Science.gov

Sample records for cardiopulmonary exercise tests

  1. Exercise-induced Myocardial Ischemia Detected by Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Sundeep; Arena, Ross; Wasserman, Karlman; Hansen, James E.; Lewis, Gregory D.; Myers, Jonathan; Chronos, Nicolas; Boden, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) is a well-accepted physiologic evaluation technique in patients diagnosed with heart failure and in individuals presenting with unexplained dyspnea on exertion. Several variables obtained during CPET, including oxygen consumption relative to heart rate (VO2/HR or O2-pulse) and work rate (VO2/Watt) provide consistent, quantitative patterns of abnormal physiologic responses to graded exercise when left ventricular dysfunction is caused by myocardial ischemia. This concept paper describes both the methodology and clinical application of CPET associated with myocardial ischemia. Initial evidence indicates left ventricular dysfunction induced by myocardial ischemia may be accurately detected by an abnormal CPET response. CPET testing may complement current non-invasive testing modalities that elicit inducible ischemia. It provides a physiologic quantification of the work rate, heart rate and O2 uptake at which myocardial ischemia develops. In conclusion, the potential value of adding CPET with gas exchange measurements is likely to be of great value in diagnosing and quantifying both overt and occult myocardial ischemia and its reversibility with treatment. PMID:19231322

  2. Pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis: the role of invasive cardiopulmonary exercise testing

    PubMed Central

    Kradin, Richard L.; Rodriguez-Lopez, Josanna M.; Channick, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PCH) is a rare form of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) characterized by pulmonary capillary proliferation and pseudoinvasion of collagenous septal structures. PCH is often accompanied by veno-occlusive changes and pulmonary hypertensive arterial remodeling. The clinical and pathological diagnosis of PCH can be subtle and easily missed. Most reported cases of PCH have been associated with resting PAH. We report the cases of 3 patients who initially presented with exertional dyspnea with normal to mildly elevated resting pulmonary arterial pressures and marked intrapulmonary shunting. In all 3 patients, invasive cardiopulmonary exercise testing was suggestive of pulmonary vascular disease. Owing to abnormalities on invasive exercise testing, lung biopsies were performed; these were diagnostic of PCH, and the patients were referred for lung transplantation. We describe unique features of these 3 cases—including novel pathological findings and the presence of intrapulmonary shunting in all 3 patients—and we discuss the role of cardiopulmonary exercise testing in the evaluation of PCH. PMID:26401260

  3. [From interpretation of cardiopulmonary exercise testing to medical decision].

    PubMed

    Aguilaniu, B; Wallaert, B

    2013-06-01

    Exercise is a situation that involves cardiovascular, respiratory and metabolic responses simultaneously. Thus, interpretating the results of the cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) requires an integrated understanding of the pathophysiology of exercise intolerance which may result from lung, heart, pulmonary or peripheral circulation, muscles disturbances, or a combination of these functional disorders. In this paper, we offer a systematic method to assist clinicians in developing a pathophysiological reasoning from the functional competency of each component measured during incremental exercise. We propose to go through four steps: descriptive analysis, prioritization of the functional disorders, mechanistic proposals and diagnostic and/or therapeutic suggestions. The descriptive analysis step should answer seven key physiological questions, the prioritization step is based on the magnitude of the functional disorders and their relevance to the primary symptoms causing exercise intolerance, the mechanistic proposals step aims at suggesting different mechanisms and etiologies compatible with the scale of observed functional abnormalities, which will finally be tested by exploring specific diagnostic or therapeutic suggestions. PMID:23835322

  4. [Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) indication and clinical impact].

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jrg; Rassouli, Frank; Brutsche, Martin H

    2015-05-01

    Dyspnoea is a common symptom of exercice intolerance. Tests performed at rest often leave the reason open. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) is a tool for the qualitative and quantitative assessment of the cardio-circulatory, pulmonary and metabolic response to exercise. It is the gold-standard in the evaluation of dyspnoea and identifying its etiology (obstructive/restrictive lung disease, heart failure, physical fitness ). CPET is particularly useful, if previous evaluations including history, physical examination, ECG, pulmonary function testing (PFT), X-ray, blood tests, and blood gases do not lead to a decisive diagnosis. The measurement of peak oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, minute ventilation and heart rate provides substantial diagnostic and prognostic information in a wide variety of clinical settings. Interpreting CPET requires pathophysiological knowledge and can sometimes be challenging. An easy-to-use algorithm may provide a useful assistance for interpretation the results. In addition to its use as a diagnostic tool, CPET can be used to support sportsmen reaching their training goals and evaluate subject's ability to work. PMID:26098070

  5. The spirografic oxygen deficit: its role in cardiopulmonary exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Sperlich, B; Schiffer, T; Hoffmann, U; Strueder, H K; Hollmann, W

    2013-12-01

    The increase in oxygen uptake > 100 ml · min-1 during steady state exercise when elevating the inspired fractional air content (FinO2) from 0.21-1.00 defines the "spirografic oxygen deficit" (SOD). The purpose of this study was 2-fold: 1) determine the SOD at different exercise intensities in healthy participants and 2) investigate if a correlation exists among key variables of cardiopulmonary exercise testing. 12 men (24±2 yrs; 183±4 cm; 83.5±5.3 kg) performed cycle tests to determine maximal power output (Pmax), the power output at the first (PVT1) and the second ventilatory threshold (PVT2), at 4 mmol · l-1 blood lactate (P4) and lactate threshold (PLT). When cycling at 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80% Pmax, the FinO2 was increased from 0.21-1.00 after 5 min to assess the power output at the SOD and at which blood lactate increased > 1 mmol∙L-1 (PLLAC). The SOD occurred at 70% Pmax accompanied by increased blood lactate concentration (p<0.01). The PSOD correlated with PLACC (p=0.05; r=0.61), but not with PVT1, PVT2, P4, or PLT (best p=0.29; highest r=0.39). In conclusion, the SOD may represent a non-invasive tool for evaluating submaximal endurance performance, especially when evaluating the peripheral contribution to performance. PMID:23670361

  6. Protocol for exercise hemodynamic assessment: performing an invasive cardiopulmonary exercise test in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Natalia C.; Manyoo, Agarwal; Oldham, William M.; Stephens, Thomas E.; Goldstein, Ronald H.; Waxman, Aaron B.; Tracy, Julie A.; Leary, Peter J.; Leopold, Jane A.; Kinlay, Scott; Opotowsky, Alexander R.; Systrom, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Invasive cardiopulmonary exercise testing (iCPET) combines full central hemodynamic assessment with continuous measurements of pulmonary gas exchange and ventilation to help in understanding the pathophysiology underpinning unexplained exertional intolerance. There is increasing evidence to support the use of iCPET as a key methodology for diagnosing heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and exercise-induced pulmonary hypertension as occult causes of exercise limitation, but there is little information available outlining the methodology to use this diagnostic test in clinical practice. To bridge this knowledge gap, the operational protocol for iCPET at our institution is discussed in detail. In turn, a standardized iCPET protocol may provide a common framework to describe the evolving understanding of mechanism(s) that limit exercise capacity and to facilitate research efforts to define novel treatments in these patients. PMID:26697168

  7. Protocol for exercise hemodynamic assessment: performing an invasive cardiopulmonary exercise test in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Berry, Natalia C; Manyoo, Agarwal; Oldham, William M; Stephens, Thomas E; Goldstein, Ronald H; Waxman, Aaron B; Tracy, Julie A; Leary, Peter J; Leopold, Jane A; Kinlay, Scott; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Systrom, David M; Maron, Bradley A

    2015-12-01

    Invasive cardiopulmonary exercise testing (iCPET) combines full central hemodynamic assessment with continuous measurements of pulmonary gas exchange and ventilation to help in understanding the pathophysiology underpinning unexplained exertional intolerance. There is increasing evidence to support the use of iCPET as a key methodology for diagnosing heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and exercise-induced pulmonary hypertension as occult causes of exercise limitation, but there is little information available outlining the methodology to use this diagnostic test in clinical practice. To bridge this knowledge gap, the operational protocol for iCPET at our institution is discussed in detail. In turn, a standardized iCPET protocol may provide a common framework to describe the evolving understanding of mechanism(s) that limit exercise capacity and to facilitate research efforts to define novel treatments in these patients. PMID:26697168

  8. Developing Pulmonary Vasculopathy in Systemic Sclerosis, Detected with Non-Invasive Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing

    PubMed Central

    Dumitrescu, Daniel; Oudiz, Ronald J.; Karpouzas, George; Hovanesyan, Arsen; Jayasinghe, Amali; Hansen, James E.; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Wasserman, Karlman

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) may develop exercise intolerance due to musculoskeletal involvement, restrictive lung disease, left ventricular dysfunction, or pulmonary vasculopathy (PV). The latter is particularly important since it may lead to lethal pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We hypothesized that abnormalities during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) in patients with SSc can identify PV leading to overt PAH. Methods Thirty SSc patients from the Harbor-UCLA Rheumatology clinic, not clinically suspected of having significant pulmonary vascular disease, were referred for this prospective study. Resting pulmonary function and exercise gas exchange were assessed, including peakVO2, anaerobic threshold (AT), heart rate- VO2 relationship (O2-pulse), exercise breathing reserve and parameters of ventilation-perfusion mismatching, as evidenced by elevated ventilatory equivalent for CO2 (VE/VCO2) and reduced end-tidal pCO2 (PETCO2) at the AT. Results Gas exchange patterns were abnormal in 16 pts with specific cardiopulmonary disease physiology: Eleven patients had findings consistent with PV, while five had findings consistent with left-ventricular dysfunction (LVD). Although both groups had low peak VO2 and AT, a higher VE/VCO2 at AT and decreasing PETCO2 during early exercise distinguished PV from LVD. Conclusions Previously undiagnosed exercise impairments due to LVD or PV were common in our SSc patients. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing may help to differentiate and detect these disorders early in patients with SSc. PMID:21179195

  9. The Utility of Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in the Assessment of Suspected Microvascular Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Sundeep; Arena, Ross; Wasserman, Karlman; Hansen, James E.; Lewis, Gregory D.; Myers, Jonathan; Belardinelli, Romualdo; LaBudde, Brian; Menasco, Nicholas; Boden, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence demonstrating the potential value of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) to accurately detect myocardial ischemia secondary to macro-vascular disease is beginning to emerge. Despite distinct mechanisms mediating ischemia in micro-vascular and macrovascular coronary artery disease (CAD), the net physiologic effect of exercise-induced left ventricular (LV) dysfunction is common to both. The abnormal physiologic response to CPET may, therefore, be similar in patients with macro- and micro-vascular ischemia. The following case report describes the CPET abnormalities in a patient with suspected microvascular CAD and the subsequent improvement in LV function following three weeks of medical therapy with the anti-ischemic drug ranolazine. PMID:19233492

  10. Decreased oxygen extraction during cardiopulmonary exercise test in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The insufficient metabolic adaptation to exercise in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is still being debated and poorly understood. Methods We analysed the cardiopulmonary exercise tests of CFS patients, idiopathic chronic fatigue (CFI) patients and healthy visitors. Continuous non-invasive measurement of the cardiac output by Nexfin (BMEYE B.V. Amsterdam, the Netherlands) was added to the cardiopulmonary exercise tests. The peak oxygen extraction by muscle cells and the increase of cardiac output relative to the increase of oxygen uptake (?Q/?VO2) were measured, calculated from the cardiac output and the oxygen uptake during incremental exercise. Results The peak oxygen extraction by muscle cells was 10.83 2.80 ml/100ml in 178 CFS women, 11.62 2.90 ml/100 ml in 172 CFI, and 13.45 2.72 ml/100 ml in 11 healthy women (ANOVA: P=0.001), 13.66 3.31 ml/100 ml in 25 CFS men, 14.63 4.38 ml/100 ml in 51 CFI, and 19.52 6.53 ml/100 ml in 7 healthy men (ANOVA: P=0.008). The ?Q/?VO2 was > 6 L/L (normal ?Q/?VO2 ? 5 L/L) in 70% of the patients and in 22% of the healthy group. Conclusion Low oxygen uptake by muscle cells causes exercise intolerance in a majority of CFS patients, indicating insufficient metabolic adaptation to incremental exercise. The high increase of the cardiac output relative to the increase of oxygen uptake argues against deconditioning as a cause for physical impairment in these patients. PMID:24456560

  11. Clinical Usefulness of Response Profiles to Rapidly Incremental Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Roberta P.; Alencar, Maria Clara N.; Treptow, Erika; Arbex, Flávio; Ferreira, Eloara M. V.; Neder, J. Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The advent of microprocessed “metabolic carts” and rapidly incremental protocols greatly expanded the clinical applications of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET). The response normalcy to CPET is more commonly appreciated at discrete time points, for example, at the estimated lactate threshold and at peak exercise. Analysis of the response profiles of cardiopulmonary responses at submaximal exercise and recovery, however, might show abnormal physiologic functioning which would not be otherwise unraveled. Although this approach has long been advocated as a key element of the investigational strategy, it remains largely neglected in practice. The purpose of this paper, therefore, is to highlight the usefulness of selected submaximal metabolic, ventilatory, and cardiovascular variables in different clinical scenarios and patient populations. Special care is taken to physiologically justify their use to answer pertinent clinical questions and to the technical aspects that should be observed to improve responses' reproducibility and reliability. The most recent evidence in favor of (and against) these variables for diagnosis, impairment evaluation, and prognosis in systemic diseases is also critically discussed. PMID:23766901

  12. [Standardizing clinical performance, data analysis, graphics display, interpretation and report for cardiopulmonary exercise testing].

