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Sample records for cardiac tissue engineering

  1. Engineered cardiac tissues

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Rohin K.; Chiu, Loraine L. Y.; Reis, Lewis A.; Radisic, Milica

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering offers the promise of creating functional tissue replacements for use in the failing heart or for in vitro drug screening. The last decade has seen a great deal of progress in this field with new advances in interdisciplinary areas such as developmental biology, genetic engineering, biomaterials, polymer science, bioreactor engineering, and stem cell biology. We review here a selection of the most recent advances in cardiac tissue engineering, including the classical cell-scaffold approaches, advanced bioreactor designs, cell sheet engineering, whole organ decellularization, stem-cell based approaches, and topographical control of tissue organization and function. We also discuss current challenges in the field, such as maturation of stem cell-derived cardiac patches and vascularization. PMID:21530228

  2. Cardiac Conduction through Engineered Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Stamm, Christof; Hammer, Peter E.; Kwaku, Kevin F.; Marler, Jennifer J.; Friehs, Ingeborg; Jones, Mara; Rader, Christine M.; Roy, Nathalie; Eddy, Mau-Thek; Triedman, John K.; Walsh, Edward P.; McGowan, Francis X.; del Nido, Pedro J.; Cowan, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    In children, interruption of cardiac atrioventricular (AV) electrical conduction can result from congenital defects, surgical interventions, and maternal autoimmune diseases during pregnancy. Complete AV conduction block is typically treated by implanting an electronic pacemaker device, although long-term pacing therapy in pediatric patients has significant complications. As a first step toward developing a substitute treatment, we implanted engineered tissue constructs in rat hearts to create an alternative AV conduction pathway. We found that skeletal muscle-derived cells in the constructs exhibited sustained electrical coupling through persistent expression and function of gap junction proteins. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction analyses, myogenic cells in the constructs were shown to survive in the AV groove of implanted hearts for the duration of the animal’s natural life. Perfusion of hearts with fluorescently labeled lectin demonstrated that implanted tissues became vascularized and immunostaining verified the presence of proteins important in electromechanical integration of myogenic cells with surrounding recipient rat cardiomyocytes. Finally, using optical mapping and electrophysiological analyses, we provide evidence of permanent AV conduction through the implant in one-third of recipient animals. Our experiments provide a proof-of-principle that engineered tissue constructs can function as an electrical conduit and, ultimately, may offer a substitute treatment to conventional pacing therapy. PMID:16816362

  3. Cardiac tissue engineering in magnetically actuated scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapir, Yulia; Polyak, Boris; Cohen, Smadar

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering offers new possibilities for the functional and structural restoration of damaged or lost heart tissue by applying cardiac patches created in vitro. Engineering such functional cardiac patches is a complex mission, involving material design on the nano- and microscale as well as the application of biological cues and stimulation patterns to promote cell survival and organization into a functional cardiac tissue. Herein, we present a novel strategy for creating a functional cardiac patch by combining the use of a macroporous alginate scaffold impregnated with magnetically responsive nanoparticles (MNPs) and the application of external magnetic stimulation. Neonatal rat cardiac cells seeded within the magnetically responsive scaffolds and stimulated by an alternating magnetic field of 5 Hz developed into matured myocardial tissue characterized by anisotropically organized striated cardiac fibers, which preserved its features for longer times than non-stimulated constructs. A greater activation of AKT phosphorylation in cardiac cell constructs after applying a short-term (20 min) external magnetic field indicated the efficacy of magnetic stimulation to actuate at a distance and provided a possible mechanism for its action. Our results point to a synergistic effect of magnetic field stimulation together with nanoparticulate features of the scaffold surface as providing the regenerating environment for cardiac cells driving their organization into functionally mature tissue.

  4. Electrical stimulation systems for cardiac tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Nina; Cannizzaro, Christopher; Chao, Pen-Hsiu Grace; Maidhof, Robert; Marsano, Anna; Au, Hoi Ting Heidi; Radisic, Milica; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    We describe a protocol for tissue engineering of synchronously contractile cardiac constructs by culturing cardiac cells with the application of pulsatile electrical fields designed to mimic those present in the native heart. Tissue culture is conducted in a customized chamber built to allow for cultivation of (i) engineered three-dimensional (3D) cardiac tissue constructs, (ii) cell monolayers on flat substrates or (iii) cells on patterned substrates. This also allows for analysis of the individual and interactive effects of pulsatile electrical field stimulation and substrate topography on cell differentiation and assembly. The protocol is designed to allow for delivery of predictable electrical field stimuli to cells, monitoring environmental parameters, and assessment of cell and tissue responses. The duration of the protocol is 5 d for two-dimensional cultures and 10 d for 3D cultures. PMID:19180087

  5. Myocardial tissue engineering for cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Pecha, Simon; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Reichenspurner, Hermann

    2016-03-01

    The number of patients with heart failure is increasing in the aging population. Heart transplantation remains the only curative treatment option for patients with end-stage heart failure. Because of an organ donor shortage, new organ-independent treatment options are necessary. Different approaches to cardiac repair therapies have been developed and optimized in recent years. One of these promising approaches is myocardial tissue engineering, which refers to the creation of 3-dimensional engineered heart tissue in vitro. This perspective provides an overview of different approaches to tissue engineering, including essentials to improve tissue quality and choice of ideal cell source, as well as an overview of in vitro and in vivo studies. Several hurdles that have to be overcome before clinical application of engineered heart tissue might become a realistic scenario are also addressed. PMID:26856673

  6. Cardiac tissue engineering using perfusion bioreactor systems

    PubMed Central

    Radisic, Milica; Marsano, Anna; Maidhof, Robert; Wang, Yadong; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    This protocol describes tissue engineering of synchronously contractile cardiac constructs by culturing cardiac cell populations on porous scaffolds (in some cases with an array of channels) and bioreactors with perfusion of culture medium (in some cases supplemented with an oxygen carrier). The overall approach is ‘biomimetic’ in nature as it tends to provide in vivo-like oxygen supply to cultured cells and thereby overcome inherent limitations of diffusional transport in conventional culture systems. In order to mimic the capillary network, cells are cultured on channeled elastomer scaffolds that are perfused with culture medium that can contain oxygen carriers. The overall protocol takes 2–4 weeks, including assembly of the perfusion systems, preparation of scaffolds, cell seeding and cultivation, and on-line and end-point assessment methods. This model is well suited for a wide range of cardiac tissue engineering applications, including the use of human stem cells, and high-fidelity models for biological research. PMID:18388955

  7. Mechanostimulation Protocols for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Govoni, Marco; Muscari, Claudio; Guarnieri, Carlo; Giordano, Emanuele

    2013-01-01

    Owing to the inability of self-replacement by a damaged myocardium, alternative strategies to heart transplantation have been explored within the last decades and cardiac tissue engineering/regenerative medicine is among the present challenges in biomedical research. Hopefully, several studies witness the constant extension of the toolbox available to engineer a fully functional, contractile, and robust cardiac tissue using different combinations of cells, template bioscaffolds, and biophysical stimuli obtained by the use of specific bioreactors. Mechanical forces influence the growth and shape of every tissue in our body generating changes in intracellular biochemistry and gene expression. That is why bioreactors play a central role in the task of regenerating a complex tissue such as the myocardium. In the last fifteen years a large number of dynamic culture devices have been developed and many results have been collected. The aim of this brief review is to resume in a single streamlined paper the state of the art in this field. PMID:23936858

  8. Distilling complexity to advance cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ogle, Brenda M; Bursac, Nenad; Domian, Ibrahim; Huang, Ngan F; Menasché, Philippe; Murry, Charles E; Pruitt, Beth; Radisic, Milica; Wu, Joseph C; Wu, Sean M; Zhang, Jianyi; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-06-01

    The promise of cardiac tissue engineering is in the ability to recapitulate in vitro the functional aspects of a healthy heart and disease pathology as well as to design replacement muscle for clinical therapy. Parts of this promise have been realized; others have not. In a meeting of scientists in this field, five central challenges or "big questions" were articulated that, if addressed, could substantially advance the current state of the art in modeling heart disease and realizing heart repair. PMID:27280684

  9. Engineered Tissue Patch for Cardiac Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianyi

    2015-01-01

    Opinion statement Cell therapy can be administered via injections delivered directly into the myocardium or as engineered cardiac tissue patches, which are the subject of this review. Engineered cardiac patches can be created from sheets of interconnected cells or by suspending the cells in a scaffold of material that is designed to mimic the native extracellular matrix. The sheet-based approach produces patches with well-aligned and electronically coupled cardiomyocytes, but cell-containing scaffolds are more readily vascularized by the host's circulatory system and, consequently, are currently more suitable for applications that require a thicker patch. Cell patches can also be modified for the co-delivery of peptides that may promote cell survival and activate endogenous repair mechanisms; nevertheless, techniques for controlling inflammation, limiting apoptosis, and improving vascular growth need continue to be developed to make it a therapeutic modality for patients with myocardial infarction. PMID:26122908

  10. Capillary force lithography for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Macadangdang, Jesse; Lee, Hyun Jung; Carson, Daniel; Jiao, Alex; Fugate, James; Pabon, Lil; Regnier, Michael; Murry, Charles; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide(1). Cardiac tissue engineering holds much promise to deliver groundbreaking medical discoveries with the aims of developing functional tissues for cardiac regeneration as well as in vitro screening assays. However, the ability to create high-fidelity models of heart tissue has proven difficult. The heart's extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex structure consisting of both biochemical and biomechanical signals ranging from the micro- to the nanometer scale(2). Local mechanical loading conditions and cell-ECM interactions have recently been recognized as vital components in cardiac tissue engineering(3-5). A large portion of the cardiac ECM is composed of aligned collagen fibers with nano-scale diameters that significantly influences tissue architecture and electromechanical coupling(2). Unfortunately, few methods have been able to mimic the organization of ECM fibers down to the nanometer scale. Recent advancements in nanofabrication techniques, however, have enabled the design and fabrication of scalable scaffolds that mimic the in vivo structural and substrate stiffness cues of the ECM in the heart(6-9). Here we present the development of two reproducible, cost-effective, and scalable nanopatterning processes for the functional alignment of cardiac cells using the biocompatible polymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)(8) and a polyurethane (PU) based polymer. These anisotropically nanofabricated substrata (ANFS) mimic the underlying ECM of well-organized, aligned tissues and can be used to investigate the role of nanotopography on cell morphology and function(10-14). Using a nanopatterned (NP) silicon master as a template, a polyurethane acrylate (PUA) mold is fabricated. This PUA mold is then used to pattern the PU or PLGA hydrogel via UV-assisted or solvent-mediated capillary force lithography (CFL), respectively(15,16). Briefly, PU or PLGA pre-polymer is drop dispensed onto a glass coverslip

  11. Distilling complexity to advance cardiac tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ogle, Brenda M.; Bursac, Nenad; Domian, Ibrahim; Huang, Ngan F; Menasché, Philippe; Murry, Charles; Pruitt, Beth; Radisic, Milica; Wu, Joseph C; Wu, Sean M; Zhang, Jianyi; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    The promise of cardiac tissue engineering is in the ability to recapitulate in vitro the functional aspects of healthy heart and disease pathology as well as to design replacement muscle for clinical therapy. Parts of this promise have been realized; others have not. In a meeting of scientists in this field, five central challenges or “big questions” were articulated that, if addressed, could substantially advance the current state-of-the-art in modeling heart disease and realizing heart repair. PMID:27280684

  12. A modular approach to cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Leung, Brendan M; Sefton, Michael V

    2010-10-01

    Functional cardiac tissue was prepared using a modular tissue engineering approach with the goal of creating vascularized tissue. Rat aortic endothelial cells (RAEC) were seeded onto submillimeter-sized modules made of type I bovine collagen supplemented with Matrigel™ (25% v/v) embedded with cardiomyocyte (CM)-enriched neonatal rat heart cells and assembled into a contractile, macroporous, sheet-like construct. Modules (without RAEC) cultured in 10% bovine serum (BS) were more contractile and responsive to external stimulus (lower excitation threshold, higher maximum capture rate, and greater en face fractional area changes) than modules cultured in 10% fetal BS. Incorporating 25% Matrigel in the matrix reduced the excitation threshold and increased the fractional area change relative to collagen only modules (without RAEC). A coculture medium, containing 10% BS, low Mg2+ (0.814mM), and normal glucose (5.5mM), was used to maintain RAEC junction morphology (VE-cadherin) and CM contractility, although the responsiveness of CM was attenuated with RAEC on the modules. Macroporous, sheet-like module constructs were assembled by partially immobilizing a layer of modules in alginate gel until day 8, with or without RAEC. RAEC/CM module sheets were electrically responsive; however, like modules with RAEC this responsiveness was attenuated relative to CM-only sheets. Muscle bundles coexpressing cardiac troponin I and connexin-43 were evident near the perimeter of modules and at intermodule junctions. These results suggest the potential of the modular approach as a platform for building vascularized cardiac tissue. PMID:20504074

  13. Biomaterial based cardiac tissue engineering and its applications

    PubMed Central

    Huyer, Locke Davenport; Montgomery, Miles; Zhao, Yimu; Xiao, Yun; Conant, Genevieve; Korolj, Anastasia; Radisic, Milica

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide, necessitating the development of effective treatment strategies. A myocardial infarction involves the blockage of a coronary artery leading to depletion of nutrient and oxygen supply to cardiomyocytes and massive cell death in a region of the myocardium. Cardiac tissue engineering is the growth of functional cardiac tissue in vitro on biomaterial scaffolds for regenerative medicine application. This strategy relies on the optimization of the complex relationship between cell networks and biomaterial properties. In this review, we discuss important biomaterial properties for cardiac tissue engineering applications, such as elasticity, degradation, and induced host response, and their relationship to engineered cardiac cell environments. With these properties in mind, we also emphasize in vitro use of cardiac tissues for high-throughput drug screening and disease modelling. PMID:25989939

  14. Biomaterial based cardiac tissue engineering and its applications.

    PubMed

    Huyer, Locke Davenport; Montgomery, Miles; Zhao, Yimu; Xiao, Yun; Conant, Genevieve; Korolj, Anastasia; Radisic, Milica

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide, necessitating the development of effective treatment strategies. A myocardial infarction involves the blockage of a coronary artery leading to depletion of nutrient and oxygen supply to cardiomyocytes and massive cell death in a region of the myocardium. Cardiac tissue engineering is the growth of functional cardiac tissue in vitro on biomaterial scaffolds for regenerative medicine application. This strategy relies on the optimization of the complex relationship between cell networks and biomaterial properties. In this review, we discuss important biomaterial properties for cardiac tissue engineering applications, such as elasticity, degradation, and induced host response, and their relationship to engineered cardiac cell environments. With these properties in mind, we also emphasize in vitro use of cardiac tissues for high-throughput drug screening and disease modelling. PMID:25989939

  15. Bioactive polymers for cardiac tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Samuel Thomas

    2007-05-01

    Prevalent in the US and worldwide, acute myocardial infarctions (AMI) can cause ischemic injuries to the heart that persist and lead to progressive degradation of the organ. Tissue engineering techniques exploiting biomaterials present a hopeful means of treating these injuries, either by mechanically stabilizing the injured ventricle, or by fostering cell growth to replace myocytes lost to damage. This thesis describes the development and testing of a synthetic extracellular matrix for cardiac tissue engineering applications. The first stage of this process was using an advanced finite element model of an injured ovine left ventricle to evaluate the potential benefits of injecting synthetic materials into the heart. These simulations indicated that addition of small amounts non-contractile material (on the order of 1--5% total wall volume) to infarct border zone regions reduced pathological systolic fiber stress to levels near those found in normal remote regions. Simulations also determined that direct addition to the infarct itself caused increases in ventricle ejection fraction while the underlying performance of the pump, ascertained by the Starling relation, was not improved. From these theoretical results, biomaterials were developed specifically for injection into the injured myocardium, and were characterized and tested for their mechanical properties and ability to sustain the proliferation of a stem cell population suitable for transplantation. Thermoresponsive synthetic copolymer hydrogels consisting of N-isopropylacrylamide and acrylic acid, p(NIPAAm-co-AAc), crosslinked with protease degradable amino acid sequences and modified with integrin binding ligands were synthesized, characterized in vitro, and used for myocardial implantation. These injectable materials could maintain a population of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells in both two dimensional and three dimensional culture, and when tested in vivo in a murine infarct model they

  16. Heart Regeneration with Embryonic Cardiac Progenitor Cells and Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Shuo; Liu, Qihai; Gnatovskiy, Leonid; Ma, Peter X.; Wang, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Recent advances in stem cell research hold great potential for heart tissue regeneration through stem cell-based therapy. While multiple cell types have been transplanted into MI heart in preclinical studies or clinical trials, reduction of scar tissue and restoration of cardiac function have been modest. Several challenges hamper the development and application of stem cell-based therapy for heart regeneration. Application of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) and cardiac tissue engineering for cell therapy has shown great promise to repair damaged heart tissue. This review presents an overview of the current applications of embryonic CPCs and the development of cardiac tissue engineering in regeneration of functional cardiac tissue and reduction of side effects for heart regeneration. We aim to highlight the benefits of the cell therapy by application of CPCs and cardiac tissue engineering during heart regeneration. PMID:26744736

  17. Biomimetic Polymers for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a morbid disorder characterized by progressive cardiomyocyte (CM) dysfunction and death. Interest in cell-based therapies is growing, but sustainability of injected CMs remains a challenge. To mitigate this, we developed an injectable biomimetic Reverse Thermal Gel (RTG) specifically engineered to support long-term CM survival. This RTG biopolymer provided a solution-based delivery vehicle of CMs, which transitioned to a gel-based matrix shortly after reaching body temperature. In this study we tested the suitability of this biopolymer to sustain CM viability. The RTG was biomolecule-functionalized with poly-l-lysine or laminin. Neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM) and adult rat ventricular myocytes (ARVM) were cultured in plain-RTG and biomolecule-functionalized-RTG both under 3-dimensional (3D) conditions. Traditional 2D biomolecule-coated dishes were used as controls. We found that the RTG-lysine stimulated NRVM to spread and form heart-like functional syncytia. Regarding cell contraction, in both RTG and RTG-lysine, beating cells were recorded after 21 days. Additionally, more than 50% (p value < 0.05; n = 5) viable ARVMs, characterized by a well-defined cardiac phenotype represented by sarcomeric cross-striations, were found in the RTG-laminin after 8 days. These results exhibit the tremendous potential of a minimally invasive CM transplantation through our designed RTG-cell therapy platform. PMID:27073119

  18. Micromolded Gelatin Hydrogels for Extended Culture of Engineered Cardiac Tissues

    PubMed Central

    McCain, Megan L.; Agarwal, Ashutosh; Nesmith, Haley W.; Nesmith, Alexander P.; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2014-01-01

    Defining the chronic cardiotoxic effects of drugs during preclinical screening is hindered by the relatively short lifetime of functional cardiac tissues in vitro, which are traditionally cultured on synthetic materials that do not recapitulate the cardiac microenvironment. Because collagen is the primary extracellular matrix protein in the heart, we hypothesized that micromolded gelatin hydrogel substrates tuned to mimic the elastic modulus of the heart would extend the lifetime of engineered cardiac tissues by better matching the native chemical and mechanical microenvironment. To measure tissue stress, we used tape casting, micromolding, and laser engraving to fabricate gelatin hydrogel muscular thin film cantilevers. Neonatal rat cardiac myocytes adhered to gelatin hydrogels and formed aligned tissues as defined by the microgrooves. Cardiac tissues could be cultured for over three weeks without declines in contractile stress. Myocytes on gelatin had higher spare respiratory capacity compared to those on fibronectin-coated PDMS, suggesting that improved metabolic function could be contributing to extended culture lifetime. Lastly, human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac myocytes adhered to micromolded gelatin surfaces and formed aligned tissues that remained functional for four weeks, highlighting their potential for human-relevant chronic studies. PMID:24731714

  19. Controlling the Structural and Functional Anisotropy of Engineered Cardiac Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bursac, N

    2014-01-01

    The ability to control the degree of structural and functional anisotropy in 3D engineered cardiac tissues would have high utility for both in vitro studies of cardiac muscle physiology and pathology as well as potential tissue engineering therapies for myocardial infarction. Here, we applied a high aspect ratio soft lithography technique to generate network-like tissue patches seeded with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Fabricating longer elliptical pores within the patch networks increased the overall cardiomyocyte and extracellular matrix (ECM) alignment within the patch. Improved uniformity of cell and matrix alignment yielded an increase in anisotropy of action potential propagation and faster longitudinal conduction velocity (LCV). Cardiac tissue patches with a higher degree of cardiomyocyte alignment and electrical anisotropy also demonstrated greater isometric twitch forces. After two weeks of culture, specific measures of electrical and contractile function (LCV = 26.8 ± 0.8 cm/s, specific twitch force = 8.9 ± 1.1 mN/mm2 for the longest pores studied) were comparable to those of neonatal rat myocardium. We have thus described methodology for engineering of highly functional 3D engineered cardiac tissues with controllable degree of anisotropy. PMID:24717534

  20. Polycaprolactone/oligomer compound scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Chaganti Srinivasa; Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Zussman, Eyal

    2014-10-01

    Polycaprolactone (PCL), a synthetic biocompatible and biodegradable polymer generally used as a scaffold material for tissue engineering applications. The high stiffness and hydrophobicity of the PCL fiber mesh does not provide significant cell attachment and proliferation in cardiac tissue engineering. Towards this goal, the study focused on a compound of PCL and oligomer hydrogel [Bisphenol A ethoxylated dimethacrylate (BPAEDMA)] processed into electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds. The composition, morphology and mechanical properties of the compound scaffolds, composed of varying ratios of PCL and hydrogel were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical analyzer. The elastic modulus of PCL/BPAEDMA nanofibrous scaffolds was shown to be varying the BPAEDMA weight fraction and was decreased by increasing the BPAEDMA weight fraction. Compound fiber meshes containing 75 wt % BPAEDMA oligomer hydrogel exhibited lower modulus (3.55 MPa) and contact angle of 25(o) . Rabbit cardiac cells cultured for 10 days on these PCL/BPAEDMA compound nanofibrous scaffolds remained viable and expressed cardiac troponin and alpha-actinin proteins for the normal functioning of myocardium. Cell adhesion and proliferations were significantly increased on compound fiber meshes containing 75 wt % BPAEDMA, when compared with other nanofibrous scaffolds. The results observed that the produced PCL/BPAEDMA compound nanofibrous scaffolds promote cell adhesion, proliferation and normal functioning of cardiac cells to clinically beneficial levels, relevant for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:24288184

  1. Spring-like fibers for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Sharon; Feiner, Ron; Shapira, Assaf; Ji, Jing; Sui, Xiaomeng; Daniel Wagner, H; Dvir, Tal

    2013-11-01

    Recapitulation of the cellular microenvironment of the heart, which promotes cell contraction, remains a key challenge in cardiac tissue engineering. We report here on our work, where for the first time, a 3-dimensional (3D) spring-like fiber scaffold was fabricated, successfully mimicking the coiled perimysial fibers of the heart. We hypothesized that since in vivo straightening and re-coiling of these fibers allow stretching and contraction of the myocardium in the direction of the cardiomyocytes, such a scaffold can support the assembly of a functional cardiac tissue capable of generating a strong contraction force. In this study, the mechanical properties of both spring-like single fibers and 3D scaffolds composed of them were investigated. The measurements showed that they have increased elasticity and extensibility compared to corresponding straight fibers and straight fiber scaffolds. We have also shown that cardiac cells cultivated on single spring-like fibers formed cell-fiber interactions that induced fiber stretching in the direction of contraction. Moreover, cardiac cells engineered within 3D thick spring-like fiber scaffolds formed a functional tissue exhibiting significantly improved function, including stronger contraction force (p = 0.002), higher beating rate (p < 0.0001) and lower excitation threshold (p = 0.02), compared to straight fiber scaffolds. Collectively, our results suggest that spring-like fibers can play a key role in contributing to the ex vivo formation of a contracting cardiac muscle tissue. We envision that cardiac tissues engineered within these spring-like fiber scaffolds can be used to improve heart function after infarction. PMID:23953840

  2. Tissue Contraction Force Microscopy for Optimization of Engineered Cardiac Tissue.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Jeremy A; Tranquillo, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    We developed a high-throughput screening assay that allows for relative comparison of the twitch force of millimeter-scale gel-based cardiac tissues. This assay is based on principles taken from traction force microscopy and uses fluorescent microspheres embedded in a soft polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate. A gel-forming cell suspension is simply pipetted onto the PDMS to form hemispherical cardiac tissue samples. Recordings of the fluorescent bead movement during tissue pacing are used to determine the maximum distance that the tissue can displace the elastic PDMS substrate. In this study, fibrin gel hemispheres containing human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes were formed on the PDMS and allowed to culture for 9 days. Bead displacement values were measured and compared to direct force measurements to validate the utility of the system. The amplitude of bead displacement correlated with direct force measurements, and the twitch force generated by the tissues was the same in 2 and 4 mg/mL fibrin gels, even though the 2 mg/mL samples visually appear more contractile if the assessment were made on free-floating samples. These results demonstrate the usefulness of this assay as a screening tool that allows for rapid sample preparation, data collection, and analysis in a simple and cost-effective platform. PMID:26538167

  3. Transplantation of a tissue-engineered human vascularized cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Lesman, Ayelet; Habib, Manhal; Caspi, Oren; Gepstein, Amira; Arbel, Gil; Levenberg, Shulamit; Gepstein, Lior

    2010-01-01

    Myocardial regeneration strategies have been hampered by the lack of sources for human cardiomyocytes (CMs) and by the significant donor cell loss following transplantation. We assessed the ability of a three-dimensional tissue-engineered human vascularized cardiac muscle to engraft in the in vivo rat heart and to promote functional vascularization. Human embryonic stem cell-derived CMs alone or with human endothelial cells (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) and embryonic fibroblasts (triculture constructs) were seeded onto biodegradable porous scaffolds. The resulting tissue constructs were transplanted to the in vivo rat heart and formed cardiac tissue grafts. Immunostaining studies for human-specific CD31 and alpha-smooth muscle actin demonstrated the formation of both donor (human) and host (rat)-derived vasculature within the engrafted triculture tissue constructs. Intraventricular injection of fluorescent microspheres or lectin resulted in their incorporation by human-derived vessels, confirming their functional integration with host coronary vasculature. Finally, the number of blood vessels was significantly greater in the triculture tissue constructs (60.3 +/- 8/mm(3), p < 0.05) when compared with scaffolds containing only CMs (39.0 +/- 14.4/mm(3)). In conclusion, a tissue-engineered human vascularized cardiac muscle can be established ex vivo and transplanted in vivo to form stable grafts. By utilizing a multicellular preparation we were able to increase biograft vascularization and to show that the preexisting human vessels can become functional and contribute to tissue perfusion. PMID:19642856

  4. Proangiogenic scaffolds as functional templates for cardiac tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Lauran R.; Mortisen, Derek J.; Sussman, Eric M.; Dupras, Sarah K.; Fugate, James A.; Cuy, Janet L.; Hauch, Kip D.; Laflamme, Michael A.; Murry, Charles E.; Ratner, Buddy D.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate here a cardiac tissue-engineering strategy addressing multicellular organization, integration into host myocardium, and directional cues to reconstruct the functional architecture of heart muscle. Microtemplating is used to shape poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid) hydrogel into a tissue-engineering scaffold with architectures driving heart tissue integration. The construct contains parallel channels to organize cardiomyocyte bundles, supported by micrometer-sized, spherical, interconnected pores that enhance angiogenesis while reducing scarring. Surface-modified scaffolds were seeded with human ES cell-derived cardiomyocytes and cultured in vitro. Cardiomyocytes survived and proliferated for 2 wk in scaffolds, reaching adult heart densities. Cardiac implantation of acellular scaffolds with pore diameters of 30–40 μm showed angiogenesis and reduced fibrotic response, coinciding with a shift in macrophage phenotype toward the M2 state. This work establishes a foundation for spatially controlled cardiac tissue engineering by providing discrete compartments for cardiomyocytes and stroma in a scaffold that enhances vascularization and integration while controlling the inflammatory response. PMID:20696917

  5. Electroactive 3D materials for cardiac tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelmi, Amy; Zhang, Jiabin; Cieslar-Pobuda, Artur; Ljunngren, Monika K.; Los, Marek Jan; Rafat, Mehrdad; Jager, Edwin W. H.

    2015-04-01

    By-pass surgery and heart transplantation are traditionally used to restore the heart's functionality after a myocardial Infarction (MI or heart attack) that results in scar tissue formation and impaired cardiac function. However, both procedures are associated with serious post-surgical complications. Therefore, new strategies to help re-establish heart functionality are necessary. Tissue engineering and stem cell therapy are the promising approaches that are being explored for the treatment of MI. The stem cell niche is extremely important for the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells and tissue regeneration. For the introduction of stem cells into the host tissue an artificial carrier such as a scaffold is preferred as direct injection of stem cells has resulted in fast stem cell death. Such scaffold will provide the proper microenvironment that can be altered electronically to provide temporal stimulation to the cells. We have developed an electroactive polymer (EAP) scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering. The EAP scaffold mimics the extracellular matrix and provides a 3D microenvironment that can be easily tuned during fabrication, such as controllable fibre dimensions, alignment, and coating. In addition, the scaffold can provide electrical and electromechanical stimulation to the stem cells which are important external stimuli to stem cell differentiation. We tested the initial biocompatibility of these scaffolds using cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs), and continued onto more sensitive induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS). We present the fabrication and characterisation of these electroactive fibres as well as the response of increasingly sensitive cell types to the scaffolds.

  6. Cardiac tissue engineering and regeneration using cell-based therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alrefai, Mohammad T; Murali, Divya; Paul, Arghya; Ridwan, Khalid M; Connell, John M; Shum-Tim, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy and tissue engineering represent a forefront of current research in the treatment of heart disease. With these technologies, advancements are being made into therapies for acute ischemic myocardial injury and chronic, otherwise nonreversible, myocardial failure. The current clinical management of cardiac ischemia deals with reestablishing perfusion to the heart but not dealing with the irreversible damage caused by the occlusion or stenosis of the supplying vessels. The applications of these new technologies are not yet fully established as part of the management of cardiac diseases but will become so in the near future. The discussion presented here reviews some of the pioneering works at this new frontier. Key results of allogeneic and autologous stem cell trials are presented, including the use of embryonic, bone marrow-derived, adipose-derived, and resident cardiac stem cells. PMID:25999743

  7. Nuclear Morphology and Deformation in Engineered Cardiac Myocytes and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Mark-Anthony; Adams, William J.; Geisse, Nicholas A.; Feinberg, Adam W.; Sheehy, Sean P.; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering requires finely-tuned manipulation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironment to optimize internal myocardial organization. The myocyte nucleus is mechanically connected to the cell membrane via cytoskeletal elements, making it a target for the cellular response to perturbation of the ECM. However, the role of ECM spatial configuration and myocyte shape on nuclear location and morphology is unknown. In this study, printed ECM proteins were used to configure the geometry of cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes. Engineered one- and two-dimensional tissue constructs and single-myocyte islands were assayed using live fluorescence imaging to examine nuclear position, morphology and motion as a function of the imposed ECM geometry during diastolic relaxation and systolic contraction. Image analysis showed that anisotropic tissue constructs cultured on microfabricated ECM lines possessed a high degree of nuclear alignment similar to that found in vivo; nuclei in isotropic tissues were polymorphic in shape with an apparently random orientation. Nuclear eccentricity was also increased for the anisotropic tissues, suggesting that intracellular forces deform the nucleus as the cell is spatially confined. During systole, nuclei experienced increasing spatial confinement in magnitude and direction of displacement as tissue anisotropy increased, yielding anisotropic deformation. Thus, the nature of nuclear displacement and deformation during systole appears to rely on a combination of the passive myofibril spatial organization and the active stress fields induced by contraction. Such findings have implications in understanding the genomic consequences and functional response of cardiac myocytes to their ECM surroundings under conditions of disease. PMID:20382423

  8. Highly Elastic Micropatterned Hydrogel for Engineering Functional Cardiac Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Annabi, Nasim; Tsang, Kelly; Mithieux, Suzanne M.; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Ameri, Afshin

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure is a major international health issue. Myocardial mass loss and lack of contractility are precursors to heart failure. Surgical demand for effective myocardial repair is tempered by a paucity of appropriate biological materials. These materials should conveniently replicate natural human tissue components, convey persistent elasticity, promote cell attachment, growth and conformability to direct cell orientation and functional performance. Here, microfabrication techniques are applied to recombinant human tropoelastin, the resilience-imparting protein found in all elastic human tissues, to generate photocrosslinked biological materials containing well-defined micropatterns. These highly elastic substrates are then used to engineer biomimetic cardiac tissue constructs. The micropatterned hydrogels, produced through photocrosslinking of methacrylated tropoelastin (MeTro), promote the attachment, spreading, alignment, function, and intercellular communication of cardiomyocytes by providing an elastic mechanical support that mimics their dynamic mechanical properties in vivo. The fabricated MeTro hydrogels also support the synchronous beating of cardiomyocytes in response to electrical field stimulation. These novel engineered micropatterned elastic gels are designed to be amenable to 3D modular assembly and establish a versatile, adaptable foundation for the modeling and regeneration of functional cardiac tissue with potential for application to other elastic tissues. PMID:24319406

  9. Engineered Biomaterials to Enhance Stem Cell-Based Cardiac Tissue Engineering and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Anwarul; Waters, Renae; Roula, Boustany; Dana, Rahbani; Yara, Seif; Alexandre, Toubia; Paul, Arghya

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. Since adult cardiac cells are limited in their proliferation, cardiac tissue with dead or damaged cardiac cells downstream of the occluded vessel does not regenerate after myocardial infarction. The cardiac tissue is then replaced with nonfunctional fibrotic scar tissue rather than new cardiac cells, which leaves the heart weak. The limited proliferation ability of host cardiac cells has motivated investigators to research the potential cardiac regenerative ability of stem cells. Considerable progress has been made in this endeavor. However, the optimum type of stem cells along with the most suitable matrix-material and cellular microenvironmental cues are yet to be identified or agreed upon. This review presents an overview of various types of biofunctional materials and biomaterial matrices, which in combination with stem cells, have shown promises for cardiac tissue replacement and reinforcement. Engineered biomaterials also have applications in cardiac tissue engineering, in which tissue constructs are developed in vitro by combining stem cells and biomaterial scaffolds for drug screening or eventual implantation. This review highlights the benefits of using biomaterials in conjunction with stem cells to repair damaged myocardium and give a brief description of the properties of these biomaterials that make them such valuable tools to the field. PMID:26953627

  10. Anisotropic Silk Biomaterials Containing Cardiac Extracellular Matrix for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Stoppel, Whitney L.; Hu, Dongjian; Domian, Ibrahim J.; Kaplan, David L.; Black, Lauren D.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac malformations and disease are the leading causes of death in the United States in live-born infants and adults, respectively. In both of these cases, a decrease in the number of functional cardiomyocytes often results in improper growth of heart tissue, wound healing complications, and poor tissue repair. The field of cardiac tissue engineering seeks to address these concerns by developing cardiac patches created from a variety of biomaterial scaffolds to be used in surgical repair of the heart. These scaffolds should be fully degradable biomaterial systems with tunable properties such that the materials can be altered to meet the needs of both in vitro culture (e.g., disease modeling) and in vivo application (e.g., cardiac patch). Current platforms do not utilize both structural anisotropy and proper cell-matrix contacts to promote functional cardiac phenotypes and thus there is still a need for critically sized scaffolds that mimic both the structural and adhesive properties of native tissue. To address this need, we have developed a silk-based scaffold platform containing cardiac tissue-derived extracellular matrix (cECM). These silk-cECM composite scaffolds have tunable architectures, degradation rates, and mechanical properties. Subcutaneous implantation in rats demonstrated that addition of the cECM to aligned silk scaffold led to 99% endogenous cell infiltration and promoted vascularization of a critically sized scaffold (10 mm × 5 mm × 2.5 mm) after 4 weeks in vivo. In vitro, silk-cECM scaffolds maintained the HL-1 atrial cardiomyocytes and human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and promoted a more functional phenotype in both cell types. This class of hybrid silk-cECM anisotropic scaffolds offers new opportunities for developing more physiologically relevant tissues for cardiac repair and disease modeling. PMID:25826196

  11. Engineered cardiac micromodules for the in vitro fabrication of 3D endogenous macro-tissues.

    PubMed

    Totaro, A; Urciuolo, F; Imparato, G; Netti, P A

    2016-01-01

    The in vitro fabrication of an endogenous cardiac muscle would have a high impact for both in vitro studies concerning cardiac tissue physiology and pathology, as well as in vivo application to potentially repair infarcted myocardium. To reach this aim, we engineered a new class of cardiac tissue precursor (CTP), specifically conceived in order to promote the synthesis and the assembly of a cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM). The CTPs were obtained by culturing a mixed cardiac cell population, composed of myocyte and non-myocyte cells, into porous gelatin microspheres in a dynamic bioreactor. By engineering the culture conditions, the CTP developed both beating properties and an endogenous immature cardiac ECM. By following a bottom-up approach, a macrotissue was fabricated by molding and packing the engineered tissue precursor in a maturation chamber. During the macrotissue formation, the tissue precursors acted as cardiac tissue depots by promoting the formation of an endogenous and interconnected cardiac network embedding the cells and the microbeads. The myocytes cell fraction pulled on ECM network and induced its compaction against the internal posts represented by the initial porous microbeads. This reciprocal interplay induced ECM consolidation without the use of external biophysical stimuli by leading to the formation of a beating and endogenous macrotissue. We have thus engineered a new class of cardiac micromodules and show its potential for the fabrication of endogenous cardiac tissue models useful for in vitro studies that involve the cardiac tissue remodeling. PMID:27213995

  12. Engineered hybrid cardiac patches with multifunctional electronics for online monitoring and regulation of tissue function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiner, Ron; Engel, Leeya; Fleischer, Sharon; Malki, Maayan; Gal, Idan; Shapira, Assaf; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi; Dvir, Tal

    2016-06-01

    In cardiac tissue engineering approaches to treat myocardial infarction, cardiac cells are seeded within three-dimensional porous scaffolds to create functional cardiac patches. However, current cardiac patches do not allow for online monitoring and reporting of engineered-tissue performance, and do not interfere to deliver signals for patch activation or to enable its integration with the host. Here, we report an engineered cardiac patch that integrates cardiac cells with flexible, freestanding electronics and a 3D nanocomposite scaffold. The patch exhibited robust electronic properties, enabling the recording of cellular electrical activities and the on-demand provision of electrical stimulation for synchronizing cell contraction. We also show that electroactive polymers containing biological factors can be deposited on designated electrodes to release drugs in the patch microenvironment on demand. We expect that the integration of complex electronics within cardiac patches will eventually provide therapeutic control and regulation of cardiac function.

  13. Vascularisation to improve translational potential of tissue engineering systems for cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Dilley, Rodney J; Morrison, Wayne A

    2014-11-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering is developing as an alternative approach to heart transplantation for treating heart failure. Shortage of organ donors and complications arising after orthotopic transplant remain major challenges to the modern field of heart transplantation. Engineering functional myocardium de novo requires an abundant source of cardiomyocytes, a biocompatible scaffold material and a functional vasculature to sustain the high metabolism of the construct. Progress has been made on several fronts, with cardiac cell biology, stem cells and biomaterials research particularly promising for cardiac tissue engineering, however currently employed strategies for vascularisation have lagged behind and limit the volume of tissue formed. Over ten years we have developed an in vivo tissue engineering model to construct vascularised tissue from various cell and tissue sources, including cardiac tissue. In this article we review the progress made with this approach and others, together with their potential to support a volume of engineered tissue for cardiac tissue engineering where contractile mass impacts directly on functional outcomes in translation to the clinic. It is clear that a scaled-up cardiac tissue engineering solution required for clinical treatment of heart failure will include a robust vascular supply for successful translation. This article is part of a directed issue entitled: Regenerative Medicine: the challenge of translation. PMID:25449260

  14. Cell electrospinning cardiac patches for tissue engineering the heart.

    PubMed

    Ehler, Elisabeth; Jayasinghe, Suwan N

    2014-09-21

    Cell electrospinning has tremendous applicability to a wide range of uses within both the laboratory and clinic. This has directly resulted from the technology's unique ability to immobilize multiple cell types with a wide range of molecules simultaneously within a fiber during the scaffold generation process. The technology has been shown to generate many cell laden complex architectures from true three-dimensional sheets to those multi-core vessels. Although those studies have demonstrated the versatility of this platform biotechnology, we show here for the first time the ability to immobilize primary cardiac myocytes within these fibers in our quest to develop this technology for creating three-dimensional cardiac patches which could be used for repairing, replacing and rejuvenating damaged, diseased and/or ageing cardiac tissues. These advances are unrivalled by any other technology currently available in the regenerative medicine toolbox, and have many interesting ramifications for repairing a damaged heart. PMID:25058315

  15. Electrospun biocomposite nanofibrous patch for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Kai, Dan; Ghasemi-Mobarakeh, Laleh; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2011-10-01

    A bioengineered construct that matches the chemical, mechanical, biological properties and extracellular matrix morphology of native tissue could be suitable as a cardiac patch for supporting the heart after myocardial infarction. The potential of utilizing a composite nanofibrous scaffold of poly(dl-lactide-co-glycolide)/gelatin (PLGA/Gel) as a biomimetic cardiac patch is studied by culturing a population of cardiomyocyte containing cells on the electrospun scaffolds. The chemical characterization and mechanical properties of the electrospun PLGA and PLGA/Gel nanofibers were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and tensile measurements. The biocompatibility of the scaffolds was also studied and the cardiomyocytes seeded on PLGA/Gel nanofibers were found to express the typical functional cardiac proteins such as alpha-actinin and troponin I, showing the easy integration of cardiomyocytes on PLGA/Gel scaffolds. Our studies strengthen the application of electrospun PLGA/Gel nanofibers as a bio-mechanical support for injured myocardium and as a potential substrate for induction of endogenous cardiomyocyte proliferation, ultimately reducing the cardiac dysfunction and improving cardiac remodeling. PMID:21813957

  16. Fabrication and characterization of bio-engineered cardiac pseudo tissues

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tao; Baicu, Catalin; Aho, Michael; Zile, Michael; Boland, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We report to fabricate functional three-dimensional (3D) tissue constructs by using an inkjet based bio-prototyping method. With the use of the modified inkjet printers, contractile cardiac hybrids that exhibit the forms of the 3D rectangular sheet and even the “half heart” (with two connected ventricles) have been fabricated by arranging alternate layers of biocompatible alginate hydrogels and mammalian cardiac cells according to pre-designed 3D patterns. In this study, primary feline adult and H1 cardiomyocytes were used as model cardiac cells. Alginate hydrogels with controlled micro-shell structures were built by spraying cross-linkers in micro drops onto un-gelled alginic acid. The cells remained viable in constructs as thick as 1 cm due to the programmed porosity. Microscopic and macroscopic contractile functions of these cardiomyocytes constructs were observed in vitro. These results suggest that the inkjet bio-prototyping method could be used for hierarchical design of functional cardiac pseudo tissues, balanced with porosity for mass transport and structural support. PMID:20811105

  17. The role of tissue engineering and biomaterials in cardiac regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yimu; Feric, Nicole T; Thavandiran, Nimalan; Nunes, Sara S; Radisic, Milica

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, the development of 3-dimensional engineered heart tissue (EHT) has made large strides forward because of advances in stem cell biology, materials science, prevascularization strategies, and nanotechnology. As a result, the role of tissue engineering in cardiac regenerative medicine has become multifaceted as new applications become feasible. Cardiac tissue engineering has long been established to have the potential to partially or fully restore cardiac function after cardiac injury. However, EHTs may also serve as surrogate human cardiac tissue for drug-related toxicity screening. Cardiotoxicity remains a major cause of drug withdrawal in the pharmaceutical industry. Unsafe drugs reach the market because preclinical evaluation is insufficient to weed out cardiotoxic drugs in all their forms. Bioengineering methods could provide functional and mature human myocardial tissues, ie, physiologically relevant platforms, for screening the cardiotoxic effects of pharmaceutical agents and facilitate the discovery of new therapeutic agents. Finally, advances in induced pluripotent stem cells have made patient-specific EHTs possible, which opens up the possibility of personalized medicine. Herein, we give an overview of the present state of the art in cardiac tissue engineering, the challenges to the field, and future perspectives. PMID:25442432

  18. Coiled fiber scaffolds embedded with gold nanoparticles improve the performance of engineered cardiac tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, Sharon; Shevach, Michal; Feiner, Ron; Dvir, Tal

    2014-07-01

    Coiled perimysial fibers within the heart muscle provide it with the ability to contract and relax efficiently. Here, we report on a new nanocomposite scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering, integrating coiled electrospun fibers with gold nanoparticles. Cultivation of cardiac cells within the hybrid scaffolds promoted cell organization into elongated and aligned tissues generating a strong contraction force, high contraction rate and low excitation threshold.Coiled perimysial fibers within the heart muscle provide it with the ability to contract and relax efficiently. Here, we report on a new nanocomposite scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering, integrating coiled electrospun fibers with gold nanoparticles. Cultivation of cardiac cells within the hybrid scaffolds promoted cell organization into elongated and aligned tissues generating a strong contraction force, high contraction rate and low excitation threshold. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00300d

  19. Coiled fiber scaffolds embedded with gold nanoparticles improve the performance of engineered cardiac tissues.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Sharon; Shevach, Michal; Feiner, Ron; Dvir, Tal

    2014-08-21

    Coiled perimysial fibers within the heart muscle provide it with the ability to contract and relax efficiently. Here, we report on a new nanocomposite scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering, integrating coiled electrospun fibers with gold nanoparticles. Cultivation of cardiac cells within the hybrid scaffolds promoted cell organization into elongated and aligned tissues generating a strong contraction force, high contraction rate and low excitation threshold. PMID:24744098

  20. Electrically Conductive Chitosan/Carbon Scaffolds for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this work, carbon nanofibers were used as doping material to develop a highly conductive chitosan-based composite. Scaffolds based on chitosan only and chitosan/carbon composites were prepared by precipitation. Carbon nanofibers were homogeneously dispersed throughout the chitosan matrix, and the composite scaffold was highly porous with fully interconnected pores. Chitosan/carbon scaffolds had an elastic modulus of 28.1 ± 3.3 KPa, similar to that measured for rat myocardium, and excellent electrical properties, with a conductivity of 0.25 ± 0.09 S/m. The scaffolds were seeded with neonatal rat heart cells and cultured for up to 14 days, without electrical stimulation. After 14 days of culture, the scaffold pores throughout the construct volume were filled with cells. The metabolic activity of cells in chitosan/carbon constructs was significantly higher as compared to cells in chitosan scaffolds. The incorporation of carbon nanofibers also led to increased expression of cardiac-specific genes involved in muscle contraction and electrical coupling. This study demonstrates that the incorporation of carbon nanofibers into porous chitosan scaffolds improved the properties of cardiac tissue constructs, presumably through enhanced transmission of electrical signals between the cells. PMID:24417502

  1. Electrically conductive chitosan/carbon scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Martins, Ana M; Eng, George; Caridade, Sofia G; Mano, João F; Reis, Rui L; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-02-10

    In this work, carbon nanofibers were used as doping material to develop a highly conductive chitosan-based composite. Scaffolds based on chitosan only and chitosan/carbon composites were prepared by precipitation. Carbon nanofibers were homogeneously dispersed throughout the chitosan matrix, and the composite scaffold was highly porous with fully interconnected pores. Chitosan/carbon scaffolds had an elastic modulus of 28.1 ± 3.3 KPa, similar to that measured for rat myocardium, and excellent electrical properties, with a conductivity of 0.25 ± 0.09 S/m. The scaffolds were seeded with neonatal rat heart cells and cultured for up to 14 days, without electrical stimulation. After 14 days of culture, the scaffold pores throughout the construct volume were filled with cells. The metabolic activity of cells in chitosan/carbon constructs was significantly higher as compared to cells in chitosan scaffolds. The incorporation of carbon nanofibers also led to increased expression of cardiac-specific genes involved in muscle contraction and electrical coupling. This study demonstrates that the incorporation of carbon nanofibers into porous chitosan scaffolds improved the properties of cardiac tissue constructs, presumably through enhanced transmission of electrical signals between the cells. PMID:24417502

  2. Cardiac tissue engineering, ex-vivo: design principles in biomaterials and bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Shachar, Michal; Cohen, Smadar

    2003-07-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering has emerged as a promising approach to replace or support an infarcted cardiac tissue and thus may hold a great potential to treat and save the lives of patients with heart diseases. By its broad definition, tissue engineering involves the construction of tissue equivalents from donor cells seeded within 3-D biomaterials, then culturing and implanting the cell-seeded scaffolds to induce and direct the growth of new, healthy tissue. In this review, we present an up-to-date summary of the research in cardiac tissue engineering, with an emphasis on the design principles and selection criteria that have been used in two key technologies employed in tissue engineering, (1) biomaterials technology, for the creation of 3-D porous scaffolds which are used to support and guide the tissue formation from dissociated cells, and (2) bioreactor cultivation of the 3-D cell constructs during ex-vivo tissue engineering, which aims to duplicate the normal stresses and flows experienced by the tissues. PMID:12878836

  3. Functional Analysis of the Engineered Cardiac Tissue Grown on Recombinant Spidroin Fiber Meshes

    PubMed Central

    Teplenin, Alexander; Krasheninnikova, Anna; Agladze, Nadezhda; Sidoruk, Konstantin; Agapova, Olga; Agapov, Igor; Bogush, Vladimir; Agladze, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the ability of the recombinant spidroin to serve as a substrate for the cardiac tissue engineering. For this purpose, isolated neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were seeded on the electrospun spidroin fiber matrices and cultured to form the confluent cardiac monolayers. Besides the adhesion assay and immunostaining analysis, we tested the ability of the cultured cardiomyocytes to form a functional cardiac syncytium by studying excitation propagation in the cultured tissue with the aid of optical mapping. It was demonstrated that recombinant spidroin fiber meshes are directly suitable for the adherence and growth of the cardiomyocytes without additional coating with the attachment factors, such as fibronectin. PMID:25799394

  4. Stem Cells for Cardiac Regeneration by Cell Therapy and Myocardial Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun; Zeng, Faquan; Weisel, Richard D.; Li, Ren-Ke

    Congestive heart failure, which often occurs progressively following a myocardial infarction, is characterized by impaired myocardial perfusion, ventricular dilatation, and cardiac dysfunction. Novel treatments are required to reverse these effects - especially in older patients whose endogenous regenerative responses to currently available therapies are limited by age. This review explores the current state of research for two related approaches to cardiac regeneration: cell therapy and tissue engineering. First, to evaluate cell therapy, we review the effectiveness of various cell types for their ability to limit ventricular dilatation and promote functional recovery following implantation into a damaged heart. Next, to assess tissue engineering, we discuss the characteristics of several biomaterials for their potential to physically support the infarcted myocardium and promote implanted cell survival following cardiac injury. Finally, looking ahead, we present recent findings suggesting that hybrid constructs combining a biomaterial with stem and supporting cells may be the most effective approaches to cardiac regeneration.

  5. Reduced Graphene Oxide-GelMA Hybrid Hydrogels as Scaffolds for Cardiac Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su Ryon; Zihlmann, Claudio; Akbari, Mohsen; Assawes, Pribpandao; Cheung, Louis; Zhang, Kaizhen; Manoharan, Vijayan; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Yüksekkaya, Mehmet; Wan, Kai-Tak; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Biomaterials currently used in cardiac tissue engineering have certain limitations, such as lack of electrical conductivity and appropriate mechanical properties, which are two parameters playing a key role in regulating cardiac cell behavior. Here, the myocardial tissue constructs are engineered based on reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-incorporated gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) hybrid hydrogels. The incorporation of rGO into the GelMA matrix significantly enhances the electrical conductivity and mechanical properties of the material. Moreover, cells cultured on composite rGO-GelMA scaffolds exhibit better biological activities such as cell viability, proliferation, and maturation compared to ones cultured on GelMA hydrogels. Cardiomyocytes show stronger contractility and faster spontaneous beating rate on rGO-GelMA hydrogel sheets compared to those on pristine GelMA hydrogels, as well as GO-GelMA hydrogel sheets with similar mechanical property and particle concentration. Our strategy of integrating rGO within a biocompatible hydrogel is expected to be broadly applicable for future biomaterial designs to improve tissue engineering outcomes. The engineered cardiac tissue constructs using rGO incorporated hybrid hydrogels can potentially provide high-fidelity tissue models for drug studies and the investigations of cardiac tissue development and/or disease processes in vitro. PMID:27254107

  6. Portable bioreactor for perfusion and electrical stimulation of engineered cardiac tissue

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Nina; Taubman, Alanna; Cimetta, Elisa; Saccenti, Laetitia; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering aims to create functional tissue constructs that can reestablish the structure and function of injured myocardium. Although bioreactors have facilitated the engineering of cardiac patches of clinically relevant size in vitro, a major drawback remains the transportation of the engineered tissues from a production facility to a medical operation facility while maintaining tissue viability and preventing contamination. Furthermore, after implantation, most of the cells are endangered by hypoxic conditions that exist before vascular flow is established. We developed a portable device that provides the perfusion and electrical stimulation necessary to engineer cardiac tissue in vitro, and to transport it to the site where it will be implantated. The micropump-powered perfusion apparatus may additionally function as an extracorporeal active pumping system providing nutrients and oxygen supply to the graft post-implantation. Such a system, through perfusion of oxygenated media and bioactive molecules (e.g. growth factors), could transiently support the tissue construct until it connects to the host vasculature and heart muscle, after which it could be taken away or let biodegrade. PMID:24111161

  7. PGS:Gelatin nanofibrous scaffolds with tunable mechanical and structural properties for engineering cardiac tissues.

    PubMed

    Kharaziha, Mahshid; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Shin, Su-Ryon; Annabi, Nasim; Masoumi, Nafiseh; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K; Camci-Unal, Gulden; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-09-01

    A significant challenge in cardiac tissue engineering is the development of biomimetic grafts that can potentially promote myocardial repair and regeneration. A number of approaches have used engineered scaffolds to mimic the architecture of the native myocardium tissue and precisely regulate cardiac cell functions. However, previous attempts have not been able to simultaneously recapitulate chemical, mechanical, and structural properties of the myocardial extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, we utilized an electrospinning approach to fabricate elastomeric biodegradable poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS):gelatin nanofibrous scaffolds with a wide range of chemical composition, stiffness and anisotropy. Our findings demonstrated that through incorporation of PGS, it is possible to create nanofibrous scaffolds with well-defined anisotropy that mimic the left ventricular myocardium architecture. Furthermore, we studied attachment, proliferation, differentiation and alignment of neonatal rat cardiac fibroblast cells (CFs) as well as protein expression, alignment, and contractile function of cardiomyocyte (CMs) on PGS:gelatin scaffolds with variable amount of PGS. Notably, aligned nanofibrous scaffold, consisting of 33 wt. % PGS, induced optimal synchronous contractions of CMs while significantly enhanced cellular alignment. Overall, our study suggests that the aligned nanofibrous PGS:gelatin scaffold support cardiac cell organization, phenotype and contraction and could potentially be used to develop clinically relevant constructs for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:23747008

  8. PGS:Gelatin Nanofibrous Scaffolds with Tunable Mechanical and Structural Properties for Engineering Cardiac Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kharaziha, Mahshid; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Shin, Su-Ryon; Annabi, Nasim; Masoumi, Nafiseh; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Camci-Unal, Gulden; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    A significant challenge in cardiac tissue engineering is the development of biomimetic grafts that can potentially promote myocardial repair and regeneration. A number of approaches have used engineered scaffolds to mimic the architecture of the native myocardium tissue and precisely regulate cardiac cell functions. However previous attempts have not been able to simultaneously recapitulate chemical, mechanical, and structural properties of the myocardial extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, we utilized an electrospinning approach to fabricate elastomeric biodegradable poly(glycerol-sebacate) (PGS):gelatin scaffolds with a wide range of chemical composition, stiffness and anisotropy. Our findings demonstrated that through incorporation of PGS, it is possible to create nanofibrous scaffolds with well-defined anisotropy that mimics the left ventricular myocardium architecture. Furthermore, we studied attachment, proliferation, differentiation and alignment of neonatal rat cardiac fibroblast cells (CFs) as well as protein expression, alignment, and contractile function of cardiomyocyte (CMs) on PGS:gelatin scaffolds with variable amount of PGS. Notably, aligned nanofibrous scaffold, consisting of 33 wt. % PGS, induced optimal synchronous contractions of CMs while significantly enhanced cellular alignment. Overall, our study suggests that the aligned nanofibrous PGS:gelatin scaffold support cardiac cell organization, phenotype and contraction and could potentially be used to develop clinically relevant constructs for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:23747008

  9. Cardiac Meets Skeletal: What's New in Microfluidic Models for Muscle Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Visone, Roberta; Gilardi, Mara; Marsano, Anna; Rasponi, Marco; Bersini, Simone; Moretti, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years microfluidics and microfabrication technique principles have been extensively exploited for biomedical applications. In this framework, organs-on-a-chip represent promising tools to reproduce key features of functional tissue units within microscale culture chambers. These systems offer the possibility to investigate the effects of biochemical, mechanical, and electrical stimulations, which are usually applied to enhance the functionality of the engineered tissues. Since the functionality of muscle tissues relies on the 3D organization and on the perfect coupling between electrochemical stimulation and mechanical contraction, great efforts have been devoted to generate biomimetic skeletal and cardiac systems to allow high-throughput pathophysiological studies and drug screening. This review critically analyzes microfluidic platforms that were designed for skeletal and cardiac muscle tissue engineering. Our aim is to highlight which specific features of the engineered systems promoted a typical reorganization of the engineered construct and to discuss how promising design solutions exploited for skeletal muscle models could be applied to improve cardiac tissue models and vice versa. PMID:27571058

  10. Engineered hybrid cardiac patches with multifunctional electronics for online monitoring and regulation of tissue function.

    PubMed

    Feiner, Ron; Engel, Leeya; Fleischer, Sharon; Malki, Maayan; Gal, Idan; Shapira, Assaf; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi; Dvir, Tal

    2016-06-01

    In cardiac tissue engineering approaches to treat myocardial infarction, cardiac cells are seeded within three-dimensional porous scaffolds to create functional cardiac patches. However, current cardiac patches do not allow for online monitoring and reporting of engineered-tissue performance, and do not interfere to deliver signals for patch activation or to enable its integration with the host. Here, we report an engineered cardiac patch that integrates cardiac cells with flexible, freestanding electronics and a 3D nanocomposite scaffold. The patch exhibited robust electronic properties, enabling the recording of cellular electrical activities and the on-demand provision of electrical stimulation for synchronizing cell contraction. We also show that electroactive polymers containing biological factors can be deposited on designated electrodes to release drugs in the patch microenvironment on demand. We expect that the integration of complex electronics within cardiac patches will eventually provide therapeutic control and regulation of cardiac function. PMID:26974408

  11. From Cardiac Tissue Engineering to Heart-on-a-Chip: Beating Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu Shrike; Aleman, Julio; Arneri, Andrea; Bersini, Simone; Piraino, Francesco; Shin, Su Ryon; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The heart is one of the most vital organs in the human body, which actively pumps the blood through the vascular network to supply nutrients to as well as to extract wastes from all other organs, maintaining the homeostasis of the biological system. Over the past few decades, tremendous efforts have been exerted in engineering functional cardiac tissues for heart regeneration via biomimetic approaches. More recently, progresses have been achieved towards the transformation of knowledge obtained from cardiac tissue engineering to building physiologically relevant microfluidic human heart models (i.e. heart-on-chips) for applications in drug discovery. The advancement in the stem cell technologies further provides the opportunity to create personalized in vitro models from cells derived from patients. Here starting from the heart biology, we review recent advances in engineering cardiac tissues and heart-on-a-chip platforms for their use in heart regeneration and cardiotoxic/cardiotherapeutic drug screening, and then briefly conclude with characterization techniques and personalization potential of the cardiac models. PMID:26065674

  12. Textile-templated electrospun anisotropic scaffolds for regenerative cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Şenel Ayaz, H Gözde; Perets, Anat; Ayaz, Hasan; Gilroy, Kyle D; Govindaraj, Muthu; Brookstein, David; Lelkes, Peter I

    2014-10-01

    For patients with end-stage heart disease, the access to heart transplantation is limited due to the shortage of donor organs and to the potential for rejection of the donated organ. Therefore, current studies focus on bioengineering approaches for creating biomimetic cardiac patches that will assist in restoring cardiac function, by repairing and/or regenerating the intrinsically anisotropic myocardium. In this paper we present a simplified, straightforward approach for creating bioactive anisotropic cardiac patches, based on a combination of bioengineering and textile-manufacturing techniques in concert with nano-biotechnology based tissue-engineering stratagems. Using knitted conventional textiles, made of cotton or polyester yarns as template targets, we successfully electrospun anisotropic three-dimensional scaffolds from poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA), and thermoplastic polycarbonate-urethane (PCU, Bionate(®)). The surface topography and mechanical properties of textile-templated anisotropic scaffolds significantly differed from those of scaffolds electrospun from the same materials onto conventional 2-D flat-target electrospun scaffolds. Anisotropic textile-templated scaffolds electrospun from both PLGA and PCU, supported the adhesion and proliferation of H9C2 cardiac myoblasts cell line, and guided the cardiac tissue-like anisotropic organization of these cells in vitro. All cell-seeded PCU scaffolds exhibited mechanical properties comparable to those of a human heart, but only the cells on the polyester-templated scaffolds exhibited prolonged spontaneous synchronous contractility on the entire engineered construct for 10 days in vitro at a near physiologic frequency of ∼120 bpm. Taken together, the methods described here take advantage of straightforward established textile manufacturing strategies as an efficient and cost-effective approach to engineering 3D anisotropic, elastomeric PCU scaffolds that can serve as a cardiac patch. PMID:25017096

  13. Biomimetic scaffold combined with electrical stimulation and growth factor promotes tissue engineered cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyoungshin; Larson, Benjamin L; Kolewe, Martin E; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Freed, Lisa E

    2014-02-15

    Toward developing biologically sound models for the study of heart regeneration and disease, we cultured heart cells on a biodegradable, microfabricated poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) scaffold designed with micro-structural features and anisotropic mechanical properties to promote cardiac-like tissue architecture. Using this biomimetic system, we studied individual and combined effects of supplemental insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and electrical stimulation (ES). On culture day 8, all tissue constructs could be paced and expressed the cardiac protein troponin-T. IGF-1 reduced apoptosis, promoted cell-to-cell connectivity, and lowered excitation threshold, an index of electrophysiological activity. ES promoted formation of tissue-like bundles oriented in parallel to the electrical field and a more than ten-fold increase in matrix metalloprotease-2 (MMP-2) gene expression. The combination of IGF-1 and ES increased 2D projection length, an index of overall contraction strength, and enhanced expression of the gap junction protein connexin-43 and sarcomere development. This culture environment, designed to combine cardiac-like scaffold architecture and biomechanics with molecular and biophysical signals, enabled functional assembly of engineered heart muscle from dissociated cells and could serve as a template for future studies on the hierarchy of various signaling domains relative to cardiac tissue development. PMID:24240126

  14. Encapsulation of cardiomyocytes in a fibrin hydrogel for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yuan Ye, Kathy; Sullivan, Kelly Elizabeth; Black, Lauren Deems

    2011-01-01

    Culturing cells in a three dimensional hydrogel environment is an important technique for developing constructs for tissue engineering as well as studying cellular responses under various culture conditions in vitro. The three dimensional environment more closely mimics what the cells observe in vivo due to the application of mechanical and chemical stimuli in all dimensions (1). Three-dimensional hydrogels can either be made from synthetic polymers such as PEG-DA (2) and PLGA (3) or a number of naturally occurring proteins such as collagen (4), hyaluronic acid (5) or fibrin (6,7). Hydrogels created from fibrin, a naturally occurring blood clotting protein, can polymerize to form a mesh that is part of the body's natural wound healing processes (8). Fibrin is cell-degradable and potentially autologous (9), making it an ideal temporary scaffold for tissue engineering. Here we describe in detail the isolation of neonatal cardiomyocytes from three day old rat pups and the preparation of the cells for encapsulation in fibrin hydrogel constructs for tissue engineering. Neonatal myocytes are a common cell source used for in vitro studies in cardiac tissue formation and engineering (4). Fibrin gel is created by mixing fibrinogen with the enzyme thrombin. Thrombin cleaves fibrinopeptides FpA and FpB from fibrinogen, revealing binding sites that interact with other monomers (10). These interactions cause the monomers to self-assemble into fibers that form the hydrogel mesh. Because the timing of this enzymatic reaction can be adjusted by altering the ratio of thrombin to fibrinogen, or the ratio of calcium to thrombin, one can injection mold constructs with a number of different geometries (11,12). Further we can generate alignment of the resulting tissue by how we constrain the gel during culture (13). After culturing the engineered cardiac tissue constructs for two weeks under static conditions, the cardiac cells have begun to remodel the construct and can generate a

  15. Electrical stimulation directs engineered cardiac tissue to an age-matched native phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Lasher, Richard A; Pahnke, Aric Q; Johnson, Jeffrey M; Sachse, Frank B

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying structural features of native myocardium in engineered tissue is essential for creating functional tissue that can serve as a surrogate for in vitro testing or the eventual replacement of diseased or injured myocardium. We applied three-dimensional confocal imaging and image analysis to quantitatively describe the features of native and engineered cardiac tissue. Quantitative analysis methods were developed and applied to test the hypothesis that environmental cues direct engineered tissue toward a phenotype resembling that of age-matched native myocardium. The analytical approach was applied to engineered cardiac tissue with and without the application of electrical stimulation as well as to age-matched and adult native tissue. Individual myocytes were segmented from confocal image stacks and assigned a coordinate system from which measures of cell geometry and connexin-43 spatial distribution were calculated. The data were collected from 9 nonstimulated and 12 electrically stimulated engineered tissue constructs and 5 postnatal day 12 and 7 adult hearts. The myocyte volume fraction was nearly double in stimulated engineered tissue compared to nonstimulated engineered tissue (0.34 ± 0.14 vs 0.18 ± 0.06) but less than half of the native postnatal day 12 (0.90 ± 0.06) and adult (0.91 ± 0.04) myocardium. The myocytes under electrical stimulation were more elongated compared to nonstimulated myocytes and exhibited similar lengths, widths, and heights as in age-matched myocardium. Furthermore, the percentage of connexin-43-positive membrane staining was similar in the electrically stimulated, postnatal day 12, and adult myocytes, whereas it was significantly lower in the nonstimulated myocytes. Connexin-43 was found to be primarily located at cell ends for adult myocytes and irregularly but densely clustered over the membranes of nonstimulated, stimulated, and postnatal day 12 myocytes. These findings support our hypothesis and reveal that the

  16. Advancing functional engineered cardiac tissues toward a preclinical model of human myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Irene C.; Karakikes, Ioannis; Serrao, Gregory W.; Backeris, Peter; Lee, Jia-Jye; Xie, Chaoqin; Senyei, Grant; Gordon, Ronald E.; Li, Ronald A.; Akar, Fadi G.; Hajjar, Roger J.; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien; Costa, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac experimental biology and translational research would benefit from an in vitro surrogate for human heart muscle. This study investigated structural and functional properties and interventional responses of human engineered cardiac tissues (hECTs) compared to human myocardium. Human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs, >90% troponin-positive) were mixed with collagen and cultured on force-sensing elastomer devices. hECTs resembled trabecular muscle and beat spontaneously (1.18±0.48 Hz). Microstructural features and mRNA expression of cardiac-specific genes (α-MHC, SERCA2a, and ACTC1) were comparable to human myocardium. Optical mapping revealed cardiac refractoriness with loss of 1:1 capture above 3 Hz, and cycle length dependence of the action potential duration, recapitulating key features of cardiac electrophysiology. hECTs reconstituted the Frank-Starling mechanism, generating an average maximum twitch stress of 660 μN/mm2 at Lmax, approaching values in newborn human myocardium. Dose-response curves followed exponential pharmacodynamics models for calcium chloride (EC50 1.8 mM) and verapamil (IC50 0.61 μM); isoproterenol elicited a positive chronotropic but negligible inotropic response, suggesting sarcoplasmic reticulum immaturity. hECTs were amenable to gene transfer, demonstrated by successful transduction with Ad.GFP. Such 3-D hECTs recapitulate an early developmental stage of human myocardium and promise to offer an alternative preclinical model for cardiology research.—Turnbull, I. C., Karakikes, I., Serrao, G. W., Backeris, P., Lee, J.-J., Xie, C., Senyei, G., Gordon, R. E., Li, R. A., Akar, F. G., Hajjar, R. J., Hulot, J.-S., Costa, K. D. Advancing functional engineered cardiac tissues toward a preclinical model of human myocardium. PMID:24174427

  17. The role of Wnt regulation in heart development, cardiac repair and disease: A tissue engineering perspective.

    PubMed

    Pahnke, Aric; Conant, Genna; Huyer, Locke Davenport; Zhao, Yimu; Feric, Nicole; Radisic, Milica

    2016-05-01

    Wingless-related integration site (Wnt) signaling has proven to be a fundamental mechanism in cardiovascular development as well as disease. Understanding its particular role in heart formation has helped to develop pluripotent stem cell differentiation protocols that produce relatively pure cardiomyocyte populations. The resultant cardiomyocytes have been used to generate heart tissue for pharmaceutical testing, and to study physiological and disease states. Such protocols in combination with induced pluripotent stem cell technology have yielded patient-derived cardiomyocytes that exhibit some of the hallmarks of cardiovascular disease and are therefore being used to model disease states. While FDA approval of new treatments typically requires animal experiments, the burgeoning field of tissue engineering could act as a replacement. This would necessitate the generation of reproducible three-dimensional cardiac tissues in a well-controlled environment, which exhibit native heart properties, such as cellular density, composition, extracellular matrix composition, and structure-function. Such tissues could also enable the further study of Wnt signaling. Furthermore, as Wnt signaling has been found to have a mechanistic role in cardiac pathophysiology, e.g. heart attack, hypertrophy, atherosclerosis, and aortic stenosis, its strategic manipulation could provide a means of generating reproducible and specific, physiological and pathological cardiac models. PMID:26626076

  18. Polypyrrole-contained electrospun conductive nanofibrous membranes for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kai, Dan; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Jin, Guorui; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2011-12-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering (TE) is one of the most promising strategies to reconstruct infarct myocardium and the major challenge is to generate a bioactive substrate with suitable chemical, biological, and conductive properties, thus mimicking the extracellular matrix (ECM) both structurally and functionally. In this study, polypyrrole/poly(ε-caprolactone)/gelatin nanofibrous scaffolds were electrospun by incorporating different concentrations of polypyrrole (PPy) to PCL/gelatin (PG) solution. Morphological, chemical, mechanical, and biodegradation properties of the electrospun nanofibers were evaluated. Our data indicated that by increasing the concentration of PPy (0-30%) in the composite, the average fiber diameters reduced from 239 ± 37 nm to 191 ± 45 nm, and the tensile modulus increased from 7.9 ± 1.6 MPa to 50.3 ± 3.3 MPa. Conductive nanofibers containing 15% PPy (PPG15) exhibited the most balanced properties of conductivity, mechanical properties, and biodegradability, matching the requirements for regeneration of cardiac tissue. The cell proliferation assay, SEM, and immunostaining analysis showed that the PPG15 scaffold promote cell attachment, proliferation, interaction, and expression of cardiac-specific proteins better than PPG30. Electrospun PPG15 conductive nanofibrous scaffold could be desirable and promising substrates suitable for the regeneration of infarct myocardium and cardiac defects. PMID:22021185

  19. Electrospun composite scaffolds containing poly(octanediol-co-citrate) for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Nair, A Sreekumaran; Kai, Dan; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2012-07-01

    A biocompatible and elastomeric nanofibrous scaffold is electrospun from a blend of poly(1,8-octanediol-co-citrate) [POC] and poly(L-lactic acid) -co-poly-(3-caprolactone) [PLCL] for application as a bioengineered patch for cardiac tissue engineering. The characterization of the scaffolds was carried out by Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and tensile measurement. The mechanical properties of the scaffolds are studied with regard to the percentage of POC incorporated with PLCL and the results of the study showed that the mechanical property and degradation behavior of the composites can be tuned with respect to the concentration of POC blended with PLCL. The composite scaffolds with POC: PLCL weight ratio of 40:60 [POC/PLCL4060] was found to have a tensile strength of 1.04 ± 0.11 MPa and Young's Modulus of 0.51 ± 0.10 MPa, comparable to the native cardiac tissue. The proliferation of cardiac myoblast cells on the electrospun POC/PLCL scaffolds was found to increase from Days 2 to 8, with the increasing concentration of POC in the composite. The morphology and cytoskeletal observation of the cells also demonstrated the biocompatibility of the POC containing scaffolds. Electrospun POC/PLCL4060 nanofibers are promising elastomeric substrates that might provide the necessary mechanical cues to cardiac muscle cells for regeneration of the heart. PMID:22328272

  20. Biomimetic perfusion and electrical stimulation applied in concert improved the assembly of engineered cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Maidhof, Robert; Tandon, Nina; Lee, Eun Jung; Luo, Jianwen; Duan, Yi; Yeager, Keith; Konofagou, Elisa; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2012-11-01

    Maintenance of normal myocardial function depends intimately on synchronous tissue contraction, driven by electrical activation and on adequate nutrient perfusion in support thereof. Bioreactors have been used to mimic aspects of these factors in vitro to engineer cardiac tissue but, due to design limitations, previous bioreactor systems have yet to simultaneously support nutrient perfusion, electrical stimulation and unconstrained (i.e. not isometric) tissue contraction. To the best of our knowledge, the bioreactor system described herein is the first to integrate these three key factors in concert. We present the design of our bioreactor and characterize its capability in integrated experimental and mathematical modelling studies. We then cultured cardiac cells obtained from neonatal rats in porous, channelled elastomer scaffolds with the simultaneous application of perfusion and electrical stimulation, with controls excluding either one or both of these two conditions. After 8 days of culture, constructs grown with simultaneous perfusion and electrical stimulation exhibited substantially improved functional properties, as evidenced by a significant increase in contraction amplitude (0.23 ± 0.10% vs 0.14 ± 0.05%, 0.13 ± 0.08% or 0.09 ± 0.02% in control constructs grown without stimulation, without perfusion, or either stimulation or perfusion, respectively). Consistently, these constructs had significantly improved DNA contents, cell distribution throughout the scaffold thickness, cardiac protein expression, cell morphology and overall tissue organization compared to control groups. Thus, the simultaneous application of medium perfusion and electrical conditioning enabled by the use of the novel bioreactor system may accelerate the generation of fully functional, clinically sized cardiac tissue constructs. PMID:22170772

  1. Genesis of myocardial repair with cardiac progenitor cells and tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Eugene K W; Haider, Husnain Kh; Lila, Nermine; Schussler, Olivier; Chachques, Juan C; Ye, Lei

    2010-01-01

    Background There is mounting evidence to suggest that the heart has regenerative potential in the event of myocardial injury. Recent studies have shown that a resident population of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) in the heart contains both vasculogenic and myogenic lineages. CPCs are able to migrate to the site of injury in the heart for participation in the healing process. The resident CPCs in the heart may also be activated through outside pharmacological intervention to promote their participation in the intrinsic repair process. In the light of these characteristics, CPCs provide a logical source for the heart cell therapy. During the regenerative cardiac process, stem cell niches (a specialised environment surrounding stem cells) provide crucial support needed for their maintenance. Discussion Compromised niche function may lead to the selection of stem cells that no longer depend on self-renewal factors produced by its environment. The objective of stem cell transplantation associated with tissue-engineered approaches is to create a new modality in the treatment of heart failure. The use of efficient scaffolds will aid to re-establish a favourable microenvironment for stem cell survival, multiplication, differentiation and function. Cardiac tissue engineering using natural and/or synthetic materials in this regard provides a novel possibility in cardiovascular therapeutics. PMID:27325955

  2. Guided orientation of cardiomyocytes on electrospun aligned nanofibers for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kai, Dan; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Jin, Guorui; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2011-08-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering (TE) is one of the most promising strategies to reconstruct the infarct myocardium and the major challenge involves producing a bioactive scaffold with anisotropic properties that assist in cell guidance to mimic the heart tissue. In this study, random and aligned poly(ε-caprolactone)/gelatin (PG) composite nanofibrous scaffolds were electrospun to structurally mimic the oriented extracellular matrix (ECM). Morphological, chemical and mechanical properties of the electrospun PG nanofibers were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), water contact angle, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and tensile measurements. Results indicated that PG nanofibrous scaffolds possessed smaller fiber diameters (239 ± 37 nm for random fibers and 269 ± 33 nm for aligned fibers), increased hydrophilicity, and lower stiffness compared to electrospun PCL nanofibers. The aligned PG nanofibers showed anisotropic wetting characteristics and mechanical properties, which closely match the requirements of native cardiac anisotropy. Rabbit cardiomyocytes were cultured on electrospun random and aligned nanofibers to assess the biocompatibility of scaffolds, together with its potential for cell guidance. The SEM and immunocytochemical analysis showed that the aligned PG scaffold greatly promoted cell attachment and alignment because of the biological components and ordered topography of the scaffolds. Moreover, we concluded that the aligned PG nanofibrous scaffolds could be more promising substrates suitable for the regeneration of infarct myocardium and other cardiac defects. PMID:21681953

  3. Cardiac arrhythmogenesis in urban air pollution: Optical mapping in a tissue-engineered model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bien, Harold H.

