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Sample records for cardiac pacemaker program

  1. Generation of cardiac pacemaker cells by programming and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Husse, Britta; Franz, Wolfgang-Michael

    2016-07-01

    A number of diseases are caused by faulty function of the cardiac pacemaker and described as "sick sinus syndrome". The medical treatment of sick sinus syndrome with electrical pacemaker implants in the diseased heart includes risks. These problems may be overcome via "biological pacemaker" derived from different adult cardiac cells or pluripotent stem cells. The generation of cardiac pacemaker cells requires the understanding of the pacing automaticity. Two characteristic phenomena the "membrane-clock" and the "Ca(2+)-clock" are responsible for the modulation of the pacemaker activity. Processes in the "membrane-clock" generating the spontaneous pacemaker firing are based on the voltage-sensitive membrane ion channel activity starting with slow diastolic depolarization and discharging in the action potential. The influence of the intracellular Ca(2+) modulating the pacemaker activity is characterized by the "Ca(2+)-clock". The generation of pacemaker cells started with the reprogramming of adult cardiac cells by targeted induction of one pacemaker function like HCN1-4 overexpression and enclosed in an activation of single pacemaker specific transcription factors. Reprogramming of adult cardiac cells with the transcription factor Tbx18 created cardiac cells with characteristic features of cardiac pacemaker cells. Another key transcription factor is Tbx3 specifically expressed in the cardiac conduction system including the sinoatrial node and sufficient for the induction of the cardiac pacemaker gene program. For a successful cell therapeutic practice, the generated cells should have all regulating mechanisms of cardiac pacemaker cells. Otherwise, the generated pacemaker cells serve only as investigating model for the fundamental research or as drug testing model for new antiarrhythmics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel

  2. Trends in Cardiac Pacemaker Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Mallela, Venkateswara Sarma; Ilankumaran, V; Rao, N.Srinivasa

    2004-01-01

    Batteries used in Implantable cardiac pacemakers-present unique challenges to their developers and manufacturers in terms of high levels of safety and reliability. In addition, the batteries must have longevity to avoid frequent replacements. Technological advances in leads/electrodes have reduced energy requirements by two orders of magnitude. Micro-electronics advances sharply reduce internal current drain concurrently decreasing size and increasing functionality, reliability, and longevity. It is reported that about 600,000 pacemakers are implanted each year worldwide and the total number of people with various types of implanted pacemaker has already crossed 3 million. A cardiac pacemaker uses half of its battery power for cardiac stimulation and the other half for housekeeping tasks such as monitoring and data logging. The first implanted cardiac pacemaker used nickel-cadmium rechargeable battery, later on zinc-mercury battery was developed and used which lasted for over 2 years. Lithium iodine battery invented and used by Wilson Greatbatch and his team in 1972 made the real impact to implantable cardiac pacemakers. This battery lasts for about 10 years and even today is the power source for many manufacturers of cardiac pacemakers. This paper briefly reviews various developments of battery technologies since the inception of cardiac pacemaker and presents the alternative to lithium iodine battery for the near future. PMID:16943934

  3. Reuse of permanent cardiac pacemakers.

    PubMed Central

    Rosengarten, M D; Portnoy, D; Chiu, R C; Paterson, A K

    1985-01-01

    Cardiac pacemakers are part of a growing group of expensive implantable electronic devices; hospitals in which 100 pacemakers are implanted per year must budget over $300 000 for these devices. This cost represents a considerable burden to health care resources. Since the "life-span" of modern pacemakers often exceeds that of the patients who receive them, the recovery and reuse of these devices seems logical. Pacemakers can be resterilized and tested with current hospital procedures. Reuse should be acceptable under Canadian law, but the manner in which the pacemakers are recovered and the patients selected should follow careful guidelines. Every patient should provide written informed consent before receiving a recovered pacemaker. Properly executed, reuse of pacemakers should provide a high level of health care while maintaining or reducing the cost of these devices. PMID:4016637

  4. Leadless Cardiac Pacemakers: Back to the Future.

    PubMed

    Miller, Marc A; Neuzil, Petr; Dukkipati, Srinivas R; Reddy, Vivek Y

    2015-09-01

    Despite significant advances in battery longevity, lead performance, and programming features since the first implanted permanent pacemaker was developed, the basic design of cardiac pacemakers has remained relatively unchanged over the past 50 years. Because of inherent limitations in their design, conventional (transvenous) pacemakers are prone to multiple potential short- and long-term complications. Accordingly, there has been intense interest in a system able to provide the symptomatic and potentially lifesaving therapies of cardiac pacemakers while mitigating many of the risks associated with their weakest link-the transvenous lead. Leadless cardiac pacing represents the future of cardiac pacing systems, similar to the transition that occurred from the use of epicardial pacing systems to the familiar transvenous systems of today. This review summarizes the current evidence and potential benefits of leadless pacing systems, which are either commercially available (in Europe) or under clinical investigation. PMID:26337997

  5. Functiogenesis of cardiac pacemaker activity.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Tetsuro; Kamino, Kohtaro

    2016-07-01

    Throughout our investigations on the ontogenesis of the electrophysiological events in early embryonic chick hearts, using optical techniques to record membrane potential probed with voltage-sensitive dyes, we have introduced a novel concept of "functiogenesis" corresponding to "morphogenesis". This article gives an account of the framework of "functiogenesis", focusing on the cardiac pacemaker function and the functional organization of the pacemaking area. PMID:26719289

  6. [Radiation therapy and cardiac pacemakers].

    PubMed

    Serafim, P; Fonseca, G; Oliveira, A; Fernandes, T

    1999-05-01

    The number of patients with cardiac pacemakers submitted annually to radiation therapy is increasing. Radiation therapy causes interference in the normal functioning processes, directly by chemical changes in the structure of the device and also by electromagnetic disturbances generated in the process of treatment. The changes in the technology used in the manufacture of cardiac pacemakers after the 70's, with the introduction of complementary metal-oxide semi-conductors (CMOS) in the circuits, drastically increased the chance of dangerous interference in the normal function of cardiac pacemakers occurring when in contact with an ionizing radiation source. The authors briefly describe the mechanisms underlying the radio-induced damage usually observed. A review of the literature on this issue is made and solutions are pointed out to perform safe radiation therapy and minimize the risk of device malfunction. PMID:10418264

  7. Optimal resources for implantable cardiac pacemakers. Pacemaker Study Group.

    PubMed

    Parsonnet, V; Furman, S; Smyth, N P; Bilitch, M

    1983-07-01

    In this document, the 1974 Inter-Society Commission for Heart Disease Resources (ICHD) report, Implantable Cardiac Pacemakers, has been revised and updated to emphasize the increased complexity of present-day pacing, to propose realistic guidelines for various aspects of pacing practivce, and to identify the resources needed for delivery of this important mode of health care. The first section of the report describes the several types of pacemakers currently available, how they function, and how and to what purpose they may be modified through noninvasive programming. Recommendations are given for a modified and updated version of the widely accepted ICHD code for identification of pacing modes. The emphasis of the second section of the report is on physical and personnel resources. Matters considered in some depth include the training and qualification of the various medical, technical, and paramedical specialists involved in an implantation procedure; requirements for, and methods of achieving, short and long-term surveillance of pacemaker patients; and the role of the hospital, the manufacturers, and the FDA in this new era of complex dual-chamber, multiprogrammable pacemakers. PMID:6681266

  8. Radiotherapy in patients with cardiac pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Last, A

    1998-01-01

    Patients with permanent cardiac pacemakers occasionally require radiotherapy. Therapeutic irradiation may cause pacemakers to malfunction due to the effects of ionizing radiation or electromagnetic interference. Modern pacemakers, using complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry, differ from older bipolar semiconductor devices both in their sensitivity to damage and the types of malfunction observed. The mechanisms and types of radiotherapy-induced pacemaker malfunction are described and in vitro and in vivo studies of pacemaker irradiation are reviewed. Some simple precautions are recommended during the planning and administration of radiotherapy to minimize the risk of harm to patients with pacemakers. PMID:9534692

  9. Space Derived Health Aids (Cardiac Pacemaker)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division's (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.) pacer is a rechargeable cardiac pacemaker that eliminates the recurring need for surgery to implant a new battery. The Programalith is an advanced cardiac pacing system which permits a physician to reprogram a patient's implanted pacemaker without surgery. System consists of a pacemaker, together with a physician's console containing the programmer and a data printer. Signals are transmitted by wireless telemetry. Two-way communications, originating from spacecraft electrical power systems technology, allows physician to interrogate the pacemaker as to the status of the heart, then to fine tune the device to best suit the patient's needs.

  10. Lithium iodide cardiac pacemakers: initial clinical experience.

    PubMed Central

    Burr, L. H.

    1976-01-01

    A new long-life cardiac pacemaker pulse generator powered by a lithium iodide fuel cell was introduced in Canada in 1973. The compact, hermetically sealed unit is easily implanted and reliable, has excellent patient acceptance and has an anticipated battery life of almost 14 years. Among 105 patients who received a lithium iodide pacemaker, complications occurred in 18. The lithium iodide pacemaker represents a significant advance in pacemaker generator technology and is recommended for long-term cardiac pacing; the manufacturer guarantees the pulse generator for 6 years. Images FIG. 1 PMID:974965

  11. Optimal resources for implantable cardiac pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Parsonnet, V; Furman, S; Smyth, N P; Bilitch, M

    1983-07-01

    In this document, the 1974 Inter-Society Commission for Heart Disease Resources (ICHD) report, Implantable Cardiac Pacemakers, has been revised and updated to emphasize the increased complexity of present-day pacing, to propose realistic guidelines for various aspects of pacing practice, and to identify the resources needed for delivery of this important mode of health care. The first section of the report describes the several types of pacemakers currently available, how they function, and how and to what purpose they may be modified through noninvasive programming. Recommendations are given for a modified and updated version of the widely accepted ICHD code for identification of pacing modes. The emphasis of the second section of the report is on physical and personnel resources. Matters considered in some depth include the training and qualification of the various medical, technical, and paramedical specialists involved in an implantation procedure; requirements for, and methods of achieving, short- and long-term surveillance of pacemaker patients; and the role of the hospital, the manufacturers, and the FDA in this new era of complex dual-chamber, multiprogrammable pacemakers. PMID:6851049

  12. Mathematical Models of Cardiac Pacemaking Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pan; Lines, Glenn T.; Maleckar, Mary M.; Tveito, Aslak

    2013-10-01

    Over the past half century, there has been intense and fruitful interaction between experimental and computational investigations of cardiac function. This interaction has, for example, led to deep understanding of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling; how it works, as well as how it fails. However, many lines of inquiry remain unresolved, among them the initiation of each heartbeat. The sinoatrial node, a cluster of specialized pacemaking cells in the right atrium of the heart, spontaneously generates an electro-chemical wave that spreads through the atria and through the cardiac conduction system to the ventricles, initiating the contraction of cardiac muscle essential for pumping blood to the body. Despite the fundamental importance of this primary pacemaker, this process is still not fully understood, and ionic mechanisms underlying cardiac pacemaking function are currently under heated debate. Several mathematical models of sinoatrial node cell membrane electrophysiology have been constructed as based on different experimental data sets and hypotheses. As could be expected, these differing models offer diverse predictions about cardiac pacemaking activities. This paper aims to present the current state of debate over the origins of the pacemaking function of the sinoatrial node. Here, we will specifically review the state-of-the-art of cardiac pacemaker modeling, with a special emphasis on current discrepancies, limitations, and future challenges.

  13. Creating a cardiac pacemaker by gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Anghel, Traian M; Pogwizd, Steven M

    2007-02-01

    While electronic cardiac pacing in its various modalities represents standard of care for treatment of symptomatic bradyarrhythmias and heart failure, it has limitations ranging from absent or rudimentary autonomic modulation to severe complications. This has prompted experimental studies to design and validate a biological pacemaker that could supplement or replace electronic pacemakers. Advances in cardiac gene therapy have resulted in a number of strategies focused on beta-adrenergic receptors as well as specific ion currents that contribute to pacemaker function. This article reviews basic pacemaker physiology, as well as studies in which gene transfer approaches to develop a biological pacemaker have been designed and validated in vivo. Additional requirements and refinements necessary for successful biopacemaker function by gene transfer are discussed. PMID:17139515

  14. Pacemaker interactions induce reentrant wave dynamics in engineered cardiac culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borek, Bartłomiej; Shajahan, T. K.; Gabriels, James; Hodge, Alex; Glass, Leon; Shrier, Alvin

    2012-09-01

    Pacemaker interactions can lead to complex wave dynamics seen in certain types of cardiac arrhythmias. We use experimental and mathematical models of pacemakers in heterogeneous excitable media to investigate how pacemaker interactions can be a mechanism for wave break and reentrant wave dynamics. Embryonic chick ventricular cells are cultured invitro so as to create a dominant central pacemaker site that entrains other pacemakers in the medium. Exposure of those cultures to a potassium channel blocker, E-4031, leads to emergence of peripheral pacemakers that compete with each other and with the central pacemaker. Waves emitted by faster pacemakers break up over the slower pacemaker to form reentrant waves. Similar dynamics are observed in a modified FitzHugh-Nagumo model of heterogeneous excitable media with two distinct sites of pacemaking. These findings elucidate a mechanism of pacemaker-induced reentry in excitable media.

  15. Medical devices; revocation of cardiac pacemaker registry. Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1999-11-24

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule to revoke a regulation requiring a cardiac pacemaker registry. The registry, which was mandated by the Deficit Reduction Act of 1984, requires any physician and any provider of services who requests or receives Medicare payment for an implantation, removal, or replacement of permanent cardiac pacemaker devices and pacemaker leads to submit certain information to the registry. The information is used by FDA to track the performance of permanent cardiac pacemakers and pacemaker leads and by the Health Care Finance Administration (HCFA) to administer its Medicare payment program for these devices. This action is being taken to implement an act to Repeal An Unnecessary Medical Device Reporting Requirement passed by Congress in 1996 to remove the cardiac pacemaker registry to eliminate duplicative and unnecessary reporting. PMID:11010690

  16. 21 CFR 870.5550 - External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... § 870.5550 External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive). (a) Identification. An external transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive) is a device used to supply a periodic electrical pulse intended to pace the heart. The pulse from the device is usually applied to the surface of the chest...

  17. 21 CFR 870.5550 - External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... § 870.5550 External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive). (a) Identification. An external transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive) is a device used to supply a periodic electrical pulse intended to pace the heart. The pulse from the device is usually applied to the surface of the chest...

  18. 21 CFR 870.5550 - External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... § 870.5550 External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive). (a) Identification. An external transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive) is a device used to supply a periodic electrical pulse intended to pace the heart. The pulse from the device is usually applied to the surface of the chest...

  19. 21 CFR 870.5550 - External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... § 870.5550 External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive). (a) Identification. An external transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive) is a device used to supply a periodic electrical pulse intended to pace the heart. The pulse from the device is usually applied to the surface of the chest...

  20. Testing of Common Electromagnetic Environments for Risk of Interference with Cardiac Pacemaker Function

    PubMed Central

    Tiikkaja, Maria; Aro, Aapo L.; Alanko, Tommi; Lindholm, Harri; Sistonen, Heli; Hartikainen, Juha E.K.; Toivonen, Lauri; Juutilainen, Jukka; Hietanen, Maila

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiac pacemakers are known to be susceptible to strong electromagnetic fields (EMFs). This in vivo study investigated occurrence of electromagnetic interference with pacemakers caused by common environmental sources of EMFs. Methods Eleven volunteers with a pacemaker were exposed to EMFs produced by two mobile phone base stations, an electrically powered commuter train, and an overhead high voltage transmission lines. All the pacemakers were programmed in normal clinically selected settings with bipolar sensing and pacing configurations. Results None of the pacemakers experienced interference in any of these exposure situations. However, often it is not clear whether or not strong EMFs exist in various work environments, and hence an individual risk assessment is needed. Conclusions Modern pacemakers are well shielded against external EMFs, and workers with a pacemaker can most often return to their previous work after having a pacemaker implanted. However, an appropriate risk assessment is still necessary after the implantation of a pacemaker, a change of its generator, or major modification of its programming settings. PMID:24106646

  1. Modern perspectives on numerical modeling of cardiac pacemaker cell.

    PubMed

    Maltsev, Victor A; Yaniv, Yael; Maltsev, Anna V; Stern, Michael D; Lakatta, Edward G

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac pacemaking is a complex phenomenon that is still not completely understood. Together with experimental studies, numerical modeling has been traditionally used to acquire mechanistic insights in this research area. This review summarizes the present state of numerical modeling of the cardiac pacemaker, including approaches to resolve present paradoxes and controversies. Specifically we discuss the requirement for realistic modeling to consider symmetrical importance of both intracellular and cell membrane processes (within a recent "coupled-clock" theory). Promising future developments of the complex pacemaker system models include the introduction of local calcium control, mitochondria function, and biochemical regulation of protein phosphorylation and cAMP production. Modern numerical and theoretical methods such as multi-parameter sensitivity analyses within extended populations of models and bifurcation analyses are also important for the definition of the most realistic parameters that describe a robust, yet simultaneously flexible operation of the coupled-clock pacemaker cell system. The systems approach to exploring cardiac pacemaker function will guide development of new therapies such as biological pacemakers for treating insufficient cardiac pacemaker function that becomes especially prevalent with advancing age. PMID:24748434

  2. Modern Perspectives on Numerical Modeling of Cardiac Pacemaker Cell

    PubMed Central

    Maltsev, Victor A.; Yaniv, Yael; Maltsev, Anna V.; Stern, Michael D.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac pacemaking is a complex phenomenon that is still not completely understood. Together with experimental studies, numerical modeling has been traditionally used to acquire mechanistic insights in this research area. This review summarizes the present state of numerical modeling of the cardiac pacemaker, including approaches to resolve present paradoxes and controversies. Specifically we discuss the requirement for realistic modeling to consider symmetrical importance of both intracellular and cell membrane processes (within a recent “coupled-clock” theory). Promising future developments of the complex pacemaker system models include the introduction of local calcium control, mitochondria function, and biochemical regulation of protein phosphorylation and cAMP production. Modern numerical and theoretical methods such as multi-parameter sensitivity analyses within extended populations of models and bifurcation analyses are also important for the definition of the most realistic parameters that describe a robust, yet simultaneously flexible operation of the coupled-clock pacemaker cell system. The systems approach to exploring cardiac pacemaker function will guide development of new therapies, such as biological pacemakers for treating insufficient cardiac pacemaker function that becomes especially prevalent with advancing age. PMID:24748434

  3. Proton Beam Therapy Interference With Implanted Cardiac Pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Oshiro, Yoshiko Sugahara, Shinji; Noma, Mio; Sato, Masato; Sakakibara, Yuzuru; Sakae, Takeji; Hayashi, Yasutaka; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Tsuboi, Koji; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Kanemoto, Ayae; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of proton beam therapy (PBT) on implanted cardiac pacemaker function. Methods and Materials: After a phantom study confirmed the safety of PBT in patients with cardiac pacemakers, we treated 8 patients with implanted pacemakers using PBT to a total tumor dose of 33-77 gray equivalents (GyE) in dose fractions of 2.2-6.6 GyE. The combined total number of PBT sessions was 127. Although all pulse generators remained outside the treatment field, 4 patients had pacing leads in the radiation field. All patients were monitored by means of electrocardiogram during treatment, and pacemakers were routinely examined before and after PBT. Results: The phantom study showed no effect of neutron scatter on pacemaker generators. In the study, changes in heart rate occurred three times (2.4%) in 2 patients. However, these patients remained completely asymptomatic throughout the PBT course. Conclusions: PBT can result in pacemaker malfunctions that manifest as changes in pulse rate and pulse patterns. Therefore, patients with cardiac pacemakers should be monitored by means of electrocardiogram during PBT.

  4. [Electromagnetic interference of electrical dental equipment with cardiac pacemakers].

    PubMed

    Brand, H S; van der Hoeff, E V; Schrama, T A M; Entjes, M L; van Nieuw, Amerongen A

    2007-09-01

    Eight different electrical dental appliances were tested at different intervals for their ability to interfere with the function of a contemporary cardiac pacemaker. The normal atrial and ventricular pacing was inhibited by an ultrasonic bath cleaner at a distance of less than 15 cm. In contrast, a dental chair, an electrosurgical unit, an ultrasonic tooth scaler, 2 handpieces, and 2 amalgamators failed to produce electromagnetic interference at the minimum distance of 2.5 cm. In conclusion, the results suggest that normal clinical use of dental electrical equipment does not have any significant effect on the cardiac pacemaker tested. PMID:17937372

  5. [Hypersensitivity reactions to implantable cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators].

    PubMed

    Kreft, B

    2016-05-01

    Nowadays, for modern electrotherapy of cardiac arrhythmias different pacemaker systems are used. Antibradycardia pacing systems (e. g. single-chamber, two-chamber, three-chamber systems, frequency-adapted pacemaker) can be distinguished from antitachycardia pacing systems like implantable or portable cardioverter defibrillators and combined antibradycardia/antitachycardia systems. Cutaneous reactions overlying a pacemaker or defibrillator are often termed "pacemaker dermatitis". In terms of the differential diagnostic workup, these cutaneous reactions can have various causes. After exclusion of infection by analyzing clinical and laboratory-chemical results, "pressure dermatitis" or the often clinically asymptomatic "reticular telangiectatic erythema" (synonym "postimplantation erythema") must be considered. Histological examination of the affected skin can contribute to the diagnosis. In case of suspected contact hypersensitivity to implant material, allergological exploration should be realized. In addition to patch testing with commercially available contact allergens, product-related material metal alloy discs are often available from the pacemaker manufacturer for epicutaneous testing. Due to the lack of additional benefit compared to standardized patch testing, a clear recommendation for such metal alloy discs cannot be given. In selected cases of suspected hypersensitivity reaction, sensitization can eventually be analyzed by the lymphocyte transformation test. Positive reactions must always be critically interpreted taking into consideration the corresponding clinical signs. Depending on the cause, cutaneous reactions are occasionally self-limiting. In many cases, however, removal of the pacemaker is inevitable. PMID:26943358

  6. Modeling cardiac pacemakers with relaxation oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grudziński, Krzysztof; Żebrowski, Jan J.

    2004-05-01

    A modified van der Pol oscillator model was designed in order to reproduce the time series of the action potential generated by a natural pacemaker of the heart (i.e., the SA or the AV node). The main motivation was that the models published up to now were not altogether adequate for research on the heart. Based on either the classical van der Pol oscillator or other nonlinear oscillators, these models were interesting rather because of the physical phenomena that could be obtained (chaos and synchronization). However, they were unable to simulate many important physiological features of true physiological action potentials. We based our research on the experience of other groups which modeled neuronal oscillators. There complex nonlinear oscillators were used whose most important feature was a certain topology of the phase space. In our case, we modified the phase space of the classical van der Pol oscillator by adding two fixed points: a saddle and a node. In addition, a damping term asymmetric with respect to the voltage was introduced. Introduction of these new features into the van der Pol oscillator allowed to change the firing frequency of the pacemaker node without changing the length of the refractory period - an important physiological detail. We also show different ways of changing the pacemaker rhythm. A comparison of the properties of the signal obtained from our model with the features of the action potentials measured by other groups is made.

  7. Generation of murine cardiac pacemaker cell aggregates based on ES-cell-programming in combination with Myh6-promoter-selection.

    PubMed

    Rimmbach, Christian; Jung, Julia J; David, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of the "sick sinus syndrome" is based on artificial pacemakers. These bear hazards such as battery failure and infections. Moreover, they lack hormone responsiveness and the overall procedure is cost-intensive. "Biological pacemakers" generated from PSCs may become an alternative, yet the typical content of pacemaker cells in Embryoid Bodies (EBs) is extremely low. The described protocol combines "forward programming" of murine PSCs via the sinus node inducer TBX3 with Myh6-promoter based antibiotic selection. This yields cardiomyocyte aggregates consistent of >80% physiologically functional pacemaker cells. These "induced-sinoatrial-bodies" ("iSABs") are spontaneously contracting at yet unreached frequencies (400-500 bpm) corresponding to nodal cells isolated from mouse hearts and are able to pace murine myocardium ex vivo. Using the described protocol highly pure sinus nodal single cells can be generated which e.g. can be used for in vitro drug testing. Furthermore, the iSABs generated according to this protocol may become a crucial step towards heart tissue engineering. PMID:25742394

  8. Pacemaker lead-associated thrombosis in cardiac resynchronisation therapy.

    PubMed

    Buttigieg, Jesmar; Asciak, Rachelle; Azzopardi, Charles Mallia

    2015-01-01

    Pacemaker lead-associated thrombosis is a possible complication of any cardiac implantable electronic device. We present a case of a middle-aged woman with a history of ischaemic left ventricular failure, who presented with fever and other non-specific symptoms 4 months after cardiac resynchronisation therapy. A transoesophageal echocardiogram confirmed a vegetation-like structure originating from the pacemaker lead in the right atrium. The patient was treated with intravenous antibiotics followed by open heart surgery in order to remove this mass as well as the pacing device, including all three pacing leads. Histology and culture of the retrieved mass confirmed a sterile thrombus with no features to suggest an infected mass (vegetation). The patient made an uncomplicated recovery and there were no long-term sequelae on follow-up during the 2 years after the event. PMID:26153289

  9. Integrative Modeling of Electrical Properties of Pacemaker Cardiac Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, M.; Babich, L.

    2016-06-01

    This work represents modeling of electrical properties of pacemaker (sinus) cardiac cells. Special attention is paid to electrical potential arising from transmembrane current of Na+, K+ and Ca2+ ions. This potential is calculated using the NaCaX model. In this respect, molar concentration of ions in the intercellular space which is calculated on the basis of the GENTEX model is essential. Combined use of two different models allows referring this approach to integrative modeling.

  10. Plethyzmography in assessment of hemodynamic results of pacemaker functions programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojciechowski, Dariusz; Sionek, Piotr; Peczalski, Kazimierz; Janusek, Dariusz

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents potential role of plethyzmography in optimization of heart hemodynamic function during pacemaker programming. The assessment of optimal stroke volume in patients, with implanted dual chamber pacemaker (DDD), by plethyzmography was a goal of the study. The data were collected during pacing rhythm. 20 patients (8 female and 12 male, average 77.4+/-4.6 years) with dual chamber pacemaker (DDD) and with pacing rhythm during routine pacemaker control and study tests were incorporated in the study group. Hemodynamic parameters were assessed during modification of atrio-ventricular delay (AVD) for pacing rhythm of 70 bpm and 90 bpm. The time of atrioventricular was programmed with 20 ms steps within range 100-200 ms and data were recorded with two minutes delay between two consecutive measurements. Stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) were calculated from plethyzmographic signal by using Beatscope software (TNO Holand). Highest SV calculated for given pacing rhythm was named optimal stroke volume (OSV) and consequently highest cardiac output was named maximal cardiac output (MCO). The time of atrio-ventricular delay for OSV was named optimal atrioventricular delay (OAVD). The results have showed: mean values of OAVD for 70 bpm - 152+/-33 ms and for 90 bpm -149+/-35 ms, shortening of the mean OAVD time caused by increase of pacing rate from 70 bpm to 90 bpm what resulted in statistically significant decrease of OSV with not statistically significant increase of MCO. The analysis of consecutive patients revealed three types of response to increase of pacing rhythm: 1. typical-shortening of OAVD, 2. neutral-no change of OAVD and 3.atypical-lengthening of OAVD.

  11. Pacemaker Dependency after Cardiac Surgery: A Systematic Review of Current Evidence

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe postoperative conduction disturbances requiring permanent pacemaker implantation frequently occur following cardiac surgery. Little is known about the long-term pacing requirements and risk factors for pacemaker dependency in this population. Methods We performed a systematic review of the literature addressing rates and predictors of pacemaker dependency in patients requiring permanent pacemaker implantation after cardiac surgery. Using a comprehensive search of the Medline, Web of Science and EMBASE databases, studies were selected for review based on predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results A total of 8 studies addressing the endpoint of pacemaker-dependency were identified, while 3 studies were found that addressed the recovery of atrioventricular (AV) conduction endpoint. There were 10 unique studies with a total of 780 patients. Mean follow-up ranged from 6–72 months. Pacemaker dependency rates ranged from 32%-91% and recovery of AV conduction ranged from 16%-42%. There was significant heterogeneity with respect to the definition of pacemaker dependency. Several patient and procedure-specific variables were found to be independently associated with pacemaker dependency, but these were not consistent between studies. Conclusions Pacemaker dependency following cardiac surgery occurs with variable frequency. While individual studies have identified various perioperative risk factors for pacemaker dependency and non-resolution of AV conduction disease, results have been inconsistent. Well-conducted studies using a uniform definition of pacemaker dependency might identify patients who will benefit most from early permanent pacemaker implantation after cardiac surgery. PMID:26470027

  12. PP2 prevents isoproterenol stimulation of cardiac pacemaker activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianying; Lin, Yen-Chang; Hileman, Stan; Martin, Karen H; Hull, Robert; Yu, Han-Gang

    2015-02-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated the potential risks of cardiac arrhythmias (such as prolonged QT interval) using tyrosine kinase inhibitors for cancer therapy. We report here that a widely used selective inhibitor of Src tyrosine kinases, PP2, can inhibit and prevent isoproterenol stimulation of cardiac pacemaker activity. In dissected rat sinus node, PP2 inhibited and prevented isoproterenol stimulation of spontaneous beating rate. In isolated sinus node myocytes, PP2 suppressed the hyperpolarization-activated "funny" current (If) by negatively shifting the activation curve and decelerating activation kinetics, associated with decreased cell surface expression and reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-modulated channel 4 (HCN4) channel proteins. In human embryonic kidney 293 cells overexpressing recombinant human HCN4 channels, PP2 reversed isoproterenol stimulation of HCN4 and inhibited HCN4-573x, a cAMP-insensitive human HCN4 mutant. Isoprotenrenol had little effects on HCN4-573x. These results demonstrated that inhibition of presumably tyrosine Src kinase activity in heart by PP2 decreased and prevented the potential β-adrenergic stimulation of cardiac pacemaker activity. These effects are mediated, at least partially, by a cAMP-independent attenuation of channel activity and cell surface expression of HCN4, the key channel protein that controls the heart rate. PMID:25658311

  13. Interference of implanted cardiac pacemakers with TASER X26 dart mode application.

    PubMed

    Leitgeb, Norbert; Niedermayr, Florian; Neubauer, Robert

    2012-06-01

    The prevalence of pacemaker patients among the general population and of conducted energy devices for law enforcement and self-defence is increasing. Consequently, the question on whether cardiac pacemaker patients are at particular risk becomes increasingly important, in particular, as the widespread use of such devices is planned in Europe. The risk of pacemaker patients has been investigated by numerical simulation at detailed anatomical models of patients with cardiac pacemakers implanted in left pectoral, right pectoral, and abdominal positions, with the monopolar electrode placed at the ventricular apex. The induced cardiac pacemaker interference voltages have been assessed for distant application of TASER X26 devices with dart electrodes propelled towards a subject. It could be shown that interference voltages are highest in abdominal pacemaker implantation, while they are about 20% lower in left or right pectoral sites. They remain below the immunity threshold level as defined by safety standards of implanted cardiac pacemakers and of implanted cardioverter defibrillators to prevent persisting malfunction or damage. However, induced voltages are high enough to be sensed by the pacemaker and to capture pacemaker function in case of hits at thorax and abdomen, frontal as well as dorsal. PMID:22691428

  14. Hardware-in-the-loop simulation and energy optimization of cardiac pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Barker, Chris; Kwiatkowska, Marta; Mereacre, Alexandru; Paoletti, Nicola; Patane, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Implantable cardiac pacemakers are medical devices that can monitor and correct abnormal heart rhythms. To provide the necessary safety assurance for pacemaker software, both testing and verification of the code, as well as testing the entire pacemaker hardware in the loop, is necessary. In this paper, we present a hardware testbed that enables detailed hardware-in-the-loop simulation and energy optimisation of pacemaker algorithms with respect to a heart model. Both the heart and the pacemaker models are encoded in Simulink/Stateflow™ and translated into executable code, with the pacemaker executed directly on the microcontroller. We evaluate the usefulness of the testbed by developing a parameter synthesis algorithm which optimises the timing parameters based on power measurements acquired in real-time. The experiments performed on real measurements successfully demonstrate that the testbed is capable of energy minimisation in real-time and obtains safe pacemaker timing parameters. PMID:26737950

  15. Excitation model of pacemaker cardiomyocytes of cardiac conduction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, M.; Babich, L.

    2015-11-01

    Myocardium includes typical and atypical cardiomyocytes - pacemakers, which form the cardiac conduction system. Excitation from the atrioventricular node in normal conditions is possible only in one direction. Retrograde direction of pulses is impossible. The most important prerequisite for the work of cardiomyocytes is the anatomical integrity of the conduction system. Changes in contractile force of the cardiomyocytes, which appear periodically, are due to two mechanisms of self-regulation - heterometric and homeometric. Graphic course of the excitation pulse propagation along the heart muscle more accurately reveals the understanding of the arrhythmia mechanism. These models have the ability to visualize the essence of excitation dynamics. However, they do not have the proper forecasting function for result estimation. Integrative mathematical model enables further investigation of general laws of the myocardium active behavior, allows for determination of the violation mechanism of electrical and contractile function of cardiomyocytes. Currently, there is no full understanding of the topography of pacemakers and ionic mechanisms. There is a need for the development of direction of mathematical modeling and comparative studies of the electrophysiological arrangement of cells of atrioventricular connection and ventricular conduction system.

  16. Pacemaker

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Arrhythmia Atrial Fibrillation Heart Block Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators Long QT Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI ... arrhythmias with another device called an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). An ICD is similar to a pacemaker. ...

  17. Advanced Pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Synchrony, developed by St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.) is an advanced state-of-the-art implantable pacemaker that closely matches the natural rhythm of the heart. The companion element of the Synchrony Pacemaker System is the Programmer Analyzer APS-II which allows a doctor to reprogram and fine tune the pacemaker to each user's special requirements without surgery. The two-way communications capability that allows the physician to instruct and query the pacemaker is accomplished by bidirectional telemetry. APS-II features 28 pacing functions and thousands of programming combinations to accommodate diverse lifestyles. Microprocessor unit also records and stores pertinent patient data up to a year.

  18. Popeye domain containing proteins and stress-mediated modulation of cardiac pacemaking

    PubMed Central

    Simrick, Subreena; Schindler, Roland; Poon, Kar-Lai; Brand, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    An intricate network of ion channels and pumps are involved in generating a diastolic pacemaker potential, which is transmitted to the working myocardium with the help of the cardiac conduction system. The principles of cardiac pacemaking are reasonably well understood, however, the mechanism by which the heart increases its beating frequency in response to adrenergic stimulation has not been fully worked out. The Popeye domain containing (Popdc) genes encode plasma membrane-localized proteins that are able to bind cAMP with high affinity and mice with null mutations in Popdc1 or -2 have a stress-induced pacemaker dysfunction. The phenotype in both mutants develops in an age-dependent manner and thus may model pacemaker dysfunction in man, as well as providing novel mechanistic insights into the process of pacemaker adaptation to stress. PMID:23562093

  19. Management of radiation therapy patients with cardiac defibrillator or pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Francesca; Gomellini, Sara; Caruso, Cristina; Barbara, Raffaele; Musio, Daniela; Coppi, Tamara; Cardinale, Mario; Tombolini, Vincenzo; de Paula, Ugo

    2016-06-01

    The increasing growth of population with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) such as Pacemaker (PM) and Implantable Cardiac Defibrillators (ICD), requires particular attention in management of patients needing radiation treatment. This paper updates and summarizes some recommendations from different international guidelines. Ionizing radiation and/or electromagnetic interferences could cause device failure. Current approaches to treatment in patients who have these devices vary among radiation oncology centres. We refer to the German Society of Radiation Oncology and Cardiology guidelines (ed. 2015); to the Society of Cardiology Australia and New Zealand Statement (ed. 2015); to the guidelines in force in the Netherlands (ed. 2012) and to the Italian Association of Radiation Oncology recommendations (ed. 2013) as reported in the guidelines for the treatment of breast cancer in patients with CIED. Although there is not a clear cut-off point, risk of device failure increases with increasing doses. Cumulative dose and pacing dependency have been combined to categorize patients into low-, medium- and high-risk groups. Measures to secure patient safety are described for each category. The use of energy ≤6MV is preferable and it's strongly recommended not to exceed a total dose of 2 Gy to the PM and 1 Gy for ICD. Given the dangers of device malfunction, radiation oncology departments should adopt all the measures designed to minimize the risk to patients. For this reason, a close collaboration between cardiologist, radiotherapist and physicist is necessary. PMID:26706454

  20. Programmable Pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Released in 1995, the Trilogy cardiac pacemaker is the fourth generation of a unit developed in the 1970s by NASA, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory and St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.). The new system incorporates the company's PDx diagnostic and programming software and a powerful microprocessor that allows more functions to be fully automatic and gives more detailed information on the patient's health and the performance of the pacing systems. The pacemaker incorporates bidirectional telemetry used for space communications for noninvasive communication with the implanted pacemaker, smaller implantable pulse generators from space microminiaturization, and longer-life batteries from technology for spacecraft electrical power systems.

  1. Septic Pulmonary Embolism Caused by Infected Pacemaker Leads After Replacement of a Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Device

    PubMed Central

    Said, Salah A.M.; Nijhuis, Rogier; Derks, Anita; Droste, Herman

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 70 Final Diagnosis: Pacemaker leads endocarditis Symptoms: Bacterial lead endocarditis • congestive heart failure • fever • pacemaker dysfunction Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Pacemaker box replacement due to end-of-service Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has been demonstrated to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with advanced, drug-refractory heart failure. Procedure-related mortality is less than 1% in larger studies. Approximately10% of CRT patients have to undergo surgical revision because of infections, dislocations, or unacceptable electrical behavior manifested as high threshold, unstable sensing, or unwanted phrenic nerve stimulation. Case Report: A 70-year-old man with symptomatic congestive heart failure underwent implantation of a biventricular pacemaker on the left anterior chest wall in 2003 and pulse generator exchange in August 2009. The patient responded well to CRT. At follow-up, the pacing system functioned normally. In September 2009, in the context of a predialysis program, an abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan was performed in another hospital for assessment and evaluation of chronic kidney disease. This procedure was complicated with peripheral thrombophlebitis that was managed appropriately with complete recovery. Eight months later (May 2010), the patient was admitted to our hospital with fever, anemia, and elevated infection parameters. During admission, blood cultures grew Staphylococcus epidermidis. The chest X-ray, lung perfusion scintigraphy, and CT scan depicted pulmonary embolism and infarction. The right ventricular lead threshold was found to be increased to 7 volts with unsuccessful capture. Echocardiography demonstrated vegetations on leads. The entire pacing system was explanted, but the patient expired few days later following percutaneous removal due to multiorgan failure. Conclusions: In heart failure

  2. Computed tomography in patients with cardiac pacemakers: difficulties and solutions.

    PubMed

    Mlynarski, Rafal; Sosnowski, Maciej; Mlynarska, Agnieszka; Tendera, Michał

    2012-05-01

    The presence of cardiac pacemaker systems may significantly limit interpretation of multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) images. In 80 patients (45 men; aged 69.5 ± 13.4) with previously implanted anti-arrhythmic devices, a 64-slice CT (Aquilion-64) was performed. In 61 patients (76.3%), ECG gating was used (coronaries visualization) and in 19 patients (23.7%) without ECG gating (not coronaries visualization). In all 19 patients without ECG gating MSCT images were diagnostic. In 37 (60.6%) patients of 61, there was no problem with gating process and image quality was diagnostic. In 24 (39.4%) with visible spikes in the ECG-gating group, there were difficulties in differentiating the R spike from an artificial spike (unipolar pacing) by MSCT software. In 15 patients (24.6%) after reprogramming, it was possible to obtain good quality images. In nine (14.7%) patients, it was not possible to reprogram devices due to old unipolar leads, but in two cases (3.3%), ECG gating was corrected manually and good image quality was obtained. In seven (11.5%) patients, it was not possible to perform ECG gating. The ECG gating process was identified as the main cause of the imaging problems. Bipolar leads working as bipolar pacing seem to be necessary to perform MSCT with ECG gating. A unipolar system lead may cause serious problems with reconstructions. PMID:21505855

  3. Possible Influences of Spark Discharges on Cardiac Pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Korpinen, Leena; Kuisti, Harri; Tarao, Hiroo; Virtanen, Vesa; Pääkkönen, Rauno; Dovan, Thanh; Kavet, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to spark discharges may occur beneath high voltage transmission lines when contact is initiated with a conductive object (such as a motor vehicle) with the spark discharge mediated by the ambient electric field from the line. The objective of this study was to assess whether such exposures could interfere with the normal functioning of implanted cardiac pacemakers (PMs). The experiment consisted of PMs implanted in a human-sized phantom and then exposed to spark discharge through an upper extremity. A circuit was designed that produced spark discharges between two spherical electrodes fed to the phantom's left hand. The circuit was set to deliver a single discharge per half cycle (every 10 ms) about 10 μs in duration with a peak current of 1.2-1.3 A, thus simulating conditions under a 400-kV power line operating at 50 Hz. Of 29 PMs acquired, all were tested in unipolar configuration and 20 in bipolar configuration with exposure consisting of 2 min of continuous exposure (one unit was exposed for 1 min). No interference was observed in bipolar configuration. One unit in unipolar configuration incorrectly identified ventricular extra systoles (more than 400 beats min(-1)) for 2 s. The use of unipolar configuration in new implants is extremely rare, thus further minimizing the risk of interference with the passage of time. Replication of this study and, if safety for human subjects can be assured, future testing of human subjects is also advisable. PMID:26606060

  4. Artificial cardiac stimulation: a current view of physiologic pacemakers.

    PubMed Central

    Rosengarten, M. D.; Chiu, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Artificial pacing of the heart has evolved rapidly over the last 20 years; the physician can now implant "physiologic" pacemakers that preserve the natural order of atrial and ventricular systole. The commonly used pacemakers that pace only the ventricle can induce dizziness, fatigue and syncope and increase congestive heart failure. Physiologic pacemakers can eliminate many of these side effects, but they are more expensive, can be less durable and may induce arrhythmias. Physiologic pacing can provide the greatest benefit and cost-effectiveness when the particular functions of the device are matched to the specific needs of the patient. PMID:6850463

  5. The vicissitudes of the pacemaker current I (Kdd) of cardiac purkinje fibers.

    PubMed

    Vassalle, Mario

    2007-11-01

    The mechanisms underlying the pacemaker current in cardiac tissues is not agreed upon. The pacemaker potential in Purkinje fibers has been attributed to the decay of the potassium current I (Kdd). An alternative proposal is that the hyperpolarization-activated current I (f) underlies the pacemaker potential in all cardiac pacemakers. The aim of this review is to retrace the experimental development related to the pacemaker mechanism in Purkinje fibers with reference to findings about the pacemaker mechanism in the SAN as warranted. Experimental data and their interpretation are critically reviewed. Major findings were attributed to K(+) depletion in narrow extracellular spaces which would result in a time dependent decay of the inward rectifier current I (K1). In turn, this decay would be responsible for a "fake" reversal of the pacemaker current. In order to avoid such a postulated depletion, Ba(2+) was used to block the decay of I (K1). In the presence of Ba(2+) the time-dependent current no longer reversed and instead increased with time and more so at potentials as negative as -120 mV. In this regard, the distinct possibility needs to be considered that Ba(2+) had blocked I (Kdd) (and not only I (K1)). That indeed this was the case was demonstrated by studying single Purkinje cells in the absence and in the presence of Ba(2+). In the absence of Ba(2+), I (Kdd) was present in the pacemaker potential range and reversed at E (K). In the presence of Ba(2+), I (Kdd) was blocked and I (f) appeared at potentials negative to the pacemaker range. The pacemaker potential behaves in a manner consistent with the underlying I (Kdd) but not with I (f). The fact that I (f) is activated on hyperpolarization at potential negative to the pacemaker range makes it suitable as a safety factor to prevent the inhibitory action of more negative potentials on pacemaker discharge. It is concluded that the large body of evidence reviewed proves the pacemaker role of I (Kdd) (but not of I

  6. Experimental Evaluation of SAR around an Implanted Cardiac Pacemaker Caused by Mobile Radio Terminal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Yuta; Saito, Kazuyuki; Watanabe, Soichi; Takahashi, Masaharu; Ito, Koichi

    Although the effect of electromagnetic interference on an implanted cardiac pacemaker due to a nearby mobile phone has been investigated, there have been few studies on the enhancement of the specific absorption rate (SAR) around an implanted cardiac pacemaker due to a nearby mobile phone. In this study, the SAR distribution around a pacemaker model embedded in a parallelepiped torso phantom when a mobile phone was nearby was numerically calculated and experimentally measured. The results of both investigations showed a characteristic SAR distribution. The system presented can be used to estimate the effects of electromagnetic interference on implanted electric circuits and thus could lead to the development of guidelines for the safe use of mobile radio terminals near people with medical implants.

  7. Mechanisms underlying the cardiac pacemaker: the role of SK4 calcium-activated potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Weisbrod, David; Khun, Shiraz Haron; Bueno, Hanna; Peretz, Asher; Attali, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The proper expression and function of the cardiac pacemaker is a critical feature of heart physiology. The sinoatrial node (SAN) in human right atrium generates an electrical stimulation approximately 70 times per minute, which propagates from a conductive network to the myocardium leading to chamber contractions during the systoles. Although the SAN and other nodal conductive structures were identified more than a century ago, the mechanisms involved in the generation of cardiac automaticity remain highly debated. In this short review, we survey the current data related to the development of the human cardiac conduction system and the various mechanisms that have been proposed to underlie the pacemaker activity. We also present the human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte system, which is used as a model for studying the pacemaker. Finally, we describe our latest characterization of the previously unrecognized role of the SK4 Ca2+-activated K+ channel conductance in pacemaker cells. By exquisitely balancing the inward currents during the diastolic depolarization, the SK4 channels appear to play a crucial role in human cardiac automaticity. PMID:26725737

  8. RNA Sequencing of Mouse Sinoatrial Node Reveals an Upstream Regulatory Role for Islet-1 in Cardiac Pacemaker Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vedantham, Vasanth; Galang, Giselle; Evangelista, Melissa; Deo, Rahul C.; Srivastava, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Treatment of sinus node disease with regenerative or cell-based therapies will require a detailed understanding of gene regulatory networks in cardiac pacemaker cells (PCs). Objective To characterize the transcriptome of PCs using RNA sequencing, and to identify transcriptional networks responsible for PC gene expression. Methods and Results We used laser capture micro-dissection (LCM) on a sinus node reporter mouse line to isolate RNA from PCs for RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). Differential expression and network analysis identified novel SAN-enriched genes, and predicted that the transcription factor Islet-1 (Isl1) is active in developing pacemaker cells. RNA-Seq on SAN tissue lacking Isl1 established that Isl1 is an important transcriptional regulator within the developing SAN. Conclusions (1) The PC transcriptome diverges sharply from other cardiomyocytes; (2) Isl1 is a positive transcriptional regulator of the PC gene expression program. PMID:25623957

  9. Popeye domain containing proteins are essential for stress-mediated modulation of cardiac pacemaking in mice

    PubMed Central

    Froese, Alexander; Breher, Stephanie S.; Waldeyer, Christoph; Schindler, Roland F.R.; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Rinné, Susanne; Wischmeyer, Erhard; Schlueter, Jan; Becher, Jan; Simrick, Subreena; Vauti, Franz; Kuhtz, Juliane; Meister, Patrick; Kreissl, Sonja; Torlopp, Angela; Liebig, Sonja K.; Laakmann, Sandra; Müller, Thomas D.; Neumann, Joachim; Stieber, Juliane; Ludwig, Andreas; Maier, Sebastian K.; Decher, Niels; Arnold, Hans-Henning; Kirchhof, Paulus; Fabritz, Larissa; Brand, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac pacemaker cells create rhythmic pulses that control heart rate; pacemaker dysfunction is a prevalent disorder in the elderly, but little is known about the underlying molecular causes. Popeye domain containing (Popdc) genes encode membrane proteins with high expression levels in cardiac myocytes and specifically in the cardiac pacemaking and conduction system. Here, we report the phenotypic analysis of mice deficient in Popdc1 or Popdc2. ECG analysis revealed severe sinus node dysfunction when freely roaming mutant animals were subjected to physical or mental stress. In both mutants, bradyarrhythmia developed in an age-dependent manner. Furthermore, we found that the conserved Popeye domain functioned as a high-affinity cAMP-binding site. Popdc proteins interacted with the potassium channel TREK-1, which led to increased cell surface expression and enhanced current density, both of which were negatively modulated by cAMP. These data indicate that Popdc proteins have an important regulatory function in heart rate dynamics that is mediated, at least in part, through cAMP binding. Mice with mutant Popdc1 and Popdc2 alleles are therefore useful models for the dissection of the mechanisms causing pacemaker dysfunction and could aid in the development of strategies for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22354168

  10. Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiac Output vs. Heart Rate in Patients with an Implanted Pacemaker Based on Electric Impedance Method Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukup, Ladislav; Vondra, Vlastimil; Viščor, Ivo; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef

    2013-04-01

    The methods and device for estimation of cardiac output and measurement of pulse wave velocity simultaneously is presented here. The beat-to-beat cardiac output as well as pulse wave velocity measurement is based on application of electrical impedance method on the thorax and calf. The results are demonstrated in a study of 24 subjects. The dependence of pulse wave velocity and cardiac output on heart rate during rest in patients with an implanted pacemaker was evaluated. The heart rate was changed by pacemaker programming while neither exercise nor drugs were applied. The most important result is that the pulse wave velocity, cardiac output and blood pressure do not depend significantly on heart rate, while the stroke volume is reciprocal proportionally to the heart rate.

  11. [Verification of irradiation conditions of X-rays that influence implantable cardiac pacemakers].

    PubMed

    Umezawa, Naoki; Hirose, Minoru; Shinbo, Toshihiro

    2008-07-20

    Originally, it was thought that X-rays did not influence implantable cardiac pacemakers. In general, radiological technologists did not take proper care of these devises at the time of X-Ray examinations. However, 11 cases in which pacemakers malfunctioned (for example partial electrical reset) during CT examinations have been reported in recent years. At the time, we tended to attribute such problems to the peculiarities of multi-detector CT (MDCT). However, on logical grounds this explanation seemed weak. To better explain the problem, we attempted various tests in which pacemakers were exposed to CT and X-ray photography equipment. We analyzed some ECG results to clarify the matter and took measurements to examine these problems. PMID:18719296

  12. Dynamics of PKA phosphorylation and gain of function in cardiac pacemaker cells: a computational model analysis.

    PubMed

    Behar, Joachim; Yaniv, Yael

    2016-05-01

    Cardiac pacemaker cell function is regulated by a coupled-clock system that integrates molecular cues on the cell-membrane surface (i.e., membrane clock) and on the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) (i.e., Ca(2+) clock). A recent study has shown that cotransfection of spontaneous beating cells (HEK293 cells and neonatal rat myocytes) with R524Q-mutant human hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated molecules (the dominant component of funny channels) increases the funny channel's sensitivity to cAMP and leads to a decrease in spontaneous action potential (AP) cycle length (i.e., tachycardia). We hypothesize that in rabbit pacemaker cells, the same behavior is expected, and because of the coupled-clock system, the resultant steady-state decrease in AP cycle length will embody contributions from both clocks: the initial decrease in the spontaneous AP beating interval, arising from increased sensitivity of the f-channel to cAMP, will be accompanied by an increase in the adenylyl cyclase (AC)-cAMP-PKA-dependent phosphorylation activity, which will further decrease this interval. To test our hypothesis, we used the recently developed Yaniv-Lakatta pacemaker cell numerical model. This model predicts the cAMP signaling dynamics, as well as the kinetics and magnitude of protein phosphorylation in both normal and mutant pacemaker cells. We found that R524Q-mutant pacemaker cells have a shorter AP firing rate than that of wild-type cells and that gain in pacemaker function is the net effect of the R514Q mutation on the functioning of the coupled-clock system. Specifically, our results directly support the hypothesis that changes in Ca(2+)-activated AC-cAMP-PKA signaling are involved in the development of tachycardia in R524Q-mutant pacemaker cells. PMID:26945074

  13. Precise Estimation of Cellular Radio Electromagnetic Field in Elevators and EMI Impact on Implantable Cardiac Pacemakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Louis-Ray; Hikage, Takashi; Nojima, Toshio

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the possible impact of cellular phones' signals on implantable cardiac pacemakers in elevators. This is achieved by carrying out precise numerical simulations based on the Finite-Difference-Time-Domain method to examine the electromagnetic fields in elevator models. In order to examine the realistic and complicated situations where humans are present in the elevator, we apply the realistic homogeneous human phantom and cellular radios operating in the frequency bands 800MHz, 1.5GHz and 2GHz. These computed results of field strength inside the elevator are compared with a certain reference level determined from the experimentally obtained maximum interference distance of implantable cardiac pacemakers. This enables us to carry out a quantitative evaluation of the EMI risk to pacemakers by cellular radio transmission. The results show that for the case when up to 5 mobile radio users are present in the elevator model used, there is no likelihood of pacemaker malfunction for the frequency bands 800MHz, 1.5GHz and 2GHz.

  14. Self-powered cardiac pacemaker enabled by flexible single crystalline PMN-PT piezoelectric energy harvester.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Geon-Tae; Park, Hyewon; Lee, Jeong-Ho; Oh, SeKwon; Park, Kwi-Il; Byun, Myunghwan; Park, Hyelim; Ahn, Gun; Jeong, Chang Kyu; No, Kwangsoo; Kwon, HyukSang; Lee, Sang-Goo; Joung, Boyoung; Lee, Keon Jae

    2014-07-23

    A flexible single-crystalline PMN-PT piezoelectric energy harvester is demonstrated to achieve a self-powered artificial cardiac pacemaker. The energy-harvesting device generates a short-circuit current of 0.223 mA and an open-circuit voltage of 8.2 V, which are enough not only to meet the standard for charging commercial batteries but also for stimulating the heart without an external power source. PMID:24740465

  15. 21 CFR 870.5550 - External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... electrodes such as defibrillator paddles. (b) Classification. Class II. The special controls for this device...-21 ‘Cardiac Defibrillator Devices’ ” 2d ed., 1996, and (2) “The maximum pulse amplitude should...

  16. Effects of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on cardiac pacemakers. Final report, Nov 88-Oct 89

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, V.J.

    1991-11-01

    The U.S. Army Harry Diamond Laboratories' (HDL's) Woodbridge Research Facility (WRF) has conducted an investigation into the effects of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on medical electronics. This report specifically documents the findings on the effects of WRF's Army EMP Simulator Operations (AESOP) on cardiac pacemakers (CPMs). Empirical data are furnished and compared to the results of two independent analytical studies. The studies support the conclusion that damage to CPMs that might be located near the WRF boundaries is not likely. Furthermore, any upset in a CPM's operation is considered unlikely and inconsequential to the health of the CPM wearer. Cardiac pacemakers (CPMs) have experienced significant technological advancements over the last decade, evolving from simple and bulky pulse generators to the small and sophisticated computerized units implanted today. With the implementation of sensitive digital electronics in modern pacemaker designs, concerns have been expressed for the possibility of an increased sensitivity of CPMs to electromagnetic interference (EMI). To some extent these concerns have abated to the increased awareness of the EMI problem by the manufacturers, as evident in better peacemaker designs and the decline in reported malfunctions due to EMI.

  17. Programmable Pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division, formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc., incorporated Apollo technology into the development of the programmable pacemaker system. This consists of the implantable pacemaker together with a physician's console containing the programmer and a data printer. Physician can communicate with patient's pacemaker by means of wireless telemetry signals transmitted through the communicating head held over the patient's chest. Where earlier pacemakers deliver a fixed type of stimulus once implanted, Programalith enables surgery free "fine tuning" of device to best suit the patient's changing needs.

  18. A fiber optic sensor system for control of rate-adaptive cardiac pacemakers and implantable defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Müller, Stefan; Hexamer, Martin; Werner, Jürgen

    2006-12-01

    Commercially available cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverters/defibrillators (ICDs) predominantly use an intracardiac-derived electrocardiogram (ECG) for the detection of arrhythmias. To achieve automatic control of the heart frequency in accordance with cardiovascular strain and improved detection of life-threatening arrhythmias, it is desirable to monitor the heart by an input signal correlated with the hemodynamic state. One possible approach to derive such a signal is to measure the inotropy (mechanical contraction strength of the heart muscle). For this purpose, an optoelectronic measurement system has been designed. The fundamental function of the system has been shown in earlier investigations using an isolated beating pig heart. In this paper the design of two algorithms for use in pacemakers and ICDs based on a fiber optic sensor signal is presented. PMID:17155869

  19. Cardiorespiratory Mechanical Simulator for In Vitro Testing of Impedance Minute Ventilation Sensors in Cardiac Pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Marcelli, Emanuela; Cercenelli, Laura

    2016-01-01

    We developed a cardiorespiratory mechanical simulator (CRMS), a system able to reproduce both the cardiac and respiratory movements, intended to be used for in vitro testing of impedance minute ventilation (iMV) sensors in cardiac pacemakers. The simulator consists of two actuators anchored to a human thorax model and a software interface to control the actuators and to acquire/process impedance signals. The actuators can be driven separately or simultaneously to reproduce the cardiac longitudinal shortening at a programmable heart rate and the diaphragm displacement at a programmable respiratory rate (RR). A standard bipolar pacing lead moving with the actuators and a pacemaker case fixed to the thorax model have been used to measure impedance (Z) variations during the simulated cardiorespiratory movements. The software is able to discriminate the low-frequency component because of respiration (Z(R)) from the high-frequency ripple because of cardiac effect (Z(C)). Impedance minute ventilation is continuously calculated from Z(R) and RR. From preliminary tests, the CRMS proved to be a reliable simulator for in vitro evaluation of iMV sensors. Respiration impedance recordings collected during cardiorespiratory movements reproduced by the CRMS were comparable in morphology and amplitude with in vivo assessments of transthoracic impedance variations. PMID:26501915

  20. Functional Role of CLC-2 Chloride Inward Rectifier Channels in Cardiac Sinoatrial Nodal Pacemaker Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Z. Maggie; Prasad, Chaithra; Britton, Fiona C.; Ye, Linda L.; Hatton, William J.; Duan, Dayue

    2009-01-01

    A novel Cl− inward rectifier channel (Cl,ir) encoded by ClC-2, a member of the ClC voltage-gated Cl− channel gene superfamily, has been recently discovered in cardiac myocytes of several species. However, the physiological role of Cl,ir channels in the heart remains unknown. In this study we tested the hypothesis that Cl,ir channels may play an important role in cardiac pacemaker activity. In isolated guinea-pig sinoatrial node (SAN) cells, Cl,ir current was activated by hyperpolarization and hypotonic cell swelling. RT-PCR and immunohistological analyses confirmed the molecular expression of ClC-2 in guinea-pig SAN cells. Hypotonic stress increased the diastolic depolarization slope and decreased the maximum diastolic potential, action potential amplitude, APD50, APD90, and the cycle-length of the SAN cells. These effects were largely reversed by intracellular dialysis of anti-ClC-2 antibody, which significantly inhibited Cl,ir current but not other pacemaker currents, including the hyperpolarization-activated non-selective cationic “funny” current (If), the L-type Ca2+ currents (ICa,L), the slowly-activating delayed rectifier IKs and the volume-regulated outwardly-rectifying Cl− current (ICl,vol). Telemetry electrocardiograph studies in conscious ClC-2 knockout (Clcn2−/−) mice revealed a decreased chronotropic response to acute exercise stress when compared to their age-matched Clcn2+/+ and Clcn2+/− littermates. Targeted inactivation of ClC-2 does not alter intrinsic heart rate but prevented the positive chronotropic effect of acute exercise stress through a sympathetic regulation of ClC-2 channels. These results provide compelling evidence that ClC-2-encoded endogenous Cl,ir channels may play an important role in the regulation of cardiac pacemaker activity, which may become more prominent under stressed or pathological conditions. PMID:19376127

  1. Why We Have to Use Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy-Pacemaker More.

    PubMed

    Daubert, Jean-Claude; Martins, Raphaël; Leclercq, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    Both cardiac resynchronization therapy with a pacemaker (CRT-P) and with a biventricular implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (CRT-D) are electrical treatment modalities validated for the management of chronic heart failure. There is no strong scientific evidence that a CRT-D must be offered to all candidates. Common sense should limit the prescription of these costly and complicated devices. The choice of CRT-P is currently acceptable. A direction to explore could be to downgrade from CRT-D to CRT-P at the time of battery depletion in patients with large reverse remodeling and no ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation detected. PMID:26596813

  2. Seven times replacement of permanent cardiac pacemaker in 33 years to maintain adequate heart rate: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yinglu; Li, Yanping; Liao, Derong; Yang, Ling

    2015-12-01

    Over the past few decades, recent developments in pacemaker technology from fixed-rate single-chamber pacemakers to dual chamber pacemakers with pacing algorithms have changed the therapeutic landscape resulting in better healthcare outcomes by improving rate response with minimal ventricular pacing. Here, we share our longest clinical experience with an elderly Chinese male patient who was diagnosed with third-degree atrioventricular (AV) block and was admitted in our hospital 33 years ago. An 85-year-old male patient from China was hospitalized due to dizziness and syncope, with an initial diagnosis revealing third-degree AV block with a heart rate of 35-40 beats per minute (bpm) along with Aase's syndrome and primary hypertension. A single-chamber pacemaker (VVI) was implanted immediately giving the patient symptomatic relief. However, 5-year post-surgery VVI was replaced due to battery exhaustion, while the primary electrode catheter was kept in use. Few years later, the patient again complained of dizziness and re-examination revealed VVI battery debilitation due to premature battery exhaustion. Single-chamber pacemaker was again implanted via the same position of right upper chest. However, after adjusting the frequency of stimulation of the pacemaker to 70 bpm, patient had a symptomatic relief. Considering the severity of patient's disease and knowing that cardiac dysfunction was reported previously, a tri-chamber pacemaker was chosen to take place of previous single-chamber pacemaker. For 33 years, the patient underwent 7 times replacement of pacemaker for battery exhaustion or inadequacy. We successfully performed overall seven pacemaker implantations and upgradation in an elderly Chinese patient diagnosed with third-degree AV block for 33 years. A long following up till now demonstrated no major complications with normal heart rate functioning. PMID:26734649

  3. Septic Pulmonary Embolism Caused by Infected Pacemaker Leads After Replacement of a Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Device.

