose, method comparison studies investigate the accuracy and precision against a reference technique. With the emergence of continuous CO monitors, the ability to detect changes in CO, in addition to its absolute value, has gained interest. Therefore, method comparison studies increasingly include assessment of trending ability in the data analysis. A number of methodological challenges arise in method comparison research with respect to the application of Bland-Altman and trending analysis. Failure to face these methodological challenges will lead to misinterpretation and erroneous conclusions. We therefore review the basic principles and pitfalls of Bland-Altman analysis in method comparison studies concerning new CO monitors. In addition, the concept of clinical concordance is introduced to evaluate trending ability from a clinical perspective. The primary scope of this review is to provide a complete overview of the pitfalls in CO method comparison research, whereas other publications focused on a single aspect of the study design or data analysis. This leads to a stepwise approach and checklist for a complete data analysis and data representation. PMID:27199309

  18. Measurement of cardiac output during exercise by open-circuit acetylene uptake.

    PubMed

    Barker, R C; Hopkins, S R; Kellogg, N; Olfert, I M; Brutsaert, T D; Gavin, T P; Entin, P L; Rice, A J; Wagner, P D

    1999-10-01

    Noninvasive measurement of cardiac output (QT) is problematic during heavy exercise. We report a new approach that avoids unpleasant rebreathing and resultant changes in alveolar PO(2) or PCO(2) by measuring short-term acetylene (C(2)H(2)) uptake by an open-circuit technique, with application of mass balance for the calculation of QT. The method assumes that alveolar and arterial C(2)H(2) pressures are the same, and we account for C(2)H(2) recirculation by extrapolating end-tidal C(2)H(2) back to breath 1 of the maneuver. We correct for incomplete gas mixing by using He in the inspired mixture. The maneuver involves switching the subject to air containing trace amounts of C(2)H(2) and He; ventilation and pressures of He, C(2)H(2), and CO(2) are measured continuously (the latter by mass spectrometer) for 20-25 breaths. Data from three subjects for whom multiple Fick O(2) measurements of QT were available showed that measurement of QT by the Fick method and by the C(2)H(2) technique was statistically similar from rest to 90% of maximal O(2) consumption (VO(2 max)). Data from 12 active women and 12 elite male athletes at rest and 90% of VO(2 max) fell on a single linear relationship, with O(2) consumption (VO(2)) predicting QT values of 9.13, 15.9, 22.6, and 29.4 l/min at VO(2) of 1, 2, 3, and 4 l/min. Mixed venous PO(2) predicted from C(2)H(2)-determined QT, measured VO(2), and arterial O(2) concentration was approximately 20-25 Torr at 90% of VO(2 max) during air breathing and 10-15 Torr during 13% O(2) breathing. This modification of previous gas uptake methods, to avoid rebreathing, produces reasonable data from rest to heavy exercise in normal subjects. PMID:10517785

  19. Dynamic device properties of pulse contour cardiac output during transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Petzoldt, Martin; Riedel, Carsten; Braeunig, Jan; Haas, Sebastian; Goepfert, Matthias S; Treede, Hendrik; Baldus, Stephan; Goetz, Alwin E; Reuter, Daniel A

    2015-06-01

    This prospective single-center study aimed to determine the responsiveness and diagnostic performance of continuous cardiac output (CCO) monitors based on pulse contour analysis compared with invasive mean arterial pressure (MAP) during predefined periods of acute circulatory deterioration in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The ability of calibrated (CCO(CAL)) and self-calibrated (CCO(AUTOCAL)) pulse contour analysis to detect the hemodynamic response to 37 episodes of balloon aortic valvuloplasty enabled by rapid ventricular pacing was quantified in 13 patients undergoing TAVI. A "low" and a "high" cut-off limit were predefined as a 15 or 25 % decrease from baseline respectively. We found no significant differences between CCO(CAL) and MAP regarding mean response time [low cut-off: 8.6 (7.1-10.5) vs. 8.9 (7.3-10.8) s, p = 0.76; high cut-off: 11.4 (9.7-13.5) vs. 12.6 (10.7-14.9) s, p = 0.32] or diagnostic performance [area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC): 0.99 (0.98-1.0) vs. 1.0 (0.99-1.0), p = 0.46]. But CCOCAL had a significantly higher amplitude response [95.0 (88.7-98.8) % decrease from baseline] than MAP [41.2 (30.0-52.9) %, p < 0.001]. CCOAUTOCAL had a significantly lower AUC [0.83 (0.73-0.93), p < 0.001] than MAP. Moreover, CCO(CAL) detected hemodynamic recovery significantly earlier than MAP. In conclusion, CCO(CAL) and MAP provided equivalent responsiveness and diagnostic performance to detect acute circulatory depression, whereas CCO(AUTOCAL) appeared to be less appropriate. In contrast to CCO(CAL) the amplitude response of MAP was poor. Consequently even small response amplitudes of MAP could indicate severe decreases in CO. PMID:25355556

  20. Predictors of Post Pericardiotomy Low Cardiac Output Syndrome in Patients With Pericardial Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Faraji, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pathological involvement of pericardium by any disease that resulting in effusion may require decompression and pericardiectomy. The current article describes rare patients with effusion who after pericadiectomy and transient hemodynamic improvement rapidly developed progressive heart failure and subsequent multi organ failure. Methods: During periods of five years, 423 patients in our hospital underwent pericardiotomy for decompression of effusion. The clinical characteristics of those patient with postoperative low cardiac output (B group) (14 cases) recorded and compared with other patients without this postoperative complication (A group) by test and X2. Significant variables in invariables (P≤0.1) entered in logistic regression analysis and odd ratio of these significant variables obtained. Results: Idiopathic pericardial effusion, malignancy, renal failure, connective tissue disease, viral pericarditis was found in 125 patients (27%), 105 patients (25.4%), 65 patients (15.6%), 50 (17.1%) and 10 (2.4%) of patients subsequently. The factors that predict post-operative death in logistic regression analysis were malignancy, radiotherapy, constrictive pericarditis inotropic drug using IABP using, pre-operative EF and pericardial calcification. Conclusion: Certain preoperative variables such as malignancy, radiotherapy, low EF, calcified pericardium and connective tissue disease are associated with POLCOS and post-operative risk of death. This paradoxical response to pericardial decompression may be more frequent than currently appreciated. Its cause may relate to the sudden removal of the chronic external ventricular support from the effusion or thicken pericardium resulting in ventricular dilatation and failure or intra operative myocardial injury due to pericardiectomy of calcified pericardium, radiation and cardiomyopathy. PMID:25859311

  1. Environmental risk assessments for transgenic crops producing output trait enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Tuttle, Ann; Shore, Scott; Stone, Terry

    2009-01-01

    The environmental risks from cultivating crops producing output trait enzymes can be rigorously assessed by testing conservative risk hypotheses of no harm to endpoints such as the abundance of wildlife, crop yield and the rate of degradation of crop residues in soil. These hypotheses can be tested with data from many sources, including evaluations of the agronomic performance and nutritional quality of the crop made during product development, and information from the scientific literature on the mode-of-action, taxonomic distribution and environmental fate of the enzyme. Few, if any, specific ecotoxicology or environmental fate studies are needed. The effective use of existing data means that regulatory decision-making, to which an environmental risk assessment provides essential information, is not unnecessarily complicated by evaluation of large amounts of new data that provide negligible improvement in the characterization of risk, and that may delay environmental benefits offered by transgenic crops containing output trait enzymes. PMID:19924556

  2. Diesel Exhaust Inhalation Increases Cardiac Output, Bradyarrhythmias, and Parasympathetic Tone in Aged Heart Failure–Prone Rats

    PubMed Central

    Farraj, Aimen K.

    2013-01-01

    Acute air pollutant inhalation is linked to adverse cardiac events and death, and hospitalizations for heart failure. Diesel engine exhaust (DE) is a major air pollutant suspected to exacerbate preexisting cardiac conditions, in part, through autonomic and electrophysiologic disturbance of normal cardiac function. To explore this putative mechanism, we examined cardiophysiologic responses to DE inhalation in a model of aged heart failure–prone rats without signs or symptoms of overt heart failure. We hypothesized that acute DE exposure would alter heart rhythm, cardiac electrophysiology, and ventricular performance and dimensions consistent with autonomic imbalance while increasing biochemical markers of toxicity. Spontaneously hypertensive heart failure rats (16 months) were exposed once to whole DE (4h, target PM2.5 concentration: 500 µg/m3) or filtered air. DE increased multiple heart rate variability (HRV) parameters during exposure. In the 4h after exposure, DE increased cardiac output, left ventricular volume (end diastolic and systolic), stroke volume, HRV, and atrioventricular block arrhythmias while increasing electrocardiographic measures of ventricular repolarization (i.e., ST and T amplitudes, ST area, T-peak to T-end duration). DE did not affect heart rate relative to air. Changes in HRV positively correlated with postexposure changes in bradyarrhythmia frequency, repolarization, and echocardiographic parameters. At 24h postexposure, DE-exposed rats had increased serum C-reactive protein and pulmonary eosinophils. This study demonstrates that cardiac effects of DE inhalation are likely to occur through changes in autonomic balance associated with modulation of cardiac electrophysiology and mechanical function and may offer insights into the adverse health effects of traffic-related air pollutants. PMID:23047911

  3. A new method of using gas exchange measurements for the noninvasive determination of cardiac output: clinical experiences in adults following cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Osterlund, B; Gedeon, A; Krill, P; Johansson, G; Reiz, S

    1995-08-01

    New mathematical algorithms have been applied to a computer controlled closed breathing circuit system for non-invasive measurement of cardiac output (COniv). This system has been described in an animal study. Forty patients were studied 5 and 18 hours after cardiac surgery using the thermodilution technique as the reference (COtd). The variables entered into the algorithms for COniv were oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide elimination, end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure, tidal volume and arterial oxygen saturation. Mixed venous carbon dioxide partial pressure was obtained from an automatically implemented short rebreathing manoeuvre. Pulmonary perfusion was calculated by a modified Fick equation for carbon dioxide and the shunt flow added to obtain COniv. During mechanical ventilation, there was a good agreement between COtd and COniv (r = 0.8). The bias was -0.14 l/min and the precision was 0.77 l/min. The reproducibility of COniv was 0.03 l/min and for COtd -0.03 l/min with a standard deviation of the difference being 0.35 l/min for COniv and 0.31 l/min for COtd. In awake, but sedated extubated patients, the method proved unsatisfactory on account for uneven tidal volumes and difficulties with leakage around the mouth piece. We conclude that this new technique provides reliable and reproducible measures of cardiac output in sedated, ventilated patients. PMID:7484024

  4. Addressing Assumptions for the Use of Non-invasive Cardiac Output Measurement Techniques During Exercise in COPD.

    PubMed

    Perrault, Hélène; Richard, Ruddy; Kapchinsky, Sophia; Baril, Jacinthe; Bourbeau, Jean; Taivassalo, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    The multifactorial functional limitation of COPD increasingly demonstrates the need for an integrated circulatory assessment. In this study cardiac output (Qc) derived from non-inert (CO2-RB), inert (N2O-RB) gas rebreathing approaches and bioimpedance were compared to examine the limitations of currently available non-invasive techniques for exercise Qc determination in patients with chronic lung disease. Thirteen COPD patients (GOLD II-III) completed three constant cycling bouts at 20, 35, and 50% of peak work on two occasions to assess Qc with bioimpedance as well as using CO2-RB and N2O-RB for all exercise tests. Results showed significantly lower Qc using the N2O-RB or end-tidal CO2-derived Qc compared to the PaCO2-derived CO2-RB or the bioimpedance at rest and for all exercise intensities. End-tidal CO2-derived values are however not statistically different from those obtained using inert-gas rebreathing. This study show that in COPD patients, CO2-rebreathing Qc values obtained using PaCO2 contents which account for any gas exchange impairment or inadequate gas mixing are similar to those obtained using thoracic bioimpedance. Alternately, the lower values for N2O rebreathing derived Qc indicates the inability of this technique to account for gas exchange impairment in the computation of Qc. These findings indicate that the choice of a gas rebreathing technique to measure Qc in patients must be dictated by the ability to include in the derived computations a correction for either gas exchange inadequacies and/or a vascular shunt. PMID:26408087

  5. Effect of hemorrhage on cardiac output, vasopressin, aldosterone, and diuresis during immersion in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Simanonok, K.; Bernauer, E. M.; Wade, C. E.; Keil, L. C.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to test the hypotesis that a reduction in blood volume would attenuate or eliminate immersion-induced increases in cardiac output (Q(sub co)) and urine excretion, and to investigate accompanying vasoactive and fluid-electrolyte hormonal responses. Eight men (19-23 yr) were supine during a 2-hr control period in air, and then sat for 5-hr test periods in air at 20 C (dry control, DC); water at 34.5 C (wet control, WC); and water (34.5 C) after hemorrhage (WH) of 14.8 plus or minus 0.3 percent of their blood volume. Blood volume was -11.6 plus or minus 0.6 percent at immersion (time 0). Mean (bar-X hrs 1-5) Q(sub co) was unchanged in WC (5.3 plus or minus 0.01 l/min) and in WH (4.5 plus or minus 0.1 l/min), but decreased (P less than 0.05) in DC to 3.6 plus or minus 0.1 l/min. Mean urine excretion rates were 1.0 plus or minus 0.2 ml/min for DC and 1.1 plus or minus 0.2 ml/min for WH; both were lower (P less than 0.05) than that for WC of 2.0 plus or minus 0.4 ml/min. Plasma (Na+) and (Osm) were unchanged in all experiments. Mean plasma vasopressin (PVP) (bar-X hrs 1-5) was 1.1 plus or minus 0.1 pg/ml in WC, and higher (P less than 0.05) in DC (2.1 plus or minus 0.2 pg/ml)and WH (2.1 plus or minus 0.1 pg/ml); it was unchanged during air and water test periods. Thus, hemorrhage attenuated the immersion-induced increase in Q(sub co), eliminated the WC diuresis, maintained plasma renin activity and PVP at DC levels and did not change immersion-induced aldosterone suppression; the osmotic diuresis during control immersion is apparently not due to either aldosterone suppression or vasopressin suppression.

  6. Bioreactance: a new tool for cardiac output and thoracic fluid content monitoring during hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Kossari, Niloufar; Hufnagel, Gilles; Squara, Pierre

    2009-10-01

    Outpatient hemodialysis therapy (HD) can be associated with hemodynamic compromise. Bioreactance has recently been shown to provide accurate, noninvasive, continuous, measurements of cardiac output (CO) and thoracic impedance (Zo) from which thoracic fluid content (TFC) can be derived assuming TFC=1000/Zo. This study was designed to evaluate the changes in TFC in comparison with the traditional indices of fluid removal (FR) and to understand the trends in CO changes in HD patients. Minute-by-minute changes in TFC and CO were prospectively collected using the bioreactance system (NICOM) in HD patients of a single unit. Changes in body weight (DeltaW), hematocrit (DeltaHct), and amount of FR were also measured. Twenty-five patients (age 77 +/- 11 years) were included. The TFC decreased in all patients by an average of 5.4 +/- 7.9 kohm(-1), weight decreased by 1.48 +/- 0.98 kg, and FR averaged 2.07 +/- 1.93 L over a 3- to 4-hour HD session. There were good correlations between DeltaTFC and DeltaW (R=0.80, P<0.0001) and FR (R=0.85, P<0.0001). DeltaHct (4.13 +/- 3.42%) was poorly correlated with DeltaTFC (R=0.35, P=0.12) and FR (R=0.40, P=0.07). The regression line between FR and TFC yielded FR=1.0024-0.1985TFC; thus, a 1 kohm(-1) change of Zo correlates with an approximately 200 mL change in total body water. The change in CO (-0.52 +/- 0.49 L/min m(2)) during HD did not correlate with FR (R=0.15, P=NS). Changes in TFC represented the monitored variable most closely related to FR. CO remained fairly constant in this stable patient cohort. Further studies in high-risk patients are warranted to understand whether TFC and CO monitoring can improve HD session management. PMID:19758300

  7. GLUCAGON LIKE PEPTIDE-1(7–36) BUT NOT (9–36) AUGMENTS CARDIAC OUTPUT DURING MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA VIA AFRANK-STARLING MECHANISM

    PubMed Central

    Goodwill, Adam G.; Tune, Johnathan D.; Noblet, Jillian N.; Conteh, Abass M.; Sassoon, Daniel; Casalini, Eli D.; Mather, Kieren J.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the cardiovascular effects of GLP-1 (7–36) or (9–36) on myocardial oxygen consumption, function and systemic hemodynamics in vivo during normal perfusion and during acute, regional myocardial ischemia. Lean Ossabaw swine received systemic infusions of saline vehicle or GLP-1 (7–36 or 9–36) at 1.5, 3.0, and 10.0 pmol/kg/min in sequence for 30 min at each dose, followed by ligation of the left circumflex artery during continued infusion at 10.0 pmol/kg/min. Systemic GLP-1 (9–36) had no effect on coronary flow, blood pressure, heart rate or indices of cardiac function before or during regional myocardial ischemia. Systemic GLP-1 (7–36) exerted no cardiometabolic or hemodynamic effects prior to ischemia. During ischemia, GLP-1 (7–36) increased cardiac output by approximately 2 L/min relative to vehicle-controls (p=0.003). This response was not diminished by treatment with the non-depolarizing ganglionic blocker hexamethonium. Left ventricular pressure-volume loops measured during steady state conditions with graded occlusion of the inferior vena cava to assess load-independent contractility revealed that GLP-1 (7–36) produced marked increases in end diastolic volume (74 ± 1 to 92 ± 5 mL; p=0.03) and volume axis intercept (8 ± 2 to 26 ± 8; p=0.05), without any change in the slope of the end systolic pressure volume relationship vs. vehicle during regional ischemia. GLP-1 (9–36) produced no changes in any of these parameters compared to vehicle. These findings indicate that short-term systemic treatment with GLP-1 (7–36) but not GLP-1 (9–36) significantly augments cardiac output during regional myocardial ischemia, via increases in ventricular preload without changes in cardiac inotropy. PMID:25005062

  8. Trending ability and limitations of transpulmonary thermodilution and pulse contour cardiac output measurement in cats as a model for pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kutter, Annette P N; Bektas, Rima N; Hofer, Christoph K; Larenza Menzies, M Paula; Bettschart-Wolfensberger, Regula

    2015-06-01

    The present study evaluated transpulmonary thermodilution (TPTD) and pulse contour cardiac output (PCCO) both measured by the PiCCO Plus™ monitor (Pulsion Medical Systems, Munich, Germany) against pulmonary artery thermodilution (PATD) in cats as a hemodynamic model for small children. A wide range of cardiac outputs (CO) was simultaneously measured. Accuracy and trending abilities were critically evaluated. Three cats were studied under isoflurane anesthesia and 160 CO measurements were performed with 3 mL ice-cold 5 % dextrose with PATD and TPTD. The results were compared with the PCCO measurement before the bolus measurement. Cardiac output was manipulated from 32 to 224 mL/kg/min by dobutamine, dopamine, phenylephrine, medetomidine and increased concentrations of isoflurane. Bland-Altman analysis, concordance and polar plot analysis were performed to assess accuracy and trending ability. TPTD was measuring constantly higher than PATD with a mean bias of 73 mL/kg/min and limits of agreement of 34-112 mL/kg/min, a concordance rate of 94 % and a mean polar angle of -5° with radial limits of agreement (RLOA) of 33°. Concordance rate of the PCCO versus PATD was 82 % with a mean polar angle of -10° and RLOA of 46° and versus TPTD 90 % with a mean polar angle of -6° and RLOA of 46°. Both tested methods constantly overestimated simultaneous PATD measurements. The small size, low flows and the relative short catheter not reaching the abdominal aorta may explain that. However TPTD tracked changes accurately opposed to a poor trending ability of the PCCO measurement. PMID:25228023

  9. Clinical evaluation of the flotrac/vigileo™ system for continuous cardiac output monitoring in patients undergoing regional anesthesia for elective cesarean section: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Auler, José Otavio C.; Torres, Marcelo L. A.; Cardoso, Mônica M.; Tebaldi, Thais C.; Schmidt, André P.; Kondo, Mario M.; Zugaib, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery may cause severe maternal hypotension and a decrease in cardiac output. Compared to assessment of cardiac output via a pulmonary artery catheter, the FloTrac/Vigileo™ system may offer a less invasive technique. The aim of this study was to evaluate cardiac output and other hemodynamic measurements made using the FloTrac/Vigileo™ system in patients undergoing spinal anesthesia for elective cesarean section. METHODS: A prospective study enrolling 10 healthy pregnant women was performed. Hemodynamic parameters were continuously obtained at 15 main points: admission to surgery (two baseline measurements), after preload, after spinal anesthesia administration and 4 time points thereafter (4, 6, 8 and 10 min after anesthesia), at skin and uterine incision, newborn and placental delivery, oxytocin administration, end of surgery, and recovery from anesthesia. Hemodynamic therapy was guided by mean arterial pressure, and vasopressors were used as appropriate to maintain baseline values. A repeated measures ANOVA was used for data analysis. RESULTS: There was a significant increase in heart rate and a decrease of stroke volume and stroke volume index up to 10 min after spinal anesthesia (P < 0.01). Importantly, stroke volume variation increased immediately after newborn delivery (P < 0.001) and returned to basal values at the end of surgery. Further hemodynamic parameters showed no significant changes over time. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: No significant hemodynamic effects, except for heart rate and stroke volume changes, were observed in pregnant women managed with preload and vasopressors when undergoing elective cesarean section and spinal anesthesia. PMID:20835557

  10. Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiac Output vs. Heart Rate in Patients with an Implanted Pacemaker Based on Electric Impedance Method Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukup, Ladislav; Vondra, Vlastimil; Viščor, Ivo; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef

    2013-04-01

    The methods and device for estimation of cardiac output and measurement of pulse wave velocity simultaneously is presented here. The beat-to-beat cardiac output as well as pulse wave velocity measurement is based on application of electrical impedance method on the thorax and calf. The results are demonstrated in a study of 24 subjects. The dependence of pulse wave velocity and cardiac output on heart rate during rest in patients with an implanted pacemaker was evaluated. The heart rate was changed by pacemaker programming while neither exercise nor drugs were applied. The most important result is that the pulse wave velocity, cardiac output and blood pressure do not depend significantly on heart rate, while the stroke volume is reciprocal proportionally to the heart rate.