    Recent epidemiological evidence has implicated particulate matter air pollution in cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that inflammatory mediators released from lung macrophages after exposure to particulate matter predisposes the heart to disturbances in rhythm. Using a rational design approach, a fluorescent optical mapping system was devised to image spatiotemporal patterns of excitation in a tissue engineered model of cardiac tissue. Algorithms for automated data analysis and characterization of rhythm stability were developed, implemented, and verified. Baseline evaluation of spatiotemporal instability patterns in normal cardiac tissue was performed for comparison to an in-vitro model of particulate matter air pollution exposure. Exposure to particulate-matter activated alveolar macrophage conditioned media resulted in paradoxical functional changes more consistent with improved growth. These findings might be indicative of a "stress" response to particulate-matter induced pulmonary inflammation, or may be specific to the animal model (neonatal rat) employed. In the pursuit of elucidating the proposed pathway, we have also furthered our understanding of fundamental behaviors of arrhythmias in general and established a model where further testing might ultimately reveal the mechanism for urban air pollution associated cardiovascular morbidity.

  4. Electrospun PLGA fibers incorporated with functionalized biomolecules for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiashing; Lee, An-Rei; Lin, Wei-Han; Lin, Che-Wei; Wu, Yuan-Kun; Tsai, Wei-Bor

    2014-07-01

    Structural similarity of electrospun fibers (ESFs) to the native extracellular matrix provides great potential for the application of biofunctional ESFs in tissue engineering. This study aimed to synthesize biofunctionalized poly (L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) ESFs for investigating the potential for cardiac tissue engineering application. We developed a simple but novel strategy to incorporate adhesive peptides in PLGA ESFs. Two adhesive peptides derived from laminin, YIGSR, and RGD, were covalently conjugated to poly-L-lysine, and then mingled with PLGA solution for electrospinning. Peptides were uniformly distributed on the surface and in the interior of ESFs. PLGA ESFs incorporated with YIGSR or RGD or adsorbed with laminin significantly enhanced the adhesion of cardiomyocytes isolated from neonatal rats. Furthermore, the cells were found to adhere better on ESFs compared with flat substrates after 7 days of culture. Immunofluorescent staining of F-actin, vinculin, a-actinin, and N-cadherin indicated that cardiomyocytes adhered and formed striated α-actinin better on the laminin-coated ESFs and the YIGSR-incorporated ESFs compared with the RGD-incorporated ESFs. The expression of α-myosin heavy chain and β-tubulin on the YIGSR-incorporated ESFs was significantly higher compared with the expression level on PLGA and RGD-incorporated samples. Furthermore, the contraction of cardiomyocytes was faster and lasted longer on the laminin-coated ESFs and YIGSR-incorporated ESFs. The results suggest that aligned YIGSR-incorporated PLGA ESFs is a better candidate for the formation of cardiac patches. This study demonstrated the potential of using peptide-incorporated ESFs as designable-scaffold platform for tissue engineering. PMID:24471778

  5. Cardiac Extracellular Matrix-Fibrin Hybrid Scaffolds with Tunable Properties for Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Corin; Budina, Erica; Stoppel, Whitney L.; Sullivan, Kelly E.; Emani, Sirisha; Emani, Sitaram M.; Black, Lauren D.

    2014-01-01

    Solubilized cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM) is being developed as an injectable therapeutic that offers promise for promoting cardiac repair. However, the ECM alone forms a hydrogel that is very soft compared to the native myocardium. As both the stiffness and composition of the ECM are important in regulating cell behavior and can have complex synergistic effects, we sought to develop an ECM-based scaffold with tunable biochemical and mechanical properties. We used solubilized rat cardiac ECM from two developmental stages (neonatal, adult) combined with fibrin hydrogels that were crosslinked with transglutaminase. We show that ECM was retained within the gels and Young’s modulus could be tuned to span the range of the developing and mature heart. C-kit+ cardiovascular progenitor cells from pediatric patients with congenital heart defects were seeded into the hybrid gels. Both the elastic modulus and composition of the scaffolds impacted the expression of endothelial and smooth muscle cell genes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the hybrid gels are injectable, and thus have potential for minimally invasive therapies. ECM-fibrin hybrid scaffolds offer new opportunities for exploiting the effects of both composition and mechanical properties in directing cell behavior for tissue engineering. PMID:25463503

  6. In vitro study of electroactive tetraaniline-containing thermosensitive hydrogels for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Cui, Haitao; Liu, Yadong; Cheng, Yilong; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Peibiao; Chen, Xuesi; Wei, Yen

    2014-04-14

    Injectable hydrogels made of degradable biomaterials can function as both physical support and cell scaffold in preventing infarct expansion and promoting cardiac repair in myocardial infarction therapy. Here, we report in situ hydrogels consisting of thermosensitive PolyNIPAM-based copolymers and electroactive tetraaniline (TA). Studies showed that the addition of 2-methylene-1,3-dioxepane (MDO) provided the PolyNIPAM-based gel with biodegradability, and the introduction of tetraaniline endowed these copolymers with desirable electrical properties and antioxidant activities. The encapsulated H9c2 cells (rat cardiac myoblast) remained highly viable in the gel matrices. In vivo gel formation and histological analyses were performed in rats by subcutaneous injection and excellent biocompatibility was observed. Furthermore, the proliferation and intracellular calcium transients of H9c2 cells were also studied with (and without) electrical stimuli. Both in vitro and in vivo results demonstrated that electroactive hydrogel may be used as a promising injectable biomaterial for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:24597966

  7. Electrically conductive gold nanoparticle-chitosan thermosensitive hydrogels for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Baei, Payam; Jalili-Firoozinezhad, Sasan; Rajabi-Zeleti, Sareh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Baharvand, Hossein; Aghdami, Nasser

    2016-06-01

    Injectable hydrogels that resemble electromechanical properties of the myocardium are crucial for cardiac tissue engineering prospects. We have developed a facile approach that uses chitosan (CS) to generate a thermosensitive conductive hydrogel with a highly porous network of interconnected pores. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were evenly dispersed throughout the CS matrix in order to provide electrical cues. The gelation response and electrical conductivity of the hydrogel were controlled by different concentrations of GNPs. The CS-GNP hydrogels were seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and cultivated for up to 14days in the absence of electrical stimulations. CS-GNP scaffolds supported viability, metabolism, migration and proliferation of MSCs along with the development of uniform cellular constructs. Immunohistochemistry for early and mature cardiac markers showed enhanced cardiomyogenic differentiation of MSCs within the CS-GNP compared to the CS matrix alone. The results of this study demonstrate that incorporation of nanoscale electro-conductive GNPs into CS hydrogels enhances the properties of myocardial constructs. These constructs could find utilization for regeneration of other electroactive tissues. PMID:27040204

  8. Direct Mechanical Stimulation of Stem Cells: A Beating Electromechanically Active Scaffold for Cardiac Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Gelmi, Amy; Cieslar-Pobuda, Artur; de Muinck, Ebo; Los, Marek; Rafat, Mehrdad; Jager, Edwin W H

    2016-06-01

    The combination of stem cell therapy with a supportive scaffold is a promising approach to improving cardiac tissue engineering. Stem cell therapy can be used to repair nonfunctioning heart tissue and achieve myocardial regeneration, and scaffold materials can be utilized in order to successfully deliver and support stem cells in vivo. Current research describes passive scaffold materials; here an electroactive scaffold that provides electrical, mechanical, and topographical cues to induced human pluripotent stem cells (iPS) is presented. The poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) fiber scaffold coated with conductive polymer polypyrrole (PPy) is capable of delivering direct electrical and mechanical stimulation to the iPS. The electroactive scaffolds demonstrate no cytotoxic effects on the iPS as well as an increased expression of cardiac markers for both stimulated and unstimulated protocols. This study demonstrates the first application of PPy as a supportive electroactive material for iPS and the first development of a fiber scaffold capable of dynamic mechanical actuation. PMID:27126086

  9. Design of Electrospun Hydrogel Fibers Containing Multivalent Peptide Conjugates for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, Nikhil Ajit

    A novel material was designed using biomimetic engineering principles to recreate the chemical and physical environment of the extracellular matrix for cardiac tissue engineering applications. In order to control the chemical and specific bioactive signals provided by the material, a multivalent conjugate of a RGD-containing cell-binding peptide with hyaluronic acid was synthesized. These conjugates were characterized using in-line size exclusion chromatography with static multi-angle light scattering, UV absorbance, and differential refractive index measurements (SEC-MALS-UV-RI) to determine their molecular weight and valency, as well as the distributions of each. These conjugates were electrospun with poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate to create a nanofibrous hydrogel material embedded with bioinstructive macromolecules. This electrospinning process was explored and optimized to create well-formed nanofibers. The diameter and orientation of the fibers was controlled to closely mimic the nanostructure of the extracellular matrix of the myocardium. Further characterization of the material was performed to ensure that its mechanical properties resemble those found in the myocardium. The availability of the peptides embedded in the hydrogel material was confirmed by measuring peptides released by trypsin incubation and was found to be sufficient to cause cell adhesion. This material was capable of supporting cell culture, maintaining the viability of cultured fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes, and preserving cardiomyocyte functionality. In this way, this material shows promise of serving as a biomimetic in vitro scaffold for generation of functional myocardial tissue, with possible applications as an in vivo cardiac patch for repair of the damage myocardium post-myocardial infarction.

  10. Minimally invasive injectable short nanofibers of poly(glycerol sebacate) for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Rajeswari; Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Sundarrajan, Subramanian; Mukherjee, Shayanti; Sridhar, Radhakrishnan; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2012-09-28

    Myocardial tissue lacks the ability to appreciably regenerate itself following myocardial infarction (MI) which ultimately results in heart failure. Current therapies can only retard the progression of disease and hence tissue engineering strategies are required to facilitate the engineering of a suitable biomaterial to repair MI. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro properties of an injectable biomaterial for the regeneration of infarcted myocardium. Fabrication of core/shell fibers was by co-axial electrospinning, with poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) as core material and poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) as shell material. The PLLA was removed by treatment of the PGS/PLLA core/shell fibers with DCM:hexane (2:1) to obtain PGS short fibers. These PGS short fibers offer the advantage of providing a minimally invasive injectable technique for the regeneration of infarcted myocardium. The scaffolds were characterized by SEM, FTIR and contact angle and cell-scaffold interactions using cardiomyocytes. The results showed that the cardiac marker proteins actinin, troponin, myosin heavy chain and connexin 43 were expressed more on short PGS fibers compared to PLLA nanofibers. We hypothesized that the injection of cells along with short PGS fibers would increase cell transplant retention and survival within the infarct, compared to the standard cell injection system. PMID:22947662

  11. Minimally invasive injectable short nanofibers of poly(glycerol sebacate) for cardiac tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, Rajeswari; Reddy Venugopal, Jayarama; Sundarrajan, Subramanian; Mukherjee, Shayanti; Sridhar, Radhakrishnan; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2012-09-01

    Myocardial tissue lacks the ability to appreciably regenerate itself following myocardial infarction (MI) which ultimately results in heart failure. Current therapies can only retard the progression of disease and hence tissue engineering strategies are required to facilitate the engineering of a suitable biomaterial to repair MI. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro properties of an injectable biomaterial for the regeneration of infarcted myocardium. Fabrication of core/shell fibers was by co-axial electrospinning, with poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) as core material and poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) as shell material. The PLLA was removed by treatment of the PGS/PLLA core/shell fibers with DCM:hexane (2:1) to obtain PGS short fibers. These PGS short fibers offer the advantage of providing a minimally invasive injectable technique for the regeneration of infarcted myocardium. The scaffolds were characterized by SEM, FTIR and contact angle and cell-scaffold interactions using cardiomyocytes. The results showed that the cardiac marker proteins actinin, troponin, myosin heavy chain and connexin 43 were expressed more on short PGS fibers compared to PLLA nanofibers. We hypothesized that the injection of cells along with short PGS fibers would increase cell transplant retention and survival within the infarct, compared to the standard cell injection system.

  12. Alginate-polyester comacromer based hydrogels as physiochemically and biologically favorable entities for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Thankam, Finosh G; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2015-11-01

    The physiochemical and biological responses of tissue engineering hydrogels are crucial in determining their desired performance. A hybrid comacromer was synthesized by copolymerizing alginate and poly(mannitol fumarate-co-sebacate) (pFMSA). Three bimodal hydrogels pFMSA-AA, pFMSA-MA and pFMSA-NMBA were synthesized by crosslinking with Ca(2+) and vinyl monomers acrylic acid (AA), methacrylic acid (MA) and N,N'-methylene bisacrylamide (NMBA), respectively. Though all the hydrogels were cytocompatible and exhibited a normal cell cycle profile, pFMSA-AA exhibited superior physiochemical properties viz non-freezable water content (58.34%) and water absorption per unit mass (0.97 g water/g gel) and pore length (19.92±3.91 μm) in comparing with other two hydrogels. The increased non-freezable water content and water absorption of pFMSA-AA hydrogels greatly influenced its biological performance, which was evident from long-term viability assay and cell cycle proliferation. The physiochemical and biological favorability of pFMSA-AA hydrogels signifies its suitability for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:26151567

  13. Myocyte-Depleted Engineered Cardiac Tissues Support Therapeutic Potential of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Gregory W.; Turnbull, Irene C.; Ancukiewicz, Damian; Kim, Do Eun; Kao, Evan; Cashman, Timothy J.; Hadri, Lahouaria; Hajjar, Roger J.

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for restoring cardiac function after cardiomyocyte loss remains controversial. Engineered cardiac tissues (ECTs) offer a simplified three-dimensional in vitro model system to evaluate stem cell therapies. We hypothesized that contractile properties of dysfunctional ECTs would be enhanced by MSC treatment. ECTs were created from neonatal rat cardiomyocytes with and without bone marrow-derived adult rat MSCs in a type-I collagen and Matrigel scaffold using custom elastomer molds with integrated cantilever force sensors. Three experimental groups included the following: (1) baseline condition ECT consisting only of myocytes, (2) 50% myocyte-depleted ECT, modeling a dysfunctional state, and (3) 50% myocyte-depleted ECT plus 10% MSC, modeling dysfunctional myocardium with intervention. Developed stress (DS) and pacing threshold voltage (VT) were measured using 2-Hz field stimulation at 37°C on culture days 5, 10, 15, and 20. By day 5, DS of myocyte-depleted ECTs was significantly lower than baseline, and VT was elevated. In MSC-supplemented ECTs, DS and VT were significantly better than myocyte-depleted values, approaching baseline ECTs. Findings were similar through culture day 15, but lost significance at day 20. Trends in DS were partly explained by changes in the cell number and alignment with time. Thus, supplementing myocyte-depleted ECTs with MSCs transiently improved contractile function and compensated for a 50% loss of cardiomyocytes, mimicking recent animal studies and clinical trials and supporting the potential of MSCs for myocardial therapy. PMID:22500611

  14. Strategies for the chemical and biological functionalization of scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering: a review

    PubMed Central

    Tallawi, Marwa; Rosellini, Elisabetta; Barbani, Niccoletta; Cascone, Maria Grazia; Rai, Ranjana; Saint-Pierre, Guillaume; Boccaccini, Aldo R.

    2015-01-01

    The development of biomaterials for cardiac tissue engineering (CTE) is challenging, primarily owing to the requirement of achieving a surface with favourable characteristics that enhances cell attachment and maturation. The biomaterial surface plays a crucial role as it forms the interface between the scaffold (or cardiac patch) and the cells. In the field of CTE, synthetic polymers (polyglycerol sebacate, polyethylene glycol, polyglycolic acid, poly-l-lactide, polyvinyl alcohol, polycaprolactone, polyurethanes and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)) have been proven to exhibit suitable biodegradable and mechanical properties. Despite the fact that they show the required biocompatible behaviour, most synthetic polymers exhibit poor cell attachment capability. These synthetic polymers are mostly hydrophobic and lack cell recognition sites, limiting their application. Therefore, biofunctionalization of these biomaterials to enhance cell attachment and cell material interaction is being widely investigated. There are numerous approaches for functionalizing a material, which can be classified as mechanical, physical, chemical and biological. In this review, recent studies reported in the literature to functionalize scaffolds in the context of CTE, are discussed. Surface, morphological, chemical and biological modifications are introduced and the results of novel promising strategies and techniques are discussed. PMID:26109634

  15. Strategies for the chemical and biological functionalization of scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering: a review.

    PubMed

    Tallawi, Marwa; Rosellini, Elisabetta; Barbani, Niccoletta; Cascone, Maria Grazia; Rai, Ranjana; Saint-Pierre, Guillaume; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2015-07-01

    The development of biomaterials for cardiac tissue engineering (CTE) is challenging, primarily owing to the requirement of achieving a surface with favourable characteristics that enhances cell attachment and maturation. The biomaterial surface plays a crucial role as it forms the interface between the scaffold (or cardiac patch) and the cells. In the field of CTE, synthetic polymers (polyglycerol sebacate, polyethylene glycol, polyglycolic acid, poly-l-lactide, polyvinyl alcohol, polycaprolactone, polyurethanes and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)) have been proven to exhibit suitable biodegradable and mechanical properties. Despite the fact that they show the required biocompatible behaviour, most synthetic polymers exhibit poor cell attachment capability. These synthetic polymers are mostly hydrophobic and lack cell recognition sites, limiting their application. Therefore, biofunctionalization of these biomaterials to enhance cell attachment and cell material interaction is being widely investigated. There are numerous approaches for functionalizing a material, which can be classified as mechanical, physical, chemical and biological. In this review, recent studies reported in the literature to functionalize scaffolds in the context of CTE, are discussed. Surface, morphological, chemical and biological modifications are introduced and the results of novel promising strategies and techniques are discussed. PMID:26109634

  16. Myocyte-depleted engineered cardiac tissues support therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Serrao, Gregory W; Turnbull, Irene C; Ancukiewicz, Damian; Kim, Do Eun; Kao, Evan; Cashman, Timothy J; Hadri, Lahouaria; Hajjar, Roger J; Costa, Kevin D

    2012-07-01

    The therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for restoring cardiac function after cardiomyocyte loss remains controversial. Engineered cardiac tissues (ECTs) offer a simplified three-dimensional in vitro model system to evaluate stem cell therapies. We hypothesized that contractile properties of dysfunctional ECTs would be enhanced by MSC treatment. ECTs were created from neonatal rat cardiomyocytes with and without bone marrow-derived adult rat MSCs in a type-I collagen and Matrigel scaffold using custom elastomer molds with integrated cantilever force sensors. Three experimental groups included the following: (1) baseline condition ECT consisting only of myocytes, (2) 50% myocyte-depleted ECT, modeling a dysfunctional state, and (3) 50% myocyte-depleted ECT plus 10% MSC, modeling dysfunctional myocardium with intervention. Developed stress (DS) and pacing threshold voltage (VT) were measured using 2-Hz field stimulation at 37°C on culture days 5, 10, 15, and 20. By day 5, DS of myocyte-depleted ECTs was significantly lower than baseline, and VT was elevated. In MSC-supplemented ECTs, DS and VT were significantly better than myocyte-depleted values, approaching baseline ECTs. Findings were similar through culture day 15, but lost significance at day 20. Trends in DS were partly explained by changes in the cell number and alignment with time. Thus, supplementing myocyte-depleted ECTs with MSCs transiently improved contractile function and compensated for a 50% loss of cardiomyocytes, mimicking recent animal studies and clinical trials and supporting the potential of MSCs for myocardial therapy. PMID:22500611

  17. Characterization of electrospun polymer fibers for applications in cardiac tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwood, Danielle N.

    Electrospinning is a technique where a polymer solution is formed into a non-woven mat by electrically charging the solution as it leaves a capillary. The resulting mats have an interconnected porous network, and the system can be tailored in order to form aligned fibers. In this work, we have chosen to electrospin and characterize two polymers with unique properties with the intention to use them as scaffolds for cardiac tissue. The first polymer studied was poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (pNIPAM), a material which shows a thermoresponsive behavior around 32°C in aqueous solutions. In this work, pNIPAM was electrospun into fibrous mats from three solvents and the resulting electrospun mats were evaluated using DSC, polarized Raman, and infrared spectroscopy and compared to the bulk material. It was found that the electrospinning process did not alter the polymer and pNIPAM maintained its thermoresponsive behavior. Therefore, it is believed that electrospun pNIPAM mats could have the potential to be used as templates or filters in aqueous solutions at high temperatures, above 32°C, and then removed by lowering the temperature. The next polymer to be investigated was a biodegradable polyurethane (PU). The PU was electrospun into isotropic mats (ES-PU) and the material properties were evaluated via GPC, DSC, and Raman spectroscopy before and after processing. These analyses showed that the polymer was also unaffected by the electrospinning process. Additionally, the degradation profile of ES-PU in the presence of chymotrypsin was assessed. It was concluded that ES-PU mats show potential for use in soft tissue engineering applications. Therefore, the next step in this research was to investigate the ability of ES-PU mats to support cardiac cells and direct tissuegenesis. Cells isolated from immature cardiac ventricles were grown on ES-PU mats with either aligned or unaligned microfibers. ES-PU cultures contained electrically-coupled, contractile myocytes and it was

  18. Development and characterization of novel electrically conductive PANI-PGS composites for cardiac tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Qazi, Taimoor H; Rai, Ranjana; Dippold, Dirk; Roether, Judith E; Schubert, Dirk W; Rosellini, Elisabetta; Barbani, Niccoletta; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases, especially myocardial infarction, are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world, also resulting in huge economic burdens on national economies. A cardiac patch strategy aims at regenerating an infarcted heart by providing healthy functional cells to the injured region via a carrier substrate, and providing mechanical support, thereby preventing deleterious ventricular remodeling. In the present work, polyaniline (PANI) was doped with camphorsulfonic acid and blended with poly(glycerol-sebacate) at ratios of 10, 20 and 30vol.% PANI content to produce electrically conductive composite cardiac patches via the solvent casting method. The composites were characterized in terms of their electrical, mechanical and physicochemical properties. The in vitro biodegradability of the composites was also evaluated. Electrical conductivity increased from 0Scm(-1) for pure PGS to 0.018Scm(-1) for 30vol.% PANI-PGS samples. Moreover, the conductivities were preserved for at least 100h post fabrication. Tensile tests revealed an improvement in the elastic modulus, tensile strength and elasticity with increasing PANI content. The degradation products caused a local drop in pH, which was higher in all composite samples compared with pure PGS, hinting at a buffering effect due to the presence of PANI. Finally, the cytocompatibility of the composites was confirmed when C2C12 cells attached and proliferated on samples with varying PANI content. Furthermore, leaching of acid dopants from the developed composites did not have any deleterious effect on the viability of C2C12 cells. Taken together, these results confirm the potential of PANI-PGS composites for use as substrates to modulate cellular behavior via electrical stimulation, and as biocompatible scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering applications. PMID:24561709

  19. The Current Status of iPS Cells in Cardiac Research and Their Potential for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Ana M.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    The recent availability of human cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells opens new opportunities to build in vitro models of cardiac disease, screening for new drugs, and patient-specific cardiac therapy. Notably, the use of iPS cells enables studies in the wide pool of genotypes and phenotypes. We describe progress in reprogramming of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells towards the cardiac lineage/differentiation. The focus is on challenges of cardiac disease modeling using iPS cells and their potential to produce safe, effective and affordable therapies/applications with the emphasis of cardiac tissue engineering. We also discuss implications of human iPS cells to biological research and some of the future needs. PMID:24425421

  20. Carbon Nanohorns Promote Maturation of Neonatal Rat Ventricular Myocytes and Inhibit Proliferation of Cardiac Fibroblasts: a Promising Scaffold for Cardiac Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yujing; Shi, Xiaoli; Li, Yi; Tian, Lei; Bai, Rui; Wei, Yujie; Han, Dong; Liu, Huiliang; Xu, Jianxun

    2016-12-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering (CTE) has developed rapidly, but a great challenge remains in finding practical scaffold materials for the construction of engineered cardiac tissues. Carbon nanohorns (CNHs) may be a potential candidate due to their special structure and properties. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of CNHs on the biological behavior of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) for CTE applications. CNHs were incorporated into collagen to form growth substrates for NRVMs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations demonstrated that CNHs exhibited a good affinity to collagen. Moreover, it was found that CNH-embedded substrates enhanced adhesion and proliferation of NRVMs. Immunohistochemical staining, western blot analysis, and intracellular calcium transient measurements indicated that the addition of CNHs significantly increased the expression and maturation of electrical and mechanical proteins (connexin-43 and N-cadherin). Bromodeoxyuridine staining and a Cell Counting Kit-8 assay showed that CNHs have the ability to inhibit the proliferation of cardiac fibroblasts. These findings suggest that CNHs can have a valuable effect on the construction of engineered cardiac tissues and may be a promising scaffold for CTE. PMID:27263018

  1. Carbon Nanohorns Promote Maturation of Neonatal Rat Ventricular Myocytes and Inhibit Proliferation of Cardiac Fibroblasts: a Promising Scaffold for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yujing; Shi, Xiaoli; Li, Yi; Tian, Lei; Bai, Rui; Wei, Yujie; Han, Dong; Liu, Huiliang; Xu, Jianxun

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering (CTE) has developed rapidly, but a great challenge remains in finding practical scaffold materials for the construction of engineered cardiac tissues. Carbon nanohorns (CNHs) may be a potential candidate due to their special structure and properties. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of CNHs on the biological behavior of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) for CTE applications. CNHs were incorporated into collagen to form growth substrates for NRVMs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations demonstrated that CNHs exhibited a good affinity to collagen. Moreover, it was found that CNH-embedded substrates enhanced adhesion and proliferation of NRVMs. Immunohistochemical staining, western blot analysis, and intracellular calcium transient measurements indicated that the addition of CNHs significantly increased the expression and maturation of electrical and mechanical proteins (connexin-43 and N-cadherin). Bromodeoxyuridine staining and a Cell Counting Kit-8 assay showed that CNHs have the ability to inhibit the proliferation of cardiac fibroblasts. These findings suggest that CNHs can have a valuable effect on the construction of engineered cardiac tissues and may be a promising scaffold for CTE.

  2. Development and Implementation of Discrete Polymeric Microstructural Cues for Applications in Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinney, James Richardson

    Chronic fibrosis caused by acute myocardial infarction (MI) leads to increased morbidity and mortality due to cardiac dysfunction. Despite care in the acute setting of MI, subsequent development of scar tissue and a lack of treatments for this maladaptive response lead to a poor prognosis. This has increased burdens on the cost of healthcare due to chronic disability. Here a novel therapeutic strategy that aims to mitigate myocardial fibrosis by utilizing injectable polymeric microstructural cues to attenuate the fibrotic response and improve functional outcomes is presented. Additionally, applications of integrated chemical functionalizations into discrete, micro-scale polymer structures are discussed in the realm of tissue engineering in order to impart enhancements in in vivo localization, three-dimensional manipulation and drug delivery. Polymeric microstructures, termed "microrods" and "microcubes", were fabricated using photolithographic techniques and studied in three-dimensional culture models of the fibrotic environment and by direct injection into the infarct zone of adult Sprague-Dawley rats. In vitro gene expression and functional and histological results were analyzed, showing a dose-dependent down-regulation fibrotic indicators and improvement in cardiac function. Furthermore, iron oxide nanoparticles and functionalized fluorocarbons were incorporated into the polymeric microdevices to promote in situ visualization by magnetic resonance imaging as well as to facilitate the manipulation and alignment of microstructural cues in a tissue-realistic environment. Lastly, successful encapsulation of native MGF peptide within microrods is demonstrated with release over two weeks as a proof of concept in the ability to locally deliver myogenic or supportive pharmacotherapeutics to the injured myocardium. This work demonstrates the efficacy and versatility of discrete microtopographical cues to attenuate the fibrotic response after MI and suggests a novel

  3. Myocardial Scaffold-based Cardiac Tissue Engineering: Application of Coordinated Mechanical and Electrical Stimulations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Guangjun; To, Filip; Butler, J. Ryan; Claude, Andrew; McLaughlin, Ronald M.; Williams, Lakiesha N.; de Jongh Curry, Amy L.; Liao, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have developed an optimal decellularization protocol to generate 3D porcine myocardial scaffolds, which preserved natural extracellular matrix structure, mechanical anisotropy, and vasculature templates, and also showed good cell recellularization and differentiation potential. In this study, a multi-stimulation bioreactor was built to provide coordinated mechanical and electrical stimulations for facilitating stem cell differentiation and cardiac construct development. The acellular myocardial scaffolds were seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (106 cells/ml) by needle injection and subjected to 5-azacytidine treatment (3 μmol/L, 24 h) and various bioreactor conditioning protocols. We found that, after 2-day culture with mechanical (20% strain) and electrical stimulation (5 V, 1 Hz), high cell density and good cell viability were observed in the reseeded scaffold. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the differentiated cells showed cardiomyocyte-like phenotype, by expressing sarcomeric α-actinin, myosin heavy chain, cardiac troponin T, connexin-43, and N-cadherin. Biaxial mechanical testing demonstrated that positive tissue remodeling took place after 2-day bioreactor conditioning (20% strain + 5 V, 1 Hz); passive mechanical properties of the 2-day and 4-day tissue constructs were comparable to the tissue constructs produced by stirring reseeding followed by 2-week static culture, implying the effectiveness and efficiency of the coordinated simulations in promoting tissue remodeling. In short, the synergistic stimulations might be beneficial not only for the quality of cardiac construct development, but also for patients by reducing the waiting time in future clinical scenarios. PMID:23923967

  4. Expansion and Characterization of Neonatal Cardiac Pericytes Provides a Novel Cellular Option for Tissue Engineering in Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Avolio, Elisa; Rodriguez-Arabaolaza, Iker; Spencer, Helen L; Riu, Federica; Mangialardi, Giuseppe; Slater, Sadie C; Rowlinson, Jonathan; Alvino, Valeria V; Idowu, Oluwasomidotun O; Soyombo, Stephanie; Oikawa, Atsuhiko; Swim, Megan M; Kong, Cherrie H T; Cheng, Hongwei; Jia, Huidong; Ghorbel, Mohamed T; Hancox, Jules C; Orchard, Clive H; Angelini, Gianni; Emanueli, Costanza; Caputo, Massimo; Madeddu, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Background Living grafts produced by combining autologous heart-resident stem/progenitor cells and tissue engineering could provide a new therapeutic option for definitive correction of congenital heart disease. The aim of the study was to investigate the antigenic profile, expansion/differentiation capacity, paracrine activity, and pro-angiogenic potential of cardiac pericytes and to assess their engrafting capacity in clinically certified prosthetic grafts. Methods and Results CD34pos cells, negative for the endothelial markers CD31 and CD146, were identified by immunohistochemistry in cardiac leftovers from infants and children undergoing palliative repair of congenital cardiac defects. Following isolation by immunomagnetic bead-sorting and culture on plastic in EGM-2 medium supplemented with growth factors and serum, CD34pos/CD31neg cells gave rise to a clonogenic, highly proliferative (>20 million at P5), spindle-shape cell population. The following populations were shown to expresses pericyte/mesenchymal and stemness markers. After exposure to differentiation media, the expanded cardiac pericytes acquired markers of vascular smooth muscle cells, but failed to differentiate into endothelial cells or cardiomyocytes. However, in Matrigel, cardiac pericytes form networks and enhance the network capacity of endothelial cells. Moreover, they produce collagen-1 and release chemo-attractants that stimulate the migration of c-Kitpos cardiac stem cells. Cardiac pericytes were then seeded onto clinically approved xenograft scaffolds and cultured in a bioreactor. After 3 weeks, fluorescent microscopy showed that cardiac pericytes had penetrated into and colonized the graft. Conclusions These findings open new avenues for cellular functionalization of prosthetic grafts to be applied in reconstructive surgery of congenital heart disease. PMID:26080813

  5. Human Engineered Cardiac Tissues Created Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Reveal Functional Characteristics of BRAF-Mediated Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Bryce V.; Gelb, Bruce D.; Costa, Kevin D.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a leading cause of sudden cardiac death that often goes undetected in the general population. HCM is also prevalent in patients with cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFCS), which is a genetic disorder characterized by aberrant signaling in the RAS/MAPK signaling cascade. Understanding the mechanisms of HCM development in such RASopathies may lead to novel therapeutic strategies, but relevant experimental models of the human condition are lacking. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop the first 3D human engineered cardiac tissue (hECT) model of HCM. The hECTs were created using human cardiomyocytes obtained by directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a patient with CFCS due to an activating BRAF mutation. The mutant myocytes were directly conjugated at a 3:1 ratio with a stromal cell population to create a tissue of defined composition. Compared to healthy patient control hECTs, BRAF-hECTs displayed a hypertrophic phenotype by culture day 6, with significantly increased tissue size, twitch force, and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) gene expression. Twitch characteristics reflected increased contraction and relaxation rates and shorter twitch duration in BRAF-hECTs, which also had a significantly higher maximum capture rate and lower excitation threshold during electrical pacing, consistent with a more arrhythmogenic substrate. By culture day 11, twitch force was no longer different between BRAF and wild-type hECTs, revealing a temporal aspect of disease modeling with tissue engineering. Principal component analysis identified diastolic force as a key factor that changed from day 6 to day 11, supported by a higher passive stiffness in day 11 BRAF-hECTs. In summary, human engineered cardiac tissues created from BRAF mutant cells recapitulated, for the first time, key aspects of the HCM phenotype, offering a new in vitro model for studying intrinsic mechanisms and screening new

  6. Human Engineered Cardiac Tissues Created Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Reveal Functional Characteristics of BRAF-Mediated Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Timothy J; Josowitz, Rebecca; Johnson, Bryce V; Gelb, Bruce D; Costa, Kevin D

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a leading cause of sudden cardiac death that often goes undetected in the general population. HCM is also prevalent in patients with cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFCS), which is a genetic disorder characterized by aberrant signaling in the RAS/MAPK signaling cascade. Understanding the mechanisms of HCM development in such RASopathies may lead to novel therapeutic strategies, but relevant experimental models of the human condition are lacking. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop the first 3D human engineered cardiac tissue (hECT) model of HCM. The hECTs were created using human cardiomyocytes obtained by directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a patient with CFCS due to an activating BRAF mutation. The mutant myocytes were directly conjugated at a 3:1 ratio with a stromal cell population to create a tissue of defined composition. Compared to healthy patient control hECTs, BRAF-hECTs displayed a hypertrophic phenotype by culture day 6, with significantly increased tissue size, twitch force, and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) gene expression. Twitch characteristics reflected increased contraction and relaxation rates and shorter twitch duration in BRAF-hECTs, which also had a significantly higher maximum capture rate and lower excitation threshold during electrical pacing, consistent with a more arrhythmogenic substrate. By culture day 11, twitch force was no longer different between BRAF and wild-type hECTs, revealing a temporal aspect of disease modeling with tissue engineering. Principal component analysis identified diastolic force as a key factor that changed from day 6 to day 11, supported by a higher passive stiffness in day 11 BRAF-hECTs. In summary, human engineered cardiac tissues created from BRAF mutant cells recapitulated, for the first time, key aspects of the HCM phenotype, offering a new in vitro model for studying intrinsic mechanisms and screening new

  7. Advancing cardiovascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Truskey, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular tissue engineering offers the promise of biologically based repair of injured and damaged blood vessels, valves, and cardiac tissue. Major advances in cardiovascular tissue engineering over the past few years involve improved methods to promote the establishment and differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), scaffolds from decellularized tissue that may produce more highly differentiated tissues and advance clinical translation, improved methods to promote vascularization, and novel in vitro microphysiological systems to model normal and diseased tissue function. iPSC technology holds great promise, but robust methods are needed to further promote differentiation. Differentiation can be further enhanced with chemical, electrical, or mechanical stimuli. PMID:27303643

  8. "The state of the heart": Recent advances in engineering human cardiac tissue from pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sirabella, Dario; Cimetta, Elisa; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-08-01

    The pressing need for effective cell therapy for the heart has led to the investigation of suitable cell sources for tissue replacement. In recent years, human pluripotent stem cell research expanded tremendously, in particular since the derivation of human-induced pluripotent stem cells. In parallel, bioengineering technologies have led to novel approaches for in vitro cell culture. The combination of these two fields holds potential for in vitro generation of high-fidelity heart tissue, both for basic research and for therapeutic applications. However, this new multidisciplinary science is still at an early stage. Many questions need to be answered and improvements need to be made before clinical applications become a reality. Here we discuss the current status of human stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes and the combined use of bioengineering approaches for cardiac tissue formation and maturation in developmental studies, disease modeling, drug testing, and regenerative medicine. PMID:26069271

  9. Pre-treatment of synthetic elastomeric scaffolds by cardiac fibroblasts improves engineered heart tissue.

    PubMed

    Radisic, Milica; Park, Hyoungshin; Martens, Timothy P; Salazar-Lazaro, Johanna E; Geng, Wenliang; Wang, Yadong; Langer, Robert; Freed, Lisa E; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2008-09-01

    Native myocardium consists of several cell types, of which approximately one-third are myocytes and most of the nonmyocytes are fibroblasts. By analogy with monolayer culture in which fibroblasts were removed to prevent overgrowth, early attempts to engineer myocardium utilized cell populations enriched for cardiac myocytes (CMs; approximately 80-90% of total cells). We hypothesized that the pre-treatment of synthetic elastomeric scaffolds with cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) will enhance the functional assembly of the engineered cardiac constructs by creating an environment supportive of cardiomyocyte attachment and function. Cells isolated from neonatal rat ventricles were prepared to form three distinct populations: rapidly plating cells identified as CFs, slowly plating cells identified as CMs, and unseparated initial population of cells (US). The cell fractions (3 x 10(6) cells total) were seeded into poly(glycerol sebacate) scaffolds (highly porous discs, 5 mm in diameter x 2-mm thick) using Matrigeltrade mark, either separately (CM or CF), concurrently (US), or sequentially (CF pre-treatment followed by CM culture, CF + CM), and cultured in spinner flasks. The CF + CM group had the highest amplitude of contraction and the lowest excitation threshold, superior DNA content, and higher glucose consumption rate. The CF + CM group exhibited compact 100- to 200-mum thick layers of elongated myocytes aligned in parallel over layers of collagen-producing fibroblasts, while US and CM groups exhibited scattered and poorly elongated myocytes. The sequential co-culture of CF and CM on a synthetic elastomer scaffold thus created an environment supportive of cardiomyocyte attachment, differentiation, and contractile function, presumably due to scaffold conditioning by cultured fibroblasts. When implanted over the infarcted myocardium in a nude rat model, cell-free poly(glycerol sebacate) remained at the ventricular wall after 2 weeks of in vivo, and was vascularized. PMID

  10. Sulfated levan from Halomonas smyrnensis as a bioactive, heparin-mimetic glycan for cardiac tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Erginer, Merve; Akcay, Ayca; Coskunkan, Binnaz; Morova, Tunc; Rende, Deniz; Bucak, Seyda; Baysal, Nihat; Ozisik, Rahmi; Eroglu, Mehmet S; Agirbasli, Mehmet; Toksoy Oner, Ebru

    2016-09-20

    Chemical derivatives of levan from Halomonas smyrnensis AAD6(T) with low, medium and high levels of sulfation were synthesized and characterized by FTIR and 2D-NMR. Sulfated levan samples were found to exhibit anticoagulation activity via the intrinsic pathway like heparin in a dose-dependent manner. Exceptionally high heparin equivalent activity of levan sulfate was shown to proceed via thrombin inhibition where decreased Factor Xa activity with increasing concentration was observed in antithrombin tests and above a certain concentration, levan sulfate showed a better inhibitor activity than heparin. In vitro experimental results were then verified in silico by docking studies using equilibrium structures obtained by molecular dynamic simulations and results suggested a sulfation dependent binding mechanism. With its high biocompatibility and heparin mimetic activity, levan sulfate can be considered as a suitable functional biomaterial to design biologically active, functionalized, thin films and engineered smart scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering applications. PMID:27261753

  11. Cardiomyocytes In Vitro Adhesion Is Actively Influenced by Biomimetic Synthetic Peptides for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Huerta-Cantillo, Rocio; Comisso, Marina; Danesin, Roberta; Ghezzo, Francesca; Naso, Filippo; Gastaldello, Alessandra; Schittullo, Eleonora; Buratto, Edward; Spina, Michele; Gerosa, Gino; Dettin, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Scaffolds for tissue engineering must be designed to direct desired events such as cell attachment, growth, and differentiation. The incorporation of extracellular matrix-derived peptides into biomaterials has been proposed to mimic biochemical signals. In this study, three synthetic fragments of fibronectin, vitronectin, and stromal-derived factor-1 were investigated for the first time as potential adhesive sequences for cardiomyocytes (CMs) compared to smooth muscle cells. CMs are responsive to all peptides to differing degrees, demonstrating the existence of diverse adhesion mechanisms. The pretreatment of nontissue culture well surfaces with the (Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic Acid) RGD sequence anticipated the appearance of CMs' contractility compared to the control (fibronectin-coated well) and doubled the length of cell viability. Future prospects are the inclusion of these sequences into biomaterial formulation with the improvement in cell adhesion that could play an important role in cell retention during dynamic cell seeding. PMID:22011064

  12. Electrospun type 1 collagen matrices preserving native ultrastructure using benign binary solvent for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Elamparithi, Anuradha; Punnoose, Alan M; Kuruvilla, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    Electrospinning is a well-established technique that uses a high electric field to fabricate ultrafine fibrous scaffolds from both natural and synthetic polymers to mimic the cellular microenvironment. Collagen is one of the most preferred biopolymers, due to its widespread occurrence in nature and its biocompatibility. Electrospinning of collagen alone has been reported, with fluoroalcohols such as hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) and trifluoroethanol (TFE), but the resultant collagen lost its characteristic ultrastructural integrity of D-periodicity 67 nm banding, confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the fluoroalcohols used were toxic to the environment. In this study, we describe the use of glacial acetic acid and DMSO to dissolve collagen and generate electrospun nanofibers of collagen type 1, which is non-toxic and economical. TEM analysis revealed the characteristic feature of native collagen triple helical repeats, showing 67 nm D-periodicity banding pattern and confirming that the ultrastructural integrity of the collagen was maintained. Analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed fiber diameters in the range of 200-1100 nm. Biocompatibility of the three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds was established by MTT assays using rat skeletal myoblasts (L6 cell line) and confocal microscopic analysis of immunofluorescent-stained sections of collagen scaffolds for muscle-specific markers such as desmin and actin. Primary neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRVCM) seeded onto the collagen scaffolds were able to maintain their contractile function for a period of 17 days and also expressed higher levels of desmin when compared with 2D cultures. We report for the first time that collagen type 1 can be electrospun without blending with copolymers using the novel benign solvent combination, and the method can be potentially explored for applications in tissue engineering. PMID:25960178

  13. Tissue engineering the cardiac microenvironment: Multicellular microphysiological systems for drug screening☆

    PubMed Central

    Kurokawa, Yosuke K.; George, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to accurately detect cardiotoxicity has become increasingly important in the development of new drugs. Since the advent of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, researchers have explored their use in creating an in vitro drug screening platform. Recently, there has been increasing interest in creating 3D microphysiological models of the heart as a tool to detect cardiotoxic compounds. By recapitulating the complex microenvironment that exists in the native heart, cardiac microphysiological systems have the potential to provide a more accurate pharmacological response compared to current standards in preclinical drug screening. This review aims to provide an overview on the progress made in creating advanced models of the human heart, including the significance and contributions of the various cellular and extracellular components to cardiac function. PMID:26212156

  14. Poly(Glycerol Sebacate)/Poly(Butylene Succinate-Butylene Dilinoleate) Fibrous Scaffolds for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tallawi, Marwa; Zebrowski, David C.; Rai, Ranjana; Roether, Judith A.; Schubert, Dirk W.; El Fray, Miroslawa; Aifantis, Katerina E.

    2015-01-01

    The present article investigates the use of a novel electrospun fibrous blend of poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) and poly(butylene succinate-butylene dilinoleate) (PBS-DLA) as a candidate for cardiac tissue engineering. Random electrospun fibers with various PGS/PBS-DLA compositions (70/30, 60/40, 50/50, and 0/100) were fabricated. To examine the suitability of these fiber blends for heart patches, their morphology, as well as their physical, chemical, and mechanical properties were measured before examining their biocompatibility through cell adhesion. The fabricated fibers were bead-free and exhibited a relatively narrow diameter distribution. The addition of PBS-DLA to PGS resulted in an increase of the average fiber diameter, whereas increasing the amount of PBS-DLA decreased the hydrophilicity and the water uptake of the nanofibrous scaffolds to values that approached those of neat PBS-DLA nanofibers. Moreover, the addition of PBS-DLA significantly increased the elastic modulus. Initial toxicity studies with C2C12 myoblast cells up to 72 h confirmed nontoxic behavior of the blends. Immunofluorescence analyses and scanning electron microscopy analyses confirmed that C2C12 cells showed better cell attachment and proliferation on electrospun mats with higher PBS-DLA content. However, immunofluorescence analyses of the 3-day-old rat cardiomyocytes cultured for 2 and 5 days demonstrated better attachment on the 70/30 fibers containing well-aligned sarcomeres and expressing high amounts of connexin 43 in cellular junctions indicating efficient cell-to-cell communication. It can be concluded, therefore, that fibrous PGS/PBS-DLA scaffolds exhibit promising characteristics as a biomaterial for cardiac patch applications. PMID:25439964

  15. Poly(glycerol sebacate)/poly(butylene succinate-butylene dilinoleate) fibrous scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tallawi, Marwa; Zebrowski, David C; Rai, Ranjana; Roether, Judith A; Schubert, Dirk W; El Fray, Miroslawa; Engel, Felix B; Aifantis, Katerina E; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2015-06-01

    The present article investigates the use of a novel electrospun fibrous blend of poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) and poly(butylene succinate-butylene dilinoleate) (PBS-DLA) as a candidate for cardiac tissue engineering. Random electrospun fibers with various PGS/PBS-DLA compositions (70/30, 60/40, 50/50, and 0/100) were fabricated. To examine the suitability of these fiber blends for heart patches, their morphology, as well as their physical, chemical, and mechanical properties were measured before examining their biocompatibility through cell adhesion. The fabricated fibers were bead-free and exhibited a relatively narrow diameter distribution. The addition of PBS-DLA to PGS resulted in an increase of the average fiber diameter, whereas increasing the amount of PBS-DLA decreased the hydrophilicity and the water uptake of the nanofibrous scaffolds to values that approached those of neat PBS-DLA nanofibers. Moreover, the addition of PBS-DLA significantly increased the elastic modulus. Initial toxicity studies with C2C12 myoblast cells up to 72 h confirmed nontoxic behavior of the blends. Immunofluorescence analyses and scanning electron microscopy analyses confirmed that C2C12 cells showed better cell attachment and proliferation on electrospun mats with higher PBS-DLA content. However, immunofluorescence analyses of the 3-day-old rat cardiomyocytes cultured for 2 and 5 days demonstrated better attachment on the 70/30 fibers containing well-aligned sarcomeres and expressing high amounts of connexin 43 in cellular junctions indicating efficient cell-to-cell communication. It can be concluded, therefore, that fibrous PGS/PBS-DLA scaffolds exhibit promising characteristics as a biomaterial for cardiac patch applications. PMID:25439964

  16. Insulin-like growth factor-I and slow, bi-directional perfusion enhance the formation of tissue-engineered cardiac grafts.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mingyu; Moretti, Matteo; Engelmayr, George C; Freed, Lisa E

    2009-03-01

    Biochemical and mechanical signals enabling cardiac regeneration can be elucidated using in vitro tissue-engineering models. We hypothesized that insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF) and slow, bi-directional perfusion could act independently and interactively to enhance the survival, differentiation, and contractile performance of tissue-engineered cardiac grafts. Heart cells were cultured on three-dimensional porous scaffolds in medium with or without supplemental IGF and in the presence or absence of slow, bi-directional perfusion that enhanced transport and provided shear stress. Structural, molecular, and electrophysiologic properties of the resulting grafts were quantified on culture day 8. IGF had independent, beneficial effects on apoptosis (p < 0.01), cellular viability (p < 0.01), contractile amplitude (p < 0.01), and excitation threshold (p < 0.01). Perfusion independently affected the four aforementioned parameters and also increased amounts of cardiac troponin-I (p < 0.01), connexin-43 (p < 0.05), and total protein (p < 0.01) in the grafts. Interactive effects of IGF and perfusion on apoptosis were also present (p < 0.01). Myofibrillogenesis and spontaneous contractility were present only in grafts cultured with perfusion, although contractility was inducible by electrical field stimulation of grafts from all groups. Our findings demonstrate that multi-factorial stimulation of tissue-engineered cardiac grafts using IGF and perfusion resulted in independent and interactive effects on heart cell survival, differentiation, and contractility. PMID:18759675

  17. Emergent Global Contractile Force in Cardiac Tissues.

    PubMed

    Knight, Meghan B; Drew, Nancy K; McCarthy, Linda A; Grosberg, Anna

    2016-04-12

    The heart is a complex organ whose structure and function are intricately linked at multiple length scales. Although several advancements have been achieved in the field of cardiac tissue engineering, current in vitro cardiac tissues do not fully replicate the structure or function necessary for effective cardiac therapy and cardiotoxicity studies. This is partially due to a deficiency in current understandings of cardiac tissue organization's potential downstream effects, such as changes in gene expression levels. We developed a novel (to our knowledge) in vitro tool that can be used to decouple and quantify the contribution of organization and associated downstream effects to tissue function. To do so, cardiac tissue monolayers were designed into a parquet pattern to be organized anisotropically on a local scale, within a parquet tile, and with any desired organization on a global scale. We hypothesized that if the downstream effects were muted, the relationship between developed force and tissue organization could be modeled as a sum of force vectors. With the in vitro experimental platforms of parquet tissues and heart-on-a-chip devices, we were able to prove this hypothesis for both systolic and diastolic stresses. Thus, insight was gained into the relationship between the generated stress and global myofibril organization. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the developed quantitative tool could be used to estimate the changes in stress production due to downstream effects decoupled from tissue architecture. This has the potential to elucidate properties coupled to tissue architecture, which change force production and pumping function in the diseased heart or stem cell-derived tissues. PMID:27074686

  18. Insulin-like Growth Factor-I and Slow, Bi-directional Perfusion Enhance the Formation of Tissue-Engineered Cardiac Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Mingyu; Moretti, Matteo; Engelmayr, George C.

    2009-01-01

    Biochemical and mechanical signals enabling cardiac regeneration can be elucidated using in vitro tissue-engineering models. We hypothesized that insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF) and slow, bi-directional perfusion could act independently and interactively to enhance the survival, differentiation, and contractile performance of tissue-engineered cardiac grafts. Heart cells were cultured on three-dimensional porous scaffolds in medium with or without supplemental IGF and in the presence or absence of slow, bi-directional perfusion that enhanced transport and provided shear stress. Structural, molecular, and electrophysiologic properties of the resulting grafts were quantified on culture day 8. IGF had independent, beneficial effects on apoptosis (p < 0.01), cellular viability (p < 0.01), contractile amplitude (p < 0.01), and excitation threshold (p < 0.01). Perfusion independently affected the four aforementioned parameters and also increased amounts of cardiac troponin-I (p < 0.01), connexin-43 (p < 0.05), and total protein (p < 0.01) in the grafts. Interactive effects of IGF and perfusion on apoptosis were also present (p < 0.01). Myofibrillogenesis and spontaneous contractility were present only in grafts cultured with perfusion, although contractility was inducible by electrical field stimulation of grafts from all groups. Our findings demonstrate that multi-factorial stimulation of tissue-engineered cardiac grafts using IGF and perfusion resulted in independent and interactive effects on heart cell survival, differentiation, and contractility. PMID:18759675

  19. “The state of the heart”: Recent advances in engineering human cardiac tissue from pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sirabella, Dario; Cimetta, Elisa; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    The pressing need for effective cell therapy for the heart has led to the investigation of suitable cell sources for tissue replacement. In recent years, human pluripotent stem cell research expanded tremendously, in particular since the derivation of human induced pluripotent stem cells. In parallel, bioengineering technologies have led to novel approaches for in vitro cell culture. The combination of these two fields holds potential for in vitro generation of high-fidelity heart tissue, both for basic research and for therapeutic applications. However, this new multidisciplinary science is still at an early stage. Many questions need to be answered and improvements need to be made before clinical applications become a reality. Here we discuss the current status of human stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes and the combined use of bioengineering approaches for cardiac tissue formation and maturation in developmental studies, disease modeling, drug testing and regenerative medicine. PMID:26069271

  20. Enabling microscale and nanoscale approaches for bioengineered cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Chan, Vincent; Raman, Ritu; Cvetkovic, Caroline; Bashir, Rashid

    2013-03-26

    In this issue of ACS Nano, Shin et al. present their finding that the addition of carbon nanotubes (CNT) in gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) results in improved functionality of bioengineered cardiac tissue. These CNT-GelMA hybrid materials demonstrate cardiac tissue with enhanced electrophysiological performance; improved mechanical integrity; better cell adhesion, viability, uniformity, and organization; increased beating rate and lowered excitation threshold; and protective effects against cardio-inhibitory and cardio-toxic drugs. In this Perspective, we outline recent progress in cardiac tissue engineering and prospects for future development. Bioengineered cardiac tissues can be used to build "heart-on-a-chip" devices for drug safety and efficacy testing, fabricate bioactuators for biointegrated robotics and reverse-engineered life forms, treat abnormal cardiac rhythms, and perhaps one day cure heart disease with tissue and organ transplants. PMID:23527748

  1. Engineered 3D bioimplants using elastomeric scaffold, self-assembling peptide hydrogel, and adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells for cardiac regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Soler-Botija, Carolina; Bagó, Juli R; Llucià-Valldeperas, Aida; Vallés-Lluch, Ana; Castells-Sala, Cristina; Martínez-Ramos, Cristina; Fernández-Muiños, Teresa; Chachques, Juan Carlos; Pradas, Manuel Monleón; Semino, Carlos E; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Contractile restoration of myocardial scars remains a challenge with important clinical implications. Here, a combination of porous elastomeric membrane, peptide hydrogel, and subcutaneous adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells (subATDPCs) was designed and evaluated as a bioimplant for cardiac regeneration in a mouse model of myocardial infarction. SubATDPCs were doubly transduced with lentiviral vectors to express bioluminescent-fluorescent reporters driven by constitutively active, cardiac tissue-specific promoters. Cells were seeded into an engineered bioimplant consisting of a scaffold (polycaprolactone methacryloyloxyethyl ester) filled with a peptide hydrogel (PuraMatrix™), and transplanted to cover injured myocardium. Bioluminescence and fluorescence quantifications showed de novo and progressive increases in promoter expression in bioactive implant-treated animals. The bioactive implant was well adapted to the heart, and fully functional vessels traversed the myocardium-bioactive implant interface. Treatment translated into a detectable positive effect on cardiac function, as revealed by echocardiography. Thus, this novel implant is a promising construct for supporting myocardial regeneration. PMID:24936221

  2. The myocardial regenerative potential of three-dimensional engineered cardiac tissues composed of multiple human iPS cell-derived cardiovascular cell lineages.

    PubMed

    Masumoto, Hidetoshi; Nakane, Takeichiro; Tinney, Joseph P; Yuan, Fangping; Ye, Fei; Kowalski, William J; Minakata, Kenji; Sakata, Ryuzo; Yamashita, Jun K; Keller, Bradley B

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are a robust source for cardiac regenerative therapy due to their potential to support autologous and allogeneic transplant paradigms. The in vitro generation of three-dimensional myocardial tissue constructs using biomaterials as an implantable hiPSC-derived myocardium provides a path to realize sustainable myocardial regeneration. We generated engineered cardiac tissues (ECTs) from three cellular compositions of cardiomyocytes (CMs), endothelial cells (ECs), and vascular mural cells (MCs) differentiated from hiPSCs. We then determined the impact of cell composition on ECT structural and functional properties. In vitro force measurement showed that CM+EC+MC ECTs possessed preferential electromechanical properties versus ECTs without vascular cells indicating that incorporation of vascular cells augmented tissue maturation and function. The inclusion of MCs facilitated more mature CM sarcomeric structure, preferential alignment, and activated multiple tissue maturation pathways. The CM+EC+MC ECTs implanted onto infarcted, immune tolerant rat hearts engrafted, displayed both host and graft-derived vasculature, and ameliorated myocardial dysfunction. Thus, a composition of CMs and multiple vascular lineages derived from hiPSCs and incorporated into ECTs promotes functional maturation and demonstrates myocardial replacement and perfusion relevant for clinical translation. PMID:27435115

  3. The myocardial regenerative potential of three-dimensional engineered cardiac tissues composed of multiple human iPS cell-derived cardiovascular cell lineages

    PubMed Central

    Masumoto, Hidetoshi; Nakane, Takeichiro; Tinney, Joseph P.; Yuan, Fangping; Ye, Fei; Kowalski, William J.; Minakata, Kenji; Sakata, Ryuzo; Yamashita, Jun K.; Keller, Bradley B.

