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Sample records for cardiac tissue depth

  1. Evaluation of optical imaging and spectroscopy approaches for cardiac tissue depth assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, B; Matthews, D; Chernomordik, V; Gandjbakhche, A; Lane, S; Demos, S G

    2008-02-13

    NIR light scattering from ex vivo porcine cardiac tissue was investigated to understand how imaging or point measurement approaches may assist development of methods for tissue depth assessment. Our results indicate an increase of average image intensity as thickness increases up to approximately 2 mm. In a dual fiber spectroscopy configuration, sensitivity up to approximately 3 mm with an increase to 6 mm when spectral ratio between selected wavelengths was obtained. Preliminary Monte Carlo results provided reasonable fit to the experimental data.

  2. Engineered cardiac tissues

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Rohin K.; Chiu, Loraine L. Y.; Reis, Lewis A.; Radisic, Milica

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering offers the promise of creating functional tissue replacements for use in the failing heart or for in vitro drug screening. The last decade has seen a great deal of progress in this field with new advances in interdisciplinary areas such as developmental biology, genetic engineering, biomaterials, polymer science, bioreactor engineering, and stem cell biology. We review here a selection of the most recent advances in cardiac tissue engineering, including the classical cell-scaffold approaches, advanced bioreactor designs, cell sheet engineering, whole organ decellularization, stem-cell based approaches, and topographical control of tissue organization and function. We also discuss current challenges in the field, such as maturation of stem cell-derived cardiac patches and vascularization. PMID:21530228

  3. Elasticity of developing cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majkut, Stephanie; Swift, Joe; Krieger, Christine; Discher, Dennis

    2011-03-01

    Proper development and function of the heart from the tissue to cellular scale depends on a compliant ECM. Here we study the maturation of embryonic cardiac tissue mechanics in parallel with the effects of extracellular mechanics on individual cardiomyocyte function throughout early development. We used micropipette aspiration to measure local and bulk elastic moduli (E) of embryonic avian heart tissue from days 2-12. We observe stiffening of the early heart tube from E = 1 kPa at day 1 to E = 2 kPa at day 4, reaching neonatal values by day 12. Treating heart tubes with blebbistatin led to 30% decrease in E, indicating a significant but partial actomyosin contribution to mechanics at these stages. We performed a proteomic analysis of intact and decellularized 2-4 day heart tubes by mass spectrometry to quantify the ECM present at these stages. Isolated cardiomyocytes from 2-4 day chick embryos were cultured on collagen-coated PA gels of various stiffnesses. Beating magnitude was modulated by substrates with E = 1-2 kPa, similar to physiological E at those stages.

  4. Cardiac Conduction through Engineered Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Stamm, Christof; Hammer, Peter E.; Kwaku, Kevin F.; Marler, Jennifer J.; Friehs, Ingeborg; Jones, Mara; Rader, Christine M.; Roy, Nathalie; Eddy, Mau-Thek; Triedman, John K.; Walsh, Edward P.; McGowan, Francis X.; del Nido, Pedro J.; Cowan, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    In children, interruption of cardiac atrioventricular (AV) electrical conduction can result from congenital defects, surgical interventions, and maternal autoimmune diseases during pregnancy. Complete AV conduction block is typically treated by implanting an electronic pacemaker device, although long-term pacing therapy in pediatric patients has significant complications. As a first step toward developing a substitute treatment, we implanted engineered tissue constructs in rat hearts to create an alternative AV conduction pathway. We found that skeletal muscle-derived cells in the constructs exhibited sustained electrical coupling through persistent expression and function of gap junction proteins. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction analyses, myogenic cells in the constructs were shown to survive in the AV groove of implanted hearts for the duration of the animal’s natural life. Perfusion of hearts with fluorescently labeled lectin demonstrated that implanted tissues became vascularized and immunostaining verified the presence of proteins important in electromechanical integration of myogenic cells with surrounding recipient rat cardiomyocytes. Finally, using optical mapping and electrophysiological analyses, we provide evidence of permanent AV conduction through the implant in one-third of recipient animals. Our experiments provide a proof-of-principle that engineered tissue constructs can function as an electrical conduit and, ultimately, may offer a substitute treatment to conventional pacing therapy. PMID:16816362

  5. Depth-resolved fluorescence of biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yicong; Xi, Peng; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Yim, So Fan; Yu, Mei-Yung; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2005-06-01

    The depth-resolved autofluorescence ofrabbit oral tissue, normal and dysplastic human ectocervical tissue within l20μm depth were investigated utilizing a confocal fluorescence spectroscopy with the excitations at 355nm and 457nm. From the topmost keratinizing layer of oral and ectocervical tissue, strong keratin fluorescence with the spectral characteristics similar to collagen was observed. The fluorescence signal from epithelial tissue between the keratinizing layer and stroma can be well resolved. Furthermore, NADH and FADfluorescence measured from the underlying non-keratinizing epithelial layer were strongly correlated to the tissue pathology. This study demonstrates that the depth-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy can reveal fine structural information on epithelial tissue and potentially provide more accurate diagnostic information for determining tissue pathology.

  6. Cardiac tissue engineering in magnetically actuated scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapir, Yulia; Polyak, Boris; Cohen, Smadar

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering offers new possibilities for the functional and structural restoration of damaged or lost heart tissue by applying cardiac patches created in vitro. Engineering such functional cardiac patches is a complex mission, involving material design on the nano- and microscale as well as the application of biological cues and stimulation patterns to promote cell survival and organization into a functional cardiac tissue. Herein, we present a novel strategy for creating a functional cardiac patch by combining the use of a macroporous alginate scaffold impregnated with magnetically responsive nanoparticles (MNPs) and the application of external magnetic stimulation. Neonatal rat cardiac cells seeded within the magnetically responsive scaffolds and stimulated by an alternating magnetic field of 5 Hz developed into matured myocardial tissue characterized by anisotropically organized striated cardiac fibers, which preserved its features for longer times than non-stimulated constructs. A greater activation of AKT phosphorylation in cardiac cell constructs after applying a short-term (20 min) external magnetic field indicated the efficacy of magnetic stimulation to actuate at a distance and provided a possible mechanism for its action. Our results point to a synergistic effect of magnetic field stimulation together with nanoparticulate features of the scaffold surface as providing the regenerating environment for cardiac cells driving their organization into functionally mature tissue.

  7. Electrical stimulation systems for cardiac tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Nina; Cannizzaro, Christopher; Chao, Pen-Hsiu Grace; Maidhof, Robert; Marsano, Anna; Au, Hoi Ting Heidi; Radisic, Milica; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    We describe a protocol for tissue engineering of synchronously contractile cardiac constructs by culturing cardiac cells with the application of pulsatile electrical fields designed to mimic those present in the native heart. Tissue culture is conducted in a customized chamber built to allow for cultivation of (i) engineered three-dimensional (3D) cardiac tissue constructs, (ii) cell monolayers on flat substrates or (iii) cells on patterned substrates. This also allows for analysis of the individual and interactive effects of pulsatile electrical field stimulation and substrate topography on cell differentiation and assembly. The protocol is designed to allow for delivery of predictable electrical field stimuli to cells, monitoring environmental parameters, and assessment of cell and tissue responses. The duration of the protocol is 5 d for two-dimensional cultures and 10 d for 3D cultures. PMID:19180087

  8. Three Dimension Filamentous Human Cardiac Tissue Model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhen; Koo, Sangmo; Finnegan, Micaela A.; Loskill, Peter; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Marks, Natalie C.; Conklin, Bruce R.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2013-01-01

    A human in vitro cardiac tissue model would be a significant advancement for understanding, studying, and developing new strategies for treating cardiac arrhythmias and related cardiovascular diseases. We developed an in vitro model of three-dimensional (3D) human cardiac tissue by populating synthetic filamentous matrices with cardiomyocytes derived from healthy wild-type volunteer (WT) and patient-specific long QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3) induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS-CMs) to mimic the condensed and aligned human ventricular myocardium. Using such a highly controllable cardiac model, we studied the contractility malfunctions associated with the electrophysiological consequences of LQT3 and their response to a panel of drugs. By varying the stiffness of filamentous matrices, LQT3 iPS-CMs exhibited different level of contractility abnormality and susceptibility to drug-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:24268663

  9. Emergent Global Contractile Force in Cardiac Tissues.

    PubMed

    Knight, Meghan B; Drew, Nancy K; McCarthy, Linda A; Grosberg, Anna

    2016-04-12

    The heart is a complex organ whose structure and function are intricately linked at multiple length scales. Although several advancements have been achieved in the field of cardiac tissue engineering, current in vitro cardiac tissues do not fully replicate the structure or function necessary for effective cardiac therapy and cardiotoxicity studies. This is partially due to a deficiency in current understandings of cardiac tissue organization's potential downstream effects, such as changes in gene expression levels. We developed a novel (to our knowledge) in vitro tool that can be used to decouple and quantify the contribution of organization and associated downstream effects to tissue function. To do so, cardiac tissue monolayers were designed into a parquet pattern to be organized anisotropically on a local scale, within a parquet tile, and with any desired organization on a global scale. We hypothesized that if the downstream effects were muted, the relationship between developed force and tissue organization could be modeled as a sum of force vectors. With the in vitro experimental platforms of parquet tissues and heart-on-a-chip devices, we were able to prove this hypothesis for both systolic and diastolic stresses. Thus, insight was gained into the relationship between the generated stress and global myofibril organization. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the developed quantitative tool could be used to estimate the changes in stress production due to downstream effects decoupled from tissue architecture. This has the potential to elucidate properties coupled to tissue architecture, which change force production and pumping function in the diseased heart or stem cell-derived tissues. PMID:27074686

  10. Cardiac tissue engineering using perfusion bioreactor systems

    PubMed Central

    Radisic, Milica; Marsano, Anna; Maidhof, Robert; Wang, Yadong; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    This protocol describes tissue engineering of synchronously contractile cardiac constructs by culturing cardiac cell populations on porous scaffolds (in some cases with an array of channels) and bioreactors with perfusion of culture medium (in some cases supplemented with an oxygen carrier). The overall approach is ‘biomimetic’ in nature as it tends to provide in vivo-like oxygen supply to cultured cells and thereby overcome inherent limitations of diffusional transport in conventional culture systems. In order to mimic the capillary network, cells are cultured on channeled elastomer scaffolds that are perfused with culture medium that can contain oxygen carriers. The overall protocol takes 2–4 weeks, including assembly of the perfusion systems, preparation of scaffolds, cell seeding and cultivation, and on-line and end-point assessment methods. This model is well suited for a wide range of cardiac tissue engineering applications, including the use of human stem cells, and high-fidelity models for biological research. PMID:18388955

  11. Mechanostimulation Protocols for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Govoni, Marco; Muscari, Claudio; Guarnieri, Carlo; Giordano, Emanuele

    2013-01-01

    Owing to the inability of self-replacement by a damaged myocardium, alternative strategies to heart transplantation have been explored within the last decades and cardiac tissue engineering/regenerative medicine is among the present challenges in biomedical research. Hopefully, several studies witness the constant extension of the toolbox available to engineer a fully functional, contractile, and robust cardiac tissue using different combinations of cells, template bioscaffolds, and biophysical stimuli obtained by the use of specific bioreactors. Mechanical forces influence the growth and shape of every tissue in our body generating changes in intracellular biochemistry and gene expression. That is why bioreactors play a central role in the task of regenerating a complex tissue such as the myocardium. In the last fifteen years a large number of dynamic culture devices have been developed and many results have been collected. The aim of this brief review is to resume in a single streamlined paper the state of the art in this field. PMID:23936858

  12. Models of defibrillation of cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krinsky, V.; Pumir, A.

    1998-03-01

    Heterogeneities, such as gap junctions, defects in periodical cellular lattices, intercellular clefts and fiber curvature allow one to understand the effect of an electric field in cardiac tissue. They induce membrane potential variations even in the bulk of the myocardium, with a characteristic sawtooth shape. The sawtooth potential, induced by heterogeneities at large scales (tissue strands) can be more easily observed, and lead to stronger effects than the one induced at the cellular level. In the generic model of propagation in cardiac tissue (FitzHugh), 4 mechanisms of defibrillation were found, two mechanisms based on excitation (EA,EM), and two—on de-excitation (DA,DM). The lowest electric field is required by an EM mechanism. In the Beeler-Reuter ionic model, mechanism DM is impossible. We critically review the experimental basis of the theory and propose new experiments.

  13. Myocardial tissue engineering for cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Pecha, Simon; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Reichenspurner, Hermann

    2016-03-01

    The number of patients with heart failure is increasing in the aging population. Heart transplantation remains the only curative treatment option for patients with end-stage heart failure. Because of an organ donor shortage, new organ-independent treatment options are necessary. Different approaches to cardiac repair therapies have been developed and optimized in recent years. One of these promising approaches is myocardial tissue engineering, which refers to the creation of 3-dimensional engineered heart tissue in vitro. This perspective provides an overview of different approaches to tissue engineering, including essentials to improve tissue quality and choice of ideal cell source, as well as an overview of in vitro and in vivo studies. Several hurdles that have to be overcome before clinical application of engineered heart tissue might become a realistic scenario are also addressed. PMID:26856673

  14. Distilling complexity to advance cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ogle, Brenda M; Bursac, Nenad; Domian, Ibrahim; Huang, Ngan F; Menasché, Philippe; Murry, Charles E; Pruitt, Beth; Radisic, Milica; Wu, Joseph C; Wu, Sean M; Zhang, Jianyi; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-06-01

    The promise of cardiac tissue engineering is in the ability to recapitulate in vitro the functional aspects of a healthy heart and disease pathology as well as to design replacement muscle for clinical therapy. Parts of this promise have been realized; others have not. In a meeting of scientists in this field, five central challenges or "big questions" were articulated that, if addressed, could substantially advance the current state of the art in modeling heart disease and realizing heart repair. PMID:27280684

  15. Capillary force lithography for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Macadangdang, Jesse; Lee, Hyun Jung; Carson, Daniel; Jiao, Alex; Fugate, James; Pabon, Lil; Regnier, Michael; Murry, Charles; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide(1). Cardiac tissue engineering holds much promise to deliver groundbreaking medical discoveries with the aims of developing functional tissues for cardiac regeneration as well as in vitro screening assays. However, the ability to create high-fidelity models of heart tissue has proven difficult. The heart's extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex structure consisting of both biochemical and biomechanical signals ranging from the micro- to the nanometer scale(2). Local mechanical loading conditions and cell-ECM interactions have recently been recognized as vital components in cardiac tissue engineering(3-5). A large portion of the cardiac ECM is composed of aligned collagen fibers with nano-scale diameters that significantly influences tissue architecture and electromechanical coupling(2). Unfortunately, few methods have been able to mimic the organization of ECM fibers down to the nanometer scale. Recent advancements in nanofabrication techniques, however, have enabled the design and fabrication of scalable scaffolds that mimic the in vivo structural and substrate stiffness cues of the ECM in the heart(6-9). Here we present the development of two reproducible, cost-effective, and scalable nanopatterning processes for the functional alignment of cardiac cells using the biocompatible polymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)(8) and a polyurethane (PU) based polymer. These anisotropically nanofabricated substrata (ANFS) mimic the underlying ECM of well-organized, aligned tissues and can be used to investigate the role of nanotopography on cell morphology and function(10-14). Using a nanopatterned (NP) silicon master as a template, a polyurethane acrylate (PUA) mold is fabricated. This PUA mold is then used to pattern the PU or PLGA hydrogel via UV-assisted or solvent-mediated capillary force lithography (CFL), respectively(15,16). Briefly, PU or PLGA pre-polymer is drop dispensed onto a glass coverslip

  16. A modular approach to cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Leung, Brendan M; Sefton, Michael V

    2010-10-01

    Functional cardiac tissue was prepared using a modular tissue engineering approach with the goal of creating vascularized tissue. Rat aortic endothelial cells (RAEC) were seeded onto submillimeter-sized modules made of type I bovine collagen supplemented with Matrigel™ (25% v/v) embedded with cardiomyocyte (CM)-enriched neonatal rat heart cells and assembled into a contractile, macroporous, sheet-like construct. Modules (without RAEC) cultured in 10% bovine serum (BS) were more contractile and responsive to external stimulus (lower excitation threshold, higher maximum capture rate, and greater en face fractional area changes) than modules cultured in 10% fetal BS. Incorporating 25% Matrigel in the matrix reduced the excitation threshold and increased the fractional area change relative to collagen only modules (without RAEC). A coculture medium, containing 10% BS, low Mg2+ (0.814mM), and normal glucose (5.5mM), was used to maintain RAEC junction morphology (VE-cadherin) and CM contractility, although the responsiveness of CM was attenuated with RAEC on the modules. Macroporous, sheet-like module constructs were assembled by partially immobilizing a layer of modules in alginate gel until day 8, with or without RAEC. RAEC/CM module sheets were electrically responsive; however, like modules with RAEC this responsiveness was attenuated relative to CM-only sheets. Muscle bundles coexpressing cardiac troponin I and connexin-43 were evident near the perimeter of modules and at intermodule junctions. These results suggest the potential of the modular approach as a platform for building vascularized cardiac tissue. PMID:20504074

  17. Engineered Tissue Patch for Cardiac Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianyi

    2015-01-01

    Opinion statement Cell therapy can be administered via injections delivered directly into the myocardium or as engineered cardiac tissue patches, which are the subject of this review. Engineered cardiac patches can be created from sheets of interconnected cells or by suspending the cells in a scaffold of material that is designed to mimic the native extracellular matrix. The sheet-based approach produces patches with well-aligned and electronically coupled cardiomyocytes, but cell-containing scaffolds are more readily vascularized by the host's circulatory system and, consequently, are currently more suitable for applications that require a thicker patch. Cell patches can also be modified for the co-delivery of peptides that may promote cell survival and activate endogenous repair mechanisms; nevertheless, techniques for controlling inflammation, limiting apoptosis, and improving vascular growth need continue to be developed to make it a therapeutic modality for patients with myocardial infarction. PMID:26122908

  18. Tissue Contraction Force Microscopy for Optimization of Engineered Cardiac Tissue.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Jeremy A; Tranquillo, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    We developed a high-throughput screening assay that allows for relative comparison of the twitch force of millimeter-scale gel-based cardiac tissues. This assay is based on principles taken from traction force microscopy and uses fluorescent microspheres embedded in a soft polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate. A gel-forming cell suspension is simply pipetted onto the PDMS to form hemispherical cardiac tissue samples. Recordings of the fluorescent bead movement during tissue pacing are used to determine the maximum distance that the tissue can displace the elastic PDMS substrate. In this study, fibrin gel hemispheres containing human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes were formed on the PDMS and allowed to culture for 9 days. Bead displacement values were measured and compared to direct force measurements to validate the utility of the system. The amplitude of bead displacement correlated with direct force measurements, and the twitch force generated by the tissues was the same in 2 and 4 mg/mL fibrin gels, even though the 2 mg/mL samples visually appear more contractile if the assessment were made on free-floating samples. These results demonstrate the usefulness of this assay as a screening tool that allows for rapid sample preparation, data collection, and analysis in a simple and cost-effective platform. PMID:26538167

  19. Distilling complexity to advance cardiac tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ogle, Brenda M.; Bursac, Nenad; Domian, Ibrahim; Huang, Ngan F; Menasché, Philippe; Murry, Charles; Pruitt, Beth; Radisic, Milica; Wu, Joseph C; Wu, Sean M; Zhang, Jianyi; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    The promise of cardiac tissue engineering is in the ability to recapitulate in vitro the functional aspects of healthy heart and disease pathology as well as to design replacement muscle for clinical therapy. Parts of this promise have been realized; others have not. In a meeting of scientists in this field, five central challenges or “big questions” were articulated that, if addressed, could substantially advance the current state-of-the-art in modeling heart disease and realizing heart repair. PMID:27280684

  20. Heart Regeneration with Embryonic Cardiac Progenitor Cells and Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Shuo; Liu, Qihai; Gnatovskiy, Leonid; Ma, Peter X.; Wang, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Recent advances in stem cell research hold great potential for heart tissue regeneration through stem cell-based therapy. While multiple cell types have been transplanted into MI heart in preclinical studies or clinical trials, reduction of scar tissue and restoration of cardiac function have been modest. Several challenges hamper the development and application of stem cell-based therapy for heart regeneration. Application of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) and cardiac tissue engineering for cell therapy has shown great promise to repair damaged heart tissue. This review presents an overview of the current applications of embryonic CPCs and the development of cardiac tissue engineering in regeneration of functional cardiac tissue and reduction of side effects for heart regeneration. We aim to highlight the benefits of the cell therapy by application of CPCs and cardiac tissue engineering during heart regeneration. PMID:26744736

  1. Spatially Extended Memory Models of Cardiac Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Jeffrey; Riccio, Mark; Hua, Fei; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Gilmour, Robert

    2002-03-01

    Beat-to-beat alternation of cardiac electrical properties (alternans) commonly occurs during rapid periodic pacing. Although alternans is generally associated with a resititution curve with slope >=1, recent studies by Gauthier and co-workers reported the absence of alternans in frog heart tissue with a restitution curve of slope >=1. These experimental findings were understood in terms of a memory model in which the duration D of an action potential depends on the preceding rest interval I as well as a memory variable M that accumulates during D and dissipates during I. We study the spatiotemporal dynamics of a spatially extended 1-d fiber using an ionic model that exhibits memory effects. We find that while a single cell can have a restitution slope >=1 and not show alternans (because of memory), the spatially extended system exhibits alternans. To understand the dynamical mechanism of this behavior, we study a coupled maps memory model both numerically and analytically. These results illustrate that spatial effects and memory effects can play a significant role in determining the dynamics of wave propagation in cardiac tissue.

  2. Cardiac image modelling: Breadth and depth in heart disease.

    PubMed

    Suinesiaputra, Avan; McCulloch, Andrew D; Nash, Martyn P; Pontre, Beau; Young, Alistair A

    2016-10-01

    With the advent of large-scale imaging studies and big health data, and the corresponding growth in analytics, machine learning and computational image analysis methods, there are now exciting opportunities for deepening our understanding of the mechanisms and characteristics of heart disease. Two emerging fields are computational analysis of cardiac remodelling (shape and motion changes due to disease) and computational analysis of physiology and mechanics to estimate biophysical properties from non-invasive imaging. Many large cohort studies now underway around the world have been specifically designed based on non-invasive imaging technologies in order to gain new information about the development of heart disease from asymptomatic to clinical manifestations. These give an unprecedented breadth to the quantification of population variation and disease development. Also, for the individual patient, it is now possible to determine biophysical properties of myocardial tissue in health and disease by interpreting detailed imaging data using computational modelling. For these population and patient-specific computational modelling methods to develop further, we need open benchmarks for algorithm comparison and validation, open sharing of data and algorithms, and demonstration of clinical efficacy in patient management and care. The combination of population and patient-specific modelling will give new insights into the mechanisms of cardiac disease, in particular the development of heart failure, congenital heart disease, myocardial infarction, contractile dysfunction and diastolic dysfunction. PMID:27349830

  3. Depth-resolved fluorescence of human ectocervical tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yicong; Xi, Peng; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Yim, So Fan; Yu, Mei-Yung; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2005-04-01

    The depth-resolved autofluorescence of normal and dysplastic human ectocervical tissue within 120um depth were investigated utilizing a portable confocal fluorescence spectroscopy with the excitations at 355nm and 457nm. From the topmost keratinizing layer of all ectocervical tissue samples, strong keratin fluorescence with the spectral characteristics similar to collagen was observed, which created serious interference in seeking the correlation between tissue fluorescence and tissue pathology. While from the underlying non-keratinizing epithelial layer, the measured NADH fluorescence induced by 355nm excitation and FAD fluorescence induced by 457nm excitation were strongly correlated to the tissue pathology. The ratios between NADH over FAD fluorescence increased statistically in the CIN epithelial relative to the normal and HPV epithelia, which indicated increased metabolic activity in precancerous tissue. This study demonstrates that the depth-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy can reveal fine structural information on epithelial tissue and potentially provide more accurate diagnostic information for determining tissue pathology.

  4. Enabling microscale and nanoscale approaches for bioengineered cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Chan, Vincent; Raman, Ritu; Cvetkovic, Caroline; Bashir, Rashid

    2013-03-26

    In this issue of ACS Nano, Shin et al. present their finding that the addition of carbon nanotubes (CNT) in gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) results in improved functionality of bioengineered cardiac tissue. These CNT-GelMA hybrid materials demonstrate cardiac tissue with enhanced electrophysiological performance; improved mechanical integrity; better cell adhesion, viability, uniformity, and organization; increased beating rate and lowered excitation threshold; and protective effects against cardio-inhibitory and cardio-toxic drugs. In this Perspective, we outline recent progress in cardiac tissue engineering and prospects for future development. Bioengineered cardiac tissues can be used to build "heart-on-a-chip" devices for drug safety and efficacy testing, fabricate bioactuators for biointegrated robotics and reverse-engineered life forms, treat abnormal cardiac rhythms, and perhaps one day cure heart disease with tissue and organ transplants. PMID:23527748

  5. Biomaterial based cardiac tissue engineering and its applications

    PubMed Central

    Huyer, Locke Davenport; Montgomery, Miles; Zhao, Yimu; Xiao, Yun; Conant, Genevieve; Korolj, Anastasia; Radisic, Milica

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide, necessitating the development of effective treatment strategies. A myocardial infarction involves the blockage of a coronary artery leading to depletion of nutrient and oxygen supply to cardiomyocytes and massive cell death in a region of the myocardium. Cardiac tissue engineering is the growth of functional cardiac tissue in vitro on biomaterial scaffolds for regenerative medicine application. This strategy relies on the optimization of the complex relationship between cell networks and biomaterial properties. In this review, we discuss important biomaterial properties for cardiac tissue engineering applications, such as elasticity, degradation, and induced host response, and their relationship to engineered cardiac cell environments. With these properties in mind, we also emphasize in vitro use of cardiac tissues for high-throughput drug screening and disease modelling. PMID:25989939

  6. Biomaterial based cardiac tissue engineering and its applications.

    PubMed

    Huyer, Locke Davenport; Montgomery, Miles; Zhao, Yimu; Xiao, Yun; Conant, Genevieve; Korolj, Anastasia; Radisic, Milica

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide, necessitating the development of effective treatment strategies. A myocardial infarction involves the blockage of a coronary artery leading to depletion of nutrient and oxygen supply to cardiomyocytes and massive cell death in a region of the myocardium. Cardiac tissue engineering is the growth of functional cardiac tissue in vitro on biomaterial scaffolds for regenerative medicine application. This strategy relies on the optimization of the complex relationship between cell networks and biomaterial properties. In this review, we discuss important biomaterial properties for cardiac tissue engineering applications, such as elasticity, degradation, and induced host response, and their relationship to engineered cardiac cell environments. With these properties in mind, we also emphasize in vitro use of cardiac tissues for high-throughput drug screening and disease modelling. PMID:25989939

  7. Incretin attenuates diabetes-induced damage in rat cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    AbdElmonem Elbassuoni, Eman

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), as a member of the incretin family, has a role in glucose homeostasis, its receptors distributed throughout the body, including the heart. The aim was to investigate cardiac lesions following diabetes induction, and the potential effect of GLP-1 on this type of lesions and the molecular mechanism driving this activity. Adult male rats were classified into: normal, diabetic, 4-week high-dose exenatide-treated diabetic rats, 4-week low-dose exenatide-treated diabetic rats, and 1-week exenatide-treated diabetic rats. The following parameters were measured: in blood: glucose, insulin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), total creatine kinase (CK), creatine kinase MB isoenzyme (CK-MB), and CK-MB relative index; in cardiac tissue: lipid peroxide (LPO) and some antioxidant enzymes. The untreated diabetic group displayed significant increases in blood level of glucose, LDH, and CK-MB, and cardiac tissue LPO, and a significant decrease in cardiac tissue antioxidant enzymes. GLP-1 supplementation in diabetic rats definitely decreased the hyperglycemia and abolished the detrimental effects of diabetes on the cardiac tissue. The effect of GLP-1 on blood glucose and on the heart also appeared after a short supplementation period (1 week). It can be concluded that GLP-1 has beneficial effects on diabetes-induced oxidative cardiac tissue damage, most probably via its antioxidant effect directly acting on cardiac tissue and independent of its hypoglycemic effect. PMID:25011640

  8. Bioactive polymers for cardiac tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Samuel Thomas

    2007-05-01

    Prevalent in the US and worldwide, acute myocardial infarctions (AMI) can cause ischemic injuries to the heart that persist and lead to progressive degradation of the organ. Tissue engineering techniques exploiting biomaterials present a hopeful means of treating these injuries, either by mechanically stabilizing the injured ventricle, or by fostering cell growth to replace myocytes lost to damage. This thesis describes the development and testing of a synthetic extracellular matrix for cardiac tissue engineering applications. The first stage of this process was using an advanced finite element model of an injured ovine left ventricle to evaluate the potential benefits of injecting synthetic materials into the heart. These simulations indicated that addition of small amounts non-contractile material (on the order of 1--5% total wall volume) to infarct border zone regions reduced pathological systolic fiber stress to levels near those found in normal remote regions. Simulations also determined that direct addition to the infarct itself caused increases in ventricle ejection fraction while the underlying performance of the pump, ascertained by the Starling relation, was not improved. From these theoretical results, biomaterials were developed specifically for injection into the injured myocardium, and were characterized and tested for their mechanical properties and ability to sustain the proliferation of a stem cell population suitable for transplantation. Thermoresponsive synthetic copolymer hydrogels consisting of N-isopropylacrylamide and acrylic acid, p(NIPAAm-co-AAc), crosslinked with protease degradable amino acid sequences and modified with integrin binding ligands were synthesized, characterized in vitro, and used for myocardial implantation. These injectable materials could maintain a population of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells in both two dimensional and three dimensional culture, and when tested in vivo in a murine infarct model they

  9. Micromolded Gelatin Hydrogels for Extended Culture of Engineered Cardiac Tissues

    PubMed Central

    McCain, Megan L.; Agarwal, Ashutosh; Nesmith, Haley W.; Nesmith, Alexander P.; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2014-01-01

    Defining the chronic cardiotoxic effects of drugs during preclinical screening is hindered by the relatively short lifetime of functional cardiac tissues in vitro, which are traditionally cultured on synthetic materials that do not recapitulate the cardiac microenvironment. Because collagen is the primary extracellular matrix protein in the heart, we hypothesized that micromolded gelatin hydrogel substrates tuned to mimic the elastic modulus of the heart would extend the lifetime of engineered cardiac tissues by better matching the native chemical and mechanical microenvironment. To measure tissue stress, we used tape casting, micromolding, and laser engraving to fabricate gelatin hydrogel muscular thin film cantilevers. Neonatal rat cardiac myocytes adhered to gelatin hydrogels and formed aligned tissues as defined by the microgrooves. Cardiac tissues could be cultured for over three weeks without declines in contractile stress. Myocytes on gelatin had higher spare respiratory capacity compared to those on fibronectin-coated PDMS, suggesting that improved metabolic function could be contributing to extended culture lifetime. Lastly, human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac myocytes adhered to micromolded gelatin surfaces and formed aligned tissues that remained functional for four weeks, highlighting their potential for human-relevant chronic studies. PMID:24731714

  10. Real time assessment of RF cardiac tissue ablation with optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Sharareh, S

    2008-03-20

    An optical spectroscopy approach is demonstrated allowing for critical parameters during RF ablation of cardiac tissue to be evaluated in real time. The method is based on incorporating in a typical ablation catheter transmitting and receiving fibers that terminate at the tip of the catheter. By analyzing the spectral characteristics of the NIR diffusely reflected light, information is obtained on such parameters as, catheter-tissue proximity, lesion formation, depth of penetration of the lesion, formation of char during the ablation, formation of coagulum around the ablation site, differentiation of ablated from healthy tissue, and recognition of micro-bubble formation in the tissue.

  11. Analyzing Remodeling of Cardiac Tissue: A Comprehensive Approach Based on Confocal Microscopy and 3D Reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Thomas; Edelmann, J-C; Sachse, Frank B

    2016-05-01

    Microstructural characterization of cardiac tissue and its remodeling in disease is a crucial step in many basic research projects. We present a comprehensive approach for three-dimensional characterization of cardiac tissue at the submicrometer scale. We developed a compression-free mounting method as well as labeling and imaging protocols that facilitate acquisition of three-dimensional image stacks with scanning confocal microscopy. We evaluated the approach with normal and infarcted ventricular tissue. We used the acquired image stacks for segmentation, quantitative analysis and visualization of important tissue components. In contrast to conventional mounting, compression-free mounting preserved cell shapes, capillary lumens and extracellular laminas. Furthermore, the new approach and imaging protocols resulted in high signal-to-noise ratios at depths up to 60 µm. This allowed extensive analyzes revealing major differences in volume fractions and distribution of cardiomyocytes, blood vessels, fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and extracellular space in control vs. infarct border zone. Our results show that the developed approach yields comprehensive data on microstructure of cardiac tissue and its remodeling in disease. In contrast to other approaches, it allows quantitative assessment of all major tissue components. Furthermore, we suggest that the approach will provide important data for physiological models of cardiac tissue at the submicrometer scale. PMID:26399990

  12. Depth sensitive oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy of oral epithelial tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Maria K.; Lam, Sylvia; Poh, Catherine; Sokolov, Konstantin

    2014-05-01

    Identifying depth-dependent alterations associated with epithelial cancerous lesions can be challenging in the oral cavity where variable epithelial thicknesses and troublesome keratin growths are prominent. Spectroscopic methods with enhanced depth resolution would immensely aid in isolating optical properties associated with malignant transformation. Combining multiple beveled fibers, oblique collection geometry, and polarization gating, oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy (OPRS) achieves depth sensitive detection. We report promising results from a clinical trial of patients with oral lesions suspected of dysplasia or carcinoma demonstrating the potential of OPRS for the analysis of morphological and architectural changes in the context of multilayer, epithelial oral tissue.

  13. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in cardiac tissues.

    PubMed

    Page, C; Doubell, A F

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) has recently emerged as a prominent role player in intracellular signalling in the ventricular myocyte with attention being focussed on its possible role in the development of ventricular hypertrophy. It is becoming clear that MAPK is also active in other cells of cardiac origin such as cardiac fibroblasts and possible functions of this signalling pathway in the heart have yet to be explored. In this report the mammalian MAPK pathway is briefly outlined, before reviewing current knowledge of the MAPK pathway in cardiac tissue (ventricular myocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells and cardiac fibroblasts). New data is also presented on the presence and activity of MAPK in two additional cardiac celltypes namely atrial myocytes and vascular endothelial cells from the coronary microcirculation. PMID:8739228

  14. Anisotropic Silk Biomaterials Containing Cardiac Extracellular Matrix for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Stoppel, Whitney L.; Hu, Dongjian; Domian, Ibrahim J.; Kaplan, David L.; Black, Lauren D.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac malformations and disease are the leading causes of death in the United States in live-born infants and adults, respectively. In both of these cases, a decrease in the number of functional cardiomyocytes often results in improper growth of heart tissue, wound healing complications, and poor tissue repair. The field of cardiac tissue engineering seeks to address these concerns by developing cardiac patches created from a variety of biomaterial scaffolds to be used in surgical repair of the heart. These scaffolds should be fully degradable biomaterial systems with tunable properties such that the materials can be altered to meet the needs of both in vitro culture (e.g., disease modeling) and in vivo application (e.g., cardiac patch). Current platforms do not utilize both structural anisotropy and proper cell-matrix contacts to promote functional cardiac phenotypes and thus there is still a need for critically sized scaffolds that mimic both the structural and adhesive properties of native tissue. To address this need, we have developed a silk-based scaffold platform containing cardiac tissue-derived extracellular matrix (cECM). These silk-cECM composite scaffolds have tunable architectures, degradation rates, and mechanical properties. Subcutaneous implantation in rats demonstrated that addition of the cECM to aligned silk scaffold led to 99% endogenous cell infiltration and promoted vascularization of a critically sized scaffold (10 mm × 5 mm × 2.5 mm) after 4 weeks in vivo. In vitro, silk-cECM scaffolds maintained the HL-1 atrial cardiomyocytes and human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and promoted a more functional phenotype in both cell types. This class of hybrid silk-cECM anisotropic scaffolds offers new opportunities for developing more physiologically relevant tissues for cardiac repair and disease modeling. PMID:25826196

  15. Self-organization of rat cardiac cells into contractile 3-D cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Baar, Keith; Birla, Ravi; Boluyt, Marvin O; Borschel, Gregory H; Arruda, Ellen M; Dennis, Robert G

    2005-02-01

    The mammalian heart is not known to regenerate following injury. Therefore, there is great interest in developing viable tissue-based models for cardiac assist. Recent years have brought numerous advances in the development of scaffold-based models of cardiac tissue, but a self-organizing model has yet to be described. Here, we report the development of an in vitro cardiac tissue without scaffolding materials in the contractile region. Using an optimal concentration of the adhesion molecule laminin, a confluent layer of neonatal rat cardiomyogenic cells can be induced to self-organize into a cylindrical construct, resembling a papillary muscle, which we have termed a cardioid. Like endogenous heart tissue, cardioids contract spontaneously and can be electrically paced between 1 and 5 Hz indefinitely without fatigue. These engineered cardiac tissues also show an increased rate of spontaneous contraction (chronotropy), increased rate of relaxation (lusitropy), and increased force production (inotropy) in response to epinephrine. Cardioids have a developmental protein phenotype that expresses both alpha- and beta-tropomyosin, very low levels of SERCA2a, and very little of the mature isoform of cardiac troponin T. PMID:15574489

  16. Cardiac Cell Culture Model (CCCM) as a Left Ventricle Mimic for Cardiac Tissue Generation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Mai-Dung; Tinney, Joseph P.; Yuan, Fangping; Roussel, Thomas J.; El-Baz, Ayman; Giridharan, Guruprasad; Keller, Bradley B.; Sethu, Palaniappan

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in cardiac tissue engineering is the delivery of hemodynamic mechanical cues that play a critical role in the early development and maturation of cardiomyocytes. Generation of functional cardiac tissue capable of replacing or augmenting cardiac function therefore requires physiologically relevant environments that can deliver complex mechanical cues for cardiomyocyte functional maturation. The goal of this work is the development and validation of a cardiac cell culture model (CCCM) microenvironment that accurately mimics pressure-volume changes seen in the left ventricle and to use this system to achieve cardiac cell maturation under conditions where mechanical loads such as pressure and stretch are gradually increased from the unloaded state to conditions seen in vivo. The CCCM platform, consisting of a cell culture chamber integrated within a flow loop was created to accomplish culture of 10 day chick embryonic ventricular cardiomyocytes subject to 4 days of stimulation (10 mm Hg, ~13% stretch at a frequency of 2 Hz). Results clearly show that CCCM conditioned cardiomyocytes accelerate cardiomyocyte structural and functional maturation in comparison to static unloaded controls as evidenced by increased proliferation, alignment of actin cytoskeleton, bundle-like sarcomeric α-actinin expression, higher pacing beat rate at lower threshold voltages and increased shortening. These results confirm the CCCM microenvironment can accelerate immature cardiac cell structural and functional maturation for potential cardiac regenerative applications. PMID:23952579

  17. Construction of cardiac tissue rings using a magnetic tissue fabrication technique.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Hirokazu; Ito, Akira; Sato, Masanori; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2010-01-01

    Here we applied a magnetic force-based tissue engineering technique to cardiac tissue fabrication. A mixture of extracellular matrix precursor and cardiomyocytes labeled with magnetic nanoparticles was added into a well containing a central polycarbonate cylinder. With the use of a magnet, the cells were attracted to the bottom of the well and allowed to form a cell layer. During cultivation, the cell layer shrank towards the cylinder, leading to the formation of a ring-shaped tissue that possessed a multilayered cell structure and contractile properties. These results indicate that magnetic tissue fabrication is a promising approach for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:21152282

  18. Controlling the Structural and Functional Anisotropy of Engineered Cardiac Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bursac, N

    2014-01-01

    The ability to control the degree of structural and functional anisotropy in 3D engineered cardiac tissues would have high utility for both in vitro studies of cardiac muscle physiology and pathology as well as potential tissue engineering therapies for myocardial infarction. Here, we applied a high aspect ratio soft lithography technique to generate network-like tissue patches seeded with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Fabricating longer elliptical pores within the patch networks increased the overall cardiomyocyte and extracellular matrix (ECM) alignment within the patch. Improved uniformity of cell and matrix alignment yielded an increase in anisotropy of action potential propagation and faster longitudinal conduction velocity (LCV). Cardiac tissue patches with a higher degree of cardiomyocyte alignment and electrical anisotropy also demonstrated greater isometric twitch forces. After two weeks of culture, specific measures of electrical and contractile function (LCV = 26.8 ± 0.8 cm/s, specific twitch force = 8.9 ± 1.1 mN/mm2 for the longest pores studied) were comparable to those of neonatal rat myocardium. We have thus described methodology for engineering of highly functional 3D engineered cardiac tissues with controllable degree of anisotropy. PMID:24717534

  19. Spring-like fibers for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Sharon; Feiner, Ron; Shapira, Assaf; Ji, Jing; Sui, Xiaomeng; Daniel Wagner, H; Dvir, Tal

    2013-11-01

    Recapitulation of the cellular microenvironment of the heart, which promotes cell contraction, remains a key challenge in cardiac tissue engineering. We report here on our work, where for the first time, a 3-dimensional (3D) spring-like fiber scaffold was fabricated, successfully mimicking the coiled perimysial fibers of the heart. We hypothesized that since in vivo straightening and re-coiling of these fibers allow stretching and contraction of the myocardium in the direction of the cardiomyocytes, such a scaffold can support the assembly of a functional cardiac tissue capable of generating a strong contraction force. In this study, the mechanical properties of both spring-like single fibers and 3D scaffolds composed of them were investigated. The measurements showed that they have increased elasticity and extensibility compared to corresponding straight fibers and straight fiber scaffolds. We have also shown that cardiac cells cultivated on single spring-like fibers formed cell-fiber interactions that induced fiber stretching in the direction of contraction. Moreover, cardiac cells engineered within 3D thick spring-like fiber scaffolds formed a functional tissue exhibiting significantly improved function, including stronger contraction force (p = 0.002), higher beating rate (p < 0.0001) and lower excitation threshold (p = 0.02), compared to straight fiber scaffolds. Collectively, our results suggest that spring-like fibers can play a key role in contributing to the ex vivo formation of a contracting cardiac muscle tissue. We envision that cardiac tissues engineered within these spring-like fiber scaffolds can be used to improve heart function after infarction. PMID:23953840

  20. Depth-resolved monitoring of analytes diffusion in ocular tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, Kirill V.; Ghosn, Mohamad G.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive imaging technique with high in-depth resolution. We employed OCT technique for monitoring and quantification of analyte and drug diffusion in cornea and sclera of rabbit eyes in vitro. Different analytes and drugs such as metronidazole, dexamethasone, ciprofloxacin, mannitol, and glucose solution were studied and whose permeability coefficients were calculated. Drug diffusion monitoring was performed as a function of time and as a function of depth. Obtained results suggest that OCT technique might be used for analyte diffusion studies in connective and epithelial tissues.

  1. Polycaprolactone/oligomer compound scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Chaganti Srinivasa; Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Zussman, Eyal

    2014-10-01

    Polycaprolactone (PCL), a synthetic biocompatible and biodegradable polymer generally used as a scaffold material for tissue engineering applications. The high stiffness and hydrophobicity of the PCL fiber mesh does not provide significant cell attachment and proliferation in cardiac tissue engineering. Towards this goal, the study focused on a compound of PCL and oligomer hydrogel [Bisphenol A ethoxylated dimethacrylate (BPAEDMA)] processed into electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds. The composition, morphology and mechanical properties of the compound scaffolds, composed of varying ratios of PCL and hydrogel were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical analyzer. The elastic modulus of PCL/BPAEDMA nanofibrous scaffolds was shown to be varying the BPAEDMA weight fraction and was decreased by increasing the BPAEDMA weight fraction. Compound fiber meshes containing 75 wt % BPAEDMA oligomer hydrogel exhibited lower modulus (3.55 MPa) and contact angle of 25(o) . Rabbit cardiac cells cultured for 10 days on these PCL/BPAEDMA compound nanofibrous scaffolds remained viable and expressed cardiac troponin and alpha-actinin proteins for the normal functioning of myocardium. Cell adhesion and proliferations were significantly increased on compound fiber meshes containing 75 wt % BPAEDMA, when compared with other nanofibrous scaffolds. The results observed that the produced PCL/BPAEDMA compound nanofibrous scaffolds promote cell adhesion, proliferation and normal functioning of cardiac cells to clinically beneficial levels, relevant for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:24288184

  2. Transplantation of a tissue-engineered human vascularized cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Lesman, Ayelet; Habib, Manhal; Caspi, Oren; Gepstein, Amira; Arbel, Gil; Levenberg, Shulamit; Gepstein, Lior

    2010-01-01

    Myocardial regeneration strategies have been hampered by the lack of sources for human cardiomyocytes (CMs) and by the significant donor cell loss following transplantation. We assessed the ability of a three-dimensional tissue-engineered human vascularized cardiac muscle to engraft in the in vivo rat heart and to promote functional vascularization. Human embryonic stem cell-derived CMs alone or with human endothelial cells (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) and embryonic fibroblasts (triculture constructs) were seeded onto biodegradable porous scaffolds. The resulting tissue constructs were transplanted to the in vivo rat heart and formed cardiac tissue grafts. Immunostaining studies for human-specific CD31 and alpha-smooth muscle actin demonstrated the formation of both donor (human) and host (rat)-derived vasculature within the engrafted triculture tissue constructs. Intraventricular injection of fluorescent microspheres or lectin resulted in their incorporation by human-derived vessels, confirming their functional integration with host coronary vasculature. Finally, the number of blood vessels was significantly greater in the triculture tissue constructs (60.3 +/- 8/mm(3), p < 0.05) when compared with scaffolds containing only CMs (39.0 +/- 14.4/mm(3)). In conclusion, a tissue-engineered human vascularized cardiac muscle can be established ex vivo and transplanted in vivo to form stable grafts. By utilizing a multicellular preparation we were able to increase biograft vascularization and to show that the preexisting human vessels can become functional and contribute to tissue perfusion. PMID:19642856

  3. Cardiac tissue characterization using near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Moon, Rajinder; Hendon, Christine P.

    2014-03-01

    Cardiac tissue from swine and canine hearts were assessed using diffuse reflectance near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) ex vivo. Slope measured between 800-880 nm reflectance was found to reveal differences between epicardial fat and normal myocardium tissue. This parameter was observed to increase monotonically from measurements obtained from the onset of radiofrequency ablation (RFA). A sheathe-style fiber optic catheter was then developed to allow real-time sampling of the zone of resistive heating during RFA treatment. A model was developed and used to extract changes in tissue absorption and reduced scattering based on the steady-state diffusion approximation. It was found that key changes in tissue optical properties occur during application of RF energy and can be monitored using NIRS. These results encourage the development of NIRS integrated catheters for real-time guidance of the cardiac ablation treatment.

  4. Depth-encoded synthetic aperture optical coherence tomography of biological tissues with extended focal depth.

    PubMed

    Mo, Jianhua; de Groot, Mattijs; de Boer, Johannes F

    2015-02-23

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has proven to be able to provide three-dimensional (3D) volumetric images of scattering biological tissues for in vivo medical diagnostics. Unlike conventional optical microscopy, its depth-resolving ability (axial resolution) is exclusively determined by the laser source and therefore invariant over the full imaging depth. In contrast, its transverse resolution is determined by the objective's numerical aperture and the wavelength which is only approximately maintained over twice the Rayleigh range. However, the prevailing laser sources for OCT allow image depths of more than 5 mm which is considerably longer than the Rayleigh range. This limits high transverse resolution imaging with OCT. Previously, we reported a novel method to extend the depth-of-focus (DOF) of OCT imaging in Mo et al.Opt. Express 21, 10048 (2013)]. The approach is to create three different optical apertures via pupil segmentation with an annular phase plate. These three optical apertures produce three OCT images from the same sample, which are encoded to different depth positions in a single OCT B-scan. This allows for correcting the defocus-induced curvature of wave front in the pupil so as to improve the focus. As a consequence, the three images originating from those three optical apertures can be used to reconstruct a new image with an extended DOF. In this study, we successfully applied this method for the first time to both an artificial phantom and biological tissues over a four times larger depth range. The results demonstrate a significant DOF improvement, paving the way for 3D high resolution OCT imaging beyond the conventional Rayleigh range. PMID:25836528

  5. Connective tissue growth factor induces cardiac hypertrophy through Akt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hayata, Nozomi; Fujio, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Iwakura, Tomohiko; Obana, Masanori; Takai, Mika; Mohri, Tomomi; Nonen, Shinpei; Maeda, Makiko; Azuma, Junichi

    2008-05-30

    In the process of cardiac remodeling, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is secreted from cardiac myocytes. Though CTGF is well known to promote fibroblast proliferation, its pathophysiological effects in cardiac myocytes remain to be elucidated. In this study, we examined the biological effects of CTGF in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Cardiac myocytes stimulated with full length CTGF and its C-terminal region peptide showed the increase in cell surface area. Similar to hypertrophic ligands for G-protein coupled receptors, such as endothelin-1, CTGF activated amino acid uptake; however, CTGF-induced hypertrophy is not associated with the increased expression of skeletal actin or BNP, analyzed by Northern-blotting. CTGF treatment activated ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, JNK and Akt. The inhibition of Akt by transducing dominant-negative Akt abrogated CTGF-mediated increase in cell size, while the inhibition of MAP kinases did not affect the cardiac hypertrophy. These findings indicate that CTGF is a novel hypertrophic factor in cardiac myocytes.

  6. Biomimetic Polymers for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a morbid disorder characterized by progressive cardiomyocyte (CM) dysfunction and death. Interest in cell-based therapies is growing, but sustainability of injected CMs remains a challenge. To mitigate this, we developed an injectable biomimetic Reverse Thermal Gel (RTG) specifically engineered to support long-term CM survival. This RTG biopolymer provided a solution-based delivery vehicle of CMs, which transitioned to a gel-based matrix shortly after reaching body temperature. In this study we tested the suitability of this biopolymer to sustain CM viability. The RTG was biomolecule-functionalized with poly-l-lysine or laminin. Neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM) and adult rat ventricular myocytes (ARVM) were cultured in plain-RTG and biomolecule-functionalized-RTG both under 3-dimensional (3D) conditions. Traditional 2D biomolecule-coated dishes were used as controls. We found that the RTG-lysine stimulated NRVM to spread and form heart-like functional syncytia. Regarding cell contraction, in both RTG and RTG-lysine, beating cells were recorded after 21 days. Additionally, more than 50% (p value < 0.05; n = 5) viable ARVMs, characterized by a well-defined cardiac phenotype represented by sarcomeric cross-striations, were found in the RTG-laminin after 8 days. These results exhibit the tremendous potential of a minimally invasive CM transplantation through our designed RTG-cell therapy platform. PMID:27073119

  7. Cardiac Tissue Injury and Remodeling Is Dependent Upon MR Regulation of Activation Pathways in Cardiac Tissue Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jimmy Z; Morgan, James; Tesch, Greg H; Rickard, Amanda J; Chrissobolis, Sophocles; Drummond, Grant R; Fuller, Peter J; Young, Morag J

    2016-08-01

    Macrophage mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) signaling is an important mediator of cardiac tissue inflammation and fibrosis. The goal of the present study was to determine the cellular mechanisms of MR signaling in macrophages that promote cardiac tissue injury and remodeling. We sought to identify specific markers of MR signaling in isolated tissue macrophages (cardiac, aortic) vs splenic mononuclear cells from wild-type and myeloid MR-null mice given vehicle/salt or deoxycorticosterone (DOC)/salt for 8 weeks. Cardiac tissue fibrosis in response to 8 weeks of DOC/salt treatment was found in the hearts from wild-type but not myeloid MR-null mice. This was associated with an increased expression of the profibrotic markers TGF-β1 and matrix metalloproteinase-12 and type 1 inflammatory markers TNFα and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand-9 in cardiac macrophages. Differential expression of immunomodulatory M2-like markers (eg, arginase-1, macrophage scavenger receptor 1) was dependent on the tissue location of wild-type and MR-null macrophages. Finally, intact MR signaling is required for the phosphorylation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase in response to a proinflammatory stimulus in bone marrow monocytes/macrophages in culture. These data suggest that the activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase pathway in macrophages after a tissue injury and inflammatory stimuli in the DOC/salt model is MR dependent and regulates the transcription of downstream profibrotic factors, which may represent potential therapeutic targets in heart failure patients. PMID:27253999

  8. Electroactive 3D materials for cardiac tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelmi, Amy; Zhang, Jiabin; Cieslar-Pobuda, Artur; Ljunngren, Monika K.; Los, Marek Jan; Rafat, Mehrdad; Jager, Edwin W. H.

    2015-04-01

    By-pass surgery and heart transplantation are traditionally used to restore the heart's functionality after a myocardial Infarction (MI or heart attack) that results in scar tissue formation and impaired cardiac function. However, both procedures are associated with serious post-surgical complications. Therefore, new strategies to help re-establish heart functionality are necessary. Tissue engineering and stem cell therapy are the promising approaches that are being explored for the treatment of MI. The stem cell niche is extremely important for the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells and tissue regeneration. For the introduction of stem cells into the host tissue an artificial carrier such as a scaffold is preferred as direct injection of stem cells has resulted in fast stem cell death. Such scaffold will provide the proper microenvironment that can be altered electronically to provide temporal stimulation to the cells. We have developed an electroactive polymer (EAP) scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering. The EAP scaffold mimics the extracellular matrix and provides a 3D microenvironment that can be easily tuned during fabrication, such as controllable fibre dimensions, alignment, and coating. In addition, the scaffold can provide electrical and electromechanical stimulation to the stem cells which are important external stimuli to stem cell differentiation. We tested the initial biocompatibility of these scaffolds using cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs), and continued onto more sensitive induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS). We present the fabrication and characterisation of these electroactive fibres as well as the response of increasingly sensitive cell types to the scaffolds.

  9. Cell electrospinning cardiac patches for tissue engineering the heart.

    PubMed

    Ehler, Elisabeth; Jayasinghe, Suwan N

    2014-09-21

    Cell electrospinning has tremendous applicability to a wide range of uses within both the laboratory and clinic. This has directly resulted from the technology's unique ability to immobilize multiple cell types with a wide range of molecules simultaneously within a fiber during the scaffold generation process. The technology has been shown to generate many cell laden complex architectures from true three-dimensional sheets to those multi-core vessels. Although those studies have demonstrated the versatility of this platform biotechnology, we show here for the first time the ability to immobilize primary cardiac myocytes within these fibers in our quest to develop this technology for creating three-dimensional cardiac patches which could be used for repairing, replacing and rejuvenating damaged, diseased and/or ageing cardiac tissues. These advances are unrivalled by any other technology currently available in the regenerative medicine toolbox, and have many interesting ramifications for repairing a damaged heart. PMID:25058315

  10. Cardiac tissue engineering and regeneration using cell-based therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alrefai, Mohammad T; Murali, Divya; Paul, Arghya; Ridwan, Khalid M; Connell, John M; Shum-Tim, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy and tissue engineering represent a forefront of current research in the treatment of heart disease. With these technologies, advancements are being made into therapies for acute ischemic myocardial injury and chronic, otherwise nonreversible, myocardial failure. The current clinical management of cardiac ischemia deals with reestablishing perfusion to the heart but not dealing with the irreversible damage caused by the occlusion or stenosis of the supplying vessels. The applications of these new technologies are not yet fully established as part of the management of cardiac diseases but will become so in the near future. The discussion presented here reviews some of the pioneering works at this new frontier. Key results of allogeneic and autologous stem cell trials are presented, including the use of embryonic, bone marrow-derived, adipose-derived, and resident cardiac stem cells. PMID:25999743

  11. Proangiogenic scaffolds as functional templates for cardiac tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Lauran R.; Mortisen, Derek J.; Sussman, Eric M.; Dupras, Sarah K.; Fugate, James A.; Cuy, Janet L.; Hauch, Kip D.; Laflamme, Michael A.; Murry, Charles E.; Ratner, Buddy D.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate here a cardiac tissue-engineering strategy addressing multicellular organization, integration into host myocardium, and directional cues to reconstruct the functional architecture of heart muscle. Microtemplating is used to shape poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid) hydrogel into a tissue-engineering scaffold with architectures driving heart tissue integration. The construct contains parallel channels to organize cardiomyocyte bundles, supported by micrometer-sized, spherical, interconnected pores that enhance angiogenesis while reducing scarring. Surface-modified scaffolds were seeded with human ES cell-derived cardiomyocytes and cultured in vitro. Cardiomyocytes survived and proliferated for 2 wk in scaffolds, reaching adult heart densities. Cardiac implantation of acellular scaffolds with pore diameters of 30–40 μm showed angiogenesis and reduced fibrotic response, coinciding with a shift in macrophage phenotype toward the M2 state. This work establishes a foundation for spatially controlled cardiac tissue engineering by providing discrete compartments for cardiomyocytes and stroma in a scaffold that enhances vascularization and integration while controlling the inflammatory response. PMID:20696917

  12. Electrospun biocomposite nanofibrous patch for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Kai, Dan; Ghasemi-Mobarakeh, Laleh; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2011-10-01

    A bioengineered construct that matches the chemical, mechanical, biological properties and extracellular matrix morphology of native tissue could be suitable as a cardiac patch for supporting the heart after myocardial infarction. The potential of utilizing a composite nanofibrous scaffold of poly(dl-lactide-co-glycolide)/gelatin (PLGA/Gel) as a biomimetic cardiac patch is studied by culturing a population of cardiomyocyte containing cells on the electrospun scaffolds. The chemical characterization and mechanical properties of the electrospun PLGA and PLGA/Gel nanofibers were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and tensile measurements. The biocompatibility of the scaffolds was also studied and the cardiomyocytes seeded on PLGA/Gel nanofibers were found to express the typical functional cardiac proteins such as alpha-actinin and troponin I, showing the easy integration of cardiomyocytes on PLGA/Gel scaffolds. Our studies strengthen the application of electrospun PLGA/Gel nanofibers as a bio-mechanical support for injured myocardium and as a potential substrate for induction of endogenous cardiomyocyte proliferation, ultimately reducing the cardiac dysfunction and improving cardiac remodeling. PMID:21813957

  13. Fabrication and characterization of bio-engineered cardiac pseudo tissues

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tao; Baicu, Catalin; Aho, Michael; Zile, Michael; Boland, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We report to fabricate functional three-dimensional (3D) tissue constructs by using an inkjet based bio-prototyping method. With the use of the modified inkjet printers, contractile cardiac hybrids that exhibit the forms of the 3D rectangular sheet and even the “half heart” (with two connected ventricles) have been fabricated by arranging alternate layers of biocompatible alginate hydrogels and mammalian cardiac cells according to pre-designed 3D patterns. In this study, primary feline adult and H1 cardiomyocytes were used as model cardiac cells. Alginate hydrogels with controlled micro-shell structures were built by spraying cross-linkers in micro drops onto un-gelled alginic acid. The cells remained viable in constructs as thick as 1 cm due to the programmed porosity. Microscopic and macroscopic contractile functions of these cardiomyocytes constructs were observed in vitro. These results suggest that the inkjet bio-prototyping method could be used for hierarchical design of functional cardiac pseudo tissues, balanced with porosity for mass transport and structural support. PMID:20811105

  14. Nuclear Morphology and Deformation in Engineered Cardiac Myocytes and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Mark-Anthony; Adams, William J.; Geisse, Nicholas A.; Feinberg, Adam W.; Sheehy, Sean P.; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering requires finely-tuned manipulation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironment to optimize internal myocardial organization. The myocyte nucleus is mechanically connected to the cell membrane via cytoskeletal elements, making it a target for the cellular response to perturbation of the ECM. However, the role of ECM spatial configuration and myocyte shape on nuclear location and morphology is unknown. In this study, printed ECM proteins were used to configure the geometry of cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes. Engineered one- and two-dimensional tissue constructs and single-myocyte islands were assayed using live fluorescence imaging to examine nuclear position, morphology and motion as a function of the imposed ECM geometry during diastolic relaxation and systolic contraction. Image analysis showed that anisotropic tissue constructs cultured on microfabricated ECM lines possessed a high degree of nuclear alignment similar to that found in vivo; nuclei in isotropic tissues were polymorphic in shape with an apparently random orientation. Nuclear eccentricity was also increased for the anisotropic tissues, suggesting that intracellular forces deform the nucleus as the cell is spatially confined. During systole, nuclei experienced increasing spatial confinement in magnitude and direction of displacement as tissue anisotropy increased, yielding anisotropic deformation. Thus, the nature of nuclear displacement and deformation during systole appears to rely on a combination of the passive myofibril spatial organization and the active stress fields induced by contraction. Such findings have implications in understanding the genomic consequences and functional response of cardiac myocytes to their ECM surroundings under conditions of disease. PMID:20382423

  15. Conducting the embryonic heart: orchestrating development of specialized cardiac tissues.

    PubMed

    Gourdie, R G; Kubalak, S; Mikawa, T

    1999-01-01

    The heterogeneous tissues of the pacemaking and conduction system comprise the "smart components" of the heart, responsible for setting, maintaining, and coordinating the rhythmic pumping of cardiac muscle. Over the last few years, a wealth of new information has been collected about the unique genetic and phenotypic characteristics expressed by these tissues during cardiac morphogenesis. More recently, genetically modified viruses, mutational analysis, and targeted transgenesis have enabled even more precise resolution of the relationships between cell fate, gene expression, and differentiation of specialized function within developing myocardium. While some information provided by these newer approaches has supported conventional wisdom, some fresh and unexpected perspectives have also emerged. In particular, there is mounting evidence that extracardiac populations of cells migrating into the tubular heart have important morphogenetic roles in the inductive pattering and functional integration of the developing conduction system. PMID:10189963

  16. Optical control of excitation waves in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Rebecca A. B.; Klimas, Aleksandra; Ambrosi, Christina M.; Tomek, Jakub; Corbett, Alex; Entcheva, Emilia; Bub, Gil

    2015-12-01

    In nature, macroscopic excitation waves are found in a diverse range of settings including chemical reactions, metal rust, yeast, amoeba and the heart and brain. In the case of living biological tissue, the spatiotemporal patterns formed by these excitation waves are different in healthy and diseased states. Current electrical and pharmacological methods for wave modulation lack the spatiotemporal precision needed to control these patterns. Optical methods have the potential to overcome these limitations, but to date have only been demonstrated in simple systems, such as the Belousov-Zhabotinsky chemical reaction. Here, we combine dye-free optical imaging with optogenetic actuation to achieve dynamic control of cardiac excitation waves. Illumination with patterned light is demonstrated to optically control the direction, speed and spiral chirality of such waves in cardiac tissue. This all-optical approach offers a new experimental platform for the study and control of pattern formation in complex biological excitable systems.

  17. Approximate analytical solutions for excitation and propagation in cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Greene, D'Artagnan; Shiferaw, Yohannes

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that a variety of cardiac arrhythmias are initiated by a focal excitation in heart tissue. At the single cell level these currents are typically induced by intracellular processes such as spontaneous calcium release (SCR). However, it is not understood how the size and morphology of these focal excitations are related to the electrophysiological properties of cardiac cells. In this paper a detailed physiologically based ionic model is analyzed by projecting the excitation dynamics to a reduced one-dimensional parameter space. Based on this analysis we show that the inward current required for an excitation to occur is largely dictated by the voltage dependence of the inward rectifier potassium current (I(K1)), and is insensitive to the detailed properties of the sodium current. We derive an analytical expression relating the size of a stimulus and the critical current required to induce a propagating action potential (AP), and argue that this relationship determines the necessary number of cells that must undergo SCR in order to induce ectopic activity in cardiac tissue. Finally, we show that, once a focal excitation begins to propagate, its propagation characteristics, such as the conduction velocity and the critical radius for propagation, are largely determined by the sodium and gap junction currents with a substantially lesser effect due to repolarizing potassium currents. These results reveal the relationship between ion channel properties and important tissue scale processes such as excitation and propagation. PMID:25974539

  18. Approximate analytical solutions for excitation and propagation in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, D'Artagnan; Shiferaw, Yohannes

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that a variety of cardiac arrhythmias are initiated by a focal excitation in heart tissue. At the single cell level these currents are typically induced by intracellular processes such as spontaneous calcium release (SCR). However, it is not understood how the size and morphology of these focal excitations are related to the electrophysiological properties of cardiac cells. In this paper a detailed physiologically based ionic model is analyzed by projecting the excitation dynamics to a reduced one-dimensional parameter space. Based on this analysis we show that the inward current required for an excitation to occur is largely dictated by the voltage dependence of the inward rectifier potassium current (IK 1) , and is insensitive to the detailed properties of the sodium current. We derive an analytical expression relating the size of a stimulus and the critical current required to induce a propagating action potential (AP), and argue that this relationship determines the necessary number of cells that must undergo SCR in order to induce ectopic activity in cardiac tissue. Finally, we show that, once a focal excitation begins to propagate, its propagation characteristics, such as the conduction velocity and the critical radius for propagation, are largely determined by the sodium and gap junction currents with a substantially lesser effect due to repolarizing potassium currents. These results reveal the relationship between ion channel properties and important tissue scale processes such as excitation and propagation.

  19. Bimodal biophotonic imaging of the structure-function relationship in cardiac tissue

    PubMed Central

    Hucker, William J.; Ripplinger, Crystal M.; Fleming, Christine P.; Fedorov, Vadim V.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Efimov, Igor R.

    2009-01-01

    The development of systems physiology is hampered by the limited ability to relate tissue structure and function in intact organs in vivo or in vitro. Here, we show the application of a bimodal biophotonic imaging approach that employs optical coherence tomography and fluorescent imaging to investigate the structure-function relationship at the tissue level in the heart. Reconstruction of cardiac excitation and structure was limited by the depth penetration of bimodal imaging to ∼2 mm in atrial tissue, and ∼1 mm in ventricular myocardium. The subcellular resolution of optical coherence tomography clearly demonstrated that microscopic fiber orientation governs the pattern of wave propagation in functionally characterized rabbit sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodal preparations and revealed structural heterogeneities contributing to ventricular arrhythmias. The combination of this bimodal biophotonic imaging approach with histology and/or immunohistochemistry can span multiple scales of resolution for the investigation of the molecular and structural determinants of intact tissue physiology. PMID:19021392

  20. Highly Elastic Micropatterned Hydrogel for Engineering Functional Cardiac Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Annabi, Nasim; Tsang, Kelly; Mithieux, Suzanne M.; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Ameri, Afshin

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure is a major international health issue. Myocardial mass loss and lack of contractility are precursors to heart failure. Surgical demand for effective myocardial repair is tempered by a paucity of appropriate biological materials. These materials should conveniently replicate natural human tissue components, convey persistent elasticity, promote cell attachment, growth and conformability to direct cell orientation and functional performance. Here, microfabrication techniques are applied to recombinant human tropoelastin, the resilience-imparting protein found in all elastic human tissues, to generate photocrosslinked biological materials containing well-defined micropatterns. These highly elastic substrates are then used to engineer biomimetic cardiac tissue constructs. The micropatterned hydrogels, produced through photocrosslinking of methacrylated tropoelastin (MeTro), promote the attachment, spreading, alignment, function, and intercellular communication of cardiomyocytes by providing an elastic mechanical support that mimics their dynamic mechanical properties in vivo. The fabricated MeTro hydrogels also support the synchronous beating of cardiomyocytes in response to electrical field stimulation. These novel engineered micropatterned elastic gels are designed to be amenable to 3D modular assembly and establish a versatile, adaptable foundation for the modeling and regeneration of functional cardiac tissue with potential for application to other elastic tissues. PMID:24319406

  1. Cardiac tissue slices: preparation, handling, and successful optical mapping.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ken; Lee, Peter; Mirams, Gary R; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Borg, Thomas K; Gavaghan, David J; Kohl, Peter; Bollensdorff, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Cardiac tissue slices are becoming increasingly popular as a model system for cardiac electrophysiology and pharmacology research and development. Here, we describe in detail the preparation, handling, and optical mapping of transmembrane potential and intracellular free calcium concentration transients (CaT) in ventricular tissue slices from guinea pigs and rabbits. Slices cut in the epicardium-tangential plane contained well-aligned in-slice myocardial cell strands ("fibers") in subepicardial and midmyocardial sections. Cut with a high-precision slow-advancing microtome at a thickness of 350 to 400 μm, tissue slices preserved essential action potential (AP) properties of the precutting Langendorff-perfused heart. We identified the need for a postcutting recovery period of 36 min (guinea pig) and 63 min (rabbit) to reach 97.5% of final steady-state values for AP duration (APD) (identified by exponential fitting). There was no significant difference between the postcutting recovery dynamics in slices obtained using 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime or blebistatin as electromechanical uncouplers during the cutting process. A rapid increase in APD, seen after cutting, was caused by exposure to ice-cold solution during the slicing procedure, not by tissue injury, differences in uncouplers, or pH-buffers (bicarbonate; HEPES). To characterize intrinsic patterns of CaT, AP, and conduction, a combination of multipoint and field stimulation should be used to avoid misinterpretation based on source-sink effects. In summary, we describe in detail the preparation, mapping, and data analysis approaches for reproducible cardiac tissue slice-based investigations into AP and CaT dynamics. PMID:25595366

  2. Cardiac tissue slices: preparation, handling, and successful optical mapping

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ken; Lee, Peter; Mirams, Gary R.; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Borg, Thomas K.; Gavaghan, David J.; Kohl, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac tissue slices are becoming increasingly popular as a model system for cardiac electrophysiology and pharmacology research and development. Here, we describe in detail the preparation, handling, and optical mapping of transmembrane potential and intracellular free calcium concentration transients (CaT) in ventricular tissue slices from guinea pigs and rabbits. Slices cut in the epicardium-tangential plane contained well-aligned in-slice myocardial cell strands (“fibers”) in subepicardial and midmyocardial sections. Cut with a high-precision slow-advancing microtome at a thickness of 350 to 400 μm, tissue slices preserved essential action potential (AP) properties of the precutting Langendorff-perfused heart. We identified the need for a postcutting recovery period of 36 min (guinea pig) and 63 min (rabbit) to reach 97.5% of final steady-state values for AP duration (APD) (identified by exponential fitting). There was no significant difference between the postcutting recovery dynamics in slices obtained using 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime or blebistatin as electromechanical uncouplers during the cutting process. A rapid increase in APD, seen after cutting, was caused by exposure to ice-cold solution during the slicing procedure, not by tissue injury, differences in uncouplers, or pH-buffers (bicarbonate; HEPES). To characterize intrinsic patterns of CaT, AP, and conduction, a combination of multipoint and field stimulation should be used to avoid misinterpretation based on source-sink effects. In summary, we describe in detail the preparation, mapping, and data analysis approaches for reproducible cardiac tissue slice-based investigations into AP and CaT dynamics. PMID:25595366

  3. Optical Imaging of Voltage and Calcium in Cardiac Cells & Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Herron, Todd J.; Lee, Peter; Jalife, José

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac optical mapping has proven to be a powerful technology for studying cardiovascular function and disease. The development and scientific impact of this methodology are well documented. Because of its relevance in cardiac research, this imaging technology advances at a rapid pace. Here we review technological and scientific developments during the past several years and look also towards the future. First we explore key components of a modern optical mapping setup, focusing on 1) new camera technologies, 2) powerful light-emitting-diodes (from ultraviolet to red) for illumination, 3) improved optical filter technology, 4) new synthetic and optogenetic fluorescent probes, 5) optical mapping with motion and contraction, 6) new multi-parametric optical mapping techniques and 7) photon scattering effects in thick tissue preparations. We then look at recent optical mapping studies in single cells, cardiomyocyte monolayers, atria and whole hearts. Finally, we briefly look into the possible future roles of optical mapping in the development of regenerative cardiac research, cardiac cell therapies, and molecular genetic advances. PMID:22343556

  4. Exercise at depth alters bradycardia and incidence of cardiac anomalies in deep-diving marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Williams, Terrie M; Fuiman, Lee A; Kendall, Traci; Berry, Patrick; Richter, Beau; Noren, Shawn R; Thometz, Nicole; Shattock, Michael J; Farrell, Edward; Stamper, Andy M; Davis, Randall W

    2015-01-01

    Unlike their terrestrial ancestors, marine mammals routinely confront extreme physiological and physical challenges while breath-holding and pursuing prey at depth. To determine how cetaceans and pinnipeds accomplish deep-sea chases, we deployed animal-borne instruments that recorded high-resolution electrocardiograms, behaviour and flipper accelerations of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) diving from the surface to >200 m. Here we report that both exercise and depth alter the bradycardia associated with the dive response, with the greatest impacts at depths inducing lung collapse. Unexpectedly, cardiac arrhythmias occurred in >73% of deep, aerobic dives, which we attribute to the interplay between sympathetic and parasympathetic drivers for exercise and diving, respectively. Such marked cardiac variability alters the common view of a stereotypic 'dive reflex' in diving mammals. It also suggests the persistence of ancestral terrestrial traits in cardiac function that may help explain the unique sensitivity of some deep-diving marine mammals to anthropogenic disturbances. PMID:25592286

  5. Engineered cardiac micromodules for the in vitro fabrication of 3D endogenous macro-tissues.

    PubMed

    Totaro, A; Urciuolo, F; Imparato, G; Netti, P A

    2016-01-01

    The in vitro fabrication of an endogenous cardiac muscle would have a high impact for both in vitro studies concerning cardiac tissue physiology and pathology, as well as in vivo application to potentially repair infarcted myocardium. To reach this aim, we engineered a new class of cardiac tissue precursor (CTP), specifically conceived in order to promote the synthesis and the assembly of a cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM). The CTPs were obtained by culturing a mixed cardiac cell population, composed of myocyte and non-myocyte cells, into porous gelatin microspheres in a dynamic bioreactor. By engineering the culture conditions, the CTP developed both beating properties and an endogenous immature cardiac ECM. By following a bottom-up approach, a macrotissue was fabricated by molding and packing the engineered tissue precursor in a maturation chamber. During the macrotissue formation, the tissue precursors acted as cardiac tissue depots by promoting the formation of an endogenous and interconnected cardiac network embedding the cells and the microbeads. The myocytes cell fraction pulled on ECM network and induced its compaction against the internal posts represented by the initial porous microbeads. This reciprocal interplay induced ECM consolidation without the use of external biophysical stimuli by leading to the formation of a beating and endogenous macrotissue. We have thus engineered a new class of cardiac micromodules and show its potential for the fabrication of endogenous cardiac tissue models useful for in vitro studies that involve the cardiac tissue remodeling. PMID:27213995

  6. Cardiac dysfunction among soft tissue sarcoma patients in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Shantakumar, Sumitra; Olsen, Morten; Vo, Thao T; Nørgaard, Mette; Pedersen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Soft tissue sarcoma (STS) patients may experience post-treatment cardiotoxicity, yet no population-based data exist. We examined the incidence of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) decline, heart failure, and cardiac death following STS diagnosis among adults, using Danish patient registries and medical record review. Patients and methods LVEF decline was examined in a regional cohort of STS patients diagnosed during 1997–2011 in Western Denmark for whom cardiac imaging data were available. LVEF decline was defined as an absolute decline from baseline to follow-up of 10% or more, or, where baseline imaging was not available, a decline below the lower limit of normal (or 40%) for a follow-up LVEF. Heart failure and cardiac death were investigated in a national Danish cohort of all STS patients diagnosed from 2000 to 2009. We followed patients from STS diagnosis until heart failure, cardiac death, emigration or December 31, 2012 (whichever occurred first). Results The incidence rate of LVEF decline for the regional cohort with follow-up data (N=100, five events) or baseline and follow-up measurements (N=75, 19 events) was 16.8 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.0–40.3) and 108 (95% CI: 69–170), respectively, per 1,000 person-years. In the national cohort (N=1,187), the incidence of heart failure (40 events) and cardiac death (15 events) was 7.3 (95% CI: 5.4–10.0) and 2.7 (95% CI: 1.6–4.5), respectively, per 1,000 person-years. The strongest predictors of heart failure were doxorubicin treatment (hazard ratio [HR] =2.2, 95% CI: 0.5–10.2) and pre-existing cardiovascular disease (HR=6.3, 95% CI: 0.98–40.6). Conclusion LVEF decline occurred more frequently compared to heart failure or cardiac death in a nationally representative cohort of Danish STS patients. PMID:27186077

  7. Human progenitor cells derived from cardiac adipose tissue ameliorate myocardial infarction in rodents.

    PubMed

    Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Soler-Botija, Carolina; Farré, Jordi; Sepúlveda, Pilar; Raya, Angel; Roura, Santiago; Prat-Vidal, Cristina; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Montero, José Anastasio; Büscher, Dirk; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2010-11-01

    Myocardial infarction caused by vascular occlusion results in the formation of nonfunctional fibrous tissue. Cumulative evidence indicates that cell therapy modestly improves cardiac function; thus, novel cell sources with the potential to repair injured tissue are actively sought. Here, we identify and characterize a cell population of cardiac adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells (ATDPCs) from biopsies of human adult cardiac adipose tissue. Cardiac ATDPCs express a mesenchymal stem cell-like marker profile (strongly positive for CD105, CD44, CD166, CD29 and CD90) and have immunosuppressive capacity. Moreover, cardiac ATDPCs have an inherent cardiac-like phenotype and were able to express de novo myocardial and endothelial markers in vitro but not to differentiate into adipocytes. In addition, when cardiac ATDPCs were transplanted into injured myocardium in mouse and rat models of myocardial infarction, the engrafted cells expressed cardiac (troponin I, sarcomeric α-actinin) and endothelial (CD31) markers, vascularization increased, and infarct size was reduced in mice and rats. Moreover, significant differences between control and cell-treated groups were found in fractional shortening and ejection fraction, and the anterior wall remained significantly thicker 30days after cardiac delivery of ATDPCs. Finally, cardiac ATDPCs secreted proangiogenic factors under in vitro hypoxic conditions, suggesting a paracrine effect to promote local vascularization. Our results indicate that the population of progenitor cells isolated from human cardiac adipose tissue (cardiac ATDPCs) may be valid candidates for future use in cell therapy to regenerate injured myocardium. PMID:20713059

  8. Electrical Pacing of Cardiac Tissue Including Potassium Inward Rectification

    PubMed Central

    Galappaththige, Suran; Roth, Bradley J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study cardiac tissue is stimulated electrically through a small unipolar electrode. Numerical simulations predict that around an electrode are adjacent regions of depolarization and hyperpolarization. Experiments have shown that during pacing of resting cardiac tissue the hyperpolarization is often inhibited. Our goal is to determine if the inward rectifying potassium current (IK1) causes the inhibition of hyperpolarization. Numerical simulations were carried out using the bidomain model with potassium dynamics specified to be inward rectifying. In the simulations, adjacent regions of depolarization and hyperpolarization were observed surrounding the electrode. For cathodal currents the virtual anode produces a hyperpolarization that decreases over time. For long duration pulses the current-voltage curve is non-linear, with very small hyperpolarization compared to depolarization. For short pulses, the hyperpolarization is more prominent. Without the inward potassium rectification, the current voltage curve is linear and the hyperpolarization is evident for both long and short pulses. In conclusion, the inward rectification of the potassium current explains the inhibition of hyperpolarization for long duration stimulus pulses, but not for short duration pulses. PMID:26057242

  9. Examination of Optical Depth Effects on Fluorescence Imaging of Cardiac Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Mark-Anthony; Wikswo, John P.