  11. Comparison of Maximum Vasoactive Inotropic Score and Low Cardiac Output Syndrome As Markers of Early Postoperative Outcomes After Neonatal Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Butts, Ryan J.; Scheurer, Mark A.; Atz, Andrew M.; Zyblewski, Sinai C.; Hulsey, Thomas C.; Bradley, Scott M.; Graham, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    Low cardiac output syndrome (LCOS) and maximum vasoactive inotropic score (VIS) have been used as surrogate markers for early postoperative outcomes in pediatric cardiac surgery. The objective of this study was to determine the associations between LCOS and maximum VIS with clinical outcomes in neonatal cardiac surgery. This was a secondary retrospective analysis of a prospective randomized trial, and the setting was a pediatric cardiac intensive care unit in a tertiary care children's hospital. Neonates (n = 76) undergoing corrective or palliative cardiac operations requiring cardiopulmonary bypass were prospectively enrolled. LCOS was defined by a standardized clinical criteria. VIS values were calculated by a standard formula during the first 36 postoperative hours, and the maximum score was recorded. Postoperative outcomes included hospital mortality, duration of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital lengths of stay (LOS), as well as total hospital charges. At surgery, the median age was 7 days and weight was 3.2 kg. LCOS occurred in 32 of 76 (42%) subjects. Median maximum VIS was 15 (range 5–33). LCOS was not associated with duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU LOS, hospital LOS, and hospital charges. Greater VIS was moderately associated with a longer duration of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.001, r = 0.36), longer ICU LOS (p = 0.02, r = 0.27), and greater total hospital costs (p = 0.05, r = 0.22) but not hospital LOS (p = 0.52). LCOS was not associated with early postoperative outcomes. Maximum VIS has only modest correlation with duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU LOS, and total hospital charges. PMID:22349666

  12. Cardiac assessment of African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Black, Peter A; Marshall, Cecilia; Seyfried, Alice W; Bartin, Anne M

    2011-03-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a common finding in captive African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) at postmortem exam. To date, treatment attempts have been mostly empirical and unrewarding. The objective of this study was to determine reference cardiac values for captive African hedgehogs based on echocardiogram, electrocardiogram (ECG), and radiographs. Adult African hedgehogs with no clinical signs of cardiac disease (n = 13) were selected. Each animal was anesthetized with isoflurane via facemask and an echocardiogram, ECG, and radiographs were performed. Standard measurements were taken and the descriptive statistics performed. Values were comparable to limited data available in other hedgehog species and other similar-sized exotic species. Two animals were removed from consideration of reference values due to valvular defects that were considered significant. These data are the first establishing cardiac parameters in normal African hedgehogs using radiographic cardiac measurement, echocardiogram, and ECG. Evaluating animals with possible cardiomyopathy may allow for earlier diagnosis and more successful treatment. PMID:22946370

  13. Femoral Blood Flow and Cardiac Output During Blood Flow Restricted Leg Press Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, M. E.; Hackney, K.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.

    2011-01-01

    Low load blood flow restricted resistance exercise (LBFR) causes muscle hypertrophy that may be stimulated by the local ischemic environment created by the cuff pressure. However, local blood flow (BF) during such exercise is not well understood. PURPOSE: To characterize femoral artery BF and cardiac output (CO) during leg press exercise (LP) performed at a high load (HL) and low load (LL) with different levels of cuff pressure. METHODS: Eleven subjects (men/women 4/7, age 31.4+/-12.8 y, weight 68.9+/-13.2 kg, mean+/-SD) performed 3 sets of supine left LP to fatigue with 90 s of rest in 4 conditions: HL (%1-RM/cuff pressure: 80%/0); LL (20%/0); LBFR(sub DBP) (20%/1.3 x diastolic blood pressure, BP); LBFR(sub SBP) (20%/1.3 x supine systolic BP). The cuff remained inflated throughout the LBFR exercise sessions. Artery diameter, velocity time integral (VTI), and stroke volume (SV) were measured using Doppler ultrasound at rest and immediately after each set of exercise. Heart rate (HR) was monitored using a 3-lead ECG. BF was calculated as VTI x vessel cross-sectional area. CO was calculated as HR x SV. The data obtained after each set of exercise were averaged and used for analyses. Multi-level modeling was used to determine the effect of exercise condition on dependent variables. Statistical significance was set a priori at p< 0.05. RESULTS: Artery diameter did not change from baseline. BF increased (p<0.05) after exercise in each condition except LBFR(sub SBP) in the order of HL (12.73+/-1.42 cm3,mean+/-SE) > LL (9.92+/-0.82 cm3) > LBFR(sub dBP)(6.47+/-0.79 cm3) > LBFR(sub SBP) (3.51+/-0.59 cm3). Blunted exercise induced increases occurred in HR, SV, and CO after LBFR compared to HL and LL. HR increased 45% after HL and LL and 28% after LBFR (p<0.05), but SV increased (p<0.05) only after HL. Consequently, the increase (p<0.05) in CO was greater in HL and LL (approximately 3 L/min) than in LBFR (approximately 1 L/min). CONCLUSION: BF during LBFR(sub SBP) was 1/3 of

  14. At high cardiac output, diesel exhaust exposure increases pulmonary vascular resistance and decreases distensibility of pulmonary resistive vessels.

    PubMed

    Wauters, Aurélien; Vicenzi, Marco; De Becker, Benjamin; Riga, Jean-Philippe; Esmaeilzadeh, Fatemeh; Faoro, Vitalie; Vachiéry, Jean-Luc; van de Borne, Philippe; Argacha, Jean-François

    2015-12-15

    Air pollution has recently been associated with the development of acute decompensated heart failure, but the underlying biological mechanisms remain unclear. A pulmonary vasoconstrictor effect of air pollution, combined with its systemic effects, may precipitate decompensated heart failure. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of acute exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) on pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) under resting and stress conditions but also to determine whether air pollution may potentiate acquired pulmonary hypertension. Eighteen healthy male volunteers were exposed to ambient air (AA) or dilute DE with a particulate matter of <2.5 μm concentration of 300 μg/m(3) for 2 h in a randomized, crossover study design. The effects of DE on PVR, on the coefficient of distensibilty of pulmonary vessels (α), and on right and left ventricular function were evaluated at rest (n = 18), during dobutamine stress echocardiography (n = 10), and during exercise stress echocardiography performed in hypoxia (n = 8). Serum endothelin-1 and fractional exhaled nitric oxide were also measured. At rest, exposure to DE did not affect PVR. During dobutamine stress, the slope of the mean pulmonary artery pressure-cardiac output relationship increased from 2.8 ± 0.5 mmHg · min · l (-1) in AA to 3.9 ± 0.5 mmHg · min · l (-1) in DE (P < 0.05) and the α coefficient decreased from 0.96 ± 0.15 to 0.64 ± 0.12%/mmHg (P < 0.01). DE did not further enhance the hypoxia-related upper shift of the mean pulmonary artery pressure-cardiac output relationship. Exposure to DE did not affect serum endothelin-1 concentration or fractional exhaled nitric oxide. In conclusion, acute exposure to DE increased pulmonary vasomotor tone by decreasing the distensibility of pulmonary resistive vessels at high cardiac output. PMID:26497960

  15. The thick left ventricular wall of the giraffe heart normalises wall tension, but limits stroke volume and cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Smerup, Morten; Damkjær, Mads; Brøndum, Emil; Baandrup, Ulrik T; Kristiansen, Steen Buus; Nygaard, Hans; Funder, Jonas; Aalkjær, Christian; Sauer, Cathrine; Buchanan, Rasmus; Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Østergaard, Kristine; Grøndahl, Carsten; Candy, Geoffrey; Hasenkam, J Michael; Secher, Niels H; Bie, Peter; Wang, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    Giraffes--the tallest extant animals on Earth--are renowned for their high central arterial blood pressure, which is necessary to secure brain perfusion. Arterial pressure may exceed 300 mmHg and has historically been attributed to an exceptionally large heart. Recently, this has been refuted by several studies demonstrating that the mass of giraffe heart is similar to that of other mammals when expressed relative to body mass. It thus remains unexplained how the normal-sized giraffe heart generates such massive arterial pressures. We hypothesized that giraffe hearts have a small intraventricular cavity and a relatively thick ventricular wall, allowing for generation of high arterial pressures at normal left ventricular wall tension. In nine anaesthetized giraffes (495±38 kg), we determined in vivo ventricular dimensions using echocardiography along with intraventricular and aortic pressures to calculate left ventricular wall stress. Cardiac output was also determined by inert gas rebreathing to provide an additional and independent estimate of stroke volume. Echocardiography and inert gas-rebreathing yielded similar cardiac outputs of 16.1±2.5 and 16.4±1.4 l min(-1), respectively. End-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were 521±61 ml and 228±42 ml, respectively, yielding an ejection fraction of 56±4% and a stroke volume of 0.59 ml kg(-1). Left ventricular circumferential wall stress was 7.83±1.76 kPa. We conclude that, relative to body mass, a small left ventricular cavity and a low stroke volume characterizes the giraffe heart. The adaptations result in typical mammalian left ventricular wall tensions, but produce a lowered cardiac output. PMID:26643090

  16. Relationship between impaired chronotropic response, cardiac output during exercise, and exercise tolerance in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Samejima, Hisanori; Omiya, Kazuto; Uno, Masato; Inoue, Kohji; Tamura, Masachika; Itoh, Kae; Suzuki, Kengo; Akashi, Yoshihiro; Seki, Atsushi; Suzuki, Noriyuki; Osada, Naohiko; Tanabe, Kazuhiko; Miyake, Fumihiko; Itoh, Haruki

    2003-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between the extent of impaired chronotropic response and cardiac output during exercise, and exercise tolerance in patients with chronic heart failure. The subjects consisted of 24 patients (mean 60.1 +/- 14.0 years) who had mild chronotropic incompetence. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing was performed in all patients, and heart rate (HR), anaerobic threshold (AT), maximum oxygen uptake (peak VO2), slope of the regression line relating the ventilatory equivalent to carbon dioxide output (VE/VCO2 slope), and exercise time were measured. Cardiac output (CO) was measured by a thoracic bioimpedance method and cardiac index (CI) was calculated. Plasma norepinephrine (NE) was measured at rest and immediately after the exercise test. The changes in HR, NE, and CI from the resting state to immediately after exercise were calculated as deltaHR, deltaNE, and deltaCI, respectively. The deltaNE was converted to a logarithmic scale and deltaHR/log deltaNE was used as a parameter of HR response to sympathetic nerve stimulation. The results were as follows: HR and NE in the resting state had no correlation with AT and with peak VO2. DeltaHR/log deltaNE correlated positively with both AT and peak VO2, and negatively with the VE/CO2 slope. DeltaHR/log deltaNE correlated positively with peak CI, %deltaCI, and deltaCI/exercise time. The data suggest that one of the mechanisms of low exercise tolerance in chronic heart failure patients was due to an inadequate increase in CO response against exercise caused by an impaired HR response to increased NE. PMID:12906033

  17. Numerical observer for cardiac motion assessment using machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Thibault; Kalayeh, Mahdi M.; Pretorius, P. H.; Wernick, Miles N.; Yang, Yongyi; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2011-03-01

    In medical imaging, image quality is commonly assessed by measuring the performance of a human observer performing a specific diagnostic task. However, in practice studies involving human observers are time consuming and difficult to implement. Therefore, numerical observers have been developed, aiming to predict human diagnostic performance to facilitate image quality assessment. In this paper, we present a numerical observer for assessment of cardiac motion in cardiac-gated SPECT images. Cardiac-gated SPECT is a nuclear medicine modality used routinely in the evaluation of coronary artery disease. Numerical observers have been developed for image quality assessment via analysis of detectability of myocardial perfusion defects (e.g., the channelized Hotelling observer), but no numerical observer for cardiac motion assessment has been reported. In this work, we present a method to design a numerical observer aiming to predict human performance in detection of cardiac motion defects. Cardiac motion is estimated from reconstructed gated images using a deformable mesh model. Motion features are then extracted from the estimated motion field and used to train a support vector machine regression model predicting human scores (human observers' confidence in the presence of the defect). Results show that the proposed method could accurately predict human detection performance and achieve good generalization properties when tested on data with different levels of post-reconstruction filtering.

  18. Clinical review: Guyton - the role of mean circulatory filling pressure and right atrial pressure in controlling cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Arthur Guyton's concepts of the determinative role of right heart filling in cardiac output continue to be controversial. This paper reviews his seminal experiments in detail and clarifies the often confusing concepts underpinning his model. One primary criticism of Guyton's model is that the parameters describing venous return had not been measured in a functioning cardiovascular system in humans. Thus, concerns have been expressed in regard to the ability of Guyton's simplistic model, with few parameters, to model the complex human circulation. Further concerns have been raised in regard to the artificial experimental preparations that Guyton used. Recently reported measurements in humans support Guyton's theoretical and animal work. PMID:21144008

  19. Alteration in systemic vascular resistance and cardiac output during acute cellular rejection and recovery in heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Garan, Arthur R; Uriel, Nir; Sayer, Gabriel; Sims, Daniel; Zahner, Doris; Farr, Maryjane; Mancini, Donna; Jorde, Ulrich P

    2010-03-01

    Coronary vascular reserve is impaired during acute cellular rejection of the orthotopically transplanted heart, but changes in the peripheral vasculature during rejection have not been well described. To investigate whether peripheral vascular compensatory mechanisms are preserved after orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT), we longitudinally observed systemic vascular resistance (SVR) and cardiac output (CO) during acute cellular rejection. CO decreased during high-grade acute cellular rejection, and maintenance of mean arterial pressure was achieved by increases in SVR, and these changes did not return to baseline until several months after histologic resolution of rejection. PMID:19875310

  20. Design and testing of an MRI-compatible cycle ergometer for non-invasive cardiac assessments during exercise

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool for cardiac research, and it is frequently used for resting cardiac assessments. However, research into non-pharmacological stress cardiac evaluation is limited. Methods We aimed to design a portable and relatively inexpensive MRI cycle ergometer capable of continuously measuring pedalling workload while patients exercise to maintain target heart rates. Results We constructed and tested an MRI-compatible cycle ergometer for a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Resting and sub-maximal exercise images (at 110 beats per minute) were successfully obtained in 8 healthy adults. Conclusions The MRI-compatible cycle ergometer constructed by our research group enabled cardiac assessments at fixed heart rates, while continuously recording power output by directly measuring pedal force and crank rotation. PMID:22423637

  1. Evaluating cardiac physiology through echocardiography in bottlenose dolphins: using stroke volume and cardiac output to estimate systolic left ventricular function during rest and following exercise.

    PubMed

    Miedler, Stefan; Fahlman, Andreas; Valls Torres, Mónica; Álvaro Álvarez, Teresa; Garcia-Parraga, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Heart-rate (fH) changes during diving and exercise are well documented for marine mammals, but changes in stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) are much less known. We hypothesized that both SV and CO are also modified following intense exercise. Using transthoracic ultrasound Doppler at the level of the aortic valve, we compared blood flow velocities in the left ventricle and cardiac frequencies during rest and at 1, 3 and 4 min after a bout of exercise in 13 adult bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus, six male and seven female, body mass range 143-212 kg). Aortic cross-sectional area and ventricle blood velocity at the aortic valve were used to calculate SV, which together with fH provided estimates of left CO at rest and following exercise. fH and SV stabilized approximately 4-7 s following the post-respiratory tachycardia, so only data after the fH had stabilized were used for analysis and comparison. There were significant increases in fH, SV and CO associated with each breath. At rest, fH, SV and CO were uncorrelated with body mass, and averaged 41±9 beats min(-1), 136±19 ml and 5514±1182 l min(-1), respectively. One minute following high intensity exercise, the cardiac variables had increased by 104±43%, 63±11% and 234±84%, respectively. All variables remained significantly elevated in all animals for at least 4 min after the exercise. These baseline values provide the first data on SV and CO in awake and unrestrained cetaceans in water. PMID:26385334

  2. Optimal dose of landiolol for preventing abrupt changes in both cardiac output and middle cerebral artery flow velocity after electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Kadoi, Yuji; Saito, Shigeru

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the dose-dependent effects of landiolol on systemic hemodynamics, cardiac output, and cerebral artery blood flow. Eight patients undergoing electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) received 1 of the 3 drugs/doses (saline, 0.125 mg/kg of landiolol, 0.25 mg/kg of landiolol), in turn, for 3 ECT sessions, immediately after the administration of succinylcholine. In the case of 0.25 mg/kg of landiolol, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and cardiac output remained unchanged throughout the study period.We believe that 0.25 mg/kg of landiolol may be suitable for preventing the increase in systemic hemodynamics, including cardiac output after ECT. PMID:24755725

  3. The effect of intravenous epoprostenol (prostacyclin, PGI2) on cerebral blood flow and cardiac output in man.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, P J; Maidment, C G; Dandona, P; Hutton, R A; James, I M

    1983-01-01

    Epoprostenol (prostacyclin, PGI2) was given intravenously to seven healthy volunteers in a dose of 4 ng kg-1 min-1 over a 30 min period. Diastolic blood pressure fell but there was no change in cardiac output. The mean PGI2 concentration at the end of the infusion was 0.43 ng/ml (1.1 nM) and a significant inhibition of ADP-induced platelet aggregation occurred. Although obvious facial flushing occurred in all subjects and some subjects complained of headache, cerebral blood flow tended to fall. The results do not support the hypothesis that PGI2 acts as a physiological vasodilator involved in the homeostasis of normal cerebral blood flow. PMID:6362696

  4. Clinical significance of a spiral phenomenon in the plot of CO₂ output versus O₂ uptake during exercise in cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Osamu; Koike, Akira; Himi, Tomoko; Sakurada, Koji; Kato, Yuko; Suzuki, Shinya; Sato, Akira; Yamashita, Takeshi; Wasserman, Karlman; Aonuma, Kazutaka

    2015-03-01

    A spiral phenomenon is sometimes noted in the plots of CO₂ output (VCO₂) against O₂ uptake (VO₂) measured during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) in patients with heart failure with oscillatory breathing. However, few data are available that elucidate the clinical significance of this phenomenon. Our group studied the prevalence of this phenomenon and its relation to cardiac and cardiopulmonary function. Of 2,263 cardiac patients who underwent CPX, 126 patients with a clear pattern of oscillatory breathing were identified. Cardiopulmonary indexes were compared between patients who showed the spiral phenomenon (n = 49) and those who did not (n = 77). The amplitudes of VO₂ and VCO₂ oscillations were greater and the phase difference between VO₂ and VCO₂ oscillations was longer in the patients with the spiral phenomenon than in those without it. Patients with the spiral phenomenon also had a lower left ventricular ejection fraction (43.4 ± 21.4% vs 57.1 ± 16.8%, p <0.001) and a higher level of brain natriuretic peptide (637.2 ± 698.3 vs 228.3 ± 351.4 pg/ml, p = 0.002). The peak VO₂ was lower (14.5 ± 5.6 vs 18.1 ± 6.3, p = 0.002), the slope of the increase in ventilation versus VCO₂ was higher (39.8 ± 9.5 vs 33.6 ± 6.8, p <0.001), and end-tidal PCO₂ both at rest and at peak exercise was lower in the patients with the spiral phenomenon than in those without it. In conclusion, the spiral phenomenon in the VCO₂-versus-VO₂ plot arising from the phase difference between VCO₂ and VO₂ oscillations reflects more advanced cardiopulmonary dysfunction in cardiac patients with oscillatory breathing. PMID:25591892

  5. Quality assessment of cardiac surgery in Britain.

    PubMed

    Treasure, T; Bridgewater, B; Gallivan, S

    2009-10-01

    Data are available for every Cardiac Surgery unit in Britain and in 70 % are identifiable by surgeon. The data are linked to registration of deaths so survival for a range of operations, and associated patient or procedure related factors, can be evaluated. The choice of statistical triggers (outside 99.99 % confidence intervals) and the time frames of reported data (averaged over three years) (See P.285/353 of the report http://www.scts.org/documents/PDF/5thBlueBook2003.pdf) reduces its value as an early warning system but the rigour of data collecting systems and the level of scrutiny required probably ensure that poor performance will be detected. PMID:19834854

  6. Computer-aided assessment of cardiac computed tomographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Martin; Giger, Maryellen; Suzuki, Kenji; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2007-03-01

    The accurate interpretation of cardiac CT images is commonly hindered by the presence of motion artifacts. Since motion artifacts commonly can obscure the presence of coronary lesions, physicians must spend much effort analyzing images at multiple cardiac phases in order to determine which coronary structures are assessable for potential lesions. In this study, an artificial neural network (ANN) classifier was designed to assign assessability indices to calcified plaques in individual region-of-interest (ROI) images reconstructed at multiple cardiac phases from two cardiac scans obtained at heart rates of 66 bpm and 90 bpm. Six individual features (volume, circularity, mean intensity, margin gradient, velocity, and acceleration) were used for analyzing images. Visually-assigned assessability indices were used as a continuous truth, and jack-knife analysis with four testing sets was used to evaluate the performance of the ANN classifier. In a study in which all six features were inputted into the ANN classifier, correlation coefficients of 0.962 +/- 0.006 and 0.935 +/- 0.023 between true and ANN-assigned assessability indices were obtained for databases corresponding to 66 bpm and 90 bpm, respectively.

