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Sample records for cardiac pacemaker program

  1. Generation of cardiac pacemaker cells by programming and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Husse, Britta; Franz, Wolfgang-Michael

    2016-07-01

    A number of diseases are caused by faulty function of the cardiac pacemaker and described as "sick sinus syndrome". The medical treatment of sick sinus syndrome with electrical pacemaker implants in the diseased heart includes risks. These problems may be overcome via "biological pacemaker" derived from different adult cardiac cells or pluripotent stem cells. The generation of cardiac pacemaker cells requires the understanding of the pacing automaticity. Two characteristic phenomena the "membrane-clock" and the "Ca(2+)-clock" are responsible for the modulation of the pacemaker activity. Processes in the "membrane-clock" generating the spontaneous pacemaker firing are based on the voltage-sensitive membrane ion channel activity starting with slow diastolic depolarization and discharging in the action potential. The influence of the intracellular Ca(2+) modulating the pacemaker activity is characterized by the "Ca(2+)-clock". The generation of pacemaker cells started with the reprogramming of adult cardiac cells by targeted induction of one pacemaker function like HCN1-4 overexpression and enclosed in an activation of single pacemaker specific transcription factors. Reprogramming of adult cardiac cells with the transcription factor Tbx18 created cardiac cells with characteristic features of cardiac pacemaker cells. Another key transcription factor is Tbx3 specifically expressed in the cardiac conduction system including the sinoatrial node and sufficient for the induction of the cardiac pacemaker gene program. For a successful cell therapeutic practice, the generated cells should have all regulating mechanisms of cardiac pacemaker cells. Otherwise, the generated pacemaker cells serve only as investigating model for the fundamental research or as drug testing model for new antiarrhythmics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. PMID:26681531

  2. Radioisotope-powered cardiac pacemaker program. Clinical studies of the nuclear pacemaker model NU-5. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Beginning in February, 1970, the Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corporation (NUMEC) undertook a program to design, develop and manufacture a radioisotope powered cardiac pacemaker system. The scope of technical work was specified to be: establish system, component, and process cost reduction goals using the prototype Radioisotope Powered Cardiac Pacemaker (RCP) design and develop production techniques to achieve these cost reduction objectives; fabricate radioisotope powered fueled prototype cardiac pacemakers (RCP's) on a pilot production basis; conduct liaison with a Government-designated fueling facility for purposes of defining fueling requirements, fabrication and encapsulation procedures, safety design criteria and quality control and inspection requirements; develop and implement Quality Assurance and Reliability Programs; conduct performance, acceptance, lifetime and reliability tests of fueled RCP's in the laboratory; conduct liaison with the National Institutes of Health and with Government specified medical research institutions selected for the purpose of undertaking clinical evaluation of the RCP in humans; monitor and evaluate, on a continuing basis, all test data; and perform necessary safety analyses and tests. Pacemaker designs were developed and quality assurance and manufacturing procedures established. Prototype pacemakers were fabricated. A total of 126 radioisotope powered units were implanted and have been followed clinically for approximately seven years. Four (4) of these units have failed. Eighty-three (83) units remain implanted and satisfactorily operational. An overall failure rate of less than the target 0.15% per month has been achieved.

  3. Trends in Cardiac Pacemaker Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Mallela, Venkateswara Sarma; Ilankumaran, V; Rao, N.Srinivasa

    2004-01-01

    Batteries used in Implantable cardiac pacemakers-present unique challenges to their developers and manufacturers in terms of high levels of safety and reliability. In addition, the batteries must have longevity to avoid frequent replacements. Technological advances in leads/electrodes have reduced energy requirements by two orders of magnitude. Micro-electronics advances sharply reduce internal current drain concurrently decreasing size and increasing functionality, reliability, and longevity. It is reported that about 600,000 pacemakers are implanted each year worldwide and the total number of people with various types of implanted pacemaker has already crossed 3 million. A cardiac pacemaker uses half of its battery power for cardiac stimulation and the other half for housekeeping tasks such as monitoring and data logging. The first implanted cardiac pacemaker used nickel-cadmium rechargeable battery, later on zinc-mercury battery was developed and used which lasted for over 2 years. Lithium iodine battery invented and used by Wilson Greatbatch and his team in 1972 made the real impact to implantable cardiac pacemakers. This battery lasts for about 10 years and even today is the power source for many manufacturers of cardiac pacemakers. This paper briefly reviews various developments of battery technologies since the inception of cardiac pacemaker and presents the alternative to lithium iodine battery for the near future. PMID:16943934

  4. [Future cardiac pacemakers – technical visions].

    PubMed

    Haeberlin, Andreas; Zurbuchen, Adrian; Pfenniger, Aloïs; Fuhrer, Jürg; Vogel, Rolf

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac pacemakers are routinely used for the treatment of bradyarrhythmias. Contemporary pacemakers are reliable and allow for a patient specific programming. However, pacemaker replacements due to battery depletion are common (~25 % of all implantation procedures) and bear the risk of complications. Batteryless pacemakers may allow overcoming this limitation. To power a batteryless pacemaker, a mechanism for intracorporeal energy harvesting is required. Such a generator may consist out of subcutaneously implanted solar cells, transforming the small amount of transcutaneously available light into electrical energy. Alternatively, intravascular turbines may harvest energy from the blood flow. Energy may also be harvested from the ventricular wall motion by a dedicated mechanical clockwork converting motion into electrical energy. All these approaches have successfully been tested in vivo. Pacemaker leads constitute another Achilles heel of contemporary pacemakers. Thus, leadless devices are desired. Miniaturized pacemaker circuits and suitable energy harvesting mechanisms (incorporated in a single device) may allow catheter-based implantation of the pacemaker in the heart. Such miniaturized battery- and leadless pacemakers would combine the advantages of both approaches and overcome major limitations of today’s systems. PMID:26227982

  5. Space Derived Health Aids (Cardiac Pacemaker)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division's (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.) pacer is a rechargeable cardiac pacemaker that eliminates the recurring need for surgery to implant a new battery. The Programalith is an advanced cardiac pacing system which permits a physician to reprogram a patient's implanted pacemaker without surgery. System consists of a pacemaker, together with a physician's console containing the programmer and a data printer. Signals are transmitted by wireless telemetry. Two-way communications, originating from spacecraft electrical power systems technology, allows physician to interrogate the pacemaker as to the status of the heart, then to fine tune the device to best suit the patient's needs.

  6. Lithium iodide cardiac pacemakers: initial clinical experience.

    PubMed Central

    Burr, L. H.

    1976-01-01

    A new long-life cardiac pacemaker pulse generator powered by a lithium iodide fuel cell was introduced in Canada in 1973. The compact, hermetically sealed unit is easily implanted and reliable, has excellent patient acceptance and has an anticipated battery life of almost 14 years. Among 105 patients who received a lithium iodide pacemaker, complications occurred in 18. The lithium iodide pacemaker represents a significant advance in pacemaker generator technology and is recommended for long-term cardiac pacing; the manufacturer guarantees the pulse generator for 6 years. Images FIG. 1 PMID:974965

  7. The influence of elevated 50 Hz electric and magnetic fields on implanted cardiac pacemakers: the role of the lead configuration and programming of the sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Toivonen, L; Valjus, J; Hongisto, M; Metso, R

    1991-12-01

    The influence of the electromagnetic interference (EMI) on performance of 15 implanted cardiac pacemakers (12 generator models) was tested during exposure at a high voltage substation. All patients had an adequate spontaneous heart rate during the study. Tests were performed in the ventricular inhibited mode with unipolar sensing in all pacemakers and repeated with bipolar sensing in four pacemakers. The sensitivity was set to a regular, functionally proper level and then to the highest available level. Exposure was done to moderate (1.2-1.7 kV/m) and strong (7.0-8.0 kV/m) electric fields, which correspond to the immediate vicinity of 110 and 400 kV power lines, respectively. In moderate electric fields the output was inhibited in one pacemaker at regular sensitivity (1.7-3.0 mV) and in five pacemakers at the highest sensitivity (0.5-1.25 mV). In strong electric fields the output was inhibited in five pacemakers at regular sensitivity and several pacemakers converted to noise reversion mode at the highest sensitivity. In bipolar mode only one of four pacemakers at high sensitivity (0.5-1.0 mV) was inhibited in the strongest electric field, whereas all four did so in the unipolar mode. One pacemaker with unipolar sensitivity at 0.5 mV was interfered by 63 microT magnetic field. The results confirm that the programmed sensitivity level and the lead configuration markedly influence pacemakers' vulnerability to EMI. Bipolar sensing mode is rather safe in the presence of EMI, which is encountered in public environments. The programmable features of today's pacemakers permit individualized, less stringent safety measures to avoid electromagnetic hazards. PMID:1723194

  8. Mathematical Models of Cardiac Pacemaking Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pan; Lines, Glenn T.; Maleckar, Mary M.; Tveito, Aslak

    2013-10-01

    Over the past half century, there has been intense and fruitful interaction between experimental and computational investigations of cardiac function. This interaction has, for example, led to deep understanding of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling; how it works, as well as how it fails. However, many lines of inquiry remain unresolved, among them the initiation of each heartbeat. The sinoatrial node, a cluster of specialized pacemaking cells in the right atrium of the heart, spontaneously generates an electro-chemical wave that spreads through the atria and through the cardiac conduction system to the ventricles, initiating the contraction of cardiac muscle essential for pumping blood to the body. Despite the fundamental importance of this primary pacemaker, this process is still not fully understood, and ionic mechanisms underlying cardiac pacemaking function are currently under heated debate. Several mathematical models of sinoatrial node cell membrane electrophysiology have been constructed as based on different experimental data sets and hypotheses. As could be expected, these differing models offer diverse predictions about cardiac pacemaking activities. This paper aims to present the current state of debate over the origins of the pacemaking function of the sinoatrial node. Here, we will specifically review the state-of-the-art of cardiac pacemaker modeling, with a special emphasis on current discrepancies, limitations, and future challenges.

  9. THE ARTIFICIAL CARDIAC PACEMAKER. INDICATIONS FOR IMPLANTATION.

    PubMed

    ROE, B B; BRUNS, D L

    1964-12-01

    Extensive clinical experience has demonstrated that implantable cardiac pacemakers are safe and effective mechanisms for controlling symptoms and preventing the hazards of third degree heart block with Stokes-Adams syncope. Medical management of this disease does not provide reliable protection and life expectancy averages about two years after diagnosis. Hence the negligible surgical morbidity and mortality associated with pacemaker implantation justifies broad indications to implant one of the four commercially available battery-powered units. ELECTIVE IMPLANTATION OF A PACEMAKER SHOULD BE CONSIDERED IN PATIENTS WITH PERSISTENT THIRD DEGREE HEART BLOCK WHO HAVE HAD: One or more episodes of Stokes-Adams syncope; surgical injury to the conduction system, regardless of syncopal attacks; evidence of low cardiac output with cardiomegaly secondary to bradycardia. Few if any other cardiac arrythmias are satisfactorily controlled by an electrical pacemaker. Emergency pacemaker control is obviously necessary for patients developing intractable or recurrent bouts of asystole. During the interval until an implantable unit can be obtained and sterilized, the patient may be controlled by intravenous isoproterenol or by an external pacemaker attached to a transvenous catheter electrode, a precordial skin electrode or a percutaneous myocardial wire electrode. PMID:14236028

  10. Effects of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging on cardiac pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Lauck, G; von Smekal, A; Wolke, S; Seelos, K C; Jung, W; Manz, M; Lüderitz, B

    1995-08-01

    Patients with cardiac pacemakers are currently restricted from nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of the study was to analyze the influence of MRI on new generation pacemakers. Tests were performed using a phantom model with seven dual chamber and two single chamber systems in a 0.5 Tesla MRI scanner. Monitoring by telemetry and oscillography were used during the standard clinical scan sequences as well as a pacemaker inquiry after each sequence. Spin echo, gradient echo, and fast field echo sequences were performed with the following stimulation modes: VVI, VVIR, VOO, DDD, DDDR, and DOO. On entering the static magnetic field, the reed switch was activated followed by asynchronous stimulation. The subsequent scan showed no influence on the stimulation function nor on the pacemaker program. Event counter function remained intact. Pacemakers with automatic mode switching to demand pacing or programmed inactivation of the reed switch were triggered in the dual chamber mode and were inhibited in the one chamber mode during the scan. Alterations of pacemaker program or rapid pacing were not observed. MRI scan could induce voltage as high as intracardiac signals, but the stimulation threshold of the heart was not reached. Thus, pacemakers should be programmed in the asynchronous mode during scan to avoid inhibition and trigger mechanism. PMID:7479176

  11. Pacemaker interactions induce reentrant wave dynamics in engineered cardiac culture.

    PubMed

    Borek, Bartłomiej; Shajahan, T K; Gabriels, James; Hodge, Alex; Glass, Leon; Shrier, Alvin

    2012-09-01

    Pacemaker interactions can lead to complex wave dynamics seen in certain types of cardiac arrhythmias. We use experimental and mathematical models of pacemakers in heterogeneous excitable media to investigate how pacemaker interactions can be a mechanism for wave break and reentrant wave dynamics. Embryonic chick ventricular cells are cultured in vitro so as to create a dominant central pacemaker site that entrains other pacemakers in the medium. Exposure of those cultures to a potassium channel blocker, E-4031, leads to emergence of peripheral pacemakers that compete with each other and with the central pacemaker. Waves emitted by faster pacemakers break up over the slower pacemaker to form reentrant waves. Similar dynamics are observed in a modified FitzHugh-Nagumo model of heterogeneous excitable media with two distinct sites of pacemaking. These findings elucidate a mechanism of pacemaker-induced reentry in excitable media. PMID:23020471

  12. Pacemaker interactions induce reentrant wave dynamics in engineered cardiac culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borek, Bartłomiej; Shajahan, T. K.; Gabriels, James; Hodge, Alex; Glass, Leon; Shrier, Alvin

    2012-09-01

    Pacemaker interactions can lead to complex wave dynamics seen in certain types of cardiac arrhythmias. We use experimental and mathematical models of pacemakers in heterogeneous excitable media to investigate how pacemaker interactions can be a mechanism for wave break and reentrant wave dynamics. Embryonic chick ventricular cells are cultured invitro so as to create a dominant central pacemaker site that entrains other pacemakers in the medium. Exposure of those cultures to a potassium channel blocker, E-4031, leads to emergence of peripheral pacemakers that compete with each other and with the central pacemaker. Waves emitted by faster pacemakers break up over the slower pacemaker to form reentrant waves. Similar dynamics are observed in a modified FitzHugh-Nagumo model of heterogeneous excitable media with two distinct sites of pacemaking. These findings elucidate a mechanism of pacemaker-induced reentry in excitable media.

  13. The effect of radar on cardiac pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Rohl, D; Laun, H M; Hauber, M E; Stauch, M; Voigt, H

    1975-01-01

    The susceptibility of 16 noncompetitive cardiac pacemakers to radiation from a powerful radar system was investigated in the laboratory and in the vicinity of its prototype. From comparative in vitro tests in air, fat, water, and saline it was concluded that only tests in fat or air represent the worst case condition after implantation. In air all pacemakers showed signs of interference at pulse power densities between 0.025 mW/cm2 and 62.5 mW/CM2. Three of six implanted pacemakers were triggered or inhibited depending on their mode of operation when tested at a location 1.2 km away from the radar station by the radar beam occurring every 5.5 sec. Because interfering radiation can enter the pacemaker circuitry directly along the electrode, acting as an antenna, metal encapsulation of the pulse generator does not provide sufficient shielding against microwave radiation. However, pacemakers modified by metal encapsulation and a low-pass filter at the electrode remained undistrubed at pulse power densities of greater than 10 W/cm2 when tested under worst case condition in air. PMID:1176271

  14. A new multiprogrammable isotopic powered cardiac pacemaker

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, N.P.; Purdy, D.L.; Sager, D.; Keshishian, J.M.

    1982-09-01

    A new multiprogrammable, isotopic-powered cardiac pacemaker was implanted in six patients as a custom device. Five were initial implants and one was a replacement. The patients were studied for up to two years. In five of the six cases it was found advantageous to change one of the programmable parameters. Multiprogrammability is obviously as important in an isotopic pulse generator as in a lithium unit, if not more so, because of the unit's greater longevity. Further studies are continuing in an FDA approved clinical trial.

  15. Testing of Common Electromagnetic Environments for Risk of Interference with Cardiac Pacemaker Function

    PubMed Central

    Tiikkaja, Maria; Aro, Aapo L.; Alanko, Tommi; Lindholm, Harri; Sistonen, Heli; Hartikainen, Juha E.K.; Toivonen, Lauri; Juutilainen, Jukka; Hietanen, Maila

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiac pacemakers are known to be susceptible to strong electromagnetic fields (EMFs). This in vivo study investigated occurrence of electromagnetic interference with pacemakers caused by common environmental sources of EMFs. Methods Eleven volunteers with a pacemaker were exposed to EMFs produced by two mobile phone base stations, an electrically powered commuter train, and an overhead high voltage transmission lines. All the pacemakers were programmed in normal clinically selected settings with bipolar sensing and pacing configurations. Results None of the pacemakers experienced interference in any of these exposure situations. However, often it is not clear whether or not strong EMFs exist in various work environments, and hence an individual risk assessment is needed. Conclusions Modern pacemakers are well shielded against external EMFs, and workers with a pacemaker can most often return to their previous work after having a pacemaker implanted. However, an appropriate risk assessment is still necessary after the implantation of a pacemaker, a change of its generator, or major modification of its programming settings. PMID:24106646

  16. Modern Perspectives on Numerical Modeling of Cardiac Pacemaker Cell

    PubMed Central

    Maltsev, Victor A.; Yaniv, Yael; Maltsev, Anna V.; Stern, Michael D.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac pacemaking is a complex phenomenon that is still not completely understood. Together with experimental studies, numerical modeling has been traditionally used to acquire mechanistic insights in this research area. This review summarizes the present state of numerical modeling of the cardiac pacemaker, including approaches to resolve present paradoxes and controversies. Specifically we discuss the requirement for realistic modeling to consider symmetrical importance of both intracellular and cell membrane processes (within a recent “coupled-clock” theory). Promising future developments of the complex pacemaker system models include the introduction of local calcium control, mitochondria function, and biochemical regulation of protein phosphorylation and cAMP production. Modern numerical and theoretical methods such as multi-parameter sensitivity analyses within extended populations of models and bifurcation analyses are also important for the definition of the most realistic parameters that describe a robust, yet simultaneously flexible operation of the coupled-clock pacemaker cell system. The systems approach to exploring cardiac pacemaker function will guide development of new therapies, such as biological pacemakers for treating insufficient cardiac pacemaker function that becomes especially prevalent with advancing age. PMID:24748434

  17. Proton Beam Therapy Interference With Implanted Cardiac Pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Oshiro, Yoshiko Sugahara, Shinji; Noma, Mio; Sato, Masato; Sakakibara, Yuzuru; Sakae, Takeji; Hayashi, Yasutaka; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Tsuboi, Koji; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Kanemoto, Ayae; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of proton beam therapy (PBT) on implanted cardiac pacemaker function. Methods and Materials: After a phantom study confirmed the safety of PBT in patients with cardiac pacemakers, we treated 8 patients with implanted pacemakers using PBT to a total tumor dose of 33-77 gray equivalents (GyE) in dose fractions of 2.2-6.6 GyE. The combined total number of PBT sessions was 127. Although all pulse generators remained outside the treatment field, 4 patients had pacing leads in the radiation field. All patients were monitored by means of electrocardiogram during treatment, and pacemakers were routinely examined before and after PBT. Results: The phantom study showed no effect of neutron scatter on pacemaker generators. In the study, changes in heart rate occurred three times (2.4%) in 2 patients. However, these patients remained completely asymptomatic throughout the PBT course. Conclusions: PBT can result in pacemaker malfunctions that manifest as changes in pulse rate and pulse patterns. Therefore, patients with cardiac pacemakers should be monitored by means of electrocardiogram during PBT.

  18. SHOX2 Overexpression Favors Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cells into Cardiac Pacemaker Cells, Improving Biological Pacing Ability

    PubMed Central

    Ionta, Vittoria; Liang, Wenbin; Kim, Elizabeth H.; Rafie, Reza; Giacomello, Alessandro; Marbán, Eduardo; Cho, Hee Cheol

    2014-01-01

    Summary When pluripotency factors are removed, embryonic stem cells (ESCs) undergo spontaneous differentiation, which, among other lineages, also gives rise to cardiac sublineages, including chamber cardiomyocytes and pacemaker cells. Such heterogeneity complicates the use of ESC-derived heart cells in therapeutic and diagnostic applications. We sought to direct ESCs to differentiate specifically into cardiac pacemaker cells by overexpressing a transcription factor critical for embryonic patterning of the native cardiac pacemaker (the sinoatrial node). Overexpression of SHOX2 during ESC differentiation upregulated the pacemaker gene program, resulting in enhanced automaticity in vitro and induced biological pacing upon transplantation in vivo. The accentuated automaticity is accompanied by temporally evolving changes in the effectors and regulators of Wnt signaling. Our findings provide a strategy for enriching the cardiac pacemaker cell population from ESCs. PMID:25533636

  19. Leadless pacemakers: A new era in cardiac pacing.

    PubMed

    Seriwala, Haseeb Munaf; Khan, Muhammad Shahzeb; Munir, Muhammad Bilal; Riaz, Irbaz Bin; Riaz, Haris; Saba, Samir; Voigt, Andrew H

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac pacemakers are a critical management option for patients with rhythm disorders. Current efforts to develop leadless pacemakers have two primary goals: to reduce lead-associated post-procedural morbidity and to avoid the surgical scar associated with placement. After extensive studies on animal models and technological advancements, these devices are currently under investigation for human use. Herein, we review the evidence from animal studies and the technological advancements that have ushered in the era of use in humans. We also discuss different leadless pacemakers currently under investigation, along with limitations and future developments of this innovative concept. PMID:26458791

  20. [An informatics program for the management of patients with pacemakers].

    PubMed

    Goicolea, A; Chicote, R; Adoue, P; Gómez, P

    1990-01-01

    We are introducing a software package (Dbase III application) for the management of patients wearing cardiac pacemakers. It runs on any IBM compatible microcomputer with a minimum of 512 Kb RAM and a 10 Mb hard-disk. It works with 6 separate databases: 1) identification-indications; 2) implants; 3) explant-closure; 4) follow-up; 5) pacemakers, and 6) electrodes. The program runs completely by menus, tasks being started by one key stroke. The patient databases are structured following the European Pacemaker Patient Card, including its codes. Data introduction is facilitated by friendly screen formats. The pacemaker database contains 495 models and 304 electrodes of all brands. Automatic searches include: 1) hospital number (from last and/or first name); 2) complete pacing history; 3) listing of patients by stimulation mode, loss of follow-up or proximity of expected battery end of life; 4) pacemaker or electrode definition, and 5) pacemaker models contained in the database. The program has been applied by nurses for over 6 months in our service, proving its efficacy with an easier and better follow-up. The accuracy of the automatic searches has been confirmed manually. PMID:2236791

  1. Effect of electric and magnetic fields near an HVDC converter terminal on implanted cardiac pacemakers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, M.J.

    1980-08-01

    The electromagnetic fields associated with HVDC converters and transmission lines constitute a unique environment for persons with implanted cardiac pacemakers. A measurement program has been conducted to assess the potential interfering effects of these harmonically rich fields on implanted pacemakers. The experimental procedures that were employed take into account the combined effects of the electric and magnetic fields. The effect of the resulting body current on the response of six pacemakers was assessed in the laboratory, using a previously developed model to relate body current to pacemaker pickup voltage. The results show that R-wave pacemaker reversion can be expected at some locations within the converter facility, but that a large safety margin for unperturbed pacemaker operation exists beneath the transmission lines.

  2. Modeling cardiac pacemakers with relaxation oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grudziński, Krzysztof; Żebrowski, Jan J.

    2004-05-01

    A modified van der Pol oscillator model was designed in order to reproduce the time series of the action potential generated by a natural pacemaker of the heart (i.e., the SA or the AV node). The main motivation was that the models published up to now were not altogether adequate for research on the heart. Based on either the classical van der Pol oscillator or other nonlinear oscillators, these models were interesting rather because of the physical phenomena that could be obtained (chaos and synchronization). However, they were unable to simulate many important physiological features of true physiological action potentials. We based our research on the experience of other groups which modeled neuronal oscillators. There complex nonlinear oscillators were used whose most important feature was a certain topology of the phase space. In our case, we modified the phase space of the classical van der Pol oscillator by adding two fixed points: a saddle and a node. In addition, a damping term asymmetric with respect to the voltage was introduced. Introduction of these new features into the van der Pol oscillator allowed to change the firing frequency of the pacemaker node without changing the length of the refractory period - an important physiological detail. We also show different ways of changing the pacemaker rhythm. A comparison of the properties of the signal obtained from our model with the features of the action potentials measured by other groups is made.

  3. Identifying incremental costs for successive generations of implantable cardiac pacemakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Allen A.

    1994-12-01

    This paper provides an assessment of the incremental expected costs of increasingly sophisticated generations of cardiac pacemaker technology. A decision analytic framework is used to calculate expected costs of pacemaker therapy over a five-year period, taking into account failure rate estimates for the various generations, device replacement costs, hospital fees, physician's fees, follow-up care, and patient lost time in follow-up care. For five years of pacing therapy, the incremental cost difference between nonprogrammable and multiprogrammable is DOL1887; between multiprogrammable and dual-chamber is DOL3321; and between dual-chamber and dual-chamber rate-responsive is $DOL676. Incremental benefits were found extremely difficult to quantify, monetarize, or translate to a scale for comparison with costs. However, medical literature indicates a decreasing level of risk for mortality and morbidity, owing to increased hemodynamic benefits from the more recent generations of high technology pacemakers.

  4. Materials aspects of implantable cardiac pacemaker leads.

    PubMed

    Bruck, S D; Mueller, E P

    1988-01-01

    The reliability of the leads of the entire pacemaker system is vital as the risks of failure include: (1) loss of pacing due to the deterioration of the polymeric insulator in the physiological environment; (2) thromboembolism due to inadequate blood compatibility of the insulator; (3) tissue reactions at the electrode/tissue interface; (4) general foreign body rejection phenomena; (5) perforation of the leads; and (6) excessive stress applied by sutures causing abrasion and stress cracking. Although silicone has been used widely, some years ago Pellethane (a segmented polyetherurethane-urea) has been introduced as an alternate lead insulator, chiefly because it can be extruded using additives into smooth and thin tubes. The additives (antioxidants), extrusion aids, and low molecular weight polymer chains (oligomers) together represent up to approximately 8% by weight of leachables, depending on the extraction medium. The in vivo degradation of Pellethane is biologic in nature and is most likely associated with the absorption and premeation of body fluids from the surrounding physiologic environment leading to stress cracking via the formation of microvoids. Thermally and biologically unstable biuret and allophonate groups in this polyurethane, exposure of the polymer to high extrusion temperatures, and stresses created within the polymer also play key roles in the degradation process. In the case of electrodes, some corrosion can occur even with noble metals and ions formed with the involvement of penetrating body fluids which may combine with the urethane and/or urea groups of the polyurethane, leading to its further degradation in vivo. The totality of the situation indicates a need for the development of a standard guideline for the uniform and consistent pre-clinical testing and evaluation of new materials and fabrication processes of implantable pacemaker leads. Such guidelines should take into consideration, among others, the physiological environment, species-differences between test animals and humans, and observe reliable statistical interpretations based on sufficient data. PMID:3285160

  5. Pacemaker Dependency after Cardiac Surgery: A Systematic Review of Current Evidence

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe postoperative conduction disturbances requiring permanent pacemaker implantation frequently occur following cardiac surgery. Little is known about the long-term pacing requirements and risk factors for pacemaker dependency in this population. Methods We performed a systematic review of the literature addressing rates and predictors of pacemaker dependency in patients requiring permanent pacemaker implantation after cardiac surgery. Using a comprehensive search of the Medline, Web of Science and EMBASE databases, studies were selected for review based on predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results A total of 8 studies addressing the endpoint of pacemaker-dependency were identified, while 3 studies were found that addressed the recovery of atrioventricular (AV) conduction endpoint. There were 10 unique studies with a total of 780 patients. Mean follow-up ranged from 6–72 months. Pacemaker dependency rates ranged from 32%-91% and recovery of AV conduction ranged from 16%-42%. There was significant heterogeneity with respect to the definition of pacemaker dependency. Several patient and procedure-specific variables were found to be independently associated with pacemaker dependency, but these were not consistent between studies. Conclusions Pacemaker dependency following cardiac surgery occurs with variable frequency. While individual studies have identified various perioperative risk factors for pacemaker dependency and non-resolution of AV conduction disease, results have been inconsistent. Well-conducted studies using a uniform definition of pacemaker dependency might identify patients who will benefit most from early permanent pacemaker implantation after cardiac surgery. PMID:26470027

  6. Surveillance and follow-up of patients with implanted cardiac pacemaker by telephone transmission.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, T; Tokutsu, S; Nishimura, O; Tagami, Y; Takimoto, M; Ohta, H; Yamaoka, Y; Okada, K; Suzuki, Y; Yokoi, H; Enomoto, K; Okada, N; Tanaka, H; Murakami, K

    1978-11-01

    A follow-up study on pacemaker function in 15 patients with implanted cardiac pacemaker has been performed by telephone transmission. The transmitting set consisting of electrocardiograph, pacemaker pulse modulator and acoustic coupler was manipulated by the patients themselves. ECG, pacemaker pulse, and pulse rate were simultaneously transmitted through 1 channel to the receiver in our clinic. Of 56 patients with pacemaker, 15 patients were surveyed by telephone transmission. In these patients battery exhaustion was detected in 3, competition in 2, and lead fracture in 1. The fact that surveillance and follow-up of the patients with implanted cardiac pacemaker could be carried out by telephone transmission as well as by clinic visitation tells us that the telephone transmission is a useful method and plays an important role in a pacemaker clinic. Moreover our study established its further usefulness in the patient's preference due to difficulties in travelling to the pacemaker clinic and in reducing patient's anxiety. PMID:750667

  7. Potential effects of intrinsic heart pacemaker cell mechanisms on dysrhythmic cardiac action potential firing

    PubMed Central

    Yaniv, Yael; Tsutsui, Kenta; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    The heart's regular electrical activity is initiated by specialized cardiac pacemaker cells residing in the sinoatrial node. The rate and rhythm of spontaneous action potential firing of sinoatrial node cells are regulated by stochastic mechanisms that determine the level of coupling of chemical to electrical clocks within cardiac pacemaker cells. This coupled-clock system is modulated by autonomic signaling from the brain via neurotransmitter release from the vagus and sympathetic nerves. Abnormalities in brain-heart clock connections or in any molecular clock activity within pacemaker cells lead to abnormalities in the beating rate and rhythm of the pacemaker tissue that initiates the cardiac impulse. Dysfunction of pacemaker tissue can lead to tachy-brady heart rate alternation or exit block that leads to long atrial pauses and increases susceptibility to other cardiac arrhythmia. Here we review evidence for the idea that disturbances in the intrinsic components of pacemaker cells may be implemented in arrhythmia induction in the heart. PMID:25755643

  8. PP2 prevents isoproterenol stimulation of cardiac pacemaker activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianying; Lin, Yen-Chang; Hileman, Stan; Martin, Karen H; Hull, Robert; Yu, Han-Gang

    2015-02-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated the potential risks of cardiac arrhythmias (such as prolonged QT interval) using tyrosine kinase inhibitors for cancer therapy. We report here that a widely used selective inhibitor of Src tyrosine kinases, PP2, can inhibit and prevent isoproterenol stimulation of cardiac pacemaker activity. In dissected rat sinus node, PP2 inhibited and prevented isoproterenol stimulation of spontaneous beating rate. In isolated sinus node myocytes, PP2 suppressed the hyperpolarization-activated "funny" current (If) by negatively shifting the activation curve and decelerating activation kinetics, associated with decreased cell surface expression and reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-modulated channel 4 (HCN4) channel proteins. In human embryonic kidney 293 cells overexpressing recombinant human HCN4 channels, PP2 reversed isoproterenol stimulation of HCN4 and inhibited HCN4-573x, a cAMP-insensitive human HCN4 mutant. Isoprotenrenol had little effects on HCN4-573x. These results demonstrated that inhibition of presumably tyrosine Src kinase activity in heart by PP2 decreased and prevented the potential β-adrenergic stimulation of cardiac pacemaker activity. These effects are mediated, at least partially, by a cAMP-independent attenuation of channel activity and cell surface expression of HCN4, the key channel protein that controls the heart rate. PMID:25658311

  9. The effects of nuclear magnetic resonance on patients with cardiac pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlicek, W.; Geisinger, M.; Castle, L.; Borkowski, G.P.; Meaney, T.F.; Bream, B.L.; Gallagher, J.H.

    1983-04-01

    The effect of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging on six representative cardiac pacemakers was studied. The results indicate that the threshold for initiating the asynchronous mode of a pacemaker is 17 gauss. Radiofrequency levels are present in an NMR unit and may confuse or possibly inhibit demand pacemakers, although sensing circuitry is normally provided with electromagnetic interference discrimination. Time-varying magnetic fields can generate pulse amplitudes and frequencies to mimic cardiac activity. A serious limitation in the possibility of imaging a patient with a pacemaker would be the alteration of normal pulsing parameters due to time-varying magnetic fields.

  10. Hardware-in-the-loop simulation and energy optimization of cardiac pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Barker, Chris; Kwiatkowska, Marta; Mereacre, Alexandru; Paoletti, Nicola; Patane, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Implantable cardiac pacemakers are medical devices that can monitor and correct abnormal heart rhythms. To provide the necessary safety assurance for pacemaker software, both testing and verification of the code, as well as testing the entire pacemaker hardware in the loop, is necessary. In this paper, we present a hardware testbed that enables detailed hardware-in-the-loop simulation and energy optimisation of pacemaker algorithms with respect to a heart model. Both the heart and the pacemaker models are encoded in Simulink/Stateflow™ and translated into executable code, with the pacemaker executed directly on the microcontroller. We evaluate the usefulness of the testbed by developing a parameter synthesis algorithm which optimises the timing parameters based on power measurements acquired in real-time. The experiments performed on real measurements successfully demonstrate that the testbed is capable of energy minimisation in real-time and obtains safe pacemaker timing parameters. PMID:26737950

  11. Excitation model of pacemaker cardiomyocytes of cardiac conduction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, M.; Babich, L.

    2015-11-01

    Myocardium includes typical and atypical cardiomyocytes - pacemakers, which form the cardiac conduction system. Excitation from the atrioventricular node in normal conditions is possible only in one direction. Retrograde direction of pulses is impossible. The most important prerequisite for the work of cardiomyocytes is the anatomical integrity of the conduction system. Changes in contractile force of the cardiomyocytes, which appear periodically, are due to two mechanisms of self-regulation - heterometric and homeometric. Graphic course of the excitation pulse propagation along the heart muscle more accurately reveals the understanding of the arrhythmia mechanism. These models have the ability to visualize the essence of excitation dynamics. However, they do not have the proper forecasting function for result estimation. Integrative mathematical model enables further investigation of general laws of the myocardium active behavior, allows for determination of the violation mechanism of electrical and contractile function of cardiomyocytes. Currently, there is no full understanding of the topography of pacemakers and ionic mechanisms. There is a need for the development of direction of mathematical modeling and comparative studies of the electrophysiological arrangement of cells of atrioventricular connection and ventricular conduction system.

  12. Popeye domain-containing proteins and stress-mediated modulation of cardiac pacemaking.

    PubMed

    Simrick, Subreena; Schindler, Roland F; Poon, Kar-Lai; Brand, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    An intricate network of ion channels and pumps are involved in generating a diastolic pacemaker potential, which is transmitted to the working myocardium with the help of the cardiac conduction system. The principles of cardiac pacemaking are reasonably well understood, however, the mechanism by which the heart increases its beating frequency in response to adrenergic stimulation has not been fully worked out. The Popeye domain-containing (Popdc) genes encode plasma membrane-localized proteins that are able to bind cAMP with high affinity; mice with null mutations in Popdc1 or 2 have a stress-induced pacemaker dysfunction. The phenotype in both mutants develops in an age-dependent manner and thus may model pacemaker dysfunction in man, as well as provide novel mechanistic insights into the process of pacemaker adaptation to stress. PMID:23562093

  13. [A new program-controlled telemetry technology for pacemakers].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Huang, Xin-ming; Fang, Zu-xinag

    2002-09-01

    This thesis is about a new technology of program-controlled telemetry for pacemakers. The system utilizes digital logic circuit design, and the program-controlled part uses single chip to control for display and debug. PWM and reflectance telemetry may improve the preciseness and correctness of signal transmission, and reduce the power consumption of pacemakers and prolong the lifetime. PMID:16104257

  14. Pacemaker

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Risks Lifestyle Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Arrhythmia Atrial Fibrillation Heart Block Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators Long ... a normal rate. Pacemakers are used to treat arrhythmias (ah-RITH-me-ahs). Arrhythmias are problems with ...

  15. Advanced Pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Synchrony, developed by St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.) is an advanced state-of-the-art implantable pacemaker that closely matches the natural rhythm of the heart. The companion element of the Synchrony Pacemaker System is the Programmer Analyzer APS-II which allows a doctor to reprogram and fine tune the pacemaker to each user's special requirements without surgery. The two-way communications capability that allows the physician to instruct and query the pacemaker is accomplished by bidirectional telemetry. APS-II features 28 pacing functions and thousands of programming combinations to accommodate diverse lifestyles. Microprocessor unit also records and stores pertinent patient data up to a year.

  16. Simple hand-held metal detectors are an effective means of detecting cardiac pacemakers in the deceased prior to cremation.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jason Lyle; Williams, John; Fearn, Lesley

    2010-05-01

    The hazard of undetected cardiac pacemakers exploding in crematoria is well described. This short report describes the use of an affordable hand-held metal detector to detect cardiac pacemakers. Over the course of a year, the metal detector located 100% of cardiac pacemakers in a district general hospital mortuary. A simple model using pigskin and fat is also used to demonstrate the effectiveness in vitro. Commercially purchased hand-held metal detectors should be used in all mortuaries responsible for detection and removal of cardiac pacemakers prior to cremation. PMID:20360143

  17. Interference with cardiac pacemakers by magnetic resonance imaging: are there irreversible changes at 0.5 Tesla?

    PubMed

    Vahlhaus, C; Sommer, T; Lewalter, T; Schimpf, R; Schumacher, B; Jung, W; Lüderitz, B

    2001-04-01

    The safety and feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with cardiac pacemakers is an issue of gaining significance. The effect of MRI on patients' pacemaker systems has only been analyzed retrospectively in some case reports. Therefore, this study prospectively investigated if MRI causes irreversible changes in patients' pacemaker systems. The effect of MRI at 0.5 Tesla on sensing and stimulation thresholds, lead impedance and battery voltage, current, and impedance was estimated during 34 MRI examinations in 32 patients with implanted pacemakers. After measurements at baseline and with documentation of intrinsic rhythm and modification of the pacing mode, patients underwent MRI. The rest of the function time of the pacemaker was calculated. Measurements were again performed after 99.5 +/- 29.6 minutes (mean +/- SD), immediately after MRI examination, and 3 months later. Lead impedance and sensing and stimulation thresholds did not change after MRI. Battery voltage decreased immediately after MRI and recovered 3 months later. Battery current and impedance tended to increase. The calculated rest of function time did not change immediately after MRI. MRI affected neither pacemaker programmed data, nor the ability to interrogate, program, or use telemetry. Surprisingly, in the gantry of the scanner, temporary deactivation of the reed switch occurred in 12 of 32 patients when positioned in the center of the magnetic field. Missing activation of the reed switch through the static magnetic field at 0.5 Tesla is not unusual. MRI at 0.5 Tesla does not cause irreversible changes in patients' pacemaker systems. PMID:11341087

  18. Possible Influences of Spark Discharges on Cardiac Pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Korpinen, Leena; Kuisti, Harri; Tarao, Hiroo; Virtanen, Vesa; Pääkkönen, Rauno; Dovan, Thanh; Kavet, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to spark discharges may occur beneath high voltage transmission lines when contact is initiated with a conductive object (such as a motor vehicle) with the spark discharge mediated by the ambient electric field from the line. The objective of this study was to assess whether such exposures could interfere with the normal functioning of implanted cardiac pacemakers (PMs). The experiment consisted of PMs implanted in a human-sized phantom and then exposed to spark discharge through an upper extremity. A circuit was designed that produced spark discharges between two spherical electrodes fed to the phantom's left hand. The circuit was set to deliver a single discharge per half cycle (every 10 ms) about 10 μs in duration with a peak current of 1.2-1.3 A, thus simulating conditions under a 400-kV power line operating at 50 Hz. Of 29 PMs acquired, all were tested in unipolar configuration and 20 in bipolar configuration with exposure consisting of 2 min of continuous exposure (one unit was exposed for 1 min). No interference was observed in bipolar configuration. One unit in unipolar configuration incorrectly identified ventricular extra systoles (more than 400 beats min(-1)) for 2 s. The use of unipolar configuration in new implants is extremely rare, thus further minimizing the risk of interference with the passage of time. Replication of this study and, if safety for human subjects can be assured, future testing of human subjects is also advisable. PMID:26606060

  19. Programmable Pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Released in 1995, the Trilogy cardiac pacemaker is the fourth generation of a unit developed in the 1970s by NASA, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory and St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.). The new system incorporates the company's PDx diagnostic and programming software and a powerful microprocessor that allows more functions to be fully automatic and gives more detailed information on the patient's health and the performance of the pacing systems. The pacemaker incorporates bidirectional telemetry used for space communications for noninvasive communication with the implanted pacemaker, smaller implantable pulse generators from space microminiaturization, and longer-life batteries from technology for spacecraft electrical power systems.

  20. [Cardiac arrest secondary to pacemaker dysfunction during general anesthesia in a young adult patient].

    PubMed

    Gayot, J; Saint-Pol, A-L; Degryse, C; Sztark, F

    2014-04-01

    The number of patients with cardiac pacemaker is continuously increasing. The anesthetic management of these patients is often trivialized, particularly during minor surgery. However there is always a potential risk of dysfunction during anesthesia. Perioperative management of these patients must be careful and standardized to avoid accidents. We report a case of cardiac arrest during general anesthesia for a day-surgery secondary to pacemaker dysfunction by increasing pacing thresholds in a young adult patient. Rapid onset after induction, without any surgical stimulation, has raised the question of the involvement of anesthetic drugs like propofol. PMID:24631007

  1. Estimation of EMI Impact by Cellular Radio on Implantable Cardiac Pacemakers in Elevator Using EMF Distributions Inside Human Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Atsushi; Hikage, Takashi; Nojima, Toshio; Simba, Ally Y.; Watanabe, Soichi

    The purpose of this study is to estimate the possible effect of cellular radio on implantable cardiac pacemakers in elevators. We previously investigated pacemaker EMI in elevator by examining the E-field distribution of horizontal plane at the height of expected for implanted pacemakers inside elevators. In this paper, we introduce our method for estimating EMI impact to implantable cardiac pacemakers using EMF distributions inside the region of the human body in which pacemakers are implanted. Simulations of a human phantom in an elevator are performed and histograms are derived from the resulting EMF distributions. The computed results of field strengths are compared with a certain reference level determined from experimentally obtained maximum interference distance of implantable cardiac pacemakers. This enables us to carry out a quantitative evaluation of the EMI impact to pacemakers by cellular radio transmission. This paper uses a numerical phantom model developed based on an European adult male. The simulations evaluate EMI on implantable cardiac pacemakers in three frequency bands. As a result, calculated E-field strengths are sufficiently low to cause the pacemaker to malfunction in the region examined.

  2. Mechanisms underlying the cardiac pacemaker: the role of SK4 calcium-activated potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Weisbrod, David; Khun, Shiraz Haron; Bueno, Hanna; Peretz, Asher; Attali, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The proper expression and function of the cardiac pacemaker is a critical feature of heart physiology. The sinoatrial node (SAN) in human right atrium generates an electrical stimulation approximately 70 times per minute, which propagates from a conductive network to the myocardium leading to chamber contractions during the systoles. Although the SAN and other nodal conductive structures were identified more than a century ago, the mechanisms involved in the generation of cardiac automaticity remain highly debated. In this short review, we survey the current data related to the development of the human cardiac conduction system and the various mechanisms that have been proposed to underlie the pacemaker activity. We also present the human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte system, which is used as a model for studying the pacemaker. Finally, we describe our latest characterization of the previously unrecognized role of the SK4 Ca2+-activated K+ channel conductance in pacemaker cells. By exquisitely balancing the inward currents during the diastolic depolarization, the SK4 channels appear to play a crucial role in human cardiac automaticity. PMID:26725737

  3. Mechanisms underlying the cardiac pacemaker: the role of SK4 calcium-activated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Weisbrod, David; Khun, Shiraz Haron; Bueno, Hanna; Peretz, Asher; Attali, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The proper expression and function of the cardiac pacemaker is a critical feature of heart physiology. The sinoatrial node (SAN) in human right atrium generates an electrical stimulation approximately 70 times per minute, which propagates from a conductive network to the myocardium leading to chamber contractions during the systoles. Although the SAN and other nodal conductive structures were identified more than a century ago, the mechanisms involved in the generation of cardiac automaticity remain highly debated. In this short review, we survey the current data related to the development of the human cardiac conduction system and the various mechanisms that have been proposed to underlie the pacemaker activity. We also present the human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte system, which is used as a model for studying the pacemaker. Finally, we describe our latest characterization of the previously unrecognized role of the SK4 Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel conductance in pacemaker cells. By exquisitely balancing the inward currents during the diastolic depolarization, the SK4 channels appear to play a crucial role in human cardiac automaticity. PMID:26725737

  4. Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiac Output vs. Heart Rate in Patients with an Implanted Pacemaker Based on Electric Impedance Method Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukup, Ladislav; Vondra, Vlastimil; Viščor, Ivo; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef

    2013-04-01

    The methods and device for estimation of cardiac output and measurement of pulse wave velocity simultaneously is presented here. The beat-to-beat cardiac output as well as pulse wave velocity measurement is based on application of electrical impedance method on the thorax and calf. The results are demonstrated in a study of 24 subjects. The dependence of pulse wave velocity and cardiac output on heart rate during rest in patients with an implanted pacemaker was evaluated. The heart rate was changed by pacemaker programming while neither exercise nor drugs were applied. The most important result is that the pulse wave velocity, cardiac output and blood pressure do not depend significantly on heart rate, while the stroke volume is reciprocal proportionally to the heart rate.

  5. Popeye domain containing proteins are essential for stress-mediated modulation of cardiac pacemaking in mice.

    PubMed

    Froese, Alexander; Breher, Stephanie S; Waldeyer, Christoph; Schindler, Roland F R; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Rinné, Susanne; Wischmeyer, Erhard; Schlueter, Jan; Becher, Jan; Simrick, Subreena; Vauti, Franz; Kuhtz, Juliane; Meister, Patrick; Kreissl, Sonja; Torlopp, Angela; Liebig, Sonja K; Laakmann, Sandra; Müller, Thomas D; Neumann, Joachim; Stieber, Juliane; Ludwig, Andreas; Maier, Sebastian K; Decher, Niels; Arnold, Hans-Henning; Kirchhof, Paulus; Fabritz, Larissa; Brand, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Cardiac pacemaker cells create rhythmic pulses that control heart rate; pacemaker dysfunction is a prevalent disorder in the elderly, but little is known about the underlying molecular causes. Popeye domain containing (Popdc) genes encode membrane proteins with high expression levels in cardiac myocytes and specifically in the cardiac pacemaking and conduction system. Here, we report the phenotypic analysis of mice deficient in Popdc1 or Popdc2. ECG analysis revealed severe sinus node dysfunction when freely roaming mutant animals were subjected to physical or mental stress. In both mutants, bradyarrhythmia developed in an age-dependent manner. Furthermore, we found that the conserved Popeye domain functioned as a high-affinity cAMP-binding site. Popdc proteins interacted with the potassium channel TREK-1, which led to increased cell surface expression and enhanced current density, both of which were negatively modulated by cAMP. These data indicate that Popdc proteins have an important regulatory function in heart rate dynamics that is mediated, at least in part, through cAMP binding. Mice with mutant Popdc1 and Popdc2 alleles are therefore useful models for the dissection of the mechanisms causing pacemaker dysfunction and could aid in the development of strategies for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22354168

  6. Precise Estimation of Cellular Radio Electromagnetic Field in Elevators and EMI Impact on Implantable Cardiac Pacemakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Louis-Ray; Hikage, Takashi; Nojima, Toshio

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the possible impact of cellular phones' signals on implantable cardiac pacemakers in elevators. This is achieved by carrying out precise numerical simulations based on the Finite-Difference-Time-Domain method to examine the electromagnetic fields in elevator models. In order to examine the realistic and complicated situations where humans are present in the elevator, we apply the realistic homogeneous human phantom and cellular radios operating in the frequency bands 800MHz, 1.5GHz and 2GHz. These computed results of field strength inside the elevator are compared with a certain reference level determined from the experimentally obtained maximum interference distance of implantable cardiac pacemakers. This enables us to carry out a quantitative evaluation of the EMI risk to pacemakers by cellular radio transmission. The results show that for the case when up to 5 mobile radio users are present in the elevator model used, there is no likelihood of pacemaker malfunction for the frequency bands 800MHz, 1.5GHz and 2GHz.

  7. Self-powered cardiac pacemaker enabled by flexible single crystalline PMN-PT piezoelectric energy harvester.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Geon-Tae; Park, Hyewon; Lee, Jeong-Ho; Oh, SeKwon; Park, Kwi-Il; Byun, Myunghwan; Park, Hyelim; Ahn, Gun; Jeong, Chang Kyu; No, Kwangsoo; Kwon, HyukSang; Lee, Sang-Goo; Joung, Boyoung; Lee, Keon Jae

    2014-07-23

    A flexible single-crystalline PMN-PT piezoelectric energy harvester is demonstrated to achieve a self-powered artificial cardiac pacemaker. The energy-harvesting device generates a short-circuit current of 0.223 mA and an open-circuit voltage of 8.2 V, which are enough not only to meet the standard for charging commercial batteries but also for stimulating the heart without an external power source. PMID:24740465

  8. Temporary cardiac pacemaker in the treatment of junctional rhythm and hypotension due to imipramine intoxication.

    PubMed

    Sert, Ahmet; Aypar, Ebru; Odabas, Dursun; Aygul, M Ulku

    2011-04-01

    Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) account for approximately 3% of all pediatric hospitalizations due to poisoning. TCAs remain a common cause of fatal drug poisoning because of their cardiovascular toxicity as manifested by electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities, arrhythmias, and hypotension. We report a 15-year-old girl with junctional escape rhythm and resistant hypotension caused by severe imipramine intoxication. Initial ECG showed junctional escape rhythm (46 bpm) with no atrial activity, low QRS voltage, widening of the QRS complex (160 ms) with a right bundle branch-like pattern, R wave > 3 mm in aVR (6 mm), and prolongation of the QT interval (QTc 550 ms). Despite intravenous fluids and inotropic support, she had resistant hypotension and acute renal failure. Junctional rhythm was successfully terminated by using temporary cardiac pacemaker. Hemodialysis and hemoperfusion were also performed. She was discharged on the day 5 without any complications. During follow-up, no ECG abnormalities were noted. We reported successful use of temporary cardiac pacemaker for treatment of junctional rhythm and resistant hypotension in imipramine intoxication. The conventional methods of activated charcoal, alkalinization, and symptomatic treatment of complications are usually enough for nonlethal doses of TCA intoxication. However, in imipramine intoxication with serious arrythmias and hypotension, using temporary cardiac pacemaker, hemodialysis, and hemoperfusion can be a life-saving therapeutic approach. PMID:21336976

  9. 21 CFR 870.5550 - External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... electrodes such as defibrillator paddles. (b) Classification. Class II. The special controls for this device...-21 ‘Cardiac Defibrillator Devices’ ” 2d ed., 1996, and (2) “The maximum pulse amplitude should...

  10. 21 CFR 870.5550 - External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... electrodes such as defibrillator paddles. (b) Classification. Class II. The special controls for this device...-21 ‘Cardiac Defibrillator Devices’ ” 2d ed., 1996, and (2) “The maximum pulse amplitude should...

  11. 21 CFR 870.5550 - External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... electrodes such as defibrillator paddles. (b) Classification. Class II. The special controls for this device...-21 ‘Cardiac Defibrillator Devices’ ” 2d ed., 1996, and (2) “The maximum pulse amplitude should...

  12. 21 CFR 870.5550 - External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... electrodes such as defibrillator paddles. (b) Classification. Class II. The special controls for this device...-21 ‘Cardiac Defibrillator Devices’ ” 2d ed., 1996, and (2) “The maximum pulse amplitude should...

  13. 21 CFR 870.5550 - External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... electrodes such as defibrillator paddles. (b) Classification. Class II. The special controls for this device...-21 ‘Cardiac Defibrillator Devices’ ” 2d ed., 1996, and (2) “The maximum pulse amplitude should...

  14. Effects of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on cardiac pacemakers. Final report, Nov 88-Oct 89

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, V.J.

    1991-11-01

    The U.S. Army Harry Diamond Laboratories' (HDL's) Woodbridge Research Facility (WRF) has conducted an investigation into the effects of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on medical electronics. This report specifically documents the findings on the effects of WRF's Army EMP Simulator Operations (AESOP) on cardiac pacemakers (CPMs). Empirical data are furnished and compared to the results of two independent analytical studies. The studies support the conclusion that damage to CPMs that might be located near the WRF boundaries is not likely. Furthermore, any upset in a CPM's operation is considered unlikely and inconsequential to the health of the CPM wearer. Cardiac pacemakers (CPMs) have experienced significant technological advancements over the last decade, evolving from simple and bulky pulse generators to the small and sophisticated computerized units implanted today. With the implementation of sensitive digital electronics in modern pacemaker designs, concerns have been expressed for the possibility of an increased sensitivity of CPMs to electromagnetic interference (EMI). To some extent these concerns have abated to the increased awareness of the EMI problem by the manufacturers, as evident in better peacemaker designs and the decline in reported malfunctions due to EMI.

  15. Cardiorespiratory Mechanical Simulator for In Vitro Testing of Impedance Minute Ventilation Sensors in Cardiac Pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Marcelli, Emanuela; Cercenelli, Laura

    2016-01-01

    We developed a cardiorespiratory mechanical simulator (CRMS), a system able to reproduce both the cardiac and respiratory movements, intended to be used for in vitro testing of impedance minute ventilation (iMV) sensors in cardiac pacemakers. The simulator consists of two actuators anchored to a human thorax model and a software interface to control the actuators and to acquire/process impedance signals. The actuators can be driven separately or simultaneously to reproduce the cardiac longitudinal shortening at a programmable heart rate and the diaphragm displacement at a programmable respiratory rate (RR). A standard bipolar pacing lead moving with the actuators and a pacemaker case fixed to the thorax model have been used to measure impedance (Z) variations during the simulated cardiorespiratory movements. The software is able to discriminate the low-frequency component because of respiration (ZR) from the high-frequency ripple because of cardiac effect (ZC). Impedance minute ventilation is continuously calculated from ZR and RR. From preliminary tests, the CRMS proved to be a reliable simulator for in vitro evaluation of iMV sensors. Respiration impedance recordings collected during cardiorespiratory movements reproduced by the CRMS were comparable in morphology and amplitude with in vivo assessments of transthoracic impedance variations. PMID:26501915

  16. A fiber optic sensor system for control of rate-adaptive cardiac pacemakers and implantable defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Müller, Stefan; Hexamer, Martin; Werner, Jürgen

    2006-12-01

    Commercially available cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverters/defibrillators (ICDs) predominantly use an intracardiac-derived electrocardiogram (ECG) for the detection of arrhythmias. To achieve automatic control of the heart frequency in accordance with cardiovascular strain and improved detection of life-threatening arrhythmias, it is desirable to monitor the heart by an input signal correlated with the hemodynamic state. One possible approach to derive such a signal is to measure the inotropy (mechanical contraction strength of the heart muscle). For this purpose, an optoelectronic measurement system has been designed. The fundamental function of the system has been shown in earlier investigations using an isolated beating pig heart. In this paper the design of two algorithms for use in pacemakers and ICDs based on a fiber optic sensor signal is presented. PMID:17155869

  17. PP2 prevents β-adrenergic stimulation of cardiac pacemaker activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianying; Lin, Yen-Chang; Hileman, Stan; Martin, Karen H; Hull, Robert; Yu, Han-Gang

    2014-06-01

    One of the main strategies for cancer therapy is to use tyrosine kinase inhibitors for inhibiting tumor proliferation. Increasing evidence has demonstrated the potential risks of cardiac arrhythmias (such as prolonged QT interval) of these drugs. We report here that a widely used selective inhibitor of Src tyrosine kinases, 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP2), can inhibit and prevent β-adrenergic stimulation of cardiac pacemaker activity. First, in dissected rat sinus node, PP2 inhibited and prevented the isoproterenol-induced increase of spontaneous beating rate. Second, in isolated rat sinus node myocytes, PP2 suppressed the hyperpolarization-activated "funny" current (traditionally called cardiac pacemaker current, I(f)) by negatively shifting the activation curve and decelerating activation kinetics. Third, in isolated rat sinus node myocytes, PP2 decreased the Src kinase activity, the cell surface expression, and tyrosine phosphorylation of hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-modulated channel 4 (HCN4) channel proteins. Finally, in human embryonic kidney 293 cells overexpressing recombinant human HCN4 channels, PP2 reversed the enhancement of HCN4 channels by isoproterenol and inhibited 573x, a cyclic adenosine momophosphate-insensitive human HCN4 mutant. These results demonstrated that inhibition of Src kinase activity in heart by PP2 decreased and prevented β-adrenergic stimulation of cardiac pacemaker activity. These effects are mediated, at least partially, by a cAMP-independent attenuation of channel activity and cell surface expression of HCN4, the main channel protein that controls the heart rate. PMID:24566462

  18. Programmable Pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division, formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc., incorporated Apollo technology into the development of the programmable pacemaker system. This consists of the implantable pacemaker together with a physician's console containing the programmer and a data printer. Physician can communicate with patient's pacemaker by means of wireless telemetry signals transmitted through the communicating head held over the patient's chest. Where earlier pacemakers deliver a fixed type of stimulus once implanted, Programalith enables surgery free "fine tuning" of device to best suit the patient's changing needs.

