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Sample records for cardiac risk factor

  1. Risk factors of cardiac allograft vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Szczurek, Wioletta; Gąsior, Mariusz; Zembala, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in prevention and treatment of heart transplant rejection, development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) remains the leading factor limiting long-term survival of the graft. Cardiac allograft vasculopathy etiopathogenesis is not fully understood, but a significant role is attributed to endothelial cell damage, caused by immunological and non-immunological mechanisms. Immunological factors include the differences between the recipient's and the donor's HLA systems, the presence of alloreactive antibodies and episodes of acute rejection. Among the non-immunological factors the most important are the age of the donor, ischemia-reperfusion injury and cytomegalovirus infection. The classical cardiovascular risk factors (diabetes, hypertension, obesity and hyperlipidemia) are also important. This study presents an up-to-date overview of current knowledge on the vasculopathy etiopathogenesis and the role played by endothelium and inflammatory processes in CAV, and it also investigates the factors which may serve as risk markers of cardiac allograft vasculopathy. PMID:26855649

  2. Sudden cardiac death: epidemiology and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Adabag, A. Selcuk; Luepker, Russell V.; Roger, Véronique L.; Gersh, Bernard J.

    2016-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is an important public-health problem with multiple etiologies, risk factors, and changing temporal trends. Substantial progress has been made over the past few decades in identifying markers that confer increased SCD risk at the population level. However, the quest for predicting the high-risk individual who could be a candidate for an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, or other therapy, continues. In this article, we review the incidence, temporal trends, and triggers of SCD, and its demographic, clinical, and genetic risk factors. We also discuss the available evidence supporting the use of public-access defibrillators. PMID:20142817

  3. Cardiac risk factors: environmental, sociodemographic, and behavioral cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Anthony, David; George, Paul; Eaton, Charles B

    2014-06-01

    Several environmental exposures are associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Exposure to secondhand smoke may increase the risk by as much as 25% to 30%. Exposure to third hand smoke, residual components of tobacco smoke that remain in the environment after a cigarette is extinguished, also appears to increase risk. These residual components can remain in rooms and automobiles for up to 30 years and enter the body through the skin or via inhalation or ingestion. Exposure to particulate matter air pollution from automobile emissions, power plants, and other sources is yet another environmental risk factor for CHD, resulting in tens of thousands of deaths annually in the United States. Exposure to other environmental toxins, particularly bisphenol A and phthalates, also has been linked to CHD. There are sociodemographic risks for CHD, with numerous studies showing that lower socioeconomic status is associated with higher risk. Behavioral risk factors include poor diet, such as frequent consumption of fast food and processed meals; sleep disturbance; and psychological stress, particularly related to marital or work issues. Finally, although high alcohol consumption is associated with increased CHD risk, moderate alcohol consumption (ie, less than 1 to 2 drinks/day), particularly of wine and possibly beer, appears to reduce the risk. PMID:24936715

  4. Effects of lifestyle modification programs on cardiac risk factors.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Moaven; Fournier, Stephen; Shepard, Donald S; Ritter, Grant; Strickler, Gail K; Stason, William B

    2014-01-01

    Medicare conducted a payment demonstration to evaluate the effectiveness of two intensive lifestyle modification programs in patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease: the Dr. Dean Ornish Program for Reversing Heart Disease (Ornish) and Cardiac Wellness Program of the Benson-Henry Mind Body Institute. This report describes the changes in cardiac risk factors achieved by each program during the active intervention year and subsequent year of follow-up. The demonstration enrolled 580 participants who had had an acute myocardial infarction, had undergone coronary artery bypass graft surgery or percutaneous coronary intervention within 12 months, or had documented stable angina pectoris. Of these, 98% completed the intense 3-month intervention, 71% the 12-month intervention, and 56% an additional follow-up year. Most cardiac risk factors improved significantly during the intense intervention period in both programs. Favorable changes in cardiac risk factors and functional cardiac capacity were maintained or improved further at 12 and 24 months in participants with active follow-up. Multivariable regressions found that risk-factor improvements were positively associated with abnormal baseline values, Ornish program participation for body mass index and systolic blood pressure, and with coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Expressed levels of motivation to lose weight and maintain weight loss were significant independent predictors of sustained weight loss (p = 0.006). Both lifestyle modification programs achieved well-sustained reductions in cardiac risk factors. PMID:25490202

  5. Pharmacological Risk Factors for Delirium after Cardiac Surgery: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Lurdes; Schwarz, Stephan KW; Bowering, John B; Moore, Randell L; Burns, Kyle D; Richford, Carole M; Osborn, Jill A; Barr, Alasdair M

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this review is to evaluate the literature on medications associated with delirium after cardiac surgery and potential prophylactic agents for preventing it. Source: Articles were searched in MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health, and EMBASE with the MeSH headings: delirium, cardiac surgical procedures, and risk factors, and the keywords: delirium, cardiac surgery, risk factors, and drugs. Principle inclusion criteria include having patient samples receiving cardiac procedures on cardiopulmonary bypass, and using DSM-IV-TR criteria or a standardized tool for the diagnosis of delirium. Principal Findings: Fifteen studies were reviewed. Two single drugs (intraoperative fentanyl and ketamine), and two classes of drugs (preoperative antipsychotics and postoperative inotropes) were identified in the literature as being independently associated with delirium after cardiac surgery. Another seven classes of drugs (preoperative antihypertensives, anticholinergics, antidepressants, benzodiazepines, opioids, and statins, and postoperative opioids) and three single drugs (intraoperative diazepam, and postoperative dexmedetomidine and rivastigmine) have mixed findings. One drug (risperidone) has been shown to prevent delirium when taken immediately upon awakening from cardiac surgery. None of these findings was replicated in the studies reviewed. Conclusion: These studies have shown that drugs taken perioperatively by cardiac surgery patients need to be considered in delirium risk management strategies. While medications with direct neurological actions are clearly important, this review has shown that specific cardiovascular drugs may also require attention. Future studies that are methodologically consistent are required to further validate these findings and improve their utility. PMID:23449337

  6. Risk factors for perioperative ischemic stroke in cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Mário Augusto Cray; Gauer, Maria Fernanda; Gomes, Ricardo Zaneti; Schafranski, Marcelo Derbli

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for ischemic stroke in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods From January 2010 to December 2012, 519 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery were analyzed prospectively. The sample was divided into two groups: patients with stroke per and postoperative were allocated in Group GS (n=22) and the other patients in the group CCONTROL (n=497). The following variables were compared between the groups: gender, age, carotid stenosis ≥ 70%, diabetes on insulin, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, peripheral arteriopathy, unstable angina, kidney function, left ventricular function, acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary arterial hypertension, use of cardiopulmonary bypass. Ischemic stroke was defined as symptoms lasting over 24 hours associated with changes in brain computed tomography scan. The variables were compared using Fisher’s exact test, Chi square, Student’s t-test and logistic regression. Results Stroke occurred in 4.2% of patients and the risk factors statistically significant were: carotid stenosis of 70% or more (P=0.03; OR 5.07; IC 95%: 1.35 to 19.02), diabetes on insulin (P=0.04; OR 2.61; IC 95%: 1.10 to 6.21) and peripheral arteriopathy (P=0.03; OR 2.61; 95% CI: 1.08 to 6.28). Conclusion Risk factors for ischemic stroke were carotid stenosis of 70% or more, diabetes on insulin and peripheral arteriopathy. PMID:26313728

  7. Radiation Therapy, Cardiac Risk Factors, and Cardiac Toxicity in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, John J.; Wang Jian; McBride, Russell; Neugut, Alfred I.; Grann, Victor R. ||; Jacobson, Judith S. |; Grann, Alison; Hershman, Dawn ||. E-mail: dlh23@columbia.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: The benefits of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) for breast cancer may be counterbalanced by the risk of cardiac toxicity. We studied the cardiac effects of RT and the impact of pre-existing cardiac risk factors (CRFs) in a population-based sample of older patients with breast cancer. Methods and Materials: In the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER)-Medicare database of women {>=}65 years diagnosed with Stages I to III breast cancer from January 1, 1992 to December 31, 2000, we used multivariable logistic regression to model the associations of demographic and clinical variables with postmastectomy and postlumpectomy RT. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we then modeled the association between treatment and myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemia in the 10 or more years after diagnosis, taking the predictors of treatment into account. Results: Among 48,353 women with breast cancer; 19,897 (42%) were treated with lumpectomy and 26,534 (55%) with mastectomy; the remainder had unknown surgery type (3%). Receipt of RT was associated with later year of diagnosis, younger age, fewer comorbidities, nonrural residence, and chemotherapy. Postlumpectomy RT was also associated with white ethnicity and no prior history of heart disease (HD). The RT did not increase the risk of MI. Presence of MI was associated with age, African American ethnicity, advanced stage, nonrural residence, more than one comorbid condition, a hormone receptor-negative tumor, CRFs and HD. Among patients who received RT, tumor laterality was not associated with MI outcome. The effect of RT on the heart was not influenced by HD or CRFs. Conclusion: It appears unlikely that RT would increase the risk of MI in elderly women with breast cancer, regardless of type of surgery, tumor laterality, or history of CRFs or HD, for at least 10 years.

  8. Risk factors for transient dysfunction of gas exchange after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Cristiane Delgado Alves; Moreira, Marcos Mello; Lima, Núbia Maria Freire Vieira; de Figueirêdo, Luciana Castilho; Falcão, Antônio Luis Eiras; Petrucci, Orlando; Dragosavac, Desanka

    2015-01-01

    Objective A retrospective cohort study was preformed aiming to verify the presence of transient dysfunction of gas exchange in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery and determine if this disorder is linked to cardiorespiratory events. Methods We included 942 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery and cardiac procedures who were referred to the Intensive Care Unit between June 2007 and November 2011. Results Fifteen patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome (2%), 199 (27.75%) had mild transient dysfunction of gas exchange, 402 (56.1%) had moderate transient dysfunction of gas exchange, and 39 (5.4%) had severe transient dysfunction of gas exchange. Hypertension and cardiogenic shock were associated with the emergence of moderate transient dysfunction of gas exchange postoperatively (P=0.02 and P=0.019, respectively) and were risk factors for this dysfunction (P=0.0023 and P=0.0017, respectively). Diabetes mellitus was also a risk factor for transient dysfunction of gas exchange (P=0.03). Pneumonia was present in 8.9% of cases and correlated with the presence of moderate transient dysfunction of gas exchange (P=0.001). Severe transient dysfunction of gas exchange was associated with patients who had renal replacement therapy (P=0.0005), hemotherapy (P=0.0001), enteral nutrition (P=0.0012), or cardiac arrhythmia (P=0.0451). Conclusion Preoperative hypertension and cardiogenic shock were associated with the occurrence of postoperative transient dysfunction of gas exchange. The preoperative risk factors included hypertension, cardiogenic shock, and diabetes. Postoperatively, pneumonia, ventilator-associated pneumonia, renal replacement therapy, hemotherapy, and cardiac arrhythmia were associated with the appearance of some degree of transient dysfunction of gas exchange, which was a risk factor for reintubation, pneumonia, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and renal replacement therapy in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery and cardiac

  9. Heart Healthy Knowledge, Food Patterns, Fatness, and Cardiac Risk Factors in Children Receiving Nutrition Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Kerry J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Elementary students (n=900) received a nutrition education program focusing on cognitive and behavioral aspects of cardiovascular health. Assessments of their health knowledge and behavior were conducted at baseline and at five follow-up periods. Children increased their knowledge and improved food patterns, but among the cardiac risk factors,…

  10. Risk Factors Associated with Cognitive Decline after Cardiac Surgery: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nikil; Minhas, Jatinder S.; Chung, Emma M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Modern day cardiac surgery evolved upon the advent of cardiopulmonary bypass machines (CPB) in the 1950s. Following this development, cardiac surgery in recent years has improved significantly. Despite such advances and the introduction of new technologies, neurological sequelae after cardiac surgery still exist. Ischaemic stroke, delirium, and cognitive impairment cause significant morbidity and mortality and unfortunately remain common complications. Postoperative cognitive decline (POCD) is believed to be associated with the presence of new ischaemic lesions originating from emboli entering the cerebral circulation during surgery. Cardiopulmonary bypass was thought to be the reason of POCD, but randomised controlled trials comparing with off-pump surgery show contradictory results. Attention has now turned to the growing evidence that perioperative risk factors, as well as patient-related risk factors, play an important role in early and late POCD. Clearly, identifying the mechanism of POCD is challenging. The purpose of this systematic review is to discuss the literature that has investigated patient and perioperative risk factors to better understand the magnitude of the risk factors associated with POCD after cardiac surgery. PMID:26491558

  11. Applying the Gender Lens to Risk Factors and Outcome after Adult Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Eifert, Sandra; Guethoff, Sonja; Kaczmarek, Ingo; Beiras-Fernandez, Andres; Seeland, Ute; Gulbins, Helmut; Seeburger, Jörg; Deutsch, Oliver; Jungwirth, Bettina; Katsari, Elpiniki; Dohmen, Pascal; Pfannmueller, Bettina; Hultgren, Rebecka; Schade, Ina; Kublickiene, Karolina; Mohr, Friedrich W.; Gansera, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Applying the gender lens to risk factors and outcome after adult cardiac surgery is of major clinical interest, as the inclusion of sex and gender in research design and analysis may guarantee more comprehensive cardiovascular science and may consecutively result in a more effective surgical treatment as well as cost savings in cardiac surgery. Methods We have reviewed classical cardiovascular risk factors (diabetes, arterial hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking) according to a gender-based approach. Furthermore, we have examined comorbidities such as depression, renal insufficiency, and hormonal influences in regard to gender. Gender-sensitive economic aspects have been evaluated, surgical outcome has been analyzed, and cardiovascular research has been considered from a gender perspective. Results The influence of typical risk factors and outcome after cardiac surgery has been evaluated from a gender perspective, and the gender-specific distribution of these risk factors is reported on. The named comorbidities are listed. Economic aspects demonstrated a gender gap. Outcome after coronary and valvular surgeries as well as after heart transplantation are displayed in this regard. Results after postoperative use of intra-aortic balloon pump are shown. Gender-related aspects of clinical and biomedical cardiosurgical research are reported. Conclusions Female gender has become an independent risk factor of survival after the majority of cardiosurgical procedures. Severely impaired left ventricular ejection fraction independently predicts survival in men, whereas age does in females. PMID:26288584

  12. Cardiac risk factors: new cholesterol and blood pressure management guidelines.

    PubMed

    Anthony, David; George, Paul; Eaton, Charles B

    2014-06-01

    The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association cholesterol guidelines depart from low-density lipoprotein (LDL) treatment targets and recommend treating four specific patient groups with statins. Statins are the only cholesterol-lowering drugs with randomized trial evidence of benefit for preventing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). The groups are patients with clinical ASCVD; patients ages 40 to 75 years with diabetes and LDL of 70 to 189 mg/dL but no clinical ASCVD; patients 21 years or older with LDL levels of 190 mg/dL or higher; and patients ages 40 to 75 years with LDL of 70 to 189 mg/dL without clinical ASCVD or diabetes but with 10-year ASCVD risk of 7.5% or higher. Ten-year ASCVD risk may be calculated using the Pooled Cohort Equations. The Eighth Joint National Committee (JNC 8) guidelines for blood pressure management recommend a blood pressure goal of less than 140/90 mm Hg for all adults except those 60 years or older. For the latter group, the JNC 8 recommends a systolic blood pressure goal of less than 150 mm Hg. In another notable change from prior guidelines, the JNC 8 recommends relaxing the systolic blood pressure goal for patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease to less than 140 mm Hg from less than 130 mm Hg. PMID:24936717

  13. Chronic kidney disease and risk factors responsible for sudden cardiac death: a whiff of hope?

    PubMed Central

    Kiuchi, Márcio G.; Mion, Decio

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have shown a strong independent association between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular events, including death, heart failure, and myocardial infarction. Recent clinical trials extend this range of adverse cardiovascular events, also including ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Furthermore, other studies suggest structural remodeling of the heart and electrophysiological alterations in this population. These processes may explain the increased risk of arrhythmia in kidney disease and help to identify patients who are at increased risk of sudden cardiac death. Sympathetic hyperactivity is well known to increase cardiovascular risk in CKD patients and is a hallmark of essential hypertensive state that occurs early in the clinical course of the disease. In CKD, the sympathetic hyperactivity seems to be expressed at the earliest clinical stage of the disease, showing a direct relationship with the severity of the condition of renal failure, being more pronounced in the terminal stage of CKD. The sympathetic efferent and afferent neural activity in kidney failure is a key mediator for the maintenance and progression of the disease. The aim of this review was to show that the feedback loop of this cycle, due to adrenergic hyperactivity, also aggravates many of the risk factors responsible for causing sudden cardiac death and may be a potential target modifiable by percutaneous renal sympathetic denervation. If it is feasible and effective in end-stage renal disease, little is known. PMID:27069851

  14. Endothelial dysfunction and progressive coronary atherosclerosis: sequential invasive studies in a patient with multiple cardiac risk factors.

    PubMed

    Chander, R; Kuhner, P A; Laws Houghton, J

    2001-08-01

    This manuscript describes sequential angiographic, endothelial and vasoreactivity characteristics of the coronary arterial circulation in a middle-aged patient with multiple cardiac risk factors who developed hemodynamically significant coronary atherosclerosis over a 6-year period. A 56-year-old woman demonstrated marked angiographic progression of coronary atherosclerosis over time beginning with minor luminal irregularities in the setting of severe endothelial dysfunction. The association of endothelial dysfunction, ineffective cardiac risk factor management and progressive atherosclerosis is discussed. PMID:11481511

  15. QT dispersion as a risk factor for sudden cardiac death and fatal myocardial infarction in a coronary risk population.

    PubMed Central

    Mänttäri, M.; Oikarinen, L.; Manninen, V.; Viitasalo, M.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test in a prospective study the hypothesis that increased QT dispersion in resting 12-lead ECG is a predictor of sudden cardiac death. DESIGN: A nested case-control study during a mean (SD) follow up time of 6.5 (2.8) years. SETTING: A prospective, placebo controlled, coronary prevention trial with gemfibrozil among dyslipidaemic middle aged men in primary (occupational) health care units: the Helsinki heart study. PATIENTS: 24 victims of fatal myocardial infarction, 48 victims of sudden cardiac death without acute myocardial infarction, and their matched controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: QT dispersion in baseline and pre-event electrocardiograms. RESULTS: At study baseline, QT dispersion was similar in all victims and controls. When estimated from the pre-event ECG on average 14 months before death, the risk of sudden cardiac death in the highest QTPEAK (up to the peak of the T wave) dispersion tertile (> or = 50 ms) was 6.2-fold (95% confidence interval 1.7 to 23.5) compared with the risk in the lowest tertile (< or = 30 ms), and 4.9-fold (1.2 to 19.5) after adjustment for the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy, while QTPEAK dispersion could not predict fatal myocardial infarction. QTEND dispersion (up to the end of the T wave) in pre-event ECGs could not discriminate victims of either sudden cardiac death or fatal myocardial infarction from their matched controls. CONCLUSIONS: In middle aged men with a normal conventional QT interval in 12-lead resting ECG, increased QTPEAK dispersion is an independent risk factor for sudden cardiac death, but not for fatal myocardial infarction. PMID:9391289

  16. Risk Factors for post-Cardiac Surgery Diaphragmatic Paralysis in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Akbariasbagh, Parvin; Mirzaghayan, Mohammad Reza; Akbariasbagh, Naseredin; Shariat, Mamak; Ebrahim, Bita

    2015-01-01

    Background: Injured phrenic nerve secondary to cardiac surgeries is the most common cause of diaphragmatic paralysis (DP) in infants. The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors for DP caused by congenital heart defect corrective surgeries in pediatrics. Methods: This cross-sectional study, conducted in a 2-year period (2006–2008), included 451 children with congenital heart diseases admitted to the Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Ward of Imam Khomeini Hospital. The diaphragmatic function was examined via fluoroscopy, and the frequency of DP and its relevant parameters were evaluated. Results: Of the 451 patients, comprising 268 males and 183 females at an age range of 3 days to 204 months (28.2 ± 33.4 months), 25 (5.5%) infants (60% male and 40% female, age range = 15 days to 132 months, 41.2 ± 28.1 months) had DP as follows: 48% unilateral right-sided and 36% unilateral left-sided. Additionally, 68% had cyanotic congenital heart disease and 84% had DP following total correction surgery. The highest prevalence rates of DP resulting in phrenic hemiparesis were observed after arterial switch operation, Fontan procedure, and Blalock–Taussig shunt surgery, respectively. Thirteen (52%) of the 25 DP patients underwent surgical diaphragmatic plication because of severe respiratory distress and dependency on mechanical ventilation, and most of the cases of plication underwent arterial switch operation. The rate of mortality was 24% (6 patients). Conclusion: DP with a prevalence of 5.5% was one of the most common complications secondary to cardiac surgeries in the infants included in the present study. Effective factors were age, weight, cyanotic congenital heart defects, and previous cardiac surgery. Diaphragmatic plication improved prognosis in severe cases. PMID:26697086

  17. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among Cardiac Patients: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Considerations for Assessment and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tulloch, Heather; Greenman, Paul S.; Tassé, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing awareness of the impact of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on physical health, particularly cardiovascular disease. We review the literature on the role of trauma in the development of cardiovascular risk factors and disease, aftermath of a cardiac event, and risk for recurrence in cardiac patients. We explore possible mechanisms to explain these relationships, as well as appropriate assessment and treatment strategies for this population. Our main conclusion is that screening and referral for appropriate treatments are important given the high prevalence rates of PTSD in cardiac populations and the associated impact on morbidity and mortality. PMID:25545708

  18. Postoperative arrhythmias after cardiac surgery: incidence, risk factors, and therapeutic management.

    PubMed

    Peretto, Giovanni; Durante, Alessandro; Limite, Luca Rosario; Cianflone, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Arrhythmias are a known complication after cardiac surgery and represent a major cause of morbidity, increased length of hospital stay, and economic costs. However, little is known about incidence, risk factors, and treatment of early postoperative arrhythmias. Both tachyarrhythmias and bradyarrhythmias can present in the postoperative period. In this setting, atrial fibrillation is the most common heart rhythm disorder. Postoperative atrial fibrillation is often self-limiting, but it may require anticoagulation therapy and either a rate or rhythm control strategy. However, ventricular arrhythmias and conduction disturbances can also occur. Sustained ventricular arrhythmias in the recovery period after cardiac surgery may warrant acute treatment and long-term preventive strategy in the absence of reversible causes. Transient bradyarrhythmias may be managed with temporary pacing wires placed at surgery, but significant and persistent atrioventricular block or sinus node dysfunction can occur with the need for permanent pacing. We provide a complete and updated review about mechanisms, risk factors, and treatment strategies for the main postoperative arrhythmias. PMID:24511410

  19. Postoperative Arrhythmias after Cardiac Surgery: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Therapeutic Management

    PubMed Central

    Cianflone, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Arrhythmias are a known complication after cardiac surgery and represent a major cause of morbidity, increased length of hospital stay, and economic costs. However, little is known about incidence, risk factors, and treatment of early postoperative arrhythmias. Both tachyarrhythmias and bradyarrhythmias can present in the postoperative period. In this setting, atrial fibrillation is the most common heart rhythm disorder. Postoperative atrial fibrillation is often self-limiting, but it may require anticoagulation therapy and either a rate or rhythm control strategy. However, ventricular arrhythmias and conduction disturbances can also occur. Sustained ventricular arrhythmias in the recovery period after cardiac surgery may warrant acute treatment and long-term preventive strategy in the absence of reversible causes. Transient bradyarrhythmias may be managed with temporary pacing wires placed at surgery, but significant and persistent atrioventricular block or sinus node dysfunction can occur with the need for permanent pacing. We provide a complete and updated review about mechanisms, risk factors, and treatment strategies for the main postoperative arrhythmias. PMID:24511410

  20. Sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery: incidence and risk factors according to clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Lemaignen, A; Birgand, G; Ghodhbane, W; Alkhoder, S; Lolom, I; Belorgey, S; Lescure, F-X; Armand-Lefevre, L; Raffoul, R; Dilly, M-P; Nataf, P; Lucet, J C

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of surgical site infection (SSI) after cardiac surgery depends on the definition used. A distinction is generally made between mediastinitis, as defined by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and superficial SSI. Our objective was to decipher these entities in terms of presentation and risk factors. We performed a 7-year single centre analysis of prospective surveillance of patients with cardiac surgery via median sternotomy. SSI was defined as the need for reoperation due to infection. Among 7170 patients, 292 (4.1%) developed SSI, including 145 CDC-defined mediastinitis (CDC-positive SSI, 2.0%) and 147 superficial SSI without associated bloodstream infection (CDC-negative SSI, 2.1%). Median time to reoperation for CDC-negative SSI was 18 days (interquartile range, 14-26) and 16 (interquartile range, 11-24) for CDC-positive SSI (p 0.02). Microorganisms associated with CDC-negative SSI were mainly skin commensals (62/147, 41%) or originated in the digestive tract (62/147, 42%); only six were due to Staphylococcus aureus (4%), while CDC-positive SSI were mostly due to S. aureus (52/145, 36%) and germs from the digestive tract (52/145, 36%). Risk factors for SSI were older age, obesity, chronic obstructive bronchopneumonia, diabetes mellitus, critical preoperative state, postoperative vasopressive support, transfusion or prolonged ventilation and coronary artery bypass grafting, especially if using both internal thoracic arteries in female patients. The number of internal thoracic arteries used and factors affecting wound healing were primarily associated with CDC-negative SSI, whereas comorbidities and perioperative complications were mainly associated with CDC-positive SSI. These 2 entities differed in time to revision surgery, bacteriology and risk factors, suggesting a differing pathophysiology. PMID:25882356

  1. Changes in Risk Factors and Exercise Capacity After Cardiac Rehabilitation and Its Effect on Hospital Readmission

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Farid; Nalini, Mehdi; Nikbakht, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite the positive outcomes reported with cardiac rehabilitation (CR), its impacts have been reported to be different from a region or country to another, which may be due to the different contents of rehabilitation programs. Objectives: To investigate the effect of CR on cardiovascular risk factors. Patients and Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study on the data from Imam Ali Cardiac Rehabilitation Center in Kermanshah province, Iran from 2001 to 2008. We used paired t-test to evaluate the effect of CR on cardiovascular risk factors. Logistic regression or t-test (unequal variance) were used to assess the factors influencing re-admission (due to cardiac problems). The relationship between different variables and death was studied using univariate cox proportional hazard. P values < 0.05 were considered significant for all analyses. Results: Out of 504 patients who completed rehabilitation, a total of 499 were analyzed. These 499 patients consisted of 383 men and 116 women. All anthropometric measurements, blood lipids (except HDL cholesterol), systolic and diastolic blood pressure, depression, anxiety and exercise capacity improved after rehabilitation (P < 0.05 for all cases). The improvement was observed in both sexes. A total of 39 patients were re-admitted to hospital after rehabilitation. Being female (OR = 2.40; 95%CI: 1.22-4.68) and history of diabetes (OR = 2.04; 95%CI: 1.04-4.02) increased the risk of re-admission significantly. Patients who were readmitted had higher anthropometric measurements at the beginning and the end of the program. Moreover, the initial exercise capacity of readmitted patients was lower than those who were not readmitted. After a maximal follow-up period of 6.3 years (median = 2.99 years), only eight patients expired (survival rate: 97.5%; 95%CI: 94.7-98.8). None of the variables in our study was significantly related to the survival rate. Conclusions: The comprehensive CR program in Imam Ali Center

  2. Degree and Direction of Change of Body Weight in Cardiac Rehabilitation and Impact on Exercise Capacity and Cardiac Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Gomadam, Pallavi S; Douglas, Christopher J; Sacrinty, Matthew T; Brady, Molly M; Paladenech, Connie C; Robinson, Killian C

    2016-02-15

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) improves functional capacity and reduces mortality in patients with cardiovascular disease. It also improves cardiovascular risk factors and aids in weight reduction. Because of the increase in morbidly obese patients with cardiovascular disease, the prevalence of obesity and patterns of weight change in those undergoing CR merit fresh study. We studied 1,320 participants in a 12-week CR program at our academic medical center. We compared 5 categories: 69 class III obese (body mass index [BMI] ≥40) patients, 128 class II obese patients (BMI 35.0 to 39.9), 318 class I obese patients (BMI 30.0 to 34.9), 487 overweight patients (BMI 25.0 to 29.9), and 318 normal weight patients (BMI 18.5 to 24.9). Exercise capacity in METs, weight, blood pressure, and fasting lipid profile were measured before and after CR. Overall, 131 patients gained weight, 827 had no significant weight change, and 363 lost weight (176 lost 3% to 5% of their baseline weight, 161 lost 5% to 10%, and 26 lost >10%). Exercise capacity, blood pressure, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol improved in all patients. Class III obese patients had the smallest improvement in peak METs (p <0.001), but the greatest weight loss. Patients who lost >10% of their baseline weight had the greatest improvements in exercise capacity, low-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides. In conclusion, after CR, a minority of patients lost weight. Most patients had no significant weight change and some even gained weight. The greatest loss was seen in class III obese patients. All patient groups showed improvements in exercise capacity and risk factors, regardless of the direction or degree of weight change. PMID:26768674

  3. Agile text mining for the 2014 i2b2/UTHealth Cardiac risk factors challenge.

    PubMed

    Cormack, James; Nath, Chinmoy; Milward, David; Raja, Kalpana; Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha R

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the use of an agile text mining platform (Linguamatics' Interactive Information Extraction Platform, I2E) to extract document-level cardiac risk factors in patient records as defined in the i2b2/UTHealth 2014 challenge. The approach uses a data-driven rule-based methodology with the addition of a simple supervised classifier. We demonstrate that agile text mining allows for rapid optimization of extraction strategies, while post-processing can leverage annotation guidelines, corpus statistics and logic inferred from the gold standard data. We also show how data imbalance in a training set affects performance. Evaluation of this approach on the test data gave an F-Score of 91.7%, one percent behind the top performing system. PMID:26209007

  4. Microvascular function, metabolic syndrome, and novel risk factor status in women with cardiac syndrome X.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Sachin T; Ferrell, William R; Petrie, John R; Scherbakova, Olga; Greer, Ian A; Cobbe, Stuart M; Sattar, Naveed

    2006-06-15

    To characterize microvascular function, candidate risk pathways, and metabolic syndrome prevalence in women with cardiac syndrome X, 52 nondiabetic women with angiographically normal epicardial arteries but >1 mm of planar ST depression during exercise testing (patients) and 24 healthy controls of similar age were recruited. In addition to fasting blood samples and anthropometric measurements, forearm cutaneous microvascular function after iontophoresis of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside was assessed by laser Doppler imaging. Despite body mass index correction and a larger proportion on statin therapy, patients had high levels of insulin (p=0.016), triglycerides (p=0.018), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (p=0.021), von Willebrand factor (p=0.005), and leptin (p=0.005) and lower levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p=0.042) compared with controls. Consistent with these data, 30% of patients but only 8% of controls fulfilled criteria for the metabolic syndrome as defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program (p=0.015). Endothelium-dependent and -independent microvascular functions were markedly impaired in patients (p<0.001), and the odds ratio for cardiac syndrome X was 7.38 (95% confidence interval 2.2 to 24.7) if the acetylcholine response was <8,710 flux units. In conclusion, women with cardiac syndrome X more commonly have metabolic syndrome and related adiposity, metabolic, and inflammatory derangements. They also have significantly impaired skin microvascular function as assessed by laser Doppler imaging, consistent with generalized vascular dysfunction, a finding with potential diagnostic implications. PMID:16765122

  5. Effect of Intense Lifestyle Modification and Cardiac Rehabilitation on Psychosocial Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldana, Steven G.; Whitmer, William R.; Greenlaw, Roger; Avins, Andrew L.; Thomas, Dean; Salberg, Audrey; Greenwell, Andrea; Lipsenthal, Lee; Fellingham, Gill W.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the effect of the Ornish Program for Reversing Heart Disease and cardiac rehabilitation(CR) on psychosocial risk factors and quality of life in patients with confirmed coronary artery disease. Participants had previously undergone a revascularization procedure. The 84 patients self-selected to participate in the Ornish Program…

  6. Treatment patterns and risk factor control in patients with and without metabolic syndrome in cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Gitt, Anselm; Jannowitz, Christina; Karoff, Marthin; Karmann, Barbara; Horack, Martin; Völler, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Aim Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a clustering of factors that are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. We aimed to investigate the proportion of patients with MetS in patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation (CR), and to describe differences between patients with MetS compared to those without MetS with regard to (1) patient characteristics including demographics, risk factors, and comorbidities, (2) risk factor management including drug treatment, and (3) control status of risk factors at entry to CR and discharge from CR. Methods Post-hoc analysis of data from 27,904 inpatients (Transparency Registry to Objectify Guideline-Oriented Risk Factor Management registry) that underwent a CR period of about 3 weeks were analyzed descriptively in total and compared by their MetS status. Results In the total cohort, mean age was 64.3 years, (71.7% male), with no major differences between groups. Patients had been referred after a ST elevation of myocardial infarction event in 41.1% of cases, non-ST elevation of myocardial infarction in 21.8%, or angina pectoris in 16.7%. They had received a percutaneous coronary intervention in 55.1% and bypass surgery (coronary artery bypass graft) in 39.5%. Patients with MetS (n = 15,819) compared to those without MetS (n = 12,085) were less frequently males, and in terms of cardiac interventions, more often received coronary artery bypass surgery. Overall, statin use increased from 79.9% at entry to 95.0% at discharge (MetS: 79.7% to 95.2%). Patients with MetS compared to those without MetS received angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, oral antidiabetics, and insulin at entry and discharge more frequently, and less frequently clopidogrel and aspirin/clopidogrel combinations. Mean blood pressure was within the normal range at discharge, and did not differ substantially between groups (124/73 versus 120/72 mmHg). Overall, between entry and discharge, levels of total cholesterol, low density

  7. Risk Factors for New-Onset Cardiac Valve Calcification in Patients on Maintenance Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yunhuan; Feng, Sheng; Zhan, Zhoubing; Lu, Ying; Wang, Yancai; Jiang, Shan; Song, Kai; Shen, Huaying

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with end-stage renal disease are susceptible to cardiac valve calcification (CVC) due to mineral metabolism disorders and other factors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the risk factors for new-onset CVC in patients on maintenance peritoneal dialysis (PD). Methods This study included patients who underwent PD catheter insertion from January 2006 to June 2013 in our Peritoneal Dialysis Center. Clinical data were collected on CVC status during echocardiography evaluations (twice) at an interval of >6 months. The data collected included intact parathyroid hormone, C-reactive protein (CRP), serum phosphorus (P), serum calcium (Ca), albumin (Alb), prealbumin and the use of five types of antihypertensive drugs, statins, active vitamin D3 and Ca tablets. Results In total, 194 patients — 105 (54.1%) men, average age 60.5 ± 13.0 years — were included. CVC was present in 50 (25.8%) patients during PD catheter placement. After an average PD duration of 20.9 ± 10.4 months, CVC was detected in 97 patients (50.0%). New-onset CVC was found in 62 patients (32.0%). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that only serum P levels (p = 0.01, OR = 2.569), Alb levels (p = 0.04, OR = 0.935), dialysis duration (p = 0.03, OR = 1.039) and CRP levels (p = 0.02, OR = 1.031) were associated with CVC. Conclusion Serum P, Alb and CRP levels as well as dialysis duration are independent risk factors for CVC. PMID:26989400

  8. Impact of Modifiable Risk Factors on B-type Natriuretic Peptide and Cardiac Troponin T Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Pratyaksh K; Pradhan, Aruna D; Cook, Nancy R; Ridker, Paul M; Everett, Brendan M

    2016-02-01

    Alcohol use, physical activity, diet, and cigarette smoking are modifiable cardiovascular risk factors that have a substantial impact on the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and cardiovascular death. We hypothesized that these behaviors may alter concentrations of cardiac troponin, a marker of myocyte injury, and B-type natriuretic peptide, a marker of myocyte stress. Both markers have shown strong association with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. In 519 women with no evidence of cardiovascular disease, we measured circulating concentrations of cardiac troponin T, using a high-sensitivity assay (hsTnT), and the N-terminal fragment of B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). We used logistic regression to determine if these behaviors were associated with hsTnT ≥ 3 ng/l or with NT-proBNP in the highest quartile (≥ 127.3 ng/l). The median (Q1 to Q3) NT-proBNP of the cohort was 68.8 ng/l (40.3 to 127.3 ng/l), and 30.8% (160 of 519) of the cohort had circulating hsTnT ≥ 3 ng/l. In adjusted models, women who drank 1 to 6 drinks/week had lower odds of having a hsTnT ≥ 3 ng/l (odds ratio 0.58, 95% confidence interval 0.34 to 0.96) and lower odds of having an elevated NT-proBNP (odds ratio 0.55, 95% confidence interval 0.32 to 0.96). We were subsequently able to validate the results for B-type natriuretic peptide in a large independent cohort. In conclusion, our results suggest that regular alcohol consumption is associated with lower concentrations of hsTnT and NT-proBNP, 2 cardiovascular biomarkers associated with cardiovascular risk, and raise the hypothesis that the beneficial effects of alcohol consumption may be mediated by direct effects on the myocardium. PMID:26739393

  9. Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Outcomes of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Caused by Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Tatsuma; Ohashi-Fukuda, Naoko; Kondo, Yutaka; Sera, Toshiki; Doi, Kent; Yahagi, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Limited information is available regarding stroke-related out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We aimed to assess the clinical characteristics of stroke-related OHCA and to identify the factors associated with patient outcomes. We conducted a nationwide population-based study of adult OHCA patients in Japan from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2009. We examined the epidemiology, risk factors, and outcomes of stroke-related OHCA compared with cardiogenic OHCA. The primary outcome was neurologically favorable survival. Of the 243,140 eligible patients, 18,682 (7.7%) were diagnosed with stroke-related OHCA. Compared to OHCA with a presumed cardiac etiology, stroke-related OHCA patients had a greater chance of prehospital return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) (9.9% vs 5.9%, P < 0.0001) but a reduced chance of 1-month survival (3.6% vs 4.9%, P < 0.0001) or favorable neurological outcomes (1.2% vs 2.6%, P < 0.0001). After adjusting for a variety of confounding factors, the prehospital ROSC rates were higher (adjusted OR 2.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.34–2.62), but the neurologically favorable survival rates were lower (adjusted OR 0.66, 95%CI 0.57–0.76), among the stroke-related OHCA patients. In stroke-related OHCA cases, having a younger age, witness, and shockable 1st documented rhythm were associated with improved outcomes. Men had more favorable neurological outcomes. Seasonal or circadian factors had no critical impact on favorable neurological outcomes. Prehospital advanced life support techniques (i.e., epinephrine administration or advanced airway management) were not associated with favorable neurological outcomes. Although stroke-related OHCA had lower 1-month survival rates and poorer neurological outcomes than cardiogenic OHCA, the rates were not considered to be medically futile. Characteristically, sex differences might impact neurologically favorable survival. PMID:27057834

  10. [Cardiac arrest in dialysis patients: Risk factors, preventive measures and management in 2015].