    PubMed

    Sun, Xing-Guo

    2015-07-01

    The cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) is one important clinical functional testing method, which linked to all functions of respiratory, circulatory, metabolic and neurohumoral etc. The most important parameter of CPET is oxygen uptake which can reflect the core oxygen metabolic information of the human being's holistic integrative physiology. We explain why the CPET interpretation needs new philosophy of holistic integrative physiology and medicine. CPET is a unique holistic, objective, quantitative scientific evaluation skill of human function to distinguish health, sub-health and dieases, It can help us to make optimal recommendations for prevention, diagnosis and differential diagnosis, treatment evaluation, exercise rehabilitation and prognosis of many clinical diseases. However, in order to so, we needs pre-qualified and calibrated stable system, standardized clinical practice, data analysis, display illustration and interpretation principle for CPET. PMID:26775511

  13. The Utility of Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing to Detect and Track Early-Stage Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Sundeep; Arena, Ross A.; Hansen, James E.; Lewis, Gregory D.; Myers, Jonathan N.; Sperling, Laurence S.; LaBudde, Brian D.; Wasserman, Karlman

    2010-01-01

    Evidence demonstrating the potential value of noninvasive cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) to accurately detect exercise-induced myocardial ischemia is emerging. This case-based concept report describes CPET abnormalities in an asymptomatic at-risk man with suspected early-stage ischemic heart disease. When CPET was repeated 1 year after baseline assessment, his cardiovascular function had worsened, and an anti-atherosclerotic regimen was initiated. When the patient was retested after 3.3 years, the diminished left ventricular function had reversed with pharmacotherapy directed at decreasing cardiovascular events in patients with coronary artery disease. Thus, in addition to identifying appropriate patients in need of escalating therapy for atherosclerosis, CPET was useful in monitoring progression and reversal of abnormalities of the coronary circulation in a safe and cost-effective manner without the use of radiation. Serial CPET parameters may be useful to track changes marking the progression and/or regression of the underlying global ischemic burden. PMID:20884826

  14. Reliability and Responsiveness of Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Fatigued Persons with Multiple Sclerosis and Low to Mild Disability

    PubMed Central

    Heine, Martin; van den Akker, Lizanne Eva; Verschuren, Olaf; Visser-Meily, Anne; Kwakkel, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Background Peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) via cardiopulmonary exercise testing is considered the gold standard for testing aerobic capacity in healthy participants and people with various medical conditions. The reliability and responsiveness of cardiopulmonary exercise testing outcomes in persons with MS (PwMS) have not been extensively studied. Objective (1) to investigate the reliability of cardiopulmonary exercise parameters in PwMS; (2) to determine the responsiveness, in terms of the smallest detectable change (SDC), for each parameter. Design Two repeated measurements of cardiopulmonary exercise outcomes were obtained, with a median time interval of 16 days. Methods Thirty-two PwMS suffering from subjective fatigue performed cardiopulmonary exercise tests on a cycle ergometer, to voluntary exhaustion. We calculated the reliability, in terms of the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC [2,k]; absolute agreement), and the measurement error, in terms of standard error of measurement (SEM) and SDC at individual (SDCindividual) and group level (SDCgroup). Results The ICC for VO2peak was 0.951, with an SEM of 0.131 L?min?1 and an SDCindividual of 0.364 L?min?1. When corrected for bodyweight, the ICC of VO2peak was 0.933, with an SEM of 1.7 mL?kg?1?min?1 and in an SDCindividual of 4.6 mL?kg?1?min?1. Limitations Generalization of our study results is restricted to fatigued PwMS with a low to mild level of disability. Conclusions At individual level, cardiopulmonary exercise testing can be used reliably to assess physical fitness in terms of VO2peak, but less so to determine significant changes. At group level, VO2peak can be reliably used to determine physical fitness status and establish change over time. PMID:25789625

  15. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing reveals onset of disease and response to treatment in a case of heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Trip, Pia; Vonk-Noordegraaf, Anton; Bogaard, Harm Jan

    2012-01-01

    Patients affected by pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) show a typical pattern of abnormalities on cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET). However, CPET is not routinely used as a screening method. We discuss a patient with hereditary PAH in whom CPET revealed onset of disease. Furthermore, we show that the abnormalities observed can improve in part by PAH-specific treatment. PMID:23130108

  16. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing is a core assessment for patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Arena, Ross; Myers, Jonathan; Guazzi, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of heart failure (HF), which have resulted in improved survival, overall prognosis continues to be poor. Given the high short-term mortality rate, it remains important to utilize assessment techniques with established prognostic value in this patient population. Ideally, a given assessment should also be able to accurately reflect disease severity, a heterogeneous phenomenon in patients with HF, and accurately reflect the magnitude of physiologic/clinical improvement following the implementation or titration of an intervention. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) satisfies all of the aforementioned desirable assessment attributes. Peak oxygen consumption and the minute ventilation/carbon dioxide production slope are key CPX variables in assessing prognosis and gauging disease severity. Given the high value of information obtained from this procedure, CPX should be considered a core assessment in the HF population. The current review will concisely define key CPX variables and summarize their clinical applications in patients with HF. PMID:21609384

  17. Effect of modality on cardiopulmonary exercise testing in male and female COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Holm, Siri M; Rodgers, Wendy; Haennel, Robert G; MacDonald, G Fred; Bryan, Tracey L; Bhutani, Mohit; Wong, Eric; Stickland, Michael K

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the physiological responses to treadmill and cycle cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) in male and female COPD patients. Fifty-five patients [28 males (FEV1=58.219.5% predicted), and 27 females (FEV1=65.316.6% predicted)] completed a treadmill and a cycle CPET in random order on two separate days. Respiratory and cardiovascular data were obtained. Compared to the cycle CPET, the treadmill elicited greater peak power output and peak oxygen uptake, while arterial saturation at peak exercise was lower with the treadmill; however, there were no differences between the responses in men and women. No differences were observed in heart rate, ventilation, tidal volume/breathing frequency, inspiratory capacity, or dyspnea responses between modalities or sex. The physiological responses between treadmill and cycle CPET protocols are largely similar for both men and women with COPD, indicating that either modality can be used in mild/moderate COPD patients. PMID:24316218

  18. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing variables as predictors of long-term outcome in thoracic sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, A.J.; Menezes, S.L.S.; Dias, C.M.; Oliveira, J.F.; Mainenti, M.R.M.; Guimares, F.S.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) plays an important role in the assessment of functional capacity in patients with interstitial lung disease. The aim of this study was to identify CPET measures that might be helpful in predicting the vital capacity and diffusion capacity outcomes of patients with thoracic sarcoidosis. A longitudinal study was conducted on 42 nonsmoking patients with thoracic sarcoidosis (median age = 46.5 years, 22 females). At the first evaluation, spirometry, the measurement of single-breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCOsb) and CPET were performed. Five years later, the patients underwent a second evaluation consisting of spirometry and DLCOsb measurement. After 5 years, forced vital capacity (FVC)% and DLCOsb% had decreased significantly [95.5 (82-105) vs 87.5 (58-103) and 93.5 (79-103) vs 84.5 (44-102), respectively; P < 0.0001 for both]. In CPET, the peak oxygen uptake, maximum respiratory rate, breathing reserve, alveolar-arterial oxygen pressure gradient at peak exercise (P(A-a)O2), and ? SpO2 values showed a strong correlation with the relative differences for FVC% and DLCOsb% (P < 0.0001 for all). P(A-a)O2 ?22?mmHg and breathing reserve ?40% were identified as significant independent variables for the decline in pulmonary function. Patients with thoracic sarcoidosis showed a significant reduction in FVC% and DLCOsb% after 5 years of follow-up. These data show that the outcome measures of CPET are predictors of the decline of pulmonary function. PMID:22331135

  19. Reliability of Maximal Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Men with Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Jessica M.; Hornsby, Whitney E.; Lane, Amy; Kenjale, Aarti A.; Eves, Neil D.; Jones, Lee W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In order to accurately assess exercise interventions and to evaluate acute and chronic cardiovascular effects in patients with early-stage cancer, consistently reliable functional outcome measures must be obtained. An incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) with gas exchange measurement, to assess peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2), provides the gold standard outcome of cardiorespiratory fitness. Methods In the context of a randomized controlled trial, 40 prostate cancer patients (mean age 59±7 years) following radical prostatectomy performed two maximal CPETs within 5.6±5.5 days of each other. Incremental treadmill tests were performed in the morning under identical laboratory conditions. Reliability and within subject variability from test 1 to test 2 for peak and submaximal variables were assessed by correlation coefficients, intraclass correlations (ICC), Bland-Altman plots, coefficient of variation (CV), and paired t-tests. Results There was high reliability between CPETs for peak VO2 (r=0.92, p<0.001, ICC=0.900); ventilatory threshold (VT; r=0.88, p<0.001, ICC=0.927); minute ventilation-carbon dioxide production relationship (VE/VCO2; r=0.86, p < 0.001, ICC=0.850); and peak heart rate (HR; r=0.95, p<0.001, ICC=0.944). However, high within-subject variability was observed for all CPET parameters (mean coefficient of variation: 4.7%). Compared to test 1, significantly higher mean values were observed for peak VO2 (27.0±5.6 vs. 28.1±5.3 mL·kg·−1min−1, p<0.05), VT (1.91±0.5 vs. 1.97±0.4 L.min−1, p<0.05) and VE/VCO2: (31.3±5.8 vs. 32.8±3.4, p<0.05) in test 2. Conclusion These findings indicate the presence of significant, and potentially clinically important, variability in CPET procedures in men with clinically-localized prostate cancer, and have important implications for the application and utility of CPETs to evaluate the efficacy of interventions to improve aerobic capacity in the oncology setting. PMID:24781891

  20. Cardiopulmonary exercise test findings in symptomatic mustard gas exposed cases with normal HRCT.

    PubMed

    Aliannejad, Rasoul; Saburi, Amin; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2013-04-01

    Many patients with sulfur mustard (SM) exposure present dyspnea in exertion while they have a normal pulmonary function test (PFT) and imaging. The cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) has been used for evaluation of dyspnea in exertion among patients with different pulmonary disorders focusing on assessing gas exchange. We evaluated subjects who were exposed to SM with normal imaging compared to the controls with CPET. A case-control study was carried out on two groups in Tehran, Iran during 2010 to compare the CPET findings. The cases with a history of SM exposure and complaint of exertional dyspnea while they had normal physical examination, chest X-ray, PFT, and nonsignificant air trapping in lung high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) were included. A group of sex- and age-matched healthy people were considered as controls. One hundred fifty-nine male patients (aged 37 4.3 years) were enrolled as a case group and ten healthy subjects (aged 35 5.9 years) as the control group. There was no significant difference in the demographic and baseline PFT characters between the two groups (P > 0.05). Only peak VO2/kg, VO2-predicted, and RR peak were statistically different between cases and controls (P < 0.05). Despite the fact that abnormal gas exchange may be present in our cases, it does not explain the low VO2 in CPET. Also, impaired cell O2 consumption could be a hypothesis for low VO2 in these cases. It seems that routine assessment of lung structure cannot be effectively used for discrimination of the etiology of dyspnea in low-dose SM exposed cases. PMID:24015343