  19. The beat goes on: Cardiac pacemaking in extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Christopher M; Cox, Georgina K; Farrell, Anthony P

    2015-08-01

    In order for an animal to survive, the heart beat must go on in all environmental conditions, or at least restart its beat. This review is about maintaining a rhythmic heartbeat under the extreme conditions of anoxia (or very severe hypoxia) and high temperatures. It starts by considering the primitive versions of the protein channels that are responsible for initiating the heartbeat, HCN channels, divulging recent findings from the ancestral craniate, the Pacific hagfish (Eptatretus stoutii). It then explores how a heartbeat can maintain a rhythm, albeit slower, for hours without any oxygen, and sometimes without autonomic innervation. It closes with a discussion of recent work on fishes, where the cardiac rhythm can become arrhythmic when a fish experiences extreme heat. PMID:25178563

  20. Seven times replacement of permanent cardiac pacemaker in 33 years to maintain adequate heart rate: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanping; Liao, Derong; Yang, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades, recent developments in pacemaker technology from fixed-rate single-chamber pacemakers to dual chamber pacemakers with pacing algorithms have changed the therapeutic landscape resulting in better healthcare outcomes by improving rate response with minimal ventricular pacing. Here, we share our longest clinical experience with an elderly Chinese male patient who was diagnosed with third-degree atrioventricular (AV) block and was admitted in our hospital 33 years ago. An 85-year-old male patient from China was hospitalized due to dizziness and syncope, with an initial diagnosis revealing third-degree AV block with a heart rate of 35–40 beats per minute (bpm) along with Aase’s syndrome and primary hypertension. A single-chamber pacemaker (VVI) was implanted immediately giving the patient symptomatic relief. However, 5-year post-surgery VVI was replaced due to battery exhaustion, while the primary electrode catheter was kept in use. Few years later, the patient again complained of dizziness and re-examination revealed VVI battery debilitation due to premature battery exhaustion. Single-chamber pacemaker was again implanted via the same position of right upper chest. However, after adjusting the frequency of stimulation of the pacemaker to 70 bpm, patient had a symptomatic relief. Considering the severity of patient’s disease and knowing that cardiac dysfunction was reported previously, a tri-chamber pacemaker was chosen to take place of previous single-chamber pacemaker. For 33 years, the patient underwent 7 times replacement of pacemaker for battery exhaustion or inadequacy. We successfully performed overall seven pacemaker implantations and upgradation in an elderly Chinese patient diagnosed with third-degree AV block for 33 years. A long following up till now demonstrated no major complications with normal heart rate functioning. PMID:26734649

  1. Seven times replacement of permanent cardiac pacemaker in 33 years to maintain adequate heart rate: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yinglu; Li, Yanping; Liao, Derong; Yang, Ling

    2015-12-01

    Over the past few decades, recent developments in pacemaker technology from fixed-rate single-chamber pacemakers to dual chamber pacemakers with pacing algorithms have changed the therapeutic landscape resulting in better healthcare outcomes by improving rate response with minimal ventricular pacing. Here, we share our longest clinical experience with an elderly Chinese male patient who was diagnosed with third-degree atrioventricular (AV) block and was admitted in our hospital 33 years ago. An 85-year-old male patient from China was hospitalized due to dizziness and syncope, with an initial diagnosis revealing third-degree AV block with a heart rate of 35-40 beats per minute (bpm) along with Aase's syndrome and primary hypertension. A single-chamber pacemaker (VVI) was implanted immediately giving the patient symptomatic relief. However, 5-year post-surgery VVI was replaced due to battery exhaustion, while the primary electrode catheter was kept in use. Few years later, the patient again complained of dizziness and re-examination revealed VVI battery debilitation due to premature battery exhaustion. Single-chamber pacemaker was again implanted via the same position of right upper chest. However, after adjusting the frequency of stimulation of the pacemaker to 70 bpm, patient had a symptomatic relief. Considering the severity of patient's disease and knowing that cardiac dysfunction was reported previously, a tri-chamber pacemaker was chosen to take place of previous single-chamber pacemaker. For 33 years, the patient underwent 7 times replacement of pacemaker for battery exhaustion or inadequacy. We successfully performed overall seven pacemaker implantations and upgradation in an elderly Chinese patient diagnosed with third-degree AV block for 33 years. A long following up till now demonstrated no major complications with normal heart rate functioning. PMID:26734649

  2. Angiotensin II promotes differentiation of mouse c-kit-positive cardiac stem cells into pacemaker-like cells

    PubMed Central

    XUE, CHENG; ZHANG, JUN; LV, ZHAN; LIU, HUI; HUANG, CONGXIN; YANG, JING; WANG, TEN

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac stem cells (CSCs) can differentiate into cardiac muscle-like cells; however, it remains unknown whether CSCs may possess the ability to differentiate into pacemaker cells. The aim of the present study was to determine whether angiotensin II (Ang II) could promote the specialization of CSCs into pacemaker-like cells. Mouse CSCs were treated with Ang II from day 3–5, after cell sorting. The differentiation potential of the cells was then analyzed by morphological analysis, flow cytometry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and patch clamp analysis. Treatment with Ang II resulted in an increased number of cardiac muscle-like cells (32.7±4.8% vs. 21.5±4.8%; P<0.05), and inhibition of smooth muscle-like cells (6.2±7.3% vs. 20.5±5.1%; P<0.05). Following treatment with Ang II, increased levels of the cardiac progenitor-specific markers GATA4 and Nkx2.5 were observed in the cells. Furthermore, the transcript levels of pacemaker function-related genes, including hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN)2, HCN4, T-box (Tbx)2 and Tbx3, were significantly upregulated. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the increased number of pacemaker-like cells. The pacemaker current (If) was recorded in the cells derived from CSCs, treated with Ang II. In conclusion, treatment of CSCs with Ang II during the differentiation process modified cardiac-specific gene expression and resulted in the enhanced formation of pacemaker-like cells. PMID:25572000

  3. Genetically engineered cardiac pacemaker: Stem cells transfected with HCN2 gene and myocytes—A model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanani, S.; Pumir, A.; Krinsky, V.

    2008-01-01

    One of the successfully tested methods to design genetically engineered cardiac pacemaker cells consists in transfecting a human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) with a HCN2 gene and connecting it to a myocyte. We develop and study a mathematical model, describing a myocyte connected to a hMSC transfected with a HCN2 gene. The cardiac action potential is described both with the simple Beeler Reuter model, as well as with the elaborate dynamic Luo Rudy model. The HCN2 channel is described by fitting electrophysiological records, in the spirit of Hodgkin Huxley. The model shows that oscillations can occur in a pair myocyte-stem cell, that was not observed in the experiments yet. The model predicted that: (1) HCN pacemaker channels can induce oscillations only if the number of expressed I channels is low enough. At too high an expression level of I channels, oscillations cannot be induced, no matter how many pacemaker channels are expressed. (2) At low expression levels of I channels, a large domain of values in the parameter space (n, N) exists, where oscillations should be observed. We denote N the number of expressed pacemaker channels in the stem cell, and n the number of gap junction channels coupling the stem cell and the myocyte. (3) The expression levels of I channels observed in ventricular myocytes, both in the Beeler Reuter and in the dynamic Luo Rudy models are too high to allow to observe oscillations. With expression levels below ˜1/4 of the original value, oscillations can be observed. The main consequence of this work is that in order to obtain oscillations in an experiment with a myocyte-stem cell pair, increasing the values of n, N is unlikely to be helpful, unless the expression level of I has been reduced enough. The model also allows us to explore levels of gene expression not yet achieved in experiments, and could be useful to plan new experiments, aimed at improving the robustness of the oscillations.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cardiac pacemakers: era of "MR Conditional" designs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Advances in cardiac device technology have led to the first generation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) conditional devices, providing more diagnostic imaging options for patients with these devices, but also new controversies. Prior studies of pacemakers in patients undergoing MRI procedures have provided groundwork for design improvements. Factors related to magnetic field interactions and transfer of electromagnetic energy led to specific design changes. Ferromagnetic content was minimized. Reed switches were modified. Leads were redesigned to reduce induced currents/heating. Circuitry filters and shielding were implemented to impede or limit the transfer of certain unwanted electromagnetic effects. Prospective multicenter clinical trials to assess the safety and efficacy of the first generation of MR conditional cardiac pacemakers demonstrated no significant alterations in pacing parameters compared to controls. There were no reported complications through the one month visit including no arrhythmias, electrical reset, inhibition of generator output, or adverse sensations. The safe implementation of these new technologies requires an understanding of the well-defined patient and MR system conditions. Although scanning a patient with an MR conditional device following the strictly defined patient and MR system conditions appears straightforward, issues related to patients with pre-existing devices remain complex. Until MR conditional devices are the routine platform for all of these devices, there will still be challenging decisions regarding imaging patients with pre-existing devices where MRI is required to diagnose and manage a potentially life threatening or serious scenario. A range of other devices including ICDs, biventricular devices, and implantable physiologic monitors as well as guidance of medical procedures using MRI technology will require further biomedical device design changes and testing. The development and implementation of cardiac MR conditional devices will continue to require the expertise and collaboration of multiple disciplines and will need to prove safety, effectiveness, and cost effectiveness in patient care. PMID:22032338

  5. Early performance of a miniaturized leadless cardiac pacemaker: the Micra Transcatheter Pacing Study

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Philippe; Duray, Gabor Z.; Steinwender, Clemens; Soejima, Kyoko; Omar, Razali; Mont, Lluís; Boersma, Lucas VA; Knops, Reinoud E.; Chinitz, Larry; Zhang, Shu; Narasimhan, Calambur; Hummel, John; Lloyd, Michael; Simmers, Timothy Alexander; Voigt, Andrew; Laager, Verla; Stromberg, Kurt; Bonner, Matthew D.; Sheldon, Todd J.; Reynolds, Dwight

    2015-01-01

    Aims Permanent cardiac pacing is the only effective treatment for symptomatic bradycardia, but complications associated with conventional transvenous pacing systems are commonly related to the pacing lead and pocket. We describe the early performance of a novel self-contained miniaturized pacemaker. Methods and results Patients having Class I or II indication for VVI pacing underwent implantation of a Micra transcatheter pacing system, from the femoral vein and fixated in the right ventricle using four protractible nitinol tines. Prespecified objectives were >85% freedom from unanticipated serious adverse device events (safety) and <2 V 3-month mean pacing capture threshold at 0.24 ms pulse width (efficacy). Patients were implanted (n = 140) from 23 centres in 11 countries (61% male, age 77.0 ± 10.2 years) for atrioventricular block (66%) or sinus node dysfunction (29%) indications. During mean follow-up of 1.9 ± 1.8 months, the safety endpoint was met with no unanticipated serious adverse device events. Thirty adverse events related to the system or procedure occurred, mostly due to transient dysrhythmias or femoral access complications. One pericardial effusion without tamponade occurred after 18 device deployments. In 60 patients followed to 3 months, mean pacing threshold was 0.51 ± 0.22 V, and no threshold was ≥2 V, meeting the efficacy endpoint (P < 0.001). Average R-wave was 16.1 ± 5.2 mV and impedance was 650.7 ± 130 ohms. Conclusion Early assessment shows the transcatheter pacemaker can safely and effectively be applied. Long-term safety and benefit of the pacemaker will further be evaluated in the trial. Clinical Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT02004873. PMID:26045305

  6. Design of wavelet-based ECG detector for implantable cardiac pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Min, Young-Jae; Kim, Hoon-Ki; Kang, Yu-Ri; Kim, Gil-Su; Park, Jongsun; Kim, Soo-Won

    2013-08-01

    A wavelet Electrocardiogram (ECG) detector for low-power implantable cardiac pacemakers is presented in this paper. The proposed wavelet-based ECG detector consists of a wavelet decomposer with wavelet filter banks, a QRS complex detector of hypothesis testing with wavelet-demodulated ECG signals, and a noise detector with zero-crossing points. In order to achieve high detection accuracy with low power consumption, a multi-scaled product algorithm and soft-threshold algorithm are efficiently exploited in our ECG detector implementation. Our algorithmic and architectural level approaches have been implemented and fabricated in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS technology. The testchip including a low-power analog-to-digital converter (ADC) shows a low detection error-rate of 0.196% and low power consumption of 19.02 μW with a 3 V supply voltage. PMID:23893202

  7. Trends in the incidence and prevalence of cardiac pacemaker insertions in an ageing population

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Pamela J; Stobie, Paul; Knuiman, Matthew W; Briffa, Thomas G; Hobbs, Michael S T

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine contemporary population estimates of the prevalence of cardiac permanent pacemaker (PPM) insertions. Methods A population-based observational study using linked hospital morbidity and death registry data from Western Australia (WA) to identify all incident cases of PPM insertion for adults aged 18?years or older. Prevalence rates were calculated by age and sex for the years 19952009 for the WA population. Results There were 9782 PPMs inserted during 19952009. Prevalence rose across the study period, exceeding 1 in 50 among people aged 75 or older from 2005. This was underpinned by incidence rates which rose with age, being highest in those 85?years or older; over 500/100?000 for men throughout, and over 200/100?000 for women. Rates for patients over 75 were more than double the rates for those aged 6574?years. Women were around 40% of cases overall. The use of dual-chamber and triple-chamber pacing increased across the study period. A cardiac resynchronisation defibrillator was implanted for 58% of patients treated with cardiac resynchronisation therapy. Conclusions Rates of insertion and prevalence of PPM continue to rise with the ageing population in WA. As equilibrium has probably not been reached, the demand for pacing services in similarly well-developed economies is likely to continue to grow. PMID:25512875

  8. Discontinuities, Canards, and Invariant Manifolds in the Phase-Resetting Response of Cardiac Pacemakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogh-Madsen, Trine; Glass, Leon; Doedel, Eusebius; Guevara, Michael R.

    2004-03-01

    Injection of a brief stimulus pulse phase-resets the spontaneous periodic activity of cardiac pacemaker cells: an earlier stimulus generally delays the time of occurrence of the next action potential, while a later one causes an advance. We investigate a model with a fast upstroke velocity (representing a peripheral sinoatrial cell), where the transition from delay to advance appears discontinuous. Formulating the model as populations of single channels with pseudo-random open/close kinetics also reveal a discontinuity in the responses, as it is seen in experiments on some cardiac preparations. In a reduced three-dimensional version of the model we show that when the abrupt transition from delay to advance occurs, the state-point follows ``canard"-like trajectories that lie close to the slow manifold as well as the stable and unstable manifolds of the equilibrium point. Our results suggest that the phase-resetting response is fundamentally continuous, but extremely delicate, and thus demonstrate one way in which experiments might measure discontinuities in the resetting response of a nonlinear oscillator. As such, our results should be applicable to a large range of experimental situations.

  9. Multicellular automaticity of cardiac cell monolayers: effects of density and spatial distribution of pacemaker cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elber Duverger, James; Boudreau-Béland, Jonathan; Le, Minh Duc; Comtois, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Self-organization of pacemaker (PM) activity of interconnected elements is important to the general theory of reaction-diffusion systems as well as for applications such as PM activity in cardiac tissue to initiate beating of the heart. Monolayer cultures of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) are often used as experimental models in studies on cardiac electrophysiology. These monolayers exhibit automaticity (spontaneous activation) of their electrical activity. At low plated density, cells usually show a heterogeneous population consisting of PM and quiescent excitable cells (QECs). It is therefore highly probable that monolayers of NRVMs consist of a heterogeneous network of the two cell types. However, the effects of density and spatial distribution of the PM cells on spontaneous activity of monolayers remain unknown. Thus, a simple stochastic pattern formation algorithm was implemented to distribute PM and QECs in a binary-like 2D network. A FitzHugh-Nagumo excitable medium was used to simulate electrical spontaneous and propagating activity. Simulations showed a clear nonlinear dependency of spontaneous activity (occurrence and amplitude of spontaneous period) on the spatial patterns of PM cells. In most simulations, the first initiation sites were found to be located near the substrate boundaries. Comparison with experimental data obtained from cardiomyocyte monolayers shows important similarities in the position of initiation site activity. However, limitations in the model that do not reflect the complex beat-to-beat variation found in experiments indicate the need for a more realistic cardiomyocyte representation.

  10. Evaluation of the effects of electric fields on implanted cardiac pacemakers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, A.J.; Carstensen, E.

    1985-02-01

    The effects of extra high voltage (EHV) transmission line electric fields on pacemaker function were evaluated in 11 patients with seven different implanted pacemaker models from four manufacturers. Alteration in pacemaker function was demonstrated in five unipolar units (three different models) from two manufacturers during exposure to electric fields ranging from 2 to 9 kV/m, with total body currents from 47 to 175 ..mu..A. These electric fields and body currents are representative of values that can be encountered by individuals standing beneath EHV transmission lines. Transient alterations in pacemaker function observed in this study included inappropriate triggered activity, inhibition of impulse generation, reduction in rate, and reversion from demand to asynchronous mode. Electromagnetic interference from high voltage transmission lines can induce alterations in pacemaker function in certain designs of these devices. However, pacemaker manufacturers can incorporate appropriate circuits in the pacemaker design to eliminate this problem. 8 references.

  11. [Behavior of various activity-controlled cardiac pacemakers in treadmill stress tests with variable slopes].

    PubMed

    Matula, M; Hölzer, K; Zitzmann, E; Schön, H; Alt, E

    1993-02-01

    New activity pacemaker systems with the principle of sensing low-frequency acceleration in the anterior-posterior axis are currently under clinical evaluation. We compared the pacemaker system Relay, which represents this new generation of accelerometer controlled devices, with conventional activity systems sensing pressure and vibration. Ten pacemaker patients with implanted Activitrax, Sensolog or Relay pacemakers and 10 healthy volunteers with externally strapped-on pacemakers were studied. The aim was to evaluate the systems' ability to distinguish different workloads during graded treadmill testing with changes in speed and/or slope. The rate adaption of the new acceleration sensing pacemakers was found to be more adequate compared to vibration and pressure-sensing pacemakers when only the slope of the treadmill was varied. The acceleration-sensing pacemaker adjusted its rate according to the workload largely independent from the type of stress (n.s.). With the vibration and pressure-sensing pacemakers, however, significant differences (p < 0.05) were seen between rate adaption in the two stress test modes. The new generation of acceleration-sensing pacemakers has certain advantages over conventional vibration-sensitive systems in terms of a higher sensitivity to varying workloads and higher specificity to the type of exercise performed. PMID:8465563

  12. Genetic Regulation of Sinoatrial Node Development and Pacemaker Program in the Venous Pole

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Wenduo; Song, Yingnan; Huang, Zhen; Zhang, Yanding; Chen, Yiping

    2015-01-01

    The definitive sinoatrial node (SAN), the primary pacemaker of the mammalian heart, develops from part of pro-pacemaking embryonic venous pole that expresses both Hcn4 and the transcriptional factor Shox2. It is noted that ectopic pacemaking activities originated from the myocardial sleeves of the pulmonary vein and systemic venous return, both derived from the Shox2+ pro-pacemaking cells in the venous pole, cause atrial fibrillation. However, the developmental link between the pacemaker properties in the embryonic venous pole cells and the SAN remains largely uncharacterized. Furthermore, the genetic program for the development of heterogeneous populations of the SAN is also under-appreciated. Here, we review the literature for a better understanding of the heterogeneous development of the SAN in relation to that of the sinus venosus myocardium and pulmonary vein myocardium. We also attempt to revisit genetic models pertinent to the development of pacemaker activities in the perspective of a Shox2-Nkx2-5 epistatic antagonism. Finally, we describe recent efforts in deciphering the regulatory networks for pacemaker development by genome-wide approaches. PMID:26682210

  13. Deep bradycardia and heart block caused by inducible cardiac-specific knockout of the pacemaker channel gene Hcn4

    PubMed Central

    Baruscotti, Mirko; Bucchi, Annalisa; Viscomi, Carlo; Mandelli, Giacomo; Consalez, Giacomo; Gnecchi-Rusconi, Tomaso; Montano, Nicola; Casali, Karina Rabello; Micheloni, Stefano; Barbuti, Andrea; DiFrancesco, Dario

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac pacemaking generation and modulation rely on the coordinated activity of several processes. Although a wealth of evidence indicates a relevant role of the If (“funny,” or pacemaker) current, whose molecular constituents are the hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels and particularly HCN4, work with mice where Hcn genes were knocked out, or functionally modified, has challenged this view. However, no previous studies used a cardiac-specific promoter to induce HCN4 ablation in adult mice. We report here that, in an inducible and cardiac-specific HCN4 knockout (ciHCN4-KO) mouse model, ablation of HCN4 consistently leads to progressive development of severe bradycardia (∼50% reduction of original rate) and AV block, eventually leading to heart arrest and death in about 5 d. In vitro analysis of sinoatrial node (SAN) myocytes isolated from ciHCN4-KO mice at the mean time of death revealed a strong reduction of both the If current (by ∼70%) and of the spontaneous rate (by ∼60%). In agreement with functional results, immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis showed reduced expression of HCN4 protein in SAN tissue and cells. In ciHCN4-KO animals, the residual If was normally sensitive to β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) modulation, and the permanence of rate response to β-AR stimulation was observed both in vivo and in vitro. Our data show that cardiac HCN4 channels are essential for normal heart impulse generation and conduction in adult mice and support the notion that dysfunctional HCN4 channels can be a direct cause of rhythm disorders. This work contributes to identifying the molecular mechanism responsible for cardiac pacemaking. PMID:21220308

  14. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of cardiac pacemaker batteries with reduced heat input

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerschbach, P.W.; Hinkley, D.A.

    1997-03-01

    The effects of Nd:YAG laser beam welding process parameters on the resulting heat input in 304L stainless steel cardiac pacemaker batteries have been studied. By careful selection of process parameters, the results can be used to reduce temperatures near glass-to-metal seals and assure hermeticity in laser beam welding of high reliability components. Three designed response surface experiments were used to compare welding performance with lenses of varying focal lengths. The measured peak temperatures at the glass-to-metal seals varied from 65 to 140 C (149 to 284 F) and depended strongly on the levels of the experimental factors. It was found that welds of equivalent size can be made with significantly reduced temperatures. The reduction in battery temperatures has been attributed to an increase in the melting efficiency. This increase is thought to be due primarily to increased travel speeds, which were facilitated by high peak powers and low pulse energies. For longer focal length lenses, weld fusion zone widths were found to be greater even without a corresponding increase in the size of the weld. It was also found that increases in laser beam irradiance either by higher peak powers or smaller spot sizes created deeper and larger welds. These gains were attributed to an increase in the laser energy transfer efficiency.

  15. Radiation effect on implanted pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Pourhamidi, A.H.

    1983-10-01

    It was previously thought that diagnostic or therapeutic ionizing radiation did not have an adverse effect on the function of cardiac pacemakers. Recently, however, some authors have reported damaging effect of therapeutic radiation on cardiac pulse generators. An analysis of a recently-extracted pacemaker documented the effect of radiation on the pacemaker pulse generator.

  16. The first seven years of implantation of permanent cardiac pacemakers in a small urban community in central Croatia.

    PubMed

    Horvat, Davor

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the situation with implantation of cardiac pacemakers and to critically evaluate the possibility of this method of treatment. The study was conducted from 2001 to 2007. Data on a total of 211 operations were included in the study. There were 121 (57.3%) male patients, mean age 69.7 years, and 90 (42.7%) female patients, mean age 74.5 years. Total number of operations increased from 18 in 2001 to 24 in 2002, 28 in 2003, 38 in 2004, 38 in 2005, 30 in 2006 and 35 in 2007. Primo implantation was carried out in 196 (92.9%) cases. The following types of pacemakers were used: VVI in 79 (40.3%), VVIR in 73 (37.2%), DDD in 7 (3.6%), DDDR in 18 (9.2%), VDD in 17 (8.7%) and AAIR in 2 (1.0%) cases. ECG indication was second degree heart block in 40, third degree heart block in 86, chronic atrial fibrillation with bradyarrhythmia in 57, sick sinus syndrome in 27 cases and trifascicular block in one case. The symptoms included dizziness in 126, syncope in 52, dyspnea in 45, bradycardia in 12, chest pain in 3 and cerebral dysfunction in 2 cases. In conclusion, our patients now receive appropriate treatment within a shorter time, thus reducing pressure upon large cardiac surgery centers. However, efforts should be continuously invested in approaching European standards of artificial pacemaker implantation. PMID:19388470

  17. Immediate and 12 months follow up of function and lead integrity after cranial MRI in 356 patients with conventional cardiac pacemakers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Conventional cardiac pacemakers are still often regarded as a contraindication to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We conducted this study to support the hypothesis that it is safe to scan patients with cardiac pacemakers in a 1.5 Tesla MRI, if close supervision and monitoring as well as adequate pre- and postscan programming is provided. Methods We followed up 356 patients (age 61.3 ± 9.1 yrs., 229 men) with single (n = 132) or dual chamber (n = 224) cardiac pacemakers and urgent indication for a cranial MRI for 12 months. The scans were performed at 1.5T. During the scan patients were monitored with a 3-lead ECG and pulse oximetry. Prior to the scan pacemakers were programmed according to our own protocol. Results All 356 scans were completed without complications. No arrhythmias were induced, programmed parameters remained unchanged. No pacemaker dysfunction was identified. Follow-up examinations were performed immediately, 2 weeks, 2, 6, and 12 months after the scan. There was no significant change of pacing capture threshold (ventricular 0.9 ± 0.4 V@0.4 ms, atrial 0.9 ± 0.3 V@0.4 ms) immediately (ventricular 1.0 ± 0.3 V@0.4 ms, atrial 0.9 ± 0.4 V@0.4 ms) or at 12 months follow-up examinations (ventricular 0.9 ± 0.2 V@0.4 ms, atrial 0.9 ± 0.3 V@0.4 ms). There was no significant change in sensing threshold (8.0 ± 4.0 mV vs. 8.1 ± 4.2 mV ventricular lead, 2.0 ± 0.9 mV vs. 2.1 ± 1.0 mV atrial lead) or lead impedance (ventricular 584 ± 179 Ω vs. 578 ± 188 Ω, atrial 534 ± 176 Ω vs. 532 ± 169 Ω) after 12 months. Conclusions This supports the evidence that patients with conventional pacemakers can safely undergo cranial MRI in a 1.5T system with suitable preparation, supervision and precautions. Long term follow-up did not reveal significant changes in pacing capture nor sensing threshold. PMID:24903354

  18. Angiotensin II promotes differentiation of mouse c-kit-positive cardiac stem cells into pacemaker-like cells.

    PubMed

    Xue, Cheng; Zhang, Jun; Lv, Zhan; Liu, Hui; Huang, Congxin; Yang, Jing; Wang, Ten

    2015-05-01

    Cardiac stem cells (CSCs) can differentiate into cardiac muscle‑like cells; however, it remains unknown whether CSCs may possess the ability to differentiate into pacemaker cells. The aim of the present study was to determine whether angiotensin II (Ang II) could promote the specialization of CSCs into pacemaker‑like cells. Mouse CSCs were treated with Ang II from day 3-5, after cell sorting. The differentiation potential of the cells was then analyzed by morphological analysis, flow cytometry, reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and patch clamp analysis. Treatment with Ang II resulted in an increased number of cardiac muscle‑like cells (32.7 ± 4.8% vs. 21.5 ± 4.8%; P<0.05), and inhibition of smooth muscle‑like cells (6.2 ± 7.3% vs. 20.5 ± 5.1%; P<0.05). Following treatment with Ang II, increased levels of the cardiac progenitor‑specific markers GATA4 and Nkx2.5 were observed in the cells. Furthermore, the transcript levels of pacemaker function‑related genes, including hyperpolarization‑activated cyclic nucleotide‑gated (HCN)2, HCN4, T‑box (Tbx)2 and Tbx3, were significantly upregulated. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the increased number of pacemaker‑like cells. The pacemaker current (If) was recorded in the cells derived from CSCs, treated with Ang II. In conclusion, treatment of CSCs with Ang II during the differentiation process modified cardiac‑specific gene expression and resulted in the enhanced formation of pacemaker‑like cells. PMID:25572000

  19. The influence of anatomical and physiological parameters on the interference voltage at the input of unipolar cardiac pacemakers in low frequency electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joosten, S.; Pammler, K.; Silny, J.

    2009-02-01

    The problem of electromagnetic interference of electronic implants such as cardiac pacemakers has been well known for many years. An increasing number of field sources in everyday life and occupational environment leads unavoidably to an increased risk for patients with electronic implants. However, no obligatory national or international safety regulations exist for the protection of this patient group. The aim of this study is to find out the anatomical and physiological worst-case conditions for patients with an implanted pacemaker adjusted to unipolar sensing in external time-varying electric fields. The results of this study with 15 volunteers show that, in electric fields, variation of the interference voltage at the input of a cardiac pacemaker adds up to 200% only because of individual factors. These factors should be considered in human studies and in the setting of safety regulations.

  20. [Sport for pacemaker patients].

    PubMed

    Israel, C W

    2012-06-01

    Sport activity is an important issue in many patients with a pacemaker either because they performed sport activities before pacemaker implantation to reduce the cardiovascular risk or to improve the course of an underlying cardiovascular disease (e.g. coronary artery disease, heart failure) by sports. Compared to patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) the risks from underlying cardiovascular disease (e.g. ischemia, heart failure), arrhythmia, lead dysfunction or inappropriate therapy are less important or absent. Sport is contraindicated in dyspnea at rest, acute heart failure, new complex arrhythmia, acute myocarditis and acute myocardial infarction, valvular disease with indications for intervention and surgery and comorbidities which prevent physical activity. Patients with underlying cardiovascular disease (including hypertension) should preferably perform types and levels of physical activity that are aerobic (with dynamic exercise) such as running, swimming, cycling instead of sport with high anaerobic demands and high muscular workload. In heart failure, studies demonstrated advantages of isometric sport that increases the amount of muscle, thereby preventing cardiac cachexia. Sport with a risk of blows to the chest or physical contact (e.g. boxing, rugby, martial arts) should be avoided. Implantation, programming and follow-up should respect specific precautions to allow optimal physical activity with a pacemaker including implantation of bipolar leads on the side contralateral to the dominant hand, individual programming of the upper sensor and tracking rate and regular exercise testing. PMID:22854824

  1. [Pacemaker longevity. Replacement of the device].

    PubMed

    Deharo, J C; Djiane, P

    2005-01-01

    Life expectancy of patients implanted with cardiac pacemakers has largely increased, so that generator replacement is becoming an important part of the activity in most of the implanting centers. In more than 70% of the cases, the indication for pacemaker replacement is normal battery depletion. Since the new devices are more and more sophisticated and smaller, longevity optimization becomes a real challenge. The main determinant of pacemaker longevity is the output programmed for the pulse generator. It mainly depends on the output voltage and duration settings. The pacing impedance and the percentage of time with pacing are other major determinants of pacemaker longevity. Each manufacturer provides specific policy but the battery voltage and internal impedance are the more accurate and easy-to-obtain battery depletion parameters. The magnet rate is still frequently used but is less valuable since it can drop abruptly at the end of battery life. The complication rate of pacemaker replacement is three-fold higher than the one of first implant. Infections, skin erosions and lead related complications are not uncommon. The replacement should be systematically preceded by the checking of several points including the patient's pacemaker dependency, the necessity to replace or extract one or several leads, the venous system status, the compatibility between the new generator and the leads and the necessity to upgrade the pacing system or to change the pacemaker pocket. PMID:15702908

  2. Cardiac pacemakers: design, function and problems. January, 1976-May, 1981 (citations from the International Information Service for the Physics and Engineering Communities data base). Report for January 1976-May 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    This retrospective bibliography contains citations concerning the design, function, and problems of fixed rate and demand implanted cardiac pacemakers. The susceptibility of pacemakers to electromagnetic interference, and the effects of radiation therapy and microwave interception are considered. The reliability of batteries, types of batteries, and other power sources are all discussed. Nondestructive methods for the assessment of cells and pacemaker are included. (Contains 107 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  3. Performance of lithium-iodine and lithium-silver chromate cells in cardiac pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Luksha, E.

    1980-01-01

    Lithium battery powered pacemakers have been manufactured since November, 1972. The in-vivo performance of various solid state lithium-iodine cells of different designs and the non-aqueous lithium-silver chromate is described and compared with projected performance. It is reported that to date all types of cells have shown a perfect record. There has not been a confirmed battery failure. 4 refs.

  4. Evaluation of patients' quality of life aspects after cardiac pacemaker implantation

    PubMed Central

    de Barros, Rubens Tofano; de Carvalho, Sebastião Marcos Ribeiro; Silva, Marcos Augusto de Moraes; Borges, Juliana Bassalobre Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate patients' quality of life aspects after pacemaker implantation, relating it to gender, age, and implantation timespan. Methods A total of 107 clinically stable patients of both genders (49.5% women and 50.5% men) over 18 years old (average 69.3±12.6 years) and presenting an implantation timespan of three to 12 months (average 6.36±2.99 months) were evaluated. The evaluation included personal, clinical, and implant data as well as quality of life questionnaires (AQUAREL and SF-36). Statistical analysis was conducted using the t test and Pearson correlation, with a 5% significance level. Results The lowest SF-36 score referred to physical aspects, and the highest score referred to social aspects. In AQUAREL, the lowest score referred to dyspnea, and the highest referred to discomfort. There was a significant association between gender and quality of life in SF-36 (physical functioning and emotional aspects) and in AQUAREL (dyspnea). A negative correlation was observed between age and quality of life (functional capacity in SF-36, and discomfort in AQUAREL) in relation to implantation timespan, a correlation with vitality from SF-36. Conclusion Lower quality of life scores were found in physical aspects and dyspnea; and higher scores in social aspects and discomfort. Men presented higher quality of life scores related to physical functioning, emotional aspects and dyspnea. As age increases, quality of life worsens regarding functional capacity and discomfort; and the longer the pacemaker implantation timespan, the worse quality of life when it comes to vitality. Gender, age, and implantation timespan influence quality of life; thus, these variables must be considered in strategies for improving quality of life of patients with pacemakers. PMID:24896161

  5. Cell-specific Dynamic Clamp analysis of the role of funny If current in cardiac pacemaking.

    PubMed

    Ravagli, E; Bucchi, A; Bartolucci, C; Paina, M; Baruscotti, M; DiFrancesco, D; Severi, S

    2016-01-01

    We used the Dynamic Clamp technique for i) comparative validation of conflicting computational models of the hyperpolarization-activated funny current, If, and ii) quantification of the role of If in mediating autonomic modulation of heart rate. Experimental protocols based on the injection of a real-time recalculated synthetic If current in sinoatrial rabbit cells were developed. Preliminary results of experiments mimicking the autonomic modulation of If demonstrated the need for a customization procedure to compensate for cellular heterogeneity. For this reason, we used a cell-specific approach, scaling the maximal conductance of the injected current based on the cell's spontaneous firing rate. The pacemaking rate, which was significantly reduced after application of Ivabradine, was restored by the injection of synthetic current based on the Severi-DiFrancesco formulation, while the injection of synthetic current based on the Maltsev-Lakatta formulation did not produce any significant variation. A positive virtual shift of the If activation curve, mimicking the Isoprenaline effects, led to a significant increase in pacemaking rate (+17.3 ± 6.7%, p < 0.01), although of lower magnitude than that induced by real Isoprenaline (+45.0 ± 26.1%). Similarly, a negative virtual shift of the activation curve significantly lowered the pacemaking rate (-11.8 ± 1.9%, p < 0.001), as did the application of real Acetylcholine (-20.5 ± 5.1%). The Dynamic Clamp approach, applied to the If study in cardiomyocytes for the first time and rate-adapted to manage intercellular variability, indicated that: i) the quantitative description of the If current in the Severi-DiFrancesco model accurately reproduces the effects of the real current on rabbit sinoatrial cell pacemaking rate and ii) a significant portion (50-60%) of the physiological autonomic rate modulation is due to the shift of the If activation curve. PMID:26718599

  6. Small bowel capsule endoscopy in patients with cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators: Outcome analysis using telemetry review

    PubMed Central

    Cuschieri, Justin R; Osman, Mohammed N; Wong, Richard CK; Chak, Amitabh; Isenberg, Gerard A

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine if there were any interactions between cardiac devices and small bowel capsules secondary to electromagnetic interference (EMI) in patients who have undergone small bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE). METHODS: Authors conducted a chart review of 20 patients with a cardiac pacemaker (CP) or implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) who underwent continuous electrocardiographic monitoring during their SBCE from 2003-2008. authors searched for unexplained electrocardiogram (ECG) findings, changes in CP and ICD set parameters, any abnormality in transmitted capsule data, and adverse clinical events. RESULTS: There were no adverse events or hemodynamically significant arrhythmias reported. CP and ICD set parameters were preserved. The majority of ECG abnormalities were also found in pre- or post- SBCE ECG tracings and the CP behavior during arrhythmias appeared appropriate. Two patients seemed to have episodes of undersensing by the CP. However, similar findings were documented in ECGs taken outside the time frame of the SBCE. One patient was observed to have a low signal encountered from the capsule resulting in lack of localization, but no images were lost. CONCLUSION: Capsule-induced EMI remains a possibility but is unlikely to be clinically important. CP-induced interference of SBCE is also possible, but is infrequent and does not result in loss of images transmitted by the capsule. PMID:22442746

  7. Impaired signaling intrinsic to sinoatrial node pacemaker cells affects heart rate variability during cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Yaniv, Yael; Lyashkov, Alexey E.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    The normal heart beat intervals are neither strictly stationary nor completely random, and continuously shift from one period to another. Decoding the ECG identifies this “hidden” information that imparts inherent complexity to the heart-beating interval time series. Loss of this complexity in cardiovascular disease is manifested as a reduction in heart rate variability (HRV) and this reduction correlates with an increase in both morbidity and mortality. Because HRV measurements are noninvasive and easy to perform, they have emerged as an important tool in cardiology. However, the identities of specific mechanisms that underline the changes in HRV that occur in cardiovascular diseases remain largely unknown. Changes in HRV have mainly been interpreted on a neural basis, ie due to changes in autonomic impulses to the heart: sympathetic activity decreases both the average heart beat interval and HRV, and parasympathetic activity increases both. It has now become clear, however, that the heart rate and HRV are also determined by intrinsic properties of the pacemaker cells that comprise the sinoatrial node, and the responses of these properties to autonomic receptor stimulation. Here we review how changes in the properties of coupled-clock mechanisms intrinsic to pacemaker cells that comprise the sinoatrial node and their impaired response to autonomic receptor stimulation are implicated in the changes of HRV observed in heart diseases. PMID:26251764

  8. [Intracorporeal cardiac pacemakers for refractory tachycardia (excluding atrial disease). Apropos of 18 cases].

    PubMed

    Leclercq, J F; Coumel, P; Slama, R

    1979-12-01

    The treatment of paroxysmal tachycardia by the use of permanent pacing to prevent or terminate attacks is discussed. The series comprises 18 patients with follow-up periods ranging from 1 to 12 years. In 6 cases the indication for pacing was atrial tachy-arrythmias favourised by bradycardia (5 of whom had vagally- induced atrial arrythmias). The atrial pacemaker successfully prevented attacks in 4 out of 6 cases. Three cases of chronic reciprocating tachycardia were successfully treated by simultaneous atrial and ventricular pacing or using sequential pacing with a very short P-R interval. Eight cases of paroxysmal orthodromic reciprocating tachycardia in the WPW syndrome were paced: in 5 cases pacing was employed to terminate attacks by atrial (3 cases) or ventricular (2 cases) stimulation, in the other 3 cases pacing was used to prevent the bradycardia which favourised the initiation of tachycardia. Good results were obtained in all 8 cases. Ventricular stimulation was used to terminate attacks in one patient with refractory ventricular tachycardia but the patient had a sudden death probably caused by the pacemaker. The place of these different pacing techniques with respect to medical treatment and specialised arrhythmia surgery is discussed. PMID:120143

  9. Dosimetric perturbations due to an implanted cardiac pacemaker in MammoSite{sup Registered-Sign} treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Wonmo; Kim, Siyong; Kim, Jung-in; Lee, Jae-gi; Shin, Young-Joo; Jung, Jae-Yong; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate dose perturbations for pacemaker-implanted patients in partial breast irradiation using high dose rate (HDR) balloon brachytherapy. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed to calculate dose distributions involving a pacemaker in Ir-192 HDR balloon brachytherapy. Dose perturbations by varying balloon-to-pacemaker distances (BPD = 50 or 100 mm) and concentrations of iodine contrast medium (2.5%, 5.0%, 7.5%, and 10.0% by volume) in the balloon were investigated for separate parts of the pacemaker (i.e., battery and substrate). Relative measurements using an ion-chamber were also performed to confirm MC results. Results: The MC and measured results in homogeneous media without a pacemaker agreed with published data within 2% from the balloon surface to 100 mm BPD. Further their dose distributions with a pacemaker were in a comparable agreement. The MC results showed that doses over the battery were increased by a factor of 3, compared to doses without a pacemaker. However, there was no significant dose perturbation in the middle of substrate but up to 70% dose increase in the substrate interface with the titanium capsule. The attenuation by iodine contrast medium lessened doses delivered to the pacemaker by up to 9%. Conclusions: Due to inhomogeneity of pacemaker and contrast medium as well as low-energy photons in Ir-192 HDR balloon brachytherapy, the actual dose received in a pacemaker is different from the homogeneous medium-based dose and the external beam-based dose. Therefore, the dose perturbations should be considered for pacemaker-implanted patients when evaluating a safe clinical distance between the balloon and pacemaker.

  10. Quantitative Assessment of Artifacts on Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Patients with Pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Takeshi; Hansford, Rozann; Zviman, Menekhem M; Kolandaivelu, Aravindan; Bluemke, David A; Berger, Ronald D; Calkins, Hugh; Halperin, Henry R; Nazarian, Saman

    2011-01-01

    Background The safety and clinical utility of magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5T in patients with cardiac implantable devices such as pacemakers (PM) and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) have been reported. This study aims to evaluate the extent of artifacts on cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in patients with PM and ICD (PM/ICD). Methods and Results A total of 71 CMR studies were performed with an established safety protocol in patients with pre-pectoral PM/ICD. The artifact area around the PM/ICD generator was measured in all short axis (SA), horizontal (HLA) and vertical long axis (VLA) SSFP cine planes. The location and extent of artifacts were also assessed in all SA (20 sectors/plane), HLA, and VLA (6 sectors/plane) late gadolinium enhanced CMR (LGE-CMR) planes. The artifact area on cine CMR was significantly larger with ICD versus PM generators in each plane (P<0.001, respectively). In patients with left-sided ICD or biventricular ICD systems, the percentages of sectors with any artifacts on LGE-CMR were 53.7%, 48.0% and 49.2% in SA, HLA and VLA planes, respectively. Meanwhile, patients with left-sided PM or right-sided PM/ICD had fewer artifacts. Anterior and apical regions were severely affected by artifact due to left-sided PM/ICD generators. Conclusions In contrast to patients with right-sided PM/ICD and left-sided PM, the anterior and apical left ventricle can be affected by susceptibility artifacts in patients with left-sided ICD. Artifact reduction methodologies will be necessary to improve the performance of CMR in patients with left sided ICD systems. PMID:21946701

  11. Electromagnetic interference from lasers and intense light sources in the treatment of patients with artificial pacemakers and other implantable cardiac devices.

    PubMed

    Lister, Tom; Grant, Lindsay; Lee, Siu-Man; Cole, Richard P; Jones, Anthony; Taylor, Timothy; Mayo, Angela; Wright, Philip A

    2015-07-01

    Measurements of the electric and magnetic field strengths surrounding six laser systems and one intense pulsed light system were carried out. The results were compared to exposure limits published by cardiac device manufacturers to assess the risk of electromagnetic interference to implantable cardiac devices such as pacemakers or implantable cardioverter defibrillators. The majority of lasers assessed in this study were found to produce electric and magnetic field strengths below the published exposure limits for cardiac devices. However, the low-frequency electric field and static magnetic field of both the CO2 laser and the ruby laser were found to exceed these limits. Ensuring that a small separation is maintained at all times between the laser unit and any patient with a pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator appears to be a sensible expedient in avoiding overexposure of an implantable cardiac device to electromagnetic interference. Due to the single-shot fast discharge nature of the intense pulsed light system, changes in electromagnetic field strength were too fast for some of the measuring equipment used in this study to register accurate readings during operation. PMID:24162308

  12. Radiography of Cardiac Conduction Devices: A Pictorial Review of Pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Ayala, Stephanie C; Santacana-Laffitte, Guido; Maldonado, José

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac conduction devices (CCDs) depend on correct anatomic positioning to function properly. Chest radiography is the preferred imaging modality to evaluate CCD's anatomic location, lead wire integrity, and help in identifying several complications. In this pictorial review, our goal is to familiarize radiologists with CCD implantation techniques, appropriate positioning of the device, common causes of malfunction, methods to improve report accuracy, and assure maximal therapeutic benefit. PMID:25806132

  13. A pilot study of a mindfulness based stress reduction program in adolescents with implantable cardioverter defibrillators or pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Freedenberg, Vicki A; Thomas, Sue A; Friedmann, Erika

    2015-04-01

    Adolescents with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) or pacemakers (PMs) face unique challenges that can cause psychosocial distress. Psychosocial interventions are effective for adults with cardiac devices and could potentially impact adolescents' adjustment to these devices. Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a structured psycho-educational program that includes meditation, yoga, and group support and has been studied extensively among adults. This study examined the feasibility of the MBSR program for adolescents with ICDs/PMs, a population previously unexamined in the research literature. The participants completed measures of anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and coping (Responses to Stress Questionnaire) at baseline and after the six-session MBSR intervention. Mean age of the cohort (n = 10) was 15 3 years, 6 were male, 6 had a PM, and 4 had an ICD. Feasibility was demonstrated by successful recruitment of 10 participants, 100 % participation and completion. Anxiety decreased significantly following the intervention, with a large effect size, t[9] = 3.67, p < .01, ? (2) = .59. Anxiety frequency decreased from baseline to post-intervention (Fisher's exact test p = .024), and 90 % of participants reported decreased anxiety scores post-intervention. Coping skills related negatively to anxiety (r = -.65, p = .04) and depression (r = -.88, p = .001). Post-intervention, the group independently formed their own Facebook group and requested to continue meeting monthly. Although generalizability is limited due to the small sample size, this successful pilot study paves the way for larger studies to examine the efficacy of MBSR interventions in adolescents with high-risk cardiac diagnoses. PMID:25519914

  14. [Percutaneous implantable transcatheter pacemaker].

    PubMed

    Meyer, Christian; Jungen, Christiane; Gosau, Nils; Hoffmann, Boris; Eickholt, Christian; Willems, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Electrical cardiac pacing today is the standard therapy for symptomatic bradycardia. Importantly, despite technical advantages, complications associated with conventional transvenous pacing leads and pockets are still challenging in a relevant number of patients. Beyond cosmetic benefits, miniaturized leadless pacemaker may partly overcome these limitations and beneficially influence implantation-related physical restrictions. Initial findings with single-chamber pacemakers for right ventricular pacing, which are completely implanted via a femoral venous vascular access, are promizing. In summary, leadless pacing offers novel perspectives regarding cardiac implantable electronic devices although acute safety and the long-term performance of these systems needs to be determined in more detail. PMID:27078248

  15. Cardiac resynchronization therapy pacemaker: critical appraisal of the adaptive CRT-P device

    PubMed Central

    Daoud, Georges E; Houmsse, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective and well-established therapy for patients suffering with heart failure, left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction (ejection fraction ≤35%), and electrical dyssynchrony, demonstrated by a surface QRS duration of ≥120 ms. Patients undergoing treatment with CRT have shown significant improvement in functional class, quality of life, LV ejection fraction, exercise capacity, hemodynamics, and reverse remodeling of LV, and ultimately, morbidity and mortality. However, 30%–40% of patients who receive a CRT device may not show improvement, and they are termed as non responders. The nonresponders have a poor prognosis; several methods have been developed to try to enhance response to CRT. Echocardiography-guided optimization of CRT has not resulted in significant clinical benefit, since it is done at rest with the patient in supine position. An ideal optimization strategy would provide continuous monitoring and adjustment of device pacing to provide maximal cardiac resynchronization, under a multitude of physiologic states. Intrinsic activation of the right ventricle (RV) with paced activation of the RV, even in the setting of biventricular (BiV) pacing, may result in an adverse effect on cardiac performance. With this physiology, the use of LV-only pacing may be preferred and may enhance CRT. Adaptive CRT is a novel device-based algorithm that was designed to achieve patient-specific adjustment in CRT so as to provide appropriate BiV pacing or LV-only pacing. This article will review the goals of CRT optimization, and implementation and outcomes associated with adaptive CRT. PMID:26848278

  16. Cardiac resynchronization therapy pacemaker: critical appraisal of the adaptive CRT-P device.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Georges E; Houmsse, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective and well-established therapy for patients suffering with heart failure, left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction (ejection fraction ?35%), and electrical dyssynchrony, demonstrated by a surface QRS duration of ?120 ms. Patients undergoing treatment with CRT have shown significant improvement in functional class, quality of life, LV ejection fraction, exercise capacity, hemodynamics, and reverse remodeling of LV, and ultimately, morbidity and mortality. However, 30%-40% of patients who receive a CRT device may not show improvement, and they are termed as non responders. The nonresponders have a poor prognosis; several methods have been developed to try to enhance response to CRT. Echocardiography-guided optimization of CRT has not resulted in significant clinical benefit, since it is done at rest with the patient in supine position. An ideal optimization strategy would provide continuous monitoring and adjustment of device pacing to provide maximal cardiac resynchronization, under a multitude of physiologic states. Intrinsic activation of the right ventricle (RV) with paced activation of the RV, even in the setting of biventricular (BiV) pacing, may result in an adverse effect on cardiac performance. With this physiology, the use of LV-only pacing may be preferred and may enhance CRT. Adaptive CRT is a novel device-based algorithm that was designed to achieve patient-specific adjustment in CRT so as to provide appropriate BiV pacing or LV-only pacing. This article will review the goals of CRT optimization, and implementation and outcomes associated with adaptive CRT. PMID:26848278

  17. Pacemaker (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A pacemaker is a small, battery-operated electronic device which is inserted under the skin to help the heart beat regularly and at an appropriate rate. The pacemaker has leads that travel through a large vein ...

  18. Pacemakers and Implantable Defibrillators

    MedlinePlus

    ... pattern. Most arrhythmias result from problems in the electrical system of the heart. If your arrhythmia is serious, you may need a cardiac pacemaker or an implantable cardioverter defibrillator ... heart rhythms. It uses electrical pulses to prompt the heart to beat at ...

  19. Novel cardiac pacemaker-based human model of periodic breathing to develop real-time, pre-emptive technology for carbon dioxide stabilisation

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Resham; Giannoni, Alberto; Willson, Keith; Manisty, Charlotte H; Mebrate, Yoseph; Kyriacou, Andreas; Yadav, Hemang; Unsworth, Beth; Sutton, Richard; Mayet, Jamil; Hughes, Alun D; Francis, Darrel P

    2014-01-01

    Background Constant flow and concentration CO2 has previously been efficacious in attenuating ventilatory oscillations in periodic breathing (PB) where oscillations in CO2 drive ventilatory oscillations. However, it has the undesirable effect of increasing end-tidal CO2, and ventilation. We tested, in a model of PB, a dynamic CO2 therapy that aims to attenuate pacemaker-induced ventilatory oscillations while minimising CO2 dose. Methods First, pacemakers were manipulated in 12 pacemaker recipients, 6 with heart failure (ejection fraction (EF)=23.7±7.3%) and 6 without heart failure, to experimentally induce PB. Second, we applied a real-time algorithm of pre-emptive dynamic exogenous CO2 administration, and tested different timings. Results We found that cardiac output alternation using pacemakers successfully induced PB. Dynamic CO2 therapy, when delivered coincident with hyperventilation, attenuated 57% of the experimentally induced oscillations in end-tidal CO2: SD/mean 0.06±0.01 untreated versus 0.04±0.01 with treatment (p<0.0001) and 0.02±0.01 in baseline non-modified breathing. This translated to a 56% reduction in induced ventilatory oscillations: SD/mean 0.19±0.09 untreated versus 0.14±0.06 with treatment (p=0.001) and 0.10±0.03 at baseline. Of note, end-tidal CO2 did not significantly rise when dynamic CO2 was applied to the model (4.84±0.47 vs 4.91± 0.45 kPa, p=0.08). Furthermore, mean ventilation was also not significantly increased by dynamic CO2 compared with untreated (7.8±1.2 vs 8.4±1.2 L/min, p=0.17). Conclusions Cardiac pacemaker manipulation can be used to induce PB experimentally. In this induced PB, delivering CO2 coincident with hyperventilation, ventilatory oscillations can be substantially attenuated without a significant increase in end-tidal CO2 or ventilation. Dynamic CO2 administration might be developed into a clinical treatment for PB. Trial Registration number ISRCTN29344450. PMID:25332798

  20. Evidence dromyosuppressin acts at posterior and anterior pacemakers to decrease the fast and the slow cardiac activity in the blowfly Protophormia terraenovae.

    PubMed

    Angioy, Anna Maria; Muroni, Patrizia; Barbarossa, Iole Tomassini; McCormick, Jennifer; Nichols, Ruthann

    2007-03-01

    The molecular complexity of the simple blowfly heart makes it an attractive preparation to delineate cardiovascular mechanisms. Blowfly cardiac activity consists of a fast, high-frequency signal phase alternating with a slow, low-frequency signal phase triggered by pacemakers located in the posterior abdominal heart and anterior thoracocephalic aorta, respectively. Mechanisms underlying FMRFamide-related peptides (FaRPs) effects on heart contractions are not well understood. Here, we report antisera generated to a FaRP, dromyosuppressin (DMS, TDVDHVFLRFamide), recognized neuronal processes that innervated the blowfly Protophormia terraenovae heart and aorta. Dromyosuppressin caused a reversible cardiac arrest. High- and low-frequency signals were abolished after which they resumed; however, the concentration-dependent resumption of the fast phase differed from the slow phase. Dromyosuppressin decreased the frequency of cardiac activity in a dose-dependent manner with threshold values between 5 fM and 0.5 fM (fast phase), and 0.5 fM and 0.1 fM (slow phase). Dromyosuppressin structure-activity relationship (SAR) for the decrease of the fast-phase frequency was not the same as the SAR for the decrease of the slow-phase frequency. The alanyl-substituted analog TDVDHVFLAFamide ([Ala9] DMS) was inactive on the fast phase, but active on the slow phase, a novel finding. FaRPs including myosuppressins are reported to require the C-terminal RFamide for activity. Our data are consistent with the conclusions DMS acts on posterior and anterior cardiac tissue to play a role in regulating the fast and slow phases of cardiac activity, respectively, and ligand-receptor binding requirements of the abdominal and thoracocephalic pacemakers are different. PMID:17141921

  1. Evidence dromyosuppressin acts at posterior and anterior pacemakers to decrease the fast and the slow cardiac activity in the blowfly Protophormia terraenovae

    PubMed Central

    Angioy, Anna Maria; Muroni, Patrizia; Barbarossa, Iole Tomassini; McCormick, Jennifer; Nichols, Ruthann

    2009-01-01

    The molecular complexity of the simple blowfly heart makes it an attractive preparation to delineate cardiovascular mechanisms. Blowfly cardiac activity consists of a fast, high frequency signal phase alternating with a slow, low frequency signal phase triggered by pacemakers located in the posterior abdominal heart and anterior thoracocephalic aorta, respectively. Mechanisms underlying FMRFamide-related peptides (FaRPs) effects on heart contractions are not well understood. Here, we report antisera generated to a FaRP, dromyosuppressin (DMS, TDVDHVFLRFamide), recognized neuronal processes that innervated the blowfly Protophormia terraenovae heart and aorta. Dromyosuppressin caused a reversible cardiac arrest. High and low frequency signals were abolished after which they resumed; however, the concentration dependent resumption of the fast phase differed from the slow phase. Dromyosuppressin decreased the frequency of cardiac activity in a dose dependent manner with threshold values between 5 fM and 0.5 fM (fast phase) and 0.5 fM and 0.1 fM (slow phase). Dromyosuppressin structure-activity relationship (SAR) for the decrease of the fast phase frequency was not the same as the SAR for the decrease of the slow phase frequency. The alanyl-substituted analog TDVDHVFLAFamide ([Ala9] DMS) was inactive on the fast phase, but active on the slow phase, a novel finding. FaRPs including myosuppressins are reported to require the C-terminal RFamide for activity. Our data are consistent with the conclusions DMS acts on posterior and anterior cardiac tissue to play a role in regulating the fast and slow phases of cardiac activity, respectively, and ligand-receptor binding requirements of the abdominal and thoracocephalic pacemakers are different. PMID:17141921

  2. Mapping Cardiac Pacemaker Circuits: Methodological Puzzles of the Sino-Atrial Node Optical Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Efimov, Igor R.; Fedorov, Vadim V.; Joung, Boyoung; Lin, Shien-Fong

    2009-01-01

    Historically, milestones in science are usually associated with methodological breakthroughs. Likewise, the advent of electrocardiography, microelectrode recordings and more recently optical mapping have ushered in new periods of significance of advancement in elucidating basic mechanisms in cardiac electrophysiology. As with any novel technique, however, data interpretation is challenging and should be approached with caution, as it cannot be simply extrapolated from previously used methodologies and with experience and time eventually becomes validated. A good example of this is the use of optical mapping in the sinoatrial node (SAN): when microelectrode and optical recordings are obtained from the same site in myocardium, significantly different results may be noted with respect to signal morphology and as a result have to be interpreted by a different set of principles. Given the rapid spread of the use of optical mapping, careful evaluation must be made in terms of methodology with respect to interpretation of data gathered by optical sensors from fluorescent potential-sensitive dyes. Different interpretations of experimental data may lead to different mechanistic conclusions. This review attempts to address the origin and interpretation of the “double component” morphology in the optical action potentials obtained from the SAN region. One view is that these two components represent distinctive signals from the sinoatrial node and atrial cells, and can be fully separated with signal processing. A second view is that the first component preceding the phase 0 activation represents the membrane currents and intracellular calcium transients induced diastolic depolarization from the SAN. While the consensus from both groups is that ionic mechanisms, namely the joint action of the membrane and calcium automaticity, are important in the SAN function, it is unresolved whether the double-component originates from the recording methodology or represents the underlying physiology. This overview aims to advance a common understanding of the basic principles of optical mapping in complex three-dimensional anatomical structures. PMID:20133911

  3. Role of sinoatrial node architecture in maintaining a balanced source-sink relationship and synchronous cardiac pacemaking.