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are a robust source for cardiac regenerative therapy due to their potential to support autologous and allogeneic transplant paradigms. The in vitro generation of three-dimensional myocardial tissue constructs using biomaterials as an implantable hiPSC-derived myocardium provides a path to realize sustainable myocardial regeneration. We generated engineered cardiac tissues (ECTs) from three cellular compositions of cardiomyocytes (CMs), endothelial cells (ECs), and vascular mural cells (MCs) differentiated from hiPSCs. We then determined the impact of cell composition on ECT structural and functional properties. In vitro force measurement showed that CM+EC+MC ECTs possessed preferential electromechanical properties versus ECTs without vascular cells indicating that incorporation of vascular cells augmented tissue maturation and function. The inclusion of MCs facilitated more mature CM sarcomeric structure, preferential alignment, and activated multiple tissue maturation pathways. The CM+EC+MC ECTs implanted onto infarcted, immune tolerant rat hearts engrafted, displayed both host and graft-derived vasculature, and ameliorated myocardial dysfunction. Thus, a composition of CMs and multiple vascular lineages derived from hiPSCs and incorporated into ECTs promotes functional maturation and demonstrates myocardial replacement and perfusion relevant for clinical translation. PMID:27435115

  4. Heart Regeneration with Engineered Myocardial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Vivek K.; Andreadis, Stelios T.; Murry, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and regenerative therapies that replace damaged myocardium could benefit millions of patients annually. The many cell types in the heart, including cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, pericytes, and cardiac fibroblasts, communicate via intercellular signaling and modulate each other’s function. Although much progress has been made in generating cells of the cardiovascular lineage from human pluripotent stem cells, a major challenge now is creating the tissue architecture to integrate a microvascular circulation and afferent arterioles into such an engineered tissue. Recent advances in cardiac and vascular tissue engineering will move us closer to the goal of generating functionally mature tissue. Using the biology of the myocardium as the foundation for designing engineered tissue and addressing the challenges to implantation and integration, we can bridge the gap from bench to bedside for a clinically tractable engineered cardiac tissue. PMID:24819474

  5. Fiber alignment and coculture with fibroblasts improves the differentiated phenotype of murine embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Parrag, Ian C; Zandstra, Peter W; Woodhouse, Kimberly A

    2012-03-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are an important source of cardiomyocytes for regenerating injured myocardium. The successful use of ESC-derived cardiomyocytes in cardiac tissue engineering requires an understanding of the important scaffold properties and culture conditions to promote cell attachment, differentiation, organization, and contractile function. The goal of this work was to investigate how scaffold architecture and coculture with fibroblasts influences the differentiated phenotype of murine ESC-derived cardiomyocytes (mESCDCs). Electrospinning was used to process an elastomeric biodegradable polyurethane (PU) into aligned or unaligned fibrous scaffolds. Bioreactor produced mESCDCs were seeded onto the PU scaffolds either on their own or after pre-seeding the scaffolds with mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Viable mESCDCs attached to the PU scaffolds and were functionally contractile in all conditions tested. Importantly, the aligned scaffolds led to the anisotropic organization of rod-shaped cells, improved sarcomere organization, and increased mESCDC aspect ratio (length-to-diameter ratio) when compared to cells on the unaligned scaffolds. In addition, pre-seeding the scaffolds with MEFs improved mESCDC sarcomere formation compared to mESCDCs cultured alone. These results suggest that both fiber alignment and pre-treatment of scaffolds with fibroblasts improve the differentiation of mESCDCs and are important parameters for developing engineered myocardial tissue constructs using ESC-derived cardiac cells. PMID:22006660

  6. Preparation of a porous conductive scaffold from aniline pentamer-modified polyurethane/PCL blend for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Baheiraei, Nafiseh; Yeganeh, Hamid; Ai, Jafar; Gharibi, Reza; Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Azami, Mahmoud; Vahdat, Sadaf; Baharvand, Hossein

    2015-10-01

    A novel biodegradable electroactive polyurethane containing aniline pentamer (AP) was blended with polycaprolactone (PCL). The prepared blend (PB) and PCL were further fabricated in to scaffolds using a mixture of poly(ethylene glycol) and salt particles in a double porogen particulate leaching and compression molding methodology. Scaffolds held open and interconnected pores having pore size ranging from several μm to 150 µm. PB scaffolds had compression modulus and strength of 4.1 and 1.3 MPa, respectively. The conductivity of the scaffold was measured as 10(-5) ± 0.09 S .cm(-1) and preserved for at least 100 h post fabrication. Scaffolds supported neonatal cardiomyocytes adhesion and growth with PB showing more extensive effect on the expression of the cardiac genes involved in muscle contraction and relaxation (troponin-T) and cytoskeleton alignment (actinin-4). Our results highlight the potential of incorporation of AP as an electroactive moiety for induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation and repair of damaged heart tissue. PMID:25765879

  7. Biomaterials in myocardial tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Lewis A.; Chiu, Loraine L. Y.; Feric, Nicole; Fu, Lara; Radisic, Milica

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the developed world, and as such there is a pressing need for treatment options. Cardiac tissue engineering emerged from the need to develop alternate sources and methods of replacing tissue damaged by cardiovascular diseases, as the ultimate treatment option for many who suffer from end-stage heart failure is a heart transplant. In this review we focus on biomaterial approaches to augment injured or impaired myocardium with specific emphasis on: the design criteria for these biomaterials; the types of scaffolds—composed of natural or synthetic biomaterials, or decellularized extracellular matrix—that have been used to develop cardiac patches and tissue models; methods to vascularize scaffolds and engineered tissue, and finally injectable biomaterials (hydrogels)designed for endogenous repair, exogenous repair or as bulking agents to maintain ventricular geometry post-infarct. The challenges facing the field and obstacles that must be overcome to develop truly clinically viable cardiac therapies are also discussed. PMID:25066525

  8. Elasticity of developing cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majkut, Stephanie; Swift, Joe; Krieger, Christine; Discher, Dennis

    2011-03-01

    Proper development and function of the heart from the tissue to cellular scale depends on a compliant ECM. Here we study the maturation of embryonic cardiac tissue mechanics in parallel with the effects of extracellular mechanics on individual cardiomyocyte function throughout early development. We used micropipette aspiration to measure local and bulk elastic moduli (E) of embryonic avian heart tissue from days 2-12. We observe stiffening of the early heart tube from E = 1 kPa at day 1 to E = 2 kPa at day 4, reaching neonatal values by day 12. Treating heart tubes with blebbistatin led to 30% decrease in E, indicating a significant but partial actomyosin contribution to mechanics at these stages. We performed a proteomic analysis of intact and decellularized 2-4 day heart tubes by mass spectrometry to quantify the ECM present at these stages. Isolated cardiomyocytes from 2-4 day chick embryos were cultured on collagen-coated PA gels of various stiffnesses. Beating magnitude was modulated by substrates with E = 1-2 kPa, similar to physiological E at those stages.

  9. Construction of cardiac tissue rings using a magnetic tissue fabrication technique.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Hirokazu; Ito, Akira; Sato, Masanori; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2010-01-01

    Here we applied a magnetic force-based tissue engineering technique to cardiac tissue fabrication. A mixture of extracellular matrix precursor and cardiomyocytes labeled with magnetic nanoparticles was added into a well containing a central polycarbonate cylinder. With the use of a magnet, the cells were attracted to the bottom of the well and allowed to form a cell layer. During cultivation, the cell layer shrank towards the cylinder, leading to the formation of a ring-shaped tissue that possessed a multilayered cell structure and contractile properties. These results indicate that magnetic tissue fabrication is a promising approach for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:21152282

  10. [Bone tissue engineering scaffolds].

    PubMed

    Fang, Liru; Weng, Wenjian; Shen, Ge; Han, Gaorong; Santos, J D; Du, Peiyi

    2003-03-01

    Bone tissue engineering may provide an alternative to the repairs to skeletal defects resulting from disease, trauma or surgery. Scaffold has played an important role in bone tissue engineering, which functions as the architecture for bone in growth. In this paper, the authors gave a brief introduction about the requirement of bone tissue engineering scaffold, the key of the design of scaffolds and the current research on this subject. PMID:12744187

  11. Engineering Complex Tissues

    PubMed Central

    MIKOS, ANTONIOS G.; HERRING, SUSAN W.; OCHAREON, PANNEE; ELISSEEFF, JENNIFER; LU, HELEN H.; KANDEL, RITA; SCHOEN, FREDERICK J.; TONER, MEHMET; MOONEY, DAVID; ATALA, ANTHONY; VAN DYKE, MARK E.; KAPLAN, DAVID; VUNJAK-NOVAKOVIC, GORDANA

    2010-01-01

    This article summarizes the views expressed at the third session of the workshop “Tissue Engineering—The Next Generation,” which was devoted to the engineering of complex tissue structures. Antonios Mikos described the engineering of complex oral and craniofacial tissues as a “guided interplay” between biomaterial scaffolds, growth factors, and local cell populations toward the restoration of the original architecture and function of complex tissues. Susan Herring, reviewing osteogenesis and vasculogenesis, explained that the vascular arrangement precedes and dictates the architecture of the new bone, and proposed that engineering of osseous tissues might benefit from preconstruction of an appropriate vasculature. Jennifer Elisseeff explored the formation of complex tissue structures based on the example of stratified cartilage engineered using stem cells and hydrogels. Helen Lu discussed engineering of tissue interfaces, a problem critical for biological fixation of tendons and ligaments, and the development of a new generation of fixation devices. Rita Kandel discussed the challenges related to the re-creation of the cartilage-bone interface, in the context of tissue engineered joint repair. Frederick Schoen emphasized, in the context of heart valve engineering, the need for including the requirements derived from “adult biology” of tissue remodeling and establishing reliable early predictors of success or failure of tissue engineered implants. Mehmet Toner presented a review of biopreservation techniques and stressed that a new breakthrough in this field may be necessary to meet all the needs of tissue engineering. David Mooney described systems providing temporal and spatial regulation of growth factor availability, which may find utility in virtually all tissue engineering and regeneration applications, including directed in vitro and in vivo vascularization of tissues. Anthony Atala offered a clinician’s perspective for functional tissue

  12. Tissue engineering therapy for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Helen M; Edelman, Elazer R

    2003-05-30

    The present treatments for the loss or failure of cardiovascular function include organ transplantation, surgical reconstruction, mechanical or synthetic devices, or the administration of metabolic products. Although routinely used, these treatments are not without constraints and complications. The emerging and interdisciplinary field of tissue engineering has evolved to provide solutions to tissue creation and repair. Tissue engineering applies the principles of engineering, material science, and biology toward the development of biological substitutes that restore, maintain, or improve tissue function. Progress has been made in engineering the various components of the cardiovascular system, including blood vessels, heart valves, and cardiac muscle. Many pivotal studies have been performed in recent years that may support the move toward the widespread application of tissue-engineered therapy for cardiovascular diseases. The studies discussed include endothelial cell seeding of vascular grafts, tissue-engineered vascular conduits, generation of heart valve leaflets, cardiomyoplasty, genetic manipulation, and in vitro conditions for optimizing tissue-engineered cardiovascular constructs. PMID:12775655

  13. Synthesis, characterization and antioxidant activity of a novel electroactive and biodegradable polyurethane for cardiac tissue engineering application.

    PubMed

    Baheiraei, Nafiseh; Yeganeh, Hamid; Ai, Jafar; Gharibi, Reza; Azami, Mahmoud; Faghihi, Faezeh

    2014-11-01

    There has been a growing trend towards applying conducting polymers for electrically excitable cells to increase electrical signal propagation within the cell-loaded substrates. A novel biodegradable electroactive polyurethane containing aniline pentamer (AP-PU) was synthesized and fully characterized by spectroscopic methods. To tune the physico-chemical properties and biocompatibility, the AP-PU was blended with polycaprolactone (PCL). The presence of electroactive moieties and the electroactivity behavior of the prepared films were confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. A conventional four probe analysis demonstrated the electrical conductivity of the films in the semiconductor range (~10(-5)S/cm). MTT assays using L929 mouse fibroblast and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) showed that the prepared blend (PB) displayed more cytocompatibility compared with AP-PU due to the introduction of a biocompatible PCL moiety. The in vitro cell culture also confirmed that PB was as supportive as tissue culture plate. The antioxidant activity of the AP-PU was proved using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging assay by employing UV-vis spectroscopy. In vitro degradation tests conducted in phosphate-buffered saline, pH7.4 and pH5.5, proved that the films were also biodegradable. The results of this study have highlighted the potential application of this bioelectroactive polyurethane as a platform substrate to study the effect of electrical signals on cell activities and to direct desirable cell function for tissue engineering applications. PMID:25280676

  14. Pharmacologically active microcarriers associated with thermosensitive hydrogel as a growth factor releasing biomimetic 3D scaffold for cardiac tissue-engineering.

    PubMed

    Karam, Jean-Pierre; Muscari, Claudio; Sindji, Laurence; Bastiat, Guillaume; Bonafè, Francesca; Venier-Julienne, Marie-Claire; Montero-Menei, N Claudia

    2014-10-28

    The challenge of tissue engineering of the infarcted heart is how to improve stem cell engraftment, survival, homing, and differentiation for myocardial repair. We here propose to integrate human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and pharmacologically active microcarriers (PAMs), a three-dimensional (3D) carrier of cells and growth factors, into an injectable hydrogel (HG), to obtain a system that stimulates the survival and/or differentiation of the grafted cells toward a cardiac phenotype. PAMs are biodegradable and non-cytotoxic poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres conveying cells on their 3D surface that deliver continuously and in a controlled manner a growth factor (GF) acting on the transported cells and on the microenvironment to improve engraftment. The choice of the appropriate GF and its protection during the formulation process and delivery are essential. In this study two GFs, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), have been encapsulated under a solid state in order to limit their interaction with the polymer and conserve their integrity. GF precipitation conditions and release profile from PAMs have been first investigated before combining them to ADSCs. The released IGF-1 and HGF induced the protein synthesis of cardiac differentiation markers GATA4, Nkx2.5, cTnI and CX43 after 1week in vitro. Moreover, the GFs accelerated cell cycle progression, as suggested by the increased expression of Cyclin D1 mRNA and the widespread distribution of Ki67 protein. Integrating PAMs within the thermosensitive P407 hydrogel increased their elastic properties but decreased the transcription of most cardiac markers. In contrast, CX43 expression increased in ADSC-PAM-GF complexes embedded within the hydrogel compared to the ADSCs cultured alone in the absence of P407. These results suggest that particulate scaffolds releasing HGF and IGF-1 may be beneficial for applications in tissue-engineering strategies for myocardial

  15. Evaluation of a tissue-engineered bovine pericardial patch in paediatric patients with congenital cardiac anomalies: initial experience with the ADAPT-treated CardioCel® patch

    PubMed Central

    Neethling, William M.L.; Strange, Geoff; Firth, Laura; Smit, Francis E.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study evaluated the safety, efficacy and clinical performance of the tissue-engineered ADAPT® bovine pericardial patch (ABPP) in paediatric patients with a range of congenital cardiac anomalies. METHODS In this single-centre, prospective, non-randomized clinical study, paediatric patients underwent surgery for insertion of the ABPP. Primary efficacy measures included early (<30 day) morbidity; incidence of device-related complications; haemodynamic performance derived from echocardiography assessment at 6- and 12-month follow-up and magnetic resonance imaging findings in 10 randomly selected patients at 12 months. Secondary measures included device-handling characteristics; shape and sizing characteristics and perioperative implant complications. The Aristotle complexity scoring system was used to score the complexity level of all surgical procedures. Patients completing the 12-month study were eligible to enter a long-term evaluation study. RESULTS Between April 2008 and September 2009, the ABPP was used in 30 paediatric patients. In the 30-day postoperative period, no graft-related morbidity was observed. In total, there were 5 deaths (2 in the 30-day postoperative period and 3 within the first 6 postoperative months). All deaths were deemed due to comorbid non-graft-related events. Echocardiography assessment at 6 and 12 months revealed intact anatomical and haemodynamically stable repairs without any visible calcification of the patch. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment in 10 patients at 12 months revealed no signs of calcification. Fisher's exact test demonstrated that patients undergoing more complex, higher risk surgical repairs (Aristotle complexity score >8) were significantly more likely to die (P = 0.0055, 58% survival compared with 100% survival for less complex surgical repairs). In 19 patients, echocardiographic data were available at 18–36 months with no evidence of device calcification, infection, thromboembolic events or

  16. Tissue engineered periodontal products.

    PubMed

    Bartold, P M; Gronthos, S; Ivanovski, S; Fisher, A; Hutmacher, D W

    2016-02-01

    Attainment of periodontal regeneration is a significant clinical goal in the management of advanced periodontal defects arising from periodontitis. Over the past 30 years numerous techniques and materials have been introduced and evaluated clinically and have included guided tissue regeneration, bone grafting materials, growth and other biological factors and gene therapy. With the exception of gene therapy, all have undergone evaluation in humans. All of the products have shown efficacy in promoting periodontal regeneration in animal models but the results in humans remain variable and equivocal concerning attaining complete biological regeneration of damaged periodontal structures. In the early 2000s, the concept of tissue engineering was proposed as a new paradigm for periodontal regeneration based on molecular and cell biology. At this time, tissue engineering was a new and emerging field. Now, 14 years later we revisit the concept of tissue engineering for the periodontium and assess how far we have come, where we are currently situated and what needs to be done in the future to make this concept a reality. In this review, we cover some of the precursor products, which led to our current position in periodontal tissue engineering. The basic concepts of tissue engineering with special emphasis on periodontal tissue engineering products is discussed including the use of mesenchymal stem cells in bioscaffolds and the emerging field of cell sheet technology. Finally, we look into the future to consider what CAD/CAM technology and nanotechnology will have to offer. PMID:25900048

  17. DENTAL PULP TISSUE ENGINEERING

    PubMed Central

    Demarco, FF; Conde, MCM; Cavalcanti, B; Casagrande, L; Sakai, V; Nör, JE

    2013-01-01

    Dental pulp is a highly specialized mesenchymal tissue, which have a restrict regeneration capacity due to anatomical arrangement and post-mitotic nature of odontoblastic cells. Entire pulp amputation followed by pulp-space disinfection and filling with an artificial material cause loss of a significant amount of dentin leaving as life-lasting sequelae a non-vital and weakened tooth. However, regenerative endodontics is an emerging field of modern tissue engineering that demonstrated promising results using stem cells associated with scaffolds and responsive molecules. Thereby, this article will review the most recent endeavors to regenerate pulp tissue based on tissue engineering principles and providing insightful information to readers about the different aspects enrolled in tissue engineering. Here, we speculate that the search for the ideal combination of cells, scaffolds, and morphogenic factors for dental pulp tissue engineering may be extended over future years and result in significant advances in other areas of dental and craniofacial research. The finds collected in our review showed that we are now at a stage in which engineering a complex tissue, such as the dental pulp, is no longer an unachievable and the next decade will certainly be an exciting time for dental and craniofacial research. PMID:21519641

  18. Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Esther J.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterials serve as an integral component of tissue engineering. They are designed to provide architectural framework reminiscent of native extracellular matrix in order to encourage cell growth and eventual tissue regeneration. Bone and cartilage represent two distinct tissues with varying compositional and mechanical properties. Despite these differences, both meet at the osteochondral interface. This article presents an overview of current biomaterials employed in bone and cartilage applications, discusses some design considerations, and alludes to future prospects within this field of research. PMID:23820768

  19. Three Dimension Filamentous Human Cardiac Tissue Model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhen; Koo, Sangmo; Finnegan, Micaela A.; Loskill, Peter; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Marks, Natalie C.; Conklin, Bruce R.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2013-01-01

    A human in vitro cardiac tissue model would be a significant advancement for understanding, studying, and developing new strategies for treating cardiac arrhythmias and related cardiovascular diseases. We developed an in vitro model of three-dimensional (3D) human cardiac tissue by populating synthetic filamentous matrices with cardiomyocytes derived from healthy wild-type volunteer (WT) and patient-specific long QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3) induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS-CMs) to mimic the condensed and aligned human ventricular myocardium. Using such a highly controllable cardiac model, we studied the contractility malfunctions associated with the electrophysiological consequences of LQT3 and their response to a panel of drugs. By varying the stiffness of filamentous matrices, LQT3 iPS-CMs exhibited different level of contractility abnormality and susceptibility to drug-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:24268663

  20. Neovascularization in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jennifer C.-Y.; Shum-Tim, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    A prerequisite for successful tissue engineering is adequate vascularization that would allow tissue engineering constructs to survive and grow. Angiogenic growth factors, alone and in combination, have been used to achieve this, and gene therapy has been used as a tool to enable sustained release of these angiogenic proteins. Cell-based therapy using endothelial cells and their precursors presents an alternative approach to tackling this challenge. These studies have occurred on a background of advancements in scaffold design and assays for assessing neovascularization. Finally, several studies have already attempted to translate research in neovascularization to clinical use in the blossoming field of therapeutic angiogenesis. PMID:24710553

  1. Self-organization of rat cardiac cells into contractile 3-D cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Baar, Keith; Birla, Ravi; Boluyt, Marvin O; Borschel, Gregory H; Arruda, Ellen M; Dennis, Robert G

    2005-02-01

    The mammalian heart is not known to regenerate following injury. Therefore, there is great interest in developing viable tissue-based models for cardiac assist. Recent years have brought numerous advances in the development of scaffold-based models of cardiac tissue, but a self-organizing model has yet to be described. Here, we report the development of an in vitro cardiac tissue without scaffolding materials in the contractile region. Using an optimal concentration of the adhesion molecule laminin, a confluent layer of neonatal rat cardiomyogenic cells can be induced to self-organize into a cylindrical construct, resembling a papillary muscle, which we have termed a cardioid. Like endogenous heart tissue, cardioids contract spontaneously and can be electrically paced between 1 and 5 Hz indefinitely without fatigue. These engineered cardiac tissues also show an increased rate of spontaneous contraction (chronotropy), increased rate of relaxation (lusitropy), and increased force production (inotropy) in response to epinephrine. Cardioids have a developmental protein phenotype that expresses both alpha- and beta-tropomyosin, very low levels of SERCA2a, and very little of the mature isoform of cardiac troponin T. PMID:15574489

  2. Neoproteoglycans in tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Weyers, Amanda; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Proteoglycans, comprised of a core protein to which glycosaminoglycan chains are covalently linked, are an important structural and functional family of macromolecules found in the extracellular matrix. Advances in our understanding of biological interactions have lead to a greater appreciation for the need to design tissue engineering scaffolds that incorporate mimetics of key extracellular matrix components. A variety of synthetic and semisynthetic molecules and polymers have been examined by tissue engineers that serve as structural, chemical and biological replacements for proteoglycans. These proteoglycan mimetics have been referred to as neoproteoglycans and serve as functional and therapeutic replacements for natural proteoglycans that are often unavailable for tissue engineering studies. Although neoproteoglycans have important limitations, such as limited signaling ability and biocompatibility, they have shown promise in replacing the natural activity of proteoglycans through cell and protein binding interactions. This review focuses on the recent in vivo and in vitro tissue engineering applications of three basic types of neoproteoglycan structures, protein–glycosaminoglycan conjugates, nano-glycosaminoglycan composites and polymer–glycosaminoglycan complexes. PMID:23399318

  3. Cardiac Cell Culture Model (CCCM) as a Left Ventricle Mimic for Cardiac Tissue Generation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Mai-Dung; Tinney, Joseph P.; Yuan, Fangping; Roussel, Thomas J.; El-Baz, Ayman; Giridharan, Guruprasad; Keller, Bradley B.; Sethu, Palaniappan

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in cardiac tissue engineering is the delivery of hemodynamic mechanical cues that play a critical role in the early development and maturation of cardiomyocytes. Generation of functional cardiac tissue capable of replacing or augmenting cardiac function therefore requires physiologically relevant environments that can deliver complex mechanical cues for cardiomyocyte functional maturation. The goal of this work is the development and validation of a cardiac cell culture model (CCCM) microenvironment that accurately mimics pressure-volume changes seen in the left ventricle and to use this system to achieve cardiac cell maturation under conditions where mechanical loads such as pressure and stretch are gradually increased from the unloaded state to conditions seen in vivo. The CCCM platform, consisting of a cell culture chamber integrated within a flow loop was created to accomplish culture of 10 day chick embryonic ventricular cardiomyocytes subject to 4 days of stimulation (10 mm Hg, ~13% stretch at a frequency of 2 Hz). Results clearly show that CCCM conditioned cardiomyocytes accelerate cardiomyocyte structural and functional maturation in comparison to static unloaded controls as evidenced by increased proliferation, alignment of actin cytoskeleton, bundle-like sarcomeric α-actinin expression, higher pacing beat rate at lower threshold voltages and increased shortening. These results confirm the CCCM microenvironment can accelerate immature cardiac cell structural and functional maturation for potential cardiac regenerative applications. PMID:23952579

  4. Biomaterials in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hubbell, J A

    1995-06-01

    Biomaterials play a pivotal role in field of tissue engineering. Biomimetic synthetic polymers have been created to elicit specific cellular functions and to direct cell-cell interactions both in implants that are initially cell-free, which may serve as matrices to conduct tissue regeneration, and in implants to support cell transplantation. Biomimetic approaches have been based on polymers endowed with bioadhesive receptor-binding peptides and mono- and oligosaccharides. These materials have been patterned in two- and three-dimensions to generate model multicellular tissue architectures, and this approach may be useful in future efforts to generate complex organizations of multiple cell types. Natural polymers have also played an important role in these efforts, and recombinant polymers that combine the beneficial aspects of natural polymers with many of the desirable features of synthetic polymers have been designed and produced. Biomaterials have been employed to conduct and accelerate otherwise naturally occurring phenomena, such as tissue regeneration in wound healing in the otherwise healthy subject; to induce cellular responses that might not be normally present, such as healing in a diseased subject or the generation of a new vascular bed to receive a subsequent cell transplant; and to block natural phenomena, such as the immune rejection of cell transplants from other species or the transmission of growth factor signals that stimulate scar formation. This review introduces the biomaterials and describes their application in the engineering of new tissues and the manipulation of tissue responses. PMID:9634795

  5. An evaluation of Admedus' tissue engineering process-treated (ADAPT) bovine pericardium patch (CardioCel) for the repair of cardiac and vascular defects.

    PubMed

    Strange, Geoff; Brizard, Christian; Karl, Tom R; Neethling, Leon

    2015-03-01

    Tissue engineers have been seeking the 'Holy Grail' solution to calcification and cytotoxicity of implanted tissue for decades. Tissues with all of the desired qualities for surgical repair of congenital heart disease (CHD) are lacking. An anti-calcification tissue engineering process (ADAPT TEP) has been developed and applied to bovine pericardium (BP) tissue (CardioCel, AdmedusRegen Pty Ltd, Perth, WA, Australia) to eliminate cytotoxicity, improve resistance to acute and chronic inflammation, reduce calcification and facilitate controlled tissue remodeling. Clinical data in pediatric patients, and additional pre-market authorized prescriber data demonstrate that CardioCel performs extremely well in the short term and is safe and effective for a range of congenital heart deformations. These data are supported by animal studies which have shown no more than normal physiologic levels of calcification, with good durability, biocompatibility and controlled healing. PMID:25431988

  6. Stereolithography in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Skoog, Shelby A; Goering, Peter L; Narayan, Roger J

    2014-03-01

    Several recent research efforts have focused on use of computer-aided additive fabrication technologies, commonly referred to as additive manufacturing, rapid prototyping, solid freeform fabrication, or three-dimensional printing technologies, to create structures for tissue engineering. For example, scaffolds for tissue engineering may be processed using rapid prototyping technologies, which serve as matrices for cell ingrowth, vascularization, as well as transport of nutrients and waste. Stereolithography is a photopolymerization-based rapid prototyping technology that involves computer-driven and spatially controlled irradiation of liquid resin. This technology enables structures with precise microscale features to be prepared directly from a computer model. In this review, use of stereolithography for processing trimethylene carbonate, polycaprolactone, and poly(D,L-lactide) poly(propylene fumarate)-based materials is considered. In addition, incorporation of bioceramic fillers for fabrication of bioceramic scaffolds is reviewed. Use of stereolithography for processing of patient-specific implantable scaffolds is also discussed. In addition, use of photopolymerization-based rapid prototyping technology, known as two-photon polymerization, for production of tissue engineering scaffolds with smaller features than conventional stereolithography technology is considered. PMID:24306145

  7. Models of defibrillation of cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krinsky, V.; Pumir, A.

    1998-03-01

    Heterogeneities, such as gap junctions, defects in periodical cellular lattices, intercellular clefts and fiber curvature allow one to understand the effect of an electric field in cardiac tissue. They induce membrane potential variations even in the bulk of the myocardium, with a characteristic sawtooth shape. The sawtooth potential, induced by heterogeneities at large scales (tissue strands) can be more easily observed, and lead to stronger effects than the one induced at the cellular level. In the generic model of propagation in cardiac tissue (FitzHugh), 4 mechanisms of defibrillation were found, two mechanisms based on excitation (EA,EM), and two—on de-excitation (DA,DM). The lowest electric field is required by an EM mechanism. In the Beeler-Reuter ionic model, mechanism DM is impossible. We critically review the experimental basis of the theory and propose new experiments.

  8. Biomechanics of engineered heart valve tissues.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Michael S

    2006-01-01

    The vast majority of prosthetic valve designs are either mechanical prosthesis and bioprosthetic heart valves (BHV). Mechanical prostheses are fabricated from synthetic materials, mainly pyrolytic carbon leaflets mounted in a titanium frame. Tissue engineering (TE) offers the potential to create cardiac replacement structures containing living cells, which has the potential for growth and remodeling, overcoming the limitations of current pediatric heart valve devices. The purpose of this paper is to present a review of the structure-strength relationships for native and engineered heart valve tissues. PMID:17946864

  9. Osteochondral tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ivan; Miot, Sylvie; Barbero, Andrea; Jakob, Marcel; Wendt, David

    2007-01-01

    Osteochondral defects (i.e., defects which affect both the articular cartilage and underlying subchondral bone) are often associated with mechanical instability of the joint, and therefore with the risk of inducing osteoarthritic degenerative changes. Current surgical limits in the treatment of complex joint lesions could be overcome by grafting osteochondral composite tissues, engineered by combining the patient's own cells with three-dimensional (3D) porous biomaterials of pre-defined size and shape. Various strategies have been reported for the engineering of osteochondral composites, which result from the use of one or more cell types cultured into single-component or composite scaffolds in a broad spectrum of compositions and biomechanical properties. The variety of concepts and models proposed by different groups for the generation of osteochondral grafts reflects that understanding of the requirements to restore a normal joint function is still poor. In order to introduce the use of engineered osteochondral composites in the routine clinical practice, it will be necessary to comprehensively address a number of critical issues, including those related to the size and shape of the graft to be generated, the cell type(s) and properties of the scaffold(s) to be used, the potential physical conditioning to be applied, the degree of functionality required, and the strategy for a cost-effective manufacturing. The progress made in material science, cell biology, mechanobiology and bioreactor technology will be key to support advances in this challenging field. PMID:16730354

  10. Lung tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hoganson, David M; Bassett, Erik K; Vacanti, Joseph P

    2014-01-01

    Lung tissue engineering is an emerging field focused on the development of lung replacement devices and tissue to treat patients with end stage lung disease. Microfluidic based lung assist devices have been developed that have biomimetically designed vascular networks that achieve physiologic blood flow. Gas exchange in these devices occurs across a thin respiratory membrane. Designed for intrathoracic implantation as a bridge to transplant or destination therapy, these lung assist devices will allow ambulation and hospital discharge for patients with end stage lung disease. Decellularized lungs subsequently recellularized with epithelial and endothelial cells have been implanted in small animal models with demonstration of initial gas exchange. Further development of these tissues and scaling to large animal models will validate this approach and may be an organ source for lung transplantation. Initial clinical success has been achieved with decellularized tracheal implants using autologous stem cells. Development of microfluidic lung models using similar architecture to the lung assist device technology allows study of lung biology and diseases with manipulation of lung cells and respiratory membrane strain. PMID:24896347

  11. Functional engineered human cardiac patches prepared from nature's platform improve heart function after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingjie; Yang, Hui; Bai, Aobing; Jiang, Wei; Li, Xiuya; Wang, Xinhong; Mao, Yishen; Lu, Chao; Qian, Ruizhe; Guo, Feng; Ding, Tianling; Chen, Haiyan; Chen, Sifeng; Zhang, Jianyi; Liu, Chen; Sun, Ning

    2016-10-01

    With the advent of induced pluripotent stem cells and directed differentiation techniques, it is now feasible to derive individual-specific cardiac cells for human heart tissue engineering. Here we report the generation of functional engineered human cardiac patches using human induced pluripotent stem cells-derived cardiac cells and decellularized natural heart ECM as scaffolds. The engineered human cardiac patches can be tailored to any desired size and shape and exhibited normal contractile and electrical physiology in vitro. Further, when patching on the infarct area, these patches improved heart function of rats with acute myocardial infarction in vivo. These engineered human cardiac patches can be of great value for normal and disease-specific heart tissue engineering, drug screening, and meet the demands for individual-specific heart tissues for personalized regenerative therapy of myocardial damages in the future. PMID:27509303

  12. Stem cells used for cardiovascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Siepe, Matthias; Akhyari, Payam; Lichtenberg, Artur; Schlensak, Christian; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm

    2008-08-01

    Stem cell research and tissue engineering have become leading fields in basic research worldwide. Especially in cardiovascular medicine, initial reports on the potential of using stem cells to recover cardiac function and replace organ subunits such as heart valves seemed to offer the promise of widespread clinical use in the near future. However, the broad application of this new therapy failed due to safety and efficacy concerns. Due in part to the initial reports, major basic research efforts were undertaken to explore the specific cell types in greater detail and identify their mechanisms of supporting function, resulting in remarkable new findings in stem cell biology. For example, the notion of resident human cardiac stem cells has disproved the earlier supposition that the human heart is a finitely differentiated organ without the intrinsic potential for regeneration. Furthermore, new technologies emerged to produce pluripotent cells without the ethical and immunological drawbacks of embryonic stem cells (for instance by nuclear transfer). Other autologous cell sources are presently under investigation in myocardial tissue engineering. For tissue engineering of heart valves and small calibre vessels, the use of autologous endothelial (precursor) cells may be the optimal means of seeding a biological or artificial scaffold. It is important that ongoing basic and clinical research in cardiovascular surgery might explore the potential of different cell types either using tissue engineering constructs or in cell transplantation approaches. PMID:18468449

  13. Material-based engineering strategies for cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Marion, Mieke H van; Bax, Noortje A M; Spreeuwel, Ariane C C van; van der Schaft, Daisy W J; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tissue is composed of muscle and non-muscle cells, surrounded by extracellular matrix (ECM) and spatially organized into a complex three-dimensional (3D) architecture to allow for coordinated contraction and electrical pulse propagation. Despite emerging evidence for cardiomyocyte turnover in mammalian hearts, the regenerative capacity of human cardiac tissue is insufficient to recover from damage, e.g. resulting from myocardial infarction (MI). Instead, the heart 'repairs' lost or injured tissue by ongoing synthesis and remodeling of scar tissue. Conventional therapies and timely (stem) cell delivery to the injured tissue markedly improve short-term function and remodeling, but do not attenuate later stage adverse remodeling, leading to functional deterioration and eventually failure of the heart. Material-based therapies have been successfully used to mechanically support and constrain the post-MI failing heart, preventing it from further remodeling and dilation. When designed to deliver the right microenvironment for endogenous or exogenous cells, as well as the mechanical and topological cues to guide neo-tissue formation, material-based therapies may even reverse remodeling and boost cardiac regeneration. This paper reviews the up-to-date status of material-based cardiac regeneration with special emphasis on 1) the use of bare biomaterials to deliver passive constraints that unload the heart, 2) the use of materials and cells to create engineered cardiac constructs for replacement, support, or regeneration of damaged myocardium, and 3) the development of bio-inspired and bioactive materials that aim to enhance the endogenous regenerative capacity of the heart. As the therapies should function in the infarcted heart, the damaged host environment and engineered in vitro test systems that mimic this environment, are reviewed as well. PMID:23886381

  14. Electrospun multifunctional tissue engineering scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chong; Wang, Min

    2014-03-01

    Tissue engineering holds great promises in providing successful treatments of human body tissue loss that current methods are unable to treat or unable to achieve satisfactory clinical outcomes. In scaffold-based tissue engineering, a highperformance scaffold underpins the success of a tissue engineering strategy and a major direction in the field is to create multifunctional tissue engineering scaffolds for enhanced biological performance and for regenerating complex body tissues. Electrospinning can produce nanofibrous scaffolds that are highly desirable for tissue engineering. The enormous interest in electrospinning and electrospun fibrous structures by the science, engineering and medical communities has led to various developments of the electrospinning technology and wide investigations of electrospun products in many industries, including biomedical engineering, over the past two decades. It is now possible to create novel, multicomponent tissue engineering scaffolds with multiple functions. This article provides a concise review of recent advances in the R & D of electrospun multifunctional tissue engineering scaffolds. It also presents our philosophy and research in the designing and fabrication of electrospun multicomponent scaffolds with multiple functions.

  15. Tissue engineering of reproductive tissues and organs.

    PubMed

    Atala, Anthony

    2012-07-01

    Regenerative medicine and tissue engineering technology may soon offer new hope for patients with serious injuries and end-stage reproductive organ failure. Scientists are now applying the principles of cell transplantation, material science, and bioengineering to construct biological substitutes that can restore and maintain normal function in diseased and injured reproductive tissues. In addition, the stem cell field is advancing, and new discoveries in this field will lead to new therapeutic strategies. For example, newly discovered types of stem cells have been retrieved from uterine tissues such as amniotic fluid and placental stem cells. The process of therapeutic cloning and the creation of induced pluripotent cells provide still other potential sources of stem cells for cell-based tissue engineering applications. Although stem cells are still in the research phase, some therapies arising from tissue engineering endeavors that make use of autologous adult cells have already entered the clinic. This article discusses these tissue engineering strategies for various organs in the male and female reproductive tract. PMID:22748231

  16. [Cell sources for cardiovascular tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Klopsch, C; Donndorf, P; Kaminski, A; Ma, N; Steinhoff, G

    2011-04-01

    Numerous studies have confirmed that stem cell therapy has significant potential for the regeneration of congenital and acquired heart diseases. The utilization of embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells promises a possible generation and regeneration of all cardiovascular structures. On the one hand fetal and adult stem cells, e.g. endothelial progenitors, mesenchymal, hematopoietic, cardiac stem cells and myoblasts, possess limited potential for multilinear differentiation. On the other hand these cells have high paracrin activity and support with well-confirmed safety the reconstruction and formation of cardiovascular structures. On the visionary track towards an autonomously functioning autologous heart generated by tissue engineering, vascular, valvular and myocardial tissues have already been successfully created. This manuscript describes the possible stem cell sources for cardiovascular tissue engineering and evaluates their potency and safety from a medical and ethical point of view employing the data from systematic reviews (Medline database) and own investigations. PMID:21424292

  17. Biomaterials for tissue engineering: summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christenson, L.; Mikos, A. G.; Gibbons, D. F.; Picciolo, G. L.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    This article summarizes presentations and discussion at the workshop "Enabling Biomaterial Technology for Tissue Engineering," which was held during the Fifth World Biomaterials Congress in May 1996. Presentations covered the areas of material substrate architecture, barrier effects, and cellular response, including analysis of biomaterials challenges involved in producing specific tissue-engineered products.

  18. Spatially Extended Memory Models of Cardiac Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Jeffrey; Riccio, Mark; Hua, Fei; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Gilmour, Robert

    2002-03-01

    Beat-to-beat alternation of cardiac electrical properties (alternans) commonly occurs during rapid periodic pacing. Although alternans is generally associated with a resititution curve with slope >=1, recent studies by Gauthier and co-workers reported the absence of alternans in frog heart tissue with a restitution curve of slope >=1. These experimental findings were understood in terms of a memory model in which the duration D of an action potential depends on the preceding rest interval I as well as a memory variable M that accumulates during D and dissipates during I. We study the spatiotemporal dynamics of a spatially extended 1-d fiber using an ionic model that exhibits memory effects. We find that while a single cell can have a restitution slope >=1 and not show alternans (because of memory), the spatially extended system exhibits alternans. To understand the dynamical mechanism of this behavior, we study a coupled maps memory model both numerically and analytically. These results illustrate that spatial effects and memory effects can play a significant role in determining the dynamics of wave propagation in cardiac tissue.

  19. Tissue Engineering by Intrinsic Vascularization in an In Vivo Tissue Engineering Chamber.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Weiqing; Marre, Diego; Mitchell, Geraldine M; Morrison, Wayne A; Lim, Shiang Y

    2016-01-01

    In reconstructive surgery, there is a clinical need for an alternative to the current methods of autologous reconstruction which are complex, costly and trade one defect for another. Tissue engineering holds the promise to address this increasing demand. However, most tissue engineering strategies fail to generate stable and functional tissue substitutes because of poor vascularization. This paper focuses on an in vivo tissue engineering chamber model of intrinsic vascularization where a perfused artery and a vein either as an arteriovenous loop or a flow-through pedicle configuration is directed inside a protected hollow chamber. In this chamber-based system angiogenic sprouting occurs from the arteriovenous vessels and this system attracts ischemic and inflammatory driven endogenous cell migration which gradually fills the chamber space with fibro-vascular tissue. Exogenous cell/matrix implantation at the time of chamber construction enhances cell survival and determines specificity of the engineered tissues which develop. Our studies have shown that this chamber model can successfully generate different tissues such as fat, cardiac muscle, liver and others. However, modifications and refinements are required to ensure target tissue formation is consistent and reproducible. This article describes a standardized protocol for the fabrication of two different vascularized tissue engineering chamber models in vivo. PMID:27286267

  20. New Methods in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Sheahan, Timothy P.; Rice, Charles M.; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2015-01-01

    New insights in the study of virus and host biology in the context of viral infection are made possible by the development of model systems that faithfully recapitulate the in vivo viral life cycle. Standard tissue culture models lack critical emergent properties driven by cellular organization and in vivo–like function, whereas animal models suffer from limited susceptibility to relevant human viruses and make it difficult to perform detailed molecular manipulation and analysis. Tissue engineering techniques may enable virologists to create infection models that combine the facile manipulation and readouts of tissue culture with the virus-relevant complexity of animal models. Here, we review the state of the art in tissue engineering and describe how tissue engineering techniques may alleviate some common shortcomings of existing models of viral infection, with a particular emphasis on hepatotropic viruses. We then discuss possible future applications of tissue engineering to virology, including current challenges and potential solutions. PMID:25893203

  1. Biomimetic Materials for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Peter X

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine is an exciting research area that aims at regenerative alternatives to harvested tissues for transplantation. Biomaterials play a pivotal role as scaffolds to provide three-dimensional templates and synthetic extracellular-matrix environments for tissue regeneration. It is often beneficial for the scaffolds to mimic certain advantageous characteristics of the natural extracellular matrix, or developmental or would healing programs. This article reviews current biomimetic materials approaches in tissue engineering. These include synthesis to achieve certain compositions or properties similar to those of the extracellular matrix, novel processing technologies to achieve structural features mimicking the extracellular matrix on various levels, approaches to emulate cell-extracellular matrix interactions, and biologic delivery strategies to recapitulate a signaling cascade or developmental/would-healing program. The article also provides examples of enhanced cellular/tissue functions and regenerative outcomes, demonstrating the excitement and significance of the biomimetic materials for tissue engineering and regeneration. PMID:18045729

  2. Chitin Scaffolds in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumar, Rangasamy; Chennazhi, Krishna Prasad; Srinivasan, Sowmya; Nair, Shantikumar V.; Furuike, Tetsuya; Tamura, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering/regeneration is based on the hypothesis that healthy stem/progenitor cells either recruited or delivered to an injured site, can eventually regenerate lost or damaged tissue. Most of the researchers working in tissue engineering and regenerative technology attempt to create tissue replacements by culturing cells onto synthetic porous three-dimensional polymeric scaffolds, which is currently regarded as an ideal approach to enhance functional tissue regeneration by creating and maintaining channels that facilitate progenitor cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. The requirements that must be satisfied by such scaffolds include providing a space with the proper size, shape and porosity for tissue development and permitting cells from the surrounding tissue to migrate into the matrix. Recently, chitin scaffolds have been widely used in tissue engineering due to their non-toxic, biodegradable and biocompatible nature. The advantage of chitin as a tissue engineering biomaterial lies in that it can be easily processed into gel and scaffold forms for a variety of biomedical applications. Moreover, chitin has been shown to enhance some biological activities such as immunological, antibacterial, drug delivery and have been shown to promote better healing at a faster rate and exhibit greater compatibility with humans. This review provides an overview of the current status of tissue engineering/regenerative medicine research using chitin scaffolds for bone, cartilage and wound healing applications. We also outline the key challenges in this field and the most likely directions for future development and we hope that this review will be helpful to the researchers working in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:21673928

  3. Polymeric Nanofibers in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Dahlin, Rebecca L.; Kasper, F. Kurtis

    2011-01-01

    Polymeric nanofibers can be produced using methods such as electrospinning, phase separation, and self-assembly, and the fiber composition, diameter, alignment, degradation, and mechanical properties can be tailored to the intended application. Nanofibers possess unique advantages for tissue engineering. The small diameter closely matches that of extracellular matrix fibers, and the relatively large surface area is beneficial for cell attachment and bioactive factor loading. This review will update the reader on the aspects of nanofiber fabrication and characterization important to tissue engineering, including control of porous structure, cell infiltration, and fiber degradation. Bioactive factor loading will be discussed with specific relevance to tissue engineering. Finally, applications of polymeric nanofibers in the fields of bone, cartilage, ligament and tendon, cardiovascular, and neural tissue engineering will be reviewed. PMID:21699434

  4. Tissue engineering: A live disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hukins, David W. L.

    2005-12-01

    A material-cell hybrid device that mimics the anatomic shape of the intervertebral disc has been made and successfully implanted into mice to show that tissue engineering may, in the future, benefit sufferers from back pain.

  5. Therapeutic cloning and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Koh, Chester J; Atala, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    A severe shortage of donor organs available for transplantation in the United States leaves patients suffering from diseased and injured organs with few treatment options. Scientists in the field of tissue engineering apply the principles of cell transplantation, material science, and engineering to construct biological substitutes that will restore and maintain normal function in diseased and injured tissues. Therapeutic cloning, where the nucleus from a donor cell is transferred into an enucleated oocyte in order to extract pluripotent embryonic stem cells, offers a potentially limitless source of cells for tissue engineering applications. The present chapter reviews recent advances that have occurred in therapeutic cloning and tissue engineering and describes applications of these new technologies that may offer novel therapies for patients with end-stage organ failure. PMID:15094294

  6. Commercial considerations in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Mansbridge, Jonathan

    2006-10-01

    Tissue engineering is a field with immense promise. Using the example of an early tissue-engineered skin implant, Dermagraft, factors involved in the successful commercial development of devices of this type are explored. Tissue engineering has to strike a balance between tissue culture, which is a resource-intensive activity, and business considerations that are concerned with minimizing cost and maximizing customer convenience. Bioreactor design takes place in a highly regulated environment, so factors to be incorporated into the concept include not only tissue culture considerations but also matters related to asepsis, scaleup, automation and ease of use by the final customer. Dermagraft is an allogeneic tissue. Stasis preservation, in this case cryopreservation, is essential in allogeneic tissue engineering, allowing sterility testing, inventory control and, in the case of Dermagraft, a cellular stress that may be important for hormesis following implantation. Although the use of allogeneic cells provides advantages in manufacturing under suitable conditions, it raises the spectre of immunological rejection. Such rejection has not been experienced with Dermagraft. Possible reasons for this and the vision of further application of allogeneic tissues are important considerations in future tissue-engineered cellular devices. This review illustrates approaches that indicate some of the criteria that may provide a basis for further developments. Marketing is a further requirement for success, which entails understanding of the mechanism of action of the procedure, and is illustrated for Dermagraft. The success of a tissue-engineered product is dependent on many interacting operations, some discussed here, each of which must be performed simultaneously and well. PMID:17005024

  7. Nanomaterials, Inflammation and Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Jagannath

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials exhibit unique properties that are absent in the bulk material because decreasing material size leads to an exponential increase in surface area, surface area to volume ratio, and effective stiffness, resulting in altered physiochemical properties. Diverse categories of nanomaterials such as nanoparticles, nanoporous scaffolds, nanopatterned surfaces, nanofibers and carbon nanotubes can be generated using advanced fabrication and processing techniques. These materials are being increasingly incorporated in tissue engineering scaffolds to facilitate the development of biomimetic substitutes to replace damaged tissues and organs. Long term success of nanomaterials in tissue engineering is contingent upon the inflammatory responses they elicit in vivo. This review seeks to summarize the recent developments in our understanding of biochemical and biophysical attributes of nanomaterials and the inflammatory responses they elicit, with a focus on strategies for nanomaterial design in tissue engineering applications. PMID:25421333

  8. Scaffolds in Tendon Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Lamberti, Alfredo; Petrillo, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering techniques using novel scaffold materials offer potential alternatives for managing tendon disorders. Tissue engineering strategies to improve tendon repair healing include the use of scaffolds, growth factors, cell seeding, or a combination of these approaches. Scaffolds have been the most common strategy investigated to date. Available scaffolds for tendon repair include both biological scaffolds, obtained from mammalian tissues, and synthetic scaffolds, manufactured from chemical compounds. Preliminary studies support the idea that scaffolds can provide an alternative for tendon augmentation with an enormous therapeutic potential. However, available data are lacking to allow definitive conclusion on the use of scaffolds for tendon augmentation. We review the current basic science and clinical understanding in the field of scaffolds and tissue engineering for tendon repair. PMID:22190961

  9. Electrical stimulation of cardiac adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells modulates cell phenotype and genetic machinery.

    PubMed

    Llucià-Valldeperas, A; Sanchez, B; Soler-Botija, C; Gálvez-Montón, C; Prat-Vidal, C; Roura, S; Rosell-Ferrer, J; Bragos, R; Bayes-Genis, A

    2015-11-01

    A major challenge of cardiac tissue engineering is directing cells to establish the physiological structure and function of the myocardium being replaced. Our aim was to examine the effect of electrical stimulation on the cardiodifferentiation potential of cardiac adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells (cardiac ATDPCs). Three different electrical stimulation protocols were tested; the selected protocol consisted of 2 ms monophasic square-wave pulses of 50 mV/cm at 1 Hz over 14 days. Cardiac and subcutaneous ATDPCs were grown on biocompatible patterned surfaces. Cardiomyogenic differentiation was examined by real-time PCR and immunocytofluorescence. In cardiac ATDPCs, MEF2A and GATA-4 were significantly upregulated at day 14 after stimulation, while subcutaneous ATDPCs only exhibited increased Cx43 expression. In response to electrical stimulation, cardiac ATDPCs elongated, and both cardiac and subcutaneous ATDPCs became aligned following the linear surface pattern of the construct. Cardiac ATDPC length increased by 11.3%, while subcutaneous ATDPC length diminished by 11.2% (p = 0.013 and p = 0.030 vs unstimulated controls, respectively). Compared to controls, electrostimulated cells became aligned better to the patterned surfaces when the pattern was perpendicular to the electric field (89.71 ± 28.47º for cardiac ATDPCs and 92.15 ± 15.21º for subcutaneous ATDPCs). Electrical stimulation of cardiac ATDPCs caused changes in cell phenotype and genetic machinery, making them more suitable for cardiac regeneration approaches. Thus, it seems advisable to use electrical cell training before delivery as a cell suspension or within engineered tissue. PMID:23420554

  10. Modular Assembly Approach to Engineer Geometrically Precise Cardiovascular Tissue.

    PubMed

    Lee, Benjamin W; Liu, Bohao; Pluchinsky, Adam; Kim, Nathan; Eng, George; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-04-01

    This modular assembly approach to microfabricate functional cardiovascular tissue composites enables quantitative assessment of the effects of microarchitecture on cellular function. Cardiac and endothelial modules are micromolded separately, designed to direct cardiomyocyte alignment and anisotropic contraction or vascular network formation. Assembled cardiovascular tissue composites contract synchronously, facilitating the use of this tissue-engineering platform to study structure-function relationships in the heart. PMID:26865105

  11. Bone tissue engineering in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Jakob, Franz; Ebert, Regina; Ignatius, Anita; Matsushita, Takashi; Watanabe, Yoshinobu; Groll, Juergen; Walles, Heike

    2013-06-01

    Osteoporosis is a polygenetic, environmentally modifiable disease, which precipitates into fragility fractures of vertebrae, hip and radius and also confers a high risk of fractures in accidents and trauma. Aging and the genetic molecular background of osteoporosis cause delayed healing and impair regeneration. The worldwide burden of disease is huge and steadily increasing while the average life expectancy is also on the rise. The clinical need for bone regeneration applications, systemic or in situ guided bone regeneration and bone tissue engineering, will increase and become a challenge for health care systems. Apart from in situ guided tissue regeneration classical ex vivo tissue engineering of bone has not yet reached the level of routine clinical application although a wealth of scaffolds and growth factors has been developed. Engineering of complex bone constructs in vitro requires scaffolds, growth and differentiation factors, precursor cells for angiogenesis and osteogenesis and suitable bioreactors in various combinations. The development of applications for ex vivo tissue engineering of bone faces technical challenges concerning rapid vascularization for the survival of constructs in vivo. Recent new ideas and developments in the fields of bone biology, materials science and bioreactor technology will enable us to develop standard operating procedures for ex vivo tissue engineering of bone in the near future. Once prototyped such applications will rapidly be tailored for compromised conditions like vitamin D and sex hormone deficiencies, cellular deficits and high production of regeneration inhibitors, as they are prevalent in osteoporosis and in higher age. PMID:23562167

  12. Incretin attenuates diabetes-induced damage in rat cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    AbdElmonem Elbassuoni, Eman

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), as a member of the incretin family, has a role in glucose homeostasis, its receptors distributed throughout the body, including the heart. The aim was to investigate cardiac lesions following diabetes induction, and the potential effect of GLP-1 on this type of lesions and the molecular mechanism driving this activity. Adult male rats were classified into: normal, diabetic, 4-week high-dose exenatide-treated diabetic rats, 4-week low-dose exenatide-treated diabetic rats, and 1-week exenatide-treated diabetic rats. The following parameters were measured: in blood: glucose, insulin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), total creatine kinase (CK), creatine kinase MB isoenzyme (CK-MB), and CK-MB relative index; in cardiac tissue: lipid peroxide (LPO) and some antioxidant enzymes. The untreated diabetic group displayed significant increases in blood level of glucose, LDH, and CK-MB, and cardiac tissue LPO, and a significant decrease in cardiac tissue antioxidant enzymes. GLP-1 supplementation in diabetic rats definitely decreased the hyperglycemia and abolished the detrimental effects of diabetes on the cardiac tissue. The effect of GLP-1 on blood glucose and on the heart also appeared after a short supplementation period (1 week). It can be concluded that GLP-1 has beneficial effects on diabetes-induced oxidative cardiac tissue damage, most probably via its antioxidant effect directly acting on cardiac tissue and independent of its hypoglycemic effect. PMID:25011640

  13. Image-guided tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ballyns, Jeffrey J; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2009-01-01

    Replication of anatomic shape is a significant challenge in developing implants for regenerative medicine. This has lead to significant interest in using medical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography to design tissue engineered constructs. Implementation of medical imaging and computer aided design in combination with technologies for rapid prototyping of living implants enables the generation of highly reproducible constructs with spatial resolution up to 25 μm. In this paper, we review the medical imaging modalities available and a paradigm for choosing a particular imaging technique. We also present fabrication techniques and methodologies for producing cellular engineered constructs. Finally, we comment on future challenges involved with image guided tissue engineering and efforts to generate engineered constructs ready for implantation. PMID:19583811

  14. Tracheal tissue engineering in rats.

    PubMed

    Jungebluth, Philipp; Haag, Johannes C; Sjöqvist, Sebastian; Gustafsson, Ylva; Beltrán Rodríguez, Antonio; Del Gaudio, Costantino; Bianco, Alessandra; Dehnisch, Ivar; Uhlén, Per; Baiguera, Silvia; Lemon, Greg; Lim, Mei Ling; Macchiarini, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    Tissue-engineered tracheal transplants have been successfully performed clinically. However, before becoming a routine clinical procedure, further preclinical studies are necessary to determine the underlying mechanisms of in situ tissue regeneration. Here we describe a protocol using a tissue engineering strategy and orthotopic transplantation of either natural decellularized donor tracheae or artificial electrospun nanofiber scaffolds into a rat model. The protocol includes details regarding how to assess the scaffolds' biomechanical properties and cell viability before implantation. It is a reliable and reproducible model that can be used to investigate the crucial aspects and pathways of in situ tracheal tissue restoration and regeneration. The model can be established in <6 months, and it may also provide a means to investigate cell-surface interactions, cell differentiation and stem cell fate. PMID:25122525

  15. Advances in Meniscal Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Loppini, Mattia; Forriol, Francisco; Romeo, Giovanni; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Meniscal tears are the most common knee injuries and have a poor ability of healing. In the last few decades, several techniques have been increasingly used to optimize meniscal healing. Current research efforts of tissue engineering try to combine cell-based therapy, growth factors, gene therapy, and reabsorbable scaffolds to promote healing of meniscal defects. Preliminary studies did not allow to draw definitive conclusions on the use of these techniques for routine management of meniscal lesions. We performed a review of the available literature on current techniques of tissue engineering for the management of meniscal tears. PMID:25098366

  16. Synthetic biology meets tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Davies, Jamie A; Cachat, Elise

    2016-06-15

    Classical tissue engineering is aimed mainly at producing anatomically and physiologically realistic replacements for normal human tissues. It is done either by encouraging cellular colonization of manufactured matrices or cellular recolonization of decellularized natural extracellular matrices from donor organs, or by allowing cells to self-organize into organs as they do during fetal life. For repair of normal bodies, this will be adequate but there are reasons for making unusual, non-evolved tissues (repair of unusual bodies, interface to electromechanical prostheses, incorporating living cells into life-support machines). Synthetic biology is aimed mainly at engineering cells so that they can perform custom functions: applying synthetic biological approaches to tissue engineering may be one way of engineering custom structures. In this article, we outline the 'embryological cycle' of patterning, differentiation and morphogenesis and review progress that has been made in constructing synthetic biological systems to reproduce these processes in new ways. The state-of-the-art remains a long way from making truly synthetic tissues, but there are now at least foundations for future work. PMID:27284030

  17. Bioactive glass in tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Rahaman, Mohamed N.; Day, Delbert E.; Bal, B. Sonny; Fu, Qiang; Jung, Steven B.; Bonewald, Lynda F.; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on recent advances in the development and use of bioactive glass for tissue engineering applications. Despite its inherent brittleness, bioactive glass has several appealing characteristics as a scaffold material for bone tissue engineering. New bioactive glasses based on borate and borosilicate compositions have shown the ability to enhance new bone formation when compared to silicate bioactive glass. Borate-based bioactive glasses also have controllable degradation rates, so the degradation of the bioactive glass implant can be more closely matched to the rate of new bone formation. Bioactive glasses can be doped with trace quantities of elements such as Cu, Zn and Sr, which are known to be beneficial for healthy bone growth. In addition to the new bioactive glasses, recent advances in biomaterials processing have resulted in the creation of scaffold architectures with a range of mechanical properties suitable for the substitution of loaded as well as non-loaded bone. While bioactive glass has been extensively investigated for bone repair, there has been relatively little research on the application of bioactive glass to the repair of soft tissues. However, recent work has shown the ability of bioactive glass to promote angiogenesis, which is critical to numerous applications in tissue regeneration, such as neovascularization for bone regeneration and the healing of soft tissue wounds. Bioactive glass has also been shown to enhance neocartilage formation during in vitro culture of chondrocyte-seeded hydrogels, and to serve as a subchondral substrate for tissue-engineered osteochondral constructs. Methods used to manipulate the structure and performance of bioactive glass in these tissue engineering applications are analyzed. PMID:21421084

  18. Two-photon induced collagen cross-linking in bioartificial cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuetemeyer, Kai; Kensah, George; Heidrich, Marko; Meyer, Heiko; Martin, Ulrich; Gruh, Ina; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2011-08-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering is a promising strategy for regenerative therapies to overcome the shortage of donor organs for transplantation. Besides contractile function, the stiffness of tissue engineered constructs is crucial to generate transplantable tissue surrogates with sufficient mechanical stability to withstand the high pressure present in the heart. Although several collagen cross-linking techniques have proven to be efficient in stabilizing biomaterials, they cannot be applied to cardiac tissue engineering, as cell death occurs in the treated area. Here, we present a novel method using femtosecond (fs) laser pulses to increase the stiffness of collagen-based tissue constructs without impairing cell viability. Raster scanning of the fs laser beam over riboflavin-treated tissue induced collagen cross-linking by two-photon photosensitized singlet oxygen production. One day post-irradiation, stress-strain measurements revealed increased tissue stiffness by around 40% being dependent on the fibroblast content in the tissue. At the same time, cells remained viable and fully functional as demonstrated by fluorescence imaging of cardiomyocyte mitochondrial activity and preservation of active contraction force. Our results indicate that two-photon induced collagen cross-linking has great potential for studying and improving artificially engineered tissue for regenerative therapies.

  19. Engineering of implantable liver tissues.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yasuyuki; Nishikawa, M; Evenou, F; Hamon, M; Huang, H; Montagne, K P; Kojima, N; Fujii, T; Niino, T

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, from the engineering point of view, we introduce the results from our group and related research on three typical configurations of engineered liver tissues; cell sheet-based tissues, sheet-like macroporous scaffold-based tissues, and tissues based on special scaffolds that comprise a flow channel network. The former two do not necessitate in vitro prevascularization and are thus promising in actual human clinical trials for liver diseases that can be recovered by relatively smaller tissue mass. The third approach can implant a much larger mass but is still not yet feasible. In all cases, oxygen supply is the key engineering factor. For the first configuration, direct oxygen supply using an oxygen-permeable polydimethylsiloxane membrane enables various liver cells to exhibit distinct behaviors, complete double layers of mature hepatocytes and fibroblasts, spontaneous thick tissue formation of hepatocarcinoma cells and fetal hepatocytes. Actual oxygen concentration at the cell level can be strictly controlled in this culture system. Using this property, we found that initially low then subsequently high oxygen concentrations were favorable to growth and maturation of fetal cells. For the second configuration, combination of poly-L: -lactic acid 3D scaffolds and appropriate growth factor cocktails provides a suitable microenvironment for the maturation of cells in vitro but the cell growth is limited to a certain distance from the inner surfaces of the macropores. However, implantation to the mesentery leaves of animals allows the cells again to proliferate and pack the remaining spaces of the macroporous structure, suggesting the high feasibility of 3D culture of hepatocyte progenitors for liver tissue-based therapies. For the third configuration, we proposed a design criterion concerning the dimensions of flow channels based on oxygen diffusion and consumption around the channel. Due to the current limitation in the resolution of 3D

  20. Myocardial tissue engineering using electrospun nanofiber composites

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2016-01-01

    Emerging trends for cardiac tissue engineering are focused on increasing the biocompatibility and tissue regeneration ability of artificial heart tissue by incorporating various cell sources and bioactive molecules. Although primary cardiomyocytes can be successfully implanted, clinical applications are restricted due to their low survival rates and poor proliferation. To develop successful cardiovascular tissue regeneration systems, new technologies must be introduced to improve myocardial regeneration. Electrospinning is a simple, versatile technique for fabricating nanofibers. Here, we discuss various biodegradable polymers (natural, synthetic, and combinatorial polymers) that can be used for fiber fabrication. We also describe a series of fiber modification methods that can increase cell survival, proliferation, and migration and provide supporting mechanical properties by mimicking micro-environment structures, such as the extracellular matrix (ECM). In addition, the applications and types of nanofiber-based scaffolds for myocardial regeneration are described. Finally, fusion research methods combined with stem cells and scaffolds to improve biocompatibility are discussed. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(1): 26-36] PMID:26497579

  1. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in cardiac tissues.

    PubMed

    Page, C; Doubell, A F

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) has recently emerged as a prominent role player in intracellular signalling in the ventricular myocyte with attention being focussed on its possible role in the development of ventricular hypertrophy. It is becoming clear that MAPK is also active in other cells of cardiac origin such as cardiac fibroblasts and possible functions of this signalling pathway in the heart have yet to be explored. In this report the mammalian MAPK pathway is briefly outlined, before reviewing current knowledge of the MAPK pathway in cardiac tissue (ventricular myocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells and cardiac fibroblasts). New data is also presented on the presence and activity of MAPK in two additional cardiac celltypes namely atrial myocytes and vascular endothelial cells from the coronary microcirculation. PMID:8739228

  2. Biomaterial Approaches for Stem Cell-Based Myocardial Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Cutts, Josh; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Brafman, David A

    2015-01-01

    Adult and pluripotent stem cells represent a ready supply of cellular raw materials that can be used to generate the functionally mature cells needed to replace damaged or diseased heart tissue. However, the use of stem cells for cardiac regenerative therapies is limited by the low efficiency by which stem cells are differentiated in vitro to cardiac lineages as well as the inability to effectively deliver stem cells and their derivatives to regions of damaged myocardium. In this review, we discuss the various biomaterial-based approaches that are being implemented to direct stem cell fate both in vitro and in vivo. First, we discuss the stem cell types available for cardiac repair and the engineering of naturally and synthetically derived biomaterials to direct their in vitro differentiation to the cell types that comprise heart tissue. Next, we describe biomaterial-based approaches that are being implemented to enhance the in vivo integration and differentiation of stem cells delivered to areas of cardiac damage. Finally, we present emerging trends of using stem cell-based biomaterial approaches to deliver pro-survival factors and fully vascularized tissue to the damaged and diseased cardiac tissue. PMID:26052226

  3. Kidney diseases and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Moon, Kyung Hyun; Ko, In Kap; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2016-04-15

    Kidney disease is a worldwide public health problem. Renal failure follows several disease stages including acute and chronic kidney symptoms. Acute kidney injury (AKI) may lead to chronic kidney disease (CKD), which can progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) with a mortality rate. Current treatment options are limited to dialysis and kidney transplantation; however, problems such as donor organ shortage, graft failure and numerous complications remain a concern. To address this issue, cell-based approaches using tissue engineering (TE) and regenerative medicine (RM) may provide attractive approaches to replace the damaged kidney cells with functional renal specific cells, leading to restoration of normal kidney functions. While development of renal tissue engineering is in a steady state due to the complex composition and highly regulated functionality of the kidney, cell therapy using stem cells and primary kidney cells has demonstrated promising therapeutic outcomes in terms of restoration of renal functions in AKI and CKD. In this review, basic components needed for successful renal kidney engineering are discussed, and recent TE and RM approaches to treatment of specific kidney diseases will be presented. PMID:26134528

  4. Coaxial electrospun fibers: applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; Huang, Jiangnan; Yu, Guoqiang; Cardenas, Romel; Wei, Suying; Wujcik, Evan K; Guo, Zhanhu

    2016-09-01

    Coelectrospinning and emulsion electrospinning are two main methods for preparing core-sheath electrospun nanofibers in a cost-effective and efficient manner. Here, physical phenomena and the effects of solution and processing parameters on the coaxial fibers are introduced. Coaxial fibers with specific drugs encapsulated in the core can exhibit a sustained and controlled release. Their exhibited high surface area and three-dimensional nanofibrous network allows the electrospun fibers to resemble native extracellular matrices. These features of the nanofibers show that they have great potential in drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. Proteins, growth factors, antibiotics, and many other agents have been successfully encapsulated into coaxial fibers for drug delivery. A main advantage of the core-sheath design is that after the process of electrospinning and release, these drugs remain bioactive due to the protection of the sheath. Applications of coaxial fibers as scaffolds for tissue engineering include bone, cartilage, cardiac tissue, skin, blood vessels and nervous tissue, among others. A synopsis of novel coaxial electrospun fibers, discussing their applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering, is covered pertaining to proteins, growth factors, antibiotics, and other drugs and applications in the fields of bone, cartilage, cardiac, skin, blood vessel, and nervous tissue engineering, respectively. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:654-677. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1391 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26848106

  5. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Progenitors Differentiate to Cardiomyocytes and Form Biosynthetic Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Syandan; Chellapan, Malathi; Bursac, Nenad; Leong, Kam W.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian heart has little capacity to regenerate, and following injury the myocardium is replaced by non-contractile scar tissue. Consequently, increased wall stress and workload on the remaining myocardium leads to chamber dilation, dysfunction, and heart failure. Cell-based therapy with an autologous, epigenetically reprogrammed, and cardiac-committed progenitor cell source could potentially reverse this process by replacing the damaged myocardium with functional tissue. However, it is unclear whether cardiac progenitor cell-derived cardiomyocytes are capable of attaining levels of structural and functional maturity comparable to that of terminally-fated cardiomyocytes. Here, we first describe the derivation of mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, which once differentiated allow for the enrichment of Nkx2-5(+) cardiac progenitors, and the cardiomyocyte-specific expression of the red fluorescent protein. We show that the cardiac progenitors are multipotent and capable of differentiating into endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes. Moreover, cardiac progenitor selection corresponds to cKit(+) cell enrichment, while cardiomyocyte cell-lineage commitment is concomitant with dual expression of either cKit/Flk1 or cKit/Sca-1. We proceed to show that the cardiac progenitor-derived cardiomyocytes are capable of forming electrically and mechanically coupled large-scale 2D cell cultures with mature electrophysiological properties. Finally, we examine the cell progenitors’ ability to form electromechanically coherent macroscopic tissues, using a physiologically relevant 3D culture model and demonstrate that following long-term culture the cardiomyocytes align, and form robust electromechanical connections throughout the volume of the biosynthetic tissue construct. We conclude that the iPS cell-derived cardiac progenitors are a robust cell source for tissue engineering applications and a 3D culture platform for pharmacological screening and

  6. Biomaterials for vascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Swathi; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the USA. The limited availability of healthy autologous vessels for bypass grafting procedures has led to the fabrication of prosthetic vascular conduits. While synthetic polymers have been extensively studied as substitutes in vascular engineering, they fall short of meeting the biological challenges at the blood–material interface. Various tissue engineering strategies have emerged to address these flaws and increase long-term patency of vascular grafts. Vascular cell seeding of scaffolds and the design of bioactive polymers for in situ arterial regeneration have yielded promising results. This article describes the advances made in biomaterials design to generate suitable materials that not only match the mechanical properties of native vasculature, but also promote cell growth, facilitate extracellular matrix production and inhibit thrombogenicity. PMID:20017698

  7. Tissue engineering the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Spurrier, Ryan G; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2013-04-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) results from the loss of a highly specialized organ, the small intestine. SBS and its current treatments are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Production of tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) from the patient's own cells could restore normal intestinal function via autologous transplantation. Improved understanding of intestinal stem cells and their niche have been coupled with advances in tissue engineering techniques. Originally described by Vacanti et al of Massachusetts General Hospital, TESI has been produced by in vivo implantation of organoid units. Organoid units are multicellular clusters of epithelium and mesenchyme that may be harvested from native intestine. These clusters are loaded onto a scaffold and implanted into the host omentum. The scaffold provides physical support that permits angiogenesis and vasculogenesis of the developing tissue. After a period of 4 weeks, histologic analyses confirm the similarity of TESI to native intestine. TESI contains a differentiated epithelium, mesenchyme, blood vessels, muscle, and nerve components. To date, similar experiments have proved successful in rat, mouse, and pig models. Additional experiments have shown clinical improvement and rescue of SBS rats after implantation of TESI. In comparison with the group that underwent massive enterectomy alone, rats that had surgical anastomosis of TESI to their shortened intestine showed improvement in postoperative weight gain and serum B12 values. Recently, organoid units have been harvested from human intestinal samples and successfully grown into TESI by using an immunodeficient mouse host. Current TESI production yields approximately 3 times the number of cells initially implanted, but improvements in the scaffold and blood supply are being developed in efforts to increase TESI size. Exciting new techniques in stem cell biology and directed cellular differentiation may generate additional sources of autologous intestinal

  8. Nanotechnological strategies for engineering complex tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvir, Tal; Timko, Brian P.; Kohane, Daniel S.; Langer, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering aims at developing functional substitutes for damaged tissues and organs. Before transplantation, cells are generally seeded on biomaterial scaffolds that recapitulate the extracellular matrix and provide cells with information that is important for tissue development. Here we review the nanocomposite nature of the extracellular matrix, describe the design considerations for different tissues and discuss the impact of nanostructures on the properties of scaffolds and their uses in monitoring the behaviour of engineered tissues. We also examine the different nanodevices used to trigger certain processes for tissue development, and offer our view on the principal challenges and prospects of applying nanotechnology in tissue engineering.