    2003-01-01

    Optical mapping with voltage-sensitive dyes provides a high-resolution technique to observe cardiac electrodynamic behavior. Although most studies assume that the fluorescent signal is emitted from the surface layer of cells, the effects of signal attenuation with depth on signal interpretation are still unclear. This simulation study examines the effects of a depth-weighted signal on epicardial activation patterns and filament localization. We simulated filament behavior using a detailed cardiac model, and compared the signal obtained from the top (epicardial) layer of the spatial domain with the calculated weighted signal. General observations included a prolongation of the action upstroke duration, early upstroke initiation, and reduction in signal amplitude in the weighted signal. A shallow filament was found to produce a dual-humped action potential morphology consistent with previously reported observations. Simulated scroll wave breakup exhibited effects such as the false appearance of graded potentials, apparent supramaximal conduction velocities, and a spatially blurred signal with the local amplitude dependent upon the immediate subepicardial activity; the combination of these effects produced a corresponding change in the accuracy of filament localization. Our results indicate that the depth-dependent optical signal has significant consequences on the interpretation of epicardial activation dynamics. PMID:14645100

  10. Engineered hybrid cardiac patches with multifunctional electronics for online monitoring and regulation of tissue function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiner, Ron; Engel, Leeya; Fleischer, Sharon; Malki, Maayan; Gal, Idan; Shapira, Assaf; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi; Dvir, Tal

    2016-06-01

    In cardiac tissue engineering approaches to treat myocardial infarction, cardiac cells are seeded within three-dimensional porous scaffolds to create functional cardiac patches. However, current cardiac patches do not allow for online monitoring and reporting of engineered-tissue performance, and do not interfere to deliver signals for patch activation or to enable its integration with the host. Here, we report an engineered cardiac patch that integrates cardiac cells with flexible, freestanding electronics and a 3D nanocomposite scaffold. The patch exhibited robust electronic properties, enabling the recording of cellular electrical activities and the on-demand provision of electrical stimulation for synchronizing cell contraction. We also show that electroactive polymers containing biological factors can be deposited on designated electrodes to release drugs in the patch microenvironment on demand. We expect that the integration of complex electronics within cardiac patches will eventually provide therapeutic control and regulation of cardiac function.

  11. Electrically Conductive Chitosan/Carbon Scaffolds for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this work, carbon nanofibers were used as doping material to develop a highly conductive chitosan-based composite. Scaffolds based on chitosan only and chitosan/carbon composites were prepared by precipitation. Carbon nanofibers were homogeneously dispersed throughout the chitosan matrix, and the composite scaffold was highly porous with fully interconnected pores. Chitosan/carbon scaffolds had an elastic modulus of 28.1 ± 3.3 KPa, similar to that measured for rat myocardium, and excellent electrical properties, with a conductivity of 0.25 ± 0.09 S/m. The scaffolds were seeded with neonatal rat heart cells and cultured for up to 14 days, without electrical stimulation. After 14 days of culture, the scaffold pores throughout the construct volume were filled with cells. The metabolic activity of cells in chitosan/carbon constructs was significantly higher as compared to cells in chitosan scaffolds. The incorporation of carbon nanofibers also led to increased expression of cardiac-specific genes involved in muscle contraction and electrical coupling. This study demonstrates that the incorporation of carbon nanofibers into porous chitosan scaffolds improved the properties of cardiac tissue constructs, presumably through enhanced transmission of electrical signals between the cells. PMID:24417502

  12. Electrically conductive chitosan/carbon scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Martins, Ana M; Eng, George; Caridade, Sofia G; Mano, João F; Reis, Rui L; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-02-10

    In this work, carbon nanofibers were used as doping material to develop a highly conductive chitosan-based composite. Scaffolds based on chitosan only and chitosan/carbon composites were prepared by precipitation. Carbon nanofibers were homogeneously dispersed throughout the chitosan matrix, and the composite scaffold was highly porous with fully interconnected pores. Chitosan/carbon scaffolds had an elastic modulus of 28.1 ± 3.3 KPa, similar to that measured for rat myocardium, and excellent electrical properties, with a conductivity of 0.25 ± 0.09 S/m. The scaffolds were seeded with neonatal rat heart cells and cultured for up to 14 days, without electrical stimulation. After 14 days of culture, the scaffold pores throughout the construct volume were filled with cells. The metabolic activity of cells in chitosan/carbon constructs was significantly higher as compared to cells in chitosan scaffolds. The incorporation of carbon nanofibers also led to increased expression of cardiac-specific genes involved in muscle contraction and electrical coupling. This study demonstrates that the incorporation of carbon nanofibers into porous chitosan scaffolds improved the properties of cardiac tissue constructs, presumably through enhanced transmission of electrical signals between the cells. PMID:24417502

  13. Fabrication and evaluation of reconstructed cardiac tissue and its application to bio-actuated microdevices.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Hiroshi; Imagawa, Kentaro; Hoshino, Takayuki; Akiyama, Yoshitake; Morishima, Keisuke

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we proposed to utilize a reconstructed cardiac tissue as microactuator with easy assembly. In a glucose solution, cardiomyocytes can contract autonomously using only chemical energy. However, a single cardiomyocyte is not enough to actuate a microrobot or a mechanical system. Though the output power will increase by using multiple cardiomyocyte, it is difficult to assemble those cardiomyocyte to predefined positions one-by-one using a micromanipulator. Reconstructed cardiac tissue not only will enable researchers to assemble the cells easily and but also has a potential to improve the contractile ability. To realize a bio-actuator in this paper, we reconstructed a microcardiac tissue using an extracellular matrix, and their displacements, displacement frequency, contractile force, and lifetime of the reconstructed cardiac tissue were evaluated. Electrical and pharmacological responses of the reconstructed cardiac tissue were also evaluated. Finally, a bioactuator, a primitive micropillar actuator, was fabricated and applicability of the reconstructed cardiac tissue for bioactuators was evaluated. PMID:20142148

  14. Curvature-dependent excitation propagation in cultured cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadota, S.; Kay, M. W.; Magome, N.; Agladze, K.

    2012-02-01

    The geometry of excitation wave front may play an important role on the propagation block and spiral wave formation. The wave front which is bent over the critical value due to interaction with the obstacles may partially cease to propagate and appearing wave breaks evolve into rotating waves or reentry. This scenario may explain how reentry spontaneously originates in a heart. We studied highly curved excitation wave fronts in the cardiac tissue culture and found that in the conditions of normal, non-inhibited excitability the curvature effects do not play essential role in the propagation. Neither narrow isthmuses nor sharp corners of the obstacles, being classical objects for production of extremely curved wave front, affect non-inhibited wave propagation. The curvature-related phenomena of the propagation block and wave detachment from the obstacle boundary were observed only after partial suppression of the sodium channels with Lidocaine. Computer simulations confirmed the experimental observations. The explanation of the observed phenomena refers to the fact that the heart tissue is made of finite size cells so that curvature radii smaller than the cardiomyocyte size loses sense, and in non-inhibited tissue the single cell is capable to transmit excitation to its neighbors.

  15. Engineered Biomaterials to Enhance Stem Cell-Based Cardiac Tissue Engineering and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Anwarul; Waters, Renae; Roula, Boustany; Dana, Rahbani; Yara, Seif; Alexandre, Toubia; Paul, Arghya

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. Since adult cardiac cells are limited in their proliferation, cardiac tissue with dead or damaged cardiac cells downstream of the occluded vessel does not regenerate after myocardial infarction. The cardiac tissue is then replaced with nonfunctional fibrotic scar tissue rather than new cardiac cells, which leaves the heart weak. The limited proliferation ability of host cardiac cells has motivated investigators to research the potential cardiac regenerative ability of stem cells. Considerable progress has been made in this endeavor. However, the optimum type of stem cells along with the most suitable matrix-material and cellular microenvironmental cues are yet to be identified or agreed upon. This review presents an overview of various types of biofunctional materials and biomaterial matrices, which in combination with stem cells, have shown promises for cardiac tissue replacement and reinforcement. Engineered biomaterials also have applications in cardiac tissue engineering, in which tissue constructs are developed in vitro by combining stem cells and biomaterial scaffolds for drug screening or eventual implantation. This review highlights the benefits of using biomaterials in conjunction with stem cells to repair damaged myocardium and give a brief description of the properties of these biomaterials that make them such valuable tools to the field. PMID:26953627

  16. Vascularisation to improve translational potential of tissue engineering systems for cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Dilley, Rodney J; Morrison, Wayne A

    2014-11-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering is developing as an alternative approach to heart transplantation for treating heart failure. Shortage of organ donors and complications arising after orthotopic transplant remain major challenges to the modern field of heart transplantation. Engineering functional myocardium de novo requires an abundant source of cardiomyocytes, a biocompatible scaffold material and a functional vasculature to sustain the high metabolism of the construct. Progress has been made on several fronts, with cardiac cell biology, stem cells and biomaterials research particularly promising for cardiac tissue engineering, however currently employed strategies for vascularisation have lagged behind and limit the volume of tissue formed. Over ten years we have developed an in vivo tissue engineering model to construct vascularised tissue from various cell and tissue sources, including cardiac tissue. In this article we review the progress made with this approach and others, together with their potential to support a volume of engineered tissue for cardiac tissue engineering where contractile mass impacts directly on functional outcomes in translation to the clinic. It is clear that a scaled-up cardiac tissue engineering solution required for clinical treatment of heart failure will include a robust vascular supply for successful translation. This article is part of a directed issue entitled: Regenerative Medicine: the challenge of translation. PMID:25449260

  17. Role of tissue thickness on depth of morphologic skin damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RajaMahmood, T. L. I.; Mat Jafri, M. Z.; Omar, Khalid M.

    2013-05-01

    Different zonal areas of the skins have different thickness and different adnexal composition. For this reason, the power density and exposure duration have to be adjusted to the area that being treated. The effects of laser expose to the different area of the skin has been studied by using the power density of 20.31 W/cm2 and the times when the cracking sound heard is the explosive duration recorded for each area of the skins. As a result, the histologic sections revealed that the explosive duration varied significantly with the difference in thickness of the skin tissue. Also, the expanding spaces between hair follicles and its surrounding tissue as well as denaturation of collagen fiberswere shownin each skin section and were mainly affected by the photothermal effect produced from the CO2 laser-skin tissue interaction.

  18. Reentry Near the Percolation Threshold in a Heterogeneous Discrete Model for Cardiac Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Sergio; Bär, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Arrhythmias in cardiac tissue are related to irregular electrical wave propagation in the heart. Cardiac tissue is formed by a discrete cell network, which is often heterogeneous. A localized region with a fraction of nonconducting links surrounded by homogeneous conducting tissue can become a source of reentry and ectopic beats. Extensive simulations in a discrete model of cardiac tissue show that a wave crossing a heterogeneous region of cardiac tissue can disintegrate into irregular patterns, provided the fraction of nonconducting links is close to the percolation threshold of the cell network. The dependence of the reentry probability on this fraction, the system size, and the degree of excitability can be inferred from the size distribution of nonconducting clusters near the percolation threshold.

  19. Increasing the penetration depth for ultrafast laser tissue ablation using glycerol based optical clearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabay, Ilan; Subramanian, Kaushik G.; Martin, Chris; Yildirim, Murat; Tuchin, Valery V.; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2016-03-01

    Background: Deep tissue ablation is the next challenge in ultrafast laser microsurgery. By focusing ultrafast pulses below the tissue surface one can create an ablation void confined to the focal volume. However, as the ablation depth increases in a scattering tissue, increase in the required power can trigger undesired nonlinear phenomena out of focus that restricts our ability to ablate beyond a maximum ablation depth of few scattering lengths. Optical clearing (OC) might reduce the intensity and increase the maximal ablation depth by lowering the refractive index mismatch, and therefore reducing scattering. Some efforts to ablate deeper showed out of focus damage, while others used brutal mechanical methods for clearing. Our clinical goal is to create voids in the scarred vocal folds and inject a biomaterial to bring back the tissue elasticity and restore phonation. Materials and methods: Fresh porcine vocal folds were excised and applied a biocompatible OC agent (75% glycerol). Collimated transmittance was monitored. The tissue was optically cleared and put under the microscope for ablation threshold measurements at different depths. Results: The time after which the tissue was optically cleared was roughly two hours. Fitting the threshold measurements to an exponential decay graph indicated that the scattering length of the tissue increased to 83+/-16 μm, which is more than doubling the known scattering length for normal tissue. Conclusion: Optical clearing with Glycerol increases the tissue scattering length and therefore reduces the energy for ablation and increases the maximal ablation depth. This technique can potentially improve clinical microsurgery.

  20. Coiled fiber scaffolds embedded with gold nanoparticles improve the performance of engineered cardiac tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, Sharon; Shevach, Michal; Feiner, Ron; Dvir, Tal

    2014-07-01

    Coiled perimysial fibers within the heart muscle provide it with the ability to contract and relax efficiently. Here, we report on a new nanocomposite scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering, integrating coiled electrospun fibers with gold nanoparticles. Cultivation of cardiac cells within the hybrid scaffolds promoted cell organization into elongated and aligned tissues generating a strong contraction force, high contraction rate and low excitation threshold.Coiled perimysial fibers within the heart muscle provide it with the ability to contract and relax efficiently. Here, we report on a new nanocomposite scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering, integrating coiled electrospun fibers with gold nanoparticles. Cultivation of cardiac cells within the hybrid scaffolds promoted cell organization into elongated and aligned tissues generating a strong contraction force, high contraction rate and low excitation threshold. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00300d

  1. Depth

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan J; van Doorn, Andrea J; Wagemans, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Depth is the feeling of remoteness, or separateness, that accompanies awareness in human modalities like vision and audition. In specific cases depths can be graded on an ordinal scale, or even measured quantitatively on an interval scale. In the case of pictorial vision this is complicated by the fact that human observers often appear to apply mental transformations that involve depths in distinct visual directions. This implies that a comparison of empirically determined depths between observers involves pictorial space as an integral entity, whereas comparing pictorial depths as such is meaningless. We describe the formal structure of pictorial space purely in the phenomenological domain, without taking recourse to the theories of optics which properly apply to physical space—a distinct ontological domain. We introduce a number of general ways to design and implement methods of geodesy in pictorial space, and discuss some basic problems associated with such measurements. We deal mainly with conceptual issues. PMID:23145244

  2. Non-Linear Dynamics of Cardiac Alternans: Subcellular to Tissue-Level Mechanisms of Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Gaeta, Stephen A.; Christini, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac repolarization alternans is a rhythm disturbance of the heart in which rapid stimulation elicits a beat-to-beat alternation in the duration of action potentials and magnitude of intracellular calcium transients in individual cardiac myocytes. Although this phenomenon has been identified as a potential precursor to dangerous reentrant arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, significant uncertainty remains regarding its mechanism and no clinically practical means of halting its occurrence or progression currently exists. Cardiac alternans has well-characterized tissue, cellular, and subcellular manifestations, the mechanisms and interplay of which are an active area of research. PMID:22783195

  3. Coiled fiber scaffolds embedded with gold nanoparticles improve the performance of engineered cardiac tissues.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Sharon; Shevach, Michal; Feiner, Ron; Dvir, Tal

    2014-08-21

    Coiled perimysial fibers within the heart muscle provide it with the ability to contract and relax efficiently. Here, we report on a new nanocomposite scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering, integrating coiled electrospun fibers with gold nanoparticles. Cultivation of cardiac cells within the hybrid scaffolds promoted cell organization into elongated and aligned tissues generating a strong contraction force, high contraction rate and low excitation threshold. PMID:24744098

  4. The role of tissue engineering and biomaterials in cardiac regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yimu; Feric, Nicole T; Thavandiran, Nimalan; Nunes, Sara S; Radisic, Milica

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, the development of 3-dimensional engineered heart tissue (EHT) has made large strides forward because of advances in stem cell biology, materials science, prevascularization strategies, and nanotechnology. As a result, the role of tissue engineering in cardiac regenerative medicine has become multifaceted as new applications become feasible. Cardiac tissue engineering has long been established to have the potential to partially or fully restore cardiac function after cardiac injury. However, EHTs may also serve as surrogate human cardiac tissue for drug-related toxicity screening. Cardiotoxicity remains a major cause of drug withdrawal in the pharmaceutical industry. Unsafe drugs reach the market because preclinical evaluation is insufficient to weed out cardiotoxic drugs in all their forms. Bioengineering methods could provide functional and mature human myocardial tissues, ie, physiologically relevant platforms, for screening the cardiotoxic effects of pharmaceutical agents and facilitate the discovery of new therapeutic agents. Finally, advances in induced pluripotent stem cells have made patient-specific EHTs possible, which opens up the possibility of personalized medicine. Herein, we give an overview of the present state of the art in cardiac tissue engineering, the challenges to the field, and future perspectives. PMID:25442432

  5. Functional Analysis of the Engineered Cardiac Tissue Grown on Recombinant Spidroin Fiber Meshes

    PubMed Central

    Teplenin, Alexander; Krasheninnikova, Anna; Agladze, Nadezhda; Sidoruk, Konstantin; Agapova, Olga; Agapov, Igor; Bogush, Vladimir; Agladze, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the ability of the recombinant spidroin to serve as a substrate for the cardiac tissue engineering. For this purpose, isolated neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were seeded on the electrospun spidroin fiber matrices and cultured to form the confluent cardiac monolayers. Besides the adhesion assay and immunostaining analysis, we tested the ability of the cultured cardiomyocytes to form a functional cardiac syncytium by studying excitation propagation in the cultured tissue with the aid of optical mapping. It was demonstrated that recombinant spidroin fiber meshes are directly suitable for the adherence and growth of the cardiomyocytes without additional coating with the attachment factors, such as fibronectin. PMID:25799394

  6. Electrical stimulation of cardiac adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells modulates cell phenotype and genetic machinery.

    PubMed

    Llucià-Valldeperas, A; Sanchez, B; Soler-Botija, C; Gálvez-Montón, C; Prat-Vidal, C; Roura, S; Rosell-Ferrer, J; Bragos, R; Bayes-Genis, A

    2015-11-01

    A major challenge of cardiac tissue engineering is directing cells to establish the physiological structure and function of the myocardium being replaced. Our aim was to examine the effect of electrical stimulation on the cardiodifferentiation potential of cardiac adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells (cardiac ATDPCs). Three different electrical stimulation protocols were tested; the selected protocol consisted of 2 ms monophasic square-wave pulses of 50 mV/cm at 1 Hz over 14 days. Cardiac and subcutaneous ATDPCs were grown on biocompatible patterned surfaces. Cardiomyogenic differentiation was examined by real-time PCR and immunocytofluorescence. In cardiac ATDPCs, MEF2A and GATA-4 were significantly upregulated at day 14 after stimulation, while subcutaneous ATDPCs only exhibited increased Cx43 expression. In response to electrical stimulation, cardiac ATDPCs elongated, and both cardiac and subcutaneous ATDPCs became aligned following the linear surface pattern of the construct. Cardiac ATDPC length increased by 11.3%, while subcutaneous ATDPC length diminished by 11.2% (p = 0.013 and p = 0.030 vs unstimulated controls, respectively). Compared to controls, electrostimulated cells became aligned better to the patterned surfaces when the pattern was perpendicular to the electric field (89.71 ± 28.47º for cardiac ATDPCs and 92.15 ± 15.21º for subcutaneous ATDPCs). Electrical stimulation of cardiac ATDPCs caused changes in cell phenotype and genetic machinery, making them more suitable for cardiac regeneration approaches. Thus, it seems advisable to use electrical cell training before delivery as a cell suspension or within engineered tissue. PMID:23420554

  7. Depth-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of normal and dysplastic cervical tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yicong; Xi, Peng; Qu, Jianan Y.; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Yu, Mei-Yung

    2005-01-01

    A portable confocal system with the excitations at 355nm and 457nm was instrumented to investigate the depth-resolved fluorescence of cervical tissue. The study focused on extracting biochemical and morphological information carried in the depth-resolved signals measured from the normal squamous epithelial tissue and squamous intraepithelial lesions. Strong keratin fluorescence with the spectral characteristics similar to collagen were observed from the topmost keratinizing layer of all tissue samples. It was found that NADH and FAD fluorescence measured from the underlying non-keratinizing epithelial layer were strongly correlated to the tissue pathology. This study demonstrates that the depth-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy can potentially provide more accurate diagnostic information for determining tissue pathology.

  8. Multifractality in depth dependent tissue refractive index variations probed via low-coherence back scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Rajib; Das, Nandan K.; Chakraborty, Semanti; Muvva, Sri B.; Ghosh, Nirmalya

    2016-04-01

    We have analyzed here low coherence spectroscopic data by multifractal analysis for obtaining tissue multifratality in depth wise index distribution. Essentially, in this method, a spectral domain interference pattern is recorded in a common path interferometer with a broad band source operated in back scattering mode. The recorded interference spectrum is subjected to Fourier domain processing to compute depth wise index distribution with a resolution of the order of one micron. The experimental set-up was validated, initially, by verifying depths of mica sheet layers and diameter of polystyrene microspheres and later, it was used for assessment of depth wise index (RI) distribution of cervical tissue slices. The structures of cervical tissues at different stages of cancer change rapidly which are manifested in the RI distribution and in turn, are encoded as multi-resolution information. This information can, effectively, be extracted by using multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA), where, multifractal parameters such as Hurst exponent h(q = 2) and width of singularity spectrum (Δα) show definitive change as cancer progresses from grade I to grade II. Moreover, the depth distribution of RI exhibited stronger multifractality (increased Δα) and considerably weakened correlations (decreased h(q = 2)) for tissues with higher pathological grades. Therefore, the technique of low coherence back-scattered (LCBS) interferometry bears a promise of using depth distribution of tissue refractive index and MFDFA analysis appears as a label free biomarker to detect cancer at early.

  9. Measurement of optical penetration depth and refractive index of human tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shusen; Li, Hui; Li, Buhong

    2003-01-01

    Experimental techniques for measurement of optical penetration depth and refractive index of human tissue are presented, respectively. Optical penetration depth can be obtained from the measurement of the relative fluence-depth distribution inside the target tissue. The depth of normal and carcinomatous human lung tissues irradiated with the wavelengths of 406.7, 632.8 and 674.4 nm in vitro are respectively determined. In addition, a novel simple method based on total internal reflection for measuring the refractive index of biotissue in vivo is developed, and the refractive indices of skin from people of different age, sex and skin color are measured. Their refractive indices are almost same and the average is 1.533.

  10. Maximum imaging depth of two-photon autofluorescence microscopy in epithelial tissues

    PubMed Central

    Durr, Nicholas J.; Weisspfennig, Christian T.; Holfeld, Benjamin A.; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2011-01-01

    Endogenous fluorescence provides morphological, spectral, and lifetime contrast that can indicate disease states in tissues. Previous studies have demonstrated that two-photon autofluorescence microscopy (2PAM) can be used for noninvasive, three-dimensional imaging of epithelial tissues down to approximately 150 μm beneath the skin surface. We report ex-vivo 2PAM images of epithelial tissue from a human tongue biopsy down to 370 μm below the surface. At greater than 320 μm deep, the fluorescence generated outside the focal volume degrades the image contrast to below one. We demonstrate that these imaging depths can be reached with 160 mW of laser power (2-nJ per pulse) from a conventional 80-MHz repetition rate ultrafast laser oscillator. To better understand the maximum imaging depths that we can achieve in epithelial tissues, we studied image contrast as a function of depth in tissue phantoms with a range of relevant optical properties. The phantom data agree well with the estimated contrast decays from time-resolved Monte Carlo simulations and show maximum imaging depths similar to that found in human biopsy results. This work demonstrates that the low staining inhomogeneity (∼20) and large scattering coefficient (∼10 mm−1) associated with conventional 2PAM limit the maximum imaging depth to 3 to 5 mean free scattering lengths deep in epithelial tissue. PMID:21361692

  11. Ultrasonic measurement of facial tissue depth in a Northern Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Jia, Linpei; Qi, Baiyu; Yang, Jingyan; Zhang, Weiguang; Lu, Yingqiang; Zhang, Hong-Liang

    2016-02-01

    In forensic anthropology, facial soft tissue depth measurement is crucial for craniofacial reconstruction technology, which is based on the morphological features of human faces to rebuild appearances of decedents, helps forensic scientists to identify the nameless bone. We measured the facial tissue depth of 135 young subjects from northern China whereby revealing the relationship among tissue depth, sex and BMI as well as providing data for craniofacial reconstruction in forensic science. All the volunteers are healthy medical students including 64 males and 71 females. Ultrasound was used to measure 19 points across the face evenly distributed in 6 regions including the eye, nose, mouth, cheek, jaw and chin. Our results indicate that tissue thickness at 11 points of females and 11 points of males are related to BMI. A majority of points are thicker in females than those of males. Further comparisons with data of American and European population show an apparent diversity in both genders. PMID:26778588

  12. Tissue and Animal Models of Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Sallam, Karim; Li, Yingxin; Sager, Philip T.; Houser, Steven R.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD) is a common cause of death in patients with structural heart disease, genetic mutations or acquired disorders affecting cardiac ion channels. A wide range of platforms exist to model and study disorders associated with SCD. Human clinical studies are cumbersome and are thwarted by the extent of investigation that can be performed on human subjects. Animal models are limited by their degree of homology to human cardiac electrophysiology including ion channel expression. Most commonly used cellular models are cellular transfection models, which are able to mimic the expression of a single ion channel offering incomplete insight into changes of the action potential profile. Induced pluripotent stem cell derived Cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) resemble, but are not identical, to adult human cardiomyocytes, and provide a new platform for studying arrhythmic disorders leading to SCD. A variety of platforms exist to phenotype cellular models including conventional and automated patch clamp, multi-electrode array, and computational modeling. iPSC-CMs have been used to study Long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and other hereditary cardiac disorders. Although iPSC-CMs are distinct from adult cardiomyocytes, they provide a robust platform to advance the science and clinical care of SCD. PMID:26044252

  13. Visualizing depth and thickness of a local blood region in skin tissue using diffuse reflectance images.

    PubMed

    Nishidate, Izumi; Maeda, Takaaki; Aizu, Yoshihisa; Niizeki, Kyuichi

    2007-01-01

    A method is proposed for visualizing the depth and thickness distribution of a local blood region in skin tissue using diffuse reflectance images at three isosbestic wavelengths of hemoglobin: 420, 585, and 800 nm. Monte Carlo simulation of light transport specifies a relation among optical densities, depth, and thickness of the region under given concentrations of melanin in epidermis and blood in dermis. Experiments with tissue-like agar gel phantoms indicate that a simple circular blood region embedded in scattering media can be visualized with errors of 6% for the depth and 22% for the thickness to the given values. In-vivo measurements on human veins demonstrate that results from the proposed method agree within errors of 30 and 19% for the depth and thickness, respectively, with values obtained from the same veins by the conventional ultrasound technique. Numerical investigation with the Monte Carlo simulation of light transport in the skin tissue is also performed to discuss effects of deviation in scattering coefficients of skin tissue and absorption coefficients of the local blood region from the typical values of the results. The depth of the local blood region is over- or underestimated as the scattering coefficients of epidermis and dermis decrease or increase, respectively, while the thickness of the region agrees well with the given values below 1.2 mm. Decreases or increases of hematocrit value give over- or underestimation of the thickness, but they have almost no influence on the depth. PMID:17994894

  14. Oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy for depth sensitive measurements in the epithelial tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Maria K.; Fradkin, Leonid; Nieman, Linda T.; Lam, Sylvia; Poh, Catherine; Sokolov, Konstantin

    2013-02-01

    Optical spectroscopy has shown potential as a tool for precancer detection by discriminating alterations in the optical properties within epithelial tissues. Identifying depth-dependent alterations associated with the progression of epithelial cancerous lesions can be especially challenging in the oral cavity due to the variable thickness of the epithelium and the presence of keratinization. Optical spectroscopy of epithelial tissue with improved depth resolution would greatly assist in the isolation of optical properties associated with cancer progression. Here, we report a fiber optic probe for oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy (OPRS) that is capable of depth sensitive detection by combining the following three approaches: multiple beveled fibers, oblique collection geometry, and polarization gating. We analyze how probe design parameters are related to improvements in collection efficiency of scattered photons from superficial tissue layers and to increased depth discrimination within epithelium. We have demonstrated that obliquely-oriented collection fibers increase both depth selectivity and collection efficiency of scattering signal. Currently, we evaluate this technology in a clinical trial of patients presenting lesions suspicious for dysplasia or carcinoma in the oral cavity. We use depth sensitive spectroscopic data to develop automated algorithms for analysis of morphological and architectural changes in the context of the multilayer oral epithelial tissue. Our initial results show that OPRS has the potential to improve the detection and monitoring of epithelial precancers in the oral cavity.

  15. Verification of cardiac tissue electrophysiology simulators using an N-version benchmark.

    PubMed

    Niederer, Steven A; Kerfoot, Eric; Benson, Alan P; Bernabeu, Miguel O; Bernus, Olivier; Bradley, Chris; Cherry, Elizabeth M; Clayton, Richard; Fenton, Flavio H; Garny, Alan; Heidenreich, Elvio; Land, Sander; Maleckar, Mary; Pathmanathan, Pras; Plank, Gernot; Rodríguez, José F; Roy, Ishani; Sachse, Frank B; Seemann, Gunnar; Skavhaug, Ola; Smith, Nic P

    2011-11-13

    Ongoing developments in cardiac modelling have resulted, in particular, in the development of advanced and increasingly complex computational frameworks for simulating cardiac tissue electrophysiology. The goal of these simulations is often to represent the detailed physiology and pathologies of the heart using codes that exploit the computational potential of high-performance computing architectures. These developments have rapidly progressed the simulation capacity of cardiac virtual physiological human style models; however, they have also made it increasingly challenging to verify that a given code provides a faithful representation of the purported governing equations and corresponding solution techniques. This study provides the first cardiac tissue electrophysiology simulation benchmark to allow these codes to be verified. The benchmark was successfully evaluated on 11 simulation platforms to generate a consensus gold-standard converged solution. The benchmark definition in combination with the gold-standard solution can now be used to verify new simulation codes and numerical methods in the future. PMID:21969679

  16. Verification of cardiac tissue electrophysiology simulators using an N-version benchmark

    PubMed Central

    Niederer, Steven A.; Kerfoot, Eric; Benson, Alan P.; Bernabeu, Miguel O.; Bernus, Olivier; Bradley, Chris; Cherry, Elizabeth M.; Clayton, Richard; Fenton, Flavio H.; Garny, Alan; Heidenreich, Elvio; Land, Sander; Maleckar, Mary; Pathmanathan, Pras; Plank, Gernot; Rodríguez, José F.; Roy, Ishani; Sachse, Frank B.; Seemann, Gunnar; Skavhaug, Ola; Smith, Nic P.

    2011-01-01

    Ongoing developments in cardiac modelling have resulted, in particular, in the development of advanced and increasingly complex computational frameworks for simulating cardiac tissue electrophysiology. The goal of these simulations is often to represent the detailed physiology and pathologies of the heart using codes that exploit the computational potential of high-performance computing architectures. These developments have rapidly progressed the simulation capacity of cardiac virtual physiological human style models; however, they have also made it increasingly challenging to verify that a given code provides a faithful representation of the purported governing equations and corresponding solution techniques. This study provides the first cardiac tissue electrophysiology simulation benchmark to allow these codes to be verified. The benchmark was successfully evaluated on 11 simulation platforms to generate a consensus gold-standard converged solution. The benchmark definition in combination with the gold-standard solution can now be used to verify new simulation codes and numerical methods in the future. PMID:21969679

  17. Stem Cells for Cardiac Regeneration by Cell Therapy and Myocardial Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun; Zeng, Faquan; Weisel, Richard D.; Li, Ren-Ke

    Congestive heart failure, which often occurs progressively following a myocardial infarction, is characterized by impaired myocardial perfusion, ventricular dilatation, and cardiac dysfunction. Novel treatments are required to reverse these effects - especially in older patients whose endogenous regenerative responses to currently available therapies are limited by age. This review explores the current state of research for two related approaches to cardiac regeneration: cell therapy and tissue engineering. First, to evaluate cell therapy, we review the effectiveness of various cell types for their ability to limit ventricular dilatation and promote functional recovery following implantation into a damaged heart. Next, to assess tissue engineering, we discuss the characteristics of several biomaterials for their potential to physically support the infarcted myocardium and promote implanted cell survival following cardiac injury. Finally, looking ahead, we present recent findings suggesting that hybrid constructs combining a biomaterial with stem and supporting cells may be the most effective approaches to cardiac regeneration.

  18. Cardiac tissue engineering, ex-vivo: design principles in biomaterials and bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Shachar, Michal; Cohen, Smadar

    2003-07-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering has emerged as a promising approach to replace or support an infarcted cardiac tissue and thus may hold a great potential to treat and save the lives of patients with heart diseases. By its broad definition, tissue engineering involves the construction of tissue equivalents from donor cells seeded within 3-D biomaterials, then culturing and implanting the cell-seeded scaffolds to induce and direct the growth of new, healthy tissue. In this review, we present an up-to-date summary of the research in cardiac tissue engineering, with an emphasis on the design principles and selection criteria that have been used in two key technologies employed in tissue engineering, (1) biomaterials technology, for the creation of 3-D porous scaffolds which are used to support and guide the tissue formation from dissociated cells, and (2) bioreactor cultivation of the 3-D cell constructs during ex-vivo tissue engineering, which aims to duplicate the normal stresses and flows experienced by the tissues. PMID:12878836

  19. Controlling spiral waves and turbulent states in cardiac tissue by traveling wave perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng-Ye; Xie, Ping

    2000-03-01

    We propose a traveling wave perturbation method to control the spatiotemporal dynamics in cardiac tissue. With a two-variable model we demonstrate that the method can successfully suppress the wave instability (alternans in action potential duration) in the one-dimensional case and convert spiral waves and turbulent states to the normal traveling wave state in the two-dimensional case. An experimental scheme is suggested which may provide a new design for a cardiac defibrillator.

  20. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Progenitors Differentiate to Cardiomyocytes and Form Biosynthetic Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Syandan; Chellapan, Malathi; Bursac, Nenad; Leong, Kam W.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian heart has little capacity to regenerate, and following injury the myocardium is replaced by non-contractile scar tissue. Consequently, increased wall stress and workload on the remaining myocardium leads to chamber dilation, dysfunction, and heart failure. Cell-based therapy with an autologous, epigenetically reprogrammed, and cardiac-committed progenitor cell source could potentially reverse this process by replacing the damaged myocardium with functional tissue. However, it is unclear whether cardiac progenitor cell-derived cardiomyocytes are capable of attaining levels of structural and functional maturity comparable to that of terminally-fated cardiomyocytes. Here, we first describe the derivation of mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, which once differentiated allow for the enrichment of Nkx2-5(+) cardiac progenitors, and the cardiomyocyte-specific expression of the red fluorescent protein. We show that the cardiac progenitors are multipotent and capable of differentiating into endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes. Moreover, cardiac progenitor selection corresponds to cKit(+) cell enrichment, while cardiomyocyte cell-lineage commitment is concomitant with dual expression of either cKit/Flk1 or cKit/Sca-1. We proceed to show that the cardiac progenitor-derived cardiomyocytes are capable of forming electrically and mechanically coupled large-scale 2D cell cultures with mature electrophysiological properties. Finally, we examine the cell progenitors’ ability to form electromechanically coherent macroscopic tissues, using a physiologically relevant 3D culture model and demonstrate that following long-term culture the cardiomyocytes align, and form robust electromechanical connections throughout the volume of the biosynthetic tissue construct. We conclude that the iPS cell-derived cardiac progenitors are a robust cell source for tissue engineering applications and a 3D culture platform for pharmacological screening and

  1. Effect of Cardiac Tissue Anisotropy on Three-Dimensional Electrical Action Potential Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi Zhu; Liu, Jing

    A three-dimensional (3D) electrical action potential propagation model is developed to characterize the integrated effect of cardiac tissue structure using a homogenous function with a spatial inhomogeneity. This method may be more effective for bridging the gap between computational models and experimental data for cardiac tissue anisotropy. A generalized 3D eikonal relation considering anisotropy and a self-similar evolution solution of such a relation are derived to identify the effect of anisotropy and predict the anisotropy-induced electrical wave propagation instabilities. Furthermore, the phase field equation is introduced to obtain the complex three-dimensional numerical solution of the new correlation. The present results are expected to be valuable for better understanding the physiological behavior of cardiac tissues.

  2. Reentrant excitation in an analog-digital hybrid circuit model of cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmud, Farhanahani; Shiozawa, Naruhiro; Makikawa, Masaaki; Nomura, Taishin

    2011-06-01

    We propose an analog-digital hybrid circuit model of one-dimensional cardiac tissue with hardware implementation that allows us to perform real-time simulations of spatially conducting cardiac action potentials. Each active nodal compartment of the tissue model is designed using analog circuits and a dsPIC microcontroller, by which the time-dependent and time-independent nonlinear current-voltage relationships of six types of ion channel currents employed in the Luo-Rudy phase I (LR-I) model for a single mammalian cardiac ventricular cell can be reproduced quantitatively. Here, we perform real-time simulations of reentrant excitation conduction in a ring-shaped tissue model that includes eighty nodal compartments. In particular, we show that the hybrid tissue model can exhibit real-time dynamics for initiation of reentries induced by uni-directional block, as well as those for phase resetting that leads to annihilation of the reentry in response to impulsive current stimulations at appropriate nodes and timings. The dynamics of the hybrid model are comparable to those of a spatially distributed tissue model with LR-I compartments. Thus, it is conceivable that the hybrid model might be a useful tool for large scale simulations of cardiac tissue dynamics, as an alternative to numerical simulations, leading toward further understanding of the reentrant mechanisms.

  3. Reduced Graphene Oxide-GelMA Hybrid Hydrogels as Scaffolds for Cardiac Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su Ryon; Zihlmann, Claudio; Akbari, Mohsen; Assawes, Pribpandao; Cheung, Louis; Zhang, Kaizhen; Manoharan, Vijayan; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Yüksekkaya, Mehmet; Wan, Kai-Tak; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Biomaterials currently used in cardiac tissue engineering have certain limitations, such as lack of electrical conductivity and appropriate mechanical properties, which are two parameters playing a key role in regulating cardiac cell behavior. Here, the myocardial tissue constructs are engineered based on reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-incorporated gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) hybrid hydrogels. The incorporation of rGO into the GelMA matrix significantly enhances the electrical conductivity and mechanical properties of the material. Moreover, cells cultured on composite rGO-GelMA scaffolds exhibit better biological activities such as cell viability, proliferation, and maturation compared to ones cultured on GelMA hydrogels. Cardiomyocytes show stronger contractility and faster spontaneous beating rate on rGO-GelMA hydrogel sheets compared to those on pristine GelMA hydrogels, as well as GO-GelMA hydrogel sheets with similar mechanical property and particle concentration. Our strategy of integrating rGO within a biocompatible hydrogel is expected to be broadly applicable for future biomaterial designs to improve tissue engineering outcomes. The engineered cardiac tissue constructs using rGO incorporated hybrid hydrogels can potentially provide high-fidelity tissue models for drug studies and the investigations of cardiac tissue development and/or disease processes in vitro. PMID:27254107

  4. Age-related changes in tissue macrophages precede cardiac functional impairment.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Alexander R; Godwin, James W; Chandran, Anjana; Hersey, Lucy; Ilinykh, Alexei; Debuque, Ryan; Wang, Lina; Rosenthal, Nadia A

    2014-05-01

    Cardiac tissue macrophages (cTMs) are abundant in the murine heart but the extent to which the cTM phenotype changes with age is unknown. This study characterizes aging-dependent phenotypic changes in cTM subsets. Using theCx3cr1(GFP/+) mouse reporter line where GFP marks cTMs, and the tissue macrophage marker Mrc1, we show that two major cardiac tissue macrophage subsets, Mrc1-GFP(hi) and Mrc1+GFP(hi) cTMs, are present in the young (<10 week old) mouse heart, and a third subset, Mrc1+GFP(lo), comprises ~50% of total Mrc1+ cTMs from 30 weeks of age. Immunostaining and functional assays show that Mrc1+ cTMs are the principal myeloid sentinels in the mouse heart and that they retain proliferative capacity throughout life. Gene expression profiles of the two Mrc1+ subsets also reveal that Mrc1+GFP(lo) cTMs have a decreased number of immune response genes (Cx3cr1, Lpar6, CD9, Cxcr4, Itga6 and Tgfβr1), and an increased number of fibrogenic genes (Ltc4s, Retnla, Fgfr1, Mmp9 and Ccl24), consistent with a potential role for cTMs in cardiac fibrosis. These findings identify early age-dependent gene expression changes in cTMs, with significant implications for cardiac tissue injury responses and aging-associated cardiac fibrosis. PMID:24861132

  5. Combined time- and depth-resolved autofluorescence spectroscopy for tissue diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yicong; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2006-02-01

    A fluorescence spectroscopy system combining depth- and time-resolved measurements is developed to investigate the layered fluorescence temporal characteristics of epithelial tissue. It is found that esophageal tissue structure can be resolved well by means of the autofluorescence time-resolved decay process with 375-, 405- and 435- nm excitation. The decay of the autofluorescence signals can be accurately fitted with a dual-exponential function consisting of a short lifetime (0.4 ~ 0.6 ns) and a long lifetime (3 ~ 4 ns) components. The short lifetime component dominates the decay of normal epithelial fluorescence while the decay of the signals from keratinized epithelium and stroma are mainly determined by the long lifetime component. The ratio of the amplitudes of two components provides the information of fine structure of epithelial tissue. This study demonstrates that the combined depth- and time-resolved measurements can potentially provide accurate information for the diagnosis of tissue pathology.

  6. Chronic intracortical microelectrode arrays induce non-uniform, depth-related tissue responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolley, Andrew J.; Desai, Himanshi A.; Otto, Kevin J.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Brain-implanted microelectrode arrays show promise as future clinical devices. However, biological responses to various designs, compositions and locations of these implants have not been fully characterized, and may impact the long-term functionality of these devices. In order to improve our understanding of the tissue conditions at the interface of chronic brain-implanted microdevices, we proposed utilizing advanced histology and microscopy techniques to image implanted devices and surrounding tissue intact within brain slices. We then proposed utilizing these methods to examine whether depth within the cerebral cortex affected tissue conditions around implants. Approach. Histological data was collected from rodent brain slices containing intact, intracortical microdevices four weeks after implantation surgery. Thick tissue sections containing the chronic implants were processed with fluorescent antibody labels, and imaged in an optical clearing solution using laser confocal microscopy. Main Results. Tissue surrounding microdevices exhibited two major depth-related phenomena: a non-uniform microglial coating along the device length and a dense mass of cells surrounding the implant in cerebral cortical layers I and II. Detailed views of the monocyte-derived immune cells improve our understanding of the close and complex association that immune cells have with chronic brain implants, and illuminated a possible relationship between cortical depth and the intensity of a chronic monocyte response around penetrating microdevices. The dense mass of cells contained vimentin, a protein not typically expressed highly in CNS cells, evidence that non-CNS cells likely descended down the face of the penetrating devices from the pial surface. Significance. Image data of highly non-uniform and depth-dependent biological responses along a device provides novel insight into the complexity of the tissue response to penetrating brain-implanted microdevices. The presented

  7. Engineered hybrid cardiac patches with multifunctional electronics for online monitoring and regulation of tissue function.

    PubMed

    Feiner, Ron; Engel, Leeya; Fleischer, Sharon; Malki, Maayan; Gal, Idan; Shapira, Assaf; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi; Dvir, Tal

    2016-06-01

    In cardiac tissue engineering approaches to treat myocardial infarction, cardiac cells are seeded within three-dimensional porous scaffolds to create functional cardiac patches. However, current cardiac patches do not allow for online monitoring and reporting of engineered-tissue performance, and do not interfere to deliver signals for patch activation or to enable its integration with the host. Here, we report an engineered cardiac patch that integrates cardiac cells with flexible, freestanding electronics and a 3D nanocomposite scaffold. The patch exhibited robust electronic properties, enabling the recording of cellular electrical activities and the on-demand provision of electrical stimulation for synchronizing cell contraction. We also show that electroactive polymers containing biological factors can be deposited on designated electrodes to release drugs in the patch microenvironment on demand. We expect that the integration of complex electronics within cardiac patches will eventually provide therapeutic control and regulation of cardiac function. PMID:26974408

  8. Mathematical Models Based on Transfer Functions to Estimate Tissue Temperature During RF Cardiac Ablation in Real Time

    PubMed Central

    Alba-Martínez, Jose; Trujillo, Macarena; Blasco-Gimenez, Ramon; Berjano, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Radiofrequency cardiac ablation (RFCA) has been used to treat certain types of cardiac arrhythmias by producing a thermal lesion. Even though a tissue temperature higher than 50ºC is required to destroy the target, thermal mapping is not currently used during RFCA. Our aim was thus to develop mathematical models capable of estimating tissue temperature from tissue characteristics acquired or estimated at the beginning of the procedure (electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, specific heat and density) and the applied voltage at any time. Biological tissue was considered as a system with an input (applied voltage) and output (tissue temperature), and so the mathematical models were based on transfer functions relating these variables. We used theoretical models based on finite element method to verify the mathematical models. Firstly, we solved finite element models to identify the transfer functions between the temperature at a depth of 4 mm and a constant applied voltage using a 7Fr and 4 mm electrode. The results showed that the relationships can be expressed as first-order transfer functions. Changes in electrical conductivity only affected the static gain of the system, while specific heat variations produced a change in the dynamic system response. In contrast, variations in thermal conductivity modified both the static gain and the dynamic system response. Finally, to assess the performance of the transfer functions obtained, we conducted a new set of computer simulations using a controlled temperature protocol and considering the temperature dependence of the thermal and electrical conductivities, i.e. conditions closer to those found in clinical use. The results showed that the difference between the values estimated from transfer functions and the temperatures obtained from finite element models was less than 4ºC, which suggests that the proposed method could be used to estimate tissue temperature in real time. PMID:22715345

  9. PGS:Gelatin nanofibrous scaffolds with tunable mechanical and structural properties for engineering cardiac tissues.

    PubMed

    Kharaziha, Mahshid; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Shin, Su-Ryon; Annabi, Nasim; Masoumi, Nafiseh; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K; Camci-Unal, Gulden; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-09-01

    A significant challenge in cardiac tissue engineering is the development of biomimetic grafts that can potentially promote myocardial repair and regeneration. A number of approaches have used engineered scaffolds to mimic the architecture of the native myocardium tissue and precisely regulate cardiac cell functions. However, previous attempts have not been able to simultaneously recapitulate chemical, mechanical, and structural properties of the myocardial extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, we utilized an electrospinning approach to fabricate elastomeric biodegradable poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS):gelatin nanofibrous scaffolds with a wide range of chemical composition, stiffness and anisotropy. Our findings demonstrated that through incorporation of PGS, it is possible to create nanofibrous scaffolds with well-defined anisotropy that mimic the left ventricular myocardium architecture. Furthermore, we studied attachment, proliferation, differentiation and alignment of neonatal rat cardiac fibroblast cells (CFs) as well as protein expression, alignment, and contractile function of cardiomyocyte (CMs) on PGS:gelatin scaffolds with variable amount of PGS. Notably, aligned nanofibrous scaffold, consisting of 33 wt. % PGS, induced optimal synchronous contractions of CMs while significantly enhanced cellular alignment. Overall, our study suggests that the aligned nanofibrous PGS:gelatin scaffold support cardiac cell organization, phenotype and contraction and could potentially be used to develop clinically relevant constructs for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:23747008

  10. PGS:Gelatin Nanofibrous Scaffolds with Tunable Mechanical and Structural Properties for Engineering Cardiac Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kharaziha, Mahshid; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Shin, Su-Ryon; Annabi, Nasim; Masoumi, Nafiseh; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Camci-Unal, Gulden; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    A significant challenge in cardiac tissue engineering is the development of biomimetic grafts that can potentially promote myocardial repair and regeneration. A number of approaches have used engineered scaffolds to mimic the architecture of the native myocardium tissue and precisely regulate cardiac cell functions. However previous attempts have not been able to simultaneously recapitulate chemical, mechanical, and structural properties of the myocardial extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, we utilized an electrospinning approach to fabricate elastomeric biodegradable poly(glycerol-sebacate) (PGS):gelatin scaffolds with a wide range of chemical composition, stiffness and anisotropy. Our findings demonstrated that through incorporation of PGS, it is possible to create nanofibrous scaffolds with well-defined anisotropy that mimics the left ventricular myocardium architecture. Furthermore, we studied attachment, proliferation, differentiation and alignment of neonatal rat cardiac fibroblast cells (CFs) as well as protein expression, alignment, and contractile function of cardiomyocyte (CMs) on PGS:gelatin scaffolds with variable amount of PGS. Notably, aligned nanofibrous scaffold, consisting of 33 wt. % PGS, induced optimal synchronous contractions of CMs while significantly enhanced cellular alignment. Overall, our study suggests that the aligned nanofibrous PGS:gelatin scaffold support cardiac cell organization, phenotype and contraction and could potentially be used to develop clinically relevant constructs for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:23747008

  11. Multispectral upconversion luminescence intensity ratios for ascertaining the tissue imaging depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Wang, Yu; Kong, Xianggui; Liu, Xiaomin; Zhang, Youlin; Tu, Langping; Ding, Yadan; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Buma, Wybren Jan; Zhang, Hong

    2014-07-01

    Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have in recent years emerged as excellent contrast agents for in vivo luminescence imaging of deep tissues. But information abstracted from these images is in most cases restricted to 2-dimensions, without the depth information. In this work, a simple method has been developed to accurately ascertain the tissue imaging depth based on the relative luminescence intensity ratio of multispectral NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ UCNPs. A theoretical mode was set up, where the parameters in the quantitative relation between the relative intensities of the upconversion luminescence spectra and the depth of the UCNPs were determined using tissue mimicking liquid phantoms. The 540 nm and 650 nm luminescence intensity ratios (G/R ratio) of NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ UCNPs were monitored following excitation path (Ex mode) and emission path (Em mode) schemes, respectively. The model was validated by embedding NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ UCNPs in layered pork muscles, which demonstrated a very high accuracy of measurement in the thickness up to centimeter. This approach shall promote significantly the power of nanotechnology in medical optical imaging by expanding the imaging information from 2-dimensional to real 3-dimensional.Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have in recent years emerged as excellent contrast agents for in vivo luminescence imaging of deep tissues. But information abstracted from these images is in most cases restricted to 2-dimensions, without the depth information. In this work, a simple method has been developed to accurately ascertain the tissue imaging depth based on the relative luminescence intensity ratio of multispectral NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ UCNPs. A theoretical mode was set up, where the parameters in the quantitative relation between the relative intensities of the upconversion luminescence spectra and the depth of the UCNPs were determined using tissue mimicking liquid phantoms. The 540 nm and 650 nm luminescence intensity ratios (G/R ratio) of NaYF4:Yb3

  12. Virtual electrodes in cardiac tissue: a common mechanism for anodal and cathodal stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Wikswo, J P; Lin, S F; Abbas, R A

    1995-01-01

    Traditional cable analyses cannot explain complex patterns of excitation in cardiac tissue with unipolar, extracellular anodal, or cathodal stimuli. Epifluorescence imaging of the transmembrane potential during and after stimulation of both refractory and excitable tissue shows distinctive regions of simultaneous depolarization and hyperpolarization during stimulation that act as virtual cathodes and anodes. The results confirm bidomain model predictions that the onset (make) of a stimulus induces propagation from the virtual cathode, whereas stimulus termination (break) induces it from the virtual anode. In make stimulation, the virtual anode can delay activation of the underlying tissue, whereas in break stimulation this occurs under the virtual cathode. Thus make and break stimulations in cardiac tissue have a common mechanism that is the result of differences in the electrical anisotropy of the intracellular and extracellular spaces and provides clear proof of the validity of the bidomain model. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8599628

  13. Biomimetic scaffold combined with electrical stimulation and growth factor promotes tissue engineered cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyoungshin; Larson, Benjamin L; Kolewe, Martin E; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Freed, Lisa E

    2014-02-15

    Toward developing biologically sound models for the study of heart regeneration and disease, we cultured heart cells on a biodegradable, microfabricated poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) scaffold designed with micro-structural features and anisotropic mechanical properties to promote cardiac-like tissue architecture. Using this biomimetic system, we studied individual and combined effects of supplemental insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and electrical stimulation (ES). On culture day 8, all tissue constructs could be paced and expressed the cardiac protein troponin-T. IGF-1 reduced apoptosis, promoted cell-to-cell connectivity, and lowered excitation threshold, an index of electrophysiological activity. ES promoted formation of tissue-like bundles oriented in parallel to the electrical field and a more than ten-fold increase in matrix metalloprotease-2 (MMP-2) gene expression. The combination of IGF-1 and ES increased 2D projection length, an index of overall contraction strength, and enhanced expression of the gap junction protein connexin-43 and sarcomere development. This culture environment, designed to combine cardiac-like scaffold architecture and biomechanics with molecular and biophysical signals, enabled functional assembly of engineered heart muscle from dissociated cells and could serve as a template for future studies on the hierarchy of various signaling domains relative to cardiac tissue development. PMID:24240126

  14. Portable bioreactor for perfusion and electrical stimulation of engineered cardiac tissue

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Nina; Taubman, Alanna; Cimetta, Elisa; Saccenti, Laetitia; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering aims to create functional tissue constructs that can reestablish the structure and function of injured myocardium. Although bioreactors have facilitated the engineering of cardiac patches of clinically relevant size in vitro, a major drawback remains the transportation of the engineered tissues from a production facility to a medical operation facility while maintaining tissue viability and preventing contamination. Furthermore, after implantation, most of the cells are endangered by hypoxic conditions that exist before vascular flow is established. We developed a portable device that provides the perfusion and electrical stimulation necessary to engineer cardiac tissue in vitro, and to transport it to the site where it will be implantated. The micropump-powered perfusion apparatus may additionally function as an extracorporeal active pumping system providing nutrients and oxygen supply to the graft post-implantation. Such a system, through perfusion of oxygenated media and bioactive molecules (e.g. growth factors), could transiently support the tissue construct until it connects to the host vasculature and heart muscle, after which it could be taken away or let biodegrade. PMID:24111161

  15. Two-photon induced collagen cross-linking in bioartificial cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuetemeyer, Kai; Kensah, George; Heidrich, Marko; Meyer, Heiko; Martin, Ulrich; Gruh, Ina; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2011-08-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering is a promising strategy for regenerative therapies to overcome the shortage of donor organs for transplantation. Besides contractile function, the stiffness of tissue engineered constructs is crucial to generate transplantable tissue surrogates with sufficient mechanical stability to withstand the high pressure present in the heart. Although several collagen cross-linking techniques have proven to be efficient in stabilizing biomaterials, they cannot be applied to cardiac tissue engineering, as cell death occurs in the treated area. Here, we present a novel method using femtosecond (fs) laser pulses to increase the stiffness of collagen-based tissue constructs without impairing cell viability. Raster scanning of the fs laser beam over riboflavin-treated tissue induced collagen cross-linking by two-photon photosensitized singlet oxygen production. One day post-irradiation, stress-strain measurements revealed increased tissue stiffness by around 40% being dependent on the fibroblast content in the tissue. At the same time, cells remained viable and fully functional as demonstrated by fluorescence imaging of cardiomyocyte mitochondrial activity and preservation of active contraction force. Our results indicate that two-photon induced collagen cross-linking has great potential for studying and improving artificially engineered tissue for regenerative therapies.

  16. Nanoscale cues regulate the structure and function of macroscopic cardiac tissue constructs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deok-Ho; Lipke, Elizabeth A.; Kim, Pilnam; Cheong, Raymond; Thompson, Susan; Delannoy, Michael; Suh, Kahp-Yang; Tung, Leslie; Levchenko, Andre

    2010-01-01

    Heart tissue possesses complex structural organization on multiple scales, from macro- to nano-, but nanoscale control of cardiac function has not been extensively analyzed. Inspired by ultrastructural analysis of the native tissue, we constructed a scalable, nanotopographically controlled model of myocardium mimicking the in vivo ventricular organization. Guided by nanoscale mechanical cues provided by the underlying hydrogel, the tissue constructs displayed anisotropic action potential propagation and contractility characteristic of the native tissue. Surprisingly, cell geometry, action potential conduction velocity, and the expression of a cell–cell coupling protein were exquisitely sensitive to differences in the substratum nanoscale features of the surrounding extracellular matrix. We propose that controlling cell–material interactions on the nanoscale can stipulate structure and function on the tissue level and yield novel insights into in vivo tissue physiology, while providing materials for tissue repair. PMID:20018748

  17. The Transfer Functions of Cardiac Tissue during Stochastic Pacing

    PubMed Central

    de Lange, Enno; Kucera, Jan P.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The restitution properties of cardiac action potential duration (APD) and conduction velocity (CV) are important factors in arrhythmogenesis. They determine alternans, wavebreak, and the patterns of reentrant arrhythmias. We developed a novel approach to characterize restitution using transfer functions. Transfer functions relate an input and an output quantity in terms of gain and phase shift in the complex frequency domain. We derived an analytical expression for the transfer function of interbeat intervals (IBIs) during conduction from one site (input) to another site downstream (output). Transfer functions can be efficiently obtained using a stochastic pacing protocol. Using simulations of conduction and extracellular mapping of strands of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, we show that transfer functions permit the quantification of APD and CV restitution slopes when it is difficult to measure APD directly. We find that the normally positive CV restitution slope attenuates IBI variations. In contrast, a negative CV restitution slope (induced by decreasing extracellular [K+]) amplifies IBI variations with a maximum at the frequency of alternans. Hence, it potentiates alternans and renders conduction unstable, even in the absence of APD restitution. Thus, stochastic pacing and transfer function analysis represent a powerful strategy to evaluate restitution and the stability of conduction. PMID:19134481

  18. Optimizing a spontaneously contracting heart tissue patch with rat neonatal cardiac cells on fibrin gel

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ze-Wei; Mohamed, Mohamed; Hogan, Matthew; Gutierrez, Laura; Birla, Ravi K.

    2014-01-01

    Engineered cardiac tissues have been constructed with primary or stem cell-derived cardiac cells on natural or synthetic scaffolds. They represent a tremendous potential for treatment of injured areas through addition of tensional support and delivery of sufficient cells. In this study 1 to 6 million (M) neonatal cardiac cells were seeded on fibrin gels to fabricate cardiac tissue patches, and the effects of culture time and cell density on spontaneous contraction rates, twitch forces and paced response frequencies were measured. Electrocardiograms and signal volume index of connexin 43 were also analyzed. Patches of 1–6M cell densities exhibited maximal contraction rates between 305–410 bpm within the first 4 days after plating; low cell densities (1–3M) patches sustained rhythmic contraction longer than high cell densities (4–6M). Patches with 1–6 M cell densities generated contractile forces in the range 2.245–14.065 mN/mm3 on days 4–6. Upon patch formation, a paced response frequency of approximately 6 Hz was obtained, and decreased to approximately 3 Hz after 6 days of culture. High cell density patches contained a thicker real cardiac tissue layer which generated higher R wave amplitudes; however, low density patches had a greater signal volume index of connexin 43. In addition, all patches manifested endothelial cell growth and robust nuclear division. The present study demonstrates that the proper time for in vivo implantation of this cardiac construct is just at patch formation and patches with 3–4M cell densities are the best candidates. PMID:24771636

  19. TRPV-1-mediated elimination of residual iPS cells in bioengineered cardiac cell sheet tissues

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Seta, Hiroyoshi; Haraguchi, Yuji; Alsayegh, Khaled; Sekine, Hidekazu; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa; Yamazaki, Kenji; Okano, Teruo

    2016-01-01

    The development of a suitable strategy for eliminating remaining undifferentiated cells is indispensable for the use of human-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cells in regenerative medicine. Here, we show for the first time that TRPV-1 activation through transient culture at 42 °C in combination with agonists is a simple and useful strategy to eliminate iPS cells from bioengineered cardiac cell sheet tissues. When human iPS cells were cultured at 42 °C, almost all cells disappeared by 48 hours through apoptosis. However, iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts maintained transcriptional and protein expression levels, and cardiac cell sheets were fabricated after reducing the temperature. TRPV-1 expression in iPS cells was upregulated at 42 °C, and iPS cell death at 42 °C was TRPV-1-dependent. Furthermore, TRPV-1 activation through thermal or agonist treatment eliminated iPS cells in cardiac tissues for a final concentration of 0.4% iPS cell contamination. These findings suggest that the difference in tolerance to TRPV-1 activation between iPS cells and iPS cell-derived cardiac cells could be exploited to eliminate remaining iPS cells in bioengineered cell sheet tissues, which will further reduce the risk of tumour formation. PMID:26888607

  20. From Cardiac Tissue Engineering to Heart-on-a-Chip: Beating Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu Shrike; Aleman, Julio; Arneri, Andrea; Bersini, Simone; Piraino, Francesco; Shin, Su Ryon; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The heart is one of the most vital organs in the human body, which actively pumps the blood through the vascular network to supply nutrients to as well as to extract wastes from all other organs, maintaining the homeostasis of the biological system. Over the past few decades, tremendous efforts have been exerted in engineering functional cardiac tissues for heart regeneration via biomimetic approaches. More recently, progresses have been achieved towards the transformation of knowledge obtained from cardiac tissue engineering to building physiologically relevant microfluidic human heart models (i.e. heart-on-chips) for applications in drug discovery. The advancement in the stem cell technologies further provides the opportunity to create personalized in vitro models from cells derived from patients. Here starting from the heart biology, we review recent advances in engineering cardiac tissues and heart-on-a-chip platforms for their use in heart regeneration and cardiotoxic/cardiotherapeutic drug screening, and then briefly conclude with characterization techniques and personalization potential of the cardiac models. PMID:26065674

  1. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging of cardiac tissue to detect collagen deposition after myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheheltani, Rabee; Rosano, Jenna M.; Wang, Bin; Sabri, Abdel Karim; Pleshko, Nancy; Kiani, Mohammad F.

    2012-05-01

    Myocardial infarction often leads to an increase in deposition of fibrillar collagen. Detection and characterization of this cardiac fibrosis is of great interest to investigators and clinicians. Motivated by the significant limitations of conventional staining techniques to visualize collagen deposition in cardiac tissue sections, we have developed a Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS) methodology for collagen assessment. The infrared absorbance band centered at 1338 cm-1, which arises from collagen amino acid side chain vibrations, was used to map collagen deposition across heart tissue sections of a rat model of myocardial infarction, and was compared to conventional staining techniques. Comparison of the size of the collagen scar in heart tissue sections as measured with this methodology and that of trichrome staining showed a strong correlation (R=0.93). A Pearson correlation model between local intensity values in FT-IRIS and immuno-histochemical staining of collagen type I also showed a strong correlation (R=0.86). We demonstrate that FT-IRIS methodology can be utilized to visualize cardiac collagen deposition. In addition, given that vibrational spectroscopic data on proteins reflect molecular features, it also has the potential to provide additional information about the molecular structure of cardiac extracellular matrix proteins and their alterations.

  2. Cardiac Meets Skeletal: What's New in Microfluidic Models for Muscle Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Visone, Roberta; Gilardi, Mara; Marsano, Anna; Rasponi, Marco; Bersini, Simone; Moretti, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years microfluidics and microfabrication technique principles have been extensively exploited for biomedical applications. In this framework, organs-on-a-chip represent promising tools to reproduce key features of functional tissue units within microscale culture chambers. These systems offer the possibility to investigate the effects of biochemical, mechanical, and electrical stimulations, which are usually applied to enhance the functionality of the engineered tissues. Since the functionality of muscle tissues relies on the 3D organization and on the perfect coupling between electrochemical stimulation and mechanical contraction, great efforts have been devoted to generate biomimetic skeletal and cardiac systems to allow high-throughput pathophysiological studies and drug screening. This review critically analyzes microfluidic platforms that were designed for skeletal and cardiac muscle tissue engineering. Our aim is to highlight which specific features of the engineered systems promoted a typical reorganization of the engineered construct and to discuss how promising design solutions exploited for skeletal muscle models could be applied to improve cardiac tissue models and vice versa. PMID:27571058

  3. Depth Evaluation of Soft Tissue Mimicking Phantoms Using Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Li, S.; Wei, C.; Wang, R. K.; Huang, Z.

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) shows advantages in revealing skin mechanical properties. In this paper, we evaluates the elasticity of tissue mimicking phantoms by inversion of SAWs phase velocity to Young's Modulus, the estimated SAWs evaluating depth is determined based on the assumption of that SAWs penetration approximately equals one wavelength. The tissue mimicking phantoms are made of agar with concentration of 1%, 2% and 3%. Their elasticity tested from our system is 13.3 kPa, 53.4 kPa and 257.9 kPa respectively, with expected gradient. The evaluation depth is then estimated as 0.542 mm to 3.403 mm underneath the phantom surface, which indicates that this method is suitable to measure elasticity in dermis layer of skin.