    PubMed

    Said, Salah A M; Nijhuis, Rogier; Derks, Anita; Droste, Herman

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has been demonstrated to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with advanced, drug-refractory heart failure. Procedure-related mortality is less than 1% in larger studies. Approximately10% of CRT patients have to undergo surgical revision because of infections, dislocations, or unacceptable electrical behavior manifested as high threshold, unstable sensing, or unwanted phrenic nerve stimulation. CASE REPORT A 70-year-old man with symptomatic congestive heart failure underwent implantation of a biventricular pacemaker on the left anterior chest wall in 2003 and pulse generator exchange in August 2009. The patient responded well to CRT. At follow-up, the pacing system functioned normally. In September 2009, in the context of a predialysis program, an abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan was performed in another hospital for assessment and evaluation of chronic kidney disease. This procedure was complicated with peripheral thrombophlebitis that was managed appropriately with complete recovery. Eight months later (May 2010), the patient was admitted to our hospital with fever, anemia, and elevated infection parameters. During admission, blood cultures grew Staphylococcus epidermidis. The chest X-ray, lung perfusion scintigraphy, and CT scan depicted pulmonary embolism and infarction. The right ventricular lead threshold was found to be increased to 7 volts with unsuccessful capture. Echocardiography demonstrated vegetations on leads. The entire pacing system was explanted, but the patient expired few days later following percutaneous removal due to multiorgan failure. CONCLUSIONS In heart failure, replacement of the CRT device may be complicated by bacterial endocarditis. As noted from this case report, sudden elevation of the pacing lead threshold should prompt thorough and immediate investigation to unravel its causes, not only the electrical characteristics but also the anatomical features. PMID:27435910

  4. Genetically engineered cardiac pacemaker: Stem cells transfected with HCN2 gene and myocytes—A model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanani, S.; Pumir, A.; Krinsky, V.

    2008-01-01

    One of the successfully tested methods to design genetically engineered cardiac pacemaker cells consists in transfecting a human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) with a HCN2 gene and connecting it to a myocyte. We develop and study a mathematical model, describing a myocyte connected to a hMSC transfected with a HCN2 gene. The cardiac action potential is described both with the simple Beeler Reuter model, as well as with the elaborate dynamic Luo Rudy model. The HCN2 channel is described by fitting electrophysiological records, in the spirit of Hodgkin Huxley. The model shows that oscillations can occur in a pair myocyte-stem cell, that was not observed in the experiments yet. The model predicted that: (1) HCN pacemaker channels can induce oscillations only if the number of expressed I channels is low enough. At too high an expression level of I channels, oscillations cannot be induced, no matter how many pacemaker channels are expressed. (2) At low expression levels of I channels, a large domain of values in the parameter space (n, N) exists, where oscillations should be observed. We denote N the number of expressed pacemaker channels in the stem cell, and n the number of gap junction channels coupling the stem cell and the myocyte. (3) The expression levels of I channels observed in ventricular myocytes, both in the Beeler Reuter and in the dynamic Luo Rudy models are too high to allow to observe oscillations. With expression levels below ˜1/4 of the original value, oscillations can be observed. The main consequence of this work is that in order to obtain oscillations in an experiment with a myocyte-stem cell pair, increasing the values of n, N is unlikely to be helpful, unless the expression level of I has been reduced enough. The model also allows us to explore levels of gene expression not yet achieved in experiments, and could be useful to plan new experiments, aimed at improving the robustness of the oscillations.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cardiac pacemakers: era of "MR Conditional" designs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Advances in cardiac device technology have led to the first generation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) conditional devices, providing more diagnostic imaging options for patients with these devices, but also new controversies. Prior studies of pacemakers in patients undergoing MRI procedures have provided groundwork for design improvements. Factors related to magnetic field interactions and transfer of electromagnetic energy led to specific design changes. Ferromagnetic content was minimized. Reed switches were modified. Leads were redesigned to reduce induced currents/heating. Circuitry filters and shielding were implemented to impede or limit the transfer of certain unwanted electromagnetic effects. Prospective multicenter clinical trials to assess the safety and efficacy of the first generation of MR conditional cardiac pacemakers demonstrated no significant alterations in pacing parameters compared to controls. There were no reported complications through the one month visit including no arrhythmias, electrical reset, inhibition of generator output, or adverse sensations. The safe implementation of these new technologies requires an understanding of the well-defined patient and MR system conditions. Although scanning a patient with an MR conditional device following the strictly defined patient and MR system conditions appears straightforward, issues related to patients with pre-existing devices remain complex. Until MR conditional devices are the routine platform for all of these devices, there will still be challenging decisions regarding imaging patients with pre-existing devices where MRI is required to diagnose and manage a potentially life threatening or serious scenario. A range of other devices including ICDs, biventricular devices, and implantable physiologic monitors as well as guidance of medical procedures using MRI technology will require further biomedical device design changes and testing. The development and implementation of cardiac MR

  6. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing. PMID:22276376

  7. Profile of St. Jude Medical's Allure Quadra quadripolar pacemaker system for cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Corbisiero, Raffaele; Muller, David

    2015-01-01

    Congestive heart failure is a major public health epidemic and economic burden in the USA and worldwide. Cardiac resynchronization therapy is an effective therapy for treating congestive heart failure in conjunction with pharmacologic therapy. The average congestive heart failure admission costs approximately US$ 8 billion annually. Current cardiac resynchronization therapy pacemaker systems from various manufacturers deliver therapy-utilizing bipolar leads including the left ventricle, with electrode spacing ranging from 8 to 22 mm. The Quartet LV™ lead model 1458Q (St. Jude Medical Sylmar, CA) is a quadripolar lead with a 4.0 Fr. tip electrode and three 4.7 Fr. ring electrodes located 20, 30 and 47 mm from the tip. The Quartet lead and Allure Quadra TM allows 14 pacing configurations, providing benefits, including reductions in phrenic nerve stimulation, reduced pacing thresholds, improved battery longevity and potential reductions, in non-responders to cardiac resynchronization therapy. In addition, there is cost benefit data from utilizing quadripolar technology compared with traditional bipolar cardiac resynchronization therapy. PMID:25418543

  8. Early performance of a miniaturized leadless cardiac pacemaker: the Micra Transcatheter Pacing Study

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Philippe; Duray, Gabor Z.; Steinwender, Clemens; Soejima, Kyoko; Omar, Razali; Mont, Lluís; Boersma, Lucas VA; Knops, Reinoud E.; Chinitz, Larry; Zhang, Shu; Narasimhan, Calambur; Hummel, John; Lloyd, Michael; Simmers, Timothy Alexander; Voigt, Andrew; Laager, Verla; Stromberg, Kurt; Bonner, Matthew D.; Sheldon, Todd J.; Reynolds, Dwight

    2015-01-01

    Aims Permanent cardiac pacing is the only effective treatment for symptomatic bradycardia, but complications associated with conventional transvenous pacing systems are commonly related to the pacing lead and pocket. We describe the early performance of a novel self-contained miniaturized pacemaker. Methods and results Patients having Class I or II indication for VVI pacing underwent implantation of a Micra transcatheter pacing system, from the femoral vein and fixated in the right ventricle using four protractible nitinol tines. Prespecified objectives were >85% freedom from unanticipated serious adverse device events (safety) and <2 V 3-month mean pacing capture threshold at 0.24 ms pulse width (efficacy). Patients were implanted (n = 140) from 23 centres in 11 countries (61% male, age 77.0 ± 10.2 years) for atrioventricular block (66%) or sinus node dysfunction (29%) indications. During mean follow-up of 1.9 ± 1.8 months, the safety endpoint was met with no unanticipated serious adverse device events. Thirty adverse events related to the system or procedure occurred, mostly due to transient dysrhythmias or femoral access complications. One pericardial effusion without tamponade occurred after 18 device deployments. In 60 patients followed to 3 months, mean pacing threshold was 0.51 ± 0.22 V, and no threshold was ≥2 V, meeting the efficacy endpoint (P < 0.001). Average R-wave was 16.1 ± 5.2 mV and impedance was 650.7 ± 130 ohms. Conclusion Early assessment shows the transcatheter pacemaker can safely and effectively be applied. Long-term safety and benefit of the pacemaker will further be evaluated in the trial. Clinical Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT02004873. PMID:26045305

  9. The relevance of non-excitable cells for cardiac pacemaker function

    PubMed Central

    Fahrenbach, John P; Mejia-Alvarez, Rafael; Banach, Kathrin

    2007-01-01

    Age-dependent changes in the architecture of the sinus node comprise an increasing ratio between fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes. This change is discussed as a potential mechanism for sinus node disease. The goal of this study was to determine the mechanism through which non-excitable cells influence the spontaneous activity of multicellular cardiomyocyte preparations. Cardiomyocyte monolayers (HL-1 cells) or embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes were used as two- and three-dimensional cardiac pacemaker models. Spontaneous activity and conduction velocity (θ) were monitored by field potential measurements with microelectrode arrays (MEAs). The influence of fibroblasts (WT-fibs) was determined in heterocellular cultures of different cardiomyocyte and fibroblast ratios. The relevance of heterocellular gap junctional coupling was evaluated by the use of fibroblasts deficient for the expression of Cx43 (Cx43−/−-fibs). The beating frequency and θ of heterocellular cultures depended negatively on the fibroblast concentration. Interspersion of fibroblasts in cardiomyocyte monolayers increased the coefficient of the interbeat interval variability. Whereas Cx43−/−-fibs decreased θ significantly less than WT-fibs, their effect on the beating frequency and the beat-to-beat variability seemed largely independent of their ability to establish intercellular coupling. These results suggest that electrically integrated, non-excitable cells modulate the excitability of cardiac pacemaker preparations by two distinct mechanisms, one dependent and the other independent of the heterocellular coupling established. Whereas heterocellular coupling enables the fibroblast to depolarize the cardiomyocytes or to act as a current sink, the mere physical separation of the cardiomyocytes by fibroblasts induces bradycardia through a reduction in frequency entrainment. PMID:17932143

  10. Exercise training starting at weaning age preserves cardiac pacemaker function in adulthood of diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Carvalho de Lima, Daniel; Guimarães, Juliana Bohnen; Rodovalho, Gisele Vieira; Silveira, Simonton Andrade; Haibara, Andrea Siqueira; Coimbra, Cândido Celso

    2014-08-01

    Peripheral sympathetic overdrive in young obese subjects contributes to further aggravation of insulin resistance, diabetes, and hypertension, thus inducing worsening clinical conditions in adulthood. Exercise training has been considered a strategy to repair obesity autonomic dysfunction, thereby reducing the cardiometabolic risk. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of early exercise training, starting immediately after weaning, on cardiac autonomic control in diet-induced obese rats. Male Wistar rats (weaning) were divided into four groups: (i) a control group (n = 6); (ii) an exercise-trained control group (n = 6); (iii) a diet-induced obesity group (n = 6); and (iv) an exercise-trained diet-induced obesity group (n = 6). The development of obesity was induced by 9 weeks of palatable diet intake, and the training program was implemented in a motor-driven treadmill (5 times per week) during the same period. After this period, animals were submitted to vein and artery catheter implantation to assess cardiac autonomic balance by methylatropine (3 mg/kg) and propranolol (4 mg/kg) administration. Exercise training increased running performance in both groups (p < 0.05). Exercise training also prevented the increased resting heart rate in obese rats, which seemed to be related to cardiac pacemaker activity preservation (p < 0.05). Additionally, the training program preserved the pressure and bradycardia responses to autonomic blockade in obese rats (p < 0.05). An exercise program beginning at weaning age prevents cardiovascular dysfunction in obese rats, indicating that exercise training may be used as a nonpharmacological therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cardiometabolic diseases. PMID:24806307

  11. Multicellular automaticity of cardiac cell monolayers: effects of density and spatial distribution of pacemaker cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elber Duverger, James; Boudreau-Béland, Jonathan; Le, Minh Duc; Comtois, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Self-organization of pacemaker (PM) activity of interconnected elements is important to the general theory of reaction-diffusion systems as well as for applications such as PM activity in cardiac tissue to initiate beating of the heart. Monolayer cultures of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) are often used as experimental models in studies on cardiac electrophysiology. These monolayers exhibit automaticity (spontaneous activation) of their electrical activity. At low plated density, cells usually show a heterogeneous population consisting of PM and quiescent excitable cells (QECs). It is therefore highly probable that monolayers of NRVMs consist of a heterogeneous network of the two cell types. However, the effects of density and spatial distribution of the PM cells on spontaneous activity of monolayers remain unknown. Thus, a simple stochastic pattern formation algorithm was implemented to distribute PM and QECs in a binary-like 2D network. A FitzHugh-Nagumo excitable medium was used to simulate electrical spontaneous and propagating activity. Simulations showed a clear nonlinear dependency of spontaneous activity (occurrence and amplitude of spontaneous period) on the spatial patterns of PM cells. In most simulations, the first initiation sites were found to be located near the substrate boundaries. Comparison with experimental data obtained from cardiomyocyte monolayers shows important similarities in the position of initiation site activity. However, limitations in the model that do not reflect the complex beat-to-beat variation found in experiments indicate the need for a more realistic cardiomyocyte representation.

  12. [Behavior of various activity-controlled cardiac pacemakers in treadmill stress tests with variable slopes].

    PubMed

    Matula, M; Hölzer, K; Zitzmann, E; Schön, H; Alt, E

    1993-02-01

    New activity pacemaker systems with the principle of sensing low-frequency acceleration in the anterior-posterior axis are currently under clinical evaluation. We compared the pacemaker system Relay, which represents this new generation of accelerometer controlled devices, with conventional activity systems sensing pressure and vibration. Ten pacemaker patients with implanted Activitrax, Sensolog or Relay pacemakers and 10 healthy volunteers with externally strapped-on pacemakers were studied. The aim was to evaluate the systems' ability to distinguish different workloads during graded treadmill testing with changes in speed and/or slope. The rate adaption of the new acceleration sensing pacemakers was found to be more adequate compared to vibration and pressure-sensing pacemakers when only the slope of the treadmill was varied. The acceleration-sensing pacemaker adjusted its rate according to the workload largely independent from the type of stress (n.s.). With the vibration and pressure-sensing pacemakers, however, significant differences (p < 0.05) were seen between rate adaption in the two stress test modes. The new generation of acceleration-sensing pacemakers has certain advantages over conventional vibration-sensitive systems in terms of a higher sensitivity to varying workloads and higher specificity to the type of exercise performed. PMID:8465563

  13. How Does a Pacemaker Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Does a Pacemaker Work? A pacemaker consists of a battery, a computerized ... these recordings to adjust your pacemaker so it works better for you. Your doctor can program the ...

  14. Reducing RF-related heating of cardiac pacemaker leads in MRI: implementation and experimental verification of practical design changes.

    PubMed

    Nordbeck, Peter; Fidler, Florian; Friedrich, Michael T; Weiss, Ingo; Warmuth, Marcus; Gensler, Daniel; Herold, Volker; Geistert, Wolfgang; Jakob, Peter M; Ertl, Georg; Ritter, Oliver; Ladd, Mark E; Bauer, Wolfgang R; Quick, Harald H

    2012-12-01

    There are serious concerns regarding safety when performing magnetic resonance imaging in patients with implanted conductive medical devices, such as cardiac pacemakers, and associated leads, as severe incidents have occurred in the past. In this study, several approaches for altering an implant's lead design were systematically developed and evaluated to enhance the safety of implanted medical devices in a magnetic resonance imaging environment. The individual impact of each design change on radiofrequency heating was then systematically investigated in functional lead prototypes at 1.5 T. Radiofrequency-induced heating could be successfully reduced by three basic changes in conventional pacemaker lead design: (1) increasing the lead tip area, (2) increasing the lead conductor resistance, and (3) increasing outer lead insulation conductivity. The findings show that radiofrequency energy pickup in magnetic resonance imaging can be reduced and, therefore, patient safety can be improved with dedicated construction changes according to a "safe by design" strategy. Incorporation of the described alterations into implantable medical devices such as pacemaker leads can be used to help achieve favorable risk-benefit-ratios when performing magnetic resonance imaging in the respective patient group. PMID:22383393

  15. Single cardiac Purkinje cells: general electrophysiology and voltage-clamp analysis of the pace-maker current.

    PubMed

    Callewaert, G; Carmeliet, E; Vereecke, J

    1984-04-01

    reverse near the presumed equilibrium potential for K ions; no reversal could be seen in the voltage range negative to -50 mV. These observations together with preliminary results on the Na and K dependence of the pace-maker current are strong arguments in favour of the hypothesis that the pace-maker current in cardiac Purkinje fibres is an inward current carried by Na and K ions and activates upon hyperpolarization. PMID:6737305

  16. The influence of anatomical and physiological parameters on the interference voltage at the input of unipolar cardiac pacemakers in low frequency electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joosten, S.; Pammler, K.; Silny, J.

    2009-02-01

    The problem of electromagnetic interference of electronic implants such as cardiac pacemakers has been well known for many years. An increasing number of field sources in everyday life and occupational environment leads unavoidably to an increased risk for patients with electronic implants. However, no obligatory national or international safety regulations exist for the protection of this patient group. The aim of this study is to find out the anatomical and physiological worst-case conditions for patients with an implanted pacemaker adjusted to unipolar sensing in external time-varying electric fields. The results of this study with 15 volunteers show that, in electric fields, variation of the interference voltage at the input of a cardiac pacemaker adds up to 200% only because of individual factors. These factors should be considered in human studies and in the setting of safety regulations.

  17. Feasibility of spinal cord stimulation in angina pectoris in patients with chronic pacemaker treatment for cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Ekre, Olof; Börjesson, Mats; Edvardsson, Nils; Eliasson, Tore; Mannheimer, Clas

    2003-11-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been used since 1985 as additional symptom-relieving treatment for patients with severe angina pectoris despite optimal conventional medical and invasive treatment. SCS has antiischemic effects and is safe and effective in long-term use. Several patients with coronary artery disease also suffer from disorders that necessitate the use of a cardiac permanent pacemaker (PPM). The combination of SCS and PPM has previously been considered hazardous because of possible false inhibition of the PPM. To assess if thoracic SCS and PPM can be safely combined in patients with refractory angina pectoris, 18 patients treated with both SCS and PPM were tested. The PPM settings were temporarily modified to increase the probability of interference, while the SCS intensity (used in bipolar mode) was increased to the maximum level tolerated by the patient. Any sign of inhibition of the ventricular pacing was recorded by continuous ECG monitoring. With the aid of a questionnaire, symptoms of interference during long-term treatment were evaluated. No patient had signs of inhibition during the tests. Reprogramming of the pacemaker because of the test results was not needed in any of the patients. The long-term follow-up data revealed no serious events. This study indicates that bipolar SCS and PPM can be safely combined in patients with refractory angina pectoris. However, individual testing is mandatory to ascertain safety in each patient. A testing procedure for patients in need of SCS and PPM is suggested in this article. PMID:14622316

  18. Evaluation of patients' quality of life aspects after cardiac pacemaker implantation

    PubMed Central

    de Barros, Rubens Tofano; de Carvalho, Sebastião Marcos Ribeiro; Silva, Marcos Augusto de Moraes; Borges, Juliana Bassalobre Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate patients' quality of life aspects after pacemaker implantation, relating it to gender, age, and implantation timespan. Methods A total of 107 clinically stable patients of both genders (49.5% women and 50.5% men) over 18 years old (average 69.3±12.6 years) and presenting an implantation timespan of three to 12 months (average 6.36±2.99 months) were evaluated. The evaluation included personal, clinical, and implant data as well as quality of life questionnaires (AQUAREL and SF-36). Statistical analysis was conducted using the t test and Pearson correlation, with a 5% significance level. Results The lowest SF-36 score referred to physical aspects, and the highest score referred to social aspects. In AQUAREL, the lowest score referred to dyspnea, and the highest referred to discomfort. There was a significant association between gender and quality of life in SF-36 (physical functioning and emotional aspects) and in AQUAREL (dyspnea). A negative correlation was observed between age and quality of life (functional capacity in SF-36, and discomfort in AQUAREL) in relation to implantation timespan, a correlation with vitality from SF-36. Conclusion Lower quality of life scores were found in physical aspects and dyspnea; and higher scores in social aspects and discomfort. Men presented higher quality of life scores related to physical functioning, emotional aspects and dyspnea. As age increases, quality of life worsens regarding functional capacity and discomfort; and the longer the pacemaker implantation timespan, the worse quality of life when it comes to vitality. Gender, age, and implantation timespan influence quality of life; thus, these variables must be considered in strategies for improving quality of life of patients with pacemakers. PMID:24896161

  19. Choosing pacemakers appropriately

    PubMed Central

    Panicker, G K; Desai, B; Lokhandwala, Y

    2009-01-01

    The range of implantable cardiac pacing devices has expanded, with the advances in available technology. Indications for cardiac pacing devices, that is pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) and cardiac resynchronisation therapy devices (CRTs), have expanded for the treatment, diagnosis and monitoring of bradycardia, tachycardia and heart failure. While the need for pacemakers is increasing, not all patients who require pacemakers are receiving them, especially in the Asia-Pacific region. There is a need to be more critical in advising the use of more expensive devices like ICDs and CRT/CRT-D devices, since most patients in the Asia-Pacific region pay out of pocket for these therapies. The AHA-ACC guidelines need not be blindly followed, since they are too wide-sweeping and are often based on the intention-to-treat basis of trials rather than on the parameters of the patients actually enrolled. PMID:27325922

  20. Dosimetric perturbations due to an implanted cardiac pacemaker in MammoSite{sup Registered-Sign} treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Wonmo; Kim, Siyong; Kim, Jung-in; Lee, Jae-gi; Shin, Young-Joo; Jung, Jae-Yong; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate dose perturbations for pacemaker-implanted patients in partial breast irradiation using high dose rate (HDR) balloon brachytherapy. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed to calculate dose distributions involving a pacemaker in Ir-192 HDR balloon brachytherapy. Dose perturbations by varying balloon-to-pacemaker distances (BPD = 50 or 100 mm) and concentrations of iodine contrast medium (2.5%, 5.0%, 7.5%, and 10.0% by volume) in the balloon were investigated for separate parts of the pacemaker (i.e., battery and substrate). Relative measurements using an ion-chamber were also performed to confirm MC results. Results: The MC and measured results in homogeneous media without a pacemaker agreed with published data within 2% from the balloon surface to 100 mm BPD. Further their dose distributions with a pacemaker were in a comparable agreement. The MC results showed that doses over the battery were increased by a factor of 3, compared to doses without a pacemaker. However, there was no significant dose perturbation in the middle of substrate but up to 70% dose increase in the substrate interface with the titanium capsule. The attenuation by iodine contrast medium lessened doses delivered to the pacemaker by up to 9%. Conclusions: Due to inhomogeneity of pacemaker and contrast medium as well as low-energy photons in Ir-192 HDR balloon brachytherapy, the actual dose received in a pacemaker is different from the homogeneous medium-based dose and the external beam-based dose. Therefore, the dose perturbations should be considered for pacemaker-implanted patients when evaluating a safe clinical distance between the balloon and pacemaker.

  1. A pilot study of a mindfulness based stress reduction program in adolescents with implantable cardioverter defibrillators or pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Freedenberg, Vicki A; Thomas, Sue A; Friedmann, Erika

    2015-04-01

    Adolescents with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) or pacemakers (PMs) face unique challenges that can cause psychosocial distress. Psychosocial interventions are effective for adults with cardiac devices and could potentially impact adolescents' adjustment to these devices. Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a structured psycho-educational program that includes meditation, yoga, and group support and has been studied extensively among adults. This study examined the feasibility of the MBSR program for adolescents with ICDs/PMs, a population previously unexamined in the research literature. The participants completed measures of anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and coping (Responses to Stress Questionnaire) at baseline and after the six-session MBSR intervention. Mean age of the cohort (n = 10) was 15 ± 3 years, 6 were male, 6 had a PM, and 4 had an ICD. Feasibility was demonstrated by successful recruitment of 10 participants, 100 % participation and completion. Anxiety decreased significantly following the intervention, with a large effect size, t[9] = 3.67, p < .01, ŋ (2) = .59. Anxiety frequency decreased from baseline to post-intervention (Fisher's exact test p = .024), and 90 % of participants reported decreased anxiety scores post-intervention. Coping skills related negatively to anxiety (r = -.65, p = .04) and depression (r = -.88, p = .001). Post-intervention, the group independently formed their own Facebook group and requested to continue meeting monthly. Although generalizability is limited due to the small sample size, this successful pilot study paves the way for larger studies to examine the efficacy of MBSR interventions in adolescents with high-risk cardiac diagnoses. PMID:25519914

  2. Radiography of Cardiac Conduction Devices: A Pictorial Review of Pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Ayala, Stephanie C; Santacana-Laffitte, Guido; Maldonado, José

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac conduction devices (CCDs) depend on correct anatomic positioning to function properly. Chest radiography is the preferred imaging modality to evaluate CCD's anatomic location, lead wire integrity, and help in identifying several complications. In this pictorial review, our goal is to familiarize radiologists with CCD implantation techniques, appropriate positioning of the device, common causes of malfunction, methods to improve report accuracy, and assure maximal therapeutic benefit. PMID:25806132

  3. Electromagnetic interference from lasers and intense light sources in the treatment of patients with artificial pacemakers and other implantable cardiac devices.

    PubMed

    Lister, Tom; Grant, Lindsay; Lee, Siu-Man; Cole, Richard P; Jones, Anthony; Taylor, Timothy; Mayo, Angela; Wright, Philip A

    2015-07-01

    Measurements of the electric and magnetic field strengths surrounding six laser systems and one intense pulsed light system were carried out. The results were compared to exposure limits published by cardiac device manufacturers to assess the risk of electromagnetic interference to implantable cardiac devices such as pacemakers or implantable cardioverter defibrillators. The majority of lasers assessed in this study were found to produce electric and magnetic field strengths below the published exposure limits for cardiac devices. However, the low-frequency electric field and static magnetic field of both the CO2 laser and the ruby laser were found to exceed these limits. Ensuring that a small separation is maintained at all times between the laser unit and any patient with a pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator appears to be a sensible expedient in avoiding overexposure of an implantable cardiac device to electromagnetic interference. Due to the single-shot fast discharge nature of the intense pulsed light system, changes in electromagnetic field strength were too fast for some of the measuring equipment used in this study to register accurate readings during operation. PMID:24162308

  4. Cardiac resynchronization therapy pacemaker: critical appraisal of the adaptive CRT-P device

    PubMed Central

    Daoud, Georges E; Houmsse, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective and well-established therapy for patients suffering with heart failure, left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction (ejection fraction ≤35%), and electrical dyssynchrony, demonstrated by a surface QRS duration of ≥120 ms. Patients undergoing treatment with CRT have shown significant improvement in functional class, quality of life, LV ejection fraction, exercise capacity, hemodynamics, and reverse remodeling of LV, and ultimately, morbidity and mortality. However, 30%–40% of patients who receive a CRT device may not show improvement, and they are termed as non responders. The nonresponders have a poor prognosis; several methods have been developed to try to enhance response to CRT. Echocardiography-guided optimization of CRT has not resulted in significant clinical benefit, since it is done at rest with the patient in supine position. An ideal optimization strategy would provide continuous monitoring and adjustment of device pacing to provide maximal cardiac resynchronization, under a multitude of physiologic states. Intrinsic activation of the right ventricle (RV) with paced activation of the RV, even in the setting of biventricular (BiV) pacing, may result in an adverse effect on cardiac performance. With this physiology, the use of LV-only pacing may be preferred and may enhance CRT. Adaptive CRT is a novel device-based algorithm that was designed to achieve patient-specific adjustment in CRT so as to provide appropriate BiV pacing or LV-only pacing. This article will review the goals of CRT optimization, and implementation and outcomes associated with adaptive CRT. PMID:26848278

  5. Mapping Cardiac Pacemaker Circuits: Methodological Puzzles of the Sino-Atrial Node Optical Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Efimov, Igor R.; Fedorov, Vadim V.; Joung, Boyoung; Lin, Shien-Fong

    2009-01-01

    Historically, milestones in science are usually associated with methodological breakthroughs. Likewise, the advent of electrocardiography, microelectrode recordings and more recently optical mapping have ushered in new periods of significance of advancement in elucidating basic mechanisms in cardiac electrophysiology. As with any novel technique, however, data interpretation is challenging and should be approached with caution, as it cannot be simply extrapolated from previously used methodologies and with experience and time eventually becomes validated. A good example of this is the use of optical mapping in the sinoatrial node (SAN): when microelectrode and optical recordings are obtained from the same site in myocardium, significantly different results may be noted with respect to signal morphology and as a result have to be interpreted by a different set of principles. Given the rapid spread of the use of optical mapping, careful evaluation must be made in terms of methodology with respect to interpretation of data gathered by optical sensors from fluorescent potential-sensitive dyes. Different interpretations of experimental data may lead to different mechanistic conclusions. This review attempts to address the origin and interpretation of the “double component” morphology in the optical action potentials obtained from the SAN region. One view is that these two components represent distinctive signals from the sinoatrial node and atrial cells, and can be fully separated with signal processing. A second view is that the first component preceding the phase 0 activation represents the membrane currents and intracellular calcium transients induced diastolic depolarization from the SAN. While the consensus from both groups is that ionic mechanisms, namely the joint action of the membrane and calcium automaticity, are important in the SAN function, it is unresolved whether the double-component originates from the recording methodology or represents the

  6. Force and torque effects of a 1.5-Tesla MRI scanner on cardiac pacemakers and ICDs.

    PubMed

    Luechinger, R; Duru, F; Scheidegger, M B; Boesiger, P; Candinas, R

    2001-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a widely accepted tool for the diagnosis of a variety of disease states. However, the presence of an implanted pacemaker is considered to be a strict contraindication to MRI in a vast majority of centers due to safety concerns. In phantom studies, the authors investigated the force and torque effects of the static magnetic field of MRI on pacemakers and ICDs. Thirty-one pacemakers (15 dual chamber and 16 single chamber units) from eight manufacturers and 13 ICDs from four manufacturers were exposed to the static magnetic field of a 1.5-Tesla MRI scanner. Magnetic force and acceleration measurements were obtained quantitatively, and torque measurements were made qualitatively. For pacemakers, the measured magnetic force was in the range of 0.05-3.60 N. Pacemakers released after 1995 had low magnetic force values as compared to the older devices. For these devices, the measured acceleration was even lower than the gravity of the earth (< 9.81 N/kg). Likewise, the torque levels were significantly reduced in newer generation pacemakers (< or = 2 from a scale of 6). ICD devices, except for one recent model, showed higher force (1.03-5.85 N), acceleration 9.5-34.2 N/kg), and torque (5-6 out of 6) levels. In conclusion, modern pacemakers present no safety risk with respect to magnetic force and torque induced by the static magnetic field of a 1.5-Tesla MRI scanner. However, ICD devices, despite considerable reduction in size and weight, may still pose problems due to strong magnetic force and torque. PMID:11270700

  7. Report of the NASPE Policy Conference training requirements for permanent pacemaker selection, implantation, and follow-up. North American Society of Pacing and Electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Hayes, D L; Naccarelli, G V; Furman, S; Parsonnet, V

    1994-01-01

    NASPE proposes and supports the concept of a two-tracked training system in cardiac pacing. Track I training will properly train physicians for the prescription of pacemakers and the monitoring of pacemaker patients, and track II training will properly prepare physicians for the implantation of pacemakers. Regardless of specialty (cardiologist or surgeon) or training venue (cardiac pacing fellowship, cardiac electrophysiology and pacing fellowship, sabbatical or mentor sponsored training), it is recommended that these minimum standards be required for hospital credentialing. NASPE also supports the voluntary institution by training program directors of core pacing training in cardiovascular disease and cardiac electrophysiology fellowships. This core training does not in itself constitute proper track I or II training for physicians interested in adequately prescribing, monitoring, or implanting cardiac pacemakers. PMID:7511233

  8. Women's compliance with cardiac rehabilitation programs.

    PubMed

    Ginzel, A R

    1996-01-01

    As the incidence of cardiovascular disease in women increases, the process of cardiac rehabilitation in women is becoming increasingly important to nurses. Specifically, the issue of women's compliance with cardiac rehabilitation needs to be addressed by nurses. Most past and current research on cardiac rehabilitation and compliance with rehabilitation programs has been conducted on male subjects and cannot be accurately generalized to the female population. This article reviews current literature which addresses the issues of heart disease in women, cardiac rehabilitation and compliance in the general population, gender differences in cardiac rehabilitation, and compliance of women in cardiac rehabilitation. PMID:8657707

  9. Ca2+-Clock-Dependent Pacemaking in the Sinus Node Is Impaired in Mice with a Cardiac Specific Reduction in SERCA2 Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Logantha, Sunil Jit R. J.; Stokke, Mathis K.; Atkinson, Andrew J.; Kharche, Sanjay R.; Parveen, Sajida; Saeed, Yawer; Sjaastad, Ivar; Sejersted, Ole M.; Dobrzynski, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Background: The sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2) pump is an important component of the Ca2+-clock pacemaker mechanism that provides robustness and flexibility to sinus node pacemaking. We have developed transgenic mice with reduced cardiac SERCA2 abundance (Serca2 KO) as a model for investigating SERCA2's role in sinus node pacemaking. Methods and Results: In Serca2 KO mice, ventricular SERCA2a protein content measured by Western blotting was 75% (P < 0.05) lower than that in control mice (Serca2 FF) tissue. Immunofluorescent labeling of SERCA2a in ventricular, atrial, sinus node periphery and center tissue sections revealed 46, 45, 55, and 34% (all P < 0.05 vs. Serca2 FF) lower labeling, respectively and a mosaic pattern of expression. With telemetric ECG surveillance, we observed no difference in basal heart rate, but the PR-interval was prolonged in Serca2 KO mice: 49 ± 1 vs. 40 ± 1 ms (P < 0.001) in Serca2 FF. During exercise, heart rate in Serca2 KO mice was elevated to 667 ± 22 bpm, considerably less than 780 ± 17 bpm (P < 0.01) in Serca2 FF. In isolated sinus node preparations, 2 mM Cs+ caused bradycardia that was equally pronounced in Serca2 KO and Serca2 FF (32 ± 4% vs. 29 ± 5%), indicating no change in the pacemaker current, If. Disabling the Ca2+-clock with 2 μM ryanodine induced bradycardia that was less pronounced in Serca2 KO preparations (9 ± 1% vs. 20 ± 3% in Serca2 FF; P < 0.05), suggesting a disrupted Ca2+-clock. Mathematical modeling was used to dissect the effects of membrane- and Ca2+-clock components on Serca2 KO mouse heart rate and sinus node action potential. Computer modeling predicted a slowing of heart rate with SERCA2 downregulation and the heart rate slowing was pronounced at >70% reduction in SERCA2 activity. Conclusions: Serca2 KO mice show a disrupted Ca2+-clock-dependent pacemaker mechanism contributing to impaired sinus node and atrioventricular node function. PMID:27313537

  10. Large Controlled Observational Study on Remote Monitoring of Pacemakers and Implantable Cardiac Defibrillators: A Clinical, Economic, and Organizational Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with implantable devices such as pacemakers (PMs) and implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) should be followed up every 3–12 months, which traditionally required in-clinic visits. Innovative devices allow data transmission and technical or medical alerts to be sent from the patient's home to the physician (remote monitoring). A number of studies have shown its effectiveness in timely detection and management of both clinical and technical events, and endorsed its adoption. Unfortunately, in daily practice, remote monitoring has been implemented in uncoordinated and rather fragmented ways, calling for a more strategic approach. Objective The objective of the study was to analyze the impact of remote monitoring for PM and ICD in a “real world” context compared with in-clinic follow-up. The evaluation focuses on how this service is carried out by Local Health Authorities, the impact on the cardiology unit and the health system, and organizational features promoting or hindering its effectiveness and efficiency. Methods A multi-center, multi-vendor, controlled, observational, prospective study was conducted to analyze the impact of remote monitoring implementation. A total of 2101 patients were enrolled in the study: 1871 patients were followed through remote monitoring of PM/ICD (I-group) and 230 through in-clinic visits (U-group). The follow-up period was 12 months. Results In-clinic device follow-ups and cardiac visits were significantly lower in the I-group compared with the U-group, respectively: PM, I-group = 0.43, U-group = 1.07, P<.001; ICD, I-group = 0.98, U-group = 2.14, P<.001. PM, I-group = 0.37, U-group = 0.85, P<.001; ICD, I-group = 1.58, U-group = 1.69, P=.01. Hospitalizations for any cause were significantly lower in the I-group for PM patients only (I-group = 0.37, U-group = 0.50, P=.005). There were no significant differences regarding use of the emergency department for both PM and ICD patients. In the I-group, 0.30 (PM

  11. Heart pacemaker

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 ounce. Most pacemakers have 2 parts: The generator contains the battery and the information to control ... are wires that connect the heart to the generator and carry the electrical messages to the heart. ...

  12. Heart pacemaker

    MedlinePlus

    ... may not get enough oxygen. Symptoms may be light-headedness, tiredness, fainting spells, and shortness of breath. Some pacemakers can be used to stop a heart rate that is too fast ( tachycardia ) ...

  13. Mechanisms of Heart Block after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement – Cardiac Anatomy, Clinical Predictors and Mechanical Factors that Contribute to Permanent Pacemaker Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Young Lee, Mark; Chilakamarri Yeshwant, Srinath; Chava, Sreedivya; Lawrence Lustgarten, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a valuable, minimally invasive treatment option in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis at prohibitive or increased risk for conventional surgical replacement. Consequently, patients undergoing TAVR are prone to peri-procedural complications including cardiac conduction disturbances, which is the focus of this review. Atrioventricular conduction disturbances and arrhythmias before, during or after TAVR remain a matter of concern for this high-risk group of patients, as they have important consequences on hospital duration, short- and long-term medical management and finally on decisions of device-based treatment strategies (pacemaker or defibrillator implantation). We discuss the mechanisms of atrioventricular disturbances and characterise predisposing factors. Using validated clinical predictors, we discuss strategies to minimise the likelihood of creating permanent high-grade heart block, and identify factors to expedite the decision to implant a permanent pacemaker when the latter is unavoidable. We also discuss optimal pacing strategies to mitigate the possibility of pacing-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:26835105

  14. Legal Aspects of Cardiac Rehabilitation Exercise Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, William; Herbert, David L.

    1988-01-01

    A medical model is used to examine liability issues related to cardiac rehabilitation programs. Obtaining effective informed consent from patients, standardizing policies and procedures, and exercise prescription and monitoring are among the proposed elements of a risk management model for developing safe and legally defensible programs. (IAH)

  15. Dosimetry of electromagnetic field exposure of an active armlet and its electromagnetic interference to the cardiac pacemakers using adult, child and infant models.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hu; Wang, Yuduo; Yang, Jiangang; Wu, Tongning

    2016-01-01

    Wearable devices have been popularly used with people from different age groups. As a consequence, the concerns of their electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure to the human body and their electromagnetic interference (EMI) to the implanted medical devices have attracted many studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the human exposure to the EMF of an active radiofrequency identification (RFID) armlet as well as its EMI to the cardiac pacemaker (CP). Different human models from various age groups were applied to assess the result variability. The scalar potential finite element method was utilized in the simulation. Local EMF exposure and the exposure to the central nerve system tissues were evaluated using different metrics. EMI to the CP was assessed in terms of the conducted voltage to the CP. The results from all the models revealed that the studied RFID armlet would not produce the EMF exposure exceeding the safety limits. The calculated interference voltage was highly dependent on the distance between the RFID armlet and the CP (i.e. the physical dimension of the individual model). The results proposed to evaluate the appropriateness of the current EMI measurement protocol for this kind of devices used by the infants. PMID:25568953

  16. The past, present, and future of pacemaker therapies.

    PubMed

    Boink, Gerard J J; Christoffels, Vincent M; Robinson, Richard B; Tan, Hanno L

    2015-11-01

    Since its introduction into clinical practice, electronic pacing has saved many lives. Despite continuous improvements, electronic pacemakers have important shortcomings, which stimulated the development of biological alternatives. Biological pacemakers generate the cardiac impulse using genes or cells to treat bradycardias. Over the past decade, significant improvements have been made in biological pacemakers, but issues remain in relation to long-term outcomes and safety. Concurrently, efforts to improve electronic pacemakers have also intensified. Whether new generations of electronic pacemakers will erase lingering concerns with regard to electronic pacing or whether biologicals will ultimately supplement or supplant electronics remains to be seen. PMID:26001958

  17. Voltage clamp of bull-frog cardiac pace-maker cells: a quantitative analysis of potassium currents.

    PubMed Central

    Giles, W R; Shibata, E F

    1985-01-01

    Spontaneously active single cells have been obtained from the sinus venosus region of the bull-frog, Rana catesbeiana, using an enzymic dispersion procedure involving serial applications of trypsin, collagenase and elastase in nominally 0 Ca2+ Ringer solution. These cells have normal action potentials and fire spontaneously at a rate very similar to the intact sinus venosus. A single suction micro-electrode technique (Hamill, Marty, Neher, Sakmann & Sigworth, 1981; Hume & Giles, 1983) has been used to record the spontaneous diastolic depolarizations or pace-maker activity as well as the regenerative action potentials in these cells. This electrophysiological activity is completely insensitive to tetrodotoxin (TTX; 3 X 10(-6) M) and is very similar to that recorded from an in vitro sinus venosus preparation. The present experiments were aimed at identifying the transmembrane potassium currents, and analysing their role(s) in the development of the pace-maker potential and the repolarization of the action potential. Depolarizing voltage-clamp steps from the normal maximum diastolic potential (-75 mV) elicit a time- and voltage-dependent activation of an outward current. The reversal potential of this current in normal Ringer solution [( K+]0 2.5 mM) is near -95 mV; and it shifts by 51 mV per tenfold increase in [K+]0, which strongly suggests that this current is carried by K+. We therefore labelled it IK. The reversal potential of IK did not shift in the positive direction following very long (20 s) depolarizing clamp steps to +20 mV, indicating that 'extracellular' accumulation of [K+]0 does not produce any significant artifacts. The fully activated instantaneous current-voltage (I-V) relationship for IK is approximately linear over the range of potentials -130 to -30 mV. Thus, the ion transfer mechanism of IK may be described as a simple ohmic conductance in this range of potentials. Positive relative to -30 mV, however, the I-V exhibits significant inward

  18. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... percutaneous coronary interventions; (2) An intensive cardiac rehabilitation program must also demonstrate... coronary artery bypass surgery; (iii) Current stable angina pectoris; (iv) Heart valve repair or replacement; (v) Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) or coronary stenting; (vi) A heart...

  19. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... percutaneous coronary interventions; (2) An intensive cardiac rehabilitation program must also demonstrate... coronary artery bypass surgery; (iii) Current stable angina pectoris; (iv) Heart valve repair or replacement; (v) Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) or coronary stenting; (vi) A heart...

  20. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... percutaneous coronary interventions; (2) An intensive cardiac rehabilitation program must also demonstrate... coronary artery bypass surgery; (iii) Current stable angina pectoris; (iv) Heart valve repair or replacement; (v) Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) or coronary stenting; (vi) A heart...

  1. A short history on pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Ward, Catherine; Henderson, Susannah; Metcalfe, Neil H

    2013-11-15

    Artificial pacemakers have taken part or possibly driven many developments in cardiac science and medicine and are therefore a very important story to remember. This 300-year journey of discovery has been contributed to by experts from across the Globe. The essential foundation of knowledge such as basic electrophysiology and applied electrotherapy was built in the 18th century and is now academically and socially accepted. This line of inventions and research has seen: early use of meta-analyses, the initial coming together of medical or bioengineering and the concept of cardiac monitoring--now a mainstay in the hospital care of a patient. In the 21st century pacemaker developments are no longer solely about reducing mortality but improving morbidity. Design developments reduce: discomfort, additional surgeries and invasive procedures. New energy sources have become lighter, smaller and with a longer life span. PMID:24083883

  2. Cardiac phase: Amplitude analysis using macro programming

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, K.W.; Hickey, K.A.

    1981-11-01

    The analysis of EKG gated radionuclide cardiac imaging data with Fourier amplitude and phase images is becoming a valuable clinical technique, demonstrating location, size, and severity of regional ventricular abnormalities. Not all commercially available nuclear medicine computer systems offer software for phase and amplitude analysis; however, many systems do have the capability of linear image arithmetic using simple macro commands which can easily be sequenced into stored macro-strings or programs. Using simple but accurate series approximations for the Fourier operations, macro programs have been written for a Digital Equipment Corporation Gamma-11 system to obtain phase and amplitude images from routine gated cardiac studies. In addition, dynamic cine-mode presentation of the onset of mechanical systole is generated from the phase data, using only a second set of macro programs. This approach is easily adapted to different data acquisition protocols, and can be used on any system with macro commands for image arithmetic. Key words: Fourier analysis, cardiac cycle, gated blood pool imaging, amplitude image, phase image

  3. Energy-conserving programming of VVI pacemakers: a telemetry-supported, long-term, follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Klein, H H; Knake, W

    1990-06-01

    Thirty patients with VVI pacemakers (Quantum 253-09, 253-19, Intermedics Inc., Freeport, TX) were observed for a mean of 65 months. Within 12 months after implantation, optimized output programming was performed in 29 patients. This included a decrease in pulse amplitude (22 patients), pulse width (4 patients), and/or pacing rate (11 patients). After 65 months postimplantation, telemetered battery voltage and battery impedance were compared with the predicted values expected when the pulse generator constantly stimulates at nominal program conditions (heart rate 72.3 beats/min, pulse amplitude 5.4 V, pulse width 0.61 ms). Instead of an expected cell voltage of 2.6 V and a cell impedance of 10 k omega mean telemetered values amounted to 2.78 V and 1.4 k omega, respectively. These data correspond to a battery age of 12-15 months at nominal program conditions. This long-term follow-up study suggests that adequate programming will extend battery longevity and thus pulse generator survival in many patients. PMID:2344702

  4. 21 CFR 870.1750 - External programmable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External programmable pacemaker pulse generator... External programmable pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external programmable pacemaker pulse generators is a device that can be programmed to produce one or more pulses at...

  5. 21 CFR 870.1750 - External programmable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false External programmable pacemaker pulse generator... External programmable pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external programmable pacemaker pulse generators is a device that can be programmed to produce one or more pulses at...

  6. 21 CFR 870.1750 - External programmable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false External programmable pacemaker pulse generator... External programmable pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external programmable pacemaker pulse generators is a device that can be programmed to produce one or more pulses at...

  7. 21 CFR 870.1750 - External programmable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false External programmable pacemaker pulse generator... External programmable pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external programmable pacemaker pulse generators is a device that can be programmed to produce one or more pulses at...

  8. 21 CFR 870.1750 - External programmable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false External programmable pacemaker pulse generator... External programmable pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external programmable pacemaker pulse generators is a device that can be programmed to produce one or more pulses at...

  9. Heart pacemaker - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... on your chest below your collarbone. The pacemaker generator was then placed under the skin at this ... with your pacemaker. Stay away from large motors, generators, and equipment. Do not lean over the open ...

  10. Heart pacemaker - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... pacemaker is placed under your skin. These include: Battery powered cordless tools (such as screwdrivers and drills) ... will take about 15 to 30 minutes. The batteries in your pacemaker should last 6 to 15 ...

  11. Gene therapy: Biological pacemaker created by gene transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miake, Junichiro; Marbán, Eduardo; Nuss, H. Bradley

    2002-09-01

    The pacemaker cells of the heart initiate the heartbeat, sustain the circulation, and dictate the rate and rhythm of cardiac contraction. Circulatory collapse ensues when these specialized cells are damaged by disease, a situation that currently necessitates the implantation of an electronic pacemaker. Here we report the use of viral gene transfer to convert quiescent heart-muscle cells into pacemaker cells, and the successful generation of spontaneous, rhythmic electrical activity in the ventricle in vivo. Our results indicate that genetically engineered pacemakers could be developed as a possible alternative to implantable electronic devices.

  12. Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Allen, M

    2006-09-01

    An increasing number of patients are now treated cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators and the technology of these is constantly changing. It is vital to have a good understanding of how they function and what the real risks are. Understanding how the device should work when functioning normally, and the possible effects of electromagnetic interference, is paramount to their safe management in the peri-operative period. Knowing when a device should be disabled or reprogrammed requires careful consideration. Information from the patient's pacemaker clinic should be sought whenever possible and can be invaluable. In addition, the Medicines Healthcare products Regulatory Agency have published the first set of UK guidelines on the management of implantable devices in the presence of surgical diathermy and this will undoubtedly provide a firm foundation on which anaesthetists can base much of their practice. PMID:16922756

  13. Prenatal programming: adverse cardiac programming by gestational testosterone excess.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Arpita K; Hoang, Vanessa; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Gilbreath, Ebony; Mietelka, Kristy A

    2016-01-01

    Adverse events during the prenatal and early postnatal period of life are associated with development of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Prenatal exposure to excess testosterone (T) in sheep induces adverse reproductive and metabolic programming leading to polycystic ovarian syndrome, insulin resistance and hypertension in the female offspring. We hypothesized that prenatal T excess disrupts insulin signaling in the cardiac left ventricle leading to adverse cardiac programming. Left ventricular tissues were obtained from 2-year-old female sheep treated prenatally with T or oil (control) from days 30-90 of gestation. Molecular markers of insulin signaling and cardiac hypertrophy were analyzed. Prenatal T excess increased the gene expression of molecular markers involved in insulin signaling and those associated with cardiac hypertrophy and stress including insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase (PI3K), Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), nuclear factor of activated T cells -c3 (NFATc3), and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) compared to controls. Furthermore, prenatal T excess increased the phosphorylation of PI3K, AKT and mTOR. Myocardial disarray (multifocal) and increase in cardiomyocyte diameter was evident on histological investigation in T-treated females. These findings support adverse left ventricular remodeling by prenatal T excess. PMID:27328820

  14. Prenatal programming: adverse cardiac programming by gestational testosterone excess

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Arpita K.; Hoang, Vanessa; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Gilbreath, Ebony; Mietelka, Kristy A.

    2016-01-01

    Adverse events during the prenatal and early postnatal period of life are associated with development of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Prenatal exposure to excess testosterone (T) in sheep induces adverse reproductive and metabolic programming leading to polycystic ovarian syndrome, insulin resistance and hypertension in the female offspring. We hypothesized that prenatal T excess disrupts insulin signaling in the cardiac left ventricle leading to adverse cardiac programming. Left ventricular tissues were obtained from 2-year-old female sheep treated prenatally with T or oil (control) from days 30–90 of gestation. Molecular markers of insulin signaling and cardiac hypertrophy were analyzed. Prenatal T excess increased the gene expression of molecular markers involved in insulin signaling and those associated with cardiac hypertrophy and stress including insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase (PI3K), Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), nuclear factor of activated T cells –c3 (NFATc3), and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) compared to controls. Furthermore, prenatal T excess increased the phosphorylation of PI3K, AKT and mTOR. Myocardial disarray (multifocal) and increase in cardiomyocyte diameter was evident on histological investigation in T-treated females. These findings support adverse left ventricular remodeling by prenatal T excess. PMID:27328820

  15. Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators--general and anesthetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Rapsang, Amy G; Bhattacharyya, Prithwis

    2014-01-01

    A pacemaking system consists of an impulse generator and lead or leads to carry the electrical impulse to the patient's heart. Pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator codes were made to describe the type of pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator implanted. Indications for pacing and implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation were given by the American College of Cardiologists. Certain pacemakers have magnet-operated reed switches incorporated; however, magnet application can have serious adverse effects; hence, devices should be considered programmable unless known otherwise. When a device patient undergoes any procedure (with or without anesthesia), special precautions have to be observed including a focused history/physical examination, interrogation of pacemaker before and after the procedure, emergency drugs/temporary pacing and defibrillation, reprogramming of pacemaker and disabling certain pacemaker functions if required, monitoring of electrolyte and metabolic disturbance and avoiding certain drugs and equipments that can interfere with pacemaker function. If unanticipated device interactions are found, consider discontinuation of the procedure until the source of interference can be eliminated or managed and all corrective measures should be taken to ensure proper pacemaker function should be done. Post procedure, the cardiac rate and rhythm should be monitored continuously and emergency drugs and equipments should be kept ready and consultation with a cardiologist or a pacemaker-implantable cardioverter defibrillator service may be necessary. PMID:24907883

  16. [Pacemakers 16 years later].

    PubMed

    Dodinot, B

    1976-01-01

    In 1976, 10 years after the first successful implantations, the pacemaker technique is perfectly well accepted. Transvenous placement of the electrode is preferred in 95 % of the cases. Besides the 15 years nuclear power pacers (1970), conventional mercury pacemakers may reach a longevity of 4 to 5 years because of the reduction of the current drain. Lithium iodine seems a very promising source of energy. The mini-pacemakers with various iodine anodes are particularly attractive. The future is probably a well designed medium sized lithium pacemaker lasting more than 7 years. Patient follow-up is very much improved. All pacemakers exhibit an obvious rate reduction when their source of energy runs down. Therefore general practitioner and even the patients may detect this symptom. The main problem remains the lead resistance. The reduction of the frequency of pacemaker replacements and of the medical check-up makes life more simple for the pacemaker patient. PMID:1087802

  17. [Experiences with telemetry-supported pacemaker controls in patients with VVI pacemakers].

    PubMed

    Klein, H H; Hanh, B K; Hellberg, K; Ruschewski, W; de Vivie, E R; Kreuzer, H

    1985-09-20

    Investigations on telemetry-supported pacemaker control were carried out in 55 patients with the VVI-pacemaker Quantum (Intermedics). The investigations were done at least once during the 6-24 month period after implantation. The telemetry function was utilised for pacemaker programming, for clarifying pacemaker defects and for characterising the type of pacemaker electrode used. It could be shown that the Osypka spiral electrode VY (Dr. Osypka) had a lower impedance, and greater pulse width and charge threshold in comparison with the two other electrodes used (Encor, Cordis; Polyflex, Intermedics). In 38 of the 55 patients (69%) a pulse amplitude of 2.7 V could be chosen, whereas an amplitude of 5.4 V was programmed in the rest. Pacemaker sensing threshold was set to values between 2.4 and 3.0 mV. Pacemaker problems appeared in three patients; in one patient due to programming too economically and in the other two due to pacemaker defects. PMID:4028997

  18. [Principle of the activity-controlled rate-adaptive cardiac pacemaker: analysis of stress and environment-induced mechanical effects on the human body].

    PubMed

    Alt, E; Matula, M; Theres, H; Heinz, M

    1989-09-01

    Rate-adaptive pacemakers are increasingly becoming part of clinical routine, the most widespread systems being activity-controlled. In order to shed more light on the foundations of mechanical forces which can possibly be utilized for controlling rate-adaptive systems, we conducted tests on six healthy volunteers and six pacemaker patients. With the aid of three orthogonal wide-band linear acceleration pick-ups attached to the body, the mechanical signals were recorded from the three axes during different activities. Along with standardized exercise on bicycle and treadmill ergometers, we tested the influence of household activities and interference influences. The results were analyzed in terms of the amplitude and frequency content of the signals. For walking activities we found a signal amplitude increasing in largely linear fashion with the walking speed, the signal amplitudes being approximately twice as high on the vertical axis as on the other two axes. Exercise on the bicycle ergometer produced mechanical signals of clearly lower amplitude than comparable walking activities. The Fast-Fourier analysis showed amplitude peaks in the low frequency range of 1 to 4 Hz for all forms of physiological exercise, while interference influences showed amplitude peaks mainly in the range above 8 Hz. The use of an acceleration pickup and a corresponding low pass filter might be a way of reducing the effect of nonphysiological interference influences on an activity-controlled pacemaker system. A sensor measuring in the horizontal axis appears to be the most favorable compromise for the various types of exercise. However, due to the considerable difference in signal amplitude for different types of exercise of the same intensity, an activity-controlled pacemaker system cannot entirely meet metabolic conditions and requirements. PMID:2815913

  19. The basis for activity controlled rate variable cardiac pacemakers: an analysis of mechanical forces on the human body induced by exercise and environment.