  7. ECG patch monitors for assessment of cardiac rhythm abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Lobodzinski, S Suave

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of long-term monitoring is the improvement of diagnostic yield. Despite the clear utility of Holter monitoring in clinical cardiology, issues of relatively low diagnostic yield, cost and inconvenience have motivated the development of ultra-portable devices referred to as ECG patch monitors. Although the "gold standard" for assessing cardiac rhythm abnormalities remains a 12-lead Holter, there is an increasing interest in portable monitoring devices that provide the opportunity for evaluating cardiac rhythm in real-world environments such as the workplace or home. To facilitate patient acceptance these monitors underwent a radical miniaturization and redesign to include wireless communication, water proofing and a patch carrier for attaching devices directly to the skin. We review recent developments in the field of "patch" devices primarily designed for very long-term monitoring of cardiac arrhythmic events. As the body of supporting clinical validation data grows, these devices hold promise for a variety of cardiac monitoring applications. From a clinical and research standpoint, the capacity to obtain longitudinal cardiac activity data by patch devices may have significant implications for device selection, monitoring duration, and care pathways for arrhythmia evaluation and atrial fibrillation surveillance. From a research standpoint, the new devices may allow for the development of novel diagnostic algorithms with the goal of finding patterns and correlations with exercise and drug regimens. PMID:24215754

  8. Cardiac output by Doppler echocardiography in the premature baboon: Comparison with radiolabeled microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, J.P.; Morrow, W.R.; Gerstmann, D.R.; Taylor, A.F.; deLemos, R.A. )

    1991-04-01

    Pulsed-Doppler echocardiography (PDE) is a useful noninvasive method for determining left ventricular output (LVO). However, despite increasingly widespread use in neonatal intensive care units, validation studies in prematures with cardiopulmonary disease are lacking. The purpose of this study was to compare radiolabeled microsphere (RLM) and PDE measurements of LVO, using the critically ill premature baboon as a model of the human neonate. Twenty-two paired RLM and PDE measurements of LVO were obtained in 14 animals between 3 and 24 h of age. Average PDE LVO was 152 ml/min/kg (range, 40-258 ml/min/kg) compared to 158 ml/min/kg (range, 67-278 ml/min/kg) measured by RLM. Linear regression analysis of the paired measurements showed good correlation with a slope near unity (gamma = 0.94x + 4.20, r = 0.91, SEE = 25.7 ml). The authors conclude that PDE determinations of LVO compare well with those measured by RLM in the premature baboon. PDE appears to provide a valid estimate of LVO and should be useful in human prematures with cardiopulmonary distress.

  9. Pulsatile flow simulator for comparison of cardiac output measurements by electromagnetic flow meter and thermodilution.

    PubMed

    Jebson, P J; Karkow, W S

    1986-01-01

    This study examined a pulsatile flow simulator for the purpose of evaluating two measurement devices, an extracorporeal flow probe with an electromagnetic flow meter and several thermodilution catheters. We measured the performance of these devices in a range of low to high flows. Using either saline or blood as a perfusate, we obtained different results with these fluids (p less than 0.001). Each catheter behaved in a linear manner, although variation occurred among the catheters with both saline (minimum slope 1.090, maximum slope 1.190) and blood (minimum slope 1.107, maximum slope 1.154). An increase in rate and stroke volumes of the simulator did not demonstrate an identifiable trend in error. The thermodilution catheters were most accurate at 5.0 L/min irrespective of rate, stroke volume, or perfusate used. In contrast, the electromagnetic flow meter accurately represented flows across the wide range of outputs examined (2.4 to 10.7 L/min). (Slope with saline 1.091, slope with blood 1.080) Throughout the range of flow, the flow meter gave a calibration line 5% higher with blood than with saline. The results indicate that accurate measurement of pulsatile blood flow can be achieved in vitro with an electromagnetic flow meter using saline as a perfusate, provided a correction factor is determined and applied to convert values for saline to accurate values for blood. PMID:2940345

  10. Beat-by-beat analysis of cardiac output and blood pressure responses to short-term barostimulation in different body positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, Wulf; Schütze, Harald; Stegemann, J.

    Rapid quantification of the human baro-reflex control of heart rate has been achieved on a beat-by-beat basis using a neck-chamber with quick ECG-triggered pressure changes. Referring to recent findings on heart rate and stroke volume, the present study uses this technique to compare cardiac output as well as blood pressure changes in supine and upright position to investigate feedback effects and to confirm postural reflex modifications not revealed by RR-interval changes. A suction profile starting at +40 mmHg and running 7 steps of pressure decrease down to -65 mmHg was examined in 0° and 90° tilting position while beat-by-beat recordings were done of heart rate, stroke volume (impedance-cardiography) and blood pressure (Finapres tm) (n=16). The percentual heart rate decrease failed to be significantly different between positions. A suction-induced stroke volume increase led to a cardiac output almost maintained when supine and significantly increased when upright. A decrease in all blood pressure values was found during suction, except for systolic values in upright position which increased. Conclusively, (a) it is confirmed that different inotropy accounts for the seen gravitational effect on the cardiac output not represented by heart rate; (b) identical suction levels in different positions lead to different stimuli at the carotid receptor. This interference has to be considered in microgravity studies by beat-by-beat measurement of cardiac output and blood pressure.

  11. Role of cardiac output and the autonomic nervous system in the antinatriuretic response to acute constriction of the thoracic superior vena cava.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrier, R. W.; Humphreys, M. H.; Ufferman, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the differential characteristics of hepatic congestion and decreased cardiac output in terms of potential afferent stimuli in the antinatriuretic effect of acute thoracic inferior vena cava (TIVC) constriction. An attempt is made to see if the autonomic nervous system is involved in the antinatriuretic effect of acute TIVC or thoracic superior vena cava constriction.

  12. The relation between cardiac output kinetics and skeletal muscle oxygenation during moderate exercise in moderately impaired patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Spee, Ruud F; Niemeijer, Victor M; Schoots, Thijs; Wijn, Pieter F; Doevendans, Pieter A; Kemps, Hareld M

    2016-07-01

    Oxygen uptake (V̇o2) kinetics are prolonged in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). This may be caused by impaired oxygen delivery or skeletal muscle derangements. We investigated whether impaired cardiac output (Q̇) kinetics limit skeletal muscle oxygen delivery relative to the metabolic demands at submaximal exercise in CHF patients by evaluating the relation between Q̇ kinetics and skeletal muscle deoxygenation. Forty-three CHF patients, NYHA II-III, performed a constant-load exercise test at 80% of the ventilatory aerobic threshold (VAT) to assess V̇o2 kinetics (τV̇o2). Q̇ kinetics (τQ̇) were assessed by a radial artery pulse contour analysis method. Skeletal muscle deoxygenation was assessed by near infrared spectroscopy at the m. vastus lateralis, using the minimal value of the tissue saturation index during onset of exercise (TSImin). Patients were categorized in slow and normal Q̇ responders relative to metabolic demands (τQ̇/V̇o2 ≥1 and τQ̇/V̇o2 <1, respectively), τQ̇ (62 ± 29 s), and τV̇o2 (60 ± 21 s) were significantly related (r = 0.66, P = 0.001). There was a significant correlation between τQ̇ and TSImin in the slow Q̇ responders [rs= -0.57, P = 0.005, n = 22 (51%)]. In conclusion, in moderately impaired CHF patients with relatively slow Q̇ kinetics, central hemodynamics may limit skeletal muscle oxygenation during moderate-intensity exercise. PMID:27283909

  13. The effects on arterial haemoglobin oxygen saturation and on shunt of increasing cardiac output with dopamine or dobutamine during one-lung ventilation.

    PubMed

    Russell, W J; James, M F

    2004-10-01

    Theoretically, if the cardiac output were increased in the presence of a given intrapulmonary shunt, the arterial saturation should improve as the venous oxygen extraction per ml of blood decreases if the total oxygen consumption remains constant. Previous work demonstrated that this was not achieved with adrenaline or isoprenaline as increased shunting negated any benefit from improved cardiac output and mixed venous oxygen content. However pharmacological stimulation of cardiac output and venous oxygen without any increase in shunt should achieve the goal of improved arterial oxygenation. To test this hypothesis, seven pigs were subjected to one-lung ventilation and infused on separate occasions, with dopamine and with dobutamine in random order to increase the cardiac output. The mixed venous oxygen content, shunt fraction, oxygen consumption and arterial oxygen saturation were measured. With both dopamine and dobutamine there was a consistent rise in venous oxygen content. However, with dopamine, the mean shunt rose from 28% to 42% and with dobutamine, the mean shunt rose from 45% to 59% (both changes P<0.01). With dopamine, the mean arterial oxygen saturation fell by 4.7%, and with dobutamine by 2.9%, but neither fall was statistically significant. It is concluded that any benefit to arterial saturation which might occur from a dopamine- or dobutamine-induced increase in mixed venous oxygen content during one-lung ventilation is offset by increased shunting. During one-lung anaesthesia, there would appear to be no benefit to arterial saturation in increasing cardiac output with an infusion of either dopamine or dobutamine. PMID:15535486

  14. Respirometric Oxidative Phosphorylation Assessment in Saponin-permeabilized Cardiac Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Hughey, Curtis C.; Hittel, Dustin S.; Johnsen, Virginia L.; Shearer, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Investigation of mitochondrial function represents an important parameter of cardiac physiology as mitochondria are involved in energy metabolism, oxidative stress, apoptosis, aging, mitochondrial encephalomyopathies and drug toxicity. Given this, technologies to measure cardiac mitochondrial function are in demand. One technique that employs an integrative approach to measure mitochondrial function is respirometric oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) analysis. The principle of respirometric OXPHOS assessment is centered around measuring oxygen concentration utilizing a Clark electrode. As the permeabilized fiber bundle consumes oxygen, oxygen concentration in the closed chamber declines. Using selected substrate-inhibitor-uncoupler titration protocols, electrons are provided to specific sites of the electron transport chain, allowing evaluation of mitochondrial function. Prior to respirometric analysis of mitochondrial function, mechanical and chemical preparatory techniques are utilized to permeabilize the sarcolemma of muscle fibers. Chemical permeabilization employs saponin to selectively perforate the cell membrane while maintaining cellular architecture. This paper thoroughly describes the steps involved in preparing saponin-skinned cardiac fibers for oxygen consumption measurements to evaluate mitochondrial OXPHOS. Additionally, troubleshooting advice as well as specific substrates, inhibitors and uncouplers that may be used to determine mitochondria function at specific sites of the electron transport chain are provided. Importantly, the described protocol may be easily applied to cardiac and skeletal tissue of various animal models and human samples. PMID:21403632

  15. Assessment of pulmonary function tests in cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    El-Sobkey, Salwa B; Gomaa, Magdi

    2011-04-01

    This study was aimed to assess the pulmonary function tests (PFTs) in cardiac patients; with ischemic or rheumatic heart diseases as well as in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) or valvular procedures. For the forty eligible participants, the pulmonary function was measured using the spirometry test before and after the cardiac surgery. Data collection sheet was used for the patient's demographic and intra-operative information. Cardiac diseases and surgeries had restrictive negative impact on PFTs. Before surgery, vital capacity (VC), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), ratio between FEV1 and FVC, and maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV) recorded lower values for rheumatic patients than ischemic patients (P values were 0.01, 0.005, 0.0001, 0.031, and 0.035, respectively). Moreover, patients who underwent valvular surgery had lower PFTs than patients who underwent CABG with significant differences for VC, FVC, FEV1, and MVV tests (P values were 0.043, 0.011, 0.040, and 0.020, respectively). No definite causative factor appeared to be responsible for those results although mechanical deficiency and incisional chest pain caused by cardiac surgery are doubtful. More comprehensive investigation is required to resolve the case. PMID:23960642

  16. Diesel Exhaust Inhalation Increases Cardiac Output, Bradyarrhythmias, and Parasympathetic Tone in Aged Heart Failure-Prone Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute air pollutant inhalation is linked to adverse cardiac events and death, and hospitalizations for heart failure. Diesel exhaust (DE) is a major air pollutant suspected to exacerbate preexisting cardiac conditions, in part, through autonomic and electrophysiologic disturbance...

  17. Comparison of cardiac output of the left and right side of the heart by ultrafast computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfkiel, C.J.; Ferguson, J.L.; Law, W.R.; Chomka, E.V.; Brundage, B.H.

    1986-03-05

    Ultrafast computed tomography (CT) evaluation of cardiac output (CO) can be determined using indicator dilution theory. The concentration of an iodinated contrast agent injected into a vein of a subject can be measured as a function of time by serial EKG, gated CT imaging. The contrast density of the blood pool measured by CT defines the indicator concentration. CT CO is proportional to the area under a time density curve from a region of the blood pool. Proper subject position and scanning timing allows CT to measure CO in the pulmonary (PA) artery and the aorta (AO) with the same contrast bolus. Three anesthetized dogs were multiply scanned following simultaneous injections of contrast and radioactive tracer microspheres. Microsphere CO was determined by reference withdrawal method. Multiple thermodilution CO measurements were made just prior and after each CT CO procedure. 24 comparisons were made of thermodilution, microsphere and CT CO measured in the PA (right sided CO (RSCO)) and the AO (left sided CO (LSCO)). CT CO was calculated as the ratio of the volume of contrast injected to the time density curve area corrected for the relation of contrast density to CT number. RSCO agreed very closely to LSCO (r = .99, p < .001; y = 1.0x +/- .32). RSCO correlated to thermodilution (r = .96, p < .001; y = 1.2x +/- 1.3) and microsphere CO (r = .93, p < .001; y = .69x +/- 1.3). These data show that CT CO measurements can be made in the PA and AO with equal accuracy.

  18. Downscaling climate model output for water resources impacts assessment (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, E. P.; Pierce, D. W.; Cayan, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Water agencies in the U.S. and around the globe are beginning to wrap climate change projections into their planning procedures, recognizing that ongoing human-induced changes to hydrology can affect water management in significant ways. Future hydrology changes are derived using global climate model (GCM) projections, though their output is at a spatial scale that is too coarse to meet the needs of those concerned with local and regional impacts. Those investigating local impacts have employed a range of techniques for downscaling, the process of translating GCM output to a more locally-relevant spatial scale. Recent projects have produced libraries of publicly-available downscaled climate projections, enabling managers, researchers and others to focus on impacts studies, drawing from a shared pool of fine-scale climate data. Besides the obvious advantage to data users, who no longer need to develop expertise in downscaling prior to examining impacts, the use of the downscaled data by hundreds of people has allowed a crowdsourcing approach to examining the data. The wide variety of applications employed by different users has revealed characteristics not discovered during the initial data set production. This has led to a deeper look at the downscaling methods, including the assumptions and effect of bias correction of GCM output. Here new findings are presented related to the assumption of stationarity in the relationships between large- and fine-scale climate, as well as the impact of quantile mapping bias correction on precipitation trends. The validity of these assumptions can influence the interpretations of impacts studies using data derived using these standard statistical methods and help point the way to improved methods.

  19. Scintigraphic assessment of regional cardiac adrenergic innervation

    SciTech Connect

    Dae, M.W.; O'Connell, J.W.; Botvinick, E.H.; Ahearn, T.; Yee, E.; Huberty, J.P.; Mori, H.; Chin, M.C.; Hattner, R.S.; Herre, J.M.

    1989-03-01

    To assess the feasibility of noninvasively imaging the regional distribution of myocardial sympathetic innervation, we evaluated the distribution of sympathetic nerve endings, using 123I metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), and compared this with the distribution of myocardial perfusion, using 201Tl. Twenty dogs were studied: 11 after regional denervation, and nine as controls. Regional denervation was done by left stellate ganglion removal, right stellate ganglion removal, and application of phenol to the epicardial surface. Computer-processed functional maps displayed the relative distribution of MIBG and thallium in multiple projections in vivo and excised heart slices in all animals. In six animals, dual isotope emission computed tomograms were acquired in vivo. Tissue samples taken from innervated and denervated regions of the MIBG images were analyzed for norepinephrine content to validate image findings. Normal controls showed homogeneous and parallel distributions of MIBG and thallium in the major left ventricular mass. In the left stellectomized hearts, MIBG was reduced relative to thallium in the posterior left ventricle; whereas in right stellectomized hearts, reduced MIBG was in the anterior left ventricle. Phenol-painted hearts showed a broad area of decreased MIBG extending beyond the area of phenol application. In both stellectomized and phenol-painted hearts, thallium distribution remained homogeneous and normal. Norepinephrine content was greater in regions showing normal MIBG (550 +/- 223 ng/g) compared with regions showing reduced MIBG (39 +/- 44 ng/g) (p less than 0.001), confirming regional denervation. Combined MIBG-thallium functional maps display the regional distribution of sympathetic innervation.

  20. Accelerated MRI for the assessment of cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Axel, Leon; Otazo, Ricardo

    2016-07-01

    Heart disease is a worldwide public health problem; assessment of cardiac function is an important part of the diagnosis and management of heart disease. MRI of the heart can provide clinically useful information on cardiac function, although it is still not routinely used in clinical practice, in part because of limited imaging speed. New accelerated methods for performing cardiovascular MRI (CMR) have the potential to provide both increased imaging speed and robustness to CMR, as well as access to increased functional information. In this review, we will briefly discuss the main methods currently employed to accelerate CMR methods, such as parallel imaging, k-t undersampling and compressed sensing, as well as new approaches that extend the idea of compressed sensing and exploit sparsity to provide richer information of potential use in clinical practice. PMID:27033471

  1. Use of a capillary input function with cardiac output for the estimation of lesion pharmacokinetic parameters: preliminary results on a breast cancer patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Giovanni, P.; Ahearn, T. S.; Semple, S. I.; Azlan, C. A.; Lloyd, W. K. C.; Gilbert, F. J.; Redpath, T. W.

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this work was to propose and demonstrate a novel technique for the assessment of tumour pharmacokinetic parameters together with a regionally estimated vascular input function. A breast cancer patient T2*-weighted dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) dataset acquired at high temporal resolution during the first-pass bolus perfusion was used for testing the technique. Extraction of the lesion volume transfer constant Ktrans together with the intravascular plasma volume fraction vp was achieved by optimizing a capillary input function with a measure of cardiac output using the principle of intravascular indicator dilution theory. For a region of interest drawn within the breast lesion a vp of 0.16 and a Ktrans of 0.70 min-1 were estimated. Despite the value of vp being higher than expected, estimated Ktrans was in accordance with the literature values. In conclusion, the technique proposed here, has the main advantage of allowing the estimation of breast tumour pharmacokinetic parameters from first-pass perfusion T2*-weighted DCE-MRI data without the need of measuring an arterial input function. The technique may also have applicability to T1-weighted DCE-MRI data.

  2. The effects of cardiac output and pulmonary arterial hypertension on volumetric capnography derived-variables during normoxia and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Mosing, Martina; Kutter, Annette P N; Iff, Samuel; Raszplewicz, Joanna; Mauch, Jacqueline; Bohm, Stephan H; Tusman, Gerardo

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effect of cardiac output (CO) and pulmonary artery hypertension (PHT) on volumetric capnography (VCap) derived-variables. Nine pigs were mechanically ventilated using fixed ventilatory settings. Two steps of PHT were induced by IV infusion of a thromboxane analogue: PHT25 [mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP) of 25 mmHg] and PHT40 (MPAP of 40 mmHg). CO was increased by 50% from baseline (COup) with an infusion of dobutamine≥5 μg kg(-1) min(-1) and decreased by 40% from baseline (COdown) infusing sodium nitroglycerine≥30 μg kg(-1) min(-1) plus esmolol 500 μg kg(-1) min(-1). Another state of PHT and COdown was induced by severe hypoxemia (FiO2 0.07). Invasive hemodynamic data and VCap were recorded and compared before and after each step using a mixed random effects model. Compared to baseline, the normalized slope of phase III (SnIII) increased by 32% in PHT25 and by 22% in PHT40. SnIII decreased non-significantly by 4% with COdown. A combination of PHT and COdown associated with severe hypoxemia increased SnIII by 28% compared to baseline. The elimination of CO2 per breath decreased by 7% in PHT40 and by 12% in COdown but increased only slightly with COup. Dead space variables did not change significantly along the protocol. At constant ventilation and body metabolism, pulmonary artery hypertension and decreases in CO had the biggest effects on the SnIII of the volumetric capnogram and on the elimination of CO2. PMID:24908108

  3. The effect of changes in cardiac output on middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity at rest and during exercise

    PubMed Central

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Brothers, R Matthew; Barnes, Quinton; Eubank, Wendy L; Hawkins, Megan N; Purkayastha, Sushmita; O-Yurvati, Albert; Raven, Peter B

    2005-01-01

    We examined the relationship between changes in cardiac output and middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA Vmean) in seven healthy volunteer men at rest and during 50% maximal oxygen uptake steady-state submaximal cycling exercise. Reductions in were accomplished using lower body negative pressure (LBNP), while increases in were accomplished using infusions of 25% human serum albumin. Heart rate (HR), arterial blood pressure and MCA Vmean were continuously recorded. At each stage of LBNP and albumin infusion was measured using an acetylene rebreathing technique. Arterial blood samples were analysed for partial pressure of carbon dioxide tension (Pa,CO2. During exercise HR and were increased above rest (P < 0.001), while neither MCA Vmean nor Pa,CO2 was altered (P > 0.05). The MCA Vmean and were linearly related at rest (P < 0.001) and during exercise (P = 0.035). The slope of the regression relationship between MCA Vmean and at rest was greater (P = 0.035) than during exercise. In addition, the phase and gain between MCA Vmean and mean arterial pressure in the low frequency range were not altered from rest to exercise indicating that the cerebral autoregulation was maintained. These data suggest that the associated with the changes in central blood volume influence the MCA Vmean at rest and during exercise and its regulation is independent of cerebral autoregulation. It appears that the exercise induced sympathoexcitation and the change in the distribution of between the cerebral and the systemic circulation modifies the relationship between MCA Vmean and . PMID:16210355

  4. CARDIO--a Lotus 1-2-3 based computer program for rapid calculation of cardiac output from dye or thermal dilution curves.