    PubMed

    Luque, Yosu; Bataille, Aurélien; Taldir, Guillaume; Rondeau, Éric; Ridel, Christophe

    2016-02-01

    Patients undergoing hemodialysis have a 10 to 20 times higher risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) than the general population. Sudden cardiac death is a rare event (approximately 1 event per 10,000 sessions) but has a very high mortality rate. Epidemiological data comes almost exclusively from North American studies; there is a great lack of European data on the subject. Ventricular arrhythmia is the main mechanism of sudden cardiac deaths in dialysis patients. These patients develop increased sensitivity mainly due to a high prevalence of severe ischemic heart disease and left ventricular hypertrophy and to a frequent trigger event: electrolytic and plasma volume shifts during dialysis sessions. Unfortunately, accurate predictive markers of SCA do not exist, however some primary prevention trials using beta-blockers or angiotensin II receptor blockers are encouraging, while the use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators in the population of chronic dialysis patients remains controversial. Identification of patients at risk, minimizing trigger events such as electrolytic shifts and improving team skills in the diagnosis and initial resuscitation with the latest recommendations from 2010 seem necessary to reduce incidence and improve survival in this high risk population. Organization of European studies would also allow a more accurate view of this reality in our dialysis units. PMID:26547563

  11. Risk Factors Influencing Complications of Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device Implantation: Infection, Pneumothorax and Heart Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Sheng; Hung, Sheng-Ping; Chen, Pei-Rung; Yang, Chia-Hung; Wo, Hung-Ta; Chang, Po-Cheng; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Chou, Chung-Chuan; Wen, Ming-Shien; Chung, Chang-Ming; Chen, Tien-Hsing

    2014-01-01

    Abstract As the number of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) is increasing annually, CIED-related complications are becoming increasingly important. The aim of the study was to assess the risks associated with CIEDs by a nationwide database. Patients were selected from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database. Admissions for CIED implantation, replacement, and revision were evaluated and the evaluation period was 14 years. Endpoints included CIED-related infection, pneumothorax, and heart perforation. The study included 40,608 patients with a mean age of 71.8 ± 13.3 years. Regarding infection, the incidence rate was 2.45 per 1000 CIED-years. Male gender, younger age, device replacement, and previous infection were risks for infection while old age and high-volume centers (>200 per year) were protectors. The incidence of pneumothorax was 0.6%, with an increased risk in individuals who had chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) and cardiac resynchronized therapy (CRT). The incidence of heart perforation was 0.09%, with an increased risk in individuals who had pre-operation temporal pacing and steroid use. High-volume center was found to decrease infection rate while male gender, young people, and individuals who underwent replacements were associated with an increased risk of infection. Additionally, pre-operation temporal pacing and steroid use should be avoided if possible. Furthermore, COPD patients or those who accept CRTs should be monitored closely. PMID:25501080

  12. Urinary tract infection in children after cardiac surgery: Incidence, causes, risk factors and outcomes in a single-center study.

    PubMed

    Kabbani, Mohamed S; Ismail, Sameh R; Fatima, Anis; Shafi, Rehana; Idris, Julinar A; Mehmood, Akhter; Singh, Reetam K; Elbarabry, Mahmoud; Hijazi, Omar; Hussein, Mohamed A

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial urinary tract infection (UTI) increases hospitalization, cost and morbidity. In this cohort study, we aimed to determine the incidence, risk factors, etiology and outcomes of UTIs in post-operative cardiac children. To this end, we studied all post-operative patients admitted to the Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (PCICU) in 2012, and we divided the patients into two groups: the UTI (UTI group) and the non-UTI (control group). We compared both groups for multiple peri-operative risk factors. We included 413 children in this study. Of these, 29 (7%) had UTIs after cardiac surgery (UTI group), and 384 (93%) were free from UTIs (control group). All UTI cases were catheter-associated UTIs (CAUTIs). A total of 1578 urinary catheter days were assessed in this study, with a CAUTI density rate of 18 per 1000 catheter days. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated the following risk factors for CAUTI development: duration of urinary catheter placement (p<0.001), presence of congenital abnormalities of kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) (p<0.0041) and the presence of certain syndromes (Down, William, and Noonan) (p<0.02). Gram-negative bacteria accounted for 63% of the CAUTI. The main causes of CAUTI were Klebsiella (27%), Candida (24%) and Escherichia coli (21%). Resistant organisms caused 34% of CAUTI. Two patients (7%) died in the UTI group compared with the one patient (0.3%) who died in the control group (p<0.05). Based on these findings, we concluded that an increased duration of the urinary catheter, the presence of CAKUT, and the presence of syndromes comprised the main risk factors for CAUTI. Gram-negative organisms were the main causes for CAUTI, and one-third of them found to be resistant in this single-center study. PMID:26829892

  13. Perceptions of risk factors of cardiovascular disease and cardiac rehabilitation: a cross-sectional study targeting the Chinese population in the Midlands, UK

    PubMed Central

    Za, Tay; Lau, Jeff C F; Wong, Arthur C K; Wong, Alice W S; Lui, Sally; Fong, James W D; Chow, Patrick Y C; Jolly, Kate B

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To find out and explore the knowledge and opinion of Chinese people on cardiovascular disease and awareness of cardiac rehabilitation. Design A cross-sectional study using 14-item bilingual (Chinese and English) questionnaires that include information on demographics, health status, cardiovascular disease related knowledge and perception, and awareness and understanding of the cardiac rehabilitation programme. Setting Chinese community groups in the Midlands, UK from January to April 2008. Participants 436 questionnaires from Chinese adults over 18 were obtained. Main outcome measures Current knowledge and attitude towards cardiovascular disease and awareness of cardiac rehabilitation. Results Obesity was the most common risk factor identified by 80.7% of participants. Those originated from China had significantly less knowledge compared with subjects from other countries (p<0.001). People who have had exposure or experience of cardiac disease rated a higher risk of cardiac disease for Chinese living in the UK than people without experience. A majority (81.7%) used orthodox medicine and perceived it to be most effective against cardiac disease. Only 30% of participants were aware of cardiac rehabilitation. Conclusion The coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors of Chinese population have increased significantly in the last decade. Cardiac rehabilitation awareness was poor among the sample population of this study and language barrier is still a problem. More large studies on Chinese population assessing CAD risk should be done to provide more evidence on CAD prevention for this growing population in the Western world. PMID:27326032

  14. Selective contribution of diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors to cardiac autonomic dysfunction in the general population.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, D; Zentai, C; Perz, S; Rathmann, W; Haastert, B; Meisinger, C; Löwel, H

    2006-04-01

    Both cardiac autonomic dysfunction adn cardiovascular risk factors are related to and excess risk of mortality. We sought to determine whether the major cardiovascular risk factors are associated with diminished heart rate variability (HRV), prolonged QTc interval, or increased QT dispersion (QTD). Male (n = 1030) and female (n = 957) subjects, aged 55-74 years, who participated in the population-based MONICA Augsburg survey 1989/90 were assessed for the presence of cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes, hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, smoking, and low physical activity. Lowest quartiles for time domain indexes of HRV (SD of R-R intervals [SDNN], max-min difference), QTc > 440 ms, and QTD > 60 ms determined from 12-lead resting ECG were used as cutpoints. In men, after adjustment for age and alcohol consumption, significant independent determinants for the lowest quartiles of SDNN were diabetes, obesity, and smoking. Independent contributors to prolonged QTc were hypertension, obesity, smoking, and low physical activity, whereas for increased QTD it was only hypertension. In women, diabetes was the only contributor to low SDNN, and hypertension was the only determinant of prolonged QTc. In conclusion, diabetes is the primary determinant of reduced HRV in the general population, while hypertension is the primary contributor to prolonged QTc in both sexes. However, obesity and smoking contribute to autonomic dysfunction in men but not women. Thus, a selectivity and sex-related differences exist among the various cardiovascular risk factors as to their influence on autonomic dysfunction. PMID:16710813

  15. Comparison of ejection fraction and Goldman risk factor analysis to dipyridamole-thallium 201 studies in the evaluation of cardiac morbidity after aortic aneurysm surgery

    SciTech Connect

    McEnroe, C.S.; O'Donnell, T.F. Jr.; Yeager, A.; Konstam, M.; Mackey, W.C. )

    1990-04-01

    Associated coronary artery disease is the critical factor that influences early and late mortality after abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery. Dipyridamole-thallium 201 scintigraphy, left ventricular ejection fraction, and Goldman risk factor analysis have been suggested as preoperative noninvasive screening methods to detect significant coronary artery disease. In this series of 95 elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repairs dipyridamole-thallium 201 scintigraphy was highly predictive of the absence of perioperative cardiac morbidity (96% specificity, 44/46 normal scans, no cardiac morbidity), whereas ejection fraction (73% specificity, 31/42 normal ejection fraction, no cardiac morbidity) and Goldman risk factor analysis (84% specificity, 44/51 class I, no cardiac morbidity) were less. Furthermore, thallium redistribution on dipyridamole-thallium 201 scintigraphy leading to coronary angiography identified a significant number of patients with occult coronary artery disease who required preoperative coronary revascularization (8%, 8/95) and might have remained undetected on the basis of left ventricular ejection fraction or Goldman risk factor analysis. Finally, fixed thallium deficit, which some investigators have interpreted as a low probability finding for cardiac morbidity, was associated with a higher than expected incidence of cardiac complications. Forty-six percent (7/15) of all postoperative cardiac complications (three myocardial infarctions, three ischemic events, one death) occurred in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms with fixed deficits. This suggests that patients with fixed deficits on dipyridamole-thallium 201 scintigraphy should be considered for later delayed (4 hours) thallium images or coronary angiography or both.

  16. Risk factors and metabolic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of uraemic cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease has been increasingly recognized as a risk factor for incident heart failure. Despite advances in chronic heart failure treatment, the prognosis remains poor. The annual mortality from all cardiovascular causes in the end stage renal disease population is significantly higher than the general population, accounting for more than half of all deaths in this group. The mechanisms underlying the enhanced susceptibility to myocardial ischemia in chronic kidney disease are not well defined. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors, although common in chronic kidney disease, do not exert the same impact as in the general population. The presence of "renal-specific" non-traditional risk factors including endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, oxidative stress, anaemia, proteinuria and changes in vitamin D metabolism (encompassing the complex interactions of calcium and phosphate metabolism, hyperparathyroidism and vascular calcification) play an important role in cardiovascular disease progression. An increased understanding of the array of metabolic changes/adaptations occurring in uraemic heart disease have allowed one to consider optimal management strategies and to develop new strategies for future management of uraemic heart disease. PMID:21196237

  17. Cardiac malformations and hypertension, but not metabolic risk factors, are common in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Landin-Wilhelmsen, K; Bryman, I; Wilhelmsen, L

    2001-09-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is caused by an X chromosome aberration and is characterized by endogenous estrogen deficiency secondary to ovarian dysgenesis and short stature. Our aim was to study the prevalence of cardiovascular malformations and cardiovascular risk factors (blood pressure, blood lipids and glucose, coagulation factors, social factors, smoking habits) in adults with Turner syndrome in comparison with a female random population sample. One hundred women with Turner syndrome (aged 16-71 yr) underwent physical examination, echocardiography, electrocardiography, and blood sampling. Seventy-one of them were matched for age [mean age, 33.7 +/- 11 yr (range, 25-64)] with a random population sample (n = 213) of women [mean age, 34.8 +/- 9 yr (range, 25-64)] from the World Health Organization's Monitoring of Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Diseases Project, Göteborg. Six percent of Turner syndrome women were smokers compared with 25% in the population (P < 0.001). Turner syndrome women were relatively heavier and had a lower degree of leisure time physical activity than controls (P < 0.001). Diabetes and treatment for hypertension were present in 3 and 22% among Turner syndrome women vs. 2% (not significant) and 3% (P < 0.001) in controls, respectively. Cardiovascular malformations were found among 17% in Turner syndrome women (45,X dominated) vs. 0.5% in controls (P < 0.001). Systolic but not diastolic blood pressure was higher in Turner syndrome women. No differences were seen in serum total cholesterol, high- or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, lipoprotein (a), or plasma fibrinogen concentrations between patients and controls. Diabetes or hypertension was not related to karyotype. In conclusion, congenital cardiovascular malformations were frequent. Most cardiovascular risk factors (glucose and lipid levels, fibrinogen, smoking habits) were not increased, but hypertension was more common in Turner syndrome women. PMID:11549644

  18. Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Outcomes of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Caused by Stroke: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Tatsuma; Ohashi-Fukuda, Naoko; Kondo, Yutaka; Sera, Toshiki; Doi, Kent; Yahagi, Naoki

    2016-04-01

    Limited information is available regarding stroke-related out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We aimed to assess the clinical characteristics of stroke-related OHCA and to identify the factors associated with patient outcomes.We conducted a nationwide population-based study of adult OHCA patients in Japan from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2009. We examined the epidemiology, risk factors, and outcomes of stroke-related OHCA compared with cardiogenic OHCA. The primary outcome was neurologically favorable survival.Of the 243,140 eligible patients, 18,682 (7.7%) were diagnosed with stroke-related OHCA. Compared to OHCA with a presumed cardiac etiology, stroke-related OHCA patients had a greater chance of prehospital return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) (9.9% vs 5.9%, P < 0.0001) but a reduced chance of 1-month survival (3.6% vs 4.9%, P < 0.0001) or favorable neurological outcomes (1.2% vs 2.6%, P < 0.0001). After adjusting for a variety of confounding factors, the prehospital ROSC rates were higher (adjusted OR 2.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.34-2.62), but the neurologically favorable survival rates were lower (adjusted OR 0.66, 95%CI 0.57-0.76), among the stroke-related OHCA patients. In stroke-related OHCA cases, having a younger age, witness, and shockable 1st documented rhythm were associated with improved outcomes. Men had more favorable neurological outcomes. Seasonal or circadian factors had no critical impact on favorable neurological outcomes. Prehospital advanced life support techniques (i.e., epinephrine administration or advanced airway management) were not associated with favorable neurological outcomes.Although stroke-related OHCA had lower 1-month survival rates and poorer neurological outcomes than cardiogenic OHCA, the rates were not considered to be medically futile. Characteristically, sex differences might impact neurologically favorable survival. PMID:27057834

  19. Prevalence of and risk factors for persistent postoperative nonanginal pain after cardiac surgery: a 2-year prospective multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    Choinière, Manon; Watt-Watson, Judy; Victor, J. Charles; Baskett, Roger J.F.; Bussières, Jean S.; Carrier, Michel; Cogan, Jennifer; Costello, Judy; Feindel, Christopher; Guertin, Marie-Claude; Racine, Mélanie; Taillefer, Marie-Christine

    2014-01-01

    Background: Persistent postoperative pain continues to be an underrecognized complication. We examined the prevalence of and risk factors for this type of pain after cardiac surgery. Methods: We enrolled patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass grafting or valve replacement, or both, from Feb. 8, 2005, to Sept. 1, 2009. Validated measures were used to assess (a) preoperative anxiety and depression, tendency to catastrophize in the face of pain, health-related quality of life and presence of persistent pain; (b) pain intensity and interference in the first postoperative week; and (c) presence and intensity of persistent postoperative pain at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after surgery. The primary outcome was the presence of persistent postoperative pain during 24 months of follow-up. Results: A total of 1247 patients completed the preoperative assessment. Follow-up retention rates at 3 and 24 months were 84% and 78%, respectively. The prevalence of persistent postoperative pain decreased significantly over time, from 40.1% at 3 months to 22.1% at 6 months, 16.5% at 12 months and 9.5% at 24 months; the pain was rated as moderate to severe in 3.6% at 24 months. Acute postoperative pain predicted both the presence and severity of persistent postoperative pain. The more intense the pain during the first week after surgery and the more it interfered with functioning, the more likely the patients were to report persistent postoperative pain. Pre-existing persistent pain and increased preoperative anxiety also predicted the presence of persistent postoperative pain. Interpretation: Persistent postoperative pain of nonanginal origin after cardiac surgery affected a substantial proportion of the study population. Future research is needed to determine whether interventions to modify certain risk factors, such as preoperative anxiety and the severity of pain before and immediately after surgery, may help to minimize or prevent persistent postoperative pain. PMID:24566643

  20. Thiotepa-associated cardiomyopathy during blood or marrow transplantation: association with the female sex and cardiac risk factors.

    PubMed

    Alidina, A; Lawrence, D; Ford, L A; Baer, M R; Bambach, B; Bernstein, S H; Czuczman, M S; Slack, J L; Spangenthal, E; Wetzler, M; Barcos, M P; Proulx, G M; Anderson, B; McCarthy, P L

    1999-01-01

    Thiotepa (TT) has not been reported to cause cardiomyopathy, whereas cyclophosphamide (Cy)-related cardiomyopathy is well characterized. To search for cases of acute onset cardiomyopathy associated with TT, we retrospectively reviewed 171 patients who received TT-containing conditioning regimens for blood or marrow transplantation (BMT). Nine of 171 patients (5.3%) developed clinical congestive heart failure in the post-BMT period. The median time to onset of heart failure was 15 days after BMT (range 5-30). The median pre-BMT left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 50% (range 42-65%) as determined by two-dimensional echocardiogram, or gated blood pool scan. At the time of cardiomyopathy onset, LVEF was 30%. Six patients died of causes unrelated to heart failure. All affected patients who developed congestive heart failure following administration of TT had some evidence of cardiac dysfunction prior to transplantation. Significant risk factors for the development of cardiomyopathy included low pre-BMT-LVEF and female sex--particularly in females receiving allogeneic transplantation. The incidence of congestive heart failure with TT-containing regimens was similar to the incidence using other regimens with and without Cy. The mean time to clinical evidence of TT-associated cardiomyopathy was longer than the mean time reported with Cy. We recommend caution in using high-dose TT-containing regimens for patients with histories of cardiac dysfunction. PMID:10534063

  1. Effect of Long-Term Physical Activity Practice after Cardiac Rehabilitation on Some Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freyssin, Celine, Jr.; Blanc, Philippe; Verkindt, Chantal; Maunier, Sebastien; Prieur, Fabrice

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of long-term physical activity practice after a cardiac rehabilitation program on weight, physical capacity and arterial compliance. The Dijon Physical Activity Score was used to identify two groups: sedentary and active. Weight, distance at the 6-min walk test and the small artery elasticity…

  2. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find a Specialist Share Twitter Facebook SCA Risk Assessment Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) occurs abruptly and without ... of all ages and health conditions. Start Risk Assessment The Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment Tool ...

  3. Do Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Severity and Complexity of Coronary Atherosclerosis Predict Aortic Pulse Pressure during Cardiac Catheterization?

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Hemal; Sanghani, Dharmesh; Apergis, George; Fernaine, George

    2016-06-01

    Pulse pressure (PP), estimated from the peripheral blood pressure measurements, has been linked with adverse cardiovascular events. But, the association of PP and coronary artery disease is not well studied. There is a lack of data on the association of invasively measured aortic PP and cardiovascular risk factors and severity of coronary atherosclerosis. We determined the predictive factors of aortic PP during cardiac catheterization. Electronic medical records from 2010 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 368 patients were eligible. The data on demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, coronary lesion characteristics, and medication use was collected. On multivariable regression analysis, aging (β = 0.34, p = 0.001, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14-0.53) and prior aspirin use (β = 5.09, p = 0.015, 95% CI 0.99-9.18) were associated with higher aortic PP. Increasing estimated glomerular filtration rate (β = - 0.52, p = 0.040, 95% CI -0.90 to -0.23) was associated with lower aortic PP. Severity and complexity of coronary lesions, SYNTAX score, and number of obstructed vessels were not associated with aortic PP. Aging, prior aspirin use, and declining renal function were associated with an increase in aortic PP. Aortic PP may not predict the severity and complexity of coronary atherosclerosis. Therefore, the risk of adverse cardiovascular events associated with an elevated aortic PP may not be mediated by the severity of coronary atherosclerosis. PMID:27231423

  4. Risk factors for mediastinitis after cardiac surgery – a retrospective analysis of 1700 patients

    PubMed Central

    Diez, Claudius; Koch, Daniel; Kuss, Oliver; Silber, Rolf-Edgar; Friedrich, Ivar; Boergermann, Jochen

    2007-01-01

    Background Mediastinitis is a rare, but serious complication of cardiac surgery. It has a significant socioeconomic impact and high morbidity. The purpose of this study was to determine pre-, intra-, and postoperative predictors of mediastinitis. Methods and results In 1700 consecutive patients, who underwent cardiac surgery in 2001, 49 variables were retrospectively assessed. Forty-five patients (2.65%, 95% CI [1.88; 3.41]) developed postoperative mediastinitis. None of these patients died during their hospitalization. Multivariate analysis identified three of the 49 variables as highly significant independent predictors for the development of mediastinitis: obesity (OR 1.03, 95% CI [1.01; 1.04] p = 0.001), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR 3.30, 95% CI [1.58; 6.88], p = 0.001), and bilateral grafting of the internal mammary artery (OR 3.18, 95% CI [1.20; 8.43] p = 0.02). The model is reliable in terms of its goodness of fit, it also discriminates well. Additionally, univariate analysis identified diabetes mellitus, CCS class and the number of intraoperatively transfused units of fresh frozen plasma as variables with a significant impact. Conclusion The present study suggests that bilateral IMA grafting, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and obesity are important predictors of mediastinitis. PMID:17511885

  5. Sudden Cardiac Death Risk Stratification

    PubMed Central

    Deyell, Marc W.; Krahn, Andrew D.; Goldberger, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Arrhythmic sudden cardiac death (SCD) may be due to ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation (SCD-VT/VF) or pulseless electrical activity/asystole. Effective risk stratification to identify patients at risk of arrhythmic SCD is essential for targeting our health care and research resources to tackle this important public health issue. Although our understanding of SCD due to pulseless electrical activity/asystole is growing, the overwhelming majority of research in risk stratification has focused on SCD-VT/VF. This review focuses on existing and novel risk stratification tools for SCD-VT/VF. For patients with left ventricular dysfunction and/or myocardial infarction, advances in imaging, measures of cardiac autonomic function, and measures of repolarization have shown considerable promise in refining risk. Yet the majority of SCD-VT/VF occurs in patients without known cardiac disease. Biomarkers and novel imaging techniques may provide further risk stratification in the general population beyond traditional risk stratification for coronary artery disease alone. Despite these advances, significant challenges in risk stratification remain that must be overcome before a meaningful impact on SCD can be realized. PMID:26044247

  6. Cardiac Rehabilitation: Improving Function and Reducing Risk.

    PubMed

    Servey, Jessica T; Stephens, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation is a comprehensive multidisciplinary program individually tailored to the needs of patients with cardiovascular disease. The overall goals focus on improving daily function and reducing cardiovascular risk factors. Cardiac rehabilitation includes interventions aimed at lowering blood pressure and improving lipid and diabetes mellitus control, with tobacco cessation, behavioral counseling, and graded physical activity. The physical activity component typically involves 36 sessions over 12 weeks, during which patients participate in supervised exercise under cardiac monitoring. There are also intensive programs that include up to 72 sessions lasting up to 18 weeks, although these programs are not widely available. Additional components of cardiac rehabilitation include counseling on nutrition, screening for and managing depression, and assuring up-to-date immunizations. Cardiac rehabilitation is covered by Medicare and recommended for patients following myocardial infarction, bypass surgery, and stent placement, and for patients with heart failure, stable angina, and several other conditions. Despite proven benefits in mortality rates, depression, functional capacity, and medication adherence, rates of referral for cardiac rehabilitation are suboptimal. Groups less likely to be referred are older adults, women, patients who do not speak English, and persons living in areas where cardiac rehabilitation is not locally available. Additionally, primary care physicians refer patients less often than cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons. PMID:27386722

  7. Simvastatin mitigates increases in risk factors for and the occurrence of cardiac disease following 10 Gy total body irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Lenarczyk, Marek; Su, Jidong; Haworth, Steven T; Komorowski, Richard; Fish, Brian L; Migrino, Raymond Q; Harmann, Leanne; Hopewell, John W; Kronenberg, Amy; Patel, Shailendra; Moulder, John E; Baker, John E

    2015-01-01

    The ability of simvastatin to mitigate the increases in risk factors for and the occurrence of cardiac disease after 10 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) was determined. This radiation dose is relevant to conditioning for stem cell transplantation and threats from radiological terrorism. Male rats received single dose TBI of 10 Gy. Age-matched, sham-irradiated rats served as controls. Lipid profile, heart and liver morphology and cardiac mechanical function were determined for up to 120 days after irradiation. TBI resulted in a sustained increase in total- and LDL-cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol), and triglycerides. Simvastatin (10 mg/kg body weight/day) administered continuously from 9 days after irradiation mitigated TBI-induced increases in total- and LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as liver injury. TBI resulted in cellular peri-arterial fibrosis, whereas control hearts had less collagen and fibrosis. Simvastatin mitigated these morphological injuries. TBI resulted in cardiac mechanical dysfunction. Simvastatin mitigated cardiac mechanical dysfunction 20–120 days following TBI. To determine whether simvastatin affects the ability of the heart to withstand stress after TBI, injury from myocardial ischemia/reperfusion was determined in vitro. TBI increased the severity of an induced myocardial infarction at 20 and 80 days after irradiation. Simvastatin mitigated the severity of this myocardial infarction at 20 and 80 days following TBI. It is concluded simvastatin mitigated the increases in risk factors for cardiac disease and the extent of cardiac disease following TBI. This statin may be developed as a medical countermeasure for the mitigation of radiation-induced cardiac disease. PMID:26171225

  8. Simvastatin mitigates increases in risk factors for and the occurrence of cardiac disease following 10 Gy total body irradiation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lenarczyk, Marek; Su, Jidong; Haworth, Steven T.; Komorowski, Richard; Fish, Brian L.; Migrino, Raymond Q.; Harmann, Leanne; Hopewell, John W.; Kronenberg, Amy; Patel, Shailendra; et al

    2015-06-01

    The ability of simvastatin to mitigate the increases in risk factors for and the occurrence of cardiac disease after 10 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) was determined. This radiation dose is relevant to conditioning for stem cell transplantation and threats from radiological terrorism. Male rats received single dose TBI of 10 Gy. Age-matched, sham-irradiated rats served as controls. Lipid profile, heart and liver morphology and cardiac mechanical function were determined for up to 120 days after irradiation. TBI resulted in a sustained increase in total- and LDL-cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol), and triglycerides. Simvastatin (10 mg/kg body weight/day) administered continuously from 9more » days after irradiation mitigated TBI-induced increases in total- and LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as liver injury. TBI resulted in cellular peri-arterial fibrosis, whereas control hearts had less collagen and fibrosis. Simvastatin mitigated these morphological injuries. TBI resulted in cardiac mechanical dysfunction. Simvastatin mitigated cardiac mechanical dysfunction 20–120 days following TBI. To determine whether simvastatin affects the ability of the heart to withstand stress after TBI, injury from myocardial ischemia/reperfusion was determined in vitro. TBI increased the severity of an induced myocardial infarction at 20 and 80 days after irradiation. Simvastatin mitigated the severity of this myocardial infarction at 20 and 80 days following TBI. It is concluded simvastatin mitigated the increases in risk factors for cardiac disease and the extent of cardiac disease following TBI. This statin may be developed as a medical countermeasure for the mitigation of radiation-induced cardiac disease.« less

  9. Simvastatin mitigates increases in risk factors for and the occurrence of cardiac disease following 10 Gy total body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lenarczyk, Marek; Su, Jidong; Haworth, Steven T.; Komorowski, Richard; Fish, Brian L.; Migrino, Raymond Q.; Harmann, Leanne; Hopewell, John W.; Kronenberg, Amy; Patel, Shailendra; Moulder, John E.; Baker, John E.

    2015-06-01

    The ability of simvastatin to mitigate the increases in risk factors for and the occurrence of cardiac disease after 10 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) was determined. This radiation dose is relevant to conditioning for stem cell transplantation and threats from radiological terrorism. Male rats received single dose TBI of 10 Gy. Age-matched, sham-irradiated rats served as controls. Lipid profile, heart and liver morphology and cardiac mechanical function were determined for up to 120 days after irradiation. TBI resulted in a sustained increase in total- and LDL-cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol), and triglycerides. Simvastatin (10 mg/kg body weight/day) administered continuously from 9 days after irradiation mitigated TBI-induced increases in total- and LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as liver injury. TBI resulted in cellular peri-arterial fibrosis, whereas control hearts had less collagen and fibrosis. Simvastatin mitigated these morphological injuries. TBI resulted in cardiac mechanical dysfunction. Simvastatin mitigated cardiac mechanical dysfunction 20–120 days following TBI. To determine whether simvastatin affects the ability of the heart to withstand stress after TBI, injury from myocardial ischemia/reperfusion was determined in vitro. TBI increased the severity of an induced myocardial infarction at 20 and 80 days after irradiation. Simvastatin mitigated the severity of this myocardial infarction at 20 and 80 days following TBI. It is concluded simvastatin mitigated the increases in risk factors for cardiac disease and the extent of cardiac disease following TBI. This statin may be developed as a medical countermeasure for the mitigation of radiation-induced cardiac disease.

  10. Trends in sudden cardiac death and its risk factors in Japan from 1981 to 2005: the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS)

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Minako; Ohira, Tetsuya; Imano, Hironori; Kitamura, Akihiko; Kiyama, Masahiko; Okada, Takeo; Maeda, Kenji; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Noda, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Shimamoto, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Objective There is little evidence whether sudden cardiac death (SCD) is increasing in Asia, although the incidence of coronary heart disease among urban middle-aged Japanese men has increased recently. We examined trends in the incidence of SCD and its risk factors in the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study. Design and setting This was a population-based longitudinal study. Surveillance of men and women for SCD incidence and risk factors was conducted from 1981 to 2005. Subjects The surveyed population was all men and women aged 30–84 years who lived in three rural communities and one urban community in Japan. Main outcome measures Trends in SCD incidence and its risk factors. Results Age-adjusted and sex-adjusted incidence of SCD decreased from 1981–1985 to 1991–1995, and plateaued thereafter. The annual incidence per 100 000 person-years was 76.0 in 1981–1985, 57.9 in 1986–1990, 39.3 in 1991–1995, 31.6 in 1996–2000 and 36.8 in 2001–2005. The prevalence of hypertension decreased from 1981–1985 to 1991–1995, and plateaued thereafter for men and women. The age-adjusted prevalence of current smoking for men decreased while that of diabetes mellitus increased for both sexes from 1981–1985 to 2001–2005. Conclusions The incidence of SCD decreased from 1981 to 1995 but was unchanged from 1996 to 2005. Continuous surveillance is necessary to clarify future trends in SCD in Japan because of an increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus. PMID:22446988

  11. Aging is a primary risk factor for cardiac arrhythmias: disruption of intracellular Ca2+ regulation as a key suspect.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Fiona; Lancaster, Matthew K; Jones, Sandra A

    2011-08-01

    Aging is an inevitable time-dependent progression associated with a functional decline of the cardiovascular system even in 'healthy' individuals. Age positively correlates with an increasing risk of cardiac problems including arrhythmias. Not only the prevalence but also the severity of arrhythmias escalates with age. The reasons for this are multifactorial but dysregulation of intracellular calcium within the heart is likely to play a key role in initiating and perpetuating these life-threatening events. We now know that several aspects of cardiac calcium regulation significantly change with advancing age - changes that could produce electrical instability. Further development of knowledge of the mechanisms underlying these changes will allow us to reduce what currently is an inevitable increase in the incidence of arrhythmias in the elderly. PMID:21878050

  12. Men Face Greater Risk of Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159651.html Men Face Greater Risk of Cardiac Arrest: Study Heart disease tends to develop earlier than ... About one in nine men will suffer a cardiac arrest before the age of 70, compared to about ...

  13. Risk factors for cardiovascular events and bleeding complications following non-cardiac surgery or procedure in patients with drug eluting stent placement

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Divya; Jurkovitz, Claudine T; Zhang, Zugui; Bowen, James; Kolm, Paul; Wygant, Gail; Weintraub, William S

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Previous studies suggest an increased incidence of cardiovascular (CV) events after P2Y12 receptor blocker cessation. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of P2Y12 receptor blocker cessation and other risk factors on the risk of CV events and bleeding events after non-cardiac surgery/procedure in patients with drug-eluting stents (DES). Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Single large healthcare system in the northeast of the USA. Patients All adult patients who had a coronary drug eluting stent (DES) placed between 2002 and 2007 in our institution. Interventions No randomised intervention. The principal exposure was cessation of P2Y12 receptor blocker Methods This was a retrospective study of all adult patients who had a coronary DES placed between 2002 and 2007 in our institution. We considered all non-cardiac procedures up to 1 year after DES placement. Generalised estimating equations were used to identify the independent risk factors. Multiple imputations were used to replace missing values. Main outcome measures The outcomes were CV events including death from any cause and bleeding, occurring within 30 days after the procedure. Results From 2002 to 2007, 6397 patients had DES, 873 (13.6%) had at least one non-cardiac procedure. A total of 3.6% (33/927) of the admissions were complicated by at least one cardiovascular event and 6.9% (55/795) were complicated by bleeding. Urgent procedure (versus elective) was the only independent risk factor for CV events (OR=4.82, 95% CI 1.95 to 11.89). Older age, diabetes, urgent procedures, orthopaedic and vascular surgery compared to unclassified surgery were independent risk factors for bleeding. Conclusions Non-cardiac procedures are common within 1 year after DES placement. Urgent nature of procedure is a risk factor for CV events and bleeding complications. Older age, diabetes, type of surgery, are risk factors associated only with bleeding events. PMID:27326174

  14. Evidence Based Review: Risk of Cardiac Rhythm Problems During Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platts, Steven H.; Stenger, Michael B.; Phillips, Tiffany R.; Brown, Angela K.; Arzeno, Natalia M.; Levine, Benjamin; Summers, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Very little research has systematically evaluated the prevalence (or potential risk) of cardiac arrhythmias during space flight. There are several observational reports of non life-threatening but potentially concerning arrhythmias. At least two potential risk factors for arrhythmias have been reported either during or immediately after space flight: cardiac atrophy and a prolonged QTc interval. The potential severity of the mission impact of a serious arrhythmia requires that a systematic evaluation be conducted of the risk of arrhythmia due to space flight.