    PubMed

    Unudurthi, Sathya D; Wolf, Roseanne M; Hund, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Normal heart rhythm (sinus rhythm) depends on regular activity of the sinoatrial node (SAN), a heterogeneous collection of specialized myocytes in the right atrium. SAN cells, in general, possess a unique electrophysiological profile that promotes spontaneous electrical activity (automaticity). However, while automaticity is required for normal pacemaking, it is not necessarily sufficient. Less appreciated is the importance of the elaborate structure of the SAN complex for proper pacemaker function. Here, we review the important structural features of the SAN with a focus on how these elements help manage a precarious balance between electrical charge generated by the SAN ("source") and the charge needed to excite the surrounding atrial tissue ("sink"). We also discuss how compromised "source-sink" balance due, for example to fibrosis, may promote SAN dysfunction, characterized by slow and/or asynchronous pacemaker activity and even failure, in the setting of cardiovascular disease (e.g., heart failure, atrial fibrillation). Finally, we discuss implications of the "source-sink" balance in the SAN complex for cell and gene therapies aimed at creating a biological pacemaker as replacement or bridge to conventional electronic pacemakers. PMID:25505419

  4. Large Controlled Observational Study on Remote Monitoring of Pacemakers and Implantable Cardiac Defibrillators: A Clinical, Economic, and Organizational Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with implantable devices such as pacemakers (PMs) and implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) should be followed up every 3–12 months, which traditionally required in-clinic visits. Innovative devices allow data transmission and technical or medical alerts to be sent from the patient's home to the physician (remote monitoring). A number of studies have shown its effectiveness in timely detection and management of both clinical and technical events, and endorsed its adoption. Unfortunately, in daily practice, remote monitoring has been implemented in uncoordinated and rather fragmented ways, calling for a more strategic approach. Objective The objective of the study was to analyze the impact of remote monitoring for PM and ICD in a “real world” context compared with in-clinic follow-up. The evaluation focuses on how this service is carried out by Local Health Authorities, the impact on the cardiology unit and the health system, and organizational features promoting or hindering its effectiveness and efficiency. Methods A multi-center, multi-vendor, controlled, observational, prospective study was conducted to analyze the impact of remote monitoring implementation. A total of 2101 patients were enrolled in the study: 1871 patients were followed through remote monitoring of PM/ICD (I-group) and 230 through in-clinic visits (U-group). The follow-up period was 12 months. Results In-clinic device follow-ups and cardiac visits were significantly lower in the I-group compared with the U-group, respectively: PM, I-group = 0.43, U-group = 1.07, P<.001; ICD, I-group = 0.98, U-group = 2.14, P<.001. PM, I-group = 0.37, U-group = 0.85, P<.001; ICD, I-group = 1.58, U-group = 1.69, P=.01. Hospitalizations for any cause were significantly lower in the I-group for PM patients only (I-group = 0.37, U-group = 0.50, P=.005). There were no significant differences regarding use of the emergency department for both PM and ICD patients. In the I-group, 0.30 (PM) and 0.37 (ICD) real clinical events per patient per year were detected within a mean (SD) time of 1.18 (2.08) days. Mean time spent by physicians to treat a patient was lower in the I-group compared to the U-group (-4.1 minutes PM; -13.7 minutes ICD). Organizational analysis showed that remote monitoring implementation was rather haphazard and fragmented. From a health care system perspective, the economic analysis showed statistically significant gains (P<.001) for the I-group using PM. Conclusions This study contributes to build solid evidence regarding the usefulness of RM in detecting and managing clinical and technical events with limited use of manpower and other health care resources. To fully gain the benefits of RM of PM/ICD, it is vital that organizational processes be streamlined and standardized within an overarching strategy. PMID:26764170

  5. Insertion and Management of Temporary Pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Breandan Lawrence; Bartels, Karsten; Hamilton, Natalie

    2016-03-01

    Temporary pacemakers are used in a variety of critical care settings. These life-saving devices are reviewed in 2 major categories in this review: first, the insertion and management of epicardial pacemakers after and during cardiac surgery; and second, the insertion of transvenous temporary pacemakers for the emergent treatment of bradyarrhythmias. Temporary epicardial pacemakers are used routinely in patients recovering from cardiac surgery. Borrowing from advances in cardiac resynchronization therapy there are many theoretical and untested benefits to pacing the postoperative cardiac surgery patient. Temporary transvenous pacing is traditionally an emergency procedure to stabilize patients suffering from hemodynamically unstable bradyarrhythmia. We review the traditional and expanding use of transvenous pacemakers inside and outside the operating room. PMID:26134176

  6. Mechanisms of Heart Block after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement – Cardiac Anatomy, Clinical Predictors and Mechanical Factors that Contribute to Permanent Pacemaker Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Young Lee, Mark; Chilakamarri Yeshwant, Srinath; Chava, Sreedivya; Lawrence Lustgarten, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a valuable, minimally invasive treatment option in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis at prohibitive or increased risk for conventional surgical replacement. Consequently, patients undergoing TAVR are prone to peri-procedural complications including cardiac conduction disturbances, which is the focus of this review. Atrioventricular conduction disturbances and arrhythmias before, during or after TAVR remain a matter of concern for this high-risk group of patients, as they have important consequences on hospital duration, short- and long-term medical management and finally on decisions of device-based treatment strategies (pacemaker or defibrillator implantation). We discuss the mechanisms of atrioventricular disturbances and characterise predisposing factors. Using validated clinical predictors, we discuss strategies to minimise the likelihood of creating permanent high-grade heart block, and identify factors to expedite the decision to implant a permanent pacemaker when the latter is unavoidable. We also discuss optimal pacing strategies to mitigate the possibility of pacing-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:26835105

  7. Indications and Choices in Pacemaker Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Benrey, Jaime

    1991-01-01

    During their 33-year history of clinical use, cardiac pacemakers have evolved from devices primarily intended to save lives into complex systems designed to improve the cardiac patient's overall quality of life. To help physicians cope with this rapidly changing field, this review outlines current indications for pacemaker therapy and examines the wide range of options available. After describing the standard nomenclature for identifying the various systems, the author discusses pacemaker selection on the basis of cardiac rhythm alone, as well as rate-modulated therapy. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1991;18:170-8) PMID:15227476

  8. Lithium pacemaker batteries - an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, C.C.; Holmes, C.F.

    1980-01-01

    Batteries used as power sources in cardiac pacemakers are expected to have high energy density, long storage and operating life and high reliability. They must be nonhazardous under normal operating as well as abusive conditions. Intensive research activities on the past 10-15 years have resulted in the development of a variety of high energy density batteries using Li as the anode material (Li-batteries). At least six different chemical systems with Li anodes are in use as power sources for cardiac pacemakers. Some basic characteristics of these systems are discussed. 11 refs.

  9. Heart pacemaker

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 ounce. Most pacemakers have 2 parts: The generator contains the battery and the information to control ... are wires that connect the heart to the generator and carry the electrical messages to the heart. ...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in a patient with a dual-chamber pacemaker.

    PubMed

    García-Bolao, I; Albaladejo, V; Benito, A; Alegría, E; Zubieta, J L

    1998-01-01

    The presence of an implanted cardiac pacemaker has been considered an absolute contraindication for magnetic resonance imaging due to the interactions between the pulse generators and the magnetic and radiofrequency fields generated by the magnetic resonance unit. We describe the case of a patient with a dual-chamber pacemaker who underwent two magnetic resonance imaging examinations of the head without any sequelae. Both procedures were performed with a 1 Tesla unit, with the pacemaker programmed to the AOO mode. The only interference observed was activation of the reed switch -probably due to the static magnetic field- resulting in asynchronous atrial pacing at the magnet rate. Although the general policy of never exposing a patient with a pacemaker to magnetic resonance imaging should not be revised, we think that if the testing is considered essential, it could be safely used in certain carefully selected patients. PMID:9638968

  11. Cardiac phase: Amplitude analysis using macro programming

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, K.W.; Hickey, K.A.

    1981-11-01

    The analysis of EKG gated radionuclide cardiac imaging data with Fourier amplitude and phase images is becoming a valuable clinical technique, demonstrating location, size, and severity of regional ventricular abnormalities. Not all commercially available nuclear medicine computer systems offer software for phase and amplitude analysis; however, many systems do have the capability of linear image arithmetic using simple macro commands which can easily be sequenced into stored macro-strings or programs. Using simple but accurate series approximations for the Fourier operations, macro programs have been written for a Digital Equipment Corporation Gamma-11 system to obtain phase and amplitude images from routine gated cardiac studies. In addition, dynamic cine-mode presentation of the onset of mechanical systole is generated from the phase data, using only a second set of macro programs. This approach is easily adapted to different data acquisition protocols, and can be used on any system with macro commands for image arithmetic. Key words: Fourier analysis, cardiac cycle, gated blood pool imaging, amplitude image, phase image

  12. Modern pacemakers: hope or hype?

    PubMed

    DAS, Mithilesh K; Dandamudi, Gopi; Steiner, Hillel A

    2009-09-01

    In recent years, the role of implantable pacing devices has expanded beyond the arrhythmia horizon and contemporary pacemakers' attempt to meet the physiological needs of patients. Modern pacemakers' functions include various modes of dual-chamber pacing, rate-response algorithms with dual sensors for optimum physiological response, cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), arrhythmia-prevention algorithms, antitachycardia pacing, and hemodynamic monitoring. The automaticity features of pacemakers enable continuous or intermittent monitoring of various pacemaker parameters including battery voltage, pacing impedance, sensing levels, pacing thresholds, and daily activity log. Modern pacemakers offer "physiological pacing" algorithms that minimize ventricular pacing and reduce the incidence of atrial fibrillation significantly. Ventricular pacing in patients with intact atrioventricular (AV) conduction or intermittent advanced AV block should be minimized with a hope to reduce heart failure hospitalization and mortality. A reduction in all-cause mortality due to physiological pacing, except for the CRT, has yet to be demonstrated in a randomized trial. Overall, modern pacemakers have acceptable performances to fulfill the clinical needs and have a reasonable safety margin. Promising new technologies are currently under development and offer hope to patients who may one day derive both symptomatic and mortality benefit from these devices. PMID:19719501

  13. Dosimetry of electromagnetic field exposure of an active armlet and its electromagnetic interference to the cardiac pacemakers using adult, child and infant models.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hu; Wang, Yuduo; Yang, Jiangang; Wu, Tongning

    2016-01-01

    Wearable devices have been popularly used with people from different age groups. As a consequence, the concerns of their electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure to the human body and their electromagnetic interference (EMI) to the implanted medical devices have attracted many studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the human exposure to the EMF of an active radiofrequency identification (RFID) armlet as well as its EMI to the cardiac pacemaker (CP). Different human models from various age groups were applied to assess the result variability. The scalar potential finite element method was utilized in the simulation. Local EMF exposure and the exposure to the central nerve system tissues were evaluated using different metrics. EMI to the CP was assessed in terms of the conducted voltage to the CP. The results from all the models revealed that the studied RFID armlet would not produce the EMF exposure exceeding the safety limits. The calculated interference voltage was highly dependent on the distance between the RFID armlet and the CP (i.e. the physical dimension of the individual model). The results proposed to evaluate the appropriateness of the current EMI measurement protocol for this kind of devices used by the infants. PMID:25568953

  14. The nuclear pacemaker: Is renewed interest warranted

    SciTech Connect

    Parsonnet, V.; Berstein, A.D.; Perry, G.Y. )

    1990-10-01

    From 1973 through 1987, 155 radioisotope-powered nuclear pacemakers were implanted in 132 patients at the Newark Beth Israel Medical Center. The longevity of the first 15 devices, all of which were fixed-rate (VOO) pacemakers, was significantly better than that of 15 lithium-chemistry demand (VVI) pacemakers used as control devices (p = 0.0002). Of the entire cohort of 155 nuclear pacemakers, 136 were VVI devices and 19 were VOO units. The patients with VOO pacemakers needed reoperations more often than did those with VVI pacemakers, chiefly for mode change (p less than 0.001). Power-source failure was observed in only 1 case, but 47 nuclear pacemakers were removed for other reasons, including component malfunction (15 units), mode change (12 units), high pacing thresholds (8 units) and lead or connector problems (5 units). The actuarial survival at 15 years was 99% for power sources and 82% for the entire pacing systems (pulse generators plus leads). The frequency of malignancy was similar to that of the population at large and primary tumor sites were randomly distributed. Deaths most commonly were due to cardiac causes (68%). Thus, nuclear pacemakers are safe and reliable and their greater initial cost appears to be offset by their longevity and the resulting decrease in the frequency of reoperations. It is reasonable to suggest that further use be made of long-lasting nuclear power sources for modern pacemakers and other implantable rhythm-management devices.

  15. The past, present, and future of pacemaker therapies.

    PubMed

    Boink, Gerard J J; Christoffels, Vincent M; Robinson, Richard B; Tan, Hanno L

    2015-11-01

    Since its introduction into clinical practice, electronic pacing has saved many lives. Despite continuous improvements, electronic pacemakers have important shortcomings, which stimulated the development of biological alternatives. Biological pacemakers generate the cardiac impulse using genes or cells to treat bradycardias. Over the past decade, significant improvements have been made in biological pacemakers, but issues remain in relation to long-term outcomes and safety. Concurrently, efforts to improve electronic pacemakers have also intensified. Whether new generations of electronic pacemakers will erase lingering concerns with regard to electronic pacing or whether biologicals will ultimately supplement or supplant electronics remains to be seen. PMID:26001958

  16. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive... following: (i) A description of the individual's diagnosis. (ii) The type, amount, frequency, and duration... combined with other types of exercise (that is, strengthening, stretching) as determined to be...

  17. Intraoperative pacemaker failure in an infant.

    PubMed

    Bailey, A G; Lacey, S R

    1991-10-01

    Pacemakers in children can present clinical challenges during surgery. We present a case report of an infant whose pacemaker reverted to a backup mode when electrocautery was used during surgery. The resulting bradycardia did not respond either to a magnet placed over the generator or to iv atropine. The circulation was supported by isoproterenol until the pacemaker was re-programmed by the manufacturer. Such devices require care and understanding if problems during surgery are to be avoided. PMID:1742829

  18. [Final arrest of a pacemaker after use of electrocautery].

    PubMed

    Delhumeau, A; Ronceray, S; Moreau, X; Cottineau, C; Cavellat, M

    1988-01-01

    A case is reported of irreversible damage being caused to a permanent programmable pacemaker by electrocautery used in the epigastric region. The pacemaker was rapidly replaced, and the patient had no adverse effects of this accident. The use of monopolar electrocautery in patients who have one of the new generation of programmable pacemakers is very dangerous. Bipolar forceps can reduce the level of interference between electrocautery units and pacemaker electrodes. With programmable pacemakers, the generator instruction manual should be consulted before surgery, as placing a magnet on the generator may not necessarily convert it to the asynchronous mode. When the use of electrocautery is unavoidable, external cardiac pacing electrodes should be placed on the patient, with an external cardiac pacemaker ready. PMID:3364815

  19. 21 CFR 870.1750 - External programmable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false External programmable pacemaker pulse generator... External programmable pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external programmable pacemaker pulse generators is a device that can be programmed to produce one or more pulses at...

  20. 21 CFR 870.1750 - External programmable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false External programmable pacemaker pulse generator... External programmable pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external programmable pacemaker pulse generators is a device that can be programmed to produce one or more pulses at...

  1. 21 CFR 870.1750 - External programmable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false External programmable pacemaker pulse generator... External programmable pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external programmable pacemaker pulse generators is a device that can be programmed to produce one or more pulses at...

  2. 21 CFR 870.1750 - External programmable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External programmable pacemaker pulse generator... External programmable pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external programmable pacemaker pulse generators is a device that can be programmed to produce one or more pulses at...

  3. 21 CFR 870.1750 - External programmable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false External programmable pacemaker pulse generator... External programmable pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external programmable pacemaker pulse generators is a device that can be programmed to produce one or more pulses at...

  4. Optimal atrioventricular delay at rest and during exercise in patients with dual chamber pacemakers: a non-invasive assessment by continuous wave Doppler.

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, D; Gilmour, S; Ward, D E; Camm, A J

    1989-01-01

    The optimal atrioventricular delay at rest and during exercise was investigated in nine patients with heart block and implanted dual chamber pacemakers. All patients studied had normal left ventricular function and a normal sinus node rate response to exercise. Cardiac output was measured by continuous wave Doppler and was calculated as the product of stroke distance measured by Doppler at the left ventricular outflow, aortic root area measured by M mode echocardiography, and heart rate. Pacemakers were programmed in the DDD mode. Cardiac output was measured with the patient at rest while supine and while erect and at the peak of submaximal exercise (the end of stage 1 of the Bruce protocol) with the pacemakers programmed to the following atrioventricular intervals: 75-80 ms, 100-110 ms, 140-150 ms, and 200 ms. During exercise the basic pacing rate was programmed to 70 beats/min. Cardiac output at rest while supine and erect was greatest with an atrioventricular delay of 140-150 ms and it was significantly higher than that with an atrioventricular delay of 75-80 ms. On average there was a 31% decrease in cardiac output when patients stood up. During treadmill exercise, however, cardiac output was greatest when the atrioventricular delay was 75-80 ms, and this was significantly higher than the cardiac output with atrioventricular delays of 150 and 200 ms. During exercise 1:1 atrioventricular relations were maintained in patients at all atrioventricular intervals. In patients with atrioventricular sequential pacemakers cardiac output at rest is greatest with an atrioventricular delay of 140-150 ms but during exercise the optimal atrioventricular delay is shorter. Rate modulation of the atrioventricular interval may improve the haemodynamic response and possibly exercise tolerance in patients with dual chamber pacemakers. PMID:2923753

  5. Effects of Lifestyle Modification Programs on Cardiac Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Moaven; Fournier, Stephen; Shepard, Donald S.; Ritter, Grant; Strickler, Gail K.; Stason, William B.

    2014-01-01

    Medicare conducted a payment demonstration to evaluate the effectiveness of two intensive lifestyle modification programs in patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease: the Dr. Dean Ornish Program for Reversing Heart Disease (Ornish) and Cardiac Wellness Program of the Benson-Henry Mind Body Institute. This report describes the changes in cardiac risk factors achieved by each program during the active intervention year and subsequent year of follow-up. The demonstration enrolled 580 participants who had had an acute myocardial infarction, had undergone coronary artery bypass graft surgery or percutaneous coronary intervention within 12 months, or had documented stable angina pectoris. Of these, 98% completed the intense 3-month intervention, 71% the 12-month intervention, and 56% an additional follow-up year. Most cardiac risk factors improved significantly during the intense intervention period in both programs. Favorable changes in cardiac risk factors and functional cardiac capacity were maintained or improved further at 12 and 24 months in participants with active follow-up. Multivariable regressions found that risk-factor improvements were positively associated with abnormal baseline values, Ornish program participation for body mass index and systolic blood pressure, and with coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Expressed levels of motivation to lose weight and maintain weight loss were significant independent predictors of sustained weight loss (p = 0.006). Both lifestyle modification programs achieved well-sustained reductions in cardiac risk factors. PMID:25490202

  6. Effects of lifestyle modification programs on cardiac risk factors.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Moaven; Fournier, Stephen; Shepard, Donald S; Ritter, Grant; Strickler, Gail K; Stason, William B

    2014-01-01

    Medicare conducted a payment demonstration to evaluate the effectiveness of two intensive lifestyle modification programs in patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease: the Dr. Dean Ornish Program for Reversing Heart Disease (Ornish) and Cardiac Wellness Program of the Benson-Henry Mind Body Institute. This report describes the changes in cardiac risk factors achieved by each program during the active intervention year and subsequent year of follow-up. The demonstration enrolled 580 participants who had had an acute myocardial infarction, had undergone coronary artery bypass graft surgery or percutaneous coronary intervention within 12 months, or had documented stable angina pectoris. Of these, 98% completed the intense 3-month intervention, 71% the 12-month intervention, and 56% an additional follow-up year. Most cardiac risk factors improved significantly during the intense intervention period in both programs. Favorable changes in cardiac risk factors and functional cardiac capacity were maintained or improved further at 12 and 24 months in participants with active follow-up. Multivariable regressions found that risk-factor improvements were positively associated with abnormal baseline values, Ornish program participation for body mass index and systolic blood pressure, and with coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Expressed levels of motivation to lose weight and maintain weight loss were significant independent predictors of sustained weight loss (p = 0.006). Both lifestyle modification programs achieved well-sustained reductions in cardiac risk factors. PMID:25490202

  7. Pacemaker insertion

    PubMed Central

    Kotsakou, Maria; Kioumis, Ioannis; Lazaridis, George; Pitsiou, Georgia; Lampaki, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Karavergou, Anastasia; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    A pacemaker (PM) (or artificial PM, so as not to be confused with the heart’s natural PM) is a medical device that uses electrical impulses, delivered by electrodes contracting the heart muscles, to regulate the beating of the heart. The primary purpose of this device is to maintain an adequate heart rate, either because the heart’s natural PM is not fast enough, or there is a block in the heart’s electrical conduction system. Modern PMs are externally programmable and allow the cardiologist to select the optimum pacing modes for individual patients. Some combine a PM and defibrillator in a single implantable device. PMs can be temporary or permanent. Temporary PMs are used to treat short-term heart problems, such as a slow heartbeat that’s caused by a heart attack, heart surgery, or an overdose of medicine. Permanent PMs are used to control long-term heart rhythm problems. A PM can relieve some arrhythmia symptoms, such as fatigue and fainting. A PM also can help a person who has abnormal HRs resume a more active lifestyle. In the current mini review we will focus on the insertion of a PM and the possible pneumothorax that can be caused. PMID:25815303

  8. Heart pacemaker - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... on your chest below your collarbone. The pacemaker generator was then placed under the skin at this ... with your pacemaker. Stay away from large motors, generators, and equipment. Do not lean over the open ...

  9. Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators--general and anesthetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Rapsang, Amy G; Bhattacharyya, Prithwis

    2014-01-01

    A pacemaking system consists of an impulse generator and lead or leads to carry the electrical impulse to the patient's heart. Pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator codes were made to describe the type of pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator implanted. Indications for pacing and implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation were given by the American College of Cardiologists. Certain pacemakers have magnet-operated reed switches incorporated; however, magnet application can have serious adverse effects; hence, devices should be considered programmable unless known otherwise. When a device patient undergoes any procedure (with or without anesthesia), special precautions have to be observed including a focused history/physical examination, interrogation of pacemaker before and after the procedure, emergency drugs/temporary pacing and defibrillation, reprogramming of pacemaker and disabling certain pacemaker functions if required, monitoring of electrolyte and metabolic disturbance and avoiding certain drugs and equipments that can interfere with pacemaker function. If unanticipated device interactions are found, consider discontinuation of the procedure until the source of interference can be eliminated or managed and all corrective measures should be taken to ensure proper pacemaker function should be done. Post procedure, the cardiac rate and rhythm should be monitored continuously and emergency drugs and equipments should be kept ready and consultation with a cardiologist or a pacemaker-implantable cardioverter defibrillator service may be necessary. PMID:24907883

  10. [Pacemakers 16 years later].

    PubMed

    Dodinot, B

    1976-01-01

    In 1976, 10 years after the first successful implantations, the pacemaker technique is perfectly well accepted. Transvenous placement of the electrode is preferred in 95 % of the cases. Besides the 15 years nuclear power pacers (1970), conventional mercury pacemakers may reach a longevity of 4 to 5 years because of the reduction of the current drain. Lithium iodine seems a very promising source of energy. The mini-pacemakers with various iodine anodes are particularly attractive. The future is probably a well designed medium sized lithium pacemaker lasting more than 7 years. Patient follow-up is very much improved. All pacemakers exhibit an obvious rate reduction when their source of energy runs down. Therefore general practitioner and even the patients may detect this symptom. The main problem remains the lead resistance. The reduction of the frequency of pacemaker replacements and of the medical check-up makes life more simple for the pacemaker patient. PMID:1087802

  11. Designing a Computer-Assisted Clinic to Cope with the Evolution of Pacemaker Technology

    PubMed Central

    Pfeil, Catherine N.; Keltz, Paul D.; Gertz, Edward W.; Okawachi, Melanie H.

    1983-01-01

    A computer-assisted program for follow-up monitoring of implanted cardiac pacemakers has been in operation at the San Francisco Veterans Administration Medical Center since 1977. It was originally created at a time when the technology of pacemakers was stable and only a few parameters could be measured or telemetered. Two recent developments have necessitated a major reassessment of this project as a well as redesign of the entire computer infrastructure: the advent of multi-programmable and multi-chamber pacemakers (presenting a wide variety of selectable and interacting parameters and features) and the expansion of the program to follow 4000 patients. In addressing the above two problems we have embarked on a project which involves distributed data structures, interactive multi-tasking and non-deterministic data structures. The resultant computer-based system will allow for maximum flexibility in the definition of data for differing pacemakers while permitting coherent and meaningful studies to be performed across large patient populations.

  12. ''Fine tuning'' programmable pacemakers using the MUGA study

    SciTech Connect

    Videen, J.S.; Huang, S.K.; Bazgan, I.D.; Mechling, E.; Patton, D.D.

    1985-05-01

    Programmable pacemakers (PPM) can be programmed to sense, stimulate, or inhibit atrial (A) and/or ventricular (V) electrical activity, and include variable A-V delays and other options. Selecting the optimum combination of settings for an individual patient can be a formidable task in the absence of noninvasive, objective, quantifiable measures of cardiac function. The authors attempt to determine whether the MUGA study could be adapted to such a task. MUGA studies were performed on 13 patients (pts) with PPM who had varying degrees of A-V block, during various settings of the PPM's. Studies were carried out 5-10 min. after pacing mode and A-V delay were changed, with the pt resting and supine. All 5 MUGA studies were carried out after a single injection of Tc-99m labeled autologous red blood cells. The results show that the VDD mode brings about a higher left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and cardiac output (CO) than the DVI mode, and that either of these dual-chamber pacing modes produces a higher LVEF and CO than single-chamber pacing (VVI). Furthermore, a longer A-V delay was shown to improve LVEF and CO in patients with initially low LVEF. The MUGA study is simple, noninvasive, objective, and quantifiable, and can easily be repeated several times following a single injection. It can be used to ''fine tune'' programmable pacemakers for optimum hemodynamic performance.

  13. New Approaches to Biological Pacemakers: Links to Sinoatrial Node Development.

    PubMed

    Vedantham, Vasanth

    2015-12-01

    Irreversible degeneration of the cardiac conduction system is a common disease that can cause activity intolerance, fainting, and death. While electronic pacemakers provide effective treatment, alternative approaches are needed when long-term indwelling hardware is undesirable. Biological pacemakers comprise electrically active cells that functionally integrate with the heart. Recent findings on cardiac pacemaker cells (PCs) within the sinoatrial node (SAN), along with developments in stem cell technology, have opened a new era in biological pacing. Recent experiments that have derived PC-like cells from non-PCs have brought the field closer than ever before to biological pacemakers that can faithfully recapitulate SAN activity. In this review, I discuss these approaches in the context of SAN biology and address the potential for clinical translation. PMID:26611337

  14. A patient with dizziness, tachycardia and a DDDR pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Balt, J.C.; Dekker, P.; de Voogt, W.G.

    2006-01-01

    An 84-year-old female patient presented to the coronary care unit with dizziness. A DDD-R minute ventilation sensor pacemaker had been implanted eight years previously. The ECG showed an atrial and ventricular paced rhythm of 140 beats/min. After disconnecting the patient from the cardiac monitor the pacemaker rate dropped gradually to 90 beats/min. The cardiac rhythm monitoring system applies low-amplitude electrical pulses in order to measure respiration rate by transthoracic impedance (TTI) measurement. The minute ventilation pacemaker sensor is driven by the same TTI measurement for rate response. Inappropriate interference between these two systems caused a sensor-driven high pacemaker rate. The dizziness was not related to the sensor-driven high rate. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:25696553

  15. Doctors at the heart of this cardiac DM program's success.

    PubMed

    1999-06-01

    Don't let patients wait for a crisis event to jolt them into your coronary heart disease program. A new population-based effort developed by a trendsetting cardiac DM provider is winning praise as well as producing savings. PMID:10538687

  16. Displacement of pacemaker leads--a 10-year survey.

    PubMed Central

    Brewster, G M; Evans, A L

    1979-01-01

    Displacement of endocardial pacemaker leads from the initial site at the time of implantation is a major cause of unpredictable pacemaker failure. In this survey, we have made a retrospective study of the effectiveness of the attempts made by two manufacturers to design leads to reduce the frequency of this occurrence. The cumulative displacement records of 5 types of leads (Medtronic types 5818, 6904, 6901, and 6950, and Cardiac Pacemakers Inc. type 4210) have been studied, and show that Medtronic 5818 and 6950, and CPI 4210 leads are superior in this respect. Images PMID:508447

  17. Reprogramming the conduction system: Onward toward a biological pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Jason D; Jay, Patrick Y; Rentschler, Stacey

    2016-01-01

    Diseases of the cardiac conduction system can be debilitating and deadly. Electronic pacemakers are incredibly effective in the treatment of sinus and AV node dysfunction, yet there remain important limitations and complications. These issues have driven interest in the development of a biological pacemaker. Here, we review experimental progress in animal models and discuss future directions, with a focus on reprogramming endogenous cells in the heart to treat defects of rhythm and conduction. PMID:25937044

  18. MRI-conditional pacemakers: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, António M; Costa, Francisco; Tralhão, António; Marques, Hugo; Cardim, Nuno; Adragão, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Use of both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pacing devices has undergone remarkable growth in recent years, and it is estimated that the majority of patients with pacemakers will need an MRI during their lifetime. These investigations will generally be denied due to the potentially dangerous interactions between cardiac devices and the magnetic fields and radio frequency energy used in MRI. Despite the increasing reports of uneventful scanning in selected patients with conventional pacemakers under close surveillance, MRI is still contraindicated in those circumstances and cannot be considered a routine procedure. These limitations prompted a series of modifications in generator and lead engineering, designed to minimize interactions that could compromise device function and patient safety. The resulting MRI-conditional pacemakers were first introduced in 2008 and the clinical experience gathered so far supports their safety in the MRI environment if certain conditions are fulfilled. With this technology, new questions and controversies arise regarding patient selection, clinical impact, and cost-effectiveness. In this review, we discuss the potential risks of MRI in patients with electronic cardiac devices and present updated information regarding the features of MRI-conditional pacemakers and the clinical experience with currently available models. Finally, we provide some guidance on how to scan patients who have these devices and discuss future directions in the field. PMID:24851058

  19. Who Needs a Pacemaker?

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart disease or for people who have had heart transplants . Children, teens, and adults can use pacemakers. Before recommending a pacemaker, your doctor will consider any arrhythmia symptoms ... a history of heart disease, what medicines you're currently taking, and ...

  20. Cardiac pacing--from then to now.

    PubMed

    Gold, R D

    1984-01-01

    Progress in both the health sciences and engineering sciences has been necessary for the development of the cardiac pacemaker. From the invention of the vacuum tube triode amplifier in 1906 to that of the oscillator just a few years later; from the early electrocardiograph in 1906 and the first stimulation of a dog's heart in 1927 to the application of electricity to the heart of a stillborn infant only 2 years later, engineering and medicine have progressed together to solve problems in pacemakers. The semiconductor transistor emerged in 1948, and in 1950 work was published on the open heart resuscitation of dogs with voltage pulses to the heart, work whose principle was applied soon after in a human patient with complete heart block. The development of the modern pacemaker has run an exciting course, including such phenomena as one engineer helping to design his own pacemaker. In the past 20 years, science has change the package, the power source, pacing mode, electrodes, and leads of pacemakers; it has improved their reliability and longevity, their programming, telemetry, and instrumentation. PMID:6369090

  1. Electromagnetic Interference on Pacemakers

    PubMed Central

    Erdogan, Okan

    2002-01-01

    External sources, either within or outside the hospital environment, may interfere with the appropriate function of pacemakers which are being implanted all around the world in current medical practice. The patient and the physician who is responsible for follow-up of the pacing systems may be confronted with some specific problems regarding the various types of electromagnetic interference (EMI). To avoid these unwanted EMI effects one must be aware of this potential problem and need to take some precautions. The effects of EMI on pacemaker function and precautions to overcome some specific problems were discussed in this review article. There are many sources of EMI interacting with pacemakers. Magnetic resonance imaging creates real problem and should be avoided in pacemaker patients. Cellular phones might be responsible for EMI when they were held on the same side with the pacemaker. Otherwise they don't cause any specific type of interaction with pacemakers. Sale security systems are not a problem if one walks through it without lingering in or near it. Patients having unipolar pacemaker systems are prone to develop EMI because of pectoral muscle artifacts during vigorous active physical exercise. PMID:17006562

  2. Sex differences in selection of pacemakers: retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Schppel, Reinhart; Bchele, Gisela; Batz, Lothar; Koenig, Wolfgang

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of patients sex on selection of pacemakers. Design: Retrospective univariate and multivariate analysis of a large database. Setting: German central pacemaker register. Subjects: Records collected at the register for 1992 and 1993 (n=31?913), covering 64% of all implantations in Germany. Main outcome measure: Probability of receiving a single chamber, dual chamber, or rate responsive pacemaker in relation to sex. Results: Univariate analysis showed that women were more likely to receive single chamber pacemakers and less likely to receive dual chamber or rate responsive systems than men. After demographic and clinical variables were controlled for, women were still more likely to receive a single chamber system (atrial pacing: odds ratio 0.89, 95% confidence interval 0.74 to 1.07; ventricular pacing: 0.85, 0.80 to 0.92) and less likely to receive a dual chamber (1.20, 1.12 to 1.30) or a rate responsive system (1.26, 1.17 to 1.37) than men. Conclusions: The data suggest sex differences in the selection of a pacemaker system which cannot be explained by the underlying cardiac disorder. Further research is needed to evaluate why guidelines for implanting pacemakers are not better adhered to. Key messages Use of pacemakers varies despite guidelines, and the reasons for this are unclear In this study women were more likely to receive single chamber pacemakers and less likely to receive dual chamber and rate responsive pacemakers than men Demographic and clinical variables cannot fully explain these differences Prospective studies are needed to evaluate the effect of sex and other non-medical variables on the selection of pacemakers PMID:9582133

  3. Pacemakers and store security devices.

    PubMed

    Harthorne, J W

    2001-01-01

    The ever-increasing complexity of medical device therapy and installation of public electronic security systems demands vigilance in discerning interactions that may be harmful to patients during typical activities of daily living. Premature pacemaker stimulation, isolated skipped beats, or reversion to backup asynchronous pacing have been observed during in vitro and in vivo testing. To date, no deaths and only minor inconvenience have been reported during extreme exposure of patients with pacemakers when they have come directly in contact with or in close apposition to electronic security systems. Patients with any type of implanted electronic medical system should be forewarned: "Don't lean, don't linger" near any potential source of electromagnetic interference. Changing technologies in implantable electronic medical systems as well as societal sources of electromagnetic interference require continued awareness on the part of physicians and patients alike, with care being taken to distinguish largely theoretical hazards from those that constitute meaningful dangers to patients with implanted cardiac arrhythmia devices. PMID:11174910

  4. Pacemakers (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... thin metal box or case called a pulse generator ( picture 1 ), which contains the power source producing ... impulses of the pacemaker. In addition, the pulse generator contains a small computer processor that can be ...

  5. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program ... be designed to meet your needs. The Cardiac Rehabilitation Team Cardiac rehab involves a long-term commitment ...

  6. Clinical assessment of pacemaker power sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bilitch, M.; Parsonnet, V.; Furman, S.

    1980-01-01

    The development of power sources for cardiac pacemakers has progressed from a 15-year usage of mercury-zinc batteries to widely used and accepted lithium cells. At present, there are about 6 different types of lithium cells incorporated into commercially distributed pacemakers. The authors reviewed experience over a 5-year period with 1711 mercury-zinc, 130 nuclear (P238) and 1912 lithium powered pacemakers. The lithium units have included 698 lithium-iodide, 270 lithium-silver chromate, 135 lithium-thionyl chloride, 31 lithium-lead and 353 lithium-cupric sulfide batteries. 57 of the lithium units have failed (91.2% component failure and 5.3% battery failure). 459 mercury-zinc units failed (25% component failure and 68% battery depletion). The data show that lithium powered pacemaker failures are primarily component, while mercury-zinc failures are primarily battery related. It is concluded that mercury-zinc powered pulse generators are obsolete and that lithium and nuclear (P238) power sources are highly reliable over the 5 years for which data are available. 3 refs.

  7. Delayed right-ventricular perforation by pacemaker lead; a rare complication in a 12-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Aykan, Hayrettin Hakan; Akın, Alper; Ertuğrul, İlker; Karagöz, Tevfik

    2015-03-01

    Developments in the diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart diseases have led to an increase in the need for intracardiac pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation. Various complications related to these interventions can be seen in the short term (pneumothorax, pericardial effusion, cardiac perforation, etc…) and in the long term (infection, subclavian vein thrombosis, sensing and pacing problems, battery erosion and cardiac perforation). In this report, we present a rare case of cardiac perforation occurring 2 years after pacemaker implantation. PMID:25782125

  8. Triboelectric simulation of pacemaker malfunction.

    PubMed

    Kahan, S; Miller, C W; Hayes, D L; Barold, S S

    2002-07-01

    We report the occurrence of a triboelectric phenomenon (static electricity) that mimicked malfunction of a contemporary pacemaker by creating an electrocardiograpic artifact virtually identical to the pacemaker stimuli. The diagnosis was established by observing a subtle overshoot of the questionable deflection that was absent from pacemaker stimuli. PMID:12134980

  9. Not all pacemakers are created equal: MRI conditional pacemaker and lead technology.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Fozia Z; Morris, Gwilym M; Allen, Stuart; Khattar, Rajdeep; Mamas, Mamas; Zaidi, Amir

    2013-09-01

    Due to expanding clinical indications and an aging society there has been an increase in the use of implantable pacemakers. At the same time, due to increased diagnostic yield over other imaging modalities and the absence of ionizing radiation, there has been a surge in demand for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment, of both cardiac and noncardiac conditions. Patients with an implantable device have a 50-75% chance of having a clinical indication for MRI during the lifetime of their device. The presence of an implantable cardiac device has been seen as a relative contraindication to MRI assessment, limiting the prognostic and diagnostic utility of MRI in many patients with these devices. The introduction of MRI conditional pacemakers will enable more patients to undergo routine MRI assessment without risk of morbidity or device malfunction. This review gives a general overview of the principles and current evidence for the use of MRI conditional implantable cardiac devices. Furthermore, we appraise the differences between those pacemakers currently released to market. PMID:24016320

  10. In utero Undernutrition Programs Skeletal and Cardiac Muscle Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, Brittany; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2016-01-01

    In utero undernutrition is associated with increased risk for insulin resistance, obesity, and cardiovascular disease during adult life. A common phenotype associated with low birth weight is reduced skeletal muscle mass. Given the central role of skeletal muscle in whole body metabolism, alterations in its mass as well as its metabolic characteristics may contribute to disease risk. This review highlights the metabolic alterations in cardiac and skeletal muscle associated with in utero undernutrition and low birth weight. These tissues have high metabolic demands and are known to be sites of major metabolic dysfunction in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Recent research demonstrates that mitochondrial energetics are decreased in skeletal and cardiac muscles of adult offspring from undernourished mothers. These effects apparently lead to the development of a thrifty phenotype, which may represent overall a compensatory mechanism programmed in utero to handle times of limited nutrient availability. However, in an environment characterized by food abundance, the effects are maladaptive and increase adulthood risks of metabolic disease. PMID:26779032

  11. Reuse Of Pacemakers In Ghana And Nigeria: Medical, Legal, Cultural And Ethical Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ochasi, Aloysius; Clark, Peter

    2015-12-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO) cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death globally. Over 80% of CVD deaths take place in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). It is estimated that 1 million to 2 million people worldwide die each year due to lack of access to an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) or a pacemaker. Despite the medical, legal, cultural and ethical controversies surrounding the pacemaker reutilization, studies done so far on the reuse of postmortem pacemakers show it to be safe and effective with an infection rate of 1.97% and device malfunction rate of 0.68%. Pacemaker reutilization can be effectively and safely done and does not pose significant additional risk to the recipient. Heart patients with reused pacemakers have an improved quality of life compared to those without pacemakers. The thesis of this paper is that pacemaker reutilization is a life-saving initiative in LMICs of Nigeria and Ghana. It is cost effective; consistent with the principles of beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice with a commitment to stewardship of resources and the Common Good. Used pacemakers with adequate battery life can be properly sterilized for use by patients in LMICs who cannot afford the cost of a new pacemaker. PMID:24720369

  12. Pacemaker Created in Human Ventricle by Depressing Inward-Rectifier K+ Current: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Li, Qince; Zhang, Henggui

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac conduction disorders are common diseases which cause slow heart rate and syncope. The best way to treat these diseases by now is to implant electronic pacemakers, which, yet, have many disadvantages, such as the limited battery life and infection. Biopacemaker has been expected to replace the electronic devices. Automatic ventricular myocytes (VMs) could show pacemaker activity, which was induced by depressing inward-rectifier K+ current (IK1). In this study, a 2D model of human biopacemaker was created from the ventricular endocardial myocytes. We examined the stability of the created biopacemaker and investigated its driving capability by finding the suitable size and spatial distribution of the pacemaker for robust pacing and driving the surrounding quiescent cardiomyocytes. Our results suggest that the rhythm of the pacemaker is similar to that of the single cell at final stable state. The driving force of the biopacemaker is closely related to the pattern of spatial distribution of the pacemaker. PMID:26998484

  13. Stem cell-based biological pacemakers from proof of principle to therapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Chauveau, Samuel; Brink, Peter R; Cohen, Ira S

    2014-07-01

    Electronic pacemakers are the standard therapy for bradycardia-related symptoms but have shortcomings. Over the past 15 years, experimental evidence has demonstrated that gene and cell-based therapies can create a biological pacemaker. Recently, physiologically acceptable rates have been reported with an adenovirus-based approach. However, adenovirus-based protein expression does not last more than 4 weeks, which limits its clinical applicability. Cell-based platforms are potential candidates for longer expression. Currently there are two cell-based approaches being tested: (i) mesenchymal stem cells used as a suitcase for delivering pacemaker genes and (ii) pluripotent stem cells differentiated down a cardiac lineage with endogenous pacemaker activity. This review examines the current achievements in engineering a biological pacemaker, defines the patient population for whom this device would be useful and identifies the challenges still ahead before cell therapy can replace current electronic devices. PMID:24831844

  14. Stem Cell Based Biological Pacemakers From Proof of Principle to Therapy: a Review

    PubMed Central

    Chauveau, Samuel; Brink, Peter R.; Cohen, Ira S.

    2014-01-01

    Electronic pacemakers are the standard therapy for bradycardia related symptoms but have shortcomings. Over the past 15 years experimental evidence has demonstrated that gene and cell-based therapies can create a biological pacemaker. Recently, physiologically acceptable rates have been reported with an adenovirus-based approach. But adenovirus-based protein expression does not last more than 4 weeks, which limits its clinical applicability. Cell-based platforms are potential candidates for longer expression. Currently there are two cell based approaches being tested: 1) Mesenchymal stem cells used as a suitcase for delivering pacemaker genes and 2) Pluripotent stem cells differentiated down a cardiac lineage with endogenous pacemaker activity. This review examines the current achievements in engineering a biological pacemaker, defines the patient population for whom this device would be useful and identifies the challenges still ahead before cell therapy can replace current electronic devices. PMID:24831844

  15. Pacemaker Created in Human Ventricle by Depressing Inward-Rectifier K(+) Current: A Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Wang, Kuanquan; Li, Qince; Zhang, Henggui

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac conduction disorders are common diseases which cause slow heart rate and syncope. The best way to treat these diseases by now is to implant electronic pacemakers, which, yet, have many disadvantages, such as the limited battery life and infection. Biopacemaker has been expected to replace the electronic devices. Automatic ventricular myocytes (VMs) could show pacemaker activity, which was induced by depressing inward-rectifier K(+) current (I K1). In this study, a 2D model of human biopacemaker was created from the ventricular endocardial myocytes. We examined the stability of the created biopacemaker and investigated its driving capability by finding the suitable size and spatial distribution of the pacemaker for robust pacing and driving the surrounding quiescent cardiomyocytes. Our results suggest that the rhythm of the pacemaker is similar to that of the single cell at final stable state. The driving force of the biopacemaker is closely related to the pattern of spatial distribution of the pacemaker. PMID:26998484

  16. Successful launch of cardiac transplantation in Japan. Osaka University Cardiac Transplant Program.

    PubMed

    Hori, M; Yamamoto, K; Kodama, K; Takashima, S; Sato, H; Koretsune, Y; Kuzuya, T; Yutani, C; Fukushima, N; Ohtake, S; Shirakura, R; Matsuda, H

    2000-05-01

    Cardiac transplantation has been established as a therapeutic strategy for patients with end-stage heart failure. In Japan, however, cardiac transplantation has not been performed since the first case in 1968, and even now, after legislation for the approval of brain death was passed in 1997, it is still not performed regularly. Following long and steady efforts to enlighten Japanese society about the concept of brain death and the importance of organ transplantation, the first cardiac transplantation under the new legislation was successfully performed at Osaka University Hospital on February 1999. The patient was 47-year-old male in the dilated phase of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who had been supported with an implantable left ventricular assist device. This article briefly reviews the situation prior to the first case of cardiac transplantation under the new legislation and discusses the current status of the therapy in Japan. PMID:10834446

  17. [When do you implant a pacemaker in myotonic dystrophy?].

    PubMed

    Babuty, Dominique; Lallemand, Bénédicte; Laurent, Valérie; Clémenty, Nicolas; Pierre, Bertrand; Fauchier, Laurent; Raynaud, Martine; Pellieux, Sybille

    2011-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is the most frequent adult form of hereditary muscular dystrophy caused by a mutation on the DMPK gene. Myotonic dystrophy leads to multiple systemic complications related to weakness, respiratory failure, cardiac arrhythmias and cardiac conduction disturbances. Age of death is earlier in myotonic dystrophy patients than in general population with a high frequency of sudden death. Several mechanisms are involved in sudden death: atrio-ventricular block, severe ventricular arrhythmias or non-cardiac mechanism. The high degree of atrio-ventricular block is a well-recognized indication of pacemaker implantation but the prophylactic implantation of pacemaker should be considered to prevent sudden death in asymptomatic myotonic dystrophy patients. A careful clinical evaluation needs to be done for the identification of patients at high risk of sudden death. The resting ECG and SA ECG are non-invasive tools useful to select the patients who need an electrophysiologic study. In presence of prolonged HV interval more than or equal to 70 ms one can discuss the implantation of a prophylactic pacemaker. The choice of an implantable cardiac defibrillator is preferred in presence of spontaneous ventricular tachycardia or an alteration of the left ventricular ejection fraction. PMID:21549556

  18. Evaluation of a New Cardiac Pacemaker

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-25

    Atrial Fibrillation With 2 or 3° AV or Bifascicular Bundle Branch (BBB) Block; Normal Sinus Rhythm With 2 or 3° AV or BBB Block; Sinus Bradycardia With Infrequent Pauses or Unexplained Syncope With EP Findings

  19. Formal Specification of a Cardiac Pacing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Artur Oliveira; Oliveira, Marcel Vincius Medeiros

    The International Grand Challenge project on Verified Software is a long-term research program involving people from all over the world and is aimed to stimulate the creation of new theories and tools to be applied on industrial-scale problems. One of the challenges proposed is to make a formal development of a cardiac pacemaker. In this paper, we present a formal specification of this system using the Z notation and also discuss our experience in building this formal model and the decisions made during the process.

  20. Cardiac rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a program that helps you live better with heart disease. It is often prescribed to ... Ades PA, et al. Core Components of Cardiac Rehabilitation/Secondary Prevention Programs: 2007 Update: A Scientific Statement ...

  1. An unusual cause of pacemaker-induced severe tricuspid regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Loupy, A; Messika-Zeitoun, D; Cachier, A; Himbert, D; Brochet, E; Lung, B; Vahanian, A

    2008-01-01

    Pacemaker (PM) induced tricuspid regurgitation (TR) is a common echocardiographic finding. Although mild or moderate TR is frequently observed, severe TR is rare. We report the exceptional observation of a severe TR due to leaflet malcoaptation occurring late after PM implantation and in the following weeks after an aortic valve replacement. Our hypothesis is that the aortic valve surgery has been responsible for conformational changes between cardiac cavities, tricuspid valve and PM leads resulting in a severe TR. PMID:18267925

  2. Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy and phase resetting of the sinoatrial node: A conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantini, Federico; Varanini, Maurizio; Macerata, Alberto; Piacenti, Marcello; Morales, Maria-Aurora; Balocchi, Rita

    2007-03-01

    Congestive heart failure is a severe chronic disease often associated with disorders that alter the mechanisms of excitation-contraction coupling that may result in an asynchronous left ventricular motion which may further impair the ability of the failing heart to eject blood. In recent years a therapeutic approach to resynchronize the ventricles (cardiac resynchronization therapy, CRT) has been performed through the use of a pacemaker device able to provide atrial-based biventricular stimulation. Atrial lead senses the spontaneous occurrence of cells depolarization and sends the information to the generator which, in turn, after a settled delay [atrioventricular (AV) delay], sends electrical impulses to both ventricles to stimulate their synchronous contraction. Recent studies performed on heart rate behavior of chronically implanted patients at different epochs after implantation have shown that CRT can lead to sustained overall improvement of heart function with a reduction in morbidity and mortality. At this moment, however, there are no studies about CRT effects on spontaneous heart activity of chronically implanted patients. We performed an experimental study in which the electrocardiographic signal of five subjects under chronic CRT was recorded during the activity of the pacemaker programmed at different AV delays and under spontaneous cardiac activity after pacemaker deactivation. The different behavior of heart rate variability during pacemaker activity and after pacemaker deactivation suggested the hypothesis of a phase resetting mechanism induced by the pacemaker stimulus on the sinoatrial (SA) node, a phenomenon already known in literature for aggregate of cardiac cells, but still unexplored in vivo. The constraints imposed by the nature of our study (in vivo tests) made it impossible to plan an experiment to prove our hypothesis directly. We therefore considered the best attainable result would be to prove the accordance of our data to the conjecture through the use of models and physical considerations. We first used the data of literature on far-field effects of cardiac defibrillators to prove that the pacemaker impulses delivered to the two ventricles were able to induce modifications in membrane voltage at the level of the SA node. To simulate a phase resetting mechanism of the SA node, we used a Van der Pol modified model to allow the possibility of changing the refractory period and the firing frequency of the cells separately. With appropriate parameters of the model we reproduced phase response curves that can account for our experimental data. Furthermore, the simulated curves closely resemble the functional form proposed in literature for perturbed aggregate of cardiac cells. Despite the small sample of subjects investigated and the limited number of ECG recordings at different AV delays, we think we have proved the plausibility of the proposed conjecture.

  3. Prevalence of E/A Wave Fusion and A Wave Truncation in DDD Pacemaker Patients with Complete AV Block under Nominal AV Intervals

    PubMed Central

    Poller, Wolfram C.; Dreger, Henryk; Schwerg, Marius; Melzer, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Aims Optimization of the AV-interval (AVI) in DDD pacemakers improves cardiac hemodynamics and reduces pacemaker syndromes. Manual optimization is typically not performed in clinical routine. In the present study we analyze the prevalence of E/A wave fusion and A wave truncation under resting conditions in 160 patients with complete AV block (AVB) under the pre-programmed AVI. We manually optimized sub-optimal AVI. Methods We analyzed 160 pacemaker patients with complete AVB, both in sinus rhythm (AV-sense; n = 129) and under atrial pacing (AV-pace; n = 31). Using Doppler analyses of the transmitral inflow we classified the nominal AVI as: a) normal, b) too long (E/A wave fusion) or c) too short (A wave truncation). In patients with a sub-optimal AVI, we performed manual optimization according to the recommendations of the American Society of Echocardiography. Results All AVB patients with atrial pacing exhibited a normal transmitral inflow under the nominal AV-pace intervals (100%). In contrast, 25 AVB patients in sinus rhythm showed E/A wave fusion under the pre-programmed AV-sense intervals (19.4%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 12.6–26.2%). A wave truncations were not observed in any patient. All patients with a complete E/A wave fusion achieved a normal transmitral inflow after AV-sense interval reduction (mean optimized AVI: 79.4 ± 13.6 ms). Conclusions Given the rate of 19.4% (CI 12.6–26.2%) of patients with a too long nominal AV-sense interval, automatic algorithms may prove useful in improving cardiac hemodynamics, especially in the subgroup of atrially triggered pacemaker patients with AV node diseases. PMID:25707003

  4. 1978 Pacemaker Newspaper Awards: What Makes a Pacemaker?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brasler, Wayne

    1979-01-01

    Lists the nine high school and college newspapers, and the one newsmagazine, that won Pacemaker Awards in 1978; discusses characteristics that make each of them outstanding, and provides reproductions of a front page from each publication. (GT)

  5. Cardiac catheterization and angiography. Third edition

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, W.

    1986-01-01

    This book discusses the papers on cardiac catheterization and angiography. The topics covered are: historical perspective and present practice of cardiac catheterization; angiography principles and utilization of radiologic and cineangiographic equipment; complications, incidence and prevention of side effects of cardiac catheterization; techniques; blood flow measurement of heart; pressure measurement; diagnostic techniques of angiography; special catheter techniques; coronary angiography, temporary and permanent pacemakers, potential role of lasers in the cardiac catheterization and evaluation of cardiac function.

  6. How Does a Pacemaker Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... A pacemaker consists of a battery, a computerized generator, and wires with sensors at their tips. (The sensors are called electrodes.) The battery powers the generator, and both are surrounded by a thin metal ...

  7. Forward Programming of Cardiac Stem Cells by Homogeneous Transduction with MYOCD plus TBX5

    PubMed Central

    Belian, Elisa; Noseda, Michela; Abreu Paiva, Marta S.; Leja, Thomas; Sampson, Robert; Schneider, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Adult cardiac stem cells (CSCs) express many endogenous cardiogenic transcription factors including members of the Gata, Hand, Mef2, and T-box family. Unlike its DNA-binding targets, Myocardin (Myocd)—a co-activator not only for serum response factor, but also for Gata4 and Tbx5—is not expressed in CSCs. We hypothesised that its absence was a limiting factor for reprogramming. Here, we sought to investigate the susceptibility of adult mouse Sca1+ side population CSCs to reprogramming by supplementing the triad of GATA4, MEF2C, and TBX5 (GMT), and more specifically by testing the effect of the missing co-activator, Myocd. Exogenous factors were expressed via doxycycline-inducible lentiviral vectors in various combinations. High throughput quantitative RT-PCR was used to test expression of 29 cardiac lineage markers two weeks post-induction. GMT induced more than half the analysed cardiac transcripts. However, no protein was detected for the induced sarcomeric genes Actc1, Myh6, and Myl2. Adding MYOCD to GMT affected only slightly the breadth and level of gene induction, but, importantly, triggered expression of all three proteins examined (α-cardiac actin, atrial natriuretic peptide, sarcomeric myosin heavy chains). MYOCD + TBX was the most effective pairwise combination in this system. In clonal derivatives homogenously expressing MYOCD + TBX at high levels, 93% of cardiac transcripts were up-regulated and all five proteins tested were visualized. In summary: (1) GMT induced cardiac genes in CSCs, but not cardiac proteins under the conditions used. (2) Complementing GMT with MYOCD induced cardiac protein expression, indicating a more complete cardiac differentiation program. (3) Homogeneous transduction with MYOCD + TBX5 facilitated the identification of differentiating cells and the validation of this combinatorial reprogramming strategy. Together, these results highlight the pivotal importance of MYOCD in driving CSCs toward a cardiac muscle fate. PMID:26047103

  8. The effects of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy on pacemaker function.

    PubMed

    Langberg, J; Abber, J; Thuroff, J W; Griffin, J C

    1987-09-01

    Twenty-two pacemaker pulse generators were exposed to shock waves of an extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter to assess the effects of the extremely high pressure transients on pacemaker function. The pulse generator and distal aspect of the lead were positioned 5 cm from the focal point of the lithotripter and 10 cm from each other. Pulse generator function was analyzed during shock wave delivery synchronized with pulse generator output, during shock waves at a rate faster than the escape rate, and after exposure to lithotripsy. During shock waves delivered synchronously with pulse generator output, only one of 22 pulse generators malfunctioned by intermittently reverting to the magnet rate. When subjected to shock waves at a rate greater than the escape rate, 50% of the pulse generators were inhibited by electromechanical interference from the lithotripter. Both bipolar and unipolar devices were affected. However, analysis after exposure to shock waves showed that none of the pacemakers was damaged or spuriously reprogrammed. In conclusion, cardiac pacemakers do not appear to be damaged or reprogrammed by exposure to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. The likelihood of false inhibition appears to be very low if shock waves are delivered synchronously with the QRS. PMID:2444938

  9. Cardiac risk stratification in cardiac rehabilitation programs: a review of protocols

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Anne Kastelianne França; Barbosa, Marianne Penachini da Costa de Rezende; Bernardo, Aline Fernanda Barbosa; Vanderlei, Franciele Marques; Pacagnelli, Francis Lopes; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2014-01-01

    Objective Gather and describe general characteristics of different protocols of risk stratification for cardiac patients undergoing exercise. Methods We conducted searches in LILACS, IBECS, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and SciELO electronic databases, using the following descriptors: Cardiovascular Disease, Rehabilitation Centers, Practice Guideline, Exercise and Risk Stratification in the past 20 years. Results Were selected eight studies addressing methods of risk stratification in patients undergoing exercise. Conclusion None of the methods described could cover every situation the patient can be subjected to; however, they are essential to exercise prescription. PMID:25140477

  10. Current facts on pacemaker electromagnetic interference and their application to clinical care

    SciTech Connect

    Sager, D.P.