  4. MEMS scanner enabled real-time depth sensitive hyperspectral imaging of biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youmin; Bish, Sheldon; Tunnell, James W; Zhang, Xiaojing

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate a hyperspectral and depth sensitive diffuse optical imaging microsystem, where fast scanning is provided by a CMOS compatible 2-axis MEMS mirror. By using lissajous scanning patterns, large field-of-view (FOV) of 1.2 cmx1.2 cm images with lateral resolution of 100 µm can be taken at 1.3 frames-per-second (fps). Hyperspectral and depth-sensitive images were acquired on tissue simulating phantom samples containing quantum dots (QDs) patterned at various depths in Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Device performance delivers 6 nm spectral resolution and 0.43 wavelengths per second acquisition speed. A sample of porcine epithelium with subcutaneously placed QDs was also imaged. Images of the biological sample were processed by spectral unmixing in order to qualitatively separate chromophores in the final images and demonstrate spectral performance of the imaging system. PMID:21164757

  5. Culturing Mouse Cardiac Valves in the Miniature Tissue Culture System.

    PubMed

    Kruithof, Boudewijn P T; Lieber, Samuel C; Kruithof-de Julio, Marianna; Gaussin, Vincian; Goumans, Marie José

    2015-01-01

    Heart valve disease is a major burden in the Western world and no effective treatment is available. This is mainly due to a lack of knowledge of the molecular, cellular and mechanical mechanisms underlying the maintenance and/or loss of the valvular structure. Current models used to study valvular biology include in vitro cultures of valvular endothelial and interstitial cells. Although, in vitro culturing models provide both cellular and molecular mechanisms, the mechanisms involved in the 3D-organization of the valve remain unclear. While in vivo models have provided insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying valvular development, insight into adult valvular biology is still elusive. In order to be able to study the regulation of the valvular 3D-organization on tissue, cellular and molecular levels, we have developed the Miniature Tissue Culture System. In this ex vivo flow model the mitral or the aortic valve is cultured in its natural position in the heart. The natural configuration and composition of the leaflet are maintained allowing the most natural response of the valvular cells to stimuli. The valves remain viable and are responsive to changing environmental conditions. This MTCS may provide advantages on studying questions including but not limited to, how does the 3D organization affect valvular biology, what factors affect 3D organization of the valve, and which network of signaling pathways regulates the 3D organization of the valve. PMID:26555276

  6. Depth of Bacterial Invasion in Resected Intestinal Tissue Predicts Mortality in Surgical Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Remon, Juan I.; Amin, Sachin C.; Mehendale, Sangeeta R.; Rao, Rakesh; Luciano, Angel A.; Garzon, Steven A.; Maheshwari, Akhil

    2015-01-01

    Objective Up to a third of all infants who develop necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) require surgical resection of necrotic bowel. We hypothesized that the histopathological findings in surgically-resected bowel can predict the clinical outcome of these infants. Study design We reviewed the medical records and archived pathology specimens from all patients who underwent bowel resection/autopsy for NEC at a regional referral center over a 10-year period. Pathology specimens were graded for the depth and severity of necrosis, inflammation, bacteria invasion, and pneumatosis, and histopathological findings were correlated with clinical outcomes. Results We performed clinico-pathological analysis on 33 infants with confirmed NEC, of which 18 (54.5%) died. Depth of bacterial invasion in resected intestinal tissue predicted death from NEC (odds ratio 5.39 per unit change in the depth of bacterial invasion, 95% confidence interval 1.33-21.73). The presence of transmural necrosis and bacteria in the surgical margins of resected bowel was also associated with increased mortality. Conclusions Depth of bacterial invasion in resected intestinal tissue predicts mortality in surgical NEC. PMID:25950918

  7. Functional interaction between charged nanoparticles and cardiac tissue: a new paradigm for cardiac arrhythmia?

    PubMed Central

    Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Shevchuk, Andrew I; Korchev, Yuri E; Lab, Max J; Tetley, Teresa D; Gorelik, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate the effect of surface charge of therapeutic nanoparticles on sarcolemmal ionic homeostasis and the initiation of arrhythmias. Materials & methods Cultured neonatal rat myocytes were exposed to 50 nm-charged polystyrene latex nanoparticles and examined using a combination of hopping probe scanning ion conductance microscopy, optical recording of action potential characteristics and patch clamp. Results Positively charged, amine-modified polystyrene latex nanoparticles showed cytotoxic effects and induced large-scale damage to cardiomyocyte membranes leading to calcium alternans and cell death. By contrast, negatively charged, carboxyl-modified polystyrene latex nanoparticles (NegNPs) were not overtly cytotoxic but triggered formation of 50–250-nm nanopores in the membrane. Cells exposed to NegNPs revealed pro-arrhythmic events, such as delayed afterdepolarizations, reduction in conduction velocity and pathological increment of action potential duration together with an increase in ionic current throughout the membrane, carried by the nanopores. Conclusion The utilization of charged nanoparticles is a novel concept for targeting cardiac excitability. However, this unique nanoscopic investigation reveals an altered electrophysiological substrate, which sensitized the heart cells towards arrhythmias. PMID:23140503

  8. Textile-templated electrospun anisotropic scaffolds for regenerative cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Şenel Ayaz, H Gözde; Perets, Anat; Ayaz, Hasan; Gilroy, Kyle D; Govindaraj, Muthu; Brookstein, David; Lelkes, Peter I

    2014-10-01

    For patients with end-stage heart disease, the access to heart transplantation is limited due to the shortage of donor organs and to the potential for rejection of the donated organ. Therefore, current studies focus on bioengineering approaches for creating biomimetic cardiac patches that will assist in restoring cardiac function, by repairing and/or regenerating the intrinsically anisotropic myocardium. In this paper we present a simplified, straightforward approach for creating bioactive anisotropic cardiac patches, based on a combination of bioengineering and textile-manufacturing techniques in concert with nano-biotechnology based tissue-engineering stratagems. Using knitted conventional textiles, made of cotton or polyester yarns as template targets, we successfully electrospun anisotropic three-dimensional scaffolds from poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA), and thermoplastic polycarbonate-urethane (PCU, Bionate(®)). The surface topography and mechanical properties of textile-templated anisotropic scaffolds significantly differed from those of scaffolds electrospun from the same materials onto conventional 2-D flat-target electrospun scaffolds. Anisotropic textile-templated scaffolds electrospun from both PLGA and PCU, supported the adhesion and proliferation of H9C2 cardiac myoblasts cell line, and guided the cardiac tissue-like anisotropic organization of these cells in vitro. All cell-seeded PCU scaffolds exhibited mechanical properties comparable to those of a human heart, but only the cells on the polyester-templated scaffolds exhibited prolonged spontaneous synchronous contractility on the entire engineered construct for 10 days in vitro at a near physiologic frequency of ∼120 bpm. Taken together, the methods described here take advantage of straightforward established textile manufacturing strategies as an efficient and cost-effective approach to engineering 3D anisotropic, elastomeric PCU scaffolds that can serve as a cardiac patch. PMID:25017096

  9. Advancing functional engineered cardiac tissues toward a preclinical model of human myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Irene C.; Karakikes, Ioannis; Serrao, Gregory W.; Backeris, Peter; Lee, Jia-Jye; Xie, Chaoqin; Senyei, Grant; Gordon, Ronald E.; Li, Ronald A.; Akar, Fadi G.; Hajjar, Roger J.; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien; Costa, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac experimental biology and translational research would benefit from an in vitro surrogate for human heart muscle. This study investigated structural and functional properties and interventional responses of human engineered cardiac tissues (hECTs) compared to human myocardium. Human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs, >90% troponin-positive) were mixed with collagen and cultured on force-sensing elastomer devices. hECTs resembled trabecular muscle and beat spontaneously (1.18±0.48 Hz). Microstructural features and mRNA expression of cardiac-specific genes (α-MHC, SERCA2a, and ACTC1) were comparable to human myocardium. Optical mapping revealed cardiac refractoriness with loss of 1:1 capture above 3 Hz, and cycle length dependence of the action potential duration, recapitulating key features of cardiac electrophysiology. hECTs reconstituted the Frank-Starling mechanism, generating an average maximum twitch stress of 660 μN/mm2 at Lmax, approaching values in newborn human myocardium. Dose-response curves followed exponential pharmacodynamics models for calcium chloride (EC50 1.8 mM) and verapamil (IC50 0.61 μM); isoproterenol elicited a positive chronotropic but negligible inotropic response, suggesting sarcoplasmic reticulum immaturity. hECTs were amenable to gene transfer, demonstrated by successful transduction with Ad.GFP. Such 3-D hECTs recapitulate an early developmental stage of human myocardium and promise to offer an alternative preclinical model for cardiology research.—Turnbull, I. C., Karakikes, I., Serrao, G. W., Backeris, P., Lee, J.-J., Xie, C., Senyei, G., Gordon, R. E., Li, R. A., Akar, F. G., Hajjar, R. J., Hulot, J.-S., Costa, K. D. Advancing functional engineered cardiac tissues toward a preclinical model of human myocardium. PMID:24174427

  10. The role of Wnt regulation in heart development, cardiac repair and disease: A tissue engineering perspective.

    PubMed

    Pahnke, Aric; Conant, Genna; Huyer, Locke Davenport; Zhao, Yimu; Feric, Nicole; Radisic, Milica

    2016-05-01

    Wingless-related integration site (Wnt) signaling has proven to be a fundamental mechanism in cardiovascular development as well as disease. Understanding its particular role in heart formation has helped to develop pluripotent stem cell differentiation protocols that produce relatively pure cardiomyocyte populations. The resultant cardiomyocytes have been used to generate heart tissue for pharmaceutical testing, and to study physiological and disease states. Such protocols in combination with induced pluripotent stem cell technology have yielded patient-derived cardiomyocytes that exhibit some of the hallmarks of cardiovascular disease and are therefore being used to model disease states. While FDA approval of new treatments typically requires animal experiments, the burgeoning field of tissue engineering could act as a replacement. This would necessitate the generation of reproducible three-dimensional cardiac tissues in a well-controlled environment, which exhibit native heart properties, such as cellular density, composition, extracellular matrix composition, and structure-function. Such tissues could also enable the further study of Wnt signaling. Furthermore, as Wnt signaling has been found to have a mechanistic role in cardiac pathophysiology, e.g. heart attack, hypertrophy, atherosclerosis, and aortic stenosis, its strategic manipulation could provide a means of generating reproducible and specific, physiological and pathological cardiac models. PMID:26626076

  11. Myocardial Scaffold-based Cardiac Tissue Engineering: Application of Coordinated Mechanical and Electrical Stimulations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Guangjun; To, Filip; Butler, J. Ryan; Claude, Andrew; McLaughlin, Ronald M.; Williams, Lakiesha N.; de Jongh Curry, Amy L.; Liao, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have developed an optimal decellularization protocol to generate 3D porcine myocardial scaffolds, which preserved natural extracellular matrix structure, mechanical anisotropy, and vasculature templates, and also showed good cell recellularization and differentiation potential. In this study, a multi-stimulation bioreactor was built to provide coordinated mechanical and electrical stimulations for facilitating stem cell differentiation and cardiac construct development. The acellular myocardial scaffolds were seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (106 cells/ml) by needle injection and subjected to 5-azacytidine treatment (3 μmol/L, 24 h) and various bioreactor conditioning protocols. We found that, after 2-day culture with mechanical (20% strain) and electrical stimulation (5 V, 1 Hz), high cell density and good cell viability were observed in the reseeded scaffold. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the differentiated cells showed cardiomyocyte-like phenotype, by expressing sarcomeric α-actinin, myosin heavy chain, cardiac troponin T, connexin-43, and N-cadherin. Biaxial mechanical testing demonstrated that positive tissue remodeling took place after 2-day bioreactor conditioning (20% strain + 5 V, 1 Hz); passive mechanical properties of the 2-day and 4-day tissue constructs were comparable to the tissue constructs produced by stirring reseeding followed by 2-week static culture, implying the effectiveness and efficiency of the coordinated simulations in promoting tissue remodeling. In short, the synergistic stimulations might be beneficial not only for the quality of cardiac construct development, but also for patients by reducing the waiting time in future clinical scenarios. PMID:23923967

  12. Biomimetic perfusion and electrical stimulation applied in concert improved the assembly of engineered cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Maidhof, Robert; Tandon, Nina; Lee, Eun Jung; Luo, Jianwen; Duan, Yi; Yeager, Keith; Konofagou, Elisa; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2012-11-01

    Maintenance of normal myocardial function depends intimately on synchronous tissue contraction, driven by electrical activation and on adequate nutrient perfusion in support thereof. Bioreactors have been used to mimic aspects of these factors in vitro to engineer cardiac tissue but, due to design limitations, previous bioreactor systems have yet to simultaneously support nutrient perfusion, electrical stimulation and unconstrained (i.e. not isometric) tissue contraction. To the best of our knowledge, the bioreactor system described herein is the first to integrate these three key factors in concert. We present the design of our bioreactor and characterize its capability in integrated experimental and mathematical modelling studies. We then cultured cardiac cells obtained from neonatal rats in porous, channelled elastomer scaffolds with the simultaneous application of perfusion and electrical stimulation, with controls excluding either one or both of these two conditions. After 8 days of culture, constructs grown with simultaneous perfusion and electrical stimulation exhibited substantially improved functional properties, as evidenced by a significant increase in contraction amplitude (0.23 ± 0.10% vs 0.14 ± 0.05%, 0.13 ± 0.08% or 0.09 ± 0.02% in control constructs grown without stimulation, without perfusion, or either stimulation or perfusion, respectively). Consistently, these constructs had significantly improved DNA contents, cell distribution throughout the scaffold thickness, cardiac protein expression, cell morphology and overall tissue organization compared to control groups. Thus, the simultaneous application of medium perfusion and electrical conditioning enabled by the use of the novel bioreactor system may accelerate the generation of fully functional, clinically sized cardiac tissue constructs. PMID:22170772

  13. Application of the Optoacoustic Technique to Obtain Depth Profiles of Phantoms of Soft Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Yépez, M. P.; Cano, M. E.; Vargas-Luna, F. M.; Delgadillo-Holtfort, I.

    2008-08-01

    In this work we implemented an optoacoustic system that uses home-made acoustic transducers having PVDF of 110 μm thickness as piezosensor. The excitation source consisted of a pulsed Nd:YAG at the wavelength of 1064 nm. Soft tissue phantoms of water, gelatin and low-fat milk were used to imitate the optical properties of mammalian tissue. These phantoms were constructed containing an object with enhanced absorption optical properties. These inclusions were used to simulate abnormal tissue within the phantom. With the constructed transducers we were able to detect the inclusions of 1.64 mm thickness using an intensity of about 100 mJ/cm2. The signal coming from the object's edge starts to be detectable at distances that are dependent of both the object's depth and the scattering properties of the phantom.

  14. Polypyrrole-contained electrospun conductive nanofibrous membranes for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kai, Dan; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Jin, Guorui; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2011-12-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering (TE) is one of the most promising strategies to reconstruct infarct myocardium and the major challenge is to generate a bioactive substrate with suitable chemical, biological, and conductive properties, thus mimicking the extracellular matrix (ECM) both structurally and functionally. In this study, polypyrrole/poly(ε-caprolactone)/gelatin nanofibrous scaffolds were electrospun by incorporating different concentrations of polypyrrole (PPy) to PCL/gelatin (PG) solution. Morphological, chemical, mechanical, and biodegradation properties of the electrospun nanofibers were evaluated. Our data indicated that by increasing the concentration of PPy (0-30%) in the composite, the average fiber diameters reduced from 239 ± 37 nm to 191 ± 45 nm, and the tensile modulus increased from 7.9 ± 1.6 MPa to 50.3 ± 3.3 MPa. Conductive nanofibers containing 15% PPy (PPG15) exhibited the most balanced properties of conductivity, mechanical properties, and biodegradability, matching the requirements for regeneration of cardiac tissue. The cell proliferation assay, SEM, and immunostaining analysis showed that the PPG15 scaffold promote cell attachment, proliferation, interaction, and expression of cardiac-specific proteins better than PPG30. Electrospun PPG15 conductive nanofibrous scaffold could be desirable and promising substrates suitable for the regeneration of infarct myocardium and cardiac defects. PMID:22021185

  15. Electrospun composite scaffolds containing poly(octanediol-co-citrate) for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Nair, A Sreekumaran; Kai, Dan; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2012-07-01

    A biocompatible and elastomeric nanofibrous scaffold is electrospun from a blend of poly(1,8-octanediol-co-citrate) [POC] and poly(L-lactic acid) -co-poly-(3-caprolactone) [PLCL] for application as a bioengineered patch for cardiac tissue engineering. The characterization of the scaffolds was carried out by Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and tensile measurement. The mechanical properties of the scaffolds are studied with regard to the percentage of POC incorporated with PLCL and the results of the study showed that the mechanical property and degradation behavior of the composites can be tuned with respect to the concentration of POC blended with PLCL. The composite scaffolds with POC: PLCL weight ratio of 40:60 [POC/PLCL4060] was found to have a tensile strength of 1.04 ± 0.11 MPa and Young's Modulus of 0.51 ± 0.10 MPa, comparable to the native cardiac tissue. The proliferation of cardiac myoblast cells on the electrospun POC/PLCL scaffolds was found to increase from Days 2 to 8, with the increasing concentration of POC in the composite. The morphology and cytoskeletal observation of the cells also demonstrated the biocompatibility of the POC containing scaffolds. Electrospun POC/PLCL4060 nanofibers are promising elastomeric substrates that might provide the necessary mechanical cues to cardiac muscle cells for regeneration of the heart. PMID:22328272

  16. In vivo facial tissue depth for Canadian Mi'kmaq adults: a case study from Nova Scotia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Peckmann, Tanya R; Harris, Mikkel; Huculak, Meaghan; Pringle, Ashleigh; Fournier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    This study examines facial tissue depth in Canadian Mi'kmaq adults. Using ultrasound, measurements were taken at 19 landmarks on the faces of 152 individuals aged 18-75 years old. The relationships between tissue thickness, age, and sex were investigated. A positive linear trend exists between tissue thickness and age for Mi'kmaq males and females at multiple landmarks. Seven landmarks show significant differences in facial tissue depth between males and females aged 18-34 years old; no landmarks show significant differences in facial tissue depth between males and females aged 35-45 years old and 46-55 years old. Significant differences were shown in facial tissue depth between Mi'kmaq and White Americans and Mi'kmaq and African Americans. These data can assist in 3-D facial reconstructions and aid in establishing the identity of unknown Mi'kmaq individuals. PMID:25572085

  17. High Resolution Magnetic Images of Planar Wave Fronts Reveal Bidomain Properties of Cardiac Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Jenny R.; Fong, Luis E.; Sidorov, Veniamin Y.; Wikswo, John P.; Baudenbacher, Franz

    2004-01-01

    We magnetically imaged the magnetic action field and optically imaged the transmembrane potentials generated by planar wavefronts on the surface of the left ventricular wall of Langendorff-perfused isolated rabbit hearts. The magnetic action field images were used to produce a time series of two-dimensional action current maps. Overlaying epifluorescent images allowed us to identify a net current along the wavefront and perpendicular to gradients in the transmembrane potential. This is in contrast to a traditional uniform double-layer model where the net current flows along the gradient in the transmembrane potential. Our findings are supported by numerical simulations that treat cardiac tissue as a bidomain with unequal anisotropies in the intra- and extracellular spaces. Our measurements reveal the anisotropic bidomain nature of cardiac tissue during plane wave propagation. These bidomain effects play an important role in the generation of the whole-heart magnetocardiogram and cannot be ignored. PMID:15377521

  18. Experimental and theoretical description of higher order periods in cardiac tissue action potential duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herndon, Conner; Fenton, Flavio; Uzelac, Ilija

    Much theoretical, experimental, and clinical research has been devoted to investigating the initiation of cardiac arrhythmias by alternans, the first period doubling bifurcation in the duration of cardiac action potentials. Although period doubling above alternans has been shown to exist in many mammalian hearts, little is understood about their emergence or behavior. There currently exists no physiologically correct theory or model that adequately describes and predicts their emergence in stimulated tissue. In this talk we present experimental data of period 2, 4, and 8 dynamics and a mathematical model that describes these bifurcations. This model extends current cell models through the addition of memory and includes spatiotemporal nonlinearities arising from cellular coupling by tissue heterogeneity.

  19. Simulation of voltage-sensitive optical signals in three-dimensional slabs of cardiac tissue: application to transillumination and coaxial imaging methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernus, O.; Wellner, M.; Mironov, S. F.; Pertsov, A. M.

    2005-01-01

    Voltage-sensitive dyes are an important tool in visualizing electrical activity in cardiac tissue. Until today, they have mainly been applied in cardiac electrophysiology to subsurface imaging. In the present study, we assess different imaging methods used in optical tomography with respect to their effectiveness in visualizing 3D cardiac activity. To achieve this goal, we simulate optical signals produced by excitation fronts initiated at different depths inside the myocardial wall and compare their properties for various imaging modes. Specifically, we consider scanning and broad-field illumination, including trans- and epi-illumination. We focus on the lateral optical resolution and signal intensity, as a function of the source depth. Optical diffusion theory is applied to derive a computationally efficient approximation of the point-spread function and to predict voltage-sensitive signals. Computations were performed both for fluorescent and absorptive voltage-sensitive dyes. Among all the above-mentioned methods, fluorescent coaxial scanning yields the best resolution (<2.5 mm) and gives the most information about the intramural cardiac activity.

  20. Cardiac tissue enriched factors serum response factor and GATA-4 are mutual coregulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belaguli, N. S.; Sepulveda, J. L.; Nigam, V.; Charron, F.; Nemer, M.; Schwartz, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Combinatorial interaction among cardiac tissue-restricted enriched transcription factors may facilitate the expression of cardiac tissue-restricted genes. Here we show that the MADS box factor serum response factor (SRF) cooperates with the zinc finger protein GATA-4 to synergistically activate numerous myogenic and nonmyogenic serum response element (SRE)-dependent promoters in CV1 fibroblasts. In the absence of GATA binding sites, synergistic activation depends on binding of SRF to the proximal CArG box sequence in the cardiac and skeletal alpha-actin promoter. GATA-4's C-terminal activation domain is obligatory for synergistic coactivation with SRF, and its N-terminal domain and first zinc finger are inhibitory. SRF and GATA-4 physically associate both in vivo and in vitro through their MADS box and the second zinc finger domains as determined by protein A pullout assays and by in vivo one-hybrid transfection assays using Gal4 fusion proteins. Other cardiovascular tissue-restricted GATA factors, such as GATA-5 and GATA-6, were equivalent to GATA-4 in coactivating SRE-dependent targets. Thus, interaction between the MADS box and C4 zinc finger proteins, a novel regulatory paradigm, mediates activation of SRF-dependent gene expression.

  1. Encapsulation of cardiomyocytes in a fibrin hydrogel for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yuan Ye, Kathy; Sullivan, Kelly Elizabeth; Black, Lauren Deems

    2011-01-01

    Culturing cells in a three dimensional hydrogel environment is an important technique for developing constructs for tissue engineering as well as studying cellular responses under various culture conditions in vitro. The three dimensional environment more closely mimics what the cells observe in vivo due to the application of mechanical and chemical stimuli in all dimensions (1). Three-dimensional hydrogels can either be made from synthetic polymers such as PEG-DA (2) and PLGA (3) or a number of naturally occurring proteins such as collagen (4), hyaluronic acid (5) or fibrin (6,7). Hydrogels created from fibrin, a naturally occurring blood clotting protein, can polymerize to form a mesh that is part of the body's natural wound healing processes (8). Fibrin is cell-degradable and potentially autologous (9), making it an ideal temporary scaffold for tissue engineering. Here we describe in detail the isolation of neonatal cardiomyocytes from three day old rat pups and the preparation of the cells for encapsulation in fibrin hydrogel constructs for tissue engineering. Neonatal myocytes are a common cell source used for in vitro studies in cardiac tissue formation and engineering (4). Fibrin gel is created by mixing fibrinogen with the enzyme thrombin. Thrombin cleaves fibrinopeptides FpA and FpB from fibrinogen, revealing binding sites that interact with other monomers (10). These interactions cause the monomers to self-assemble into fibers that form the hydrogel mesh. Because the timing of this enzymatic reaction can be adjusted by altering the ratio of thrombin to fibrinogen, or the ratio of calcium to thrombin, one can injection mold constructs with a number of different geometries (11,12). Further we can generate alignment of the resulting tissue by how we constrain the gel during culture (13). After culturing the engineered cardiac tissue constructs for two weeks under static conditions, the cardiac cells have begun to remodel the construct and can generate a

  2. A quantitative assessment of the depth sensitivity of an optical topography system using a solid dynamic tissue-phantom.

    PubMed

    Correia, Teresa; Banga, Anil; Everdell, N L; Gibson, Adam P; Hebden, Jeremy C

    2009-10-21

    A solid dynamic phantom with tissue-like optical properties is presented, which contains seven discrete targets impregnated with thermochromic pigment located at different depths from the surface. Changes in absorption are obtained in response to localized heating of the targets, simulating haemodynamic changes occurring in the brain and other tissues. The depth sensitivity of a continuous wave optical topography system was assessed successfully using the phantom. Images of the targets have been reconstructed using a spatially variant regularization, and the determined spatial localization in the depth direction is shown to be accurate within an uncertainty of about 3 mm down to a depth of about 30 mm. PMID:19794240

  3. A quantitative assessment of the depth sensitivity of an optical topography system using a solid dynamic tissue-phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Teresa; Banga, Anil; Everdell, N. L.; Gibson, Adam P.; Hebden, Jeremy C.

    2009-10-01

    A solid dynamic phantom with tissue-like optical properties is presented, which contains seven discrete targets impregnated with thermochromic pigment located at different depths from the surface. Changes in absorption are obtained in response to localized heating of the targets, simulating haemodynamic changes occurring in the brain and other tissues. The depth sensitivity of a continuous wave optical topography system was assessed successfully using the phantom. Images of the targets have been reconstructed using a spatially variant regularization, and the determined spatial localization in the depth direction is shown to be accurate within an uncertainty of about 3 mm down to a depth of about 30 mm.

  4. Epigenetic Regulation of Cardiac Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cells and Tissues.

    PubMed

    Jebeniani, Imen; Leschik, Julia; Puceat, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Specific gene transcription is a key biological process that underlies cell fate decision during embryonic development. The biological process is mediated by transcription factors which bind genomic regulatory regions including enhancers and promoters of cardiac constitutive genes. DNA is wrapped around histones that are subjected to chemical modifications. Modifications of histones further lead to repressed, activated or poised gene transcription, thus bringing another level of fine tuning regulation of gene transcription. Embryonic Stem cells (ES cells) recapitulate within embryoid bodies (i.e., cell aggregates) or in 2D culture the early steps of cardiac development. They provide in principle enough material for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), a technology broadly used to identify gene regulatory regions. Furthermore, human ES cells represent a human cell model of cardiogenesis. At later stages of development, mouse embryonic tissues allow for investigating specific epigenetic landscapes required for determination of cell identity. Herein, we describe protocols of ChIP, sequential ChIP followed by PCR or ChIP-sequencing using ES cells, embryoid bodies and cardiac specific embryonic regions. These protocols allow to investigating the epigenetic regulation of cardiac gene transcription. PMID:27285123

  5. An integrated in vitro model of perfused tumor and cardiac tissue

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cancer and cardiovascular disease remain the two leading causes of death in the United States. Progress in treatment to reduce morbidity and mortality will include the development of new drugs. Recent advances in induced pluripotent stem cell technology, tissue engineering, and microfabrication techniques have created a unique opportunity to develop three-dimensional (3D) microphysiological systems that more accurately reflect in vivo human biology when compared with two-dimensional flat systems or animal models. Our group is working to develop 3D microphysiological systems using induced pluripotent stem cell technology that simulates the microcirculation, the cardiac muscle, and the solid tumor, and then to combine these systems into an integrated microphysiological system that simulates perfused cardiac muscle and solid tumor on a single platform. The platform will be initially validated to predict anti-cancer efficacy while minimizing cardiac muscle toxicity. A critical feature will be blood flow through a human microcirculation (capillaries and larger microvessels), which is necessary to overcome diffusion limitations of nutrients and waste products in realistic 3D cultures, and serves to integrate multiple organ systems. This is a necessary and critical feature of any platform that seeks to simulate integrated human organ systems. The results of our project should produce a new paradigm for efficient and accurate drug and toxicity screening, initially for anti-cancer drugs with minimal cardiac side effects, and a platform technology that can be eventually used to integrate multiple major organ systems of the human body. PMID:24565445

  6. Guided orientation of cardiomyocytes on electrospun aligned nanofibers for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kai, Dan; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Jin, Guorui; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2011-08-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering (TE) is one of the most promising strategies to reconstruct the infarct myocardium and the major challenge involves producing a bioactive scaffold with anisotropic properties that assist in cell guidance to mimic the heart tissue. In this study, random and aligned poly(ε-caprolactone)/gelatin (PG) composite nanofibrous scaffolds were electrospun to structurally mimic the oriented extracellular matrix (ECM). Morphological, chemical and mechanical properties of the electrospun PG nanofibers were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), water contact angle, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and tensile measurements. Results indicated that PG nanofibrous scaffolds possessed smaller fiber diameters (239 ± 37 nm for random fibers and 269 ± 33 nm for aligned fibers), increased hydrophilicity, and lower stiffness compared to electrospun PCL nanofibers. The aligned PG nanofibers showed anisotropic wetting characteristics and mechanical properties, which closely match the requirements of native cardiac anisotropy. Rabbit cardiomyocytes were cultured on electrospun random and aligned nanofibers to assess the biocompatibility of scaffolds, together with its potential for cell guidance. The SEM and immunocytochemical analysis showed that the aligned PG scaffold greatly promoted cell attachment and alignment because of the biological components and ordered topography of the scaffolds. Moreover, we concluded that the aligned PG nanofibrous scaffolds could be more promising substrates suitable for the regeneration of infarct myocardium and other cardiac defects. PMID:21681953

  7. The induction of reentry in cardiac tissue. The missing link: How electric fields alter transmembrane potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Bradley J.; Krassowska, Wanda

    1998-03-01

    This review examines the initiation of reentry in cardiac muscle by strong electric shocks. Specifically, it concentrates on the mechanisms by which electric shocks change the transmembrane potential of the cardiac membrane and create the physiological substrate required by the critical point theory for the initiation of rotors. The mechanisms examined include (1) direct polarization of the tissue by the stimulating current, as described by the one-dimensional cable model and its two- and three-dimensional extensions, (2) the presence of virtual anodes and cathodes, as described by the bidomain model with unequal anisotropy ratios of the intra- and extracellular spaces, (3) polarization of the tissue due to changing orientation of cardiac fibers, and (4) polarization of individual cells or groups of cells by the electric field ("sawtooth potential"). The importance of these mechanisms in the initiation of reentry is examined in two case studies: the induction of rotors using successive stimulation with a unipolar electrode, and the induction of rotors using cross-field stimulation. These cases reveal that the mechanism by which a unipolar stimulation induces arrhythmias can be explained in the framework of the bidomain model with unequal anisotropy ratios. In contrast, none of the examined mechanisms provide an adequate explanation for the induction of rotors by cross-field stimulation. Hence, this study emphasizes the need for further experimental and theoretical work directed toward explaining the mechanism of field stimulation.

  8. Genesis of myocardial repair with cardiac progenitor cells and tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Eugene K W; Haider, Husnain Kh; Lila, Nermine; Schussler, Olivier; Chachques, Juan C; Ye, Lei

    2010-01-01

    Background There is mounting evidence to suggest that the heart has regenerative potential in the event of myocardial injury. Recent studies have shown that a resident population of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) in the heart contains both vasculogenic and myogenic lineages. CPCs are able to migrate to the site of injury in the heart for participation in the healing process. The resident CPCs in the heart may also be activated through outside pharmacological intervention to promote their participation in the intrinsic repair process. In the light of these characteristics, CPCs provide a logical source for the heart cell therapy. During the regenerative cardiac process, stem cell niches (a specialised environment surrounding stem cells) provide crucial support needed for their maintenance. Discussion Compromised niche function may lead to the selection of stem cells that no longer depend on self-renewal factors produced by its environment. The objective of stem cell transplantation associated with tissue-engineered approaches is to create a new modality in the treatment of heart failure. The use of efficient scaffolds will aid to re-establish a favourable microenvironment for stem cell survival, multiplication, differentiation and function. Cardiac tissue engineering using natural and/or synthetic materials in this regard provides a novel possibility in cardiovascular therapeutics. PMID:27325955

  9. Effect of Twisted Fiber Anisotropy in Cardiac Tissue on Ablation with Pulsed Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Fei; Zemlin, Christian W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ablation of cardiac tissue with pulsed electric fields is a promising alternative to current thermal ablation methods, and it critically depends on the electric field distribution in the heart. Methods We developed a model that incorporates the twisted anisotropy of cardiac tissue and computed the electric field distribution in the tissue. We also performed experiments in rabbit ventricles to validate our model. We find that the model agrees well with the experimentally determined ablation volume if we assume that all tissue that is exposed to a field greater than 3 kV/cm is ablated. In our numerical analysis, we considered how tissue thickness, degree of anisotropy, and electrode configuration affect the geometry of the ablated volume. We considered two electrode configurations: two parallel needles inserted into the myocardium (“penetrating needles” configuration) and one circular electrode each on epi- and endocardium, opposing each other (“epi-endo” configuration). Results For thick tissues (10 mm) and moderate anisotropy ratio (a = 2), we find that the geometry of the ablated volume is almost unaffected by twisted anisotropy, i.e. it is approximately translationally symmetric from epi- to endocardium, for both electrode configurations. Higher anisotropy ratio (a = 10) leads to substantial variation in ablation width across the wall; these variations were more pronounced for the penetrating needle configuration than for the epi-endo configuration. For thinner tissues (4 mm, typical for human atria) and higher anisotropy ratio (a = 10), the epi-endo configuration yielded approximately translationally symmetric ablation volumes, while the penetrating electrodes configuration was much more sensitive to fiber twist. Conclusions These results suggest that the epi-endo configuration will be reliable for ablation of atrial fibrillation, independently of fiber orientation, while the penetrating electrode configuration may experience problems when the

  10. Three Potential Mechanisms for Failure of HIFU Ablation in Cardiac Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Laughner, Jacob I.; Sulkin, Matthew S.; Wu, Ziqi; Deng, Cheri X.; Efimov, Igor R.

    2012-01-01

    Background High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has been introduced for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias, because it offers the ability to create rapid tissue modification in confined volumes without directly contacting the myocardium. In spite of the benefits of HIFU, a number of limitations have been reported, which hindered its clinical adoption. Methods and Results In this study, we used a multimodal approach to evaluate thermal and non-thermal effects of HIFU in cardiac ablation. We designed a computer-controlled system capable of simultaneous fluorescence mapping and HIFU ablation. Using this system, linear lesions were created in isolated rabbit atria (n = 6) and point lesions were created in the ventricles of whole-heart (n = 6) preparations by applying HIFU at clinical doses (4–16W). Additionally, we evaluate the gap size in ablation lines necessary for conduction in atrial preparations (n = 4). The voltage sensitive dye di-4-ANEPPS was used to assess functional damage produced by HIFU. Optical coherence tomography and general histology were used to evaluate lesion extent. Conduction block was achieved in 1 (17%) of 6 atrial preparations with a single ablation line. Following 10 minutes of rest, 0 (0%) of 6 atrial preparations demonstrated sustained conduction block from a single ablation line. Tissue displacement of 1–3mm was observed during HIFU application due to acoustic radiation force along the lesion line. Additionally, excessive acoustic pressure and high temperature from HIFU generated cavitation causing macroscopic tissue damage. A minimum gap size of 1.5mm was found to conduct electrical activity. Conclusions This study identified three potential mechanisms responsible for the failure of HIFU ablation in cardiac tissues. Both acoustic radiation force and acoustic cavitation in conjunction with inconsistent thermal deposition can increase the risk of lesion discontinuity and result in gap sizes that promote ablation failure. PMID:22322367

  11. Wave trains induced by circularly polarized electric fields in cardiac tissues

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xia; Gao, Xiang; Tang, Juan-Mei; Pan, Jun-Ting; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Clinically, cardiac fibrillation caused by spiral and turbulent waves can be terminated by globally resetting electric activity in cardiac tissues with a single high-voltage electric shock, but it is usually associated with severe side effects. Presently, a promising alternative uses wave emission from heterogeneities induced by a sequence of low-voltage uniform electric field pulses. Nevertheless, this method can only emit waves locally near obstacles in turbulent waves and thereby requires multiple obstacles to globally synchronize myocardium and thus to terminate fibrillation. Here we propose a new approach using wave emission from heterogeneities induced by a low-voltage circularly polarized electric field (i.e., a rotating uniform electric field). We find that, this approach can generate circular wave trains near obstacles and they propagate outwardly. We study the characteristics of such circular wave trains and further find that, the higher-frequency circular wave trains can effectively suppress spiral turbulence. PMID:26302781

  12. Global coupling in excitable media provides a simplified description of mechanoelectrical feedback in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Lacalle, E.; Echebarria, B.

    2009-03-01

    Cardiac mechanoelectric feedback can play an important role in different heart pathologies. In this paper, we show that mechanoelectric models which describe both the electric propagation and the mechanic contraction of cardiac tissue naturally lead to close systems of equations with global coupling among the variables. This point is exemplified using the Nash-Panfilov model, which reduces to a FitzHugh-Nagumo-type equation with global coupling in the linear elastic regime. We explain the appearance of self-oscillatory regimes in terms of the system nullclines and describe the different dynamical attractors. Finally, we study their basin of attraction in terms of the system size and the strength of the stretch-induced currents.

  13. Fibroblast–myocyte electrotonic coupling: Does it occur in native cardiac tissue?☆

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, Peter; Gourdie, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Heterocellular electrotonic coupling between cardiac myocytes and non-excitable connective tissue cells has been a long-established and well-researched fact in vitro. Whether or not such coupling exists in vivo has been a matter of considerable debate. This paper reviews the development of experimental insight and conceptual views on this topic, describes evidence in favour of and against the presence of such coupling in native myocardium, and identifies directions for further study needed to resolve the riddle, perhaps less so in terms of principal presence which has been demonstrated, but undoubtedly in terms of extent, regulation, patho-physiological context, and actual relevance of cardiac myocyte–non-myocyte coupling in vivo. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Myocyte-Fibroblast Signalling in Myocardium." PMID:24412581

  14. Unidirectional Pinning and Hysteresis of Spatially Discordant Alternans in Cardiac Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skardal, Per Sebastian; Karma, Alain; Restrepo, Juan G.

    2012-03-01

    Spatially discordant alternans is a widely observed pattern of voltage and calcium signals in cardiac tissue that can precipitate lethal cardiac arrhythmia. Using spatially coupled iterative maps of the beat-to-beat dynamics, we explore this pattern’s dynamics in the regime of a calcium-dominated period-doubling instability at the single-cell level. We find a novel nonlinear bifurcation associated with the formation of a discontinuous jump in the amplitude of calcium alternans at nodes separating discordant regions. We show that this jump unidirectionally pins nodes by preventing their motion away from the pacing site following a pacing rate decrease but permitting motion towards this site following a rate increase. This unidirectional pinning leads to strongly history-dependent node motion that is strongly arrhythmogenic.

  15. Wave trains induced by circularly polarized electric fields in cardiac tissues.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xia; Gao, Xiang; Tang, Juan-Mei; Pan, Jun-Ting; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Clinically, cardiac fibrillation caused by spiral and turbulent waves can be terminated by globally resetting electric activity in cardiac tissues with a single high-voltage electric shock, but it is usually associated with severe side effects. Presently, a promising alternative uses wave emission from heterogeneities induced by a sequence of low-voltage uniform electric field pulses. Nevertheless, this method can only emit waves locally near obstacles in turbulent waves and thereby requires multiple obstacles to globally synchronize myocardium and thus to terminate fibrillation. Here we propose a new approach using wave emission from heterogeneities induced by a low-voltage circularly polarized electric field (i.e., a rotating uniform electric field). We find that, this approach can generate circular wave trains near obstacles and they propagate outwardly. We study the characteristics of such circular wave trains and further find that, the higher-frequency circular wave trains can effectively suppress spiral turbulence. PMID:26302781

  16. Two-wavelength approach for control of coagulation depth during laser tissue soldering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehner, Martin; Aden, Mirko; Toedter, Nina; Rosenkranz, Beate

    2015-03-01

    In laser tissue soldering (LTS) protein solutions are used for closing of incisions or fixation of wound dressings. During coagulation and thermal denaturation of the protein solutions their morphology changes significantly such that light is strongly scattered. When scattering becomes major component extinction increases and the optical penetration depth shrinks which could lead to unsufficient coagulation and bonding. For adaption of extinction during coagulation we are investigating a two-wavelength approach. A strongly absorbed laser wavelength (1540 nm) and weakly absorbed wavelength (980 nm) can be applied simultaneously. Simulation of beam propagation is performed in natural and coagulated state of the solder. The model describes a three-layer system consisting of membrane, solder and phantom. The optical properties are determined by spectrometric measurements both in natural and coagulated state. The absorption coefficient μa, scattering coefficient μs and anisotropy factor γ are determined by numerical analysis from the spectrometric data. Beam propagation is simulated for 980 nm and 1540 nm radiation with ZEMAX® software based on the Monte Carlo method. For both wavelengths the beginning of the process with a clear solder layer, and the final state characterized by a coagulated solder layer are examined. The optical penetration depth depends mainly on the optical properties of the solder, which change in the course of coagulation process. The coagulation depth can be varied between 1.5 mm to 3.5 mm by changing the proportion of both laser sources. This leads to concepts for minimizing heat input while maintaining a constant coagulation depth.

  17. "The state of the heart": Recent advances in engineering human cardiac tissue from pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sirabella, Dario; Cimetta, Elisa; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-08-01

    The pressing need for effective cell therapy for the heart has led to the investigation of suitable cell sources for tissue replacement. In recent years, human pluripotent stem cell research expanded tremendously, in particular since the derivation of human-induced pluripotent stem cells. In parallel, bioengineering technologies have led to novel approaches for in vitro cell culture. The combination of these two fields holds potential for in vitro generation of high-fidelity heart tissue, both for basic research and for therapeutic applications. However, this new multidisciplinary science is still at an early stage. Many questions need to be answered and improvements need to be made before clinical applications become a reality. Here we discuss the current status of human stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes and the combined use of bioengineering approaches for cardiac tissue formation and maturation in developmental studies, disease modeling, drug testing, and regenerative medicine. PMID:26069271

  18. Electrical stimulation directs engineered cardiac tissue to an age-matched native phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Lasher, Richard A; Pahnke, Aric Q; Johnson, Jeffrey M; Sachse, Frank B

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying structural features of native myocardium in engineered tissue is essential for creating functional tissue that can serve as a surrogate for in vitro testing or the eventual replacement of diseased or injured myocardium. We applied three-dimensional confocal imaging and image analysis to quantitatively describe the features of native and engineered cardiac tissue. Quantitative analysis methods were developed and applied to test the hypothesis that environmental cues direct engineered tissue toward a phenotype resembling that of age-matched native myocardium. The analytical approach was applied to engineered cardiac tissue with and without the application of electrical stimulation as well as to age-matched and adult native tissue. Individual myocytes were segmented from confocal image stacks and assigned a coordinate system from which measures of cell geometry and connexin-43 spatial distribution were calculated. The data were collected from 9 nonstimulated and 12 electrically stimulated engineered tissue constructs and 5 postnatal day 12 and 7 adult hearts. The myocyte volume fraction was nearly double in stimulated engineered tissue compared to nonstimulated engineered tissue (0.34 ± 0.14 vs 0.18 ± 0.06) but less than half of the native postnatal day 12 (0.90 ± 0.06) and adult (0.91 ± 0.04) myocardium. The myocytes under electrical stimulation were more elongated compared to nonstimulated myocytes and exhibited similar lengths, widths, and heights as in age-matched myocardium. Furthermore, the percentage of connexin-43-positive membrane staining was similar in the electrically stimulated, postnatal day 12, and adult myocytes, whereas it was significantly lower in the nonstimulated myocytes. Connexin-43 was found to be primarily located at cell ends for adult myocytes and irregularly but densely clustered over the membranes of nonstimulated, stimulated, and postnatal day 12 myocytes. These findings support our hypothesis and reveal that the

  19. Sensitivity and Specificity of Cardiac Tissue Discrimination Using Fiber-Optics Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Sachse, Frank B; Hitchcock, Robert W; Kaza, Aditya K

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances of the cardiac conduction system constitute a major risk after surgical repair of complex cases of congenital heart disease. Intraoperative identification of the conduction system may reduce the incidence of these disturbances. We previously developed an approach to identify cardiac tissue types using fiber-optics confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores. Here, we applied this approach to investigate sensitivity and specificity of human and automated classification in discriminating images of atrial working myocardium and specialized tissue of the conduction system. Two-dimensional image sequences from atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue of isolated perfused rodent hearts were acquired using a fiber-optics confocal microscope (Leica FCM1000). We compared two methods for local application of extracellular fluorophores: topical via pipette and with a dye carrier. Eight blinded examiners evaluated 162 randomly selected images of atrial working myocardium (n = 81) and nodal tissue (n = 81). In addition, we evaluated the images using automated classification. Blinded examiners achieved a sensitivity and specificity of 99.2 ± 0.3% and 98.0 ± 0.7%, respectively, with the dye carrier method of dye application. Sensitivity and specificity was similar for dye application via a pipette (99.2 ± 0.3% and 94.0 ± 2.4%, respectively). Sensitivity and specificity for automated methods of tissue discrimination were similarly high. Human and automated classification achieved high sensitivity and specificity in discriminating atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue. We suggest that our findings facilitate clinical translation of fiber-optics confocal microscopy as an intraoperative imaging modality to reduce the incidence of conduction disturbances during surgical correction of congenital heart disease. PMID:26808149

  20. Sensitivity and Specificity of Cardiac Tissue Discrimination Using Fiber-Optics Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao; Sachse, Frank B.; Hitchcock, Robert W.; Kaza, Aditya K.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances of the cardiac conduction system constitute a major risk after surgical repair of complex cases of congenital heart disease. Intraoperative identification of the conduction system may reduce the incidence of these disturbances. We previously developed an approach to identify cardiac tissue types using fiber-optics confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores. Here, we applied this approach to investigate sensitivity and specificity of human and automated classification in discriminating images of atrial working myocardium and specialized tissue of the conduction system. Two-dimensional image sequences from atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue of isolated perfused rodent hearts were acquired using a fiber-optics confocal microscope (Leica FCM1000). We compared two methods for local application of extracellular fluorophores: topical via pipette and with a dye carrier. Eight blinded examiners evaluated 162 randomly selected images of atrial working myocardium (n = 81) and nodal tissue (n = 81). In addition, we evaluated the images using automated classification. Blinded examiners achieved a sensitivity and specificity of 99.2±0.3% and 98.0±0.7%, respectively, with the dye carrier method of dye application. Sensitivity and specificity was similar for dye application via a pipette (99.2±0.3% and 94.0±2.4%, respectively). Sensitivity and specificity for automated methods of tissue discrimination were similarly high. Human and automated classification achieved high sensitivity and specificity in discriminating atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue. We suggest that our findings facilitate clinical translation of fiber-optics confocal microscopy as an intraoperative imaging modality to reduce the incidence of conduction disturbances during surgical correction of congenital heart disease. PMID:26808149

  1. Experimental high-intensity focused ultrasound lesion formation in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratore, Robert; Kalisz, Andrew; Lee, Paul; Lizzi, Frederic; Fujikura, Kana; Otsuka, Ryo; Homma, Shunichi

    2001-05-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) (4.5-7.5 MHz) was used to form lesions in cardiac tissue, with an ultimate objective of treating conditions such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and ventricular tachycardia. Ultrasound attenuation coefficients were experimentally determined in vitro for calf myocardial tissue, both muscle and pericardial fat. These coefficients were employed in computational models of linear beam propagation, tissue heating profiles and thermal lesion formation for a variety of focused transducers. Modeling was performed for continuous and pulsed exposures. These models suggested initial power levels and exposure durations for in vitro experiments on calf ventricles and septa and ex vivo experiments on canine whole hearts. Repeatability of lesion size and placement was studied as power and exposure parameters varied around the initial values. With these experimental results, power and exposure parameters were selected to create lesions in vivo in canine ventricles and septa in open-chest, anesthetized dogs. Pulsed exposures were synchronized to cardiac and respiration cycles to ensure accurate placement of the lesions. These initial in vivo experiments showed that HIFU treatments in the beating heart are feasible; they also identified refinements that are now being implemented for better control of lesion size and placement. [Work supported by NCI and NHLBI Grant 5R01 CA84588.

  2. Cardiac arrhythmogenesis in urban air pollution: Optical mapping in a tissue-engineered model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bien, Harold H.

    Recent epidemiological evidence has implicated particulate matter air pollution in cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that inflammatory mediators released from lung macrophages after exposure to particulate matter predisposes the heart to disturbances in rhythm. Using a rational design approach, a fluorescent optical mapping system was devised to image spatiotemporal patterns of excitation in a tissue engineered model of cardiac tissue. Algorithms for automated data analysis and characterization of rhythm stability were developed, implemented, and verified. Baseline evaluation of spatiotemporal instability patterns in normal cardiac tissue was performed for comparison to an in-vitro model of particulate matter air pollution exposure. Exposure to particulate-matter activated alveolar macrophage conditioned media resulted in paradoxical functional changes more consistent with improved growth. These findings might be indicative of a "stress" response to particulate-matter induced pulmonary inflammation, or may be specific to the animal model (neonatal rat) employed. In the pursuit of elucidating the proposed pathway, we have also furthered our understanding of fundamental behaviors of arrhythmias in general and established a model where further testing might ultimately reveal the mechanism for urban air pollution associated cardiovascular morbidity.

  3. Volume regulation mechanisms in Rana castebeiana cardiac tissue under hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Laura N; Souza, Marta M

    2008-01-01

    Volume changes of cardiac tissue under hyperosmotic stress in Rana catesbeiana were characterized by the identification of the osmolytes involved and the possible regulatory processes activated by both abrupt and gradual changes in media osmolality (from 220 to 280mosmol/kg H(2)O). Slices of R. catesbeiana cardiac tissue were subjected to hyperosmotic shock, and total tissue Na(+), K(+), Cl(-) and ninhydrin-positive substances were measured. Volume changes were also induced in the presence of transport inhibitors to identify osmolyte pathways. The results show a maximum volume loss to 90.86+/-0.73% of the original volume (measured as 9% decrease in wet weight) during abrupt hyperosmotic shock. However, during a gradual osmotic challenge the volume was never significantly different from that of the control. During both types of hyperosmotic shock, we observed an increase in Na(+) but no significant change in Cl(-) contents. Additionally, we found no change in ninhydrin-positive substances during any osmotic challenge. Pharmacological analyses suggest the involvement of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger, and perhaps the HCO(3)(-)/Cl(-) exchanger. There is indirect evidence for decrease in Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity. The Na(+) fluxes seem to result from Mg(2+) signaling, as saline rich in Mg(2+) enhances the regulatory volume increase, followed by a higher intracellular Na(+) content. The volume maintenance mechanisms activated during the gradual osmotic change are similar to that activated by abrupt osmotic shock. PMID:18457937

  4. Correlation-based discrimination between cardiac tissue and blood for segmentation of 3D echocardiographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saris, Anne E. C. M.; Nillesen, Maartje M.; Lopata, Richard G. P.; de Korte, Chris L.

    2013-03-01

    Automated segmentation of 3D echocardiographic images in patients with congenital heart disease is challenging, because the boundary between blood and cardiac tissue is poorly defined in some regions. Cardiologists mentally incorporate movement of the heart, using temporal coherence of structures to resolve ambiguities. Therefore, we investigated the merit of temporal cross-correlation for automated segmentation over the entire cardiac cycle. Optimal settings for maximum cross-correlation (MCC) calculation, based on a 3D cross-correlation based displacement estimation algorithm, were determined to obtain the best contrast between blood and myocardial tissue over the entire cardiac cycle. Resulting envelope-based as well as RF-based MCC values were used as additional external force in a deformable model approach, to segment the left-ventricular cavity in entire systolic phase. MCC values were tested against, and combined with, adaptive filtered, demodulated RF-data. Segmentation results were compared with manually segmented volumes using a 3D Dice Similarity Index (3DSI). Results in 3D pediatric echocardiographic images sequences (n = 4) demonstrate that incorporation of temporal information improves segmentation. The use of MCC values, either alone or in combination with adaptive filtered, demodulated RF-data, resulted in an increase of the 3DSI in 75% of the cases (average 3DSI increase: 0.71 to 0.82). Results might be further improved by optimizing MCC-contrast locally, in regions with low blood-tissue contrast. Reducing underestimation of the endocardial volume due to MCC processing scheme (choice of window size) and consequential border-misalignment, could also lead to more accurate segmentations. Furthermore, increasing the frame rate will also increase MCC-contrast and thus improve segmentation.

  5. Controlling activation site density by low-energy far-field stimulation in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörning, Marcel; Takagi, Seiji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2012-06-01

    Tachycardia and fibrillation are potentially fatal arrhythmias associated with the formation of rotating spiral waves in the heart. Presently, the termination of these types of arrhythmia is achieved by use of antitachycardia pacing or cardioversion. However, these techniques have serious drawbacks, in that they either have limited application or produce undesirable side effects. Low-energy far-field stimulation has recently been proposed as a superior therapy. This proposed therapeutic method would exploit the phenomenon in which the application of low-energy far-field shocks induces a large number of activation sites (“virtual electrodes”) in tissue. It has been found that the formation of such sites can lead to the termination of undesired states in the heart and the restoration of normal beating. In this study we investigate a particular aspect of this method. Here we seek to determine how the activation site density depends on the applied electric field through in vitro experiments carried out on neonatal rat cardiac tissue cultures. The results indicate that the activation site density increases exponentially as a function of the intracellular conductivity and the level of cell isotropy. Additionally, we report numerical results obtained from bidomain simulations of the Beeler-Reuter model that are quantitatively consistent with our experimental results. Also, we derive an intuitive analytical framework that describes the activation site density and provides useful information for determining the ratio of longitudinal to transverse conductivity in a cardiac tissue culture. The results obtained here should be useful in the development of an actual therapeutic method based on low-energy far-field pacing. In addition, they provide a deeper understanding of the intrinsic properties of cardiac cells.

  6. Unpinning of rotating spiral waves in cardiac tissues by circularly polarized electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xia; Gao, Xiang; Pan, De-Bei; Li, Bing-Wei; Zhang, Hong

    2014-04-01

    Spiral waves anchored to obstacles in cardiac tissues may cause lethal arrhythmia. To unpin these anchored spirals, comparing to high-voltage side-effect traditional therapies, wave emission from heterogeneities (WEH) induced by the uniform electric field (UEF) has provided a low-voltage alternative. Here we provide a new approach using WEH induced by the circularly polarized electric field (CPEF), which has higher success rate and larger application scope than UEF, even with a lower voltage. And we also study the distribution of the membrane potential near an obstacle induced by CPEF to analyze its mechanism of unpinning. We hope this promising approach may provide a better alternative to terminate arrhythmia.

  7. Cardiac Extracellular Matrix-Fibrin Hybrid Scaffolds with Tunable Properties for Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Corin; Budina, Erica; Stoppel, Whitney L.; Sullivan, Kelly E.; Emani, Sirisha; Emani, Sitaram M.; Black, Lauren D.

    2014-01-01

    Solubilized cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM) is being developed as an injectable therapeutic that offers promise for promoting cardiac repair. However, the ECM alone forms a hydrogel that is very soft compared to the native myocardium. As both the stiffness and composition of the ECM are important in regulating cell behavior and can have complex synergistic effects, we sought to develop an ECM-based scaffold with tunable biochemical and mechanical properties. We used solubilized rat cardiac ECM from two developmental stages (neonatal, adult) combined with fibrin hydrogels that were crosslinked with transglutaminase. We show that ECM was retained within the gels and Young’s modulus could be tuned to span the range of the developing and mature heart. C-kit+ cardiovascular progenitor cells from pediatric patients with congenital heart defects were seeded into the hybrid gels. Both the elastic modulus and composition of the scaffolds impacted the expression of endothelial and smooth muscle cell genes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the hybrid gels are injectable, and thus have potential for minimally invasive therapies. ECM-fibrin hybrid scaffolds offer new opportunities for exploiting the effects of both composition and mechanical properties in directing cell behavior for tissue engineering. PMID:25463503

  8. In vitro study of electroactive tetraaniline-containing thermosensitive hydrogels for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Cui, Haitao; Liu, Yadong; Cheng, Yilong; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Peibiao; Chen, Xuesi; Wei, Yen

    2014-04-14

    Injectable hydrogels made of degradable biomaterials can function as both physical support and cell scaffold in preventing infarct expansion and promoting cardiac repair in myocardial infarction therapy. Here, we report in situ hydrogels consisting of thermosensitive PolyNIPAM-based copolymers and electroactive tetraaniline (TA). Studies showed that the addition of 2-methylene-1,3-dioxepane (MDO) provided the PolyNIPAM-based gel with biodegradability, and the introduction of tetraaniline endowed these copolymers with desirable electrical properties and antioxidant activities. The encapsulated H9c2 cells (rat cardiac myoblast) remained highly viable in the gel matrices. In vivo gel formation and histological analyses were performed in rats by subcutaneous injection and excellent biocompatibility was observed. Furthermore, the proliferation and intracellular calcium transients of H9c2 cells were also studied with (and without) electrical stimuli. Both in vitro and in vivo results demonstrated that electroactive hydrogel may be used as a promising injectable biomaterial for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:24597966

  9. Bone marrow transplantation modulates tissue macrophage phenotype and enhances cardiac recovery after subsequent acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Protti, Andrea; Mongue-Din, Heloise; Mylonas, Katie J.; Sirker, Alexander; Sag, Can Martin; Swim, Megan M.; Maier, Lars; Sawyer, Greta; Dong, Xuebin; Botnar, Rene; Salisbury, Jon; Gray, Gillian A.; Shah, Ajay M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is commonly used in experimental studies to investigate the contribution of BM-derived circulating cells to different disease processes. During studies investigating the cardiac response to acute myocardial infarction (MI) induced by permanent coronary ligation in mice that had previously undergone BMT, we found that BMT itself affects the remodelling response. Methods and results Compared to matched naive mice, animals that had previously undergone BMT developed significantly less post-MI adverse remodelling, infarct thinning and contractile dysfunction as assessed by serial magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiac rupture in male mice was prevented. Histological analysis showed that the infarcts of mice that had undergone BMT had a significantly higher number of inflammatory cells, surviving cardiomyocytes and neovessels than control mice, as well as evidence of significant haemosiderin deposition. Flow cytometric and histological analyses demonstrated a higher number of alternatively activated (M2) macrophages in myocardium of the BMT group compared to control animals even before MI, and this increased further in the infarcts of the BMT mice after MI. Conclusions The process of BMT itself substantially alters tissue macrophage phenotype and the subsequent response to acute MI. An increase in alternatively activated macrophages in this setting appears to enhance cardiac recovery after MI. PMID:26688473

  10. The Multi-Domain Fibroblast/Myocyte Coupling in the Cardiac Tissue: A Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Greisas, Ariel; Zlochiver, Sharon

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac fibroblast proliferation and concomitant collagenous matrix accumulation (fibrosis) develop during multiple cardiac pathologies. Recent studies have demonstrated direct electrical coupling between myocytes and fibroblasts in vitro, and assessed the electrophysiological implications of such coupling. However, in the living tissues, such coupling has not been demonstrated, and only indirect coupling via the extracellular space is likely to exist. In this study we employed a multi-domain model to assess the modulation of the cardiac electrophysiological properties by neighboring fibroblasts assuming only indirect coupling. Numerical simulations in 1D and 2D human atrial models showed that extracellular coupling sustains a significant impact on conduction velocity (CV) and a less significant effect on the action potential duration. Both CV and the slope of the CV restitution increased with increasing fibroblast density. This effect was more substantial for lower extracellular conductance. In 2D, spiral waves exhibited reduced frequency with increasing fibroblast density, and the propensity of wavebreaks and complex dynamics at high pacing rates significantly increased. PMID:27150222

  11. Burn Depth Estimation Based on Infrared Imaging of Thermally Excited Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, F.M.; Hoswade, S.C.; Yee, M.L.

    1999-03-05

    Accurate estimation of the depth of partial-thickness burns and the early prediction of a need for surgical intervention are difficult. A non-invasive technique utilizing the difference in thermal relaxation time between burned and normal skin may be useful in this regard. In practice, a thermal camera would record the skin's response to heating or cooling by a small amount-roughly 5 C for a short duration. The thermal stimulus would be provided by a heat lamp, hot or cold air, or other means. Processing of the thermal transients would reveal areas that returned to equilibrium at different rates, which should correspond to different burn depths. In deeper thickness burns, the outside layer of skin is further removed from the constant-temperature region maintained through blood flow. Deeper thickness areas should thus return to equilibrium more slowly than other areas. Since the technique only records changes in the skin's temperature, it is not sensitive to room temperature, the burn's location, or the state of the patient. Preliminary results are presented for analysis of a simulated burn, formed by applying a patch of biosynthetic wound dressing on top of normal skin tissue.

  12. The Current Status of iPS Cells in Cardiac Research and Their Potential for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Ana M.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    The recent availability of human cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells opens new opportunities to build in vitro models of cardiac disease, screening for new drugs, and patient-specific cardiac therapy. Notably, the use of iPS cells enables studies in the wide pool of genotypes and phenotypes. We describe progress in reprogramming of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells towards the cardiac lineage/differentiation. The focus is on challenges of cardiac disease modeling using iPS cells and their potential to produce safe, effective and affordable therapies/applications with the emphasis of cardiac tissue engineering. We also discuss implications of human iPS cells to biological research and some of the future needs. PMID:24425421

  13. Increasing depth penetration in biological tissue imaging using 808-nm excited Nd3+/Yb3+/Er3+-doped upconverting nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Söderlund, Hugo; Mousavi, Monirehalsadat; Liu, Haichun; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    Ytterbium (Yb 3+ )-sensitized upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) are excited at 975 nm causing relatively high absorption in tissue. A new type of UCNPs with neodymium (Nd 3+ ) and Yb 3+ codoping is excitable at a 808-nm wavelength. At this wavelength, the tissue absorption is lower. Here we quantify, both experimentally and theoretically, to what extent Nd 3+ -doped UCNPs will provide an increased signal at larger depths in tissue compared to conventional 975-nm excited UCNPs. PMID:26271054

  14. Thermal welding of biological tissues derived from porcine aorta for manufacturing bioprosthetic cardiac valves.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Rubem L P; Dantas, Maria Sylvia Silva; Oréfice, Rodrigo L

    2011-08-01

    Sutures in cardiac valve bioprostheses have several disadvantages as they have to be manually processed and the suturing region is always a mechanically weak spot. Thermal welding of biological tissues has been evaluated as a means of replacing sutures by the direct application of heat to tissues. The mechanical strength of the welds increased up to 50°C and with lower degrees of humidity and longer times of welding. Chemical fixation was essential for the stability of the weld during re-hydration. The average mechanical strength of the welds (0.87 MPa) was lower than the strength of sutures (1.36 MPa) but some results showed strengths that were similar to sutures. Raman and electron micrographs showed that weld formation is primarily associated with chemical bonds between collagen fibers rather than chain flow and interpenetration. PMID:21479631

  15. The Dip in the Anodal Strength-Interval Curve in Cardiac Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Sunil; Roth, Bradley J.

    2012-10-01

    Heart disease -- specifically ventricular fibrillation -- is the leading cause of death in the United States. The most common treatment for this lethal arrhythmia is defibrillation: application of a strong electrical shock that resets the heart to its normal rhythm. The goal of this project is to obtain a better understanding of how anodal (hyperpolarizing) shocks affect the heart by using numerical simulations. To accomplish this goal, we will test four hypotheses to find the response of refractory tissue to an anodal shock. We will use bidomain model; the state-of-the-art mathematical description of how cardiac tissue responds to an electric shock. The innovative feature of this proposal is to integrate the bidomain model with an ion channel model (Luo-Rudy model, 1994) that includes intracellular calcium dynamics to get a detailed calculation of the mechanism of the excitation and to understand the electrical behavior of the heart, which is important for pacing and defibrillation.

  16. Carbon Nanohorns Promote Maturation of Neonatal Rat Ventricular Myocytes and Inhibit Proliferation of Cardiac Fibroblasts: a Promising Scaffold for Cardiac Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yujing; Shi, Xiaoli; Li, Yi; Tian, Lei; Bai, Rui; Wei, Yujie; Han, Dong; Liu, Huiliang; Xu, Jianxun

    2016-12-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering (CTE) has developed rapidly, but a great challenge remains in finding practical scaffold materials for the construction of engineered cardiac tissues. Carbon nanohorns (CNHs) may be a potential candidate due to their special structure and properties. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of CNHs on the biological behavior of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) for CTE applications. CNHs were incorporated into collagen to form growth substrates for NRVMs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations demonstrated that CNHs exhibited a good affinity to collagen. Moreover, it was found that CNH-embedded substrates enhanced adhesion and proliferation of NRVMs. Immunohistochemical staining, western blot analysis, and intracellular calcium transient measurements indicated that the addition of CNHs significantly increased the expression and maturation of electrical and mechanical proteins (connexin-43 and N-cadherin). Bromodeoxyuridine staining and a Cell Counting Kit-8 assay showed that CNHs have the ability to inhibit the proliferation of cardiac fibroblasts. These findings suggest that CNHs can have a valuable effect on the construction of engineered cardiac tissues and may be a promising scaffold for CTE. PMID:27263018

  17. Carbon Nanohorns Promote Maturation of Neonatal Rat Ventricular Myocytes and Inhibit Proliferation of Cardiac Fibroblasts: a Promising Scaffold for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yujing; Shi, Xiaoli; Li, Yi; Tian, Lei; Bai, Rui; Wei, Yujie; Han, Dong; Liu, Huiliang; Xu, Jianxun

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering (CTE) has developed rapidly, but a great challenge remains in finding practical scaffold materials for the construction of engineered cardiac tissues. Carbon nanohorns (CNHs) may be a potential candidate due to their special structure and properties. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of CNHs on the biological behavior of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) for CTE applications. CNHs were incorporated into collagen to form growth substrates for NRVMs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations demonstrated that CNHs exhibited a good affinity to collagen. Moreover, it was found that CNH-embedded substrates enhanced adhesion and proliferation of NRVMs. Immunohistochemical staining, western blot analysis, and intracellular calcium transient measurements indicated that the addition of CNHs significantly increased the expression and maturation of electrical and mechanical proteins (connexin-43 and N-cadherin). Bromodeoxyuridine staining and a Cell Counting Kit-8 assay showed that CNHs have the ability to inhibit the proliferation of cardiac fibroblasts. These findings suggest that CNHs can have a valuable effect on the construction of engineered cardiac tissues and may be a promising scaffold for CTE.

  18. Optical recording of calcium currents during impulse conduction in cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Jousset, Florian; Rohr, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    We explore the feasibility of obtaining a spatially resolved picture of [Formula: see text] inward currents ([Formula: see text]) in multicellular cardiac tissue by differentiating optically recorded [Formula: see text] transients that accompany propagating action potentials. Patterned growth strands of neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes were stained with the [Formula: see text] indicators Fluo-4 or Fluo-4FF. Preparations were stimulated at 1 Hz, and [Formula: see text] transients were recorded with high spatiotemporal resolution ([Formula: see text], 2 kHz analog bandwidth) with a photodiode array. Signals were differentiated after appropriate digital filtering. Differentiation of [Formula: see text] transients resulted in optically recorded calcium currents (ORCCs) that carried the temporal and pharmacological signatures of L-type [Formula: see text] inward currents: the time to peak amounted to [Formula: see text] (Fluo-4FF) and [Formula: see text] (Fluo-4), full-width at half-maximum was [Formula: see text], and ORCCs were completely suppressed by [Formula: see text][Formula: see text]. Also, and as reported before from patch-clamp studies, caffeine reversibly depressed the amplitude of ORCCs. The results demonstrate that the differentiation of [Formula: see text] transients can be used to obtain a spatially resolved picture of the initial phase of [Formula: see text] in cardiac tissue and to assess relative changes of activation/fast inactivation of [Formula: see text] following pharmacological interventions. PMID:26158001

  19. Feasibility of a nanomaterial-tissue patch for vascular and cardiac reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ostdiek, Allison M; Ivey, Jan R; Hansen, Sarah A; Gopaldas, Raja; Grant, Sheila A

    2016-04-01

    Vascular and cardiac reconstruction involves the use of biological patches to treat trauma and defects. An in vivo study was performed to determine the remodeling and biologic effects of novel nanostructured vascular patches with and without gold nanoparticles. Porcine vascular tissue was decellularized and conjugated with gold nanoparticles to evaluate if integration would occur while avoiding rupture and stenosis. Swine underwent a bilateral patch angioplasty of the carotid arteries with experimental patches on the right and control patches of bovine pericardium on the left. Animals were sacrificed after surgery and at 3 and 9 weeks. Ultrasound was performed during surgery, every 3 weeks, and before euthanasia. Endothelial regeneration was examined using Evans Blue dye and histology using Trichrome and H&E. There was a 100% success rate of implantation with 0% mortality. All patches were patent on ultrasound. At 3 weeks, experimental patches had regenerating endothelial cell growth and normal healing responses. At 9 weeks, the experimental patches demonstrated excellent integration. Histology demonstrated cellular in-growth into the experimental patches and no major immune reactions. This is one of the first studies to demonstrate the feasibility of nanomaterial-tissue patches for vascular and cardiac reconstruction. PMID:25891427

  20. Design of a Novel Composite H2 S-Releasing Hydrogel for Cardiac Tissue Repair.

    PubMed

    Mauretti, Arianna; Neri, Annalisa; Kossover, Olga; Seliktar, Dror; Nardo, Paolo Di; Melino, Sonia

    2016-06-01

    The design of 3D scaffolds is a crucial step in the field of regenerative medicine. Scaffolds should be degradable and bioresorbable as well as display good porosity, interconnecting pores, and topographic features; these properties favour tissue integration and vascularization. These requirements could be fulfilled by hybrid hydrogels using a combination of natural and synthetic components. Here, the mechanical and biological properties of a polyethylene glycol-fibrinogen hydrogel (PFHy) are improved in order to favour the proliferation and differentiation of human Sca-1(pos) cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs). PFHys are modified by embedding air- or perfluorohexane-filled bovine serum albumin microbubbles (MBs) and characterized. Changes in cell morphology are observed in MBs-PFHys, suggesting that MBs could enhance the formation of bundles of cells and influence the direction of the spindle growth. The properties of MBs as carriers of active macromolecules are also exploited. For the first time, enzyme-coated MBs have been used as systems for the production of hydrogen sulfide (H2 S)-releasing scaffolds. Novel H2 S-releasing PFHys are produced, which are able to improve the growth of hCPCs. This novel 3D cell-scaffold system will allow the assessment of the effects of H2 S on the cardiac muscle regeneration with its potential applications in tissue repair. PMID:26857526

  1. Electrically conductive gold nanoparticle-chitosan thermosensitive hydrogels for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Baei, Payam; Jalili-Firoozinezhad, Sasan; Rajabi-Zeleti, Sareh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Baharvand, Hossein; Aghdami, Nasser

    2016-06-01

    Injectable hydrogels that resemble electromechanical properties of the myocardium are crucial for cardiac tissue engineering prospects. We have developed a facile approach that uses chitosan (CS) to generate a thermosensitive conductive hydrogel with a highly porous network of interconnected pores. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were evenly dispersed throughout the CS matrix in order to provide electrical cues. The gelation response and electrical conductivity of the hydrogel were controlled by different concentrations of GNPs. The CS-GNP hydrogels were seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and cultivated for up to 14days in the absence of electrical stimulations. CS-GNP scaffolds supported viability, metabolism, migration and proliferation of MSCs along with the development of uniform cellular constructs. Immunohistochemistry for early and mature cardiac markers showed enhanced cardiomyogenic differentiation of MSCs within the CS-GNP compared to the CS matrix alone. The results of this study demonstrate that incorporation of nanoscale electro-conductive GNPs into CS hydrogels enhances the properties of myocardial constructs. These constructs could find utilization for regeneration of other electroactive tissues. PMID:27040204

  2. High-frequency ultrasound M-mode monitoring of HIFU ablation in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumon, R. E.; Gudur, M. S. R.; Zhou, Y.; Deng, C. X.

    2012-10-01

    Effective real-time HIFU lesion detection is important for expanded use of HIFU in interventional electrophysiology (e.g., epicardial ablation of cardiac arrhythmia). The goal of this study was to investigate rapid, high-frequency M-mode ultrasound imaging for monitoring spatiotemporal changes in tissue during HIFU application. The HIFU application (4.33 MHz, 1000 Hz PRF, 50% duty cycle, 1 s exposure, 6100 W/cm2) was perpendicularly applied to porcine cardiac tissue with a high-frequency imaging system (Visualsonics Vevo 770, 55 MHz, 4.5 mm focal distance) confocally aligned. Radiofrequency (RF) M-mode data (1 kHz PRF, 4 s × 7 mm) was acquired before, during, and after HIFU treatment. Gross lesions were compared with M-mode data to correlate lesion and cavity formation. Integrated backscatter, echo-decorrelation parameters, and their cumulative extrema over time were analyzed for automatically identifying lesion width and bubble formation. Cumulative maximum integrated backscatter showed the best results for identifying the final lesion width, and a criterion based on line-to-line decorrelation was proposed for identification of transient bubble activity.

