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Sample records for cardiac tamponade due

  1. Cardiac tamponade

    MedlinePlus

    ... increase blood pressure may also help keep the person alive until the fluid is drained. Oxygen may be given to help reduce the workload on the heart by decreasing tissue demands for blood flow. The cause of tamponade must ...

  2. A successful treatment of cardiac tamponade due to an aortic dissection using open-chest massage.

    PubMed

    Keiko, Terasumi; Yanagawa, Youichi; Isoda, Susumu

    2012-05-01

    An 81-year-old woman became unconsciousness after complaining of a backache, and then, an ambulance was called. She was suspected to have an aortic dissection by the emergency medical technicians and was transferred to our department. On arrival, she was in shock. Emergency cardiac ultrasound disclosed good wall motion with cardiac tamponade but no complication of aortic regurgitation. Computed tomography of the trunk revealed a type A aortic dissection with cardiac tamponade. During performance of pericardial drainage, she lapsed into cardiopulmonary arrest. Immediately after sterilization of the patient's upper body with compression of the chest wall, we performed a thoracotomy and dissolved the cardiac tamponade by pericardiotomy and obtained her spontaneous circulation. Fortunately, blood discharge was ceased immediately after controlling her blood pressure aggressively. As she complicated pneumonitis, conservative therapy was performed. Her physical condition gradually improved, and she finally could feed herself and communicate. In cases of acute cardiac tamponade, simple pericardiocentesis often is not effective due to the presence of the clot, and a cardiac tamponade by a Stanford type A aortic dissection is highly possible to complicate cardiac arrest, so emergency physicians should be ready to provide immediate open cardiac massage to treat such patients. PMID:21406318

  3. Acute cardiac tamponade due to spontaneous bleeding in a child with haemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Goz, Mustafa; Hazar, Abdussemet; Mordeniz, Cengiz; Kocarslan, Aydemir; Demirkol, Abbas Heval; Koc, Ahmet

    2010-08-01

    In severe haemophilia A, patients, start from the first years of life, with spontaneous bleeding and require transfusion. However, cardiac tamponade due to spontaneous pericardial bleeding is rare. An 11-year-old boy receiving haemophilia A treatment was referred to the Department of Paediatric Haematology with pneumonia, fever, dyspnoea, and palpitation. In his PA chest radiograph, pneumonic infiltration in the right lung and enlargement in the pericardial area were found. On his echocardiograph, pericardial effusion reaching 3.9 cm and other findings of tamponade were detected. APTT was outside the measurable range. It was deranged to > 120 seconds. The patient received 1000 U of factor VIII intravenously. A pericardial window was made via left anterior mini thoracotomy due to fluid drained. In his control echocardiograph taken after one month, no pathology was found. At 50th day, the patient showed left pleural serohaemorrhagic effusion, which was treated with tube thoracostomy. In haemophilia A patients, either pericardiocentesis or subxiphoid pericardial drainage or pericardial window creation via thoracotomy may be applied, depending on the primary pathology. In paediatric cases, pericardial window creation via mini thoracotomy can be an alternative treatment of choice considering complications such as recurring bleeding and effusion during pericardiocentesis. PMID:20726209

  4. Early cardiac tamponade due to tension pneumopericardium after bilateral lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lasocki, Sigismond; Castier, Yves; Geffroy, Arnaud; Mal, Hervé; Brugière, Olivier; Lesèche, Guy; Montravers, Philippe

    2007-10-01

    We report the case of a 42-year-old woman who developed severe hemodynamic instability with marked arterial pulsed pressure variation in the early course of bilateral lung transplantation. The diagnosis of tension pneumopericardium was made on Day 2 post-operatively based on chest X-ray and echocardiography. Transoesophageal echocardiography revealed both a cardiac tamponade and a right-to-left shunt via a patent foramen ovale. The treatment and mechanisms of these two rare complications are discussed. PMID:17919630

  5. Cardiac tamponade: an unusual clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Eakle, J F; Goodin, R R

    2001-02-01

    Pericardial effusion with cardiac tamponade is an unusual presentation of lymphoma, although cardiac involvement is often a late finding in widespread malignancy. Clinical identification can be difficult ante-mortem. New cardiac symptoms or classic findings of cardiac tamponade should prompt aggressive investigation. We present a case of B-cell lymphoma that initially presented as pericardial effusion with tamponade and discuss the characteristic physical findings and radiographic data that assist in diagnosis. PMID:11441582

  6. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis with cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, H A; Kvasnicka, J

    1978-01-01

    A 4-year-old girl with seronegative systemic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis developed acute cardiac tamponade. Pericardiocentesis and systemic corticosteroids resulted in complete recovery of the pericardial involvement. This was followed by complete remission of rheumatoid disease. Images PMID:686861

  7. Spontaneous chylous cardiac tamponade: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chylous cardiac tamponade is a rare condition with little known cause. Case presentation A case of an otherwise healthy woman who admitted with dyspnea and palpitations is presented. She had a history of a painful flexion-hyperextension of the spine. Diagnostic evaluation proved a chylous pericardial effusion with a disruption of the anterior longitudinal spinal ligament. Video-assisted thoracic surgery with mass supradiaphragmatic ligation of the thoracic duct and pericardial window formation was carried out successfully and resulted in the complete cure of the patient's condition. Conclusion Chylous pericardial effusion and subsequent tamponade is a rare entity. Endoscopic surgery is offering a safe and effective treatment. PMID:20236535

  8. Guide Wire Induced Cardiac Tamponade: The Soft J Tip Is Not So Benign.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Sankalp; Siddiqui, Fayez; Patel, Milan; Cardozo, Shaun

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheter (CVC) insertion rarely causes cardiac tamponade due to perforation. Although it is a rare complication, it can be lethal if not identified early. We report a case of cardiac tamponade caused by internal jugular (IJ) central venous catheter (CVC) insertion using a soft J-tipped guide wire which is considered safe and rarely implicated with cardiac tamponade. A bedside transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) revealed a pericardial effusion with tamponade. An emergent bedside pericardiocentesis was done revealing bloody fluid and resulted in clinical stabilization. PMID:27597903

  9. Guide Wire Induced Cardiac Tamponade: The Soft J Tip Is Not So Benign

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheter (CVC) insertion rarely causes cardiac tamponade due to perforation. Although it is a rare complication, it can be lethal if not identified early. We report a case of cardiac tamponade caused by internal jugular (IJ) central venous catheter (CVC) insertion using a soft J-tipped guide wire which is considered safe and rarely implicated with cardiac tamponade. A bedside transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) revealed a pericardial effusion with tamponade. An emergent bedside pericardiocentesis was done revealing bloody fluid and resulted in clinical stabilization. PMID:27597903

  10. Acute myocarditis presenting as cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed Central

    Nwizu, Chidi; Onwuanyi, Anekwe E.

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of acute fulminant myocarditis presenting with cardiac tamponade and shock. The patient was managed in the coronary care unit with emergency pericardiotomy, invasive hemodynamic monitoring, and supportive therapy for cardiac failure. Pleural effusion and pneumonia complicated her clinical course. She responded well to therapy with normalization of left ventricular systolic function. This case demonstrates the potential for complete recovery with appropriate management in acute myocarditis even with a fulminant course. Images Figure 1 PMID:15586655

  11. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection with Cardiac Tamponade.

    PubMed

    Goh, Anne C H; Lundstrom, Robert J

    2015-10-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare cause of acute coronary syndrome. Clinical presentation ranges from chest pain alone to ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation, and sudden death. The treatment of patients with spontaneous coronary artery dissection is challenging because the disease pathophysiology is unclear, optimal treatment is unknown, and short- and long-term prognostic data are minimal. We report the case of a 70-year-old woman who presented with an acute ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction secondary to a spontaneous dissection of the left anterior descending coronary artery. She was treated conservatively. Cardiac tamponade developed 16 hours after presentation. Repeat coronary angiography revealed extension of the dissection. Medical therapy was continued after the hemopericardium was aspirated. The patient remained asymptomatic 3 years after hospital discharge. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of spontaneous coronary artery dissection in association with cardiac tamponade that was treated conservatively and had a successful outcome. PMID:26504447

  12. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection with Cardiac Tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Lundstrom, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare cause of acute coronary syndrome. Clinical presentation ranges from chest pain alone to ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation, and sudden death. The treatment of patients with spontaneous coronary artery dissection is challenging because the disease pathophysiology is unclear, optimal treatment is unknown, and short- and long-term prognostic data are minimal. We report the case of a 70-year-old woman who presented with an acute ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction secondary to a spontaneous dissection of the left anterior descending coronary artery. She was treated conservatively. Cardiac tamponade developed 16 hours after presentation. Repeat coronary angiography revealed extension of the dissection. Medical therapy was continued after the hemopericardium was aspirated. The patient remained asymptomatic 3 years after hospital discharge. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of spontaneous coronary artery dissection in association with cardiac tamponade that was treated conservatively and had a successful outcome. PMID:26504447

  13. An unusual case of cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed

    Braconi, Lucio; Pretelli, Paola; Calamai, Giancarlo; Montesi, Gianfranco; Romagnoli, Stefano; Gelsomino, Sandro; Bevilacqua, Sergio; Stefàno, Pierluigi; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2006-03-01

    A case of a 67-year-old woman with cardiac tamponade caused by toothpick ingestion is presented. At clinical presentation, it mimicked postinfarction ventricular free wall rupture and the diagnosis was not made until the operation. Ingested toothpicks have often been reported as a cause of intestinal injuries, but in this rare case the toothpick migrated into the pericardium and caused laceration of the right coronary artery. PMID:16645390

  14. Cardiac Tamponade as Initial Presentation of Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Hajra, Adrija; Bandyopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Layek, Manas; Mukhopadhyay, Sabyasachi

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac involvement in malignant lymphoma is one of the least investigated subjects. Pericardial effusion is rarely symptomatic in patients of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Few case reports are available in the literature. There are case reports of diagnosed HL patients presenting with pericardial effusion. HL patients who present with recurrent episodes of pericardial effusion have also been reported. Pericardial effusion has also been reported in cases of non HL. However, pericardial effusion leading to cardiac tamponade as an initial presentation of HL is extremely rare. Very few such cases are there in the literature. Here, we present a case of a 26-year-old male patient who presented with cardiac tamponade and in due course was found to be a case of classical type of HL. This case is interesting because of its presentation. PMID:26900491

  15. Acute Cardiac Tamponade: An Unusual Cause of Acute Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Gautam; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Dalal, Pranavkumar; Markley, John; Rich, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    We are reporting a case of acute renal failure after cardiac surgery due to acute pericardial effusion. The patient had normal baseline renal function but developed acute oliguric renal failure with a significant increase in serum creatinine postoperatively. Pericardiotomy led to an improvement in blood pressure, immediate diuresis and quick recovery of renal function back to baseline. Pericardial tamponade should be included in the consideration of causes of the cardiorenal syndrome. PMID:22619656

  16. Attention! Cardiac tamponade may be caused by underlying Castleman's disease.

    PubMed

    Atay, Hilmi; Kelkitli, Engin; Okuyucu, Muhammed; Yildiz, Levent; Turgut, Mehmet

    2015-05-01

    Castleman's disease is a rarely observed lymphoproliferative disease. In the literature, various signs and symptoms of the disease have been reported; one of these is secondary cardiac tamponade. We describe the case of a 41-year-old man who developed cardiac tamponade during examination, and who was later diagnosed with Castleman's disease, based on his lymph node biopsies. PMID:24887912

  17. Rapid progression to cardiac tamponade in Erdheim-Chester disease despite treatment with interferon alpha.

    PubMed

    Nakhleh, Afif; Slobodin, Gleb; Elias, Nizar; Bejar, Jacob; Odeh, Majed

    2016-07-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare form of non-Langerhans histiocytosis with heterogeneous clinical manifestations. The most common presentation is bone pains typically involving the long bones. Approximately 75% of the patients develop extraskeletal involvement. Cardiac involvement is seen in up to 45% of the patients, and although, pericardial involvement is the most common cardiac pathology of this rare disease, cardiac tamponade due to ECD has been very rarely reported. We describe a case of a patient found to have ECD with multi-organ involvement and small pericardial effusion, which progressed to cardiac tamponade despite treatment with interferon alpha. PMID:24754271

  18. Cardiac tamponade as an initial manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Carrion, Diego M; Carrion, Andres F

    2012-01-01

    Clinical manifestations of pericardial disease may precede other signs and symptoms associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. Although pericardial effusion is one of the most common cardiac problems in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, haemodynamically significant effusions manifesting as cardiac tamponade are rare and require prompt diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22693326

  19. Cardiac tamponade secondary to haemopericardium in a patient on warfarin

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jundi, Wissam; Rubin, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    Excessive anticoagulation with warfarin may contribute to certain complications, including bleeding into body cavities. Haemopericardiac tamponade secondary to warfarin is rare outside cardiac surgery. The present report describes an unusual presentation of spontaneous cardiac tamponade in a patient on warfarin and recently treated for chest infection with erythromycin. The patient was referred to the surgeons with acute abdominal pain and hypotension. Blood tests revealed an international normalised ratio (INR) of 16.9. An emergency abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan revealed pericardial effusion. Intravenous vitamin K and prothrombin complex concentrate were administered and urgent referral to a cardiologist was made for pericardiocentesis. Monitoring INR in patients on warfarin is paramount in avoiding the potential detrimental complications of excessive anticoagulation. Clinicians should be aware of drug interactions of warfarin and risk factors associated with its prolonged half-life. Internal bleeding, including haemorrhagic cardiac tamponade, should be ruled out in patients with unexplained hypotension and excessive anticoagulation. PMID:22485118

  20. Early Cardiac Tamponade in a Patient with Postsurgical Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Archana; Yeruva, Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi; Kumar, Rajan; Curry, Bryan H

    2015-01-01

    Pericardial effusion is a common cardiac manifestation of hypothyroidism, but effusion resulting in cardiac tamponade is extremely rare. We present a case of a 56-year-old African American woman with slurred speech and altered mental status that was initially suspected to have stroke. Her chest X-ray revealed cardiomegaly and subsequent echocardiogram showed a large pericardial effusion with echocardiographic evidence of cardiac tamponade. Clinically, patient did not have pulsus paradoxus or hypotension. Further questioning revealed a history of total surgical thyroidectomy and noncompliance with thyroid replacement therapy. Pericardiocentesis was performed promptly and thyroxine replacement therapy was started. Thereafter, her mental status improved significantly. The management of pericardial effusion associated with hypothyroidism varies depending on size of effusion and hemodynamic stability of the patient. The management strategy ranges from conservative management with close monitoring and thyroxine replacement to pericardiocentesis or creation of a pericardial window. PMID:26294982

  1. Modified emergency department thoracotomy for postablation cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Thomas E; Haug, Eric W

    2012-04-01

    Cardiac dysrhythmias are a common problem in the United States. Radiofrequency ablation is being used more frequently as a treatment for these diagnoses. Although rare, serious complications such as cardiac tamponade have been reported as a result of ablation procedures. Traditionally, emergency department (ED) thoracotomy has been reserved for cases of traumatic arrest only. We report a case of a successful modified ED thoracotomy in a patient with postablation cardiac tamponade and subsequent obstructive shock who failed intravenous fluid resuscitation, pressor administration, and multiple attempts at pericardiocentesis. In this case, a modified approach was used to incise the pericardium. Although this was associated with large blood loss, we believed that using the traditional method of completely removing the pericardium would have resulted in uncontrolled hemorrhage. Instead, our method led to successful resuscitation of the patient until definitive care was available. A smaller pericardial incision than is traditionally used during ED thoracotomy deserves further consideration and research to determine whether and when it may be most useful as a temporizing treatment of cardiac tamponade when other methods have failed. PMID:22104519

  2. [Pericardial tamponade due to malpositioned cooling catheter].

    PubMed

    Löwer, C; Niedeggen, A; Janssens, U

    2016-05-01

    The case of a 60-year-old woman who received prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation for cardiopulmonary arrest is reported. In the hospital, coronary angiography was performed including percutaneous coronary intervention of the left anterior descending artery and placement of a cooling catheter. After approximately 30 min, severe hypotension progressively developed. Pericardial tamponade was identified and treated by pericardial puncture. Clear fluid was drained. Transesophageal echocardiography detected a perforation of the right atrial roof by the cooling catheter. Open surgery was performed immediately and the catheter was removed. The patient was discharged from the hospital without any further complication 10 days later. PMID:26065384

  3. Cardiac tamponade and bilateral pleural effusion in a very low birth weight infant.

    PubMed

    Haass, Cristina; Sorrentino, Elena; Tempera, Alessia; Consigli, Chiara; De Paola, Domenico; Calcagni, Giulio; Piastra, Marco; Finocchi, Maurizio

    2009-02-01

    A very low birth weight premature newborn developed a sudden cardiac tamponade due to parenteral fluid extravasation 1 month after central line insertion. Besides tensive pericardial effusion a bilateral pleural effusion also developed. An emergency pericardiocentesis was really life-saving and after pleural fluid removal a complete cardiorespiratory recovery was obtained. Pericardial and bilateral pleural effusions very rarely coexist as a complication of central line extravasation. PMID:19253161

  4. Early and long-term outcomes of pericardiotomy in the treatment of primary cardiac tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszewska, Iga; Stefaniak, Sebastian; Bartczak, Agnieszka; Jemielity, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac tamponade is a life-threatening clinical entity that requires emergent treatment. A variety of therapeutic methods have been applied. The purpose of this retrospective analysis was to study the efficacy of emergent surgical pericardiotomy in both the relief of cardiac tamponade and in the prevention of recurrence of pericardial effusion. Material and methods This study involved 90 consecutive patients (58 males and 32 females) with a mean age of 57.4 ± 14.1 years, who underwent emergent pericardiotomy in the years 2006 to 2011 due to symptomatic primary cardiac tamponade. At the end of the follow-up period all living subjects had control echocardiographic examination. Survival analysis was performed with the use of the Kaplan-Meier method. Results The mean duration time of surgery was 14.2 ± 4.5 minutes. All patients survived surgery but one died during in-hospital stay. During the post-discharge follow-up period (median 49 months) 32 patients died for any reason. One-year and four-year probability of survival was 0.68 ± 0.05 and 0.64 ± 0.05, respectively. Malignancy diagnosis was associated with significant negative impact on survival. One-year and four-year probability of survival was 0.56 ± 0.06 and 0.53 ± 0.06 for cancer patients while it was 0.93 ± 0.05 and 0.89 ± 0.06 for the others, respectively. In two cases, only cancer patients, re-intervention due to effusion recurrence was necessary. Conclusions Pericardiotomy, although invasive, is a safe method to relieve cardiac tamponade. It is also very efficient in the prevention of recurrence of pericardial effusion, even in cancer patients. PMID:26702272

  5. [Cardiac tamponade after withdrawal of a peripheral access central catheter].

    PubMed

    García-Galiana, E; Sanchis-Gil, V; Martínez-Navarrete, M Á

    2015-03-01

    Central venous catheterization is a very common technique, although its complications can be multiple and sometimes fatal. A case is presented of cardiac tamponade by parenteral nutrition a few hours after moving a central venous catheter peripherally inserted a few days before. The diagnosis was made by echocardiography, and an emergency pericardiocentesis was performed, achieving complete recovery of the patient. Peripherally inserted central venous catheters are more likely to change their position secondary to the movements of the patient's arm, thus it is important to use soft catheters, make sure the tip lies above the carina to avoid perforation of the pericardial reflexion, and fix it well to the skin. Diagnosis must be made as soon as possible, given the high mortality rate of this complication, and the essential diagnostic tool is echocardiography. Elective treatment consists of early catheter withdrawal and emergency pericardiocentesis. PMID:24929256

  6. Right atrial tamponade complicating cardiac operation: clinical, hemodynamic, and scintigraphic correlates

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, T.; Gray, R.; Chaux, A.; Lee, M.; De Robertis, M.; Berman, D.; Matloff, J.

    1982-09-01

    Persistent bleeding into the pericardial space in the early hours after cardiac operation not uncommonly results in cardiac tamponade. Single chamber tamponade also might be expected, since in this setting the pericardium frequently contains firm blood clots localized to the area of active bleeding. However, this complication has received very little attention in the surgical literature. We are therefore providing documentation that isolated right atrial tamponade can occur as a complication of cardiac operation and that there exists a potential for misdiagnosis and hence incorrect treatment of this condition. Right atrial tamponade may be recognized by a combination of low cardiac output, low blood pressure, prominent neck veins, right atrial pressure in excess of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and right ventricular end-diastolic pressure, and a poor response to plasma volume expansion. Findings on chest roentgenogram and gated wall motion scintigraphy may be highly suggestive. This review should serve to increase awareness of this complication and to provide some helpful diagnostic clues.

  7. Pericardial ectopic thymoma presenting with cardiac tamponade: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Arai, Hiromasa; Rino, Yasushi; Fushimi, Ken-Ichi; Goda, Masami; Yoshioka, Emi; Okudela, Koji; Yukawa, Norio; Masuda, Munetaka

    2015-09-01

    Ectopic thymoma arising from organs other than the thymus, such as the neck, trachea, thyroid, lung and pericardium, is rare. To date, there have been only seven other cases of pericardial thymoma reported in the English literature. We herein report a case of pericardial ectopic thymoma that presented with cardiac tamponade. A 72-year-old Japanese male noticed body weight gain and leg edema. Chest computed tomography (CT) revealed pericardial effusion and an irregularly shaped mass in the pericardial space compressing the right atrium. He was considered to have cardiac tamponade due to a paracardiac tumor that developed following acute cardiac failure. The intraoperative frozen diagnosis was thymoma. Pericardectomy of the thickened pericardium, tumorectomy and thymectomy via a median sternotomy were performed. The final pathological diagnosis was pericardial ectopic thymoma associated with constrictive pericarditis. The differential diagnosis and complete resection of mediastinal tumors such as this rare case of thymoma are important to obtain a better prognosis, as patients with such tumors often present in a state of shock. PMID:25069422

  8. Cardiac tamponade as the initial presentation of malignancy: is it as rare as previously supposed?

    PubMed Central

    Muir, K. W.; Rodger, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced malignant disease frequently involves the heart and pericardium, and pericardial effusion is a common postmortem finding in such patients. Identification of pericardial effusions in life is uncommon, however, even when symptomatic. Cardiac tamponade occurring as the first presentation of malignancy appears to be uncommon. We present five cases of cardiac tamponade due to undiagnosed malignancy which presented to a general medical unit over 18 months. The availability of echocardiography was an important factor in correct diagnosis, since clinical features were non-specific. Bronchial adenocarcinoma was the cause in three of the five cases. Review of the literature confirms adenocarcinomas of the bronchus as the most common cause of this complication. The majority of cases have presented with large volume, haemorrhagic effusions, and cytology (with or without carcinoembryonic antigen measurement) was diagnostic in most patients. Immediate treatment with subxiphoid pericardiotomy is recommended; the role of balloon catheter pericardiotomy remains to be established. Combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy appears to extend survival, which in some cases may be prolonged. We recommend that early echocardiography should be obtained in all patients presenting with apparent cardiac failure, since early treatment of malignant effusions provides symptomatic relief. Images Figure 1 PMID:7831164

  9. Adult-Onset Still's Disease and Cardiac Tamponade: A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Doroteia; de Jesus Silva, Maria; André, Rui; Varela, Manuel Gato; Diogo, António Nunes

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare disorder with potentially severe clinical features, including cardiac involvement. This systemic inflammatory disease of unknown origin should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pericarditis, with or without pericardial effusion. Cardiac tamponade is a very rare sequela that requires an invasive approach, such as percutaneous or surgical pericardial drainage, in addition to the usual conservative therapy. The authors describe a case of adult-onset Still's disease rendered more difficult by pericarditis and cardiac tamponade, and they briefly review the literature on this entity. PMID:26175648

  10. Life-Threatening Cardiac Tamponade Secondary to Chylopericardium Following Orthotopic Heart Transplantation-A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Wierzbicki, Karol; Mazur, Piotr; Węgrzyn, Piotr; Kapelak, Bogusław

    2016-08-23

    Chylopericardium is a rare complication in cardiac surgery, and an extremely rare occurrence in patients following orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT), which, however, can lead to cardiac tamponade. Here we present a case of a 59-year-old man who underwent OHT and suffered from chylopericardium resulting in cardiac tamponade late in the postoperative course, despite the initially uneventful early postoperative period (decreasing blood drainage was observed directly after the procedure, and the drains were safely removed). After the diagnosis of chylopericardium was made, the conservative treatment was initiated, which turned out to be insufficient, and eventually invasive approach for the recurrence of tamponade secondary to chylopericardium was required. We discuss the available therapeutic options for chylopericardium and demonstrate the successful invasive therapeutic approach with use of the absorbable fibrin sealant patch. PMID:26548537

  11. Pseudoidiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis in a patient with cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed

    Pandi, A S; Kronik, G

    1987-04-01

    A 53-year-old woman with a large pericardial effusion and tamponade presented with signs of IHSS including a grade 4/6 apical systolic murmur, severe SAM, early systolic aortic valve closure and a small hypercontractile left ventricle but at most borderline left ventricular hypertrophy. Following pericardiocentesis, the clinical and echocardiographic signs of subvalvular obstruction resolved completely. One year later the patient died of bronchial carcinoma and no evidence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was found at autopsy. Pericardial tamponade should be added to the list of possible causes of dynamic subvalvular obstruction in a structurally normal heart. PMID:3829760

  12. Systemic mastocytosis presenting as cardiac tamponade with CD25(+) pericardial mast cells.

    PubMed

    Sukrithan, Vineeth K; Salamon, Jason N; Berulava, Giorgi; Sibinga, Nicholas E; Verma, Amit

    2016-03-01

    In this first-in-literature case, we describe a patient with Systemic mastocytosis presenting with life-threatening cardiac tamponade associated with the presence of aberrant mast cells in the pericardium. Procedures involving surgical incisions through the pericardium in such cases can lead to uncontrolled mast cell degranulation leading to circulatory collapse. PMID:27014452

  13. Cardiac tamponade: a review of diagnosis and anaesthetic and surgical management illustrated by three case reports.

    PubMed Central

    White, J. B.; Macklin, S.; Studley, J. G.; Marshall, R. D.

    1988-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade is an uncommon problem in a district general hospital. Three patients were admitted to the intensive therapy unit at Northampton General Hospital with tamponade in a 7-week period, each with a different underlying aetiology. Their case histories are presented and the management in the light of these described. The aetiology, physiology, clinical signs and investigations leading to the diagnosis are considered. In the discussion the opportunity is taken to review the recent literature on the subject. Images fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:3061355

  14. [Cardiac tamponade associated with umbilical venous catheter (UVC) placed in inappropriate position].

    PubMed

    Gálvez-Cancino, Franco; de la Luz Sánchez-Tirado, María

    2015-01-01

    Umbilical venous catheter (UVC) is widely used in neonatal intensive care units. Pericardial effusion is an uncommon but life-threatening complication; and tamponade have been reported in 3% of neonates having such catheters. We present a case of cardiac tamponade as a complication of venous catheter in a neonate. The patient was diagnosed at the appropriate time by echocardiography and the pericardiocentesis was performed, and after removal of the complete pericardial effusion,an improvement of the critical condition was achieved. It is important to document the optimal positioning of UVC before the start of infusions. PMID:26089276

  15. SLE or hypothyroidism: who can triumph in cardiac tamponade?

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Sameer Sadashiv; Wankhedkar, Kashmira Pramod; Mushiyev, Savi

    2015-01-01

    A 36-year-old Hispanic woman with a history of systemic lupus erythaematosus (SLE) in remission presented with progressive dyspnoea, bilateral leg swelling and increasing fatigue with rapid weight gain over the past few months. Her physical examination showed mildly tender thyromegaly and pericardial rub. Investigations showed new onset marked hypothyroidism as well as an active lupus serology with echocardiogram confirming severe pericardial effusion and a tamponade phenomenon. Urgent pericardiocentesis relieved her acute symptoms, and prompt treatment with thyroxine replacement and immunosuppression for lupus disease was initiated. Pericardial fluid analysis remained negative for any malignancy and/or infection/s. The patient had a gradual and consistent improvement with this treatment. She was discharged and appeared to be clinically stable at subsequent follow-up visits. However, the case remained a diagnostic dilemma over whether the tamponade was being driven by hypothyroidism versus lupus, leaving us with an opportunity to explore further. PMID:25750217

  16. Recurrent Hemorrhagic Pericardial Effusion and Tamponade due to Filariasis Successfully Treated with Ivermectin and Albendazole.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Goel, Amit; Sachan, Mohit; Saraf, Sameer; Verma, Chandra Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Filariasis presenting with pericardial effusion with tamponade is rare. We report a case of a 30-year-old female who was admitted with severe dyspnea and chest pain since 2 days. Echocardiogram showed massive pericardial effusion with tamponade. Pericardial fluid aspiration drained 1.2 L of hemorrhagic fluid. Cytology examination revealed microfilaria of Wuchereria bancrofti. She was treated with diethyl carbamazine and discharged. Six weeks later, she presented again with massive pericardial effusion with cardiac tamponade. Pericardiocentesis was done. Cytology examination revealed microfilaria of W. bancrofti. This time she was treated with ivermectin and albendazole and cured. Hemorrhagic effusion resolved completely. Though relatively uncommon, tropical diseases must always be considered in the etiological diagnosis of recurrent pericardial effusion. PMID:26240733

  17. Cardiac tamponade: new technology masking an old nemesis.

    PubMed

    Yates, Andrew R; Duffy, Victoria L; Clark, Tamara D; Hayes, Don; Tobias, Joseph D; McConnell, Patrick I; Preston, Thomas J

    2014-03-01

    A 16-year-old male patient underwent bilateral pulmonary embolectomy complicated by reperfusion injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome requiring venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support using a bicaval double-lumen catheter. A unique hemodynamic profile developed consistent with tamponade but without an associated decrease in venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation pump flow, improved venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuit preload, and decreased recirculation. The use of newer bicaval double-lumen catheters can result in old problems presenting in new ways and require clinicians to be ever vigilant. PMID:24580918

  18. An unusual case of non-small-cell lung cancer presenting as spontaneous cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Sarah; Al-Khalisy, Hassan; Randhawa, Umair; Lazar, John; Peroutka, Kathryn

    2016-04-01

    Hemorrhagic pericardial effusion with associated cardiac tamponade as a de novo sign of malignancy is seen in about 2% of patients.1 Consequently, cardiac tamponade is an oncologic emergency and considered a unique presentation of a malignancy.2 Cancer emergency is defined as an acute condition that is caused directly by the cancer itself or its treatment and requires intervention to avoid death or significant morbidity.3 The mechanism by which cardiac tamponade is classified as a life-threatening emergency stems from its impairment of right ventricular filling, resulting in ventricular diastolic collapse and decreased cardiac output, which can ultimately lead to death.4 We describe the case of a previously healthy woman in her late 40s who was a nonsmoker with no previous risk factors and who presented with a large pericardial effusion and bilateral pulmonary emboli. She was diagnosed with metastatic epidermal growth factor receptor-positive (EGFR-positive) adenocarcinoma of the lung. This case highlights an oncologic emergency as a de novo presentation of malignancy. PMID:27152516

  19. A Rare Case of Cardiac Tamponade Induced by Chronic Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yousuf, Tariq; Kramer, Jason; Kopiec, Adam; Bulwa, Zachary; Sanyal, Shuvani; Ziffra, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease primarily involving the joint synovium. RA is a systemic disease which has many known extra-articular manifestations. We present a unique case of a patient with long standing RA who presented with a primary complaint of chest and back pain. Echocardiography revealed borderline normal left ventricular function and a large pericardial effusion with the finding of elevated intrapericardial pressure suspicious for cardiac tamponade. Infectious workup was all found to be negative. The presence and elevation of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody, rheumatoid factor and C-reactive protein (CRP) confirmed the patient was having an active flare-up of RA. It was determined that this flare-up was the cause of the cardiac tamponade. A pericardiocentesis was performed and 850 mL of bloody fluid was drained. The patient remained stable following the pericardiocentesis. At his follow-up visit, repeat echocardiogram showed no signs for pericardial effusion. Although there has been extensive study of RA, there are only a few documented cases noting the occurrence of cardiac tamponade in these patients. Therefore, it is important for the clinician to be aware of and recognize this potentially serious cardiac outcome associated with a common rheumatologic condition. PMID:26251689

  20. Microvascular Permeability Changes Might Explain Cardiac Tamponade after Alcohol Septal Ablation for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jen-Te; Hsiao, Ju-Feng; Chang, Jung-Jung; Chung, Chang-Min; Chang, Shih-Tai; Pan, Kuo-Li

    2014-01-01

    Various sequelae of alcohol septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy have been reported. Of note, some cases of cardiac tamponade after alcohol septal ablation cannot be well explained. We describe the case of a 78-year-old woman with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in whom cardiac tamponade developed one hour after alcohol septal ablation, probably unrelated to mechanical trauma. At that time, we noted a substantial difference in the red blood cell-to-white blood cell ratio between the pericardial effusion (1,957.4) and the peripheral blood (728.3). In addition to presenting the patient's case, we speculate that a possible mechanism for acute tamponade—alcohol-induced changes in microvascular permeability—is a reasonable explanation for cases of alcohol septal ablation that are complicated by otherwise-unexplainable massive pericardial effusions. PMID:24808788

  1. [Pericardial Fenestration in a Patient with Myocardial Metastasis and Cardiac Tamponade after Surgery for Esophageal Cancer;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kensuke; Suto, Yukio; Akashi, Okihiko; Sakata, Yoshihito; Hayama, Yasufumi; Kon, Junichi; Chino, Osamu

    2016-09-01

    We report a case of pericardial fenestration in a patient with myocardial metastasis and cardiac tamponade after surgery for esophageal cancer. A 66-year-old man had been suffering from orthopnea, hypotension and general malaise due to cardiac tamponade and heart failure. Esophagectomy was performed with substernal gastric tube reconstruction for advanced esophageal carcinoma. Nine months after the operation, heart failure developed, and myocardial and pericardial metastasis was subsequently detected. Subxiphoidal pericardiocentesis was abandoned due to the substernal gastric tube, and pericardial fenestration was performed through a small left anterior thoracotomy at the 5th intercostal space. His symptoms were ameliorated immediately and the procedure contributed greatly to maintain his quality of life. Preoperative computed tomography was useful for revealing the anatomical positions of the gastric tube and important vessels. PMID:27586320

  2. Sanguineous Pericardial Effusion and Cardiac Tamponade in the Setting of Graves' Disease: Report of a Case and Review of Previously Reported Cases.

    PubMed

    Bui, Peter V; Zaveri, Sonia N; Pierce, J Rush

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Pericardial effusion in the setting of hyperthyroidism is rare. We present a patient with Graves' disease who developed a sanguineous pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade. Case Description. A 76-year-old man presenting with fatigue was diagnosed with Graves' disease and treated with methimazole. Two months later, he was hospitalized for uncontrolled atrial fibrillation. Electrocardiography showed diffuse low voltage and atrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular rate. Chest radiograph revealed an enlarged cardiac silhouette and left-sided pleural effusion. Thyroid stimulating hormone was undetectable, and free thyroxine was elevated. Diltiazem and heparin were started, and methimazole was increased. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a large pericardial effusion with cardiac tamponade physiology. Pericardiocentesis obtained 1,050 mL of sanguineous fluid. The patient progressed to thyroid storm, treated with propylthiouracil, potassium iodine, hydrocortisone, and cholestyramine. Cultures and cytology of the pericardial fluid were negative. Thyroid hormone markers progressively normalized, and he improved clinically and was discharged. Discussion. We found 10 previously reported cases of pericardial effusions in the setting of hyperthyroidism. Heparin use may have contributed to the sanguineous nature of our patient's pericardial effusion, but other reported cases occurred without anticoagulation. Sanguineous and nonsanguineous pericardial effusions and cardiac tamponade may be due to hyperthyroidism. PMID:27446216

  3. Sanguineous Pericardial Effusion and Cardiac Tamponade in the Setting of Graves' Disease: Report of a Case and Review of Previously Reported Cases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Pericardial effusion in the setting of hyperthyroidism is rare. We present a patient with Graves' disease who developed a sanguineous pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade. Case Description. A 76-year-old man presenting with fatigue was diagnosed with Graves' disease and treated with methimazole. Two months later, he was hospitalized for uncontrolled atrial fibrillation. Electrocardiography showed diffuse low voltage and atrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular rate. Chest radiograph revealed an enlarged cardiac silhouette and left-sided pleural effusion. Thyroid stimulating hormone was undetectable, and free thyroxine was elevated. Diltiazem and heparin were started, and methimazole was increased. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a large pericardial effusion with cardiac tamponade physiology. Pericardiocentesis obtained 1,050 mL of sanguineous fluid. The patient progressed to thyroid storm, treated with propylthiouracil, potassium iodine, hydrocortisone, and cholestyramine. Cultures and cytology of the pericardial fluid were negative. Thyroid hormone markers progressively normalized, and he improved clinically and was discharged. Discussion. We found 10 previously reported cases of pericardial effusions in the setting of hyperthyroidism. Heparin use may have contributed to the sanguineous nature of our patient's pericardial effusion, but other reported cases occurred without anticoagulation. Sanguineous and nonsanguineous pericardial effusions and cardiac tamponade may be due to hyperthyroidism. PMID:27446216

  4. Cardiac tamponade in juvenile chronic arthritis: report of two cases and review of publications.

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, J; Pessoa, A P; Roizenblatt, S; Pávoa, R M; Hilário, M O; Atra, E; Ferraz, M B

    1990-01-01

    Two cases of systemic juvenile chronic arthritis, complicated by cardiac tamponade and eight previously reported cases are described. The clinical features and radiological, electrocardiographic, and echocardiographic findings were similar for all cases. One patient in this series was treated with corticosteroids and underwent pericardiectomy, dying of sepsis 30 days after surgery. The other patient was also treated with corticosteroids, underwent pericardiocentesis and developed fatal ventricular tachycardia. Of the 10 cases, only six were successfully treated. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential for a favourable outcome. Images PMID:2088321

  5. Bacterial Pericarditis Accompanied by Sudden Cardiac Tamponade After Transbronchial Needle Aspiration Cytology.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takeshi; Otsuka, Kojiro; Imai, Yukihiro; Tomii, Keisuke

    2016-04-01

    A 48-year-old man was referred for an abnormal shadow in his chest x-ray. Transbronchial needle aspiration cytology was performed at the mediastinal necrotic lymph node #7, and he was diagnosed as having small cell carcinoma. Fifteen days after bronchoscopy, sudden cardiac tamponade occurred and pericardial drainage suggested a diagnosis of bacterial pericarditis. He was successfully treated by drainage and administration of antibiotics. Complication of bacterial pericarditis associated with bronchoscopy is rare. However, physicians should watch for the appearance of this condition for up to 3 weeks after bronchoscopy, especially in cases with necrotic lymph nodes. PMID:27058720

  6. Recurrent Cardiac Tamponade: An Unusual Presentation of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Corral, Juan E.; Arosemena, Leopoldo; Garcia-Buitrago, Monica T.; Madrazo, Beatrice; Martin, Paul

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old Egyptian woman presented with 8 months of sharp right upper chest pain and weight loss. She was discovered to have an enlarged cardiac silhouette on chest x-ray, and an echocardiogram revealed a large pericardial effusion with diastolic right atrial collapse. Pericardial window was done, and epithelial membrane antigen-positive neoplastic cells were identified in the pericardial fluid. Computed tomography showed a 6-cm hypermetabolic lesion on the liver segment IV, confirmed on biopsy to be a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma consistent with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:27144206

  7. Recurrent Cardiac Tamponade: An Unusual Presentation of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Liege I; Corral, Juan E; Arosemena, Leopoldo; Garcia-Buitrago, Monica T; Madrazo, Beatrice; Martin, Paul

    2016-04-01

    A 48-year-old Egyptian woman presented with 8 months of sharp right upper chest pain and weight loss. She was discovered to have an enlarged cardiac silhouette on chest x-ray, and an echocardiogram revealed a large pericardial effusion with diastolic right atrial collapse. Pericardial window was done, and epithelial membrane antigen-positive neoplastic cells were identified in the pericardial fluid. Computed tomography showed a 6-cm hypermetabolic lesion on the liver segment IV, confirmed on biopsy to be a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma consistent with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:27144206

  8. Successful treatment of a ruptured spontaneous dissecting coronary artery pseudoaneurysm with a covered stent in a patient with cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Yuji; Satoh, Osami; Arakawa, Shuji; Hayano, Motonobu; Suyama, Hiroyuki; Maemura, Koji

    2014-01-01

    The rupture of spontaneous dissecting coronary artery pseudoaneurysms is rare, and no standard therapy has yet been established for this condition. This report describes a case of a ruptured spontaneous dissecting coronary artery pseudoaneurysm in a patient with cardiac tamponade that was successfully treated with emergent implantation of a covered stent. PMID:24827486

  9. Cardiac tamponade

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart Other possible causes include: Heart tumors Hypothyroidism Kidney failure Leukemia Placement of central lines Radiation ... failure Aortic dissection Heart attack Heart failure - overview Hypothyroidism Pericarditis Pulmonary edema Radiation therapy Systemic lupus erythematosus ...

  10. An unusual presentation of cardiac tamponade associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ho, Kai Man Alexander; Mitchell, Sheena C

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of an 80-year-old woman who presented with a dry cough, shortness of breath and general malaise. She had presented 5 days previously with a sore throat, feeling feverish and with non-specific symptoms. Her background included paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and hypertension. She was initially thought to have decompensated heart failure secondary to atrial fibrillation and was initiated on diuretic therapy. However, a transthoracic echocardiogram performed revealed collapse of the right ventricle and a swinging heart, suggestive of cardiac tamponade. The patient underwent therapeutic pericardiocentesis where 700 mL of exudative, blood-stained fluid was drained. Subsequent testing of the pericardial fluid revealed the presence of Epstein-Barr virus DNA. Serial follow-up transthoracic echocardiograms revealed resolution of the pericardial effusion and the patient remained asymptomatic. PMID:25972381

  11. Cardiac tamponade and septic shock caused by viral infection in a previously healthy woman.

    PubMed

    Laurila, J J; Ala-Kokko, T I; Tuokko, H; Syrjälä, H

    2005-10-01

    A previously healthy woman was admitted to hospital after 'flu-like' symptoms for 5 days followed by acute intense abdominal and lower back pain. On admission she was found to be in severe shock and was transferred to the ICU. Echocardiography revealed cardiac tamponade, and pericardiocentesis was performed immediately. Thereafter her cardiovascular state improved, but she developed hypotension with low systemic vascular resistance and required vasoactive treatment for 4 days. Nine days after admission the patient was transferred to the ward, after which she recovered rapidly and completely. The cause of her illness was extensively screened. No underlying disease was found, and all bacterial cultures remained negative. Acute virus infection was confirmed by diagnostic elevations of antibody titers to Influenza A and adenovirus. Adenovirus was also isolated from her bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. PMID:16146481

  12. Delayed recurrent pericarditis complicated by pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade in a blunt trauma patient

    PubMed Central

    Khidir, Hazar H.; Bloom, Jordan P.; Hawkins, Alexander T.

    2015-01-01

    A 19-year-old male suffered orthopedic fractures, blunt solid organ injury and pneumopericardium after a fall from 40 feet. With the exception of an external fixation device, he was managed non-operatively and discharged to a rehabilitation unit after 8 days. He was readmitted 4 days later with chest pain and clinical evidence of pericardititis that resolved with the initiation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine. He returned to the rehabilitation hospital, but was readmitted once again for chest pain and hypotension. Echocardiogram revealed cardiac tamponade that required emergent drainage. He tolerated the procedure well and was discharged home from the hospital to continue treatment for his pericarditis. He is doing well at 3 months of follow-up. PMID:25709254

  13. Over-diuresis or cardiac tamponade? An unusual case of acute kidney injury and early closure

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurkeerat; Sabath, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    An 84-year-old man with hypertension and a history of deep venous thrombosis (on warfarin) was admitted with shortness of breath presumed to be due to congestive heart failure. Echocardiogram performed the following day showed a low-normal ejection fraction with signs of elevated right-sided pressures but was otherwise normal. He improved with diuretic therapy but after a few days was found to be hypotensive with a concomitant rise in creatinine with decreased urine output. This was felt to be secondary to over-diuresis but he did not respond to small boluses of intravenous fluids as his kidney function continued to worsen and hypotension persisted. He was transferred to the intermediate care unit where a rapid, bedside ultrasound revealed a new, moderate-sized pericardial effusion with tamponade physiology. Pericardiocentesis, with removal of 750 cc of frank blood, led to dramatic improvement in blood pressure, kidney function, and urine output. Here, we demonstrate the utility of point-of-care ultrasound in a community hospital setting where urgent echocardiogram is not routinely available. We also report acute kidney injury due to pericardial tamponade reversed with therapeutic pericardiocentesis. PMID:27124173

  14. Hemodynamic and regional blood flow distribution responses to dextran, hydralazine, isoproterenol and amrinone during experimental cardiac tamponade

    SciTech Connect

    Millard, R.W.; Fowler, N.O.; Gabel, M.

    1983-06-01

    Four different interventions were examined in dogs with cardiac tamponade. Infusion of 216 to 288 ml saline solution into the pericardium reduced cardiac output from 3.5 +/- 0.3 to 1.7 +/- 0.2 liters/min as systemic vascular resistance increased from 4,110 +/- 281 to 6,370 +/- 424 dynes . s . cm-5. Left ventricular epicardial and endocardial blood flows were 178 +/- 13 and 220 +/- 12 ml/min per 100 g, respectively, and decreased to 72 +/- 14 and 78 +/- 11 ml/min per 100 g with tamponade. Reductions of 25 to 65% occurred in visceral and brain blood flows and in a composite brain sample. Cardiac output during tamponade was significantly increased by isoproterenol, 0.5 microgram/kg per min intravenously; hydralazine, 40 mg intravenously; dextran infusion or combined hydralazine and dextran, but not by amrinone. Total systemic vascular resistance was reduced by all interventions. Left ventricular epicardial flow was increased by isoproterenol, hydralazine and the hydralazine-dextran combination. Endocardial flow was increased by amrinone and the combination of hydralazine and dextran. Right ventricular myocardial blood flow increased with all interventions except dextran. Kidney cortical and composite brain blood flows were increased by both dextran alone and by the hydralazine-dextran combinations. Blood flow to small intestine was increased by all interventions as was that to large intestine by all except amrinone and hydralazine. Liver blood flow response was variable. The most pronounced hemodynamic and tissue perfusion improvements during cardiac tamponade were effected by combined vasodilation-blood volume expansion with a hydralazine-dextran combination. Isoproterenol had as dramatic an effect but it was short-lived. Amrinone was the least effective intervention.

  15. Prolonged Drainage and Intrapericardial Bleomycin Administration for Cardiac Tamponade Secondary to Cancer-Related Pericardial Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Numico, Gianmauro; Cristofano, Antonella; Occelli, Marcella; Sicuro, Marco; Mozzicafreddo, Alessandro; Fea, Elena; Colantonio, Ida; Merlano, Marco; Piovano, Pierluigi; Silvestris, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Malignant pericardial effusion (MPE) is a serious complication of several cancers. The most commonly involved solid tumors are lung and breast cancer. MPE can give rise to the clinical picture of cardiac tamponade, a life threatening condition that needs immediate drainage. While simple pericardiocentesis allows resolution of the symptoms, MPE frequently relapses unless further procedures are performed. Prolonged drainage, talcage with antineoplastic agents, or surgical creation of a pleuro-pericardial window are the most commonly suggested ones. They all result in MPE resolution and high rates of long-term control. Patients suitable for further systemic treatments can have a good prognosis irrespective of the pericardial site of disease. We prospectively enrolled patients with cardiac tamponade treated with prolonged drainage associated with Bleomycin administration. Twenty-two consecutive patients with MPE and associated signs of hemodynamical compromise underwent prolonged drainage and subsequent Bleomycin administration. After injection of 100 mg lidocaine hydrochloride, 10 mg Bleomycin was injected into the pericardial space. The catheter was clumped for 48 h and then reopened. Removal was performed when the drainage volume was <25 mL daily. Twelve patients (54%) achieved complete response and 9 (41%) a partial response. Only 1 (5%) had a treatment failure and underwent a successful surgical procedure. Acute toxicity was of a low degree and occurred in 7 patients (32%). It consisted mainly in thoracic pain and supraventricular arrhythmia. The 1-year pericardial effusion progression-free survival rate was 74.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 51.0–97.3). At a median follow-up of 75 months, a pericardial progression was detected in 4 patients (18%). One- and two-year overall survival rates were 33.9% (95% CI: 13.6–54.2) and 14.5% (95% CI: 0.0–29.5), respectively, with lung cancer patients having a shorter survival than breast cancer patients

  16. An autopsy case of cardiac tamponade caused by a ruptured ventricular aneurysm associated with acute myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Takeshi; Nagasaki, Yasushi; Takahashi, Motonori; Nakagawa, Kanako; Kuse, Azumi; Morichika, Mai; Sakurada, Makoto; Asano, Migiwa; Ueno, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    We report an autopsy case of hemopericardium caused by rupture of a ventricular aneurysm associated with acute myocarditis in an infant boy aged 2 years and 10 months. Three days before his death, the patient developed fever. On the day of death, he described an urge to defecate and attempted to do so in an upright position. While straining to defecate without success for a prolonged period, he stopped breathing and collapsed. On autopsy, his heart weighed 91.7 g and cardiac tamponade was evident, the pericardial cavity being filled with 140 mL of blood that had come from a 1.5-cm-long rupture in a 2.7×1.5 cm ventricular aneurysm in the posterior left ventricular wall. Patchy grayish-white discoloration was noted in the myocardium. Histologically, CD3-positive T lymphocytic infiltration accompanied by pronounced macrophage infiltration was observed in the myocardium. Hemorrhagic necrosis was detected in the area of the ventricular aneurysm. Staining for matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression revealed abundant MMP-2, MMP-7, and MMP-9. Polymerase chain reaction to detect viruses failed to identify any specific causative viruses in the myocardium. In this case of lymphocytic (viral) and histiocytic myocarditis with pronounced macrophage infiltration and upregulation of MMP expression, myocardial remodeling and associated wall weakening had resulted in formation and rupture of an aneurysm. PMID:26832375

  17. Cardiac tamponade via a fistula to the pericardium from a hydatid cyst: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Demircan, Ahmet; Keles, Ayfer; Kahveci, F Ozan; Tulmac, Murat; Ozsarac, Murat

    2010-06-01

    Although echinococcus is endemic in many sheep-raising areas of the world, cardiac involvement is rare. Cysts usually reach the heart by means of the coronary circulation, but other routes have been proposed. Pericardial tamponade due to a hydatid cyst has not yet been described in the literature. We present the case of a 46-year-old woman who presented to the Emergency Department with complaints of chest pain and mild dyspnea. Her medical history was positive for a liver hydatid cyst operation 26 years earlier. She was tachypneic, tachycardic, and hypotensive. Pleural and pericardial effusions were detected on transthoracic echocardiography. When she worsened clinically, pericardiocentesis was performed and she promptly improved. A fistula was detected between the liver and pericardium on computed tomography (CT) scan of the torso. Serologic test (agglutination) for Echinococcus granulosus was positive in a 1/32 dilution. A final diagnosis of mediastinal hydatic cyst was made, and a 4-week course of albendazol was given. Then the cyst was surgically excised, and the patient recovered without complications. PMID:18065186

  18. Air tamponade of the heart

    PubMed Central

    Orłowski, Tadeusz; Iwanowicz, Katarzyna; Snarska, Jadwiga

    2016-01-01

    Pneumopericardium is a rare disease defined as the presence of air or gas in the pericardial sac. Among the etiological factors, the following stand out: chest trauma, barotrauma, air-containing fistulas between the pericardium and the surrounding structures, secondary gas production by microorganisms growing in the pericardial sac, and iatrogenic factors. Until now, spontaneous pneumopericardium has been considered a harmless and temporary state, but a review of clinical cases indicates that the presence of air in the pericardium can lead to cardiac tamponade and life-threatening hemodynamic disturbances. We present the case of an 80-year-old patient with a chronic bronchopericardial fistula, who suffered from a cardiac arrest due to air tamponade of the heart. PMID:27516791

  19. Periprocedural anticoagulation of patients undergoing pericardiocentesis for cardiac tamponade complicating catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Bai, Rong; Chen, Ying-wei; Yu, Rong-hui; Tang, Ri-bo; Sang, Cai-hua; Li, Song-nan; Ma, Chang-sheng; Dong, Jian-zeng

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulation of patients with cardiac tamponade (CT) complicating catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) is an ongoing problem. The aim of this study was to survey the clinical practice of periprocedural anticoagulation in such patients. This study analyzed the periprocedural anticoagulation of 17 patients with CT complicating AF ablation. Emergent pericardiocentesis was performed once CT was confirmed. The mean drained volume was 410.0 ± 194.1 mL. Protamine sulfate was administered to neutralize heparin (1 mg neutralizes 100 units heparin) in 11 patients with persistent pericardial bleeding and vitamin K1 (10 mg) was given to reverse warfarin in 3 patients with supratherapeutic INR (INR > 2.1). Drainage catheters were removed 12 hours after echocardiography confirmed absence of intrapericardial bleeding and anticoagulation therapy was restored 12 hours after removing the catheter. Fifteen patients took oral warfarin and 10 of them were given subcutaneous injection of LMWH (1 mg/kg, twice daily) as a bridge to resumption of systemic anticoagulation with warfarin. Two patients with a small amount of persistent pericardial effusion were given LMWH on days 5 and 13, and warfarin on days 6 and 24. The dosage of warfarin was adjusted to keep the INR within 2-3 in all patients. After 12 months of follow-up, all patients had no neurological events and no occurrence of delayed CT. The results showed that it was effective and safe to resume anticoagulation therapy 12 hours after removal of the drainage catheter. This may help to prevent thromboembolic events following catheter ablation of AF. PMID:25503659

  20. Iatrogenic acute cardiac tamponade during percutaneous removal of a fractured peripherally inserted central catheter in a premature neonate.

    PubMed

    Minghui, Zou; Hujun, Cui; Li, Ma; Weidan, Chen; Yanqin, Cui; Xinxin, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Acute cardiac tamponade (ACT) is a life-threatening complication associated with a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) in premature neonates. We present a case of ACT in a 4-day-old male infant. On the second admission day, a PICC was inserted. After 2.5 months, chest radiography showed PICC fracture, and its distal portion had migrated into the right pulmonary artery. Percutaneous removal through cardiac catheterization was attempted. However, right ventriculography demonstrated intrapericardial spillage of contrast agents, and iatrogenic ACT was confirmed. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was immediately started with open-chest cardiac massage. Further surgical exploration revealed right atrial appendage perforation. After 25-min CPR, the patient restored spontaneous circulation, and removal of the foreign bodies was performed. The post-operative course was uneventful. PICC fracture is an uncommon complication, but may be life-threatening. Precaution should be taken to avoid ACT during removal of a broken PICC. Once the tamponade is diagnosed, immediate interventions are mandatory. PMID:26105562

  1. Clinically suspected acute myopericarditis with cardiac tamponade associated with peripheral blood eosinophilia presenting in early pregnancy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The clinical presentation of eosinophilic myocarditis may vary from asymptomatic to the manifestation of severe symptoms, including cardiac tamponade and arrhythmias. In pregnant patients with this condition, drugs must be used cautiously up to approximately the 4th month of pregnancy because drug use should be limited during the period of fetal organogenesis. Case presentation A 30-year-old Asian woman at 14 weeks of pregnancy with progressive malaise was hospitalized. The electrocardiogram revealed ST elevation and low QRS voltage. Echocardiography revealed massive pericardial effusion and myocardial swelling. A laboratory examination revealed an increase in her white blood cell count, with a predominance of neutrophils. Pericardial drainage was performed for relief of the cardiac tamponade. The pericardial effusion revealed an abundance of eosinophils. Subsequently, the peripheral blood eosinophil count began to rise, and the patient was clinically diagnosed with eosinophilic myopericarditis. The patient’s condition improved rapidly following the initiation of prednisolone treatment, and she finally delivered a full-term normal infant. Conclusions A patient with clinically suspected myopericarditis in the early stage of pregnancy who improved rapidly with pericardial drainage and prednisolone therapy, and successfully delivered a normal full-term infant; the diagnosis was made in the early stage of the disease, based on the detection of an abundance of eosinophils in the pericardial effusion preceding the subsequent development of peripheral blood eosinophilia. PMID:23668918

  2. Cardiac Tamponade Associated with the Presentation of Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma in a 2-Year-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Mira-Perceval Juan, Gema; Alcalá Minagorre, Pedro J.; Huertas Sánchez, Ana M.; Segura Sánchez, Sheila; López Iniesta, Silvia; De León Marrero, Francisco J.; Costa Navarro, Estela; Niveiro de Jaime, María

    2015-01-01

    The anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a rare entity in pediatric patients. We present an unusual case of pericardial involvement, quite uncommon as extranodal presentation of this type of disorder, that provoked a life-risk situation requiring an urgent pericardiocentesis. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a child with pericardial involvement without an associated cardiac mass secondary to anaplastic large cell lymphoma in pediatric age. We report the case of a 21-month-old Caucasian male infant with cardiac tamponade associated with the presentation of anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Initially, the child presented with 24-day prolonged fever syndrome, cutaneous lesions associated with hepatomegaly, inguinal adenopathies, and pneumonia. After a 21-day asymptomatic period, polypnea and tachycardia were detected in a clinical check-up. Chest X-ray revealed a remarkable increase of the cardiothoracic index. The anaplastic large cell lymphoma has a high incidence of extranodal involvement but myocardial or pericardial involvements are rare. For this reason, we recommend a close monitoring of patients with a differential diagnosis of anaplastic large cell lymphoma. PMID:26435869

  3. Complete tamponade system for management of severe postpartum vaginal haemorrhage due to uterine atony.

    PubMed

    Atilgan, Remzi; Ozkan, Zehra Sema; Orak, Ugur; Baspinar, Melike

    2014-01-01

    A 30-year-old, 39 weeks pregnant, multiparous woman with single fetus, attended our obstetric clinic with complete cervical dilation in intractable mentum anterior presentation. The fetus was delivered by caesarean section with vertical uterine incision under general anaesthesia and lithotomy position. After surgery, examination of the vagina revealed multiple, serious tears with severe haemorrhage. Vaginal bleeding could not be controlled by sutures and concurrently uterine atony developed, which could not be controlled with medical treatment. Owing to intractable bleeding from uterus and vagina, a complete tamponade system was used. After the instillation of the uterine balloon with 500 mL and vaginal balloon with 300 mL liquid, the bleeding was controlled. The estimated blood loss was 3200 mL. The vaginal wound healed well during the postoperative 2 weeks. A complete tamponade system may be an effective treatment method for treatment of postpartum haemorrhage owing to vaginal lacerations and uterine atony. PMID:25452297

  4. Pericardial salmonella with cardiac tamponade and ventricular wall rupture: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Chand, Gaurav; Jhaj, Ruby; Sanam, Kumar; Sinha, Prabhat; Alexander, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) is mostly restricted to gastroenteritis; however, we report a case of Salmonella pericarditis complicated by tamponade and spontaneous ventricular wall rupture. Case presentation A 67-year-old male presents to the Emergency Department with complaints of fevers, chills and body aches. A chest radiograph displayed an infiltrate and an electrocardiogram suggested acute pericarditis. An echocardiogram revealed a small pericardial effusion without tamponade. Broad-spectrum antibiotics were initiated until Salmonella was discovered in blood cultures. The hospital course was complicated by sudden decompensation, and a repeat echocardiogram displayed a large effusion with constrictive physiology. During a pericardial window, the tissue was noted to have a thickened appearance with a complex effusion. The following day, the patient developed increased chest tube drainage, hypotension and acidosis, requiring an emergent sternotomy. The right ventricle was friable and had spontaneously ruptured. After ventricular repair and pericardiectomy, the tissue was sent for cultures and pathology. The specimen revealed Salmonella enteriditis. Treatment with ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin was initiated. On postoperative day four, the patient was successfully extubated. Repeat blood cultures were negative. Discussion In our review of literature, only 19 cases of NTS pericarditis have been reported. Prior to our case, salmonellosis resulting in ventricular rupture has been reported once. Early diagnosis and treatment is crucial in minimizing morbidity and mortality. Clinical suspicion based on electrocardiogram and hemodynamic assessment is critical in suspecting pericardial effusion in a patient with nonspecific symptoms and Salmonella bacteremia. The key to recovery involves aggressive treatment, including pericardiectomy and antibiotic treatment. PMID:27141304

  5. Repeated pericardiocentesis as palliative treatment for tamponade associated with cardiac lymphoma in a Holstein cow

    PubMed Central

    Buczinski, Sébastien; Boulay, Guillaume; DesCôteaux, Luc

    2011-01-01

    Maintaining a good quality of life for cows with cardiac manifestation of lymphoma may be valuable, especially in high-producing cows. This report describes the medical management of cardiac lymphoma in a cow by means of repeated pericardiocentesis. The cow survived for 34 days and was productive. PMID:22131585

  6. Undetected Aorto-RV Fistula With Aortic Valve Injury and Delayed Cardiac Tamponade following a Chest Stab Wound: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Esfahanizadeh, Jamil; Abbasi Tashnizi, Mohammad; Moeinipour, Ali Asghar; Sepehri Shamloo, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Although a few patients will survive after penetrating cardiac injuries, some of them may have unnoticeable intracardiac injuries. The combination of aorto-right ventricular fistula with aortic valve injury is rare. Case Presentation A 19 year-old man referred with an aorto-right ventricular fistula accompanied with aortic regurgitation and delayed tamponade following a stab in the chest. The patient was scheduled for fistula repair, aortic valve replacement and pericardectomy two months after trauma. Conclusions To prevent missing intracardiac injury and also late cardiac injury complications, in all pericordial stab wounds, serial clinical examinations and serial echocardiography should be performed. In addition, cardiac injuries should be repaired during the same hospital stay. PMID:24350161

  7. Lemierre's syndrome secondary to community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection presenting with cardiac tamponade, a rare disease with a life-threatening presentation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lemierre's syndrome is a rare condition characterized by thrombophlebitis of internal jugular vein, septicemia and septic metastatic infection of different organs. It is preceded by an oropharyngeal infection by anaerobic organisms. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is now emerging as a causative organism in Lemierre's syndrome. Clinical manifestations vary depending on the organ system affected by the infection. Although rare, patients may present with life-threatening conditions such as cardiac tamponade. Case presentation We report the first case, to our knowledge, of Lemierre's syndrome presenting with cardiac tamponade secondary to community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus in a previously well 45-year-old Sri Lankan lady. Fever, sore throat and left-sided neck pain complicated with facial and left upper limb swelling were followed by severe shortness of breath for 24 h. There was tachycardia with pulsus paradoxus, low blood pressure and soft heart sounds. Pericardial effusion with cardiac tamponade was detected on echocardiogram and methicillin-resistant S. aureus species were isolated in both blood and pericardial fluid cultures. Venous duplex of neck veins and computed tomography scan of the neck showed thrombosis of left-sided internal jugular, external jugular, subclavian and axillary veins. Diagnosis of Lemierre's syndrome was made, and patient had a satisfactory recovery following emergency pericardiocentesis and a prolonged course of antibiotics. Conclusions Although uncommon, Lemierre's syndrome is a life-threatening condition. Patients may present with cardiac tamponade secondary to purulent pericarditis in Lemierre's syndrome, where emergency pericardiocentesis is lifesaving. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus is emerging as a causative agent in Lemierre's syndrome, and awareness is required amongst physicians for prompt diagnosis and appropriate empirical treatment to prevent mortality

  8. Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Due to Trauma.