    1987-03-01

    The development of the sensing demand cardiac pacemaker brought with it the problem of interference as a result of extraneous electric current and electromagnetic fields. This problem still deserves consideration, not only because harmful disruption of pacemaker function, while infrequent, can occur but also because myths and misunderstandings have flourished on the subject. Misinformation has often led to needless patient anxiety and unnecessary restrictions in activities of daily living. Similarly, when health care practitioners are misinformed about pacemaker interference, potentially hazardous situations can occur in the clinical environment. This article is a review of current information on the sources and effects of electromagnetic interference (EMI) on pacemakers and includes a discussion of their application to patient care.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Patient with a Dual Chamber Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Lynne Martina; Robinson, Andrew George; O'Flaherty, Maurice Thomas; Eames, Niall; Johnston, Nicola; Heyburn, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Having a pacemaker has been seen an absolute contraindication to having an MRI scan. This has become increasingly difficult in clinical practice as insertion of pacemakers and implantable cardiac defibrillators is at an all time high. Here we outline a case where a 71-year-old male patient with a permanent pacemaker needed to have an MRI scan to ascertain the aetiology of his condition and help guide further management. Given this clinical dilemma, an emergency clinical ethics consultation was arranged. As a result the patient underwent an MRI scan safely under controlled conditions with a consultant cardiologist and radiologist present. The results of the MRI scan were then able to tailor further treatment. This case highlights that in certain conditions an MRI can be performed in patients with permanent pacemakers and outlines the role of clinical ethics committees in complex medical decision making. PMID:21331383

  12. Ventricular pacing on the prognosis of patients with pacemaker implantation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Liuying; Du, Xinping

    2014-06-01

    Excessive right ventricular apex pacing has significant adverse effects on the cardiac function and hence, it is necessary to clinically optimize pacing parameters and advocate suitable physiological pacing to safeguard the cardiac function after pacemaker implant. Minimizing ventricular pacing is an atrioventricular node priority function, to encourage ventricular self conduction and to reduce unnecessary right ventricular pacing. Minimized ventricular pacing reduces ventricular pacing by encouraging self atrioventricular conduction function and extending the AV interval. This study is a prospective cohort study to evaluate the changes of cardiac function in patients and serum amino-terminal natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) before and after pacing, and the risk of atrial fibrillation with different CUM% VP. The study has shown that the cardiac function will deteriorate with an increase in pacing rate. PMID:24242189

  13. Cardiac arrhythmias during exercise testing in healthy men.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, E. F.; Owen, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    Clinically healthy male executives who participate in a long-term physical conditioning program have demonstrated cardiac arrhythmia during and after periodic ergometric testing at submaximal and maximal levels. In 1,385 tests on 248 subjects, it was found that 34% of subjects demonstrated an arrhythmia at some time and 13% of subjects developed arrhythmia on more than one test. Premature systoles of ventricular origin were most common, but premature systoles of atrial origin, premature systoles of junctional origin, paroxysmal atrial tachycardia, atrioventricular block, wandering pacemaker, and pre-excitation were also seen. Careful post-test monitoring and pulse rate regulated training sessions are suggested for such programs.

  14. Interference of apex locator, pulp tester and diathermy on pacemaker function

    PubMed Central

    Sriman, Narayanan; Prabhakar, V.; Bhuvaneswaran, J.S.; Subha, N.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of three electronic apex locators (EAL), electric pulp tester (EPT) and diathermy on pacemaker function in vitro. Materials and Methods: Three EALs: Root ZX (J. Morita Co., Tustin, CA, U.S.A.), Propex (Dentsply), Mini Apex locator (SybronEndo, Anaheim, CA, USA), EPT (Parkell pulp vitality tester Farmingdale, NY, USA) and Diathermy (Neomed 250 B) were tested for any interference with one pacemaker (A medtronic kappa KVDD901-serial number: PLE734632S). Directly connecting the pacemaker lead with the EAL/EPT/diathermy operating on a flat bench top, the telemetry wand was held directly over the pacemaker to monitor the pacing pattern for a period of 30 s. Pacemaker activity was continuously recorded on the telemetric programmer and electro gram (EGM) readings examined for pacer inhibition, noise reversion or inappropriate pacemaker pulses. Results: All the three apex locators showed no pacing interference or background noise during its function or at rest. The EGM readings of EPT showed varying levels of background noise in between pacing however, this did not affect the normal pacing pattern and the pacing interval remained constant. EGM readings of diathermy showed an increase in the pacing interval (irregular pacing pattern) followed by complete inhibition of the pacing system. Conclusion: The tested EALs do not interfere with cardiac pacemaker function. The tested EPT showed varying levels of background noise but does not interfere with cardiac pacemaker function. Use of Diathermy interfered with the normal pacing, leading to complete inhibition of the pacing system. PMID:25657520

  15. Devices That May Interfere with Pacemakers

    MedlinePlus

    ... and the devices that may interfere with pulse generators. Carry your pacemaker ID card to prove that ... 3 watts) don't appear to damage pulse generators or affect how the pacemaker works. Technology is ...

  16. Clinical experience with nuclear pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Parsonnet, V; Myers, G H; Gilbert, L; Zucker, I R

    1975-12-01

    Approximately 1,400 nuclear pacemakers have been implanted in patients since April, 1970, without a single battery failure; 64 of these have been implanted at the Newark Beth Israel Medical Center. All except four of the 64 pulse generators were attached to transvenous electrodes, 39 to pacing wires already in place. Fifty-nine of the 64 units are in service and continue to function normally in a follow-up period of up to 2 years. In the total worldwide experience, 70 pacemakers are out of service, approximately half because of the patient's death, and the rest for infection or lead problems, and only three or four because of difficulties with components. The first 15 ARCO pacemakers implanted 2 years ago continue to function well. Of the 15 control pacemakers implanted at the same time, one unit has failed. We have concluded that a nuclear pacemaker should not be used in a patient with limited life expectancy or in an infant, but for the otherwise healthy young or middle-age individual, it should be the unit of choice. PMID:1188620

  17. Ventricular perforation by pacemaker lead repaired with two hemostatic devices

    PubMed Central

    Prestipino, Filippo; Nenna, Antonio; Casacalenda, Adele; Chello, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cardiac perforation is a rare, but potentially serious, complication of pacemaker implantation that may develop days or weeks after implantation. PRESENTATION OF CASE In the current case, 92-year-old man underwent permanent pacemaker implantation, but he presented 3 weeks later with severe symptoms. Computed tomography showed protrusion of the tip of the ventricular electrode through the right ventricle and into the chest wall. During an urgent surgical intervention, the lead was disconnected and extracted. A sealing hemostatic device and an hemostatic patch were applied to repair the ventricle; the procedure was uneventfull. DISCUSSION This case demonstrates how the correct diagnosis of ventricular perforation is crucial, and should be followed immediately by surgical planning. CONCLUSION The hemostatic patch is a valuable alternative to sutures in patients with thin and fragile ventricular wall, unable to undergo stitching. PMID:25460433

  18. Percutaneously Inject able Fetal Pacemaker: Electrodes, Mechanical Design and Implantation*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li; Chmait, Ramen; Bar-Cohen, Yaniv; Peck, Raymond A.; Loeb, Gerald E.

    2015-01-01

    We are developing a self-contained cardiac pacemaker with a small, cylindrical shape (~3×20mm) that permits it to be implanted percutaneously into a fetus to treat complete heart block and consequent hydrops fetalis, which is otherwise fatal. The device uses off-the-shelf components including a rechargeable lithium cell and a highly efficient relaxation oscillator encapsulated in epoxy and glass. A corkscrew electrode made from activated iridium can be screwed into the myocardium, followed by release of the pacemaker and a short, flexible lead entirely within the chest of the fetus to avoid dislodgement from fetal movement. The feasibility of implanting the device percutaneously under ultrasonic imaging guidance was demonstrated in acute adult rabbit experiments. PMID:23367442

  19. Design and Testing of a Percutaneously Implantable Fetal Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Gerald E.; Zhou, Li; Zheng, Kaihui; Nicholson, Adriana; Peck, Raymond A.; Krishnan, Anjana; Silka, Michael; Pruetz, Jay; Chmait, Ramen; Bar-Cohen, Yaniv

    2012-01-01

    We are developing a cardiac pacemaker with a small, cylindrical shape that permits percutaneous implantation into a fetus to treat complete heart block and consequent hydrops fetalis, which can otherwise be fatal. The device uses off-the-shelf components including a rechargeable lithium cell and a highly efficient relaxation oscillator encapsulated in epoxy and glass. A corkscrew electrode made from activated iridium can be screwed into the myocardium, followed by release of the pacemaker and a short, flexible lead entirely within the chest of the fetus to avoid dislodgement from fetal movement. Acute tests in adult rabbits demonstrated the range of electrical parameters required for successful pacing and the feasibility of successfully implanting the device percutaneously under ultrasonic imaging guidance. The lithium cell can be recharged inductively as needed, as indicated by a small decline in the pulsing rate. PMID:22855119

  20. Utility of the NavX® Electroanatomic Mapping System for Permanent Pacemaker Implantation in a Pregnant Patient with Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Alejandro; Velasco, Victor Manuel; Rosas, Fernando; Cevik, Cihan; Morillo, Carlos A

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease is a highly prevalent zoonosis in Mexico, Central, and South America. Early cardiac involvement is one of the most serious complications of this disease, and conduction disturbances may occur at an early age. We describe a young pregnant woman with Chagas disease and a high degree atrioventricular block, who required implantation of a permanent dual chamber pacemaker. Using an electroanatomic navigation EnSite NavX® system the pacemaker was successfully implanted with minimal fluoroscopic exposure. This case demonstrates the safety and feasibility of using an electroanatomic navigation system to guide permanent pacemaker implantation minimizing x-ray exposure in pregnant patients. PMID:23329872

  1. Comparison of the normal sinus node with seven types of rate responsive pacemaker during everyday activity.

    PubMed

    Sulke, A N; Pipilis, A; Henderson, R A; Bucknall, C A; Sowton, E

    1990-07-01

    The heart rate response of 59 patients aged 17-79 years implanted with seven different types of rate responsive pacemakers was evaluated during graded exercise treadmill testing and during standardised daily activities. The heart rate response in patients with pacemakers was compared with the chronotropic response in 20 healthy controls of similar age and sex distribution who performed identical protocols. All pacemaker types adequately simulated the control heart rate response during the graded exercise treadmill test except during the early stages of exercise. However, during everyday activities, the response of ventricular rate responsive (VVIR) pacemakers was varied. Activity sensing systems rapidly overresponded to staircase descent, to changes in walking speed, and to suitcase lifting with the pacemaker arm, and these systems did not respond to mental stress. "Physiological" sensors (QT and minute ventilation units) responded slowly to rapid changes in physiological demand. The QT pacemaker patients did respond to mental stress but showed a paradoxical increase in rate during the recovery phases of burst exercise protocols such as staircase ascent/descent and walking deceleration. Dual chamber pacemakers in VDD, DDD, and DDDR modes most closely simulated the normal chronotropic response during everyday activities. Graded exercise treadmill testing, in isolation, may not be the best way to asses or program the heart rate response in patients with the heart rate adaptive pacemakers because changes in heart rate during everyday activities may deviate considerably from the normal sinus response despite satisfactory simulation of the normal chronotropic response during treadmill testing. PMID:2390399

  2. 21 CFR 870.3670 - Pacemaker charger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker charger. 870.3670 Section 870.3670 Food... DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3670 Pacemaker charger. (a) Identification. A pacemaker charger is a device used transcutaneously to recharge the batteries of a...

  3. 21 CFR 870.3670 - Pacemaker charger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker charger. 870.3670 Section 870.3670 Food... DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3670 Pacemaker charger. (a) Identification. A pacemaker charger is a device used transcutaneously to recharge the batteries of a...

  4. 21 CFR 870.3670 - Pacemaker charger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker charger. 870.3670 Section 870.3670 Food... DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3670 Pacemaker charger. (a) Identification. A pacemaker charger is a device used transcutaneously to recharge the batteries of a...

  5. 21 CFR 870.3670 - Pacemaker charger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker charger. 870.3670 Section 870.3670 Food... DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3670 Pacemaker charger. (a) Identification. A pacemaker charger is a device used transcutaneously to recharge the batteries of a...

  6. 21 CFR 870.3670 - Pacemaker charger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker charger. 870.3670 Section 870.3670 Food... DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3670 Pacemaker charger. (a) Identification. A pacemaker charger is a device used transcutaneously to recharge the batteries of a...

  7. Pacemaker-associated Bacillus cereus endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Barraud, Olivier; Hidri, Nadia; Ly, Kim; Pichon, Nicolas; Manea, Petrus; Ploy, Marie-Cécile; Garnier, Fabien

    2012-11-01

    We report the case of a pacemaker-associated Bacillus cereus endocarditis in a nonimmunocompromised patient. Antibiotic treatment was ineffective, and the pacemaker had to be removed. B. cereus was cultured from several blood samples and from the pacemaker electrodes. This case underlines the contribution of the rpoB gene for Bacillus species determination. PMID:22959918

  8. Pacemaker registration electronic-card. A proposal for a computerised system of storing of the pacemaker registration card.

    PubMed

    Barbaro, V; Bedini, R; Bosi, C; Ialongo, D

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes an example of a computerised system dedicated to store an Emergency Health Card into a compact and portable memory support such as the CMOS RAM CARD. Details are given from the system used and of the program developed for this task. In particular, patient, pacemaker and lead data are stored by the prototype system. The acquisition layout is similar to that of the European pacemaker registration card but some other sections are added. The possibilities of an introduction of a card system like this on E.E.C. countries is discussed. PMID:2976876

  9. The cardiac implantable electronic device power source: evolution and revolution.

    PubMed

    Mond, Harry G; Freitag, Gary

    2014-12-01

    Although the first power source for an implantable pacemaker was a rechargeable nickel-cadmium battery, it was rapidly replaced by an unreliable short-life zinc-mercury cell. This sustained the small pacemaker industry until the early 1970s, when the lithium-iodine cell became the dominant power source for low voltage, microampere current, single- and dual-chamber pacemakers. By the early 2000s, a number of significant advances were occurring with pacemaker technology which necessitated that the power source should now provide milliampere current for data logging, telemetric communication, and programming, as well as powering more complicated pacing devices such as biventricular pacemakers, treatment or prevention of atrial tachyarrhythmias, and the integration of innovative physiologic sensors. Because the current delivery of the lithium-iodine battery was inadequate for these functions, other lithium anode chemistries that can provide medium power were introduced. These include lithium-carbon monofluoride, lithium-manganese dioxide, and lithium-silver vanadium oxide/carbon mono-fluoride hybrids. In the early 1980s, the first implantable defibrillators for high voltage therapy used a lithium-vanadium pentoxide battery. With the introduction of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator, the reliable lithium-silver vanadium oxide became the power source. More recently, because of the demands of biventricular pacing, data logging, and telemetry, lithium-manganese dioxide and the hybrid lithium-silver vanadium oxide/carbon mono-fluoride laminate have also been used. Today all cardiac implantable electronic devices are powered by lithium anode batteries. PMID:25387600

  10. Pacemaker lead endocarditis due to multidrug-resistant Corynebacterium striatum detected with sonication of the device.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Alessandra; Belvisi, Valeria; Iannetta, Marco; Andreoni, Carolina; Mascellino, Maria T; Lichtner, Miriam; Vullo, Vincenzo; Mastroianni, Claudio M

    2010-12-01

    Corynebacterium striatum is a commensal of human skin and has been recently recognized as an emerging pathogen. A case of nosocomial pacemaker lead endocarditis due to a multidrug-resistant C. striatum strain is described, highlighting the role of sonication as a diagnostic tool in cardiac device infections. PMID:20943861

  11. Rheumatoid pericardial effusion with heart block treated by pericardiectomy and implantation of permanent pacemaker.

    PubMed Central

    Gelson, A; Sanderson, J M; Carson, P

    1977-01-01

    A patient with long-standing seropositive erosive rheumatoid arthritis developed a pericardial effusion with chronic cardiac tamponade. He had evidence of conducting system disease and developed heart block. He was successfully treated by pericardiectomy and implantation of a demand pacemaker. PMID:831733

  12. Mammalian circannual pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Lincoln, G A; Hazlerigg, D G

    2010-01-01

    Circannual clocks drive rhythms in reproduction and many other seasonal characteristics but the underlying control of these long-term oscillators remains a mystery. Now, we propose that circannual timing involves mechanisms that are integral to the ontogenetic life-history programme where annual transitions are generated by cell birth, death and tissue regeneration throughout the life cycle--the histogenesis hypothesis. The intrinsic cycle is then timed by cues from the environment. The concept is that in specific sites in the brain, pituitary and peripheral tissues, residual populations of progenitor cells (adult stem cells) synchronously initiate a phase of cell division to begin a cycle. The progeny cells then proliferate, migrate and differentiate, providing the substrate that drives physiological change over long time-spans (e.g. summer/winter); cell death may be required to trigger the next cycle. We have begun to characterise such a tissue-based timer in our Soay sheep model focusing on the pars tuberalis (PT) of the pituitary gland and the sub-ventricular zone of the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) as potential circannual pacemakers. The PT is of special interest because it is a melatonin-responsive tissue containing undifferentiated cells, strategically located at the gateway between the brain and pituitary gland. The PT also governs long-photoperiod activation of thyroid hormone dependant processes in the MBH required for neurogenesis. In sheep, exposure to long photoperiod markedly activates BrDU-labelled cell proliferation in the PT and MBH, and acts to entrain the circannual reproductive cycle. Variation in expression and co-ordination of multiple tissue timers may explain species differences in circannual rhythmicity. This paper is dedicated to the memory of Ebo Gwinner. PMID:21755671

  13. Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Interactive Multimedia Computer-based Patient Education Program in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenny, Ng Yuen Yee; Fai, Tam Sing

    2001-01-01

    A study compared 48 cardiac patients who used an interactive multimedia computer-assisted patient education program and 48 taught by tutorial. The computer-assisted instructional method resulted in significantly better knowledge about exercise and self-management of chronic diseases. (Contains 29 references.) (JOW)

  14. Pacemaker/implantable cardioverter-defibrillator interaction.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Alejandro; Dickfeld, Timm; Saliaris, Anastasios; Shorofsky, Stephen

    2010-08-01

    We describe a case of pacemaker/implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) interaction in a single system causing failure to detect induced ventricular fibrillation (VF) in an 83-year-old man with ischemic cardiomyopathy. He underwent an ICD generator replacement due to battery depletion. In addition, a right atrial lead was placed to treat symptomatic bradycardia. Appropriate sensing and pacing parameters were observed in both leads during implant, and there was no cross-talk between the leads. A defibrillation threshold (DFT) test was performed (sense 1.5 mV, shock on T) with induction of VF that was not detected by the device, ultimately requiring an external defibrillation to terminate the arrhythmia. The device printout during testing showed atrial/ventricular lead cross-talk caused by the 1.1-J shock to induce VF, sensed beats in the noise window activating the noise suppression algorithm and preventing initial VF detection, and recurrent resetting of the automatic gain control due to ventricular sensing of the atrial pacing artifact preventing detection and perpetuating atrioventricular (AV) pacing at a rate of 60 bpm. In conclusion, pacemaker/ICD interaction can occur in a dual-chamber ICD system. This can be prevented by programming a shorter AV delay, increasing sensitivity (i.e., more sensitive value), and programming a pause before initiating pacing after an ICD discharge. PMID:20382269

  15. Activation of the Cardiac Renin-Angiotensin System in High Oxygen-Exposed Newborn Rats: Angiotensin Receptor Blockade Prevents the Developmental Programming of Cardiac Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bertagnolli, Mariane; Dios, Anne; Béland-Bonenfant, Sarah; Gascon, Gabrielle; Sutherland, Megan; Lukaszewski, Marie-Amélie; Cloutier, Anik; Paradis, Pierre; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; Nuyt, Anne Monique

    2016-04-01

    Newborn rats exposed to high oxygen (O2), mimicking preterm birth-related neonatal stress, develop later in life cardiac hypertrophy, dysfunction, fibrosis, and activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Cardiac renin-angiotensin system activation in O2-exposed adult rats is characterized by an imbalance in angiotensin (Ang) receptors type 1/2 (AT1/2), with prevailing AT1 expression. To study the role of renin-angiotensin system in the developmental programming of cardiac dysfunction, we assessed Ang receptor expression during neonatal high O2 exposure and whether AT1 receptor blockade prevents cardiac alterations in early adulthood. Sprague-Dawley newborn rats were kept with their mother in 80% O2 or room air (control) from days 3 to 10 (P3-P10) of life. Losartan or water was administered by gavage from P8 to P10 (n=9/group). Rats were studied at P3 (before O2 exposure), P5, P10 (end of O2), and P28. Losartan treatment had no impact on growth or kidney development. AT1 and Ang type 2 receptors were upregulated in the left ventricle by high O2 exposure (P5 and P10), which was prevented by Losartan treatment at P10. Losartan prevented the cardiac AT1/2 imbalance at P28. Losartan decreased cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis and improved left ventricle fraction of shortening in P28 O2-exposed rats, which was associated with decreased oxidation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, inhibition of the transforming growth factor-β/SMAD3 pathway, and upregulation of cardiac angiotensin-converting enzyme 2. In conclusion, short-term Ang II blockade during neonatal high O2 prevents the development of cardiac alterations later in life in rats. These findings highlight the key role of neonatal renin-angiotensin system activation in the developmental programming of cardiac dysfunction induced by deleterious neonatal conditions. PMID:26857347

  16. Electrical interference in non-competitive pacemakers

    PubMed Central

    Sowton, E.; Gray, K.; Preston, T.

    1970-01-01

    Patients with 41 implanted non-competitive pacemakers were investigated. A variety of domestic electrical equipment, a motor-car, and a physiotherapy diathermy apparatus were each operated in turn at various ranges from the patient. Interference effects on pacemaker function were assessed on the electrocardiograph. Medtronic demand 5841 pacemakers were stopped by diathermy while Cordis Ectocor pacemakers developed a fast discharge rate. Cordis triggered pacemakers (both Atricor and Ectocor) were sensitive to interference from many items of domestic equipment and the motor car. The Elema EM153 ran at an increased rate when an electric razor was running close to the pacemaker. The Devices demand 2980 and the Medtronic demand 5841 were not affected by the domestic equipment tested. The significance of interference effects is discussed in relation to pacemaker design. Images PMID:5470044

  17. [Wide QRS tachycardia preceded by pacemaker spikes].

    PubMed

    Romero, M; Aranda, A; Gómez, F J; Jurado, A

    2014-04-01

    The differential diagnosis and therapeutic management of wide QRS tachycardia preceded by pacemaker spike is presented. The pacemaker-mediated tachycardia, tachycardia fibrillo-flutter in patients with pacemakers, and runaway pacemakers, have a similar surface electrocardiogram, but respond to different therapeutic measures. The tachycardia response to the application of a magnet over the pacemaker could help in the differential diagnosis, and in some cases will be therapeutic, as in the case of a tachycardia-mediated pacemaker. Although these conditions are diagnosed and treated in hospitals with catheterization laboratories using the application programmer over the pacemaker, patients presenting in primary care clinic and emergency forced us to make a diagnosis and treat the haemodynamically unstable patient prior to referral. PMID:23768570

  18. Case study thoracic radiotherapy in an elderly patient with pacemaker: The issue of pacing leads

    SciTech Connect

    Kirova, Youlia M.; Menard, Jean; Chargari, Cyrus; Mazal, Alejandro; Kirov, Krassen

    2012-07-01

    To assess clinical outcome of patients with pacemaker treated with thoracic radiation therapy for T8-T9 paravertebral chloroma. A 92-year-old male patient with chloroma presenting as paravertebral painful and compressive (T8-T9) mass was referred for radiotherapy in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie. The patient presented with cardiac dysfunction and a permanent pacemaker that had been implanted prior. The decision of Multidisciplinary Meeting was to deliver 30 Gy in 10 fractions for reducing the symptoms and controlling the tumor growth. The patient received a total dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions using 4-field conformal radiotherapy with 20-MV photons. The dose to pacemaker was 0.1 Gy but a part of the pacing leads was in the irradiation fields. The patient was treated the first time in the presence of his radiation oncologist and an intensive care unit doctor. Moreover, the function of his pacemaker was monitored during the entire radiotherapy course. No change in pacemaker function was observed during any of the radiotherapy fractions. The radiotherapy was very well tolerated without any side effects. The function of the pacemaker was checked before and after the radiotherapy treatment by the cardiologist and no pacemaker dysfunction was observed. Although updated guidelines are needed with acceptable dose criteria for implantable cardiac devices, it is possible to treat patients with these devices and parts encroaching on the radiation field. This case report shows we were able to safely treat our patient through a multidisciplinary approach, monitoring the patient during each step of the treatment.

  19. Cardiac rehabilitation programs and health-related quality of life. State of the art.

    PubMed

    Cano de la Cuerda, Roberto; Alguacil Diego, Isabel María; Alonso Martín, Joaquín Jesús; Molero Sánchez, Alberto; Miangolarra Page, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the main health problem in developed countries. Prevention is presented as the most effective and efficient primary care intervention, whereas cardiac rehabilitation programs are considered the most effective of secondary prevention interventions; however, these are underused. This literature review examines the effectiveness and the levels of evidence of cardiac rehabilitation programs, their components, their development and role in developed countries, applications in different fields of research and treatment, including their psychological aspects, and their application in heart failure as a paradigm of disease care under this type of intervention. It is completed by a review of the impact of such programs on measures of health-related quality of life, describing the instruments involved in studies in recent scientific literature. PMID:22015019

  20. Pacemaker interference by magnetic fields at power line frequencies.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Trevor W; Caputa, Kris; Stuchly, Maria A; Shepard, Richard B; Kavet, Robert; Sastre, Antonio

    2002-03-01

    Human exposure to external 50/60-Hz electric and magnetic fields induces electric fields within the body. These induced fields can cause interference with implanted pacemakers. In the case of exposure to magnetic fields, the pacemaker leads are subject to induced electromotive forces, with current return paths being provided by the conducting body tissues. Modern computing resources used in conjunction with millimeter-scale human body conductivity models make numerical modeling a viable technique for examining any such interference. In this paper, an existing well-verified scalar-potential finite-difference frequency-domain code is modified to handle thin conducting wires embedded in the body. The effects of each wire can be included numerically by a simple modification to the existing code. Results are computed for two pacemaker lead insertion paths, terminating at either atrial or ventricular electrodes in the heart. Computations are performed for three orthogonal 60-Hz magnetic field orientations. Comparison with simplified estimates from Faraday's law applied directly to extracorporeal loops representing unipolar leads underscores problems associated with this simplified approach. Numerically estimated electromagnetic interference (EMI) levels under the worst case scenarios are about 40 microT for atrial electrodes, and 140 microT for ventricular electrodes. These methods could also be applied to studying EMI with other implanted devices such as cardiac defibrillators. PMID:11876290

  1. Effect of 1. 5 tesla nuclear magnetic resonance imaging scanner on implanted permanent pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, D.L.; Holmes, D.R. Jr.; Gray, J.E.

    1987-10-01

    Patients with a permanent pacemaker are currently restricted from diagnostic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging because of potential adverse effects on the pacemaker by the magnet. Previous work has shown that NMR imaging will result in asynchronous pacing of the pulse generator within a given distance of the magnet. The radiofrequency signal generated by the system may also result in rapid cardiac pacing, which may have deleterious effects. This study utilized a 1.5 tesla unit in an in vivo laboratory animal to evaluate the unit's effects on eight different pulse generators from two manufacturers. All pacemakers functioned in an asynchronous mode when placed within a certain distance of the magnet. In addition, transient reed switch inhibition was observed. Seven of the eight pulse generators paced rapidly when exposed to the radiofrequency signal and there was a dramatic decrease in arterial blood pressure. Whether effective rapid cardiac pacing would occur could not be predicted before exposure to the magnetic resonance unit. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging with high magnetic fields in patients with a pacemaker should continue to be avoided until the mechanism of the rapid cardiac pacing can be further delineated and either predicted or prevented.

  2. Effect of 1.5 tesla nuclear magnetic resonance imaging scanner on implanted permanent pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Hayes, D L; Holmes, D R; Gray, J E

    1987-10-01

    Patients with a permanent pacemaker are currently restricted from diagnostic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging because of potential adverse effects on the pacemaker by the magnet. Previous work has shown that NMR imaging will result in asynchronous pacing of the pulse generator within a given distance of the magnet. The radiofrequency signal generated by the system may also result in rapid cardiac pacing, which may have deleterious effects. This study utilized a 1.5 tesla unit in an in vivo laboratory animal to evaluate the unit's effects on eight different pulse generators from two manufacturers. All pacemakers functioned in an asynchronous mode when placed within a certain distance of the magnet. In addition, transient reed switch inhibition was observed. Seven of the eight pulse generators paced rapidly when exposed to the radiofrequency signal and there was a dramatic decrease in arterial blood pressure. Whether effective rapid cardiac pacing would occur could not be predicted before exposure to the magnetic resonance unit. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging with high magnetic fields in patients with a pacemaker should continue to be avoided until the mechanism of the rapid cardiac pacing can be further delineated and either predicted or prevented. PMID:3655146

  3. Transhepatic venous approach to permanent pacemaker placement in a patient with limited central venous access.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Adeel M; Harris, Gregory S; Movahed, Assad; Chiang, Karl S; Chelu, Mihail G; Nekkanti, Rajasekhar

    2015-09-16

    The end-stage renal disease population poses a challenge for obtaining venous access required for life-saving invasive cardiac procedures. In this case report, we describe an adult patient with end-stage renal disease in whom the hepatic vein was the only available access to implant a single-lead permanent cardiac pacemaker. A 63-year-old male with end-stage renal disease on maintenance hemodialysis and permanent atrial fibrillation/atrial flutter presented with symptomatic bradycardia. Imaging studies revealed all traditional central venous access sites to be occluded/non-accessible. With the assistance of vascular interventional radiology, a trans-hepatic venous catheter was placed. This was then used to place a right ventricular pacing lead with close attention to numerous technical aspects. The procedure was completed successfully with placement of a single-lead permanent cardiac pacemaker. PMID:26380831

  4. Predictors of Clinical Anxiety Aggravation at the End of a Cardiac Rehabilitation Program

    PubMed Central

    Saeidi, Mozhgan; Komasi, Saeid; Heydarpour, Behzad; Karim, Hossein; Nalini, Mehdi; Ezzati, Parvin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anxiety is one of the most primary and common reactions to a cardiac event can lead to hypertension, tachycardia, and high cardiac output. Objectives: To investigate the predictors of clinical anxiety aggravation at the end of a cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study used a database of a CR ward of a hospital in Iran. The demographic and clinical information of 574 patients participating in the CR program from April 2005 through April 2010 were analyzed. In order to determine the predictors of anxiety, binary logistic regression was performed. Results: After adjustment for gender, age and education, the results showed that 16.7% of the patients completed their CR program with increased levels of clinical anxiety. The following study variables were independently predictive of increased anxiety at the end of the CR program: male gender (OR = 2.04, 95% CI = 1.11 to 3.33, P = 0.048), no history of diabetes (OR = 4.24, 95% CI = 172 to 10.44, P = 0.002), family history of cardiac disease (OR = 2.63, 95% CI = 1.03 to 6.74, P = 0.043), and not quitting smoking (OR = 3.29, 95% CI = 1.38 to 7.85, P = 0.007). These variables could explain 9% - 15% of the variance in the dependent variable. Conclusions: It is possible to predict higher anxiety levels at the end of the CR program and implement preventive measures to control anxiety by considering certain demographic and clinical variables. Future studies should assess the predictive power of other variables. PMID:26937419

  5. Evaluation of bluetooth low power for physiological monitoring in a home based cardiac rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Martin, Timothy; Ding, Hang; D'Souza, Matthew; Karunanithi, Mohan

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in Australia, and places large burdens on the healthcare system. To assist patients with CVDs in recovering from cardiac events and mediating cardiac risk factors, a home based cardiac rehabilitation program, known as the Care Assessment Platform (CAP), was developed. In the CAP program, patients are required to manually enter health information into their mobile phones on a daily basis. The manual operation is often subject to human errors and is inconvenient for some elderly patients. To improve this, an automated wireless solution has been desired. The objectives of this paper are to investigate the feasibility of implementing the newly released Bluetooth 4.0 (BT4.0) for the CAP program, and practically evaluate BT4.0 communications between a developed mobile application and some emulated healthcare devices. The study demonstrated that BT4.0 addresses usability, interoperability and security for healthcare applications, reduces the power consumption in wireless communication, and improves the flexibility of interface for software development. This evaluation study provides an essential mobile BT4.0 framework to incorporate a large range of healthcare devices for clinical assessment and intervention in the CAP program, and hence it is useful for similar development and research work of other mobile healthcare solutions. PMID:22797030

  6. Neuropeptide Secreted from a Pacemaker Activates Neurons to Control a Rhythmic Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han; Girskis, Kelly; Janssen, Tom; Chan, Jason P.; Dasgupta, Krishnakali; Knowles, James A.; Schoofs, Liliane; Sieburth, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Rhythmic behaviors are driven by endogenous biological clocks in pacemakers, which must reliably transmit timing information to target tissues that execute rhythmic outputs. During the defecation motor program in C. elegans, calcium oscillations in the pacemaker (intestine), which occur about every 50 seconds, trigger rhythmic enteric muscle contractions through downstream GABAergic neurons that innervate enteric muscles. However, the identity of the timing signal released by the pacemaker and the mechanism underlying the delivery of timing information to the GABAergic neurons are unknown. Results Here we show that a neuropeptide-like protein (NLP-40) released by the pacemaker triggers a single rapid calcium transient in the GABAergic neurons during each defecation cycle. We find that mutants lacking nlp-40 have normal pacemaker function, but lack enteric muscle contractions. NLP-40 undergoes calcium-dependent release that is mediated by the calcium sensor, SNT-2/synaptotagmin. We identify AEX-2, the G protein-coupled receptor on the GABAergic neurons, as the receptor of NLP-40. Functional calcium imaging reveals that NLP-40 and AEX-2/GPCR are both necessary for rhythmic activation of these neurons. Furthermore, acute application of synthetic NLP-40-derived peptide depolarizes the GABAergic neurons in vivo. Conclusions Our results show that NLP-40 carries the timing information from the pacemaker via calcium-dependent release and delivers it to the GABAergic neurons by instructing their activation. Thus, we propose that rhythmic release of neuropeptides can deliver temporal information from pacemakers to downstream neurons to execute rhythmic behaviors. PMID:23583549

  7. The challenge of staphylococcal pacemaker endocarditis in a patient with transposition of the great arteries endocarditis in congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ch'ng, Julie; Chan, William; Lee, Paul; Joshi, Subodh; Grigg, Leanne E.; Ajani, Andrew E

    2003-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of septicaemia and infective endocarditis. The overall incidence of staphylococcal bacteraemia is increasing, contributing to 16% of all hospital-acquired bacteraemias. The use of cardiac pacemakers has revolutionized the management of rhythm disturbances, yet this has also resulted in a group of patients at risk of pacemaker lead endocarditis and seeding in the range of 1% to 7%. We describe a 26-year-old man with transposition of the great arteries who had a pacemaker implanted and presented with S. aureus septicaemia 2 years postpacemaker implantation and went on to develop pacemaker lead endocarditis. This report illustrates the risk of endocarditis in the population with congenital heart disease and an intracardiac device.

  8. Reconstruction of Hyman's second pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Furman, Seymour; Szarka, George; Layvand, Dmitriy

    2005-05-01

    Though journal articles and newspaper reports suggest that three Hyman pacemakers existed or were intended; a patent, descriptive photographs and a written description of an earlier model and only a photograph of a later model exist. A replica of the earlier has been made based on the patent and description, and a new replica of the second based on a critical deconstruction and analysis of the photograph of the second with a modern circuit duplicating the function of the earlier circuit. Both replicas were "operational" in that stimuli were mimicked though not delivered and neither could under any circumstances actually resuscitate the heart. The design and construction of the second Hyman pacemaker are presented. PMID:15869680

  9. The costs of a suburban paramedic program in reducing deaths due to cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Urban, N; Bergner, L; Eisenberg, M S

    1981-04-01

    The marginal costs per averted death of a suburban paramedic program are estimated to be approximately $42,000, when program costs are attributed entirely to cardiac arrest cases due to underlying heart disease, and indirect costs attributable to episode-related hospitalization are included, It is suggested that at $42,000 per cardiac arrest death averted the program is cost-beneficial by two criteria. First, it compares favorably with an estimate obtained from the literature of the value to the average individual of saving the life of a myocardial infarction patient. Second, the people of King County passed a cost-commensurate Paramedic Program Property Tax Levy in 1979, revealing their willingness to support the program. Results of the study should be generalized in accordance with the facts that in King County 1) the population density averages approximately 1,300 per square mile; 2) a basic emergency medical system ensures a 4-minute average response time to initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation; 3) a citizen-training program in cardiopulmonary resuscitation further reduces average time to initiation of basic life support; and 4) the paramedic program is designed to ensure a 10-minute average time to definitive care. PMID:6785539

  10. Lithium-iodine pacemaker cell

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, A.A.; Snyder, S.E.; DeVan, T.; Harney, M.J.; Harney, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    The lithium-iodine pacemaker cell is described as supplied by several manufacturers. The features of each design are discussed along with their effect on energy density, self-discharge and shape of the discharge curve. Differences in performance characteristics are related to morphology of the lithium iodine electrolyte and to the form of the cathode. A new, high-drain cell is mentioned which can supply 60 /mu/a/cm/sup 2/. 10 refs.

  11. Syncope in Patients with Pacemakers

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Syncope in a pacemaker patient is a serious symptom but it is rarely due a pacemaker system malfunction. Syncope occurs in about 5 % of patients paced for atrioventricular (AV) block in 5 years, 18% in those paced for sinus node disease in 10 years, 20 % of those paced for carotid sinus syndrome in 5 years and 5–55 % of those older patients paced for vasovagal syncope in 2 years. The vastly different results in vasovagal syncope depend on the results of tilt testing, where those with negative tests approach results in pacing for AV block and those with a positive tilt test show no better results than with no pacemaker. The implication of tilt results is that a hypotensive tendency is clearly demonstrated by tilt positivity pointing to syncope recurrence with hypotension. This problem may be addressed by treatment with vasoconstrictor drugs in those who are suited or, more commonly, a reduction or cessation of hypotensive therapy in hypertensive patients. Other causes of syncope such as tachyarrhythmias are rare. The clinical approach to patients who report syncope is detailed. PMID:26835124

  12. Syncope in Patients with Pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Syncope in a pacemaker patient is a serious symptom but it is rarely due a pacemaker system malfunction. Syncope occurs in about 5 % of patients paced for atrioventricular (AV) block in 5 years, 18% in those paced for sinus node disease in 10 years, 20 % of those paced for carotid sinus syndrome in 5 years and 5-55 % of those older patients paced for vasovagal syncope in 2 years. The vastly different results in vasovagal syncope depend on the results of tilt testing, where those with negative tests approach results in pacing for AV block and those with a positive tilt test show no better results than with no pacemaker. The implication of tilt results is that a hypotensive tendency is clearly demonstrated by tilt positivity pointing to syncope recurrence with hypotension. This problem may be addressed by treatment with vasoconstrictor drugs in those who are suited or, more commonly, a reduction or cessation of hypotensive therapy in hypertensive patients. Other causes of syncope such as tachyarrhythmias are rare. The clinical approach to patients who report syncope is detailed. PMID:26835124

  13. Calcium transient and sodium-calcium exchange current in human versus rabbit sinoatrial node pacemaker cells.

    PubMed

    Verkerk, Arie O; van Borren, Marcel M G J; Wilders, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate on the mechanism underlying the pacemaker activity of sinoatrial node (SAN) cells, focusing on the relative importance of the "membrane clock" and the "Ca(2+) clock" in the generation of the small net membrane current that depolarizes the cell towards the action potential threshold. Specifically, the debate centers around the question whether the membrane clock-driven hyperpolarization-activated current, I f , which is also known as the "funny current" or "pacemaker current," or the Ca(2+) clock-driven sodium-calcium exchange current, I NaCa, is the main contributor to diastolic depolarization. In our contribution to this journal's "Special Issue on Cardiac Electrophysiology," we present a numerical reconstruction of I f and I NaCa in isolated rabbit and human SAN pacemaker cells based on experimental data on action potentials, I f , and intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)] i ) that we have acquired from these cells. The human SAN pacemaker cells have a smaller I f , a weaker [Ca(2+)] i transient, and a smaller I NaCa than the rabbit cells. However, when compared to the diastolic net membrane current, I NaCa is of similar size in human and rabbit SAN pacemaker cells, whereas I f is smaller in human than in rabbit cells. PMID:23606816

  14. Pacemaker failure resulting from radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Quertermous, T.; Megahy, M.S.; Das Gupta, D.S.; Griem, M.L.

    1983-07-01

    The authors present a case of radiation-induced pacemaker failure. After 2000 rad (20 Gy) of photon irradiation for metastatic bronchogenic carcinoma, the pulse generator circuitry failed, producing a runaway rhythm. This suggests that present pacemaker circuitry may be more susceptible to irradiation than previously believed, and that even modest radiation doses can induce life-threatening arrhythmias.

  15. 21 CFR 870.3700 - Pacemaker programmers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker programmers. 870.3700 Section 870.3700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3700 Pacemaker...

  16. 21 CFR 870.3700 - Pacemaker programmers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker programmers. 870.3700 Section 870.3700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3700 Pacemaker...

  17. 21 CFR 870.3700 - Pacemaker programmers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker programmers. 870.3700 Section 870.3700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3700 Pacemaker...

  18. 21 CFR 870.3700 - Pacemaker programmers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker programmers. 870.3700 Section 870.3700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3700 Pacemaker...

  19. 21 CFR 870.3700 - Pacemaker programmers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker programmers. 870.3700 Section 870.3700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3700 Pacemaker...

  20. Runaway pacemaker caused by a stuck accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Nakazato, Y; Nakata, Y; Yasuda, M; Nakazato, K; Tanaka, M; Sumiyoshi, M; Sakurai, H; Yamaguchi, H

    1999-03-01

    We report a case of runaway pacemaker with a ventricular pacing rate of 190 beats/min. The runaway occurred when the accelerometer became stuck due to the magnet application during VVIR pacing. Runaways in modern pacemakers are particularly rare, but they do still occur. The best solution for this phenomenon is generator replacement. PMID:10192868

  1. Program Code Generator for Cardiac Electrophysiology Simulation with Automatic PDE Boundary Condition Handling.

    PubMed

    Punzalan, Florencio Rusty; Kunieda, Yoshitoshi; Amano, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and experimental studies involving human hearts can have certain limitations. Methods such as computer simulations can be an important alternative or supplemental tool. Physiological simulation at the tissue or organ level typically involves the handling of partial differential equations (PDEs). Boundary conditions and distributed parameters, such as those used in pharmacokinetics simulation, add to the complexity of the PDE solution. These factors can tailor PDE solutions and their corresponding program code to specific problems. Boundary condition and parameter changes in the customized code are usually prone to errors and time-consuming. We propose a general approach for handling PDEs and boundary conditions in computational models using a replacement scheme for discretization. This study is an extension of a program generator that we introduced in a previous publication. The program generator can generate code for multi-cell simulations of cardiac electrophysiology. Improvements to the system allow it to handle simultaneous equations in the biological function model as well as implicit PDE numerical schemes. The replacement scheme involves substituting all partial differential terms with numerical solution equations. Once the model and boundary equations are discretized with the numerical solution scheme, instances of the equations are generated to undergo dependency analysis. The result of the dependency analysis is then used to generate the program code. The resulting program code are in Java or C programming language. To validate the automatic handling of boundary conditions in the program code generator, we generated simulation code using the FHN, Luo-Rudy 1, and Hund-Rudy cell models and run cell-to-cell coupling and action potential propagation simulations. One of the simulations is based on a published experiment and simulation results are compared with the experimental data. We conclude that the proposed program code generator can be used to generate code for physiological simulations and provides a tool for studying cardiac electrophysiology. PMID:26356082

  2. Program Code Generator for Cardiac Electrophysiology Simulation with Automatic PDE Boundary Condition Handling

    PubMed Central

    Punzalan, Florencio Rusty; Kunieda, Yoshitoshi; Amano, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and experimental studies involving human hearts can have certain limitations. Methods such as computer simulations can be an important alternative or supplemental tool. Physiological simulation at the tissue or organ level typically involves the handling of partial differential equations (PDEs). Boundary conditions and distributed parameters, such as those used in pharmacokinetics simulation, add to the complexity of the PDE solution. These factors can tailor PDE solutions and their corresponding program code to specific problems. Boundary condition and parameter changes in the customized code are usually prone to errors and time-consuming. We propose a general approach for handling PDEs and boundary conditions in computational models using a replacement scheme for discretization. This study is an extension of a program generator that we introduced in a previous publication. The program generator can generate code for multi-cell simulations of cardiac electrophysiology. Improvements to the system allow it to handle simultaneous equations in the biological function model as well as implicit PDE numerical schemes. The replacement scheme involves substituting all partial differential terms with numerical solution equations. Once the model and boundary equations are discretized with the numerical solution scheme, instances of the equations are generated to undergo dependency analysis. The result of the dependency analysis is then used to generate the program code. The resulting program code are in Java or C programming language. To validate the automatic handling of boundary conditions in the program code generator, we generated simulation code using the FHN, Luo-Rudy 1, and Hund-Rudy cell models and run cell-to-cell coupling and action potential propagation simulations. One of the simulations is based on a published experiment and simulation results are compared with the experimental data. We conclude that the proposed program code generator can be used to generate code for physiological simulations and provides a tool for studying cardiac electrophysiology. PMID:26356082

  3. Pacemaker Lead Endocarditis Due to Multidrug-Resistant Corynebacterium striatum Detected with Sonication of the Device ▿

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Alessandra; Belvisi, Valeria; Iannetta, Marco; Andreoni, Carolina; Mascellino, Maria T.; Lichtner, Miriam; Vullo, Vincenzo; Mastroianni, Claudio M.

    2010-01-01

    Corynebacterium striatum is a commensal of human skin and has been recently recognized as an emerging pathogen. A case of nosocomial pacemaker lead endocarditis due to a multidrug-resistant C. striatum strain is described, highlighting the role of sonication as a diagnostic tool in cardiac device infections. PMID:20943861

  4. Characterizing a mammalian circannual pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Lincoln, Gerald A; Clarke, Iain J; Hut, Roelof A; Hazlerigg, David G

    2006-12-22

    Many species express endogenous cycles in physiology and behavior that allow anticipation of the seasons. The anatomical and cellular bases of these circannual rhythms have not been defined. Here, we provide strong evidence using an in vivo Soay sheep model that the circannual regulation of prolactin secretion, and its associated biology, derive from a pituitary-based timing mechanism. Circannual rhythm generation is seen as the product of the interaction between melatonin-regulated timer cells and adjacent prolactin-secreting cells, which together function as an intrapituitary "pacemaker-slave" timer system. These new insights open the way for a molecular analysis of long-term timing mechanisms. PMID:17185605

  5. Pacemaker safety and long-distance running

    PubMed Central

    Bennekers, J.H.; van Mechelen, R.; Meijer, A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective To prove that long-distance running is safe for athletes with pacemaker devices, pacemaker function was evaluated in nine long-distance runners. Method Nine runners participated in a nine-month training programme that involved running for 1000 or 2000 km in preparation for either a full or a half marathon. A professional coach, three cardiologists and a technician — all with running experience — conducted the training and medical checkups. Commercial heart rate monitors were used during training to assess heart rates at rest, and during exercise and long-distance running. Sensing and pacing functions of the pacemaker system were tested during training sessions as well as during the race. In addition, the ChampionChip (a time registration device used in competition) and the Polar heart rate monitor (a widely used self-monitoring device) were tested for possible interference with the pacemaker. Results All nine athletes completed the Amsterdam 2001 half or full marathon without any pacemaker dysfunction. A short survey after two years showed no pacemaker dysfunction. Conclusion Long-distance running is safe for athletes with pacemaker implants. Overall fitness and sufficient endurance training remain the prerequisites for maintaining the condition necessary for successful completion of a marathon regardless of medical status. In our study, it became clear that for patients who had received a pacemaker because of complete heart block, the upper rate of the pacemaker programme needed to be adjusted to 170 to 180 ppm to insure 1:1 atrio-ventricular synchrony during high atrial rates. It is concluded that there is no a priori reason for cardiologists to advise against long-distance running in athletes with pacemakers. Patients with known or suspected structural heart disease should be screened according the recommendations. PMID:25696264

  6. 21 CFR 870.3620 - Pacemaker lead adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker lead adaptor. 870.3620 Section 870.3620...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3620 Pacemaker lead adaptor. (a) Identification. A pacemaker lead adaptor is a device used to adapt a pacemaker lead so that...

  7. 21 CFR 870.3620 - Pacemaker lead adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker lead adaptor. 870.3620 Section 870.3620...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3620 Pacemaker lead adaptor. (a) Identification. A pacemaker lead adaptor is a device used to adapt a pacemaker lead so that...

  8. 21 CFR 870.3620 - Pacemaker lead adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker lead adaptor. 870.3620 Section 870.3620...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3620 Pacemaker lead adaptor. (a) Identification. A pacemaker lead adaptor is a device used to adapt a pacemaker lead so that...

  9. 21 CFR 870.3620 - Pacemaker lead adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker lead adaptor. 870.3620 Section 870.3620...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3620 Pacemaker lead adaptor. (a) Identification. A pacemaker lead adaptor is a device used to adapt a pacemaker lead so that...

  10. 21 CFR 870.3620 - Pacemaker lead adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker lead adaptor. 870.3620 Section 870.3620...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3620 Pacemaker lead adaptor. (a) Identification. A pacemaker lead adaptor is a device used to adapt a pacemaker lead so that...

  11. Abnormal permanent pacemaker inhibition by a magnet: a case study.

    PubMed

    Bierman, P Q; Roche, D A; Carlson, L G

    1993-01-01

    Permanent pacemaker evaluation with a magnet is an essential and widely practiced procedure used by cardiologists and electrophysiology nurses for routine pacemaker follow-up. It is generally safely performed. We present a case of a prolonged period of pacemaker inhibition in a pacemaker-dependent patient after routine magnet placement over her permanent pulse generator. PMID:8449758

  12. 21 CFR 870.3610 - Implantable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implantable pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3610... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An implantable pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has... implantable pacemaker pulse generator device that was in commercial distribution before May 28, 1976, or...

  13. 21 CFR 870.3610 - Implantable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Implantable pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3610... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An implantable pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has... implantable pacemaker pulse generator device that was in commercial distribution before May 28, 1976, or...

  14. Implementation of Ultraportable Echocardiography in an Adolescent Sudden Cardiac Arrest Screening Program

    PubMed Central

    Vanhecke, Thomas E; Weber, James E; Ebinger, Matthew; Bonzheim, Kimberly; Tilli, Frank; Rao, Sunilkumar; Osman, Abdulfatah; Silver, Marc; Fliegner, Karsten; Almany, Steve; Haines, David

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Over a 12-month period, adolescent heart-screening programs were performed for identifying at-risk adolescents for sudden cardiac death (SCD) in our community. Novel to our study, all adolescents received an abbreviated, ultraportable echocardiography (UPE). In this report, we describe the use of UPE in this screening program. METHODS AND RESULTS Four hundred thirty-two adolescents underwent cardiac screening with medical history questionnaire, physical examination, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG), and an abbreviated transthoracic echocardiographic examination. There were 11 abnormalities identified with uncertain/varying clinical risk significance. In this population, 75 adolescents had a murmur or high ECG voltage, of which only three had subsequent structural abnormalities on echocardiography that may pose risk. Conversely, UPE discovered four adolescents who had a cardiovascular structural abnormality that was not signaled by the 12-lead ECG, medical history questionnaire, and/or physical examination. CONCLUSIONS The utilization of ultraportable, handheld echocardiography is feasible in large-scale adolescent cardiovascular screening programs. UPE appears to be useful for finding additional structural abnormalities and for risk-stratifying abnormalities of uncertain potential of adolescents’ sudden death. PMID:25249762

  15. Damaging effect of therapeutic radiation on programmable pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Adamec, R.; Haefliger, J.M.; Killisch, J.P.; Niederer, J.; Jaquet, P.

    1982-03-01

    Two series of present-day pacemakers were tested in vitro with pulsed x-ray radiation. The first series of 12 pacemakers consisted of 10 different types and models of demand pacemakers (VVI). The second series of 13 pacemakers had 9 different types and models of programmable pacemakers. Unlike the first series which showed only mild changes in frequency and pulse width, all but four of the programmable pacemakers presented sudden complete failure after different radiation doses. We conclude that direct pulse radiation at therapeutic levels of programmable pacemakers should be avoided.

  16. Pacemakers charging using body energy.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Dinesh; Bairagi, Sweeti; Goel, Sanat; Jangra, Manoj

    2010-01-01

    Life-saving medical implants like pacemakers and defibrillators face a big drawback that their batteries eventually run out and patients require frequent surgery to have these batteries replaced. With the advent of technology, alternatives can be provided for such surgeries. To power these devices, body energy harvesting techniques may be employed. Some of the power sources are patient's heartbeat, blood flow inside the vessels, movement of the body parts, and the body temperature (heat). Different types of sensors are employed, such as for sensing the energy from the heartbeat the piezoelectric and semiconducting coupled nanowires are used that convert the mechanical energy into electricity. Similarly, for sensing the blood flow energy, nanogenerators driven by ultrasonic waves are used that have the ability to directly convert the hydraulic energy in human body to electrical energy. Another consideration is to use body heat employing biothermal battery to generate electricity using multiple arrays of thermoelectric generators built into an implantable chip. These generators exploit the well-known thermocouple effect. For the biothermal device to work, it needs a 2°C temperature difference across it. But there are many parts of the body where a temperature difference of 5°C exists - typically in the few millimeters just below the skin, where it is planned to place this device. This study focuses on using body heat as an alternative energy source to recharge pacemaker batteries and other medical devices and prevent the possibility of life-risk during repeated surgery. PMID:21814432

  17. Pacemakers charging using body energy

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Dinesh; Bairagi, Sweeti; Goel, Sanat; Jangra, Manoj

    2010-01-01

    Life-saving medical implants like pacemakers and defibrillators face a big drawback that their batteries eventually run out and patients require frequent surgery to have these batteries replaced. With the advent of technology, alternatives can be provided for such surgeries. To power these devices, body energy harvesting techniques may be employed. Some of the power sources are patient's heartbeat, blood flow inside the vessels, movement of the body parts, and the body temperature (heat). Different types of sensors are employed, such as for sensing the energy from the heartbeat the piezoelectric and semiconducting coupled nanowires are used that convert the mechanical energy into electricity. Similarly, for sensing the blood flow energy, nanogenerators driven by ultrasonic waves are used that have the ability to directly convert the hydraulic energy in human body to electrical energy. Another consideration is to use body heat employing biothermal battery to generate electricity using multiple arrays of thermoelectric generators built into an implantable chip. These generators exploit the well-known thermocouple effect. For the biothermal device to work, it needs a 2°C temperature difference across it. But there are many parts of the body where a temperature difference of 5°C exists – typically in the few millimeters just below the skin, where it is planned to place this device. This study focuses on using body heat as an alternative energy source to recharge pacemaker batteries and other medical devices and prevent the possibility of life-risk during repeated surgery. PMID:21814432

  18. Participation Rates, Process Monitoring, and Quality Improvement Among United States Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs: A National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Pack, Quinn R.; Squires, Ray W.; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco; Lichtman, Steven W.; Rodriguez-Escudero, Juan P.; Lindenauer, Peter K; Thomas, Randal J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although strategies exist for improving cardiac rehabilitation (CR) participation rates, it is unclear how frequently these strategies are utilized and what efforts are being made by CR programs to improve participation rates. Methods We surveyed all CR program directors in the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation’s database. We assessed program characteristics, use of specific referral and recruitment strategies, and self-reported program participation rates. Results Between 2007 and 2012, 49% of programs measured hospital referral, 21% measured office/clinic referral, 71% measured program enrollment, and 74% measured program completion rates. Program-reported participation rates [interquartile range] were 68 [32 to 90]% for hospital referral, 35 [15 to 60]% for office/clinic referral, 70 [46 to 80]% for enrollment, and 75 [62 to 82]% for completion. The majority of programs utilize a hospital-based systematic referral, liaison facilitated referral, or inpatient CR program (64%, 68%, and 60% of the time, respectively). Early appointments (< 2 weeks) were utilized by 35% and consistent phone call appointment reminders were utilized by 50% of programs. Quality improvement (QI) projects were performed by about half of CR programs. Measurement of participation rates was highly correlated with performing QI projects (p < 0.0001.) Conclusions Although programs are aware of participation rate gaps, the monitoring of participation rates is suboptimal, quality improvement initiatives are infrequent, and proven strategies for increasing patient participation are inconsistently utilized. These issues likely contribute to the national CR participation gap and may prove to be useful targets for national QI initiatives. PMID:25763922

  19. SU-D-18C-06: Initial Experience with Implementing MRI Safety Guidelines for Patients with Pacemakers - Medical Physicist Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    James, J; Place, V; Panda, A; Edmonson, H; Felmlee, J; Pooley, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Several institutions have developed MRI guidelines for patients with MR-unsafe or MR-conditional pacemakers. Here we highlight the role of a medical physicist in implementing these guidelines for non-pacemaker dependent patients. Guidelines: Implementing these guidelines requires involvement from several medical specialties and a strong collaboration with the site MRI supervisor to develop a structured workflow. A medical physicist is required to be present during the scan to supervise the MR scanning and to maintain a safety checklist that ensures: 1) uninterrupted patient communication with the technologist, 2) continuous patient physiologic monitoring (e.g. blood pressure and electrocardiography) by a trained nurse, 3) redundant patient vitals monitoring (e.g. pulse oximetry) due to the possibility of in vivo electrocardiography reading fluctuations during image acquisition. A radiologist is strongly recommended to be available to review the images before patients are discharged from the scanner. Pacemaker MRI should be restricted to 1.5T field strength. The MRI sequences should be optimized by the physicist with regards to: a) SAR: limited to <1.5 W/Kg for MR-unsafe pacemakers in normal operating mode, b) RF exposure time: <30 min, c) Coils: use T/R coils but not restricted to such, d) Artifacts: further optimization of sequences whenever image quality is compromised due to the pacemaker. In particular, cardiac, breast and left-shoulder MRIs are most susceptible to these artifacts. Possible strategies to lower the SAR include: a) BW reduction, 2) echo-train-length reduction, 3) increase TR, 4) decrease number of averages, 5) decrease flip angle, 6) reduce slices and/or a combination of all the options. Conclusion: A medical physicist in collaboration with the MR supervisor plays an important role in the supervision/implementation of safe MR scanning of pacemaker patients. Developing and establishing a workflow has enabled our institution to scan over 30 patients with pacemakers without complications, including 3 cardiac MR exams.