  3. Direct Mechanical Stimulation of Stem Cells: A Beating Electromechanically Active Scaffold for Cardiac Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Gelmi, Amy; Cieslar-Pobuda, Artur; de Muinck, Ebo; Los, Marek; Rafat, Mehrdad; Jager, Edwin W H

    2016-06-01

    The combination of stem cell therapy with a supportive scaffold is a promising approach to improving cardiac tissue engineering. Stem cell therapy can be used to repair nonfunctioning heart tissue and achieve myocardial regeneration, and scaffold materials can be utilized in order to successfully deliver and support stem cells in vivo. Current research describes passive scaffold materials; here an electroactive scaffold that provides electrical, mechanical, and topographical cues to induced human pluripotent stem cells (iPS) is presented. The poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) fiber scaffold coated with conductive polymer polypyrrole (PPy) is capable of delivering direct electrical and mechanical stimulation to the iPS. The electroactive scaffolds demonstrate no cytotoxic effects on the iPS as well as an increased expression of cardiac markers for both stimulated and unstimulated protocols. This study demonstrates the first application of PPy as a supportive electroactive material for iPS and the first development of a fiber scaffold capable of dynamic mechanical actuation. PMID:27126086

  4. Imaging of action currents reveals the origin of biomagnetic fields in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, Jenny R.; Sidorov, Veniamin; Fong, Luis; Baudenbacher, Franz

    2003-03-01

    The origin of the magnetocardiogram (MCG) and the relative information content between the MCG and the electrocardiogram (ECG) remain central questions in biomagnetism. To provide key insights to this question, we mapped excitation wave fronts in a thin layer of cardiac tissue of an isolated rabbit heart using high-resolution LTS-SQUID microscopy and epi-fluorescent imaging with sub-millimeter resolution. The combination of the two methods allows us to map the transmembrane potential (Vm) and the magnetic field over the same area. The leading edge of a propagating action potential can be defined as the wave front and can be identified by the difference in relative intensities of resting and depolarized tissue in the epi-fluorescence data. The corresponding magnetic field pattern was used to calculate the net action current, which shows a strong current component parallel to and overlying the Vm wave front. These electrically silent currents are a direct consequence of the cardiac bidomain with unequal anisotropies in the intra- and extracellular space and depend strongly on the angle of the wave front relative to the fiber orientation. We provide evidence that the MCG contains information not present in the ECG, and that it is necessary to reexamine the modeling and interpretation of the MCG.

  5. Energy absorption buildup factors of human organs and tissues at energies and penetration depths relevant for radiotherapy and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Manohara, S R; Hanagodimath, S M; Gerward, L

    2011-01-01

    Energy absorption geometric progression (GP) fitting parameters and the corresponding buildup factors have been computed for human organs and tissues, such as adipose tissue, blood (whole), cortical bone, brain (grey/white matter), breast tissue, eye lens, lung tissue, skeletal muscle, ovary, testis, soft tissue, and soft tissue (4-component), for the photon energy range 0.015-15 MeV and for penetration depths up to 40 mfp (mean free path). The chemical composition of human organs and tissues is seen to influence the energy absorption buildup factors. It is also found that the buildup factor of human organs and tissues changes significantly with the change of incident photon energy and effective atomic number, Z(eff). These changes are due to the dominance of different photon interaction processes in different energy regions and different chemical compositions of human organs and tissues. With the proper knowledge of buildup factors of human organs and tissues, energy absorption in the human body can be carefully controlled. The present results will help in estimating safe dose levels for radiotherapy patients and also useful in diagnostics and dosimetry. The tissue-equivalent materials for skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, cortical bone, and lung tissue are also discussed. It is observed that water and MS20 are good tissue equivalent materials for skeletal muscle in the extended energy range. PMID:22089011

  6. Influence of different fixation protocols on the preservation and dimensions of cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Hołda, Mateusz K; Klimek-Piotrowska, Wiesława; Koziej, Mateusz; Piątek, Katarzyna; Hołda, Jakub

    2016-08-01

    Recent extensive progress in invasive cardiac procedures has triggered a wave of dozens of heart morphometric anatomical studies that are carried out largely using autopsied samples fixed in formaldehyde solution prior to observations and measurements. In reality, very little is known about changes in heart tissue dimensions during fixation. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate how fixation affects the dimensions of cardiac tissue, and if different types and concentrations of reagents affect this phenomenon. A total of 40 pig heart samples were investigated, and seven different measuring sites were permanently marked in every heart prior to fixation. Four study groups (n = 10 each) were assembled that differed only in concentration and the type of fixative: (i) 2% formaldehyde solution; (ii) 4% formaldehyde solution (formalin); (iii) 10% formaldehyde solution; (iv) alcoholic formalin. The samples were measured before and after fixation at the following time points: 24 h, 72 h and 168 h. It was found that different fixatives significantly affected different parameters. Almost all of the heart dimensions that were measured stabilized after 24 h; later changes were statistically insignificant in the point-to-point comparison. Change in the length of the interatrial septum surface was not altered significantly in any of the fixatives after 24 h of preservation. It was found that 10% formaldehyde increased the thickness of muscular tissue only after 24 h; this thickening was reduced after 72 h and was insignificant at 168 h. Other heart parameters in this group do not present significant changes over the entire fixation time duration. In conclusion, the 10% formaldehyde phosphate-buffered solution appeared to be the best fixative among the fixatives that were studied for cardiac morphometric purposes; this solution caused the smallest changes in tissue dimensions. Measurements should be obtained at least after 1 week of preservation

  7. Characterization of electrospun polymer fibers for applications in cardiac tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwood, Danielle N.

    Electrospinning is a technique where a polymer solution is formed into a non-woven mat by electrically charging the solution as it leaves a capillary. The resulting mats have an interconnected porous network, and the system can be tailored in order to form aligned fibers. In this work, we have chosen to electrospin and characterize two polymers with unique properties with the intention to use them as scaffolds for cardiac tissue. The first polymer studied was poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (pNIPAM), a material which shows a thermoresponsive behavior around 32°C in aqueous solutions. In this work, pNIPAM was electrospun into fibrous mats from three solvents and the resulting electrospun mats were evaluated using DSC, polarized Raman, and infrared spectroscopy and compared to the bulk material. It was found that the electrospinning process did not alter the polymer and pNIPAM maintained its thermoresponsive behavior. Therefore, it is believed that electrospun pNIPAM mats could have the potential to be used as templates or filters in aqueous solutions at high temperatures, above 32°C, and then removed by lowering the temperature. The next polymer to be investigated was a biodegradable polyurethane (PU). The PU was electrospun into isotropic mats (ES-PU) and the material properties were evaluated via GPC, DSC, and Raman spectroscopy before and after processing. These analyses showed that the polymer was also unaffected by the electrospinning process. Additionally, the degradation profile of ES-PU in the presence of chymotrypsin was assessed. It was concluded that ES-PU mats show potential for use in soft tissue engineering applications. Therefore, the next step in this research was to investigate the ability of ES-PU mats to support cardiac cells and direct tissuegenesis. Cells isolated from immature cardiac ventricles were grown on ES-PU mats with either aligned or unaligned microfibers. ES-PU cultures contained electrically-coupled, contractile myocytes and it was

  8. Reentry produced by small-scale heterogeneities in a discrete model of cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Sergio; Bär, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Reentries are reexcitations of cardiac tissue after the passing of an excitation wave which can cause dangerous arrhythmias like tachycardia or life-threatening heart failures like fibrillation. The heart is formed by a network of cells connected by gap junctions. Under ischemic conditions some of the cells lose their connections, because gap junctions are blocked and the excitability is decreased. We model a circular region of the tissue where a fraction of connections among individual cells are removed and substituted by non-conducting material in a two-dimensional (2D) discrete model of a heterogeneous excitable medium with local kinetics based on electrophysiology. Thus, two neighbouring cells are connected (disconnected) with a probability ϕ (1 – ϕ). Such a region is assumed to be surrounded by homogeneous tissue. The circular heterogeneous area is shown to act as a source of new waves which reenter into the tissue and reexcitate the whole domain. We employ the Fenton-Karma equations to model the action potential for the local kinetics of the discrete nodes to study the statistics of the reentries in two dimensional networks with different topologies. We conclude that the probability of reentry is determined by the proximity of the fraction of disrupted connections between neighboring nodes (“cells”) in the heterogeneous region to the percolation threshold.

  9. Electrospun PLGA fibers incorporated with functionalized biomolecules for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiashing; Lee, An-Rei; Lin, Wei-Han; Lin, Che-Wei; Wu, Yuan-Kun; Tsai, Wei-Bor

    2014-07-01

    Structural similarity of electrospun fibers (ESFs) to the native extracellular matrix provides great potential for the application of biofunctional ESFs in tissue engineering. This study aimed to synthesize biofunctionalized poly (L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) ESFs for investigating the potential for cardiac tissue engineering application. We developed a simple but novel strategy to incorporate adhesive peptides in PLGA ESFs. Two adhesive peptides derived from laminin, YIGSR, and RGD, were covalently conjugated to poly-L-lysine, and then mingled with PLGA solution for electrospinning. Peptides were uniformly distributed on the surface and in the interior of ESFs. PLGA ESFs incorporated with YIGSR or RGD or adsorbed with laminin significantly enhanced the adhesion of cardiomyocytes isolated from neonatal rats. Furthermore, the cells were found to adhere better on ESFs compared with flat substrates after 7 days of culture. Immunofluorescent staining of F-actin, vinculin, a-actinin, and N-cadherin indicated that cardiomyocytes adhered and formed striated α-actinin better on the laminin-coated ESFs and the YIGSR-incorporated ESFs compared with the RGD-incorporated ESFs. The expression of α-myosin heavy chain and β-tubulin on the YIGSR-incorporated ESFs was significantly higher compared with the expression level on PLGA and RGD-incorporated samples. Furthermore, the contraction of cardiomyocytes was faster and lasted longer on the laminin-coated ESFs and YIGSR-incorporated ESFs. The results suggest that aligned YIGSR-incorporated PLGA ESFs is a better candidate for the formation of cardiac patches. This study demonstrated the potential of using peptide-incorporated ESFs as designable-scaffold platform for tissue engineering. PMID:24471778

  10. Evaluation of an established pericardium patch for delivery of mesenchymal stem cells to cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Vashi, Aditya V; White, Jacinta F; McLean, Keith M; Neethling, William M L; Rhodes, David I; Ramshaw, John A M; Werkmeister, Jerome A

    2015-06-01

    The present study has evaluated a commercial pericardial material for its capacity to assist as a natural extracellular matrix (ECM) patch for the delivery and retention of mesenchymal stem cells for cardiac repair. The repair of cardiac tissue with cells delivered by an appropriate bioscaffold is expected to offer a superior, long-lasting treatment strategy. The present material, CardioCel®, is based on acellular pericardium that has been stabilized by treatments, including a low concentration of glutaraldehyde, that eliminate calcification after implantation. In the present study, we have assessed this material using human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells at various cell densities under standard, static cell culture conditions. The initial seeding densities were monitored to evaluate the extent of cell attachment and cell viability, with subsequent cell proliferation assessed up to 4 weeks using an MTS assay. Cell morphology, infiltration, and spreading were tracked using scanning electron microscopy and phalloidin staining. The efficacy of long-term cell survival was further assessed by examining the extent and type of new tissue formation on seeded scaffolds at 70 days; both type I and type III collagens were present in fibrillar structures on these scaffolds indicating that the seeded stem cells had the capacity to differentiate into collagen-producing cells necessary to repair damaged ECM. These data show that the CardioCel® scaffold is an appropriate substrate for the stem cells and has the potential to both retain seeded stem cells and to act as a template for cell propagation and new tissue formation. PMID:25266083

  11. Evaluation of an established pericardium patch for delivery of mesenchymal stem cells to cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Vashi, Aditya V; White, Jacinta F; McLean, Keith M; Neethling, William M L; Rhodes, David I; Ramshaw, John A M; Werkmeister, Jerome A

    2014-09-25

    The present study has evaluated a commercial pericardial material for its capacity to assist as a natural extracellular matrix patch for the delivery and retention of mesenchymal stem cells for cardiac repair. The repair of cardiac tissue with cells delivered by an appropriate bioscaffold is expected to offer a superior, long-lasting treatment strategy. The present material, CardioCel®, is based on acellular pericardium that has been stabilized by treatments, including a low concentration of glutaraldehyde, that eliminate calcification after implantation. In the present study, we have assessed this material using human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells at various cell densities under standard, static cell culture conditions. The initial seeding densities were monitored to evaluate the extent of cell attachment and cell viability, with subsequent cell proliferation assessed up to 4 weeks using an MTS assay. Cell morphology, infiltration and spreading were tracked using scanning electron microscopy and phalloidin staining. The efficacy of long-term cell survival was further assessed by examining the extent and type of new tissue formation on seeded scaffolds at 70 days; both type I and type III collagens were present in fibrillar structures on these scaffolds indicating that the seeded stem cells had the capacity to differentiate into collagen-producing cells necessary to repair damaged extracellular matrix. These data show that the CardioCel® scaffold is an appropriate substrate for the stem cells and has the potential to both retain seeded stem cells and to act as a template for cell propagation and new tissue formation. PMID:25256436

  12. Development and characterization of novel electrically conductive PANI-PGS composites for cardiac tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Qazi, Taimoor H; Rai, Ranjana; Dippold, Dirk; Roether, Judith E; Schubert, Dirk W; Rosellini, Elisabetta; Barbani, Niccoletta; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases, especially myocardial infarction, are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world, also resulting in huge economic burdens on national economies. A cardiac patch strategy aims at regenerating an infarcted heart by providing healthy functional cells to the injured region via a carrier substrate, and providing mechanical support, thereby preventing deleterious ventricular remodeling. In the present work, polyaniline (PANI) was doped with camphorsulfonic acid and blended with poly(glycerol-sebacate) at ratios of 10, 20 and 30vol.% PANI content to produce electrically conductive composite cardiac patches via the solvent casting method. The composites were characterized in terms of their electrical, mechanical and physicochemical properties. The in vitro biodegradability of the composites was also evaluated. Electrical conductivity increased from 0Scm(-1) for pure PGS to 0.018Scm(-1) for 30vol.% PANI-PGS samples. Moreover, the conductivities were preserved for at least 100h post fabrication. Tensile tests revealed an improvement in the elastic modulus, tensile strength and elasticity with increasing PANI content. The degradation products caused a local drop in pH, which was higher in all composite samples compared with pure PGS, hinting at a buffering effect due to the presence of PANI. Finally, the cytocompatibility of the composites was confirmed when C2C12 cells attached and proliferated on samples with varying PANI content. Furthermore, leaching of acid dopants from the developed composites did not have any deleterious effect on the viability of C2C12 cells. Taken together, these results confirm the potential of PANI-PGS composites for use as substrates to modulate cellular behavior via electrical stimulation, and as biocompatible scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering applications. PMID:24561709

  13. Visualization of spiral and scroll waves in simulated and experimental cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, E. M.; Fenton, F. H.

    2008-12-01

    The heart is a nonlinear biological system that can exhibit complex electrical dynamics, complete with period-doubling bifurcations and spiral and scroll waves that can lead to fibrillatory states that compromise the heart's ability to contract and pump blood efficiently. Despite the importance of understanding the range of cardiac dynamics, studying how spiral and scroll waves can initiate, evolve, and be terminated is challenging because of the complicated electrophysiology and anatomy of the heart. Nevertheless, over the last two decades advances in experimental techniques have improved access to experimental data and have made it possible to visualize the electrical state of the heart in more detail than ever before. During the same time, progress in mathematical modeling and computational techniques has facilitated using simulations as a tool for investigating cardiac dynamics. In this paper, we present data from experimental and simulated cardiac tissue and discuss visualization techniques that facilitate understanding of the behavior of electrical spiral and scroll waves in the context of the heart. The paper contains many interactive media, including movies and interactive two- and three-dimensional Java appletsDisclaimer: IOP Publishing was not involved in the programming of this software and does not accept any responsibility for it. You download and run the software at your own risk. If you experience any problems with the software, please contact the author directly. To the fullest extent permitted by law, IOP Publishing Ltd accepts no responsibility for any loss, damage and/or other adverse effect on your computer system caused by your downloading and running this software. IOP Publishing Ltd accepts no responsibility for consequential loss..

  14. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Use in Cardiac Arrest Secondary to Fulminant Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Yousuf, Tariq; Brinton, Taylor; Ahmed, Khansa; Iskander, Joy; Woznicka, Daniel; Kramer, Jason; Kopiec, Adam; Chadaga, Amar R.; Ortiz, Kathia

    2016-01-01

    Background Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is used emergently to dissolve thrombi in the treatment of fulminant pulmonary embolism. Currently, there is a relative contraindication to tPA in the setting of traumatic or prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation > 10 minutes because of the risk of massive hemorrhage. Methods Our single-center, retrospective study investigated patients experiencing cardiac arrest (CA) secondary to pulmonary embolus. We compared the effectiveness of advanced cardiac life support with the administration of tPA vs. the standard of care consisting of advanced cardiac life support without thrombolysis. The primary endpoint was survival to discharge. Secondary endpoints were return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), major bleeding, and minor bleeding. Results We analyzed 42 patients, of whom 19 received tPA during CA. Patients who received tPA were not associated with a statistically significant increase in survival to discharge (10.5% vs. 8.7%, P = 1.00) or ROSC (47.4% vs. 47.8%, P = 0.98) compared to the control group. We observed no statistically significant difference between the groups in major bleeding events (5.3% in the tPA group vs. 4.3% in the control group, P = 1.00) and minor bleeding events (10.5% in the tPA group vs. 0.0% in the control group, P = 0.11). Conclusion This study did not find a statistically significant difference in survival to discharge or in ROSC in patients treated with tPA during CA compared to patients treated with standard therapy. However, because no significant difference was found in major or minor bleeding, we suggest that the potential therapeutic benefits of this medication should not be limited by the potential for massive hemorrhage. Larger prospective studies are warranted to define the efficacy and safety profile of thrombolytic use in this population. PMID:26858790

  15. Development of a multi-frequency diffuse photon density wave device for the characterization of tissue damage at multiple depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, David; Weingarten, Michael S.; Neidrauer, Michael T.; Samuels, Joshua A.; Huneke, Richard B.; Kuzmin, Vladimir L.; Lewin, Peter A.; Zubkov, Leonid A.

    2014-02-01

    The ability to determine the depth and degree of cutaneous and subcutaneous tissue damage is critical for medical applications such as burns and pressure ulcers. The Diffuse Photon Density Wave (DPDW) methodology at near infrared wavelengths can be used to non-invasively measure the optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of tissue at depths of several millimeters. A multi-frequency DPDW system with one light source and one detector was constructed so that light is focused onto the tissue surface using an optical fiber and lens mounted to a digitally-controlled actuator which changes the distance between light source and detector. A variable RF generator enables the modulation frequency to be selected between 50 to 400MHz. The ability to digitally control both source-detector separation distance and modulation frequency allows for virtually unlimited number of data points, enabling precise selection of the volume and depth of tissue that will be characterized. Suspensions of Intralipid and india ink with known absorption and reduced scattering coefficients were used as optical phantoms to assess device accuracy. Solid silicon phantoms were formulated for stability testing. Standard deviations for amplitude and phase shift readings were found to be 0.9% and 0.2 degrees respectively, over a one hour period. The ability of the system to quantify tissue damage in vivo at multiple depths was tested in a porcine burn model.

  16. Myocyte-Depleted Engineered Cardiac Tissues Support Therapeutic Potential of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Gregory W.; Turnbull, Irene C.; Ancukiewicz, Damian; Kim, Do Eun; Kao, Evan; Cashman, Timothy J.; Hadri, Lahouaria; Hajjar, Roger J.

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for restoring cardiac function after cardiomyocyte loss remains controversial. Engineered cardiac tissues (ECTs) offer a simplified three-dimensional in vitro model system to evaluate stem cell therapies. We hypothesized that contractile properties of dysfunctional ECTs would be enhanced by MSC treatment. ECTs were created from neonatal rat cardiomyocytes with and without bone marrow-derived adult rat MSCs in a type-I collagen and Matrigel scaffold using custom elastomer molds with integrated cantilever force sensors. Three experimental groups included the following: (1) baseline condition ECT consisting only of myocytes, (2) 50% myocyte-depleted ECT, modeling a dysfunctional state, and (3) 50% myocyte-depleted ECT plus 10% MSC, modeling dysfunctional myocardium with intervention. Developed stress (DS) and pacing threshold voltage (VT) were measured using 2-Hz field stimulation at 37°C on culture days 5, 10, 15, and 20. By day 5, DS of myocyte-depleted ECTs was significantly lower than baseline, and VT was elevated. In MSC-supplemented ECTs, DS and VT were significantly better than myocyte-depleted values, approaching baseline ECTs. Findings were similar through culture day 15, but lost significance at day 20. Trends in DS were partly explained by changes in the cell number and alignment with time. Thus, supplementing myocyte-depleted ECTs with MSCs transiently improved contractile function and compensated for a 50% loss of cardiomyocytes, mimicking recent animal studies and clinical trials and supporting the potential of MSCs for myocardial therapy. PMID:22500611

  17. Strategies for the chemical and biological functionalization of scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering: a review

    PubMed Central

    Tallawi, Marwa; Rosellini, Elisabetta; Barbani, Niccoletta; Cascone, Maria Grazia; Rai, Ranjana; Saint-Pierre, Guillaume; Boccaccini, Aldo R.

    2015-01-01

    The development of biomaterials for cardiac tissue engineering (CTE) is challenging, primarily owing to the requirement of achieving a surface with favourable characteristics that enhances cell attachment and maturation. The biomaterial surface plays a crucial role as it forms the interface between the scaffold (or cardiac patch) and the cells. In the field of CTE, synthetic polymers (polyglycerol sebacate, polyethylene glycol, polyglycolic acid, poly-l-lactide, polyvinyl alcohol, polycaprolactone, polyurethanes and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)) have been proven to exhibit suitable biodegradable and mechanical properties. Despite the fact that they show the required biocompatible behaviour, most synthetic polymers exhibit poor cell attachment capability. These synthetic polymers are mostly hydrophobic and lack cell recognition sites, limiting their application. Therefore, biofunctionalization of these biomaterials to enhance cell attachment and cell material interaction is being widely investigated. There are numerous approaches for functionalizing a material, which can be classified as mechanical, physical, chemical and biological. In this review, recent studies reported in the literature to functionalize scaffolds in the context of CTE, are discussed. Surface, morphological, chemical and biological modifications are introduced and the results of novel promising strategies and techniques are discussed. PMID:26109634

  18. Strategies for the chemical and biological functionalization of scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering: a review.

    PubMed

    Tallawi, Marwa; Rosellini, Elisabetta; Barbani, Niccoletta; Cascone, Maria Grazia; Rai, Ranjana; Saint-Pierre, Guillaume; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2015-07-01

    The development of biomaterials for cardiac tissue engineering (CTE) is challenging, primarily owing to the requirement of achieving a surface with favourable characteristics that enhances cell attachment and maturation. The biomaterial surface plays a crucial role as it forms the interface between the scaffold (or cardiac patch) and the cells. In the field of CTE, synthetic polymers (polyglycerol sebacate, polyethylene glycol, polyglycolic acid, poly-l-lactide, polyvinyl alcohol, polycaprolactone, polyurethanes and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)) have been proven to exhibit suitable biodegradable and mechanical properties. Despite the fact that they show the required biocompatible behaviour, most synthetic polymers exhibit poor cell attachment capability. These synthetic polymers are mostly hydrophobic and lack cell recognition sites, limiting their application. Therefore, biofunctionalization of these biomaterials to enhance cell attachment and cell material interaction is being widely investigated. There are numerous approaches for functionalizing a material, which can be classified as mechanical, physical, chemical and biological. In this review, recent studies reported in the literature to functionalize scaffolds in the context of CTE, are discussed. Surface, morphological, chemical and biological modifications are introduced and the results of novel promising strategies and techniques are discussed. PMID:26109634

  19. Three-dimensional pseudospectral modelling of cardiac propagation in an inhomogeneous anisotropic tissue.

    PubMed

    Ng, K T; Yan, R

    2003-11-01

    Various investigators have used the monodomain model to study cardiac propagation behaviour. In many cases, the governing non-linear parabolic equation is solved using the finite-difference method. An adequate discretisation of cardiac tissue with realistic dimensions, however, often leads to a large model size that is computationally demanding. Recently, it has been demonstrated, for a two-dimensional homogeneous monodomain, that the Chebyshev pseudospectral method can offer higher computational efficiency than the finite-difference technique. Here, an extension of the pseudospectral approach to a three-dimensional inhomogeneous case with fibre rotation is presented. The unknown transmembrane potential is expanded in terms of Chebyshev polynomial trial functions, and the monodomain equation is enforced at the Gauss-Lobatto node points. The forward Euler technique is used to advance the solution in time. Numerical results are presented that demonstrate that the Chebyshev pseudospectral method offered an even larger improvement in computational performance over the finite-difference method in the three-dimensional case. Specifically, the pseudospectral method allowed the number of nodes to be reduced by approximately 85 times, while the same solution accuracy was maintained. Depending on the model size, simulations were performed with approximately 18-41 times less memory and approximately 99-169 times less CPU time. PMID:14686586

  20. Myocyte-depleted engineered cardiac tissues support therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Serrao, Gregory W; Turnbull, Irene C; Ancukiewicz, Damian; Kim, Do Eun; Kao, Evan; Cashman, Timothy J; Hadri, Lahouaria; Hajjar, Roger J; Costa, Kevin D

    2012-07-01

    The therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for restoring cardiac function after cardiomyocyte loss remains controversial. Engineered cardiac tissues (ECTs) offer a simplified three-dimensional in vitro model system to evaluate stem cell therapies. We hypothesized that contractile properties of dysfunctional ECTs would be enhanced by MSC treatment. ECTs were created from neonatal rat cardiomyocytes with and without bone marrow-derived adult rat MSCs in a type-I collagen and Matrigel scaffold using custom elastomer molds with integrated cantilever force sensors. Three experimental groups included the following: (1) baseline condition ECT consisting only of myocytes, (2) 50% myocyte-depleted ECT, modeling a dysfunctional state, and (3) 50% myocyte-depleted ECT plus 10% MSC, modeling dysfunctional myocardium with intervention. Developed stress (DS) and pacing threshold voltage (VT) were measured using 2-Hz field stimulation at 37°C on culture days 5, 10, 15, and 20. By day 5, DS of myocyte-depleted ECTs was significantly lower than baseline, and VT was elevated. In MSC-supplemented ECTs, DS and VT were significantly better than myocyte-depleted values, approaching baseline ECTs. Findings were similar through culture day 15, but lost significance at day 20. Trends in DS were partly explained by changes in the cell number and alignment with time. Thus, supplementing myocyte-depleted ECTs with MSCs transiently improved contractile function and compensated for a 50% loss of cardiomyocytes, mimicking recent animal studies and clinical trials and supporting the potential of MSCs for myocardial therapy. PMID:22500611

  1. Proteomic profiling of cardiac tissue by isolation of nuclei tagged in specific cell types (INTACT)

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Nirav M.; Greco, Todd M.; Kuchenbrod, Lauren M.; Rigney, Maggie M.; Chung, Mei-I; Wallingford, John B.; Cristea, Ileana M.; Conlon, Frank L.

    2014-01-01

    The proper dissection of the molecular mechanisms governing the specification and differentiation of specific cell types requires isolation of pure cell populations from heterogeneous tissues and whole organisms. Here, we describe a method for purification of nuclei from defined cell or tissue types in vertebrate embryos using INTACT (isolation of nuclei tagged in specific cell types). This method, previously developed in plants, flies and worms, utilizes in vivo tagging of the nuclear envelope with biotin and the subsequent affinity purification of the labeled nuclei. In this study we successfully purified nuclei of cardiac and skeletal muscle from Xenopus using this strategy. We went on to demonstrate the utility of this approach by coupling the INTACT approach with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) proteomic methodologies to profile proteins expressed in the nuclei of developing hearts. From these studies we have identified the Xenopus orthologs of 12 human proteins encoded by genes, which when mutated in human lead to congenital heart disease. Thus, by combining these technologies we are able to identify tissue-specific proteins that are expressed and required for normal vertebrate organ development. PMID:24496632

  2. Unstable spiral waves and local Euclidean symmetry in a model of cardiac tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Marcotte, Christopher D.; Grigoriev, Roman O.

    2015-06-15

    This paper investigates the properties of unstable single-spiral wave solutions arising in the Karma model of two-dimensional cardiac tissue. In particular, we discuss how such solutions can be computed numerically on domains of arbitrary shape and study how their stability, rotational frequency, and spatial drift depend on the size of the domain as well as the position of the spiral core with respect to the boundaries. We also discuss how the breaking of local Euclidean symmetry due to finite size effects as well as the spatial discretization of the model is reflected in the structure and dynamics of spiral waves. This analysis allows identification of a self-sustaining process responsible for maintaining the state of spiral chaos featuring multiple interacting spirals.

  3. [Clinical features and physical fitness parameters in athletes with cardiac connective tissue dysplasia syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlova, A V; Smolenskiĭ, A V

    2004-01-01

    Seventy-seven athletes with different manifestations of the cardiac connective tissue dysplasia (CCTD) syndrome (mitral prolapse (MP), anomalously located chordae (ALC) of the left ventricle and/or their combination) and 23 athletes without signs of CCTD syndrome were examined. The purpose of the study was to determine the specific features of the phenotypic picture, ECG data, and physical fitness in athletes with the manifestations of CCTD syndrome. The characteristic features of anthropometric data (higher heights and decreased body mass index), a larger number of the phenotypic signs of CCTD, the specific features of ECG, and lower parameters of physical fitness and aerobic capacities in the groups of MP, ALC, and/or their combination were identified; the impact of MP and ALC on these parameters was evaluated. PMID:15468725

  4. Covariant stringlike dynamics of scroll wave filaments in anisotropic cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Verschelde, Henri; Dierckx, Hans; Bernus, Olivier

    2007-10-19

    It has been hypothesized that stationary scroll wave filaments in cardiac tissue describe a geodesic in a curved space whose metric is the inverse diffusion tensor. Several numerical studies support this hypothesis, but no analytical proof has been provided yet for general anisotropy. In this Letter, we derive dynamic equations for the filament in the case of general anisotropy. These equations are covariant under general spatial coordinate transformations and describe the motion of a stringlike object in a curved space whose metric tensor is the inverse diffusion tensor. Therefore the behavior of scroll wave filaments in excitable media with anisotropy is similar to the one of cosmic strings in a curved universe. Our dynamic equations are valid for thin filaments and for general anisotropy. We show that stationary filaments obey the geodesic equation. PMID:17995301

  5. Tissue-Mimicking Geometrical Constraints Stimulate Tissue-Like Constitution and Activity of Mouse Neonatal and Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pilarczyk, Götz; Raulf, Alexandra; Gunkel, Manuel; Fleischmann, Bernd K.; Lemor, Robert; Hausmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The present work addresses the question of to what extent a geometrical support acts as a physiological determining template in the setup of artificial cardiac tissue. Surface patterns with alternating concave to convex transitions of cell size dimensions were used to organize and orientate human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hIPSC)-derived cardiac myocytes and mouse neonatal cardiac myocytes. The shape of the cells, as well as the organization of the contractile apparatus recapitulates the anisotropic line pattern geometry being derived from tissue geometry motives. The intracellular organization of the contractile apparatus and the cell coupling via gap junctions of cell assemblies growing in a random or organized pattern were examined. Cell spatial and temporal coordinated excitation and contraction has been compared on plain and patterned substrates. While the α-actinin cytoskeletal organization is comparable to terminally-developed native ventricular tissue, connexin-43 expression does not recapitulate gap junction distribution of heart muscle tissue. However, coordinated contractions could be observed. The results of tissue-like cell ensemble organization open new insights into geometry-dependent cell organization, the cultivation of artificial heart tissue from stem cells and the anisotropy-dependent activity of therapeutic compounds. PMID:26751484

  6. Tissue-Mimicking Geometrical Constraints Stimulate Tissue-Like Constitution and Activity of Mouse Neonatal and Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Pilarczyk, Götz; Raulf, Alexandra; Gunkel, Manuel; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Lemor, Robert; Hausmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The present work addresses the question of to what extent a geometrical support acts as a physiological determining template in the setup of artificial cardiac tissue. Surface patterns with alternating concave to convex transitions of cell size dimensions were used to organize and orientate human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hIPSC)-derived cardiac myocytes and mouse neonatal cardiac myocytes. The shape of the cells, as well as the organization of the contractile apparatus recapitulates the anisotropic line pattern geometry being derived from tissue geometry motives. The intracellular organization of the contractile apparatus and the cell coupling via gap junctions of cell assemblies growing in a random or organized pattern were examined. Cell spatial and temporal coordinated excitation and contraction has been compared on plain and patterned substrates. While the α-actinin cytoskeletal organization is comparable to terminally-developed native ventricular tissue, connexin-43 expression does not recapitulate gap junction distribution of heart muscle tissue. However, coordinated contractions could be observed. The results of tissue-like cell ensemble organization open new insights into geometry-dependent cell organization, the cultivation of artificial heart tissue from stem cells and the anisotropy-dependent activity of therapeutic compounds. PMID:26751484

  7. A Quantitative Comparison of the Behavior of Human Ventricular Cardiac Electrophysiology Models in Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Elshrif, Mohamed M.; Cherry, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical integration of mathematical models of heart cell electrophysiology provides an important computational tool for studying cardiac arrhythmias, but the abundance of available models complicates selecting an appropriate model. We study the behavior of two recently published models of human ventricular action potentials, the Grandi-Pasqualini-Bers (GPB) and the O'Hara-Virág-Varró-Rudy (OVVR) models, and compare the results with four previously published models and with available experimental and clinical data. We find the shapes and durations of action potentials and calcium transients differ between the GPB and OVVR models, as do the magnitudes and rate-dependent properties of transmembrane currents and the calcium transient. Differences also occur in the steady-state and S1–S2 action potential duration and conduction velocity restitution curves, including a maximum conduction velocity for the OVVR model roughly half that of the GPB model and well below clinical values. Between single cells and tissue, both models exhibit differences in properties, including maximum upstroke velocity, action potential amplitude, and minimum diastolic interval. Compared to experimental data, action potential durations for the GPB and OVVR models agree fairly well (although OVVR epicardial action potentials are shorter), but maximum slopes of steady-state restitution curves are smaller. Although studies show alternans in normal hearts, it occurs only in the OVVR model, and only for a narrow range of cycle lengths. We find initiated spiral waves do not progress to sustained breakup for either model. The dominant spiral wave period of the GPB model falls within clinically relevant values for ventricular tachycardia (VT), but for the OVVR model, the dominant period is longer than periods associated with VT. Our results should facilitate choosing a model to match properties of interest in human cardiac tissue and to replicate arrhythmia behavior more closely. Furthermore, by

  8. Design of Electrospun Hydrogel Fibers Containing Multivalent Peptide Conjugates for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, Nikhil Ajit

    A novel material was designed using biomimetic engineering principles to recreate the chemical and physical environment of the extracellular matrix for cardiac tissue engineering applications. In order to control the chemical and specific bioactive signals provided by the material, a multivalent conjugate of a RGD-containing cell-binding peptide with hyaluronic acid was synthesized. These conjugates were characterized using in-line size exclusion chromatography with static multi-angle light scattering, UV absorbance, and differential refractive index measurements (SEC-MALS-UV-RI) to determine their molecular weight and valency, as well as the distributions of each. These conjugates were electrospun with poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate to create a nanofibrous hydrogel material embedded with bioinstructive macromolecules. This electrospinning process was explored and optimized to create well-formed nanofibers. The diameter and orientation of the fibers was controlled to closely mimic the nanostructure of the extracellular matrix of the myocardium. Further characterization of the material was performed to ensure that its mechanical properties resemble those found in the myocardium. The availability of the peptides embedded in the hydrogel material was confirmed by measuring peptides released by trypsin incubation and was found to be sufficient to cause cell adhesion. This material was capable of supporting cell culture, maintaining the viability of cultured fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes, and preserving cardiomyocyte functionality. In this way, this material shows promise of serving as a biomimetic in vitro scaffold for generation of functional myocardial tissue, with possible applications as an in vivo cardiac patch for repair of the damage myocardium post-myocardial infarction.

  9. Epicardial Adipose Tissue Is Associated with Plaque Burden and Composition and Provides Incremental Value for the Prediction of Cardiac Outcome. A Clinical Cardiac Computed Tomography Angiography Study

    PubMed Central

    Gitsioudis, Gitsios; Schmahl, Christina; Missiou, Anna; Voss, Andreas; Schüssler, Alena; Abdel-Aty, Hassan; Buss, Sebastian J.; Mueller, Dirk; Vembar, Mani; Bryant, Mark; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Katus, Hugo A.; Korosoglou, Grigorios

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought to investigate the association of epicardial adipose tissue (eCAT) volume with plaque burden, circulating biomarkers and cardiac outcomes in patients with intermediate risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods and Results 177 consecutive outpatients at intermediate risk for CAD and completed biomarker analysis including high-sensitive Troponin T (hs-TnT) and hs-CRP underwent 256-slice cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) between June 2008 and October 2011. Patients with lumen narrowing ≥50% exhibited significantly higher eCAT volume than patients without any CAD or lumen narrowing <50% (median (interquartile range, IQR): 108 (73–167) cm3 vs. 119 (82–196) cm3, p = 0.04). Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated an independent association eCAT volume with plaque burden by number of lesions (R2 = 0.22, rpartial = 0.29, p = 0.026) and CAD severity by lumen narrowing (R2 = 0.22, rpartial = 0.23, p = 0.038) after adjustment for age, diabetes mellitus, hyperlidipemia, body-mass-index (BMI), hs-CRP and hs-TnT. Univariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis identified a significant association for both increased eCAT volume and maximal lumen narrowing with all cardiac events. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis revealed an independent association of increased eCAT volume with all cardiac events after adjustment for age, >3 risk factors, presence of CAD, hs-CRP and hs-TnT. Conclusion Epicardial adipose tissue volume is independently associated with plaque burden and maximum luminal narrowing by CCTA and may serve as an independent predictor for cardiac outcomes in patients at intermediate risk for CAD. PMID:27187590

  10. Modeling the response of normal and ischemic cardiac tissue to electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Sunil Mani

    Heart disease, the leading cause of death worldwide, is often caused by ventricular fibrillation. A common treatment for this lethal arrhythmia is defibrillation: a strong electrical shock that resets the heart to its normal rhythm. To design better defibrillators, we need a better understanding of both fibrillation and defibrillation. Fundamental mysteries remain regarding the mechanism of how the heart responds to a shock, particularly anodal shocks and the resultant hyperpolarization. Virtual anodes play critical roles in defibrillation, and one cannot build better defibrillators until these mechanisms are understood. We are using mathematical modeling to numerically simulate observed phenomena, and are exploring fundamental mechanisms responsible for the heart's electrical behavior. Such simulations clarify mechanisms and identify key parameters. We investigate how systolic tissue responds to an anodal shock and how refractory tissue reacts to hyperpolarization by studying the dip in the anodal strength-interval curve. This dip is due to electrotonic interaction between regions of depolarization and hyperpolarization following a shock. The dominance of the electrotonic mechanism over calcium interactions implies the importance of the spatial distribution of virtual electrodes. We also investigate the response of localized ischemic tissue to an anodal shock by modeling a regional elevation of extracellular potassium concentration. This heterogeneity leads to action potential instability, 2:1 conduction block (alternans), and reflection-like reentry at the boarder of the normal and ischemic regions. This kind of reflection (reentry) occurs due to the delay between proximal and distal segments to re-excite the proximal segment. Our numerical simulations are based on the bidomain model, the state-of-the-art mathematical description of how cardiac tissue responds to shocks. The dynamic LuoRudy model describes the active properties of the membrane. To model ischemia

  11. Phantom validation of Monte Carlo modeling for noncontact depth sensitive fluorescence measurements in an epithelial tissue model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Yi Hong; Zhu, Caigang; Liu, Quan

    2014-08-01

    Experimental investigation and optimization of various optical parameters in the design of depth sensitive optical measurements in layered tissues would require a huge amount of time and resources. A computational method to model light transport in layered tissues using Monte Carlo simulations has been developed for decades to reduce the cost incurred during this process. In this work, we employed the Monte Carlo method to investigate the depth sensitivity achieved by various illumination and detection configurations including both the traditional cone configurations and new cone shell configurations, which are implemented by convex or axicon lenses. Phantom experiments have been carried out to validate the Monte Carlo modeling of fluorescence in a two-layered turbid, epithelial tissue model. The measured fluorescence and depth sensitivity of different illumination-detection configurations were compared with each other. The results indicate excellent agreement between the experimental and simulation results in the trends of fluorescence intensity and depth sensitivity. The findings of this study and the development of the Monte Carlo method for noncontact setups provide useful insight and assistance in the planning and optimization of optical designs for depth sensitive fluorescence measurements.

  12. No evidence for mosaic pathogenic copy number variations in cardiac tissue from patients with congenital heart malformations.

    PubMed

    Winberg, Johanna; Berggren, Håkan; Malm, Torsten; Johansson, Sune; Johansson Ramgren, Jens; Nilsson, Boris; Liedén, Agne; Nordenskjöld, Agneta; Gustavsson, Peter; Nordgren, Ann

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if pathogenic copy number variations (CNVs) are present in mosaic form in patients with congenital heart malformations. We have collected cardiac tissue and blood samples from 23 patients with congenital heart malformations that underwent cardiac surgery and screened for mosaic gene dose alterations restricted to cardiac tissue using array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). We did not find evidence of CNVs in mosaic form after array CGH analysis. Pathogenic CNVs that were present in both cardiac tissue and blood were detected in 2/23 patients (9%), and in addition we found several constitutional CNVs of unclear clinical significance. This is the first study investigating mosaicism for CNVs in heart tissue compared to peripheral blood and the results do not indicate that pathogenic mosaic copy number changes are common in patients with heart malformations. Importantly, in line with previous studies, our results show that constitutional pathogenic CNVs are important factors contributing to congenital heart malformations. PMID:25652018

  13. Acoustic-radiation-force-induced shear wave propagation in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Richard R.; Wolf, Patrick D.; Hsu, Stephen J.; Dumont, Douglas M.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2009-02-01

    Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) was employed to track acoustic radiation force (ARF)-induced shear waves in the myocardium of a beating heart. Shear waves were generated in and tracked through the myocardium of the left ventricular free wall (LVFW) in an in vivo heart that was exposed through a thoracotomy; matched studies were also preformed on an ex vivo myocardial specimen. Average shear wave velocities ranged from 2.22 to 2.53 m/s for the ex vivo specimen and 1.5 to 2.9 m/s (1.5-2.09 m/s during diastole; 2.9 m/s during systole) for in vivo specimens. Despite the known rotation of myocardial fiber orientation with tissue depth, there was no statistically significant shear wave velocity depth dependence observed in any of the experimental trials.

  14. Real-time optical monitoring of permanent lesion progression in radiofrequency ablated cardiac tissue (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh-Moon, Rajinder P.; Hendon, Christine P.

    2016-02-01

    Despite considerable advances in guidance of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) therapies for atrial fibrillation, success rates have been hampered by an inability to intraoperatively characterize the extent of permanent injury. Insufficient lesions can elusively create transient conduction blockages that eventually reconduct. Prior studies suggest significantly greater met-myoglobin (Mmb) concentrations in the lesion core than those in the healthy myocardium and may serve as a marker for irreversible tissue damage. In this work, we present real-time monitoring of permanent injury through spectroscopic assessment of Mmb concentrations at the catheter tip. Atrial wedges (n=6) were excised from four fresh swine hearts and submerged under pulsatile flow of warm (37oC) phosphate buffered saline. A commercial RFA catheter inserted into a fiber optic sheath allowed for simultaneous measurement of tissue diffuse reflectance (DR) spectra (500-650nm) during application of RF energy. Optical measurements were continuously acquired before, during, and post-ablation, in addition to healthy neighboring tissue. Met-myoglobin, oxy-myoglobin, and deoxy-myoglobin concentrations were extracted from each spectrum using an inverse Monte Carlo method. Tissue injury was validated with Masson's trichrome and hematoxylin and eosin staining. Time courses revealed a rapid increase in tissue Mmb concentrations at the onset of RFA treatment and a gradual plateauing thereafter. Extracted Mmb concentrations were significantly greater post-ablation (p<0.0001) as compared to healthy tissue and correlated well with histological assessment of severe thermal tissue destruction. On going studies are aimed at integrating these findings with prior work on near infrared spectroscopic lesion depth assessment. These results support the use of spectroscopy-facilitated guidance of RFA therapies for real-time permanent injury estimation.

  15. Minimally invasive injectable short nanofibers of poly(glycerol sebacate) for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Rajeswari; Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Sundarrajan, Subramanian; Mukherjee, Shayanti; Sridhar, Radhakrishnan; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2012-09-28

    Myocardial tissue lacks the ability to appreciably regenerate itself following myocardial infarction (MI) which ultimately results in heart failure. Current therapies can only retard the progression of disease and hence tissue engineering strategies are required to facilitate the engineering of a suitable biomaterial to repair MI. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro properties of an injectable biomaterial for the regeneration of infarcted myocardium. Fabrication of core/shell fibers was by co-axial electrospinning, with poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) as core material and poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) as shell material. The PLLA was removed by treatment of the PGS/PLLA core/shell fibers with DCM:hexane (2:1) to obtain PGS short fibers. These PGS short fibers offer the advantage of providing a minimally invasive injectable technique for the regeneration of infarcted myocardium. The scaffolds were characterized by SEM, FTIR and contact angle and cell-scaffold interactions using cardiomyocytes. The results showed that the cardiac marker proteins actinin, troponin, myosin heavy chain and connexin 43 were expressed more on short PGS fibers compared to PLLA nanofibers. We hypothesized that the injection of cells along with short PGS fibers would increase cell transplant retention and survival within the infarct, compared to the standard cell injection system. PMID:22947662

  16. Minimally invasive injectable short nanofibers of poly(glycerol sebacate) for cardiac tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, Rajeswari; Reddy Venugopal, Jayarama; Sundarrajan, Subramanian; Mukherjee, Shayanti; Sridhar, Radhakrishnan; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2012-09-01

    Myocardial tissue lacks the ability to appreciably regenerate itself following myocardial infarction (MI) which ultimately results in heart failure. Current therapies can only retard the progression of disease and hence tissue engineering strategies are required to facilitate the engineering of a suitable biomaterial to repair MI. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro properties of an injectable biomaterial for the regeneration of infarcted myocardium. Fabrication of core/shell fibers was by co-axial electrospinning, with poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) as core material and poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) as shell material. The PLLA was removed by treatment of the PGS/PLLA core/shell fibers with DCM:hexane (2:1) to obtain PGS short fibers. These PGS short fibers offer the advantage of providing a minimally invasive injectable technique for the regeneration of infarcted myocardium. The scaffolds were characterized by SEM, FTIR and contact angle and cell-scaffold interactions using cardiomyocytes. The results showed that the cardiac marker proteins actinin, troponin, myosin heavy chain and connexin 43 were expressed more on short PGS fibers compared to PLLA nanofibers. We hypothesized that the injection of cells along with short PGS fibers would increase cell transplant retention and survival within the infarct, compared to the standard cell injection system.

  17. Alginate-polyester comacromer based hydrogels as physiochemically and biologically favorable entities for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Thankam, Finosh G; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2015-11-01

    The physiochemical and biological responses of tissue engineering hydrogels are crucial in determining their desired performance. A hybrid comacromer was synthesized by copolymerizing alginate and poly(mannitol fumarate-co-sebacate) (pFMSA). Three bimodal hydrogels pFMSA-AA, pFMSA-MA and pFMSA-NMBA were synthesized by crosslinking with Ca(2+) and vinyl monomers acrylic acid (AA), methacrylic acid (MA) and N,N'-methylene bisacrylamide (NMBA), respectively. Though all the hydrogels were cytocompatible and exhibited a normal cell cycle profile, pFMSA-AA exhibited superior physiochemical properties viz non-freezable water content (58.34%) and water absorption per unit mass (0.97 g water/g gel) and pore length (19.92±3.91 μm) in comparing with other two hydrogels. The increased non-freezable water content and water absorption of pFMSA-AA hydrogels greatly influenced its biological performance, which was evident from long-term viability assay and cell cycle proliferation. The physiochemical and biological favorability of pFMSA-AA hydrogels signifies its suitability for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:26151567

  18. Modelling the effect of gap junctions on tissue-level cardiac electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Doug; Pathmanathan, Pras; Whiteley, Jonathan P

    2014-02-01

    When modelling tissue-level cardiac electrophysiology, a continuum approximation to the discrete cell-level equations, known as the bidomain equations, is often used to maintain computational tractability. Analysing the derivation of the bidomain equations allows us to investigate how microstructure, in particular gap junctions that electrically connect cells, affect tissue-level conductivity properties. Using a one-dimensional cable model, we derive a modified form of the bidomain equations that take gap junctions into account, and compare results of simulations using both the discrete and continuum models, finding that the underlying conduction velocity of the action potential ceases to match up between models when gap junctions are introduced at physiologically realistic coupling levels. We show that this effect is magnified by: (i) modelling gap junctions with reduced conductivity; (ii) increasing the conductance of the fast sodium channel; and (iii) an increase in myocyte length. From this, we conclude that the conduction velocity arising from the bidomain equations may not be an accurate representation of the underlying discrete system. In particular, the bidomain equations are less likely to be valid when modelling certain diseased states whose symptoms include a reduction in gap junction coupling or an increase in myocyte length. PMID:24338526

  19. [The morphological changes in the myocardial tissue after sudden cardiac death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Sokolova, O V

    2016-01-01

    This paper was designed to report the results of the retrospective analysis of the protocols of 180 forensic medical autopsy sections stored in the archives of Sankt-Petersburg Bureau of Forensic Medical Expertise and the data of the histological studies of myocardial tissues obtained after sudden cardiac death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy. The study revealed the following most pathognomonic histological criteria for alcoholic heart lesions: the alternation of hypertrophic and atrophic cardiomyocytes in the state of severe parenchymatous degeneration, pronounced mesenchymal fatty dystrophy in combination with pathological changes of the vascular walls (vascular wall plasmatization), sub-endothelial accumulation of the PAS-positive tissue compounds, microcirculatory disorders in the form of erythrocyte stasis with the manifestations of the blood "sludge" phenomenon, and precapillary fibrosis. The signs of severe parenchymatous and stromal vascular dystrophy of the myocardial histohematic barrier (HHB) are supposed to reflect the toxic effects of ethanol and its metabolites that are directly involved in the mechanisms underlying the disturbances of intracellular metabolism and dyscirculatory events leading to the development of heart muscle hypoxia. PMID:27030089

  20. Multiphoton microscopy using intrinsic signals for pharmacological studies in unstained cardiac and vascular tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Boulesteix, Thierry; Pena, Ana-Maria; Pages, Nicole; Senni, Karim; Godeau, Gaston; Sauviat, Martin-Pierre; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2005-03-01

    We report two novel applications of multiphoton microscopy for pharmacological studies of unstained cardiovascular tissue. First, we show that second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy of unstained cardiac myocytes can be used to determine the sarcomere length with sub-resolution accuracy, owing to the remarkable contrast of the SHG signal originating from myosin filaments. A measurement precision of 20 nm is achieved, taking the sample variability into account. We used this technique to measure sarcomere contracture in the presence of saxitoxin, and results were in agreement with mechanical measurements of atrial tissue contracture. Second, we characterized multiphoton microscopy of intact unlabeled arteries. We performed simultaneous detection of two-photon-excited fluorescence (2PEF) from elastin laminae and SHG from collagen fibers upon 860 nm excitation. Combined 2PEF/SHG images provide a highly specific, micron scale description of the architecture of these two major components of the vessel wall. We used this methodology to study the effects of lindane (a pesticide) on the artery wall structure and evidenced structural alteration of the vessel morphology.

  1. Development and Implementation of Discrete Polymeric Microstructural Cues for Applications in Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinney, James Richardson

    Chronic fibrosis caused by acute myocardial infarction (MI) leads to increased morbidity and mortality due to cardiac dysfunction. Despite care in the acute setting of MI, subsequent development of scar tissue and a lack of treatments for this maladaptive response lead to a poor prognosis. This has increased burdens on the cost of healthcare due to chronic disability. Here a novel therapeutic strategy that aims to mitigate myocardial fibrosis by utilizing injectable polymeric microstructural cues to attenuate the fibrotic response and improve functional outcomes is presented. Additionally, applications of integrated chemical functionalizations into discrete, micro-scale polymer structures are discussed in the realm of tissue engineering in order to impart enhancements in in vivo localization, three-dimensional manipulation and drug delivery. Polymeric microstructures, termed "microrods" and "microcubes", were fabricated using photolithographic techniques and studied in three-dimensional culture models of the fibrotic environment and by direct injection into the infarct zone of adult Sprague-Dawley rats. In vitro gene expression and functional and histological results were analyzed, showing a dose-dependent down-regulation fibrotic indicators and improvement in cardiac function. Furthermore, iron oxide nanoparticles and functionalized fluorocarbons were incorporated into the polymeric microdevices to promote in situ visualization by magnetic resonance imaging as well as to facilitate the manipulation and alignment of microstructural cues in a tissue-realistic environment. Lastly, successful encapsulation of native MGF peptide within microrods is demonstrated with release over two weeks as a proof of concept in the ability to locally deliver myogenic or supportive pharmacotherapeutics to the injured myocardium. This work demonstrates the efficacy and versatility of discrete microtopographical cues to attenuate the fibrotic response after MI and suggests a novel

  2. Nitric oxide mediates cardiac protection of tissue kallikrein by reducing inflammation and ventricular remodeling after myocardial ischemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang; Chao, Lee; Chao, Julie

    2008-01-01

    We assessed the role of nitric oxide (NO) and the kinin B2 receptor in mediating tissue kallikrein’s actions in intramyocardial inflammation and cardiac remodeling after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Adenovirus carrying the human tissue kallikrein gene was delivered locally into rat hearts 4 days prior to 30-minute ischemia followed by 24- hour or 7-day reperfusion with or without administration of icatibant, a kinin B2 receptor antagonist, or N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. Kallikrein gene delivery improved cardiac contractility and diastolic function, reduced infarct size at 1 day after I/R without affecting mean arterial pressure. Kallikrein treatment reduced macrophage/monocyte and neutrophil accumulation in the infarcted myocardium in association with reduced intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels. Kallikrein increased cardiac endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation and NO levels and decreased superoxide formation, TGF-β1 levels and Smad2 phosphorylation. Furthermore, kallikrein reduced I/R-induced JNK, p38MAPK, IκB-α phosphorylation and nuclear NF-κB activation. In addition, kallikrein improved cardiac performance, reduced infarct size and prevented ventricular wall thinning at 7 days after I/R. The effects of kallikrein on cardiac function, inflammation and signaling mediators were all blocked by icatibant and L-NAME. These results indicate that tissue kallikrein through kinin B2 receptor and NO formation improves cardiac function, prevents inflammation and limits left ventricular remodeling after myocardial I/R by suppression of oxidative stress, TGF-β1/Smad2 and JNK/p38MAPK signaling pathways and NF-κB activation. PMID:18068196

  3. Adult stem cells and biocompatible scaffolds as smart drug delivery tools for cardiac tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Pagliari, Stefania; Romanazzo, Sara; Mosqueira, Diogo; Pinto-do-Ó, Perpetua; Aoyagi, Takao; Forte, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of adult stem cells to cardiac repair is mostly ascribed to an indirect paracrine effect, rather than to their actual engraftment and differentiation into new contractile and vascular cells. This effect consists in a direct reduction of host cell death, promotion of neovascularization, and in a "bystander effect" on local inflammation. A number of cytokines secreted by adult stem/progenitor cells has been proposed to be responsible for the consistent beneficial effect reported in the early attempts to deliver different stem cell subsets to the injured myocardium. Aiming to maximize their beneficial activity on the diseased myocardium, the genetic modification of adult stem cells to enhance and/or control the secretion of specific cytokines would turn them into active drug delivery vectors. On the other hand, engineering biocompatible scaffolds as to release paracrine factors could result in multiple advantages: (1) achieve a local controlled release of the drug of interest, thus minimizing off-target effects, (2) enhance stem cell retention in the injured area and (3) boost the beneficial paracrine effects exerted by adult stem cells on the host tissue. In the present review, a critical overview of the state-of-the-art in the modification of stem cells and the functionalization of biocompatible scaffolds to deliver beneficial soluble factors to the injured myocardium is offered. Besides the number of concerns to be addressed before a clinical application can be foreseen for such concepts, this path could translate into the generation of active scaffolds as smart cell and drug delivery systems for cardiac repair. PMID:23745554

  4. Expansion and Characterization of Neonatal Cardiac Pericytes Provides a Novel Cellular Option for Tissue Engineering in Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Avolio, Elisa; Rodriguez-Arabaolaza, Iker; Spencer, Helen L; Riu, Federica; Mangialardi, Giuseppe; Slater, Sadie C; Rowlinson, Jonathan; Alvino, Valeria V; Idowu, Oluwasomidotun O; Soyombo, Stephanie; Oikawa, Atsuhiko; Swim, Megan M; Kong, Cherrie H T; Cheng, Hongwei; Jia, Huidong; Ghorbel, Mohamed T; Hancox, Jules C; Orchard, Clive H; Angelini, Gianni; Emanueli, Costanza; Caputo, Massimo; Madeddu, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Background Living grafts produced by combining autologous heart-resident stem/progenitor cells and tissue engineering could provide a new therapeutic option for definitive correction of congenital heart disease. The aim of the study was to investigate the antigenic profile, expansion/differentiation capacity, paracrine activity, and pro-angiogenic potential of cardiac pericytes and to assess their engrafting capacity in clinically certified prosthetic grafts. Methods and Results CD34pos cells, negative for the endothelial markers CD31 and CD146, were identified by immunohistochemistry in cardiac leftovers from infants and children undergoing palliative repair of congenital cardiac defects. Following isolation by immunomagnetic bead-sorting and culture on plastic in EGM-2 medium supplemented with growth factors and serum, CD34pos/CD31neg cells gave rise to a clonogenic, highly proliferative (>20 million at P5), spindle-shape cell population. The following populations were shown to expresses pericyte/mesenchymal and stemness markers. After exposure to differentiation media, the expanded cardiac pericytes acquired markers of vascular smooth muscle cells, but failed to differentiate into endothelial cells or cardiomyocytes. However, in Matrigel, cardiac pericytes form networks and enhance the network capacity of endothelial cells. Moreover, they produce collagen-1 and release chemo-attractants that stimulate the migration of c-Kitpos cardiac stem cells. Cardiac pericytes were then seeded onto clinically approved xenograft scaffolds and cultured in a bioreactor. After 3 weeks, fluorescent microscopy showed that cardiac pericytes had penetrated into and colonized the graft. Conclusions These findings open new avenues for cellular functionalization of prosthetic grafts to be applied in reconstructive surgery of congenital heart disease. PMID:26080813

  5. Evaluation of cardiac functions of cirrhotic children using serum brain natriuretic peptide and tissue Doppler imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fattouh, Aya M; El-Shabrawi, Mortada H; Mahmoud, Enas H; Ahmed, Wafaa O

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy (CCM) is described as the presence of cardiac dysfunction in cirrhotic patients. In children with chronic liver disease, CCM has been very rarely investigated. The Aim of the Study: Is to evaluate the cardiac function of cirrhotic children to identify those with CCM. Patients and Methods: Fifty-two cirrhotic patients and 53 age and sex matched controls were assessed using serum brain-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), conventional echocardiography, and tissue Doppler imaging. Results: Patients’ mean ages were 7.66 ± 4.16 years (vs. 6.88 ± 3.04 years for the controls). The study included 27 males and 25 females (28 and 25 respectively for the controls). Patients had larger left atrium and right ventricle (RV) (P value 0.05) and increased LV posterior wall thickness than controls (P value 0.04). They had higher late atrial diastolic filling velocity (A) of tricuspid valve (TV) inflow (0.59 ± 0.17 vs. 0.5 ± 0.1 m/s, P < 0.001) and lower ratios between the early diastolic filling velocity (E) and A wave velocity (E/A) of both mitral valve and TV inflow (1.7 ± 0.35 vs. 1.87 ± 0.34 and 1.3 ± 0.3 vs. 1.5 ± 0.3, P < 0.005 and 0.0008, respectively). Patients had significantly longer isovolumic relaxation time of LV (45.5 ± 11.1 vs. 40.5 ± 7.7 ms P 0.008), higher late diastolic peak myocardial velocity (A’) (11.8 ± 3.6 vs. 9.5 ± 2.7 ms, P 0.0003) and systolic velocity (S’) of the RV (14.5 ± 2.7 vs. 13.2 ± 2.9, P 0.01) and significantly higher myocardial performance index of both LV and RV (P 0.001 and 0.01). BNP levels were significantly higher in cases than controls (5.25 ng/l vs. 3.75 ng/l, P < 0.04) and was correlated with the E wave velocity of the TV (r 0.004) and the E/E’ ratio of the RV (r 0.001). None of the clinical or laboratory data were correlated with the BNP level. Conclusion Cirrhotic children have cardiac dysfunction mainly in the form of diastolic dysfunction. There is a need that CCM be more accurately

  6. Teratocarcinomas Arising from Allogeneic Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Tissue Constructs Provoked Host Immune Rejection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Ai; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Fukushima, Satsuki; Kawamura, Takuji; Kashiyama, Noriyuki; Ito, Emiko; Watabe, Tadashi; Masuda, Shigeo; Toda, Koichi; Hatazawa, Jun; Morii, Eiichi; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac tissue constructs is a promising regenerative treatment for cardiac failure: however, its tumourigenic potential is concerning. We hypothesised that the tumourigenic potential may be eliminated by the host immune response after allogeneic cell transplantation. Scaffold-free iPSC-derived cardaic tissue sheets of C57BL/6 mouse origin were transplanted into the cardiac surface of syngeneic C57BL/6 mice and allogeneic BALB/c mice with or without tacrolimus injection. Syngeneic mice and tacrolimus-injected immunosuppressed allogeneic mice formed teratocarcinomas with identical phenotypes, characteristic, and time courses, as assessed by imaging tools including 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography. In contrast, temporarily immunosuppressed allogeneic mice, following cessation of tacrolimus injection displayed diminished progression of the teratocarcinoma, accompanied by an accumulation of CD4/CD8-positive T cells, and finally achieved complete elimination of the teratocarcinoma. Our results indicated that malignant teratocarcinomas arising from induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac tissue constructs provoked T cell-related host immune rejection to arrest tumour growth in murine allogeneic transplantation models. PMID:26763872

  7. Comparison of the depth of tissue necrosis between double-freeze and single-freeze nitrous oxide-based cryotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Adepiti, Akinfolarin Clement; Ajenifuja, Olusegun Kayode; Fadahunsi, Oluwaseyi Olatunji; Osasan, Stephen Adebayo; Pelemo, Olumuyiwa Eyitayo; Loto, Morebishe Olabisi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cryotherapy is one the methods of treating cervical premalignant lesions. It is particularly suitable for low-resource countries because of it is relative cheaper, has low cost of maintenance, ease of use and that does not require electricity which is in short supply in many rural areas of developing countries where the incidence and mortality from cervical cancer is very high. In this study we compared single and double freezing on the cervices of women admitted for hysterectomy for benign conditions using Nitrous-based cryotherapy. Materials and Methods: Patients admitted for elective hysterectomy for benign gynaecological conditions were randomized into two arms. The first group had single freeze cryotherapy while the second arm received double freeze cryotherapy. The cervices were examined 24 hours later to determine the depth of tissue necrosis. Results: In this comparative study, the depth of tissue necrosis was deeper with double freeze compared with single freeze. Also in both arms, the depth of necrosis was deeper on anterior lips than on posterior lips of the cervix. Conclusion: Double freeze technique achieve more depth of tissue necrosis than single-freeze on both anterior and posterior lips of the cervix. PMID:27185971

  8. Nonequilibrium Arrhythmic States and Transitions in a Mathematical Model for Diffuse Fibrosis in Human Cardiac Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Rupamanjari; Nayak, Alok Ranjan; Pandit, Rahul

    2012-01-01

    We present a comprehensive numerical study of spiral-and scroll-wave dynamics in a state-of-the-art mathematical model for human ventricular tissue with fiber rotation, transmural heterogeneity, myocytes, and fibroblasts. Our mathematical model introduces fibroblasts randomly, to mimic diffuse fibrosis, in the ten Tusscher-Noble-Noble-Panfilov (TNNP) model for human ventricular tissue; the passive fibroblasts in our model do not exhibit an action potential in the absence of coupling with myocytes; and we allow for a coupling between nearby myocytes and fibroblasts. Our study of a single myocyte-fibroblast (MF) composite, with a single myocyte coupled to fibroblasts via a gap-junctional conductance , reveals five qualitatively different responses for this composite. Our investigations of two-dimensional domains with a random distribution of fibroblasts in a myocyte background reveal that, as the percentage of fibroblasts increases, the conduction velocity of a plane wave decreases until there is conduction failure. If we consider spiral-wave dynamics in such a medium we find, in two dimensions, a variety of nonequilibrium states, temporally periodic, quasiperiodic, chaotic, and quiescent, and an intricate sequence of transitions between them; we also study the analogous sequence of transitions for three-dimensional scroll waves in a three-dimensional version of our mathematical model that includes both fiber rotation and transmural heterogeneity. We thus elucidate random-fibrosis-induced nonequilibrium transitions, which lead to conduction block for spiral waves in two dimensions and scroll waves in three dimensions. We explore possible experimental implications of our mathematical and numerical studies for plane-, spiral-, and scroll-wave dynamics in cardiac tissue with fibrosis. PMID:23071505

  9. The Effects of Radiofrequency or Cryothermal Ablation on Biomechanical Properties of Isolated Human or Swine Cardiac Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Quallich, Stephen G.; Kriege, Kevin E.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in cardiac tissue properties following the application of various ablation modalities may lead to the development of an array of associated complications. The application of either radio frequency (RF) or cryothermal ablations will alter the biomechanical properties of various cardiac tissues in a differential manner; in some cases, this may be attributable to increased incidences of cardiac tamponade, pulmonary vein stenosis, and/or atrial-esophageal fistula. Thus, a greater understanding of the underlying changes in tissue properties induced by ablative therapies will ultimately promote safer and more efficacious procedures. The effects of applied RF or cryothermal energies on the biomechanical properties of the pulmonary vein, left atrial, or right atrial samples (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\text {n}=369$ \\end{document}) were examined from fresh excised porcine (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\text {n}=35$ \\end{document}) and donated human tissue (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\text {n}=11$ \\end{document}). RF ablations were found to reduce the tensile strength of the porcine cardiac specimens (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt

  10. Application of perfluorocarbon emulsions as fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance molecular probes of cardiac tissues oxygen tension

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, H.P.

    1994-01-01

    The basic and universal need for oxygen in mammalian tissue has long been recognized. The quantitation of oxygen tension (pO[sub 2]) in cardiac tissue is available by many techniques, but these are generally invasive or superficial. In addition, the role of cardiac pO[sub 2] along the oxygen gradient has yet to be defined. To date, no single method fits the ideal, i.e. non-invasive, sensitive, accurate, rapid, three-dimensional, and economical. The use of perfluorocarbon emulsions as tissue oximeters by [sup 19]F NMR relaxometry has the potential to fulfill many of these requirements. Development of a novel method requires the assessment of validity, reproducibility, and practicality. To this end, I have characterized the linear relationship between pO[sub 2] and the [sup 19]F spin-lattice relaxation rate (R1) for several perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions at high magnetic fields. The physical basis of underlying [sup 19]F relaxation mechanisms were modeled with respect to the structure and thermal behavior of perfluorocarbon molecules. Utility of these molecules in vivo was tested by spectroscopy and imaging of perfluorocarbons sequestered in the perfused rat heart. Under a wide range of steady-state oxygenation, the global cardiac tissue pO[sub 2] of perfused rat hearts responded in a manner consistent with physiological processes. The cardiac pO[sub 2] was measured by MRS either with high reproducibility ([plus minus]20 torr) or temporal resolution (1 sec). Independent validation of this method was provided in the total absence of oxygen consumption by the heart. Localized pO[sub 2] measurements in tissue were accomplished by [sup 19]F MRI of PFCs in arrested, perfused rat hearts, and found to change significantly with ischemia. It was concluded that the measurement of pO[sub 2] by NMR can provide important information about the physiological condition of the heart.

  11. Comparative study of depth dose distributions for beams of light and heavy nuclei in tissue-like media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pshenichnov, Igor; Mishustin, Igor; Greiner, Walter

    2008-04-01

    We study the energy deposition by beams of light and heavy nuclei in tissue-like media for their possible application in charged-particle cancer therapy. The depth-dose distributions for protons, 3He, 12C, 20Ne and 58Ni nuclei are calculated within a Monte Carlo model based on the GEANT4 toolkit. These distributions are compared with each other and with available experimental data. It is demonstrated that nuclear fragmentation reactions essentially reduce the peak-to-plateau ratio of the dose profiles for deeply penetrating energetic ions heavier than 3He. On the other hand, the shapes of depth-dose profiles for all projectiles up to 58Ni were found similar at low penetration depths.

  12. Efficient integration of a realistic two-dimensional cardiac tissue model by domain decomposition.

    PubMed

    Quan, W; Evans, S J; Hastings, H M

    1998-03-01

    The size of realistic cardiac tissue models has been limited by their high computational demands. In particular, the Luo-Rudy phase II membrane model, used to simulate a thin sheet of ventricular tissue with arrays of coupled ventricular myocytes, is usually limited to 100 x 100 arrays. We introduce a new numerical method based on domain decomposition and a priority queue integration scheme which reduces the computational cost by a factor of 3-17. In the standard algorithm all the nodes advance with the same time step delta t, whose size is limited by the time scale of activation. However, at any given time, many regions may be inactive and do not require the same small delta t and consequent extensive computations. Hence, adjusting delta t locally is a key factor in improving computational efficiency, since most of the computing time is spent calculating ionic currents. This paper proposes an efficient adaptive numerical scheme for integrating a two-dimensional (2-D) propagation model, by incorporating local adjustments of delta t. In this method, alternating direction Cooley-Dodge and Rush-Larsen methods were used for numerical integration. Between consecutive integrations over the whole domain using an implicit method, the model was spatially decomposed into many subdomains, and delta t adjusted locally. The Euler method was used for numerical integration in the subdomains. Local boundary values were determined from the boundary mesh elements of the neighboring subdomains using linear interpolation. Because delta t was defined locally, a priority queue was used to store and order next update times for each subdomain. The subdomain with the earliest update time was given the highest priority and advanced first. This new method yielded stable solutions with relative errors less than 1% and reduced computation time by a factor of 3-17 and will allow much larger (e.g., 500 x 500) models based on realistic membrane kinetics and realistic dimensions to simulate

  13. Differentially expressed genes in embryonic cardiac tissues of mice lacking Folr1 gene activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Huiping; Cabrera, Robert M; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J; Bozinov, Daniel; Wang, Deli; Schwartz, Robert J; Finnell, Richard H

    2007-01-01

    Background Heart anomalies are the most frequently observed among all human congenital defects. As with the situation for neural tube defects (NTDs), it has been demonstrated that women who use multivitamins containing folic acid peri-conceptionally have a reduced risk for delivering offspring with conotruncal heart defects [1-3]. Cellular folate transport is mediated by a receptor or binding protein and by an anionic transporter protein system. Defective function of the Folr1 (also known as Folbp1; homologue of human FRα) gene in mice results in inadequate transport, accumulation, or metabolism of folate during cardiovascular morphogenesis. Results We have observed cardiovascular abnormalities including outflow tract and aortic arch arterial defects in genetically compromised Folr1 knockout mice. In order to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the failure to complete development of outflow tract and aortic arch arteries in the Folr1 knockout mouse model, we examined tissue-specific gene expression difference between Folr1 nullizygous embryos and morphologically normal heterozygous embryos during early cardiac development (14-somite stage), heart tube looping (28-somite stage), and outflow track septation (38-somite stage). Microarray analysis was performed as a primary screening, followed by investigation using quantitative real-time PCR assays. Gene ontology analysis highlighted the following ontology groups: cell migration, cell motility and localization of cells, structural constituent of cytoskeleton, cell-cell adhesion, oxidoreductase, protein folding and mRNA processing. This study provided preliminary data and suggested potential candidate genes for further description and investigation. Conclusion The results suggested that Folr1 gene ablation and abnormal folate homeostasis altered gene expression in developing heart and conotruncal tissues. These changes affected normal cytoskeleton structures, cell migration and motility as well as cellular

  14. Exact coherent structures and chaotic dynamics in a model of cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Greg; Marcotte, Christopher D; Grigoriev, Roman O

    2015-03-01

    Unstable nonchaotic solutions embedded in the chaotic attractor can provide significant new insight into chaotic dynamics of both low- and high-dimensional systems. In particular, in turbulent fluid flows, such unstable solutions are referred to as exact coherent structures (ECS) and play an important role in both initiating and sustaining turbulence. The nature of ECS and their role in organizing spatiotemporally chaotic dynamics, however, is reasonably well understood only for systems on relatively small spatial domains lacking continuous Euclidean symmetries. Construction of ECS on large domains and in the presence of continuous translational and/or rotational symmetries remains a challenge. This is especially true for models of excitable media which display spiral turbulence and for which the standard approach to computing ECS completely breaks down. This paper uses the Karma model of cardiac tissue to illustrate a potential approach that could allow computing a new class of ECS on large domains of arbitrary shape by decomposing them into a patchwork of solutions on smaller domains, or tiles, which retain Euclidean symmetries locally. PMID:25833430

  15. Exact coherent structures and chaotic dynamics in a model of cardiac tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, Greg; Marcotte, Christopher D.; Grigoriev, Roman O.