    PubMed

    Brill, R W; Bushnell, P G

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a menu-driven computer program (CARDIO), based on a Lotus 1-2-3 template and a series of macrocommands, that rapidly and semiautomatically calculates cardiac output from dye or thermal dilution curves. CARDIO works with any dye or thermal dilution recorder with an analog output, any analog to digital (A-to-D) conversion system, and any computer capable of running Lotus 1-2-3 version 2. No prior experience with Lotus 1-2-3 is needed to operate CARDIO, but experienced users can take full advantage of Lotus 1-2-3's graphics, data manipulation, and data retrieval capabilities. PMID:2689079

  5. Cardiac status assessment with a multi-signal device for improved home-based congestive heart failure management.

    PubMed

    Muehlsteff, Jens; Carvalho, Paulo; Henriques, Jorge; Paiva, Rui P; Reiter, Harald

    2011-01-01

    State-of-the-Art disease management for Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) patients is still based on easy-to-acquire measures such as heart rate (HR), weight and blood pressure (BP). However, these measures respond late to changes of the patient health status and provide limited information to personalize and adapt medication therapy. This paper describes our concept called "Cardiac Status Assessment" we have been investigating within the European project "HeartCycle" towards next-generation home-based disease management of CHF. In our concept we analyze non-invasive surrogate measures of the cardio-vascular function in particular systolic time intervals and pulse wave characteristics to estimate Cardiac Output (CO) and Systemic Vascular Resistance (SVR) both are established clinical measures. We discuss the underlying concept, a developed measurement system and first results. PMID:22254450

  6. The effects on increasing cardiac output with adrenaline or isoprenaline on arterial haemoglobin oxygen saturation and shunt during one-lung ventilation.

    PubMed

    Russell, W J; James, M F

    2000-12-01

    Theoretically, if the cardiac output were increased in the presence of a given intrapulmonary shunt, the arterial haemoglobin oxygen saturation (SaO2) should improve as the venous oxygen extraction per ml of blood decreases. To test this hypothesis, eight pigs were subjected to one-lung ventilation and adrenaline and isoprenaline infusions used to increase the cardiac output. The mixed venous oxygen, shunt fraction and oxygen consumption were measured. With both adrenaline and isoprenaline, although there was a small rise in mixed venous oxygen content, there was a fall in SaO2. With adrenaline, the mean shunt rose from 48% to 65%, the mean oxygen consumption rose from 126 ml/min to 134 ml/min and the mean SaO2 fell from 86.9% to 82.5%. With isoprenaline, the mean shunt rose from 45% to 59%, the mean oxygen consumption rose from 121 ml/min to 137 ml/min and the mean SaO2 fell from 89.5% to 84.7%. It is concluded that potential improvement in SaO2, which might occur from a catecholamine-induced increase in mixed venous oxygen content during one-lung ventilation, is more than offset by increased shunting and oxygen consumption which reduce SaO2. PMID:11153288

  7. Economic Input-Output Life Cycle Assessment of Water Reuse Strategies in Residential Buildings

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper evaluates the environmental sustainability and economic feasibility of four water reuse designs through economic input-output life cycle assessments (EIO-LCA) and benefit/cost analyses. The water reuse designs include: 1. Simple Greywater Reuse System for Landscape Ir...

  8. 78 FR 36787 - Rechanneling the Current Cardiac Risk Paradigm: Arrhythmia Risk Assessment During Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Rechanneling the Current Cardiac Risk Paradigm: Arrhythmia... the Current Cardiac Risk Paradigm: Arrhythmia Risk Assessment During Drug Development Without the... the current guidelines, and the importance of a uniform assay schema. Date and Time: The...

  9. Comparison of general circulation model outputs and ensemble assessment of climate change using a Bayesian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yongtai

    2014-11-01

    A number of general circulation models (GCMs) have been developed to project future global climate change. Unfortunately, projected results are different and it is not known which set of GCM outputs are more creditable than the others. The objective of this work is to present a Bayesian approach to compare GCM outputs and make an ensemble assessment of climate change. This method is applied to Cannonsville Reservoir watershed, New York, USA. The GCM outputs under the 20C3M scenario for a historical time period of 1981-2000 are used to calculate posterior probabilities, and the outputs under the scenarios (A1B, A2 and B1) for the future time period of 2084-2100 are then processed using the Bayesian modeling averaging (BMA) which is a statistical procedure that infers a consensus prediction by weighing individual predictions based on the posterior probabilities, with the better performing predictions receiving higher weights. The obtained results reveal that the posterior probabilities are slightly different for four variables including average, maximum and minimum temperatures, and shortwave radiation, implying that the GCM outputs are qualitatively different for these four variables, but the distributions of posterior probabilities are flat for precipitation and wind speed, suggesting that the GCM outputs are qualitatively similar for these two variables. The results also show that no one set of GCM data are the best for all six meteorological variables. Furthermore, the results indicate that the projected changes are for regional warming, but the changes in precipitation, wind speed, and shortwave radiation depend on the emission scenarios and seasons. The application of the method demonstrates that the Bayesian approach is useful for the comparison of GCM outputs and making ensemble assessments of climate change.

  10. Cancer treatment-related cardiac toxicity: prevention, assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Fanous, Ibrahim; Dillon, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Cancer therapies, especially anthracyclines and monoclonal antibodies, have been linked with increased rates of cardiotoxicity. The development of some cardiac side effects happens over several months, and changes in ejection fraction can be detected long before permanent damage or disability occurs. Advanced heart failure could be averted with better and earlier detection. Methodologies for early detection of cardiac changes include stress echocardiograms, cardiac velocity measurements, radionuclide imaging, cardiac MRI and several potential biomarkers. Many agents have been described for prophylaxis of cardiac events precipitated by cancer therapy. Prophylactic use of beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors may be considered for use with trastuzumab in breast cancer as tolerated. Recovery of cardiac function is possible early after the injury from a cancer therapy. Late complications for coronary artery disease, hypertension and arrhythmia are underappreciated. Treatments for severe cancer therapy-related cardiac complications follow the existing paradigms for congestive heart failure and coronary artery disease, although outcomes for cancer patients differ from outcomes for non-cancer patients. PMID:27372782

  11. [Cardiovascular assessment and management before non-cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Stefanie; Bernheim, Alain M

    2015-05-01

    The preoperative cardiovascular risk management accounts for patient-related risk factors, the circumstances leading to the surgical procedure, and the risk of the operation. While urgent operations should not be delayed for cardiac testing, an elective surgical intervention should be postponed in unstable cardiac conditions. In stable cardiac situations, prophylactic coronary interventions to reduce the risk of perioperative complications are rarely indicated. Therefore, in most cases, the planned operation can be performed without previous cardiac stress testing or coronary angiography. Preoperative imaging stress testing is recommended for patients with poor functional capacities that are at high cardiovascular risk prior to a high-risk operation. According to the literature, preoperative prophylactic administration of betablockers and aspirin is controversial. Preoperative discontinuation of dual anti-platelet therapy within six months following drug-eluting stent implantation is not recommended. PMID:26098052

  12. Imminent cardiac risk assessment via optical intravascular biochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, David L; Wetzel, Louis H; Wetzel, Mark D; Lodder, Robert A

    2009-06-01

    Heart disease is by far the biggest killer in the United States, and type II diabetes, which affects 8% of the U.S. population, is on the rise. In many cases, the acute coronary syndrome and/or sudden cardiac death occurs without warning. Atherosclerosis has known behavioral, genetic and dietary risk factors. However, our laboratory studies with animal models and human post-mortem tissue using FT-IR microspectroscopy reveal the chemical microstructure within arteries and in the arterial walls themselves. These include spectra obtained from the aortas of ApoE-/- knockout mice on sucrose and normal diets showing lipid deposition in the former case. Also pre-aneurysm chemical images of knockout mouse aorta walls, and spectra of plaque excised from a living human patient are shown for comparison. In keeping with the theme of the SPEC 2008 conference 'Spectroscopic Diagnosis of Disease...' this paper describes the background and potential value of a new catheter-based system to provide in vivo biochemical analysis of plaque in human coronary arteries. We report the following: (1) results of FT-IR microspectroscopy on animal models of vascular disease to illustrate the localized chemical distinctions between pathological and normal tissue, (2) current diagnostic techniques used for risk assessment of patients with potential unstable coronary syndromes, and (3) the advantages and limitations of each of these techniques illustrated with patent care histories, related in the first person, by the physician coauthors. Note that the physician comments clarify the contribution of each diagnostic technique to imminent cardiac risk assessment in a clinical setting, leading to the appreciation of what localized intravascular chemical analysis can contribute as an add-on diagnostic tool. The quality of medical imaging has improved dramatically since the turn of the century. Among clinical non-invasive diagnostic tools, laboratory tests of body fluids, EKG, and physical examination

  13. Imminent Cardiac Risk Assessment via Optical Intravascular Biochemical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, D.; Wetzel, L; Wetzel, M; Lodder, R

    2009-01-01

    Heart disease is by far the biggest killer in the United States, and type II diabetes, which affects 8% of the U.S. population, is on the rise. In many cases, the acute coronary syndrome and/or sudden cardiac death occurs without warning. Atherosclerosis has known behavioral, genetic and dietary risk factors. However, our laboratory studies with animal models and human post-mortem tissue using FT-IR microspectroscopy reveal the chemical microstructure within arteries and in the arterial walls themselves. These include spectra obtained from the aortas of ApoE-/- knockout mice on sucrose and normal diets showing lipid deposition in the former case. Also pre-aneurysm chemical images of knockout mouse aorta walls, and spectra of plaque excised from a living human patient are shown for comparison. In keeping with the theme of the SPEC 2008 conference Spectroscopic Diagnosis of Disease this paper describes the background and potential value of a new catheter-based system to provide in vivo biochemical analysis of plaque in human coronary arteries. We report the following: (1) results of FT-IR microspectroscopy on animal models of vascular disease to illustrate the localized chemical distinctions between pathological and normal tissue, (2) current diagnostic techniques used for risk assessment of patients with potential unstable coronary syndromes, and (3) the advantages and limitations of each of these techniques illustrated with patent care histories, related in the first person, by the physician coauthors. Note that the physician comments clarify the contribution of each diagnostic technique to imminent cardiac risk assessment in a clinical setting, leading to the appreciation of what localized intravascular chemical analysis can contribute as an add-on diagnostic tool. The quality of medical imaging has improved dramatically since the turn of the century. Among clinical non-invasive diagnostic tools, laboratory tests of body fluids, EKG, and physical examination are

  14. Continuous cardiac output and left atrial pressure monitoring by long time interval analysis of the pulmonary artery pressure waveform: proof of concept in dogs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Da; Olivier, N Bari; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2009-02-01

    We developed a technique to continuously (i.e., automatically) monitor cardiac output (CO) and left atrial pressure (LAP) by mathematical analysis of the pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) waveform. The technique is unique to the few previous related techniques in that it jointly estimates the two hemodynamic variables and analyzes the PAP waveform over time scales greater than a cardiac cycle wherein wave reflections and inertial effects cease to be major factors. First, a 6-min PAP waveform segment is analyzed so as to determine the pure exponential decay and equilibrium pressure that would eventually result if cardiac activity suddenly ceased (i.e., after the confounding wave reflections and inertial effects vanish). Then, the time constant of this exponential decay is computed and assumed to be proportional to the average pulmonary arterial resistance according to a Windkessel model, while the equilibrium pressure is regarded as average LAP. Finally, average proportional CO is determined similar to invoking Ohm's law and readily calibrated with one thermodilution measurement. To evaluate the technique, we performed experiments in five dogs in which the PAP waveform and accurate, but highly invasive, aortic flow probe CO and LAP catheter measurements were simultaneously recorded during common hemodynamic interventions. Our results showed overall calibrated CO and absolute LAP root-mean-squared errors of 15.2% and 1.7 mmHg, respectively. For comparison, the root-mean-squared error of classic end-diastolic PAP estimates of LAP was 4.7 mmHg. On future successful human testing, the technique may potentially be employed for continuous hemodynamic monitoring in critically ill patients with pulmonary artery catheters. PMID:19057003

  15. The ability of stroke volume variation measured by a noninvasive cardiac output monitor to predict fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated children.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yeon; Kim, Ji Young; Choi, Chang Hyu; Kim, Hong Soon; Lee, Kyung Cheon; Kwak, Hyun Jeong

    2014-02-01

    Continuous noninvasive cardiac output monitoring (NICOM) is a clinically useful tool in the pediatric setting. This study compared the ability of stroke volume variation (SVV) measured by NICOM with that of respiratory variations in the velocity of aortic blood flow (△Vpeak) and central venous pressure (CVP) to predict of fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated children after ventricular septal defect repair. The study investigated 26 mechanically ventilated children after the completion of surgery. At 30 min after their arrival in an intensive care unit, a colloid solution of 10 ml/kg was administrated for volume expansion. Hemodynamic variables, including CVP, stroke volume, and △Vpeak in addition to cardiac output and SVV in NICOM were measured before and 10 min after volume expansion. The patients with a stroke volume increase of more than 15 % after volume expansion were defined as responders. The 26 patients in the study consisted of 13 responders and 13 nonresponders. Before volume expansion, △Vpeak and SVV were higher in the responders (both p values <0.001). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves of △Vpeak, SVV, and CVP were respectively 0.956 (95 % CI 0.885-1.00), 0.888 (95 % CI 0.764-1.00), and 0.331 (95 % CI 0.123-0.540). This study showed that SVV by NICOM and △Vpeak by echocardiography, but not CVP, reliably predicted fluid responsiveness during mechanical ventilation after ventricular septal defect repair in children. PMID:23963186

  16. [Radionuclide assessment of cardiac involvement in patients with sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Hiroe, M; Nagata, M; Sekiguchi, M; Ohta, Y; Kusakabe, K; Shigeta, A; Horie, T; Fujita, N; Hasumi, M; Toyosaki, T

    1990-01-01

    This study was aimed to determine whether nuclear methods were useful for examining cardiac pathology and for making a decision of corticosteroid therapy in patients with sarcoidosis. Thirty six patients were divided into two groups; GpA consisted of 19 patients with cardiac sarcoidosis and abnormal ECG findings, and GpB of 17 patients with sarcoidosis without ECG abnormalities. Cardiac uptake of 67Ga-citrate in 2 and 99mTc-PYP in one of GpA was observed and steroid therapy resulted in the disappearance of the uptake. 201Tl-CL cardiac tomograms disclosed perfusion defects in 10 of 14 patients (71%) in GpA, including defects with redistribution in 8 of the 10 pts, but only one case in GpB. Radionuclide ventriculography using 99mTc-RBC revealed abnormal response of left ventricular (LV) function to exercise and LV dysfunction in GpA. These data suggest that nuclear study is a useful tool for diagnosing cardiac sarcoidosis, evaluating therapeutic effectiveness and long-term follow-up in patients with sarcoidosis. PMID:2162435

  17. Using climate model output to assess the impacts of climate change on water resources

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    The use of general circulation models (GCMs) to provide climate data for regional assessments of the impacts of changing climate on water resources stretches the limits of what the models were designed for. Problems that must be addressed include disagreement on a regional scale among GCMs and between the modeled and observed climate; coarse spatial resolution of the models; and simplistic representation of surface hydrology. It is important that continued progress be made in developing the methodology for using GCM output in climate-impact assessments. 18 refs.

  18. A model-free method for mass spectrometer response correction. [for oxygen consumption and cardiac output calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shykoff, Barbara E.; Swanson, Harvey T.

    1987-01-01

    A new method for correction of mass spectrometer output signals is described. Response-time distortion is reduced independently of any model of mass spectrometer behavior. The delay of the system is found first from the cross-correlation function of a step change and its response. A two-sided time-domain digital correction filter (deconvolution filter) is generated next from the same step response data using a regression procedure. Other data are corrected using the filter and delay. The mean squared error between a step response and a step is reduced considerably more after the use of a deconvolution filter than after the application of a second-order model correction. O2 consumption and CO2 production values calculated from data corrupted by a simulated dynamic process return to near the uncorrupted values after correction. Although a clean step response or the ensemble average of several responses contaminated with noise is needed for the generation of the filter, random noise of magnitude not above 0.5 percent added to the response to be corrected does not impair the correction severely.

  19. The feasibility and applications of non-invasive cardiac output monitoring, thromboelastography and transit-time flow measurement in living-related renal transplantation surgery: results of a prospective pilot observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Delayed graft function (DGF) remains a significant and detrimental postoperative phenomenon following living-related renal allograft transplantation, with a published incidence of up to 15%. Early therapeutic vasodilatory interventions have been shown to improve DGF, and modifications to immunosuppressive regimens may subsequently lessen its impact. This pilot study assesses the potential applicability of perioperative non-invasive cardiac output monitoring (NICOM), transit-time flow monitoring (TTFM) of the transplant renal artery and pre-/perioperative thromboelastography (TEG) in the early prediction of DGF and perioperative complications. Methods Ten consecutive living-related renal allograft recipients were studied. Non-invasive cardiac output monitoring commenced immediately following induction of anaesthesia and was maintained throughout the perioperative period. Doppler-based TTFM was performed during natural haemostatic pauses in the transplant surgery: immediately following graft reperfusion and following ureteric implantation. Central venous blood sampling for TEG was performed following induction of anaesthesia and during abdominal closure. Results A single incidence of DGF was seen within the studied cohort and one intra-operative (thrombotic) complication noted. NICOM confirmed a predictable trend of increased cardiac index (CI) following allograft reperfusion (mean CI - clamped: 3.17 ± 0.29 L/min/m2, post-reperfusion: 3.50 ± 0.35 L/min/m2; P < 0.05) mediated by a significant reduction in total peripheral resistance. Reduced TTFM at the point of allograft reperfusion (227 ml/min c.f. mean; 411 ml/min (95% CI: 358 to 465)) was identified in a subject who experienced intra-operative transplant renal artery thrombosis. TEG data exhibited significant reductions in clot lysis (LY30 (%): pre-op: 1.0 (0.29 to 1.71), post reperfusion 0.33 (0.15 to 0.80); P = 0.02) and a trend towards increased clot initiation following

  20. The electrocardiogram in the assessment of the effect of drugs on cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed Central

    Reid, D S

    1978-01-01

    The search for the ideal antiarrhythmic drug continues since none of the available agents offers optimum antiarrhythmic therapy. The continuing search coupled with the interest in the mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias has led to the development of new techniques for the study of arrhythmias and antiarrhythmic drugs. In this article it is proposed to discuss the electrocardiographic methods used in the assessment of antiarrhythmic drugs. Firstly, to discuss the electrocardiogram in the assessment of the clinical electrophysiological properties of a drug and secondly, the electrocardiogram in the assessment of the value of the drug in the management of cardiac arrhythmias in man. PMID:365208

  1. Echocardiographic abnormalities in the assessment of cardiac organ damage in never-treated hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Milan, Alberto; Avenatti, Eleonora; Puglisi, Elisabetta; Abram, Sara; Magnino, Corrado; Naso, Diego; Tosello, Francesco; Fabbri, Ambra; Vairo, Alessandro; Mulatero, Paolo; Rabbia, Franco; Veglio, Franco

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension-related cardiac organ damage, other than left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (LVH), has been described: in particular, concentric remodeling, LV diastolic dysfunction (DD), and left atrial (LA) enlargement are significantly associated with cardiovascular morbility and mortality in different populations. This study evaluated the prevalence of these latter morphofunctional abnormalities, in never-treated essential hypertensive patients and the role of such a serial assessment of hypertensive cardiac damage in improving cardiovascular risk stratification in these patients. A total of 100 never-treated essential hypertensive subjects underwent a complete clinical and echocardiographic evaluation. Left ventricular morphology, systolic and diastolic function, and LA dimension (linear and volume) were evaluated by echocardiography. Left ventricular hypertrophy was present in 14% of the patients, whereas concentric remodeling was present in 25% of the subjects. Among patients free from LV morphology abnormalities, the most frequent abnormality was LA enlargement (global prevalence 57%); the percentage of patients with at least one parameter consistent with DD was 22% in the entire population, but DD was present as the only cardiac abnormality in 1% of our patient. Left atrial volume indexed for body surface area was the most sensitive parameter in identifying hypertension-related cardiac modification. The global prevalence of cardiac alteration reached 73% in never-treated hypertensive patients. Left ventricular remodeling and LA enlargement evaluation may grant a better assessment of cardiac organ damage and cardiovascular risk stratification of hypertensive patients without evidence of LVH after routine examination. PMID:22738434

  2. The new criterion for cardiac resynchronization therapy treatment assessed by two channels impedance cardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peczalski, K.; Palko, T.; Wojciechowski, D.; Dunajski, Z.; Kowalewski, M.

    2013-04-01

    The cardiac resynchronization therapy is an effective treatment for systolic failure patients. Independent electrical stimulation of left and right ventricle corrects mechanical ventricular dyssynchrony. About 30-40% treated patients do not respond to therapy. In order to improve clinical outcome authors propose the two channels impedance cardiography for assessment of ventricular dyssynchrony. The proposed method is intended for validation of patients diagnosis and optimization of pacemaker settings for cardiac resynchronization therapy. The preliminary study has showed that bichannel impedance cardiography is a promising tool for assessment of ventricular dyssynchrony.

  3. Short-Term Effects of Transjugular Intrahepatic Shunt on Cardiac Function Assessed by Cardiac MRI: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kovacs, A.; Schepke, M.; Heller, J.; Schild, H. H.; Flacke, S.