  20. Demonstration of the feasibility of implantation of a skeletal muscle pulse generator for fecal incontinence in a patient with an implanted unipolar DDD pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Konsten, J; Baeten, C G; Den Dulk, K; Spaans, F

    1992-05-01

    Electromagnetic fields and myopotentials from skeletal muscle may interfere with the function of a cardiac pacemaker. A 65-year-old woman with a unipolar DDD cardiac pacemaker underwent dynamic graciloplasty (transposition of the gracilis muscle around the anal canal and subsequent implantation of a bipolar pulse generator to stimulate the gracilis muscle), for the treatment of fecal incontinence. This gracilis pulse generator is turned "off" with an external magnet to allow defecation. Appropriate functioning of these two pulse generators (the cardiac pacemaker and the gracilis pulse generator) was tested during implantation of the gracilis pulse generator and afterwards. It was demonstrated that the combination could be used safely in this patient. PMID:1382284

  1. Adjustment of the evoked response sensitivity after hospital discharge in pacemaker patients with automatic ventricular threshold tracking activated.

    PubMed

    Schuchert, A; Ventura, R; Meinertz, T

    2001-02-01

    Automatic threshold tracking in cardiac pacemakers allows ventricular capture verification and self-adaptive pacing output regulation. The Autocapture algorithm detects the evoked response (ER) signal immediately after the pacing pulse to verify the efficacy of ventricular pacing. Before hospital delivery, the ER sensitivity must be programmed individually so that the pacemaker detects the ER signal adequately without sensing lead polarization. The aims of the study were to assess the frequency of patients in whom Autocapture could be activated and whether the ER sensitivity had to be adjusted after hospital discharge. The study included 44 patients who received the VVIR pacemaker Regency SR+ (St. Jude Medical) connected to the model 1450 T pacing lead. ER signal, lead polarization, and ER sensitivity were evaluated before hospital discharge and 1, 3, and 6 months after implantation. The system recommended activating Autocapture in 42 of 44 patients. The mean ER signal was 8.4+/-1.2 mV at discharge, 9.0+/-3.9 mV at month 1, 8.9+/-4.9 mV at month 3, and 9.3+/-4.5 mV at month 6. Polarization was 1.0+/-0.1 mV at discharge, 1.1+/-0.5 mV at month 1, 1.1+/-0.2 mV at month 3, and 1.1+/-0.5 mV at month 6. Mean ER sensitivity was 3.7+/-1.8 mV at discharge, 4.0+/-1.8 mV after 1, 4.1+/-2.2 mV after 3, and 4.1+/-1.8 mV after 6 months. ER sensitivity could remain unadjusted in 14 patients. Programming to a less sensitive ER setting from 2.9+/-1.2 mV to 4.3+/-1.5 mV was possible in 21 patients. Programming to a more sensitive ER setting from 4.1+/-1.1 mV to 2.5+/-0.9 mV was required in nine patients because of the decrease of the ER signal. The automatic threshold tracking algorithm Autocapture could be activated in 95% of patients. Programming to more sensitive ER settings was recommended in 21% of the patients after hospital discharge. Therefore, ER signal and polarization must be checked at each follow-up, as a decrease in ER signal amplitude can make reprogramming of the ER sensitivity necessary. There is no risk for the patient if the ER is not sensed, as high voltage backup stimulation is present. PMID:11270702

  2. Pacemaker failure associated with therapeutic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, C.; Mutter, M.

    1988-11-01

    A 48-year-old white man with a multiprogrammable Intramedics 259-01 pacemaker was treated for inoperable lung cancer with a course of cobalt-60 radiotherapy (total 3500 rad). Several weeks subsequent to his last radiation treatment, the patient presented to the emergency department with chest and abdominal pain, shortness of breath, hypotension, and tachycardia. A paced tachycardia was noted, and application of a magnet over the pacemaker completely inhibited its function, allowing a normal sinus rhythm to ensue and the patient's symptoms to be relieved. Pacemaker failure probably was a complication of radiotherapy.

  3. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePlus

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...

  4. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program to help people who have A heart attack Angioplasty or coronary artery bypass grafting for coronary heart disease A heart valve repair or replacement A ...

  5. 'This is a forever project': supporting lifestyle changes in a regional Queensland community-based cardiac rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation programs throughout the world have struggled for several years to attract more participants and facilitate behaviour changes in these clients. Over the past few years, there has been an increased level of attention in the role that self-efficacy and social support may play in this respect. The main aim of this study was to explore self-efficacy and social support within a regional, community-based cardiac rehabilitation program that does not adhere to traditional cardiac rehabilitation structures. Twelve participants were interviewed and two major themes emerged from the thematic analysis of the interview transcripts: making personal lifestyle changes; and supportive environment for lifestyle changes. Although this study is exploratory in nature, it has highlighted the significance of social support from within a program as opposed to participants' friends and family, the subject of most social-support research. It also contributes to the challenges others are starting to make regarding the limited timeframes associated with traditional cardiac rehabilitation programs, suggesting more time may be needed to build firmer psychosocial foundations for behaviour change after cardiac events. PMID:22950845

  6. Cardiac resynchronization therapy: Dire need for targeted left ventricular lead placement and optimal device programming

    PubMed Central

    Pastromas, Sokratis; Manolis, Antonis S

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) effected via biventricular pacing has been established as prime therapy for heart failure patients of New York Heart Association functional class II, III and ambulatory IV, reduced left ventricular (LV) function, and a widened QRS complex. CRT has been shown to improve symptoms, LV function, hospitalization rates, and survival. In order to maximize the benefit from CRT and reduce the number of non-responders, consideration should be given to target the optimal site for LV lead implantation away from myocardial scar and close to the latest LV site activation; and also to appropriately program the device paying particular attention to optimal atrioventricular and interventricular intervals. We herein review current data related to both optimal LV lead placement and device programming and their effects on CRT clinical outcomes. PMID:25548617

  7. Changing trends in pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator generator advisories.

    PubMed

    Maisel, William H; Stevenson, William G; Epstein, Laurence M

    2002-12-01

    Pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) generator recalls and safety alerts (advisories) occur frequently, affect many patients, and are increasing in number and rate. It is unknown if advances in device technology have been accompanied by changing patterns of device advisory type. Weekly FDA Enforcement Reports from January 1991 to December 2000 were analyzed to identify all advisories involving pacemaker and ICD generators. This article represents additional analysis of previously cited advisories and does not contain additional recalls or safety alerts over those that have been previously reported. The 29 advisories (affecting 159,061 devices) from the early 1990s (1991-1995) were compared to the 23 advisories (affecting 364,084 devices) from the late 1990s (1996-2000). While the annual number of device advisories did not change significantly, ICD advisories became more frequent and a three-fold increase in the number of devices affected per advisory was observed. The number of devices affected by hardware advisories increased three-fold, due primarily to a 700-fold increase in electrical/circuitry abnormalities and a 20-fold increase in potential battery/capacitor malfunctions. Other types of hardware abnormalities (defects in the device header, hermetic seal, etc.) became less common. The number of devices recalled due to firmware (computer programming) abnormalities more than doubled. The remarkable technological advances in pacemaker and ICD therapy have been accompanied by changing patterns of device advisory type. Accurate, timely physician and patient notification systems, and routine pacemaker and ICD patient follow-up continue to be of paramount importance. PMID:12520666

  8. Permanent pacemaker implantation using a femoral approach.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Patrícia; Reis, Hipólito; Lagarto, Vítor; Palma, Paulo; Roque, Carla; Pinheiro-Vieira, António; Anjo, Diana; Torres, Severo

    2014-11-01

    We describe two cases in which a permanent pacemaker was implanted via the femoral vein, because the cephalic and subclavian veins were not patent. The technique and its indications, advantages and potential complications are reviewed. PMID:25444764

  9. How Will a Pacemaker Affect My Lifestyle?

    MedlinePlus

    ... High-tension wires Metal detectors Industrial welders Electrical generators These devices can disrupt the electrical signaling of ... 2 feet away from industrial welders and electrical generators. Some medical procedures can disrupt your pacemaker. These ...

  10. What Are the Risks of Pacemaker Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ... or nerve damage A collapsed lung A bad reaction to the medicine used during the procedure Talk with your doctor about the benefits and risks of pacemaker surgery. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: February 28, 2012 Twitter ...

  11. Mangalith: a new lithium pacemaker battery

    SciTech Connect

    Gerbier, G.; Lehmann, G.

    1980-01-01

    An original lithium battery system is being developed for pacemaker application. The material used, lithium-manganese dioxide, industrially available at the present time for a variety of electronic applications, has been modified and adapted for pacemaker power requirements. The utilization of a different modification of manganese dioxide offers performance advantages. The cell technology is described and performance comparisons between this new cathode material and the industrial counterpart are reported. 7 refs.

  12. Contact dermatitis after implantable cardiac defibrillator implantation for ventricular tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Pinar; Inci, Sinan; Kuyumcu, Mevlut Serdar; Kus, Ozgur

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pacemaker contact sensitivity is a rare condition. Less than 30 reports of pacemaker skin reactions have been described. We report a 57-year-old woman who underwent an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) implantation for ventricular tachycardia. A skin patch test was positive on almost all components of the pacemaker system. She was treated with topical corticosteroids and skin lesions resolved within 2 weeks. Because of widespread use of various devices, we will see this more often and therefore it is important to recognize this problem and its effective management. PMID:26989652

  13. The G-protein-gated K+ channel, IKACh, is required for regulation of pacemaker activity and recovery of resting heart rate after sympathetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Mesirca, Pietro; Marger, Laurine; Toyoda, Futoshi; Rizzetto, Riccardo; Audoubert, Matthieu; Dubel, Stefan; Torrente, Angelo G; Difrancesco, Mattia L; Muller, Jana Christina; Leoni, Anne-Laure; Couette, Brigitte; Nargeot, Joël; Clapham, David E; Wickman, Kevin; Mangoni, Matteo E

    2013-08-01

    Parasympathetic regulation of sinoatrial node (SAN) pacemaker activity modulates multiple ion channels to temper heart rate. The functional role of the G-protein-activated K(+) current (IKACh) in the control of SAN pacemaking and heart rate is not completely understood. We have investigated the functional consequences of loss of IKACh in cholinergic regulation of pacemaker activity of SAN cells and in heart rate control under physiological situations mimicking the fight or flight response. We used knockout mice with loss of function of the Girk4 (Kir3.4) gene (Girk4(-/-) mice), which codes for an integral subunit of the cardiac IKACh channel. SAN pacemaker cells from Girk4(-/-) mice completely lacked IKACh. Loss of IKACh strongly reduced cholinergic regulation of pacemaker activity of SAN cells and isolated intact hearts. Telemetric recordings of electrocardiograms of freely moving mice showed that heart rate measured over a 24-h recording period was moderately increased (10%) in Girk4(-/-) animals. Although the relative extent of heart rate regulation of Girk4(-/-) mice was similar to that of wild-type animals, recovery of resting heart rate after stress, physical exercise, or pharmacological β-adrenergic stimulation of SAN pacemaking was significantly delayed in Girk4(-/-) animals. We conclude that IKACh plays a critical role in the kinetics of heart rate recovery to resting levels after sympathetic stimulation or after direct β-adrenergic stimulation of pacemaker activity. Our study thus uncovers a novel role for IKACh in SAN physiology and heart rate regulation. PMID:23858001

  14. Normal heart rhythm is initiated and regulated by an intracellular Calcium clock within pacemaker cells

    PubMed Central

    Maltsev, Victor A.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2007-01-01

    For almost half a century it has been thought that the heart rhythm originates on the surface membrane of the cardiac pacemaker cells and is driven by voltage-gated ion channels (membrane clocks). Data from several recent studies, however, conclusively show that the rhythm is initiated, sustained, and regulated by oscillatory Ca2+ releases (Ca2+ clock) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, a major Ca2+ store within sinoatrial node cells, the primary heart’s pacemakers. Activation of the local oscillatory Ca2+ releases is independent of membrane depolarization and driven by a high level of basal state phosphorylation of Ca2+ cycling proteins. The releases produce Ca2+ wavelets under the cell surface membrane during the later phase of diastolic depolarization and activate the forward mode of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger resulting in inward membrane current, which ignites an action potential. Phosphorylation-dependent gradation of speed at which Ca2+ clock cycles is the essential regulatory mechanism of normal pacemaker rate and rhythm. The robust regulation of pacemaker function is insured by tight integration of Ca2+ and membrane clocks: the action potential shape and ion fluxes are tuned by membrane clocks to sustain operation of the Ca2+ clock which produces timely and powerful ignition of the membrane clocks to effect action potentials. PMID:17827062

  15. Prediction of drug-related cardiac adverse effects in humans--B: use of QSAR programs for early detection of drug-induced cardiac toxicities.

    PubMed

    Frid, Anna A; Matthews, Edwin J

    2010-04-01

    This report describes the use of three quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) programs to predict drug-related cardiac adverse effects (AEs), BioEpisteme, MC4PC, and Leadscope Predictive Data Miner. QSAR models were constructed for 9 cardiac AE clusters affecting Purkinje nerve fibers (arrhythmia, bradycardia, conduction disorder, electrocardiogram, palpitations, QT prolongation, rate rhythm composite, tachycardia, and Torsades de pointes) and 5 clusters affecting the heart muscle (coronary artery disorders, heart failure, myocardial disorders, myocardial infarction, and valve disorders). The models were based on a database of post-marketing AEs linked to 1632 chemical structures, and identical training data sets were configured for three QSAR programs. Model performance was optimized and shown to be affected by the ratio of the number of active to inactive drugs. Results revealed that the three programs were complementary and predictive performances using any single positive, consensus two positives, or consensus three positives were as follows, respectively: 70.7%, 91.7%, and 98.0% specificity; 74.7%, 47.2%, and 21.0% sensitivity; and 138.2, 206.3, and 144.2 chi(2). In addition, a prospective study using AE data from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) MedWatch Program showed 82.4% specificity and 94.3% sensitivity. Furthermore, an external validation study of 18 drugs with serious cardiotoxicity not considered in the models had 88.9% sensitivity. PMID:19941924

  16. Adoption of community-based cardiac rehabilitation programs and physical activity following phase III cardiac rehabilitation in Scotland: a prospective and predictive study.

    PubMed

    Sniehotta, Falko F; Gorski, Charlotta; Araujo-Soares, Vera

    2010-09-01

    Little is known about levels of physical activity and attendance at phase IV community-based Cardiac Rehabilitation (CR) programs following completion of exercise-focussed, hospital-based phase III CR. This study aims to test, compare and combine the predictive utility of the Common-Sense Self-Regulation Model (CS-SRM) and the extended Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) with action planning for two rehabilitation behaviours: physical activity and phase IV CR attendance. Individuals diagnosed with coronary heart disease (n = 103) completed baseline measures of illness perceptions, intentions, perceived behavioural control (PBC), action planning and past physical activity in the last week of a phase III CR program, and 95 participants completed follow-up measures of physical activity and attended phase IV CR (objectively confirmed) 2 months later. Only one predictor (PBC/cyclical timeline) significantly predicted levels and change of physical activity. While illness perceptions were not predictive of phase IV CR attendance, the extended TPB model showed good predictive power with action planning and intention as the most powerful predictors. Amongst participants who planned when and where to attend phase IV CR at the end of phase III rehabilitation, 65.9% subsequently attended a phase IV CR program compared to only 18.5% of those who had not made a plan. This study adds to our understanding of cardiac rehabilitation behaviour after completion of health service delivered programs. Comparing theoretical models and rehabilitation behaviours contributes to the development of behaviour theory. PMID:20204953

  17. Radiology of cardiac devices and their complications

    PubMed Central

    Dipoce, J; Spindola-Franco, H

    2015-01-01

    This article familiarizes the reader with several different cardiac devices including pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, intra-aortic balloon pumps, ventricular assist devices, valve replacements and repairs, shunt-occluding devices and passive constraint devices. Many cardiac devices are routinely encountered in clinical practice. Other devices are in the early stages of development, but circumstances suggest that they too will become commonly found. The radiologist must be familiar with these devices and their complications. PMID:25411826

  18. Update on arrhythmias and cardiac pacing 2013.

    PubMed

    Almendral, Jesús; Pombo, Marta; Martínez-Alday, Jesús; González-Rebollo, José M; Rodríguez-Font, Enrique; Martínez-Ferrer, José; Castellanos, Eduardo; García-Fernández, F Javier; Ruiz-Mateas, Francisco

    2014-04-01

    This report discusses a selection of the most relevant articles on cardiac arrhythmias and pacing published in 2013. The first section discusses arrhythmias, classified as regular paroxysmal supraventricular tachyarrhythmias, atrial fibrillation, and ventricular arrhythmias, together with their treatment by means of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. The next section reviews cardiac pacing, subdivided into resynchronization therapy, remote monitoring of implantable devices, and pacemakers. The final section discusses syncope. PMID:24774592

  19. The Artificial Cardiac Pacemaker—Indications for Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Benson B.; Bruns, David L.

    1964-01-01

    Extensive clinical experience has demonstrated that implantable cardiac pacemakers are safe and effective mechanisms for controlling symptoms and preventing the hazards of third degree heart block with Stokes-Adams syncope. Medical management of this disease does not provide reliable protection and life expectancy averages about two years after diagnosis. Hence the negligible surgical morbidity and mortality associated with pacemaker implantation justifies broad indications to implant one of the four commercially available battery-powered units. Elective implantation of a pacemaker should be considered in patients with persistent third degree heart block who have had: One or more episodes of Stokes-Adams syncope; surgical injury to the conduction system, regardless of syncopal attacks; evidence of low cardiac output with cardiomegaly secondary to bradycardia. Few if any other cardiac arrythmias are satisfactorily controlled by an electrical pacemaker. Emergency pacemaker control is obviously necessary for patients developing intractable or recurrent bouts of asystole. During the interval until an implantable unit can be obtained and sterilized, the patient may be controlled by intravenous isoproterenol or by an external pacemaker attached to a transvenous catheter electrode, a precordial skin electrode or a percutaneous myocardial wire electrode. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:14236028

  20. U.S. trends in CABG hospital volume: the effect of adding cardiac surgery programs.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Chad T; Fisher, Elliott S; Welch, H Gilbert; Siewers, Andrea E; Lucas, F Lee

    2007-01-01

    Hospital coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) volume is inversely related to mortality--with low-volume hospitals having the highest mortality. Medicare data (1992-2003) show that the number of CABG procedures increased from 158,000 in 1992 to a peak of 190,000 in 1996 and then fell to 152,000 in 2003, while the number of hospitals performing CABG increased steadily. Predictably, the proportion of CABG procedures performed at low-volume hospitals increased, and the proportion in high-volume hospitals declined. An unintended consequence of starting new cardiac surgery programs is declining CABG hospital volume--a side effect that might increase mortality. PMID:17211025

  1. Induction of oscillatory ventilation pattern using dynamic modulation of heart rate through a pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Manisty, Charlotte H; Willson, Keith; Davies, Justin E R; Whinnett, Zachary I; Baruah, Resham; Mebrate, Yoseph; Kanagaratnam, Prapa; Peters, Nicholas S; Hughes, Alun D; Mayet, Jamil; Francis, Darrel P

    2008-07-01

    For disease states characterized by oscillatory ventilation, an ideal dynamic therapy would apply a counteracting oscillation in ventilation. Modulating respiratory gas transport through the circulation might allow this. We explore the ability of repetitive alternations in heart rate, using a cardiac pacemaker, to elicit oscillations in respiratory variables and discuss the potential for therapeutic exploitation. By incorporating acute cardiac output manipulations into an integrated mathematical model, we observed that a rise in cardiac output should yield a gradual rise in end-tidal CO2 and, subsequently, ventilation. An alternating pattern of cardiac output might, therefore, create oscillations in CO2 and ventilation. We studied the effect of repeated alternations in heart rate of 30 beats/min with periodicity of 60 s, on cardiac output, respiratory gases, and ventilation in 22 subjects with implanted cardiac pacemakers and stable breathing patterns. End-tidal CO2 and ventilation developed consistent oscillations with a period of 60 s during the heart rate alternations, with mean peak-to-trough relative excursions of 8.4 +/- 5.0% (P < 0.0001) and 24.4 +/- 18.8% (P < 0.0001), respectively. Furthermore, we verified the mathematical prediction that the amplitude of these oscillations would depend on those in cardiac output (r = 0.59, P = 0.001). Repetitive alternations in heart rate can elicit reproducible oscillations in end-tidal CO2 and ventilation. The size of this effect depends on the magnitude of the cardiac output response. Harnessed and timed appropriately, this cardiorespiratory mechanism might be exploited to create an active dynamic responsive pacing algorithm to counteract spontaneous respiratory oscillations, such as those causing apneic breathing disorders. PMID:18463195

  2. Interspike Interval Fluctuations in Aplysia Pacemaker Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Junge, Douglas; Moore, George P.

    1966-01-01

    In recent years, several mathematical models have been put forth to explain the time sequence of spike discharges in single neurons, in terms of synaptic inputs or intrinsic mechanisms. All of these models have been hypothetical, in that intracellular events were assumed, and not measured directly. The purpose of the present work was to study the statistics of the discharge from a preparation where intracellular recording was possible, and relate the observed discharge to measurable cell parameters. Regularly firing “pacemaker neurons” in the visceral ganglion of Aplysia californica were studied, using intracellular stimulating and recording techniques. Measurements were obtained of average curves of membrane potential, threshold for spike initiation, membrane resistance, and fluctuations of potential in the intervals between spontanously occurring spikes. The timing of discharges from these neurons was described quantitatively by interspike-interval histograms, mean and standard deviation of intervals, skewness, and serial correlation coefficients. A mathematical model (contained in a simulation program for the IBM 7094 computer) was constructed, based on discrete fluctuations of membrane potential following each spike and other directly observed intracellular events. It was found that the model could quantitatively account for observed spike trains, including variations in the discharge from one cell to another. ImagesFigure 2Figure 4 PMID:19210968

  3. Effect of Cardiac Rehabilitation Program on Heart Rate Recovery in Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi Anari, Leila; Ghanbari-Firoozabadi, Mahdieh; Ansari, Zahra; Emami, Mahmoud; Vafaii Nasab, Mohammadreza; Nemaiande, Mahdieh; Boostany, Fatemeh; Neishaboury, Mohamadreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that the autonomic system function and the metabolic syndrome can significantly affect patients' survival. The aim of the current study was to investigate the impact of the cardiac rehabilitation program on the autonomic system balance in patients with coronary artery disease. Methods: Patients with a previous diagnosis of coronary artery disease who were referred to the Cardiovascular Rehabilitation Center of Afshar Hospital (Yazd, Iran) between March and November 2011 were enrolled. All the patients participated in rehabilitation sessions 3 times a week for 12 weeks. Heart rate recovery (HRR) was measured as an indicator of the autonomic system balance. In order to calculate HRR, the maximum heart rate during the exercise test was recorded. At the end of the exercise test, the patients were asked to sit down without having a cooldown period and their heart rate was recorded again after 1 minute. The difference between these 2 measurements was considered as HRR. Results: A total of 108 patients, including 86 (79.6%) men and 22 (20.4%) women, completed the rehabilitation course. The mean age of the study participants was 58.25 ± 9.83 years. A statistically significant improvement was observed in HRR (p value = 0.040). Significant declines were also observed in the patients' waist circumference (p value < 0.001) and systolic and diastolic blood pressures (p value = 0.018 and 0.003, respectively). A decreasing trend was observed in the patients' body mass index, but it failed to reach statistical significance (p value = 0.063). No statistically meaningful changes were noted in fasting blood glucose (p value = 0.171), high-density lipoprotein (p value = 0.070), or triglyceride concentrations (p value = 0.149). Conclusion: The cardiac rehabilitation program may help to improve HRR and several components of the metabolic syndrome in patients with coronary heart disease. PMID:26985205

  4. Cardiac rehabilitation programs improve metabolic parameters in patients with the metabolic syndrome and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Ignacio P; Zapata, Maria A; Cervantes, Carlos E; Jarabo, Rosario M; Grande, Cristina; Plaza, Rose; Garcia, Sara; Rodriguez, Miriam L; Crespo, Silvia; Perea, Jesús

    2010-05-01

    This study was performed to determine the effectiveness of a cardiac rehabilitation and exercise training program on metabolic parameters and coronary risk factors in patients with the metabolic syndrome and coronary heart disease. The study involved 642 patients with coronary heart disease. Of them, 171 (26.7%) fulfilled criteria for the metabolic syndrome. Clinical data, laboratory tests, and exercise testing were performed before and after the program, which lasted 2 to 3 months. Except for waist circumference, there were no significant differences between groups; blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and fasting glucose improvements during the follow-up were higher in patients with the metabolic syndrome (all P<.001). At study end, in patients with the metabolic syndrome, functional capacity increased by 26.45% ( P<.001), as measured by metabolic equivalents, with a slight increase of 1.25% ( P=not significant) in the double product. Patients with the metabolic syndrome who took part in this secondary prevention program reported improvements in cardiovascular risk profile and functional capacity. PMID:20546381

  5. Mutual entrainment of bilaterally distributed circadian pacemaker.

    PubMed Central

    Page, T L; Caldarola, P C; Pittendrigh, C S

    1977-01-01

    The interactions between the bilaterally distributed components of the circadin system that controls the locomotor activity rhythm of the cockroach Leucophaea maderae were investigated in a series of surgical lesion experiments. Complete excision of one optic lobe (either right or left) or its surgical isolation from the central nervous system had no effect on the animals' ability to free-run in constant darkness nor was there any indication, as judged by postoperative pi values of any difference between left and right lobe pacemakers. However, these surgical procedures consistently resulted in a significant increase in tau over preoperative value while optic nerve section had no effect on tau. The propostion is developed that the left and right pacemakers in the two optic lobes are mutally coupled and that the compound pacemaker's period is shorter than either of its constituent pacemakers. It was also found that the integrity of either compound eye is sufficient to assure entrainment of both left and right pacemakers. Images PMID:265571

  6. Mutual entrainment of bilaterally distributed circadian pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Page, T L; Caldarola, P C; Pittendrigh, C S

    1977-03-01

    The interactions between the bilaterally distributed components of the circadin system that controls the locomotor activity rhythm of the cockroach Leucophaea maderae were investigated in a series of surgical lesion experiments. Complete excision of one optic lobe (either right or left) or its surgical isolation from the central nervous system had no effect on the animals' ability to free-run in constant darkness nor was there any indication, as judged by postoperative pi values of any difference between left and right lobe pacemakers. However, these surgical procedures consistently resulted in a significant increase in tau over preoperative value while optic nerve section had no effect on tau. The propostion is developed that the left and right pacemakers in the two optic lobes are mutally coupled and that the compound pacemaker's period is shorter than either of its constituent pacemakers. It was also found that the integrity of either compound eye is sufficient to assure entrainment of both left and right pacemakers. PMID:265571

  7. Comparison of cardiac rehabilitation programs combined with relaxation and meditation techniques on reduction of depression and anxiety of cardiovascular patients.

    PubMed

    Delui, Mahdy Hassanzadeh; Yari, Maliheh; Khouyinezhad, Gholamreza; Amini, Maral; Bayazi, Mohammad Hosein

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of death in developed countries. Most cardiac rehabilitation programs include psychological interventions. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of rehabilitation techniques in cardiac patients including psychological-physical interventions such as Meditation and Relaxation. We enrolled 45 patients with CVD and depression. The patients were allocated to 3 groups (Relaxation, Meditation and Control). There was a significant reduction on depression, systolic blood pressure and heart rate in the Meditation group compared with the control group. Our findings suggest that meditation techniques have better outcomes in cardiac patients for improving depression, reduction of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate than relaxation techniques. PMID:24179555

  8. 21 CFR 870.3690 - Pacemaker test magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker test magnet. 870.3690 Section 870.3690...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3690 Pacemaker test magnet. (a) Identification. A pacemaker test magnet is a device used to test an inhibited or triggered...

  9. 21 CFR 870.3690 - Pacemaker test magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker test magnet. 870.3690 Section 870.3690...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3690 Pacemaker test magnet. (a) Identification. A pacemaker test magnet is a device used to test an inhibited or triggered...

  10. 21 CFR 870.3690 - Pacemaker test magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker test magnet. 870.3690 Section 870.3690...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3690 Pacemaker test magnet. (a) Identification. A pacemaker test magnet is a device used to test an inhibited or triggered...

  11. 21 CFR 870.3690 - Pacemaker test magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker test magnet. 870.3690 Section 870.3690...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3690 Pacemaker test magnet. (a) Identification. A pacemaker test magnet is a device used to test an inhibited or triggered...

  12. 21 CFR 870.3690 - Pacemaker test magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker test magnet. 870.3690 Section 870.3690...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3690 Pacemaker test magnet. (a) Identification. A pacemaker test magnet is a device used to test an inhibited or triggered...

  13. 21 CFR 870.3650 - Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3650 Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. (a) Identification. A pacemaker polymeric mesh bag is an implanted device used to hold a pacemaker pulse generator. The bag is designed to create a stable implant environment for the...

  14. 21 CFR 870.3650 - Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3650 Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. (a) Identification. A pacemaker polymeric mesh bag is an implanted device used to hold a pacemaker pulse generator. The bag is designed to create a stable implant environment for the...

  15. 21 CFR 870.3650 - Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3650 Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. (a) Identification. A pacemaker polymeric mesh bag is an implanted device used to hold a pacemaker pulse generator. The bag is designed to create a stable implant environment for the...

  16. 21 CFR 870.3650 - Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3650 Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. (a) Identification. A pacemaker polymeric mesh bag is an implanted device used to hold a pacemaker pulse generator. The bag is designed to create a stable implant environment for the...

  17. 21 CFR 870.3650 - Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3650 Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. (a) Identification. A pacemaker polymeric mesh bag is an implanted device used to hold a pacemaker pulse generator. The bag is designed to create a stable implant environment for the...

  18. 21 CFR 870.3640 - Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3640 Section 870.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. An indirect pacemaker...

  19. 21 CFR 870.3630 - Pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3630... generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. A pacemaker generator function analyzer is a device that is connected to a pacemaker pulse generator to test any or all of the generator's parameters, including...

  20. 21 CFR 870.3630 - Pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3630... generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. A pacemaker generator function analyzer is a device that is connected to a pacemaker pulse generator to test any or all of the generator's parameters, including...

  1. 21 CFR 870.3630 - Pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3630... generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. A pacemaker generator function analyzer is a device that is connected to a pacemaker pulse generator to test any or all of the generator's parameters, including...

  2. 21 CFR 870.3610 - Implantable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implantable pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3610 Section 870.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An implantable pacemaker pulse generator is a device that...

  3. 21 CFR 870.3610 - Implantable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Implantable pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3610 Section 870.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An implantable pacemaker pulse generator is a device that...

  4. 21 CFR 870.3600 - External pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3600 Section 870.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has...

  5. 21 CFR 870.3610 - Implantable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Implantable pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3610 Section 870.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An implantable pacemaker pulse generator is a device that...

  6. 21 CFR 870.3640 - Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3640 Section 870.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. An indirect pacemaker...

  7. 21 CFR 870.3640 - Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3640 Section 870.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. An indirect pacemaker...

  8. 21 CFR 870.3640 - Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3640 Section 870.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. An indirect pacemaker...

  9. 21 CFR 870.3600 - External pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false External pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3600 Section 870.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has...

  10. 21 CFR 870.3600 - External pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false External pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3600 Section 870.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has...

  11. 21 CFR 870.3630 - Pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3630... generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. A pacemaker generator function analyzer is a device that is connected to a pacemaker pulse generator to test any or all of the generator's parameters, including...

  12. 21 CFR 870.3600 - External pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false External pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3600 Section 870.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has...

  13. 21 CFR 870.3640 - Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3640 Section 870.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. An indirect pacemaker...

  14. 21 CFR 870.3600 - External pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false External pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3600 Section 870.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has...

  15. 21 CFR 870.3630 - Pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3630... generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. A pacemaker generator function analyzer is a device that is connected to a pacemaker pulse generator to test any or all of the generator's parameters, including...

  16. Impact of an endurance training program on exercise-induced cardiac biomarker release.

    PubMed

    Legaz-Arrese, Alejandro; López-Laval, Isaac; George, Keith; Puente-Lanzarote, Juan José; Mayolas-Pi, Carmen; Serrano-Ostáriz, Enrique; Revilla-Martí, Pablo; Moliner-Urdiales, Diego; Reverter-Masià, Joaquín

    2015-04-15

    We evaluated the influence of a 14-wk endurance running program on the exercise-induced release of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) and NH2-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). Fifty-eight untrained participants were randomized to supervised endurance exercise (14 wk, 3-4 days/wk, 120-240 min/wk, 65-85% of maximum heart rate) or a control group. At baseline and after the training program, hs-cTnT and NT-proBNP were assessed before and 5 min, 1 h, 3 h, 6 h, 12 h, and 24 h after a 60-min maximal running test. Before training, hs-cTnT was significantly elevated in both groups with acute exercise (P < 0.0001) with no between-group differences. There was considerable heterogeneity in peak hs-cTnT concentration with the upper reference limit exceeded in 71% of the exercise tests. After training, both baseline and postexercise hs-cTnT were significantly higher compared with pretraining and the response of the control group (P = 0.008). Acute exercise led to a small but significant increase in NT-proBNP, but this was not mediated by training (P = 0.121). In summary, a controlled endurance training intervention resulted in higher pre- and postexercise values of hs-cTnT with no changes in NT-proBNP. PMID:25681432

  17. Cardiac arrest in kearns-sayre syndrome.

    PubMed

    van Beynum, Ingrid; Morava, Eva; Taher, Marjan; Rodenburg, Richard J; Karteszi, Judit; Toth, Kalman; Szabados, Eszter

    2012-01-01

    The prognosis of progressive ophthalmoplegia in patients with large-scale mitochondrial DNA deletions is highly variable and almost unpredictable. The risk to develop cardiac involvement and sudden cardiac death is strikingly high, especially in patients with Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS). The most typical cardiac complications of the disease are conduction defects, which usually begin with left anterior fascicular block with or without right bundle branch block (RBBB), progressing sometimes rapidly to complete atrioventricular block. Other cardiac manifestations reported are first or second degree of AV block, QT prolongation, torsades de pointes ventricular tachycardia, and rarely dilated cardiomyopathy. Most frequently syncope, sometimes even sudden cardiac death, is the first clinical sign of the cardiac disease in KSS. Due to these life-threatening cardiac conditions, patients should be carefully monitored for cardiac signs and symptoms and pacemaker implantation should be suggested early to avoid sudden cardiac arrest in KSS.Here, we present two cases of KSS with life-threatening syncope due to complete atrioventricular block. To emphasize the importance of an early pacemaker implantation, we review the literature on cardiac complications in KSS in the last 20 years. In almost all of the reviewed cases, ophthalmoplegia or ptosis was present before the cardiac manifestations. In most of the cases, syncope was the first symptom of the cardiac involvement. There was no correlation between the age of the onset of the disease and the onset of cardiac manifestations.With our current report, we increase awareness for life-threatening cardiac complications in patients with KSS. PMID:23430846

  18. Pacemaker-Induced Transient Asynchrony Suppresses Heart Failure Progression

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Jonathan A.; Chakir, Khalid; Lee, Kyoung Hwan; Karst, Edward; Holewinski, Ronald J.; Pironti, Gianluigi; Tunin, Richard S.; Pozios, Iraklis; Abraham, Theodore P.; de Tombe, Pieter; Rockman, Howard A.; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Craig, Roger; Farazi, Taraneh G.; Kass, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Uncoordinated contraction from electromechanical delay worsens heart failure pathophysiology and prognosis, but restoring coordination with bi-ventricular pacing, known as cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) improves both. Not every patient, however, qualifies for CRT. Here we show that heart failure with synchronous contraction is improved by inducing dyssynchrony for 6 hours daily by right-ventricular pacing using an intracardiac pacing device, in a process we call pacemaker-induced transient asynchrony (PITA). In dogs with heart failure induced by 6 weeks of atrial tachypacing, PITA (starting on week 3) suppressed progressive cardiac dilation as well as chamber and myocyte dysfunction. PITA enhanced β-adrenergic responsiveness in vivo and normalized it in myocytes. Myofilament calcium response declined in dogs with synchronous heart failure, which was accompanied by sarcomere disarray and generation of myofibers with severely reduced function, and these changes were absent in PITA-treated hearts. The benefits of PITA were not replicated when the same number of RV-paced beats was randomly distributed throughout the day, indicating that continuity of dyssynchrony exposure is necessary to trigger the beneficial biological response upon resynchronization. These results suggest PITA could bring the benefits of CRT to the many heart failure patients with synchronous contraction that are not CRT candidates. PMID:26702095

  19. Pacemaker-induced transient asynchrony suppresses heart failure progression.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Jonathan A; Chakir, Khalid; Lee, Kyoung Hwan; Karst, Edward; Holewinski, Ronald J; Pironti, Gianluigi; Tunin, Richard S; Pozios, Iraklis; Abraham, Theodore P; de Tombe, Pieter; Rockman, Howard A; Van Eyk, Jennifer E; Craig, Roger; Farazi, Taraneh G; Kass, David A

    2015-12-23

    Uncoordinated contraction from electromechanical delay worsens heart failure pathophysiology and prognosis, but restoring coordination with biventricular pacing, known as cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), improves both. However, not every patient qualifies for CRT. We show that heart failure with synchronous contraction is improved by inducing dyssynchrony for 6 hours daily by right ventricular pacing using an intracardiac pacing device, in a process we call pacemaker-induced transient asynchrony (PITA). In dogs with heart failure induced by 6 weeks of atrial tachypacing, PITA (starting on week 3) suppressed progressive cardiac dilation as well as chamber and myocyte dysfunction. PITA enhanced β-adrenergic responsiveness in vivo and normalized it in myocytes. Myofilament calcium response declined in dogs with synchronous heart failure, which was accompanied by sarcomere disarray and generation of myofibers with severely reduced function, and these changes were absent in PITA-treated hearts. The benefits of PITA were not replicated when the same number of right ventricular paced beats was randomly distributed throughout the day, indicating that continuity of dyssynchrony exposure is necessary to trigger the beneficial biological response upon resynchronization. These results suggest that PITA could bring the benefits of CRT to the many heart failure patients with synchronous contraction who are not CRT candidates. PMID:26702095

  20. Randomized controlled trial of a psychoeducation program for the self-management of chronic cardiac pain.

    PubMed

    McGillion, Michael H; Watt-Watson, Judy; Stevens, Bonnie; Lefort, Sandra M; Coyte, Peter; Graham, Anthony

    2008-08-01

    Cardiac pain arising from chronic stable angina (CSA) is a cardinal symptom of coronary artery disease and has a major negative impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL), including pain, poor general health status, and inability to self-manage. Current secondary prevention approaches lack adequate scope to address CSA as a multidimensional ischemic and persistent pain problem. This trial evaluated the impact of a low-cost six-week angina psychoeducation program, entitled The Chronic Angina Self-Management Program (CASMP), on HRQL, self-efficacy, and resourcefulness to self-manage anginal pain. One hundred thirty participants were randomized to the CASMP or three-month wait-list usual care; 117 completed the study. Measures were taken at baseline and three months. General HRQL was measured using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form and the disease-specific Seattle Angina Questionnaire (SAQ). Self-efficacy and resourcefulness were measured using the Self-Efficacy Scale and the Self-Control Schedule, respectively. The mean age of participants was 68 years, 80% were male. Analysis of variance of change scores yielded significant improvements in treatment group physical functioning [F=11.75(1,114), P<0.001] and general health [F=10.94(1,114), P=0.001] aspects of generic HRQL. Angina frequency [F=5.57(1,115), P=0.02], angina stability [F=7.37(1,115), P=0.001], and self-efficacy to manage disease [F=8.45(1,115), P=0.004] were also significantly improved at three months. The CASMP did not impact resourcefulness. These data indicate that the CASMP was effective for improving physical functioning, general health, anginal pain symptoms, and self-efficacy to manage pain at three months and provide a basis for long-term evaluation of the program. PMID:18395397

  1. CALCIUM-DRIVEN TRANSCRIPTION OF CARDIAC SPECIFYING GENE PROGRAM IN LIVER STEM CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously shown that a cloned liver stem cell line (WB F344) acquires a cardiac phenotype when seeded in a cardiac microenvironment in vivo and ex vivo. Here we investigated the mechanisms of this transdifferentiation in early (<72 hr) WB F344 cell, rat neonatal ventricu...

  2. "Pacecare"--a computerized database for pacemaker follow-up.

    PubMed

    Strathmore, N; Mond, H; Hunt, D; Graham, D; Cowling, R; Hale, G; Pate, B

    1990-12-01

    A computerized database for pacemaker follow-up has been designed to run on IBM compatible hardware and to accept pulse generator and lead models of all manufacturers. Stored data includes patient, physician and implant details, indications for pacing, underlying rhythm, complications and management, program settings, and follow-up measurements. Typing is minimized by the use of "pop-up" lists and prepared pulse generator template displays. At each follow-up visit a patient's file is retrieved by surname or number, a visit record created, and measurements documented. As the template of the previous visit is used, recording of the clinic visit takes less than 1 minute. Changes in pacing rates (base or magnet), pulse widths, lead thresholds, lead impedance, and battery cell impedance can be displayed graphically for immediate recognition of end-of-life parameters or suspected malfunction. The program will print patient, implantation and clinic visit summary reports, clinic appointment lists, letters to patients, and annual reports. Two Melbourne hospitals have now entered over 3,600 patients into the database. Valuable information has been obtained regarding implantation details and trends with pulse generator and lead usage. Pacecare is a sophisticated, yet user friendly, computerized database for pacemaker follow-up. Recording of clinic visits is fast and changes in testing parameters can be recognized immediately. PMID:1704542

  3. Clinical Outcome After Permanent Pacemaker Implantation in Patients With a High Percentage of Ventricular Pacing.

    PubMed

    Sakatani, Tomohiko; Sakamoto, Akira; Kawamura, Kohei; Tanigaki, Toru; Tsubakimoto, Yoshinori; Isodono, Koji; Kimura, Shinzo; Matsuo, Akiko; Inoue, Keiji; Kitamura, Makoto; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Previous reports have suggested that right ventricular apical pacing may lead to cardiac dysfunction. Septal pacing is thought to be superior to apical pacing in the prevention of cardiac dyssynchrony, however, there have been no reports on the contribution of septal pacing to improving clinical outcome.We retrospectively evaluated factors associated with cardiac events in patients with right ventricular pacing.The study population consisted of 256 consecutive patients newly implanted with permanent pacemakers and followed-up for 29 18 months. Cardiac events, consisting of cardiac death or heart failure requiring hospitalization, occurred in 22 patients. Kaplan-Meier curves revealed that patients with a high percentage of ventricular pacing (> 90%, n = 101, group H) had a higher incidence of cardiac events than patients with a low percentage of ventricular pacing (< 10%, n = 83, group L) (P = 0.002). In group H, multivariate analysis showed that age (HR: 1.174, 95%CI: 1.066-1.291, P = 0.001), ejection fraction (EF) (HR: 0.898, 95%CI: 0.836-0.964, P = 0.003), QRS duration during cardiac pacing (HR: 1.059, 95%CI: 1.017-1.103, P = 0.006), and existing basal cardiac diseases (HR: 13.080, 95%CI: 2.463-69.479, P = 0.003) were significant predictors of cardiac events, although pacing site had no significant association with prognosis (P = 0.56).Higher age, lower EF, longer QRS duration during cardiac pacing, and existing basal cardiac diseases are associated with poor prognosis in patients with a high percentage of ventricular pacing. PMID:26549389

  4. Economics of cardiac adverse events after smallpox vaccination: lessons from the 2003 US Vaccination Program.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Sanchez, Ismael R; Sniadack, Mercedes M; Mootrey, Gina T

    2008-03-15

    Of >39,000 civilian public health responders vaccinated against smallpox in 2003, 203 reported cardiovascular adverse events (CAEs). An association exists between the US vaccinia strain and myocarditis and/or pericarditis ("myo/pericarditis" [MP]). Other associations are inconclusive. We used surveillance and follow-up survey data of CAE case patients to estimate the resources used during the 2003 smallpox vaccination program and used a probabilistic model to estimate the potential costs of CAEs in a mass vaccination campaign. For every million adult vaccinees, 3001 CAEs (including 351 MP cases) would occur, with >92% in revaccinees. CAEs would require a median of 5934 outpatient visits, 1786 emergency department visits, 533 days in general wards, 132 days in intensive care units, 5484 cardiac enzymes tests, 3504 electrocardiograms, 3049 chemistry tests, 2828 complete blood counts, and 1444 transthoracic echocardiograms, among other procedures. CAEs would reduce productivity (15,969 work days lost) and cost $11 per vaccinee. In a mass vaccination campaign, the care of a sizable number of CAEs would be resource intensive. PMID:18284356

  5. Autonomic cardiac innervation

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Wohaib

    2013-01-01

    Autonomic cardiac neurons have a common origin in the neural crest but undergo distinct developmental differentiation as they mature toward their adult phenotype. Progenitor cells respond to repulsive cues during migration, followed by differentiation cues from paracrine sources that promote neurochemistry and differentiation. When autonomic axons start to innervate cardiac tissue, neurotrophic factors from vascular tissue are essential for maintenance of neurons before they reach their targets, upon which target-derived trophic factors take over final maturation, synaptic strength and postnatal survival. Although target-derived neurotrophins have a central role to play in development, alternative sources of neurotrophins may also modulate innervation. Both developing and adult sympathetic neurons express proNGF, and adult parasympathetic cardiac ganglion neurons also synthesize and release NGF. The physiological function of these “non-classical” cardiac sources of neurotrophins remains to be determined, especially in relation to autocrine/paracrine sustenance during development.   Cardiac autonomic nerves are closely spatially associated in cardiac plexuses, ganglia and pacemaker regions and so are sensitive to release of neurotransmitter, neuropeptides and trophic factors from adjacent nerves. As such, in many cardiac pathologies, it is an imbalance within the two arms of the autonomic system that is critical for disease progression. Although this crosstalk between sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves has been well established for adult nerves, it is unclear whether a degree of paracrine regulation occurs across the autonomic limbs during development. Aberrant nerve remodeling is a common occurrence in many adult cardiovascular pathologies, and the mechanisms regulating outgrowth or denervation are disparate. However, autonomic neurons display considerable plasticity in this regard with neurotrophins and inflammatory cytokines having a central regulatory function, including in possible neurotransmitter changes. Certainly, neurotrophins and cytokines regulate transcriptional factors in adult autonomic neurons that have vital differentiation roles in development. Particularly for parasympathetic cardiac ganglion neurons, additional examinations of developmental regulatory mechanisms will potentially aid in understanding attenuated parasympathetic function in a number of conditions, including heart failure. PMID:23872607

  6. PATIENT COMPREHENSION OF AN INTERACTIVE, COMPUTER-BASED INFORMATION PROGRAM FOR CARDIAC CATHETERIZATION: A COMPARISON WITH STANDARD INFORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Tait, Alan R.; Voepel-Lewis, Terri; Moscucci, Mauro; Brennan-Martinez, Colleen M.; Levine, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Background Several studies suggest that standard verbal and written consent information for treatment is often poorly understood by patients and their families. This study examined the effect of an interactive computer-based information program on patients’ understanding of cardiac catheterization. Methods 135 adult patients scheduled to undergo diagnostic cardiac catheterization were randomized to receive details about the procedure using either standard institutional verbal and written information (SI), or interactive computerized information (ICI) preloaded on a laptop computer. Understanding was measured using semi-structured interviews at baseline (i.e, before information was given), immediately following cardiac catheterization (Early understanding), and two weeks post-procedure (Late understanding). The primary study outcome was the change from baseline to Early understanding between groups. Results Subjects randomized to the ICI intervention had significantly greater improvement in understanding compared to those who received the SI (net change 0.81; 95% confidence interval: 0.01, 1.6). Significantly more subjects in the ICI group had complete understanding of the risks of cardiac catheterization (53.6% vs 23.1%, P< 0.05) and options for treatment (63.2% vs 46.2%, P< 0.05) compared to the SI group, respectively. Several predictors of improved understanding were identified including baseline knowledge (P< 0.001), younger age (P = 0.002), and use of the ICI (p = 0.003). Conclusions Results suggest that an interactive computer-based information program for cardiac catheterization may be more effective in improving patient understanding than conventional written consent information. This technology, therefore, holds promise as a means of presenting understandable detailed information regarding a variety of medical treatments and procedures. PMID:19901144

  7. Wandering atrial pacemaker (prevalence in French hornists).

    PubMed

    Nizet, P M; Borgi, J F; Horvath, S M

    1976-01-01

    Continuous electrocardiographic recordings were obtained in a group of French horn players during performance of identical pieces of music. Half of the musicians developed wandering atrial pacemaker. One example is illustrated. The causative mechanism is briefly discussed. This may represent an "occupational" hazard. PMID:1245812

  8. Alterations of field potentials in isotropic cardiomyocyte cell layers induced by multiple endogenous pacemakers under normal and hypothermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Kienast, R; Stöger, M; Handler, M; Hanser, F; Baumgartner, C

    2014-10-01

    The use of autonomous contracting randomly grown cardiomyocyte monolayers cultivated on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) represents an accepted experimental setting for preclinical experimental research in the field of cardiac electrophysiology. A dominant pacemaker forces a monolayer to adhere to a regular and synchronized contraction. Randomly distributed multiple pacemakers interfere with this dominant center, resulting in more or less frequent changes of propagation direction. This study aims to characterize the impact of changing propagation directions at single electrodes of the MEA on the four intrinsic parameters of registered field potentials (FPs) FPrise, FPMIN, FPpre, and FPdur and conduction velocity (CV) under normal and hypothermal conditions. Primary cultures of chicken cardiomyocytes (n = 18) were plated directly onto MEAs and FPs were recorded in a temperature range between 37 and 29°C. The number and spatiotemporal distribution of biological and artificial pacemakers of each cell layer inside and outside of the MEA registration area were evaluated using an algorithm developed in-house. In almost every second myocardial cell layer, interfering autonomous pacemakers were detected at stable temperatures, showing random spatial distributions with similar beating rates. Additionally, a temperature-dependent change of the dominant pacemaker center was observed in n = 16 experiments. A significant spread-direction-dependent variation of CV, FPrise, FPMIN, and FPpre up to 14% could be measured between different endogenous pacemakers. In conclusion, based on our results, disregarding the spatial origin of excitation may lead to misinterpretations and erroneous conclusions of FP parameters in the verification of research hypotheses in cellular electrocardiology. PMID:25085965

  9. Measuring pacemaker dose: A clinical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Studenski, Matthew T.; Xiao Ying; Harrison, Amy S.

    2012-07-01

    Recently in our clinic, we have seen an increased number of patients presenting with pacemakers and defibrillators. Precautions are taken to develop a treatment plan that minimizes the dose to the pacemaker because of the adverse effects of radiation on the electronics. Here we analyze different dosimeters to determine which is the most accurate in measuring pacemaker or defibrillator dose while at the same time not requiring a significant investment in time to maintain an efficient workflow in the clinic. The dosimeters analyzed here were ion chambers, diodes, metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFETs), and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters. A simple phantom was used to quantify the angular and energy dependence of each dosimeter. Next, 8 patients plans were delivered to a Rando phantom with all the dosimeters located where the pacemaker would be, and the measurements were compared with the predicted dose. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image was obtained to determine the dosimeter response in the kilovoltage energy range. In terms of the angular and energy dependence of the dosimeters, the ion chamber and diode were the most stable. For the clinical cases, all the dosimeters match relatively well with the predicted dose, although the ideal dosimeter to use is case dependent. The dosimeters, especially the MOSFETS, tend to be less accurate for the plans, with many lateral beams. Because of their efficiency, we recommend using a MOSFET or a diode to measure the dose. If a discrepancy is observed between the measured and expected dose (especially when the pacemaker to field edge is <10 cm), we recommend analyzing the treatment plan to see whether there are many lateral beams. Follow-up with another dosimeter rather than repeating multiple times with the same type of dosimeter. All dosimeters should be placed after the CBCT has been acquired.

  10. Gene Therapy in Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    V, Praveen S; Francis, Johnson; K, Venugopal

    2006-01-01

    Gene therapy has progressed from a dream to a bedside reality in quite a few human diseases. From its first application in adenosine deaminase deficiency, through the years, its application has evolved to vascular angiogenesis and cardiac arrhythmias. Gene based biological pacemakers using viral vectors or mesenchymal cells tested in animal models hold much promise. Induction of pacemaker activity within the left bundle branch can provide stable heart rates. Genetic modification of the AV node mimicking beta blockade can be therapeutic in the management of atrial fibrillation. G protein overexpression to modify the AV node also is experimental. Modification and expression of potassium channel genes altering the delayed rectifier potassium currents may permit better management of congenital long QT syndromes. Arrhythmias in a failing heart are due to abnormal calcium cycling. Potential targets for genetic modulation include the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump, calsequestrin and sodium calcium exchanger. Lastly the ethical concerns need to be addressed. PMID:16943902

  11. Executive functions improvement following a 5-month aquaerobics program in older adults: Role of cardiac vagal control in inhibition performance.

    PubMed

    Albinet, Cédric T; Abou-Dest, Amira; André, Nathalie; Audiffren, Michel

    2016-03-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the effects of aerobic exercise on measures of executive performance and their relationships with changes in cardiorespiratory fitness, cardiac vagal control (heart rate variability) and psychological variables. Thirty-six sedentary seniors aged 60-75 years were randomly assigned to a swimming and aquaerobics program or a stretching program two times a week for 21 weeks. Executive functions (inhibition, updating of working memory and cognitive flexibility) and cardiorespiratory fitness (estimated VO2max) were assessed at the start, after 10 weeks of program and at the end of the program. Resting HRV and measures of psychological outcomes (depression, self-efficacy, decisional balance) were obtained at the start and at the end of the program. Participants of both groups significantly improved their VO2max level, their psychological state and their performance for the 2-back task. Only the participants in the aquaerobics group significantly improved their vagally-mediated HRV and their performance for the Stroop test and the verbal running-span test at the end of the program. Only improvements in cardiac vagal control and in inhibition were shown to be functionally related. These results are discussed in line with the model of neurovisceral integration. PMID:26812613

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging safety in pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator patients: how far have we come?

    PubMed Central

    Nordbeck, Peter; Ertl, Georg; Ritter, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been regarded a general contraindication in patients with cardiovascular implanted electronic devices such as cardiac pacemakers or cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) due to the risk of severe complications and even deaths caused by interactions of the magnetic resonance (MR) surrounding and the electric devices. Over the last decade, a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for such potentially life-threatening complications as well as technical advances have allowed an increasing number of pacemaker and ICD patients to safely undergo MRI. This review lists the key findings from basic research and clinical trials over the last 20 years, and discusses the impact on current day clinical practice. With ‘MR-conditional’ devices being the new standard of care, MRI in pacemaker and ICD patients has been adopted to clinical routine today. However, specific precautions and specifications of these devices should be carefully followed if possible, to avoid patient risks which might appear with new MR technology and further increasing indications and patient numbers. PMID:25796053

  13. Cardiac Metastasis of Leiomyosarcoma Complicated with Complete Atrio-Ventricular Block and Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae Ouk; Kim, Minsu; Kang, Woong Chol; Moon, Jeonggeun; Chung, Wook-Jin; Sung, Yon Mi

    2016-01-01

    We described a case of a 54-year-old male who presented with dizziness and dyspnea due to cardiac metastasis of leiomyosarcoma. Cardiac metastasis of leiomyosarcoma caused both bradyarrhythmia and tachyarrhythmia in the patient. He was treated with implantation of a permanent pacemaker for management of complete atrio-ventricular block and anti-arrhythmic drug that suppressed ventricular tachycardia successfully. PMID:27014358

  14. Spontaneous Activity in Isolated Somata of Aplysia Pacemaker Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Alving, Barbara O.