  15. Emotion Risk-Factor in Patients With Cardiac Diseases: The Role of Cognitive Emotion Regulation Strategies, Positive Affect and Negative Affect (A Case-Control Study)

    PubMed Central

    Bahremand, Mostafa; Alikhani, Mostafa; Zakiei, Ali; Janjani, Parisa; Aghaei, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Application of psychological interventions is essential in classic treatments for patient with cardiac diseases. The present study compared cognitive emotion regulation strategies, positive affect, and negative affect for cardiac patients with healthy subjects. This study was a case-control study. Fifty subjects were selected using convenient sampling method from cardiac (coronary artery disease) patients presenting in Imam Ali medical center of Kermanshah, Iran in the spring 2013. Fifty subjects accompanied the patients to the medical center, selected as control group, did not have any history of cardiac diseases. For collecting data, the cognitive emotion regulation questionnaire and positive and negative affect scales were used. For data analysis, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was applied using the SPSS statistical software (ver. 19.0). In all cognitive emotion regulation strategies, there was a significant difference between the two groups. A significant difference was also detected regarding positive affect between the two groups, but no significant difference was found regarding negative affect. We found as a result that, having poor emotion regulation strategies is a risk factor for developing heart diseases. PMID:26234976

  16. Risk factors associated with postoperative seizures in patients undergoing cardiac surgery who received tranexamic acid: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Montes, Felix R; Pardo, Daniel F; Carreño, Marisol; Arciniegas, Catalina; Dennis, Rodolfo J; Umaña, Juan P

    2012-01-01

    Antifibrinolytic agents are used during cardiac surgery to minimize bleeding and reduce exposure to blood products. Several reports suggest that tranexamic acid (TA) can induce seizure activity in the postoperative period. To examine factors associated with postoperative seizures in patients undergoing cardiac surgery who received TA. University-affiliated hospital. Case-control study. Patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) between January 2008 and December 2009 were identified. During this time, all patients undergoing heart surgery with CPB received TA. Cases were defined as patients who developed seizures that required initiation of anticonvulsive therapy within 48 h of surgery. Exclusion criteria included subjects with preexisting epilepsy and patients in whom the convulsive episode was secondary to a new ischemic lesion on brain imaging. Controls who did not develop seizures were randomly selected from the initial cohort. From an initial cohort of 903 patients, we identified 32 patients with postoperative seizures. Four patients were excluded. Twenty-eight cases and 112 controls were analyzed. Cases were more likely to have a history of renal impairment and higher preoperative creatinine values compared with controls (1.39 ± 1.1 vs. 0.98 ± 0.02 mg/dL, P = 0.02). Significant differences in the intensive care unit, postoperative and total lengths of stay were observed. An association between high preoperative creatinine value and postoperative seizure was identified. TA may be associated with the development of postoperative seizures in patients with renal dysfunction. Doses of TA should be reduced or even avoided in this population. PMID:22234015

  17. Cardiac risk assessment: decreasing postoperative complications.

    PubMed

    Thanavaro, Joanne L

    2015-02-01

    Preoperative cardiac assessment helps identify patients undergoing noncardiac surgery who are at risk for significant postoperative cardiac complications and those who may benefit from additional preoperative evaluation and perioperative care. Advanced practice nurses can identify surgery- and patient-related risks by conducting a thorough health history and physical examination. Multiple risk indices and evidence-based guidelines are available to inform health care providers regarding patient evaluation and strategies to reduce postoperative cardiac risk. In general, preoperative tests are recommended only if the findings will influence medical therapy or perioperative monitoring or will require postponement of surgery until a cardiac condition can be corrected or stabilized. Medication management is a crucial component of the preoperative assessment; providers may need to initiate the use of beta-blockers and make decisions regarding continuing or withholding antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy. Preoperative cardiac risk stratification, medication reconciliation, and device management are essential for providing safe care for patients. PMID:25645037

  18. Cardiac fibrillation risk of Taser weapons.

    PubMed

    Leitgeb, Norbert

    2014-06-01

    The debate on potential health hazards associated with delivering electric discharges to incapacitated subjects, in particular on whether electric discharge weapons are lethal, less lethal or non-lethal, is still controversial. The cardiac fibrillation risks of Taser weapons X26 and X3 have been investigated by measuring the delivered high-tension pulses in dependence on load impedance. Excitation thresholds and sinus-to-Taser conversion factors have been determined by numerical modeling of endocardial, myocardial, and epicardial cells. Detailed quantitative assessment of cardiac electric exposure has been performed by numerical simulation at the normal-weighted anatomical model NORMAN. The impact of anatomical variation has been quantified at an overweight model (Visible Man), both with a spatial resolution of 2 × 2 × 2 mm voxels. Spacing and location of dart electrodes were systematically varied and the worst-case position determined. Based on volume-weighted cardiac exposure assessment, the fibrillation probability of the worst-case hit was determined to 30% (Taser X26) and 9% (Taser X3). The overall risk assessment of Taser application accounting for realistic spatial hit distributions was derived from training sessions of police officers under realistic scenarios and by accounting for the influence of body (over-)weight as well as gender. The analysis of the results showed that the overall fibrillation risk of Taser use is not negligible. It is higher at Taser X26 than at Taser X3 and amounts to about 1% for Europeans with an about 20% higher risk for Asians. Results demonstrate that enhancement as well as further reduction of fibrillation risk depends on responsible use or abuse of Taser weapons. PMID:24776896

  19. The incidence, risk factors, and outcome of transfusion-related acute lung injury in a cohort of cardiac surgery patients: a prospective nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Vlaar, Alexander P J; Hofstra, Jorrit J; Determann, Rogier M; Veelo, Denise P; Paulus, Frederique; Kulik, Wim; Korevaar, Johanna; de Mol, Bas A; Koopman, Marianne M W; Porcelijn, Leendert; Binnekade, Jan M; Vroom, Margreeth B; Schultz, Marcus J; Juffermans, Nicole P

    2011-04-21

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality. Both antibodies and bioactive lipids that have accumulated during storage of blood have been implicated in TRALI pathogenesis. In a single-center, nested, case-control study, patients were prospectively observed for onset of TRALI according to the consensus definition. Of 668 patients, 16 patients (2.4%) developed TRALI. Patient-related risk factors for onset of TRALI were age and time on the cardiopulmonary bypass. Transfusion-related risk factors were total amount of blood products (odds ratio [OR] = 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.44), number of red blood cells stored more than 14 days (OR = 1.6; 95% CI, 1.04-2.37), total amount of plasma (OR = 1.2; 95% CI, 1.03-1.44), presence of antibodies in donor plasma (OR = 8.8; 95% CI, 1.8-44), and total amount of transfused bioactive lipids (OR = 1.0; 95% CI, 1.00-1.07). When adjusted for patient risk factors, only the presence of antibodies in the associated blood products remained a risk factor for TRALI (OR = 14.2; 95% CI, 1.5-132). In-hospital mortality of TRALI was 13% compared with 0% and 3% in transfused and nontransfused patients, respectively (P < .05). In conclusion, the incidence of TRALI is high in cardiac surgery patients and associated with adverse outcome. Our results suggest that cardiac surgery patients may benefit from exclusion of blood products containing HLA/HNA antibodies. PMID:21325598

  20. Safety and Efficacy of Prophylactic Amiodarone in Preventing Early Junctional Ectopic Tachycardia (JET) in Children After Cardiac Surgery and Determination of Its Risk Factor.

    PubMed

    Amrousy, Doaa El; Elshehaby, Walid; Feky, Wael El; Elshmaa, Nagat S

    2016-04-01

    Postoperative arrhythmia is a common complication after open heart surgery in children. JET is the most common and dangerous arrhythmia. We aimed to assess safety and efficacy of prophylactic amiodarone in preventing JET in children underwent cardiac surgery and to assess risk factors for JET among our patients. In total, 117 children who underwent cardiac surgery for CHD at Tanta University Hospital from October 2011 to April 2015 were divided in two groups; amiodarone group (65 patients) was given prophylactic amiodarone intraoperatively and placebo group (52 patients). Amiodarone is started as loading dose of 5 mg/kg IV in the operating room after induction of anesthesia and continued for 3 days as continuous infusion 10-15 μg/kg/min. Primary outcome and secondary outcomes of amiodarone administration were reported. We studied pre-, intra- and postoperative factors to determine risk factors for occurrence of JET among these children. Prophylactic amiodarone was found to significantly decrease incidence of postoperative JET from 28.9 % in placebo group to 9.2 % in amiodarone group, and symptomatic JET from 11.5 % in placebo group to 3.1 % in amiodarone group, and shorten postoperative intensive care unit and hospital stay without significant side effects. Risk factors for occurrence of JET were younger age, lower body weight, longer cardiopulmonary bypass, aortic cross-clamp time, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, acidosis and high dose of inotropes. JET was more associated with surgical repair of right ventricular outlet obstruction as in case of tetralogy of Fallot and pulmonary stenosis. Most of JET 15/21 (71.4 %) occurred in the first day postoperatively, and 6/21 occurred in the second day (28.6 %). Prophylactic amiodarone is safe and effective in preventing early JET in children after open heart surgery. PMID:26818850

  1. What Are the Benefits and Risks of Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Benefits and Risks of Cardiac Rehabilitation? Benefits Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) has ... health also can help some people quit smoking . Risks The lifestyle changes that you make during cardiac ...

  2. Hypoxic hepatitis in cardiac intensive care unit: a study of cardiovascular risk factors, clinical course, and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Chávez-Tapia, Norberto C; Balderas-Garces, Brenda V; Meza-Meneses, Patricia; Herrera-Gomar, Magali; García-López, Sandra; Gónzalez-Chon, Octavio; Uribe, Misael

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Hypoxic hepatitis (HH) is observed frequently in intensive care units. Information in the cardiac intensive care unit (CICU) is limited. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical course and outcomes of HH in the specific setting of the CICU. Methods We analyzed records of patients with HH admitted to the CICU (Group 1). Data were collected and compared with those of an intermediate group of patients with altered liver test results that did not meet the HH criteria who had a serum aminotransferase level of five to ≤20 times the upper-normal limit (Group 2), and with a control group who had an aminotransferase level less than five times the upper-normal limit (Group 3). Results Patients with HH exhibited a worse hemodynamic profile and more of these patients were in shock: 17 (94.4%) in Group 1, 14 (77.8%) in Group 2, and seven (38.9%) in Group 3 (P=0.001). Cardiogenic shock was the most frequent event: 12 (66.7%) in Group 1, 13 (72.2%) in Group 2, and six (33.3%) in Group 3 (P=0.006). The mortality rate was 55.6%. Mechanical ventilation was an independent factor associated with death (odds ratio 12.25, 95% confidence interval 1.26–118.36). Conclusion The mortality rate of patients with HH in CICU is high and is associated with ventilatory disturbances. PMID:24600229

  3. Incidence, risk factors and prediction of post-operative acute kidney injury following cardiac surgery for active infective endocarditis: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac surgery is frequently needed in patients with infective endocarditis (IE). Acute kidney injury (AKI) often complicates IE and is associated with poor outcomes. The purpose of the study was to determine the risk factors for post-operative AKI in patients operated on for IE. Methods A retrospective, non-interventional study of prospectively collected data (2000–2010) included patients with IE and cardiac surgery with cardio-pulmonary bypass. The primary outcome was post-operative AKI, defined as the development of AKI or progression of AKI based on the acute kidney injury network (AKIN) definition. We used ensemble machine learning (“Super Learning”) to develop a predictor of AKI based on potential risk factors, and evaluated its performance using V-fold cross validation. We identified clinically important predictors among a set of risk factors using Targeted Maximum Likelihood Estimation. Results 202 patients were included, of which 120 (59%) experienced a post-operative AKI. 65 (32.2%) patients presented an AKI before surgery while 91 (45%) presented a progression of AKI in the post-operative period. 20 patients (9.9%) required a renal replacement therapy during the post-operative ICU stay and 30 (14.8%) died during their hospital stay. The following variables were found to be significantly associated with renal function impairment, after adjustment for other risk factors: multiple surgery (OR: 4.16, 95% CI: 2.98-5.80, p<0.001), pre-operative anemia (OR: 1.89, 95% CI: 1.34-2.66, p<0.001), transfusion requirement during surgery (OR: 2.38, 95% CI: 1.55-3.63, p<0.001), and the use of vancomycin (OR: 2.63, 95% CI: 2.07-3.34, p<0.001), aminoglycosides (OR: 1.44, 95% CI: 1.13-1.83, p=0.004) or contrast iodine (OR: 1.70, 95% CI: 1.37-2.12, p<0.001). Post-operative but not pre-operative AKI was associated with hospital mortality. Conclusions Post-operative AKI following cardiopulmonary bypass for IE results from additive hits to the kidney. We

  4. Understand Your Risk for Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. The first six months after a heart attack is a particularly high-risk period for sudden cardiac arrest in patients with atherosclerotic heart disease . ...

  5. Men Face Greater Risk of Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159651.html Men Face Greater Risk of Cardiac Arrest: Study Heart ... 30, 2016 THURSDAY, June 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Men are significantly more likely to have their heart ...

  6. Phosphate excretion is decreased in older cardiac patients with normal kidney function: an emerging dietary risk factor?

    PubMed

    Jozefacki, Alexis; White, Christine A; Shobeiri, Navid S; Hopman, Wilma M; Johri, Amer M; Adams, Michael A; Holden, Rachel M

    2016-04-01

    Serum phosphate independently predicts cardiovascular events and mortality. Sixteen healthy adults and 9 adults with cardiovascular disease (CVD) ingested 500 mg of sodium phosphate after an over-night fast. In control subjects, the urine phosphate/creatinine ratio was significantly higher at 2 h (3.12 ± 1.02) than at baseline (1.98 ± 0.58, p < 0.001) but no change was observed in CVD patients. Decreased postprandial urinary excretion of phosphate could accelerate vascular calcification and may be an under-recognized risk factor for CVD. PMID:26944224

  7. Mitochondrial Transcription Factors TFA, TFB1 and TFB2: A Search for DNA Variants/Haplotypes and the Risk of Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Montes, Cristina; Castro, Mónica G.; Reguero, Julián R.; Perrot, Andreas; Özcelik, Cemil; Geier, Christian; Posch, Maximilian G.; Morís, César; Alvarez, Victoria; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Coto, Eliecer

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factors mtTFA, mtTFB1 and mtTFB2 are required for the replication of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), regulating the number of mtDNA copies. Mice with a mtTFA deletion showed a reduced number of mtDNA copies, a reduction in respiratory chain activity, and a characteristic dilated cardiomyopathy. DNA variants in these genes could be involved in the risk for cardiac hypertrophy (HCM). We determined the variation in the TFAM, TFB1M, and TFB2M genes (using SSCA, DHPLC, and direct sequencing) in a total of 200 HCM-patients from Spain and Germany, and in 250 healthy controls. We found several common polymorphisms that defined haplotype blocks in these genes, with frequencies that did not differ between patients and controls. We also found four novel variants in patients which were absent in the controls: -91 C > A (5'-UTR) and Ala105 > Thr in TFAM, and Thr211 > Ala and Arg256 > Lys in TFB1M. The three missense changes were in highly conserved amino acids, and could be involved in HCM-risk. In conclusion, common variants in the mitochondrial transcription factors were not associated with the risk for HCM. However, rare DNA variants (putative mutations) could be involved in the pathogenesis of HCM in a reduced number of cases. PMID:19096125

  8. Prediction of cardiac risk in patients undergoing vascular surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Morise, A.P.; McDowell, D.E.; Savrin, R.A.; Goodwin, C.A.; Gabrielle, O.F.; Oliver, F.N.; Nullet, F.R.; Bekheit, S.; Jain, A.C.

    1987-03-01

    In an attempt to determine whether noninvasive cardiac testing could be used to assess cardiac risk in patients undergoing surgery for vascular disease, the authors studied 96 patients. Seventy-seven patients eventually underwent major vascular surgery with 11 (14%) experiencing a significant cardiac complication. Thallium imaging was much more likely to be positive (p less than 0.01) in patients with a cardiac complication; however, there was a significant number of patients with cardiac complications who had a positive history or electrocardiogram for myocardial infarction. When grouped by complication and history of infarction, thallium imaging, if negative, correctly predicted low cardiac risk in the group with a history of infarction. Thallium imaging, however, did not provide a clear separation of risk in those without a history of infarction. Age and coronary angiography, on the other hand, did reveal significant differences within the group without a history of infarction. The resting radionuclide ejection fraction followed a similar pattern to thallium imaging. It is concluded that a positive history of myocardial infarction at any time in the past is the strongest risk predictor in this population and that the predictive value of noninvasive testing is dependent on this factor. Considering these findings, a proposed scheme for assessing risk that will require further validation is presented.

  9. Multidimensional Health Locus of Control and Causal Attributions as Predictors of Health and Risk Factor Status after Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkimer, John C.; And Others

    Compliance with many health-promoting regimens is often poor, even among individuals with known chronic disease. Lifestyle changes recommended by cardiac rehabilitation educators are often not adopted or not maintained by clients having suffered myocardial infarction and/or coronary graft bypass surgery. Subjects were graduates (N=117) of a Phase…

  10. Risk Factors in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Mustacchi, Piero

    1985-01-01

    In the United States, stroke accounts for 160,000 annual deaths; only 16% of the 1.8 million stroke survivors are fully independent. The incidence of stroke increases with age. Hemorrhagic strokes outnumber ischemic strokes before age 15. Japanese men in this country have a lower stroke mortality than their age peers in Japan. Excessive stroke mortality for US nonwhites may not be entirely due to the greater prevalence of hypertension among blacks. Hypertension emerges as the single most powerful and reversible risk factor in stroke and for survival after stroke. Impaired cardiac function is the second most important precursor of stroke. The recurrence of stroke in survivors is high. The frequency of completed stroke is high in persons with transient ischemic attacks, but not in those with asymptomatic carotid bruits. Other reversible risk factors are smoking, the use of oral contraceptives, alcoholic excess, a low level of physical activity, blood hyperviscosity and drug abuse. PMID:3898597

  11. Association of Roadway Proximity with Fasting Plasma Glucose and Metabolic Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in a Cross-Sectional Study of Cardiac Catheterization Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, William E.; Blach, Colette; Haynes, Carol S.; Dowdy, Elaine; Miranda, Marie Lynn; Devlin, Robert B.; Diaz-Sanchez, David; Cascio, Wayne E.; Mukerjee, Shaibal; Stallings, Casson; Smith, Luther A.; Gregory, Simon G.; Shah, Svati H.; Hauser, Elizabeth R.; Neas, Lucas M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The relationship between traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) and risk factors for cardiovascular disease needs to be better understood in order to address the adverse impact of air pollution on human health. Objective We examined associations between roadway proximity and traffic exposure zones, as markers of TRAP exposure, and metabolic biomarkers for cardiovascular disease risk in a cohort of patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 2,124 individuals residing in North Carolina (USA). Roadway proximity was assessed via distance to primary and secondary roadways, and we used residence in traffic exposure zones (TEZs) as a proxy for TRAP. Two categories of metabolic outcomes were studied: measures associated with glucose control, and measures associated with lipid metabolism. Statistical models were adjusted for race, sex, smoking, body mass index, and socioeconomic status (SES). Results An interquartile-range (990 m) decrease in distance to roadways was associated with higher fasting plasma glucose (β = 2.17 mg/dL; 95% CI: –0.24, 4.59), and the association appeared to be limited to women (β = 5.16 mg/dL; 95% CI: 1.48, 8.84 compared with β = 0.14 mg/dL; 95% CI: –3.04, 3.33 in men). Residence in TEZ 5 (high-speed traffic) and TEZ 6 (stop-and-go traffic), the two traffic zones assumed to have the highest levels of TRAP, was positively associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C; β = 8.36; 95% CI: –0.15, 16.9 and β = 5.98; 95% CI: –3.96, 15.9, for TEZ 5 and 6, respectively). Conclusion Proxy measures of TRAP exposure were associated with intermediate metabolic traits associated with cardiovascular disease, including fasting plasma glucose and possibly HDL-C. Citation Ward-Caviness CK, Kraus WE, Blach C, Haynes CS, Dowdy E, Miranda ML, Devlin RB, Diaz-Sanchez D, Cascio WE, Mukerjee S, Stallings C, Smith LA, Gregory SG, Shah SH, Hauser ER, Neas LM. 2015. Association of roadway

  12. Depression as a Risk Factor for the Initial Presentation of Twelve Cardiac, Cerebrovascular, and Peripheral Arterial Diseases: Data Linkage Study of 1.9 Million Women and Men

    PubMed Central

    George, Julie; Walters, Kate; Osborn, David P.; Batty, G. David; Stogiannis, Dimitris; Rapsomaniki, Eleni; Pujades-Rodriguez, Mar; Denaxas, Spiros; Udumyan, Ruzan; Kivimaki, Mika; Hemingway, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression is associated with coronary heart disease and stroke, but associations with a range of pathologically diverse cardiovascular diseases are not well understood. We examine the risk of 12 cardiovascular diseases according to depression status (history or new onset). Methods Cohort study of 1,937,360 adult men and women, free from cardiovascular disease at baseline, using linked UK electronic health records between 1997 and 2010. The exposures were new-onset depression (a new GP diagnosis of depression and/or prescription for antidepressants during a one-year baseline), and history of GP-diagnosed depression before baseline. The primary endpoint was initial presentation of 12 cardiovascular diseases after baseline. We used disease-specific Cox proportional hazards models with multiple imputation adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors (age, sex, socioeconomic status, smoking, blood pressure, diabetes, cholesterol). Results Over a median [IQR] 6.9 [2.1–10.5] years of follow-up, 18.9% had a history of depression and 94,432 incident cardiovascular events occurred. After adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, history of depression was associated with: stable angina (Hazard Ratio = 1.38, 95%CI 1.32–1.45), unstable angina (1.70, 1.60–1.82), myocardial infarction (1.21, 1.16–1.27), unheralded coronary death (1.23, 1.14–1.32), heart failure (1.18, 1.13–1.24), cardiac arrest (1.14, 1.03–1.26), transient ischemic attack (1.31, 1.25–1.38), ischemic stroke (1.26, 1.18–1.34), subarachnoid haemorrhage (1.17, 1.01–1.35), intracerebral haemorrhage (1.30, 1.17–1.45), peripheral arterial disease (1.24, 1.18–1.30), and abdominal aortic aneurysm (1.12,1.01–1.24). New onset depression developed in 2.9% of people, among whom 63,761 cardiovascular events occurred. New onset depression was similarly associated with each of the 12 diseases, with no evidence of stronger associations compared to history of depression. The strength of

  13. Cardiac factors in orthostatic hypotension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löllgen, H.; Dirschedl, P.; Koppenhagen, K.; Klein, K. E.

    Cardiac function is determined by preload, afterload, heart rate and contractility. During orthostatic stress, the footward blood shift is compensated for by an increase of afterload. LBNP is widely used to analyze effects of volume displacement during orthostatic stress. Comparisons of invasive ( right heart catheterization) and non-invasive approach (echocardiography) yielded similar changes. Preload and afterload change with graded LBNP, heart rate increases, and stroke volume and cardiac output decrease. Thus, the working point on the left ventricular function curve is shifted to the left and downward, similar to hypovolemia. However, position on the Frank-Starling curve, the unchanged ejection fraction, and the constant Vcf indicate a normal contractile state during LBNP. A decrease of arterial oxygen partial pressure during LBNP shwos impaired ventilation/perfusion ratio. Finally, LBNP induced cardiac and hemodynamic changes can be effectively countermeasured by dihydroergotamine, a potent venoconstrictor. Comparison of floating catheter data with that of echocardiography resulted in close correlation for cardiac output and stroke volume. In addition, cardiac dimensions changed in a similar way during LBNP. From our findings, echocardiography as a non-invasive procedure can reliably used in LBNP and orthostatic stress tests. Some informations can be obtained on borderline values indicating collaps or orthostatic syncope. Early fainters can be differentiated from late fainters by stroke volume changes.

  14. Motivational factors of adherence to cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Shahsavari, Hooman; Shahriari, Mohsen; Alimohammadi, Nasrollah

    2012-01-01

    Background: Main suggested theories about patients’ adherence to treatment regimens recognize the importance of motivation in positive changes in behaviors. Since cardiac diseases are chronic and common, cardiac rehabilitation as an effective prevention program is crucial in management of these diseases. There is always concern about the patients’ adherence to cardiac rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to describe the motivational factors affecting the patients’ participation and compliance to cardiac rehabilitation by recognizing and understanding the nature of patients’ experiences. Materials and Methods: The participants were selected among the patients with cardiac diseases who were referred to cardiac rehabilitation in Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Center, Iran. The purposive sampling method was used and data saturation achieved after 8 semi-structured interviews. Findings: The three main concepts obtained from this study are “beliefs”, “supporters” and “group cohesion”. Conclusions: In cardiac rehabilitation programs, emphasis on motivational factors affects the patient’s adherence. It is suggested that in cardiac rehabilitation programs more attention should be paid to patients’ beliefs, the role of patients’ supporters and the role of group-based rehabilitation. PMID:23833634

  15. Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been linked to some cancers: Links between air pollution and cancer risk have been found. These include ... between lung cancer and secondhand tobacco smoke , outdoor air pollution, and asbestos . Drinking water that contains a large ...

  16. Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart disease and stroke. However, certain groups—including African Americans and older individuals—are at higher risk ... life expectancy found among minorities. As of 2007, African American men were 30% more likely to die ...

  17. Usefulness of High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin T for the Identification of Outlier Patients With Diffuse Coronary Atherosclerosis and Low-Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Magnoni, Marco; Masson, Serge; Andreini, Daniele; Moccetti, Tiziano; Modena, Maria Grazia; Canestrari, Mauro; Berti, Sergio; Casolo, Giancarlo; Gabrielli, Domenico; Marraccini, Paolo; Pontone, Gianluca; Latini, Roberto; Maggioni, Aldo Pietro; Maseri, Attilio

    2016-05-01

    Novel high-sensitivity assay can detect very low levels of circulating cardiac troponin (hs-cTnT) in apparently healthy subjects. Within normal range, higher levels are associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) and cardiac abnormalities commonly associated to traditional risk factors (RFs) for CAD. Therefore, we investigated the relation between circulating hs-cTnT and CAD in patients with a spectrum of RF burden aiming to assess the added value of hs-cTnT to identify "outlier" patients with CAD despite a low RF burden. Hs-cTnT was measured in 525 stable patients without previous diagnosis of ischemic heart disease with 0 to 1 RF, excluded diabetes, (low-RF group, n = 263) or ≥2 RFs (multiple-RF group, n = 262) and without CAD (segment involvement score = 0) or diffuse CAD (segment involvement score >5) at coronary computed tomography angiography. Outlier patients with diffuse CAD despite low-RF burden had similar extent, severity, and plaque composition than patients with multiple RFs. Overall, hs-cTnT was measurable in 81% of patients with median value of 6.0 ng/L. In both groups, hs-cTnT concentration was higher in patients with CAD than in patients with normal coronary arteries (p <0.0001). Hs-cTnT was more accurate to detect patients with CAD in the low-RF group than in the multiple-RF group (p = 0.04). In multivariate analysis, higher level of hs-cTnT (>6 ng/L) was independently associated with CAD in low-RF group only. Despite very low circulating concentrations, hs-cTnT may identify with a good accuracy the outlier patients with diffuse CAD despite low-RF burden. PMID:26976791

  18. Aconitine "challenge" test reveals a single whole-body exposure to diesel exhaust increases cardiac arrhythmia risk in hypertensive rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate a significant association between cardiac electrical dysfunction, arrhythmias and air pollution exposure. Sensitivity to aconitine-induced arrhythmia has been used repeatedly to examine the factors that increase the risk of such cardiac electri...

  19. Predicting the risk of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Lerma, Claudia; Glass, Leon

    2016-05-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the result of a change of cardiac activity from normal (typically sinus) rhythm to a rhythm that does not pump adequate blood to the brain. The most common rhythms leading to SCD are ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF). These result from an accelerated ventricular pacemaker or ventricular reentrant waves. Despite significant efforts to develop accurate predictors for the risk of SCD, current methods for risk stratification still need to be improved. In this article we briefly review current approaches to risk stratification. Then we discuss the mathematical basis for dynamical transitions (called bifurcations) that may lead to VT and VF. One mechanism for transition to VT or VF involves a perturbation by a premature ventricular complex (PVC) during sinus rhythm. We describe the main mechanisms of PVCs (reentry, independent pacemakers and abnormal depolarizations). An emerging approach to risk stratification for SCD involves the development of individualized dynamical models of a patient based on measured anatomy and physiology. Careful analysis and modelling of dynamics of ventricular arrhythmia on an individual basis will be essential in order to improve risk stratification for SCD and to lay a foundation for personalized (precision) medicine in cardiology. PMID:26660287

  20. Factors controlling cardiac neural crest cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Hutson, Mary R

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac neural crest cells originate as part of the postotic caudal rhombencephalic neural crest stream. Ectomesenchymal cells in this stream migrate to the circumpharyngeal ridge and then into the caudal pharyngeal arches where they condense to form first a sheath and then the smooth muscle tunics of the persisting pharyngeal arch arteries. A subset of the cells continues migrating into the cardiac outflow tract where they will condense to form the aorticopulmonary septum. Cell signaling, extracellular matrix and cell-cell contacts are all critical for the initial migration, pauses, continued migration and condensation of these cells. This Review elucidates what is currently known about these factors. PMID:20890117

  1. Risk assessment methods for cardiac surgery and intervention.

    PubMed

    Thalji, Nassir M; Suri, Rakesh M; Greason, Kevin L; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2014-12-01

    Surgical risk models estimate operative outcomes while controlling for heterogeneity in 'case mix' within and between institutions. In cardiac surgery, risk models are used for patient counselling, surgical decision-making, clinical research, quality assurance and improvement, and financial reimbursement. Importantly, risk models are only as good as the databases from which they are derived; physicians and investigators should, therefore, be aware of shortcomings of clinical and administrative databases used for modelling risk estimates. The most frequently modelled outcome in cardiac surgery is 30-day mortality. However, results of randomized trials to compare conventional surgery versus transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) indicate attrition of surgical patients at 2-4 months postoperatively, suggesting that 3-month survival or mortality might be an appropriate procedural end point worth modelling. Risk models are increasingly used to identify patients who might be better-suited for TAVI. However, the appropriateness of available statistical models in this application is controversial, particularly given the tendency of risk models to misestimate operative mortality in high-risk patient subsets. Incorporation of new risk factors (such as previous mediastinal radiation, liver failure, and frailty) in future surgical or interventional risk-prediction tools might enhance model performance, and thereby optimize patient selection for TAVI. PMID:25245832

  2. Risk stratification for sudden cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, Michael J; Rosenbaum, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The proportion of cardiovascular deaths attributable to sudden cardiac death (SCD) is on the rise. Herein lies the rationale for developing risk stratification strategies to predict who will benefit from prophylactic ICD implantation. Current guidelines recommend prophylactic ICD therapy in patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). However, there are clear limitations in using LVEF alone to decide who should receive an ICD. There is mounting evidence that microvolt-level T wave alternans (TWA) is an important marker of arrhythmic risk. TWA is appealing because it non-invasively probes underlying electrophysiological substrate and has been linked to cellular mechanisms for arrhythmias. This review considers the clinical role of TWA for risk stratification of SCD. PMID:19631909

  3. Heart disease - risk factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000106.htm Heart disease - risk factors To use the sharing features on this ... may help you live a longer, healthier life. Risk Factors You Cannot Change Some of your heart ...