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess short-term effects of transjugular intrahepatic shunt (TIPS) on cardiac function with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with liver cirrhosis. Eleven patients (six males and five females) with intractable esophageal varices or refractory ascites were imaged with MRI at 1.5 T prior to, within 24 h after, and 4-6 months after TIPS creation (n = 5). Invasive pressures were registered during TIPS creation. MRI consisted of a stack of contiguous slices as well as phase contrast images at all four valve planes and perpendicular to the portal vein. Imaging data were analyzed through time-volume curves and first derivatives. The portoatrial pressure gradient decreased from 19.8 {+-} 2.3 to 6.6 {+-} 2.3, accompanied by a nearly two fold increase in central pressures and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure immediately after TIPS creation. Left and right end diastolic volumes and stroke volumes increased by 11, 13, and 24%, respectively (p < 0.001), but dropped back to baseline at follow-up. End systolic volumes remained unchanged. E/A ratios remained within normal range. During follow-up the left ventricular mass was larger than baseline values in all patients, with an average increase of 7.9 g (p < 0.001). In conclusion, the increased volume load shunted to the heart after TIPS creation transiently exceeded the preload reserve of the right and left ventricle, leading to significantly increased pulmonary wedge pressures and persistent enlargement of the left and right atria. Normalization of cardiac dimensions was observed after months together with mild left ventricular hypertrophy.

  4. Risk assessment methods for cardiac surgery and intervention.

    PubMed

    Thalji, Nassir M; Suri, Rakesh M; Greason, Kevin L; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2014-12-01

    Surgical risk models estimate operative outcomes while controlling for heterogeneity in 'case mix' within and between institutions. In cardiac surgery, risk models are used for patient counselling, surgical decision-making, clinical research, quality assurance and improvement, and financial reimbursement. Importantly, risk models are only as good as the databases from which they are derived; physicians and investigators should, therefore, be aware of shortcomings of clinical and administrative databases used for modelling risk estimates. The most frequently modelled outcome in cardiac surgery is 30-day mortality. However, results of randomized trials to compare conventional surgery versus transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) indicate attrition of surgical patients at 2-4 months postoperatively, suggesting that 3-month survival or mortality might be an appropriate procedural end point worth modelling. Risk models are increasingly used to identify patients who might be better-suited for TAVI. However, the appropriateness of available statistical models in this application is controversial, particularly given the tendency of risk models to misestimate operative mortality in high-risk patient subsets. Incorporation of new risk factors (such as previous mediastinal radiation, liver failure, and frailty) in future surgical or interventional risk-prediction tools might enhance model performance, and thereby optimize patient selection for TAVI. PMID:25245832

  5. The left ventricle as a mechanical engine: from Leonardo da Vinci to the echocardiographic assessment of peak power output-to-left ventricular mass.

    PubMed

    Dini, Frank L; Guarini, Giacinta; Ballo, Piercarlo; Carluccio, Erberto; Maiello, Maria; Capozza, Paola; Innelli, Pasquale; Rosa, Gian M; Palmiero, Pasquale; Galderisi, Maurizio; Razzolini, Renato; Nodari, Savina

    2013-03-01

    The interpretation of the heart as a mechanical engine dates back to the teachings of Leonardo da Vinci, who was the first to apply the laws of mechanics to the function of the heart. Similar to any mechanical engine, whose performance is proportional to the power generated with respect to weight, the left ventricle can be viewed as a power generator whose performance can be related to left ventricular mass. Stress echocardiography may provide valuable information on the relationship between cardiac performance and recruited left ventricular mass that may be used in distinguishing between adaptive and maladaptive left ventricular remodeling. Peak power output-to-mass, obtained during exercise or pharmacological stress echocardiography, is a measure that reflects the number of watts that are developed by 100 g of left ventricular mass under maximal stimulation. Power output-to-mass may be calculated as left ventricular power output per 100 g of left ventricular mass: 100× left ventricular power output divided by left ventricular mass (W/100 g). A simplified formula to calculate power output-to-mass is as follows: 0.222 × cardiac output (l/min) × mean blood pressure (mmHg)/left ventricular mass (g). When the integrity of myocardial structure is compromised, a mismatch becomes apparent between maximal cardiac power output and left ventricular mass; when this occurs, a reduction of the peak power output-to-mass index is observed. PMID:21934524

  6. Environmental impact assessment including indirect effects--a case study using input-output analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lenzen, Manfred; Murray, Shauna A.; Korte, Britta; Dey, Christopher J

    2003-05-01

    Environmental impact assessment (EIA) is a process covered by several international standards, dictating that as many environmental aspects as possible should be identified in a project appraisal. While the ISO 14011 standard stipulates a broad-ranging study, off-site, indirect impacts are not specifically required for an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The reasons for this may relate to the perceived difficulty of measuring off-site impacts, or the assumption that these are a relatively insignificant component of the total impact. In this work, we describe a method that uses input-output analysis to calculate the indirect effects of a development proposal in terms of several indicator variables. The results of our case study of a Second Sydney Airport show that the total impacts are considerably higher than the on-site impacts for the indicators land disturbance, greenhouse gas emissions, water use, emissions of NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2}, and employment. We conclude that employing input-output analysis enhances conventional EIA, as it allows for national and international effects to be taken into account in the decision-making process.

  7. Heart mass and the maximum cardiac output of birds and mammals: implications for estimating the maximum aerobic power input of flying animals

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, C. M.

    1997-01-01

    Empirical studies of cardiovascular variables suggest that relative heart muscle mass (relative Mh) is a good indicator of the degree of adaptive specialization for prolonged locomotor activities, for both birds and mammals. Reasonable predictions for the maximum oxygen consumption of birds during flight can be obtained by assuming that avian heart muscle has the same maximum physiological and biomechanical performance as that of terrestrial mammals. Thus, data on Mh can be used to provide quantitative estimates for the maximum aerobic power input (aerobic Pi,max) available to animals during intense levels of locomotor activity. The maximum cardiac output of birds and mammals is calculated to scale with respect to Mh (g) as 213 Mh0.88+-0.04 (ml min-1), while aerobic Pi,max is estimated to scale approximately as 11 Mh0.88+-0.09 (W). In general, estimated inter-species aerobic Pi,max, based on Mh for all bird species (excluding hummingbirds), is calculated to scale with respect to body mass (Mb in kg) as 81 Mb0.82+-0.11 (W). Comparison of family means for Mh indicate that there is considerable diversity in aerobic capacity among birds and mammals, for example, among the medium to large species of birds the Tinamidae have the smallest relative Mh (0.25 per cent) while the Otidae have unusually large relative Mh (1.6 per cent). Hummingbirds have extremely large relative Mh (2.28 per cent), but exhibit significant sexual dimorphism in their scaling of Mh and flight muscle mass, so that when considering hummingbird flight performance it may be useful to control for sexual differences in morphology. The estimated scaling of aerobic Pi,max (based on Mh and Mb in g) for male and female hummingbirds is 0.51 Mb0.83 +/-0.07 and 0.44 Mb0.85+- 0.11 (W), respectively. Locomotory muscles are dynamic structures and it might be anticipated that where additional energetic 'costs' occur seasonally (e.g. due to migratory fattening or the development of large secondary sexual

  8. Increased cardiac output, not pulmonary artery systolic pressure, increases intrapulmonary shunt in healthy humans breathing room air and 40% O2

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Jonathan E; Duke, Joseph W; Hawn, Jerold A; Halliwill, John R; Lovering, Andrew T

    2014-01-01

    Blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses (IPAVAs) has been demonstrated to increase in healthy humans during a variety of conditions; however, whether or not this blood flow represents a source of venous admixture (/) that impairs pulmonary gas exchange efficiency (i.e. increases the alveolar-to-arterial difference (A–aDO2)) remains controversial and unknown. We hypothesized that blood flow through IPAVAs does provide a source of /. To test this, blood flow through IPAVAs was increased in healthy humans at rest breathing room air and 40% O2: (1) during intravenous adrenaline (epinephrine) infusion at 320 ng kg−1 min−1 (320 ADR), and (2) with vagal blockade (2 mg atropine), before and during intravenous adrenaline infusion at 80 ng kg−1 min−1 (ATR + 80 ADR). When breathing room air the A–aDO2 increased by 6 ± 2 mmHg during 320 ADR and by 5 ± 2 mmHg during ATR + 80 ADR, and the change in calculated / was +2% in both conditions. When breathing 40% O2, which minimizes contributions from diffusion limitation and alveolar ventilation-to-perfusion inequality, the A–aDO2 increased by 12 ± 7 mmHg during 320 ADR, and by 9 ± 6 mmHg during ATR + 80 ADR, and the change in calculated / was +2% in both conditions. During 320 ADR cardiac output () and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) were significantly increased; however, during ATR + 80 ADR only was significantly increased, yet blood flow through IPAVAs as detected with saline contrast echocardiography was not different between conditions. Accordingly, we suggest that blood flow through IPAVAs provides a source of intrapulmonary shunt, and is mediated primarily by increases in rather than PASP. PMID:25085889

  9. Nexfin Noninvasive Continuous Hemodynamic Monitoring: Validation against Continuous Pulse Contour and Intermittent Transpulmonary Thermodilution Derived Cardiac Output in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Van De Vijver, Katrijn; De laet, Inneke; Schoonheydt, Karen; Dits, Hilde; Bein, Berthold; Malbrain, Manu L. N. G.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Nexfin (Bmeye, Amsterdam, Netherlands) is a noninvasive cardiac output (CO) monitor based on finger arterial pulse contour analysis. The aim of this study was to validate Nexfin CO (NexCO) against thermodilution (TDCO) and pulse contour CO (CCO) by PiCCO (Pulsion Medical Systems, Munich, Germany). Patients and Methods. In a mix of critically ill patients (n = 45), NexCO and CCO were measured continuously and recorded at 2-hour intervals during the 8-hour study period. TDCO was measured at 0–4–8 hrs. Results. NexCO showed a moderate to good (significant) correlation with TDCO (R2 0.68, P < 0.001) and CCO (R2 0.71, P < 0.001). Bland and Altman analysis comparing NexCO with TDCO revealed a bias (± limits of agreement, LA) of 0.4 ± 2.32 L/min (with 36% error) while analysis comparing NexCO with CCO showed a bias (±LA) of 0.2 ± 2.32 L/min (37% error). NexCO is able to follow changes in TDCO and CCO during the same time interval (level of concordance 89.3% and 81%). Finally, polar plot analysis showed that trending capabilities were acceptable when changes in NexCO (ΔNexCO) were compared to ΔTDCO and ΔCCO (resp., 89% and 88.9% of changes were within the level of 10% limits of agreement). Conclusion. we found a moderate to good correlation between CO measurements obtained with Nexfin and PiCCO. PMID:24319373

  10. Assessment of cardiac function in mice lacking the mitochondrial calcium uniporter.

    PubMed

    Holmström, Kira M; Pan, Xin; Liu, Julia C; Menazza, Sara; Liu, Jie; Nguyen, Tiffany T; Pan, Haihui; Parks, Randi J; Anderson, Stasia; Noguchi, Audrey; Springer, Danielle; Murphy, Elizabeth; Finkel, Toren

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondrial calcium is thought to play an important role in the regulation of cardiac bioenergetics and function. The entry of calcium into the mitochondrial matrix requires that the divalent cation pass through the inner mitochondrial membrane via a specialized pore known as the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU). Here, we use mice deficient of MCU expression to rigorously assess the role of mitochondrial calcium in cardiac function. Mitochondria isolated from MCU(-/-) mice have reduced matrix calcium levels, impaired calcium uptake and a defect in calcium-stimulated respiration. Nonetheless, we find that the absence of MCU expression does not affect basal cardiac function at either 12 or 20months of age. Moreover, the physiological response of MCU(-/-) mice to isoproterenol challenge or transverse aortic constriction appears similar to control mice. Thus, while mitochondria derived from MCU(-/-) mice have markedly impaired mitochondrial calcium handling, the hearts of these animals surprisingly appear to function relatively normally under basal conditions and during stress. PMID:26057074

  11. Heart rate complexity: A novel approach to assessing cardiac stress reactivity.

    PubMed

    Brindle, Ryan C; Ginty, Annie T; Phillips, Anna C; Fisher, James P; McIntyre, David; Carroll, Douglas

    2016-04-01

    Correlation dimension (D2), a measure of heart rate (HR) complexity, has been shown to decrease in response to acute mental stress and relate to adverse cardiovascular health. However, the relationship between stress-induced changes in D2 and HR has yet to be established. The present studies aimed to assess this relationship systematically while controlling for changes in respiration and autonomic activity. In Study 1 (N = 25) D2 decreased during stress and predicted HR reactivity even after adjusting for changes in respiration rate, and cardiac vagal tone. This result was replicated in Study 2 (N = 162) and extended by including a measure of cardiac sympathetic activity; correlation dimension remained an independent predictor of HR reactivity in a hierarchical linear model containing measures of cardiac parasympathetic and sympathetic activity and their interaction. These results suggest that correlation dimension may provide additional information regarding cardiac stress reactivity above that provided by traditional measures of cardiac autonomic function. PMID:26585809

  12. Life Cycle Assessment of Mixed Municipal Solid Waste: Multi-input versus multi-output perspective.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, G; Ripa, M; Protano, G; Hornsby, C; Ulgiati, S

    2015-12-01

    This paper analyses four strategies for managing the Mixed Municipal Solid Waste (MMSW) in terms of their environmental impacts and potential advantages by means of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology. To this aim, both a multi-input and a multi-output approach are applied to evaluate the effect of these perspectives on selected impact categories. The analyzed management options include direct landfilling with energy recovery (S-1), Mechanical-Biological Treatment (MBT) followed by Waste-to-Energy (WtE) conversion (S-2), a combination of an innovative MBT/MARSS (Material Advanced Recovery Sustainable Systems) process and landfill disposal (S-3), and finally a combination of the MBT/MARSS process with WtE conversion (S-4). The MARSS technology, developed within an European LIFE PLUS framework and currently implemented at pilot plant scale, is an innovative MBT plant having the main goal to yield a Renewable Refined Biomass Fuel (RRBF) to be used for combined heat and power production (CHP) under the regulations enforced for biomass-based plants instead of Waste-to-Energy systems, for increased environmental performance. The four scenarios are characterized by different resource investment for plant and infrastructure construction and different quantities of matter, heat and electricity recovery and recycling. Results, calculated per unit mass of waste treated and per unit exergy delivered, under both multi-input and multi-output LCA perspectives, point out improved performance for scenarios characterized by increased matter and energy recovery. Although none of the investigated scenarios is capable to provide the best performance in all the analyzed impact categories, the scenario S-4 shows the best LCA results in the human toxicity and freshwater eutrophication categories, i.e. the ones with highest impacts in all waste management processes. PMID:26257056

  13. Cardiac Imaging In Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Asaad A.; Safi, Lucy; Wood, Malissa

    2016-01-01

    Athletic heart syndrome refers to the physiological and morphological changes that occur in a human heart after repetitive strenuous physical exercise. Examples of exercise-induced changes in the heart include increases in heart cavity dimensions, augmentation of cardiac output, and increases in heart muscle mass. These cardiac adaptations vary based on the type of exercise performed and are often referred to as sport-specific cardiac remodeling. The hemodynamic effects of endurance and strength training exercise lead to these adaptations. Any abnormalities in chamber dilatation and left ventricular function usually normalize with cessation of exercise. Athletic heart syndrome is rare and should be differentiated from pathologic conditions such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia when assessing a patient for athletic heart syndrome. This paper describes specific adaptations that occur in athletic heart syndrome and tools to distinguish between healthy alterations versus underlying pathology. PMID:27486490

  14. Bayesian Spatial-temporal Model for Cardiac Congenital Anomalies and Ambient Air Pollution Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Joshua; Fuentes, Montserrat; Herring, Amy; Langlois, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a Bayesian spatial-temporal hierarchical multivariate probit regression model that identifies weeks during the first trimester of pregnancy which are impactful in terms of cardiac congenital anomaly development. The model is able to consider multiple pollutants and a multivariate cardiac anomaly grouping outcome jointly while allowing the critical windows to vary in a continuous manner across time and space. We utilize a dataset of numerical chemical model output which contains information regarding multiple species of PM2.5. Our introduction of an innovative spatial-temporal semiparametric prior distribution for the pollution risk effects allows for greater flexibility to identify critical weeks during pregnancy which are missed when more standard models are applied. The multivariate kernel stick-breaking prior is extended to include space and time simultaneously in both the locations and the masses in order to accommodate complex data settings. Simulation study results suggest that our prior distribution has the flexibility to outperform competitor models in a number of data settings. When applied to the geo-coded Texas birth data, weeks 3, 7 and 8 of the pregnancy are identified as being impactful in terms of cardiac defect development for multiple pollutants across the spatial domain. PMID:23482298

  15. Effects of active chronic cocaine use on cardiac sympathetic neuronal function assessed by carbon-11-hydroxyephedrine

    SciTech Connect

    Melon, P.G.; Boyd, C.J.; McVey, S. |

    1997-03-01

    Cardiac toxicity of cocaine has been linked to its inhibitory effect on norepinephrine reuptake by sympathetic nerve terminals of the heart. Carbon-11-hydroxyephedrine is a positron-emitting tracer that has been validated as a highly specific marker for norepinephrine transporter activity of the sympathetic nerve terminals and thus makes possible in vivo assessment of the effect of cocaine on norepinephrine reuptake and storage in the cardiac sympathetic nerve terminals. The aim of the study was to use the catecholamine analog {sup 11}C-hydroxyephedrine with PET to determine whether active chronic use of cocaine in women modifies the function of sympathetic nerve terminals of the heart. Six normal female volunteers and nine female active chronic cocaine users were studied. Cardiac regional {sup 11}C-hydroxyephedrine uptake and blood flow, as assessed with {sup 13}N-ammonia, were determined using semi-quantitative polar map analysis of myocardial tracer distribution. Carbon-11-hydroxyephedrine cardiac retention was quantified using dynamic data acquisition and kinetic analysis of blood and tissue activity. 27 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Assessment and Utility of Frailty Measures in Critical Illness, Cardiology, and Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Rajabali, Naheed; Rolfson, Darryl; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2016-09-01

    Frailty is a clearly emerging theme in acute care medicine, with obvious prognostic and health resource implications. "Frailty" is a term used to describe a multidimensional syndrome of loss of homeostatic reserves that gives rise to a vulnerability to adverse outcomes after relatively minor stressor events. This is conceptually simple, yet there has been little consensus on the operational definition. The gold standard method to diagnose frailty remains a comprehensive geriatric assessment; however, a variety of validated physical performance measures, judgement-based tools, and multidimensional scales are being applied in critical care, cardiology, and cardiac surgery settings, including open cardiac surgery and transcatheter aortic value replacement. Frailty is common among patients admitted to the intensive care unit and correlates with an increased risk for adverse events, increased resource use, and less favourable patient-centred outcomes. Analogous findings have been described across selected acute cardiology and cardiac surgical settings, in particular those that commonly intersect with critical care services. The optimal methods for screening and diagnosing frailty across these settings remains an active area of investigation. Routine assessment for frailty conceivably has numerous purported benefits for patients, families, health care providers, and health administrators through better informed decision-making regarding treatments or goals of care, prognosis for survival, expectations for recovery, risk of complications, and expected resource use. In this review, we discuss the measurement of frailty and its utility in patients with critical illness and in cardiology and cardiac surgery settings. PMID:27476983

  17. The Use of Standard Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Ultrasound to Assess Cardiac Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Sentissi, Kinza; Sawhney, Mandeep S; Pleskow, Douglas; Sepe, Paul; Mella, Jose M; Kwittken, Benjamin; Ketwaroo, Gyanprakash; Subramaniam, Balachundhar

    2016-09-01

    In this prospective observational study, conducted at an academic medical center, we evaluated the feasibility of performing a basic transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) examination using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) technology to determine what cardiac structures could be assessed. This may be potentially beneficial during hemodynamic emergencies in the endoscopy suite resulting from hypovolemia, depressed ventricular function, aortic dissection, pericardial effusions, or aortic stenosis. Of the 20 patients enrolled, 18 underwent EUS with a linear echoendoscope for standard clinical indications followed by a cardiac assessment performed under the guidance of a TEE-certified cardiac anesthesiologist. Eight of the 20 standard views of cardiovascular structures per the 1999 American Society of Echocardiography/Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists guidelines for TEE could be obtained using the linear echoendoscope. The following cardiac valvular structures were visualized: aortic valve (100%), mitral valve (100%), tricuspid valve (33%), and pulmonic valve (11%). Left ventricular and right ventricular systolic function could be assessed in 89% and 67% of patients, respectively. Other structures such as the ascending and descending aorta, pericardium, left atrial appendage, and interatrial septum were identified in 100% of patients. Doppler-dependent functions could not be assessed. Given that the EUS images were not directly compared with TEE in these patients, we cannot comment definitively on the quality of these assessments and further studies would need to be performed to make a formal comparison. Based on this study, EUS technology can consistently assess the mitral valve, aortic valve, aorta, pericardium, and left ventricular function. Given its limitations, EUS technology, although not a substitute for formal echocardiography, could be a helpful early diagnostic tool in an emergency setting. PMID:27541718

  18. Computerized assessment of coronary calcified plaques in CT images of a dynamic cardiac phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, Zachary B.; King, Martin; Giger, Maryellen L.; Vannier, Michael; Bardo, Dianna M. E.; Suzuki, Kenji; Lan, Li

    2008-03-01

    Motion artifacts in cardiac CT are an obstacle to obtaining diagnostically usable images. Although phase-specific reconstruction can produce images with improved assessability (image quality), this requires that the radiologist spend time and effort evaluating multiple image sets from reconstructions at different phases. In this study, ordinal logistic regression (OLR) and artificial neural network (ANN) models were used to automatically assign assessability to images of coronary calcified plaques obtained using a physical, dynamic cardiac phantom. 350 plaque images of 7 plaques from five data sets (heart rates 60, 60, 70, 80, 90) and ten phases of reconstruction were obtained using standard cardiac CT scanning parameters on a Phillips Brilliance 64-channel clinical CT scanner. Six features of the plaques (velocity, acceleration, edge-based volume, threshold-based volume, sphericity, and standard deviation of intensity) as well as mean feature values and heart rate were used for training the OLR and ANN in a round-robin re-sampling scheme based on training and testing groups with independent plaques. For each image, an ordinal assessability index rating on a 1-5 scale was assigned by a cardiac radiologist (D.B.) for use as a "truth" in training the OLR and ANN. The mean difference between the assessability index truth and model-predicted assessability index values was +0.111 with SD=0.942 for the OLR and +0.143 with SD=0.916 for the ANN. Comparing images from the repeat 60 bpm scans gave concordance correlation coefficients (CCCs) of 0.794 [0.743, 0.837] (value, 95% CI) for the radiologist assigned values, 0.894 [0.856, 0.922] for the OLR, and 0.861 [0.818, 0.895] for the ANN. Thus, the variability of the OLR and ANN assessability index values appear to lie within the variability of the radiologist assigned values.