    1968-01-01

    Somata of pacemaker and nonpacemaker neurons were isolated by ligatures tied around the axons between the somata and the synaptic regions, and the transmembrane potentials of the isolated somata were recorded. Isolated somata of pacemaker neurons had a spontaneous discharge while isolated somata of nonpacemaker neurons were quiescent. In addition, the time course of accommodation in isolated somata of pacemaker and nonpacemaker neurons was found to be different. In pacemaker neurons, injection of current produced a change in rate of discharge sustained for the duration of current injection, while in nonpacemakers, current injection produced only a transient change in discharge rate. Evidence is presented that the pacemaker locus and spike trigger zone in the intact pacemaker neuron are located on the soma. PMID:5642472

  15. Peak Oxygen Uptake after Cardiac Rehabilitation: A Randomized Controlled Trial of a 12-Month Maintenance Program versus Usual Care

    PubMed Central

    Madssen, Erik; Arbo, Ingerid; Granøien, Ingrid; Walderhaug, Liv; Moholdt, Trine

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise capacity is a strong predictor of survival in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Exercise capacity improves after cardiac rehabilitation exercise training, but previous studies have demonstrated a decline in peak oxygen uptake after ending a formal rehabilitation program. There is a lack of knowledge on how long-term exercise adherence can be achieved in CAD patients. We therefore assessed if a 12-month maintenance program following cardiac rehabilitation would lead to increased adherence to exercise and increased exercise capacity compared to usual care. Materials and Methods Two-centre, open, parallel randomized controlled trial with 12 months follow-up comparing usual care to a maintenance program. The maintenance program consisted of one monthly supervised high intensity interval training session, a written exercise program and exercise diary, and a maximum exercise test every third month during follow-up. Forty-nine patients (15 women) on optimal medical treatment were included following discharge from cardiac rehabilitation. The primary endpoint was change in peak oxygen uptake at follow-up; secondary endpoints were physical activity level, quality of life and blood markers of cardiovascular risk. Results There was no change in peak oxygen uptake from baseline to follow-up in either group (intervention group 27.9 (±4.7) to 28.8 (±5.6) mL·kg (-1) min (−1), control group 32.0 (±6.2) to 32.8 (±5.8) mL·kg (−1) min (−1), with no between-group difference, p = 0.22). Quality of life and blood biomarkers remained essentially unchanged, and both self-reported and measured physical activity levels were similar between groups after 12 months. Conclusions A maintenance exercise program for 12 months did not improve adherence to exercise or peak oxygen uptake in CAD patients after discharge from cardiac rehabilitation compared to usual care. This suggests that infrequent supervised high intensity interval training sessions are inadequate to improve peak oxygen uptake in this patient group. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01246570 PMID:25247991

  16. [Reprogramming of a pacemaker induced by electrocautery].

    PubMed

    Caramella, J P; Mentre, B; Jattiot, F; Strouk, R; Deltang, D

    1987-01-01

    A case is reported of reprogramming of a ventricular unipolar permanent pacemaker induced by electrocautery during biliary surgery. After skin incision and use of the unipolar electrosurgery unit, the CPI model 505 multiprogrammable pulse generator previously set at 70 b X min-1 abruptly fired at 120 b X min-1. Application of a magnet over the pacemaker reduced the heart rate to 100 b X min-1. After surgery, the pulse generator was successfully reprogrammed to a rate of 65 b X min-1. Based on the analysis of this case and of previous reports, it is suggested, so as to avoid such complications, that the unipolar electrocautery be avoided when the surgical field is near the pulse generator or lead: that the bipolar electrocautery be preferred; that a magnet and non-invasive programmer be available during and after surgery; and that a postoperative assessment of the pulse generator be carried out. PMID:3619157

  17. [Magnets, pacemaker and defibrillator: fatal attraction?].

    PubMed

    Bergamin, C; Graf, D

    2015-05-27

    This article aims at clarifying the effects of a clinical magnet on pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators. The effects of electromagnetic interferences on such devices, including interferences linked to electrosurgery and magnetic resonance imaging are also discussed. In general, a magnet provokes a distinctive effect on a pacemaker by converting it into an asynchronous mode of pacing, and on an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator by suspending its own antitachyarythmia therapies without affecting the pacing. In the operating room, the magnet has to be used cautiously with precisely defined protocols which respect the type of the device used, the type of intervention planned, the presence or absence of EMI and the pacing-dependency of the patient. PMID:26182637

  18. Pacemakers and Implantable Defibrillators - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... العربية) Pacemaker (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Pacemaker 心脏起搏器 - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) Pacemaker 心臟起搏器 - 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional) ...

  19. Software Simulation of an Implantable Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Riley, R. E.; Rossing, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Software simulation of a hardware system has been used as an effective tool in evaluating and testing software for microprocessor-based control systems. This paper reports on a system simulator used in the development and testing of software for an implantable pacemaker. The paper describes the functional and structural characteristics of the simulator, the user interface, run-time information that is provided from a simulation, and experiences with the system simulator.

  20. Pacemaker neurons within newborn spinal pain circuits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Baccei, Mark L.

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous activity driven by “pacemaker” neurons, defined by their intrinsic ability to generate rhythmic burst-firing, contributes to the development of sensory circuits in many regions of the immature CNS. However, it is unknown if pacemaker-like neurons are present within central pain pathways in the neonate. Here we provide evidence that a subpopulation of glutamatergic interneurons within lamina I of the rat spinal cord exhibits oscillatory burst-firing during early life, which occurs independently of fast synaptic transmission. Pacemaker neurons were distinguished by a higher ratio of persistent, voltage-gated Na+ conductance to leak membrane conductance (gNa,P / gleak) compared to adjacent, non-bursting lamina I neurons. The activation of high-threshold (N-type and L-type) voltage-gated Ca2+ channels also facilitated rhythmic burst-firing by triggering intracellular Ca2+ signaling. Bursting neurons received direct projections from high-threshold sensory afferents, but transmitted nociceptive signals with poor fidelity while in the bursting mode. The observation that pacemaker neurons send axon collaterals throughout the neonatal spinal cord raises the possibility that intrinsic burst-firing could provide an endogenous drive to the developing sensorimotor networks which mediate spinal pain reflexes. PMID:21677184

  1. [Rhythm disorders and cardiac crypto-malformations].

    PubMed

    Davy, J M; Raczka, F; Cung, T T; Combes, N; Bortone, A; Gaty, D

    2005-12-01

    Faced with a cardiac arrhythmia occuring in an apparently healthy heart, it is necessary to perform an anatomical investigation to detect any unsuspected anomalies. Congenital cardiopathy must certainly be excluded, as this is often responsible for rhythm disorders and/or cardiac conduction defects. Similarly, any acquired conditions, cardiomyopathy, or cardiac tumour must be sought. However, the possibility should always be considered of a minimal congenital malformation, which could be repsonsible for: any type of cardiac arrhythmia: rhythm disorder or conduction defect at the atrial, junctional or ventricular level, with a benign or serious prognosis. Unexpected therapeutic difficulties during radiofrequency ablation procedures or at implantation of pacemakers or defibrillators. Together with rhythm studies, the investigation of choice is high quality imaging, either the classic left or right angiography or the more modern cardiac CT or intracardiac mapping. PMID:16433240

  2. Nonlinear dynamics, chaos and complex cardiac arrhythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, L.; Courtemanche, M.; Shrier, A.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    Periodic stimulation of a nonlinear cardiac oscillator in vitro gives rise to complex dynamics that is well described by one-dimensional finite difference equations. As stimulation parameters are varied, a large number of different phase-locked and chaotic rhythms is observed. Similar rhythms can be observed in the intact human heart when there is interaction between two pacemaker sites. Simplified models are analyzed, which show some correspondence to clinical observations.

  3. Quantification of fiber orientation in the canine atrial pacemaker complex using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosi, Christina M.; Fedorov, Vadim V.; Schuessler, Richard B.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Efimov, Igor R.

    2012-07-01

    The atrial pacemaker complex is responsible for the initiation and early propagation of cardiac impulses. Optical coherence tomography (OCT), a nondestructive imaging modality with spatial resolutions of ˜1 to 15 μm, can be used to identify unique fiber orientation patterns in this region of the heart. Functionally characterized canine sinoatrial nodes (SAN) (n=7) were imaged using OCT up to ˜1 mm below the endocardial tissue surface. OCT images were directly compared to their corresponding histological sections. Fiber orientation patterns unique to the crista terminalis (CT), SAN, and surrounding atrial myocardium were identified with dominant average fiber angles of 89±12 deg, 110±16 deg, and 95±35 deg, respectively. Both the CT and surrounding atrial myocardium displayed predominantly unidirectionally based fiber orientation patterns within each specimen, whereas the SAN displayed an increased amount of fiber disarray manifested quantitatively as a significantly greater standard deviation in fiber angle distribution within specimens [33±7 deg versus 23±5 deg, atrium (p=0.02); 18±3 deg, CT (p=0.0003)]. We also identified unique, local patterns of fiber orientation specific to the functionally characterized block zone. We demonstrate the ability of OCT in detecting components of the atrial pacemaker complex which are intimately involved in both normal and abnormal cardiac conduction.

  4. Correlation between changes in diastolic dysfunction and health-related quality of life after cardiac rehabilitation program in dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mehani, Sherin H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a complex syndrome characterized by progressive decline in left ventricular function, low exercise tolerance and raised mortality and morbidity. Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction plays a major role in CHF and progression of most cardiac diseases. The current recommended goals can theoretically be accomplished via exercise and pharmacological therapy so the aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of cardiac rehabilitation program on diastolic dysfunction and health related quality of life and to determine the correlation between changes in left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and domains of health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Forty patients with chronic heart failure were diagnosed as having dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with systolic and diastolic dysfunction. The patients were equally and randomly divided into training and control groups. Only 30 of them completed the study duration. The training group participated in rehabilitation program in the form of circuit-interval aerobic training adjusted according to 55–80% of heart rate reserve for a period of 7 months. Circuit training improved both diastolic and systolic dysfunction in the training group. On the other hand, only a significant correlation was found between improvement in diastolic dysfunction and health related quality of life measured by Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire. It was concluded that improvement in diastolic dysfunction as a result of rehabilitation program is one of the important underlying mechanisms responsible for improvement in health-related quality of life in DCM patients. PMID:25685417

  5. Cardiac pacing in Canada in 1998: working towards optimal pacing therapy. Canadian Working Group on Cardiac Pacing.

    PubMed

    Gillis, A M; Goldman, B S; Yee, R; Irwin, M E; Wilson, S L; Ashton, T; Philippon, F; Fraser, J D; Clavette, P; Tyers, G F

    1998-09-01

    The Canadian Working Group on Cardiac Pacing (CWGCP) was formed in 1996 with the primary goal of promoting optimal pacing therapy in Canada. In 1997, the CWGCP conducted a survey of pacing practices across Canada. Ninety-two of 125 implanting programs (74%) responded. Implant rates vary by province--from 39 per 100,00 population in Ontario to 63 per 100,000 population in Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. Variations in regional implant rates persist even after correcting for the age of the population. Physiological pacing was used for 35% of all implants in Canada in 1996/97. There were marked differences across Canada in the mode of pacing selected. In western Canada, 39.5% of pacing systems implanted were physiological compared with 18.2% in Atlantic Canada and 29% in Quebec. There were also differences in follow-up practices. Approximately 40% of centres follow patients with single chamber pacemakers annually, whereas most other centres still follow these patients every six months. Economic constraints, the size of pacing programs and the involvement of committed pacing physicians are factors that may influence the regional differences in cardiac pacing across Canada. PMID:9779016

  6. Evaluation of a Standardized Patient Education Program for Inpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation: Impact on Illness Knowledge and Self-Management Behaviors up to 1 Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Karin; Seekatz, Bettina; Haug, Gnter; Mosler, Gabriele; Schwaab, Bernhard; Worringen, Ulrike; Faller, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Patient education is an essential part of the treatment of coronary heart disease in cardiac rehabilitation. In Germany, no standardized and evaluated patient education programs for coronary heart disease have been available so far. In this article, we report the evaluation of a patient-oriented program. A multicenter quasi-experimental,

  7. Evaluation of a Standardized Patient Education Program for Inpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation: Impact on Illness Knowledge and Self-Management Behaviors up to 1 Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Karin; Seekatz, Bettina; Haug, Günter; Mosler, Gabriele; Schwaab, Bernhard; Worringen, Ulrike; Faller, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Patient education is an essential part of the treatment of coronary heart disease in cardiac rehabilitation. In Germany, no standardized and evaluated patient education programs for coronary heart disease have been available so far. In this article, we report the evaluation of a patient-oriented program. A multicenter quasi-experimental,…

  8. Drug overdoses requiring temporary cardiac pacing; a study of six cases treated at Altnagelvin Hospital, Londonderry.

    PubMed Central

    McGlinchey, P. G.; McNeill, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    Drug overdoses in general are increasing and overdoses of cardiac medications are also increasing; some are associated with a high mortality. Temporary cardiac pacing has a valuable role in cases of hypotension related to dysrhythmia, or when it is necessary to provide overdrive pacing. However, despite technically successful and uncomplicated pacemaker insertion and restoration of cardiac electrical activity, patients developing bradyarrhythmia and hypotension after an overdose are in a high risk group. PMID:9652193

  9. [A Corynebacterium striatum endocarditis on a carrier of pacemaker].

    PubMed

    Abi, Rachid; Ez-Zahraouii, Khalil; Ghazouani, Mohammed; Zohoun, Alban; Kheyi, Jamal; Chaib, Ali; Elouennass, Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    We report a new case of a Corynebacterium striatum endocarditis on a carrier of a pacemaker. Corynebacterium striatum was isolated from blood culture, the pulse generator and the pacing lead. A literature review of Corynebacterium striatum endocarditis on a carrier of pacemaker was conducted. PMID:22565181

  10. 21 CFR 870.3730 - Pacemaker service tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker service tools. 870.3730 Section 870.3730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... tools. (a) Identification. Pacemaker service tools are devices such as screwdrivers and Allen...

  11. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker electrode function tester. 870.3720 Section 870.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... electrode function tester. (a) Identification. A pacemaker electrode function tester is a device which...

  12. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker electrode function tester. 870.3720 Section 870.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... electrode function tester. (a) Identification. A pacemaker electrode function tester is a device which...

  13. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker electrode function tester. 870.3720 Section 870.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... electrode function tester. (a) Identification. A pacemaker electrode function tester is a device which...

  14. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker electrode function tester. 870.3720 Section 870.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... electrode function tester. (a) Identification. A pacemaker electrode function tester is a device which...

  15. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker electrode function tester. 870.3720 Section 870.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... electrode function tester. (a) Identification. A pacemaker electrode function tester is a device which...

  16. 21 CFR 870.3730 - Pacemaker service tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker service tools. 870.3730 Section 870.3730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3730 Pacemaker...

  17. 21 CFR 870.3730 - Pacemaker service tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker service tools. 870.3730 Section 870.3730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3730 Pacemaker...

  18. 21 CFR 870.3730 - Pacemaker service tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker service tools. 870.3730 Section 870.3730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3730 Pacemaker...

  19. 21 CFR 870.3730 - Pacemaker service tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker service tools. 870.3730 Section 870.3730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3730 Pacemaker...

  20. Runaway pacemaker: a still existing complication and therapeutic guidelines.

    PubMed

    Mickley, H; Andersen, C; Nielsen, L H

    1989-07-01

    Runaway pacemaker is a rare, but still existing potential lethal complication in permanent pacemakers. Within 4 1/2 years, we saw two cases of runaway pacemaker in patients with multiprogrammable, VVI pacemakers (Siemens-Elema, Model 668). In both cases a pacemaker-induced ventricular tachycardia (rate 240-260 beats/min) was documented. One patient died. Runaway pacemakers must be exchanged as soon as possible. Until this can be accomplished, different emergency maneuvers should be tried. As documented in the cases presented, placing a magnet over the pacemaker may result in a lower, more physiological pacing rate. Reprogramming the pulse generator to a lower output or the use of external chest wall overdrive stimulation may also be successful, but these procedures require the presence of an adequate escape rhythm. If this is not the case or the former maneuvers have failed, an external pacemaker may be connected to the permanent pacing lead. Thereafter, the lead can be safely cut. As an alternative, a temporary transvenous pacing lead may be established prior to disconnecting the permanent pacing lead. PMID:2743631

  1. Cardiac fluid dynamics anticipates heart adaptation.

    PubMed

    Pedrizzetti, Gianni; Martiniello, Alfonso R; Bianchi, Valter; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Caso, Pio; Tonti, Giovanni

    2015-01-21

    Hemodynamic forces represent an epigenetic factor during heart development and are supposed to influence the pathology of the grown heart. Cardiac blood motion is characterized by a vortical dynamics, and it is common belief that the cardiac vortex has a role in disease progressions or regression. Here we provide a preliminary demonstration about the relevance of maladaptive intra-cardiac vortex dynamics in the geometrical adaptation of the dysfunctional heart. We employed an in vivo model of patients who present a stable normal heart function in virtue of the cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT, bi-ventricular pace-maker) and who are expected to develop left ventricle remodeling if pace-maker was switched off. Intra-ventricular fluid dynamics is analyzed by echocardiography (Echo-PIV). Under normal conditions, the flow presents a longitudinal alignment of the intraventricular hemodynamic forces. When pacing is temporarily switched off, flow forces develop a misalignment hammering onto lateral walls, despite no other electro-mechanical change is noticed. Hemodynamic forces result to be the first event that evokes a physiological activity anticipating cardiac changes and could help in the prediction of longer term heart adaptations. PMID:25529139

  2. Asynchronous response of coupled pacemaker neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dodla, Ramana; Wilson, Charles J.

    2009-01-01

    We study a network model of two conductance-based pacemaker neurons of differing natural frequency, coupled with either mutual excitation or inhibition, and receiving shared random inhibitory synaptic input. The networks may phase-lock spike-to-spike for strong mutual coupling. But the shared input can desynchronize the locked spike-pairs by selectively eliminating the lagging spike or modulating its timing with respect to the leading spike depending on their separation time window. Such loss of synchrony is also found in a large network of sparsely coupled heterogeneous spiking neurons receiving shared input. PMID:19257636

  3. Asynchronous response of coupled pacemaker neurons.

    PubMed

    Dodla, Ramana; Wilson, Charles J

    2009-02-13

    We study a network model of two conductance-based pacemaker neurons of differing natural frequency, coupled with either mutual excitation or inhibition, and receiving shared random inhibitory synaptic input. The networks may phase lock spike to spike for strong mutual coupling. But the shared input can desynchronize the locked spike pairs by selectively eliminating the lagging spike or modulating its timing with respect to the leading spike depending on their separation time window. Such loss of synchrony is also found in a large network of sparsely coupled heterogeneous spiking neurons receiving shared input. PMID:19257636

  4. Integration of a Notch-dependent mesenchymal gene program and Bmp2-driven cell invasiveness regulates murine cardiac valve formation

    PubMed Central

    Luna-Zurita, Luis; Prados, Beln; Grego-Bessa, Joaquim; Luxn, Guillermo; del Monte, Gonzalo; Bengura, Alberto; Adams, Ralf H.; Prez-Pomares, Jos Mara; de la Pompa, Jos Luis

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac valve formation is crucial for embryonic and adult heart function. Valve malformations constitute the most common congenital cardiac defect, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating valve formation and homeostasis. Here, we show that endocardial Notch1 and myocardial Bmp2 signal integration establish a valve-forming field between 2 chamber developmental domains. Patterning occurs through the activation of endocardial epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) exclusively in prospective valve territories. Mice with constitutive endocardial Notch1 activity ectopically express Hey1 and Heyl. They also display an activated mesenchymal gene program in ventricles and a partial (noninvasive) EMT in vitro that becomes invasive upon BMP2 treatment. Snail1, TGF-?2, or Notch1 inhibition reduces BMP2-induced ventricular transformation and invasion, whereas BMP2 treatment inhibits endothelial Gsk3?, stabilizing Snail1 and promoting invasiveness. Integration of Notch and Bmp2 signals is consistent with Notch1 signaling being attenuated after myocardial Bmp2 deletion. Notch1 activation in myocardium extends Hey1 expression to nonchamber myocardium, represses Bmp2, and impairs EMT. In contrast, Notch deletion abrogates endocardial Hey gene transcription and extends Bmp2 expression to the ventricular endocardium. This embryonic Notch1-Bmp2-Snail1 relationship may be relevant in adult valve disease, in which decreased NOTCH signaling causes valve mesenchyme cell formation, fibrosis, and calcification. PMID:20890042

  5. Effects of the Comprehensive Cardiac Rehabilitation Program on Psychological Factors and Quality of Life among Coronary Heart Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Intarakamhang, Patrawut; Intarakamhang, Ungsinun

    2013-01-01

    The Comprehensive Lifestyle Intervention, which integrates psychological and educational intervention, is a program to improve self-efficacy, self-regulation, self-care, body mass index and quality of life of the patients with coronary heart disease during early stages following hospitalization. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the Comprehensive Cardiac Rehabilitation Program affecting psychological factors including self-efficacy, self-regulation, self-care, quality of life (QoL), and body mass index (BMI). This study was a quasi-experimental research with a repeated one group design. Eighty patients with coronary artery disease were recruited from either the Medicine or Surgical Ward at the Phramongkutklao Hospital where the patients joined the Comprehensive Cardiac Rehabilitation Program, which included attending exercising practice and receiving face-to-face counseling while being admitted to the hospital. Telephone counseling was thereafter performed one week after being discharged from the hospital, followed by undergoing individual or group counseling at the Cardiac Rehabilitation Clinic the following week. The follow-up period was performed within six weeks after hospitalization. Data was collected on two occasions before discharging from the hospital (pretest) and six weeks after (post-test) by using the self-efficacy, self-regulation, and self-care questionnaires, as well as the Short Form(SF) -36 (Thai version). The results indicated that by six weeks, 50%, 58.80%, 46.20%, and 72.50% of patients, respectively, had experienced increases with self-efficacy, self-regulation, self-care, and quality of life scores, while 12.50% of patients had decreased their body mass index in comparison with the pretest score. From the paired t-test, the self-efficacy, self-regulation and quality of life scores were statistically significant, having increased to the p<0.01 level; self-care was statistically significant, having increased to the p<0.05 level along with body mass index, which was statistically significant having experienced a decrease to the p<0.01 level. PMID:23445702

  6. Cardiovascular patients’ experiences of living with pacemaker: Qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Azami-Aghdash, Saber; Sohrab-Navi, Zahra; Kolahdouzan, Kasra

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND A pacemaker implantation is considered major life event for cardiovascular patients, so they will probably have very interesting experiences of living with this device. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of cardiovascular patients living with the pacemaker. METHODS In this qualitative study, 27 patients were chosen through purposive sampling to achieve data saturation, and their experiences were examined using semi-structured interviews. The patients’ statements were recorded with their consent and analyzed using content analysis method. RESULTS Participants’ experiences included three main themes: “Problems and limitations,” “feeling and dealing with pacemaker”, and “sources of comfort” and 10 sub-themes including: physical problems, financial problems, social problems, the first encounter, the feeling of living with the pacemaker, how to cope with pacemaker, satisfaction with pacemaker, good family support, hospital and hospital staff performance, and role of religious beliefs. CONCLUSION Planning to solve social problems, identifying and changing feelings of patients using pacemakers, reinforcing the resources of comfort especially family support seem to be necessary steps for improving quality of life and impact of using pacemaker. PMID:26715933

  7. Influence of electromagnetic interference on implanted cardiac arrhythmia devices in and around a magnetically levitated linear motor car.

    PubMed

    Fukuta, Motoyuki; Mizutani, Noboru; Waseda, Katsuhisa

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the susceptibility of implanted cardiac arrhythmia devices to electromagnetic interference in and around a magnetically levitated linear motor car [High-Speed Surface Transport (HSST)]. During the study, cardiac devices were connected to a phantom model that had similar characteristics to the human body. Three pacemakers from three manufacturers and one implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) were evaluated in and around the magnetically levitated vehicle. The system is based on a normal conductive system levitated by the attractive force of magnets and propelled by a linear induction motor without wheels. The magnetic field strength at 40 cm from the vehicle in the nonlevitating state was 0.12 mT and that during levitation was 0.20 mT. The magnetic and electric field strengths on a seat close to the variable voltage/variable frequency inverter while the vehicle was moving and at rest were 0.13 mT, 2.95 V/m and 0.04 mT, 0.36 V/m, respectively. Data recorded on a seat close to the reactor while the vehicle was moving and at rest were 0.09 mT, 2.45 V/m and 0.05 mT, 1.46 V/m, respectively. Measured magnetic and electric field strengths both inside and outside the linear motor car were too low to result in device inactivation. No sensing, pacing, or arrhythmic interactions were noted with any pacemaker or ICD programmed in either bipolar and unipolar configurations. In conclusion, our data suggest that a permanent programming change or a device failure is unlikely to occur and that the linear motor car system is probably safe for patients with one of the four implanted cardiac arrhythmia devices used in this study under the conditions tested. PMID:16235032

  8. Firing Patterns and Transitions in Coupled Neurons Controlled by a Pacemaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mei-Sheng; Lu, Qi-Shao; Duan, Li-Xia; Wang, Qing-Yun

    2008-08-01

    To reveal the dynamics of neuronal networks with pacemakers, the firing patterns and their transitions are investigated in a ring HR neuronal network with gap junctions under the control of a pacemaker. Compared with the situation without pacemaker, the neurons in the network can exhibit various firing patterns as the external current is applied or the coupling strength of pacemaker varies. The results are beneficial for understanding the complex cooperative behaviour of large neural assemblies with pacemaker control.

  9. Cardiac involvement in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Khalighi, Koroush; Kodali, Archana; Thapamagar, Suman B.; Walker, Stanley R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an inherited progressive muscle disorder caused by defects in muscle proteins. As the incidence of this condition is low, not many are familiar with the multisystem involvement. At times, cardiac disease may even be the predominant manifestation in the form of arrhythmias, conduction defects, and cardiomyopathies. The progression of the disease can lead to sudden, unpredictable death. Thus, it is important to identify this subgroup and treat accordingly. Objective To identify patients with DM and assess their risk for sudden cardiac death. Methods Nine patients previously diagnosed with muscular dystrophy were evaluated by cardiologists for various reasons, from a general follow-up to cardiac arrest. All of them had electrocardiograms (EKG) and 2-D echocardiograms, and seven of them had further electrophysiological (EP) studies. Results Of the nine patients with DM, eight had EKG evidence of conduction abnormalities ranging from first-degree heart block to complete heart block. Of the seven who had EP studies, five had inducible ventricular tachycardia requiring immediate cardioversion and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implant. Two of them underwent permanent pacemaker placement due to complete heart block and infra-Hissian block. The remaining two patients opted for a conservative approach with yearly EKG monitoring. Conclusion Because one-third of the cardiac deaths in patients with DM are sudden, there is a strong need to identify these patients and intervene in those at high risk. Prophylactic pacemaker placement is recommended even in those with minimal conduction system abnormality. However, the common practice is to identify patients at high risk of conduction abnormalities by EP studies and then provide them with prophylactic invasive strategies. PMID:25656662

  10. Which Factors Unexpectedly Increase Depressive Symptom Severity in Patients at the End of a Cardiac Rehabilitation Program?

    PubMed Central

    Komasi, Saeid; Montazeri, Nafiseh; Masoumi, Masoumali; Soroush, Ali; Ezzati, Parvin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate predictors of depressive symptom aggravation at the end of a cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program. Methods The design of the study was retrospective. The administrative data were obtained from the database of the CR department of a heart hospital in Iran. The demographic and clinical information of 615 CR patients between January 2000 and January 2010 was analyzed using binary logistic regression analysis. Results The results showed that 10.7% of the patients completed the CR program with aggravated depressive symptoms. After adjustment for gender, age, and pre-intervention depression score, lower education level (p<0.05) and smoking (p<0.01) were significant predictors of increased depressive symptoms at the end of the program. Our model variables could explain 6% to 13% of the dependent variable variance. Conclusion The results suggest that targeting patients who are less literate or who smoke could allow for taking the required measures to prevent or control depression at the end of a CR program. It is suggested that future studies consider other variables. PMID:26798600

  11. Cardiac Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Catheterization? Cardiac catheterization (KATH-eh-ter-ih-ZA-shun) is a ... disease. Doctors also can use ultrasound during cardiac catheterization to see blockages in the coronary arteries. Ultrasound ...

  12. Preliminary experience with the use of a programmable pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Morse, D; Fernandez, J; Samuel, A; Lemole, G; Parsonnet, V

    1975-05-01

    One hundred sixty-four patients, in whom new externally programmable pacemakers had been inserted, were studied over a two year period, beginning July, 1972. Following implantation, the rate and current output of this pacemaker could be changed at any time by a non-invasive technique involving electromagnetic pulse trains emitted by an external "programmer". In 89 percent of the patients it was possible to reduce battery output by half, implying greater longevity of the pacer in these cases. In 15 percent of the patients, manipulative control of the pacemaker rate was employed and found beneficial. PMID:1126191

  13. The effect of a text message and telephone follow-up program on cardiac self-efficacy of patients with coronary artery disease: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Boroumand, Saba; Moeini, Mahin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiac self-efficacy is an essential factor in persistence of healthy behaviors in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Today, telenursing methods have numerous applications in health care. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effect of a text message and telephone follow-up program on cardiac self-efficacy of patients with CAD. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial on 70 patients with CAD who were hospitalized in Shahid Chamran Hospital (Isfahan, Iran). The participants were randomly assigned to the experimental and control groups. Collection of data on cardiac self-efficacy was performed before, 3 months after, and 4 months after the beginning of the intervention using Cardiac Self-Efficacy Scale designed by Sullivan et al. During the 3 months of intervention, six messages were sent to the subjects each week and calls were made twice a week in the first month and once a week during the second and third months. The statistical analysis of data was performed using independent t-test, Chi-square, Mann-Whitney U test, and repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: Before the intervention, there was no significant difference between the mean scores of cardiac self-efficacy of the two groups. However, 3 months and 4 months after the beginning of the intervention, the mean score of cardiac self-efficacy in the experimental group was significantly higher than in the control group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The text message and telephone follow-up program is effective in promoting the cardiac self-efficacy of patients with CAD. PMID:27095991

  14. [{sup 13}N] Ammonia Cardiac Program At West Virginia University Health Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Armbruster, John M.

    2011-06-01

    Due to the shortage of the more traditional cardiac imagining isotopes, specifically, Technicium-99, the Cardiologists at WVU have had to look to alternative imagining techniques such as PET. This has led to a dramatic increase in the use of [{sup 13}N] Ammonia PET scans at the Health Sciences Center. The patient load has gone from one to two patients one day a week to typically two to three patients, two days a week, with occasional add-on in-house patients; each patient typically requiring two target irradiations. In this paper, we will discuss the process that is being used to meet this increased demand from the production of the isotope through the final result.

  15. [13N] Ammonia Cardiac Program At West Virginia University Health Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, John M.

    2011-06-01

    Due to the shortage of the more traditional cardiac imagining isotopes, specifically, Technicium-99, the Cardiologists at WVU have had to look to alternative imagining techniques such as PET. This has led to a dramatic increase in the use of [13N] Ammonia PET scans at the Health Sciences Center. The patient load has gone from one to two patients one day a week to typically two to three patients, two days a week, with occasional add-on in-house patients; each patient typically requiring two target irradiations. In this paper, we will discuss the process that is being used to meet this increased demand from the production of the isotope through the final result.

  16. Performing magnetic resonance imaging in patients with implantable pacemakers and defibrillators: results of a European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Marinskis, Germanas; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Dagres, Nikolaos; Dobreanu, Dan; Lewalter, Thorsten; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of our survey was to evaluate the experience, current practice and attitudes of performing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices. Fifty-one centre-members of European Heart Rhythm Association Research network have responded to the survey. According to the obtained data, 55.2% of responding centres do not perform MRI scans in patients with non-MRI-certified pacemakers and 65.8% in patients with such implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). Reported complication rate in patients with non-MRI-certified devices is low and conforms to the literature data. Experience with newer MRI-compatible pacemakers and ICDs is limited to single cases in most centres. This survey shows limited experience with performing MRI studies in patients with implanted pacemakers and ICDs. In concordance with available guidelines, most centres limit MRI scans in patients with non-MRI-certified devices. The implant numbers for MRI-certified devices and experience with performing MRI scans in these patients are still low. PMID:23134623

  17. Intracardiac Origin of Heart Rate Variability, Pacemaker Funny Current and their Possible Association with Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, Vasilios E; Verkerk, Arie O; Amin, Ahmed S; de Bakker, Jaques MT

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is an indirect estimator of autonomic modulation of heart rate and is considered a risk marker in critical illness, particularly in heart failure and severe sepsis. A reduced HRV has been found in critically ill patients and has been associated with neuro-autonomic uncoupling or decreased baroreflex sensitivity. However, results from human and animal experimental studies indicate that intracardiac mechanisms might also be responsible for interbeat fluctuations. These studies have demonstrated that different membrane channel proteins and especially the so-called ‘funny’ current (If), an hyperpolarization-activated, inward current that drives diastolic depolarization resulting in spontaneous activity in cardiac pacemaker cells, are altered during critical illness. Furthermore, membrane channels kinetics seem to have significant impact upon HRV, whose early decrease might reflect a cellular metabolic stress. In this review article we present research findings regarding intracardiac origin of HRV, at the cellular level and in both isolated sinoatrial node and whole ex vivo heart preparations. In addition, we will review results from various experimental studies that support the interrelation between If and HRV during endotoxemia. We suggest that reduced HRV during sepsis could also be associated with altered pacemaker cell membrane properties, due to ionic current remodeling. PMID:22920474

  18. Reflex vasovagal syncope--is there a benefit in pacemaker therapy?

    PubMed

    Sousa, Pedro Alexandre; Candeias, Rui; Marques, Nuno; Jesus, Ilídio

    2014-05-01

    Reflex vasovagal syncope often affects young populations and is associated with a benign prognosis in terms of mortality. However, a minority of patients have recurrent episodes, with a considerable impact on their quality of life. Pacemaker therapy has been an option in these patients since the 1990s if a conservative strategy fails. Initially, non-randomized and open-label randomized trials showed promising results, but these studies were associated with a significant placebo effect. Recently, an approach based on the use of implantable loop recorders has shown that some patients with reflex vasovagal syncope could benefit from implantation with dual-chamber pacemakers, particularly patients aged >40 years, with recurrent syncopal episodes resulting in frequent injuries, in whom a long asystole (≥3 s asystole with syncope or ≥6 s asystole without syncope) has been documented with an implantable loop recorder. The authors present a literature review on the role of cardiac pacing in reflex vasovagal syncope and propose a diagnostic and therapeutic decision flowchart for patients with syncope of probable reflex etiology. PMID:24895017

  19. Dynamic tricuspid valve stenosis induced with a pacemaker lead: a case report.

    PubMed

    Skoric, Bosko; Baricevic, Zeljko; Brida, Margarita; Samardzic, Jure; Jurin, Hrvoje; Milicic, Davor

    2014-01-01

    Isolated severe tricuspid valve stenosis due to an endocardial pacemaker lead is extremely rare, and is usually caused by either fibrosis of a perforated or lacerated leaflet, or fibrotic adherence between the lead and the valvular apparatus. Reported cases typically include clinical manifestations of both systemic venous stasis and low cardiac output. The case is presented of a 20-year-old female with a surgically repaired congenital heart disease who developed severe tricuspid stenosis at six years after the implantation of a DDD pacemaker. Unexpectedly, the patient had no signs of venous stasis and suffered only from exercise intolerance. Right heart catheterization under fluoroscopic guidance revealed an atrial lead forming a loop at the level of the tricuspid valve. A paradoxical inspiratory decrease in the transvalvular diastolic gradient, caused by the caudal heart motion and straightening of the loop during inspiration, was noted. Such a dynamic nature with a temporary inspiratory relief of the obstruction may explain the partial clinical presentation of tricuspid stenosis in this case. The lead was removed and the tricuspid valve repaired surgically, after which the patient's recovery was uneventful with normalization of exercise tolerance. PMID:24779342

  20. Membranes as possible pacemakers of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hulbert, A J; Else, P L

    1999-08-01

    Basal metabolic rate (BMR) varies dramatically among vertebrate species, both (i) being several fold higher in the endothermic mammals and birds compared to the ectothermic reptiles, amphibians and fish, and (ii) being much greater, on a body mass basis, in small vertebrates compared to large vertebrates. These differences in whole animal BMR are also manifest at the cellular level with substantial contributions to basal metabolic activity from the maintenance of various trans-membrane gradients. The percentage contribution of various processes to basal metabolism is remarkably consistent between different vertebrates and when BMR varies, the components of metabolic activity vary in relative unison. Membrane composition also varies between vertebrates and the degree of polyunsaturation of membrane phospholipids is correlated with cellular metabolic activity. In general, the tissue phospholipids and thus membrane bilayers of endotherms are more polyunsaturated than those from similar-sized ectotherms. In mammals membrane polyunsaturation is allometrically related to body mass. We suggest that membranes can act as pacemakers for overall metabolic activity. We propose that such membrane polyunsaturation increases the molecular activity of many membrane-bound proteins and consequently some specific membrane leak-pump cycles and cellular metabolic activity. We hypothesize a possible mechanistic basis for this effect that is based on a greater transfer of energy during intermolecular collisions of membrane proteins with the unsaturated two carbon units (C=C) of polyunsaturates compared to the single carbon units of saturated acyl chains, as well as the more even distribution of such units throughout the depth of the bilayer when membranes contain polyunsaturated acyl chains compared to monounsaturated ones. The proposed pacemaker role of differences in membrane bilayer composition is briefly discussed with respect to the brain (and sensory cells), evolution of mammalian endothermic metabolism, and its clinical implications for humans. PMID:10433891

  1. Medium-Term Effectiveness of a Comprehensive Internet-Based and Patient-Specific Telerehabilitation Program With Text Messaging Support for Cardiac Patients: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Dominique; Coninx, Karin; Vandervoort, Pieter; Vandijck, Dominique; Hens, Niel; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline; Van Driessche, Niels; Dendale, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac telerehabilitation has been introduced as an adjunct or alternative to conventional center-based cardiac rehabilitation to increase its long-term effectiveness. However, before large-scale implementation and reimbursement in current health care systems is possible, well-designed studies on the effectiveness of this new additional treatment strategy are needed. Objective The aim of this trial was to assess the medium-term effectiveness of an Internet-based, comprehensive, and patient-tailored telerehabilitation program with short message service (SMS) texting support for cardiac patients. Methods This multicenter randomized controlled trial consisted of 140 cardiac rehabilitation patients randomized (1:1) to a 24-week telerehabilitation program in combination with conventional cardiac rehabilitation (intervention group; n=70) or to conventional cardiac rehabilitation alone (control group; n=70). In the telerehabilitation program, initiated 6 weeks after the start of ambulatory rehabilitation, patients were stimulated to increase physical activity levels. Based on registered activity data, they received semiautomatic telecoaching via email and SMS text message encouraging them to gradually achieve predefined exercise training goals. Patient-specific dietary and/or smoking cessation advice was also provided as part of the telecoaching. The primary endpoint was peak aerobic capacity (VO2 peak). Secondary endpoints included accelerometer-recorded daily step counts, self-assessed physical activities by International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), and health-related quality of life (HRQL) assessed by the HeartQol questionnaire at baseline and at 6 and 24 weeks. Results Mean VO2 peak increased significantly in intervention group patients (n=69) from baseline (mean 22.46, SD 0.78 mL/[min*kg]) to 24 weeks (mean 24.46, SD 1.00 mL/[min*kg], P<.01) versus control group patients (n=70), who did not change significantly (baseline: mean 22.72, SD 0.74 mL/[min*kg]; 24 weeks: mean 22.15, SD 0.77 mL/[min*kg], P=.09). Between-group analysis of aerobic capacity confirmed a significant difference between the intervention group and control group in favor of the intervention group (P<.001). At 24 weeks, self-reported physical activity improved more in the intervention group compared to the control group (P=.01) as did the global HRQL score (P=.01). Conclusions This study showed that an additional 6-month patient-specific, comprehensive telerehabilitation program can lead to a bigger improvement in both physical fitness (VO2 peak) and associated HRQL compared to center-based cardiac rehabilitation alone. These results are supportive in view of possible future implementation in standard cardiac care. PMID:26206311

  2. Pacemakers in a Reaction-Diffusion Mechanics System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keldermann, R. H.; Nash, M. P.; Panfilov, A. V.

    2007-07-01

    Non-linear waves of excitation are found in various biological, physical and chemical systems and are often accompanied by deformations of the medium. In this paper, we numerically study wave propagation in a deforming excitable medium using a two-variable reaction-diffusion system coupled with equations of continuum mechanics. We study the appearance and dynamics of different excitation patterns organized by pacemakers that occur in the medium as a result of deformation. We also study the interaction of several pacemakers with each other and the characteristics of pacemakers in the presence of heterogeneities in the medium. We found that mechanical deformation not only induces pacemakers, but also has a pronounced effect on spatial organization of various excitation patterns. We show how these effects are modulated by the size of the medium, the location of the initial stimulus, and the properties of the reaction-diffusion-mechanics feedback.

  3. Arteriovenous fistula after laser-assisted pacemaker lead extraction.

    PubMed

    Milla, Federico; Mack, Charles A; Girardi, Leonard N

    2006-06-01

    Acute arteriovenous fistulas have been reported after pacemaker lead extraction. We report a case of an arteriovenous fistula presenting 2 weeks after transvenous laser-assisted lead extraction. PMID:16731181

  4. Sleep Apnea May Raise Heart Risks in People with Pacemakers

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158688.html Sleep Apnea May Raise Heart Risks in People With ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People with heart pacemakers and sleep apnea are at much greater risk for a ...

  5. Fistula Formation 6 Years after Removal of Infected Pacemaker Leads

    PubMed Central

    Schroeter, Thomas; Kiefer, Philipp; Sauer, Matthias; Mohr, Friedrich Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of a male patient who presented with a chronic ulcer below the left clavicle. Six years before the present admission a permanent pacemaker, including leads, was explanted related to endocarditis. The initial working hypothesis suspected an infected sebaceous gland as the cause of ulceration. After two periods of unsuccessful surgical treatment of the gland, further examination identified a small pacemaker lead fragment underneath the articulation between sternum and clavicle as a possible reason. PMID:26693129

  6. Fistula Formation 6 Years after Removal of Infected Pacemaker Leads.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, Thomas; Kiefer, Philipp; Sauer, Matthias; Mohr, Friedrich Wilhelm

    2015-12-01

    We describe a case of a male patient who presented with a chronic ulcer below the left clavicle. Six years before the present admission a permanent pacemaker, including leads, was explanted related to endocarditis. The initial working hypothesis suspected an infected sebaceous gland as the cause of ulceration. After two periods of unsuccessful surgical treatment of the gland, further examination identified a small pacemaker lead fragment underneath the articulation between sternum and clavicle as a possible reason. PMID:26693129

  7. Delayed lead perforation: a rare cause of pacemaker dysfunction.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Luís Ferreira; Costa, Filipa; Correia, Emanuel; Rodrigues, Bruno; Moreira, Davide; Correia, Hugo; Nunes, Luís; Pipa, João; Costa, António; de Carvalho, Lopes; Cabral, Costa; Ribeiro, Nuno; de Olival, Ramos; Santos, Oliveira

    2011-06-01

    A 65-year-old woman with a dual-chamber pacemaker implanted in 2006 for symptomatic carotid sinus hypersensitivity was incidentally found to have loss of ventricular capture on routine pacemaker interrogation. A chest X-ray raised the suspicion of perforation and migration of the right ventricular lead, confirmed by three-dimensional echocardiogram and CT scan. On the basis of this case, we review myocardial lead perforation, including predisposing factors, pathophysiological mechanisms, diagnostic approach and therapeutic options. PMID:21874925

  8. Venous obstruction in permanent pacemaker patients: an isotopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Pauletti, M.; Di Ricco, G.; Solfanelli, S.; Marini, C.; Contini, C.; Giuntini, C.

    1981-01-01

    Isotope venography was used to study the venous circulation proximal to the superior vena cava in two groups of pacemaker patients, one with a single endocavitary electrode and the other with multiple pacing catheters. A control group of patients without pacemakers was also studied. Numerous abnormalities were found, especially in the group with multiple electrodes. These findings suggest that venous obstruction is a common complication of endocardial pacing.

  9. Illness cognition as a predictor of exercise habits and participation in cardiac prevention and rehabilitation programs after acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite well-established medical recommendations, many cardiac patients do not exercise regularly either independently or through formal cardiac prevention and rehabilitation programs (CPRP). This non-adherence is even more pronounced among minority ethnic groups. Illness cognition (IC), i.e. the way people perceive the situation they encounter, has been recognized as a crucial determinant of health-promoting behavior. Few studies have applied a cognitive perspective to explain the disparity in exercising and CPRP attendance between cardiac patients from different ethnic backgrounds. Based on the Health Belief Model (HBM) and the Common Sense Model (CSM), the objective was to assess the association of IC with exercising and with participation in CPRP among Jewish/majority and Arab/minority patients hospitalized with acute coronary syndrome. Methods Patients (N = 420) were interviewed during hospitalization (January-2009 until August- 2010) about IC, with 6-month follow-up interviews about exercise habits and participation in CPRP. Determinants that predict active lifestyle and participation in CPRP were assessed using backward stepwise logistic regression. Results Perceived susceptibility to heart disease and sense and personal control were independently associated with exercising 6 months after the acute event (OR = 0.58, 95% CI: 0.42-0.80 and OR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.02-1.17, per unit on a 5-point scale). Perceived benefits of regular exercise and a sense of personal control were independently associated with participation in CPRP (OR = 1.56, 95% CI: 1.12-2.16 and OR = 1.08, 95% CI: 1.01-1.15, per unit on a 5-point scale). None of the IC variables assessed could explain the large differences in health promoting behaviors between the majority and minority ethnic groups. Conclusions IC should be taken into account in future interventions to promote physical activity and participation in CPRP for both ethnic groups. Yet, because IC failed to explain the gap between Arab and Jewish patients in those behaviors, other explanatory pathways such as psychological state or cultural views should be considered as potential areas for further research. PMID:24119027

  10. Cardiac pacing and aviation.

    PubMed

    Toff, W D; Edhag, O K; Camm, A J

    1992-12-01

    Certain applicants with stable disturbances of rhythm or conduction requiring cardiac pacing, in whom no other disqualifying condition is present, may be considered fit for medical certification restricted to multi-crew operations. The reliability of modern pacing systems appears adequate to permit restricted certification even in pacemaker dependent subjects except for certain models of pacemakers and leads known to be at increased risk of failure. These are to be avoided. There is little evidence to suggest that newer devices are any more reliable than their predecessors. Single and dual chamber systems appear to have similar reliability up to 4 years, after which time significant attrition of dual chamber devices occurs, principally due to battery depletion. All devices require increased scrutiny as they approach their end of life as predicted from longevity data and pacing characteristics. Unipolar and bipolar leads are of similar reliability, apart from a number of specific bipolar polyurethane leads which have been identified. Atrial leads, particularly those without active fixation, are less secure than ventricular leads and applicants who are dependent on atrial sensing or pacing should be denied certification. Bipolar leads are to be preferred due to the lower risk of myopotential and exogenous EMI. Sensor-driven adaptive-rate pacing systems using active sensors may have reduced longevity and require close scrutiny. Activity-sensing devices using piezoelectric crystal sensors may be subject to significant rate rises in rotary wing aircraft. The impracticality of restricted certification in helicopters will, in any event, preclude certification. Such devices would best be avoided in hovercraft (air cushioned vehicle) pilots. Only minor rate rises are likely in fixed-wing aircraft which are unlikely to be of significance. Anti-tachycardia devices and implanted defibrillators are inconsistent with any form of certification to fly. PMID:1493823

  11. Interdependence of receptor activation and ligand binding in HCN2 pacemaker channels.

    PubMed

    Kusch, Jana; Biskup, Christoph; Thon, Susanne; Schulz, Eckhard; Nache, Vasilica; Zimmer, Thomas; Schwede, Frank; Benndorf, Klaus

    2010-07-15

    HCN pacemaker channels are tetramers mediating rhythmicity in neuronal and cardiac cells. The activity of these channels is controlled by both membrane voltage and the ligand cAMP, binding to each of the four channel subunits. The molecular mechanism underlying channel activation and the relationship between the two activation stimuli are still unknown. Using patch-clamp fluorometry and a fluorescent cAMP analog, we show that full ligand-induced activation appears already with only two ligands bound to the tetrameric channel. Kinetic analysis of channel activation and ligand binding suggests direct interaction between the voltage sensor and the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain, bypassing the pore. By exploiting the duality of activation in HCN2 channels by voltage and ligand binding, we quantify the increase of the binding affinity and overall free energy for binding upon channel activation, proving thus the principle of reciprocity between ligand binding and conformational change in a receptor protein. PMID:20624593

  12. Initial experiences with a telemedicine framework for remote pacemaker follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kollmann, A; Hayn, D; Garcia, J; Kastner, P; Rotman, B; Tscheliessnigg, K H; Schreier, G

    2006-01-01

    According to international guidelines implanted cardiac pacemakers (PM) have to be checked periodically to ensure that they are working correctly. To spare a significant number of patients the burden of traveling to specialized PM clinics a telemedicine framework has been developed prototypically. A mobile, personal digital assistant (PDA) based PM follow-up unit provides the caregiver at the point-of-care with the necessary infrastructure to perform a basic PM follow-up examination remotely. In case of detected malfunction of the PM the patient is ordered to the hospital for further examination. The system has been evaluated in a clinical pilot trial on 44 patients with a total of 23 different PM models from 8 different manufacturers. The initial results indicate the potential of the concept to work as an efficient, manufacturer independent screening method with the ultimate goal to increase the safety, quality and efficiency of PM therapy. PMID:17946290

  13. Irreversible third-degree heart block and pacemaker implant in a case of flecainide toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Thomas; Zimmerman, Jacob; Griffin, Gregory D

    2013-09-01

    An 82-year-old white woman was seen in the emergency department (ED) after ingesting 400 mg of flecainide in an attempt to treat an episode of dizziness and palpitations that occurred while she was gardening. Consequently, she developed bradycardia, hypotension, and complete heart block. In addition to supportive care, she also received sodium bicarbonate, atropine, calcium gluconate, and dopamine in an effort to reverse the heart block. The patient continued to remain in heart block and was sent to the cardiac catheterization laboratory for placement of an external pacing wire, which stabilized the patient. After further evaluation, a permanent pacemaker was implanted during her admission. External pacing wires may be useful in the treatment of complete heart block in cases of flecainide poisoning when a patient is unresponsive to drug therapy provided in the ED. PMID:23810074

  14. The pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator recall issue – a Canadian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Christopher S; Gillis, Anne M

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, an unprecedented number of recalls were issued on pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators. While recalls in the cardiac rhythm device industry are not new, the sheer magnitude of potentially affected patients in 2005 led to a great deal of concern, frustration, and even anger. Physicians have, in many instances, been uncertain when (or if) to recommend device replacement in an environment where the magnitude of the risk and the potential consequences of device failure have not been well defined in a timely way. Doctors and patients are now calling for reform of postmarket analysis and reporting mechanisms. The present article provides a uniquely Canadian perspective on this international issue. Potential solutions include the development of a set of realistic and common expectations, a restoration of confidence in postmarket analysis and reporting mechanisms, increased data transparency, and an increased role for patient and physician groups. PMID:16685309

  15. Surgical Management of the Patient with an Implanted Cardiac Device

    PubMed Central

    Madigan, John D.; Choudhri, Asim F.; Chen, Jonathan; Spotnitz, Henry M.; Oz, Mehmet C.; Edwards, Niloo

    1999-01-01

    Objective To identify the sources of electromagnetic interference (EMI) that may alter the performance of implanted cardiac devices and develop strategies to minimize their effects on patient hemodynamic status. Summary Background Data Since the development of the sensing demand pacemaker, EMI in the clinical setting has concerned physicians treating patients with such devices. Implanted cardiovertor defibrillators (ICDs) and ventricular assist devices (VADs) can also be affected by EMI. Methods All known sources of interference to pacemakers, ICDs, and VADs were evaluated and preventative strategies were devised. Results All devices should be thoroughly evaluated before and after surgery to make sure that its function has not been permanently damaged or changed. If electrocautery is to be used, pacemakers should be placed in a triggered or asynchronous mode; ICDs should have arrhythmia detection suspended before surgery. If defibrillation is to be used, the current flow between the paddles should be kept as far away from and perpendicular to the lead system as possible. Both pacemakers and ICDs should be properly shielded if magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, or radiation therapy is to be used. The effect of EMI on VADs depends on the model. Magnetic resonance imaging adversely affects all VADs except the Abiomed VAD, and therefore its use should be avoided in this population of patients. Conclusions The patient with an implanted cardiac device can safely undergo surgery as long as certain precautions are taken. PMID:10561087

  16. Predictors of severe tricuspid regurgitation in patients with permanent pacemaker or automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator leads.

    PubMed

    Najib, Mohammad Q; Vittala, Satya S; Challa, Suresh; Raizada, Amol; Tondato, Fernando J; Lee, Howard R; Chaliki, Hari P

    2013-01-01

    Patients with permanent pacemaker or automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (AICD) leads have an increased prevalence of tricuspid regurgitation. However, the roles of cardiac rhythm and lead-placement duration in the development of severe tricuspid regurgitation are unclear. We reviewed echocardiographic data on 26 consecutive patients who had severe tricuspid regurgitation after permanent pacemaker or AICD placement; before treatment, they had no organic tricuspid valve disease, pulmonary hypertension, left ventricular dysfunction, or severe tricuspid regurgitation. We compared the results to those of 26 control subjects who had these same devices but no more than mild tricuspid regurgitation. The patients and control subjects were similar in age (mean, 81 6 vs 81 8 yr; P = 0.83), sex (male, 42% vs 46%; P = 0.78), and left ventricular ejection fraction (0.60 0.06 vs 0.58 0.05; P = 0.4). The patients had a higher prevalence of atrial fibrillation (92% vs 65%; P=0.01) and longer median duration of pacemaker or AICD lead placement (49.5 vs 5 mo; P < 0.001). After adjusting for age, sex, and right ventricular systolic pressure by multivariate logistic regression analysis, we found that atrial fibrillation (odds ratio=6.4; P = 0.03) and duration of lead placement (odds ratio=1.5/yr; P = 0.001) were independently associated with severe tricuspid regurgitation. Out study shows that atrial fibrillation and longer durations of lead placement might increase the risk of severe tricuspid regurgitation in patients with permanent pacemakers or AICDs. PMID:24391312

  17. Technology utilization program report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The application of aerospace technology to the solution of public health and industrial problems is reported. Data cover: (1) development of an externally rechargeable cardiac pacemaker, (2) utilization of ferrofluids-colloidal suspensions of ferrite particles - in the efficient separation of nonferrous metals as Ni, Zn, Cu, and Al from shredded automobile scrap, and (3) development of a breathing system for fire fighters.

  18. A 9-year-old boy with severe diphtherial infection and cardiac complications.

    PubMed

    Washington, Charles Henry; Issaranggoon na ayuthaya, Satja; Makonkawkeyoon, Krit; Oberdorfer, Peninnah

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of diphtheria has decreased since the introduction of an effective vaccine. However, in countries with low vaccination rates it has now become a re-emerging disease. Complications from diphtheria commonly include upper airway obstruction and cardiac complications. We present a 9-year-old boy who was diagnosed with diphtheria. He presented with fever, tonsilar plaques, respiratory failure and an incomplete vaccination history. He was endotracheal intubated and received diphtheria antitoxin and penicillin on the first day of hospitalisation. He developed progressive arrhythmias and fulminant myocarditis despite early identification and treatment with equine antitoxin and antibiotics. After a temporary transvenous pacemaker insertion due to third-degree atrioventricular block and hypotension for 1 week, he developed myocardial perforation from the pacemaker tip resulting in pericardial effusion. The treatment included emergency pericardiocentesis and pacemaker removal. His electrocardiogram showed a junctional rhythm with occasional premature ventricular complexes. He then developed ventricular tachycardia and cardiac arrest and finally died. PMID:25414216

  19. [Cardiac neuroses].

    PubMed

    Simson, U; Martin, K; Janssen, P L

    2001-09-01

    Cardiac neurosis is defined as heart complaints for which no organic cause can be found. Other common terms are "cardiac anxiety neurosis", "cardiac anxiety disorder", "cardiac phobia", "functional heart complaints" and "somatoform autonomous functional disorders of the cardiovascular system" (ICD-10). Although cardiac neurosis is rarely diagnosed, it is estimated that approximately 30 bis 40% of patients with cardiovascular disorders are actually suffering from functional complaints. Predisposing to the development of cardiac neurosis are insufficient internalization processes during childhood, leading to an insoluble autonomy dependency conflict. Cardiac neurosis is treated with drugs and psychotherapy. PMID:11554103

  20. Simulation of Ectopic Pacemakers in the Heart: Multiple Ectopic Beats Generated by Reentry inside Fibrotic Regions

    PubMed Central

    Gouvêa de Barros, Bruno; Weber dos Santos, Rodrigo; Lobosco, Marcelo; Alonso, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of nonconducting media, mimicking cardiac fibrosis, in two models of cardiac tissue produces the formation of ectopic beats. The fraction of nonconducting media in comparison with the fraction of healthy myocytes and the topological distribution of cells determines the probability of ectopic beat generation. First, a detailed subcellular microscopic model that accounts for the microstructure of the cardiac tissue is constructed and employed for the numerical simulation of action potential propagation. Next, an equivalent discrete model is implemented, which permits a faster integration of the equations. This discrete model is a simplified version of the microscopic model that maintains the distribution of connections between cells. Both models produce similar results when describing action potential propagation in homogeneous tissue; however, they slightly differ in the generation of ectopic beats in heterogeneous tissue. Nevertheless, both models present the generation of reentry inside fibrotic tissues. This kind of reentry restricted to microfibrosis regions can result in the formation of ectopic pacemakers, that is, regions that will generate a series of ectopic stimulus at a fast pacing rate. In turn, such activity has been related to trigger fibrillation in the atria and in the ventricles in clinical and animal studies. PMID:26583127

  1. Randomized controlled trial of a self-efficacy enhancement program for the cardiac rehabilitation of Thai patients with myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Vibulchai, Nisakorn; Thanasilp, Sureeporn; Preechawong, Sunida

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the effects of a self-efficacy enhancement program for the cardiac rehabilitation of Thai patients who had a myocardial infarction. Sixty-six hospitalized patients of various ages and both genders were randomly assigned to either an experimental or a control group. Participants in the experimental group took part in three individualized in-hospital education sessions and three weekly sessions of telephone counseling. The control group primarily engaged in a supervised exercise and activities of a daily living performance regimen, and received education in this regard. Self-efficacy and functional status were measured via questionnaire. Four weeks after discharge, the experimental group was found to have significantly higher total self-efficacy and functional status scores than the control group. In addition, the experimental group exhibited significantly higher subscale scores on social activity, household tasks, occupation, and exercise self-efficacy than the control group. These results indicate that the program is effective in improving the self-efficacy and functional status of Thai patients who have had a myocardial infarction. PMID:26415520

  2. Radiation induced failures of complementary metal oxide semiconductor containing pacemakers: a potentially lethal complication

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, A.A.; Serago, C.F.; Schwade, J.G.; Abitbol, A.A.; Margolis, S.C.