    PubMed

    Kjellemo, Hugo; Hansen, Andreas E; Øines, Dennis A; Nilsen, Thor O; Wik, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Survival from pediatric cardiac arrest due to trauma has been reported to be 0.0%-8.8%. Some argue that resuscitation efforts in the case of trauma-related cardiac arrests are futile. We describe a successful outcome in the case of a child who suffered cardiac arrest caused by external traumatic airway obstruction. Our case illustrates how to deal with pediatric traumatic cardiac arrests in an out-of-hospital environment. It also illustrates how good clinical treatment in these situations may be supported by correct treatment after hospital admission when it is impossible to ventilate the patient to provide sufficient oxygen delivery to vital organs. This case relates to a lifeless child of 3-5 years, blue, and trapped by an electrically operated garage door. The first ambulance arrived to find several men trying to bend the frame and the door apart in order to extricate the child, who was hanging in the air with head and neck squeezed between the horizontally-moving garage door and the vertical door frame. One paramedic found a car jack and used it to push the door and the frame apart, allowing the lifeless child to be extricated. Basic life support was then initiated. Intubation was performed by the anesthesiologist without drugs. With FiO2 1.0 the first documented SaO2 was <50%. Restoration of Spontaneous Circulation was achieved after thirty minutes, and she was transported to the hospital. After a few hours she was put on venous-arterial ECMO for 5.5 days and discharged home after two months. Outpatient examinations during the rest of 2013 were positive, and the child found not to be suffering from any injuries, either physical or mental. The last follow-up in October 2014 demonstrated she had made a 100% recovery and she started school in August 2014. PMID:26930137

  9. Pericardial Metastasis Induced Tamponade from Urothelial Carcinoma: A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Rafay; Jehangir, Waqas; Tulpule, Sunil; Osman, Mohamed; Singh, Shilpi; Sen, Shuvendu

    2016-01-01

    Urothelial carcinoma in a few cases may result in cardiac metastasis. A rare presentation of this condition is its diagnosis as a result of cardiac tamponade. Tamponade is an unusual entity as a result of urothelial carcinoma and has only been reported in four cases. There have also been only a total of fifteen cases of cardiac metastasis from this form of malignancy. It is through this discussion that we emphasize the importance of early detection and monitoring of cardiac symptoms with the implementation of echocardiogram imaging. Although not feasible in all patients it may be considered in those presenting with cardiac and pulmonary symptoms. In this case we discuss the presentation of a 71-year-old gentleman with a history of urothelial carcinoma after cystectomy and while on chemotherapy presented with new onset atrial fibrillation and later was diagnosed with cardiac tamponade as a result of malignant metastasis. PMID:27148366

  10. Familial cardiac valvulopathy due to filamin A mutation.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Jonathan A; Bernstein, Daniel; Hehr, Ute; Hudgins, Louanne

    2011-09-01

    We report on the clinical findings in siblings affected by the recently characterized X-linked form of hereditary cardiac valvular dystrophy or cardiac valve disease (OMIM 314400) due to mutations in the FLNA gene and review the literature on this condition. Although FLNA related cardiac valve disease is presumed to be a rare disorder, it is likely underdiagnosed. Several features of this condition may aid in its identification. FLNA related valvular disease can be recognized on the basis of its distinctive inheritance, early age of onset, and frequent multi-valve involvement. PMID:21815255

  11. Malignant Pericardial Tamponade in a Case of Signet Cell Gastric Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Rakul; Prabhakaran, Sunil Prasobh; Pillai, Padmakumar Rajasekharan; Dalus, D

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of gastric signet cell carcinoma, presenting as cardiac tamponade, in a young male patient. The diagnosis of gastric signet cell carcinoma was confirmed by immunohistochemistry of the lymph node specimen in our patient. PMID:27608703

  12. Direct transatrial pericardiocentesis for tamponade caused by left atrial perforation after trans-septal puncture.

    PubMed

    Picard, Fabien; Millán, Xavier; de Hemptinne, Quentin; L L'allier, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Trans-septal puncture is associated with risks of serious complications. We report a case of an obese 52-year-old man with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who underwent preoperative coronary angiography and cardiac catheterisation complicated by left atrial perforation. We describe a direct transatrial pericardiocentesis approach to treating cardiac tamponade. PMID:27389729

  13. Cardiac arrest due to airway obstruction in hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Fuse, Takashi; Nakada, Taka-aki; Taniguchi, Masashi; Mizushima, Yasuaki; Matsuoka, Tetsuya

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare genetic disease caused by a deficiency of functional C1 esterase inhibitor that causes swelling attacks in various body tissues. We hereby report a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to airway obstruction in HAE. Cutaneous swelling and abdominal pain attacks caused by gastrointestinal wall swelling are common symptoms in HAE, whereas laryngeal swelling is rare. Emergency physicians may have few chances to experience cases of life-threatening laryngeal edema resulting in a delay from symptom onset to the diagnosis of HAE. Hereditary angioedema is diagnosed by performing complement blood tests. Because safe and effective treatment options are available for the life-threatening swellings in HAE, the diagnosis potentially reduces the risk of asphyxiation in patients and their blood relatives. PMID:25913082

  14. Cardiac arrest due to a missed diagnosis of Boerhaave's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Davies, Jennifer; Spitzer, David; Phylactou, Maria; Glasser, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A 91-year-old presented with a rare cause of cardiac arrest. He was initially admitted with severe back pain following vomiting and diagnosed with probable aspiration pneumonia. On day 3 of admission, he was discovered in cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was started. On intubation, a left-sided pneumothorax and subcutaneous emphysema were noted. Needle decompression showed gastric fluid leaking from the cannula. The patient regained a cardiac output, and a subsequent CT scan confirmed a large pneumomediastinum with air tracking to the neck and chest, and bilateral pneumothoraces. A diagnosis of Boerhaave's syndrome was made. The patient was transferred to the intensive care unit but did not survive. This case demonstrates the importance of looking for and treating the rarer reversible causes of cardiac arrest, and of maintaining a high index of suspicion for Boerhaave's syndrome. Despite its rarity, Boerhaave's syndrome is often misdiagnosed on initial presentation, leading to delayed treatment and poor outcomes. PMID:27154984

  15. [Postmortem genetic testing in sudden cardiac death due to ion channelopathies].

    PubMed

    Guan, Da-wei; Zhao, Rui

    2010-04-01

    Sudden cardiac death accounts for majority of deaths in human. Evident cardiac lesions that may explain the cause of death can be detected in comprehensive postmortem investigation in most sudden cardiac death. However, no cardiac morphological abnormality is found in a considerable number of cases although the death is highly suspected from cardiac anomaly. With the advances in the modern molecular biology techniques, it has been discovered that many of these sudden deaths are caused by congenital ion channelopathies in myocardial cell, i.e., Brugada syndrome, long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and short QT syndrome, etc. This article presents the molecular genetics, electrocardiographic abnormalities, clinical manifestations, and mechanisms leading to sudden cardiac death with emphasis on the role of postmortem genetic testing in certification of cause of death. It may provide helpful information in investigating sudden cardiac death due to ion channelopathies in medico-legal practice. PMID:20653139

  16. [Acute pericarditis and tamponade: An unusual revelation of a visceral tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Thabouillot, O; Bouvier, F; Lupu, J; Charbonnel, A; Dumitrescu, N; Stefuriac, M; Godreuil, C; Ficko, C; Andriamanantena, D; Flateau, C; Rapp, C; Roche, N C

    2015-11-01

    Tuberculosis is a common pulmonary disease, which is still endemic in disadvantaged communities. Pericarditis is a rare but very lethal visceral localization. The authors report the case of a 58-year-old man, without neither medical history nor social risk, who presented a cardiac tamponade as the first and atypic manifestation of a visceral tuberculosis. PMID:26602745

  17. Mediastinal mass and pericardial tamponade in a renal transplant recipient: A rare case of nocardia infection

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Maria Nieva; Wray, Dannah; Denlinger, Chadrick; Srinivas, Titte; Thomas, Beje; Posadas, Aurora

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Female, 30 Final Diagnosis: Nocardiosis Symptoms: Cardiac tamponade • cough • dyspnea • hoarseness • mediastinal mass • pericardial effusion • short of breath Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Transplantology Objective: Rare disease Background: Nocardia infections can complicate solid organ transplantation. The usual clinical presentations include pulmonary infiltrates with or without cavitation and subcutaneous and brain abscesses. We report an unusual case of nocardia infection in a kidney transplant recipient that presented as mediastinal mass and was associated with pericardial tamponade. Case Report: A 30 year old African American renal transplant recipient presented with cough, hoarseness and shortness of breath nine months after kidney transplantation. She received basiliximab perioperatively and her maintenance immunosuppression included tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisone. Computed tomography (CT) showed a large mediastinal mass with a large pericardial effusion. An echocardiogram revealed collapse of the right ventricle consistent with tamponade. We performed emergent pericardiocentesis to treat the tamponade. A mediastinoscopic biopsy of the mediastinal mass was done to establish a diagnosis. The mediastinal biopsy confirmed the growth of Nocardia. After 2 weeks of imipenem and 6 weeks of linezolid, there was marked radiographic improvement in the size of the mediastinal mass. Conclusions: We report a rare case of a large mediastinal mass associated with pericardial tamponade from nocardia infection in a renal transplant recipient. An invasive approach may be necessary to obtain tissue diagnosis to direct treatment in these cases. Prompt and appropriate medical therapy leads to marked radiographic improvement. PMID:23940824

  18. Sudden unexpected death due to severe pulmonary and cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Ginelliová, Alžbeta; Farkaš, Daniel; Farkašová Iannaccone, Silvia; Vyhnálková, Vlasta

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we report the autopsy findings of a 57 year old woman who died unexpectedly at home. She had been complaining of shortness of breath, episodes of dry coughing, and nausea. Her past medical and social history was unremarkable. She had no previous history of any viral or bacterial disease and no history of oncological disorders. Autopsy revealed multiple grayish-white nodular lesions in the pleura and epicardial fat and areas resembling fibrosis on the cut surface of the anterior and posterior wall of the left ventricle and interventricular septum. Histological examination of the lungs and heart revealed multiple well-formed noncaseating epithelioid cell granulomas with multinucleated giant cells. Death was attributed to myocardial ischemia due to vasculitis of intramural coronary artery branches associated with sarcoidosis. Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disease of unknown etiology characterized by the formation of noncaseating epithelioid cell granulomas in the affected organs and tissues. The diagnosis of sarcoidosis in this case was established when other causes of granulomatous disease such as tuberculosis, berylliosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and giant cell myocarditis had been reasonably excluded. PMID:27379608

  19. Early vein graft failure leading to acute myocardial infarction, dehiscence and haemopericardium treated by percutaneous coil embolisation and balloon tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Kanakadandi, Uday; Huang, Juxiang; Lee, Kwan

    2014-01-01

    Early vein graft failure is a well-described early complication of coronary artery bypass grafting. Revascularisation with emergency percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) may limit the extent of myocardial damage and is associated with lower procedural complications compared than with emergency redo bypass surgery. We describe a case of an early saphenous vein graft (SVG) thrombosis presenting as an inferior ST-elevation to our non-surgical PCI site, complicated by SVG graft dehiscence leading to cardiac tamponade, which we treated with coil embolisation and balloon tamponade during the patient's transfer to a surgical facility for emergent haemopericardium evacuation. PMID:24496067

  20. Successful extracorporeal life support in sudden cardiac arrest due to coronary anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Wan; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Ki-Sik; Bang, Duk Won; Hyon, Min-Su; Lee, Min-Ho; Park, Byoung-Won

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) has recently been reported to have a survival benefit in patients with cardiac arrest. It is now used widely as a lifesaving modality. Here, we describe a case of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in a young athlete with an anomalous origin of the right coronary artery from the left coronary sinus. Resuscitation was successful using ECLS before curative bypass surgery. We highlight the efficacy of ECLS for a patient with SCA caused by a rare, unexpected aetiology. In conclusion, ECLS was a lifesaving modality for SCA due to an anomalous coronary artery in this young patient. PMID:27354896

  1. Puerperal uterine inversion managed by the uterine balloon tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Thiam, Mariétou; Niang, Mouhamadou Mansour; Gueye, Lamine; Sarr, Fatou Rachel; Dieme, Marie Edouard Faye; Cisse, Mamadou Lamine

    2015-01-01

    The uterine inversion is a rare and severe puerperal complication. Uncontrolled cord traction and uterine expression are the common causes described. We report a case of uterine inversion stage III caused by poor management of the third stage of labor. It was about a 20 years old primigravida referred in our unit for postpartum hemorrhage due to uterine atony. After manual reduction of the uterus, the use of intra uterine balloon tamponade helped to stop the hemorrhage. The uterine inversion is a rare complication that may cause maternel death. The diagnosis is clinical and its management must be immediate to avoid maternal complications. PMID:26977239

  2. Early detection and efficient therapy of cardiac angiosarcoma due to routine transesophageal echocardiography after cerebrovascular stroke

    PubMed Central

    Vogelgesang, Dirk; Dahm, Johannes B; Großmann, Holm; Hippe, Andre; Hummel, Astrid; Lotze, Christian; Vogelgesang, Silke

    2008-01-01

    Primary malignant cardiac tumors (cardiac angiosarcomas) are exceedingly rare. Since there are initially nonspecific or missing symptoms, these tumors are usually diagnosed only in an advanced, often incurable stage, after the large tumor mass elicits hemodynamic obstructive symptoms. A 59-year-old female presented with symptoms of cerebral ischemia. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed changes suggestive of stroke. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed an inhomogeneous, medium-echogenic, floating mass at the roof of the left atrium near the mouth of the right upper pulmonary vein, indicative of a thrombus. At surgery, a solitary tumor was completely enucleated. Histologically, cardiac angiosarcoma was diagnosed. The patient received adjuvant chemotherapy and was free of symptoms and recurrence of disease at 14 months follow-up. Due to the fortuitous appearance of clinical signs indicative of stroke, cardiac angiosarcoma was diagnosed and effectively treated at an early, nonmetastatic, and therefore potentially curable stage. Although cardiac angiosarcoma is a rare disease, it should be taken into consideration as a potential cause of cerebral embolic disease. PMID:19066013

  3. Prehospital ultrasound detects pericardial tamponade in a pregnant victim of stabbing assault.

    PubMed

    Byhahn, Christian; Bingold, Tobias M; Zwissler, Bernhard; Maier, Marcus; Walcher, Felix

    2008-01-01

    The development of handheld, portable ultrasound devices has enabled the use of this diagnostic tool also in the out-of-hospital environment. We report on a pregnant teenager who was found haemodynamically unstable after a stab assault. When she suffered cardiac arrest shortly thereafter, diagnosis of cardiac tamponade was made by portable ultrasound, and immediate pericardiocentesis was performed by the emergency physician. While her baby died after emergency Caesarean section, the teenager survived after thoracotomy and prolonged resuscitation without neurological sequelae. PMID:17716805

  4. Successful use of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest due to amitriptyline and venlafaxine intoxication.

    PubMed

    Kontio, Terhi; Salo, Ari; Kantola, Teemu; Toivonen, Lauri; Skrifvars, Markus B

    2015-06-01

    The prognosis of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) due to intoxication is dismal. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are widely used in the treatment of depression, but possess significant cardiotoxicity, and are one of the most common medications used in suicide attempts worldwide. TCA poisoning can cause hypotension, seizures, and cardiac conduction disturbances, which can lead to life-threatening arrhythmia. Current guidelines recommend mild therapeutic hypothermia (TH) for unconscious survivors of OHCA, but hypothermia treatment itself can cause disturbances in cardiac conduction, which could aggravate the effect of TCAs on cardiac conduction. We report the successful use of TH in a 19-year-old woman who was resuscitated from ventricular tachycardia after intentional ingestion of amitriptyline and venlafaxine, a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor. The cardiac arrest was witnessed, but no bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was performed. The initial rhythm was ventricular tachycardia with no detectable pulse. Three defibrillations, magnesium sulfate, and sodium bicarbonate were given and her trachea was intubated, after which return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was achieved in 26 minutes. After ROSC, she had seizures and was sedated with propofol. Out-of-hospital TH was initiated with 1500 mL of cold Ringer's acetate. An infusion of norepinephrine was initiated for low blood pressure. On arrival at the university hospital, she was unconscious and had dilated pupils. She was tachycardic with a body temperature of 33.5°C. She was transferred to the intensive care unit and TH was maintained with invasive cooling. During the TH treatment, she did not experience any serious cardiac arrhythmia, transthoracic echocardiogram was normal, and the electrocardiogram (ECG) returned to normal. The patient was extubated 45 hours after the cardiac arrest. After the extubation, she was alert and cooperative, but slightly delusional. She was

  5. Tamponade following sternoclavicular dislocation surgical fixation.

    PubMed

    Bensafi, H; Laffosse, J-M; Taam, S A; Molinier, F; Chaminade, B; Puget, J

    2010-05-01

    The authors report a case of posterior sternoclavicular dislocation surgically reduced and stabilized with tenodesis, according to the Burrows technique completed by temporary wire fixation. The patient presented postoperative pericardiac tamponade appearing progressively from brachiocephalic blood vessels bleeding. Emergency drainage was surgically placed associated with removal of the material, thus curing the patient. This complication, although exceptional, formally contraindicates the use of wire fixation in surgery of the sternoclavicular joint. PMID:20488152

  6. Recurrent tamponade and aortic dissection in syphilis.

    PubMed

    Stansal, Audrey; Mirault, Tristan; Rossi, Aude; Dupin, Nicolas; Bruneval, Patrick; Bel, Alain; Azarine, Arshid; Minozzi, Catherine; Deman, Anne Laure; Messas, Emmanuel

    2013-11-01

    Syphilitic cardiovascular disease has been described since the 19th century, mainly on autopsy series. Major clinical manifestations are aortic aneurysm, aortic insufficiency, and coronary ostial stenosis. The diagnosis of syphilitic cardiovascular disease is based mainly on positive serologic tests and overt clinical manifestations. We present here a rare and unusual clinical presentation of a tertiary syphilis with recurrent tamponade and type B aortic dissection, whose positive diagnosis was made by polymerase chain reaction on pericardial fluid analysis. PMID:24182507

  7. Cardiac arrest during radical nephrectomy due to a mass in the right ventricular outflow tract.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Young; Baek, Seung-Hoon; Yoon, Ji Uk; Lee, Dong Hoon; Byeon, Gyeong-Jo; Ahn, Ji Hye

    2016-09-01

    We report cardiac arrest due to obstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) caused by an RVOT mass that was not identified preoperatively. A 62-year-old woman with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) experienced deteriorating hypotension and bradycardia during radical nephrectomy. Hemodynamic stability was maintained on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and after surgery, she was transferred to the intensive care unit. On postoperative day 3, transthoracic echocardiography showed an intracardiac mass obstructing the RVOT, which caused severe functional pulmonary stenosis and moderate resting pulmonary hypertension. Despite maintaining extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, the patient died of cardiac arrest. Our findings suggest that it may be necessary to perform additional tests if RCC has invaded the renal vein and inferior vena cava or if a patient with RCC has abnormal cardiovascular symptoms without definite etiology for exclusion of cardiac metastasis or tumor thrombus. In addition, intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography might be the procedure of choice for the evaluation of these conditions because other diagnostic tests are difficult to perform during surgery. In conclusion, for patients with acute hemodynamic instability for whom other possible causes have been excluded, we recommend that anesthesiologists use transesophageal echocardiography to detect outflow tract obstruction or pulmonary thromboembolism and perform anesthetic management. PMID:27555152

  8. Clinical Usefulness of Bakri Balloon Tamponade in the Treatment of Massive Postpartum Uterine Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Sayori; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Nagata, Tomomi; Hiwatashi, Sayuri; Kawamura, Toshihiko; Yokomine, Daisaku; Orita, Yuji; Oki, Toshimichi; Yoshinaga, Mitsuhiro; Douchi, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine globe-shaped metreurynter tamponade has been used for some time to treat massive postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). More recently, the Bakri balloon has come into use to treat PPH. It is made of silicon, possesses a drainage lumen, and has a sausage-like spindle shape. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical usefulness of Bakri balloon tamponade for massive PPH. Subjects in the present study comprised 5 patients with uterine atony, 3 with placenta previa, and 2 with low-lying placenta. All patients exhibited massive PPH and resistance to conventional hemostatic managements. Bakri balloon tamponade was appliedto these 10 patients. The mean amounts of uterine bleeding (average ± SD) before and after Bakri insertion were2,732 ± 1,397 mL and 380 ± 376 mL, respectively. The median (third-first quartile ranges) volume of salineinflating the balloon was 200 mL (300-150 mL). The median (third-first quartile ranges) indwelling duration of Bakri balloon was 24 hours (24-11 hrs). The overall success rate of Bakri balloon tamponade was 90% (9/10).There were no cases of slipping out or complications regarding balloon placement. Our findings suggest that Bakri balloon tamponade may be applied to the treatment of massive PPH in uterine atony and placenta previa.The Bakri balloon appears to have the following merits: (1) easy insertion into the uterine cavity and low rate of slipping out, (2) proper conformability to the hemorrhagic area due to its spindle shape, (3) ability to monitor blood loss through the drainage lumen even after insertion. PMID:26935443

  9. A Comparison of Sms 201-995 and Oesophageal Tamponade in the Control of Acute Variceal Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Garden, O. J.; Anderson, J. R.; Carter, D. C.

    1992-01-01

    Forty endoscopically proven active variceal bleeds were entered in a prospective trial comparing oesophageal tamponade with SMS 201-995 infusion. Oesophageal tamponade controlled 19 of 20 bleeds over the first four hours and 14 of 18 bleeds over 48 hours. SMS 201-995 infusion controlled 18 of 20 bleeds over the first four hours and 10 of 20 bleeds over 48 hours (p = 0.15). No significant differences between the groups were seen in time to control of bleeding, amount of blood transfused or number of patients crossed over to the opposite treatment. Complications in the oesophageal tamponade group were discomfort due to the tube (17 patients) and chest infection (10 patients), while in the SMS 201-995 group 7 chest infections and one episode of hyperglycaemia occurred, with no symptomatic complaints. The patient survived the admission in 15 of the oesophageal tamponade bleeds and all of the SMS 201-995 bleeds (p = 0.047). An intravenous infusion of SMS 201-995 appears to have comparable efficacy to oesophageal tamponade in variceal bleeding. PMID:1467319

  10. The costs of a suburban paramedic program in reducing deaths due to cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Urban, N; Bergner, L; Eisenberg, M S

    1981-04-01

    The marginal costs per averted death of a suburban paramedic program are estimated to be approximately $42,000, when program costs are attributed entirely to cardiac arrest cases due to underlying heart disease, and indirect costs attributable to episode-related hospitalization are included, It is suggested that at $42,000 per cardiac arrest death averted the program is cost-beneficial by two criteria. First, it compares favorably with an estimate obtained from the literature of the value to the average individual of saving the life of a myocardial infarction patient. Second, the people of King County passed a cost-commensurate Paramedic Program Property Tax Levy in 1979, revealing their willingness to support the program. Results of the study should be generalized in accordance with the facts that in King County 1) the population density averages approximately 1,300 per square mile; 2) a basic emergency medical system ensures a 4-minute average response time to initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation; 3) a citizen-training program in cardiopulmonary resuscitation further reduces average time to initiation of basic life support; and 4) the paramedic program is designed to ensure a 10-minute average time to definitive care. PMID:6785539

  11. Artificial aortic valve dysfunction due to pannus and thrombus – different methods of cardiac surgical management

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkiewicz, Anna; Kośmider, Anna; Walczak, Andrzej; Zwoliński, Radosław; Jaszewski, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 60 000 prosthetic valves are implanted annually in the USA. The risk of prosthesis dysfunction ranges from 0.1% to 4% per year. Prosthesis valve dysfunction is usually caused by a thrombus obstructing the prosthetic discs. However, 10% of prosthetic valves are dysfunctional due to pannus formation, and 12% of prostheses are damaged by both fibrinous and thrombotic components. The authors present two patients with dysfunctional aortic prostheses who were referred for cardiac surgery. Different surgical solutions were used in the treatment of each case. Case study 1 The first patient was a 71-year-old woman whose medical history included arterial hypertension, stable coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and hypercholesterolemia; she had previously undergone left-sided mastectomy and radiotherapy. The patient was admitted to the Cardiac Surgery Department due to aortic prosthesis dysfunction. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed complete obstruction of one disc and a severe reduction in the mobility of the second. The mean transvalvular gradient was very high. During the operation, pannus covering the discs’ surface was found. A biological aortic prosthesis was reimplanted without complications. Case study 2 The second patient was an 87-year-old woman with arterial hypertension, persistent atrial fibrillation, and COPD, whose past medical history included gastric ulcer disease and ischemic stroke. As in the case of the first patient, she was admitted due to valvular prosthesis dysfunction. Preoperative transthoracic echocardiography revealed an obstruction of the posterior prosthetic disc and significant aortic regurgitation. Transesophageal echocardiography and fluoroscopy confirmed the prosthetic dysfunction. During the operation, a thrombus growing around a minor pannus was found. The thrombus and pannus were removed, and normal functionality of the prosthetic valve was restored

  12. Fulminant mediastinitis due to extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae: atypical presentation and spreading following cardiac surgery†

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Horacio; Carrascal, Yolanda; Maroto, Laura; Arce, Nuria

    2013-01-01

    Mediastinitis due to Klebsiella pneumoniae, related to thoracic wall contamination after cardiac surgery, has rarely been described. We aim to report a case of fulminant mediastinitis due to extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae, secondary to a disseminated concomitant pulmonary infection. The patient remained pauci-symptomatic until clinical manifestations of sepsis acutely appeared. PMID:23416348

  13. Bleeding heart: a case of spontaneous hemopericardium and tamponade in a hyperthyroid patient on warfarin.

    PubMed

    Sajawal Ali, Muhammad; Mba, Benjamin I; Ciftci, Farah Diba; Ali, Ahya Sajawal

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of an 81-year-old female, diagnosed with hyperthyroidism-related atrial fibrillation. Given her CHA2DS2VASc score of 3, she was started on warfarin for stroke prevention. One month later, she was admitted with cardiac tamponade. This tamponade was suspected to be secondary to hemopericardium, based on the elevated international normalized ratio (INR), drop in haemoglobin and the radiodensity (55 HU) of the pericardial effusion on CT. The patient was a Jehovah's witness who therefore initially refused measures for reversing coagulopathy. Given her coagulopathy and absence of imminent haemodynamic compromise, pericardiocentesis was deferred. Unfortunately, 1 day later, the patient deteriorated rapidly. By the time pericardiocentesis was performed and factor VIIa administered, the patient had already started developing multiple organ failure. She developed cardiac arrest and died 3 days after her admission. Only 10 cases of hemopericardium attributable to warfarin have previously been reported. In this report, we review the literature and also describe how hyperthyroidism most likely predisposed our patient to bleeding complications from warfarin. PMID:27413023

  14. Blunt cardiac rupture.

    PubMed

    Martin, T D; Flynn, T C; Rowlands, B J; Ward, R E; Fischer, R P

    1984-04-01

    Blunt injury to the heart ranges from contusion to disruption. This report comprises 14 patients seen during a 6-year period with cardiac rupture secondary to blunt trauma. Eight patients were injured in automobile accidents, two patients were injured in auto-pedestrian accidents, two were kicked in the chest by ungulates, and two sustained falls. Cardiac tamponade was suspected in ten patients. Five patients presented with prehospital cardiac arrest or arrested shortly after arrival. All underwent emergency department thoracotomy without survival. Two patients expired in the operating room during attempted cardiac repair; both had significant extracardiac injury. Seven patients survived, three had right atrial injuries, three had right ventricular injuries, and one had a left atrial injury. Cardiopulmonary bypass was not required for repair of the surviving patients. There were no significant complications from the cardiac repair. The history of significant force dispersed over a relatively small area of the precordium as in a kicking injury from an animal or steering wheel impact should alert the physician to possible cardiac rupture. Cardiac rupture should be considered in patients who present with signs of cardiac tamponade or persistent thoracic bleeding after blunt trauma. PMID:6708151

  15. [Right Atrial Rupture due to Blunt Trauma;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Nishi, Toshihiko; Tamenishi, Akinori; Niimi, Takao; Okamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    The survival rate of cardiac rupture due to blunt trauma is generally low. We report a case of surgical treatment of blunt cardiac trauma. A 55-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for blunt trauma due to a car accident. His hemodynamics was compromised due to cardiac tamponade. The patient underwent pericardial drainage by small subxiphoid incision. Although about 400 ml of blood was evacuated, hemorrhage was still continuing. After full sternotomy, we found a 3 mm tear in the right atrial appendage and sutured it easily without cardiopulmonary bypass. The patient recovered uneventfully and was discharged on the 10th postoperative day. He is now leading a normal life. PMID:26197827

  16. Efficacy of Intrauterine Bakri Balloon Tamponade in Cesarean Section for Placenta Previa Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hee Young; Park, Yong Won; Kim, Young Han; Jung, Inkyung; Kwon, Ja-Young

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this study were to analyze the predictive factors for the use of intrauterine balloon insertion and to evaluate the efficacy and factors affecting failure of uterine tamponade with a Bakri balloon during cesarean section for abnormal placentation. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 137 patients who underwent elective cesarean section for placenta previa between July 2009 and March 2014. Cesarean section and Bakri balloon insertion were performed by a single qualified surgeon. The Bakri balloon was applied when blood loss during cesarean delivery exceeded 1,000 mL. Results Sixty-four patients (46.7%) required uterine balloon tamponade during cesarean section due to postpartum bleeding from the lower uterine segment, of whom 50 (78.1%) had placenta previa totalis. The overall success rate was 75% (48/64) for placenta previa patients. Previous cesarean section history, anterior placenta, peripartum platelet count, and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy all significantly differed according to balloon success or failure (all p<0.05). The drainage amount over 1 hour was 500 mL (20–1200 mL) in the balloon failure group and 60 mL (5–500 mL) in the balloon success group (p<0.01). Conclusion Intrauterine tamponade with a Bakri balloon is an adequate adjunct management for postpartum hemorrhage following cesarean section for placenta previa to preserve the uterus. This method is simple to apply, non-invasive, and inexpensive. However, possible factors related to failure of Bakri balloon tamponade for placenta previa patients such as prior cesarean section history, anterior placentation, thrombocytopenia, presence of DIC at the time of catheter insertion, and catheter drainage volume more than 500 mL within 1 hour of catheter placement should be recognized, and the next-line management should be prepared in advance. PMID:26263014

  17. A case of cerebral embolism due to cardiac myxoma presenting with multiple cerebral microaneurysms detected on first MRI scans.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takahiro; Saji, Naoki; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Shibazaki, Kensaku; Kimura, Kazumi

    2016-03-01

    A 64-year-old man developed right arm weakness and dysarthria, and was admitted to our hospital. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a high intensity area in the frontal lobe. T2*-weighted images showed multiple spotty low intensity lesions in bilateral cerebral hemispheres, mimicking cerebral microbleeds. Cerebral angiography showed multiple aneurysms in the anterior, middle, posterior cerebral arteries and cerebellar arteries. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a floating structure in the left atrial chamber, indicating cardiac myxoma. We diagnosed cardioembolic ischemic stroke due to left atrial myxoma. Cardiac surgery for excision of a left atrial myxoma was performed on the 3rd hospital day. Multiple aneurysms should be taken into account for differential diagnosis in patients with cardiac myxoma and with atypical spotty low intensity on T2*-weighted images. PMID:26797485

  18. Idiopathic, aseptic, effusive, fibrinous, nonconstrictive pericarditis with tamponade in a standardbred filly.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J A; Marr, C M; Reef, V B; Sweeney, R W

    1992-11-15

    A Standardbred filly was admitted for evaluation of pleuritis and pneumonia. Heart rate was 80 to 120 beats/min, and the pulse was barely palpable. Thoracic and abdominal ultrasonography and echocardiography revealed substantial pericardial effusion with cardiac tamponade, fibrinous pericarditis, pleural effusion, and ascites. Initial electrocardiography revealed normal sinus rhythm with decreased amplitude of the QRS complexes consistent with pericardial effusion. Following thoracentesis, echocardiogram-guided pericardiocentesis was performed. Bacterial culture yielded no growth from any of the fluids, and bacteria were not seen on cytologic examination. Initial treatment included broad-spectrum antibiotic treatments, IV fluid therapy, and anti-inflammatory agent administration. On the basis of negative culture results, an immune-mediated cause was considered, and dexamethasone was instituted in a decreasing dosage regimen. Pericardial effusion, ventral edema, and ascites began to resolve within 3 days after beginning dexamethasone treatment. Thirty days following discharge, the filly was reexamined, and at that time, the prognosis for athletic performance was considered good so the horse was returned to race training. The final diagnosis in this case was idiopathic, effusive, nonconstrictive pericarditis with tamponade. Early identification, clinical understanding, and application of knowledge of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of pericarditis in horses, combined with use of diagnostic aids such as ultrasonography and aggressive therapy consisting of effusion drainage, pericardial lavage, antibiotics that penetrate the pericardium, and corticosteroids when indicated are critical for a successful outcome in horses with pericarditis. PMID:1289343

  19. Dysautonomia Due to Reduced Cholinergic Neurotransmission Causes Cardiac Remodeling and Heart Failure ▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Aline; Damasceno, Denis D.; Pires, Rita; Gros, Robert; Gomes, Enéas R.; Gavioli, Mariana; Lima, Ricardo F.; Guimarães, Diogo; Lima, Patricia; Bueno, Carlos Roberto; Vasconcelos, Anilton; Roman-Campos, Danilo; Menezes, Cristiane A. S.; Sirvente, Raquel A.; Salemi, Vera M.; Mady, Charles; Caron, Marc G.; Ferreira, Anderson J.; Brum, Patricia C.; Resende, Rodrigo R.; Cruz, Jader S.; Gomez, Marcus Vinicius; Prado, Vania F.; de Almeida, Alvair P.; Prado, Marco A. M.; Guatimosim, Silvia

    2010-01-01

    Overwhelming evidence supports the importance of the sympathetic nervous system in heart failure. In contrast, much less is known about the role of failing cholinergic neurotransmission in cardiac disease. By using a unique genetically modified mouse line with reduced expression of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) and consequently decreased release of acetylcholine, we investigated the consequences of altered cholinergic tone for cardiac function. M-mode echocardiography, hemodynamic experiments, analysis of isolated perfused hearts, and measurements of cardiomyocyte contraction indicated that VAChT mutant mice have decreased left ventricle function associated with altered calcium handling. Gene expression was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and Western blotting, and the results indicated that VAChT mutant mice have profound cardiac remodeling and reactivation of the fetal gene program. This phenotype was attributable to reduced cholinergic tone, since administration of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine for 2 weeks reversed the cardiac phenotype in mutant mice. Our findings provide direct evidence that decreased cholinergic neurotransmission and underlying autonomic imbalance cause plastic alterations that contribute to heart dysfunction. PMID:20123977

  20. Recurrent proptotic diplopia due to congestive expansion of cavernous haemangioma with relapsing right-sided cardiac failure

    PubMed Central

    O'Mahony, D.; O'Neill, E.

    1999-01-01

    A 75-year-old man with a recent history of pulmonary embolism, presented with collapse followed by a gran mal seizure and right-sided non-pulsatile proptosis. On recovery, he had diplopia on lateral and upward gaze and signs of congestive cardiac failure. Further pulmonary embolism was proven by lung scintigraphy. Computed tomography of his orbits confirmed a contrast-enhancing space-occupying lesion of the medial wall of the right orbit, with no intracranial abnormality. The patient was investigated for metastatic tumour as a possible cause of the space-occupying lesion and the unprovoked thromboembolic event, but no evidence of malignancy was found. The orbital lesion was not biopsied because of the risk of bleeding from anticoagulation. Three weeks later, the patient re-presented with recurrent cardiac failure, proptosis, and diplopia. A transorbital ultrasound confirmed an encapsulated, well-defined vascular lesion, with typical appearances and Doppler flow characteristics of a cavernous haemangioma. Diuretic therapy abolished the proptosis and diplopia in tandem with relief of the cardiac failure. This is the first description of recurrent proptosis with diplopia due to recurrent congestive expansion of an orbital cavernous haemangioma.


Keywords: haemangioma; proptosis; diplopia; cardiac failure PMID:10621902

  1. Evidence of a wide spectrum of cardiac involvement due to ACAD9 mutations: Report on nine patients.

    PubMed

    Dewulf, Joseph P; Barrea, Catherine; Vincent, Marie-Françoise; De Laet, Corinne; Van Coster, Rudy; Seneca, Sara; Marie, Sandrine; Nassogne, Marie-Cécile

    2016-07-01

    Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9 (ACAD9) is a mitochondrial protein involved in oxidative phosphorylation complex I biogenesis. This protein also exhibits acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) activity. ACAD9-mutated patients have been reported to suffer from primarily heart, muscle, liver, and nervous system disorders. ACAD9 mutation is suspected in cases of elevated lactic acid levels combined with complex I deficiency, and confirmed by ACAD9 gene analysis. At least 18 ACAD9-mutated patients have previously been reported, usually displaying severe cardiac involvement. We retrospectively studied nine additional patients from three unrelated families with a wide spectrum of cardiac involvement between the families as well as the patients from the same families. All patients exhibited elevated lactate levels. Deleterious ACAD9 mutations were identified in all patients except one for whom it was not possible to recover DNA. To our knowledge, this is one of the first reports on isolated mild ventricular hypertrophy due to ACAD9 mutation in a family with moderate symptoms during adolescence. This report also confirms that dilated cardiomyopathy may occur in conjunction with ACAD9 mutation and that some patients may respond clinically to riboflavin treatment. Of note, several patients suffered from patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), with one exhibiting a complex congenital heart defect. It is yet unknown whether these cardiac manifestations were related to ACAD9 mutation. In conclusion, this disorder should be suspected in the presence of lactic acidosis, complex I deficiency, and any cardiac involvement, even mild. PMID:27233227

  2. High incidence and variable clinical outcome of cardiac hypertrophy due to ACAD9 mutations in childhood.

    PubMed

    Collet, Marie; Assouline, Zahra; Bonnet, Damien; Rio, Marlène; Iserin, Franck; Sidi, Daniel; Goldenberg, Alice; Lardennois, Caroline; Metodiev, Metodi Dimitrov; Haberberger, Birgit; Haack, Tobias; Munnich, Arnold; Prokisch, Holger; Rötig, Agnès

    2016-08-01

    Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family, member 9 (ACAD9) mutation is a frequent, usually fatal cause of early-onset cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I deficiency in early childhood. We retrospectively studied a series of 20 unrelated children with cardiac hypertrophy and isolated complex I deficiency and identified compound heterozygosity for missense, splice site or frame shift ACAD9 variants in 8/20 patients (40%). Age at onset ranged from neonatal period to 9 years and 5/8 died in infancy. Heart transplantation was possible in 3/8. Two of them survived and one additional patient improved spontaneously. Importantly, the surviving patients later developed delayed-onset neurologic or muscular symptoms, namely cognitive impairment, seizures, muscle weakness and exercise intolerance. Other organ involvement included proximal tubulopathy, renal failure, secondary ovarian failure and optic atrophy. We conclude that ACAD9 mutation is the most frequent cause of cardiac hypertrophy and isolated complex I deficiency. Heart transplantation in children surviving neonatal period should be considered with caution, as delayed-onset muscle and brain involvement of various severity may occur, even if absent prior to transplantation. PMID:26669660

  3. Sudden Cardiac Death Due to Deficiency of the Mitochondrial Inorganic Pyrophosphatase PPA2.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Hannah; Haack, Tobias B; Hartill, Verity; Mataković, Lavinija; Baumgartner, E Regula; Potter, Howard; Mackay, Richard; Alston, Charlotte L; O'Sullivan, Siobhan; McFarland, Robert; Connolly, Grainne; Gannon, Caroline; King, Richard; Mead, Scott; Crozier, Ian; Chan, Wandy; Florkowski, Chris M; Sage, Martin; Höfken, Thomas; Alhaddad, Bader; Kremer, Laura S; Kopajtich, Robert; Feichtinger, René G; Sperl, Wolfgang; Rodenburg, Richard J; Minet, Jean Claude; Dobbie, Angus; Strom, Tim M; Meitinger, Thomas; George, Peter M; Johnson, Colin A; Taylor, Robert W; Prokisch, Holger; Doudney, Kit; Mayr, Johannes A

    2016-09-01

    We have used whole-exome sequencing in ten individuals from four unrelated pedigrees to identify biallelic missense mutations in the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPA2) that are associated with mitochondrial disease. These individuals show a range of severity, indicating that PPA2 mutations may cause a spectrum of mitochondrial disease phenotypes. Severe symptoms include seizures, lactic acidosis, cardiac arrhythmia, and death within days of birth. In the index family, presentation was milder and manifested as cardiac fibrosis and an exquisite sensitivity to alcohol, leading to sudden arrhythmic cardiac death in the second decade of life. Comparison of normal and mutant PPA2-containing mitochondria from fibroblasts showed that the activity of inorganic pyrophosphatase was significantly reduced in affected individuals. Recombinant PPA2 enzymes modeling hypomorphic missense mutations had decreased activity that correlated with disease severity. These findings confirm the pathogenicity of PPA2 mutations and suggest that PPA2 is a cardiomyopathy-associated protein, which has a greater physiological importance in mitochondrial function than previously recognized. PMID:27523597

  4. Tamponade in the surgical management of retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, Kamyar; Schwartz, Stephen G; Kishor, Krishna S; Flynn, Harry W

    2016-01-01

    Despite treatment advances, rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RD) can have poor visual outcomes even with prompt and appropriate therapy. Pars plana vitrectomy is a leading management modality for the treatment of RD. This procedure is generally accompanied by the use of internal tamponade. Various gases and silicone oils may yield beneficial outcomes. Heavy silicone oils have been approved in some European nations but are not available in the USA. Different tamponade agents have unique benefits and risks, and choice of the agent should be individualized according to the characteristics of the patient and RD, as well as perioperative and postoperative factors. PMID:27041988

  5. Tamponade in the surgical management of retinal detachment.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, Kamyar; Schwartz, Stephen G; Kishor, Krishna S; Flynn, Harry W

    2016-01-01

    Despite treatment advances, rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RD) can have poor visual outcomes even with prompt and appropriate therapy. Pars plana vitrectomy is a leading management modality for the treatment of RD. This procedure is generally accompanied by the use of internal tamponade. Various gases and silicone oils may yield beneficial outcomes. Heavy silicone oils have been approved in some European nations but are not available in the USA. Different tamponade agents have unique benefits and risks, and choice of the agent should be individualized according to the characteristics of the patient and RD, as well as perioperative and postoperative factors. PMID:27041988

  6. [Right atrium rupture due to blunt trauma].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Thuboi, H; Okada, H

    2008-03-01

    We report 2 cases of surgical treatment of blunt cardiac trauma. The postoperative course was uneventful in either case. Pericardial drainage in patients with cardiac rupture should be performed with preparation for thoracotomy. Case 1: A 34-year-old male, hit in the chest by a collapsing 700-kg steel rod, was transported to our hospital via ambulance. The patient was diagnosed as having a cardiac rupture by echocardiography and underwent emergency thoracotomy. The right atrium near the inferior vena cava (IVC) was damaged, though bleeding from the wound had already ceased. No suture hemostusis was needed. Case 2: A 63-year-old female was hit by a car and transported to our hospital due to blunt trauma to the chest. Low blood pressure and chest computed tomography demonstrated cardiac tamponade, and subxiphoid pericardial drainage was performed. Blood pressure was recovered, but persistent hemorrhage necessitated emergency thoracotomy, which revealed a laceration at the right atrium near IVC. The injury was sutured to achieve complete hemostasis. PMID:18323181

  7. Cardiac advanced life support-surgical guideline: overview and implementation.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest in the immediate postoperative recovery period in a patient who underwent cardiac surgery is typically related to reversible causes-tamponade, bleeding, ventricular arrhythmias, or heart blocks associated with conduction problems. When treated promptly, 17% to 79% of patients who experience cardiac arrest after cardiac surgery survive to discharge. The Cardiac Advanced Life Support-Surgical (CALS-S) guideline provides a standardized algorithm approach to resuscitation of patients who experience cardiac arrest after cardiac surgery. The purpose of this article is to discuss the CALS-S guideline and how to implement it. PMID:24752025

  8. Vitrectomy, lensectomy and silicone oil tamponade in the management of retinal detachment associated with choroidal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Jun-Min; Jia, Li; Liu, Lei; Liu, Jian-Di

    2013-01-01

    AIM To report the results of combined vitrectomy, lensectomy and silicone oil (SO) tamponade in treating primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) associated with choroidal detachment (CD). METHODS A retrospective, consecutive and case series study of 21 subjects with concurrent RRD associated with CD was conducted. All subjects underwent a standard three-port 20G pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) with lensectomy and silicone oil tamponade. Mean follow-up time was 8 months (rang from 4 to 19 months). The primary and final anatomic success rate, visual acuity and final intraocular pressure(IOP) were recorded and analyzed. RESULTS Of 21 subjects, 8 were women and 13 were men. Age at presentation ranged from 22 to 75 years (mean 57.4 years). The presenting vision ranged from light perception to 0.15. The initial IOP ranged from 3mmHg to 12mmHg (mean 6.2mmHg). All eyes were phakic except one pseudophakic. No intraocular lens was implanted during the primary surgical intervention. Fifteen of 21 (71.4%) eyes had retina reattached after one operation. Six eyes had recurrent inferior retinal detachment due to proliferation. Five of them were successfully reattached after one or more additional operations. Mean IOP at final follow-up was 15.2mmHg (range from 8mmHg to 20mmHg). One case declined for further operation. The final reattachment rate was 95.2%. Visual acuity improved in 19 (90.5%) eyes, was unchanged in 1 (4.8%) eye and decreased in 1 (4.8%) eye. CONCLUSION Combination of vitrectomy, lensectomy and silicone tamponade is an effective method in treating RRD associated with CD, reducing the incidence of postoperative hypotony. PMID:23826529

  9. [Cardiac Angiosarcoma with Acute Myocardial Infarction due to Tumor Embolism;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Date, Yusuke; Miyazu, Katsuyuki; Ikeda, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    We report the case of a 28-year-old man with a rare angiosarcoma complicated by acute myocardial infarction secondary to tumor embolism. He was transported to our emergency unit because of sudden onset of chest pain. The echocardiography showed a 42×60 mm mass in the left ventricle, and the coronary angiography showed embolic occlusion of the proximal left anterior descending and circumflex arteries. Emergent surgical removal of the mass was attempted under cardiopulmonary bypass, concomitant with double coronary artery bypass grafting and mitral valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. However, complete tumor excision was impossible. The postoperative pathological examination revealed undifferentiated angiosarcoma. Twenty days after the operation, the patient suffered acute cerebral hemorrhage from a metastatic tumor in the brain. He died at 37 days after the initial cardiac surgery. PMID:27586319

  10. Calcium Alternans is Due to an Order-Disorder Phase Transition in Cardiac Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Lacalle, Enrique; Echebarria, Blas; Spalding, Jon; Shiferaw, Yohannes

    2015-03-01

    Electromechanical alternans is a beat-to-beat alternation in the strength of contraction of a cardiac cell, which can be caused by an instability of calcium cycling. Using a distributed model of subcellular calcium we show that alternans occurs via an order-disorder phase transition which exhibits critical slowing down and a diverging correlation length. We apply finite size scaling along with a mapping to a stochastic coupled map model, to show that this transition in two dimensions is characterized by critical exponents consistent with the Ising universality class. These findings highlight the important role of cooperativity in biological cells, and suggest novel approaches to investigate the onset of the alternans instability in the heart.

  11. Image reconstruction in higher dimensions: myocardial perfusion imaging of tracer dynamics with cardiac motion due to deformation and respiration

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shrestha, Uttam M.; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2015-10-09

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using slow rotating large field of view cameras requires spatiotemporal reconstruction of dynamically acquired data to capture the time variation of the radiotracer concentration. In vivo, MPI contains additional degrees of freedom involving unavoidable motion of the heart due to quasiperiodic beating and the effects of respiration, which can severely degrade the quality of the images. This work develops a technique for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that reconstructs the distribution of the radiotracer concentration in the myocardium using a tensor product of different sets of basis functions that approximately describe the spatiotemporal variationmore » of the radiotracer concentration and the motion of the heart. In this study the temporal B-spline basis functions are chosen to reflect the dynamics of the radiotracer, while the intrinsic deformation and the extrinsic motion of the heart are described by a product of a discrete set of Gaussian basis functions. Reconstruction results are presented showing the dynamics of the tracer in the myocardium as it deforms due to cardiac beating, and is displaced due to respiratory motion. We find these results are compared with the conventional 4D-spatiotemporal reconstruction method that models only the temporal changes of the tracer activity. The higher dimensional reconstruction method proposed here improves bias, yet the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases slightly due to redistribution of the counts over the cardiac-respiratory gates. Additionally, there is a trade-off between the number of gates and the number of projections per gate to achieve high contrast images.« less

  12. Image Reconstruction in Higher Dimensions: Myocardial Perfusion Imaging of Tracer Dynamics with Cardiac Motion Due to Deformation and Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Uttam M.; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using slow rotating large field of view cameras requires spatiotemporal reconstruction of dynamically acquired data to capture the time variation of the radiotracer concentration. In vivo, MPI contains additional degrees of freedom involving unavoidable motion of the heart due to quasiperiodic beating and the effects of respiration, which can severely degrade the quality of the images. This work develops a technique for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that reconstructs the distribution of the radiotracer concentration in the myocardium using a tensor product of different sets of basis functions that approximately describe the spatiotemporal variation of the radiotracer concentration and the motion of the heart. In this study the temporal B-spline basis functions are chosen to reflect the dynamics of the radiotracer, while the intrinsic deformation and the extrinsic motion of the heart are described by a product of a discrete set of Gaussian basis functions. Reconstruction results are presented showing the dynamics of the tracer in the myocardium as it deforms due to cardiac beating, and is displaced due to respiratory motion. These results are compared with the conventional 4D-spatiotemporal reconstruction method that models only the temporal changes of the tracer activity. The higher dimensional reconstruction method proposed here improves bias, yet the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases due to redistribution of the counts over the cardiac-respiratory gates. However, there is a trade-off between the number of gates and the number of projections per gate to achieve high contrast images. PMID:26450115

  13. Image reconstruction in higher dimensions: myocardial perfusion imaging of tracer dynamics with cardiac motion due to deformation and respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Uttam M.; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2015-10-09

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using slow rotating large field of view cameras requires spatiotemporal reconstruction of dynamically acquired data to capture the time variation of the radiotracer concentration. In vivo, MPI contains additional degrees of freedom involving unavoidable motion of the heart due to quasiperiodic beating and the effects of respiration, which can severely degrade the quality of the images. This work develops a technique for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that reconstructs the distribution of the radiotracer concentration in the myocardium using a tensor product of different sets of basis functions that approximately describe the spatiotemporal variation of the radiotracer concentration and the motion of the heart. In this study the temporal B-spline basis functions are chosen to reflect the dynamics of the radiotracer, while the intrinsic deformation and the extrinsic motion of the heart are described by a product of a discrete set of Gaussian basis functions. Reconstruction results are presented showing the dynamics of the tracer in the myocardium as it deforms due to cardiac beating, and is displaced due to respiratory motion. We find these results are compared with the conventional 4D-spatiotemporal reconstruction method that models only the temporal changes of the tracer activity. The higher dimensional reconstruction method proposed here improves bias, yet the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases slightly due to redistribution of the counts over the cardiac-respiratory gates. Additionally, there is a trade-off between the number of gates and the number of projections per gate to achieve high contrast images.

  14. Image reconstruction in higher dimensions: myocardial perfusion imaging of tracer dynamics with cardiac motion due to deformation and respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Uttam M.; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2015-11-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using slow rotating large field of view cameras requires spatiotemporal reconstruction of dynamically acquired data to capture the time variation of the radiotracer concentration. In vivo, MPI contains additional degrees of freedom involving unavoidable motion of the heart due to quasiperiodic beating and the effects of respiration, which can severely degrade the quality of the images. This work develops a technique for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that reconstructs the distribution of the radiotracer concentration in the myocardium using a tensor product of different sets of basis functions that approximately describe the spatiotemporal variation of the radiotracer concentration and the motion of the heart. In this study the temporal B-spline basis functions are chosen to reflect the dynamics of the radiotracer, while the intrinsic deformation and the extrinsic motion of the heart are described by a product of a discrete set of Gaussian basis functions. Reconstruction results are presented showing the dynamics of the tracer in the myocardium as it deforms due to cardiac beating, and is displaced due to respiratory motion. These results are compared with the conventional 4D-spatiotemporal reconstruction method that models only the temporal changes of the tracer activity. The higher dimensional reconstruction method proposed here improves bias, yet the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases slightly due to redistribution of the counts over the cardiac-respiratory gates. Additionally, there is a trade-off between the number of gates and the number of projections per gate to achieve high contrast images.

  15. Image reconstruction in higher dimensions: myocardial perfusion imaging of tracer dynamics with cardiac motion due to deformation and respiration.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Uttam M; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H; Gullberg, Grant T

    2015-11-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using slow rotating large field of view cameras requires spatiotemporal reconstruction of dynamically acquired data to capture the time variation of the radiotracer concentration. In vivo, MPI contains additional degrees of freedom involving unavoidable motion of the heart due to quasiperiodic beating and the effects of respiration, which can severely degrade the quality of the images. This work develops a technique for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that reconstructs the distribution of the radiotracer concentration in the myocardium using a tensor product of different sets of basis functions that approximately describe the spatiotemporal variation of the radiotracer concentration and the motion of the heart. In this study the temporal B-spline basis functions are chosen to reflect the dynamics of the radiotracer, while the intrinsic deformation and the extrinsic motion of the heart are described by a product of a discrete set of Gaussian basis functions. Reconstruction results are presented showing the dynamics of the tracer in the myocardium as it deforms due to cardiac beating, and is displaced due to respiratory motion. These results are compared with the conventional 4D-spatiotemporal reconstruction method that models only the temporal changes of the tracer activity. The higher dimensional reconstruction method proposed here improves bias, yet the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases slightly due to redistribution of the counts over the cardiac-respiratory gates. Additionally, there is a trade-off between the number of gates and the number of projections per gate to achieve high contrast images. PMID:26450115

  16. Uterine Balloon Tamponade in Combination with Topical Administration of Tranexamic Acid for Management of Postpartum Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kinugasa, Masato; Tamai, Hanako; Miyake, Mayu; Shimizu, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    While uterine balloon tamponade is an effective modality for control of postpartum hemorrhage, the reported success rates have ranged from the level of 60% to the level of 80%. In unsuccessful cases, more invasive interventions are needed, including hysterectomy as a last resort. We developed a modified tamponade method and applied it to two cases of refractory postpartum hemorrhage after vaginal delivery. The first case was accompanied by uterine myoma and low-lying placenta. After an induced delivery, the patient had excessive hemorrhage due to uterine atony. Despite oxytocin infusion and bimanual uterine compression, the total blood loss was estimated at 2,800 mL or more. The second case was diagnosed as placental abruption complicated by fetal death and severe disseminated intravascular coagulation, subsequently. A profuse hemorrhage continued despite administration of uterotonics, fluid, and blood transfusion. The total blood loss was more than 5,000 mL. In each case, an intrauterine balloon catheter was wrapped in gauze impregnated with tranexamic acid, inserted into the uterus, and inflated sufficiently with sterile water. In this way, mechanical compression by a balloon and a topical antifibrinolytic agent were combined together. This method brought complete hemostasis and no further treatments were needed. Both the women left hospital in stable condition. PMID:25861495

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus infection in a child revealed by a massive purulent pericarditis mistaken for a liver abscess due to Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Bernadette, Ngo Nonga; Kamgaing, N.; Monebenimp, F.; Simeu, C.

    2015-01-01

    Massive purulent andacute pericarditis in children is a life-threatening disease associated with high mortality. It has been described tocomplicate usuallya bronchopulmonary infectionbut is currently uncommon in the era of antibiotics. Acute and massive purulent pericarditis has been rarely reported in children in association with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This is a case of a10-year-old boy who presented with signs of sepsis and cardiac tamponade due to a massive staphylococcal purulent pericarditis complicating an unknown HIV infection. The child underwent pericardiectomy, intensive treatment, and survived this life-threatening disease. PMID:25659555

  18. Pericardial Tamponade Following CT-Guided Lung Biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Michael J.; Montgomery, Mark; Reiter, Charles G.; Culp, William C.

    2008-07-15

    While not free from hazards, CT-guided biopsy of the lung is a safe procedure, with few major complications. Despite its safety record, however, potentially fatal complications do rarely occur. We report a case of pericardial tamponade following CT-guided lung biopsy. Rapid diagnosis and therapy allowed for complete patient recovery. Physicians who perform this procedure should be aware of the known complications and be prepared to treat them appropriately.

  19. Length-dependent changes in contractile dynamics are blunted due to cardiac myosin binding protein-C ablation

    PubMed Central

    Mamidi, Ranganath; Gresham, Kenneth S.; Stelzer, Julian E.

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced cardiac contractile function with increased sarcomere length (SL) is, in part, mediated by a decrease in the radial distance between myosin heads and actin. The radial disposition of myosin heads relative to actin is modulated by cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C), suggesting that cMyBP-C contributes to the length-dependent activation (LDA) in the myocardium. However, the precise roles of cMyBP-C in modulating cardiac LDA are unclear. To determine the impact of cMyBP-C on LDA, we measured isometric force, myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity (pCa50) and length-dependent changes in kinetic parameters of cross-bridge (XB) relaxation (krel), and recruitment (kdf) due to rapid stretch, as well as the rate of force redevelopment (ktr) in response to a large slack-restretch maneuver in skinned ventricular multicellular preparations isolated from the hearts of wild-type (WT) and cMyBP-C knockout (KO) mice, at SL's 1.9 μm or 2.1 μm. Our results show that maximal force was not significantly different between KO and WT preparations but length-dependent increase in pCa50 was attenuated in the KO preparations. pCa50 was not significantly different between WT and KO preparations at long SL (5.82 ± 0.02 in WT vs. 5.87 ± 0.02 in KO), whereas pCa50 was significantly different between WT and KO preparations at short SL (5.71 ± 0.02 in WT vs. 5.80 ± 0.01 in KO; p < 0.05). The ktr, measured at half-maximal Ca2+-activation, was significantly accelerated at short SL in WT preparations (8.74 ± 0.56 s−1 at 1.9 μm vs. 5.71 ± 0.40 s−1 at 2.1 μm, p < 0.05). Furthermore, krel and kdf were accelerated by 32% and 50%, respectively at short SL in WT preparations. In contrast, ktr was not altered by changes in SL in KO preparations (8.03 ± 0.54 s−1 at 1.9 μm vs. 8.90 ± 0.37 s−1 at 2.1 μm). Similarly, KO preparations did not exhibit length-dependent changes in krel and kdf. Collectively, our data implicate cMyBP-C as an important regulator of LDA via its impact on

  20. Reduced ability to release adenosine by diabetic rat cardiac fibroblasts due to altered expression of nucleoside transporters

    PubMed Central

    Podgorska, Marzena; Kocbuch, Katarzyna; Grden, Marzena; Szutowicz, Andrzej; Pawelczyk, Tadeusz

    2006-01-01

    Adenosine produced by cardiac cells is known to attenuate the proliferation of cardiac fibroblasts (CFs), inhibit collagen synthesis, and protect the myocardium against ischaemic and reperfusion injury. Diabetic patients' hearts exhibit ventricular hypertrophy and demonstrate reduced tolerance to hypoxia or ischaemia. In this study, we characterize the effects of glucose and insulin on processes that determine the release of adenosine from CFs. We showed that during ATP depletion, rat CFs cultured in the absence of insulin release significantly less adenosine compared to cells grown in the presence of insulin. Moreover, under both conditions the quantity of released adenosine depends on glucose concentration. We demonstrate that this is due to altered expression of nucleoside transporters. High glucose (25 mm) induced 85% decrease in nucleoside transporter ENT1 mRNA levels. Decrease of the insulin level below 10−11m resulted in over 3-fold increase in the nucleoside transporter CNT2 mRNA content. Measurements of adenosine transport in CFs cultured in the presence of 5 mm glucose and 10 nm insulin showed that the bidirectional equilibrative adenosine transport accounted for 70% of the overall adenosine uptake. However, cells grown in the presence of high glucose (25 mm) demonstrated 65% decrease of the bidirectional equilibrative adenosine transport. Experiments on CFs cultured in the absence of insulin showed that the unidirectional Na+-dependent adenosine uptake rose in these cells more than 4-fold. These results indicate that the development of diabetes may result in an increased uptake of interstitial adenosine by CFs, and reduction of the ability of these cells to release adenosine during ATP deprivation. PMID:16873415

  1. Tamponade in surgery for retinal detachment associated with proliferative vitreoretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Stephen G; Flynn, Harry W; Lee, Wen-Hsiang; Wang, Xue

    2014-01-01

    Background Retinal detachment (RD) with proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) often requires surgery to restore normal anatomy and to stabilize or improve vision. PVR usually occurs in association with recurrent RD (that is, after initial retinal re-attachment surgery) but occasionally may be associated with primary RD. Either way, a tamponade agent (gas or silicone oil) is needed during surgery to reduce the rate of postoperative recurrent RD. Objectives The objective of this review was to assess the relative safety and effectiveness of various tamponade agents used with surgery for retinal detachment (RD) complicated by proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 5), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to June 2013), EMBASE (January 1980 to June 2013), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to June 2013), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 26 June 2013. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of participants undergoing surgery for RD associated with PVR that compared various tamponade agents. Data collection and analysis Two review authors screened the search results independently. We used the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. PMID:24532038

  2. Pericardial effusions with tamponade and visceral constriction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis on tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Soh, May Ching; Hart, Hamish H; Corkill, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-inhibitor (TNF-inhibitor) therapy is increasingly used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. While it is effective for the articular manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis we have reason to believe that it is less effective for extra-articular disease. We present two cases of life-threatening cardiac tamponade in two patients with well-controlled rheumatoid arthritis on adalimumab. An extensive literature search was carried out and three other patients were found. We believe that these cases highlight the need for rheumatologists to be vigilant for extra-articular manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis even in the presence of quiescent joint disease while on TNF-inhibitors. PMID:20374322

  3. Some Physicochemical Remarks on Spontaneous Emulsification of Vitreal Tamponades

    PubMed Central

    dell'Omo, Roberto; Zeppa, Lucio; Bufalo, Gennaro; Cardone, Michele; Romano, Mario; Ambrosone, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    The importance of gravitational instability in determining the emulsification of vitreal tamponades is discussed. Theoretical results and numerical simulations indicate that the spontaneous formation of water-silicon oil is a rare event and that the very low concentration of surface active agents cannot justify the systematic formation of emulsions. The gravitational instabilities seem to play the main role. Our theoretical results seem in agreement with the experimental evidences; furthermore they indicate a future research line for the improvement of endotamponades. Indeed, the use of biodegradable antifoam may avoid the formation of bubbles and delay the formation of emulsions. PMID:25133159

  4. Fatal Pericardial Tamponade After Superior Vena Cava Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Ploegmakers, Marieke J. M. Rutten, Matthieu J. C. M.

    2009-05-15

    We discuss a fatal complication of percutaneous superior vena cava (SVC) self-expandable stent placement in a patient with superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS). The SVCS was caused by a malignant mediastinal mass with total occlusion of the SVC. Twenty-four hours after the procedure, the patient died of a hemopericardial tamponade. In the literature, only seven cases have been described with this life-threatening complication. Patients with a necrotic tumor mass are more likely to develop this complication. Knowledge of this complication may increase patient survival.