  4. Risk stratification for major adverse cardiac events and ventricular tachyarrhythmias by cardiac MRI in patients with cardiac sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Masakazu; Iwanaga, Yoshitaka; Kato, Takao; Izumi, Toshiaki; Inuzuka, Yasutaka; Nakamura, Takashi; Miyaji, Yuki; Kawamura, Takayuki; Ikeguchi, Shigeru; Inoko, Moriaki; Kurita, Takashi; Miyazaki, Shunichi

    2016-01-01

    Background The presence of myocardial fibrosis by cardiac MRI has prognostic value in cardiac sarcoidosis, and localisation may be equally relevant to clinical outcomes. Objective We aimed to analyse cardiac damage and function in detail and explore the relationship with clinical outcomes in patients with cardiac sarcoidosis using cardiac MRI. Methods We included 81 consecutive patients with cardiac sarcoidosis undergoing cardiac MR. Left ventricular mass and fibrosis mass were calculated, and localisation was analysed using a 17-segment model. Participants underwent follow-up through 2015, and the development of major adverse cardiac events including ventricular tachyarrhythmias was recorded. Results Increased left ventricular fibrosis mass was associated with increased prevalence of ventricular tachyarrhythmias (p<0.001). When localisation was defined as the sum of late gadolinium enhancement in the left ventricular basal anterior and basal anteroseptal areas, or the right ventricular area, it was associated with ventricular tachyarrhythmias (p<0.001). Kaplan-Meier analysis during a median follow-up of 22.1 months showed that both the mass and localisation groupings for fibrosis were significantly associated with major adverse cardiac events or ventricular tachyarrhythmias and that when combined, the risk stratification was better than for each variable alone (p<0.001, respectively). By Cox-proportional hazard risk analysis, the localisation grouping was an independent predictor for the both. Conclusions In patients with cardiac sarcoidosis, both fibrosis mass and its localisation to the basal anterior/anteroseptal left ventricle, or right ventricle was associated with the development of major adverse cardiac events or ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Cardiac MR with late gadolinium enhancement may be useful for improving risk stratification in patients with cardiac sarcoidosis. PMID:27547432

  5. Risk of sudden cardiac death in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Poulikakos, Dimitrios; Banerjee, Debasish; Malik, Marek

    2014-02-01

    The review discusses the epidemiology and the possible underlying mechanisms of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in chronic kidney disease (CKD), and highlights the unmet clinical need for noninvasive risk stratification strategies in these patients. Although renal dysfunction shares common risk factors and often coexists with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, the presence of renal impairment increases the risk of arrhythmic complications to an extent that cannot be explained by the severity of the atherosclerotic process. Renal impairment is an independent risk factor for SCD from the early stages of CKD; the risk increases as renal function declines and reaches very high levels in patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis. Autonomic imbalance, uremic cardiomyopathy, and electrolyte disturbances likely play a role in increasing the arrhythmic risk and can be potential targets for treatment. Cardioverter defibrillator treatment could be offered as lifesaving treatment in selected patients, although selection strategies for this treatment mode are presently problematic in dialyzed patients. The review also examines the current experience with risk stratification tools in renal patients and suggests that noninvasive electrophysiological testing during dialysis may be of clinical value as it provides the necessary standardized environment for reproducible measurements for risk stratification purposes. PMID:24256575

  6. Premature Cardiac Contractions and Risk of Incident Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ofoma, Uchenna; He, Fan; Shaffer, Michele L.; Naccarelli, Gerard V.; Liao, Duanping

    2012-01-01

    Background The etiologies of ischemic stroke remain undetermined in 15% to 40% of patients. Apart from atrial fibrillation, other arrhythmias are less well-characterized as risk factors. Premature cardiac contractions are known to confer long-term cardiovascular risks, like myocardial infarction. Ischemic stroke as cardiovascular risk outcome remains a topic of interest. We examined the prospective relationships in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, to determine whether premature atrial (PAC) or ventricular (PVC) contractions are associated with increased risk for incident ischemic stroke. Methods and Results We analyzed 14 493 baseline stroke-free middle-aged individuals in the ARIC public-use data. The presence of PAC or PVC at baseline was assessed from 2-minute electrocardiogram. A physician-panel confirmed and classified all stroke cases. Average follow-up time was 13 years. Proportional hazards models assessed associations between premature contractions and incident stroke. PACs and PVCs were identified in 717 (4.9%) and 793 (5.5%) participants, respectively. In all, 509(3.5%) participants developed ischemic stroke. The hazard ratio (HR) (95% confidence interval [CI]) associated with PVC was 1.77 (1.30, 2.41), attenuated to 1.25 (0.91, 1.71) after adjusting for baseline stroke risk factors. The interaction between PVC and baseline hypertension was marginally significant (P=0.08). Among normotensives, having PVCs was associated with nearly 2-fold increase in the rate of incident ischemic stroke (HR 1.69; 95% CI 1.02, 2.78), adjusting for stroke risk factors. The adjusted risk of ischemic stroke associated with PACs was 1.30 (95% CI 0.92, 1.83). Conclusions Presence of PVCs may indicate an increased risk of ischemic stroke, especially in normotensives. This risk approximates risk of stroke from being black, male, or obese in normotensives from this cohort. PMID:23316293

  7. Reference values of myocardial structure, function, and tissue composition by cardiac magnetic resonance in healthy African-Americans at 3T and their relations to serologic and cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Ying; Bluemke, David A; Gerstenblith, Gary; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Li, Ji; Zhu, Hong; Lai, Shenghan; Lai, Hong

    2014-09-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a standard of reference for cardiac structure and function. Recent advances in T1 mapping and spectroscopy also provide assessment of myocardial tissue composition. However, the reference ranges of left ventricular parameters have rarely been assessed in an African-American (AA) population without known cardiac disease. To estimate the reference values of myocardial structure, function, and tissue composition by CMR and to explore their relationships to serologic factors and cardiovascular risk factors in asymptomatic AAs with low Framingham risk, between November 2010 and June 2012, 92 healthy AAs aged ≥21 years, from Baltimore, MD, were enrolled in an observational study. CMR examination was performed on a 3T scanner. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy was performed to noninvasively quantify myocardial triglyceride content. Native T1 values were obtained from modified Look-Locker inversion recovery sequence. The median age was 37 (interquartile range IQR 27 to 44) years (41% men). The median native T1 time of the myocardium was 1,228 ms (IQR 1,200 to 1,263) with no gender difference. The median myocardial fat content was 0.6% (IQR 0.7% to 4.6%). Native T1 time was not influenced by age, sex, and body mass index. Among the factors investigated, myocardial fat and elevated C-reactive protein (>2.0 mg/dL) were independently associated with T1 relaxation time. Native T1 time was also independently associated with left ventricular end-diastolic volume indexed to body surface area. In conclusion, this study of asymptomatic AAs provides reference ranges for cardiovascular structure, function, and tissue composition. Alterations in myocardial fat are associated with native T1 time, a CMR measure of interstitial fibrosis. PMID:25037675

  8. Macrolide Antibiotics and the Risk of Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Schuller, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Randomized, controlled trials have demonstrated that chronic therapy with macrolide antibiotics reduces the morbidity of patients with cystic fibrosis, non–cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections. Lower levels of evidence indicate that chronic macrolides are also effective in treating patients with panbronchiolitis, bronchiolitis obliterans, and rejection after lung transplant. Macrolides are known to cause torsade des pointes and other ventricular arrhythmias, and a recent observational study prompted the FDA to strengthen the Warnings and Precautions section of azithromycin drug labels. This summary describes the electrophysiological effects of macrolides, reviews literature indicating that the large majority of subjects experiencing cardiac arrhythmias from macrolides have coexisting risk factors and that the incidence of arrhythmias in absence of coexisting risk factors is very low, examines recently published studies describing the relative risk of arrhythmias from macrolides, and concludes that this risk has been overestimated and suggests an approach to patient evaluation that should reduce the relative risk and the incidence of arrhythmias to the point that chronic macrolides can be used safely in the majority of subjects for whom they are recommended. PMID:24707986

  9. Athletes at Risk for Sudden Cardiac Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subasic, Kim

    2010-01-01

    High school athletes represent the largest group of individuals affected by sudden cardiac death, with an estimated incidence of once or twice per week. Structural cardiovascular abnormalities are the most frequent cause of sudden cardiac death. Athletes participating in basketball, football, track, soccer, baseball, and swimming were found to…

  10. 78 FR 36787 - Rechanneling the Current Cardiac Risk Paradigm: Arrhythmia Risk Assessment During Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Rechanneling the Current Cardiac Risk Paradigm: Arrhythmia... the Current Cardiac Risk Paradigm: Arrhythmia Risk Assessment During Drug Development Without the... the current guidelines, and the importance of a uniform assay schema. Date and Time: The...

  11. Height and Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities and Cardiovascular Health Studies

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Michael A.; Lopez, Faye L.; Bůžková, Petra; Adabag, SelcukPhD; Chen, Lin Y.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Kronmal, Richard A.; Siscovick, David S.; Alonso, Alvaro; Buxton, Alfred; Folsom, Aaron R.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is an important cause of mortality in the adult population. Height has been associated with cardiac hypertrophy and an increased risk of arrhythmias, but also with decreased risk of coronary heart disease, suggesting a complex association with SCD. Methods We examined the association of adult height with the risk of physician-adjudicated SCD in two large population-based cohorts: the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) and the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Results Over an average follow-up time of 11.7 years in CHS, there were 199 (3.6%) cases of SCD among 5,556 participants. In ARIC, over 12.6 years, there were 227 (1.5%) cases of SCD among 15,633 participants. In both cohorts, there was a trend towards decreased SCD with taller height. In fixed effects meta-analysis, the pooled hazard ratio per 10 cm of height was 0.84 (95%CI 0.73, 0.98, p=0.03). The association of increased height with lower risk of SCD was slightly attenuated after inclusion of risk factors associated with height, such as hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy. The association appeared stronger among men than women in both cohorts. Conclusion In two population-based prospective cohorts of different ages, greater height was associated with lower risk of SCD. PMID:24360853

  12. Roadway Proximity and Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death in Women

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Jaime E; Chiuve, Stephanie E; Laden, Francine; Albert, Christine M

    2015-01-01

    Background Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a major source of mortality and is the first manifestation of heart disease for the majority of cases. Thus, there is a definite need to identify risk factors for SCD that can be modified on the population level. Exposure to traffic, measured by residential roadway proximity, has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Our objective was to determine if roadway proximity was associated with an increased risk of SCD and to compare to the risk of other coronary heart disease (CHD) outcomes. Methods and Results A total of 523 cases of SCD were identified over 26 years of follow-up among 107,130 members of the prospective Nurses’ Health Study. We calculated residential distance to roadways at all residential addresses from 1986–2012. In age- and race-adjusted models, women living within 50 meters of a major roadway had an elevated risk of SCD (HR=1.56; 95%CI: 1.18–2.05). The association was attenuated but still statistically significant after controlling for potential confounders and mediators (HR=1.38; 95%CI:1.04–1.82). The equivalent adjusted HRs for nonfatal myocardial infarction and fatal CHD were 1.08 (95%CI: 0.96–1.23) and 1.24 (95%CI: 1.03–1.50), respectively. Conclusions Among this sample of middle-aged and older women, roadway proximity was associated with an elevated and statistically significant risks of SCD and fatal CHD, even after controlling for other cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:25332277

  13. Abnormal Heart Rate Turbulence Predicts Cardiac Mortality in Low, Intermediate and High Risk Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Phyllis K.; Barzilay, Joshua I.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction We examined whether heart rate turbulence (HRT) adds to traditional risk factors for cardiac mortality in older adults at low, intermediate and high risk. Methods and Results N=1298, age ≥65 years, with 24-hour Holter recordings were studied. HRT, which quantifies heart rate response to ventricular premature contractions, was categorized as: both turbulence onset (TO) and turbulence slope (TS) normal; TO abnormal; TS abnormal; or both abnormal. Independent risks for cardiac mortality associated with HRT or, for comparison, elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) (>3.0 mg/L), were calculated using Cox regression analysis adjusted for traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors and stratified by the presence of no, isolated subclinical (i.e., intermediate risk) or clinical CVD. Having both TS and TO abnormal compared to both normal was associated with cardiac mortality in the low risk group [HR 7.9, 95% CI 2.8–22.5, (p<0.001)]. In the high and intermediate risk groups, abnormal TS and TO ([HR 2.2, 95% CI 1.5–4.0, p=0.016] and [HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.2–5.9, p=0.012]), respectively, were also significantly associated with cardiac mortality. In contrast, elevated CRP was associated with increased cardiac mortality risk only in low risk individuals [HR 2.5, 95% CI 1.3–5.1, p=0.009]. In the low risk group, the c-statistic was 0.706 for the base model, 0.725 for the base model with CRP, and 0.767 for the base model with HRT. Conclusions Abnormal HRT independently adds to risk stratification of low, intermediate and high risk individuals but appears to add especially to the stratification of those considered at low risk. PMID:21134026

  14. Factors in risk perception

    PubMed

    Sjoberg

    2000-02-01

    Risk perception is a phenomenon in search of an explanation. Several approaches are discussed in this paper. Technical risk estimates are sometimes a potent factor in accounting for perceived risk, but in many important applications it is not. Heuristics and biases, mainly availability, account for only a minor portion of risk perception, and media contents have not been clearly implicated in risk perception. The psychometric model is probably the leading contender in the field, but its explanatory value is only around 20% of the variance of raw data. Adding a factor of "unnatural risk" considerably improves the psychometric model. Cultural Theory, on the other hand, has not been able to explain more than 5-10% of the variance of perceived risk, and other value scales have similarly failed. A model is proposed in which attitude, risk sensitivity, and specific fear are used as explanatory variables; this model seems to explain well over 30-40% of the variance and is thus more promising than previous approaches. The model offers a different type of psychological explanation of risk perception, and it has many implications, e.g., a different approach to the relationship between attitude and perceived risk, as compared with the usual cognitive analysis of attitude. PMID:10795334

  15. Specification of the Cardiac Conduction System by Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Cathy J.; Basson, Craig T.

    2009-01-01

    Diseases of the cardiovascular system that cause sudden cardiac deaths are often caused by lethal arrhythmias that originate from defects in the cardiac conduction system. Development of the cardiac conduction system is a complex biological process that can be wrought with problems. Although several genes involved in mature conduction system function have been identified, their association with development of specific subcomponents of the cardiac conduction system remains challenging. Several transcription factors, including homeodomain proteins and T-box proteins, are essential for cardiac conduction system morphogenesis and activation or repression of key regulatory genes. In addition, several transcription factors modify expression of genes encoding the ion channel proteins that contribute to the electrophysiological properties of the conduction system and govern contraction of the surrounding myocardium. Loss of transcriptional regulation during cardiac development has detrimental effects on cardiogenesis that may lead to arrhythmias. Human genetic mutations in some of these transcription factors have been identified and are known to cause congenital heart diseases that include cardiac conduction system malformations. In this review, we summarize the contributions of several key transcription factors to specification, patterning, maturation and function of the cardiac conduction system. Further analysis of the molecular programs involved in this process should lead to improved diagnosis and therapy of conduction system disease. PMID:19797194

  16. Aconitine Challenge Test Reveals a Single Exposure to Air Pollution Causes Increased Cardiac Arrhythmia Risk in Hypertensive Rats - Abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate a significant association between arrhythmias and air pollution exposure. Sensitivity to aconitine-induced arrhythmia has been used repeatedly to examine the factors that increase the risk of such cardiac electrical dysfunction. In this study, ...

  17. Cardiac fibrillation risks with TASER conducted electrical weapons.

    PubMed

    Panescu, Dorin; Kroll, Mark; Brave, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The TASER(®) conducted electrical weapon (CEW) delivers electrical pulses that can temporarily incapacitate subjects. We analyzed the cardiac fibrillation risk with TASER CEWs. Our risk model accounted for realistic body mass index distributions, used a new model of effects of partial or oblique dart penetration and used recent epidemiological CEW statics. PMID:26736265

  18. Risk Factors for Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Padmanesan; Wood, James; MacIntyre, Chandini Raina; Mathai, Dilip

    2013-01-01

    The risk of progression from exposure to the tuberculosis bacilli to the development of active disease is a two-stage process governed by both exogenous and endogenous risk factors. Exogenous factors play a key role in accentuating the progression from exposure to infection among which the bacillary load in the sputum and the proximity of an individual to an infectious TB case are key factors. Similarly endogenous factors lead in progression from infection to active TB disease. Along with well-established risk factors (such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), malnutrition, and young age), emerging variables such as diabetes, indoor air pollution, alcohol, use of immunosuppressive drugs, and tobacco smoke play a significant role at both the individual and population level. Socioeconomic and behavioral factors are also shown to increase the susceptibility to infection. Specific groups such as health care workers and indigenous population are also at an increased risk of TB infection and disease. This paper summarizes these factors along with health system issues such as the effects of delay in diagnosis of TB in the transmission of the bacilli. PMID:23476764

  19. Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation following Open Cardiac Surgery: Predisposing Factors and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Hashemzadeh, Khosrow; Dehdilani, Mahnaz; Dehdilani, Marjan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: New-onset postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) is a common complication of cardiac surgery that has substantial effects on outcomes. The aim of this study is to analyze the risk factors in the pre, intra, and postoperative periods, and evaluate its impact on patients’ outcome. Methods: In this prospective study, between March 2007 and February 2011, a total of 1254 patients with preoperative sinus rhythm who underwent open cardiac surgery were included of which 177 (13.6%) had developed POAF. Many clinical variables that are associated with the development of POAF, were evaluated. Results: The study population consisted of 1254 patients that 864 (68.9%) were male and 390 (31.1%) female, and average age was 55.1±15.7 years. POAF occurred in 171 (13.6%) of patients and most of them (68.4%) developed within the first two days after surgery. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the following risk factors of POAF: Preoperative risk factors: age>50, smoking, Left ventricular hypertrophy, renal dysfunction, intraoperative risk factors: intraoperative inotrope use, valve surgery, atrial septal defect (ASD) surgery, bicaval cannulation, concomitant cardiac venting of pulmonary and aorta, longer cardiopulmonary time, longer cross-clamp time, postoperative use of inotropic agent after termination of cardiopulmonary bypass. Conclusion: POAF is the most common arrhythmia after cardiac surgery and not only concerted effort should be performed to identify and to reduce the risk factors, but also effective treatment is necessary to prevent mortality and morbidity. PMID:24252985

  20. Fibroblast growth factor 21 is induced upon cardiac stress and alters cardiac lipid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Brahma, Manoja K.; Adam, Rene C.; Pollak, Nina M.; Jaeger, Doris; Zierler, Kathrin A.; Pöcher, Nadja; Schreiber, Renate; Romauch, Matthias; Moustafa, Tarek; Eder, Sandra; Ruelicke, Thomas; Preiss-Landl, Karina; Lass, Achim; Zechner, Rudolf; Haemmerle, Guenter

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a PPARα-regulated gene elucidated in the liver of PPARα-deficient mice or PPARα agonist-treated mice. Mice globally lacking adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) exhibit a marked defect in TG catabolism associated with impaired PPARα-activated gene expression in the heart and liver, including a drastic reduction in hepatic FGF21 mRNA expression. Here we show that FGF21 mRNA expression is markedly increased in the heart of ATGL-deficient mice accompanied by elevated expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers, which can be reversed by reconstitution of ATGL expression in cardiac muscle. In line with this assumption, the induction of ER stress increases FGF21 mRNA expression in H9C2 cardiomyotubes. Cardiac FGF21 expression was also induced upon fasting of healthy mice, implicating a role of FGF21 in cardiac energy metabolism. To address this question, we generated and characterized mice with cardiac-specific overexpression of FGF21 (CM-Fgf21). FGF21 was efficiently secreted from cardiomyocytes of CM-Fgf21 mice, which moderately affected cardiac TG homeostasis, indicating a role for FGF21 in cardiac energy metabolism. Together, our results show that FGF21 expression is activated upon cardiac ER stress linked to defective lipolysis and that a persistent increase in circulating FGF21 levels interferes with cardiac and whole body energy homeostasis. PMID:25176985

  1. Update in cardiology: vascular risk and cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Galve, Enrique; Cordero, Alberto; Bertomeu-Martínez, Vicente; Fácila, Lorenzo; Mazón, Pilar; Alegría, Eduardo; Fernández de Bobadilla, Jaime; García-Porrero, Esteban; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2015-02-01

    As in other fields, understanding of vascular risk and rehabilitation is constantly improving. The present review of recent epidemiological update shows how far we are from achieving good risk factor control: in diet and nutrition, where unhealthy and excessive societal consumption is clearly increasing the prevalence of obesity; in exercise, where it is difficult to find a balance between benefit and risk, despite systemization efforts; in smoking, where developments center on programs and policies, with the electronic cigarette seeming more like a problem than a solution; in lipids, where the transatlantic debate between guidelines is becoming a paradigm of the divergence of views in this extensively studied area; in hypertension, where a nonpharmacological alternative (renal denervation) has been undermined by the SYMPLICITY HTN-3 setback, forcing a deep reassessment; in diabetes mellitus, where the new dipeptidyl peptidase-4 and sodium-glucose cotransporter type 2 inhibitors and glucagon like peptide 1 analogues have contributed much new information and a glimpse of the future of diabetes treatment, and in cardiac rehabilitation, which continues to benefit from new information and communication technologies and where clinical benefit is not hindered by advanced diseases, such as heart failure. Our summary concludes with the update in elderly patients, whose treatment criteria are extrapolated from those of younger patients, with the present review clearly indicating that should not be the case. PMID:25583549

  2. Cardiac PET Perfusion: Prognosis, Risk Stratification, Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    Dorbala, Sharmila; Di Carli, Marcelo F.

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with positron emission tomography (PET) has expanded significantly over the past decade. With the wider availability of PET scanners and the routine use of quantitative blood flow imaging, the clinical use of PET MPI is expected to increase further. PET MPI is a powerful tool to identify risk, to quantify risk, and to guide therapy in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). A large body of evidence supports the prognostic value of PET MPI and ejection fraction in intermediate to high risk subjects, in women, in obese individuals and in post coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) individuals. A normal perfusion study indicates low risk (< 1% annualized rate of cardiac events of cardiac death and non-fatal myocardial infarction), while an abnormal study indicates high risk. With accurate risk stratification, high quality images, and quantitation PET MPI may transform the management of patients with known or suspected CAD. PMID:25234079

  3. Physician Decision Making and Cardiac Risk: Effects of Knowledge, Risk Perception, Risk Tolerance, and Fuzzy Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyna, Valerie F.; Lloyd, Farrell J.

    2006-01-01

    Despite training, professionals sometimes make serious errors in risky decision making. The authors investigated judgments and decisions for 9 hypothetical patients at 3 levels of cardiac risk, comparing student and physician groups varying in domain-specific knowledge. Decisions were examined regarding whether they deviated from guidelines, how…

  4. Thyroid Cancer Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... and radiation fallout from power plant accidents or nuclear weapons. Having had head or neck radiation treatments in childhood is a risk factor for ... should be done using the lowest dose of radiation that still provides a clear ... from nuclear weapons or power plant accidents. For instance, thyroid ...

  5. Perioperative allergy: risk factors.

    PubMed

    Caffarelli, C; Stringari, G; Pajno, G B; Peroni, D G; Franceschini, F; Dello Iacono, I; Bernardini, R

    2011-01-01

    Perioperative anaphylactic as well as anaphylactoid reactions can be elicited by drugs, diagnostic agents, antiseptics, disinfectants and latex. In some individuals, allergic reactions occur in the absence of any evident risk factor. Previous history of specific safe exposure to a product does not permit to exclude the risk of having a reaction. We have systematically reviewed characteristics in the patient's history or clinical parameters that affect the risk of developing reactions during anesthesia. Evidence shows that patients with previous unexplained reaction during anesthesia are at risk for perioperative allergic reactions. An allergic reaction to an agent is associated with previous reaction to a product that is related with the culprit agent. Multiple surgery procedures, professional exposure to latex and allergy to fruit are associated with an increased frequency of latex allergy. It has been shown that in some instances, allergic perioperative reactions may be more common in atopic patients and in females. PMID:22014923

  6. Has Microsoft® Left Behind Risk Modeling in Cardiac and Thoracic Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Poullis, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: This concept paper examines a number of key areas central to quality and risk assessment in cardiac surgery. The effect of surgeon and institutional factors with regard to outcomes in cardiac surgery is utilized to demonstrate the need to sub analyze cardiac surgeons performance in a more sophisticated manner than just operation type and patient risk factors, as in current risk models. By utilizing the mathematical/engineering concept of Fourier analysis in the breakdown of cardiac surgical results the effects of each of the core components that makes up the care package of a patient’s experiences are examined. The core components examined include: institutional, regional, patient, and surgeon effects. The limitations of current additive (Parsonnet, Euroscore) and logistic (Euroscore, Southern Thoracic Society) regression risk analysis techniques are discussed. The inadequacy of current modeling techniques is demonstrated via the use of known medical formula for calculating flow in the internal mammary artery and the calculation of blood pressure. By examining the fundamental limitations of current risk analysis techniques a new technique is proposed that embraces modern software computer technology via the use of structured query language. PMID:21449233

  7. Antidepressant Use in Pregnancy and the Risk of Cardiac Defects

    PubMed Central

    Huybrechts, Krista F.; Palmsten, Kristin; Avorn, Jerry; Cohen, Lee S.; Holmes, Lewis B.; Franklin, Jessica M.; Mogun, Helen; Levin, Raisa; Kowal, Mary; Setoguchi, Soko; Hernandez-Diaz, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Background There is controversy regarding whether the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and other antidepressants in pregnancy is associated with increased risks for congenital cardiac defects. In particular, concerns exist about a possible association between paroxetine and right ventricular outflow tract obstruction (RVOTO), and between sertraline and ventricular septal defects (VSD). Methods We performed a cohort study nested in the 2000–2007 nationwide Medicaid Analytic eXtract. The study included 949,504 pregnant women enrolled in Medicaid from three months before conception through one month post delivery, and their live-born infants. We compared the risk of major cardiac defects in women with antidepressant medication use during the first trimester versus no use, restricting the cohort to women with depression and using propensity score adjustment to control for depression severity and other potential confounders. Results 64,389 women (6.8%) used antidepressants during the first trimester. Overall, 6,403 infants not exposed to antidepressants were born with a cardiac defect (72.3 per 10,000), compared with 580 infants exposed (90.1 per 10,000). Associations between antidepressant use and cardiac defects were attenuated with increasing levels of adjustment for confounding. For SSRIs, relative risks for any cardiac defect were 1.25 (95%CI, 1.13–1.38) unadjusted, 1.12 (1.00–1.26) depression-restricted, and 1.06 (0.93–1.22) depression-restricted and fully-adjusted. We found no significant associations between the use of paroxetine and RVOTO (1.07, 0.59–1.93), or the use of sertraline and VSD (1.04, 0.76–1.41). Conclusions Results of this large population-based cohort study suggest no substantial increased risk of cardiac malformations attributable to SSRIs. PMID:24941178

  8. Use of cardiac glycosides and risk of glioma.

    PubMed

    Seliger, Corinna; Meier, Christoph R; Jick, Susan S; Uhl, Martin; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Hau, Peter; Leitzmann, M F

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac glycosides induce apoptotic effects on glioma cells, but whether cardiac glycosides protect against risk for glioma is unknown. We therefore explored the relation between glycoside use and glioma risk using a large and validated database. We performed a case-control analysis using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink involving 2005 glioma cases diagnosed between 1995 and 2012 that were individually matched to 20,050 controls on age, gender, general practice, and number of years of active history in the database. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between cardiac glycosides and the risk of glioma adjusting for body mass index and smoking. We also examined use of common heart failure and arrhythmia medications to differentiate between a specific glycoside effect and a generic effect of treatment for congestive heart failure or arrhythmia. Cardiac glycoside use was inversely related to glioma incidence. After adjustment for congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, diabetes, and common medications used to treat those conditions, the OR of glioma was 0.47 (95 % CI 0.27-0.81, Bonferroni-corrected p value = 0.024) for use versus non-use of cardiac glycosides, based on 17 exposed cases. In contrast, no associations were noted for other medications used to treat congestive heart failure or arrhythmias. The OR of glioma in people with congestive heart failure was 0.65 (95 % CI 0.40-1.04), and for arrhythmia it was 1.01 (95 % CI 0.78-1.31). These data indicate that cardiac glycoside use is independently associated with reduced glioma risk. PMID:26721242

  9. GATA factors efficiently direct cardiac fate from embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Turbendian, Harma K; Gordillo, Miriam; Tsai, Su-Yi; Lu, Jia; Kang, Guoxin; Liu, Ting-Chun; Tang, Alice; Liu, Susanna; Fishman, Glenn I; Evans, Todd

    2013-04-01

    The GATA4 transcription factor is implicated in promoting cardiogenesis in combination with other factors, including TBX5, MEF2C and BAF60C. However, when expressed in embryonic stem cells (ESCs), GATA4 was shown to promote endoderm, not cardiac mesoderm. The capacity of related GATA factors to promote cardiogenesis is untested. We found that expression of the highly related gene, Gata5, very efficiently promotes cardiomyocyte fate from murine ESCs. Gata5 directs development of beating sheets of cells that express cardiac troponin T and show a full range of action potential morphologies that are responsive to pharmacological stimulation. We discovered that by removing serum from the culture conditions, GATA4 and GATA6 are each also able to efficiently promote cardiogenesis in ESC derivatives, with some distinctions. Thus, GATA factors can function in ESC derivatives upstream of other cardiac transcription factors to direct the efficient generation of cardiomyocytes. PMID:23487308

  10. Breast cancer risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ciszewski, Tomasz; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Miotła, Paweł; Starosławska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women's ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual's life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence. PMID:26528110

  11. Controlled Exposures to Air Pollutants and Risk of Cardiac Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Simon J.; Hunter, Amanda J.; Shah, Anoop S.V.; Bosson, Jenny A.; Unosson, Jon; Barath, Stefan; Lundbäck, Magnus; Cassee, Flemming R.; Donaldson, Ken; Sandström, Thomas; Blomberg, Anders; Newby, David E.; Mills, Nicholas L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological studies have reported associations between air pollution exposure and increases in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Exposure to air pollutants can influence cardiac autonomic tone and reduce heart rate variability, and may increase the risk of cardiac arrhythmias, particularly in susceptible patient groups. Objectives: We investigated the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias during and after controlled exposure to air pollutants in healthy volunteers and patients with coronary heart disease. Methods: We analyzed data from 13 double-blind randomized crossover studies including 282 participants (140 healthy volunteers and 142 patients with stable coronary heart disease) from whom continuous electrocardiograms were available. The incidence of cardiac arrhythmias was recorded for each exposure and study population. Results: There were no increases in any cardiac arrhythmia during or after exposure to dilute diesel exhaust, wood smoke, ozone, concentrated ambient particles, engineered carbon nanoparticles, or high ambient levels of air pollution in either healthy volunteers or patients with coronary heart disease. Conclusions: Acute controlled exposure to air pollutants did not increase the short-term risk of arrhythmia in participants. Research employing these techniques remains crucial in identifying the important pathophysiological pathways involved in the adverse effects of air pollution, and is vital to inform environmental and public health policy decisions. Citation: Langrish JP, Watts SJ, Hunter AJ, Shah AS, Bosson JA, Unosson J, Barath S, Lundbäck M, Cassee FR, Donaldson K, Sandström T, Blomberg A, Newby DE, Mills NL. 2014. Controlled exposures to air pollutants and risk of cardiac arrhythmia. Environ Health Perspect 122:747–753; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307337 PMID:24667535

  12. Weighing the adverse cardiac effects of fluoroquinolones: A risk perspective.

    PubMed

    Mehrzad, Raman; Barza, Michael

    2015-11-01

    A rare side effect of fluoroquinolone (FQ) antibiotics is QT prolongation, which may result in serious arrhythmias. Most published comparative trials describe the relative risks among the drug class but do not focus on the incidence of serious arrhythmias. It is important for the prescriber to have a sense not only of relative risk but also of incidence to balance the risks against the other attributes of the individual members of the drug class. A review of English-language literature was performed to identify trials that provide data on the relative risk and, when able to be calculated, the incidence of adverse cardiac events among the commonly used FQs. Moxifloxacin had a several-fold higher risk of cardiac arrhythmias than levofloxacin or ciprofloxacin in randomized trials. However, the actual event rate was low in 2 of 3 studies. Given inconsistencies among the studies and the relative rarity of the events, the clinician need not base the choice of drug primarily on concern for a cardiac arrhythmia except in patients at the highest risk of such an event. PMID:26011799

  13. Factors Affecting the Occurrence of Out-of-Hospital Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Bartkiewicz, Wiesław; Sowizdraniuk, Jarosław; Rosińczuk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This paper aims to discover the risk factors for sudden cardiac arrest (out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest (OHSCA)) which significantly affect the decision about prioritizing emergency interventions before dispatching medical emergency teams, risk of deterioration of the patient's condition at the scene, and emergency procedures. Methods. A retrospective study taking into account the international classification of diseases ICD-10 based on an analysis of medical records of Emergency Medical Service in Wroclaw (Poland). Results. The main risk factor of OHSCA is coexistence of external cause leading to illness or death (ICD Group V-10) as well as the occurrence of diseases from the group of endocrine disorders (group E), in particular diabetes. The increase in the risk of OHSCA incidence is affected by nervous system diseases (group G), especially epilepsy of various etiologies, respiratory diseases (group J), mainly COPD, and bronchial asthma or mental and behavioral disorders (group F), with particular emphasis on the drugs issue. The procedure for receiving calls for Emergency Notification Centre does not take into account clinical risk factors for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Conclusion. Having knowledge of OHSCA risk factors can increase the efficiency of rescue operations from rapid assessment and provision of appropriate medical team, through effective performance of medical emergency treatment and prevention of SCA or finally reducing the costs. PMID:25705520

  14. High-Risk Cardiac Disease in Pregnancy: Part I.

    PubMed

    Elkayam, Uri; Goland, Sorel; Pieper, Petronella G; Silverside, Candice K

    2016-07-26

    The incidence of pregnancy in women with cardiovascular disease is rising, primarily due to the increased number of women with congenital heart disease reaching childbearing age and the changing demographics associated with advancing maternal age. Although most cardiac conditions are well tolerated during pregnancy and women can deliver safely with favorable outcomes, there are some cardiac conditions that have significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this paper is to review the available published reports and provide recommendations on the management of women with high-risk cardiovascular conditions during pregnancy. PMID:27443437

  15. PRELIMINARY EXPLORATION OF FACTORS THAT MAY INFLUENCE THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN AIR QUALITY AND THE RISK OF CARDIAC VENTRICULAR SEPTAL DEFECTS, TEXAS, 2000

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to sulfur dioxide (SO2) during weeks three through eight of pregnancy increased risk for ventricular septal defects in a population-based case-control study of air quality and birth defects in seven Texas counties between 1997 and 2000. As a follow-back, a computer-assi...

  16. Factors influencing health care utilisation among Aboriginal cardiac patients in central Australia: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aboriginal Australians suffer from poorer overall health compared to the general Australian population, particularly in terms of cardiovascular disease and prognosis following a cardiac event. Despite such disparities, Aboriginal Australians utilise health care services at much lower rates than the general population. Improving health care utilisation (HCU) among Aboriginal cardiac patients requires a better understanding of the factors that constrain or facilitate use. The study aimed to identify ecological factors influencing health care utilisation (HCU) for Aboriginal cardiac patients, from the time of their cardiac event to 6–12 months post-event, in central Australia. Methods This qualitative descriptive study was guided by an ecological framework. A culturally-sensitive illness narrative focusing on Aboriginal cardiac patients’ “typical” journey guided focus groups and semi-structured interviews with Aboriginal cardiac patients, non-cardiac community members, health care providers and community researchers. Analysis utilised a thematic conceptual matrix and mixed coding method. Themes were categorised into Predisposing, Enabling, Need and Reinforcing factors and identified at Individual, Interpersonal, Primary Care and Hospital System levels. Results Compelling barriers to HCU identified at the Primary Care and Hospital System levels included communication, organisation and racism. Individual level factors related to HCU included language, knowledge of illness, perceived need and past experiences. Given these individual and health system barriers patients were reliant on utilising alternate family-level supports at the Interpersonal level to enable their journey. Conclusion Aboriginal cardiac patients face significant barriers to HCU, resulting in sub-optimal quality of care, placing them at risk for subsequent cardiovascular events and negative health outcomes. To facilitate HCU amongst Aboriginal people, strategies must be implemented

  17. Cardiac risk stratification in cardiac rehabilitation programs: a review of protocols

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Anne Kastelianne França; Barbosa, Marianne Penachini da Costa de Rezende; Bernardo, Aline Fernanda Barbosa; Vanderlei, Franciele Marques; Pacagnelli, Francis Lopes; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2014-01-01

    Objective Gather and describe general characteristics of different protocols of risk stratification for cardiac patients undergoing exercise. Methods We conducted searches in LILACS, IBECS, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and SciELO electronic databases, using the following descriptors: Cardiovascular Disease, Rehabilitation Centers, Practice Guideline, Exercise and Risk Stratification in the past 20 years. Results Were selected eight studies addressing methods of risk stratification in patients undergoing exercise. Conclusion None of the methods described could cover every situation the patient can be subjected to; however, they are essential to exercise prescription. PMID:25140477

  18. Air Pollution and the Risk of Cardiac Defects

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Bing-Fang; Lee, Yungling Leo; Jaakkola, Jouni J.K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previous epidemiologic studies have assessed the role of the exposure to ambient air pollution in the development of cardiac birth defects, but they have provided somewhat inconsistent results. To assess the associations between exposure to ambient air pollutants and the risk of cardiac defects, a population-based case-control study was conducted using 1087 cases of cardiac defects and a random sample of 10,870 controls from 1,533,748 Taiwanese newborns in 2001 to 2007. Logistic regression was performed to calculate odds ratios for 10 ppb increases in O3 and 10 μg/m3 increases in PM10. In addition, we compared the risk of cardiac defects in 4 categories-high exposure (>75th percentile); medium exposure (75th to 50th percentile); low exposure (<50th–25th percentile); reference (<25th percentile) based on the distribution of each pollutant. The risks of ventricular septal defects (VSD), atrial septal defects (ASD), and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) were associated with 10 ppb increases in O3 exposure during the first 3 gestational months among term and preterm babies. In comparison between high PM10 exposure and reference category, there were statistically significant elevations in the effect estimates of ASD for all and terms births. In addition, there was a negative or weak association between SO2, NO2, CO, and cardiac defects. The study proved that exposure to outdoor air O3 and PM10 during the first trimester of gestation may increase the risk of VSD, ASD, and PDA. PMID:26554783

  19. Risk Factors for Eating Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors review research on risk factors for eating disorders, restricting their focus to studies in which clear precedence of the hypothesized risk factor over onset of the disorder is established. They illustrate how studies of sociocultural risk factors and biological factors have progressed on parallel tracks and propose that major advances…

  20. Connective tissue growth factor induces cardiac hypertrophy through Akt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hayata, Nozomi; Fujio, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Iwakura, Tomohiko; Obana, Masanori; Takai, Mika; Mohri, Tomomi; Nonen, Shinpei; Maeda, Makiko; Azuma, Junichi

    2008-05-30

    In the process of cardiac remodeling, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is secreted from cardiac myocytes. Though CTGF is well known to promote fibroblast proliferation, its pathophysiological effects in cardiac myocytes remain to be elucidated. In this study, we examined the biological effects of CTGF in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Cardiac myocytes stimulated with full length CTGF and its C-terminal region peptide showed the increase in cell surface area. Similar to hypertrophic ligands for G-protein coupled receptors, such as endothelin-1, CTGF activated amino acid uptake; however, CTGF-induced hypertrophy is not associated with the increased expression of skeletal actin or BNP, analyzed by Northern-blotting. CTGF treatment activated ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, JNK and Akt. The inhibition of Akt by transducing dominant-negative Akt abrogated CTGF-mediated increase in cell size, while the inhibition of MAP kinases did not affect the cardiac hypertrophy. These findings indicate that CTGF is a novel hypertrophic factor in cardiac myocytes.