  19. Cardiac Mr For The Assessment Of Myocardial Viability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Han W.; Kim, Raymond J.

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on delayed contrast enhanced MRI (DE-MRI) to assess myocardial viability. We start by discussing previous literature that evaluated the potential importance of myocardial viability testing and follow up with the more recent Surgical Treatment for Heart Disease Trial (STICH) trial results. We then provide an overview of the basic concepts and technical aspects of the current DE-MRI technique and review the initial studies demonstrating that DE-MRI before coronary revascularization can predict functional improvement. Finally, we use DE-MRI as a paradigm to discuss physiological insights into viability assessment and examine common assumptions in the metrics used to evaluate viability techniques. PMID:24066200

  20. Integrating input output analysis with risk assessment to evaluate the population risk of arsenic.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hwong-Wen; Shih, Hsiu-Ching; Hung, Ming-Lung; Chao, Chia-Wei; Li, Pei-Chiun

    2012-01-17

    Multimedia and site-specific risk assessments (RA) of major sources releasing arsenic (As) were converted into sector-based risk coefficients, which were integrated with the Input Output Table (IO) to analyze the association between sector activities and health risks. The developed IO-RA framework is a valuable tool for unfolding the risk chain linking the receptors, exposure pathways, emission sources, and production and consumption activities associated with various industrial sectors. The enlarged decision space along the chain can then be considered in planning risk management strategies. This case study estimates that air emissions of As result in 1.54 carcinogenic cases. Export is the primary driving force and accounts for approximately 48% of the final demand that leads to population risks of As. The ranking of the contribution of the five sectors in terms of total population risks is as follows: electricity supply (1.06E+00), steelmaking (2.2 × 10(-1)), cement kilns (1.50 × 10(-1)), semiconductor manufacturing (6.34 × 10(-2)) and incinerators (4.31 × 10(-2)). The electricity supply, steelmaking industry, and cement kilns are the major sectors, not only because their emissions directly cause risk but also because they have a stronger influence on the risk generated by other sectors. PMID:22192073

  1. Assessing and Improving Land Surface Model Outputs Over Africa Using GRACE, Field, and Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mohamed; Sultan, Mohamed; Yan, Eugene; Wahr, John

    2016-05-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), along with other relevant field and remote sensing datasets, was used to assess the performance of two land surface models (LSMs: CLM4.5-SP and GLDAS-Noah) over the African continent and improve the outputs of the CLM4.5-SP model. Spatial and temporal analysis of monthly (January 2003-December 2010) Terrestrial Water Storage (TWS) estimates extracted from GRACE (TWSGRACE), CLM4.5-SP (TWSCLM4.5), and GLDAS-Noah (TWSGLDAS) indicates the following: (1) compared to GRACE, LSMs overestimate TWS in winter months and underestimate them in summer months; (2) the amplitude of annual cycle (AAC) of TWSGRACE is higher than that of TWSLSM (AAC: TWSGRACE > TWSGLDAS > TWSCLM4.5); (3) higher, and statistically significant correlations were observed between TWSGRACE and TWSGLDAS compared to those between TWSGRACE and TWSCLM4.5; (4) differences in forcing precipitation and temperature datasets for GLDAS-Noah and CLM4.5-SP models are unlikely to be the main cause for the observed discrepancies between TWSGRACE and TWSLSM; and (5) the CLM4.5-SP model overestimates evapotranspiration (ET) values in summer months and underestimates them in winter months compared to ET estimates extracted from field-based (FLUXNET-MTE) and satellite-based (MOD16 and GLEAM) ET measurements. A first-order correction was developed and applied to correct the CLM4.5-derived ET, soil moisture, groundwater, and TWS. The corrections improved the correspondence (i.e., higher correlation and comparable AAC) between TWSCLM4.5 and TWSGRACE over various climatic settings. Our findings suggest that similar straightforward correction approaches could potentially be developed and used to assess and improve the performance of a wide range of LSMs.

  2. Enhanced DEA model with undesirable output and interval data for rice growing farmers performance assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Sahubar Ali Mohd. Nadhar; Ramli, Razamin; Baten, M. D. Azizul

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural production process typically produces two types of outputs which are economic desirable as well as environmentally undesirable outputs (such as greenhouse gas emission, nitrate leaching, effects to human and organisms and water pollution). In efficiency analysis, this undesirable outputs cannot be ignored and need to be included in order to obtain the actual estimation of firms efficiency. Additionally, climatic factors as well as data uncertainty can significantly affect the efficiency analysis. There are a number of approaches that has been proposed in DEA literature to account for undesirable outputs. Many researchers has pointed that directional distance function (DDF) approach is the best as it allows for simultaneous increase in desirable outputs and reduction of undesirable outputs. Additionally, it has been found that interval data approach is the most suitable to account for data uncertainty as it is much simpler to model and need less information regarding its distribution and membership function. In this paper, an enhanced DEA model based on DDF approach that considers undesirable outputs as well as climatic factors and interval data is proposed. This model will be used to determine the efficiency of rice farmers who produces undesirable outputs and operates under uncertainty. It is hoped that the proposed model will provide a better estimate of rice farmers' efficiency.

  3. Enhanced DEA model with undesirable output and interval data for rice growing farmers performance assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Sahubar Ali Mohd. Nadhar Ramli, Razamin Baten, M. D. Azizul

    2015-12-11

    Agricultural production process typically produces two types of outputs which are economic desirable as well as environmentally undesirable outputs (such as greenhouse gas emission, nitrate leaching, effects to human and organisms and water pollution). In efficiency analysis, this undesirable outputs cannot be ignored and need to be included in order to obtain the actual estimation of firms efficiency. Additionally, climatic factors as well as data uncertainty can significantly affect the efficiency analysis. There are a number of approaches that has been proposed in DEA literature to account for undesirable outputs. Many researchers has pointed that directional distance function (DDF) approach is the best as it allows for simultaneous increase in desirable outputs and reduction of undesirable outputs. Additionally, it has been found that interval data approach is the most suitable to account for data uncertainty as it is much simpler to model and need less information regarding its distribution and membership function. In this paper, an enhanced DEA model based on DDF approach that considers undesirable outputs as well as climatic factors and interval data is proposed. This model will be used to determine the efficiency of rice farmers who produces undesirable outputs and operates under uncertainty. It is hoped that the proposed model will provide a better estimate of rice farmers’ efficiency.

  4. Productivity in Academia: An Assessment of Causal Linkages between Output and Outcome Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wamala, Robert; Ssembatya, Vincent A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate causal linkages between output and outcome indicators of productivity in academia. Design/methodology/approach: The duration of teaching service and the number of graduate students supervised to completion were adopted as output indicators of productivity. Equivalent outcome indicators were the…

  5. Factors for successful weaning from a percutaneous cardiopulmonary support system (PCPS) in patients with low cardiac output syndrome after cardiovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Kiyohiro; Kunimoto, Fumio; Takahashi, Toru; Mohara, Jun; Takeyoshi, Izumi; Hinohara, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Yoshiro; Tajima, Yukio; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2007-11-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the early predictive factors for successful weaning from a percutaneous cardiopulmonary support system (PCPS) in patients with low cardiac output syndrome after cardiovascular surgery. A total of 938 patients underwent cardiovascular surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) from January 1991 to September 2006 at Gunma University Hospital. Of these 938 patients, 13 (1.4%) required PCPS to maintain hemodynamics within 48 hours after surgery. The mean age of the 13 patients was 66 years (range, 45 to 86 years). Nine patients underwent open-heart surgery, 3 repair of a thoracic aortic aneurysm, and 1 a pericardiectomy. The patients were divided into 2 groups; group A (n = 4) who were removed from PCPS and group B (n = 9) who were not removed from PCPS. The conditions during the operation and after PCPS support were compared between the 2 groups. The mean age was higher, and operation time, CPB time, and aortic cross-clamping time were significantly (P < 0.05) longer in patients with PCPS than in those without PCPS. The mean PCPS time in all 13 patients was 190 +/- 122 hours. The mean age was higher, and CPB time and the aortic cross-clamping time were longer in group B than in group A (NS). The mean duration of PCPS support was significantly (P < 0.05) shorter in group A than in group B (117 +/- 42 hours versus 235 +/- 136 hours). PCPS flow in group A could be reduced from 48 hours after PCPS induction. However, PCPC flow in group B could not be reduced, and there were significant (P < 0.05) differences in PCPS flow at 72 and 96 hours after starting PCPS. Significant (P < 0.05) differences in the absolute values of the APACHE II score, serum lactate levels, administered epinephrine dose, and levels of total bilirubin (T-Bil), serum creatinine (sCr), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were found between the 2 groups within 96 hours after PCPS induction. In addition, there were significant (P < 0.05) differences in the rate of

  6. Noninvasive Physiologic Assessment of Coronary Stenoses Using Cardiac CT

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhanming

    2015-01-01

    Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) has become an important noninvasive imaging modality in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). CCTA enables accurate evaluation of coronary artery stenosis. However, CCTA provides limited information on the physiological significance of stenotic lesions. A noninvasive “one-stop-shop” diagnostic test that can provide both anatomical significance and functional significance of stenotic lesions would be beneficial in the diagnosis and management of CAD. Recently, with the introduction of novel techniques, such as myocardial CT perfusion, CT-derived fractional flow reserve (FFRCT), and transluminal attenuation gradient (TAG), CCTA has emerged as a noninvasive method for the assessment of both anatomy of coronary lesions and its physiological consequences during a single study. This review provides an overview of the current status of new CT techniques for the physiologic assessments of CAD. PMID:25685790

  7. Assessing the blalock-hanlon atrioseptectomy at cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Clark, E B; Rosenquist, G C

    1977-01-01

    Blalock-Hanlon atrial septectomy (BH) is performed to increase systemic and pulmonary venous mixing at the atrial level. Failure of clinical improvement may be related to inadequate intraatrial communication. A simple catheterization technique employing a balloon catheter is used to assess the presence or absence of the limbus of the foramen ovale following BH, since persistence of the limbus of the fossa ovalis after BH is associated with significantly smaller percentage of communication (atrial communication area/total atrial area). PMID:603909

  8. Evaluation of optical imaging and spectroscopy approaches for cardiac tissue depth assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, B; Matthews, D; Chernomordik, V; Gandjbakhche, A; Lane, S; Demos, S G

    2008-02-13

    NIR light scattering from ex vivo porcine cardiac tissue was investigated to understand how imaging or point measurement approaches may assist development of methods for tissue depth assessment. Our results indicate an increase of average image intensity as thickness increases up to approximately 2 mm. In a dual fiber spectroscopy configuration, sensitivity up to approximately 3 mm with an increase to 6 mm when spectral ratio between selected wavelengths was obtained. Preliminary Monte Carlo results provided reasonable fit to the experimental data.

  9. Assessing the use of subgrid land model output to study impacts of land cover change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Natalie M.; Lee, Xuhui; Lawrence, Peter J.; Lawrence, David M.; Zhao, Lei

    2016-06-01

    Subgrid information from land models has the potential to be a powerful tool for investigating land-atmosphere interactions, but relatively few studies have attempted to exploit subgrid output. In this study, we modify the configuration of the Community Land Model version CLM4.5 so that each plant functional type (PFT) is assigned its own soil column. We compare subgrid and grid cell-averaged air temperature and surface energy fluxes from this modified case (PFTCOL) to a case with the default configuration—a shared soil column for all PFTs (CTRL)—and examine the difference in simulated surface air temperature between grass and tree PFTs within the same grid cells (ΔTGT). The magnitude and spatial patterns of ΔTGT from PFTCOL agree more closely with observations, ranging from -1.5 K in boreal regions to +0.6 K in the tropics. We find that the column configuration has a large effect on PFT-level energy fluxes. In the CTRL configuration, the PFT-level annual mean ground heat flux (G) differs substantially from zero. For example, at a typical tropical grid cell, the annual G is 31.8 W m-2 for the tree PFTs and -14.7 W m-2 for grass PFTs. In PFTCOL, G is always close to zero. These results suggest that care must be taken when assessing local land cover change impacts with subgrid information. For models with PFTs on separate columns, it may be possible to isolate the differences in land surface fluxes between vegetation types that would be associated with land cover change from other climate forcings and feedbacks in climate model simulations.

  10. Spatiotemporal Downscaling of Global Climate Model Output for Assessing Soil Erosion and Crop Production Under Climate Change.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spatial and temporal mismatches between coarse resolution output of General Circulation Models (GCMs) and fine resolution data requirements of ecosystems models are the major obstacles for assessing the site-specific climatic impacts of climate change on natural resources and ecosystems. The object...

  11. A Simplified and Rapid Screening Assay using Zebrafish to Assess Cardiac Effects of Air Pollution-derived Particulate Matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative toxicity assessment of particulate matter (PM) from different sources will potentially inform the understanding of regional differences in PM-induced cardiac health effects by identifying PM sources linked to highest potency components. Conventional low-throughput in...

  12. Validation of On-Orbit Methodology for the Assessment of Cardiac Function and Changes in the Circulating Volume Using Ultrasound and Braslet-M Occlusion Cuffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Douglas; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Ebert, Douglas; Duncan, Michael; Bogomolov, Valery V.; Alferova, Irina V.; Matveev, Vladimir P.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this joint U.S. - Russian project was the development and validation of an in-flight methodology to assess a number of cardiac and vascular parameters associated with circulating volume and its manipulation in long-duration space flight. Responses to modified Valsalva and Mueller maneuvers were measured by cardiac and vascular ultrasound (US) before, during, and after temporary volume reduction by means of Braslet-M thigh occlusion cuffs (Russia). Materials and Methods: The study protocol was conducted in 14 sessions on 9 ISS crewmembers, with an average exposure to microgravity of 122 days. Baseline cardiovascular measurements were taken by echocardiography in multiple modes (including tissue Doppler of both ventricles) and femoral and jugular vein imaging on the International Space Station (ISS). The Braslet devices were then applied and measurements were repeated after >10 minutes. The cuffs were then released and the hemodynamic recovery process was monitored. Modified Valsalva and Mueller maneuvers were used throughout the protocol. All US data were acquired by the HDI-5000 ultrasound system aboard the ISS (ATL/Philips, USA) during remotely guided sessions. The study protocol, including the use of Braslet-M for this purpose, was approved by the ISS Human Research Multilateral Review Board (HRMRB). Results: The effects of fluid sequestration on a number of echocardiographic and vascular parameters were readily detectable by in-flight US, as were responses to respiratory maneuvers. The overall volume status assessment methodology appears to be valid and practical, with a decrease in left heart lateral E (tissue Doppler) as one of the most reliable measures. Increase in the femoral vein cross-sectional areas was consistently observed with Braslet application. Other significant differences and trends within the extensive cardiovascular data were also observed. (Decreased - RV and LV preload indices, Cardiac Output, LV E all maneuvers, LV Stroke

  13. Cardiac activity in marine invertebrates in response to pollutants: Automated interpulse duration assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Lundebye, A.K.; Curtis, T.; Depledge, M.H.

    1995-12-31

    The updated method of the Computer-Aided Physiological Monitoring (CAPMON) system was used to study the effects of copper exposure on cardiac activity in the shore crab (Carcinus maenas) and the common mussel (Mytilus edulis). This new Automated Interpulse Duration Assessment (AIDA) system measures the time interval between heart beats, and was found to be a more sensitive tool for evaluating cardiac responses to pollutant exposure than other techniques. In addition to information regarding heart rate, also obtained by the CAPMON system (as beats per minute), the new system enables frequency distribution analysis of interpulse duration. An experiment involving C. maenas examined the effects of short term (24 h) and chronic exposure (4 weeks) to copper concentrations 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 mgl{sup {minus}1} Cu. Subsequent recovery (6 weeks) of cardiac activity was also examined. In a second experiment mussels were exposed to one of five copper concentrations (in the range of 0--0.1 mgl{sup {minus}1} Cu) and `normal` cardiac activity was compared with activity after copper exposure. A dose-response relationship was established between copper concentration and heart rate in crabs. The control group had the longest mean inter-pulse duration, and mean interpulse duration decreased in a concentration-dependent manner for the copper treatments, reflecting an increase in heart rate. Distribution of interpulse duration changed from a variable, rather wide distribution in control crabs, to a sharp-peaked normal distribution in exposed crabs. Results after 4 weeks exposure were not significantly different from those found after 24 h. Return to normal cardiac activity was evident after a 6 week `recovery` period. Results from the mussel experiment showed burst activity followed by a decline in heart rate in response to copper exposure.

  14. Nuclear cardiac imaging for the assessment of myocardial viability

    PubMed Central

    Slart, R.H.J.A.; Bax, J.J.; van der Wall, E.E.; van Veldhuisen, D.J.; Jager, P.L.; Dierckx, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    An important aspect of the diagnostic and prognostic work-up of patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy is the assessment of myocardial viability. Patients with left ventricular dysfunction who have viable myocardium are the patients at highest risk because of the potential for ischaemia but at the same time benefit most from revascularisation. It is important to identify viable myocardium in these patients, and radionuclide myocardial scintigraphy is an excellent tool for this. Single-photon emission computed tomography perfusion scintigraphy (SPECT), whether using 201thallium, 99mTc-sestamibi, or 99mTc- tetrofosmin, in stress and/or rest protocols, has consistently been shown to be an effective modality for identifying myocardial viability and guiding appropriate management. Metabolic and perfusion imaging with positron emission tomography radiotracers frequently adds additional information and is a powerful tool for predicting which patients will have an improved outcome from revascularisation. New techniques in the nuclear cardiology field, such as attenuation corrected SPECT, dual isotope simultaneous acquisition (DISA) SPECT and gated FDG PET are promising and will further improve the detection of myocardial viability. Also the combination of multislice computed tomography scanners with PET opens possibilities of adding coronary calcium scoring and noninvasive coronary angiography to myocardial perfusion imaging and quantification. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:25696432

  15. Autocalibrating pulse contour analysis based on radial artery applanation tonometry for continuous non-invasive cardiac output monitoring in intensive care unit patients after major gastrointestinal surgery--a prospective method comparison study.

    PubMed

    Wagner, J Y; Langemann, M; Schön, G; Kluge, S; Reuter, D A; Saugel, B

    2016-05-01

    The T-Line(®) system (Tensys(®) Medical Inc., San Diego, CA, USA) non-invasively estimates cardiac output (CO) using autocalibrating pulse contour analysis of the radial artery applanation tonometry-derived arterial waveform. We compared T-Line CO measurements (TL-CO) with invasively obtained CO measurements using transpulmonary thermodilution (TDCO) and calibrated pulse contour analysis (PC-CO) in patients after major gastrointestinal surgery. We compared 1) TL-CO versus TD-CO and 2) TL-CO versus PC-CO in 27 patients treated in the intensive care unit (ICU) after major gastrointestinal surgery. For the assessment of TD-CO and PC-CO we used the PiCCO(®) system (Pulsion Medical Systems SE, Feldkirchen, Germany). Per patient, we compared two sets of TD-CO and 30 minutes of PC-CO measurements with the simultaneously recorded TL-CO values using Bland-Altman analysis. The mean of differences (± standard deviation; 95% limits of agreement) between TL-CO and TD-CO was -0.8 (±1.6; -4.0 to +2.3) l/minute with a percentage error of 45%. For TL-CO versus PC-CO, we observed a mean of differences of -0.4 (±1.5; -3.4 to +2.5) l/minute with a percentage error of 43%. In ICU patients after major gastrointestinal surgery, continuous non-invasive CO measurement based on autocalibrating pulse contour analysis of the radial artery applanation tonometry-derived arterial waveform (TL-CO) is feasible in a clinical study setting. However, the agreement of TL-CO with TD-CO and PC-CO observed in our study indicates that further improvements are needed before the technology can be recommended for clinical use in these patients. PMID:27246932

  16. Computerized assessment of motion-contaminated calcified plaques in cardiac multidetector CT

    SciTech Connect

    King, Martin; Giger, Maryellen L.; Suzuki, Kenji; Bardo, Dianna M. E.; Greenberg, Brent; Lan Li; Pan Xiaochuan

    2007-12-15

    An automated method for evaluating the image quality of calcified plaques with respect to motion artifacts in noncontrast-enhanced cardiac computed tomography (CT) images is introduced. This method involves using linear regression (LR) and artificial neural network (ANN) regression models for predicting two patient-specific, region-of-interest-specific, reconstruction-specific and temporal phase-specific image quality indices. The first is a plaque motion index, which is derived from the actual trajectory of the calcified plaque and is represented on a continuous scale. The second is an assessability index, which reflects the degree to which a calcified plaque is affected by motion artifacts, and is represented on an ordinal five-point scale. Two sets of assessability indices were provided independently by two radiologists experienced in evaluating cardiac CT images. Inputs for the regression models were selected from 12 features characterizing the dynamic, morphological, and intensity-based properties of the calcified plaques. Whereas LR-velocity (LR-V) used only a single feature (three-dimensional velocity), the LR-multiple (LR-M) and ANN regression models used the same subset of these 12 features selected through stepwise regression. The regression models were parameterized and evaluated using a database of simulated calcified plaque images from the dynamic NCAT phantom involving nine heart rate/multi-sector gating combinations and 40 cardiac phases covering two cardiac cycles. Six calcified plaques were used for the plaque motion indices and three calcified plaques were used for both sets of assessability indices. In one configuration, images from the second cardiac cycle were used for feature selection and regression model parameterization, whereas images from the first cardiac cycle were used for testing. With this configuration, repeated measures concordance correlation coefficients (CCCs) and associated 95% confidence intervals for the LR-V, LR-M, and ANN

  17. Indium-111 antimyosin scintigraphy to assess myocardial damage in patients with suspected myocarditis and cardiac rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Carrio, I.; Berna, L.; Ballester, M.; Estorch, M.; Obrador, D.; Cladellas, M.; Abadal, L.; Ginjaume, M.