  5. Some physicochemical remarks on spontaneous emulsification of vitreal tamponades.

    PubMed

    Costagliola, Ciro; Semeraro, Francesco; dell'Omo, Roberto; Zeppa, Lucio; Bufalo, Gennaro; Cardone, Michele; Romano, Mario; Ambrosone, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    The importance of gravitational instability in determining the emulsification of vitreal tamponades is discussed. Theoretical results and numerical simulations indicate that the spontaneous formation of water-silicon oil is a rare event and that the very low concentration of surface active agents cannot justify the systematic formation of emulsions. The gravitational instabilities seem to play the main role. Our theoretical results seem in agreement with the experimental evidences; furthermore they indicate a future research line for the improvement of endotamponades. Indeed, the use of biodegradable antifoam may avoid the formation of bubbles and delay the formation of emulsions. PMID:25133159

  6. Salt-induced cardiac hypertrophy and interstitial fibrosis are due to a blood pressure-independent mechanism in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Daniele N; Katayama, Isis A; Oliveira, Ivone B; Rosa, Kaleizu T; Furukawa, Luzia N S; Coelho, Michella S; Casarini, Dulce E; Heimann, Joel C

    2010-10-01

    High salt intake is a known cardiovascular risk factor and is associated with cardiac alterations. To better understand this effect, male Wistar rats were fed a normal (NSD: 1.3% NaCl), high 4 (HSD4: 4%), or high 8 (HSD8: 8%) salt diet from weaning until 18 wk of age. The HSD8 group was subdivided into HSD8, HSD8+HZ (15 mg . kg(-1) . d(-1) hydralazine in the drinking water), and HSD8+LOS (20 mg . kg(-1) . d(-1) losartan in the drinking water) groups. The cardiomyocyte diameter was greater in the HSD4 and HSD8 groups than in the HSD8+LOS and NSD groups. Interstitial fibrosis was greater in the HSD4 and HSD8 groups than in the HSD8+HZ and NSD groups. Hydralazine prevented high blood pressure (BP) and fibrosis, but not cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Losartan prevented high BP and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, but not fibrosis. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT(1)) protein expression in both ventricles was greater in the HSD8 group than in the NSD group. Losartan, but not hydralazine, prevented this effect. Compared with the NSD group, the binding of an AT(1) conformation-specific antibody that recognizes the activated form of the receptor was lower in both ventricles in all other groups. Losartan further lowered the binding of the anti-AT(1) antibody in both ventricles compared with all other experimental groups. Angiotensin II was greater in both ventricles in all groups compared with the NSD group. Myocardial structural alterations in response to HSD are independent of the effect on BP. Salt-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and interstitial fibrosis possibly are due to different mechanisms. Evidence from the present study suggests that salt-induced AT(1) receptor internalization is probably due to angiotensin II binding. PMID:20724490

  7. Use of cold intravenous fluid to induce hypothermia in a comatose child after cardiac arrest due to a lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Min; Jeong, Ju-Hwan; Kyong, Yeon-Young; Kim, Han-Joon; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Park, Jeong-Ho; Park, Kyu-Nam

    2008-11-01

    We report a case in which mild hypothermia was induced successfully using a cold intravenous fluid infusion in a 12-year-old boy who was comatose following 21 min of cardiac arrest caused by a lightning strike. PMID:18805616

  8. Bronchogenic Carcinoma with Cardiac Invasion Simulating Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anirban; Das, Sibes K.; Pandit, Sudipta; Karmakar, Rathindra Nath

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac metastases in bronchogenic carcinoma may occur due to retrograde lymphatic spread or by hematogenous dissemination of tumour cells, but direct invasion of heart by adjacent malignant lung mass is very uncommon. Pericardium is frequently involved in direct cardiac invasion by adjacent lung cancer. Pericardial effusion, pericarditis, and tamponade are common and life threatening presentation in such cases. But direct invasion of myocardium and endocardium is very uncommon. Left atrial endocardium is most commonly involved in such cases due to anatomical contiguity with pulmonary hilum through pulmonary veins, and in most cases left atrial involvement is asymptomatic. But myocardial compression and invasion by adjacent lung mass may result in myocardial ischemia and may present with retrosternal, oppressive chest pain which clinically may simulate with the acute myocardial infarction (AMI). As a result, it leads to misdiagnosis and delayed diagnosis of lung cancer. Here we report a case of non-small-cell carcinoma of right lung which was presented with asymptomatic invasion in left atrium and retrosternal chest pain simulating AMI due to myocardial compression by adjacent lung mass, in a seventy-four-year-old male smoker. PMID:27042370

  9. Imaging patients with cardiac trauma.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Carlos S; Gutierrez, Fernando R; Marmol-Velez, Juan A; Ocazionez, Daniel; Martinez-Jimenez, Santiago

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, trauma is the leading cause of death among those who are 1-44 years old, with cardiovascular injuries representing the second most common cause of traumatic death after central nervous system injuries. Evaluation of trauma patients with suspected cardiac injury may be complex and include electrocardiography, measurement of cardiac biomarkers, and imaging examinations. Contrast material-enhanced computed tomography (CT) has become one of the most valuable imaging tools available for evaluating hemodynamically stable patients with suspected cardiac injury. The presence of hemopericardium, with or without cardiac tamponade, is one of the most significant findings of cardiac injury. Other complications that result from blunt cardiac injury, such as pericardial rupture and cardiac herniation, may be readily depicted at multidetector CT. Assessment of patients with cardiac injuries, particularly those with penetrating injuries, is a challenging and time-critical matter, with clinical and imaging findings having complementary roles in the formation of an accurate diagnosis. Patients who are hemodynamically stable, particularly those with penetrating cardiac injuries, also may benefit from a timely imaging examination. In addition to chest radiography, other available modalities such as transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, nuclear medicine, and magnetic resonance imaging may play a role in selected cases. PMID:22582351

  10. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase-1b (CPT1b) Deficiency Aggravates Pressure-Overload-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy due to Lipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    He, Lan; Kim, Teayoun; Long, Qinqiang; Liu, Jian; Wang, Peiyong; Zhou, Yiqun; Ding, Yishu; Prasain, Jeevan; Wood, Philip A.; Yang, Qinglin

    2012-01-01

    Background Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1(CPT1) is a rate-limiting step of mitochondrial β-oxidation by controlling the mitochondrial uptake of long-chain acyl-CoAs. The muscle isoform, CPT1b, is the predominant isoform expressed in the heart. It has been suggested that inhibiting CPT-1 activity by specific CPT-1 inhibitors exerts protective effects against cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. However, clinical and animal studies have shown mixed results, thereby posting concerns on the safety of this class of drugs. Preclinical studies using genetically modified animal models should provide a better understanding of targeting CPT1 in order to evaluate it as a safe and effective therapeutic approach. Methods and Results Heterozygous CPT1b knockout mice (CPT1b+/−) were subjected to transverse aorta constriction (TAC)-induced pressure-overload. These mice showed overtly normal cardiac structure/function under the basal condition. Under a severe pressure-overload condition induced by two weeks of transverse aorta constriction (TAC), CPT1b+/− mice were susceptible to premature death with congestive heart failure. Under a milder pressure-overload condition, CPT1b+/− mice exhibited exacerbated cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling compared with that in wild-type littermates. There were more pronounced impairments of cardiac contraction with greater eccentric cardiac hypertrophy in CPT1b+/− than in controlled mice. Moreover, the CPT1b+/− heart exhibited exacerbated mitochondrial abnormalities and myocardial lipid accumulation with elevated triglycerides and ceramide content, leading to greater cardiomyocytes apoptosis. Conclusions We conclude that CPT1b deficiency can cause lipotoxicity in the heart under pathological stress, leading to exacerbation of cardiac pathology. Therefore, caution should be applied in the clinical use of CPT-1 inhibitors. PMID:22932257

  11. Tamponade or Filling Effect: Changes of Forces in Myopic Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Morescalchi, Francesco; Romano, Mario R.

    2014-01-01

    Myopia is the most common ocular abnormality. Its high and growing prevalence has contributed to a recent surge in surgical interest in the disorder, since retinal detachment in eyes with high myopia differs from that in emmetropic eyes or eyes with low myopia. The myopic eye, because of its specific anatomy, poses special challenges that need to be overcome to ensure the appropriate use of vitreous substitutes. However, intraocular tamponades have shown great potential for revolutionizing retinal detachment surgery and vitreomacular surgery in general in myopic eyes. We provide an updated review of the clinical use of vitreous substitutes in the myopic eye, paying particular attention to analyzing the ideal function of endotamponade agents and comparing the effects of these agents on the physical and biological properties of the eye. PMID:25101290

  12. Upregulation of cardiac NOS due to endotoxemia and vagal overactivity contributes to the hypotensive effect of chronic ethanol in female rats.

    PubMed

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M; Fan, Ming; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A

    2011-01-10

    We previously reported that chronic ethanol lowers blood pressure in female rats. In this study, hemodynamic, biochemical, and immunoblot analyses were performed to investigate: (i) the roles of cardiac contractility and autonomic activity in the hypotensive action of ethanol, and (ii) whether endotoxemia-induced upregulation of cardiac and/or vascular nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms underlies the hypotensive and cardiac effects of ethanol. Telemetric monitoring of blood pressure, heart rate, and myocardial contractility (dP/dt(max)) was performed in female rats receiving liquid diet with or without ethanol (5% w/v, 13weeks). Autonomic control was assessed by frequency domain analysis of interbeat intervals (IBI) and systolic blood pressure (SBP). Compared with pair-fed controls, ethanol caused sustained reductions in blood pressure, heart rate, and+dP/dt(max). Ethanol feeding increased the spectral power of high-frequency band (IBI(HF), 0.75-3Hz) and decreased the low-frequency band (IBI(LF), 0.25-0.75Hz) and IBI(LF/HF) ratio, suggesting increased cardiac parasympathetic dominance. In contrast, vascular tone was not affected by ethanol because SBP spectral bands and plasma norepinephrine remained unchanged. Myocardial expressions of eNOS and its upstream regulators, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt, and plasma endotoxin and nitrite/nitrate were increased by ethanol. Myocardial iNOS was also increased by ethanol whereas nNOS remained unchanged and aortic levels of all NOS isoforms were not altered by ethanol. These findings suggest that facilitation of myocardial PI3K/Akt/eNOS and iNOS pathways, due possibly to ethanol-induced endotoxemia and/or increased cardiac parasympathetic dominance, might constitute a cellular mechanism for the reduced myocardial contractility and hypotension caused by ethanol in female rats. PMID:20970417

  13. Upregulation of cardiac NOS due to endotoxemia and vagal overactivity contribute to the hypotensive effect of chronic ethanol in female rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M.; Fan, Ming; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A.

    2010-01-01

    We previously reported that chronic ethanol lowers blood pressure in female rats. In this study, hemodynamic, biochemical, and immunoblot analyses were performed to investigate: (i) the roles of cardiac contractility and autonomic activity in the hypotensive action of ethanol, and (ii) whether endotoxemia-induced upregulation of cardiac and/or vascular nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms underlies the hypotensive and cardiac effects of ethanol. Telemetric monitoring of blood pressure, heart rate, and myocardial contractility (dP/dtmax) was performed in female rats receiving liquid diet with or without ethanol (5% w/v, 13 weeks). Autonomic control was assessed by frequency domain analysis of interbeat intervals (IBI) and systolic blood pressure (SBP). Compared with pair-fed controls, ethanol caused sustained reductions in blood pressure, heart rate, and +dP/dtmax. Ethanol feeding increased the spectral power of high-frequency band (IBIHF, 0.75–3 Hz) and decreased the low-frequency band (IBILF, 0.25–0.75 Hz) and IBILF/HF ratio, suggesting increased cardiac parasympathetic dominance. In contrast, vascular tone was not affected by ethanol because SBP spectral bands and plasma norepinephrine remained unchanged. Myocardial expressions of eNOS and its upstream regulators, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase(PI3K) and Akt, and plasma endotoxin and nitrite/nitrate were increased by ethanol. Myocardial iNOS was also increased by ethanol whereas nNOS remained unchanged and aortic levels of all NOS isoforms were not altered by ethanol. These findings suggest that facilitation of myocardial PI3K/Akt/eNOS and iNOS pathways, due possibly to ethanol-induced endotoxemia and/or increased cardiac parasympathetic dominance, might constitute a cellular mechanism for the reduced myocardial contractility and hypotension caused by ethanol in female rats. PMID:20970417

  14. Pericardial effusion after cardiac surgery: incidence, site, size, and haemodynamic consequences.

    PubMed Central

    Pepi, M; Muratori, M; Barbier, P; Doria, E; Arena, V; Berti, M; Celeste, F; Guazzi, M; Tamborini, G

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the incidence, characteristics, and haemodynamic consequences of pericardial effusion after cardiac surgery. DESIGN--Clinical, echocardiographic, and Doppler evaluations before and 8 days after cardiac surgery; with echocardiographic and Doppler follow up of patients with moderate or large pericardial effusion after operation. SETTING--Patients undergoing cardiac surgery at a tertiary centre. PATIENTS--803 consecutive patients who had coronary artery bypass grafting (430), valve replacement (330), and other types of surgery (43). 23 were excluded because of early reoperation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Size and site of pericardial effusion evaluated by cross sectional echocardiography and signs of cardiac tamponade detected by ultrasound (right atrial and ventricular diastolic collapse, left ventricular diastolic collapse, distension of the inferior vena cava), and Doppler echocardiography (inspiratory decrease of aortic and mitral flow velocities). RESULTS--Pericardial effusion was detected in 498 (64%) of 780 patients and was more often associated with coronary artery bypass grafting than with valve replacement or other types of surgery; it was small in 68.4%, moderate in 29.8%, and large in 1.6%. Loculated effusions (57.8%) were more frequent than diffuse ones (42.2%). The size and site of effusion were related to the type of surgery. None of the small pericardial effusions increased in size; the amount of fluid decreased within a month in most patients with moderate effusion and in a few (7 patients) developed into a large effusion and cardiac tamponade. 15 individuals (1.9%) had cardiac tamponade; this event was significantly more common after valve replacement (12 patients) than after coronary artery bypass grafting (2 patients) or other types of surgery (1 patient after pulmonary embolectomy). In patients with cardiac tamponade aortic and mitral flow velocities invariably decreased during inspiration; the echocardiographic signs were less

  15. Endovascular Stenting under Cardiac and Cerebral Protection for Subclavian Steal after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Due to Right Subclavian Artery Origin Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shigeyuki; Kiura, Yoshihiro; Okazaki, Takahito; Ichinose, Nobuhiko; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2015-03-01

    Coronary-subclavian steal (CSS) can occur after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) using the internal thoracic artery (ITA). Subclavian artery (SA) stenosis proximal to the ITA graft causes CSS. We describe a technique for cardiac and cerebral protection during endovascular stenting for CSS due to right SA origin stenosis after CABG. A 64-year-old man with a history of CABG using the right ITA presented with exertional right arm claudication. Angiogram showed a CSS and retrograde blood flow in the right vertebral artery (VA) due to severe stenosis of the right SA origin. Endovascular treatment of the right SA stenosis was planned. For cardiac and cerebral protection, distal balloon protection by inflating a 5.2-F occlusion balloon catheter in the SA proximal to the origin of the right VA and ITA through the right brachial artery approach and distal filter protection of the right internal carotid artery (ICA) through the left femoral artery (FA) approach were performed. Endovascular stenting for SA stenosis from the right FA approach was performed under cardiac and cerebral protection by filter-protection of the ICA and balloon-protection of the VA and ITA. Successful treatment of SA severe stenosis was achieved with no complications. PMID:25874182

  16. Endovascular Stenting under Cardiac and Cerebral Protection for Subclavian Steal after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Due to Right Subclavian Artery Origin Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kiura, Yoshihiro; Okazaki, Takahito; Ichinose, Nobuhiko; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Coronary-subclavian steal (CSS) can occur after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) using the internal thoracic artery (ITA). Subclavian artery (SA) stenosis proximal to the ITA graft causes CSS. We describe a technique for cardiac and cerebral protection during endovascular stenting for CSS due to right SA origin stenosis after CABG. A 64-year-old man with a history of CABG using the right ITA presented with exertional right arm claudication. Angiogram showed a CSS and retrograde blood flow in the right vertebral artery (VA) due to severe stenosis of the right SA origin. Endovascular treatment of the right SA stenosis was planned. For cardiac and cerebral protection, distal balloon protection by inflating a 5.2-F occlusion balloon catheter in the SA proximal to the origin of the right VA and ITA through the right brachial artery approach and distal filter protection of the right internal carotid artery (ICA) through the left femoral artery (FA) approach were performed. Endovascular stenting for SA stenosis from the right FA approach was performed under cardiac and cerebral protection by filter-protection of the ICA and balloon-protection of the VA and ITA. Successful treatment of SA severe stenosis was achieved with no complications. PMID:25874182

  17. Cardiac amyloidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way electrical signals move through the heart (conduction system). This can lead to abnormal heart beats ( ... due to medication) Sick sinus syndrome Symptomatic cardiac conduction system disease (arrhythmias related to abnormal conduction of ...

  18. Mechanical Chest Compressions in Prolonged Cardiac Arrest due to ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction Can Cause Myocardial Contusion.

    PubMed

    Stechovsky, Cyril; Hajek, Petr; Cipro, Simon; Veselka, Josef

    2016-09-01

    Acute coronary syndrome is a common cause of sudden cardiac death. We present a case report of a 60-year-old man without a history of coronary artery disease who presented with ST-elevation myocardial infarction. During transportation to the hospital, he developed ventricular fibrillation (VF) and later pulseless electrical activity. Chest compressions with LUCAS 2 (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) automated mechanical compression-decompression device were initiated. Coronary angiography showed total occlusion of the left main coronary artery and primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was performed. After the PCI, his heart started to generate effective contractions and LUCAS could be discontinued. Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved after 90 minutes of cardiac arrest. The patient died of cardiogenic shock 11 hours later. An autopsy revealed a transmural anterolateral myocardial infarction but also massive subepicardial hemorrhage and interstitial edema and hemorrhages on histologic samples from regions of the myocardium outside the infarction itself and also from the right ventricle. These lesions were concluded to be a myocardial contusion. The true incidence of myocardial contusion as a consequence of mechanical chest compressions is not known. We speculate that severe myocardial contusion might have influenced outcome of our patient. PMID:27574387

  19. Cardiac and aortic structural alterations due to surgically-induced menopause associated with renovascular hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Leonardo de Souza; Fernandes-Santos, Caroline; Mandarim-de-Lacerda, Carlos Alberto

    2007-08-01

    Menopause and hypertension independently alter cardiovascular remodelling, but little is known about their effect on left ventricular and aortic wall remodelling. Eight-weeks-old Wistar rats were divided into four groups of six animals each: Sham group, OVX group (ovariectomized rats), 2K1C (two-kidneys, one-clip rats) and OVX + 2K1C group and kept until 19 weeks. Blood pressure (BP) increased 12% in OVX group, 35% in 2K1C and OVX + 2K1C groups compared with sham group. Vaginal cytology showed Sham and 2K1C rats cycling normally, whereas OVX and OVX + 2K1C rats were persistently in dioestrus or proestrus. At euthanasia, left ventricle (LV) and thoracic aorta were removed and analysed (immunohistochemistry and stereology). LV mass/tibia length ratio and cross-sectional area of cardiomyocytes increased in all groups except Sham. The intramyocardial vascularization reduced 30% in comparison with Sham group, with no difference among OVX, 2K1C and OVX + 2K1C groups. The cardiac interstitium increased more than 45% in both 2K1C and OVX + 2K1C groups compared with Sham, but there was no significant difference between Sham and OVX groups. Nuclei number of LV cardiomyocyte diminished in OVX group, followed by 2K1C group and OVX + 2K1C group, with no difference between the 2K1C and the OVX + 2K1C groups. There was positive immunostaining for angiotensin II AT1 receptor in smooth muscle cell layer of aortic tunica media in all groups. These results show that both ovariectomy and renovascular hypertension enhance BP as a single stimulus and therefore produce adverse cardiac remodelling. However, renovascular hypertension exerts a far greater influence than surgically-induced menopause in this parameter. PMID:17696911

  20. 23-gauge vitrectomy and silicone oil tamponade with and without phacoemulsification in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Ozkan, Seyhan Sonar; Citirik, Mehmet; Beyazyildiz, Emrullah; Beyazyildiz, Ozlem

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess clinical outcomes of 23-gauge vitrectomy and silicone oil (SO) tamponade combined with and without phacoemulsification (PE) in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). The study included forty eyes of 40 patients that underwent 23-gauge vitrectomy and SO tamponade combined with and without PE. Twenty eyes of 20 cases, of whom underwent 23-gauge vitrectomy and SO tamponade combined with PE were allocated to the group 1. Likewise, 20 eyes of 20 cases that underwent 23-gauge vitrectomy and SO tamponade alone were allocated to the group 2. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) between two groups was compared. There was no significant difference in BCVA between the two groups during the 6 months (P = 0.3). Recurrent retinal detachments were observed in 2 cases (10%) in both groups. There was no statistically significant difference between two groups as a point of recurrent retinal detachments (P = 1). We have found higher rates of post-vitrectomy cataract progression (45%) in the eyes with RRD who underwent 23-gauge vitrectomy and SO tamponade. Combined vitrectomy and PE is safe and effective for the patients with RRD. PMID:26064338

  1. Imaging of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Erthal, Fernanda; Juneau, Daniel; Lim, Siok P; Dwivedi, Girish; Nery, Pablo B; Birnie, David; Beanlands, Rob S

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease. Cardiac involvement is described in up to 50% of the cases. The disease spectrum is wide and cardiac manifestations ranges from being asymptomatic to heart failure, arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. The diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis can be challenging due to its non-specific nature and the focal involvement of the heart. In this review, we discuss the utility of a stepwise approach with multimodality cardiac imaging in the diagnosis and management of CS. PMID:27225318

  2. Recurrent Muscle Weakness with Rhabdomyolysis, Metabolic Crises, and Cardiac Arrhythmia Due to Bi-allelic TANGO2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R.; Liu, Pengfei; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Watkin, Levi B.; Chiang, Theodore; Leduc, Magalie S.; Zhu, Wenmiao; Ding, Yan; Pan, Shujuan; Vetrini, Francesco; Miyake, Christina Y.; Shinawi, Marwan; Gambin, Tomasz; Eldomery, Mohammad K.; Akdemir, Zeynep Hande Coban; Emrick, Lisa; Wilnai, Yael; Schelley, Susan; Koenig, Mary Kay; Memon, Nada; Farach, Laura S.; Coe, Bradley P.; Azamian, Mahshid; Hernandez, Patricia; Zapata, Gladys; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Muzny, Donna M.; Lotze, Timothy; Clark, Gary; Wilfong, Angus; Northrup, Hope; Adesina, Adekunle; Bacino, Carlos A.; Scaglia, Fernando; Bonnen, Penelope E.; Crosson, Jane; Duis, Jessica; Maegawa, Gustavo H.B.; Coman, David; Inwood, Anita; McGill, Jim; Boerwinkle, Eric; Graham, Brett; Beaudet, Art; Eng, Christine M.; Hanchard, Neil A.; Xia, Fan; Orange, Jordan S.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Yang, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    The underlying genetic etiology of rhabdomyolysis remains elusive in a significant fraction of individuals presenting with recurrent metabolic crises and muscle weakness. Using exome sequencing, we identified bi-allelic mutations in TANGO2 encoding transport and Golgi organization 2 homolog (Drosophila) in 12 subjects with episodic rhabdomyolysis, hypoglycemia, hyperammonemia, and susceptibility to life-threatening cardiac tachyarrhythmias. A recurrent homozygous c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation was found in four unrelated individuals of Hispanic/Latino origin, and a homozygous ∼34 kb deletion affecting exons 3–9 was observed in two families of European ancestry. One individual of mixed Hispanic/European descent was found to be compound heterozygous for c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) and the deletion of exons 3–9. Additionally, a homozygous exons 4–6 deletion was identified in a consanguineous Middle Eastern Arab family. No homozygotes have been reported for these changes in control databases. Fibroblasts derived from a subject with the recurrent c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation showed evidence of increased endoplasmic reticulum stress and a reduction in Golgi volume density in comparison to control. Our results show that the c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation and the exons 3–9 heterozygous deletion in TANGO2 are recurrent pathogenic alleles present in the Latino/Hispanic and European populations, respectively, causing considerable morbidity in the homozygotes in these populations. PMID:26805781

  3. Cerebral infarction due to cardiac myxoma developed with the loss of consciousness immediately after defecation-a case report.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Toshimasa; Oomura, Masahiro; Sato, Chikako; Anan, Chise; Yamada, Kentaro; Kamimoto, Kaoru

    2016-05-31

    A 74-year-old man lost consciousness immediately after defecation. The loss of consciousness lasted for several minutes, and he experienced difficulty in walking when he regained consciousness. He was transferred to our hospital via an ambulance. Upon neurological examination, nystagmus and ataxia in the left arm and leg were noted. An MRI of the brain revealed multiple acute infarcts mainly in the bilateral cerebellum. Intravenous thrombolytic therapy with alteplase was initiated 3 h and 20 min after the onset of symptoms, and an improvement in neurological symptoms was observed. Echocardiography displayed a mobile mass in the left atrium, suggesting myxoma. After 14 days from the onset of symptoms, the tumor was surgically resected, and a pathological diagnosis of myxoma was established. Because of the unique event surrounding the onset in this case, we considered that there was a potential detachment of myxoma and/or thrombi fragments triggered by an increase in intrathoracic pressure induced by the action of defecation. This present case suggests that clinicians should consider cardiac myxoma in patients with cerebral infarction if the stroke is preceded by a Valsalva maneuver-like action and accompanied by the loss of consciousness. PMID:27151226

  4. High-Dose Polymerized Hemoglobin Fails to Alleviate Cardiac Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury due to Induction of Oxidative Damage in Coronary Artery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Wu, Wei; Li, Qian; Chen, Chan; Zhou, Ronghua; Qiu, Yanhua; Luo, Ming; Tan, Zhaoxia; Li, Shen; Chen, Gang; Zhou, Wentao; Liu, Jiaxin; Yang, Chengmin; Liu, Jin; Li, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is an unavoidable event for patients in cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). This study was designed to investigate whether glutaraldehyde-polymerized human placenta hemoglobin (PolyPHb), a hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier (HBOC), can protect heart against CPB-induced I/R injury or not and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Methods and Results. A standard dog CPB model with 2-hour cardiac arrest and 2-hour reperfusion was established. The results demonstrated that a low-dose PolyPHb (0.1%, w/v) provided a significant protection on the I/R heart, whereas the high-dose PolyPHb (3%, w/v) did not exhibit cardioprotective effect, as evidenced by the impaired cardiac function, decreased myocardial oxygen utilization, and elevated enzymes release and pathological changes. Further study indicated that exposure of isolated coronary arteries or human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to a high-dose PolyPHb caused impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation, which was companied with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and elevated malonaldehyde (MDA) formation. Consistent with the increased oxidative stress, the NAD(P)H oxidase activity and subunits expression, including gp91(phox), p47(phox), p67(phox), and Nox1, were greatly upregulated. Conclusion. The high-dose PolyPHb fails to protect heart from CPB-induced I/R injury, which was due to overproduction of NAD(P)H oxidase-induced ROS and resultant endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26161234

  5. High-Dose Polymerized Hemoglobin Fails to Alleviate Cardiac Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury due to Induction of Oxidative Damage in Coronary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qian; Wu, Wei; Li, Qian; Chen, Chan; Zhou, Ronghua; Qiu, Yanhua; Luo, Ming; Tan, Zhaoxia; Li, Shen; Chen, Gang; Zhou, Wentao; Liu, Jiaxin; Yang, Chengmin; Liu, Jin; Li, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is an unavoidable event for patients in cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). This study was designed to investigate whether glutaraldehyde-polymerized human placenta hemoglobin (PolyPHb), a hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier (HBOC), can protect heart against CPB-induced I/R injury or not and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Methods and Results. A standard dog CPB model with 2-hour cardiac arrest and 2-hour reperfusion was established. The results demonstrated that a low-dose PolyPHb (0.1%, w/v) provided a significant protection on the I/R heart, whereas the high-dose PolyPHb (3%, w/v) did not exhibit cardioprotective effect, as evidenced by the impaired cardiac function, decreased myocardial oxygen utilization, and elevated enzymes release and pathological changes. Further study indicated that exposure of isolated coronary arteries or human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to a high-dose PolyPHb caused impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation, which was companied with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and elevated malonaldehyde (MDA) formation. Consistent with the increased oxidative stress, the NAD(P)H oxidase activity and subunits expression, including gp91phox, p47phox, p67phox, and Nox1, were greatly upregulated. Conclusion. The high-dose PolyPHb fails to protect heart from CPB-induced I/R injury, which was due to overproduction of NAD(P)H oxidase-induced ROS and resultant endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26161234

  6. Cesarean Scar Dehiscence Associated with Intrauterine Balloon Tamponade Placement After a Second Trimester Dilation and Evacuation

    PubMed Central

    Aeby, Tod; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2011-01-01

    While surgical abortion is a safe procedure, the most common complication is excessive bleeding. Methods to conservatively manage hemorrhage are gaining popularity. The authors present a case of a Cesarean scar rupture that occurred after an intrauterine balloon tamponade was placed to treat postabortion bleeding. PMID:21886300

  7. Hemopericardium and Cardiac Tamponade in a Patient Treated with Dabigatran Etexilate

    PubMed Central

    Gunes, Haci Murat; Guler, Ekrem; Demir, Gultekin Gunhan; Karaca, Oguz; Canpolat, Habibe Gamze

    2016-01-01

    Dabigatran etexilate is one of the new oral anticoagulants approved to reduce the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). A variety of bleeding complications with dabigatran have been reported, but reports of hemopericardium are rare. We described a case of a 66 year-old female patient with non-valvular AF receiving dabigatran etexilate 150 mg twice daily for one year who suffered from hemopericardium. Her laboratory tests performed 1 year prior were normal and her admission tests revealed acute renal failure and elevated international normalized ratio (INR) level (4.79). Urgent pericardiocentesis was followed by improved renal functions and normalized INR. Dabigatran etexilate is a new oral anticoagulant that is increasingly used in daily practice. However, life-threatening complications warrant caution. Elevated INR may be related with overdose but the association of bleeding risk of dabigatran and INR requires further confirmation. PMID:26798391

  8. Dosimetric perturbations due to an implanted cardiac pacemaker in MammoSite{sup Registered-Sign} treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Wonmo; Kim, Siyong; Kim, Jung-in; Lee, Jae-gi; Shin, Young-Joo; Jung, Jae-Yong; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate dose perturbations for pacemaker-implanted patients in partial breast irradiation using high dose rate (HDR) balloon brachytherapy. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed to calculate dose distributions involving a pacemaker in Ir-192 HDR balloon brachytherapy. Dose perturbations by varying balloon-to-pacemaker distances (BPD = 50 or 100 mm) and concentrations of iodine contrast medium (2.5%, 5.0%, 7.5%, and 10.0% by volume) in the balloon were investigated for separate parts of the pacemaker (i.e., battery and substrate). Relative measurements using an ion-chamber were also performed to confirm MC results. Results: The MC and measured results in homogeneous media without a pacemaker agreed with published data within 2% from the balloon surface to 100 mm BPD. Further their dose distributions with a pacemaker were in a comparable agreement. The MC results showed that doses over the battery were increased by a factor of 3, compared to doses without a pacemaker. However, there was no significant dose perturbation in the middle of substrate but up to 70% dose increase in the substrate interface with the titanium capsule. The attenuation by iodine contrast medium lessened doses delivered to the pacemaker by up to 9%. Conclusions: Due to inhomogeneity of pacemaker and contrast medium as well as low-energy photons in Ir-192 HDR balloon brachytherapy, the actual dose received in a pacemaker is different from the homogeneous medium-based dose and the external beam-based dose. Therefore, the dose perturbations should be considered for pacemaker-implanted patients when evaluating a safe clinical distance between the balloon and pacemaker.

  9. Surgical Removal of Retained Subfoveal Perfluorocarbon Liquid through a Therapeutic Macular Hole with Intravitreal PFCL Injection and Gas Tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Min; Park, Kyu Hyung; Chung, Hum

    2013-01-01

    We report two cases of surgical removal of a retained subfoveal perfluorocarbon liquid (PFCL) bubble through a therapeutic macular hole combined with intravitreal PFCL injection and gas tamponade. Two patients underwent pars plana vitrectomy with PFCL injection for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. In both cases, a retained subfoveal PFCL bubble was noticed postoperatively by funduscopy and optical coherence tomography. Both patients underwent surgical removal of the subfoveal PFCL through a therapeutic macular hole and gas tamponade. The therapeutic macular holes were completely closed by gas tamponade and the procedure yielded a good visual outcome (best-corrected visual acuity of 20 / 40 in both cases). In one case, additional intravitreal PFCL injection onto the macula reduced the size of the therapeutic macular hole and preserved the retinal structures in the macula. Surgical removal of a retained subfoveal PFCL bubble through a therapeutic macular hole combined with intravitreal PFCL injection and gas tamponade provides an effective treatment option. PMID:24082781

  10. [Cardiac arrest following blunt chest injury. Emergency thoracotomy without ifs or buts?].

    PubMed

    Leidel, B A; Kanz, K G; Kirchhoff, C; Bürklein, D; Wismüller, A; Mutschler, W

    2007-10-01

    In German-speaking countries, most serious thoracic injuries are attributable to the impact of blunt force; they are the second most frequent result of injury after head injury in polytrauma patients with multiple injuries. Almost one in every three polytraumatized patients with significant chest injury develops acute lung failure, and one in every four, acute circulatory failure. The acute circulatory arrest following serious chest injury involves a high mortality rate, and in most cases it reflects a tension pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade, or hemorrhagic shock resulting from injury to the heart or one of the large vessels close to it. Brisk drainage of tension pneumothorax and adequate volume restoration are therefore particularly important in resuscitation of multiply traumatized patients, as are rapid resuscitative thoracotomy to allow direct heart massage, drainage of pericardial tamponade, and control of hemorrhage. However the probability of survival described in the literature is very low for patients sustaining severe chest trauma with acute cardiac arrest. The case report presented here describes a female polytrauma patient who suffered an acute cardiac arrest following cardiac tamponade after admission in the emergency department and who survived without neurological deficits after an emergency thoracotomy. Selections from the topical literature can help the treating physician in the emergency department in making decisions on whether an emergency thoracotomy is indicated after a blunt chest injury and on the procedure itself. PMID:17909734

  11. Shear and Extensional Rheometry of PDMS Tamponade Agents Used in Vitroretinal Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Michael; Blanchard, Rowan-Louise; English, Rob; Dobbie, Tom; Williams, Rachel; Garvey, Michael; Wong, David

    2008-07-01

    The emulsification of low molar mass silicone oil (PDMS)-based tamponade agents used in the treatment of complex retinal detachments is a significant clinical problem leading to the patient suffering impairment of vision whilst the tamponade is in place. This is particularly the case in temporal postoperative applications where the tamponade can remain in the ocular cavity for several months. The majority of clinicians prefer to use a PDMS fluid of kinematic viscosity 1000 cS, which offers ease of manual injection. Work is progressing towards the development of tamponades with a reduced tendency to emulsify, through specific tailoring of rheology and interfacial properties. Greater knowledge of the mechanism of intraocular emulsification is being elucidated and has led to the development of `polymer modified' tamponades with enhanced performance. Such materials are formulated by the addition of a high molecular weight PDMS to the base PDMS fluid. Measurement of the shear viscosity at moderate shear rates is useful in predicting performance during manual injection into the eye. However, the determination of the behaviour in both shear and extension at high strain rates is useful in predicting resistance to intraocular emulsification and in informing future modeling studies. Initial experiments focused on rotational rheometry (shear) and capillary breakup rheometry (CaBER—extension). A range of polymer modified tamponades were characterised—based on PDMS base oils from 100-5000 cS and containing up to 30% by weight PDMS of molecular weight varying in the range 100-800 kDa. Even though the volume occupancy of the polymeric additive ranged from dilute to significantly interpenetrated, a linear response was observed in each case. However, subsequent experiments using capillary rheometry lead to the observation of non-linear behaviour and significant differences in the type of response. Systems with enhanced high strain rate tensile viscosities gave improved

  12. Neonatal multiorgan failure due to ACAD9 mutation and complex I deficiency with mitochondrial hyperplasia in liver, cardiac myocytes, skeletal muscle, and renal tubules.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Nancy; Wang, Xinjian; Peng, Yanyan; Valencia, C Alexander; Khuchua, Zaza; Hata, Jessica; Witte, David; Huang, Taosheng; Bove, Kevin E

    2016-03-01

    Complex I deficiency causes Leigh syndrome, fatal infant lactic acidosis, and neonatal cardiomyopathy. Mutations in more than 100 nuclear DNA and mitochondrial DNA genes miscode for complex I subunits or assembly factors. ACAD9 is an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase with a novel function in assembly of complex I; biallelic mutations cause progressive encephalomyopathy, recurrent Reye syndrome, and fatal cardiomyopathy. We describe the first autopsy in fatal neonatal lethal lactic acidosis due to mutations in ACAD9 that reduced complex I activity. We identified mitochondrial hyperplasia in cardiac myocytes, diaphragm muscle, and liver and renal tubules in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue using immunohistochemistry for mitochondrial antigens. Whole-exome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous variants in the ACAD9 gene: c.187G>T (p.E63*) and c.941T>C (p.L314P). The nonsense mutation causes late infantile lethality; the missense variant is novel. Autopsy-derived fibroblasts had reduced complex I activity (53% of control) with normal activity in complexes II to IV, similar to reported cases of ACAD9 deficiency. PMID:26826406

  13. Giant retinal tears. Surgical techniques and results using perfluorodecalin and silicone oil tamponade.

    PubMed

    Mathis, A; Pagot, V; Gazagne, C; Malecaze, F

    1992-01-01

    Intraoperative use of perfluorocarbon liquids in the management of giant retinal tears was introduced about 4 years ago. Twenty-four patients were operated on for giant retinal tears using perfluorodecalin and silicone oil tamponade. All patients underwent pars plana vitrectomy, unfolding of the giant retinal tears by perfluorodecalin, perfluorodecalin-silicone oil exchange, and endophotocoagulation. The lens was removed in 10 of 14 phakic patients, and encircling scleral buckle was placed in 18 cases. Twenty-three of 24 retinas remained successfully attached with a minimum of 6 months of follow-up. Short-term results of intraoperative use of perfluorodecalin and silicone oil tamponade in the management of giant retinal tears are encouraging. Perfluorodecalin offers the advantage of low cost compared with other perfluoro-carbon liquids like perfluoro-n-octane. The exchange with silicone oil offers the advantages of easy removal of perfluorodecalin and absence of posterior slippage of the retinal tear. PMID:1455087

  14. Large pericardial effusions due to systemic lupus erythematosus: a report of eight cases.

    PubMed

    Weich, H S v H; Burgess, L J; Reuter, H; Brice, E A; Doubell, A F

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the clinical, echocardiographic and laboratory characteristics of large pericardial effusions and cardiac tamponade secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). An ongoing prospective study was conducted at Tygerberg Academic Hospital, South Africa between 1996 and 2002. All patients older than 13 years presenting with large pericardial effusions (> 10 mm) requiring pericardiocentesis were included. Eight cases (out of 258) were diagnosed with SLE. The mean (SD) age was 29.5 (10.7) years. Common clinical features were Raynaud's phenomenon, arthralgia and lupus nephritis class III/IV. Echocardiography showed Libman-Sacks endocarditis (LSE) in all the mitral valves. Two patients developed transient left ventricular dysfunction; both these patients had pancarditis. Typical serological findings included antinuclear antibodies, anti-double stranded DNA antibodies, low complement C4 levels and low C3 levels. CRP was elevated in six cases. Treatment consisted of oral steroids and complete drainage of the pericardial effusions. No repeat pericardial effusions or constrictive pericarditis developed amongst the survivors (3.1 years follow up). This study concludes that large pericardial effusions due to SLE are rare, and associated with nephritis, LSE and myocardial dysfunction. Treatment with steroids and complete drainage is associated with a good cardiac outcome. PMID:16038109

  15. Antiplatelet efficacy of P2Y12 inhibitors (prasugrel, ticagrelor, clopidogrel) in patients treated with mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest due to acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Bednar, Frantisek; Kroupa, Josef; Ondrakova, Martina; Osmancik, Pavel; Kopa, Milos; Motovska, Zuzana

    2016-05-01

    Survivors after cardiac arrest (CA) due to AMI undergo PCI and then receive dual antiplatelet therapy. Mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) is recommended for unconscious patients after CA to improve neurological outcomes. MTH can attenuate the effectiveness of P2Y12 inhibitors by reducing gastrointestinal absorption and metabolic activation. The combined effect of these conditions on the efficacy of P2Y12 inhibitors is unknown. We compared the antiplatelet efficacies of new P2Y12 inhibitors in AMI patients after CA treated with MTH. Forty patients after CA for AMI treated with MTH and received one P2Y12 inhibitor (clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor) were enrolled in a prospective observational single-center study. Platelet inhibition was measured by VASP (PRI) on days 1, 2, and 3 after drug administration. In-hospital clinical data and 1-year survival data were obtained. The proportion of patients with ineffective platelet inhibition (PRI > 50 %, high on-treatment platelet reactivity) for clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor was 77 vs. 19 vs. 1 % on day 1; 77 vs. 17 vs. 0 % on day 2; and 85 vs. 6 vs. 0 % on day 3 (P < 0.001). The platelet inhibition was significantly worse in clopidogrel group than in prasugrel or ticagrelor group. Prasugrel and ticagrelor are very effective for platelet inhibition in patients treated with MTH after CA due to AMI, but clopidogrel is not. Using prasugrel or ticagrelor seems to be a more suitable option in this high-risk group of acute patients. PMID:26340851

  16. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program ... be designed to meet your needs. The Cardiac Rehabilitation Team Cardiac rehab involves a long-term commitment ...

  17. Apoptosis Factors of Lens Epithelial Cells Responsible for Cataractogenesis in Vitrectomized Eyes with Silicone Oil Tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lili; Zhao, Ke; Lou, Dinghua

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the expression of apoptotic factors Bax, Bcl-2, and Caspase-3 in lens epithelial cells (LECs) from cataracts secondary to pars plana vitrectomy with silicone oil (SO) tamponade. We also investigated the impact of SO emulsification on the expression of apoptotic factors. Material/Methods Anterior capsulotomy specimens of 20 eyes in 20 patients with cataract secondary to SO tamponade (Group 2), were collected. Another 20 eyes of 20 patients with age-related cataract (Group 1) were recruited as controls. The anterior capsule specimens were obtained from the patients during cataract surgery, frozen and later analyzed with respect to immunohistochemical stains of Bax, Bcl-2, and Caspase-3 using a confocal microscope. Results Age, sex, and laterality did not show any difference between the 2 groups. There was a greater increase in Bax and Caspase-3 expression in LEC in Group 2 than in Group 1 (PBax<0.0001, PCaspase-3<0.0001). The Bcl-2 expression decreased in Group 2, although the difference was not significant (P=0.616). The changes of apoptosis factors are not associated to SO emulsification (PBax=0.354, PBcl-2=0.728, PCaspase-3=0.939). Conclusions The caspase-3-dependent apoptosis of LECs increased in complicated cataract patients with SO endotamponade. The Bax played a critical role in regulating apoptosis of LECs in vitrectomized eyes with SO tamponade. The SO emulsification had no significant impact on the expression of apoptosis factors. PMID:26956740

  18. Injury to the coronary arteries and related structures by implantation of cardiac implantable electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Pang, Benjamin J; Barold, S Serge; Mond, Harry G

    2015-04-01

    Damage to the coronary arteries and related structures from pacemaker and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead implantation is a rarely reported complication that can lead to myocardial infarction and pericardial tamponade that may occur acutely or even years later. We summarize the reported cases of injury to coronary arteries and related structures and review the causes of troponin elevation in the setting of cardiac implantable electronic device implantation. PMID:25564549

  19. Posttraumatic stress due to an acute coronary syndrome increases risk of 42-month major adverse cardiac events and all-cause mortality.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Donald; Rieckmann, Nina; Shaffer, Jonathan A; Schwartz, Joseph E; Burg, Matthew M; Davidson, Karina W; Clemow, Lynn; Shimbo, Daichi; Kronish, Ian M

    2011-12-01

    Approximately 15% of patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) due to their ACS event. We assessed whether ACS-induced PTSD symptoms increase risk for major adverse cardiac events (MACE) and all-cause mortality (ACM) in an observational cohort study of 247 patients (aged 25-93 years; 45% women) hospitalized for an ACS at one of 3 academic medical centers in New York and Connecticut between November 2003 and June 2005. Within 1 week of admission, patient demographics, Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events risk score, Charlson comorbidity index, left ventricular ejection fraction, and depression status were obtained. At 1-month follow-up, ACS-induced PTSD symptoms were assessed with the Impact of Events Scale-Revised. The primary endpoint was combined MACE (hospitalization for myocardial infarction, unstable angina or urgent/emergency coronary revascularization procedures) and ACM, which were actively surveyed for 42 months after index event. Thirty-six (15%) patients had elevated intrusion symptoms, 32 (13%) elevated avoidance symptoms, and 21 (9%) elevated hyperarousal symptoms. Study physicians adjudicated 21 MACEs and 15 deaths during the follow-up period. In unadjusted Cox proportional hazards regression analyses, and analyses adjusted for sex, age, clinical characteristics and depression, high intrusion symptoms were associated with the primary endpoint (adjusted hazard ratio, 3.38; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-9.02; p = .015). Avoidance and hyperarousal symptoms were not associated with the primary endpoint. The presence of intrusion symptoms is a strong and independent predictor of elevated risk for MACE and ACM, and should be considered in the risk stratification of ACS patients. PMID:21807378

  20. Out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest due to penetrating cardiac injury treated by percutaneous cardiopulmonary support in the emergency room: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kurimoto, Yoshihiko; Kano, Hitoshi; Yama, Naoya; Nara, Satoshi; Hase, Mamoru; Asai, Yasufumi

    2007-01-01

    Penetrating cardiac injury tends to generally be repaired without cardiopulmonary bypass in the operating room. We herein report the case of penetrating cardiac injury repaired using percutaneous cardiopulmonary support in an emergency room. A 57-year-old man attempted suicide by stabbing himself in the left anterior chest with a knife. Although the patient suffered cardiopulmonary arrest for 7 min in the ambulance, spontaneous circulation was restored following pericardiotomy through emergency left thoracotomy in the emergency room. To prevent coronary artery injury and control the massive bleeding, percutaneous cardiopulmonary support was instituted without systemic heparinization and the cardiac injury was repaired in the emergency room. The patient was then transferred to another hospital on day 46 for further rehabilitation. Percutaneous cardiopulmonary support might be helpful for treating critical patients in an emergency room, even in the case of trauma patients. PMID:17342366

  1. Endovascular Repair Using Suture-Mediated Closure Devices and Balloon Tamponade following Inadvertent Subclavian Artery Catheterization with Large-Caliber Hemodialysis Catheter.

    PubMed

    Park, Taek Kyu; Yang, Jeong Hoon; Choi, Seung-Hyuk

    2016-07-01

    Accidental subclavian artery cannulation is an uncommon but potentially serious complication of central venous catheterization. Removal of a catheter inadvertently placed in the subclavian artery can lead to substantial bleeding, as achieving hemostasis in this area through manual compression presents considerable difficulty. Additionally, surgical treatment might be unsuitable for high-risk patients due to comorbidities. Here, we report a case of an inadvertently-inserted 11.5-French hemodialysis catheter in the subclavian artery during internal jugular venous catheterization. We performed percutaneous closure of the subclavian artery using three 6-French Perclose Proglide® devices with a balloon tamponade in the proximal part of the subclavian artery. Closure was completed without embolic neurological complications. PMID:27482271

  2. Endovascular Repair Using Suture-Mediated Closure Devices and Balloon Tamponade following Inadvertent Subclavian Artery Catheterization with Large-Caliber Hemodialysis Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Park, Taek Kyu; Yang, Jeong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Accidental subclavian artery cannulation is an uncommon but potentially serious complication of central venous catheterization. Removal of a catheter inadvertently placed in the subclavian artery can lead to substantial bleeding, as achieving hemostasis in this area through manual compression presents considerable difficulty. Additionally, surgical treatment might be unsuitable for high-risk patients due to comorbidities. Here, we report a case of an inadvertently-inserted 11.5-French hemodialysis catheter in the subclavian artery during internal jugular venous catheterization. We performed percutaneous closure of the subclavian artery using three 6-French Perclose Proglide® devices with a balloon tamponade in the proximal part of the subclavian artery. Closure was completed without embolic neurological complications. PMID:27482271

  3. Factors influencing self-sealing of sclerotomy performed under gas tamponade in 23-gauge transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Takashina, Hirotsugu; Watanabe, Akira; Mitooka, Katsuya; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate factors influencing self-sealing of sclerotomy performed under gas tamponade in 23-gauge transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy. Methods This study was a retrospective review of 84 patients (84 eyes) who underwent 23-gauge transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy under gas tamponade by a single surgeon. At the end of surgery, the sclerotomy was massaged to promote self-sealing. Factors influencing massage time were examined using multiple regression analysis. Independent variables were age, surgical time, vitreous incarceration, intraocular manipulation, and axial length. Results Significant factors were intraocular manipulation and vitreous incarceration in the examination of all sclerotomies, age only in the examination of infusion sites, and vitreous incarceration only in the examination of manipulation sites. Conclusion In sclerotomy performed with gas tamponade using 23-gauge transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy, intraocular manipulation influenced self-sealing of sclerotomy the most, followed by vitreous incarceration, and then age. PMID:25336910

  4. Gender Differences in Non-Ischemic Myocardial Remodeling: Are They Due to Estrogen Modulation of Cardiac Mast Cells and/or Membrane Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase

    PubMed Central

    Janicki, Joseph S.; Spinale, Francis G.; Levick, Scott P.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY This review is focused on gender differences in cardiac remodeling secondary to sustained increases in cardiac volume (VO) and generated pressure (PO). Estrogen has been shown to favorably alter the course of VO-induced remodeling. That is, the VO-induced increased extracellular matrix proteolytic activity and mast cell degranulation responsible for the adverse cardiac remodeling in males and ovariectomized rodents do not occur in intact premenopausal females. While less is known regarding the mechanisms responsible for female cardioprotection in PO-induced stress, gender differences in remodeling have been reported indicating the ability of premenopausal females to adequately compensate. In view of the fact that, in male mice with PO, mast cells have been shown to play a role in the adverse remodeling suggests favorable estrogen modification of mast cell phenotype may also be responsible for cardioprotection in females with PO. Thus, while evidence is accumulating regarding premenopausal females being cardioprotected; there remains the need for in-depth studies to identify critical downstream molecular targets that are under the regulation of estrogen and relevant to cardiac remodeling. Such studies would result in the development of therapy which provides cardioprotection while avoiding the adverse effects of systemic estrogen delivery. PMID:23417570

  5. Cardiac Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Catheterization? Cardiac catheterization (KATH-eh-ter-ih-ZA-shun) is a ... disease. Doctors also can use ultrasound during cardiac catheterization to see blockages in the coronary arteries. Ultrasound ...

  6. Right Ventricular Migration of a Recovery IVC Filter's Fractured Wire with Subsequent Pericardial Tamponade

    SciTech Connect

    Saeed, Imran Garcia, Mark; McNicholas, Kathleen

    2006-08-15

    A Recovery filter (C.R. Bard, Tempe, AZ, USA) is a device for pulmonary embolism prophylaxis. There have been few case reports involving the migration of this particular filter or of a broken wire migrating to the heart. We report a case of right ventricular migration of a fractured wire from this filter in a patient who subsequently developed pericardial tamponade and required open heart surgery to extract the fractured wire. We discuss the current US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved nonpermanent inferior vena cava filters and their reported complications. These complications can be life-threatening and may require immediate surgical intervention.

  7. Blunt cardiac rupture with prehospital pulseless electrical activity: a rare successful experience.

    PubMed

    Lu, Li-Hua; Choi, Wai-Mau; Wu, Hsueh-Ru; Liu, Hung-Chang; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Tsai, Shin-Han

    2005-12-01

    Blunt cardiac rupture is highly associated with mortality. In the recent literature, the reported mortality rates of cardiac rupture ranged from 59.7% to 100%. The probability of survival for those with prehospital pulseless electrical activity was extremely low. This case report describes a rare example of survival of a female patient with life-threatening cardiac rupture and cardiac tamponade after a major car accident. The victim developed pulseless electrical activity at admission. She recovered from the accident, however, without developing any signs of neurologic deficits. This case study emphasizes the value of the primary survey of patients and prompt and accurate interventions, including focused abdominal sonography for trauma, pericardiocentesis, and an urgent thoracotomy in the operating room for primary repair of cardiac rupture without applying a cardiopulmonary bypass system. The study showed that early diagnosis and aggressive interventions are crucial factors to the successful outcome of patient's survival. PMID:16394928

  8. An interesting case of cryptogenic stroke in a young man due to left ventricular non-compaction: role of cardiac MRI in the accurate diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Arun; Das, Anindita; Janardhanan, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    A 28-year-old man arrived for an outpatient cardiac MRI (CMR) study to evaluate cardiac structure. At the age of 24 the patient presented with acute onset expressive aphasia and was diagnosed with ischaemic stroke. Echocardiography at that time was reported as ‘apical wall thickening consistent with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy’. CMR revealed a moderately dilated left ventricle with abnormal appearance of the left ventricular (LV) apical segments. Further evaluation was consistent with a diagnosis of LV non­compaction (LVNC) cardiomyopathy with a ratio of non­compacted to compacted myocardium measuring 3. There was extensive delayed hyperenhancement signal involving multiple segments representing a significant myocardial scar which is shown to have a prognostic role. Our patient, with no significant cerebrovascular risk factors, would likely have had an embolic stroke. This case demonstrates the role of CMR in accurately diagnosing LVNC in a patient with young stroke where prior echocardiography was non­diagnostic. PMID:24962593

  9. Cardiac arrest due to intracranial hypotension following pseudohypoxic brain swelling induced by negative suction drainage in a cranioplasty patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyun-Soo; Lee, Soo Kyung; Kim, Su Ryun; Kim, Seon Ju

    2016-06-01

    Pseudohypoxic brain swelling (PHBS) is known to be an uncommon event that may occur during and following an uneventful brain surgery, when negative suction drainage is used. The cerebrospinal fluid loss related to suction drainage can evoke intracranial hypotension that progress to PHBS. The main presentations of PHBS are sudden unexpected circulatory collapses, such as severe bradycardia, hypotension, cardiac arrest, consciousness deterioration and diffuse brain swelling as seen with brain computerized tomography (CT). We present a stuporous 22-year-old patient who underwent cranioplasty under general anesthesia. The entire course of the general anesthesia and operation progressed favorably. However, the time of scalp suture completion, sudden bradycardia and hypotension occurred, followed by cardiac arrest immediately after initiation of subgaleal and epidural suction drainage. After successful resuscitation, the comatose patient was transferred to the neurosurgical intensive care unit and PHBS was confirmed using brain CT. PMID:27274378

  10. Cardiac arrest due to intracranial hypotension following pseudohypoxic brain swelling induced by negative suction drainage in a cranioplasty patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Ryun; Kim, Seon Ju

    2016-01-01

    Pseudohypoxic brain swelling (PHBS) is known to be an uncommon event that may occur during and following an uneventful brain surgery, when negative suction drainage is used. The cerebrospinal fluid loss related to suction drainage can evoke intracranial hypotension that progress to PHBS. The main presentations of PHBS are sudden unexpected circulatory collapses, such as severe bradycardia, hypotension, cardiac arrest, consciousness deterioration and diffuse brain swelling as seen with brain computerized tomography (CT). We present a stuporous 22-year-old patient who underwent cranioplasty under general anesthesia. The entire course of the general anesthesia and operation progressed favorably. However, the time of scalp suture completion, sudden bradycardia and hypotension occurred, followed by cardiac arrest immediately after initiation of subgaleal and epidural suction drainage. After successful resuscitation, the comatose patient was transferred to the neurosurgical intensive care unit and PHBS was confirmed using brain CT. PMID:27274378

  11. Calmodulin 2 Mutation N98S Is Associated with Unexplained Cardiac Arrest in Infants Due to Low Clinical Penetrance Electrical Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Jáimez, Juan; Palomino Doza, Julián; Ortega, Ángeles; Macías-Ruiz, Rosa; Perin, Francesca; Rodríguez-Vázquez del Rey, M. Mar; Ortiz-Genga, Martín; Monserrat, Lorenzo; Barriales-Villa, Roberto; Blanca, Enrique; Álvarez, Miguel; Tercedor, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background Calmodulin 1, 2 and 3 (CALM) mutations have been found to cause cardiac arrest in children at a very early age. The underlying aetiology described is long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) and idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (IVF). Little phenotypical data about CALM2 mutations is available. Objectives The aim of this paper is to describe the clinical manifestations of the Asn98Ser mutation in CALM2 in two unrelated children in southern Spain with apparently unexplained cardiac arrest/death. Methods Two unrelated children aged 4 and 7, who were born to healthy parents, were studied. Both presented with sudden cardiac arrest. The first was resuscitated after a VF episode, and the second died suddenly. In both cases the baseline QTc interval was within normal limits. Peripheral blood DNA was available to perform targeted gene sequencing. Results The surviving 4-year-old girl had a positive epinephrine test for LQTS, and polymorphic ventricular ectopic beats were seen on a previous 24-hour Holter recording from the deceased 7-year-old boy, suggestive of a possible underlying CPVT phenotype. A p.Asn98Ser mutation in CALM2 was detected in both cases. This affected a highly conserved across species residue, and the location in the protein was adjacent to critical calcium binding loops in the calmodulin carboxyl-terminal domain, predicting a high pathogenic effect. Conclusions Human calmodulin 2 mutation p.Asn98Ser is associated with sudden cardiac death in childhood with a variable clinical penetrance. Our results provide new phenotypical information about clinical behaviour of this mutation. PMID:27100291

  12. Uterine rupture complicating sequential curettage and Bakri balloon tamponade to control secondary PPH

    PubMed Central

    Ajayi, Olukunle Adegboye; Sant, Manjusha; Ikhena, Sunday; Bako, Abdumalik

    2013-01-01

    A 20-year-old para 2 woman had a preterm delivery at 25 weeks and 6 days, readmitted to the hospital 25 days after delivery with severe secondary postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). Uncontrolled by initial conservative management, she underwent uterine curettage followed by Bakri balloon tamponade. She later had laparotomy for continued bleeding. She was found to have uterine rupture and hysterectomy was carried out as a life-saving measure. She was transfused in total with 14 units of blood, 1 unit of platelet, 2 units of cryoprecipitate and 3 units of fresh frozen plasma. The patient had intensive therapy unit  care and was discharged home on the sixth postoperative day. The histology report showed ectatic non-constricted vessels as the cause of the secondary PPH. No myometrial tissue, products of conception or evidence of endometritis. The sequential use of uterine curettage and balloon tamponade in the aetiology of uterine rupture is a rare occurrence. PMID:23391948

  13. Cardiac Hegemony of Senescence.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Sailay; Sussman, Mark A

    2013-12-01

    Cardiac senescence and age-related disease development have gained general attention and recognition in the past decades due to increased accessibility and quality of health care. The advancement in global civilization is complementary to concerns regarding population aging and development of chronic degenerative diseases. Cardiac degeneration has been rigorously studied. The molecular mechanisms of cardiac senescence are on multiple cellular levels and hold a multilayer complexity level, thereby hampering development of unambiguous treatment protocols. In particular, the synergistic exchange of the senescence phenotype through a senescence secretome between myocytes and stem cells appears complicated and is of great future therapeutic value. The current review article will highlight hallmarks of senescence, cardiac myocyte and stem cell senescence, and the mutual exchange of senescent secretome. Future cardiac cell therapy approaches require a comprehensive understanding of myocardial senescence to improve therapeutic efficiency as well as efficacy. PMID:24349878

  14. Cardiac Hegemony of Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, Sailay; Sussman, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac senescence and age-related disease development have gained general attention and recognition in the past decades due to increased accessibility and quality of health care. The advancement in global civilization is complementary to concerns regarding population aging and development of chronic degenerative diseases. Cardiac degeneration has been rigorously studied. The molecular mechanisms of cardiac senescence are on multiple cellular levels and hold a multilayer complexity level, thereby hampering development of unambiguous treatment protocols. In particular, the synergistic exchange of the senescence phenotype through a senescence secretome between myocytes and stem cells appears complicated and is of great future therapeutic value. The current review article will highlight hallmarks of senescence, cardiac myocyte and stem cell senescence, and the mutual exchange of senescent secretome. Future cardiac cell therapy approaches require a comprehensive understanding of myocardial senescence to improve therapeutic efficiency as well as efficacy. PMID:24349878

  15. Early imaging of a macular hole following vitrectomy with primary silicone oil tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Niladri; Lake, Stewart; Wang, Bob Z

    2011-01-01

    Background To describe the morphology of a macular hole in the early postoperative period following vitrectomy with primary silicone oil tamponade. Methods A case report with optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans prior to surgery, at 20 minutes postoperatively and then at 17 hours postoperatively. Results OCT images of a 73-year-old woman with a stage 3 macular hole were obtained. At 20 minutes postoperatively, there was a reduction in intraretinal cysts and a reduction in macular hole size with elevated-open configuration. At 17 hours postoperatively, complete macular hole closure was noted. Conclusion OCT Images of a macular hole in the early postoperative period have been successfully obtained. Macular holes can close within 24 hours postoperatively and show morphological changes that may be predictive of closure within 20 minutes postoperatively. PMID:22140310

  16. Reduced Cardiac Contractile Force Due to Sympathovagal Dysfunction Mediates the Additive Hypotensive Effects of Limited-Access Regimens of Ethanol and Clonidine in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M.

    2010-01-01

    Our previous attempts to investigate the long-term hemodynamic interaction between ethanol and clonidine in telemetered spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) were hampered by the lack of a sustained hypotensive response to continuous clonidine exposure. This limitation was circumvented when we adopted a limited-access clonidine (8:30 AM–4:30 PM) paradigm in a recent study. The latter paradigm was employed here to evaluate the ethanol-clonidine interaction and possible roles of myocardial function and autonomic control in this interaction. Changes in blood pressure (BP), heart rate, maximum rate of rise in BP wave (+dP/dtmax), and spectral cardiovascular autonomic profiles were measured by radiotelemetry in pair-fed SHRs receiving clonidine (150 μg/kg/day), ethanol [2.5% (w/v)], or their combination during the day for 12 weeks. Ethanol or clonidine elicited long-term decreases in BP, and their combination caused additive hypotensive response. Significant reductions in +dP/dtmax were observed upon concurrent treatment with ethanol and clonidine, in contrast to no effect for individual treatment. In addition, the combined treatment increased the high-frequency (HF) spectral band of interbeat interval (IBI-HFnu, 0.75–3 Hz) and decreased low-frequency (IBI-LFnu, 0.2–0.75 Hz) bands and IBILF/HF ratios. Clonidine-evoked reductions in plasma and urine norepinephrine and BP-LF spectral power (measure of vasomotor sympathetic tone) were not affected by ethanol. In conclusion, concurrent treatment with ethanol and clonidine shifts the sympathovagal balance toward parasympathetic dominance and elicits exaggerated hypotension as a result of a reduction in cardiac contractile force. PMID:20864507

  17. Vitrectomy, argon laser, and gas tamponade for serous retinal detachment associated with an optic disc pit: a case report.

    PubMed Central

    Snead, M P; James, N; Jacobs, P M

    1991-01-01

    We report the case of a 9-year-old boy with a right optic disc pit and associated serous retinal detachment of the macula. This was treated by vitrectomy, endolaser, and gas tamponade as a primary procedure, which resulted in complete resolution. We review the literature and conclude that further reports of the management of this uncommon condition are required so that firmer guidelines on treatment can be established. Images PMID:2043587

  18. Cardiac metastases

    PubMed Central

    Bussani, R; De‐Giorgio, F; Abbate, A; Silvestri, F

    2007-01-01

    Tumours metastatic to the heart (cardiac metastases) are among the least known and highly debated issues in oncology, and few systematic studies are devoted to this topic. Although primary cardiac tumours are extremely uncommon (various postmortem studies report rates between 0.001% and 0.28%), secondary tumours are not, and at least in theory, the heart can be metastasised by any malignant neoplasm able to spread to distant sites. In general, cardiac metastases are considered to be rare; however, when sought for, the incidence seems to be not as low as expected, ranging from 2.3% and 18.3%. Although no malignant tumours are known that diffuse preferentially to the heart, some do involve the heart more often than others—for example, melanoma and mediastinal primary tumours. This paper attempts to review the pathophysiology of cardiac metastatic disease, epidemiology and clinical presentation of cardiac metastases, and pathological characterisation of the lesions. PMID:17098886

  19. Non-Ischemic Perfusion Defects due to Delayed Arrival of Contrast Material on Stress Perfusion Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeo Koon; Park, Sang Joon; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung

    2014-01-01

    Herein we report about the adenosine stress perfusion MR imaging findings of a 50-year-old man who exhibited two different perfusion defects resulting from two different mechanisms after a coronary artery bypass surgery. An invasive coronary angiography confirmed that one perfusion defect at the mid-anterior wall resulted from an ischemia due to graft stenosis. However, no stenosis was detected on the graft responsible for the mid-inferior wall showing the other perfusion defect. It was assumed that the perfusion defect at the mid-inferior wall resulted from delayed perfusion owing to the long pathway of the bypass graft. The semiquantitative analysis of corrected signal-time curves supported our speculation, demonstrating that the rest-to-stress ratio index of the maximal slope of the myocardial territory in question was similar to those of normal myocardium, whereas that of myocardium with the stenotic graft showed a typical ischemic pattern. A delayed perfusion during long graft pathway in a post-bypass graft patient can mimick a true perfusion defect on myocardial stress MR imaging. Radiologists should be aware of this knowledge to avoid misinterpretation of graft and myocardial status in post bypass surgery patients. PMID:24644408

  20. Cardiac Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jeudy, Jean; Burke, Allen P; Frazier, Aletta Ann

    2016-07-01

    Lymphoma of the heart and pericardium may develop in up to 25% of patients with disseminated nodal disease, but primary cardiac lymphoma is rare. The majority are diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, which arise in immunocompetent older individuals, men twice as often as women. Subsets are found in immunocompromised patients, including those with HIV-AIDS or allograft recipients. Cardiac lymphomas tend to arise in the wall of the right heart, especially right atrium, with contiguous infiltration of epicardium and pericardium. Pericardial implants and effusions are common. The disease is often multifocal in the heart, but cardiac valves are usually spared. PMID:27265603

  1. Cardiac arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment for cardiac arrest. It is a medical device that gives an electrical shock to the heart. The shock can get the heart beating normally again. Small, portable defibrillators are often available in public areas for ...

  2. Cardiac rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... 123-210. Thomas PD. Exercise-Based, Comprehensive Cardiac Rehabilitation. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2011: ...

  3. Cardiac rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... goal of cardiac rehab is to: Improve your cardiovascular function Improve your overall health and quality of ... E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015: ...

  4. Cardiac Sarcoidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Cardiac Sarcoidosis? Sarcoidosis is a poorly understood disease that commonly affects the lungs. It can also involve the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, eyes, skin, bones, salivary glands and heart. ...