  1. Clustering of cardiac risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome and associations with psychosocial distress in a young Asian Indian population.

    PubMed

    Suchday, Sonia; Bellehsen, Mayer; Friedberg, Jennifer P; Almeida, Maureen; Kaplan, Erica

    2014-08-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a precursor for coronary heart disease. However, its pathophysiology is not clear, its phenotypic expression may vary by region; also, the phenotypic manifestation may be exacerbated by psychosocial distress and family history. The purpose of the current study was to assess the factor structure of the metabolic syndrome in young urban Asian Indians. Asian Indian youth (N = 112) were evaluated for body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio, blood pressure (systolic: SBP; diastolic: DBP), blood sugar, triglycerides, cholesterol, insulin, psychosocial distress and family health history. Factor analyses were computed on components of the metabolic syndrome. Three factors were identified for the entire sample: hemodynamic-obesity (SBP, DBP, waist-hip ratio), Lipid (cholesterol, triglyceride), and insulin-obesity (blood sugar, BMI, insulin). Similar to previous research with this population, three distinct factors with no overlap were identified. Factors did not correlate with psychosocial distress or family history. Lack of correlation with family history and psychosocial distress may be a function of the young age and demographics of the sample. PMID:23775637

  2. Risk Prediction of One-Year Mortality in Patients with Cardiac Arrhythmias Using Random Survival Forest

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Fen; Cai, Yun-Peng; Zhang, Yu-Xiao; Li, Ye; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Existing models for predicting mortality based on traditional Cox proportional hazard approach (CPH) often have low prediction accuracy. This paper aims to develop a clinical risk model with good accuracy for predicting 1-year mortality in cardiac arrhythmias patients using random survival forest (RSF), a robust approach for survival analysis. 10,488 cardiac arrhythmias patients available in the public MIMIC II clinical database were investigated, with 3,452 deaths occurring within 1-year followups. Forty risk factors including demographics and clinical and laboratory information and antiarrhythmic agents were analyzed as potential predictors of all-cause mortality. RSF was adopted to build a comprehensive survival model and a simplified risk model composed of 14 top risk factors. The built comprehensive model achieved a prediction accuracy of 0.81 measured by c-statistic with 10-fold cross validation. The simplified risk model also achieved a good accuracy of 0.799. Both results outperformed traditional CPH (which achieved a c-statistic of 0.733 for the comprehensive model and 0.718 for the simplified model). Moreover, various factors are observed to have nonlinear impact on cardiac arrhythmias prognosis. As a result, RSF based model which took nonlinearity into account significantly outperformed traditional Cox proportional hazard model and has great potential to be a more effective approach for survival analysis. PMID:26379761

  3. Cut the risks for cardiac cath patients.

    PubMed

    Beattie, S

    1999-01-01

    As the list of interventions performed with the aid of femoral catheterization grows, so does the number of patients at risk for developing post-procedure problems. Here's a primer on how to recognize and prevent complications like pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous fistulas, and retroperitoneal hematoma. PMID:9987436

  4. A Web-Based Nutrition Program Reduces Health Care Costs in Employees With Cardiac Risk Factors: Before and After Cost Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Howard; Kazis, Lewis E; Jarrett, Kelli M; Vetter, Delia; Richmond, Russell; Moore, Thomas J

    2009-01-01

    Background Rising health insurance premiums represent a rapidly increasing burden on employer-sponsors of health insurance and their employees. Some employers have become proactive in managing health care costs by providing tools to encourage employees to directly manage their health and prevent disease. One example of such a tool is DASH for Health, an Internet-based nutrition and exercise behavior modification program. This program was offered as a free, opt-in benefit to US-based employees of the EMC Corporation. Objective The aim was to determine whether an employer-sponsored, Internet-based diet and exercise program has an effect on health care costs. Methods There were 15,237 total employees and spouses who were included in our analyses, of whom 1967 enrolled in the DASH for Health program (DASH participants). Using a retrospective, quasi-experimental design, study year health care costs among DASH participants and non-participants were compared, controlling for baseline year costs, risk, and demographic variables. The relationship between how often a subject visited the DASH website and health care costs also was examined. These relationships were examined among all study subjects and among a subgroup of 735 subjects with cardiovascular conditions (diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia). Multiple linear regression analysis examined the relationship of program use to health care costs, comparing study year costs among DASH participants and non-participants and then examining the effects of increased website use on health care costs. Analyses were repeated among the cardiovascular condition subgroups. Results Overall, program use was not associated with changes in health care costs. However, among the cardiovascular risk study subjects, health care costs were US$827 lower, on average, during the study year (P = .05; t 729 = 1.95). Among 1028 program users, increased website use was significantly associated with lower health care costs among those who visited

  5. Growth hormone and risk for cardiac tumors in Carney complex.

    PubMed

    Bandettini, W Patricia; Karageorgiadis, Alexander S; Sinaii, Ninet; Rosing, Douglas R; Sachdev, Vandana; Schernthaner-Reiter, Marie Helene; Gourgari, Evgenia; Papadakis, Georgios Z; Keil, Meg F; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Carney, J Aidan; Arai, Andrew E; Lodish, Maya; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-09-01

    Carney complex (CNC) is a multiple neoplasia syndrome that is caused mostly by PRKAR1A mutations. Cardiac myxomas are the leading cause of mortality in CNC patients who, in addition, often develop growth hormone (GH) excess. We studied patients with CNC, who were observed for over a period of 20 years (1995-2015) for the development of both GH excess and cardiac myxomas. GH secretion was evaluated by standard testing; dedicated cardiovascular imaging was used to detect cardiac abnormalities. Four excised cardiac myxomas were tested for the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). A total of 99 CNC patients (97 with a PRKAR1A mutation) were included in the study with a mean age of 25.8 ± 16.6 years at presentation. Over an observed mean follow-up of 25.8 years, 60% of patients with GH excess (n = 46) developed a cardiac myxoma compared with only 36% of those without GH excess (n = 54) (P = 0.016). Overall, patients with GH excess were also more likely to have a tumor vs those with normal GH secretion (OR: 2.78, 95% CI: 1.23-6.29; P = 0.014). IGF-1 mRNA and protein were higher in CNC myxomas than in normal heart tissue. We conclude that the development of cardiac myxomas in CNC may be associated with increased GH secretion, in a manner analogous to the association between fibrous dysplasia and GH excess in McCune-Albright syndrome, a condition similar to CNC. We speculate that treatment of GH excess in patients with CNC may reduce the likelihood of cardiac myxoma formation and/or recurrence of this tumor. PMID:27535175

  6. Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device Infection in Patients at Risk

    PubMed Central

    Tarakji, Khaldoun G; Ellis, Christopher R; Defaye, Pascal; Kennergren, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of infection following implantation of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) is increasing at a faster rate than that of device implantation. Patients with a CIED infection usually require hospitalisation and complete device and lead removal. A significant proportion die from their infection. Transvenous lead extraction (TLE) is associated with rare but serious complications including major vascular injury or cardiac perforation. Operator experience and advances in lead extraction methods, including laser technology and rotational sheaths, have resulted in procedures having a low risk of complication and mortality. Strategies for preventing CIED infections include intravenous antibiotics and aseptic surgical techniques. An additional method to reduce CIED infection may be the use of antibacterial TYRX™ envelope. Data from non-randomised cohort studies have indicated that antibacterial envelope use can reduce the incidence of CIED infection by more than 80 % in high-risk patients and a randomised clinical trial is ongoing. PMID:27403296

  7. Risk Factor Assessment Branch (RFAB)

    Cancer.gov

    The Risk Factor Assessment Branch (RFAB) focuses on the development, evaluation, and dissemination of high-quality risk factor metrics, methods, tools, technologies, and resources for use across the cancer research continuum, and the assessment of cancer-related risk factors in the population.

  8. The Risks of Inappropriateness in Cardiac Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Picano, Eugenio

    2009-01-01

    The immense clinical and scientific benefits of cardiovascular imaging are well-established, but are also true that 30 to 50% of all examinations are partially or totally inappropriate. Marketing messages, high patient demand and defensive medicine, lead to the vicious circle of the so-called Ulysses syndrome. Mr. Ulysses, a typical middle-aged “worried-well” asymptomatic subject with an A-type coronary personality, a heavy (opium) smoker, leading a stressful life, would be advised to have a cardiological check-up after 10 years of war. After a long journey across imaging laboratories, he will have stress echo, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, PET-CT, 64-slice CT, and adenosine-MRI performed, with a cumulative cost of >100 times a simple exercise-electrocardiography test and a cumulative radiation dose of >4,000 chest x-rays, with a cancer risk of 1 in 100. Ulysses is tired of useless examinations, exorbitant costs. unaffordable even by the richest society, and unacceptable risks. PMID:19543412

  9. The risks of inappropriateness in cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Picano, Eugenio

    2009-05-01

    The immense clinical and scientific benefits of cardiovascular imaging are well-established, but are also true that 30 to 50% of all examinations are partially or totally inappropriate. Marketing messages, high patient demand and defensive medicine, lead to the vicious circle of the so-called Ulysses syndrome. Mr. Ulysses, a typical middle-aged "worried-well" asymptomatic subject with an A-type coronary personality, a heavy (opium) smoker, leading a stressful life, would be advised to have a cardiological check-up after 10 years of war. After a long journey across imaging laboratories, he will have stress echo, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, PET-CT, 64-slice CT, and adenosine-MRI performed, with a cumulative cost of >100 times a simple exercise-electrocardiography test and a cumulative radiation dose of >4,000 chest x-rays, with a cancer risk of 1 in 100. Ulysses is tired of useless examinations, exorbitant costs. unaffordable even by the richest society, and unacceptable risks. PMID:19543412

  10. The contribution of the anaesthetist to risk-adjusted mortality after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Papachristofi, O; Sharples, L D; Mackay, J H; Nashef, S A M; Fletcher, S N; Klein, A A

    2016-02-01

    It is widely accepted that the performance of the operating surgeon affects outcomes, and this has led to the publication of surgical results in the public domain. However, the effect of other members of the multidisciplinary team is unknown. We studied the effect of the anaesthetist on mortality after cardiac surgery by analysing data collected prospectively over ten years of consecutive cardiac surgical cases from ten UK centres. Casemix-adjusted outcomes were analysed in models that included random-effects for centre, surgeon and anaesthetist. All cardiac surgical operations for which the EuroSCORE model is appropriate were included, and the primary outcome was in-hospital death up to three months postoperatively. A total of 110 769 cardiac surgical procedures conducted between April 2002 and March 2012 were studied, which included 127 consultant surgeons and 190 consultant anaesthetists. The overwhelming factor associated with outcome was patient risk, accounting for 95.75% of the variation for in-hospital mortality. The impact of the surgeon was moderate (intra-class correlation coefficient 4.00% for mortality), and the impact of the anaesthetist was negligible (0.25%). There was no significant effect of anaesthetist volume above ten cases per year. We conclude that mortality after cardiac surgery is primarily determined by the patient, with small but significant differences between surgeons. Anaesthetists did not appear to affect mortality. These findings do not support public disclosure of cardiac anaesthetists' results, but substantially validate current UK cardiac anaesthetic training and practice. Further research is required to establish the potential effects of very low anaesthetic caseloads and the effect of cardiac anaesthetists on patient morbidity. PMID:26511481

  11. Cardiovascular risk, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary rehabilitation: Can we learn from cardiac rehabilitation?

    PubMed

    Triest, Filip Jj; Singh, Sally J; Vanfleteren, Lowie Egw

    2016-08-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who participate in pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) often have concomitant cardiovascular disease (CVD), which is a frequently undiagnosed and undertreated comorbidity. CVD contributes to the burden of the disease and is associated with an increased risk for hospitalizations and mortality. Optimizing the diagnosis and management of cardiovascular risk and disease should be considered as part of the holistic approach of PR. In addition, we need to consider similarities and differences in cardiac and PR programs, in order to improve personalized care in patients with both diseases. The current review addresses the burden of CVD in COPD patients who participate in PR, how CVD and its risk factors affect PR and should be managed during PR, and extends on what we can learn of the organization of cardiac rehabilitation programs. PMID:27081189

  12. Imminent cardiac risk assessment via optical intravascular biochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, David L; Wetzel, Louis H; Wetzel, Mark D; Lodder, Robert A

    2009-06-01

    Heart disease is by far the biggest killer in the United States, and type II diabetes, which affects 8% of the U.S. population, is on the rise. In many cases, the acute coronary syndrome and/or sudden cardiac death occurs without warning. Atherosclerosis has known behavioral, genetic and dietary risk factors. However, our laboratory studies with animal models and human post-mortem tissue using FT-IR microspectroscopy reveal the chemical microstructure within arteries and in the arterial walls themselves. These include spectra obtained from the aortas of ApoE-/- knockout mice on sucrose and normal diets showing lipid deposition in the former case. Also pre-aneurysm chemical images of knockout mouse aorta walls, and spectra of plaque excised from a living human patient are shown for comparison. In keeping with the theme of the SPEC 2008 conference 'Spectroscopic Diagnosis of Disease...' this paper describes the background and potential value of a new catheter-based system to provide in vivo biochemical analysis of plaque in human coronary arteries. We report the following: (1) results of FT-IR microspectroscopy on animal models of vascular disease to illustrate the localized chemical distinctions between pathological and normal tissue, (2) current diagnostic techniques used for risk assessment of patients with potential unstable coronary syndromes, and (3) the advantages and limitations of each of these techniques illustrated with patent care histories, related in the first person, by the physician coauthors. Note that the physician comments clarify the contribution of each diagnostic technique to imminent cardiac risk assessment in a clinical setting, leading to the appreciation of what localized intravascular chemical analysis can contribute as an add-on diagnostic tool. The quality of medical imaging has improved dramatically since the turn of the century. Among clinical non-invasive diagnostic tools, laboratory tests of body fluids, EKG, and physical examination

  13. Imminent Cardiac Risk Assessment via Optical Intravascular Biochemical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, D.; Wetzel, L; Wetzel, M; Lodder, R

    2009-01-01

    Heart disease is by far the biggest killer in the United States, and type II diabetes, which affects 8% of the U.S. population, is on the rise. In many cases, the acute coronary syndrome and/or sudden cardiac death occurs without warning. Atherosclerosis has known behavioral, genetic and dietary risk factors. However, our laboratory studies with animal models and human post-mortem tissue using FT-IR microspectroscopy reveal the chemical microstructure within arteries and in the arterial walls themselves. These include spectra obtained from the aortas of ApoE-/- knockout mice on sucrose and normal diets showing lipid deposition in the former case. Also pre-aneurysm chemical images of knockout mouse aorta walls, and spectra of plaque excised from a living human patient are shown for comparison. In keeping with the theme of the SPEC 2008 conference Spectroscopic Diagnosis of Disease this paper describes the background and potential value of a new catheter-based system to provide in vivo biochemical analysis of plaque in human coronary arteries. We report the following: (1) results of FT-IR microspectroscopy on animal models of vascular disease to illustrate the localized chemical distinctions between pathological and normal tissue, (2) current diagnostic techniques used for risk assessment of patients with potential unstable coronary syndromes, and (3) the advantages and limitations of each of these techniques illustrated with patent care histories, related in the first person, by the physician coauthors. Note that the physician comments clarify the contribution of each diagnostic technique to imminent cardiac risk assessment in a clinical setting, leading to the appreciation of what localized intravascular chemical analysis can contribute as an add-on diagnostic tool. The quality of medical imaging has improved dramatically since the turn of the century. Among clinical non-invasive diagnostic tools, laboratory tests of body fluids, EKG, and physical examination are

  14. The transcription factor GATA-6 regulates pathological cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    van Berlo, Jop H.; Elrod, John W.; van den Hoogenhof, Maarten M.G.; York, Allen J.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Duncan, Stephen A.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale The transcriptional code that programs maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy involves the zinc finger-containing DNA binding factor GATA-4. The highly related transcription factor GATA-6 is also expressed in the adult heart, although its role in controlling the hypertrophic program is unknown. Objective To determine the role of GATA-6 in cardiac hypertrophy and homeostasis. Methods and Results Here we performed a cardiomyocyte-specific conditional gene targeting approach for Gata6, as well as a transgenic approach to overexpress GATA-6 in the mouse heart. Deletion of Gata6-loxP with Nkx2.5-cre produced late embryonic lethality with heart defects, while deletion with β-myosin heavy chain-cre (βMHC-cre) produced viable adults with greater than 95% loss of GATA-6 protein in the heart. These later mice were subjected to pressure overload induced hypertrophy for 2 and 6 weeks, which showed a significant reduction in cardiac hypertrophy similar to that observed Gata4 heart-specific deleted mice. Gata6-deleted mice subjected to pressure overload also developed heart failure while control mice maintained proper cardiac function. Gata6-deleted mice also developed less cardiac hypertrophy following 2 weeks of angiotensin II/phenylephrine infusion. Controlled GATA-6 overexpression in the heart induced hypertrophy with aging and predisposed to greater hypertrophy with pressure overload stimulation. Combinatorial deletion of Gata4 and Gata6 from the adult heart resulted in dilated cardiomyopathy and lethality by 16 weeks of age. Mechanistically, deletion of Gata6 from the heart resulted in fundamental changes in the levels of key regulatory genes and myocyte differentiation-specific genes. Conclusions These results indicate that GATA-6 is both necessary and sufficient for regulating the cardiac hypertrophic response and differentiated gene expression, both alone and in coordination with GATA-4. PMID:20705924

  15. Cardiometabolic risk factors and atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Arthur R; Lavie, Carl J; Dinicolantonio, James J; O'Keefe, James; Morin, Daniel P; Khatib, Sammy; Abi-Samra, Freddy M; Messerli, Franz H; Milani, Richard V

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia worldwide; it is a significant risk factor for stroke and embolization, and has an impact on cardiac function. Despite its impact on morbidity and mortality, our understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of this disease process is still incomplete. Over the past several decades, there has been evidence to suggest that AF has a significant correlation with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Furthermore, AF appears to be more closely related to specific components of MetS compared with others. This article provides an overview of the various components of MetS and their impact on AF. PMID:24448257

  16. A contemporary assessment of the risk for sudden cardiac death in patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Silka, Michael J; Bar-Cohen, Yaniv

    2012-03-01

    Assessment of the risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD) after surgery for congenital heart disease (CHD) remains a difficult challenge. In the study of this problem, the focus has evolved from concern regarding late-onset heart block to a subsequent focus on ventricular and reentrant atrial arrhythmias, with the most recent emphasis on ventricular dysfunction and heart failure. Sudden cardiac death in CHD patients has been studied most extensively in tetralogy of Fallot. More than 30 risk factors have been proposed, with age at repair, QRS duration, right ventricular enlargement, and left ventricular dysfunction considered the most predictive risk factors. Additionally, SCD has been studied in patients with atrial repair for transposition of the great arteries, left heart obstructive lesions, and to a limited extent, patients with univentricular physiology. This review discusses current risk factors for SCD in CHD and the limited positive predictive value of any individual factor. The emphasis is on contemporary patients with CHD, who differ markedly from those who had repair of CHD decades earlier. This is characterized by complete repairs during the neonatal period, improved physiologic outcomes, and extended survival of patients with complex forms of CHD. Therefore, earlier data and conclusions may not be relevant to newer generations of patients with CHD. According to current perspectives, systemic ventricular dysfunction becomes a major risk factor beyond the age of 20 years. The first symptomatic arrhythmia may result in SCD, and defibrillators are increasingly implanted despite the lack of risk stratification criteria. The large number of potential risk factors and therapeutic options, in contrast to the low incidence of actual events, results in a difficult clinical challenge in the assessment of the risk for SCD in the individual patient with CHD. PMID:22311569

  17. Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Factors Request Permissions Print to PDF Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 08/ ... anything that increases a person’s chance of developing cancer. Although risk factors often influence the development of cancer, most do ...

  18. Impact of exercise training on psychological risk factors.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Carl J; Milani, Richard V; O'Keefe, James H; Lavie, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    Although the role of psychological risk factors has been underemphasized, considerable evidence indicates the adverse effects of various psychosocial stressors in the pathogenesis and recovery from cardiovascular diseases. Substantial data, especially from cardiac rehabilitation and exercise training programs, have demonstrated the role of physical activity, exercise training, and cardiorespiratory fitness, to improve psychological risk factors, including depression, anxiety, hostility, and total psychological stress, as well as stress-related mortality. PMID:21545933

  19. Unveiling specific triggers and precipitating factors for fatal cardiac events in inherited arrhythmia syndromes.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tadashi; Kaneko, Yoshiaki; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Patients with inherited arrhythmia syndromes, such as long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, early repolarization syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and their latent forms, are at risk for fatal arrhythmias. These diseases are typically associated with genetic mutations that perturb cardiac ionic currents. The analysis of cardiac events by genotype-phenotype correlation studies has revealed that fatal arrhythmias in some genotypes are triggered by physical or emotional stress, and those in the others are more likely to occur during sleep or at rest. Thus, the risk stratification and management of affected patients differ strikingly according to the genetic variant of the inherited arrhythmia syndrome. Risk stratification may be further refined by considering the precipitating factors, such as drugs, bradycardia, electrolyte disturbances, fever, and cardiac memory. Moreover, an increasing number of studies imply that the susceptibility of fatal arrhythmias in patients with acute coronary syndrome or takotsubo cardiomyopathy is at least partly ascribed to the genetic variants causing inherited arrhythmia syndromes. In this article, we review the recent advances in the understanding of the molecular genetics and genotype-phenotype correlations in inherited arrhythmia syndromes and consider the triggers and precipitating factors for fatal arrhythmias in these disorders. Further studies to explore the triggers and precipitating factors specific to the genotypes and diseases are needed for better clinical management. PMID:25925977

  20. Fibroblast Growth Factors and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Promote Cardiac Reprogramming under Defined Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yamakawa, Hiroyuki; Muraoka, Naoto; Miyamoto, Kazutaka; Sadahiro, Taketaro; Isomi, Mari; Haginiwa, Sho; Kojima, Hidenori; Umei, Tomohiko; Akiyama, Mizuha; Kuishi, Yuki; Kurokawa, Junko; Furukawa, Tetsushi; Fukuda, Keiichi; Ieda, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Summary Fibroblasts can be directly reprogrammed into cardiomyocyte-like cells (iCMs) by overexpression of cardiac transcription factors, including Gata4, Mef2c, and Tbx5; however, this process is inefficient under serum-based culture conditions, in which conversion of partially reprogrammed cells into fully reprogrammed functional iCMs has been a major hurdle. Here, we report that a combination of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 2, FGF10, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), termed FFV, promoted cardiac reprogramming under defined serum-free conditions, increasing spontaneously beating iCMs by 100-fold compared with those under conventional serum-based conditions. Mechanistically, FFV activated multiple cardiac transcriptional regulators and converted partially reprogrammed cells into functional iCMs through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphoinositol 3-kinase/AKT pathways. Moreover, FFV enabled cardiac reprogramming with only Mef2c and Tbx5 through the induction of cardiac reprogramming factors, including Gata4. Thus, defined culture conditions promoted the quality of cardiac reprogramming, and this finding provides new insight into the mechanism of cardiac reprogramming. PMID:26626177

  1. A single exposure to particulate or gaseous air pollution increases the risk of aconitine-induced cardiac arrythmia in hypertensive rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate a significant association between arrhythmias and air pollution exposure. Sensitivity to aconitine-induced arrhythmia has been used repeatedly to examine the factors that increase the risk of such cardiac electrical dysfunction. In this study, ...

  2. Cardiac risks associated with antibiotics: azithromycin and levofloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhiqiang Kevin; Yuan, Jing; Li, Minghui; Sutton, S Scott; Rao, Gowtham A; Jacob, Sony; Bennett, Charles L

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Azithromycin and levofloxacin have been shown to be efficacious in treating infections. The adverse drug events associated with azithromycin and levofloxacin were considered rare. However, the US FDA released warnings regarding the possible risk of QT prolongation with azithromycin and levofloxacin. Areas covered Case reports/case series, observational studies and clinical trials assessing cardiovascular risks associated with azithromycin and levofloxacin were critically reviewed, including 15 case reports/series, 5 observational studies and 5 clinical trials that investigated the cardiac risks associated azithromycin and levofloxacin. Expert opinion Results are discordant. Two retrospective studies utilizing large databases demonstrated an increased risk of cardiovascular death with azithromycin, when azithromycin was compared with amoxicillin. Two other retrospective studies found no difference in cardiovascular death associated with azithromycin and other antibiotics. For levofloxacin, the increased risk of cardiovascular death was only found in one retrospective study. Therefore, the risks and benefits of antibacterial therapies should be considered when making prescription decisions. This study should not preclude clinicians from avoiding azithromycin and levofloxacin. If a patient has an indication to receive an antibiotic and if azithromycin or levofloxacin is needed, it may be used, but the potential risks must be understood. PMID:25494485

  3. Stroke prevention: modifying risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Romero, José Rafael; Morris, Jane; Pikula, Aleksandra

    2009-01-01

    Risk factor modification remains as the principal aspect of care for stroke prevention. Understanding of risk factors has advanced and several options are now available to treat modifiable risk factors. However, effective treatment remains a challenging task in clinical practice. Prevention begins with awareness of risk factors by patients and clinicians. Risk factor assessment along with overall stroke risk estimation should be part of evaluation of patients with stroke, and used with careful clinical judgment. In this review we discuss the impact of modifiable traditional vascular risk factors on ischemic stroke, interventions for stroke prevention, and evidence for early treatment of risk factors where available as well as areas of research progress. Emphasis should be paid in education of patients, the community and medical personnel. Future research in the field of genetic determinants of vascular risk factors and stroke will increase our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of cerebrovascular disease and likely result in development of new therapies and individualized programs for stroke prevention. PMID:19124428

  4. Obesity related risk of sudden cardiac death in the atherosclerosis risk in communities study

    PubMed Central

    Adabag, Selcuk; Huxley, Rachel R; Lopez, Faye L; Chen, Lin Y; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Siscovick, David; Deo, Rajat; Konety, Suma; Alonso, Alvaro; Folsom, Aaron R

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the association of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and waist hip ratio (WHR) with sudden cardiac death (SCD) in community dwelling individuals. Methods Data from a multicentre, prospective, cohort study of 14 941 men and women (African American, and white), aged 45–64 years, participating in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study was analysed. Obesity measures were assessed at baseline (1987–1989). SCD was adjudicated by a committee. Results At enrolment mean±SD age of the participants was 54±6 years (55% female; 26% African American). During 12.6±2.5 years of follow-up, 253 SCD occurred (incidence rate 1.34/100 person-years). The association between obesity and SCD differed by smoking status (interaction p≤0.01). In models adjusting for age, sex, race, study centre and education level, SCD risk was positively associated (p<0.001) with BMI, WC and WHR in non-smokers, but not in smokers. WHR was more strongly associated with SCD in non-smokers than was BMI or WC (HR per SD increment (95% CI) 2.00 (1.65 to 2.42); 1.34 (1.15 to 1.56) and 1.49 (1.28 to 1.74), respectively). After adjustment for potential mediators (hypertension, diabetes, lipid profile, prevalent coronary heart disease, heart failure, and LV hypertrophy), non-smokers in the highest WHR category (>0.95 in women; >1.01 in men) had double the risk of SCD (HR 2.03, 95% CI 1.19 to 3.46; incidence rate 1.43/1000 person-years) versus those with normal WHR. Conclusions General obesity is associated with increased risk of SCD in middle-aged, non-smoking individuals, mediated by traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Central obesity, however, is independently associated with SCD by pathways that remain to be elucidated. PMID:25410499

  5. Identification of high-risk communities for unattended out-of-hospital cardiac arrests using GIS.

    PubMed

    Semple, Hugh M; Cudnik, Michael T; Sayre, Michael; Keseg, David; Warden, Craig R; Sasson, Comilla

    2013-04-01

    Improving survival rates for out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) at the neighborhood level is increasingly seen as priority in US cities. Since wide disparities exist in OHCA rates at the neighborhood level, it is necessary to locate neighborhoods where people are at elevated risk for cardiac arrest and target these for educational outreach and other mitigation strategies. This paper describes a GIS-based methodology that was used to identify communities with high risk for cardiac arrests in Franklin County, Ohio during the period 2004-2009. Prior work in this area used a single criterion, i.e., the density of OHCA events, to define the high-risk areas, and a single analytical technique, i.e., kernel density analysis, to identify the high-risk communities. In this paper, two criteria are used to identify the high-risk communities, the rate of OHCA incidents and the level of bystander CPR participation. We also used Local Moran's I combined with traditional map overlay techniques to add robustness to the methodology for identifying high-risk communities for OHCA. Based on the criteria established for this study, we successfully identified several communities that were at higher risk for OHCA than neighboring communities. These communities had incidence rates of OHCA that were significantly higher than neighboring communities and bystander rates that were significantly lower than neighboring communities. Other risk factors for OHCA were also high in the selected communities. The methodology employed in this study provides for a measurement conceptualization of OHCA clusters that is much broader than what has been previously offered. It is also statistically reliable and can be easily executed using a GIS. PMID:22983677

  6. Risk Factors for Teenage Fatherhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornberry, Terence P.; Smith, Carolyn A.; Howard, Gregory J.

    1997-01-01

    Uses data from the Rochester Youth Development Study of urban youth (N=615) to identify early risk factors for the likelihood of becoming a teen father. Results show that teen fatherhood is related to a variety of risk factors, such as social class, educational performance, precocious sexual activity, and drug use. (RJM)

  7. Prediction of Cardiovascular Disease Risk by Cardiac Biomarkers in 2 United Kingdom Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, Paul; Hart, Carole; Papacosta, Olia; Preiss, David; McConnachie, Alex; Murray, Heather; Ramsay, Sheena; Upton, Mark; Watt, Graham; Whincup, Peter; Wannamethee, Goya; Sattar, Naveed

    2016-01-01

    We tested the predictive ability of cardiac biomarkers N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), high-sensitivity troponin T, and midregional pro adrenomedullin for cardiovascular disease (CVD) events using the British Regional Heart Study (BRHS) of men aged 60 to 79 years, and the MIDSPAN Family Study (MFS) of men and women aged 30 to 59 years. They included 3757 and 2226 participants, respectively, and during median 13.0 and 17.3 years follow-up the primary CVD event rates were 16.6 and 5.3 per 1000 patient-years, respectively. In Cox models adjusted for basic classical risk factors, 1 SD increases in log-transformed NT-proBNP, high-sensitivity troponin T, and midregional pro adrenomedullin were generally associated with increased primary CVD risk in both the studies (P<0.006) except midregional pro adrenomedullin in MFS (P=0.10). In BRHS, QRISK2 risk factors yielded a C-index of 0.657, which was improved by 0.017 (P=0.005) by NT-proBNP, but not by other biomarkers. Using 28% 14-year risk as a proxy for 20% 10-year risk, NT-proBNP improved risk classification for primary CVD cases (case net reclassification index, 5.9%; 95% confidence interval, 2.8%–9.2%), but only improved classification of noncases at a 14% 14-year risk threshold (4.6%; 2.9%–6.3%). In MFS, ASSIGN risk factors yielded a C-index of 0.752 for primary CVD; none of the cardiac biomarkers improved the C-index. Improvements in risk classification were only seen using NT-proBNP and high-sensitivity troponin T among cases using the 28% 14-year risk threshold (4.7%; 1.0%–9.2% and 2.6%; 0.0%–5.8%, respectively). In conclusion, the improvement in treatment allocation gained by adding cardiac biomarkers to risk scores seems to depend on the risk threshold chosen for commencing preventative treatments. PMID:26667414

  8. Risk Factors for Scleroderma

    MedlinePlus

    ... part of a study, please call the Scleroderma Research Foundation at 1-800-441-CURE. Environmental Risk Some ... is both time consuming and expensive. The Scleroderma Research Foundation continues to fund and facilitate the most promising ...

  9. Regulation of cardiac metabolism and function by lipogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Bednarski, Tomasz; Pyrkowska, Aleksandra; Opasińska, Agnieszka; Dobrzyń, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    The heart has a limited capacity for lipogenesis and de novo lipid synthesis. However, expression of lipogenic genes in cardiomyocytes is unexpectedly high. Recent studies showed that lipogenic genes are important factors regulating cardiac metabolism and function. Long chain fatty acids are a major source of ATP required for proper heart function, and under aerobic conditions, the heart derives 60-90% of the energy necessary for contractile function from fatty acid oxidation. On the other hand, cardiac lipid over-accumulation (e.g. ceramides, diacylglycerols) leads to heart dysfunction. Downregulation of the lipogenic genes' expression (e.g. sterol regulatory element binding protein 1, stearoyl-CoA desaturase, acetyl-CoA kwacarboxylase) decreased heart steatosis and cardiomyocyte apoptosis, improving systolic and diastolic function of the left ventricle. Lipogenic factors also regulate fatty acids and glucose utilization in the heart, underlining their important role in maintaining energetic homeostasis in pathological states. Fatty acid synthase, the enzyme catalyzing fatty acids de novo synthesis, affects cardiac calcium signaling through regulation of L-type calcium channel activity. Thus, a growing body of evidence suggests that the role of lipogenic genes in cardiomyocytes may be distinct from other tissues. Here, we review recent advances made in understanding the role of lipogenic genes in the control of heart metabolism and its involvement in the pathogenesis of lipotoxic cardiomyopathy. PMID:27333934

  10. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Scar Imaging for Sudden Cardiac Death Risk Stratification in Patients with Non-Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Kyoung; Chattranukulchai, Pairoj

    2015-01-01

    In patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM), risk stratification for sudden cardiac death (SCD) and selection of patients who would benefit from prophylactic implantable cardioverter-defibrillators remains challenging. We aim to discuss the evidence of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR)-derived myocardial scar for the prediction of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in NICM. From the 15 studies analyzed, with a total of 2747 patients, the average prevalence of myocardial scar was 41%. In patients with myocardial scar, the risk for adverse cardiac events was more than 3-fold higher, and risk for arrhythmic events 5-fold higher, as compared to patients without scar. Based on the available observational, single center studies, CMR scar assessment may be a promising new tool for SCD risk stratification, which merits further investigation. PMID:26175568

  11. Stroke Risk Factors and Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... effective if given quickly. Every minute counts! "Stroke Risk Factors and Symptoms", NINDS. June 1, 2008. Prepared by: Office of Communications and Public Liaison National Institute of Neurological Disorders ...

  12. Hidden Risk Factors for Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... high cholesterol. “Those are the most common risk factors,” according to Steven J. Kittner, M.D., director of the Maryland Stroke Center at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. “But ...

  13. The Role of Clinical and Geographic Factors in the Use of Hospital versus Home-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brual, Janette; Gravely, Shannon; Suskin, Neville; Stewart, Donna E.; Grace, Sherry L.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is most often provided in a hospital setting. Home-based models of care have been developed to overcome geographic, among other, barriers in patients at a lower risk. This study assessed whether clinical and geographic factors were related to the use of either a hospital-based or a home-based program. Secondary analysis…

  14. Long-Term Exercise and Risk of Metabolic and Cardiac Diseases: The Erlangen Fitness and Prevention Study

    PubMed Central

    Kemmler, Wolfgang; von Stengel, Simon; Bebenek, Michael; Kalender, Willi A.