    PubMed

    Alt, E; Matula, M; Theres, H; Heinz, M; Baker, R

    1989-10-01

    We conducted tests on six healthy volunteers and six pacemaker patients. With the aid of three straight line frequency acceleration pickups attached to the body, the mechanical signals were recorded on the three axes during different activities. Along with standardized exercise on bicycle and treadmill ergometers, we tested the influence of household activities and interference influences. The results were analyzed in terms of the amplitude and frequency content of the signals. For walking activities, we found a signal amplitude increasing in a largely linear fashion with the walking speed, the signal amplitudes being approximately twice as high on the vertical axis as on the other two axes. Exercise on the bicycle ergometer produced mechanical signals of clearly lower amplitude than comparable walking activities. The Fast-Fourier analysis showed amplitude peaks in the low frequency range of 1 to 4 Hz for all forms of physiological exercise, while interference influences showed amplitude peaks mainly in the range above 8 Hz. The use of a straight line-frequency acceleration pickup and a corresponding low pass filter might be a way of reducing the effect of unphysiological interference influences on an activity controlled pacemaker system. A sensor measuring on the horizontal axis appears to be the most favorable compromise for the various types of exercise. However, due to the considerable difference in signal amplitude for different types of exercise of the same intensity, an activity controlled pacemaker system cannot entirely meet metabolic conditions and requirements. PMID:2477823

  20. Effects of lifestyle modification programs on cardiac risk factors.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Moaven; Fournier, Stephen; Shepard, Donald S; Ritter, Grant; Strickler, Gail K; Stason, William B

    2014-01-01

    Medicare conducted a payment demonstration to evaluate the effectiveness of two intensive lifestyle modification programs in patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease: the Dr. Dean Ornish Program for Reversing Heart Disease (Ornish) and Cardiac Wellness Program of the Benson-Henry Mind Body Institute. This report describes the changes in cardiac risk factors achieved by each program during the active intervention year and subsequent year of follow-up. The demonstration enrolled 580 participants who had had an acute myocardial infarction, had undergone coronary artery bypass graft surgery or percutaneous coronary intervention within 12 months, or had documented stable angina pectoris. Of these, 98% completed the intense 3-month intervention, 71% the 12-month intervention, and 56% an additional follow-up year. Most cardiac risk factors improved significantly during the intense intervention period in both programs. Favorable changes in cardiac risk factors and functional cardiac capacity were maintained or improved further at 12 and 24 months in participants with active follow-up. Multivariable regressions found that risk-factor improvements were positively associated with abnormal baseline values, Ornish program participation for body mass index and systolic blood pressure, and with coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Expressed levels of motivation to lose weight and maintain weight loss were significant independent predictors of sustained weight loss (p = 0.006). Both lifestyle modification programs achieved well-sustained reductions in cardiac risk factors. PMID:25490202

  1. Low frequency magnetic emissions and resulting induced voltages in a pacemaker by iPod portable music players

    PubMed Central

    Bassen, Howard

    2008-01-01

    Background Recently, malfunctioning of a cardiac pacemaker electromagnetic, caused by electromagnetic interference (EMI) by fields emitted by personal portable music players was highly publicized around the world. A clinical study of one patient was performed and two types of interference were observed when the clinicians placed a pacemaker programming head and an iPod were placed adjacent to the patient's implanted pacemaker. The authors concluded that "Warning labels may be needed to avoid close contact between pacemakers and iPods". We performed an in-vitro study to evaluate these claims of EMI and present our findings of no-effects" in this paper. Methods We performed in-vitro evaluations of the low frequency magnetic field emissions from various models of the Apple Inc. iPod music player. We measured magnetic field emissions with a 3-coil sensor (diameter of 3.5 cm) placed within 1 cm of the surface of the player. Highly localized fields were observed (only existing in a one square cm area). We also measured the voltages induced inside an 'instrumented-can' pacemaker with two standard unipolar leads. Each iPod was placed in the air, 2.7 cm above the pacemaker case. The pacemaker case and leads were placed in a saline filled torso simulator per pacemaker electromagnetic compatibility standard ANSI/AAMI PC69:2000. Voltages inside the can were measured. Results Emissions were strongest (≈ 0.2 μT pp) near a few localized points on the cases of the two iPods with hard drives. Emissions consisted of 100 kHz sinusoidal signal with lower frequency (20 msec wide) pulsed amplitude modulation. Voltages induced in the iPods were below the noise level of our instruments (0.5 mV pp in the 0 – 1 kHz band or 2 mV pp in the 0 – 5 MHz bandwidth. Conclusion Our measurements of the magnitude and the spatial distribution of low frequency magnetic flux density emissions by 4 different models of iPod portable music players. Levels of less than 0.2 μT exist very close (1 cm

  2. A new symbolic language for diagramming pacemaker/heart interaction.

    PubMed

    Brownlee, R R; Shimmel-Golden, J B; Del Marco, C J; Furman, S

    1982-09-01

    A new symbolic language is presented that can be used to diagram pacemaker/heart interactions. The language symbolically indicates "normally" conducted and ectopic events; pacemaker stimuli; pacemaker capture of the chamber; triggered pacemaker stimuli by "normal" or ectopic events; as well as such anomalous pacemaker/heart interactions as failure to sense; "crosstalk" between electrodes; and "normal," ectopic, or paced events in one chamber sensed by the electrode in the other chamber. In addition, symbols are provided to represent antegrade and retrograde accessory pathway conduction, and electronic and physiological refractory intervals. A common baseline is used to separate symbols for atrial activity, above the baseline, from those for ventricular activity, below the baseline. Parallel baselines are used to plot refractory intervals. Thus, even complex dual-chamber pacemaker operating modes can be represented with intrinsic and stimulated cardiac response to pacemaker operation. The language can be sketched out informally for description of general concepts or drafted on millimeter grid paper to make precise timing notations. It is especially useful for interdisciplinary communication of ideas about complex pacemaker/heart interactions. PMID:6182542

  3. Emergency Care of Patients with Pacemakers and Defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Allison, Michael G; Mallemat, Haney A

    2015-08-01

    Devices such as pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are commonly inserted to treat unstable cardiac rhythm disturbances. Despite the benefits of these devices on mortality and morbidity rates, patients often present to the emergency department with complaints related to device insertion or malfunction. Emergency physicians must be able to rapidly identify potential life threats caused by pacemaker malfunction, ICD firing, and complications associated with implantation of the devices. PMID:26226872

  4. Electromagnetic Interference on Pacemakers

    PubMed Central

    Erdogan, Okan

    2002-01-01

    External sources, either within or outside the hospital environment, may interfere with the appropriate function of pacemakers which are being implanted all around the world in current medical practice. The patient and the physician who is responsible for follow-up of the pacing systems may be confronted with some specific problems regarding the various types of electromagnetic interference (EMI). To avoid these unwanted EMI effects one must be aware of this potential problem and need to take some precautions. The effects of EMI on pacemaker function and precautions to overcome some specific problems were discussed in this review article. There are many sources of EMI interacting with pacemakers. Magnetic resonance imaging creates real problem and should be avoided in pacemaker patients. Cellular phones might be responsible for EMI when they were held on the same side with the pacemaker. Otherwise they don't cause any specific type of interaction with pacemakers. Sale security systems are not a problem if one walks through it without lingering in or near it. Patients having unipolar pacemaker systems are prone to develop EMI because of pectoral muscle artifacts during vigorous active physical exercise. PMID:17006562

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Conditional Pacemakers: Rationale, Development and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Edmond M; Wilkoff, Bruce L

    2012-01-01

    Pacemakers and other cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) have long been considered an absolute contraindication to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a crucial and growing imaging modality. In the last 20 years, protocols have been developed to allow MR scanning of CIED patients with a low complication rate. However, this practice has remained limited to a relatively small number of centers, and many pacemaker patients continue to be denied access to clinically indicated imaging. The introduction of MRI conditional pacemakers has provided a widely applicable and satisfactory solution to this problem. Here, the interactions of pacemakers with the MR environment, the results of MR scanning in patients with conventional CIEDs, the development and clinical experience with MRI conditional devices, and future directions are reviewed. PMID:23071382

  6. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... coronary artery bypass surgery; (iii) Current stable angina pectoris; (iv) Heart valve repair or replacement; (v) Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) or coronary stenting; (vi) A heart or heart-lung transplant. (vii) For cardiac rehabilitation only, other cardiac conditions as...

  7. A new method for diagramming pacemaker electrocardiograms.

    PubMed

    Hesselson, A B; Parsonnet, V

    1994-08-01

    Advancements in technology have made paced ECG interpretation increasingly difficult. A new method for depicting the complex pacemaker/heart interactions that eliminates the extensive use of symbols and repetitious use of refractory period and rate limit information of previous methods has been devised. The method uses a framework of parallel horizontal lines drawn on grid paper underneath the ECG. The lines are spaced apart by the actual programmed values (lower rate, AV, VA intervals) of the pacemaker in question. This framework allows the simultaneous use of the horizontal and vertical directions for the diagram of pacemaker timing intervals. Also, a single representation of refractory periods, upper rate intervals, and other variables can be labeled vertically and extrapolated horizontally across the entire diagram. Single chamber, dual chamber, and rate-modulated ECGs are readily represented. The diagram is easily plotted on standard ECG paper and flexible enough to represent complex ECGs. PMID:7526348

  8. Ventricular capture by anodal pacemaker stimulation.

    PubMed

    Occhetta, Eraldo; Bortnik, Miriam; Marino, Paolo

    2006-05-01

    This report describes the case of an 86-year-old male with syncopal paroxysmal 2:1 atrioventricular block and a single chamber VVI pacemaker programmed to bipolar sensing and unipolar pacing. After recurrence of syncope, a complete loss of ventricular capture with regular ventricular sensing was observed on ECG; fluoroscopic examination suggested perforation of the right ventricle by the helix of the implanted screw-in lead. Reprogramming the pacemaker to bipolar pacing/sensing resulted in regular ventricular capture and sensing, suggesting effective anodal stimulation from the ring electrode permitting complete non-invasive palliation. PMID:16636000

  9. Safety of nerve conduction studies in patients with implanted cardiac devices.

    PubMed

    Schoeck, Andreas P; Mellion, Michelle L; Gilchrist, James M; Christian, Fredric V

    2007-04-01

    Patients with implanted cardiac devices and their physicians may defer important electrodiagnostic testing because of anxiety about potential negative effects on the device. To determine the safety of routine nerve conduction studies (NCS) in this population, 10 patients with permanent dual-chamber pacemakers of various types and five patients with implanted cardiac defibrillators (ICD) underwent nerve stimulation at sites commonly used during NCS. The implanted cardiac device was interrogated before and after the study and there was continuous monitoring of the surface electrocardiogram (ECG) and atrial and ventricular electrograms. Electrical impulses generated during routine NCS were never detected by the sensing amplifier and did not affect the programmed settings of the implanted cardiac device. We conclude that routine NCS is safe in patients with implanted cardiac pacemakers with bipolar sensing configurations and defibrillators. PMID:17094099

  10. Ground zero: building a cardiac surgery program.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, A; Earley, M B; Fenner, D J; Postlewaite, C S; Scott, A D

    2001-01-01

    More and more community hospitals are opening cardiovascular surgery programs to provide a broader spectrum of services closer to home. This article leads the reader through one hospital's experience in opening a new heart center and highlights the philosophy, triaging of issues, and staff preparation needed to achieve successful patient outcomes. Our case study can serve as a guide for other hospitals as they take on the challenge of opening new programs. PMID:22076456

  11. Pacemakers (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is pulsed on and off at a rapid rate. For most patients with a pacemaker, this procedure is a relative contraindication. ● Transcutaneous electrical nerve/muscle stimulators (TENS), a method of pain control. ● Diathermy, which heats body tissues with high-frequency electromagnetic radiation or ...

  12. Delayed right-ventricular perforation by pacemaker lead; a rare complication in a 12-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Aykan, Hayrettin Hakan; Akın, Alper; Ertuğrul, İlker; Karagöz, Tevfik

    2015-03-01

    Developments in the diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart diseases have led to an increase in the need for intracardiac pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation. Various complications related to these interventions can be seen in the short term (pneumothorax, pericardial effusion, cardiac perforation, etc…) and in the long term (infection, subclavian vein thrombosis, sensing and pacing problems, battery erosion and cardiac perforation). In this report, we present a rare case of cardiac perforation occurring 2 years after pacemaker implantation. PMID:25782125

  13. Permanent internal pacemaker safety in air medical transport.

    PubMed

    Gordon, R S; O'Dell, K B

    1991-02-01

    Helicopter and fixed-wing air medical transportation provides an important role in the management of critically-ill patients. As the use of cardiac pacemakers continues to grow, knowledge of their expanding capabilities and sophistication is important. The environments of our "airborne intensive care units" are subject to many sources of electromagnetic and vibrational interference. Although pacemaker shielding mechanisms have become quite elaborate, further studies are needed to define their reliability in modern aircraft. Further, the possible effects of electromagnetic and vibrational interference upon inflight reprogramming require further study. PMID:10109075

  14. Reuse Of Pacemakers In Ghana And Nigeria: Medical, Legal, Cultural And Ethical Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ochasi, Aloysius; Clark, Peter

    2015-12-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO) cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death globally. Over 80% of CVD deaths take place in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). It is estimated that 1 million to 2 million people worldwide die each year due to lack of access to an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) or a pacemaker. Despite the medical, legal, cultural and ethical controversies surrounding the pacemaker reutilization, studies done so far on the reuse of postmortem pacemakers show it to be safe and effective with an infection rate of 1.97% and device malfunction rate of 0.68%. Pacemaker reutilization can be effectively and safely done and does not pose significant additional risk to the recipient. Heart patients with reused pacemakers have an improved quality of life compared to those without pacemakers. The thesis of this paper is that pacemaker reutilization is a life-saving initiative in LMICs of Nigeria and Ghana. It is cost effective; consistent with the principles of beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice with a commitment to stewardship of resources and the Common Good. Used pacemakers with adequate battery life can be properly sterilized for use by patients in LMICs who cannot afford the cost of a new pacemaker. PMID:24720369

  15. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program ... be designed to meet your needs. The Cardiac Rehabilitation Team Cardiac rehab involves a long-term commitment ...

  16. Pacemaker Created in Human Ventricle by Depressing Inward-Rectifier K+ Current: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Li, Qince; Zhang, Henggui

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac conduction disorders are common diseases which cause slow heart rate and syncope. The best way to treat these diseases by now is to implant electronic pacemakers, which, yet, have many disadvantages, such as the limited battery life and infection. Biopacemaker has been expected to replace the electronic devices. Automatic ventricular myocytes (VMs) could show pacemaker activity, which was induced by depressing inward-rectifier K+ current (IK1). In this study, a 2D model of human biopacemaker was created from the ventricular endocardial myocytes. We examined the stability of the created biopacemaker and investigated its driving capability by finding the suitable size and spatial distribution of the pacemaker for robust pacing and driving the surrounding quiescent cardiomyocytes. Our results suggest that the rhythm of the pacemaker is similar to that of the single cell at final stable state. The driving force of the biopacemaker is closely related to the pattern of spatial distribution of the pacemaker. PMID:26998484

  17. Defibrillator/monitor/pacemakers.

    PubMed

    2003-05-01

    Defibrillator/monitors allow operators to assess and monitor a patient's ECG and, when necessary, deliver a defibrillating shock to the heart. When integral noninvasive pacing is added, the device is called a defibrillator/monitor/pacemaker. In this Evaluation, we present our findings for two newly evaluated models, the Welch Allyn PIC 50 and the Zoll M Series CCT, and we summarize our findings for the previously evaluated models that are still on the market. We rate the models for the following applications: general crash-cart use, in-hospital transport use, and emergency medical service (EMS) use. PMID:12827940

  18. Effect of cardiac resynchronization therapy with implantable cardioverter defibrillator versus cardiac resynchronization therapy with pacemaker on mortality in heart failure patients: results of a high-volume, single-centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Kutyifa, Valentina; Geller, Laszlo; Bogyi, Peter; Zima, Endre; Aktas, Mehmet K; Ozcan, Emin Evren; Becker, David; Nagy, Vivien Klaudia; Kosztin, Annamaria; Szilagyi, Szabolcs; Merkely, Bela

    2014-01-01

    Aims There are limited and contradictory data on the effects of CRT with implantable cardioverter defibrillator (CRT-D) on mortality as compared with CRT with pacemaker (CRT-P). Methods and results We evaluated the long-term outcome of patients implanted with a CRT-D or CRT-P device in our high-volume single-centre experience. Data on all-cause mortality were derived from clinic visits and the Hungarian National Healthcare Fund Death Registry. Kaplan–Meier survival analyses and multivariate Cox regression models were used to evaluate all-cause mortality in patients with CRT-D vs. CRT-P, stratified by the aetiology of cardiomyopathy. From 2000 to 2011, 1122 CRT devices, 693 CRT-P (LVEF 28.2 ± 7.4%) and 429 CRT-D (LVEF 27.6 ± 6.4%), were implanted at our centre. During the median follow-up of 28 months, 379 patients died from any cause, 250 patients (36%) with an implanted CRT-P and 129 patients (30%) with an implanted CRT-D. There was no evidence of mortality benefit in patients implanted with a CRT-D compared with a CRT-P in the total cohort [hazard ratio (HR) 0.98, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.73–1.32, P = 0.884]. In patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy, CRT-D treatment was associated with a significant 30% risk reduction in all-cause mortality compared with an implanted CRT-P (HR 0.70, 95% CI 0.51–0.97, P = 0.03). In non-ischaemic patients, there was no mortality benefit of CRT-D over CRT-P (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.73–1.32, P = 0.894, interaction P-value = 0.15). Conclusions In heart failure patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy, CRT-D was associated with a mortality benefit compared with CRT-P, but no benefit of CRT-D over CRT-P in mortality was observed in non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25379962

  19. A prospective audit of pacemaker function, implant lifetime, and cause of death in the patient.

    PubMed Central

    Suvarna, S K; Start, R D; Tayler, D I

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To audit prospectively the reasons for pacemaker implantation, the duration of the pacemaker use, the cause of death, and pacemaker function after removal from the patient. METHODS: Pacemakers were removed at necropsy, or from the bodies of patients awaiting cremation, in three hospitals over a three year period. The cause of death was taken from the results of the necropsy or from the certified cause of death. Demographic data, including the time of implant and reasons for implantation, were checked. The pacemakers were analysed in terms of battery status, program, and output under a standard 470 ohm load. RESULTS: 69 patients were studied. Average age at death was 78 and 80 years for men and women, respectively. The average duration since pacemaker implantation was 46 months. Eleven patients had necropsies, showing that three died from ischaemic heart disease, six from cardiomyopathy, one from an aortic aneurysm, and one from disseminated neoplasia. From the necropsy results and death certificates, the distribution of causes of death in the group as a whole were ischaemic heart disease (21), cardiomyopathy (8), cerebrovascular disease (11), neoplasia (11), chest infection/chronic obstructive airways disease (8), and other causes (10). In all cases the pacemaker box function was within normal limits. CONCLUSIONS: Neither primary nor secondary pacemaker dysfunction was found. The study highlights the impact of arrhythmias in cardiomyopathy, and raises questions about the true role of ischaemic heart disease in these pacemaker requiring patients. The relatively short gap between pacemaker implantation and death requires further study. Images PMID:10655989

  20. [When do you implant a pacemaker in myotonic dystrophy?].

    PubMed

    Babuty, Dominique; Lallemand, Bénédicte; Laurent, Valérie; Clémenty, Nicolas; Pierre, Bertrand; Fauchier, Laurent; Raynaud, Martine; Pellieux, Sybille

    2011-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is the most frequent adult form of hereditary muscular dystrophy caused by a mutation on the DMPK gene. Myotonic dystrophy leads to multiple systemic complications related to weakness, respiratory failure, cardiac arrhythmias and cardiac conduction disturbances. Age of death is earlier in myotonic dystrophy patients than in general population with a high frequency of sudden death. Several mechanisms are involved in sudden death: atrio-ventricular block, severe ventricular arrhythmias or non-cardiac mechanism. The high degree of atrio-ventricular block is a well-recognized indication of pacemaker implantation but the prophylactic implantation of pacemaker should be considered to prevent sudden death in asymptomatic myotonic dystrophy patients. A careful clinical evaluation needs to be done for the identification of patients at high risk of sudden death. The resting ECG and SA ECG are non-invasive tools useful to select the patients who need an electrophysiologic study. In presence of prolonged HV interval more than or equal to 70 ms one can discuss the implantation of a prophylactic pacemaker. The choice of an implantable cardiac defibrillator is preferred in presence of spontaneous ventricular tachycardia or an alteration of the left ventricular ejection fraction. PMID:21549556

  1. In vitro investigation of eddy current effect on pacemaker operation generated by low frequency magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Babouri, A; Hedjeidj, A

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents in vitro investigation of the eddy current induction effects to the cardiac pacemaker exposed to low frequency magnetic fields. The method used in this study is based to the interaction by inductive coupling through the loop formed by the pacemaker and its leads and the surrounding medium. This interaction results in an induced electromotive force between the terminals of the pacemaker which can potentially disturb the operation of this last. In this article we present experimental results, analytical calculations and numerical simulations using the finite element method. PMID:18003302

  2. [The termination of auricular flutter by noninvasive programmed electrical stimulation using a permanent AAI-mode pacemaker].

    PubMed

    Saucedo, J; Iturralde, P; Attie, F; Colín, L; Kershenovich, S; González Hermosillo, J A

    1993-01-01

    We describe a case of a 15-year-old boy with an atrial septal defect who three years after the direct closure of the defect presented with atrial flutter type I according to Wells's classification. He was then electrically cardioverted but presented immediately sinus bradycardia and a ventricular escape rhythm that required epicardial pacing (Intermedics 292-03 DASH) in the AAI mode. We report here the successful termination of a new episode of atrial flutter into sinus rhythm with a noninvasive programmed stimulation using his previously implanted pacing system. PMID:8215704

  3. M-mode echocardiograms for determination of optimal left atrial timing in patients with dual chamber pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Wish, M; Gottdiener, J S; Cohen, A I; Fletcher, R D

    1988-02-01

    To determine if the A wave of the mitral valve echocardiogram can be used as a marker for left atrial (LA) activity and assist in the programming of dual chamber pacemakers, 156 echocardiograms with the mitral A wave present were obtained from 23 patients with dual chamber pacemakers, all of whom had bipolar esophageal recordings of LA depolarization. Twelve of these patients also underwent hemodynamic study with cardiac function determined at 5 different pacemaker settings: ventricular demand pacing and dual chamber sequential pacing at 0 or 25, 150, 200 and 250 ms programming atrioventricular (AV) delay. The time delay from right atrial pacing artifact to onset and peak of mitral A wave was linearly related to the time from atrial pacing artifact to LA depolarization on the esophageal lead (p less than 0.001). As pacing mode changed from dual chamber sequential pacing (DVI) mode to atrial synchronous-ventricular pacing (VDD), the A wave came earlier relative to the ventricular pacing spike, linearly related to the LA to ventricular extension with mode change determined with the esophageal lead (r = 0.94, p less than 0.001). The time from atrial pacing to peak of A wave was shorter in patients whose optimal programmed AV delay was 150 ms compared with those whose optimal AV delay was 200 or 250 ms (p less than 0.02). At the optimal programmed delay for cardiac output, the peak of the A wave was an average of 13 +/- 36 ms after the ventricular pacing spike.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3341208

  4. Evaluation of a New Cardiac Pacemaker

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-25

    Atrial Fibrillation With 2 or 3° AV or Bifascicular Bundle Branch (BBB) Block; Normal Sinus Rhythm With 2 or 3° AV or BBB Block; Sinus Bradycardia With Infrequent Pauses or Unexplained Syncope With EP Findings

  5. Temporary transvenous pacemaker placement in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Harrigan, Richard A; Chan, Theodore C; Moonblatt, Steven; Vilke, Gary M; Ufberg, Jacob W

    2007-01-01

    Emergency Department placement of a temporary transvenous cardiac pacemaker offers potential life-saving benefits, as the device can definitively control heart rate, ensure effective myocardial contractility, and provide adequate cardiac output in select circumstances. The procedure begins with establishment of central venous access, usually by a right internal jugular or left subclavian vein approach, although the femoral vein is an acceptable alternative, especially in patients who are more likely to bleed should vascular access become complicated. The indications for the procedure, as well as the equipment needed, are reviewed. Both blind and ECG-guided techniques of insertion are described. Methods of verification of pacemaker placement and function are discussed, as are the early complications of the procedure. PMID:17239740

  6. In utero Undernutrition Programs Skeletal and Cardiac Muscle Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, Brittany; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2016-01-01

    In utero undernutrition is associated with increased risk for insulin resistance, obesity, and cardiovascular disease during adult life. A common phenotype associated with low birth weight is reduced skeletal muscle mass. Given the central role of skeletal muscle in whole body metabolism, alterations in its mass as well as its metabolic characteristics may contribute to disease risk. This review highlights the metabolic alterations in cardiac and skeletal muscle associated with in utero undernutrition and low birth weight. These tissues have high metabolic demands and are known to be sites of major metabolic dysfunction in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Recent research demonstrates that mitochondrial energetics are decreased in skeletal and cardiac muscles of adult offspring from undernourished mothers. These effects apparently lead to the development of a thrifty phenotype, which may represent overall a compensatory mechanism programmed in utero to handle times of limited nutrient availability. However, in an environment characterized by food abundance, the effects are maladaptive and increase adulthood risks of metabolic disease. PMID:26779032

  7. Pacemaker and Defibrillator Lead Extraction

    MedlinePlus

    ... to cure the infection without completely removing all hardware from the body. This requires removal of the ... Footnotes References Figures & Tables Info & Metrics eLetters Article Tools Print Citation Tools Pacemaker and Defibrillator Lead Extraction ...

  8. Smartphone-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation Program: Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Heewon; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Lee, Jinseok

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) that utilizes only a smartphone, with no external devices. As an efficient guide for cardiac rehabilitation exercise, we developed an application to automatically indicate the exercise intensity by comparing the estimated heart rate (HR) with the target heart rate zone (THZ). The HR is estimated using video images of a fingertip taken by the smartphone’s built-in camera. The introduced CRP app includes pre-exercise, exercise with intensity guidance, and post-exercise. In the pre-exercise period, information such as THZ, exercise type, exercise stage order, and duration of each stage are set up. In the exercise with intensity guidance, the app estimates HR from the pulse obtained using the smartphone’s built-in camera and compares the estimated HR with the THZ. Based on this comparison, the app adjusts the exercise intensity to shift the patient’s HR to the THZ during exercise. In the post-exercise period, the app manages the ratio of the estimated HR to the THZ and provides a questionnaire on factors such as chest pain, shortness of breath, and leg pain during exercise, as objective and subjective evaluation indicators. As a key issue, HR estimation upon signal corruption due to motion artifacts is also considered. Through the smartphone-based CRP, we estimated the HR accuracy as mean absolute error and root mean squared error of 6.16 and 4.30bpm, respectively, with signal corruption due to motion artifacts being detected by combining the turning point ratio and kurtosis. PMID:27551969

  9. Smartphone-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation Program: Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Heewon; Ko, Hoon; Thap, Tharoeun; Jeong, Changwon; Noh, Se-Eung; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Lee, Jinseok

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) that utilizes only a smartphone, with no external devices. As an efficient guide for cardiac rehabilitation exercise, we developed an application to automatically indicate the exercise intensity by comparing the estimated heart rate (HR) with the target heart rate zone (THZ). The HR is estimated using video images of a fingertip taken by the smartphone's built-in camera. The introduced CRP app includes pre-exercise, exercise with intensity guidance, and post-exercise. In the pre-exercise period, information such as THZ, exercise type, exercise stage order, and duration of each stage are set up. In the exercise with intensity guidance, the app estimates HR from the pulse obtained using the smartphone's built-in camera and compares the estimated HR with the THZ. Based on this comparison, the app adjusts the exercise intensity to shift the patient's HR to the THZ during exercise. In the post-exercise period, the app manages the ratio of the estimated HR to the THZ and provides a questionnaire on factors such as chest pain, shortness of breath, and leg pain during exercise, as objective and subjective evaluation indicators. As a key issue, HR estimation upon signal corruption due to motion artifacts is also considered. Through the smartphone-based CRP, we estimated the HR accuracy as mean absolute error and root mean squared error of 6.16 and 4.30bpm, respectively, with signal corruption due to motion artifacts being detected by combining the turning point ratio and kurtosis. PMID:27551969

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Patient with a Dual Chamber Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Lynne Martina; Robinson, Andrew George; O'Flaherty, Maurice Thomas; Eames, Niall; Johnston, Nicola; Heyburn, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Having a pacemaker has been seen an absolute contraindication to having an MRI scan. This has become increasingly difficult in clinical practice as insertion of pacemakers and implantable cardiac defibrillators is at an all time high. Here we outline a case where a 71-year-old male patient with a permanent pacemaker needed to have an MRI scan to ascertain the aetiology of his condition and help guide further management. Given this clinical dilemma, an emergency clinical ethics consultation was arranged. As a result the patient underwent an MRI scan safely under controlled conditions with a consultant cardiologist and radiologist present. The results of the MRI scan were then able to tailor further treatment. This case highlights that in certain conditions an MRI can be performed in patients with permanent pacemakers and outlines the role of clinical ethics committees in complex medical decision making. PMID:21331383

  11. Clinical experience with nuclear pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Parsonnet, V; Myers, G H; Gilbert, L; Zucker, I R

    1975-12-01

    Approximately 1,400 nuclear pacemakers have been implanted in patients since April, 1970, without a single battery failure; 64 of these have been implanted at the Newark Beth Israel Medical Center. All except four of the 64 pulse generators were attached to transvenous electrodes, 39 to pacing wires already in place. Fifty-nine of the 64 units are in service and continue to function normally in a follow-up period of up to 2 years. In the total worldwide experience, 70 pacemakers are out of service, approximately half because of the patient's death, and the rest for infection or lead problems, and only three or four because of difficulties with components. The first 15 ARCO pacemakers implanted 2 years ago continue to function well. Of the 15 control pacemakers implanted at the same time, one unit has failed. We have concluded that a nuclear pacemaker should not be used in a patient with limited life expectancy or in an infant, but for the otherwise healthy young or middle-age individual, it should be the unit of choice. PMID:1188620

  12. First Wire-Free Pacemaker Approved

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wire-Free Pacemaker Approved Treats irregular heartbeat without wired leads To use the sharing features on this ... said in a news release. In traditional pacemakers, wired leads may malfunction and require the device to ...

  13. FDA Approves First Wire-Free Pacemaker

    MedlinePlus

    ... Radiological Health. He said in an agency news release: "As the first leadless pacemaker, Micra offers a new option for patients considering a single chamber pacemaker device, which may help prevent problems associated with the ...

  14. Devices That May Interfere with Pacemakers

    MedlinePlus

    ... and the devices that may interfere with pulse generators. Carry your pacemaker ID card to prove that ... 3 watts) don't appear to damage pulse generators or affect how the pacemaker works. Technology is ...

  15. Successful launch of cardiac transplantation in Japan. Osaka University Cardiac Transplant Program.

    PubMed

    Hori, M; Yamamoto, K; Kodama, K; Takashima, S; Sato, H; Koretsune, Y; Kuzuya, T; Yutani, C; Fukushima, N; Ohtake, S; Shirakura, R; Matsuda, H

    2000-05-01

    Cardiac transplantation has been established as a therapeutic strategy for patients with end-stage heart failure. In Japan, however, cardiac transplantation has not been performed since the first case in 1968, and even now, after legislation for the approval of brain death was passed in 1997, it is still not performed regularly. Following long and steady efforts to enlighten Japanese society about the concept of brain death and the importance of organ transplantation, the first cardiac transplantation under the new legislation was successfully performed at Osaka University Hospital on February 1999. The patient was 47-year-old male in the dilated phase of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who had been supported with an implantable left ventricular assist device. This article briefly reviews the situation prior to the first case of cardiac transplantation under the new legislation and discusses the current status of the therapy in Japan. PMID:10834446

  16. Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy and phase resetting of the sinoatrial node: A conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantini, Federico; Varanini, Maurizio; Macerata, Alberto; Piacenti, Marcello; Morales, Maria-Aurora; Balocchi, Rita

    2007-03-01

    Congestive heart failure is a severe chronic disease often associated with disorders that alter the mechanisms of excitation-contraction coupling that may result in an asynchronous left ventricular motion which may further impair the ability of the failing heart to eject blood. In recent years a therapeutic approach to resynchronize the ventricles (cardiac resynchronization therapy, CRT) has been performed through the use of a pacemaker device able to provide atrial-based biventricular stimulation. Atrial lead senses the spontaneous occurrence of cells depolarization and sends the information to the generator which, in turn, after a settled delay [atrioventricular (AV) delay], sends electrical impulses to both ventricles to stimulate their synchronous contraction. Recent studies performed on heart rate behavior of chronically implanted patients at different epochs after implantation have shown that CRT can lead to sustained overall improvement of heart function with a reduction in morbidity and mortality. At this moment, however, there are no studies about CRT effects on spontaneous heart activity of chronically implanted patients. We performed an experimental study in which the electrocardiographic signal of five subjects under chronic CRT was recorded during the activity of the pacemaker programmed at different AV delays and under spontaneous cardiac activity after pacemaker deactivation. The different behavior of heart rate variability during pacemaker activity and after pacemaker deactivation suggested the hypothesis of a phase resetting mechanism induced by the pacemaker stimulus on the sinoatrial (SA) node, a phenomenon already known in literature for aggregate of cardiac cells, but still unexplored in vivo. The constraints imposed by the nature of our study (in vivo tests) made it impossible to plan an experiment to prove our hypothesis directly. We therefore considered the best attainable result would be to prove the accordance of our data to the conjecture

  17. Cardiac resynchronization therapy and phase resetting of the sinoatrial node: a conjecture.

    PubMed

    Cantini, Federico; Varanini, Maurizio; Macerata, Alberto; Piacenti, Marcello; Morales, Maria-Aurora; Balocchi, Rita

    2007-03-01

    Congestive heart failure is a severe chronic disease often associated with disorders that alter the mechanisms of excitation-contraction coupling that may result in an asynchronous left ventricular motion which may further impair the ability of the failing heart to eject blood. In recent years a therapeutic approach to resynchronize the ventricles (cardiac resynchronization therapy, CRT) has been performed through the use of a pacemaker device able to provide atrial-based biventricular stimulation. Atrial lead senses the spontaneous occurrence of cells depolarization and sends the information to the generator which, in turn, after a settled delay [atrioventricular (AV) delay], sends electrical impulses to both ventricles to stimulate their synchronous contraction. Recent studies performed on heart rate behavior of chronically implanted patients at different epochs after implantation have shown that CRT can lead to sustained overall improvement of heart function with a reduction in morbidity and mortality. At this moment, however, there are no studies about CRT effects on spontaneous heart activity of chronically implanted patients. We performed an experimental study in which the electrocardiographic signal of five subjects under chronic CRT was recorded during the activity of the pacemaker programmed at different AV delays and under spontaneous cardiac activity after pacemaker deactivation. The different behavior of heart rate variability during pacemaker activity and after pacemaker deactivation suggested the hypothesis of a phase resetting mechanism induced by the pacemaker stimulus on the sinoatrial (SA) node, a phenomenon already known in literature for aggregate of cardiac cells, but still unexplored in vivo. The constraints imposed by the nature of our study (in vivo tests) made it impossible to plan an experiment to prove our hypothesis directly. We therefore considered the best attainable result would be to prove the accordance of our data to the conjecture

  18. Interference of apex locator, pulp tester and diathermy on pacemaker function

    PubMed Central

    Sriman, Narayanan; Prabhakar, V.; Bhuvaneswaran, J.S.; Subha, N.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of three electronic apex locators (EAL), electric pulp tester (EPT) and diathermy on pacemaker function in vitro. Materials and Methods: Three EALs: Root ZX (J. Morita Co., Tustin, CA, U.S.A.), Propex (Dentsply), Mini Apex locator (SybronEndo, Anaheim, CA, USA), EPT (Parkell pulp vitality tester Farmingdale, NY, USA) and Diathermy (Neomed 250 B) were tested for any interference with one pacemaker (A medtronic kappa KVDD901-serial number: PLE734632S). Directly connecting the pacemaker lead with the EAL/EPT/diathermy operating on a flat bench top, the telemetry wand was held directly over the pacemaker to monitor the pacing pattern for a period of 30 s. Pacemaker activity was continuously recorded on the telemetric programmer and electro gram (EGM) readings examined for pacer inhibition, noise reversion or inappropriate pacemaker pulses. Results: All the three apex locators showed no pacing interference or background noise during its function or at rest. The EGM readings of EPT showed varying levels of background noise in between pacing however, this did not affect the normal pacing pattern and the pacing interval remained constant. EGM readings of diathermy showed an increase in the pacing interval (irregular pacing pattern) followed by complete inhibition of the pacing system. Conclusion: The tested EALs do not interfere with cardiac pacemaker function. The tested EPT showed varying levels of background noise but does not interfere with cardiac pacemaker function. Use of Diathermy interfered with the normal pacing, leading to complete inhibition of the pacing system. PMID:25657520

  19. Intraperitoneal Migration of Epicardial Pacemakers

    PubMed Central

    García-Bengochea, José; Caínzos, Miguel; Fernández, Angel L.; Santos, Fernando; Gonzalez, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Intraperitoneal migration of epicardial leads and abdominally placed generators is a potentially serious complication. We report the case of an 83-year-old man who experienced intraperitoneal migration of an epicardial pacing system and consequent small-bowel obstruction. Laparotomy was required in order to free constrictive lead adhesions. The patient's postoperative recovery was satisfactory after the placement of a new pacemaker generator in the abdominal wall. Predisposing factors are analyzed and the literature is reviewed in order to clarify the mechanisms of sequelae associated with the migration of epicardial pacemakers from the abdominal wall. To the best of our knowledge, this is the 1st report of pacemaker migration having caused bowel obstruction that required urgent laparotomy in an adult. PMID:17948093

  20. 21 CFR 870.3700 - Pacemaker programmers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker programmers. 870.3700 Section 870.3700...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3700 Pacemaker programmers. (a) Identification. A pacemaker programmer is a device used to noninvasively change one or more...

  1. 21 CFR 870.3700 - Pacemaker programmers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker programmers. 870.3700 Section 870.3700...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3700 Pacemaker programmers. (a) Identification. A pacemaker programmer is a device used to noninvasively change one or more...

  2. 21 CFR 870.3700 - Pacemaker programmers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker programmers. 870.3700 Section 870.3700...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3700 Pacemaker programmers. (a) Identification. A pacemaker programmer is a device used to change noninvasively one or more...

  3. 21 CFR 870.3700 - Pacemaker programmers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker programmers. 870.3700 Section 870.3700...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3700 Pacemaker programmers. (a) Identification. A pacemaker programmer is a device used to change noninvasively one or more...

  4. 21 CFR 870.3700 - Pacemaker programmers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker programmers. 870.3700 Section 870.3700...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3700 Pacemaker programmers. (a) Identification. A pacemaker programmer is a device used to change noninvasively one or more...

  5. 21 CFR 870.3670 - Pacemaker charger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker charger. 870.3670 Section 870.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3670 Pacemaker charger. (a) Identification. A pacemaker charger is a...

  6. 21 CFR 870.3670 - Pacemaker charger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker charger. 870.3670 Section 870.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3670 Pacemaker charger. (a) Identification. A pacemaker charger is a...

  7. Effects of a brief intervention on retention of patients in a cardiac rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    McGrady, Angele; Burkes, Robert; Badenhop, Dalynn; McGinnis, Ron

    2014-12-01

    This intervention assessed the effects of a brief intervention on dropout rate in a cardiac rehabilitation program. One hundred thirty five patients were recruited from a cardiac rehabilitation program and randomized to either a control or intervention group. The intervention group participated in four sessions of motivational interviewing and stress management-relaxation in addition to standard cardiac rehabilitation. The control group underwent cardiac rehabilitation alone. Patients who completed the intervention completed an average of 30 sessions while those who dropped out of the intervention completed about six (p < 0.001). Anxiety and depression measured at baseline were the primary predictors of dropout. Patients in both the intervention and controls groups who completed cardiac rehabilitation improved the distance walked, quality of life and decreased anxiety. PMID:25150038

  8. Design and Testing of a Percutaneously Implantable Fetal Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Gerald E.; Zhou, Li; Zheng, Kaihui; Nicholson, Adriana; Peck, Raymond A.; Krishnan, Anjana; Silka, Michael; Pruetz, Jay; Chmait, Ramen; Bar-Cohen, Yaniv

    2012-01-01

    We are developing a cardiac pacemaker with a small, cylindrical shape that permits percutaneous implantation into a fetus to treat complete heart block and consequent hydrops fetalis, which can otherwise be fatal. The device uses off-the-shelf components including a rechargeable lithium cell and a highly efficient relaxation oscillator encapsulated in epoxy and glass. A corkscrew electrode made from activated iridium can be screwed into the myocardium, followed by release of the pacemaker and a short, flexible lead entirely within the chest of the fetus to avoid dislodgement from fetal movement. Acute tests in adult rabbits demonstrated the range of electrical parameters required for successful pacing and the feasibility of successfully implanting the device percutaneously under ultrasonic imaging guidance. The lithium cell can be recharged inductively as needed, as indicated by a small decline in the pulsing rate. PMID:22855119

  9. Percutaneously Inject able Fetal Pacemaker: Electrodes, Mechanical Design and Implantation*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li; Chmait, Ramen; Bar-Cohen, Yaniv; Peck, Raymond A.; Loeb, Gerald E.

    2015-01-01

    We are developing a self-contained cardiac pacemaker with a small, cylindrical shape (~3×20mm) that permits it to be implanted percutaneously into a fetus to treat complete heart block and consequent hydrops fetalis, which is otherwise fatal. The device uses off-the-shelf components including a rechargeable lithium cell and a highly efficient relaxation oscillator encapsulated in epoxy and glass. A corkscrew electrode made from activated iridium can be screwed into the myocardium, followed by release of the pacemaker and a short, flexible lead entirely within the chest of the fetus to avoid dislodgement from fetal movement. The feasibility of implanting the device percutaneously under ultrasonic imaging guidance was demonstrated in acute adult rabbit experiments. PMID:23367442

  10. Temporary inhibition of permanently implanted demand pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Latif, P; Ewy, G A

    1977-01-01

    Temporary inhibition of permanently implanted demand pacemakers has been previously described. Demand pacemakers may be inhibited by waving a magnet over the region of the pacemaker generator or by chest wall stimulation. The former may not inhibit most of the bipolar pacemakers, whereas the latter may be time consuming and may casue patient discomfort. Another method is described which utilized a commercially available Cordis Omnicor Programmer, Model 166-B, to temporarily inhibit bipolar and unipolar pacemakers. By placing the programmer over the skin where the pacemaker generator is implanted and/or over the area of the subcutaneous pervenous lead and activating the programmer multiple times at a rate faster then the pacing rate, the demand pacemakers are inhibited. After testing the efficacy in vitro, the method was successfully tried on 45 patients. Fifteen of these patients had unipolar pacemakers. Pacemakers marketed by Medtronic, Cordis, Starr-Edwards, C.P.I., and Arco were tested. Temporary inhibition of permanent demand pacemakers is desirable under various clinical situations. The method herein described has the advantages of being simple, quick, painless, and is effective for both unipolar and bipolar pacemakers. PMID:830215

  11. [Wide QRS tachycardia preceded by pacemaker spikes].

    PubMed

    Romero, M; Aranda, A; Gómez, F J; Jurado, A

    2014-04-01

    The differential diagnosis and therapeutic management of wide QRS tachycardia preceded by pacemaker spike is presented. The pacemaker-mediated tachycardia, tachycardia fibrillo-flutter in patients with pacemakers, and runaway pacemakers, have a similar surface electrocardiogram, but respond to different therapeutic measures. The tachycardia response to the application of a magnet over the pacemaker could help in the differential diagnosis, and in some cases will be therapeutic, as in the case of a tachycardia-mediated pacemaker. Although these conditions are diagnosed and treated in hospitals with catheterization laboratories using the application programmer over the pacemaker, patients presenting in primary care clinic and emergency forced us to make a diagnosis and treat the haemodynamically unstable patient prior to referral. PMID:23768570

  12. Electrical interference in non-competitive pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Sowton, E; Gray, K; Preston, T

    1970-09-01

    Patients with 41 implanted non-competitive pacemakers were investigated. A variety of domestic electrical equipment, a motor-car, and a physiotherapy diathermy apparatus were each operated in turn at various ranges from the patient. Interference effects on pacemaker function were assessed on the electrocardiograph. Medtronic demand 5841 pacemakers were stopped by diathermy while Cordis Ectocor pacemakers developed a fast discharge rate. Cordis triggered pacemakers (both Atricor and Ectocor) were sensitive to interference from many items of domestic equipment and the motor car. The Elema EM153 ran at an increased rate when an electric razor was running close to the pacemaker. The Devices demand 2980 and the Medtronic demand 5841 were not affected by the domestic equipment tested. The significance of interference effects is discussed in relation to pacemaker design. PMID:5470044

  13. Safety Of Mris In Patients With Pacemakers And Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Baher, Alex; Shah, Dipan

    2013-01-01

    With a burgeoning population, increases in life expectancy, and expanding indications, the number of patients with cardiac devices such as pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators continues to increase each year. A majority of these patients will develop an indication for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in their lifetime. MRIs have established themselves as one of the most powerful imaging tools for a variety of conditions. However, given the historic safety concerns, many physicians are reluctant to use MRIs in this patient population. In this paper, we discuss the potential adverse effects of MRIs in patients with cardiac devices, review key studies that have addressed strategies to limit adverse effects, and provide our cardiovascular MRI laboratory’s protocol for imaging patients with implanted cardiac devices. PMID:24066196

  14. Case study thoracic radiotherapy in an elderly patient with pacemaker: The issue of pacing leads

    SciTech Connect

    Kirova, Youlia M.; Menard, Jean; Chargari, Cyrus; Mazal, Alejandro; Kirov, Krassen

    2012-07-01

    To assess clinical outcome of patients with pacemaker treated with thoracic radiation therapy for T8-T9 paravertebral chloroma. A 92-year-old male patient with chloroma presenting as paravertebral painful and compressive (T8-T9) mass was referred for radiotherapy in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie. The patient presented with cardiac dysfunction and a permanent pacemaker that had been implanted prior. The decision of Multidisciplinary Meeting was to deliver 30 Gy in 10 fractions for reducing the symptoms and controlling the tumor growth. The patient received a total dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions using 4-field conformal radiotherapy with 20-MV photons. The dose to pacemaker was 0.1 Gy but a part of the pacing leads was in the irradiation fields. The patient was treated the first time in the presence of his radiation oncologist and an intensive care unit doctor. Moreover, the function of his pacemaker was monitored during the entire radiotherapy course. No change in pacemaker function was observed during any of the radiotherapy fractions. The radiotherapy was very well tolerated without any side effects. The function of the pacemaker was checked before and after the radiotherapy treatment by the cardiologist and no pacemaker dysfunction was observed. Although updated guidelines are needed with acceptable dose criteria for implantable cardiac devices, it is possible to treat patients with these devices and parts encroaching on the radiation field. This case report shows we were able to safely treat our patient through a multidisciplinary approach, monitoring the patient during each step of the treatment.

  15. Cardiac arrhythmias during exercise testing in healthy men.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, E. F.; Owen, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    Clinically healthy male executives who participate in a long-term physical conditioning program have demonstrated cardiac arrhythmia during and after periodic ergometric testing at submaximal and maximal levels. In 1,385 tests on 248 subjects, it was found that 34% of subjects demonstrated an arrhythmia at some time and 13% of subjects developed arrhythmia on more than one test. Premature systoles of ventricular origin were most common, but premature systoles of atrial origin, premature systoles of junctional origin, paroxysmal atrial tachycardia, atrioventricular block, wandering pacemaker, and pre-excitation were also seen. Careful post-test monitoring and pulse rate regulated training sessions are suggested for such programs.

  16. Electrical stimulation of primary neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes using pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Martherus, Ruben S R M; Zeijlemaker, Volkert A; Ayoubi, Torik A Y

    2010-01-01

    The study of gene regulation in cardiac myocytes requires a reliable in vitro model. However, monolayer cultures used for this purpose are typically not exposed to electrical stimulation, though this has been shown to strongly affect cardiomyocyte gene expression. Based on pacemakers for clinical use, we developed an easy-to-use portable system that allows the user to perform electro-stimulation of cardiomyocyte cultures in standard tissue incubators without the need for bulky equipment. In addition, we present a refined protocol for culturing high-purity cardiomyocyte cultures with excellent contractile properties for a wide variety of applications. PMID:20078430

  17. Forward Programming of Cardiac Stem Cells by Homogeneous Transduction with MYOCD plus TBX5

    PubMed Central

    Belian, Elisa; Noseda, Michela; Abreu Paiva, Marta S.; Leja, Thomas; Sampson, Robert; Schneider, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Adult cardiac stem cells (CSCs) express many endogenous cardiogenic transcription factors including members of the Gata, Hand, Mef2, and T-box family. Unlike its DNA-binding targets, Myocardin (Myocd)—a co-activator not only for serum response factor, but also for Gata4 and Tbx5—is not expressed in CSCs. We hypothesised that its absence was a limiting factor for reprogramming. Here, we sought to investigate the susceptibility of adult mouse Sca1+ side population CSCs to reprogramming by supplementing the triad of GATA4, MEF2C, and TBX5 (GMT), and more specifically by testing the effect of the missing co-activator, Myocd. Exogenous factors were expressed via doxycycline-inducible lentiviral vectors in various combinations. High throughput quantitative RT-PCR was used to test expression of 29 cardiac lineage markers two weeks post-induction. GMT induced more than half the analysed cardiac transcripts. However, no protein was detected for the induced sarcomeric genes Actc1, Myh6, and Myl2. Adding MYOCD to GMT affected only slightly the breadth and level of gene induction, but, importantly, triggered expression of all three proteins examined (α-cardiac actin, atrial natriuretic peptide, sarcomeric myosin heavy chains). MYOCD + TBX was the most effective pairwise combination in this system. In clonal derivatives homogenously expressing MYOCD + TBX at high levels, 93% of cardiac transcripts were up-regulated and all five proteins tested were visualized. In summary: (1) GMT induced cardiac genes in CSCs, but not cardiac proteins under the conditions used. (2) Complementing GMT with MYOCD induced cardiac protein expression, indicating a more complete cardiac differentiation program. (3) Homogeneous transduction with MYOCD + TBX5 facilitated the identification of differentiating cells and the validation of this combinatorial reprogramming strategy. Together, these results highlight the pivotal importance of MYOCD in driving CSCs toward a cardiac muscle fate. PMID

  18. Cardiac risk stratification in cardiac rehabilitation programs: a review of protocols

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Anne Kastelianne França; Barbosa, Marianne Penachini da Costa de Rezende; Bernardo, Aline Fernanda Barbosa; Vanderlei, Franciele Marques; Pacagnelli, Francis Lopes; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2014-01-01

    Objective Gather and describe general characteristics of different protocols of risk stratification for cardiac patients undergoing exercise. Methods We conducted searches in LILACS, IBECS, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and SciELO electronic databases, using the following descriptors: Cardiovascular Disease, Rehabilitation Centers, Practice Guideline, Exercise and Risk Stratification in the past 20 years. Results Were selected eight studies addressing methods of risk stratification in patients undergoing exercise. Conclusion None of the methods described could cover every situation the patient can be subjected to; however, they are essential to exercise prescription. PMID:25140477

  19. Does the Effect of Supervised Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs on Body Fat Distribution Remained Long Time?

    PubMed Central

    Nalini, Mehdi; Moradi, Bahieh; Esmaeilzadeh, Maryam; Maleki, Majid

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: An increased accumulation of fat in the intra-abdominal cavity is highly correlated with adverse coronary risk profiles. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) produces a host of health benefits related to modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. Further research is needed to define better program for weight loss and risk improvement in coronary patients. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of supervised and unsupervised cardiac rehabilitation program on body composition and body fat distribution in a population with coronary artery disease. Methods: The study investigated 167 patients with coronary artery disease (73% males; mean age = 52.67±9.11 years) before and after a supervised protocol cardiac rehabilitation program, and 12-months later. Target variables included body fat distribution indices (waist and hip circumference and waist to hip ratio), weight and body mass index. Results: Weight, waist circumference, waist to hip ratio and body mass index significantly decreased with 2 month supervised program (P<0.001), but hip circumference was not significantly changed. Males improved to a greater extent than the female patients. All of measurements relatively returned to baseline at the end of program (after 12 months). Conclusion: Supervised cardiac rehabilitation program results in improvements in body composition and body fat distribution. The effects of non-supervised program were minimal and the program needed to be reviewed. PMID:24404342

  20. Syncope in Patients with Pacemakers

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Syncope in a pacemaker patient is a serious symptom but it is rarely due a pacemaker system malfunction. Syncope occurs in about 5 % of patients paced for atrioventricular (AV) block in 5 years, 18% in those paced for sinus node disease in 10 years, 20 % of those paced for carotid sinus syndrome in 5 years and 5–55 % of those older patients paced for vasovagal syncope in 2 years. The vastly different results in vasovagal syncope depend on the results of tilt testing, where those with negative tests approach results in pacing for AV block and those with a positive tilt test show no better results than with no pacemaker. The implication of tilt results is that a hypotensive tendency is clearly demonstrated by tilt positivity pointing to syncope recurrence with hypotension. This problem may be addressed by treatment with vasoconstrictor drugs in those who are suited or, more commonly, a reduction or cessation of hypotensive therapy in hypertensive patients. Other causes of syncope such as tachyarrhythmias are rare. The clinical approach to patients who report syncope is detailed. PMID:26835124

  1. The cardiac implantable electronic device power source: evolution and revolution.

    PubMed

    Mond, Harry G; Freitag, Gary

    2014-12-01

    Although the first power source for an implantable pacemaker was a rechargeable nickel-cadmium battery, it was rapidly replaced by an unreliable short-life zinc-mercury cell. This sustained the small pacemaker industry until the early 1970s, when the lithium-iodine cell became the dominant power source for low voltage, microampere current, single- and dual-chamber pacemakers. By the early 2000s, a number of significant advances were occurring with pacemaker technology which necessitated that the power source should now provide milliampere current for data logging, telemetric communication, and programming, as well as powering more complicated pacing devices such as biventricular pacemakers, treatment or prevention of atrial tachyarrhythmias, and the integration of innovative physiologic sensors. Because the current delivery of the lithium-iodine battery was inadequate for these functions, other lithium anode chemistries that can provide medium power were introduced. These include lithium-carbon monofluoride, lithium-manganese dioxide, and lithium-silver vanadium oxide/carbon mono-fluoride hybrids. In the early 1980s, the first implantable defibrillators for high voltage therapy used a lithium-vanadium pentoxide battery. With the introduction of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator, the reliable lithium-silver vanadium oxide became the power source. More recently, because of the demands of biventricular pacing, data logging, and telemetry, lithium-manganese dioxide and the hybrid lithium-silver vanadium oxide/carbon mono-fluoride laminate have also been used. Today all cardiac implantable electronic devices are powered by lithium anode batteries. PMID:25387600

  2. [Exercise test in patients with permanent pacemakers].

    PubMed

    Esturau, R; Iturralde, P; Férez, S; Galván, O; Rosado, J; Pérez, G; González Hermosillo, J A

    1991-01-01

    From June 1988 to June 1990 we studied fifty patients who had implantation of a pacemaker. (31 females and 19 males). All of them underwent stress test with Bruce's protocol. Patients were divided in two groups; pacemaker-independent (PI) and pacemaker-dependent (PD). Over 50% of the patients inhibited the pacemaker with their own rhythm, most of them had sinus dysfunction. Complete A-V block was predominant in PD. The group of PI achieved more mets and had more oxygen consumption. Blood pressure response was similar in both groups. PMID:1929668

  3. [Elemental research on intelligent non-invasive temporary pacemakers].

    PubMed

    Nie, Bang-ji; Xu, Long; Xin, Xue-gang; Wang, Cheng-lai; Wu, Min-shan

    2005-01-01

    Some research on intelligent non-invasive temporary pacemakers is introduced in this paper. An industrial computer, some IC chips and other elements are used to construct its hardware, and its software is in C++ language. The experimental device has some intelligent functions of recognizing some arrhythmia. The system has a pacemaker module and an ECG monitor module. Its software includes a main program, a RS-232C communication program, a printer VxD, a pacing control VxD and ECG signal pretreatment and recognizing program and so on. The pacing-generating circuit is employed to make the precision control of pacing current. The communication between industrial-computer system and ECG module is completed through the DLL. The real time processing of ECG signals is based on filter method for a higher recognizing ratio. The system calculates several parameters to recognize certain arrhythmia and uses MIT/BIH database to validate the reliability of ECG recognition. PMID:15875682

  4. Transhepatic venous approach to permanent pacemaker placement in a patient with limited central venous access

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Adeel M; Harris, Gregory S; Movahed, Assad; Chiang, Karl S; Chelu, Mihail G; Nekkanti, Rajasekhar

    2015-01-01

    The end-stage renal disease population poses a challenge for obtaining venous access required for life-saving invasive cardiac procedures. In this case report, we describe an adult patient with end-stage renal disease in whom the hepatic vein was the only available access to implant a single-lead permanent cardiac pacemaker. A 63-year-old male with end-stage renal disease on maintenance hemodialysis and permanent atrial fibrillation/atrial flutter presented with symptomatic bradycardia. Imaging studies revealed all traditional central venous access sites to be occluded/non-accessible. With the assistance of vascular interventional radiology, a trans-hepatic venous catheter was placed. This was then used to place a right ventricular pacing lead with close attention to numerous technical aspects. The procedure was completed successfully with placement of a single-lead permanent cardiac pacemaker. PMID:26380831

  5. Influence of D-net (EUROPEAN GSM-standard) cellular telephones on implanted pacemakers in children.

    PubMed

    Elshershari, Huda; Celiker, Alpay; Ozer, Sema; Ozme, Sencan

    2002-09-01

    This study was designed to evaluate possible interactions between digital cellular telephones and implanted pacemakers in children. The study comprised 95 patients (53 males and 42 females) with a mean age of 11.5 +/- 4.6 years (range 1-22 years). The average time from pacemaker implantation was 2.5 years (range 1 month-12 years). Fourteen (15%) devices were dual chamber and the remaining were single chamber pacemakers. The following companies manufactured the pacemakers tested: Medtronic (n = 42), Telectronics (n = 9), Vitatron (n = 16), Pacesetter (n = 19), CPI (n = 8), and Biotronik (n = 1). All the patients were tested in the supine position during continuous ECG monitoring. After completion of the routine pacemaker check, the effects of the European Global system for mobile communication (GSM) was tested using two cellular telephone models (Ericsson GA 628 and Siemens S 25, 2-W power). For this purpose, atrial and ventricular sensitivity settings were programmed to the most sensitive values, and the tests were carried out in the unipolar and bipolar sensing modes. The evaluation was performed during ringing, switching on/off, and conversation phase with the cellular telephone positioned over the pulse generator and around the pacemaker pocket. A malfunction of the pacemaker was not observed in any patient. Only 1 (1%) of 95 patients showed a brief oversensing problem during calls with the cellular telephone. In this case, an AAIR pacemaker was implanted transvenously in a subcutaneous pocket and the sensing defect occurred only with the unipolar sensing mode and was not reproducible. Once the source of interference was removed, no sensing defect was detected and the patient remained asymptomatic. No symptoms were experienced in this study. The authors believe that pacemaker dependent patients with nonprotected pulse generators manufactured at the beginning of 1990s may be tested by their physicians for possible interferences before they use a digital cellular

  6. Cardiac pacing for severe childhood neurally mediated syncope with reflex anoxic seizures

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, K; Wilson, N; Hewitt, J; Norrie, J; Stephenson, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine whether permanent cardiac pacing could prevent syncope and seizures in children with frequent severe neurally mediated syncope, and if so whether dual chamber pacing was superior to single chamber ventricular pacing.
METHODS—Dual chamber pacemakers were implanted into 12 children (eight male, four female) aged 2-14 years (median 2.8 years) with frequent episodes of reflex anoxic seizures and a recorded prolonged asystole during an attack. The pacemaker was programmed to sensing only (ODO), single chamber ventricular pacing with hysteresis (VVI), and dual chamber pacing with rate drop response (DDD) for four month periods, with each patient allocated to one of the six possible sequences of these modes, according to chronological order of pacemaker implantation. The parent and patient were blinded to the pacemaker mode and asked to record all episodes of syncope or presyncope ("near miss" events). The doctor analysing the results was blinded to the patient and pacemaker mode.
RESULTS—One patient was withdrawn from the study after the pacemaker was removed because of infection. In the remaining children, both dual chamber and single chamber pacing significantly reduced the number of syncopal episodes compared with sensing only (p = 0.0078 for both). VVI was as effective as DDD for preventing syncope, but DDD was superior to VVI in reducing near miss events (p = 0.016).
CONCLUSIONS—Permanent pacing is an effective treatment for children with severe neurally mediated syncope and reflex anoxic seizures. VVI is as effective as DDD in preventing syncope and seizures, but DDD is superior in preventing overall symptoms.