    1988-12-01

    Indium-111 antimyosin scans were used to assess myocardial damage in patients with suspected myocarditis and cardiac transplant rejection. The calculation of a myocardium to lung ratio (AM index) to quantify antimyosin uptake was performed. AM index in normal subjects (n = 8) at 48 hr postinjection was 1.46 +/- 0.04. In patients with suspected myocarditis (16 studies in 13 patients), AM index was 2.0 +/- 0.5 (p less than 0.001); suggesting a considerable incidence of ongoing cell damage in this group, despite the small proportion of positive right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy (RVbx) (4/13). In patients studied after cardiac transplantation (37 studies in 17 patients), AM indexes correlated with RVbx. In patients with RVbx proven rejection (n = 14), AM index was 1.87 +/- 0.19 (p less than 0.001). In patients with RVbx showing infiltrates but not myocyte damage (n = 13), AM index was 1.80 +/- 0.27 (p = 0.02). In patients with normal RVbx (n = 10), AM index was 1.56 +/- 0.17 (p = NS versus controls; p = 0.001 versus those with positive RVbx). Calculated AM indexes correlated with graded visual analysis of the scans (r = 0.823; p = 0.001). Antimyosin scans are an appropriate method to assess myocardial damage in patients with suspected myocarditis and cardiac rejection.

  18. ICT Expenditures and Education Outputs/Outcomes in Selected Developed Countries: An Assessment of Relative Efficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aristovnik, Aleksander

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the paper is to review some previous researches examining ICT efficiency and the impact of ICT on educational output/outcome as well as different conceptual and methodological issues related to performance measurement. Design/methodology/approach: This paper adopts a non-parametric methodology, i.e. data envelopment analysis…

  19. Resource and Output Equity as a Mechanism for Assessing Educational Opportunity in Korean Middle School Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houck, Eric A.; Eom, Moonyoung

    2012-01-01

    Korea is recognized as a high-performing country in international achievement studies; however, many researchers in and outside Korea have been worried about the existing gaps between high-socioeconomic and low-socioeconomic (SES) students in both student achievement and educational resources. We analyzed the resource and output equity of Korean…

  20. Comparison of simultaneous and sequential SPECT imaging for discrimination tasks in assessment of cardiac defects

    PubMed Central

    Trott, CM; Ouyang, J; El Fakhri, G

    2011-01-01

    Simultaneous rest perfusion/fatty-acid metabolism studies have the potential to replace sequential rest/stress perfusion studies for the assessment of cardiac function. Simultaneous acquisition has the benefits of increased signal and lack of need for patient stress, but is complicated by cross-talk between the two radionuclide signals. We consider a simultaneous rest 99mTc-sestamibi/123I-BMIPP imaging protocol in place of the commonly-used sequential rest/stress 99mTc-sestamibi protocol. The theoretical precision with which the severity of a cardiac defect and the transmural extent of infarct can be measured is computed for simultaneous and sequential SPECT imaging, and their performance is compared for discriminating (1) degrees of defect severity, and (2) sub-endocardial from transmural defects. We consider cardiac infarcts, for which reduced perfusion and metabolism are observed. From an information perspective, simultaneous imaging is found to yield comparable or improved performance compared with sequential imaging for discriminating both severity of defect and transmural extent of infarct, for three defects of differing location and size. PMID:21048290

  1. A novel approach for assessing cardiac fibrosis using label-free second harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Martin, Tamara P; Norris, Greg; McConnell, Gail; Currie, Susan

    2013-12-01

    To determine whether second harmonic generation (SHG) can be used as a novel and improved label-free technique for detection of collagen deposition in the heart. To verify whether SHG will allow accurate quantification of altered collagen deposition in diseased hearts following hypertrophic remodelling. Minimally invasive transverse aortic banding (MTAB) of mouse hearts was used to generate a reproducible model of cardiac hypertrophy. Physiological and functional assessment of hypertrophic development was performed using echocardiography and post-mortem analysis of remodelled hearts. Cardiac fibroblasts were isolated from sham-operated and hypertrophied hearts and proliferation rates compared. Multi-photon laser scanning microscopy was used to capture both two-photon excited autofluorescence (TPEF) and SHG images simultaneously in two channels. TPEF images were subtracted from SHG images and the resulting signal intensities from ventricular tissue sections were calculated. Traditional picrosirius red staining was used to verify the suitability of the SHG application. MTAB surgery induced significant hypertrophic remodelling and increased cardiac fibroblast proliferation. A significant increase in the density of collagen fibres between hypertrophic and control tissues (p < 0.05) was evident using SHG. Similar increases and patterns of staining were observed using parallel traditional picrosirius red staining of collagen. Label-free SHG microscopy provides a new alternative method for quantifying collagen deposition in fibrotic hearts. PMID:23921804

  2. Motion corrected LV quantification based on 3D modelling for improved functional assessment in cardiac MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Y. M.; McLaughlin, R. A.; Chan, B. T.; Aziz, Y. F. Abdul; Chee, K. H.; Ung, N. M.; Tan, L. K.; Lai, K. W.; Ng, S.; Lim, E.

    2015-04-01

    Cine MRI is a clinical reference standard for the quantitative assessment of cardiac function, but reproducibility is confounded by motion artefacts. We explore the feasibility of a motion corrected 3D left ventricle (LV) quantification method, incorporating multislice image registration into the 3D model reconstruction, to improve reproducibility of 3D LV functional quantification. Multi-breath-hold short-axis and radial long-axis images were acquired from 10 patients and 10 healthy subjects. The proposed framework reduced misalignment between slices to subpixel accuracy (2.88 to 1.21 mm), and improved interstudy reproducibility for 5 important clinical functional measures, i.e. end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, ejection fraction, myocardial mass and 3D-sphericity index, as reflected in a reduction in the sample size required to detect statistically significant cardiac changes: a reduction of 21-66%. Our investigation on the optimum registration parameters, including both cardiac time frames and number of long-axis (LA) slices, suggested that a single time frame is adequate for motion correction whereas integrating more LA slices can improve registration and model reconstruction accuracy for improved functional quantification especially on datasets with severe motion artefacts.

  3. [Positron emission tomography (PET): a useful tool for the assessment of cardiac metabolism].

    PubMed

    Alexánderson, Erick; Gómez-Martín, Diana; Benito, Israel; Ruíz-Ramírez, Leonel; Ricalde, Alejandro; Meave, Aloha

    2004-01-01

    Under normal conditions, myocardial metabolism is based on the oxidation of fatty acids and in a lesser extent carbohydrates. Cardiac function depends upon an adequate supplement of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by these substrates. However, the main source of energy is susceptible to change upon a various physiologic (exercise) as well as pathologic (ischemia-reperfusion) conditions. Recently, carnitine has gained attention as a modulator of fatty acids and carbohydrates metabolism by means of modifying intramitochondrial Acetyl-CoA/CoA ratio. Disturbances in fatty acids and carbohydrates metabolism in the myocardium have been associated with cardiovascular diseases (chronic ischemic disease, ventricular hypertrophy and dilated cardiomyopathy). The evaluation of cardiac metabolism attains great value regarding diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of these diseases. Currently, positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the preferred methods to evaluate cardiac energy metabolism in clinical practice. In PET images the tracers most commonly used are 11C-palmitate, 11C-acetate y 18Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG), the first two are employed to assess fatty acids oxidation and FDG is used to evaluate carbohydrates metabolism. PMID:15559875

  4. A novel cardiac MR chamber volume model for mechanical dyssynchrony assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ting; Fung, Maggie; Stainsby, Jeffrey A.; Hood, Maureen N.; Ho, Vincent B.

    2009-02-01

    A novel cardiac chamber volume model is proposed for the assessment of left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony. The tool is potentially useful for assessment of regional cardiac function and identification of mechanical dyssynchrony on MRI. Dyssynchrony results typically from a contraction delay between one or more individual left ventricular segments, which in turn leads to inefficient ventricular function and ultimately heart failure. Cardiac resynchronization therapy has emerged as an electrical treatment of choice for heart failure patients with dyssynchrony. Prior MRI techniques have relied on assessments of actual cardiac wall changes either using standard cine MR images or specialized pulse sequences. In this abstract, we detail a semi-automated method that evaluates dyssynchrony based on segmental volumetric analysis of the left ventricular (LV) chamber as illustrated on standard cine MR images. Twelve sectors each were chosen for the basal and mid-ventricular slices and 8 sectors were chosen for apical slices for a total of 32 sectors. For each slice (i.e. basal, mid and apical), a systolic dyssynchrony index (SDI) was measured. SDI, a parameter used for 3D echocardiographic analysis of dyssynchrony, was defined as the corrected standard deviation of the time at which minimal volume is reached in each sector. The SDI measurement of a healthy volunteer was 3.54%. In a patient with acute myocardial infarction, the SDI measurements 10.98%, 16.57% and 1.41% for basal, mid-ventricular and apical LV slices, respectively. Based on published 3D echocardiogram reference threshold values, the patient's SDI corresponds to moderate basal dysfunction, severe mid-ventricular dysfunction, and normal apical LV function, which were confirmed on echocardiography. The LV chamber segmental volume analysis model and SDI is feasible using standard cine MR data and may provide more reliable assessment of patients with dyssynchrony especially if the LV myocardium is thin or if

  5. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among Cardiac Patients: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Considerations for Assessment and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tulloch, Heather; Greenman, Paul S.; Tassé, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing awareness of the impact of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on physical health, particularly cardiovascular disease. We review the literature on the role of trauma in the development of cardiovascular risk factors and disease, aftermath of a cardiac event, and risk for recurrence in cardiac patients. We explore possible mechanisms to explain these relationships, as well as appropriate assessment and treatment strategies for this population. Our main conclusion is that screening and referral for appropriate treatments are important given the high prevalence rates of PTSD in cardiac populations and the associated impact on morbidity and mortality. PMID:25545708

  6. A mobile phone-based care model for outpatient cardiac rehabilitation: the care assessment platform (CAP)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cardiac rehabilitation programs offer effective means to prevent recurrence of a cardiac event, but poor uptake of current programs have been reported globally. Home based models are considered as a feasible alternative to avoid various barriers related to care centre based programs. This paper sets out the study design for a clinical trial seeking to test the hypothesis that these programs can be better and more efficiently supported with novel Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). Methods/Design We have integrated mobile phones and web services into a comprehensive home- based care model for outpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Mobile phones with a built-in accelerometer sensor are used to measure physical exercise and WellnessDiary software is used to collect information on patients' physiological risk factors and other health information. Video and teleconferencing are used for mentoring sessions aiming at behavioural modifications through goal setting. The mentors use web-portal to facilitate personal goal setting and to assess the progress of each patient in the program. Educational multimedia content are stored or transferred via messaging systems to the patients phone to be viewed on demand. We have designed a randomised controlled trial to compare the health outcomes and cost efficiency of the proposed model with a traditional community based rehabilitation program. The main outcome measure is adherence to physical exercise guidelines. Discussion The study will provide evidence on using mobile phones and web services for mentoring and self management in a home-based care model targeting sustainable behavioural modifications in cardiac rehabilitation patients. Trial registration The trial has been registered in the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) with number ACTRN12609000251224. PMID:20109196

  7. Assessment of Cardiac Autonomic Functions in Medical Students With Type D Personality

    PubMed Central

    Panwar, R. Abhilasha Singh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Type D personality experiences joint occurrence of Negative Affectivity and Social Inhibition. It is an emerging risk factor for cardiovascular disease, with prevalence being 18-53% among cardiac patients. Type D personality people have exaggerated cardiovascular activity mediated by increased sympathetic drive and decreased vagal control of the heart which leads to enhanced risk of hypertension and is an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease. Aim To compare the cardiac autonomic function of Type D and non-Type D students. To compare cardiac autonomic functions among male and female students and students with and without family history of hypertension and coronary artery disease among Type D. To find the most affected test among Type D students. Materials and Methods Thirty Type D and 30 non- Type D medical students were identified by DS14. The Parasympathetic cardiac autonomic tests done assessed Heart Rate response to valsalva manoeuvre, immediate heart rate response to standing and heart rate variation during deep breathing. Sympathetic tests assessed BP response to standing and Sustained Hand Grip. The heart rate and R-R interval measurement were got from lead II of ECG recordings on Polyrite D. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS software. Unpaired student’s t-test was used and p-value <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results Type D students showed slightly decreased parasympathetic activity and increased sympathetic activity when compared to non-Type D students even though there was no statistically significant difference between them. There is a statistically significant decrease in valsalva ratio among females (p<0.01) when compared to males. There is a statistically significant decrease in 30:15 ratio and BP response to handgrip (p<0.05) among students with family history of hypertension and coronary artery disease when compared with students with no family history of coronary artery disease. Valsalva

  8. Wavelet transform analysis to assess oscillations in pial artery pulsation at the human cardiac frequency.

    PubMed

    Winklewski, P J; Gruszecki, M; Wolf, J; Swierblewska, E; Kunicka, K; Wszedybyl-Winklewska, M; Guminski, W; Zabulewicz, J; Frydrychowski, A F; Bieniaszewski, L; Narkiewicz, K

    2015-05-01

    Pial artery adjustments to changes in blood pressure (BP) may last only seconds in humans. Using a novel method called near-infrared transillumination backscattering sounding (NIR-T/BSS) that allows for the non-invasive measurement of pial artery pulsation (cc-TQ) in humans, we aimed to assess the relationship between spontaneous oscillations in BP and cc-TQ at frequencies between 0.5 Hz and 5 Hz. We hypothesized that analysis of very short data segments would enable the estimation of changes in the cardiac contribution to the BP vs. cc-TQ relationship during very rapid pial artery adjustments to external stimuli. BP and pial artery oscillations during baseline (70s and 10s signals) and the response to maximal breath-hold apnea were studied in eighteen healthy subjects. The cc-TQ was measured using NIR-T/BSS; cerebral blood flow velocity, the pulsatility index and the resistive index were measured using Doppler ultrasound of the left internal carotid artery; heart rate and beat-to-beat systolic and diastolic blood pressure were recorded using a Finometer; end-tidal CO2 was measured using a medical gas analyzer. Wavelet transform analysis was used to assess the relationship between BP and cc-TQ oscillations. The recordings lasting 10s and representing 10 cycles with a frequency of ~1 Hz provided sufficient accuracy with respect to wavelet coherence and wavelet phase coherence values and yielded similar results to those obtained from approximately 70cycles (70s). A slight but significant decrease in wavelet coherence between augmented BP and cc-TQ oscillations was observed by the end of apnea. Wavelet transform analysis can be used to assess the relationship between BP and cc-TQ oscillations at cardiac frequency using signals intervals as short as 10s. Apnea slightly decreases the contribution of cardiac activity to BP and cc-TQ oscillations. PMID:25804326

  9. Low-carbon building assessment and multi-scale input-output analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G. Q.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z. M.; Zhang, Bo; Shao, L.; Guo, S.; Zhou, S. Y.; Jiang, M. M.

    2011-01-01

    Presented as a low-carbon building evaluation framework in this paper are detailed carbon emission account procedures for the life cycle of buildings in terms of nine stages as building construction, fitment, outdoor facility construction, transportation, operation, waste treatment, property management, demolition, and disposal for buildings, supported by integrated carbon intensity databases based on multi-scale input-output analysis, essential for low-carbon planning, procurement and supply chain design, and logistics management.

  10. Use of a Three Dimensional Printed Cardiac Model to Assess Suitability for Biventricular Repair.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, Kanwal M; Gonzalez-Lengua, Carlos; Shenoy, Rajesh; Sanz, Javier; Nguyen, Khanh

    2016-05-01

    Three dimensional (3D) printing is rapidly gaining interest in the medical field for use in presurgical planning. We present the case of a seven-year-old boy with double outlet right ventricle who underwent a bidirectional Glenn anastomosis. We used a 3D cardiac model to assess his suitability for a biventricular repair. He underwent a left ventricle-to-aorta baffle with a right ventricle-to-pulmonary artery conduit placement. He did well postoperatively and was discharged home with no evidence of baffle obstruction and good biventricular function. A 3D printed model can provide invaluable intracardiac spatial information in these complex patients. PMID:27009890

  11. Developing a genetic fuzzy system for risk assessment of mortality after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Nouei, Mahyar Taghizadeh; Kamyad, Ali Vahidian; Sarzaeem, MahmoodReza; Ghazalbash, Somayeh

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac events could be taken into account as the leading causes of death throughout the globe. Such events also trigger an undesirable increase in what treatment procedures cost. Despite the giant leaps in technological development in heart surgery, coronary surgery still carries the high risk of the mortality. Besides, there is still a long way ahead to accurately predict and assess the mortality risk. This study is an attempt to develop an expert system for the risk assessment of mortality following the cardiac surgery. The developed system involves three main steps. In the first step, a filtering feature selection method is applied to select the best features. In the second step, an ad hoc data-driven method is utilized to generate the preliminary fuzzy inference system. Finally, a hybrid optimization method is presented to select the optimum subset of the rules. The study relies on 1,811 samples to evaluate the diagnosis performance of the proposed system. The obtained classification accuracy is very promising with regard to other benchmark classification methods including binary logistic regression (LR) and multilayer perceptron neural network (MLP) with the same attributes. The developed system leads to 100% sensitivity and 84.7% specificity, while LR and MLP methods statistically come up with lower figures (65, 78.6 and 65%, 75.8%), respectively. Now, a fuzzy supportive tool can be potentially taken as an alternative for the current mortality risk assessment system that are applied in coronary surgeries, and are chiefly based on crisp database. PMID:25119238

  12. Statistical Downscaling and Bias Correction of Climate Model Outputs for Climate Change Impact Assessment in the U.S. Northeast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Kazi Farzan; Wang, Guiling; Silander, John; Wilson, Adam M.; Allen, Jenica M.; Horton, Radley; Anyah, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Statistical downscaling can be used to efficiently downscale a large number of General Circulation Model (GCM) outputs to a fine temporal and spatial scale. To facilitate regional impact assessments, this study statistically downscales (to 1/8deg spatial resolution) and corrects the bias of daily maximum and minimum temperature and daily precipitation data from six GCMs and four Regional Climate Models (RCMs) for the northeast United States (US) using the Statistical Downscaling and Bias Correction (SDBC) approach. Based on these downscaled data from multiple models, five extreme indices were analyzed for the future climate to quantify future changes of climate extremes. For a subset of models and indices, results based on raw and bias corrected model outputs for the present-day climate were compared with observations, which demonstrated that bias correction is important not only for GCM outputs, but also for RCM outputs. For future climate, bias correction led to a higher level of agreements among the models in predicting the magnitude and capturing the spatial pattern of the extreme climate indices. We found that the incorporation of dynamical downscaling as an intermediate step does not lead to considerable differences in the results of statistical downscaling for the study domain.

  13. Assessment of cardiac single-photon emission computed tomography performance using a scanning linear observer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chih-Jie; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Volokh, Lana

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is widely used to detect myocardial ischemia and myocardial infarction. It is important to assess and compare different SPECT system designs in order to achieve the highest detectability of cardiac defects. Methods: Whitaker et al.'s study ['Estimating random signal parameters from noisy images with nuisance parameters: linear and scanning-linear methods,' Opt. Express 16(11), 8150-8173 (2008)] on the scanning linear observer (SLO) shows that the SLO can be used to estimate the location and size of signals. One major advantage of the SLO is that it can be used with projection data rather than with reconstruction data. Thus, this observer model assesses the overall hardware performance independent of any reconstruction algorithm. In addition, the computation time of image quality studies is significantly reduced. In this study, three systems based on the design of the GE cadmium zinc telluride-based dedicated cardiac SPECT camera Discovery 530c were assessed. This design, which is officially named the Alcyone Technology: Discovery NM 530c, was commercialized in August, 2009. The three systems, GE27, GE19, and GE13, contain 27, 19, and 13 detectors, respectively. Clinically, a human heart can be virtually segmented into three coronary artery territories: the left-anterior descending artery, left-circumflex artery, and right coronary artery. One of the most important functions of a cardiac SPECT system is to produce images from which a radiologist can accurately predict in which territory the defect exists [http://www.asnc.org/media/PDFs/PPReporting081511.pdf, Guideline from American Society of Nuclear Cardiology]. A good estimation of the extent of the defect from the projection images is also very helpful for determining the seriousness of the myocardial ischemia. In this study, both the location and extent of defects were estimated by the SLO, and the system performance was assessed by localization

  14. Assessment of cardiac single-photon emission computed tomography performance using a scanning linear observer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chih-Jie; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Volokh, Lana

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is widely used to detect myocardial ischemia and myocardial infarction. It is important to assess and compare different SPECT system designs in order to achieve the highest detectability of cardiac defects. Methods:Whitaker ’s study [“Estimating random signal parameters from noisy images with nuisance parameters: linear and scanning-linear methods,” Opt. Express 16(11), 8150–8173 (2008)]10.1364/OE.16.008150 on the scanning linear observer (SLO) shows that the SLO can be used to estimate the location and size of signals. One major advantage of the SLO is that it can be used with projection data rather than with reconstruction data. Thus, this observer model assesses the overall hardware performance independent of any reconstruction algorithm. In addition, the computation time of image quality studies is significantly reduced. In this study, three systems based on the design of the GE cadmium zinc telluride-based dedicated cardiac SPECT camera Discovery 530c were assessed. This design, which is officially named the Alcyone Technology: Discovery NM 530c, was commercialized in August, 2009. The three systems, GE27, GE19, and GE13, contain 27, 19, and 13 detectors, respectively. Clinically, a human heart can be virtually segmented into three coronary artery territories: the left-anterior descending artery, left-circumflex artery, and right coronary artery. One of the most important functions of a cardiac SPECT system is to produce images from which a radiologist can accurately predict in which territory the defect exists [http://www.asnc.org/media/PDFs/PPReporting081511.pdf, Guideline from American Society of Nuclear Cardiology]. A good estimation of the extent of the defect from the projection images is also very helpful for determining the seriousness of the myocardial ischemia. In this study, both the location and extent of defects were estimated by the SLO, and the system performance was assessed by

  15. A Delay Vector Variance based Marker for an Output-Only Assessment of Structural Changes in Tension Leg Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaksic, V.; Wright, C.; Mandic, D. P.; Murphy, J.; Pakrashi, V.