    2013-01-01

    In female subjects, ageing and the menopausal transition contribute to a rapid increase of metabolic and cardiac risk factors. Exercise may be an option to positively impact various risk factors prone to severe metabolic and cardiac diseases and events. This study was conducted to determine the long-term effect of a multipurpose exercise program on metabolic and cardiac risk scores in postmenopausal women. 137 osteopenic Caucasian females (55.4 ± 3.2 yrs), 1–8 years postmenopausal, were included in the study. Eighty-six subjects joined the exercise group (EG) and performed an intense multipurpose exercise program which was carefully supervised during the 12-year period, while 51 females maintained their habitual physical activity (CG). Main outcome measures were 10-year coronary heart disease risk (10 y CHD risk), metabolic syndrome Z-score (MetS Index), and 10-year myocardial infarction risk (10 y hard CHD risk). Significant between-group differences all in favor of the EG were determined for 10 y-CHD risk (EG: 2.65 ± 2.09% versus CG: 5.40 ± 3.30%; P = 0.001), MetS-Index (EG: −0.42 ± 1.03% versus CG: 1.61 ± 1.88; P = 0.001), and 10 y-hard-CHD risk (EG: 2.06 ± 1.17% versus CG: 3.26 ± 1.31%; P = 0.001). Although the nonrandomized design may prevent definite evidence, the intense multi-purpose exercise program determined the long-term efficacy and feasibility of an exercise program to significantly impact metabolic and cardiac risk scores in postmenopausal women. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01177761. PMID:23983804

  15. Plasma Fatty Acid Binding Protein 4 and Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Djoussé, Luc; Maziarz, Marlena; Biggs, Mary L.; Ix, Joachim H.; Zieman, Susan J.; Kizer, Jorge R.; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Tracy, Russell P.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; Siscovick, David S.; Sotoodehnia, Nona

    2013-01-01

    Although fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) may increase risk of diabetes and exert negative cardiac inotropy, it is unknown whether plasma concentrations of FABP4 are associated with incidence of sudden cardiac death (SCD). We prospectively analyzed data on 4,560 participants of the Cardiovascular Health Study. FABP4 was measured at baseline using ELISA, and SCD events were adjudicated through review of medical records. We used Cox proportional hazards to estimate effect measures. During a median followup of 11.8 years, 146 SCD cases occurred. In a multivariable model adjusting for demographic, lifestyle, and metabolic factors, relative risk of SCD associated with each higher standard deviation (SD) of plasma FABP4 was 1.15 (95% CI: 0.95–1.38), P = 0.15. In a secondary analysis stratified by prevalent diabetes status, FABP4 was associated with higher risk of SCD in nondiabetic participants, (RR per SD higher FABP4: 1.33 (95% CI: 1.07–1.65), P = 0.009) but not in diabetic participants (RR per SD higher FABP4: 0.88 (95% CI: 0.62–1.27), P = 0.50), P for diabetes-FABP4 interaction 0.049. In summary, a single measure of plasma FABP4 obtained later in life was not associated with the risk of SCD in older adults overall. Confirmation of our post-hoc results in nondiabetic people in other studies is warranted. PMID:24455402

  16. Cardiac Atrophy and Diastolic Dysfunction During and After Long Duration Spaceflight: Functional Consequences for Orthostatic Intolerance, Exercise Capability and Risk for Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Benjamin D.; Bungo, Michael W.; Platts, Steven H.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Johnston, Smith L.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac Atrophy and Diastolic Dysfunction During and After Long Duration Spaceflight: Functional Consequences for Orthostatic Intolerance, Exercise Capability and Risk for Cardiac Arrhythmias (Integrated Cardiovascular) will quantify the extent of long-duration space flightassociated cardiac atrophy (deterioration) on the International Space Station crewmembers.

  17. Factor analytic reduction of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, David A.

    1989-01-01

    An accepted method for measuring the responsiveness of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex to arterial pressure changes is to artificially stimulate the baroreceptors in the neck. This is accomplished by using a pressurized neck cuff which constricts and distends the carotid artery and subsequently stimulates the baroreceptors. Nine physiological responses to this type of stimulation are quantified and used as indicators of the baroreflex. Thirty male humans between the ages 27 and 46 underwent the carotid-cardiac baroreflex test. The data for the nine response parameters were analyzed by principle component factor analysis. The results of this analysis indicated that 93 percent of the total variance across all nine parameters could be explained in four dimensions. Examination of the factor loadings following an orthogonal rotation of the principle components indicated four well defined dimensions. The first two dimensions reflected location points for R-R interval and carotid distending pressure respectively. The third dimension was composed of measures reflecting the gain of the reflex. The fourth dimension was the ratio of the resting R-R interval to R-R interval during simulated hypertension. The data suggests that the analysis of all nine baroreflex parameters is redundant.

  18. Apocynin Attenuates Cardiac Injury in Type 4 Cardiorenal Syndrome via Suppressing Cardiac Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 With Oxidative Stress Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Yu; Liu, Xun; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Kun; Huang, Feifei; Wang, Jing-Feng; Tang, Wanchun; Huang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background Type 4 cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) refers to the cardiac injury induced by chronic kidney disease. We aimed to assess oxidative stress and cardiac injury in patients with type 4 CRS, determine whether the antioxidant apocynin attenuated cardiac injury in rats with type 4 CRS, and explore potential mechanisms. Methods and Results A cross-sectional study was conducted among patients with type 4 CRS (n=17) and controls (n=16). Compared with controls, patients with type 4 CRS showed elevated oxidative stress, which was significantly correlated with cardiac hypertrophy and decreased ejection fraction. In vivo study, male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 5/6 subtotal nephrectomy and sham surgery, followed with apocynin or vehicle treatment for 8 weeks. Eight weeks after surgery, the 5/6 subtotal nephrectomy rats mimicked type 4 CRS, showing increased serum creatinine, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, and decreased ejection fraction compared with sham-operated animals. Cardiac malondialdehyde, NADPH oxidase activity, fibroblast growth factor-2, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation increased significantly in the 5/6 subtotal nephrectomy rats. These changes were significantly attenuated by apocynin. In vitro study showed that apocynin reduced angiotensin II–induced NADPH oxidase–dependent oxidative stress, upregulation of fibroblast growth factor-2 and fibrosis biomarkers, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in cardiac fibroblasts. Importantly, the ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 reduced the upregulation of fibroblast growth factor-2 and fibrosis biomarkers in angiotensin II–treated fibroblasts. Conclusions Oxidative stress is a candidate mediator for type 4 CRS. Apocynin attenuated cardiac injury in type 4 CRS rats via inhibiting NADPH oxidase–dependent oxidative stress-activated ERK1/2 pathway and subsequent fibroblast growth factor-2 upregulation. Our study added evidence to the beneficial effect of apocynin in type 4 CRS. PMID:26109504

  19. About Alzheimer's Disease: Risk Factors and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Risk Factors and Prevention We can’t control some risk factors for ... as well. NIA Information on Risk Factors and Prevention 2014-2015 Alzheimer's Disease Progress Report: Advancing Research ...

  20. Environmental risk factors for osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Goyer, R.A.; Korach, K.S. ); Epstein, S. ); Bhattacharyya, M. ); Pounds, J. )

    1994-04-01

    Environmental risk factors for osteoporosis were reviewed at a conference held at the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences 8-9 November 1993. The conference was co-sponsored by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease and the NIH Office of Research in Women's Health. The objective of the conference was to review what is known about risk factors for osteoporosis and to identify gaps in the present state of knowledge that might be addressed by future research. The conference was divided into two broad themes. The first session focused on current knowledge regarding etiology, risk factors, and approaches to clinical and laboratory diagnosis. This was followed by three sessions in which various environmental pollutants were discussed. Topics selected for review included environmental agents that interfere with bone and calcium metabolism, such as the toxic metals lead, cadmium, aluminum, and fluoride, natural and antiestrogens, calcium, and vitamin D.

  1. Expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor in Human Acute Cardiac Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Arbustini, Eloisa; Grasso, Maurizia; Diegoli, Marta; Bramerio, Manuela; Foglieni, Andrea Scotti; Albertario, Marco; Martinelli, Luigi; Gavazzi, Antonello; Goggi, Claudio; Campana, Carlo; Vigano, Mario

    1991-01-01

    The authors performed an immunohistochemical study on expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) in endomyocardial biopsies from human cardiac allografts. TNFα immunoreactivity was found in 45% biopsies with mild acute rejection, in 83% biopsies with focal moderate rejection, in 80% biopsies with diffuse moderate rejection. Biopsies with absent rejection did not show immunoreactive cells. In mild rejection, positive cells were few and scanty monocytes and macrophages (MAC-387 and LN5 positive cells) and T lymphocytes (UCHL-1/CD45 RO positive cells) (up to 20% of all infiltrating cells). Expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens on infiltrating and endothelial cells occurred earlier and independent of TNFα reactivity. Number of immunoreactive cells increased in moderate rejection (up to 50%). Immunoreactivity was also present in nonpigmented macrophages in part of the biopsies with resolving rejection (45%). The authors conclude that TNFα is expressed in acute cardiac rejection by immunologically activated inflammatory cells. Immunoreactive cells increase in number with increasing severity of the reaction. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:1928295

  2. Left Ventricular Diameter and Risk Stratification for Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Kumar; Reinier, Kyndaron; Teodorescu, Carmen; Uy‐Evanado, Audrey; Aleong, Ryan; Chugh, Harpriya; Nichols, Gregory A.; Gunson, Karen; London, Barry; Jui, Jonathan; Chugh, Sumeet S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Left ventricular (LV) diameter is routinely measured on the echocardiogram but has not been jointly evaluated with the ejection fraction (EF) for risk stratification of sudden cardiac death (SCD). Methods and Results From a large ongoing community‐based study of SCD (The Oregon Sudden Unexpected Death Study; population ≈1 million), SCD cases were compared with geographic controls. LVEF and LV diameter, measured using the LV internal dimension in diastole (categorized as normal, mild, moderate, or severe dilatation using American Society of Echocardiography definitions) were assessed from echocardiograms prior but unrelated to the SCD event. Cases (n=418; 69.5±13.8 years), compared with controls (n=329; 67.7±11.9 years), more commonly had severe LV dysfunction (EF ≤35%; 30.5% versus 18.8%; P<0.01) and larger LV diameter (52.2±10.5 mm versus 49.7±7.9 mm; P<0.01). Moderate or severe LV dilatation (16.3% versus 8.2%; P=0.001) and severe LV dilatation (8.1% versus 2.1%; P<0.001) were significantly more frequent in cases. In multivariable analysis, severe LV dilatation was an independent predictor of SCD (odds ratio 2.5 [95% CI 1.03 to 5.9]; P=0.04). In addition, subjects with both EF ≤35% and severe LV dilatation had higher odds for SCD compared with those with low EF only (odds ratio 3.8 [95% CI 1.5 to 10.2] for both versus 1.7 [95% CI 1.2 to 2.5] for low EF only), suggesting that severe LV dilatation additively increased SCD risk. Conclusion LV diameter may contribute to risk stratification for SCD independent of the LVEF. This readily available echocardiographic measure warrants further prospective evaluation. PMID:25227407

  3. Risk Factors For Chronic Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jin-Young; Tan, Bruce K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the recent literature on risk factors for chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) with an emphasis on genetic, comorbid diseases and environmental factors associated with CRS. Through identifying potential risk factors for CRS, we glean insights into the underlying pathogenic mechanisms and essential for developing effective therapeutic strategies. Recent findings Recent findings demonstrate that genetics, comorbid medical conditions including airway diseases, gastroesophageal reflux disease, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and various demographic and environmental factors are associated with having a CRS diagnosis. Limitations of current studies include, variable application of disease definitions, lack of prospective longitudinal studies and a disproportionate focus on tertiary care populations. Summary CRS has a broad spectrum of associations ranging from genetics to comorbid diseases and environmental factors. These predisposing factors provide valuable information for possible designing therapeutic and preventive interventions. However, to better understand whether these associations cause CRS, further studies are needed to independently replicate findings, establish temporal relationships between exposure and disease onset, evaluate the influence of exposure dose on disease severity, and to understand the biological effects of these risk factors in the context of CRS. PMID:25479315

  4. Clinical risk predictors associated with cardiac mortality following vascular surgery in South African patients.

    PubMed

    Biccard, B M; Bandu, R

    2007-01-01

    Clinical risk prediction is important in the prognostication of peri-operative cardiac complications and the management of high-risk cardiac patients for major non-cardiac surgery. However, the current pre-operative clinical risk indices have been derived in European and American patients and not validated in South African patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of the clinical risk predictors identified in Lee's revised cardiac risk index and in the African arm of the INTERHEART study, in predicting cardiac mortality following vascular surgery in South African patients. A retrospective cohort study was conducted of all patients undergoing elective or urgent vascular surgery at Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital over a three-year period. All in-hospital deaths were identified and classified into cardiac or non-cardiac deaths by an investigator blinded to the patients' pre-operative clinical risk predicators. A second investigator blinded to the cause of death identified the following clinical risk predictors: history of ischaemic heart disease, congestive cardiac failure and cerebrovascular accident, presence of diabetes, hypertension and obesity (BMI > 30 kg.m(-2)), elevated serum creatinine (> 180 micromol.l(-1)), positive smoking history and ethnicity. The main finding was that a serum creatinine level of greater than 180 micromol.l(-1) and a positive smoking history were significantly associated with cardiac death (p = 0.012, p = 0.012, respectively). Multivariate analyses using a backward stepwise modeling technique found only a serum creatinine of > 180 micromol.l(-1) and a positive smoking history to be significantly associated with cardiac mortality (p = 0.038, 0.035, respectively) with an odds ratio and 95% confidence interval of 3.02 (1.06-8.59) and 3.40 (1.09-10.62), respectively. All other clinical predictors were not significantly different between the two groups. However, based on the sample size of this study, a type 2 or

  5. Sexual harassment: identifying risk factors.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, E A; O'Donohue, W

    1998-12-01

    A new model of the etiology of sexual harassment, the four-factor model, is presented and compared with several models of sexual harassment including the biological model, the organizational model, the sociocultural model, and the sex role spillover model. A number of risk factors associated with sexually harassing behavior are examined within the framework of the four-factor model of sexual harassment. These include characteristics of the work environment (e.g., sexist attitudes among co-workers, unprofessional work environment, skewed sex ratios in the workplace, knowledge of grievance procedures for sexual harassment incidents) as well as personal characteristics of the subject (e.g., physical attractiveness, job status, sex-role). Subjects were 266 university female faculty, staff, and students who completed the Sexual Experience Questionnaire to assess the experience of sexual harassment and a questionnaire designed to assess the risk factors stated above. Results indicated that the four-factor model is a better predictor of sexual harassment than the alternative models. The risk factors most strongly associated with sexual harassment were an unprofessional environment in the workplace, sexist atmosphere, and lack of knowledge about the organization's formal grievance procedures. PMID:9883305

  6. [Psoriasis and cardiovascular risk factors].

    PubMed

    Tal, Roy; Pavlovsky, Lev; David, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease which may dramatically affect patients' lives. This chronic disease is characterized by a protracted course of alternating remissions and relapses. In recent years, the attention of researchers has focused on the association between psoriasis and cardiovascular disease risk factors. This review summarizes the literature on this topic with an emphasis on research conducted in Israel. PMID:23316664

  7. [New strategies for assessing the risk of sudden cardiac death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Jaworski, Krzysztof; Możeńska, Olga; Kosior, Dariusz A

    2016-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by a primarily increased ventricular wall thickness, usually caused by the mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins. Thanks to the growing awareness in the medical community as well as advances in diagnostic techniques HCM can be diagnosed at earlier stages than ever before. However, in some cases the first symptom of this disease is a sudden cardiac death (SCD) and diagnosis remains unknown until post-mortem examination. Implantation of a cardioverterdefibrillator (ICD) provides the most effective method of SCD prevention. Nevertheless, due to a number of risks associated with surgery as well as the possession of such devices, predictive factors of serious ventricular arrhythmia in individual patients have been sought for many years. The aim of this review is to present the current strategies of risk assessment and prevention of SCD in patients with HCM. PMID:27590646

  8. [New strategies for assessing the risk of sudden cardiac death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Jaworski, Krzysztof; Możeńska, Olga; Kosior, Dariusz A

    2016-08-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by a primarily increased ventricular wall thickness, usually caused by the mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins. Thanks to the growing awareness in the medical community as well as advances in diagnostic techniques HCM can be diagnosed at earlier stages than ever before. However, in some cases the first symptom of this disease is a sudden cardiac death (SCD) and diagnosis remains unknown until post-mortem examination. Implantation of a cardioverterdefibrillator (ICD) provides the most effective method of SCD prevention. Nevertheless, due to a number of risks associated with surgery as well as the possession of such devices, predictive factors of serious ventricular arrhythmia in individual patients have been sought for many years. The aim of this review is to present the current strategies of risk assessment and prevention of SCD in patients with HCM. PMID:27591441

  9. Dipyridamole-thallium scanning in patients undergoing vascular surgery. Optimizing preoperative evaluation of cardiac risk

    SciTech Connect

    Eagle, K.A.; Singer, D.E.; Brewster, D.C.; Darling, R.C.; Mulley, A.G.; Boucher, C.A.

    1987-04-24

    Dipyridamole-thallium imaging has been suggested as a method of preoperatively assessing cardiac risk in patients undergoing major surgery. To define more clearly its proper role in preoperative assessment, we prospectively evaluated 111 patients undergoing vascular surgery. In the first set of 61 patients, our data confirmed the value of preoperative dipyridamole-thallium scanning in identifying the patients who suffered postoperative ischemic events. Events occurred in eight of 18 patients with reversible defects on preoperative imaging, compared with no events in 43 patients with no thallium redistribution (confidence interval for the risk difference: 0.624, 0.256). The results also suggested that clinical factors might allow identification of a low-risk subset of patients. To test the hypothesis that patients with no evidence of congestive heart failure, angina, prior myocardial infarction, or diabetes do not require further preoperative testing, we evaluated an additional 50 patients having vascular procedures. None of the 23 without the clinical markers had untoward outcomes, while ten of 27 patients with one or more of these clinical markers suffered postoperative ischemic events (confidence interval for the risk difference: 0.592, 0.148). In the clinical high-risk subset, further risk stratification is achieved with dipyridamole-thallium scanning.

  10. Shared Risk Factors in Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Koene, Ryan J; Prizment, Anna E; Blaes, Anne; Konety, Suma H

    2016-03-15

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer are the 2 leading causes of death worldwide. Although commonly thought of as 2 separate disease entities, CVD and cancer possess various similarities and possible interactions, including a number of similar risk factors (eg, obesity, diabetes mellitus), suggesting a shared biology for which there is emerging evidence. Although chronic inflammation is an indispensable feature of the pathogenesis and progression of both CVD and cancer, additional mechanisms can be found at their intersection. Therapeutic advances, despite improving longevity, have increased the overlap between these diseases, with millions of cancer survivors now at risk of developing CVD. Cardiac risk factors have a major impact on subsequent treatment-related cardiotoxicity. In this review, we explore the risk factors common to both CVD and cancer, highlighting the major epidemiological studies and potential biological mechanisms that account for them. PMID:26976915

  11. Risk factors for postoperative ileus

    PubMed Central

    Kutun, Suat; Ulucanlar, Haluk; Tarcan, Oguz; Demir, Abdullah; Cetin, Abdullah

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to examine extended postoperative ileus and its risk factors in patients who have undergone abdominal surgery, and discuss the techniques of prevention and management thereof the light of related risk factors connected with our study. Methods This prospective study involved 103 patients who had undergone abdominal surgery. The effects of age, gender, diagnosis, surgical operation conducted, excessive small intestine manipulation, opioid analgesic usage time, and systemic inflammation on the time required for the restoration of intestinal motility were investigated. The parameters were investigated prospectively. Results Regarding the factors that affected the restoration of gastrointestinal motility, resection operation type, longer operation period, longer opioid analgesics use period, longer nasogastric catheter use period, and the presence of systemic inflammation were shown to retard bowel motility for 3 days or more. Conclusion Our study confirmed that unnecessary analgesics use in patients with pain tolerance with non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs, excessive small bowel manipulation, prolonged nasogastric catheter use have a direct negative effect on gastrointestinal motility. Considering that an exact treatment for postoperative ileus has not yet been established, and in light of the risk factors mentioned above, we regard that prevention of postoperative ileus is the most effective way of coping with intestinal dysmotility. PMID:22111079

  12. Comparison of Cardiac and Non-Cardiac Biomarkers for Risk Stratification in Elderly Patients with Non-Massive Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Méan, Marie; Limacher, Andreas; Lescuyer, Pierre; Gerstel, Eric; Bounameaux, Henri; Aujesky, Drahomir; Righini, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers unrelated to myocardial necrosis, such as cystatin C, copeptin, and mid-regional pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM), showed promise for cardiovascular risk prediction. Knowing whether they are comparable to cardiac biomarkers such as high-sensitive cardiac-troponin T (hs-cTnT) or N-terminal pro-Brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in elderly patients with acute non-massive pulmonary embolism (NMPE) remains elusive. This study aims at comparing the prognostic accuracy of cardiac and non-cardiac biomarkers in patients with NMPE aged ≥65 years over time. In the context of the SWITCO65+ cohort, we evaluated 227 elderly patients with an available blood sample taken within one day from diagnosis. The primary study endpoint was defined as PE-related mortality and the secondary endpoint as PE-related complications. The biomarkers’ predictive ability at 1, 3, 12 and 24 months was determined using C-statistics and Cox regression. For both study endpoints, C-statistics (95% confidence interval) were stable over time for all biomarkers, with the highest value for hs-cTnT, ranging between 0.84 (0.68–1.00) and 0.80 (0.70–0.90) for the primary endpoint, and between 0.74 (0.63–0.86) and 0.65 (0.57–0.73) for the secondary endpoint. For both study endpoints, cardiac biomarkers were found to be independently associated with risk, NT-proBNP displaying a negative predictive value of 100%. Among non-cardiac biomarkers, only copeptin and MR-proADM were independent predictors of PE-related mortality but they were not independent predictors of PE-related complications, and displayed lower negative predictive values. In elderly NMPE patients, cardiac biomarkers appear to be valuable prognostic to identify very low-risk individuals. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00973596 PMID:27219621

  13. Cardiac tissue enriched factors serum response factor and GATA-4 are mutual coregulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belaguli, N. S.; Sepulveda, J. L.; Nigam, V.; Charron, F.; Nemer, M.; Schwartz, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Combinatorial interaction among cardiac tissue-restricted enriched transcription factors may facilitate the expression of cardiac tissue-restricted genes. Here we show that the MADS box factor serum response factor (SRF) cooperates with the zinc finger protein GATA-4 to synergistically activate numerous myogenic and nonmyogenic serum response element (SRE)-dependent promoters in CV1 fibroblasts. In the absence of GATA binding sites, synergistic activation depends on binding of SRF to the proximal CArG box sequence in the cardiac and skeletal alpha-actin promoter. GATA-4's C-terminal activation domain is obligatory for synergistic coactivation with SRF, and its N-terminal domain and first zinc finger are inhibitory. SRF and GATA-4 physically associate both in vivo and in vitro through their MADS box and the second zinc finger domains as determined by protein A pullout assays and by in vivo one-hybrid transfection assays using Gal4 fusion proteins. Other cardiovascular tissue-restricted GATA factors, such as GATA-5 and GATA-6, were equivalent to GATA-4 in coactivating SRE-dependent targets. Thus, interaction between the MADS box and C4 zinc finger proteins, a novel regulatory paradigm, mediates activation of SRF-dependent gene expression.

  14. Human factors and risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Minhali, A.

    1996-11-01

    A case study was presented in the 1994 Abu Dhabi International Exhibition and Conference (ADIPEC, 94) which discussed the importance of investigating human factors in the design of a high integrity protection system (HIPS) to be installed on an offshore high pressure gas platform, (SPE reference ADSPE 80). This paper will follow up on the design changes, installation and operation of the HIPS with emphasis on practical implications as a result of improper integration of human factors in the system reliability and risk assessment studies.

  15. [Environmental Risk Factors for Dementia].

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Yoshitaka; Kinoshita, Ayae

    2016-07-01

    Owing to recent advancements in imaging techniques and biomarker research, the natural history of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has become clear from the very first preclinical stage. According to the study, more than 20 years before the onset of AD, Aβ starts to accumulate in the brain. This induces neurofibrillary tangle formation in the cerebral isocortex, leading to cognitive decline. If this process is suppressed, disease activity can be controlled. However, at this point, the best and most realistic way to deal with AD is to target the environmental factors that have been identified as risk factors by epidemiological studies. PMID:27395468

  16. [Suicide - background, epidemiology, risk factors].

    PubMed

    Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta

    2015-10-01

    Suicide research, in particular epidemiology, comprises a huge amount of data. However, the theoretical understanding clearly lags behind the empirical knowledge. Suicide, suicide attempts and other suicidal behaviors are more heterogeneous than most explanatory approaches would assume. The most important recent contributions to a better understanding have come from selected epidemiological findings and, interestingly, prevention. This article provides an overview of epidemiological findings, the most relevant risk factors and conclusions related to successful preventive efforts. PMID:26423878

  17. Critical factors in case management: practical lessons from a cardiac case management program.

    PubMed

    Stafford, Randall S; Berra, Kathy

    2007-08-01

    Case management (CM) is an important strategy for chronic disease care. By utilizing non-physician providers for conditions requiring ongoing care and follow-up, CM can facilitate guideline-concordant care, patient empowerment, and improvement in quality of life. We identify a series of critical factors required for successful CM implementation. Heart to Heart is a clinical trial evaluating CM for coronary heart disease (CHD) risk reduction in a multiethnic, low-income population. Patients at elevated cardiac risk were randomized to CM plus primary care (212 patients) or to primary care alone (207). Over a mean follow-up of 17 months, patients received face-to-face nurse and dietitian visits. Mean contact time was 14 hours provided at an estimated cost of $1250 per patient for the 341 (81%) patients completing follow-up. Visits emphasized behavior change, risk-factor monitoring, self-management skills, and guideline-based pharmacotherapy. A statistically significant reduction in mean Framingham risk probability occurred in CM plus primary care relative to primary care alone (1.6% decrease in 10-year CHD risk, p = 0.007). Favorable changes were noted across individual risk factors. Our findings suggest that successful CM implementation relies on choosing appropriate case managers and investing in training, integrating CM into existing care systems, delineating the scope and appropriate levels of clinical decision making, using information systems, and monitoring outcomes and costs. While our population, setting, and intervention model are unique, these insights are broadly relevant. If implemented with attention to critical factors, CM has great potential to improve the process and outcomes of chronic disease care. PMID:17718658

  18. Cardiac Surgery Costs According to the Preoperative Risk in the Brazilian Public Health System

    PubMed Central

    Titinger, David Provenzale; Lisboa, Luiz Augusto Ferreira; Matrangolo, Bruna La Regina; Dallan, Luis Roberto Palma; Dallan, Luis Alberto Oliveira; Trindade, Evelinda Marramon; Eckl, Ivone; Kalil Filho, Roberto; Mejía, Omar Asdrúbal Vilca; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart surgery has developed with increasing patient complexity. Objective To assess the use of resources and real costs stratified by risk factors of patients submitted to surgical cardiac procedures and to compare them with the values reimbursed by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS). Method All cardiac surgery procedures performed between January and July 2013 in a tertiary referral center were analyzed. Demographic and clinical data allowed the calculation of the value reimbursed by the Brazilian SUS. Patients were stratified as low, intermediate and high-risk categories according to the EuroSCORE. Clinical outcomes, use of resources and costs (real costs versus SUS) were compared between established risk groups. Results Postoperative mortality rates of low, intermediate and high-risk EuroSCORE risk strata showed a significant linear positive correlation (EuroSCORE: 3.8%, 10%, and 25%; p < 0.0001), as well as occurrence of any postoperative complication EuroSCORE: 13.7%, 20.7%, and 30.8%, respectively; p = 0.006). Accordingly, length-of-stay increased from 20.9 days to 24.8 and 29.2 days (p < 0.001). The real cost was parallel to increased resource use according to EuroSCORE risk strata (R$ 27.116,00 ± R$ 13.928,00 versus R$ 34.854,00 ± R$ 27.814,00 versus R$ 43.234,00 ± R$ 26.009,00, respectively; p < 0.001). SUS reimbursement also increased (R$ 14.306,00 ± R$ 4.571,00 versus R$ 16.217,00 ± R$ 7.298,00 versus R$ 19.548,00 ± R$935,00; p < 0.001). However, as the EuroSCORE increased, there was significant difference (p < 0.0001) between the real cost increasing slope and the SUS reimbursement elevation per EuroSCORE risk strata. Conclusion Higher EuroSCORE was related to higher postoperative mortality, complications, length of stay, and costs. Although SUS reimbursement increased according to risk, it was not proportional to real costs. PMID:26107813

  19. Cardiac evaluation and risk reduction in patients undergoing major vascular operations.

    PubMed Central

    Potyk, D K

    1994-01-01

    Occult coronary artery disease often accompanies symptomatic peripheral vascular disease and has an important effect on survival. Most perioperative and late fatalities after peripheral vascular operations are due to cardiac causes. Noninvasive cardiac testing can identify patients at increased risk for postoperative cardiac complications, although controversy exists regarding the optimal preoperative evaluation. Risk reduction strategies for patients known to be at high risk are also controversial. Some authors advocate coronary revascularization with coronary artery bypass grafting or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty before the vascular procedure. Others believe that the combined morbidity and mortality of 2 operations exceed those of a peripheral vascular operation performed with aggressive monitoring and medical therapy. Continuous electrocardiographic monitoring after an operation has identified silent myocardial ischemia as a powerful predictor of cardiac complications. Ongoing research is likely to provide insights into the pathogenesis of postoperative cardiac complications and may lead to specific therapeutic interventions. Few prospective studies have been done in this area, and the threshold for preoperative and postoperative intervention is unknown. I review the literature and present an algorithm to guide cardiac testing and risk reduction in patients undergoing elective vascular surgical procedures. PMID:7941507

  20. Lineage Reprogramming of Fibroblasts into Proliferative Induced Cardiac Progenitor Cells by Defined Factors.

    PubMed

    Lalit, Pratik A; Salick, Max R; Nelson, Daryl O; Squirrell, Jayne M; Shafer, Christina M; Patel, Neel G; Saeed, Imaan; Schmuck, Eric G; Markandeya, Yogananda S; Wong, Rachel; Lea, Martin R; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Hacker, Timothy A; Crone, Wendy C; Kyba, Michael; Garry, Daniel J; Stewart, Ron; Thomson, James A; Downs, Karen M; Lyons, Gary E; Kamp, Timothy J

    2016-03-01

    Several studies have reported reprogramming of fibroblasts into induced cardiomyocytes; however, reprogramming into proliferative induced cardiac progenitor cells (iCPCs) remains to be accomplished. Here we report that a combination of 11 or 5 cardiac factors along with canonical Wnt and JAK/STAT signaling reprogrammed adult mouse cardiac, lung, and tail tip fibroblasts into iCPCs. The iCPCs were cardiac mesoderm-restricted progenitors that could be expanded extensively while maintaining multipotency to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells in vitro. Moreover, iCPCs injected into the cardiac crescent of mouse embryos differentiated into cardiomyocytes. iCPCs transplanted into the post-myocardial infarction mouse heart improved survival and differentiated into cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells. Lineage reprogramming of adult somatic cells into iCPCs provides a scalable cell source for drug discovery, disease modeling, and cardiac regenerative therapy. PMID:26877223

  1. Early origins of heart disease: low birth weight and the role of the insulin-like growth factor system in cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kimberley C W; Botting, Kimberley J; Padhee, Monalisa; Zhang, Song; McMillen, I Caroline; Suter, Catherine M; Brooks, Doug A; Morrison, Janna L

    2012-11-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that poor growth before birth is associated with left ventricular hypertrophy and an increased risk of death from heart disease later in life. In fetal life, the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system has been implicated in physiological growth of the heart, whereas in postnatal life IGFs can be involved in both physiological and pathological cardiac hypertrophy. A reduction in substrate supply in fetal life, resulting in chronic hypoxaemia and intrauterine growth restriction, results in increased cardiac IGF-1R, IGF-2 and IGF-2R gene expression; and there is also evidence for a role of the IGF-2 receptor in the ensuing cardiac hypertrophy. The persistent high level of cardiac IGF-2R gene expression from fetal to postnatal life may be due to epigenetic changes in key cardiac hypertrophy regulatory pathways. PMID:22774980

  2. Modifications of Coronary Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Albu, Jeanine; Gottlieb, Sheldon H.; August, Phyllis; Nesto, Richard W.; Orchard, Trevor J.

    2009-01-01

    In addition to the revascularization and glycemic management interventions assigned at random, the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) design includes the uniform control of major coronary artery disease risk factors, including dyslipidemia, hypertension, smoking, central obesity, and sedentary lifestyle. Target levels for risk factors were adjusted throughout the trial to comply with changes in recommended clinical practice guidelines. At present, the goals are low-density lipoprotein cholesterol <2.59 mmol/L (<100 mg/dL) with an optional goal of <1.81 mmol/L (<70 mg/dL); plasma triglyceride level <1.70 mmol/L (<150 mg/dL); blood pressure level <130 mm Hg systolic and <80 mm Hg diastolic; and smoking cessation treatment for all active smokers. Algorithms were developed for the pharmacologic management of dyslipidemia and hypertension. Dietary prescriptions for the management of glycemia, plasma lipid profiles, and blood pressure levels were adapted from existing clinical practice guidelines. Patients with a body mass index >25 were prescribed moderate caloric restriction; after the trial was under way, a lifestyle weight-management program was instituted. All patients were formally prescribed both endurance and resistance/flexibility exercises, individually adapted to their level of disability and fitness. Pedometers were distributed as a biofeedback strategy. Strategies to achieve the goals for risk factors were designed by BARI 2D working groups (lipid, cardiovascular and hypertension, and nonpharmacologic intervention) and the ongoing implementation of the strategies is monitored by lipid, hypertension, and lifestyle intervention management centers. PMID:16813737

  3. Risk factors identified for certain lymphoma subtypes

    Cancer.gov

    In a large international collaborative analysis of risk factors for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), scientists were able to quantify risk associated with medical history, lifestyle factors, family history of blood or lymph-borne cancers, and occupation for 11

  4. Coronary risk factors in schoolchildren.

    PubMed Central

    Boreham, C; Savage, J M; Primrose, D; Cran, G; Strain, J

    1993-01-01

    Death rates from coronary heart disease (CHD) in Northern Ireland are among the highest in the world. However, no data have been available to test the hypothesis that the high prevalence of CHD is reflected by the risk status of the childhood population. A randomly selected 2% population sample of 1015 children aged 12 and 15 years was studied to obtain baseline information on blood pressure, lipid profile, cigarette smoking, family history, physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and dietary fat intake. Using available criteria thresholds, 15-23% displayed increased blood pressure, 12-25% had unfavourable lipid profiles, and 18-34% were overfat. In 15 year old children, 16-21% admitted being regular smokers, 26-34% displayed poor cardiorespiratory fitness, and 24-29% reported little physical activity in the previous week. Dietary analysis revealed relatively low polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acid ratios and high mean fat intakes, accounting for approximately 40% total daily energy. Despite the exclusion of family history from the analysis, 16% of the older children exhibited three or more risk factors. These results justify major concern about the level of potential coronary risk in Northern Ireland schoolchildren. Broadly based primary prevention strategies aimed at children are essential if future adult CHD mortality is to be reduced. PMID:8481039

  5. Risk Stratification for Sudden Cardiac Death: Current Approaches and Predictive Value

    PubMed Central

    Lopera, Gustavo; Curtis, Anne B.