  1. Robot-Assisted End-Effector-Based Stair Climbing for Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing: Feasibility, Reliability, and Repeatability

    PubMed Central

    Stoller, Oliver; Schindelholz, Matthias; Hunt, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Neurological impairments can limit the implementation of conventional cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) and cardiovascular training strategies. A promising approach to provoke cardiovascular stress while facilitating task-specific exercise in people with disabilities is feedback-controlled robot-assisted end-effector-based stair climbing (RASC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, reliability, and repeatability of augmented RASC-based CPET in able-bodied subjects, with a view towards future research and applications in neurologically impaired populations. Methods Twenty able-bodied subjects performed a familiarisation session and 2 consecutive incremental CPETs using augmented RASC. Outcome measures focussed on standard cardiopulmonary performance parameters and on accuracy of work rate tracking (RMSEP−root mean square error). Criteria for feasibility were cardiopulmonary responsiveness and technical implementation. Relative and absolute test-retest reliability were assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), standard error of the measurement (SEM), and minimal detectable change (MDC). Mean differences, limits of agreement, and coefficients of variation (CoV) were estimated to assess repeatability. Results All criteria for feasibility were achieved. Mean V′O2peak was 106±9% of predicted V′O2max and mean HRpeak was 99±3% of predicted HRmax. 95% of the subjects achieved at least 1 criterion for V′O2max, and the detection of the sub-maximal ventilatory thresholds was successful (ventilatory anaerobic threshold 100%, respiratory compensation point 90% of the subjects). Excellent reliability was found for peak cardiopulmonary outcome measures (ICC ≥ 0.890, SEM ≤ 0.60%, MDC ≤ 1.67%). Repeatability for the primary outcomes was good (CoV ≤ 0.12). Conclusions RASC-based CPET with feedback-guided exercise intensity demonstrated comparable or higher peak cardiopulmonary performance variables relative to predicted values, achieved the criteria for V′O2max, and allowed determination of sub-maximal ventilatory thresholds. The reliability and repeatability were found to be high. There is potential for augmented RASC to be used for exercise testing and prescription in populations with neurological impairments who would benefit from repetitive task-specific training. PMID:26849137

  2. Difference in Physiological Components of VO2 Max During Incremental and Constant Exercise Protocols for the Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Junshiro; Harada, Tetsuya; Okada, Akinori; Maemura, Yuko; Yamamoto, Misaki; Tabira, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] VO2 is expressed as the product of cardiac output and O2 extraction by the Fick equation. During the incremental exercise test and constant high-intensity exercise test, VO2 results in the attainment of maximal O2 uptake at exhaustion. However, the differences in the physiological components, cardiac output and muscle O2 extraction, have not been fully elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that constant exercise would result in higher O2 extraction than incremental exercise at exhaustion. [Subjects] Twenty-five subjects performed incremental exercise and constant exercise at 80% of their peak work rate. [Methods] Ventilatory, cardiovascular, and muscle oxygenation responses were measured using a gas analyzer, Finapres, and near-infrared spectroscopy, respectively. [Results] VO2 was not significantly different between the incremental exercise and constant exercise. However, cardiac output and muscle O2 saturation were significantly lower for the constant exercise than the incremental exercise at the end of exercise. [Conclusion] These findings indicate that if both tests produce a similar VO2 value, the VO2 in incremental exercise would have a higher ratio of cardiac output than constant exercise, and VO2 in constant exercise would have a higher ratio of O2 extraction than incremental exercise at the end of exercise. PMID:25202198

  3. Reduced fitness and abnormal cardiopulmonary responses to maximal exercise testing in children and young adults with sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Liem, Robert I; Reddy, Madhuri; Pelligra, Stephanie A; Savant, Adrienne P; Fernhall, Bo; Rodeghier, Mark; Thompson, Alexis A

    2015-01-01

    Physiologic contributors to reduced exercise capacity in individuals with sickle cell anemia (SCA) are not well understood. The objective of this study was to characterize the cardiopulmonary response to maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) and determine factors associated with reduced exercise capacity among children and young adults with SCA. A cross-sectional cohort of 60 children and young adults (mean 15.1 3.4years) with hemoglobin SS or S/?0 thalassemia and 30 matched controls (mean 14.63.5years) without SCA or sickle cell trait underwent maximal CPET by a graded, symptom-limited cycle ergometry protocol with breath-by-breath, gas exchange analysis. Compared to controls without SCA, subjects with SCA demonstrated significantly lower peak VO2 (26.9 6.9 vs. 37.09.2 mL/kg/min, P<0.001). Subjects demonstrated slower oxygen uptake (?VO2/?WR, 92 vs. 122 mL/min/watt, P<0.001) and lower oxygen pulse (?VO2/?HR, 124 vs. 207 mL/beat, P<0.001) as well as reduced oxygen uptake efficiency (?VE/?VO2, 428 vs. 325, P<0.001) and ventilation efficiency (?VE/?VCO2, 30.33.7 vs. 27.32.5, P<0.001) during CPET. Peak VO2 remained significantly lower in subjects with SCA after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and hemoglobin, which were independent predictors of peak VO2 for subjects with SCA. In the largest study to date using maximal CPET in SCA, we demonstrate that children and young adults with SCA have reduced exercise capacity attributable to factors independent of anemia. Complex derangements in gas exchange and oxygen uptake during maximal exercise are common in this population. PMID:25847915

  4. Measurement of Exercise Tolerance before Surgery (METS) study: a protocol for an international multicentre prospective cohort study of cardiopulmonary exercise testing prior to major non-cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pearse, Rupert M; Shulman, Mark A; Abbott, Tom E F; Torres, Elizabeth; Croal, Bernard L; Granton, John T; Thorpe, Kevin E; Grocott, Michael P W; Farrington, Catherine; Myles, Paul S; Cuthbertson, Brian H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Preoperative functional capacity is considered an important risk factor for cardiovascular and other complications of major non-cardiac surgery. Nonetheless, the usual approach for estimating preoperative functional capacity, namely doctors’ subjective assessment, may not accurately predict postoperative morbidity or mortality. 3 possible alternatives are cardiopulmonary exercise testing; the Duke Activity Status Index, a standardised questionnaire for estimating functional capacity; and the serum concentration of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT pro-BNP), a biomarker for heart failure and cardiac ischaemia. Methods and analysis The Measurement of Exercise Tolerance before Surgery (METS) Study is a multicentre prospective cohort study of patients undergoing major elective non-cardiac surgery at 25 participating study sites in Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the UK. We aim to recruit 1723 participants. Prior to surgery, participants undergo symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing on a cycle ergometer, complete the Duke Activity Status Index questionnaire, undergo blood sampling to measure serum NT pro-BNP concentration and have their functional capacity subjectively assessed by their responsible doctors. Participants are followed for 1 year after surgery to assess vital status, postoperative complications and general health utilities. The primary outcome is all-cause death or non-fatal myocardial infarction within 30 days after surgery, and the secondary outcome is all-cause death within 1 year after surgery. Both receiver-operating-characteristic curve methods and risk reclassification table methods will be used to compare the prognostic accuracy of preoperative subjective assessment, peak oxygen consumption during cardiopulmonary exercise testing, Duke Activity Status Index scores and serum NT pro-BNP concentration. Ethics and dissemination The METS Study has received research ethics board approval at all sites. Participant recruitment began in March 2013, and 1-year follow-up is expected to finish in 2016. Publication of the results of the METS Study is anticipated to occur in 2017. PMID:26969643

  5. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing in patients with pulmonary hypertension: clinical recommendations based on a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Pinkstaff, Sherry O; Burger, Charles D; Daugherty, John; Bond, Samantha; Arena, Ross

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) remains an ominous diagnosis despite advances in pharmacological and surgical therapy. Early and effective diagnosis is important for clinicians making treatment determinations and patients wishing to understand the prognostic implications of their illness. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) has the power to reveal the underlying pathophysiological consequences of the disease process. Research, especially over the last 10-15 years, has demonstrated the utility of this tool. Several CPX variables have been shown to be consistently altered in patients with PH and more so as severity of disease increases. However, to further enhance clinical application, additional research is needed to better define optimal CPX measures and associated cutoff values. This paper gives class-based recommendations with associated levels of evidence for the use of CPX in the PH patient population. PMID:26789612

  6. Central and Peripheral Hemodynamic Adaptations During Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test in Heart Failure Patients With Exercise Periodic Breathing.

    PubMed

    Fu, Tieh-Cheng; Chou, Szu-Ling; Chen, Tai-Tzung; Wang, Chao-Hung; Chang, Hen-Hong; Wang, Jong-Shyan

    2015-01-01

    Some heart failure (HF) patients develop ventilatory oscillation which is composed of exercise periodic breathing (EPB) and sleep apnea. The ventilatory oscillation is associated with exercise intolerance. This study employed an integrated monitoring system to elucidate the way of central and peripheral hemodynamic adaption responding to exercise. This study recruited 157 HF patients to perform exercise testing using a bicycle ergometer. A noninvasive bio-reactance device was adopted to measure cardiac hemodynamics, whereas a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was used to assess perfusion and O2 extraction in the frontal cerebral lobe (FC) and vastus lateralis muscle (VL) during exercise respectively. Furthermore, quality of life (QoL) was measured with the Short Form-36 (SF-36) and the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure questionnaires (MLHFQ). The patients were divided into an EPB group (n = 65) and a non-EPB group (n = 92) according to their ventilation patterns during testing. Compared to their non-EPB counterparts, the patients with EPB exhibited 1) impaired aerobic capacity with a smaller peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) and oxygen uptake efficiency slopes; 2) impaired circulatory and ventilatory efficiency with relatively high cardiac output and ventilation per unit workload; 3) impaired ventilatory/hemodynamic adaptation in response to exercise with elevated deoxyhemoglobin levels in the FC region; and 4) impaired QoL with lower physical component scores on the SF-36 and higher scores on the MLHFQ. In conclusion, EPB may reduce circulatory-ventilatory-hemodynamic efficiency during exercise, thereby impairing functional capacity in patients with HF. PMID:26084463

  7. Physiology of oxygen uptake kinetics: Insights from incremental cardiopulmonary exercise testing in the Study of Health in Pomerania

    PubMed Central

    Barron, Anthony J.; Dhutia, Niti M.; Glser, Sven; Koch, Beate; Ewert, Ralf; Obst, Anne; Drr, Marcus; Vlzke, Henry; Francis, Darrel P.; Wensel, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiopulmonary exercise testing allows for assessment of cardiac and respiratory limitation, but is often affected by patient effort. Indices of oxygen kinetics, including the oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES), oxygen uptakework-rate slope (VO2WR slope) and the heart rateoxygen uptake slope (HRVO2 slope) are relatively effort independent but may be affected by patient characteristics. The objective of this study is to identify the impact of factors, such as age, gender, body size, respiratory function, smoking and beta-blockade on these parameters, as well as generate predictive equations. Methods 1708 volunteers from the population-based Study of Health in Pomerania underwent an incremental bicycle exercise protocol. Markers of oxygen kinetics were calculated. Participants with structural heart disease, echocardiographic or lung function pathology were excluded, leaving 577 males and 625 females. Age, height, weight, smoking, forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV1) and beta-blockers were analysed for their influencing power by gender. Quantile regression analysis determined the reference equations for each parameter. Results Age, gender, height, weight and FEV1 (but not percent predicted FEV1) are strongly related to OUES. Participants using beta-blockers and male smokers had significantly lower OUES values. VO2WR slope was minimally affected by age, gender, weight and FEV1. Gender, height, weight and beta-blocker use, but not FEV1 and smoking status, were related to the HRVO2 slope whilst age was only related in females. Conclusions Markers of oxygen kinetics are differentially affected by patient characteristics. This study provides normal reference values for these variables thereby facilitating interpretation of oxygen uptake kinetics in health and disease. PMID:26339572