  9. Advanced Material Strategies for Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Engelmayr, George C.; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.; Moutos, Franklin T.; Guilak, Farshid

    2010-01-01

    Tissue engineering seeks to restore the function of diseased or damaged tissues through the use of cells and biomaterial scaffolds. It is now apparent that the next generation of functional tissue replacements will require advanced material strategies to achieve many of the important requirements for long-term success. Here we provide representative examples of engineered skeletal and myocardial tissue constructs in which scaffolds were explicitly designed to match native tissue mechanical properties as well as to promote cell alignment. We discuss recent progress in microfluidic devices that can potentially serve as tissue engineering scaffolds, since mass transport via microvascular-like structures will be essential in the development of tissue engineered constructs on the length scale of native tissues. Given the rapid evolution of the field of tissue engineering, it is important to consider the use of advanced materials in light of the emerging role of genetics, growth factors, bioreactors, and other technologies. PMID:20882506

  10. Tissue engineering using adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Eberli, Daniel; Atala, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Patients with a variety of diseases may be treated with transplanted tissues and organs. However, there is a shortage of donor tissues and organs, which is worsening yearly because of the aging population. Scientists in the field of tissue engineering are applying the principles of cell transplantation, material science, and bioengineering to construct biological substitutes that will restore and maintain normal function in diseased and injured tissues. The stem cell field is also advancing rapidly, opening new options for cellular therapy and tissue engineering. The use of adult stem cells for tissue engineering applications is promising. This chapter discusses applications of these new technologies for the engineering of tissues and organs. The first part provides an overview of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering techniques; the second highlights different adult stem cell populations used for tissue regeneration. PMID:17161702

  11. Cardiac tissue characterization using near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Moon, Rajinder; Hendon, Christine P.

    2014-03-01

    Cardiac tissue from swine and canine hearts were assessed using diffuse reflectance near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) ex vivo. Slope measured between 800-880 nm reflectance was found to reveal differences between epicardial fat and normal myocardium tissue. This parameter was observed to increase monotonically from measurements obtained from the onset of radiofrequency ablation (RFA). A sheathe-style fiber optic catheter was then developed to allow real-time sampling of the zone of resistive heating during RFA treatment. A model was developed and used to extract changes in tissue absorption and reduced scattering based on the steady-state diffusion approximation. It was found that key changes in tissue optical properties occur during application of RF energy and can be monitored using NIRS. These results encourage the development of NIRS integrated catheters for real-time guidance of the cardiac ablation treatment.

  12. Materials Science and Tissue Engineering: Repairing the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Radisic, Milica; Christman, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure following a myocardial infarction continues to be a leading killer in the western world. Currently there are no therapies that effectively prevent or reverse the cardiac damage and negative left ventricular remodeling process that follows a myocardial infarction. Since the heart has limited regenerative capacity, there has been significant effort to develop new therapies that could repair and regenerate the myocardium. While cell transplantation alone was initially studied, more recently tissue engineering strategies using biomaterial scaffolds have been explored. In this review, we cover the different approaches to engineer the myocardium. These include cardiac patches, which are in vitro engineered constructs of functional myocardium, as well as injectable scaffolds that can either encourage endogenous repair and regeneration, or act as vehicles to support delivery of cells and other therapeutics. PMID:23910415

  13. Connective tissue growth factor induces cardiac hypertrophy through Akt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hayata, Nozomi; Fujio, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Iwakura, Tomohiko; Obana, Masanori; Takai, Mika; Mohri, Tomomi; Nonen, Shinpei; Maeda, Makiko; Azuma, Junichi

    2008-05-30

    In the process of cardiac remodeling, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is secreted from cardiac myocytes. Though CTGF is well known to promote fibroblast proliferation, its pathophysiological effects in cardiac myocytes remain to be elucidated. In this study, we examined the biological effects of CTGF in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Cardiac myocytes stimulated with full length CTGF and its C-terminal region peptide showed the increase in cell surface area. Similar to hypertrophic ligands for G-protein coupled receptors, such as endothelin-1, CTGF activated amino acid uptake; however, CTGF-induced hypertrophy is not associated with the increased expression of skeletal actin or BNP, analyzed by Northern-blotting. CTGF treatment activated ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, JNK and Akt. The inhibition of Akt by transducing dominant-negative Akt abrogated CTGF-mediated increase in cell size, while the inhibition of MAP kinases did not affect the cardiac hypertrophy. These findings indicate that CTGF is a novel hypertrophic factor in cardiac myocytes.

  14. Cardiac Tissue Injury and Remodeling Is Dependent Upon MR Regulation of Activation Pathways in Cardiac Tissue Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jimmy Z; Morgan, James; Tesch, Greg H; Rickard, Amanda J; Chrissobolis, Sophocles; Drummond, Grant R; Fuller, Peter J; Young, Morag J

    2016-08-01

    Macrophage mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) signaling is an important mediator of cardiac tissue inflammation and fibrosis. The goal of the present study was to determine the cellular mechanisms of MR signaling in macrophages that promote cardiac tissue injury and remodeling. We sought to identify specific markers of MR signaling in isolated tissue macrophages (cardiac, aortic) vs splenic mononuclear cells from wild-type and myeloid MR-null mice given vehicle/salt or deoxycorticosterone (DOC)/salt for 8 weeks. Cardiac tissue fibrosis in response to 8 weeks of DOC/salt treatment was found in the hearts from wild-type but not myeloid MR-null mice. This was associated with an increased expression of the profibrotic markers TGF-β1 and matrix metalloproteinase-12 and type 1 inflammatory markers TNFα and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand-9 in cardiac macrophages. Differential expression of immunomodulatory M2-like markers (eg, arginase-1, macrophage scavenger receptor 1) was dependent on the tissue location of wild-type and MR-null macrophages. Finally, intact MR signaling is required for the phosphorylation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase in response to a proinflammatory stimulus in bone marrow monocytes/macrophages in culture. These data suggest that the activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase pathway in macrophages after a tissue injury and inflammatory stimuli in the DOC/salt model is MR dependent and regulates the transcription of downstream profibrotic factors, which may represent potential therapeutic targets in heart failure patients. PMID:27253999

  15. Physiology and metabolism of tissue-engineered skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cindy S; Davis, Brittany N J; Madden, Lauran; Bursac, Nenad; Truskey, George A

    2014-09-01

    Skeletal muscle is a major target for tissue engineering, given its relative size in the body, fraction of cardiac output that passes through muscle beds, as well as its key role in energy metabolism and diabetes, and the need for therapies for muscle diseases such as muscular dystrophy and sarcopenia. To date, most studies with tissue-engineered skeletal muscle have utilized murine and rat cell sources. On the other hand, successful engineering of functional human muscle would enable different applications including improved methods for preclinical testing of drugs and therapies. Some of the requirements for engineering functional skeletal muscle include expression of adult forms of muscle proteins, comparable contractile forces to those produced by native muscle, and physiological force-length and force-frequency relations. This review discusses the various strategies and challenges associated with these requirements, specific applications with cultured human myoblasts, and future directions. PMID:24912506

  16. Physiology and Metabolism of Tissue Engineered Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Cindy S.; Davis, Brittany N.J.; Madden, Lauran; Bursac, Nenad; Truskey, George A.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a major target for tissue engineering, given its relative size in the body, fraction of cardiac output that passes through muscle beds, as well as its key role in energy metabolism and diabetes, and the need for therapies for muscle diseases such as muscular dystrophy and sarcopenia. To date, most studies with tissue-engineered skeletal muscle have utilized murine and rat cell sources. On the other hand, successful engineering of functional human muscle would enable different applications including improved methods for preclinical testing of drugs and therapies. Some of the requirements for engineering functional skeletal muscle include expression of adult forms of muscle proteins, comparable contractile forces to those produced by native muscle, and physiological force-length and force-frequency relations. This review discusses the various strategies and challenges associated with these requirements, specific applications with cultured human myoblasts, and future directions. PMID:24912506

  17. Multiscale tissue engineering for liver reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sudo, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a target of in vitro tissue engineering despite its capability to regenerate in vivo. The construction of liver tissues in vitro remains challenging. In this review, conventional 3D cultures of hepatocytes are first discussed. Recent advances in the 3D culturing of liver cells are then summarized in the context of in vitro liver tissue reconstruction at the micro- and macroscales. The application of microfluidics technology to liver tissue engineering has been introduced as a bottom-up approach performed at the microscale, whereas whole-organ bioengineering technology was introduced as a top-down approach performed at the macroscale. Mesoscale approaches are also discussed in considering the integration of micro- and macroscale approaches. Multiple parallel multiscale liver tissue engineering studies are ongoing; however, no tissue-engineered liver that is appropriate for clinical use has yet been realized. The integration of multiscale tissue engineering studies is essential for further understanding of liver reconstruction strategies. PMID:24500493

  18. Soft tissue engineering in craniomaxillofacial surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Roderick Y; Fasi, Anthony C; Feinberg, Stephen E

    2014-01-01

    Craniofacial soft tissue reconstruction may be required following trauma, tumor resection, and to repair congenital deformities. Recent advances in the field of tissue engineering have significantly widened the reconstructive armamentarium of the surgeon. The successful identification and combination of tissue engineering, scaffold, progenitor cells, and physiologic signaling molecules has enabled the surgeon to design, recreate the missing tissue in its near natural form. This has resolved the issues like graft rejection, wound dehiscence, or poor vascularity. Successfully reconstructed tissue through soft tissue engineering protocols would help surgeon to restore the form and function of the lost tissue in its originality. This manuscript intends to provide a glimpse of the basic principle of tissue engineering, contemporary, and future direction of this field as applied to craniofacial surgery. PMID:24987591

  19. Imaging Strategies for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seung Yun; Ricles, Laura M.; Suggs, Laura J.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering has evolved with multifaceted research being conducted using advanced technologies, and it is progressing toward clinical applications. As tissue engineering technology significantly advances, it proceeds toward increasing sophistication, including nanoscale strategies for material construction and synergetic methods for combining with cells, growth factors, or other macromolecules. Therefore, to assess advanced tissue-engineered constructs, tissue engineers need versatile imaging methods capable of monitoring not only morphological but also functional and molecular information. However, there is no single imaging modality that is suitable for all tissue-engineered constructs. Each imaging method has its own range of applications and provides information based on the specific properties of the imaging technique. Therefore, according to the requirements of the tissue engineering studies, the most appropriate tool should be selected among a variety of imaging modalities. The goal of this review article is to describe available biomedical imaging methods to assess tissue engineering applications and to provide tissue engineers with criteria and insights for determining the best imaging strategies. Commonly used biomedical imaging modalities, including X-ray and computed tomography, positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound imaging, optical imaging, and emerging techniques and multimodal imaging, will be discussed, focusing on the latest trends of their applications in recent tissue engineering studies. PMID:25012069

  20. Carbon-nanotube-embedded hydrogel sheets for engineering cardiac constructs and bioactuators.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su Ryon; Jung, Sung Mi; Zalabany, Momen; Kim, Keekyoung; Zorlutuna, Pinar; Kim, Sang Bok; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Khabiry, Masoud; Azize, Mohamed; Kong, Jing; Wan, Kai-Tak; Palacios, Tomas; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Bae, Hojae; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-03-26

    We engineered functional cardiac patches by seeding neonatal rat cardiomyocytes onto carbon nanotube (CNT)-incorporated photo-cross-linkable gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogels. The resulting cardiac constructs showed excellent mechanical integrity and advanced electrophysiological functions. Specifically, myocardial tissues cultured on 50 μm thick CNT-GelMA showed 3 times higher spontaneous synchronous beating rates and 85% lower excitation threshold, compared to those cultured on pristine GelMA hydrogels. Our results indicate that the electrically conductive and nanofibrous networks formed by CNTs within a porous gelatin framework are the key characteristics of CNT-GelMA leading to improved cardiac cell adhesion, organization, and cell-cell coupling. Centimeter-scale patches were released from glass substrates to form 3D biohybrid actuators, which showed controllable linear cyclic contraction/extension, pumping, and swimming actuations. In addition, we demonstrate for the first time that cardiac tissues cultured on CNT-GelMA resist damage by a model cardiac inhibitor as well as a cytotoxic compound. Therefore, incorporation of CNTs into gelatin, and potentially other biomaterials, could be useful in creating multifunctional cardiac scaffolds for both therapeutic purposes and in vitro studies. These hybrid materials could also be used for neuron and other muscle cells to create tissue constructs with improved organization, electroactivity, and mechanical integrity. PMID:23363247

  1. Carbon-Nanotube-Embedded Hydrogel Sheets for Engineering Cardiac Constructs and Bioactuators

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Su Ryon; Jung, Sung Mi; Zalabany, Momen; Kim, Keekyoung; Zorlutuna, Pinar; Kim, Sang bok; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Khabiry, Masoud; Azize, Mohamed; Kong, Jing; Wan, Kai-tak; Palacios, Tomas; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Bae, Hojae; Tang, Xiaowu (Shirley); Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    We engineered functional cardiac patches by seeding neonatal rat cardiomyocytes onto carbon nanotube (CNT) incorporated photocrosslinkable gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogel. The resulting cardiac constructs showed excellent mechanical integrity and advanced electrophysiological functions. Specifically, myocardial tissues cultured on 50 μm thick CNT-GelMA showed 3 times higher spontaneous synchronous beating rates and 85% lower excitation threshold, compared to those cultured on pristine GelMA hydrogels. Our results indicate that the electrically conductive and nanofibrous networks formed by CNTs within a porous gelatin framework is the key characteristics of CNT-GelMA leading to improved cardiac cell adhesion, organization, and cell-cell coupling. Centimeter-scale patches were released from glass substrates to form 3D biohybrid actuators, which showed controllable linear cyclic contraction/extension, pumping, and swimming actuations. In addition, we demonstrate for the first time that cardiac tissues cultured on CNT-GelMA resist damage by a model cardiac inhibitor as well as a cytotoxic compound. Therefore, incorporation of CNTs into gelatin, and potentially other biomaterials, could be useful in creating multifunctional cardiac scaffolds for both therapeutic purposes and in vitro studies. These hybrid materials could also be used for neuron and other muscle cells to create tissue constructs with improved organization, electroactivity, and mechanical integrity. PMID:23363247

  2. Stromal Cells in Dense Collagen Promote Cardiomyocyte and Microvascular Patterning in Engineered Human Heart Tissue.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Meredith A; Tran, Dominic; Coulombe, Kareen L K; Razumova, Maria; Regnier, Michael; Murry, Charles E; Zheng, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering is a strategy to replace damaged contractile tissue and model cardiac diseases to discover therapies. Current cardiac and vascular engineering approaches independently create aligned contractile tissue or perfusable vasculature, but a combined vascularized cardiac tissue remains to be achieved. Here, we sought to incorporate a patterned microvasculature into engineered heart tissue, which balances the competing demands from cardiomyocytes to contract the matrix versus the vascular lumens that need structural support. Low-density collagen hydrogels (1.25 mg/mL) permit human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) to form a dense contractile tissue but cannot support a patterned microvasculature. Conversely, high collagen concentrations (density ≥6 mg/mL) support a patterned microvasculature, but the hESC-CMs lack cell-cell contact, limiting their electrical communication, structural maturation, and tissue-level contractile function. When cocultured with matrix remodeling stromal cells, however, hESC-CMs structurally mature and form anisotropic constructs in high-density collagen. Remodeling requires the stromal cells to be in proximity with hESC-CMs. In addition, cocultured cardiac constructs in dense collagen generate measurable active contractions (on the order of 0.1 mN/mm(2)) and can be paced up to 2 Hz. Patterned microvascular networks in these high-density cocultured cardiac constructs remain patent through 2 weeks of culture, and hESC-CMs show electrical synchronization. The ability to maintain microstructural control within engineered heart tissue enables generation of more complex features, such as cellular alignment and a vasculature. Successful incorporation of these features paves the way for the use of large scale engineered tissues for myocardial regeneration and cardiac disease modeling. PMID:26955856

  3. Conducting the embryonic heart: orchestrating development of specialized cardiac tissues.

    PubMed

    Gourdie, R G; Kubalak, S; Mikawa, T

    1999-01-01

    The heterogeneous tissues of the pacemaking and conduction system comprise the "smart components" of the heart, responsible for setting, maintaining, and coordinating the rhythmic pumping of cardiac muscle. Over the last few years, a wealth of new information has been collected about the unique genetic and phenotypic characteristics expressed by these tissues during cardiac morphogenesis. More recently, genetically modified viruses, mutational analysis, and targeted transgenesis have enabled even more precise resolution of the relationships between cell fate, gene expression, and differentiation of specialized function within developing myocardium. While some information provided by these newer approaches has supported conventional wisdom, some fresh and unexpected perspectives have also emerged. In particular, there is mounting evidence that extracardiac populations of cells migrating into the tubular heart have important morphogenetic roles in the inductive pattering and functional integration of the developing conduction system. PMID:10189963

  4. Optical control of excitation waves in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Rebecca A. B.; Klimas, Aleksandra; Ambrosi, Christina M.; Tomek, Jakub; Corbett, Alex; Entcheva, Emilia; Bub, Gil

    2015-12-01

    In nature, macroscopic excitation waves are found in a diverse range of settings including chemical reactions, metal rust, yeast, amoeba and the heart and brain. In the case of living biological tissue, the spatiotemporal patterns formed by these excitation waves are different in healthy and diseased states. Current electrical and pharmacological methods for wave modulation lack the spatiotemporal precision needed to control these patterns. Optical methods have the potential to overcome these limitations, but to date have only been demonstrated in simple systems, such as the Belousov-Zhabotinsky chemical reaction. Here, we combine dye-free optical imaging with optogenetic actuation to achieve dynamic control of cardiac excitation waves. Illumination with patterned light is demonstrated to optically control the direction, speed and spiral chirality of such waves in cardiac tissue. This all-optical approach offers a new experimental platform for the study and control of pattern formation in complex biological excitable systems.

  5. Tissue engineering a fetal membrane.

    PubMed

    Mi, Shengli; David, Anna L; Chowdhury, Bipasha; Jones, Roanne Razalia; Hamley, Ian William; Squires, Adam M; Connon, Che John

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to construct an artificial fetal membrane (FM) by combination of human amniotic epithelial stem cells (hAESCs) and a mechanically enhanced collagen scaffold containing encapsulated human amniotic stromal fibroblasts (hASFs). Such a tissue-engineered FM may have the potential to plug structural defects in the amniotic sac after antenatal interventions, or to prevent preterm premature rupture of the FM. The hAESCs and hASFs were isolated from human fetal amniotic membrane (AM). Magnetic cell sorting was used to enrich the hAESCs by positive ATP-binding cassette G2 selection. We investigated the use of a laminin/fibronectin (1:1)-coated compressed collagen gel as a novel scaffold to support the growth of hAESCs. A type I collagen gel was dehydrated to form a material mimicking the mechanical properties and ultra-structure of human AM. hAESCs successfully adhered to and formed a monolayer upon the biomimetic collagen scaffold. The resulting artificial membrane shared a high degree of similarity in cell morphology, protein expression profiles, and structure to normal fetal AM. This study provides the first line of evidence that a compacted collagen gel containing hASFs could adequately support hAESCs adhesion and differentiation to a degree that is comparable to the normal human fetal AM in terms of structure and maintenance of cell phenotype. PMID:21919796

  6. Keratoconus: Tissue Engineering and Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Karamichos, Dimitrios; Hjortdal, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is a bilateral, asymmetric, corneal disorder that is characterized by progressive thinning, steepening, and potential scarring. The prevalence of KC is stated to be 1 in 2000 persons worldwide; however, numbers vary depending on size of the study and regions. KC appears more often in South Asian, Eastern Mediterranean, and North African populations. The cause remains unknown, although a variety of factors have been considered. Genetics, cellular, and mechanical changes have all been reported; however, most of these studies have proven inconclusive. Clearly, the major problem here, like with any other ocular disease, is quality of life and the threat of vision loss. While most KC cases progress until the third or fourth decade, it varies between individuals. Patients may experience periods of several months with significant changes followed by months or years of no change, followed by another period of rapid changes. Despite the major advancements, it is still uncertain how to treat KC at early stages and prevent vision impairment. There are currently limited tissue engineering techniques and/or “smart” biomaterials that can help arrest the progression of KC. This review will focus on current treatments and how biomaterials may hold promise for the future. PMID:25215423

  7. 3D Printing for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jia; Yao, Hai; Mei, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering aims to fabricate functional tissue for applications in regenerative medicine and drug testing. More recently, 3D printing has shown great promise in tissue fabrication with a structural control from micro- to macro-scale by using a layer-by-layer approach. Whether through scaffold-based or scaffold-free approaches, the standard for 3D printed tissue engineering constructs is to provide a biomimetic structural environment that facilitates tissue formation and promotes host tissue integration (e.g., cellular infiltration, vascularization, and active remodeling). This review will cover several approaches that have advanced the field of 3D printing through novel fabrication methods of tissue engineering constructs. It will also discuss the applications of synthetic and natural materials for 3D printing facilitated tissue fabrication. PMID:26869728

  8. Biomimetic strategies for engineering composite tissues.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nancy; Robinson, Jennifer; Lu, Helen

    2016-08-01

    The formation of multiple tissue types and their integration into composite tissue units presents a frontier challenge in regenerative engineering. Tissue-tissue synchrony is crucial in providing structural support for internal organs and enabling daily activities. This review highlights the state-of-the-art in composite tissue scaffold design, and explores how biomimicry can be strategically applied to avoid over-engineering the scaffold. Given the complexity of biological tissues, determining the most relevant parameters for recapitulating native structure-function relationships through strategic biomimicry will reduce the burden for clinical translation. It is anticipated that these exciting efforts in composite tissue engineering will enable integrative and functional repair of common soft tissue injuries and lay the foundation for total joint or limb regeneration. PMID:27010653

  9. Approximate analytical solutions for excitation and propagation in cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Greene, D'Artagnan; Shiferaw, Yohannes

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that a variety of cardiac arrhythmias are initiated by a focal excitation in heart tissue. At the single cell level these currents are typically induced by intracellular processes such as spontaneous calcium release (SCR). However, it is not understood how the size and morphology of these focal excitations are related to the electrophysiological properties of cardiac cells. In this paper a detailed physiologically based ionic model is analyzed by projecting the excitation dynamics to a reduced one-dimensional parameter space. Based on this analysis we show that the inward current required for an excitation to occur is largely dictated by the voltage dependence of the inward rectifier potassium current (I(K1)), and is insensitive to the detailed properties of the sodium current. We derive an analytical expression relating the size of a stimulus and the critical current required to induce a propagating action potential (AP), and argue that this relationship determines the necessary number of cells that must undergo SCR in order to induce ectopic activity in cardiac tissue. Finally, we show that, once a focal excitation begins to propagate, its propagation characteristics, such as the conduction velocity and the critical radius for propagation, are largely determined by the sodium and gap junction currents with a substantially lesser effect due to repolarizing potassium currents. These results reveal the relationship between ion channel properties and important tissue scale processes such as excitation and propagation. PMID:25974539

  10. Approximate analytical solutions for excitation and propagation in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, D'Artagnan; Shiferaw, Yohannes

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that a variety of cardiac arrhythmias are initiated by a focal excitation in heart tissue. At the single cell level these currents are typically induced by intracellular processes such as spontaneous calcium release (SCR). However, it is not understood how the size and morphology of these focal excitations are related to the electrophysiological properties of cardiac cells. In this paper a detailed physiologically based ionic model is analyzed by projecting the excitation dynamics to a reduced one-dimensional parameter space. Based on this analysis we show that the inward current required for an excitation to occur is largely dictated by the voltage dependence of the inward rectifier potassium current (IK 1) , and is insensitive to the detailed properties of the sodium current. We derive an analytical expression relating the size of a stimulus and the critical current required to induce a propagating action potential (AP), and argue that this relationship determines the necessary number of cells that must undergo SCR in order to induce ectopic activity in cardiac tissue. Finally, we show that, once a focal excitation begins to propagate, its propagation characteristics, such as the conduction velocity and the critical radius for propagation, are largely determined by the sodium and gap junction currents with a substantially lesser effect due to repolarizing potassium currents. These results reveal the relationship between ion channel properties and important tissue scale processes such as excitation and propagation.

  11. Optimizing a spontaneously contracting heart tissue patch with rat neonatal cardiac cells on fibrin gel

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ze-Wei; Mohamed, Mohamed; Hogan, Matthew; Gutierrez, Laura; Birla, Ravi K.

    2014-01-01

    Engineered cardiac tissues have been constructed with primary or stem cell-derived cardiac cells on natural or synthetic scaffolds. They represent a tremendous potential for treatment of injured areas through addition of tensional support and delivery of sufficient cells. In this study 1 to 6 million (M) neonatal cardiac cells were seeded on fibrin gels to fabricate cardiac tissue patches, and the effects of culture time and cell density on spontaneous contraction rates, twitch forces and paced response frequencies were measured. Electrocardiograms and signal volume index of connexin 43 were also analyzed. Patches of 1–6M cell densities exhibited maximal contraction rates between 305–410 bpm within the first 4 days after plating; low cell densities (1–3M) patches sustained rhythmic contraction longer than high cell densities (4–6M). Patches with 1–6 M cell densities generated contractile forces in the range 2.245–14.065 mN/mm3 on days 4–6. Upon patch formation, a paced response frequency of approximately 6 Hz was obtained, and decreased to approximately 3 Hz after 6 days of culture. High cell density patches contained a thicker real cardiac tissue layer which generated higher R wave amplitudes; however, low density patches had a greater signal volume index of connexin 43. In addition, all patches manifested endothelial cell growth and robust nuclear division. The present study demonstrates that the proper time for in vivo implantation of this cardiac construct is just at patch formation and patches with 3–4M cell densities are the best candidates. PMID:24771636

  12. A Microfabricated Platform to Measure and Manipulate the Mechanics of Engineered Cardiac Microtissues

    PubMed Central

    Boudou, Thomas; Legant, Wesley R.; Mu, Anbin; Borochin, Michael A.; Thavandiran, Nimalan; Radisic, Milica; Zandstra, Peter W.; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Margulies, Kenneth B.

    2012-01-01

    Engineered myocardial tissues can be used to elucidate fundamental features of myocardial biology, develop organotypic in vitro model systems, and as engineered tissue constructs for replacing damaged heart tissue in vivo. However, a key limitation is an inability to test the wide range of parameters (cell source, mechanical, soluble and electrical stimuli) that might impact the engineered tissue in a high-throughput manner and in an environment that mimics native heart tissue. Here we used microelectromechanical systems technology to generate arrays of cardiac microtissues (CMTs) embedded within three-dimensional micropatterned matrices. Microcantilevers simultaneously constrain CMT contraction and report forces generated by the CMTs in real time. We demonstrate the ability to routinely produce ∼200 CMTs per million cardiac cells (<1 neonatal rat heart) whose spontaneous contraction frequency, duration, and forces can be tracked. Independently varying the mechanical stiffness of the cantilevers and collagen matrix revealed that both the dynamic force of cardiac contraction as well as the basal static tension within the CMT increased with boundary or matrix rigidity. Cell alignment is, however, reduced within a stiff collagen matrix; therefore, despite producing higher force, CMTs constructed from higher density collagen have a lower cross-sectional stress than those constructed from lower density collagen. We also study the effect of electrical stimulation on cell alignment and force generation within CMTs and we show that the combination of electrical stimulation and auxotonic load strongly improves both the structure and the function of the CMTs. Finally, we demonstrate the suitability of our technique for high-throughput monitoring of drug-induced changes in spontaneous frequency or contractility in CMTs as well as high-speed imaging of calcium dynamics using fluorescent dyes. Together, these results highlight the potential for this approach to quantitatively

  13. Oxygen Releasing Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Camci-Unal, Gulden; Alemdar, Neslihan; Annabi, Nasim; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Due to the increasing demand to generate thick and vascularized tissue engineered constructs, novel strategies are currently being developed. An emerging example is the generation of oxygen-releasing biomaterials to tackle mass transport and diffusion limitations within engineered tissue-like constructs. Biomaterials containing oxygen releasing molecules can be fabricated in various forms such as, hybrid thin films, microparticles, or three dimensional (3D) scaffolds. In this perspective, we will summarize various oxygen-releasing reagents and their potential applications in regenerative engineering. Moreover, we will review the main approaches to fabricate oxygen-releasing biomaterials for a range of tissue engineering applications. PMID:23853426

  14. Tissue engineering in the rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ringe, Jochen; Sittinger, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Diseases such as degenerative or rheumatoid arthritis are accompanied by joint destruction. Clinically applied tissue engineering technologies like autologous chondrocyte implantation, matrix-assisted chondrocyte implantation, or in situ recruitment of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells target the treatment of traumatic defects or of early osteoarthritis. Inflammatory conditions in the joint hamper the application of tissue engineering during chronic joint diseases. Here, most likely, cartilage formation is impaired and engineered neocartilage will be degraded. Based on the observations that mesenchymal stem cells (a) develop into joint tissues and (b) in vitro and in vivo show immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory qualities indicating a transplant-protecting activity, these cells are prominent candidates for future tissue engineering approaches for the treatment of rheumatic diseases. Tissue engineering also provides highly organized three-dimensional in vitro culture models of human cells and their extracellular matrix for arthritis research. PMID:19232063

  15. Engineering the heart: Evaluation of conductive nanomaterials for improving implant integration and cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jin; Chen, Jun; Sun, Hongyu; Qiu, Xiaozhong; Mou, Yongchao; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yuwei; Li, Xia; Han, Yao; Duan, Cuimi; Tang, Rongyu; Wang, Chunlan; Zhong, Wen; Liu, Jie; Luo, Ying; (Mengqiu) Xing, Malcolm; Wang, Changyong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, carbon nanotubes together with other types of conductive materials have been used to enhance the viability and function of cardiomyocytes in vitro. Here we demonstrated a paradigm to construct ECTs for cardiac repair using conductive nanomaterials. Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were incorporated into gelatin hydrogel scaffolds to construct three-dimensional ECTs. We found that SWNTs could provide cellular microenvironment in vitro favorable for cardiac contraction and the expression of electrochemical associated proteins. Upon implantation into the infarct hearts in rats, ECTs structurally integrated with the host myocardium, with different types of cells observed to mutually invade into implants and host tissues. The functional measurements showed that SWNTs were essential to improve the performance of ECTs in inhibiting pathological deterioration of myocardium. This work suggested that conductive nanomaterials hold therapeutic potential in engineering cardiac tissues to repair myocardial infarction. PMID:24429673

  16. Engineering the heart: Evaluation of conductive nanomaterials for improving implant integration and cardiac function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jin; Chen, Jun; Sun, Hongyu; Qiu, Xiaozhong; Mou, Yongchao; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yuwei; Li, Xia; Han, Yao; Duan, Cuimi; Tang, Rongyu; Wang, Chunlan; Zhong, Wen; Liu, Jie; Luo, Ying; (Mengqiu) Xing, Malcolm; Wang, Changyong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, carbon nanotubes together with other types of conductive materials have been used to enhance the viability and function of cardiomyocytes in vitro. Here we demonstrated a paradigm to construct ECTs for cardiac repair using conductive nanomaterials. Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were incorporated into gelatin hydrogel scaffolds to construct three-dimensional ECTs. We found that SWNTs could provide cellular microenvironment in vitro favorable for cardiac contraction and the expression of electrochemical associated proteins. Upon implantation into the infarct hearts in rats, ECTs structurally integrated with the host myocardium, with different types of cells observed to mutually invade into implants and host tissues. The functional measurements showed that SWNTs were essential to improve the performance of ECTs in inhibiting pathological deterioration of myocardium. This work suggested that conductive nanomaterials hold therapeutic potential in engineering cardiac tissues to repair myocardial infarction.

  17. Animal Models for Adipose Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Uthamanthil, Rajesh; Beahm, Elisabeth; Frye, Cindy

    2008-01-01

    Abstract There is a critical need for adequate reconstruction of soft tissue defects resulting from tumor resection, trauma, and congenital abnormalities. To be sure, adipose tissue engineering strategies offer promising solutions. However, before clinical translation can occur, efficacy must be proven in animal studies. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of animal models currently employed for adipose tissue engineering. PMID:18544014

  18. Amelogenin in Enamel Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter the basic premises, the recent findings and the future challenges in the use of amelogenin for enamel tissue engineering are being discoursed on. Results emerging from the experiments performed to assess the fundamental physicochemical mechanisms of the interaction of amelogenin, the main protein of the enamel matrix, and the growing crystals of apatite, are mentioned, alongside a moderately comprehensive literature review of the subject at hand. The clinical importance of understanding this protein/mineral interaction at the nanoscale are highlighted as well as the potential for tooth enamel to act as an excellent model system for studying some of the essential aspects of biomineralization processes in general. The dominant paradigm stating that amelogenin directs the uniaxial growth of apatite crystals in enamel by slowing down the growth of (hk0) faces on which it adheres is being questioned based on the results demonstrating the ability of amelogenin to promote the nucleation and crystal growth of apatite under constant titration conditions designed to mimic those present in the developing enamel matrix. The role of numerous minor components of the enamel matrix is being highlighted as essential and impossible to compensate for by utilizing its more abundant ingredients only. It is concluded that the three major aspects of amelogenesis outlined hereby – (1) the assembly of amelogenin and other enamel matrix proteins, (2) the proteolytic activity, and (3) crystallization – need to be in precise synergy with each other in order for the grounds for the proper imitation of amelogenesis in the lab to be created. PMID:26545753

  19. Amelogenin in Enamel Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Uskoković, Vuk

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter the basic premises, the recent findings and the future challenges in the use of amelogenin for enamel tissue engineering are being discoursed on. Results emerging from the experiments performed to assess the fundamental physicochemical mechanisms of the interaction of amelogenin, the main protein of the enamel matrix, and the growing crystals of apatite, are mentioned, alongside a moderately comprehensive literature review of the subject at hand. The clinical importance of understanding this protein/mineral interaction at the nanoscale are highlighted as well as the potential for tooth enamel to act as an excellent model system for studying some of the essential aspects of biomineralization processes in general. The dominant paradigm stating that amelogenin directs the uniaxial growth of apatite crystals in enamel by slowing down the growth of (hk0) faces on which it adheres is being questioned based on the results demonstrating the ability of amelogenin to promote the nucleation and crystal growth of apatite under constant titration conditions designed to mimic those present in the developing enamel matrix. The role of numerous minor components of the enamel matrix is being highlighted as essential and impossible to compensate for by utilizing its more abundant ingredients only. It is concluded that the three major aspects of amelogenesis outlined hereby--(1) the assembly of amelogenin and other enamel matrix proteins, (2) the proteolytic activity, and (3) crystallization--need to be in precise synergy with each other in order for the grounds for the proper imitation of amelogenesis in the lab to be created. PMID:26545753

  20. Cardiac tissue slices: preparation, handling, and successful optical mapping.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ken; Lee, Peter; Mirams, Gary R; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Borg, Thomas K; Gavaghan, David J; Kohl, Peter; Bollensdorff, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Cardiac tissue slices are becoming increasingly popular as a model system for cardiac electrophysiology and pharmacology research and development. Here, we describe in detail the preparation, handling, and optical mapping of transmembrane potential and intracellular free calcium concentration transients (CaT) in ventricular tissue slices from guinea pigs and rabbits. Slices cut in the epicardium-tangential plane contained well-aligned in-slice myocardial cell strands ("fibers") in subepicardial and midmyocardial sections. Cut with a high-precision slow-advancing microtome at a thickness of 350 to 400 μm, tissue slices preserved essential action potential (AP) properties of the precutting Langendorff-perfused heart. We identified the need for a postcutting recovery period of 36 min (guinea pig) and 63 min (rabbit) to reach 97.5% of final steady-state values for AP duration (APD) (identified by exponential fitting). There was no significant difference between the postcutting recovery dynamics in slices obtained using 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime or blebistatin as electromechanical uncouplers during the cutting process. A rapid increase in APD, seen after cutting, was caused by exposure to ice-cold solution during the slicing procedure, not by tissue injury, differences in uncouplers, or pH-buffers (bicarbonate; HEPES). To characterize intrinsic patterns of CaT, AP, and conduction, a combination of multipoint and field stimulation should be used to avoid misinterpretation based on source-sink effects. In summary, we describe in detail the preparation, mapping, and data analysis approaches for reproducible cardiac tissue slice-based investigations into AP and CaT dynamics. PMID:25595366

  1. Cardiac tissue slices: preparation, handling, and successful optical mapping

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ken; Lee, Peter; Mirams, Gary R.; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Borg, Thomas K.; Gavaghan, David J.; Kohl, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac tissue slices are becoming increasingly popular as a model system for cardiac electrophysiology and pharmacology research and development. Here, we describe in detail the preparation, handling, and optical mapping of transmembrane potential and intracellular free calcium concentration transients (CaT) in ventricular tissue slices from guinea pigs and rabbits. Slices cut in the epicardium-tangential plane contained well-aligned in-slice myocardial cell strands (“fibers”) in subepicardial and midmyocardial sections. Cut with a high-precision slow-advancing microtome at a thickness of 350 to 400 μm, tissue slices preserved essential action potential (AP) properties of the precutting Langendorff-perfused heart. We identified the need for a postcutting recovery period of 36 min (guinea pig) and 63 min (rabbit) to reach 97.5% of final steady-state values for AP duration (APD) (identified by exponential fitting). There was no significant difference between the postcutting recovery dynamics in slices obtained using 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime or blebistatin as electromechanical uncouplers during the cutting process. A rapid increase in APD, seen after cutting, was caused by exposure to ice-cold solution during the slicing procedure, not by tissue injury, differences in uncouplers, or pH-buffers (bicarbonate; HEPES). To characterize intrinsic patterns of CaT, AP, and conduction, a combination of multipoint and field stimulation should be used to avoid misinterpretation based on source-sink effects. In summary, we describe in detail the preparation, mapping, and data analysis approaches for reproducible cardiac tissue slice-based investigations into AP and CaT dynamics. PMID:25595366

  2. Optical Imaging of Voltage and Calcium in Cardiac Cells & Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Herron, Todd J.; Lee, Peter; Jalife, José

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac optical mapping has proven to be a powerful technology for studying cardiovascular function and disease. The development and scientific impact of this methodology are well documented. Because of its relevance in cardiac research, this imaging technology advances at a rapid pace. Here we review technological and scientific developments during the past several years and look also towards the future. First we explore key components of a modern optical mapping setup, focusing on 1) new camera technologies, 2) powerful light-emitting-diodes (from ultraviolet to red) for illumination, 3) improved optical filter technology, 4) new synthetic and optogenetic fluorescent probes, 5) optical mapping with motion and contraction, 6) new multi-parametric optical mapping techniques and 7) photon scattering effects in thick tissue preparations. We then look at recent optical mapping studies in single cells, cardiomyocyte monolayers, atria and whole hearts. Finally, we briefly look into the possible future roles of optical mapping in the development of regenerative cardiac research, cardiac cell therapies, and molecular genetic advances. PMID:22343556

  3. Optical Coherence Tomography in Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Youbo; Yang, Ying; Wang, Ruikang K.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    Tissue engineering holds the promise for a therapeutic solution in regenerative medicine. The primary goal of tissue engineering is the development of physiologically functional and biocompatible tissues/organs being implanted for the repair and replacement of damaged or diseased ones. Given the complexity in the developing processes of engineered tissues, which involves multi-dimensional interactions among cells of different types, three-dimensionally constructed scaffolds, and actively intervening bioreactors, a capable real-time imaging tool is critically required for expanding our knowledge about the developing process of desired tissues or organs. It has been recognized that optical coherence tomography (OCT), an emerging noninvasive imaging technique that provides high spatial resolution (up to the cellular level) and three-dimensional imaging capability, is a promising investigative tool for tissue engineering. This chapter discusses the existing and potential applications of OCT in tissue engineering. Example OCT investigations of the three major components of tissue engineering, i.e., cells, scaffolds, and bioreactors are overviewed. Imaging examples of OCT and its enabling functions and variants, e.g., Doppler OCT, polarization-sensitive OCT, optical coherence microscopy are emphasized. Remaining challenges in the application of OCT to tissue engineering are discussed, and the prospective solutions including the combination of OCT with other high-contrast and high-resolution modalities such as two-photon fluorescence microscopy are suggested as well. It is expected that OCT, along with its functional variants, will make important contributions toward revealing the complex cellular dynamics in engineered tissues as well as help us culture demanding tissue/organ implants that will advance regenerative medicine.

  4. Biomaterials for hollow organ tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hendow, Eseelle K; Guhmann, Pauline; Wright, Bernice; Sofokleous, Panagiotis; Parmar, Nina; Day, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a rapidly advancing field that is likely to transform how medicine is practised in the near future. For hollow organs such as those found in the cardiovascular and respiratory systems or gastrointestinal tract, tissue engineering can provide replacement of the entire organ or provide restoration of function to specific regions. Larger tissue-engineered constructs often require biomaterial-based scaffold structures to provide support and structure for new tissue growth. Consideration must be given to the choice of material and manufacturing process to ensure the de novo tissue closely matches the mechanical and physiological properties of the native tissue. This review will discuss some of the approaches taken to date for fabricating hollow organ scaffolds and the selection of appropriate biomaterials. PMID:27014369

  5. The use of animal models in developing the discipline of cardiovascular tissue engineering: a review.

    PubMed

    Rashid, S Tawqeer; Salacinski, Henryk J; Hamilton, George; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2004-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains one of the major causes of death and disability in the Western world. Tissue engineering offers the prospect of being able to meet the demand for replacement of heart valves, vessels for coronary and lower limb bypass surgery and the generation of cardiac tissue for addition to the diseased heart. In order to test prospective tissue-engineered devices, these constructs must first be proven in animal models before receiving CE marking or FDA approval for a clinical trial. The choice of animal depends on the nature of the tissue-engineered construct being tested. Factors that need to be considered include technical requirements of implanting the construct, availability of the animal, cost and ethical considerations. In this paper, we review the history of animal studies in cardiovascular tissue engineering and the uses of animal tissue as sources for tissue engineering. PMID:14697864

  6. Cell-scaffold interaction within engineered tissue.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiping; Liu, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Zhenglong; Chen, Weihua; Yu, Yongzhe; Hu, Qingxi

    2014-05-01

    The structure of a tissue engineering scaffold plays an important role in modulating tissue growth. A novel gelatin-chitosan (Gel-Cs) scaffold with a unique structure produced by three-dimensional printing (3DP) technology combining with vacuum freeze-drying has been developed for tissue-engineering applications. The scaffold composed of overall construction, micro-pore, surface morphology, and effective mechanical property. Such a structure meets the essential design criteria of an ideal engineered scaffold. The favorable cell-matrix interaction supports the active biocompatibility of the structure. The structure is capable of supporting cell attachment and proliferation. Cells seeded into this structure tend to maintain phenotypic shape and secreted large amounts of extracellular matrix (ECM) and the cell growth decreased the mechanical properties of scaffold. This novel biodegradable scaffold has potential applications for tissue engineering based upon its unique structure, which acts to support cell growth. PMID:24631290

  7. 3-dimensional bioprinting for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bon Kang; Choi, Dong Jin; Park, Sang Jun; Kim, Min Sup; Kang, Chang Mo; Kim, Chun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The 3-dimensional (3D) printing technologies, referred to as additive manufacturing (AM) or rapid prototyping (RP), have acquired reputation over the past few years for art, architectural modeling, lightweight machines, and tissue engineering applications. Among these applications, tissue engineering field using 3D printing has attracted the attention from many researchers. 3D bioprinting has an advantage in the manufacture of a scaffold for tissue engineering applications, because of rapid-fabrication, high-precision, and customized-production, etc. In this review, we will introduce the principles and the current state of the 3D bioprinting methods. Focusing on some of studies that are being current application for biomedical and tissue engineering fields using printed 3D scaffolds. PMID:27114828

  8. Liposomes in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Nelson; Martins, Albino; Reis, Rui L.; Neves, Nuno M.

    2014-01-01

    Liposomes are vesicular structures made of lipids that are formed in aqueous solutions. Structurally, they resemble the lipid membrane of living cells. Therefore, they have been widely investigated, since the 1960s, as models to study the cell membrane, and as carriers for protection and/or delivery of bioactive agents. They have been used in different areas of research including vaccines, imaging, applications in cosmetics and tissue engineering. Tissue engineering is defined as a strategy for promoting the regeneration of tissues for the human body. This strategy may involve the coordinated application of defined cell types with structured biomaterial scaffolds to produce living structures. To create a new tissue, based on this strategy, a controlled stimulation of cultured cells is needed, through a systematic combination of bioactive agents and mechanical signals. In this review, we highlight the potential role of liposomes as a platform for the sustained and local delivery of bioactive agents for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine approaches. PMID:25401172

  9. Nanostructured Capsules for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Correia, Clara R; Reis, Rui L; Mano, João F

    2015-01-01

    Polymeric multilayered capsules (PMCs) have found great applicability in bioencapsulation, an evolving branch of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here, we describe the production of hierarchical PMCs composed by an external multilayered membrane by layer-by-layer assembly of poly(L-lysine), alginate, and chitosan. The core of the PMCs is liquified and encapsulates human adipose stem cells and surface-functionalized collagen II-TGF-β3 poly(L-lactic acid) microparticles for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:26445839

  10. Bone Tissue Engineering: Recent Advances and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Ami R.; Laurencin, Cato T.; Nukavarapu, Syam P.

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of bone disorders and conditions has trended steeply upward and is expected to double by 2020, especially in populations where aging is coupled with increased obesity and poor physical activity. Engineered bone tissue has been viewed as a potential alternative to the conventional use of bone grafts, due to their limitless supply and no disease transmission. However, bone tissue engineering practices have not proceeded to clinical practice due to several limitations or challenges. Bone tissue engineering aims to induce new functional bone regeneration via the synergistic combination of biomaterials, cells, and factor therapy. In this review, we discuss the fundamentals of bone tissue engineering, highlighting the current state of this field. Further, we review the recent advances of biomaterial and cell-based research, as well as approaches used to enhance bone regeneration. Specifically, we discuss widely investigated biomaterial scaffolds, micro- and nano-structural properties of these scaffolds, and the incorporation of biomimetic properties and/or growth factors. In addition, we examine various cellular approaches, including the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), embryonic stem cells (ESCs), adult stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and their clinical application strengths and limitations. We conclude by overviewing the challenges that face the bone tissue engineering field, such as the lack of sufficient vascularization at the defect site, and the research aimed at functional bone tissue engineering. These challenges will drive future research in the field. PMID:23339648

  11. Cardiac dysfunction among soft tissue sarcoma patients in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Shantakumar, Sumitra; Olsen, Morten; Vo, Thao T; Nørgaard, Mette; Pedersen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Soft tissue sarcoma (STS) patients may experience post-treatment cardiotoxicity, yet no population-based data exist. We examined the incidence of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) decline, heart failure, and cardiac death following STS diagnosis among adults, using Danish patient registries and medical record review. Patients and methods LVEF decline was examined in a regional cohort of STS patients diagnosed during 1997–2011 in Western Denmark for whom cardiac imaging data were available. LVEF decline was defined as an absolute decline from baseline to follow-up of 10% or more, or, where baseline imaging was not available, a decline below the lower limit of normal (or 40%) for a follow-up LVEF. Heart failure and cardiac death were investigated in a national Danish cohort of all STS patients diagnosed from 2000 to 2009. We followed patients from STS diagnosis until heart failure, cardiac death, emigration or December 31, 2012 (whichever occurred first). Results The incidence rate of LVEF decline for the regional cohort with follow-up data (N=100, five events) or baseline and follow-up measurements (N=75, 19 events) was 16.8 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.0–40.3) and 108 (95% CI: 69–170), respectively, per 1,000 person-years. In the national cohort (N=1,187), the incidence of heart failure (40 events) and cardiac death (15 events) was 7.3 (95% CI: 5.4–10.0) and 2.7 (95% CI: 1.6–4.5), respectively, per 1,000 person-years. The strongest predictors of heart failure were doxorubicin treatment (hazard ratio [HR] =2.2, 95% CI: 0.5–10.2) and pre-existing cardiovascular disease (HR=6.3, 95% CI: 0.98–40.6). Conclusion LVEF decline occurred more frequently compared to heart failure or cardiac death in a nationally representative cohort of Danish STS patients. PMID:27186077

  12. Engineering a growth factor embedded nanofiber matrix niche to promote vascularization for functional cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Rajesh; Kumaraswamy, Priyadharshini; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Sethuraman, Swaminathan

    2016-08-01

    The major loss of tissue extracellular matrix (ECM) after myocardial ischemia is a serious burden that gradually leads to heart failure. Due to lack of available treatment methods to restore the cardiac function, various research strategies have come up to treat the ischemic myocardium. However these have met with limited success due to the complexity of the cardiac tissue, which exhibits a nanofibrous collagenous matrix with spatio-temporal localization of a combination of growth factors. To mimic the topographical and chemical cues of the natural cardiac tissue, we have fabricated a growth factor embedded nanofibrous scaffold through electrospinning. In our previous work, we have reported a nanofibrous matrix made of PLCL and PEOz with an average diameter of 500 nm. The scaffold properties were specifically characterized in vitro for cardio-compatibility. In the present study, we have loaded dual growth factors VEGF and bFGF in the nanofiber matrix and investigated its suitability for cardiac tissue engineering. The encapsulation and release of dual growth factors from the matrix were studied using XPS and ELISA. Bioactivity of the loaded growth factors towards proliferation and migration of endothelial cells (HUVECs) was evaluated through MTS and Boyden chamber assays respectively. The efficiency of growth factors on the nanofibrous matrix to activate signaling molecules was studied in HUVECs through gene expression analysis. Preclinical evaluation of the growth factor embedded nanofibrous patch in a rabbit acute myocardial infarction (AMI) model was studied and cardiac function assessment was made through ECG and echocardiography. The evidence for angiogenesis in the patch secured regions was analyzed through histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Our results confirm the effectiveness of growth factor embedded nanofiber matrix in restoration of cardiac function after ischemia when compared to conventional patch material thereby exhibiting promise as a

  13. Engineering cell attachments to scaffolds in cartilage tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steward, Andrew J.; Liu, Yongxing; Wagner, Diane R.

    2011-04-01

    One of the challenges of tissue engineering, a promising cell-based treatment for damaged or diseased cartilage, is designing the scaffold that provides structure while the tissue regenerates. In addition to the scaffold material's biocompatibility, mechanical properties, and ease of manufacturing, scaffold interactions with the cells must also be considered. In cartilage tissue engineering, a range of scaffolds with various degrees of cell attachment have been proposed, but the attachment density and type have yet to be optimized. Several techniques have been developed to modulate cell adhesion to the scaffold. These studies suggest that the need for cell attachment in cartilage tissue engineering may vary with cell type, stage of differentiation, culture condition, and scaffold material. Further studies will elucidate the role of cell attachment in cartilage regeneration and enhance efforts to engineer cell-based cartilage therapies.

  14. Tissue Engineering Chamber Promotes Adipose Tissue Regeneration in Adipose Tissue Engineering Models Through Induced Aseptic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhangsong; Dong, Ziqing; Chang, Qiang; Zhan, Weiqing; Zeng, Zhaowei; Zhang, Shengchang

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering chamber (TEC) makes it possible to generate significant amounts of mature, vascularized, stable, and transferable adipose tissue. However, little is known about the role of the chamber in tissue engineering. Therefore, to investigate the role of inflammatory response and the change in mechanotransduction started by TEC after implantation, we placed a unique TEC model on the surface of the groin fat pads in rats to study the expression of cytokines and tissue development in the TEC. The number of infiltrating cells was counted, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) expression levels in the chamber at multiple time points postimplantation were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Tissue samples were collected at various time points and labeled for specific cell populations. The result showed that new adipose tissue formed in the chamber at day 60. Also, the expression of MCP-1 and VEGF in the chamber decreased slightly from an early stage as well as the number of the infiltrating cells. A large number of CD34+/perilipin− perivascular cells could be detected at day 30. Also, the CD34+/perilipin+ adipose precursor cell numbers increased sharply by day 45 and then decreased by day 60. CD34−/perilipin+ mature adipocytes were hard to detect in the chamber content at day 30, but their number increased and then peaked at day 60. Ki67-positive cells could be found near blood vessels and their number decreased sharply over time. Masson's trichrome showed that collagen was the dominant component of the chamber content at early stage and was replaced by newly formed small adipocytes over time. Our findings suggested that the TEC implantation could promote the proliferation of adipose precursor cells derived from local adipose tissue, increase angiogenesis, and finally lead to spontaneous adipogenesis by inducing aseptic inflammation and changing local mechanotransduction. PMID:24559078

  15. Tissue Engineering: Step Ahead in Maxillofacial Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Raj; Raval, Rushik; Khandeparker, Rakshit Vijay Sinai; Chidrawar, Swati K; Khan, Abdul Ahad; Ganpat, Makne Sachin

    2015-01-01

    Within the precedent decade, a new field of “tissue engineering” or “tissue regeneration” emerge that offers an innovative and exhilarating substitute for maxillofacial reconstruction. It offers a new option to supplement existing treatment regimens for reconstruction/regeneration of the oral and craniofacial complex, which includes the teeth, periodontium, bones, soft tissues (oral mucosa, conjunctiva, skin), salivary glands, and the temporomandibular joint (bone and cartilage), as well as blood vessels, muscles, tendons, and nerves. Tissue engineering is based on harvesting the stem cells which are having potential to form an organ. Harvested cells are then transferred into scaffolds that are manufactured in a laboratory to resemble the structure of the desired tissue to be replaced. This article reviews the principles of tissue engineering and its various applications in oral and maxillofacial surgery. PMID:26435634

  16. Human progenitor cells derived from cardiac adipose tissue ameliorate myocardial infarction in rodents.

    PubMed

    Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Soler-Botija, Carolina; Farré, Jordi; Sepúlveda, Pilar; Raya, Angel; Roura, Santiago; Prat-Vidal, Cristina; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Montero, José Anastasio; Büscher, Dirk; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2010-11-01

    Myocardial infarction caused by vascular occlusion results in the formation of nonfunctional fibrous tissue. Cumulative evidence indicates that cell therapy modestly improves cardiac function; thus, novel cell sources with the potential to repair injured tissue are actively sought. Here, we identify and characterize a cell population of cardiac adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells (ATDPCs) from biopsies of human adult cardiac adipose tissue. Cardiac ATDPCs express a mesenchymal stem cell-like marker profile (strongly positive for CD105, CD44, CD166, CD29 and CD90) and have immunosuppressive capacity. Moreover, cardiac ATDPCs have an inherent cardiac-like phenotype and were able to express de novo myocardial and endothelial markers in vitro but not to differentiate into adipocytes. In addition, when cardiac ATDPCs were transplanted into injured myocardium in mouse and rat models of myocardial infarction, the engrafted cells expressed cardiac (troponin I, sarcomeric α-actinin) and endothelial (CD31) markers, vascularization increased, and infarct size was reduced in mice and rats. Moreover, significant differences between control and cell-treated groups were found in fractional shortening and ejection fraction, and the anterior wall remained significantly thicker 30days after cardiac delivery of ATDPCs. Finally, cardiac ATDPCs secreted proangiogenic factors under in vitro hypoxic conditions, suggesting a paracrine effect to promote local vascularization. Our results indicate that the population of progenitor cells isolated from human cardiac adipose tissue (cardiac ATDPCs) may be valid candidates for future use in cell therapy to regenerate injured myocardium. PMID:20713059

  17. Electrical Pacing of Cardiac Tissue Including Potassium Inward Rectification

    PubMed Central

    Galappaththige, Suran; Roth, Bradley J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study cardiac tissue is stimulated electrically through a small unipolar electrode. Numerical simulations predict that around an electrode are adjacent regions of depolarization and hyperpolarization. Experiments have shown that during pacing of resting cardiac tissue the hyperpolarization is often inhibited. Our goal is to determine if the inward rectifying potassium current (IK1) causes the inhibition of hyperpolarization. Numerical simulations were carried out using the bidomain model with potassium dynamics specified to be inward rectifying. In the simulations, adjacent regions of depolarization and hyperpolarization were observed surrounding the electrode. For cathodal currents the virtual anode produces a hyperpolarization that decreases over time. For long duration pulses the current-voltage curve is non-linear, with very small hyperpolarization compared to depolarization. For short pulses, the hyperpolarization is more prominent. Without the inward potassium rectification, the current voltage curve is linear and the hyperpolarization is evident for both long and short pulses. In conclusion, the inward rectification of the potassium current explains the inhibition of hyperpolarization for long duration stimulus pulses, but not for short duration pulses. PMID:26057242

  18. Tissue engineered constructs for peripheral nerve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, P. J.; Wood, M. D.; Moore, A. M.; Mackinnon, S. E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Tissue engineering has been defined as “an interdisciplinary field that applies the principles of engineering and life sciences toward the development of biological substitutes that restore, maintain, or improve tissue function or a whole organ”. Traumatic peripheral nerve injury resulting in significant tissue loss at the zone of injury necessitates the need for a bridge or scaffold for regenerating axons from the proximal stump to reach the distal stump. Methods A review of the literature was used to provide information on the components necessary for the development of a tissue engineered peripheral nerve substitute. Then, a comprehensive review of the literature is presented composed of the studies devoted to this goal. Results Extensive research has been directed toward the development of a tissue engineered peripheral nerve substitute to act as a bridge for regenerating axons from the proximal nerve stump seeking the distal nerve. Ideally this nerve substitute would consist of a scaffold component that mimics the extracellular matrix of the peripheral nerve and a cellular component that serves to stimulate and support regenerating peripheral nerve axons. Conclusions The field of tissue engineering should consider its challenge to not only meet the autograft “gold standard” but also to understand what drives and inhibits nerve regeneration in order to surpass the results of an autograft. PMID:24385980

  19. Chapter 11: Tissue engineering of peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Battiston, Bruno; Raimondo, Stefania; Tos, Pierluigi; Gaidano, Valentina; Audisio, Chiara; Scevola, Anna; Perroteau, Isabelle; Geuna, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    Tissue engineering of peripheral nerves has seen an increasing interest over the last years and, similarly to many other fields of regenerative medicine, great expectations have risen within the general public to its potential clinical application in the treatment of damaged nerves. However, in spite of the scientific advancements, applications to the patients is still very limited and it appears that to optimize the strategy for the tissue engineering of the peripheral nerves in the clinical view, researchers have to strive for a new level of innovation which will bring together (in a multitranslational approach) the main pillars of tissue engineering: namely (1) microsurgery, (2) cell and tissue transplantation, (3) material science, and (4) gene transfer. This review paper provides an overview of these four key approaches to peripheral nerve tissue engineering. While some of these issues will also be specifically addressed in other papers in this special issue on peripheral nerve regeneration of the International Review of Neurobiology, in this paper we will focus on an example of successful translational research in tissue engineering, namely nerve reconstruction by muscle-vein-combined nerve scaffolds. PMID:19682640

  20. An integrated in vitro model of perfused tumor and cardiac tissue

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cancer and cardiovascular disease remain the two leading causes of death in the United States. Progress in treatment to reduce morbidity and mortality will include the development of new drugs. Recent advances in induced pluripotent stem cell technology, tissue engineering, and microfabrication techniques have created a unique opportunity to develop three-dimensional (3D) microphysiological systems that more accurately reflect in vivo human biology when compared with two-dimensional flat systems or animal models. Our group is working to develop 3D microphysiological systems using induced pluripotent stem cell technology that simulates the microcirculation, the cardiac muscle, and the solid tumor, and then to combine these systems into an integrated microphysiological system that simulates perfused cardiac muscle and solid tumor on a single platform. The platform will be initially validated to predict anti-cancer efficacy while minimizing cardiac muscle toxicity. A critical feature will be blood flow through a human microcirculation (capillaries and larger microvessels), which is necessary to overcome diffusion limitations of nutrients and waste products in realistic 3D cultures, and serves to integrate multiple organ systems. This is a necessary and critical feature of any platform that seeks to simulate integrated human organ systems. The results of our project should produce a new paradigm for efficient and accurate drug and toxicity screening, initially for anti-cancer drugs with minimal cardiac side effects, and a platform technology that can be eventually used to integrate multiple major organ systems of the human body. PMID:24565445

  1. Current Trends in Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Péault, Bruno; James, Aaron W.

    2014-01-01

    The development of tissue engineering and regeneration constitutes a new platform for translational medical research. Effective therapies for bone engineering typically employ the coordinated manipulation of cells, biologically active signaling molecules, and biomimetic, biodegradable scaffolds. Bone tissue engineering has become increasingly dependent on the merging of innovations from each of these fields, as they continue to evolve independently. This foreword will highlight some of the most recent advances in bone tissue engineering and regeneration, emphasizing the interconnected fields of stem cell biology, cell signaling biology, and biomaterial research. These include, for example, novel methods for mesenchymal stem cell purification, new methods of Wnt signaling pathway manipulation, and cutting edge computer assisted nanoscale design of bone scaffold materials. In the following special issue, we sought to incorporate these diverse areas of emphasis in order to reflect current trends in the field. PMID:24804256

  2. Tissue engineering: from research to dental clinics

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Vinicius; Bona, Alvaro Della; Cavalcanti, Bruno Neves; Nör, Jacques Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering is an interdisciplinary field that combines the principles of engineering, material and biological sciences toward the development of therapeutic strategies and biological substitutes that restore, maintain, replace or improve biological functions. The association of biomaterials, stem cells, growth and differentiation factors have yielded the development of new treatment opportunities in most of the biomedical areas, including Dentistry. The objective of this paper is to present the principles underlying tissue engineering and the current scenario, the challenges and the perspectives of this area in Dentistry. Significance The growth of tissue engineering as a research field have provided a novel set of therapeutic strategies for biomedical applications. The emerging knowledge arisen from studies in the dental area may translate into new methods for caring or improving the alternatives used to treat patients in the daily clinic. PMID:22240278

  3. Silk scaffolds for musculoskeletal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yao, Danyu; Liu, Haifeng; Fan, Yubo

    2016-02-01

    The musculoskeletal system, which includes bone, cartilage, tendon/ligament, and skeletal muscle, is becoming the targets for tissue engineering because of the high need for their repair and regeneration. Numerous factors would affect the use of musculoskeletal tissue engineering for tissue regeneration ranging from cells used for scaffold seeding to the manufacture and structures of materials. The essential function of the scaffolds is to convey growth factors as well as cells to the target site to aid the regeneration of the injury. Among the variety of biomaterials used in scaffold engineering, silk fibroin is recognized as an ideal material for its impressive cytocompatibility, slow biodegradability, and excellent mechanical properties. The current review describes the advances made in the fabrication of silk fibroin scaffolds with different forms such as films, particles, electrospun fibers, hydrogels, three-dimensional porous scaffolds, and their applications in the regeneration of musculoskeletal tissues. PMID:26445979

  4. Engineering complex orthopaedic tissues via strategic biomimicry.

    PubMed

    Qu, Dovina; Mosher, Christopher Z; Boushell, Margaret K; Lu, Helen H

    2015-03-01

    The primary current challenge in regenerative engineering resides in the simultaneous formation of more than one type of tissue, as well as their functional assembly into complex tissues or organ systems. Tissue-tissue synchrony is especially important in the musculoskeletal system, wherein overall organ function is enabled by the seamless integration of bone with soft tissues such as ligament, tendon, or cartilage, as well as the integration of muscle with tendon. Therefore, in lieu of a traditional single-tissue system (e.g., bone, ligament), composite tissue scaffold designs for the regeneration of functional connective tissue units (e.g., bone-ligament-bone) are being actively investigated. Closely related is the effort to re-establish tissue-tissue interfaces, which is essential for joining these tissue building blocks and facilitating host integration. Much of the research at the forefront of the field has centered on bioinspired stratified or gradient scaffold designs which aim to recapitulate the structural and compositional inhomogeneity inherent across distinct tissue regions. As such, given the complexity of these musculoskeletal tissue units, the key question is how to identify the most relevant parameters for recapitulating the native structure-function relationships in the scaffold design. Therefore, the focus of this review, in addition to presenting the state-of-the-art in complex scaffold design, is to explore how strategic biomimicry can be applied in engineering tissue connectivity. The objective of strategic biomimicry is to avoid over-engineering by establishing what needs to be learned from nature and defining the essential matrix characteristics that must be reproduced in scaffold design. Application of this engineering strategy for the regeneration of the most common musculoskeletal tissue units (e.g., bone-ligament-bone, muscle-tendon-bone, cartilage-bone) will be discussed in this review. It is anticipated that these exciting efforts will

  5. Engineering Complex Orthopaedic Tissues via Strategic Biomimicry

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Dovina; Mosher, Christopher Z.; Boushell, Margaret K.; Lu, Helen H.