    2009-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a serious public health problem; the annual incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in North America is approximately 166,200. Identifying patients at risk is a difficult proposition. At the present time, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) remains the single most important marker for risk stratification. According to current guidelines, most patients with LVEF <35% could benefit from prophylactic ICD implantation, particularly in the setting of symptomatic heart failure. Current risk stratification strategies fail to identify patients at risk of SCD in larger population groups encompassing a greater number of potential SCD victims. However, the best approach to identifying patients and the value of various risk stratification tools is not entirely clear. The goal of this review is to discuss the problem of SCD and the value of the different risk stratification markers and their potential clinical use either alone or in combination with other risk stratification markers. PMID:20066150

  6. Cardiovascular risk factors among Chamorros

    PubMed Central

    Chiem, Binh; Nguyen, Victoria; Wu, Phillis L; Ko, Celine M; Cruz, Lee Ann; Sadler, Georgia Robins

    2006-01-01

    Background Little is known regarding the cardiovascular disease risk factors among Chamorros residing in the United States. Methods The Chamorro Directory International and the CDC's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Questionnaire (BRFSS) were used to assess the health related practices and needs of a random sample of 228 Chamorros. Results Inactivity, hypertension, elevated cholesterol and diabetes mellitus were more prevalent in this Chamorro sample compared to the US average. Participants who were 50-and-older or unemployed were more likely to report hypertension, diabetes and inactivity, but they were also more likely to consume more fruits and vegetables than their younger and employed counterparts. Women were more likely to report hypertension and diabetes, whereas men were more likely to have elevated BMI and to have never had their blood cholesterol checked. Conclusion The study provides data that will help healthcare providers, public health workers and community leaders identify where to focus their health improvement efforts for Chamorros and create culturally competent programs to promote health in this community. PMID:17156462

  7. Echocardiographic Measures of Cardiac Structure and Function Are Associated with Risk of Atrial Fibrillation in Blacks: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Bekwelem, Wobo; Misialek, Jeffrey R.; Konety, Suma; Solomon, Scott D.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Loehr, Laura R.; Lopez, Faye L.; Fox, Ervin R.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Alonso, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Background Several studies have examined the link between atrial fibrillation (AF) and various echocardiographic measures of cardiac structure and function in whites and other racial groups but not in blacks. Exploring AF risk factors in blacks is important given that the lower incidence of AF in this racial group despite higher risk factors, is not completely explained. Methods We examined the association of echocardiographic measures with AF incidence in 2283 blacks (64.5% women, mean age 58.8 years) free of diagnosed AF and enrolled in the Jackson cohort of Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, a prospective study of cardiovascular disease. Echocardiography was performed in 1993–1995, and incident AF was determined by electrocardiograms at a follow-up study exam, hospitalization discharge codes and death certificates through the end of 2009. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for AF associated with the echocardiographic measures, adjusting for age, sex, and known AF risk factors. Results During an average follow-up of 13.5 years, 191 (8.4%) individuals developed AF. Left ventricular (LV) internal diameter 2-D (diastole) and percent fractional shortening of LV diameter displayed a U-shaped relationship with risk of AF, while left atrial diameter displayed a J-shaped nonlinear association. LV mass index was associated positively with AF. E/A ratio <0.7 or >1.5 and ejection fraction (EF <50%) were also associated with higher AF risk. These measures improved risk stratification for AF in addition to traditional risk factors, although not significantly {C-statistic of 0.767 (0.714–0.819) vs. 0.744 (0.691–0.797)}. Conclusions In a community-based population of blacks, echocardiographic measures of cardiac structure and function are significantly associated with an increased risk of AF. PMID:25330035

  8. Nurse-led risk assessment/management clinics reduce predicted cardiac morbidity and mortality in claudicants.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Josephine; Gulati, Sumit; Abdul Rahman, Morhisham N A; Coughlin, Patrick A; Chetter, Ian C

    2008-12-01

    Nurse-led assessment/management of risk factors is effective in many chronic medical conditions. We aimed to evaluate whether this finding was true for patients with intermittent claudication and to analyze its impact on patient-reported quality of life and predicted mortality due to coronary heart disease. We prospectively studied a series of 78 patients (51 men; median age, 65 years [IQR: 56-74 years]), diagnosed with intermittent claudication and referred to a nurse-led risk assessment/management clinic (NLC) from a consultant-led vascular surgical clinic. The NLC used clinical care pathways to manage antiplatelet medication, smoking cessation, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes and to provide exercise advice. All patients were reassessed at a 3 months. Medication compliance, smoking status, fasting lipid profiles, blood pressure, and HbA1c were recorded. Disease-specific quality of life was assessed using King's College VascuQoL and predicted cardiac morbidity and mortality were calculated using the PROCAM and Framingham risk scores. We found that NLC enrollment produced an antiplatelet and a statin compliance of 100%, a smoking cessation rate of 17% (9 patients) and significant improvements in total cholesterol (median, 5.2-4.5 mmol/l), LDL (median, 3.1-2.5 mmol/l) and triglyceride (median, 1.7-1.4 mmol/l) levels. Significant disease-specific quality of life improvements and significant reduction in both the PROCAM (14% to 10%) and Framingham (14% to 11%) coronary risk scores were observed. Providing care at NLCs for claudicants is effective in assessing and managing risk factors, improves disease-specific quality of life and reduces predicted morbidity and mortality due to coronary heart disease. PMID:19022170

  9. Configurations of Common Childhood Psychosocial Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, William; Shanahan, Lilly; Costello, E. Jane; Angold, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Background: Co-occurrence of psychosocial risk factors is commonplace, but little is known about psychiatrically-predictive configurations of psychosocial risk factors. Methods: Latent class analysis (LCA) was applied to 17 putative psychosocial risk factors in a representative population sample of 920 children ages 9 to 17. The resultant class…

  10. Concurrent Risk Factors for Adolescent Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saner, Hilary; Ellickson, Phyllis

    1996-01-01

    Examines the risk and protective factors for different types of violent behavior in high school adolescents. Major risk factors include gender and deviant behaviors, committing nonviolent felonies, academic failure, and lack of parental affection and support. As risk factors increase, the likelihood of violent behavior increases. Impaired parental…

  11. Family History of Sudden Cardiac Death of the Young: Prevalence and Associated Factors

    PubMed Central

    White, Michelle J.; Duquette, Debra; Bach, Janice; Rafferty, Ann P.; Fussman, Chris; Sharangpani, Ruta; Russell, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death of the young (SCDY) is a devastating event for families and communities. Family history is a significant risk factor for this potentially preventable cause of death, however a complete and detailed family history is not commonly obtained during routine health maintenance visits. To estimate the proportion of adults with a family history of SCDY, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) Genomics Program included two questions within the 2007 Michigan Behavioral Risk Factor Survey (MiBRFS). Prevalence estimates and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Among adults in Michigan, 6.3% reported a family history of SCDY, with a greater prevalence among blacks, those with lower household income, and those with less education. Among those reporting a family history of SCDY, 42.3% had at least one first-degree relative and 26.2% had multiple affected family members. This is the first study to demonstrate the prevalence of family history of SCDY while also highlighting key sociodemographic characteristics associated with increased prevalence. These findings should guide evidence-based interventions to reach those at greatest risk.

  12. Depression and Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death and Coronary Heart Disease in Women: Results from the Nurses’ Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Whang, William; Kubzansky, Laura D.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Rexrode, Kathryn M.; Kroenke, Candyce H.; Glynn, Robert J.; Garan, Hasan; Albert, Christine M.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives We assessed the association between depression and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and cardiac events among individuals without baseline coronary heart disease (CHD). Background Depression is a risk factor for cardiac events and mortality among those with CHD, possibly from arrhythmia. Methods We studied depressive symptoms, and a proxy variable for clinical depression consisting of severe symptoms and/or antidepressant medication use, and their relationship to cardiac events in the Nurses’ Health Study. Questionnaires in 1992, 1996, and 2000 assessed symptoms with the Mental Health Index (MHI-5), and antidepressant use was assessed in 1996 and 2000. Primary endpoints included SCD, fatal CHD, and non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI). Results Among 63,469 women without prior CHD/stroke in 1992, 7.9% had MHI-5 scores (<53) previously found to predict clinical depression. Depressive symptoms were associated with CHD events, and the relationship was strongest for fatal CHD, where the association remained significant even after controlling for CHD risk factors (HR=1.49; 95% CI 1.11–2.00 for MHI-5 score<53). In models from 1996 onward, our proxy variable for clinical depression was most associated with SCD in multivariable models (HR=2.33, 95% CI 1.47–3.70), and this risk was primarily due to a specific relationship between antidepressant use and SCD (HR=3.34, 95% CI 2.03–5.50). Conclusions In this cohort of women without baseline CHD, depressive symptoms were associated with fatal CHD, and a measure of clinical depression including antidepressant use was specifically associated with SCD. Although antidepressant use may be a marker of worse depression, its specific association with SCD merits further study. CONDENSED ABSTRACT We prospectively analyzed the association between depression and cardiac events in the Nurses’ Health Study. Symptoms of depression as measured by Mental Health Index (MHI-5) score were directly associated with risk of CHD events

  13. Transcription factors ETS2 and MESP1 transdifferentiate human dermal fibroblasts into cardiac progenitors.

    PubMed

    Islas, Jose Francisco; Liu, Yu; Weng, Kuo-Chan; Robertson, Matthew J; Zhang, Shuxing; Prejusa, Allan; Harger, John; Tikhomirova, Dariya; Chopra, Mani; Iyer, Dinakar; Mercola, Mark; Oshima, Robert G; Willerson, James T; Potaman, Vladimir N; Schwartz, Robert J

    2012-08-01

    Unique insights for the reprograming of cell lineages have come from embryonic development in the ascidian Ciona, which is dependent upon the transcription factors Ci-ets1/2 and Ci-mesp to generate cardiac progenitors. We tested the idea that mammalian v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2 (ETS2) and mesoderm posterior (MESP) homolog may be used to convert human dermal fibroblasts into cardiac progenitors. Here we show that murine ETS2 has a critical role in directing cardiac progenitors during cardiopoiesis in embryonic stem cells. We then use lentivirus-mediated forced expression of human ETS2 to convert normal human dermal fibroblasts into replicative cells expressing the cardiac mesoderm marker KDR(+). However, although neither ETS2 nor the purported cardiac master regulator MESP1 can by themselves generate cardiac progenitors de novo from fibroblasts, forced coexpression of ETS2 and MESP1 or cell treatment with purified proteins reprograms fibroblasts into cardiac progenitors, as shown by the de novo appearance of core cardiac transcription factors, Ca(2+) transients, and sarcomeres. Our data indicate that ETS2 and MESP1 play important roles in a genetic network that governs cardiopoiesis. PMID:22826236

  14. The Role of Biomarkers in Decreasing Risk of Cardiac Toxicity after Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Henri, Christine; Heinonen, Therese; Tardif, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    With the improvement of cancer therapy, survival related to malignancy has improved, but the prevalence of long-term cardiotoxicity has also increased. Cancer therapies with known cardiac toxicity include anthracyclines, biologic agents (trastuzumab), and multikinase inhibitors (sunitinib). The most frequent presentation of cardiac toxicity is dilated cardiomyopathy associated with poorest prognosis. Monitoring of cardiac toxicity is commonly performed by assessment of left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction, which requires a significant amount of myocardial damage to allow detection of cardiac toxicity. Accordingly, this creates the impetus to search for more sensitive and reproducible biomarkers of cardiac toxicity after cancer therapy. Different biomarkers have been proposed to that end, the most studied ones included troponin release resulting from cardiomyocyte damage and natriuretic peptides reflecting elevation in LV filling pressure and wall stress. Increase in the levels of troponin and natriuretic peptides have been correlated with cumulative dose of anthracycline and the degree of LV dysfunction. Troponin is recognized as a highly efficient predictor of early and chronic cardiac toxicity, but there remains some debate regarding the clinical usefulness of the measurement of natriuretic peptides because of divergent results. Preliminary data are available for other biomarkers targeting inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, myocardial ischemia, and neuregulin-1. The purpose of this article is to review the available data to determine the role of biomarkers in decreasing the risk of cardiac toxicity after cancer therapy. PMID:27257396

  15. Remote ischaemic preconditioning does not alter perioperative cytokine production in high-risk cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jenni M; Young, Paul; Pilcher, Janine; Weatherall, Mark; Miller, John Holmes; Beasley, Richard; La Flamme, Anne Camille

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Remote ischaemic preconditioning (RIPC) is a novel cardioprotective strategy that uses brief intermittent limb ischaemia to protect the myocardium and other organs from perioperative ischaemic damage. The precise mechanism through which this protective effect occurs is unknown, but potentially could be related to changes in blood-borne mediators such as cytokines. Objective To determine whether RIPC alters inflammatory cytokine expression in a double-blind, randomised, controlled trial of patients undergoing high-risk cardiac surgery. Methods and results Serum interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and IL-10 levels from 95 patients randomised to RIPC (n=47) or control treatment (n=48) were measured preoperatively, and 1, 2, 3, 6 and 12 h after cross-clamp removal. Systemic concentrations of all cytokines were increased from baseline following surgery, and, compared with simple procedures, complex surgeries were associated with significantly higher release of IL-6 (ratio of mean area under the curves 1.54 (95% CI 1.02 to 2.34), p=0.04) and IL-10 (1.97 (1.16 to 3.35), p=0.012). No significant difference in mean cytokine levels between the RIPC and control groups was detected at any time point, irrespective of the type of surgery undergone. Conclusions High levels of IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 are produced during high-risk cardiac surgery, and RIPC does not alter these elevated perioperative cytokine concentrations. Identification of factors that influence the ability to induce RIPC-mediated cardioprotection should be the priority of future research. Trial registration is in the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (http://www.anzctr.org.au; ACTRN12609000965202)

  16. Factors affecting postoperative blood loss in children undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Faraoni, David; Van der Linden, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that the influence of cyanotic disease on postoperative blood loss is closely related to age in children undergoing cardiac surgery. Here, we demonstrate that the presence of a cyanotic disease is associated with increased postoperative blood loss in children aged 1 to 6 months. Children with cyanotic disease and aged<1 month who received fresh frozen plasma during cardiopulmonary bypass had less postoperative blood loss and higher maximal clot firmness on FIBTEM than cyanotic children from all other groups. Additional studies are needed to define optimal pathophysiology-based management in children undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:24512988

  17. Prediction of Cardiovascular Disease Risk by Cardiac Biomarkers in 2 United Kingdom Cohort Studies: Does Utility Depend on Risk Thresholds For Treatment?

    PubMed

    Welsh, Paul; Hart, Carole; Papacosta, Olia; Preiss, David; McConnachie, Alex; Murray, Heather; Ramsay, Sheena; Upton, Mark; Watt, Graham; Whincup, Peter; Wannamethee, Goya; Sattar, Naveed

    2016-02-01

    We tested the predictive ability of cardiac biomarkers N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), high-sensitivity troponin T, and midregional pro adrenomedullin for cardiovascular disease (CVD) events using the British Regional Heart Study (BRHS) of men aged 60 to 79 years, and the MIDSPAN Family Study (MFS) of men and women aged 30 to 59 years. They included 3757 and 2226 participants, respectively, and during median 13.0 and 17.3 years follow-up the primary CVD event rates were 16.6 and 5.3 per 1000 patient-years, respectively. In Cox models adjusted for basic classical risk factors, 1 SD increases in log-transformed NT-proBNP, high-sensitivity troponin T, and midregional pro adrenomedullin were generally associated with increased primary CVD risk in both the studies (P<0.006) except midregional pro adrenomedullin in MFS (P=0.10). In BRHS, QRISK2 risk factors yielded a C-index of 0.657, which was improved by 0.017 (P=0.005) by NT-proBNP, but not by other biomarkers. Using 28% 14-year risk as a proxy for 20% 10-year risk, NT-proBNP improved risk classification for primary CVD cases (case net reclassification index, 5.9%; 95% confidence interval, 2.8%-9.2%), but only improved classification of noncases at a 14% 14-year risk threshold (4.6%; 2.9%-6.3%). In MFS, ASSIGN risk factors yielded a C-index of 0.752 for primary CVD; none of the cardiac biomarkers improved the C-index. Improvements in risk classification were only seen using NT-proBNP and high-sensitivity troponin T among cases using the 28% 14-year risk threshold (4.7%; 1.0%-9.2% and 2.6%; 0.0%-5.8%, respectively). In conclusion, the improvement in treatment allocation gained by adding cardiac biomarkers to risk scores seems to depend on the risk threshold chosen for commencing preventative treatments. PMID:26667414

  18. Developmental stage-specific regulation of atrial natriuretic factor gene transcription in cardiac cells.

    PubMed Central

    Argentin, S; Ardati, A; Tremblay, S; Lihrmann, I; Robitaille, L; Drouin, J; Nemer, M

    1994-01-01

    Cardiac myocytes undergo a major genetic switch within the first week of postnatal development, when cell division ceases terminally and many cardiac genes are either activated or silenced. We have developed stage-specific cardiocyte cultures to analyze transcriptional control of the rat atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) gene to identify the mechanisms underlying tissue-specific and developmental regulation of this gene in the heart. The first 700 bp of ANF flanking sequences was sufficient for cardiac muscle- and stage-specific expression in both atrial and ventricular myocytes, and a cardiac muscle-specific enhancer was localized between -136 and -700 bp. Deletion of this enhancer markedly reduced promoter activity in cardiac myocytes and derepressed ANF promoter activity in nonexpressing cells. Two distinct domains of the enhancer appeared to contribute differentially to cardiac specificity depending on the differentiation stage of the myocytes. DNase I footprinting of the enhancer domain active in differentiated cells revealed four putative regulatory elements including an A+T-rich region and a CArG element. Deletion mutagenesis and promoter reconstitution assays revealed an important role for the CArG-containing element exclusively in cardiac cells, where its activity was switched on in differentiated myocytes. Transcriptional activity of the ANF-CArG box correlated with the presence of a cardiac- and stage-specific DNA-binding complex which was not recognized by the c-fos serum response element. Thus, the use of this in vitro model system representing stage-specific cardiac development unraveled the presence of different regulatory mechanisms for transcription of the ANF gene during cardiac differentiation and may be useful for studying the regulatory pathways of other genes that undergo switching during cardiac myogenesis. Images PMID:8264645

  19. Obesity, Exercise, Obstructive Sleep Apnea, and Modifiable Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jared D; Aronis, Konstantinos N; Chrispin, Jonathan; Patil, Kaustubha D; Marine, Joseph E; Martin, Seth S; Blaha, Michael J; Blumenthal, Roger S; Calkins, Hugh

    2015-12-29

    Classically, the 3 pillars of atrial fibrillation (AF) management have included anticoagulation for prevention of thromboembolism, rhythm control, and rate control. In both prevention and management of AF, a growing body of evidence supports an increased role for comprehensive cardiac risk factor modification (RFM), herein defined as management of traditional modifiable cardiac risk factors, weight loss, and exercise. In this narrative review, we summarize the evidence demonstrating the importance of each facet of RFM in AF prevention and therapy. Additionally, we review emerging data on the importance of weight loss and cardiovascular exercise in prevention and management of AF. PMID:26718677

  20. [Suicide risk factors among the elderly].

    PubMed

    Pérez Barrero, Sergio Andrés

    2012-08-01

    The author offers a brief overview of suicide risk factors among the elderly such as depression, all manner of abuse of the elderly, as well as medical, psychological and social risk factors, etc. By way of conclusion, a practical guide to evaluate suicide risk among the elderly is provided. PMID:22899142

  1. Family Factors Predicting Categories of Suicide Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randell, Brooke P.; Wang, Wen-Ling; Herting, Jerald R.; Eggert, Leona L.

    2006-01-01

    We compared family risk and protective factors among potential high school dropouts with and without suicide-risk behaviors (SRB) and examined the extent to which these factors predict categories of SRB. Subjects were randomly selected from among potential dropouts in 14 high schools. Based upon suicide-risk status, 1,083 potential high school…

  2. Risk Stratification for Sudden Cardiac Death In Patients With Non-ischemic Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shekha, Karthik; Ghosh, Joydeep; Thekkoott, Deepak; Greenberg, Yisachar

    2005-01-01

    Non ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDCM) is a disorder of myocardium. It has varying etiologies. Albeit the varying etiologies of this heart muscle disorder, it presents with symptoms of heart failure, and rarely as sudden cardiac death (SCD). Manifestations of this disorder are in many ways similar to its counterpart, ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM). A proportion of patients with NIDCM carries a grave prognosis and is prone to sudden cardiac death from sustained ventricular arrhythmias. Identification of this subgroup of patients who carry the risk of sudden cardiac death despite adequate medical management is a challenge .Yet another method is a blanket treatment of patients with this disorder with anti arrhythmic medications or anti tachyarrhythmia devices like implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD). However this modality of treatment could be a costly exercise even for affluent economies. In this review we try to analyze the existing data of risk stratification of NIDCM and its clinical implications in practice. PMID:16943952

  3. Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure Anyone can develop high blood pressure; however, age, ... can increase your risk for developing high blood pressure. Age Blood pressure tends to rise with age. About 65 ...

  4. [General practitioner burnout: risk factors].

    PubMed

    Dagrada, H; Verbanck, P; Kornreich, C

    2011-09-01

    This paper aims to review current knowledge on risk factors leading to burn-out of general practitioners, who are particularly concerned by burn-out, as 50% of them are being more or less affected. This article is based on bibliographic research covering literature between 1975 and 2010, using PUB MED software, medical books and articles. 44 articles were selected as dealing well with the aspects of the burn-out reviewed here. It seems established that stress precedes burnout symptoms. Theories investigating relationships between stress and work are presented. Exogenic stress (load and organization of work, emotional interaction with the patient, constraints, lack of recognition, conflicts between private and professional life) interacts with endogenous stress (idealism, (too much) acute feeling of responsibility, mood disorder, difficulty in collaborating, character, personality). Burn-out symptoms would appear preferentially when these two stresses coexist. Despite the wealth of publications, there is still a lack of knowledge of the causes of burn-out, requiring therefore increased research efforts, in order to improve the implementation of preventive measures, beneficial to the doctors as well as to their patients. PMID:22034773

  5. Leukemia Risk After Cardiac Fluoroscopic Interventions Stratified by Procedure Number, Exposure Latent Time, and Sex

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Kai-Che; Lin, Hon-Yi; Hung, Shih-Kai; Huang, Yu-Tung; Lee, Moon-Sing; Wang, Wen-Hua; Wu, Chieh-Shan; Su, Yu-Chieh; Shen, Bing-Jie; Tsai, Shiang-Jiun; Tsai, Wei-Ta; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Li, Chung-Yi; Chiou, Wen-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A number of cardiac fluoroscopic interventions have increased rapidly worldwide over the past decade. Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) and stent implantation have become increasingly popular, and these advancements have allowed patients to receive repetitive treatments for restenosis. However, these advancements also significantly increase radiation exposure that may lead to higher cumulative doses of radiation. In the present study, a nationwide population-based case-controlled study was used to explore the risk of leukemia after cardiac angiographic fluoroscopic intervention. A total of 5026 patients with leukemia and 100,520 control patients matched for age and sex (1:20) by a propensity score method without any cancer history were enrolled using the Registry Data for Catastrophic Illness and the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) of Taiwan between 2008 and 2010. All subjects were retrospectively surveyed (from year 2000) to determine receipt of cardiac fluoroscopic interventions. Data were analyzed using conditional logistic regression models, and estimated crude and adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval). After adjusting for age, gender, and comorbidities, PTCA was found to be associated with an increased risk of leukemia with an adjusted OR of 1.566 (95% CI, 1.282–1.912), whereas coronary angiography alone without PTCA and cardiac electrophysiologic study were not. Our results also showed that an increased frequency of PTCA and coronary angiography was associated with a higher risk of leukemia (adjusted OR: 1.326 to 1.530 [all P < 0.05]). Gender subgroup analyses demonstrated that men were associated with a higher risk of leukemia compared with women. These results provide additional data in the quantification of the long-term health effects of radiation exposure derived from the cardiac fluoroscopic diagnostic and therapeutic intervention. PTCA alone or PTCA with coronary angiography was associated

  6. [Obesity as a risk factor for atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Duraj, Iwona; Broncel, Marlena

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) and obesity is a growing problem of public health both in Poland and in the whole world. AF risk factors may be summarized as elderliness, male sex, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, coronary heart disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease, cardiac surgery. Once obesity is an independent, potentially modifiable risk factor for AF. The connection between obesity and atrial fibrillation is very up-to-date because of incremental prevalence, almost epidemic of obesity in the whole world. The probability of AF among obese patients increases with concomitant obstructive sleep apnea. Regardless many researches it hasn't been assessed yet how obesity itself predisposes to AF. It could be an effect of change in the atrial anatomy, the rise of atrial pressure, mechanical stretch, interstitial atrial fibrosis and disruption of atrial electric integrity. A great role is ascribed to inflammation, especially proinflammatory cytokines increased by adipocites of left atrial epicardial adiposity. PMID:26891428

  7. [Assessment of risk of sudden cardiac death in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Attanasio, Philipp; Blaschke, Florian; Pieske, Burkert; Tschöpe, Carsten; Haverkamp, Wilhelm

    2016-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a hereditary disease characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy with or without concomitant outflow tract obstruction. Identification of patients with HCM who are at high risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) is crucial as those patients are likely to benefit from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). Based on the HCM Risk-SCD study published in 2013, that included 3675 HCM patients with 24 313 years of follow up, a new clinical risk prediction model for sudden cardiac death was developed. This model was included in the recently released 2014 ESC guidelines. This review summarizes the changes in the prediction model and the resulting recommendations and discusses potential risks and limitations of the new score. PMID:27404936

  8. Electrocardiographic T Wave Abnormalities and the Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death: The Finnish Perspective.

    PubMed

    Tikkanen, Jani T; Kenttä, Tuomas; Porthan, Kimmo; Huikuri, Heikki V; Junttila, M Juhani

    2015-11-01

    The identification of patients at risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD) is still a significant challenge to clinicians and scientists. Noninvasive identification of high-risk patients has been of great interest, and several ventricular depolarization and repolarization abnormalities in the standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) have been associated with increased vulnerability to lethal ventricular arrhythmias. Several benign and pathological conditions can induce changes in repolarization detected as alteration of the ST segment or T wave. Changes in the ST segment and T waves can be early markers of an underlying cardiovascular disease, and even minor ST-T abnormalities have predicted reduced survival and increased risk of SCD in the adult population. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge of the SCD risk with standard 12-lead ECG T wave abnormalities in the general population, and possible T wave changes in various cardiac conditions predisposing to SCD. PMID:26391699

  9. Risk of cardiovascular, cardiac and arrhythmic complications in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ballestri, Stefano; Lonardo, Amedeo; Bonapace, Stefano; Byrne, Christopher D; Loria, Paola; Targher, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as a public health problem of epidemic proportions worldwide. Accumulating clinical and epidemiological evidence indicates that NAFLD is not only associated with liver-related morbidity and mortality but also with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), abnormalities of cardiac function and structure (e.g., left ventricular dysfunction and hypertrophy, and heart failure), valvular heart disease (e.g., aortic valve sclerosis) and arrhythmias (e.g., atrial fibrillation). Experimental evidence suggests that NAFLD itself, especially in its more severe forms, exacerbates systemic/hepatic insulin resistance, causes atherogenic dyslipidemia, and releases a variety of pro-inflammatory, pro-coagulant and pro-fibrogenic mediators that may play important roles in the pathophysiology of cardiac and arrhythmic complications. Collectively, these findings suggest that patients with NAFLD may benefit from more intensive surveillance and early treatment interventions to decrease the risk for CHD and other cardiac/arrhythmic complications. The purpose of this clinical review is to summarize the rapidly expanding body of evidence that supports a strong association between NAFLD and cardiovascular, cardiac and arrhythmic complications, to briefly examine the putative biological mechanisms underlying this association, and to discuss some of the current treatment options that may influence both NAFLD and its related cardiac and arrhythmic complications. PMID:24587651

  10. Risks of packed red blood cell transfusion in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Gerber, David R

    2012-12-01

    Packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusion is common in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Evidence has accumulated demonstrating that such patients can tolerate relatively low hemoglobins, and an extensive body of literature has developed demonstrating that patients undergoing such surgery who receive PRBC are at risk for several adverse outcomes including increased mortality, atrial fibrillation, and more postoperative infections, as well as numerous other complications. The PubMed database was searched for the English language literature on the topic of PRBC transfusion and outcomes in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, as well as alternatives to this intervention. Data were reviewed to assess the impact of transfusion in patients undergoing cardiac surgery on mortality, cardiac, infectious, and pulmonary, as well as a variety of miscellaneous complications. Patients receiving PRBC were consistently identified as being at higher risk for complications in all categories. The limited prospective data were consistent with the retrospective data, which comprised most of the literature. The preponderance of the literature suggests that patients undergoing cardiac surgery can tolerate lower hemoglobin/hematocrit values than traditionally appreciated. Most published data also indicate that PRBC transfusion should be reserved for patients with an identifiable clinical/physiologic indication fir this intervention, consistent with recent specialty society guidelines. PMID:22762927

  11. Erythropoietin protects myocardin-expressing cardiac stem cells against cytotoxicity of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Madonna, Rosalinda; Shelat, Harnath; Xue, Qun; Willerson, James T.; De Caterina, Raffaele; Geng, Yong-Jian

    2009-10-15

    Cardiac stem cells are vulnerable to inflammation caused by infarction or ischemic injury. The growth factor, erythropoietin (Epo), ameliorates the inflammatory response of the myocardium to ischemic injury. This study was designed to assess the role of Epo in regulation of expression and activation of the cell death-associated intracellular signaling components in cardiac myoblasts stimulated with the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}. Cardiac myoblasts isolated from canine embryonic hearts characterized by expression of myocardin A, a promyogenic transcription factor for cardiovascular muscle development were pretreated with Epo and then exposed to TNF-{alpha}. Compared to untreated cells, the Epo-treated cardiac myoblasts exhibited better morphology and viability. Immunoblotting revealed lower levels of active caspase-3 and reductions in iNOS expression and NO production in Epo-treated cells. Furthermore, Epo pretreatment reduced nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B and inhibited phosphorylation of inhibitor of kappa B (I{kappa}B) in TNF-{alpha}-stimulated cardiac myoblasts. Thus, Epo protects cardiac myocyte progenitors or myoblasts against the cytotoxic effects of TNF-{alpha} by inhibiting NF-{kappa}B-mediated iNOS expression and NO production and by preventing caspase-3 activation.

  12. The mediation of coronary calcification in the association between risk scores and cardiac troponin T elevation in healthy adults: Is atherosclerosis a good prognostic precursor of coronary disease?

    PubMed Central

    Lazzarino, Antonio Ivan; Hamer, Mark; Carvalho, Livia; Gaze, David; Collinson, Paul; Steptoe, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background Conventional cardiac risk scores may not be completely accurate in predicting acute events because they only include factors associated with atherosclerosis, considered as the fundamental precursor of cardiovascular disease. In UK in 2006–2008 (Whitehall II study) we tested the ability of several risk scores to identify individuals with cardiac cell damage and assessed to what extent their estimates were mediated by the presence of atherosclerosis. Methods 430 disease-free, low-risk participants were tested for high-sensitivity cardiac troponin-T (HS-CTnT) and for coronary calcification using electron-beam, dual-source, computed tomography (CAC). We analysed the data cross-sectionally using ROC curves and mediation tests. Results When the risk scores were ranked according to the magnitude of ROC areas for HS-CTnT prediction, a score based only on age and gender came first (ROC area = 0.79), followed by Q-Risk2 (0.76), Framingham (0.70), Joint-British-Societies (0.69) and Assign (0.68). However, when the scores were ranked according to the extent of mediation by CAC (proportion of association mediated), their order was essentially reversed (age&gender = 6.8%, Q-Risk2 = 9.7%, Framingham = 16.9%, JBS = 17.8%, Assign = 17.7%). Therefore, the more accurate a score is in predicting detectable HS-CTnT, the less it is mediated by CAC; i.e. the more able a score is in capturing atherosclerosis the less it is able to predict cardiac damage. The P for trend was 0.009. Conclusions The dynamics through which cardiac cell damage is caused cannot be explained by ‘classic’ heart disease risk factors alone. Further research is needed to identify precursors of heart disease other than atherosclerosis. PMID:26051205

  13. Risk of sudden cardiac death in young athletes: which screening strategies are appropriate?

    PubMed

    Bader, Rima S; Goldberg, Linn; Sahn, David J

    2004-10-01

    Resources are not available to comprehensively evaluate all young athletes before participation in competitive sports. Therefore, the cardiovascular evaluation of young athletes needs to be targeted at high-risk areas and focus on the individuals who are at greatest possible risk: those who have suggestive, even if minor, symptoms, and those who have a family history of sudden death or premature cardiac disease. PMID:15331292

  14. Apigenin ameliorates hypertension-induced cardiac hypertrophy and down-regulates cardiac hypoxia inducible factor-lα in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zeng-Yan; Gao, Tian; Huang, Yan; Xue, Jie; Xie, Mei-Lin

    2016-04-20

    Apigenin is a natural flavonoid compound that can inhibit hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α expression in cultured tumor cells under hypoxic conditions. Hypertension-induced cardiac hypertrophy is always accompanied by abnormal myocardial glucolipid metabolism due to an increase of HIF-1α. However, whether or not apigenin may ameliorate the cardiac hypertrophy and abnormal myocardial glucolipid metabolism remains unknown. This study aimed to examine the effects of apigenin. Rats with cardiac hypertrophy induced by renovascular hypertension were treated with apigenin 50-100 mg kg(-1) (the doses can be achieved by pharmacological or dietary supplementation for an adult person) by gavage for 4 weeks. The results showed that after treatment with apigenin, the blood pressure, heart weight, heart weight index, cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area, serum angiotensin II, and serum and myocardial free fatty acids were reduced. It is important to note that apigenin decreased the expression level of myocardial HIF-1α protein. Moreover, apigenin simultaneously increased the expression levels of myocardial peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α, carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT)-1, and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK)-4 proteins and decreased the expression levels of myocardial PPARγ, glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase genes (GPAT), and glucose transporter (GLUT)-4 proteins. These findings demonstrated that apigenin could improve hypertensive cardiac hypertrophy and abnormal myocardial glucolipid metabolism in rats, and its mechanisms might be associated with the down-regulation of myocardial HIF-1α expression and, subsequently increasing the expressions of myocardial PPARα and its target genes CPT-1 and PDK-4, and decreasing the expressions of myocardial PPARγ and its target genes GPAT and GLUT-4. PMID:26987380

  15. Identification and Progression of Heart Disease Risk Factors in Diabetic Patients from Longitudinal Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Jonnagaddala, Jitendra; Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Ray, Pradeep; Kumar, Manish; Dai, Hong-Jie; Hsu, Chien-Yeh

    2015-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Therefore, assessing the risk of its occurrence is a crucial step in predicting serious cardiac events. Identifying heart disease risk factors and tracking their progression is a preliminary step in heart disease risk assessment. A large number of studies have reported the use of risk factor data collected prospectively. Electronic health record systems are a great resource of the required risk factor data. Unfortunately, most of the valuable information on risk factor data is buried in the form of unstructured clinical notes in electronic health records. In this study, we present an information extraction system to extract related information on heart disease risk factors from unstructured clinical notes using a hybrid approach. The hybrid approach employs both machine learning and rule-based clinical text mining techniques. The developed system achieved an overall microaveraged F-score of 0.8302. PMID:26380290

  16. Identification and Progression of Heart Disease Risk Factors in Diabetic Patients from Longitudinal Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Jonnagaddala, Jitendra; Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Ray, Pradeep; Kumar, Manish; Dai, Hong-Jie; Hsu, Chien-Yeh

    2015-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Therefore, assessing the risk of its occurrence is a crucial step in predicting serious cardiac events. Identifying heart disease risk factors and tracking their progression is a preliminary step in heart disease risk assessment. A large number of studies have reported the use of risk factor data collected prospectively. Electronic health record systems are a great resource of the required risk factor data. Unfortunately, most of the valuable information on risk factor data is buried in the form of unstructured clinical notes in electronic health records. In this study, we present an information extraction system to extract related information on heart disease risk factors from unstructured clinical notes using a hybrid approach. The hybrid approach employs both machine learning and rule-based clinical text mining techniques. The developed system achieved an overall microaveraged F-score of 0.8302. PMID:26380290

  17. Cardiovascular risk factors in Italy.

    PubMed

    Menotti, A

    1999-12-01

    In the 1950s the Italian population was known for its low mean levels of major cardiovascular risk factors and serum cholesterol in particular. A definite increase of those mean levels was associated, in the next 2 decades, with increasing death rates from cardiovascular diseases and coronary heart disease. Between the late 1970s and early 1990s cardiovascular death rates declined by over 40%. Large population surveys showed, between 1978 and 1987, small decreases in the mean levels of blood pressure (in both sexes), of smoking habits (in men), and of body weight (in women), while serum cholesterol remained stable. These changes mathematically explained about two-thirds of the observed decline in cardiovascular mortality among middle-aged people. In the late 1980s and early 1990s scattered population studies suggested a decline in mean population levels of serum cholesterol, at least in some areas of the country. More coordinated or systematic preventive campaigns were organized by the public health authorities. On the other hand activities of many small private organizations dealing with heart health likely explain the spread of knowledge, attitude, and practice in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Food industry started to produce low-fat products and to label foods with nutrition facts. Changes in food consumption in the beneficial direction started to be recorded in the late 1980s. The spread of antihypertensive treatment was partly favored by the National Health Service offering anti-hypertensive drugs at relatively low cost. Government regulations have more and more restricted the public areas where smoking is allowed. An increasing interest for prevention on the part of physicians is a recent issue, mainly bound to the success of some major controlled trials of hypocholesterolemic drugs. PMID:10641828

  18. Electrophysiologic testing guided risk stratification approach for sudden cardiac death beyond the left ventricular ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Gatzoulis, Konstantinos A; Tsiachris, Dimitris; Arsenos, Petros; Tousoulis, Dimitris

    2016-01-26

    Sudden cardiac death threats ischaemic and dilated cardiomyopathy patients. Anti- arrhythmic protection may be provided to these patients with implanted cardiac defibrillators (ICD), after an efficient risk stratification approach. The proposed risk stratifier of an impaired left ventricular ejection fraction has limited sensitivity meaning that a significant number of victims will remain undetectable by this risk stratification approach because they have a preserved left ventricular systolic function. Current risk stratification strategies focus on combinations of non invasive methods like T wave alternans, late potentials, heart rate turbulence, deceleration capacity and others, with invasive methods like the electrophysiologic study. In the presence of an electrically impaired substrate with formed post myocardial infarction fibrotic zones, programmed ventricular stimulation provides important prognostic information for the selection of the patients expected to benefit from an ICD implantation, while due to its high negative predictive value, patients at low risk level may also be detected. Clustering evidence from different research groups and electrophysiologic labs support an electrophysiologic testing guided risk stratification approach for sudden cardiac death. PMID:26839662

  19. Identifying sudden cardiac death risk and specifying its occurrence time by analyzing electrocardiograms in natural time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varotsos, P. A.; Sarlis, N. V.; Skordas, E. S.; Lazaridou, M. S.