  8. A novel cardiopulmonary exercise test protocol and criterion to determine maximal oxygen uptake in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, T. Scott; Cannon, Daniel T.; Begg, Gordon; Baliga, Vivek; Witte, Klaus K.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing for peak oxygen uptake (V?o2peak) can evaluate prognosis in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients, with the peak respiratory exchange ratio (RERpeak) commonly used to confirm maximal effort and maximal oxygen uptake (V?o2max). We determined the precision of RERpeak in confirming V?o2max, and whether a novel ramp-incremental (RI) step-exercise (SE) (RISE) test could better determine V?o2max in CHF. Male CHF patients (n = 24; NYHA class IIII) performed a symptom-limited RISE-95 cycle ergometer test in the format: RI (418 W/min; ?10 min); 5 min recovery (10 W); SE (95% peak RI work rate). Patients (n = 18) then performed RISE-95 tests using slow (38 W/min; ?15 min) and fast (1030 W/min; ?6 min) ramp rates. Pulmonary gas exchange was measured breath-by-breath. V?o2peak was compared within patients by unpaired t-test of the highest 12 breaths during RI and SE phases to confirm V?o2max and its 95% confidence limits (CI95). RERpeak was significantly influenced by ramp rate (fast, medium, slow: 1.21 0.1 vs. 1.15 0.1 vs. 1.09 0.1; P = 0.001), unlike V?o2peak (mean n = 18; 14.4 2.6 mlkg?1min?1; P = 0.476). Group V?o2peak was similar between RI and SE (n = 24; 14.5 3.0 vs. 14.7 3.1 mlkg?1min?1; P = 0.407); however, within-subject comparisons confirmed V?o2max in only 14 of 24 patients (CI95 for V?o2max estimation averaged 1.4 0.8 mlkg?1min?1). The RERpeak in CHF was significantly influenced by ramp rate, suggesting its use to determine maximal effort and V?o2max be abandoned. In contrast, the RISE-95 test had high precision for V?o2max confirmation with patient-specific CI95 (without secondary criteria), and showed that V?o2max is commonly underestimated in CHF. The RISE-95 test was well tolerated by CHF patients, supporting its use for V?o2max confirmation. PMID:22653993

  9. Personalized pulmonary rehabilitation and occupational therapy based on cardiopulmonary exercise testing for patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Maekura, Ryoji; Hiraga, Toru; Miki, Keisuke; Kitada, Seigo; Miki, Mari; Yoshimura, Kenji; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Kawabe, Toshiko; Mori, Masahide

    2015-01-01

    Take-home summary Personalized pulmonary rehabilitation including occupational therapy improves the prognosis of patients with advanced COPD. Purpose We previously reported that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exhibit three exercise-induced life-threatening conditions: hypoxemia, sympathetic overactivity, and respiratory acidosis. We aimed to verify whether mortality in patients with advanced COPD could be reduced by a personalized pulmonary rehabilitation (PPR) program in hospital, which determines individual safe ranges and includes occupational therapy (PPR-OT), to prevent desaturation and sympathetic nerve activation during daily activities. Patients and methods The novel PPR-OT program was evaluated in a retrospective study of patients with COPD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] Grade D) who underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) between April 1990 and December 1999. They received regular treatment without the proposed therapy (control group: n=61; male-to-female ratio [M:F] =57:4; mean age: 68.5±6.7 years) or with the proposed therapy (PPR-OT group: n=46; M:F =44:2; mean age: 68.7±7.1 years). A prospective observational study included patients with COPD receiving home oxygen therapy (HOT) between April 1995 and March 2007 to compare the survival rates of the control group (n=47; M:F ratio =34:13; mean age: 71.3±10.0 years) and the PPR-OT group (n=85; M:F =78:7; mean age: 70.7±6.1 years) who completed the proposed therapy. Survival after CPET or HOT was analyzed using Cox proportional-hazards regression and Kaplan–Meier analyses. Results In both studies, the program significantly improved all-cause mortality (retrospective study: risk ratio =0.389 [range: 0.172–0.800]; P=0.0094; log-rank test, P=0.0094; observational study: risk ratio =0.515 [range: 0.296–0.933]; P=0.0291; log-rank test, P=0.0232]. At 5 years and 7 years, all-cause mortality was extremely low in patients in the PPR-OT group receiving HOT (18.8% and 28.2%, respectively), compared to that in the control group (34.0% and 44.7%, respectively). Survival of patients with life-threatening pathophysiological conditions also greatly improved. Conclusion The PPR-OT program improved the survival of patients with advanced COPD probably because it modified life-threatening conditions. PMID:26366071

  10. Abnormalities in cardiopulmonary exercise testing ventilatory parameters in heart failure: pathophysiology and clinical usefulness.

    PubMed

    Guazzi, Marco

    2014-03-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex syndrome characterized by myocardial dysfunction, derangement of multiple organ systems and poor outcome. Out of several markers of severity, abnormalities in exercise ventilation (VE) offer relevant insights into the pathophysiology of dyspnea, lung gas exchange, and control of ventilation and are now recognized as meaningful indicators of disease severity and prognosis. Ventilation inefficiency, identified as an increased slope of VE vs carbon dioxide production (VCO2) recognizes as major determinants an increased waste ventilation due to enhanced dead space, early occurrence of lactic acidosis, and an abnormal chemoreflex and/or metaboreflex activity. In some cases of HF, especially associated with advanced hemodynamic and neural deregulation, an exercise oscillatory ventilatory (EOV) pattern may occur. According to an increasing number of studies, EOV identifies the 15-30% of higher-risk HF patients requiring aggressive treatment and provides an even more robust prediction of outcome compared to VE/VCO2 slope. Overall, a refined prevalence definition and more comprehensive use of these markers in a clinical environment and in future interventional trials seem challenging for the years to come. PMID:24408786

  11. Risk stratification by pre-operative cardiopulmonary exercise testing improves outcomes following elective abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2009, the NHS evidence adoption center and National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) published a review of the use of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). They recommended the development of a risk-assessment tool to help identify AAA patients with greater or lesser risk of operative mortality and to contribute to mortality prediction. A low anaerobic threshold (AT), which is a reliable, objective measure of pre-operative cardiorespiratory fitness, as determined by pre-operative cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) is associated with poor surgical outcomes for major abdominal surgery. We aimed to assess the impact of a CPET-based risk-stratification strategy upon perioperative mortality, length of stay and non-operative costs for elective (open and endovascular) infra-renal AAA patients. Methods A retrospective cohort study was undertaken. Pre-operative CPET-based selection for elective surgical intervention was introduced in 2007. An anonymized cohort of 230 consecutive infra-renal AAA patients (2007 to 2011) was studied. A historical control group of 128 consecutive infra-renal AAA patients (2003 to 2007) was identified for comparison. Comparative analysis of demographic and outcome data for CPET-pass (AT ? 11 ml/kg/min), CPET-fail (AT < 11 ml/kg/min) and CPET-submaximal (no AT generated) subgroups with control subjects was performed. Primary outcomes included 30-day mortality, survival and length of stay (LOS); secondary outcomes were non-operative inpatient costs. Results Of 230 subjects, 188 underwent CPET: CPET-pass n = 131, CPET-fail n = 35 and CPET-submaximal n = 22. When compared to the controls, CPET-pass patients exhibited reduced median total LOS (10 vs 13 days for open surgery, n = 74, P < 0.01 and 4 vs 6 days for EVAR, n = 29, P < 0.05), intensive therapy unit requirement (3 vs 4 days for open repair only, P < 0.001), non-operative costs (5,387 vs 9,634 for open repair, P < 0.001) and perioperative mortality (2.7% vs 12.6% (odds ratio: 0.19) for open repair only, P < 0.05). CPET-stratified (open/endovascular) patients exhibited a mid-term survival benefit (P < 0.05). Conclusion In this retrospective cohort study, a pre-operative AT > 11 ml/kg/min was associated with reduced perioperative mortality (open cases only), LOS, survival and inpatient costs (open and endovascular repair) for elective infra-renal AAA surgery. PMID:24472159

  12. Pulmonary Hypertension and Cardiopulmonary Exercise in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chul-Ho; Jae, Sae Young; Johnson, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    In heart failure (HF), pulmonary hypertension (PH) is initially associated with a rise in the left ventricular filling pressure. PH is defined by pulmonary hemodynamic measurements including pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, mean pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance. Eventually, PH in HF may become more of a reactive process. Although the mechanism of the reactive PH development is not clearly understood, vascular dysfunction induced by remodeling, vasoactive substances and genetic variation appear to contribute significantly to this form of PH. Noninvasive cardiopulmonary exercise testing has been extensively utilized to assess disease severity in HF patients. It provides integrated information that is dependent on cardiopulmonary hemodynamics, lung mechanics, breathing pattern and strategy. In this review, we will discuss the mechanisms of PH development in HF and how noninvasive gas exchange measures obtained with submaximal exercise are influenced by PH in this population. PMID:26389080

  13. Effects of resistance exercise on cardiopulmonary factors in sedentary individuals

    PubMed Central

    Janyacharoen, Taweesak; Thayon, Methiya; Bushong, Wanwisa; Jaikla, Nussamol; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of resistance exercise on cardiopulmonary functions in young sedentary subjects. [Subjects] Forty-two young and healthy subjects with a sedentary lifestyle were included in this study. [Methods] The subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups: control and experimental. The control group (n=21) received health education and continued with normal activities of daily living. The experimental group (n=21) underwent resistance training, health education, and continued with normal activities of daily living. The resistance exercise program consisted of 3 postural exercises: chest press, dumbbell pullover, and flat-bench dumbbell fly. The subjects received this intervention 3 times/week for 8 weeks. [Results] The baseline characteristics were comparable between the 2 groups. The 6-minute-walk test score, peak expiratory flow, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, maximal voluntary ventilation, and chest expansions were significantly improved post-intervention in the experimental group and between the 2 groups. [Conclusion] Cardiopulmonary functions in young sedentary subjects were significantly improved with the 8-week resistance exercise program.

  14. Use of the Wasserman equation in optimization of the duration of the power ramp in a cardiopulmonary exercise test: a study of Brazilian men

    PubMed Central

    Costa, D. C.; de Santi, G. L.; Crescncio, J. C.; Seabra, L. P.; Carvalho, E. E. V.; Papa, V.; Marques, F.; Gallo, L.; Schmidt, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the agreement between measurements of unloaded oxygen uptake and peak oxygen uptake based on equations proposed by Wasserman and on real measurements directly obtained with the ergospirometry system. We performed an incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET), which was applied to two groups of sedentary male subjects: one apparently healthy group (HG, n=12) and the other had stable coronary artery disease (n=16). The mean age in the HG was 474 years and that in the coronary artery disease group (CG) was 578 years. Both groups performed CPET on a cycle ergometer with a ramp-type protocol at an intensity that was calculated according to the Wasserman equation. In the HG, there was no significant difference between measurements predicted by the formula and real measurements obtained in CPET in the unloaded condition. However, at peak effort, a significant difference was observed between oxygen uptake (V?O2)peak(predicted)and V?O2peak(real)(nonparametric Wilcoxon test). In the CG, there was a significant difference of 116.26 mL/min between the predicted values by the formula and the real values obtained in the unloaded condition. A significant difference in peak effort was found, where V?O2peak(real)was 40% lower than V?O2peak(predicted)(nonparametric Wilcoxon test). There was no agreement between the real and predicted measurements as analyzed by Lins coefficient or the Bland and Altman model. The Wasserman formula does not appear to be appropriate for prediction of functional capacity of volunteers. Therefore, this formula cannot precisely predict the increase in power in incremental CPET on a cycle ergometer. PMID:26397972

  15. Use of the Wasserman equation in optimization of the duration of the power ramp in a cardiopulmonary exercise test: a study of Brazilian men.

    PubMed

    Costa, D C; Santi, G L de; Crescncio, J C; Seabra, L P; Carvalho, E E V; Papa, V; Marques, F; Gallo Junior, L; Schmidt, A

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to analyze the agreement between measurements of unloaded oxygen uptake and peak oxygen uptake based on equations proposed by Wasserman and on real measurements directly obtained with the ergospirometry system. We performed an incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET), which was applied to two groups of sedentary male subjects: one apparently healthy group (HG, n=12) and the other had stable coronary artery disease (n=16). The mean age in the HG was 474 years and that in the coronary artery disease group (CG) was 578 years. Both groups performed CPET on a cycle ergometer with a ramp-type protocol at an intensity that was calculated according to the Wasserman equation. In the HG, there was no significant difference between measurements predicted by the formula and real measurements obtained in CPET in the unloaded condition. However, at peak effort, a significant difference was observed between oxygen uptake (V?O2)peak(predicted)and V?O2peak(real)(nonparametric Wilcoxon test). In the CG, there was a significant difference of 116.26 mL/min between the predicted values by the formula and the real values obtained in the unloaded condition. A significant difference in peak effort was found, where V?O2peak(real)was 40% lower than V?O2peak(predicted)(nonparametric Wilcoxon test). There was no agreement between the real and predicted measurements as analyzed by Lin's coefficient or the Bland and Altman model. The Wasserman formula does not appear to be appropriate for prediction of functional capacity of volunteers. Therefore, this formula cannot precisely predict the increase in power in incremental CPET on a cycle ergometer. PMID:26397972

  16. Cardiopulmonary adaptation to exercise in coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Scano, G.; Garcia-Herreros, P.; Stendardi, D.; Degre, S.; De Coster, A.; Sergysels, R.