  5. Early performance of a miniaturized leadless cardiac pacemaker: the Micra Transcatheter Pacing Study

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Philippe; Duray, Gabor Z.; Steinwender, Clemens; Soejima, Kyoko; Omar, Razali; Mont, Lluís; Boersma, Lucas VA; Knops, Reinoud E.; Chinitz, Larry; Zhang, Shu; Narasimhan, Calambur; Hummel, John; Lloyd, Michael; Simmers, Timothy Alexander; Voigt, Andrew; Laager, Verla; Stromberg, Kurt; Bonner, Matthew D.; Sheldon, Todd J.; Reynolds, Dwight

    2015-01-01

    Aims Permanent cardiac pacing is the only effective treatment for symptomatic bradycardia, but complications associated with conventional transvenous pacing systems are commonly related to the pacing lead and pocket. We describe the early performance of a novel self-contained miniaturized pacemaker. Methods and results Patients having Class I or II indication for VVI pacing underwent implantation of a Micra transcatheter pacing system, from the femoral vein and fixated in the right ventricle using four protractible nitinol tines. Prespecified objectives were >85% freedom from unanticipated serious adverse device events (safety) and <2 V 3-month mean pacing capture threshold at 0.24 ms pulse width (efficacy). Patients were implanted (n = 140) from 23 centres in 11 countries (61% male, age 77.0 ± 10.2 years) for atrioventricular block (66%) or sinus node dysfunction (29%) indications. During mean follow-up of 1.9 ± 1.8 months, the safety endpoint was met with no unanticipated serious adverse device events. Thirty adverse events related to the system or procedure occurred, mostly due to transient dysrhythmias or femoral access complications. One pericardial effusion without tamponade occurred after 18 device deployments. In 60 patients followed to 3 months, mean pacing threshold was 0.51 ± 0.22 V, and no threshold was ≥2 V, meeting the efficacy endpoint (P < 0.001). Average R-wave was 16.1 ± 5.2 mV and impedance was 650.7 ± 130 ohms. Conclusion Early assessment shows the transcatheter pacemaker can safely and effectively be applied. Long-term safety and benefit of the pacemaker will further be evaluated in the trial. Clinical Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT02004873. PMID:26045305

  6. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Using a Pocket-Size Device in the Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, Frederico José Neves; Siqueira, Vicente Nicoliello; Moisés, Valdir Ambrósio; Gois, Aécio Flavio Teixeira; de Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Camargo; Campos, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular urgencies are frequent reasons for seeking medical care. Prompt and accurate medical diagnosis is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these conditions. Objective To evaluate the use of a pocket-size echocardiography in addition to clinical history and physical exam in a tertiary medical emergency care. Methods One hundred adult patients without known cardiac or lung diseases who sought emergency care with cardiac complaints were included. Patients with ischemic changes in the electrocardiography or fever were excluded. A focused echocardiography with GE Vscan equipment was performed after the initial evaluation in the emergency room. Cardiac chambers dimensions, left and right ventricular systolic function, intracardiac flows with color, pericardium, and aorta were evaluated. Results The mean age was 61 ± 17 years old. The patient complaint was chest pain in 51 patients, dyspnea in 32 patients, arrhythmia to evaluate the left ventricular function in ten patients, hypotension/dizziness in five patients and edema in one patient. In 28 patients, the focused echocardiography allowed to confirm the initial diagnosis: 19 patients with heart failure, five with acute coronary syndrome, two with pulmonary embolism and two patients with cardiac tamponade. In 17 patients, the echocardiography changed the diagnosis: ten with suspicious of heart failure, two with pulmonary embolism suspicious, two with hypotension without cause, one suspicious of acute coronary syndrome, one of cardiac tamponade and one of aortic dissection. Conclusion The focused echocardiography with pocket-size equipment in the emergency care may allow a prompt diagnosis and, consequently, an earlier initiation of the therapy. PMID:25590933

  7. Use of intra-aortic balloon pump support for oozing-type cardiac rupture after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Su, Xi; Liu, Cheng-Wei; Song, Dan; Peng, Jian; Wu, Ming-Xiang; Yang, Yu-Chun; Liu, Bo; Xu, Cheng-Yi; Wang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular free wall rupture usually leads to acute hemopericardium and sudden cardiac death resulting in cardiac tamponade. Rarely, only a few patients with subacute free wall rupture such as oozing-type ventricular rupture or left ventricular false aneurysm may permit time for pericardiocentesis and surgery. We report a 63-year-old man with ST-elevation myocardial infarction who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention about 12 hours from the onset, and cardiac tamponade occurred on the second day. An intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) was immediately inserted for hemodynamic support. After 100 mL of pericardial fresh blood was drained from the percardial cavity, his hemodynamic collapse was promptly improved with IABP support. In the following 24 hours, about 600 mL of hemorrhagic pericardial fluid was drained. The most likely diagnosis was concerning for oozing-type ventricular rupture, and a conservative approach was decided. The patient survived to the acute phase under IABP support and was discharged with complete recovery. PMID:26145582

  8. Cardiac complications after laparoscopic large hiatal hernia repair. Is it related with staple fixation of the mesh? -Report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Maria del Carmen; Diaz, María; López, Fernando; Martí-Obiol, Roberto; Ortega, J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Laparoscopic Nissen operation with mesh reinforcement remains being the most popular operation for large hiatal hernia repair. Complications related to mesh placement have been widely described. Cardiac complications are rare, but have a fatal outcome if they are misdiagnosed. Presentation of cases We sought to outline our institutional experience of three patients who developed cardiac complications following a laparoscopic Nissen operation for large hiatal hernia repair. Discussion Laparoscopic hiatoplasty and Nissen fundoplication are safe and effective procedures for the hiatal hernia repair, but they are not exempt from complications. Fixation technique and material used must be taken into account. We have conducted a review of the literature on complications related to these procedures. Conclusion In the differential diagnosis of hemodynamic instability after laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair, cardiac tamponade and other cardiac complications should be considered. PMID:26635954

  9. Cardiac applications of PET.

    PubMed

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-10-01

    Routine use of cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) applications has been increasing but has not replaced cardiac single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) studies yet. The majority of cardiac PET tracers, with the exception of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG), are not widely available, as they require either an onsite cyclotron or a costly generator for their production. 18F-FDG PET imaging has high sensitivity for the detection of hibernating/viable myocardium and has replaced Tl-201 SPECT imaging in centers equipped with a PET/CT camera. PET myocardial perfusion imaging with various tracers such as Rb-82, N-13 ammonia, and O-15 H2O has higher sensitivity and specificity than myocardial perfusion SPECT for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD). In particular, quantitative PET measurements of myocardial perfusion help identify subclinical coronary stenosis, better define the extent and severity of CAD, and detect ischemia when there is balanced reduction in myocardial perfusion due to three-vessel or main stem CAD. Fusion images of PET perfusion and CT coronary artery calcium scoring or CT coronary angiography provide additional complementary information and improve the detection of CAD. PET studies with novel 18F-labeled perfusion tracers such as 18F-flurpiridaz and 18F-FBnTP have yielded high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of CAD. These tracers are still being tested in humans, and, if approved for clinical use, they will be commercially and widely available. In addition to viability studies, 18F-FDG PET can also be utilized to detect inflammation/infection in various conditions such as endocarditis, sarcoidosis, and atherosclerosis. Some recent series have obtained encouraging results for the detection of endocarditis in patients with intracardiac devices and prosthetic valves. PET tracers for cardiac neuronal imaging, such as C-11 HED, help assess the severity of heart failure and post-transplant cardiac

  10. Smoking after cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Botha, P; Peaston, R; White, K; Forty, J; Dark, J H; Parry, G

    2008-04-01

    Although smoking cessation is a prerequisite prior to listing for cardiac transplantation, some patients return to smoking after recovery. We have covertly assessed the smoking habits of our cardiac transplant recipients (with ethical approval) since 1993 by measuring urinary cotinine: a level of >500 ng/mL signifying continued tobacco use. We retrospectively analyzed survival, causes of death and the development of graft coronary artery disease (GCAD) with respect to the number of positive and negative cotinine levels. One hundred four of 380 (27.4%) patients tested positive for active smoking at some point posttransplant, and 57 (15.0%) tested positive repeatedly. Smokers suffered significantly more deaths due to GCAD (21.2% vs. 12.3%, p < 0.05), and due to malignancy (16.3% vs. 5.8%, p < 0.001). In univariate analysis, smoking after heart transplantation shortened median survival from 16.28 years to 11.89 years. After correcting for the effects of pretransplant smoking in time-dependent multivariate analysis, posttransplant smoking remained the most significant determinant of overall mortality (p < 0.00001). We conclude that tobacco smoking after cardiac transplantation significantly impacts survival by accelerating the development of graft vasculopathy and malignancy. We hope that this information will deter cardiac transplant recipients from relapsing, and intensify efforts in improving cessation rates. PMID:18324978

  11. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David H; Nery, Pablo B; Ha, Andrew C; Beanlands, Rob S B

    2016-07-26

    Clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in perhaps 5% of patients with sarcoidosis. The 3 principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. An estimated 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic cardiac involvement (clinically silent disease). In 2014, the first international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS was published. In patients with clinically manifest CS, the extent of left ventricular dysfunction seems to be the most important predictor of prognosis. There is controversy in published reports as to the outcome of patients with clinically silent CS. Despite a paucity of data, immunosuppression therapy (primarily with corticosteroids) has been advocated for the treatment of clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, primarily with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, is often recommended for patients with clinically manifest disease. PMID:27443438

  12. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Smedema, J.P.; Zondervan, P.E.; van Hagen, P.; ten Cate, F.J.; Bresser, P.; Doubell, A.F.; Pattynama, P.; Hoogsteden, H.C.; Balk, A.H.M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system granulomatous disorder of unknown aetiology. Symptomatic cardiac involvement occurs in approximately 5% of patients. The prevalence of sarcoidosis in the Netherlands is unknown, but estimated to be approximately 20 per 100,000 population (3200 patients). We report on five patients who presented with different manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis, and give a brief review on the current management of this condition. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be of great help in diagnosing this condition as well as in the follow-up of the response to therapy. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:25696121

  13. Surgical management of macular holes: results using gas tamponade alone, or in combination with autologous platelet concentrate, or transforming growth factor β2

    PubMed Central

    Minihan, M; Goggin, M; Cleary, P

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Vitrectomy and gas tamponade has become a recognised technique for the treatment of macular holes. In an attempt to improve the anatomic and visual success of the procedure, various adjunctive therapies—cytokines, serum, and platelets—have been employed. A consecutive series of 85 eyes which underwent macular hole surgery using gas tamponade alone, or gas tamponade with either the cytokine transforming growth factor β2 (TGF-β2) or autologous platelet concentrate is reported.
METHODS—Twenty eyes had vitrectomy and 20% SF6 gas tamponade; 15 had vitrectomy, 20% SF6 gas, and TGF-β2; 50 had vitrectomy, 16% C3F8 gas tamponade, and 0.1 ml of autologous platelet concentrate prepared during the procedure.
RESULTS—Anatomic success occurred in 86% of eyes, with 96% of the platelet treated group achieving closure of the macular hole. Visual acuity improved by two lines or more in 65% of the SF6 only group, 33% of those treated with TGF-β2, and in 74% of the platelet treated group. In the platelet treated group 40% achieved 6/12 or better and 62% achieved 6/18 or better. The best visual results were obtained in stage 2 holes.
CONCLUSION—Vitrectomy for macular holes is often of benefit and patients may recover good visual acuity, especially early in the disease process. The procedure has a number of serious complications, and the postoperative posturing requirement is difficult. Patients need to be informed of such concerns before surgery.

 PMID:9497468

  14. Dual gated nuclear cardiac images

    SciTech Connect

    Zubal, I.G.; Bennett, G.W.; Bizais, Y.; Brill, A.B.

    1984-02-01

    A data acquisition system has been developed to collect camera events simultaneously with continually digitized electrocardiograph signals and respiratory flow measurements. Software processing of the list mode data creates more precisely gated cardiac frames. Additionally, motion blur due to heart movement during breathing is reduced by selecting events within a specific respiratory phase. Thallium myocardium images of a healthy volunteer show increased definition. This technique of combined cardiac and respiratory gating has the potential of improving the detectability of small lesions, and the characterization of cardiac wall motion.

  15. Hepato-cardiac disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, Yasser Mahrous; Yehia, Reem

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mutual relationship between the liver and the heart is important for both hepatologists and cardiologists. Hepato-cardiac diseases can be classified into heart diseases affecting the liver, liver diseases affecting the heart, and conditions affecting the heart and the liver at the same time. Differential diagnoses of liver injury are extremely important in a cardiologist’s clinical practice calling for collaboration between cardiologists and hepatologists due to the many other diseases that can affect the liver and mimic haemodynamic injury. Acute and chronic heart failure may lead to acute ischemic hepatitis or chronic congestive hepatopathy. Treatment in these cases should be directed to the primary heart disease. In patients with advanced liver disease, cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may develop including hemodynamic changes, diastolic and systolic dysfunctions, reduced cardiac performance and electrophysiological abnormalities. Cardiac evaluation is important for patients with liver diseases especially before and after liver transplantation. Liver transplantation may lead to the improvement of all cardiac changes and the reversal of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. There are systemic diseases that may affect both the liver and the heart concomitantly including congenital, metabolic and inflammatory diseases as well as alcoholism. This review highlights these hepatocardiac diseases PMID:24653793

  16. Temporary resolution of foveal schisis following vitrectomy with silicon oil tamponade in X-linked retinoschisis with retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Neha; Ghosh, Basudeb

    2015-01-01

    X-linked retinoschisis (XLR) is an uncommon bilateral vitreoretinal dystrophy characterized by typical foveoschisis in all patients that may be associated with peripheral retinoschisis. A young male with XLR with retinal detachment in his right eye underwent 23 gauge pars plana vitrectomy with silicone oil tamponade. Postoperatively, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) improved to 20/120 with an attached retina. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography showed macular thinning with the collapse of the schitic cavities with silicone oil in situ. Following silicone oil removal at 6 months follow-up, the retina remained attached with a BCVA of 20/80 however the foveal schitic cavities reappeared. This unusual course has not been described previously. PMID:26669343

  17. Blunt traumatic cardiac rupture. A 5-year experience.

    PubMed

    Brathwaite, C E; Rodriguez, A; Turney, S Z; Dunham, C M; Cowley, R

    1990-12-01

    Blunt traumatic cardiac rupture is associated with a high rate of mortality. A review of the computerized trauma registry (1983 to 1988) identified 32 patients with this injury (ages 19 to 65 years; mean age, 39.5 years; 21 men and 11 women). Twenty-one patients (65.6%) were injured in vehicular crashes, 3 (9.4%) in pedestrian accidents, 3 (9.4%) in motorcycle accidents; 3 (9.4%) sustained crush injury; 1 (3.1%) was injured by a fall; and 1 (3.1%) was kicked in the chest by a horse. Anatomic injuries included right atrial rupture (13[40.6%]), left atrial rupture (8 [25%]), right ventricular rupture (10[31.3%]), left ventricular rupture (4[12.5%]), and rupture of two cardiac chambers (3 [9.4%]). Diagnosis was made by thoracotomy in all 20 patients presenting in cardiac arrest. In the remaining 12 patients, the diagnosis was established in seven by emergency left anterolateral thoracotomy and in five by subxyphoid pericardial window. Seven of these 12 patients (58.3%) had clinical cardiac tamponade and significant upper torso cyanosis. The mean Injury Severity Score (ISS), Trauma Score (TS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score were 33.8, 13.2, and 14.3, respectively, among survivors and 51.5, 8.3, and 7.0 for nonsurvivors. The overall mortality rate was 81.3% (26 of 32 patients), the only survivors being those presenting with vital signs (6 of 12 patients [50%]). All patients with rupture of two cardiac chambers or with ventricular rupture died. The mortality rate from myocardial rupture is very high. Rapid prehospital transportation, a high index of suspicion, and prompt surgical intervention contribute to survival in these patients. PMID:2256761

  18. [Cardiac surgery: within the revolution!].

    PubMed

    Raanani, Ehud

    2007-11-01

    Cardiac surgery is undergoing major changes. Until recently, coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) constituted the majority of cardiac surgery cases that were performed. The sharp rise in percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) mainly due to the development of drug eluting stents resulted in a drop in the worldwide number of CABG cases. The cardiac surgery community reacted by developing several new surgical procedures and techniques to better treat cardiac patients. Some of those procedures are demonstrated in this special issue of the Harefuah journal. Those procedures include better techniques to repair the aortic and mitral valves, minimally invasive techniques including video assisted methodology for valves and CABG surgery, surgery for congestive heart failure including new axial flow assist devices, surgery for the treatment of atrial fibrillation and more. The excellent results in cardiac surgery caused older and sicker patients to be referred to surgery. All these are creating a "revolution" in cardiac surgery. Those new technologies, surgical techniques and high risk patients require special financing. In order to complete the revolution and continue providing advanced "state of the art" cardiac surgery procedures for the patients, there is a need for special long term economic planning by the government and the Ministry of Health. PMID:18087831

  19. Cardiac optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetics is an emerging technology for optical interrogation and control of biological function with high specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. Mammalian cells and tissues can be sensitized to respond to light by a relatively simple and well-tolerated genetic modification using microbial opsins (light-gated ion channels and pumps). These can achieve fast and specific excitatory or inhibitory response, offering distinct advantages over traditional pharmacological or electrical means of perturbation. Since the first demonstrations of utility in mammalian cells (neurons) in 2005, optogenetics has spurred immense research activity and has inspired numerous applications for dissection of neural circuitry and understanding of brain function in health and disease, applications ranging from in vitro to work in behaving animals. Only recently (since 2010), the field has extended to cardiac applications with less than a dozen publications to date. In consideration of the early phase of work on cardiac optogenetics and the impact of the technique in understanding another excitable tissue, the brain, this review is largely a perspective of possibilities in the heart. It covers the basic principles of operation of light-sensitive ion channels and pumps, the available tools and ongoing efforts in optimizing them, overview of neuroscience use, as well as cardiac-specific questions of implementation and ideas for best use of this emerging technology in the heart. PMID:23457014

  20. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  1. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Pericarditis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious complications of pericarditis are cardiac tamponade (tam-po-NAD) and chronic constrictive pericarditis. Cardiac tamponade occurs ... National Institutes of Health Department of Health and Human Services USA.gov

  2. Extramedullary Cardiac Multiple Myeloma-A Case Report and Contemporary Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Coakley, Maria; Yeneneh, Beeletsega; Rosenthal, Allison; Fonseca, Rafael; Mookadam, Farouk

    2016-05-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by a clonal proliferation of plasma cells. Although the bone marrow is the usual site of involvement, extramedullary plasmacytomas (EMPs) also occur, affecting any tissue. Cardiac and pericardial involvement, although described, have been rare occurrences. We present the case of a 61-year-old female patient 47 days after autologous stem cell transplant for MM who developed cardiac tamponade owing to extramedullary recurrence of myeloma, pulmonary embolism, and takotsubo cardiomyopathy. We performed a review of the published studies of all cases of MM presenting at diagnosis or relapse with cardiac or pericardial involvement in the past 25 years. Including our patient, 34 patients with plasmacytoma involving cardiac or pericardial structures were identified from the literature search. Approximately equal numbers of patients were male and female (42% and 57%, respectively). The mean age was 62 years. Primary plasmacytomas accounted for 12% of the cases. A history of MM, EMP, or monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance was noted in two thirds of the cases (66.6%). Treatment included chemotherapy and/or high-dose corticosteroids in 81.1% of cases and 27% underwent radiation therapy. The reporting of all cases to date has focused on unusual findings, rather than treatment approaches or new therapeutic strategies that might benefit patients. We suggest the formation of a database of all cases of cardiac and pericardial EMPs, with a focus on predictive disease variables, standardized staging, outcomes, and survival, to ensure that patients are optimally treated in the modern era. PMID:27009538

  3. Sudden cardiac arrest during pregnancy: a rare complication of acquired maternal diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, R; Honore, P M; Hosseinpour, N; Nieboer, K; Spapen, H D

    2012-01-01

    Acute cardiac arrest during pregnancy is a rare but devastating event. Major causes are haemorrhagic, septic or anaphylactic shock, trauma, pulmonary or amniotic fluid embolism, and congenital or acquired cardiac disease. We present a case of massive intrathoracic migration of viscera through a left diaphragmatic hernia in a pregnant multipara, causing acute obstructive shock and cardiac arrest. Complications of intrathoracic herniation occur when the intruding viscera cause left lung and cardiac compression or mediastinal "tamponade" with decreased venous return. Intrathoracic strangulation of viscera is also common and may cause ischaemia, gangrene and eventual perforation. Sudden cardiac arrest as first sign of left diaphragmatic rupture during pregnancy, however, has rarely been described. In contrast with our patient, this catastrophic event is mostly seen in nulli- and primipara with a known congenital left diaphragmatic defect. Management of a diaphragmatic hernia depends on the clinical presentation and the period of gestation during which it is detected. Despite prolonged resuscitation with more than 1 hour of chest compressions, our patient recovered completely. PMID:22897068

  4. Sudden cardiac death – Historical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Abhilash, S.P.; Namboodiri, Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is an unexpected death due to cardiac causes that occurs in a short time period (generally within 1 h of symptom onset) in a person with known or unknown cardiac disease. It is believed to be involved in nearly a quarter of human deaths, with ventricular fibrillation being the most common mechanism. It is estimated that more than 7 million lives per year are lost to SCD worldwide. Historical perspectives of SCD are analyzed with a brief description on how the developments in the management of sudden cardiac arrest evolved over time. PMID:24568828

  5. Cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ehsani, A A

    1984-02-01

    Exercise training is a major, and the most important, component of cardiac rehabilitation. Besides providing psychological benefits and promoting a "sense of well being," it elicits a number of adaptations in patients with ischemic heart disease. Among the clinically important adaptations are changes in the trained skeletal muscles and autonomic nervous system, resulting not only in increased maximum exercise capacity but also a slower heart rate and, at times, a lower systolic blood pressure during submaximal exercise. The reduction in the rate pressure product decreases myocardial O2 demand at any given submaximal exercise intensity and may thus alleviate myocardial ischemia and angina in patients with coronary artery disease. These adaptive responses occur even with a relatively modest exercise intensity. Although short-term exercise training of moderate intensity has not been reported to result in improvement in left ventricular performance, recent data suggest that exercise training of higher intensity and longer duration (12 months or longer) than has conventionally been used in cardiac rehabilitation programs may favorably affect the heart. This is characterized by improvements in left ventricular function, diminished electrocardiographic criteria of myocardial ischemia and increased stroke volume during exercise. Modest weight reduction accompanies regularly performed prolonged exercise training. It is important, however, to recognize that high-intensity exercise programs are suitable for only some patients with coronary artery disease who are stable and should be used only under strict medical supervision. PMID:6400004

  6. Physiological and pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Ippei; Minamino, Tohru

    2016-08-01

    The heart must continuously pump blood to supply the body with oxygen and nutrients. To maintain the high energy consumption required by this role, the heart is equipped with multiple complex biological systems that allow adaptation to changes of systemic demand. The processes of growth (hypertrophy), angiogenesis, and metabolic plasticity are critically involved in maintenance of cardiac homeostasis. Cardiac hypertrophy is classified as physiological when it is associated with normal cardiac function or as pathological when associated with cardiac dysfunction. Physiological hypertrophy of the heart occurs in response to normal growth of children or during pregnancy, as well as in athletes. In contrast, pathological hypertrophy is induced by factors such as prolonged and abnormal hemodynamic stress, due to hypertension, myocardial infarction etc. Pathological hypertrophy is associated with fibrosis, capillary rarefaction, increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and cellular dysfunction (impairment of signaling, suppression of autophagy, and abnormal cardiomyocyte/non-cardiomyocyte interactions), as well as undesirable epigenetic changes, with these complex responses leading to maladaptive cardiac remodeling and heart failure. This review describes the key molecules and cellular responses involved in physiological/pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27262674

  7. Cardiac manifestations in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lambova, Sevdalina

    2014-01-01

    Primary cardiac involvement, which develops as a direct consequence of systemic sclerosis (SSc), may manifest as myocardial damage, fibrosis of the conduction system, pericardial and, less frequently, as valvular disease. In addition, cardiac complications in SSc may develop as a secondary phenomenon due to pulmonary arterial hypertension and kidney pathology. The prevalence of primary cardiac involvement in SSc is variable and difficult to determine because of the diversity of cardiac manifestations, the presence of subclinical periods, the type of diagnostic tools applied, and the diversity of patient populations. When clinically manifested, cardiac involvement is thought to be an important prognostic factor. Profound microvascular disease is a pathognomonic feature of SSc, as both vasospasm and structural alterations are present. Such alterations are thought to predict macrovascular atherosclerosis over time. There are contradictory reports regarding the prevalence of atherosclerosis in SSc. According to some authors, the prevalence of atherosclerosis of the large epicardial coronary arteries is similar to that of the general population, in contrast with other rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. However, the level of inflammation in SSc is inferior. Thus, the atherosclerotic process may not be as aggressive and not easily detectable in smaller studies. Echocardiography (especially tissue Doppler imaging), single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and cardiac computed tomography are sensitive techniques for earlier detection of both structural and functional scleroderma-related cardiac pathologies. Screening for subclinical cardiac involvement via modern, sensitive tools provides an opportunity for early diagnosis and treatment, which is of crucial importance for a positive outcome. PMID:25276300

  8. Aging and Cardiac Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Biernacka, Anna; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G

    2011-01-01

    The aging heart is characterized by morphological and structural changes that lead to its functional decline and are associated with diminished ability to meet increased demand. Extensive evidence, derived from both clinical and experimental studies suggests that the aging heart undergoes fibrotic remodeling. Age-dependent accumulation of collagen in the heart leads to progressive increase in ventricular stiffness and impaired diastolic function. Increased mechanical load, due to reduced arterial compliance, and direct senescence-associated fibrogenic actions appear to be implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis in the elderly. Evolving evidence suggests that activation of several distinct molecular pathways may contribute to age-related fibrotic cardiac remodeling. Reactive oxygen species, chemokine-mediated recruitment of mononuclear cells and fibroblast progenitors, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β activation, endothelin-1 and angiotensin II signaling mediate interstitial and perivascular fibrosis in the senescent heart. Reduced collagen degradation may be more important than increased de novo synthesis in the pathogenesis of aging-associated fibrosis. In contrast to the baseline activation of fibrogenic pathways in the senescent heart, aging is associated with an impaired reparative response to cardiac injury and defective activation of reparative fibroblasts in response to growth factors. Because these reparative defects result in defective scar formation, senescent hearts are prone to adverse dilative remodeling following myocardial infarction. Understanding the pathogenesis of interstitial fibrosis in the aging heart and dissecting the mechanisms responsible for age-associated healing defects following cardiac injury are critical in order to design new strategies for prevention of adverse remodeling and heart failure in elderly patients. PMID:21837283

  9. Intrauterine balloon tamponade as management of postpartum haemorrhage and prevention of haemorrhage related to low-lying placenta.

    PubMed

    Patacchiola, F; D'Alfonso, A; Di Fonso, A; Di Febbo, G; Kaliakoudas, D; Carta, G

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Bakri balloon in preventing and treating postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). Intrauterine Bakri balloon was used in a total of 16 patients with two different purposes: prophylactic placement of the balloon after cesarean section (CS) in six patients with low-lying placenta and therapeutic placement in ten patients with persistent bleeding from uterine atony, after spontaneous delivery, and administration of uterotonics. Intrauterine Bakri balloon was a successful approach in controlling and preventing PPH in all 16 patients. The median nadir hematocrit was 26.6% in six patients who underwent CS and 25.6% in ten patients with persistent bleeding after spontaneous delivery. The intrauterine balloon was in place for a duration of 24 hours. The median balloon infusion volume was 345 ml (range 250-455). No complications were reported. Bakri balloon tamponade was a useful measure in treating PPH unresponsive to pharmacological therapy in patients who delivered vaginally. Moreover, it was able to prevent persistent bleeding in patients who underwent CS for central placenta previa. PMID:23444752

  10. Acute Effusive Pericarditis due to Horse Chestnut Consumption.

    PubMed

    Edem, Efe; Kahyaoğlu, Behlül; Çakar, Mehmet Akif

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND There are many well-known causes of pericardial effusion, such as cancer metastasis, bacterial or viral pericarditis, and uremic pericarditis; however, no reports exist in the literature demonstrating a pericardial effusion that led to cardiac tamponade following consumption of an herbal remedy. CASE REPORT A 32-year-old male patient was referred to our cardiology outpatient clinic with a complaint of dyspnea. The patient's medical history was unremarkable; however, he had consumed 3 boxes of horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum L) paste over the previous 1.5 months. His chest x-ray examination revealed an enlarged cardiac shadow and bilateral pleural effusion. On transthoracic echocardiographic examination, his ejection fraction was found to be 55% with circumferentially extended pericardial effusion that reached 3.9 cm at its maximal thickness. No growth had been detected in the pericardial and pleural biopsies or blood samples; there was no evidence of an infectious process in the physical examination. Based on this information, we diagnosed pericarditis resulting from the use of herbal remedies. This is the first report to demonstrate that herbal remedy consumption may cause this type of clinical condition. CONCLUSIONS Besides other well-known causes, pericardial effusion related to the consumption of herbal remedies should always be considered when treating patients with pericardial effusion caused by unclear etiologies. PMID:27141926

  11. Diagnostic approach to cardiac amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Amin, Hilman Zulkifli; Mori, Shumpei; Sasaki, Naoto; Hirata, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a relatively rare disease that may be underdiagnosed and could affect the entire human body. Many organs may be affected, which could increase the morbidity and mortality. Cardiac involvement is the leading cause of poor prognosis. Patients with cardiac amyloidosis are usually admitted with heart failure. The clinical presentation varies greatly, and using the correct approach is important in identifying cardiac amyloidosis. A 51-year-old man was diagnosed with chronic heart failure. He had increased brain natriuretic peptide levels, a low ejection fraction, and left and right ventricular hypertrophy with granular sparkling as seen by echocardiography. These findings led us to perform a cardiac biopsy that confirmed the diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis. Further investigation revealed that the patient had amyloid light-chain type amyloidosis due to multiple myeloma. He is now undergoing the 3rd phase of chemotherapy. Congo-red stain is usually used by physicians to histologically confirm amyloidosis, with which apple-green birefringence indicates amyloid deposits. Other stains such as direct fast scarlet (DFS) and hematoxylin-eosin (HE) can also confirm the presence of amyloid deposits. In the present case, DFS and HE were used, both of which suggested amyloid deposits surrounding myocardial cells. The use of a combination of stains can increase the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of amyloidosis. However, the typical echocardiographic appearances would be enough to diagnose cardiac amyloidosis when it is impossible for the patient to undergo a cardiac biopsy, if an additional histological specimen from another tissue such as abdominal fat confirms amyloidosis. PMID:25011639

  12. Animal models of cardiac cachexia.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Francesca; Malara, Natalia; Mollace, Vincenzo; Rosano, Giuseppe; Ferraro, Elisabetta

    2016-09-15

    Cachexia is the loss of body weight associated with several chronic diseases including chronic heart failure (CHF). The cachectic condition is mainly due to loss of skeletal muscle mass and adipose tissue depletion. The majority of experimental in vivo studies on cachexia rely on animal models of cancer cachexia while a reliable and appropriate model for cardiac cachexia has not yet been established. A critical issue in generating a cardiac cachexia model is that genetic modifications or pharmacological treatments impairing the heart functionality and used to obtain the heart failure model might likely impair the skeletal muscle, this also being a striated muscle and sharing with the myocardium several molecular and physiological mechanisms. On the other hand, often, the induction of heart damage in the several existing models of heart failure does not necessarily lead to skeletal muscle loss and cachexia. Here we describe the main features of cardiac cachexia and illustrate some animal models proposed for cardiac cachexia studies; they include the genetic calsequestrin and Dahl salt-sensitive models, the monocrotaline model and the surgical models obtained by left anterior descending (LAD) ligation, transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and ascending aortic banding. The availability of a specific animal model for cardiac cachexia is a crucial issue since, besides the common aspects of cachexia in the different syndromes, each disease has some peculiarities in its etiology and pathophysiology leading to cachexia. Such peculiarities need to be unraveled in order to find new targets for effective therapies. PMID:27317993

  13. [A case of cardiac angiosarcoma successfully treated with docetaxel].

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Naoya; Mitachi, Yasushi; Sugawara, Shigeo; Shinozaki, Shigeru; Miura, Makoto; Fukuju, Takeo; Katahira, Yoshiaki; Koyama, Kaneki; Fujikawa, Nanako; Kato, Taizo; Murakami, Kazuhiro

    2007-11-01

    We report a case of angiosarcoma of the right atrium presenting superior vena cava syndrome. The patient was a 61-year-old man. Echocardiography, CT and MRI revealed a tumor arising in the anterior wall of the right atrium. The tumor was hen-egg sized and unresectable because of the invasion of the pericardium, the right ventricular wall and the superior vena cava. An open biopsy and left brachiocephalic vein-right atrium bypass grafting were performed. The pathological diagnosis was angiosarcoma. The patient agreed to chemotherapy with docetaxel, which is known to be often effective against angiosarcoma of the scalp or face. After 5 courses of docetaxel administration (30 mg/m2 on day 1, 8 and 15 followed by 14 days. rest as one course), echocardiography and CT showed a remarkable tumor reduction, which was evaluated as a partial response. The chemotherapy was suspended for 8 months because of neutropenia and general fatigue as side effects of docetaxel. The administration of docetaxel was resumed and 4 courses were performed. The tumor, however, became resistant to docetaxel and formed metastatic involvements in the liver. Following treatments with paclitaxel, IL-2 and CPT-11 were ineffective for the primary tumor and liver metastases. He died of cardiac tamponade caused by massive hemorrhage into the pericardiac space from the tumor surface. He had long-term survival 31 months after the diagnosis. An effective treatment for cardiac angiosarcoma has not yet been established. Chemotherapy with docetaxel should be considered in the treatment of patients with cardiac angiosarcoma. PMID:18030022

  14. Cardiac perception and cardiac control. A review.

    PubMed

    Carroll, D

    1977-12-01

    The evidence regarding specific cardiac perception and discrimination, and its relationship to voluntary cardiac control, is critically reviewed. Studies are considered in three sections, depending on the method used to assess cardiac perception: questionnaire assessment, discrimination procedures, and heartbeat tracking. The heartbeat tracking procedure would appear to suffer least from interpretative difficulties. Recommendations are made regarding the style of analysis used to assess heartbeat perception in such tracking tasks. PMID:348240

  15. Cardiac torsion and electromagnetic fields: the cardiac bioinformation hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Burleson, Katharine O; Schwartz, Gary E

    2005-01-01

    Although in physiology the heart is often referred to as a simple piston pump, there are in fact two additional features that are integral to cardiac physiology and function. First, the heart as it contracts in systole, also rotates and produces torsion due to the structure of the myocardium. Second, the heart produces a significant electromagnetic field with each contraction due to the coordinated depolarization of myocytes producing a current flow. Unlike the electrocardiogram, the magnetic field is not limited to volume conduction and extends outside the body. The therapeutic potential for interaction of this cardioelectromagnetic field both within and outside the body is largely unexplored. It is our hypothesis that the heart functions as a generator of bioinformation that is central to normative functioning of body. The source of this bioinformation is based on: (1) vortex blood flow in the left ventricle; (2) a cardiac electromagnetic field and both; (3) heart sounds; and (4) pulse pressure which produce frequency and amplitude information. Thus, there is a multidimensional role for the heart in physiology and biopsychosocial dynamics. Recognition of these cardiac properties may result in significant implications for new therapies for cardiovascular disease based on increasing cardiac energy efficiency (coherence) and bioinformation from the cardioelectromagnetic field. Research studies to test this hypothesis are suggested. PMID:15823696

  16. Dipyridamole cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Heo, J.; Askenase, A.; Segal, B.L.; Auerbach, N.

    1988-02-01

    Dipyridamole cardiac imaging is a useful alternative technique to exercise stress testing in the evaluation of patients with ischemic heart disease. Intravenous dipyridamole is still in the investigational phase, while oral dipyridamole is widely available. The hemodynamic effects of dipyridamole include an increase in coronary blood flow (due to coronary vasodilation) which is in excess of the increase in myocardial oxygen consumption and cardiac output. The disparity in the increase in coronary blood flow relative to the cardiac output results in an increase in myocardial thallium activity and an increase in the myocardial/background activity ratio. The quality of the thallium images is better or similar to that of exercise thallium images. The optimal dose of intravenous dipyridamole is 0.56 mg/kg, and of the oral dose it is 300 to 400 mg, although higher doses may be necessary in some patients. Analysis of the thallium images has been to a large extent based on visual inspection of the planar images. Delayed images are helpful to establish the nature of the perfusion abnormalities (transient or fixed). The process of redistribution is based on disparate rates of washout from the normal and abnormal zones. The sensitivity and specificity of dipyridamole thallium imaging, whether intravenous or oral, have been shown in a number of studies to be quite adequate and comparable to that achieved during exercise thallium imaging. Dipyridamole two-dimensional echocardiography has also been used in the detection of coronary artery disease; transient (new or worsening of preexisting) wall motion abnormalities have been found to be a specific marker of coronary artery disease. Transmural as well as regional coronary steal phenomena have been postulated as the mechanism for dipyridamole-induced regional wall motion abnormalities. 65 references.

  17. Complex cardiac pacing in the setting of a district general hospital: procedural success and complications

    PubMed Central

    Rahbi, Hazim; El-din, Mohammed; Salloum, Mohammad; Shaukat, Naeem; Farooq, Mohsin

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Complex cardiac pacing with either an implantable cardiovertor defibrillator (ICD) or a biventricular pacemaker with pacing only (CRT-P) or biventricular pacemaker with implantable cardiovertor defibrillator (CRT-D) plays an important role in the management of patients with heart failure. However, device implantation is associated with rare but significant complications which may limit the number of centres offering this treatment. The aim of this study is to define procedural success and complication rates associated with implantation of complex implantable cardiac devices in a district general hospital. Methods and subjects The pacing records of all the patients who underwent complex cardiac pacing (ICD, CRT-P and CRT-D) between January 2010 and December 2011 were reviewed. Information on clinical characteristics, pacing indications, venous access, implantation data, lead stability at follow-up, and procedure-related complications were obtained. Results A total of 151 devices (60 CRT-Ds, 55 CRT-Ps and 36 ICDs), were implanted between January 2010 and December 2011 with a median follow-up of 12 months. Overall transvenous procedural success rate was 99.3%. 14 (9.3%) out of the 151 patients suffered a complication. There were no procedure-related deaths, and lead displacement (5.3%) was the most common complication. Other complications included pocket haematoma and phrenic nerve stimulation (1.3% and 3.4%, respectively). There were no cases of pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade, device-related infection, symptomatic venous thrombosis and stroke. Lead thresholds, in particular that of the left ventricular lead, remained stable during the follow-up period indicating persistent delivery of cardiac resynchronisation therapy in the group receiving CRT systems. Conclusions In the presence of necessary clinical expertise, complex cardiac devices can be implanted successfully and with a high degree of safety in the setting of a district general

  18. Cardiac amyloidosis: updates in diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Mohty, Dania; Damy, Thibaud; Cosnay, Pierre; Echahidi, Najmeddine; Casset-Senon, Danielle; Virot, Patrice; Jaccard, Arnaud

    2013-10-01

    Amyloidosis is a severe systemic disease. Cardiac involvement may occur in the three main types of amyloidosis (acquired monoclonal light-chain, hereditary transthyretin and senile amyloidosis) and has a major impact on prognosis. Imaging the heart to characterize and detect early cardiac involvement is one of the major aims in the assessment of this disease. Electrocardiography and transthoracic echocardiography are important diagnostic and prognostic tools in patients with cardiac involvement. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging better characterizes myocardial involvement, functional abnormalities and amyloid deposition due to its high spatial resolution. Nuclear imaging has a role in the diagnosis of transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy. Cardiac biomarkers are now used for risk stratification and staging of patients with light-chain systemic amyloidosis. Different types of cardiac complications may occur, including diastolic followed by systolic heart failure, atrial and/or ventricular arrhythmias, conduction disturbances, embolic events and sometimes sudden death. Senile amyloid and hereditary transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy have better prognoses than light-chain amyloidosis. Cardiac treatment of heart failure is usually ineffective and is often poorly tolerated because of its hypotensive and bradycardiac effects. The three main types of amyloid disease, despite their similar cardiac appearance, have specific new aetiological treatments that may change the prognosis of this disease. Cardiologists should be aware of this disease to allow early treatment. PMID:24070600

  19. Cardiac conduction system

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals to the heart muscle causing it to contract. The main components ... the cardiac conduction system’s electrical activity in the heart.

  20. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePlus

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...

  1. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... from American Heart Association Aneurysms and Dissections Angina Arrhythmia Bundle Branch Block Cardiomyopathy Carotid Artery Disease Chronic ... terms: SCA, sudden cardiac death (SCD), sudden death, arrhythmias, ... ventricular fibrillation, defibrillator, automatic cardiac defibrillator ( ...

  2. Usefulness of cardiac resynchronisation therapy devices and implantable cardioverter defibrillators in the treatment of heart failure due to severe systolic dysfunction: systematic review of clinical trials and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    García García, M A; Rosero Arenas, M A; Ruiz Granell, R; Chorro Gascó, F J; Martínez Cornejo, A

    2016-01-01

    Aim To assess the effectiveness of cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT), implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy, and the combination of these devices (CRT+ICD) in adult patients with left ventricular dysfunction and symptomatic heart failure. Methods A comprehensive systematic review of randomised clinical trials was conducted. Several electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, Ovid, Cochrane, ClinicalTrials.gov) were reviewed. The mortality rates between treatments were compared. A network was established comparing the various options, and direct, indirect and mixed comparisons were made using multivariate meta-regression. The degree of clinical and statistical homogeneity was assessed. Results 43 trials involving 13 017 patients were reviewed. Resynchronisation therapy, defibrillators, and combined devices (CRT+ICD) are clearly beneficial compared to optimal medical treatment, showing clear benefit in all of these cases. In a theoretical order of efficiency, the first option is combined therapy (CRT+ICD), the second is CRT, and the third is defibrillator implantation (ICD). Given the observational nature of these comparisons, and the importance of the overlapping CIs, we cannot state that the combined option (CRT+ICD) offers superior survival benefit compared to the other two options. Conclusions The combined option of CRT+ICD seems to be better than the option of CRT alone, although no clear improvement in survival was found for the combined option. It would be advisable to perform a direct comparative study of these two options. PMID:27326223

  3. Cardiac Biomarkers: a Focus on Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Forough, Reza; Scarcello, Catherine; Perkins, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Historically, biomarkers have been used in two major ways to maintain and improve better health status: first, for diagnostic purposes, and second, as specific targets to treat various diseases. A new era in treatment and even cure for the some diseases using reprograming of somatic cells is about to be born. In this approach, scientists are successfully taking human skin cells (previously considered terminally-differentiated cells) and re-programming them into functional cardiac myocytes and other cell types in vitro. A cell reprograming approach for treatment of cardiovascular diseases will revolutionize the field of medicine and significantly expand the human lifetime. Availability of a comprehensive catalogue for cardiac biomarkers is necessary for developing cell reprograming modalities to treat cardiac diseases, as well as for determining the progress of reprogrammed cells as they become cardiac cells. In this review, we present a comprehensive survey of the cardiac biomarkers currently known. PMID:23074366

  4. Primary cardiac lymphoma mimicking infiltrative cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ga Yeon; Kim, Won Seog; Ko, Young-Hyeh; Choi, Jin-Oh; Jeon, Eun-Seok

    2013-05-01

    Primary cardiac lymphoma is a rare malignancy which has been described as thickened myocardium due to the infiltration of atypical lymphocytes and accompanying intracardiac masses. Here, we report a case of a primary cardiac lymphoma without demonstrable intracardiac masses, mimicking infiltrative cardiomyopathy. A 40-year-old male presented with exertional dyspnoea and was diagnosed as having restrictive cardiomyopathy with severely decreased LV systolic function. Endomyocardial biopsy was performed and the diagnosis of primary cardiac lymphoma was confirmed. After appropriate chemotherapy, he recovered his systolic function fully. PMID:23248217

  5. Cardiac Amyloidosis Presenting With Cardiogenic Shock.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Ashwad; Brener, Sorin J; Narula, Navneet; Worku, Berhane; Gulkarov, Iosif

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac amyloidosis is an infiltrative disorder of the myocardium. It is the result of one of 4 types of amyloidosis: primary systemic (immunoglobulin light chain), secondary, familial (hereditary), or senile. Cardiac amyloidosis ultimately causes congestive heart failure due to irreversible restrictive cardiomyopathy. Because of the rapid progression of the disease, early recognition and determination of underlying etiology are important for tailored therapy. Current interventions range from conservative heart failure management to autologous stem cell and heart transplantation. We present a case of cardiac amyloidosis accompanying undiagnosed multiple myeloma to illustrate the rapid progression of the disease and the complexities of diagnosing and treating this disorder. PMID:26177555

  6. Preliminary Study on Retinal Vascular and Oxygen-related Changes after Long-term Silicone Oil and Foldable Capsular Vitreous Body Tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Yuan, Yongguang; Zong, Yao; Huang, Zhen; Mai, Shuyi; Li, Yujie; Qian, Xiaobing; Liu, Yaqin; Gao, Qianying

    2014-01-01

    Silicone oil has been the only long-term vitreous substitute used in the treatment of retinal detachment since 1962 by Cibis. Nevertheless, its effects on retinal vascular morphology and oxygen supply to the retina are ambiguous in current research. We previously invented a foldable capsular vitreous body (FCVB) to use as a new vitreous substitute in the treatment of severe retinal detachment, but its effects on the retinal vessel were unknown. Therefore, in this study, a standard three-port pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) was performed on the right eye of each rabbit and then silicone oil and FCVB were injected into the vitreous cavity as vitreous substitutes. After 180 days of retention, the retinal vascular morphology did not display any distinct abnormalities, and hypoxia-induced factor-1alpha (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) did not vary markedly during the observation period in silicone oil tamponade- and FCVB-implanted eyes. This study may suggest that silicone oil and FCVB tamponade in rabbit eyes did not cause retinal vascular pathologic changes or retinal hypoxia for 180 days. PMID:24920425

  7. A Comparative Study between Vitrectomy with Internal Tamponade and a New Modified Fiber Optic Illuminated Ando Plombe for Cases of Macular Hole Retinal Detachment in Myopic Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Bedda, Ahmed M.; Abdel Hadi, Ahmed M.; Abd Al Shafy, Muhammad S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To compare pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) with silicone tamponade or gas (Groups Ia and Ib) and a new modified Ando plombe equipped with a fiber optic light (Group II) for cases with macular hole retinal detachment (MHRD) in high myopic eyes (axial length > 26 mm). Methods. A prospective interventional randomized case series included 60 eyes (20 in each group). Successful outcome was considered if the retina was completely attached at the end of the follow-up period. Complications were identified for each group. Results. Visual acuity improved by 37.31%, 40.67%, and 49.40% in Groups Ia, Ib, and II, respectively. The success rate was 55%, 60%, and 100% in Groups Ia , Ib, and II, respectively, with a statistically significant difference between Groups Ia, Ib, and II (p < 0.001 in Ia, p: 0.002 in Ib). Complications rates were 60%, 45%, and 20% in Groups Ia, Ib, and II, respectively, with a statistically significant difference between Groups Ia and II (p: 0.01). Conclusion. Fiber optic illuminated Ando plombe allows better positioning under the macula and consequently improves the success rate of epimacular buckling in comparison to PPV with internal tamponade in MMHRD. PMID:26550487

  8. Cardiac ventricular aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Harley, Hugh R. S.

    1969-01-01

    A case of successful excision of a ventricular aneurysm due to myocardial infarction is presented. The aetiology, incidence, pathogenesis, pathology, clinical features, and diagnosis of the condition are discussed. An account is given of the haemodynamic upset caused by aneurysms of the ventricle. The prognosis of untreated aneurysms is discussed. Although there is difference of opinion, it is concluded that a ventricular aneurysm adversely affects the prognosis after myocardial infarction. The indications for, and the mortality and results of, resection of ventricular aneurysms are discussed. The conclusion is drawn that persistent cardiac failure and angina can be relieved and the risk of systemic embolism reduced by the excision of expansile ventricular aneurysms of a fibrous nature. It is possible that excision may also reduce the incidence of subsequent acute myocardial infarction. Images PMID:5821618

  9. Pericardiocentesis followed by thoracotomy and repair of penetrating cardiac injury caused by nail gun injury to the heart

    PubMed Central

    Chirumamilla, Vasu; Prabhakaran, Kartik; Patrizio, Petrone; Savino, John A.; Marini, Corrado P.; Zoha, Zobair

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Work site injuries involving high projectile tools such as nail guns can lead to catastrophic injuries. Generally, penetrating cardiac injuries are associated with a high mortality rate. Presentation of case A construction worker was brought to the emergency room having sustained a nail gun injury to the chest. The patient was hypotensive, tachycardic with prominent jugular venous distention, and had a profound lactic acidosis. Bedside ultrasound confirmed the presence of pericardial fluid. Pericardiocentesis was performed twice using a central venous catheter inserted into the pericardial space, resulting in improvement in the patient’s hemodynamics. Thereafter he underwent left anterolateral thoracotomy and repair of a right atrial laceration. He recovered uneventfully. Discussion Penetrating cardiac injuries caused by nail guns, although rare, have been previously described. However, pericardiocentesis, while retaining a role in the management of medical causes of cardiac tamponade, has been reported only sporadically in the setting of trauma. We report a rare case of penetrating nail gun injury to the heart where pericardiocentesis was used as a temporizing measure to stabilize the patient in preparation for definitive but timely operative intervention. Conclusion We propose awareness that percardiocentesis can serve as a temporary life saving measure in the setting of trauma, particularly as a bridge to definitive therapy. To our knowledge, this represents the first reported case of catheter pericardiocentesis used to stabilize a patient until definitive repair of a penetrating cardiac injury caused by a nail gun. PMID:27107304

  10. Cardiac gated ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, C.W. III; Hoffman, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. The authors evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50 msec scan aperture. Multi slice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. The authors observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a non-failing model of the heart.

  11. Cardiac gated ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, C. William, III; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1995-05-01

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. We evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50msec scan aperture. Multislice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. We observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a nonfailing model of the heart.

  12. Death Due to Intra-aortic Migration of Kirschner Wire From the Clavicle

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lei; Sun, Da-Hui; Yu, Tiecheng; Wang, Linxiang; Zhu, Dong; Li, Yan-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Migration of orthopedic fixation wires into the ascending aorta though a rare occurrence can have devastating consequences. Therefore, prompt recognition, with immediate and cautious retrieval of the implant is paramount in averting these complications. We present a case of a 5-year-old boy with the intra-aortic migration of a K-wire used for the treatment of a right clavicle fracture. He was transferred to us with a history of syncope, chest pain, and shortness of breath 7 days after K-wire placement, which was performed at another hospital. On CT scan, the wire was found to be partially inside the ascending aorta, which was associated with massive hemopericardium and cardiac tamponade. The patient was taken up for emergency surgery for the removal K-wire and for the management of cardiac temponade. However, the patient developed cardiac arrest during the induction of intravenous anesthesia and endotracheal intubation. The K-wire was retrieved from the thorax via thoracotomy. However, the patient died 10 days after the surgery. As the migration of wires and pins during orthopedic surgery can cause potentially fatal complications, these should be used very cautiously, especially for percutaneous treatment of shoulder girdle fractures. The patients with such implants should be followed frequently, both clinically and radiographically. If migration occurs, the patient should be closely monitored for emergent complications and the K-wire should be extracted immediately. PMID:27227938

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of cardiac echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Kahlfuß, Sascha; Flieger, Robert Rainer; Roepke, Torsten Kai; Yilmaz, Kadir

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac echinococcosis is a rare manifestation of cystic echinococcosis (CE) caused by the tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus Among all patients suffering from CE, only 0.5%-2% exhibit a cardiac involvement. In addition, during the past years the number of CE cases reported in Western Europe remained roughly unchanged. However, we postulate that cases of CE in Western Europe will increase due to a growing number of refugees coming from endemic areas such as Southern Europe, Eastern Europe and the Middle East. Importantly, although cardiac echinococcosis is rare the disease can lead to many clinical complications, for instance acute heart failure and life-threatening arrhythmias. With respect to the increasing relevance of cardiac echinococcosis in Western Europe and the danger of fulminant disease courses, here we review diagnosis strategies and treatment options of the disease. Diagnosis of cardiac echinococcosis requires a detailed evaluation of the patients' case history, specific laboratory analyses and radiological imaging methods. Ultrasound, MRI and CT are key imaging tools for diagnosis, therapy control, prognosis estimation and disease course control. For the therapy of cardiac echinococcosis, a combination of surgical removal and drug treatment should be applied to symptomatic as well as asymptomatic patients. The complete surgical removal of the cyst(s) is the major prognosis factor of the cardiac manifestation of CE. PMID:27199228

  14. Stimulating endogenous cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Amanda; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration, a combination of these approaches could ameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation of multiple cellular players. PMID:26484341

  15. Cardiac Innervation and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Keiichi; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Ardell, Jeffrey L.; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2015-01-01

    Afferent and efferent cardiac neurotransmission via the cardiac nerves intricately modulates nearly all physiological functions of the heart (chronotropy, dromotropy, lusitropy and inotropy). Afferent information from the heart is transmitted to higher levels of the nervous system for processing (intrinsic cardiac nervous system, extracardiac-intrathoracic ganglia, spinal cord, brain stem and higher centers) which ultimately results in efferent cardiomotor neural impulses (via the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves). This system forms interacting feedback loops that provide physiological stability for maintaining normal rhythm and life-sustaining circulation. This system also ensures that there is fine-tuned regulation of sympathetic-parasympathetic balance in the heart under normal and stressed states in the short (beat to beat), intermediate (minutes-hours) and long term (days-years). This important neurovisceral /autonomic nervous system also plays a major role in the pathophysiology and progression of heart disease, including heart failure and arrhythmias leading to sudden cardiac death (SCD). Transdifferentiation of neurons in heart failure, functional denervation, cardiac and extra-cardiac neural remodeling have also been identified and characterized during the progression of disease. Recent advances in understanding the cellular and molecular processes governing innervation and the functional control of the myocardium in health and disease provides a rational mechanistic basis for development of neuraxial therapies for preventing SCD and other arrhythmias. Advances in cellular, molecular, and bioengineering realms have underscored the emergence of this area as an important avenue of scientific inquiry and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26044253

  16. Cardiac action potential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qinghai; Lipp, Peter; Kaestner, Lars

    2013-06-01

    Action potentials in cardiac myocytes have durations in the order of magnitude of 100 milliseconds. In biomedical investigations the documentation of the occurrence of action potentials is often not sufficient, but a recording of the shape of an action potential allows a functional estimation of several molecular players. Therefore a temporal resolution of around 500 images per second is compulsory. In the past such measurements have been performed with photometric approaches limiting the measurement to one cell at a time. In contrast, imaging allows reading out several cells at a time with additional spatial information. Recent developments in camera technologies allow the acquisition with the required speed and sensitivity. We performed action potential imaging on isolated adult cardiomyocytes of guinea pigs utilizing the fluorescent membrane potential sensor di-8-ANEPPS and latest electron-multiplication CCD as well as scientific CMOS cameras of several manufacturers. Furthermore, we characterized the signal to noise ratio of action potential signals of varying sets of cameras, dye concentrations and objective lenses. We ensured that di-8-ANEPPS itself did not alter action potentials by avoiding concentrations above 5 μM. Based on these results we can conclude that imaging is a reliable method to read out action potentials. Compared to conventional current-clamp experiments, this optical approach allows a much higher throughput and due to its contact free concept leaving the cell to a much higher degree undisturbed. Action potential imaging based on isolated adult cardiomyocytes can be utilized in pharmacological cardiac safety screens bearing numerous advantages over approaches based on heterologous expression of hERG channels in cell lines.

  17. Cardiac assessment of African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Black, Peter A; Marshall, Cecilia; Seyfried, Alice W; Bartin, Anne M

    2011-03-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a common finding in captive African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) at postmortem exam. To date, treatment attempts have been mostly empirical and unrewarding. The objective of this study was to determine reference cardiac values for captive African hedgehogs based on echocardiogram, electrocardiogram (ECG), and radiographs. Adult African hedgehogs with no clinical signs of cardiac disease (n = 13) were selected. Each animal was anesthetized with isoflurane via facemask and an echocardiogram, ECG, and radiographs were performed. Standard measurements were taken and the descriptive statistics performed. Values were comparable to limited data available in other hedgehog species and other similar-sized exotic species. Two animals were removed from consideration of reference values due to valvular defects that were considered significant. These data are the first establishing cardiac parameters in normal African hedgehogs using radiographic cardiac measurement, echocardiogram, and ECG. Evaluating animals with possible cardiomyopathy may allow for earlier diagnosis and more successful treatment. PMID:22946370

  18. Vitrectomy combined with silicone oil tamponade in the treatment of severely traumatized eyes with the visual acuity of no light perception

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shan-Shan; Jiang, Tao

    2013-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the efficacy of surgical treatment of vitrectomy combined with silicone oil tamponade in the treatment of severely traumatized eyes with the visual acuity of no light perception (NLP). METHODS This was a retrospective uncontrolled interventional case-series of 19 patients of severely traumatized eyes with NLP who underwent vitrectomy surgery at the Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Qingdao University (Qingdao, China) during a 3-year period. We recorded perioperative factors with the potential to influence functional outcome including duration from the injury to intervention; causes for ocular trauma; open globe or closed globe injury; grade of vitreous hemorrhage; grade of endophthalmitis; grade of retinal detachment; size and location of intraocular foreign body (IOFB); extent and position of retinal defect; grade of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR); type of surgery; perioperative complications and tamponade agent. The follow-up time was from 3 to 18 months, and the mean time was 12 months. RESULTS After a mean follow-up period of 12 months (3-18 months) 10.53% (2/19) of eyes had visual acuity of between 20/60 and 20/400, 52.63% (10/19) had visual acuity less than 20/400 but more than NLP, and 36.84% (7/19) remained NLP. Visual acuity was improved from NLP to light perception (LP) or better in 63.16% (12/19) of eyes and the rate of complete retinal reattachment was 73.68% (14/19). Good visual acuity all resulted from those patients of blunt trauma with intact eyewall (closed globe injury). The perioperative factors of poor visual acuity prognosis included delayed intervention; open globe injury; endophthalmitis; severe retinal detachment; large IOFB; macular defect; a wide range of retinal defects and severe PVR. CONCLUSION The main reasons of NLP after ocular trauma are severe vitreous hemorrhage opacity; refractive media opacity; retinal detachment; retinal and uveal damages and defects, especially defects of the macula; PVR and

  19. Sudden Cardiac Death Risk Stratification

    PubMed Central

    Deyell, Marc W.; Krahn, Andrew D.; Goldberger, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Arrhythmic sudden cardiac death (SCD) may be due to ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation (SCD-VT/VF) or pulseless electrical activity/asystole. Effective risk stratification to identify patients at risk of arrhythmic SCD is essential for targeting our health care and research resources to tackle this important public health issue. Although our understanding of SCD due to pulseless electrical activity/asystole is growing, the overwhelming majority of research in risk stratification has focused on SCD-VT/VF. This review focuses on existing and novel risk stratification tools for SCD-VT/VF. For patients with left ventricular dysfunction and/or myocardial infarction, advances in imaging, measures of cardiac autonomic function, and measures of repolarization have shown considerable promise in refining risk. Yet the majority of SCD-VT/VF occurs in patients without known cardiac disease. Biomarkers and novel imaging techniques may provide further risk stratification in the general population beyond traditional risk stratification for coronary artery disease alone. Despite these advances, significant challenges in risk stratification remain that must be overcome before a meaningful impact on SCD can be realized. PMID:26044247

  20. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing. PMID:22276376

  1. Acute Effusive Pericarditis due to Horse Chestnut Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Edem, Efe; Kahyaoğlu, Behlül; Çakar, Mehmet Akif

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 32 Final Diagnosis: Pericardial effusion related to the consumption of herbal product Symptoms: Dyspnea Medication: Horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum L) Clinical Procedure: Pericardial and pleural effusions were drained through a pericardiopleural window Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: There are many well-known causes of pericardial effusion, such as cancer metastasis, bacterial or viral pericarditis, and uremic pericarditis; however, no reports exist in the literature demonstrating a pericardial effusion that led to cardiac tamponade following consumption of an herbal remedy. Case Report: A 32-year-old male patient was referred to our cardiology outpatient clinic with a complaint of dyspnea. The patient’s medical history was unremarkable; however, he had consumed 3 boxes of horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum L) paste over the previous 1.5 months. His chest x-ray examination revealed an enlarged cardiac shadow and bilateral pleural effusion. On transthoracic echocardiographic examination, his ejection fraction was found to be 55% with circumferentially extended pericardial effusion that reached 3.9 cm at its maximal thickness. No growth had been detected in the pericardial and pleural biopsies or blood samples; there was no evidence of an infectious process in the physical examination. Based on this information, we diagnosed pericarditis resulting from the use of herbal remedies. This is the first report to demonstrate that herbal remedy consumption may cause this type of clinical condition. Conclusions: Besides other well-known causes, pericardial effusion related to the consumption of herbal remedies should always be considered when treating patients with pericardial effusion caused by unclear etiologies. PMID:27141926

  2. Assessment of Anterior Segment Changes in Pseudophakic Eyes, Using Ultrasonic Biomicroscopic Imaging, after Pars Plana Vitrectomy with Silicone Oil or Gas Tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Kızılay, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the morphological changes of the anterior segment using ultrasonic biomicroscopy (UBM) imaging in pseudophakic patients who underwent pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) with silicone oil or gas (C3F8) internal tamponade agent injection. Method. This prospective study included pseudophakic patients with planned PPV, divided into two groups according to internal tamponade agent: those in which silicone oil was used (n = 27, Group 1) and those in which gas (C3F8) was used (n = 24, Group 2). UBM measurements were performed in the supine position before and one week after surgery. Results. In patients of Group 1, postoperative trabecular meshwork-ciliary process distance (T-CPD) and iris-ciliary process distance (I-CPD), according to preoperative values, were found to be statistically significantly reduced, and postoperative mean value of scleral thickness (ST) and intraocular pressure (IOP), according to preoperative value, was found to be statistically significantly increased. In patients of Group 2, postoperative mean values of anterior chamber depth (ACD), ciliary body thickness (CBT), T-CPD, I-CPD, and IOP, according to preoperative values, were found to be statistically significantly reduced. Preoperatively, in Group 2 patients, according to Group 1 patients, TIA and IOP were found to be statistically significantly increased. Preoperative and postoperative IOP between the measured parameters with UBM showed no statistically significant correlation. Conclusions. Gases cause more morphological changes in the anterior segment structures. It is thought that complications such as increased intraocular pressure can be seen more frequently for this reason. PMID:27298733

  3. Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Marc

    1978-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a significant decrease in the hospital mortality of patients with coronary artery disease. However, sudden cardiac death, which accounts for the majority of deaths from coronary artery disease, hasbeen little affected. This report reviews the pathology, electrophysiology, demographics and clinical presentation of sudden cardiac death. Emergency care and possible preventative measures are examined. PMID:356435

  4. A burn mass casualty event due to boiler room explosion on a cruise ship: preparedness and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tekin, Akin; Namias, Nicholas; O'Keeffe, Terence; Pizano, Louis; Lynn, Mauricio; Prater-Varas, Robin; Quintana, Olga Delia; Borges, Leda; Ishii, Mary; Lee, Seong; Lopez, Peter; Lessner-Eisenberg, Sharon; Alvarez, Angel; Ellison, Tom; Sapnas, Katherine; Lefton, Jennifer; Ward, Charles Gillon

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to review our experience with a mass casualty incident resulting from a boiler room steam explosion aboard a cruise ship. Experience with major, moderate, and minor burns, steam inhalation, mass casualty response systems, and psychological sequelae will be discussed. Fifteen cruise ship employees were brought to the burn center after a boiler room explosion on a cruise ship. Eleven were triaged to the trauma resuscitation area and four to the surgical emergency room. Seven patients were intubated for respiratory distress or airway protection. Six patients had >80 per cent burns with steam inhalation, and all of these died. One of the 6 patients had 99 per cent burns with steam inhalation and died after withdrawal of support within the first several hours. All patients with major burns required escharotomy on arrival to trauma resuscitation. One patient died in the operating room, despite decompression by laparotomy for abdominal compartment syndrome and pericardiotomy via thoracotomy for cardiac tamponade. Four patients required crystalloid, 20,000 mls/m2-27,000 ml/m2 body surface area (BSA) in the first 48 hours to maintain blood pressure and urine output. Three of these four patients subsequently developed abdominal compartment syndrome and died in the first few days. The fourth patient of this group died after 26 days due to sepsis. Five patients had 13-20 per cent bums and four patients had less than 10 per cent burns. Two of the patients with 20 per cent burns developed edema of the vocal cords with mild hoarseness. They improved and recovered without intubation. The facility was prepared for the mass casualty event; having just completed a mass casualty drill several days earlier. Twenty-six beds were made available in 50 minutes for anticipated casualties. Fifteen physicians reported immediately to the trauma resuscitation area to assist in initial stabilization. The event occurred at shift change; thus, adequate support

  5. Impact of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging on cardiac device and surgical therapy: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Andrew J; Ellims, Andris; Lew, Philip J K; Murphy, Bridie; Pally, Suzana; Younie, Sandra