Keywords: syncope; reflex anoxic seizures; pacing; paediatric cardiology PMID:10573501

  7. The challenge of staphylococcal pacemaker endocarditis in a patient with transposition of the great arteries endocarditis in congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ch'ng, Julie; Chan, William; Lee, Paul; Joshi, Subodh; Grigg, Leanne E.; Ajani, Andrew E

    2003-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of septicaemia and infective endocarditis. The overall incidence of staphylococcal bacteraemia is increasing, contributing to 16% of all hospital-acquired bacteraemias. The use of cardiac pacemakers has revolutionized the management of rhythm disturbances, yet this has also resulted in a group of patients at risk of pacemaker lead endocarditis and seeding in the range of 1% to 7%. We describe a 26-year-old man with transposition of the great arteries who had a pacemaker implanted and presented with S. aureus septicaemia 2 years postpacemaker implantation and went on to develop pacemaker lead endocarditis. This report illustrates the risk of endocarditis in the population with congenital heart disease and an intracardiac device.

  8. 21 CFR 870.3670 - Pacemaker charger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker charger. 870.3670 Section 870.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3670 Pacemaker charger....

  9. 21 CFR 870.3670 - Pacemaker charger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker charger. 870.3670 Section 870.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3670 Pacemaker charger....

  10. Calcium transient and sodium-calcium exchange current in human versus rabbit sinoatrial node pacemaker cells.

    PubMed

    Verkerk, Arie O; van Borren, Marcel M G J; Wilders, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate on the mechanism underlying the pacemaker activity of sinoatrial node (SAN) cells, focusing on the relative importance of the "membrane clock" and the "Ca(2+) clock" in the generation of the small net membrane current that depolarizes the cell towards the action potential threshold. Specifically, the debate centers around the question whether the membrane clock-driven hyperpolarization-activated current, I f , which is also known as the "funny current" or "pacemaker current," or the Ca(2+) clock-driven sodium-calcium exchange current, I NaCa, is the main contributor to diastolic depolarization. In our contribution to this journal's "Special Issue on Cardiac Electrophysiology," we present a numerical reconstruction of I f and I NaCa in isolated rabbit and human SAN pacemaker cells based on experimental data on action potentials, I f , and intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)] i ) that we have acquired from these cells. The human SAN pacemaker cells have a smaller I f , a weaker [Ca(2+)] i transient, and a smaller I NaCa than the rabbit cells. However, when compared to the diastolic net membrane current, I NaCa is of similar size in human and rabbit SAN pacemaker cells, whereas I f is smaller in human than in rabbit cells. PMID:23606816

  11. Successful Treatment of Occipital Neuralgia with Implantable Peripheral Nerve Stimulation in a Pacemaker-Dependent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Chaiban, Gassan; Tolba, Reda; Eissa, Hazem; Lirette, Lesley Smallwood; Almualim, Mohammed; Malaty, Adham; Atallah, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background Peripheral nerve stimulation has been used to treat patients with occipital nerve–related chronic headaches who have been unsuccessful with less invasive therapeutic approaches. Patients with pacemaker-dependent cardiac conduction abnormalities require unique consideration prior to the implantation of peripheral nerve stimulators because the placement of the devices may lead to failure of the systems secondary to electromagnetic interference or crosstalk between the devices. Case Report An 86-year-old female who suffered from chronic right-sided cervicogenic headaches and neck pain had received only temporary relief from previous treatments. Additional comorbidities included longstanding pacemaker-dependent atrioventricular node conduction disease. Because the extent to which nerve stimulators electrically interact with pacemakers is unclear, we tunneled the leads to the lumbar region of the back and placed the generator on the contralateral side to the pacemaker to minimize the chance that the 2 devices would interfere. The patient has remained pain free for 1 year since implantation. Conclusion Although no current published trials evaluate the degree of interference between medical devices, case reports increasingly suggest that simultaneous implantation of a spinal cord stimulator and pacemaker is safe as long as precautions are taken and the devices are checked periodically, particularly when the devices are adjusted. PMID:24688344

  12. Utility of a dedicated pediatric cardiac anticoagulation program: the Boston Children's Hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Murray, Jenna M; Hellinger, Amy; Dionne, Roger; Brown, Loren; Galvin, Rosemary; Griggs, Suzanne; Mittler, Karen; Harney, Kathy; Manzi, Shannon; VanderPluym, Christina; Baker, Annette; O'Brien, Patricia; O'Connell, Cheryl; Almond, Christopher S

    2015-04-01

    Congenital heart disease is the leading cause of stroke in children. Warfarin therapy can be difficult to manage safely in this population because of its narrow therapeutic index, multiple drug and dietary interactions, small patient size, high-risk cardiac indications, and lack of data to support anticoagulation recommendations. We sought to describe our institution's effort to develop a dedicated cardiac anticoagulation service to address the special needs of this population and to review the literature. In 2009, in response to Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goals for Anticoagulation, Boston Children's Hospital created a dedicated pediatric Cardiac Anticoagulation Monitoring Program (CAMP). The primary purpose was to provide centralized management of outpatient anticoagulation to cardiac patients, to serve as a disease-specific resource to families and providers, and to devise strategies to evolve clinical care with rapidly emerging trends in anticoagulation care. Over 5 years the CAMP Service, staffed by a primary pediatric cardiology attending, a full-time nurse practitioner, and administrative assistant with dedicated support from pharmacy and nutrition, has enrolled over 240 patients ranging in age from 5 months to 55 years. The most common indications include a prosthetic valve (34 %), Fontan prophylaxis (20 %), atrial arrhythmias (11 %), cardiomyopathy (10 %), Kawasaki disease (7 %), and a ventricular assist device (2 %). A patient-centered multi-disciplinary cardiac anticoagulation clinic was created in 2012. Overall program international normalized ratio (INR) time in therapeutic range (TTR) is favorable at 67 % (81 % with a 0.2 margin) and has improved steadily over 5 years. Pediatric-specific guidelines for VKOR1 and CYP2C9 pharmacogenomics testing, procedural bridging with enoxaparin, novel anticoagulant use, and quality metrics have been developed. Program satisfaction is rated highly among families and providers. A dedicated pediatric

  13. The Nonlinear Dynamics of Pacemaker Dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buechley, Leah

    2003-08-01

    A person is considered pacemaker dependent when most of his or her heartbeats are supplied by a pacemaker. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are significant differences between the heart dynamics of pacemaker-dependent patients and those of normal patients. Nonlinear dynamics techniques and statistical methods were used to analyze the ECGs of normal patients and pacemaker-dependent patients. Standard embedding of the ECG data yielded inconclusive results, but embedding the beat intervals proved to be much more useful. Lyapunov exponent calculations, recurrence plot analyses, and standard statistical analyses of these data showed significant differences in heart behavior between the two groups of patients. In particular, the beat intervals appear to exhibit chaotic behavior for the normal patients and fixed-point dynamics for pacemaker-dependent patients.

  14. Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Interactive Multimedia Computer-based Patient Education Program in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenny, Ng Yuen Yee; Fai, Tam Sing

    2001-01-01

    A study compared 48 cardiac patients who used an interactive multimedia computer-assisted patient education program and 48 taught by tutorial. The computer-assisted instructional method resulted in significantly better knowledge about exercise and self-management of chronic diseases. (Contains 29 references.) (JOW)

  15. Activation of the Cardiac Renin-Angiotensin System in High Oxygen-Exposed Newborn Rats: Angiotensin Receptor Blockade Prevents the Developmental Programming of Cardiac Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bertagnolli, Mariane; Dios, Anne; Béland-Bonenfant, Sarah; Gascon, Gabrielle; Sutherland, Megan; Lukaszewski, Marie-Amélie; Cloutier, Anik; Paradis, Pierre; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; Nuyt, Anne Monique

    2016-04-01

    Newborn rats exposed to high oxygen (O2), mimicking preterm birth-related neonatal stress, develop later in life cardiac hypertrophy, dysfunction, fibrosis, and activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Cardiac renin-angiotensin system activation in O2-exposed adult rats is characterized by an imbalance in angiotensin (Ang) receptors type 1/2 (AT1/2), with prevailing AT1 expression. To study the role of renin-angiotensin system in the developmental programming of cardiac dysfunction, we assessed Ang receptor expression during neonatal high O2 exposure and whether AT1 receptor blockade prevents cardiac alterations in early adulthood. Sprague-Dawley newborn rats were kept with their mother in 80% O2 or room air (control) from days 3 to 10 (P3-P10) of life. Losartan or water was administered by gavage from P8 to P10 (n=9/group). Rats were studied at P3 (before O2 exposure), P5, P10 (end of O2), and P28. Losartan treatment had no impact on growth or kidney development. AT1 and Ang type 2 receptors were upregulated in the left ventricle by high O2 exposure (P5 and P10), which was prevented by Losartan treatment at P10. Losartan prevented the cardiac AT1/2 imbalance at P28. Losartan decreased cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis and improved left ventricle fraction of shortening in P28 O2-exposed rats, which was associated with decreased oxidation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, inhibition of the transforming growth factor-β/SMAD3 pathway, and upregulation of cardiac angiotensin-converting enzyme 2. In conclusion, short-term Ang II blockade during neonatal high O2 prevents the development of cardiac alterations later in life in rats. These findings highlight the key role of neonatal renin-angiotensin system activation in the developmental programming of cardiac dysfunction induced by deleterious neonatal conditions. PMID:26857347

  16. 21 CFR 870.3620 - Pacemaker lead adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker lead adaptor. 870.3620 Section 870.3620...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3620 Pacemaker lead adaptor. (a) Identification. A pacemaker lead adaptor is a device used to adapt a pacemaker lead so that...

  17. 21 CFR 870.3610 - Implantable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Implantable pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3610... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An implantable pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has... implantable pacemaker pulse generator device that was in commercial distribution before May 28, 1976, or...

  18. 21 CFR 870.3610 - Implantable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implantable pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3610... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An implantable pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has... implantable pacemaker pulse generator device that was in commercial distribution before May 28, 1976, or...

  19. 21 CFR 870.3620 - Pacemaker lead adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker lead adaptor. 870.3620 Section 870.3620...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3620 Pacemaker lead adaptor. (a) Identification. A pacemaker lead adaptor is a device used to adapt a pacemaker lead so that...

  20. 21 CFR 870.3620 - Pacemaker lead adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker lead adaptor. 870.3620 Section 870.3620...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3620 Pacemaker lead adaptor. (a) Identification. A pacemaker lead adaptor is a device used to adapt a pacemaker lead so that...

  1. 21 CFR 870.3620 - Pacemaker lead adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker lead adaptor. 870.3620 Section 870.3620...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3620 Pacemaker lead adaptor. (a) Identification. A pacemaker lead adaptor is a device used to adapt a pacemaker lead so that...

  2. 21 CFR 870.3620 - Pacemaker lead adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker lead adaptor. 870.3620 Section 870.3620...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3620 Pacemaker lead adaptor. (a) Identification. A pacemaker lead adaptor is a device used to adapt a pacemaker lead so that...

  3. 21 CFR 870.3710 - Pacemaker repair or replacement material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... repair or replacement material. (a) Identification. A pacemaker repair or replacement material is an adhesive, a sealant, a screw, a crimp, or any other material used to repair a pacemaker lead or to reconnect a pacemaker lead to a pacemaker pulse generator. (b) Classification. Class III (premarket...

  4. National Heart Attack Alert Program position paper: chest pain centers and programs for the evaluation of acute cardiac ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zalenski, R J; Selker, H P; Cannon, C P; Farin, H M; Gibler, W B; Goldberg, R J; Lambrew, C T; Ornato, J P; Rydman, R J; Steele, P

    2000-05-01

    The National Heart Attack Alert Program (NHAAP), which is coordinated by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), promotes the early detection and optimal treatment of patients with acute myocardial infarction and other acute coronary ischemic syndromes. The NHAAP, having observed the development and growth of chest pain centers in emergency departments with special interest, created a task force to evaluate such centers and make recommendations pertaining to the management of patients with acute cardiac ischemia. This position paper offers recommendations to assist emergency physicians in EDs, including those with chest pain centers, in providing comprehensive care for patients with acute cardiac ischemia. PMID:10783408

  5. Historical highlights in cardiac pacing.

    PubMed

    Geddes, L A

    1990-01-01

    The benchmarks in cardiac pacing are identified, beginning with F. Steiner (1871), who rhythmically stimulated the chloroform-arrested hearts of 3 horses, 1 donkey, 10 dogs, 14 cats, and 8 rabbits. The chloroform-arrested heart in human subjects was paced by T. Greene in the following year (1872) in the UK. In 1882, H. Ziemssen in Germany applied cardiac pacing to a 42-year old woman who had a large defect in the anterior left chest wall subsequent to resection of an enchondroma. Intentional cardiac pacing did not occur until 1932, when A.A. Hyman in the US demonstrated that cardiac pacing could be clinically practical. Hyman made a batteryless pacemaker for delivery in induction shock stimuli (60-120/min) to the atria. His pacemaker was powered by a hand-wound, spring-driven generator which provided 6 min of pacemaking without rewinding. Closed-chest ventricular pacing was introduced in the US in 1952 by P.M. Zoll et al. Zoll (1956) also introduced closed-chest ventricular defibrillation. W.L. Weirich et al. (1958) demonstrated that direct-heart stimulation in closed-chest patients could be achieved with slender wire electrodes. S. Furman and J.B. Schwedel (1959) developed a monopolar catheter electrode for ventricular pacing in man. In the same year, W. Greatbatch and W.M. Chardack developed the implantable pacemaker. PMID:18238328

  6. Cardiac rehabilitation programs and health-related quality of life. State of the art.

    PubMed

    Cano de la Cuerda, Roberto; Alguacil Diego, Isabel María; Alonso Martín, Joaquín Jesús; Molero Sánchez, Alberto; Miangolarra Page, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the main health problem in developed countries. Prevention is presented as the most effective and efficient primary care intervention, whereas cardiac rehabilitation programs are considered the most effective of secondary prevention interventions; however, these are underused. This literature review examines the effectiveness and the levels of evidence of cardiac rehabilitation programs, their components, their development and role in developed countries, applications in different fields of research and treatment, including their psychological aspects, and their application in heart failure as a paradigm of disease care under this type of intervention. It is completed by a review of the impact of such programs on measures of health-related quality of life, describing the instruments involved in studies in recent scientific literature. PMID:22015019

  7. Diagnostic imaging and pacemaker implantation in a domestic goat with persistent left cranial vena cava.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Ravi; Dosdall, Derek; Norlund, Layne; Higuchi, Koji; Silvernagel, Joshua M; Olsen, Aaron L; Davies, Christopher J; MacLeod, Rob; Marrouche, Nassir F

    2014-03-01

    Difficulty was encountered with the insertion of a right atrial pacing lead via the left jugular vein during lead and pacemaker implantation in a clinically normal goat as part of an ongoing rapid atrial pacing - induced atrial fibrillation research project. Fluoroscopic visualization of an abnormal lead advancement path prompted angiographic assessment which revealed a persistent left cranial vena cava (PLCVC) and prominent coronary sinus communicating with the right atrium. Angiography facilitated successful advancement and securing of the pacing lead into the right side of the interatrial septum. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance angiography (MRI/MRA) allowed further characterization of this rare venous anomaly. Even though PLCVC has been reported once in a goat, to the authors' knowledge this is the first report to include MRI/MRA characterization of PLCVC and prominent coronary sinus with successful cardiac pacemaker implantation using the PLCVC. PMID:24480717

  8. Petascale computation performance of lightweight multiscale cardiac models using hybrid programming models.

    PubMed

    Pope, Bernard J; Fitch, Blake G; Pitman, Michael C; Rice, John J; Reumann, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Future multiscale and multiphysics models must use the power of high performance computing (HPC) systems to enable research into human disease, translational medical science, and treatment. Previously we showed that computationally efficient multiscale models will require the use of sophisticated hybrid programming models, mixing distributed message passing processes (e.g. the message passing interface (MPI)) with multithreading (e.g. OpenMP, POSIX pthreads). The objective of this work is to compare the performance of such hybrid programming models when applied to the simulation of a lightweight multiscale cardiac model. Our results show that the hybrid models do not perform favourably when compared to an implementation using only MPI which is in contrast to our results using complex physiological models. Thus, with regards to lightweight multiscale cardiac models, the user may not need to increase programming complexity by using a hybrid programming approach. However, considering that model complexity will increase as well as the HPC system size in both node count and number of cores per node, it is still foreseeable that we will achieve faster than real time multiscale cardiac simulations on these systems using hybrid programming models. PMID:22254341

  9. SU-D-18C-06: Initial Experience with Implementing MRI Safety Guidelines for Patients with Pacemakers - Medical Physicist Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    James, J; Place, V; Panda, A; Edmonson, H; Felmlee, J; Pooley, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Several institutions have developed MRI guidelines for patients with MR-unsafe or MR-conditional pacemakers. Here we highlight the role of a medical physicist in implementing these guidelines for non-pacemaker dependent patients. Guidelines: Implementing these guidelines requires involvement from several medical specialties and a strong collaboration with the site MRI supervisor to develop a structured workflow. A medical physicist is required to be present during the scan to supervise the MR scanning and to maintain a safety checklist that ensures: 1) uninterrupted patient communication with the technologist, 2) continuous patient physiologic monitoring (e.g. blood pressure and electrocardiography) by a trained nurse, 3) redundant patient vitals monitoring (e.g. pulse oximetry) due to the possibility of in vivo electrocardiography reading fluctuations during image acquisition. A radiologist is strongly recommended to be available to review the images before patients are discharged from the scanner. Pacemaker MRI should be restricted to 1.5T field strength. The MRI sequences should be optimized by the physicist with regards to: a) SAR: limited to <1.5 W/Kg for MR-unsafe pacemakers in normal operating mode, b) RF exposure time: <30 min, c) Coils: use T/R coils but not restricted to such, d) Artifacts: further optimization of sequences whenever image quality is compromised due to the pacemaker. In particular, cardiac, breast and left-shoulder MRIs are most susceptible to these artifacts. Possible strategies to lower the SAR include: a) BW reduction, 2) echo-train-length reduction, 3) increase TR, 4) decrease number of averages, 5) decrease flip angle, 6) reduce slices and/or a combination of all the options. Conclusion: A medical physicist in collaboration with the MR supervisor plays an important role in the supervision/implementation of safe MR scanning of pacemaker patients. Developing and establishing a workflow has enabled our institution to scan over

  10. Predictors of Clinical Anxiety Aggravation at the End of a Cardiac Rehabilitation Program

    PubMed Central

    Saeidi, Mozhgan; Komasi, Saeid; Heydarpour, Behzad; Karim, Hossein; Nalini, Mehdi; Ezzati, Parvin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anxiety is one of the most primary and common reactions to a cardiac event can lead to hypertension, tachycardia, and high cardiac output. Objectives: To investigate the predictors of clinical anxiety aggravation at the end of a cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study used a database of a CR ward of a hospital in Iran. The demographic and clinical information of 574 patients participating in the CR program from April 2005 through April 2010 were analyzed. In order to determine the predictors of anxiety, binary logistic regression was performed. Results: After adjustment for gender, age and education, the results showed that 16.7% of the patients completed their CR program with increased levels of clinical anxiety. The following study variables were independently predictive of increased anxiety at the end of the CR program: male gender (OR = 2.04, 95% CI = 1.11 to 3.33, P = 0.048), no history of diabetes (OR = 4.24, 95% CI = 172 to 10.44, P = 0.002), family history of cardiac disease (OR = 2.63, 95% CI = 1.03 to 6.74, P = 0.043), and not quitting smoking (OR = 3.29, 95% CI = 1.38 to 7.85, P = 0.007). These variables could explain 9% - 15% of the variance in the dependent variable. Conclusions: It is possible to predict higher anxiety levels at the end of the CR program and implement preventive measures to control anxiety by considering certain demographic and clinical variables. Future studies should assess the predictive power of other variables. PMID:26937419

  11. Evaluation of bluetooth low power for physiological monitoring in a home based cardiac rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Martin, Timothy; Ding, Hang; D'Souza, Matthew; Karunanithi, Mohan

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in Australia, and places large burdens on the healthcare system. To assist patients with CVDs in recovering from cardiac events and mediating cardiac risk factors, a home based cardiac rehabilitation program, known as the Care Assessment Platform (CAP), was developed. In the CAP program, patients are required to manually enter health information into their mobile phones on a daily basis. The manual operation is often subject to human errors and is inconvenient for some elderly patients. To improve this, an automated wireless solution has been desired. The objectives of this paper are to investigate the feasibility of implementing the newly released Bluetooth 4.0 (BT4.0) for the CAP program, and practically evaluate BT4.0 communications between a developed mobile application and some emulated healthcare devices. The study demonstrated that BT4.0 addresses usability, interoperability and security for healthcare applications, reduces the power consumption in wireless communication, and improves the flexibility of interface for software development. This evaluation study provides an essential mobile BT4.0 framework to incorporate a large range of healthcare devices for clinical assessment and intervention in the CAP program, and hence it is useful for similar development and research work of other mobile healthcare solutions. PMID:22797030

  12. How Will a Pacemaker Affect My Lifestyle?

    MedlinePlus

    ... High-tension wires Metal detectors Industrial welders Electrical generators These devices can disrupt the electrical signaling of ... 2 feet away from industrial welders and electrical generators. Some medical procedures can disrupt your pacemaker. These ...

  13. QTC TENDENCY IN PACEMAKER DEPENDENT PATIENTS - PROGNOSTIC MEANING OF LONG QTC DURING 5 YEAR FOLLOW UP.

    PubMed

    Tsetskhladze, E; Khintibidze, I

    2016-04-01

    Prolongation of ventricular repolarization, which is represented by QTc prolongation on the standard ECG can be considered as increased risk for fatal arrhythmia. However, in pacemaker dependency (with ventricular pacing from the right apex) Ventricular Pacemaker causes abnormal steps of ventricular activation and therefore widens QRS complex and alters ventricular repolarization. It is still questionable whether QTc prolongation in right ventricular-paced patients is associated with increased risk of fatal arrhythmia or other cardiac complications. The other important question is whether the pacemaker dependent patient with long QTc interval may safely receive medications with known potential to prolong ventricular repolarization. The aim of the study was to determine whether QTc prolongation in VP (ventricular pacemaker) patients is associated with increased risk of fatal arrhythmia or other cardiac complications and whether these patients can safely receive medications with known potential to prolong ventricular repolarization. The study is based on retrospective analysis of the QTc interval prior and after pacemaker insertion; dynamic changes of QTc interval and possible influence of the medications, with known potential to prolong ventricular repolarization. Study population consisted 76 patients with narrow native QRS complexes and QTcF/QTcB <500 ms for both male and female patients. QTc prolongation in VP patients most likely does not represent true repolarization abnormalities and is not associated with risk of fatal arrhythmia. While analysis of group receiving medications with known potency of QTc increase we found no additional tendency of QTc increase. Based on our data receiving the medications with known potency of QTc prolongation in VP patients should be considered as safe approach. Long-term follow up data (5 years) assessed retrospectively shows that in patients with widened QRS after VP are at increased risk of development of HF and HF

  14. Chronic fibrous sheath mistaken for retained pacemaker product.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Sheraz A; Hudsmith, Lucy; Newton, James D; Betts, Tim R

    2009-03-01

    A 71-year-old man underwent implantation of a single-chamber system in 1988 for sinoatrial disease, which was then upgraded to dual-chamber 7 years later following recurrent syncope. He presented with pacemaker erosion but without clinical or laboratory evidence of infective endocarditis. The pacemaker system was uneventfully extracted 5 days later via a transfemoral approach using a needle-eye snare. A post-procedure trans-thoracic echocardiogram was performed, which demonstrated an echogenic structure in the right atrium-this was initially felt to be a retained fragment of pacing lead. A short-axis view of the tricuspid valve with a bright linear echo crossing is shown in Figure 1. However, a post-procedural chest X-ray confirmed the absence of any retained intra-cardiac lead. The reverberant cast-like structure noted is a heavily calcified fibrous sheath as the pacing leads were confirmed to be intact at the time of removal. PMID:19147697

  15. 50th Anniversary of the first successful permanent pacemaker implantation in the United States: historical review and future directions.

    PubMed

    Beck, Hiroko; Boden, William E; Patibandla, Sushmitha; Kireyev, Dmitriy; Gutpa, Vipul; Campagna, Franklin; Cain, Michael E; Marine, Joseph E

    2010-09-15

    June 2010 marks the 50th anniversary of the first successful human cardiac pacemaker implantation in the United States. On June 6, 1960, in Buffalo, New York, Dr. William Chardack implanted a pacemaker, designed and built by Wilson Greatbatch, an electrical engineer and inventor, in a 77-year old man with complete atrioventricular block, extending the patient's life by 18 months. This landmark event ushered in a new era of implantable cardiac pacemakers with batteries and leads of high reliability and increasing durability. Over the past half century, the field of electrophysiology and implantable devices for the management of cardiac conduction disturbances has evolved dramatically. Today's pacemakers include increasingly complex features such as telemetry monitoring, auto programmability, and hemodynamic sensors. New-generation leads present a sophisticated design with improved geometry and steroid-eluting tips to reduce chronic inflammation, maintaining a low pacing threshold and high sensing capability. The lithium iodide battery remains the mainstay of implantable pacemaker systems, exhibiting a multiple-year lifespan, slow terminal decay, and a reduced size and cost of production. Although Greatbatch's first successful pacemaker implantation remains a seminal scientific contribution to modern cardiovascular disease management, emerging developments in this field may challenge its preeminence. Important challenges such as imaging compatibility, lead durability, and infection prevention are being addressed. Novel concepts such as leadless and biologic pacing are under active investigation. In conclusion, Greatbatch's historic achievement 50 years ago reminds us that technologic progress is timeless, as efforts to enhance clinical outcomes and the quality of life continue unimpeded into the 21st century. PMID:21391322

  16. The costs of a suburban paramedic program in reducing deaths due to cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Urban, N; Bergner, L; Eisenberg, M S

    1981-04-01

    The marginal costs per averted death of a suburban paramedic program are estimated to be approximately $42,000, when program costs are attributed entirely to cardiac arrest cases due to underlying heart disease, and indirect costs attributable to episode-related hospitalization are included, It is suggested that at $42,000 per cardiac arrest death averted the program is cost-beneficial by two criteria. First, it compares favorably with an estimate obtained from the literature of the value to the average individual of saving the life of a myocardial infarction patient. Second, the people of King County passed a cost-commensurate Paramedic Program Property Tax Levy in 1979, revealing their willingness to support the program. Results of the study should be generalized in accordance with the facts that in King County 1) the population density averages approximately 1,300 per square mile; 2) a basic emergency medical system ensures a 4-minute average response time to initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation; 3) a citizen-training program in cardiopulmonary resuscitation further reduces average time to initiation of basic life support; and 4) the paramedic program is designed to ensure a 10-minute average time to definitive care. PMID:6785539

  17. Deactivation of Pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Daniel B.; Mitchell, Susan L.; Brock, Dan W.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac implantable electrical devices (CIEDs), including pacemakers (PMs) and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs), are the most effective treatment for life-threatening arrhythmias. Patients or their surrogates may request device deactivation to avoid prolongation of the dying process or in other settings, such as after device-related complications or with changes in their health care goals. Despite published guidelines outlining theoretical and practical aspects of this common clinical scenario, significant uncertainty remains for both patients and health care providers regarding the ethical and legal status of CIED deactivation. This review outlines the ethical and legal principles supporting CIED deactivation at patients’ request, centered upon patient autonomy and authority over their own medical treatment. The empirical literature describing stakeholder views and experiences surrounding CIED deactivation is described, along with lessons for future research and practice guidance surrounding the care of patients with CIEDs. PMID:23217433

  18. Transforming cardiac rehabilitation into broad-based healthy lifestyle programs to combat noncommunicable disease.

    PubMed

    Arena, Ross; Lavie, Carl J; Cahalin, Lawrence P; Briggs, Paige D; Guizilini, Solange; Daugherty, John; Chan, Wai-Man; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    The current incidence and prevalence of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) is currently a cause for great concern on a global scale; future projections are no less disconcerting. Unhealthy lifestyle patterns are at the core of the NCD crisis; physical inactivity, excess body mass, poor nutrition and tobacco use are the primary lifestyle factors that substantially increase the risk of developing one or more NCDs. We have now come to recognize that healthy lifestyle interventions are a medical necessity that should be prescribed to all individuals. Perhaps the most well-established model for healthy lifestyle interventions in the current healthcare model is cardiac rehabilitation. To have any hope of improving the outlook for NCDs on a global scale, what is currently known as cardiac rehabilitation must transform into broad-based healthy lifestyle programing, with a shifted focus on primordial and primary prevention. PMID:26511659

  19. Pacemakers and Implantable Defibrillators - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Pacemakers and Implantable Defibrillators URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... List of All Topics All Pacemakers and Implantable Defibrillators - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  20. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... electrode function tester. (a) Identification. A pacemaker electrode function tester is a device which is connected to an implanted pacemaker lead that supplies an accurately calibrated, variable pacing pulse...

  1. Program Code Generator for Cardiac Electrophysiology Simulation with Automatic PDE Boundary Condition Handling

    PubMed Central

    Punzalan, Florencio Rusty; Kunieda, Yoshitoshi; Amano, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and experimental studies involving human hearts can have certain limitations. Methods such as computer simulations can be an important alternative or supplemental tool. Physiological simulation at the tissue or organ level typically involves the handling of partial differential equations (PDEs). Boundary conditions and distributed parameters, such as those used in pharmacokinetics simulation, add to the complexity of the PDE solution. These factors can tailor PDE solutions and their corresponding program code to specific problems. Boundary condition and parameter changes in the customized code are usually prone to errors and time-consuming. We propose a general approach for handling PDEs and boundary conditions in computational models using a replacement scheme for discretization. This study is an extension of a program generator that we introduced in a previous publication. The program generator can generate code for multi-cell simulations of cardiac electrophysiology. Improvements to the system allow it to handle simultaneous equations in the biological function model as well as implicit PDE numerical schemes. The replacement scheme involves substituting all partial differential terms with numerical solution equations. Once the model and boundary equations are discretized with the numerical solution scheme, instances of the equations are generated to undergo dependency analysis. The result of the dependency analysis is then used to generate the program code. The resulting program code are in Java or C programming language. To validate the automatic handling of boundary conditions in the program code generator, we generated simulation code using the FHN, Luo-Rudy 1, and Hund-Rudy cell models and run cell-to-cell coupling and action potential propagation simulations. One of the simulations is based on a published experiment and simulation results are compared with the experimental data. We conclude that the proposed program code generator can be used to

  2. Program Code Generator for Cardiac Electrophysiology Simulation with Automatic PDE Boundary Condition Handling.

    PubMed

    Punzalan, Florencio Rusty; Kunieda, Yoshitoshi; Amano, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and experimental studies involving human hearts can have certain limitations. Methods such as computer simulations can be an important alternative or supplemental tool. Physiological simulation at the tissue or organ level typically involves the handling of partial differential equations (PDEs). Boundary conditions and distributed parameters, such as those used in pharmacokinetics simulation, add to the complexity of the PDE solution. These factors can tailor PDE solutions and their corresponding program code to specific problems. Boundary condition and parameter changes in the customized code are usually prone to errors and time-consuming. We propose a general approach for handling PDEs and boundary conditions in computational models using a replacement scheme for discretization. This study is an extension of a program generator that we introduced in a previous publication. The program generator can generate code for multi-cell simulations of cardiac electrophysiology. Improvements to the system allow it to handle simultaneous equations in the biological function model as well as implicit PDE numerical schemes. The replacement scheme involves substituting all partial differential terms with numerical solution equations. Once the model and boundary equations are discretized with the numerical solution scheme, instances of the equations are generated to undergo dependency analysis. The result of the dependency analysis is then used to generate the program code. The resulting program code are in Java or C programming language. To validate the automatic handling of boundary conditions in the program code generator, we generated simulation code using the FHN, Luo-Rudy 1, and Hund-Rudy cell models and run cell-to-cell coupling and action potential propagation simulations. One of the simulations is based on a published experiment and simulation results are compared with the experimental data. We conclude that the proposed program code generator can be used to

  3. Effects of a comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation program on quality of life and exercise tolerance in women: A retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Michael D; Haykowsky, Mark; Daub, Bill; van Lohuizen, Karen; Knapik, Grant; Black, Bill

    2003-01-01

    Background Currently, there are a lack of investigations that have examined the effect of participating in a comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation program on quality of life and physiological measures in women of different ages. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effect of participating in a comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation program on quality of life, exercise tolerance, blood pressure and lipids in women between 33 and 82 years of age. Methods The 126 women participated in a 14-week cardiac rehabilitation program that consisted of 7 weeks of formal supervised exercise training and 7 weeks of unsupervised exercise and lifestyle modification. Physiologic and quality of life outcome measures obtained at the outset and after 14 weeks included: 1) exercise treadmill time; 2) resting and peak systolic and diastolic blood pressure; 3) total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol and Triglycerides; 4) Cardiac Quality of Life Index questionnaire. Results Significant improvements were found in the following quality of life measures after participating in the cardiac rehabilitation program: physical well being, psychosocial, worry, nutrition and symptoms. No significant differences were seen for any QOL variable between the different age groups. Significant improvements were seen in exercise tolerance (+21%) and high density lipoprotein (+5%). Conclusion Cardiac rehabilitation may play an important role in improving quality of life, exercise tolerance and high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in younger and older women with underlying cardiovascular disease. PMID:12735789

  4. 21 CFR 870.3690 - Pacemaker test magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker test magnet. 870.3690 Section 870.3690...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3690 Pacemaker test magnet. (a) Identification. A pacemaker test magnet is a device used to test an inhibited or triggered...

  5. 21 CFR 870.3690 - Pacemaker test magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker test magnet. 870.3690 Section 870.3690...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3690 Pacemaker test magnet. (a) Identification. A pacemaker test magnet is a device used to test an inhibited or triggered...

  6. 21 CFR 870.3690 - Pacemaker test magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker test magnet. 870.3690 Section 870.3690...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3690 Pacemaker test magnet. (a) Identification. A pacemaker test magnet is a device used to test an inhibited or triggered...

  7. 21 CFR 870.3690 - Pacemaker test magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker test magnet. 870.3690 Section 870.3690...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3690 Pacemaker test magnet. (a) Identification. A pacemaker test magnet is a device used to test an inhibited or triggered...

  8. 21 CFR 870.3690 - Pacemaker test magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker test magnet. 870.3690 Section 870.3690...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3690 Pacemaker test magnet. (a) Identification. A pacemaker test magnet is a device used to test an inhibited or triggered...

  9. 21 CFR 870.3600 - External pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3600 Section 870.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has...

  10. 21 CFR 870.3610 - Implantable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Implantable pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3610 Section 870.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An implantable pacemaker pulse generator is a device that...

  11. 21 CFR 870.3640 - Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3640 Section 870.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. An indirect pacemaker...

  12. 21 CFR 870.3610 - Implantable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implantable pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3610 Section 870.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An implantable pacemaker pulse generator is a device that...

  13. 21 CFR 870.3630 - Pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3630... generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. A pacemaker generator function analyzer is a device that is connected to a pacemaker pulse generator to test any or all of the generator's parameters, including...

  14. 21 CFR 870.3640 - Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3640 Section 870.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. An indirect pacemaker...

  15. 21 CFR 870.3600 - External pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false External pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3600 Section 870.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has...

  16. 21 CFR 870.3600 - External pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false External pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3600 Section 870.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has...

  17. 21 CFR 870.3630 - Pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3630... generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. A pacemaker generator function analyzer is a device that is connected to a pacemaker pulse generator to test any or all of the generator's parameters, including...

  18. 21 CFR 870.3630 - Pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3630... generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. A pacemaker generator function analyzer is a device that is connected to a pacemaker pulse generator to test any or all of the generator's parameters, including...

  19. 21 CFR 870.3640 - Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3640 Section 870.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. An indirect pacemaker...

  20. 21 CFR 870.3630 - Pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3630... generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. A pacemaker generator function analyzer is a device that is connected to a pacemaker pulse generator to test any or all of the generator's parameters, including...

  1. 21 CFR 870.3630 - Pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3630... generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. A pacemaker generator function analyzer is a device that is connected to a pacemaker pulse generator to test any or all of the generator's parameters, including...

  2. 21 CFR 870.3640 - Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3640 Section 870.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. An indirect pacemaker...

  3. 21 CFR 870.3600 - External pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false External pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3600 Section 870.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has...

  4. 21 CFR 870.3610 - Implantable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Implantable pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3610 Section 870.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An implantable pacemaker pulse generator is a device that...

  5. 21 CFR 870.3640 - Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3640 Section 870.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. An indirect pacemaker...

  6. 21 CFR 870.3600 - External pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false External pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3600 Section 870.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has...

  7. A role for Sp and nuclear receptor transcription factors in a cardiac hypertrophic growth program

    PubMed Central

    Sack, Michael N.; Disch, Dennis L.; Rockman, Howard A.; Kelly, Daniel P.

    1997-01-01

    During cardiac hypertrophy, the chief myocardial energy source switches from fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) to glycolysis—a reversion to fetal metabolism. The expression of genes encoding myocardial FAO enzymes was delineated in a murine ventricular pressure overload preparation to characterize the molecular regulatory events involved in the alteration of energy substrate utilization during cardiac hypertrophy. Expression of genes involved in the thioesterification, mitochondrial import, and β-oxidation of fatty acids was coordinately down-regulated after 7 days of right ventricular (RV) pressure overload. Results of RV pressure overload studies in mice transgenic for the promoter region of the gene encoding human medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD, which catalyzes a rate-limiting step in the FAO cycle) fused to a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter confirmed that repression of MCAD gene expression in the hypertrophied ventricle occurred at the transcriptional level. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays performed with MCAD promoter fragments and nuclear protein extracts prepared from hypertrophied and control RV identified pressure overload-induced protein/DNA interactions at a regulatory unit shown previously to confer control of MCAD gene transcription during cardiac development. Antibody “supershift” studies demonstrated that members of the Sp (Sp1, Sp3) and nuclear hormone receptor [chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF)/erbA-related protein 3] families interact with the pressure overload-responsive unit. Cardiomyocyte transfection studies confirmed that COUP-TF repressed the transcriptional activity of the MCAD promoter. The DNA binding activities and nuclear expression of Sp1/3 and COUP-TF in normal fetal mouse heart were similar to those in the hypertrophied adult heart. These results identify a transcriptional regulatory mechanism involved in the reinduction of a fetal metabolic program during pressure

  8. Implementation of Ultraportable Echocardiography in an Adolescent Sudden Cardiac Arrest Screening Program

    PubMed Central

    Vanhecke, Thomas E; Weber, James E; Ebinger, Matthew; Bonzheim, Kimberly; Tilli, Frank; Rao, Sunilkumar; Osman, Abdulfatah; Silver, Marc; Fliegner, Karsten; Almany, Steve; Haines, David

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Over a 12-month period, adolescent heart-screening programs were performed for identifying at-risk adolescents for sudden cardiac death (SCD) in our community. Novel to our study, all adolescents received an abbreviated, ultraportable echocardiography (UPE). In this report, we describe the use of UPE in this screening program. METHODS AND RESULTS Four hundred thirty-two adolescents underwent cardiac screening with medical history questionnaire, physical examination, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG), and an abbreviated transthoracic echocardiographic examination. There were 11 abnormalities identified with uncertain/varying clinical risk significance. In this population, 75 adolescents had a murmur or high ECG voltage, of which only three had subsequent structural abnormalities on echocardiography that may pose risk. Conversely, UPE discovered four adolescents who had a cardiovascular structural abnormality that was not signaled by the 12-lead ECG, medical history questionnaire, and/or physical examination. CONCLUSIONS The utilization of ultraportable, handheld echocardiography is feasible in large-scale adolescent cardiovascular screening programs. UPE appears to be useful for finding additional structural abnormalities and for risk-stratifying abnormalities of uncertain potential of adolescents’ sudden death. PMID:25249762

  9. Long-term epicardial ventricular pacing from endocardial bipolar pacemaker lead: perforation of right atrial wall.

    PubMed Central

    Lees, D A; Green, G D

    1977-01-01

    One of the hazards of endocardial cardiac pacing is that the pacemaker lead may perforate the myocardial wall or interventricular septum although the incidence of such perforations is believed to be small. This paper describes what is believed to be a unique case in which a pacemaker lead perforated the atrial wall at implantation (or possibly shortly afterwards) and yet gave satisfactory right ventricular epicardial pacing for more than five years. The perforation was discovered during a routine postmortem examination but earlier lateral x-ray examinations would probably have identified the abnormal position of the electrodes. Moreover, the present implantation technique would not have allowed perforation of the atrial wall at implantation to go undetected. Images PMID:882955

  10. Percutaneous extraction of inadvertently placed left-sided pacemaker leads with complete cerebral embolic protection.

    PubMed

    Bahadorani, John N; Schricker, Amir A; Pretorius, Victor G; Birgersdotter-Green, Ulrika; Dominguez, Arturo; Mahmud, Ehtisham

    2015-10-01

    Lead wire malposition is a known, but rare complication of permanent pacemaker or defibrillator implantation. The actual incidence and prevalence is unknown and management options for inadvertent left ventricular lead malposition have not been uniform. Current recommendations include systemic anticoagulation with warfarin or surgical lead removal with circulatory arrest for compelling clinical scenarios. Percutaneous left-sided lead extraction is contraindicated due to the potentially increased risk of thromboembolic complications associated with this procedure. To our knowledge, this is the first report of percutaneous extraction of inadvertently placed left ventricular and left atrial endocardial pacemaker leads with flow-preserving complete cerebral embolic protection. We also review the current literature regarding the incidence, management, and percutaneous extraction of left-sided cardiac leads. PMID:25581608

  11. Contact dermatitis after implantable cardiac defibrillator implantation for ventricular tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Pinar; Inci, Sinan; Kuyumcu, Mevlut Serdar; Kus, Ozgur

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pacemaker contact sensitivity is a rare condition. Less than 30 reports of pacemaker skin reactions have been described. We report a 57-year-old woman who underwent an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) implantation for ventricular tachycardia. A skin patch test was positive on almost all components of the pacemaker system. She was treated with topical corticosteroids and skin lesions resolved within 2 weeks. Because of widespread use of various devices, we will see this more often and therefore it is important to recognize this problem and its effective management. PMID:26989652

  12. Pacemaker-induced transient asynchrony suppresses heart failure progression.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Jonathan A; Chakir, Khalid; Lee, Kyoung Hwan; Karst, Edward; Holewinski, Ronald J; Pironti, Gianluigi; Tunin, Richard S; Pozios, Iraklis; Abraham, Theodore P; de Tombe, Pieter; Rockman, Howard A; Van Eyk, Jennifer E; Craig, Roger; Farazi, Taraneh G; Kass, David A

    2015-12-23

    Uncoordinated contraction from electromechanical delay worsens heart failure pathophysiology and prognosis, but restoring coordination with biventricular pacing, known as cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), improves both. However, not every patient qualifies for CRT. We show that heart failure with synchronous contraction is improved by inducing dyssynchrony for 6 hours daily by right ventricular pacing using an intracardiac pacing device, in a process we call pacemaker-induced transient asynchrony (PITA). In dogs with heart failure induced by 6 weeks of atrial tachypacing, PITA (starting on week 3) suppressed progressive cardiac dilation as well as chamber and myocyte dysfunction. PITA enhanced β-adrenergic responsiveness in vivo and normalized it in myocytes. Myofilament calcium response declined in dogs with synchronous heart failure, which was accompanied by sarcomere disarray and generation of myofibers with severely reduced function, and these changes were absent in PITA-treated hearts. The benefits of PITA were not replicated when the same number of right ventricular paced beats was randomly distributed throughout the day, indicating that continuity of dyssynchrony exposure is necessary to trigger the beneficial biological response upon resynchronization. These results suggest that PITA could bring the benefits of CRT to the many heart failure patients with synchronous contraction who are not CRT candidates. PMID:26702095

  13. Pacemaker-Induced Transient Asynchrony Suppresses Heart Failure Progression

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Jonathan A.; Chakir, Khalid; Lee, Kyoung Hwan; Karst, Edward; Holewinski, Ronald J.; Pironti, Gianluigi; Tunin, Richard S.; Pozios, Iraklis; Abraham, Theodore P.; de Tombe, Pieter; Rockman, Howard A.; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Craig, Roger; Farazi, Taraneh G.; Kass, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Uncoordinated contraction from electromechanical delay worsens heart failure pathophysiology and prognosis, but restoring coordination with bi-ventricular pacing, known as cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) improves both. Not every patient, however, qualifies for CRT. Here we show that heart failure with synchronous contraction is improved by inducing dyssynchrony for 6 hours daily by right-ventricular pacing using an intracardiac pacing device, in a process we call pacemaker-induced transient asynchrony (PITA). In dogs with heart failure induced by 6 weeks of atrial tachypacing, PITA (starting on week 3) suppressed progressive cardiac dilation as well as chamber and myocyte dysfunction. PITA enhanced β-adrenergic responsiveness in vivo and normalized it in myocytes. Myofilament calcium response declined in dogs with synchronous heart failure, which was accompanied by sarcomere disarray and generation of myofibers with severely reduced function, and these changes were absent in PITA-treated hearts. The benefits of PITA were not replicated when the same number of RV-paced beats was randomly distributed throughout the day, indicating that continuity of dyssynchrony exposure is necessary to trigger the beneficial biological response upon resynchronization. These results suggest PITA could bring the benefits of CRT to the many heart failure patients with synchronous contraction that are not CRT candidates. PMID:26702095

  14. What Are the Risks of Pacemaker Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor about the benefits and risks of pacemaker surgery. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: February 28, 2012 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA OIG CONTACT US National Institutes of Health Department of Health and Human Services USA.gov

  15. Wandering atrial pacemaker (prevalence in French hornists).

    PubMed

    Nizet, P M; Borgi, J F; Horvath, S M

    1976-01-01

    Continuous electrocardiographic recordings were obtained in a group of French horn players during performance of identical pieces of music. Half of the musicians developed wandering atrial pacemaker. One example is illustrated. The causative mechanism is briefly discussed. This may represent an "occupational" hazard. PMID:1245812

  16. The Artificial Cardiac Pacemaker—Indications for Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Benson B.; Bruns, David L.

    1964-01-01

    Extensive clinical experience has demonstrated that implantable cardiac pacemakers are safe and effective mechanisms for controlling symptoms and preventing the hazards of third degree heart block with Stokes-Adams syncope. Medical management of this disease does not provide reliable protection and life expectancy averages about two years after diagnosis. Hence the negligible surgical morbidity and mortality associated with pacemaker implantation justifies broad indications to implant one of the four commercially available battery-powered units. Elective implantation of a pacemaker should be considered in patients with persistent third degree heart block who have had: One or more episodes of Stokes-Adams syncope; surgical injury to the conduction system, regardless of syncopal attacks; evidence of low cardiac output with cardiomegaly secondary to bradycardia. Few if any other cardiac arrythmias are satisfactorily controlled by an electrical pacemaker. Emergency pacemaker control is obviously necessary for patients developing intractable or recurrent bouts of asystole. During the interval until an implantable unit can be obtained and sterilized, the patient may be controlled by intravenous isoproterenol or by an external pacemaker attached to a transvenous catheter electrode, a precordial skin electrode or a percutaneous myocardial wire electrode. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:14236028

  17. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePlus

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...

  18. Measuring pacemaker dose: a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Studenski, Matthew T; Xiao, Ying; Harrison, Amy S

    2012-01-01

    Recently in our clinic, we have seen an increased number of patients presenting with pacemakers and defibrillators. Precautions are taken to develop a treatment plan that minimizes the dose to the pacemaker because of the adverse effects of radiation on the electronics. Here we analyze different dosimeters to determine which is the most accurate in measuring pacemaker or defibrillator dose while at the same time not requiring a significant investment in time to maintain an efficient workflow in the clinic. The dosimeters analyzed here were ion chambers, diodes, metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFETs), and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters. A simple phantom was used to quantify the angular and energy dependence of each dosimeter. Next, 8 patients plans were delivered to a Rando phantom with all the dosimeters located where the pacemaker would be, and the measurements were compared with the predicted dose. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image was obtained to determine the dosimeter response in the kilovoltage energy range. In terms of the angular and energy dependence of the dosimeters, the ion chamber and diode were the most stable. For the clinical cases, all the dosimeters match relatively well with the predicted dose, although the ideal dosimeter to use is case dependent. The dosimeters, especially the MOSFETS, tend to be less accurate for the plans, with many lateral beams. Because of their efficiency, we recommend using a MOSFET or a diode to measure the dose. If a discrepancy is observed between the measured and expected dose (especially when the pacemaker to field edge is <10 cm), we recommend analyzing the treatment plan to see whether there are many lateral beams. Follow-up with another dosimeter rather than repeating multiple times with the same type of dosimeter. All dosimeters should be placed after the CBCT has been acquired. PMID:21875785

  19. Measuring pacemaker dose: A clinical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Studenski, Matthew T.; Xiao Ying; Harrison, Amy S.

    2012-07-01

    Recently in our clinic, we have seen an increased number of patients presenting with pacemakers and defibrillators. Precautions are taken to develop a treatment plan that minimizes the dose to the pacemaker because of the adverse effects of radiation on the electronics. Here we analyze different dosimeters to determine which is the most accurate in measuring pacemaker or defibrillator dose while at the same time not requiring a significant investment in time to maintain an efficient workflow in the clinic. The dosimeters analyzed here were ion chambers, diodes, metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFETs), and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters. A simple phantom was used to quantify the angular and energy dependence of each dosimeter. Next, 8 patients plans were delivered to a Rando phantom with all the dosimeters located where the pacemaker would be, and the measurements were compared with the predicted dose. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image was obtained to determine the dosimeter response in the kilovoltage energy range. In terms of the angular and energy dependence of the dosimeters, the ion chamber and diode were the most stable. For the clinical cases, all the dosimeters match relatively well with the predicted dose, although the ideal dosimeter to use is case dependent. The dosimeters, especially the MOSFETS, tend to be less accurate for the plans, with many lateral beams. Because of their efficiency, we recommend using a MOSFET or a diode to measure the dose. If a discrepancy is observed between the measured and expected dose (especially when the pacemaker to field edge is <10 cm), we recommend analyzing the treatment plan to see whether there are many lateral beams. Follow-up with another dosimeter rather than repeating multiple times with the same type of dosimeter. All dosimeters should be placed after the CBCT has been acquired.

  20. Cost-Utility Analysis of a Cardiac Telerehabilitation Program: The Teledialog Project

    PubMed Central

    Kidholm, Kristian; Rasmussen, Maja Kjær; Andreasen, Jan Jesper; Hansen, John; Nielsen, Gitte; Spindler, Helle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cardiac rehabilitation can reduce mortality of patients with cardiovascular disease, but a frequently low participation rate in rehabilitation programs has been found globally. The objective of the Teledialog study was to assess the cost-utility (CU) of a cardiac telerehabilitation (CTR) program. The aim of the intervention was to increase the patients' participation in the CTR program. At discharge, an individualized 3-month rehabilitation plan was formulated for each patient. At home, the patients measured their own blood pressure, pulse, weight, and steps taken for 3 months. Materials and Methods: The analysis was carried out together with a randomized controlled trial with 151 patients during 2012–2014. Costs of the intervention were estimated with a health sector perspective following international guidelines for CU. Quality of life was assessed using the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey. Results: The rehabilitation activities were approximately the same in the two groups, but the number of contacts with the physiotherapist was higher among the intervention group. The mean total cost per patient was €1,700 higher in the intervention group. The quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gain was higher in the intervention group, but the difference was not statistically significant. The incremental CU ratio was more than €400,000 per QALY gained. Conclusions: Even though the rehabilitation activities increased, the program does not appear to be cost-effective. The intervention itself was not costly (less than €500), and increasing the number of patients may show reduced costs of the devices and make the CTR more cost-effective. Telerehabilitation can increase participation, but the intervention, in its current form, does not appear to be cost-effective. PMID:26713491

  1. Radiology of cardiac devices and their complications.

    PubMed

    Dipoce, J; Bernheim, A; Spindola-Franco, H

    2015-02-01

    This article familiarizes the reader with several different cardiac devices including pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, intra-aortic balloon pumps, ventricular assist devices, valve replacements and repairs, shunt-occluding devices and passive constraint devices. Many cardiac devices are routinely encountered in clinical practice. Other devices are in the early stages of development, but circumstances suggest that they too will become commonly found. The radiologist must be familiar with these devices and their complications. PMID:25411826

  2. Radiology of cardiac devices and their complications

    PubMed Central

    Dipoce, J; Spindola-Franco, H

    2015-01-01

    This article familiarizes the reader with several different cardiac devices including pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, intra-aortic balloon pumps, ventricular assist devices, valve replacements and repairs, shunt-occluding devices and passive constraint devices. Many cardiac devices are routinely encountered in clinical practice. Other devices are in the early stages of development, but circumstances suggest that they too will become commonly found. The radiologist must be familiar with these devices and their complications. PMID:25411826

  3. Pacemaker failures characterized by continuous direct current leakage.

    PubMed

    Fisher, J D; Furman, S; Parker, B; Escher, D J

    1976-06-01

    Pulse generator failure caused by continuous leakage of direct current through an output capacitor has not previously been appreciated. Routine post-explant electronic evaluation has identified the defect in six implanted and one external pulse generator. The constant direct current in the implantable units, 0.14 to 0.26 milliamperes, is in the range that produces ventricular arrhythmias in dogs although this did not occur in our patients. Evidence of local myocardial damage existed in four cases and of electrode deterioration in three. The implant failures occurred without warning and in four cases within 2 weeks of demonstrated normal function, blunting the predictive benefits of pacemaker monitoring programs. Capacitor discharge circuits used in many pacers are inherently capable of developing direct current leakage in the event of output capacitor short circuit. In one model of pacemakers such continuous direct current leakage caused 8.3 percent (3 of 36) of pulse generator failures, widely scattered in time at 23, 27 and 46 months after implant. Capacitor short circuit causing constant direct current leakage can masquerade as primary battery failure and should be suspected when cessation of pacer function is associated with increased threshold or poor myocardial electrogram without evidence of wire break or displacement. PMID:1274862

  4. [Does electromagnetic interference not occur to a bipolar pacemaker during TUR-P?].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tetsuya; Matsuoka, Nobuhiro; Ohshima, Takashi; Uchihashi, Yoshitaka; Satoh, Tetsuo

    2004-01-01

    It has been reported that a unipolar pacemaker is more sensitive to electromagnetic interference (EMI) than a bipolar pacemaker. However, we experienced cases in which electrosurgery device interfered with a bipolar pacemaker, but not with a unipolar pacemaker during TUR-P. It has been suggested that EMI occurs to a bipolar pacemaker depending on sensitivity and electric resistance of a patient. PMID:14968601

  5. Alterations of field potentials in isotropic cardiomyocyte cell layers induced by multiple endogenous pacemakers under normal and hypothermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Kienast, R; Stöger, M; Handler, M; Hanser, F; Baumgartner, C

    2014-10-01

    The use of autonomous contracting randomly grown cardiomyocyte monolayers cultivated on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) represents an accepted experimental setting for preclinical experimental research in the field of cardiac electrophysiology. A dominant pacemaker forces a monolayer to adhere to a regular and synchronized contraction. Randomly distributed multiple pacemakers interfere with this dominant center, resulting in more or less frequent changes of propagation direction. This study aims to characterize the impact of changing propagation directions at single electrodes of the MEA on the four intrinsic parameters of registered field potentials (FPs) FPrise, FPMIN, FPpre, and FPdur and conduction velocity (CV) under normal and hypothermal conditions. Primary cultures of chicken cardiomyocytes (n = 18) were plated directly onto MEAs and FPs were recorded in a temperature range between 37 and 29°C. The number and spatiotemporal distribution of biological and artificial pacemakers of each cell layer inside and outside of the MEA registration area were evaluated using an algorithm developed in-house. In almost every second myocardial cell layer, interfering autonomous pacemakers were detected at stable temperatures, showing random spatial distributions with similar beating rates. Additionally, a temperature-dependent change of the dominant pacemaker center was observed in n = 16 experiments. A significant spread-direction-dependent variation of CV, FPrise, FPMIN, and FPpre up to 14% could be measured between different endogenous pacemakers. In conclusion, based on our results, disregarding the spatial origin of excitation may lead to misinterpretations and erroneous conclusions of FP parameters in the verification of research hypotheses in cellular electrocardiology. PMID:25085965

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging safety in pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator patients: how far have we come?

    PubMed

    Nordbeck, Peter; Ertl, Georg; Ritter, Oliver

    2015-06-21

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been regarded a general contraindication in patients with cardiovascular implanted electronic devices such as cardiac pacemakers or cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) due to the risk of severe complications and even deaths caused by interactions of the magnetic resonance (MR) surrounding and the electric devices. Over the last decade, a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for such potentially life-threatening complications as well as technical advances have allowed an increasing number of pacemaker and ICD patients to safely undergo MRI. This review lists the key findings from basic research and clinical trials over the last 20 years, and discusses the impact on current day clinical practice. With 'MR-conditional' devices being the new standard of care, MRI in pacemaker and ICD patients has been adopted to clinical routine today. However, specific precautions and specifications of these devices should be carefully followed if possible, to avoid patient risks which might appear with new MR technology and further increasing indications and patient numbers. PMID:25796053

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging safety in pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator patients: how far have we come?

    PubMed Central

    Nordbeck, Peter; Ertl, Georg; Ritter, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been regarded a general contraindication in patients with cardiovascular implanted electronic devices such as cardiac pacemakers or cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) due to the risk of severe complications and even deaths caused by interactions of the magnetic resonance (MR) surrounding and the electric devices. Over the last decade, a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for such potentially life-threatening complications as well as technical advances have allowed an increasing number of pacemaker and ICD patients to safely undergo MRI. This review lists the key findings from basic research and clinical trials over the last 20 years, and discusses the impact on current day clinical practice. With ‘MR-conditional’ devices being the new standard of care, MRI in pacemaker and ICD patients has been adopted to clinical routine today. However, specific precautions and specifications of these devices should be carefully followed if possible, to avoid patient risks which might appear with new MR technology and further increasing indications and patient numbers. PMID:25796053

  8. [Permanent pacemaker implantation. Indications and results].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, A; Iturralde, P; Gutiérrez Fuster, E; Martínez Ríos, N; Martínez Ríos, M A; Romero, L; Hernández, D; González Hermosillo, J A

    1990-01-01

    Clinical, laboratory and electrocardiographic data from 608 patients with permanent pacemakers implanted over a period of 8 years, were evaluated retrospectively. The number of implants was greater in males (56.5%) and in patients over 60 years of age (77.5%). Atherosclerosis was the most common disease found in this group (50%). Syncope occurred in 96.2% of the cases; and complete AV block was the most common electrocardiographic alteration (50.5%). Electrode displacement occurred in 32 patients (5.2%) and was the most commonly found early complication. Among the late complications, 10.3% of the patients had infections in the area of the generator. The total mortality was 7.7% due to the heart disease rather than pacemaker-related complication. PMID:2344227

  9. Pacemakers and Implantable Defibrillators - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... العربية) Pacemaker (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Pacemaker 心脏起搏器 - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) Pacemaker 心臟起搏器 - 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional) ...