    2014-01-01

    The primary current challenge in regenerative engineering resides in the simultaneous formation of more than one type of tissue, as well as their functional assembly into complex tissues or organ systems. Tissue-tissue synchrony is especially important in the musculoskeletal system, whereby overall organ function is enabled by the seamless integration of bone with soft tissues such as ligament, tendon, or cartilage, as well as the integration of muscle with tendon. Therefore, in lieu of a traditional single-tissue system (e.g. bone, ligament), composite tissue scaffold designs for the regeneration of functional connective tissue units (e.g. bone-ligament-bone) are being actively investigated. Closely related is the effort to re-establish tissue-tissue interfaces, which is essential for joining these tissue building blocks and facilitating host integration. Much of the research at the forefront of the field has centered on bioinspired stratified or gradient scaffold designs which aim to recapitulate the structural and compositional inhomogeneity inherent across distinct tissue regions. As such, given the complexity of these musculoskeletal tissue units, the key question is how to identify the most relevant parameters for recapitulating the native structure-function relationships in the scaffold design. Therefore, the focus of this review, in addition to presenting the state-of-the-art in complex scaffold design, is to explore how strategic biomimicry can be applied in engineering tissue connectivity. The objective of strategic biomimicry is to avoid over-engineering by establishing what needs to be learned from nature and defining the essential matrix characteristics that must be reproduced in scaffold design. Application of this engineering strategy for the regeneration of the most common musculoskeletal tissue units (e.g. bone-ligament-bone, muscle-tendon-bone, cartilage-bone) will be discussed in this review. It is anticipated that these exciting efforts will

  6. New Era in Health Care: Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Parveen, S; Krishnakumar, K; Sahoo, SK

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Tissue engineering is a rapidly expanding field, which applies the principles and methods of physical sciences, life sciences and engineering to understand physiological and pathological systems and to modify and create cells and tissues for therapeutic applications. It has emerged as a rapidly expanding ‘interdisciplinary field’ that is a significant potential alternative wherein tissue and organ failure is addressed by implanting natural, synthetic, or semi synthetic tissue or organ mimics that grow into the required functionality or that are fully functional from the start. This review presents in a comprehensive manner the various considerations for the reconstruction of various tissues and organs as well as the various applications of this young emerging field in different disciplines. PMID:24692857

  7. The Expanding World of Tissue Engineering: The Building Blocks and New Applications of Tissue Engineered Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Zorlutuna, Pinar; Vrana, Nihal Engin; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering has been growing in the recent years as more products have made it to the market and as new uses for the engineered tissues have emerged, motivating many researchers to engage in this multidisciplinary field of research. Engineered tissues are now not only considered as end products for regenerative medicine, but also have emerged as enabling technologies for other fields of research ranging from drug discovery to biorobotics. This widespread use necessitates a variety of methodologies for production of tissue engineered constructs. In this review, these methods together with their non-clinical applications will be described. First, we will focus on novel materials used in tissue engineering scaffolds; such as recombinant proteins and synthetic, self assembling polypeptides. The recent advances in the modular tissue engineering area will be discussed. Then scaffold-free production methods, based on either cell sheets or cell aggregates will be described. Cell sources used in tissue engineering and new methods that provide improved control over cell behavior such as pathway engineering and biomimetic microenvironments for directing cell differentiation will be discussed. Finally, we will summarize the emerging uses of engineered constructs such as model tissues for drug discovery, cancer research and biorobotics applications. PMID:23268388

  8. Engineering Superficial Zone Features in Tissue Engineered Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tony; Hilton, Matthew J.; Brown, Edward B.; Zuscik, Michael J.; Awad, Hani A.

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in cartilage tissue engineering is the need to recreate the native tissue's anisotropic extracellular matrix structure. This anisotropy has important mechanical and biological consequences and could be crucial for integrative repair. Here we report that hydrodynamic conditions that mimic the motion-induced flow fields in between the articular surfaces in the synovial joint induce the formation of a distinct superficial layer in tissue engineered cartilage hydrogels, with enhanced production of cartilage matrix proteoglycan and type II collagen. Moreover, the flow stimulation at the surface induces the production of the surface zone protein Proteoglycan 4 (aka PRG4 or lubricin). Analysis of second harmonic generation signature of collagen in this superficial layer reveals a highly aligned fibrillar matrix that resembles the alignment pattern in native tissue's surface zone, suggesting that mimicking synovial fluid flow at the cartilage surface in hydrodynamic bioreactors could be key to creating engineered cartilage with superficial zone features. PMID:23239161

  9. Tough and Flexible CNT-Polymeric Hybrid Scaffolds for Engineering Cardiac Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Kharaziha, Mahshid; Ryon Shin, Su; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Nur Topkaya, Seda; Masoumi, Nafiseh; Annabi, Nasim; Dokmeci, Mehmet. R.

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, a considerable amount of effort has been devoted toward the development of biomimetic scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering. However, most of the previous scaffolds have been electrically insulating or lacked the structural and mechanical robustness to engineer cardiac tissue constructs with suitable electrophysiological functions. Here, we developed tough and flexible hybrid scaffolds with enhanced electrical properties composed of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) embedded aligned poly(glycerol sebacate):gelatin (PG) electrospun nanofibers. Incorporation of varying concentrations of CNTs from 0 to 1.5% within the PG nanofibrous scaffolds (CNT-PG scaffolds) notably enhanced fiber alignment and improved the electrical conductivity and toughness of the scaffolds while maintaining the viability, retention, alignment, and contractile activities of cardiomyocytes (CMs) seeded on the scaffolds. The resulting CNT-PG scaffolds resulted in stronger spontaneous and synchronous beating behavior (3.5-fold lower excitation threshold and 2.8-fold higher maximum capture rate) compared to those cultured on PG scaffold. Overall, our findings demonstrated that aligned CNT-PG scaffold exhibited superior mechanical properties with enhanced CM beating properties. It is envisioned that the proposed hybrid scaffolds can be useful for generating cardiac tissue constructs with improved organization and maturation. PMID:24927679

  10. Tough and flexible CNT-polymeric hybrid scaffolds for engineering cardiac constructs.

    PubMed

    Kharaziha, Mahshid; Shin, Su Ryon; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Topkaya, Seda Nur; Masoumi, Nafiseh; Annabi, Nasim; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-08-01

    In the past few years, a considerable amount of effort has been devoted toward the development of biomimetic scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering. However, most of the previous scaffolds have been electrically insulating or lacked the structural and mechanical robustness to engineer cardiac tissue constructs with suitable electrophysiological functions. Here, we developed tough and flexible hybrid scaffolds with enhanced electrical properties composed of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) embedded aligned poly(glycerol sebacate):gelatin (PG) electrospun nanofibers. Incorporation of varying concentrations of CNTs from 0 to 1.5% within the PG nanofibrous scaffolds (CNT-PG scaffolds) notably enhanced fiber alignment and improved the electrical conductivity and toughness of the scaffolds while maintaining the viability, retention, alignment, and contractile activities of cardiomyocytes (CMs) seeded on the scaffolds. The resulting CNT-PG scaffolds resulted in stronger spontaneous and synchronous beating behavior (3.5-fold lower excitation threshold and 2.8-fold higher maximum capture rate) compared to those cultured on PG scaffold. Overall, our findings demonstrated that aligned CNT-PG scaffold exhibited superior mechanical properties with enhanced CM beating properties. It is envisioned that the proposed hybrid scaffolds can be useful for generating cardiac tissue constructs with improved organization and maturation. PMID:24927679

  11. The materials used in bone tissue engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Tereshchenko, V. P. Kirilova, I. A.; Sadovoy, M. A.; Larionov, P. M.

    2015-11-17

    Bone tissue engineering looking for an alternative solution to the problem of skeletal injuries. The method is based on the creation of tissue engineered bone tissue equivalent with stem cells, osteogenic factors, and scaffolds - the carriers of these cells. For production of tissue engineered bone equivalent is advisable to create scaffolds similar in composition to natural extracellular matrix of the bone. This will provide optimal conditions for the cells, and produce favorable physico-mechanical properties of the final construction. This review article gives an analysis of the most promising materials for the manufacture of cell scaffolds. Biodegradable synthetic polymers are the basis for the scaffold, but it alone cannot provide adequate physical and mechanical properties of the construction, and favorable conditions for the cells. Addition of natural polymers improves the strength characteristics and bioactivity of constructions. Of the inorganic compounds, to create cell scaffolds the most widely used calcium phosphates, which give the structure adequate stiffness and significantly increase its osteoinductive capacity. Signaling molecules do not affect the physico-mechanical properties of the scaffold, but beneficial effect is on the processes of adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of cells. Biodegradation of the materials will help to fulfill the main task of bone tissue engineering - the ability to replace synthetic construct by natural tissues that will restore the original anatomical integrity of the bone.

  12. The materials used in bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tereshchenko, V. P.; Kirilova, I. A.; Sadovoy, M. A.; Larionov, P. M.

    2015-11-01

    Bone tissue engineering looking for an alternative solution to the problem of skeletal injuries. The method is based on the creation of tissue engineered bone tissue equivalent with stem cells, osteogenic factors, and scaffolds - the carriers of these cells. For production of tissue engineered bone equivalent is advisable to create scaffolds similar in composition to natural extracellular matrix of the bone. This will provide optimal conditions for the cells, and produce favorable physico-mechanical properties of the final construction. This review article gives an analysis of the most promising materials for the manufacture of cell scaffolds. Biodegradable synthetic polymers are the basis for the scaffold, but it alone cannot provide adequate physical and mechanical properties of the construction, and favorable conditions for the cells. Addition of natural polymers improves the strength characteristics and bioactivity of constructions. Of the inorganic compounds, to create cell scaffolds the most widely used calcium phosphates, which give the structure adequate stiffness and significantly increase its osteoinductive capacity. Signaling molecules do not affect the physico-mechanical properties of the scaffold, but beneficial effect is on the processes of adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of cells. Biodegradation of the materials will help to fulfill the main task of bone tissue engineering - the ability to replace synthetic construct by natural tissues that will restore the original anatomical integrity of the bone.

  13. Nanostructured Biomaterials for Tissue Engineered Bone Tissue Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chiara, Gardin; Letizia, Ferroni; Lorenzo, Favero; Edoardo, Stellini; Diego, Stomaci; Stefano, Sivolella; Eriberto, Bressan; Barbara, Zavan

    2012-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering strategies are emerging as attractive alternatives to autografts and allografts in bone tissue reconstruction, in particular thanks to their association with nanotechnologies. Nanostructured biomaterials, indeed, mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the natural bone, creating an artificial microenvironment that promotes cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. At the same time, the possibility to easily isolate mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from different adult tissues together with their multi-lineage differentiation potential makes them an interesting tool in the field of bone tissue engineering. This review gives an overview of the most promising nanostructured biomaterials, used alone or in combination with MSCs, which could in future be employed as bone substitutes. Recent works indicate that composite scaffolds made of ceramics/metals or ceramics/polymers are undoubtedly more effective than the single counterparts in terms of osteoconductivity, osteogenicity and osteoinductivity. A better understanding of the interactions between MSCs and nanostructured biomaterials will surely contribute to the progress of bone tissue engineering. PMID:22312283

  14. Bottom-up tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Elbert, Donald L.

    2011-01-01

    Recapitulating the elegant structures formed during development is an extreme synthetic and biological challenge. Great progress has been made in developing materials to support transplanted cells, yet the complexity of tissues is far beyond that found in even the most advanced scaffolds. Self-assembly is a motif used in development and a route for the production of complex materials. Self-assembly of peptides, proteins and other molecules at the nanoscale is promising, but in addition, intriguing ideas are emerging for self-assembly of micron-scale structures. In this brief review, very recent advances in the assembly of micron-scale cell aggregates and microgels will be described and discussed. PMID:21524904

  15. Composite tissue engineering on polycaprolactone nanofiber scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Reed, Courtney R; Han, Li; Andrady, Anthony; Caballero, Montserrat; Jack, Megan C; Collins, James B; Saba, Salim C; Loboa, Elizabeth G; Cairns, Bruce A; van Aalst, John A

    2009-05-01

    Tissue engineering has largely focused on single tissue-type reconstruction (such as bone); however, the basic unit of healing in any clinically relevant scenario is a compound tissue type (such as bone, periosteum, and skin). Nanofibers are submicron fibrils that mimic the extracellular matrix, promoting cellular adhesion, proliferation, and migration. Stem cell manipulation on nanofiber scaffolds holds significant promise for future tissue engineering. This work represents our initial efforts to create the building blocks for composite tissue reflecting the basic unit of healing. Polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibers were electrospun using standard techniques. Human foreskin fibroblasts, murine keratinocytes, and periosteal cells (4-mm punch biopsy) harvested from children undergoing palate repair were grown in appropriate media on PCL nanofibers. Human fat-derived mesenchymal stem cells were osteoinduced on PCL nanofibers. Cell growth was assessed with fluorescent viability staining; cocultured cells were differentiated using antibodies to fibroblast- and keratinocyte-specific surface markers. Osteoinduction was assessed with Alizarin red S. PCL nanofiber scaffolds supported robust growth of fibroblasts, keratinocytes, and periosteal cells. Cocultured periosteal cells (with fibroblasts) and keratinocytes showed improved longevity of the keratinocytes, though growth of these cell types was randomly distributed throughout the scaffold. Robust osteoinduction was noted on PCL nanofibers. Composite tissue engineering using PCL nanofiber scaffolds is possible, though the major obstacles to the trilaminar construct are maintaining an appropriate interface between the tissue types and neovascularization of the composite structure. PMID:19387150

  16. Application of polarization OCT in tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying; Ahearne, Mark; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.; Hu, Bin; Hampson, Karen; El Haj, Alicia J.

    2008-02-01

    For tissue engineering of load-bearing tissues, such as bone, tendon, cartilage, and cornea, it is critical to generate a highly organized extracellular matrix. The major component of the matrix in these tissues is collagen, which usually forms a highly hierarchical structure with increasing scale from fibril to fiber bundles. These bundles are ordered into a 3D network to withstand forces such as tensile, compressive or shear. To induce the formation of organized matrix and create a mimic body environment for tissue engineering, in particular, tendon tissue engineering, we have fabricated scaffolds with features to support the formation of uniaxially orientated collagen bundles. In addition, mechanical stimuli were applied to stimulate tissue formation and matrix organization. In parallel, we seek a nondestructive tool to monitor the changes within the constructs in response to these external stimulations. Polarizationsensitive optical coherence tomography (PSOCT) is a non-destructive technique that provides functional imaging, and possesses the ability to assess in depth the organization of tissue. In this way, an engineered tissue construct can be monitored on-line, and correlated with the application of different stimuli by PSOCT. We have constructed a PSOCT using a superluminescent diode (FWHM 52nm) in this study and produced two types of tendon constructs. The matrix structural evolution under different mechanical stimulation has been evaluated by the PSOCT. The results in this study demonstrate that PSOCT was a powerful tool enabling us to monitor non-destructively and real time the progressive changes in matrix organization and assess the impact of various stimuli on tissue orientation and growth.

  17. Tissue Engineered Strategies for Pseudoarthrosis

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Trovato, Ugo; Loppini, Mattia; Rizzello, Giacomo; Khan, Wasim Sardar; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Numerous classification systems of non-union have been proposed based on: presence or absence of infection, radiographic features, clinical findings, biologic activity, location and shape. The management of pseudarthrosis is strongly related to the type of non-union (infected versus uninfected, atrophic versus hypertrophic). Surgical management of pseudarthrosis is generally effective with a success rate ranging from 75 to 100%. Nevertheless, in a relatively high number of instances several combined treatments are required for the fracture healing. The current gold standard to stimulate the bone regeneration is represented by the revision surgery with the application of autologous bone grafts. However, several approaches have been described to promote and enhance the bone tissue regeneration, including extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT), ultrasound, electromagnetic, bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) and platelet-rich-plasma (PRP). The aim of the present study was to perform a systematic review of the literature evaluating the current therapies to promote and enhance the bone tissue healing. The systematic review was performed according to PRISMA guidelines with a PRISMA checklist and algorithm. Limitations of the present systematic review are mainly related to the scanty quality of the studies available in the literature. Although the therapies previously described for the management of patients with non-unions seems to be effective, the limitations of the included studies, especially the extensive clinical heterogeneity, make not possible to provide clear recommendations regarding the application of these approaches. The problems remain the need to better understand the most effective treatment options, subject to surgical stabilization as a first step. PMID:23248729

  18. Fabrication and evaluation of reconstructed cardiac tissue and its application to bio-actuated microdevices.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Hiroshi; Imagawa, Kentaro; Hoshino, Takayuki; Akiyama, Yoshitake; Morishima, Keisuke

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we proposed to utilize a reconstructed cardiac tissue as microactuator with easy assembly. In a glucose solution, cardiomyocytes can contract autonomously using only chemical energy. However, a single cardiomyocyte is not enough to actuate a microrobot or a mechanical system. Though the output power will increase by using multiple cardiomyocyte, it is difficult to assemble those cardiomyocyte to predefined positions one-by-one using a micromanipulator. Reconstructed cardiac tissue not only will enable researchers to assemble the cells easily and but also has a potential to improve the contractile ability. To realize a bio-actuator in this paper, we reconstructed a microcardiac tissue using an extracellular matrix, and their displacements, displacement frequency, contractile force, and lifetime of the reconstructed cardiac tissue were evaluated. Electrical and pharmacological responses of the reconstructed cardiac tissue were also evaluated. Finally, a bioactuator, a primitive micropillar actuator, was fabricated and applicability of the reconstructed cardiac tissue for bioactuators was evaluated. PMID:20142148

  19. Engineering tissue from human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Metallo, CM; Azarin, SM; Ji, L; De Pablo, JJ; Palecek, SP

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Recent advances in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) biology now offer an alternative cell source for tissue engineers, as these cells are capable of proliferating indefinitely and differentiating to many clinically relevant cell types. Novel culture methods capable of exerting spatial and temporal control over the stem cell microenvironment allow for more efficient expansion of hESCs, and significant advances have been made toward improving our understanding of the biophysical and biochemical cues that direct stem cell fate choices. Effective production of lineage specific progenitors or terminally differentiated cells enables researchers to incorporate hESC derivatives into engineered tissue constructs. Here, we describe current efforts using hESCs as a cell source for tissue engineering applications, highlighting potential advantages of hESCs over current practices as well as challenges which must be overcome. PMID:18194458

  20. Airway tissue engineering for congenital laryngotracheal disease.

    PubMed

    Maughan, Elizabeth; Lesage, Flore; Butler, Colin R; Hynds, Robert E; Hewitt, Richard; Janes, Sam M; Deprest, Jan A; Coppi, Paolo De

    2016-06-01

    Regenerative medicine offers hope of a sustainable solution for severe airway disease by the creation of functional, immunocompatible organ replacements. When considering fetuses and newborns, there is a specific spectrum of airway pathologies that could benefit from cell therapy and tissue engineering applications. While hypoplastic lungs associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) could benefit from cellular based treatments aimed at ameliorating lung function, patients with upper airway obstruction could take advantage from a de novo tissue engineering approach. Moreover, the international acceptance of the EXIT procedure as a means of securing the precarious neonatal airway, together with the advent of fetal surgery as a method of heading off postnatal co-morbidities, offers the revolutionary possibility of extending the clinical indication for tissue-engineered airway transplantation to infants affected by diverse severe congenital laryngotracheal malformations. This article outlines the necessary basic components for regenerative medicine solutions in this potential clinical niche. PMID:27301606

  1. Extracellular Matrix Revisited: Roles in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a heterogeneous, connective network composed of fibrous glycoproteins that coordinate in vivo to provide the physical scaffolding, mechanical stability, and biochemical cues necessary for tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis. This review highlights some of the recently raised aspects of the roles of the ECM as related to the fields of biophysics and biomedical engineering. Fundamental aspects of focus include the role of the ECM as a basic cellular structure, for novel spontaneous network formation, as an ideal scaffold in tissue engineering, and its essential contribution to cell sheet technology. As these technologies move from the laboratory to clinical practice, they are bound to shape the vast field of tissue engineering for medical transplantations. PMID:27230457

  2. Tissue engineering applications of therapeutic cloning.

    PubMed

    Atala, Anthony; Koh, Chester J

    2004-01-01

    Few treatment options are available for patients suffering from diseased and injured organs because of a severe shortage of donor organs available for transplantation. Therapeutic cloning, where the nucleus from a donor cell is transferred into an enucleated oocyte in order to extract pluripotent embryonic stem cells, offers a potentially limitless source of cells for replacement therapy. Scientists in the field of tissue engineering apply the principles of cell transplantation, material science, and engineering to construct biological substitutes that will restore and maintain normal function in diseased and injured tissues. The present chapter reviews recent advances that have occurred in therapeutic cloning and tissue engineering and describes applications of these new technologies that may offer novel therapies for patients with end-stage organ failure. PMID:15255761

  3. Curvature-dependent excitation propagation in cultured cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadota, S.; Kay, M. W.; Magome, N.; Agladze, K.

    2012-02-01

    The geometry of excitation wave front may play an important role on the propagation block and spiral wave formation. The wave front which is bent over the critical value due to interaction with the obstacles may partially cease to propagate and appearing wave breaks evolve into rotating waves or reentry. This scenario may explain how reentry spontaneously originates in a heart. We studied highly curved excitation wave fronts in the cardiac tissue culture and found that in the conditions of normal, non-inhibited excitability the curvature effects do not play essential role in the propagation. Neither narrow isthmuses nor sharp corners of the obstacles, being classical objects for production of extremely curved wave front, affect non-inhibited wave propagation. The curvature-related phenomena of the propagation block and wave detachment from the obstacle boundary were observed only after partial suppression of the sodium channels with Lidocaine. Computer simulations confirmed the experimental observations. The explanation of the observed phenomena refers to the fact that the heart tissue is made of finite size cells so that curvature radii smaller than the cardiomyocyte size loses sense, and in non-inhibited tissue the single cell is capable to transmit excitation to its neighbors.

  4. Evolving concepts in bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Catherine M; Soo, Chia; Ting, Kang; Wu, Benjamin

    2005-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering integrates the latest advances in molecular biology, biochemistry, engineering, material science, and medical transplantation. Researchers in the developing field of regenerative medicine have identified bone tissue engineering as an attractive translational target. Clinical problems requiring bone regeneration are diverse, and no single regeneration approach will likely resolve all defects. Recent advances in the field of tissue engineering have included the use of sophisticated biocompatible scaffolds, new postnatal multipotent cell populations, and the appropriate cellular stimulation. In particular, synthetic polymer scaffolds allow for fast and reproducible construction, while still retaining biocompatible characteristics. These criteria relate to the immediate goal of determining the ideal implant. The search is becoming a reality with widespread availability of biocompatible scaffolds; however, the desired parameters have not been clearly defined. Currently, most research focuses on the use of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), specifically BMP-2 and BMP-7. These proteins induce osteogenic differentiation in vitro, as well as bone defect healing in vivo. Protein-scaffold interactions that enhance BMP binding are of the utmost importance, since prolonged BMP release creates the most osteogenic microenvironment. Transition into clinical studies has had only mild success and relies on large doses of BMPs for bone formation. Advances within the field of bone tissue engineering will likely overcome these challenges and lead to more clinically relevant therapies. PMID:15797456

  5. BIOMIMETIC GRADIENT HYDROGELS FOR TISSUE ENGINEERING

    PubMed Central

    Sant, Shilpa; Hancock, Matthew J.; Donnelly, Joseph P.; Iyer, Dharini; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2011-01-01

    During tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis, cells experience various signals in their environments, including gradients of physical and chemical cues. Spatial and temporal gradients regulate various cell behaviours such as proliferation, migration, and differentiation during development, inflammation, wound healing, and cancer. One of the goals of functional tissue engineering is to create microenvironments that mimic the cellular and tissue complexity found in vivo by incorporating physical, chemical, temporal, and spatial gradients within engineered three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds. Hydrogels are ideal materials for 3D tissue scaffolds that mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM). Various techniques from material science, microscale engineering, and microfluidics are used to synthesise biomimetic hydrogels with encapsulated cells and tailored microenvironments. In particular, a host of methods exist to incorporate micrometer to centimetre scale chemical and physical gradients within hydrogels to mimic the cellular cues found in vivo. In this review, we draw on specific biological examples to motivate hydrogel gradients as tools for studying cell–material interactions. We provide a brief overview of techniques to generate gradient hydrogels and showcase their use to study particular cell behaviours in two-dimensional (2D) and 3D environments. We conclude by summarizing the current and future trends in gradient hydrogels and cell–material interactions in context with the long-term goals of tissue engineering. PMID:21874065

  6. Tissue engineering: current strategies and future directions.

    PubMed

    Olson, Jennifer L; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2011-04-01

    Novel therapies resulting from regenerative medicine and tissue engineering technology may offer new hope for patients with injuries, end-stage organ failure, or other clinical issues. Currently, patients with diseased and injured organs are often treated with transplanted organs. However, there is a shortage of donor organs that is worsening yearly as the population ages and as the number of new cases of organ failure increases. Scientists in the field of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering are now applying the principles of cell transplantation, material science, and bioengineering to construct biological substitutes that can restore and maintain normal function in diseased and injured tissues. In addition, the stem cell field is a rapidly advancing part of regenerative medicine, and new discoveries in this field create new options for this type of therapy. For example, new types of stem cells, such as amniotic fluid and placental stem cells that can circumvent the ethical issues associated with embryonic stem cells, have been discovered. The process of therapeutic cloning and the creation of induced pluripotent cells provide still other potential sources of stem cells for cell-based tissue engineering applications. Although stem cells are still in the research phase, some therapies arising from tissue engineering endeavors that make use of autologous, adult cells have already entered the clinical setting, indicating that regenerative medicine holds much promise for the future. PMID:22111050

  7. Recombinant protein scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Werkmeister, Jerome A; Ramshaw, John A M

    2012-02-01

    New biological materials for tissue engineering are now being developed using common genetic engineering capabilities to clone and express a variety of genetic elements that allow cost-effective purification and scaffold fabrication from these recombinant proteins, peptides or from chimeric combinations of these. The field is limitless as long as the gene sequences are known. The utility is dependent on the ease, product yield and adaptability of these protein products to the biomedical field. The development of recombinant proteins as scaffolds, while still an emerging technology with respect to commercial products, is scientifically superior to current use of natural materials or synthetic polymer scaffolds, in terms of designing specific structures with desired degrees of biological complexities and motifs. In the field of tissue engineering, next generation scaffolds will be the key to directing appropriate tissue regeneration. The initial period of biodegradable synthetic scaffolds that provided shape and mechanical integrity, but no biological information, is phasing out. The era of protein scaffolds offers distinct advantages, particularly with the combination of powerful tools of molecular biology. These include, for example, the production of human proteins of uniform quality that are free of infectious agents and the ability to make suitable quantities of proteins that are found in low quantity or are hard to isolate from tissue. For the particular needs of tissue engineering scaffolds, fibrous proteins like collagens, elastin, silks and combinations of these offer further advantages of natural well-defined structural scaffolds as well as endless possibilities of controlling functionality by genetic manipulation. PMID:22262725

  8. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine: manufacturing challenges.

    PubMed

    Williams, D J; Sebastine, I M

    2005-12-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine are interdisciplinary fields that apply principles of engineering and life sciences to develop biological substitutes, typically composed of biological and synthetic components, that restore, maintain or improve tissue function. Many tissue engineering technologies are still at a laboratory or pre-commercial scale. The short review paper describes the most significant manufacturing and bio-process challenges inherent in the commercialisation and exploitation of the exciting results emerging from the biological and clinical laboratories exploring tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. A three-generation road map of the industry has been used to structure a view of these challenges and to define where the manufacturing community can contribute to the commercial success of the products from these emerging fields. The first-generation industry is characterised by its demonstrated clinical applications and products in the marketplace, the second is characterised by emerging clinical applications, and the third generation is characterised by aspirational clinical applications. The paper focuses on the cost reduction requirement of the first generation of the industry to allow more market penetration and consequent patient impact. It indicates the technological requirements, for instance the creation of three-dimensional tissue structures, and value chain issues in the second generation of the industry. The third-generation industry challenges lie in fundamental biological and clinical science. The paper sets out a road map of these generations to identify areas for research. PMID:16441181

  9. BIOMIMETIC GRADIENT HYDROGELS FOR TISSUE ENGINEERING.

    PubMed

    Sant, Shilpa; Hancock, Matthew J; Donnelly, Joseph P; Iyer, Dharini; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2010-12-01

    During tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis, cells experience various signals in their environments, including gradients of physical and chemical cues. Spatial and temporal gradients regulate various cell behaviours such as proliferation, migration, and differentiation during development, inflammation, wound healing, and cancer. One of the goals of functional tissue engineering is to create microenvironments that mimic the cellular and tissue complexity found in vivo by incorporating physical, chemical, temporal, and spatial gradients within engineered three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds. Hydrogels are ideal materials for 3D tissue scaffolds that mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM). Various techniques from material science, microscale engineering, and microfluidics are used to synthesise biomimetic hydrogels with encapsulated cells and tailored microenvironments. In particular, a host of methods exist to incorporate micrometer to centimetre scale chemical and physical gradients within hydrogels to mimic the cellular cues found in vivo. In this review, we draw on specific biological examples to motivate hydrogel gradients as tools for studying cell-material interactions. We provide a brief overview of techniques to generate gradient hydrogels and showcase their use to study particular cell behaviours in two-dimensional (2D) and 3D environments. We conclude by summarizing the current and future trends in gradient hydrogels and cell-material interactions in context with the long-term goals of tissue engineering. PMID:21874065

  10. MicroRNAs in skin tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kyle J; Brown, David A; Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Ramchal, Talisha D; Levinson, Howard

    2015-07-01

    35.2 million annual cases in the U.S. require clinical intervention for major skin loss. To meet this demand, the field of skin tissue engineering has grown rapidly over the past 40 years. Traditionally, skin tissue engineering relies on the "cell-scaffold-signal" approach, whereby isolated cells are formulated into a three-dimensional substrate matrix, or scaffold, and exposed to the proper molecular, physical, and/or electrical signals to encourage growth and differentiation. However, clinically available bioengineered skin equivalents (BSEs) suffer from a number of drawbacks, including time required to generate autologous BSEs, poor allogeneic BSE survival, and physical limitations such as mass transfer issues. Additionally, different types of skin wounds require different BSE designs. MicroRNA has recently emerged as a new and exciting field of RNA interference that can overcome the barriers of BSE design. MicroRNA can regulate cellular behavior, change the bioactive milieu of the skin, and be delivered to skin tissue in a number of ways. While it is still in its infancy, the use of microRNAs in skin tissue engineering offers the opportunity to both enhance and expand a field for which there is still a vast unmet clinical need. Here we give a review of skin tissue engineering, focusing on the important cellular processes, bioactive mediators, and scaffolds. We further discuss potential microRNA targets for each individual component, and we conclude with possible future applications. PMID:25953499

  11. Peptide Amphiphiles in Corneal Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Miotto, Martina; Gouveia, Ricardo M.; Connon, Che J.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing interest in effort towards creating alternative therapies have led to exciting breakthroughs in the attempt to bio-fabricate and engineer live tissues. This has been particularly evident in the development of new approaches applied to reconstruct corneal tissue. The need for tissue-engineered corneas is largely a response to the shortage of donor tissue and the lack of suitable alternative biological scaffolds preventing the treatment of millions of blind people worldwide. This review is focused on recent developments in corneal tissue engineering, specifically on the use of self-assembling peptide amphiphiles for this purpose. Recently, peptide amphiphiles have generated great interest as therapeutic molecules, both in vitro and in vivo. Here we introduce this rapidly developing field, and examine innovative applications of peptide amphiphiles to create natural bio-prosthetic corneal tissue in vitro. The advantages of peptide amphiphiles over other biomaterials, namely their wide range of functions and applications, versatility, and transferability are also discussed to better understand how these fascinating molecules can help solve current challenges in corneal regeneration. PMID:26258796

  12. Articular cartilage: from formation to tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Camarero-Espinosa, Sandra; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Foster, E Johan; Weder, Christoph

    2016-05-26

    Hyaline cartilage is the nonlinear, inhomogeneous, anisotropic, poro-viscoelastic connective tissue that serves as friction-reducing and load-bearing cushion in synovial joints and is vital for mammalian skeletal movements. Due to its avascular nature, low cell density, low proliferative activity and the tendency of chondrocytes to de-differentiate, cartilage cannot regenerate after injury, wear and tear, or degeneration through common diseases such as osteoarthritis. Therefore severe damage usually requires surgical intervention. Current clinical strategies to generate new tissue include debridement, microfracture, autologous chondrocyte transplantation, and mosaicplasty. While articular cartilage was predicted to be one of the first tissues to be successfully engineered, it proved to be challenging to reproduce the complex architecture and biomechanical properties of the native tissue. Despite significant research efforts, only a limited number of studies have evolved up to the clinical trial stage. This review article summarizes the current state of cartilage tissue engineering in the context of relevant biological aspects, such as the formation and growth of hyaline cartilage, its composition, structure and biomechanical properties. Special attention is given to materials development, scaffold designs, fabrication methods, and template-cell interactions, which are of great importance to the structure and functionality of the engineered tissue. PMID:26923076

  13. Biomaterials and Stem Cells for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhanpeng; Gupte, Melanie J.; Ma, Peter X.

    2013-01-01

    Importance of the field Organ failure and tissue loss are challenging health issues due to widespread injury, the lack of organs for transplantation, and limitations of conventional artificial implants. The field of tissue engineering aims to provide alternative living substitutes that restore, maintain or improve tissue function. Areas covered in this review In this paper, a wide range of porous scaffolds are reviewed, with an emphasis on phase separation techniques that generate advantageous nanofibrous 3D scaffolds for stem cell-based tissue engineering applications. In addition, methods for presentation and delivery of bioactive molecules to mimic the properties of stem cell niche are summarized. Recent progress in using these bio-instructive scaffolds to support stem cell differentiation and tissue regeneration is also presented. What the reader will gain Stem cells have great clinical potential because of their capability to differentiate into multiple cell types. Biomaterials have served as artificial extracellular environments to regulate stem cell behavior. Biomaterials with various physical, mechanical, and chemical properties can be designed to control stem cell development for regeneration. Take home message The research at the interface of stem cell biology and biomaterials has made and will continue to make exciting advances in tissue engineering. PMID:23327471

  14. Dentin Matrix Proteins in Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, Sriram

    2016-01-01

    Dentin and bone are mineralized tissue matrices comprised of collagen fibrils and reinforced with oriented crystalline hydroxyapatite. Although both tissues perform different functionalities, they are assembled and orchestrated by mesenchymal cells that synthesize both collagenous and noncollagenous proteins albeit in different proportions. The dentin matrix proteins (DMPs) have been studied in great detail in recent years due to its inherent calcium binding properties in the extracellular matrix resulting in tissue calcification. Recent studies have shown that these proteins can serve both as intracellular signaling proteins leading to induction of stem cell differentiation and also function as nucleating proteins in the extracellular matrix. These properties make the DMPs attractive candidates for bone and dentin tissue regeneration. This chapter will provide an overview of the DMPs, their functionality and their proven and possible applications with respect to bone tissue engineering. PMID:26545748

  15. Cell–scaffold interaction within engineered tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Haiping; Liu, Yuanyuan Jiang, Zhenglong; Chen, Weihua; Yu, Yongzhe; Hu, Qingxi

    2014-05-01

    The structure of a tissue engineering scaffold plays an important role in modulating tissue growth. A novel gelatin–chitosan (Gel–Cs) scaffold with a unique structure produced by three-dimensional printing (3DP) technology combining with vacuum freeze-drying has been developed for tissue-engineering applications. The scaffold composed of overall construction, micro-pore, surface morphology, and effective mechanical property. Such a structure meets the essential design criteria of an ideal engineered scaffold. The favorable cell–matrix interaction supports the active biocompatibility of the structure. The structure is capable of supporting cell attachment and proliferation. Cells seeded into this structure tend to maintain phenotypic shape and secreted large amounts of extracellular matrix (ECM) and the cell growth decreased the mechanical properties of scaffold. This novel biodegradable scaffold has potential applications for tissue engineering based upon its unique structure, which acts to support cell growth. - Highlights: • The scaffold is not only for providing a surface for cell residence but also for determining cell phenotype and retaining structural integrity. • The mechanical property of scaffold can be affected by activities of cell. • The scaffold provides a microenvironment for cell attachment, growth, and migration.

  16. Biomaterials in Tooth Tissue Engineering: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sarang; Srivastava, Dhirendra; Grover, Shibani; Sharma, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterials play a crucial role in the field of tissue engineering. They are utilized for fabricating frameworks known as scaffolds, matrices or constructs which are interconnected porous structures that establish a cellular microenvironment required for optimal tissue regeneration. Several natural and synthetic biomaterials have been utilized for fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds. Amongst different biomaterials, polymers are the most extensively experimented and employed materials. They can be tailored to provide good interconnected porosity, large surface area, adequate mechanical strengths, varying surface characterization and different geometries required for tissue regeneration. A single type of material may however not meet all the requirements. Selection of two or more biomaterials, optimization of their physical, chemical and mechanical properties and advanced fabrication techniques are required to obtain scaffold designs intended for their final application. Current focus is aimed at designing biomaterials such that they will replicate the local extra cellular environment of the native organ and enable cell-cell and cell-scaffold interactions at micro level required for functional tissue regeneration. This article provides an insight into the different biomaterials available and the emerging use of nano engineering principles for the construction of bioactive scaffolds in tooth regeneration. PMID:24596804

  17. Tailored Carbon Nanotubes for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Veetil, Jithesh V.; Ye, Kaiming

    2008-01-01

    A decade of aggressive researches on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has paved way for extending these unique nanomaterials into a wide range of applications. In the relatively new arena of nanobiotechnology, a vast majority of applications are based on CNTs, ranging from miniaturized biosensors to organ regeneration. Nevertheless, the complexity of biological systems poses a significant challenge in developing CNT-based tissue engineering applications. This review focuses on the recent developments of CNT-based tissue engineering, where the interaction between living cells/tissues and the nanotubes have been transformed into a variety of novel techniques. This integration has already resulted in a revaluation of tissue engineering and organ regeneration techniques. Some of the new treatments that were not possible previously become reachable now. Because of the advent of surface chemistry, the CNT’s biocompatibility has been significantly improved, making it possible to serve as tissue scaffolding materials to enhance the organ regeneration. The superior mechanic strength and chemical inert also makes it ideal for blood compatible applications, especially for cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. The applications of CNTs in these cardiovascular surgeries led to a remarkable improvement in mechanical strength of implanted catheters and reduced thrombogenecity after surgery. Moreover, the functionalized CNTs have been extensively explored for in vivo targeted drug or gene delivery, which could potentially improve the efficiency of many cancer treatments. However, just like other nanomaterials, the cytotoxicity of CNTs has not been well established. Hence, more extensive cytotoxic studies are warranted while converting the hydrophobic CNTs into biocompatible nanomaterials. PMID:19496152

  18. Injectable Biomaterials for Adipose Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Young, D. Adam; Christman, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    Adipose tissue engineering has recently gained significant attention from materials scientists as a result of the exponential growth of soft tissue filler procedures being performed within the clinic. While several injectable materials are currently being marketed for filling subcutaneous voids, they often face limited longevity due to rapid resorption. Their inability to encourage natural adipose formation or ingrowth necessitates repeated injections for a prolonged effect, and thus classifies them as temporary fillers. As a result, a significant need for injectable materials that not only act as fillers, but also promote in vivo adipogenesis is beginning to be realized. This review will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of commercially available soft tissue fillers. It will then summarize the current state of research using injectable synthetic materials, biopolymers, and extracellular matrix-derived materials for adipose tissue engineering. Furthermore, the successful attributes observed across each of these materials will be outlined along with a discussion of the current difficulties and future directions for adipose tissue engineering. PMID:22456805

  19. Vascularization in bone tissue engineering constructs

    PubMed Central

    Mercado-Pagán, Ángel E.; Stahl, Alexander M.; Shanjani, Yaser; Yang, Yunzhi

    2016-01-01

    Vascularization of large bone grafts is one of the main challenges of bone tissue engineering (BTE), and has held back the clinical translation of engineered bone constructs for two decades so far. The ultimate goal of vascularized BTE constructs is to provide a bone environment rich in functional vascular networks to achieve efficient osseointegration and accelerate restoration of function after implantation. To attain both structural and vascular integration of the grafts, a large number of biomaterials, cells, and biological cues have been evaluated. This review will present biological considerations for bone function restoration, contemporary approaches for clinical salvage of large bone defects and their limitations, state-of-the-art research on the development of vascularized bone constructs, and perspectives on evaluating and implementing novel BTE grafts in clinical practice. Success will depend on achieving full graft integration at multiple hierarchical levels, both between the individual graft components as well as between the implanted constructs and their surrounding host tissues. The paradigm of vascularized tissue constructs could not only revolutionize the progress of bone tissue engineering, but could also be readily applied to other fields in regenerative medicine for the development of new innovative vascularized tissue designs. PMID:25616591

  20. Esophageal tissue engineering: Current status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, T; Catry, J; Luong-Nguyen, M; Bruneval, P; Domet, T; Arakelian, L; Sfeir, R; Michaud, L; Vanneaux, V; Gottrand, F; Larghero, J; Cattan, P

    2016-02-01

    Tissue engineering, which consists of the combination and in vivo implantation of elements required for tissue remodeling toward a specific organ phenotype, could be an alternative for classical techniques of esophageal replacement. The current hybrid approach entails creation of an esophageal substitute composed of an acellular matrix and autologous epithelial and muscle cells provides the most successful results. Current research is based on the use of mesenchymal stem cells, whose potential for differentiation and proangioogenic, immune-modulator and anti-inflammatory properties are important assets. In the near future, esophageal substitutes could be constructed from acellular "intelligent matrices" that contain the molecules necessary for tissue regeneration; this should allow circumvention of the implantation step and still obtain standardized in vivo biological responses. At present, tissue engineering applications to esophageal replacement are limited to enlargement plasties with absorbable, non-cellular matrices. Nevertheless, the application of existing clinical techniques for replacement of other organs by tissue engineering in combination with a multiplication of translational research protocols for esophageal replacement in large animals should soon pave the way for health agencies to authorize clinical trials. PMID:26711880

  1. Hydrogel Composite Materials for Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Jenna M.; Oyen, Michelle L.

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogels are appealing for biomaterials applications due to their compositional similarity with highly hydrated natural biological tissues. However, for structurally demanding tissue engineering applications, hydrogel use is limited by poor mechanical properties. Here, composite materials approaches are considered for improving hydrogel properties while attempting to more closely mimic natural biological tissue structures. A variety of composite material microstructures is explored, based on multiple hydrogel constituents, particle reinforcement, electrospun nanometer to micrometer diameter polymer fibers with single and multiple fiber networks, and combinations of these approaches to form fully three-dimensional fiber-reinforced hydrogels. Natural and synthetic polymers are examined for formation of a range of scaffolds and across a range of engineered tissue applications. Following a discussion of the design and fabrication of composite scaffolds, interactions between living biological cells and composite scaffolds are considered across the full life cycle of tissue engineering from scaffold fabrication to in vivo use. We conclude with a summary of progress in this area to date and make recommendations for continuing research and for advanced hydrogel scaffold development.

  2. Drug releasing systems in cardiovascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Spadaccio, Cristiano; Chello, Massimo; Trombetta, Marcella; Rainer, Alberto; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Genovese, Jorge A

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Heart disease and atherosclerosis are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The lack of suitable autologous grafts has produced a need for artificial grafts; however, current artificial grafts carry significant limitations, including thrombosis, infection, limited durability and the inability to grow. Tissue engineering of blood vessels, cardiovascular structures and whole organs is a promising approach for creating replacement tissues to repair congenital defects and/or diseased tissues. In an attempt to surmount the shortcomings of artificial grafts, tissue-engineered cardiovascular graft (TECVG), constructs obtained using cultured autologous vascular cells seeded onto a synthetic biodegradable polymer scaffold, have been developed. Autologous TECVGs have the potential advantages of growth, durability, resistance to infection, and freedom from problems of rejection, thrombogenicity and donor scarcity. Moreover polymers engrafted with growth factors, cytokines, drugs have been developed allowing drug-releasing systems capable of focused and localized delivery of molecules depending on the environmental requirements and the milieu in which the scaffold is placed. A broad range of applications for compound-releasing, tissue-engineered grafts have been suggested ranging from drug delivery to gene therapy. This review will describe advances in the development of drug-delivery systems for cardiovascular applications focusing on the manufacturing techniques and on the compounds delivered by these systems to date. PMID:19379142

  3. Cartilage tissue engineering for degenerative joint disease.

    PubMed

    Nesic, Dobrila; Whiteside, Robert; Brittberg, Mats; Wendt, David; Martin, Ivan; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre

    2006-05-20

    Pain in the joint is often due to cartilage degeneration and represents a serious medical problem affecting people of all ages. Although many, mostly surgical techniques, are currently employed to treat cartilage lesions, none has given satisfactory results in the long term. Recent advances in biology and material science have brought tissue engineering to the forefront of new cartilage repair techniques. The combination of autologous cells, specifically designed scaffolds, bioreactors, mechanical stimulations and growth factors together with the knowledge that underlies the principles of cell biology offers promising avenues for cartilage tissue regeneration. The present review explores basic biology mechanisms for cartilage reconstruction and summarizes the advances in the tissue engineering approaches. Furthermore, the limits of the new methods and their potential application in the osteoarthritic conditions are discussed. PMID:16574268

  4. Tissue engineering advances in spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Makhni, Melvin C; Caldwell, Jon-Michael E; Saifi, Comron; Fischer, Charla R; Lehman, Ronald A; Lenke, Lawrence G; Lee, Francis Y

    2016-03-01

    Autograft, while currently the gold standard for bone grafting, has several significant disadvantages including limited supply, donor site pain, hematoma formation, nerve and vascular injury, and fracture. Bone allografts have their own disadvantages including reduced osteoinductive capability, lack of osteoprogenitor cells, immunogenicity and risk of disease transmission. Thus demand exists for tissue-engineered constructs that can produce viable bone while avoiding the complications associated with human tissue grafts. This review will focus on recent advancements in tissue-engineered bone graft substitutes utilizing nanoscale technology in spine surgery applications. An evaluation will be performed of bone graft substitutes, biomimetic 3D scaffolds, bone morphogenetic protein, mesenchymal stem cells and intervertebral disc regeneration strategies. PMID:26877156

  5. Protein Engineering for Cardiovascular Therapeutics: Untapped Potential for Cardiac Repair

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Steven M.; Lee, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous new and innovative approaches for repairing damaged myocardium are currently under investigation, with several encouraging results. In addition to the progression of stem cell-based approaches and gene therapy/silencing methods, evidence continues to emerge that protein therapeutics may be used to directly promote cardiac repair and even regeneration. However, proteins are often limited in their therapeutic potential by short local half-lives and insufficient bioavailability and/or bioactivity, and many academic laboratories studying cardiovascular diseases are more comfortable with molecular and cellular biology compared with protein biochemistry. Protein engineering has been employed broadly to overcome weaknesses traditionally associated with protein therapeutics and has the potential to specifically enhance the efficacy of molecules for cardiac repair. Yet protein engineering as a strategy has not yet been employed in the development of cardiovascular therapeutics to the degree that it has in other fields. In this review, we discuss the role of engineered proteins in cardiovascular therapies to date. Further, we address the promise of applying emerging protein engineering technologies to cardiovascular medicine and the barriers that must be overcome to enable the ultimate success of this approach. PMID:24030023

  6. Ocular tissue engineering: current and future directions.

    PubMed

    Karamichos, D

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) is a concept that was first emerged in the early 1990s to provide solutions to severe injured tissues and/or organs [1]. The dream was to be able to restore and replace the damaged tissue with an engineered version which would ultimately help overcome problems such as donor shortages, graft rejections, and inflammatory responses following transplantation. While an incredible amount of progress has been made, suggesting that TE concept is viable, we are still not able to overcome major obstacles. In TE, there are two main strategies that researchers have adopted: (1) cell-based, where cells are been manipulated to create their own environment before transplanted to the host, and (2) scaffold-based, where an extracellular matrix is created to mimic in vivo structures. TE approaches for ocular tissues are available and have indeed come a long way, over the last decades; however more clinically relevant ocular tissue substitutes are needed. Figure 1 highlights the importance of TE in ocular applications and indicates the avenues available based on each tissue.[...]. PMID:25695336

  7. Development of multilayer constructs for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Bettahalli, N M S; Groen, N; Steg, H; Unadkat, H; de Boer, J; van Blitterswijk, C A; Wessling, M; Stamatialis, D

    2014-02-01

    The rapidly developing field of tissue engineering produces living substitutes that restore, maintain or improve the function of tissues or organs. In contrast to standard therapies, the engineered products become integrated within the patient, affording a potentially permanent and specific cure of the disease, injury or impairment. Despite the great progress in the field, development of clinically relevantly sized tissues with complex architecture remains a great challenge. This is mostly due to limitations of nutrient and oxygen delivery to the cells and limited availability of scaffolds that can mimic the complex tissue architecture. This study presents the development of a multilayer tissue construct by rolling pre-seeded electrospun sheets [(prepared from poly (l-lactic acid) (PLLA) seeded with C2C12 pre-myoblast cells)] around a porous multibore hollow fibre (HF) membrane and its testing using a bioreactor. Important elements of this study are: 1) the medium permeating through the porous walls of multibore HF acts as an additional source of nutrients and oxygen to the cells, which exerts low shear stress (controllable by trans membrane pressure); 2) application of dynamic perfusion through the HF lumen and around the 3D construct to achieve high cell proliferation and homogenous cell distribution across the layers, and 3) cell migration occurs within the multilayer construct (shown using pre-labeled C2C12 cells), illustrating the potential of using this concept for developing thick and more complex tissues. PMID:22499264

  8. Parthenogenetic stem cells for tissue-engineered heart repair

    PubMed Central

    Didié, Michael; Christalla, Peter; Rubart, Michael; Muppala, Vijayakumar; Döker, Stephan; Unsöld, Bernhard; El-Armouche, Ali; Rau, Thomas; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Schwoerer, Alexander P.; Ehmke, Heimo; Schumacher, Udo; Fuchs, Sigrid; Lange, Claudia; Becker, Alexander; Tao, Wen; Scherschel, John A.; Soonpaa, Mark H.; Yang, Tao; Lin, Qiong; Zenke, Martin; Han, Dong-Wook; Schöler, Hans R.; Rudolph, Cornelia; Steinemann, Doris; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Kattman, Steve; Witty, Alec; Keller, Gordon; Field, Loren J.; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus

    2013-01-01

    Uniparental parthenotes are considered an unwanted byproduct of in vitro fertilization. In utero parthenote development is severely compromised by defective organogenesis and in particular by defective cardiogenesis. Although developmentally compromised, apparently pluripotent stem cells can be derived from parthenogenetic blastocysts. Here we hypothesized that nonembryonic parthenogenetic stem cells (PSCs) can be directed toward the cardiac lineage and applied to tissue-engineered heart repair. We first confirmed similar fundamental properties in murine PSCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs), despite notable differences in genetic (allelic variability) and epigenetic (differential imprinting) characteristics. Haploidentity of major histocompatibility complexes (MHCs) in PSCs is particularly attractive for allogeneic cell-based therapies. Accordingly, we confirmed acceptance of PSCs in MHC-matched allotransplantation. Cardiomyocyte derivation from PSCs and ESCs was equally effective. The use of cardiomyocyte-restricted GFP enabled cell sorting and documentation of advanced structural and functional maturation in vitro and in vivo. This included seamless electrical integration of PSC-derived cardiomyocytes into recipient myocardium. Finally, we enriched cardiomyocytes to facilitate engineering of force-generating myocardium and demonstrated the utility of this technique in enhancing regional myocardial function after myocardial infarction. Collectively, our data demonstrate pluripotency, with unrestricted cardiogenicity in PSCs, and introduce this unique cell type as an attractive source for tissue-engineered heart repair. PMID:23434590

  9. Engineered whole organs and complex tissues.

    PubMed

    Badylak, Stephen F; Weiss, Daniel J; Caplan, Arthur; Macchiarini, Paolo

    2012-03-10

    End-stage organ failure is a key challenge for the medical community because of the ageing population and the severe shortage of suitable donor organs available. Equally, injuries to or congenital absence of complex tissues such as the trachea, oesophagus, or skeletal muscle have few therapeutic options. A new approach to treatment involves the use of three-dimensional biological scaffolds made of allogeneic or xenogeneic extracellular matrix derived from non-autologous sources. These scaffolds can act as an inductive template for functional tissue and organ reconstruction after recellularisation with autologous stem cells or differentiated cells. Such an approach has been used successfully for the repair and reconstruction of several complex tissues such as trachea, oesophagus, and skeletal muscle in animal models and human beings, and, guided by appropriate scientific and ethical oversight, could serve as a platform for the engineering of whole organs and other tissues. PMID:22405797

  10. Nanofiber Scaffold Gradients for Interfacial Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, Murugan; Young, Marian F.; Thomas, Vinoy; Sun, Limin; Chow, Laurence C.; Tison, Christopher K.; Chatterjee, Kaushik; Miles, William C.; Simon, Carl G.

    2012-01-01

    We have designed a 2-spinnerette device that can directly electrospin nanofiber scaffolds containing a gradient in composition that can be used to engineer interfacial tissues such as ligament and tendon. Two types of nanofibers are simultaneously electrospun in an overlapping pattern to create a nonwoven mat of nanofibers containing a composition gradient. The approach is an advance over previous methods due to its versatility - gradients can be formed from any materials that can be electrospun. A dye was used to characterize the 2-spinnerette approach and applicability to tissue engineering was demonstrated by fabricating nanofibers with gradients in amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles (nACP). Adhesion and proliferation of osteogenic cells (MC3T3-E1 murine pre-osteoblasts) on gradients was enhanced on the regions of the gradients that contained higher nACP content yielding a graded osteoblast response. Since increases in soluble calcium and phosphate ions stimulate osteoblast function, we measured their release and observed significant release from nanofibers containing nACP. The nanofiber-nACP gradients fabricated herein can be applied to generate tissues with osteoblast gradients such as ligaments or tendons. In conclusion, these results introduce a versatile approach for fabricating nanofiber gradients that can have application for engineering graded tissues. PMID:22286209

  11. Multiphasic Scaffolds for Periodontal Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ivanovski, S.; Vaquette, C.; Gronthos, S.; Hutmacher, D.W.; Bartold, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    For a successful clinical outcome, periodontal regeneration requires the coordinated response of multiple soft and hard tissues (periodontal ligament, gingiva, cementum, and bone) during the wound-healing process. Tissue-engineered constructs for regeneration of the periodontium must be of a complex 3-dimensional shape and adequate size and demonstrate biomechanical stability over time. A critical requirement is the ability to promote the formation of functional periodontal attachment between regenerated alveolar bone, and newly formed cementum on the root surface. This review outlines the current advances in multiphasic scaffold fabrication and how these scaffolds can be combined with cell- and growth factor–based approaches to form tissue-engineered constructs capable of recapitulating the complex temporal and spatial wound-healing events that will lead to predictable periodontal regeneration. This can be achieved through a variety of approaches, with promising strategies characterized by the use of scaffolds that can deliver and stabilize cells capable of cementogenesis onto the root surface, provide biomechanical cues that encourage perpendicular alignment of periodontal fibers to the root surface, and provide osteogenic cues and appropriate space to facilitate bone regeneration. Progress on the development of multiphasic constructs for periodontal tissue engineering is in the early stages of development, and these constructs need to be tested in large animal models and, ultimately, human clinical trials. PMID:25139362

  12. Multimodal evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Joseph M; Welter, Jean F

    2013-02-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) has promise as a biological solution and a disease modifying treatment for arthritis. Although cartilage can be generated by TE, substantial inter- and intra-donor variability makes it impossible to guarantee optimal, reproducible results. TE cartilage must be able to perform the functions of native tissue, thus mechanical and biological properties approaching those of native cartilage are likely a pre-requisite for successful implantation. A quality-control assessment of these properties should be part of the implantation release criteria for TE cartilage. Release criteria should certify that selected tissue properties have reached certain target ranges, and should be predictive of the likelihood of success of an implant in vivo. Unfortunately, it is not currently known which properties are needed to establish release criteria, nor how close one has to be to the properties of native cartilage to achieve success. Achieving properties approaching those of native cartilage requires a clear understanding of the target properties and reproducible assessment methodology. Here, we review several main aspects of quality control as it applies to TE cartilage. This includes a look at known mechanical and biological properties of native cartilage, which should be the target in engineered tissues. We also present an overview of the state of the art of tissue assessment, focusing on native articular and TE cartilage. Finally, we review the arguments for developing and validating non-destructive testing methods for assessing TE products. PMID:23606823

  13. 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues.

    PubMed

    Mandrycky, Christian; Wang, Zongjie; Kim, Keekyoung; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Bioprinting is a 3D fabrication technology used to precisely dispense cell-laden biomaterials for the construction of complex 3D functional living tissues or artificial organs. While still in its early stages, bioprinting strategies have demonstrated their potential use in regenerative medicine to generate a variety of transplantable tissues, including skin, cartilage, and bone. However, current bioprinting approaches still have technical challenges in terms of high-resolution cell deposition, controlled cell distributions, vascularization, and innervation within complex 3D tissues. While no one-size-fits-all approach to bioprinting has emerged, it remains an on-demand, versatile fabrication technique that may address the growing organ shortage as well as provide a high-throughput method for cell patterning at the micrometer scale for broad biomedical engineering applications. In this review, we introduce the basic principles, materials, integration strategies and applications of bioprinting. We also discuss the recent developments, current challenges and future prospects of 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues. Combined with recent advances in human pluripotent stem cell technologies, 3D-bioprinted tissue models could serve as an enabling platform for high-throughput predictive drug screening and more effective regenerative therapies. PMID:26724184

  14. Tumor Engineering: The Other Face of Tissue Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Ghajar, Cyrus M; Bissell, Mina J

    2010-03-09

    Advances in tissue engineering have been accomplished for years by employing biomimetic strategies to provide cells with aspects of their original microenvironment necessary to reconstitute a unit of both form and function for a given tissue.We believe that the most critical hallmark of cancer is loss of integration of architecture and function; thus, it stands to reason that similar strategies could be employed to understand tumor biology. In this commentary, we discuss work contributed by Fischbach-Teschl and colleagues to this special issue of Tissue Engineering in the context of 'tumor engineering', that is, the construction of complex cell culture models that recapitulate aspects of the in vivo tumor microenvironment to study the dynamics of tumor development, progression, and therapy on multiple scales. We provide examples of fundamental questions that could be answered by developing such models, and encourage the continued collaboration between physical scientists and life scientists not only for regenerative purposes, but also to unravel the complexity that is the tumor microenvironment. In 1993, Vacanti and Langer cast a spotlight on the growing gap between patients in need of organ transplants and the amount of available donor organs; they reaffirmed that tissue engineering could eventually address this problem by 'applying principles of engineering and the life sciences toward the development of biological substitutes. Mortality figures and direct health care costs for cancer patients rival those of patients who experience organ failure. Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States (Source: American Cancer Society) and it is estimated that direct medical costs for cancer patients approach $100B yearly in the United States alone (Source: National Cancer Institute). In addition, any promising therapy that emerges from the laboratory costs roughly $1.7B to take from bench to bedside. Whereas we have indeed waged war on cancer, the

  15. 3D Printing and Biofabrication for Load Bearing Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Claire G; Atala, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based direct biofabrication and 3D bioprinting is becoming a dominant technological platform and is suggested as a new paradigm for twenty-first century tissue engineering. These techniques may be our next step in surpassing the hurdles and limitations of conventional scaffold-based tissue engineering, and may offer the industrial potential of tissue engineered products especially for load bearing tissues. Here we present a topically focused review regarding the fundamental concepts, state of the art, and perspectives of this new technology and field of biofabrication and 3D bioprinting, specifically focused on tissue engineering of load bearing tissues such as bone, cartilage, osteochondral and dental tissue engineering. PMID:26545741

  16. Tissue engineering and regeneration using biodegradable scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Zhang, Y

    2015-12-01

    A number of people across the world suffer from various diseases or genetic defects and many of these patients die because of the lack of the availability of ideal tissue substitute and/or treatment. An important aspect of the disease is its association with the loss of tissue function. Many end-stage diseases and/or complete organ failure often require total or partial organ transplantation to restore functionality. However, such transplantation surgeries are not always successful because of the organ/ tissue rejection and also the scarcity of donors. Regenerative medicine and tissue engineering aim to improve or repair the function of a dysfunctional tissue or organ. In spite of the many advances in tissue engineering methods, the field of regenerative medicine still awaits acceptable designs of bioscaffolds that are clinically tenable. Design of scaffolds and the nature of biomaterial used to make the scaffolds dictate cell behavior and function. Several approaches are currently being tried to optimize the design and improve the quality of the biomaterials. Innervation, vascularization and proper cell differentiation that are influenced by the biomaterials, are few challenges that need to be optimized along with the choice of stem cells that can be employed. Extracellular matrix scaffolds have proven to be a better choice for cartilage and bone repair while the fibrin, polyglycolate and polylactate etc are still being developed. Future research and technological innovations are still needed for a better choice of biomaterials that can support the tissue regeneration without causing any immune or inflammatory response from the host and which last for longer periods. PMID:25634586

  17. Electrospun Nanofibers for Neural and Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Younan

    2009-03-01

    Electrospinning has been exploited for almost one century to process polymers and other materials into nanofibers with controllable compositions, diameters, porosities, and porous structures for a variety of applications. Owing to its small size, high porosity, and large surface area, a nonwoven mat of electrospun nanofibers can serve as an ideal scaffold to mimic the extra cellular matrix for cell attachment and nutrient transportation. The nanofiber itself can also be functionalized through encapsulation or attachment of bioactive species such as extracellular matrix proteins, enzymes, and growth factors. In addition, the nanofibers can be further assembled into a variety of arrays or architectures by manipulating their alignment, stacking, or folding. All these attributes make electrospinning a powerful tool for generating nanostructured materials for a range of biomedical applications that include controlled release, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. This talk will focus on the use of electrospun nanofibers as scaffolds for neural and bone tissue engineering.

  18. Tissue-Engineered Kidney Disease Models

    PubMed Central

    DesRochers, Teresa M.; Palma, Erica; Kaplan, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Renal disease represents a major health problem that often results in end-stage renal failure necessitating dialysis and eventually transplantation. Historically these diseases have been studied with patient observation and screening, animal models, and two-dimensional cell culture. In this review, we focus on recent advances in tissue engineered kidney disease models that have the capacity to compensate for the limitations of traditional modalities. The cells and materials utilized to develop these models are discussed and tissue engineered models of polycystic kidney disease, drug-induced nephrotoxicity, and the glomerulus are examined in detail. The application of these models has the potential to direct future disease treatments and preclinical drug development. PMID:24361391

  19. Tissue engineering: an option for esophageal replacement?

    PubMed

    Zani, Augusto; Pierro, Agostino; Elvassore, Nicola; De Coppi, Paolo

    2009-02-01

    Esophageal replacement is required in several pediatric surgical conditions, like long-gap esophageal atresia. Although several techniques have been described to bridge the gap, all of them could be followed by postoperative complications. Esophageal tissue engineering could represent a valid alternative thanks to the recent advances in biomaterial science and cellular biology. Numerous attempts to shape a new esophagus in vitro have been described in the last decade. Herein, we review the main studies on the experimental use of nonabsorbable and absorbable materials as well as the development of cellularized patches. Furthermore, we describe the future perspectives of esophageal tissue engineering characterized by the use of stem cells seeded on new biopolymers. This opens to the construction of a functional allograft that could allow an anatomical replacement that grows with the children and does not severely impair their anatomy. PMID:19103424

  20. Reentry Near the Percolation Threshold in a Heterogeneous Discrete Model for Cardiac Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Sergio; Bär, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Arrhythmias in cardiac tissue are related to irregular electrical wave propagation in the heart. Cardiac tissue is formed by a discrete cell network, which is often heterogeneous. A localized region with a fraction of nonconducting links surrounded by homogeneous conducting tissue can become a source of reentry and ectopic beats. Extensive simulations in a discrete model of cardiac tissue show that a wave crossing a heterogeneous region of cardiac tissue can disintegrate into irregular patterns, provided the fraction of nonconducting links is close to the percolation threshold of the cell network. The dependence of the reentry probability on this fraction, the system size, and the degree of excitability can be inferred from the size distribution of nonconducting clusters near the percolation threshold.

  1. Cell and Tissue Engineering for Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Underhill, Gregory H.; Zaret, Kenneth S.; Fox, Ira J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the tremendous hurdles presented by the complexity of the liver’s structure and function, advances in liver physiology, stem cell biology and reprogramming, and the engineering of tissues and devices are accelerating the development of cell-based therapies for treating liver disease and liver failure. This State of the Art Review discusses both the near and long-term prospects for such cell-based therapies and the unique challenges for clinical translation. PMID:25031271

  2. Strategies for Whole Lung Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Calle, Elizabeth A.; Ghaedi, Mahboobe; Sundaram, Sumati; Sivarapatna, Amogh; Tseng, Michelle K.

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated the feasibility of using decellularized lung extracellular matrix scaffolds to support the engineering of functional lung tissue in vitro. Rendered acellular through the use of detergents and other reagents, the scaffolds are mounted in organ-specific bioreactors where cells in the scaffold are provided with nutrients and appropriate mechanical stimuli such as ventilation and perfusion. Though initial studies are encouraging, a great deal remains to be done to advance the field and transition from rodent lungs to whole human tissue engineered lungs. To do so, a variety of hurdles must be overcome. In particular, a reliable source of human-sized scaffolds, as well as a method of terminal sterilization of scaffolds, must be identified. Continued research in lung cell and developmental biology will hopefully help identify the number and types of cells that will be required to regenerate functional lung tissue. Finally, bioreactor designs must be improved in order to provide more precise ventilation stimuli and vascular perfusion in order to avoid injury to or death of the cells cultivated within the scaffold. Ultimately, the success of efforts to engineer a functional lung in vitro will critically depend on the ability to create a fully endothelialized vascular network that provides sufficient barrier function and alveolar-capillary surface area to exchange gas at rates compatible with healthy lung function. PMID:24691527

  3. Strategies for whole lung tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Calle, Elizabeth A; Ghaedi, Mahboobe; Sundaram, Sumati; Sivarapatna, Amogh; Tseng, Michelle K; Niklason, Laura E

    2014-05-01

    Recent work has demonstrated the feasibility of using decellularized lung extracellular matrix scaffolds to support the engineering of functional lung tissue in vitro. Rendered acellular through the use of detergents and other reagents, the scaffolds are mounted in organ-specific bioreactors where cells in the scaffold are provided with nutrients and appropriate mechanical stimuli such as ventilation and perfusion. Though initial studies are encouraging, a great deal remains to be done to advance the field and transition from rodent lungs to whole human tissue engineered lungs. To do so, a variety of hurdles must be overcome. In particular, a reliable source of human-sized scaffolds, as well as a method of terminal sterilization of scaffolds, must be identified. Continued research in lung cell and developmental biology will hopefully help identify the number and types of cells that will be required to regenerate functional lung tissue. Finally, bioreactor designs must be improved in order to provide more precise ventilation stimuli and vascular perfusion in order to avoid injury to or death of the cells cultivated within the scaffold. Ultimately, the success of efforts to engineer a functional lung in vitro will critically depend on the ability to create a fully endothelialized vascular network that provides sufficient barrier function and alveolar-capillary surface area to exchange gas at rates compatible with healthy lung function. PMID:24691527

  4. Cardiovascular tissue engineering: where we come from and where are we now?

    PubMed

    Smit, Francis E; Dohmen, Pascal M

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tissue engineering was introduced by Vacanti and Langer in the 80's, exploring the potential of this new technology starting with the well-known "human ear on the mouse back". The goal is to create a substitute which supplies an individual therapy for patients with regeneration, remodeling and growth potential. The growth potential of these subjects is of special interest in congenital cardiac surgery, avoiding repeated interventions and surgery. Initial applications of tissue engineered created substitutes were relatively simple cardiovascular grafts seeded initially by end-differentiated autologous endothelial cells. Important data were collected from these initial clinical autologous endothelial cell seeded grafts in peripheral and coronary vessel disease. After these initial successfully implantation bone marrow cell were used to seed patches and pulmonary conduits were implanted in patients. Driven by the positive results of tissue engineered material implanted under low pressure circumstances, first tissue engineered patches were implanted in the systemic circulation followed by the implantation of tissue engineered aortic heart valves. Tissue engineering is an extreme dynamic technology with continuously modifications and improvements to optimize clinical products. New technologies are unified and so this has also be done with tissue engineering and new application features, so called transcatheter valve intervention. First studies are initiated to apply tissue engineered heart valves with this new transcatheter delivery system less invasive. Simultaneously studies have been started on tissue engineering of so-called whole organs since organ transplantation is restricted due to donor shortage and tissue engineering could overcome this problem. Initial studies of whole heart engineering in the rat model are promising and larger size models are initiated. PMID:25623227

  5. Vascularization in bone tissue engineering constructs.

    PubMed

    Mercado-Pagán, Ángel E; Stahl, Alexander M; Shanjani, Yaser; Yang, Yunzhi

    2015-03-01

    Vascularization of large bone grafts is one of the main challenges of bone tissue engineering (BTE), and has held back the clinical translation of engineered bone constructs for two decades so far. The ultimate goal of vascularized BTE constructs is to provide a bone environment rich in functional vascular networks to achieve efficient osseointegration and accelerate restoration of function after implantation. To attain both structural and vascular integration of the grafts, a large number of biomaterials, cells, and biological cues have been evaluated. This review will present biological considerations for bone function restoration, contemporary approaches for clinical salvage of large bone defects and their limitations, state-of-the-art research on the development of vascularized bone constructs, and perspectives on evaluating and implementing novel BTE grafts in clinical practice. Success will depend on achieving full graft integration at multiple hierarchical levels, both between the individual graft components as well as between the implanted constructs and their surrounding host tissues. The paradigm of vascularized tissue constructs could not only revolutionize the progress of BTE, but could also be readily applied to other fields in regenerative medicine for the development of new innovative vascularized tissue designs. PMID:25616591

  6. Novel detergent for whole organ tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Takanori; Kirita, Yuhei; Kami, Daisuke; Kitani, Tomoya; Ozaki, Chisa; Itakura, Yoko; Toyoda, Masashi; Gojo, Satoshi

    2015-10-01

    Whole organ tissue engineering for various organs, including the heart, lung, liver, and kidney, has demonstrated promising results for end-stage organ failure. However, the sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-based protocol for standard decellularization has drawbacks such as clot formation in vascularized transplantation and poor cell engraftment in recellularization procedures. Preservation of the surface milieu of extracellular matrices (ECMs) might be crucial for organ generation based on decellularization/recellularization engineering. We examined a novel detergent, sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES), to determine whether it could overcome the drawbacks associated with SDS using rat heart and kidney. Both organs were perfused in an antegrade fashion with either SLES or SDS. Although immunohistochemistry for collagen I, IV, laminin, and fibronectin showed similar preservation in both detergents, morphological analysis using scanning electron microscopy and an assay of glycosaminoglycan content on ECMs showed that SLES-treated tissues had better-preserved ECMs than SDS-treated tissues. Mesenteric transplantation revealed SLES did not induce significant inflammation, as opposed to SDS. Platelet adhesion to decellularized tissues was significantly reduced with SLES. Overall, SLES could replace older detergents such as SDS in the decellularization process for generation of transplantable recellularized organs. PMID:25850947

  7. Cell interactions in bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Pirraco, R P; Marques, A P; Reis, R L

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Bone fractures, where the innate regenerative bone response is compromised, represent between 4 and 8 hundred thousands of the total fracture cases, just in the United States. Bone tissue engineering (TE) brought the notion that, in cases such as those, it was preferable to boost the healing process of bone tissue instead of just adding artificial parts that could never properly replace the native tissue. However, despite the hype, bone TE so far could not live up to its promises and new bottom-up approaches are needed. The study of the cellular interactions between the cells relevant for bone biology can be of essential importance to that. In living bone, cells are in a context where communication with adjacent cells is almost permanent. Many fundamental works have been addressing these communications nonetheless, in a bone TE approach, the 3D perspective, being part of the microenvironment of a bone cell, is as crucial. Works combining the study of cell-to-cell interactions in a 3D environment are not as many as expected. Therefore, the bone TE field should not only gain knowledge from the field of fundamental Biology but also contribute for further understanding the biology of bone. In this review, a summary of the main works in the field of bone TE, aiming at studying cellular interactions in a 3D environment, and how they contributed towards the development of a functional engineered bone tissue, is presented. PMID:20050963

  8. [Tissue engineered skin and regenerative wound repair].