    1984-10-01

    New multi-programmable pacemakers frequently employ complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS). This circuitry appears more sensitive to the effects of ionizing radiation when compared to the semiconductor circuits used in older pacemakers. A case of radiation induced runaway pacemaker in a CMOS device is described. Because of this and other recent reports of radiation therapy-induced CMOS type pacemaker failure, these pacemakers should not be irradiated. If necessary, the pacemaker can be shielded or moved to a site which can be shielded before institution of radiation therapy. This is done to prevent damage to the CMOS circuit and the life threatening arrythmias which may result from such damage.

  3. Dual-chamber pacemakers for treating symptomatic bradycardia due to sick sinus syndrome without atrioventricular block: a systematic review and economic evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Steven J; Karner, Charlotta; Trevor, Nicola; Wakefield, Victoria; Salih, Fatima

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Bradycardia [resting heart rate below 60 beats per minute (b.p.m.)] can be caused by conditions affecting the natural pacemakers of the heart, such as sick sinus syndrome (SSS) and atrioventricular (AV) blocks. People suffering from bradycardia may present with palpitations, exercise intolerance and fainting. The only effective treatment for patients suffering from symptomatic bradycardia is implantation of a permanent pacemaker. OBJECTIVE To appraise the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of dual-chamber pacemakers compared with single-chamber atrial pacemakers for treating symptomatic bradycardia in people with SSS and no evidence of AV block. DATA SOURCES All databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Health Technology Assessment database, NHS Economic Evaluations Database) were searched from inception to June 2014. METHODS A systematic review of the clinical and economic literature was carried out in accordance with the general principles published by the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating dual-chamber and single-chamber atrial pacemakers and economic evaluations were included. Pairwise meta-analysis was carried out. A de novo economic model was developed. RESULTS Of 493 references, six RCTs were included in the review. The results were predominantly influenced by the largest trial DANPACE. Dual-chamber pacing was associated with a statistically significant reduction in reoperation [odds ratio (OR) 0.48, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.36 to 0.63] compared with single-chamber atrial pacing. The difference is primarily because of the development of AV block requiring upgrade to a dual-chamber device. The risk of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation was also reduced with dual-chamber pacing compared with single-chamber atrial pacing (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.59 to 0.96). No statistically significant difference was found between the pacing modes for mortality, heart failure, stroke, chronic atrial fibrillation or quality of life. However, the risk of developing heart failure may vary with age and device. The de novo economic model shows that dual-chamber pacemakers are more expensive and more effective than single-chamber atrial devices, resulting in a base-case incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of £6506. The ICER remains below £20,000 in probabilistic sensitivity analysis, structural sensitivity analysis and most scenario analyses and one-way sensitivity analyses. The risk of heart failure may have an impact on the decision to use dual-chamber or single-chamber atrial pacemakers. Results from an analysis based on age (> 75 years or ≤ 75 years) and risk of heart failure indicate that dual-chamber pacemakers dominate single-chamber atrial pacemakers (i.e. are less expensive and more effective) in older patients, whereas dual-chamber pacemakers are dominated by (i.e. more expensive and less effective) single-chamber atrial pacemakers in younger patients. However, these results are based on a subgroup analysis and should be treated with caution. CONCLUSIONS In patients with SSS without evidence of impaired AV conduction, dual-chamber pacemakers appear to be cost-effective compared with single-chamber atrial pacemakers. The risk of developing a complete AV block and the lack of tools to identify patients at high risk of developing the condition argue for the implantation of a dual-chamber pacemaker programmed to minimise unnecessary ventricular pacing. However, considerations have to be made around the risk of developing heart failure, which may depend on age and device. STUDY REGISTRATION This study is registered as PROSPERO CRD42013006708. FUNDING The National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment programme. PMID:26293406

  4. Right Ventricular Anatomy Can Accommodate Multiple Micra Transcatheter Pacemakers

    PubMed Central

    EGGEN, MICHAEL D.; BONNER, MATTHEW D.; IAIZZO, PAUL A.; WIKA, KENT

    2016-01-01

    Background The introduction of transcatheter pacemaker technology has the potential to significantly reduce if not eliminate a number of complications associated with a traditional leaded pacing system. However, this technology raises new questions regarding how to manage the device at end of service, the number of devices the right ventricle (RV) can accommodate, and what patient age is appropriate for this therapy. In this study, six human cadaver hearts and one reanimated human heart (not deemed viable for transplant) were each implanted with three Micra devices in traditional pacing locations via fluoroscopic imaging. Methods A total of six human cadaver hearts were obtained from the University of Minnesota Anatomy Bequest Program; the seventh heart was a heart not deemed viable for transplant obtained from LifeSource and then reanimated using Visible Heart® methodologies. Each heart was implanted with multiple Micras using imaging and proper delivery tools; in these, the right ventricular volumes were measured and recorded. The hearts were subsequently dissected to view the right ventricular anatomies and the positions and spacing between devices. Results Multiple Micra devices could be placed in each heart in traditional, clinically accepted pacing implant locations within the RV and in each case without physical device interactions. This was true even in a human heart considered to be relatively small. Conclusions Although this technology is new, it was demonstrated here that within the human heart's RV, three Micra devices could be accommodated within traditional pacing locations: with the potential in some, for even more. PMID:26710918

  5. Measurement of functional capacity requirements to aid in development of an occupation-specific rehabilitation training program to help firefighters with cardiac disease safely return to work.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jenny; Roberts, Joanne; Simms, Kay; Cheng, Dunlei; Hartman, Julie; Bartlett, Charles

    2009-03-15

    We designed a study to measure the functional capacity requirements of firefighters to aid in the development of an occupation-specific training program in cardiac rehabilitation; 23 healthy male firefighters with no history of heart disease completed a fire and rescue obstacle course that simulated 7 common firefighting tasks. They wore complete personal protective equipment and portable metabolic instruments that included a data collection mask. We monitored each subject's oxygen consumption (VO(2)) and working heart rate, then calculated age-predicted maximum heart rates (220 - age) and training target heart rates (85% of age-predicted maximum heart rate). During performance of the obstacle course, the subjects' mean working heart rates and peak heart rates were higher than the calculated training target heart rates (t(22) = 5.69 [working vs target, p <0.001] and t(22) = 15.14 [peak vs target, p <0.001]). These findings, with mean results for peak VO(2) (3,447 ml/min) and metabolic equivalents (11.9 METs), show that our subjects' functional capacity greatly exceeded that typically attained by patients in traditional cardiac rehabilitation programs (5 to 8 METs). In conclusion, our results indicate the need for intense, occupation-specific cardiac rehabilitation training that will help firefighters safely return to work after a cardiac event. PMID:19268728

  6. Exercise Programming for Cardiacs--A New Direction for Physical Therapists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutin, Bernard

    This speech begins with the presentation of a conceptual scheme of the physical working capacity of a person starting a training program. The scheme shows that after exercise, when recovery begins and sufficient time elapses, the individual recovers and adapts to a level of physical working capacity which is higher than his starting level. From…

  7. FDG PET/CT Evidence of Effective Treatment of Cardiac Sarcoidosis With Adalimumab.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christina T; Sweiss, Nadera J; Lu, Yang

    2016-05-01

    A 53-year-old man with mediastinal lymph node biopsy and cardiac MRI-proven cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) received treatment with pacemaker and steroids. FDG PET/CT showed active CS despite treatment with prednisone and methotrexate. Addition of weekly adalimumab (Humira) injections was introduced for 3 months. Follow-up FDG PET/CT showed complete resolution of CS as well as improvement of other sarcoid lesions in the thoracic lymph nodes. PMID:26828145

  8. A coupled SYSTEM of intracellular Ca2+ clocks and surface membrane voltage clocks controls the timekeeping mechanism of the heart’s pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Lakatta, Edward G.; Maltsev, Victor A.; Vinogradova, Tatiana M.

    2010-01-01

    Ion channels on the surface membrane of sinoatrial nodal pacemaker cells (SANC) are the proximal cause of an action potential. Each individual channel type has been thoroughly characterized under voltage clamp, and the ensemble of the ion channel currents reconstructed in silico generates rhythmic action potentials. Thus, this ensemble can be envisioned as a surface “membrane clock” (M clock). Localized subsarcolemmal Ca2+ releases are generated by the sarcoplasmic reticulum via ryanodine receptors during late diastolic depolarization and are referred to as an intracellular “Ca2+ clock”, because their spontaneous occurrence is periodic during voltage clamp or in detergent-permeabilized SANC, and in silico as well. In spontaneously firing SANC, the M and Ca2+ clocks do not operate in isolation, but work together via numerous interactions modulated by membrane voltage, subsarcolemmal Ca2+, and PKA and CaMKII-dependent protein phosphorylation. Through these interactions the two subsystem clocks become mutually entrained to form a robust, stable, coupled-clock system that drives normal cardiac pacemaker cell automaticity. G-protein coupled-receptors signaling creates pacemaker flexibility, i.e. effects changes in the rhythmic action potential firing rate, by impacting on these very same factors that regulate robust basal coupled-clock system function. This review examines evidence that forms the basis of this coupled-clock system concept in cardiac SANC. PMID:20203315

  9. A common Shox2-Nkx2-5 antagonistic mechanism primes the pacemaker cell fate in the pulmonary vein myocardium and sinoatrial node.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wenduo; Wang, Jun; Song, Yingnan; Yu, Diankun; Sun, Cheng; Liu, Chao; Chen, Fading; Zhang, Yanding; Wang, Fen; Harvey, Richard P; Schrader, Laura; Martin, James F; Chen, YiPing

    2015-07-15

    In humans, atrial fibrillation is often triggered by ectopic pacemaking activity in the myocardium sleeves of the pulmonary vein (PV) and systemic venous return. The genetic programs that abnormally reinforce pacemaker properties at these sites and how this relates to normal sinoatrial node (SAN) development remain uncharacterized. It was noted previously that Nkx2-5, which is expressed in the PV myocardium and reinforces a chamber-like myocardial identity in the PV, is lacking in the SAN. Here we present evidence that in mice Shox2 antagonizes the transcriptional output of Nkx2-5 in the PV myocardium and in a functional Nkx2-5(+) domain within the SAN to determine cell fate. Shox2 deletion in the Nkx2-5(+) domain of the SAN caused sick sinus syndrome, associated with the loss of the pacemaker program. Explanted Shox2(+) cells from the embryonic PV myocardium exhibited pacemaker characteristics including node-like electrophysiological properties and the capability to pace surrounding Shox2(-) cells. Shox2 deletion led to Hcn4 ablation in the developing PV myocardium. Nkx2-5 hypomorphism rescued the requirement for Shox2 for the expression of genes essential for SAN development in Shox2 mutants. Similarly, the pacemaker-like phenotype induced in the PV myocardium in Nkx2-5 hypomorphs reverted back to a working myocardial phenotype when Shox2 was simultaneously deleted. A similar mechanism is also adopted in differentiated embryoid bodies. We found that Shox2 interacts with Nkx2-5 directly, and discovered a substantial genome-wide co-occupancy of Shox2, Nkx2-5 and Tbx5, further supporting a pivotal role for Shox2 in the core myogenic program orchestrating venous pole and pacemaker development. PMID:26138475

  10. [Future of implantable electrical cardiac devices].

    PubMed

    Daubert, Jean-Claude; Behaghel, Albin; Leclercq, Christophe; Mabo, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    Major improvements in implantable electrical cardiac devices have been made during the last two decades, notably with the advent of automatic internal defibrillation (ICD) to prevent sudden arrhythmic death, and cardiac resynchronisation (CRT) to treat the discoordinated failing heart. They now constitute a major therapeutic option and may eventually supersede drug therapy. The coming era will be marked by a technological revolution, with improvements in treatment delivery, safety and efficacy, and an expansion of clinical indications. Leadless technologyfor cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators is already in the pipeline, endovascular leads currently being responsible for most long-term complications (lead failure, infection, vein thrombosis, etc.). Miniaturized pacemakers based on nanotechnology can now be totally implanted inside the right ventricle through the transvenous route, thus eliminating leads, pockets and scarring In the same way, totally subcutaneous ICD systems are now available, although they are currently only capable of delivering shocks, without pacing (including antitachycardia pacing). In CRT optimised delivery is important to improve clinical responses and to reduce the non-response rate (around 30 % with current technology). Endocardial left ventricular pacing could be a solution if it can be achieved at an acceptable risk. Multisite ventricular pacing is an alternative. Besides CRT neuromodulation, especially by vagal stimulation, is another important field of device researchfor heart failure. Preliminary clinical results are encouraging. PMID:26427291

  11. Are Electronic Cardiac Devices Still Evolving?

    PubMed Central

    Mabo, P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives The goal of this paper is to review some important issues occurring during the past year in Implantable devices. Methods First cardiac implantable device was proposed to maintain an adequate heart rate, either because the heart’s natural pacemaker is not fast enough, or there is a block in the heart’s electrical conduction system. During the last forty years, pacemakers have evolved considerably and become programmable and allow to configure specific patient optimum pacing modes. Various technological aspects (electrodes, connectors, algorithms diagnosis, therapies, …) have been progressed and cardiac implants address several clinical applications: management of arrhythmias, cardioversion / defibrillation and cardiac resynchronization therapy. Results Observed progress was the miniaturization of device, increased longevity, coupled with efficient pacing functions, multisite pacing modes, leadless pacing and also a better recognition of supraventricular or ventricular tachycardia’s in order to deliver appropriate therapy. Subcutaneous implant, new modes of stimulation (leadless implant or ultrasound lead), quadripolar lead and new sensor or new algorithm for the hemodynamic management are introduced and briefly described. Each times, the main result occurring during the two past years are underlined and repositioned from the history, remaining limitations are also addressed. Conclusion Some important technological improvements were described. Nevertheless, news trends for the future are also considered in a specific session such as the remote follow-up of the patient or the treatment of heart failure by neuromodulation. PMID:25123732

  12. Nonphotic entrainment of the human circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klerman, E. B.; Rimmer, D. W.; Dijk, D. J.; Kronauer, R. E.; Rizzo, J. F. 3rd; Czeisler, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    In organisms as diverse as single-celled algae and humans, light is the primary stimulus mediating entrainment of the circadian biological clock. Reports that some totally blind individuals appear entrained to the 24-h day have suggested that nonphotic stimuli may also be effective circadian synchronizers in humans, although the nonphotic stimuli are probably comparatively weak synchronizers, because the circadian rhythms of many totally blind individuals "free run" even when they maintain a 24-h activity-rest schedule. To investigate entrainment by nonphotic synchronizers, we studied the endogenous circadian melatonin and core body temperature rhythms of 15 totally blind subjects who lacked conscious light perception and exhibited no suppression of plasma melatonin in response to ocular bright-light exposure. Nine of these fifteen blind individuals were able to maintain synchronization to the 24-h day, albeit often at an atypical phase angle of entrainment. Nonphotic stimuli also synchronized the endogenous circadian rhythms of a totally blind individual to a non-24-h schedule while living in constant near darkness. We conclude that nonphotic stimuli can entrain the human circadian pacemaker in some individuals lacking ocular circadian photoreception.

  13. Radioisotope thermoelectric generators for implanted pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Pustovalov, A.A.; Bovin, A.V.; Fedorets, V.I.; Shapovalov, V.P.

    1986-08-01

    This paper discusses the development and application of long-life lithium batteries and the problems associated with miniature radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RITEG) with service lives of 10 years or longer. On eof the main problems encountered when devising a radioisotope heat source (RHS) for an RITEG is to obtain biomedical /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ with a specific neutron yield of 3.10/sup 3/-4.10/sup 3/ (g /SUP ./ sec)/sup -1/, equivalent to metallic Pu 238, and with a content of gamma impurities sufficient to ensure a permissible exposure a permissible exposure does rate (EDR) of a mixture of neutron and gamma radiation. After carrying out the isotope exchange and purifying the initial sample of its gamma impurity elements, the authors obtain biomedical Pu 238 satisfying the indicated requirements king suitable for use in the power packs of medical devices. Taking the indicated specifications into account, the Ritm-1o and gamma radioisotope heat sources were designed, built, tested in models and under natural conditions, and then into production as radioisotope thermoelectric generators designed to power the electronic circuits of implanted pacemakers. The Ritm-MT and Gemma radioisotope thermoelectric generators described are basic units, which can be used as self-contained power supplies for electronic equipment with power requirements in the micromilliwatt range.

  14. Asymptomatic left ventricular permanent pacemaker malposition detected on routine follow-up--a case report.

    PubMed

    Kassotis, J; Mirhoseni, N; Makan, M; Reddy, C V

    2001-12-01

    The authors present an asymptomatic left ventricular pacemaker lead malposition that was detected upon routine 2-D Echocardiography. Clinical implication diagnosis and therapeutic options on left ventricular pacemaker lead malposition are discussed. PMID:11775628

  15. Spiral-pacemaker interactions in a mathematical model of excitable medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shajahan, T. K.; Borek, Bartłomiej; Shrier, Alvin; Glass, Leon

    2013-02-01

    Interactions of a spiral wave with a pacemaker is studied in a mathematical model of two dimensional excitable medium. Faster pacemakers emitting target waves can abolish spirals by driving them to the border of the medium. Our study shows that a slower pacemaker can modify spiral wave behavior by changing the motion of the spiral core. We analyze the dynamics of the spiral wave near the spiral core and away from the core as a function of size and period of the pacemaker. The pacemaker can cause the spiral wave to drift towards it, and either speed up or slow down the reentrant activity. Furthermore, the drift induced by the pacemaker can result in irregular or quasiperiodic dynamics even at sites away from the pacemaker. These results highlight the influence of pacemakers on complex spiral wave dynamics.

  16. Factors associated with implantation of single- versus dual-chamber pacemakers in 1992.

    PubMed

    Daley, W R

    1998-08-01

    Characteristics of hospitalized patients receiving initial pacemaker implantation were determined using a multistate inpatient discharge database. Analysis revealed a significant association of pacemaker type with patient age and income level, even after controlling for diagnostic factors. PMID:9708676

  17. Exercise Trajectories of Women from Entry to a 6-Month Cardiac Rehabilitation Program to One Year after Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Heather M.; Blanchard, Chris; Gunn, Elizabeth; Kodis, Jennifer; Walker, Steven; Toner, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    Background. Physical activity is associated with reduced mortality and morbidity. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is an effective intervention for patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Unfortunately, women are less likely to engage in, or sustain, regular physical activity. Objectives were to (1) describe women's guidelines-based levels of physical activity during and after CR and (2) determine the physical activity trajectories of women from entry to CR to one year after CR. Methods and Results. A prospective, longitudinal study of 203 women with CVD enrolled in a 6-month CR program. Physical activity was measured using the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire (LSI), focusing on moderate-strenuous activity. Data were analyzed using latent class growth analysis (LCGA) and logistic regression. Mean scores on the LSI showed women to be “active” at all follow-up points. LCGA revealed a two-class model, respectively, called “inactive relapsers” and “moderately active relapsers.” Predictors of the “moderately active relapsers” class were employment status and diagnosis of myocardial infarction. Conclusions. Women achieved the recommended physical activity levels by the end of CR and sustained them until one year after CR. LCGA allowed us to determine the class trajectories associated with moderate-strenuous activity and, from these, to identify implications for targeted intervention. PMID:24151580

  18. Biomechanics of Early Cardiac Development

    PubMed Central

    Goenezen, Sevan; Rennie, Monique Y.

    2012-01-01

    Biomechanics affect early cardiac development, from looping to the development of chambers and valves. Hemodynamic forces are essential for proper cardiac development, and their disruption leads to congenital heart defects. A wealth of information already exists on early cardiac adaptations to hemodynamic loading, and new technologies, including high resolution imaging modalities and computational modeling, are enabling a more thorough understanding of relationships between hemodynamics and cardiac development. Imaging and modeling approaches, used in combination with biological data on cell behavior and adaptation, are paving the road for new discoveries on links between biomechanics and biology and their effect on cardiac development and fetal programming. PMID:22760547

  19. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement: establishing a comprehensive program model for hybrid cardiac catheterization laboratories in the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    PubMed

    Speiser, Bernadette; Dutra-Brice, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Aortic valve disease, especially aortic stenosis, becomes progressively debilitating and carries a high mortality risk if it is categorized as severe and symptomatic (J Thorac Cardiovas Surg. 2012;144(3):e29-e84). In the past, the only treatment for aortic stenosis was surgical aortic valve replacement. Surgical treatment may require several hours of cardioplegia, and if the patient has comorbidities, such as renal failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, their operative mortality percentage increases.In 2011, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the use of a transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedure for patients who were deemed high risk or inoperative for the routine surgical aortic valve replacement surgery. More than 20,?000 TAVRs have been performed in patients worldwide since 2002 when Dr Alain Cribier performed the first-in-man TAVR (Arch Cardiovasc Dis. 2012;105(3):145-152). The Edwards Lifesciences SAPIEN XT valve and the Medtronic CoreValve are commercially available.The clinical findings and economic statistic have supported the expansion of the TAVR procedure. However, there has been considerable controversy over where the procedure is to occur and who is directly responsible for directing the TAVR care. This debate has identified barriers to the implementation of a TAVR program. The operating rooms and a cardiac catheterization laboratory are underprepared for the hybrid valve replacement therapy. Because of the barriers identified, the Department of Veterans Affairs determined a need for a systematic approach to review the programs that applied for this structural heart disease program. A centralized team was developed to ensure room readiness and staff competency. The use of the Health Failure Mode and Effects Analysis can define high-risk clinical processes and conduct a hazard analysis. Worksheets can show potential failure modes and their probabilities, along with actions and outcome measures, team collaboration, extensive screening, and selection process. The TAVR program begins implementation with data entry with each case into CART-CL (Cardiovascular Assessment, Reporting and Tracking System for Cath Labs, Veteran Administration database for interventional cardiology procedures). If an untoward event occurs, within 24 hours the CART-CL Quality Assessment Team is activated to begin the review process. This provides real-time review and feedback to the local facility in an expeditious manner. Cardiac catheterization laboratories have been inundated with rapidly changing technological advances in the past decade. The era for structural heart repair is rapidly mobilizing from a surgical/operating room setting to a transcatheter/hybrid catheterization laboratory suite. The use of the new hybrid catheterization laboratories will continue to expand as the approval of future transcatheter therapies evolve. Editor's note: Due to the volume of important information presented in each table, only the first table is included in the print version of the article, however, all tables may be viewed in their entirety free of charge on the online version of this article: http://journals.lww.com/dccnjournal/pages/default.aspx. PMID:25144213

  20. The neurochemical basis of photic entrainment of the circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, Michael A.; Buckley, Becky; Lutton, Lewis M.

    1992-01-01

    Circadian rhythmicity in mammals is controlled by the action of a light-entrainable hypothalamus, in association with two cell clusters known as the supra chiasmatic nuclei (SCN). In the absence of temporal environmental clues, this pacemaker continues to measure time by an endogenous mechanism (clock), driving biochemical, physiological, and behavioral rhythms that reflect the natural period of the pacemaker oscillation. This endogenous period usually differs slightly from 24 hours (i.e., circadian). When mammals are maintained under a 24 hour light-dark (LD) cycle, the pacemaker becomes entrained such that the period of the pacemaker oscillation matches that of the LD cycle. Potentially entraining photic information is conveyed to the SCN via a direct retinal projection, the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT). RHT neurotransmission is thought to be mediated by the release of excitatory amino acids (EAA) in the SCN. In support of this hypothesis, recent experiments using nocturnal rodents have shown that EAA antagonists block the effects of light on pacemaker-driven behavioral rhythms, and attenuate light induced gene expression in SCN cells. An understanding of the neurochemical basis of the photic entrainment process would facilitate the development of pharmacological strategies for maintaining synchrony among shift workers in environments, such as the Space Station, which provide unreliable or conflicting temporal photic clues.

  1. Entrainment of coupled oscillators on regular networks by pacemakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radicchi, Filippo; Meyer-Ortmanns, Hildegard

    2006-03-01

    We study Kuramoto oscillators, driven by one pacemaker, on d -dimensional regular topologies with nearest neighbor interactions. We derive the analytical expressions for the common frequency in the case of phase-locked motion and for the critical frequency of the pacemaker, placed at an arbitrary position in the lattice, so that above the critical frequency no phase-locked motion is possible. We show that the mere change in topology from an open chain to a ring induces synchronization for a certain range of pacemaker frequencies and couplings, while keeping the other parameters fixed. Moreover, we demonstrate numerically that the critical frequency of the pacemaker decreases as a power of the linear size of the lattice with an exponent equal to the dimension of the system. This leads in particular to the conclusion that for infinite-dimensional topologies the critical frequency for having entrainment decreases exponentially with increasing size of the system, or, more generally, with increasing depth of the network, that is, the average distance of the oscillators from the pacemaker.

  2. Biasing the pacemaker in the behavioral theory of timing

    PubMed Central

    Bizo, Lewis A.; White, K. Geoffrey

    1995-01-01

    In the behavioral theory of timing, pacemaker rate is determined by overall rate of reinforcement. A two-alternative free-operant psychophysical procedure was employed to investigate whether pacemaker period was also sensitive to the differential rate of reinforcement. Responding on a left key during the first 25 s and on a right key during the second 25 s of a 50-s trial was reinforced at variable intervals, and variable-interval schedule values during the two halves of the trials were varied systematically. Responding on the right key during the first 25 s and on the left key during the second 25 s was not reinforced. Estimates of pacemaker period were derived from fits of a function predicted by the behavioral theory of timing to right-key response proportions in consecutive 5-s bins of the 50-s trial. Estimates of pacemaker period were shortest when the differential reinforcer rate most strongly favored right-key responses, and were longest when the differential reinforcer rate most strongly favored left-key responses. The results were consistent with the conclusion that pacemaker rate is influenced by relative reinforcer rate. PMID:16812769

  3. Diabetes mellitus activates fetal gene program and intensifies cardiac remodeling and oxidative stress in aged spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The combination of systemic arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus (DM) induces greater cardiac remodeling than either condition alone. However, this association has been poorly addressed in senescent rats. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the influence of streptozotocin-induced DM on ventricular remodeling and oxidative stress in aged spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Methods Fifty 18 month old male SHR were divided into two groups: control (SHR, n = 25) and diabetic (SHR-DM, n = 25). DM was induced by streptozotocin (40 mg/kg, i.p.). After nine weeks, the rats underwent echocardiography and myocardial functional study in left ventricular (LV) isolated papillary muscle preparations. LV samples were obtained to measure myocyte diameters, interstitial collagen fraction, and hydroxyproline concentration. Gene expression of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and α- and β-myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms was evaluated by RT-PCR. Serum oxidative stress was assessed by measuring lipid hydroperoxide concentration and superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities. Statistics: Student’s t test or Mann-Whitney test, p < 0.05. Results SHR-DM presented higher blood glucose (487 ± 29 vs. 89.1 ± 21.1 mg/dL) and lower body weight (277 ± 26 vs. 339 ± 38 g). Systolic blood pressure did not differ between groups. Echocardiography showed LV and left atrial dilation, LV diastolic and relative wall thickness decrease, and LV systolic and diastolic function impairment in SHR-DM. Papillary muscle study showed decreased myocardial contractility and contractile reserve in SHR-DM. Myocyte diameters and myocardial interstitial collagen fraction and hydroxyproline concentration did not differ between groups. Increased serum pro-oxidant activity and gene expression of ANP and β/α-MyHC ratio were observed in DM. Conclusion Diabetes mellitus induces cardiac dilation and functional impairment, increases oxidative stress and activates fetal gene program in aged spontaneously hypertensive rats. PMID:24134628

  4. Progressive simulation-based program for training cardiac surgery-related skills.

    PubMed

    Cristancho, Sayra; Moussa, Fuad; Monclou, Alex; Moncayo, Camilo; Rueda, Claudia; Dubrowski, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Off Pump Coronary Artery Bypass (OPCAB) surgery is a strategy for revascularizing diseased coronary arteries without cardiopulmonary bypass. The complete operation can be deconstructed into individual tasks and subtasks that are ideal for creating simulation modules. Recently, we have developed a modular mechanical beating-heart OPCAB simulator for use in learner-centered training. In the present study, we describe the design of a progressive, simulation-augmented training program for OPCAB surgery. In particular, we a) define need-driven education and training goals, b) create simulation scenarios with progressive difficulty to specifically address these goals, and c) design corresponding assessment tools for both formative and summative purposes. PMID:21335780

  5. Positional convulsant syncope in a pacemaker patient following insulation break of the right ventricular lead

    PubMed Central

    Ben Lassoued, Mehdi; Baatour, Makram; Haggui, Abdeddayem; Lamine, Khaled

    2014-01-01

    In spite of the advances made in the technology of pacemakers which resulted in a decrease in the incidence of pacemaker lead fracture, the latter remains a potential complication of implanted pacemakers manufactured in the early days. In this report, we present a case of fracture of the unipolar electrode diagnosed by an emergency physician in a patient on a pacemaker for 10 years who presented to the emergency department with positional convulsant syncopes. PMID:24827652

  6. Same-day transfer of patients to the cardiac telemetry unit after surgery: the Rapid after Bypass Back into Telemetry (RABBIT) program.

    PubMed

    Sakallaris, B R; Halpin, L S; Knapp, M; Sheridan, M J

    2000-04-01

    Early data from this project suggest that the RABBIT program fulfilled the process improvement goals of decreasing costs of cardiac surgery and maintaining high quality. Decreased cost was achieved by decreasing time to extubation and decreasing length of stay in the ICU and the total length of stay in the hospital. The cost savings were achieved without compromising the quality of care, which was assessed by measuring rates of readmission to the ICU and to the hospital and by surveying patients about their level of satisfaction. The success of the RABBIT program can be attributed to several factors. First, members of the cardiac surgery quality improvement team worked well together to solve problems and overcome obstacles, particularly after the pilot program. Second, naming the program helped to motivate staff, physicians, and patients. Outcome data was shared with the staff quarterly, and successes were celebrated. Finally, the use of a facilitator early in the process to establish the process with the surgeons and the staff was invaluable. Opportunities for continued improvement include resolving operational difficulties related to availability of beds and staffing, continuing work with physicians in changing practice patterns, increasing efficiency in scheduling operating rooms, and adjusting the preoperative education provided to patients and their families about the length of stay to expect. Quarterly outcome analysis continues, with reports to the cardiac surgery quality improvement team. The team continues to explore creative solutions to the aforementioned issues, as the goal of having 25% of patients who undergo cardiac surgery be transferred to the CTU on the day of surgery has remained elusive. PMID:11873752

  7. Cardiac arrest

    MedlinePlus

    Sudden cardiac arrest, SCA; Cardiopulmonary arrest; Circulatory arrest ... While some people refer to a heart attack as a cardiac arrest, they are not the same thing. A heart attack occurs when a blocked artery stops the flow ...

  8. Bursting in Cellular Automata and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bub, Gil; Shrier, Alvin; Glass, Leon

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the initiation and continuation of abnormal cardiac arrhythmias are incompletely understood. In this chapter, we summarize work that shows how simple cellular automata models of excitable media can display a range of interesting dynamical behavior including spontaneous bursts of reentrant spiral activity. Since the model incorporates basic physiological properties of excitability, heterogeneity, localized pacemakers, and fatigue in a schematic way, the model captures generic physiological dynamics that should be broadly observed in experimental and clinical settings as well as in more realistic mathematical models.

  9. Starting a transradial vascular access program in the cardiac catheterization laboratory.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mauricio G; Alfonso, Carlos

    2009-08-01

    Over the past 20 years, since the first reports, transradial vascular access for coronary angiography and intervention has flourished in many countries while still accounting for less than 2% of all cases performed in the United States due, in part, to difficulties in introducing change to established practice patterns. The benefits of transradial access include decreased bleeding risk, increased patient comfort, lessened post-procedure nursing workload, and decreased hospital costs. A learning curve to gain the specific set of skills for transradial access has been well described. Although published data suggest that 100-200 cases are necessary to become proficient, the learning curve is likely highly individual, and some operators may become proficient sooner. The equipment to start a transradial program is minimal and includes modified sheaths and catheters. Patients with morbid obesity, peripheral vascular disease, and anticoagulation clearly benefit from this approach. To establish a transradial program and offer the benefits of this approach to most patients, a dedicated interventionalist must incorporate peers and hospital staff to create a multidisciplinary team. PMID:19734569

  10. [Cardiac Rehabilitation 2015].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Andreas

    2015-11-25

    The goals of cardiac rehabilitation are (re-)conditioning and secondary prevention in patients with heart disease or an elevated cardiovascular risk profile. Rehabilitation is based on motivation through education, on adapted physical activity, instruction of relaxation techniques, psychological support and optimized medication. It is performed preferably in groups either in outpatient or inpatient settings. The Swiss working group on cardiac rehabilitation provides a network of institutions with regular quality auditing. Positive effects of rehabilitation programs on mortality and morbidity have been established by numerous studies. Although a majority of patients after cardiac surgery are being referred to rehabilitation, these services are notoriously underused after catheter procedures. PMID:26602848

  11. Evaluation of a self-management patient education program for patients with chronic heart failure undergoing inpatient cardiac rehabilitation: study protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic heart failure requires a complex treatment regimen on a life-long basis. Therefore, self-care/self-management is an essential part of successful treatment and comprehensive patient education is warranted. However, specific information on program features and educational strategies enhancing treatment success is lacking. This trial aims to evaluate a patient-oriented and theory-based self-management educational group program as compared to usual care education during inpatient cardiac rehabilitation in Germany. Methods/Design The study is a multicenter cluster randomized controlled trial in four cardiac rehabilitation clinics. Clusters are patient education groups that comprise HF patients recruited within 2 weeks after commencement of inpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Cluster randomization was chosen for pragmatic reasons, i.e. to ensure a sufficient number of eligible patients to build large-enough educational groups and to prevent contamination by interaction of patients from different treatment allocations during rehabilitation. Rehabilitants with chronic systolic heart failure (n = 540) will be consecutively recruited for the study at the beginning of inpatient rehabilitation. Data will be assessed at admission, at discharge and after 6 and 12 months using patient questionnaires. In the intervention condition, patients receive the new patient-oriented self-management educational program, whereas in the control condition, patients receive a short lecture-based educational program (usual care). The primary outcome is patients’ self-reported self-management competence. Secondary outcomes include behavioral determinants and self-management health behavior (symptom monitoring, physical activity, medication adherence), health-related quality of life, and treatment satisfaction. Treatment effects will be evaluated separately for each follow-up time point using multilevel regression analysis, and adjusting for baseline values. Discussion This study evaluates the effectiveness of a comprehensive self-management educational program by a cluster randomized trial within inpatient cardiac rehabilitation in Germany. Furthermore, subgroup-related treatment effects will be explored. Study results will contribute to a better understanding of both the effectiveness and mechanisms of a self-management group program as part of cardiac rehabilitation. Trial registration German Clinical Trials Register: DRKS00004841; WHO International Clinical Trials: = DRKS00004841 PMID:23968340

  12. Cardiac cell: a biological laser?

    PubMed

    Chorvat, D; Chorvatova, A

    2008-04-01

    We present a new concept of cardiac cells based on an analogy with lasers, practical implementations of quantum resonators. In this concept, each cardiac cell comprises a network of independent nodes, characterised by a set of discrete energy levels and certain transition probabilities between them. Interaction between the nodes is given by threshold-limited energy transfer, leading to quantum-like behaviour of the whole network. We propose that in cardiomyocytes, during each excitation-contraction coupling cycle, stochastic calcium release and the unitary properties of ionic channels constitute an analogue to laser active medium prone to "population inversion" and "spontaneous emission" phenomena. This medium, when powered by an incoming threshold-reaching voltage discharge in the form of an action potential, responds to the calcium influx through L-type calcium channels by stimulated emission of Ca2+ ions in a coherent, synchronised and amplified release process known as calcium-induced calcium release. In parallel, phosphorylation-stimulated molecular amplification in protein cascades adds tuneable features to the cells. In this framework, the heart can be viewed as a coherent network of synchronously firing cardiomyocytes behaving as pulsed laser-like amplifiers, coupled to pulse-generating pacemaker master-oscillators. The concept brings a new viewpoint on cardiac diseases as possible alterations of "cell lasing" properties. PMID:18191016

  13. Reprogramming of implanted pacemaker following external defibrillation.

    PubMed

    Barold, S S; Ong, L S; Scovil, J; Heinle, R A; Wright, T

    1978-10-01

    This report describes reprogramming of a pulse generator consequent to cardiac defibrillation. Analysis of the explanted pulse generator revealed normal function. We tested the electrical properties of several defibrillators and our studies suggest that erratic electrostatic discharges at the time of paddle application before defibrillation may create a signal sequence capable of reprogramming the particular pulse generator by activating either the reed switch or internal electronics. PMID:95645

  14. Experimental evidence of a chaotic region in a neural pacemaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Hua-Guang; Jia, Bing; Chen, Guan-Rong

    2013-03-01

    In this Letter, we report the finding of period-adding scenarios with chaos in firing patterns, observed in biological experiments on a neural pacemaker, with fixed extra-cellular potassium concentration at different levels and taken extra-cellular calcium concentration as the bifurcation parameter. The experimental bifurcations in the two-dimensional parameter space demonstrate the existence of a chaotic region interwoven with the periodic region thereby forming a period-adding sequence with chaos. The behavior of the pacemaker in this region is qualitatively similar to that of the Hindmarsh-Rose neuron model in a well-known comb-shaped chaotic region in two-dimensional parameter spaces.

  15. Interference with the pacemakers of two workers at electricity substations.

    PubMed

    Butrous, G S; Bexton, R S; Barton, D G; Male, J C; Camm, A J

    1983-11-01

    Pacemaker function was tested in two electricity substation workers exposed to high tension electric fields. High intensity electric fields induced reversion to the interference mode, producing in one case competitive rhythm and in the other inappropriately slow pacing which resulted in asymptomatic pauses of up to 2.5 s. A suit designed to shield the body from the effects of high intensity electric fields was tried and proved to be effective in protecting the pacemaker, allowing it to function normally in the substations. PMID:6626476

  16. Interference with the pacemakers of two workers at electricity substations.

    PubMed Central

    Butrous, G S; Bexton, R S; Barton, D G; Male, J C; Camm, A J

    1983-01-01

    Pacemaker function was tested in two electricity substation workers exposed to high tension electric fields. High intensity electric fields induced reversion to the interference mode, producing in one case competitive rhythm and in the other inappropriately slow pacing which resulted in asymptomatic pauses of up to 2.5 s. A suit designed to shield the body from the effects of high intensity electric fields was tried and proved to be effective in protecting the pacemaker, allowing it to function normally in the substations. Images PMID:6626476

  17. [Development and research of temporary demand pacemaker with electrocardiosignal display].

    PubMed

    Fan, Shounian; Jiang, Chenxi; Cai, Yunchang; Pan, Yangzhong; Yang, Tianhe; Wu, Qiang; Zheng, Yaxi; Liu, Xiaoqiao; Li, Shiying

    2004-08-01

    A temporary demand pacemaker with electrocardiosignal display is introduced in this paper. Double way low-noise electrocardiosignal preamplifier, amplitude limiter, high and low pass filter, 50 Hz notch filter, TTL level generator and stimulating pulse formation circuit are components of the hardware electrocircuit. The demand pacing and the electrocardiosignal display are separately controlled by the software in which the double microcontrollers communications technique is used. In this study, liquid crystal display is firstly used in body surface electrocardiosignal display or intracardial electrophysiologic signal display when the temporary demand pacemaker is installed and put into use. The machine has proven clinically useful and can be of wide appliation. PMID:15357453

  18. Femoral approach: an exceptional alternative for permanent pacemaker implantation.

    PubMed

    Tereno Valente, Bruno; Conceição, José M; Nogueira da Silva, Manuel; M Oliveira, Mário; S Cunha, Pedro; Lousinha, Ana; Galrinho, Ana; C Ferreira, Rui

    2014-05-01

    The classic transvenous implantation of a permanent pacemaker in a pectoral location may be precluded by obstruction of venous access through the superior vena cava or recent infection at the implant site. When these barriers to the procedure are bilateral and there are also contraindications or technical difficulties to performing a thoracotomy for an epicardial approach, the femoral vein, although rarely used, can be a viable alternative. We describe the case of a patient with occlusion of both subclavian veins and a high risk for mini-thoracotomy or videothoracoscopy, who underwent implantation of a permanent single-chamber pacemaker via the right femoral vein. PMID:24931177

  19. How are arrhythmias detected by implanted cardiac devices managed in Europe? Results of the European Heart Rhythm Association Survey.

    PubMed

    Todd, Derick; Hernandez-Madrid, Antonio; Proclemer, Alessandro; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Estner, Heidi; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2015-09-01

    The management of arrhythmias detected by implantable cardiac devices can be challenging. There are no formal international guidelines to inform decision-making. The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to assess the management of various clinical scenarios among members of the EHRA electrophysiology research network. There were 49 responses to the questionnaire. The survey responses were mainly (81%) from medium-high volume device implanting centres, performing more than 200 total device implants per year. Clinical scenarios were described focusing on four key areas: the implantation of pacemakers for bradyarrhythmia detected on an implantable loop recorder (ILR), the management of patients with ventricular arrhythmia detected by an ILR or pacemaker, the management of atrial fibrillation in patients with pacemakers and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices and the management of ventricular tachycardia in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. PMID:26443791

  20. Dynamic clamp: a powerful tool in cardiac electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Wilders, Ronald

    2006-10-15

    Dynamic clamp is a collection of closely related techniques that have been employed in cardiac electrophysiology to provide direct answers to numerous research questions regarding basic cellular mechanisms of action potential formation, action potential transfer and action potential synchronization in health and disease. Building on traditional current clamp, dynamic clamp was initially used to create virtual gap junctions between isolated myocytes. More recent applications include the embedding of a real pacemaking myocyte in a simulated network of atrial or ventricular cells and the insertion of virtual ion channels, either simulated in real time or simultaneously recorded from an expression system, into the membrane of an isolated myocyte. These applications have proven that dynamic clamp, which is characterized by the real-time evaluation and injection of simulated membrane current, is a powerful tool in cardiac electrophysiology. Here, each of the three different experimental configurations used in cardiac electrophysiology is reviewed. Also, directions are given for the implementation of dynamic clamp in the cardiac electrophysiology laboratory. With the growing interest in the application of dynamic clamp in cardiac electrophysiology, it is anticipated that dynamic clamp will also prove to be a powerful tool in basic research on biological pacemakers and in identification of specific ion channels as targets for drug development. PMID:16873403

  1. A randomized trial of long-term remote monitoring of pacemaker recipients (The COMPAS trial)

    PubMed Central

    Mabo, Philippe; Victor, Frédéric; Bazin, Patrick; Ahres, Saïd; Babuty, Dominique; Da Costa, Antoine; Binet, Didier; Daubert, Jean-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Aims Professional practice guidelines recommend that pacemaker recipients be followed regularly. However, the majority of scheduled ambulatory visits is unproductive and imposes a heavy burden on the health-care system. Methods and results The COMPAS randomized, multicentre, non-inferiority trial examined the safety of long-term remote monitoring of pacemakers. Between December 2005 and January 2008, 538 patients were randomly assigned to remote monitoring follow-up (active group) vs. standard care (control group). The primary objective was to confirm that the proportion of patients who experienced at least one major adverse event (MAE), including all-cause death and hospitalizations for device-related or cardiovascular adverse events, was not >7% higher in the active than in the control group. MAE-free survivals and quality of life were compared in both groups. The characteristics of the study groups were similar. Over a follow-up of 18.3 months, 17.3% of patients in the active and 19.1% in the control group experienced at least one MAE (P < 0.01 for non-inferiority). Hospitalizations for atrial arrhythmias (6 vs. 18) and strokes (2 vs. 8) were fewer (P < 0.05), and the number of interim ambulatory visits was 56% lower (P < 0.001) in the active than the control group. Changes in pacemaker programming or drug regimens were made in 62% of visits in the active vs. 29% in the control group (P < 0.001). Quality of life remained unchanged in both groups. Conclusion Remote monitoring was a safe alternative to conventional care and significantly lowered the number of ambulatory visits during long-term follow-up of permanently paced patients. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00989326. PMID:22127418

  2. Bifurcations in a nonlinear model of the baroreceptor-cardiac reflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, H.; Herzel, H.

    1998-04-01

    We investigate the dynamic properties of a nonlinear model of the human cardio-baroreceptor control loop. As a new feature we use a phase effectiveness curve to describe the experimentally well-known phase dependency of the cardiac pacemaker's sensitivity to neural activity. We show that an increase of sympathetic time delays leads via a Hopf bifurcation to sustained heart rate oscillations. For increasing baroreflex sensitivity or for repetitive vagal stimulation we observe period-doubling, toroidal oscillations, chaos, and entrainment between the rhythms of the heart and the control loop. The bifurcations depend crucially on the involvement of the cardiac pacemaker's phase dependency. We compare the model output with experimental data from electrically stimulated anesthetized dogs and discuss possible implications for cardiac arrhythmias.

  3. Aspergillus fumigatus pacemaker lead endocarditis: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Roger; Gannon, Brian R; Childs, Tim J; Isotalo, Phillip A; Abdollah, Hoshiar

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis of fungal endocarditis requires a high index of clinical suspicion. Rarely, pacemaker implantation may be a risk factor for the development of fungal endocarditis. A 71-year-old man with a history of multiple transvenous pacemaker manipulations and fever of an uncertain source is described. A diagnosis of culture-negative pacemaker endocarditis was established only after repeat transthoracic echocardiography. Amphotericin B was instituted; however, the patient developed a cerebral infarct and died. Postmortem examination demonstrated Aspergillus fumigatus within a large pacemaker lead thrombus, tricuspid and aortic valve vegetations, and septic pulmonary and renal emboli. The present report describes the clinical and pathological features of a rare case of Aspergillus fumigatus pacemaker lead endocarditis and suggests that serial echocardiograms may be effective in the early detection of pacemaker lead vegetations. The diagnostic features and therapeutic management of pacemaker lead endocarditis are reviewed. PMID:16568159

  4. [Practical questions around individual with a pacemaker or an implantable cardioverter defibrillator].

    PubMed

    Manaouil, Cécile; Fantoni, Sophie; Montpellier, Dominique; Tordjman, Eric; Jarde, Olivier

    2012-07-01

    An individual with a pacemaker can ask his GP for information about potential problems associated with the device. Should a pacemaker continue to be used by end-of-life patients? Should a pacemaker be stopped in a limited care situation? What precautions should be taken when treating a patient with a pacemaker? Pacemakers and implantable defibrillators are sensitive to electromagnetic interference (EMI). Medically, MRIs are theoretically contraindicated, even though examinations could be performed without a major problem, and special precautions should be taken when using an electrosurgical cutter or radiotherapy. In case of death, a doctor or embalmer must remove the patient's pacemaker due to its risk of explosion during cremation. Doctors who sign cremation forms have a legal obligation to provide such information. It may affect an employee's ability to work. Are there some professions that are not well suited for individuals with a pacemaker? PMID:22138293

  5. Optimizing the programation of cardiac resynchronization therapy devices in patients with heart failure and left bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Bàrbara; Sitges, Marta; Marigliano, Alba; Delgado, Victoria; Díaz-Infante, Ernesto; Azqueta, Manel; Tamborero, David; Tolosana, José María; Berruezo, Antonio; Pérez-Villa, Félix; Paré, Carles; Mont, Lluís; Brugada, Josep

    2007-09-15

    This study was conducted to investigate the clinical impact of cardiac resynchronization device optimization. A series of 100 consecutive patients received cardiac resynchronization therapy. In the first 49 patients, an empirical atrioventricular delay of 120 ms was set, with simultaneous biventricular stimulation (interventricular [VV] interval=0 ms). In the next 51 patients, systematic atrioventricular optimization was performed. VV optimization was also performed, selecting 1 VV delay: right or left ventricular preactivation (+30 or -30 ms) or simultaneous (VV interval=0 ms), according to the best synchrony obtained by tissue Doppler-derived wall displacement. At follow-up, patients who were alive without cardiac transplantation and showed improvement of >or=10% in the distance walked in the 6-minute walking test were considered responders. There were no differences between the 2 groups at baseline. Left ventricular ejection fraction improved in the 2 groups, but left ventricular cardiac output improved only in the optimized group. At 6 months, patients with optimized devices walked slightly further in the 6-minute walking test (497+/-167 vs 393+/-123 m, p<0.01), with no differences in New York Heart Association functional class or quality of life compared with nonoptimized patients. Overall, the number of nonresponders were similar in the 2 groups (27% vs 23%, p=NS). In conclusion, the echocardiographic optimization of cardiac resynchronization devices provided a slight incremental clinical benefit at midterm follow-up. Simple and rapid methods to routinely optimize the devices are warranted. PMID:17826387

  6. Extended Application of the Hybrid Procedure in Neonates with Left-Sided Obstructive Lesions in an Evolving Cardiac Program.

    PubMed

    Taqatqa, Anas; Diab, Karim A; Stuart, Christopher; Fogg, Louis; Ilbawi, Michel; Awad, Sawsan; Caputo, Massimo; Amin, Zahid; Abdulla, Ra-Id; Kenny, Damien; Hijazi, Ziyad M

    2016-03-01

    The hybrid approach to management of hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) was developed as an alternative to neonatal Norwood surgery, providing a less invasive initial palliation for HLHS. We describe our experience in extending the concept of the hybrid procedure to palliate neonates with anatomically compromised systemic arterial blood flow in a variety of congenital cardiac anomalies and supporting its application as first-line palliation in centers developing their HLHS programs. Retrospective review of patients undergoing therapy for HLHS at a single institution from June 2008 to December 2014 was performed. Subject demographics, clinical and procedural data, along with follow-up, were collected. Thirteen patients had initial hybrid palliation for HLHS during the time frame indicated at a median age of 8 days (range 1-29 days) and median weight of 3.4 kg (range 2.4-4.6 kg). Diagnoses included typical HLHS (n = 6), right-dominant unbalanced atrioventricular septal defect with arch hypoplasia (n = 4), double outlet right ventricle [subpulmonic VSD (n = 1) and intact ventricular septum (n = 1)] with hypoplastic transverse aortic arch and borderline left ventricular dimensions. Standard approach with bilateral pulmonary artery banding and ductal stenting was carried out in all thirteen patients. Two patients required two ductal stents at the time of index procedure. There were no intraprocedural complications. Median intubation length post-procedure was 4 days (range 1-74 days). Median hospital stay post-procedure was 47 days (range 15-270 days). The overall mortality rate on follow-up through comprehensive stage 2 over the 6-year experience was 38 % (5 out of 13). Of note, the mortality rate was significantly lower in the latter 3 years of the study period when the procedure was adopted as a primary palliation for HLHS (14 % or 1 out of 7) compared to the initial 3-year period when it was reserved for higher risk cohorts (67 % or 4 out of 6). Median time to subsequent surgery was 3 months (range 1-4 months). One patient required further ductal stenting on follow-up and developed subsequently airway compression. On median follow-up of 24 months, two patients required pulmonary artery arterioplasty. The hybrid procedure may be used for palliation for a variety of cardiac lesions to avoid high-risk surgery in the neonatal period. This approach may be also an alternative in centers performing lower number of Norwood surgery, which has been associated with higher mortality. PMID:26538212

  7. 21 CFR 870.3710 - Pacemaker repair or replacement material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker repair or replacement material. 870.3710 Section 870.3710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3710...

  8. 21 CFR 870.3710 - Pacemaker repair or replacement material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker repair or replacement material. 870.3710 Section 870.3710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3710...

  9. 21 CFR 870.3710 - Pacemaker repair or replacement material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker repair or replacement material. 870.3710 Section 870.3710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3710...

  10. 21 CFR 870.3710 - Pacemaker repair or replacement material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker repair or replacement material. 870.3710 Section 870.3710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3710...

  11. 21 CFR 870.3710 - Pacemaker repair or replacement material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker repair or replacement material. 870.3710 Section 870.3710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3710...

  12. Differentially Timed Extracellular Signals Synchronize Pacemaker Neuron Clocks

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Ben; Kaplan, Harris S.; Cavey, Matthieu; Lelito, Katherine R.; Bahle, Andrew H.; Zhu, Zhonghua; Macara, Ann Marie; Roman, Gregg; Shafer, Orie T.; Blau, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Synchronized neuronal activity is vital for complex processes like behavior. Circadian pacemaker neurons offer an unusual opportunity to study synchrony as their molecular clocks oscillate in phase over an extended timeframe (24 h). To identify where, when, and how synchronizing signals are perceived, we first studied the minimal clock neural circuit in Drosophila larvae, manipulating either the four master pacemaker neurons (LNvs) or two dorsal clock neurons (DN1s). Unexpectedly, we found that the PDF Receptor (PdfR) is required in both LNvs and DN1s to maintain synchronized LNv clocks. We also found that glutamate is a second synchronizing signal that is released from DN1s and perceived in LNvs via the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluRA). Because simultaneously reducing Pdfr and mGluRA expression in LNvs severely dampened Timeless clock protein oscillations, we conclude that the master pacemaker LNvs require extracellular signals to function normally. These two synchronizing signals are released at opposite times of day and drive cAMP oscillations in LNvs. Finally we found that PdfR and mGluRA also help synchronize Timeless oscillations in adult s-LNvs. We propose that differentially timed signals that drive cAMP oscillations and synchronize pacemaker neurons in circadian neural circuits will be conserved across species. PMID:25268747

  13. Pacemaker lead infection: echocardiographic features, management, and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Victor, F; De Place, C; Camus, C; Le Breton, H; Leclercq, C; Pavin, D; Mabo, P; Daubert, C

    1999-01-01

    Objective—To compare transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography (TTE, TOE) in patients with permanent pacemaker lead infection and to evaluate the safety of medical extraction in cases of large vegetations.
Methods—TTE and TOE were performed in 23 patients with definite pacemaker lead infection. Seventeen patients without previous infection served as a TOE reference for non-infected leads.
Results—TTE was positive in seven cases (30%) whereas with TOE three different types of vegetations attached to the leads were visualised in 21 of the 23 cases (91%). Of the 20 patients with vegetations and lead culture, 17 (85%) had bacteriologically active infection. Left sided valvar endocarditis was diagnosed in two patients. In the control group, strands were visualised by TOE in five patients, and vegetations in none. Medical extraction of vegetations ⩾ 10 mm was performed in 12 patients and was successful in nine (75%) without clinical pulmonary embolism. After 31.2 (19.1) months of follow up (mean (SD)), all patients except one were cured of infection; three died from other causes.
Conclusions—Combined with bacteriological data, vegetations seen on TOE strongly suggest pacemaker lead infection. Normal TTE examinations do not exclude this diagnosis because of its poor sensitivity. Medical extraction of even large vegetations appeared to be safe.

 Keywords: pacemaker lead infection;  transoesophageal echocardiography PMID:10220550

  14. Predicting the risk of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Lerma, Claudia; Glass, Leon

    2016-05-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the result of a change of cardiac activity from normal (typically sinus) rhythm to a rhythm that does not pump adequate blood to the brain. The most common rhythms leading to SCD are ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF). These result from an accelerated ventricular pacemaker or ventricular reentrant waves. Despite significant efforts to develop accurate predictors for the risk of SCD, current methods for risk stratification still need to be improved. In this article we briefly review current approaches to risk stratification. Then we discuss the mathematical basis for dynamical transitions (called bifurcations) that may lead to VT and VF. One mechanism for transition to VT or VF involves a perturbation by a premature ventricular complex (PVC) during sinus rhythm. We describe the main mechanisms of PVCs (reentry, independent pacemakers and abnormal depolarizations). An emerging approach to risk stratification for SCD involves the development of individualized dynamical models of a patient based on measured anatomy and physiology. Careful analysis and modelling of dynamics of ventricular arrhythmia on an individual basis will be essential in order to improve risk stratification for SCD and to lay a foundation for personalized (precision) medicine in cardiology. PMID:26660287

  15. Pacemaker reed switch behavior in 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging units: are reed switches always closed in strong magnetic fields?

    PubMed

    Luechinger, Roger; Duru, Firat; Zeijlemaker, Volkert A; Scheidegger, Markus B; Boesiger, Peter; Candinas, Reto

    2002-10-01

    MRI is established as an important diagnostic tool in medicine. However, the presence of a cardiac pacemaker is usually regarded as a contraindication for MRI due to safety reasons. The aim of this study was to investigate the state of a pacemaker reed switch in different orientations and positions in the main magnetic field of 0.5-, 1.5-, and 3.0-T MRI scanners. Reed switches used in current pacemakers and ICDs were tested in 0.5-, 1.5-, and 3.0-T MRI scanners. The closure of isolated reed switches was evaluated for different orientations and positions relative to the main magnetic field. The field strengths to close and open the reed switch and the orientation dependency of the closed state inside the main magnetic field were investigated. The measurements were repeated using two intact pacemakers to evaluate the potential influence of the other magnetic components, like the battery. If the reed switches were oriented parallel to the magnetic fields, they closed at 1.0 +/- 0.2 mT and opened at 0.7 +/- 0.2 mT. Two different reed switch behaviors were observed at different magnetic field strengths. In low magnetic fields (< 50 mT), the reed switches were closed. However, in high magnetic fields (> 200 mT), the reed switches opened in 50% of all tested orientations. No difference between the three scanners could be demonstrated. The reed switches showed the same behavior whether they were isolated or an integral part of the pacemakers. The reed switch in a pacemaker or an ICD does not necessarily remain closed in strong magnetic fields at 0.5, 1.5, or 3.0 T and the state of the reed switch may not be predictable with certainty in clinical situations. PMID:12418737

  16. [Cardiac resynchronization in a patient with congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries].