    1980-11-01

    Twenty-six coal miners, without associated functional chronic obstructive lung disease (COLD), assessed by normal airway resistance, were divided into three groups: (1) Group C, normal x-ray; (2) Group S1, micronodular silicosis; and (3) Group S2, complicated silicosis. All subjects were evaluated while at rest and during exercise. Significant lung volume reduction was observed in the S2 Group only. Blood gases, pulmonary pressure, and cardiac output were found to be within the normal range for all three groups when at rest. The pulmonary pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance were higher, however, for the S1 and S2 Groups when compared to the C Group. During exercise, pulmonary hypertension was observed in 50% of the patients with complicated silicosis. When all data (N = 26) were included, the high values for pulmonary pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance correlated well with the loss in vital capacity (VC) and the decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV/sub 1/ /sub 0/). From the initial 26 patients, 19 were selected on the basis of their normal airway resistance and FEV/sub 1/ /sub 0//VC ratio. This selection did not alter the differences noted for the pulmonary pressure and total pulmonary vascular resistance, which previously existed between the groups, even though the correlations were not statistically significant. We conclude that silicosis without associated COLD leads to minimal hemodynamic impairment at rest and during exercise, and that airway resistance does not detect impairment of flow as effectively as FEV/sub 1/ /sub 0/ reduction. The increased pulmonary vascular resistance observed, especially in complicated silicosis, may be best explained by the loss of lung parenchyma and possible impairment of small airways.

  17. Vitamin D is associated with cardiopulmonary exercise capacity: results of two independent cohorts of healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Kaul, A; Glser, S; Hannemann, A; Schper, C; Nauck, M; Felix, S B; Bollmann, T; Ewert, R; Friedrich, N

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin D has an important role in calcium homeostasis and is known to have various health-promoting effects. Moreover, potential interactions between vitamin D and physical activity have been suggested. This study aims to investigate the relationship between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and exercise capacity quantified by cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET). For this, 1377 participants from the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-1) and 750 participants from the independent SHIP-TREND cohort were investigated. Standardised incremental exercise tests on a cycle ergometer were performed to assess exercise capacity by VO2 at anaerobic threshold, peakVO2, O2 pulse and peak power output. Serum 25(OH)D levels were measured by an automated chemiluminescence immunoassay. In SHIP-1, 25(OH)D levels were positively associated with all considered parameters of cardiopulmonary exercise capacity. Subjects with high 25(OH)D levels (4th quartile) showed an up to 25 % higher exercise capacity compared with subjects with low 25(OH)D levels (1st quartile). All associations were replicated in the independent SHIP-TREND cohort and were independent of age, sex, season and other interfering factors. In conclusion, significant positive associations between 25(OH)D and parameters of CPET were detected in two large cohorts of healthy adults. PMID:26620039

  18. Genetics of ?2-Adrenergic Receptors and the Cardiopulmonary Response to Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Eric M.; Johnson, Bruce D.; Joyner, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Exercise elicits a number of physiologic responses to increase oxygen delivery to working muscles. The ?2-adrenergic receptors (ADRB2) play a role in the cardiopulmonary response to exercise. This review is focused on how the gene that encodes the ADRB2 influences the cardiopulmonary response to exercise. In addition, we discuss possible interactions between ADRB2 and other genes important in exercise performance. PMID:18362692

  19. Incremental and independent value of cardiopulmonary exercise test measures and the Seattle Heart Failure Model for prediction of risk in patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Dardas, Todd; Li, Yanhong; Reed, Shelby D.; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Whellan, David J.; Ellis, Stephen J.; Schulman, Kevin A.; Kraus, William E.; Forman, Daniel E.; Levy, Wayne C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Multivariable risk scores and exercise measures are well-validated risk prediction methods. Combining information from a functional evaluation and a risk model may improve accuracy of risk predictions. We analyzed whether adding exercise measures to the Seattle Heart Failure Model (SHFM) improves risk prediction accuracy in systolic heart failure. Methods and Results We used a sample of patients from the Heart Failure and A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise TraiNing (HF-ACTION) study to examine the addition of peak VO2, VE/VCO2 slope, 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) or exercise duration (CPXDUR) to the SHFM. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to test the association between the combined endpoint (death, LVAD or cardiac transplantation) and the addition of exercise variables to the SHFM. 2152 patients were included in the sample. The SHFM and all exercise measures were associated with events (all p-values<0.0001) in proportional hazards models. There was statistically significant improvement in risk estimation when exercise measures were added to the SHFM. However, the improvement in c-index for addition of peak VO2 (+0.01), VE/VCO2 (+0.02), 6MWD (−0.001) and CPXDUR (+0.001) to the SHFM was small or slightly worse than the SHFM alone. Changes in risk assignment with the addition of exercise variables were minimal for patients above or below a15% 1-year mortality. Conclusions Exercise performance measures and the SHFM are independently useful for predicting risk in systolic heart failure. Adding CPET measures and 6MWD to the SHFM offers only minimal improvement in risk reassignment at clinically meaningful cutpoints. PMID:25940075

  20. Orbital Fitness: An Overview of Space Shuttle Cardiopulmonary Exercise Physiology Findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Alan D.

    2011-01-01

    Limited observations regarding the cardiopulmonary responses to aerobic exercise had been conducted during short-duration spaceflight before the Space Shuttle program. This presentation focuses on the findings regarding changes observed in the cardiopulmonary exercise responses during and following Shuttle flights. During flight, maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) remained unchanged as did the maximum work rate achievable during cycle exercise testing conducted during the last full flight day. Immediately following flight, the ubiquitous finding, confirmed by investigations conducted during the Spacelab Life Sciences missions 1 and 2 and by NASA Detailed Supplemental Objective studies, indicated that VO2max was reduced; however, the reduction in VO2max was transient and returned to preflight levels within 7 days following return. Studies regarding the influence of aerobic exercise countermeasures performed during flight on postflight performance were mostly limited to the examination of the heart rate (HR) response to submaximal exercise testing on landing day. These studies revealed that exercise HR was elevated in individuals who performed little to no exercise during their missions as compared to individuals who performed regular exercise. In addition, astronauts who performed little to no aerobic exercise during flight demonstrated an increased HR and lowered pulse pressure response to the standard stand test on landing day, indicating a decrease in orthostatic function in these individuals. With regard to exercise modality, four devices were examined during the Shuttle era: two treadmills, a cycle ergometer, and a rowing device. Although there were limited investigations regarding the use of these devices for exercise training aboard the Shuttle, there was no clear consensus reached regarding which proved to be a "superior" device. Each device had a unique operational or physiologic limitation associated with its use. In conclusion, exercise research conducted during the Shuttle Program demonstrated that attenuation of postflight deconditioning was possible through use of exercise countermeasures and the Shuttle served as a test bed for equipment destined for use on the International Space Station. Learning Objective: Overview of the Space Shuttle Program research results related to aerobic capacity and performance, including what was learned from research and effectiveness of exercise countermeasures.

  1. Interaction of the carotid baroreflex, the muscle chemoreflex and the cardiopulmonary baroreflex in man during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiken, O.; Convertino, V. A.; Doerr, D. F.; Dudley, G. A.; Morariu, G.; Mekjavic, I. B.

    1991-01-01

    The interaction of the muscle chemoreflex and the cardiopulmonary baroreflex with the carotid baroreflex in humans performing exercise was investigated in healthy subjects using specially designed exercise regimen and apparatus. Stimulation of the muscle chemoreflex was achieved by restricting blood flow in the exercising muscles by means of applying a pressure of 50 mm Hg, whereas cardiopulmonary baroreceptors were unloaded by employing LBNP of -20 mm Hg. The carotid baroreceptors were unloaded and stimulated by neck-pressure maneuvers (Sprenkle et al., 1986). Results showed that the cardiodecelerating capacity of the carotid baroreflex remains active during exercise, and may even be sensitized by the chemoreflex-induced increase in arterial pressure; but it is not affected by the cardiopulmonary baroreceptor activity.

  2. Cardiopulmonary Function, Exercise Capacity, and Echocardiography Finding of Pediatric Patients With Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tuan, Sheng-Hui; Li, Min-Hui; Hsu, Miao-Ju; Tsai, Yun-Jeng; Chen, Yin-Han; Liao, Tin-Yun; Lin, Ko-Long

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Coronary artery (CA) abnormalities influence exercise capacity (EC) of patients with Kawasaki disease (KD), and Z-score of CA is a well established method for detecting CA aneurysm. We studied the influence of KD on cardiopulmonary function and EC; meanwhile we analyzed echocardiographic findings of KD patients. We also assessed the correlation between CA Z-score and EC of KD patients to see if CA Z-score of KD patients could reflect EC during exercise. Sixty-three KD patients were recruited as KD group 1 from children (aged 5–18 y) who received transthoracic echocardiographic examinations and symptom-limited treadmill exercise test for regular follow-up of KD from January 2010 to October 2014 in 1 medical center. We then divided KD group 1 into KD group 2 (<5 y, n = 12) and KD group 3 (≥5 y, n = 51) according to time interval between KD onset to when patients received test. Control groups were matched by age, sex, and body mass index. Max-Z of CA was defined as the maximal Z-score of the proximal LCA or RCA by Dalliarre equation or Fuse calculator. All routine parameters measured during standard exercise test were similar between KD and control groups, except that peak rate pressure products (PRPPs) in KD group 1 to 3 were all lower than corresponding control groups significantly (P = 0.010, 0.020, and 0.049, respectively). PRPPs correlated with Max-Z of CA by both equations modest inversely (by Dallaire, P = 0.017, Spearman rho = −0.301; by Fuse, P = 0.014, Spearman rho = −0.309). Our study recruited larger number of KD patients and provided a newer data of EC of KD patients. Our finding suggests that after acute stage of KD, patients could maintain normal cardiorespiratory fitness. Therefore, we believe that it is important to promote cardiovascular health to KD patients and KD patients should exercise as normal peers. However, since KD patients might still have compromised coronary perfusion during exercise, it remains crucial to assess and monitor cardiovascular risk of KD patients. Max-Z of CA correlates with PRPP modest inversely and might be used as a follow-up indicator of CA reserve during exercise after acute stage of KD. PMID:26765431

  3. Cardiopulmonary Function, Exercise Capacity, and Echocardiography Finding of Pediatric Patients With Kawasaki Disease: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Tuan, Sheng-Hui; Li, Min-Hui; Hsu, Miao-Ju; Tsai, Yun-Jeng; Chen, Yin-Han; Liao, Tin-Yun; Lin, Ko-Long

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery (CA) abnormalities influence exercise capacity (EC) of patients with Kawasaki disease (KD), and Z-score of CA is a well established method for detecting CA aneurysm. We studied the influence of KD on cardiopulmonary function and EC; meanwhile we analyzed echocardiographic findings of KD patients. We also assessed the correlation between CA Z-score and EC of KD patients to see if CA Z-score of KD patients could reflect EC during exercise.Sixty-three KD patients were recruited as KD group 1 from children (aged 5-18 y) who received transthoracic echocardiographic examinations and symptom-limited treadmill exercise test for regular follow-up of KD from January 2010 to October 2014 in 1 medical center. We then divided KD group 1 into KD group 2 (<5 y, n = 12) and KD group 3 (≥5 y, n = 51) according to time interval between KD onset to when patients received test. Control groups were matched by age, sex, and body mass index. Max-Z of CA was defined as the maximal Z-score of the proximal LCA or RCA by Dalliarre equation or Fuse calculator.All routine parameters measured during standard exercise test were similar between KD and control groups, except that peak rate pressure products (PRPPs) in KD group 1 to 3 were all lower than corresponding control groups significantly (P = 0.010, 0.020, and 0.049, respectively). PRPPs correlated with Max-Z of CA by both equations modest inversely (by Dallaire, P = 0.017, Spearman rho = -0.301; by Fuse, P = 0.014, Spearman rho = -0.309).Our study recruited larger number of KD patients and provided a newer data of EC of KD patients. Our finding suggests that after acute stage of KD, patients could maintain normal cardiorespiratory fitness. Therefore, we believe that it is important to promote cardiovascular health to KD patients and KD patients should exercise as normal peers. However, since KD patients might still have compromised coronary perfusion during exercise, it remains crucial to assess and monitor cardiovascular risk of KD patients. Max-Z of CA correlates with PRPP modest inversely and might be used as a follow-up indicator of CA reserve during exercise after acute stage of KD. PMID:26765431

  4. Exercise and NO production: relevance and implications in the cardiopulmonary system

    PubMed Central

    Nosarev, Alexei V.; Smagliy, Lyudmila V.; Anfinogenova, Yana; Popov, Sergey V.; Kapilevich, Leonid V.