    PubMed

    Han, Chun-mao; Wang, Xin-gang

    2013-04-01

    Various skin defects resulting from mechanical injury, burns, chronic ulcers, and resection of tumor etc. are very common in clinic. The traditional treatment measure, such as grafting of autologous split-thickness skin remains the gold standard. However, its limitations are obvious, such as shortage of donor sites, creation of new injury, and scar formation. To realize regenerative or scarless repair of tissue defects has always been the dream of human being. The advent of tissue engineered skin (TES) provides an ideal access to tissue regeneration. After decades of development, several kinds of TES products have been developed and used in clinic, with promising effects. However, a large number of basic scientific problems regarding TES, as well as difficulties in translation of basic research to bedside should be taken into serious consideration. This article presents a comprehensive overview of strategies of construction of TES, the role of TES in regenerative wound repair, and its opportunities and challenges. PMID:23985197

  9. Oxygen Delivering Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Ashley L.; Rindone, Alexandra N.; Grayson, Warren L.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) has provided promising strategies for regenerating tissue defects, but few TE approaches have been translated for clinical applications. One major barrier in TE is providing adequate oxygen supply to implanted tissue scaffolds, since oxygen diffusion from surrounding vasculature in vivo is limited to the periphery of the scaffolds. Moreover, oxygen is also an important signaling molecule for controlling stem cell differentiation within TE scaffolds. Various technologies have been developed to increase oxygen delivery in vivo and enhance the effectiveness of TE strategies. Such technologies include hyperbaric oxygen therapy, perfluorocarbon- and hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers, and oxygen-generating, peroxide-based materials. Here, we provide an overview of the underlying mechanisms and how these technologies have been utilized for in vivo TE applications. Emerging technologies and future prospects for oxygen delivery in TE are also discussed to evaluate the progress of this field towards clinical translation. PMID:27453782

  10. Cardiac stem cell genetic engineering using the αMHC promoter

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Brandi; Izarra, Alberto; Alvarez, Roberto; Fischer, Kimberlee M; Cottage, Christopher T; Quijada, Pearl; Díez-Juan, Antonio; Sussman, Mark A

    2010-01-01

    Aims Cardiac stem cells (CSCs) show potential as a cellular therapeutic approach to blunt tissue damage and facilitate reparative and regenerative processes after myocardial infarction. Despite multiple published reports of improvement, functional benefits remain modest using normal stem cells delivered by adoptive transfer into damaged myocardium. The goal of this study is to enhance survival and proliferation of CSCs that have undergone lineage commitment in early phases as evidenced by expression of proteins driven by the α-myosin heavy chain (αMHC) promoter. The early increased expression of survival kinases augments expansion of the cardiogenic CSC pool and subsequent daughter progeny. Materials & methods Normal CSCs engineered with fluorescent reporter protein constructs under control of the αMHC promoter show transgene protein expression, confirming activity of the promoter in CSCs. Cultured CSCs from both nontransgenic and cardiac-specific transgenic mice expressing survival kinases driven by the αMHC promoter were analyzed to characterize transgene expression following treatments to promote differentiation in culture. Results & conclusion Therapeutic genes controlled by the αMHC promoter can be engineered into and expressed in CSCs and cardiomyocyte progeny with the goal of improving the efficacy of cardiac stem cell therapy. PMID:19903002

  11. Tissue engineering: state of the art in oral rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    SCHELLER, E. L.; KREBSBACH, P. H.; KOHN, D. H.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY More than 85% of the global population requires repair or replacement of a craniofacial structure. These defects range from simple tooth decay to radical oncologic craniofacial resection. Regeneration of oral and craniofacial tissues presents a formidable challenge that requires synthesis of basic science, clinical science and engineering technology. Identification of appropriate scaffolds, cell sources and spatial and temporal signals (the tissue engineering triad) is necessary to optimize development of a single tissue, hybrid organ or interface. Furthermore, combining the understanding of the interactions between molecules of the extracellular matrix and attached cells with an understanding of the gene expression needed to induce differentiation and tissue growth will provide the design basis for translating basic science into rationally developed components of this tissue engineering triad. Dental tissue engineers are interested in regeneration of teeth, oral mucosa, salivary glands, bone and periodontium. Many of these oral structures are hybrid tissues. For example, engineering the periodontium requires growth of alveolar bone, cementum and the periodontal ligament. Recapitulation of biological development of hybrid tissues and interfaces presents a challenge that exceeds that of engineering just a single tissue. Advances made in dental interface engineering will allow these tissues to serve as model systems for engineering other tissues or organs of the body. This review will begin by covering basic tissue engineering principles and strategic design of functional biomaterials. We will then explore the impact of biomaterials design on the status of craniofacial tissue engineering and current challenges and opportunities in dental tissue engineering. PMID:19228277

  12. Stem Cells and Progenitor Cells for Tissue-Engineered Solutions to Congenital Heart Defects

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Jacot, Jeffrey G

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic patches and fixed grafts currently used in the repair of congenital heart defects are nonliving, noncontractile, and not electrically responsive, leading to increased risk of complication, reoperation, and sudden cardiac death. Studies suggest that tissue-engineered patches made from living, functional cells could grow with the patient, facilitate healing, and help recover cardiac function. In this paper, we review the research into possible sources of cardiomyocytes and other cardiac cells, including embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells, umbilical cord blood cells, amniotic fluid-derived stem cells, and cardiac progenitor cells. Each cell source has advantages, but also has technical hurdles to overcome, including heterogeneity, functional maturity, immunogenicity, and pathogenicity. Additionally, biomaterials used as patch materials will need to attract and support desired cells and induce minimal immune responses. PMID:26379417

  13. Tissue engineering of cultured skin substitutes.

    PubMed

    Horch, Raymund E; Kopp, Jürgen; Kneser, Ulrich; Beier, Justus; Bach, Alexander D

    2005-01-01

    Skin replacement has been a challenging task for surgeons ever since the introduction of skin grafts by Reverdin in 1871. Recently, skin grafting has evolved from the initial autograft and allograft preparations to biosynthetic and tissue-engineered living skin replacements. This has been fostered by the dramatically improved survival rates of major burns where the availability of autologous normal skin for grafting has become one of the limiting factors. The ideal properties of a temporary and a permanent skin substitute have been well defined. Tissue-engineered skin replacements: cultured autologous keratinocyte grafts, cultured allogeneic keratinocyte grafts, autologous/allogeneic composites, acellular biological matrices, and cellular matrices including such biological substances as fibrin sealant and various types of collagen, hyaluronic acid etc. have opened new horizons to deal with such massive skin loss. In extensive burns it has been shown that skin substitution with cultured grafts can be a life-saving measure where few alternatives exist. Future research will aim to create skin substitutes with cultured epidermis that under appropriate circumstances may provide a wound cover that could be just as durable and esthetically acceptable as conventional split-thickness skin grafts. Genetic manipulation may in addition enhance the performance of such cultured skin substitutes. If cell science, molecular biology, genetic engineering, material science and clinical expertise join their efforts to develop optimized cell culture techniques and synthetic or biological matrices then further technical advances might well lead to the production of almost skin like new tissue-engineered human skin products resembling natural human skin. PMID:16202208

  14. PROTEIN TEMPLATES IN HARD TISSUE ENGINEERING

    PubMed Central

    George, Anne; Ravindran, Sriram

    2010-01-01

    Biomineralization processes such as formation of bones and teeth require controlled mineral deposition and self-assembly into hierarchical biocomposites with unique mechanical properties. Ideal biomaterials for regeneration and repair of hard tissues must be biocompatible, possess micro and macroporosity for vascular invasion, provide surface chemistry and texture that facilitate cell attachment, proliferation, differentiation of lineage specific progenitor cells, and induce deposition of calcium phosphate mineral. To expect in-vivo like cellular response several investigators have used extracellular matrix proteins as templates to recreate in-vivo microenvironment for regeneration of hard tissues. Recently, several novel methods of designing tissue repair and restoration materials using bioinspired strategies are currently being formulated. Nanoscale structured materials can be fabricated via the spontaneous organization of self-assembling proteins to construct hierarchically organized nanomaterials. The advantage of such a method is that polypeptides can be specifically designed as building blocks incorporated with molecular recognition features and spatially distributed bioactive ligands that would provide a physiological environment for cells in-vitro and in-vivo. This is a rapidly evolving area and provides a promising platform for future development of nanostructured templates for hard tissue engineering. In this review we try to highlight the importance of proteins as templates for regeneration and repair of hard tissues as well as the potential of peptide based nanomaterials for regenerative therapies. PMID:20802848

  15. Bone Tissue Engineering: Past-Present-Future.

    PubMed

    Quarto, Rodolfo; Giannoni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Bone is one of the few tissues to display a true potential for regeneration. Fracture healing is an obvious example where regeneration occurs through tightly regulated sequences of molecular and cellular events which recapitulate tissue formation seen during embryogenesis. Still in some instances, bone regeneration does not occur properly (i.e. critical size lesions) and an appropriate therapeutic intervention is necessary. Successful replacement of bone by tissue engineering will likely depend on the recapitulation of this flow of events. In fact, bone regeneration requires cross-talk between microenvironmental factors and cells; for example, resident mesenchymal progenitors are recruited and properly guided by soluble and insoluble signaling molecules. Tissue engineering attempts to reproduce and to mimic this natural milieu by delivering cells capable of differentiating into osteoblasts, inducing growth factors and biomaterials to support cellular attachment, proliferation, migration, and matrix deposition. In the last two decades, a significant effort has been made by the scientific community in the development of methods and protocols to repair and regenerate tissues such as bone, cartilage, tendons, and ligaments. In this same period, great advancements have been achieved in the biology of stem cells and on the mechanisms governing "stemness". Unfortunately, after two decades, effective clinical translation does not exist, besides a few limited examples. Many years have passed since cell-based regenerative therapies were first described as "promising approaches", but this definition still engulfs the present literature. Failure to envisage translational cell therapy applications in routine medical practice evidences the existence of unresolved scientific and technical struggles, some of which still puzzle researchers in the field and are presented in this chapter. PMID:27236664

  16. Biomaterial systems for orthopedic tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoerke, Erik David

    2003-06-01

    The World Health Organization has estimated that one out of seven Americans suffers from a musculoskeletal impairment, annually incurring 28.6 million musculoskeletal injuries---more than half of all injuries. Bone tissue engineering has evolved rapidly to address this continued health concern. In the last decade, the focus of orthopedic biomaterials design has shifted from the use of common engineering metals and plastics to smart materials designed to mimic nature and elicit favorable bioresponse. Working within this new paradigm, this thesis explores unique chemical and materials systems for orthopedic tissue engineering. Improving on current titanium implant technologies, porous titanium scaffolds were utilized to better approximate the mechanical and structural properties of natural bone. These foam scaffolds were enhanced with bioactive coatings, designed to enhance osteoblastic implant colonization. The biopolymer poly(L-lysine) was incorporated into both hydroxypatite and octacalcium phosphate mineral phases to create modified organoapatite and pLys-CP coatings respectively. These coatings were synthesized and characterized on titanium surfaces, including porous structures such as titanium mesh and titanium foam. In addition, in vitro osteoblastic cell culture experiments probed the biological influences of these coatings. Organoapatite (OA) accelerated preosteoblastic colonization of titanium mesh and improved cellular ingrowth into titanium foam. Alternatively, the thin, uniform pLys-CP coating demonstrated significant potential as a substrate for chemically binding biological molecules and supramolecular assemblies. Biologically, pLys-CP demonstrated enhanced cellular attachment over titanium and inorganic calcium phosphate controls. Supramolecular self-assembled nanofiber assemblies were also explored both as stand-alone tissue engineering gels and as titanium coatings. Self-supporting nanofiber gels induced accelerated, biomimetic mineralization

  17. The Application of Tissue Engineering Procedures to Repair the Larynx

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringel, Robert L.; Kahane, Joel C.; Hillsamer, Peter J.; Lee, Annie S.; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2006-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering/regenerative medicine combines the quantitative principles of engineering with the principles of the life sciences toward the goal of reconstituting structurally and functionally normal tissues and organs. There has been relatively little application of tissue engineering efforts toward the organs of speech, voice,…

  18. Non-Linear Dynamics of Cardiac Alternans: Subcellular to Tissue-Level Mechanisms of Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Gaeta, Stephen A.; Christini, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac repolarization alternans is a rhythm disturbance of the heart in which rapid stimulation elicits a beat-to-beat alternation in the duration of action potentials and magnitude of intracellular calcium transients in individual cardiac myocytes. Although this phenomenon has been identified as a potential precursor to dangerous reentrant arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, significant uncertainty remains regarding its mechanism and no clinically practical means of halting its occurrence or progression currently exists. Cardiac alternans has well-characterized tissue, cellular, and subcellular manifestations, the mechanisms and interplay of which are an active area of research. PMID:22783195

  19. A multistep procedure to prepare pre-vascularized cardiac tissue constructs using adult stem sells, dynamic cell cultures, and porous scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Pagliari, Stefania; Tirella, Annalisa; Ahluwalia, Arti; Duim, Sjoerd; Goumans, Marie-Josè; Aoyagi, Takao; Forte, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    The vascularization of tissue engineered products represents a key issue in regenerative medicine which needs to be addressed before the translation of these protocols to the bedside can be foreseen. Here we propose a multistep procedure to prepare pre-vascularized three-dimensional (3D) cardiac bio-substitutes using dynamic cell cultures and highly porous biocompatible gelatin scaffolds. The strategy adopted exploits the peculiar differentiation potential of two distinct subsets of adult stem cells to obtain human vascularized 3D cardiac tissues. In the first step of the procedure, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are seeded onto gelatin scaffolds to provide interconnected vessel-like structures, while human cardiomyocyte progenitor cells (hCMPCs) are stimulated in vitro to obtain their commitment toward the cardiac phenotype. The use of a modular bioreactor allows the perfusion of the whole scaffold, providing superior performance in terms of cardiac tissue maturation and cell survival. Both the cell culture on natural-derived polymers and the continuous medium perfusion of the scaffold led to the formation of a densely packaged proto-tissue composed of vascular-like and cardiac-like cells, which might complete maturation process and interconnect with native tissue upon in vivo implantation. In conclusion, the data obtained through the approach here proposed highlight the importance to provide stem cells with complementary signals in vitro able to resemble the complexity of cardiac microenvironment. PMID:24917827

  20. Elastomeric PGS scaffolds in arterial tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kee-Won; Wang, Yadong

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading cause of mortality in the US and especially, coronary artery disease increases with an aging population and increasing obesity. Currently, bypass surgery using autologous vessels, allografts, and synthetic grafts are known as a commonly used for arterial substitutes. However, these grafts have limited applications when an inner diameter of arteries is less than 6 mm due to low availability, thrombotic complications, compliance mismatch, and late intimal hyperplasia. To overcome these limitations, tissue engineering has been successfully applied as a promising alternative to develop small-diameter arterial constructs that are nonthrombogenic, robust, and compliant. Several previous studies have developed small-diameter arterial constructs with tri-lamellar structure, excellent mechanical properties and burst pressure comparable to native arteries. While high tensile strength and burst pressure by increasing collagen production from a rigid material or cell sheet scaffold, these constructs still had low elastin production and compliance, which is a major problem to cause graft failure after implantation. Considering these issues, we hypothesized that an elastometric biomaterial combined with mechanical conditioning would provide elasticity and conduct mechanical signals more efficiently to vascular cells, which increase extracellular matrix production and support cellular orientation. The objective of this report is to introduce a fabrication technique of porous tubular scaffolds and a dynamic mechanical conditioning for applying them to arterial tissue engineering. We used a biodegradable elastomer, poly (glycerol sebacate) (PGS) for fabricating porous tubular scaffolds from the salt fusion method. Adult primary baboon smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were seeded on the lumen of scaffolds, which cultured in our designed pulsatile flow bioreactor for 3 weeks. PGS scaffolds had consistent thickness and randomly distributed macro

  1. Tissue Engineering Organs for Space Biology Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, H. H.; Shansky, J.; DelTatto, M.; Lee, P.; Meir, J.

    1999-01-01

    Long-term manned space flight requires a better understanding of skeletal muscle atrophy resulting from microgravity. Atrophy most likely results from changes at both the systemic level (e.g. decreased circulating growth hormone, increased circulating glucocorticoids) and locally (e.g. decreased myofiber resting tension). Differentiated skeletal myofibers in tissue culture have provided a model system over the last decade for gaining a better understanding of the interactions of exogenous growth factors, endogenous growth factors, and muscle fiber tension in regulating protein turnover rates and muscle cell growth. Tissue engineering these cells into three dimensional bioartificial muscle (BAM) constructs has allowed us to extend their use to Space flight studies for the potential future development of countermeasures.

  2. Tissue Engineering Considerations in Dental Pulp Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Nosrat, Ali; Kim, Jong Ryul; Verma, Prashant; S. Chand, Priya

    2014-01-01

    Regenerative endodontic procedure is introduced as a biologically based treatment for immature teeth with pulp necrosis. Successful clinical and radiographic outcomes following regenerative procedures have been reported in landmark case reports. Retrospective studies have shown that this conservative treatment allows for continued root development and increases success and survival rate of the treated teeth compared to other treatment options. Although the goal of treatment is regeneration of a functional pulp tissue, histological analyses show a different outcome. Developing predictable protocols would require the use of key elements for tissue engineering: stem cells, bioactive scaffolds, and growth factors. In this study we will review the evidence based steps and outcomes of regenerative endodontics. PMID:24396373

  3. Hybrid Multicomponent Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xinqiao; Kiick, Kristi L.

    2009-01-01

    Artificial ECMs that not only closely mimic the hybrid nature of the natural ECM but also provide tunable material properties and enhanced biological functions are attractive candidates for tissue engineering applications. This review summarizes recent advances in developing multicomponent hybrid hydrogels by integrating modular and heterogeneous building blocks into well-defined, multifunctional hydrogel composites. The individual building blocks can be chemically, morphologically, and functionally diverse, and the hybridization can occur at molecular level or microscopic scale. The modular nature of the designs, combined with the potential synergistic effects of the hybrid systems, has resulted in novel hydrogel matrices with robust structure and defined functions. PMID:19107720

  4. Recent advances in bone tissue engineering scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Susmita; Roy, Mangal; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2012-01-01

    Bone disorders are of significant concern due to increase in the median age of our population. Traditionally, bone grafts have been used to restore damaged bone. Synthetic biomaterials are now being used as bone graft substitutes. These biomaterials were initially selected for structural restoration based on their biomechanical properties. Later scaffolds were engineered to be bioactive or bioresorbable to enhance tissue growth. Now scaffolds are designed to induce bone formation and vascularization. These scaffolds are often porous, biodegradable materials that harbor different growth factors, drugs, genes or stem cells. In this review, we highlight recent advances in bone scaffolds and discuss aspects that still need to be improved. PMID:22939815

  5. Cryogenic 3D printing for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Adamkiewicz, Michal; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-12-01

    We describe a new cryogenic 3D printing technology for freezing hydrogels, with a potential impact to tissue engineering. We show that complex frozen hydrogel structures can be generated when the 3D object is printed immersed in a liquid coolant (liquid nitrogen), whose upper surface is maintained at the same level as the highest deposited layer of the object. This novel approach ensures that the process of freezing is controlled precisely, and that already printed frozen layers remain at a constant temperature. We describe the device and present results which illustrate the potential of the new technology. PMID:26548335

  6. Piezoelectric polymers as biomaterials for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Clarisse; Sencadas, Vítor; Correia, Daniela M; Lanceros-Méndez, Senentxu

    2015-12-01

    Tissue engineering often rely on scaffolds for supporting cell differentiation and growth. Novel paradigms for tissue engineering include the need of active or smart scaffolds in order to properly regenerate specific tissues. In particular, as electrical and electromechanical clues are among the most relevant ones in determining tissue functionality in tissues such as muscle and bone, among others, electroactive materials and, in particular, piezoelectric ones, show strong potential for novel tissue engineering strategies, in particular taking also into account the existence of these phenomena within some specific tissues, indicating their requirement also during tissue regeneration. This referee reports on piezoelectric materials used for tissue engineering applications. The most used materials for tissue engineering strategies are reported together with the main achievements, challenges and future needs for research and actual therapies. This review provides thus a compilation of the most relevant results and strategies and a start point for novel research pathways in the most relevant and challenging open questions. PMID:26355812

  7. Tumor Engineering: The Other Face of Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Advances in tissue engineering have been accomplished for years by employing biomimetic strategies to provide cells with aspects of their original microenvironment necessary to reconstitute a unit of both form and function for a given tissue. We believe that the most critical hallmark of cancer is loss of integration of architecture and function; thus, it stands to reason that similar strategies could be employed to understand tumor biology. In this commentary, we discuss work contributed by Fischbach-Teschl and colleagues to this special issue of Tissue Engineering in the context of ‘tumor engineering’, that is, the construction of complex cell culture models that recapitulate aspects of the in vivo tumor microenvironment to study the dynamics of tumor development, progression, and therapy on multiple scales. We provide examples of fundamental questions that could be answered by developing such models, and encourage the continued collaboration between physical scientists and life scientists not only for regenerative purposes, but also to unravel the complexity that is the tumor microenvironment. PMID:20214448

  8. Fibrin Gel as an Injectable Biodegradable Scaffold and Cell Carrier for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuting; Meng, Hao; Liu, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Due to the increasing needs for organ transplantation and a universal shortage of donated tissues, tissue engineering emerges as a useful approach to engineer functional tissues. Although different synthetic materials have been used to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds, they have many limitations such as the biocompatibility concerns, the inability to support cell attachment, and undesirable degradation rate. Fibrin gel, a biopolymeric material, provides numerous advantages over synthetic materials in functioning as a tissue engineering scaffold and a cell carrier. Fibrin gel exhibits excellent biocompatibility, promotes cell attachment, and can degrade in a controllable manner. Additionally, fibrin gel mimics the natural blood-clotting process and self-assembles into a polymer network. The ability for fibrin to cure in situ has been exploited to develop injectable scaffolds for the repair of damaged cardiac and cartilage tissues. Additionally, fibrin gel has been utilized as a cell carrier to protect cells from the forces during the application and cell delivery processes while enhancing the cell viability and tissue regeneration. Here, we review the recent advancement in developing fibrin-based biomaterials for the development of injectable tissue engineering scaffold and cell carriers. PMID:25853146

  9. Tissue engineered small-diameter vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Schmedlen, Rachael H; Elbjeirami, Wafa M; Gobin, Andrea S; West, Jennifer L

    2003-10-01

    Arterial occlusive disease remains the leading cause of death in western countries and often requires vascular reconstructive surgery. The limited supply of suitable small-diameter vascular grafts has led to the development of tissue engineered blood vessel substitutes. Many different approaches have been examined, including natural scaffolds containing one or more ECM proteins and degradable polymeric scaffolds. For optimal graft development, many efforts have modified the culture environment to enhance ECM synthesis and organization using bioreactors under physiologic conditions and biochemical supplements. In the past couple of decades, a great deal of progress on TEVGs has been made. Many challenges remain and are being addressed, particularly with regard to the prevention of thrombosis and the improvement of graft mechanical properties. To develop a patent TEVG that grossly resembles native tissue, required culture times in most studies exceed 8 weeks. Even with further advances in the field, TEVGs will likely not be used in emergency situations because of the time necessary to allow for cell expansion, ECM production and organization, and attainment of desired mechanical strength. Furthermore, TEVGs will probably require the use of autologous tissue to prevent an immunogenic response, unless advances in immune acceptance render allogenic and xenogenic tissue use feasible. TEVGs have not yet been subjected to clinical trials, which will determine the efficacy of such grafts in the long term. Finally, off-the-shelf availability and cost will become the biggest hurdles in the development of a feasible TEVG product. Although many obstacles exist in the effort to develop a small-diameter TEVG, the potential benefits of such an achievement are exciting. In the near future, a nonthrombogenic TEVG with sufficient mechanical strength may be developed for clinical trials. Such a graft will have the minimum characteristics of biological tissue necessary to remain patent

  10. Electrospinning polyaniline-contained gelatin nanofibers for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengyan; Guo, Yi; Wei, Yen; MacDiarmid, Alan G; Lelkes, Peter I

    2006-05-01

    Polyaniline (PANi), a conductive polymer, was blended with a natural protein, gelatin, and co-electrospun into nanofibers to investigate the potential application of such a blend as conductive scaffold for tissue engineering purposes. Electrospun PANi-contained gelatin fibers were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrical conductivity measurement, mechanical tensile testing, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). SEM analysis of the blend fibers containing less than 3% PANi in total weight, revealed uniform fibers with no evidence for phase segregation, as also confirmed by DSC. Our data indicate that with increasing the amount of PANi (from 0 to approximately 5%w/w), the average fiber size was reduced from 803+/-121 nm to 61+/-13 nm (p<0.01) and the tensile modulus increased from 499+/-207 MPa to 1384+/-105 MPa (p<0.05). The results of the DSC study further strengthen our notion that the doping of gelatin with a few % PANi leads to an alteration of the physicochemical properties of gelatin. To test the usefulness of PANi-gelatin blends as a fibrous matrix for supporting cell growth, H9c2 rat cardiac myoblast cells were cultured on fiber-coated glass cover slips. Cell cultures were evaluated in terms of cell proliferation and morphology. Our results indicate that all PANi-gelatin blend fibers supported H9c2 cell attachment and proliferation to a similar degree as the control tissue culture-treated plastic (TCP) and smooth glass substrates. Depending on the concentrations of PANi, the cells initially displayed different morphologies on the fibrous substrates, but after 1 week all cultures reached confluence of similar densities and morphology. Taken together these results suggest that PANi-gelatin blend nanofibers might provide a novel conductive material well suited as biocompatible scaffolds for tissue engineering. PMID:16352335

  11. An overview of recent patents on musculoskeletal interface tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Rao, Rohit T; Browe, Daniel P; Lowe, Christopher J; Freeman, Joseph W

    2016-02-01

    Interface tissue engineering involves the development of engineered grafts that promote integration between multiple tissue types. Musculoskeletal tissue interfaces are critical to the safe and efficient transmission of mechanical forces between multiple musculoskeletal tissues, e.g., between ligament and bone tissue. However, these interfaces often do not physiologically regenerate upon injury, resulting in impaired tissue function. Therefore, interface tissue engineering approaches are considered to be particularly relevant for the structural restoration of musculoskeletal tissues interfaces. In this article, we provide an overview of the various strategies used for engineering musculoskeletal tissue interfaces with a specific focus on the recent important patents that have been issued for inventions that were specifically designed for engineering musculoskeletal interfaces as well as those that show promise to be adapted for this purpose. PMID:26577344

  12. Tissue engineering skeletal muscle for orthopaedic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payumo, Francis C.; Kim, Hyun D.; Sherling, Michael A.; Smith, Lee P.; Powell, Courtney; Wang, Xiao; Keeping, Hugh S.; Valentini, Robert F.; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    2002-01-01

    With current technology, tissue-engineered skeletal muscle analogues (bioartificial muscles) generate too little active force to be clinically useful in orthopaedic applications. They have been engineered genetically with numerous transgenes (growth hormone, insulinlike growth factor-1, erythropoietin, vascular endothelial growth factor), and have been shown to deliver these therapeutic proteins either locally or systemically for months in vivo. Bone morphogenetic proteins belonging to the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily are osteoinductive molecules that drive the differentiation pathway of mesenchymal cells toward the chondroblastic or osteoblastic lineage, and stimulate bone formation in vivo. To determine whether skeletal muscle cells endogenously expressing bone morphogenetic proteins might serve as a vehicle for systemic bone morphogenetic protein delivery in vivo, proliferating skeletal myoblasts (C2C12) were transduced with a replication defective retrovirus containing the gene for recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6 (C2BMP-6). The C2BMP-6 cells constitutively expressed recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6 and synthesized bioactive recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6, based on increased alkaline phosphatase activity in coincubated mesenchymal cells. C2BMP-6 cells did not secrete soluble, bioactive recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6, but retained the bioactivity in the cell layer. Therefore, genetically-engineered skeletal muscle cells might serve as a platform for long-term delivery of osteoinductive bone morphogenetic proteins locally.

  13. Photocrosslinkable Gelatin Hydrogel for Epidermal Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Lang, Qi; Yildirimer, Lara; Lin, Zhi Yuan; Cui, Wenguo; Annabi, Nasim; Ng, Kee Woei; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Natural hydrogels are promising scaffolds to engineer epidermis. Currently, natural hydrogels used to support epidermal regeneration are mainly collagen- or gelatin-based, which mimic the natural dermal extracellular matrix but often suffer from insufficient and uncontrollable mechanical and degradation properties. In this study, a photocrosslinkable gelatin (i.e., gelatin methacrylamide (GelMA)) with tunable mechanical, degradation, and biological properties is used to engineer the epidermis for skin tissue engineering applications. The results reveal that the mechanical and degradation properties of the developed hydrogels can be readily modified by varying the hydrogel concentration, with elastic and compressive moduli tuned from a few kPa to a few hundred kPa, and the degradation times varied from a few days to several months. Additionally, hydrogels of all concentrations displayed excellent cell viability (>90%) with increasing cell adhesion and proliferation corresponding to increases in hydrogel concentrations. Furthermore, the hydrogels are found to support keratinocyte growth, differentiation, and stratification into a reconstructed multilayered epidermis with adequate barrier functions. The robust and tunable properties of GelMA hydrogels suggest that the keratinocyte laden hydrogels can be used as epidermal substitutes, wound dressings, or substrates to construct various in vitro skin models. PMID:25880725

  14. Silk film biomaterials for cornea tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Brian D.; Marchant, Jeffrey K.; Pindrus, Mariya; Omenetto, Fiorenzo; Kaplan, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Biomaterials for corneal tissue engineering must demonstrate several critical features for potential utility in vivo, including transparency, mechanical integrity, biocompatibility and slow biodegradation. Silk film biomaterials were designed and characterized to meet these functional requirements. Silk protein films were used in a biomimetic approach to replicate corneal stromal tissue architecture. The films were 2 μm thick to emulate corneal collagen lamellae dimensions, and were surface patterned to guide cell alignment. To enhance trans-lamellar diffusion of nutrients and to promote cell-cell interaction, pores with 0.5 to 5.0 μm diameters were introduced into the silk films. Human and rabbit corneal fibroblast proliferation, alignment and corneal extracellular matrix expression on these films in both 2D and 3D cultures was demonstrated. The mechanical properties, optical clarity and surface patterned features of these films, combined with their ability to support corneal cell functions suggest this new biomaterial system offers important potential benefits for corneal tissue regeneration. PMID:19059642

  15. Adipose tissue extract promotes adipose tissue regeneration in an adipose tissue engineering chamber model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zijing; Yuan, Yi; Gao, Jianhua; Lu, Feng

    2016-05-01

    An adipose tissue engineering chamber model of spontaneous adipose tissue generation from an existing fat flap has been described. However, the chamber does not completely fill with adipose tissue in this model. Here, the effect of adipose tissue extract (ATE) on adipose tissue regeneration was investigated. In vitro, the adipogenic and angiogenic capacities of ATE were evaluated using Oil Red O and tube formation assays on adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and rat aortic endothelial cells (RAECs), respectively. In vivo, saline or ATE was injected into the adipose tissue engineering chamber 1 week after its implantation. At different time points post-injection, the contents were morphometrically, histologically, and immunohistochemically evaluated, and the expression of growth factors and adipogenic genes was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real-time PCR. With the exception of the baseline control group, in which fat flaps were not inserted into a chamber, the total volume of fat flap tissue increased significantly in all groups, especially in the ATE group. Better morphology and structure, a thinner capsule, and more vessels were observed in the ATE group than in the control group. Expression of angiogenic growth factors and adipogenic markers were significantly higher in the ATE group. ATE therefore significantly promoted adipose tissue regeneration and reduced capsule formation in an adipose tissue engineering chamber model. These data suggest that ATE provides a more angiogenic and adipogenic microenvironment for adipose tissue formation by releasing various cytokines and growth factors that also inhibit capsule formation. PMID:26678825

  16. Quantitative Ultrasound for Nondestructive Characterization of Engineered Tissues and Biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Dalecki, Diane; Mercado, Karla P; Hocking, Denise C

    2016-03-01

    Non-invasive, non-destructive technologies for imaging and quantitatively monitoring the development of artificial tissues are critical for the advancement of tissue engineering. Current standard techniques for evaluating engineered tissues, including histology, biochemical assays and mechanical testing, are destructive approaches. Ultrasound is emerging as a valuable tool for imaging and quantitatively monitoring the properties of engineered tissues and biomaterials longitudinally during fabrication and post-implantation. Ultrasound techniques are rapid, non-invasive, non-destructive and can be easily integrated into sterile environments necessary for tissue engineering. Furthermore, high-frequency quantitative ultrasound techniques can enable volumetric characterization of the structural, biological, and mechanical properties of engineered tissues during fabrication and post-implantation. This review provides an overview of ultrasound imaging, quantitative ultrasound techniques, and elastography, with representative examples of applications of these ultrasound-based techniques to the field of tissue engineering. PMID:26581347

  17. Textile Technologies and Tissue Engineering: A Path Toward Organ Weaving.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Mohsen; Tamayol, Ali; Bagherifard, Sara; Serex, Ludovic; Mostafalu, Pooria; Faramarzi, Negar; Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Textile technologies have recently attracted great attention as potential biofabrication tools for engineering tissue constructs. Using current textile technologies, fibrous structures can be designed and engineered to attain the required properties that are demanded by different tissue engineering applications. Several key parameters such as physiochemical characteristics of fibers, microarchitecture, and mechanical properties of the fabrics play important roles in the effective use of textile technologies in tissue engineering. This review summarizes the current advances in the manufacturing of biofunctional fibers. Different textile methods such as knitting, weaving, and braiding are discussed and their current applications in tissue engineering are highlighted. PMID:26924450

  18. Natural and Genetically Engineered Proteins for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Sílvia; Leonor, Isabel B.; Mano, João F.; Reis, Rui L.

    2011-01-01

    To overcome the limitations of traditionally used autografts, allografts and, to a lesser extent, synthetic materials, there is the need to develop a new generation of scaffolds with adequate mechanical and structural support, control of cell attachment, migration, proliferation and differentiation and with bio-resorbable features. This suite of properties would allow the body to heal itself at the same rate as implant degradation. Genetic engineering offers a route to this level of control of biomaterial systems. The possibility of expressing biological components in nature and to modify or bioengineer them further, offers a path towards multifunctional biomaterial systems. This includes opportunities to generate new protein sequences, new self-assembling peptides or fusions of different bioactive domains or protein motifs. New protein sequences with tunable properties can be generated that can be used as new biomaterials. In this review we address some of the most frequently used proteins for tissue engineering and biomedical applications and describe the techniques most commonly used to functionalize protein-based biomaterials by combining them with bioactive molecules to enhance biological performance. We also highlight the use of genetic engineering, for protein heterologous expression and the synthesis of new protein-based biopolymers, focusing the advantages of these functionalized biopolymers when compared with their counterparts extracted directly from nature and modified by techniques such as physical adsorption or chemical modification. PMID:22058578

  19. Tissue and Animal Models of Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Sallam, Karim; Li, Yingxin; Sager, Philip T.; Houser, Steven R.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD) is a common cause of death in patients with structural heart disease, genetic mutations or acquired disorders affecting cardiac ion channels. A wide range of platforms exist to model and study disorders associated with SCD. Human clinical studies are cumbersome and are thwarted by the extent of investigation that can be performed on human subjects. Animal models are limited by their degree of homology to human cardiac electrophysiology including ion channel expression. Most commonly used cellular models are cellular transfection models, which are able to mimic the expression of a single ion channel offering incomplete insight into changes of the action potential profile. Induced pluripotent stem cell derived Cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) resemble, but are not identical, to adult human cardiomyocytes, and provide a new platform for studying arrhythmic disorders leading to SCD. A variety of platforms exist to phenotype cellular models including conventional and automated patch clamp, multi-electrode array, and computational modeling. iPSC-CMs have been used to study Long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and other hereditary cardiac disorders. Although iPSC-CMs are distinct from adult cardiomyocytes, they provide a robust platform to advance the science and clinical care of SCD. PMID:26044252

  20. Acute pergolide exposure stiffens engineered valve interstitial cell tissues and reduces contractility in vitro.

    PubMed

    Capulli, Andrew K; MacQueen, Luke A; O'Connor, Blakely B; Dauth, Stephanie; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-01-01

    Medications based on ergoline-derived dopamine and serotonin agonists are associated with off-target toxicities that include valvular heart disease (VHD). Reports of drug-induced VHD resulted in the withdrawal of appetite suppressants containing fenfluramine and phentermine from the US market in 1997 and pergolide, a Parkinson's disease medication, in 2007. Recent evidence suggests that serotonin receptor activity affected by these medications modulates cardiac valve interstitial cell activation and subsequent valvular remodeling, which can lead to cardiac valve fibrosis and dysfunction similar to that seen in carcinoid heart disease. Failure to identify these risks prior to market and continued use of similar drugs reaffirm the need to improve preclinical evaluation of drug-induced VHD. Here, we present two complimentary assays to measure stiffness and contractile stresses generated by engineered valvular tissues in vitro. As a case study, we measured the effects of acute (24 h) pergolide exposure to engineered porcine aortic valve interstitial cell (AVIC) tissues. Pergolide exposure led to increased tissue stiffness, but it decreased both basal and active contractile tone stresses generated by AVIC tissues. Pergolide exposure also disrupted AVIC tissue organization (i.e., tissue anisotropy), suggesting that the mechanical properties and contractile functionality of these tissues are governed by their ability to maintain their structure. We expect further use of these assays to identify off-target drug effects that alter the phenotypic balance of AVICs, disrupt their ability to maintain mechanical homeostasis, and lead to VHD. PMID:27174867

  1. Mechanical Stretching for Tissue Engineering: Two-Dimensional and Three-Dimensional Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Riehl, Brandon D.; Park, Jae-Hong; Kwon, Il Keun

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical cell stretching may be an attractive strategy for the tissue engineering of mechanically functional tissues. It has been demonstrated that cell growth and differentiation can be guided by cell stretch with minimal help from soluble factors and engineered tissues that are mechanically stretched in bioreactors may have superior organization, functionality, and strength compared with unstretched counterparts. This review explores recent studies on cell stretching in both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) setups focusing on the applications of stretch stimulation as a tool for controlling cell orientation, growth, gene expression, lineage commitment, and differentiation and for achieving successful tissue engineering of mechanically functional tissues, including cardiac, muscle, vasculature, ligament, tendon, bone, and so on. Custom stretching devices and lab-specific mechanical bioreactors are described with a discussion on capabilities and limitations. While stretch mechanotransduction pathways have been examined using 2D stretch, studying such pathways in physiologically relevant 3D environments may be required to understand how cells direct tissue development under stretch. Cell stretch study using 3D milieus may also help to develop tissue-specific stretch regimens optimized with biochemical feedback, which once developed will provide optimal tissue engineering protocols. PMID:22335794

  2. Perspectives on the Interface of Drug Delivery and Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ekenseair, Adam K.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2012-01-01

    Controlled drug delivery of bioactive molecules continues to be an essential component of engineering strategies for tissue defect repair. This article surveys the current challenges associated with trying to regenerate complex tissues utilizing drug delivery and gives perspectives on the development of translational tissue engineering therapies which promote spatiotemporal cell-signaling cascades to maximize the rate and quality of repair. PMID:23000743

  3. Bioprinted Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun-Wook; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Researchers are focusing on bioprinting technology as a viable option to overcome current difficulties in cartilage tissue engineering. Bioprinting enables a three-dimensional (3-D), free-form, computer-designed structure using biomaterials, biomolecules, and/or cells. The inner and outer shape of a scaffold can be controlled by this technology with great precision. Here, we introduce a hybrid bioprinting technology that is a co-printing process of multiple materials including high-strength synthetic polymer and cell-laden hydrogel. The synthetic polymer provides mechanical support for shape maintenance and load bearing, while the hydrogel provides the biological environment for artificial cartilage regeneration. This chapter introduces the procedures for printing of a 3-D scaffold using our hybrid bioprinting technology and includes the source materials for preparation of 3-D printing. PMID:26445837

  4. Cardiovascular tissue engineering: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Vara, Dina S; Salacinski, Henryk J; Kannan, Ruben Y; Bordenave, Laurence; Hamilton, George; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2005-12-01

    In patients requiring coronary or peripheral vascular bypass procedures, autogenous arterial or vein grafts remain as the conduit of choice even in the case of redo patients. It is in this class of redo patients that often natural tissue of suitable quality becomes unavailable; so that prosthetic material is then used. Prosthetic grafts are liable to fail due to graft occlusion caused by surface thrombogenicity and lack of elasticity. To prevent this, seeding of the graft lumen with endothelial cells has been undertaken and recent clinical studies have evidenced patency rates approaching reasonable vein grafts. Recent advances have also looked at developing a completely artificial biological graft engineered from the patient's cells with surface and viscoelastic properties similar to autogenous vessels. This review encompasses both endothelialisation of grafts and the construction of biological cardiovascular conduits. PMID:16364812

  5. Hype and expectations in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Oerlemans, Anke J M; van Hoek, Maria E C; van Leeuwen, Evert; Dekkers, Wim Jm M

    2014-01-01

    Scientific progress and the development of new technologies often incite enthusiasm, both in scientists and the public at large, and this is especially apparent in discussions of emerging medical technologies, such as tissue engineering (TE). Future-oriented narratives typically discuss potential applications with much hype and expectations. In this article, we analyze the discourse on TE, its history and the promises present in the discourse surrounding it. Subsequently, we regard discussions about implantable bioartificial kidneys, and consider the concepts of hype and expectations in TE in general. Finally, we discuss what ethically responsible choices should be made in discussing TE to adequately deal with the scientific reality and public expectations surrounding this technology. PMID:24351011

  6. Scaffolds for central nervous system tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jin; Wang, Xiu-Mei; Spector, Myron; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2012-03-01

    Traumatic injuries to the brain and spinal cord of the central nervous system (CNS) lead to severe and permanent neurological deficits and to date there is no universally accepted treatment. Owing to the profound impact, extensive studies have been carried out aiming at reducing inflammatory responses and overcoming the inhibitory environment in the CNS after injury so as to enhance regeneration. Artificial scaffolds may provide a suitable environment for axonal regeneration and functional recovery, and are of particular importance in cases in which the injury has resulted in a cavitary defect. In this review we discuss development of scaffolds for CNS tissue engineering, focusing on mechanism of CNS injuries, various biomaterials that have been used in studies, and current strategies for designing and fabricating scaffolds.

  7. Verification of cardiac tissue electrophysiology simulators using an N-version benchmark.

    PubMed

    Niederer, Steven A; Kerfoot, Eric; Benson, Alan P; Bernabeu, Miguel O; Bernus, Olivier; Bradley, Chris; Cherry, Elizabeth M; Clayton, Richard; Fenton, Flavio H; Garny, Alan; Heidenreich, Elvio; Land, Sander; Maleckar, Mary; Pathmanathan, Pras; Plank, Gernot; Rodríguez, José F; Roy, Ishani; Sachse, Frank B; Seemann, Gunnar; Skavhaug, Ola; Smith, Nic P

    2011-11-13

    Ongoing developments in cardiac modelling have resulted, in particular, in the development of advanced and increasingly complex computational frameworks for simulating cardiac tissue electrophysiology. The goal of these simulations is often to represent the detailed physiology and pathologies of the heart using codes that exploit the computational potential of high-performance computing architectures. These developments have rapidly progressed the simulation capacity of cardiac virtual physiological human style models; however, they have also made it increasingly challenging to verify that a given code provides a faithful representation of the purported governing equations and corresponding solution techniques. This study provides the first cardiac tissue electrophysiology simulation benchmark to allow these codes to be verified. The benchmark was successfully evaluated on 11 simulation platforms to generate a consensus gold-standard converged solution. The benchmark definition in combination with the gold-standard solution can now be used to verify new simulation codes and numerical methods in the future. PMID:21969679

  8. Verification of cardiac tissue electrophysiology simulators using an N-version benchmark

    PubMed Central

    Niederer, Steven A.; Kerfoot, Eric; Benson, Alan P.; Bernabeu, Miguel O.; Bernus, Olivier; Bradley, Chris; Cherry, Elizabeth M.; Clayton, Richard; Fenton, Flavio H.; Garny, Alan; Heidenreich, Elvio; Land, Sander; Maleckar, Mary; Pathmanathan, Pras; Plank, Gernot; Rodríguez, José F.; Roy, Ishani; Sachse, Frank B.; Seemann, Gunnar; Skavhaug, Ola; Smith, Nic P.

    2011-01-01

    Ongoing developments in cardiac modelling have resulted, in particular, in the development of advanced and increasingly complex computational frameworks for simulating cardiac tissue electrophysiology. The goal of these simulations is often to represent the detailed physiology and pathologies of the heart using codes that exploit the computational potential of high-performance computing architectures. These developments have rapidly progressed the simulation capacity of cardiac virtual physiological human style models; however, they have also made it increasingly challenging to verify that a given code provides a faithful representation of the purported governing equations and corresponding solution techniques. This study provides the first cardiac tissue electrophysiology simulation benchmark to allow these codes to be verified. The benchmark was successfully evaluated on 11 simulation platforms to generate a consensus gold-standard converged solution. The benchmark definition in combination with the gold-standard solution can now be used to verify new simulation codes and numerical methods in the future. PMID:21969679

  9. Controlling spiral waves and turbulent states in cardiac tissue by traveling wave perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng-Ye; Xie, Ping

    2000-03-01

    We propose a traveling wave perturbation method to control the spatiotemporal dynamics in cardiac tissue. With a two-variable model we demonstrate that the method can successfully suppress the wave instability (alternans in action potential duration) in the one-dimensional case and convert spiral waves and turbulent states to the normal traveling wave state in the two-dimensional case. An experimental scheme is suggested which may provide a new design for a cardiac defibrillator.

  10. Analyzing Remodeling of Cardiac Tissue: A Comprehensive Approach Based on Confocal Microscopy and 3D Reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Thomas; Edelmann, J-C; Sachse, Frank B

    2016-05-01

    Microstructural characterization of cardiac tissue and its remodeling in disease is a crucial step in many basic research projects. We present a comprehensive approach for three-dimensional characterization of cardiac tissue at the submicrometer scale. We developed a compression-free mounting method as well as labeling and imaging protocols that facilitate acquisition of three-dimensional image stacks with scanning confocal microscopy. We evaluated the approach with normal and infarcted ventricular tissue. We used the acquired image stacks for segmentation, quantitative analysis and visualization of important tissue components. In contrast to conventional mounting, compression-free mounting preserved cell shapes, capillary lumens and extracellular laminas. Furthermore, the new approach and imaging protocols resulted in high signal-to-noise ratios at depths up to 60 µm. This allowed extensive analyzes revealing major differences in volume fractions and distribution of cardiomyocytes, blood vessels, fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and extracellular space in control vs. infarct border zone. Our results show that the developed approach yields comprehensive data on microstructure of cardiac tissue and its remodeling in disease. In contrast to other approaches, it allows quantitative assessment of all major tissue components. Furthermore, we suggest that the approach will provide important data for physiological models of cardiac tissue at the submicrometer scale. PMID:26399990

  11. Tissue Engineered Constructs: Perspectives on Clinical Translation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lichun; Arbit, Harvey M.; Herrick, James L.; Segovis, Suzanne Glass; Maran, Avudaiappan; Yaszemski, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, a “bedside to bench and back” approach for developing tissue engineered medical products (TEMPs) for clinical applications is reviewed. The driving force behind this approach is unmet clinical needs. Preclinical research, both in vitro and in vivo using small and large animal models, will help find solutions to key research questions. In clinical research, ethical issues regarding the use of cells and tissues, their sources, donor consent, as well as clinical trials are important considerations. Regulatory issues, at both institutional and government levels, must be addressed prior to the translation of TEMPs to clinical practice. TEMPs are regulated as drugs, biologics, devices, or combination products by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Depending on the mode of regulation, applications for TEMP introduction must be filed with the FDA to demonstrate safety and effectiveness in premarket clinical studies, followed by 510(k) premarket clearance or premarket approval (for medical devices), biologics license application approval (for biologics), or New Drug Application approval (for drugs). A case study on nerve cuffs is presented to illustrate the regulatory process. Finally, perspectives on commercialization such as finding a company partner and funding issues, as well as physician culture change, are presented. PMID:25711151

  12. Tissue engineered constructs: perspectives on clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lichun; Arbit, Harvey M; Herrick, James L; Segovis, Suzanne Glass; Maran, Avudaiappan; Yaszemski, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    In this article, a "bedside to bench and back" approach for developing tissue engineered medical products (TEMPs) for clinical applications is reviewed. The driving force behind this approach is unmet clinical needs. Preclinical research, both in vitro and in vivo using small and large animal models, will help find solutions to key research questions. In clinical research, ethical issues regarding the use of cells and tissues, their sources, donor consent, as well as clinical trials are important considerations. Regulatory issues, at both institutional and government levels, must be addressed prior to the translation of TEMPs to clinical practice. TEMPs are regulated as drugs, biologics, devices, or combination products by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Depending on the mode of regulation, applications for TEMP introduction must be filed with the FDA to demonstrate safety and effectiveness in premarket clinical studies, followed by 510(k) premarket clearance or premarket approval (for medical devices), biologics license application approval (for biologics), or new drug application approval (for drugs). A case study on nerve cuffs is presented to illustrate the regulatory process. Finally, perspectives on commercialization such as finding a company partner and funding issues, as well as physician culture change, are presented. PMID:25711151

  13. Biomimetic nanoclay scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambre, Avinash Harishchandra

    Tissue engineering offers a significant potential alternative to conventional methods for rectifying tissue defects by evoking natural regeneration process via interactions between cells and 3D porous scaffolds. Imparting adequate mechanical properties to biodegradable scaffolds for bone tissue engineering is an important challenge and extends from molecular to macroscale. This work focuses on the use of sodium montmorillonite (Na-MMT) to design polymer composite scaffolds having enhanced mechanical properties along with multiple interdependent properties. Materials design beginning at the molecular level was used in which Na-MMT clay was modified with three different unnatural amino acids and further characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD). Based on improved bicompatibility with human osteoblasts (bone cells) and intermediate increase in d-spacing of MMT clay (shown by XRD), 5-aminovaleric acid modified clay was further used to prepare biopolymer (chitosan-polygalacturonic acid complex) scaffolds. Osteoblast proliferation in biopolymer scaffolds containing 5-aminovaleric acid modified clay was similar to biopolymer scaffolds containing hydroxyapatite (HAP). A novel process based on biomineralization in bone was designed to prepare 5-aminovaleric acid modified clay capable of imparting multiple properties to the scaffolds. Bone-like apatite was mineralized in modified clay and a novel nanoclay-HAP hybrid (in situ HAPclay) was obtained. FTIR spectroscopy indicated a molecular level organic-inorganic association between the intercalated 5-aminovaleric acid and mineralized HAP. Osteoblasts formed clusters on biopolymer composite films prepared with different weight percent compositions of in situ HAPclay. Human MSCs formed mineralized nodules on composite films and mineralized extracellular matrix (ECM) in composite scaffolds without the use of osteogenic supplements. Polycaprolactone (PCL), a synthetic polymer, was

  14. Tissue engineering: a 21st century solution to surgical reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, J R; Nasseri, B A; Vacanti, J P

    2001-08-01

    Tissue engineering has emerged as a rapidly expanding approach to address the organ shortage problem. It is an "interdisciplinary field that applies the principles and methods of engineering and the life sciences toward the development of biological substitutes that can restore, maintain, or improve tissue function." Much progress has been made in the tissue engineering of structures relevant to cardiothoracic surgery, including heart valves, blood vessels, myocardium, esophagus, and trachea. PMID:11515900

  15. Effect of Cardiac Tissue Anisotropy on Three-Dimensional Electrical Action Potential Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi Zhu; Liu, Jing

    A three-dimensional (3D) electrical action potential propagation model is developed to characterize the integrated effect of cardiac tissue structure using a homogenous function with a spatial inhomogeneity. This method may be more effective for bridging the gap between computational models and experimental data for cardiac tissue anisotropy. A generalized 3D eikonal relation considering anisotropy and a self-similar evolution solution of such a relation are derived to identify the effect of anisotropy and predict the anisotropy-induced electrical wave propagation instabilities. Furthermore, the phase field equation is introduced to obtain the complex three-dimensional numerical solution of the new correlation. The present results are expected to be valuable for better understanding the physiological behavior of cardiac tissues.

  16. Tissue engineering in urethral reconstruction—an update

    PubMed Central

    Mangera, Altaf; Chapple, Christopher R

    2013-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering is rapidly progressing. Much work has gone into developing a tissue engineered urethral graft. Current grafts, when long, can create initial donor site morbidity. In this article, we evaluate the progress made in finding a tissue engineered substitute for the human urethra. Researchers have investigated cell-free and cell-seeded grafts. We discuss different approaches to developing these grafts and review their reported successes in human studies. With further work, tissue engineered grafts may facilitate the management of lengthy urethral strictures requiring oral mucosa substitution urethroplasty. PMID:23042444

  17. Reentrant excitation in an analog-digital hybrid circuit model of cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmud, Farhanahani; Shiozawa, Naruhiro; Makikawa, Masaaki; Nomura, Taishin

    2011-06-01

    We propose an analog-digital hybrid circuit model of one-dimensional cardiac tissue with hardware implementation that allows us to perform real-time simulations of spatially conducting cardiac action potentials. Each active nodal compartment of the tissue model is designed using analog circuits and a dsPIC microcontroller, by which the time-dependent and time-independent nonlinear current-voltage relationships of six types of ion channel currents employed in the Luo-Rudy phase I (LR-I) model for a single mammalian cardiac ventricular cell can be reproduced quantitatively. Here, we perform real-time simulations of reentrant excitation conduction in a ring-shaped tissue model that includes eighty nodal compartments. In particular, we show that the hybrid tissue model can exhibit real-time dynamics for initiation of reentries induced by uni-directional block, as well as those for phase resetting that leads to annihilation of the reentry in response to impulsive current stimulations at appropriate nodes and timings. The dynamics of the hybrid model are comparable to those of a spatially distributed tissue model with LR-I compartments. Thus, it is conceivable that the hybrid model might be a useful tool for large scale simulations of cardiac tissue dynamics, as an alternative to numerical simulations, leading toward further understanding of the reentrant mechanisms.

  18. Age-related changes in tissue macrophages precede cardiac functional impairment.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Alexander R; Godwin, James W; Chandran, Anjana; Hersey, Lucy; Ilinykh, Alexei; Debuque, Ryan; Wang, Lina; Rosenthal, Nadia A

    2014-05-01

    Cardiac tissue macrophages (cTMs) are abundant in the murine heart but the extent to which the cTM phenotype changes with age is unknown. This study characterizes aging-dependent phenotypic changes in cTM subsets. Using theCx3cr1(GFP/+) mouse reporter line where GFP marks cTMs, and the tissue macrophage marker Mrc1, we show that two major cardiac tissue macrophage subsets, Mrc1-GFP(hi) and Mrc1+GFP(hi) cTMs, are present in the young (<10 week old) mouse heart, and a third subset, Mrc1+GFP(lo), comprises ~50% of total Mrc1+ cTMs from 30 weeks of age. Immunostaining and functional assays show that Mrc1+ cTMs are the principal myeloid sentinels in the mouse heart and that they retain proliferative capacity throughout life. Gene expression profiles of the two Mrc1+ subsets also reveal that Mrc1+GFP(lo) cTMs have a decreased number of immune response genes (Cx3cr1, Lpar6, CD9, Cxcr4, Itga6 and Tgfβr1), and an increased number of fibrogenic genes (Ltc4s, Retnla, Fgfr1, Mmp9 and Ccl24), consistent with a potential role for cTMs in cardiac fibrosis. These findings identify early age-dependent gene expression changes in cTMs, with significant implications for cardiac tissue injury responses and aging-associated cardiac fibrosis. PMID:24861132

  19. Adult stem cells and biocompatible scaffolds as smart drug delivery tools for cardiac tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Pagliari, Stefania; Romanazzo, Sara; Mosqueira, Diogo; Pinto-do-Ó, Perpetua; Aoyagi, Takao; Forte, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of adult stem cells to cardiac repair is mostly ascribed to an indirect paracrine effect, rather than to their actual engraftment and differentiation into new contractile and vascular cells. This effect consists in a direct reduction of host cell death, promotion of neovascularization, and in a "bystander effect" on local inflammation. A number of cytokines secreted by adult stem/progenitor cells has been proposed to be responsible for the consistent beneficial effect reported in the early attempts to deliver different stem cell subsets to the injured myocardium. Aiming to maximize their beneficial activity on the diseased myocardium, the genetic modification of adult stem cells to enhance and/or control the secretion of specific cytokines would turn them into active drug delivery vectors. On the other hand, engineering biocompatible scaffolds as to release paracrine factors could result in multiple advantages: (1) achieve a local controlled release of the drug of interest, thus minimizing off-target effects, (2) enhance stem cell retention in the injured area and (3) boost the beneficial paracrine effects exerted by adult stem cells on the host tissue. In the present review, a critical overview of the state-of-the-art in the modification of stem cells and the functionalization of biocompatible scaffolds to deliver beneficial soluble factors to the injured myocardium is offered. Besides the number of concerns to be addressed before a clinical application can be foreseen for such concepts, this path could translate into the generation of active scaffolds as smart cell and drug delivery systems for cardiac repair. PMID:23745554

  20. Utilizing stem cells for three-dimensional neural tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Cho, Yongku; Li, Xue-Jun; Khademhosseini, Ali; Tasoglu, Savas

    2016-05-26

    Three-dimensional neural tissue engineering has made great strides in developing neural disease models and replacement tissues for patients. However, the need for biomimetic tissue models and effective patient therapies remains unmet. The recent push to expand 2D neural tissue engineering into the third dimension shows great potential to advance the field. Another area which has much to offer to neural tissue engineering is stem cell research. Stem cells are well known for their self-renewal and differentiation potential and have been shown to give rise to tissues with structural and functional properties mimicking natural organs. Application of these capabilities to 3D neural tissue engineering may be highly useful for basic research on neural tissue structure and function, engineering disease models, designing tissues for drug development, and generating replacement tissues with a patient's genetic makeup. Here, we discuss the vast potential, as well as the current challenges, unique to integration of 3D fabrication strategies and stem cells into neural tissue engineering. We also present some of the most significant recent achievements, including nerve guidance conduits to facilitate better healing of nerve injuries, functional 3D biomimetic neural tissue models, physiologically relevant disease models for research purposes, and rapid and effective screening of potential drugs. PMID:26890524

  1. Scaffolding in tissue engineering: general approaches and tissue-specific considerations

    PubMed Central

    Leong, K. W.

    2008-01-01

    Scaffolds represent important components for tissue engineering. However, researchers often encounter an enormous variety of choices when selecting scaffolds for tissue engineering. This paper aims to review the functions of scaffolds and the major scaffolding approaches as important guidelines for selecting scaffolds and discuss the tissue-specific considerations for scaffolding, using intervertebral disc as an example. PMID:19005702

  2. Optimization of nanoparticles for cardiovascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Izadifar, Mohammad; Kelly, Michael E; Haddadi, Azita; Chen, Xiongbiao

    2015-06-12

    Nano-particulate delivery systems have increasingly been playing important roles in cardiovascular tissue engineering. Properties of nanoparticles (e.g. size, polydispersity, loading capacity, zeta potential, morphology) are essential to system functions. Notably, these characteristics are regulated by fabrication variables, but in a complicated manner. This raises a great need to optimize fabrication process variables to ensure the desired nanoparticle characteristics. This paper presents a comprehensive experimental study on this matter, along with a novel method, the so-called Geno-Neural approach, to analyze, predict and optimize fabrication variables for desired nanoparticle characteristics. Specifically, ovalbumin was used as a protein model of growth factors used in cardiovascular tissue regeneration, and six fabrication variables were examined with regard to their influence on the characteristics of nanoparticles made from high molecular weight poly(lactide-co-glycolide). The six-factor five-level central composite rotatable design was applied to the conduction of experiments, and based on the experimental results, a geno-neural model was developed to determine the optimum fabrication conditions. For desired particle sizes of 150, 200, 250 and 300 nm, respectively, the optimum conditions to achieve the low polydispersity index, higher negative zeta potential and higher loading capacity were identified based on the developed geno-neural model and then evaluated experimentally. The experimental results revealed that the polymer and the external aqueous phase concentrations and their interactions with other fabrication variables were the most significant variables to affect the size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, loading capacity and initial burst release of the nanoparticles, while the electron microscopy images of the nanoparticles showed their spherical geometries with no sign of large pores or cracks on their surfaces. The release study revealed

  3. Optimization of nanoparticles for cardiovascular tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izadifar, Mohammad; Kelly, Michael E.; Haddadi, Azita; Chen, Xiongbiao

    2015-06-01

    Nano-particulate delivery systems have increasingly been playing important roles in cardiovascular tissue engineering. Properties of nanoparticles (e.g. size, polydispersity, loading capacity, zeta potential, morphology) are essential to system functions. Notably, these characteristics are regulated by fabrication variables, but in a complicated manner. This raises a great need to optimize fabrication process variables to ensure the desired nanoparticle characteristics. This paper presents a comprehensive experimental study on this matter, along with a novel method, the so-called Geno-Neural approach, to analyze, predict and optimize fabrication variables for desired nanoparticle characteristics. Specifically, ovalbumin was used as a protein model of growth factors used in cardiovascular tissue regeneration, and six fabrication variables were examined with regard to their influence on the characteristics of nanoparticles made from high molecular weight poly(lactide-co-glycolide). The six-factor five-level central composite rotatable design was applied to the conduction of experiments, and based on the experimental results, a geno-neural model was developed to determine the optimum fabrication conditions. For desired particle sizes of 150, 200, 250 and 300 nm, respectively, the optimum conditions to achieve the low polydispersity index, higher negative zeta potential and higher loading capacity were identified based on the developed geno-neural model and then evaluated experimentally. The experimental results revealed that the polymer and the external aqueous phase concentrations and their interactions with other fabrication variables were the most significant variables to affect the size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, loading capacity and initial burst release of the nanoparticles, while the electron microscopy images of the nanoparticles showed their spherical geometries with no sign of large pores or cracks on their surfaces. The release study revealed

  4. Hydrogel scaffolds for tissue engineering: Progress and challenges

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherbiny, Ibrahim M.; Yacoub, Magdi H.