    2015-03-15

    Unstable nonchaotic solutions embedded in the chaotic attractor can provide significant new insight into chaotic dynamics of both low- and high-dimensional systems. In particular, in turbulent fluid flows, such unstable solutions are referred to as exact coherent structures (ECS) and play an important role in both initiating and sustaining turbulence. The nature of ECS and their role in organizing spatiotemporally chaotic dynamics, however, is reasonably well understood only for systems on relatively small spatial domains lacking continuous Euclidean symmetries. Construction of ECS on large domains and in the presence of continuous translational and/or rotational symmetries remains a challenge. This is especially true for models of excitable media which display spiral turbulence and for which the standard approach to computing ECS completely breaks down. This paper uses the Karma model of cardiac tissue to illustrate a potential approach that could allow computing a new class of ECS on large domains of arbitrary shape by decomposing them into a patchwork of solutions on smaller domains, or tiles, which retain Euclidean symmetries locally.

  16. Cardiac and vascular responses of isolated rat tissues treated with diterpenes from Sinularia flexibilis (coelenterata: octocorallia).

    PubMed

    Aceret, T L; Brown, L; Miller, J; Coll, J C; Sammarco, P W

    1996-10-01

    The marine environment is a rich source of compounds with cardiovascular activity. This study characterizes the cardiac and vascular responses in isolated rat tissues of flexibilide, dihydroflexibilide and sinulariolide, three diterpenes isolated from the soft coral Sinularia flexibilis. On rat left ventricular papillary muscles, dihydroflexibilide and flexibilide showed similar potencies (-log EC50 = 4.69 +/- 0.05 and 4.66 +/- 0.06, respectively); the maximal response to dihydroflexibilide of 1.4 +/- 0.2 mN was 35 +/- 7% that of calcium chloride in the same muscles. All diterpenes relaxed rat thoracic aortic rings precontracted with KC1 (100 mM) with similar potencies (flexibilide, -log EC50 = 4.17 +/- 0.06). Flexibilide was further characterized and shown to increase force in isolated rat left atria by 0.8 +/- 0.5 mN at 1 x 10(-4) M, to increase rate of contraction in isolated rat right atria by 18 +/- 5 beta/min at 3 x 10(-5) M and to completely relax endothelium-denuded rat thoracic aortic rings (-log EC50 = 4.14 +/- 0.05). Toxicity as indicated by the occurrence of ectopic beats was not observed with the diterpenes at concentrations which produced complete relaxation of blood vessels, maximal positive inotropic activity and minor positive chronotropic responses. Thus, these compounds may be useful lead compounds in the search for improved treatment of cardiovascular disease, especially heart failure. PMID:8931257

  17. Waveguide and articulated arm for Er:YAG laser system: shape and depth of laser cavity in hard dental tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinkova, Helena; Dostalova, Tatjana; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Wang, You; Shi, Yi-Wei; Dolezalova, Libuse; Hamal, Karel; Krejsa, Otakar; Kubelka, Jiri; Prochazka, Stanislav

    1998-04-01

    The aim of our study was to verify the efficiency of delivery systems for Er:YAG laser radiation which could be used in dentistry. The influence of increasing energy and number of pulses on a profile and depth of drilled holes was investigated. Er:YAG laser was operating in a free-running mode, generating a length of pulses 200 microsecond with a maximum energy of 500 mJ. The delivery systems investigated were an articulated arm and a fluorocarbon polymer-coated silver hollow glass waveguide. The prepared hard tissues were a sliced part of enamel, dentine and ivory. The laser radiation was directed on them by focusing optics (CaF2 lens) together with the cooling water to ensure that the tissues will not be burned. For the evaluation of shapes, depth and profiles of the prepared cavities the metallographic microscope, x-ray microtomograph and scanning electron microscope were used. From the results it was observed that the profile and depth of the cavities prepared by the laser radiation delivered by the various systems (waveguide or articulated arm) are not the same. The laser radiation delivered by waveguide produces a larger diameter cavity with a lower depth. The holes are smoother and without side effects.

  18. Three-dimensional theoretical temperature distributions produced by 915 MHz dipole antenna arrays with varying insertion depths in muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Mechling, J A; Strohbehn, J W; Ryan, T P

    1992-01-01

    Interstitial microwave antenna array hyperthermia (IMAAH) systems are currently being used in the treatment of cancer. The insertion depth of an interstitial microwave antenna, defined as the length of the antenna from the tip to the point of insertion in tissue, affects its ability to produce uniform power deposition patterns in tumor volumes. The effect of varying insertion depths on the ability of an IMAAH system to heat two theoretical tumor models was examined. Four dipole microwave antennas were implanted in a 2 x 2 cm array and driven at 915 MHz in muscle tissue. The explicit power deposition patterns were calculated for each insertion depth using known theory. The bioheat transfer equation was solved for the 3-dimensional steady-state temperature distributions in cylindrical and ellipsoidal tumor models using a finite element method. Homogeneous and nonhomogeneous blood flow models were considered. As a basis of comparison of the various temperature distributions, the volume of tumor heated to greater than or equal to 43 degrees C was calculated. Under the conditions of this study, the insertion depth was shown to have a significant effect on the ability of an IMAAH system to heat the tumor volumes. A sharp decrease in the percentage of tumor volume heated to greater than or equal to 43 degrees C was seen for insertion depths between 7.8 and 14.6 cm. At an insertion depth of 11.7 cm (3/4 lambda) there was virtually no heating of the tumor. Regions of elevated power occurred outside of the desired treatment volume, stressing the importance of adequate thermometry techniques and demonstrating the need for hyperthermia treatment planning prior to implantation of an antenna array. Plots of the power deposition patterns and the corresponding temperatures produced in the diagonal plane of the antenna arrays are present. PMID:1727110

  19. Increased interstitial loading reduces the effect of microstructural variations in cardiac tissue

    PubMed Central

    Henriquez, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    Electrical propagation in diseased and aging hearts is strongly influenced by structural changes that occur in both the intracellular and interstitial spaces of cardiac tissue; however, very few studies have investigated how interactions between the two spaces affect propagation at the microscale. In this study, we used one-dimensional microstructural computer models of interconnected ventricular myocytes to systematically investigate how increasing the effective interstitial resistivity (ρoeff) influences action potential propagation in fibers with variations in intracellular properties such as cell coupling and cell length. Changes in ρoeff were incorporated into a monodomain model using a correction to the intracellular properties that was based on bidomain simulations. The results showed that increasing ρoeff in poorly coupled one-dimensional fibers alters the distribution of electrical load at the microscale and causes propagation to become more continuous. In the poorly coupled fiber, this continuous state is characterized by decreased gap junction delay, sustained conduction velocity, increased sodium current, reduced maximum upstroke velocity, and increased safety factor. Long, poorly coupled cells experience greater loading effects than short cells and show the greatest initial response to changes in ρoeff. In inhomogeneous fibers with adjacent well-coupled and poorly coupled regions, increasing ρoeff in the poorly coupled region also reduces source-load mismatch, which delays the onset of conduction block and reduces the dispersion of repolarization at the transition between the two regions. Increasing the ρoeff minimizes the effect of cell-to-cell variations and may influence the pattern of activation in critical regimes characterized by low intercellular coupling, microstructural heterogeneity, and reduced or abnormal membrane excitability. PMID:20097772

  20. Human Engineered Cardiac Tissues Created Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Reveal Functional Characteristics of BRAF-Mediated Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Bryce V.; Gelb, Bruce D.; Costa, Kevin D.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a leading cause of sudden cardiac death that often goes undetected in the general population. HCM is also prevalent in patients with cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFCS), which is a genetic disorder characterized by aberrant signaling in the RAS/MAPK signaling cascade. Understanding the mechanisms of HCM development in such RASopathies may lead to novel therapeutic strategies, but relevant experimental models of the human condition are lacking. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop the first 3D human engineered cardiac tissue (hECT) model of HCM. The hECTs were created using human cardiomyocytes obtained by directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a patient with CFCS due to an activating BRAF mutation. The mutant myocytes were directly conjugated at a 3:1 ratio with a stromal cell population to create a tissue of defined composition. Compared to healthy patient control hECTs, BRAF-hECTs displayed a hypertrophic phenotype by culture day 6, with significantly increased tissue size, twitch force, and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) gene expression. Twitch characteristics reflected increased contraction and relaxation rates and shorter twitch duration in BRAF-hECTs, which also had a significantly higher maximum capture rate and lower excitation threshold during electrical pacing, consistent with a more arrhythmogenic substrate. By culture day 11, twitch force was no longer different between BRAF and wild-type hECTs, revealing a temporal aspect of disease modeling with tissue engineering. Principal component analysis identified diastolic force as a key factor that changed from day 6 to day 11, supported by a higher passive stiffness in day 11 BRAF-hECTs. In summary, human engineered cardiac tissues created from BRAF mutant cells recapitulated, for the first time, key aspects of the HCM phenotype, offering a new in vitro model for studying intrinsic mechanisms and screening new

  1. Human Engineered Cardiac Tissues Created Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Reveal Functional Characteristics of BRAF-Mediated Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Timothy J; Josowitz, Rebecca; Johnson, Bryce V; Gelb, Bruce D; Costa, Kevin D

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a leading cause of sudden cardiac death that often goes undetected in the general population. HCM is also prevalent in patients with cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFCS), which is a genetic disorder characterized by aberrant signaling in the RAS/MAPK signaling cascade. Understanding the mechanisms of HCM development in such RASopathies may lead to novel therapeutic strategies, but relevant experimental models of the human condition are lacking. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop the first 3D human engineered cardiac tissue (hECT) model of HCM. The hECTs were created using human cardiomyocytes obtained by directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a patient with CFCS due to an activating BRAF mutation. The mutant myocytes were directly conjugated at a 3:1 ratio with a stromal cell population to create a tissue of defined composition. Compared to healthy patient control hECTs, BRAF-hECTs displayed a hypertrophic phenotype by culture day 6, with significantly increased tissue size, twitch force, and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) gene expression. Twitch characteristics reflected increased contraction and relaxation rates and shorter twitch duration in BRAF-hECTs, which also had a significantly higher maximum capture rate and lower excitation threshold during electrical pacing, consistent with a more arrhythmogenic substrate. By culture day 11, twitch force was no longer different between BRAF and wild-type hECTs, revealing a temporal aspect of disease modeling with tissue engineering. Principal component analysis identified diastolic force as a key factor that changed from day 6 to day 11, supported by a higher passive stiffness in day 11 BRAF-hECTs. In summary, human engineered cardiac tissues created from BRAF mutant cells recapitulated, for the first time, key aspects of the HCM phenotype, offering a new in vitro model for studying intrinsic mechanisms and screening new

  2. Single-molecule RNA detection at depth by hybridization chain reaction and tissue hydrogel embedding and clearing.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sheel; Lubeck, Eric; Schwarzkopf, Maayan; He, Ting-Fang; Greenbaum, Alon; Sohn, Chang Ho; Lignell, Antti; Choi, Harry M T; Gradinaru, Viviana; Pierce, Niles A; Cai, Long

    2016-08-01

    Accurate and robust detection of mRNA molecules in thick tissue samples can reveal gene expression patterns in single cells within their native environment. Preserving spatial relationships while accessing the transcriptome of selected cells is a crucial feature for advancing many biological areas - from developmental biology to neuroscience. However, because of the high autofluorescence background of many tissue samples, it is difficult to detect single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH) signals robustly in opaque thick samples. Here, we draw on principles from the emerging discipline of dynamic nucleic acid nanotechnology to develop a robust method for multi-color, multi-RNA imaging in deep tissues using single-molecule hybridization chain reaction (smHCR). Using this approach, single transcripts can be imaged using epifluorescence, confocal or selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) depending on the imaging depth required. We show that smHCR has high sensitivity in detecting mRNAs in cell culture and whole-mount zebrafish embryos, and that combined with SPIM and PACT (passive CLARITY technique) tissue hydrogel embedding and clearing, smHCR can detect single mRNAs deep within thick (0.5 mm) brain slices. By simultaneously achieving ∼20-fold signal amplification and diffraction-limited spatial resolution, smHCR offers a robust and versatile approach for detecting single mRNAs in situ, including in thick tissues where high background undermines the performance of unamplified smFISH. PMID:27342713

  3. Single-molecule RNA detection at depth by hybridization chain reaction and tissue hydrogel embedding and clearing

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sheel; Lubeck, Eric; Schwarzkopf, Maayan; He, Ting-Fang; Greenbaum, Alon; Sohn, Chang Ho; Lignell, Antti; Choi, Harry M. T.; Gradinaru, Viviana; Pierce, Niles A.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and robust detection of mRNA molecules in thick tissue samples can reveal gene expression patterns in single cells within their native environment. Preserving spatial relationships while accessing the transcriptome of selected cells is a crucial feature for advancing many biological areas – from developmental biology to neuroscience. However, because of the high autofluorescence background of many tissue samples, it is difficult to detect single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH) signals robustly in opaque thick samples. Here, we draw on principles from the emerging discipline of dynamic nucleic acid nanotechnology to develop a robust method for multi-color, multi-RNA imaging in deep tissues using single-molecule hybridization chain reaction (smHCR). Using this approach, single transcripts can be imaged using epifluorescence, confocal or selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) depending on the imaging depth required. We show that smHCR has high sensitivity in detecting mRNAs in cell culture and whole-mount zebrafish embryos, and that combined with SPIM and PACT (passive CLARITY technique) tissue hydrogel embedding and clearing, smHCR can detect single mRNAs deep within thick (0.5 mm) brain slices. By simultaneously achieving ∼20-fold signal amplification and diffraction-limited spatial resolution, smHCR offers a robust and versatile approach for detecting single mRNAs in situ, including in thick tissues where high background undermines the performance of unamplified smFISH. PMID:27342713

  4. Tests of one Brazilian facial reconstruction method using three soft tissue depth sets and familiar assessors.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Clemente Maia S; Serra, Mônica da Costa; da Silva, Jorge Vicente Lopes; Noritomi, Pedro Yoshito; Pereira, Frederico David Alencar de Sena; Melani, Rodolfo Francisco Haltenhoff

    2012-01-10

    Facial reconstruction is a method that seeks to recreate a person's facial appearance from his/her skull. This technique can be the last resource used in a forensic investigation, when identification techniques such as DNA analysis, dental records, fingerprints and radiographic comparison cannot be used to identify a body or skeletal remains. To perform facial reconstruction, the data of facial soft tissue thickness are necessary. Scientific literature has described differences in the thickness of facial soft tissue between ethnic groups. There are different databases of soft tissue thickness published in the scientific literature. There are no literature records of facial reconstruction works carried out with data of soft tissues obtained from samples of Brazilian subjects. There are also no reports of digital forensic facial reconstruction performed in Brazil. There are two databases of soft tissue thickness published for the Brazilian population: one obtained from measurements performed in fresh cadavers (fresh cadavers' pattern), and another from measurements using magnetic resonance imaging (Magnetic Resonance pattern). This study aims to perform three different characterized digital forensic facial reconstructions (with hair, eyelashes and eyebrows) of a Brazilian subject (based on an international pattern and two Brazilian patterns for soft facial tissue thickness), and evaluate the digital forensic facial reconstructions comparing them to photos of the individual and other nine subjects. The DICOM data of the Computed Tomography (CT) donated by a volunteer were converted into stereolitography (STL) files and used for the creation of the digital facial reconstructions. Once the three reconstructions were performed, they were compared to photographs of the subject who had the face reconstructed and nine other subjects. Thirty examiners participated in this recognition process. The target subject was recognized by 26.67% of the examiners in the reconstruction

  5. ACE2 Deficiency Worsens Epicardial Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Cardiac Dysfunction in Response to Diet-Induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vaibhav B; Mori, Jun; McLean, Brent A; Basu, Ratnadeep; Das, Subhash K; Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Parajuli, Nirmal; Penninger, Josef M; Grant, Maria B; Lopaschuk, Gary D; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is increasing in prevalence and is strongly associated with metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has emerged as a key pathogenic mechanism for these disorders; angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) negatively regulates RAS by metabolizing Ang II into Ang 1-7. We studied the role of ACE2 in obesity-mediated cardiac dysfunction. ACE2 null (ACE2KO) and wild-type (WT) mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) or a control diet and studied at 6 months of age. Loss of ACE2 resulted in decreased weight gain but increased glucose intolerance, epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) inflammation, and polarization of macrophages into a proinflammatory phenotype in response to HFD. Similarly, human EAT in patients with obesity and heart failure displayed a proinflammatory macrophage phenotype. Exacerbated EAT inflammation in ACE2KO-HFD mice was associated with decreased myocardial adiponectin, decreased phosphorylation of AMPK, increased cardiac steatosis and lipotoxicity, and myocardial insulin resistance, which worsened heart function. Ang 1-7 (24 µg/kg/h) administered to ACE2KO-HFD mice resulted in ameliorated EAT inflammation and reduced cardiac steatosis and lipotoxicity, resulting in normalization of heart failure. In conclusion, ACE2 plays a novel role in heart disease associated with obesity wherein ACE2 negatively regulates obesity-induced EAT inflammation and cardiac insulin resistance. PMID:26224885

  6. Laser speckle contrast imaging with extended depth of field for in-vivo tissue imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sigal, Iliya; Gad, Raanan; Caravaca-Aguirre, Antonio M.; Atchia, Yaaseen; Conkey, Donald B.; Piestun, Rafael; Levi, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    This work presents, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of the Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging (LSCI) technique with extended depth of field (DOF). We employ wavefront coding on the detected beam to gain quantitative information on flow speeds through a DOF extended two-fold compared to the traditional system. We characterize the system in-vitro using controlled microfluidic experiments, and apply it in-vivo to imaging the somatosensory cortex of a rat, showing improved ability to image flow in a larger number of vessels simultaneously. PMID:24466481

  7. Depth resolved photothermal OCT detection of macrophages in tissue using nanorose

    PubMed Central

    Paranjape, Amit S.; Kuranov, Roman; Baranov, Stepan; Ma, Li Leo; Villard, Joseph W.; Wang, Tianyi; Sokolov, Konstantin V.; Feldman, Marc D.; Johnston, Keith P.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Application of photothermal Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) to detect macrophages in ex vivo rabbit arteries which have engulfed nanoclusters of gold coated iron oxide (nanorose) is reported. Nanorose engulfed by macrophages associated with atherosclerotic lesions in rabbit arteries absorb incident laser (800nm) energy and cause optical pathlength (OP) variation which is measured using photothermal OCT. OP variation in polydimethyl siloxane tissue phantoms containing varying concentrations of nanorose match values predicted from nanoparticle and material properties. Measurement of OP variation in rabbit arteries in response to laser excitation provides an estimate of nanorose concentration in atherosclerotic lesions of 2.5x109 particles/ml. OP variation in atherosclerotic lesions containing macrophages taking up nanorose has a different magnitude and profile from that observed in control thoracic aorta without macrophages and is consistent with macrophage presence as identified with RAM-11 histology staining. Our results suggest that tissue regions with macrophages taking up nanorose can be detected using photothermal OCT. PMID:21258441

  8. Dependence of light fluence on treated depth with photosensitization reaction shortly after photosensitizer injection in rabbit myocardial tissue in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suenari, T.; Matsuo, H.; Ito, A.; Miyoshi, S.; Arai, T.

    2010-02-01

    We investigated experimentally dependence of light fluence on treated depth with photosensitization reaction shortly after photosensitizer injection in rabbit myocardial tissue in vivo. In this particular photosensitization reaction scheme, the photosensitizer accumulation characteristics for target region are not available. Meanwhile, the photosensitizer dose and hospitalization period under restricted light circumstance might be reduced. Since both photosensitizer and oxygen supply are governed by blood flow, this photosensitization reaction is influenced significantly by blood flow variation in particular blood vessel occlusion. We employed the myocardial tissue to keep tissue blood flow during the photosensitization reaction because vessel blood flow speed in myocardial tissue is fast to resist vascular occlusion. Surgically exposed rabbits myocardial tissues were irradiated with the light fluence ranging 25-100 J/cm2 by a 663 nm diode laser 30 min after the injection of 2 mg/kg water soluble chlorin photosensitizer, Talaporfin sodium. Two weeks after the irradiation, the rabbits were sacrificed and the histological specimens of the irradiated area were made to measure scar layer thickness. The scar layer tissue thickness of 0.2-3.0 mm was observed microscopically by the light fluence ranging 25-100 J/cm2. The scarring threshold in the deposit light fluence was estimated to 15-25 J/cm3 based on the above mentioned relation assuming constant and uniform myocardial effective attenuation coefficient of 0.72 mm-1. The estimated scarring threshold in the deposit light fluence was lower than the threshold of conventional PDT. Large variation of the estimated threshold value might be attributed to unconsidered PDT parameter such as flow rate inhomogeneity in the myocardial tissue. These results suggested that the photosensitization reaction investigated in this study would be available to apply arrhythmia therapy such as atrial fibrillation.

  9. Correlation-based discrimination between cardiac tissue and blood for segmentation of the left ventricle in 3-D echocardiographic images.

    PubMed

    Saris, Anne E C M; Nillesen, Maartje M; Lopata, Richard G P; de Korte, Chris L

    2014-03-01

    For automated segmentation of 3-D echocardiographic images, incorporation of temporal information may be helpful. In this study, optimal settings for calculation of temporal cross-correlations between subsequent time frames were determined, to obtain the maximum cross-correlation (MCC) values that provided the best contrast between blood and cardiac tissue over the entire cardiac cycle. Both contrast and boundary gradient quality measures were assessed to optimize MCC values with respect to signal choice (radiofrequency or envelope data) and axial window size. Optimal MCC values were incorporated into a deformable model to automatically segment the left ventricular cavity. MCC values were tested against, and combined with, filtered, demodulated radiofrequency data. Results reveal that using envelope data in combination with a relatively small axial window (0.7-1.25 mm) at fine scale results in optimal contrast and boundary gradient between the two tissues over the entire cardiac cycle. Preliminary segmentation results indicate that incorporation of MCC values has additional value for automated segmentation of the left ventricle. PMID:24412178

  10. ACE2/Ang 1-7 axis: A critical regulator of epicardial adipose tissue inflammation and cardiac dysfunction in obesity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vaibhav B; Basu, Ratnadeep; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is characterized by an excessive fat accumulation in adipose tissues leading to weight gain and is increasing in prevalence and is strongly associated with metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has emerged as a key pathogenic mechanism for these disorders; activated RAS and angiotensin (Ang) II production results in worsening of cardiovascular diseases and angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) negatively regulates RAS by metabolizing Ang II into Ang 1-7. ACE2 is expressed in the adipocytes and its expression is upregulated in response to high fat diet induced obesity in mice. Loss of ACE2 results in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction which is mediated in part by epicardial adipose tissue inflammation. Angiotensin 1-7 reduces the obesity associated cardiac dysfunction predominantly via its role in adiponectin expression and attenuation of epicardial adipose tissue inflammation. Human heart disease is also linked with inflammed epicardial adipose tissue. Here, we discuss the important interpretation of the novel of ACE2/Ang 1-7 pathway in obesity associated cardiac dysfunction. PMID:27617176

  11. Penetration depth in tissue-mimicking phantoms from hyperspectral imaging in SWIR in transmission and reflection geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hairong; Salo, Daniel; Kim, David M.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2016-03-01

    We explored the depth penetration in tissue-mimicking intralipid-based phantoms in SWIR (800-1650 nm) using a hyperspectral imaging system composed from a 2D CCD camera coupled to a microscope. Hyperspectral images in transmission and reflection geometries were collected with a spectral resolution of 5.27 nm and a total acquisition time of 3 minutes or less that minimized artifacts from sample drying. Michelson spatial contrast was used as a metric to evaluate light penetration. Results from both transmission and reflection geometries consistently revealed the highest spatial contrast in the wavelength range of 1300 to 1350 nm.

  12. Depth profiling of laser-heated chromophores in biological tissues by pulsed photothermal radiometry.

    PubMed

    Milner, T E; Goodman, D M; Tanenbaum, B S; Nelson, J S

    1995-07-01

    A solution method is proposed to the inverse problem of determining the unknown initial temperature distribution in a laser-exposed test material from measurements provided by infrared radiometry. A Fredholm integral equation of the first kind is derived that relates the temporal evolution of the infrared signal amplitude to the unknown initial temperature distribution in the exposed test material. The singular-value decomposition is used to demonstrate the severely ill-posed nature of the derived inverse problem. Three inversion methods are used to estimate solutions for the initial temperature distribution. A nonnegatively constrained conjugate-gradient algorithm using early termination is found superior to unconstrained inversion methods and is applied to image the depth of laser-heated chromophores in human skin. PMID:7608789

  13. Depth profiling of laser-heated chromophores in biological tissues by pulsed photothermal radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Milner, T.E.; Goodman, D.M.; Tanenbaum, B.S.; Nelson, J.S.

    1995-07-01

    A solution method is proposed to the inverse problem of determining the unknown initial temperature distribution in a laser-exposed test material from measurements provided by infrared radiometry. A Fredholm integral equation of the first kind is derived that relates the temporal evolution of the infrared signal amplitude to the unknown initial temperature distribution in the exposed test material. The singular-value decomposition is used to demonstrate the severely ill-posed nature of the derived inverse problem. Three inversion methods are used to estimate solutions for the initial temperature distribution. A nonnegatively constrained conjugate-gradient algorithm using early termination is found superior to unconstrained inversion methods and is applied to image the depth of laser-heated chromophores in human skin. {ital Key} {ital words}: constrained conjugate gradients, ill-posed problem, infrared radiometry, laser surgery, nonnegative, singular-value decomposition.

  14. Hypoxia-induced epigenetic modifications are associated with cardiac tissue fibrosis and the development of a myofibroblast-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Watson, Chris J; Collier, Patrick; Tea, Isaac; Neary, Roisin; Watson, Jenny A; Robinson, Claire; Phelan, Dermot; Ledwidge, Mark T; McDonald, Kenneth M; McCann, Amanda; Sharaf, Osama; Baugh, John A

    2014-04-15

    Ischemia caused by coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction leads to aberrant ventricular remodeling and cardiac fibrosis. This occurs partly through accumulation of gene expression changes in resident fibroblasts, resulting in an overactive fibrotic phenotype. Long-term adaptation to a hypoxic insult is likely to require significant modification of chromatin structure in order to maintain the fibrotic phenotype. Epigenetic changes may play an important role in modulating hypoxia-induced fibrosis within the heart. Therefore, the aim of the study was to investigate the potential pro-fibrotic impact of hypoxia on cardiac fibroblasts and determine whether alterations in DNA methylation could play a role in this process. This study found that within human cardiac tissue, the degree of hypoxia was associated with increased expression of collagen 1 and alpha-smooth muscle actin (ASMA). In addition, human cardiac fibroblast cells exposed to prolonged 1% hypoxia resulted in a pro-fibrotic state. These hypoxia-induced pro-fibrotic changes were associated with global DNA hypermethylation and increased expression of the DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) enzymes DNMT1 and DNMT3B. Expression of these methylating enzymes was shown to be regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α. Using siRNA to block DNMT3B expression significantly reduced collagen 1 and ASMA expression. In addition, application of the DNMT inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine suppressed the pro-fibrotic effects of TGFβ. Epigenetic modifications and changes in the epigenetic machinery identified in cardiac fibroblasts during prolonged hypoxia may contribute to the pro-fibrotic nature of the ischemic milieu. Targeting up-regulated expression of DNMTs in ischemic heart disease may prove to be a valuable therapeutic approach. PMID:24301681

  15. Angiotensin II (AT(1)) receptor blockade reduces vascular tissue factor in angiotensin II-induced cardiac vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Müller, D N; Mervaala, E M; Dechend, R; Fiebeler, A; Park, J K; Schmidt, F; Theuer, J; Breu, V; Mackman, N; Luther, T; Schneider, W; Gulba, D; Ganten, D; Haller, H; Luft, F C

    2000-07-01

    Tissue factor (TF), a main initiator of clotting, is up-regulated in vasculopathy. We tested the hypothesis that chronic in vivo angiotensin (ANG) II receptor AT(1) receptor blockade inhibits TF expression in a model of ANG II-induced cardiac vasculopathy. Furthermore, we explored the mechanisms by examining transcription factor activation and analyzing the TF promoter. Untreated transgenic rats overexpressing the human renin and angiotensinogen genes (dTGR) feature hypertension and severe left ventricular hypertrophy with focal areas of necrosis, and die at age 7 weeks. Plasma and cardiac ANG II was three- to fivefold increased compared to Sprague-Dawley rats. Chronic treatment with valsartan normalized blood pressure and coronary resistance completely, and ameliorated cardiac hypertrophy (P < 0.001). Valsartan prevented monocyte/macrophage infiltration, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation, and c-fos expression in dTGR hearts. NF-kappaB subunit p65 and TF expression was increased in the endothelium and media of cardiac vessels and markedly reduced by valsartan treatment. To analyze the mechanism of TF transcription, we then transfected human coronary artery smooth muscle cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells overexpressing the AT(1) receptor with plasmids containing the human TF promoter and the luciferase reporter gene. ANG II induced the full-length TF promoter in both transfected cell lines. TF transcription was abolished by AT(1) receptor blockade. Deletion of both AP-1 and NF-kappaB sites reduced ANG II-induced TF gene transcription completely, whereas the deletion of AP-1 sites reduced transcription. Thus, the present study clearly shows an aberrant TF expression in the endothelium and media in rats with ANG II-induced vasculopathy. The beneficial effects of AT(1) receptor blockade in this model are mediated via the inhibition of NF-kappaB and AP-1 activation, thereby preventing TF expression, cardiac vasculopathy, and

  16. Angiotensin II (AT1) Receptor Blockade Reduces Vascular Tissue Factor in Angiotensin II-Induced Cardiac Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Dominik N.; Mervaala, Eero M. A.; Dechend, Ralf; Fiebeler, Anette; Park, Joon-Keun; Schmidt, Folke; Theuer, Jürgen; Breu, Volker; Mackman, Nigel; Luther, Thomas; Schneider, Wolfgang; Gulba, Dietrich; Ganten, Detlev; Haller, Hermann; Luft, Friedrich C.

    2000-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF), a main initiator of clotting, is up-regulated in vasculopathy. We tested the hypothesis that chronic in vivo angiotensin (ANG) II receptor AT1 receptor blockade inhibits TF expression in a model of ANG II-induced cardiac vasculopathy. Furthermore, we explored the mechanisms by examining transcription factor activation and analyzing the TF promoter. Untreated transgenic rats overexpressing the human renin and angiotensinogen genes (dTGR) feature hypertension and severe left ventricular hypertrophy with focal areas of necrosis, and die at age 7 weeks. Plasma and cardiac ANG II was three- to fivefold increased compared to Sprague-Dawley rats. Chronic treatment with valsartan normalized blood pressure and coronary resistance completely, and ameliorated cardiac hypertrophy (P < 0.001). Valsartan prevented monocyte/macrophage infiltration, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation, and c-fos expression in dTGR hearts. NF-κB subunit p65 and TF expression was increased in the endothelium and media of cardiac vessels and markedly reduced by valsartan treatment. To analyze the mechanism of TF transcription, we then transfected human coronary artery smooth muscle cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells overexpressing the AT1 receptor with plasmids containing the human TF promoter and the luciferase reporter gene. ANG II induced the full-length TF promoter in both transfected cell lines. TF transcription was abolished by AT1 receptor blockade. Deletion of both AP-1 and NF-κB sites reduced ANG II-induced TF gene transcription completely, whereas the deletion of AP-1 sites reduced transcription. Thus, the present study clearly shows an aberrant TF expression in the endothelium and media in rats with ANG II-induced vasculopathy. The beneficial effects of AT1 receptor blockade in this model are mediated via the inhibition of NF-κB and AP-1 activation, thereby preventing TF expression, cardiac vasculopathy, and microinfarctions. PMID

  17. “The state of the heart”: Recent advances in engineering human cardiac tissue from pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sirabella, Dario; Cimetta, Elisa; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    The pressing need for effective cell therapy for the heart has led to the investigation of suitable cell sources for tissue replacement. In recent years, human pluripotent stem cell research expanded tremendously, in particular since the derivation of human induced pluripotent stem cells. In parallel, bioengineering technologies have led to novel approaches for in vitro cell culture. The combination of these two fields holds potential for in vitro generation of high-fidelity heart tissue, both for basic research and for therapeutic applications. However, this new multidisciplinary science is still at an early stage. Many questions need to be answered and improvements need to be made before clinical applications become a reality. Here we discuss the current status of human stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes and the combined use of bioengineering approaches for cardiac tissue formation and maturation in developmental studies, disease modeling, drug testing and regenerative medicine. PMID:26069271

  18. A multistep procedure to prepare pre-vascularized cardiac tissue constructs using adult stem sells, dynamic cell cultures, and porous scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Pagliari, Stefania; Tirella, Annalisa; Ahluwalia, Arti; Duim, Sjoerd; Goumans, Marie-Josè; Aoyagi, Takao; Forte, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    The vascularization of tissue engineered products represents a key issue in regenerative medicine which needs to be addressed before the translation of these protocols to the bedside can be foreseen. Here we propose a multistep procedure to prepare pre-vascularized three-dimensional (3D) cardiac bio-substitutes using dynamic cell cultures and highly porous biocompatible gelatin scaffolds. The strategy adopted exploits the peculiar differentiation potential of two distinct subsets of adult stem cells to obtain human vascularized 3D cardiac tissues. In the first step of the procedure, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are seeded onto gelatin scaffolds to provide interconnected vessel-like structures, while human cardiomyocyte progenitor cells (hCMPCs) are stimulated in vitro to obtain their commitment toward the cardiac phenotype. The use of a modular bioreactor allows the perfusion of the whole scaffold, providing superior performance in terms of cardiac tissue maturation and cell survival. Both the cell culture on natural-derived polymers and the continuous medium perfusion of the scaffold led to the formation of a densely packaged proto-tissue composed of vascular-like and cardiac-like cells, which might complete maturation process and interconnect with native tissue upon in vivo implantation. In conclusion, the data obtained through the approach here proposed highlight the importance to provide stem cells with complementary signals in vitro able to resemble the complexity of cardiac microenvironment. PMID:24917827

  19. Tissue-specific expression of the human brain natriuretic peptide gene in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    LaPointe, M C; Wu, G; Garami, M; Yang, X P; Gardner, D G

    1996-03-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a cardiac hormone constitutively expressed in the adult heart. To identify the cis-acting elements involved in regulation of the human BNP gene, we subcloned the full-length promoter (-1818 to +100) and deletions thereof upstream from a luciferase reporter gene and transiently transfected them into primary cultures of neonatal rat atrial and ventricular myocytes and myocardial fibroblasts. Luciferase activity of the full-length construct was higher in ventricular (39064 +/- 8488 relative light units, N=11) and atrial (11225 +/- 1907, N=17) myocytes than myocardial fibroblasts (329 +/- 113, n=5). Maximal promoter activity in ventricular and atrial myocytes was maintained by sequences positioned between -1818 and -1283 relative to the transcription start site. Deletion to -1175 resulted in a decrease, whereas further deletion to -500 effected an increase in reporter activity in both cell types. In ventricular and atrial myocytes, deletion from -500 to -40 reduced luciferase activity 20-fold and 2-fold, respectively, whereas in myocardial fibroblasts, deletion to -40 upregulated the BNP promoter 2-fold. Of note, deleting 16 bp between -127 and -111 reduced luciferase activity 7-fold and 4-fold in ventricular and atrial myocytes, respectively, but had essentially no effect on luciferase activity in fibroblasts. Placement of sequences lying between -127 and -40 upstream from a heterologous thymidine kinase promoter resulted in reporter expression that was 7.4-fold greater than the vector alone in ventricular myocytes, approximately 2-fold greater in atrial myocytes, and equivalent to the vector alone in fibroblasts. For study of activity of the human BNP promoter in adult myocytes, either 408 or 97 bp of 5' flanking sequence coupled to the luciferase reporter gene was injected into the apex of adult male Sprague-Dawley rat hearts. After 7 days, luciferase activity in the injected myocardium was 9.8-fold higher for the longer construct

  20. A Novel Miniaturized Multimodal Bioreactor for Continuous In Situ Assessment of Bioartificial Cardiac Tissue During Stimulation and Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kensah, George; Viering, Jörg; Schumann, Henning; Dahlmann, Julia; Meyer, Heiko; Skvorc, David; Bär, Antonia; Akhyari, Payam; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Haverich, Axel; Martin, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell-based cardiac tissue engineering is a promising approach for regenerative therapy of the injured heart. At present, the small number of stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes that can be obtained using current culture and enrichment techniques represents one of the key limitations for the development of functional bioartificial cardiac tissue (BCT). We have addressed this problem by construction of a novel bioreactor with functional features of larger systems that enables the generation and in situ monitoring of miniaturized BCTs. BCTs were generated from rat cardiomyocytes to demonstrate advantages and usefulness of the bioreactor. Tissues showed spontaneous, synchronized contractions with cell orientation along the axis of strain. Cyclic stretch induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, demonstrated by a shift of myosin heavy chain expression from the alpha to beta isoform, together with elevated levels of atrial natriuretic factor. Stretch led to a moderate increase in systolic force (1.42 ± 0.09 mN vs. 0.96 ± 0.09 mN in controls), with significantly higher forces observed after β-adrenergic stimulation with noradrenalin (2.54 ± 0.11 mN). Combined mechanical and β-adrenergic stimulation had no synergistic effect. This study demonstrates for the first time that mechanical stimulation and direct real-time contraction force measurement can be combined into a single multimodal bioreactor system, including electrical stimulation of excitable tissue, perfusion of the culture chamber, and the possibility of (fluorescence) microscopic assessment during continuous cultivation. Thus, this bioreactor represents a valuable tool for monitoring tissue development and, ultimately, the optimization of stem cell-based tissue replacement strategies in regenerative medicine. PMID:21142417

  1. Correlation between average tissue depth data and quantitative accuracy of forensic craniofacial reconstructions measured by geometric surface comparison method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Joon; Wilkinson, Caroline M; Hwang, Hyeon-Shik; Lee, Sang-Mi

    2015-05-01

    Accuracy is the most important factor supporting the reliability of forensic facial reconstruction (FFR) comparing to the corresponding actual face. A number of methods have been employed to evaluate objective accuracy of FFR. Recently, it has been attempted that the degree of resemblance between computer-generated FFR and actual face is measured by geometric surface comparison method. In this study, three FFRs were produced employing live adult Korean subjects and three-dimensional computerized modeling software. The deviations of the facial surfaces between the FFR and the head scan CT of the corresponding subject were analyzed in reverse modeling software. The results were compared with those from a previous study which applied the same methodology as this study except average facial soft tissue depth dataset. Three FFRs of this study that applied updated dataset demonstrated lesser deviation errors between the facial surfaces of the FFR and corresponding subject than those from the previous study. The results proposed that appropriate average tissue depth data are important to increase quantitative accuracy of FFR. PMID:25739646

  2. Depth-resolved measurement of ocular fundus pulsations by low-coherence tissue interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragostinoff, Nikolaus; Werkmeister, René M.; Gröschl, Martin; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2009-09-01

    A device that allows for the measurement of ocular fundus pulsations at preselected axial positions of a subject's eye is presented. Unlike previously presented systems, which only allow for observation of the strongest reflecting retinal layer, our system enables the measurement of fundus pulsations at a preselected ocular layer. For this purpose the sample is illuminated by light of low temporal coherence. The layer is then selected by positioning one mirror of a Michelson interferometer according to the depth of the layer. The device contains a length measurement system based on partial coherence interferometry and a line scan charge-coupled device camera for recording and online inspection of the fringe system. In-vivo measurements in healthy humans are performed as proof of principle. The algorithms used for enhancing the recorded images are briefly introduced. The contrast of the observed interference pattern is evaluated for different positions of the measurement mirror and at various distances from the front surface of the cornea. The applications of such a system may be wide, including assessment of eye elongation during myopia development and blood-flow-related changes in intraocular volume.

  3. Zearalenone-induced changes in biochemical parameters, oxidative stress and apoptosis in cardiac tissue: Protective role of crocin.

    PubMed

    Salem, I Ben; Boussabbeh, M; Neffati, F; Najjar, M F; Abid-Essefi, S; Bacha, H

    2016-06-01

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is a mycotoxin from Fusarium species commonly found in food commodities and is known to cause reproductive disorders. Several in vivo studies have shown that ZEN is haematotoxic and hepatotoxic and causes several alterations of immunological parameters. Meantime, the available information on the cardiotoxic effects of ZEN is very much limited. In the present study, we investigated the toxic effects of ZEN in heart tissues of Balb/c mice. We demonstrated that ZEN (40 mg kg(-1) body weight (b.w.)) increased creatine phosphokinase, lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, total cholesterol and triglyceride levels and induced oxidative stress as monitored by measuring the malondialdehyde level, the generation of protein carbonyls, the catalase and superoxide dismutase activity and the expression of the heat shock proteins (Hsp 70). We also demonstrated that acute administration of ZEN triggers apoptosis in cardiac tissue. Furthermore, we aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of crocin (CRO), a natural carotenoid, to prevent ZEN-induced cardiotoxicity in mice. In fact, combined treatment of ZEN with different doses of CRO (50, 100, and 250 mg kg(-1) b.w.) showed a significant reduction of ZEN-induced toxicity for all tested markers in a dose-dependent manner. It could be concluded that CRO was effective in the protection against ZEN-induced toxicity in cardiac tissue. PMID:26231423

  4. Advanced computer techniques for inverse modeling of electric current in cardiac tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, S.A.; Romero, L.A.; Diegert, C.F.

    1996-08-01

    For many years, ECG`s and vector cardiograms have been the tools of choice for non-invasive diagnosis of cardiac conduction problems, such as found in reentrant tachycardia or Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. Through skillful analysis of these skin-surface measurements of cardiac generated electric currents, a physician can deduce the general location of heart conduction irregularities. Using a combination of high-fidelity geometry modeling, advanced mathematical algorithms and massively parallel computing, Sandia`s approach would provide much more accurate information and thus allow the physician to pinpoint the source of an arrhythmia or abnormal conduction pathway.

  5. An inverse finite element method for determining the tissue compressibility of human left ventricular wall during the cardiac cycle.

    PubMed

    Hassaballah, Abdallah I; Hassan, Mohsen A; Mardi, Azizi N; Hamdi, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    The determination of the myocardium's tissue properties is important in constructing functional finite element (FE) models of the human heart. To obtain accurate properties especially for functional modeling of a heart, tissue properties have to be determined in vivo. At present, there are only few in vivo methods that can be applied to characterize the internal myocardium tissue mechanics. This work introduced and evaluated an FE inverse method to determine the myocardial tissue compressibility. Specifically, it combined an inverse FE method with the experimentally-measured left ventricular (LV) internal cavity pressure and volume versus time curves. Results indicated that the FE inverse method showed good correlation between LV repolarization and the variations in the myocardium tissue bulk modulus K (K = 1/compressibility), as well as provided an ability to describe in vivo human myocardium material behavior. The myocardium bulk modulus can be effectively used as a diagnostic tool of the heart ejection fraction. The model developed is proved to be robust and efficient. It offers a new perspective and means to the study of living-myocardium tissue properties, as it shows the variation of the bulk modulus throughout the cardiac cycle. PMID:24367544

  6. An Inverse Finite Element Method for Determining the Tissue Compressibility of Human Left Ventricular Wall during the Cardiac Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Hassaballah, Abdallah I.; Hassan, Mohsen A.; Mardi, Azizi N.; Hamdi, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    The determination of the myocardium’s tissue properties is important in constructing functional finite element (FE) models of the human heart. To obtain accurate properties especially for functional modeling of a heart, tissue properties have to be determined in vivo. At present, there are only few in vivo methods that can be applied to characterize the internal myocardium tissue mechanics. This work introduced and evaluated an FE inverse method to determine the myocardial tissue compressibility. Specifically, it combined an inverse FE method with the experimentally-measured left ventricular (LV) internal cavity pressure and volume versus time curves. Results indicated that the FE inverse method showed good correlation between LV repolarization and the variations in the myocardium tissue bulk modulus K (K = 1/compressibility), as well as provided an ability to describe in vivo human myocardium material behavior. The myocardium bulk modulus can be effectively used as a diagnostic tool of the heart ejection fraction. The model developed is proved to be robust and efficient. It offers a new perspective and means to the study of living-myocardium tissue properties, as it shows the variation of the bulk modulus throughout the cardiac cycle. PMID:24367544

  7. Cardiomyocyte Circadian Oscillations Are Cell-Autonomous, Amplified by β-Adrenergic Signaling, and Synchronized in Cardiac Ventricle Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks impact vital cardiac parameters such as blood pressure and heart rate, and adverse cardiac events such as myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death. In mammals, the central circadian pacemaker, located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, synchronizes cellular circadian clocks in the heart and many other tissues throughout the body. Cardiac ventricle explants maintain autonomous contractions and robust circadian oscillations of clock gene expression in culture. In the present study, we examined the relationship between intrinsic myocardial function and circadian rhythms in cultures from mouse heart. We cultured ventricular explants or dispersed cardiomyocytes from neonatal mice expressing a PER2::LUC bioluminescent reporter of circadian clock gene expression. We found that isoproterenol, a β-adrenoceptor agonist known to increase heart rate and contractility, also amplifies PER2 circadian rhythms in ventricular explants. We found robust, cell-autonomous PER2 circadian rhythms in dispersed cardiomyocytes. Single-cell rhythms were initially synchronized in ventricular explants but desynchronized in dispersed cells. In addition, we developed a method for long-term, simultaneous monitoring of clock gene expression, contraction rate, and basal intracellular Ca2+ level in cardiomyocytes using PER2::LUC in combination with GCaMP3, a genetically encoded fluorescent Ca2+ reporter. In contrast to robust PER2 circadian rhythms in cardiomyocytes, we detected no rhythms in contraction rate and only weak rhythms in basal Ca2+ level. In summary, we found that PER2 circadian rhythms of cardiomyocytes are cell-autonomous, amplified by adrenergic signaling, and synchronized by intercellular communication in ventricle explants, but we detected no robust circadian rhythms in contraction rate or basal Ca2+. PMID:27459195

  8. Removal of pinned scroll waves in cardiac tissues by electric fields in a generic model of three-dimensional excitable media

    PubMed Central

    Pan, De-Bei; Gao, Xiang; Feng, Xia; Pan, Jun-Ting; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Spirals or scroll waves pinned to heterogeneities in cardiac tissues may cause lethal arrhythmias. To unpin these life-threatening spiral waves, methods of wave emission from heterogeneities (WEH) induced by low-voltage pulsed DC electric fields (PDCEFs) and circularly polarized electric fields (CPEFs) have been used in two-dimensional (2D) cardiac tissues. Nevertheless, the unpinning of scroll waves in three-dimensional (3D) cardiac systems is much more difficult than that of spiral waves in 2D cardiac systems, and there are few reports on the removal of pinned scroll waves in 3D cardiac tissues by electric fields. In this article, we investigate in detail the removal of pinned scroll waves in a generic model of 3D excitable media using PDCEF, AC electric field (ACEF) and CPEF, respectively. We find that spherical waves can be induced from the heterogeneities by these electric fields in initially quiescent excitable media. However, only CPEF can induce spherical waves with frequencies higher than that of the pinned scroll wave. Such higher-frequency spherical waves induced by CPEF can be used to drive the pinned scroll wave out of the cardiac systems. We hope this remarkable ability of CPEF can provide a better alternative to terminate arrhythmias caused by pinned scroll waves. PMID:26905367

  9. Removal of pinned scroll waves in cardiac tissues by electric fields in a generic model of three-dimensional excitable media.

    PubMed

    Pan, De-Bei; Gao, Xiang; Feng, Xia; Pan, Jun-Ting; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Spirals or scroll waves pinned to heterogeneities in cardiac tissues may cause lethal arrhythmias. To unpin these life-threatening spiral waves, methods of wave emission from heterogeneities (WEH) induced by low-voltage pulsed DC electric fields (PDCEFs) and circularly polarized electric fields (CPEFs) have been used in two-dimensional (2D) cardiac tissues. Nevertheless, the unpinning of scroll waves in three-dimensional (3D) cardiac systems is much more difficult than that of spiral waves in 2D cardiac systems, and there are few reports on the removal of pinned scroll waves in 3D cardiac tissues by electric fields. In this article, we investigate in detail the removal of pinned scroll waves in a generic model of 3D excitable media using PDCEF, AC electric field (ACEF) and CPEF, respectively. We find that spherical waves can be induced from the heterogeneities by these electric fields in initially quiescent excitable media. However, only CPEF can induce spherical waves with frequencies higher than that of the pinned scroll wave. Such higher-frequency spherical waves induced by CPEF can be used to drive the pinned scroll wave out of the cardiac systems. We hope this remarkable ability of CPEF can provide a better alternative to terminate arrhythmias caused by pinned scroll waves. PMID:26905367

  10. Tissue engineering the cardiac microenvironment: Multicellular microphysiological systems for drug screening☆

    PubMed Central

    Kurokawa, Yosuke K.; George, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to accurately detect cardiotoxicity has become increasingly important in the development of new drugs. Since the advent of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, researchers have explored their use in creating an in vitro drug screening platform. Recently, there has been increasing interest in creating 3D microphysiological models of the heart as a tool to detect cardiotoxic compounds. By recapitulating the complex microenvironment that exists in the native heart, cardiac microphysiological systems have the potential to provide a more accurate pharmacological response compared to current standards in preclinical drug screening. This review aims to provide an overview on the progress made in creating advanced models of the human heart, including the significance and contributions of the various cellular and extracellular components to cardiac function. PMID:26212156

  11. Co-localized confocal Raman spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography (CRS-OCT) for depth-resolved analyte detection in tissue

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Jason R.; Chuchuen, Oranat; Henderson, Marcus H.; Kim, Sanghoon; Rinehart, Matthew T.; Kashuba, Angela D. M.; Wax, Adam; Katz, David F.

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of a combined confocal Raman spectroscopy (CRS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) instrument (CRS-OCT) capable of measuring analytes in targeted biological tissues with sub-100-micron spatial resolution. The OCT subsystem was used to measure depth-resolved tissue morphology and guide the acquisition of chemically-specific Raman spectra. To demonstrate its utility, the instrument was used to accurately measure depth-resolved, physiologically-relevant concentrations of Tenofovir, a microbicide drug used to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV, in ex vivo tissue samples. PMID:26114026

  12. Physiological response of cardiac tissue to bisphenol a: alterations in ventricular pressure and contractility

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Daina; Chandra, Akhil; Jaimes, Rafael; Sarvazyan, Narine; Kay, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Biomonitoring studies have indicated that humans are routinely exposed to bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical that is commonly used in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Epidemiological studies have shown that BPA exposure in humans is associated with cardiovascular disease; however, the direct effects of BPA on cardiac physiology are largely unknown. Previously, we have shown that BPA exposure slows atrioventricular electrical conduction, decreases epicardial conduction velocity, and prolongs action potential duration in excised rat hearts. In the present study, we tested if BPA exposure also adversely affects cardiac contractile performance. We examined the impact of BPA exposure level, sex, and pacing rate on cardiac contractile function in excised rat hearts. Hearts were retrogradely perfused at constant pressure and exposed to 10−9-10−4 M BPA. Left ventricular developed pressure and contractility were measured during sinus rhythm and during pacing (5, 6.5, and 9 Hz). Ca2+ transients were imaged from whole hearts and from neonatal rat cardiomyocyte layers. During sinus rhythm in female hearts, BPA exposure decreased left ventricular developed pressure and inotropy in a dose-dependent manner. The reduced contractile performance was exacerbated at higher pacing rates. BPA-induced effects on contractile performance were also observed in male hearts, albeit to a lesser extent. Exposure to BPA altered Ca2+ handling within whole hearts (reduced diastolic and systolic Ca2+ transient potentiation) and neonatal cardiomyocytes (reduced Ca2+ transient amplitude and prolonged Ca2+ transient release time). In conclusion, BPA exposure significantly impaired cardiac performance in a dose-dependent manner, having a major negative impact upon electrical conduction, intracellular Ca2+ handing, and ventricular contractility. PMID:25980024

  13. Simultaneous measurement of cerebral and muscle tissue parameters during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosrati, Reyhaneh; Ramadeen, Andrew; Hu, Xudong; Woldemichael, Ermias; Kim, Siwook; Dorian, Paul; Toronov, Vladislav

    2015-03-01

    In this series of animal experiments on resuscitation after cardiac arrest we had a unique opportunity to measure hyperspectral near-infrared spectroscopy (hNIRS) parameters directly on the brain dura, or on the brain through the intact pig skull, and simultaneously the muscle hNIRS parameters. Simultaneously the arterial blood pressure and carotid and femoral blood flow were recorded in real time using invasive sensors. We used a novel hyperspectral signalprocessing algorithm to extract time-dependent concentrations of water, hemoglobin, and redox state of cytochrome c oxidase during cardiac arrest and resuscitation. In addition in order to assess the validity of the non-invasive brain measurements the obtained results from the open brain was compared to the results acquired through the skull. The comparison of hNIRS data acquired on brain surface and through the adult pig skull shows that in both cases the hemoglobin and the redox state cytochrome c oxidase changed in similar ways in similar situations and in agreement with blood pressure and flow changes. The comparison of simultaneously measured brain and muscle changes showed expected differences. Overall the results show feasibility of transcranial hNIRS measurements cerebral parameters including the redox state of cytochrome oxidase in human cardiac arrest patients.

  14. Apolipoprotein A-I Mimetic Peptide D-4F Reduces Cardiac Hypertrophy and Improves Apolipoprotein A-I-Mediated Reverse Cholesterol Transport From Cardiac Tissue in LDL Receptor-null Mice Fed a Western Diet.

    PubMed

    Han, Jie; Zhang, Song; Ye, Ping; Liu, Yong-Xue; Qin, Yan-Wen; Miao, Dong-Mei

    2016-05-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that hypercholesterolemia is an independent determinant of increased left ventricular (LV) mass. Because high-density lipoprotein and its major protein apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) mediate reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) and have cardiac protective effects, we hypothesized that the apoA-I mimetic peptide D-4F could promote RCT in cardiac tissue and decrease cardiac hypertrophy induced by hypercholesterolemia. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-null mice were fed by a Western diet for 18 weeks and then randomized to receive water, or D-4F 0.3 mg/mL, or D-4F 0.5 mg/mL added to drinking water for 6 weeks. After D-4F administration, an increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and a decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, and triglyceride in a trend toward dose-responsivity were found in cardiac tissue. Ultrasound biomicroscopy revealed a reduction in LV posterior wall end-diastolic dimension, and an increase in mitral valve E/A ratio and LV ejection fraction. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed reduced LV wall thickness and myocardial cell diameter. The protein levels of ABCA1 and LXRα were elevated in cardiac tissue of D-4F treated mice compared with the controls (P < 0.05). These results demonstrated that D-4F treatment reduced cardiac hypertrophy, and improved cardiac performance in low-density lipoprotein receptor-null mice fed a Western diet, presumably through the LXRα-ABCA1 pathway associated with enhanced myocardial RCT. PMID:26828321

  15. Pre-treatment of synthetic elastomeric scaffolds by cardiac fibroblasts improves engineered heart tissue.

    PubMed

    Radisic, Milica; Park, Hyoungshin; Martens, Timothy P; Salazar-Lazaro, Johanna E; Geng, Wenliang; Wang, Yadong; Langer, Robert; Freed, Lisa E; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2008-09-01

    Native myocardium consists of several cell types, of which approximately one-third are myocytes and most of the nonmyocytes are fibroblasts. By analogy with monolayer culture in which fibroblasts were removed to prevent overgrowth, early attempts to engineer myocardium utilized cell populations enriched for cardiac myocytes (CMs; approximately 80-90% of total cells). We hypothesized that the pre-treatment of synthetic elastomeric scaffolds with cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) will enhance the functional assembly of the engineered cardiac constructs by creating an environment supportive of cardiomyocyte attachment and function. Cells isolated from neonatal rat ventricles were prepared to form three distinct populations: rapidly plating cells identified as CFs, slowly plating cells identified as CMs, and unseparated initial population of cells (US). The cell fractions (3 x 10(6) cells total) were seeded into poly(glycerol sebacate) scaffolds (highly porous discs, 5 mm in diameter x 2-mm thick) using Matrigeltrade mark, either separately (CM or CF), concurrently (US), or sequentially (CF pre-treatment followed by CM culture, CF + CM), and cultured in spinner flasks. The CF + CM group had the highest amplitude of contraction and the lowest excitation threshold, superior DNA content, and higher glucose consumption rate. The CF + CM group exhibited compact 100- to 200-mum thick layers of elongated myocytes aligned in parallel over layers of collagen-producing fibroblasts, while US and CM groups exhibited scattered and poorly elongated myocytes. The sequential co-culture of CF and CM on a synthetic elastomer scaffold thus created an environment supportive of cardiomyocyte attachment, differentiation, and contractile function, presumably due to scaffold conditioning by cultured fibroblasts. When implanted over the infarcted myocardium in a nude rat model, cell-free poly(glycerol sebacate) remained at the ventricular wall after 2 weeks of in vivo, and was vascularized. PMID

  16. Multi-parametric MRI as an indirect evaluation tool of the mechanical properties of in-vitro cardiac tissues

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Early detection of heart failure is essential to effectively reduce related mortality. The quantification of the mechanical properties of the myocardium, a primordial indicator of the viability of the cardiac tissue, is a key element in patient’s care. Despite an incremental utilization of multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for cardiac tissue characteristics and function, the link between multi-parametric MRI and the mechanical properties of the heart has not been established. We sought to determine the parametric relationship between the myocardial mechanical properties and the MR parameters. The specific aim was to develop a reproducible evaluative quantitative tool of the mechanical properties of cardiac tissue using multi-parametric MRI associated to principal component analysis. Methods Samples from porcine hearts were submitted to a multi-parametric MRI acquisition followed by a uniaxial tensile test. Multi linear regressions were performed between dependent (Young’s modulus E) and independent (relaxation times T1, T2 and T2*, magnetization transfer ratio MTR, apparent diffusion coefficient ADC and fractional anisotropy FA) variables. A principal component analysis was used to convert the set of possibly correlated variables into a set of linearly uncorrelated variables. Results Values of 46.1±12.7 MPa for E, 729±21 ms for T1, 61±6 ms for T2, 26±7 for T2*, 35±5% for MTRx100, 33.8±4.7 for FAx10-2, and 5.85±0.21 mm2/s for ADCx10-4 were measured. Multi linear regressions showed that only 45% of E can be explained by the MRI parameters. The principal component analysis reduced our seven variables to two principal components with a cumulative variability of 63%, which increased to 80% when considering the third principal component. Conclusions The proposed multi-parametric MRI protocol associated to principal component analysis is a promising tool for the evaluation of mechanical properties within the left ventricle in the

  17. In vitro chick pre-cardiac explant tissue differentiation during spaceflight on SpaceHab-02

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    van Twest, J. S.; Paulsen, A.; Spooner, B. S.

    1995-01-01

    Chick precardiac tissue explants were cultured on the 8-day mission of STS-60, space shuttle Discovery. Development of in vitro cultures of precardiac chick tissue from embryo stages 5 though 8 (H-H) were initiated during orbit and were terminated after approximately fifteen hours of 37 degree C culture. Transmission electron microscopy and tritiated thymidine studies were performed postflight. No significant differences in cell proliferation were observed between flight and ground controls. Electron-microscopic studies revealed stage 8 explants were capable of differentiation during flight in a pattern which matched ground control tissues. As anticipated, stage 7 explant tissues had differentiated to a lesser extent compared to stage 8 tissues. Interestingly, stage 7 precardiac explant flight tissue differentiation was less than ground control tissue. This difference in differentiation between flight and ground cultures was enhanced in stage 6 tissues, as high levels of myofibril organization were only seen in ground controls. Other cellular components such as Golgi apparatus, junctional complexes, and mitochondria were present and appeared normal and healthy.

  18. mTOR Complexes Repress Hypertrophic Agonist-Stimulated Expression of Connective Tissue Growth Factor in Adult Cardiac Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Sundararaj, Kamala; Pleasant, Dorea L; Moschella, Phillip C; Panneerselvam, Kavin; Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Kuppuswamy, Dhandapani

    2016-02-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a fibrogenic cytokine that promotes fibrosis in various organs. In the heart, both cardiomyocytes (CM) and cardiac fibroblasts have been reported as a source of CTGF expression, aiding cardiac fibrosis. Although the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) forms 2 distinct complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, and plays a central role in integrating biochemical signals for protein synthesis and cellular homeostasis, we explored its role in CTGF expression in adult feline CM. CM were stimulated with 10 μM phenylephrine (PE), 200 nM angiotensin (Ang), or 100 nM insulin for 24 hours. PE and Ang, but not insulin, caused an increase in CTGF mRNA expression with the highest expression observed with PE. Inhibition of mTOR with torin1 but not rapamycin significantly enhanced PE-stimulated CTGF expression. Furthermore, silencing of raptor and rictor using shRNA adenoviral vectors to suppress mTORC1 and mTORC2, respectively, or blocking phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling with LY294002 (LY) or Akt signaling by dominant-negative Akt expression caused a substantial increase in PE-stimulated CTGF expression as measured by both mRNA and secreted protein levels. However, studies with dominant-negative delta isoform of protein kinase C demonstrate that delta isoform of protein kinase C is required for both agonist-induced CTGF expression and mTORC2/Akt-mediated CTGF suppression. Finally, PE-stimulated CTGF expression was accompanied with a corresponding increase in Smad3 phosphorylation and pretreatment of cells with SIS3, a Smad3 specific inhibitor, partially blocked the PE-stimulated CTGF expression. Therefore, a PI3K/mTOR/Akt axis plays a suppressive role on agonist-stimulated CTGF expression where the loss of this mechanism could be a contributing factor for the onset of cardiac fibrosis in the hypertrophying myocardium. PMID:26371948

  19. The Responses of Tissues from the Brain, Heart, Kidney, and Liver to Resuscitation following Prolonged Cardiac Arrest by Examining Mitochondrial Respiration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junhwan; Perales Villarroel, José Paul; Zhang, Wei; Yin, Tai; Shinozaki, Koichiro; Hong, Angela; Lampe, Joshua W.; Becker, Lance B.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrest induces whole-body ischemia, which causes damage to multiple organs. Understanding how each organ responds to ischemia/reperfusion is important to develop better resuscitation strategies. Because direct measurement of organ function is not practicable in most animal models, we attempt to use mitochondrial respiration to test efficacy of resuscitation on the brain, heart, kidney, and liver following prolonged cardiac arrest. Male Sprague-Dawley rats are subjected to asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest for 30 min or 45 min, or 30 min cardiac arrest followed by 60 min cardiopulmonary bypass resuscitation. Mitochondria are isolated from brain, heart, kidney, and liver tissues and examined for respiration activity. Following cardiac arrest, a time-dependent decrease in state-3 respiration is observed in mitochondria from all four tissues. Following 60 min resuscitation, the respiration activity of brain mitochondria varies greatly in different animals. The activity after resuscitation remains the same in heart mitochondria and significantly increases in kidney and liver mitochondria. The result shows that inhibition of state-3 respiration is a good marker to evaluate the efficacy of resuscitation for each organ. The resulting state-3 respiration of brain and heart mitochondria following resuscitation reenforces the need for developing better strategies to resuscitate these critical organs following prolonged cardiac arrest. PMID:26770657

  20. Estimation of cardiac conductivities in ventricular tissue by a variational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huanhuan; Veneziani, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    The bidomain model is the current standard model to simulate cardiac potential propagation. The numerical solution of this system of partial differential equations strongly depends on the model parameters and in particular on the cardiac conductivities. Unfortunately, it is quite problematic to measure these parameters in vivo and even more so in clinical practice, resulting in no common agreement in the literature. In this paper we consider a variational data assimilation approach to estimating those parameters. We consider the parameters as control variables to minimize the mismatch between the computed and the measured potentials under the constraint of the bidomain system. The existence of a minimizer of the misfit function is proved with the phenomenological Rogers-McCulloch ionic model, that completes the bidomain system. We significantly improve the numerical approaches in the literature by resorting to a derivative-based optimization method with settlement of some challenges due to discontinuity. The improvement in computational efficiency is confirmed by a 2D test as a direct comparison with approaches in the literature. The core of our numerical results is in 3D, on both idealized and real geometries, with the minimal ionic model. We demonstrate the reliability and the stability of the conductivity estimation approach in the presence of noise and with an imperfect knowledge of other model parameters.

  1. A sensitive algorithm for automatic detection of space-time alternating signals in cardiac tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bien, Harold; Entcheva, Emilia

    2011-01-01

    Alternans, a beat-to-beat alternation in cardiac signals, may serve as a precursor to lethal cardiac arrhythmias, including ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. Therefore, alternans is a desirable target of early arrhythmia prediction/detection. For long-term records and in the presence of noise, the definition of alternans is qualitative and ambiguous. This makes their automatic detection in large spatiotemporal data sets almost impossible. We present here a quantitative combinatorics-derived definition of alternans in the presence of random noise and a novel algorithm for automatic alternans detection using criteria like temporal persistence (TP), representative phase (RP) and alternans ratio (AR). This technique is validated by comparison to theoretically-derived probabilities and by test data sets with white noise. Finally, the algorithm is applied to ultra-high resolution optical mapping data from cultured cell monolayers, exhibiting calcium alternans. Early fine-scale alternans, close to the noise level, were revealed and linked to the later formation of larger regions and evolution of spatially discordant alternans (SDA). This robust new technique can be useful in quantification and better understanding of the onset of arrhythmias and in general analysis of space-time alternating signals. PMID:19162616

  2. A spatially-dense regression study of facial form and tissue depth: towards an interactive tool for craniofacial reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Shrimpton, Sarah; Daniels, Katleen; de Greef, Sven; Tilotta, Francoise; Willems, Guy; Vandermeulen, Dirk; Suetens, Paul; Claes, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Forensic Craniofacial Reconstruction (CFR) is an investigative technique used to illicit recognition of a deceased person by reconstructing the most likely face starting from the skull. A key component in most CFR methods are estimates of facial soft tissue depths (TD) at particular points (landmarks) on the skull based on averages from databases of TD recordings. These databases vary in their method of extraction, number and position of landmarks (usually sparse <100), condition of the body, population studied, and sub-categorization of the data. In this work a new dataset is presented in a novel manner based on 156 CT scans using a spatially-dense set (∼7500) of TD recordings to allow for a complete understanding of TD variation interpolating between typical landmarks. Furthermore, to unravel the interplay between soft-tissue layers, skull and facial morphology, TD and Facial Form (FF) are investigated both separately and combined. Using a partial least squares regression (PLSR) analysis, which allows for working with multivariate and spatially-dense data, on metadata of Sex, Age and BMI, different significant patterns on TD and FF variation were found. A similar, but with TD and FF combined, PLSR generated a model useful to report on both, in function of Sex, Age and BMI. In contrast to other datasets and due to the continuous nature of the regression there is no need for data sub-categorization. In further contrast, previous datasets have been presented in tabulated form, which is impractical for spatially-dense data. Instead an interactive tool was built to visualize the regression model in an accessible way for CFR practitioners as well as anatomists. The tool is free to the community and forms a base for data contributions to augment the model and its future use in practice. PMID:24378309

  3. Intracellular pH in Gastric and Rectal Tissue Post Cardiac Arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Elaine M.; Steiner, Richard P.; LaManna, Joseph C.

    We directly measured pHi using the pH sensitive dye, neutral red. We defined pHi for rectal and gastric tissue in whole tissue and by layer under control and arrest conditions. Fifteen minutes of arrest was not sufficient time to alter the pHi at the rectal or gastric site. On initial inspection, the stomach may be more sensitive to ischemic changes than the rectum. Understanding the mechanism by which PCO2 generation is used to track clinical changes is vital to the early detection of tissue dysoxia in order to effectively treat and manage critically ill patients.

  4. Sulfated levan from Halomonas smyrnensis as a bioactive, heparin-mimetic glycan for cardiac tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Erginer, Merve; Akcay, Ayca; Coskunkan, Binnaz; Morova, Tunc; Rende, Deniz; Bucak, Seyda; Baysal, Nihat; Ozisik, Rahmi; Eroglu, Mehmet S; Agirbasli, Mehmet; Toksoy Oner, Ebru

    2016-09-20

    Chemical derivatives of levan from Halomonas smyrnensis AAD6(T) with low, medium and high levels of sulfation were synthesized and characterized by FTIR and 2D-NMR. Sulfated levan samples were found to exhibit anticoagulation activity via the intrinsic pathway like heparin in a dose-dependent manner. Exceptionally high heparin equivalent activity of levan sulfate was shown to proceed via thrombin inhibition where decreased Factor Xa activity with increasing concentration was observed in antithrombin tests and above a certain concentration, levan sulfate showed a better inhibitor activity than heparin. In vitro experimental results were then verified in silico by docking studies using equilibrium structures obtained by molecular dynamic simulations and results suggested a sulfation dependent binding mechanism. With its high biocompatibility and heparin mimetic activity, levan sulfate can be considered as a suitable functional biomaterial to design biologically active, functionalized, thin films and engineered smart scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering applications. PMID:27261753

  5. Synchronization of early afterdepolarizations and arrhythmogenesis in heterogeneous cardiac tissue models.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Enno; Xie, Yuanfang; Qu, Zhilin

    2012-07-18

    Early afterdepolarizations (EADs) are linked to both triggered arrhythmias and reentrant arrhythmias by causing premature ventricular complexes (PVCs), focal excitations, or heterogeneous tissue substrates for reentry formation. However, a critical number of cells that synchronously exhibit EADs are needed to result in arrhythmia triggers and substrates in tissue. In this study, we use mathematical modeling and computer simulations to investigate EAD synchronization and arrhythmia induction in tissue models with random cell-to-cell variations. Our major observations are as follows. Random cell-to-cell variations in action potential duration without EAD presence do not cause large dispersion of refractoriness in well-coupled tissue. In the presence of phase-2 EADs, the cells may synchronously exhibit the same number of EADs or no EADs with a very small dispersion of refractoriness, or synchronize regionally to result in large dispersion of refractoriness. In the presence of phase-3 EADs, regional synchronization leads to propagating EADs, forming PVCs in tissue. Interestingly, even though the uncoupled cells exhibit either no EAD or only a single EAD, when these cells are coupled to form a tissue, more than one PVC can occur. When the PVCs occur at different locations and time, multifocal arrhythmias are triggered, with the foci shifting in space and time in an irregular manner. The focal arrhythmias either spontaneously terminate or degenerate into reentrant arrhythmias due to heterogeneities and spatiotemporal chaotic dynamics of the foci. PMID:22853915

  6. [Time costs cardiac muscle tissue--prehospital therapy of acute myocardial infarct--a case report].

    PubMed

    Eschenburg, G; Pappert, D; Ohlmeier, H

    2003-01-01

    Symptoms of an acute myocardial infarction are a common reason for calling the emergency physician. Pre-hospital mortality caused by cardiac infarction is constantly high. The main potential for decreasing infarction mortality lies in the pre-hospital period. The problems and prospects of treatment in the early period are described in the case of a 73-year-old patient with an acute anterior infarction. The diagnostic and therapeutic approach is shown and discussed in this concrete case, taking into consideration the guidelines for diagnostics and therapy of acute myocardial infarction in the pre-hospital period of the German Society for Cardiology. A particular focus is the management of pre-hospital thrombolysis, the preconditions, realization and risks of which are described. In this context, the experience and competence of the emergency physician is prerequisite for the exact diagnosis and therapy. Furthermore, the importance of a smooth transition from pre-hospital therapy to intensive care is emphasized. PMID:12666508

  7. Putative population of adipose-derived stem cells isolated from mediastinal tissue during cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Patel, Amit N; Yockman, James; Vargas, Vanessa; Bull, David A

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells have been isolated from various adult human tissues and are valuable for not only therapeutic applications but for the study of tissue homeostasis and disease progression. Subcutaneous adipose depots have been shown to contain large amounts of stem cells. There is little information that has been reported to date describing the isolation and characterization of mesenchymal stem cells from visceral adipose tissue. In this study, we describe a mesenchymal stem cell population isolated from mediastinal adipose depots. The cells express CD44, CD105, CD166, and CD90 and are negative for hematopoietic markers CD34, CD45, and HLA-DR. In addition, the cells have a multilineage potential, with the ability to differentiate into adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic cell types. The biological function of visceral adipose tissue remains largely unknown and uncharacterized. However, the proximity of adipose tissue to the heart suggests a potential role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in obesity. In addition, with the ability of fat to regulate metabolic activity in humans, this novel stem cell source may be useful to further study the mechanisms involved in metabolic disorders. PMID:22490339

  8. Vulnerability to re-entry in simulated two-dimensional cardiac tissue: Effects of electrical restitution and stimulation sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Diana X.; Yang, Ming-Jim; Weiss, James N.; Garfinkel, Alan; Qu, Zhilin

    2007-12-01

    Ventricular fibrillation is a lethal arrhythmia characterized by multiple wavelets usually starting from a single or figure-of-eight re-entrant circuit. Understanding the factors regulating vulnerability to the re-entry is essential for developing effective therapeutic strategies to prevent ventricular fibrillation. In this study, we investigated how pre-existing tissue heterogeneities and electrical restitution properties affect the initiation of re-entry by premature extrastimuli in two-dimensional cardiac tissue models. We studied two pacing protocols for inducing re-entry following the "sinus" rhythm (S1) beat: (1) a single premature (S2) extrastimulus in heterogeneous tissue; (2) two premature extrastimuli (S2 and S3) in homogeneous tissue. In the first case, the vulnerable window of re-entry is determined by the spatial dimension and extent of the heterogeneity, and is also affected by electrical restitution properties and the location of the premature stimulus. The vulnerable window first increases as the action potential duration (APD) difference between the inside and outside of the heterogeneous region increases, but then decreases as this difference increases further. Steeper APD restitution reduces the vulnerable window of re-entry. In the second case, electrical restitution plays an essential role. When APD restitution is flat, no re-entry can be induced. When APD restitution is steep, re-entry can be induced by an S3 over a range of S1S2 intervals, which is also affected by conduction velocity restitution. When APD restitution is even steeper, the vulnerable window is reduced due to collision of the spiral tips.