    2013-04-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging may allow more appropriate selection of patients for cardiac device implantation and/or cardiac surgery. In this prospective observational study we evaluated the impact of CMR imaging on cardiac device and surgical therapy. All CMR examinations performed in a single centre over a 2 year period were prospectively recorded in a dedicated database under 4 clinical pathways [cardiomyopathy, viability, tumour/mass and arrythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC)]. Baseline data entered included planned cardiac device implantation and/or cardiac surgical intervention. Patients were contacted 6 months following CMR to evaluate the impact of CMR on planned therapy. Cost savings due to CMR were calculated as the number of surgical or device procedures averted following CMR scanning multiplied by their respective cost weights. Of 732 CMR examinations performed, the clinical pathway was cardiomyopathy in 488 (67 %), ARVC in 118 (16 %), viability in 92 (12 %) and tumour/mass in 34 (5 %). Six month follow-up was available in 666/732 patients. Following CMR, 56/150 (37 %) of patients with an initial plan for device implantation or cardiac surgery, did not undergo the planned intervention (P < 0.001, one-sample exact binomial test). Of 516 patients without an initial device or surgical plan, 33 (6 %) CMR resulted in device implantation or cardiac surgery (P < 0.001, Chi squared). Overall, the estimated saving due to CMR-guided management changes was AUD$737,270. CMR has a significant impact on patient management and offers potential cost savings with respect to selection of device and surgical therapy for cardiac disease. PMID:23592405

  6. Cardiac response induced by voluntary self-paced finger movement.

    PubMed

    Florian, G; Stancák, A; Pfurtscheller, G

    1998-05-01

    Cardiac responses induced by slow and brisk voluntary self-paced index finger movements of the dominant and non-dominant hand were investigated in a group of 12 right-handed subjects. Since subjects synchronised movement and respiration, initiating movement preferably during inspiration, a novel method of evaluating the movement-induced cardiac response was used. This method allows one to distinguish the differential effects on the cardiac response due to movement and respiration. The effect of type of movements (slow vs. brisk) and hand (right vs. left) were analysed. Slow movements induced a monophasic cardiac response, consisting of cardiac deceleration preceding and accompanying movement. Brisk movements induced a biphasic cardiac response, consisting of preparatory deceleration followed by slight post-movement cardiac acceleration. Hand-dominance did not influence the movement-induced cardiac response. The results suggest that neocortical structures involved in planning and execution of voluntary movement impinge upon brainstem cardiovascular nuclei. Vagal cardiac outflow is affected and gives rise to movement-induced changes in cardiac chronotropism. PMID:9545662

  7. Stem cell sources for cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Roccio, M; Goumans, M J; Sluijter, J P G; Doevendans, P A

    2008-03-01

    Cell-based cardiac repair has the ambitious aim to replace the malfunctioning cardiac muscle developed after myocardial infarction, with new contractile cardiomyocytes and vessels. Different stem cell populations have been intensively studied in the last decade as a potential source of new cardiomyocytes to ameliorate the injured myocardium, compensate for the loss of ventricular mass and contractility and eventually restore cardiac function. An array of cell types has been explored in this respect, including skeletal muscle, bone marrow derived stem cells, embryonic stem cells (ESC) and more recently cardiac progenitor cells. The best-studied cell types are mouse and human ESC cells, which have undisputedly been demonstrated to differentiate into cardiomyocyte and vascular lineages and have been of great help to understand the differentiation process of pluripotent cells. However, due to their immunogenicity, risk of tumor development and the ethical challenge arising from their embryonic origin, they do not provide a suitable cell source for a regenerative therapy approach. A better option, overcoming ethical and allogenicity problems, seems to be provided by bone marrow derived cells and by the recently identified cardiac precursors. This report will overview current knowledge on these different cell types and their application in cardiac regeneration and address issues like implementation of delivery methods, including tissue engineering approaches that need to be developed alongside. PMID:18427385

  8. Cardiac involvement in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Khalighi, Koroush; Kodali, Archana; Thapamagar, Suman B.; Walker, Stanley R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an inherited progressive muscle disorder caused by defects in muscle proteins. As the incidence of this condition is low, not many are familiar with the multisystem involvement. At times, cardiac disease may even be the predominant manifestation in the form of arrhythmias, conduction defects, and cardiomyopathies. The progression of the disease can lead to sudden, unpredictable death. Thus, it is important to identify this subgroup and treat accordingly. Objective To identify patients with DM and assess their risk for sudden cardiac death. Methods Nine patients previously diagnosed with muscular dystrophy were evaluated by cardiologists for various reasons, from a general follow-up to cardiac arrest. All of them had electrocardiograms (EKG) and 2-D echocardiograms, and seven of them had further electrophysiological (EP) studies. Results Of the nine patients with DM, eight had EKG evidence of conduction abnormalities ranging from first-degree heart block to complete heart block. Of the seven who had EP studies, five had inducible ventricular tachycardia requiring immediate cardioversion and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implant. Two of them underwent permanent pacemaker placement due to complete heart block and infra-Hissian block. The remaining two patients opted for a conservative approach with yearly EKG monitoring. Conclusion Because one-third of the cardiac deaths in patients with DM are sudden, there is a strong need to identify these patients and intervene in those at high risk. Prophylactic pacemaker placement is recommended even in those with minimal conduction system abnormality. However, the common practice is to identify patients at high risk of conduction abnormalities by EP studies and then provide them with prophylactic invasive strategies. PMID:25656662

  9. [Cardiac evaluation before non-cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Menzenbach, Jan; Boehm, Olaf

    2016-07-01

    Before non-cardiac surgery, evaluation of cardiac function is no frequent part of surgical treatment. European societies of anesthesiology and cardiology published consensus-guidelines in 2014 to present a reasonable approach for preoperative evaluation. This paper intends to differentiate the composite of perioperative risk and to display the guidelines methodical approach to handle it. Features to identify patients at risk from an ageing population with comorbidities, are the classification of surgical risk, functional capacity and risk indices. Application of diagnostic means, should be used adjusted to this risk estimation. Cardiac biomarkers are useful to discover risk of complications or mortality, that cannot be assessed by clinical signs. After preoperative optimization and perioperative cardiac protection, the observation of the postoperative period remains, to prohibit complications or even death. In consideration of limited resources of intensive care department, postoperative ward rounds beyond intensive care units are considered to be an appropriate instrument to avoid or recognize complications early to reduce postoperative mortality. PMID:27479258

  10. Naturally occurring cardiac glycosides.

    PubMed

    Radford, D J; Gillies, A D; Hinds, J A; Duffy, P

    1986-05-12

    Cardiac glycoside poisoning from the ingestion of plants, particularly of oleanders, occurs with reasonable frequency in tropical and subtropical areas. We have assessed a variety of plant specimens for their cardiac glycoside content by means of radioimmunoassays with antibodies that differ in their specificity for cardiac glycosides. Significant amounts of immunoreactive cardiac glycoside were found to be present in the ornamental shrubs: yellow oleander (Thevetia peruviana); oleander (Nerium oleander); wintersweet (Carissa spectabilis); bushman's poison (Carissa acokanthera); sea-mango (Cerbera manghas); and frangipani (Plumeria rubra); and in the milkweeds: redheaded cotton-bush (Asclepias curassavica); balloon cotton (Asclepias fruiticosa); king's crown (Calotropis procera); and rubber vine (Cryptostegia grandifolia). The venom gland of the cane toad (Bufo marinus) also contained large quantities of cardiac glycosides. The competitive immunoassay method permits the rapid screening of specimens that are suspected to contain cardiac glycosides. Awareness of the existence of these plant and animal toxins and their dangers allows them to be avoided and poisoning prevented. The method is also useful for the confirmation of the presence of cardiac glycosides in serum in cases of poisoning. PMID:3086679

  11. [Cardiac Rehabilitation 2015].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Andreas

    2015-11-25

    The goals of cardiac rehabilitation are (re-)conditioning and secondary prevention in patients with heart disease or an elevated cardiovascular risk profile. Rehabilitation is based on motivation through education, on adapted physical activity, instruction of relaxation techniques, psychological support and optimized medication. It is performed preferably in groups either in outpatient or inpatient settings. The Swiss working group on cardiac rehabilitation provides a network of institutions with regular quality auditing. Positive effects of rehabilitation programs on mortality and morbidity have been established by numerous studies. Although a majority of patients after cardiac surgery are being referred to rehabilitation, these services are notoriously underused after catheter procedures. PMID:26602848

  12. Cardiac pacing and aviation.

    PubMed

    Toff, W D; Edhag, O K; Camm, A J

    1992-12-01

    Certain applicants with stable disturbances of rhythm or conduction requiring cardiac pacing, in whom no other disqualifying condition is present, may be considered fit for medical certification restricted to multi-crew operations. The reliability of modern pacing systems appears adequate to permit restricted certification even in pacemaker dependent subjects except for certain models of pacemakers and leads known to be at increased risk of failure. These are to be avoided. There is little evidence to suggest that newer devices are any more reliable than their predecessors. Single and dual chamber systems appear to have similar reliability up to 4 years, after which time significant attrition of dual chamber devices occurs, principally due to battery depletion. All devices require increased scrutiny as they approach their end of life as predicted from longevity data and pacing characteristics. Unipolar and bipolar leads are of similar reliability, apart from a number of specific bipolar polyurethane leads which have been identified. Atrial leads, particularly those without active fixation, are less secure than ventricular leads and applicants who are dependent on atrial sensing or pacing should be denied certification. Bipolar leads are to be preferred due to the lower risk of myopotential and exogenous EMI. Sensor-driven adaptive-rate pacing systems using active sensors may have reduced longevity and require close scrutiny. Activity-sensing devices using piezoelectric crystal sensors may be subject to significant rate rises in rotary wing aircraft. The impracticality of restricted certification in helicopters will, in any event, preclude certification. Such devices would best be avoided in hovercraft (air cushioned vehicle) pilots. Only minor rate rises are likely in fixed-wing aircraft which are unlikely to be of significance. Anti-tachycardia devices and implanted defibrillators are inconsistent with any form of certification to fly. PMID:1493823

  13. Critical care ultrasound in cardiac arrest. Technological requirements for performing the SESAME-protocol--a holistic approach.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, Daniel; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2015-01-01

    The use of ultrasound has gained its place in critical care as part of our day-to-day monitoring tools. A better understanding of ultrasound techniques and recent publications including protocols for the lungs, the abdomen and the blood vessels has introduced ultrasound to the bedside of our ICU patients. However, we will prove in this paper that early machines, dating back more than 25 years, were perfectly able to do the job as compared to modern laptop machines with more features but few additional advantages. Ultrasound is not only a diagnostic tool, but should also be seen as an extension of the traditional physical examination. This paper will focus on the use of the SESAME-protocol in cardiac arrest. The SESAME-protocol suggests starting with a lung scan to rule out possible causes leading to cardiac arrest. Firstly, pneumothorax needs to be ruled out. Secondly, a partial diagnosis of pulmonary embolism is done following the BLUE-protocol. Thirdly, fluid therapy can be guided, following the FALLS-protocol. The SESAME-protocol continues by scanning the lower femoral veins to check for signs of deep venous thrombosis, followed by (or before, in case of trauma) the abdomen to detect massive bleeding. Next comes the pericardium, to exclude pericardial tamponade. Finally, a transthoracic cardiac ultrasound is performed to check for other (cardiac) causes leading to cardiac arrest. The emphasis is on a holistic approach, where ultrasound can be seen as the modern stethoscope needed by clinicians to complete the full physiological examination of their critically ill unstable patients. PMID:26578398

  14. New approach for simultaneous respiratory and cardiac motion correction in cardiac PET (NAMC-CPET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mohamed A. A.; Xiao, Peng; Xie, Qingguo

    2015-10-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions are inevitable during the relatively long acquisition time of cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) scan. The correction of the resultant motion blur has become a significant challenge due to recent spatial resolution improvement of the PET scanners. The majority of current motion compensation algorithms are based on gating as a primary step. A new approach based on temporal basis functions is developed to correct respiratory and cardiac motion simultaneously in cardiac PET within the normal scanning time (NAMC-CPET). Simulation and experimental studies are conducted to evaluate and validate the final outputs in comparison to the existing gating methods. A dynamic digital phantom is used to simulate realistic human thorax and abdomen with respiratory and cardiac motions. GATE simulation was run at China National Grid Center to obtain realistic PET data in a reasonable time. Moreover, Tibet minipig experiments were conducted using a preclinical small animal PET scanner developed at HUST to validate the performance of the NAMC-CPET in real data. The results reveal that NAMC-CPET outperformed the existing gating methods (respiratory, cardiac, and dual) in cardiac imaging in term of noise reduction and contrast, especially in short acquisition duration. NAMC-CPET obtained better results in the conducted experiments in terms of contrast and the visibility of the heart. In contrast, the dual gating failed to obtain valuable images in the normal scan time due to the low 18F-FDG uptake. NAMC-CPET is advantageous in the low-statistic situation. The results are promising with great potential implications in cardiac PET imaging in terms of the radioactive dose and scan time reduction.

  15. Cardiac conduction system

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... signals to the heart muscle causing it to contract. The main components of the cardiac conduction system ... the sequence by causing the atrial muscles to contract. From there, the signal travels to the AV ...

  16. Cardiac sarcoidosis - silent destroyer.

    PubMed

    Martusewicz-Boros, Magdalena M; Piotrowska-Kownacka, Dorota; Wiatr, Elżbieta; Roszkowski-Śliż, Kazimierz

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of histologically proven pulmonary sarcoidosis and cardiac involvement in a 53-year old woman with progression leading to the heart failure documented in cardiovascular magnetic resonsnce studies. PMID:27537722

  17. Cardiac glycoside overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... found in the leaves of the digitalis (foxglove) plant. This plant is the original source of this medicine. People ... Digitoxin (Crystodigin) Digoxin (Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin) Besides the foxglove plant, cardiac glycosides also occur naturally in plants such ...

  18. Enhancing Cardiac Triacylglycerol Metabolism Improves Recovery From Ischemic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Goldberg, Ira J.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated cardiac triacylglycerol (TAG) content is traditionally equated with cardiolipotoxicity and suggested to be a culprit in cardiac dysfunction. However, previous work demonstrated that myosin heavy-chain–mediated cardiac-specific overexpression of diacylglycerol transferase 1 (MHC-DGAT1), the primary enzyme for TAG synthesis, preserved cardiac function in two lipotoxic mouse models despite maintaining high TAG content. Therefore, we examined whether increased cardiomyocyte TAG levels due to DGAT1 overexpression led to changes in cardiac TAG turnover rates under normoxia and ischemia-reperfusion conditions. MHC-DGAT1 mice had elevated TAG content and synthesis rates, which did not alter cardiac function, substrate oxidation, or myocardial energetics. MHC-DGAT1 hearts had ischemia-induced lipolysis; however, when a physiologic mixture of long-chain fatty acids was provided, enhanced TAG turnover rates were associated with improved functional recovery from low-flow ischemia. Conversely, exogenous supply of palmitate during reperfusion suppressed elevated TAG turnover rates and impaired recovery from ischemia in MHC-DGAT1 hearts. Collectively, this study shows that elevated TAG content, accompanied by enhanced turnover, does not adversely affect cardiac function and, in fact, provides cardioprotection from ischemic stress. In addition, the results highlight the importance of exogenous supply of fatty acids when assessing cardiac lipid metabolism and its relationship with cardiac function. PMID:25858561

  19. Strategies for the prevention of sudden cardiac death during sports.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Domenico; Drezner, Jonathan; Basso, Cristina; Pelliccia, Antonio; Thiene, Gaetano

    2011-04-01

    Sudden cardiac death of a young athlete is the most tragic event in sports and devastates the family, the sports medicine team, and the local community. Such a fatality represents the first manifestation of cardiac disease in up to 80% of young athletes who remain asymptomatic before sudden cardiac arrest occurs; this explains the limited power of screening modalities based solely on history and physical examination. The long-running Italian experience showed that electrocardiogram (ECG) screening definitively improves the sensitivity of pre-participation evaluation for heart diseases and substantially reduces the risk of death in the athletic field (primary prevention). However, some cardiac conditions, such as coronary artery diseases, present no abnormalities on 12-lead ECG. Moreover, cardiac arrest due to non-penetrating chest injury (commotio cordis) cannot be prevented by screening. This justifies the efforts for implementing programmes of early external defibrillation of unpredictable arrhythmic cardiac arrest. This article reviews the epidemiology of sudden cardiac arrest in the athlete in terms of incidence, sport-related risk, underlying causes, and the currently available prevention programmes such as pre-participation screening and early external defibrillation by using automated external defibrillators. The best strategy is to combine synergistically primary prevention of sudden cardiac death by pre-participation identification of athletes affected by at-risk cardiomyopathies and secondary prevention with back-up defibrillation of unpredictable sudden cardiac arrest on the athletic field. PMID:21567995

  20. Enhancing Cardiac Triacylglycerol Metabolism Improves Recovery From Ischemic Stress.

    PubMed

    Kolwicz, Stephen C; Liu, Li; Goldberg, Ira J; Tian, Rong

    2015-08-01

    Elevated cardiac triacylglycerol (TAG) content is traditionally equated with cardiolipotoxicity and suggested to be a culprit in cardiac dysfunction. However, previous work demonstrated that myosin heavy-chain-mediated cardiac-specific overexpression of diacylglycerol transferase 1 (MHC-DGAT1), the primary enzyme for TAG synthesis, preserved cardiac function in two lipotoxic mouse models despite maintaining high TAG content. Therefore, we examined whether increased cardiomyocyte TAG levels due to DGAT1 overexpression led to changes in cardiac TAG turnover rates under normoxia and ischemia-reperfusion conditions. MHC-DGAT1 mice had elevated TAG content and synthesis rates, which did not alter cardiac function, substrate oxidation, or myocardial energetics. MHC-DGAT1 hearts had ischemia-induced lipolysis; however, when a physiologic mixture of long-chain fatty acids was provided, enhanced TAG turnover rates were associated with improved functional recovery from low-flow ischemia. Conversely, exogenous supply of palmitate during reperfusion suppressed elevated TAG turnover rates and impaired recovery from ischemia in MHC-DGAT1 hearts. Collectively, this study shows that elevated TAG content, accompanied by enhanced turnover, does not adversely affect cardiac function and, in fact, provides cardioprotection from ischemic stress. In addition, the results highlight the importance of exogenous supply of fatty acids when assessing cardiac lipid metabolism and its relationship with cardiac function. PMID:25858561

  1. How Can Death Due to Sudden Cardiac Arrest Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... heartbeats that can trigger the ICD. Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator The illustration shows the location of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator in the upper chest. The electrodes are inserted ...

  2. Ranolazine in Cardiac Arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Saad, Marwan; Mahmoud, Ahmed; Elgendy, Islam Y; Richard Conti, C

    2016-03-01

    Ranolazine utilization in the management of refractory angina has been established by multiple randomized clinical studies. However, there is growing evidence showing an evolving role in the field of cardiac arrhythmias. Multiple experimental and clinical studies have evaluated the role of ranolazine in prevention and management of atrial fibrillation, with ongoing studies on its role in ventricular arrhythmias. In this review, we will discuss the pharmacological, experimental, and clinical evidence behind ranolazine use in the management of various cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26459200

  3. Cardiac rehabilitation in Germany.

    PubMed

    Karoff, Marthin; Held, Klaus; Bjarnason-Wehrens, Birna

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the rehabilitation measures provided for cardiac patients in Germany and to outline its legal basis and outcomes. In Germany the cardiac rehabilitation system is different from rehabilitation measures in other European countries. Cardiac rehabilitation in Germany since 1885 is based on specific laws and the regulations of insurance providers. Cardiac rehabilitation has predominantly been offered as an inpatient service, but has recently been complemented by outpatient services. A general agreement on the different indications for offering these two services has yet to be reached. Cardiac rehabilitation is mainly offered after an acute cardiac event and bypass surgery. It is also indicated in severe heart failure and special cases of percutaneous coronary intervention. Most patients are men (>65%) and the age at which events occur is increasing. The benefits obtained during the 3-4 weeks after an acute event, and confirmed in numerous studies, are often later lost under 'usual care' conditions. Many attempts have been made by rehabilitation institutions to improve this deficit by providing intensive aftercare. One instrument set up to achieve this is the nationwide institution currently comprising more than 6000 heart groups with approximately 120000 outpatients. After coronary artery bypass grafting or acute coronary syndrome cardiac rehabilitation can usually be started within 10 days. The multidisciplinary rehabilitation team consists of cardiologists, psychologists, exercise therapists, social workers, nutritionists and nurses. The positive effects of cardiac rehabilitation are also important economically, for example, for the improvement of secondary prevention and vocational integration. PMID:17301623

  4. Cardiac Munchausen's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, E J; Evans, T R

    1987-01-01

    Ten years' experience of cardiac Munchausen's syndrome in the Cardiac Care Unit of an Inner London teaching hospital is reported. Thirty-six admissions in this category were identified and analysed, and 4 typical cases are described. The common presenting complaints, recurring features and the relationship with other forms of Munchausen's syndrome are discussed, as are possible strategies available to deal with this clinical entity. PMID:3694601

  5. Cardiac imaging in adults

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority.

  6. Cardiac arrest: first presentation of anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Ewan, Sian-Lee; Moynihan, Patricia C

    2013-01-01

    A 16-year-old girl collapsed in cardiac arrest in a hospital car park. Investigations revealed a potassium level of 1.8. Following a 5-day intensive care unit admission she described behaviours consistent with restrictive-purging type anorexia nervosa, which had been concealed from her parents and health professionals. Long-term management has been difficult due to poor patient engagement. Further, recurrent episodes of hypokalaemia continue to feature. Here we explore the cardiac complications of anorexia nervosa and challenges with long-term management of this condition. PMID:24092611

  7. Sudden cardiac death in athletes.

    PubMed

    Schmied, C; Borjesson, M

    2014-02-01

    A 'paradox of sport' is that in addition to the undisputed health benefits of physical activity, vigorous exertion may transiently increase the risk of acute cardiac events. In general, the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) approximately doubles during physical activity and is 2- to 3-fold higher in athletes compared to nonathletes. The incidence of SCD in young athletes is in fact very low, at around 1-3 per 100,000, but attracts much public attention. Variations in incidence figures may be explained by the methodology used for data collection and more importantly by differences between subpopulations of athletes. The incidence of SCD in older (≥ 35 years) athletes is higher and may be expected to rise, as more and older individuals take part in organized sports. SCD is often the first clinical manifestation of a potentially fatal underlying cardiovascular disorder and usually occurs in previously asymptomatic athletes. In the young (<35 years), SCD is mainly due to congenital/inherited cardiac abnormalities, whilst coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common cause in older athletes. Cardiac screening including family/personal history, physical examination and resting electrocardiogram (ECG) may identify individuals at risk and has the potential to decrease the risk of SCD in young athletes. Screening including the ECG has a high sensitivity for underlying disease in young athletes, but the specificity needs to be improved, whereas the sensitivity of screening without the use of ECG is very low. The screening modality recommended for young athletes is of limited value in older athletes, who should receive individualized screening with cardiac stress testing for patients with high risk of underlying CAD. As cardiovascular screening will never be able to identify all athletes at risk, adequate preparedness is vital in case of a potentially fatal event at the sporting arena/facility. Firstly, we will review the magnitude of the problem of SCD in athletes of

  8. Cardiac Applications of Optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, Christina M.; Klimas, Aleksandra; Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    In complex multicellular systems, such as the brain or the heart, the ability to selectively perturb and observe the response of individual components at the cellular level and with millisecond resolution in time, is essential for mechanistic understanding of function. Optogenetics uses genetic encoding of light sensitivity (by the expression of microbial opsins) to provide such capabilities for manipulation, recording, and control by light with cell specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. As an optical approach, it is inherently scalable for remote and parallel interrogation of biological function at the tissue level; with implantable miniaturized devices, the technique is uniquely suitable for in vivo tracking of function, as illustrated by numerous applications in the brain. Its expansion into the cardiac area has been slow. Here, using examples from published research and original data, we focus on optogenetics applications to cardiac electrophysiology, specifically dealing with the ability to manipulate membrane voltage by light with implications for cardiac pacing, cardioversion, cell communication, and arrhythmia research, in general. We discuss gene and cell delivery methods of inscribing light sensitivity in cardiac tissue, functionality of the light-sensitive ion channels within different types of cardiac cells, utility in probing electrical coupling between different cell types, approaches and design solutions to all-optical electrophysiology by the combination of optogenetic sensors and actuators, and specific challenges in moving towards in vivo cardiac optogenetics. PMID:25035999

  9. Direct Cardiac Reprogramming: Advances in Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Olivia; Qian, Li

    2015-01-01

    Heart disease is one of the lead causes of death worldwide. Many forms of heart disease, including myocardial infarction and pressure-loading cardiomyopathies, result in irreversible cardiomyocyte death. Activated fibroblasts respond to cardiac injury by forming scar tissue, but ultimately this response fails to restore cardiac function. Unfortunately, the human heart has little regenerative ability and long-term outcomes following acute coronary events often include chronic and end-stage heart failure. Building upon years of research aimed at restoring functional cardiomyocytes, recent advances have been made in the direct reprogramming of fibroblasts toward a cardiomyocyte cell fate both in vitro and in vivo. Several experiments show functional improvements in mouse models of myocardial infarction following in situ generation of cardiomyocyte-like cells from endogenous fibroblasts. Though many of these studies are in an early stage, this nascent technology holds promise for future applications in regenerative medicine. In this review, we discuss the history, progress, methods, challenges, and future directions of direct cardiac reprogramming. PMID:26176012

  10. Pre-liver transplantation, cardiac assessment.

    PubMed

    Rugină, M; Predescu, L; Sălăgean, M; Gheorghe, L; Gheorghe, C; Tulbure, D; Popescu, I; Bubenek-Turconi, S

    2012-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is a stressful condition for the cardiovascular system of patients with advanced hepatic disease. The underlying hemodynamic and cardiac status of patients with cirrhosis is crucial to determine which patients should became recipients. In addition to advanced age and the presence of comorbidities, there are specific cardiovascular responses in cirrhosis that can be detrimental to the LT candidate. Patients with cirrhosis requiring LT usually demonstrate increased cardiac output, a compromised ventricular response to stress, low systemic vascular resistance and bradycardia. Post-transplant reperfusion may result in cardiac death due to a multitude of causes, including arrhythmia, acute heart failure and myocardial infarction. This review examines screening strategies for transplant candidates and details the prognostic value of common test used to identify ischemic heart disease, heart failure, portopulmonary hypertension. There are discused evidence-based recommendations for their evaluation and management. PMID:22844825

  11. Mammalian Cardiac Regeneration After Fetal Myocardial Infarction Requires Cardiac Progenitor Cell Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Allukian, Myron; Xu, Junwang; Morris, Michael; Caskey, Robert; Dorsett-Martin, Wanda; Plappert, Theodore; Griswold, Michael; Gorman, Joseph H.; Gorman, Robert C.; Liechty, Kenneth W.

    2013-01-01

    Background In contrast to the adult, fetal sheep consistently regenerate functional myocardium after myocardial infarction. We hypothesize that this regeneration is due to the recruitment of cardiac progenitor cells to the infarct by stromal-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) and that its competitive inhibition will block the regenerative fetal response. Methods A 20% apical infarct was created in adult and fetal sheep by selective permanent coronary artery ligation. Lentiviral overexpression of mutant SDF-1α competitively inhibited SDF-1α in fetal infarcts. Echocardiography was performed to assess left ventricular function and infarct size. Cardiac progenitor cell recruitment and proliferation was assessed in fetal infarcts at 1 month by immunohistochemistry for nkx2.5 and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine. Results Competitive inhibition of SDF-1α converted the regenerative fetal response into a reparative response, similar to the adult. SDF-inhibited fetal infarcts demonstrated significant infarct expansion by echocardiography (p < 0.001) and a significant decrease in the number of nkx2.5+ cells repopulating the infarct (p < 0.001). Conclusions The fetal regenerative response to myocardial infarction requires the recruitment of cardiac progenitor cells and is dependent on SDF1α. This novel model of mammalian cardiac regeneration after myocardial infarction provides a powerful tool to better understand cardiac progenitor cell biology and to develop strategies to cardiac regeneration in the adult. PMID:23816072

  12. [Sudden cardiac death in individuals with normal hearts: an update].

    PubMed

    González-Melchor, Laila; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Iturralde-Torres, Pedro; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia

    2014-01-01

    Sudden death (SD) is a tragic event and a world-wide health problem. Every year, near 4-5 million people experience SD. SD is defined as the death occurred in 1h after the onset of symptoms in a person without previous signs of fatality. It can be named "recovered SD" when the case received medical attention, cardiac reanimation effective defibrillation or both, surviving the fatal arrhythmia. Cardiac channelopathies are a group of diseases characterized by abnormal ion channel function due to genetic mutations in ion channel genes, providing increased susceptibility to develop cardiac arrhythmias and SD. Usually the death occurs before 40 years of age and in the autopsy the heart is normal. In this review we discuss the main cardiac channelopathies involved in sudden cardiac death along with current management of cases and family members that have experienced such tragic event. PMID:25128006

  13. Recent advances in the diagnosis and management of cardiac amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Sher, Taimur; Gertz, Morie A

    2014-01-01

    The heart is commonly involved in various forms of amyloidosis and cardiomyopathy is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis is often delayed due to nonspecific presenting symptoms and failure to recognize early signs of amyloid heart disease on routine cardiac imaging. Treatment of cardiac amyloidosis depends upon the type of amyloid protein. Systemic chemotherapy with or without stem cell transplantation is used to treat immunoglobulin-related amyloidosis and liver transplantation is used for familial transthyretin amyloidosis in select patients. Clinical trials with siRNA for the treatment of transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathies and amyloid protein stabilizers are ongoing. Prognosis depends on the type of amyloid protein with poorer outcomes noted in immunoglobulin light-chain amyloidosis. Supportive care forms the cornerstone of management and advancements in cardiac imaging and proteomics are expected to positively impact our ability to diagnose, prognosticate and treat cardiac amyloidosis. PMID:24344669

  14. Cardiac extracellular matrix proteomics: Challenges, techniques, and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia Wei; Dalgliesh, Ailsa J; López, Javier E; Griffiths, Leigh G

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) has emerged as a dynamic tissue component, providing not only structural support, but also functionally participating in a wide range of signaling events during development, injury, and disease remodeling. Investigation of dynamic changes in cardiac ECM proteome is challenging due to the relative insolubility of ECM proteins, which results from their macromolecular nature, extensive post-translational modification (PTM), and tendency to form protein complexes. Finally, the relative abundance of cellular and mitochondrial proteins in cardiac tissue further complicates cardiac ECM proteomic approaches. Recent developments of various techniques to enrich and analyze ECM proteins are playing a major role in overcoming these challenges. Application of cardiac ECM proteomics in disease tissues can further provide spatial and temporal information relevant to disease diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and engineering of therapeutic candidates for cardiac repair and regeneration. PMID:26200932

  15. Cardiac involvement in hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Vinay; Harikrishnan, Prakash; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Aronow, Wilbert S; Jain, Diwakar; Frishman, William H

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hemochromatosis or primary iron-overload cardiomyopathy is an important and potentially preventable cause of heart failure. This is initially characterized by diastolic dysfunction and arrhythmias and in later stages by dilated cardiomyopathy. Diagnosis of iron overload is established by elevated transferrin saturation (>55%) and elevated serum ferritin (>300 ng/mL). Genetic testing for mutations in the HFE (high iron) gene and other proteins, such as hemojuvelin, transferrin receptor, and ferroportin, should be performed if secondary causes of iron overload are ruled out. Patients should undergo comprehensive 2D and Doppler echocardiography to evaluate their systolic and diastolic function. Newer modalities like strain imaging and speckle-tracking echocardiography hold promise for earlier detection of cardiac involvement. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with measurement of T2* relaxation times can help quantify myocardial iron overload. In addition to its value in diagnosis of cardiac iron overload, response to iron reduction therapy can be assessed by serial imaging. Therapeutic phlebotomy and iron chelation are the cornerstones of therapy. The average survival is less than a year in untreated patients with severe cardiac impairment. However, if treated early and aggressively, the survival rate approaches that of the regular heart failure population. PMID:24503941

  16. Cardiac tumors: leiomyosarcoma – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Syska-Sumińska, Joanna; Zieliński, Piotr; Dłużniewski, Mirosław; Sadowski, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    We present a case report of a 60-year-old woman with a long history of leiomyosarcoma in different locations. She was admitted to the clinic due to a left ventricular tumor diagnosed in ECHO examination. The patient was qualified for radical tumor resection. The early postoperative period was complicated due to low cardiac output syndrome and bradyarrhythmia requiring temporary cardiac pacing. Optimized pharmacological therapy resulted in a gradual reduction of symptoms and a clinical improvement of congestive heart failure (NYHA III – NYHA II). Due to the radical nature of the surgery, the patient was not referred for supplementary treatment. The follow-up currently exceeds 12 months – no new metastases have been found. This case provides an example of how to diagnose and treat heart tumors. PMID:26702284

  17. Role of breathing in cardiac performance: experimental and mathematical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Binh Q.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1999-05-01

    Due to the close proximity of the heart and lungs within a closed chest environment, we expect breathing to affect various cardiac performance parameters and hence cardiac output. We present an integrative approach to study heart-lung interactions, combining a mathematical formulation of the circulation system with imaging techniques using echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging (EPI) and dynamic x-ray CT (EBCT). We hypothesize that appropriate synchronization of mechanical ventilation to cardiac-cycle specific events can improve cardiac function, i.e. stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO). Computational and experimental results support the notion that heart-lung interaction, leading to altered cardiac output associated with inspiration/expiration, is not directly associated with lung inflation/deflation and thus is felt to be more influenced by pleural pressure changes. The mathematical model of the circulation demonstrates the importance of cardiac-cycle specific timing of ventilation on cardiac function and matches with experimentally observed relationships found in animal models studied via EBCT and human studies using EPI. Results show that positive pressure mechanical ventilation timed to systolic events may increase SV and CO by up to 30%, mainly by increased filling of the ventricles during diastole. Similarly, negative pressure (spontaneous) respiration has its greatest effect on ventricular diastolic filling. Cardiac-gated mechanical ventilation may provide sufficient cardiac augmentation to warrant further investigation as a minimally-invasive technique for temporary cardiac assist. Through computational modeling and advanced imaging protocols, we were able to uniquely study heart-lung interactions within the intact milieu of the never-invaded thorax.

  18. Delaying urinary catheter insertion in the reception and resuscitation of blunt multitrauma and using a full bladder to tamponade pelvic bleeding.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sean; Vohora, Ashray; Russ, Matthias K; Mathew, Joseph K; Johnny, Cecil S; Stevens, Jeremy; Fitzgerald, Mark C

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes a counter-argument to standard Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) training--which advocates bladder catheterisation to be performed as an adjunct to the primary survey and resuscitation for early decompression of the bladder and urine output monitoring. We argue the case for delaying bladder catheterisation until after definitive truncal Computed Tomography (CT) imaging. To reduce pelvic volume and associated bleeding, our trauma team delay catheter insertion until after the initial CT scan. The benefits of a full bladder also include improved views on initial Focussed Assessment with Sonography in Trauma (FAST) scan and improved interpretation of injuries on CT. Our urinary catheter related infection rates anecdotally decreased when insertion was delayed and consequently performed in a more controlled, non-resuscitation setting following CT. Adult blunt multitrauma patients with pelvic ring fractures are at risk of significant haemorrhage. Venous, arterial and medullary injuries with associated bleeding may be potentiated by an increased pelvic volume with ring disruption, as well as a reduced pressure effect from retroperitoneal and intra-pelvic organs on bleeding sites. Various techniques are used to reduce intra-pelvic bleeding. For shocked patients who have sustained major pelvic injuries with no other signs of urinary tract trauma and minimal urine in the bladder on initial FAST scan, we advocate careful, aseptic Foley catheter insertion followed by bladder insufflation with 500-600 mL of Normal Saline (NS) and subsequent catheter clamping to tamponade pelvic bleeding. PMID:25805552

  19. Primary cardiac tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, N A

    1980-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are a rare, but potentially curably form of heart disease. A high index of clinical suspicion is necessary for diagnosis as these tumors have protean manifestations that mimic a variety of other cardiac and noncardiac diseases. Presently, M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiography are utilized as safe, reliable, and noninvasive imaging modalities. Seventy-five per cent of these tumors are benign, with myxoma accounting for 50% and rhabodomyoma comprising 20% of lesions. Various histologic types of sarcoma are the predominant malignant cardiac neoplasms. With strict attention to avoiding perioperative tumor embolization, surgical resection of these lesions can be accomplished with minimal morbidity and mortality. Sixteen consecutive primary tumors of the heart have been surgically treated at Duke University Medical Center since 1966 with no perioperative deaths and no late recurrences. Images Figs. 2A and B. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Figs. 5A and B Fig. 6. PMID:7362282

  20. Engineered cardiac tissues

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Rohin K.; Chiu, Loraine L. Y.; Reis, Lewis A.; Radisic, Milica

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering offers the promise of creating functional tissue replacements for use in the failing heart or for in vitro drug screening. The last decade has seen a great deal of progress in this field with new advances in interdisciplinary areas such as developmental biology, genetic engineering, biomaterials, polymer science, bioreactor engineering, and stem cell biology. We review here a selection of the most recent advances in cardiac tissue engineering, including the classical cell-scaffold approaches, advanced bioreactor designs, cell sheet engineering, whole organ decellularization, stem-cell based approaches, and topographical control of tissue organization and function. We also discuss current challenges in the field, such as maturation of stem cell-derived cardiac patches and vascularization. PMID:21530228

  1. Cardiac Imaging In Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Asaad A.; Safi, Lucy; Wood, Malissa

    2016-01-01

    Athletic heart syndrome refers to the physiological and morphological changes that occur in a human heart after repetitive strenuous physical exercise. Examples of exercise-induced changes in the heart include increases in heart cavity dimensions, augmentation of cardiac output, and increases in heart muscle mass. These cardiac adaptations vary based on the type of exercise performed and are often referred to as sport-specific cardiac remodeling. The hemodynamic effects of endurance and strength training exercise lead to these adaptations. Any abnormalities in chamber dilatation and left ventricular function usually normalize with cessation of exercise. Athletic heart syndrome is rare and should be differentiated from pathologic conditions such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia when assessing a patient for athletic heart syndrome. This paper describes specific adaptations that occur in athletic heart syndrome and tools to distinguish between healthy alterations versus underlying pathology. PMID:27486490

  2. Cardiac toxicities of antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, H R; Parker, J L; Durrett, L R

    1978-01-01

    Isolated heart muscle preparations are useful in the study of cardiac toxicities of drugs and environmental chemicals: such tissues allow assessment of chemical effects on heart muscle that is free from indirect in vivo influences that can mask or even accentuate cardiac responses measured in the intact animal. In the present study, left atria of guinea pigs were used to demonstrate a direct cardiac depressant effect of greater-than-therapeutic concentrations of several aminoglycoside antibiotics. The toxic effect of these antibiotics seems to be a calcium-dependent event, and may prove useful to characterize contractile responses of the heart. Other antibiotic agents can also depress cardiovascular function, as summarized in this report, but mechanisms of action have not been clearly defined. PMID:720315

  3. Inhibition of the Unfolded Protein Response Mechanism Prevents Cardiac Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Joanna; Dyck, Jason R. B.; Lopaschuk, Gary D.; Agellon, Luis B.; Michalak, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac fibrosis attributed to excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins is a major cause of heart failure and death. Cardiac fibrosis is extremely difficult and challenging to treat in a clinical setting due to lack of understanding of molecular mechanisms leading to cardiac fibrosis and effective anti-fibrotic therapies. The objective in this study was to examine whether unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway mediates cardiac fibrosis and whether a pharmacological intervention to modulate UPR can prevent cardiac fibrosis and preserve heart function. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate here that the mechanism leading to development of fibrosis in a mouse with increased expression of calreticulin, a model of heart failure, stems from impairment of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis, transient activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway and stimulation of the TGFβ1/Smad2/3 signaling pathway. Remarkably, sustained pharmacologic inhibition of the UPR pathway by tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) is sufficient to prevent cardiac fibrosis, and improved exercise tolerance. Conclusions We show that the mechanism leading to development of fibrosis in a mouse model of heart failure stems from transient activation of UPR pathway leading to persistent remodelling of cardiac tissue. Blocking the activation of the transiently activated UPR pathway by TUDCA prevented cardiac fibrosis, and improved prognosis. These findings offer a window for additional interventions that can preserve heart function. PMID:27441395

  4. Antibodies to cardiac receptors.

    PubMed

    Boivin-Jahns, V; Schlipp, A; Hartmann, S; Panjwani, P; Klingel, K; Lohse, M J; Ertl, G; Jahns, R

    2012-12-01

    Inflammation of cardiac tissue is generally associated with an activation of the host's immune system. On the one hand, this activation is mandatory to protect the heart by fighting the invading microbial agents or toxins and by engaging myocardial reparation and healing processes. On the other hand, uncontrolled activation of the immune defense has the risk of an arousal of auto- or cross-reactive immune cells, which in some cases bring more harm than good. Dependent on the individual genetic predisposition, such heart-directed autoimmune reactions most likely occur as a result of myocyte apoptosis or necrosis and subsequent liberation of self-antigens previously hidden to the immune system. During the past two decades, evidence for a pathogenic relevance of autoimmunity in human heart disease has substantially increased. Conformational cardiac (auto)antibodies affecting cardiac function and, in particular, (auto)antibodies that target G protein-coupled cardiac membrane receptors are thought to play a key role in the development of heart failure. Clinical pilot studies even suggest that such antibodies negatively affect survival in heart failure patients. However, the true prevalence and clinical impact of many cardiac (auto)antibodies in human heart diseases are still unclear, as are the events triggering their formation, their titer course, and their patterns of clearance and/or persistence. The present article summarizes current knowledge in the field of cardiac receptor (auto)antibodies including recent efforts to address some of the aforementioned gaps of knowledge, thereby attempting to pave the way for novel, more specific therapeutic approaches. PMID:23183584

  5. Giant Cardiac Cavernous Hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Unger, Eric; Costic, Joseph; Laub, Glenn

    2015-07-01

    We report the case of an asymptomatic giant cardiac cavernous hemangioma in a 71-year-old man. The intracardiac mass was discovered incidentally during surveillance for his prostate cancer; however, the patient initially declined intervention. On presentation to our institution 7 years later, the lesion had enlarged significantly, and the patient consented to excision. At surgery, an 8 × 6.5 × 4.8 cm intracardiac mass located on the inferior heart border was excised with an intact capsule through a median sternotomy approach. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course. We discuss the diagnostic workup, treatment, and characteristics of this rare cardiac tumor. PMID:26140782

  6. Mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Blood circulation is the result of the beating of the heart, which provides the mechanical force to pump oxygenated blood to, and deoxygenated blood away from, the peripheral tissues. This depends critically on the preceding electrical activation. Disruptions in the orderly pattern of this propagating cardiac excitation wave can lead to arrhythmias. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying their generation and maintenance requires knowledge of the ionic contributions to the cardiac action potential, which is discussed in the first part of this review. A brief outline of the different classification systems for arrhythmogenesis is then provided, followed by a detailed discussion for each mechanism in turn, highlighting recent advances in this area. PMID:27092186

  7. Lipid partitioning during cardiac stress.

    PubMed

    Kolwicz, Stephen C

    2016-10-01

    It is well documented that fatty acids serve as the primary fuel substrate for the contracting myocardium. However, extensive research has identified significant changes in the myocardial oxidation of fatty acids during acute or chronic cardiac stress. As a result, the redistribution or partitioning of fatty acids due to metabolic derangements could have biological implications. Fatty acids can be stored as triacylglycerols, serve as critical components for biosynthesis of phospholipid membranes, and form the potent signaling molecules, diacylglycerol and ceramides. Therefore, the contribution of lipid metabolism to health and disease is more intricate than a balance of uptake and oxidation. In this review, the available data regarding alterations that occur in endogenous cardiac lipid pathways during the pathological stressors of ischemia-reperfusion and pathological hypertrophy/heart failure are highlighted. In addition, changes in endogenous lipids observed in exercise training models are presented for comparison. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heart Lipid Metabolism edited by G.D. Lopaschuk. PMID:27040509

  8. Modeling the isolated cardiac myocyte.

    PubMed

    Puglisi, Jose L; Wang, Fei; Bers, Donald M

    2004-01-01

    Computer modeling of cardiac myocytes has flourished in recent years. Models have evolved from mathematical descriptions of ionic channels alone to more sophisticated formulations that include calcium transport mechanisms, ATP production and metabolic pathways. The increased complexity is fueled by the new data available in the field. The continuous production of experimental data has led to the evolution of increasingly refined descriptions of the phenomena by modelers. Integrating the numerous systems involved in cardiac myocyte homeostasis makes the use of computer models necessary due to the unreliability of intuitive approaches. However the complexity of the model should not imply a cumbersome operation of the program. As with any tool, computer models have to be easy to operate or their strength will be diminished and potential users will not benefit fully from them. The contribution of the computer modeler to their respective biological fields will be more successful and enduring if modelers devote sufficient time to implement their equations into a model with user-friendly characteristics. PMID:15142742

  9. Succinate dehydrogenase gene mutations in cardiac paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Martucci, Victoria L; Emaminia, Abbas; del Rivero, Jaydira; Lechan, Ronald M; Magoon, Bindiya T; Galia, Analyza; Fojo, Tito; Leung, Steve; Lorusso, Roberto; Jimenez, Camilo; Shulkin, Barry L; Audibert, Jennifer L; Adams, Karen T; Rosing, Douglas R; Vaidya, Anand; Dluhy, Robert G; Horvath, Keith A; Pacak, Karel

    2015-06-15

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are chromaffin cell tumors arising from neuroendocrine cells. At least 1/3 of paragangliomas are related to germline mutations in 1 of 17 genes. Although these tumors can occur throughout the body, cardiac paragangliomas are very rare, accounting for <0.3% of mediastinal tumors. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics of patients with cardiac paragangliomas, particularly focusing on their genetic backgrounds. A retrospective chart analysis of 15 patients with cardiac paragangliomas was performed to determine clinical presentation, genetic background, diagnostic workup, and outcomes. The average age at diagnosis was 41.9 years. Typical symptoms of paraganglioma (e.g., hypertension, sweating, palpitations, headache) were reported at initial presentation in 13 patients (86.7%); the remaining 2, as well as 4 symptomatic patients, initially presented with cardiac-specific symptoms (e.g., chest pain, dyspnea). Genetic testing was done in 13 patients (86.7%); 10 (76.9%) were positive for mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDHx) subunits B, C, or D. Thirteen patients (86.7%) underwent surgery to remove the paraganglioma with no intraoperative morbidity or mortality; 1 additional patient underwent surgical resection but experienced intraoperative complications after removal of the tumor due to co-morbidities and did not survive. SDHx mutations are known to be associated with mediastinal locations and malignant behavior of paragangliomas. In this report, the investigators extend the locations of predominantly SDHx-related paragangliomas to cardiac tumors. In conclusion, cardiac paragangliomas are frequently associated with underlying SDHx germline mutations, suggesting a need for genetic testing of all patients with this rare tumor. PMID:25896150

  10. Heart failure therapy and sudden cardiac death prevention.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J M

    2004-12-01

    Primary prophylaxis of sudden cardiac death by implantable defibrillators is an accepted therapeutic strategy because sudden cardiac death is reduced by their use. However, many patients at risk of sudden cardiac death due to left ventricular systolic dysfunction also suffer heart failure symptoms. There is increasing evidence that the morbidity of heart failure can be alleviated by device therapy in which ventricular dysynchrony is improved by biventricular pacing. Both therapies in the same device can reduce both morbidity and mortality. Device therapy is an important new aspect in the field of heart failure management. PMID:15729212

  11. Estrogen prevents cardiac and vascular failure in the 'listless' zebrafish (Danio rerio) developmental model.

    PubMed

    Allgood, Ottie E; Hamad, Alia; Fox, Joshua; Defrank, Anna; Gilley, Ryan; Dawson, Frederick; Sykes, Benjamin; Underwood, Tarenne J; Naylor, Rachel C; Briggs, Ashley A; Lassiter, Christopher S; Bell, Wade E; Turner, James E

    2013-08-01

    The presence of a robust estrogen (E2) response system throughout heart and blood vessel tissues of vertebrates, including humans, has led to the speculation that this ubiquitous hormone may play a prominent role in the health and maintenance of the adult cardiovascular system (CVS). We previously established an embryonic zebrafish model called 'listless', which results from the inhibition of E2 synthesis by treatment with aromatase enzyme inhibitors (AI). These fish have outward symptoms similar to the human condition of congestive heart failure and tamponade. E2 replacement therapy (1) reduced the severity of cardiac sac abnormalities, (2) protected heart function, (3) prevented reduction in heart size, and (4) reduced blood vessel deterioration. Nitric oxide may be a critical downstream mediator of these events. We also demonstrate that removal of fluid around the heart increases survival of AI-treated fish. These results strongly indicate the importance of E2 in the developing CVS of the zebrafish and offer a potential model for the study of its role in CVS development, maintenance, and disease conditions. PMID:23631900

  12. Detection of pulsus paradoxus by pulse oximetry in pediatric patients after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Amoozgar, Hamid; Ghodsi, Hossein; Borzoee, Mohammad; Amirghofran, Ahmad Ali; Ajami, Gholamhossein; Serati, Zahra

    2009-01-01

    The presence or absence of pulsus paradoxus (PP), defined as an inspiratory decrease greater than 10 mmHg in systolic blood pressure, can have significant diagnostic and therapeutic implications for many clinical conditions including acute asthma, pericardial tamponade, heart failure, hypovolemia, shock states, and the like. However, PP may be difficult to measure in children. Indwelling arterial catheters facilitate the measurement of PP, but this invasive technique generally is reserved for critically ill patients. This study aimed to assess the use of the pulse oximetry plethysmographic waveform (POPW) for the detection of PP in pediatric patients after cardiac surgery. The study enrolled 40 pediatric patients 18 years of age and younger who had invasive blood pressure monitoring with an intraarterial cannula. Systolic pressure variability (SPV) and changes in POPW amplitude (DeltaPOPW%), calculated using five consecutive snapshots from every patient's monitor, were compared using linear regression, Pearson product-moment correlation, the Spearman rank method, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. A strong correlation existed between respiratory SPV and DeltaPOPW% for the detection of PP (r = 0.682; p < 0.0001). A respiratory variation in DeltaPOPW% exceeding 25.44% (about one-fourth the amplitude of the tallest POP waveform) allowed detection of PP with a sensitivity of 86.7% and a specificity of 88%. Pulse oximetry is a readily available and easily performed noninvasive means for detecting PP in children. PMID:18665417

  13. Diminazene Aceturate Improves Cardiac Fibrosis and Diastolic Dysfunction in Rats with Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Velkoska, Elena; Patel, Sheila K.; Griggs, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) 2 is a negative regulator of the renin angiotensin system (RAS) through its role to degrade angiotensin II. In rats with subtotal nephrectomy (STNx), adverse cardiac remodelling occurs despite elevated cardiac ACE2 activity. We hypothesised that diminazene aceturate (DIZE), which has been described as having an off-target effect to activate ACE2, would have beneficial cardiac effects in STNx rats. STNx led to hypertension, diastolic dysfunction, left ventricular hypertrophy, cardiac fibrosis, and increased cardiac ACE, ACE2, Ang II and Ang 1–7 levels. Cardiac gene expression of ADAM17 was also increased. In STNx, two-weeks of subcutaneous DIZE (15mg/kg/d) had no effect on blood pressure but improved diastolic dysfunction and cardiac fibrosis, reduced ADAM17 mRNA and shifted the cardiac RAS balance to a cardioprotective profile with reduced ACE and Ang II. There was no change in cardiac ACE2 activity or in cardiac Ang 1–7 levels with DIZE. In conclusion, our results suggest that DIZE exerts a protective effect on the heart under the pathological condition of kidney injury. This effect was not due to improved kidney function, a fall in blood pressure or a reduction in LVH but was associated with a reduction in cardiac ACE and cardiac Ang II levels. As in vitro studies showed no direct effect of DIZE on ACE2 or ACE activity, the precise mechanism of action of DIZE remains to be determined. PMID:27571511

  14. Diminazene Aceturate Improves Cardiac Fibrosis and Diastolic Dysfunction in Rats with Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Velkoska, Elena; Patel, Sheila K; Griggs, Karen; Burrell, Louise M

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) 2 is a negative regulator of the renin angiotensin system (RAS) through its role to degrade angiotensin II. In rats with subtotal nephrectomy (STNx), adverse cardiac remodelling occurs despite elevated cardiac ACE2 activity. We hypothesised that diminazene aceturate (DIZE), which has been described as having an off-target effect to activate ACE2, would have beneficial cardiac effects in STNx rats. STNx led to hypertension, diastolic dysfunction, left ventricular hypertrophy, cardiac fibrosis, and increased cardiac ACE, ACE2, Ang II and Ang 1-7 levels. Cardiac gene expression of ADAM17 was also increased. In STNx, two-weeks of subcutaneous DIZE (15mg/kg/d) had no effect on blood pressure but improved diastolic dysfunction and cardiac fibrosis, reduced ADAM17 mRNA and shifted the cardiac RAS balance to a cardioprotective profile with reduced ACE and Ang II. There was no change in cardiac ACE2 activity or in cardiac Ang 1-7 levels with DIZE. In conclusion, our results suggest that DIZE exerts a protective effect on the heart under the pathological condition of kidney injury. This effect was not due to improved kidney function, a fall in blood pressure or a reduction in LVH but was associated with a reduction in cardiac ACE and cardiac Ang II levels. As in vitro studies showed no direct effect of DIZE on ACE2 or ACE activity, the precise mechanism of action of DIZE remains to be determined. PMID:27571511

  15. A case of coronary rupture and pseudoaneurysm formation after fracture of implanted paclitaxel-eluting stents.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Yasuyuki; Kitayama, Michihiko; Akao, Hironobu; Motoyama, Atsushi; Tsuchiya, Taketsugu; Kajinami, Kouji

    2016-07-01

    A 48-year-old man who had undergone implantation of two paclitaxel-eluting stents (PESs) at the right coronary artery was admitted to our hospital with progressive dyspnea. In the coronary care unit, he developed cardiogenic shock due to cardiac tamponade treated by pericardiocentesis. A coronary angiogram showed a large pseudoaneurysm at the site of the previously implanted stents, suggesting coronary rupture due to implanted stent fracture. The pseudoaneurysm was completely sealed by polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent implantation. Although this case is very rare, coronary rupture by stent fracture should be considered when cardiac tamponade occurs after drug-eluting stent implantation, especially PES. PMID:25998891

  16. Cardiac mechanoenergetics in silico.

    PubMed

    Vendelin, Marko; Bovendeerd, Peter H M; Saks, Valdur; Engelbrecht, Jüri

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate the link between biochemical intracellular processes and mechanical contraction of the cardiac muscle. First, the regulation of intracellular energy fluxes between mitochondria and myofibrils is studied. It is shown, that the experimentally observed metabolic stability of the cardiac muscle is reproducible by a simple feedback regulation mechanism, i.e., ATP consumption in myofibrils and ATP production in mitochondria are balanced by the changes of the high energy phosphate concentrations. Second, an important property of energy transformation from biochemical form to mechanical work in the cardiac muscle, the linear relationship between the oxygen consumption and the stress-strain area, is replicated by a cross-bridge model. Third, by using the developed cross-bridge model, the correlation between ejection fraction of the left ventricle and heterogeneity of sarcomere strain, developed stress and ATP consumption in the left ventricular wall is established. Fourth, an experimentally observed linear relationship between oxygen consumption and the pressure-volume area can be predicted theoretically from a linear relationship between the oxygen consumption and the stress-strain area. Summing up, it is shown how the macrovariables of a cardiac muscle are interwoven with intracellular physiological processes into a whole. PMID:11880857

  17. [Insertable Cardiac Monitor].

    PubMed

    Lewalter, Thorsten; Koutsouraki, Ilia; Brodherr, Turgut

    2015-08-01

    Intermittent cardiac arrhythmias are sometimes difficult to register using conventional detection concepts. The implantable event recorders offer a unique opportunity to document short lasting or rare and even asymptomatic arrhythmias. This manuscript describes event recorder implantation in a step-by-step manner. PMID:26306017

  18. Advanced Cardiac Life Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document contains materials for an advanced college course in cardiac life support developed for the State of Iowa. The course syllabus lists the course title, hours, number, description, prerequisites, learning activities, instructional units, required text, six references, evaluation criteria, course objectives by units, course…

  19. Cardiac effects of vasopressin.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Jean-Sébastien; Dicken, Bryan; Bigam, David; Cheung, Po-Yin

    2014-07-01

    Vasopressin is an essential hormone involved in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis. It has been in use therapeutically for many decades, with an emphasis on its vasoconstrictive and antidiuretic properties. However, this hormone has a ubiquitous influence and has specific effects on the heart. Although difficult to separate from its powerful vascular effects in the clinical setting, a better understanding of vasopressin's direct cardiac effects could lead to its more effective clinical use for a variety of shock states by maximizing its therapeutic benefit. The cardiac-specific effects of vasopressin are complex and require further elucidation. Complicating our understanding include the various receptors and secondary messengers involved in vasopressin's effects, which may lead to various results based on differing doses and varying environmental conditions. Thus, there have been contradictory reports on vasopressin's action on the coronary vasculature and on its effect on inotropy. However, beneficial results have been found and warrant further study to expand the potential therapeutic role of vasopressin. This review outlines the effect of vasopressin on the coronary vasculature, cardiac contractility, and on hypertrophy and cardioprotection. These cardiac-specific effects of vasopressin represent an interesting area for further study for potentially important therapeutic benefits. PMID:24621650

  20. Utility of cardiac troponins in patients with suspected cardiac trauma or after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Adams, J E

    1997-12-01

    Detection of cardiac injury after blunt chest wall trauma or cardiac surgery is problematic. Previously available biomarkers have been hindered largely by limitations of specifity for myocardial damage. Both cardiac troponin I and T have been evaluated in these patient subgroups. While many questions remain unanswered, it appears that measurement of troponin proteins will facilitate patient care in these difficult situations. PMID:9439875

  1. Emergent Global Contractile Force in Cardiac Tissues.

    PubMed

    Knight, Meghan B; Drew, Nancy K; McCarthy, Linda A; Grosberg, Anna

    2016-04-12

    The heart is a complex organ whose structure and function are intricately linked at multiple length scales. Although several advancements have been achieved in the field of cardiac tissue engineering, current in vitro cardiac tissues do not fully replicate the structure or function necessary for effective cardiac therapy and cardiotoxicity studies. This is partially due to a deficiency in current understandings of cardiac tissue organization's potential downstream effects, such as changes in gene expression levels. We developed a novel (to our knowledge) in vitro tool that can be used to decouple and quantify the contribution of organization and associated downstream effects to tissue function. To do so, cardiac tissue monolayers were designed into a parquet pattern to be organized anisotropically on a local scale, within a parquet tile, and with any desired organization on a global scale. We hypothesized that if the downstream effects were muted, the relationship between developed force and tissue organization could be modeled as a sum of force vectors. With the in vitro experimental platforms of parquet tissues and heart-on-a-chip devices, we were able to prove this hypothesis for both systolic and diastolic stresses. Thus, insight was gained into the relationship between the generated stress and global myofibril organization. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the developed quantitative tool could be used to estimate the changes in stress production due to downstream effects decoupled from tissue architecture. This has the potential to elucidate properties coupled to tissue architecture, which change force production and pumping function in the diseased heart or stem cell-derived tissues. PMID:27074686

  2. Hypothermia improves outcome from cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Bernard, S A

    2005-12-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is common and patients who are initially resuscitated by ambulance officers and transported to hospital are usually admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). In the past, the treatment in the ICU consisted of supportive care only, and most patients remained unconscious due to the severe anoxic neurological injury. It was this neurological injury rather than cardiac complications that caused the high rate of morbidity and mortality. However, in the early 1990's, a series of animal experiments demonstrated convincingly that mild hypothermia induced after return of spontaneous circulation and maintained for several hours dramatically reduced the severity of the anoxic neurological injury. In the mid-1990's, preliminary human studies suggested that mild hypothermia could be induced and maintained in post-cardiac arrest patients without an increase in the rate of cardiac or other complications. In the late 1990's, two prospective, randomised, controlled trials were conducted and the results confirmed the animal data that mild hypothermia induced after resuscitation and maintained for 12 - 24 hours dramatically improved neurological and overall outcomes. On the basis of these studies, mild hypothermia was endorsed in 2003 by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation as a recommended treatment for comatose patients with an initial cardiac rhythm of ventricular fibrillation. However, the application of this therapy into routine clinical critical care practice has been slow. The reasons for this are uncertain, but may relate to the relative complexity of the treatment, unfamiliarity with the pathophysiology of hypothermia, lack of clear protocols and/or uncertainty of benefit in particular patients. Therefore, recent research in this area has focused on the development of feasible, inexpensive techniques for the early, rapid induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Currently, the most promising strategy is a rapid

  3. Cardiac surgery outcomes.

    PubMed

    Halpin, Linda S; Barnett, Scott D; Beachy, Jim

    2003-01-01

    Accrediting organizations and payers are demanding valid and reliable data that demonstrate the value of services. Federal agencies, healthcare industry groups, and healthcare watchdog groups are increasing the demand for public access to outcomes data. A new and growing outcomes dynamic is the information requested by prospective patients in an increasingly consumer-oriented business. Patients demand outcomes, and resources are developing to meet these demands. Physicians are increasingly confronted with requests for information about their mortality and morbidity rates, malpractice suits, and disciplinary actions received. For example, in Virginia, prospective patients have access to data provided by the nonprofit group Virginia Health Information. After numerous resolutions by the Virginia Senate since 1999, the prospective Virginia medical consumer now has access to several annual publications: Virginia Hospitals: A Consumer's Guide, 1999 Annual Report and Strategic Plan Update, and the 1999 Industry Report: Virginia Hospitals and Nursing Facilities. Consumers have access to cardiac outcomes data stratified by hospital, gender, and cardiac service line (cardiac surgery, noninvasive cardiology, and invasive cardiology). This is particularly relevant to IHI because Virginia Health Information specifically targets cardiac care. IHI has a sizable investment in cardiovascular outcomes and has found outcomes measurement and research are key to providing quality care. IHI's goal is to move from an outcomes management model to a disease management model. The hope is to incorporate all aspects of the patient's continuum of care, from preoperative and diagnostic services through cardiac interventions to postoperative rehabilitation. Furthermore, every step along the way will be supported with functional status and quality of life assessments. Although these goals are ambitious and expensive, the return on investment is high. PMID:14618772

  4. Ethical Issues in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kavarana, Minoo N.; Sade, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    While ethical behavior has always been part of cardiac surgical practice, ethical deliberation has only recently become an important component of cardiac surgical practice. Issues such as informed consent, conflict of interest, and professional self-regulation, among many others, have increasingly attracted the attention of cardiac surgeons. This review covers several broad topics of interest to cardiac surgeons and cardiologists, and treats several other topics more briefly. There is much uncertainty about what the future holds for cardiac surgical practice, research, and culture, and we discuss the background of ethical issues to serve as a platform for envisioning what is to come. PMID:22642634

  5. Maternal cardiac metabolism in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Laura X; Arany, Zolt

    2014-03-15

    Pregnancy causes dramatic physiological changes in the expectant mother. The placenta, mostly foetal in origin, invades maternal uterine tissue early in pregnancy and unleashes a barrage of hormones and other factors. This foetal 'invasion' profoundly reprogrammes maternal physiology, affecting nearly every organ, including the heart and its metabolism. We briefly review here maternal systemic metabolic changes during pregnancy and cardiac metabolism in general. We then discuss changes in cardiac haemodynamic during pregnancy and review what is known about maternal cardiac metabolism during pregnancy. Lastly, we discuss cardiac diseases during pregnancy, including peripartum cardiomyopathy, and the potential contribution of aberrant cardiac metabolism to disease aetiology. PMID:24448314

  6. Evidence Based Review: Risk of Cardiac Rhythm Problems During Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platts, Steven H.; Stenger, Michael B.; Phillips, Tiffany R.; Brown, Angela K.; Arzeno, Natalia M.; Levine, Benjamin; Summers, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Very little research has systematically evaluated the prevalence (or potential risk) of cardiac arrhythmias during space flight. There are several observational reports of non life-threatening but potentially concerning arrhythmias. At least two potential risk factors for arrhythmias have been reported either during or immediately after space flight: cardiac atrophy and a prolonged QTc interval. The potential severity of the mission impact of a serious arrhythmia requires that a systematic evaluation be conducted of the risk of arrhythmia due to space flight.

  7. [EVOLUTION OF MINIMALLY INVASIVE CARDIAC SURGERY].