    2013-01-01

    Designing of biologically active scaffolds with optimal characteristics is one of the key factors for successful tissue engineering. Recently, hydrogels have received a considerable interest as leading candidates for engineered tissue scaffolds due to their unique compositional and structural similarities to the natural extracellular matrix, in addition to their desirable framework for cellular proliferation and survival. More recently, the ability to control the shape, porosity, surface morphology, and size of hydrogel scaffolds has created new opportunities to overcome various challenges in tissue engineering such as vascularization, tissue architecture and simultaneous seeding of multiple cells. This review provides an overview of the different types of hydrogels, the approaches that can be used to fabricate hydrogel matrices with specific features and the recent applications of hydrogels in tissue engineering. Special attention was given to the various design considerations for an efficient hydrogel scaffold in tissue engineering. Also, the challenges associated with the use of hydrogel scaffolds were described. PMID:24689032

  5. Expediting the transition from replacement medicine to tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Coury, Arthur J

    2016-06-01

    In this article, an expansive interpretation of "Tissue Engineering" is proposed which is in congruence with classical and recent published definitions. I further simplify the definition of tissue engineering as: "Exerting systematic control of the body's cells, matrices and fluids." As a consequence, many medical therapies not commonly considered tissue engineering are placed in this category because of their effect on the body's responses. While the progress of tissue engineering strategies is inexorable and generally positive, it has been subject to setbacks as have many important medical therapies. Medical practice is currently undergoing a transition on several fronts (academics, start-up companies, going concerns) from the era of "replacement medicine" where body parts and functions are replaced by mechanical, electrical or chemical therapies to the era of tissue engineering where health is restored by regeneration generation or limitation of the body's tissues and functions by exploiting our expanding knowledge of the body's biological processes to produce natural, healthy outcomes. PMID:27047677

  6. Amniotic Fluid-Derived Stem Cells for Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Petsche Connell, Jennifer; Camci-Unal, Gulden; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that a population of stem cells can be isolated from amniotic fluid removed by amniocentesis that are broadly multipotent and nontumorogenic. These amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSC) could potentially provide an autologous cell source for treatment of congenital defects identified during gestation, particularly cardiovascular defects. In this review, the various methods of isolating, sorting, and culturing AFSC are compared, along with techniques for inducing differentiation into cardiac myocytes and endothelial cells. Although research has not demonstrated complete and high-yield cardiac differentiation, AFSC have been shown to effectively differentiate into endothelial cells and can effectively support cardiac tissue. Additionally, several tissue engineering and regenerative therapeutic approaches for the use of these cells in heart patches, injection after myocardial infarction, heart valves, vascularized scaffolds, and blood vessels are summarized. These applications show great promise in the treatment of congenital cardiovascular defects, and further studies of isolation, culture, and differentiation of AFSC will help to develop their use for tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and cardiovascular therapies. PMID:23350771

  7. Bioreactors Drive Advances in Tissue Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    It was an unlikely moment for inspiration. Engineers David Wolf and Ray Schwarz stopped by their lab around midday. Wolf, of Johnson Space Center, and Schwarz, with NASA contractor Krug Life Sciences (now Wyle Laboratories Inc.), were part of a team tasked with developing a unique technology with the potential to enhance medical research. But that wasn t the focus at the moment: The pair was rounding up colleagues interested in grabbing some lunch. One of the lab s other Krug engineers, Tinh Trinh, was doing something that made Wolf forget about food. Trinh was toying with an electric drill. He had stuck the barrel of a syringe on the bit; it spun with a high-pitched whirr when he squeezed the drill s trigger. At the time, a multidisciplinary team of engineers and biologists including Wolf, Schwarz, Trinh, and project manager Charles D. Anderson, who formerly led the recovery of the Apollo capsules after splashdown and now worked for Krug was pursuing the development of a technology called a bioreactor, a cylindrical device used to culture human cells. The team s immediate goal was to grow human kidney cells to produce erythropoietin, a hormone that regulates red blood cell production and can be used to treat anemia. But there was a major barrier to the technology s success: Moving the liquid growth media to keep it from stagnating resulted in turbulent conditions that damaged the delicate cells, causing them to quickly die. The team was looking forward to testing the bioreactor in space, hoping the device would perform more effectively in microgravity. But on January 28, 1986, the Space Shuttle Challenger broke apart shortly after launch, killing its seven crewmembers. The subsequent grounding of the shuttle fleet had left researchers with no access to space, and thus no way to study the effects of microgravity on human cells. As Wolf looked from Trinh s syringe-capped drill to where the bioreactor sat on a workbench, he suddenly saw a possible solution to both

  8. [Strategies to choose scaffold materials for tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Gao, Qingdong; Zhu, Xulong; Xiang, Junxi; Lü, Yi; Li, Jianhui

    2016-02-01

    Current therapies of organ failure or a wide range of tissue defect are often not ideal. Transplantation is the only effective way for long time survival. But it is hard to meet huge patients demands because of donor shortage, immune rejection and other problems. Tissue engineering could be a potential option. Choosing a suitable scaffold material is an essential part of it. According to different sources, tissue engineering scaffold materials could be divided into three types which are natural and its modified materials, artificial and composite ones. The purpose of tissue engineering scaffold is to repair the tissues or organs damage, so could reach the ideal recovery in its function and structure aspect. Therefore, tissue engineering scaffold should even be as close as much to the original tissue or organs in function and structure. We call it "organic scaffold" and this strategy might be the drastic perfect substitute for the tissues or organs in concern. Optimized organization with each kind scaffold materials could make up for biomimetic structure and function of the tissue or organs. Scaffold material surface modification, optimized preparation procedure and cytosine sustained-release microsphere addition should be considered together. This strategy is expected to open new perspectives for tissue engineering. Multidisciplinary approach including material science, molecular biology, and engineering might find the most ideal tissue engineering scaffold. Using the strategy of drawing on each other strength and optimized organization with each kind scaffold material to prepare a multifunctional biomimetic tissue engineering scaffold might be a good method for choosing tissue engineering scaffold materials. Our research group had differentiated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into bile canaliculi like cells. We prepared poly(L-lactic acid)/poly(ε-caprolactone) biliary stent. The scaffold's internal played a part in the long-term release of cytokines which

  9. Preclinical imaging in bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Manuela; Boerman, Otto C; de Korte, Chris; Rijpkema, Mark; Heerschap, Arend; Oosterwijk, Egbert; Jansen, John A; Walboomers, X Frank

    2014-12-01

    Since X-rays were discovered, in 1895, and since the first radiological image of a hand, bone tissue has been the subject of detailed medical imaging. However, advances in bone engineering, including the increased complexity of implant scaffolds, currently also underline the limits of X-ray imaging. Therefore, advanced follow-up imaging methods are pivotal to develop. The field of noninvasive, high-sensitivity, and high-resolution anatomical and functional imaging techniques (optical, ultrasound, positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance, etc.) offers a wide variety of tools that potentially could be considered as alternatives, or at least supportive, to the most commonly used X-ray computed tomography. Moreover, dedicated preclinical scanners have become available, with sensitivity and resolution even higher than clinical scanners, thus favoring a quick translation from preclinical to clinical applications. Furthermore, the armamentarium of bone-specific probes and contrast agents for each of this imaging modalities is constantly growing. This review focuses on such preclinical imaging tools, each with its respective strengths and weaknesses, used alone or in combination. Especially, multimodal imaging will dramatically contribute to improve the knowledge on bone healing regenerative processes. PMID:24720381

  10. Acellular organ scaffolds for tumor tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guller, Anna; Trusova, Inna; Petersen, Elena; Shekhter, Anatoly; Kurkov, Alexander; Qian, Yi; Zvyagin, Andrei

    2015-12-01

    Rationale: Tissue engineering (TE) is an emerging alternative approach to create models of human malignant tumors for experimental oncology, personalized medicine and drug discovery studies. Being the bottom-up strategy, TE provides an opportunity to control and explore the role of every component of the model system, including cellular populations, supportive scaffolds and signalling molecules. Objectives: As an initial step to create a new ex vivo TE model of cancer, we optimized protocols to obtain organ-specific acellular matrices and evaluated their potential as TE scaffolds for culture of normal and tumor cells. Methods and results: Effective decellularization of animals' kidneys, ureter, lungs, heart, and liver has been achieved by detergent-based processing. The obtained scaffolds demonstrated biocompatibility and growthsupporting potential in combination with normal (Vero, MDCK) and tumor cell lines (C26, B16). Acellular scaffolds and TE constructs have been characterized and compared with morphological methods. Conclusions: The proposed methodology allows creation of sustainable 3D tumor TE constructs to explore the role of organ-specific cell-matrix interaction in tumorigenesis.

  11. Tissue engineering red blood cells: a therapeutic.

    PubMed

    van Veen, Theun; Hunt, John A

    2015-07-01

    The use of red blood cells (RBCs) in transfusion is widespread in modern medicine. Limitations in blood transfusion have made an urgent argument for the focus on alternatives, as particular medical treatments heavily rely on the supply of donated blood. Stem cells have been successfully used in vitro to produce RBCs and researchers are currently challenged with developing larger-scale culture methods to meet the requirements for clinically relevant cell numbers. The ultimate conditions that will be beneficial for this type of research are trivial. A successful human clinical trial has shown that tremendous progress has already been made in this field. Other alternatives are based on the oxygen carrier protein that RBCs contain, i.e. haemoglobin (Hb). Chemically defined molecules and crosslinked proteins, which are able to bind and transport oxygen, have been found to be functional in vivo. Major progress has been achieved, but developing highly suitable products for the transfusion market still remains an enormous challenge for these acellular blood substitutes. We provide a review about developing alternatives for blood transfusion, with the emphasis on tissue-engineering approaches. PMID:24753354

  12. Recent progress in interfacial tissue engineering approaches for osteochondral defects.

    PubMed

    Castro, Nathan J; Hacking, S Adam; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2012-08-01

    This review provides a brief synopsis of the anatomy and physiology of the osteochondral interface, scaffold-based and non-scaffold based approaches for engineering both tissues independently as well as recent developments in the manufacture of gradient constructs. Novel manufacturing techniques and nanotechnology will be discussed with potential application in osteochondral interfacial tissue engineering. PMID:22677924

  13. Construction Strategy and Progress of Whole Intervertebral Disc Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiang; Xu, Hai-Wei; Hurday, Sookesh; Xu, Bao-Shan

    2016-02-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) is the major cause of low back pain, which usually leads to work absenteeism, medical visits and hospitalization. Because the current conservative procedures and surgical approaches to treatment of DDD only aim to relieve the symptoms of disease but not to regenerate the diseased disc, their long-term efficiency is limited. With the rapid developments in medical science, tissue engineering techniques have progressed markedly in recent years, providing a novel regenerative strategy for managing intervertebral disc disease. However, there are as yet no ideal methods for constructing tissue-engineered intervertebral discs. This paper reviews published reports pertaining to intervertebral disc tissue engineering and summarizes data concerning the seed cells and scaffold materials for tissue-engineered intervertebral discs, construction of tissue-engineered whole intervertebral discs, relevant animal experiments and effects of mechanics on the construction of tissue-engineered intervertebral disc and outlines the existing problems and future directions. Although the perfect regenerative strategy for treating DDD has not yet been developed, great progress has been achieved in the construction of tissue-engineered intervertebral discs. It is believed that ongoing research on intervertebral disc tissue engineering will result in revolutionary progress in the treatment of DDD. PMID:27028376

  14. Tissue engineering in periodontal regeneration: A brief review

    PubMed Central

    Dabra, Sarita; Chhina, Kamalpreet; Soni, Nitin; Bhatnagar, Rakhi

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a major public health issue and the development of effective therapies to treat the disease and regenerate periodontal tissue is an important goal of today's medicine. Regeneration of periodontal tissue is perhaps one of the most complex process to occur in the body. Langer and colleagues proposed tissue engineering as a possible technique for regenerating the lost periodontal tissues. Tissue engineering is a multidisciplinary field, which involves the application of the principles and methods of engineering and life sciences to help in the development of biological substitutes to restore, maintain or improve the function of damaged tissues and organs. A Google/Medline search was conducted and relevant literature evaluating the potential role of the tissue engineering in periodontal regeneration, which included histological studies and controlled clinical trials, was reviewed. A comprehensive search was designed. The articles were independently screened for eligibility. Articles with authentic controls and proper randomization and pertaining specifically to their role in periodontal regeneration were included. The available literature was analyzed and compiled. The analysis indicate tissue engineering to be a promising, as well as an effective novel approach to reconstruct and engineer the periodontal apparatus. Here, we represent several articles, as well as recent texts that make up a special and an in-depth review on the subject. The purpose behind writing this brief review has been to integrate the evidence of research related to tissue engineering so as to implement them in our daily practice. PMID:23559940

  15. Virtual electrodes in cardiac tissue: a common mechanism for anodal and cathodal stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Wikswo, J P; Lin, S F; Abbas, R A

    1995-01-01

    Traditional cable analyses cannot explain complex patterns of excitation in cardiac tissue with unipolar, extracellular anodal, or cathodal stimuli. Epifluorescence imaging of the transmembrane potential during and after stimulation of both refractory and excitable tissue shows distinctive regions of simultaneous depolarization and hyperpolarization during stimulation that act as virtual cathodes and anodes. The results confirm bidomain model predictions that the onset (make) of a stimulus induces propagation from the virtual cathode, whereas stimulus termination (break) induces it from the virtual anode. In make stimulation, the virtual anode can delay activation of the underlying tissue, whereas in break stimulation this occurs under the virtual cathode. Thus make and break stimulations in cardiac tissue have a common mechanism that is the result of differences in the electrical anisotropy of the intracellular and extracellular spaces and provides clear proof of the validity of the bidomain model. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8599628

  16. Real time assessment of RF cardiac tissue ablation with optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Sharareh, S

    2008-03-20

    An optical spectroscopy approach is demonstrated allowing for critical parameters during RF ablation of cardiac tissue to be evaluated in real time. The method is based on incorporating in a typical ablation catheter transmitting and receiving fibers that terminate at the tip of the catheter. By analyzing the spectral characteristics of the NIR diffusely reflected light, information is obtained on such parameters as, catheter-tissue proximity, lesion formation, depth of penetration of the lesion, formation of char during the ablation, formation of coagulum around the ablation site, differentiation of ablated from healthy tissue, and recognition of micro-bubble formation in the tissue.

  17. [Tissue engineering applied to the trachea as a graft].

    PubMed

    Barrera-Ramírez, Elisa; Rico-Escobar, Edna; Garrido-Cardona, Rubén E

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering offers, through new technologies, an ex vivo generation of organs and functional tissues as grafts for transplants, for the improvement and substitution of biological functions, with an absence of immunological response. The treatment of extended tracheal lesions is a substitution of the affected segment; nevertheless, the allogeneic transplant has failed and the use of synthetic materials has not had good results. New tissue engineering technology is being developed to offer a tracheal graft for a posterior implantation. The purpose of this article is to review all the methods and components used by the engineering of tissue for tracheal grafts. PMID:26927653

  18. Powder-based 3D printing for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Brunello, G; Sivolella, S; Meneghello, R; Ferroni, L; Gardin, C; Piattelli, A; Zavan, B; Bressan, E

    2016-01-01

    Bone tissue engineered 3-D constructs customized to patient-specific needs are emerging as attractive biomimetic scaffolds to enhance bone cell and tissue growth and differentiation. The article outlines the features of the most common additive manufacturing technologies (3D printing, stereolithography, fused deposition modeling, and selective laser sintering) used to fabricate bone tissue engineering scaffolds. It concentrates, in particular, on the current state of knowledge concerning powder-based 3D printing, including a description of the properties of powders and binder solutions, the critical phases of scaffold manufacturing, and its applications in bone tissue engineering. Clinical aspects and future applications are also discussed. PMID:27086202

  19. Clinical translation of controlled protein delivery systems for tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, Kara L.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Strategies that utilize controlled release of drugs and proteins for tissue engineering have enormous potential to regenerate damaged organs and tissues. The multiple advantages of controlled release strategies merit overcoming the significant challenges to translation, including high costs and long, difficult regulatory pathways. This review highlights the potential of controlled release of proteins for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. We specifically discuss treatment modalities that have reached preclinical and clinical trials, with emphasis on controlled release systems for bone tissue engineering, the most advanced application with several products already in clinic. Possible strategies to address translational and regulatory concerns are also discussed. PMID:25787736

  20. Bioreactor Development for Lung Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Much recent interest in lung bioengineering by pulmonary investigators, industry and the organ transplant field has seen a rapid growth of bioreactor development ranging from the microfluidic scale to the human-sized whole lung systems. A comprehension of the findings from these models is needed to provide the basis for further bioreactor development. Objective The goal was to comprehensively review the current state of bioreactor development for the lung. Methods A search using PubMed was done for published, peer-reviewed papers using the keywords “lung” AND “bioreactor” or “bioengineering” or “tissue engineering” or “ex vivo perfusion”. Main Results Many new bioreactors ranging from the microfluidic scale to the human-sized whole lung systems have been developed by both academic and commercial entities. Microfluidic, lung-mimic and lung slice cultures have the advantages of cost-efficiency and high throughput analyses ideal for pharmaceutical and toxicity studies. Perfused/ventilated rodent whole lung systems can be adapted for mid-throughput studies of lung stem/progenitor cell development, cell behavior, understanding and treating lung injury and for preliminary work that can be translated to human lung bioengineering. Human-sized ex vivo whole lung bioreactors incorporating perfusion and ventilation are amenable to automation and have been used for whole lung decellularization and recellularization. Clinical scale ex vivo lung perfusion systems have been developed for lung preservation and reconditioning and are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Conclusions Significant advances in bioreactors for lung engineering have been made at both the microfluidic and the macro scale. The most advanced are closed systems that incorporate pressure-controlled perfusion and ventilation and are amenable to automation. Ex vivo lung perfusion systems have advanced to clinical trials for lung preservation and reconditioning. The biggest

  1. Evaluation of optical imaging and spectroscopy approaches for cardiac tissue depth assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, B; Matthews, D; Chernomordik, V; Gandjbakhche, A; Lane, S; Demos, S G

    2008-02-13

    NIR light scattering from ex vivo porcine cardiac tissue was investigated to understand how imaging or point measurement approaches may assist development of methods for tissue depth assessment. Our results indicate an increase of average image intensity as thickness increases up to approximately 2 mm. In a dual fiber spectroscopy configuration, sensitivity up to approximately 3 mm with an increase to 6 mm when spectral ratio between selected wavelengths was obtained. Preliminary Monte Carlo results provided reasonable fit to the experimental data.

  2. Tissue Engineered Airways: A Prospects Article.

    PubMed

    Bogan, Stephanie L; Teoh, Gui Zhen; Birchall, Martin A

    2016-07-01

    An ideal tracheal scaffold must withstand luminal collapse yet be flexible, have a sufficient degree of porosity to permit vascular and cellular ingrowth, but also be airtight and must facilitate growth of functional airway epithelium to avoid infection and aid in mucocilliary clearance. Finally, the scaffold must also be biocompatible to avoid implant rejection. Over the last 40 years, efforts to design and manufacture the airway have been undertaken worldwide but success has been limited and far apart. As a result, tracheal resection with primary repair remains the Gold Standard of care for patients presenting with airway disorders and malignancies. However, the maximum resectable length of the trachea is restricted to 30% of the total length in children or 50% in adults. Attempts to provide autologous grafts for human application have also been disappointing for a host of different reasons, including lack of implant integration, insufficient donor organs, and poor mechanical strength resulting in an unmet clinical need. The two main approaches researchers have taken to address this issue have been the development of synthetic scaffolds and the use of decellularized organs. To date, a number of different decellularization techniques and a variety of materials, including polyglycolic acid (PGA) and nanocomposite polymers have been explored. The findings thus far have shown great promise, however, there remain a significant number of caveats accompanying each approach. That being said, the possibilities presented by these two approaches could be combined to produce a highly successful, clinically viable hybrid scaffold. This article aims to highlight advances in airway tissue engineering and provide an overview of areas to explore and utilize in accomplishing the aim of developing an ideal tracheal prosthesis. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1497-1505, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26853803

  3. A Novel Miniaturized Multimodal Bioreactor for Continuous In Situ Assessment of Bioartificial Cardiac Tissue During Stimulation and Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kensah, George; Viering, Jörg; Schumann, Henning; Dahlmann, Julia; Meyer, Heiko; Skvorc, David; Bär, Antonia; Akhyari, Payam; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Haverich, Axel; Martin, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell-based cardiac tissue engineering is a promising approach for regenerative therapy of the injured heart. At present, the small number of stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes that can be obtained using current culture and enrichment techniques represents one of the key limitations for the development of functional bioartificial cardiac tissue (BCT). We have addressed this problem by construction of a novel bioreactor with functional features of larger systems that enables the generation and in situ monitoring of miniaturized BCTs. BCTs were generated from rat cardiomyocytes to demonstrate advantages and usefulness of the bioreactor. Tissues showed spontaneous, synchronized contractions with cell orientation along the axis of strain. Cyclic stretch induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, demonstrated by a shift of myosin heavy chain expression from the alpha to beta isoform, together with elevated levels of atrial natriuretic factor. Stretch led to a moderate increase in systolic force (1.42 ± 0.09 mN vs. 0.96 ± 0.09 mN in controls), with significantly higher forces observed after β-adrenergic stimulation with noradrenalin (2.54 ± 0.11 mN). Combined mechanical and β-adrenergic stimulation had no synergistic effect. This study demonstrates for the first time that mechanical stimulation and direct real-time contraction force measurement can be combined into a single multimodal bioreactor system, including electrical stimulation of excitable tissue, perfusion of the culture chamber, and the possibility of (fluorescence) microscopic assessment during continuous cultivation. Thus, this bioreactor represents a valuable tool for monitoring tissue development and, ultimately, the optimization of stem cell-based tissue replacement strategies in regenerative medicine. PMID:21142417

  4. Vascularized Bone Tissue Engineering: Approaches for Potential Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Lonnissa H.; Annabi, Nasim; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Bae, Hojae; Binan, Loïc; Park, Sangwon; Kang, Yunqing

    2012-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in bone tissue engineering (TE) in the past decade. However, classical bone TE strategies have been hampered mainly due to the lack of vascularization within the engineered bone constructs, resulting in poor implant survival and integration. In an effort toward clinical success of engineered constructs, new TE concepts have arisen to develop bone substitutes that potentially mimic native bone tissue structure and function. Large tissue replacements have failed in the past due to the slow penetration of the host vasculature, leading to necrosis at the central region of the engineered tissues. For this reason, multiple microscale strategies have been developed to induce and incorporate vascular networks within engineered bone constructs before implantation in order to achieve successful integration with the host tissue. Previous attempts to engineer vascularized bone tissue only focused on the effect of a single component among the three main components of TE (scaffold, cells, or signaling cues) and have only achieved limited success. However, with efforts to improve the engineered bone tissue substitutes, bone TE approaches have become more complex by combining multiple strategies simultaneously. The driving force behind combining various TE strategies is to produce bone replacements that more closely recapitulate human physiology. Here, we review and discuss the limitations of current bone TE approaches and possible strategies to improve vascularization in bone tissue substitutes. PMID:22765012

  5. Nanoscale cues regulate the structure and function of macroscopic cardiac tissue constructs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deok-Ho; Lipke, Elizabeth A.; Kim, Pilnam; Cheong, Raymond; Thompson, Susan; Delannoy, Michael; Suh, Kahp-Yang; Tung, Leslie; Levchenko, Andre

    2010-01-01

    Heart tissue possesses complex structural organization on multiple scales, from macro- to nano-, but nanoscale control of cardiac function has not been extensively analyzed. Inspired by ultrastructural analysis of the native tissue, we constructed a scalable, nanotopographically controlled model of myocardium mimicking the in vivo ventricular organization. Guided by nanoscale mechanical cues provided by the underlying hydrogel, the tissue constructs displayed anisotropic action potential propagation and contractility characteristic of the native tissue. Surprisingly, cell geometry, action potential conduction velocity, and the expression of a cell–cell coupling protein were exquisitely sensitive to differences in the substratum nanoscale features of the surrounding extracellular matrix. We propose that controlling cell–material interactions on the nanoscale can stipulate structure and function on the tissue level and yield novel insights into in vivo tissue physiology, while providing materials for tissue repair. PMID:20018748

  6. The Transfer Functions of Cardiac Tissue during Stochastic Pacing

    PubMed Central

    de Lange, Enno; Kucera, Jan P.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The restitution properties of cardiac action potential duration (APD) and conduction velocity (CV) are important factors in arrhythmogenesis. They determine alternans, wavebreak, and the patterns of reentrant arrhythmias. We developed a novel approach to characterize restitution using transfer functions. Transfer functions relate an input and an output quantity in terms of gain and phase shift in the complex frequency domain. We derived an analytical expression for the transfer function of interbeat intervals (IBIs) during conduction from one site (input) to another site downstream (output). Transfer functions can be efficiently obtained using a stochastic pacing protocol. Using simulations of conduction and extracellular mapping of strands of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, we show that transfer functions permit the quantification of APD and CV restitution slopes when it is difficult to measure APD directly. We find that the normally positive CV restitution slope attenuates IBI variations. In contrast, a negative CV restitution slope (induced by decreasing extracellular [K+]) amplifies IBI variations with a maximum at the frequency of alternans. Hence, it potentiates alternans and renders conduction unstable, even in the absence of APD restitution. Thus, stochastic pacing and transfer function analysis represent a powerful strategy to evaluate restitution and the stability of conduction. PMID:19134481

  7. The role of perfusion bioreactors in bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Diana Alves; Gomide, Viviane; Monteiro, Fernando Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering has emerged as a possible alternative to current treatments for bone injuries and defects. However, the common tissue engineering approach presents some obstacles to the development of functional tissues, such as insufficient nutrient and metabolite transport and non-homogenous cell distribution. Culture of bone cells in three-dimensional constructs in bioreactor systems is a solution for those problems as it improves mass transport in the culture system. For bone tissue engineering spinner flasks, rotating wall vessels and perfusion systems have been investigated, and based on these, variations that support cell seeding and mechanical stimulation have also been researched. This review aims at providing an overview of the concepts, advantages and future applications of bioreactor systems for bone tissue engineering with emphasis on the design of different perfusion systems and parameters that can be optimized. PMID:23507883

  8. Tissue Engineering of Articular Cartilage with Biomimetic Zones

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Travis J.; Malda, Jos; Sah, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    Articular cartilage damage is a persistent and increasing problem with the aging population, and treatments to achieve biological repair or restoration remain a challenge. Cartilage tissue engineering approaches have been investigated for over 20 years, but have yet to achieve the consistency and effectiveness for widespread clinical use. One of the potential reasons for this is that the engineered tissues do not have or establish the normal zonal organization of cells and extracellular matrix that appears critical for normal tissue function. A number of approaches are being taken currently to engineer tissue that more closely mimics the organization of native articular cartilage. This review focuses on the zonal organization of native articular cartilage, strategies being used to develop such organization, the reorganization that occurs after culture or implantation, and future prospects for the tissue engineering of articular cartilage with biomimetic zones. PMID:19203206

  9. Stem cells and tissue engineering: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Polak, Julia M; Bishop, Anne E

    2006-04-01

    Tissue engineering is an interdisciplinary field that brings together the principles of the life sciences and medicine with those of engineering. The increase in its development over the past decade has resulted from a variety of factors; advances in genomics and proteomics, the advent of new biomaterials as potential templates for tissue growth, improvements in bioreactor design, and increased understanding of healing processes. Possibly the greatest contribution has come from our increased knowledge and understanding of stem cell biology, which is paving the way for the generation of unlimited cells of specific phenotypes for incorporation into engineered tissue constructs. Thus, tissue engineering approaches for expanding and engrafting the differentiated progeny of embryonic, fetal, or adult stem cells have major potential for tissue repair and will make a major contribution to medicine in the 21st century. PMID:16831937

  10. Cell-Based Strategies for Meniscus Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Wei; Guo, Weimin; Han, Shufeng; Zhu, Yun; Liu, Shuyun; Guo, Quanyi

    2016-01-01

    Meniscus injuries remain a significant challenge due to the poor healing potential of the inner avascular zone. Following a series of studies and clinical trials, tissue engineering is considered a promising prospect for meniscus repair and regeneration. As one of the key factors in tissue engineering, cells are believed to be highly beneficial in generating bionic meniscus structures to replace injured ones in patients. Therefore, cell-based strategies for meniscus tissue engineering play a fundamental role in meniscal regeneration. According to current studies, the main cell-based strategies for meniscus tissue engineering are single cell type strategies; cell coculture strategies also were applied to meniscus tissue engineering. Likewise, on the one side, the zonal recapitulation strategies based on mimicking meniscal differing cells and internal architectures have received wide attentions. On the other side, cell self-assembling strategies without any scaffolds may be a better way to build a bionic meniscus. In this review, we primarily discuss cell seeds for meniscus tissue engineering and their application strategies. We also discuss recent advances and achievements in meniscus repair experiments that further improve our understanding of meniscus tissue engineering. PMID:27274735

  11. Ethical considerations in tissue engineering research: Case studies in translation.

    PubMed

    Baker, Hannah B; McQuilling, John P; King, Nancy M P

    2016-04-15

    Tissue engineering research is a complex process that requires investigators to focus on the relationship between their research and anticipated gains in both knowledge and treatment improvements. The ethical considerations arising from tissue engineering research are similarly complex when addressing the translational progression from bench to bedside, and investigators in the field of tissue engineering act as moral agents at each step of their research along the translational pathway, from early benchwork and preclinical studies to clinical research. This review highlights the ethical considerations and challenges at each stage of research, by comparing issues surrounding two translational tissue engineering technologies: the bioartificial pancreas and a tissue engineered skeletal muscle construct. We present relevant ethical issues and questions to consider at each step along the translational pathway, from the basic science bench to preclinical research to first-in-human clinical trials. Topics at the bench level include maintaining data integrity, appropriate reporting and dissemination of results, and ensuring that studies are designed to yield results suitable for advancing research. Topics in preclinical research include the principle of "modest translational distance" and appropriate animal models. Topics in clinical research include key issues that arise in early-stage clinical trials, including selection of patient-subjects, disclosure of uncertainty, and defining success. The comparison of these two technologies and their ethical issues brings to light many challenges for translational tissue engineering research and provides guidance for investigators engaged in development of any tissue engineering technology. PMID:26282436

  12. Microfluidic systems for stem cell-based neural tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mahdi; Bahrami, Sajad; Mirshekari, Hamed; Basri, Seyed Masoud Moosavi; Nik, Amirala Bakhshian; Aref, Amir R; Akbari, Mohsen; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-07-01

    Neural tissue engineering aims at developing novel approaches for the treatment of diseases of the nervous system, by providing a permissive environment for the growth and differentiation of neural cells. Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture systems provide a closer biomimetic environment, and promote better cell differentiation and improved cell function, than could be achieved by conventional two-dimensional (2D) culture systems. With the recent advances in the discovery and introduction of different types of stem cells for tissue engineering, microfluidic platforms have provided an improved microenvironment for the 3D-culture of stem cells. Microfluidic systems can provide more precise control over the spatiotemporal distribution of chemical and physical cues at the cellular level compared to traditional systems. Various microsystems have been designed and fabricated for the purpose of neural tissue engineering. Enhanced neural migration and differentiation, and monitoring of these processes, as well as understanding the behavior of stem cells and their microenvironment have been obtained through application of different microfluidic-based stem cell culture and tissue engineering techniques. As the technology advances it may be possible to construct a "brain-on-a-chip". In this review, we describe the basics of stem cells and tissue engineering as well as microfluidics-based tissue engineering approaches. We review recent testing of various microfluidic approaches for stem cell-based neural tissue engineering. PMID:27296463

  13. Nano scaffolds and stem cell therapy in liver tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montaser, Laila M.; Fawzy, Sherin M.

    2015-08-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have been constantly developing of late due to the major progress in cell and organ transplantation, as well as advances in materials science and engineering. Although stem cells hold great potential for the treatment of many injuries and degenerative diseases, several obstacles must be overcome before their therapeutic application can be realized. These include the development of advanced techniques to understand and control functions of micro environmental signals and novel methods to track and guide transplanted stem cells. A major complication encountered with stem cell therapies has been the failure of injected cells to engraft to target tissues. The application of nanotechnology to stem cell biology would be able to address those challenges. Combinations of stem cell therapy and nanotechnology in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have achieved significant advances. These combinations allow nanotechnology to engineer scaffolds with various features to control stem cell fate decisions. Fabrication of Nano fiber cell scaffolds onto which stem cells can adhere and spread, forming a niche-like microenvironment which can guide stem cells to proceed to heal damaged tissues. In this paper, current and emergent approach based on stem cells in the field of liver tissue engineering is presented for specific application. The combination of stem cells and tissue engineering opens new perspectives in tissue regeneration for stem cell therapy because of the potential to control stem cell behavior with the physical and chemical characteristics of the engineered scaffold environment.

  14. Mesoscopic Fluorescence Molecular Tomography for Evaluating Engineered Tissues.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Mehmet S; Chen, Chao-Wei; Ji, Robin; Zhao, Lingling; Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc B; Fisher, John P; Chen, Yu; Intes, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    Optimization of regenerative medicine strategies includes the design of biomaterials, development of cell-seeding methods, and control of cell-biomaterial interactions within the engineered tissues. Among these steps, one paramount challenge is to non-destructively image the engineered tissues in their entirety to assess structure, function, and molecular expression. It is especially important to be able to enable cell phenotyping and monitor the distribution and migration of cells throughout the bulk scaffold. Advanced fluorescence microscopic techniques are commonly employed to perform such tasks; however, they are limited to superficial examination of tissue constructs. Therefore, the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine would greatly benefit from the development of molecular imaging techniques which are capable of non-destructive imaging of three-dimensional cellular distribution and maturation within a tissue-engineered scaffold beyond the limited depth of current microscopic techniques. In this review, we focus on an emerging depth-resolved optical mesoscopic imaging technique, termed laminar optical tomography (LOT) or mesoscopic fluorescence molecular tomography (MFMT), which enables longitudinal imaging of cellular distribution in thick tissue engineering constructs at depths of a few millimeters and with relatively high resolution. The physical principle, image formation, and instrumentation of LOT/MFMT systems are introduced. Representative applications in tissue engineering include imaging the distribution of human mesenchymal stem cells embedded in hydrogels, imaging of bio-printed tissues, and in vivo applications. PMID:26645079

  15. TRPV-1-mediated elimination of residual iPS cells in bioengineered cardiac cell sheet tissues

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Seta, Hiroyoshi; Haraguchi, Yuji; Alsayegh, Khaled; Sekine, Hidekazu; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa; Yamazaki, Kenji; Okano, Teruo

    2016-01-01

    The development of a suitable strategy for eliminating remaining undifferentiated cells is indispensable for the use of human-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cells in regenerative medicine. Here, we show for the first time that TRPV-1 activation through transient culture at 42 °C in combination with agonists is a simple and useful strategy to eliminate iPS cells from bioengineered cardiac cell sheet tissues. When human iPS cells were cultured at 42 °C, almost all cells disappeared by 48 hours through apoptosis. However, iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts maintained transcriptional and protein expression levels, and cardiac cell sheets were fabricated after reducing the temperature. TRPV-1 expression in iPS cells was upregulated at 42 °C, and iPS cell death at 42 °C was TRPV-1-dependent. Furthermore, TRPV-1 activation through thermal or agonist treatment eliminated iPS cells in cardiac tissues for a final concentration of 0.4% iPS cell contamination. These findings suggest that the difference in tolerance to TRPV-1 activation between iPS cells and iPS cell-derived cardiac cells could be exploited to eliminate remaining iPS cells in bioengineered cell sheet tissues, which will further reduce the risk of tumour formation. PMID:26888607

  16. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging of cardiac tissue to detect collagen deposition after myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheheltani, Rabee; Rosano, Jenna M.; Wang, Bin; Sabri, Abdel Karim; Pleshko, Nancy; Kiani, Mohammad F.

    2012-05-01

    Myocardial infarction often leads to an increase in deposition of fibrillar collagen. Detection and characterization of this cardiac fibrosis is of great interest to investigators and clinicians. Motivated by the significant limitations of conventional staining techniques to visualize collagen deposition in cardiac tissue sections, we have developed a Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS) methodology for collagen assessment. The infrared absorbance band centered at 1338 cm-1, which arises from collagen amino acid side chain vibrations, was used to map collagen deposition across heart tissue sections of a rat model of myocardial infarction, and was compared to conventional staining techniques. Comparison of the size of the collagen scar in heart tissue sections as measured with this methodology and that of trichrome staining showed a strong correlation (R=0.93). A Pearson correlation model between local intensity values in FT-IRIS and immuno-histochemical staining of collagen type I also showed a strong correlation (R=0.86). We demonstrate that FT-IRIS methodology can be utilized to visualize cardiac collagen deposition. In addition, given that vibrational spectroscopic data on proteins reflect molecular features, it also has the potential to provide additional information about the molecular structure of cardiac extracellular matrix proteins and their alterations.

  17. [Ocular surface reconstruction by tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2002-12-01

    Ocular surface reconstruction by tissue engineering using somatic stem cells is a second-generation modality. In order to treat bilaterally affected, severe ocular surface disorders, we investigated the transplantation of two types of cultivated mucosal epithelia: allogenic corneal epithelial stem cells, and autologous oral mucosal epithelial cells. For this, first, we summarized the clinical results of allogenic keratoepithelioplasty and limbal transplantation. In addition, we showed that the immunological shift from Th1 to Th2 by using keyhole limpet hemocyanin was effective in suppressing the incidence of immunological rejection. Second, we investigated the transplantation of cultivated human corneal epithelial stem cells onto amniotic membrane. The cultivated sheet was created by co-culture with 3T3 fibroblasts, using the air-lift method, in cultivating the corneal epithelial stem cell on the amniotic membrane. These cultivated cells demonstrated positive keratin 3 and 12 specific to in vivo corneal epithelium, tight junction related proteins, and telomerase activity. The transplanted allogenic human corneal epithelial sheet survived on the corneal surface in all cases, and was quite effective for achieving ocular surface stability in the acute phase of Stevens-Johnson syndrome, ocular cicatricial pemphigoid, or chemical injury. However, a few cases developed immunological rejection or opportunistic infection. Third, to establish the transplantation of the autologous cultivated oral mucosal epithelial sheet, we performed animal experiments using rabbits. In vitro oral mucosal epithelial sheet showed histology similar to that of in vivo corneal epithelial sheet. It expressed positive keratin 3 as well. Since the autologous transplantation of this sheet survived on the ocular surface with the recovery of corneal transparency, a cultivated oral mucosal epithelium may become a substitute for corneal epithelium. Fourth, we created a cultivated human corneal

  18. A Review of Three-Dimensional Printing in Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Sears, Nick A; Seshadri, Dhruv R; Dhavalikar, Prachi S; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in three-dimensional (3D) printing technologies have led to a rapid expansion of applications from the creation of anatomical training models for complex surgical procedures to the printing of tissue engineering constructs. In addition to achieving the macroscale geometry of organs and tissues, a print layer thickness as small as 20 μm allows for reproduction of the microarchitectures of bone and other tissues. Techniques with even higher precision are currently being investigated to enable reproduction of smaller tissue features such as hepatic lobules. Current research in tissue engineering focuses on the development of compatible methods (printers) and materials (bioinks) that are capable of producing biomimetic scaffolds. In this review, an overview of current 3D printing techniques used in tissue engineering is provided with an emphasis on the printing mechanism and the resultant scaffold characteristics. Current practical challenges and technical limitations are emphasized and future trends of bioprinting are discussed. PMID:26857350

  19. Development of Hydrogels and Biomimetic Regulators as Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Junbin; Xing, Malcolm M. Q.; Zhong, Wen

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews major research and development issues relating to hydrogels as scaffolds for tissue engineering, the article starts with a brief introduction of tissue engineering and hydrogels as extracellular matrix mimics, followed by a description of the various types of hydrogels and preparation methods, before a discussion of the physical and chemical properties that are important to their application. There follows a short comment on the trends of future research and development. Throughout the discussion there is an emphasis on the genetic understanding of bone tissue engineering application. PMID:24957963

  20. Vascularization and Angiogenesis in Tissue Engineering: Beyond Creating Static Networks.

    PubMed

    Rouwkema, Jeroen; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Engineered tissues need a vascular network to supply cells with nutrients and oxygen after implantation. A network that can connect to the vasculature of the patient after implantation can be included during in vitro culture. For optimal integration, this network needs to be highly organized, including venules, capillaries, and arterioles, to supply all of the cells with sufficient nutrients. Owing to the importance of vascularization for the clinical applicability of tissue engineering, many approaches have been investigated to include an organized vascular network in tissue constructs. This review will give an overview of recent efforts, and will propose future perspectives to engineer the optimal, functional vascular network. PMID:27032730

  1. Progress and opportunities for tissue-engineered skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacNeil, Sheila

    2007-02-01

    Tissue-engineered skin is now a reality. For patients with extensive full-thickness burns, laboratory expansion of skin cells to achieve barrier function can make the difference between life and death, and it was this acute need that drove the initiation of tissue engineering in the 1980s. A much larger group of patients have ulcers resistant to conventional healing, and treatments using cultured skin cells have been devised to restart the wound-healing process. In the laboratory, the use of tissue-engineered skin provides insight into the behaviour of skin cells in healthy skin and in diseases such as vitiligo, melanoma, psoriasis and blistering disorders.

  2. Culturing Mouse Cardiac Valves in the Miniature Tissue Culture System.

    PubMed

    Kruithof, Boudewijn P T; Lieber, Samuel C; Kruithof-de Julio, Marianna; Gaussin, Vincian; Goumans, Marie José

    2015-01-01

    Heart valve disease is a major burden in the Western world and no effective treatment is available. This is mainly due to a lack of knowledge of the molecular, cellular and mechanical mechanisms underlying the maintenance and/or loss of the valvular structure. Current models used to study valvular biology include in vitro cultures of valvular endothelial and interstitial cells. Although, in vitro culturing models provide both cellular and molecular mechanisms, the mechanisms involved in the 3D-organization of the valve remain unclear. While in vivo models have provided insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying valvular development, insight into adult valvular biology is still elusive. In order to be able to study the regulation of the valvular 3D-organization on tissue, cellular and molecular levels, we have developed the Miniature Tissue Culture System. In this ex vivo flow model the mitral or the aortic valve is cultured in its natural position in the heart. The natural configuration and composition of the leaflet are maintained allowing the most natural response of the valvular cells to stimuli. The valves remain viable and are responsive to changing environmental conditions. This MTCS may provide advantages on studying questions including but not limited to, how does the 3D organization affect valvular biology, what factors affect 3D organization of the valve, and which network of signaling pathways regulates the 3D organization of the valve. PMID:26555276

  3. Rationally engineered Troponin C modulates in vivo cardiac function and performance in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Shettigar, Vikram; Zhang, Bo; Little, Sean C; Salhi, Hussam E; Hansen, Brian J; Li, Ning; Zhang, Jianchao; Roof, Steve R; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Brunello, Lucia; Lerch, Jessica K; Weisleder, Noah; Fedorov, Vadim V; Accornero, Federica; Rafael-Fortney, Jill A; Gyorke, Sandor; Janssen, Paul M L; Biesiadecki, Brandon J; Ziolo, Mark T; Davis, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for heart disease, the leading cause of death in the world, has progressed little for several decades. Here we develop a protein engineering approach to directly tune in vivo cardiac contractility by tailoring the ability of the heart to respond to the Ca(2+) signal. Promisingly, our smartly formulated Ca(2+)-sensitizing TnC (L48Q) enhances heart function without any adverse effects that are commonly observed with positive inotropes. In a myocardial infarction (MI) model of heart failure, expression of TnC L48Q before the MI preserves cardiac function and performance. Moreover, expression of TnC L48Q after the MI therapeutically enhances cardiac function and performance, without compromising survival. We demonstrate engineering TnC can specifically and precisely modulate cardiac contractility that when combined with gene therapy can be employed as a therapeutic strategy for heart disease. PMID:26908229

  4. Rationally engineered Troponin C modulates in vivo cardiac function and performance in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Shettigar, Vikram; Zhang, Bo; Little, Sean C.; Salhi, Hussam E.; Hansen, Brian J.; Li, Ning; Zhang, Jianchao; Roof, Steve R.; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Brunello, Lucia; Lerch, Jessica K.; Weisleder, Noah; Fedorov, Vadim V.; Accornero, Federica; Rafael-Fortney, Jill A.; Gyorke, Sandor; Janssen, Paul M. L.; Biesiadecki, Brandon J.; Ziolo, Mark T.; Davis, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for heart disease, the leading cause of death in the world, has progressed little for several decades. Here we develop a protein engineering approach to directly tune in vivo cardiac contractility by tailoring the ability of the heart to respond to the Ca2+ signal. Promisingly, our smartly formulated Ca2+-sensitizing TnC (L48Q) enhances heart function without any adverse effects that are commonly observed with positive inotropes. In a myocardial infarction (MI) model of heart failure, expression of TnC L48Q before the MI preserves cardiac function and performance. Moreover, expression of TnC L48Q after the MI therapeutically enhances cardiac function and performance, without compromising survival. We demonstrate engineering TnC can specifically and precisely modulate cardiac contractility that when combined with gene therapy can be employed as a therapeutic strategy for heart disease. PMID:26908229

  5. Multiscale assembly for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Inci, Fatih; Tasoglu, Savas; Erkmen, Burcu; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of cell biology and its integration with materials science has led to technological innovations in the bioengineering of tissue-mimicking grafts that can be utilized in clinical and pharmaceutical applications. Bio-engineering of native-like multiscale building blocks provides refined control over the cellular microenvironment, thus enabling functional tissues. In this review, we focus on assembling building blocks from the biomolecular level to the millimeter scale. We also provide an overview of techniques for assembling molecules, cells, spheroids, and microgels and achieving bottom-up tissue engineering. Additionally, we discuss driving mechanisms for self- and guided assembly to create micro-to-macro scale tissue structures. PMID:25796488

  6. Vascular Tissue Engineering: Building Perfusable Vasculature for Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Liqiong; Niklason, Laura E.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue and organ replacement is required when there are no alternative therapies available. Although vascular tissue engineering was originally developed to meet the clinical demands of small-diameter vascular conduits as bypass grafts, it has evolved into a highly advanced field where perfusable vasculatures are generated for implantation. Herein, we review several cutting-edge techniques that have led to implantable human blood vessels in clinical trials, the novel approaches that build complex perfusable microvascular networks in functional tissues, the use of stem cells to generate endothelial cells for vascularization, as well as the challenges in bringing vascular tissue engineering technologies into the clinics. PMID:24533306

  7. [The biologic functional surfaces and their applications in tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Yao, Fanglian; Chen, Man; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Haiyue; An, Xiaoyan; Yao, Kangde

    2007-10-01

    The construction of biologic functional surfaces of materials, from the visual angle of material science, is aimed to make the biomaterials adapted by tissues, and to endow them with dynamic conformity; moreover, from the view-point of clinical applications, it is the functional surface to join the environmental tissues with the implanted material, playing the role of artificial extracellular matrix (ECM). The architecture of biologic functional surface is very important in tissue engineering science. Here the primary concepts of biological surface science and the construction and application of biofunctional surfaces in tissue engineering are reviewed. PMID:18027721

  8. Tendon Tissue Engineering: Progress, Challenges, and Translation to the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Shearn, Jason T.; Kinneberg, Kirsten R.C.; Dyment, Nathaniel A.; Galloway, Marc T.; Kenter, Keith; Wylie, Christopher; Butler, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The tissue engineering field has made great strides in understanding how different aspects of tissue engineered constructs (TECs) and the culture process affect final tendon repair. However, there remain significant challenges in developing strategies that will lead to a clinically effective and commercially successful product. In an effort to increase repair quality, a better understanding of normal development, and how it differs from adult tendon healing, may provide strategies to improve tissue engineering. As tendon tissue engineering continues to improve, the field needs to employ more clinically relevant models of tendon injury such as degenerative tendons. We need to translate successes to larger animal models to begin exploring the clinical implications of our treatments. By advancing the models used to validate our TECs, we can help convince our toughest customer, the surgeon, that our products will be clinically efficacious. As we address these challenges in musculoskeletal tissue engineering, the field still needs to address the commercialization of products developed in the laboratory. TEC commercialization faces numerous challenges because each injury and patient is unique. This review aims to provide tissue engineers with a summary of important issues related to engineering tendon repairs and potential strategies for producing clinically successful products. PMID:21625053

  9. Functional interaction between charged nanoparticles and cardiac tissue: a new paradigm for cardiac arrhythmia?

    PubMed Central

    Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Shevchuk, Andrew I; Korchev, Yuri E; Lab, Max J; Tetley, Teresa D; Gorelik, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate the effect of surface charge of therapeutic nanoparticles on sarcolemmal ionic homeostasis and the initiation of arrhythmias. Materials & methods Cultured neonatal rat myocytes were exposed to 50 nm-charged polystyrene latex nanoparticles and examined using a combination of hopping probe scanning ion conductance microscopy, optical recording of action potential characteristics and patch clamp. Results Positively charged, amine-modified polystyrene latex nanoparticles showed cytotoxic effects and induced large-scale damage to cardiomyocyte membranes leading to calcium alternans and cell death. By contrast, negatively charged, carboxyl-modified polystyrene latex nanoparticles (NegNPs) were not overtly cytotoxic but triggered formation of 50–250-nm nanopores in the membrane. Cells exposed to NegNPs revealed pro-arrhythmic events, such as delayed afterdepolarizations, reduction in conduction velocity and pathological increment of action potential duration together with an increase in ionic current throughout the membrane, carried by the nanopores. Conclusion The utilization of charged nanoparticles is a novel concept for targeting cardiac excitability. However, this unique nanoscopic investigation reveals an altered electrophysiological substrate, which sensitized the heart cells towards arrhythmias. PMID:23140503

  10. Recent insights on applications of pullulan in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ram Sarup; Kaur, Navpreet; Rana, Vikas; Kennedy, John F

    2016-11-20

    Tissue engineering is a recently emerging line of act which assists the regeneration of damaged tissues, unable to self-repair themselves and in turn, enhances the natural healing potential of patients. The repair of injured tissue can be induced with the help of some artificially created polymer scaffolds for successful tissue regeneration. The pullulan composite scaffolds can be used to enhance the proliferation and differentiation of cells for tissue regeneration. The unique pattern of pullulan with α-(1→4) and α-(1→6) linkages along with the presence of nine hydroxyl groups on its surface, endows the polymer with distinctive physical features required for tissue engineering. Pullulan can be used for vascular engineering, bone repair and skin tissue engineering. Pullulan composite scaffolds can also be used for treatment of injured femoral condyle bone, skull bone and full thickness skin wound of murine models, transversal mandibular and tibial osteotomy in goat, etc. This review article highlights the latest developments on applications of pullulan and its derivatives in tissue engineering. PMID:27561517

  11. Stem cell origin differently affects bone tissue engineering strategies

    PubMed Central

    Mattioli-Belmonte, Monica; Teti, Gabriella; Salvatore, Viviana; Focaroli, Stefano; Orciani, Monia; Dicarlo, Manuela; Fini, Milena; Orsini, Giovanna; Di Primio, Roberto; Falconi, Mirella

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering approaches are encouraging for the improvement of conventional bone grafting technique drawbacks. Thanks to their self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation ability, stem cells are one of the major actors in tissue engineering approaches, and among these adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold a great promise for regenerative medicine strategies. Bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) are the first- identified and well-recognized stem cell population used in bone tissue engineering. Nevertheless, several factors hamper BM-MSC clinical application and subsequently, new stem cell sources have been investigated for these purposes. The fruitful selection and combination of tissue engineered scaffold, progenitor cells, and physiologic signaling molecules allowed the surgeon to reconstruct the missing natural tissue. On the basis of these considerations, we analyzed the capability of two different scaffolds, planned for osteochondral tissue regeneration, to modulate differentiation of adult stem cells of dissimilar local sources (i.e., periodontal ligament, maxillary periosteum) as well as adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), in view of possible craniofacial tissue engineering strategies. We demonstrated that cells are differently committed toward the osteoblastic phenotype and therefore, taking into account their specific features, they could be intriguing cell sources in different stem cell-based bone/periodontal tissue regeneration approaches. PMID:26441682

  12. Environmental regulation of valvulogenesis: implications for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Riem Vis, Paul W; Kluin, Jolanda; Sluijter, Joost P G; van Herwerden, Lex A; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2011-01-01

    Ongoing research efforts aim at improving the creation of tissue-engineered heart valves for in vivo systemic application. Hence, in vitro studies concentrate on optimising culture protocols incorporating biological as well as biophysical stimuli for tissue development. Important lessons can be drawn from valvulogenesis to mimic natural valve development in vitro. Here, we review the up-to-date status of valvulogenesis, focussing on the biomolecular and biophysical regulation of semilunar valve development. In addition, we discuss potential benefits of incorporating concepts derived from valvulogenesis, as well as alternative approaches, in tissue-engineering protocols, to improve in vitro valve development. The combined efforts from clinicians, cell biologists and engineers are required to implement and evaluate these approaches to achieve optimised protocols for heart-valve tissue engineering. PMID:20637649

  13. Cartilage Tissue Engineering: What Have We Learned in Practice?

    PubMed

    Doran, Pauline M

    2015-01-01

    Many technologies that underpin tissue engineering as a research field were developed with the aim of producing functional human cartilage in vitro. Much of our practical experience with three-dimensional cultures, tissue bioreactors, scaffold materials, stem cells, and differentiation protocols was gained using cartilage as a model system. Despite these advances, however, generation of engineered cartilage matrix with the composition, structure, and mechanical properties of mature articular cartilage has not yet been achieved. Currently, the major obstacles to synthesis of clinically useful cartilage constructs are our inability to control differentiation to the extent needed, and the failure of engineered and host tissues to integrate after construct implantation. The aim of this chapter is to distil from the large available body of literature the seminal approaches and experimental techniques developed for cartilage tissue engineering and to identify those specific areas requiring further research effort. PMID:26445827

  14. Generating new blood flow: integrating developmental biology and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Krenning, Guido; Moonen, Jan-Renier A J; van Luyn, Marja J A; Harmsen, Martin C

    2008-11-01

    Vascular tissue engineering aims to restore blood flow by seeding artificial tubular scaffolds with endothelial and smooth muscle cells, thus creating bioartificial blood vessels. Herein, the progenitors of smooth muscle and endothelial cells hold great promise because they efficiently differentiate and harbor longevity. In this review, we describe a novel tissue engineering approach that uses current insights from developmental biology, that is, progenitor cell plasticity, and the latest advances in biomaterial design. We focus specifically on developmental processes that regulate progenitor cell (trans)differentiation and offer a platform for the integration of these molecular clues into biomaterial design. We propose a novel engineering paradigm for the creation of a small-diameter blood vessel wherein progenitor cell differentiation and tissue organization are instructed by the biomaterial solely. With this review, we emphasize the power of integrating developmental biology and material science for vascular tissue engineering. PMID:19345319

  15. Engineering extracellular matrix structure in 3D multiphase tissues

    PubMed Central

    Gillette, Brian M.; Rossen, Ninna S.; Das, Nikkan; Leong, Debra; Wang, Meixin; Dugar, Arushi; Sia, Samuel K.

    2011-01-01

    In native tissues, microscale variations in the extracellular matrix (ECM) structure can drive different cellular behaviors. Although control over ECM structure could prove useful in tissue engineering and in studies of cellular behavior, isotropic 3D matrices poorly replicate variations in local microenvironments. In this paper, we demonstrate a method to engineer local variations in the density and size of collagen fibers throughout 3D tissues. The results showed that, in engineered multiphase tissues, the structures of collagen fibers in both the bulk ECM phases (as measured by mesh size and width of fibers) as well as at tissue interfaces (as measured by density of fibers and thickness of tissue interfaces) could be modulated by varying the collagen concentrations and gelling temperatures. As the method makes use of a previously published technique for tissue bonding, we also confirmed that significant adhesion strength at tissue interfaces was achieved under all conditions tested. Hence, this study demonstrates how collagen fiber structures can be engineered within all regions of a tightly integrated multiphase tissue scaffold by exploiting knowledge of collagen assembly. PMID:21840047

  16. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound in dentofacial tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Eiji; Kuroda, Shingo; Horiuchi, Shinya; Tabata, Akira; El-Bialy, Tarek

    2015-04-01

    Oral and maxillofacial diseases affect millions of people worldwide and hence tissue engineering can be considered an interesting and clinically relevant approach to regenerate orofacial tissues after being affected by different diseases. Among several innovations for tissue regeneration, low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been used extensively in medicine as a therapeutic, operative, and diagnostic tool. LIPUS is accepted to promote bone fracture repair and regeneration. Furthermore, the effect of LIPUS on soft tissues regeneration has been paid much attention, and many studies have performed to evaluate the potential use of LIPUS to tissue engineering soft tissues. The present article provides an overview about the status of LIPUS stimulation as a tool to be used to enhance regeneration/tissue engineering. This review consists of five parts. Part 1 is a brief introduction of the acoustic description of LIPUS and mechanical action. In Part 2, biological problems in dentofacial tissue engineering are proposed. Part 3 explores biologic mechanisms of LIPUS to cells and tissues in living body. In Part 4, the effectiveness of LIPUS on cell metabolism and tissue regeneration in dentistry are summarized. Finally, Part 5 relates the possibility of clinical application of LIPUS in orthodontics. The present review brings out better understanding of the bioeffect of LIPUS therapy on orofacial tissues which is essential to the successful integration of management remedies for tissue regeneration/engineering. To develop an evidence-based approach to clinical management and treatment of orofacial degenerative diseases using LIPUS, we would like to be in full pursuit of LIPUS biotherapy. Still, there are many challenges for this relatively new strategy, but the up to date achievements using it promises to go far beyond the present possibilities. PMID:25672801

  17. Fiber-Based Tissue Engineering: Progress, Challenges, and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Tamayol, Ali; Akbari, Mohsen; Annabi, Nasim; Paul, Arghya; Khademhosseini, Ali; Juncker, David

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering aims to improve the function of diseased or damaged organs by creating biological substitutes. To fabricate a functional tissue, the engineered construct should mimic the physiological environment including its structural, topographical, and mechanical properties. Moreover, the construct should facilitate nutrients and oxygen diffusion as well as removal of metabolic waste during tissue regeneration. In the last decade, fiber-based techniques such as weaving, knitting, braiding, as well as electrospinning, and direct writing have emerged as promising platforms for making 3D tissue constructs that can address the above mentioned challenges. Here, we critically review the techniques used to form cell-free and cell-laden fibers and to assemble them into scaffolds. We compare their mechanical properties, morphological features and biological activity. We discuss current challenges and future opportunities of fiber-based tissue engineering (FBTE) for use in research and clinical practice. PMID:23195284

  18. Stratified scaffold design for engineering composite tissues.

    PubMed

    Mosher, Christopher Z; Spalazzi, Jeffrey P; Lu, Helen H

    2015-08-01

    A significant challenge to orthopaedic soft tissue repair is the biological fixation of autologous or allogeneic grafts with bone, whereby the lack of functional integration between such grafts and host bone has limited the clinical success of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and other common soft tissue-based reconstructive grafts. The inability of current surgical reconstruction to restore the native fibrocartilaginous insertion between the ACL and the femur or tibia, which minimizes stress concentration and facilitates load transfer between the soft and hard tissues, compromises the long-term clinical functionality of these grafts. To enable integration, a stratified scaffold design that mimics the multiple tissue regions of the ACL interface (ligament-fibrocartilage-bone) represents a promising strategy for composite tissue formation. Moreover, distinct cellular organization and phase-specific matrix heterogeneity achieved through co- or tri-culture within the scaffold system can promote biomimetic multi-tissue regeneration. Here, we describe the methods for fabricating a tri-phasic scaffold intended for ligament-bone integration, as well as the tri-culture of fibroblasts, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts on the stratified scaffold for the formation of structurally contiguous and compositionally distinct regions of ligament, fibrocartilage and bone. The primary advantage of the tri-phasic scaffold is the recapitulation of the multi-tissue organization across the native interface through the layered design. Moreover, in addition to ease of fabrication, each scaffold phase is similar in polymer composition and therefore can be joined together by sintering, enabling the seamless integration of each region and avoiding delamination between scaffold layers. PMID:25846397

  19. Stem cell sources for vascular tissue engineering and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Vivek K; Andreadis, Stelios T

    2012-10-01

    This review focuses on the stem cell sources with the potential to be used in vascular tissue engineering and to promote vascular regeneration. The first clinical studies using tissue-engineered vascular grafts are already under way, supporting the potential of this technology in the treatment of cardiovascular and other diseases. Despite progress in engineering biomaterials with the appropriate mechanical properties and biological cues as well as bioreactors for generating the correct tissue microenvironment, the source of cells that make up the vascular tissues remains a major challenge for tissue engineers and physicians. Mature cells from the tissue of origin may be difficult to obtain and suffer from limited proliferative capacity, which may further decline as a function of donor age. On the other hand, multipotent and pluripotent stem cells have great potential to provide large numbers of autologous cells with a great differentiation capacity. Here, we discuss the adult multipotent as well as embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, their differentiation potential toward vascular lineages, and their use in engineering functional and implantable vascular tissues. We also discuss the associated challenges that need to be addressed in order to facilitate the transition of this technology from the bench to the bedside. PMID:22571595

  20. Stem Cell Sources for Vascular Tissue Engineering and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Vivek K.

    2012-01-01

    This review focuses on the stem cell sources with the potential to be used in vascular tissue engineering and to promote vascular regeneration. The first clinical studies using tissue-engineered vascular grafts are already under way, supporting the potential of this technology in the treatment of cardiovascular and other diseases. Despite progress in engineering biomaterials with the appropriate mechanical properties and biological cues as well as bioreactors for generating the correct tissue microenvironment, the source of cells that make up the vascular tissues remains a major challenge for tissue engineers and physicians. Mature cells from the tissue of origin may be difficult to obtain and suffer from limited proliferative capacity, which may further decline as a function of donor age. On the other hand, multipotent and pluripotent stem cells have great potential to provide large numbers of autologous cells with a great differentiation capacity. Here, we discuss the adult multipotent as well as embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, their differentiation potential toward vascular lineages, and their use in engineering functional and implantable vascular tissues. We also discuss the associated challenges that need to be addressed in order to facilitate the transition of this technology from the bench to the bedside. PMID:22571595

  1. Application of the cell sheet technique in tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, GUANGNAN; QI, YIYING; NIU, LIE; DI, TUOYU; ZHONG, JINWEI; FANG, TINGTING; YAN, WEIQI

    2015-01-01

    The development and application of the tissue engineering technique has shown a significant potential in regenerative medicine. However, the limitations of conventional tissue engineering methods (cell suspensions, scaffolds and/or growth factors) restrict its application in certain fields. The novel cell sheet technique can overcome such disadvantages. Cultured cells can be harvested as intact sheets without the use of proteolytic enzymes, such as trypsin or dispase, which can result in cell damage and loss of differentiated phenotypes. The cell sheet is a complete layer, which contains extracellular matrix, ion channel, growth factor receptors, nexin and other important cell surface proteins. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which have the potential for multiple differentiation, are promising candidate seed cells for tissue engineering. The MSC sheet technique may have potential in the fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering in general. Additionally, induced pluripotent stem cell and embryonic stem cell-derived cell sheets have been proposed for tissue regeneration. Currently, the application of cell sheet for tissue reconstruction includes: Direct recipient sites implantation, superposition of cell sheets to construct three-dimensional structure for implantation, or cell sheet combined with scaffolds. The present review discusses the progress in cell sheet techniques, particularly stem cell sheet techniques, in tissue engineering. PMID:26623011

  2. High Resolution Magnetic Images of Planar Wave Fronts Reveal Bidomain Properties of Cardiac Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Jenny R.; Fong, Luis E.; Sidorov, Veniamin Y.; Wikswo, John P.; Baudenbacher, Franz

    2004-01-01

    We magnetically imaged the magnetic action field and optically imaged the transmembrane potentials generated by planar wavefronts on the surface of the left ventricular wall of Langendorff-perfused isolated rabbit hearts. The magnetic action field images were used to produce a time series of two-dimensional action current maps. Overlaying epifluorescent images allowed us to identify a net current along the wavefront and perpendicular to gradients in the transmembrane potential. This is in contrast to a traditional uniform double-layer model where the net current flows along the gradient in the transmembrane potential. Our findings are supported by numerical simulations that treat cardiac tissue as a bidomain with unequal anisotropies in the intra- and extracellular spaces. Our measurements reveal the anisotropic bidomain nature of cardiac tissue during plane wave propagation. These bidomain effects play an important role in the generation of the whole-heart magnetocardiogram and cannot be ignored. PMID:15377521

  3. Experimental and theoretical description of higher order periods in cardiac tissue action potential duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herndon, Conner; Fenton, Flavio; Uzelac, Ilija

    Much theoretical, experimental, and clinical research has been devoted to investigating the initiation of cardiac arrhythmias by alternans, the first period doubling bifurcation in the duration of cardiac action potentials. Although period doubling above alternans has been shown to exist in many mammalian hearts, little is understood about their emergence or behavior. There currently exists no physiologically correct theory or model that adequately describes and predicts their emergence in stimulated tissue. In this talk we present experimental data of period 2, 4, and 8 dynamics and a mathematical model that describes these bifurcations. This model extends current cell models through the addition of memory and includes spatiotemporal nonlinearities arising from cellular coupling by tissue heterogeneity.

  4. Strategies for improving the physiological relevance of human engineered tissues

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Rosalyn D; Kaplan, David L

    2015-01-01

    This review examines important robust methods for sustained, steady state, in vitro culture. To achieve ‘physiologically relevant’ tissues in vitro additional complexity must be introduced to provide suitable transport, cell signaling, and matrix support for cells in 3D environments to achieve stable readouts of tissue function. Most tissue engineering systems draw conclusions on tissue functions such as responses to toxins, nutrition or drugs based on short term outcomes with in vitro cultures (2–14 days). However, short term cultures limit insight with physiological relevance, as the cells and tissues have not reached a steady state. PMID:25937289

  5. Textile Processes for Engineering Tissues with Biomimetic Architectures and Properties.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, Afsoon; Khademhosseini, Ali; Tamayol, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Textile technologies in which fibers containing biological factors and cells are formed and assembled into constructs with biomimetic properties have attracted significant attention in the field of tissue engineering. This Forum article highlights the most prominent advances of the field in the areas of fiber fabrication and construct engineering. PMID:27499277

  6. The coming of age of musculoskeletal tissue engineering and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tuan, Rocky S.

    2016-01-01

    Standfirst Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have advanced rapidly towards the development of therapeutic solutions for musculoskeletal disorders. In 2012, breakthroughs have been made in the guidance of adult stem cell homing, the tissue regenerative activity of stem-cell-derived extracellular matrix has been tested, and novel, mechanically superior biomaterials have been fabricated. PMID:23321611

  7. Three-dimensional bioprinting in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guifang; Cui, Xiaofeng

    2016-02-01

    With the advances of stem cell research, development of intelligent biomaterials and three-dimensional biofabrication strategies, highly mimicked tissue or organs can be engineered. Among all the biofabrication approaches, bioprinting based on inkjet printing technology has the promises to deliver and create biomimicked tissue with high throughput, digital control, and the capacity of single cell manipulation. Therefore, this enabling technology has great potential in regenerative medicine and translational applications. The most current advances in organ and tissue bioprinting based on the thermal inkjet printing technology are described in this review, including vasculature, muscle, cartilage, and bone. In addition, the benign side effect of bioprinting to the printed mammalian cells can be utilized for gene or drug delivery, which can be achieved conveniently during precise cell placement for tissue construction. With layer-by-layer assembly, three-dimensional tissues with complex structures can be printed using converted medical images. Therefore, bioprinting based on thermal inkjet is so far the most optimal solution to engineer vascular system to the thick and complex tissues. Collectively, bioprinting has great potential and broad applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The future advances of bioprinting include the integration of different printing mechanisms to engineer biphasic or triphasic tissues with optimized scaffolds and further understanding of stem cell biology. PMID:26466597

  8. Pulp and dentin tissue engineering and regeneration: current progress

    PubMed Central

    Huang, George TJ

    2009-01-01

    Dental pulp tissue is vulnerable to infection. Entire pulp amputation followed by pulp-space disinfection and filling with an artificial rubber-like material is employed to treat the infection – commonly known as root-canal therapy. Regeneration of pulp tissue has been difficult as the tissue is encased in dentin without collateral blood supply except from the root apical end. However, with the advent of the concept of modern tissue engineering and the discovery of dental stem cells, regeneration of pulp and dentin has been tested. This article will review the early attempts to regenerate pulp tissue and the current endeavor of pulp and dentin tissue engineering, and regeneration. The prospective outcome of the current advancement in this line of research will be discussed. PMID:19761395

  9. [Tissue engineering and construction of human skin in vitro].