  9. Depth-resolved monitoring of diffusion of hyperosmotic agents in normal and malignant human esophagus tissues using optical coherence tomography in-vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Qingliang; Guo Zhouyi; Wei Huajiang; Yang Hongqin; Xie Shusen

    2011-10-31

    Depth-resolved monitoring with differentiation and quantification of glucose diffusion in healthy and abnormal esophagus tissues has been studied in vitro. Experiments have been performed using human normal esophagus and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tissues by the optical coherence tomography (OCT). The images have been continuously acquired for 120 min in the experiments, and the depth-resolved and average permeability coefficients of the 40 % glucose solution have been calculated by the OCT amplitude (OCTA) method. We demonstrate the capability of the OCT technique for depth-resolved monitoring, differentiation, and quantifying of glucose diffusion in normal esophagus and ESCC tissues. It is found that the permeability coefficients of the 40 % glucose solution are not uniform throughout the normal esophagus and ESCC tissues and increase from (3.30 {+-} 0.09) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} and (1.57 {+-} 0.05) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1} at the mucous membrane of normal esophagus and ESCC tissues to (1.82 {+-} 0.04) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} and (3.53 {+-} 0.09) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1} at the submucous layer approximately 742 {mu}m away from the epithelial surface of normal esophagus and ESCC tissues, respectively. (optical coherence tomography)

  10. Elucidation of transcriptome-wide microRNA binding sites in human cardiac tissues by Ago2 HITS-CLIP

    PubMed Central

    Spengler, Ryan M.; Zhang, Xiaoming; Cheng, Congsheng; McLendon, Jared M.; Skeie, Jessica M.; Johnson, Frances L.; Davidson, Beverly L.; Boudreau, Ryan L.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) have emerged as key biological effectors in human health and disease. These small noncoding RNAs are incorporated into Argonaute (Ago) proteins, where they direct post-transcriptional gene silencing via base-pairing with target transcripts. Although miRs have become intriguing biological entities and attractive therapeutic targets, the translational impacts of miR research remain limited by a paucity of empirical miR targeting data, particularly in human primary tissues. Here, to improve our understanding of the diverse roles miRs play in cardiovascular function and disease, we applied high-throughput methods to globally profile miR:target interactions in human heart tissues. We deciphered Ago2:RNA interactions using crosslinking immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (HITS-CLIP) to generate the first transcriptome-wide map of miR targeting events in human myocardium, detecting 4000 cardiac Ago2 binding sites across >2200 target transcripts. Our initial exploration of this interactome revealed an abundance of miR target sites in gene coding regions, including several sites pointing to new miR-29 functions in regulating cardiomyocyte calcium, growth and metabolism. Also, we uncovered several clinically-relevant interactions involving common genetic variants that alter miR targeting events in cardiomyopathy-associated genes. Overall, these data provide a critical resource for bolstering translational miR research in heart, and likely beyond. PMID:27418678

  11. Gene expression profiling in the fetal cardiac tissue after folate and low dose trichloroethylene exposure

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Patricia T.; Manziello, Ann; Howard, Jamie; Palbykin, Brittany; Runyan, Raymond B.; Selmin, Ornella

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies show gene expression alterations in rat embryo hearts and cell lines that correspond to the cardio-teratogenic effects of trichloroethylene (TCE) in animal models. One potential mechanism of TCE teratogenicity may be through altered regulation of calcium homeostatic genes with a corresponding inhibition of cardiac function. It has been suggested that TCE may interfere with the folic acid/methylation pathway in liver and kidney and alter gene regulation by epigenetic mechanisms. According to this hypothesis, folate supplementation in the maternal diet should counteract TCE effects on gene expression in the embryonic heart. Approach To identify transcriptional targets altered in the embryonic heart after exposure to TCE, and possible protective effects of folate, we used DNA microarray technology to profile gene expression in embryonic mouse hearts with maternal TCE exposure and dietary changes in maternal folate. Results Exposure to low doses of TCE (10ppb) caused extensive alterations in transcripts encoding proteins involved in transport, ion channel, transcription, differentiation, cytoskeleton, cell cycle and apoptosis. Exogenous folate did not offset the effects of TCE exposure on normal gene expression and both high and low levels of folate produced additional significant changes in gene expression. Conclusions A mechanism where TCE induces a folate deficiency does not explain altered gene expression patterns in the embryonic mouse heart. The data further suggest that use of folate supplementation, in the presence of this toxin, may be detrimental and non-protective of the developing embryo. PMID:19813261

  12. An MRM-based Workflow for Quantifying Cardiac Mitochondrial Protein Phosphorylation in Murine and Human Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Maggie P.Y.; Scruggs, Sarah B.; Kim, Tae-Young; Zong, Chenggong; Lau, Edward; Wang, Ding; Ryan, Christopher M.; Faull, Kym F.; Ping, Peipei

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of mitochondrial function is essential for cardiomyocyte adaptation to cellular stress. While it has long been understood that phosphorylation regulates flux through metabolic pathways, novel phosphorylation sites are continually being discovered in all functionally distinct areas of the mitochondrial proteome. Extracting biologically meaningful information from these phosphorylation sites requires an adaptable, sensitive, specific and robust method for their quantification. Here we report a multiple reaction monitoring-based mass spectrometric workflow for quantifying site-specific phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins. Specifically, chromatographic and mass spectrometric conditions for 68 transitions derived from 23 murine and human phosphopeptides, and their corresponding unmodified peptides, were optimized. These methods enabled the quantification of endogenous phosphopeptides from the outer mitochondrial membrane protein VDAC, and the inner membrane proteins ANT and ETC complexes I, III and V. The development of this quantitative workflow is a pivotal step for advancing our knowledge and understanding of the regulatory effects of mitochondrial protein phosphorylation in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:22387130

  13. Robust image-based estimation of cardiac tissue parameters and their uncertainty from noisy data.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Dominik; Mansi, Tommaso; Georgescu, Bogdan; Kamen, Ali; Kayvanpour, Elham; Amr, Ali; Sedaghat-Hamedani, Farbod; Haas, Jan; Katus, Hugo; Meder, Benjamin; Hornegger, Joachim; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2014-01-01

    Clinical applications of computational cardiac models require precise personalization, i.e. fitting model parameters to capture patient's physiology. However, due to parameter non-identifiability, limited data, uncertainty in the clinical measurements, and modeling assumptions, various combinations of parameter values may exist that yield the same quality of fit. Hence, there is a need for quantifying the uncertainty in estimated parameters and to ascertain the uniqueness of the found solution. This paper presents a stochastic method to estimate the parameters of an image-based electromechanical model of the heart and their uncertainty due to noise in measurements. First, Bayesian inference is applied to fully estimate the posterior probability density function (PDF) of the model. To that end, Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling is used, which is made computationally tractable by employing a fast surrogate model based on Polynomial Chaos Expansion, instead of the true forward model. Then, we use the mean-shift algorithm to automatically find the modes of the PDF and select the most likely one while being robust to noise. The approach is used to estimate global active stress and passive stiffness from invasive pressure and image-based volume quantification. Experiments on eight patients showed that not only our approach yielded goodness of fits equivalent to a well-established deterministic method, but we could also demonstrate the non-uniqueness of the problem and report uncertainty estimates, crucial information for subsequent clinical assessments of the personalized models. PMID:25485357

  14. Effects of the tissue-air interface in calculations of beta-particle skin dose at a depth of 70 microns.

    PubMed

    Crawford, O H; Turner, J E; Hamm, R N; Ashley, J C

    1991-11-01

    The effects that the tissue-air interface has on the basal-layer dose at a depth of 70 microns from beta emitters on the skin surface are studied using Monte Carlo calculations. The dose is decreased at small lateral distances from a point source but is increased at large distances. PMID:1752748

  15. Poly(Glycerol Sebacate)/Poly(Butylene Succinate-Butylene Dilinoleate) Fibrous Scaffolds for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tallawi, Marwa; Zebrowski, David C.; Rai, Ranjana; Roether, Judith A.; Schubert, Dirk W.; El Fray, Miroslawa; Aifantis, Katerina E.

    2015-01-01

    The present article investigates the use of a novel electrospun fibrous blend of poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) and poly(butylene succinate-butylene dilinoleate) (PBS-DLA) as a candidate for cardiac tissue engineering. Random electrospun fibers with various PGS/PBS-DLA compositions (70/30, 60/40, 50/50, and 0/100) were fabricated. To examine the suitability of these fiber blends for heart patches, their morphology, as well as their physical, chemical, and mechanical properties were measured before examining their biocompatibility through cell adhesion. The fabricated fibers were bead-free and exhibited a relatively narrow diameter distribution. The addition of PBS-DLA to PGS resulted in an increase of the average fiber diameter, whereas increasing the amount of PBS-DLA decreased the hydrophilicity and the water uptake of the nanofibrous scaffolds to values that approached those of neat PBS-DLA nanofibers. Moreover, the addition of PBS-DLA significantly increased the elastic modulus. Initial toxicity studies with C2C12 myoblast cells up to 72 h confirmed nontoxic behavior of the blends. Immunofluorescence analyses and scanning electron microscopy analyses confirmed that C2C12 cells showed better cell attachment and proliferation on electrospun mats with higher PBS-DLA content. However, immunofluorescence analyses of the 3-day-old rat cardiomyocytes cultured for 2 and 5 days demonstrated better attachment on the 70/30 fibers containing well-aligned sarcomeres and expressing high amounts of connexin 43 in cellular junctions indicating efficient cell-to-cell communication. It can be concluded, therefore, that fibrous PGS/PBS-DLA scaffolds exhibit promising characteristics as a biomaterial for cardiac patch applications. PMID:25439964

  16. Poly(glycerol sebacate)/poly(butylene succinate-butylene dilinoleate) fibrous scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tallawi, Marwa; Zebrowski, David C; Rai, Ranjana; Roether, Judith A; Schubert, Dirk W; El Fray, Miroslawa; Engel, Felix B; Aifantis, Katerina E; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2015-06-01

    The present article investigates the use of a novel electrospun fibrous blend of poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) and poly(butylene succinate-butylene dilinoleate) (PBS-DLA) as a candidate for cardiac tissue engineering. Random electrospun fibers with various PGS/PBS-DLA compositions (70/30, 60/40, 50/50, and 0/100) were fabricated. To examine the suitability of these fiber blends for heart patches, their morphology, as well as their physical, chemical, and mechanical properties were measured before examining their biocompatibility through cell adhesion. The fabricated fibers were bead-free and exhibited a relatively narrow diameter distribution. The addition of PBS-DLA to PGS resulted in an increase of the average fiber diameter, whereas increasing the amount of PBS-DLA decreased the hydrophilicity and the water uptake of the nanofibrous scaffolds to values that approached those of neat PBS-DLA nanofibers. Moreover, the addition of PBS-DLA significantly increased the elastic modulus. Initial toxicity studies with C2C12 myoblast cells up to 72 h confirmed nontoxic behavior of the blends. Immunofluorescence analyses and scanning electron microscopy analyses confirmed that C2C12 cells showed better cell attachment and proliferation on electrospun mats with higher PBS-DLA content. However, immunofluorescence analyses of the 3-day-old rat cardiomyocytes cultured for 2 and 5 days demonstrated better attachment on the 70/30 fibers containing well-aligned sarcomeres and expressing high amounts of connexin 43 in cellular junctions indicating efficient cell-to-cell communication. It can be concluded, therefore, that fibrous PGS/PBS-DLA scaffolds exhibit promising characteristics as a biomaterial for cardiac patch applications. PMID:25439964

  17. Plasma tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1): an independent predictor of poor response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tolosana, Jose María; Mont, Lluís; Sitges, Marta; Berruezo, Antonio; Delgado, Victoria; Vidal, Bàrbara; Tamborero, David; Morales, Manel; Batlle, Montserrat; Roig, Eulalia; Castel, M. Angeles; Pérez-Villa, Félix; Godoy, Miguel; Brugada, Josep

    2010-01-01

    Aims Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) play a role in left ventricular structural remodelling. The aim of our study was to analyse MMP-2 and TIMP-1 levels as predictors of poor response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Methods and results A cohort of 42 CRT patients from our centre was prospectively evaluated at baseline and after 12-month follow-up. MMP-2 and TIMP-1 assays were performed prior to CRT implant. Cardiac resynchronization therapy responders were defined as patients who survived, were not transplanted, and increased their basal 6 min walking distance test (6MWDT) by ≥10% or improved their NYHA functional class. Overall, 25 patients (60%) were classed as responders. At 12-month follow-up, six patients (14.2%) had died and one (2.4%) patient had been transplanted. Compared with responders, non-responders had higher levels of TIMP-1 (277 ± 59 vs. 216 ± 46 ng/mL, P = 0.001), MMP-2 (325 ± 115 vs. 258 ± 56 ng/mL, P = 0.02), and creatinine (1.76 ± 0.8 vs. 1.25 ± 0.3 mg/dL, P = 0.01). In a multivariate analysis, TIMP-1 was the only independent predictor of non-response to CRT [OR 0.97, 95% (CI 0.96–0.99) P = 0.005]. TIMP-1≥248 ng/mL predicted non-response with 71% sensitivity and 72% specificity. Conclusion TIMP-1 is an independent predictor of non-response in patients treated with CRT. PMID:20360066

  18. Stereoselective binding in cardiac tissue of the enatiomers of benzetimide, and antimuscarinic drug.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, J A; Lüllmann, H; Mitchelson, F; Reil, G H

    1976-01-01

    1 Benzetimide, possessing two stable enantiomers, dexetimide and levetimide, has been investigated in guinea-pig atria with respect to its atropine-like action and its tissue distribution. 2 The antagonistic potency of dexetimide was found to be over 6000 times higher than that of levetimide, the pA2 values being 9.82 and 6.0 respectively. 3 The tissue accumulation was investigated for both isomers in the concentration range from 1.5 X 10(-9) M to 10(-6) M yielding tissue to medium ratios (T/M) of between approximately 50 and 10. The highest values were found for the lowest concentrations. At any concentration investigated, dexetimide exhibited a higher uptake than the levoisomer. 4 The rate of uptake and washout of dexetimide was extremely slow, that of levetimide being considerably faster at equimolar concentrations. The same pattern held true for the onset and decline of the antagonistic action. 5 The high accumulation was found to be almost entirely due to unspecific binding. Even in the case of dexetimide the relative size of the receptor compartment could not be determined. The unspecific binding sites displayed a certain stereoselectivity but to a much lesser extent than the specific receptor binding sites. PMID:1260229

  19. Insulin-like growth factor-I and slow, bi-directional perfusion enhance the formation of tissue-engineered cardiac grafts.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mingyu; Moretti, Matteo; Engelmayr, George C; Freed, Lisa E

    2009-03-01

    Biochemical and mechanical signals enabling cardiac regeneration can be elucidated using in vitro tissue-engineering models. We hypothesized that insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF) and slow, bi-directional perfusion could act independently and interactively to enhance the survival, differentiation, and contractile performance of tissue-engineered cardiac grafts. Heart cells were cultured on three-dimensional porous scaffolds in medium with or without supplemental IGF and in the presence or absence of slow, bi-directional perfusion that enhanced transport and provided shear stress. Structural, molecular, and electrophysiologic properties of the resulting grafts were quantified on culture day 8. IGF had independent, beneficial effects on apoptosis (p < 0.01), cellular viability (p < 0.01), contractile amplitude (p < 0.01), and excitation threshold (p < 0.01). Perfusion independently affected the four aforementioned parameters and also increased amounts of cardiac troponin-I (p < 0.01), connexin-43 (p < 0.05), and total protein (p < 0.01) in the grafts. Interactive effects of IGF and perfusion on apoptosis were also present (p < 0.01). Myofibrillogenesis and spontaneous contractility were present only in grafts cultured with perfusion, although contractility was inducible by electrical field stimulation of grafts from all groups. Our findings demonstrate that multi-factorial stimulation of tissue-engineered cardiac grafts using IGF and perfusion resulted in independent and interactive effects on heart cell survival, differentiation, and contractility. PMID:18759675

  20. Nonlinear behaviour of conduction and block in cardiac tissue with heterogeneous expression of connexin 43.

    PubMed

    Prudat, Yann; Kucera, Jan P

    2014-11-01

    Altered gap junctional coupling potentiates slow conduction and arrhythmias. To better understand how heterogeneous connexin expression affects conduction at the cellular scale, we investigated conduction in tissue consisting of two cardiomyocyte populations expressing different connexin levels. Conduction was mapped using microelectrode arrays in cultured strands of foetal murine ventricular myocytes with predefined contents of connexin 43 knockout (Cx43KO) cells. Corresponding computer simulations were run in randomly generated two-dimensional tissues mimicking the cellular architecture of the strands. In the cultures, the relationship between conduction velocity (CV) and Cx43KO cell content was nonlinear. CV first decreased significantly when Cx43KO content was increased from 0 to 50%. When the Cx43KO content was ≥60%, CV became comparable to that in 100% Cx43KO strands. Co-culturing Cx43KO and wild-type cells also resulted in significantly more heterogeneous conduction patterns and in frequent conduction blocks. The simulations replicated this behaviour of conduction. For Cx43KO contents of 10-50%, conduction was slowed due to wavefront meandering between Cx43KO cells. For Cx43KO contents ≥60%, clusters of remaining wild-type cells acted as electrical loads that impaired conduction. For Cx43KO contents of 40-60%, conduction exhibited fractal characteristics, was prone to block, and was more sensitive to changes in ion currents compared to homogeneous tissue. In conclusion, conduction velocity and stability behave in a nonlinear manner when cardiomyocytes expressing different connexin amounts are combined. This behaviour results from heterogeneous current-to-load relationships at the cellular level. Such behaviour is likely to be arrhythmogenic in various clinical contexts in which gap junctional coupling is heterogeneous. PMID:25128085

  1. Microwave Treatment for Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor); Pacifico, Antonio (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for propagating microwave energy into heart tissues to produce a desired temperature profile therein at tissue depths sufficient for thermally ablating arrhythmogenic cardiac tissue to treat ventricular tachycardia and other arrhythmias while preventing excessive heating of surrounding tissues, organs, and blood. A wide bandwidth double-disk antenna is effective for this purpose over a bandwidth of about six gigahertz. A computer simulation provides initial screening capabilities for an antenna such as antenna, frequency, power level, and power application duration. The simulation also allows optimization of techniques for specific patients or conditions. In operation, microwave energy between about 1 Gigahertz and 12 Gigahertz is applied to monopole microwave radiator having a surface wave limiter. A test setup provides physical testing of microwave radiators to determine the temperature profile created in actual heart tissue or ersatz heart tissue. Saline solution pumped over the heart tissue with a peristaltic pump simulates blood flow. Optical temperature sensors disposed at various tissue depths within the heart tissue detect the temperature profile without creating any electromagnetic interference. The method may be used to produce a desired temperature profile in other body tissues reachable by catheter such as tumors and the like.

  2. Pulmonary tissue volume, cardiac output, and diffusing capacity in sustained microgravity.

    PubMed

    Verbanck, S; Larsson, H; Linnarsson, D; Prisk, G K; West, J B; Paiva, M

    1997-09-01

    In microgravity (microG) humans have marked changes in body fluids, with a combination of an overall fluid loss and a redistribution of fluids in the cranial direction. We investigated whether interstitial pulmonary edema develops as a result of a headward fluid shift or whether pulmonary tissue fluid volume is reduced as a result of the overall loss of body fluid. We measured pulmonary tissue volume (Vti), capillary blood flow, and diffusing capacity in four subjects before, during, and after 10 days of exposure to microG during spaceflight. Measurements were made by rebreathing a gas mixture containing small amounts of acetylene, carbon monoxide, and argon. Measurements made early in flight in two subjects showed no change in Vti despite large increases in stroke volume (40%) and diffusing capacity (13%) consistent with increased pulmonary capillary blood volume. Late in-flight measurements in four subjects showed a 25% reduction in Vti compared with preflight controls (P < 0.001). There was a concomittant reduction in stroke volume, to the extent that it was no longer significantly different from preflight control. Diffusing capacity remained elevated (11%; P < 0.05) late in flight. These findings suggest that, despite increased pulmonary perfusion and pulmonary capillary blood volume, interstitial pulmonary edema does not result from exposure to microG. PMID:9292467

  3. Pulmonary tissue volume, cardiac output, and diffusing capacity in sustained microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verbanck, S.; Larsson, H.; Linnarsson, D.; Prisk, G. K.; West, J. B.; Paiva, M.

    1997-01-01

    In microgravity (microG) humans have marked changes in body fluids, with a combination of an overall fluid loss and a redistribution of fluids in the cranial direction. We investigated whether interstitial pulmonary edema develops as a result of a headward fluid shift or whether pulmonary tissue fluid volume is reduced as a result of the overall loss of body fluid. We measured pulmonary tissue volume (Vti), capillary blood flow, and diffusing capacity in four subjects before, during, and after 10 days of exposure to microG during spaceflight. Measurements were made by rebreathing a gas mixture containing small amounts of acetylene, carbon monoxide, and argon. Measurements made early in flight in two subjects showed no change in Vti despite large increases in stroke volume (40%) and diffusing capacity (13%) consistent with increased pulmonary capillary blood volume. Late in-flight measurements in four subjects showed a 25% reduction in Vti compared with preflight controls (P < 0.001). There was a concomittant reduction in stroke volume, to the extent that it was no longer significantly different from preflight control. Diffusing capacity remained elevated (11%; P < 0.05) late in flight. These findings suggest that, despite increased pulmonary perfusion and pulmonary capillary blood volume, interstitial pulmonary edema does not result from exposure to microG.

  4. The Role of anisotropy on the initiation and propagation of action currents in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudenbacher, F.; Peters, N. T.; Koola, J.; Holzer, J. R.; Fong, L. E.; Trontelj, Z.; Wikswo, J. P.

    2001-03-01

    A central question in biomagnetism is whether the biomagnetic field can contain information not present in the bioelectric potential. We have examined the physiological basis of magnetically-detectable but electrically silent sources, and identified the roles of tissue anisotropy and the spiral architecture of the heart: electrically silent current loops can in principle flow perpendicular to the direction of propagation. We have conducted experiments using an ultra high resolution scanning SQUID microscope in combination with epi-fluorescence imaging system to measure the action currents and the transmembrane potentials of a propagating wavefront in a Langendorff perfused rabbit heart. An activation wavefront has been induced on either the leftventricular free wall or the appex. Results show characteristic differences in the propagation velocities as a function of angle, which provide strong evidence for electrically silent sources.

  5. Cardiomyocytes In Vitro Adhesion Is Actively Influenced by Biomimetic Synthetic Peptides for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Huerta-Cantillo, Rocio; Comisso, Marina; Danesin, Roberta; Ghezzo, Francesca; Naso, Filippo; Gastaldello, Alessandra; Schittullo, Eleonora; Buratto, Edward; Spina, Michele; Gerosa, Gino; Dettin, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Scaffolds for tissue engineering must be designed to direct desired events such as cell attachment, growth, and differentiation. The incorporation of extracellular matrix-derived peptides into biomaterials has been proposed to mimic biochemical signals. In this study, three synthetic fragments of fibronectin, vitronectin, and stromal-derived factor-1 were investigated for the first time as potential adhesive sequences for cardiomyocytes (CMs) compared to smooth muscle cells. CMs are responsive to all peptides to differing degrees, demonstrating the existence of diverse adhesion mechanisms. The pretreatment of nontissue culture well surfaces with the (Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic Acid) RGD sequence anticipated the appearance of CMs' contractility compared to the control (fibronectin-coated well) and doubled the length of cell viability. Future prospects are the inclusion of these sequences into biomaterial formulation with the improvement in cell adhesion that could play an important role in cell retention during dynamic cell seeding. PMID:22011064

  6. How to measure propagation velocity in cardiac tissue: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Linnenbank, Andre C.; de Bakker, Jacques M. T.; Coronel, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    To estimate conduction velocities from activation times in myocardial tissue, the “average vector” method computes all the local activation directions and velocities from local activation times and estimates the fastest and slowest propagation speed from these local values. The “single vector” method uses areas of apparent uniform elliptical spread of activation and chooses a single vector for the estimated longitudinal velocity and one for the transversal. A simulation study was performed to estimate the influence of grid size, anisotropy, and vector angle bin size. The results indicate that the “average vector” method can best be used if the grid- or bin-size is large, although systematic errors occur. The “single vector” method performs better, but requires human intervention for the definition of fiber direction. The average vector method can be automated. PMID:25101004

  7. Preparation of a porous conductive scaffold from aniline pentamer-modified polyurethane/PCL blend for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Baheiraei, Nafiseh; Yeganeh, Hamid; Ai, Jafar; Gharibi, Reza; Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Azami, Mahmoud; Vahdat, Sadaf; Baharvand, Hossein

    2015-10-01

    A novel biodegradable electroactive polyurethane containing aniline pentamer (AP) was blended with polycaprolactone (PCL). The prepared blend (PB) and PCL were further fabricated in to scaffolds using a mixture of poly(ethylene glycol) and salt particles in a double porogen particulate leaching and compression molding methodology. Scaffolds held open and interconnected pores having pore size ranging from several μm to 150 µm. PB scaffolds had compression modulus and strength of 4.1 and 1.3 MPa, respectively. The conductivity of the scaffold was measured as 10(-5) ± 0.09 S .cm(-1) and preserved for at least 100 h post fabrication. Scaffolds supported neonatal cardiomyocytes adhesion and growth with PB showing more extensive effect on the expression of the cardiac genes involved in muscle contraction and relaxation (troponin-T) and cytoskeleton alignment (actinin-4). Our results highlight the potential of incorporation of AP as an electroactive moiety for induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation and repair of damaged heart tissue. PMID:25765879

  8. MALDI Mass Spectrometric Imaging of Cardiac Tissue Following Myocardial Infarction in a Rat Coronary Artery Ligation Model

    PubMed Central

    Menger, Robert F.; Stutts, Whitney L.; Anbukumar, Dhanam S.; Bowden, John A.; Ford, David A.; Yost, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Although acute myocardial infarction (MI) is consistently among the top causes of death in the United States, the spatial distribution of lipids and metabolites following MI remains to be elucidated. This work presents the investigation of an in vivo rat model of MI using mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) and multivariate data analysis. MSI was conducted on cardiac tissue following a 24-hour left anterior descending coronary artery ligation in order to analyze multiple compound classes. First, the spatial distribution of a small metabolite, creatine, was used to identify areas of infarcted myocardium. Second, multivariate data analysis and tandem mass spectrometry were used to identify phospholipid (PL) markers of MI. A number of lysophospholipids demonstrated increased ion signal in areas of infarction. In contrast, select intact PLs demonstrated decreased ion signal in the area of infarction. The complementary nature of these two lipid classes suggest increased activity of phospholipase A2, an enzyme that has been implicated in coronary heart disease and inflammation. PMID:22141424

  9. Quantifying the effect of tissue deformation on diffusion-weighted MRI: a mathematical model and an efficient simulation framework applied to cardiac diffusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Mekkaoui, Imen; Moulin, Kevin; Croisille, Pierre; Pousin, Jerome; Viallon, Magalie

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac motion presents a major challenge in diffusion weighted MRI, often leading to large signal losses that necessitate repeated measurements. The diffusion process in the myocardium is difficult to investigate because of the unqualified sensitivity of diffusion measurements to cardiac motion. A rigorous mathematical formalism is introduced to quantify the effect of tissue motion in diffusion imaging. The presented mathematical model, based on the Bloch-Torrey equations, takes into account deformations according to the laws of continuum mechanics. Approximating this mathematical model by using finite elements method, numerical simulations can predict the sensitivity of the diffusion signal to cardiac motion. Different diffusion encoding schemes are considered and the diffusion weighted MR signals, computed numerically, are compared to available results in literature. Our numerical model can identify the existence of two time points in the cardiac cycle, at which the diffusion is unaffected by myocardial strain and cardiac motion. Of course, these time points depend on the type of diffusion encoding scheme. Our numerical results also show that the motion sensitivity of the diffusion sequence can be reduced by using either spin echo technique with acceleration motion compensation diffusion gradients or stimulated echo acquisition mode with unipolar and bipolar diffusion gradients. PMID:27385441

  10. Quantifying the effect of tissue deformation on diffusion-weighted MRI: a mathematical model and an efficient simulation framework applied to cardiac diffusion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekkaoui, Imen; Moulin, Kevin; Croisille, Pierre; Pousin, Jerome; Viallon, Magalie

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac motion presents a major challenge in diffusion weighted MRI, often leading to large signal losses that necessitate repeated measurements. The diffusion process in the myocardium is difficult to investigate because of the unqualified sensitivity of diffusion measurements to cardiac motion. A rigorous mathematical formalism is introduced to quantify the effect of tissue motion in diffusion imaging. The presented mathematical model, based on the Bloch–Torrey equations, takes into account deformations according to the laws of continuum mechanics. Approximating this mathematical model by using finite elements method, numerical simulations can predict the sensitivity of the diffusion signal to cardiac motion. Different diffusion encoding schemes are considered and the diffusion weighted MR signals, computed numerically, are compared to available results in literature. Our numerical model can identify the existence of two time points in the cardiac cycle, at which the diffusion is unaffected by myocardial strain and cardiac motion. Of course, these time points depend on the type of diffusion encoding scheme. Our numerical results also show that the motion sensitivity of the diffusion sequence can be reduced by using either spin echo technique with acceleration motion compensation diffusion gradients or stimulated echo acquisition mode with unipolar and bipolar diffusion gradients.

  11. Preclinical Evaluation of the Immunomodulatory Properties of Cardiac Adipose Tissue Progenitor Cells Using Umbilical Cord Blood Mesenchymal Stem Cells: A Direct Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Perea-Gil, Isaac; Monguió-Tortajada, Marta; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Borràs, Francesc E.; Roura, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based strategies to regenerate injured myocardial tissue have emerged over the past decade, but the optimum cell type is still under scrutiny. In this context, human adult epicardial fat surrounding the heart has been characterized as a reservoir of mesenchymal-like progenitor cells (cardiac ATDPCs) with potential clinical benefits. However, additional data on the possibility that these cells could trigger a deleterious immune response following implantation are needed. Thus, in the presented study, we took advantage of the well-established low immunogenicity of umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCBMSCs) to comparatively assess the immunomodulatory properties of cardiac ATDPCs in an in vitro allostimulatory assay using allogeneic mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). Similar to UCBMSCs, increasing amounts of seeded cardiac ATDPCs suppressed the alloproliferation of T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (IL6, TNFα, and IFNγ) was also specifically modulated by the different numbers of cardiac ATDPCs cocultured. In summary, we show that cardiac ATDPCs abrogate T cell alloproliferation upon stimulation with allogeneic mature MDDCs, suggesting that they could further regulate a possible harmful immune response in vivo. Additionally, UCBMSCs can be considered as valuable tools to preclinically predict the immunogenicity of prospective regenerative cells. PMID:25861626

  12. Magnetic and Fluorescent Imaging of Wave Front Propagation in Cardiac Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, Jenny R.; Chancellor, Eric; Sidorov, Veniamin; Fong, Luis; Baudenbacher, Franz

    2002-03-01

    To investigate the origin of the magnetocardiogram (MCG), we mapped excitation wave fronts on the left ventricle of a Langendorff perfused isolated rabbit heart using high-resolution LTS-SQUID microscopy and epi-fluorescent imaging with sub-millimeter resolution. The combination of the two methods allows us to map the transmembrane potential and the magnetic field over the same area of the left ventricle. The leading edge of the action potential can be defined as the wave front and identified in the magnetic data as a border between areas of opposite polarity. Calculating the current from the magnetic field shows a strong component parallel to the wave front. Therefore, the MCG on the surface of the heart is mainly generated by a propagating three-dimensional sheet of current. The shape and the size of the MCG depend strongly on the direction of the currents relative to the fiber orientation. These observations are in qualitative agreement with predictions using a two-dimensional bidomain model by Roth et al (1999). However, due to imhomogenities in the tissue properties, the wave front propagates at different angles relative to the fiber orientation and can only be identified as planar over small localized areas of, typically, a few millimeters. This explains the variations in the MCG over the scan area and confirms the sensitivity of the MCG to the angle between current flow and fiber orientation.

  13. Quantitative assessment of brain tissue oxygenation in porcine models of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation using hyperspectral near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfabadi, Shahin S.; Toronov, Vladislav; Ramadeen, Andrew; Hu, Xudong; Kim, Siwook; Dorian, Paul; Hare, Gregory M. T.

    2014-03-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a non-invasive tool to measure real-time tissue oxygenation in the brain. In an invasive animal experiment we were able to directly compare non-invasive NIRS measurements on the skull with invasive measurements directly on the brain dura matter. We used a broad-band, continuous-wave hyper-spectral approach to measure tissue oxygenation in the brain of pigs under the conditions of cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and defibrillation. An additional purpose of this research was to find a correlation between mortality due to cardiac arrest and inadequacy of the tissue perfusion during attempts at resuscitation. Using this technique we measured the changes in concentrations of oxy-hemoglobin [HbO2] and deoxy-hemoglobin [HHb] to quantify the tissue oxygenation in the brain. We also extracted cytochrome c oxidase changes Δ[Cyt-Ox] under the same conditions to determine increase or decrease in cerebral oxygen delivery. In this paper we proved that applying CPR, [HbO2] concentration and tissue oxygenation in the brain increase while [HHb] concentration decreases which was not possible using other measurement techniques. We also discovered a similar trend in changes of both [Cyt-Ox] concentration and tissue oxygen saturation (StO2). Both invasive and non-invasive measurements showed similar results.

  14. Electrospun type 1 collagen matrices preserving native ultrastructure using benign binary solvent for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Elamparithi, Anuradha; Punnoose, Alan M; Kuruvilla, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    Electrospinning is a well-established technique that uses a high electric field to fabricate ultrafine fibrous scaffolds from both natural and synthetic polymers to mimic the cellular microenvironment. Collagen is one of the most preferred biopolymers, due to its widespread occurrence in nature and its biocompatibility. Electrospinning of collagen alone has been reported, with fluoroalcohols such as hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) and trifluoroethanol (TFE), but the resultant collagen lost its characteristic ultrastructural integrity of D-periodicity 67 nm banding, confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the fluoroalcohols used were toxic to the environment. In this study, we describe the use of glacial acetic acid and DMSO to dissolve collagen and generate electrospun nanofibers of collagen type 1, which is non-toxic and economical. TEM analysis revealed the characteristic feature of native collagen triple helical repeats, showing 67 nm D-periodicity banding pattern and confirming that the ultrastructural integrity of the collagen was maintained. Analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed fiber diameters in the range of 200-1100 nm. Biocompatibility of the three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds was established by MTT assays using rat skeletal myoblasts (L6 cell line) and confocal microscopic analysis of immunofluorescent-stained sections of collagen scaffolds for muscle-specific markers such as desmin and actin. Primary neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRVCM) seeded onto the collagen scaffolds were able to maintain their contractile function for a period of 17 days and also expressed higher levels of desmin when compared with 2D cultures. We report for the first time that collagen type 1 can be electrospun without blending with copolymers using the novel benign solvent combination, and the method can be potentially explored for applications in tissue engineering. PMID:25960178

  15. High Resolution Systematic Digital Histological Quantification of Cardiac Fibrosis and Adipose Tissue in Phospholamban p.Arg14del Mutation Associated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gho, Johannes M. I. H.; van Es, René; Stathonikos, Nikolas; Harakalova, Magdalena; te Rijdt, Wouter P.; Suurmeijer, Albert J. H.; van der Heijden, Jeroen F.; de Jonge, Nicolaas; Chamuleau, Steven A. J.; de Weger, Roel A.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Vink, Aryan

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial fibrosis can lead to heart failure and act as a substrate for cardiac arrhythmias. In dilated cardiomyopathy diffuse interstitial reactive fibrosis can be observed, whereas arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy is characterized by fibrofatty replacement in predominantly the right ventricle. The p.Arg14del mutation in the phospholamban (PLN) gene has been associated with dilated cardiomyopathy and recently also with arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy. Aim of the present study is to determine the exact pattern of fibrosis and fatty replacement in PLN p.Arg14del mutation positive patients, with a novel method for high resolution systematic digital histological quantification of fibrosis and fatty tissue in cardiac tissue. Transversal mid-ventricular slices (n = 8) from whole hearts were collected from patients with the PLN p.Arg14del mutation (age 48±16 years; 4 (50%) male). An in-house developed open source MATLAB script was used for digital analysis of Masson's trichrome stained slides (http://sourceforge.net/projects/fibroquant/). Slides were divided into trabecular, inner and outer compact myocardium. Per region the percentage of connective tissue, cardiomyocytes and fatty tissue was quantified. In PLN p.Arg14del mutation associated cardiomyopathy, myocardial fibrosis is predominantly present in the left posterolateral wall and to a lesser extent in the right ventricular wall, whereas fatty changes are more pronounced in the right ventricular wall. No difference in distribution pattern of fibrosis and adipocytes was observed between patients with a clinical predominantly dilated and arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy phenotype. In the future, this novel method for quantifying fibrosis and fatty tissue can be used to assess cardiac fibrosis and fatty tissue in animal models and a broad range of human cardiomyopathies. PMID:24732829

  16. Attenuation of cold stress-induced exacerbation of cardiac and adipose tissue pathology and metabolic disorders in a rat model of metabolic syndrome by the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU486

    PubMed Central

    Nagasawa, K; Matsuura, N; Takeshita, Y; Ito, S; Sano, Y; Yamada, Y; Uchinaka, A; Murohara, T; Nagata, K

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Chronic stress affects the central nervous system as well as endocrine, metabolic and immune systems. However, the effects of cold stress on cardiovascular and metabolic disorders in metabolic syndrome (MetS) have remained unclear. We recently characterized DahlS.Z-Leprfa/Leprfa (DS/obese) rats, derived from a cross between Dahl salt-sensitive and Zucker rats, as a new animal model of MetS. We have now investigated the effects of chronic cold stress and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) blockade on cardiac and adipose tissue pathology as well as on metabolic parameters in this model. Methods: DS/obese rats were exposed to cold stress (immersion in ice-cold water to a depth of 1–2 cm for 2 h per day) with or without subcutaneous injection of the GR antagonist RU486 (2 mg kg−1day−1) for 4 weeks beginning at 9 weeks of age. Age-matched homozygous lean (DahlS.Z-Lepr+/Lepr+) littermates served as a control. Results: Chronic cold stress exacerbated hypertension as well as left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction in DS/obese rats in a manner sensitive to RU486 treatment. Cold stress with or without RU486 did not affect body weight or fat mass. In contrast, cold stress further increased cardiac oxidative stress as well as macrophage infiltration and proinflammatory gene expression in LV and visceral fat tissue, with all of these effects being attenuated by RU486. Cold stress also further increased GR and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 mRNA and protein abundance in LV and visceral adipose tissue, and these effects were again inhibited by RU486. In addition, RU486 ameliorated the stress-induced aggravation of dyslipidemia, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in DS/obese rats. Conclusions: Our results implicate GR signaling in cold stress-induced exacerbation of cardiac and adipose tissue pathology as well as of abnormal glucose and lipid metabolism in a rat model of MetS. PMID:27110688

  17. 2-Oxoglutarate dehydrogenase is a more significant source of O2(·-)/H2O2 than pyruvate dehydrogenase in cardiac and liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Gardiner, Danielle; O'Brien, Marisa

    2016-08-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (Pdh) and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (Ogdh) are vital for Krebs cycle metabolism and sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS). O2(·-)/H2O2 formation by Pdh and Ogdh from porcine heart were compared when operating under forward or reverse electron transfer conditions. Comparisons were also conducted with liver and cardiac mitochondria. During reverse electron transfer (RET) from NADH, purified Ogdh generated ~3-3.5× more O2(·-)/H2O2 in comparison to Pdh when metabolizing 0.5-10µM NADH. Under forward electron transfer (FET) conditions Ogdh generated ~2-4× more O2(·-)/H2O2 than Pdh. In both liver and cardiac mitochondria, Ogdh displayed significantly higher rates of ROS formation when compared to Pdh. Ogdh was also a significant source of ROS in liver mitochondria metabolizing 50µM and 500µM pyruvate or succinate. Finally, we also observed that DTT directly stimulated O2(·-)/H2O2 formation by purified Pdh and Ogdh and in cardiac or liver mitochondria in the absence of substrates and cofactors. Taken together, Ogdh is a more potent source of ROS than Pdh in liver and cardiac tissue. Ogdh is also an important ROS generator regardless of whether pyruvate or succinate serve as the sole source of carbon. Our observations provide insight into the ROS generating capacity of either complex in cardiac and liver tissue. The evidence presented herein also indicates DTT, a reductant that is routinely added to biological samples, should be avoided when assessing mitochondrial O2(·-)/H2O2 production. PMID:27394173

  18. RF-based two-dimensional cardiac strain estimation: a validation study in a tissue-mimicking phantom.

    PubMed

    Langeland, Stian; D'hooge, Jan; Claessens, Tom; Claus, Piet; Verdonck, Pascal; Suetens, Paul; Sutherland, George R; Bijnens, Bart

    2004-11-01

    Strain and strain rate imaging have been shown to be useful techniques for the assessment of cardiac function. However, one of the major problems of these techniques is their angle dependency. In order to overcome this problem, a new method for estimating the strain (rate) tensor had previously been proposed by our lab. The aim of this study was to validate this methodology in a phantom setup. A tubular thick-walled tissue-mimicking phantom was fixed in a water tank. Varying the intraluminal pressure resulted in a cyclic radial deformation. The 2D strain was calculated from the 2D velocity estimates, obtained from 2D radio frequency (RF) tracking using a 1D kernel. Additionally, ultrasonic microcrystals were implanted on the outer and inner walls of the tube in order to give an independent measurement of the instantaneous wall thickness. The two methods were compared by means of linear regression, the correlation coefficient, and Bland-Altman statistics. As expected, the strain estimates dominated by the azimuth velocity component were less accurate than the ones dominated by the axial velocity component. Correlation coefficients were found to be r = 0.78 for the former estimates and r = 0.83 was found for the latter. Given that the overall shape and timing of the 2D deformation were very accurate (r = 0.95 and r = 0.84), these results were within acceptable limits for clinical applications. The 2D RF-tracking using a 1D kernel thus allows for 2D, and therefore angle-independent, strain estimation. PMID:15600099

  19. Mechanical and electrophysiological studies on the positive inotropic effect of 2-phenyl-4-oxo-hydroquinoline in rat cardiac tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Su, M. J.; Chang, G. J.; Kuo, S. C.

    1993-01-01

    1. The pharmacological and electrophysiological effect of 2-phenyl-4-oxo-hydroquinoline (YT-1), a new synthetic agent, were determined in rat isolated cardiac tissues and ventricular myocytes. 2. YT-1 was found to have a positive inotropic effect in both atria and ventricular muscles but did not cause significant increases in the spontaneously beating rate of right atria. 3. The positive inotropic effect of YT-1 was antagonized neither by beta-nor by alpha-adrenoceptor antagonists but was partially antagonized by a Ca2+ channel blocker (verapamil) and a K+ channel blocker (4-AP). 4. The action potential duration and amplitude of ventricular cells were progressively increased as the concentration of YT-1 was increased from 3 to 30 microM. 5. A voltage clamp study revealed that the prolongation of action potential duration by YT-1 was associated with a prominent inhibition of 4-AP-sensitive transient outward current (I(to)). At potentials negative to the reversal potential of K1-channels, the inward current through these channels was partially reduced by YT-1. At potentials positive to the reversal potential, the outward current through these channels was affected very little. 6. Although YT-1 blocked the amplitude of I(to), the voltage-dependence of the steady-state inactivation of I(to), was unaffected. 7. Apart from the inhibition of K+ currents, YT-1 also inhibited the sodium inward current. 8. The evidence suggests that YT-1 increases the slow inward Ca2+ current (ICa) significantly. 9. It is concluded that the positive inotropic effect of YT-1 is due predominantly to the increase of ICa and inhibition of I(to).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8106106

  20. Insulin-like Growth Factor-I and Slow, Bi-directional Perfusion Enhance the Formation of Tissue-Engineered Cardiac Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Mingyu; Moretti, Matteo; Engelmayr, George C.

    2009-01-01

    Biochemical and mechanical signals enabling cardiac regeneration can be elucidated using in vitro tissue-engineering models. We hypothesized that insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF) and slow, bi-directional perfusion could act independently and interactively to enhance the survival, differentiation, and contractile performance of tissue-engineered cardiac grafts. Heart cells were cultured on three-dimensional porous scaffolds in medium with or without supplemental IGF and in the presence or absence of slow, bi-directional perfusion that enhanced transport and provided shear stress. Structural, molecular, and electrophysiologic properties of the resulting grafts were quantified on culture day 8. IGF had independent, beneficial effects on apoptosis (p < 0.01), cellular viability (p < 0.01), contractile amplitude (p < 0.01), and excitation threshold (p < 0.01). Perfusion independently affected the four aforementioned parameters and also increased amounts of cardiac troponin-I (p < 0.01), connexin-43 (p < 0.05), and total protein (p < 0.01) in the grafts. Interactive effects of IGF and perfusion on apoptosis were also present (p < 0.01). Myofibrillogenesis and spontaneous contractility were present only in grafts cultured with perfusion, although contractility was inducible by electrical field stimulation of grafts from all groups. Our findings demonstrate that multi-factorial stimulation of tissue-engineered cardiac grafts using IGF and perfusion resulted in independent and interactive effects on heart cell survival, differentiation, and contractility. PMID:18759675

  1. Postmortem mRNA Expression Patterns in Left Ventricular Myocardial Tissues and Their Implications for Forensic Diagnosis of Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Son, Gi Hoon; Park, Seong Hwan; Kim, Yunmi; Kim, Ji Yeon; Kim, Jin Wook; Chung, Sooyoung; Kim, Yu-Hoon; Kim, Hyun; Hwang, Juck-Joon; Seo, Joong-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD), which is primarily caused by lethal heart disorders resulting in structural and arrhythmogenic abnormalities, is one of the prevalent modes of death in most developed countries. Myocardial ischemia, mainly due to coronary artery disease, is the most common type of heart disease leading to SCD. However, postmortem diagnosis of SCD is frequently complicated by obscure histological evidence. Here, we show that certain mRNA species, namely those encoding hemoglobin A1/2 and B (Hba1/2 and Hbb, respectively) as well as pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (Pdk4), exhibit distinct postmortem expression patterns in the left ventricular free wall of SCD subjects when compared with their expression patterns in the corresponding tissues from control subjects with non-cardiac causes of death. Hba1/2 and Hbb mRNA expression levels were higher in ischemic SCD cases with acute myocardial infarction or ischemic heart disease without recent infarction, and even in cardiac death subjects without apparent pathological signs of heart injuries, than control subjects. By contrast, Pdk4 mRNA was expressed at lower levels in SCD subjects. In conclusion, we found that altered myocardial Hba1/2, Hbb, and Pdk4 mRNA expression patterns can be employed as molecular signatures of fatal cardiac dysfunction to forensically implicate SCD as the primary cause of death. PMID:24642708

  2. Efficient long-term survival of cell grafts after myocardial infarction with thick viable cardiac tissue entirely from pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Takehiko; Masumoto, Hidetoshi; Tajima, Shuhei; Ikuno, Takeshi; Katayama, Shiori; Minakata, Kenji; Ikeda, Tadashi; Yamamizu, Kohei; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Sakata, Ryuzo; Yamashita, Jun K.

    2015-01-01

    Poor engraftment of cells after transplantation to the heart is a common and unresolved problem in the cardiac cell therapies. We previously generated cardiovascular cell sheets entirely from pluripotent stem cells with cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and vascular mural cells. Though sheet transplantation showed a better engraftment and improved cardiac function after myocardial infarction, stacking limitation (up to 3 sheets) by hypoxia hampered larger structure formation and long-term survival of the grafts. Here we report an efficient method to overcome the stacking limitation. Insertion of gelatin hydrogel microspheres (GHMs) between each cardiovascular cell sheet broke the viable limitation via appropriate spacing and fluid impregnation with GHMs. Fifteen sheets with GHMs (15-GHM construct; >1 mm thickness) were stacked within several hours and viable after 1 week in vitro. Transplantation of 5-GHM constructs (≈2 × 106 of total cells) to a rat myocardial infarction model showed rapid and sustained functional improvements. The grafts were efficiently engrafted as multiple layered cardiovascular cells accompanied by functional capillary networks. Large engrafted cardiac tissues (0.8 mm thickness with 40 cell layers) successfully survived 3 months after TX. We developed an efficient method to generate thicker viable tissue structures and achieve long-term survival of the cell graft to the heart. PMID:26585309

  3. Engineered 3D bioimplants using elastomeric scaffold, self-assembling peptide hydrogel, and adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells for cardiac regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Soler-Botija, Carolina; Bagó, Juli R; Llucià-Valldeperas, Aida; Vallés-Lluch, Ana; Castells-Sala, Cristina; Martínez-Ramos, Cristina; Fernández-Muiños, Teresa; Chachques, Juan Carlos; Pradas, Manuel Monleón; Semino, Carlos E; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Contractile restoration of myocardial scars remains a challenge with important clinical implications. Here, a combination of porous elastomeric membrane, peptide hydrogel, and subcutaneous adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells (subATDPCs) was designed and evaluated as a bioimplant for cardiac regeneration in a mouse model of myocardial infarction. SubATDPCs were doubly transduced with lentiviral vectors to express bioluminescent-fluorescent reporters driven by constitutively active, cardiac tissue-specific promoters. Cells were seeded into an engineered bioimplant consisting of a scaffold (polycaprolactone methacryloyloxyethyl ester) filled with a peptide hydrogel (PuraMatrix™), and transplanted to cover injured myocardium. Bioluminescence and fluorescence quantifications showed de novo and progressive increases in promoter expression in bioactive implant-treated animals. The bioactive implant was well adapted to the heart, and fully functional vessels traversed the myocardium-bioactive implant interface. Treatment translated into a detectable positive effect on cardiac function, as revealed by echocardiography. Thus, this novel implant is a promising construct for supporting myocardial regeneration. PMID:24936221

  4. IFATS collection: Human adipose tissue-derived stem cells induce angiogenesis and nerve sprouting following myocardial infarction, in conjunction with potent preservation of cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Cai, Liying; Johnstone, Brian H; Cook, Todd G; Tan, Jian; Fishbein, Michael C; Chen, Peng-Sheng; March, Keith L

    2009-01-01

    The administration of therapeutic cell types, such as stem and progenitor cells, has gained much interest for the limitation or repair of tissue damage caused by a variety of insults. However, it is still uncertain whether the morphological and functional benefits are mediated predominantly via cell differentiation or paracrine mechanisms. Here, we assessed the extent and mechanisms of adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASC)-dependent tissue repair in the context of acute myocardial infarction. Human ASCs in saline or saline alone was injected into the peri-infarct region in athymic rats following left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery ligation. Cardiac function and structure were evaluated by serial echocardiography and histology. ASC-treated rats consistently exhibited better cardiac function, by all measures, than control rats 1 month following LAD occlusion. Left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction and fractional shortening were improved in the ASC group, whereas LV remodeling and dilation were limited in the ASC group compared with the saline control group. Anterior wall thinning was also attenuated by ASC treatment, and post-mortem histological analysis demonstrated reduced fibrosis in ASC-treated hearts, as well as increased peri-infarct density of both arterioles and nerve sprouts. Human ASCs were persistent at 1 month in the peri-infarct region, but they were not observed to exhibit significant cardiomyocyte differentiation. Human ASCs preserve heart function and augment local angiogenesis and cardiac nerve sprouting following myocardial infarction predominantly by the provision of beneficial trophic factors. PMID:18772313

  5. The myocardial regenerative potential of three-dimensional engineered cardiac tissues composed of multiple human iPS cell-derived cardiovascular cell lineages.

    PubMed

    Masumoto, Hidetoshi; Nakane, Takeichiro; Tinney, Joseph P; Yuan, Fangping; Ye, Fei; Kowalski, William J; Minakata, Kenji; Sakata, Ryuzo; Yamashita, Jun K; Keller, Bradley B

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are a robust source for cardiac regenerative therapy due to their potential to support autologous and allogeneic transplant paradigms. The in vitro generation of three-dimensional myocardial tissue constructs using biomaterials as an implantable hiPSC-derived myocardium provides a path to realize sustainable myocardial regeneration. We generated engineered cardiac tissues (ECTs) from three cellular compositions of cardiomyocytes (CMs), endothelial cells (ECs), and vascular mural cells (MCs) differentiated from hiPSCs. We then determined the impact of cell composition on ECT structural and functional properties. In vitro force measurement showed that CM+EC+MC ECTs possessed preferential electromechanical properties versus ECTs without vascular cells indicating that incorporation of vascular cells augmented tissue maturation and function. The inclusion of MCs facilitated more mature CM sarcomeric structure, preferential alignment, and activated multiple tissue maturation pathways. The CM+EC+MC ECTs implanted onto infarcted, immune tolerant rat hearts engrafted, displayed both host and graft-derived vasculature, and ameliorated myocardial dysfunction. Thus, a composition of CMs and multiple vascular lineages derived from hiPSCs and incorporated into ECTs promotes functional maturation and demonstrates myocardial replacement and perfusion relevant for clinical translation. PMID:27435115

  6. The myocardial regenerative potential of three-dimensional engineered cardiac tissues composed of multiple human iPS cell-derived cardiovascular cell lineages

    PubMed Central

    Masumoto, Hidetoshi; Nakane, Takeichiro; Tinney, Joseph P.; Yuan, Fangping; Ye, Fei; Kowalski, William J.; Minakata, Kenji; Sakata, Ryuzo; Yamashita, Jun K.; Keller, Bradley B.

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are a robust source for cardiac regenerative therapy due to their potential to support autologous and allogeneic transplant paradigms. The in vitro generation of three-dimensional myocardial tissue constructs using biomaterials as an implantable hiPSC-derived myocardium provides a path to realize sustainable myocardial regeneration. We generated engineered cardiac tissues (ECTs) from three cellular compositions of cardiomyocytes (CMs), endothelial cells (ECs), and vascular mural cells (MCs) differentiated from hiPSCs. We then determined the impact of cell composition on ECT structural and functional properties. In vitro force measurement showed that CM+EC+MC ECTs possessed preferential electromechanical properties versus ECTs without vascular cells indicating that incorporation of vascular cells augmented tissue maturation and function. The inclusion of MCs facilitated more mature CM sarcomeric structure, preferential alignment, and activated multiple tissue maturation pathways. The CM+EC+MC ECTs implanted onto infarcted, immune tolerant rat hearts engrafted, displayed both host and graft-derived vasculature, and ameliorated myocardial dysfunction. Thus, a composition of CMs and multiple vascular lineages derived from hiPSCs and incorporated into ECTs promotes functional maturation and demonstrates myocardial replacement and perfusion relevant for clinical translation. PMID:27435115

  7. Effect of Broccoli (Brassica oleracea) Tissue, Incorporated at Different Depths in a Soil Column, on Meloidogyne incognita

    PubMed Central

    Roubtsova, Tatiana; López-Péŕez, Jose-Antonio; Edwards, Scott; Ploeg, Antoon

    2007-01-01

    Brassicas have been used frequently for biofumigation, a pest-management strategy based on the release of biocidal volatiles during decomposition of soil-incorporated tissue. However, the role of such volatiles in control of plant-parasitic nematodes is unclear. The goal of this study was to determine the direct localized and indirect volatile effects of amending soil with broccoli tissue on root-knot nematode populations. Meloidogyne incognita-infested soil in 50-cm-long tubes was amended with broccoli tissue, which was mixed throughout the tube or concentrated in a 10-cm layer. After three weeks at 28°C, M. incognita populations in the amended tubes were 57 to 80% smaller than in non-amended tubes. Mixing broccoli throughout the tubes reduced M. incognita more than concentrating broccoli in a 10-cm layer. Amending a 10-cm layer reduced M. incognita in the non-amended layers of those tubes by 31 to 71%, probably due to a nematicidal effect of released volatiles. However, the localized direct effect was much stronger than the indirect effect of volatiles. The strong direct effect may have resulted from the release of non-volatile nematicidal compounds. Therefore, when using biofumigation with broccoli to control M. incognita, the tissue should be thoroughly and evenly mixed through the soil layer(s) where the target nematodes occur. Effects on saprophytic nematodes were the reverse. Amended soil layers had much greater numbers of saprophytic nematodes than non-amended layers, and there was no indirect effect of amendments on saprophytic nematodes in adjacent non-amended layers. PMID:19259479

  8. Minocycline attenuates brain tissue levels of TNF-α produced by neurons after prolonged hypothermic cardiac arrest in rats

    PubMed Central

    Drabek, Tomas; Janata, Andreas; Wilson, Caleb D.; Stezoski, Jason; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Tisherman, Samuel A.; Foley, Lesley M.; Verrier, Jonathan; Kochanek, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Neuro-cognitive disabilities are a well-recognized complication of hypothermic circulatory arrest. We and others have reported that prolonged cardiac arrest (CA) produces neuronal death and microglial proliferation and activation that are only partially mitigated by hypothermia. Microglia, and possibly other cells, are suggested to elaborate tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) which can trigger neuronal death cascades and exacerbate edema after CNS insults. Minocycline is neuroprotective in some brain ischemia models in part by blunting the microglial response. We tested the hypothesis that minocycline would attenuate neuroinflammation as reflected by brain tissue levels of TNF-α after hypothermic CA in rats. Rats were subjected to rapid exsanguination, followed by a 6 min normothermic CA. Hypothermia (30 °C) was then induced by an aortic saline flush. After a total of 20 min CA, resuscitation was achieved via cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). After 5 min reperfusion, minocycline (90 mg/kg; n=6) or vehicle (PBS; n=6) were given. Hypothermia (34 °C) was maintained for 6 h. Rats were sacrificed at 6 or 24 h. TNF-α was quantified (ELISA) in four brain regions (cerebellum, CEREB; cortex, CTX; hippocampus, HIP; striatum, STRI). Naïve rats (n=6) and rats subjected to the same anesthesia and CPB but no CA served as controls (n=6). Immunocytochemistry was used to localize TNF-α. Naïve rats and CPB controls had no detectable TNF-α in any brain region. CA markedly increased brain TNF-α. Regional differences were seen, with the highest TNF-α levels in striatum in CA groups (10-fold higher, P<0.05 vs. all other brain regions). TNF-α was undetectable at 24 h. Minocycline attenuated TNF-α levels in CTX, HIP and STRI (P<0.05). TNF-α showed unique co-localization with neurons. In conclusion, we report region-dependent early increases in brain TNF-α levels after prolonged hypothermic CA, with maximal increases in striatum. Surprisingly, TNF-α co-localized in neurons and

  9. Effect of Irradiation on Tissue Penetration Depth of Doxorubicin after Pressurized Intra-Peritoneal Aerosol Chemotherapy (PIPAC) in a Novel Ex-Vivo Model

    PubMed Central

    Khosrawipour, Veria; Giger-Pabst, Urs; Khosrawipour, Tanja; Pour, Yousef Hedayat; Diaz-Carballo, David; Förster, Eckart; Böse-Ribeiro, Hugo; Adamietz, Irenäus Anton; Zieren, Jürgen; Fakhrian, Khashayar

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was performed to assess the impact of irradiation on the tissue penetration depth of doxorubicin delivered during Pressurized Intra-Peritoneal Aerosol Chemotherapy (PIPAC). Methods: Fresh post mortem swine peritoneum was cut into 10 proportional sections. Except for 2 control samples, all received irradiation with 1, 2, 7 and 14 Gy, respectively. Four samples received PIPAC 15 minutes after irradiation and 4 other after 24 hours. Doxorubicin was aerosolized in an ex-vivo PIPAC model at 12 mmHg/36°C. In-tissue doxorubicin penetration was measured using fluorescence microscopy on frozen thin sections. Results: Doxorubicin penetration after PIPAC (15 minutes after irradiation) was 476 ± 74 µm for the control sample, 450 ± 45µm after 1 Gy (p > 0.05), 438 ± 29 µm after 2 Gy (p > 0.05), 396 ± 32 µm after 7 Gy (p = 0.005) and 284 ± 57 after 14 Gy irradiation (p < 0.001). The doxorubicin penetration after PIPAC (24 hours after irradiation) was 428 ± 77 µm for the control sample, 393 ± 41 µm after 1 Gy (p > 0.05), 379 ± 56 µm after 2 Gy (p > 0.05), 352 ± 53 µm after 7 Gy (p = 0.008) and 345 ± 53 after 14 Gy irradiation (p = 0.001). Conclusions: Higher (fractional) radiation dose might reduce the tissue penetration depth of doxorubicin in our ex-vivo model. However, irradiation with lower (fractional) radiation dose does not affect the tissue penetration negatively. Further studies are warranted to investigate if irradiation can be used safely as chemopotenting agent for patients with peritoneal metastases treated with PIPAC. PMID:27313780

  10. Synthesis and tissue biodistribution of [{omega}-{sup 11}C]palmitic acid. A novel PET imagining agent for cardiac fatty acid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Buckman, B.O.; VanBrocklin, H.F.; Katzenellenbogen, J.A.; Dence, C.S.; Bergmann, S.R.; Welch, M.J.

    1994-12-31

    In order to diagnose patients with medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency with a noninvasive diagnostic technique such as positron emission tomography, they have developed a synthesis of [{omega}-{sup 11}C]palmitic acid. The radiochemical synthesis was achieved by coupling an alkylfuran Grignard reagent (7) with [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide, followed by rapid oxidative cleavage of the furan ring to the carboxylate using ruthenium tetraoxide. Tissue biodistribution studies in rags comparing [{omega}-{sup 11}C]palmitic acid and [1-{sup 11}C]palmitic acid show that the %ID/g and %ID/organ in the heart tissue after administration of [{omega}-{sup 11}C]palmitic acid is approximately 50% greater than after administration of [1-{sup 11}C]palmitic acid, due to the diminished metabolism of the [{omega}-{sup 11}C]palmitic acid. These studies show as well, low uptake in nontarget tissues (blood, lung, kidney, and muscle). PET images of a dog heart obtained after administration of [{omega}-{sup 11}C]- and [1-{sup 11}C]palmitic acid show virtually identical uptake and distribution in the myocardium. The differing cardiac washout of labeled palmitates measured by dynamic PET studies may allow diagnosis of disorders in cardiac fatty acid metabolism.

  11. Early Prediction of Cancer Progression by Depth-Resolved Nanoscale Mapping of Nuclear Architecture from Unstained Tissue Specimens.

    PubMed

    Uttam, Shikhar; Pham, Hoa V; LaFace, Justin; Leibowitz, Brian; Yu, Jian; Brand, Randall E; Hartman, Douglas J; Liu, Yang

    2015-11-15

    Early cancer detection currently relies on screening the entire at-risk population, as with colonoscopy and mammography. Therefore, frequent, invasive surveillance of patients at risk for developing cancer carries financial, physical, and emotional burdens because clinicians lack tools to accurately predict which patients will actually progress into malignancy. Here, we present a new method to predict cancer progression risk via nanoscale nuclear architecture mapping (nanoNAM) of unstained tissue sections based on the intrinsic density alteration of nuclear structure rather than the amount of stain uptake. We demonstrate that nanoNAM detects a gradual increase in the density alteration of nuclear architecture during malignant transformation in animal models of colon carcinogenesis and in human patients with ulcerative colitis, even in tissue that appears histologically normal according to pathologists. We evaluated the ability of nanoNAM to predict "future" cancer progression in patients with ulcerative colitis who did and did not develop colon cancer up to 13 years after their initial colonoscopy. NanoNAM of the initial biopsies correctly classified 12 of 15 patients who eventually developed colon cancer and 15 of 18 who did not, with an overall accuracy of 85%. Taken together, our findings demonstrate great potential for nanoNAM in predicting cancer progression risk and suggest that further validation in a multicenter study with larger cohorts may eventually advance this method to become a routine clinical test. PMID:26383164

  12. Microscopic variations in interstitial and intracellular structure modulate the distribution of conduction delays and block in cardiac tissue with source–load mismatch

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Marjorie Letitia; Henriquez, Craig S.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Reentrant activity in the heart is often correlated with heterogeneity in both the intracellular structure and the interstitial structure surrounding cells; however, the combined effect of cardiac microstructure and interstitial resistivity in regions of source–load mismatch is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate how microstructural variations in cell arrangement and increased interstitial resistivity influence the spatial distribution of conduction delays and block in poorly coupled regions of tissue. Methods and results Two-dimensional 0.6 cm × 0.6 cm computer models with idealized and realistic cellular structure were used to represent a monolayer of ventricular myocytes. Gap junction connections were distributed around the periphery of each cell at 10 μm intervals. Regions of source–load mismatch were added to the models by increasing the gap junction and interstitial resistivity in one-half of the tissue. Heterogeneity in cell shape and cell arrangement along the boundary between well-coupled and poorly coupled tissue increased variability in longitudinal conduction delays to as much as 10 ms before the onset of conduction block, resulting in wavefront breakthroughs with pronounced curvature at distinct points along the boundary. Increasing the effective interstitial resistivity reduced source–load mismatch at the transition boundary, which caused a decrease in longitudinal conduction delay and an increase in the number of wavefront breakthroughs. Conclusion Microstructural variations in cardiac tissue facilitate the formation of isolated sites of wavefront breakthrough that may enable abnormal electrical activity in small regions of diseased tissue to develop into more widespread reentrant activity. PMID:23104912

  13. Accuracies of facial soft tissue depth means for estimating ground truth skin surfaces in forensic craniofacial identification.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Carl N

    2015-07-01

    Facial soft tissue thickness means have long been used as a proxy to estimate the soft tissue envelope, over the skull, in craniofacial identification. However, estimation errors of these statistics are not well understood, making casework selection of the best performing estimation models impossible and overarching method accuracies controversial. To redress this situation, residuals between predicted and ground truth values were calculated in two experiments: (1) for 27 suites of means drawn from 10 recently published studies, all examining the same 10 landmarks (N ≥ 3051), and tested against six independent raw datasets of contemporary living adults (N = 797); and (2) pairwise tests of the above six, and five other, raw datasets (N = 1063). In total, 380 out-of-sample tests of 416 arithmetic means were conducted across 11 independent samples. Experiment 1 produced an overarching mean absolute percentage error (MAE) of 29% and a standard error of the estimate (S(est)) of 2.7 mm. Experiment 2 yielded MAE of 32% and S(est) of 2.8 mm. In any instance, MAE was always ≥20% of the ground truth value. The overarching 95% limits of the error, for contemporary samples, was large (11.4 mm). CT-derived means from South Korean males and Black South African females routinely performed well across the test samples and produced the smallest errors of any tests (but did so for Black American male reference samples). Sample-specific statistics thereby performed poorly despite discipline esteem. These results—and the practice of publishing means without prior model validation—demand major reforms in the field. PMID:25394746

  14. The application of the central limit theorem and the law of large numbers to facial soft tissue depths: T-Table robustness and trends since 2008.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Carl N

    2014-03-01

    By pooling independent study means (x¯), the T-Tables use the central limit theorem and law of large numbers to average out study-specific sampling bias and instrument errors and, in turn, triangulate upon human population means (μ). Since their first publication in 2008, new data from >2660 adults have been collected (c.30% of the original sample) making a review of the T-Table's robustness timely. Updated grand means show that the new data have negligible impact on the previously published statistics: maximum change = 1.7 mm at gonion; and ≤1 mm at 93% of all landmarks measured. This confirms the utility of the 2008 T-Table as a proxy to soft tissue depth population means and, together with updated sample sizes (8851 individuals at pogonion), earmarks the 2013 T-Table as the premier mean facial soft tissue depth standard for craniofacial identification casework. The utility of the T-Table, in comparison with shorths and 75-shormaxes, is also discussed. PMID:24313424

  15. Folic acid mitigated cardiac dysfunction by normalizing the levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase and homocysteine-metabolizing enzymes postmyocardial infarction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Qipshidze, Natia; Tyagi, Neetu; Sen, Utpal; Givvimani, Srikanth; Metreveli, Naira; Lominadze, David

    2010-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) results in significant metabolic derangement, causing accumulation of metabolic by product, such as homocysteine (Hcy). Hcy is a nonprotein amino acid generated during nucleic acid methylation and demethylation of methionine. Folic acid (FA) decreases Hcy levels by remethylating the Hcy to methionine, by 5-methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (5-MTHFR). Although clinical trials were inconclusive regarding the role of Hcy in MI, in animal models, the levels of 5-MTHFR were decreased, and FA mitigated the MI injury. We hypothesized that FA mitigated MI-induced injury, in part, by mitigating cardiac remodeling during chronic heart failure. Thus, MI was induced in 12-wk-old male C57BL/J mice by ligating the left anterior descending artery, and FA (0.03 g/l in drinking water) was administered for 4 wk after the surgery. Cardiac function was assessed by echocardiography and by a Millar pressure-volume catheter. The levels of Hcy-metabolizing enzymes, cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), and 5-MTHFR, were estimated by Western blot analyses. The results suggest that FA administered post-MI significantly improved cardiac ejection fraction and induced tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase, CBS, CSE, and 5-MTHFR. We showed that FA supplementation resulted in significant improvement of myocardial function after MI. The study eluted the importance of homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism and FA supplementation in cardiovascular disease. PMID:20802128

  16. Assessing the mechanical properties of tissue-mimicking phantoms at different depths as an approach to measure biomechanical gradient of crystalline lens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shang; Aglyamov, Salavat; Karpiouk, Andrei; Li, Jiasong; Emelianov, Stanislav; Manns, Fabrice; Larin, Kirill V.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of using the dominant frequency of the sample surface response to a mechanical stimulation as an effective indicator for sensing the depthwise distribution of elastic properties in transparent layered phantom samples simulating the cortex and nucleus of the crystalline lens. Focused ultrasound waves are used to noninvasively interrogate the sample surface. A phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography system is utilized to capture the surface dynamics over time with nanometer scale sensitivity. Spectral analysis is performed on the sample surface response to ultrasound stimulation and the dominant frequency is calculated under particular loading parameters. Pilot experiments were conducted on homogeneous and layered tissue-mimicking phantoms. Results indicate that the mechanical layers located at different depths introduce different frequencies to the sample surface response, which are correlated with the depth-dependent elasticity of the sample. The duration and the frequency of the ultrasound excitation are also investigated for their influences on this spectrum-based detection. This noninvasive method may be potentially applied for localized and rapid assessment of the depth dependence of the mechanical properties of the crystalline lens. PMID:24409379

  17. Cardiac Time Intervals by Tissue Doppler Imaging M-Mode: Normal Values and Association with Established Echocardiographic and Invasive Measures of Systolic and Diastolic Function

    PubMed Central

    Mogelvang, Rasmus; de Knegt, Martina Chantal; Olsen, Flemming Javier; Galatius, Søren; Jensen, Jan Skov

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To define normal values of the cardiac time intervals obtained by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) M-mode through the mitral valve (MV). Furthermore, to evaluate the association of the myocardial performance index (MPI) obtained by TDI M-mode (MPITDI) and the conventional method of obtaining MPI (MPIConv), with established echocardiographic and invasive measures of systolic and diastolic function. Methods In a large community based population study (n = 974), where all are free of any cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular risk factors, cardiac time intervals, including isovolumic relaxation time (IVRT), isovolumic contraction time (IVCT), and ejection time (ET) were obtained by TDI M-mode through the MV. IVCT/ET, IVRT/ET and the MPI ((IVRT+IVCT)/ET) were calculated. We also included a validation population (n = 44) of patients who underwent left heart catheterization and had the MPITDI and MPIConv measured. Results IVRT, IVRT/ET and MPI all increased significantly with increasing age in both genders (p<0.001 for all). IVCT, ET, IVRT/ET, and MPI differed significantly between males and females, displaying that women, in general exhibit better cardiac function. MPITDI was significantly associated with invasive (dP/dt max) and echocardiographic measures of systolic (LVEF, global longitudinal strain and global strainrate s) and diastolic function (e’, global strainrate e)(p<0.05 for all), whereas MPIConv was significantly associated with LVEF, e’ and global strainrate e (p<0.05 for all). Conclusion Normal values of cardiac time intervals differed between genders and deteriorated with increasing age. The MPITDI (but not MPIConv) is associated with most invasive and established echocardiographic measures of systolic and diastolic function. PMID:27093636

  18. Mast cell deficient W/Wv mice have lower serum IL-6 and less cardiac tissue necrosis than their normal littermates following myocardial ischemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, K; Farwell, K; Huang, M; Kempuraj, D; Donelan, J; Papaliodis, D; Vasiadi, M; Theoharides, T C

    2007-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury complicates all forms of coronary artery revascularization. Circulating interleukin-6 (IL-6) has been implicated in cell death following a variety of stimuli. Macrophages, platelets, neutrophils and the endothelium have been shown to release IL-6 after IR injury. Cardiac mast cells have been implicated in IR; however, their involvement has never been quantified. In this randomized, prospective study, we compared cardiac tissue susceptibility and serum IL-6 changes between mast cell deficient (W/Wv) mice and their normal littermates (+/+). Twenty-eight male W/Wv mice (n=14) and their +/+ littermates (n=14) were anaesthetized with 2.5% isoflurane. The left coronary artery (LCA) was ligated for 30 minutes or a sham procedure was performed. After 6 hours of reperfusion, the animals were sacrificed. The muscle viability was assessed on fresh whole-mount slices by nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) histochemical assay and serum IL-6 concentrations measured by ELISA. Cardiac muscle viability was significantly higher in W/Wv mice than the +/+ mice. Serum IL-6 levels were higher in the +/+ sham mice (465 +/- 32 pg/ml, n=6) than the W/Wv mice (185 +/- 31 pg/ml, n=6), p < 0.001. The IL-6 levels increased significantly after reperfusion only in the +/+ mice (698 +/- 41 pg/ml, n=8, p = 0.001), while it remained similar in the W/Wv mice (202 +/- 48 pg/ml, n=8, p = 0.783). These results show that the absence of mast cells reduces the myocardial damage associated with IR injury. Furthermore, there is an attenuation in the inflammatory response, as measured by serum IL-6 levels, following this local insult. This finding entertains the prospect of developing prophylactic therapy--targeting selective inhibition of cardiac mast cell activation, in clinical situations involving medical or surgical myocardial revascularization. PMID:17346429

  19. Spectra from 2.5-15 microm of tissue phantom materials, optical clearing agents and ex vivo human skin: implications for depth profiling of human skin.