    PubMed

    Fujita, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Junjiro

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is an attractive choice for patients undergoing major cardiac surgery. We review the history of minimally invasive valve surgery in this article. Due to many innovations in surgical tools, cardiopulmonary bypass systems, visualization systems, and robotic systems as well as surgical techniques, minimally invasive cardiac surgery has become standard care for valve lesion repair. In particular, aortic cross-clamp techniques and methods for cardioplegia using the Chitwood clamp and root cannula or endoballoon catheter in combination with femoro-femoral bypass systems have made such procedures safer and more practical. On the other hand, robotically assisted surgery has not become standard due to the cost and slow learning curve. However, along with the development of robotics, this less-invasive technique may provide another choice for patients in the near future. PMID:27295770

  8. Sonography in Hypotension and Cardiac Arrest (SHoC): Rates of Abnormal Findings in Undifferentiated Hypotension and During Cardiac Arrest as a Basis for Consensus on a Hierarchical Point of Care Ultrasound Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Milne, James; Lewis, David; Fraser, Jacqueline; Diegelmann, Laura; Olszynski, Paul; Stander, Melanie; Lamprecht, Hein

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Point of care ultrasound (PoCUS) has become an established tool in the initial management of patients with undifferentiated hypotension. Current established protocols (RUSH and ACES) were developed by expert user opinion, rather than objective, prospective data. PoCUS also provides invaluable information during resuscitation efforts in cardiac arrest by determining presence/absence of cardiac activity and identifying reversible causes such as pericardial tamponade. There is no agreed guideline on how to safely and effectively incorporate PoCUS into the advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) algorithm. We wished to report disease incidence as a basis to develop a hierarchical approach to PoCUS in hypotension and during cardiac arrest. Methods We summarized the recorded incidence of PoCUS findings from the initial cohort during the interim analysis of two prospective studies. We propose that this will form the basis for developing a modified Delphi approach incorporating this data to obtain the input of a panel of international experts associated with five professional organizations led by the International Federation of Emergency Medicine (IFEM). The modified Delphi tool will be developed to reach an international consensus on how to integrate PoCUS for hypotensive emergency department patients as well as into cardiac arrest algorithms. Results Rates of abnormal PoCUS findings from 151 patients with undifferentiated hypotension included left ventricular dynamic changes (43%), IVC abnormalities (27%), pericardial effusion (16%), and pleural fluid (8%). Abdominal pathology was rare (fluid 5%, AAA 2%). During cardiac arrest there were no pericardial effusions, however abnormalities of ventricular contraction (45%) and valvular motion (39%) were common among the 43 patients included. Conclusions A prospectively collected disease incidence-based hierarchy of scanning can be developed based on the reported findings. This will inform an international consensus

  9. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-01-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  10. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-09-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  11. Death Due to Intra-aortic Migration of Kirschner Wire From the Clavicle: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lei; Sun, Da-Hui; Yu, Tiecheng; Wang, Linxiang; Zhu, Dong; Li, Yan-Hui

    2016-05-01

    Migration of orthopedic fixation wires into the ascending aorta though a rare occurrence can have devastating consequences. Therefore, prompt recognition, with immediate and cautious retrieval of the implant is paramount in averting these complications.We present a case of a 5-year-old boy with the intra-aortic migration of a K-wire used for the treatment of a right clavicle fracture. He was transferred to us with a history of syncope, chest pain, and shortness of breath 7 days after K-wire placement, which was performed at another hospital. On CT scan, the wire was found to be partially inside the ascending aorta, which was associated with massive hemopericardium and cardiac tamponade. The patient was taken up for emergency surgery for the removal K-wire and for the management of cardiac temponade. However, the patient developed cardiac arrest during the induction of intravenous anesthesia and endotracheal intubation. The K-wire was retrieved from the thorax via thoracotomy. However, the patient died 10 days after the surgery.As the migration of wires and pins during orthopedic surgery can cause potentially fatal complications, these should be used very cautiously, especially for percutaneous treatment of shoulder girdle fractures. The patients with such implants should be followed frequently, both clinically and radiographically. If migration occurs, the patient should be closely monitored for emergent complications and the K-wire should be extracted immediately. PMID:27227938

  12. Sudden cardiac death in 2 young siblings.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Reetu; Punia, Rajpal Singh; Handa, Uma; Singh, Amandeep; Mohan, Harsh

    2014-12-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a disease known for exhibiting phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. At times, sudden cardiac death may be the first and foremost manifestation of the disease. We report 2 cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy causing sudden death, which were diagnosed on autopsy with special emphasis on histopathological findings of this entity. The role of a pathologist cannot be undermined as the disease is a diagnostic challenge often overlooked by the neophytes in the field due to unawareness. PMID:25361060

  13. Cardiac imaging using gated magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzer, P.; Botvinick, E.H.; Schiller, N.B.

    1984-01-01

    To overcome the limitations of magnetic resonance (MR) cardiac imaging using nongated data acquisition, three methods for acquiring a gating signal, which could be applied in the presence of a magnetic field, were tested; an air-filled plethysmograph, a laser-Doppler capillary perfusion flowmeter, and an electrocardiographic gating device. The gating signal was used for timing of MR imaging sequences (IS). Application of each gating method yielded significant improvements in structural MR image resolution of the beating heart, although with both plethysmography and laser-Doppler velocimetry it was difficult to obtain cardiac images from the early portion of the cardiac cycle due to an intrinsic delay between the ECG R wave and peripheral detection of the gating signal. Variations in the temporal relationship between the R wave and plethysmographic and laser-Doppler signals produced inconsistencies in the timing of IS. Since the ECG signal is virtually free of these problems, the preferable gating technique is IS synchronization with an electrocardiogram. The gated images acquired with this method provide sharp definition of internal cardiac morphology and can be temporarily referenced to end diastole and end systole or intermediate points.

  14. Ubiquitous health monitoring and real-time cardiac arrhythmias detection: a case study.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Zhou, Haiying; Zuo, Decheng; Hou, Kun-Mean; De Vaulx, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    As the symptoms and signs of heart diseases that cause sudden cardiac death, cardiac arrhythmia has attracted great attention. Due to limitations in time and space, traditional approaches to cardiac arrhythmias detection fail to provide a real-time continuous monitoring and testing service applicable in different environmental conditions. Integrated with the latest technologies in ECG (electrocardiograph) analysis and medical care, the pervasive computing technology makes possible the ubiquitous cardiac care services, and thus brings about new technical challenges, especially in the formation of cardiac care architecture and realization of the real-time automatic ECG detection algorithm dedicated to care devices. In this paper, a ubiquitous cardiac care prototype system is presented with its architecture framework well elaborated. This prototype system has been tested and evaluated in all the clinical-/home-/outdoor-care modes with a satisfactory performance in providing real-time continuous cardiac arrhythmias monitoring service unlimitedly adaptable in time and space. PMID:24211993

  15. Cardiac fusion and complex congenital cardiac defects in thoracopagus twins: diagnostic value of cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Park, Jeong-Jun; Kim, Ellen Ai-Rhan; Won, Hye-Sung

    2014-09-01

    Most thoracopagus twins present with cardiac fusion and associated congenital cardiac defects, and assessment of this anatomy is of critical importance in determining patient care and outcome. Cardiac CT with electrocardiographic triggering provides an accurate and quick morphological assessment of both intracardiac and extracardiac structures in newborns, making it the best imaging modality to assess thoracopagus twins during the neonatal period. In this case report, we highlight the diagnostic value of cardiac CT in thoracopagus twins with an interatrial channel and complex congenital cardiac defects. PMID:24687619

  16. Cardiac risk in the treatment of breast cancer: assessment and management

    PubMed Central

    Valachis, Antonis; Nilsson, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    As the number of long-term breast cancer survivors has increased, the side effects of adjuvant cancer therapy, such as cardiac toxicity, remain clinically important. Although the cardiac toxicity due to anthracyclines, radiotherapy, or trastuzumab is well-documented, several issues need to be clarified and are the subjects of extensive ongoing clinical research. This review summarizes the incidence of cardiac toxicity due to breast cancer adjuvant therapy and highlights the current trends in early detection and management of cardiac toxicities. PMID:25653554

  17. [Sudden cardiac death in diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Israel, C W; Lee-Barkey, Y H

    2016-05-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) represents one of the most frequent causes of death in patients with diabetes. In contrast to patients without diabetes it has not been significantly reduced despite improvements in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction and long-term treatment of cardiovascular diseases as well as diabetes mellitus. Several mechanisms can be responsible for the high incidence of SCD in diabetics: 1. arrhythmogenic effects mediated via cardiac autonomic neuropathy, repolarization disturbances or sympathetic tone activation (hypoglycemia), 2. myocardial ischemia due to atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, platelet aggregation or thrombophilic effects, 3. myocardial disease due to inflammation, fibrosis, associated hypertension or uremia and 4. potassium imbalance due to diabetic nephropathy or hypoglycemia. This review introduces concepts of mechanisms that are responsible for SCD in patients with diabetes. Treatment of patients with diabetes should primarily consider a systematic assessment of any deterioration of this chronic disease and of complications at an early stage. Cardiovascular drug treatment corresponds to that of non-diabetics. In antidiabetic treatment drugs with a low risk of hypoglycemia should be preferred. Treatment with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) also combined with cardiac resynchronization therapy () demonstrated a high life-saving potential particularly in patients with diabetes. PMID:27071967

  18. Lean heart: Role of leptin in cardiac hypertrophy and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael E; Harmancey, Romain; Stec, David E

    2015-01-01

    Leptin is an adipokine that has been linked with the cardiovascular complications resulting from obesity such as hypertension and heart disease. Obese patients have high levels of circulating leptin due to increased fat mass. Clinical and population studies have correlated high levels of circulating leptin with the development of cardiac hypertrophy in obesity. Leptin has also been demonstrated to increase the growth of cultured cardiomyocytes. However, several animal studies of obese leptin deficient mice have not supported a role for leptin in promoting cardiac hypertrophy so the role of leptin in this pathological process remains unclear. Leptin is also an important hormone in the regulation of cardiac metabolism where it supports oxidation of glucose and fatty acids. In addition, leptin plays a critical role in protecting the heart from excess lipid accumulation and the formation of toxic lipids in obesity a condition known as cardiac lipotoxicity. This paper focuses on the data supporting and refuting leptin’s role in promoting cardiac hypertrophy as well as its important role in the regulation of cardiac metabolism and protection against cardiac lipotoxicity. PMID:26413228

  19. Lean heart: Role of leptin in cardiac hypertrophy and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hall, Michael E; Harmancey, Romain; Stec, David E

    2015-09-26

    Leptin is an adipokine that has been linked with the cardiovascular complications resulting from obesity such as hypertension and heart disease. Obese patients have high levels of circulating leptin due to increased fat mass. Clinical and population studies have correlated high levels of circulating leptin with the development of cardiac hypertrophy in obesity. Leptin has also been demonstrated to increase the growth of cultured cardiomyocytes. However, several animal studies of obese leptin deficient mice have not supported a role for leptin in promoting cardiac hypertrophy so the role of leptin in this pathological process remains unclear. Leptin is also an important hormone in the regulation of cardiac metabolism where it supports oxidation of glucose and fatty acids. In addition, leptin plays a critical role in protecting the heart from excess lipid accumulation and the formation of toxic lipids in obesity a condition known as cardiac lipotoxicity. This paper focuses on the data supporting and refuting leptin's role in promoting cardiac hypertrophy as well as its important role in the regulation of cardiac metabolism and protection against cardiac lipotoxicity. PMID:26413228

  20. Orofacial pain of cardiac origin: Review literature and clinical cases

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Vicente, Laia; Jané-Salas, Enric; Estrugo-Devesa, Albert; Chimenos-Küstner, Eduardo; Roca-Elias, Josep

    2012-01-01

    The most common types of orofacial pain originate at the dental or periodontal level or in the musculoskeletal structures. However, the patient may present pain in this region even though the source is located elsewhere in the body. One possible source of heterotopic pain is of cardiac origin. Objectives: Report two cases of orofacial pain of cardiac origin and review the clinical cases described in the literature. Study Design: Description of clinical cases and review of clinical cases. Results and conclusions: Nine cases of atypical pain of cardiac origin are recorded, which include 5 females and 4 males. In craniofacial structures, pain of cardiac origin is usually bilateral. At the craniofacial level, the most frequent location described is in the throat and jaw. Pain of cardiac origin is considered atypical due to its location, although roughly 10% of the cases of cardiac ischemia manifest primarily in craniofacial structures. Finally, the differential diagnosis of pain of odontogenic origin must be taken into account with pain of non-odontogenic origin (muscle, psychogenic, neuronal, cardiac, sinus and neurovascular pain) in order to avoid diagnostic errors in the dental practice as well as unnecessary treatments. Key words:Orofacial pain, ischemic heart disease, heterotopic pain, odontalgia. PMID:22322488

  1. Cardiac arrhythmias in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Knotts, Robert J; Garan, Hasan

    2014-08-01

    As more women with repaired congenital heart disease survive to their reproductive years and many other women are delaying pregnancy until later in life, a rising concern is the risk of cardiac arrhythmias during pregnancy. Naturally occurring cardiovascular changes during pregnancy increase the likelihood that a recurrence of a previously experienced cardiac arrhythmia or a de novo arrhythmia will occur. Arrhythmias should be thoroughly investigated to determine if there is a reversible etiology, and risks/benefits of treatment options should be fully explored. We discuss the approach to working up and treating various arrhythmias during pregnancy with attention to fetal and maternal risks as well as treatment of fetal arrhythmias. Acute management in stable patients includes close monitoring and intravenous pharmacologic therapy, while DC cardioversion should be used to terminate arrhythmias in hemodynamically unstable patients. Long-term management may require continued oral antiarrhythmic therapy, with particular attention to fetal safety, to prevent complications associated with arrhythmias. PMID:25037518

  2. Cardiac nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Gerson, M.C.

    1987-01-01

    The book begins with a review of the radionuclide methods available for evaluating cardiac perfusion and function. The authors discuss planar and tomographic thallium myocardial imaging, first-pass and equilibrium radionuclide angiography, and imaging with infarct-avid tracers. Several common but more specialized procedures are then reviewed: nonogemetric measurement of left ventricular volume, phase (Fourier) analysis, stroke volume ratio, right ventricular function, and diastolic function. A separate chapter is devoted to drug interventions and in particular the use of radionuclide ventriculography to monitor doxorubicin toxicity and therapy of congestive heart failure. The subsequent chapters provide a comprehensive guide to test selection, accuracy, and results in acute myocardial infarction, in postmyocardial infarction, in chronic coronary artery disease, before and after medical or surgical revascularization, in valvular heart disease, in cardiomyopathies, and in cardiac trauma.

  3. Cardiac arrest in children.

    PubMed

    Tress, Erika E; Kochanek, Patrick M; Saladino, Richard A; Manole, Mioara D

    2010-07-01

    Major advances in the field of pediatric cardiac arrest (CA) were made during the last decade, starting with the publication of pediatric Utstein guidelines, the 2005 recommendations by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, and culminating in multicenter collaborations. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of in-hospital and out-of-hospital CA are now well described. Four phases of CA are described and the term "post-cardiac arrest syndrome" has been proposed, along with treatment goals for each of its four phases: immediate post-arrest, early post-arrest, intermediate and recovery phase. Hypothermia is recommended to be considered as a therapy for post-CA syndrome in comatose patients after CA, and large multicenter prospective studies are underway. We reviewed landmark articles related to pediatric CA published during the last decade. We present the current knowledge of epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of CA relevant to pre-hospital and acute care health practitioners. PMID:20930971

  4. Biomechanics of Cardiac Function.

    PubMed

    Voorhees, Andrew P; Han, Hai-Chao

    2015-10-01

    The heart pumps blood to maintain circulation and ensure the delivery of oxygenated blood to all the organs of the body. Mechanics play a critical role in governing and regulating heart function under both normal and pathological conditions. Biological processes and mechanical stress are coupled together in regulating myocyte function and extracellular matrix structure thus controlling heart function. Here, we offer a brief introduction to the biomechanics of left ventricular function and then summarize recent progress in the study of the effects of mechanical stress on ventricular wall remodeling and cardiac function as well as the effects of wall mechanical properties on cardiac function in normal and dysfunctional hearts. Various mechanical models to determine wall stress and cardiac function in normal and diseased hearts with both systolic and diastolic dysfunction are discussed. The results of these studies have enhanced our understanding of the biomechanical mechanism in the development and remodeling of normal and dysfunctional hearts. Biomechanics provide a tool to understand the mechanism of left ventricular remodeling in diastolic and systolic dysfunction and guidance in designing and developing new treatments. PMID:26426462

  5. Penetrating cardiac injuries.

    PubMed

    Mittal, V; McAleese, P; Young, S; Cohen, M

    1999-05-01

    Our objective was to determine the influence of several clinical factors on the survival of patients with penetrating wounds to the heart. A retrospective review of 80 consecutive penetrating cardiac injuries treated in a Level II urban trauma center from 1980 through 1994 were examined. Thirty-six patients (45%) had gunshot wounds (including 1 shotgun wound), and 44 (55%) had stab wounds. Intervention consisted of emergency room (ER) or operating room thoracotomy. We measured the effect of several clinical factors on morbidity and patient survival. Survival rate was 17 of 36 (47%) in gunshot injuries and 35 of 44 (80%) in stab injuries, with an overall survival rate of 52 of 80 patients (65%). The average age was 24 years (range, 9-53), and there were 3 female patients. Twelve patients (15%) had multiple cardiac injuries, and 63 (79%) had other associated injuries. Fourteen patients (17%) presented with no blood pressure, and 55 (69%) were hypotensive on admission. ER thoracotomy was performed on 7 of 52 survivors (13%) and 24 of 28 nonsurvivors (86%). Survival after ER thoracotomy was 7 of 31 patients (22%). A selective approach is recommended, because ER thoracotomy has a limited role in penetrating cardiac injury. A high index of suspicion, prompt resuscitation, and immediate definitive surgical management resulted in a high survival rate for these frequently lethal injuries. PMID:10231214

  6. Physiologically inspired cardiac scaffolds for tailored in vivo function and heart regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Nicholas J; Coulombe, Kareen L K

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering is well suited for the treatment of cardiac disease due to the limited regenerative capacity of native cardiac tissue and the loss of function associated with endemic cardiac pathologies, such as myocardial infarction and congenital heart defects. However, the physiological complexity of the myocardium imposes extensive requirements on tissue therapies intended for these applications. In recent years, the field of cardiac tissue engineering has been characterized by great innovation and diversity in the fabrication of engineered tissue scaffolds for cardiac repair and regeneration to address these problems. From early approaches that attempted only to deliver cardiac cells in a hydrogel vessel, significant progress has been made in understanding the role of each major component of cardiac living tissue constructs (namely cells, scaffolds, and signaling mechanisms) as they relate to mechanical, biological, and electrical in vivo performance. This improved insight, accompanied by modern material science techniques, allows for the informed development of complex scaffold materials that are optimally designed for cardiac applications. This review provides a background on cardiac physiology as it relates to critical cardiac scaffold characteristics, the degree to which common cardiac scaffold materials fulfill these criteria, and finally an overview of recent in vivo studies that have employed this type of approach. PMID:25970645

  7. The pathogenesis and treatment of cardiac atrophy in cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kate T

    2016-02-15

    Cancer cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome characterized by a progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass associated with significant functional impairment. In addition to a loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, many patients with cancer cachexia also experience cardiac atrophy, remodeling, and dysfunction, which in the field of cancer cachexia is described as cardiac cachexia. The cardiac alterations may be due to underlying heart disease, the cancer itself, or problems initiated by the cancer treatment and, unfortunately, remains largely underappreciated by clinicians and basic scientists. Despite recent major advances in the treatment of cancer, little progress has been made in the treatment of cardiac cachexia in cancer, and much of this is due to lack of information regarding the mechanisms. This review focuses on the cardiac atrophy associated with cancer cachexia, describing some of the known mechanisms and discussing the current and future therapeutic strategies to treat this condition. Above all else, improved awareness of the condition and an increased focus on identification of mechanisms and therapeutic targets will facilitate the eventual development of an effective treatment for cardiac atrophy in cancer cachexia. PMID:26718971

  8. Cardiac Emergencies in Neurosurgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Petropolis, Andrea; Cappellani, Ronald B.

    2015-01-01

    Perioperative safety concerns are a major area of interest in recent years. Severe cardiac perturbation such as cardiac arrest is one of the most dreaded complications in the intraoperative period; however, little is known about the management of these events in the patients undergoing elective neurosurgery. This special group needs further attention, as it is often neither feasible nor appropriate to apply conventional advanced cardiac life support algorithms in patients undergoing neurosurgery. Factors such as neurosurgical procedure and positioning can also have a significant effect on the occurrence of cardiac arrest. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to describe the various causes and management of cardiac emergencies with special reference to cardiac arrest during elective neurosurgical procedures, including discussion of position-related factors and resuscitative considerations in these situations. This will help to formulate possible guidelines for management of such events. PMID:25692145

  9. An overview of cardiac morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schleich, Jean-Marc; Abdulla, Tariq; Summers, Ron; Houyel, Lucile

    2013-11-01

    Accurate knowledge of normal cardiac development is essential for properly understanding the morphogenesis of congenital cardiac malformations that represent the most common congenital anomaly in newborns. The heart is the first organ to function during embryonic development and is fully formed at 8 weeks of gestation. Recent studies stemming from molecular genetics have allowed specification of the role of cellular precursors in the field of heart development. In this article we review the different steps of heart development, focusing on the processes of alignment and septation. We also show, as often as possible, the links between abnormalities of cardiac development and the main congenital heart defects. The development of animal models has permitted the unraveling of many mechanisms that potentially lead to cardiac malformations. A next step towards a better knowledge of cardiac development could be multiscale cardiac modelling. PMID:24138816

  10. Sham-feeding decreases cardiac output in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Andersen, H B; Jensen, E W; Madsbad, S; Nielsen, S L; Burcharth, F; Christensen, N J

    1992-07-01

    The cardiovascular effect of sham-feeding was measured in seven healthy non-obese human subjects by the Fick principle using the carbon dioxide rebreathing method. The subjects were resting in the sitting position and were exposed to the sight and smell but not the taste of a breakfast meal. Cardiac output decreased significantly from a mean value of 4.0 1 min-1 to 3.5 1 min-1 during sham-feeding (Friedman, P = 0.004). The cardiac output returned to basal values in all seven subjects when the sensory stimulus was removed. The decrease in cardiac output was due to a decreased stroke volume, whereas heart rate and blood pressure did not change. The mechanism of the decrease in cardiac output during sham-feeding remains to be established. PMID:1505165

  11. Rare Intracardiac Tumor: Primary Cardiac Lymphoma Presenting as Atypical Angina.

    PubMed

    Aimanan, Karthigesu; Kumar, K Saravana; Mohd Arif, M N; Noor Zuraini, Md; Ramdzan, Md Jamil; Hamdan, L

    2016-01-01

    Primary lymphomas of the heart are extremely rare, accounting for 2% of all primary cardiac tumors. Due to the rare presentation, there is no proper consensus available on treatment strategy. Preoperative confirmation of the pathology is fundamental in guiding an early treatment plan, which allows for improved prognosis. Unfortunately, in most cases, primary cardiac lymphoma is only identified on postoperative histopathological analyses, which affect the treatment plan and outcome. Here, we report a unique case of primary cardiac lymphoma presented with dyspnea and reduced effort tolerance. Young age, rapid onset of symptom, and absence of cardiac risk factors prompted us towards further imaging and emergency resection. The patient received a course of postoperative chemotherapy and was disease-free on six months of follow-up. PMID:26904128

  12. Cardiac sarcoidosis-state of the art review.

    PubMed

    Hulten, Edward; Aslam, Saira; Osborne, Michael; Abbasi, Siddique; Bittencourt, Marcio Sommer; Blankstein, Ron

    2016-02-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology resulting in formation of non-caseating granulomas. Cardiac involvement-which is associated with worse prognosis-has been detected in approximately 25% of individuals based on autopsy or cardiac imaging studies. Nevertheless, the diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis is challenging due to the low yield of endomyocardial biopsy, and the limited accuracy of various clinical criteria. Thus, no gold standard diagnostic criterion exists. This review will summarize the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of cardiac sarcoidosis with a focus on advanced cardiovascular imaging, We review the evidence to support a role for cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging in the initial evaluation of selected patients with suspected cardiac sarcoidosis, with cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) as an alternative or complementary initial diagnostic test in a subgroup of patients in whom CMR may be contra-indicated or when CMR is negative with continued clinical concern for myocardial inflammation. In addition to the diagnostic value of these tests, CMR and PET are also useful in identifying patients who have higher risk of adverse events such as ventricular tachycardia or death, in whom preventive therapies such as defibrillators should be more strongly considered. Although no randomized controlled trials for treatment of cardiac sarcoidosis exist, immunosuppressive therapy is often used. We review emerging evidence regarding the use of cardiac PET to identify and quantity the amount of myocardial inflammation as well as to guide the use of immunotherapy. Future studies are needed to determine the benefit of imaging guided therapies aimed at improving patient outcomes. PMID:26885492

  13. Cardiac sarcoidosis—state of the art review

    PubMed Central

    Hulten, Edward; Aslam, Saira; Osborne, Michael; Abbasi, Siddique; Bittencourt, Marcio Sommer

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology resulting in formation of non-caseating granulomas. Cardiac involvement—which is associated with worse prognosis—has been detected in approximately 25% of individuals based on autopsy or cardiac imaging studies. Nevertheless, the diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis is challenging due to the low yield of endomyocardial biopsy, and the limited accuracy of various clinical criteria. Thus, no gold standard diagnostic criterion exists. This review will summarize the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of cardiac sarcoidosis with a focus on advanced cardiovascular imaging, We review the evidence to support a role for cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging in the initial evaluation of selected patients with suspected cardiac sarcoidosis, with cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) as an alternative or complementary initial diagnostic test in a subgroup of patients in whom CMR may be contra-indicated or when CMR is negative with continued clinical concern for myocardial inflammation. In addition to the diagnostic value of these tests, CMR and PET are also useful in identifying patients who have higher risk of adverse events such as ventricular tachycardia or death, in whom preventive therapies such as defibrillators should be more strongly considered. Although no randomized controlled trials for treatment of cardiac sarcoidosis exist, immunosuppressive therapy is often used. We review emerging evidence regarding the use of cardiac PET to identify and quantity the amount of myocardial inflammation as well as to guide the use of immunotherapy. Future studies are needed to determine the benefit of imaging guided therapies aimed at improving patient outcomes. PMID:26885492

  14. Sudden Cardiac Death in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Wasfy, Meagan M; Hutter, Adolph M; Weiner, Rory B

    2016-01-01

    There are clear health benefits to exercise; even so, patients with cardiac conditions who engage in exercise and athletic competition may on rare occasion experience sudden cardiac death (SCD). This article reviews the epidemiology and common causes of SCD in specific athlete populations. There is ongoing debate about the optimal mechanism for SCD prevention, specifically regarding the inclusion of the ECG and/or cardiac imaging in routine preparticipation sports evaluation. This controversy and contemporary screening recommendations are also reviewed. PMID:27486488

  15. Sudden Cardiac Death in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Wasfy, Meagan M.; Hutter, Adolph M.; Weiner, Rory B.

    2016-01-01

    There are clear health benefits to exercise; even so, patients with cardiac conditions who engage in exercise and athletic competition may on rare occasion experience sudden cardiac death (SCD). This article reviews the epidemiology and common causes of SCD in specific athlete populations. There is ongoing debate about the optimal mechanism for SCD prevention, specifically regarding the inclusion of the ECG and/or cardiac imaging in routine preparticipation sports evaluation. This controversy and contemporary screening recommendations are also reviewed. PMID:27486488

  16. Cardiac Involvement in Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Yasemin

    2016-06-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is one of the subgroup of diseases called "seronegative spondyloarthropathy". Frequently, it affects the vertebral colon and sacroiliac joint primarily and affects the peripheral joints less often. This chronic, inflammatory and rheumatic disease can also affect the extraarticular regions of the body. The extraarticular affections can be ophthalmologic, cardiac, pulmonary or neurologic. The cardiac affection can be 2-10% in all patients. Cardiac complications such as left ventricular dysfunction, aortitis, aortic regurgitation, pericarditis and cardiomegaly are reviewed. PMID:27222669

  17. Toxocariasis-associated cardiac diseases--A systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kuenzli, Esther; Neumayr, Andreas; Chaney, Matthew; Blum, Johannes

    2016-02-01

    Toxocariasis, caused by Toxocara canis or Toxocara catis, is a worldwide occurring parasitic disease, reaching high prevalences especially in tropical and subtropical countries. The clinical presentation can range from asymptomatic seropositivity to life threatenting disease, depending on the organ system involved. Cardiac involvement, one of the possible manifestations of human Toxocara spp. infection, is rarely reported in case reports. As far as we know, no systematic reviews of clinical presentations have been published till now and no clear recommendations regarding the treatment of Toxocara spp. infection involving the heart exist. In a systematic review of the literature, 24 published cases of Toxocara spp. infection involving the heart were identified. The cardiac entities described included myocarditis, pericarditis, and Loeffler's endocarditis. The clinical presentation ranged from asymptomatic or mild disease to life threatening myocarditis/pericarditis with heart failure or cardiac tamponade, leading to death. In most cases, the diagnosis was based on a combination of clinical, laboratory and radiological findings. Only in three of the nine cases in which histological analysis was performed (either pre- or post-mortem), granulomas or remnants of the parasite were detected. In the other six cases, findings were non-specific; the damage of the heart was equally caused by direct invasion of the larvae and by immunological reactions, either caused by the systemic hypereosinophilia or by the presence of the larvae in the tissue. The treatment regimen described mostly consisted of anthelmintic drugs in combination with corticosteroids. Even though dosage and duration of treatment varied widely, ranging from days to months, most patients were treated successfully. Cardiac involvement in Toxocara spp. infection is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of a very common disease. The therapeutic regimens vary widely especially with regard to the

  18. Recurrent right atrial thrombosis due to Behçet disease.

    PubMed

    Kuno, Toshiki; Tamura, Yuichi; Ono, Tomohiko; Murata, Mitsushige; Kuwana, Masataka; Satoh, Toru; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2014-10-01

    Behçet disease is a rare condition sometimes associated with chronic cardiac inflammation followed by myocardial dysfunction and vascular inflammation. We report a case of recurrent right atrial thrombus due to Behçet disease despite continued anticoagulation therapy. The thrombus disappeared after the initiation of immunosuppressive therapy. To avoid a progression to thrombus or cardiac dysfunction in this recurrent case, the early identification of cardiac involvement of Behçet disease using echocardiography and/or cardiac magnetic resonance imaging might be important. Combined immunosuppressive therapy with prednisone and cyclophosphamide might be needed to treat recurrent thrombosis due to Behçet disease. PMID:25174856

  19. Registry of Unexplained Cardiac Arrest

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-16

    Cardiac Arrest; Long QT Syndrome; Brugada Syndrome; Catecholaminergi Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia; Idiopathic VentricularFibrillation; Early Repolarization Syndrome; Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy

  20. A qualitative assessment of the impact of a uterine balloon tamponade package on decisions regarding the role of emergency hysterectomy in women with uncontrolled postpartum haemorrhage in Kenya and Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Pendleton, Anna Alaska; Natarajan, Abirami; Ahn, Roy; Eckardt, Melody J; Burke, Thomas F

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the impact of a every second matters for mothers and babies uterine balloon tamponade package (ESM-UBT) on provider decisions regarding emergency hysterectomy in cases of uncontrolled postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). Design Qualitative assessment and analysis of a subgroup extracted from a larger database that contains all UBT device uses among ESM-UBT trained health providers. Setting Health facilities in Kenya and Senegal with ESM-UBT training and capable of performing emergency hysterectomies. Participants All medical doctors who had placed a UBT for uncontrolled PPH subsequent to implementation of ESM-UBT at their facility, and who also had the capabilities of performing emergency hysterectomies. Primary outcome measures The impact of ESM-UBT on decisions regarding emergency hysterectomy in cases of uncontrolled PPH. Results 30 of the 31 medical doctors (97%) who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were independently interviewed. Collectively the interviewed medical doctors had placed over 80 UBT devices for uncontrolled PPH since ESM-UBT implementation. All 30 responded that UBT devices immediately controlled haemorrhage and prevented women from being taken to emergency hysterectomy. All 30 would continue to use UBT devices in future cases of uncontrolled PPH. Conclusions These preliminary data suggest that following ESM-UBT implementation, emergency hysterectomy for uncontrolled PPH may be averted by use of uterine balloon tamponade. PMID:26747039

  1. The Effects of Radiofrequency or Cryothermal Ablation on Biomechanical Properties of Isolated Human or Swine Cardiac Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Quallich, Stephen G.; Kriege, Kevin E.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in cardiac tissue properties following the application of various ablation modalities may lead to the development of an array of associated complications. The application of either radio frequency (RF) or cryothermal ablations will alter the biomechanical properties of various cardiac tissues in a differential manner; in some cases, this may be attributable to increased incidences of cardiac tamponade, pulmonary vein stenosis, and/or atrial-esophageal fistula. Thus, a greater understanding of the underlying changes in tissue properties induced by ablative therapies will ultimately promote safer and more efficacious procedures. The effects of applied RF or cryothermal energies on the biomechanical properties of the pulmonary vein, left atrial, or right atrial samples (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\text {n}=369$ \\end{document}) were examined from fresh excised porcine (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\text {n}=35$ \\end{document}) and donated human tissue (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\text {n}=11$ \\end{document}). RF ablations were found to reduce the tensile strength of the porcine cardiac specimens (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt

  2. Reliability systems for implantable cardiac defibrillator batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Esther S.

    The reliability of the power sources used in implantable cardiac defibrillators is critical due to the life-saving nature of the device. Achieving a high reliability power source depends on several systems functioning together. Appropriate cell design is the first step in assuring a reliable product. Qualification of critical components and of the cells using those components is done prior to their designation as implantable grade. Product consistency is assured by control of manufacturing practices and verified by sampling plans using both accelerated and real-time testing. Results to date show that lithium/silver vanadium oxide cells used for implantable cardiac defibrillators have a calculated maximum random failure rate of 0.005% per test month.

  3. Navigating the labyrinth of cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lambers, Erin; Kume, Tsutomu

    2016-07-01

    Heart disease is the number one cause of morbidity and mortality in the world and is a major health and economic burden, costing the United States Health Care System more than $200 billion annually. A major cause of heart disease is the massive loss or dysfunction of cardiomyocytes caused by myocardial infarctions and hypertension. Due to the limited regenerative capacity of the heart, much research has focused on better understanding the process of differentiation toward cardiomyocytes. This review will highlight what is currently known about cardiac cell specification during mammalian development, areas of controversy, cellular sources of cardiomyocytes, and current and potential uses of stem cell derived cardiomyocytes for cardiac therapies. Developmental Dynamics 245:751-761, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26890576

  4. Ketamine in adult cardiac surgery and the cardiac surgery Intensive Care Unit: An evidence-based clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Mazzeffi, Michael; Johnson, Kyle; Paciullo, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine is a unique anesthetic drug that provides analgesia, hypnosis, and amnesia with minimal respiratory and cardiovascular depression. Because of its sympathomimetic properties it would seem to be an excellent choice for patients with depressed ventricular function in cardiac surgery. However, its use has not gained widespread acceptance in adult cardiac surgery patients, perhaps due to its perceived negative psychotropic effects. Despite this limitation, it is receiving renewed interest in the United States as a sedative and analgesic drug for critically ill-patients. In this manuscript, the authors provide an evidence-based clinical review of ketamine use in cardiac surgery patients for intensive care physicians, cardio-thoracic anesthesiologists, and cardio-thoracic surgeons. All MEDLINE indexed clinical trials performed during the last 20 years in adult cardiac surgery patients were included in the review. PMID:25849690

  5. Cardiac Involvement with Parasitic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Hidron, Alicia; Vogenthaler, Nicholas; Santos-Preciado, José I.; Rodriguez-Morales, Alfonso J.; Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Rassi, Anis

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Parasitic infections previously seen only in developing tropical settings can be currently diagnosed worldwide due to travel and population migration. Some parasites may directly or indirectly affect various anatomical structures of the heart, with infections manifested as myocarditis, pericarditis, pancarditis, or pulmonary hypertension. Thus, it has become quite relevant for clinicians in developed settings to consider parasitic infections in the differential diagnosis of myocardial and pericardial disease anywhere around the globe. Chagas' disease is by far the most important parasitic infection of the heart and one that it is currently considered a global parasitic infection due to the growing migration of populations from areas where these infections are highly endemic to settings where they are not endemic. Current advances in the treatment of African trypanosomiasis offer hope to prevent not only the neurological complications but also the frequently identified cardiac manifestations of this life-threatening parasitic infection. The lack of effective vaccines, optimal chemoprophylaxis, or evidence-based pharmacological therapies to control many of the parasitic diseases of the heart, in particular Chagas' disease, makes this disease one of the most important public health challenges of our time. PMID:20375355

  6. ASCI 2010 appropriateness criteria for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: a report of the Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging guideline working group

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byoung Wook; Chan, Carmen; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Tsai, I-Chen; Yong, Hwan Seok; Yu, Wei

    2010-01-01

    There has been a growing need for standard Asian population guidelines for cardiac CT and cardiac MR due to differences in culture, healthcare system, ethnicity and disease prevalence. The Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging, as the only society dedicated to cardiovascular imaging in Asia, formed a cardiac CT and cardiac MR guideline working group in order to help Asian practitioners to establish cardiac CT and cardiac MR services. In this ASCI cardiac MR appropriateness criteria report, 23 Technical Panel members representing various Asian countries were invited to rate 50 indications that can frequently be encountered in clinical practice in Asia. Indications were rated on a scale of 1–9 to be categorized into ‘appropriate’ (7–9), ‘uncertain’ (4–6), or ‘inappropriate’ (1–3). According to median scores of the 23 members, the final ratings for indications were 24 appropriate, 18 uncertain and 8 inappropriate with 22 ‘highly-agreed’ (19 appropriate and 3 inappropriate) indications. This report is expected to have a significant impact on the cardiac MR practices in many Asian countries by promoting the appropriate use of cardiac MR. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10554-010-9687-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20734234

  7. UPDATE: CARDIAC XENOTRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Ekser, Burcin; Cooper, David K.C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the latest development in cardiac xenotransplantation in small and large animal models and related in vitro studies. Recent findings With the recent introduction of α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knockout (GT-KO) pig organs for xenotransplantation, improved cardiac graft survival has been obtained. However, this experience has demonstrated the importance of pig antigens other than Galα1,3Gal (Gal) antigens (so-called nonGal antigens) as targets for primate anti-pig antibodies. Several in vitro studies have confirmed that, although the incidence and levels of anti-nonGal antibodies in non-human primates and humans are significantly less when compared with total anti-pig antibodies (i.e., anti-Gal + anti-nonGal), they can result in complement-mediated lysis of GT-KO pig cells. More recently, it has been demonstrated that regulatory T cells (Treg) suppress the cellular xenogeneic response, thus potentially preventing or reducing T cell-mediated rejection. The importance of thrombotic microangiopathy as a feature of the immune/inflammatory response and incompatibilities between the coagulation-anticoagulation systems of pig and primate are receiving increasing attention. Development of GT-KO pigs transgenic for one or more ‘anti-thrombotic’ genes, e.g., CD39 or tissue factor pathway inhibitor, may contribute to overcoming these problems. Summary Although GT-KO pigs have provided an advance over wild-type pigs as a source of Organs for transplantation into primates, further genetic modification of GT-KO pigs is required to overcome the remaining immune barriers before a clinical trial of cardiac xenotransplantation can be contemplated. PMID:19060538

  8. Clinical outcomes of double membrane peeling with or without simultaneous phacoemulsification/gas tamponade for vitreoretinal-interface-associated (VRI) disorders.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kshitiz; Chandnani, Nisha; Raj, Pallavi; Agarwal, Amar

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical outcomes of double membrane (ERM & ILM) peeling and the effect of combined cataract surgery and SF6 gas injection in vitreoretinal interface (VRI) disorders. This is a retrospective interventional study. Seventy-two eyes with idiopathic vitreoretinal interface abnormalities that underwent 23 gauge pars plana vitrectomy with "double stain and double peel" technique were reviewed. SD-OCT was used to classify VRI disorders into following 4 groups: 44 in ERM type, 17 in VMTS type, 7 in macular pseudohole (MPH) type, and 4 in lamellar macular hole (LMH) type. ERM was a common association in all types. Mean preoperative BCVA improved from 0.58 ± 0.14 logMAR to 0.27 ± 0.16 logMAR units (p = 0.001). Mean CFT reduced from 409.17 ± 122.31 µm preoperatively to 277.28 ± 0.16 µm postoperatively (p < 0.0001). Among the VRI subtypes, visual improvement was significant except in LMH variety (ERM type, p = 0.0029; VMTS type, p = 0.0281; MPH type, p = 0.05; and LMH type, p = 0.7926). Mean change in CFT from baseline was least in LMH cases (p = 0.0093). There was no significant difference in BCVA and CFT in the group who had combined phacovitrectomy versus pseudophakic group (p > 0.05). Use of intraocular SF6 gas tamponade did not show any added benefits among the groups (p > 0.05). Improvement in foveal contour was seen in all groups. Simultaneous removal of ILM along with ERM during surgery for VRI disorders helps in restoring normal foveal contour with a favorable visual outcome. Combined cataract extraction or use of intraocular SF6 gas injection does not affect the surgical results. PMID:26659009

  9. A case of double coronary perforations and tamponade during left main percutaneous coronary intervention and treatment with stenting and autotransfusion.

    PubMed

    Alıcı, Gökhan; Özkan, Birol; Esen, Ali Metin

    2013-01-01

    Coronary perforation is a rare complication of percutaneous coronary intervention. A 60-year-old male patient with a diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma was admitted to our hospital with crescendo anginal attacks. Coronary angiogram revealed significant stenosis in distal left main coronary artery (LMCA). After implanting a 4.0×18 mm coronary stent from LMCA to left anterior descending artery (LAD), coronary angiography showed a perforation in the proximal part of the LAD and a plaque shift to the osteum of circumflex artery (Cx), causing 60% stenosis. Rupture was sealed by implantation of a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) coated stent in proximal LAD. Due to ongoing chest pain and electrocardiographic ischemic changes, a 3.5×18 mm coronary stent was implanted in Cx. Unfortunately, another perforation occurred in Cx. The PTFE coated stent was not flexible enough to advance from the former LMCA to LAD stent to the Cx artery, and another 3.5×18 mm coronary stent was deployed in Cx artery successfully. Although control angiography showed complete sealing of the rupture, echocardiography showed a large pericardial effusion compressing the right side of the heart. Autotransfusion was done to stabilize the hemodynamic status. One-week later, coronary angiography did not show any contrast agent extravasation. In this case, we present double coronary perforations of the LAD and Cx arteries, and successful treatment with both covered and conventional stents and autotransfusion. PMID:23518943

  10. [Chronic surplus of Japanese cardiac surgeon--ideal nurse practitioner for cardiac surgery, cardiac surgeon's attitude toward the future].

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Hirohisa

    2014-03-01

    It is chronically surplus of doctors in the world of cardiac surgery. There are too many cardiac surgeons because cardiac surgery requires a large amount of manpower resources to provide adequate medical services. Many Japanese cardiac surgeons do not have enough opportunity to perform cardiac surgery operations, and many Japanese cardiac surgery residents do not have enough opportunity to learn cardiac surgery operations. There are physician assistants and nurse practitioners in the US. Because they provide a part of medical care to cardiac surgery patients, American cardiac surgeons can focus more energy on operative procedures. Introduction of cardiac surgery specialized nurse practitioner is essential to deliver a high quality medical service as well as to solve chronic problems that Japanese cardiac surgery has had for a long time. PMID:24749334

  11. Health Instruction Packages: Cardiac Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Gwen; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these five learning modules to instruct nurses, students, and other health care professionals in cardiac anatomy and functions and in fundamental electrocardiographic techniques. The first module, "Cardiac Anatomy and Physiology: A Review" by Gwen Phillips, teaches the learner to draw and label…

  12. Current perspectives on cardiac amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Jian; Mishra, Shikha; Falk, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    Amyloidosis represents a group of diseases in which proteins undergo misfolding to form insoluble fibrils with subsequent tissue deposition. While almost all deposited amyloid fibers share a common nonbranched morphology, the affected end organs, clinical presentation, treatment strategies, and prognosis vary greatly among this group of diseases and are largely dependent on the specific amyloid precursor protein. To date, at least 27 precursor proteins have been identified to result in either local tissue or systemic amyloidosis, with nine of them manifesting in cardiac deposition and resulting in a syndrome termed “cardiac amyloidosis” or “amyloid cardiomyopathy.” Although cardiac amyloidosis has been traditionally considered to be a rare disorder, as clinical appreciation and understanding continues to grow, so too has the prevalence, suggesting that this disease may be greatly underdiagnosed. The most common form of cardiac amyloidosis is associated with circulating amyloidogenic monoclonal immunoglobulin light chain proteins. Other major cardiac amyloidoses result from a misfolding of products of mutated or wild-type transthyretin protein. While the various cardiac amyloidoses share a common functional consequence, namely, an infiltrative cardiomyopathy with restrictive pathophysiology leading to progressive heart failure, the underlying pathophysiology and clinical syndrome varies with each precursor protein. Herein, we aim to provide an up-to-date overview of cardiac amyloidosis from nomenclature to molecular mechanisms and treatment options, with a particular focus on amyloidogenic immunoglobulin light chain protein cardiac amyloidosis. PMID:22058156

  13. Redox Control of Cardiac Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nitin T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with various human diseases, and considerable attention has been paid to investigate their physiological effects. Various ROS are synthesized in the mitochondria and accumulate in the cytoplasm if the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism fails. The critical balance of this ROS synthesis and antioxidant defense systems is termed the redox system of the cell. Various cardiovascular diseases have also been affected by redox to different degrees. ROS have been indicated as both detrimental and protective, via different cellular pathways, for cardiac myocyte functions, electrophysiology, and pharmacology. Mostly, the ROS functions depend on the type and amount of ROS synthesized. While the literature clearly indicates ROS effects on cardiac contractility, their effects on cardiac excitability are relatively under appreciated. Cardiac excitability depends on the functions of various cardiac sarcolemal or mitochondrial ion channels carrying various depolarizing or repolarizing currents that also maintain cellular ionic homeostasis. ROS alter the functions of these ion channels to various degrees to determine excitability by affecting the cellular resting potential and the morphology of the cardiac action potential. Thus, redox balance regulates cardiac excitability, and under pathological regulation, may alter action potential propagation to cause arrhythmia. Understanding how redox affects cellular excitability may lead to potential prophylaxis or treatment for various arrhythmias. This review will focus on the studies of redox and cardiac excitation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 432–468. PMID:22897788

  14. [Hygienic handling in cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Shimasaki, T; Masaoka, T; Hirooka, S; Abe, H; Watanabe, T; Washio, M

    1993-04-01

    Some points regarding the hygienic handling in cardiac surgery are mentioned. The sternal infection or mediastinitis is still one of the most important complications after cardiac operation especially when ITA is used for CABG. After we paid much attention to these points, the postoperative sternal infection has decreased obviously. PMID:8468855

  15. Determination of cardiac size following space missions of different durations - The second manned Skylab mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, A.; Hoffler, G. W.; Johnson, R. L.; Gowen, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    A simple method to estimate cardiac size from single frontal plane chest roentgenograms has been described. Pre- and postflight chest X-rays from Apollo 17, and Skylab 2 and 3 have been analyzed for changes in the cardiac silhouette size. The data obtained from the computed cardiothoracic areal ratios compared well with the clinical cardiothoracic diametral ratios (r = .86). Though an overall postflight decrease in cardiac size is evident, the mean difference was not statistically significant (n = 8). The individual decreases in the cardiac silhouette size postflight are thought to be due to decrements in intracardiac chamber volumes rather than in myocardial muscle mass.

  16. Increase in Cardiac Troponin I in a Lamb with Tetralogy of Fallot

    PubMed Central

    NEUWALD, Elisa Barp; SOARES, Frederico Aécio Carvalho; DREYER, Cristina Terres; CARNESELLA, Samuel; WOUTERS, Angelica Terezinha Barth; GONZÁLEZ, Félix Hilario Diaz; DRIEMEIER, David

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study describes a case of tetralogy of Fallot in a lamb showing failure to thrive and signs of respiratory distress. Physical examination, electrocardiography, thoracic radiographies, echocardiography and cardiac troponin I evaluation were performed. The value of cardiac troponin I was compared with the values of 10 healthy lambs of the same age and breed, and the affected animal demonstrated an increase in cardiac troponin I. Due to the poor prognosis, euthanasia was indicated, and necropsy confirmed the diagnosis. This is the first report of an increase in cardiac troponin I in a lamb with tetralogy of Fallot. PMID:23685750

  17. Hydatid cyst of the cardiac interventricular septum with complete atrioventricular block: a case report from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Bilal; Ahmed, Waqas; Akbar, Mohammad Tauqeer

    2012-03-01

    Cardiac involvement in systemic echinococcosis is a rare phenomenon. Abnormalities of the cardiac conduction system are an exceptional feature of cardiac hydatidosis. We report, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of cardiac hydatidosis from Pakistan in a 30 year old male who presented with recurrent syncopal episodes due to complete atrioventricular conduction block and subsequently underwent implantation of dual chamber pacemaker. His transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a large, well circumscribed, interventricular septal mass which was avascular on subsequent perfusion imaging. Surgical resection of the mass three years later confirmed it to be a hydatid cyst. PMID:22764470

  18. CARDIAC INJURY FROM LONG TERM EPISODIC EXPOSURE TO PARTICULATE MATTER (PM): SOLUBLE COMPONENTS OR SOLID PARTICLES?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long-term exposure to PM has been associated with cardiac injury in rats. The purpose of this study was to investigate if cardiac injury was due to soluble metals (i.e., zinc), insoluble PM, or pulmonary injury/inflammation. Male Wistar Kyoto rats (n=8) were exposed intratracheal...

  19. Cardiac Metastasis of Leiomyosarcoma Complicated with Complete Atrio-Ventricular Block and Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae Ouk; Kim, Minsu; Kang, Woong Chol; Moon, Jeonggeun; Chung, Wook-Jin; Sung, Yon Mi

    2016-01-01

    We described a case of a 54-year-old male who presented with dizziness and dyspnea due to cardiac metastasis of leiomyosarcoma. Cardiac metastasis of leiomyosarcoma caused both bradyarrhythmia and tachyarrhythmia in the patient. He was treated with implantation of a permanent pacemaker for management of complete atrio-ventricular block and anti-arrhythmic drug that suppressed ventricular tachycardia successfully. PMID:27014358

  20. Cardiac Arrests in Patients Undergoing Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: A Retrospective Analysis of 73,029 Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Goudra, Basavana; Nuzat, Ahmad; Singh, Preet M.; Gouda, Gowri B.; Carlin, Augustus; Manjunath, Amit K.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Airway difficulties leading to cardiac arrest are frequently encountered during propofol sedation in patients undergoing gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. With a noticeable increase in the use of propofol for endoscopic sedation, we decided to examine the incidence and outcome of cardiac arrests in patients undergoing gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy with sedation. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective study, cardiac arrest data obtained from the clinical quality improvement and local registry over 5 years was analyzed. The information of patients who sustained cardiac arrest attributable to sedation was studied in detail. Analysis included comparison of cardiac arrests due to all causes until discharge (or death) versus the cardiac arrests and death occurring during the procedure and in the recovery area. Results: The incidence of cardiac arrest and death (all causes, until discharge) was 6.07 and 4.28 per 10,000 in patients sedated with propofol, compared with non–propofol-based sedation (0.67 and 0.44). The incidence of cardiac arrest during and immediately after the procedure (recovery area) for all endoscopies was 3.92 per 10,000; of which, 72% were airway management related. About 90.0% of all peri-procedural cardiac arrests occurred in patients who received propofol. Conclusions: The incidence of cardiac arrest and death is about 10 times higher in patients receiving propofol-based sedation compared with those receiving midazolam–fentanyl sedation. More than two thirds of these events occur during EGD and ERCP. PMID:26655137

  1. Tailoring Material Properties of Cardiac Matrix Hydrogels to Induce Endothelial Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeffords, Megan E.; Wu, Jinglei; Shah, Mickey; Hong, Yi; Zhang, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac matrix hydrogel has shown great promise as an injectable biomaterial due to the possession of cardiac-specific extracellular matrix composition. A cardiac matrix hydrogel facilitating neovascularization will further improve its therapeutic outcomes in cardiac repair. In this study, we explored the feasibility of tailoring material properties of cardiac matrix hydrogels using a natural compound, genipin, to promote endothelial differentiation of stem cells. Our results demonstrated that the genipin crosslinking could increase the mechanical properties of the cardiac matrix hydrogel to a stiffness range promoting endothelial differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). It also decreased the swelling ratio and prolonged degradation without altering gelation time. Human mesenchymal stem cells cultured on the genipin crosslinked cardiac matrix hydrogels showed great viability. After 1-day culture, hMSCs demonstrated down-regulation of early endothelial marker expression and up-regulation of mature endothelial marker expression. Especially for 1 mM genipin crosslinked cardiac matrix hydrogels, hMSCs showed particularly significant expression of mature endothelial cell marker vWF. These attractive results indicate the potential of using genipin crosslinked cardiac matrix hydrogels to promote rapid vascularization for cardiac infarction treatment through minimally invasive therapy. PMID:25946697

  2. Cardiac rehabilitation in Germany.

    PubMed

    Cantwell, J D

    1976-09-01

    The concept of cardiac reconditioning centers for the prevention and rehabilitation of coronary patients has been tremendously successful in Germany over the past 20 years. At least 40 such centers are located throughout the country. Physicians, nurses, and physical therapists work closely together in the various facets of the rehabilitation process. The financial backing for these facilities is primarily through governmental and regional insurance companies, whose officials are apparently convinced that in the long run supporting preventive measures is financially sound. Objective data supporting their convictions come from studies such as that of Brusis, who showed that such as that of 1,500 employees was diminished by nearly 70 percent during a two-year period after cardiac reconditioning, as compared to a similar time period before the rehabilitation experience. Subjective benefits, which are extremely difficult to quantitate in meaningful terms, were nonetheless expressed by nearly all the patients with whom I conversed. Perhaps they have experienced the same feelings that Mark Twain did when he observed that "all frets and worries and chafings sank to sleep in the presence of the benignant serenity of the Alps; the Great Spirit of the Mountains breathed his own peace upon their hurt minds and sore hearts and healed them." PMID:959329

  3. Decoding the Cardiac Message

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Gerald W

    2012-01-01

    This review reflects and expands upon the contents of the author’s presentation at The Thomas W. Smith Memorial Lecture at AHA Scientific Sessions, 2011. “Decoding the cardiac message” refers to accumulating results from ongoing microRNA research that is altering longstanding concepts of the mechanisms for, and consequences of, messenger RNA (mRNA) regulation in the heart. First, I provide a brief historical perspective of the field of molecular genetics, touching upon seminal research that paved the way for modern molecular cardiovascular research and helped establish the foundation for current concepts of mRNA regulation in the heart. I follow with some interesting details about the specific research that led to the discovery and appreciation of microRNAs as highly conserved pivotal regulators of RNA expression and translation. Finally, I provide a personal viewpoint as to how agnostic genome-wide techniques for measuring microRNAs, their mRNA targets, and their protein products can be applied in an integrated multi-systems approach to uncover direct and indirect effects of microRNAs. Experimental designs integrating next-generation sequencing and global proteomics have the potential to address unanswered questions regarding microRNA-mRNA interactions in cardiac disease, how disease alters mRNA targeting by specific microRNAs, and how mutational and polymorphic nucleotide variation in microRNAs can affect end-organ function and stress-response. PMID:22383710

  4. Pregnancy After Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kanhere, Anjali Vivek; Kanhere, Vivek Madhav

    2016-02-01

    Heart disease is one of the common, indirect obstetric causes of maternal death. Management of these cases may challenge the entire team providing care to the mother and fetus. Advances in cardiac surgery has improved quality of life and level of functioning of cardiovascular system of patients with congenital or acquired heart disease. These diseases complicate 0.1-4 % pregnancies. Maternal complications in the form of thromboembolic, hemorrhagic episode and heart failure may occur. The fetus is in danger of effects of oral anticoagulation therapy and other medications given to the patient in order to support cardiovascular system, intrauterine growth restriction and danger of hypoxia. In recent era, we are facing more pregnant patients with previous history of surgical correction of congenital or rheumatic heart disease. In this review, we have attempted to draw a management protocol of such patients based on the available literature and various international guidelines. In pregnant women with mechanical heart valves, recent data support warfarin use throughout pregnancy, followed by a switch to heparin and planned induction of labor. However, the complexity of this situation demands a cafeteria approach where the patient herself can choose from the available options that are supported by evidence-based information. Preconception counseling, evaluation and antenatal high-risk management protocol with the help of cardiologist and cardiac surgeon improves maternal and neonatal outcome. PMID:26924901

  5. Leadership in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Rao, Christopher; Patel, Vanash; Ibrahim, Michael; Ahmed, Kamran; Wong, Kathie A; Darzi, Ara; von Segesser, Ludwig K; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2011-06-01

    Despite the efficacy of cardiac surgery, less invasive interventions with more uncertain long-term outcomes are increasingly challenging surgery as first-line treatment for several congenital, degenerative and ischemic cardiac diseases. The specialty must evolve if it is to ensure its future relevance. More importantly, it must evolve to ensure that future patients have access to treatments with proven long-term effectiveness. This cannot be achieved without dynamic leadership; however, our contention is that this is not enough. The demands of a modern surgical career and the importance of the task at hand are such that the serendipitous emergence of traditional charismatic leadership cannot be relied upon to deliver necessary change. We advocate systematic analysis and strategic leadership at a local, national and international level in four key areas: Clinical Care, Research, Education and Training, and Stakeholder Engagement. While we anticipate that exceptional individuals will continue to shape the future of our specialty, the creation of robust structures to deliver collective leadership in these key areas is of paramount importance. PMID:20884217

  6. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic–clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy. PMID:27347227

  7. Affect intensity and cardiac arousal.

    PubMed

    Blascovich, J; Brennan, K; Tomaka, J; Kelsey, R M; Hughes, P; Coad, M L; Adlin, R

    1992-07-01

    Relationships between affect intensity and basal, evoked, and perceived cardiac arousal were investigated in 3 experiments. Affect intensity was assessed using Larsen and Diener's (1987) Affect Intensity Measure (AIM). Cardiac arousal was evoked with exercise in the 1st study and with mental arithmetic in the 2nd and 3rd. Perceived cardiac arousal was measured under optimal conditions using a standard heartbeat discrimination procedure. Women as a group scored higher on the AIM. Affect intensity was unrelated to basal or evoked cardiac arousal and was negatively related to perceived cardiac arousal in all 3 studies. Data suggest that affect intensity, although unrelated to actual physiological arousal, is negatively related to the accuracy with which individuals perceive their own arousal. Results are discussed within the context of an expanded arousal-regulation model (Blascovich, 1990). PMID:1494983

  8. Influence of cardiac and respiratory motion on tomographic reconstructions of the heart: implications for quantitative nuclear cardiology

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Pogossian, M.M.; Bergmann, S.R.; Sobel, B.E.

    1982-12-01

    The potential influence of physiological, periodic motions of the heart due to the cardiac cycle, the respiratory cycle, or both on quantitative image reconstruction by positron emission tomography (PET) has been largely neglected. To define their quantitative impact, cardiac PET was performed in 6 dogs after injection of /sup 11/C-palmitate under disparate conditions including: normal cardiac and respiration cycles and cardiac arrest with and without respiration. Although in vitro assay of myocardial samples demonstrated that palmitate uptake was homogeneous (coefficient of variation . 10.1%), analysis of the reconstructed images demonstrated significant heterogeneity of apparent cardiac distribution of radioactivity due to both intrinsic cardiac and respiratory motion. Image degradation due to respiratory motion was demonstrated in a healthy human volunteer as well, in whom cardiac tomography was performed with Super PETT I during breath-holding and during normal breathing. The results indicate that quantitatively significant degradation of reconstructions of true tracer distribution occurs in cardiac PET due to both intrinsic cardiac and respiratory induced motion of the heart. They suggest that avoidance of or minimization of these influences can be accomplished by gating with respect to both the cardiac cycle and respiration or by employing brief scan times during breath-holding.

  9. Ventilation and gas exchange management after cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Sutherasan, Yuda; Raimondo, Pasquale; Pelosi, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    For several decades, physicians had integrated several interventions aiming to improve the outcomes in post-cardiac arrest patients. However, the mortality rate after cardiac arrest is still as high as 50%. Post-cardiac arrest syndrome is associated with high morbidity and mortality due to not only poor neurological outcome and cardiovascular failure but also respiratory dysfunction. To minimize ventilator-associated lung injury, protective mechanical ventilation by using low tidal volume ventilation and driving pressure may decrease pulmonary complications and improve survival. Low level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) can be initiated and titrated with careful cardiac output and respiratory mechanics monitoring. Furthermore, optimizing gas exchange by avoiding hypoxia and hyperoxia as well as maintaining normocarbia may improve neurological and survival outcome. Early multidisciplinary cardiac rehabilitation intervention is recommended. Minimally invasive monitoring techniques, that is, echocardiography, transpulmonary thermodilution method measuring extravascular lung water, as well as transcranial Doppler ultrasound, might be useful to improve appropriate management of post-cardiac arrest patients. PMID:26670813

  10. Streak artifact reduction in cardiac cone beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shechter, Gilad; Naveh, Galit; Lessick, Jonathan; Altman, Ami

    2005-04-01

    Cone beam reconstructed cardiac CT images suffer from characteristic streak artifacts that affect the quality of coronary artery imaging. These artifacts arise from inhomogeneous distribution of noise. While in non-tagged reconstruction inhomogeneity of noise distribution is mainly due to anisotropy of the attenuation of the scanned object (e.g. shoulders), in cardiac imaging it is largely influenced by the non-uniform distribution of the acquired data used for reconstructing the heart at a given phase. We use a cardiac adaptive filter to reduce these streaks. In difference to previous methods of adaptive filtering that locally smooth data points on the basis of their attenuation values, our filter is applied as a function of the noise distribution of the data as it is used in the phase selective reconstruction. We have reconstructed trans-axial images without adaptive filtering, with a regular adaptive filter and with the cardiac adaptive filter. With the cardiac adaptive filter significant reduction of streaks is achieved, and thus image quality is improved. The coronary vessel is much more pronounced in the cardiac adaptive filtered images, in slab MIP the main coronary artery branches are more visible, and non-calcified plaque is better differentiated from vessel wall. This improvement is accomplished without altering significantly the border definition of calcified plaques.