  10. In vitro characterization of HCN channel kinetics and frequency dependence in myocytes predicts biological pacemaker functionality.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Bucchi, Annalisa; Oren, Ronit V; Kryukova, Yelena; Dun, Wen; Clancy, Colleen E; Robinson, Richard B

    2009-04-01

    The pacemaker current, mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, contributes to the initiation and regulation of cardiac rhythm. Previous experiments creating HCN-based biological pacemakers in vivo found that an engineered HCN2/HCN1 chimeric channel (HCN212) resulted in significantly faster rates than HCN2, interrupted by 1-5 s pauses. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the differences in HCN212 and HCN2 in vivo functionality as biological pacemakers, we studied newborn rat ventricular myocytes over-expressing either HCN2 or HCN212 channels. The HCN2- and HCN212-over-expressing myocytes manifest similar voltage dependence, current density and sensitivity to saturating cAMP concentrations, but HCN212 has faster activation/deactivation kinetics. Compared with HCN2, myocytes expressing HCN212 exhibit a faster spontaneous rate and greater incidence of irregular rhythms (i.e. periods of rapid spontaneous rate followed by pauses). To explore these rhythm differences further, we imposed consecutive pacing and found that activation kinetics of the two channels are slower at faster pacing frequencies. As a result, time-dependent HCN current flowing during diastole decreases for both constructs during a train of stimuli at a rapid frequency, with the effect more pronounced for HCN2. In addition, the slower deactivation kinetics of HCN2 contributes to more pronounced instantaneous current at a slower frequency. As a result of the frequency dependence of both instantaneous and time-dependent current, HCN2 exhibits more robust negative feedback than HCN212, contributing to the maintenance of a stable pacing rhythm. These results illustrate the benefit of screening HCN constructs in spontaneously active myocyte cultures and may provide the basis for future optimization of HCN-based biological pacemakers. PMID:19171659

  11. Performance of hybrid programming models for multiscale cardiac simulations: preparing for petascale computation.

    PubMed

    Pope, Bernard J; Fitch, Blake G; Pitman, Michael C; Rice, John J; Reumann, Matthias

    2011-10-01

    Future multiscale and multiphysics models that support research into human disease, translational medical science, and treatment can utilize the power of high-performance computing (HPC) systems. We anticipate that computationally efficient multiscale models will require the use of sophisticated hybrid programming models, mixing distributed message-passing processes [e.g., the message-passing interface (MPI)] with multithreading (e.g., OpenMP, Pthreads). The objective of this study is to compare the performance of such hybrid programming models when applied to the simulation of a realistic physiological multiscale model of the heart. Our results show that the hybrid models perform favorably when compared to an implementation using only the MPI and, furthermore, that OpenMP in combination with the MPI provides a satisfactory compromise between performance and code complexity. Having the ability to use threads within MPI processes enables the sophisticated use of all processor cores for both computation and communication phases. Considering that HPC systems in 2012 will have two orders of magnitude more cores than what was used in this study, we believe that faster than real-time multiscale cardiac simulations can be achieved on these systems. PMID:21768044

  12. How to test mode switching in pacemakers implanted in patients: the MOST study.

    PubMed

    Padeletti, Luigi; Gasparini, Maurizio; Porciani, Maria Cristina; Pieragnoli, Paolo; Colella, Andrea; Michelucci, Antonio; Proclemer, Alessandro; Tognarini, Stefano; Mantica, Massimo; Coltorti, Fernando; Corbucci, Giorgio; Sutton, Richard

    2002-02-01

    Optimal management of atrial arrhythmias with dual chamber pacemakers requires proper performance of automatic mode switching (AMS). The aim of this study was to develop a reliable technique to test the AMS function by using an external electronic device capable of mimicking the occurrence of supraventricular arrhythmias (Supraventricular Arrhythmia Simulator [SAS]). The SAS delivers low voltage pulse trains (200 mV, 20 ms) through two skin electrodes. Each pulse train lasts 15 seconds and starts synchronously with a pacing pulse of the implanted pacemaker to avoid interference from the operator. The pulse train rate is set at 350, 250, and 160 beats/min to simulate AF, atrial flutter, and atrial tachycardia (AT), respectively. Thirty-five patients implanted with Vitatron pacemakers, whose AMS system has been previously validated, were enrolled. Atrial and ventricular sensing were programmed in unipolar mode at 0.5 mV and in bipolar mode at > 2 mV, respectively. All pulses from the SAS were detected by the atrial channel at an amplitude ranging from 1 to 3 mV. The test proved to be safe and reliable at rest and during exercise. AMS occurred immediately at onset or at offset of atrial arrhythmias, and no adverse interference on pacemaker function was seen from the SAS. In conclusion, the described technique and the SAS are safe and reliable for patient and pacemaker function and can be proposed as a useful method to verify proper performance of AMS function irrespective of the type of implanted devices. PMID:11915981

  13. [Study on Chaotic Detection Method of Pacemaker Contact-Less Power Supply].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chenghu; Huang, Mingming; Li, Songtao

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the reliability of cardiac pacemaker contact-less power supply technology, this paper proposes a novel application of wireless feedback voltage stabilizing technology to adjust heart disease patients with inner power supply filter circuit output voltage and current control method, to keep the output voltage stability, and to ensure that the super capacitor and cardiac pacemaker to get a stable power supply. To implement the real-time accurate voltage control with considering the primary and secondary side inductance coupling coefficient changes, the change of the external power supply voltage and load, it is necessary to test thee real-time and accurate output voltage and current value after rectifying filtering. Therefore, based on the chaotic control theory, we adopted method of phase diagram on the basis of the quick observation after rectifying filtering, so that the method of voltage and current could improve the detection time of the circuit. The phase diagram of proposed control method can be divided into 8 segments, and we got 7 zero-extreme points. When these zero-extreme points are detected, according to extreme points of the zero instantaneous values, the corresponding average values of voltage and current were obtained. Simulation and experimental results showed that using the above method can shorten the response time to less than switch devices 1/2 switching cycles, thus validating the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed detection algorithm. PMID:27079110

  14. Quantification of fiber orientation in the canine atrial pacemaker complex using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosi, Christina M.; Fedorov, Vadim V.; Schuessler, Richard B.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Efimov, Igor R.

    2012-07-01

    The atrial pacemaker complex is responsible for the initiation and early propagation of cardiac impulses. Optical coherence tomography (OCT), a nondestructive imaging modality with spatial resolutions of ˜1 to 15 μm, can be used to identify unique fiber orientation patterns in this region of the heart. Functionally characterized canine sinoatrial nodes (SAN) (n=7) were imaged using OCT up to ˜1 mm below the endocardial tissue surface. OCT images were directly compared to their corresponding histological sections. Fiber orientation patterns unique to the crista terminalis (CT), SAN, and surrounding atrial myocardium were identified with dominant average fiber angles of 89±12 deg, 110±16 deg, and 95±35 deg, respectively. Both the CT and surrounding atrial myocardium displayed predominantly unidirectionally based fiber orientation patterns within each specimen, whereas the SAN displayed an increased amount of fiber disarray manifested quantitatively as a significantly greater standard deviation in fiber angle distribution within specimens [33±7 deg versus 23±5 deg, atrium (p=0.02); 18±3 deg, CT (p=0.0003)]. We also identified unique, local patterns of fiber orientation specific to the functionally characterized block zone. We demonstrate the ability of OCT in detecting components of the atrial pacemaker complex which are intimately involved in both normal and abnormal cardiac conduction.

  15. 21 CFR 870.3730 - Pacemaker service tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker service tools. 870.3730 Section 870.3730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... tools. (a) Identification. Pacemaker service tools are devices such as screwdrivers and Allen...

  16. 21 CFR 870.3730 - Pacemaker service tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker service tools. 870.3730 Section 870.3730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... tools. (a) Identification. Pacemaker service tools are devices such as screwdrivers and Allen...

  17. 21 CFR 870.3730 - Pacemaker service tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker service tools. 870.3730 Section 870.3730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... tools. (a) Identification. Pacemaker service tools are devices such as screwdrivers and Allen...

  18. 21 CFR 870.3730 - Pacemaker service tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker service tools. 870.3730 Section 870.3730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... tools. (a) Identification. Pacemaker service tools are devices such as screwdrivers and Allen...

  19. 21 CFR 870.3730 - Pacemaker service tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker service tools. 870.3730 Section 870.3730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... tools. (a) Identification. Pacemaker service tools are devices such as screwdrivers and Allen...

  20. 21 CFR 870.3650 - Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. 870.3650 Section 870.3650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3650 Pacemaker...

  1. 21 CFR 870.3650 - Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. 870.3650 Section 870.3650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3650 Pacemaker...

  2. 21 CFR 870.3650 - Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. 870.3650 Section 870.3650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3650 Pacemaker...

  3. 21 CFR 870.3650 - Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. 870.3650 Section 870.3650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3650 Pacemaker...

  4. CALCIUM-DRIVEN TRANSCRIPTION OF CARDIAC SPECIFYING GENE PROGRAM IN LIVER STEM CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously shown that a cloned liver stem cell line (WB F344) acquires a cardiac phenotype when seeded in a cardiac microenvironment in vivo and ex vivo. Here we investigated the mechanisms of this transdifferentiation in early (<72 hr) WB F344 cell, rat neonatal ventricu...

  5. Asynchronous response of coupled pacemaker neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dodla, Ramana; Wilson, Charles J.

    2009-01-01

    We study a network model of two conductance-based pacemaker neurons of differing natural frequency, coupled with either mutual excitation or inhibition, and receiving shared random inhibitory synaptic input. The networks may phase-lock spike-to-spike for strong mutual coupling. But the shared input can desynchronize the locked spike-pairs by selectively eliminating the lagging spike or modulating its timing with respect to the leading spike depending on their separation time window. Such loss of synchrony is also found in a large network of sparsely coupled heterogeneous spiking neurons receiving shared input. PMID:19257636

  6. Chaotic Response of the Pacemaker Neuron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Hatsuo; Ishizuka, Satoru; Hirakawa, Kazuyoshi

    1985-06-01

    Excitable membranes respond irregularly to a periodic stimulation with proper stimulus parameters. Because irregular firing is macroscopic, it seems that irregularity is caused by other factors besides microscopic membrane noise. The responses of the repetitively firing Onchidium pacemaker neuron to a sinusoidal current stimulation were investigated. The irregular responses are classified into three kinds of chaotic oscillation: chaos, intermittency and random alternation. 1/2- and 1/1-harmonic responses bifurcate to chaos via intermittency and random alternation respectively. Harmonic and chaotic responses alternate with each other with increasing frequency of stimulation and with smaller amplitude. Nonlinear factors, threshold and refractory period, are concerned with hyperbolicity of chaotic responses.

  7. Use of pacemaker programmers for disaster victim identification.

    PubMed

    Makinae, Haruka; Numata, Norio; Kitaoka, Hirofumi; Daimon, Masao; Yamamoto, Taira; Amano, Atsushi

    2013-12-01

    Disaster victim identification (DVI) presents a number of physical and legal challenges, involving the degeneration of human remains and legal obstacles to forensic examinations. One non-invasive method for positive identification may be the use of a pacemaker programmer to detect and obtain data from pacemakers recovered from unidentified remains. To test the usefulness of this method, this investigation examined the efficiency and utility of 5 different pacemaker programmers in the positive identification of victims of the March 2011 tsunami in Japan at 8 disaster sites in May 2011. On scanning 148 sets of remains, data were successfully obtained from 1 implant in 1 set of remains, allowing for the rapid positive identification of the individual. Scanning pacemakers with pacemaker programmers can be a non-invasive method of positive identification that meets Japanese legal and institutional requirements, but this method is ineffective without a preceding whole-body X-ray scan. PMID:23592022

  8. Economics of cardiac adverse events after smallpox vaccination: lessons from the 2003 US Vaccination Program.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Sanchez, Ismael R; Sniadack, Mercedes M; Mootrey, Gina T

    2008-03-15

    Of >39,000 civilian public health responders vaccinated against smallpox in 2003, 203 reported cardiovascular adverse events (CAEs). An association exists between the US vaccinia strain and myocarditis and/or pericarditis ("myo/pericarditis" [MP]). Other associations are inconclusive. We used surveillance and follow-up survey data of CAE case patients to estimate the resources used during the 2003 smallpox vaccination program and used a probabilistic model to estimate the potential costs of CAEs in a mass vaccination campaign. For every million adult vaccinees, 3001 CAEs (including 351 MP cases) would occur, with >92% in revaccinees. CAEs would require a median of 5934 outpatient visits, 1786 emergency department visits, 533 days in general wards, 132 days in intensive care units, 5484 cardiac enzymes tests, 3504 electrocardiograms, 3049 chemistry tests, 2828 complete blood counts, and 1444 transthoracic echocardiograms, among other procedures. CAEs would reduce productivity (15,969 work days lost) and cost $11 per vaccinee. In a mass vaccination campaign, the care of a sizable number of CAEs would be resource intensive. PMID:18284356

  9. Cardiac Metastasis of Leiomyosarcoma Complicated with Complete Atrio-Ventricular Block and Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae Ouk; Kim, Minsu; Kang, Woong Chol; Moon, Jeonggeun; Chung, Wook-Jin; Sung, Yon Mi

    2016-01-01

    We described a case of a 54-year-old male who presented with dizziness and dyspnea due to cardiac metastasis of leiomyosarcoma. Cardiac metastasis of leiomyosarcoma caused both bradyarrhythmia and tachyarrhythmia in the patient. He was treated with implantation of a permanent pacemaker for management of complete atrio-ventricular block and anti-arrhythmic drug that suppressed ventricular tachycardia successfully. PMID:27014358

  10. MRI Mode Programming for Safe Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients With a Magnetic Resonance Conditional Cardiac Device.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Toshiko; Kurokawa, Sayaka; Ikeya, Yukitoshi; Iso, Kazuki; Takahashi, Keiko; Sasaki, Naoko; Ashino, Sonoko; Okubo, Kimie; Okumura, Yasuo; Kunimoto, Satoshi; Watanabe, Ichiro; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Although diagnostically indispensable, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been, until recently, contraindicated in patients with an implantable cardiac device. MR conditional cardiac devices are now widely used, but the mode programming needed for safe MRI has yet to be established. We reviewed the details of 41 MRI examinations of patients with a MR conditional device. There were no associated adverse events. However, in 3 cases, paced beats competed with the patient's own beats during the MRI examination. We describe 2 of the 3 specific cases because they illustrate these potentially risky situations: a case in which the intrinsic heart rate increased and another in which atrial fibrillation occurred. Safe MRI in patients with an MR conditional device necessitates detailed MRI mode programming. The MRI pacing mode should be carefully and individually selected. PMID:26973263

  11. Pre-ejection period by radial artery tonometry supplements echo doppler findings during biventricular pacemaker optimization

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Biventricular (Biv) pacemaker echo optimization has been shown to improve cardiac output however is not routinely used due to its complexity. We investigated the role of a simple method involving computerized pre-ejection time (PEP) assessment by radial artery tonometry in guiding Biv pacemaker optimization. Methods Blinded echo and radial artery tonometry were performed simultaneously in 37 patients, age 69.1 ± 12.8 years, left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) 33 ± 10%, during Biv pacemaker optimization. Effect of optimization on echo derived velocity time integral (VTI), ejection time (ET), myocardial performance index (MPI), radial artery tonometry derived PEP and echo-radial artery tonometry derived PEP/VTI and PEP/ET indices was evaluated. Results Significant improvement post optimization was achieved in LV ET (286.9 ± 37.3 to 299 ± 34.6 ms, p < 0.001), LV VTI (15.9 ± 4.8 cm to 18.4 ± 5.1 cm, p < 0.001) and MPI (0.57 ± 0.2 to 0.45 ± 0.13, p < 0.001) and in PEP (246.7 ± 36.1 ms to 234.7 ± 35.5 ms, p = 0.003), PEP/ET (0.88 ± 0.21 to 0.79 ± 0.17, p < 0.001), and PEP/VTI (17.3 ± 7 to 13.78 ± 4.7, p < 0.001). The correlation between comprehensive echo Doppler and radial artery tonometry-PEP guided optimal atrioventricular delay (AVD) and optimal interventricular delay (VVD) was 0.75 (p < 0.001) and 0.69 (p < 0.001) respectively. In 29 patients with follow up assessment, New York Heart Association (NYHA) class reduced from 2.5 ± 0.8 to 2.0 ± 0.9 (p = 0.004) at 1.8 ± 1.4 months. Conclusion An acute shortening of PEP by radial artery tonometry occurs post Biv pacemaker optimization and correlates with improvement in hemodynamics by echo Doppler and may provide a cost-efficient approach to assist with Biv pacemaker echo optimization. PMID:21794181

  12. [A new dual-chamber pacemaker with an automatic antitachycardia system in the treatment of the bradycardia-tachycardia syndrome].

    PubMed

    Adornato, E; Polimeni, R M; Monea, P; Tassone, F; Pennisi, V

    1985-04-01

    A new dual-chamber pacemaker with automatic tachycardia terminating system was used in three patients with bradycardia-tachycardia syndrome. This pacemaker (Medtronic Symbios 7008) is a multiprogrammable, bipolar device with bidirectional telemetry and six permanent pacing modes (DDD-DVI-VVI-DOO-VOO-AOO). The antitachycardia system can be programmed in two different modes: underdrive dual demand and overdrive atrial burts (1 to 16 stimuli with selectable coupling interval from 135 to 360 msec). The pacing modes are automatically activated when five consecutive R-R cycles shorter than the tachycardia detection interval are sensed. The pacemaker may sense the ventricle (when set on VVI or DVI mode) or sense both the atrium and the ventricle (in DDD mode). The pacemaker was programmed on DVI mode in all three patients, and the overdrive atrial burst program was used for tachycardia termination, with promptly and costantly effective results. The underdrive dual demand program was tested after the implantation, but it did not show constant results because inefficacy or late termination of tachycardias. PMID:4043644

  13. Executive functions improvement following a 5-month aquaerobics program in older adults: Role of cardiac vagal control in inhibition performance.

    PubMed

    Albinet, Cédric T; Abou-Dest, Amira; André, Nathalie; Audiffren, Michel

    2016-03-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the effects of aerobic exercise on measures of executive performance and their relationships with changes in cardiorespiratory fitness, cardiac vagal control (heart rate variability) and psychological variables. Thirty-six sedentary seniors aged 60-75 years were randomly assigned to a swimming and aquaerobics program or a stretching program two times a week for 21 weeks. Executive functions (inhibition, updating of working memory and cognitive flexibility) and cardiorespiratory fitness (estimated VO2max) were assessed at the start, after 10 weeks of program and at the end of the program. Resting HRV and measures of psychological outcomes (depression, self-efficacy, decisional balance) were obtained at the start and at the end of the program. Participants of both groups significantly improved their VO2max level, their psychological state and their performance for the 2-back task. Only the participants in the aquaerobics group significantly improved their vagally-mediated HRV and their performance for the Stroop test and the verbal running-span test at the end of the program. Only improvements in cardiac vagal control and in inhibition were shown to be functionally related. These results are discussed in line with the model of neurovisceral integration. PMID:26812613

  14. Cardiovascular patients’ experiences of living with pacemaker: Qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Azami-Aghdash, Saber; Sohrab-Navi, Zahra; Kolahdouzan, Kasra

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND A pacemaker implantation is considered major life event for cardiovascular patients, so they will probably have very interesting experiences of living with this device. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of cardiovascular patients living with the pacemaker. METHODS In this qualitative study, 27 patients were chosen through purposive sampling to achieve data saturation, and their experiences were examined using semi-structured interviews. The patients’ statements were recorded with their consent and analyzed using content analysis method. RESULTS Participants’ experiences included three main themes: “Problems and limitations,” “feeling and dealing with pacemaker”, and “sources of comfort” and 10 sub-themes including: physical problems, financial problems, social problems, the first encounter, the feeling of living with the pacemaker, how to cope with pacemaker, satisfaction with pacemaker, good family support, hospital and hospital staff performance, and role of religious beliefs. CONCLUSION Planning to solve social problems, identifying and changing feelings of patients using pacemakers, reinforcing the resources of comfort especially family support seem to be necessary steps for improving quality of life and impact of using pacemaker. PMID:26715933

  15. Endogenous pacemaker activity of rat tumour somatotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Kwiecien, Renata; Robert, Christophe; Cannon, Robert; Vigues, Stephan; Arnoux, Annie; Kordon, Claude; Hammond, Constance

    1998-01-01

    Cells derived from a rat pituitary tumour (GC cell line) that continuously release growth hormone behave as endogenous pacemakers. In simultaneous patch clamp recordings and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) imaging, they displayed rhythmic action potentials (44.7 ± 2.7 mV, 178 ± 40 ms, 0.30 ± 0.04 Hz) and concomitant [Ca2+]i transients (374 ± 57 nM, 1.0 ± 0.2 s, 0.27 ± 0.03 Hz). Action potentials and [Ca2+]i transients were reversibly blocked by removal of external Ca2+, addition of nifedipine (1 μM) or Ni2+ (40 μM), but were insensitive to TTX (1 μM). An L-type Ca2+ current activated at -33.6 ± 0.4 mV (holding potential (Vh), −40 mV), peaked at -1.8 ± 1.3 mV, was reduced by nifedipine and enhanced by S-(+)-SDZ 202 791. A T/R-type Ca2+ current activated at -41.7 ± 2.7 mV (Vh, -80 or -60 mV), peaked at -9.2 ± 3.0 mV, was reduced by low concentrations of Ni2+ (40 μM) or Cd2+ (10 μM) and was toxin resistant. Parallel experiments revealed the expression of the class E calcium channel α1-subunit mRNA. The K+ channel blockers TEA (25 mM) and charybdotoxin (10–100 nM) enhanced spike amplitude and/or duration. Apamin (100 nM) also strongly reduced the after-spike hyperpolarization. The outward K+ tail current evoked by a depolarizing step that mimicked an action potential reversed at −69.8 ± 0.3 mV, presented two components, lasted 2–3 s and was totally blocked by Cd2+ (400 μM). The slow pacemaker depolarization (3.5 ± 0.4 s) that separated consecutive spikes corresponded to a 2- to 3-fold increase in membrane resistance, was strongly Na+ sensitive but TTX insensitive. Computer simulations showed that pacemaker activity can be reproduced by a minimum of six currents: an L-type Ca2+ current underlies the rising phase of action potentials that are repolarized by a delayed rectifier and Ca2+-activated K+ currents. In between spikes, the decay of Ca2+-activated K+ currents and a persistent inward cationic current depolarize the membrane

  16. Of pacemakers and statistics: the actuarial method extended.

    PubMed

    Dussel, J; Wolbarst, A B; Scott-Millar, R N; Obel, I W

    1980-01-01

    Pacemakers cease functioning because of either natural battery exhaustion (nbe) or component failure (cf). A study of four series of pacemakers shows that a simple extension of the actuarial method, so as to incorporate Normal statistics, makes possible a quantitative differentiation between the two modes of failure. This involves the separation of the overall failure probability density function PDF(t) into constituent parts pdfnbe(t) and pdfcf(t). The approach should allow a meaningful comparison of the characteristics of different pacemaker types. PMID:6160497

  17. Preliminary experience with the use of a programmable pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Morse, D; Fernandez, J; Samuel, A; Lemole, G; Parsonnet, V

    1975-05-01

    One hundred sixty-four patients, in whom new externally programmable pacemakers had been inserted, were studied over a two year period, beginning July, 1972. Following implantation, the rate and current output of this pacemaker could be changed at any time by a non-invasive technique involving electromagnetic pulse trains emitted by an external "programmer". In 89 percent of the patients it was possible to reduce battery output by half, implying greater longevity of the pacer in these cases. In 15 percent of the patients, manipulative control of the pacemaker rate was employed and found beneficial. PMID:1126191

  18. Nonlinear dynamics, chaos and complex cardiac arrhythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, L.; Courtemanche, M.; Shrier, A.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    Periodic stimulation of a nonlinear cardiac oscillator in vitro gives rise to complex dynamics that is well described by one-dimensional finite difference equations. As stimulation parameters are varied, a large number of different phase-locked and chaotic rhythms is observed. Similar rhythms can be observed in the intact human heart when there is interaction between two pacemaker sites. Simplified models are analyzed, which show some correspondence to clinical observations.

  19. Peak Oxygen Uptake after Cardiac Rehabilitation: A Randomized Controlled Trial of a 12-Month Maintenance Program versus Usual Care

    PubMed Central

    Madssen, Erik; Arbo, Ingerid; Granøien, Ingrid; Walderhaug, Liv; Moholdt, Trine

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise capacity is a strong predictor of survival in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Exercise capacity improves after cardiac rehabilitation exercise training, but previous studies have demonstrated a decline in peak oxygen uptake after ending a formal rehabilitation program. There is a lack of knowledge on how long-term exercise adherence can be achieved in CAD patients. We therefore assessed if a 12-month maintenance program following cardiac rehabilitation would lead to increased adherence to exercise and increased exercise capacity compared to usual care. Materials and Methods Two-centre, open, parallel randomized controlled trial with 12 months follow-up comparing usual care to a maintenance program. The maintenance program consisted of one monthly supervised high intensity interval training session, a written exercise program and exercise diary, and a maximum exercise test every third month during follow-up. Forty-nine patients (15 women) on optimal medical treatment were included following discharge from cardiac rehabilitation. The primary endpoint was change in peak oxygen uptake at follow-up; secondary endpoints were physical activity level, quality of life and blood markers of cardiovascular risk. Results There was no change in peak oxygen uptake from baseline to follow-up in either group (intervention group 27.9 (±4.7) to 28.8 (±5.6) mL·kg (-1) min (−1), control group 32.0 (±6.2) to 32.8 (±5.8) mL·kg (−1) min (−1), with no between-group difference, p = 0.22). Quality of life and blood biomarkers remained essentially unchanged, and both self-reported and measured physical activity levels were similar between groups after 12 months. Conclusions A maintenance exercise program for 12 months did not improve adherence to exercise or peak oxygen uptake in CAD patients after discharge from cardiac rehabilitation compared to usual care. This suggests that infrequent supervised high intensity interval training sessions are

  20. Transcatheter leadless pacemaker implantation in a patient with a transvenous dual-chamber pacemaker already in place.

    PubMed

    Karjalainen, Pasi P; Nammas, Wail; Paana, Tuomas

    2016-01-01

    An 83-year-old lady had a DDDR pacemaker inserted in 1997 for symptomatic atrioventricular block. She underwent battery replacement in 2008. In 2010, she developed atrial fibrillation; the pacemaker was switched to VVIR mode. During the last 2years, ventricular lead threshold increased progressively. In December 2015, she presented for elective battery replacement. After successful battery replacement, the ventricular lead threshold remained high; therefore, we implanted a leadless transcatheter pacemaker, via femoral vein access, using a dedicated catheter delivery system. Electrical measurements at this stage revealed a pacing threshold of 0.28V at 0.24msec, and an impedance of 650Ω. PMID:27323664

  1. Engineered Biological Pacemakers | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institute on Aging's Cellular Biophysics Section is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize biological pacemakers.

  2. [Scientific results of the pacemaker register: possibilities and limits].

    PubMed

    Wiegand, U K H; Lemke, B; Nowak, B

    2010-09-01

    The German obligatory external quality assurance for pacemaker implantation generates a large database giving an almost complete review of in-patient pacemaker interventions since 2001. Publications on lead fixation, age and gender dependency of pacemaker indications, choice of pacing mode and complication rates as well as investigations into the causes of lead dysfunction prove that the database is basically suitable for health service research. In contrast to pacemaker registries of other European countries the focus on in-patient operations, missing product specifications and the absence of patient follow-up largely limits the scientific potential of the database. It is greatly hoped that these limitations will be overcome by cross-sectional and longitudinal quality assurance within the next years. PMID:20668867

  3. Sleep Apnea May Raise Heart Risks in People with Pacemakers

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158688.html Sleep Apnea May Raise Heart Risks in People With ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People with heart pacemakers and sleep apnea are at much greater risk for a ...

  4. Sleep Apnea May Raise Heart Risks in People with Pacemakers

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk for a dangerous heart rhythm disorder called atrial fibrillation, a new study suggests. With sleep apnea, breathing ... sleep disorder is a known risk factor for atrial fibrillation, but the risk for pacemaker patients with sleep ...

  5. Fistula Formation 6 Years after Removal of Infected Pacemaker Leads

    PubMed Central

    Schroeter, Thomas; Kiefer, Philipp; Sauer, Matthias; Mohr, Friedrich Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of a male patient who presented with a chronic ulcer below the left clavicle. Six years before the present admission a permanent pacemaker, including leads, was explanted related to endocarditis. The initial working hypothesis suspected an infected sebaceous gland as the cause of ulceration. After two periods of unsuccessful surgical treatment of the gland, further examination identified a small pacemaker lead fragment underneath the articulation between sternum and clavicle as a possible reason. PMID:26693129

  6. Fistula Formation 6 Years after Removal of Infected Pacemaker Leads.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, Thomas; Kiefer, Philipp; Sauer, Matthias; Mohr, Friedrich Wilhelm

    2015-12-01

    We describe a case of a male patient who presented with a chronic ulcer below the left clavicle. Six years before the present admission a permanent pacemaker, including leads, was explanted related to endocarditis. The initial working hypothesis suspected an infected sebaceous gland as the cause of ulceration. After two periods of unsuccessful surgical treatment of the gland, further examination identified a small pacemaker lead fragment underneath the articulation between sternum and clavicle as a possible reason. PMID:26693129

  7. Donation of explanted pacemakers for reuse in underserved nations.

    PubMed

    Stanyon, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Some charitable organizations and physicians are willing to assist in the compassionate donation of explanted pacemakers for reuse in medically underserved nations. However, healthcare organizations must recognize that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), device manufacturers, professional societies and many physicians advocate return of explanted pacemakers to the manufacturer to ensure an accurate performance database promoting improved device reliability and safety for the patient. PMID:20151371

  8. Pacemaker activity and ionic currents in mouse atrioventricular node cells

    PubMed Central

    Marger, Laurine; Mesirca, Pietro; Alig, Jacqueline; Torrente, Angelo; Dubel, Stefan; Engeland, Birgit; Kanani, Sandra; Fontanaud, Pierre; Striessnig, Jörg; Shin, Hee-Sup; Isbrandt, Dirk; Ehmke, Heimo; Nargeot, Joël

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that pacemaker activity of the sino-atrial node (SAN) initiates the heartbeat. However, the atrioventricular node (AVN) can generate viable pacemaker activity in case of SAN failure, but we have limited knowledge of the ionic bases of AVN automaticity. We characterized pacemaker activity and ionic currents in automatic myocytes of the mouse AVN. Pacemaking of AVN cells (AVNCs) was lower than that of SAN pacemaker cells (SANCs), both in control conditions and upon perfusion of isoproterenol (ISO). Block of INa by tetrodotoxin (TTX) or of ICa,L by isradipine abolished AVNCs pacemaker activity. TTX-resistant (INar) and TTX-sensitive (INas) Na+ currents were recorded in mouse AVNCs, as well as T-(ICa,T) and L-type (ICa,L) Ca2+ currents. ICa,L density was lower than in SANCs (51%). The density of the hyperpolarization-activated current, (If) and that of the fast component of the delayed rectifier current (IKr) were, respectively, lower (52%) and higher (53%) in AVNCs than in SANCs. Pharmacological inhibition of If by 3 µM ZD-7228 reduced pacemaker activity by 16%, suggesting a relevant role for If in AVNCs automaticity. Some AVNCs expressed also moderate densities of the transient outward K+ current (Ito). In contrast, no detectable slow component of the delayed rectifier current (IKs) could be recorded in AVNCs. The lower densities of If and ICa,L, as well as higher expression of IKr in AVNCs than in SANCs may contribute to the intrinsically slower AVNCs pacemaking than that of SANCs. PMID:21406959

  9. Reflex vasovagal syncope--is there a benefit in pacemaker therapy?

    PubMed

    Sousa, Pedro Alexandre; Candeias, Rui; Marques, Nuno; Jesus, Ilídio

    2014-05-01

    Reflex vasovagal syncope often affects young populations and is associated with a benign prognosis in terms of mortality. However, a minority of patients have recurrent episodes, with a considerable impact on their quality of life. Pacemaker therapy has been an option in these patients since the 1990s if a conservative strategy fails. Initially, non-randomized and open-label randomized trials showed promising results, but these studies were associated with a significant placebo effect. Recently, an approach based on the use of implantable loop recorders has shown that some patients with reflex vasovagal syncope could benefit from implantation with dual-chamber pacemakers, particularly patients aged >40 years, with recurrent syncopal episodes resulting in frequent injuries, in whom a long asystole (≥3 s asystole with syncope or ≥6 s asystole without syncope) has been documented with an implantable loop recorder. The authors present a literature review on the role of cardiac pacing in reflex vasovagal syncope and propose a diagnostic and therapeutic decision flowchart for patients with syncope of probable reflex etiology. PMID:24895017

  10. Light microscopy of the lymphatics of the human atrial wall and lymphatic drainage of supraventricular pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Elisková, M; Eliska, O

    1989-01-01

    After injection of Indian ink stained 2% gelatine in 42 human hearts the lymph drainage of the regions of supraventricular cardiac pacemakers and the patterns of the lymphatic vascular bed in the atrial wall were studied. From the sites of the pacemakers the lymph is drained into the tracheobronchial nodes in 100%. Only two of those regions are drained through additional pathways, namely the SAN region into the anterior mediastinal node situated at the azygos vein and the coronary sinus area into the anterior mediastinal lateropericardiac nodes. In the cleared specimens as microscopically the epicardial lymph vessels produce polygonal superficial network; oblique anastomoses of that network run into the deeper layers of subepicardial tissue where they join with deep irregular lymphatic network. Deep subepicardial lymph vessels are often accompanied by veins and nerves. The course of most of myocardial lymph vessels follows the position of muscle cells. In the connective septa these vessels join to form larger trunks and open into the subepicardial vessels. PMID:2475557

  11. Repetitive nonreentrant ventriculoatrial synchrony: An underrecognized cause of pacemaker-related arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Parikshit S; Kaszala, Karoly; Tan, Alex Y; Koneru, Jayanthi N; Shepard, Richard; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A; Huizar, Jose F

    2016-08-01

    Similar to endless loop tachycardia (ELT), repetitive nonreentrant ventriculoatrial synchrony (RNRVAS) is a ventriculoatrial (VA) synchrony pacemaker-mediated arrhythmia. RNRVAS was first described in 1990 and can only occur in the presence of retrograde VA conduction and dual-chamber or cardiac resynchronization devices with tracking (P-synchronous ventricular pacing such as DDD, DDDR) or nontracking pacing modes that allow AV-sequential pacing (DDI, DDIR). RNRVAS is promoted by (1) high lower rate limit or any feature that allows rapid pacing, (2) long AV intervals, or (3) long postventricular atrial refractory period (PVARP). In contrast to ELT, RNRVAS is a less well-recognized form of pacemaker-mediated arrhythmia; thus, unlike ELT, there are no specific device algorithms to prevent, recognize, and terminate RNRVAS. However, RNRVAS has been recently shown to occur frequently. We present a series of cases, some of which were found fortuitously. Owing to its clinical implications, we propose that algorithms should be developed to prevent, identify, and terminate RNRVAS. PMID:27050909

  12. Dynamic tricuspid valve stenosis induced with a pacemaker lead: a case report.

    PubMed

    Skoric, Bosko; Baricevic, Zeljko; Brida, Margarita; Samardzic, Jure; Jurin, Hrvoje; Milicic, Davor

    2014-01-01

    Isolated severe tricuspid valve stenosis due to an endocardial pacemaker lead is extremely rare, and is usually caused by either fibrosis of a perforated or lacerated leaflet, or fibrotic adherence between the lead and the valvular apparatus. Reported cases typically include clinical manifestations of both systemic venous stasis and low cardiac output. The case is presented of a 20-year-old female with a surgically repaired congenital heart disease who developed severe tricuspid stenosis at six years after the implantation of a DDD pacemaker. Unexpectedly, the patient had no signs of venous stasis and suffered only from exercise intolerance. Right heart catheterization under fluoroscopic guidance revealed an atrial lead forming a loop at the level of the tricuspid valve. A paradoxical inspiratory decrease in the transvalvular diastolic gradient, caused by the caudal heart motion and straightening of the loop during inspiration, was noted. Such a dynamic nature with a temporary inspiratory relief of the obstruction may explain the partial clinical presentation of tricuspid stenosis in this case. The lead was removed and the tricuspid valve repaired surgically, after which the patient's recovery was uneventful with normalization of exercise tolerance. PMID:24779342

  13. Return to flight status after cardiac rehabilitation: three case histories.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, J

    2001-01-01

    A pilot's license to operate aircraft is not valid unless it is accompanied by a medical certificate. This certificate is revoked if a pilot is diagnosed with a cardiovascular illness. After a lengthy waiting period, the medical certificate may be reinstated if the pilot meets rigid standards. For many pilots, participation in a cardiac rehabilitation program is essential to achieve the minimal functional capacity in exercise testing (10.0 metabolic equivalents), document tolerance of medications, and achieve successful rehabilitation. Our staff has assisted 11 pilots in their quest to resume commercial or recreational flying after heart surgery, pacemaker implantation, or angioplasty. This article summarizes the case histories of three pilots who returned to fight status, in three Federal Aviation Administration categories (FAA), after a cardiac illness. The principle goals of our rehabilitation program for pilots are: (1) to achieve the highest possible outcome of the rehabilitation process; (2) to establish a safe and effective independent exercise program; (3) to obtain measures of compliance and success with the independent exercise program; (4) to document tolerance of medications and ensure that medications are acceptable to the FAA; (5) to document stability of the serum glucose in diabetic patients engaged in rigorous, prolonged exercise; and (6) prepare the patient for performance of a treadmill test in which 100% predicted maximum heart rate is achieved without symptoms of cardiovascular distress. An inherent effect of pursuing these goals is dramatic risk factor modification including improved blood pressure and lipid status and reduced body mass index. After resumption of flying, none of our pilot-patients have experienced cardiac symptoms during flight, nor have they required emergency department visits or hospitalization for any reason. PMID:11591042

  14. Initial experiences with a telemedicine framework for remote pacemaker follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kollmann, A; Hayn, D; Garcia, J; Kastner, P; Rotman, B; Tscheliessnigg, K H; Schreier, G

    2006-01-01

    According to international guidelines implanted cardiac pacemakers (PM) have to be checked periodically to ensure that they are working correctly. To spare a significant number of patients the burden of traveling to specialized PM clinics a telemedicine framework has been developed prototypically. A mobile, personal digital assistant (PDA) based PM follow-up unit provides the caregiver at the point-of-care with the necessary infrastructure to perform a basic PM follow-up examination remotely. In case of detected malfunction of the PM the patient is ordered to the hospital for further examination. The system has been evaluated in a clinical pilot trial on 44 patients with a total of 23 different PM models from 8 different manufacturers. The initial results indicate the potential of the concept to work as an efficient, manufacturer independent screening method with the ultimate goal to increase the safety, quality and efficiency of PM therapy. PMID:17946290

  15. Predictors of severe tricuspid regurgitation in patients with permanent pacemaker or automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator leads.

    PubMed

    Najib, Mohammad Q; Vittala, Satya S; Challa, Suresh; Raizada, Amol; Tondato, Fernando J; Lee, Howard R; Chaliki, Hari P

    2013-01-01

    Patients with permanent pacemaker or automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (AICD) leads have an increased prevalence of tricuspid regurgitation. However, the roles of cardiac rhythm and lead-placement duration in the development of severe tricuspid regurgitation are unclear. We reviewed echocardiographic data on 26 consecutive patients who had severe tricuspid regurgitation after permanent pacemaker or AICD placement; before treatment, they had no organic tricuspid valve disease, pulmonary hypertension, left ventricular dysfunction, or severe tricuspid regurgitation. We compared the results to those of 26 control subjects who had these same devices but no more than mild tricuspid regurgitation. The patients and control subjects were similar in age (mean, 81 ±6 vs 81 ±8 yr; P = 0.83), sex (male, 42% vs 46%; P = 0.78), and left ventricular ejection fraction (0.60 ±0.06 vs 0.58 ± 0.05; P = 0.4). The patients had a higher prevalence of atrial fibrillation (92% vs 65%; P=0.01) and longer median duration of pacemaker or AICD lead placement (49.5 vs 5 mo; P < 0.001). After adjusting for age, sex, and right ventricular systolic pressure by multivariate logistic regression analysis, we found that atrial fibrillation (odds ratio=6.4; P = 0.03) and duration of lead placement (odds ratio=1.5/yr; P = 0.001) were independently associated with severe tricuspid regurgitation. Out study shows that atrial fibrillation and longer durations of lead placement might increase the risk of severe tricuspid regurgitation in patients with permanent pacemakers or AICDs. PMID:24391312

  16. Predictors of Severe Tricuspid Regurgitation in Patients with Permanent Pacemaker or Automatic Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Leads

    PubMed Central

    Najib, Mohammad Q.; Vittala, Satya S.; Challa, Suresh; Raizada, Amol; Tondato, Fernando J.; Lee, Howard R.; Chaliki, Hari P.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with permanent pacemaker or automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (AICD) leads have an increased prevalence of tricuspid regurgitation. However, the roles of cardiac rhythm and lead-placement duration in the development of severe tricuspid regurgitation are unclear. We reviewed echocardiographic data on 26 consecutive patients who had severe tricuspid regurgitation after permanent pacemaker or AICD placement; before treatment, they had no organic tricuspid valve disease, pulmonary hypertension, left ventricular dysfunction, or severe tricuspid regurgitation. We compared the results to those of 26 control subjects who had these same devices but no more than mild tricuspid regurgitation. The patients and control subjects were similar in age (mean, 81 ±6 vs 81 ±8 yr; P = 0.83), sex (male, 42% vs 46%; P = 0.78), and left ventricular ejection fraction (0.60 ±0.06 vs 0.58 ± 0.05; P = 0.4). The patients had a higher prevalence of atrial fibrillation (92% vs 65%; P=0.01) and longer median duration of pacemaker or AICD lead placement (49.5 vs 5 mo; P < 0.001). After adjusting for age, sex, and right ventricular systolic pressure by multivariate logistic regression analysis, we found that atrial fibrillation (odds ratio=6.4; P = 0.03) and duration of lead placement (odds ratio=1.5/yr; P = 0.001) were independently associated with severe tricuspid regurgitation. Out study shows that atrial fibrillation and longer durations of lead placement might increase the risk of severe tricuspid regurgitation in patients with permanent pacemakers or AICDs. PMID:24391312

  17. Cardiac fluid dynamics anticipates heart adaptation.

    PubMed

    Pedrizzetti, Gianni; Martiniello, Alfonso R; Bianchi, Valter; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Caso, Pio; Tonti, Giovanni

    2015-01-21

    Hemodynamic forces represent an epigenetic factor during heart development and are supposed to influence the pathology of the grown heart. Cardiac blood motion is characterized by a vortical dynamics, and it is common belief that the cardiac vortex has a role in disease progressions or regression. Here we provide a preliminary demonstration about the relevance of maladaptive intra-cardiac vortex dynamics in the geometrical adaptation of the dysfunctional heart. We employed an in vivo model of patients who present a stable normal heart function in virtue of the cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT, bi-ventricular pace-maker) and who are expected to develop left ventricle remodeling if pace-maker was switched off. Intra-ventricular fluid dynamics is analyzed by echocardiography (Echo-PIV). Under normal conditions, the flow presents a longitudinal alignment of the intraventricular hemodynamic forces. When pacing is temporarily switched off, flow forces develop a misalignment hammering onto lateral walls, despite no other electro-mechanical change is noticed. Hemodynamic forces result to be the first event that evokes a physiological activity anticipating cardiac changes and could help in the prediction of longer term heart adaptations. PMID:25529139

  18. Right Ventricular Anatomy Can Accommodate Multiple Micra Transcatheter Pacemakers

    PubMed Central

    EGGEN, MICHAEL D.; BONNER, MATTHEW D.; IAIZZO, PAUL A.; WIKA, KENT

    2016-01-01

    Background The introduction of transcatheter pacemaker technology has the potential to significantly reduce if not eliminate a number of complications associated with a traditional leaded pacing system. However, this technology raises new questions regarding how to manage the device at end of service, the number of devices the right ventricle (RV) can accommodate, and what patient age is appropriate for this therapy. In this study, six human cadaver hearts and one reanimated human heart (not deemed viable for transplant) were each implanted with three Micra devices in traditional pacing locations via fluoroscopic imaging. Methods A total of six human cadaver hearts were obtained from the University of Minnesota Anatomy Bequest Program; the seventh heart was a heart not deemed viable for transplant obtained from LifeSource and then reanimated using Visible Heart® methodologies. Each heart was implanted with multiple Micras using imaging and proper delivery tools; in these, the right ventricular volumes were measured and recorded. The hearts were subsequently dissected to view the right ventricular anatomies and the positions and spacing between devices. Results Multiple Micra devices could be placed in each heart in traditional, clinically accepted pacing implant locations within the RV and in each case without physical device interactions. This was true even in a human heart considered to be relatively small. Conclusions Although this technology is new, it was demonstrated here that within the human heart's RV, three Micra devices could be accommodated within traditional pacing locations: with the potential in some, for even more. PMID:26710918

  19. Evaluation of a Standardized Patient Education Program for Inpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation: Impact on Illness Knowledge and Self-Management Behaviors up to 1 Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Karin; Seekatz, Bettina; Haug, Günter; Mosler, Gabriele; Schwaab, Bernhard; Worringen, Ulrike; Faller, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Patient education is an essential part of the treatment of coronary heart disease in cardiac rehabilitation. In Germany, no standardized and evaluated patient education programs for coronary heart disease have been available so far. In this article, we report the evaluation of a patient-oriented program. A multicenter quasi-experimental,…

  20. A Prospective Evaluation of a Protocol for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Patients With Implanted Cardiac Devices

    PubMed Central

    Nazarian, Saman; Hansford, Rozann; Roguin, Ariel; Goldsher, Dorith; Zviman, Menekhem M.; Lardo, Albert C.; Caffo, Brian S.; Frick, Kevin D.; Kraut, Michael A.; Kamel, Ihab R.; Calkins, Hugh; Berger, Ronald D.; Bluemke, David A.; Halperin, Henry R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is avoided in most patients with implanted cardiac devices because of safety concerns. Objective To define the safety of a protocol for MRI at the commonly used magnetic strength of 1.5 T in patients with implanted cardiac devices. Design Prospective nonrandomized trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT01130896) Setting One center in the United States (94% of examinations) and one in Israel. Patients 438 patients with devices (54% with pacemakers and 46% with defibrillators) who underwent 555 MRI studies. Intervention Pacing mode was changed to asynchronous for pacemaker-dependent patients and to demand for others. Tachy-arrhythmia functions were disabled. Blood pressure, electrocardiography, oximetry, and symptoms were monitored by a nurse with experience in cardiac life support and device programming who had immediate backup from an electrophysiologist. Measurements Activation or inhibition of pacing, symptoms, and device variables. Results In 3 patients (0.7% [95% CI, 0% to 1.5%]), the device reverted to a transient back-up programming mode without long-term effects. Right ventricular (RV) sensing (median change, 0 mV [interquartile range {IQR}, −0.7 to 0 V]) and atrial and right and left ventricular lead impedances (median change, −2 Ω[IQR, −13 to 0 Ω], −4 Ω [IQR, −16 to 0 Ω], and −11 Ω [IQR, −40 to 0 Ω], respectively) were reduced immediately after MRI. At long-term follow-up (61% of patients), decreased RV sensing (median, 0 mV, [IQR, −1.1 to 0.3 mV]), decreased RV lead impedance (median, −3 Ω, [IQR, −29 to 15 Ω]), increased RV capture threshold (median, 0 V, IQR, [0 to 0.2 Ω]), and decreased battery voltage (median, −0.01 V, IQR, −0.04 to 0 V) were noted. The observed changes did not require device revision or reprogramming. Limitations Not all available cardiac devices have been tested. Long-term in-person or telephone follow-up was unavailable in 43 patients (10%), and

  1. Simulation of Ectopic Pacemakers in the Heart: Multiple Ectopic Beats Generated by Reentry inside Fibrotic Regions

    PubMed Central

    Gouvêa de Barros, Bruno; Weber dos Santos, Rodrigo; Lobosco, Marcelo; Alonso, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of nonconducting media, mimicking cardiac fibrosis, in two models of cardiac tissue produces the formation of ectopic beats. The fraction of nonconducting media in comparison with the fraction of healthy myocytes and the topological distribution of cells determines the probability of ectopic beat generation. First, a detailed subcellular microscopic model that accounts for the microstructure of the cardiac tissue is constructed and employed for the numerical simulation of action potential propagation. Next, an equivalent discrete model is implemented, which permits a faster integration of the equations. This discrete model is a simplified version of the microscopic model that maintains the distribution of connections between cells. Both models produce similar results when describing action potential propagation in homogeneous tissue; however, they slightly differ in the generation of ectopic beats in heterogeneous tissue. Nevertheless, both models present the generation of reentry inside fibrotic tissues. This kind of reentry restricted to microfibrosis regions can result in the formation of ectopic pacemakers, that is, regions that will generate a series of ectopic stimulus at a fast pacing rate. In turn, such activity has been related to trigger fibrillation in the atria and in the ventricles in clinical and animal studies. PMID:26583127

  2. Synergism of coupled subsarcolemmal Ca2+ clocks and sarcolemmal voltage clocks confers robust and flexible pacemaker function in a novel pacemaker cell model

    PubMed Central

    Maltsev, Victor A.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent experimental studies have demonstrated that sinoatrial node cells (SANC) generate spontaneous, rhythmic, local subsarcolemmal Ca2+ releases (Ca2+ clock), which occur during late diastolic depolarization (DD) and interact with the classic sarcolemmal voltage oscillator (membrane clock) by activating Na+-Ca2+ exchanger current (INCX). This and other interactions between clocks, however, are not captured by existing essentially membrane-delimited cardiac pacemaker cell numerical models. Using wide-scale parametric analysis of classic formulations of membrane clock and Ca2+ cycling, we have constructed and initially explored a prototype rabbit SANC model featuring both clocks. Our coupled oscillator system exhibits greater robustness and flexibility than membrane clock operating alone. Rhythmic spontaneous Ca2+ releases of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR)-based Ca2+ clock ignite rhythmic action potentials via late DD INCX over much broader ranges of membrane clock parameters [e.g., L-type Ca2+ current (ICaL) and/or hyperpolarization-activated (“funny”) current (If) conductances]. The system Ca2+ clock includes SR and sarcolemmal Ca2+ fluxes, which optimize cell Ca2+ balance to increase amplitudes of both SR Ca2+ release and late DD INCX as SR Ca2+ pumping rate increases, resulting in a broad pacemaker rate modulation (1.8–4.6 Hz). In contrast, the rate modulation range via membrane clock parameters is substantially smaller when Ca2+ clock is unchanged or lacking. When Ca2+ clock is disabled, the system parametric space for fail-safe SANC operation considerably shrinks: without rhythmic late DD INCX ignition signals membrane clock substantially slows, becomes dysrhythmic, or halts. In conclusion, the Ca2+ clock is a new critical dimension in SANC function. A synergism of the coupled function of Ca2+ and membrane clocks confers fail-safe SANC operation at greatly varying rates. PMID:19136600

  3. Nonphotic entrainment of the human circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klerman, E. B.; Rimmer, D. W.; Dijk, D. J.; Kronauer, R. E.; Rizzo, J. F. 3rd; Czeisler, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    In organisms as diverse as single-celled algae and humans, light is the primary stimulus mediating entrainment of the circadian biological clock. Reports that some totally blind individuals appear entrained to the 24-h day have suggested that nonphotic stimuli may also be effective circadian synchronizers in humans, although the nonphotic stimuli are probably comparatively weak synchronizers, because the circadian rhythms of many totally blind individuals "free run" even when they maintain a 24-h activity-rest schedule. To investigate entrainment by nonphotic synchronizers, we studied the endogenous circadian melatonin and core body temperature rhythms of 15 totally blind subjects who lacked conscious light perception and exhibited no suppression of plasma melatonin in response to ocular bright-light exposure. Nine of these fifteen blind individuals were able to maintain synchronization to the 24-h day, albeit often at an atypical phase angle of entrainment. Nonphotic stimuli also synchronized the endogenous circadian rhythms of a totally blind individual to a non-24-h schedule while living in constant near darkness. We conclude that nonphotic stimuli can entrain the human circadian pacemaker in some individuals lacking ocular circadian photoreception.

  4. Influence of electromagnetic interference on implanted cardiac arrhythmia devices in and around a magnetically levitated linear motor car.

    PubMed

    Fukuta, Motoyuki; Mizutani, Noboru; Waseda, Katsuhisa

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the susceptibility of implanted cardiac arrhythmia devices to electromagnetic interference in and around a magnetically levitated linear motor car [High-Speed Surface Transport (HSST)]. During the study, cardiac devices were connected to a phantom model that had similar characteristics to the human body. Three pacemakers from three manufacturers and one implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) were evaluated in and around the magnetically levitated vehicle. The system is based on a normal conductive system levitated by the attractive force of magnets and propelled by a linear induction motor without wheels. The magnetic field strength at 40 cm from the vehicle in the nonlevitating state was 0.12 mT and that during levitation was 0.20 mT. The magnetic and electric field strengths on a seat close to the variable voltage/variable frequency inverter while the vehicle was moving and at rest were 0.13 mT, 2.95 V/m and 0.04 mT, 0.36 V/m, respectively. Data recorded on a seat close to the reactor while the vehicle was moving and at rest were 0.09 mT, 2.45 V/m and 0.05 mT, 1.46 V/m, respectively. Measured magnetic and electric field strengths both inside and outside the linear motor car were too low to result in device inactivation. No sensing, pacing, or arrhythmic interactions were noted with any pacemaker or ICD programmed in either bipolar and unipolar configurations. In conclusion, our data suggest that a permanent programming change or a device failure is unlikely to occur and that the linear motor car system is probably safe for patients with one of the four implanted cardiac arrhythmia devices used in this study under the conditions tested. PMID:16235032

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cardiac pacing devices.

    PubMed

    Buendía, Francisco; Sánchez-Gómez, Juan M; Sancho-Tello, María J; Olagüe, José; Osca, Joaquín; Cano, Oscar; Arnau, Miguel A; Igual, Begoña

    2010-06-01

    Currently, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging is contraindicated in patients with a pacemaker or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. This study was carried out because the potential risks in this situation need to be clearly defined. This prospective study evaluated clinical and electrical parameters before and after magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 33 patients (five with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and 28 with pacemakers). In these patients, magnetic resonance imaging was considered clinically essential. There were no clinical complications. There was a temporary communication failure in two cases, sensing errors during imaging in two cases, and a safety signal was generated in one pacemaker at the maximum magnetic resonance frequency and output level. There were no technical restrictions on imaging nor were there any permanent changes in the performance of the cardiac pacing device. PMID:20515632

  6. Thallium cardiac stressing by esophageal pacing

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.L.; Vacek, J.L.; Preston, D.F.; Robinson, R.G.; Feldkamp, M.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Forty-three patients were examined with the transesophageal pacing method of cardiac stressing and thallium imaging. Transesophageal cardiac pacing, using a pill electrode or a permanent pacemaker lead, is a safe alternative for patients who are physically unable to exercise. Prior studies suggest that transvenous right atrial pacing with thallium injection is equivalent to physical exercise thallium studies in the detection of coronary artery disease. The esophageal pacing bipolar electrode similarly increases heart rate without the necessity of transvenous pacing or fluoroscopy and without the adverse side effects often seen when using pharmacologic stressing agents (i.e., dipyridamole). The results compare well with cardiac catheterization, echocardiographic, and electrocardiographic results. Cardiac paced stress testing requires no sedation, is performed on an out-patient basis, and causes little if any discomfort for the patient.

  7. Biasing the pacemaker in the behavioral theory of timing

    PubMed Central

    Bizo, Lewis A.; White, K. Geoffrey

    1995-01-01

    In the behavioral theory of timing, pacemaker rate is determined by overall rate of reinforcement. A two-alternative free-operant psychophysical procedure was employed to investigate whether pacemaker period was also sensitive to the differential rate of reinforcement. Responding on a left key during the first 25 s and on a right key during the second 25 s of a 50-s trial was reinforced at variable intervals, and variable-interval schedule values during the two halves of the trials were varied systematically. Responding on the right key during the first 25 s and on the left key during the second 25 s was not reinforced. Estimates of pacemaker period were derived from fits of a function predicted by the behavioral theory of timing to right-key response proportions in consecutive 5-s bins of the 50-s trial. Estimates of pacemaker period were shortest when the differential reinforcer rate most strongly favored right-key responses, and were longest when the differential reinforcer rate most strongly favored left-key responses. The results were consistent with the conclusion that pacemaker rate is influenced by relative reinforcer rate. PMID:16812769

  8. The neurochemical basis of photic entrainment of the circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, Michael A.; Buckley, Becky; Lutton, Lewis M.

    1992-01-01

    Circadian rhythmicity in mammals is controlled by the action of a light-entrainable hypothalamus, in association with two cell clusters known as the supra chiasmatic nuclei (SCN). In the absence of temporal environmental clues, this pacemaker continues to measure time by an endogenous mechanism (clock), driving biochemical, physiological, and behavioral rhythms that reflect the natural period of the pacemaker oscillation. This endogenous period usually differs slightly from 24 hours (i.e., circadian). When mammals are maintained under a 24 hour light-dark (LD) cycle, the pacemaker becomes entrained such that the period of the pacemaker oscillation matches that of the LD cycle. Potentially entraining photic information is conveyed to the SCN via a direct retinal projection, the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT). RHT neurotransmission is thought to be mediated by the release of excitatory amino acids (EAA) in the SCN. In support of this hypothesis, recent experiments using nocturnal rodents have shown that EAA antagonists block the effects of light on pacemaker-driven behavioral rhythms, and attenuate light induced gene expression in SCN cells. An understanding of the neurochemical basis of the photic entrainment process would facilitate the development of pharmacological strategies for maintaining synchrony among shift workers in environments, such as the Space Station, which provide unreliable or conflicting temporal photic clues.

  9. Factors associated with implantation of single- versus dual-chamber pacemakers in 1992.

    PubMed

    Daley, W R

    1998-08-01

    Characteristics of hospitalized patients receiving initial pacemaker implantation were determined using a multistate inpatient discharge database. Analysis revealed a significant association of pacemaker type with patient age and income level, even after controlling for diagnostic factors. PMID:9708676

  10. Long-term secondary prevention programs after cardiac rehabilitation for the reduction of future cardiovascular events: focus on regular physical activity.