    PubMed

    Sousa, Pedro Alexandre; Cavaco, Diogo; Adragão, Pedro; Teixeira, Ana; Ribeiras, Regina; Martins, Maymone; Mendes, Miguel

    2014-06-01

    Congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries is a rare heart defect that can be associated with systemic ventricular dysfunction and conduction disturbances. The use of cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with congenital heart disease is not fully established. The authors report a case of cardiac resynchronization therapy in a 31-year-old woman with a history of congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries and heart failure, who had undergone two heart surgeries and had a DDDR pacemaker implanted. To our knowledge this is the first case reported in Portugal of cardiac resynchronization therapy by transvenous access in a patient with congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries. PMID:24999264

  17. Inter-Association Task Force Recommendations on Emergency Preparedness and Management of Sudden Cardiac Arrest in High School and College Athletic Programs: A Consensus Statement

    PubMed Central

    Drezner, Jonathan A; Courson, Ron W; Roberts, William O; Mosesso, Vincent N; Link, Mark S; Maron, Barry J

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assist high school and college athletic programs prepare for and respond to a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). This consensus statement summarizes our current understanding of SCA in young athletes, defines the necessary elements for emergency preparedness, and establishes uniform treatment protocols for the management of SCA. Background: Sudden cardiac arrest is the leading cause of death in young athletes. The increasing presence of and timely access to automated external defibrillators (AEDs) at sporting events provides a means of early defibrillation and the potential for effective secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death. An Inter-Association Task Force was sponsored by the National Athletic Trainers' Association to develop consensus recommendations on emergency preparedness and management of SCA in athletes. Recommendations: Comprehensive emergency planning is needed for high school and college athletic programs to ensure an efficient and structured response to SCA. Essential elements of an emergency action plan include establishment of an effective communication system, training of anticipated responders in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and AED use, access to an AED for early defibrillation, acquisition of necessary emergency equipment, coordination and integration of on-site responder and AED programs with the local emergency medical services system, and practice and review of the response plan. Prompt recognition of SCA, early activation of the emergency medical services system, the presence of a trained rescuer to initiate cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and access to early defibrillation are critical in the management of SCA. In any collapsed and unresponsive athlete, SCA should be suspected and an AED applied as soon as possible for rhythm analysis and defibrillation if indicated. PMID:17597956

  18. Absent right and persistent left superior vena cava: troubleshooting during a challenging pacemaker implant: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Venous anomalies of the thorax can occur in isolation or in association with complex congenital heart disease. The incidence of an absent right superior vena cava in the setting of a persistent left superior vena cava is very rare in the general population with only a dozen cases documented in the medical literature. Such venous anomalies can make for very challenging electronic cardiac device implantation. We report our challenging dual chamber pacemaker implant in a patient with such complex anatomy and focus on our implantation technique that helped achieve adequate lead positioning. Case presentation A 73-year-old Caucasian female with degenerative complete heart block presented for dual chamber permanent pacemaker implant. Lead implantation was very challenging due to abnormal and rare vena cava anatomy; a persistent left superior vena cava drained directly into the coronary sinus and the right brachiocephalic vein drained directly into the left persistent superior vena cava as the patient had an absent right superior vena cava . Adequate right ventricular lead positioning was achieved following numerous lead-stylet manipulations and careful looping in the atria to redirect its trajectory to the ventricular apex. Conclusion Abnormal superior vena cava development is uncommon and can lead to technical challenges when venous access is required during various interventional procedures. Pre-operative imaging can help identify such challenging anatomy allowing appropriate operative planning; careful patient selection is warranted for venography given the risk of contrast nephrotoxicity. PMID:25047923

  19. CARDIO--a Lotus 1-2-3 based computer program for rapid calculation of cardiac output from dye or thermal dilution curves.

    PubMed

    Brill, R W; Bushnell, P G

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a menu-driven computer program (CARDIO), based on a Lotus 1-2-3 template and a series of macrocommands, that rapidly and semiautomatically calculates cardiac output from dye or thermal dilution curves. CARDIO works with any dye or thermal dilution recorder with an analog output, any analog to digital (A-to-D) conversion system, and any computer capable of running Lotus 1-2-3 version 2. No prior experience with Lotus 1-2-3 is needed to operate CARDIO, but experienced users can take full advantage of Lotus 1-2-3's graphics, data manipulation, and data retrieval capabilities. PMID:2689079

  20. High-intensity cardiac rehabilitation training of a commercial pilot who, after percutaneous coronary intervention, wanted to continue participating in a rigorous strength and conditioning program.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sanjay; Adams, Jenny; Lawrence, Anne; Schussler, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    After undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention, a 64-year-old commercial pilot was referred to cardiac rehabilitation. His stated goals were to continue participating in a rigorous strength and conditioning program at a community workout facility and to resume working as a pilot. To help him meet those goals, we designed and implemented a regimen of high-intensity exercises, with quick transitions between a variety of tasks that are not typically included in cardiac rehabilitation programs (e.g., medicine ball throws, push-ups, dead lifts, squats, military presses, sprints, and lunges). The training was symptom limited, enabling the patient to reach extreme levels of physical exertion in a controlled, monitored setting. By studying his training data (heart rate, blood pressure, and rating of perceived exertion), we were able to give him specific recommendations for controlling his exercise intensity after graduating from our program. More than 18 months later, he continues to exercise vigorously 3 days per week and is working as a commercial pilot. PMID:26722183

  1. High-intensity cardiac rehabilitation training of a commercial pilot who, after percutaneous coronary intervention, wanted to continue participating in a rigorous strength and conditioning program

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Sanjay; Lawrence, Anne; Schussler, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    After undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention, a 64-year-old commercial pilot was referred to cardiac rehabilitation. His stated goals were to continue participating in a rigorous strength and conditioning program at a community workout facility and to resume working as a pilot. To help him meet those goals, we designed and implemented a regimen of high-intensity exercises, with quick transitions between a variety of tasks that are not typically included in cardiac rehabilitation programs (e.g., medicine ball throws, push-ups, dead lifts, squats, military presses, sprints, and lunges). The training was symptom limited, enabling the patient to reach extreme levels of physical exertion in a controlled, monitored setting. By studying his training data (heart rate, blood pressure, and rating of perceived exertion), we were able to give him specific recommendations for controlling his exercise intensity after graduating from our program. More than 18 months later, he continues to exercise vigorously 3 days per week and is working as a commercial pilot. PMID:26722183

  2. Evaluation of a rechargeable pacemaker system.

    PubMed

    Stertzer, S H; DePasquale, N P; Cohn, L J; Bruno, M S

    1978-04-01

    A rechargeable-demand nickel-cadmium pulse generator for permanent transvenous cardiac pacing was evaluated in 66 patients. During a cumulative follow-up period of 2,333 patient months (194.4 patient years), failure of the pacing circuit occurred in 3 patients at 21, 25, and 27 months, respectively. Nine patients had difficulty accepting the recharging concept and, in 3 of these patients, it became necessary to replace the rechargeable generator with a conventional energy source. The overall failure rate of approximately 3% per year (including the 3 patients in whom it was necessary to remove the generator because of failure to recharge properly), coupled with the inconvenience of recharging, limits the usefulness of the rechargeable system compared to the newer lithium-powered generator. PMID:83632

  3. Cardiac metastases

    PubMed Central

    Bussani, R; De‐Giorgio, F; Abbate, A; Silvestri, F

    2007-01-01

    Tumours metastatic to the heart (cardiac metastases) are among the least known and highly debated issues in oncology, and few systematic studies are devoted to this topic. Although primary cardiac tumours are extremely uncommon (various postmortem studies report rates between 0.001% and 0.28%), secondary tumours are not, and at least in theory, the heart can be metastasised by any malignant neoplasm able to spread to distant sites. In general, cardiac metastases are considered to be rare; however, when sought for, the incidence seems to be not as low as expected, ranging from 2.3% and 18.3%. Although no malignant tumours are known that diffuse preferentially to the heart, some do involve the heart more often than others—for example, melanoma and mediastinal primary tumours. This paper attempts to review the pathophysiology of cardiac metastatic disease, epidemiology and clinical presentation of cardiac metastases, and pathological characterisation of the lesions. PMID:17098886

  4. Comparison Between Effects of Home Based Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs Versus Usual Care on the Patients’ Health Related Quality of Life After Coronary Artery Bypass Graft

    PubMed Central

    Salavati, Mohsen; Falahinia, Gholamhossein; Vardanjani, Ali Esmaeili; Rafiei, Hossein; Moosavi, Saeid; Torkamani, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aim: To compare home-based cardiac rehabilitation with usual care on the patients’ Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) after coronary artery bypass graft in patients with coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Methods: In a randomized controlled clinical conducted from March 2013 to June 2013, 110 patients with CABG surgery were randomly assigned into two groups. While patients in group I, were received usual care and patients in group II, in addition to the usual care were received home-based cardiac rehabilitation programs. The 27-item MacNew Heart Disease HRQoL questionnaire was used to evaluate the patient’s HRQoL under and over 2 months after intervention. Results: At the time of 0, mean score of HRQoL was 67.86±7.5 and 64.76±8.4 in patients in group I and group II, respectively (P> 0.05). Although mean score of HRQoL in all patients in both groups increased two month after intervention, but this increase in patients in group II were higher than patients in group I (154.93±4.6 vs 134.20±8.2). This difference were statistically significant (P< 0.05). Conclusion: Quality of Life (QoL) can be considered as a quality indicator of health care systems. Results of present study showed that home-based cardiac rehabilitation program improved patients HRQoL after CABG surgery. PMID:26573042

  5. From syncitium to regulated pump: a cardiac muscle cellular update

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to present a basic overview of some key teaching concepts that should be considered for inclusion in an six- to eight-lecture introductory block on the regulation of cardiac performance for graduate students. Within the context of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, this review incorporates information on Ca2+ microdomains and local control theory, with particular emphasis on the role of Ca2+ sparks as a key regulatory component of ventricular myocyte contraction dynamics. Recent information pertaining to local Ca2+ cycling in sinoatrial nodal cells (SANCs) as a mechanism underlying cardiac automaticity is also presented as part of the recently described coupled-clock pacemaker system. The details of this regulation are emerging; however, the notion that the sequestration and release of Ca2+ from internal stores in SANCs (similar to that observed in ventricular myocytes) regulates the rhythmic excitation of the heart (i.e., membrane ion channels) is an important advancement in this area. The regulatory role of cardiac adrenergic receptors on cardiac rate and function is also included, and fundamental concepts related to intracellular signaling are discussed. An important point of emphasis is that whole organ cardiac dynamics can be traced back to cellular events regulating intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and, as such, provides an important conceptual framework from which students can begin to think about whole organ physiology in health and disease. Greater synchrony of Ca2+-regulatory mechanisms between ventricular and pacemaker cells should enhance student comprehension of complex regulatory phenomenon in cardiac muscle. PMID:21385997

  6. Mechanism of programmed cell death factor 4/nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway in porcine coronary micro-embolization-induced cardiac dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Su, Qiang; Li, Lang; Wang, Jiangyou; Zhou, You; Liu, Yangchun

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the programmed cell death factor 4 (PDCD4)/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway in coronary micro-embolism (CME)-induced inflammatory responses and cardiac dysfunction in a porcine model. Bama miniature pigs were randomly divided into four groups (n = 5 per group). Micro-embolization balls or saline were infused through a microcatheter in the left anterior descending (LAD) artery in the CME and Sham groups, respectively. PDCD4 siRNA or control siRNA mixed with transfection reagent was infused via the LAD artery 72 h before CME induction in the CME + siRNA-PDCD4 and siRNA-control groups, respectively. Cardiac function was evaluated with ultrasound. Tissue biopsy was stained with hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and hematoxylin basic fuchsin picric acid (HBFP) to measure infarction area. Myocardial PDCD4 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) mRNA and protein expression were analyzed by quantitative PCR and Western blotting. NF-κB activity was evaluated in gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Echocardiographic parameters showed that compared with the sham group, the CME group had impaired heart function, manifested as systolic dysfunction and left ventricular dilatation (reduced left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF], left ventricular fractional shortening [FS], and cardiac output [CO] [P < 0.05] and increased left ventricular end-diastolic diameter [LVEDd] [P < 0.05]). Compared with the CME group, the CME + siRNA-PDCD4 group had attenuated CME-induced cardiac function damage (increased LVEF, FS and CO [P < 0.05] and reduced LVEDd [P < 0.05]). Compared with the sham group, the CME group had significantly increased PDCD4 and TNF-α mRNA and protein expression and increased NF-κB activity (P < 0.05). These effects were significantly inhibited in the CME + siRNA-PDCD4 group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, PDCD4/NF-κB signaling pathway activation is an important mechanism for CME-induced cardiac dysfunction, suggesting that inhibition of PDCD4/NF-κB signaling pathway may be a potential target for the prevention and treatment of CME. PMID:25769315

  7. Beyond Bowditch: the convergence of cardiac chronotropy and inotropy.

    PubMed

    Lakatta, Edward G

    2004-06-01

    The ability of the heart to acutely beat faster and stronger is central to the vertebrate survival instinct. Released neurotransmitters, norepinephrine and epinephrine, bind to beta-adrenergic receptors (beta-AR) on pacemaker cells comprising the sinoatrial node, and to beta-AR on ventricular myocytes to modulate cellular mechanisms that govern the frequency and amplitude, respectively, of the duty cycles of these cells. While a role for sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) cycling via SERCA2 and ryanodine receptors (RyR) has long been appreciated with respect to cardiac inotropy, recent evidence also implicates Ca(2+) cycling with respect to chronotropy. In spontaneously beating primary sinoatrial nodal pacemaker cells, RyR Ca(2+) releases occurring during diastolic depolarization activate the Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) to produce an inward current that enhances their diastolic depolarization rate, and thus increases their beating rate. beta-AR stimulation synchronizes RyR activation and Ca(2+) release to effect an increased beating rate in pacemaker cells and contraction amplitude in myocytes: in pacemaker cells, the beta-AR stimulation synchronization of RyR activation occurs during the diastolic depolarization, and augments the NCX inward current; in ventricular myocytes, beta-AR stimulation synchronizes the openings of unitary L-type Ca(2+) channel activation following the action potential, and also synchronizes RyR Ca(2+) releases following depolarization, and in the absence of depolarization, both leading to the generation of a global cytosolic Ca(i) transient of increased amplitude and accelerated kinetics. Thus, beta-AR stimulation induced synchronization of RyR activation (recruitment of additional RyRs to fire) and of the ensuing Ca(2+) release cause the heart to beat both stronger and faster, and is thus, a common mechanism that links both the maximum achievable cardiac inotropy and chronotropy. PMID:15110153

  8. Overdrive suppression of implanted pacemakers in patients with AV block.

    PubMed Central

    Grendahl, H; Miller, M; Kjekshus, J

    1978-01-01

    Patients being permanently paced for symptomatic AV block were studied by overdrive suppression of the QRS-inhibited pacemaker, in order to observe the underlying heart rhythm. The chest wall stimulation method was used. In complete AV block the escape rhythm recovery time proved highly reproducible on repeated testing on the same day, and in many patients remained so over months or years. Occasionally, a doubling of the escape rhythm recovery time was seen, suggesting initial exit block of the escape focus. Resetting of the escape rhythm usually followed an exponential curve until stabilisation after about 3 minutes. An early escape rhythm with a recovery time of less than 4 seconds was found on every occasion in 21 of 58 patients with complete AV block, and inconstantly in 23 more; in 14 it was never observed. Accidental pacing failure was seen in 15 patients. The overdrive suppression test was helpful in selecting pacemaker dependent patients. PMID:637960

  9. Complex regional pain syndrome type I following pacemaker implantation.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Sangita; Rao, Ballamudi Srinivas

    2015-12-01

    A 70-year-old woman presented with burning pain and swelling over dorsum of right hand and small joints of the fingers, associated with redness, feeling of warmth, and stiffness of the fingers, with inability to bend the fingers since 2 months. The symptoms were progressively increasing in intensity for the past 1 month. There was no history of fever or trauma to the hand. Two months before her symptoms started, she had permanent pacemaker implanted for complete heart block with syncope. She was hypertensive and was on regular medication. Her X-ray of right hand showed decreased bone density (demineralisation), suggestive of osteopenia. A diagnosis of reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome or complex regional pain syndrome type I induced by pacemaker insertion was made. She was treated with amitriptyline and steroids, after which her symptoms improved dramatically. PMID:26995412

  10. Transient apical dyskinesia with a pacemaker: Electrocardiographic features.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Gil, Iván J; Feltes, Gisela I; Mejía-Rentería, Hernán D; Biagioni, Corina; De Agustín, J Alberto; Vivas, David; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Transient apical dyskinesia syndromes present features similar to acute coronary syndromes, but with normal coronary arteries and rapid complete resolution of wall motion alterations. We report the case of a 73-year-old woman who was admitted to hospital because of typical chest pain at rest after her brother's death. She had had a pacemaker implanted in 2001. Troponin levels were elevated and apical hypokinesia was shown by ventriculography and echocardiography, with normal coronary arteries. Evolving ECG alterations were observed in spite of the continued pacing rhythm. All these alterations were fully resolved after discharge. This case shows that, even in the presence of a pacemaker, evolving ECG alterations can be observed in Takotsubo syndrome. PMID:25840647

  11. Multiple pulse generator malfunctions with a dual chamber pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Lipchenca, Igor; Barlev, David; Luria, David; Granit, Chava; Rotshtein, Zeev; Eldar, Michael; Glikson, Michael

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the dual chamber uni/bipolarpacemaker Minidual 50, manufactured by Sorin Biomedica. Between 1995 and 1998, 66 Minidual 50 models were implanted at the Heart Institute. During the follow-up period of 33 +/- 12.8 months (range 0-50 months), total function loss in seven (10.6%) units and false threshold measurement of sensing and pacing in three (4.5%) patients were observed. Average time from implantation to malfunction was 37 months (range 28-42). Malfunction was unrelated to battery status and could not be predicted by any measures obtained during the pacemaker follow-up period. Kaplan Meyer survival curve predicted a 70% 4-year malfunction-free survival of that pacemaker model. Given this high rate of total malfunction and the unpredictable nature of its occurrence, the authors recommend the replacement of all remaining Minidual 50 units at risk, at least in dependent patients. PMID:12137346

  12. Intraoperative recordings of monophasic action potentials with chronically implantable pacemaker leads.

    PubMed

    Zrenner, B; Müssig, D; Schreieck, J; Weyerbrock, S; Schneider, M; Schaldach, M; Schömig, A; Schmitt, C

    1998-01-01

    Since the development of fractally coated Iridium electrodes recordings of monophasic action potentials are possible. Intraoperative recordings of MAP from 15 pacemaker implantations were done after positioning the chronically implantable pacemaker leads (Biotronik, Berlin, Germany) in the right ventricle by using five screw-in electrodes and ten anchor electrodes. Intraoperative recordings of MAP are possible with all implanted pacemaker leads. The recordings of typical MAP signals were always accompanied with stable electrode positions and good sensing and pacing characteristics. PMID:9474679

  13. Haemophilus parainfluenzae bacteremia associated with a pacemaker wire localized by gallium scan

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbaum, G.S.; Calubiran, O.; Cunha, B.A. )

    1990-05-01

    A young woman with a history of sick sinus syndrome and placement of a permanent pacemaker 6 months before admission had fever and Haemophilus parainfluenzae bacteremia. A gallium scan localized the infection to the site of the pacemaker wire. Echocardiograms were negative for any vegetations. The patient responded to cefotaxime and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole therapy. We believe that this is the first case of H. parainfluenzae bacteremia associated with a pacemaker wire and localized by gallium scan.

  14. Self-Organized Pacemakers in a Coupled Reaction-Diffusion-Mechanics System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panfilov, A. V.; Keldermann, R. H.; Nash, M. P.

    2005-12-01

    Using a computational model of a coupled reaction-diffusion-mechanics system, we find that mechanical deformation can induce automatic pacemaking activity. Pacemaking is shown to occur after a single electrical or mechanical stimulus in an otherwise nonoscillatory medium. We study the mechanisms underpinning this effect and conditions for its existence. We show that self-organized pacemakers drift throughout the medium to approach attractors with locations that depend on the size of the medium, and on the location of the initial stimulus.

  15. Endovascular extraction techniques for pacemaker and ICD lead extraction

    PubMed Central

    Bracke, F.A.; Meijer, A.; van Gelder, B.

    2001-01-01

    In the last few years, comprehensive endovascular techniques have been developed to extract chronically implanted pacemaker and defibrillator leads. It is important that referring physician have knowledge of the advantages and limitations of the different techniques. In this paper we discuss the techniques and results of the currently used endovascular extraction techniques. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:25696690

  16. Isolating Neural Correlates of the Pacemaker for Food Anticipation

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Ian David; Waddington Lamont, Elaine; Rodrigues, Trevor; Abizaid, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Mice fed a single daily meal at intervals within the circadian range exhibit food anticipatory activity. Previous investigations strongly suggest that this behaviour is regulated by a circadian pacemaker entrained to the timing of fasting/refeeding. The neural correlate(s) of this pacemaker, the food entrainable oscillator (FEO), whether found in a neural network or a single locus, remain unknown. This study used a canonical property of circadian pacemakers, the ability to continue oscillating after removal of the entraining stimulus, to isolate activation within the neural correlates of food entrainable oscillator from all other mechanisms driving food anticipatory activity. It was hypothesized that continued anticipatory activation of central nuclei, after restricted feeding and a return to ad libitum feeding, would elucidate a neural representation of the signaling circuits responsible for the timekeeping component of the food entrainable oscillator. Animals were entrained to a temporally constrained meal then placed back on ad libitum feeding for several days until food anticipatory activity was abolished. Activation of nuclei throughout the brain was quantified using stereological analysis of c-FOS expressing cells and compared against both ad libitum fed and food entrained controls. Several hypothalamic and brainstem nuclei remained activated at the previous time of food anticipation, implicating them in the timekeeping mechanism necessary to track previous meal presentation. This study also provides a proof of concept for an experimental paradigm useful to further investigate the anatomical and molecular substrates of the FEO. PMID:22558352

  17. Physiological effects of light on the human circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanahan, T. L.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    The physiology of the human circadian pacemaker and its influence and on the daily organization of sleep, endocrine and behavioral processes is an emerging interest in science and medicine. Understanding the development, organization and fundamental properties underlying the circadian timing system may provide insight for the application of circadian principles to the practice of clinical medicine, both diagnostically (interpretation of certain clinical tests are dependent on time of day) and therapeutically (certain pharmacological responses vary with the time of day). The light-dark cycle is the most powerful external influence acting upon the human circadian pacemaker. It has been shown that timed exposure to light can both synchronize and reset the phase of the circadian pacemaker in a predictable manner. The emergence of detectable circadian rhythmicity in the neonatal period is under investigation (as described elsewhere in this issue). Therefore, the pattern of light exposure provided in the neonatal intensive care setting has implications. One recent study identified differences in both amount of sleep time and weight gain in infants maintained in a neonatal intensive care environment that controlled the light-dark cycle. Unfortunately, neither circadian phase nor the time of day has been considered in most clinical investigations. Further studies with knowledge of principles characterizing the human circadian timing system, which governs a wide array of physiological processes, are required to integrate these findings with the practice of clinical medicine.

  18. Powering pacemakers from heartbeat vibrations using linear and nonlinear energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin Karami, M.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear piezoelectric devices are introduced to continuously recharge the batteries of the pacemakers by converting the vibrations from the heartbeats to electrical energy. The power requirement of a pacemaker is very low. However, after few years, patients require another surgical operation just to replace their pacemaker battery. Linear low frequency and nonlinear mono-stable and bi-stable energy harvesters are designed according to the especial signature of heart vibrations. The proposed energy harvesters are robust to variation of heart rate and can meet the power requirement of pacemakers.

  19. Self-organized pacemakers and bistability of pulses in an excitable medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stich, Michael; Mikhailov, Alexander S.; Kuramoto, Yoshiki

    2009-02-01

    Pattern formation in an excitable medium described by a three-component reaction-diffusion system is investigated. Our focus is on stable self-organized pacemakers which give rise to spatially extended target patterns. Bistability of pulse solutions in the excitable regime is also reported, and interactions of the different pulses with each other and the pacemaker are studied. Self-organized pacemakers are created by a suitable perturbation from the steady state or through interaction of pulses. Bound states of one-dimensional pacemakers and phase flips are also observed.

  20. Long-term management of atrial myopathy in two dogs with single chamber permanent transvenous pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, K E; Lefbom, B K

    2016-06-01

    Two young Labrador retriever dogs with bradycardia-induced syncope resulting from atrial myopathy underwent permanent transvenous pacemaker implantation. Both dogs developed heart failure 3-5 years after pacemaker implantation. Both were managed medically for approximately 7 years after pacemaker implantation and, ultimately, were humanely euthanized due to refractory heart failure signs and quality of life concerns. Long-term management of dogs with atrial myopathy and secondary atrial standstill with pacemaker implantation and medical therapy for heart failure is feasible and prognosis may be better than previously reported or speculated. PMID:26923757

  1. Cardiac Sarcoidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... do at National Jewish Health? We provide comprehensive cardiology evaluation and consultation and non-invasive cardiac testing. ... the whole person, not just the disease. Our cardiology team works with healthcare providers from all areas ...

  2. Cardiac CT

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of CT scan is called a coronary CT angiography (an-je-OG-rah-fee), or CTA. Overview ... called atrial fibrillation (AF). The pictures that cardiac CT creates of the pulmonary veins can help guide procedures used to treat ...

  3. Cardiac Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... done during a cardiac catheterization include: closing small holes inside the heart repairing leaky or narrow heart ... bandage. It's normal for the site to be black and blue, red, or slightly swollen for a ...

  4. Cardiac MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a safe, noninvasive test that creates detailed ... and no instruments are inserted into your body. MRI uses radio waves, magnets, and a computer to ...

  5. Radiotherapy in patients with pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Zaremba, Tomas; Jakobsen, Annette Ross; Søgaard, Mette; Thøgersen, Anna Margrethe; Riahi, Sam

    2016-04-01

    An increasing number of patients with implantable cardiac rhythm devices undergo radiotherapy (RT) for cancer and are thereby exposed to the risk of device failure. Current safety recommendations seem to have limitations by not accounting for the risk of pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators malfunctioning at low radiation doses. Besides scant knowledge about optimal safety measures, only little is known about the exact prevalence of patients with devices undergoing RT. In this review, we provide a short overview of the principles of RT and present the current evidence on the predictors and mechanisms of device malfunctions during RT. We also summarize practical recommendations from recent publications and from the industry. Strongly associated with beam energy of photon RT, device malfunctions occur at ∼3% of RT courses, posing a substantial issue in clinical practice. Malfunctions described in the literature typically consist of transient software disturbances and only seldom manifest as a permanent damage of the device. Through close cooperation between cardiologists and oncologists, a tailored individualized approach might be necessary in this patient group in waiting time for updated international guidelines in the field. PMID:26041870

  6. Using regular expressions to extract information on pacemaker implantation procedures from clinical reports

    PubMed Central

    Rosier, Arnaud; Burgun, Anita; Mabo, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Objective : This study evaluated natural language processing methods to extract clinical data from free text in surgical reports related to cardiac pacing and defibrillation in order to populate a registry. Methods : The information extraction system that we have developed is a name entity recognition system based on GATE using regular expressions. 232 reports were analyzed. For each report, we performed manual abstraction, we collected the information stored in the registry, and we performed information extraction with our system. Sensitivity, positive predictive value and accuracy were used to evaluate our method. Results : Our system extracted information, including numeric data, text and combination of numbers and strings, with a high sensitivity (>90%) and very high predictive positive value (>95%). It featured a precision that was higher than the precision of the original registry database populated by manual input. Conclusion This tool based on GATE open source components provides a robust approach to extracting information from documents related to a specific narrow domain such as pacemaker reports. Further evaluation is needed for application to broader domains. PMID:18998970

  7. Cardiac cephalgia.

    PubMed

    Torres-Yaghi, Yasar; Salerian, Justin; Dougherty, Carrie

    2015-04-01

    "Cardiac cephalgia" is a type of secondary headache disorder, usually initiated by exertion that is related to myocardial ischemia. Primary exertional headaches such as sex-, cough-, or exercise-induced headaches are typically benign. Cardiac cephalgia, on the other hand, can have life-threatening complications. Due to overlapping features and similarities in presentation, cardiac cephalgia can be misdiagnosed as a primary headache disorder such as migraine. However, the management of these conditions is unique, and treatment of cardiac cephalgia with vasoconstrictors intended for migraine can potentially worsen myocardial ischemia. Thus, it is important to make the correct diagnosis by evaluating cardiac function with an electrocardiogram and/or stress testing. In this review, we examine reported cases of cardiac cephalgia from the past 5 years to highlight the importance of this condition in the differential diagnosis of a headache in a patient with a history of cardiovascular risk factors, as well as to discuss the appropriate approach to diagnosis and the proposed pathogenic mechanisms of this condition. PMID:25819974

  8. High thresholds may alter end-of-life behavior in a dual chamber pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Kraus, M; Buckingham, T A; Candinas, R

    1997-06-01

    We noted a series of 12 consecutive patients with a DDD Genisis pacemaker that showed an unexpected and a relatively rapid fall in battery voltage and output as these devices approached end-of-life (EOL). Twenty-one of 24 leads were Vitatron Helifix leads and there was a relatively high mean threshold (atrial 2.5 +/- 0.94 V; ventricular 2.9 +/- 0.65 V). These devices were replaced after 65 +/- 12 months. During the 9.3 +/- 3.5 months before replacement, a striking fall in voltage from 2.7 +/- 0.04 V to 2.49 +/- 0.05 V was seen. Battery impedance rose from 3 +/- 1.2 K omega to 10.2 +/- 4.3 K omega during this same period. We unexpectedly observed a marked difference between programmed and telemetered output for both atrial (50%) and ventricular leads (30%). A discrepancy between measured and telemetered magnet rate was also seen. Despite this relatively rapid fall in battery voltage, several of these devices did not meet the manufacturer's recommended replacement time (RRT) criteria by magnet rate or according to the projected RRT determined by the relationship of battery impedance to current drain. These data have implications for the selection of RRT and EOL criteria for this device. Magnet rate measured by surface ECG was the safest indicator for RRT. Follow-up for this pulse generator should be increased to every 2 months when battery impedance is > 2 KOhms or if there is a difference between programmed and measured output amplitude of more than 15%. The data also highlight the effect of combining high threshold leads with modern pacemakers with relatively "small" batteries as well as certain problems with telemetered data. PMID:9227769

  9. Connectivity of pacemaker neurons in the neonatal rat superficial dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Kritzer, Elizabeth; Ford, Neil C; Arbabi, Shahriar; Baccei, Mark L

    2015-05-01

    Pacemaker neurons with an intrinsic ability to generate rhythmic burst-firing have been characterized in lamina I of the neonatal spinal cord, where they are innervated by high-threshold sensory afferents. However, little is known about the output of these pacemakers, as the neuronal populations that are targeted by pacemaker axons have yet to be identified. The present study combines patch-clamp recordings in the intact neonatal rat spinal cord with tract-tracing to demonstrate that lamina I pacemaker neurons contact multiple spinal motor pathways during early life. Retrograde labeling of premotor interneurons with the trans-synaptic pseudorabies virus PRV-152 revealed the presence of burst-firing in PRV-infected lamina I neurons, thereby confirming that pacemakers are synaptically coupled to motor networks in the spinal ventral horn. Notably, two classes of pacemakers could be distinguished in lamina I based on cell size and the pattern of their axonal projections. Whereas small pacemaker neurons possessed ramified axons that contacted ipsilateral motor circuits, large pacemaker neurons had unbranched axons that crossed the midline and ascended rostrally in the contralateral white matter. Recordings from identified spino-parabrachial and spino-periaqueductal gray neurons indicated the presence of pacemaker activity within neonatal lamina I projection neurons. Overall, these results show that lamina I pacemakers are positioned to regulate both the level of activity in developing motor circuits and the ascending flow of nociceptive information to the brain, thus highlighting a potential role for pacemaker activity in the maturation of pain and sensorimotor networks in the central nervous system. PMID:25380417

  10. Pacemaker Primary Curriculum; Lesson Book Level C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Dorothea M.; Ross, Sheila A.

    This lesson book, which is the third in a four-level program for young children with learning difficulties, describes the purpose of and equipment and procedures for teaching lessons in the following subject areas on the primary grade level: arithmetic, reading, vocabulary, spelling, printing, listening, planning, problem solving, social behavior,…

  11. Pacemaker Primary Curriculum; Lesson Book Level B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Dorothea M.; Ross, Sheila A.

    This lesson book, which is the second in a four-level program for young children with learning difficulties, describes the purpose of and equipment and procedures for teaching lessons in the following subjects areas on the primary grade level: arithmetic, reading, vocabulary, listening, planning, problem solving, social behavior, art, music, and…

  12. Pacemaker Primary Curriculum; Lesson Book Level D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Dorothea M.; Ross, Sheila A.

    This lesson book, which is the last in a four-level program for young children with learning difficulties, describes the purpose of and equipment and procedures for teaching lessons in the following subject areas on the primary level: arithmetic, reading, vocabulary, spelling, printing, listening, planning and problem solving, social behavior,…

  13. Pacemaker Primary Curriculum; Lesson Book Level A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Dorothea M.; Ross, Sheila A.

    This lesson book, which is the first in a four-level program for young children with learning difficulties, describes the purpose of and equipment and procedures for teaching lessons in the following subject areas on the kindergarten level: arithmetic concepts, number concepts, reading readiness, vocabulary, language, listening, social behavior,…

  14. Pacemaker Primary Curriculum; Lesson Book Level D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Dorothea M.; Ross, Sheila A.

    This lesson book, which is the last in a four-level program for young children with learning difficulties, describes the purpose of and equipment and procedures for teaching lessons in the following subject areas on the primary level: arithmetic, reading, vocabulary, spelling, printing, listening, planning and problem solving, social behavior,

  15. Pacemaker Primary Curriculum; Lesson Book Level A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Dorothea M.; Ross, Sheila A.

    This lesson book, which is the first in a four-level program for young children with learning difficulties, describes the purpose of and equipment and procedures for teaching lessons in the following subject areas on the kindergarten level: arithmetic concepts, number concepts, reading readiness, vocabulary, language, listening, social behavior,

  16. Pacemaker Primary Curriculum; Lesson Book Level C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Dorothea M.; Ross, Sheila A.

    This lesson book, which is the third in a four-level program for young children with learning difficulties, describes the purpose of and equipment and procedures for teaching lessons in the following subject areas on the primary grade level: arithmetic, reading, vocabulary, spelling, printing, listening, planning, problem solving, social behavior,

  17. Pacemaker Primary Curriculum; Lesson Book Level B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Dorothea M.; Ross, Sheila A.

    This lesson book, which is the second in a four-level program for young children with learning difficulties, describes the purpose of and equipment and procedures for teaching lessons in the following subjects areas on the primary grade level: arithmetic, reading, vocabulary, listening, planning, problem solving, social behavior, art, music, and

  18. The Different Effects of BMI and WC on Organ Damage in Patients from a Cardiac Rehabilitation Program after Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lin; Zhao, Hui; Qiu, Jian; Zhu, Wei; Lei, Hongqiang; Cai, Zekun; Lin, Wan-Hua; Huang, Wenhua; Zhang, Heye; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    One of the purposes of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is to monitor and control weight of the patient. Our study is to compare the different obesity indexes, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference (WC), through one well-designed CR program (CRP) with ACS in Guangzhou city of Guangdong Province, China, in order to identify different effects of BMI and WC on organ damage. In our work, sixty-one patients between October 2013 and January 2014 fulfilled our study. We collected the vital signs by medical records, the clinical variables of body-metabolic status by fasting blood test, and the organ damage variables by submaximal exercise treadmill test (ETT) and ultrasonic cardiogram (UCG) both on our inpatient and four-to-five weeks of outpatient part of CRP after ACS. We mainly used two-tailed Pearson's test and liner regression to evaluate the relationship of BMI/WC and organ damage. Our results confirmed that WC could be more accurate than BMI to evaluate the cardiac function through the changes of left ventricular structure on the CRP after ACS cases. It makes sense of early diagnosis, valid evaluation, and proper adjustment to ACS in CRP of the obesity individuals in the future. PMID:26247035

  19. Cardiac conduction system

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... node, bundle of His, bundle branches, and Purkinje fibers. The SA node (anatomical pacemaker) starts the sequence ... down the bundle branches, and through the Purkinje fibers, causing the ventricles to contract. This signal creates ...

  20. Injury to the coronary arteries and related structures by implantation of cardiac implantable electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Pang, Benjamin J; Barold, S Serge; Mond, Harry G

    2015-04-01

    Damage to the coronary arteries and related structures from pacemaker and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead implantation is a rarely reported complication that can lead to myocardial infarction and pericardial tamponade that may occur acutely or even years later. We summarize the reported cases of injury to coronary arteries and related structures and review the causes of troponin elevation in the setting of cardiac implantable electronic device implantation. PMID:25564549

  1. Evaluation of the Genetic Basis of Familial Aggregation of Pacemaker Implantation by a Large Next Generation Sequencing Panel

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Hillel A.; Uradu, Andrea; Lynnes, Ty C.; Groh, William J.; Miller, John M.; Lin, Hai; Gao, Hongyu; Wang, Zhiping; Liu, Yunlong; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Vatta, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Background The etiology of conduction disturbances necessitating permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation is often unknown, although familial aggregation of PPM (faPPM) suggests a possible genetic basis. We developed a pan-cardiovascular next generation sequencing (NGS) panel to genetically characterize a selected cohort of faPPM. Materials and Methods We designed and validated a custom NGS panel targeting the coding and splicing regions of 246 genes with involvement in cardiac pathogenicity. We enrolled 112 PPM patients and selected nine (8%) with faPPM to be analyzed by NGS. Results Our NGS panel covers 95% of the intended target with an average of 229x read depth at a minimum of 15-fold depth, reaching a SNP true positive rate of 98%. The faPPM patients presented with isolated cardiac conduction disease (ICCD) or sick sinus syndrome (SSS) without overt structural heart disease or identifiable secondary etiology. Three patients (33.3%) had heterozygous deleterious variants previously reported in autosomal dominant cardiac diseases including CCD: LDB3 (p.D117N) and TRPM4 (p.G844D) variants in patient 4; TRPM4 (p.G844D) and ABCC9 (p.V734I) variants in patient 6; and SCN5A (p.T220I) and APOB (p.R3527Q) variants in patient 7. Conclusion FaPPM occurred in 8% of our PPM clinic population. The employment of massive parallel sequencing for a large selected panel of cardiovascular genes identified a high percentage (33.3%) of the faPPM patients with deleterious variants previously reported in autosomal dominant cardiac diseases, suggesting that genetic variants may play a role in faPPM. PMID:26636822

  2. Cardiac or Other Implantable Electronic Devices and Sleep-disordered Breathing – Implications for Diagnosis and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bitter, Thomas; Gutleben, Klaus-Jürgen; Horstkotte, Dieter; Oldenburg, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is of growing interest in cardiology because SDB is a highly prevalent comorbidity in patients with a variety of cardiovascular diseases. The prevalence of SDB is particularly high in patients with cardiac dysrhythmias and/or heart failure. In this setting, many patients now have implantable cardiac devices, such as pacemakers, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators or implanted cardiac resynchronisation therapy devices (CRT). Treatment of SDB using implantable cardiac devices has been studied previously, with atrial pacing and CRT being shown not to bring about satisfactory results in SDB care. The latest generations of these devices have the capacity to determine transthoracic impedance, to detect and quantify breathing efforts and to identify SDB. The capability of implantable cardiac devices to detect SDB is of potential importance for patients with cardiovascular disease, allowing screening for SDB, monitoring of the course of SDB in relation to cardiac status, and documenting of the effects of treatment. PMID:26835077

  3. Late-presenting complete heart block after pediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Bana Agha; Mesned, Abdu Rahman; Mohamad, Tagelden; Kabbani, Mohamad S

    2016-01-01

    Late presenting complete heart block after pediatric cardiac surgery is a rare complication and its management is well defined once the initial diagnosis in made timely and appropriately. In this report we described a child who underwent atrioventricular septal defect repair with a normal sinus rhythm during the postoperative period, as well as during the first 2 years of follow up. She subsequently developed complete heart block with bradycardia that required insertion of a pacemaker. Here we discuss this unusual late-presenting complication, possible risk factors, and management. PMID:26778907

  4. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Smedema, J.P.; Zondervan, P.E.; van Hagen, P.; ten Cate, F.J.; Bresser, P.; Doubell, A.F.; Pattynama, P.; Hoogsteden, H.C.; Balk, A.H.M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system granulomatous disorder of unknown aetiology. Symptomatic cardiac involvement occurs in approximately 5% of patients. The prevalence of sarcoidosis in the Netherlands is unknown, but estimated to be approximately 20 per 100,000 population (3200 patients). We report on five patients who presented with different manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis, and give a brief review on the current management of this condition. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be of great help in diagnosing this condition as well as in the follow-up of the response to therapy. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:25696121

  5. Synchronous Drosophila circadian pacemakers display nonsynchronous Ca²⁺ rhythms in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xitong; Holy, Timothy E; Taghert, Paul H

    2016-02-26

    In Drosophila, molecular clocks control circadian rhythmic behavior through a network of ~150 pacemaker neurons. To explain how the network's neuronal properties encode time, we performed brainwide calcium imaging of groups of pacemaker neurons in vivo for 24 hours. Pacemakers exhibited daily rhythmic changes in intracellular Ca(2+) that were entrained by environmental cues and timed by molecular clocks. However, these rhythms were not synchronous, as each group exhibited its own phase of activation. Ca(2+) rhythms displayed by pacemaker groups that were associated with the morning or evening locomotor activities occurred ~4 hours before their respective behaviors. Loss of the receptor for the neuropeptide PDF promoted synchrony of Ca(2+) waves. Thus, neuropeptide modulation is required to sequentially time outputs from a network of synchronous molecular pacemakers. PMID:26917772

  6. Multiple photoreceptor systems control the swim pacemaker activity in box jellyfish.

    PubMed

    Garm, A; Mori, S

    2009-12-01

    Like all other cnidarian medusae, box jellyfish propel themselves through the water by contracting their bell-shaped body in discrete swim pulses. These pulses are controlled by a swim pacemaker system situated in their sensory structures, the rhopalia. Each medusa has four rhopalia each with a similar set of six eyes of four morphologically different types. We have examined how each of the four eye types influences the swim pacemaker. Multiple photoreceptor systems, three of the four eye types, plus the rhopalial neuropil, affect the swim pacemaker. The lower lens eye inhibits the pacemaker when stimulated and provokes a strong increase in the pacemaker frequency upon light-off. The upper lens eye, the pit eyes and the rhopalial neuropil all have close to the opposite effect. When these responses are compared with all-eye stimulations it is seen that some advanced integration must take place. PMID:19946073

  7. Linear and nonlinear energy harvesters for powering pacemakers from heart beat vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, M. Amin; Inman, Daniel J.

    2011-03-01

    Linear and nonlinear piezoelectric devices are introduced to continuously recharge the batteries of the pacemakers by converting the vibrations from the heartbeats to electrical energy. The power requirement of the pacemakers is very low. At the same time, after about 10 years from the original implantation of the pacemakers, patients have to go through another surgical operation just to replace the batteries of their pacemakers. We investigate using vibration energy harvesters to significantly increase the battery life of the pace makers. The major source of vibrations in chest area is due to heartbeats. Linear low frequency and nonlinear mono-stable and bi-stable energy harvesters are designed according to especial signature of heart vibrations. The proposed energy harvesters are robust to variations of heart beat frequency and can meet the power requirement of the pacemakers.

  8. Endoscopic Electrosurgery in Patients with Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Baeg, Myong Ki; Kim, Sang-Woo; Ko, Sun-Hye; Lee, Yoon Bum; Hwang, Seawon; Lee, Bong-Woo; Choi, Hye Jin; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In-Seok; Oh, Yong-Seog; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) undergoing endoscopic electrosurgery (EE) are at a risk of electromagnetic interference (EMI). We aimed to analyze the effects of EE in CIED patients. Methods: Patients with CIED who underwent EE procedures such as snare polypectomy, endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) were retrospectively analyzed. Postprocedural symptoms as well as demographic and outpatient follow-up data were reviewed through medical records. Electrical data, including preprocedural and postprocedural arrhythmia records, were reviewed through pacemaker interrogation, 24-hour Holter monitoring, or electrocardiogram. Results: Fifty-nine procedures in 49 patients were analyzed. Fifty procedures were performed in 43 patients with a pacemaker, and nine were performed in six patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. There were one gastric and 44 colon snare polypectomies, five gastric and one colon ESDs, and eight ERCPs with EST. Fifty-five cases of electrical follow-up were noted, with two postprocedural changes not caused by EE. Thirty-one pacemaker interrogations had procedure recordings, with two cases of asymptomatic tachycardia. All patients were asymptomatic with no adverse events. Conclusions: Our study reports no adverse events from EE in patients with CIED, suggesting that this procedure is safe. However, because of the possibility of EMI, recommendations on EE should be followed. PMID:26867552

  9. E AND M CIRCADIAN PACEMAKER NEURONS USE DIFFERENT PDF RECEPTOR SIGNALOSOME COMPONENTS IN DROSOPHILA

    PubMed Central

    Duvall, Laura B.

    2014-01-01

    We used real-time imaging to detect cAMP levels in neurons of intact fly brains to study mechanisms of circadian pacemaker synchronization by the neuropeptide PDF in Drosophila. PDF receptor (PDF-R) is expressed by both M (sLNv) and E (LNd) pacemaker sub-classes and is coupled to Gsα in both cases. We previously reported that PDF-R in M pacemakers elevates cAMP levels by activating the ortholog of mammalian Adenylate Cyclase 3 (AC3), but that AC3 disruptions had no effect on E pacemaker sensitivity to PDF. Here we show that PDF-R in E pacemakers activates a different AC isoform, AC78C, an ortholog of mammalian AC8. Knockdown of AC78C by transgenic RNAi substantially reduces, but does not completely abrogate, PDF responses in these E pacemakers. The knockdown effect is intact when restricted to mature stages, suggesting a physiological and not a development role for AC78C in E pacemakers. The AC78C phenotype is rescued by over-expression of AC78C, but not by over-expression of the rutabaga AC. AC78C over-expression does not disrupt PDF responses in these E pacemakers, and neither AC78C knockdown nor its over-expression disrupted locomotor rhythms. Finally, knockdown of two AKAPs, nervy and AKAP 200 partially reduces LNd PDF responses. These findings begin to identify the components of E pacemaker PDF-R signalosomes and indicate they are distinct from PDF-R signalosomes in M pacemakers: we propose they contain AC78C and at least one other AC. PMID:23929551

  10. Information technology implementing globalization on strategies for quality care provided to children submitted to cardiac surgery: International Quality Improvement Collaborative Program - IQIC

    PubMed Central

    Sciarra, Adilia Maria Pires; Croti, Ulisses Alexandre; Batigalia, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Congenital heart diseases are the world's most common major birth defect, affecting one in every 120 children. Ninety percent of these children are born in areas where appropriate medical care is inadequate or unavailable. Objective To share knowledge and experience between an international center of excellence in pediatric cardiac surgery and a related program in Brazil. Methods The strategy used by the program was based on long-term technological and educational support models used in that center, contributing to the creation and implementation of new programs. The Telemedicine platform was used for real-time monthly broadcast of themes. A chat software was used for interaction between participating members and the group from the center of excellence. Results Professionals specialized in care provided to the mentioned population had the opportunity to share to the knowledge conveyed. Conclusion It was possible to observe that the technological resources that implement the globalization of human knowledge were effective in the dissemination and improvement of the team regarding the care provided to children with congenital heart diseases. PMID:24896168

  11. [Cardiac amyloidosis].

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Caroline; Angermann, Christiane E; Knop, Stefan; Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan

    2008-03-15

    Amyloidoses are a heterogeneous group of multisystem disorders, which are characterized by an extracellular deposition of amyloid fibrils. Typically affected are the heart, liver, kidneys, and nervous system. More than half of the patients die due to cardiac involvement. Clinical signs of cardiac amyloidosis are edema of the lower limbs, hepatomegaly, ascites and elevated jugular vein pressure, frequently in combination with dyspnea. There can also be chest pain, probably due to microvessel disease. Dysfunction of the autonomous nervous system or arrhythmias may cause low blood pressure, dizziness, or recurrent syncope. The AL amyloidosis caused by the deposition of immunoglobulin light chains is the most common form. It can be performed by monoclonal gammopathy. The desirable treatment therapy consists of high-dose melphalan therapy twice followed by autologous stem cell transplantation. Due to the high peritransplantation mortality, selection of appropriate patients is mandatory. The ATTR amyloidosis is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by the amyloidogenic form of transthyretin, a plasmaprotein that is synthesized in the liver. Therefore, liver transplantation is the only curative therapy. The symptomatic treatment of cardiac amyloidosis is based on the current guidelines for chronic heart failure according to the patient's New York Heart Association (NYHA) state. Further types of amyloidosis with possible cardiac involvement comprise the senile systemic amyloidosis caused by the wild-type transthyretin, secondary amyloidosis after chronic systemic inflammation, and the beta(2)-microglobulin amyloidosis after long-term dialysis treatment. PMID:18344065

  12. Theoretical model for solid-state lithium-halide cells for cardiac pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, A.M.; Luksha, E.

    1980-01-01

    A theoretical model for electrochemical cells formed with lithium anodes and halogen/charge-transfer-complex (CTC) cathodes is proposed. The electrolyte, the corresponding lithium halide, is initially formed in situ, and is added as a product of the electrochemical reaction. Current limitation due to lithium self-diffusion in the anode is considered. Calculations for the internal resistance of these cells are given for bromine-CTC cathodes assuming a crystalline solid-layer LiBr electrolyte. Calculations for self-discharge due to atomic bromine diffusion through the electrolyte to the anode are also presented. The actual state of the LiBr electrolyte is explained with recent scanning electron micrographs. Predictions of the theoretical model are compared to discharge data and to recent microcalorimetric self-discharge measurements. 15 refs.

  13. The new criterion for cardiac resynchronization therapy treatment assessed by two channels impedance cardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peczalski, K.; Palko, T.; Wojciechowski, D.; Dunajski, Z.; Kowalewski, M.

    2013-04-01

    The cardiac resynchronization therapy is an effective treatment for systolic failure patients. Independent electrical stimulation of left and right ventricle corrects mechanical ventricular dyssynchrony. About 30-40% treated patients do not respond to therapy. In order to improve clinical outcome authors propose the two channels impedance cardiography for assessment of ventricular dyssynchrony. The proposed method is intended for validation of patients diagnosis and optimization of pacemaker settings for cardiac resynchronization therapy. The preliminary study has showed that bichannel impedance cardiography is a promising tool for assessment of ventricular dyssynchrony.

  14. Stress Management Training May Help Cardiac Rehab Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157876.html Stress Management Training May Help Cardiac Rehab Patients When ... March 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of stress management training can make cardiac rehabilitation programs more ...

  15. Effects of tertiapin-Q and ZD7288 on changes in sinoatrial pacemaker rhythm during vagal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Han, Su Young; Bolter, Chris P

    2015-12-01

    Heart rate slowing produced by cardiac parasympathetic (vagal) stimulation is thought to be the result of modulation of the acetylcholine-activated K(+) current (IK,ACh) and the pacemaker current (If) in sinoatrial (SAN) pacemaker cells. However, the contribution of these and other ion currents to vagal slowing is controversial. Here, we examined the contributions of IK,ACh and If to vagal slowing in 15 isolated, vagal-innervated preparations of guinea-pig atria, using 300 nM tertiapin-Q (TQ) and 2 ?M ZD7288 to obtain full and substantial block of these currents, respectively. Blocking IK,ACh alone reduced atrial rate responses to 10-s trains of regular vagal stimulation (supramaximal stimulation, 2-ms duration, 1-10 Hz) by ~50% (P<0.01; N=11); blocking If alone had no effect (N=7). Blocking both IK,ACh and If produced ~90% reduction (P<0.01; N=4). Atrial cycle length response to a single burst of vagal stimuli (3 stimuli at 50 Hz), delivered at the optimum phase of the cycle was strongly suppressed by blocking IK,ACh (reduced by 98%; P<0.01; N=9), and modestly reduced by blocking If alone (by ~43%; P=0.20; N=6). The response was abolished by combined block of IK,ACh and If (P=0.04; N=4). Our data show that modulation of IK,ACh and If is sufficient to account for all the vagal slowing observed in this preparation. The vagally-induced negative shift in activation potential for If will be opposed by hyperpolarisation of SAN through activation of IK,ACh. Thus removal of IK,ACh by TQ may have exaggerated the overall contribution of If to vagal slowing. PMID:26549880

  16. Glocal Clinical Registries: Pacemaker Registry Design and Implementation for Global and Local Integration Methodology and Case Study

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Ktia Regina; Costa, Roberto; Crevelari, Elizabeth Sartori; Lacerda, Marianna Sobral; de Moraes Albertini, Caio Marcos; Filho, Martino Martinelli; Santana, Jos Eduardo; Vissoci, Joo Ricardo Nickenig; Pietrobon, Ricardo; Barros, Jacson V.

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to apply standard and interoperable solutions for implementing and managing medical registries as well as aggregate, reproduce, and access data sets from legacy formats and platforms to advanced standard formats and operating systems are crucial for both clinical healthcare and biomedical research settings. Purpose Our study describes a reproducible, highly scalable, standard framework for a device registry implementation addressing both local data quality components and global linking problems. Methods and Results We developed a device registry framework involving the following steps: (1) Data standards definition and representation of the research workflow, (2) Development of electronic case report forms using REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture), (3) Data collection according to the clinical research workflow and, (4) Data augmentation by enriching the registry database with local electronic health records, governmental database and linked open data collections, (5) Data quality control and (6) Data dissemination through the registry Web site. Our registry adopted all applicable standardized data elements proposed by American College Cardiology / American Heart Association Clinical Data Standards, as well as variables derived from cardiac devices randomized trials and Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium. Local interoperability was performed between REDCap and data derived from Electronic Health Record system. The original data set was also augmented by incorporating the reimbursed values paid by the Brazilian government during a hospitalization for pacemaker implantation. By linking our registry to the open data collection repository Linked Clinical Trials (LinkedCT) we found 130 clinical trials which are potentially correlated with our pacemaker registry. Conclusion This study demonstrates how standard and reproducible solutions can be applied in the implementation of medical registries to constitute a re-usable framework. Such approach has the potential to facilitate data integration between healthcare and research settings, also being a useful framework to be used in other biomedical registries. PMID:23936257

  17. DsRNA as a stimulator of cell pacemaker activity

    SciTech Connect

    Airapetyan, S.N.; Zakharyan, R.A.; Rychkov, G.E.; Dadalyan, S.S.; Bakunts, I.S.; Agabalyan, A.S.

    1986-03-01

    The authors study the action of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNA) on the characteristics of neuron pacemaker activity which permits prediction of the character of action of dsRNA on the pacemaker activity of cells and organs, and takes the investigators closer to an understanding of the membrane mechanisms underlying the action of dsRNA on the cell. The methods for isolating and fractionating dsRNA from yeasts and the intracellular recording of the electrical activity of the snail giant neuron have been described by the authors earlier. The authors determined the dependence of Ca/sup 2 +/ entry upon dsRNA concentration using the isotope /sup 45/Ca. Preweighed ganglia were incubated five each for an hour in 2 ml Ringer's solution containing dsRNA and 5 microliters /sup 45/CaCl/sub 2/ of 12.5 mCi activity. After incubation, the ganglia were rinsed three times for 8 min each time in normal Ringers solution. The washed ganglia were dissolved for one day in KOH. The amount of isotope entering was counted using Brav's scintillator and an RGT counter tuned to the /sup 45/Ca isotope. The physiological saline used for the isolated ganglion contained 85 mmole NaCl, 4 mmole KCl, 8 mmole CaCl/sub 2/, 10 mmole MgCl/sub 2/, 10 mmole Tris-HCl, and 5 mmole glucose.

  18. Pacemaker dynamics in the full Morris-Lecar model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Miranda, J. M.

    2014-09-01

    This article reports the finding of pacemaker dynamics in certain region of the parameter space of the three-dimensional version of the Morris-Lecar model for the voltage oscillations of a muscle cell. This means that the cell membrane potential displays sustained oscillations in the absence of an external electrical stimulation. The development of this dynamic behavior is shown to be tied to the strength of the leak current contained in the model. The approach followed is mostly based on the use of linear stability analysis and numerical continuation techniques. In this way it is shown that the oscillatory dynamics is associated to the existence of two Hopf bifurcations, one subcritical and other supercritical. Moreover, it is explained that in the region of parameter values most commonly studied for this model such pacemaker dynamics is not displayed because of the development of two fold bifurcations, with the increase of the strength of the leak current, whose interaction with the Hopf bifurcations destroys the oscillatory dynamics.

  19. X-ray effects on pacemaker type circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Blamires, N.G.; Myatt, J.

    1982-03-01

    Queries have been raised concerning the potential hazards of X-ray irradiation on patients using the new generation of heart pacemakers based on digital circuitry. The present study was undertaken to provide some answers to these queries. The work was conducted in two parts. First, a literature search was done and, second, circuits using current state of the art digital technology were irradiated with X-rays. Watch circuits were chosen because of their availability and built-in facilities by which their function could be tested. Doses up to 330 rads were administered to them using energies of 46, 114, and 141 KeV. The conclusion drawn from both parts of the study was that X-rays used for diagnostic purposes were unlikely to affect the performance of this type of circuit in any way. It was accepted that for therapeutic purposes doses far in excess of this are administered and circuit malfunctions are likely to occur. To assess the probability of a digital pacemaker malfunctioning, samples of that particular type would have to be irradiated at the relevant dose.

  20. Phase shifting two coupled circadian pacemakers - Implications for jet lag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gander, P. H.; Kronauer, R. E.; Graeber, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    Two Van der Pol oscillators with reciprocal linear velocity coupling are utilized to model the response of the human circadian timing system to abrupt displacements of the environmental time cues (zeitgebers). The core temperature rhythm and sleep-wake cycle simulated by the model are examined. The relationship between the masking of circadian rhythms by environmental variables and behavioral and physiological events and the rates of resynchronization is studied. The effects of zeitgeber phase shifts and zeitgeber strength on the resynchronization rates are analyzed. The influence of intrinsic pacemakers periods and coupling strength on resynchronization are investigated. The simulated data reveal that: resynchronization after a time zone shift depends on the magnitude of the shift; the time of day of the shift has little influence on resynchronization; the strength of zeitgebers affects the rate and direction of the resynchronization; the intrinsic pacemaker periods have a significant effect on resynchronization; and increasing the coupling between the oscillators results in an increase in the rate of resynchronization. The model data are compared to transmeridian flight studies data and similar resynchronization patterns are observed.