    2015-07-01

    Although aspects of power generation of many offshore renewable devices are well understood, their dynamic responses under high wind and wave conditions are still to be investigated to a great detail. Output only statistical markers are important for these offshore devices, since access to the device is limited and information about the exposure conditions and the true behaviour of the devices are generally partial, limited, and vague or even absent. The markers can summarise and characterise the behaviour of these devices from their dynamic response available as time series data. The behaviour may be linear or nonlinear and consequently a marker that can track the changes in structural situations can be quite important. These markers can then be helpful in assessing the current condition of the structure and can indicate possible intervention, monitoring or assessment. This paper considers a Delay Vector Variance based marker for changes in a tension leg platform tested in an ocean wave basin for structural changes brought about by single column dampers. The approach is based on dynamic outputs of the device alone and is based on the estimation of the nonlinearity of the output signal. The advantages of the selected marker and its response with changing structural properties are discussed. The marker is observed to be important for monitoring the as- deployed structural condition and is sensitive to changes in such conditions. Influence of exposure conditions of wave loading is also discussed in this study based only on experimental data.

  16. Cardiac gated ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, C.W. III; Hoffman, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. The authors evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50 msec scan aperture. Multi slice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. The authors observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a non-failing model of the heart.

  17. Cardiac gated ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, C. William, III; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1995-05-01

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. We evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50msec scan aperture. Multislice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. We observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a nonfailing model of the heart.

  18. Prospective coronary angioscopy assessment of allograft coronary artery disease in human cardiac transplant recipients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Ashit; Ventura, Hector O.; Collins, Tyrone J.; Ramee, Stephen R.; White, Christopher J.

    1993-09-01

    Annual angiographic assessment to determine the presence or progression of allograft coronary artery disease (CAD) has been unable to modify the natural history of this disease. Coronary angioscopy is a sensitive method to detect the early presence of coronary artery disease and in a retrospective analysis severity of CAD by angioscopy correlated with the time since transplantation. The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate progression of coronary artery disease over a one year period in 40 cardiac transplant recipients. The progression of coronary artery disease as assessed by angioscopy is directly related to time after transplantation and therefore angioscopy may be the method of choice for detection and evaluation of therapeutic regimens to control allograft coronary artery disease.

  19. Lower limb alactic anaerobic power output assessed with different techniques in morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Lafortuna, C L; Fumagalli, E; Vangeli, V; Sartorio, A

    2002-02-01

    Short-term alactic anaerobic performance in jumping (5 consecutive jumps with maximal effort), sprint running (8 m) and stair climbing (modified Margaria test) were measured in 75 obese subjects (BMI: 40.3+/-5.0 kg/m2) and in 36 lean control subjects (BMI: 22.4+/-3.2 kg/m2) of the same age and gender distribution. The results show that obese subjects attained a significantly lower specific (per unit body mass) power output both in jumping (W(spec,j); p<0.001) and stair climbing (W(spec,s); p<0.001) and run at a significantly lower average velocity (v; p<0.001) during sprinting. In spite of the different motor skillfulness required to accomplish the jumping and climbing tests, W(spec,s) (and hence the vertical velocity in climbing, v(v)) was closely correlated with W(spec,j) (R2=0.427, p<0.001). In jumping, although the average force during the positive work phase was significantly higher in obese subjects (p<0.001), no difference between the 2 groups was detected in absolute power. In stair climbing the absolute power output of obese resulted significantly higher (18%) than that of lean controls (p<0.001). In sprint running, the lower average horizontal velocity attained by obese subjects also entailed a different locomotion pattern with shorter step length (L(s); p<0.001), lower frequency (p<0.001) and longer foot contact time with ground (T(c,r); p<0.001). W(spec,j) seems to be a determinant of the poorer motor performance of obese, being significantly correlated with: I) the vertical displacement of the centre of gravity (R2=0.853, p<0.001) in jumping; II) with v(v) in stair climbing; and III) with T(c,r) (R2=0.492, p<0.001), L(s) (R2=0.266, p<0.001) and v (R2=0.454, p<0.001) in sprinting. The results suggest that obese individuals, although partially hampered in kinetic movements, largely rely on their effective specific power output to perform complex anaerobic tasks, and they suffer from the disproportionate excess of inert mass of fat. Furthermore, in view

  20. Assessment of adult body composition using bioelectrical impedance: comparison of researcher calculated to machine outputted values

    PubMed Central

    Franco-Villoria, Maria; Wright, Charlotte M; McColl, John H; Sherriff, Andrea; Pearce, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore the usefulness of Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA) for general use by identifying best-evidenced formulae to calculate lean and fat mass, comparing these to historical gold standard data and comparing these results with machine-generated output. In addition, we explored how to best to adjust lean and fat estimates for height and how these overlapped with body mass index (BMI). Design Cross-sectional observational study within population representative cohort study. Setting Urban community, North East England Participants Sample of 506 mothers of children aged 7–8 years, mean age 36.3 years. Methods Participants were measured at a home visit using a portable height measure and leg-to-leg BIA machine (Tanita TBF-300MA). Measures Height, weight, bioelectrical impedance (BIA). Outcome measures Lean and fat mass calculated using best-evidenced published formulae as well as machine-calculated lean and fat mass data. Results Estimates of lean mass were similar to historical results using gold standard methods. When compared with the machine-generated values, there were wide limits of agreement for fat mass and a large relative bias for lean that varied with size. Lean and fat residuals adjusted for height differed little from indices of lean (or fat)/height2. Of 112 women with BMI >30 kg/m2, 100 (91%) also had high fat, but of the 16 with low BMI (<19 kg/m2) only 5 (31%) also had low fat. Conclusions Lean and fat mass calculated from BIA using published formulae produces plausible values and demonstrate good concordance between high BMI and high fat, but these differ substantially from the machine-generated values. Bioelectrical impedance can supply a robust and useful field measure of body composition, so long as the machine-generated output is not used. PMID:26743700

  1. Noninvasive measurement of cardiac performance in recovery from exercise in heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jonathan N; Gujja, Pradeep; Neelagaru, Suresh; Hsu, Leon; Burkhoff, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between cardiac performance during recovery and the severity of heart failure, as determined by clinical and cardiopulmonary exercise test responses. METHODS: As part of a retrospective cohort study, 46 heart failure patients and 13 normal subjects underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing while cardiac output was measured using a noninvasive device. Cardiac output in recovery was expressed as the slope of a single exponential relationship between cardiac output and time; the recovery-time constant was assessed in relation to indices of cardiac function, along with clinical, functional, and cardiopulmonary exercise responses. RESULTS: The recovery time constant was delayed in patients with heart failure compared with normal subjects (296.7±238 vs. 110.1±27 seconds, p <0.01), and the slope of the decline of cardiac output in recovery was steeper in normal subjects compared with heart failure patients (p<0.001). The slope of the decline in cardiac output recovery was inversely related to peak VO2 (r = -0.72, p<0.001) and directly related to the VE/VCO2 slope (r = 0.57, p<0.001). Heart failure patients with abnormal recovery time constants had lower peak VO2, lower VO2 at the ventilatory threshold, lower peak cardiac output, and a heightened VE/VCO2 slope during exercise. CONCLUSIONS: Impaired cardiac output recovery kinetics can identify heart failure patients with more severe disease, lower exercise capacity, and inefficient ventilation. Estimating cardiac output in recovery from exercise may provide added insight into the cardiovascular status of patients with heart failure. PMID:21655761

  2. Pulse Oximetry Wave Variation as a Noninvasive Tool to Assess Volume Status in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Glauco A; Silva, Eliezer; Gonçalves, Anderson Roman; Filho, Milton Caldeira; Poli-de-Figueiredo, Luíz F

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare variations of plethysmographic wave amplitude (ΔPpleth) and to determine the percent difference between inspiratory and expiratory pulse pressure (ΔPp) cutoff values for volume responsiveness in a homogenous population of postoperative cardiac surgery patients. INTRODUCTION: Intra-thoracic pressure variations interfere with stroke volume variation. Pulse pressure variations through arterial lines during mechanical ventilation have been recommended for the estimation of fluid responsiveness. Pulse oximetry may offer a non-invasive plethysmographic method to evaluate pulse pressure; this may be useful for guiding fluid replacement. METHODS: Controlled, prospective study in cardiac surgery patients under controlled ventilation. Simultaneous digital recordings of arterial pressure and plethysmographic waves were performed. ΔPp, systolic pressure (ΔPs), ΔPpleth, and systolic component (ΔSpleth) were calculated. A ΔPp ≥ 13% identified fluid-responsive patients. Volume expansion was performed in responsive subjects. Systolic and amplitude components of pressure and plethysmographic waves were compared. RESULTS: In 50 measurements from 43 patients, ΔPp was correlated with (Ppleth (r=0.90, p<0.001), (Ps (r=0.90, p<0.001), and (Spleth (r=0.73, p<0.001). An aArea under ROC curve (AUC) identified the fluid responsiveness thresholds: (Ppleth of 11% (AUC = 0.95±0.04), (Ps of 8% (AUC=0.93±0.05), and (Spleth of 32% (AUC=0.82±0.07). A (Ppleth value ≥ 11% predicted (Pp ≥ 13% with 100% specificity and 91% sensitivity. Volume expansion, performed in 20 patients, changed (Pp, (Ppleth, (Ps and (Spleth significantly (p<0.008). CONCLUSIONS: ΔPpleth is well correlated with ΔPp and constitutes a simple and non-invasive method for assessing fluid responsiveness in patients following cardiac surgery. PMID:19488592

  3. Animal welfare assessment at slaughter in Europe: moving from inputs to outputs.

    PubMed

    Velarde, Antonio; Dalmau, Antoni

    2012-11-01

    Producers, retailers and other food chain actors increasingly recognize that consumer concerns for good animal welfare represent a business opportunity that could be profitably incorporated into their commercial strategies. Therefore, during the last decade, numerous trade groups (producers, processors, retailers and restaurant chains) have developed certification systems with their suppliers which include elements of animal welfare. The Welfare Quality® project has developed an integrated and standardised welfare assessment system based on twelve welfare criteria grouped into four main principles (good feeding, good housing, good health and appropriate behaviour) according to how they are experienced by animals. One of the innovations of the Welfare Quality® assessment system is that it focuses more on outcome measures (e.g. directly related to animal body condition, health aspects, injuries, behaviour, etc.). This paper has the objective to discuss the rationale behind the welfare assessment and to describe the Welfare Quality® assessment of pigs and cattle at the slaughterhouse. PMID:22551869

  4. LVM Assessed by Echocardiography and Cardiac Magnetic Resonance, Cardiovascular Outcomes, and Medical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Anderson C.; Gidding, Samuel; Gjesdal, Ola; Wu, Colin; Bluemke, David A; Lima, João A.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate three important areas related to the clinical use of LVM (LVM): accuracy of assessments by echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), the ability to predict cardiovascular outcomes, and the comparative value of different indexing methods. The recommended formula for echocardiographic estimation of LVM uses linear measurements and is based on the assumption of the left ventricle as a prolate ellipsoid of revolution. CMR permits a modeling of the left ventricle free of cardiac geometric assumptions or acoustic window dependency, showing better accuracy and reproducibility. However, echocardiography has lower cost, easier availability, and better tolerability. From the Medline database, 26 longitudinal echocardiographic studies and 5 CMR studies, investigating LVM or LV hypertrophy as predictors of death or major cardiovascular outcomes, were identified. LVM and LV hypertrophy were reliable cardiovascular risk predictors using both modalities. However, no study directly compared the methods for the ability to predict events, agreement in hypertrophy classification, or performance in cardiovascular risk reclassification. Indexing LVM to BSA was the earliest normalization process used, but it seems to underestimate the prevalence of hypertrophy in obese and overweight subjects. Dividing LVM by height to 1.7 or 2.7 as allometric powers are the most promising normalization methods in terms of practicality and usefulness from a clinical ans scientific standpoints for scaling myocardial mass to body size. The measurement of LVM, calculation of LVMi, and classification for LVH should be standardized by scientific societies across measurement techniques and adopted by clinicians in risk stratification and therapeutic decision. PMID:22897998

  5. Graduating internal medicine residents' self-assessment and performance of advanced cardiac life support skills.

    PubMed

    Wayne, Diane B; Butter, John; Siddall, Viva J; Fudala, Monica J; Wade, Leonard D; Feinglass, Joe; McGaghie, William C

    2006-06-01

    Internal medicine residents in the US must be competent to perform procedures including Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) to become board-eligible. Our aim was to determine if residents near graduation could assess their skills in ACLS procedures accurately. Participants were 40 residents in a university-based training program. Self-assessments of confidence in managing six ACLS scenarios were measured on a 0 (very low) to 100 (very high) scale. These were compared to reliable observational ratings of residents' performance on a high-fidelity simulator using published treatment protocols. Residents expressed strong self-confidence about managing the scenarios. Residents' simulator performance varied widely (range from 45% to 94%). Self-confidence assessments correlated poorly with performance (median r = 0.075). Self-assessment of performance by graduating internal medicine residents was not accurate in this study. The use of self-assessment to document resident competence in procedures such as ACLS is not a proxy for objective evaluation. PMID:16807178

  6. Cardiac index assessment using bioreactance in patients undergoing cytoreductive surgery in ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kober, David; Trepte, Constantin; Petzoldt, Martin; Nitzschke, Rainer; Herich, Lena; Reuter, Daniel A; Haas, Sebastian

    2013-12-01

    This clinical study compared the cardiac index (CI) assessed by the totally non-invasive method of bioreactance (CIBR) (NICOM™, Cheetah Medical, Vancouver, USA) to transpulmonary thermodilution (CITD) during cytoreductive surgery in ovarian carcinoma. The hypothesis was that CI could be assessed by bioreactance in an accurate and precise manner including accurate trending ability when compared to transpulmonary thermodilution. In 15 patients CIBR and CITD were assessed after induction of anesthesia, after opening of the peritoneum, hourly during the operative procedure, and 30 min after extubation. Trending ability was assessed between the described timepoints. In total 84 points of measurement were analyzed. Concordance correlation coefficient for repeated measures correlating the CIBR and CITD was 0.32. Bias was 0.26 l/min/m(2) (limits of agreement -1.39 and 1.92 l/min/m(2)). The percentage error was 50.7 %. Trending ability quantified by the mean of angles θ which are made by the ΔCI vector and the line of identity (y = x) showed a value for CIBR of θ = 23.4°. CI assessment by bioreactance showed acceptable accuracy and trending ability. However, its precision was poor. Therefore, CI measurement can not be solely based on bioreactance in patients undergoing cytoreductive surgery in ovarian carcinoma. PMID:23689837

  7. Accounting for the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen in input-output life cycle assessment.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shweta; Bakshi, Bhavik R

    2013-08-20

    Nitrogen is indispensable for sustaining human activities through its role in the production of food, animal feed, and synthetic chemicals. This has encouraged significant anthropogenic mobilization of reactive nitrogen and its emissions into the environment resulting in severe disruption of the nitrogen cycle. This paper incorporates the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen into the 2002 input-output model of the U.S. economy. Due to the complexity of this cycle, this work proposes a unique classification of nitrogen flows to facilitate understanding of the interaction between economic activities and various flows in the nitrogen cycle. The classification scheme distinguishes between the mobilization of inert nitrogen into its reactive form, use of nitrogen in various products, and nitrogen losses to the environment. The resulting inventory and model of the US economy can help quantify the direct and indirect impacts or dependence of economic sectors on the nitrogen cycle. This paper emphasizes the need for methods to manage the N cycle that focus not just on N losses, which has been the norm until now, but also include other N flows for a more comprehensive view and balanced decisions. Insight into the N profile of various sectors of the 2002 U.S. economy is presented, and the inventory can also be used for LCA or Hybrid LCA of various products. The resulting model is incorporated in the approach of Ecologically-Based LCA and available online. PMID:23869533

  8. A Study of Underprepared Students at One Community College: Assessing the Impact of Student and Institutional Input, Environmental, and Output Variables on Student Success. ASHE Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Patricia N.; Amey, Marilyn J.

    This study identified input, environmental, and output variables accounting for differences between successful and unsuccessful groups of underprepared students at Johnson County Community College (Kansas). The study applied an adaptation of Alexander Astin's input-environment-output model of assessing student and institutional effectiveness.…

  9. Combining SERCA2a activation and Na-K ATPase inhibition: a promising new approach to managing acute heart failure syndromes with low cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Ambrosy, Andrew P; Ferrandi, Mara; Ferrari, Patrizia

    2011-08-01

    Heart failure (HF) patients are a medically complex and heterogeneous population with multiple cardiac and non-cardiac comorbidities. Although there are a multitude of etiologic substrates and initiating and amplifying mechanisms contributing to disease progression, these pathophysiologic processes ultimately all lead to impaired myocardial function. The myocardium must both pump oxygenated, nutrient-rich blood throughout the body (systolic function) and receive deoxygenated, nutrient-poor blood returning from the periphery (diastolic function). At the molecular level, it is well-established that Ca2+ plays a central role in excitation-contracting coupling with action potentials stimulating the opening of L-type Ca2+ in the plasma membrane and ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2) in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane during systole and the Na-Ca2+ exchanger and SERCA2a returning Ca2+ to the extracellular space and SR, respectively, during diastole. However, there is increasing recognition that impaired Ca2+ cycling may contribute to myocardial dysfunction. Preclinical studies and clinical trials indicate that combining SERCA2a activation and Na-K ATPase inhibition may increase contractility (inotropy) and facilitate active relaxation (lusitropy), improving both systolic and diastolic functions. Istaroxime, a novel luso-inotrope that activates SERCA2a and inhibits the Na-K ATPase, is currently in phase II clinical development and has been shown to improve systolic and diastolic functions and central hemodynamics, increase systolic but not diastolic blood pressure, and decrease substantially heart rate. Irrespective of its clinical utility, the development of istaroxime has evolved our understanding of the clinical importance of inhibiting the Na-K ATPase in order to obtain a clinically significant effect from SERCA2a activation in the setting of myocardial failure. PMID:21878191

  10. 3D left ventricular extracellular volume fraction by low-radiation dose cardiac CT: Assessment of interstitial myocardial fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nacif, Marcelo Souto; Liu, Yixun; Yao, Jianhua; Liu, Songtao; Sibley, Christopher T.; Summers, Ronald M.; Bluemke, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Myocardial fibrosis leads to impaired cardiac function and events. Extracellular volume fraction (ECV) assessed with an iodinated contrast agent and measured by cardiac CT may be a useful noninvasive marker of fibrosis. Objective The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a 3-dimensional (3D) ECV calculation toolkit (ECVTK) for ECV determination by cardiac CT. Methods Twenty-four subjects (10 systolic heart failure, age, 60 ± 17 years; 5 diastolic failure, age 56 ± 20 years; 9 matched healthy subjects, age 59 ± 7 years) were evaluated. Cardiac CT examinations were done on a 320-multidetector CT scanner before and after 130 mL of iopamidol (Isovue-370; Bracco Diagnostics, Plainsboro, NJ, USA) was administered. A calcium score type sequence was performed before and 7 minutes after contrast with single gantry rotation during 1 breath hold and single cardiac phase acquisition. ECV was calculated as (ΔHUmyocardium/ΔHUblood) × (1 − Hct) where Hct is the hematocrit, and ΔHU is the change in Hounsfield unit attenuation = HUafter iodine − HUbefore iodine. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was performed to assess myocardial structure and function. Results Mean 3D ECV values were significantly higher in the subjects with systolic heart failure than in healthy subjects and subjects with diastolic heart failure (mean, 41% ± 6%, 33% ± 2%, and 35% ± 5%, respectively; P = 0.02). Interobserver and intraobserver agreements were excellent for myocardial, blood pool, and ECV (intraclass correlation coefficient, >0.90 for all). Higher 3D ECV by cardiac CT was associated with reduced systolic circumferential strain, greater end-diastolic and -systolic volumes, and lower ejection fraction (r = 0.70, r = 0.60, r = 0.73, and r = −0.68, respectively; all P < 0.001). Conclusion 3D ECV by cardiac CT can be performed with ECVTK. We demonstrated increased ECV in subjects with systolic heart failure compared with healthy subjects. Cardiac CT results also