    PubMed

    Scrutinio, Domenico; Temporelli, Pier Luigi; Passantino, Andrea; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo

    2009-05-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention programs are recognized as integral to the comprehensive care of patients with coronary heart disease, and as such are recommended in most contemporary clinical practice guidelines. The interventions are aimed at reducing disability, optimizing cardiovascular risk reduction by drug therapy and promoting healthy behavior. Healthy lifestyle habits must be recognized as capable of substantially reducing the risk for cardiovascular events in patients with coronary heart disease. This review highlights the recommended components of cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention programs, with special emphasis on regular physical activity. PMID:19450055

  11. A common Shox2-Nkx2-5 antagonistic mechanism primes the pacemaker cell fate in the pulmonary vein myocardium and sinoatrial node.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wenduo; Wang, Jun; Song, Yingnan; Yu, Diankun; Sun, Cheng; Liu, Chao; Chen, Fading; Zhang, Yanding; Wang, Fen; Harvey, Richard P; Schrader, Laura; Martin, James F; Chen, YiPing

    2015-07-15

    In humans, atrial fibrillation is often triggered by ectopic pacemaking activity in the myocardium sleeves of the pulmonary vein (PV) and systemic venous return. The genetic programs that abnormally reinforce pacemaker properties at these sites and how this relates to normal sinoatrial node (SAN) development remain uncharacterized. It was noted previously that Nkx2-5, which is expressed in the PV myocardium and reinforces a chamber-like myocardial identity in the PV, is lacking in the SAN. Here we present evidence that in mice Shox2 antagonizes the transcriptional output of Nkx2-5 in the PV myocardium and in a functional Nkx2-5(+) domain within the SAN to determine cell fate. Shox2 deletion in the Nkx2-5(+) domain of the SAN caused sick sinus syndrome, associated with the loss of the pacemaker program. Explanted Shox2(+) cells from the embryonic PV myocardium exhibited pacemaker characteristics including node-like electrophysiological properties and the capability to pace surrounding Shox2(-) cells. Shox2 deletion led to Hcn4 ablation in the developing PV myocardium. Nkx2-5 hypomorphism rescued the requirement for Shox2 for the expression of genes essential for SAN development in Shox2 mutants. Similarly, the pacemaker-like phenotype induced in the PV myocardium in Nkx2-5 hypomorphs reverted back to a working myocardial phenotype when Shox2 was simultaneously deleted. A similar mechanism is also adopted in differentiated embryoid bodies. We found that Shox2 interacts with Nkx2-5 directly, and discovered a substantial genome-wide co-occupancy of Shox2, Nkx2-5 and Tbx5, further supporting a pivotal role for Shox2 in the core myogenic program orchestrating venous pole and pacemaker development. PMID:26138475

  12. Cardiac involvement in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Khalighi, Koroush; Kodali, Archana; Thapamagar, Suman B.; Walker, Stanley R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an inherited progressive muscle disorder caused by defects in muscle proteins. As the incidence of this condition is low, not many are familiar with the multisystem involvement. At times, cardiac disease may even be the predominant manifestation in the form of arrhythmias, conduction defects, and cardiomyopathies. The progression of the disease can lead to sudden, unpredictable death. Thus, it is important to identify this subgroup and treat accordingly. Objective To identify patients with DM and assess their risk for sudden cardiac death. Methods Nine patients previously diagnosed with muscular dystrophy were evaluated by cardiologists for various reasons, from a general follow-up to cardiac arrest. All of them had electrocardiograms (EKG) and 2-D echocardiograms, and seven of them had further electrophysiological (EP) studies. Results Of the nine patients with DM, eight had EKG evidence of conduction abnormalities ranging from first-degree heart block to complete heart block. Of the seven who had EP studies, five had inducible ventricular tachycardia requiring immediate cardioversion and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implant. Two of them underwent permanent pacemaker placement due to complete heart block and infra-Hissian block. The remaining two patients opted for a conservative approach with yearly EKG monitoring. Conclusion Because one-third of the cardiac deaths in patients with DM are sudden, there is a strong need to identify these patients and intervene in those at high risk. Prophylactic pacemaker placement is recommended even in those with minimal conduction system abnormality. However, the common practice is to identify patients at high risk of conduction abnormalities by EP studies and then provide them with prophylactic invasive strategies. PMID:25656662

  13. Positional convulsant syncope in a pacemaker patient following insulation break of the right ventricular lead

    PubMed Central

    Ben Lassoued, Mehdi; Baatour, Makram; Haggui, Abdeddayem; Lamine, Khaled

    2014-01-01

    In spite of the advances made in the technology of pacemakers which resulted in a decrease in the incidence of pacemaker lead fracture, the latter remains a potential complication of implanted pacemakers manufactured in the early days. In this report, we present a case of fracture of the unipolar electrode diagnosed by an emergency physician in a patient on a pacemaker for 10 years who presented to the emergency department with positional convulsant syncopes. PMID:24827652

  14. Positional convulsant syncope in a pacemaker patient following insulation break of the right ventricular lead.

    PubMed

    Ben Lassoued, Mehdi; Baatour, Makram; Haggui, Abdeddayem; Lamine, Khaled

    2014-01-01

    In spite of the advances made in the technology of pacemakers which resulted in a decrease in the incidence of pacemaker lead fracture, the latter remains a potential complication of implanted pacemakers manufactured in the early days. In this report, we present a case of fracture of the unipolar electrode diagnosed by an emergency physician in a patient on a pacemaker for 10 years who presented to the emergency department with positional convulsant syncopes. PMID:24827652

  15. Determining the risks of magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 tesla for patients with pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jennifer D; Costa, Heather S; Russo, Robert J

    2012-12-01

    Conventional pacemaker and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator product labeling currently cautions against exposure to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, there is a growing clinical need for MRI, without an acceptable alternative imaging modality in many patients with cardiac devices. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of MRI at 1.5 T for patients with cardiac devices by measuring the frequency of device failures and clinically relevant device parameter changes. Data from a single-center retrospective review of 109 patients with pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (the MRI group) who underwent 125 clinically indicated MRI studies were compared to data from a prospective cohort of 50 patients with cardiac devices who did not undergo MRI (the control group). In the MRI group, there were no deaths, device failures requiring generator or lead replacement, induced arrhythmias, losses of capture, or electrical reset episodes. Decreases in battery voltage of ≥0.04 V occurred in 4%, pacing threshold increases of ≥0.5 V in 3%, and pacing lead impedance changes of ≥50 Ω in 6%. Although there were statistically significant differences between the MRI and control groups for the mean change in pacing lead impedance (-6.2 ± 23.9 vs 3.0 ± 22.1 Ω) and left ventricular pacing threshold (-0.1 ± 0.3 vs 0.1 ± 0.2 V), these differences were not clinically important. In conclusion, MRI in patients with cardiac devices resulted in no device or lead failures. A small number of clinically relevant changes in device parameter measurements were noted. However, these changes were similar to those in a control group of patients who did not undergo MRI. PMID:22921995

  16. Integration of a Notch-dependent mesenchymal gene program and Bmp2-driven cell invasiveness regulates murine cardiac valve formation.

    PubMed

    Luna-Zurita, Luis; Prados, Belén; Grego-Bessa, Joaquim; Luxán, Guillermo; del Monte, Gonzalo; Benguría, Alberto; Adams, Ralf H; Pérez-Pomares, José María; de la Pompa, José Luis

    2010-10-01

    Cardiac valve formation is crucial for embryonic and adult heart function. Valve malformations constitute the most common congenital cardiac defect, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating valve formation and homeostasis. Here, we show that endocardial Notch1 and myocardial Bmp2 signal integration establish a valve-forming field between 2 chamber developmental domains. Patterning occurs through the activation of endocardial epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) exclusively in prospective valve territories. Mice with constitutive endocardial Notch1 activity ectopically express Hey1 and Heyl. They also display an activated mesenchymal gene program in ventricles and a partial (noninvasive) EMT in vitro that becomes invasive upon BMP2 treatment. Snail1, TGF-β2, or Notch1 inhibition reduces BMP2-induced ventricular transformation and invasion, whereas BMP2 treatment inhibits endothelial Gsk3β, stabilizing Snail1 and promoting invasiveness. Integration of Notch and Bmp2 signals is consistent with Notch1 signaling being attenuated after myocardial Bmp2 deletion. Notch1 activation in myocardium extends Hey1 expression to nonchamber myocardium, represses Bmp2, and impairs EMT. In contrast, Notch deletion abrogates endocardial Hey gene transcription and extends Bmp2 expression to the ventricular endocardium. This embryonic Notch1-Bmp2-Snail1 relationship may be relevant in adult valve disease, in which decreased NOTCH signaling causes valve mesenchyme cell formation, fibrosis, and calcification. PMID:20890042

  17. [Development and research of temporary demand pacemaker with electrocardiosignal display].

    PubMed

    Fan, Shounian; Jiang, Chenxi; Cai, Yunchang; Pan, Yangzhong; Yang, Tianhe; Wu, Qiang; Zheng, Yaxi; Liu, Xiaoqiao; Li, Shiying

    2004-08-01

    A temporary demand pacemaker with electrocardiosignal display is introduced in this paper. Double way low-noise electrocardiosignal preamplifier, amplitude limiter, high and low pass filter, 50 Hz notch filter, TTL level generator and stimulating pulse formation circuit are components of the hardware electrocircuit. The demand pacing and the electrocardiosignal display are separately controlled by the software in which the double microcontrollers communications technique is used. In this study, liquid crystal display is firstly used in body surface electrocardiosignal display or intracardial electrophysiologic signal display when the temporary demand pacemaker is installed and put into use. The machine has proven clinically useful and can be of wide appliation. PMID:15357453

  18. Which Factors Unexpectedly Increase Depressive Symptom Severity in Patients at the End of a Cardiac Rehabilitation Program?

    PubMed Central

    Komasi, Saeid; Montazeri, Nafiseh; Masoumi, Masoumali; Soroush, Ali; Ezzati, Parvin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate predictors of depressive symptom aggravation at the end of a cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program. Methods The design of the study was retrospective. The administrative data were obtained from the database of the CR department of a heart hospital in Iran. The demographic and clinical information of 615 CR patients between January 2000 and January 2010 was analyzed using binary logistic regression analysis. Results The results showed that 10.7% of the patients completed the CR program with aggravated depressive symptoms. After adjustment for gender, age, and pre-intervention depression score, lower education level (p<0.05) and smoking (p<0.01) were significant predictors of increased depressive symptoms at the end of the program. Our model variables could explain 6% to 13% of the dependent variable variance. Conclusion The results suggest that targeting patients who are less literate or who smoke could allow for taking the required measures to prevent or control depression at the end of a CR program. It is suggested that future studies consider other variables. PMID:26798600

  19. Technology utilization program report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The application of aerospace technology to the solution of public health and industrial problems is reported. Data cover: (1) development of an externally rechargeable cardiac pacemaker, (2) utilization of ferrofluids-colloidal suspensions of ferrite particles - in the efficient separation of nonferrous metals as Ni, Zn, Cu, and Al from shredded automobile scrap, and (3) development of a breathing system for fire fighters.

  20. Cardiac Biomarkers: a Focus on Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Forough, Reza; Scarcello, Catherine; Perkins, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Historically, biomarkers have been used in two major ways to maintain and improve better health status: first, for diagnostic purposes, and second, as specific targets to treat various diseases. A new era in treatment and even cure for the some diseases using reprograming of somatic cells is about to be born. In this approach, scientists are successfully taking human skin cells (previously considered terminally-differentiated cells) and re-programming them into functional cardiac myocytes and other cell types in vitro. A cell reprograming approach for treatment of cardiovascular diseases will revolutionize the field of medicine and significantly expand the human lifetime. Availability of a comprehensive catalogue for cardiac biomarkers is necessary for developing cell reprograming modalities to treat cardiac diseases, as well as for determining the progress of reprogrammed cells as they become cardiac cells. In this review, we present a comprehensive survey of the cardiac biomarkers currently known. PMID:23074366

  1. Evaluating the Interactive Web-Based Program, Activate Your Heart, for Cardiac Rehabilitation Patients: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, Sally; Houchen-Wolloff, Linzy; Sewell, Louise; Singh, Sally

    2014-01-01

    Background Conventional cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs are traditionally based on time-constrained, structured, group-based programs, usually set in hospitals or leisure centers. Uptake for CR remains poor, despite the ongoing evidence demonstrating its benefits. Additional alternative forms of CR are needed. An Internet-based approach may offer an alternative mode of delivering CR that may improve overall uptake. Activate Your Heart (AYH) is a Web-based CR program that has been designed to support individuals with coronary heart disease (CHD). Objective The aim of this pilot study was to observe the outcome for participants following the AYH program. Methods We conducted a prospective observational trial, recruiting low-risk patients with CHD. Measures of exercise, exercise capacity, using the Incremental Shuttle Walk Test (ISWT), dietary habits, and psychosocial well-being were conducted by a CR specialist at baseline and at 8 weeks following the Web-based intervention. Results We recruited 41 participants; 33 completed the program. We documented significant improvements in the ISWT distance (mean change 49.69 meters, SD 68.8, P<.001), and Quality of Life (QOL) (mean change 0.28, SD 0.4, P<.001). Dietary habits improved with an increased proportion of patients consuming at least 5 portions of fruit and vegetables per day, (22 [71%] to 29 [94%] P=.01) and an increased proportion of patients consuming at least 2 portions of oily fish per week (14 [45%] to 21 [68%], P=.01). We did not detect changes in anxiety and depression scores or exercise behavior. Conclusions We observed important improvements in exercise capacity, QOL, and dietary habits in a group of participants following a Web-based CR program. The program may offer an alternative approach to CR. A mobile version has been developed and we need to conduct further trials to establish its value compared to supervised CR. PMID:25359204

  2. Surgical Management of the Patient with an Implanted Cardiac Device

    PubMed Central

    Madigan, John D.; Choudhri, Asim F.; Chen, Jonathan; Spotnitz, Henry M.; Oz, Mehmet C.; Edwards, Niloo

    1999-01-01

    Objective To identify the sources of electromagnetic interference (EMI) that may alter the performance of implanted cardiac devices and develop strategies to minimize their effects on patient hemodynamic status. Summary Background Data Since the development of the sensing demand pacemaker, EMI in the clinical setting has concerned physicians treating patients with such devices. Implanted cardiovertor defibrillators (ICDs) and ventricular assist devices (VADs) can also be affected by EMI. Methods All known sources of interference to pacemakers, ICDs, and VADs were evaluated and preventative strategies were devised. Results All devices should be thoroughly evaluated before and after surgery to make sure that its function has not been permanently damaged or changed. If electrocautery is to be used, pacemakers should be placed in a triggered or asynchronous mode; ICDs should have arrhythmia detection suspended before surgery. If defibrillation is to be used, the current flow between the paddles should be kept as far away from and perpendicular to the lead system as possible. Both pacemakers and ICDs should be properly shielded if magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, or radiation therapy is to be used. The effect of EMI on VADs depends on the model. Magnetic resonance imaging adversely affects all VADs except the Abiomed VAD, and therefore its use should be avoided in this population of patients. Conclusions The patient with an implanted cardiac device can safely undergo surgery as long as certain precautions are taken. PMID:10561087

  3. The effect of a text message and telephone follow-up program on cardiac self-efficacy of patients with coronary artery disease: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Boroumand, Saba; Moeini, Mahin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiac self-efficacy is an essential factor in persistence of healthy behaviors in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Today, telenursing methods have numerous applications in health care. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effect of a text message and telephone follow-up program on cardiac self-efficacy of patients with CAD. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial on 70 patients with CAD who were hospitalized in Shahid Chamran Hospital (Isfahan, Iran). The participants were randomly assigned to the experimental and control groups. Collection of data on cardiac self-efficacy was performed before, 3 months after, and 4 months after the beginning of the intervention using Cardiac Self-Efficacy Scale designed by Sullivan et al. During the 3 months of intervention, six messages were sent to the subjects each week and calls were made twice a week in the first month and once a week during the second and third months. The statistical analysis of data was performed using independent t-test, Chi-square, Mann-Whitney U test, and repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: Before the intervention, there was no significant difference between the mean scores of cardiac self-efficacy of the two groups. However, 3 months and 4 months after the beginning of the intervention, the mean score of cardiac self-efficacy in the experimental group was significantly higher than in the control group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The text message and telephone follow-up program is effective in promoting the cardiac self-efficacy of patients with CAD. PMID:27095991

  4. Cardiac Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Catheterization? Cardiac catheterization (KATH-eh-ter-ih-ZA-shun) is a ... disease. Doctors also can use ultrasound during cardiac catheterization to see blockages in the coronary arteries. Ultrasound ...

  5. Cardiac rehabilitation: a comprehensive program for the management of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, Mary; Genovese, Janet

    2007-01-01

    Heart failure is one of the major health problems found in the United States today. Medical and interventional therapies play an important role in the treatment of this chronic condition, but they create a huge economic burden on the health care system. Nonpharmacologic interventions need further exploration. This article reviews research that examined the relationship between exercise and heart failure. A variety of exercise modalities measured outcomes of functional capacity and quality of life in both supervised and nonsupervised settings. Many investigators found exercise training to be safe and to confer benefits, especially on functional capacity, quality of life, and survival. The most favorable outcomes were observed in supervised settings. Cardiac rehabilitation provides an ideal environment for safe exercise and management of the health care needs of patients with heart failure. The multidisciplinary staff is adept at providing a paced approach to activity based on individualized exercise prescriptions, education, and management of this population's many comorbidities. PMID:17541318

  6. [13N] Ammonia Cardiac Program At West Virginia University Health Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, John M.

    2011-06-01

    Due to the shortage of the more traditional cardiac imagining isotopes, specifically, Technicium-99, the Cardiologists at WVU have had to look to alternative imagining techniques such as PET. This has led to a dramatic increase in the use of [13N] Ammonia PET scans at the Health Sciences Center. The patient load has gone from one to two patients one day a week to typically two to three patients, two days a week, with occasional add-on in-house patients; each patient typically requiring two target irradiations. In this paper, we will discuss the process that is being used to meet this increased demand from the production of the isotope through the final result.

  7. Cardiac pacing and aviation.

    PubMed

    Toff, W D; Edhag, O K; Camm, A J

    1992-12-01

    Certain applicants with stable disturbances of rhythm or conduction requiring cardiac pacing, in whom no other disqualifying condition is present, may be considered fit for medical certification restricted to multi-crew operations. The reliability of modern pacing systems appears adequate to permit restricted certification even in pacemaker dependent subjects except for certain models of pacemakers and leads known to be at increased risk of failure. These are to be avoided. There is little evidence to suggest that newer devices are any more reliable than their predecessors. Single and dual chamber systems appear to have similar reliability up to 4 years, after which time significant attrition of dual chamber devices occurs, principally due to battery depletion. All devices require increased scrutiny as they approach their end of life as predicted from longevity data and pacing characteristics. Unipolar and bipolar leads are of similar reliability, apart from a number of specific bipolar polyurethane leads which have been identified. Atrial leads, particularly those without active fixation, are less secure than ventricular leads and applicants who are dependent on atrial sensing or pacing should be denied certification. Bipolar leads are to be preferred due to the lower risk of myopotential and exogenous EMI. Sensor-driven adaptive-rate pacing systems using active sensors may have reduced longevity and require close scrutiny. Activity-sensing devices using piezoelectric crystal sensors may be subject to significant rate rises in rotary wing aircraft. The impracticality of restricted certification in helicopters will, in any event, preclude certification. Such devices would best be avoided in hovercraft (air cushioned vehicle) pilots. Only minor rate rises are likely in fixed-wing aircraft which are unlikely to be of significance. Anti-tachycardia devices and implanted defibrillators are inconsistent with any form of certification to fly. PMID:1493823

  8. [Practical questions around individual with a pacemaker or an implantable cardioverter defibrillator].

    PubMed

    Manaouil, Cécile; Fantoni, Sophie; Montpellier, Dominique; Tordjman, Eric; Jarde, Olivier

    2012-07-01

    An individual with a pacemaker can ask his GP for information about potential problems associated with the device. Should a pacemaker continue to be used by end-of-life patients? Should a pacemaker be stopped in a limited care situation? What precautions should be taken when treating a patient with a pacemaker? Pacemakers and implantable defibrillators are sensitive to electromagnetic interference (EMI). Medically, MRIs are theoretically contraindicated, even though examinations could be performed without a major problem, and special precautions should be taken when using an electrosurgical cutter or radiotherapy. In case of death, a doctor or embalmer must remove the patient's pacemaker due to its risk of explosion during cremation. Doctors who sign cremation forms have a legal obligation to provide such information. It may affect an employee's ability to work. Are there some professions that are not well suited for individuals with a pacemaker? PMID:22138293

  9. Atrial electromechanical sequence in normal subjects and patients with DDD pacemakers.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, K.; Xiao, H. B.; Fujimoto, S.; Gibson, D. G.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the effect of right atrial appendage pacing on atrial electromechanical interrelations in patients with DDD pacemakers. DESIGN--Prospective study by M mode echocardiogram, Doppler echocardiogram, and apexcardiogram, along with electrocardiogram and phonocardiogram. SETTING--Tertiary cardiac referral centre. PATIENTS--20 patients with DDD pacemakers and 20 age matched normal controls. RESULTS--Age, RR interval, atrial size, left ventricular size, and fractional shortening were similar in the two groups. Atrial electromechanical delay (the time from the onset of P wave or atrial pacing spike on ECG to the onset of atrial contraction on M mode echogram) was 68 (SD 7) ms at the lateral site of right atrium, 82 (9) ms at the central fibrous body, 93 (11) ms at the lateral site of left atrium in normals. In patients with DDD pacing, however, this delay increased to 85 (22) ms, 117 (23) ms, and 138 (25) ms respectively (all P < 0.01). Interatrial mechanical delay (the time from the onset of right atrial motion to the onset of the left) increased from 25 (6) ms in normal controls to 53 (18) ms in patients (P < 0.01). Intra-atrial mechanical dispersion (the time from the earliest to the latest onset of regional atrial motion around the atrioventricular ring) in the right atrium increased from 6 (2) ms in normals to 19 (2) ms in patients (P < 0.01), but it remained unchanged in the left atrium (6 (2) ms in normal controls v 7 (2) ms in patients, P > 0.05). Peak atrial shortening rate was not different between the two groups. Differences of atrial electromechanical activity between the two groups were also reflected on Doppler echocardiogram and apexcardiogram. CONCLUSIONS--Right atrial appendage pacing disturbs the normal coordinate sequence of right atrial mechanical activity and leads to a striking and variable increase in intra-atrial conduction time as well as in interatrial conduction time. Left atrial contraction remains synchronous although the

  10. Very-late proarrhythmia of a migrant pacemaker lead.

    PubMed

    Stein, Andreas; Mazzitelli, Domenico; Kolb, Christof

    2011-01-01

    The report is on a 49-year-old patient who experienced life-threatening ventricular tachyarrhythmias caused by a pacemaker lead that was abandoned 26 years ago, migrated with its proximal ending to the main pulmonary artery and remained there asymptomatically for at least 3 years. PMID:20888005

  11. Factors defining a pacemaker region for synchrony in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wittner, Lucia; Miles, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Synchronous activities of neuronal populations are often initiated in a pacemaker region and spread to recruit other regions. Here we examine factors that define a pacemaker site. The CA3a region acts as the pacemaker for disinhibition induced synchrony in guinea pig hippocampal slices and CA3b is a follower region. We found CA3a pyramidal cells were more excitable and fired in bursts more frequently than CA3b cells. CA3a cells had more complex dendritic arbors than CA3b cells especially in zones targetted by recurrent synapses. The product of the density of pyramidal cell axon terminals and dendritic lengths in innervated zones predicted a higher recurrent synaptic connectivity in the CA3a than in the CA3b region. We show that some CA3a cells but few CA3b cells behave as pacemaker cells by firing early during population events and by recruiting follower cells to fire. With a greater excitability and enhanced synaptic connectivity these CA3a cells may also possess initiating functions for other hippocampal ensemble activities initiated in this region. PMID:17823211

  12. Circadian organization is governed by extra-SCN pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Pezuk, Pinar; Mohawk, Jennifer A; Yoshikawa, Tomoko; Sellix, Michael T; Menaker, Michael

    2010-12-01

    In mammals, a pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is thought to be required for behavioral, physiological, and molecular circadian rhythms. However, there is considerable evidence that temporal food restriction (restricted feedisng [RF]) and chronic methamphetamine (MA) can drive circadian rhythms of locomotor activity, body temperature, and endocrine function in the absence of SCN. This indicates the existence of extra-SCN pacemakers: the Food Entrainable Oscillator (FEO) and Methamphetamine Sensitive Circadian Oscillator (MASCO). Here, we show that these extra-SCN pacemakers control the phases of peripheral oscillators in intact as well as in SCN-ablated PER2::LUC mice. MA administration shifted the phases of SCN, cornea, pineal, pituitary, kidney, and salivary glands in intact animals. When the SCN was ablated, disrupted phase relationships among peripheral oscillators were reinstated by MA treatment. When intact animals were subjected to restricted feeding, the phases of cornea, pineal, kidney, salivary gland, lung, and liver were shifted. In SCN-lesioned restricted-fed mice, phases of all of the tissues shifted such that they aligned with the time of the meal. Taken together, these data show that FEO and MASCO are strong circadian pacemakers able to regulate the phases of peripheral oscillators. PMID:21135159

  13. 21 CFR 870.3710 - Pacemaker repair or replacement material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker repair or replacement material. 870.3710 Section 870.3710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3710...

  14. 21 CFR 870.3710 - Pacemaker repair or replacement material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker repair or replacement material. 870.3710 Section 870.3710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3710...

  15. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker electrode function tester. 870.3720 Section 870.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3720...

  16. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker electrode function tester. 870.3720 Section 870.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3720...

  17. 21 CFR 870.3710 - Pacemaker repair or replacement material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker repair or replacement material. 870.3710 Section 870.3710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3710...

  18. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker electrode function tester. 870.3720 Section 870.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3720...

  19. 21 CFR 870.3710 - Pacemaker repair or replacement material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker repair or replacement material. 870.3710 Section 870.3710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3710...

  20. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker electrode function tester. 870.3720 Section 870.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3720...

  1. Medium-Term Effectiveness of a Comprehensive Internet-Based and Patient-Specific Telerehabilitation Program With Text Messaging Support for Cardiac Patients: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Dominique; Coninx, Karin; Vandervoort, Pieter; Vandijck, Dominique; Hens, Niel; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline; Van Driessche, Niels; Dendale, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac telerehabilitation has been introduced as an adjunct or alternative to conventional center-based cardiac rehabilitation to increase its long-term effectiveness. However, before large-scale implementation and reimbursement in current health care systems is possible, well-designed studies on the effectiveness of this new additional treatment strategy are needed. Objective The aim of this trial was to assess the medium-term effectiveness of an Internet-based, comprehensive, and patient-tailored telerehabilitation program with short message service (SMS) texting support for cardiac patients. Methods This multicenter randomized controlled trial consisted of 140 cardiac rehabilitation patients randomized (1:1) to a 24-week telerehabilitation program in combination with conventional cardiac rehabilitation (intervention group; n=70) or to conventional cardiac rehabilitation alone (control group; n=70). In the telerehabilitation program, initiated 6 weeks after the start of ambulatory rehabilitation, patients were stimulated to increase physical activity levels. Based on registered activity data, they received semiautomatic telecoaching via email and SMS text message encouraging them to gradually achieve predefined exercise training goals. Patient-specific dietary and/or smoking cessation advice was also provided as part of the telecoaching. The primary endpoint was peak aerobic capacity (VO2 peak). Secondary endpoints included accelerometer-recorded daily step counts, self-assessed physical activities by International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), and health-related quality of life (HRQL) assessed by the HeartQol questionnaire at baseline and at 6 and 24 weeks. Results Mean VO2 peak increased significantly in intervention group patients (n=69) from baseline (mean 22.46, SD 0.78 mL/[min*kg]) to 24 weeks (mean 24.46, SD 1.00 mL/[min*kg], P<.01) versus control group patients (n=70), who did not change significantly (baseline: mean 22.72, SD 0.74 m

  2. Electromagnetic interference of implantable cardiac devices from a shoulder massage machine.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Saeko; Fujiwara, Kousaku; Kohira, Satoshi; Hirose, Minoru

    2014-09-01

    Shoulder massage machines have two pads that are driven by solenoid coils to perform a per cussive massage on the shoulders. There have been concerns that such machines might create electromagnetic interference (EMI) in implantable cardiac devices because of the time-varying magnetic fields produced by the alternating current in the solenoid coils. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential EMI from one such shoulder massage machine on implantable cardiac devices. We measured the distribution profile of the magnetic field intensity around the massage machine. Furthermore, we performed an inhibition test and an asynchronous test on an implantable cardiac pacemaker using the standardized Irnich human body model. We examined the events on an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) using a pacemaker programmer while the massage machine was in operation. The magnetic field distribution profile exhibited a peak intensity of 212 (A/m) in one of the solenoid coils. The maximal interference distance between the massage machine and the implantable cardiac pacemaker was 28 cm. Ventricular fibrillation was induced when the massage machine was brought near the electrode of the ICD and touched the Irnich human body model. It is necessary to provide a "don't use" warning on the box or the exterior of the massage machines or in the user manuals and to caution patients with implanted pacemakers about the dangers and appropriate usage of massage machines. PMID:24710851

  3. Illness cognition as a predictor of exercise habits and participation in cardiac prevention and rehabilitation programs after acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite well-established medical recommendations, many cardiac patients do not exercise regularly either independently or through formal cardiac prevention and rehabilitation programs (CPRP). This non-adherence is even more pronounced among minority ethnic groups. Illness cognition (IC), i.e. the way people perceive the situation they encounter, has been recognized as a crucial determinant of health-promoting behavior. Few studies have applied a cognitive perspective to explain the disparity in exercising and CPRP attendance between cardiac patients from different ethnic backgrounds. Based on the Health Belief Model (HBM) and the Common Sense Model (CSM), the objective was to assess the association of IC with exercising and with participation in CPRP among Jewish/majority and Arab/minority patients hospitalized with acute coronary syndrome. Methods Patients (N = 420) were interviewed during hospitalization (January-2009 until August- 2010) about IC, with 6-month follow-up interviews about exercise habits and participation in CPRP. Determinants that predict active lifestyle and participation in CPRP were assessed using backward stepwise logistic regression. Results Perceived susceptibility to heart disease and sense and personal control were independently associated with exercising 6 months after the acute event (OR = 0.58, 95% CI: 0.42-0.80 and OR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.02-1.17, per unit on a 5-point scale). Perceived benefits of regular exercise and a sense of personal control were independently associated with participation in CPRP (OR = 1.56, 95% CI: 1.12-2.16 and OR = 1.08, 95% CI: 1.01-1.15, per unit on a 5-point scale). None of the IC variables assessed could explain the large differences in health promoting behaviors between the majority and minority ethnic groups. Conclusions IC should be taken into account in future interventions to promote physical activity and participation in CPRP for both ethnic groups. Yet, because IC failed

  4. Psychiatric morbidity and depressive symptomatology in patients with permanent pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Aydemir, O; Ozmen, E; Küey, L; Kültür, S; Yeşil, M; Postaci, N; Bayata, S

    1997-06-01

    Implantation of a permanent pacemaker requires a psychological effort on the patient's part for adaptation in the acute term, and chronically, it restricts activities of the patient and may cause some psychiatric disturbances. To investigate psychiatric morbidity and depressive symptomatology of the patients with permanent pacemakers, 84 pacemaker patients were diagnosed using the DSM-III-R criteria and depressive symptoms were determined by modified Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (mHDRS). Sixteen (19.1%) patients had been given a psychiatric diagnosis. The most frequent diagnoses were adjustment disorder (5.9%) and major depressive episode (4.7%). Nine patients (10.7%) were diagnosed as having clinical depression (mHDRS > or = 17). The mean score of mHDRS was 7.57 +/- 7.46, and the severity of depression was significantly higher in females. The most frequent symptoms are difficulties in work and activities (53.6%), psychic anxiety (48.8%), loss of energy (42.9%), and hypochondriasis and insomnia (39.3%). Depressed mood, psychic anxiety, loss of energy, loss of interest, insomnia, and hypochondriasis were significantly more frequent in females. Uneducated patients had a more significant loss of energy than educated patients. Depressed mood, psychic anxiety, and somatic concerns and symptoms were more frequent in patients with permanent pacemakers than in the general population. These symptoms, resembling mixed anxiety-depression disorder, were related to fears of having a permanent pacemaker, since our series were composed of uneducated patients who did not have enough knowledge about the device. PMID:9227759

  5. FDG PET/CT Evidence of Effective Treatment of Cardiac Sarcoidosis With Adalimumab.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christina T; Sweiss, Nadera J; Lu, Yang

    2016-05-01

    A 53-year-old man with mediastinal lymph node biopsy and cardiac MRI-proven cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) received treatment with pacemaker and steroids. FDG PET/CT showed active CS despite treatment with prednisone and methotrexate. Addition of weekly adalimumab (Humira) injections was introduced for 3 months. Follow-up FDG PET/CT showed complete resolution of CS as well as improvement of other sarcoid lesions in the thoracic lymph nodes. PMID:26828145

  6. Hydatid cyst of the cardiac interventricular septum with complete atrioventricular block: a case report from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Bilal; Ahmed, Waqas; Akbar, Mohammad Tauqeer

    2012-03-01

    Cardiac involvement in systemic echinococcosis is a rare phenomenon. Abnormalities of the cardiac conduction system are an exceptional feature of cardiac hydatidosis. We report, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of cardiac hydatidosis from Pakistan in a 30 year old male who presented with recurrent syncopal episodes due to complete atrioventricular conduction block and subsequently underwent implantation of dual chamber pacemaker. His transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a large, well circumscribed, interventricular septal mass which was avascular on subsequent perfusion imaging. Surgical resection of the mass three years later confirmed it to be a hydatid cyst. PMID:22764470

  7. An interactive videodisk training program in basic cardiac life support: implications for staff development.

    PubMed

    Hekelman, F P; Phillips, J A; Bierer, L A

    1990-01-01

    Interactive videodisk training programs offer a new instructional approach to demands for technical skills training. This article highlights the demands for staff development providers to address technical skills training through interactive videodisk modalities. PMID:2122986

  8. Randomized controlled trial of a self-efficacy enhancement program for the cardiac rehabilitation of Thai patients with myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Vibulchai, Nisakorn; Thanasilp, Sureeporn; Preechawong, Sunida

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the effects of a self-efficacy enhancement program for the cardiac rehabilitation of Thai patients who had a myocardial infarction. Sixty-six hospitalized patients of various ages and both genders were randomly assigned to either an experimental or a control group. Participants in the experimental group took part in three individualized in-hospital education sessions and three weekly sessions of telephone counseling. The control group primarily engaged in a supervised exercise and activities of a daily living performance regimen, and received education in this regard. Self-efficacy and functional status were measured via questionnaire. Four weeks after discharge, the experimental group was found to have significantly higher total self-efficacy and functional status scores than the control group. In addition, the experimental group exhibited significantly higher subscale scores on social activity, household tasks, occupation, and exercise self-efficacy than the control group. These results indicate that the program is effective in improving the self-efficacy and functional status of Thai patients who have had a myocardial infarction. PMID:26415520

  9. I(f) and SR Ca(2+) release both contribute to pacemaker activity in canine sinoatrial node cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhan; Chen, Biyi; Joiner, Mei-Ling A; Wu, Yuejin; Guan, Xiaoqun; Koval, Olha M; Chaudhary, Ashok K; Cunha, Shane R; Mohler, Peter J; Martins, James B; Song, Long-Sheng; Anderson, Mark E

    2010-07-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that cardiac pacemaking is the result of two sinoatrial node (SAN) cell mechanisms: a 'voltage clock' and a Ca(2+) dependent process, or 'Ca(2+) clock.' The voltage clock initiates action potentials (APs) by SAN cell membrane potential depolarization from inward currents, of which the pacemaker current (I(f)) is thought to be particularly important. A Ca(2+) dependent process triggers APs when sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release activates inward current carried by the forward mode of the electrogenic Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX). However, these mechanisms have mostly been defined in rodents or rabbits, but are unexplored in single SAN cells from larger animals. Here, we used patch-clamp and confocal microscope techniques to explore the roles of the voltage and Ca(2+) clock mechanisms in canine SAN pacemaker cells. We found that ZD7288, a selective I(f) antagonist, significantly reduced basal automaticity and induced irregular, arrhythmia-like activity in canine SAN cells. In addition, ZD7288 impaired but did not eliminate the SAN cell rate acceleration by isoproterenol. In contrast, ryanodine significantly reduced the SAN cell acceleration by isoproterenol, while ryanodine reduction of basal automaticity was modest ( approximately 14%) and did not reach statistical significance. Importantly, pretreatment with ryanodine eliminated SR Ca(2+) release, but did not affect basal or isoproterenol-enhanced I(f). Taken together, these results indicate that voltage and Ca(2+) dependent automaticity mechanisms coexist in canine SAN cells, and suggest that I(f) and SR Ca(2+) release cooperate to determine baseline and catecholamine-dependent automaticity in isolated dog SAN cells. PMID:20380837

  10. Critical factors in case management: practical lessons from a cardiac case management program.

    PubMed

    Stafford, Randall S; Berra, Kathy

    2007-08-01

    Case management (CM) is an important strategy for chronic disease care. By utilizing non-physician providers for conditions requiring ongoing care and follow-up, CM can facilitate guideline-concordant care, patient empowerment, and improvement in quality of life. We identify a series of critical factors required for successful CM implementation. Heart to Heart is a clinical trial evaluating CM for coronary heart disease (CHD) risk reduction in a multiethnic, low-income population. Patients at elevated cardiac risk were randomized to CM plus primary care (212 patients) or to primary care alone (207). Over a mean follow-up of 17 months, patients received face-to-face nurse and dietitian visits. Mean contact time was 14 hours provided at an estimated cost of $1250 per patient for the 341 (81%) patients completing follow-up. Visits emphasized behavior change, risk-factor monitoring, self-management skills, and guideline-based pharmacotherapy. A statistically significant reduction in mean Framingham risk probability occurred in CM plus primary care relative to primary care alone (1.6% decrease in 10-year CHD risk, p = 0.007). Favorable changes were noted across individual risk factors. Our findings suggest that successful CM implementation relies on choosing appropriate case managers and investing in training, integrating CM into existing care systems, delineating the scope and appropriate levels of clinical decision making, using information systems, and monitoring outcomes and costs. While our population, setting, and intervention model are unique, these insights are broadly relevant. If implemented with attention to critical factors, CM has great potential to improve the process and outcomes of chronic disease care. PMID:17718658

  11. Conduction block and chaotic dynamics in an asymmetrical model of coupled cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Landau, M; Lorente, P

    1997-05-01

    The initiation and propagation of the cardiac impulse depends on intrinsic properties of cells, geometrical arrangements, and intercellular coupling resistances. To address the issue of the interplay between these factors in a simple way, we have used a system, based on the van Capelle and Dürrer model, including a pacemaker and a non-pacemaker cell linked by an ohmic coupling resistance. The influence of asymmetrical cell sizes and electronic load was investigated by using numerical simulations and continuation-bifurcation techniques. The loading of a small pacemaker cell by a large non-pacemaker one (pacemaker: non-pacemaker size ratio = 0.3) was expressed as a pronounced early repolarization in the pacemaker cell and a quite long latency for the impulse propagation. Using coupling resistance as the continuation parameter, three behavioral zones were detected from low to high coupling resistance values: a zone of total quiescence (0:0), a zone of effective entertainment (1:1), and a zone of total block (1:0 pattern). At the boundary between 1:1 and 1:0 patterns, for relatively high coupling resistance values, a cascade of period doubling bifurcations emerged, corresponding to discrete changes of propagation patterns leading into irregular dynamics. Another route to irregular dynamics was also observed in the parameter space. The high sensitivity of the detected irregular dynamics to initial conditions and the positive value of the maximum Lyapunov exponent allowed us to identify these dynamics as being chaotic. Since neither intermediate block patterns nor irregular dynamics were observed with larger size ratios, we suggest that the interplay between resting membrane conductance of the non-pacemaker cell and intercellular coupling may bring about these rhythmic disturbances. PMID:9176640

  12. Are Electronic Cardiac Devices Still Evolving?

    PubMed Central

    Mabo, P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives The goal of this paper is to review some important issues occurring during the past year in Implantable devices. Methods First cardiac implantable device was proposed to maintain an adequate heart rate, either because the heart’s natural pacemaker is not fast enough, or there is a block in the heart’s electrical conduction system. During the last forty years, pacemakers have evolved considerably and become programmable and allow to configure specific patient optimum pacing modes. Various technological aspects (electrodes, connectors, algorithms diagnosis, therapies, …) have been progressed and cardiac implants address several clinical applications: management of arrhythmias, cardioversion / defibrillation and cardiac resynchronization therapy. Results Observed progress was the miniaturization of device, increased longevity, coupled with efficient pacing functions, multisite pacing modes, leadless pacing and also a better recognition of supraventricular or ventricular tachycardia’s in order to deliver appropriate therapy. Subcutaneous implant, new modes of stimulation (leadless implant or ultrasound lead), quadripolar lead and new sensor or new algorithm for the hemodynamic management are introduced and briefly described. Each times, the main result occurring during the two past years are underlined and repositioned from the history, remaining limitations are also addressed. Conclusion Some important technological improvements were described. Nevertheless, news trends for the future are also considered in a specific session such as the remote follow-up of the patient or the treatment of heart failure by neuromodulation. PMID:25123732

  13. [Future of implantable electrical cardiac devices].

    PubMed

    Daubert, Jean-Claude; Behaghel, Albin; Leclercq, Christophe; Mabo, Philippe

    2014-03-01

    Major improvements in implantable electrical cardiac devices have been made during the last two decades, notably with the advent of automatic internal defibrillation (ICD) to prevent sudden arrhythmic death, and cardiac resynchronisation (CRT) to treat the discoordinated failing heart. They now constitute a major therapeutic option and may eventually supersede drug therapy. The coming era will be marked by a technological revolution, with improvements in treatment delivery, safety and efficacy, and an expansion of clinical indications. Leadless technologyfor cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators is already in the pipeline, endovascular leads currently being responsible for most long-term complications (lead failure, infection, vein thrombosis, etc.). Miniaturized pacemakers based on nanotechnology can now be totally implanted inside the right ventricle through the transvenous route, thus eliminating leads, pockets and scarring In the same way, totally subcutaneous ICD systems are now available, although they are currently only capable of delivering shocks, without pacing (including antitachycardia pacing). In CRT optimised delivery is important to improve clinical responses and to reduce the non-response rate (around 30 % with current technology). Endocardial left ventricular pacing could be a solution if it can be achieved at an acceptable risk. Multisite ventricular pacing is an alternative. Besides CRT neuromodulation, especially by vagal stimulation, is another important field of device researchfor heart failure. Preliminary clinical results are encouraging. PMID:26427291

  14. Cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ehsani, A A

    1984-02-01

    Exercise training is a major, and the most important, component of cardiac rehabilitation. Besides providing psychological benefits and promoting a "sense of well being," it elicits a number of adaptations in patients with ischemic heart disease. Among the clinically important adaptations are changes in the trained skeletal muscles and autonomic nervous system, resulting not only in increased maximum exercise capacity but also a slower heart rate and, at times, a lower systolic blood pressure during submaximal exercise. The reduction in the rate pressure product decreases myocardial O2 demand at any given submaximal exercise intensity and may thus alleviate myocardial ischemia and angina in patients with coronary artery disease. These adaptive responses occur even with a relatively modest exercise intensity. Although short-term exercise training of moderate intensity has not been reported to result in improvement in left ventricular performance, recent data suggest that exercise training of higher intensity and longer duration (12 months or longer) than has conventionally been used in cardiac rehabilitation programs may favorably affect the heart. This is characterized by improvements in left ventricular function, diminished electrocardiographic criteria of myocardial ischemia and increased stroke volume during exercise. Modest weight reduction accompanies regularly performed prolonged exercise training. It is important, however, to recognize that high-intensity exercise programs are suitable for only some patients with coronary artery disease who are stable and should be used only under strict medical supervision. PMID:6400004

  15. Combined use of non-thoracotomy cardioverter defibrillators and endocardial pacemakers.

    PubMed Central

    Noguera, H. H.; Peralta, A. O.; John, R. M.; Venditti, F. J.; Martin, D. T.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the potential interactions in patients with endocardial permanent pacemakers and non-thoracotomy implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) systems. DESIGN: Case series and cohort study. SETTING: Tertiary referral centre. PATIENTS: Fifteen consecutive patients with both endocardial pacemakers (12 dual chamber and three single chamber) and non-thoracotomy ICD systems. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Detection inhibition of induced ventricular fibrillation; double counting; and pacemaker function after shocks. In the evaluation of detection inhibition, 124 VF inductions were analysed for detection duration compared with induced VF episodes in controls with an ICD but without a pacemaker. RESULTS: Two patients (13%) showed detection inhibition of VF and required pacemaker system change at the time of the ICD implant. With the final lead position, despite frequent pacemaker undersensing of VF, ICD detection of VF was not inhibited during any induction, and neither initial detection nor redetection times for VF were different from controls. Double/triple counting of pacemaker artefact and evoked electrogram was noted in three patients (20%). In two, this was remedied during the implantation procedure, and in the other it was abolished when amiodarone treatment was discontinued. Pacemaker function was affected by ICD discharges in two patients, one who showed postshock atrial undersensing and loss of capture, and another whose pacemaker reverted to VVI mode. CONCLUSIONS: When careful testing is performed at implantation to detect and remedy device interactions, non-thoracotomy ICD treatment and endocardial pacemakers can be used safely in combination. Images PMID:9290402

  16. Measurement of functional capacity requirements to aid in development of an occupation-specific rehabilitation training program to help firefighters with cardiac disease safely return to work.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jenny; Roberts, Joanne; Simms, Kay; Cheng, Dunlei; Hartman, Julie; Bartlett, Charles

    2009-03-15

    We designed a study to measure the functional capacity requirements of firefighters to aid in the development of an occupation-specific training program in cardiac rehabilitation; 23 healthy male firefighters with no history of heart disease completed a fire and rescue obstacle course that simulated 7 common firefighting tasks. They wore complete personal protective equipment and portable metabolic instruments that included a data collection mask. We monitored each subject's oxygen consumption (VO(2)) and working heart rate, then calculated age-predicted maximum heart rates (220 - age) and training target heart rates (85% of age-predicted maximum heart rate). During performance of the obstacle course, the subjects' mean working heart rates and peak heart rates were higher than the calculated training target heart rates (t(22) = 5.69 [working vs target, p <0.001] and t(22) = 15.14 [peak vs target, p <0.001]). These findings, with mean results for peak VO(2) (3,447 ml/min) and metabolic equivalents (11.9 METs), show that our subjects' functional capacity greatly exceeded that typically attained by patients in traditional cardiac rehabilitation programs (5 to 8 METs). In conclusion, our results indicate the need for intense, occupation-specific cardiac rehabilitation training that will help firefighters safely return to work after a cardiac event. PMID:19268728

  17. Flexibility and Strength Measures in Children Participating in a Cardiac Rehabilitation Exercise Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Barbara M.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A 12-week structured rehabilitation program featuring warm-up exercises, increased aerobic exercise, cool down, and home-based continuation of exercise helped 12 children with surgically corrected congenital heart disease improve lower extremity strength and flexibility. (Author/CB)

  18. Exercise Programming for Cardiacs--A New Direction for Physical Therapists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutin, Bernard

    This speech begins with the presentation of a conceptual scheme of the physical working capacity of a person starting a training program. The scheme shows that after exercise, when recovery begins and sufficient time elapses, the individual recovers and adapts to a level of physical working capacity which is higher than his starting level. From…

  19. Absent right and persistent left superior vena cava: troubleshooting during a challenging pacemaker implant: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Venous anomalies of the thorax can occur in isolation or in association with complex congenital heart disease. The incidence of an absent right superior vena cava in the setting of a persistent left superior vena cava is very rare in the general population with only a dozen cases documented in the medical literature. Such venous anomalies can make for very challenging electronic cardiac device implantation. We report our challenging dual chamber pacemaker implant in a patient with such complex anatomy and focus on our implantation technique that helped achieve adequate lead positioning. Case presentation A 73-year-old Caucasian female with degenerative complete heart block presented for dual chamber permanent pacemaker implant. Lead implantation was very challenging due to abnormal and rare vena cava anatomy; a persistent left superior vena cava drained directly into the coronary sinus and the right brachiocephalic vein drained directly into the left persistent superior vena cava as the patient had an absent right superior vena cava . Adequate right ventricular lead positioning was achieved following numerous lead-stylet manipulations and careful looping in the atria to redirect its trajectory to the ventricular apex. Conclusion Abnormal superior vena cava development is uncommon and can lead to technical challenges when venous access is required during various interventional procedures. Pre-operative imaging can help identify such challenging anatomy allowing appropriate operative planning; careful patient selection is warranted for venography given the risk of contrast nephrotoxicity. PMID:25047923

  20. How are arrhythmias detected by implanted cardiac devices managed in Europe? Results of the European Heart Rhythm Association Survey.

    PubMed

    Todd, Derick; Hernandez-Madrid, Antonio; Proclemer, Alessandro; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Estner, Heidi; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2015-09-01

    The management of arrhythmias detected by implantable cardiac devices can be challenging. There are no formal international guidelines to inform decision-making. The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to assess the management of various clinical scenarios among members of the EHRA electrophysiology research network. There were 49 responses to the questionnaire. The survey responses were mainly (81%) from medium-high volume device implanting centres, performing more than 200 total device implants per year. Clinical scenarios were described focusing on four key areas: the implantation of pacemakers for bradyarrhythmia detected on an implantable loop recorder (ILR), the management of patients with ventricular arrhythmia detected by an ILR or pacemaker, the management of atrial fibrillation in patients with pacemakers and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices and the management of ventricular tachycardia in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. PMID:26443791

  1. Secure pacemaker fixation critical for prevention of Twiddler's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Sarah A; Bright, Janice M

    2004-05-01

    A two year old, female spayed border collie presented three weeks after permanent pacemaker implantation for weakness, lethargy and collapse. Electrocardiogram documented complete (3(rd) degree) atrioventricular (AV) block, the absence of pacing and a ventricular escape rhythm. Thoracic radiographs revealed retraction and dislodgement of the passive fixation lead from the right ventricular apex. During a procedure to reposition the lead, it was noted that lead retraction had resulted from rotation of the generator with twisting and entanglement of the lead on itself and around the generator, a complication recognized in human patients as "Twiddlers syndrome". The pacemaker lead was removed, a new lead securely placed at the right ventricular apex, and the generator was secured into a revised subcutaneous pocket. Pacing was re-established and the Twiddler's syndrome has not reoccurred. PMID:19083303

  2. Overdrive suppression of implanted pacemakers in patients with AV block.

    PubMed Central

    Grendahl, H; Miller, M; Kjekshus, J

    1978-01-01

    Patients being permanently paced for symptomatic AV block were studied by overdrive suppression of the QRS-inhibited pacemaker, in order to observe the underlying heart rhythm. The chest wall stimulation method was used. In complete AV block the escape rhythm recovery time proved highly reproducible on repeated testing on the same day, and in many patients remained so over months or years. Occasionally, a doubling of the escape rhythm recovery time was seen, suggesting initial exit block of the escape focus. Resetting of the escape rhythm usually followed an exponential curve until stabilisation after about 3 minutes. An early escape rhythm with a recovery time of less than 4 seconds was found on every occasion in 21 of 58 patients with complete AV block, and inconstantly in 23 more; in 14 it was never observed. Accidental pacing failure was seen in 15 patients. The overdrive suppression test was helpful in selecting pacemaker dependent patients. PMID:637960

  3. [Representations, myths, and behaviors among Chagas disease patients with pacemakers].

    PubMed

    Magnani, Claudia; Oliveira, Bruna Guimarães; Gontijo, Eliane Dias

    2007-07-01

    This anthropological study aimed to evaluate the incorporation of pacemakers into the lives of individuals with Chagas disease. An ethnographic methodology was used, based on an open interview focusing on the personal perceptions of 15 patients with chronic Chagas cardiopathy who had required pacemaker implants at the Federal University Hospital in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. As part of a broader quality of life analysis, the study investigated the cultural, physical, and psychological resources used by patients to confront, explain, and accept the disease process, including mental representations on the cultural perception of the illness and definition of social relations. The study was intended to contribute to comprehensive patient care by health professionals, including psychosocial aspects. Decoded and integrated orientation in the cultural sphere assumes an important role in order to prevent disinformation from perpetuating the dissemination of popular myths as active elements in patient stigmatization. PMID:17572811

  4. Transient apical dyskinesia with a pacemaker: Electrocardiographic features.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Gil, Iván J; Feltes, Gisela I; Mejía-Rentería, Hernán D; Biagioni, Corina; De Agustín, J Alberto; Vivas, David; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Transient apical dyskinesia syndromes present features similar to acute coronary syndromes, but with normal coronary arteries and rapid complete resolution of wall motion alterations. We report the case of a 73-year-old woman who was admitted to hospital because of typical chest pain at rest after her brother's death. She had had a pacemaker implanted in 2001. Troponin levels were elevated and apical hypokinesia was shown by ventriculography and echocardiography, with normal coronary arteries. Evolving ECG alterations were observed in spite of the continued pacing rhythm. All these alterations were fully resolved after discharge. This case shows that, even in the presence of a pacemaker, evolving ECG alterations can be observed in Takotsubo syndrome. PMID:25840647

  5. A Computer-Aided Large Scale Pacemaker Surveillance System*

    PubMed Central

    Covvey, H.D.; MacGregor, D.C.; Noble, E.J.; Goldman, B.S.; Wigle, E.D.

    1980-01-01

    Beginning in 1972 with a small PDP-8 based system, our Pacemaker Center has continued a commitment to the implementation of computer-based systems to reduce the cost and increase the safety of patient follow-up. Recently we brought into operation a new version of our patient surveillance system on our shared database management computer, the Sperry-Univac V-76. A complete set of optical mark readable forms has been developed to capture pacemaker data. A variety of operational support reports are produced. Pre-clinic and pre-telephone follow-up reports summarize patient status and serve as a basis for comparing the patient's current state to his history of encounters. Post-clinic and post-transtelephone reports document the encounter and are used as reports to the referring physician and for inclusion in the patient's chart. The surgical form set is used to generate a detailed operative note.

  6. The surdo-cardiac syndrome and therapeutic observations

    PubMed Central

    Olley, P. M.; Fowler, R. S.

    1970-01-01

    First recognized in 1957, the surdo-cardiac syndrome includes congenital deafness, prolonged QT interval, and a high incidence of syncope and sudden death. Haemodynamic studies in two patients were normal except for an abnormal wave during left ventricular diastole probably related to abnormal left ventricular relaxation. The syncopal attacks are based on cardiac arrhythmias: both ventricular fibrillation and asystole may occur. Abnormal adrenergic stimulation of the heart is probably responsible. Propranolol appears to be effective in preventing the syncopal attacks. Artificial pacemaking provoked ventricular fibrillation in one patient and seems contraindicated. Images PMID:5433307

  7. Physiological effects of light on the human circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanahan, T. L.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    The physiology of the human circadian pacemaker and its influence and on the daily organization of sleep, endocrine and behavioral processes is an emerging interest in science and medicine. Understanding the development, organization and fundamental properties underlying the circadian timing system may provide insight for the application of circadian principles to the practice of clinical medicine, both diagnostically (interpretation of certain clinical tests are dependent on time of day) and therapeutically (certain pharmacological responses vary with the time of day). The light-dark cycle is the most powerful external influence acting upon the human circadian pacemaker. It has been shown that timed exposure to light can both synchronize and reset the phase of the circadian pacemaker in a predictable manner. The emergence of detectable circadian rhythmicity in the neonatal period is under investigation (as described elsewhere in this issue). Therefore, the pattern of light exposure provided in the neonatal intensive care setting has implications. One recent study identified differences in both amount of sleep time and weight gain in infants maintained in a neonatal intensive care environment that controlled the light-dark cycle. Unfortunately, neither circadian phase nor the time of day has been considered in most clinical investigations. Further studies with knowledge of principles characterizing the human circadian timing system, which governs a wide array of physiological processes, are required to integrate these findings with the practice of clinical medicine.

  8. Isolating Neural Correlates of the Pacemaker for Food Anticipation

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Ian David; Waddington Lamont, Elaine; Rodrigues, Trevor; Abizaid, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Mice fed a single daily meal at intervals within the circadian range exhibit food anticipatory activity. Previous investigations strongly suggest that this behaviour is regulated by a circadian pacemaker entrained to the timing of fasting/refeeding. The neural correlate(s) of this pacemaker, the food entrainable oscillator (FEO), whether found in a neural network or a single locus, remain unknown. This study used a canonical property of circadian pacemakers, the ability to continue oscillating after removal of the entraining stimulus, to isolate activation within the neural correlates of food entrainable oscillator from all other mechanisms driving food anticipatory activity. It was hypothesized that continued anticipatory activation of central nuclei, after restricted feeding and a return to ad libitum feeding, would elucidate a neural representation of the signaling circuits responsible for the timekeeping component of the food entrainable oscillator. Animals were entrained to a temporally constrained meal then placed back on ad libitum feeding for several days until food anticipatory activity was abolished. Activation of nuclei throughout the brain was quantified using stereological analysis of c-FOS expressing cells and compared against both ad libitum fed and food entrained controls. Several hypothalamic and brainstem nuclei remained activated at the previous time of food anticipation, implicating them in the timekeeping mechanism necessary to track previous meal presentation. This study also provides a proof of concept for an experimental paradigm useful to further investigate the anatomical and molecular substrates of the FEO. PMID:22558352

  9. Gold-coated pacemaker implantation for a patient with type IV allergy to titanium

    PubMed Central

    Kypta, Alexander; Blessberger, Hermann; Lichtenauer, Michael; Lambert, Thomas; Kammler, Juergen; Steinwender, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old man was scheduled for pacemaker implantation for symptomatic sick-sinus-syndrome (SSS). He suffered from multiple drug-allergies and allergies to several metals like quicksilver and titanium. Gold-coated pacemaker generators and polyurethane leads are effective in avoiding allergic reactions to pacing system components. Therefore, we decided to implant a custom-made gold-coated DDDR-pacemaker generator and polyurethane leads. PMID:27479204

  10. Gold-coated pacemaker implantation for a patient with type IV allergy to titanium.

    PubMed

    Kypta, Alexander; Blessberger, Hermann; Lichtenauer, Michael; Lambert, Thomas; Kammler, Juergen; Steinwender, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    A 65-year-old man was scheduled for pacemaker implantation for symptomatic sick-sinus-syndrome (SSS). He suffered from multiple drug-allergies and allergies to several metals like quicksilver and titanium. Gold-coated pacemaker generators and polyurethane leads are effective in avoiding allergic reactions to pacing system components. Therefore, we decided to implant a custom-made gold-coated DDDR-pacemaker generator and polyurethane leads. PMID:27479204

  11. Evaluation of a self-management patient education program for patients with chronic heart failure undergoing inpatient cardiac rehabilitation: study protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic heart failure requires a complex treatment regimen on a life-long basis. Therefore, self-care/self-management is an essential part of successful treatment and comprehensive patient education is warranted. However, specific information on program features and educational strategies enhancing treatment success is lacking. This trial aims to evaluate a patient-oriented and theory-based self-management educational group program as compared to usual care education during inpatient cardiac rehabilitation in Germany. Methods/Design The study is a multicenter cluster randomized controlled trial in four cardiac rehabilitation clinics. Clusters are patient education groups that comprise HF patients recruited within 2 weeks after commencement of inpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Cluster randomization was chosen for pragmatic reasons, i.e. to ensure a sufficient number of eligible patients to build large-enough educational groups and to prevent contamination by interaction of patients from different treatment allocations during rehabilitation. Rehabilitants with chronic systolic heart failure (n = 540) will be consecutively recruited for the study at the beginning of inpatient rehabilitation. Data will be assessed at admission, at discharge and after 6 and 12 months using patient questionnaires. In the intervention condition, patients receive the new patient-oriented self-management educational program, whereas in the control condition, patients receive a short lecture-based educational program (usual care). The primary outcome is patients’ self-reported self-management competence. Secondary outcomes include behavioral determinants and self-management health behavior (symptom monitoring, physical activity, medication adherence), health-related quality of life, and treatment satisfaction. Treatment effects will be evaluated separately for each follow-up time point using multilevel regression analysis, and adjusting for baseline values. Discussion This

  12. Powering pacemakers from heartbeat vibrations using linear and nonlinear energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin Karami, M.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear piezoelectric devices are introduced to continuously recharge the batteries of the pacemakers by converting the vibrations from the heartbeats to electrical energy. The power requirement of a pacemaker is very low. However, after few years, patients require another surgical operation just to replace their pacemaker battery. Linear low frequency and nonlinear mono-stable and bi-stable energy harvesters are designed according to the especial signature of heart vibrations. The proposed energy harvesters are robust to variation of heart rate and can meet the power requirement of pacemakers.