  11. Automated detection of cardiac phase from intracoronary ultrasound image sequences.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zheng; Dong, Yi; Li, Mengchan

    2015-01-01

    Intracoronary ultrasound (ICUS) is a widely used interventional imaging modality in clinical diagnosis and treatment of cardiac vessel diseases. Due to cyclic cardiac motion and pulsatile blood flow within the lumen, there exist changes of coronary arterial dimensions and relative motion between the imaging catheter and the lumen during continuous pullback of the catheter. The action subsequently causes cyclic changes to the image intensity of the acquired image sequence. Information on cardiac phases is implied in a non-gated ICUS image sequence. A 1-D phase signal reflecting cardiac cycles was extracted according to cyclical changes in local gray-levels in ICUS images. The local extrema of the signal were then detected to retrieve cardiac phases and to retrospectively gate the image sequence. Results of clinically acquired in vivo image data showed that the average inter-frame dissimilarity of lower than 0.1 was achievable with our technique. In terms of computational efficiency and complexity, the proposed method was shown to be competitive when compared with the current methods. The average frame processing time was lower than 30 ms. We effectively reduced the effect of image noises, useless textures, and non-vessel region on the phase signal detection by discarding signal components caused by non-cardiac factors. PMID:26406038

  12. Peri-operative cardiac protection for non-cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Wong, S S C; Irwin, M G

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications are an important cause of morbidity and mortality after non-cardiac surgery. Pre-operative identification of high-risk individuals and appropriate peri-operative management can reduce cardiovascular risk. It is important to continue chronic beta-blocker and statin therapy. Statins are relatively safe and peri-operative initiation may be beneficial in high-risk patients and those scheduled for vascular surgery. The pre-operative introduction of beta-blockers reduces myocardial injury but increases rates of stroke and mortality, possibly due to hypotension. They should only be considered in high-risk patients and the dose should be titrated to heart rate. Alpha-2 agonists may also contribute to hypotension. Aspirin continuation can increase the risk of major bleeding and offset the benefit of reduced myocardial risk. Contrary to the initial ENIGMA study, nitrous oxide does not seem to increase the risk of myocardial injury. Volatile anaesthetic agents and opioids have been shown to be cardioprotective in animal laboratory studies but these effects have, so far, not been conclusively reproduced clinically. PMID:26620144

  13. Generating Primary Cultures of Murine Cardiac Myocytes and Cardiac Fibroblasts to Study Viral Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Viruses can induce direct damage to cardiac myocytes and cardiac fibroblasts resulting in myocarditis and impaired cardiac function. Cardiac myocytes and cardiac fibroblasts display different capacities to support viral infection and generate a protective antiviral response. This chapter provides detailed protocols for generation and characterization of primary cultures of murine cardiac myocytes and cardiac fibroblasts, offering a powerful tool to probe cell type-specific responses that determine protection against viral myocarditis. PMID:25836571

  14. Cardiac asthma in elderly patients: incidence, clinical presentation and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Stéphane; Becquemin, Marie-Hélène; Delerme, Samuel; Bennaceur, Mohamed; Isnard, Richard; Achkar, Rony; Riou, Bruno; Boddaert, Jacques; Ray, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Background Cardiac asthma is common, but has been poorly investigated. The objective was to compare the characteristics and outcome of cardiac asthma with that of classical congestive heart failure (CHF) in elderly patients. Methods Prospective study in an 1,800-bed teaching hospital. Results Two hundred and twelve consecutive patients aged ≥ 65 years presenting with dyspnea due to CHF (mean age of 82 ± 8 years) were included. Findings of cardiac echocardiography and natriuretic peptides levels were used to confirm CHF. Cardiac asthma patients were defined as a patient with CHF and wheezing reported by attending physician upon admission to the emergency department. The CHF group (n = 137) and the cardiac asthma group (n = 75), differed for tobacco use (34% vs. 59%, p < 0.05), history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (16% vs. 47%, p < 0.05), peripheral arterial disease (10% vs. 24%, p < 0.05). Patients with cardiac asthma had a significantly lower pH (7.38 ± 0.08 vs. 7.43 ± 0.06, p < 0.05), and a higher PaCO2 (47 ± 15 vs. 41 ± 11 mmHg, p < 0.05) at admission. In the cardiac asthma group, patients had greater distal airway obstruction: forced expiratory volume in 1 second of 1.09 vs. 1.33 Liter (p < 0.05), and a forced expiratory flow at 25% to 75% of vital capacity of 0.76 vs. 0.99 Liter (p < 0.05). The in-hospital (23% vs. 19%) and one year mortality (48% vs. 43%) rates were similar. Conclusion Patients with cardiac asthma represented one third of CHF in elderly patients. They were more hypercapnic and experienced more distal airway obstruction. However, outcomes were similar. PMID:17498318

  15. Pregnancy and delivery in cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Ruys, Titia P E; Cornette, Jérôme; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W

    2013-02-01

    Although its prevalence is relatively low in pregnant women, heart disease is the most important cause of maternal mortality. Problems may arise due to hemodynamic burden and the hypercoagulable state of pregnancy. Heart disease may be congenital or acquired. In developed countries, the former composes the biggest part of women with heart disease. Patients with unrepaired lesions, cyanotic lesions, diminished systemic ventricular function, complex congenital heart disease, left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, pulmonary hypertension, or mechanical valves are at highest risk of developing complications during pregnancy. All patients with known cardiac disease should preferably be counseled before conception. Pre-pregnancy evaluation should include risk assessment for the mother and fetus, including medication use and information on heredity of the cardiac lesion. Management of pregnancy and delivery should be planned accordingly on individual bases. The types of complications are related to the cardiac diagnosis, with arrhythmias and heart failure being most common. Treatment options should be discussed with the future parents, as they may affect both mother and child. In general, the preferred route of delivery is vaginal. The optimal care for pregnant women with heart disease requires multidisciplinary involvement and is best concentrated in tertiary centers. PMID:23290155

  16. Mitochondrial DNA, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cardiac manifestations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Ryul; Kim, Nari; Noh, Yeonhee; Xu, Zhelong; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Han, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria, the powerhouses of cells, have their own DNA (mtDNA). They regulate the transport of metabolites and ions, which determine cell physiology, survival, and death. Mitochondrial dysfunction, including impaired oxidative phosphorylation, preferentially affects heart function via imbalance of energy supply and demand. Recently, mitochondrial mutations and associated mitochondrial dysfunction were suggested as a causal factor of cardiac manifestations. Oxidative stress largely influences mtDNA stability due to oxidative modifications of mtDNA. Furthermore, the continuous replicative state of mtDNA and presence of minimal nucleoid structure render mitochondria vulnerable to oxidative damage and subsequent mutations, which impair mitochondrial functions. However, the occurrence of mtDNA heteroplasmy in the same mitochondrion or cell and presence of nuclear DNA-encoded mtDNA repair systems raise questions regarding whether oxidative stress-mediated mtDNA mutations are the major driving force in accumulation of mtDNA mutations. Here, we address the possible causes of mitochondrial DNA mutations and their involvement in cardiac manifestations. Current strategies for treatment related to mitochondrial mutations and/or dysfunction in cardiac manifestations are briefly discussed. PMID:27100514

  17. Current state of cardiac rehabilitation in Japan.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    In Japan, metabolic risk factors have been increasing due to the westernization and urbanization of lifestyle. This justifiably raises a concern that the incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) in Japan will increase over time, and indeed, recent epidemiological studies in Japan suggest the incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is increasing. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in Japan has been traditionally performed in the inpatient setting. To obtain reimbursement, a CR facility must fulfill certain criteria including being a medical institution with a cardiology/cardiac surgery section which has at least a cardiologist/cardiac surgeon and an experienced CR physician as full-time employees. These criteria create challenges to the availability of outpatient CR after hospital discharge. A recent analysis found outpatient CR participation rate was estimated to be between 3.8 and 7.6% in Japan. This review describes recent trends in the incidence of AMI and the current status of the use of CR in Japan. PMID:24607022

  18. Cardiac arrest and pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Tabitha A; Sanson, Tracy G

    2009-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary arrest in pregnancy is rare occurring in 1 in 30,000 pregnancies. When it does occur, it is important for a clinician to be familiar with the features peculiar to the pregnant state. Knowledge of the anatomic and physiologic changes of pregnancy is helpful in the treatment and diagnosis. Although the main focus should be on the mother, it should not be forgotten that there is another potential life at stake. Resuscitation of the mother is performed in the same manner as in any other patient, except for a few minor adjustments because of the changes of pregnancy. The specialties of obstetrics and neonatology should be involved early in the process to ensure appropriate treatment of both mother and the newborn. This article will explore the changes that occur in pregnancy and their impact on treatment. The common causes of maternal cardiac arrest will be discussed briefly. PMID:19561954

  19. Physics of Cardiac Arrhythmogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karma, Alain

    2013-04-01

    A normal heartbeat is orchestrated by the stable propagation of an excitation wave that produces an orderly contraction. In contrast, wave turbulence in the ventricles, clinically known as ventricular fibrillation (VF), stops the heart from pumping and is lethal without prompt defibrillation. I review experimental, computational, and theoretical studies that have shed light on complex dynamical phenomena linked to the initiation, maintenance, and control of wave turbulence. I first discuss advances made to understand the precursor state to a reentrant arrhythmia where the refractory period of cardiac tissue becomes spatiotemporally disordered; this is known as an arrhythmogenic tissue substrate. I describe observed patterns of transmembrane voltage and intracellular calcium signaling that can contribute to this substrate, and symmetry breaking instabilities to explain their formation. I then survey mechanisms of wave turbulence and discuss novel methods that exploit electrical pacing stimuli to control precursor patterns and low-energy pulsed electric fields to control turbulence.

  20. Trends in Cardiac Pacemaker Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Mallela, Venkateswara Sarma; Ilankumaran, V; Rao, N.Srinivasa

    2004-01-01

    Batteries used in Implantable cardiac pacemakers-present unique challenges to their developers and manufacturers in terms of high levels of safety and reliability. In addition, the batteries must have longevity to avoid frequent replacements. Technological advances in leads/electrodes have reduced energy requirements by two orders of magnitude. Micro-electronics advances sharply reduce internal current drain concurrently decreasing size and increasing functionality, reliability, and longevity. It is reported that about 600,000 pacemakers are implanted each year worldwide and the total number of people with various types of implanted pacemaker has already crossed 3 million. A cardiac pacemaker uses half of its battery power for cardiac stimulation and the other half for housekeeping tasks such as monitoring and data logging. The first implanted cardiac pacemaker used nickel-cadmium rechargeable battery, later on zinc-mercury battery was developed and used which lasted for over 2 years. Lithium iodine battery invented and used by Wilson Greatbatch and his team in 1972 made the real impact to implantable cardiac pacemakers. This battery lasts for about 10 years and even today is the power source for many manufacturers of cardiac pacemakers. This paper briefly reviews various developments of battery technologies since the inception of cardiac pacemaker and presents the alternative to lithium iodine battery for the near future. PMID:16943934

  1. Insulin Cannot Induce Adipogenic Differentiation in Primary Cardiac Cultures.

    PubMed

    Parameswaran, Sreejit; Sharma, Rajendra K

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac tissue contains a heterogeneous population of cardiomyocytes and nonmyocyte population especially fibroblasts. Fibroblast differentiation into adipogenic lineage is important for fat accumulation around the heart which is important in cardiac pathology. The differentiation in fibroblast has been observed both spontaneously and due to increased insulin stimulation. The present study aims to observe the effect of insulin in adipogenic differentiation of cardiac cells present in primary murine cardiomyocyte cultures. Oil Red O (ORO) staining has been used for observing the lipid accumulations formed due to adipogenic differentiation in murine cardiomyocyte cultures. The accumulated lipids were quantified by ORO assay and normalized using protein estimation. The lipid accumulation in cardiac cultures did not increase in presence of insulin. However, addition of other growth factors like insulin-like growth factor 1 and epidermal growth factor promoted adipogenic differentiation even in the presence of insulin and other inhibitory molecules such as vitamins. Lipid accumulation also increased in cells grown in media without insulin after an initial exposure to insulin-containing growth media. The current study adds to the existing knowledge that the insulin by itself cannot induce adipogenic induction in the cardiac cultures. The data have significance in the understanding of cardiovascular health especially in diabetic patients. PMID:27574386

  2. The Spectrum of Epidemiology Underlying Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Meiso; Shimizu, Wataru; Albert, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) from cardiac arrest is a major international public health problem accounting for an estimated 15–20% of all deaths. Although resuscitation rates are generally improving throughout the world, the majority of individuals who suffer a sudden cardiac arrest will not survive. SCD most often develops in older adults with acquired structural heart disease, but it also rarely occurs in the young, where it is more commonly due to inherited disorders. Coronary heart disease (CHD) is known to be the most common pathology underlying SCD, followed by cardiomyopathies, inherited arrhythmia syndromes, and valvular heart disease. Over the past three decades, declines in SCD rates have not been as steep as for other causes of CHD deaths, and there is a growing fraction of SCDs not due to CHD and/or ventricular arrhythmias, particularly among certain subsets of the population. The growing heterogeneity of the pathologies and mechanisms underlying SCD present major challenges for SCD prevention, which are magnified further by a frequent lack of recognition of the underlying cardiac condition prior to death. Multifaceted preventative approaches, which address risk factors in seemingly low risk and known high-risk populations will be required to decrease the burden of SCD. In this Compendium, we review the wide-ranging spectrum of epidemiology underlying SCD within both the general population and in high-risk subsets with established cardiac disease placing an emphasis on recent global trends, remaining uncertainties, and potential targeted preventive strategies. PMID:26044246

  3. Cardiac cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manzke, Robert . E-mail: robert.manzke@philips.com

    2005-10-15

    This doctoral thesis addresses imaging of the heart with retrospectively gated helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT). A thorough review of the CT reconstruction literature is presented in combination with a historic overview of cardiac CT imaging and a brief introduction to other cardiac imaging modalities. The thesis includes a comprehensive chapter about the theory of CT reconstruction, familiarizing the reader with the problem of cone-beam reconstruction. The anatomic and dynamic properties of the heart are outlined and techniques to derive the gating information are reviewed. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, a new approach is presented for the heart-rate-adaptive gated helical cardiac cone-beam CT reconstruction. Reconstruction assessment criteria such as the temporal resolution, the homogeneity in terms of the cardiac phase, and the smoothness at cycle-to-cycle transitions are developed. Several reconstruction optimization approaches are described: An approach for the heart-rate-adaptive optimization of the temporal resolution is presented. Streak artifacts at cycle-to-cycle transitions can be minimized by using an improved cardiac weighting scheme. The optimal quiescent cardiac phase for the reconstruction can be determined automatically with the motion map technique. Results for all optimization procedures applied to ECR are presented and discussed based on patient and phantom data. The ECR algorithm is analyzed for larger detector arrays of future cone-beam systems throughout an extensive simulation study based on a four-dimensional cardiac CT phantom. The results of the scientific work are summarized and an outlook proposing future directions is given. The presented thesis is available for public download at www.cardiac-ct.net.

  4. Radiotherapy in patients with cardiac pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Last, A

    1998-01-01

    Patients with permanent cardiac pacemakers occasionally require radiotherapy. Therapeutic irradiation may cause pacemakers to malfunction due to the effects of ionizing radiation or electromagnetic interference. Modern pacemakers, using complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry, differ from older bipolar semiconductor devices both in their sensitivity to damage and the types of malfunction observed. The mechanisms and types of radiotherapy-induced pacemaker malfunction are described and in vitro and in vivo studies of pacemaker irradiation are reviewed. Some simple precautions are recommended during the planning and administration of radiotherapy to minimize the risk of harm to patients with pacemakers. PMID:9534692

  5. Abulia following an episode of cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Naik, Vismay Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    The word 'abulia' means a lack of will, initiative or drive. The symptoms of abulia include lack of spontaneous action and speech, reduced emotional responsiveness and social interaction, poor attention and easy distractibility. These symptoms are independent of reduced levels of consciousness or cognitive impairment. We describe a case of a socially active 72-year-old female patient who presented with symptoms of abulia which may have occurred due to damage of the frontosubcortical circuits following an episode of cardiac arrest. The patient's symptoms improved dramatically following treatment with bromocriptine. PMID:26135487

  6. Essentials in cardiac arrest during cesarean section.

    PubMed

    van Liempt, Susan W J D; Stoecklein, Katrin; Tjiong, Ming Y; Schwarte, Lothar A; de Groot, Christianne J M; Teunissen, Pim W

    2015-01-28

    Cardiac arrest during cesarean section is very rare. Obstetrical teams have low exposure to these critical situations necessitating frequent rehearsal and knowledge of its differential diagnosis and treatment. A 40-year-old woman pregnant with triplets underwent cesarean sections because of vaginal bleeding due to a placenta previa at 35.2 weeks of gestation. Spinal anesthesia was performed. Asystole occurred during uterotomy. Immediate resuscitation and delivery of the neonates eventually resulted in good maternal and neonatal outcomes. The differential diagnosis is essential and should include obstetric and non-obstetric causes. We describe the consideration of Bezold Jarisch reflex and amniotic fluid embolism as most appropriate in this case. PMID:25918626

  7. Laser speckle analysis synchronised with cardiac cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Pavel; Scheffold, Frank; Weber, Bruno

    2015-07-01

    We present an improved Laser speckle imaging approach to investigate the cerebral blood flow response following function stimulation of a single vibrissa. By synchronising speckle analysis with the cardiac cycle we are able to obtain robust averaging of the correlation signals while at the same time removing the contributions due to the pulsation of blood flow and associated tissue adaptation. With our inter-pulse correlation analysis we can follow second-scale dynamics of the cortical vascular system in response to functional brain activation. We find evidence for two temporally separated processes in the blood flow pattern following stimulation we tentatively attribute to vasodilation and vasoconstriction phases, respectively.

  8. [18F]-NaF PET/CT imaging in cardiac amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Van Der Gucht, Axel; Galat, Arnault; Rosso, Jean; Guellich, Aziz; Garot, Jérôme; Bodez, Diane; Plante-Bordeneuve, Violaine; Hittinger, Luc; Dubois-Randé, Jean-Luc; Evangelista, Eva; Sasanelli, Myriam; Chalaye, Julia; Meignan, Michel; Itti, Emmanuel; Damy, Thibaud

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac amyloidosis (CA) is recognized as a common cause of restrictive cardiomyopathy and heart failure due to the deposition of insoluble proteins in the myocardial interstitium. We emphasize the role of [18F]-sodium fluoride (NaF) PET/CT as a potential noninvasive tool to identify and differentiate the transthyretin-related cardiac amyloidosis from the light-chain cardiac amyloidosis. We report cases of a 73-year-old man and a 75-year-old woman followed in our center for congestive heart failure with marked alteration of the left ventricular ejection fraction due to familial transthyretin Val122Ile cardiac amyloidosis and light-chain cardiac amyloidosis, respectively, confirmed on endomyocardial biopsy. PMID:26403145

  9. Coronary thrombus detected by cardiac CT angiography before cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Slim, Ahmad M; Slim, Jennifer N; Haney, Brian R; Shry, Eric A

    2010-11-01

    A patient presented with a complaint of pleuritic chest discomfort with elevated cardiac biomarkers. After a cardiac magnetic resonance imaging scan for the suspicion of myopericarditis showed a potential myocardial infarct, a coronary CT scan was performed. This revealed a thrombus of the left anterior descending artery. Cardiac catheterization confirmed the findings, and a small clot was removed. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of coronary thrombus being detected by CT angiography with cardiac catheterization correlation. Coronary CT angiography has been increasingly used to evaluate acute chest pain with a negative predictive value close to 100%. In a young patient with suspicion of myopericarditis, CT angiography proved to be useful in diagnosing thrombus in the coronary tree. PMID:20463613

  10. Epigenetic regulation in cardiac fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li-Ming; Xu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis represents an adoptive response in the heart exposed to various stress cues. While resolution of the fibrogenic response heralds normalization of heart function, persistent fibrogenesis is usually associated with progressive loss of heart function and eventually heart failure. Cardiac fibrosis is regulated by a myriad of factors that converge on the transcription of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins, a process the epigenetic machinery plays a pivotal role. In this mini-review, we summarize recent advances regarding the epigenetic regulation of cardiac fibrosis focusing on the role of histone and DNA modifications and non-coding RNAs. PMID:26635926

  11. Cardiac Involvement in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Ozkan, Yasemin

    2016-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is one of the subgroup of diseases called “seronegative spondyloarthropathy”. Frequently, it affects the vertebral colon and sacroiliac joint primarily and affects the peripheral joints less often. This chronic, inflammatory and rheumatic disease can also affect the extraarticular regions of the body. The extraarticular affections can be ophthalmologic, cardiac, pulmonary or neurologic. The cardiac affection can be 2-10% in all patients. Cardiac complications such as left ventricular dysfunction, aortitis, aortic regurgitation, pericarditis and cardiomegaly are reviewed. PMID:27222669

  12. Visualization of Streptococcus pneumoniae within Cardiac Microlesions and Subsequent Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Armand O.; Orihuela, Carlos J.

    2016-01-01

    During bacteremia Streptococcus pneumoniae can translocate across the vascular endothelium into the myocardium and form discrete bacteria-filled microscopic lesions (microlesions) that are remarkable due to the absence of infiltrating immune cells. Due to their release of cardiotoxic products, S. pneumoniae within microlesions are thought to contribute to the heart failure that is frequently observed during fulminate invasive pneumococcal disease in adults. Herein is demonstrated a protocol for experimental mouse infection that leads to reproducible cardiac microlesion formation within 30 hr. Instruction is provided on microlesion identification in hematoxylin & eosin stained heart sections and the morphological distinctions between early and late microlesions are highlighted. Instruction is provided on a protocol for verification of S. pneumoniae within microlesions using antibodies against pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide and immunofluorescent microscopy. Last, a protocol for antibiotic intervention that rescues infected mice and for the detection and assessment of scar formation in the hearts of convalescent mice is provided. Together, these protocols will facilitate the investigation of the molecular mechanisms underlying pneumococcal cardiac invasion, cardiomyocyte death, cardiac remodeling as a result of exposure to S. pneumoniae, and the immune response to the pneumococci in the heart. PMID:25939051

  13. A Common Polymorphism of the Human Cardiac Sodium Channel Alpha Subunit (SCN5A) Gene Is Associated with Sudden Cardiac Death in Chronic Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marcsa, Boglárka; Dénes, Réka; Vörös, Krisztina; Rácz, Gergely; Sasvári-Székely, Mária; Rónai, Zsolt; Törő, Klára; Keszler, Gergely

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac death remains one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. Recent research has shed light on pathophysiological mechanisms underlying cardiac death, and several genetic variants in novel candidate genes have been identified as risk factors. However, the vast majority of studies performed so far investigated genetic associations with specific forms of cardiac death only (sudden, arrhythmogenic, ischemic etc.). The aim of the present investigation was to find a genetic marker that can be used as a general, powerful predictor of cardiac death risk. To this end, a case-control association study was performed on a heterogeneous cohort of cardiac death victims (n=360) and age-matched controls (n=300). Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from five candidate genes (beta2 adrenergic receptor, nitric oxide synthase 1 adaptor protein, ryanodine receptor 2, sodium channel type V alpha subunit and transforming growth factor-beta receptor 2) that had previously been shown to associate with certain forms of cardiac death were genotyped using sequence-specific real-time PCR probes. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the CC genotype of the rs11720524 polymorphism in the SCN5A gene encoding a subunit of the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel occurred more frequently in the highly heterogeneous cardiac death cohort compared to the control population (p=0.019, odds ratio: 1.351). A detailed subgroup analysis uncovered that this effect was due to an association of this variant with cardiac death in chronic ischemic heart disease (p=0.012, odds ratio = 1.455). None of the other investigated polymorphisms showed association with cardiac death in this context. In conclusion, our results shed light on the role of this non-coding polymorphism in cardiac death in ischemic cardiomyopathy. Functional studies are needed to explore the pathophysiological background of this association. PMID:26146998

  14. Cardiac Rehabilitation: Then and Now.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Philip K.

    1988-01-01

    As more and more patients survive a coronary event, the need for cardiac rehabilitation will increase. The author reviews the history and current status of this field and predicts what lies ahead. (JD)

  15. MedlinePlus: Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... available Research Clinical Trials Journal Articles Resources Reference Desk Find an Expert For You Patient Handouts Summary Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program to help people who have A heart attack Angioplasty or ...

  16. Endogenous Mechanisms of Cardiac Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xiang, M S W; Kikuchi, K

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish possess a remarkable capacity for cardiac regeneration throughout their lifetime, providing a model for investigating endogenous cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating myocardial regeneration. By contrast, adult mammals have an extremely limited capacity for cardiac regeneration, contributing to mortality and morbidity from cardiac diseases such as myocardial infarction and heart failure. However, the viewpoint of the mammalian heart as a postmitotic organ was recently revised based on findings that the mammalian heart contains multiple undifferentiated cell types with cardiogenic potential as well as a robust regenerative capacity during a short period early in life. Although it occurs at an extremely low level, continuous cardiomyocyte turnover has been detected in adult mouse and human hearts, which could potentially be enhanced to restore lost myocardium in damaged human hearts. This review summarizes and discusses recent advances in the understanding of endogenous mechanisms of cardiac regeneration. PMID:27572127

  17. Understanding traumatic blunt cardiac injury.

    PubMed

    El-Menyar, Ayman; Al Thani, Hassan; Zarour, Ahmad; Latifi, Rifat

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac injuries are classified as blunt and penetrating injuries. In both the injuries, the major issue is missing the diagnosis and high mortality. Blunt cardiac injuries (BCI) are much more common than penetrating injuries. Aiming at a better understanding of BCI, we searched the literature from January 1847 to January 2012 by using MEDLINE and EMBASE search engines. Using the key word "Blunt Cardiac Injury," we found 1814 articles; out of which 716 articles were relevant. Herein, we review the causes, diagnosis, and management of BCI. In conclusion, traumatic cardiac injury is a major challenge in critical trauma care, but the guidelines are lacking. A high index of suspicion, application of current diagnostic protocols, and prompt and appropriate management is mandatory. PMID:23041686

  18. A Public-Private Consortium Advances Cardiac Safety Evaluation: Achievements of the HESI Cardiac Safety Technical Committee

    EPA Science Inventory

    The evaluation of cardiovascular side-effects is a critical element in the development of all new drugs and chemicals. Cardiac safety issues have been and continue to be a major cause of attrition and withdrawal due to Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) in pharmaceutical drug developm...

  19. Human cardiac systems electrophysiology and arrhythmogenesis: iteration of experiment and computation

    PubMed Central

    Holzem, Katherine M.; Madden, Eli J.; Efimov, Igor R.

    2014-01-01

    Human cardiac electrophysiology (EP) is a unique system for computational modelling at multiple scales. Due to the complexity of the cardiac excitation sequence, coordinated activity must occur from the single channel to the entire myocardial syncytium. Thus, sophisticated computational algorithms have been developed to investigate cardiac EP at the level of ion channels, cardiomyocytes, multicellular tissues, and the whole heart. Although understanding of each functional level will ultimately be important to thoroughly understand mechanisms of physiology and disease, cardiac arrhythmias are expressly the product of cardiac tissue—containing enough cardiomyocytes to sustain a reentrant loop of activation. In addition, several properties of cardiac cellular EP, that are critical for arrhythmogenesis, are significantly altered by cell-to-cell coupling. However, relevant human cardiac EP data, upon which to develop or validate models at all scales, has been lacking. Thus, over several years, we have developed a paradigm for multiscale human heart physiology investigation and have recovered and studied over 300 human hearts. We have generated a rich experimental dataset, from which we better understand mechanisms of arrhythmia in human and can improve models of human cardiac EP. In addition, in collaboration with computational physiologists, we are developing a database for the deposition of human heart experimental data, including thorough experimental documentation. We anticipate that accessibility to this human heart dataset will further human EP computational investigations, as well as encourage greater data transparency within the field of cardiac EP. PMID:25362174

  20. Imaging modalities in cardiac electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Reema; Clifford, Sarah M; Ghanbari, Hamid; Schmidt, Martin; Segerson, Nathan M; Daccarett, Marcos

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac imaging, both noninvasive and invasive, has become a crucial part of evaluating patients during the electrophysiology procedure experience. These anatomical data allow electrophysiologists to not only assess who is an appropriate candidate for each procedure, but also to determine the rate of success from these procedures. This article incorporates a review of the various cardiac imaging techniques available today, with a focus on atrial arrhythmias, ventricular arrhythmias and device therapy. PMID:20014991

  1. Pulmonary Hypertension in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Denault, André; Deschamps, Alain; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Lambert, Jean; Perrault, Louis

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is an important prognostic factor in cardiac surgery associated with increased morbidity and mortality. With the aging population and the associated increase severity of illness, the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in cardiac surgical patients will increase. In this review, the definition of pulmonary hypertension, the mechanisms and its relationship to right ventricular dysfunction will be presented. Finally, pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapeutic and preventive approaches will be presented. PMID:21286273

  2. Gene Transfer into Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Sarah E.; Westfall, Margaret V.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional methods for DNA transfection are often inefficient and toxic for terminally differentiated cells, such as cardiac myocytes. Vector-based gene transfer is an efficient approach for introducing exogenous cDNA into these types of primary cell cultures. In this chapter, separate protocols for adult rat cardiac myocyte isolation and gene transfer with recombinant adenovirus are provided and are routinely utilized for studying the effects of sarcomeric proteins on myofilament function. PMID:25836585

  3. Recurrent pulmonary microemboli secondary to primary cardiac hydatidosis.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Ebru; Ozturk, Adil; Zeyrek, Fadile; Demirbag, Recep; Temamogullari, Ali Vahip

    2007-12-01

    Primary cardiac hydatid cysts are rarely diagnosed and seldom rupture to lungs via pulmonary vein resulting in multifocal cystic lesions. We report a rare instance of an interventricular hydatid cyst. A 19-year-old patient was admitted with dyspnea and multiple homogenous opacities with different sizes in his chest X-ray and contrast enhanced thorax computed tomography. We considered recurrent pulmonary microemboli, although neither systemic embolisation nor intravascular cyst of pulmonary arteries was detected. Due to extensive distribution of the pulmonary cysts, only the cardiac cyst was taken surgically. The patient remains in our care without any pulmonary improvement despite appropriate medical treatment. PMID:17314071

  4. A Benign Cardiac Growth but Not So Indolent

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Sahadev T.; Biederman, Robert W. W.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac lipomatous hypertrophy is a rare benign condition that usually involves the interatrial septum. Due to its benign nature it rarely requires intervention. Its presence outside the interatrial septum is reported infrequently. We present a case of lipomatous hypertrophy in the intraventricular septum that was complicated by a severe, symptomatic, and disabling dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. The symptoms significantly improved following the excision of the mass. In our case transthoracic echocardiogram was used to visualize the mass and measure the severity of the obstruction; Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging was used to characterize the mass and histopathology confirmed the diagnosis. PMID:27293911

  5. High-Risk Cardiac Disease in Pregnancy: Part I.

    PubMed

    Elkayam, Uri; Goland, Sorel; Pieper, Petronella G; Silverside, Candice K

    2016-07-26

    The incidence of pregnancy in women with cardiovascular disease is rising, primarily due to the increased number of women with congenital heart disease reaching childbearing age and the changing demographics associated with advancing maternal age. Although most cardiac conditions are well tolerated during pregnancy and women can deliver safely with favorable outcomes, there are some cardiac conditions that have significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this paper is to review the available published reports and provide recommendations on the management of women with high-risk cardiovascular conditions during pregnancy. PMID:27443437

  6. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Driessen, Mieke M P; Breur, Johannes M P J; Budde, Ricardo P J; van Oorschot, Joep W M; van Kimmenade, Roland R J; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj; Meijboom, Folkert J; Leiner, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. PMID:25552386

  7. [Stem cells and cardiac regeneration].

    PubMed

    Perez Millan, Maria Ines; Lorenti, Alicia

    2006-01-01

    Stem cells are defined by virtue of their functional attributes: absence of tissue specific differentitated markers, capable of proliferation, able to self-maintain the population, able to produce a large number of differentiated, functional progeny, able to regenerate the tissue after injury. Cell therapy is an alternative for the treatment of several diseases, like cardiac diseases (cell cardiomyoplasty). A variety of stem cells could be used for cardiac repair: from cardiac and extracardiac sources. Each cell type has its own profile of advantages, limitations, and practicability issues in specific clinical settings. Differentiation of bone marrow stem cells to cardiomyocyte-like cells have been observed under different culture conditions. The presence of resident cardiac stem cell population capable of differentiation into cardiomyocyte or vascular lineage suggests that these cells could be used for cardiac tissue repair, and represent a great promise for clinical application. Stem cells mobilization by cytokines may also offer a strategy for cardiac regeneration. The use of stem cells (embryonic and adult) may hold the key to replacing cells lost in many devastating diseases. This potential benefit is a major focus for stem cell research. PMID:17240634

  8. Global availability of cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Turk-Adawi, Karam; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Grace, Sherry L

    2014-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most-prevalent noncommunicable disease and leading cause of death globally. Over 80% of deaths from CVD occur in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs). To limit the socioeconomic impact of CVD, a comprehensive approach to health care is needed. Cardiac rehabilitation delivers a cost-effective and structured exercise, education, and risk reduction programme, which can reduce mortality by up to 25% in addition to improving a patient's functional capacity and lowering rehospitalization rates. Despite these benefits and recommendations in clinical practice guidelines, cardiac rehabilitation programmes are grossly under-used compared with revascularization or medical therapy for patients with CVD. Worldwide, only 38.8% of countries have cardiac rehabilitation programmes. Specifically, 68.0% of high-income and 23% of LMICs (8.3% for low-income and 28.2% for middle-income countries) offer cardiac rehabilitation programmes to patients with CVD. Cardiac rehabilitation density estimates range from one programme per 0.1 to 6.4 million inhabitants. Multilevel strategies to augment cardiac rehabilitation capacity and availability at national and international levels, such as supportive public health policies, systematic referral strategies, and alternative models of delivery are needed. PMID:25027487

  9. Drosophila Models of Cardiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Nicole; Wessells, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has emerged as a useful model for cardiac diseases, both developmental abnormalities and adult functional impairment. Using the tools of both classical and molecular genetics, the study of the developing fly heart has been instrumental in identifying the major signaling events of cardiac field formation, cardiomyocyte specification, and the formation of the functioning heart tube. The larval stage of fly cardiac development has become an important model system for testing isolated preparations of living hearts for the effects of biological and pharmacological compounds on cardiac activity. Meanwhile, the recent development of effective techniques to study adult cardiac performance in the fly has opened new uses for the Drosophila model system. The fly system is now being used to study long-term alterations in adult performance caused by factors such as diet, exercise, and normal aging. The fly is a unique and valuable system for the study of such complex, long-term interactions, as it is the only invertebrate genetic model system with a working heart developmentally homologous to the vertebrate heart. Thus, the fly model combines the advantages of invertebrate genetics (such as large populations, facile molecular genetic techniques, and short lifespan) with physiological measurement techniques that allow meaningful comparisons with data from vertebrate model systems. As such, the fly model is well situated to make important contributions to the understanding of complicated interactions between environmental factors and genetics in the long-term regulation of cardiac performance. PMID:21377627

  10. FGF21 and Cardiac Physiopathology

    PubMed Central

    Planavila, Anna; Redondo-Angulo, Ibon; Villarroya, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    The heart is not traditionally considered either a target or a site of fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21) production. However, recent findings indicate that FGF21 can act as a cardiomyokine; that is, it is produced by cardiac cells at significant levels and acts in an autocrine manner on the heart itself. The heart is sensitive to the effects of FGF21, both systemic and locally generated, owing to the expression in cardiomyocytes of β-Klotho, the key co-receptor known to confer specific responsiveness to FGF21 action. FGF21 has been demonstrated to protect against cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac inflammation, and oxidative stress. FGF21 expression in the heart is induced in response to cardiac insults, such as experimental cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial infarction in rodents, as well as in failing human hearts. Intracellular mechanisms involving PPARα and Sirt1 mediate transcriptional regulation of the FGF21 gene in response to exogenous stimuli. In humans, circulating FGF21 levels are elevated in coronary heart disease and atherosclerosis, and are associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes. These findings provide new insights into the role of FGF21 in the heart and may offer potential therapeutic strategies for cardiac disease. PMID:26379627

  11. Cardiac Regeneration and Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Mignone, John; MacLellan, W Robb

    2015-10-01

    After decades of believing the heart loses the ability to regenerate soon after birth, numerous studies are now reporting that the adult heart may indeed be capable of regeneration, although the magnitude of new cardiac myocyte formation varies greatly. While this debate has energized the field of cardiac regeneration and led to a dramatic increase in our understanding of cardiac growth and repair, it has left much confusion in the field as to the prospects of regenerating the heart. Studies applying modern techniques of genetic lineage tracing and carbon-14 dating have begun to establish limits on the amount of endogenous regeneration after cardiac injury, but the underlying cellular mechanisms of this regeneration remained unclear. These same studies have also revealed an astonishing capacity for cardiac repair early in life that is largely lost with adult differentiation and maturation. Regardless, this renewed focus on cardiac regeneration as a therapeutic goal holds great promise as a novel strategy to address the leading cause of death in the developed world. PMID:26269526

  12. Rho Kinases and Cardiac Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Toru; Liao, James K

    2016-06-24

    Hypertensive cardiac remodeling is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and interstitial fibrosis, which can lead to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. The Rho-associated coiled-coil containing kinases (ROCKs) are members of the serine/threonine protein kinase family, which mediates the downstream effects of the small GTP-binding protein RhoA. There are 2 isoforms: ROCK1 and ROCK2. They have different functions in different types of cells and tissues. There is growing evidence that ROCKs contribute to the development of cardiovascular diseases, including cardiac fibrosis, hypertrophy, and subsequent heart failure. Recent experimental studies using ROCK inhibitors, such as fasudil, have shown the benefits of ROCK inhibition in cardiac remodeling. Mice lacking each ROCK isoform also exhibit reduced myocardial fibrosis in a variety of pathological models of cardiac remodeling. Indeed, clinical studies with fasudil have suggested that ROCKs could be potential novel therapeutic targets for cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the roles of ROCKs in the development of cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy and discuss their therapeutic potential for deleterious cardiac remodeling. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1491-1498). PMID:27251065

  13. Endothelial ROS and Impaired Myocardial Oxygen Consumption in Sepsis-induced Cardiac Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Potz, Brittany A; Sellke, Frank W; Abid, M Ruhul

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is known as the presence of a Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) in response to an infection. In the USA alone, 750,000 cases of severe sepsis are diagnosed annually. More than 70% of sepsis-related deaths occur due to organ failure and more than 50% of septic patients demonstrate cardiac dysfunction. Patients with sepsis who develop cardiac dysfunction have significantly higher mortality, and thus cardiac dysfunction serves as a predictor of survival in sepsis. We have very little understanding about the mechanisms that result in cardiac dysfunction in the setting of sepsis. At present, the factors involved in sepsis-related cardiac dysfunction are believed to include the following: persistent inflammatory changes in the vascular endothelium and endocardium leading to circulatory and micro vascular changes, increase in endothelial reactive oxygen species (ROS), abnormal endothelium-leukocyte interaction resulting in a feed-forward loop for inflammatory cytokines and ROS, contractile dysfunction of the heart due to autonomic dysregulation, metabolic changes in myocardium leading to impaired oxygen delivery and increased oxygen consumption, mitochondrial dysfunction, and persistent inflammatory signaling. In this review article, we will briefly discuss the clinical challenges and our current understanding of cardiac dysfunction in sepsis. Major focus will be on the pathological changes that occur in vascular endothelium, with an emphasis on endocardium, and how endothelial ROS, impaired endothelium-leukocyte interaction, and microcirculatory changes lead to cardiac dysfunction in sepsis. The importance of the ongoing quest for the clinical biomarkers for cardiac dysfunction will also be discussed. PMID:27135058

  14. Early Recognition of Foreign Body Aspiration as the Cause of Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Talib Hashmi, Hafiz Rizwan; Khaja, Misbahuddin

    2016-01-01

    Foreign body aspiration (FBA) is uncommon in the adult population but can be a life-threatening condition. Clinical manifestations vary according to the degree of airway obstruction, and, in some cases, making the correct diagnosis requires a high level of clinical suspicion combined with a detailed history and exam. Sudden cardiac arrest after FBA may occur secondary to asphyxiation. We present a 48-year-old male with no history of cardiac disease brought to the emergency department after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The patient was resuscitated after 15 minutes of cardiac arrest. He was initially managed with therapeutic hypothermia (TH). Subsequent history suggested FBA as a possible etiology of the cardiac arrest, and fiberoptic bronchoscopy demonstrated a piece of meat and bone lodged in the left main stem bronchus. The foreign body was removed with the bronchoscope and the patient clinically improved with full neurological recovery. Therapeutic hypothermia following cardiac arrest due to asphyxia has been reported to have high mortality and poor neurological outcomes. This case highlights the importance of early identification of FBA causing cardiac arrest, and we report a positive neurological outcome for postresuscitation therapeutic hypothermia following cardiac arrest due to asphyxia. PMID:27006837

  15. Cardiac achalasia in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harjit; Sethi, R. S.; Gupta, H. L.; Khetarpal, S. K.

    1969-01-01

    Cardiac achalasia is a disorder not unknown in the paediatric age-group and may occur even in the neonatal period. This disorder should, therefore, be considered in all cases presenting with persistent vomiting, as well as in those with chronic respiratory disease in whom more common causes have been excluded. It is almost universally accepted that the disorder results from a disturbed function of ganglion cells in the distal oesophagus, as the disease has been reproduced in laboratory animals by denervation of the distal oesophagus. The exact pathogenesis of this degenerative change is not well understood. However, in at least some of the cases congenital absence of the ganglion cells may be responsible for this functional disturbance. This is inferred from the fact that the disease may be found in association with Hirschsprung disease, in which there is a congenital absence of ganglion cells in the terminal colon. Moreover, the occurrence of the disease in the neonatal period itself favours a congenital lesion. Surgery was preferred to other forms of treatment in the paediatric age-group in view of the reported equivocal response to mechanical dilatation and pre-disposition of children to respiratory complications. The results of surgery were satisfactory. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:5790932

  16. Exploring cardiac biophysical properties

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Younss Ait; Bollensdorff, Christian; Cazorla, Olivier; Magdi, Yacoub; de Tombe, Pieter P.

    2015-01-01

    The heart is subject to multiple sources of stress. To maintain its normal function, and successfully overcome these stresses, heart muscle is equipped with fine-tuned regulatory mechanisms. Some of these mechanisms are inherent within the myocardium itself and are known as intrinsic mechanisms. Over a century ago, Otto Frank and Ernest Starling described an intrinsic mechanism by which the heart, even ex vivo, regulates its function on a beat-to-beat basis. According to this phenomenon, the higher the ventricular filling is, the bigger the stroke volume. Thus, the Frank-Starling law establishes a direct relationship between the diastolic and systolic function of the heart. To observe this biophysical phenomenon and to investigate it, technologic development has been a pre-requisite to scientific knowledge. It allowed for example to observe, at the cellular level, a Frank-Starling like mechanism and has been termed: Length Dependent Activation (LDA). In this review, we summarize some experimental systems that have been developed and are currently still in use to investigate cardiac biophysical properties from the whole heart down to the single myofibril. As a scientific support, investigation of the Frank-Starling mechanism will be used as a case study. PMID:26779498

  17. [Pharmaca Induced Cardiac Injury].

    PubMed

    Haen, Ekkehard

    2016-01-01

    Many drugs influence vital functions via the sympathetic and the parasympathetic system. Besides that hypersensitivity reactions and reactions by chemical radicals that arise in drug metabolism may directly harm the heart muscle cell. Cardiac adverse drug reactions (ADR) result in disturbances of the heart rhythm, negative inotropic effects, direct damage to the heart muscle cell, and reduced perfusion of heart tissue. Their importance is often neglected because pharmacologically similar drugs are licensed for completely different indications. This is of particular interest if more drugs are prescribed in combination. Now these effects may add up to pharmacodynamic drug-drug-interactions. Data banks like PSIAConline (www.psiac.de), individualization of drug prescription by therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) combined with a clinical pharmacological report (www.konbest.de), as well as drug information systems such as AGATE (www.amuep-agate.de) are today of help not just to recognize such drug risks, but also to find professional and evidence based solutions for it. PMID:26800070

  18. Cardiac Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Although not available to all patients with narrowed arteries, balloon angioplasty has expanded dramatically since its introduction with an estimated further growth to 562,000 procedures in the U.S. alone by 1992. Growth has fueled demand for higher quality imaging systems that allow the cardiologist to be more accurate and increase the chances of a successful procedure. A major advance is the Digital Cardiac Imaging (DCI) System designed by Philips Medical Systems International, Best, The Netherlands and marketed in the U.S. by Philips Medical Systems North America Company. The key benefit is significantly improved real-time imaging and the ability to employ image enhancement techniques to bring out added details. Using a cordless control unit, the cardiologist can manipulate images to make immediate assessment, compare live x-ray and roadmap images by placing them side-by-side on monitor screens, or compare pre-procedure and post procedure conditions. The Philips DCI improves the cardiologist's precision by expanding the information available to him.

  19. Paediatric cardiac surgery in a patient with cold agglutinins.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tomomi; Oshima, Yoshihiro; Maruo, Ayako; Matsuhisa, Hironori

    2012-03-01

    Cold agglutinins (CAs) lead to organ thrombosis or haemolysis due to increased blood viscosity and red blood cell clumping when blood temperature drops below the thermal amplitude for haemagglutination. Although it is well known that CAs are particularly relevant to adult cardiac surgery with hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), paediatric cardiac surgery with congenital heart disease and with CAs has been reported very rarely. We present here a case of paediatric cardiac surgery to repair atrial septal defect with pulmonary stenosis in an 11-month old infant with a family history of CAs. She was detected to have a high titre of CAs preoperatively, and underwent an intracardiac repair with normothermic CPB using temporary electrical fibrillation for added safety. Her post-operative course was uneventful without any complications. PMID:22184466

  20. Thoracoscopic left ventricular lead implantation in cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Dong Seop; Park, Pyo Won; Lee, Young Tak; Park, Seung-Jung; Kim, June Soo; On, Young Keun

    2012-12-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy is known to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with advanced heart failure as a result of dyssynchrony and systolic dysfunction of the left ventricle. Placement of the left ventricular (LV) lead via the coronary sinus can be difficult. When LV lead implantation is difficult, a video-assisted epicardial approach can be a good alternative. Although there are several reports of video-assisted epicardial LV lead implantation, mini-thoracotomy and lead implantation under direct vision have been used in most series. A 49-yr-old woman with dilated cardiomyopathy underwent the video-assisted epicardial LV lead implantation because percutaneous transvenous approach was difficult due to small cardiac veins. The patient was discharged without problems and showed improved cardiac function at the 3 follow-up months. We report the first successful total thoracoscopic LV lead implantation (without mini-thoracotomy) in Korea. PMID:23255865

  1. Cardiac troponins-Translational biomarkers in cardiology: Theory and practice of cardiac troponin high-sensitivity assays.

    PubMed

    Adamcova, Michaela; Popelova-Lencova, Olga; Jirkovsky, Eduard; Simko, Fedor; Gersl, Vladimir; Sterba, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Tn is a unique translational biomarker in cardiology whose potential has not been diminished in the new era of high sensitive assays. cTns can be valuable markers in cardiac diseases as well as in infectious diseases and respiratory diseases. Furthermore, the role of cTns is growing in the routine evaluation of cardioxicity and in determining the efficacy/safety ratio of novel cardioprotective strategies in clinical settings. cTns can detect myocardial injury not only in a wide spectrum of laboratory animals in experimental studies in vivo, but also in isolated heart models or cardiomyocytes in vitro. The crucial issue regarding the cross-species usage of cardiac troponin investigation remains the choice of cardiac troponin testing. This review summarizes the recent proteomic data on aminoacid sequences of cTnT and cTnI in various species, as well as selected analytical characteristics of human cardiac troponin high-sensitivity assays. Due to the highly phylogenetically conserved structure of troponins, the same bioindicator can be investigated using the same method in both clinical and experimental cardiology, thus contributing to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of cardiac diseases as well as to increased effectiveness of troponin use in clinical practice. Measuring cardiac troponins using commercially available human high-sensitivity cardiac troponin tests with convenient antibodies selected on the basis of adequate proteomic knowledge can solve many issues which would otherwise be difficult to address in clinical settings for various ethical and practical reasons. Our survey could help elaborate the practical guidelines for optimizing the choice of cTns assay in cardiology. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(2):133-148, 2016. PMID:26876101

  2. Amino Acids as Metabolic Substrates during Cardiac Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Kenneth J.; Sidorov, Veniamin Y.; McGuinness, Owen P.; Wasserman, David H.; Wikswo, John P.

    2013-01-01

    The heart is well known as a metabolic omnivore in that it is capable of consuming fatty acids, glucose, ketone bodies, pyruvate, lactate, amino acids and even its own constituent proteins, in order of decreasing preference. The energy from these substrates supports not only mechanical contraction, but also the various transmembrane pumps and transporters required for ionic homeostasis, electrical activity, metabolism and catabolism. Cardiac ischemia – for example, due to compromise of the coronary vasculature or end-stage heart failure – will alter both electrical and metabolic activity. While the effects of myocardial ischemia on electrical propagation and stability have been studied in depth, the effects of ischemia on metabolic substrate preference has not been fully appreciated: oxygen deprivation during ischemia will significantly alter the relative ability of the heart to utilize each of these substrates. Although changes in cardiac metabolism are understood to be an underlying component in almost all cardiac myopathies, the potential contribution of amino acids in maintaining cardiac electrical conductance and stability during ischemia is underappreciated. Despite clear evidence that amino acids exert cardioprotective effects in ischemia and other cardiac disorders, their role in the metabolism of the ischemic heart has yet to be fully elucidated. This review synthesizes the current literature of the metabolic contribution of amino acids during ischemia by analyzing relevant historical and recent research. PMID:23354395

  3. The spectrum of epidemiology underlying sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Meiso; Shimizu, Wataru; Albert, Christine M

    2015-06-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) from cardiac arrest is a major international public health problem accounting for an estimated 15%-20% of all deaths. Although resuscitation rates are generally improving throughout the world, the majority of individuals who experience a sudden cardiac arrest will not survive. SCD most often develops in older adults with acquired structural heart disease, but it also rarely occurs in the young, where it is more commonly because of inherited disorders. Coronary heart disease is known to be the most common pathology underlying SCD, followed by cardiomyopathies, inherited arrhythmia syndromes, and valvular heart disease. During the past 3 decades, declines in SCD rates have not been as steep as for other causes of coronary heart disease deaths, and there is a growing fraction of SCDs not due to coronary heart disease and ventricular arrhythmias, particularly among certain subsets of the population. The growing heterogeneity of the pathologies and mechanisms underlying SCD present major challenges for SCD prevention, which are magnified further by a frequent lack of recognition of the underlying cardiac condition before death. Multifaceted preventative approaches, which address risk factors in seemingly low-risk and known high-risk populations, will be required to decrease the burden of SCD. In this Compendium, we review the wide-ranging spectrum of epidemiology underlying SCD within both the general population and in high-risk subsets with established cardiac disease placing an emphasis on recent global trends, remaining uncertainties, and potential targeted preventive strategies. PMID:26044246

  4. Neonatal emergencies associated with cardiac rhabdomyomas: an 8-year experience.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, Gabriella; De Carolis, Maria Pia; Pardeo, Manuela; Bersani, Iliana; Tempera, Alessia; De Nisco, Alessia; Caforio, Leonardo; Romagnoli, Costantino; Piastra, Marco

    2011-01-01

    During the foetal-neonatal period, rhabdomyomas represent the majority of cardiac tumours and are closely associated with tuberous sclerosis. Cardiac rhabdomyomas may be completely asymptomatic and are incidentally discovered during an echocardiogram, or may cause cardiac dysfunctions requiring medical and/or surgical intervention. During foetal life and the early neonatal period, life-threatening conditions, mostly due to arrhythmias, cardiac failure or obstruction, do occur on rare occasions. We reviewed the medical records of all cases of cardiac rhabdomyomas diagnosed prenatally or postnatally over an 8-year period. The present study reviews 7 cases of life-threatening conditions. Arrhythmic episodes were described in 5 patients, and blood flow obstruction was reported in 2 cases. Antiarrhythmic agents successfully controlled the clinical and electrophysiological conditions. Obstructive conditions were associated with poor outcomes. In conclusion, when prenatal diagnosis of rhabdomyoma is made, appropriate planning at delivery for the management of potential haemodynamic complications may prevent adverse neonatal outcomes. The clinical outcome is more influenced by obstructive rather than by dysrhythmic complications. Appropriate antiarrhythmic treatment is of primary importance. In all cases discovered through prenatal and/or neonatal life-threatening conditions, an accurate follow-up should always be performed to anticipate the development of tuberous sclerosis. PMID:21109725

  5. [The athletes' ECG and the exercise related sudden cardiac death].

    PubMed

    Trachsel, Lukas-Daniel; Wilhelm, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    Regular physical activity induces structural, electrical and functional cardiac adaptations. The main challenge for the athletes' physician is to distinguish abnormal structural changes of the heart from training-induced adaptations (so-called “athlete's heart”). In athletes with underlying cardiac disease, physical activity may be a trigger, not the cause of exercise-induced tachyarrhythmia's and sudden cardiac death (SCD). To identify athletes with cardiac diseases and increased risk for an SCD, the European society of cardiology (ESC) recommends a pre-participation screening in elite athletes which was adopted by the Swiss society of sports medicine. The screening includes a specific medical history, cardiac auscultation and a resting ECG. Due to the high number of false-positive cases of athletes' ECGs based on traditional criteria, the ESC assessment criteria were adjusted to account for training-related changes of the ECG. The sensitivity and especially the specificity could be improved in the “revised Seattle criteria” in 2014. During the last years main attention has been shifted to the early repolarization pattern: additionally to (endurance-) training there is a clear association with male gender, ethnicity, changes in autonomic nervous system activity and high QRS-voltage criteria PMID:26098068

  6. Strategies for analyzing cardiac phenotypes in the zebrafish embryo.

    PubMed

    Houk, A R; Yelon, D

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying cardiogenesis are of critical biomedical importance due to the high prevalence of cardiac birth defects. Over the past two decades, the zebrafish has served as a powerful model organism for investigating heart development, facilitated by its powerful combination of optical access to the embryonic heart and plentiful opportunities for genetic analysis. Work in zebrafish has identified numerous factors that are required for various aspects of heart formation, including the specification and differentiation of cardiac progenitor cells, the morphogenesis of the heart tube, cardiac chambers, and atrioventricular canal, and the establishment of proper cardiac function. However, our current roster of regulators of cardiogenesis is by no means complete. It is therefore valuable for ongoing studies to continue pursuit of additional genes and pathways that control the size, shape, and function of the zebrafish heart. An extensive arsenal of techniques is available to distinguish whether particular mutations, morpholinos, or small molecules disrupt specific processes during heart development. In this chapter, we provide a guide to the experimental strategies that are especially effective for the characterization of cardiac phenotypes in the zebrafish embryo. PMID:27312497

  7. Cardiac remodelling and RAS inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Carlos M

    2016-06-01

    Risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes are known to augment the activity and tissue expression of angiotensin II (Ang II), the major effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Overstimulation of the RAS has been implicated in a chain of events that contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular (CV) disease, including the development of cardiac remodelling. This chain of events has been termed the CV continuum. The concept of CV disease existing as a continuum was first proposed in 1991 and it is believed that intervention at any point within the continuum can modify disease progression. Treatment with antihypertensive agents may result in regression of left ventricular hypertrophy, with different drug classes exhibiting different degrees of efficacy. The greatest decrease in left ventricular mass is observed following treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is), which inhibit Ang II formation. Although ACE-Is and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) provide significant benefits in terms of CV events and stroke, mortality remains high. This is partly due to a failure to completely suppress the RAS, and, as our knowledge has increased, an escape phenomenon has been proposed whereby the human sequence of the 12 amino acid substrate angiotensin-(1-12) is converted to Ang II by the mast cell protease, chymase. Angiotensin-(1-12) is abundant in a wide range of organs and has been shown to increase blood pressure in animal models, an effect abolished by the presence of ACE-Is or ARBs. This review explores the CV continuum, in addition to examining the influence of the RAS. We also consider novel pathways within the RAS and how new therapeutic approaches that target this are required to further reduce Ang II formation, and so provide patients with additional benefits from a more complete blockade of the RAS. PMID:27105891

  8. Cardiac Rehabilitation in Real Life

    PubMed Central

    Jankowski, Piotr; Pajak, Andrzej; Lysek, Radoslaw; Lukaszewska, Anna; Wolfshaut-Wolak, Renata; Bogacki, Piotr; Grodecki, Janusz; Mirek-Bryniarska, Ewa; Nessler, Jadwiga; Podolec, Piotr; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Czarnecka, Danuta

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Participation in cardiac rehabilitation programs (CRPs) improves prognosis in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). However, not much is known about the effectiveness of CRP in real life. The aim of this analysis was to identify factors related to the referral to CRP following hospitalization for CAD and estimate the effectiveness of the programs in real life. Medical records of 1061 consecutive patients aged ≤80 years, hospitalized due to an acute coronary syndrome or for a myocardial revascularization procedure in 5 hospitals serving the city and surrounding counties, were reviewed and 611 patients were interviewed 6–18 months posthospitalization. Of 611 patients participating in the interview, 212 (34.7%) were referred following the hospitalization to a center providing CRP. Age, hospitalization in a teaching hospital, and index diagnosis were independently related to being granted a referral. Among the referred patients, 86.3% participated in the CRP. Participation in CRP was related to the lower probability of having high total cholesterol (23% vs 32%, P < 0.05), fasting glucose (11% vs 18%, P = 0.05), HbA1c (8% vs 16%, P = 0.05), and body mass index (27% vs 37%, P < 0.05). Generally, the effect of the CRP was significant in participants with a higher education, but not in those with a low education level. Other factors were not significantly related to the effectiveness of CRP. This study shows that CRPs are effective, but underused in Poland. The participant's education level may influence the effectiveness of CRP. Therefore, in order to increase the impact of CRP, the content of such programs should vary depending on the education level of the participants. PMID:26266357

  9. Computed tomography of cardiac pseudotumors and neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Anavekar, Nandan S; Bonnichsen, Crystal R; Foley, Thomas A; Morris, Michael F; Martinez, Matthew W; Williamson, Eric E; Glockner, James F; Miller, Dylan V; Breen, Jerome F; Araoz, Philip A

    2010-07-01

    Important features of cardiac masses can be clearly delineated on cardiac computed tomography (CT) imaging. This modality is useful in identifying the presence of a mass, its relationship with cardiac and extracardiac structures, and the features that distinguish one type of mass from another. A multimodality approach to the evaluation of cardiac tumors is advocated, with the use of echocardiography, CT imaging and magnetic resonance imaging as appropriately indicated. In this article, various cardiac masses are described, including pseudotumors and true cardiac neoplasms, and the CT imaging findings that may be useful in distinguishing these rare entities are presented. PMID:20705174

  10. Women's compliance with cardiac rehabilitation programs.

    PubMed

    Ginzel, A R

    1996-01-01

    As the incidence of cardiovascular disease in women increases, the process of cardiac rehabilitation in women is becoming increasingly important to nurses. Specifically, the issue of women's compliance with cardiac rehabilitation needs to be addressed by nurses. Most past and current research on cardiac rehabilitation and compliance with rehabilitation programs has been conducted on male subjects and cannot be accurately generalized to the female population. This article reviews current literature which addresses the issues of heart disease in women, cardiac rehabilitation and compliance in the general population, gender differences in cardiac rehabilitation, and compliance of women in cardiac rehabilitation. PMID:8657707

  11. Sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Sra, J; Dhala, A; Blanck, Z; Deshpande, S; Cooley, R; Akhtar, M

    1999-08-01

    SCD continues to be an important cause of death and morbidity. Despite expanding insight into the mechanisms causing SCD, the population at high risk is not being effectively identified. Although there is still much to do in the management phase of SCD (predicting the efficacy of various therapies), recent clinical trials have helped define the relative risks and benefits of therapies in preventing SCD. Trials are underway to determine whether treating other patient populations, including asymptomatic patients after MI, will improve survival rate. The approach to reducing mortality rate will always be multifaceted; primary prevention of coronary artery disease and prompt salvage of jeopardized myocardium are 2 important aspects of this approach. In addition to interventions for MI, such as myocardial revascularization when indicated, simple and easily administered therapies that are likely to remain the most effective prophylactic interventions are aspirin, ACE inhibitors, beta-blockers, and cholesterol-lowering agents. However, the MADIT and AVID data clearly demonstrate a role for ICD therapy in a subgroup of patients who have VT/VF and are at risk of cardiac arrest. Even though the absolute magnitude of benefit associated with ICDs is still to be determined, the AVID study and other recent reports provide convincing evidence that patients who have VT/VF fare better with ICDs than with antiarrhythmic drug therapy. For the high-risk population described in this article, in addition to aggressive anti-ischemic and heart failure therapy, ICDs are now a mainstay of life-saving treatment. Still to be surmounted is the challenge of identifying patients who have nonischemic substrates and of providing them with the appropriate therapy. Guided by genetic studies and new insight into the mechanisms of such problems as congenital long QT syndrome, life-saving and life-enhancing therapies may soon be available for the management of SCD. PMID:10459474

  12. Metallothionein prevents cardiac pathological changes in diabetes by modulating nitration and inactivation of cardiac ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Cong, Weitao; Zhao, Ting; Zhu, Zhongxin; Huang, Binbin; Ma, Weide; Wang, Yuehui; Tan, Yi; Chakrabarti, Subrata; Li, Xiaokun; Jin, Litai; Cai, Lu

    2014-04-01

    Mitochondrial ATP production is the main energy source for the cell. Diabetes reduces the efficient generation of ATP, possibly due to the inactivation of ATP synthase. However, the exact mechanism by which diabetes induces inactivation of ATP synthase remains unknown, as well as whether such inactivation has a role in the development of pathological abnormalities of the diabetic heart. To address these issues, we used cardiac metallothionein-transgenic (MT-TG) and wild-type (WT) mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes, since we have demonstrated previously that diabetes-induced cardiac damage and remodeling were found in WT diabetic mice, but not in MT-TG diabetic mice. Immunohistochemical and biochemical assays were used to compare pathological and biochemical changes of the heart between MT-TG and WT diabetic mice, and a proteomic assay to evaluate ATP synthase expression and tyrosine nitration, with its activity. LC/MS analysis revealed that diabetes increased tyrosine nitration of the ATP synthase α subunit at Tyr(271), Tyr(311), and Tyr(476), and the β subunit at Tyr(269) and Tyr(508), and also significantly reduced ATP synthase activity by ~32%. These changes were not observed in MT-TG diabetic mice. Furthermore, parallel experiments with induced expression of cardiac MT by zinc supplementation in diabetic mice produced similar effects. These results suggest that MT can preserve ATP synthase activity in streptozotocin-induced diabetes, probably through the inhibition of ATP synthase nitration. PMID:24629910

  13. Segmental Renal Infarction due to Blunt Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Alevizopoulos, Aristeidis; Hamilton, Lauren; Stratu, Natalia; Rix, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Segmental renal infarction is a rare situation which has been reported so far in the form of case reports. It's caused usually by cardiac conditions, such as atrial fibrillation, and systemic diseases (e.g. systemic lupus erythematous). We are presenting a case of a 31 year old healthy male, who sustained a left segmental renal infarction, following a motorbike accident. We report his presentation, management and outcome. We also review the literature in search of the optimal diagnostic and treatment pathway. To our knowledge, this is the first report of segmental renal infarction due to blunt trauma. PMID:27175338

  14. Causes of sudden unexpected cardiac death in the first two decades of life.

    PubMed

    Steinberger, J; Lucas, R V; Edwards, J E; Titus, J L

    1996-05-01

    Sudden, unexpected cardiac death in the age group 1 to 21 years usually is due to myocarditis, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, aortic valvar stenosis, and coronary arterial abnormalities. The hearts of 70 patients <21 years of age who died suddenly were reviewed. Twenty patients were <1 year of age and 50 were 1 to 21 years old. The cardiac findings were compared with those in 68 age-matched controls with known cardiac disease who did not die suddenly. Significant cardiac abnormalities were present in 13 (65%) of the 20 infants; 10 (50%) had anomalies of the aortic origin of the coronary arteries. Among the 50 older patients, cardiac abnormalities were found in 40 (80%), among whom coronary arterial anomalies existed in 12 (24%). Anomalies of aortic origin more frequently involved the left main than the right coronary artery in both groups. PMID:8644651

  15. Neurological prognostication after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Sandroni, Claudio; Geocadin, Romergryko G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Prediction of neurological prognosis in patients who are comatose after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest remains difficult. Previous guidelines recommended ocular reflexes, somatosensory evoked potentials and serum biomarkers for predicting poor outcome within 72h from cardiac arrest. However, these guidelines were based on patients not treated with targeted temperature management and did not appropriately address important biases in literature. Recent findings Recent evidence reviews detected important limitations in prognostication studies, such as low precision and, most importantly, lack of blinding, which may have caused a self-fulfilling prophecy and overestimated the specificity of index tests. Maintenance of targeted temperature using sedatives and muscle relaxants may interfere with clinical examination, making assessment of neurological status before 72 h or more after cardiac arrest unreliable. Summary No index predicts poor neurological outcome after cardiac arrest with absolute certainty. Prognostic evaluation should start not earlier than 72 h after ROSC and only after major confounders have been excluded so that reliable clinical examination can be made. Multimodality appears to be the most reasonable approach for prognostication after cardiac arrest. PMID:25922894

  16. Vitamin D and Cardiac Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Irene M; Norris, Keith C; Artaza, Jorge N

    2016-01-01

    Calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol or 1,25-D3) is the hormonally active metabolite of vitamin D. Experimental studies of vitamin D receptors and 1,25-D3 establish calcitriol to be a critical regulator of the structure and function of the heart. Clinical studies link vitamin D deficiency with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Emerging evidence demonstrates that calcitriol is highly involved in CVD-related signaling pathways, particularly the Wnt signaling pathway. Addition of 1,25-D3 to cardiomyocyte cells and examination of its effects on cardiomyocytes and mainly Wnt11 signaling allowed the specific characterization of the role of calcitriol in cardiac differentiation. 1,25-D3 is demonstrated to: (i) inhibit cell proliferation without promoting apoptosis; (ii) decrease expression of genes related to the regulation of the cell cycle; (iii) promote formation of cardiomyotubes; (iv) induce expression of casein kinase-1-α1, a negative regulator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway; and (v) increase expression of noncanonical Wnt11, which has been recognized to induce cardiac differentiation during embryonic development and in adult cells. Thus, it appears that vitamin D promotes cardiac differentiation through negative modulation of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and upregulation of noncanonical Wnt11 expression. Future work to elucidate the role(s) of vitamin D in cardiovascular disorders will hopefully lead to improvement and potentially prevention of CVD, including abnormal cardiac differentiation in settings such as postinfarction cardiac remodeling. PMID:26827957

  17. Cardiac factors in orthostatic hypotension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löllgen, H.; Dirschedl, P.; Koppenhagen, K.; Klein, K. E.

    Cardiac function is determined by preload, afterload, heart rate and contractility. During orthostatic stress, the footward blood shift is compensated for by an increase of afterload. LBNP is widely used to analyze effects of volume displacement during orthostatic stress. Comparisons of invasive ( right heart catheterization) and non-invasive approach (echocardiography) yielded similar changes. Preload and afterload change with graded LBNP, heart rate increases, and stroke volume and cardiac output decrease. Thus, the working point on the left ventricular function curve is shifted to the left and downward, similar to hypovolemia. However, position on the Frank-Starling curve, the unchanged ejection fraction, and the constant Vcf indicate a normal contractile state during LBNP. A decrease of arterial oxygen partial pressure during LBNP shwos impaired ventilation/perfusion ratio. Finally, LBNP induced cardiac and hemodynamic changes can be effectively countermeasured by dihydroergotamine, a potent venoconstrictor. Comparison of floating catheter data with that of echocardiography resulted in close correlation for cardiac output and stroke volume. In addition, cardiac dimensions changed in a similar way during LBNP. From our findings, echocardiography as a non-invasive procedure can reliably used in LBNP and orthostatic stress tests. Some informations can be obtained on borderline values indicating collaps or orthostatic syncope. Early fainters can be differentiated from late fainters by stroke volume changes.

  18. Automatic basal slice detection for cardiac analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paknezhad, Mahsa; Marchesseau, Stephanie; Brown, Michael S.