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the existing knowledge about the effects of physical exercise on nitric oxide (NO) production in the cardiopulmonary system. The authors review the sources of NO in the cardiopulmonary system; involvement of three forms of NO synthases (eNOS, nNOS, and iNOS) in exercise physiology; exercise-induced modulation of NO and/or NOS in physiological and pathophysiological conditions in human subjects and animal models in the absence and presence of pharmacological modulators; and significance of exercise-induced NO production in health and disease. The authors suggest that physical activity significantly improves functioning of the cardiovascular system through an increase in NO bioavailability, potentiation of antioxidant defense, and decrease in the expression of reactive oxygen species-forming enzymes. Regular physical exercises are considered a useful approach to treat cardiovascular diseases. Future studies should focus on detailed identification of (i) the exercise-mediated mechanisms of NO exchange; (ii) optimal exercise approaches to improve cardiovascular function in health and disease; and (iii) physical effort thresholds. PMID:25610830

  5. Effect of Regular Exercise on Cardiopulmonary Fitness in Males With Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Hee; Kong, In Deok; Kim, Sung Hoon; Shinn, Jong Mock; Kim, Jong Heon; Yi, Dongsoo; Lee, Jin Hyeong; Chang, Jae Seung; Kim, Tae-ho; Kim, Eun Ju

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the cardiopulmonary endurance of subjects with spinal cord injury by measuring the maximal oxygen consumption with varying degrees of spinal cord injury level, age, and regular exercise. Methods We instructed the subjects to perform exercises using arm ergometer on healthy adults at 20 years of age or older with spinal cord injury, and their maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) was measured with a metabolic measurement system. The exercise proceeded stepwise according to the exercise protocol and was stopped when the subject was exhausted or when VO2 reached an equilibriu Results Among the 40 subjects, there were 10 subjects with cervical cord injury, 27 with thoracic cord injury, and 3 with lumbar cord injury. Twenty-five subjects who were exercised regularly showed statistically higher results of VO2max than those who did not exercise regularly. Subjects with cervical injury showed statistically lower VO2max than the subjects with thoracic or lumbar injury out of the 40 subjects with neurologic injury. In addition, higher age showed a statistically lower VO2max. Lastly, the regularly exercising paraplegic group showed higher VO2max than the non-exercising paraplegic group. Conclusion There are differences in VO2max of subjects with spinal cord injury according to the degree of neurologic injury, age, and whether the subject participates in regular exercise. We found that regular exercise increased the VO2max in individuals with spinal cord injury. PMID:25750877

  6. Exercise training improves cardiopulmonary and endothelial function in women with breast cancer: findings from the Diana-5 dietary intervention study.

    PubMed

    Giallauria, Francesco; Vitelli, Alessandra; Maresca, Luigi; Santucci De Magistris, Maria; Chiodini, Paolo; Mattiello, Amalia; Gentile, Marco; Mancini, Maria; Grieco, Alessandra; Russo, Angelo; Lucci, Rosa; Torella, Giorgio; Berrino, Franco; Panico, Salvatore; Vigorito, Carlo

    2016-03-01

    To investigate whether exercise training (ET) improves cardiopulmonary and endothelial function in women with breast cancer (BC). Fifty-one female patients (aged between 39 and 72 years) with a history of primary invasive BC within the previous 5 years and enrolled in the Mediterranean diet-based DIANA (diet and androgens)-5 Trial were subdivided into 2 groups: an ET group (n = 25) followed a formal ET program of moderate intensity (3 session/week on a bicycle at 60-70 % VO2peak for 3 months, followed by one session/week until 1-year follow-up), while a control group (n = 26) did not perform any formal ET. At baseline and at 1-year follow-up, all patients underwent cardiopulmonary exercise stress test (CPET) and measurements of vascular endothelial function by peripheral artery tonometry (Reactive Hyperemia Index, RHI). There were no significant differences between the groups in baseline anthropometrical, BC characteristics, and metabolic profile. No differences in baseline CPET and RHI parameters were found. Peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) significantly increased in ET group (from 12.4 ± 2.9 to 14.3 ± 3.3 mL/kg/min, p < 0.001) compared to the control group (from 12.8 ± 2.5 to 12.6 ± 2.8 mL/kg/min, p = 0.55; p < 0.001 between groups). Compared to the control group (from 2.0 ± 0.4 to 1.9 ± 0.4, p = 0.62), the ET group showed a significant improvement of RHI after 1 year (from 2.1 ± 0.7 to 2.5 ± 0.8, p < 0.001). Changes in VO2peak were correlated with changes in RHI (ΔVO2peak vs. ΔRHI: r = 0.47, p = 0.017). In BC survivors, ET program improves cardiopulmonary functional capacity and vascular endothelial function after 12 months. Whether these changes may favorably modulate some of the pathophysiological mechanisms implied in cancer evolution should be investigated. PMID:26016834

  7. Contrasting Cardiopulmonary Responses to Incremental Exercise in Patients with Schistosomiasis-Associated and Idiopathic Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension with Similar Resting Hemodynamic Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Valois, Fabricio Martins; Nery, Luiz Eduardo; Ramos, Roberta Pulcheri; Ferreira, Eloara Vieira Machado; Silva, Celia Camelo; Neder, Jose Alberto; Ota-Arakaki, Jaquelina Sonoe

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported that schistosomiasis-associated PAH (Sch-PAH) has a more benign clinical course compared with idiopathic PAH (IPAH). We therefore hypothesized that Sch-PAH subjects would present with less impaired cardiopulmonary and metabolic responses to exercise than IPAH patients, even with similar resting pulmonary hemodynamic abnormalities. The aim of this study was to contrast physiologic responses to incremental exercise on cycle ergometer between subjects with Sch-PAH and IPAH. We performed incremental cardiopulmonary exercise tests (CPET) in subjects newly diagnosed with IPAH (n?=?9) and Sch-PAH (n?=?8), within 1 month of the hemodynamic study and before the initiation of specific therapy for PAH. There were no significant between-group differences in cardiac index, pulmonary vascular resistance or mean pulmonary artery pressure. However, mean peak oxygen uptake (VO2) was greater in Sch-PAH than IPAH patients (75.521.4 vs 54.116.1% predicted, p?=?0.016), as well as the ratio of increase in VO2 to work rate (8.21.0 vs 6.81.8 mL/min/W, p?=?0.03). Additionally, the slope of the ventilatory response as a function of CO2 output was lower in Sch-PAH (40.33.9 vs 55.619.8; p?=?0.04), and the heart rate response for a given change in VO2 was also diminished in Sch-PAH compared to IPAH (80.120.6 vs 123.039.2 beats/L/min; p?=?0.02). In conclusion, Sch-PAH patients had less impaired physiological responses to exercise than IPAH subjects with similar resting hemodynamic dysfunction. Our data suggest a more preserved cardiopulmonary response to exercise in Sch-PAH which might be related to its better clinical course compared to IPAH. PMID:24498356

  8. Effect of exercise training on cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, G. W.; Convertino, V. A.; Nadel, E. R.

    1993-01-01

    We studied the stimulus-response characteristics of cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance (FVR) in four groups of male volunteer subjects: i) unfit, ii) physically fit, iii) before and after 10 wk of endurance training (chronic blood volume expansion), and iv) before and after acute blood volume expansion. We assessed the relationship between reflex stimulus, i.e., changes in central venous pressure and response, i.e., FVR, during unloading of cardiopulmonary mechanoreceptors with lower body negative pressure (LBNP, 0 to -20 mm Hg). The slope of the linear relationship between FVR and CVP, the index of the responsiveness of this baroreflex, was significantly diminished (> 50%) in the fit subjects compared with the unfit. The slope of the FVR-CVP relationship was inversely correlated with the subject's total blood volume, suggesting that blood volume expansion was related to the attenuated CP baroreflex. In the exercise training study, maximal oxygen consumption and blood volume increased following 10 wk of endurance training (N = 14) but were unchanged in the time control group (N = 7). The slope of the FVR-CVP relationship was significantly reduced (32%) following 10 wk of training but was unchanged in the time control group. The reduction in slope of the FVR-CVP relationship was inversely related to the increase in blood volume associated with exercise training. Acute blood volume expansion 8 ml.kg-1 body weight with 5% human serum albumin solution) significantly reduced the slope of the FVR-CVP relationship. These data support the hypothesis that the attenuated forearm vascular reflex in physically fit individuals is related to a training-induced hypervolemia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  9. Sample Proficiency Test exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaraz, A; Gregg, H; Koester, C

    2006-02-05

    The current format of the OPCW proficiency tests has multiple sets of 2 samples sent to an analysis laboratory. In each sample set, one is identified as a sample, the other as a blank. This method of conducting proficiency tests differs from how an OPCW designated laboratory would receive authentic samples (a set of three containers, each not identified, consisting of the authentic sample, a control sample, and a blank sample). This exercise was designed to test the reporting if the proficiency tests were to be conducted. As such, this is not an official OPCW proficiency test, and the attached report is one method by which LLNL might report their analyses under a more realistic testing scheme. Therefore, the title on the report ''Report of the Umpteenth Official OPCW Proficiency Test'' is meaningless, and provides a bit of whimsy for the analyses and readers of the report.

  10. Effects of acceleration in the Gz axis on human cardiopulmonary responses to exercise.

    PubMed

    Bonjour, Julien; Bringard, Aurélien; Antonutto, Guglielmo; Capelli, Carlo; Linnarsson, Dag; Pendergast, David R; Ferretti, Guido

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this paper was to develop a model from experimental data allowing a prediction of the cardiopulmonary responses to steady-state submaximal exercise in varying gravitational environments, with acceleration in the G(z) axis (a (g)) ranging from 0 to 3 g. To this aim, we combined data from three different experiments, carried out at Buffalo, at Stockholm and inside the Mir Station. Oxygen consumption, as expected, increased linearly with a (g). In contrast, heart rate increased non-linearly with a (g), whereas stroke volume decreased non-linearly: both were described by quadratic functions. Thus, the relationship between cardiac output and a (g) was described by a fourth power regression equation. Mean arterial pressure increased with a (g) non linearly, a relation that we interpolated again with a quadratic function. Thus, total peripheral resistance varied linearly with a (g). These data led to predict that maximal oxygen consumption would decrease drastically as a (g) is increased. Maximal oxygen consumption would become equal to resting oxygen consumption when a (g) is around 4.5 g, thus indicating the practical impossibility for humans to stay and work on the biggest Planets of the Solar System. PMID:21437604

  11. Lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide metabolites in sedentary subjects and sportsmen before and after a cardiopulmonary test.