  13. Long-term management of atrial myopathy in two dogs with single chamber permanent transvenous pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, K E; Lefbom, B K

    2016-06-01

    Two young Labrador retriever dogs with bradycardia-induced syncope resulting from atrial myopathy underwent permanent transvenous pacemaker implantation. Both dogs developed heart failure 3-5 years after pacemaker implantation. Both were managed medically for approximately 7 years after pacemaker implantation and, ultimately, were humanely euthanized due to refractory heart failure signs and quality of life concerns. Long-term management of dogs with atrial myopathy and secondary atrial standstill with pacemaker implantation and medical therapy for heart failure is feasible and prognosis may be better than previously reported or speculated. PMID:26923757

  14. Dynamic clamp: a powerful tool in cardiac electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Wilders, Ronald

    2006-10-15

    Dynamic clamp is a collection of closely related techniques that have been employed in cardiac electrophysiology to provide direct answers to numerous research questions regarding basic cellular mechanisms of action potential formation, action potential transfer and action potential synchronization in health and disease. Building on traditional current clamp, dynamic clamp was initially used to create virtual gap junctions between isolated myocytes. More recent applications include the embedding of a real pacemaking myocyte in a simulated network of atrial or ventricular cells and the insertion of virtual ion channels, either simulated in real time or simultaneously recorded from an expression system, into the membrane of an isolated myocyte. These applications have proven that dynamic clamp, which is characterized by the real-time evaluation and injection of simulated membrane current, is a powerful tool in cardiac electrophysiology. Here, each of the three different experimental configurations used in cardiac electrophysiology is reviewed. Also, directions are given for the implementation of dynamic clamp in the cardiac electrophysiology laboratory. With the growing interest in the application of dynamic clamp in cardiac electrophysiology, it is anticipated that dynamic clamp will also prove to be a powerful tool in basic research on biological pacemakers and in identification of specific ion channels as targets for drug development. PMID:16873403

  15. [Cardiac Rehabilitation 2015].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Andreas

    2015-11-25

    The goals of cardiac rehabilitation are (re-)conditioning and secondary prevention in patients with heart disease or an elevated cardiovascular risk profile. Rehabilitation is based on motivation through education, on adapted physical activity, instruction of relaxation techniques, psychological support and optimized medication. It is performed preferably in groups either in outpatient or inpatient settings. The Swiss working group on cardiac rehabilitation provides a network of institutions with regular quality auditing. Positive effects of rehabilitation programs on mortality and morbidity have been established by numerous studies. Although a majority of patients after cardiac surgery are being referred to rehabilitation, these services are notoriously underused after catheter procedures. PMID:26602848

  16. Heart Block in Acute Myocardial Infarction: Prognostic Factors and Role of Transvenous Catheter Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Narvas, R. M.; Kilgour, J. M.; Basu, S. K.

    1970-01-01

    A prospective study was carried out to determine the prognostic factors in patients with second-degree and complete heart block following acute myocardial infarction and to re-examine the indications for artificial transvenous pacing. Of the 117 consecutive patients with proved acute myocardial infarction, 15 developed advanced heart block (second degree and complete). The presence of the following factors, either alone or in combinations, were attended with poor prognosis: preceding Stokes-Adams syndrome, cardiogenic shock, congestive heart failure, complications secondary to cardiac arrest, anterior infarction and wide QRS complex. In the nine cases requiring artificial transvenous pacemaker because of Stokes-Adams attacks, congestive heart failure or frequent multifocal ventricular ectopic beats, there were five deaths. The remaining six patients, who were without complications and were not paced, all survived; these patients had normal QRS duration with heart rates above 60 per minute. This study indicates that prophylactic transvenous catheter insertion in acute heart block does not appear justified unless specific indication(s) arise. Postmortem studies revealed significant narrowing of all the major coronary vessels in all five fatalities. The overall mortality in this series of cases of acute heart block was 33%. PMID:5410415

  17. Radiotherapy in patients with pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Zaremba, Tomas; Jakobsen, Annette Ross; Søgaard, Mette; Thøgersen, Anna Margrethe; Riahi, Sam

    2016-04-01

    An increasing number of patients with implantable cardiac rhythm devices undergo radiotherapy (RT) for cancer and are thereby exposed to the risk of device failure. Current safety recommendations seem to have limitations by not accounting for the risk of pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators malfunctioning at low radiation doses. Besides scant knowledge about optimal safety measures, only little is known about the exact prevalence of patients with devices undergoing RT. In this review, we provide a short overview of the principles of RT and present the current evidence on the predictors and mechanisms of device malfunctions during RT. We also summarize practical recommendations from recent publications and from the industry. Strongly associated with beam energy of photon RT, device malfunctions occur at ∼3% of RT courses, posing a substantial issue in clinical practice. Malfunctions described in the literature typically consist of transient software disturbances and only seldom manifest as a permanent damage of the device. Through close cooperation between cardiologists and oncologists, a tailored individualized approach might be necessary in this patient group in waiting time for updated international guidelines in the field. PMID:26041870

  18. A Comparative Survey of Pacemaker Implantation in Trinidad and Tobago in 2005 and 2009

    PubMed Central

    Henry, R; Dookie, T; Primus, E

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The indications for permanent pacemaker implantations in Trinidad have expanded from initially symptomatic bradycardia to now include complex devices. A retrospective review of the available data was conducted to better understand the evolving trends in device implantation in Trinidad and Tobago. Methods: Data were collated from the two major implanting teams in Trinidad for the years 2005 and 2009. The two implanting centres were the Advanced Cardiovascular Institute (ACI) at Westshore Medical Centre and the Catheterization Laboratory of the Eric Williams Medical Sciences Complex (EWMSC). Data were based on retrospective collation using the implantation records. Results: The implantation rate for new devices increased from 39 per million to 103 per million population. The most common indications for new device implants in 2009 were high degree atrioventricular (AV) block (53%) and sick sinus syndrome (22%), with the notable appearance of congestive cardiomyopathy (13%) which was not present in the earlier cohort. Of particular note, 23 high-end devices were implanted in 2009. These were five cardiac-resynchronization therapy (CRT-P) devices, 14 automatic implantable cardio-defibrillator (AICD) devices and four combined cardiac-resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) devices versus none in 2005. Conclusions: In summary, over the period 2005 to 2009, a substantial increase in device implantation rates has occurred which now include high-end complex devices. Absolute rates, however, remain far below that of developed countries, indicating that the true need remains underserved. Furthermore, adjustment for gross domestic product suggests that the relatively buoyant economy of Trinidad and Tobago is capable of servicing a greater proportion of this need than is currently met. PMID:26108119

  19. Connectivity of Pacemaker Neurons in the Neonatal Rat Superficial Dorsal Horn

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Neil C.; Arbabi, Shahriar; Baccei, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Pacemaker neurons with an intrinsic ability to generate rhythmic burst-firing have been characterized in lamina I of the neonatal spinal cord, where they are innervated by high-threshold sensory afferents. However, little is known about the output of these pacemakers, as the neuronal populations which are targeted by pacemaker axons have yet to be identified. The present study combines patch clamp recordings in the intact neonatal rat spinal cord with tract-tracing to demonstrate that lamina I pacemaker neurons contact multiple spinal motor pathways during early life. Retrograde labeling of premotor interneurons with the trans-synaptic virus PRV-152 revealed the presence of burst-firing in PRV-infected lamina I neurons, thereby confirming that pacemakers are synaptically coupled to motor networks in the spinal ventral horn. Notably, two classes of pacemakers could be distinguished in lamina I based on cell size and the pattern of their axonal projections. While small pacemaker neurons possessed ramified axons which contacted ipsilateral motor circuits, large pacemaker neurons had unbranched axons which crossed the midline and ascended rostrally in the contralateral white matter. Recordings from identified spino-parabrachial and spino-PAG neurons indicated the presence of pacemaker activity within neonatal lamina I projection neurons. Overall, these results show that lamina I pacemakers are positioned to regulate both the level of activity in developing motor circuits as well as the ascending flow of nociceptive information to the brain, thus highlighting a potential role for pacemaker activity in the maturation of pain and sensorimotor networks in the CNS. PMID:25380417

  20. Treatment of Infected Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Fakhro, Abdulla; Jalalabadi, Faryan; Brown, Rodger H; Izaddoost, Shayan A

    2016-05-01

    With their rising benefits, cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) such as pacemakers and left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have witnessed a sharp rise in use over the past 50 years. As indications for use broaden, so too does their widespread employment with its attendant rise of CIED infections. Such large numbers of infections have inspired various algorithms mandating treatment. Early diagnosis of inciting organisms is crucial to tailoring appropriate antibiotic and or antifungal treatment. In addition, surgical debridement and explant of the device have been a longstanding modality of care. More novel therapies focus on salvage of the device by way of serial washouts and instilling drug-eluting antibiotic impregnated beads into the wound. The wound is then serially debrided until clean and closed. This technique is better suited to patients whose device cannot be removed, patients who are poor candidates for cardiac surgery, or patients who have failed conventional prior treatments. PMID:27152097

  1. Predicting the risk of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Lerma, Claudia; Glass, Leon

    2016-05-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the result of a change of cardiac activity from normal (typically sinus) rhythm to a rhythm that does not pump adequate blood to the brain. The most common rhythms leading to SCD are ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF). These result from an accelerated ventricular pacemaker or ventricular reentrant waves. Despite significant efforts to develop accurate predictors for the risk of SCD, current methods for risk stratification still need to be improved. In this article we briefly review current approaches to risk stratification. Then we discuss the mathematical basis for dynamical transitions (called bifurcations) that may lead to VT and VF. One mechanism for transition to VT or VF involves a perturbation by a premature ventricular complex (PVC) during sinus rhythm. We describe the main mechanisms of PVCs (reentry, independent pacemakers and abnormal depolarizations). An emerging approach to risk stratification for SCD involves the development of individualized dynamical models of a patient based on measured anatomy and physiology. Careful analysis and modelling of dynamics of ventricular arrhythmia on an individual basis will be essential in order to improve risk stratification for SCD and to lay a foundation for personalized (precision) medicine in cardiology. PMID:26660287

  2. Far-field P-wave sensing by the right ventricular lead of conventional dual chamber pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Barold, S Serge; Garrigue, Stéphane; Clémenty, Jacques

    2002-02-01

    This report describes two cases of far-field sensing of the P wave by the ventricular channel of conventional DDD pacemakers programmed to a relatively high sensitivity to promote sensing of ventricular extrasystoles. Ventricular pacing was maintained in both cases when the ventricular channel was not inhibited. One case was caused by displacement of a bipolar ventricular lead towards the right ventricular inflow tract. The other case occurred only in relation to an atrial extrasystole in the absence of ventricular lead displacement. PMID:11839887

  3. Exercise Rehabilitation for Chronic Heart Failure Patients with Cardiac Device Implants

    PubMed Central

    Haennel, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade a significant development in the management and rehabilitation of people with chronic heart failure (CHF) has been the utilization of cardiac devices. The use of biventricular pacemakers, referred to as Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT) can yield improvements in functional abilities for a select group of CHF patients and the inclusion of implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) may reduce the risk of sudden death. This review provides physical therapists with a basic understanding of how to prescribe exercise for people with CHF who have these device implants. PMID:22993499

  4. Extended Application of the Hybrid Procedure in Neonates with Left-Sided Obstructive Lesions in an Evolving Cardiac Program.

    PubMed

    Taqatqa, Anas; Diab, Karim A; Stuart, Christopher; Fogg, Louis; Ilbawi, Michel; Awad, Sawsan; Caputo, Massimo; Amin, Zahid; Abdulla, Ra-Id; Kenny, Damien; Hijazi, Ziyad M

    2016-03-01

    The hybrid approach to management of hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) was developed as an alternative to neonatal Norwood surgery, providing a less invasive initial palliation for HLHS. We describe our experience in extending the concept of the hybrid procedure to palliate neonates with anatomically compromised systemic arterial blood flow in a variety of congenital cardiac anomalies and supporting its application as first-line palliation in centers developing their HLHS programs. Retrospective review of patients undergoing therapy for HLHS at a single institution from June 2008 to December 2014 was performed. Subject demographics, clinical and procedural data, along with follow-up, were collected. Thirteen patients had initial hybrid palliation for HLHS during the time frame indicated at a median age of 8 days (range 1-29 days) and median weight of 3.4 kg (range 2.4-4.6 kg). Diagnoses included typical HLHS (n = 6), right-dominant unbalanced atrioventricular septal defect with arch hypoplasia (n = 4), double outlet right ventricle [subpulmonic VSD (n = 1) and intact ventricular septum (n = 1)] with hypoplastic transverse aortic arch and borderline left ventricular dimensions. Standard approach with bilateral pulmonary artery banding and ductal stenting was carried out in all thirteen patients. Two patients required two ductal stents at the time of index procedure. There were no intraprocedural complications. Median intubation length post-procedure was 4 days (range 1-74 days). Median hospital stay post-procedure was 47 days (range 15-270 days). The overall mortality rate on follow-up through comprehensive stage 2 over the 6-year experience was 38 % (5 out of 13). Of note, the mortality rate was significantly lower in the latter 3 years of the study period when the procedure was adopted as a primary palliation for HLHS (14 % or 1 out of 7) compared to the initial 3-year period when it was reserved for higher risk cohorts (67 % or 4 out of 6

  5. A Novel Way Of Repair Of Insulation Breaks During Pacemaker Generator Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Manzoor Ali, Syed; Iqbal, Khurshid; Tramboo, Nisar A; Lone, Aijaz A; Kaul, Suresh; Kaul, Neelam; Hafiz, Imran

    2009-01-01

    Minor abrasions can occur while mobilising old lead during pacemaker generator replacement necesittating placement of additional lead adding to the financial burden and junk in heart. We describe a novel way of repair of old pacemaker lead preventing additional lead placement. PMID:19763196

  6. Stimulating Cardiac Muscle by Light: Cardiac Optogenetics by Cell Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhiheng; Valiunas, Virginijus; Lu, Zongju; Bien, Harold; Liu, Huilin; Wang, Hong-Zhang; Rosati, Barbara; Brink, Peter R.; Cohen, Ira S.; Entcheva, Emilia

    2011-01-01

    Background After the recent cloning of light-sensitive ion channels and their expression in mammalian cells, a new field, optogenetics, emerged in neuroscience, allowing for precise perturbations of neural circuits by light. However, functionality of optogenetic tools has not been fully explored outside neuroscience; and a non-viral, non-embryogenesis based strategy for optogenetics has not been shown before. Methods and Results We demonstrate the utility of optogenetics to cardiac muscle by a tandem cell unit (TCU) strategy, where non-excitable cells carry exogenous light-sensitive ion channels, and when electrically coupled to cardiomyocytes, produce optically-excitable heart tissue. A stable channelrhodopsin2 (ChR2) expressing cell line was developed, characterized and used as a cell delivery system. The TCU strategy was validated in vitro in cell pairs with adult canine myocytes (for a wide range of coupling strengths) and in cardiac syncytium with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. For the first time, we combined optical excitation and optical imaging to capture light-triggered muscle contractions and high-resolution propagation maps of light-triggered electrical waves, found to be quantitatively indistinguishable from electrically-triggered waves. Conclusions Our results demonstrate feasibility to control excitation and contraction in cardiac muscle by light using the TCU approach. Optical pacing in this case uses less energy, offers superior spatiotemporal control, remote access and can serve not only as an elegant tool in arrhythmia research, but may form the basis for a new generation of light-driven cardiac pacemakers and muscle actuators. The TCU strategy is extendable to (non-viral) stem cell therapy and is directly relevant to in vivo applications. PMID:21828312

  7. Synchronous Drosophila circadian pacemakers display nonsynchronous Ca²⁺ rhythms in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xitong; Holy, Timothy E; Taghert, Paul H

    2016-02-26

    In Drosophila, molecular clocks control circadian rhythmic behavior through a network of ~150 pacemaker neurons. To explain how the network's neuronal properties encode time, we performed brainwide calcium imaging of groups of pacemaker neurons in vivo for 24 hours. Pacemakers exhibited daily rhythmic changes in intracellular Ca(2+) that were entrained by environmental cues and timed by molecular clocks. However, these rhythms were not synchronous, as each group exhibited its own phase of activation. Ca(2+) rhythms displayed by pacemaker groups that were associated with the morning or evening locomotor activities occurred ~4 hours before their respective behaviors. Loss of the receptor for the neuropeptide PDF promoted synchrony of Ca(2+) waves. Thus, neuropeptide modulation is required to sequentially time outputs from a network of synchronous molecular pacemakers. PMID:26917772

  8. Synchronous Drosophila circadian pacemakers display non-synchronous Ca2+ rhythms in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xitong; Holy, Timothy E.; Taghert, Paul H.

    2016-01-01

    In Drosophila, molecular clocks control circadian rhythmic behavior through a network of ~150 pacemaker neurons. To explain how the network’s neuronal properties encode time, we performed brain-wide calcium imaging of groups of pacemaker neurons in vivo for 24 hours. Pacemakers exhibited daily rhythmic changes in intracellular Ca2+ that were entrained by environmental cues and timed by molecular clocks. However, these rhythms were not synchronous, as each group exhibited its own phase of activation. Ca2+ rhythms displayed by pacemaker groups that were associated with the morning or evening locomotor activities occurred ~4 hours before their respective behaviors. Loss of receptor for neuropeptide PDF promoted synchrony of Ca2+ waves. Thus neuropeptide modulation is required to sequentially time outputs from a network of synchronous molecular pacemakers. PMID:26917772

  9. Evaluation of the Genetic Basis of Familial Aggregation of Pacemaker Implantation by a Large Next Generation Sequencing Panel

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Hillel A.; Uradu, Andrea; Lynnes, Ty C.; Groh, William J.; Miller, John M.; Lin, Hai; Gao, Hongyu; Wang, Zhiping; Liu, Yunlong; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Vatta, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Background The etiology of conduction disturbances necessitating permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation is often unknown, although familial aggregation of PPM (faPPM) suggests a possible genetic basis. We developed a pan-cardiovascular next generation sequencing (NGS) panel to genetically characterize a selected cohort of faPPM. Materials and Methods We designed and validated a custom NGS panel targeting the coding and splicing regions of 246 genes with involvement in cardiac pathogenicity. We enrolled 112 PPM patients and selected nine (8%) with faPPM to be analyzed by NGS. Results Our NGS panel covers 95% of the intended target with an average of 229x read depth at a minimum of 15-fold depth, reaching a SNP true positive rate of 98%. The faPPM patients presented with isolated cardiac conduction disease (ICCD) or sick sinus syndrome (SSS) without overt structural heart disease or identifiable secondary etiology. Three patients (33.3%) had heterozygous deleterious variants previously reported in autosomal dominant cardiac diseases including CCD: LDB3 (p.D117N) and TRPM4 (p.G844D) variants in patient 4; TRPM4 (p.G844D) and ABCC9 (p.V734I) variants in patient 6; and SCN5A (p.T220I) and APOB (p.R3527Q) variants in patient 7. Conclusion FaPPM occurred in 8% of our PPM clinic population. The employment of massive parallel sequencing for a large selected panel of cardiovascular genes identified a high percentage (33.3%) of the faPPM patients with deleterious variants previously reported in autosomal dominant cardiac diseases, suggesting that genetic variants may play a role in faPPM. PMID:26636822

  10. Utility of short-term variability of repolarization as a marker for monitoring a safe exercise training program in patients with cardiac diseases.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Isao; Sugiyama, Atsushi; Takahara, Akira; Kuroki, Kenji; Igawa, Masayuki; Enomoto, Tsuyoshi; Iida, Kaname; Koseki, Susumu; Aonuma, Kazutaka

    2011-01-01

    In order to begin searching for new markers for safe exercise training in patients with cardiac diseases, we tested the sensitivity and reliability of the short-term variability of repolarization (STV(QT)) in comparison with QT interval, QTc, and T(peak)-T(end) interval (T(p-e)) in patients with cardiac diseases. Nine patients (8 men, 1 woman; 58 ± 10 years) were enrolled. The cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program consisted of walking, bicycling on an ergometer, and calisthenics for 30-50 minutes/session and 3-5 sessions/week for 3 months. ECGs of 31 consecutive sinus beats were obtained before and after the CR program. RR and QT intervals were measured in the aVL lead. The mean orthogonal distance from the diagonal to the points of the Poincaré plots was determined using the following equation; STV(QT) [= Σ |QT(n+1)-QT(n)/(30 × 2(1/2))], as a marker of temporal dispersion of repolarization. Also, T(p-e) of 5 consecutive beats was measured as a marker of spatial dispersion. No fatal arrhythmias were observed in the CR. No significant difference was observed in the RR or QT interval between at baseline and at the end of the CR program. Meanwhile, QTc, STV(QT) and T(p-e) decreased significantly from 429 ± 27 to 400 ± 17 (P < 0.01), from 6.8 ± 1.3 to 4.7 ± 1.4 msec (P < 0.001), and from 74.8 (61.2/79.1) to 64.8 (51.4/70.7) msec (median (25th/75th percentile), P < 0.01), respectively. STV(QT) together with T(p-e) and QTc may reflect the time-courses of safe exercise training. PMID:22008441

  11. [The best of cardiac pacing in 1999].

    PubMed

    Deharo, J C

    2000-01-01

    Since the first clinical application to man forty years ago, for the treatment of bradycardia, cardiac pacing has been the object of continuous technological innovation in parallel with those in electronics and computerisation. However, independently of these expected advances, there has been a surprising widening of the field of application of pacing into those of haemodynamics and rhythmology. The recent publication of the long-term results of the Pacing in Cardiomyopathy (PIC) study confirmed the sustained decrease of intraventricular pressure gradient, of NYHA functional stage and improved quality of life of patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy paced in the DDD mode. The investigators also underlined the placebo effect of the pacemaker. The decrease in risk of sudden death and the reduction in ventricular remodelling have not been demonstrated yet. More recently, biventricular pacing has been proposed for the treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy and a French study showed a long-term improvement in NYHA stage and effort capacity. Several prospective randomised trials are under way to validate this indication. Acute haemodynamic evaluations have confirmed the efficacy of biventricular stimulation but also underline the value of left ventricular pacing alone. The effects on mortality, the selection of patients and the optimal configuration of pacing remain to be defined. In the field of prevention of atrial arrhythmias, the results of the multicenter SYNBIAPACE study, investigating biatrial pacing in patients with interatrial conduction defects, only showed a tendency to an increase in the delay before recurrence of atrial fibrillation. The value of the memory functions of pacemakers and the algorithms of prevention of atrial arrhythmias are still under investigation. Haemodynamic transducers have been introduced in some recent pacemakers to assess myocardial contractility and have applications in the evaluation of different pacing modes and in the

  12. From syncitium to regulated pump: a cardiac muscle cellular update

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to present a basic overview of some key teaching concepts that should be considered for inclusion in an six- to eight-lecture introductory block on the regulation of cardiac performance for graduate students. Within the context of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, this review incorporates information on Ca2+ microdomains and local control theory, with particular emphasis on the role of Ca2+ sparks as a key regulatory component of ventricular myocyte contraction dynamics. Recent information pertaining to local Ca2+ cycling in sinoatrial nodal cells (SANCs) as a mechanism underlying cardiac automaticity is also presented as part of the recently described coupled-clock pacemaker system. The details of this regulation are emerging; however, the notion that the sequestration and release of Ca2+ from internal stores in SANCs (similar to that observed in ventricular myocytes) regulates the rhythmic excitation of the heart (i.e., membrane ion channels) is an important advancement in this area. The regulatory role of cardiac adrenergic receptors on cardiac rate and function is also included, and fundamental concepts related to intracellular signaling are discussed. An important point of emphasis is that whole organ cardiac dynamics can be traced back to cellular events regulating intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and, as such, provides an important conceptual framework from which students can begin to think about whole organ physiology in health and disease. Greater synchrony of Ca2+-regulatory mechanisms between ventricular and pacemaker cells should enhance student comprehension of complex regulatory phenomenon in cardiac muscle. PMID:21385997

  13. CARDIO--a Lotus 1-2-3 based computer program for rapid calculation of cardiac output from dye or thermal dilution curves.

    PubMed

    Brill, R W; Bushnell, P G

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a menu-driven computer program (CARDIO), based on a Lotus 1-2-3 template and a series of macrocommands, that rapidly and semiautomatically calculates cardiac output from dye or thermal dilution curves. CARDIO works with any dye or thermal dilution recorder with an analog output, any analog to digital (A-to-D) conversion system, and any computer capable of running Lotus 1-2-3 version 2. No prior experience with Lotus 1-2-3 is needed to operate CARDIO, but experienced users can take full advantage of Lotus 1-2-3's graphics, data manipulation, and data retrieval capabilities. PMID:2689079

  14. High-intensity cardiac rehabilitation training of a commercial pilot who, after percutaneous coronary intervention, wanted to continue participating in a rigorous strength and conditioning program.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sanjay; Adams, Jenny; Lawrence, Anne; Schussler, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    After undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention, a 64-year-old commercial pilot was referred to cardiac rehabilitation. His stated goals were to continue participating in a rigorous strength and conditioning program at a community workout facility and to resume working as a pilot. To help him meet those goals, we designed and implemented a regimen of high-intensity exercises, with quick transitions between a variety of tasks that are not typically included in cardiac rehabilitation programs (e.g., medicine ball throws, push-ups, dead lifts, squats, military presses, sprints, and lunges). The training was symptom limited, enabling the patient to reach extreme levels of physical exertion in a controlled, monitored setting. By studying his training data (heart rate, blood pressure, and rating of perceived exertion), we were able to give him specific recommendations for controlling his exercise intensity after graduating from our program. More than 18 months later, he continues to exercise vigorously 3 days per week and is working as a commercial pilot. PMID:26722183

  15. High-intensity cardiac rehabilitation training of a commercial pilot who, after percutaneous coronary intervention, wanted to continue participating in a rigorous strength and conditioning program

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Sanjay; Lawrence, Anne; Schussler, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    After undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention, a 64-year-old commercial pilot was referred to cardiac rehabilitation. His stated goals were to continue participating in a rigorous strength and conditioning program at a community workout facility and to resume working as a pilot. To help him meet those goals, we designed and implemented a regimen of high-intensity exercises, with quick transitions between a variety of tasks that are not typically included in cardiac rehabilitation programs (e.g., medicine ball throws, push-ups, dead lifts, squats, military presses, sprints, and lunges). The training was symptom limited, enabling the patient to reach extreme levels of physical exertion in a controlled, monitored setting. By studying his training data (heart rate, blood pressure, and rating of perceived exertion), we were able to give him specific recommendations for controlling his exercise intensity after graduating from our program. More than 18 months later, he continues to exercise vigorously 3 days per week and is working as a commercial pilot. PMID:26722183

  16. The behavioral theory of timing: Reinforcer rate determines pacemaker rate

    PubMed Central

    Bizo, Lewis A.; White, K. Geoffrey

    1994-01-01

    In the behavioral theory of timing, pulses from a hypothetical Poisson pacemaker produce transitions between states that are correlated with adjunctive behavior. The adjunctive behavior serves as a discriminative stimulus for temporal discriminations. The present experiments tested the assumption that the average interpulse time of the pacemaker is proportional to interreinforcer interval. Responses on a left key were reinforced at variable intervals for the first 25 s since the beginning of a 50-s trial, and right-key responses were reinforced at variable intervals during the second 25 s. Psychometric functions relating proportion of right-key responses to time since trial onset, in 5-s intervals across the 50-s trial, were sigmoidal in form. Average interpulse times derived by fitting quantitative predictions from the behavioral theory of timing to obtained psychometric functions decreased when the interreinforcer interval was decreased and increased when the interreinforcer interval was increased, as predicted by the theory. In a second experiment, average interpulse times estimated from trials without reinforcement followed global changes in interreinforcer interval, as predicted by the theory. Changes in temporal discrimination as a function of interreinforcer interval were therefore not influenced by the discrimination of reinforcer occurrence. The present data support the assumption of the behavioral theory of timing that interpulse time is determined by interreinforcer interval. PMID:16812723

  17. Phase shifting two coupled circadian pacemakers - Implications for jet lag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gander, P. H.; Kronauer, R. E.; Graeber, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    Two Van der Pol oscillators with reciprocal linear velocity coupling are utilized to model the response of the human circadian timing system to abrupt displacements of the environmental time cues (zeitgebers). The core temperature rhythm and sleep-wake cycle simulated by the model are examined. The relationship between the masking of circadian rhythms by environmental variables and behavioral and physiological events and the rates of resynchronization is studied. The effects of zeitgeber phase shifts and zeitgeber strength on the resynchronization rates are analyzed. The influence of intrinsic pacemakers periods and coupling strength on resynchronization are investigated. The simulated data reveal that: resynchronization after a time zone shift depends on the magnitude of the shift; the time of day of the shift has little influence on resynchronization; the strength of zeitgebers affects the rate and direction of the resynchronization; the intrinsic pacemaker periods have a significant effect on resynchronization; and increasing the coupling between the oscillators results in an increase in the rate of resynchronization. The model data are compared to transmeridian flight studies data and similar resynchronization patterns are observed.

  18. Cardiac metastases

    PubMed Central

    Bussani, R; De‐Giorgio, F; Abbate, A; Silvestri, F

    2007-01-01

    Tumours metastatic to the heart (cardiac metastases) are among the least known and highly debated issues in oncology, and few systematic studies are devoted to this topic. Although primary cardiac tumours are extremely uncommon (various postmortem studies report rates between 0.001% and 0.28%), secondary tumours are not, and at least in theory, the heart can be metastasised by any malignant neoplasm able to spread to distant sites. In general, cardiac metastases are considered to be rare; however, when sought for, the incidence seems to be not as low as expected, ranging from 2.3% and 18.3%. Although no malignant tumours are known that diffuse preferentially to the heart, some do involve the heart more often than others—for example, melanoma and mediastinal primary tumours. This paper attempts to review the pathophysiology of cardiac metastatic disease, epidemiology and clinical presentation of cardiac metastases, and pathological characterisation of the lesions. PMID:17098886

  19. Antidepressants and food restriction cycles: evidence for multiple pacemakers in rodents.

    PubMed

    McEachron, D L

    1987-01-01

    Studies involving the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) provide insufficient evidence to support the SCN as master pacemaker(s) in the rodent circadian system. Restricted feeding (RF) cycles act as strong zeitgebers for activity and corticosterone rhythms and provide support for the existence of important secondary pacemakers. These proposed pacemakers show anticipatory behavior, a limited range of entertainment for RF cycles, and prolonged free runs under certain circumstances. Additional evidence supporting a multiple pacemaker model of rodent circadian organization comes from studies involving antidepressants. Lithium treatment lengthens the free-running tau of rat activity rhythms and shifts the range of entrainment towards longer zeitgeber cycles. Lithium also phase delays many rodent rhythms but does not appear to affect the SCN-pineal axis. These data are difficult to explain without involving more than one pacemaker. Models of the rodent system can be developed incorporating multiple pacemakers. To test these models, a multivariate approach will be required. Combining the labeled 2-deoxyglucose method for metabolic mapping and the procedures of fractional desynchronization with antidepressant psychopharmacology and RF cycles may prove to be an important multivariate approach. PMID:3306700

  20. Glocal Clinical Registries: Pacemaker Registry Design and Implementation for Global and Local Integration – Methodology and Case Study

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Kátia Regina; Costa, Roberto; Crevelari, Elizabeth Sartori; Lacerda, Marianna Sobral; de Moraes Albertini, Caio Marcos; Filho, Martino Martinelli; Santana, José Eduardo; Vissoci, João Ricardo Nickenig; Pietrobon, Ricardo; Barros, Jacson V.

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to apply standard and interoperable solutions for implementing and managing medical registries as well as aggregate, reproduce, and access data sets from legacy formats and platforms to advanced standard formats and operating systems are crucial for both clinical healthcare and biomedical research settings. Purpose Our study describes a reproducible, highly scalable, standard framework for a device registry implementation addressing both local data quality components and global linking problems. Methods and Results We developed a device registry framework involving the following steps: (1) Data standards definition and representation of the research workflow, (2) Development of electronic case report forms using REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture), (3) Data collection according to the clinical research workflow and, (4) Data augmentation by enriching the registry database with local electronic health records, governmental database and linked open data collections, (5) Data quality control and (6) Data dissemination through the registry Web site. Our registry adopted all applicable standardized data elements proposed by American College Cardiology / American Heart Association Clinical Data Standards, as well as variables derived from cardiac devices randomized trials and Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium. Local interoperability was performed between REDCap and data derived from Electronic Health Record system. The original data set was also augmented by incorporating the reimbursed values paid by the Brazilian government during a hospitalization for pacemaker implantation. By linking our registry to the open data collection repository Linked Clinical Trials (LinkedCT) we found 130 clinical trials which are potentially correlated with our pacemaker registry. Conclusion This study demonstrates how standard and reproducible solutions can be applied in the implementation of medical registries to constitute a re-usable framework

  1. Evaluation of a dual sensor rate responsive pacing system based on a new concept. French Talent DR Pacemaker Investigators.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, J L; Géroux, L; Cazeau, S

    1998-11-01

    The minute ventilation is known to be one of the most physiological indicators of exercise. A curvilinear relationship between VE and the normal sinus rhythm (NSR) has been demonstrated in healthy patients. The aim of this study is to show that a pacemaker based on a VE sensor can reproduce such a relationship. Eighty-one patients received a Talent DR 213 (ELA Medical, Montrouge, France) pacemaker with a third-generation rate responsive algorithm. At 1-month follow-up, the patients underwent a treadmill exercise test, after which three groups were defined: group 1 had 6 patients who were 100% paced throughout the exercise test; group 2 had 10 patients who maintained NSR throughout the test; and group 3 had 12 patients who had cardiopulmonary recording during the exercise test. In group 1 patients, the simulation function computed the simulated rate (sim-rate), which was compared to the sensor-driven rate (SDR). In group 2 patients, sim-rate was compared to the NSR. In group 3 patients, cardiac and metabolic reserves were compared to determine the appropriateness of the rate response to exercise (HRR% vs MR%). The results showed that the mean correlation coefficient between sim-rate and SDR was 0.983 +/- 0.005 (P < 0.001); the mean correlation coefficient between NSR and SDR was 0.92 +/- 0.07 (P < 0.001); and a linear relationship was found between HRR% and MR%, with a mean slope of 1.1 +/- 0.2 that was significantly equal to the theoretical value of 1 (P = NS). In conclusion, combining an activity-driven sensor with a physiological sensor allows the preservation of a physiological rate response during exercise. PMID:9825318

  2. Comparison Between Effects of Home Based Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs Versus Usual Care on the Patients’ Health Related Quality of Life After Coronary Artery Bypass Graft

    PubMed Central

    Salavati, Mohsen; Falahinia, Gholamhossein; Vardanjani, Ali Esmaeili; Rafiei, Hossein; Moosavi, Saeid; Torkamani, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aim: To compare home-based cardiac rehabilitation with usual care on the patients’ Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) after coronary artery bypass graft in patients with coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Methods: In a randomized controlled clinical conducted from March 2013 to June 2013, 110 patients with CABG surgery were randomly assigned into two groups. While patients in group I, were received usual care and patients in group II, in addition to the usual care were received home-based cardiac rehabilitation programs. The 27-item MacNew Heart Disease HRQoL questionnaire was used to evaluate the patient’s HRQoL under and over 2 months after intervention. Results: At the time of 0, mean score of HRQoL was 67.86±7.5 and 64.76±8.4 in patients in group I and group II, respectively (P> 0.05). Although mean score of HRQoL in all patients in both groups increased two month after intervention, but this increase in patients in group II were higher than patients in group I (154.93±4.6 vs 134.20±8.2). This difference were statistically significant (P< 0.05). Conclusion: Quality of Life (QoL) can be considered as a quality indicator of health care systems. Results of present study showed that home-based cardiac rehabilitation program improved patients HRQoL after CABG surgery. PMID:26573042

  3. Mechanisms that match ATP supply to demand in cardiac pacemaker cells during high ATP demand

    PubMed Central

    Yaniv, Yael; Spurgeon, Harold A.; Ziman, Bruce D.; Lyashkov, Alexey E.

    2013-01-01

    The spontaneous action potential (AP) firing rate of sinoatrial node cells (SANCs) involves high-throughput signaling via Ca2+-calmodulin activated adenylyl cyclases (AC), cAMP-mediated protein kinase A (PKA), and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)-dependent phosphorylation of SR Ca2+ cycling and surface membrane ion channel proteins. When the throughput of this signaling increases, e.g., in response to β-adrenergic receptor activation, the resultant increase in spontaneous AP firing rate increases the demand for ATP. We hypothesized that an increase of ATP production to match the increased ATP demand is achieved via a direct effect of increased mitochondrial Ca2+ (Ca2+m) and an indirect effect via enhanced Ca2+-cAMP/PKA-CaMKII signaling to mitochondria. To increase ATP demand, single isolated rabbit SANCs were superfused by physiological saline at 35 ± 0.5°C with isoproterenol, or by phosphodiesterase or protein phosphatase inhibition. We measured cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca2+ and flavoprotein fluorescence in single SANC, and we measured cAMP, ATP, and O2 consumption in SANC suspensions. Although the increase in spontaneous AP firing rate was accompanied by an increase in O2 consumption, the ATP level and flavoprotein fluorescence remained constant, indicating that ATP production had increased. Both Ca2+m and cAMP increased concurrently with the increase in AP firing rate. When Ca2+m was reduced by Ru360, the increase in spontaneous AP firing rate in response to isoproterenol was reduced by 25%. Thus, both an increase in Ca2+m and an increase in Ca2+ activated cAMP-PKA-CaMKII signaling regulate the increase in ATP supply to meet ATP demand above the basal level. PMID:23604710

  4. Considerations in Patients With Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices at End of Life.

    PubMed

    Gura, Melanie T

    2015-01-01

    Since the introduction of implantable cardiac pacemakers in 1958 and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators in 1980, these devices have been proven to save and prolong lives. Pacemakers, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, and cardiac resynchronization therapy are deemed life-sustaining therapies. Despite these life-saving technologies, all patients ultimately will reach the end of their lives from either their heart disease or development of a terminal illness. Clinicians may be faced with patient and family requests to withdraw these life-sustaining therapies. The purpose of this article is to educate clinicians about the legal and ethical principles that underlie withdrawal of life-sustaining therapies such as device deactivation and to highlight the importance of proactive communication with patients and families in these situations. PMID:26484996

  5. The year in review of clinical cardiac electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Gregory M; Keung, Edmund; Scheinman, Melvin M

    2013-02-19

    This past year saw multiple important advances in the field clinical cardiac electrophysiology. Seminal articles describing new anticoagulant drugs for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation were published. New results that raise questions regarding the safety of dronedarone and several new promising techniques in AF ablation were described. Important articles that refine our understanding of the risk of sudden death among Wolff-Parkinson-White patients were published. In the basic and translational sciences, the application of gene therapy to the study and potential treatment of arrhythmias was described, whereas genetic determinants important to the optimal treatment of inherited arrhythmia syndromes were further elucidated. Issues relevant to cardiac rhythm device therapy included investigations into the St. Jude Riata lead, new applications of device monitoring, predicting response to cardiac resynchronization therapy, and the use of pacemakers for vasovagal syncope. PMID:23312706

  6. Combined Left Atrial Appendage Closure and Pacemaker Implant through a Single Right Femoral Vein Access.

    PubMed

    Regoli, François; Moccetti, Tiziano; Pasotti, Elena; Auricchio, Angelo; Moccetti, Marco

    2016-08-01

    Left atrial appendage (LAA) closure is indicated in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and high bleeding as well as thromboembolic risks. A subgroup of these patients may also present an indication for a single-chamber permanent pacemaker due to symptomatic low-rate AF or when "ablate and pace" strategy is indicated for rate control. A miniaturized wireless transcatheter pacing system (TPS) is now available as a single-chamber permanent pacemaker. This case presents how combined LAA closure and permanent pacemaker implant, by means of TPS, is feasible through a single femoral venous access. PMID:26970532

  7. MedlinePlus: Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... available Research Clinical Trials Journal Articles Resources Reference Desk Find an Expert For You Patient Handouts Summary Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program to help people who have A heart attack Angioplasty or ...

  8. Left Ventricular Synchrony and Function in Pediatric Patients with Definitive Pacemakers

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Michel Cabrera; Morejón, Adel Eladio Gonzales; Ricardo, Giselle Serrano

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic right ventricular pacing (RVP) induces a dyssynchronous contraction pattern, producing interventricular and intraventricular asynchrony. Many studies have shown the relationship of RVP with impaired left ventricular (LV) form and function. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate LV synchrony and function in pediatric patients receiving RVP in comparison with those receiving LV pacing (LVP). Methods LV systolic and diastolic function and synchrony were evaluated in 80 pediatric patients with either nonsurgical or postsurgical complete atrioventricular block, with pacing from either the RV endocardium (n = 40) or the LV epicardium (n = 40). Echocardiographic data obtained before pacemaker implantation, immediately after it, and at the end of a mean follow-up of 6.8 years were analyzed. Results LV diastolic function did not change in any patient during follow-up. LV systolic function was preserved in patients with LVP. However, in children with RVP the shortening fraction and ejection fraction decreased from medians of 41% ± 2.6% and 70% ± 6.9% before implantation to 32% ± 4.2% and 64% ± 2.5% (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0001), respectively, at final follow-up. Interventricular mechanical delay was significantly larger with RVP (66 ± 13 ms) than with LVP (20 ± 8 ms). Similarly, the following parameters were significantly different in the two groups: LV mechanical delay (RVP: 69 ± 6 ms, LVP: 30 ± 11 ms, p < 0.0001); septal to lateral wall motion delay (RVP: 75 ± 19 ms, LVP: 42 ± 10 ms, p < 0.0001); and, septal to posterior wall motion delay (RVP: 127 ± 33 ms, LVP: 58 ± 17 ms, p < 0.0001). Conclusion Compared with RV endocardium, LV epicardium is an optimal site for pacing to preserve cardiac synchrony and function. PMID:24061683

  9. Cardiac Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jeudy, Jean; Burke, Allen P; Frazier, Aletta Ann

    2016-07-01

    Lymphoma of the heart and pericardium may develop in up to 25% of patients with disseminated nodal disease, but primary cardiac lymphoma is rare. The majority are diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, which arise in immunocompetent older individuals, men twice as often as women. Subsets are found in immunocompromised patients, including those with HIV-AIDS or allograft recipients. Cardiac lymphomas tend to arise in the wall of the right heart, especially right atrium, with contiguous infiltration of epicardium and pericardium. Pericardial implants and effusions are common. The disease is often multifocal in the heart, but cardiac valves are usually spared. PMID:27265603

  10. Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices and End-of-Life Care: An Australian Perspective.

    PubMed

    Alhammad, Nasser J; O'Donnell, Mark; O'Donnell, David; Mariani, Justin A; Gould, Paul A; McGavigan, Andrew D

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac implantable electronic devices (pacemakers and defibrillators) are increasingly common in modern cardiology practice, and health professionals from a variety of specialties will encounter patients with such devices on a frequent basis. This article will focus on the subset of patients who may request, or be appropriate for, device deactivation and discuss the issues surrounding end-of-life decisions, along with the ethical and legal implications of device deactivation. PMID:27320854

  11. Anaesthesia Application for Cardiac Denervation in a Patient with Long QT Syndrome and Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Karadeniz, Ümit; Demir, Aslı; Koçulu, Rabia

    2016-01-01

    Long QT syndrome is a congenital disorder that is characterized by a prolongation of the QT interval on electrocardiograms and a propensity to ventricular tachyarrhythmias, which may lead to syncope, cardiac arrest or sudden death. Cardiomyopathy and pulmonary hypertension diseases have additional risks in anaesthesia management. In this study, we emphasize on one lung ventilation, pacemaker-implantable cardioverter–defibrillator and the anaesthesia management process in a patient with long QT syndrome, cardiomyopathy and pulmonary hypertension who underwent thoracic sympathectomy. PMID:27366557

  12. Injury to the coronary arteries and related structures by implantation of cardiac implantable electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Pang, Benjamin J; Barold, S Serge; Mond, Harry G

    2015-04-01

    Damage to the coronary arteries and related structures from pacemaker and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead implantation is a rarely reported complication that can lead to myocardial infarction and pericardial tamponade that may occur acutely or even years later. We summarize the reported cases of injury to coronary arteries and related structures and review the causes of troponin elevation in the setting of cardiac implantable electronic device implantation. PMID:25564549

  13. Pacemaker activity resulting from the coupling with nonexcitable cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquemet, Vincent

    2006-07-01

    Fibroblasts are nonexcitable cells that are sometimes coupled with excitable cells (cardiomyocytes). Due to a higher resting potential, these cells may act as a current source or sink and therefore disturb the electrical activity of the surrounding excitable cells. The possible occurrence of spontaneous pacemaker activity resulting from these electrotonic interactions was investigated in a theoretical model of two coupled cells as well as in a multicellular fiber model based on the Courtemanche kinetics. The results indicate that repeated spontaneous activations can be observed after an alteration in the activation and recovery properties of the sodium current (changes in excitability properties), provided that the difference in the resting potential as well as the coupling between the excitable and nonexcitable cells is sufficiently high. This may constitute a mechanism of focal sources triggering arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation.

  14. The dromotropic pacemaker: system analysis and design considerations.

    PubMed

    Hexamer, M; Meine, M; Kloppe, C; Kloppe, A; Mügge, A; Werner, J

    2004-11-01

    Patients suffering from chronotropic incompetence are generally treated with a rate-responsive pacemaker that stimulates the heart at a rate derived from a strain related sensor signal. The pacemaker concept described here uses a well-defined time interval in the electrogram as sensor parameter (AVCT: atrio-ventricular conduction time). AVCT is directly controlled by the autonomic nervous system. The design of the new algorithm was based on a thorough experimental analysis of AVCT subject to variations of the exercise rate and the pacing frequency. There it was demonstrated that AVCT is disturbed by the respiratory activity. The new rate-responsive algorithm which uses the internal model control principle explicitly takes into account the closed-loop nature of the underlying system. The major design objectives were: a) extended range of the individual heart rate, b) effective attenuation of the respiratory related disturbance and c) dynamic stability. Seven patients undergoing an incremental exercise test were paced with the new AVCT-based algorithm. When paced with this algorithm the paced heart rate was 126 +/- 12 min(-1) whereas the peak intrinsic heart rate was only 100 +/- 20 min(-1). The increase which was significant (26 +/- 13 min(-1); 15.53 min(-1)) clearly demonstrated the potential of this concept to restore chronotropic competence. A reanalysis of the experiments was undertaken in order to facilitate the individual parameterization in clinical practice. It could be demonstrated that a rather simple screening test is sufficient to gain the knowledge necessary for the individual parameterisation. PMID:15624866

  15. The Immunoendocrine Thymus as a Pacemaker of Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Csaba, György

    2016-06-01

    The thymus develops from an endocrine area of the foregut, and retains the ancient potencies of this region. However, later it is populated by bone marrow originated lymphatic elements and forms a combined organ, which is a central part of the immune system as well as an influential element of the endocrine orchestra. Thymus produces self-hormones (thymulin, thymosin, thymopentin, and thymus humoral factor), which are participating in the regulation of immune cell transformation and selection, and also synthesizes hormones similar to that of the other endocrine glands such as melatonin, neuropeptides, and insulin, which are transported by the immune cells to the sites of requests (packed transport). Thymic (epithelial and immune) cells also have receptors for hormones which regulate them. This combined organ, which is continuously changing from birth to senescence seems to be a pacemaker of life. This function is basically regulated by the selection of self-responsive thymocytes as their complete destruction helps the development (up to puberty) and their gradual release in case of weakened control (after puberty) causes the erosion of cells and intercellular material, named aging. This means that during aging, self-destructive and non-protective immune activities are manifested under the guidance of the involuting thymus, causing the continuous irritation of cells and organs. Possibly the pineal body is the main regulator of the pacemaker, the neonatal removal of which results in atrophy of thymus and wasting disease and its later corrosion causes the insufficiency of thymus. The co-involution of pineal and thymus could determine the aging and the time of death without external intervention; however, external factors can negatively influence both of them. PMID:27352969

  16. Cardiac arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment for cardiac arrest. It is a medical device that gives an electrical shock to the heart. The shock can get the heart beating normally again. Small, portable defibrillators are often available in public areas for ...

  17. Cardiac amyloidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way electrical signals move through the heart (conduction system). This can lead to abnormal heart beats ( ... due to medication) Sick sinus syndrome Symptomatic cardiac conduction system disease (arrhythmias related to abnormal conduction of ...

  18. Cardiac rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... 123-210. Thomas PD. Exercise-Based, Comprehensive Cardiac Rehabilitation. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2011: ...

  19. Cardiac rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... goal of cardiac rehab is to: Improve your cardiovascular function Improve your overall health and quality of ... E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015: ...

  20. Cardiac Sarcoidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Cardiac Sarcoidosis? Sarcoidosis is a poorly understood disease that commonly affects the lungs. It can also involve the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, eyes, skin, bones, salivary glands and heart. ...

  1. SU-E-I-42: Normalized Embryo/fetus Doses for Fluoroscopically Guided Pacemaker Implantation Procedures Calculated Using a Monte Carlo Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Damilakis, J; Stratakis, J; Solomou, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is well known that pacemaker implantation is sometimes needed in pregnant patients with symptomatic bradycardia. To our knowledge, there is no reported experience regarding radiation doses to the unborn child resulting from fluoroscopy during pacemaker implantation. The purpose of the current study was to develop a method for estimating embryo/fetus dose from fluoroscopically guided pacemaker implantation procedures performed on pregnant patients during all trimesters of gestation. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code was employed in this study. Three mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing the average pregnant patient at the first, second and third trimesters of gestation were generated using Bodybuilder software (White Rock science, White Rock, NM). The normalized embryo/fetus dose from the posteroanterior (PA), the 30° left-anterior oblique (LAO) and the 30° right-anterior oblique (RAO) projections were calculated for a wide range of kVp (50–120 kVp) and total filtration values (2.5–9.0 mm Al). Results: The results consist of radiation doses normalized to a) entrance skin dose (ESD) and b) dose area product (DAP) so that the dose to the unborn child from any fluoroscopic technique and x-ray device used can be calculated. ESD normalized doses ranged from 0.008 (PA, first trimester) to 2.519 μGy/mGy (RAO, third trimester). DAP normalized doses ranged from 0.051 (PA, first trimester) to 12.852 μGy/Gycm2 (RAO, third trimester). Conclusion: Embryo/fetus doses from fluoroscopically guided pacemaker implantation procedures performed on pregnant patients during all stages of gestation can be estimated using the method developed in this study. This study was supported by the Greek Ministry of Education and Religious Affairs, General Secretariat for Research and Technology, Operational Program ‘Education and Lifelong Learning’, ARISTIA (Research project: CONCERT)

  2. [Optimalization of rate adaptation using Holter functions in DDD/R pacemakers].

    PubMed

    Novotný, T; Dvorák, R; Kozák, M; Vlasínová, J

    1998-06-01

    Introduction of the pacing rate adaptation according to the momentary metabolic needs added other programmable parametres which demand physician's attention during the initial postimplantation programmation and also in follow-up of pacemaker patients. The parametres setting is strictly individual with a need of feedback control. In some devices it is enabled by Holter functions as a part of pacemaker software. These methods were used to set the rate adaptive parametres in the group of 23 patients with implanted DDD/R pacemaker. The walking stress test was used. Model follow-up situations are presented in 3 case reports. Using Holter functions enables the physician to put patient's subjective complains in relation with actual heart rate--this is used to optimize the parametres of rate adaptation. The authors consider the Holter functions a necessary part of rate adaptive pacemaker software. PMID:9820057

  3. A Sodium Leak Current Regulates Pacemaker Activity of Adult Central Pattern Generator Neurons in Lymnaea Stagnalis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tom Z.; Feng, Zhong-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The resting membrane potential of the pacemaker neurons is one of the essential mechanisms underlying rhythm generation. In this study, we described the biophysical properties of an uncharacterized channel (U-type channel) and investigated the role of the channel in the rhythmic activity of a respiratory pacemaker neuron and the respiratory behaviour in adult freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Our results show that the channel conducts an inward leak current carried by Na+ (ILeak-Na). The ILeak-Na contributed to the resting membrane potential and was required for maintaining rhythmic action potential bursting activity of the identified pacemaker RPeD1 neurons. Partial knockdown of the U-type channel suppressed the aerial respiratory behaviour of the adult snail in vivo. These findings identified the Na+ leak conductance via the U-type channel, likely a NALCN-like channel, as one of the fundamental mechanisms regulating rhythm activity of pacemaker neurons and respiratory behaviour in adult animals. PMID:21526173

  4. Contributions of high resolution electrograms memorized by DDDR pacemakers in the interpretation of arrhythmic events.

    PubMed

    Defaye, Pascal; Leclercq, Jean-François; Guilleman, Danièle; Scanu, Patrice; Hazard, Jean-René; Fatemi, Marjaneh; Boursier, Michel; Lambiez, Marie

    2003-01-01

    The accuracy of information retrievable from the memories of DDDR pacing systems has been limited by the absence of actual electrograms confirming the proper sensing of spontaneous cardiac activity versus that of extraneous signals. This study examined the diagnostic power of a new arrhythmia interpretation scheme, which includes the recording and storage of high resolution endocavitary atrial and ventricular electrograms (HREGM). HREGM stored in the memories of new generation pacemakers (PM) in response to nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT), sustained VT, and atrial arrhythmias were analyzed in a follow-up registry of 520 patients at 1 month, and 3 to 6 months after implantation of a PM for standard indications. For each sequence of stored HREGM, the accuracy of the PM response was examined, classified as accurate (true positive), versus inaccurate (false positive), versus undetermined, and the relative contribution of the HREGM in verifying the PM diagnosis was measured. During a follow-up of 4.9 +/- 2 months, 256 (49%) of the 520 patients had an event recorded, which was confirmed to be arrhythmic on the basis of HREGM. Overall, approximately 34% of atrialtachy response (ATR) episodes were confirmed to be appropriate. Similar percentages of episodes were prompted by oversensing of signals unrelated to cardiac arrhythmias, while nearly 12% of the episodes could not be clarified because of such brief duration as to preclude recording of their onset. Approximately one-third of NSVT, and one-half of VT detections were false positive. Ventricular oversensing, most often due to myopotential interference in presence of unipolar sensing, and atrial undersensing were both identified as sources of false-positive detections of ventricular events. The proportion of true-positive detections was significantly higher in the bipolar (83%) than unipolar configuration. Among 520 PM recipients, miscellaneous episodes of atrial arrhythmias were confirmed by HREGM in 37% of

  5. Laser extraction of pacemaker lead traversing a patent foramen ovale and the mitral valve.

    PubMed

    Anastacio, Melissa M; Castillo-Sang, Mario; Lawton, Jennifer S

    2012-12-01

    Left ventricular lead misplacement is an infrequent complication of pacemaker or defibrillator lead insertion. It most commonly occurs through defects in the interatrial septum. Although patients may remain asymptomatic, the most common clinical complication is a thromboembolic event. Percutaneous technology has been described to safely remove misplaced leads. We present a case of a patient with a pacemaker lead in the left ventricle through a patent foramen ovale that was successfully extracted using excimer laser technology. PMID:23176932

  6. Endoscopic Electrosurgery in Patients with Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Baeg, Myong Ki; Kim, Sang-Woo; Ko, Sun-Hye; Lee, Yoon Bum; Hwang, Seawon; Lee, Bong-Woo; Choi, Hye Jin; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In-Seok; Oh, Yong-Seog; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) undergoing endoscopic electrosurgery (EE) are at a risk of electromagnetic interference (EMI). We aimed to analyze the effects of EE in CIED patients. Methods: Patients with CIED who underwent EE procedures such as snare polypectomy, endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) were retrospectively analyzed. Postprocedural symptoms as well as demographic and outpatient follow-up data were reviewed through medical records. Electrical data, including preprocedural and postprocedural arrhythmia records, were reviewed through pacemaker interrogation, 24-hour Holter monitoring, or electrocardiogram. Results: Fifty-nine procedures in 49 patients were analyzed. Fifty procedures were performed in 43 patients with a pacemaker, and nine were performed in six patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. There were one gastric and 44 colon snare polypectomies, five gastric and one colon ESDs, and eight ERCPs with EST. Fifty-five cases of electrical follow-up were noted, with two postprocedural changes not caused by EE. Thirty-one pacemaker interrogations had procedure recordings, with two cases of asymptomatic tachycardia. All patients were asymptomatic with no adverse events. Conclusions: Our study reports no adverse events from EE in patients with CIED, suggesting that this procedure is safe. However, because of the possibility of EMI, recommendations on EE should be followed. PMID:26867552

  7. The Different Effects of BMI and WC on Organ Damage in Patients from a Cardiac Rehabilitation Program after Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lin; Zhao, Hui; Qiu, Jian; Zhu, Wei; Lei, Hongqiang; Cai, Zekun; Lin, Wan-Hua; Huang, Wenhua; Zhang, Heye; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    One of the purposes of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is to monitor and control weight of the patient. Our study is to compare the different obesity indexes, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference (WC), through one well-designed CR program (CRP) with ACS in Guangzhou city of Guangdong Province, China, in order to identify different effects of BMI and WC on organ damage. In our work, sixty-one patients between October 2013 and January 2014 fulfilled our study. We collected the vital signs by medical records, the clinical variables of body-metabolic status by fasting blood test, and the organ damage variables by submaximal exercise treadmill test (ETT) and ultrasonic cardiogram (UCG) both on our inpatient and four-to-five weeks of outpatient part of CRP after ACS. We mainly used two-tailed Pearson's test and liner regression to evaluate the relationship of BMI/WC and organ damage. Our results confirmed that WC could be more accurate than BMI to evaluate the cardiac function through the changes of left ventricular structure on the CRP after ACS cases. It makes sense of early diagnosis, valid evaluation, and proper adjustment to ACS in CRP of the obesity individuals in the future. PMID:26247035

  8. Cardiac or Other Implantable Electronic Devices and Sleep-disordered Breathing – Implications for Diagnosis and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bitter, Thomas; Gutleben, Klaus-Jürgen; Horstkotte, Dieter; Oldenburg, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is of growing interest in cardiology because SDB is a highly prevalent comorbidity in patients with a variety of cardiovascular diseases. The prevalence of SDB is particularly high in patients with cardiac dysrhythmias and/or heart failure. In this setting, many patients now have implantable cardiac devices, such as pacemakers, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators or implanted cardiac resynchronisation therapy devices (CRT). Treatment of SDB using implantable cardiac devices has been studied previously, with atrial pacing and CRT being shown not to bring about satisfactory results in SDB care. The latest generations of these devices have the capacity to determine transthoracic impedance, to detect and quantify breathing efforts and to identify SDB. The capability of implantable cardiac devices to detect SDB is of potential importance for patients with cardiovascular disease, allowing screening for SDB, monitoring of the course of SDB in relation to cardiac status, and documenting of the effects of treatment. PMID:26835077

  9. Biological pacemaker created by minimally invasive somatic reprogramming in pigs with complete heart block

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yu-Feng; Dawkins, James Frederick; Cho, Hee Cheol; Marbán, Eduardo; Cingolani, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Somatic reprogramming by reexpression of the embryonic transcription factor T-box 18 (TBX18) converts cardiomyocytes into pacemaker cells. We hypothesized that this could be a viable therapeutic avenue for pacemaker-dependent patients afflicted with device-related complications, and therefore tested whether adenoviral TBX18 gene transfer could create biological pacemaker activity in vivo in a large-animal model of complete heart block. Biological pacemaker activity, originating from the intramyocardial injection site, was evident in TBX18-transduced animals starting at day 2 and persisted for the duration of the study (14 days) with minimal backup electronic pacemaker use. Relative to controls transduced with a reporter gene, TBX18-transduced animals exhibited enhanced autonomic responses and physiologically superior chronotropic support of physical activity. Induced sinoatrial node cells could be identified by their distinctive morphology at the site of injection in TBX18-transduced animals, but not in controls. No local or systemic safety concerns arose. Thus, minimally invasive TBX18 gene transfer creates physiologically relevant pacemaker activity in complete heart block, providing evidence for therapeutic somatic reprogramming in a clinically relevant disease model. PMID:25031269

  10. Sphingosine and FTY720 Modulate Pacemaking Activity in Interstitial Cells of Cajal from Mouse Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Joo Hyun; Kim, Woo Kyung; Kim, Byung Joo

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are the pacemakers of the gastrointestinal tract, and transient receptor potential melastatin type 7 (TRPM7) and Ca2+ activated Cl− channels (ANO1) are candidate the generators of pacemaker potentials in ICCs. The effects of D-erythro-sphingosine (SPH) and structural analogues of SPH, that is, N,N-dimethyl-Derythro-sphingosine (N,N-DMS), FTY720, and FTY720-P on the pacemaking activities of ICCs were examined using the whole cell patch clamp technique. SPH, N,N-DMS, and FTY720 decreased the amplitudes of pacemaker potentials in ICC clusters, but resting membrane potentials displayed little change. Also, perfusing SPH, N,N-DMS, or FTY720 in the bath reduced both inward and outward TRPM7-like currents in single ICCs, and inhibited ANO1 currents. The another structural analogue of SPH, FTY720-P was ineffective at the pacemaker potentials in ICC clusters and the TRPM7-like currents in single ICCs. Furthermore, FTY720- P had no effect on ANO1. These results suggest that SPH, N,N-DMS, and FTY720 modulate the pacemaker activities of ICCs, and that TRPM7 and ANO1 channels affect intestinal motility. PMID:23912597

  11. The East Asian Summer Monsoon in pacemaker experiments driven by ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hui; Greatbatch, Richard J.; Lu, Jian; Cash, Ben

    2015-03-01

    The variability of the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) is studied using a pacemaker technique driven by ENSO in an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) coupled to a slab mixed layer model. In the pacemaker experiments, sea surface temperature (SST) is constrained to observations in the eastern equatorial Pacific through a q- flux that measures the contribution of ocean dynamics to SST variability, while the AGCM is coupled to the slab model. An ensemble of pacemaker experiments is analyzed using a multivariate EOF analysis to identify the two major modes of variability of the EASM. The results show that the pacemaker experiments simulate a substantial amount (around 45 %) of the variability of the first mode (the Pacific-Japan pattern) in ERA40 from 1979 to 1999. Different from previous work, the pacemaker experiments also simulate a large part (25 %) of the variability of the second mode, related to rainfall variability over northern China. Furthermore, we find that the lower (850 hPa) and the upper (200 hPa) tropospheric circulation of the first mode display the same degree of reproducibility whereas only the lower part of the second mode is reproducible. The basis for the success of the pacemaker experiments is the ability of the experiments to reproduce the observed relationship between El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the EASM.