    PubMed

    Viator, John A; Choi, Bernard; Peavy, George M; Kimel, Sol; Nelson, J Stuart

    2003-01-21

    Infrared measurements have been used to profile or image biological tissue, including human skin. Usually, analysis of such measurements has assumed that infrared absorption is due to water and collagen. Such an assumption may be reasonable for soft tissue, but introduction of exogenous agents into skin or the measurement of tissue phantoms has raised the question of their infrared absorption spectrum. We used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflection mode to measure the infrared absorption spectra, in the range of 2-15 microm, of water, polyacrylamide, Intralipid, collagen gels, four hyperosmotic clearing agents (glycerol, 1,3-butylene glycol, trimethylolpropane, Topicare), and ex vivo human stratum corneum and dermis. The absorption spectra of the phantom materials were similar to that of water, although additional structure was noted in the range of 6-10 microm. The absorption spectra of the clearing agents were more complex, with molecular absorption bands dominating between 6 and 12 microm. Dermis was similar to water, with collagen structure evident in the 6-10 microm range. Stratum corneum had a significantly lower absorption than dermis due to a lower content of water. These results suggest that the assumption of water-dominated absorption in the 2.5-6 microm range is valid. At longer wavelengths, clearing agent absorption spectra differ significantly from the water spectrum. This spectral information can be used in pulsed photothermal radiometry or utilized in the interpretation of reconstructions in which a constant mu(ir) is used. In such cases, overestimating mu(ir) will underestimate chromophore depth and vice versa, although the effect is dependent on actual chromophore depth. PMID:12587910

  20. Fiber alignment and coculture with fibroblasts improves the differentiated phenotype of murine embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Parrag, Ian C; Zandstra, Peter W; Woodhouse, Kimberly A

    2012-03-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are an important source of cardiomyocytes for regenerating injured myocardium. The successful use of ESC-derived cardiomyocytes in cardiac tissue engineering requires an understanding of the important scaffold properties and culture conditions to promote cell attachment, differentiation, organization, and contractile function. The goal of this work was to investigate how scaffold architecture and coculture with fibroblasts influences the differentiated phenotype of murine ESC-derived cardiomyocytes (mESCDCs). Electrospinning was used to process an elastomeric biodegradable polyurethane (PU) into aligned or unaligned fibrous scaffolds. Bioreactor produced mESCDCs were seeded onto the PU scaffolds either on their own or after pre-seeding the scaffolds with mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Viable mESCDCs attached to the PU scaffolds and were functionally contractile in all conditions tested. Importantly, the aligned scaffolds led to the anisotropic organization of rod-shaped cells, improved sarcomere organization, and increased mESCDC aspect ratio (length-to-diameter ratio) when compared to cells on the unaligned scaffolds. In addition, pre-seeding the scaffolds with MEFs improved mESCDC sarcomere formation compared to mESCDCs cultured alone. These results suggest that both fiber alignment and pre-treatment of scaffolds with fibroblasts improve the differentiation of mESCDCs and are important parameters for developing engineered myocardial tissue constructs using ESC-derived cardiac cells. PMID:22006660

  1. Lactate Up-Regulates the Expression of Lactate Oxidation Complex-Related Genes in Left Ventricular Cardiac Tissue of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel-Costa, Daniele; da Cunha, Telma Fatima; Bechara, Luiz Roberto Grassmann; Fortunato, Rodrigo Soares; Bozi, Luiz Henrique Marchesi; Coelho, Marcele de Almeida; Barreto-Chaves, Maria Luiza; Brum, Patricia Chakur

    2015-01-01

    Background Besides its role as a fuel source in intermediary metabolism, lactate has been considered a signaling molecule modulating lactate-sensitive genes involved in the regulation of skeletal muscle metabolism. Even though the flux of lactate is significantly high in the heart, its role on regulation of cardiac genes regulating lactate oxidation has not been clarified yet. We tested the hypothesis that lactate would increase cardiac levels of reactive oxygen species and up-regulate the expression of genes related to lactate oxidation complex. Methods/Principal Findings Isolated hearts from male adult Wistar rats were perfused with control, lactate or acetate (20mM) added Krebs-Henseleit solution during 120 min in modified Langendorff apparatus. Reactive oxygen species (O2●-/H2O2) levels, and NADH and NADPH oxidase activities (in enriched microsomal or plasmatic membranes, respectively) were evaluated by fluorimetry while SOD and catalase activities were evaluated by spectrophotometry. mRNA levels of lactate oxidation complex and energetic enzymes MCT1, MCT4, HK, LDH, PDH, CS, PGC1α and COXIV were quantified by real time RT-PCR. Mitochondrial DNA levels were also evaluated. Hemodynamic parameters were acquired during the experiment. The key findings of this work were that lactate elevated cardiac NADH oxidase activity but not NADPH activity. This response was associated with increased cardiac O2●-/H2O2 levels and up-regulation of MCT1, MCT4, LDH and PGC1α with no changes in HK, PDH, CS, COXIV mRNA levels and mitochondrial DNA levels. Lactate increased NRF-2 nuclear expression and SOD activity probably as counter-regulatory responses to increased O2●-/H2O2. Conclusions Our results provide evidence for lactate-induced up-regulation of lactate oxidation complex associated with increased NADH oxidase activity and cardiac O2●-/H2O2 driving to an anti-oxidant response. These results unveil lactate as an important signaling molecule regulating components of

  2. Structure, function and clinical relevance of the cardiac conduction system, including the atrioventricular ring and outflow tract tissues.

    PubMed

    Dobrzynski, Halina; Anderson, Robert H; Atkinson, Andrew; Borbas, Zoltan; D'Souza, Alicia; Fraser, John F; Inada, Shin; Logantha, Sunil J R J; Monfredi, Oliver; Morris, Gwilym M; Moorman, Anton F M; Nikolaidou, Thodora; Schneider, Heiko; Szuts, Viktoria; Temple, Ian P; Yanni, Joseph; Boyett, Mark R

    2013-08-01

    It is now over 100years since the discovery of the cardiac conduction system, consisting of three main parts, the sinus node, the atrioventricular node and the His-Purkinje system. The system is vital for the initiation and coordination of the heartbeat. Over the last decade, immense strides have been made in our understanding of the cardiac conduction system and these recent developments are reviewed here. It has been shown that the system has a unique embryological origin, distinct from that of the working myocardium, and is more extensive than originally thought with additional structures: atrioventricular rings, a third node (so called retroaortic node) and pulmonary and aortic sleeves. It has been shown that the expression of ion channels, intracellular Ca(2+)-handling proteins and gap junction channels in the system is specialised (different from that in the ordinary working myocardium), but appropriate to explain the functioning of the system, although there is continued debate concerning the ionic basis of pacemaking. We are beginning to understand the mechanisms (fibrosis and remodelling of ion channels and related proteins) responsible for dysfunction of the system (bradycardia, heart block and bundle branch block) associated with atrial fibrillation and heart failure and even athletic training. Equally, we are beginning to appreciate how naturally occurring mutations in ion channels cause congenital cardiac conduction system dysfunction. Finally, current therapies, the status of a new therapeutic strategy (use of a specific heart rate lowering drug) and a potential new therapeutic strategy (biopacemaking) are reviewed. PMID:23612425

  3. Bioaccumulation and Tissue Distribution of Arsenic, Cadmium, Copper and Zinc in Crassostrea virginica Grown at Two Different Depths in Jamaica Bay, New York

    PubMed Central

    Rodney, Eric; Herrera, Pedro; Luxama, Juan; Boykin, Mark; Crawford, Alisa; Carroll, Margaret A.; Catapane, Edward J.

    2011-01-01

    Historically, Jamaica Bay was a site of extensive oyster beds and shellfish culture leases that supported a significant oyster fishery in the New York area. The industrial and urban expansion of the early 1900’s led to over-harvesting and a deterioration in water and bay sediment quality that coincided with shellfish decline and the ultimate disappearance of oysters from the bay. Over the past 50 years, efforts to arrest and reverse the pollution problems of Jamaica Bay have been undertaken but the area still contains metals and other pollutants at levels higher than NYS Water Quality Standards. Previous we showed that Crassostrea virginica seed transplanted to the bay had excellent growth and survival despite the bay’s pollution problems. In this study we measured the one-year bioaccumulation and tissue distribution of four metals in C. virginica seed that were transplanted to the bay at two different depths: one foot from the surface and one foot above the sediment. Tissues of C. virginica were dissected, dried and digested in nitric acid. Arsenic, cadmium, copper and zinc levels were measured using electrothermal vaporization with deuterium lamp background correction in an atomic absorption spectrophotometer fitted with a THGA graphite furnace. Metals were distributed in the various tissues in μg/g dry weight amounts, which correlate well with published values for whole oysters grown in other polluted areas. Metal distributions were not homogeneous throughout the animals and in most of the tissues tested, oysters grown near the surface accumulated more metal than those positioned near bay sediment. PMID:21841973

  4. Facial soft tissue depth statistics and enhanced point estimators for craniofacial identification: the debut of the shorth and the 75-shormax.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Carl N; Simpson, Ellie K; Byrd, John E

    2013-11-01

    Several methods that have customarily been used in craniofacial identification to describe facial soft tissue depths (FSTDs) implore improvement. They include the calculation of arithmetic means for skewed data, omission of concern for measurement uncertainty, oversight of effect size, and misuse of statistical significance tests (e.g., p-values for strength of association). This paper redresses these limitations using FSTDs from 10 prior studies (N = 516). Measurement uncertainty was large (>20% of the FSTD), skewness (≥ 0.8) existed at 11 of the 23 FSTD landmarks examined, and sex and age each explained <4% of the total FSTD variance (η(2) calculated as part of MANOVA). These results call for a new and improved conceptualization of FSTDs, which is attained by the replacement of arithmetic means with shorths and 75-shormaxes. The outcomes of this implementation are dramatic reduction in FSTD complexity; improved data accuracy; and new data-driven standards for casework application of methods. PMID:24147787

  5. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program ... be designed to meet your needs. The Cardiac Rehabilitation Team Cardiac rehab involves a long-term commitment ...

  6. In-vivo measurements of penetration depth, oxygenation, and drug concentration using broadband absorption spectroscopy in human tissues before and after photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsing-Wen; Zhu, Timothy C.; Solonenko, Michael; Hahn, Stephen M.; Metz, James M.; Dimofte, Andrea; Mile, Jermy; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2003-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) employs a combination of photosensitizing chemical, light, and oxygen Knowledge of tissue optical properties, including absorption (μa) and reduce scattering coefficients (μs"), makes possible to derive blood oxygen saturation, light penetration depth, and drug concentration, which are important to ensure PDT treatment efficacy at the specific wavelengths. We have developed an absorption spectroscopy system to measure μa and μs" in the spectral range 600-800nm using a contact linear probe with a source fiber and multiple source-detector separation distances less than 1 cm. The μa and μs" were recovered based on diffusion approximations of the photon transport equation. We measured tissue optical properties among various organs of patients with intraperitoneal malignancies for an on-going Phase II PDT protocol. The results from 12 patients showed various effective penetration depth from site to site and from organ to organ. The percentage oxygen saturation (%StO2) are similar before and after PDT. Before PDT, meff (mean (standard deviation) (number of patients)) in cm-1 at 630nm are 2.4 (0.2) (12) in small bowel, 2.2(0.4) (9) in large bowel, 4.2(2.7) (7) in tumor, 3.3 (0.3) (10) in peritoneum, 2.7 (0.3) (11) in skin, and 10.1 (0.6) (10) in liver. %StO2 is 60-80% for most organs but 30-40% for tumor.

  7. Transcriptome of the Deep-Sea Black Scabbardfish, Aphanopus carbo (Perciformes: Trichiuridae): Tissue-Specific Expression Patterns and Candidate Genes Associated to Depth Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Stefanni, Sergio; Bettencourt, Raul; Pinheiro, Miguel; Moro, Gianluca De; Bongiorni, Lucia; Pallavicini, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Deep-sea fishes provide a unique opportunity to study the physiology and evolutionary adaptation to extreme environments. We carried out a high throughput sequencing analysis on a 454 GS-FLX titanium plate using unnormalized cDNA libraries from six tissues of A. carbo. Assemblage and annotations were performed by Newbler and InterPro/Pfam analyses, respectively. The assembly of 544,491 high quality reads provided 8,319 contigs, 55.6% of which retrieved blast hits against the NCBI nonredundant database or were annotated with ESTscan. Comparison of functional genes at both the protein sequences and protein stability levels, associated with adaptations to depth, revealed similarities between A. carbo and other bathypelagic fishes. A selection of putative genes was standardized to evaluate the correlation between number of contigs and their normalized expression, as determined by qPCR amplification. The screening of the libraries contributed to the identification of new EST simple-sequence repeats (SSRs) and to the design of primer pairs suitable for population genetic studies as well as for tagging and mapping of genes. The characterization of the deep-sea fish A. carbo first transcriptome is expected to provide abundant resources for genetic, evolutionary, and ecological studies of this species and the basis for further investigation of depth-related adaptation processes in fishes. PMID:25309900

  8. Cardiac optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetics is an emerging technology for optical interrogation and control of biological function with high specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. Mammalian cells and tissues can be sensitized to respond to light by a relatively simple and well-tolerated genetic modification using microbial opsins (light-gated ion channels and pumps). These can achieve fast and specific excitatory or inhibitory response, offering distinct advantages over traditional pharmacological or electrical means of perturbation. Since the first demonstrations of utility in mammalian cells (neurons) in 2005, optogenetics has spurred immense research activity and has inspired numerous applications for dissection of neural circuitry and understanding of brain function in health and disease, applications ranging from in vitro to work in behaving animals. Only recently (since 2010), the field has extended to cardiac applications with less than a dozen publications to date. In consideration of the early phase of work on cardiac optogenetics and the impact of the technique in understanding another excitable tissue, the brain, this review is largely a perspective of possibilities in the heart. It covers the basic principles of operation of light-sensitive ion channels and pumps, the available tools and ongoing efforts in optimizing them, overview of neuroscience use, as well as cardiac-specific questions of implementation and ideas for best use of this emerging technology in the heart. PMID:23457014

  9. Transplantation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells improves cardiac contractile function and electrical stability in a rat myocardial infarction model.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Milan; Fujita, Daiki; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Ichikawa, Hinako; Izawa, Atsushi; Hirose, Masamichi; Kashihara, Toshihide; Yamada, Mitsuhiko; Takahashi, Masafumi; Ikeda, Uichi; Shiba, Yuji

    2015-04-01

    The transplantation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) improves cardiac contractility after myocardial infarction (MI); however, little is known about the electrophysiological consequences of transplantation. The purpose of this study was to clarify whether the transplantation of ADSCs increases or decreases the incidence of ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT) in a rat model of MI. MI was induced experimentally by permanent occlusion of the left anterior descending artery of Lewis rats. ADSCs were harvested from GFP-transgenic rats, and were cultured until passage four. ADSCs (10×10(6)) resuspended in 100μL saline or pro-survival cocktail (PSC), which enhances cardiac graft survival, were injected directly into syngeneic rat hearts 1week after MI. The recipients of ADSCs suspended in PSC had a larger graft area compared with those receiving ASDCs suspended in saline at 1week post-transplantation (number of graft cells/section: 148.7±10.6 vs. 22.4±3.4, p<0.05, n=5/group). Thereafter, all ADSC recipients were transplanted with ASDCs in PSC. ADSCs were transplanted into infarcted hearts, and the mechanical and electrophysiological functions were assessed. Echocardiography revealed that ADSC recipients had improved contractile function compared with those receiving PSC vehicle (fractional shortening: 21.1±0.9 vs. 14.1±1.2, p<0.05, n≥12/group). Four weeks post-transplantation, VT was induced via in vivo programmed electrical stimulation. The recipients of ADSCs showed a significantly lower incidence of induced VT compared with the control (31.3% vs. 83.3%, p<0.05, n≥12/group). To understand the electrical activity following transplantation, we performed ex vivo optical mapping using a voltage sensitive dye, and found that ADSC transplantation decreased conduction velocity and its dispersion in the peri-infarct area. These results suggest that ADSC transplantation improved cardiac mechanical and electrophysiological functions in subacute MI. PMID

  10. Isoproterenol directs hair follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells to differentiate in vitro to cardiac muscle cells which can be induced to form beating heart-muscle tissue sheets.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Aiko; Yashiro, Masateru; Mii, Sumiyuki; Aki, Ryoichi; Hamada, Yuko; Arakawa, Nobuko; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Hoffman, Robert M; Amoh, Yasuyuki

    2016-03-01

    Nestin-expressing hair-follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells are located in the bulge area of the follicle. Previous studies have shown that HAP stem cells can differentiate to neurons, glia, keratinocytes, smooth muscle cells, and melanocytes in vitro. HAP stem cells effected nerve and spinal cord regeneration in mouse models. Recently, we demonstrated that HAP stem cells differentiated to beating cardiac muscle cells. The differentiation potential to cardiac muscle cells was greatest in the upper part of the follicle. The beat rate of the cardiac muscle cells was stimulated by isoproterenol. In the present study, we observed that isoproterenol directs HAP stem cells to differentiate to cardiac muscle cells in large numbers in culture compared to HAP stem cells not supplemented with isoproterenol. The addition of activin A, bone morphogenetic protein 4, and basic fibroblast growth factor, along with isoproternal, induced the cardiac muscle cells to form tissue sheets of beating heart muscle cells. These results demonstrate that HAP stem cells have great potential to form beating cardiac muscle cells in tissue sheets. PMID:27104748

  11. [Algorithm study on the three-dimensional cardiac tissue based on the model of ventricular action potential].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Ming, Lequn; Jin, Yinbin; Li, Mingjun; Zhang, Zhenxi; Lin, Yang

    2010-02-01

    Cardiac reentry is one of the important factors to induce arrhythmias. It could lead to ventricular tachycardia (VT) or even fibrillation (VF), resulting in sudden cardiac death. With the wide use of computer in the quantitative study of electrophysiology, the three-dimensional virtual heart for simulations needs to be developed imminently in computer. In this paper, numerical algorithm of the model was studied. The three-dimensional model was constructed by integrating Luo-Rudy 1991 ventricular cell model and diffusion equation. The operator splitting method was employed to solve the model. The alternate direction iterative (ADI) format and seven-point centered difference method were used for the partial differential equation. And the discrete format with second-order accuracy was taken for the boundary conditions. The results showed that the ADI format and seven-point centered difference method both could successfully figure out the membrane potential and electrical activities with good numerical stability. However, computing consumption could be greatly reduced with the ADI format, implying that the ADI method with large time step was more powerful in numerical simulations. PMID:20337013

  12. Reverse Genetic Morpholino Approach Using Cardiac Ventricular Injection to Transfect Multiple Difficult-to-target Tissues in the Zebrafish Larva

    PubMed Central

    Konantz, Judith; Antos, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish is an important model to understand the cell and molecular biology of organ and appendage regeneration. However, molecular strategies to employ reverse genetics have not yet been adequately developed to assess gene function in regeneration or tissue homeostasis during larval stages after zebrafish embryogenesis, and several tissues within the zebrafish larva are difficult to target. Intraventricular injections of gene-specific morpholinos offer an alternative method for the current inability to genomically target zebrafish genes in a temporally controlled manner at these stages. This method allows for complete dispersion and subsequent incorporation of the morpholino into various tissues throughout the body, including structures that were formerly impossible to reach such as those in the larval caudal fin, a structure often used to noninvasively research tissue regeneration. Several genes activated during larval finfold regeneration are also present in regenerating adult vertebrate tissues, so the larva is a useful model to understand regeneration in adults. This morpholino dispersion method allows for the quick and easy identification of genes required for the regeneration of larval tissues as well as other physiological phenomena regulating tissue homeostasis after embryogenesis. Therefore, this delivery method provides a currently needed strategy for temporal control to the evaluation of gene function after embryogenesis.  PMID:24961304

  13. Microwave Treatment for Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez-Moya, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    NASA seeks to transfer the NASA developed microwave ablation technology, designed for the treatment of ventricular tachycardia (irregular heart beat), to industry. After a heart attack, many cells surrounding the resulting scar continue to live but are abnormal electrically; they may conduct impulses unusually slowly or fire when they would typically be silent. These diseased areas might disturb smooth signaling by forming a reentrant circuit in the muscle. The objective of microwave ablation is to heat and kill these diseased cells to restore appropriate electrical activity in the heart. This technology is a method and apparatus that provides for propagating microwave energy into heart tissues to produce a desired temperature profile therein at tissue depths sufficient for thermally ablating arrhythmogenic cardiac tissue while preventing excessive heating of surrounding tissues, organs, and blood. A wide bandwidth double-disk antenna is effective for this purpose over a bandwidth of about six gigahertz. A computer simulation provides initial screening capabilities for an antenna such as antenna, frequency, power level, and power application duration. The simulation also allows optimization of techniques for specific patients or conditions. In comparison with other methods that involve direct-current pulses or radio frequencies below 1 GHz, this method may prove more effective in treating ventricular tachycardia. This is because the present method provides for greater control of the location, cross-sectional area, and depth of a lesion via selection of the location and design of the antenna and the choice of microwave power and frequency.

  14. Design of preservation solutions for universal tissue preservation in vivo: demonstration of efficacy in preclinical models of profound hypothermic cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M J; Rhee, P; Chen, Z; Alam, H B

    2005-01-01

    The design of new solutions for the universal preservation of tissues is a quest that would facilitate multiple-organ harvesting from organ donors since current preservation solutions do not provide optimum preservation for all organs. In contrast, a new approach to bloodless surgery using hypothermic blood substitution (HBS) to protect the whole body during profound hypothermic circulatory arrest (clinical suspended animation) has focused on the development of a hybrid solution design with the objective of providing universal tissue preservation. In this study, a porcine model of uncontrolled lethal hemorrhage was employed. A combination of two new solutions, maintenance and purge, was used in a cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) technique to affect profound hypothermia and prolonged cardiac arrest (60 min), with resuscitation after surgical repair of the vascular deficit induced to affect exsanguination. After rewarming and recovery, pigs were monitored for 6 weeks for neurological deficits, cognitive function (learning new skills), and organ dysfunction. All the normothermic control animals died (n = 10), whereas 90% (9 of 10) in the HBS group survived (P < .05). Moreover, all of the survivors were neurologically intact, displayed normal learning and memory capability, and had no long-term organ dysfunction. Histology of brains after 6 weeks revealed no ischemic damage in marked contrast to control animals, which all showed diffuse ischemic damage. The demonstrated efficacy of these synthetic, acellular HBS solutions for protection of all the tissues in the body during clinical suspended animation justifies their consideration for multiple-organ harvesting from cadaveric and living donors. PMID:15808626

  15. The study of simulated microgravity effects on cardiac myocytes using a 3D heart tissue-equivalent model encapsulated in alginate microbeads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu; Tian, Weiming; Zheng, Hongxia; Yu, Lei; Zhang, Yao; Han, Fengtong

    Long duration spaceflight may increase the risk and occurrence of potentially life-threatening heart rhythm disturbances associated with alterations of cardiac myocytes, myocyte connec-tivity, and extracellular matrix resulting from prolonged exposure to zero-or low-gravity. For understanding of the effects of microgravity, either traditional 2-dimensional (2D) cell cultures of adherent cell populations or animal models were typically used. The 2D in vitro systems do not allow assessment of the dynamic effects of intercellular interactions within tissues, whereas potentially confounding factors tend to be overlooked in animal models. Therefore novel cell culture model representative of the cellular interactions and with extracellular matrix present in tissues needs to be used. In this study, 3D multi-cellular heart tissue-equivalent model was constructed by culturing neonatal rat myocardial cells in alginate microbeads for one week. With this model we studied the simulated microgravity effects on myocardiocytes by incubat-ing the microbeads in NASA rotary cell culture system with a rate of 15rpm. Cytoskeletal changes, mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen production were studied after incubating for 24h, 48h and 72h respectively. Compared with 3D ground-culture group, sig-nificant cytoskeleton depolymerization characterized by pseudo-feet disappearance, significant increase of mitochondrial membrane potential, and greater reactive oxygen production were observed in after incubating 24h, 48h, and 72h, in NASA system. The beating rate of 3D heart tissue-equivalent decreased significantly at 24h, and all the samples stopped beating after 48h incubation while the beating rate of control group did not change. This study indicated that mi-crogravity affects both the structure and function of myocardial cells. Our results suggest that a 3D heart tissue-equivalent model maybe better for attempting to elucidate the microgravity effects on myocardiocytes in

  16. Coral colony tissue damage in six species of reef-building corals: partial mortality in relation with depth and surface area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meesters, Erik H.; Wesseling, Ineke; Bak, Rolf P. M.

    1997-05-01

    Partial mortality and its relation with colony size was assessed in colonies of 6 species of reef-building corals (Scleractinia) at three sites in 2 depth zones, reef terrace (7 m) and fore-reef slope (18 m), on the fringing reefs of Curaçao, Netherlands Antilles. Partial mortality is manifest on coral colonies as tissue lesions which have not been closed by the surrounding tissue. Two types of lesions were distinguished: (1) Type I lesions, completely enclosed by living tissue, and (2) Type II lesions, not completely surrounded by tissue and open to the edge of the colony. These lesion types differed in occurrence and lesion size-frequency distributions, as well as in relation to variation in colony surface area and morphology. The percentage of undamaged colonies decreased with increasing colony size and lesion number increased logarithmically with colony surface area. Larger colonies have little chance to escape partial mortality. The abundance of Type I lesions was significantly less on the reef slope, while the number of Type II lesions was greater. This is probably caused by a relative increase of the colony circumference because colony height is reduced on the reef slope. Median lesion sizes ranged from 0.5 to 3 cm 2 for Type I lesions and from 2 to 60 cm 2 for Type I1 lesions. Type I1 lesions covered a much larger colony area than Type I lesions, suggesting that bottom-associated causes are relatively important with respect to partial mortality. Species and colonies with large circumference relative to total colony surface area, such as plate-like and small colonies, were particularly susceptible to partial mortality by Type II lesions. Whole-colony mortality rate of small juvenile corals was very high, but dropped abruptly with increasing size, probably at the time that growth direction changes from horizontal to vertical. This `escape in height' makes corals less susceptible to partial mortality and represents an important life history characteristic

  17. Pharmacologically active microcarriers associated with thermosensitive hydrogel as a growth factor releasing biomimetic 3D scaffold for cardiac tissue-engineering.

    PubMed

    Karam, Jean-Pierre; Muscari, Claudio; Sindji, Laurence; Bastiat, Guillaume; Bonafè, Francesca; Venier-Julienne, Marie-Claire; Montero-Menei, N Claudia

    2014-10-28

    The challenge of tissue engineering of the infarcted heart is how to improve stem cell engraftment, survival, homing, and differentiation for myocardial repair. We here propose to integrate human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and pharmacologically active microcarriers (PAMs), a three-dimensional (3D) carrier of cells and growth factors, into an injectable hydrogel (HG), to obtain a system that stimulates the survival and/or differentiation of the grafted cells toward a cardiac phenotype. PAMs are biodegradable and non-cytotoxic poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres conveying cells on their 3D surface that deliver continuously and in a controlled manner a growth factor (GF) acting on the transported cells and on the microenvironment to improve engraftment. The choice of the appropriate GF and its protection during the formulation process and delivery are essential. In this study two GFs, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), have been encapsulated under a solid state in order to limit their interaction with the polymer and conserve their integrity. GF precipitation conditions and release profile from PAMs have been first investigated before combining them to ADSCs. The released IGF-1 and HGF induced the protein synthesis of cardiac differentiation markers GATA4, Nkx2.5, cTnI and CX43 after 1week in vitro. Moreover, the GFs accelerated cell cycle progression, as suggested by the increased expression of Cyclin D1 mRNA and the widespread distribution of Ki67 protein. Integrating PAMs within the thermosensitive P407 hydrogel increased their elastic properties but decreased the transcription of most cardiac markers. In contrast, CX43 expression increased in ADSC-PAM-GF complexes embedded within the hydrogel compared to the ADSCs cultured alone in the absence of P407. These results suggest that particulate scaffolds releasing HGF and IGF-1 may be beneficial for applications in tissue-engineering strategies for myocardial

  18. Determining the Depth of Injury in Bioengineered Tissue Models of Cornea and Conjunctiva for the Prediction of All Three Ocular GHS Categories

    PubMed Central

    Zorn-Kruppa, Michaela; Houdek, Pia; Wladykowski, Ewa; Engelke, Maria; Bartok, Melinda; Mewes, Karsten R.; Moll, Ingrid; Brandner, Johanna M.

    2014-01-01

    The depth of injury (DOI) is a mechanistic correlate to the ocular irritation response. Attempts to quantitatively determine the DOI in alternative tests have been limited to ex vivo animal eyes by fluorescent staining for biomarkers of cell death and viability in histological cross sections. It was the purpose of this study to assess whether DOI could also be measured by means of cell viability detected by the MTT assay using 3-dimensional (3D) reconstructed models of cornea and conjunctiva. The formazan-free area of metabolically inactive cells in the tissue after topical substance application is used as the visible correlate of the DOI. Areas of metabolically active or inactive cells are quantitatively analyzed on cryosection images with ImageJ software analysis tools. By incorporating the total tissue thickness, the relative MTT-DOI (rMTT-DOI) was calculated. Using the rMTT-DOI and human reconstructed cornea equivalents, we developed a prediction model based on suitable viability cut-off values. We tested 25 chemicals that cover the whole range of eye irritation potential based on the globally harmonized system of classification and labelling of chemicals (GHS). Principally, the MTT-DOI test method allows distinguishing between the cytotoxic effects of the different chemicals in accordance with all 3 GHS categories for eye irritation. Although the prediction model is slightly over-predictive with respect to non-irritants, it promises to be highly valuable to discriminate between severe irritants (Cat. 1), and mild to moderate irritants (Cat. 2). We also tested 3D conjunctiva models with the aim to specifically address conjunctiva-damaging substances. Using the MTT-DOI method in this model delivers comparable results as the cornea model, but does not add additional information. However, the MTT-DOI method using reconstructed cornea models already provided good predictability that was superior to the already existing established in vitro/ex vivo methods. PMID

  19. Stimulating endogenous cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Amanda; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration, a combination of these approaches could ameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation of multiple cellular players. PMID:26484341

  20. Stress relaxation of swine growth plate in semi-confined compression: depth dependent tissue deformational behavior versus extracellular matrix composition and collagen fiber organization.

    PubMed

    Amini, Samira; Mortazavi, Farhad; Sun, Jun; Levesque, Martin; Hoemann, Caroline D; Villemure, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical environment is one of the regulating factors involved in the process of longitudinal bone growth. Non-physiological compressive loading can lead to infantile and juvenile musculoskeletal deformities particularly during growth spurt. We hypothesized that tissue mechanical behavior in sub-regions (reserve, proliferative and hypertrophic zones) of the growth plate is related to its collagen and proteoglycan content as well as its collagen fiber orientation. To characterize the strain distribution through growth plate thickness and to evaluate biochemical content and collagen fiber organization of the three histological zones of growth plate tissue. Distal ulnar growth plate samples (N = 29) from 4-week old pigs were analyzed histologically for collagen fiber organization (N = 7) or average zonal thickness (N = 8), or trimmed into the three average zones, based on the estimated thickness of each histological zone, for biochemical analysis of water, collagen and glycosaminoglycan content (N = 7). Other samples (N = 7) were tested in semi-confined compression under 10% compressive strain. Digital images of the fluorescently labeled nuclei were concomitantly acquired by confocal microscopy before loading and after tissue relaxation. Strain fields were subsequently calculated using a custom-designed 2D digital image correlation algorithm. Depth-dependent compressive strain patterns and collagen content were observed. The proliferative and hypertrophic zone developed the highest axial and transverse strains, respectively, under compression compared to the reserve zone, in which the lowest axial and transverse strains arose. The collagen content per wet mass was significantly lower in the proliferative and hypertrophic zones compared to the reserve zone, and all three zones had similar glycosaminoglycan and water content.Polarized light microscopy showed that collagen fibers were mainly organized horizontally in the reserve zone and vertically aligned with the

  1. Avenanthramides are bioavailable and accumulate in hepatic, cardiac, and skeletal muscle tissue following oral gavage in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avenanthramides (AVA), polyphenols found exclusively in oats (Avena sativa L.), may play a role in the anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic activity of oats. The bioavailability of AVA has been demonstrated previously, but its distribution at the organ and tissue level and the extent of conjugati...

  2. Noninvasive, near infrared spectroscopic-measured muscle pH and PO2 indicate tissue perfusion for cardiac surgical patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soller, Babs R.; Idwasi, Patrick O.; Balaguer, Jorge; Levin, Steven; Simsir, Sinan A.; Vander Salm, Thomas J.; Collette, Helen; Heard, Stephen O.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether near infrared spectroscopic measurement of tissue pH and Po2 has sufficient accuracy to assess variation in tissue perfusion resulting from changes in blood pressure and metabolic demand during cardiopulmonary bypass. DESIGN: Prospective clinical study. SETTING: Academic medical center. SUBJECTS: Eighteen elective cardiac surgical patients. INTERVENTION: Cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: A near infrared spectroscopic fiber optic probe was placed over the hypothenar eminence. Reference Po2 and pH sensors were inserted in the abductor digiti minimi (V). Data were collected every 30 secs during surgery and for 6 hrs following cardiopulmonary bypass. Calibration equations developed from one third of the data were used with the remaining data to investigate sensitivity of the near infrared spectroscopic measurement to physiologic changes resulting from cardiopulmonary bypass. Near infrared spectroscopic and reference pH and Po2 measurements were compared for each subject using standard error of prediction. Near infrared spectroscopic pH and Po2 at baseline were compared with values during cardiopulmonary bypass just before rewarming commenced (hypotensive, hypothermic), after rewarming (hypotensive, normothermic) just before discontinuation of cardiopulmonary bypass, and at 6 hrs following cardiopulmonary bypass (normotensive, normothermic) using mixed-model analysis of variance. Near infrared spectroscopic pH and Po2 were well correlated with the invasive measurement of pH (R2 =.84) and Po2 (R 2 =.66) with an average standard error of prediction of 0.022 +/- 0.008 pH units and 6 +/- 3 mm Hg, respectively. The average difference between the invasive and near infrared spectroscopic measurement was near zero for both the pH and Po2 measurements. Near infrared spectroscopic Po2 significantly decreased 50% on initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass and remained depressed throughout the bypass and

  3. Cardiac Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Catheterization? Cardiac catheterization (KATH-eh-ter-ih-ZA-shun) is a ... disease. Doctors also can use ultrasound during cardiac catheterization to see blockages in the coronary arteries. Ultrasound ...

  4. Evaluation of a tissue-engineered bovine pericardial patch in paediatric patients with congenital cardiac anomalies: initial experience with the ADAPT-treated CardioCel® patch

    PubMed Central

    Neethling, William M.L.; Strange, Geoff; Firth, Laura; Smit, Francis E.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study evaluated the safety, efficacy and clinical performance of the tissue-engineered ADAPT® bovine pericardial patch (ABPP) in paediatric patients with a range of congenital cardiac anomalies. METHODS In this single-centre, prospective, non-randomized clinical study, paediatric patients underwent surgery for insertion of the ABPP. Primary efficacy measures included early (<30 day) morbidity; incidence of device-related complications; haemodynamic performance derived from echocardiography assessment at 6- and 12-month follow-up and magnetic resonance imaging findings in 10 randomly selected patients at 12 months. Secondary measures included device-handling characteristics; shape and sizing characteristics and perioperative implant complications. The Aristotle complexity scoring system was used to score the complexity level of all surgical procedures. Patients completing the 12-month study were eligible to enter a long-term evaluation study. RESULTS Between April 2008 and September 2009, the ABPP was used in 30 paediatric patients. In the 30-day postoperative period, no graft-related morbidity was observed. In total, there were 5 deaths (2 in the 30-day postoperative period and 3 within the first 6 postoperative months). All deaths were deemed due to comorbid non-graft-related events. Echocardiography assessment at 6 and 12 months revealed intact anatomical and haemodynamically stable repairs without any visible calcification of the patch. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment in 10 patients at 12 months revealed no signs of calcification. Fisher's exact test demonstrated that patients undergoing more complex, higher risk surgical repairs (Aristotle complexity score >8) were significantly more likely to die (P = 0.0055, 58% survival compared with 100% survival for less complex surgical repairs). In 19 patients, echocardiographic data were available at 18–36 months with no evidence of device calcification, infection, thromboembolic events or

  5. A Discrete Electromechanical Model for Human Cardiac Tissue: Effects of Stretch-Activated Currents and Stretch Conditions on Restitution Properties and Spiral Wave Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Weise, Louis D.; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce an electromechanical model for human cardiac tissue which couples a biophysical model of cardiac excitation (Tusscher, Noble, Noble, Panfilov, 2006) and tension development (adjusted Niederer, Hunter, Smith, 2006 model) with a discrete elastic mass-lattice model. The equations for the excitation processes are solved with a finite difference approach, and the equations of the mass-lattice model are solved using Verlet integration. This allows the coupled problem to be solved with high numerical resolution. Passive mechanical properties of the mass-lattice model are described by a generalized Hooke's law for finite deformations (Seth material). Active mechanical contraction is initiated by changes of the intracellular calcium concentration, which is a variable of the electrical model. Mechanical deformation feeds back on the electrophysiology via stretch-activated ion channels whose conductivity is controlled by the local stretch of the medium. We apply the model to study how stretch-activated currents affect the action potential shape, restitution properties, and dynamics of spiral waves, under constant stretch, and dynamic stretch caused by active mechanical contraction. We find that stretch conditions substantially affect these properties via stretch-activated currents. In constantly stretched medium, we observe a substantial decrease in conduction velocity, and an increase of action potential duration; whereas, with dynamic stretch, action potential duration is increased only slightly, and the conduction velocity restitution curve becomes biphasic. Moreover, in constantly stretched medium, we find an increase of the core size and period of a spiral wave, but no change in rotation dynamics; in contrast, in the dynamically stretching medium, we observe spiral drift. Our results may be important to understand how altered stretch conditions affect the heart's functioning. PMID:23527160

  6. Detection of Soluble ED-A+ Fibronectin and Evaluation as Novel Serum Biomarker for Cardiac Tissue Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Ospel, Johanna; Neri, Dario; Pfeil, Alexander; Fritzenwanger, Michael; Figulla, Hans R.; Jung, Christian; Berndt, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Fibronectin containing the extra domain A (ED-A+ Fn) was proven to serve as a valuable biomarker for cardiac remodeling. The study was aimed at establishing an ELISA to determine ED-A+ Fn in serum of heart failure patients. Methods. ED-A+ Fn was quantified in serum samples from 114 heart failure patients due to ischemic (ICM, n = 44) and dilated (DCM, n = 39) cardiomyopathy as well as hypertensive heart disease (HHD, n = 31) compared to healthy controls (n = 12). Results. In comparison to healthy volunteers, heart failure patients showed significantly increased levels of ED-A+ Fn (p < 0.001). In particular in ICM patients there were significant associations between ED-A+ Fn serum levels and clinical parameters, for example, increased levels with rising NYHA class (p = 0.013), a negative correlation with left ventricular ejection fraction (p = 0.026, r: −0.353), a positive correlation with left atrial diameter (p = 0.008, r: 0.431), and a strong positive correlation with systolic pulmonary artery pressure (p = 0.002, r: 0.485). In multivariate analysis, ED-A+ Fn was identified as an independent predictor of an ischemic heart failure etiology. Conclusions. The current study could clearly show that ED-A+ Fn is a promising biomarker in cardiovascular diseases, especially in heart failure patients due to an ICM. We presented a valid ELISA method, which could be applied for further studies investigating the value of ED-A+ Fn.

  7. Maternal cardiac metabolism in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Laura X; Arany, Zolt

    2014-03-15

    Pregnancy causes dramatic physiological changes in the expectant mother. The placenta, mostly foetal in origin, invades maternal uterine tissue early in pregnancy and unleashes a barrage of hormones and other factors. This foetal 'invasion' profoundly reprogrammes maternal physiology, affecting nearly every organ, including the heart and its metabolism. We briefly review here maternal systemic metabolic changes during pregnancy and cardiac metabolism in general. We then discuss changes in cardiac haemodynamic during pregnancy and review what is known about maternal cardiac metabolism during pregnancy. Lastly, we discuss cardiac diseases during pregnancy, including peripartum cardiomyopathy, and the potential contribution of aberrant cardiac metabolism to disease aetiology. PMID:24448314

  8. Synthesis, characterization and antioxidant activity of a novel electroactive and biodegradable polyurethane for cardiac tissue engineering application.

    PubMed

    Baheiraei, Nafiseh; Yeganeh, Hamid; Ai, Jafar; Gharibi, Reza; Azami, Mahmoud; Faghihi, Faezeh

    2014-11-01

    There has been a growing trend towards applying conducting polymers for electrically excitable cells to increase electrical signal propagation within the cell-loaded substrates. A novel biodegradable electroactive polyurethane containing aniline pentamer (AP-PU) was synthesized and fully characterized by spectroscopic methods. To tune the physico-chemical properties and biocompatibility, the AP-PU was blended with polycaprolactone (PCL). The presence of electroactive moieties and the electroactivity behavior of the prepared films were confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. A conventional four probe analysis demonstrated the electrical conductivity of the films in the semiconductor range (~10(-5)S/cm). MTT assays using L929 mouse fibroblast and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) showed that the prepared blend (PB) displayed more cytocompatibility compared with AP-PU due to the introduction of a biocompatible PCL moiety. The in vitro cell culture also confirmed that PB was as supportive as tissue culture plate. The antioxidant activity of the AP-PU was proved using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging assay by employing UV-vis spectroscopy. In vitro degradation tests conducted in phosphate-buffered saline, pH7.4 and pH5.5, proved that the films were also biodegradable. The results of this study have highlighted the potential application of this bioelectroactive polyurethane as a platform substrate to study the effect of electrical signals on cell activities and to direct desirable cell function for tissue engineering applications. PMID:25280676

  9. Preventive effects of garlic (Allium sativum) on oxidative stress and histopathology of cardiac tissue in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Naderi, R; Mohaddes, G; Mohammadi, M; Alihemmati, A; Badalzadeh, R; Ghaznavi, R; Ghyasi, R; Mohammadi, Sh

    2015-12-01

    Since some complications of diabetes mellitus may be caused or exacerbated by an oxidative stress, the protective effects of garlic (Allium sativum) were investigated in the blood and heart of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Twenty-eight male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: control, garlic, diabetic, and diabetic+garlic. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg) in male rats. Rats were fed with raw fresh garlic homogenate (250 mg/kg) six days a week by gavage for a period of 6 weeks. At the end of the 6th week blood samples and heart tissues were collected and used for determination of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), malondialdehyde (MDA) and histological evaluation. Induction of diabetes increased MDA levels in blood and homogenates of heart. In diabetic rats treated with garlic, MDA levels decreased in blood and heart homogenates. Treatment of diabetic rats with garlic increased SOD, GPX and CAT in blood and heart homogenates. Histopathological finding of the myocardial tissue confirmed a protective role for garlic in diabetic rats. Thus, the present study reveals that garlic may effectively modulate antioxidants status in the blood and heart of streptozotocin induced-diabetic rats. PMID:26690030

  10. Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Protect Mice Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi from Cardiac Damage through Modulation of Anti-parasite Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Fernanda C. P.; Brasil, Guilherme V.; Rocha, Nazareth N.; Takiya, Christina M.; Lima, Ana Paula C. A.; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio C.; Goldenberg, Regina S.; Carvalho, Adriana B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi (T.cruzi), is a complex disease endemic in Central and South America. It has been gathering interest due to increases in non-vectorial forms of transmission, especially in developed countries. The objective of this work was to investigate if adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (ASC) can alter the course of the disease and attenuate pathology in a mouse model of chagasic cardiomyopathy. Methodology/Principal Findings ASC were injected intraperitoneally at 3 days post-infection (dpi). Tracking by bioluminescence showed that cells remained in the abdominal cavity for up to 9 days after injection and most of them migrated to the abdominal or subcutaneous fat, an early parasite reservoir. ASC injection resulted in a significant reduction in blood parasitemia, which was followed by a decrease in cardiac tissue inflammation, parasitism and fibrosis at 30 dpi. At the same time point, analyses of cytokine release in cells isolated from the heart and exposed to T. cruzi antigens indicated an anti-inflammatory response in ASC-treated animals. In parallel, splenocytes exposed to the same antigens produced a pro-inflammatory response, which is important for the control of parasite replication, in placebo and ASC-treated groups. However, splenocytes from the ASC group released higher levels of IL-10. At 60 dpi, magnetic resonance imaging revealed that right ventricular (RV) dilation was prevented in ASC-treated mice. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, the injection of ASC early after T. cruzi infection prevents RV remodeling through the modulation of immune responses. Lymphoid organ response to the parasite promoted the control of parasite burden, while the heart, a target organ of Chagas disease, was protected from damage due to an improved control of inflammation in ASC-treated mice. PMID:26248209

  11. Is cardiac tissue more susceptible than lung to oxidative effects induced by chronic nasotropic instillation of residual oil fly ash (ROFA)?

    PubMed

    Damiani, Roberto Marques; Piva, Marcella Ody; Petry, Marcelo Rafael; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Tavares Duarte de Oliveira, Alexandre; Rhoden, Cláudia Ramos

    2012-09-01

    The current study aimed to determine the role of oxidants in cardiac and pulmonary toxicities induced by chronic exposure to ROFA. Eighty Wistar rats were divided into four groups: G1 (10 µL Saline), G2 (ROFA 50 µg/10 µL), G3 (ROFA 250 µg/10 µL) and G4 (ROFA 500 µg/10 µL). Rats received ROFA by nasotropic instillation for 90 days. After that, they were euthanized and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed for total count of leukocytes, protein and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) determinations. Lungs and heart were removed to measure lipid peroxidation (MDA), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. BAL presented an increase in leukocytes count in G4 in comparison to the Saline group (p = 0.019). In lung, MDA level was not modified by ROFA, while CAT was higher in G4 when compared to all other groups (p = 0.013). In heart, G4 presented an increase in MDA (p = 0.016) and CAT (p = 0.027) levels in comparison to G1. The present study demonstrated cardiopulmonary oxidative changes after a chronic ROFA exposure. More specifically, the heart tissue seems to be more susceptible to oxidative effects of long-term exposure to ROFA than the lung. PMID:22563929

  12. Effects of Pacing Site and Stimulation History on Alternans Dynamics and the Development of Complex Spatiotemporal Patterns in Cardiac Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gizzi, Alessio; Cherry, Elizabeth M.; Gilmour, Robert F.; Luther, Stefan; Filippi, Simonetta; Fenton, Flavio H.

    2013-01-01

    Alternans of action potential duration has been associated with T wave alternans and the development of arrhythmias because it produces large gradients of repolarization. However, little is known about alternans dynamics in large mammalian hearts. Using optical mapping to record electrical activations simultaneously from the epicardium and endocardium of 9 canine right ventricles, we demonstrate novel arrhythmogenic complex spatiotemporal dynamics. (i) Alternans predominantly develops first on the endocardium. (ii) The postulated simple progression from normal rhythm to concordant to discordant alternans is not always observed; concordant alternans can develop from discordant alternans as the pacing period is decreased. (iii) In contrast to smaller tissue preparations, multiple stationary nodal lines may exist and need not be perpendicular to the pacing site or to each other. (iv) Alternans has fully three-dimensional dynamics and the epicardium and endocardium can show significantly different dynamics: multiple nodal surfaces can be transmural or intramural and can form concave/convex surfaces resulting in islands of discordant alternans. (v) The complex spatiotemporal patterns observed during alternans are very sensitive to both the site of stimulation and the stimulation history. Alternans in canine ventricles not only exhibit larger amplitudes and persist for longer cycle length regimes compared to those found in smaller mammalian hearts, but also show novel dynamics not previously described that enhance dispersion and show high sensitivity to initial conditions. This indicates some underlying predisposition to chaos and can help to guide the design of new drugs and devices controlling and preventing arrhythmic events. PMID:23637684

  13. An atlas of selected beta-ray spectra and depth-dose distributions in lithium fluoride and soft tissue generated by a fast Monte-Carlo-based sampling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samei, Ehsan; Kearfott, Kimberlee J.; Gillespie, Timothy J.; Chris Wang, C.-K.

    1996-12-01

    A method to generate depth-dose distributions due to beta radiation in LiF and soft tissue is proposed. In this method, the EGS4 Monte Carlo radiation transport code is initially used to generate a library of monoenergetic electron depth-dose distributions in the material for electron energies in the range of 10 keV to 5 MeV in 10 keV increments. A polynomial least-squares fit is applied to each distribution. In addition, a theoretical model is developed to generate beta-ray energy spectra of selected radionuclides. A standard Monte Carlo random sampling technique is then employed to sample the spectra and generate the depth-dose distributions in LiF and soft tissue. The proposed method has an advantage over more traditional methods in that the actual radiation transport in the media is performed only once for a set of monoenergetic cases and the beta depth-dose distributions are easily generated by sampling this previously-acquired database in a matter of minutes. This method therefore reduces the demand on computer resources and time. The method can be used to calculate depth-dose distribution due to any beta-emitting nuclide or combination of nuclides with up to ten beta components.

  14. Ultrasound catheters for circumferential cardiac ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Chris J.; Nau, William H.; Taylor, Kevin; Maguire, Mark T.; Picazo, Guillermo; Gangu, Madhuri; Lesh, Michael D.

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate performance characteristics of a catheter-based ultrasound applicator intended for circumferential ablation of cardiac tissue. The catheter design integrates a cylindrical ultrasound transducer within a distendable water filled balloon in order to produce circumferential lesions at sites in the atria (i.e., pulmonary vein ostia), intended for treatment of certain atrial arrhythmias. Biothermal simulations were used to investigate thermal lesion depths corresponding to variations in applied power, duration, balloon diameter, and acoustic efficiency. Prototype applicators of varying frequency (7 - 12 MHz) and balloon diameter were constructed and characterized using measurements of acoustic efficiency and rotational beam plots. In vitro studies were performed in freshly excised beef hearts to characterize the radial penetration, axial length, and angular uniformity of thermal lesions produced by these applicators. Selected applicators were tested in vivo within pulmonary veins, coronary sinus, and atrial appendage of canine and porcine hearts. These preliminary efforts have indicated that circumferential ablation of cardiac tissue using ultrasound balloon catheters is feasible, and devices between 7 - 12 MHz with balloon diameters of 1.5 - 2.0 cm are capable of producing uniform lesions between 1 - 5 mm depth or greater for treatment durations of 120 seconds or less.

  15. Apparent Depth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassar, Antonio B.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses a well-known optical refraction problem where the depth of an object in a liquid is determined. Proposes that many texts incorrectly solve the problem. Provides theory, equations, and diagrams. (MVL)

  16. Cardiac Applications of Optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, Christina M.; Klimas, Aleksandra; Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    In complex multicellular systems, such as the brain or the heart, the ability to selectively perturb and observe the response of individual components at the cellular level and with millisecond resolution in time, is essential for mechanistic understanding of function. Optogenetics uses genetic encoding of light sensitivity (by the expression of microbial opsins) to provide such capabilities for manipulation, recording, and control by light with cell specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. As an optical approach, it is inherently scalable for remote and parallel interrogation of biological function at the tissue level; with implantable miniaturized devices, the technique is uniquely suitable for in vivo tracking of function, as illustrated by numerous applications in the brain. Its expansion into the cardiac area has been slow. Here, using examples from published research and original data, we focus on optogenetics applications to cardiac electrophysiology, specifically dealing with the ability to manipulate membrane voltage by light with implications for cardiac pacing, cardioversion, cell communication, and arrhythmia research, in general. We discuss gene and cell delivery methods of inscribing light sensitivity in cardiac tissue, functionality of the light-sensitive ion channels within different types of cardiac cells, utility in probing electrical coupling between different cell types, approaches and design solutions to all-optical electrophysiology by the combination of optogenetic sensors and actuators, and specific challenges in moving towards in vivo cardiac optogenetics. PMID:25035999

  17. SU-E-T-499: Comparison of Measured Tissue Phantom Ratios (TPR) Against Calculated From Percent Depth Doses (PDD) with and Without Peak Scatter Factor (PSF) in 6MV Open Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanasamy, G; Cruz, W; Gutierrez, Alonso; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S; Breton, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To examine the accuracy of measured tissue phantom ratios (TPR) values with TPR calculated from percentage depth dose (PDD) with and without peak scatter fraction (PSF) correction. Methods: For 6MV open beam, TPR and PDD values were measured using PTW Semiflex (31010) ionization field and reference chambers (0.125cc volume) in a PTW MP3-M water tank. PDD curves were measured at SSD of 100cm for 7 square fields from 3cm to 30cm. The TPR values were measured up to 22cm depth for the same fields by continuous water draining method with ionization chamber static at 100cm from source. A comparison study was performed between the (a) measured TPR, (b) TPR calculated from PDD without PSF, (c) TPR calculated from PDD with PSF and (d) clinical TPR from RadCalc (ver 6.2, Sun Nuclear Corp). Results: There is a field size, depth dependence on TPR values. For 10cmx10cm, the differences in surface dose (DDs), dose at 10cm depth (DD10) <0.5%; differences in dmax (Ddmax) <2mm for the 4 methods. The corresponding values for 30cmx30cm are DDs, DD10 <0.2% and Ddmax<3mm. Even though for 3cmx3cm field, DDs and DD10 <1% and Ddmax<1mm, the calculated TPR values with and without PSF correction differed by 2% at >20cm depth. In all field sizes at depths>28cm, (d) clinical TPR values are larger than that from (b) and (c) by >3%. Conclusion: Measured TPR in method (a) differ from calculated TPR in methods (b) and (c) to within 1% for depths < 28cm in all 7 fields in open 6MV beam. The dmax values are within 3mm of each other. The largest deviation of >3% was observed in clinical TPR values in method (d) for all fields at depths < 28cm.

  18. Types of muscle tissue (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The 3 types of muscle tissue are cardiac, smooth, and skeletal. Cardiac muscle cells are located in the walls of the heart, appear striated, and are under involuntary control. Smooth muscle fibers are located in walls of hollow ...

  19. Label-free and depth resolved optical sectioning of iron-complex deposits in sickle cell disease splenic tissue by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigil, Genevieve D.; Adami, Alexander J.; Ahmed, Tahsin; Khan, Aamir; Chapman, Sarah; Andemariam, Biree; Thrall, Roger S.; Howard, Scott S.

    2015-06-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) imaging of intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) is performed on humanized sickle cell disease (SCD) mouse model splenic tissue. Distinct morphological and spectral features associated with SCD are identified and discussed in terms of diagnostic relevance. Specifically, spectrally unique splenic iron-complex deposits are identified by MPM; this finding is supported by TPEF spectroscopy and object size to standard histopathological methods. Further, iron deposits are found at higher concentrations in diseased tissue than in healthy tissue by all imaging methods employed here including MPM, and therefore, may provide a useful biomarker related to the disease state. These newly characterized biomarkers allow for further investigations of SCD in live animals as a means to gain insight into the mechanisms impacting immune dysregulation and organ malfunction, which are currently not well understood.

  20. Mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Blood circulation is the result of the beating of the heart, which provides the mechanical force to pump oxygenated blood to, and deoxygenated blood away from, the peripheral tissues. This depends critically on the preceding electrical activation. Disruptions in the orderly pattern of this propagating cardiac excitation wave can lead to arrhythmias. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying their generation and maintenance requires knowledge of the ionic contributions to the cardiac action potential, which is discussed in the first part of this review. A brief outline of the different classification systems for arrhythmogenesis is then provided, followed by a detailed discussion for each mechanism in turn, highlighting recent advances in this area. PMID:27092186

  1. Reference values of myocardial structure, function, and tissue composition by cardiac magnetic resonance in healthy African-Americans at 3T and their relations to serologic and cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Ying; Bluemke, David A; Gerstenblith, Gary; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Li, Ji; Zhu, Hong; Lai, Shenghan; Lai, Hong

    2014-09-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a standard of reference for cardiac structure and function. Recent advances in T1 mapping and spectroscopy also provide assessment of myocardial tissue composition. However, the reference ranges of left ventricular parameters have rarely been assessed in an African-American (AA) population without known cardiac disease. To estimate the reference values of myocardial structure, function, and tissue composition by CMR and to explore their relationships to serologic factors and cardiovascular risk factors in asymptomatic AAs with low Framingham risk, between November 2010 and June 2012, 92 healthy AAs aged ≥21 years, from Baltimore, MD, were enrolled in an observational study. CMR examination was performed on a 3T scanner. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy was performed to noninvasively quantify myocardial triglyceride content. Native T1 values were obtained from modified Look-Locker inversion recovery sequence. The median age was 37 (interquartile range IQR 27 to 44) years (41% men). The median native T1 time of the myocardium was 1,228 ms (IQR 1,200 to 1,263) with no gender difference. The median myocardial fat content was 0.6% (IQR 0.7% to 4.6%). Native T1 time was not influenced by age, sex, and body mass index. Among the factors investigated, myocardial fat and elevated C-reactive protein (>2.0 mg/dL) were independently associated with T1 relaxation time. Native T1 time was also independently associated with left ventricular end-diastolic volume indexed to body surface area. In conclusion, this study of asymptomatic AAs provides reference ranges for cardiovascular structure, function, and tissue composition. Alterations in myocardial fat are associated with native T1 time, a CMR measure of interstitial fibrosis. PMID:25037675

  2. Current perspectives on cardiac amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Jian; Mishra, Shikha; Falk, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    Amyloidosis represents a group of diseases in which proteins undergo misfolding to form insoluble fibrils with subsequent tissue deposition. While almost all deposited amyloid fibers share a common nonbranched morphology, the affected end organs, clinical presentation, treatment strategies, and prognosis vary greatly among this group of diseases and are largely dependent on the specific amyloid precursor protein. To date, at least 27 precursor proteins have been identified to result in either local tissue or systemic amyloidosis, with nine of them manifesting in cardiac deposition and resulting in a syndrome termed “cardiac amyloidosis” or “amyloid cardiomyopathy.” Although cardiac amyloidosis has been traditionally considered to be a rare disorder, as clinical appreciation and understanding continues to grow, so too has the prevalence, suggesting that this disease may be greatly underdiagnosed. The most common form of cardiac amyloidosis is associated with circulating amyloidogenic monoclonal immunoglobulin light chain proteins. Other major cardiac amyloidoses result from a misfolding of products of mutated or wild-type transthyretin protein. While the various cardiac amyloidoses share a common functional consequence, namely, an infiltrative cardiomyopathy with restrictive pathophysiology leading to progressive heart failure, the underlying pathophysiology and clinical syndrome varies with each precursor protein. Herein, we aim to provide an up-to-date overview of cardiac amyloidosis from nomenclature to molecular mechanisms and treatment options, with a particular focus on amyloidogenic immunoglobulin light chain protein cardiac amyloidosis. PMID:22058156

  3. Cardiac toxicities of antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, H R; Parker, J L; Durrett, L R

    1978-01-01

    Isolated heart muscle preparations are useful in the study of cardiac toxicities of drugs and environmental chemicals: such tissues allow assessment of chemical effects on heart muscle that is free from indirect in vivo influences that can mask or even accentuate cardiac responses measured in the intact animal. In the present study, left atria of guinea pigs were used to demonstrate a direct cardiac depressant effect of greater-than-therapeutic concentrations of several aminoglycoside antibiotics. The toxic effect of these antibiotics seems to be a calcium-dependent event, and may prove useful to characterize contractile responses of the heart. Other antibiotic agents can also depress cardiovascular function, as summarized in this report, but mechanisms of action have not been clearly defined. PMID:720315

  4. Cardiac metastases

    PubMed Central

    Bussani, R; De‐Giorgio, F; Abbate, A; Silvestri, F

    2007-01-01

    Tumours metastatic to the heart (cardiac metastases) are among the least known and highly debated issues in oncology, and few systematic studies are devoted to this topic. Although primary cardiac tumours are extremely uncommon (various postmortem studies report rates between 0.001% and 0.28%), secondary tumours are not, and at least in theory, the heart can be metastasised by any malignant neoplasm able to spread to distant sites. In general, cardiac metastases are considered to be rare; however, when sought for, the incidence seems to be not as low as expected, ranging from 2.3% and 18.3%. Although no malignant tumours are known that diffuse preferentially to the heart, some do involve the heart more often than others—for example, melanoma and mediastinal primary tumours. This paper attempts to review the pathophysiology of cardiac metastatic disease, epidemiology and clinical presentation of cardiac metastases, and pathological characterisation of the lesions. PMID:17098886

  5. Depth keying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvili, Ronen; Kaplan, Amir; Ofek, Eyal; Yahav, Giora

    2003-05-01

    We present a new solution to the known problem of video keying in a natural environment. We segment foreground objects from background objects using their relative distance from the camera, which makes it possible to do away with the use of color for keying. To do so, we developed and built a novel depth video camera, capable of producing RGB and D signals, where D stands for the distance to each pixel. The new RGBD camera enables the creation of a whole new gallery of effects and applications such as multi-layer background substitutions. This new modality makes the production of real time mixed reality video possible, as well as post-production manipulation of recorded video. We address the problem of color spill -- in which the color of the foreground object is mixed, along its boundary, with the background color. This problem prevents an accurate separation of the foreground object from its background, and it is most visible when compositing the foreground objects to a new background. Most existing techniques are limited to the use of a constant background color. We offer a novel general approach to the problem with enabling the use of the natural background, based upon the D channel generated by the camera.

  6. Cardiac Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jeudy, Jean; Burke, Allen P; Frazier, Aletta Ann

    2016-07-01

    Lymphoma of the heart and pericardium may develop in up to 25% of patients with disseminated nodal disease, but primary cardiac lymphoma is rare. The majority are diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, which arise in immunocompetent older individuals, men twice as often as women. Subsets are found in immunocompromised patients, including those with HIV-AIDS or allograft recipients. Cardiac lymphomas tend to arise in the wall of the right heart, especially right atrium, with contiguous infiltration of epicardium and pericardium. Pericardial implants and effusions are common. The disease is often multifocal in the heart, but cardiac valves are usually spared. PMID:27265603

  7. [Stem cells and cardiac regeneration].

    PubMed

    Perez Millan, Maria Ines; Lorenti, Alicia

    2006-01-01

    Stem cells are defined by virtue of their functional attributes: absence of tissue specific differentitated markers, capable of proliferation, able to self-maintain the population, able to produce a large number of differentiated, functional progeny, able to regenerate the tissue after injury. Cell therapy is an alternative for the treatment of several diseases, like cardiac diseases (cell cardiomyoplasty). A variety of stem cells could be used for cardiac repair: from cardiac and extracardiac sources. Each cell type has its own profile of advantages, limitations, and practicability issues in specific clinical settings. Differentiation of bone marrow stem cells to cardiomyocyte-like cells have been observed under different culture conditions. The presence of resident cardiac stem cell population capable of differentiation into cardiomyocyte or vascular lineage suggests that these cells could be used for cardiac tissue repair, and represent a great promise for clinical application. Stem cells mobilization by cytokines may also offer a strategy for cardiac regeneration. The use of stem cells (embryonic and adult) may hold the key to replacing cells lost in many devastating diseases. This potential benefit is a major focus for stem cell research. PMID:17240634

  8. Cardiac arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment for cardiac arrest. It is a medical device that gives an electrical shock to the heart. The shock can get the heart beating normally again. Small, portable defibrillators are often available in public areas for ...

  9. Cardiac amyloidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way electrical signals move through the heart (conduction system). This can lead to abnormal heart beats ( ... due to medication) Sick sinus syndrome Symptomatic cardiac conduction system disease (arrhythmias related to abnormal conduction of ...

  10. Cardiac rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... 123-210. Thomas PD. Exercise-Based, Comprehensive Cardiac Rehabilitation. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2011: ...

  11. Cardiac rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... goal of cardiac rehab is to: Improve your cardiovascular function Improve your overall health and quality of ... E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015: ...

  12. Cardiac Sarcoidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Cardiac Sarcoidosis? Sarcoidosis is a poorly understood disease that commonly affects the lungs. It can also involve the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, eyes, skin, bones, salivary glands and heart. ...

  13. An evaluation of Admedus' tissue engineering process-treated (ADAPT) bovine pericardium patch (CardioCel) for the repair of cardiac and vascular defects.

    PubMed

    Strange, Geoff; Brizard, Christian; Karl, Tom R; Neethling, Leon

    2015-03-01

    Tissue engineers have been seeking the 'Holy Grail' solution to calcification and cytotoxicity of implanted tissue for decades. Tissues with all of the desired qualities for surgical repair of congenital heart disease (CHD) are lacking. An anti-calcification tissue engineering process (ADAPT TEP) has been developed and applied to bovine pericardium (BP) tissue (CardioCel, AdmedusRegen Pty Ltd, Perth, WA, Australia) to eliminate cytotoxicity, improve resistance to acute and chronic inflammation, reduce calcification and facilitate controlled tissue remodeling. Clinical data in pediatric patients, and additional pre-market authorized prescriber data demonstrate that CardioCel performs extremely well in the short term and is safe and effective for a range of congenital heart deformations. These data are supported by animal studies which have shown no more than normal physiologic levels of calcification, with good durability, biocompatibility and controlled healing. PMID:25431988

  14. Imaging cardiac extracellular matrices: a blueprint for regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jangwook P.; Squirrell, Jayne M.; Lyons, Gary E.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Ogle, Brenda M.

    2013-01-01

    Once damaged, cardiac tissue does not readily repair and is therefore a primary target of regenerative therapies. One regenerative approach is the development of scaffolds that functionally mimic the cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM) to deliver stem cells or cardiac precursor populations to the heart. Technological advances in micro/nanotechnology, stem cell biology, biomaterials and tissue decellularization have propelled this promising approach forward. Surprisingly, technological advances in optical imaging methods have not been fully utilized in the field of cardiac regeneration. Here, we describe and provide examples to demonstrate how advanced imaging techniques could revolutionize how ECM-mimicking cardiac tissues are informed and evaluated. PMID:22209562

  15. Antibodies to cardiac receptors.

    PubMed

    Boivin-Jahns, V; Schlipp, A; Hartmann, S; Panjwani, P; Klingel, K; Lohse, M J; Ertl, G; Jahns, R

    2012-12-01

    Inflammation of cardiac tissue is generally associated with an activation of the host's immune system. On the one hand, this activation is mandatory to protect the heart by fighting the invading microbial agents or toxins and by engaging myocardial reparation and healing processes. On the other hand, uncontrolled activation of the immune defense has the risk of an arousal of auto- or cross-reactive immune cells, which in some cases bring more harm than good. Dependent on the individual genetic predisposition, such heart-directed autoimmune reactions most likely occur as a result of myocyte apoptosis or necrosis and subsequent liberation of self-antigens previously hidden to the immune system. During the past two decades, evidence for a pathogenic relevance of autoimmunity in human heart disease has substantially increased. Conformational cardiac (auto)antibodies affecting cardiac function and, in particular, (auto)antibodies that target G protein-coupled cardiac membrane receptors are thought to play a key role in the development of heart failure. Clinical pilot studies even suggest that such antibodies negatively affect survival in heart failure patients. However, the true prevalence and clinical impact of many cardiac (auto)antibodies in human heart diseases are still unclear, as are the events triggering their formation, their titer course, and their patterns of clearance and/or persistence. The present article summarizes current knowledge in the field of cardiac receptor (auto)antibodies including recent efforts to address some of the aforementioned gaps of knowledge, thereby attempting to pave the way for novel, more specific therapeutic approaches. PMID:23183584

  16. Direct Cardiac Reprogramming: Advances in Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Olivia; Qian, Li

    2015-01-01

    Heart disease is one of the lead causes of death worldwide. Many forms of heart disease, including myocardial infarction and pressure-loading cardiomyopathies, result in irreversible cardiomyocyte death. Activated fibroblasts respond to cardiac injury by forming scar tissue, but ultimately this response fails to restore cardiac function. Unfortunately, the human heart has little regenerative ability and long-term outcomes following acute coronary events often include chronic and end-stage heart failure. Building upon years of research aimed at restoring functional cardiomyocytes, recent advances have been made in the direct reprogramming of fibroblasts toward a cardiomyocyte cell fate both in vitro and in vivo. Several experiments show functional improvements in mouse models of myocardial infarction following in situ generation of cardiomyocyte-like cells from endogenous fibroblasts. Though many of these studies are in an early stage, this nascent technology holds promise for future applications in regenerative medicine. In this review, we discuss the history, progress, methods, challenges, and future directions of direct cardiac reprogramming. PMID:26176012

  17. Cardiac progenitor cells for heart repair

    PubMed Central

    Le, TYL; Chong, JJH

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is being investigated as an innovative and promising strategy to restore cardiac function in patients with heart failure. Several stem cell populations, including adult (multipotent) stem cells from developed organs and tissues, have been tested for cardiac repair with encouraging clinical and pre-clinical results. The heart has been traditionally considered a post-mitotic organ, however, this view has recently changed with the identification of stem/progenitor cells residing within the adult heart. Given their cardiac developmental origins, these endogenous cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) may represent better candidates for cardiac cell therapy compared with stem cells from other organs such as the bone marrow and adipose tissue. This brief review will outline current research into CPC populations and their cardiac repair/regenerative potential. PMID:27551540

  18. Telocytes in exercise-induced cardiac growth.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Junjie; Chen, Ping; Qu, Yi; Yu, Pujiao; Yao, Jianhua; Wang, Hongbao; Fu, Siyi; Bei, Yihua; Chen, Yan; Che, Lin; Xu, Jiahong

    2016-05-01

    Exercise can induce physiological cardiac growth, which is featured by enlarged cardiomyocyte cell size and formation of new cardiomyocytes. Telocytes (TCs) are a recently identified distinct interstitial cell type, existing in many tissues and organs including heart. TCs have been shown to form a tandem with cardiac stem/progenitor cells in cardiac stem cell niches, participating in cardiac regeneration and repair. Although exercise-induced cardiac growth has been confirmed as an important way to promote cardiac regeneration and repair, the response of cardiac TCs to exercise is still unclear. In this study, 4 weeks of swimming training was used to induce robust healthy cardiac growth. Exercise can induce an increase in cardiomyocyte cell size and formation of new cardiomyocytes as determined by Wheat Germ Lectin and EdU staining respectively. TCs were identified by three immunofluorescence stainings including double labelling for CD34/vimentin, CD34/platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor-α and CD34/PDGF receptor-β. We found that cardiac TCs were significantly increased in exercised heart, suggesting that TCs might help control the activity of cardiac stem/progenitor cells, cardiomyocytes or endothelial cells. Adding cardiac TCs might help promote cardiac regeneration and renewal. PMID:26987685

  19. In Utero Exposure of Female CD-1 Mice to AZT and/or 3TC: I. Persistence of Microscopic Lesions in Cardiac Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Salina M.; March, Thomas H.; Carter, Meghan M.; McCash, Consuelo L.; Seilkop, Steven K.; Poirier, Miriam C.; Walker, Dale M.