    PubMed

    Lo Presti, Rosalia; Canino, Baldassare; Montana, Maria; Caimi, Gregorio

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the effects of an exercise test on some indices of oxidative status and endothelial function, in trained and untrained subjects. We examined lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide metabolites (NOx) and their ratio before and after a cardiopulmonary test, using a cycloergometer. We enrolled 60 male subjects who practiced sport unprofessionally, subdivided in two groups (A and B) according to the values of VO2max. Group A included sportsmen with poor or fair aerobic fitness (VO2max <39 ml/Kg/min), group B sportsmen with average to excellent aerobic fitness (VO2max >39 ml/Kg/min). The control group included 19 male sedentary subjects. Lipid peroxidation was evaluated by detection of the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS); the NOx were evaluated employing the Griess reagent. At rest, in comparison with sedentary controls, an increase in TBARS, NOx and TBARS/NOx ratio was found in all sportsmen and partially in the two groups. After the cardiopulmonary test, the increase of TBARS and TBARS/NOx ratio was significantly more evident in sedentary controls than in sportsmen. No variation was observed for NOx in any group. These data suggest that sportsmen are protected against the acute oxidative stress induced by an exercise test, and that protection is not strictly dependent on the aerobic fitness. PMID:22710809

  12. Heparin Sensitivity Test for Patients Requiring Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    DeBois, William J.; Liu, Junli; Elmer, Barbara; Ebrahimi, Haleh; Voevidko, Lilia; Lee, Leonard Y.; Krieger, Karl H.; Isom, Wayne W.; Girardi, Leonard N.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: Anticoagulation for the open heart surgery patient undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is achieved with the use of heparin. The industry standard of activated clotting time (ACT) was used to measure the effect of heparin. The commonly acceptable target time of anticoagulation adequacy is 480 seconds or greater. Some patients, however, exhibit resistance to standard dosing of heparin and do not reach target anticoagulation time (480 seconds). Antithrombin III deficiency has been previously cited as the cause of heparin resistance. Early detection of heparin resistance (HR) may avoid both the delayed start of CPB and inadequate anticoagulation, if emergency bypass is required. An anticoagulation sensitivity test (AST) was developed by adding 12 units of porcine mucosa heparin to the ACT tube (International Technidyne, celite type). Before anticoagulation, 4 mL of blood was drawn from the patient arterial line. Following the manufacturers instructions, 2 mL of blood was added to each tube (ACT-baseline and ACT-AST). Three minutes after anticoagulation with 4 mg heparin/kg body weight, a second sample (ACT-CPB) was taken to determine anticoagulation adequacy. The ACT times of each sample were recorded for 300 procedures occurring during 2004 and were retrospectively reviewed. Heparin resistance occurred in ?20% of the patients (n = 61). In 54 patients, heparin resistance was predicted by the ACT-AST. This was determined by the presence of an ACT-AST time and an ACT-CPB that were both <480 seconds. The positive predictive value was 90%, with a false positive rate of 3%. Heparin resistance occurs in patients undergoing CPB. We describe a simple and reliable test to avoid the delays of assessing anticoagulation for CPB (90% positive predictive value). Depending on program guidelines, patients can be given additional heparin or antithrombin III derivatives to aid in anticoagulation. An additional ACT must be performed and reach target times before CPB initiation. Testing of patient blood before the time of incision for sensitivity to heparin is a way to avoid a delay that can be critical in the care of the patient. Commercial tests are available, but efficacy data are limited, and they lead to added inventory expense. This method of titrating a diluted heparin additive, mixed with patient blood in a familiar ACT test, has proven to be an inexpensive and reliable test to predict patients sensitivity to heparin. PMID:17312901

  13. Protein carbonyl groups in trained subjects before and after a cardiopulmonary test.

    PubMed

    Lo Presti, R; Canino, B; Cilluffo, P; Calandrino, V; Hopps, E; Caimi, G

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise influences the body's oxidative status. The modifications can involve lipids, proteins and nucleic acids, and different effects seem to be induced by regular and acute exercise respectively. We examined protein oxidation, expressed as concentration of protein carbonyl groups (PC), in trained subjects before (time 0), 10 min (time 1) and 24 hours (time 2) after a cardiopulmonary test performed on a cycloergometer. We enrolled 38 trained subjects (26 men and 12 women), subdivided in two groups (A1 and B1) of 19 subjects each, according to the median value of VO2max, and in two groups (A2 and B2) of 19 subjects each, according to the median value of PC at baseline. PC concentration was measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The groups A1 and B1 did not differ from each other as regards the basal PC level and groups A2 and B2 were not different as regards the VO2max. At time 1 PC showed a significant increase in comparison with baseline in trained subjects as a whole group, as well as in each subgroup. At time 2, PC were decreased in comparison with both times 0 and 1 in the whole group and in subgroups A1 and B2, whereas in subgroups A2 and B1 the PC value at time 2 was not different compared to time 0. The percentage increase of PC at time 1 vs time 0, as well as the percentage decrease at time 2 vs time 1 and time 0 respectively, were not different between subgroups A1 and B1. On the contrary, the percentage variations observed at each interval were significantly different between subgroups A2 and B2. The results suggest a reaction of antioxidant systems to acute exercise in trained subjects, influenced by basal PC levels more than by aerobic fitness. PMID:23603325

  14. [The exercise test in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Rodrguez de Roa, E

    1997-11-01

    Arterial hypertension is characterized for abnormalities in its different stages, progressing from a hyperdynamic stage with increased volume and cardiac output with a normal peripheral resistance to increased in peripheral resistance and normal cardiac output in established hypertension. During childhood and adolescence, the risk for developing hypertension, because of a positive family history or high normal values of casual Blood Pressure (BP), could be detected according to the BP response to exercise during a treadmill test. It may be necessary to begin non pharmacological or even pharmacological treatment in patients with abnormally high values. Adolescents with normal casual BP may have abnormally high BP with exercise, while some of those with high normal BP at rest, will have normal BP response to exercise. Additionally, treadmill test, will allow to determine the level of exercise secure for each adolescent and to measure the conditioning effect of exercise. PMID:9471231

  15. Maximising the clinical use of exercise gaseous exchange testing in children with repaired cyanotic congenital heart defects: the development of an appropriate test strategy.

    PubMed

    McManus, A; Leung, M

    2000-04-01

    Implicit in deciding upon an exercise test strategy to elucidate cardiopulmonary function in children with congenital heart disease are appropriate application of gas exchange techniques and the significance of the data collected to the specific congenital heart disorder. Post-operative cardiopulmonary responses to exercise in cyanotic disorders are complex and, despite a large body of extant literature in paediatric patients, there has been much difficulty in achieving quality and consistency of data. Maximal oxygen uptake is widely recognised as the best single indicator of cardiopulmonary function and has therefore been the focus of most clinical exercise tests in children. Many children with various heart anomalies are able to exercise to maximum without adverse symptoms, and it is essential that test termination is based on the same criteria for these children. Choosing appropriate, valid indicators of maximum in children with congenital heart disease is beset by difficulties. Such maximal intensity exercise testing procedures have been challenged on the grounds that they do not give a good indication of cardiopulmonary function that is relevant to real life situations. Furthermore, they are prone to much interindividual variability and error in the definition of maximal exertion. Alternative strategies have been proposed which focus upon dynamic submaximal and kinetic cardiopulmonary responses, which are thought to be less dependent on maximal voluntary effort and more suited to the daily activity patterns of children. These methods are also not without problems. Variability in anaerobic threshold measurements and controversy regarding its physiological meaning have been debated. It is recommended that an appropriate cardiopulmonary exercise gas exchange test strategy, which provides clinically useful information for children with cyanotic congenital heart disease, should include both maximal and submaximal data. The inclusion of oxygen uptake kinetics and ventilatory data are encouraged, since they may allow the distinction between a pulmonary, cardiovascular or inactivity related exercise limitation. PMID:10783899

  16. Changes in cardiopulmonary function in normal adults after the Rockport 1 mile walking test: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung; Lee, Hye-Young; Lee, Do-Youn; Nam, Chan-Woo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes of cardiopulmonary function in normal adults after the Rockport 1 mile walking test. [Subjects and Methods] University students (13 males and 27 females) participated in this study. Before and after the Rockport 1 mile walking test, pulmonary function, respiratory pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake were measured. [Results] Significant improvements in forced vital capacity and maximal inspiratory pressure were observed after the Rockport 1 mile walking test in males, and significant improvements in forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume at 1?s, maximal inspiratory pressure, and maximal expiratory pressure were observed after the Rockport 1 mile walking test in females. However, the maximal oxygen uptake was not significantly different. [Conclusion] Our findings indicate that the Rockport 1 mile walking test changes cardiopulmonary function in males and females, and that it may improve cardiopulmonary function in middle-aged and older adults and provide basic data on cardiopulmonary endurance. PMID:26356048

  17. Exercise stress testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, B.

    1975-01-01

    Positive maximum stress tests in the management of coronary patients are discussed. It is believed that coronary angiography would be the ultimate test to predict the future of patients with coronary heart disease. Progression of angina, myocardial infarction, and death due to heart disease were analyzed.

  18. Exercise stress test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... must not eat, smoke, or drink beverages containing caffeine or alcohol for 3 hours (or more) before ... most cases, you will be asked to avoid caffeine for 24 hours before the test. This includes: ...

  19. Specificity of a Maximal Step Exercise Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darby, Lynn A.; Marsh, Jennifer L.; Shewokis, Patricia A.; Pohlman, Roberta L.

    2007-01-01

    To adhere to the principle of "exercise specificity" exercise testing should be completed using the same physical activity that is performed during exercise training. The present study was designed to assess whether aerobic step exercisers have a greater maximal oxygen consumption (max VO sub 2) when tested using an activity specific, maximal step

  20. Specificity of a Maximal Step Exercise Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darby, Lynn A.; Marsh, Jennifer L.; Shewokis, Patricia A.; Pohlman, Roberta L.

    2007-01-01

    To adhere to the principle of "exercise specificity" exercise testing should be completed using the same physical activity that is performed during exercise training. The present study was designed to assess whether aerobic step exercisers have a greater maximal oxygen consumption (max VO sub 2) when tested using an activity specific, maximal step…

  1. Cardiopulmonary Response to Exercise in COPD and Overweight Patients: Relationship between Unloaded Cycling and Maximal Oxygen Uptake Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Ba, Abdoulaye; Brgeon, Fabienne; Delliaux, Stphane; Ciss, Fallou; Samb, Abdoulaye; Jammes, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary response to unloaded cycling may be related to higher workloads. This was assessed in male subjects: 18 healthy sedentary subjects (controls), 14 hypoxemic patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and 31 overweight individuals (twelve were hypoxemic). They underwent an incremental exercise up to the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), preceded by a 2?min unloaded cycling period. Oxygen uptake (VO2), heart rate (HR), minute ventilation (VE), and respiratory frequency (fR) were averaged every 10?s. At the end of unloaded cycling period, HR increase was significantly accentuated in COPD and hypoxemic overweight subjects (resp., +14 2 and +13 1.5?min?1, compared to +7.5 1.5?min?1 in normoxemic overweight subjects and +8 1.8?min?1 in controls). The fR increase was accentuated in all overweight subjects (hypoxemic: +4.5 0.8; normoxemic: +3.9 0.7?min?1) compared to controls (+2.5 0.8?min?1) and COPDs (+2.0 0.7?min?1). The plateau VE increase during unloaded cycling was positively correlated with VE values measured at the ventilatory threshold and VO2max. Measurement of ventilation during unloaded cycling may serve to predict the ventilatory performance of COPD patients and overweight subjects during an exercise rehabilitation program. PMID:25866778

  2. Oxidative stress and antioxidant defense mechanisms linked to exercise during cardiopulmonary and metabolic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey; Bell, Heather K

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple human diseases, in addition to the aging process. Although various stimuli exist, acute exercise is known to induce a transient increase in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), evident by several reports of increased oxidative damage following acute bouts of aerobic and anaerobic exercise. Although the results are somewhat mixed and appear disease dependent, individuals with chronic disease experience an exacerbation in oxidative stress following acute exercise when compared to healthy individuals. However, this increased oxidant stress may serve as a necessary “signal” for the upregulation in antioxidant defenses, thereby providing protection against subsequent exposure to prooxidant environments within susceptible individuals. Here we present studies related to both acute exercise-induced oxidative stress in those with disease, in addition to studies focused on adaptations resulting from increased RONS exposure associated with chronic exercise training in persons with disease. PMID:20046644

  3. Exercise Testing In Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, John R.; Jones, Norman L.

    1974-01-01

    This article outlines areas where exercise testing may be helpful to the clinician, and describes how the various tests can be used to quantify simple cardiac and pulmonary responses to exercise. Exercise testing is also discussed as a diagnostic tool in areas such as ischemic heart disease or asthma. PMID:20469057

  4. [Preflight assessment by hypoxic inhalation test in cardiopulmonary patients].