  12. Using the Virtual Heart Model to validate the mode-switch pacemaker operation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhihao; Connolly, Allison; Mangharam, Rahul

    2010-01-01

    Artificial pacemakers are one of the most widely-used implantable devices today, with millions implanted worldwide. The main purpose of an artificial pacemaker is to treat bradycardia, or slow heart beats, by pacing the atrium and ventricles at a faster rate. While the basic functionality of the device is fairly simple, there are many documented cases of death and injury due to device malfunctions. The frequency of malfunctions due to firmware problems will only increase as the pacemaker operations become more complex in an attempt to expand the use of the device. One reason these malfunctions arise is that there is currently no methodology for formal validation and verification of medical device software, as there are in the safety-critical domains of avionics and industrial control automation. We have developed a timed-automata based Virtual Heart Model (VHM) to act as platform for medical device software validation and verification. Through a case study involving multiple arrhythmias, this investigation shows how the VHM can be used with closed-loop operation of a pacemaker to validate the necessity and functionality of the complex mode-switch pacemaker operation. We demonstrate the correct pacemaker operation, to switch from one rhythm management mode to another, in patients with supraventricular tachycardias. (1). PMID:21096077

  13. Development of pacemaker properties and rhythmogenic mechanisms in the mouse embryonic respiratory network

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Marc; Toporikova, Natalia; Simmers, John; Thoby-Brisson, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Breathing is a vital rhythmic behavior generated by hindbrain neuronal circuitry, including the preBötzinger complex network (preBötC) that controls inspiration. The emergence of preBötC network activity during prenatal development has been described, but little is known regarding inspiratory neurons expressing pacemaker properties at embryonic stages. Here, we combined calcium imaging and electrophysiological recordings in mouse embryo brainstem slices together with computational modeling to reveal the existence of heterogeneous pacemaker oscillatory properties relying on distinct combinations of burst-generating INaP and ICAN conductances. The respective proportion of the different inspiratory pacemaker subtypes changes during prenatal development. Concomitantly, network rhythmogenesis switches from a purely INaP/ICAN-dependent mechanism at E16.5 to a combined pacemaker/network-driven process at E18.5. Our results provide the first description of pacemaker bursting properties in embryonic preBötC neurons and indicate that network rhythmogenesis undergoes important changes during prenatal development through alterations in both circuit properties and the biophysical characteristics of pacemaker neurons. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16125.001 PMID:27434668

  14. The new criterion for cardiac resynchronization therapy treatment assessed by two channels impedance cardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peczalski, K.; Palko, T.; Wojciechowski, D.; Dunajski, Z.; Kowalewski, M.

    2013-04-01

    The cardiac resynchronization therapy is an effective treatment for systolic failure patients. Independent electrical stimulation of left and right ventricle corrects mechanical ventricular dyssynchrony. About 30-40% treated patients do not respond to therapy. In order to improve clinical outcome authors propose the two channels impedance cardiography for assessment of ventricular dyssynchrony. The proposed method is intended for validation of patients diagnosis and optimization of pacemaker settings for cardiac resynchronization therapy. The preliminary study has showed that bichannel impedance cardiography is a promising tool for assessment of ventricular dyssynchrony.

  15. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David H; Nery, Pablo B; Ha, Andrew C; Beanlands, Rob S B

    2016-07-26

    Clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in perhaps 5% of patients with sarcoidosis. The 3 principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. An estimated 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic cardiac involvement (clinically silent disease). In 2014, the first international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS was published. In patients with clinically manifest CS, the extent of left ventricular dysfunction seems to be the most important predictor of prognosis. There is controversy in published reports as to the outcome of patients with clinically silent CS. Despite a paucity of data, immunosuppression therapy (primarily with corticosteroids) has been advocated for the treatment of clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, primarily with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, is often recommended for patients with clinically manifest disease. PMID:27443438

  16. Propagation of pacemaker activity in the guinea-pig antrum

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, G W; Hirst, G D S; Park, K J; Smith, C B; Sanders, K M; Ward, S M; Smith, T K

    2004-01-01

    Cyclical periods of depolarization (slow waves) underlie peristaltic contractions involved in mixing and emptying of contents in the gastric antrum. Slow waves originate from a myenteric network of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC-MY). In this study we have visualized the sequence and propagation of Ca2+ transients associated with pacemaker potentials in the ICC network and longitudinal (LM) and circular muscle (CM) layers of the isolated guinea-pig gastric antrum. Gastric antrum was dissected to reveal the ICC-MY network, loaded with Fluo-4 AM and activity was monitored at 37°C. Ca2+ waves propagated throughout the ICC-MY network at an average velocity of 3.24 ± 0.12 mm s−1 at a frequency of 4.87 ± 0.16 cycles min−1 (n = 4). The propagation of the Ca2+ wave often appeared ‘step-like’, with separate regions of the network being activated after variable delays. The direction of propagation was highly variable (Δ angle of propagation 44.3 ± 10.9 deg per cycle) and was not confined to the axes of the longitudinal or circular muscle. Ca2+ waves appeared to spread out radially from the site of initiation. The initiating Ca2+ wave in ICC-MY was correlated to secondary Ca2+ waves in intramuscular interstial cells of Cajal, ICC-IM, and smooth muscle cells, and the local distortion (contraction) in a field of view. TTX (1 μm) had little effect on slow wave or pacemaker potential activity, but 2-APB (50 μm) blocked all Ca2+ waves, indicating a pivotal role for intracellular Ca2+ stores. Nicardipine (2 μm) eliminated the Ca2+ transient generated by smooth muscle, but did not affect the fast upstroke associated with ICC-MY. These results indicate that slow waves follow a sequence of activation, beginning with the ICC-MY and ICC-IM network, followed later by a sustained Ca2+ transient in the muscle layers that is responsible for contraction. PMID:14754999

  17. Is metabolic rate a universal 'pacemaker' for biological processes?

    PubMed

    Glazier, Douglas S

    2015-05-01

    A common, long-held belief is that metabolic rate drives the rates of various biological, ecological and evolutionary processes. Although this metabolic pacemaker view (as assumed by the recent, influential 'metabolic theory of ecology') may be true in at least some situations (e.g. those involving moderate temperature effects or physiological processes closely linked to metabolism, such as heartbeat and breathing rate), it suffers from several major limitations, including: (i) it is supported chiefly by indirect, correlational evidence (e.g. similarities between the body-size and temperature scaling of metabolic rate and that of other biological processes, which are not always observed) - direct, mechanistic or experimental support is scarce and much needed; (ii) it is contradicted by abundant evidence showing that various intrinsic and extrinsic factors (e.g. hormonal action and temperature changes) can dissociate the rates of metabolism, growth, development and other biological processes; (iii) there are many examples where metabolic rate appears to respond to, rather than drive the rates of various other biological processes (e.g. ontogenetic growth, food intake and locomotor activity); (iv) there are additional examples where metabolic rate appears to be unrelated to the rate of a biological process (e.g. ageing, circadian rhythms, and molecular evolution); and (v) the theoretical foundation for the metabolic pacemaker view focuses only on the energetic control of biological processes, while ignoring the importance of informational control, as mediated by various genetic, cellular, and neuroendocrine regulatory systems. I argue that a comprehensive understanding of the pace of life must include how biological activities depend on both energy and information and their environmentally sensitive interaction. This conclusion is supported by extensive evidence showing that hormones and other regulatory factors and signalling systems coordinate the processes of

  18. The Australian history of cardiac pacing: memories from a bygone era.

    PubMed

    Mond, Harry G; Wickham, Geoffrey G; Sloman, J Graeme

    2012-06-01

    Although Dr Albert Hyman in New York is believed to have built the first cardiac pacemaker in 1932, he acknowledges Dr Mark Lidwell in Sydney, Australia as having not only built a pacemaker, but also successfully used it to resuscitate a newborn infant in or before 1929. Fully implantable pacemakers, however, were not possible until 1958, following the development of the silicon transistor. Within three years of that first implant, a pulse generator attached to epicardial leads was implanted at the Royal Melbourne Hospital. About the same time, an engineer in Sydney with intermittent complete heart block who had received epicardial leads and an external pulse generator proposed a simple sensing circuit, leading to the design of the first demand pacing system. By the mid 1960s, physicians were inserting transvenous leads in the right ventricle attached to pulse generators implanted in the anterior abdominal wall. In 1963, an Australian pacemaker company, Telectronics, was founded in Sydney. This innovative company-designed many of the features of transvenous leads and pulse generators we take for granted today. Australia also played a leading role in the design or early evaluation of the lithium power source, lead fixation, steroid elution, automatic anti-tachycardia pacing algorithms and the minute ventilation rate adaptive sensor. This manuscript describes the challenges and frustrations of those pioneers: physicians, surgeons and biomedical engineers. PMID:22033147

  19. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Smedema, J.P.; Zondervan, P.E.; van Hagen, P.; ten Cate, F.J.; Bresser, P.; Doubell, A.F.; Pattynama, P.; Hoogsteden, H.C.; Balk, A.H.M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system granulomatous disorder of unknown aetiology. Symptomatic cardiac involvement occurs in approximately 5% of patients. The prevalence of sarcoidosis in the Netherlands is unknown, but estimated to be approximately 20 per 100,000 population (3200 patients). We report on five patients who presented with different manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis, and give a brief review on the current management of this condition. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be of great help in diagnosing this condition as well as in the follow-up of the response to therapy. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:25696121

  20. Frequency of cardiac arrhythmias in high- and low- yielding dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    Jafari Dehkordi, Afshin; Nasser Mohebi, Abdonnaser; Heidari Soreshjani, Masoumeh

    2014-01-01

    Electrocardiography (ECG) may be used to recognize cardiac disorders. Levels of milk production may change the serum electrolytes which its imbalance has a role in cardiac arrhythmia. Fifty high yielding and fifty low yielding Holstein dairy cows were used in this study. Electrocardiography was recorded by base-apex lead and blood samples were collected from jugular vein for measurement of serum elements such as sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorous, iron and magnesium. Cardiac dysrhythmias were detected more frequent in low yielding Holstein cows (62.00%) compared to high yielding Holstein cows (46.00%). The cardiac dysrhythmias that were observed in low yielding Holstein cows included sinus arrhythmia (34.70%), wandering pacemaker (22.45 %), bradycardia (18.37%), tachycardia (10.20%), atrial premature beat (2.04%), sinoatrial block (2.04%), atrial fibrillation (8.16%) and atrial tachycardia (2.04%). The cardiac dysrhythmias were observed in high yielding Holstein cows including, sinus arrhythmia (86.95%) and wandering pacemaker (13.05%). Also, notched P wave was observed to be 30% and 14% in high- and low- yielding Holstein cows respectively. The serum calcium concentration of low yielding Holstein cows was significantly lower than that of high yielding Holstein cows. There was not any detectable significant difference in other serum elements between high- and low- yielding Holstein cows. Based on the result of present study, could be concluded that low serum concentration of calcium results to more frequent dysrhythmias in low yielding Holstein cows. PMID:25568685

  1. Long-term clinical effects of ventricular pacing reduction with a changeover mode to minimize ventricular pacing in a general pacemaker population

    PubMed Central

    Stockburger, Martin; Boveda, Serge; Moreno, Javier; Da Costa, Antoine; Hatala, Robert; Brachmann, Johannes; Butter, Christian; Garcia Seara, Javier; Rolando, Mara; Defaye, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Aim Right ventricular pacing (VP) has been hypothesized to increase the risk in heart failure (HF) and atrial fibrillation (AF). The ANSWER study evaluated, whether an AAI-DDD changeover mode to minimize VP (SafeR) improves outcome compared with DDD in a general dual-chamber pacemaker population. Methods and results ANSWER was a randomized controlled multicentre trial assessing SafeR vs. standard DDD in sinus node disease (SND) or AV block (AVB) patients. After a 1-month run-in period, they were randomized (1 : 1) and followed for 3 years. Pre-specified co-primary end-points were VP and the composite of hospitalization for HF, AF, or cardioversion. Pre-specified secondary end-points were cardiac death or HF hospitalizations and cardiovascular hospitalizations. ANSWER enrolled 650 patients (52.0% SND, 48% AVB) at 43 European centres and randomized in SafeR (n = 314) or DDD (n = 318). The SafeR mode showed a significant decrease in VP compared with DDD (11.5 vs. 93.6%, P < 0.0001 at 3 years). Deaths and syncope did not differ between randomization arms. No significant difference between groups [HR = 0.78; 95% CI (0.48–1.25); P = 0.30] was found in the time to event of the co-primary composite of hospitalization for HF, AF, or cardioversion, nor in the individual components. SafeR showed a 51% risk reduction (RR) in experiencing cardiac death or HF hospitalization [HR = 0.49; 95% CI (0.27–0.90); P = 0.02] and 30% RR in experiencing cardiovascular hospitalizations [HR = 0.70; 95% CI (0.49–1.00); P = 0.05]. Conclusion SafeR safely and significantly reduced VP in a general pacemaker population though had no effect on hospitalization for HF, AF, or cardioversion, when compared with DDD. PMID:25179761

  2. Information technology implementing globalization on strategies for quality care provided to children submitted to cardiac surgery: International Quality Improvement Collaborative Program - IQIC

    PubMed Central

    Sciarra, Adilia Maria Pires; Croti, Ulisses Alexandre; Batigalia, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Congenital heart diseases are the world's most common major birth defect, affecting one in every 120 children. Ninety percent of these children are born in areas where appropriate medical care is inadequate or unavailable. Objective To share knowledge and experience between an international center of excellence in pediatric cardiac surgery and a related program in Brazil. Methods The strategy used by the program was based on long-term technological and educational support models used in that center, contributing to the creation and implementation of new programs. The Telemedicine platform was used for real-time monthly broadcast of themes. A chat software was used for interaction between participating members and the group from the center of excellence. Results Professionals specialized in care provided to the mentioned population had the opportunity to share to the knowledge conveyed. Conclusion It was possible to observe that the technological resources that implement the globalization of human knowledge were effective in the dissemination and improvement of the team regarding the care provided to children with congenital heart diseases. PMID:24896168

  3. Cardiac Conduction through Engineered Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Stamm, Christof; Hammer, Peter E.; Kwaku, Kevin F.; Marler, Jennifer J.; Friehs, Ingeborg; Jones, Mara; Rader, Christine M.; Roy, Nathalie; Eddy, Mau-Thek; Triedman, John K.; Walsh, Edward P.; McGowan, Francis X.; del Nido, Pedro J.; Cowan, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    In children, interruption of cardiac atrioventricular (AV) electrical conduction can result from congenital defects, surgical interventions, and maternal autoimmune diseases during pregnancy. Complete AV conduction block is typically treated by implanting an electronic pacemaker device, although long-term pacing therapy in pediatric patients has significant complications. As a first step toward developing a substitute treatment, we implanted engineered tissue constructs in rat hearts to create an alternative AV conduction pathway. We found that skeletal muscle-derived cells in the constructs exhibited sustained electrical coupling through persistent expression and function of gap junction proteins. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction analyses, myogenic cells in the constructs were shown to survive in the AV groove of implanted hearts for the duration of the animal’s natural life. Perfusion of hearts with fluorescently labeled lectin demonstrated that implanted tissues became vascularized and immunostaining verified the presence of proteins important in electromechanical integration of myogenic cells with surrounding recipient rat cardiomyocytes. Finally, using optical mapping and electrophysiological analyses, we provide evidence of permanent AV conduction through the implant in one-third of recipient animals. Our experiments provide a proof-of-principle that engineered tissue constructs can function as an electrical conduit and, ultimately, may offer a substitute treatment to conventional pacing therapy. PMID:16816362

  4. Architecture of retinal projections to the central circadian pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Diego Carlos; Chang, Yi-Ting; Hattar, Samer; Chen, Shih-Kuo

    2016-05-24

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) receives direct retinal input from the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) for circadian photoentrainment. Interestingly, the SCN is the only brain region that receives equal inputs from the left and right eyes. Despite morphological assessments showing that axonal fibers originating from ipRGCs cover the entire SCN, physiological evidence suggests that only vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)/gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) cells located ventrally in the SCN receive retinal input. It is still unclear, therefore, which subpopulation of SCN neurons receives synaptic input from the retina and how the SCN receives equal inputs from both eyes. Here, using single ipRGC axonal tracing and a confocal microscopic analysis in mice, we show that ipRGCs have elaborate innervation patterns throughout the entire SCN. Unlike conventional retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that innervate visual targets either ipsilaterally or contralaterally, a single ipRGC can bilaterally innervate the SCN. ipRGCs form synaptic contacts with major peptidergic cells of the SCN, including VIP, GRP, and arginine vasopressin (AVP) neurons, with each ipRGC innervating specific subdomains of the SCN. Furthermore, a single SCN-projecting ipRGC can send collateral inputs to many other brain regions. However, the size and complexity of the axonal arborizations in non-SCN regions are less elaborate than those in the SCN. Our results provide a better understanding of how retinal neurons connect to the central circadian pacemaker to synchronize endogenous circadian clocks with the solar day. PMID:27162356

  5. Anticoagulation Management in Patients with Pacemaker-Detected Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Poposka, Lidija; Boskov, Vladimir; Risteski, Dejan; Taleski, Jane; Georgievska-Ismail, Ljubica

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In patients with an implanted pacemaker, asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with an increased risk of thrombo-embolic complications. There is still no consensus which duration of episodes of atrial fibrillation should be taken as an indicator for inclusion of oral anticoagulation therapy (OAC). MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 104 patients who had no AF episodes in the past and have an indication for permanent pacing were included in the study. RESULTS: During an average follow-up of 18 months, 33 of the patients developed episodes of AF. Inclusion of OAC was performed in 17 patients, in whom AF was recorded, although in all patients CHA2DS2-VASc score was ≥ 1. The inclusion of OAC showed a statistically significant correlation with increasing duration of episodes of AF (r = 0.502, p = 0.003). During the follow-up period none of the patients developed thrombo-embolic complication. CONCLUSION: Considering that our group of patients had no thrombo-embolic events, we could conclude that dividing the AF episodes in less than 1% in 24 hours and longer than 1% within 24 hours could be an indicator for decision-making to include OAK if the CHA2DS2-VASc score is ≥ 1. PMID:27335594

  6. Piezoelectric energy harvesting from heartbeat vibrations for leadless pacemakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, M. H.; Karami, M. Amin

    2015-12-01

    This paper studies energy harvesting from heartbeat vibrations using fan-folded piezoelectric beams. The generated energy from the heartbeat can be used to power a leadless pacemaker. In order to utilize the available 3 dimensional space to the energy harvester, we chose the fan-folded design. The proposed device consists of several piezoelectric beams stacked on top of each other. The size for this energy harvester is 2 cm by 0.5 cm by 1 cm, which makes the natural frequency very high. High natural frequency is one major concern about the micro-scaled energy harvesters. By utilizing the fan-folded geometry and adding tip mass and link mass to the configuration, this natural frequency is reduced to the desired range. This fan-folded design makes it possible to generate more than 10 μW of power. The proposed device does not incorporate magnets and is thus Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatible. Although our device is a linear energy harvester, it is shown that the device is relatively insensitive to the heartrate. The natural frequencies and the mode shapes of the device are calculated. An analytical solution is presented and the method is verified by experimental investigation. We use a closed loop shaker controller and a shaker to simulate the heartbeat vibrations. The developed analytical model is verified through comparison of theoretical and experimental tip displacement and acceleration frequency response functions.

  7. Stress Management Training May Help Cardiac Rehab Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157876.html Stress Management Training May Help Cardiac Rehab Patients When added ... March 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of stress management training can make cardiac rehabilitation programs more effective, ...

  8. Ionic Mechanisms of Pacemaker Activity in Spontaneously-contracting Atrial HL-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhenjiang; Murray, Katherine T.

    2010-01-01

    Although normally absent, spontaneous pacemaker activity can develop in human atrium to promote tachyarrhythmias. HL-1 cells are immortalized atrial cardiomyocytes that contract spontaneously in culture, providing a model system of atrial cell automaticity. Using electrophysiologic recordings and selective pharmacologic blockers, we investigated the ionic basis of automaticity in atrial HL-1 cells. Both the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca++ release channel inhibitor ryanodine and the SR Ca++ ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin slowed automaticity, supporting a role for intracellular Ca++ release in pacemaker activity. Additional experiments were performed to examine the effects of ionic currents activating in the voltage range of diastolic depolarization. Inhibition of the hyperpolarization-activated pacemaker current, If, by ivabradine significantly suppressed diastolic depolarization, with modest slowing of automaticity. Block of inward Na+ currents also reduced automaticity, while inhibition of T- and L-type Ca++ currents caused milder effects to slow beat rate. The major outward current in HL-1 cells is the rapidly activating delayed rectifier, IKr. Inhibition of IKr using dofetilide caused marked prolongation of APD and thus spontaneous cycle length. These results demonstrate a mutual role for both intracellular Ca++ release and sarcolemmal ionic currents in controlling automaticity in atrial HL-1 cells. Given that similar internal and membrane-based mechanisms also play a role in sinoatrial nodal cell pacemaker activity, our findings provide evidence for generalized conservation of pacemaker mechanisms among different types of cardiomyocytes. PMID:20881602

  9. The six-minute walk--an adequate exercise test for pacemaker patients?

    PubMed

    Langenfeld, H; Schneider, B; Grimm, W; Beer, M; Knoche, M; Riegger, G; Kochsiek, K

    1990-12-01

    In many pacemaker patients bicycle and treadmill ergometry are not practicable. As an alternative, we performed a 6-minute walk on a 20-m corridor in 97 pacemaker patients, who were asked to walk as far as possible determining their speed by themselves. Results were compared with those of bicycle ergometry in 42 of these patients and with treadmill exercise of a group of 92 other pacemaker patients. In the 6-minute walk, performance and maximal heart rate were slightly lower (49 +/- 18 W; 96 +/- 23 beats/min) than in bicycle (57 +/- 16 W; 110 +/- 26 beats/min) and treadmill ergometry (50 +/- 37 W; 102 +/- 35 beats/min). A good correlation was found between walking and bicycling (r = 0.74) and in subgroups of patients with different pacemaker indications. All patients preferred the walk to bicycle ergometry considering it to be more related to daily physical activity. In conclusion, a 6-minute walk is a simple and physiological exercise test for nearly all pacemaker patients with good correlation to other types of exercise. It seems to be preferable to other tests because of its better acceptance and practicability. PMID:1704537

  10. Ionic mechanisms of pacemaker activity in spontaneously contracting atrial HL-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenjiang; Murray, Katherine T

    2011-01-01

    Although normally absent, spontaneous pacemaker activity can develop in human atrium to promote tachyarrhythmias. HL-1 cells are immortalized atrial cardiomyocytes that contract spontaneously in culture, providing a model system of atrial cell automaticity. Using electrophysiologic recordings and selective pharmacologic blockers, we investigated the ionic basis of automaticity in atrial HL-1 cells. Both the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca release channel inhibitor ryanodine and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin slowed automaticity, supporting a role for intracellular Ca release in pacemaker activity. Additional experiments were performed to examine the effects of ionic currents activating in the voltage range of diastolic depolarization. Inhibition of the hyperpolarization-activated pacemaker current, If, by ivabradine significantly suppressed diastolic depolarization, with modest slowing of automaticity. Block of inward Na currents also reduced automaticity, whereas inhibition of T- and L-type Ca currents caused milder effects to slow beat rate. The major outward current in HL-1 cells is the rapidly activating delayed rectifier, IKr. Inhibition of IKr using dofetilide caused marked prolongation of action potential duration and thus spontaneous cycle length. These results demonstrate a mutual role for both intracellular Ca release and sarcolemmal ionic currents in controlling automaticity in atrial HL-1 cells. Given that similar internal and membrane-based mechanisms also play a role in sinoatrial nodal cell pacemaker activity, our findings provide evidence for generalized conservation of pacemaker mechanisms among different types of cardiomyocytes. PMID:20881602

  11. Modeling and experimental verification of a fan-folded vibration energy harvester for leadless pacemakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, M. H.; Karami, M. Amin

    2016-03-01

    This paper studies energy harvesting from heartbeat vibrations for powering leadless pacemakers. Unlike traditional pacemakers, leadless pacemakers are implanted inside the heart and the pacemaker is in direct contact with the myocardium. A leadless pacemaker is in the shape of a cylinder. Thus, in order to utilize the available 3-dimensional space for the energy harvester, we choose a fan-folded 3D energy harvester. The proposed device consists of several piezoelectric beams stacked on top of each other. The volume of the energy harvester is 1 cm3 and its dimensions are 2 cm × 0.5 cm × 1 cm. Although high natural frequency is generally a major concern with micro-scale energy harvesters, by utilizing the fan-folded geometry and adding tip mass and link mass to the configuration, we reduced the natural frequency to the desired range. This fan-folded design makes it possible to generate more than 10 μ W of power per cubic centimeter. The proposed device is compatible with Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Although the proposed device is a linear energy harvester, it is relatively insensitive to the heart rate. The natural frequencies and the mode shapes of the device are calculated analytically. The accuracy of the analytical model is verified by experimental investigations. We use a closed loop shaker system to precisely replicate heartbeat vibrations in vitro.

  12. Conducting the embryonic heart: orchestrating development of specialized cardiac tissues.

    PubMed

    Gourdie, R G; Kubalak, S; Mikawa, T

    1999-01-01

    The heterogeneous tissues of the pacemaking and conduction system comprise the "smart components" of the heart, responsible for setting, maintaining, and coordinating the rhythmic pumping of cardiac muscle. Over the last few years, a wealth of new information has been collected about the unique genetic and phenotypic characteristics expressed by these tissues during cardiac morphogenesis. More recently, genetically modified viruses, mutational analysis, and targeted transgenesis have enabled even more precise resolution of the relationships between cell fate, gene expression, and differentiation of specialized function within developing myocardium. While some information provided by these newer approaches has supported conventional wisdom, some fresh and unexpected perspectives have also emerged. In particular, there is mounting evidence that extracardiac populations of cells migrating into the tubular heart have important morphogenetic roles in the inductive pattering and functional integration of the developing conduction system. PMID:10189963

  13. The evolution of the cardiac implantable electronic device connector.

    PubMed

    Mond, Harry G; Helland, John R; Fischer, Avi

    2013-11-01

    Cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) play a vital role in the management of cardiac rhythm disturbances. The devices are comprised of two primary components: a generator and lead joined by a connector. Original pacemaker lead connectors were created de novo at the time of implantation or replacement and were very unreliable. With the development of new lead designs, creation of a standard connector configuration, the IS-1 connector became mandatory. Similar connector development also occurred with the advent of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), resulting in creation of the high voltage standard: the DF-1 connector. Differing from a pacemaker lead, the ICD lead connector requires one IS-1 connector and one or two DF-1 connectors, resulting in a large cumbersome lead connector and generator header block. Recently, a revolutionary quad pole single plug connector standard has been approved for market release. These are the single-pin DF4 and IS4 lead connectors that carry low- and high-voltage poles or all low-voltage poles, respectively. These connectors, together with new labeling guidelines, have simplified operative procedures and reduced errors, when mating lead connectors into the generator's connector block. PMID:23808816

  14. Complications of Cardiac Perforation and Lead Dislodgement with an MRI-Conditional Pacing Lead: a Korean Multi-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Chang Hee; Choi, Jin Hee; Kim, Jun; Jo, Uk; Lee, Ji Hyun; Lee, Woo Seok; Kim, Yoo Ri; Lee, Soo Yong; Whang, Ki Won; Yang, Jihyun; Kim, Sung Hwan; Oh, Yong Seog; Park, Kyoung Min; Nam, Gi Byoung; Choi, Kee Joon; Kim, You Ho

    2016-09-01

    Medtronic CapSureFix MRI 5086 pacing lead (5086; Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA) has been reported to be associated with increased cardiac perforation and lead dislodgement. This study aimed to compare the incidence of cardiac perforation and lead dislodgement within 30 days after pacemaker implantation between 5086 MRI lead and previous Medtronic CapSureFix Novus 5076 non-MRI pacing lead. This was a nationwide, multicenter retrospective study in which we compared the incidence of adverse events between 277 patients implanted with 5086 lead and 205 patients implanted with 5076 lead between March 2009 and September 2014. Cardiac perforation within 30 days of pacemaker implantation occurred in 4 patients (1.4%) with the 5086 lead and in no patient with the 5076 lead (P = 0.084). Lead dislodgement occurred in 8 patients (2.9%) with the 5086 lead and in 5 patients (2.4%) with the 5076 lead (P = 0.764). On multivariate logistic regression analysis, age was significantly associated with cardiac perforation. Congestive heart failure and implantation of right atrial (RA) lead at RA free wall or septum were significant factors for the incidence of lead dislodgement and lead revision. The incidence of cardiac perforation and lead dislodgement were not statistically different between the patients with 5086 lead and the patients with 5076 lead. However, careful attention for cardiac perforation may be needed when using the 5086 MRI lead, especially in elderly patients. PMID:27510382

  15. Revisiting the reticulum: feedforward and feedback contributions to motor program parameters in the crab cardiac ganglion microcircuit.

    PubMed

    García-Crescioni, Keyla; Miller, Mark W

    2011-10-01

    The neurogenic heartbeat of crustaceans is controlled by the cardiac ganglion (CG), a central pattern generator (CPG) microcircuit composed of nine neurons. In most decapods, five "large" motor neurons (MNs) project from the CG to the myocardium, where their excitatory synaptic signals generate the rhythmic heartbeat. The processes of four "small" premotor neurons (PMNs) are confined to the CG, where they provide excitatory drive to the MNs via impulse-mediated chemical signals and electrotonic coupling. This study explored feedforward and feedback interactions between the PMNs and the MNs in the CG of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus). Three methods were used to compare the activity of the MNs and the PMNs in the integrated CG to their autonomous firing patterns: 1) ligatures were tightened on the ganglion trunk that connects the PMNs and MNs; 2) TTX was applied focally to suppress selectively PMN or MN activity; and 3) sucrose pools were devised to block reversibly PMN or MN impulse conduction. With all treatments, the PMNs and MNs continued to produce autonomous rhythmic bursting following disengagement. Removal of PMN influence resulted in a significantly reduced MN duty cycle that was mainly attributable to a lower autonomous burst frequency. Conversely, after removal of MN feedback, the PMN duty cycle was increased, primarily due to a prolonged burst duration. Application of sucrose to block impulse conduction without eliminating PMN oscillations disclosed significant contributions of spike-mediated PMN-to-MN signals to the initiation and prolongation of the MN burst. Together, these observations support a view of the Callinectes CG composed of two classes of spontaneously bursting neurons with distinct endogenous rhythms. Compartmentalized feedforward and feedback signaling endow this microcircuit with syncytial properties such that the intrinsic attributes of the PMNs and MNs both contribute to shaping all parameters of the motor patterns transmitted to

  16. Electrophysiological Evidence for Intrinsic Pacemaker Currents in Crayfish Parasol Cells.

    PubMed

    Mellon, DeForest

    2016-01-01

    I used sharp intracellular electrodes to record from parasol cells in the semi-isolated crayfish brain to investigate pacemaker currents. Evidence for the presence of the hyperpolarization-activated inward rectifier potassium current was obtained in about half of the parasol cells examined, where strong, prolonged hyperpolarizing currents generated a slowly-rising voltage sag, and a post-hyperpolarization rebound. The amplitudes of both the sag voltage and the depolarizing rebound were dependent upon the strength of the hyperpolarizing current. The voltage sag showed a definite threshold and was non-inactivating. The voltage sag and rebound depolarization evoked by hyperpolarization were blocked by the presence of 5-10 mM Cs2+ ions, 10 mM tetraethyl ammonium chloride, and 10 mM cobalt chloride in the bathing medium, but not by the drug ZD 7288. Cs+ ions in normal saline in some cells caused a slight increase in mean resting potential and a reduction in spontaneous burst frequency. Many of the neurons expressing the hyperpolarization-activated inward potassium current also provided evidence for the presence of the transient potassium current IA, which was inferred from experimental observations of an increased latency of post-hyperpolarization response to a depolarizing step, compared to the response latency to the depolarization alone. The latency increase was reduced in the presence of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), a specific blocker of IA. The presence of 4-AP in normal saline also induced spontaneous bursting in parasol cells. It is conjectured that, under normal physiological conditions, these two potassium currents help to regulate burst generation in parasol cells, respectively, by helping to maintain the resting membrane potential near a threshold level for burst generation, and by regulating the rate of rise of membrane depolarizing events leading to burst generation. The presence of post-burst hyperpolarization may depend upon IA channels in parasol cells. PMID

  17. Setups for in vitro assessment of RFID interference on pacemakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattei, E.; Censi, F.; Delogu, A.; Ferrara, A.; Calcagnini, G.

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study is to propose setups for in vitro assessment of RFID (radiofrequency identification) interference on pacemakers (PM). The voltage induced at the input stage of the PM by low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) RFID transmitters has been used to quantify the amount of the interference. A commercial PM was modified in order to measure the voltage at its input stage when exposed to a sinusoidal signal at 125 kHz and 13.56 MHz. At both frequencies, two antennas with different dimensions (diameter = 10 cm and 30 cm, respectively) were used to generate the interfering field, and the induced voltage was measured between the lead tip and the PM case (unipolar voltage), and between the tip and ring electrodes (bipolar voltage). The typical lead configurations adopted in similar studies or proposed by international standards, as well as lead paths closer to actual physiological implants were tested. At 125 kHz, the worst-case condition differs for the two antennas: the 10 cm antenna induced the highest voltage in the two-loop spiral configuration, whereas the 30 cm antenna in the 225 cm2 loop configuration. At 13.56 MHz, the highest voltage was observed for both the antennas in the 225 cm2 loop configuration. Bipolar voltages were found to be lower than the unipolar voltages induced in the same configurations, this difference being not as high as one could expect from theoretical considerations. The worst-case scenario, in terms of the induced voltage at the PM input stage, has been identified both for LF and HF readers, and for two sizes of transmitting antennas. These findings may provide the basis for the definition of a standard implant configuration and a lead path to test the EMI effects of LF and HF RFID transmitters on active implantable devices.

  18. Electrophysiological Evidence for Intrinsic Pacemaker Currents in Crayfish Parasol Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, DeForest

    2016-01-01

    I used sharp intracellular electrodes to record from parasol cells in the semi-isolated crayfish brain to investigate pacemaker currents. Evidence for the presence of the hyperpolarization-activated inward rectifier potassium current was obtained in about half of the parasol cells examined, where strong, prolonged hyperpolarizing currents generated a slowly-rising voltage sag, and a post-hyperpolarization rebound. The amplitudes of both the sag voltage and the depolarizing rebound were dependent upon the strength of the hyperpolarizing current. The voltage sag showed a definite threshold and was non-inactivating. The voltage sag and rebound depolarization evoked by hyperpolarization were blocked by the presence of 5–10 mM Cs2+ ions, 10 mM tetraethyl ammonium chloride, and 10 mM cobalt chloride in the bathing medium, but not by the drug ZD 7288. Cs+ ions in normal saline in some cells caused a slight increase in mean resting potential and a reduction in spontaneous burst frequency. Many of the neurons expressing the hyperpolarization-activated inward potassium current also provided evidence for the presence of the transient potassium current IA, which was inferred from experimental observations of an increased latency of post-hyperpolarization response to a depolarizing step, compared to the response latency to the depolarization alone. The latency increase was reduced in the presence of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), a specific blocker of IA. The presence of 4-AP in normal saline also induced spontaneous bursting in parasol cells. It is conjectured that, under normal physiological conditions, these two potassium currents help to regulate burst generation in parasol cells, respectively, by helping to maintain the resting membrane potential near a threshold level for burst generation, and by regulating the rate of rise of membrane depolarizing events leading to burst generation. The presence of post-burst hyperpolarization may depend upon IA channels in parasol cells

  19. Right ventricle bipolar pacing may prevent appropriate biventricular pacing from two pacemakers. Case report.

    PubMed

    Kranidis, Athanasios I; Andrikopoulos, George K; Kappos, Kostas G; Bouki, Tania P; Dedehlias, Panos N

    2004-10-01

    This article reports on practical problems and possible solutions that may occur in case of upgrading a dual-chamber pacemaker by implanting a second left ventricular ventricular pacing, ventricular sensing, ventricular triggering (VVT) pacemaker. This therapeutic strategy was considered appropriate in the case of a 73-year-old patient with severe heart failure, who was scheduled to undergo coronary artery bypass surgery. A right-sided, dual-chamber pacemaker had been already implanted to the patient. The duration of the paced QRS complex was 220 ms and inter- and intraventricular dyssynchrony was documented in the echocardiographic study. We describe the methodological problems and possible solutions related to biventricular pacing following the abovementioned strategy. PMID:15484162

  20. Superior vena cava occlusion and/or syndrome related to pacemaker leads.

    PubMed

    Mazzetti, H; Dussaut, A; Tentori, C; Dussaut, E; Lazzari, J O

    1993-03-01

    Four cases of pacemaker-related SVC obstruction or syndrome are reported. While two of them lacked any symptom suggestive of SVC obstruction, the other two presented with mild symptoms. None of them received any treatment. One died from a cause unrelated to SVC obstruction, while the others presented no change in their clinical status. A review of the literature suggests that neither thrombotic nor fibrotic obstruction in patients with pacemaker leads is strictly related to the number of abandoned leads, the presence of severed leads, or the time elapsing from pacemaker implant. The diagnosis is clinically made and is confirmed by venography. Only one of the reported deaths is attributable to SVC obstruction. The remaining cases from the literature responded to treatment with heparin, thrombolytic agents, angioplasty, or surgery. PMID:8438712

  1. In search of the pathways for light-induced pacemaker resetting in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Johanna H; Schwartz, William J

    2003-06-01

    Within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the mammalian hypothalamus is a circadian pacemaker that functions as a clock. Its endogenous period is adjusted to the external 24-h light-dark cycle, primarily by light-induced phase shifts that reset the pacemaker's oscillation. Evidence using a wide variety of neurobiological and molecular genetic tools has elucidated key elements that comprise the visual input pathway for SCN photoentrainment in rodents. Important questions remain regarding the intracellular signals that reset the autoregulatory molecular loop within photoresponsive cells in the SCN's retino-recipient subdivision, as well as the intercellular coupling mechanisms that enable SCN tissue to generate phase shifts of overt behavioral and physiological circadian rhythms such as locomotion and SCN neuronal firing rate. Multiple neurotransmitters, protein kinases, and photoinducible genes add to system complexity, and we still do not fully understand how dawn and dusk light pulses ultimately produce bidirectional, advancing and delaying phase shifts for pacemaker entrainment. PMID:12828281

  2. Cardiac optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetics is an emerging technology for optical interrogation and control of biological function with high specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. Mammalian cells and tissues can be sensitized to respond to light by a relatively simple and well-tolerated genetic modification using microbial opsins (light-gated ion channels and pumps). These can achieve fast and specific excitatory or inhibitory response, offering distinct advantages over traditional pharmacological or electrical means of perturbation. Since the first demonstrations of utility in mammalian cells (neurons) in 2005, optogenetics has spurred immense research activity and has inspired numerous applications for dissection of neural circuitry and understanding of brain function in health and disease, applications ranging from in vitro to work in behaving animals. Only recently (since 2010), the field has extended to cardiac applications with less than a dozen publications to date. In consideration of the early phase of work on cardiac optogenetics and the impact of the technique in understanding another excitable tissue, the brain, this review is largely a perspective of possibilities in the heart. It covers the basic principles of operation of light-sensitive ion channels and pumps, the available tools and ongoing efforts in optimizing them, overview of neuroscience use, as well as cardiac-specific questions of implementation and ideas for best use of this emerging technology in the heart. PMID:23457014

  3. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  4. Effects of lubiprostone on pacemaker activity of interstitial cells of cajal from the mouse colon.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Han-Yi; Kim, Dong Hyun; Ki, Jung Suk; Ryu, Kwon Ho; Choi, Seok; Jun, Jae Yeoul

    2014-08-01

    Lubiprostone is a chloride (Cl(-)) channel activator derived from prostaglandin E1 and used for managing constipation. In addition, lubiprostone affects the activity of gastrointestinal smooth muscles. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are pacemaker cells that generate slow-wave activity in smooth muscles. We studied the effects of lubiprostone on the pacemaker potentials of colonic ICCs. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to determine the pacemaker activity in cultured colonic ICCs obtained from mice. Lubiprostone hyperpolarized the membrane and inhibited the generation of pacemaker potentials. Prostanoid EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4 antagonists (SC-19220, PF-04418948, 6-methoxypyridine-2-boronc acid N-phenyldiethanolamine ester, and GW627368, respectively) did not block the response to lubiprostone. L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase) and 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3,-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase) did not block the response to lubiprostone. In addition, tetraethylammonium (TEA, a voltage-dependent potassium [K(+)] channel blocker) and apamin (a calcium [Ca(2+)]-dependent K(+) channel blocker) did not block the response to lubiprostone. However, glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive K(+) channel blocker) blocked the response to lubiprostone. Similar to lubiprostone, pinacidil (an opener of ATP-sensitive K(+) channel) hyperpolarized the membrane and inhibited the generation of pacemaker potentials, and these effects were inhibited by glibenclamide. These results suggest that lubiprostone can modulate the pacemaker potentials of colonic ICCs via activation of ATP-sensitive K(+) channel through a prostanoid EP receptor-independent mechanism. PMID:25177167

  5. Autaptic pacemaker mediated propagation of weak rhythmic activity across small-world neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Ergin; Baysal, Veli; Ozer, Mahmut; Perc, Matjaž

    2016-02-01

    We study the effects of an autapse, which is mathematically described as a self-feedback loop, on the propagation of weak, localized pacemaker activity across a Newman-Watts small-world network consisting of stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neurons. We consider that only the pacemaker neuron, which is stimulated by a subthreshold periodic signal, has an electrical autapse that is characterized by a coupling strength and a delay time. We focus on the impact of the coupling strength, the network structure, the properties of the weak periodic stimulus, and the properties of the autapse on the transmission of localized pacemaker activity. Obtained results indicate the existence of optimal channel noise intensity for the propagation of the localized rhythm. Under optimal conditions, the autapse can significantly improve the propagation of pacemaker activity, but only for a specific range of the autaptic coupling strength. Moreover, the autaptic delay time has to be equal to the intrinsic oscillation period of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron or its integer multiples. We analyze the inter-spike interval histogram and show that the autapse enhances or suppresses the propagation of the localized rhythm by increasing or decreasing the phase locking between the spiking of the pacemaker neuron and the weak periodic signal. In particular, when the autaptic delay time is equal to the intrinsic period of oscillations an optimal phase locking takes place, resulting in a dominant time scale of the spiking activity. We also investigate the effects of the network structure and the coupling strength on the propagation of pacemaker activity. We find that there exist an optimal coupling strength and an optimal network structure that together warrant an optimal propagation of the localized rhythm.

  6. Optogenetics-enabled assessment of viral gene and cell therapy for restoration of cardiac excitability

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, Christina M.; Boyle, Patrick M.; Chen, Kay; Trayanova, Natalia A.; Entcheva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    Multiple cardiac pathologies are accompanied by loss of tissue excitability, which leads to a range of heart rhythm disorders (arrhythmias). In addition to electronic device therapy (i.e. implantable pacemakers and cardioverter/defibrillators), biological approaches have recently been explored to restore pacemaking ability and to correct conduction slowing in the heart by delivering excitatory ion channels or ion channel agonists. Using optogenetics as a tool to selectively interrogate only cells transduced to produce an exogenous excitatory ion current, we experimentally and computationally quantify the efficiency of such biological approaches in rescuing cardiac excitability as a function of the mode of application (viral gene delivery or cell delivery) and the geometry of the transduced region (focal or spatially-distributed). We demonstrate that for each configuration (delivery mode and spatial pattern), the optical energy needed to excite can be used to predict therapeutic efficiency of excitability restoration. Taken directly, these results can help guide optogenetic interventions for light-based control of cardiac excitation. More generally, our findings can help optimize gene therapy for restoration of cardiac excitability. PMID:26621212

  7. Circadian clock and cardiac vulnerability: A time stamp on multi-scale neuroautonomic regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2005-03-01

    Cardiovascular vulnerability displays a 24-hour pattern with a peak between 9AM and 11AM. This daily pattern in cardiac risk is traditionally attributed to external factors including activity levels and sleep-wake cycles. However,influences from the endogenous circadian pacemaker independent from behaviors may also affect cardiac control. We investigate heartbeat dynamics in healthy subjects recorded throughout a 10-day protocol wherein the sleep/wake and behavior cycles are desynchronized from the endogenous circadian cycle,enabling assessment of circadian factors while controlling for behavior-related factors. We demonstrate that the scaling exponent characterizing temporal correlations in heartbeat dynamics over multiple time scales does exhibit a significant circadian rhythm with a sharp peak at the circadian phase corresponding to the period 9-11AM, and that this rhythm is independent from scheduled behaviors and mean heart rate. Our findings of strong circadian rhythms in the multi-scale heartbeat dynamics of healthy young subjects indicate that the underlying mechanism of cardiac regulation is strongly influenced by the endogenous circadian pacemaker. A similar circadian effect in vulnerable individuals with underlying cardiovascular disease would contribute to the morning peak of adverse cardiac events observed in epidemiological studies.

  8. Treatment of paroxysmal nodal tachycardia by dual demand pacemaker in the coronary sinus.

    PubMed Central

    O'Keeffe, D B; Curry, P V; Sowton, E

    1981-01-01

    A patient with refractory paroxysmal atrioventricular nodal re-entrant tachycardia had required direct current cardioversion to terminate attacks on 83 occasions. A dual demand pacemaker was implanted to sense and interrupt attacks of tachycardia automatically. The pacing electrode was positioned in the proximal coronary sinus near to the atrioventricular node; a site from which fixed rate underdrive pacing successfully interrupted attacks throughout a trial period of one week, with a lead left in this position on a temporary basis. Complete control of the arrhythmia was obtained in the six months after pacemaker implantation. Images PMID:7459160

  9. Electromagnetic interference with a bipolar pacemaker by an induction heating (IH) rice cooker.

    PubMed

    Nagatomo, Toshihisa; Abe, Haruhiko; Kohno, Ritsuko; Toyoshima, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Hiroshi; Kondo, Shoichi; Kabashima, Narutoshi; Takeuchi, Masaaki; Tamura, Masahito; Okazaki, Masahiro; Otsuji, Yutaka

    2009-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields may interfere with normal pacemaker function. Despite new device designs and bipolar leads, electromagnetic interference (EMI) remains a concern when pacemaker recipients are exposed to various household appliances. We report the observation of EMI by an induction heating (IH) rice cooker in a patient with sick sinus syndrome who was the recipient of a bipolar dual chamber-pacing system. Stored electrograms revealed episodes of inappropriate ventricular pacing, all coinciding with the opening of an IH rice cooker. Recipients of implantable medical devices must be warned to handle IH rice cookers with caution. PMID:19246854

  10. Myopotential inhibition of a bipolar pacemaker caused by electrode insulation defect.

    PubMed Central

    Amikam, S; Peleg, H; Lemer, J; Riss, E

    1977-01-01

    A patient is described in whom myopotentials orginating from the anterior abdominal wall muscle suppressed the implanted demand pacemaker despite its bipolar mode of action. This phenomenon was shown by simultaneous recording of the electrocardiogram the electromyogram. At operation, a defect in the insulation of a previously repaired epicardial electrode was found lying in close proximity to these muscles. After repair of the insulation defect, normal pacemaker function was restored. It is suggested that the myopotentials leaked into the pacing system through the insulation defect, thereby suppressing the demand unit, which maintained its bipolar mode of pacing throughout. Images PMID:145229

  11. Percutaneous permanent pacemaker implantation via the azygous vein in a patient with superior vena cava occlusion.

    PubMed

    Kamdar, Ravindu Hasmukh; Schilling, Richard John

    2008-03-01

    Occlusion of the superior vena cava (SVCO) makes implantation of permanent pacemakers challenging and difficult. We describe an extended application of a Medtronic Attain (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA) guide catheter (a tool designed for delivery of left ventricular pacing leads into the coronary sinus) for delivery of a right ventricular pacing lead via the azygous vein in a 72-year-old woman with SVCO secondary to long-term central venous hemodialysis catheters. This approach allowed the use of an endocardial pacing lead, implantation under local anesthesia, and conventional positioning of the pacemaker generator in the pectoral region in a patient with SVCO. PMID:18307638

  12. Tracking preference as unusual trigger of pacemaker-mediated tachycardia in a resynchronization device.

    PubMed

    Crea, Pasquale; Picciolo, Giuseppe; Luzza, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old woman with a history of congestive heart failure, who previously received a biventricular cardioverter-defibrillator was admitted with dyspnea and peripheral edema. She was noted on telemetry to have multiple self-terminated episodes of rapid ventricular pacing, consistent with pacemaker-mediated tachycardia. All episodes started after three consecutive ventricular extrasystoles. "Tracking preference" algorithm, designed to maintain atrial-tracked biventricular pacing in CRT devices, resulted turned on. It affected minimum PVARP and resulted the trigger for pacemaker mediated tachycardia. PMID:26976512

  13. Usefulness of the 12-lead electrocardiogram in the follow-up of patients with cardiac resynchronization devices. Part II.

    PubMed

    Barold, S Serge; Herweg, Bengt

    2011-01-01

    The interval from the pacemaker stimulus to the onset of the earliest paced QRS complex (latency) may be prolonged during left ventricular (LV) pacing. Marked latency is more common with LV than right ventricular (RV) pacing because of indirect stimulation through a coronary vein and higher incidence of LV pathology including scars. During simultaneous biventricular (BiV) pacing a prolonged latency interval may give rise to an ECG dominated by the pattern of RV pacing with a left bundle branch block configuration and commonly a QS complex in lead V1. With marked latency programming the V-V interval (LV before RV) often restore the dominant R wave in lead V1 representing the visible contribution of the LV to overall myocardial depolarization. When faced with a negative QRS complex in lead V1 during simultaneous BiV pacing especially in setting of a relatively short PR interval, the most likely diagnosis is ventricular fusion with the intrinsic rhythm. Fusion may cause misinterpretation of the ECG because narrowing of the paced QRS complex simulates appropriate BiV capture. The diagnosis of fusion depends on temporary reprogramming a very short atrio-ventricular delay or an asynchronous BiV pacing mode. Sequential programming of various interventricular (V-V) delays may bring out a diagnostic dominant QRS complex in lead V1 that was previously negative with simultaneous LV and RV apical pacing even in the absence of an obvious latency problem. The emergence of a dominant R wave by V-V programming strongly indicates that the LV lead captures the LV from the posterior or the posterolateral coronary vein and therefore rules out pacing from the middle or anterior coronary vein. In some cardiac resynchronization systems LV pacing is achieved with the tip electrode of the LV lead as the cathode and the proximal electrode of the bipolar RV as the anode. This arrangement creates a common anode for both RV and LV pacing. RV anodal capture can occur at a high LV output during

  14. Bortezomib-Induced Complete Heart Block and Myocardial Scar: The Potential Role of Cardiac Biomarkers in Monitoring Cardiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Diwadkar, Sachin; Patel, Aarti A.; Fradley, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Bortezomib is a proteasome inhibitor used to treat multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. Traditionally, bortezomib was thought to have little cardiovascular toxicity; however, there is increasing evidence that bortezomib can lead to cardiac complications including left ventricular dysfunction and atrioventricular block. We present the case of a 66-year-old man with multiple myeloma and persistent asymptomatic elevations of cardiac biomarkers who developed complete heart block and evidence of myocardial scar after his eighth cycle of bortezomib, requiring permanent pacemaker placement. In addition to discussing the cardiovascular complications of bortezomib therapy, we propose a potential role for biomarkers in the prediction and monitoring of bortezomib cardiotoxicity. PMID:26942019

  15. Surgical Treatment of a Catheter-Induced Iatrogenic Dissection of the Right Coronary Artery following Cardiac Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Artemiou, Panagiotis; Lukacin, Stefan; Kirsch, Peter; Ignac, Jan; Bily, Boris; Tohatyova, Alzbeta; Bilecova-Rabajdova, Miroslava; Sabol, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic dissections of the ascending aorta are an uncommon and severe complication during cardiac catheterization. A 68-year-old female patient underwent diagnostic cardiac catheterization due to non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction. During the procedure, a catheter-induced 360° Class I dissection of the right coronary artery occurred. The patient developed severe bradycardia, which was treated with a temporary pacemaker. She underwent an emergency operation with ligation and a saphenous vein graft in the right coronary artery. The postoperative course was uneventful; and on postoperative day 6, she was discharged home. PMID:27403187

  16. Recent advances in cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Steffel, Jan; Holzmeister, Johannes; Abraham, William T

    2011-03-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an integral component of modern heart failure therapy for patients with severe symptoms (New York Heart Association [NYHA] class III or IV), a reduced ejection fraction (≤ 35%), and a wide QRS complex (> 120 ms). Results from recent trials have provided ample evidence that CRT may also reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with mildly symptomatic heart failure (NYHA class II). As a result, the 2010 European guidelines now recommend CRT for this patient population (level of evidence I, class A). This review summarizes and critically evaluates the landmark Resynchronization Reverses Remodeling in Systolic Left Ventricular Dysfunction (REVERSE), Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial with Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (MADIT-CRT), and Resynchronization/Defibrillation for Ambulatory Heart Failure Trial (RAFT) studies, which comprise the suite of randomized controlled trials available today on this matter. Furthermore, we discuss the rationale and available evidence for other emerging indications for CRT, including its use in patients with a mildly reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (> 35%), in those with a narrow QRS complex (≤ 130 ms), or in patients with concomitant bradyarrhythmic pacemaker indications. PMID:21474889

  17. Underdiagnosis of Conditions Associated with Sudden Cardiac Death in Children - Is it the Absence of a Comprehensive Screening Program or a True Low Prevalence?

    PubMed Central

    Takiguchi, Marisa; Knight, Tristan; Nguyen, Tin Toan; Limm, Blair; Hayes, Donald; Reddy, Venu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the prevalence of conditions associated with sudden cardiac death (SCD) among all children and children with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in the State of Hawai‘i, where no comprehensive screening program is conducted for such conditions. A retrospective chart review was conducted from the single tertiary pediatric hospital in Hawai‘i, from offices of all pediatric cardiologists in Hawai‘i, and the Hawai‘i State Department of Health from 1/1/2000 to 12/31/2013. Children aged 0–18 years were included in the study. A subset of the study analyzed records of infants aged 0–12 months. SIDS rate was calculated and compared to national data. Prevalence was calculated for known conditions associated with SCD. The identified prevalence was compared to the established prevalence of conditions associated with SCD. In Hawai‘i, the infant SIDS rate (66.4/100,000) was similar to the national rate (54.4/100,000). Over 14 years, only 51 children were diagnosed with a condition associated with SCD; 28 with a cardiomyopathy and 21 with a channelopathy. A 14-year retrospective analysis in the State of Hawai‘i revealed that less than 1 in 30 children, who are expected to harbor a SCD-associated condition, had been appropriately diagnosed. The underdiagnosis of conditions associated with SCD reflects that in the absence of a comprehensive screening program, conditions without obvious signs and symptoms are difficult to diagnose. Many children with these conditions will remain at risk of SCD. PMID:26918207

  18. Liénard-type models for the simulation of the action potential of cardiac nodal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podziemski, P.; Żebrowski, J. J.

    2013-10-01

    Existing models of cardiac cells which include multi-variable cardiac transmembrane current are too complex to simulate the long time dynamical properties of the heart rhythm. The large number of parameters that need to be defined and set for such models make them not only cumbersome to use but also require a large computing power. Consequently, the application of such models for the bedside analysis of heart rate of a specific patient may be difficult. Other ways of modelling need to be investigated. We consider the general problem of developing a model of cardiac pacemaker tissue that allows to combine the investigation of phenomena at a time scale of thousands of heart beats with the ability to reproduce realistic tissue-level characteristics of cell dynamics. We propose a modified van der Pol-Duffing equation-a Liénard-type oscillator-as a phenomenological model for cardiac nodal tissue, with certain important physiological similarities to ion-channel models of cardiac pacemaker cells. The model presented here is specifically designed to qualitatively reproduce mesoscopic characteristics of cell dynamics, including action potential duration (APD) restitution properties, phase response characteristics, and phase space structure. We show that these characteristics agree qualitatively with the extensive ionic models and experimental results in the literature [Anumonwo et al., 1991, [33], Cao et al., 1999, [49], Coster and Celler, 2003, [31], Qu, 2004, [45], Tsalikakis et al., 2007, [32], Inada et al., 2009, [14], Qu et al., 2010, [50

  19. Patients with pacemaker or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Schulman, Peter M; Rozner, Marc A; Sera, Valerie; Stecker, Eric C

    2013-11-01

    The preparation of patients with a cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) for the perioperative period necessitates familiarity with recommendations from the American Society of Anesthesiologists and Heart Rhythm Society. Even clinicians who are not CIED experts should understand the indications for implantation, as well as the basic functions, operations, and limitations of these devices. Before any scheduled procedure, proper CIED function should be verified and a specific CIED prescription obtained. Acquiring the requisite knowledge base and developing the systems to competently manage the CIED patient ensures safe and efficient perioperative care. PMID:24182719

  20. Beating irregularity of single pacemaker cells isolated from the rabbit sinoatrial node.

    PubMed Central

    Wilders, R; Jongsma, H J

    1993-01-01

    Single pacemaker heart cells discharge irregularly. Data on fluctuations in interbeat interval of single pacemaker cells isolated from the rabbit sinoatrial node are presented. The coefficient of variation of the interbeat interval is quite small, approximately 2%, even though the coefficient of variation of diastolic depolarization rate is approximately 15%. It has been hypothesized that random fluctuations in interbeat interval arise from the stochastic behavior of the membrane ionic channels. To test this hypothesis, we constructed a single channel model of a single pacemaker cell isolated from the rabbit sinoatrial node, i.e., a model into which the stochastic open-close kinetics of the individual membrane ionic channels are incorporated. Single channel conductances as well as single channel open and closed lifetimes are based on experimental data from whole cell and single channel experiments that have been published in the past decade. Fluctuations in action potential parameters of the model cell are compared with those observed experimentally. It is concluded that fluctuations in interbeat interval of single sinoatrial node pacemaker cells indeed are due to the stochastic open-close kinetics of the membrane ionic channels. PMID:8312495