    2016-03-01

    Identification of the basal slice in cardiac imaging is a key step to measuring the ejection fraction (EF) of the left ventricle (LV). Despite research on cardiac segmentation, basal slice identification is routinely performed manually. Manual identification, however, has been shown to have high inter-observer variability, with a variation of the EF by up to 8%. Therefore, an automatic way of identifying the basal slice is still required. Prior published methods operate by automatically tracking the mitral valve points from the long-axis view of the LV. These approaches assumed that the basal slice is the first short-axis slice below the mitral valve. However, guidelines published in 2013 by the society for cardiovascular magnetic resonance indicate that the basal slice is the uppermost short-axis slice with more than 50% myocardium surrounding the blood cavity. Consequently, these existing methods are at times identifying the incorrect short-axis slice. Correct identification of the basal slice under these guidelines is challenging due to the poor image quality and blood movement during image acquisition. This paper proposes an automatic tool that focuses on the two-chamber slice to find the basal slice. To this end, an active shape model is trained to automatically segment the two-chamber view for 51 samples using the leave-one-out strategy. The basal slice was detected using temporal binary profiles created for each short-axis slice from the segmented two-chamber slice. From the 51 successfully tested samples, 92% and 84% of detection results were accurate at the end-systolic and the end-diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle, respectively.

  19. Electrospun nanofibrous sheets of collagen/elastin/polycaprolactone improve cardiac repair after myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Xu, Yachen; Wang, Zhenhua; Wen, Dezhong; Zhang, Wentian; Schmull, Sebastian; Li, Haiyan; Chen, Yao; Xue, Song

    2016-01-01

    Electrospun nanofibrous sheets get increasing attention in myocardial infarction (MI) treatment due to their good cytocompatibility to deliver transplanted stem cells to infarcted areas and due to mechanical characteristics to support damaged tissue. Cardiac extracellular matrix is essential for implanted cells since it provides the cardiac microenvironment. In this study, we hypothesized high concentrations of cardiac nature protein (NP), namely elastin and collagen, in hybrid polycaprolactone (PCL) electrospun nanofibrous sheets could be effective as cardiac-mimicking patch. Optimal ratio of elastin and collagen with PCL in electrospun sheets (80% NP/PCL) was selected based on cytocompatibility and mechanical characteristics. Bone-marrow (BM) c-kit+ cells anchoring onto NP/PCL sheets exhibited increased proliferative capacity compared with those seeded on PCL in vitro. Moreover, we examined the improvement of cardiac function in MI mice by cell-seeded cardiac patch. Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)-labeled BM c-kit+ cells were loaded on 80% NP/PCL sheets which was transplanted into MI mice. Both 80% NP/PCL and c-kit+-seeded 80% NP/PCL effectively improved cardiac function after 4 weeks of transplantation, with reduced infarction area and restricted LV remodeling. C-kit+-seeded 80% NP/PCL was even superior to the 80% NP/PCL alone and both superior to PCL. GFP+ cells were identified both in the sheets and local infarcted area where transplanted cells underwent cardiac differentiation after 4 weeks. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that sheets with high concentrations of nature proteins loaded with BM c-kit+ cells might be a novel promising candidate for tissue-engineered cardiac patch to improve cardiac repair after MI. PMID:27186292

  20. Electrospun nanofibrous sheets of collagen/elastin/polycaprolactone improve cardiac repair after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Xu, Yachen; Wang, Zhenhua; Wen, Dezhong; Zhang, Wentian; Schmull, Sebastian; Li, Haiyan; Chen, Yao; Xue, Song

    2016-01-01

    Electrospun nanofibrous sheets get increasing attention in myocardial infarction (MI) treatment due to their good cytocompatibility to deliver transplanted stem cells to infarcted areas and due to mechanical characteristics to support damaged tissue. Cardiac extracellular matrix is essential for implanted cells since it provides the cardiac microenvironment. In this study, we hypothesized high concentrations of cardiac nature protein (NP), namely elastin and collagen, in hybrid polycaprolactone (PCL) electrospun nanofibrous sheets could be effective as cardiac-mimicking patch. Optimal ratio of elastin and collagen with PCL in electrospun sheets (80% NP/PCL) was selected based on cytocompatibility and mechanical characteristics. Bone-marrow (BM) c-kit(+) cells anchoring onto NP/PCL sheets exhibited increased proliferative capacity compared with those seeded on PCL in vitro. Moreover, we examined the improvement of cardiac function in MI mice by cell-seeded cardiac patch. Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)-labeled BM c-kit(+) cells were loaded on 80% NP/PCL sheets which was transplanted into MI mice. Both 80% NP/PCL and c-kit(+)-seeded 80% NP/PCL effectively improved cardiac function after 4 weeks of transplantation, with reduced infarction area and restricted LV remodeling. C-kit(+)-seeded 80% NP/PCL was even superior to the 80% NP/PCL alone and both superior to PCL. GFP(+) cells were identified both in the sheets and local infarcted area where transplanted cells underwent cardiac differentiation after 4 weeks. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that sheets with high concentrations of nature proteins loaded with BM c-kit(+) cells might be a novel promising candidate for tissue-engineered cardiac patch to improve cardiac repair after MI. PMID:27186292

  1. Cardiac operations in patients with severe pulmonary impairment.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, S; Sakata, R; Nakayama, Y; Ura, M; Arai, Y; Morishima, Y

    2000-04-01

    Many reviews concerning pulmonary complications after cardiac surgical procedures in patients with serious pulmonary disease have been published. However, no strict pulmonary function guidelines were proposed to help the clinician identify the patients at greater risk. We considered whether a low pulmonary function became a risk factor of cardiac operations. We conducted a retrospective analysis of records of 32 patients with severely impaired preoperative pulmonary function who had undergone cardiac operations between July 1988 and March 1999. There was 1 hospital death. The over-all mortality rate was 3.1% (1 of 32). However, this death could not be directly attributed to postoperative pulmonary complications. Postoperative pulmonary complications were seen in 2 patients (6.3%) who required tracheostomy due to atelectasis and pneumonia. No late deaths due to pulmonary complications were observed during the follow-up period. The actual survival rate is 68% at 7 years. A low pulmonary function did not, by itself, become a risk factor of cardiac operations, although a pulmonary function test can be used to alert the clinician to possible postoperative complications, including the requirement of tracheostomy. Especially strict control of postoperative respiration is necessary in patients with forced expiratory volume (FEV) of 1.0 <= 800 ml and/or FEV1.0/BSA <= 600 ml/m2. PMID:10870003

  2. Current trends in cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Dafoe, W; Huston, P

    1997-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation can reduce mortality and morbidity for patients with many types of cardiac disease cost-effectively, yet is generally underutilized. Rehabilitation is helpful not only for patients who have had a myocardial infarction but also for those with stable angina or congestive heart failure or those who have undergone myocardial revascularization procedures, a heart transplant or heart valve surgery. The beneficial effects of rehabilitation include a reduction in the rate of death from cardiovascular disease, improved exercise tolerance, fewer cardiac symptoms, improved lipid levels, decreased cigarette smoking, improvement in psychosocial well-being and increased likelihood of return to work. Rehabilitation involves a multidisciplinary team that focuses on education, individually tailored exercise, risk-factor modification and the optimization of functional status and mental health. Current research trends in this area include the evaluation of new secondary-prevention modalities and alternative program options, such as home-based rehabilitation. PMID:9054823

  3. [Radiation therapy and cardiac pacemakers].

    PubMed

    Serafim, P; Fonseca, G; Oliveira, A; Fernandes, T

    1999-05-01

    The number of patients with cardiac pacemakers submitted annually to radiation therapy is increasing. Radiation therapy causes interference in the normal functioning processes, directly by chemical changes in the structure of the device and also by electromagnetic disturbances generated in the process of treatment. The changes in the technology used in the manufacture of cardiac pacemakers after the 70's, with the introduction of complementary metal-oxide semi-conductors (CMOS) in the circuits, drastically increased the chance of dangerous interference in the normal function of cardiac pacemakers occurring when in contact with an ionizing radiation source. The authors briefly describe the mechanisms underlying the radio-induced damage usually observed. A review of the literature on this issue is made and solutions are pointed out to perform safe radiation therapy and minimize the risk of device malfunction. PMID:10418264

  4. Mechanical regulation of cardiac development

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephanie E.; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Yalcin, Huseyin C.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical forces are essential contributors to and unavoidable components of cardiac formation, both inducing and orchestrating local and global molecular and cellular changes. Experimental animal studies have contributed substantially to understanding the mechanobiology of heart development. More recent integration of high-resolution imaging modalities with computational modeling has greatly improved our quantitative understanding of hemodynamic flow in heart development. Merging these latest experimental technologies with molecular and genetic signaling analysis will accelerate our understanding of the relationships integrating mechanical and biological signaling for proper cardiac formation. These advances will likely be essential for clinically translatable guidance for targeted interventions to rescue malforming hearts and/or reconfigure malformed circulations for optimal performance. This review summarizes our current understanding on the levels of mechanical signaling in the heart and their roles in orchestrating cardiac development. PMID:25191277

  5. Cardiac myofilaments: mechanics and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Tombe, Pieter P.; Bers, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the cardiac myofilament are an important determinant of pump function of the heart. This report is focused on the regulation of myofilament function in cardiac muscle. Calcium ions form the trigger that induces activation of the thin filament which, in turn, allows for cross-bridge formation, ATP hydrolysis, and force development. The structure and protein-protein interactions of the cardiac sarcomere that are responsible for these processes will be reviewed. The molecular mechanism that underlies myofilament activation is incompletely understood. Recent experimental approaches have been employed to unravel the mechanism and regulation of myofilament mechanics and energetics by activator calcium and sarcomere length, as well as contractile protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinase A. Central to these studies is the question whether such factors impact on muscle function simply by altering thin filament activation state, or whether modulation of cross-bridge cycling also plays a part in the responses of muscle to these stimuli.

  6. Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Scheller, RoseAnn L; Johnson, Laurie; Lorts, Angela; Ryan, Thomas D

    2016-09-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in the pediatric population is a rare and potentially devastating occurrence. An understanding of the differential diagnosis for the etiology of the cardiac arrest allows for the most effective emergency care and provides the patient with the best possible outcome. Pediatric SCA can occur with or without prodromal symptoms and may occur during exercise or rest. The most common cause is arrhythmia secondary to an underlying channelopathy, cardiomyopathy, or myocarditis. After stabilization, evaluation should include electrocardiogram, chest radiograph, and echocardiogram. Management should focus on decreasing the potential for recurring arrhythmia, maintaining cardiac preload, and thoughtful medication use to prevent exacerbation of the underlying condition. The purpose of this review was to provide the emergency physician with a concise and current review of the incidence, differential diagnosis, and management of pediatric patients presenting with SCA. PMID:27585126

  7. Cancer Causes Cardiac Atrophy and Autophagy in a Sexually Dimorphic Manner

    PubMed Central

    Cosper, Pippa F.; Leinwand, Leslie A.

    2010-01-01

    Approximately one-third of cancer deaths are caused by cachexia, a severe form of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue wasting that affects men more than women. The heart also undergoes atrophy in cancer patients but the mechanisms and the basis for apparent sex differences are unclear. In a mouse colon-adenocarcinoma model, cancer causes a loss of cardiac mass due to a decrease in cardiac myocyte size that is associated with reduced levels of all sarcomeric proteins. Unlike skeletal muscle cachexia, atrophic hearts do not upregulate the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) or its activity but increase autophagy. Thus, cancer causes cardiac atrophy by a mechanism distinct from that in skeletal muscle. Male tumor-bearing mice have a more severe phenotype than females, including greater cardiac mass loss and mortality, a more robust pro-inflammatory response to the tumor, and greater cardiac autophagy. In females, estrogen protects against cancer-induced cardiac atrophy and body weight loss by signaling through its receptor. Sex differences in cardiac atrophy need to be considered during the treatment of patients suffering from chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy to prevent exacerbation of cardiac dysfunction. PMID:21163868

  8. The science of reperfusion injury post cardiac arrest--Implications for emergency nurses.

    PubMed

    Baker, Edward; Lee, Geraldine

    2016-01-01

    Survival following cardiac arrest in the developed world remains below 10%. In those who survive the initial cardiac arrest, prognosis remains poor due to the onset of multi-organ failure with both significant cardiac and neurological dysfunction. Nurses have demonstrated good understanding of cardiac arrest/post arrest guidelines and have good technical skills but deficits remain in their understanding of pathophysiological processes involved in post cardiac arrest syndromes. This article aims to provide an overview of these pathophysiological processes involved in the post cardiac arrest phase, potential treatment options and the nursing interventions that may be required within the emergency department setting. This article will focus emergency nurses to become more involved in patient management at this critical phase of treatment and highlight potential early signs of deterioration. Although return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) is crucial in the process of recovery from cardiac arrest, it is only the first of many complex stages. Given the complexity of post cardiac arrest syndrome and its impact on the patient, healthcare professionals need to understand the cellular changes associated with reperfusion injuries in order to improve outcomes. It is only through effective nursing care and medical management that improved outcomes will become more common in the future. PMID:26385262

  9. Haptoglobin Enhances Cardiac Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hua; Heuzey, Elizabeth; Mori, Daniel; Wong, Christine; Colangelo, Christopher; Chung, Lisa M.; Bruce, Can; Slizovskiy, Ilya B.; Booth, Carmen J.; Kreisel, Daniel; Goldstein, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Early graft inflammation enhances both acute and chronic rejection of heart transplants, but it is unclear how this inflammation is initiated. Objective To identify specific inflammatory modulators and determine their underlying molecular mechanisms after cardiac transplantation. Methods and Results We used a murine heterotopic cardiac transplant model to identify inflammatory modulators of early graft inflammation. Unbiased mass spectrometric analysis of cardiac tissue before and up to 72 hours after transplantation revealed that 22 proteins including haptoglobin, a known anti-oxidant, are significantly upregulated in our grafts. Through the use of haptoglobin deficient mice, we show that 80% of haptoglobin deficient recipients treated with peri-operative administration of the costimulatory blocking agent CTLA4 immunoglobulin exhibited > 100 days survival of full major histocompatibility complex mismatched allografts, whereas all similarly treated wild type recipients rejected their transplants by 21 days post transplantation. We found that haptoglobin modifies the intra-allograft inflammatory milieu by enhancing levels of the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 and the chemokine MIP-2 but impair levels of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10. Haptoglobin also enhances dendritic cell graft recruitment and augments anti-donor T cell responses. Moreover, we confirmed that the protein is present in human cardiac allograft specimens undergoing acute graft rejection. Conclusions Our findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of inflammation after cardiac transplantation and suggest that, in contrast to its prior reported anti-oxidant function in vascular inflammation, haptoglobin is an enhancer of inflammation after cardiac transplantation. Haptoglobin may also be a key component in other sterile inflammatory conditions. PMID:25801896

  10. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find a Specialist Share Twitter Facebook SCA Risk Assessment Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) occurs abruptly and without ... of all ages and health conditions. Start Risk Assessment The Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment Tool ...

  11. Men Face Greater Risk of Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159651.html Men Face Greater Risk of Cardiac Arrest: Study Heart disease tends to develop earlier than ... About one in nine men will suffer a cardiac arrest before the age of 70, compared to about ...

  12. Successful Biopsy and Removal of a Tricuspid Valve Papillary Fibroelastoma in Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gollol-Raju, Narasimha Swamy; Joshi, Deepak; Daggubati, Ramesh; Nekkanti, Rajasekhar; Movahed, Assad

    2016-06-01

    Papillary fibroelastomas are rare benign cardiac tumours with a predilection for cardiac valves. Because of the rarity of these tumours, management is individualized, but some recommend surgical removal of all papillary fibroelastomas due to the increased risk of embolization. We report a case of a 71-year-old man who presented with a sessile mass on the tricuspid valve. The mass, a papillary fibroelastoma, was successfully biopsied and removed in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. This report demonstrates a unique minimally invasive way of approaching a cardiac tumour wherein a major surgery was avoided. PMID:26577893

  13. Cardiac Metastasis from Invasive Thymoma Via the Superior Vena Cava: Cardiac MRI Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Dursun, Memduh Sarvar, Sadik; Cekrezi, Bledi; Kaba, Erkan; Bakir, Baris; Toker, Alper

    2008-07-15

    Cardiac tumors are rare, and metastatic deposits are more common than primary cardiac tumors. We present cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a 50-year-old woman with invasive thymoma. Cardiac MRI revealed a heterogeneous, lobulated anterior mediastinal mass invading the superior vena cava and extending to the right atrium. In cine images there was no invasion to the right atrial wall.

  14. Cardiac 4D Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'hooge, Jan

    Volumetric cardiac ultrasound imaging has steadily evolved over the last 20 years from an electrocardiography (ECC) gated imaging technique to a true real-time imaging modality. Although the clinical use of echocardiography is still to a large extent based on conventional 2D ultrasound imaging it can be anticipated that the further developments in image quality, data visualization and interaction and image quantification of three-dimensional cardiac ultrasound will gradually make volumetric ultrasound the modality of choice. In this chapter, an overview is given of the technological developments that allow for volumetric imaging of the beating heart by ultrasound.

  15. [Cardiac rehabilitation after myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Ghannem, M; Ghannem, L; Ghannem, L

    2015-12-01

    Although the proofs of the benefits of cardiac rehabilitation accumulate, many patients are not sent to rehabilitation units, especially younger and very elderly patients. As the length of stay in acute care units decreases, rehabilitation offers more time to fully assess the patients' conditions and needs. Meta-analyses of randomised trials suggest that mortality can be improved by as much as 20-30%. In addition, rehabilitation helps managing risk factors, including hyperlipidemia, diabetes, smoking and sedentary behaviours. Physical training also helps improving exercise capacity. Because of all of these effects, cardiac rehabilitation for post-myocardial infarction patients has been given a class IA recommendation in current guidelines. PMID:26548984

  16. Anxiety and Hypervigilance to Cardiopulmonary Sensations in Non-Cardiac Chest Pain Patients With and Without Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    White, Kamila S.; Craft, Jennifer M.; Gervino, Ernest V.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated body vigilance, cardiac anxiety, and the mediating role of interoceptive fear on pain in patients with non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP; a syndrome of chest pain in the absence of identifiable organic etiology). Patients were more attentive to cardiac-congruent sensations than cardiac-incongruent sensations (e.g., gastrointestinal, cognitive dyscontrol; p's < .001). Patients with a DSM-IV Axis I anxiety or mood disorder were more body vigilant compared to patients who did not have a disorder (p's < .05). Patients with anxiety disorders were particularly vigilant to and fearful of cardiac sensations relative to patients without anxiety disorders. Latent variable path models examined the extent that interoceptive fear mediated the association between body vigilance and cardiac anxiety on chest pain. Within each model, diagnostic status, body vigilance, and cardiac anxiety were exogenous and predicted interoceptive fear that in turn predicted pain. Separate models examined body vigilance and cardiac anxiety, and both models fit the data well. Findings showed partial mediation for the body vigilance factor, and full mediation for the cardiac anxiety factor. Interoceptive fear played a mediating role in both models. The syndrome of NCCP may persist partly due to conscious hypervigilance to and fear of cardiac-congruent body sensations, particularly among anxious patients. PMID:20110083

  17. Cardiac atrophy after bed rest and spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perhonen, M. A.; Franco, F.; Lane, L. D.; Buckey, J. C.; Blomqvist, C. G.; Zerwekh, J. E.; Peshock, R. M.; Weatherall, P. T.; Levine, B. D.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac muscle adapts well to changes in loading conditions. For example, left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy may be induced physiologically (via exercise training) or pathologically (via hypertension or valvular heart disease). If hypertension is treated, LV hypertrophy regresses, suggesting a sensitivity to LV work. However, whether physical inactivity in nonathletic populations causes adaptive changes in LV mass or even frank atrophy is not clear. We exposed previously sedentary men to 6 (n = 5) and 12 (n = 3) wk of horizontal bed rest. LV and right ventricular (RV) mass and end-diastolic volume were measured using cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 2, 6, and 12 wk of bed rest; five healthy men were also studied before and after at least 6 wk of routine daily activities as controls. In addition, four astronauts were exposed to the complete elimination of hydrostatic gradients during a spaceflight of 10 days. During bed rest, LV mass decreased by 8.0 +/- 2.2% (P = 0.005) after 6 wk with an additional atrophy of 7.6 +/- 2.3% in the subjects who remained in bed for 12 wk; there was no change in LV mass for the control subjects (153.0 +/- 12.2 vs. 153.4 +/- 12.1 g, P = 0.81). Mean wall thickness decreased (4 +/- 2.5%, P = 0.01) after 6 wk of bed rest associated with the decrease in LV mass, suggesting a physiological remodeling with respect to altered load. LV end-diastolic volume decreased by 14 +/- 1.7% (P = 0.002) after 2 wk of bed rest and changed minimally thereafter. After 6 wk of bed rest, RV free wall mass decreased by 10 +/- 2.7% (P = 0.06) and RV end-diastolic volume by 16 +/- 7.9% (P = 0.06). After spaceflight, LV mass decreased by 12 +/- 6.9% (P = 0.07). In conclusion, cardiac atrophy occurs during prolonged (6 wk) horizontal bed rest and may also occur after short-term spaceflight. We suggest that cardiac atrophy is due to a physiological adaptation to reduced myocardial load and work in real or simulated microgravity and demonstrates the plasticity

  18. Sudden cardiac death athletes: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Previous events evidence that sudden cardiac death (SCD) in athletes is still a reality and it keeps challenging cardiologists. Considering the importance of SCD in athletes and the requisite for an update of this matter, we endeavored to describe SCD in athletes. The Medline (via PubMed) and SciELO databases were searched using the subject keywords "sudden death, athletes and mortality". The incidence of SCD is expected at one case for each 200,000 young athletes per year. Overall it is resulted of complex dealings of factors such as arrhythmogenic substrate, regulator and triggers factors. In great part of deaths caused by heart disease in athletes younger than 35 years old investigations evidence cardiac congenital abnormalities. Athletes above 35 years old possibly die due to impairments of coronary heart disease, frequently caused by atherosclerosis. Myocardial ischemia and myocardial infarction are responsible for the most cases of SCD above this age (80%). Pre-participatory athletes' evaluation helps to recognize situations that may put the athlete's life in risk including cardiovascular diseases. In summary, cardiologic examinations of athletes' pre-competition routine is an important way to minimize the risk of SCD. PMID:20682064

  19. [Cardiac output monitoring by impedance cardiography in cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, H; Seki, S; Mizuguchi, A; Tsuchida, H; Watanabe, H; Namiki, A

    1990-04-01

    The cardiac output monitoring by impedance cardiography, NCCOM3, was evaluated in adult patients (n = 12) who were subjected to coronary artery bypass grafting. Values of cardiac output measured by impedance cardiography were compared to those by the thermodilution method. Changes of base impedance level used as an index of thoracic fluid volume were also investigated before and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Correlation coefficient (r) of the values obtained by thermodilution with impedance cardiography was 0.79 and the mean difference was 1.29 +/- 16.9 (SD)% during induction of anesthesia. During the operation, r was 0.83 and the mean difference was -14.6 +/- 18.7%. The measurement by impedance cardiography could be carried out through the operation except when electro-cautery was used. Base impedance level before CPB was significantly lower as compared with that after CPB. There was a negative correlation between the base impedance level and central venous pressure (CVP). No patients showed any signs suggesting lung edema and all the values of CVP, pulmonary artery pressure and blood gas analysis were within normal ranges. From the result of this study, it was concluded that cardiac output monitoring by impedance cardiography was useful in cardiac surgery, but further detailed examinations will be necessary on the relationship between the numerical values of base impedance and the clinical state of the patients. PMID:2362347

  20. Health Literacy Predicts Cardiac Knowledge Gains in Cardiac Rehabilitation Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Colleen C.; Rawson, Katherine; Hughes, Joel W.; Waechter, Donna; Rosneck, James

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Health literacy is increasingly recognised as a potentially important patient characteristic related to patient education efforts. We evaluated whether health literacy would predict gains in knowledge after completion of patient education in cardiac rehabilitation. Method: This was a re-post observational analysis study design based on…

  1. Mathematics and the Heart: Understanding Cardiac Output

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champanerkar, Jyoti

    2013-01-01

    This paper illustrates a biological application of the concepts of relative change and area under a curve, from mathematics. We study two biological measures "relative change in cardiac output" and "cardiac output", which are predictors of heart blockages and other related ailments. Cardiac output refers to the quantity of…

  2. Telocytes in exercise-induced cardiac growth.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Junjie; Chen, Ping; Qu, Yi; Yu, Pujiao; Yao, Jianhua; Wang, Hongbao; Fu, Siyi; Bei, Yihua; Chen, Yan; Che, Lin; Xu, Jiahong

    2016-05-01

    Exercise can induce physiological cardiac growth, which is featured by enlarged cardiomyocyte cell size and formation of new cardiomyocytes. Telocytes (TCs) are a recently identified distinct interstitial cell type, existing in many tissues and organs including heart. TCs have been shown to form a tandem with cardiac stem/progenitor cells in cardiac stem cell niches, participating in cardiac regeneration and repair. Although exercise-induced cardiac growth has been confirmed as an important way to promote cardiac regeneration and repair, the response of cardiac TCs to exercise is still unclear. In this study, 4 weeks of swimming training was used to induce robust healthy cardiac growth. Exercise can induce an increase in cardiomyocyte cell size and formation of new cardiomyocytes as determined by Wheat Germ Lectin and EdU staining respectively. TCs were identified by three immunofluorescence stainings including double labelling for CD34/vimentin, CD34/platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor-α and CD34/PDGF receptor-β. We found that cardiac TCs were significantly increased in exercised heart, suggesting that TCs might help control the activity of cardiac stem/progenitor cells, cardiomyocytes or endothelial cells. Adding cardiac TCs might help promote cardiac regeneration and renewal. PMID:26987685

  3. Native Cardiac Extracellular Matrix Hydrogels for Cultivation of Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Freytes, Donald O; O’Neill, John D; Duan-Arnold, Yi; Wrona, Emily; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    Summary Biomaterial scaffolds made of native and synthetic materials are designed to serve as a structural and informational template for cell attachment and tissue formation. The use of native extracellular matrix (ECM) is of special interest for the culture of cardiac stem and progenitor cells due to the presence of intrinsic regulatory factors regulating cardiac function. We describe here how to obtain native ECM hydrogels from porcine hearts for the culture of human embryonic, induced pluripotent, and somatic stem cells for cardiac tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:25070328

  4. [Cardiac MRI in the follow-up of adult congenital cardiomyopathy patients].

    PubMed

    Monney, P; Stalder, N; Clair, M; Vogt, P; Schwitter, J; Meijboom, E J; Bouchardy, J

    2011-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a rapidly developing modality in cardiology. It offers an excellent image definition and a large field of view, allowing a more accurate morphological assessment of cardiac malformations. Due to its unique versatility and its ability to provide myocardial tissue characterization, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is now recognized as a central imaging modality for a wide range of congenital heart diseases, including assessment of post-surgical cardiac anatomy, quantification of valvular disease and detection of myocardial ischemia. CMR provides useful diagnostic information without any radiation exposure, and improves the global management of patients with congenital heart disease. PMID:21717692

  5. Shoshin Beriberi With Low Cardiac Output and Hemodynamic Deterioration Treated Dramatically by Thiamine Administration.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Teruhiko; Kinugawa, Koichiro

    2015-01-01

    "Shoshin beriberi", which is a fulminant form of cardiovascular beriberi accompanied by hemodynamic deterioration with high cardiac output and decreased systemic blood pressure, caused by thiamine deficiency due to alcoholic abuse or malnutrition, is often difficult to address because of its rarity and non-specific symptoms. We here present a patient with a history of alcoholic abuse who had suffered hemodynamic deterioration with extremely low cardiac output refractory to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and intravenous catecholamine support, which was improved dramatically by bolus intravenous thiamine administration. Such a type with low cardiac output would be the most severe form of Shoshin beriberi, and cannot be rescued without diagnostic administration of thiamine. PMID:26346515

  6. Natural cardiac extracellular matrix hydrogels for cultivation of human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Freytes, Donald O; O'Neill, John D; Duan-Arnold, Yi; Wrona, Emily A; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterial scaffolds made of natural and synthetic materials are designed to serve as a structural and informational template for cell attachment and tissue formation. The use of native extracellular matrix (ECM) is of special interest for the culture of cardiac stem and progenitor cells due to the presence of intrinsic regulatory factors regulating cardiac function. We describe here how to obtain native ECM hydrogels from porcine hearts for the culture of human embryonic, induced pluripotent, and somatic stem cells for cardiac tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:25070328

  7. Improved bioavailability of targeted Curcumin delivery efficiently regressed cardiac hypertrophy by modulating apoptotic load within cardiac microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Ray, Aramita; Rana, Santanu; Banerjee, Durba; Mitra, Arkadeep; Datta, Ritwik; Naskar, Shaon; Sarkar, Sagartirtha

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyocyte apoptosis acts as a prime modulator of cardiac hypertrophy leading to heart failure, a major cause of human mortality worldwide. Recent therapeutic interventions have focussed on translational applications of diverse pharmaceutical regimes among which, Curcumin (from Curcuma longa) is known to have an anti-hypertrophic potential but with limited pharmacological efficacies due to low aqueous solubility and poor bioavailability. In this study, Curcumin encapsulated by carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC) nanoparticle conjugated to a myocyte specific homing peptide was successfully delivered in bioactive form to pathological myocardium for effective regression of cardiac hypertrophy in a rat (Rattus norvegicus) model. Targeted nanotization showed higher cardiac bioavailability of Curcumin at a low dose of 5 mg/kg body weight compared to free Curcumin at 35 mg/kg body weight. Moreover, Curcumin/CMC-peptide treatment during hypertrophy significantly improved cardiac function by downregulating expression of hypertrophy marker genes (ANF, β-MHC), apoptotic mediators (Bax, Cytochrome-c) and activity of apoptotic markers (Caspase 3 and PARP); whereas free Curcumin in much higher dose showed minimal improvement during compromised cardiac function. Targeted Curcumin treatment significantly lowered p53 expression and activation in diseased myocardium via inhibited interaction of p53 with p300-HAT. Thus attenuated acetylation of p53 facilitated p53 ubiquitination and reduced the apoptotic load in hypertrophied cardiomyocytes; thereby limiting cardiomyocytes' need to enter the regeneration cycle during hypertrophy. This study elucidates for the first time an efficient targeted delivery regimen for Curcumin and also attributes towards probable mechanistic insight into its therapeutic potential as a cardio-protective agent for regression of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26612707

  8. Prospective Surveillance for Cardiac Adverse Events in Healthy Adults Receiving Modified Vaccinia Ankara Vaccines: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Elizaga, Marnie L.; Vasan, Sandhya; Marovich, Mary A.; Sato, Alicia H.; Lawrence, Dale N.; Chaitman, Bernard R.; Frey, Sharon E.; Keefer, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Vaccinia-associated myo/pericarditis was observed during the US smallpox vaccination (DryVax) campaign initiated in 2002. A highly-attenuated vaccinia strain, modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) has been evaluated in clinical trials as a safer alternative to DryVax and as a vector for recombinant vaccines. Due to the lack of prospectively collected cardiac safety data, the US Food and Drug Administration required cardiac screening and surveillance in all clinical trials of MVA since 2004. Here, we report cardiac safety surveillance from 6 phase I trials of MVA vaccines. Methods Four clinical research organizations contributed cardiac safety data using common surveillance methods in trials administering MVA or recombinant MVA vaccines to healthy participants. ‘Routine cardiac investigations’ (ECGs and cardiac enzymes obtained 2 weeks after injections of MVA or MVA-HIV recombinants, or placebo-controls), and ‘Symptom-driven cardiac investigations’ are reported. The outcome measure is the number of participants who met the CDC-case definition for vaccinia-related myo/pericarditis or who experienced cardiac adverse events from an MVA vaccine. Results Four hundred twenty-five study participants had post-vaccination safety data analyzed, 382 received at least one MVA-containing vaccine and 43 received placebo; 717 routine ECGs and 930 cardiac troponin assays were performed. Forty-five MVA recipients (12%) had additional cardiac testing performed; 22 for cardiac symptoms, 19 for ECG/laboratory changes, and 4 for cardiac symptoms with an ECG/laboratory change. No participant had evidence of symptomatic or asymptomatic myo/pericarditis meeting the CDC-case definition and judged to be related to an MVA vaccine. Conclusions Prospective surveillance of MVA recipients for myo/pericarditis did not detect cardiac adverse reactions in 382 study participants. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00082446 NCT003766090 NCT00252148 NCT00083603 NCT00301184

  9. An unusual case of mesenteric ischemia in a patient with cardiac myxoma.

    PubMed

    Pérez Baztarrica, Gabriel; Bornancini, Norberto; Salvaggio, Flavio; Porcile, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Symptoms related to peripheral embolism are experienced in 2%-15% of cases of cardiac myxoma. We present a rare case of a 54-year-old man admitted due to sudden abdominal pain. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). As the patient's response to support treatment was favorable, a non-invasive approach was adopted, with prescription of oral anticoagulation (OAC) therapy. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed a tumor in the left atrium. The cardiac mass was completely removed and diagnosed as myxoma by histopathological analysis. As periodic CT scans showed progressive improvement of blood flow through the SMA, OAC was continued. OAC may have been beneficial due to the nature of emboli originating from a cardiac myxoma: thrombi covering the surface of the tumor. At present, there is no explanation in the literature for the benefits of OAC in patients with embolism associated with cardiac myxoma. PMID:23890757

  10. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Using a Pocket-Size Device in the Emergency Room.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Frederico José Neves; Siqueira, Vicente Nicoliello; Moisés, Valdir Ambrósio; Gois, Aécio Flavio Teixeira; Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo de; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Camargo; Campos, Orlando

    2014-10-28

    Background: Cardiovascular urgencies are frequent reasons for seeking medical care. Prompt and accurate medical diagnosis is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these conditions. Objective: To evaluate the use of a pocket-size echocardiography in addition to clinical history and physical exam in a tertiary medical emergency care. Methods: One hundred adult patients without known cardiac or lung diseases who sought emergency care with cardiac complaints were included. Patients with ischemic changes in the electrocardiography or fever were excluded. A focused echocardiography with GE Vscan equipment was performed after the initial evaluation in the emergency room. Cardiac chambers dimensions, left and right ventricular systolic function, intracardiac flows with color, pericardium, and aorta were evaluated. Results: The mean age was 61 ± 17 years old. The patient complaint was chest pain in 51 patients, dyspnea in 32 patients, arrhythmia to evaluate the left ventricular function in ten patients, hypotension/dizziness in five patients and edema in one patient. In 28 patients, the focused echocardiography allowed to confirm the initial diagnosis: 19 patients with heart failure, five with acute coronary syndrome, two with pulmonary embolism and two patients with cardiac tamponade. In 17 patients, the echocardiography changed the diagnosis: ten with suspicious of heart failure, two with pulmonary embolism suspicious, two with hypotension without cause, one suspicious of acute coronary syndrome, one of cardiac tamponade and one of aortic dissection. Conclusion: The focused echocardiography with pocket-size equipment in the emergency care may allow a prompt diagnosis and, consequently, an earlier initiation of the therapy.Fundamento: As urgências cardiovasculares são causas importantes de procura por atendimento médico, sendo fundamentais a rapidez e a precisão no diagnóstico para diminuir sua morbimortalidade. Objetivo: Avaliar o uso da ecocardiografia

  11. Historical highlights in cardiac pacing.

    PubMed

    Geddes, L A

    1990-01-01

    The benchmarks in cardiac pacing are identified, beginning with F. Steiner (1871), who rhythmically stimulated the chloroform-arrested hearts of 3 horses, 1 donkey, 10 dogs, 14 cats, and 8 rabbits. The chloroform-arrested heart in human subjects was paced by T. Greene in the following year (1872) in the UK. In 1882, H. Ziemssen in Germany applied cardiac pacing to a 42-year old woman who had a large defect in the anterior left chest wall subsequent to resection of an enchondroma. Intentional cardiac pacing did not occur until 1932, when A.A. Hyman in the US demonstrated that cardiac pacing could be clinically practical. Hyman made a batteryless pacemaker for delivery in induction shock stimuli (60-120/min) to the atria. His pacemaker was powered by a hand-wound, spring-driven generator which provided 6 min of pacemaking without rewinding. Closed-chest ventricular pacing was introduced in the US in 1952 by P.M. Zoll et al. Zoll (1956) also introduced closed-chest ventricular defibrillation. W.L. Weirich et al. (1958) demonstrated that direct-heart stimulation in closed-chest patients could be achieved with slender wire electrodes. S. Furman and J.B. Schwedel (1959) developed a monopolar catheter electrode for ventricular pacing in man. In the same year, W. Greatbatch and W.M. Chardack developed the implantable pacemaker. PMID:18238328

  12. The cardiac patient in Ramadan

    PubMed Central

    Chamsi-Pasha, Majed; Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Ramadan is one of the five fundamental pillars of Islam. During this month, the majority of the 1.6 billion Muslims worldwide observe an absolute fast from dawn to sunset without any drink or food. Our review shows that the impact of fasting during Ramadan on patients with stable cardiac disease is minimal and does not lead to any increase in acute events. Most patients with the stable cardiac disease can fast safely. Most of the drug doses and their regimen are easily manageable during this month and may need not to be changed. Ramadan fasting is a healthy nonpharmacological means for improving cardiovascular risk factors. Most of the Muslims, who suffer from chronic diseases, insist on fasting Ramadan despite being exempted by religion. The Holy Quran specifically exempts the sick from fasting. This is particularly relevant if fasting worsens one's illness or delays recovery. Patients with unstable angina, recent myocardial infarction, uncontrolled hypertension, decompensated heart failure, recent cardiac intervention or cardiac surgery or any debilitating diseases should avoid fasting. PMID:27144139

  13. The cardiac patient in Ramadan.

    PubMed

    Chamsi-Pasha, Majed; Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Ramadan is one of the five fundamental pillars of Islam. During this month, the majority of the 1.6 billion Muslims worldwide observe an absolute fast from dawn to sunset without any drink or food. Our review shows that the impact of fasting during Ramadan on patients with stable cardiac disease is minimal and does not lead to any increase in acute events. Most patients with the stable cardiac disease can fast safely. Most of the drug doses and their regimen are easily manageable during this month and may need not to be changed. Ramadan fasting is a healthy nonpharmacological means for improving cardiovascular risk factors. Most of the Muslims, who suffer from chronic diseases, insist on fasting Ramadan despite being exempted by religion. The Holy Quran specifically exempts the sick from fasting. This is particularly relevant if fasting worsens one's illness or delays recovery. Patients with unstable angina, recent myocardial infarction, uncontrolled hypertension, decompensated heart failure, recent cardiac intervention or cardiac surgery or any debilitating diseases should avoid fasting. PMID:27144139

  14. The Cardiac Complications of Methamphetamines.

    PubMed

    Paratz, Elizabeth D; Cunningham, Neil J; MacIsaac, Andrew I

    2016-04-01

    Methamphetamines are increasingly popular drugs of abuse in Australia, and are rising in purity. The rising popularity and purity of methamphetamines has notably increased demands upon Australian medical services. Methamphetamines are sympathomimetic amines with a range of adverse effects upon multiple organ systems. Cardiovascular complications are the second leading cause of death in methamphetamine abusers, and there appears to be a high prevalence of cardiac pathology. Cardiovascular pathology frequently seen in methamphetamine abusers includes hypertension, aortic dissection, acute coronary syndromes, pulmonary arterial hypertension and methamphetamine-associated cardiomyopathy. The rising prevalence of methamphetamine abuse is likely to increase the burden of cardiovascular pathology in Australians. A National Parliamentary Enquiry was opened in March 2015 to address concerns regarding the medical and social impacts of methamphetamine abuse. From April 2015, a National 'Ice Taskforce' was also created in parallel. Reversal of cardiac pathology appears to be achievable with abstinence from methamphetamines and initiation of appropriate treatment. It is key to appreciate that the pathogenesis of methamphetamine-induced cardiac complications arises as a result of the specific toxic effects of methamphetamines. Clinical management is hence individualised; suggested management approaches for methamphetamine-induced cardiac complications are detailed within this article. PMID:26706652

  15. Device Assists Cardiac Chest Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichstadt, Frank T.

    1995-01-01

    Portable device facilitates effective and prolonged cardiac resuscitation by chest compression. Developed originally for use in absence of gravitation, also useful in terrestrial environments and situations (confined spaces, water rescue, medical transport) not conducive to standard manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques.

  16. Guide to prosthetic cardiac valves

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, D.; Steiner, R.M.; Fernandez, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The development of artificial heart valves: Introduction and historical perspective; The radiology of prosthetic heart valves; The evaluation of patients for prosthetic valve implantation; Pathology of cardiac valve replacement; and Bioengineering of mechanical and biological heart valve substitutes.

  17. Cardiac sarcoidosis: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Dubrey, S W; Sharma, R; Underwood, R; Mittal, T

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac sarcoidosis is one of the most serious and unpredictable aspects of this disease state. Heart involvement frequently presents with arrhythmias or conduction disease, although myocardial infiltration resulting in congestive heart failure may also occur. The prognosis in cardiac sarcoidosis is highly variable, which relates to the heterogeneous nature of heart involvement and marked differences between racial groups. Electrocardiography and echocardiography often provide the first clue to the diagnosis, but advanced imaging studies using positron emission tomography and MRI, in combination with nuclear isotope perfusion scanning are now essential to the diagnosis and management of this condition. The identification of clinically occult cardiac sarcoidosis and the management of isolated and/or asymptomatic heart involvement remain both challenging and contentious. Corticosteroids remain the first treatment choice with the later substitution of immunosuppressive and steroid-sparing therapies. Heart transplantation is an unusual outcome, but when performed, the results are comparable or better than heart transplantation for other disease states. We review the epidemiology, developments in diagnostic techniques and the management of cardiac sarcoidosis. PMID:26130811

  18. MedlinePlus: Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Journal Articles References and abstracts from MEDLINE/PubMed (National Library of Medicine) Article: A Prospective Study of Sudden Cardiac Death ... Players MedlinePlus Connect for EHRs For Developers U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department ...

  19. Cardiac arrest during dipyridamole imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, M.S.; McCauley, C.S.

    1988-05-01

    A case of cardiac arrest and subsequent acute myocardial infarction occurring during thallium-201 imaging with oral dipyridamole augmentation is presented. Previous reports emphasizing the safety of this procedure are briefly reviewed and a recommendation for close hemodynamic and arrhythmia monitoring during the study is made. Large doses of oral dipyridamole may be contraindicated in patients with unstable angina.

  20. Molecular Modeling of Cardiac Troponin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Edward P.

    The cardiac thin filament regulates interactions of actin and myosin, the force-generating elements of muscular contraction. Over the past several decades many details have been discovered regarding the structure and function of the cardiac thin filament and its components, including cardiac troponin (cTn). My hypothesis is that signal propagation occurs between distant ends of the cardiac troponin complex through calcium-dependent alterations in the dynamics of cTn and tropomyosin (Tm). I propose a model of the thin filament that encompasses known structures of cTn, Tm and actin to gain insight into cardiac troponin's allosteric regulation of thin filament dynamics. By performing molecular dynamics simulations of cTn in conjunction with overlapping Tm in two conditions, with and without calcium bound to site II of cardiac troponin C (cTnC), I found a combination of calcium-dependent changes in secondary structure and dynamics throughout the cTn-Tm complex. I then applied this model to investigate familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC), a disease of the sarcomere that is one of the most commonly occurring genetic causes of heart disease. Approximately 15% of known FHC-related mutations are found in cardiac troponin T (cTnT), most of which are in or flank the alpha-helical N-tail domain TNT1. TNT1 directly interacts with overlapping Tm coiled coils. Using this model I identified effects of TNT1 mutations that propagate to the cTn core where site II of cTnC, the regulatory site of calcium binding in the thin filament, is located. Specifically, I found that mutations in TNT1 alter the flexibility of TNT1 and that the flexibility of TNT1 is inversely proportional to the cooperativity of calcium activation of the thin filament. Further, I identified a pathway of propagation of structural and dynamic changes linking TNT1 to site II of cTnC. Mutation-induced changes at site II cTnC alter calcium coordination which corresponds to biophysical measurements of calcium

  1. Cardiac strain associated with high-rise firefighting.

    PubMed

    Smith, Denise L; Haller, Jeannie M; Benedict, Ron; Moore-Merrell, Lori

    2015-01-01

    experienced more cardiac strain than fire suppression crews due primarily to differences in assignment duration. Furthermore, using stairs to transport firefighters and equipment to upper floors results in significantly greater cardiac strain than using the elevator. PMID:25369509

  2. Carney complex with biatrial cardiac myxoma.

    PubMed

    Havrankova, Eniko; Stenova, Emoke; Olejarova, Ingrid; Sollarova, Katarina; Kinova, Sona

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac myxomas make up approximately 50% of all benign cardiac tumors and represented 86% of all surgically treated cardiac tumors. Most of them originated from the left atrium, in some cases from both of atria. We report a case of male patient with biatrial myxomas and other extra-cardiac involvement: hypophyseal adenoma, enlargement of thyroid gland, tubular adenoma polyp of colon and bilateral large cell calcifying Sertoli cell tumor (LCCSCT) of testis. These findings led to the diagnosis of Carney's complex, which is a syndrome with multiple neoplasias, cardiac myxomas, lentigines, and endocrine abnormalities. A genetic test confirm this diagnosis. PMID:24088910

  3. [Cardiac rehabilitation in patients with atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Schlitt, Axel; Kamke, Wolfram; Guha, Manju; Haberecht, Olaf; Völler, Heinz

    2015-06-01

    The course of cardiac rehabilitation is often altered due to episodes of paroxysmal, predominantly postoperative atrial fibrillation. In symptomatic patients, a TEE-guided cardioversion - preferential DC shock - is indicated. In patients with persistent / permanent atrial fibrillation, a heart rate up to 110 / min and 170 / min at rest and during physical activity should, respectively, be tolerated. Therefore, training should not be quitted by heart rate but rather by load. The antithrombotic management is in addition a great task in treating patients with atrial fibrillation. With the exception of patients with a CHA2DS2-VASc-Score < 1, oral anticoagulation is indicated. Atrial fibrillation has little impact on social aspects, whereas the underlying heart disease and drug treatment (oral anticoagulation) has an important impact. PMID:26115137

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of acquired cardiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Carrol, C L; Higgins, C B; Caputo, G R

    1996-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, advances in magnetic resonance imaging techniques have increased the accuracy and applicability of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. These advances have improved the utility of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating cardiac morphology, blood flow, and myocardial contractility, all significant diagnostic features in the evaluation of the patient with acquired heart disease. Utilization of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging has been limited, primarily due to clinical reliance upon nuclear scintigraphy and echocardiography. Recent developments in fast and ultrafast imaging should continue to enhance the significance of magnetic resonance imaging in this field. Widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the cardiovascular system will ultimately depend upon its maturation into a comprehensive, noninvasive imaging technique for the varying manifestations of acquired heart disease, including cardiomyopathy, ischemic heart disease, and acquired valvular disease. Images PMID:8792545

  5. Sudden cardiac death in the older athlete.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Sumeet S; Weiss, Joseph B

    2015-02-10

    The overwhelming majority of sports-related sudden deaths occur among those older than 35 years of age. Because increasing numbers of older people are participating in organized endurance and competitive sporting events, the incidence of sports-related sudden death in older adults is expected to rise. Older athletes will approach clinical cardiologists for advice regarding their fitness for participation. It is important to recognize both that strenuous exercise is associated with a transient elevation in risk of sudden cardiac death and that appropriate training substantially reduces this risk. The approach to pre-participation screening for risk of sudden death in the older athlete is a complex issue and at present is largely focused on identifying inducible ischemia due to significant coronary disease. In this brief review, we summarize the current state of knowledge in this area with respect to epidemiology, mechanisms, and approaches to risk stratification, as viewed from the perspective of the consulting clinical cardiologist. PMID:25660928

  6. Two unsung heroes of closed-chest cardiac pacing: Green and McWilliam.

    PubMed

    Geddes, L A

    1994-07-01

    In the latter half of the last century, cardiorespiratory arrest was not uncommon due to the anesthetic used (chloroform). Animal studies showed that the heart could be paced. One physician (Green) resuscitated 5 of 7 cardiac arrest patients with single stimuli applied to body surface electrodes. Another (McWilliam) issued a proposal for adoption of closed-chest pacing and provided information on the procedure. The following historical footnote describes these pioneering events in the history of cardiac pacing. PMID:7937239

  7. Radiographic findings in the chest of patients following cardiac transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Shirazi, K.K.; Amendola, M.A.; Tisnado, J.; Cho, S.R.; Beachley, M.C.; Lower, R.R.

    1983-04-01

    The postoperative chest radiographic findings in 38 patients undergoing orthotopic (37 patients) and heterotopic (1 patient) cardiac transplantation were evaluated. Findings were correlated with those of echocardiograms, sputum and blood cultures, and lung and heart biopsies. The radiographic manifestations in the chest of these patients are classified in the following three main categories: 1) newly formed cardiac silhouette findings due to the transplanted heart itself, i.e., changes in size and shape of the new heart and pericardial effusion resulting from the placement of a smaller heart in a larger pericardial sac. 2) infectious complications due to bacteria, fungal, and other opportunistic agents secondary to immunosuppressive therapy, and 3) usual postoperative complications following thoracomoty and open-heart surgery.

  8. Functional cardiomyocytes derived from Isl1 cardiac progenitors via Bmp4 stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cagavi, Esra; Bartulos, Oscar; Suh, Carol Y; Sun, Baonan; Yue, Zhichao; Jiang, Zhengxin; Yue, Lixia; Qyang, Yibing

    2014-01-01

    As heart failure due to myocardial infarction remains a leading cause of morbidity worldwide, cell-based cardiac regenerative therapy using cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) could provide a potential treatment for the repair of injured myocardium. As adult CPCs may have limitations regarding tissue accessibility and proliferative ability, CPCs derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) could serve as an unlimited source of cells with high proliferative ability. As one of the CPCs that can be derived from embryonic stem cells, Isl1 expressing cardiac progenitor cells (Isl1-CPCs) may serve as a valuable source of cells for cardiac repair due to their high cardiac differentiation potential and authentic cardiac origin. In order to generate an unlimited number of Isl1-CPCs, we used a previously established an ESC line that allows for isolation of Isl1-CPCs by green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression that is directed by the mef2c gene, specifically expressed in the Isl1 domain of the anterior heart field. To improve the efficiency of cardiac differentiation of Isl1-CPCs, we studied the role of Bmp4 in cardiogenesis of Isl1-CPCs. We show an inductive role of Bmp directly on cardiac progenitors and its enhancement on early cardiac differentiation of CPCs. Upon induction of Bmp4 to Isl1-CPCs during differentiation, the cTnT+ cardiomyocyte population was enhanced 2.8±0.4 fold for Bmp4 treated CPC cultures compared to that detected for vehicle treated cultures. Both Bmp4 treated and untreated cardiomyocytes exhibit proper electrophysiological and calcium signaling properties. In addition, we observed a significant increase in Tbx5 and Tbx20 expression in differentiation cultures treated with Bmp4 compared to the untreated control, suggesting a link between Bmp4 and Tbx genes which may contribute to the enhanced cardiac differentiation in Bmp4 treated cultures. Collectively these findings suggest a cardiomyogenic role for Bmp4 directly on a pure population of Isl1 expressing

  9. Registration-based segmentation of murine 4D cardiac micro-CT data using symmetric normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Darin; Badea, Alexandra; Liu, Yilin; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T.

    2012-10-01

    Micro-CT can play an important role in preclinical studies of cardiovascular disease because of its high spatial and temporal resolution. Quantitative analysis of 4D cardiac images requires segmentation of the cardiac chambers at each time point, an extremely time consuming process if done manually. To improve throughput this study proposes a pipeline for registration-based segmentation and functional analysis of 4D cardiac micro-CT data in the mouse. Following optimization and validation using simulations, the pipeline was applied to in vivo cardiac micro-CT data corresponding to ten cardiac phases acquired in C57BL/6 mice (n = 5). After edge-preserving smoothing with a novel adaptation of 4D bilateral filtration, one phase within each cardiac sequence was manually segmented. Deformable registration was used to propagate these labels to all other cardiac phases for segmentation. The volumes of each cardiac chamber were calculated and used to derive stroke volume, ejection fraction, cardiac output, and cardiac index. Dice coefficients and volume accuracies were used to compare manual segmentations of two additional phases with their corresponding propagated labels. Both measures were, on average, >0.90 for the left ventricle and >0.80 for the myocardium, the right ventricle, and the right atrium, consistent with trends in inter- and intra-segmenter variability. Segmentation of the left atrium was less reliable. On average, the functional metrics of interest were underestimated by 6.76% or more due to systematic label propagation errors around atrioventricular valves; however, execution of the pipeline was 80% faster than performing analogous manual segmentation of each phase.

  10. Post-resuscitation care following out-of-hospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Girotra, Saket; Chan, Paul S; Bradley, Steven M

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in developed countries. Although a majority of cardiac arrest patients die during the acute event, a substantial proportion of cardiac arrest deaths occur in patients following successful resuscitation and can be attributed to the development of post-cardiac arrest syndrome. There is growing recognition that integrated post-resuscitation care, which encompasses targeted temperature management (TTM), early coronary angiography and comprehensive critical care, can improve patient outcomes. TTM has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome in patients who remain comatose especially following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to ventricular arrhythmias. Early coronary angiography and revascularisation if needed may also be beneficial during the post-resuscitation phase, based on data from observational studies. In addition, resuscitated patients usually require intensive care, which includes mechanical ventilator, haemodynamic support and close monitoring of blood gases, glucose, electrolytes, seizures and other disease-specific intervention. Efforts should be taken to avoid premature withdrawal of life-supporting treatment, especially in patients treated with TTM. Given that resources and personnel needed to provide high-quality post-resuscitation care may not exist at all hospitals, professional societies have recommended regionalisation of post-resuscitation care in specialised 'cardiac arrest centres' as a strategy to improve cardiac arrest outcomes. Finally, evidence for post-resuscitation care following in-hospital cardiac arrest is largely extrapolated from studies in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Future studies need to examine the effectiveness of different post-resuscitation strategies, such as TTM, in patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest. PMID:26385451

  11. Clinically applicable gated cardiac computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Cipriano, P.R.; Nassi, M.; Brody, W.R.

    1983-03-01

    Several attempts have been made to improve cardiac images obtained with x-ray transmission computed tomography (CT) by stopping cardiac motion through electrocardiographic gating. These methods reconstruct images that correspond to time intervals of the cardiac cycle identified by electrocardiography using either a pulsed x-ray beam at a selected time in the cardiac cycle or selected measurements in retrospect from regularly pulsed measurements made over several cardiac cycles. Missing CT angles of view (line integrals) have been a major problem contributing to degradation of such gated cardiac CT images. A new method for CT reconstruction from an incomplete set of projection data is presented that can be used clinically with a standard fan-beam reconstruction algorithm to improve gated cardiac CT images.

  12. Pulling on my heartstrings: mechanotransduction in cardiac development and function

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Margaret E.; Tzima, Ellie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Endothelial cells line the surface of the cardiovascular system and display a large degree of heterogeneity due to developmental origin and location. Despite this heterogeneity, all endothelial cells are exposed to wall shear stress (WSS) imparted by the frictional force of flowing blood, which plays an important role in determining the endothelial cell phenotype. Although the effects of WSS have been greatly studied in vascular endothelial cells, less is known about the role of WSS in regulating cardiac function and cardiac endothelial cells. Recent findings Recent advances in genetic and imaging technologies have enabled a more thorough investigation of cardiac hemodynamics. Using developmental models, shear stress sensing by endocardial endothelial cells has been shown to play an integral role in proper cardiac development including morphogenesis and formation of the conduction system. In the adult, less is known about hemodynamics and endocardial endothelial cells, but a clear role for WSS in the development of coronary and valvular disease is increasingly appreciated. Summary Future research will further elucidate a role for WSS in the developing and adult heart, and understanding this dynamic relationship may represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cardiomyopathies. PMID:26906028

  13. Resistive exercise training in cardiac rehabilitation. An update.

    PubMed

    Verrill, D E; Ribisl, P M

    1996-05-01

    Resistive exercise training has become very popular for patients of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation programmes (CRPs). For decades, CRPs focused almost exclusively on improving cardiorespiratory endurance and most programmes ignored muscular fitness development. Moreover, resistance training was thought to be potentially hazardous for the cardiac patient due to the risk of cardiovascular complications from adverse haemodynamic responses. We now know that resistive exercise testing and training is very safe for properly screened patients, even at relatively high workloads. Improvement in muscular strength facilitates return to daily vocational and avocational activities and is important for the CRP participant to regain lost strength and resume work soon after a cardiac event. Circuit weight training (CWT) is helpful in this respect and has been shown to increase muscular strength, cardiovascular endurance, body composition, bone density and mineral content, self-confidence, and self-efficacy in various populations. This article presents an update on current research in cardiac patients and also presents guidelines for implementing a properly supervised cardiac resistive exercise programme. PMID:8724203

  14. Transcriptomic alterations in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, Regina Coeli dos Santos; Iacobas, Dumitru A.; Iacobas, Sanda; Rocha, Leonardo Lima; de Azevedo Fortes, Fabio da Silva; Vairo, Leandro; Nagajyothi, Fnu; de Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Campos; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Spray, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi infection is a major cause of cardiomyopathy. Previous gene profiling studies of infected mouse hearts have revealed prominent changes in gene expression within many functional pathways. This variety of transcriptomic changes in infected mice raises the question of whether gene expression alterations in whole hearts are due to changes in infected cardiac myocytes or other cells or even to systemic effects of the infection on the heart. We employed microarrays to examine infected cardiac myocyte cultures 48 h post-infection. Statistical comparison of gene expression levels of 7624 well annotated unigenes in four independent cultures of infected and uninfected myocytes detected substantial (≥1.5 absolute fold changes) in 420 (5.5%) of the sampled genes. Major categories of affected genes included those involved in immune response, extracellular matrix and cell adhesion. These findings on infected cardiac myocytes in culture reveal that alterations in cardiac gene expression described in Chagas disease are the consequence of both direct infection of the myocytes themselves as well as resulting from the presence of other cell types in the myocardium and systemic effects of infection. PMID:19729072

  15. Automatic phase determination for retrospectively gated cardiac CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manzke, R.; Koehler, Th.; Nielsen, T.; Hawkes, D.; Grass, M.

    2004-12-01

    The recent improvements in CT detector and gantry technology in combination with new heart rate adaptive cone beam reconstruction algorithms enable the visualization of the heart in three dimensions at high spatial resolution. However, the finite temporal resolution still impedes the artifact-free reconstruction of the heart at any arbitrary phase of the cardiac cycle. Cardiac phases must be found during which the heart is quasistationary to obtain outmost image quality. It is challenging to find these phases due to intercycle and patient-to-patient variability. Electrocardiogram (ECG) information does not always represent the heart motion with an adequate accuracy. In this publication, a simple and efficient image-based technique is introduced which is able to deliver stable cardiac phases in an automatic and patient-specific way. From low-resolution four-dimensional data sets, the most stable phases are derived by calculating the object similarity between subsequent phases in the cardiac cycle. Patient-specific information about the object motion can be determined and resolved spatially. This information is used to perform optimized high-resolution reconstructions at phases of little motion. Results based on a simulation study and three real patient data sets are presented. The projection data were generated using a 16-slice cone beam CT system in low-pitch helical mode with parallel ECG recording.

  16. AVE 0991 attenuates cardiac hypertrophy through reducing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuedong; Huang, Huiling; Jiang, Jingzhou; Wu, Lingling; Lin, Chunxi; Tang, Anli; Dai, Gang; He, Jiangui; Chen, Yili

    2016-06-10

    AVE 0991, the nonpeptide angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)) analog, is recognized as having beneficial cardiovascular effects. However, the mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. This study was designed to investigate the effects of AVE 0991 on cardiac hypertrophy and the mechanisms involved. Mice were underwent aortic banding to induce cardiac hypertrophy followed by the administration of AVE 0991 (20 mg kg·day (-1)) for 4 weeks. It was shown that AVE 0991 reduced left ventricular hypertrophy and improved heart function, characterized by decreases in left ventricular weight and left ventricular end-diastolic diameter, and increases in ejection fraction. Moreover, AVE 0991 significantly down-regulated mean myocyte diameter and attenuate the gene expression of the hypertrophic markers. Furthermore, AVE 0991 inhibited the expression of NOX 2 and NOX 4, meaning that AVE 0991 reduced oxidative stress of cardiac hypertrophy mice. Our data showed that AVE 0991 treatment could attenuate cardiac hypertrophy and improve heart function, which may be due to reduce oxidative stress. PMID:26403967

  17. Fabrication and characterization of bio-engineered cardiac pseudo tissues

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tao; Baicu, Catalin; Aho, Michael; Zile, Michael; Boland, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We report to fabricate functional three-dimensional (3D) tissue constructs by using an inkjet based bio-prototyping method. With the use of the modified inkjet printers, contractile cardiac hybrids that exhibit the forms of the 3D rectangular sheet and even the “half heart” (with two connected ventricles) have been fabricated by arranging alternate layers of biocompatible alginate hydrogels and mammalian cardiac cells according to pre-designed 3D patterns. In this study, primary feline adult and H1 cardiomyocytes were used as model cardiac cells. Alginate hydrogels with controlled micro-shell structures were built by spraying cross-linkers in micro drops onto un-gelled alginic acid. The cells remained viable in constructs as thick as 1 cm due to the programmed porosity. Microscopic and macroscopic contractile functions of these cardiomyocytes constructs were observed in vitro. These results suggest that the inkjet bio-prototyping method could be used for hierarchical design of functional cardiac pseudo tissues, balanced with porosity for mass transport and structural support. PMID:20811105

  18. Early detection of acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jefferies, John Lynn; Devarajan, Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly recognized as a common problem in children undergoing cardiac surgery, with well documented increases in morbidity and mortality in both the short and the long term. Traditional approaches to the identification of AKI such as changes in serum creatinine have revealed a large incidence in this population with significant negative impact on clinical outcomes. However, the traditional diagnostic approaches to AKI diagnosis have inherent limitations that may lead to under-diagnosis of this pathologic process. There is a dearth of randomized controlled trials for the prevention and treatment of AKI associated with cardiac surgery, at least in part due to the paucity of early predictive biomarkers. Novel non-invasive biomarkers have ushered in a new era that allows for earlier detection of AKI. With these new diagnostic tools, a more consistent approach can be employed across centers that may facilitate a more accurate representation of the actual prevalence of AKI and more importantly, clinical investigation that may minimize the occurrence of AKI following pediatric cardiac surgery. A thoughtful management approach is necessary to mitigate the effects of AKI after cardiac surgery, which is best accomplished in close collaboration with pediatric nephrologists. Long-term surveillance for improvement in kidney function and potential development of chronic kidney disease should also be a part of the comprehensive management strategy. PMID:27429538

  19. Measuring cardiac waste: the premier cardiac waste measures.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Timothy J; Partovian, Chohreh; Kroch, Eugene; Martin, John; Bankowitz, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The authors developed 8 measures of waste associated with cardiac procedures to assist hospitals in comparing their performance with peer facilities. Measure selection was based on review of the research literature, clinical guidelines, and consultation with key stakeholders. Development and validation used the data from 261 hospitals in a split-sample design. Measures were risk adjusted using Premier's CareScience methodologies or mean peer value based on Medicare Severity Diagnosis-Related Group assignment. High variability was found in resource utilization across facilities. Validation of the measures using item-to-total correlations (range = 0.27-0.78), Cronbach α (.88), and Spearman rank correlation (0.92) showed high reliability and discriminatory power. Because of the level of variability observed among hospitals, this study suggests that there is opportunity for facilities to design successful waste reduction programs targeting cardiac-device procedures. PMID:23719033

  20. Stimulating Cardiac Muscle by Light: Cardiac Optogenetics by Cell Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhiheng; Valiunas, Virginijus; Lu, Zongju; Bien, Harold; Liu, Huilin; Wang, Hong-Zhang; Rosati, Barbara; Brink, Peter R.; Cohen, Ira S.; Entcheva, Emilia

    2011-01-01

    Background After the recent cloning of light-sensitive ion channels and their expression in mammalian cells, a new field, optogenetics, emerged in neuroscience, allowing for precise perturbations of neural circuits by light. However, functionality of optogenetic tools has not been fully explored outside neuroscience; and a non-viral, non-embryogenesis based strategy for optogenetics has not been shown before. Methods and Results We demonstrate the utility of optogenetics to cardiac muscle by a tandem cell unit (TCU) strategy, where non-excitable cells carry exogenous light-sensitive ion channels, and when electrically coupled to cardiomyocytes, produce optically-excitable heart tissue. A stable channelrhodopsin2 (ChR2) expressing cell line was developed, characterized and used as a cell delivery system. The TCU strategy was validated in vitro in cell pairs with adult canine myocytes (for a wide range of coupling strengths) and in cardiac syncytium with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. For the first time, we combined optical excitation and optical imaging to capture light-triggered muscle contractions and high-resolution propagation maps of light-triggered electrical waves, found to be quantitatively indistinguishable from electrically-triggered waves. Conclusions Our results demonstrate feasibility to control excitation and contraction in cardiac muscle by light using the TCU approach. Optical pacing in this case uses less energy, offers superior spatiotemporal control, remote access and can serve not only as an elegant tool in arrhythmia research, but may form the basis for a new generation of light-driven cardiac pacemakers and muscle actuators. The TCU strategy is extendable to (non-viral) stem cell therapy and is directly relevant to in vivo applications. PMID:21828312