    2007-08-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a frequent cause of death and may occur even if the electrocardiogram seems to be similar to that of a healthy individual. A method which not only identifies the risk but also provides an estimate of the time of an impending cardiac arrest is proposed. Analyzing 159 electrocardiograms in natural time, the authors find that the key quantity is the entropy change under time reversal. After it becomes maximum at the scale of 13 heartbeats, ventricular fibrillation starts within ˜3h in 16 out of 18 SCDs. The method also distinguishes congestive heart failure patients from SCD.

  20. Multiple Interacting Risk Factors: On Methods for Allocating Risk Factor Interactions.

    PubMed

    Price, Bertram; MacNicoll, Michael

    2015-05-01

    A persistent problem in health risk analysis where it is known that a disease may occur as a consequence of multiple risk factors with interactions is allocating the total risk of the disease among the individual risk factors. This problem, referred to here as risk apportionment, arises in various venues, including: (i) public health management, (ii) government programs for compensating injured individuals, and (iii) litigation. Two methods have been described in the risk analysis and epidemiology literature for allocating total risk among individual risk factors. One method uses weights to allocate interactions among the individual risk factors. The other method is based on risk accounting axioms and finding an optimal and unique allocation that satisfies the axioms using a procedure borrowed from game theory. Where relative risk or attributable risk is the risk measure, we find that the game-theory-determined allocation is the same as the allocation where risk factor interactions are apportioned to individual risk factors using equal weights. Therefore, the apportionment problem becomes one of selecting a meaningful set of weights for allocating interactions among the individual risk factors. Equal weights and weights proportional to the risks of the individual risk factors are discussed. PMID:25644783

  1. Cardiac ventricular repolarization reserve: a principle for understanding drug-related proarrhythmic risk

    PubMed Central

    Varró, András; Baczkó, István

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac repolarization abnormalities can be caused by a wide range of cardiac and non-cardiac compounds and may lead to the development of life-threatening Torsades de Pointes (TdP) ventricular arrhythmias. Drug-induced Torsades de Pointes is associated with unexpected and unexplained sudden cardiac deaths resulting in the withdrawal of several compounds in the past. To better understand the mechanism of such unexpected sudden cardiac deaths, the concept of repolarization reserve has recently emerged. According to this concept, pharmacological, congenital or acquired impairment of one type of transmembrane ion channel does not necessarily result in excessive repolarization changes because other repolarizing currents can take over and compensate. In this review, the major factors contributing to repolarization reserve are discussed in the context of their clinical significance in physiological and pathophysiological conditions including drug administration, genetic defects, heart failure, diabetes mellitus, gender, renal failure, hypokalaemia, hypothyroidism and athletes' sudden deaths. In addition, pharmacological support of repolarization reserve as a possible therapeutic option is discussed. Some methods for the quantitative estimation of repolarization reserve are also recommended. It is concluded that repolarization reserve should be considered by safety pharmacologists to better understand, predict and prevent previously unexplained drug-induced sudden cardiac deaths. PMID:21545574

  2. Engineering a growth factor embedded nanofiber matrix niche to promote vascularization for functional cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Rajesh; Kumaraswamy, Priyadharshini; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Sethuraman, Swaminathan

    2016-08-01

    The major loss of tissue extracellular matrix (ECM) after myocardial ischemia is a serious burden that gradually leads to heart failure. Due to lack of available treatment methods to restore the cardiac function, various research strategies have come up to treat the ischemic myocardium. However these have met with limited success due to the complexity of the cardiac tissue, which exhibits a nanofibrous collagenous matrix with spatio-temporal localization of a combination of growth factors. To mimic the topographical and chemical cues of the natural cardiac tissue, we have fabricated a growth factor embedded nanofibrous scaffold through electrospinning. In our previous work, we have reported a nanofibrous matrix made of PLCL and PEOz with an average diameter of 500 nm. The scaffold properties were specifically characterized in vitro for cardio-compatibility. In the present study, we have loaded dual growth factors VEGF and bFGF in the nanofiber matrix and investigated its suitability for cardiac tissue engineering. The encapsulation and release of dual growth factors from the matrix were studied using XPS and ELISA. Bioactivity of the loaded growth factors towards proliferation and migration of endothelial cells (HUVECs) was evaluated through MTS and Boyden chamber assays respectively. The efficiency of growth factors on the nanofibrous matrix to activate signaling molecules was studied in HUVECs through gene expression analysis. Preclinical evaluation of the growth factor embedded nanofibrous patch in a rabbit acute myocardial infarction (AMI) model was studied and cardiac function assessment was made through ECG and echocardiography. The evidence for angiogenesis in the patch secured regions was analyzed through histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Our results confirm the effectiveness of growth factor embedded nanofiber matrix in restoration of cardiac function after ischemia when compared to conventional patch material thereby exhibiting promise as a

  3. What Are the Risk Factors for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... what causes gastrointestinal stromal tumors? What are the risk factors for gastrointestinal stromal tumors? A risk factor is ... disease like cancer. Different cancers have different risk factors. Some risk factors, like smoking, can be changed. Others, like ...

  4. Air Pollution and the Risk of Cardiac Defects: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Bing-Fang; Lee, Yungling Leo; Jaakkola, Jouni J K

    2015-11-01

    Previous epidemiologic studies have assessed the role of the exposure to ambient air pollution in the development of cardiac birth defects, but they have provided somewhat inconsistent results. To assess the associations between exposure to ambient air pollutants and the risk of cardiac defects, a population-based case-control study was conducted using 1087 cases of cardiac defects and a random sample of 10,870 controls from 1,533,748 Taiwanese newborns in 2001 to 2007.Logistic regression was performed to calculate odds ratios for 10 ppb increases in O3 and 10 μg/m increases in PM10. In addition, we compared the risk of cardiac defects in 4 categories-high exposure (>75th percentile); medium exposure (75th to 50th percentile); low exposure (<50th-25th percentile); reference (<25th percentile) based on the distribution of each pollutant. The risks of ventricular septal defects (VSD), atrial septal defects (ASD), and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) were associated with 10 ppb increases in O3 exposure during the first 3 gestational months among term and preterm babies. In comparison between high PM10 exposure and reference category, there were statistically significant elevations in the effect estimates of ASD for all and terms births. In addition, there was a negative or weak association between SO2, NO2, CO, and cardiac defects.The study proved that exposure to outdoor air O3 and PM10 during the first trimester of gestation may increase the risk of VSD, ASD, and PDA. PMID:26554783

  5. Impaired Olfaction and Risk for Delirium or Cognitive Decline After Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Charles H.; Morrissey, Candice; Ono, Masahiro; Yenokyan, Gayane; Selnes, Ola A.; Walston, Jeremy; Max, Laura; LaFlam, Andrew; Neufeld, Karin; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Hogue, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Statement Impaired olfaction, identified in 33% of patients undergoing cardiac surgery, was associated with the adjusted risk for postoperative delirium but not cognitive decline. Objectives The prevalence and significance of impaired olfaction is not well characterized in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Because impaired olfaction has been associated with underlying neurologic disease, impaired olfaction may identify patients who are vulnerable to poor neurological outcomes in the perioperative period. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of impaired olfaction among patients presenting for cardiac surgery and the independent association of impaired olfaction with postoperative delirium and cognitive decline. Design Nested prospective cohort study Setting Academic hospital Participants 165 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass and/or valve surgery Measurements Olfaction was measured using the Brief Smell Identification Test, with impaired olfaction defined as an olfactory score < 5th percentile of normative data. Delirium was assessed using a validated chart-review method. Cognitive performance was assessed using a neuropsychological testing battery at baseline and 4–6 weeks after surgery. Results Impaired olfaction was identified in 54 of 165 patients (33%) prior to surgery. Impaired olfaction was associated with increased adjusted risk for postoperative delirium (relative risk [RR] 1.90, 95% CI 1.17–3.09; P=0.009). There was no association between impaired olfaction and change in composite cognitive score in the overall study population. Conclusion Impaired olfaction is prevalent in patients undergoing cardiac surgery and is associated with increased adjusted risk for postoperative delirium, but not cognitive decline. Impaired olfaction may identify unrecognized vulnerability for postoperative delirium among patients undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:25597555

  6. [Lifestyle-related risk factors for dementia].

    PubMed

    Phung, Thien Kieu Thi; Andersen, Kjeld; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2006-10-01

    Emerging knowledge about modifiable risk factors for dementia has given rise to interventions that can potentially prevent or delay the onset of dementia and the possible target periods for intervention extend from prenatal period to old age. Factors during early life such as nutrition, education, and parental socioeconomic status can influence the development of dementia later in life. From mid to late life, a physically, socially, and intellectually active lifestyle is associated with reduced risk for dementia. Moreover, modification of cardiovascular risk factors during this period can potentially reduce risk for dementia. PMID:17032603

  7. Developmental Risk Factors for Sexual Offending.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joseph K. P.; Jackson, Henry J.; Pattison, Pip; Ward, Tony

    2002-01-01

    A study involving 64 Australian sex offenders and 33 non-sex offenders found childhood emotional abuse and family dysfunction, childhood behavior problems, and childhood sexual abuse were developmental risk factors for paraphilia. Emotional abuse and family dysfunction was found to be a risk factor for pedophilia, exhibitionism, rape, or multiple…

  8. Risk factors across the eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Anja; Pike, Kathleen M; Goldschmidt, Andrea B; Wilfley, Denise E; Fairburn, Christopher G; Dohm, Faith-Anne; Walsh, B Timothy; Striegel Weissman, Ruth

    2014-12-15

    This study sought to examine risk and onset patterns in anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge eating disorder (BED). Women with AN (n=71), BN (n=66), BED (n=160) and non-psychiatric controls (n=323) were compared retrospectively on risk factors, symptom onset, and diagnostic migration. Eating disorder groups reported greater risk exposure than non-psychiatric controls. AN and BED differed on premorbid personality/behavioral problems, childhood obesity, and family overeating. Risk factors for BN were shared with AN and BED. Dieting was the most common onset symptom in AN, whereas binge eating was most common in BN and BED. Migration between AN and BED was rare, but more frequent between AN and BN and between BN and BED. AN and BED have distinct risk factors and onset patterns, while BN shares similar risk factors and onset patterns with both AN and BED. Results should inform future classification schemes and prevention programs. PMID:25103674

  9. Seismic Risk Perception compared with seismic Risk Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crescimbene, Massimo; La Longa, Federica; Pessina, Vera; Pino, Nicola Alessandro; Peruzza, Laura

    2016-04-01

    The communication of natural hazards and their consequences is one of the more relevant ethical issues faced by scientists. In the last years, social studies have provided evidence that risk communication is strongly influenced by the risk perception of people. In order to develop effective information and risk communication strategies, the perception of risks and the influencing factors should be known. A theory that offers an integrative approach to understanding and explaining risk perception is still missing. To explain risk perception, it is necessary to consider several perspectives: social, psychological and cultural perspectives and their interactions. This paper presents the results of the CATI survey on seismic risk perception in Italy, conducted by INGV researchers on funding by the DPC. We built a questionnaire to assess seismic risk perception, with a particular attention to compare hazard, vulnerability and exposure perception with the real data of the same factors. The Seismic Risk Perception Questionnaire (SRP-Q) is designed by semantic differential method, using opposite terms on a Likert scale to seven points. The questionnaire allows to obtain the scores of five risk indicators: Hazard, Exposure, Vulnerability, People and Community, Earthquake Phenomenon. The questionnaire was administered by telephone interview (C.A.T.I.) on a statistical sample at national level of over 4,000 people, in the period January -February 2015. Results show that risk perception seems be underestimated for all indicators considered. In particular scores of seismic Vulnerability factor are extremely low compared with house information data of the respondents. Other data collected by the questionnaire regard Earthquake information level, Sources of information, Earthquake occurrence with respect to other natural hazards, participation at risk reduction activities and level of involvement. Research on risk perception aims to aid risk analysis and policy-making by

  10. Cerebrovascular disease in South Asia – Part II: Risk factors and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Vibha, Deepti; Prasad, Kameshwar

    2012-01-01

    In South Asian countries, conventional vascular risk factors like hypertension, diabetes mellitus, cardiac disease, smoking, obesity, atrial fibrillation are the dominant ones, while other aetiologies like rheumatic heart disease, infective meningitis-related infarcts and postpartum cerebral venous thrombosis also constitute a big fraction. This review discusses the evidence of prevalence of various risk factors in South Asian countries and possible measures to combat the rising burden of cerebrovascular disease. The last part of the review discusses prevention and identification of risk factors that are unique to or especially found in patient population of South Asia. PMID:24175078

  11. Vehicle emission unit risk factors for transportation risk assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Biwer, B.M.; Butler, J.P.

    1999-12-01

    When the transportation risk posed by shipments of hazardous chemical and radioactive materials is being assessed, it is necessary to evaluate the risks associated with both vehicle emissions and cargo-related risks. Diesel exhaust and fugitive dust emissions from vehicles transporting hazardous shipments lead to increased air pollution, which increases the risk of latent fatalities in the affected population along the transport route. The estimated risk from these vehicle-related sources can often by as large or larger than the estimated risk associated with the material being transported. In this paper, data from the US Environmental Protection Agency's Motor Vehicle-Related Air Toxics Study are first used to develop latent cancer fatality estimates per kilometer of travel in rural and urban areas for all diesel truck classes. These unit risk factors are based on studies investigating the carcinogenic nature of diesel exhaust. With the same methodology, the current per=kilometer latent fatality risk factor used in transportation risk assessment for heavy diesel trucks in urban areas is revised and the analysis expanded to provide risk factors for rural areas and all diesel truck classes. These latter fatality estimates may include, but are not limited to, cancer fatalities and are based primarily on the most recent epidemiological data available on mortality rates associated with ambient air PM-10 concentrations.

  12. Vehicle emission unit risk factors for transportation risk assessments.

    PubMed

    Biwer, B M; Butler, J P

    1999-12-01

    When the transportation risk posed by shipments of hazardous chemical and radioactive materials is being assessed, it is necessary to evaluate the risks associated with both vehicle emissions and cargo-related risks. Diesel exhaust and fugitive dust emissions from vehicles transporting hazardous shipments lead to increased air pollution, which increases the risk of latent fatalities in the affected population along the transport route. The estimated risk from these vehicle-related sources can often be as large or larger than the estimated risk associated with the material being transported. In this paper, data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Motor Vehicle-Related Air Toxics Study are first used to develop latent cancer fatality estimates per kilometer of travel in rural and urban areas for all diesel truck classes. These unit risk factors are based on studies investigating the carcinogenic nature of diesel exhaust. With the same methodology, the current per-kilometer latent fatality risk factor used in transportation risk assessments for heavy diesel trucks in urban areas is revised and the analysis expanded to provide risk factors for rural areas and all diesel truck classes. These latter fatality estimates may include, but are not limited to, cancer fatalities and are based primarily on the most recent epidemiological data available on mortality rates associated with ambient air PM-10 concentrations. PMID:10765454

  13. A Role for RE-1-Silencing Transcription Factor in Embryonic Stem Cells Cardiac Lineage Specification.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Irene; Marcy, Guillaume; Chen, Jiaxuan; Divakar, Ushashree; Kumar, Vibhor; John-Sanchez, Daniel; Rahmani, Mehran; Buckley, Noel J; Stanton, Lawrence W

    2016-04-01

    During development, lineage specification is controlled by several signaling pathways involving various transcription factors (TFs). Here, we studied the RE-1-silencing transcription factor (REST) and identified an important role of this TF in cardiac differentiation. Using mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) to model development, we found that REST knockout cells lost the ability to differentiate into the cardiac lineage. Detailed analysis of specific lineage markers expression showed selective downregulation of endoderm markers in REST-null cells, thus contributing to a loss of cardiogenic signals. REST regulates cardiac differentiation of ESCs by negatively regulating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and positively regulating the cardiogenic TF Gata4. We propose here a new role for REST in cell fate specification besides its well-known repressive role of neuronal differentiation. PMID:26864965

  14. Genetic Insights into Cardiometabolic Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, John B

    2014-01-01

    Many biochemical traits are recognised as risk factors, which contribute to or predict the development of disease. Only a few are in widespread use, usually to assist with treatment decisions and motivate behavioural change. The greatest effort has gone into evaluation of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes, with substantial overlap as ‘cardiometabolic’ risk. Over the past few years many genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have sought to account for variation in risk factors, with the expectation that identifying relevant polymorphisms would improve our understanding or prediction of disease; others have taken the direct approach of genomic case-control studies for the corresponding diseases. Large GWAS have been published for coronary heart disease and Type 2 diabetes, and also for associated biomarkers or risk factors including body mass index, lipids, C-reactive protein, urate, liver function tests, glucose and insulin. Results are not encouraging for personal risk prediction based on genotyping, mainly because known risk loci only account for a small proportion of risk. Overlap of allelic associations between disease and marker, as found for low density lipoprotein cholesterol and heart disease, supports a causal association, but in other cases genetic studies have cast doubt on accepted risk factors. Some loci show unexpected effects on multiple markers or diseases. An intriguing feature of risk factors is the blurring of categories shown by the correlation between them and the genetic overlap between diseases previously thought of as distinct. GWAS can provide insight into relationships between risk factors, biomarkers and diseases, with potential for new approaches to disease classification. PMID:24659834

  15. Circadian misalignment increases cardiovascular disease risk factors in humans

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Christopher J.; Purvis, Taylor E.; Hu, Kun; Scheer, Frank A. J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Shift work is a risk factor for hypertension, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease. This increased risk cannot be fully explained by classic risk factors. One of the key features of shift workers is that their behavioral and environmental cycles are typically misaligned relative to their endogenous circadian system. However, there is little information on the impact of acute circadian misalignment on cardiovascular disease risk in humans. Here we show—by using two 8-d laboratory protocols—that short-term circadian misalignment (12-h inverted behavioral and environmental cycles for three days) adversely affects cardiovascular risk factors in healthy adults. Circadian misalignment increased 24-h systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) by 3.0 mmHg and 1.5 mmHg, respectively. These results were primarily explained by an increase in blood pressure during sleep opportunities (SBP, +5.6 mmHg; DBP, +1.9 mmHg) and, to a lesser extent, by raised blood pressure during wake periods (SBP, +1.6 mmHg; DBP, +1.4 mmHg). Circadian misalignment decreased wake cardiac vagal modulation by 8–15%, as determined by heart rate variability analysis, and decreased 24-h urinary epinephrine excretion rate by 7%, without a significant effect on 24-h urinary norepinephrine excretion rate. Circadian misalignment increased 24-h serum interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, resistin, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels by 3–29%. We demonstrate that circadian misalignment per se increases blood pressure and inflammatory markers. Our findings may help explain why shift work increases hypertension, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:26858430

  16. Risk scoring for prediction of acute cardiac complications from imbalanced clinical data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nan; Koh, Zhi Xiong; Chua, Eric Chern-Pin; Tan, Licia Mei-Ling; Lin, Zhiping; Mirza, Bilal; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2014-11-01

    Fast and accurate risk stratification is essential in the emergency department (ED) as it allows clinicians to identify chest pain patients who are at high risk of cardiac complications and require intensive monitoring and early intervention. In this paper, we present a novel intelligent scoring system using heart rate variability, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG), and vital signs where a hybrid sampling-based ensemble learning strategy is proposed to handle data imbalance. The experiments were conducted on a dataset consisting of 564 chest pain patients recruited at the ED of a tertiary hospital. The proposed ensemble-based scoring system was compared with established scoring methods such as the modified early warning score and the thrombolysis in myocardial infarction score, and showed its effectiveness in predicting acute cardiac complications within 72 h in terms of the receiver operation characteristic analysis. PMID:25375686

  17. Risk Factors and Levels of Risk for High School Dropouts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Suhyun; Suh, Jingyo

    2007-01-01

    The study in this article identifies three major risk categories of high school dropouts and evaluates the impact of possible prevention strategies. As students accumulate these risks, they became more likely to drop out and prevention programs become less effective. Additionally, it was found that factors influencing the decision to drop out vary…

  18. Interleukin 1 and Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibit Cardiac Myocyte β -adrenergic Responsiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, Tod; Chung, Mina K.; Pieper, Stephen J.; Lange, Louis G.; Schreiner, George F.

    1989-09-01

    Reversible congestive heart failure can accompany cardiac allograft rejection and inflammatory myocarditis, conditions associated with an immune cell infiltrate of the myocardium. To determine whether immune cell secretory products alter cardiac muscle metabolism without cytotoxicity, we cultured cardiac myocytes in the presence of culture supernatants from activated immune cells. We observed that these culture supernatants inhibit β -adrenergic agonist-mediated increases in cultured cardiac myocyte contractility and intracellular cAMP accumulation. The myocyte contractile response to increased extracellular Ca2+ concentration is unaltered by prior exposure to these culture supernatants, as is the increase in myocyte intracellular cAMP concentration in response to stimulation with forskolin, a direct adenyl cyclase activator. Inhibition occurs in the absence of alteration in β -adrenergic receptor density or ligand binding affinity. Suppressive activity is attributable to the macrophage-derived cytokines interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor. Thus, these observations describe a role for defined cytokines in regulating the hormonal responsiveness and function of contractile cells. The effects of interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor on intracellular cAMP accumulation may be a model for immune modulation of other cellular functions dependent upon cyclic nucleotide metabolism. The uncoupling of agonist-occupied receptors from adenyl cyclase suggests that β -receptor or guanine nucleotide binding protein function is altered by the direct or indirect action of cytokines on cardiac muscle cells.

  19. Risk Factors for Complications of Traumatic Injuries.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar Júnior, Wagner; Saleh, Carmen Mohamad Rida; Whitaker, Iveth Yamaguchi

    2016-01-01

    Complications in hospitalized trauma patients are major causes of morbidity and mortality. The aims of this study were to identify the in-hospital trauma patients' complications and identify the risk factors for complications in this population. A retrospective analysis was conducted in a sample from a Brazilian hospital. The sample consisted of 407 patients, 194 (47.66%) of whom had records of complications. The most common complications were infections (41.80%). The risk factors related to the complications were age, length of hospital stay, external causes, and injury severity. The complications were frequent in this sample, and the risk for complications was characterized by multiple factors. PMID:27618375

  20. Factors involved in maintenance of cardiac catecholamine content

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, B.; Friedman, Eitan

    1969-01-01

    1. When animals were exposed to a temperature of 4° C for 6 hr, endogenous catecholamines remained unaltered or reduced slightly depending upon the strain of rats used. In contrast, labelled noradrenaline declined rapidly, but the decline was inhibited when animals were pretreated with monoamine oxidase inhibitors. 2. Increased sympathetic nervous activity associated with cold resulted in a four-fold increase in rate of synthesis of noradrenaline. 3. Reduction in endogenous and labelled catecholamine levels associated with cold was exaggerated by pretreatment with cocaine, imipramine or phenoxybenzamine—drugs known to inhibit the uptake of noradrenaline into the nerve terminal. 4. Cocaine and imipramine in higher doses inhibited the release of both endogenous and labelled noradrenaline, suggesting a dual action: in small doses they increased the depletion of catecholamines by blocking the reincorporation, while in higher doses they inhibited the release of noradrenaline. 5. It is concluded that, under normal conditions, the re-uptake mechanism may not play a significant role in the maintenance of normal cardiac catecholamine levels and that such levels are maintained by synthesis alone. However, when the heart is subjected to high impulse nerve activity, synthesis is not sufficiently accelerated to compensate for impulse-induced massive release and may require the support of an additional mechanism, such as the partial reincorporation of released transmitter. In fact, the re-uptake mechanism is enhanced during high impulse activity. PMID:4390484

  1. Body Mass Index as a Predictor of Sudden Cardiac Death and Usefulness of the Electrocardiogram for Risk Stratification.

    PubMed

    Eranti, Antti; Aro, Aapo L; Kerola, Tuomas; Tikkanen, Jani T; Rissanen, Harri A; Anttonen, Olli; Junttila, M Juhani; Knekt, Paul; Huikuri, Heikki V

    2016-02-01

    Evidence of the role of body mass index (BMI) as a risk factor for sudden cardiac death (SCD) is conflicting, and how electrocardiographic (ECG) SCD risk markers perform in subjects with different BMIs is not known. In this study, a general population cohort consisting of 10,543 middle-aged subjects (mean age 44 years, 52.7% men) was divided into groups of lean (BMI <20, n = 374), normal weight (BMI 20.0 to 24.9, n = 4,334), overweight (BMI 25.0 to 29.9, n = 4,390), and obese (BMI >30, n = 1,445) subjects. Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for confounders were used to assess the risk for SCD associated with BMI and the risk for SCD associated with ECG abnormalities in subjects with different BMIs. The overweight and obese subjects were at increased risk for SCD (hazard ratios [95% CIs] were 1.33 [1.13 to 1.56], p = 0.001 and 1.79 [1.44 to 2.23], p <0.001 for overweight and obese subjects, respectively). The risk of non-SCD had a similar relation with BMI as SCD. Hazard ratios associated with ECG abnormalities were 3.03, 1.75, 1.74, and 1.34 in groups of lean, normal weight, overweight, and obese subjects, respectively, but no statistical significance was reached in the obese. ECG abnormalities improved integrated discrimination indexes and continuous net reclassification indexes statistically significantly only in the normal weight group. In conclusion, the overweight and obese are at increased risk for SCD but also for non-SCD, and ECG abnormalities are associated with increased risk of SCD also in normal weight subjects presenting with less traditional cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:26723105

  2. Preoperative evaluation of cardiac risk by means of atrial pacing and thallium 201 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Stratmann, H.G.; Mark, A.L.; Walter, K.E.; Williams, G.A. )

    1989-10-01

    Atrial pacing and thallium 201 scintigraphy were done in 61 patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease referred for evaluation of cardiac risk before elective vascular surgery. All patients had noncardiac limitations precluding performance of an adequate exercise stress test. Before atrial pacing all were considered to be at low risk of a postoperative cardiac event based on assessment of clinical parameters. Vascular surgery was subsequently performed in 47 patients. In these patients, pacing-induced ST segment depression greater than or equal to 1 mm occurred in 18, a fixed perfusion defect occurred in 11, and a reversible defect occurred in six. Two of the six patients with reversible perfusion defects had preoperative coronary angiography; both had significant coronary artery disease (one or more lesions greater than or equal to 50%). Two patients (one of whom had a reversible perfusion defect) underwent preoperative coronary revascularization and tolerated subsequent vascular surgery well. All other patients received only medical therapy. None of the 47 patients undergoing vascular surgery had a postoperative cardiac event (unstable angina, congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, or cardiac death). Of the 14 patients in whom vascular surgery was deferred or canceled, surgery was canceled for noncardiac reasons in seven. Six of these seven patients had a normal perfusion scan; none had a reversible perfusion defect or marked (greater than or equal to 2 mm) ST segment depression. No cardiac event occurred during a 3-month period after atrial pacing in any of these patients. Six of the remaining seven patients had reversible perfusion defects.

  3. Radiation as a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moulder, John E.; Hopewell, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Humans are continually exposed to ionizing radiation from terrestrial sources. The two major contributors to radiation exposure of the U.S. population are ubiquitous background radiation and medical exposure of patients. From the early 1980s to 2006, the average dose per individual in the United States for all sources of radiation increased by a factor of 1.7–6.2 mSv, with this increase due to the growth of medical imaging procedures. Radiation can place individuals at an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Excess risk of cardiovascular disease occurs a long time after exposure to lower doses of radiation as demonstrated in Japanese atomic bomb survivors. This review examines sources of radiation (atomic bombs, radiation accidents, radiological terrorism, cancer treatment, space exploration, radiosurgery for cardiac arrhythmia, and computed tomography) and the risk for developing cardiovascular disease. The evidence presented suggests an association between cardiovascular disease and exposure to low-to-moderate levels of radiation, as well as the well-known association at high doses. Studies are needed to define the extent that diagnostic and therapeutic radiation results in increased risk factors for cardiovascular disease, to understand the mechanisms involved, and to develop strategies to mitigate or treat radiation-induced cardiovascular disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 1945–1956. PMID:21091078

  4. Radiation as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Baker, John E; Moulder, John E; Hopewell, John W

    2011-10-01

    Abstract population are ubiquitous background radiation and medical exposure of patients. From the early 1980s to 2006, the average dose per individual in the United States for all sources of radiation increased by a factor of 1.7-6.2 mSv, with this increase due to the growth of medical imaging procedures. Radiation can place individuals at an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Excess risk of cardiovascular disease occurs a long time after exposure to lower doses of radiation as demonstrated in Japanese atomic bomb survivors. This review examines sources of radiation (atomic bombs, radiation accidents, radiological terrorism, cancer treatment, space exploration, radiosurgery for cardiac arrhythmia, and computed tomography) and the risk for developing cardiovascular disease. The evidence presented suggests an association between cardiovascular disease and exposure to low-to-moderate levels of radiation, as well as the well-known association at high doses. Studies are needed to define the extent that diagnostic and therapeutic radiation results in increased risk factors for cardiovascular disease, to understand the mechanisms involved, and to develop strategies to mitigate or treat radiation-induced cardiovascular disease. PMID:21091078

  5. Risk Factors in Adolescent Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ewald, D Rose; Haldeman PhD, Lauren A

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a complex and multifaceted disease, with many contributing factors. While diet and nutrition are important influences, the confounding effects of overweight and obesity, metabolic and genetic factors, racial and ethnic predispositions, socioeconomic status, cultural influences, growth rate, and pubertal stage have even more influence and make diagnosis quite challenging. The prevalence of hypertension in adolescents far exceeds the numbers who have been diagnosed; studies have found that 75% or more go undiagnosed. This literature review summarizes the challenges of blood pressure classification in adolescents, discusses the impact of these confounding influences, and identifies actions that will improve diagnosis and treatment outcomes. PMID:27335997

  6. Risk Factors in Adolescent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, D. Rose; Haldeman, Lauren A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a complex and multifaceted disease, with many contributing factors. While diet and nutrition are important influences, the confounding effects of overweight and obesity, metabolic and genetic factors, racial and ethnic predispositions, socioeconomic status, cultural influences, growth rate, and pubertal stage have even more influence and make diagnosis quite challenging. The prevalence of hypertension in adolescents far exceeds the numbers who have been diagnosed; studies have found that 75% or more go undiagnosed. This literature review summarizes the challenges of blood pressure classification in adolescents, discusses the impact of these confounding influences, and identifies actions that will improve diagnosis and treatment outcomes. PMID:27335997

  7. ANTHRACYCLINE-INDUCED SUPRESSION OF GATA-4 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR: IMPLICATION REGULATION OF CARDIAC MYOCYTE APOPTOSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthracyclines are effective cancer chemotherapeutic agents but can induce serious cardiotoxicity. Understanding the mechanism of cardiac damage by these agents will help in development of better therapeutic strategies against cancer. The GATA-4 transcription factor is an important regulator of ca...

  8. Cardiovascular risk factor investigation: a pediatric issue

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Anabel N; Abreu, Glaucia R; Resende, Rogério S; Goncalves, Washington LS; Gouvea, Sonia Alves

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To correlate cardiovascular risk factors (e.g., hypertension, obesity, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperglycemia, sedentariness) in childhood and adolescence with the occurrence of cardiovascular disease. Sources A systematic review of books and selected articles from PubMed, SciELO and Cochrane from 1992 to 2012. Summary of findings Risk factors for atherosclerosis are present in childhood, although cardiovascular disease arises during adulthood. This article presents the main studies that describe the importance of investigating the risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in childhood and their associations. Significant rates of hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, and sedentariness occur in children and adolescents. Blood pressure needs to be measured in childhood. An increase in arterial blood pressure in young people predicts hypertension in adulthood. The death rate from cardiovascular disease is lowest in children with lower cholesterol levels and in individuals who exercise regularly. In addition, there is a high prevalence of sedentariness in children and adolescents. Conclusions Studies involving the analysis of cardiovascular risk factors should always report the prevalence of these factors and their correlations during childhood because these factors are indispensable for identifying an at-risk population. The identification of risk factors in asymptomatic children could contribute to a decrease in cardiovascular disease, preventing such diseases as hypertension, obesity, and dyslipidemia from becoming the epidemics of this century. PMID:23515212

  9. Risk factors of morbidity and mortality following hip fracture surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Dong; Park, Sang Jin; Lee, Deok Hee

    2013-01-01

    Background The preoperative coexisting chronic systemic illness, delay in surgery, gender, and age were considered as risk factors for the complications after hip fracture surgery. The wider range of surgical delay and immobility-related pulmonary morbidity may affect postoperative complications and mortality. This study examined the risk factors for morbidity and mortality following the hip fracture surgery. Methods The patient data was collected retrospectively. The consecutive 506 patients with hip fracture surgery, aged 60 years or older, were included. The patients' age, gender, preexisting diseases, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification, delay in surgical repair, duration of surgical procedure, and methods of anesthesia were noted. The thirty-day postoperative complications were reviewed, and cardiac complications, pulmonary complications, delirium, and death were recorded. The data was analyzed for postoperative complications and risk factors. Results Atelectasis was associated with postoperative pulmonary complications. Male gender and age ≥ 80 years were associated with an increased incidence of postoperative delirium. ASA classification 3 was associated with death. A delay in surgery was not associated with any complications. Preexisting diseases and methods of anesthesia did not affect mortality and postoperative complications. Conclusions The results suggest that a delay in surgery did not affect the postoperative complications and morbidity. PMID:23814650

  10. Risk factors and outcomes of childhood ischemic stroke in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ying-Ying; Lin, Kuang-Lin; Wang, Huei-Shyong; Chou, Min-Liang; Hung, Po-Cheng; Hsieh, Meng-Ying; Lin, Jainn-Jim; Wong, Alex Mun-Ching

    2008-01-01

    In this retrospective study, we reviewed the charts and collected clinical and radiographic data on children (age range, 1 month to 18 years) with symptoms and radiographic confirmation of ischemic stroke for the period of January 1996 to July 2006. Ninety-four children were enrolled. Eighty-eight had arterial ischemic stroke and six had sinovenous thrombosis. Twenty-nine percent of the children had seizures. Twenty-six percent had diffuse neurological signs and 76% had focal neurological signs. Risk factors included vascular disease (33%), infection (27%), metabolic disorders (18%), trauma (11%), prothrombotic states (13%), cardiac disease (10%), and mitochondrial disease (6%). Ten percent (n=9) had no identifiable cause. Twenty-two percent of the children had more than one risk factor. Anterior territory (70%) was more involved than posterior territory (18%) in arterial ischemic stroke. Unilateral infarctions were more common on the left side (51%) than on the right (24.5%). Neurological deficits were present in 45% (n=34/75) of the children; the most frequent deficit was motor impairment (24%). Seven children (9%) died in the acute stage. There were 12 children (16%) who had recurrent stroke and 8 children (8/12) who had underlying vascular disease. The vascular disease included moyamoya disease (5), CNS lupus (1) and ill-defined vasculopathy (2). The etiology pattern in Taiwan was different from that in Western countries. Vascular disease was a significant risk factor for recurrence in childhood ischemic stroke. PMID:17573220