    2010-01-01

    The current study was designed to delineate temporal changes in cardiomyocytes and mitochondria at the light and electron microscopic levels in hearts of mice exposed transplacentally to commonly used nucleoside analogs (NRTIs). Pregnant CD-1 mice were given 80 mg AZT/kg, 40 mg 3TC/kg, 80 mg AZT/kg plus 40 mg 3TC/kg, or vehicle alone during the last 7 days of gestation, and hearts from female mouse pups were examined at 13 and 26 weeks postpartum for histopathological or ultrastructural changes in cross-sections of both the ventricles and the interventricular septum. Using light microscopy and special staining techniques, transplacental exposure to AZT, 3TC, or AZT/3TC was shown to induce significant histopathological changes in myofibrils; these changes were more widespread at 13 weeks than at 26 weeks postpartum. While most light microscopic lesions resolved, some became more severe between 13 and 26 weeks postpartum. Transplacental NRTI exposure also resulted in progressive drug-specific changes in the number and ultrastructural integrity of cardiac mitochondria. These light and electron microscopic findings show that a subset of changes in cardiac mitochondria and myofibrils persisted and progressed months after transplacental exposure of an animal model to NRTIs, with combined AZT/3TC exposure yielding additive effects compared with either drug alone. PMID:20101476

  20. Identification and Characterization of a Compound That Protects Cardiac Tissue from Human Ether-à-go-go-related Gene (hERG)-related Drug-induced Arrhythmias*

    PubMed Central

    Potet, Franck; Lorinc, Amanda N.; Chaigne, Sebastien; Hopkins, Corey R.; Venkataraman, Raghav; Stepanovic, Svetlana Z.; Lewis, L. Michelle; Days, Emily; Sidorov, Veniamin Y.; Engers, Darren W.; Zou, Beiyan; Afshartous, David; George, Alfred L.; Campbell, Courtney M.; Balser, Jeffrey R.; Li, Min; Baudenbacher, Franz J.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Weaver, C. David; Kupershmidt, Sabina

    2012-01-01

    The human Ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG)-encoded K+ current, IKr is essential for cardiac repolarization but is also a source of cardiotoxicity because unintended hERG inhibition by diverse pharmaceuticals can cause arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. We hypothesized that a small molecule that diminishes IKr block by a known hERG antagonist would constitute a first step toward preventing hERG-related arrhythmias and facilitating drug discovery. Using a high-throughput assay, we screened a library of compounds for agents that increase the IC70 of dofetilide, a well characterized hERG blocker. One compound, VU0405601, with the desired activity was further characterized. In isolated, Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts, optical mapping revealed that dofetilide-induced arrhythmias were reduced after pretreatment with VU0405601. Patch clamp analysis in stable hERG-HEK cells showed effects on current amplitude, inactivation, and deactivation. VU0405601 increased the IC50 of dofetilide from 38.7 to 76.3 nm. VU0405601 mitigates the effects of hERG blockers from the extracellular aspect primarily by reducing inactivation, whereas most clinically relevant hERG inhibitors act at an inner pore site. Structure-activity relationships surrounding VU0405601 identified a 3-pyridiyl and a naphthyridine ring system as key structural components important for preventing hERG inhibition by multiple inhibitors. These findings indicate that small molecules can be designed to reduce the sensitivity of hERG to inhibitors. PMID:23033485

  1. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David H; Nery, Pablo B; Ha, Andrew C; Beanlands, Rob S B

    2016-07-26

    Clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in perhaps 5% of patients with sarcoidosis. The 3 principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. An estimated 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic cardiac involvement (clinically silent disease). In 2014, the first international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS was published. In patients with clinically manifest CS, the extent of left ventricular dysfunction seems to be the most important predictor of prognosis. There is controversy in published reports as to the outcome of patients with clinically silent CS. Despite a paucity of data, immunosuppression therapy (primarily with corticosteroids) has been advocated for the treatment of clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, primarily with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, is often recommended for patients with clinically manifest disease. PMID:27443438

  2. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Smedema, J.P.; Zondervan, P.E.; van Hagen, P.; ten Cate, F.J.; Bresser, P.; Doubell, A.F.; Pattynama, P.; Hoogsteden, H.C.; Balk, A.H.M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system granulomatous disorder of unknown aetiology. Symptomatic cardiac involvement occurs in approximately 5% of patients. The prevalence of sarcoidosis in the Netherlands is unknown, but estimated to be approximately 20 per 100,000 population (3200 patients). We report on five patients who presented with different manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis, and give a brief review on the current management of this condition. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be of great help in diagnosing this condition as well as in the follow-up of the response to therapy. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:25696121

  3. The Association between Serum Ferritin Level, Tissue Doppler Echocardiography, Cardiac T2* MRI, and Heart Rate Recovery in Patients with Beta Thalassemia Major

    PubMed Central

    Yuksel, Isa Oner; Koklu, Erkan; Kurtoglu, Erdal; Arslan, Sakir; Cagirci, Goksel; Karakus, Volkan; Kus, Gorkem; Cay, Serkan; Kucukseymen, Selcuk

    2016-01-01

    Background It is generally well-understood that iron-mediated cardiomyopathy is the major complication that can arise from beta thalassemia major (TM). Therefore, early diagnosis, risk stratification, and the effective treatment of beta TM patients are clinically important to optimize long-term positive outcomes. Methods This study included 57 beta TM patients with a mean age of 25 ± 7 years. We determined the serum ferritin level, echocardiography, heart rate recovery (HRR), and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) T2* in all patients. CMR T2* findings were categorized as normal myocardium (T2* > 20 ms), and myocardial involvement (T2* ≤ 20 ms). HRR values at 1-5 min (HRR1-5) were recorded; Subsequently. HRR was calculated by subtracting the heart rate at each time point from the heart rate at peak exercise. Results There was a significant negative correlation between the serum ferritin level and the cardiac T2* MRI findings (r = -0.34, p = 0.009). A similar result was found in the negative correlation between serum ferritin and all heart rate recovery values. There was a significant positive correlation between HRR1, HRR2, and HRR3 values, and CMR T2* (T2* heart rate recovery (HRR)1: r = 0.51, p < 0.001; T2* HRR2: r = 0.48, p < 0.001; T2* HRR3: r = 0.47, p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusions The serum ferritin level and echocardiography can be used to predict the presence of myocardial iron load in beta TM patients. Therefore, HRR can be used to screen beta TM patients, and the clinical use of HRR can be a predictive marker for autonomic dysfunction in beta TM patients. PMID:27122954

  4. Design and Organization of the Dexamethasone, Light Anesthesia and Tight Glucose Control (DeLiT) Trial: a factorial trial evaluating the effects of corticosteroids, glucose control, and depth-of-anesthesia on perioperative inflammation and morbidity from major non-cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The perioperative period is characterized by an intense inflammatory response. Perioperative inflammation promotes postoperative morbidity and increases mortality. Blunting the inflammatory response to surgical trauma might thus improve perioperative outcomes. We are studying three interventions that potentially modulate perioperative inflammation: corticosteroids, tight glucose control, and light anesthesia. Methods/Design The DeLiT Trial is a factorial randomized single-center trial of dexamethasone vs placebo, intraoperative tight vs. conventional glucose control, and light vs deep anesthesia in patients undergoing major non-cardiac surgery. Anesthetic depth will be estimated with Bispectral Index (BIS) monitoring (Aspect medical, Newton, MA). The primary outcome is a composite of major postoperative morbidity including myocardial infarction, stroke, sepsis, and 30-day mortality. C-reactive protein, a measure of the inflammatory response, will be evaluated as a secondary outcome. One-year all-cause mortality as well as post-operative delirium will be additional secondary outcomes. We will enroll up to 970 patients which will provide 90% power to detect a 40% reduction in the primary outcome, including interim analyses for efficacy and futility at 25%, 50% and 75% enrollment. Discussion The DeLiT trial started in February 2007. We expect to reach our second interim analysis point in 2010. This large randomized controlled trial will provide a reliable assessment of the effects of corticosteroids, glucose control, and depth-of-anesthesia on perioperative inflammation and morbidity from major non-cardiac surgery. The factorial design will enable us to simultaneously study the effects of the three interventions in the same population, both individually and in different combinations. Such a design is an economically efficient way to study the three interventions in one clinical trial vs three. Trial registration This trial is registered at Clinicaltrials

  5. Feasibility of In-Vivo Cardiac HIFU Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikura, Kana; Otsuka, Ryo; Kalisz, Andrew; Muratore, Robert; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.; Lizzi, Frederic L.; Homma, Shunichi

    2005-03-01

    The potential for cardiac applications of HIFU remains largely unexplored. In order to create reproducible lesions in a beating heart, it is necessary to maintain focusing at a certain position within moving myocardial tissue. One technique is to use multiple short HIFU exposures (0.2 s) and to synchronize them with an EKG signal and respiration. In order to investigate the interaction of HIFU exposures and cardiac tissues, a series of in-vitro experiments was conducted. The left ventricular free wall (LVFW) of calf hearts were cut into 4-cm cubes, degassed in phosphate buffer saline (PBS), and heated to 37C. Several transducers were employed. Most experiments used a 33-mm diameter spherical-cap transducer with focal length of 35 mm, operated at a frequency of 5.075 MHz and a focused intensity of 13 kW/cm2 (in-situ spatial average over the half-power points of the focused beam). The transducer was coupled to the LVFW using degassed PBS. First, the effects of pericardial fat, focal depth, and temperature on lesion size were individually evaluated. We compared the effect of different time pulse duration (0.2 s and 0.3 s) and number of applied pulses. Dimensions of all lesions were measured by visual examination of the fresh, unstained tissue. Histopathological examination of the lesions was also performed.

  6. Identification and characterization of a gene regulating enzymatic glycosylation which is induced by diabetes and hyperglycemia specifically in rat cardiac tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Y; Warren, C E; Buczek-Thomas, J A; Rulfs, J; Koya, D; Aiello, L P; Feener, E P; Miller, T B; Dennis, J W; King, G L

    1995-01-01

    Primary cardiac abnormalities have been frequently reported in patients with diabetes probably due to metabolic consequences of the disease. Approximately 2,000 mRNA species from the heart of streptozotocin-induced diabetic and control rats were compared by the mRNA differential display method, two of eight candidate clones thus isolated (DH1 and 13) were confirmed by Northern blot analysis. The expression of clone 13 was increased in the heart by 3.5-fold (P < 0.05) and decreased in the aorta by twofold (P < 0.05) in diabetes as compared to control. Sequence analysis showed that clone 13 is a rat mitochondrial gene. DH1 was predominantly expressed in the heart with an expression level 6.8-fold higher in the diabetic rats than in control (P < 0.001). Insulin treatment significantly (P < 0.001) normalized the expression of DH1 in the hearts of diabetic rats. DH1 expression was observed in cultured rat cardiomyocytes, but not in aortic smooth muscle cells or in cardiac derived fibroblasts. The expression in cardiomyocytes was regulated by insulin and glucose concentration of culture media. The full length cDNA of DH1 had a single open-reading frame with 85 and 92% amino acid identity to human and mouse UDP-GlcNAc:Gal beta 1-3GalNAc alpha R beta 1-6 N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (core 2 GlcNAc-T), respectively, a key enzyme determining the structure of O-linked glycosylation. Transient transfection of DH1 cDNA into Cos7 cells conferred core 2 GlcNAc-T enzyme activity. In vivo, core 2 GlcNAc-T activity was increased by 82% (P < 0.05) in diabetic hearts vs controls, while the enzymes GlcNAc-TI and GlcNAc-TV responsible for N-linked glycosylation were unchanged. These results suggest that core 2 GlcNAc-T is specifically induced in the heart by diabetes or hyperglycemia. The induction of this enzyme may be responsible for the increase in the deposition of glycoconjugates and the abnormal functions found in the hearts of diabetic rats. Images PMID:7560067

  7. Studies of the voltage-sensitive calcium channels in smooth muscle, neuronal, and cardiac tissues using 1,4-dihydropyridine calcium channel antagonists and activators

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, X.

    1988-01-01

    This study describes the investigation of the voltage-sensitive Ca{sup +} channels in vascular and intestinal smooth muscle, chick neural retina cells and neonatal rat cardiac myocytes using 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca{sup 2+} channel antagonists and activators. In rat aorta, the tumor promoting phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) produced Ca{sup 2+}-dependent contractile responses. The responses to TPA were blocked by the Ca{sup 2+} channel antagonists. The effects of the enantiomers of Bay K 8644 and 202-791 were characterized in both rat tail artery and guinea pig ileal longitudinal smooth muscle preparations using pharmacologic and radioligand binding assays. The (S)-enantiomers induced contraction and potentiated the responses to K{sup +} depolarization. The (R)-enantiomers inhibited the tension responses to K{sup +}. All the enantiomers inhibited specific ({sup 3}H)nitrendipine binding. The pharmacologic activities of both activator and antagonist ligands correlated on a 1:1 basis with the binding affinities. In chick neural retina cells the (S)-enantiomers of Bay K 8644 and 202-791 enhanced Ca{sup 2+} influx. In contrast, the (R)-enantiomers inhibited Ca{sup 2+} influx. The enantiomers of Bay K 8644 and 202-791 inhibited specific ({sup 3}H)PN 200-110 binding competitively. Binding of 1,4-dihydropyridines was characterized in neonatal rat heart cells.

  8. Rho Kinases and Cardiac Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Toru; Liao, James K

    2016-06-24

    Hypertensive cardiac remodeling is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and interstitial fibrosis, which can lead to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. The Rho-associated coiled-coil containing kinases (ROCKs) are members of the serine/threonine protein kinase family, which mediates the downstream effects of the small GTP-binding protein RhoA. There are 2 isoforms: ROCK1 and ROCK2. They have different functions in different types of cells and tissues. There is growing evidence that ROCKs contribute to the development of cardiovascular diseases, including cardiac fibrosis, hypertrophy, and subsequent heart failure. Recent experimental studies using ROCK inhibitors, such as fasudil, have shown the benefits of ROCK inhibition in cardiac remodeling. Mice lacking each ROCK isoform also exhibit reduced myocardial fibrosis in a variety of pathological models of cardiac remodeling. Indeed, clinical studies with fasudil have suggested that ROCKs could be potential novel therapeutic targets for cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the roles of ROCKs in the development of cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy and discuss their therapeutic potential for deleterious cardiac remodeling. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1491-1498). PMID:27251065

  9. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  10. Cardiac manifestations in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lambova, Sevdalina

    2014-01-01

    Primary cardiac involvement, which develops as a direct consequence of systemic sclerosis (SSc), may manifest as myocardial damage, fibrosis of the conduction system, pericardial and, less frequently, as valvular disease. In addition, cardiac complications in SSc may develop as a secondary phenomenon due to pulmonary arterial hypertension and kidney pathology. The prevalence of primary cardiac involvement in SSc is variable and difficult to determine because of the diversity of cardiac manifestations, the presence of subclinical periods, the type of diagnostic tools applied, and the diversity of patient populations. When clinically manifested, cardiac involvement is thought to be an important prognostic factor. Profound microvascular disease is a pathognomonic feature of SSc, as both vasospasm and structural alterations are present. Such alterations are thought to predict macrovascular atherosclerosis over time. There are contradictory reports regarding the prevalence of atherosclerosis in SSc. According to some authors, the prevalence of atherosclerosis of the large epicardial coronary arteries is similar to that of the general population, in contrast with other rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. However, the level of inflammation in SSc is inferior. Thus, the atherosclerotic process may not be as aggressive and not easily detectable in smaller studies. Echocardiography (especially tissue Doppler imaging), single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and cardiac computed tomography are sensitive techniques for earlier detection of both structural and functional scleroderma-related cardiac pathologies. Screening for subclinical cardiac involvement via modern, sensitive tools provides an opportunity for early diagnosis and treatment, which is of crucial importance for a positive outcome. PMID:25276300

  11. The effects of α- and β-adrenergic blocking agents on postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction and myocardial tissue injury in a rat model of cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Hu, Xianwen; Lu, Xiaoye; Wu, Xiaobo; Xu, Jiefeng; Yang, Zhengfei; Qian, Jie; Sun, Shijie; Cahoon, Jena; Tang, Wanchun

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the relationship between the severity of postresuscitation (PR) myocardial tissue injury and myocardial dysfunction after the administration of epinephrine as well as the protective effects of α- and β-adrenergic blocking agents. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into 6 groups: (1) placebo; (2) epinephrine; (3) epinephrine pretreated with α1-blocker (prazosin); (4) epinephrine pretreated with α2-blocker (yohimbine); (5) epinephrine pretreated with β-blocker (propranolol); and (6) epinephrine pretreated with β- plus α1-blocker (propranolol and prazosin). Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was initiated after 8 minutes of untreated ventricular fibrillation and continued for an additional 8 minutes. The myocardial function and the serum concentrations of troponin I (Tn I) and N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) were measured at baseline and after resuscitation. After resuscitation, both Tn I and NT-proBNP were significantly increased in all groups, especially in the epinephrine and epinephrine pretreated with α2-blocker groups. Significantly better PR myocardial function and neurologic deficit score were observed in epinephrine pretreated with the α1- or β-blocker with decreased releases of Tn I and NT-proBNP. However, the most significant improvements were observed in the animals pretreated with β- plus α1-blocker. The present study demonstrated that myocardial stunning may not be the only mechanism of PR myocardial dysfunction. Administration of epinephrine increased the severity of PR myocardial tissue injury and dysfunction. The β- and β- plus α1-blocker pretreatment significantly reduced the severity of PR myocardial tissue injury and myocardial dysfunction with better neurologic function and prolonged duration of survival. PMID:25468485

  12. Systemic senile amyloidosis. Identification of a new prealbumin (transthyretin) variant in cardiac tissue: immunologic and biochemical similarity to one form of familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Gorevic, P D; Prelli, F C; Wright, J; Pras, M; Frangione, B

    1989-01-01

    Isolated amyloid fibrils from three cases of systemic senile amyloidosis (SSA) contained subunit proteins with molecular masses of 14 (10-20%), 10-12 (60-80%), and 5-6 kD (5-10%) when fractionated under reducing and dissociating conditions. This grouping was identical to that seen in SKO, a case of familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) studied earlier. Amino acid sequencing confirmed that SSA subunit proteins were in fact prealbumin (transthyretin). Complete sequence analysis of one SSA preparation revealed the presence of a new variant Pa (TTr) molecule with a single amino acid substitution of isoleucine for valine at position 122. Further studies used an antiserum specific for SKO IV, a subunit protein of SKO previously shown to correspond to carboxy-terminal 78 residues (positions 49-127) of (TTr). Anti-SKO IV reacted with SSA in tissue at equivalent dilutions to anti-Pa (TTr) and with the 10-12-kD fraction of SSA on Western blots; reactivity was blocked by SKO IV, but not by Pa (TTr). SSA is a form of systemic amyloidosis caused by tissue deposition of Pa (TTr) and its fragments, with shared conformational or subunit antigenicity to at least one form of FAP. Identification of a new variant Pa (TTr) molecule in one case suggests further that SSA may be a genetically determined disease expressed late in life. Images PMID:2646319

  13. Cardiac cell proliferation assessed by EdU, a novel analysis of cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Bin; Tong, Suiyang; Ren, Xiaofeng; Xia, Hao

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that mammalian hearts maintain the capacity for cardiac regeneration. Rapid and sensitive identification of cardiac cellular proliferation is prerequisite for understanding the underlying mechanisms and strategies of cardiac regeneration. The following immunologically related markers of cardiac cells were analyzed: cardiac transcription factors Nkx2.5 and Gata 4; specific marker of cardiomyocytes TnT; endothelial cell marker CD31; vascular smooth muscle marker smooth muscle myosin IgG; cardiac resident stem cells markers IsL1, Tbx18, and Wt1. Markers were co-localized in cardiac tissues of embryonic, neonatal, adult, and pathological samples by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) staining. EdU was also used to label isolated neonatal cardiomyocytes in vitro. EdU robustly labeled proliferating cells in vitro and in vivo, co-immunostaining with different cardiac cells markers. EdU can rapidly and sensitively label proliferating cardiac cells in developmental and pathological states. Cardiac cell proliferation assessed by EdU is a novel analytical tool for investigating the mechanism and strategies of cardiac regeneration in response to injury. PMID:25480318

  14. Feasibility of in vivo cardiac HIFU ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikura, Kana; Otsuka, Ryo; Homma, Shunichi; Muratore, Robert; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.; Lizzi, Frederic L.

    2001-05-01

    The potential for cardiac applications of HIFU remains unexamined. In order to create reproducible lesions in a beating heart, it is necessary to maintain focusing at a certain position within moving myocardial tissue. One technique is to use multiple short HIFU exposures (0.2 s) and synchronize them with an EKG signal and respiration. The left ventricular free wall (LVFW) of calf hearts were cut into 4-cm cubes, degassed in phosphate buffer saline (PBS), and heated to 37°C. An 80-mm-diam spherical-cap transducer with a focus of 90 mm was operated at a frequency of 4.67 MHz and a nominal focal point intensity of 26.9 kW/cm2. The transducer was coupled to the LVFW using degassed PBS. First, the effect of pericardial fat, focal depth, and temperature on lesion size was individually evaluated. Then the 0.2-s HIFU exposure was applied 10 to 30 times at 4-s intervals. The same HIFU transducer was applied to an open-chest canine LVFW with the same triggering protocol. Dimensions of all lesions were measured by visual examination of the fresh, unstained tissue. A histopathological examination of the lesion was also performed. The in vivo lesions were created in similar size to those in vitro.

  15. Physics of Cardiac Arrhythmogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karma, Alain

    2013-04-01

    A normal heartbeat is orchestrated by the stable propagation of an excitation wave that produces an orderly contraction. In contrast, wave turbulence in the ventricles, clinically known as ventricular fibrillation (VF), stops the heart from pumping and is lethal without prompt defibrillation. I review experimental, computational, and theoretical studies that have shed light on complex dynamical phenomena linked to the initiation, maintenance, and control of wave turbulence. I first discuss advances made to understand the precursor state to a reentrant arrhythmia where the refractory period of cardiac tissue becomes spatiotemporally disordered; this is known as an arrhythmogenic tissue substrate. I describe observed patterns of transmembrane voltage and intracellular calcium signaling that can contribute to this substrate, and symmetry breaking instabilities to explain their formation. I then survey mechanisms of wave turbulence and discuss novel methods that exploit electrical pacing stimuli to control precursor patterns and low-energy pulsed electric fields to control turbulence.

  16. Advancing cardiovascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Truskey, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular tissue engineering offers the promise of biologically based repair of injured and damaged blood vessels, valves, and cardiac tissue. Major advances in cardiovascular tissue engineering over the past few years involve improved methods to promote the establishment and differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), scaffolds from decellularized tissue that may produce more highly differentiated tissues and advance clinical translation, improved methods to promote vascularization, and novel in vitro microphysiological systems to model normal and diseased tissue function. iPSC technology holds great promise, but robust methods are needed to further promote differentiation. Differentiation can be further enhanced with chemical, electrical, or mechanical stimuli. PMID:27303643

  17. Tomotherapy and Multifield Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Planning Reduce Cardiac Doses in Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients With Unfavorable Cardiac Anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, Alan B.; Dickler, Adam; Kirk, Michael C.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: For patients with left-sided breast cancers, radiation treatment to the intact breast results in high doses to significant volumes of the heart, increasing the risk of cardiac morbidity, particularly in women with unfavorable cardiac anatomy. We compare helical tomotherapy (TOMO) and inverse planned intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy using opposed tangents (3D-CRT) for reductions in cardiac volumes receiving high doses. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with left-sided breast cancers and unfavorable cardiac anatomy, determined by a maximum heart depth (MHD) of {>=}1.0 cm within the tangent fields, were planned for TOMO and IMRT with five to seven beam angles, in addition to 3D-CRT. The volumes of heart and left ventricle receiving {>=}35 Gy (V35) were compared for the plans, as were the mean doses to the contralateral breast and the volume receiving {>=}20 Gy (V20) for the ipsilateral lung. Results: The mean MHD was 1.7 cm, and a significant correlation was observed between MHD and both heart and left ventricle V35. The V35s for IMRT (0.7%) and TOMO (0.5%) were significantly lower than for 3D-CRT (3.6%). The V20 for IMRT (22%) was significantly higher than for 3D-CRT (15%) or TOMO (18%), but the contralateral breast mean dose for TOMO (2.48 Gy) was significantly higher than for 3D-CRT (0.93 Gy) or IMRT (1.38 Gy). Conclusions: Both TOMO and IMRT can significantly reduce cardiac doses, with modest increases in dose to other tissues in left-sided breast cancer patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy.

  18. Cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ehsani, A A

    1984-02-01

    Exercise training is a major, and the most important, component of cardiac rehabilitation. Besides providing psychological benefits and promoting a "sense of well being," it elicits a number of adaptations in patients with ischemic heart disease. Among the clinically important adaptations are changes in the trained skeletal muscles and autonomic nervous system, resulting not only in increased maximum exercise capacity but also a slower heart rate and, at times, a lower systolic blood pressure during submaximal exercise. The reduction in the rate pressure product decreases myocardial O2 demand at any given submaximal exercise intensity and may thus alleviate myocardial ischemia and angina in patients with coronary artery disease. These adaptive responses occur even with a relatively modest exercise intensity. Although short-term exercise training of moderate intensity has not been reported to result in improvement in left ventricular performance, recent data suggest that exercise training of higher intensity and longer duration (12 months or longer) than has conventionally been used in cardiac rehabilitation programs may favorably affect the heart. This is characterized by improvements in left ventricular function, diminished electrocardiographic criteria of myocardial ischemia and increased stroke volume during exercise. Modest weight reduction accompanies regularly performed prolonged exercise training. It is important, however, to recognize that high-intensity exercise programs are suitable for only some patients with coronary artery disease who are stable and should be used only under strict medical supervision. PMID:6400004

  19. Role of temperature on nonlinear cardiac dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenton, Flavio H.; Gizzi, Alessio; Cherubini, Christian; Pomella, Nicola; Filippi, Simonetta

    2013-04-01

    Thermal effects affecting spatiotemporal behavior of cardiac tissue are discussed by relating temperature variations to proarrhythmic dynamics in the heart. By introducing a thermoelectric coupling in a minimal model of cardiac tissue, we are able to reproduce experimentally measured dynamics obtained simultaneously from epicardial and endocardial canine right ventricles at different temperatures. A quantitative description of emergent proarrhythmic properties of restitution, conduction velocity, and alternans regimes as a function of temperature is presented. Complex discordant alternans patterns that enhance tissue dispersion consisting of one wave front and three wave backs are described in both simulations and experiments. Possible implications for model generalization are finally discussed.

  20. Automatic classification of scar tissue in late gadolinium enhancement cardiac MRI for the assessment of left-atrial wall injury after radiofrequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Daniel; Morris, Alan; Burgon, Nathan; McGann, Christopher; MacLeod, Robert; Cates, Joshua

    2012-03-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is a promising procedure for treating atrial fibrillation (AF) that relies on accurate lesion delivery in the left atrial (LA) wall for success. Late Gadolinium Enhancement MRI (LGE MRI) at three months post-ablation has proven effective for noninvasive assessment of the location and extent of scar formation, which are important factors for predicting patient outcome and planning of redo ablation procedures. We have developed an algorithm for automatic classification in LGE MRI of scar tissue in the LA wall and have evaluated accuracy and consistency compared to manual scar classifications by expert observers. Our approach clusters voxels based on normalized intensity and was chosen through a systematic comparison of the performance of multivariate clustering on many combinations of image texture. Algorithm performance was determined by overlap with ground truth, using multiple overlap measures, and the accuracy of the estimation of the total amount of scar in the LA. Ground truth was determined using the STAPLE algorithm, which produces a probabilistic estimate of the true scar classification from multiple expert manual segmentations. Evaluation of the ground truth data set was based on both inter- and intra-observer agreement, with variation among expert classifiers indicating the difficulty of scar classification for a given a dataset. Our proposed automatic scar classification algorithm performs well for both scar localization and estimation of scar volume: for ground truth datasets considered easy, variability from the ground truth was low; for those considered difficult, variability from ground truth was on par with the variability across experts.

  1. Diagnostic approach to cardiac amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Amin, Hilman Zulkifli; Mori, Shumpei; Sasaki, Naoto; Hirata, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a relatively rare disease that may be underdiagnosed and could affect the entire human body. Many organs may be affected, which could increase the morbidity and mortality. Cardiac involvement is the leading cause of poor prognosis. Patients with cardiac amyloidosis are usually admitted with heart failure. The clinical presentation varies greatly, and using the correct approach is important in identifying cardiac amyloidosis. A 51-year-old man was diagnosed with chronic heart failure. He had increased brain natriuretic peptide levels, a low ejection fraction, and left and right ventricular hypertrophy with granular sparkling as seen by echocardiography. These findings led us to perform a cardiac biopsy that confirmed the diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis. Further investigation revealed that the patient had amyloid light-chain type amyloidosis due to multiple myeloma. He is now undergoing the 3rd phase of chemotherapy. Congo-red stain is usually used by physicians to histologically confirm amyloidosis, with which apple-green birefringence indicates amyloid deposits. Other stains such as direct fast scarlet (DFS) and hematoxylin-eosin (HE) can also confirm the presence of amyloid deposits. In the present case, DFS and HE were used, both of which suggested amyloid deposits surrounding myocardial cells. The use of a combination of stains can increase the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of amyloidosis. However, the typical echocardiographic appearances would be enough to diagnose cardiac amyloidosis when it is impossible for the patient to undergo a cardiac biopsy, if an additional histological specimen from another tissue such as abdominal fat confirms amyloidosis. PMID:25011639

  2. Feature-based MRI data fusion for cardiac arrhythmia studies.

    PubMed

    Magtibay, Karl; Beheshti, Mohammadali; Foomany, Farbod Hosseyndoust; Massé, Stéphane; Lai, Patrick F H; Zamiri, Nima; Asta, John; Nanthakumar, Kumaraswamy; Jaffray, David; Krishnan, Sridhar; Umapathy, Karthikeyan

    2016-05-01

    Current practices in studying cardiac arrhythmias primarily use electrical or optical surface recordings of a heart, spatially limited transmural recordings, and mathematical models. However, given that such arrhythmias occur on a 3D myocardial tissue, information obtained from such practices lack in dimension, completeness, and are sometimes prone to oversimplification. The combination of complementary Magnetic-Resonance Imaging (MRI)-based techniques such as Current Density Imaging (CDI) and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) could provide more depth to current practices in assessing the cardiac arrhythmia dynamics in entire cross sections of myocardium. In this work, we present an approach utilizing feature-based data fusion methods to demonstrate that complimentary information obtained from electrical current distribution and structural properties within a heart could be quantified and enhanced. Twelve (12) pairs of CDI and DTI image data sets were gathered from porcine hearts perfused through a Langendorff setup. Images were fused together using feature-based data fusion techniques such as Joint Independent Component Analysis (jICA), Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA), and their combination (CCA+jICA). The results suggest that the complimentary information of cardiac states from CDI and DTI are enhanced and are better classified with the use of data fusion methods. For each data set, an increase in mean correlations of fused images were observed with 38% increase from CCA+jICA compared to the original images while mean mutual information of the fused images from jICA and CCA+jICA increased by approximately three-fold. We conclude that MRI-based techniques present potential viable tools in furthering studies for cardiac arrhythmias especially Ventricular Fibrillation. PMID:26970857

  3. Animal models of cardiac cachexia.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Francesca; Malara, Natalia; Mollace, Vincenzo; Rosano, Giuseppe; Ferraro, Elisabetta

    2016-09-15

    Cachexia is the loss of body weight associated with several chronic diseases including chronic heart failure (CHF). The cachectic condition is mainly due to loss of skeletal muscle mass and adipose tissue depletion. The majority of experimental in vivo studies on cachexia rely on animal models of cancer cachexia while a reliable and appropriate model for cardiac cachexia has not yet been established. A critical issue in generating a cardiac cachexia model is that genetic modifications or pharmacological treatments impairing the heart functionality and used to obtain the heart failure model might likely impair the skeletal muscle, this also being a striated muscle and sharing with the myocardium several molecular and physiological mechanisms. On the other hand, often, the induction of heart damage in the several existing models of heart failure does not necessarily lead to skeletal muscle loss and cachexia. Here we describe the main features of cardiac cachexia and illustrate some animal models proposed for cardiac cachexia studies; they include the genetic calsequestrin and Dahl salt-sensitive models, the monocrotaline model and the surgical models obtained by left anterior descending (LAD) ligation, transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and ascending aortic banding. The availability of a specific animal model for cardiac cachexia is a crucial issue since, besides the common aspects of cachexia in the different syndromes, each disease has some peculiarities in its etiology and pathophysiology leading to cachexia. Such peculiarities need to be unraveled in order to find new targets for effective therapies. PMID:27317993

  4. Cardiac tamponade

    MedlinePlus

    ... increase blood pressure may also help keep the person alive until the fluid is drained. Oxygen may be given to help reduce the workload on the heart by decreasing tissue demands for blood flow. The cause of tamponade must ...

  5. Cardiac MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the structures within ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  6. 78 FR 1162 - Cardiovascular Devices; Reclassification of External Cardiac Compressor

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... rate and depth are necessary to increase the probability of survival in victims of sudden cardiac... CPR during patient transport or for use in situations where fatigue of or inaccessibility to emergency... (44 FR 13424), FDA published a proposed rule for classification of external cardiac compressors...

  7. Automated cardiac sarcomere analysis from second harmonic generation images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Canadilla, Patricia; Gonzalez-Tendero, Anna; Iruretagoyena, Igor; Crispi, Fatima; Torre, Iratxe; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Bijnens, Bart H.; Gratacos, Eduard

    2014-05-01

    Automatic quantification of cardiac muscle properties in tissue sections might provide important information related to different types of diseases. Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging provides a stain-free microscopy approach to image cardiac fibers that, combined with our methodology of the automated measurement of the ultrastructure of muscle fibers, computes a reliable set of quantitative image features (sarcomere length, A-band length, thick-thin interaction length, and fiber orientation). We evaluated the performance of our methodology in computer-generated muscle fibers modeling some artifacts that are present during the image acquisition. Then, we also evaluated it by comparing it to manual measurements in SHG images from cardiac tissue of fetal and adult rabbits. The results showed a good performance of our methodology at high signal-to-noise ratio of 20 dB. We conclude that our automated measurements enable reliable characterization of cardiac fiber tissues to systematically study cardiac tissue in a wide range of conditions.

  8. UPDATE: CARDIAC XENOTRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Ekser, Burcin; Cooper, David K.C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the latest development in cardiac xenotransplantation in small and large animal models and related in vitro studies. Recent findings With the recent introduction of α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knockout (GT-KO) pig organs for xenotransplantation, improved cardiac graft survival has been obtained. However, this experience has demonstrated the importance of pig antigens other than Galα1,3Gal (Gal) antigens (so-called nonGal antigens) as targets for primate anti-pig antibodies. Several in vitro studies have confirmed that, although the incidence and levels of anti-nonGal antibodies in non-human primates and humans are significantly less when compared with total anti-pig antibodies (i.e., anti-Gal + anti-nonGal), they can result in complement-mediated lysis of GT-KO pig cells. More recently, it has been demonstrated that regulatory T cells (Treg) suppress the cellular xenogeneic response, thus potentially preventing or reducing T cell-mediated rejection. The importance of thrombotic microangiopathy as a feature of the immune/inflammatory response and incompatibilities between the coagulation-anticoagulation systems of pig and primate are receiving increasing attention. Development of GT-KO pigs transgenic for one or more ‘anti-thrombotic’ genes, e.g., CD39 or tissue factor pathway inhibitor, may contribute to overcoming these problems. Summary Although GT-KO pigs have provided an advance over wild-type pigs as a source of Organs for transplantation into primates, further genetic modification of GT-KO pigs is required to overcome the remaining immune barriers before a clinical trial of cardiac xenotransplantation can be contemplated. PMID:19060538

  9. [Cardiac involvement in Fabry's disease].

    PubMed

    Weidemann, Frank; Breunig, Frank

    2008-03-15

    Fabry's disease is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder leading to an accumulation of globotriaosylceramides in the lysosomes of all tissues. The disease is characterized by a progressive involvement of important vital organs like the kidneys, the cerebrovascular system and the heart. Within the scope of this article an overview of Fabry's cardiomyopathy, the necessary cardiac diagnostic tests and, in addition, the new concept of enzyme replacement therapy is given. PMID:18344066

  10. Imaging of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Erthal, Fernanda; Juneau, Daniel; Lim, Siok P; Dwivedi, Girish; Nery, Pablo B; Birnie, David; Beanlands, Rob S

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease. Cardiac involvement is described in up to 50% of the cases. The disease spectrum is wide and cardiac manifestations ranges from being asymptomatic to heart failure, arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. The diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis can be challenging due to its non-specific nature and the focal involvement of the heart. In this review, we discuss the utility of a stepwise approach with multimodality cardiac imaging in the diagnosis and management of CS. PMID:27225318

  11. Cardiac differentiation of cardiosphere-derived cells in scaffolds mimicking morphology of the cardiac extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanyi; Patnaik, Sourav; Guo, Xiaolei; Li, Zhenqing; Lo, Wilson; Butler, Ryan; Claude, Andrew; Liu, Zhenguo; Zhang, Ge; Liao, Jun; Anderson, Peter M; Guan, Jianjun

    2014-08-01

    Stem cell therapy has the potential to regenerate heart tissue after myocardial infarction (MI). The regeneration is dependent upon cardiac differentiation of the delivered stem cells. We hypothesized that timing of the stem cell delivery determines the extent of cardiac differentiation as cell differentiation is dependent on matrix properties such as biomechanics, structure and morphology, and these properties in cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM) continuously vary with time after MI. In order to elucidate the relationship between ECM properties and cardiac differentiation, we created an in vitro model based on ECM-mimicking fibers and a type of cardiac progenitor cell, cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs). A simultaneous fiber electrospinning and cell electrospraying technique was utilized to fabricate constructs. By blending a highly soft hydrogel with a relatively stiff polyurethane and modulating fabrication parameters, tissue constructs with similar cell adhesion property but different global modulus, single fiber modulus, fiber density and fiber alignment were achieved. The CDCs remained alive within the constructs during a 1week culture period. CDC cardiac differentiation was dependent on the scaffold modulus, fiber volume fraction and fiber alignment. Two constructs with relatively low scaffold modulus, ∼50-60kPa, most significantly directed the CDC differentiation into mature cardiomyocytes as evidenced by gene expressions of cardiac troponin T (cTnT), calcium channel (CACNA1c) and cardiac myosin heavy chain (MYH6), and protein expressions of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and connexin 43 (CX43). Of these two low-modulus constructs, the extent of differentiation was greater for lower fiber alignment and higher fiber volume fraction. These results suggest that cardiac ECM properties may have an effect on cardiac differentiation of delivered stem cells. PMID:24769114

  12. A numerical method for cardiac mechanoelectric simulations.

    PubMed

    Pathmanathan, Pras; Whiteley, Jonathan P

    2009-05-01

    Much effort has been devoted to developing numerical techniques for solving the equations that describe cardiac electrophysiology, namely the monodomain equations and bidomain equations. Only a limited selection of publications, however, address the development of numerical techniques for mechanoelectric simulations where cardiac electrophysiology is coupled with deformation of cardiac tissue. One problem commonly encountered in mechanoelectric simulations is instability of the coupled numerical scheme. In this study, we develop a stable numerical scheme for mechanoelectric simulations. A number of convergence tests are carried out using this stable technique for simulations where deformations are of the magnitude typically observed in a beating heart. These convergence tests demonstrate that accurate computation of tissue deformation requires a nodal spacing of around 1 mm in the mesh used to calculate tissue deformation. This is a much finer computational grid than has previously been acknowledged, and has implications for the computational efficiency of the resulting numerical scheme. PMID:19263223

  13. Haptoglobin Enhances Cardiac Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hua; Heuzey, Elizabeth; Mori, Daniel; Wong, Christine; Colangelo, Christopher; Chung, Lisa M.; Bruce, Can; Slizovskiy, Ilya B.; Booth, Carmen J.; Kreisel, Daniel; Goldstein, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Early graft inflammation enhances both acute and chronic rejection of heart transplants, but it is unclear how this inflammation is initiated. Objective To identify specific inflammatory modulators and determine their underlying molecular mechanisms after cardiac transplantation. Methods and Results We used a murine heterotopic cardiac transplant model to identify inflammatory modulators of early graft inflammation. Unbiased mass spectrometric analysis of cardiac tissue before and up to 72 hours after transplantation revealed that 22 proteins including haptoglobin, a known anti-oxidant, are significantly upregulated in our grafts. Through the use of haptoglobin deficient mice, we show that 80% of haptoglobin deficient recipients treated with peri-operative administration of the costimulatory blocking agent CTLA4 immunoglobulin exhibited > 100 days survival of full major histocompatibility complex mismatched allografts, whereas all similarly treated wild type recipients rejected their transplants by 21 days post transplantation. We found that haptoglobin modifies the intra-allograft inflammatory milieu by enhancing levels of the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 and the chemokine MIP-2 but impair levels of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10. Haptoglobin also enhances dendritic cell graft recruitment and augments anti-donor T cell responses. Moreover, we confirmed that the protein is present in human cardiac allograft specimens undergoing acute graft rejection. Conclusions Our findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of inflammation after cardiac transplantation and suggest that, in contrast to its prior reported anti-oxidant function in vascular inflammation, haptoglobin is an enhancer of inflammation after cardiac transplantation. Haptoglobin may also be a key component in other sterile inflammatory conditions. PMID:25801896

  14. Cardiac perception and cardiac control. A review.

    PubMed

    Carroll, D

    1977-12-01

    The evidence regarding specific cardiac perception and discrimination, and its relationship to voluntary cardiac control, is critically reviewed. Studies are considered in three sections, depending on the method used to assess cardiac perception: questionnaire assessment, discrimination procedures, and heartbeat tracking. The heartbeat tracking procedure would appear to suffer least from interpretative difficulties. Recommendations are made regarding the style of analysis used to assess heartbeat perception in such tracking tasks. PMID:348240

  15. Cardiac extracellular matrix proteomics: Challenges, techniques, and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia Wei; Dalgliesh, Ailsa J; López, Javier E; Griffiths, Leigh G

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) has emerged as a dynamic tissue component, providing not only structural support, but also functionally participating in a wide range of signaling events during development, injury, and disease remodeling. Investigation of dynamic changes in cardiac ECM proteome is challenging due to the relative insolubility of ECM proteins, which results from their macromolecular nature, extensive post-translational modification (PTM), and tendency to form protein complexes. Finally, the relative abundance of cellular and mitochondrial proteins in cardiac tissue further complicates cardiac ECM proteomic approaches. Recent developments of various techniques to enrich and analyze ECM proteins are playing a major role in overcoming these challenges. Application of cardiac ECM proteomics in disease tissues can further provide spatial and temporal information relevant to disease diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and engineering of therapeutic candidates for cardiac repair and regeneration. PMID:26200932

  16. Physiologically inspired cardiac scaffolds for tailored in vivo function and heart regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Nicholas J; Coulombe, Kareen L K

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering is well suited for the treatment of cardiac disease due to the limited regenerative capacity of native cardiac tissue and the loss of function associated with endemic cardiac pathologies, such as myocardial infarction and congenital heart defects. However, the physiological complexity of the myocardium imposes extensive requirements on tissue therapies intended for these applications. In recent years, the field of cardiac tissue engineering has been characterized by great innovation and diversity in the fabrication of engineered tissue scaffolds for cardiac repair and regeneration to address these problems. From early approaches that attempted only to deliver cardiac cells in a hydrogel vessel, significant progress has been made in understanding the role of each major component of cardiac living tissue constructs (namely cells, scaffolds, and signaling mechanisms) as they relate to mechanical, biological, and electrical in vivo performance. This improved insight, accompanied by modern material science techniques, allows for the informed development of complex scaffold materials that are optimally designed for cardiac applications. This review provides a background on cardiac physiology as it relates to critical cardiac scaffold characteristics, the degree to which common cardiac scaffold materials fulfill these criteria, and finally an overview of recent in vivo studies that have employed this type of approach. PMID:25970645

  17. Cardiac Cells Beating in Culture: A Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Debora

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how to establish a primary tissue culture, where cells are taken directly from an organ of a living animal. Cardiac cells are taken from chick embryos and transferred to culture dishes. These cells are not transformed and therefore have a limited life span. However, the unique characteristics of cardiac cells are maintained…

  18. Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Cardiac Repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei-Zhong; Hauch, Kip; Xu, Chunhui; Laflamme, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The muscle lost after a myocardial infarction is replaced with non-contractile scar tissue, often initiating heart failure. Whole-organ cardiac transplantation is the only currently available clinical means of replacing the lost muscle, but this option is limited by the inadequate supply of donor hearts. Thus, cell-based cardiac repair has attracted considerable interest as an alternative means of ameliorating cardiac injury. Because of their tremendous capacity for expansion and unquestioned cardiac potential, pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an attractive candidate cell source for obtaining cardiomyocytes and other useful mesenchymal cell types for such therapies. hESC-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) exhibit a committed cardiac phenotype and robust proliferative capacity, and recent testing in rodent infarct models indicates that they can partially remuscularize injured hearts and improve contractile function. Although the latter successes give good reason for optimism, considerable challenges remain to the successful application of hESCs to cardiac repair, including the need for preparations of high cardiac purity, improved methods of delivery, and approaches to overcome immune rejection and other causes of graft cell death. This review will describe the phenotype of hESC-CMs and preclinical experience with these cells and will consider strategies to overcoming the aforementioned challenges. PMID:18657407

  19. Cardiac conduction system

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals to the heart muscle causing it to contract. The main components ... the cardiac conduction system’s electrical activity in the heart.

  20. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePlus

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...

  1. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... from American Heart Association Aneurysms and Dissections Angina Arrhythmia Bundle Branch Block Cardiomyopathy Carotid Artery Disease Chronic ... terms: SCA, sudden cardiac death (SCD), sudden death, arrhythmias, ... ventricular fibrillation, defibrillator, automatic cardiac defibrillator ( ...

  2. Unveiling nonischemic cardiomyopathies with cardiac magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Niti R; Peterson, Tyler J; Young, Phillip M; Araoz, Philip A; Glockner, James; Mankad, Sunil V; Williamson, Eric E

    2014-02-01

    Cardiomyopathy is defined as a heterogeneous group of myocardial disorders with mechanical or electrical dysfunction. Identification of the etiology is important for accurate diagnosis, treatment and prognosis, but continues to be challenging. The ability of cardiac MRI to non-invasively obtain 3D-images of unparalleled resolution without radiation exposure and to provide tissue characterization gives it a distinct advantage over any other diagnostic tool used for evaluation of cardiomyopathies. Cardiac MRI can accurately visualize cardiac morphology and function and also help identify myocardial edema, infiltration and fibrosis. It has emerged as an important diagnostic and prognostic tool in tertiary care centers for work up of patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. This review covers the role of cardiac MRI in evaluation of nonischemic cardiomyopathies, particularly in the context of other diagnostic and prognostic imaging modalities. PMID:24417294

  3. Physiological and structural differences in spatially distinct subpopulations of cardiac mitochondria: influence of cardiac pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Thapa, Dharendra; Shepherd, Danielle L.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tissue contains discrete pools of mitochondria that are characterized by their subcellular spatial arrangement. Subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) exist below the cell membrane, interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM) reside in rows between the myofibrils, and perinuclear mitochondria are situated at the nuclear poles. Microstructural imaging of heart tissue coupled with the development of differential isolation techniques designed to sequentially separate spatially distinct mitochondrial subpopulations have revealed differences in morphological features including shape, absolute size, and internal cristae arrangement. These findings have been complemented by functional studies indicating differences in biochemical parameters and, potentially, functional roles for the ATP generated, based upon subcellular location. Consequently, mitochondrial subpopulations appear to be influenced differently during cardiac pathologies including ischemia/reperfusion, heart failure, aging, exercise, and diabetes mellitus. These influences may be the result of specific structural and functional disparities between mitochondrial subpopulations such that the stress elicited by a given cardiac insult differentially impacts subcellular locales and the mitochondria contained within. The goal of this review is to highlight some of the inherent structural and functional differences that exist between spatially distinct cardiac mitochondrial subpopulations as well as provide an overview of the differential impact of various cardiac pathologies on spatially distinct mitochondrial subpopulations. As an outcome, we will instill a basis for incorporating subcellular spatial location when evaluating the impact of cardiac pathologies on the mitochondrion. Incorporation of subcellular spatial location may offer the greatest potential for delineating the influence of cardiac pathology on this critical organelle. PMID:24778166

  4. Primary Cardiac Lymphoma: Diagnosis and the Impact of Chemotherapy on Cardiac Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Pagé, Maude; Grasso, Agata E; Carpenter, John-Paul; Sheppard, Mary N; Karwatowski, Stefan P; Mohiaddin, Raad H

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of primary cardiac lymphoma presenting as myopericarditis and rapidly deteriorating into biventricular heart failure and ventricular arrhythmias. Computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging showed extensive myocardial infiltration with typical patterns on tissue characterization CMR images, raising clinical suspicion. Diagnosis was confirmed by myocardial histologic examination. Marked regression of tumor burden was apparent after 6 cycles of anthracycline-based chemotherapy. This case illustrates that a high degree of suspicion for this rare entity is mandated to institute timely treatment. Rapid tumor lysis may induce life-threatening acute cardiac decompensation that requires intensive monitoring and support therapy. PMID:26755242

  5. Oxygen depth profiling with subnanometre depth resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmata, Marcel; Munnik, Frans; Hanf, Daniel; Grötzschel, Rainer; Crocoll, Sonja; Möller, Wolfhard

    2014-10-01

    A High-depth Resolution Elastic Recoil Detection (HR-ERD) set-up using a magnetic spectrometer has been taken into operation at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf for the first time. This instrument allows the investigation of light elements in ultra-thin layers and their interfaces with a depth resolution of less than 1 nm near the surface. As the depth resolution is highly influenced by the experimental measurement parameters, sophisticated optimisation procedures have been implemented. Effects of surface roughness and sample damage caused by high fluences need to be quantified for each kind of material. Also corrections are essential for non-equilibrium charge state distributions that exist very close to the surface. Using the example of a high-k multilayer SiO2/Si3N4Ox/SiO2/Si it is demonstrated that oxygen in ultra-thin films of a few nanometres thickness can be investigated by HR-ERD.

  6. Cardiac Biomarkers: a Focus on Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Forough, Reza; Scarcello, Catherine; Perkins, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Historically, biomarkers have been used in two major ways to maintain and improve better health status: first, for diagnostic purposes, and second, as specific targets to treat various diseases. A new era in treatment and even cure for the some diseases using reprograming of somatic cells is about to be born. In this approach, scientists are successfully taking human skin cells (previously considered terminally-differentiated cells) and re-programming them into functional cardiac myocytes and other cell types in vitro. A cell reprograming approach for treatment of cardiovascular diseases will revolutionize the field of medicine and significantly expand the human lifetime. Availability of a comprehensive catalogue for cardiac biomarkers is necessary for developing cell reprograming modalities to treat cardiac diseases, as well as for determining the progress of reprogrammed cells as they become cardiac cells. In this review, we present a comprehensive survey of the cardiac biomarkers currently known. PMID:23074366

  7. Translational Paradigms in Scientific and Clinical Imaging of Cardiac Development

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, Chelsea L.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHD) are the most prevalent congenital disease with 45% of deaths resulting from a congenital defect are due to a cardiac malformation. Clinically significant CHD permit survival upon birth but may become immediately life threatening. Advances in surgical intervention have significantly reduced perinatal mortality, but the outcome for many malformations is bleak. Furthermore, patients living while tolerating a CHD often acquire additional complications due to the long-term systemic blood flow changes caused by even subtle anatomical abnormalities. Accurate diagnosis of defects during fetal development is critical for interventional planning and improving patient outcomes. Advances in quantitative, multi-dimensional imaging is necessary to uncover the basic scientific and clinically relevant morphogenetic changes and associated hemodynamic consequences influencing normal and abnormal heart development. Ultrasound is the most widely used clinical imaging technology for assessing fetal cardiac development. Ultrasound-based fetal assessment modalities include M-mode, 2D, and 3D/4D imaging. These datasets can be combined with computational fluid dynamics analysis to yield quantitative, volumetric and physiological data. Additional imaging modalities, however are available to study basic mechanisms of cardiogenesis, including optical coherence tomography, micro-computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Each imaging technology has its advantages and disadvantages regarding resolution, depth of penetration, soft tissue contrast considerations, and cost. In this review, we analyze the current clinical and scientific imaging technologies, research studies utilizing them, and appropriate animal models reflecting clinically relevant cardiogenesis and cardiac malformations. We conclude with discussing the translational impact and future opportunities for cardiovascular development imaging research. PMID:23897595

  8. Position Control of Motion Compensation Cardiac Catheters.

    PubMed

    Kesner, Samuel B; Howe, Robert D

    2011-07-21

    Robotic catheters have the potential to revolutionize cardiac surgery by enabling minimally invasive structural repairs within the beating heart. This paper presents an actuated catheter system that compensates for the fast motion of cardiac tissue using 3D ultrasound image guidance. We describe the design and operation of the mechanical drive system and catheter module and analyze the catheter performance limitations of friction and backlash in detail. To mitigate these limitations, we propose and evaluate mechanical and control system compensation methods, including inverse and model-based backlash compensation, to improve the system performance. Finally, in vivo results are presented that demonstrate that the catheter can track the cardiac tissue motion with less than 1 mm RMS error. The ultimate goal of this research is to create a fast and dexterous robotic catheter system that can perform surgery on the delicate structures inside of the beating heart. PMID:21874124

  9. Numerical Investigation of Macroscopic Cardiac Mechanics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxton, Gavin; Balazs, Anna

    2003-03-01

    In order to gain insight into the complex interactions between electrical excitation of the myocardial tissue, the mechanical contraction of the heart muscles and cardiac fluid dynamics, three computational techniques are successfully coupled. A Gerhardt-Schuster-Tyson Cellular Automata algorithm enables the excitation kinetics of myocardial tissue to be simulated in a computationally efficient manner. The cardiac excitation spreading is then coupled with a dynamic Born Lattice Spring Model which enables the contraction of the heart muscles and their subsequent relaxation to be modelled. The velocities at the inner surfaces of the heart can then be transferred to a Lattice Boltzmann simulation of blood flow within the cardiac chambers. The interactions (and complex feedback mechanisms) between electrical excitation, mechanical deformation, and fluid flow in the heart are explored through these three-dimensional models and the regular functionality of the whole heart is visualised.

  10. Depth selective acousto-optic flow measurement

    PubMed Central

    Tsalach, Adi; Schiffer, Zeev; Ratner, Eliahu; Breskin, Ilan; Zeitak, Reuven; Shechter, Revital; Balberg, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Optical based methods for non-invasive measurement of regional blood flow tend to incorrectly assess cerebral blood flow, due to contribution of extra-cerebral tissues to the obtained signal. We demonstrate that spectral analysis of phase-coded light signals, tagged by specific ultrasound patterns, enables differentiation of flow patterns at different depths. Validation of the model is conducted by Monte Carlo simulation. In-vitro experiments demonstrate good agreement with the simulations' results and provide a solid validation to depth discrimination ability. These results suggest that signal contamination originating from extra-cerebral tissue may be eliminated using spectral analysis of ultrasonically tagged light. PMID:26713201

  11. Stereoscopic depth constancy.

    PubMed

    Guan, Phillip; Banks, Martin S

    2016-06-19

    Depth constancy is the ability to perceive a fixed depth interval in the world as constant despite changes in viewing distance and the spatial scale of depth variation. It is well known that the spatial frequency of depth variation has a large effect on threshold. In the first experiment, we determined that the visual system compensates for this differential sensitivity when the change in disparity is suprathreshold, thereby attaining constancy similar to contrast constancy in the luminance domain. In a second experiment, we examined the ability to perceive constant depth when the spatial frequency and viewing distance both changed. To attain constancy in this situation, the visual system has to estimate distance. We investigated this ability when vergence, accommodation and vertical disparity are all presented accurately and therefore provided veridical information about viewing distance. We found that constancy is nearly complete across changes in viewing distance. Depth constancy is most complete when the scale of the depth relief is constant in the world rather than when it is constant in angular units at the retina. These results bear on the efficacy of algorithms for creating stereo content.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in our three-dimensional world'. PMID:27269596

  12. Stereoscopic depth constancy

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Depth constancy is the ability to perceive a fixed depth interval in the world as constant despite changes in viewing distance and the spatial scale of depth variation. It is well known that the spatial frequency of depth variation has a large effect on threshold. In the first experiment, we determined that the visual system compensates for this differential sensitivity when the change in disparity is suprathreshold, thereby attaining constancy similar to contrast constancy in the luminance domain. In a second experiment, we examined the ability to perceive constant depth when the spatial frequency and viewing distance both changed. To attain constancy in this situation, the visual system has to estimate distance. We investigated this ability when vergence, accommodation and vertical disparity are all presented accurately and therefore provided veridical information about viewing distance. We found that constancy is nearly complete across changes in viewing distance. Depth constancy is most complete when the scale of the depth relief is constant in the world rather than when it is constant in angular units at the retina. These results bear on the efficacy of algorithms for creating stereo content. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Vision in our three-dimensional world’. PMID:27269596

  13. Cardiac gated ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, C.W. III; Hoffman, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. The authors evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50 msec scan aperture. Multi slice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. The authors observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a non-failing model of the heart.

  14. Cardiac gated ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, C. William, III; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1995-05-01

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. We evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50msec scan aperture. Multislice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. We observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a nonfailing model of the heart.

  15. Deep depth undex simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Higginbotham, R. R.; Malakhoff, A.

    1985-01-29

    A deep depth underwater simulator is illustrated for determining the dual effects of nuclear type underwater explosion shockwaves and hydrostatic pressures on a test vessel while simulating, hydrostatically, that the test vessel is located at deep depths. The test vessel is positioned within a specially designed pressure vessel followed by pressurizing a fluid contained between the test and pressure vessels. The pressure vessel, with the test vessel suspended therein, is then placed in a body of water at a relatively shallow depth, and an explosive charge is detonated at a predetermined distance from the pressure vessel. The resulting shockwave is transmitted through the pressure vessel wall so that the shockwave impinging on the test vessel is representative of nuclear type explosive shockwaves transmitted to an underwater structure at great depths.

  16. Depth-resolved measurements with elliptically polarized reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Maria J.; Sokolov, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    The ability of elliptical polarized reflectance spectroscopy (EPRS) to detect spectroscopic alterations in tissue mimicking phantoms and in biological tissue in situ is demonstrated. It is shown that there is a linear relationship between light penetration depth and ellipticity. This dependence is used to demonstrate the feasibility of a depth-resolved spectroscopic imaging using EPRS. The advantages and drawbacks of EPRS in evaluation of biological tissue are analyzed and discussed. PMID:27446712

  17. Depth Optimization Study

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kawase, Mitsuhiro

    2009-11-22

    The zipped file contains a directory of data and routines used in the NNMREC turbine depth optimization study (Kawase et al., 2011), and calculation results thereof. For further info, please contact Mitsuhiro Kawase at kawase@uw.edu. Reference: Mitsuhiro Kawase, Patricia Beba, and Brian Fabien (2011), Finding an Optimal Placement Depth for a Tidal In-Stream Conversion Device in an Energetic, Baroclinic Tidal Channel, NNMREC Technical Report.

  18. Nonsurgical management of cardiac missiles.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jillian A; Nowak, Jeffrey E; Sutherell, Jamie S; Wheeler, Derek S

    2010-01-01

    Modern air-powered pellet guns are capable of propelling their projectiles at velocities of 250 to 930 ft/s depending on their propulsion system-rivaling traditional small caliber firearms in the potential for serious soft tissue injuries. Management decisions regarding thoracic/cardiac pellet gun injuries must be based on the presentation and stability of the patient and the location of the retained pellet. We present a report of the nonsurgical management of an 8-year-old girl with a retained pericardial pellet and small stable effusion. PMID:20065828

  19. Telocytes in cardiac regeneration and repair.

    PubMed

    Bei, Yihua; Zhou, Qiulian; Sun, Qi; Xiao, Junjie

    2016-07-01

    Telocytes (TCs) are a novel type of stromal cells reported by Popescu's group in 2010. The unique feature that distinguishes TCs from other "classical" stromal cells is their extremely long and thin telopodes (Tps). As evidenced by electron microscopy, TCs are widely distributed in almost all tissues and organs. TCs contribute to form a three-dimensional interstitial network and play as active regulators in intercellular communication via homocellular/heterocellular junctions or shed vesicles. Interestingly, increasing evidence suggests the potential role of TCs in regenerative medicine. Although the heart retains some limited endogenous regenerative capacity, cardiac regenerative and repair response is however insufficient to make up the loss of cardiomyocytes upon injury. Developing novel strategies to increase cardiomyocyte renewal and repair is of great importance for the treatment of cardiac diseases. In this review, we focus on the role of TCs in cardiac regeneration and repair. We particularly describe the intercellular communication between TCs and cardiomyocytes, stem/progenitor cells, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. Also, we discuss the current knowledge about TCs in cardiac repair after myocardial injury, as well as their potential roles in cardiac development and aging. TC-based therapy or TC-derived exosome delivery might be used as novel therapeutic strategies to promote cardiac regeneration and repair. PMID:26826525

  20. Stem cell sources for cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Roccio, M; Goumans, M J; Sluijter, J P G; Doevendans, P A

    2008-03-01

    Cell-based cardiac repair has the ambitious aim to replace the malfunctioning cardiac muscle developed after myocardial infarction, with new contractile cardiomyocytes and vessels. Different stem cell populations have been intensively studied in the last decade as a potential source of new cardiomyocytes to ameliorate the injured myocardium, compensate for the loss of ventricular mass and contractility and eventually restore cardiac function. An array of cell types has been explored in this respect, including skeletal muscle, bone marrow derived stem cells, embryonic stem cells (ESC) and more recently cardiac progenitor cells. The best-studied cell types are mouse and human ESC cells, which have undisputedly been demonstrated to differentiate into cardiomyocyte and vascular lineages and have been of great help to understand the differentiation process of pluripotent cells. However, due to their immunogenicity, risk of tumor development and the ethical challenge arising from their embryonic origin, they do not provide a suitable cell source for a regenerative therapy approach. A better option, overcoming ethical and allogenicity problems, seems to be provided by bone marrow derived cells and by the recently identified cardiac precursors. This report will overview current knowledge on these different cell types and their application in cardiac regeneration and address issues like implementation of delivery methods, including tissue engineering approaches that need to be developed alongside. PMID:18427385

  1. Stimulating Cardiac Muscle by Light: Cardiac Optogenetics by Cell Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhiheng; Valiunas, Virginijus; Lu, Zongju; Bien, Harold; Liu, Huilin; Wang, Hong-Zhang; Rosati, Barbara; Brink, Peter R.; Cohen, Ira S.; Entcheva, Emilia

    2011-01-01

    Background After the recent cloning of light-sensitive ion channels and their expression in mammalian cells, a new field, optogenetics, emerged in neuroscience, allowing for precise perturbations of neural circuits by light. However, functionality of optogenetic tools has not been fully explored outside neuroscience; and a non-viral, non-embryogenesis based strategy for optogenetics has not been shown before. Methods and Results We demonstrate the utility of optogenetics to cardiac muscle by a tandem cell unit (TCU) strategy, where non-excitable cells carry exogenous light-sensitive ion channels, and when electrically coupled to cardiomyocytes, produce optically-excitable heart tissue. A stable channelrhodopsin2 (ChR2) expressing cell line was developed, characterized and used as a cell delivery system. The TCU strategy was validated in vitro in cell pairs with adult canine myocytes (for a wide range of coupling strengths) and in cardiac syncytium with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. For the first time, we combined optical excitation and optical imaging to capture light-triggered muscle contractions and high-resolution propagation maps of light-triggered electrical waves, found to be quantitatively indistinguishable from electrically-triggered waves. Conclusions Our results demonstrate feasibility to control excitation and contraction in cardiac muscle by light using the TCU approach. Optical pacing in this case uses less energy, offers superior spatiotemporal control, remote access and can serve not only as an elegant tool in arrhythmia research, but may form the basis for a new generation of light-driven cardiac pacemakers and muscle actuators. The TCU strategy is extendable to (non-viral) stem cell therapy and is directly relevant to in vivo applications. PMID:21828312

  2. Cardiac Innervation and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Keiichi; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Ardell, Jeffrey L.; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2015-01-01

    Afferent and efferent cardiac neurotransmission via the cardiac nerves intricately modulates nearly all physiological functions of the heart (chronotropy, dromotropy, lusitropy and inotropy). Afferent information from the heart is transmitted to higher levels of the nervous system for processing (intrinsic cardiac nervous system, extracardiac-intrathoracic ganglia, spinal cord, brain stem and higher centers) which ultimately results in efferent cardiomotor neural impulses (via the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves). This system forms interacting feedback loops that provide physiological stability for maintaining normal rhythm and life-sustaining circulation. This system also ensures that there is fine-tuned regulation of sympathetic-parasympathetic balance in the heart under normal and stressed states in the short (beat to beat), intermediate (minutes-hours) and long term (days-years). This important neurovisceral /autonomic nervous system also plays a major role in the pathophysiology and progression of heart disease, including heart failure and arrhythmias leading to sudden cardiac death (SCD). Transdifferentiation of neurons in heart failure, functional denervation, cardiac and extra-cardiac neural remodeling have also been identified and characterized during the progression of disease. Recent advances in understanding the cellular and molecular processes governing innervation and the functional control of the myocardium in health and disease provides a rational mechanistic basis for development of neuraxial therapies for preventing SCD and other arrhythmias. Advances in cellular, molecular, and bioengineering realms have underscored the emergence of this area as an important avenue of scientific inquiry and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26044253

  3. Design and formulation of functional pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac microtissues

    PubMed Central

    Thavandiran, Nimalan; Dubois, Nicole; Mikryukov, Alexander; Massé, Stéphane; Beca, Bogdan; Simmons, Craig A.; Deshpande, Vikram S.; McGarry, J. Patrick; Chen, Christopher S.; Nanthakumar, Kumaraswamy; Keller, Gordon M.; Radisic, Milica; Zandstra, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Access to robust and information-rich human cardiac tissue models would accelerate drug-based strategies for treating heart disease. Despite significant effort, the generation of high-fidelity adult-like human cardiac tissue analogs remains challenging. We used computational modeling of tissue contraction and assembly mechanics in conjunction with microfabricated constraints to guide the design of aligned and functional 3D human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived cardiac microtissues that we term cardiac microwires (CMWs). Miniaturization of the platform circumvented the need for tissue vascularization and enabled higher-throughput image-based analysis of CMW drug responsiveness. CMW tissue properties could be tuned using electromechanical stimuli and cell composition. Specifically, controlling self-assembly of 3D tissues in aligned collagen, and pacing with point stimulation electrodes, were found to promote cardiac maturation-associated gene expression and in vivo-like electrical signal propagation. Furthermore, screening a range of hPSC-derived cardiac cell ratios identified that 75% NKX2 Homeobox 5 (NKX2-5)+ cardiomyocytes and 25% Cluster of Differentiation 90 OR (CD90)+ nonmyocytes optimized tissue remodeling dynamics and yielded enhanced structural and functional properties. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the optimized platform in a tachycardic model of arrhythmogenesis, an aspect of cardiac electrophysiology not previously recapitulated in 3D in vitro hPSC-derived cardiac microtissue models. The design criteria identified with our CMW platform should accelerate the development of predictive in vitro assays of human heart tissue function. PMID:24255110

  4. [Pharmaca Induced Cardiac Injury].

    PubMed

    Haen, Ekkehard

    2016-01-01

    Many drugs influence vital functions via the sympathetic and the parasympathetic system. Besides that hypersensitivity reactions and reactions by chemical radicals that arise in drug metabolism may directly harm the heart muscle cell. Cardiac adverse drug reactions (ADR) result in disturbances of the heart rhythm, negative inotropic effects, direct damage to the heart muscle cell, and reduced perfusion of heart tissue. Their importance is often neglected because pharmacologically similar drugs are licensed for completely different indications. This is of particular interest if more drugs are prescribed in combination. Now these effects may add up to pharmacodynamic drug-drug-interactions. Data banks like PSIAConline (www.psiac.de), individualization of drug prescription by therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) combined with a clinical pharmacological report (www.konbest.de), as well as drug information systems such as AGATE (www.amuep-agate.de) are today of help not just to recognize such drug risks, but also to find professional and evidence based solutions for it. PMID:26800070

  5. Cardiac lipoma and lipomatous hypertrophy of the interatrial septum: cardiac magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Salanitri, John C; Pereles, F Scott

    2004-01-01

    Cardiac lipomas are uncommon, usually asymptomatic benign primary tumors of the heart that may incidentally be discovered during computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although the finding of a low-attenuation mass with density similar to fat on CT is pathognomonic, the MRI appearances of fatty cardiac masses are variable depending on the sequences employed. The MRI findings of 4 patients with cardiac lipomas or lipomatous hypertrophy of the interatrial septum are presented. All patients had lesions with characteristic low-signal-intensity margins and high central signal intensity on "bright-blood" balanced gradient-echo cardiac MRI sequences with very low repetition and echo times. It is proposed that this appearance results from intravoxel phase cancellation effects occurring at the fat/tissue interface and is sufficiently characteristic to obviate the need for confirmatory CT. PMID:15538164

  6. Display of cardiac activation pathways with echocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olstad, Bjoern; Brodin, Lars A.; Berg, Sevald

    1997-05-01

    The study of cardiac activation dynamics is an important factor in the characterization of the cardiac function. One such example is the localization of WPW-pathways inside the myocardium. Accurate localization of these pathways can be used to determine if the patient should be treated with catheter techniques or surgical techniques. This paper analyzes the temporal information in tissue velocity imaging with both qualitative and quantitative methods. The clinical experiments indicate that echocardiography can become an alternative technique for non-invasive electrophysiology in these kinds of applications.

  7. Cardiac ganglioneuroma in a juvenile pig.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ryoko; Joma, Ikumi; Otsubo, Koji; Matsutake, Hiroshi; Yanai, Tokuma; Sakai, Hiroki

    2016-02-01

    A cardiac mass (3 × 5 × 3 cm) was detected at the base between the right auricular wall and right vena cava of a slaughtered 6-month-old female mixed-breed pig during a meat inspection. The tumor comprised infiltrative prominent interweaving fascicles of Schwann cells with Verocay bodies. Moreover, the ganglion cells were scattered or aggregated throughout the neoplastic tissue. The ganglion and Schwann cells had neither cellular atypism nor mitosis. On the basis of the bearing site as well as the morphological and immunohistochemical features, this is the first case of a cardiac ganglioneuroma in a pig. PMID:26256406

  8. Cardiac ganglioneuroma in a juvenile pig

    PubMed Central

    INOUE, Ryoko; JOMA, Ikumi; OTSUBO, Koji; MATSUTAKE, Hiroshi; YANAI, Tokuma; SAKAI, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    A cardiac mass (3 × 5 × 3 cm) was detected at the base between the right auricular wall and right vena cava of a slaughtered 6-month-old female mixed-breed pig during a meat inspection. The tumor comprised infiltrative prominent interweaving fascicles of Schwann cells with Verocay bodies. Moreover, the ganglion cells were scattered or aggregated throughout the neoplastic tissue. The ganglion and Schwann cells had neither cellular atypism nor mitosis. On the basis of the bearing site as well as the morphological and immunohistochemical features, this is the first case of a cardiac ganglioneuroma in a pig. PMID:26256406

  9. Role of Cardiac MRI in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ravi V.; Abbasi, Siddique A.; Kwong, Raymond Y.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes and insulin resistance have a variety of detrimental effects on cardiovascular health and outcomes. Cardiac magnetic resonance offers a non-invasive means to obtain many layers of information at a tissue level, including fibrosis, edema, intramyocardial motion, triglyceride content, and myocardial energetics. The role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance is particularly important in the evaluation of recognized and unrecognized coronary artery disease. In this review, we address the current state-of-the-art in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging – for both clinical and investigational use – as it applies to diabetic cardiovascular disease. PMID:24430012

  10. Radon depth migration

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, S.T. ); Carroll, R.J. )

    1993-02-01

    A depth migration method is presented that used Radon-transformed common-source seismograms as input. It is shown that the Radon depth migration method can be extended to spatially varying velocity depth models by using asymptotic ray theory (ART) to construct wavefield continuation operators. These operators downward continue an incident receiver-array plane wave and an assumed point-source wavefield into the subsurface. The migration velocity model is constrain to have longer characteristic wavelengths than the dominant source wavelength such that the ART approximations for the continuation operators are valid. This method is used successfully to migrate two synthetic data examples: (1) a point diffractor, and (2) a dipping layer and syncline interface model. It is shown that the Radon migration method has a computational advantage over the standard Kirchhoff migration method in that fewer rays are computed in a main memory implementation.