    PubMed

    Arvelo, Francisco

    2007-09-01

    Tissue engineering is the new science that has come to make possible the growth of new organ tissue from small fragments of healthy tissue, thus partially or totally restoring the lost functions of ill tissues or organs, as shown by the achievements made with the culture of skin, cornea or cartilage. Thus far, this new science is able to ensure the recovery of lost functions and, doubtlessly, in a near future will be capable of developing tissues and organs not unlike natural ones. In our laboratory we have began the development of tissue engineering techniques for the successful construction of in vitro skin with the aim at mid term of producing cornea and cartilage. In a first clinical trial, these techniques were applied in the treatment of chronic skin lesions and the advantages and reach of these new tools were demonstrated for the effective solution of problems with would otherwise not be easily solved through the use of conventional treatments. PMID:17853796

  10. Pulp and dentin tissue engineering and regeneration: current progress.

    PubMed

    Huang, George T J

    2009-09-01

    Dental pulp tissue is vulnerable to infection. Entire pulp amputation followed by pulp-space disinfection and filling with an artificial rubber-like material is employed to treat the infection - commonly known as root-canal therapy. Regeneration of pulp tissue has been difficult as the tissue is encased in dentin without collateral blood supply except from the root apical end. However, with the advent of the concept of modern tissue engineering and the discovery of dental stem cells, regeneration of pulp and dentin has been tested. This article will review the early attempts to regenerate pulp tissue and the current endeavor of pulp and dentin tissue engineering, and regeneration. The prospective outcome of the current advancement in this line of research will be discussed. PMID:19761395

  11. Impact of Detergent-Based Decellularization Methods on Porcine Tissues for Heart Valve Engineering.

    PubMed

    Roosens, Annelies; Somers, Pamela; De Somer, Filip; Carriel, Victor; Van Nooten, Guido; Cornelissen, Ria

    2016-09-01

    To date an optimal decellularization protocol of heart valve leaflets (HVL) and pericardia (PER) with an adequate preservation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is still lacking. This study compares a 4 day Triton X-100-based protocol with faster SDC-based protocols for the decellularization of cardiac tissues. Decellularized and non-treated HVL and PER were processed for histological, biochemical and mechanical analysis to determine the effect of these agents on the structure, ECM components, and biomechanical properties. Tissues treated with SDC-based protocols still showed nuclear material, whereas tissues treated with Triton X-100 1% + ENZ ± TRYP were completely cell free. For both decellularized tissues, an almost complete washout of glycosaminoglycans, a reduction of soluble collagen and an alteration of the surface ultrastructure was observed. Interestingly, only the elastic fibers of pericardial tissue were affected and this tissue had a decreased maximum load. This study showed that both detergents had a similar impact on the ECM. However, Triton X-100 1% +DNase/RNase (ENZ) ± Trypsin (TRYP) is the only protocol that generated completely cell free bioscaffolds. Also, our study clearly demonstrated that the decellularization agents have more impact on pericardial tissues than on heart valve leaflets. Thus, for the purpose of tissue engineering of heart valves, it is advisable to use valvular rather than pericardial matrices. PMID:26842626

  12. Cardiac tissue enriched factors serum response factor and GATA-4 are mutual coregulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belaguli, N. S.; Sepulveda, J. L.; Nigam, V.; Charron, F.; Nemer, M.; Schwartz, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Combinatorial interaction among cardiac tissue-restricted enriched transcription factors may facilitate the expression of cardiac tissue-restricted genes. Here we show that the MADS box factor serum response factor (SRF) cooperates with the zinc finger protein GATA-4 to synergistically activate numerous myogenic and nonmyogenic serum response element (SRE)-dependent promoters in CV1 fibroblasts. In the absence of GATA binding sites, synergistic activation depends on binding of SRF to the proximal CArG box sequence in the cardiac and skeletal alpha-actin promoter. GATA-4's C-terminal activation domain is obligatory for synergistic coactivation with SRF, and its N-terminal domain and first zinc finger are inhibitory. SRF and GATA-4 physically associate both in vivo and in vitro through their MADS box and the second zinc finger domains as determined by protein A pullout assays and by in vivo one-hybrid transfection assays using Gal4 fusion proteins. Other cardiovascular tissue-restricted GATA factors, such as GATA-5 and GATA-6, were equivalent to GATA-4 in coactivating SRE-dependent targets. Thus, interaction between the MADS box and C4 zinc finger proteins, a novel regulatory paradigm, mediates activation of SRF-dependent gene expression.

  13. Photo Cleavable Polymers for Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, Monica

    We have found that P4VP and PMMA thin films can be etched with UVA radiation. Furthermore, we also found that dermal fibroblasts could be cultured successfully on the P4VP polymer, with a doubling time comparable to tissue culture Petri dish standards. Consequently we were able to grow tissue on P4VP substrates which could easily be lifted using UVA radiation. The cells that were removed were then re-plated at a lower density and a series of assays was performed at 3 and 6 days. While only a small amount of damage was discernable at day 3 nearly complete recovery was observed at day 6. The technique was also used to pattern areas within the tissue, where other types of cells could be inserted. In order to demonstrate the technique, a hybrid tissue layer was produced, where the dermal fibroblasts in a circular area at the center of the sample were removed via exposure through a mask. A keratinocyte layer was inserted which adhere to the fibroblast layer forming a tissue with integrated layers of two distinct cell types. We also investigated the effects of coated TiO2 particles on cells exposed to UVC. We found that as expected, cells were adversely affected by exposure to UVC and died even after exposure to as little as 3.5 J/cm 2. Addition of 0.4mg/ml TiO2 particles that were uncoated did not provide protection, and the cells died at the same rate. Addition of 4mg/ml of coated TiO2 on the other hand, did not affect cell viability in the absence of UV light and increased the viability after exposure to UVC radiation. In fact the cells containing the coated particles were indistinguishable for the unexposed control samples even after exposure to as much as 7.1J/cm 2 of UVC.

  14. Stem cells for tissue engineering of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Gao, J; Yao, J Q; Caplan, A I

    2007-07-01

    Articular cartilage injuries are one of the most common disorders in the musculo-skeletal system. Injured cartilage tissue cannot spontaneously heal and, if not treated, can lead to osteoarthritis of the affected joints. Although a variety of procedures are being employed to repair cartilage damage, methods that result in consistent durable repair tissue are not yet available. Tissue engineering is a recently developed science that merges the fields of cell biology, engineering, material science, and surgery to regenerate new functional tissue. Three critical components in tissue engineering of cartilage are as follows: first, sufficient cell numbers within the defect, such as chondrocytes or multipotent stem cells capable of differentiating into chondrocytes; second, access to growth and differentiation factors that modulate these cells to differentiate through the chondrogenic lineage; third, a cell carrier or matrix that fills the defect, delivers the appropriate cells, and supports cell proliferation and differentiation. Stem cells that exist in the embyro or in adult somatic tissues are able to renew themselves through cell division without changing their phenotype and are able to differentiate into multiple lineages including the chondrogenic lineage under certain physiological or experimental conditions. Here the application of stem cells as a cell source for cartilage tissue engineering is reviewed. PMID:17822146

  15. Smooth Muscle Strips for Intestinal Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Walthers, Christopher M.; Lee, Min; Wu, Benjamin M.; Dunn, James C. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Functionally contracting smooth muscle is an essential part of the engineered intestine that has not been replicated in vitro. The purpose of this study is to produce contracting smooth muscle in culture by maintaining the native smooth muscle organization. We employed intact smooth muscle strips and compared them to dissociated smooth muscle cells in culture for 14 days. Cells isolated by enzymatic digestion quickly lost maturity markers for smooth muscle cells and contained few enteric neural and glial cells. Cultured smooth muscle strips exhibited periodic contraction and maintained neural and glial markers. Smooth muscle strips cultured for 14 days also exhibited regular fluctuation of intracellular calcium, whereas cultured smooth muscle cells did not. After implantation in omentum for 14 days on polycaprolactone scaffolds, smooth muscle strip constructs expressed high levels of smooth muscle maturity markers as well as enteric neural and glial cells. Intact smooth muscle strips may be a useful component for engineered intestinal smooth muscle. PMID:25486279

  16. Bimodal biophotonic imaging of the structure-function relationship in cardiac tissue

    PubMed Central

    Hucker, William J.; Ripplinger, Crystal M.; Fleming, Christine P.; Fedorov, Vadim V.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Efimov, Igor R.

    2009-01-01

    The development of systems physiology is hampered by the limited ability to relate tissue structure and function in intact organs in vivo or in vitro. Here, we show the application of a bimodal biophotonic imaging approach that employs optical coherence tomography and fluorescent imaging to investigate the structure-function relationship at the tissue level in the heart. Reconstruction of cardiac excitation and structure was limited by the depth penetration of bimodal imaging to ∼2 mm in atrial tissue, and ∼1 mm in ventricular myocardium. The subcellular resolution of optical coherence tomography clearly demonstrated that microscopic fiber orientation governs the pattern of wave propagation in functionally characterized rabbit sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodal preparations and revealed structural heterogeneities contributing to ventricular arrhythmias. The combination of this bimodal biophotonic imaging approach with histology and/or immunohistochemistry can span multiple scales of resolution for the investigation of the molecular and structural determinants of intact tissue physiology. PMID:19021392

  17. Superior Tissue Evolution in Slow-Degrading Scaffolds for Valvular Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Brugmans, Marieke M C P; Soekhradj-Soechit, R Sarita; van Geemen, Daphne; Cox, Martijn; Bouten, Carlijn V C; Baaijens, Frank P T; Driessen-Mol, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic polymers are widely used to fabricate porous scaffolds for the regeneration of cardiovascular tissues. To ensure mechanical integrity, a balance between the rate of scaffold absorption and tissue formation is of high importance. A higher rate of tissue formation is expected in fast-degrading materials than in slow-degrading materials. This could be a result of synthetic cells, which aim to compensate for the fast loss of mechanical integrity of the scaffold by deposition of collagen fibers. Here, we studied the effect of fast-degrading polyglycolic acid scaffolds coated with poly-4-hydroxybutyrate (PGA-P4HB) and slow-degrading poly-ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds on amount of tissue, composition, and mechanical characteristics in time, and compared these engineered values with values for native human heart valves. Electrospun PGA-P4HB and PCL scaffolds were either kept unseeded in culture or were seeded with human vascular-derived cells. Tissue formation, extracellular matrix (ECM) composition, remaining scaffold weight, tissue-to-scaffold weight ratio, and mechanical properties were analyzed every week up to 6 weeks. Mass of unseeded PCL scaffolds remained stable during culture, whereas PGA-P4HB scaffolds degraded rapidly. When seeded with cells, both scaffold types demonstrated increasing amounts of tissue with time, which was more pronounced for PGA-P4HB-based tissues during the first 2 weeks; however, PCL-based tissues resulted in the highest amount of tissue after 6 weeks. This study is the first to provide insight into the tissue-to-scaffold weight ratio, therewith allowing for a fair comparison between engineered tissues cultured on scaffolds as well as between native heart valve tissues. Although the absolute amount of ECM components differed between the engineered tissues, the ratio between ECM components was similar after 6 weeks. PCL-based tissues maintained their shape, whereas the PGA-P4HB-based tissues deformed during culture. After 6 weeks

  18. Cell Microenvironment Engineering and Monitoring for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine: The Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Barthes, Julien; Özçelik, Hayriye; Hindié, Mathilde; Ndreu-Halili, Albana; Hasan, Anwarul

    2014-01-01

    In tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, the conditions in the immediate vicinity of the cells have a direct effect on cells' behaviour and subsequently on clinical outcomes. Physical, chemical, and biological control of cell microenvironment are of crucial importance for the ability to direct and control cell behaviour in 3-dimensional tissue engineering scaffolds spatially and temporally. In this review, we will focus on the different aspects of cell microenvironment such as surface micro-, nanotopography, extracellular matrix composition and distribution, controlled release of soluble factors, and mechanical stress/strain conditions and how these aspects and their interactions can be used to achieve a higher degree of control over cellular activities. The effect of these parameters on the cellular behaviour within tissue engineering context is discussed and how these parameters are used to develop engineered tissues is elaborated. Also, recent techniques developed for the monitoring of the cell microenvironment in vitro and in vivo are reviewed, together with recent tissue engineering applications where the control of cell microenvironment has been exploited. Cell microenvironment engineering and monitoring are crucial parts of tissue engineering efforts and systems which utilize different components of the cell microenvironment simultaneously can provide more functional engineered tissues in the near future. PMID:25143954

  19. Cell microenvironment engineering and monitoring for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine: the recent advances.

    PubMed

    Barthes, Julien; Özçelik, Hayriye; Hindié, Mathilde; Ndreu-Halili, Albana; Hasan, Anwarul; Vrana, Nihal Engin

    2014-01-01

    In tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, the conditions in the immediate vicinity of the cells have a direct effect on cells' behaviour and subsequently on clinical outcomes. Physical, chemical, and biological control of cell microenvironment are of crucial importance for the ability to direct and control cell behaviour in 3-dimensional tissue engineering scaffolds spatially and temporally. In this review, we will focus on the different aspects of cell microenvironment such as surface micro-, nanotopography, extracellular matrix composition and distribution, controlled release of soluble factors, and mechanical stress/strain conditions and how these aspects and their interactions can be used to achieve a higher degree of control over cellular activities. The effect of these parameters on the cellular behaviour within tissue engineering context is discussed and how these parameters are used to develop engineered tissues is elaborated. Also, recent techniques developed for the monitoring of the cell microenvironment in vitro and in vivo are reviewed, together with recent tissue engineering applications where the control of cell microenvironment has been exploited. Cell microenvironment engineering and monitoring are crucial parts of tissue engineering efforts and systems which utilize different components of the cell microenvironment simultaneously can provide more functional engineered tissues in the near future. PMID:25143954

  20. Cell Patterning for Liver Tissue Engineering via Dielectrophoretic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yahya, Wan Nurlina Wan; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib; Ibrahim, Fatimah

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplantation is the most common treatment for patients with end-stage liver failure. However, liver transplantation is greatly limited by a shortage of donors. Liver tissue engineering may offer an alternative by providing an implantable engineered liver. Currently, diverse types of engineering approaches for in vitro liver cell culture are available, including scaffold-based methods, microfluidic platforms, and micropatterning techniques. Active cell patterning via dielectrophoretic (DEP) force showed some advantages over other methods, including high speed, ease of handling, high precision and being label-free. This article summarizes liver function and regenerative mechanisms for better understanding in developing engineered liver. We then review recent advances in liver tissue engineering techniques and focus on DEP-based cell patterning, including microelectrode design and patterning configuration. PMID:24991941

  1. Epigenetic Regulation of Cardiac Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cells and Tissues.

    PubMed

    Jebeniani, Imen; Leschik, Julia; Puceat, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Specific gene transcription is a key biological process that underlies cell fate decision during embryonic development. The biological process is mediated by transcription factors which bind genomic regulatory regions including enhancers and promoters of cardiac constitutive genes. DNA is wrapped around histones that are subjected to chemical modifications. Modifications of histones further lead to repressed, activated or poised gene transcription, thus bringing another level of fine tuning regulation of gene transcription. Embryonic Stem cells (ES cells) recapitulate within embryoid bodies (i.e., cell aggregates) or in 2D culture the early steps of cardiac development. They provide in principle enough material for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), a technology broadly used to identify gene regulatory regions. Furthermore, human ES cells represent a human cell model of cardiogenesis. At later stages of development, mouse embryonic tissues allow for investigating specific epigenetic landscapes required for determination of cell identity. Herein, we describe protocols of ChIP, sequential ChIP followed by PCR or ChIP-sequencing using ES cells, embryoid bodies and cardiac specific embryonic regions. These protocols allow to investigating the epigenetic regulation of cardiac gene transcription. PMID:27285123

  2. Living electrodes: tissue engineering the neural interface.

    PubMed

    Green, Rylie A; Lim, Khoon S; Henderson, William C; Hassarati, Rachelle T; Martens, Penny J; Lovell, Nigel H; Poole-Warren, Laura A

    2013-01-01

    Soft, cell integrated electrode coatings are proposed to address the problem of scar tissue encapsulation of stimulating neuroprosthetics. The aim of these studies was to prove the concept and feasibility of integrating a cell loaded hydrogel with existing electrode coating technologies. Layered conductive hydrogel constructs are embedded with neural cells and shown to both support cell growth and maintain electro activity. The safe charge injection limit of these electrodes was 8 times higher than conventional platinum (Pt) electrodes and the stiffness was four orders of magnitude lower than Pt. Future studies will determine the biological cues required to support stem cell differentiation from the electrode surface. PMID:24111345

  3. Colloidal gas aphron foams: A novel approach to a hydrogel based tissue engineered myocardial patch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Elizabeth Edna

    Cardiovascular disease currently affects an estimated 58 million Americans and is the leading cause of death in the US. Over 2.3 million Americans are currently living with heart failure a leading cause of which is acute myocardial infarction, during which a part of the heart muscle is damaged beyond repair. There is a great need to develop treatments for damaged heart tissue. One potential therapy involves replacement of nonfunctioning scar tissue with a patch of healthy, functioning tissue. A tissue engineered cardiac patch would be ideal for such an application. Tissue engineering techniques require the use of porous scaffolds, which serve as a 3-D template for initial cell attachment and grow-th leading to tissue formation. The scaffold must also have mechanical properties closely matching those of the tissues at the site of implantation. Our research presents a new approach to meet these design requirements. A unique interaction between poly(vinyl alcohol) and amino acids has been discovered by our lab, resulting in the production of novel gels. These unique synthetic hydrogels along with one natural hydrogel, alginate (derived from brown seaweed), have been coupled with a new approach to tissue scaffold fabrication using solid colloidal gas aphrons (CGAs). CGAs are colloidal foams containing uniform bubbles with diameters on the order of micrometers. Upon solidification the GCAs form a porous, 3-D network suitable for a tissue scaffold. The project encompasses four specific aims: (I) characterize hydrogel formation mechanism, (II) use colloidal gas aphrons to produce hydrogel scaffolds, (III) chemically and physically characterize scaffold materials and (IV) optimize and evaluate scaffold biocompatibility.

  4. Biocompatible magnetic core-shell nanocomposites for engineered magnetic tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Arco, Laura; Rodriguez, Ismael A.; Carriel, Victor; Bonhome-Espinosa, Ana B.; Campos, Fernando; Kuzhir, Pavel; Duran, Juan D. G.; Lopez-Lopez, Modesto T.

    2016-04-01

    The inclusion of magnetic nanoparticles into biopolymer matrixes enables the preparation of magnetic field-responsive engineered tissues. Here we describe a synthetic route to prepare biocompatible core-shell nanostructures consisting of a polymeric core and a magnetic shell, which are used for this purpose. We show that using a core-shell architecture is doubly advantageous. First, gravitational settling for core-shell nanocomposites is slower because of the reduction of the composite average density connected to the light polymer core. Second, the magnetic response of core-shell nanocomposites can be tuned by changing the thickness of the magnetic layer. The incorporation of the composites into biopolymer hydrogels containing cells results in magnetic field-responsive engineered tissues whose mechanical properties can be controlled by external magnetic forces. Indeed, we obtain a significant increase of the viscoelastic moduli of the engineered tissues when exposed to an external magnetic field. Because the composites are functionalized with polyethylene glycol, the prepared bio-artificial tissue-like constructs also display excellent ex vivo cell viability and proliferation. When implanted in vivo, the engineered tissues show good biocompatibility and outstanding interaction with the host tissue. Actually, they only cause a localized transitory inflammatory reaction at the implantation site, without any effect on other organs. Altogether, our results suggest that the inclusion of magnetic core-shell nanocomposites into biomaterials would enable tissue engineering of artificial substitutes whose mechanical properties could be tuned to match those of the potential target tissue. In a wider perspective, the good biocompatibility and magnetic behavior of the composites could be beneficial for many other applications.The inclusion of magnetic nanoparticles into biopolymer matrixes enables the preparation of magnetic field-responsive engineered tissues. Here we

  5. Skeletal muscle tissue engineering: strategies for volumetric constructs

    PubMed Central

    Cittadella Vigodarzere, Giorgio; Mantero, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue is characterized by high metabolic requirements, defined structure and high regenerative potential. As such, it constitutes an appealing platform for tissue engineering to address volumetric defects, as proven by recent works in this field. Several issues common to all engineered constructs constrain the variety of tissues that can be realized in vitro, principal among them the lack of a vascular system and the absence of reliable cell sources; as it is, the only successful tissue engineering constructs are not characterized by active function, present limited cellular survival at implantation and possess low metabolic requirements. Recently, functionally competent constructs have been engineered, with vascular structures supporting their metabolic requirements. In addition to the use of biochemical cues, physical means, mechanical stimulation and the application of electric tension have proven effective in stimulating the differentiation of cells and the maturation of the constructs; while the use of co-cultures provided fine control of cellular developments through paracrine activity. This review will provide a brief analysis of some of the most promising improvements in the field, with particular attention to the techniques that could prove easily transferable to other branches of tissue engineering. PMID:25295011

  6. Tissue engineering a surrogate niche for metastatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Seib, F Philipp; Berry, Janice E; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Taichman, Russell S; Kaplan, David L

    2015-05-01

    In breast and prostate cancer patients, the bone marrow is a preferred site of metastasis. We hypothesized that we could use tissue-engineering strategies to lure metastasizing cancer cells to tissue-engineered bone marrow. First, we generated highly porous 3D silk scaffolds that were biocompatible and amenable to bone morphogenetic protein 2 functionalization. Control and functionalized silk scaffolds were subcutaneously implanted in mice and bone marrow development was followed. Only functionalized scaffolds developed cancellous bone and red bone marrow, which appeared as early as two weeks post-implantation and further developed over the 16-week study period. This tissue-engineered bone marrow microenvironment could be readily manipulated in situ to understand the biology of bone metastasis. To test the ability of functionalized scaffolds to serve as a surrogate niche for metastasis, human breast cancer cells were injected into the mammary fat pads of mice. The treatment of animals with scaffolds had no significant effect on primary tumor growth. However, extensive metastasis was observed in functionalized scaffolds, and the highest levels for scaffolds that were in situ manipulated with receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). We also applied this tissue-engineered bone marrow model in a prostate cancer and experimental metastasis setting. In summary, we were able to use tissue-engineered bone marrow to serve as a target or "trap" for metastasizing cancer cells. PMID:25771021

  7. Tissue engineering a surrogate niche for metastatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Seib, F. Philipp; Berry, Janice E.; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Taichman, Russell S.; Kaplan, David L.

    2015-01-01

    In breast and prostate cancer patients, the bone marrow is a preferred site of metastasis. We hypothesized that we could use tissue-engineering strategies to lure metastasizing cancer cells to tissue-engineered bone marrow. First, we generated highly porous 3D silk scaffolds that were biocompatible and amenable to bone morphogenetic protein 2 functionalization. Control and functionalized silk scaffolds were subcutaneously implanted in mice and bone marrow development was followed. Only functionalized scaffolds developed cancellous bone and red bone marrow, which appeared as early as two weeks post-implantation and further developed over the 16-week study period. This tissue-engineered bone marrow microenvironment could be readily manipulated in situ to understand the biology of bone metastasis. To test the ability of functionalized scaffolds to serve as a surrogate niche for metastasis, human breast cancer cells were injected into the mammary fat pads of mice. The treatment of animals with scaffolds had no significant effect on primary tumor growth. However, extensive metastasis was observed in functionalized scaffolds, and the highest levels for scaffolds that were in situ manipulated with receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). We also applied this tissue-engineered bone marrow model in a prostate cancer and experimental metastasis setting. In summary, we were able to use tissue-engineered bone marrow to serve as a target for metastasizing cancer cells. PMID:25771021

  8. Bioactive scaffold for bone tissue engineering: An in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, Treena Lynne

    Massive bone loss of the proximal femur is a common problem in revision cases of total hip implants. Allograft is typically used to reconstruct the site for insertion of the new prosthesis. However, for long term fixation and function, it is desirable that the allograft becomes fully replaced by bone tissue and aids in the regeneration of bone to that site. However, allograft use is typically associated with delayed incorporation and poor remodeling. Due to these profound limitations, alternative approaches are needed. Tissue engineering is an attractive approach to designing improved graft materials. By combining osteogenic activity with a resorbable scaffold, bone formation can be stimulated while providing structure and stability to the limb during incorporation and remodeling of the scaffold. Porous, surface modified bioactive ceramic scaffolds (pSMC) have been developed which stimulate the expression of the osteoblastic phenotype and production of bone-like tissue in vitro. The scaffold and two tissue-engineered constructs, osteoprogenitor cells seeded onto scaffolds or cells expanded in culture to form bone tissue on the scaffolds prior to implantation, were investigated in a long bone defect model. The rate of incorporation was assessed. Both tissue-engineered constructs stimulated bone formation and comparable repair at 2 weeks. In a rat femoral window defect model, bone formation increased over time for all groups in concert with scaffold resorption, leading to a 40% increase in bone and 40% reduction of the scaffold in the defect by 12 weeks. Both tissue-engineered constructs enhanced the rate of mechanical repair of long bones due to better bony union with the host cortex. Long bones treated with tissue engineered constructs demonstrated a return in normal torsional properties by 4 weeks as compared to 12 weeks for long bones treated with pSMC. Culture expansion of cells to produce bone tissue in vitro did not accelerate incorporation over the treatment

  9. The induction of reentry in cardiac tissue. The missing link: How electric fields alter transmembrane potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Bradley J.; Krassowska, Wanda

    1998-03-01

    This review examines the initiation of reentry in cardiac muscle by strong electric shocks. Specifically, it concentrates on the mechanisms by which electric shocks change the transmembrane potential of the cardiac membrane and create the physiological substrate required by the critical point theory for the initiation of rotors. The mechanisms examined include (1) direct polarization of the tissue by the stimulating current, as described by the one-dimensional cable model and its two- and three-dimensional extensions, (2) the presence of virtual anodes and cathodes, as described by the bidomain model with unequal anisotropy ratios of the intra- and extracellular spaces, (3) polarization of the tissue due to changing orientation of cardiac fibers, and (4) polarization of individual cells or groups of cells by the electric field ("sawtooth potential"). The importance of these mechanisms in the initiation of reentry is examined in two case studies: the induction of rotors using successive stimulation with a unipolar electrode, and the induction of rotors using cross-field stimulation. These cases reveal that the mechanism by which a unipolar stimulation induces arrhythmias can be explained in the framework of the bidomain model with unequal anisotropy ratios. In contrast, none of the examined mechanisms provide an adequate explanation for the induction of rotors by cross-field stimulation. Hence, this study emphasizes the need for further experimental and theoretical work directed toward explaining the mechanism of field stimulation.

  10. Expediting the transition from replacement medicine to tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Coury, Arthur J.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, an expansive interpretation of “Tissue Engineering” is proposed which is in congruence with classical and recent published definitions. I further simplify the definition of tissue engineering as: “Exerting systematic control of the body’s cells, matrices and fluids.” As a consequence, many medical therapies not commonly considered tissue engineering are placed in this category because of their effect on the body’s responses. While the progress of tissue engineering strategies is inexorable and generally positive, it has been subject to setbacks as have many important medical therapies. Medical practice is currently undergoing a transition on several fronts (academics, start-up companies, going concerns) from the era of “replacement medicine” where body parts and functions are replaced by mechanical, electrical or chemical therapies to the era of tissue engineering where health is restored by regeneration generation or limitation of the body’s tissues and functions by exploiting our expanding knowledge of the body’s biological processes to produce natural, healthy outcomes. PMID:27047677

  11. Patterning vascular networks in vivo for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Ritika R; Stevens, Kelly R; Solorzano, Ricardo D; Schwartz, Robert E; Eyckmans, Jeroen; Baranski, Jan D; Stapleton, Sarah Chase; Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Chen, Christopher S

    2015-05-01

    The ultimate design of functionally therapeutic engineered tissues and organs will rely on our ability to engineer vasculature that can meet tissue-specific metabolic needs. We recently introduced an approach for patterning the formation of functional spatially organized vascular architectures within engineered tissues in vivo. Here, we now explore the design parameters of this approach and how they impact the vascularization of an engineered tissue construct after implantation. We used micropatterning techniques to organize endothelial cells (ECs) into geometrically defined "cords," which in turn acted as a template after implantation for the guided formation of patterned capillaries integrated with the host tissue. We demonstrated that the diameter of the cords before implantation impacts the location and density of the resultant capillary network. Inclusion of mural cells to the vascularization response appears primarily to impact the dynamics of vascularization. We established that clinically relevant endothelial sources such as induced pluripotent stem cell-derived ECs and human microvascular endothelial cells can drive vascularization within this system. Finally, we demonstrated the ability to control the juxtaposition of parenchyma with perfused vasculature by implanting cords containing a mixture of both a parenchymal cell type (hepatocytes) and ECs. These findings define important characteristics that will ultimately impact the design of vasculature structures that meet tissue-specific needs. PMID:25390971

  12. Role of morphogenetic proteins in skeletal tissue engineering and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Reddi, A H

    1998-03-01

    Morphogenesis is the developmental cascade of pattern formation and body plan establishment, culminating in the adult form. It has formed the basis for the emerging discipline of tissue engineering, which uses principles of molecular developmental biology and morphogenesis gleaned through studies on inductive signals, responding stem cells, and the extracellular matrix to design and construct spare parts that restore function to the human body. Among the many organs in the body, bone has considerable powers for regeneration and is a prototype model for tissue engineering. Implantation of demineralized bone matrix into subcutaneous sites results in local bone induction. This model mimics sequential limb morphogenesis and has permitted the isolation of bone morphogens, such as bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), from demineralized adult bone matrix. BMPs initiate, promote, and maintain chondrogenesis and osteogenesis, but are also involved in the morphogenesis of organs other than bone. The symbiosis of the mechanisms underlying bone induction and differentiation is critical for tissue engineering and is governed by both biomechanics (physical forces) and context (microenvironment/extracellular matrix), which can be duplicated by biomimetic biomaterials such as collagens, hydroxyapatite, proteoglycans, and cell adhesion glycoproteins, including fibronectins and laminin. Rules of tissue architecture elucidated in bone morphogenesis may provide insights into tissue engineering and be universally applicable for all organs/tissues, including bones and joints. PMID:9528003

  13. Biocompatible magnetic core-shell nanocomposites for engineered magnetic tissues.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Arco, Laura; Rodriguez, Ismael A; Carriel, Victor; Bonhome-Espinosa, Ana B; Campos, Fernando; Kuzhir, Pavel; Duran, Juan D G; Lopez-Lopez, Modesto T

    2016-04-14

    The inclusion of magnetic nanoparticles into biopolymer matrixes enables the preparation of magnetic field-responsive engineered tissues. Here we describe a synthetic route to prepare biocompatible core-shell nanostructures consisting of a polymeric core and a magnetic shell, which are used for this purpose. We show that using a core-shell architecture is doubly advantageous. First, gravitational settling for core-shell nanocomposites is slower because of the reduction of the composite average density connected to the light polymer core. Second, the magnetic response of core-shell nanocomposites can be tuned by changing the thickness of the magnetic layer. The incorporation of the composites into biopolymer hydrogels containing cells results in magnetic field-responsive engineered tissues whose mechanical properties can be controlled by external magnetic forces. Indeed, we obtain a significant increase of the viscoelastic moduli of the engineered tissues when exposed to an external magnetic field. Because the composites are functionalized with polyethylene glycol, the prepared bio-artificial tissue-like constructs also display excellent ex vivo cell viability and proliferation. When implanted in vivo, the engineered tissues show good biocompatibility and outstanding interaction with the host tissue. Actually, they only cause a localized transitory inflammatory reaction at the implantation site, without any effect on other organs. Altogether, our results suggest that the inclusion of magnetic core-shell nanocomposites into biomaterials would enable tissue engineering of artificial substitutes whose mechanical properties could be tuned to match those of the potential target tissue. In a wider perspective, the good biocompatibility and magnetic behavior of the composites could be beneficial for many other applications. PMID:27029891

  14. Engineering smooth muscle tissue with a predefined structure.

    PubMed

    Kim, B S; Mooney, D J

    1998-08-01

    Nonwoven meshes of polyglycolic acid (PGA) fibers are attractive synthetic extracellular matrices (ECMs) for tissue engineering and have been used to engineer many types of tissues. However, these synthetic ECMs lack structural stability and often cannot maintain their original structure during tissue development. This makes it difficult to design an engineered tissue with a predefined configuration and dimensions. In this study, we investigated the ability of PGA fiber-based matrices bonded at their fiber crosspoints with a secondary polymer, poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA), to resist cellular contractile forces and maintain their predefined structure during the process of smooth muscle (SM) tissue development in vitro. Physically bonded PGA matrices exhibited a 10- to 35-fold increase in the compressive modulus over unbonded PGA matrices, depending on the mass of PLLA utilized to bond the PGA matrices. In addition, the bonded PGA matrices degraded much more slowly than the unbonded matrices. The PLLA bonding of PGA matrices had no effect on the ability of cells to adhere to the matrices. After 7 weeks in culture, the bonded matrices maintained 101 +/- 4% of their initial volume and an approximate original shape while the unbonded matrices contracted to 5 +/- 1% of their initial volume with an extreme change in their shape. At this time the bonded PGA matrices had a high cellularity, with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and ECM proteins produced by these cells (e.g., elastin) filling the pores between PGA fibers. This study demonstrated that physically bonded PGA fiber-based matrices allow the maintenance of the configuration and dimensions of the original matrices and the development of a new tissue in a predefined three-dimensional structure. This approach may be useful for engineering a variety of tissues of various structures and shapes, and our study demonstrates the importance of matching both the initial mechanical properties and the degradation rate of a matrix to

  15. Effect of Twisted Fiber Anisotropy in Cardiac Tissue on Ablation with Pulsed Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Fei; Zemlin, Christian W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ablation of cardiac tissue with pulsed electric fields is a promising alternative to current thermal ablation methods, and it critically depends on the electric field distribution in the heart. Methods We developed a model that incorporates the twisted anisotropy of cardiac tissue and computed the electric field distribution in the tissue. We also performed experiments in rabbit ventricles to validate our model. We find that the model agrees well with the experimentally determined ablation volume if we assume that all tissue that is exposed to a field greater than 3 kV/cm is ablated. In our numerical analysis, we considered how tissue thickness, degree of anisotropy, and electrode configuration affect the geometry of the ablated volume. We considered two electrode configurations: two parallel needles inserted into the myocardium (“penetrating needles” configuration) and one circular electrode each on epi- and endocardium, opposing each other (“epi-endo” configuration). Results For thick tissues (10 mm) and moderate anisotropy ratio (a = 2), we find that the geometry of the ablated volume is almost unaffected by twisted anisotropy, i.e. it is approximately translationally symmetric from epi- to endocardium, for both electrode configurations. Higher anisotropy ratio (a = 10) leads to substantial variation in ablation width across the wall; these variations were more pronounced for the penetrating needle configuration than for the epi-endo configuration. For thinner tissues (4 mm, typical for human atria) and higher anisotropy ratio (a = 10), the epi-endo configuration yielded approximately translationally symmetric ablation volumes, while the penetrating electrodes configuration was much more sensitive to fiber twist. Conclusions These results suggest that the epi-endo configuration will be reliable for ablation of atrial fibrillation, independently of fiber orientation, while the penetrating electrode configuration may experience problems when the

  16. Three Potential Mechanisms for Failure of HIFU Ablation in Cardiac Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Laughner, Jacob I.; Sulkin, Matthew S.; Wu, Ziqi; Deng, Cheri X.; Efimov, Igor R.

    2012-01-01

    Background High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has been introduced for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias, because it offers the ability to create rapid tissue modification in confined volumes without directly contacting the myocardium. In spite of the benefits of HIFU, a number of limitations have been reported, which hindered its clinical adoption. Methods and Results In this study, we used a multimodal approach to evaluate thermal and non-thermal effects of HIFU in cardiac ablation. We designed a computer-controlled system capable of simultaneous fluorescence mapping and HIFU ablation. Using this system, linear lesions were created in isolated rabbit atria (n = 6) and point lesions were created in the ventricles of whole-heart (n = 6) preparations by applying HIFU at clinical doses (4–16W). Additionally, we evaluate the gap size in ablation lines necessary for conduction in atrial preparations (n = 4). The voltage sensitive dye di-4-ANEPPS was used to assess functional damage produced by HIFU. Optical coherence tomography and general histology were used to evaluate lesion extent. Conduction block was achieved in 1 (17%) of 6 atrial preparations with a single ablation line. Following 10 minutes of rest, 0 (0%) of 6 atrial preparations demonstrated sustained conduction block from a single ablation line. Tissue displacement of 1–3mm was observed during HIFU application due to acoustic radiation force along the lesion line. Additionally, excessive acoustic pressure and high temperature from HIFU generated cavitation causing macroscopic tissue damage. A minimum gap size of 1.5mm was found to conduct electrical activity. Conclusions This study identified three potential mechanisms responsible for the failure of HIFU ablation in cardiac tissues. Both acoustic radiation force and acoustic cavitation in conjunction with inconsistent thermal deposition can increase the risk of lesion discontinuity and result in gap sizes that promote ablation failure. PMID:22322367

  17. Bone mechanobiology, gravity and tissue engineering: effects and insights.

    PubMed

    Ruggiu, Alessandra; Cancedda, Ranieri

    2015-12-01

    Bone homeostasis strongly depends on fine tuned mechanosensitive regulation signals from environmental forces into biochemical responses. Similar to the ageing process, during spaceflights an altered mechanotransduction occurs as a result of the effects of bone unloading, eventually leading to loss of functional tissue. Although spaceflights represent the best environment to investigate near-zero gravity effects, there are major limitations for setting up experimental analysis. A more feasible approach to analyse the effects of reduced mechanostimulation on the bone is represented by the 'simulated microgravity' experiments based on: (1) in vitro studies, involving cell cultures studies and the use of bioreactors with tissue engineering approaches; (2) in vivo studies, based on animal models; and (3) direct analysis on human beings, as in the case of the bed rest tests. At present, advanced tissue engineering methods allow investigators to recreate bone microenvironment in vitro for mechanobiology studies. This group and others have generated tissue 'organoids' to mimic in vitro the in vivo bone environment and to study the alteration cells can go through when subjected to unloading. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the bone tissue response to mechanostimuli will help developing new strategies to prevent loss of tissue caused by altered mechanotransduction, as well as identifying new approaches for the treatment of diseases via drug testing. This review focuses on the effects of reduced gravity on bone mechanobiology by providing the up-to-date and state of the art on the available data by drawing a parallel with the suitable tissue engineering systems. PMID:25052837

  18. Tissue engineering and its potential impact on surgery.

    PubMed

    Lalan, S; Pomerantseva, I; Vacanti, J P

    2001-11-01

    The loss or failure of an organ or tissue is one of the most frequent, devastating, and costly problems in healthcare. Current treatment modalities include transplantation of organs, surgical reconstruction, use of mechanical devices, or supplementation of metabolic products. A new field, tissue engineering, applies the principles and methods of engineering, material science, and cell and molecular biology toward the development of viable substitutes which restore, maintain, or improve the function of human tissues. In this review, we outline the opportunities and challenges of this emerging interdisciplinary field and its attempts to provide solutions to tissue creation and repair. Within this context, we present our experience using the basic tools of tissue engineering to guide regeneration of diverse tissues that include the liver, small intestine, cardiovascular structures, nerve, and cartilage. And in addition, we discuss the necessity of finding new strategies to achieve vascularization of complex tissues for transplant and present our approaches utilizing MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) technology and three-dimensional printing. PMID:11760750

  19. Nanostructured materials for applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering*

    PubMed Central

    GOLDBERG, MICHAEL; LANGER, ROBERT; JIA, XINQIAO

    2010-01-01

    Research in the areas of drug delivery and tissue engineering has witnessed tremendous progress in recent years due to their unlimited potential to improve human health. Meanwhile, the development of nanotechnology provides opportunities to characterize, manipulate and organize matter systematically at the nanometer scale. Biomaterials with nano-scale organizations have been used as controlled release reservoirs for drug delivery and artificial matrices for tissue engineering. Drug-delivery systems can be synthesized with controlled composition, shape, size and morphology. Their surface properties can be manipulated to increase solubility, immunocompatibility and cellular uptake. The limitations of current drug delivery systems include suboptimal bioavailability, limited effective targeting and potential cytotoxicity. Promising and versatile nano-scale drug-delivery systems include nanoparticles, nanocapsules, nanotubes, nanogels and dendrimers. They can be used to deliver both small-molecule drugs and various classes of biomacromolecules, such as peptides, proteins, plasmid DNA and synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides. Whereas traditional tissue-engineering scaffolds were based on hydrolytically degradable macroporous materials, current approaches emphasize the control over cell behaviors and tissue formation by nano-scale topography that closely mimics the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). The understanding that the natural ECM is a multifunctional nanocomposite motivated researchers to develop nanofibrous scaffolds through electrospinning or self-assembly. Nanocomposites containing nanocrystals have been shown to elicit active bone growth. Drug delivery and tissue engineering are closely related fields. In fact, tissue engineering can be viewed as a special case of drug delivery where the goal is to accomplish controlled delivery of mammalian cells. Controlled release of therapeutic factors in turn will enhance the efficacy of tissue engineering. From a materials

  20. Stem cells and scaffolds for vascularizing engineered tissue constructs.

    PubMed

    Luong, E; Gerecht, S

    2009-01-01

    The clinical impact of tissue engineering depends upon our ability to direct cells to form tissues with characteristic structural and mechanical properties from the molecular level up to organized tissue. Induction and creation of functional vascular networks has been one of the main goals of tissue engineering either in vitro, for the transplantation of prevascularized constructs, or in vivo, for cellular organization within the implantation site. In most cases, tissue engineering attempts to recapitulate certain aspects of normal development in order to stimulate cell differentiation and functional tissue assembly. The induction of tissue growth generally involves the use of biodegradable and bioactive materials designed, ideally, to provide a mechanical, physical, and biochemical template for tissue regeneration. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), derived from the inner cell mass of a developing blastocyst, are capable of differentiating into all cell types of the body. Specifically, hESCs have the capability to differentiate and form blood vessels de novo in a process called vasculogenesis. Human ESC-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and endothelial cells have substantial potential for microvessel formation, in vitro and in vivo. Human adult EPCs are being isolated to understand the fundamental biology of how these cells are regulated as a population and to explore whether these cells can be differentiated and reimplanted as a cellular therapy in order to arrest or even reverse damaged vasculature. This chapter focuses on advances made toward the generation and engineering of functional vascular tissue, focusing on both the scaffolds - the synthetic and biopolymer materials - and the cell sources - hESCs and hEPCs. PMID:19082932

  1. Stem Cells and Scaffolds for Vascularizing Engineered Tissue Constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, E.; Gerecht, S.

    The clinical impact of tissue engineering depends upon our ability to direct cells to form tissues with characteristic structural and mechanical properties from the molecular level up to organized tissue. Induction and creation of functional vascular networks has been one of the main goals of tissue engineering either in vitro, for the transplantation of prevascularized constructs, or in vivo, for cellular organization within the implantation site. In most cases, tissue engineering attempts to recapitulate certain aspects of normal development in order to stimulate cell differentiation and functional tissue assembly. The induction of tissue growth generally involves the use of biodegradable and bioactive materials designed, ideally, to provide a mechanical, physical, and biochemical template for tissue regeneration. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), derived from the inner cell mass of a developing blastocyst, are capable of differentiating into all cell types of the body. Specifically, hESCs have the capability to differentiate and form blood vessels de novo in a process called vasculogenesis. Human ESC-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and endothelial cells have substantial potential for microvessel formation, in vitro and in vivo. Human adult EPCs are being isolated to understand the fundamental biology of how these cells are regulated as a population and to explore whether these cells can be differentiated and reimplanted as a cellular therapy in order to arrest or even reverse damaged vasculature. This chapter focuses on advances made toward the generation and engineering of functional vascular tissue, focusing on both the scaffolds - the synthetic and biopolymer materials - and the cell sources - hESCs and hEPCs.

  2. Wave trains induced by circularly polarized electric fields in cardiac tissues

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xia; Gao, Xiang; Tang, Juan-Mei; Pan, Jun-Ting; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Clinically, cardiac fibrillation caused by spiral and turbulent waves can be terminated by globally resetting electric activity in cardiac tissues with a single high-voltage electric shock, but it is usually associated with severe side effects. Presently, a promising alternative uses wave emission from heterogeneities induced by a sequence of low-voltage uniform electric field pulses. Nevertheless, this method can only emit waves locally near obstacles in turbulent waves and thereby requires multiple obstacles to globally synchronize myocardium and thus to terminate fibrillation. Here we propose a new approach using wave emission from heterogeneities induced by a low-voltage circularly polarized electric field (i.e., a rotating uniform electric field). We find that, this approach can generate circular wave trains near obstacles and they propagate outwardly. We study the characteristics of such circular wave trains and further find that, the higher-frequency circular wave trains can effectively suppress spiral turbulence. PMID:26302781

  3. Global coupling in excitable media provides a simplified description of mechanoelectrical feedback in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Lacalle, E.; Echebarria, B.

    2009-03-01

    Cardiac mechanoelectric feedback can play an important role in different heart pathologies. In this paper, we show that mechanoelectric models which describe both the electric propagation and the mechanic contraction of cardiac tissue naturally lead to close systems of equations with global coupling among the variables. This point is exemplified using the Nash-Panfilov model, which reduces to a FitzHugh-Nagumo-type equation with global coupling in the linear elastic regime. We explain the appearance of self-oscillatory regimes in terms of the system nullclines and describe the different dynamical attractors. Finally, we study their basin of attraction in terms of the system size and the strength of the stretch-induced currents.

  4. Fibroblast–myocyte electrotonic coupling: Does it occur in native cardiac tissue?☆

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, Peter; Gourdie, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Heterocellular electrotonic coupling between cardiac myocytes and non-excitable connective tissue cells has been a long-established and well-researched fact in vitro. Whether or not such coupling exists in vivo has been a matter of considerable debate. This paper reviews the development of experimental insight and conceptual views on this topic, describes evidence in favour of and against the presence of such coupling in native myocardium, and identifies directions for further study needed to resolve the riddle, perhaps less so in terms of principal presence which has been demonstrated, but undoubtedly in terms of extent, regulation, patho-physiological context, and actual relevance of cardiac myocyte–non-myocyte coupling in vivo. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Myocyte-Fibroblast Signalling in Myocardium." PMID:24412581

  5. Unidirectional Pinning and Hysteresis of Spatially Discordant Alternans in Cardiac Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skardal, Per Sebastian; Karma, Alain; Restrepo, Juan G.

    2012-03-01

    Spatially discordant alternans is a widely observed pattern of voltage and calcium signals in cardiac tissue that can precipitate lethal cardiac arrhythmia. Using spatially coupled iterative maps of the beat-to-beat dynamics, we explore this pattern’s dynamics in the regime of a calcium-dominated period-doubling instability at the single-cell level. We find a novel nonlinear bifurcation associated with the formation of a discontinuous jump in the amplitude of calcium alternans at nodes separating discordant regions. We show that this jump unidirectionally pins nodes by preventing their motion away from the pacing site following a pacing rate decrease but permitting motion towards this site following a rate increase. This unidirectional pinning leads to strongly history-dependent node motion that is strongly arrhythmogenic.

  6. Wave trains induced by circularly polarized electric fields in cardiac tissues.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xia; Gao, Xiang; Tang, Juan-Mei; Pan, Jun-Ting; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Clinically, cardiac fibrillation caused by spiral and turbulent waves can be terminated by globally resetting electric activity in cardiac tissues with a single high-voltage electric shock, but it is usually associated with severe side effects. Presently, a promising alternative uses wave emission from heterogeneities induced by a sequence of low-voltage uniform electric field pulses. Nevertheless, this method can only emit waves locally near obstacles in turbulent waves and thereby requires multiple obstacles to globally synchronize myocardium and thus to terminate fibrillation. Here we propose a new approach using wave emission from heterogeneities induced by a low-voltage circularly polarized electric field (i.e., a rotating uniform electric field). We find that, this approach can generate circular wave trains near obstacles and they propagate outwardly. We study the characteristics of such circular wave trains and further find that, the higher-frequency circular wave trains can effectively suppress spiral turbulence. PMID:26302781

  7. Pericyte-targeting drug delivery and tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eunah; Shin, Jong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Pericytes are contractile mural cells that wrap around the endothelial cells of capillaries and venules. Depending on the triggers by cellular signals, pericytes have specific functionality in tumor microenvironments, properties of potent stem cells, and plasticity in cellular pathology. These features of pericytes can be activated for the promotion or reduction of angiogenesis. Frontier studies have exploited pericyte-targeting drug delivery, using pericyte-specific peptides, small molecules, and DNA in tumor therapy. Moreover, the communication between pericytes and endothelial cells has been applied to the induction of vessel neoformation in tissue engineering. Pericytes may prove to be a novel target for tumor therapy and tissue engineering. The present paper specifically reviews pericyte-specific drug delivery and tissue engineering, allowing insight into the emerging research targeting pericytes. PMID:27313454

  8. Tissue engineering and peripheral nerve reconstruction: an overview.

    PubMed

    Geuna, Stefano; Gnavi, Sara; Perroteau, Isabelle; Tos, Pierluigi; Battiston, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Nerve repair is no more regarded as merely a matter of microsurgical reconstruction. To define this evolving reconstructive/regenerative approach, the term tissue engineering is being increasingly used since it reflects the search for interdisciplinary and integrated treatment strategies. However, the drawback of this new approach is its intrinsic complexity, which is the result of the variety of scientific disciplines involved. This chapter presents a synthetic overview of the state of the art in peripheral nerve tissue engineering with a look forward at the most promising innovations emerging from basic science investigation. This review is intended to set the stage for the collection of papers in the thematic issue of the International Review of Neurobiology that is focused on the various interdisciplinary approaches in peripheral nerve tissue engineering. PMID:24083430

  9. Synthetic biodegradable functional polymers for tissue engineering: a brief review

    PubMed Central

    BaoLin, GUO; MA, Peter X.

    2015-01-01

    Scaffolds play a crucial role in tissue engineering. Biodegradable polymers with great processing flexibility are the predominant scaffolding materials. Synthetic biodegradable polymers with well-defined structure and without immunological concerns associated with naturally derived polymers are widely used in tissue engineering. The synthetic biodegradable polymers that are widely used in tissue engineering, including polyesters, polyanhydrides, polyphosphazenes, polyurethane, and poly (glycerol sebacate) are summarized in this article. New developments in conducting polymers, photoresponsive polymers, amino-acid-based polymers, enzymatically degradable polymers, and peptide-activated polymers are also discussed. In addition to chemical functionalization, the scaffold designs that mimic the nano and micro features of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are presented as well, and composite and nanocomposite scaffolds are also reviewed. PMID:25729390

  10. The potential impact of bone tissue engineering in the clinic.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ruchi; Bishop, Tyler; Valerio, Ian L; Fisher, John P; Dean, David

    2016-09-01

    Bone tissue engineering (BTE) intends to restore structural support for movement and mineral homeostasis, and assist in hematopoiesis and the protective functions of bone in traumatic, degenerative, cancer, or congenital malformation. While much effort has been put into BTE, very little of this research has been translated to the clinic. In this review, we discuss current regenerative medicine and restorative strategies that utilize tissue engineering approaches to address bone defects within a clinical setting. These approaches involve the primary components of tissue engineering: cells, growth factors and biomaterials discussed briefly in light of their clinical relevance. This review also presents upcoming advanced approaches for BTE applications and suggests a probable workpath for translation from the laboratory to the clinic. PMID:27549369

  11. Pericyte-targeting drug delivery and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kang, Eunah; Shin, Jong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Pericytes are contractile mural cells that wrap around the endothelial cells of capillaries and venules. Depending on the triggers by cellular signals, pericytes have specific functionality in tumor microenvironments, properties of potent stem cells, and plasticity in cellular pathology. These features of pericytes can be activated for the promotion or reduction of angiogenesis. Frontier studies have exploited pericyte-targeting drug delivery, using pericyte-specific peptides, small molecules, and DNA in tumor therapy. Moreover, the communication between pericytes and endothelial cells has been applied to the induction of vessel neoformation in tissue engineering. Pericytes may prove to be a novel target for tumor therapy and tissue engineering. The present paper specifically reviews pericyte-specific drug delivery and tissue engineering, allowing insight into the emerging research targeting pericytes. PMID:27313454

  12. Protein turnover during in vitro tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiyao; Chang, Zhen; Oliveira, Gisele; Xiong, Maiyer; Smith, Lloyd M; Frey, Brian L; Welham, Nathan V

    2016-03-01

    Repopulating acellular biological scaffolds with phenotypically appropriate cells is a promising approach for regenerating functional tissues and organs. Under this tissue engineering paradigm, reseeded cells are expected to remodel the scaffold by active protein synthesis and degradation; however, the rate and extent of this remodeling remain largely unknown. Here, we present a technique to measure dynamic proteome changes during in vitro remodeling of decellularized tissue by reseeded cells, using vocal fold mucosa as the model system. Decellularization and recellularization were optimized, and a stable isotope labeling strategy was developed to differentiate remnant proteins constituting the original scaffold from proteins newly synthesized by reseeded cells. Turnover of matrix and cellular proteins and the effects of cell-scaffold interaction were elucidated. This technique sheds new light on in vitro tissue remodeling and the process of tissue regeneration, and is readily applicable to other tissue and organ systems. PMID:26724458

  13. Corneal Tissue Engineering: Recent Advances and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ghezzi, Chiara E.; Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena

    2015-01-01

    To address the growing need for corneal transplants two main approaches are being pursued: allogenic and synthetic materials. Allogenic tissue from human donors is currently the preferred choice; however, there is a worldwide shortage in donated corneal tissue. In addition, tissue rejection often limits the long-term success of this approach. Alternatively, synthetic homologs to donor corneal grafts are primarily considered temporary replacements until suitable donor tissue becomes available, as they result in a high incidence of graft failure. Tissue engineered cornea analogs would provide effective cornea tissue substitutes and alternatives to address the need to reduce animal testing of commercial products. Recent progress toward these needs is reviewed here, along with future perspectives. PMID:25434371

  14. Preparation by coaxial electrospinning and characterization of membranes releasing (-) epicatechin as scaffold for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Ortega, M M; Montaño-Figueroa, A G; Rodríguez-Félix, D E; Prado-Villegas, G; Pino-Ocaño, K P; Valencia-Córdova, M J; Quiroz-Castillo, J M; Herrera-Franco, P J

    2015-01-01

    Optimal conditions for the preparation of a composite material of fibers of cellulose acetate (CA) and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP), containing epicatechin (Epic) within the fiber CA/PVP-Epic/CA, were found. The morphology and physical/chemical properties of the fibrous membranes containing CA, PVP, and epicatechin were characterized using FTIR spectroscopy, thermal analysis, SEM, TEM, and natural weathering. Also, mechanical characterization of the fibers showed that tensile strength of the membrane was not affected by the presence of epicatechin within the fiber as compared with fibers without epicatechin. The effect of the medium on the release rate of epicatechin was also studied. The amount of epicatechin release was higher in water, 79.6%, and 31% in MesenCult medium. These results showed that these composite materials are recommended for cardiac tissue engineering; furthermore, using these materials allows precise release of the epicatechin in the damaged tissue. PMID:25491975

  15. Engineering muscle tissue for the fetus: getting ready for a strong life

    PubMed Central

    Christ, George J.; Siriwardane, Mevan L.; de Coppi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Congenital malformations frequently involve either skeletal, smooth or cardiac tissues. When large parts of those tissues are damaged, the repair of the malformations is challenged by the fact that so much autologous tissue is missing. Current treatments require the use of prostheses or other therapies and are associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. Nonetheless, affected children have generally good survival rates and mostly normal schooling. As such, new therapeutic modalities need to represent significant improvements with clear safety profiles. Regenerative medicine and tissue engineering technologies have the potential to dramatically improve the treatment of any disease or disorder involving a lack of viable tissue. With respect to congenital soft tissue anomalies, the development of, for example, implantable muscle constructs would provide not only the usual desired elasticity and contractile proprieties, but should also be able to grow with the fetus and/or in the postnatal life. Such an approach would eliminate the need for multiple surgeries. However, the more widespread clinical applications of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering technologies require identification of the optimal indications, as well as further elucidation of the precise mechanisms and best methods (cells, scaffolds/biomaterials) for achieving large functional tissue regeneration in those clinical indications. In short, despite some amazing scientific progress, significant safety and efficacy hurdles remain. However, the rapid preclinical advances in the field bode well for future applications. As such, translational researchers and clinicians alike need be informed and prepared to utilize these new techniques for the benefit of their patients, as soon as they are available. To this end, we review herein, the clinical need(s), potential applications, and the relevant preclinical studies that are currently guiding the field toward novel therapeutics. PMID:25914643

  16. The influence of topography on tissue engineering perspective.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Negar; SamiraBagheri

    2016-04-01

    The actual in vivo tissue scaffold offers a three-dimensional (3D) structural support along with a nano-textured surfaces consist of a fibrous network in order to deliver cell adhesion and signaling. A scaffold is required, until the tissue is entirely regenerated or restored, to act as a temporary ingrowth template for cell proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. This review depicts some of the most significant three dimensional structure materials used as scaffolds in various tissue engineering application fields currently being employed to mimic in vivo features. Accordingly, some of the researchers' attempts have envisioned utilizing graphene for the fabrication of porous and flexible 3D scaffolds. The main focus of this paper is to evaluate the topographical and topological optimization of scaffolds for tissue engineering applications in order to improve scaffolds' mechanical performances. PMID:26838922

  17. Cell Encapsulation in Biodegradable Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Nicodemus, Garret D.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Encapsulating cells in biodegradable hydrogels offers numerous attractive features for tissue engineering, including ease of handling, a highly hydrated tissue-like environment for cell and tissue growth, and the ability to form in vivo. Many properties important to the design of a hydrogel scaffold, such as swelling, mechanical properties, degradation, and diffusion, are closely linked to the crosslinked structure of the hydrogel, which is controlled through a variety of different processing conditions. Degradation may be tuned by incorporating hydrolytically or enzymatically labile segments into the hydrogel or by using natural biopolymers that are susceptible to enzymatic degradation. Because cells are present during the gelation process, the number of suitable chemistries and formulations are limited. In this review, we describe important considerations for designing biodegradable hydrogels for cell encapsulation and highlight recent advances in material design and their applications in tissue engineering. PMID:18498217

  18. Electrospun nanofibrous 3D scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Eap, Sandy; Ferrand, Alice; Palomares, Carlos Mendoza; Hébraud, Anne; Stoltz, Jean-François; Mainard, Didier; Schlatter, Guy; Benkirane-Jessel, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering aims at developing functional substitutes for damaged tissues by mimicking natural tissues. In particular, tissue engineering for bone regeneration enables healing of some bone diseases. Thus, several methods have been developed in order to produce implantable biomaterial structures that imitate the constitution of bone. Electrospinning is one of these methods. This technique produces nonwoven scaffolds made of nanofibers which size and organization match those of the extracellular matrix. Until now, seldom electrospun scaffolds were produced with thickness exceeding one millimeter. This article introduces a new kind of electrospun membrane called 3D scaffold of thickness easily exceeding one centimeter. The manufacturing involves a solution of poly(ε-caprolactone) in DMF/DCM system. The aim is to establish parameters for electrospinning in order to characterize these 3D scaffolds and, establish whether such scaffolds are potentially interesting for bone regeneration. PMID:22766712

  19. Colorectal tissue engineering: prerequisites, current status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Denost, Quentin; Adam, Jean-Philippe; Rullier, Eric; Bareille, Reine; Montembault, Alexandra; David, Laurent; Bordenave, Laurence

    2013-07-01

    Gastrointestinal tissue engineering has emerged over the past 20 years and was often focused on esophagus, stomach or small intestine, whereas bioengineering researches of colorectal tissue are scarce. However, some promising results have been obtained in animal models. Refinements should be performed in scaffold and cell source selection to allow smooth muscle layer regeneration. Indeed, synthetic and natural polymers such as small intestinal submucosa and collagen sponge seeded with organoid units or smooth muscle cells did not allow smooth muscle regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue seeded on composite scaffold could represent an interesting way to achieve this goal. This article reviews potential indications, current status and perspectives of tissue engineering in the area of colorectal surgery. PMID:23895077

  20. Electrospun fibrinogen: feasibility as a tissue engineering scaffold in a rat cell culture model.

    PubMed

    McManus, Michael C; Boland, Eugene D; Simpson, David G; Barnes, Catherine P; Bowlin, Gary L

    2007-05-01

    Fibrinogen has a well-established tissue engineering track record because of its ability to induce improved cellular interaction and scaffold remodeling compared to synthetic scaffolds. While the feasibility of electrospinning fibrinogen scaffolds of submicron diameter fibers and their mechanical properties have been demonstrated, in vitro cellular interaction has not yet been evaluated. The goal of this study was to demonstrate, based on cellular interaction and scaffold remodeling, that electrospun fibrinogen can be used successfully as a tissue engineering scaffold. Electrospun fibrinogen scaffolds were disinfected, seeded with neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts, and cultured for 2, 7, and 14 days. Cultures were treated to regulate scaffold degradation by either supplementing serum-containing media with aprotinin or crosslinking the scaffolds with glutaraldehyde vapor. Biocompatibility was assessed through a WST-1 cell proliferation assay. Postculture scaffolds were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and histology. Cell culture demonstrated that fibroblasts readily migrate into and remodel electrospun fibrinogen scaffolds with deposition of native collagen. Supplementation of culture media with different concentrations of aprotinin-modulated scaffold degradation in a predictable fashion, but glutaraldehyde vapor fixation was less reliable. Based on the observed cellular interactions, there is tremendous potential for electrospun fibrinogen as a tissue engineering scaffold. PMID:17120217

  1. Vascular assembly in natural and engineered tissues.

    PubMed

    Hirschi, Karen K; Skalak, Thomas C; Peirce, Shayn M; Little, Charles D

    2002-06-01

    With the advent of molecular embryology and exploitation of genetic models systems, many genes necessary for normal blood vessel formation during early development have been identified. These genes include soluble effectors and their receptors, as well as components of cell-cell junctions and mediators of cell-matrix interactions. In vitro model systems (2-D and 3-D) to study paracrine and autocrine interactions of vascular cells and their progenitors have also been created. These systems are being combined to study the behavior of genetically altered cells to dissect and define the cellular role(s) of specific genes and gene families in directing the migration, proliferation, and differentiation needed for blood vessel assembly. It is clear that a complex spatial and temporal interplay of signals, including both genetic and environmental, modulates the assembly process. The development of real-time imaging and image analysis will enable us to gain further insights into this process. Collaborative efforts among vascular biologists, biomedical engineers, mathematicians, and physicists will allow us to bridge the gap between understanding vessel assembly in vivo and assembling vessels ex vivo. PMID:12081906

  2. Sensitivity and Specificity of Cardiac Tissue Discrimination Using Fiber-Optics Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Sachse, Frank B; Hitchcock, Robert W; Kaza, Aditya K

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances of the cardiac conduction system constitute a major risk after surgical repair of complex cases of congenital heart disease. Intraoperative identification of the conduction system may reduce the incidence of these disturbances. We previously developed an approach to identify cardiac tissue types using fiber-optics confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores. Here, we applied this approach to investigate sensitivity and specificity of human and automated classification in discriminating images of atrial working myocardium and specialized tissue of the conduction system. Two-dimensional image sequences from atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue of isolated perfused rodent hearts were acquired using a fiber-optics confocal microscope (Leica FCM1000). We compared two methods for local application of extracellular fluorophores: topical via pipette and with a dye carrier. Eight blinded examiners evaluated 162 randomly selected images of atrial working myocardium (n = 81) and nodal tissue (n = 81). In addition, we evaluated the images using automated classification. Blinded examiners achieved a sensitivity and specificity of 99.2 ± 0.3% and 98.0 ± 0.7%, respectively, with the dye carrier method of dye application. Sensitivity and specificity was similar for dye application via a pipette (99.2 ± 0.3% and 94.0 ± 2.4%, respectively). Sensitivity and specificity for automated methods of tissue discrimination were similarly high. Human and automated classification achieved high sensitivity and specificity in discriminating atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue. We suggest that our findings facilitate clinical translation of fiber-optics confocal microscopy as an intraoperative imaging modality to reduce the incidence of conduction disturbances during surgical correction of congenital heart disease. PMID:26808149

  3. Sensitivity and Specificity of Cardiac Tissue Discrimination Using Fiber-Optics Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao; Sachse, Frank B.; Hitchcock, Robert W.; Kaza, Aditya K.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances of the cardiac conduction system constitute a major risk after surgical repair of complex cases of congenital heart disease. Intraoperative identification of the conduction system may reduce the incidence of these disturbances. We previously developed an approach to identify cardiac tissue types using fiber-optics confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores. Here, we applied this approach to investigate sensitivity and specificity of human and automated classification in discriminating images of atrial working myocardium and specialized tissue of the conduction system. Two-dimensional image sequences from atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue of isolated perfused rodent hearts were acquired using a fiber-optics confocal microscope (Leica FCM1000). We compared two methods for local application of extracellular fluorophores: topical via pipette and with a dye carrier. Eight blinded examiners evaluated 162 randomly selected images of atrial working myocardium (n = 81) and nodal tissue (n = 81). In addition, we evaluated the images using automated classification. Blinded examiners achieved a sensitivity and specificity of 99.2±0.3% and 98.0±0.7%, respectively, with the dye carrier method of dye application. Sensitivity and specificity was similar for dye application via a pipette (99.2±0.3% and 94.0±2.4%, respectively). Sensitivity and specificity for automated methods of tissue discrimination were similarly high. Human and automated classification achieved high sensitivity and specificity in discriminating atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue. We suggest that our findings facilitate clinical translation of fiber-optics confocal microscopy as an intraoperative imaging modality to reduce the incidence of conduction disturbances during surgical correction of congenital heart disease. PMID:26808149

  4. Decellularized matrices for cardiovascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, Francesco; Mirabella, Teodelinda

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the leading causes of death in the Western world. The replacement of damaged vessels and valves has been practiced since the 1950’s. Synthetic grafts, usually made of bio-inert materials, are long-lasting and mechanically relevant, but fail when it comes to “biointegration”. Decellularized matrices, instead, can be considered biological grafts capable of stimulating in vivo migration and proliferation of endothelial cells (ECs), recruitment and differentiation of mural cells, finally, culminating in the formation of a biointegrated tissue. Decellularization protocols employ osmotic shock, ionic and non-ionic detergents, proteolitic digestions and DNase/RNase treatments; most of them effectively eliminate the cellular component, but show limitations in preserving the native structure of the extracellular matrix (ECM). In this review, we examine the current state of the art relative to decellularization techniques and biological performance of decellularized heart, valves and big vessels. Furthermore, we focus on the relevance of ECM components, native and resulting from decellularization, in mediating in vivo host response and determining repair and regeneration, as opposed to graft corruption. PMID:24660110

  5. Biomolecular localization: Applications in tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Znidarsic, William John

    A carrier material designed for in vivo implantation of cells can be chemically modified to present ligands that interact with cell surface receptors and guide new tissue formation. This study presents a versatile technique for modification of alginate matrices that relies upon molecular coating of nanoparticle surfaces, using a layer-by-layer deposition technique, followed by dispersion of these particles with the alginate gel matrix. The deposition technique results in nanoparticle coatings that present a variety of biological information including organic molecules (e.g. amines, polyacrylic acid (PAA), phosphoproteins, collagen, albumin, and growth factors) and inorganic calcium phosphate (e.g. hydroxyapatite). Results show that incorporation of coated nanoparticles can stimulate cell proliferation when compared with incorporation of un-coated particles and/or free molecules. Because cells incorporated within the volume of the alginate matrix present cell surface receptors that are spatially distributed on the nano-scale, the observed stimulation in proliferation may be a result of changes in local concentration of molecules that are coated on the nanoparticles rather than added in "free form". In the repair of maxillofacial defects, alginate gels are used clinically for the delivery and localization of stem cells. Similar techniques for three-dimensional localization of biomolecules within these constructs may possibly prove beneficial in stimulating positive biological outcomes in vivo.

  6. Materials and surface modification for tissue engineered vascular scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-Kui; Wu, Zhong-Shi; Lu, Ting; Yuan, Hao-Yong; Tang, Hao; Tang, Zhen-Jie; Tan, Ling; Wang, Bin; Yan, Si-Ming

    2016-10-01

    Although vascular implantation has been used as an effective treatment for cardiovascular disease for many years, off-the-shelf and regenerable vascular scaffolds are still not available. Tissue engineers have tested various materials and methods of surface modification in the attempt to develop a scaffold that is more suitable for implantation. Extracellular matrix-based natural materials and biodegradable polymers, which are the focus of this review, are considered to be suitable materials for production of tissue-engineered vascular grafts. Various methods of surface modification that have been developed will also be introduced, their impacts will be summarized and assessed, and challenges for further research will briefly be discussed. PMID:27484610

  7. Tissue-Engineered Skeletal Muscle Organoids for Reversible Gene Therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman; DelTatto, Michael; Shansky, Janet; Lemaire, Julie; Chang, Albert; Payumo, Francis; Lee, Peter; Goodyear, Amy; Raven, Latasha

    1996-01-01

    Genetically modified murine skeletal myoblasts were tissue engineered in vitro into organ-like structures (organoids) containing only postmitotic myoribers secreting pharmacological levels of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH). Subcutaneous organoid implantation under tension led to the rapid and stable appearance of physiological sera levels of rhGH for up to 12 weeks, whereas surgical removal led to its rapid disappearance. Reversible delivery of bioactive compounds from postmitotic cells in tissue engineered organs has several advantages over other forms of muscle gene therapy.

  8. Tissue-Engineered