    PubMed

    Lebzelter, J; Fink, G; Kleinman, E; Rosenberg, I; Kramer, M R

    2000-04-16

    Flying may expose passengers to hypoxic conditions, which may induce hypoxemia, particularly in those with chronic heart and/or lung disease. Onset of dyspnea, wheezing, chest pain, cyanosis and right heart failure can lead to urgent need for oxygen during flight. The hypoxia inhalation test (HIT) provides a safe and simple means of identifying those who may develop hypoxemia during flight. We report our experience with 48 self-reporting patients who underwent HIT prior to pre-planned air travel. They inhaled for 15-minute periods a reduced oxygen concentration (F1O2 15%) under normobaric conditions, during which O2 saturation was monitored by pulse oximeter; electrocardiogram, blood pressure and symptoms were also monitored. O2 saturation of < 85% (PaO2 50 mm Hg) was considered a positive test. In the 8 cases (17%) with a positive test, 5 had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and 3 had cardiovascular and/or combined heart-lung disease. We calculated predicted O2 partial pressure in altitude (PaO2ALT) and compared it to actual results in the 8 patients with a positive HIT. In 5, use of the predicted formula would have under-diagnosed the hypoxemia that developed during the HIT. Thus, the results of the HIT changed treatment strategy in these patients. We recommend that patients with positive tests use O2 (2LPM or 4LPM) during flight. HIT is practical and of potential benefit in the objective assessment of patients with various degrees of heart, lung or combined heart-lung disease. Clinicians should be aware of the relative risk of hypoxia during flight in such patients, and of the value of HIT in identifying them, leading to increase in its use. PMID:10883202

  5. [Exercise testing and blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Brenner, R; Allemann, Y

    2011-08-24

    Cardiac monitoring with ECG and blood pressure recording is routinely performed during a stress test and blood pressure response is an important part of its interpretation. Unfortunately, the latter is not straightforward, partly because of the inconsistent definition of a pathologic blood pressure response, the different populations included in the studies and divergent test modalities. An exaggerated blood pressure response in normotensive subjects without coronary heart disease is associated with an increased risk of future arterial hypertension, whereas in patients with known or suspected coronary heart disease, prognosis is not worse than in patients with normal blood pressure response. By contrast, exercise induced hypotension, particularly in patients with coronary artery disease indicates an increased risk for cardiac events and should be investigated further, usually by performing coronary angiography. PMID:21863574

  6. In vitro characterization and performance testing of the ension pediatric cardiopulmonary assist system.

    PubMed

    Pantalos, George M; Horrell, Tim; Merkley, Tracey; Sahetya, Sarina; Speakman, Jeff; Johnson, Greg; Gartner, Mark

    2009-01-01

    In the last 40 years, mechanical circulatory support devices have become an effective option for the treatment of end-stage heart failure in adults. Few possibilities, however, are available for pediatric cardiopulmonary support. Ension Inc. (Pittsburgh, PA) is developing a pediatric cardiopulmonary assist system (pCAS) intended to address the limitations of existing devices used for this patient population. The pCAS device is an integrated unit containing an oxygenator and pump within a single casing, significantly reducing the size and blood-contacting surface area in comparison to current devices. Prototype pCAS devices produce appropriate flows and pressures while minimizing priming volume and preparation time. The pCAS was tested on a mock circulation designed to approximate the hemodynamic parameters of a small infant using a 10-Fr. extracorporeal membrane oxygenation inflow cannula and an 8-Fr. extracorporeal membrane oxygenation outflow cannula. Revision 4 of the device provided a flow rate of 0.42 L/min at 6,500 RPM. Revision 5, featuring improved impeller and diffuser designs, provided a flow rate of 0.57 L/min at 5,000 RPM. The performance tests indicate that for this cannulae combination, the pCAS pump is capable of delivering sufficient flows for patients <5 kg. PMID:19293710

  7. Computer Based System for Breath-By-Breath Analysis of Cardio-Pulmonary Responses to Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, David H.; Milhorn, H. T.

    1977-01-01

    A computer based system for measurement of respiratory variables is presented. Tidal volume, respiratory frequency, minute ventilation, alveolar ventilation, dead space, oxygen transfer, carbon dioxide transfer, respiratory exchange ratio, end-tidal oxygen, end-tidal carbon dioxide, and heart rate are determined on a breath-to-breath basis. The computer is programmed to control the duration and intensity of the work involved. This program instructs the subject when to start and stop exercising, controls switching of the ergometer from an idle speed, and selects the work load. The computer system analyzes the data, averages multiple experiments and plots averages of multiple experiments along with standard error bars. Plotting time scales can be expanded to inspect selected portions of an experiment. The system is especially adapted to careful observation of the responses within the first few seconds of a change in work load. Appropriate computer programs and mathematical equations are presented. The results of several experiments are compared with data from other sources and found to be in good agreement.

  8. Exercise testing in asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Magne, Julien; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Pirard, Luc A

    2014-02-01

    The management and the clinical decision making in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis are challenging. An "aggressive" management, including early aortic valve replacement, is debated in these patients. However, the optimal timing for surgery remains controversial due to the lack of prospective data on the determinants of aortic stenosis progression, multicenter studies on risk stratification, and randomized studies on patient management. Exercise stress testing with or without imaging is strictly contraindicated in symptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis. Exercise stress test is now recommended by current guidelines in asymptomatic patients and may provide incremental prognostic value. Indeed, the development of symptoms during exercise or an abnormal blood pressure response are associated with poor outcome and should be considered as an indication for surgery, as suggested by the most recently updated European Society of Cardiology 2012 guidelines. Exercise stress echocardiography may also improve the risk stratification and identify asymptomatic patients at higher risk of a cardiac event. When the test is combined with imaging, echocardiography during exercise should be recommended rather than post-exercise echocardiography. During exercise, an increase >18 to 20 mm Hg in mean pressure gradient, absence of improvement in left ventricular ejection fraction (i.e., absence of contractile reserve), and/or a systolic pulmonary arterial pressure >60 mm Hg (i.e., exercise pulmonary hypertension) are suggestive signs of advanced stages of the disease and impaired prognosis. Hence, exercise stress test may identify resting asymptomatic patients who develop exercise abnormalities and in whom surgery is recommended according to current guidelines. Exercise stress echocardiography may further unmask a subset of asymptomatic patients (i.e., without exercise stress test abnormalities) who are at high risk of reduced cardiac event free survival. In these patients, early surgery could be beneficial, whereas regular follow-up seems more appropriate in patients without echocardiographic abnormalities during exercise. PMID:24524744

  9. Use of exercise testing in the evaluation of interventional efficacy: an official ERS statement.

    PubMed

    Puente-Maestu, Luis; Palange, Paolo; Casaburi, Richard; Laveneziana, Pierantonio; Maltais, François; Neder, J Alberto; O'Donnell, Denis E; Onorati, Paolo; Porszasz, Janos; Rabinovich, Roberto; Rossiter, Harry B; Singh, Sally; Troosters, Thierry; Ward, Susan

    2016-02-01

    This document reviews 1) the measurement properties of commonly used exercise tests in patients with chronic respiratory diseases and 2) published studies on their utilty and/or evaluation obtained from MEDLINE and Cochrane Library searches between 1990 and March 2015.Exercise tests are reliable and consistently responsive to rehabilitative and pharmacological interventions. Thresholds for clinically important changes in performance are available for several tests. In pulmonary arterial hypertension, the 6-min walk test (6MWT), peak oxygen uptake and ventilation/carbon dioxide output indices appear to be the variables most responsive to vasodilators. While bronchodilators do not always show clinically relevant effects in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, high-intensity constant work-rate (endurance) tests (CWRET) are considerably more responsive than incremental exercise tests and 6MWTs. High-intensity CWRETs need to be standardised to reduce interindividual variability. Additional physiological information and responsiveness can be obtained from isotime measurements, particularly of inspiratory capacity and dyspnoea. Less evidence is available for the endurance shuttle walk test. Although the incremental shuttle walk test and 6MWT are reliable and less expensive than cardiopulmonary exercise testing, two repetitions are needed at baseline. All exercise tests are safe when recommended precautions are followed, with evidence suggesting that no test is safer than others. PMID:26797036

  10. Eccentric exercise testing and training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarkson, Priscilla M.

    1994-01-01

    Some researchers and practitioners have touted the benefits of including eccentric exercise in strength training programs. However, others have challenged its use because they believe that eccentric actions are dangerous and lead to injuries. Much of the controversy may be based on a lack of understanding of the physiology of eccentric actions. This review will present data concerning eccentric exercise in strength training, the physiological characteristics of eccentric exercise, and the possible stimulus for strength development. Also a discussion of strength needs for extended exposure to microgravity will be presented. Not only is the use of eccentric exercise controversial, but the name itself is fraught with problems. The correct pronunciation is with a hard 'c' so that the word sounds like ekscentric. The confusion in pronunciation may have been prevented if the spelling that Asmussen used in 1953, excentric, had been adopted. Another problem concerns the expressions used to describe eccentric exercise. Commonly used expressions are negatives, eccentric contractions, lengthening contractions, resisted muscle lengthenings, muscle lengthening actions, and eccentric actions. Some of these terms are cumbersome (i.e., resisted muscle lengthenings), one is slang (negatives), and another is an oxymoron (lengthening contractions). Only eccentric action is appropriate and adoption of this term has been recommended by Cavanagh. Despite the controversy that surrounds eccentric exercise, it is important to note that these types of actions play an integral role in normal daily activities. Eccentric actions are used during most forms of movement, for example, in walking when the foot touches the ground and the center of mass is decelerated and in lowering objects, such as placing a bag of groceries in the car.

  11. Exercise testing in metabolic myopathies.

    PubMed

    Tarnopolsky, Mark

    2012-02-01

    Metabolic myopathies are a group of genetic disorders specifically affecting glucose/glycogen, lipid, and mitochondrial metabolism. The main metabolic myopathies that are evaluated in this article are the mitochondrial myopathies, fatty acid oxidation defects, and glycogen storage disease. This article focuses on the usefulness of exercise in the evaluation of genetic metabolic myopathies. PMID:22239882

  12. Reversibility of cardiopulmonary impairment after laparoscopic repair of large hiatal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Asti, Emanuele; Bonavina, Luigi; Lombardi, Massimo; Bandera, Francesco; Secchi, Francesco; Guazzi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Giant hiatus hernia with or without intrathoracic gastric volvulus often presents with symptoms suggestive of both cardiac and pulmonary compression. Cardiopulmonary impairment may be reversible in these patients by laparoscopic crural repair and fundoplication as shown in this case report. Cardiac magnetic resonance and the cardiopulmonary exercise test may help selecting patients for surgery. These preliminary findings led us to start a prospective study using this multimodality diagnostic approach. PMID:26210719

  13. Exercise thallium testing in ventricular preexcitation

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, S.; Gornick, C.; Grund, F.; Shafer, R.; Weir, E.K.

    1987-05-01

    Ventricular preexcitation, as seen in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, results in a high frequency of positive exercise electrocardiographic responses. Why this occurs is unknown but is not believed to reflect myocardial ischemia. Exercise thallium testing is often used for noninvasive assessment of coronary artery disease in patients with conditions known to result in false-positive electrocardiographic responses. To assess the effects of ventricular preexcitation on exercise thallium testing, 8 men (aged 42 +/- 4 years) with this finding were studied. No subject had signs or symptoms of coronary artery disease. Subjects exercised on a bicycle ergometer to a double product of 26,000 +/- 2,000 (+/- standard error of mean). All but one of the subjects had at least 1 mm of ST-segment depression. Tests were terminated because of fatigue or dyspnea and no patient had chest pain. Thallium test results were abnormal in 5 patients, 2 of whom had stress defects as well as abnormally delayed thallium washout. One of these subjects had normal coronary arteries on angiography with a negative ergonovine challenge, and both had normal exercise radionuclide ventriculographic studies. Delayed thallium washout was noted in 3 of the subjects with ventricular preexcitation and normal stress images. This study suggests that exercise thallium testing is frequently abnormal in subjects with ventricular preexcitation. Ventricular preexcitation may cause dyssynergy of ventricular activation, which could alter myocardial thallium handling, much as occurs with left bundle branch block. Exercise radionuclide ventriculography may be a better test for noninvasive assessment of coronary artery disease in patients with ventricular preexcitation.

  14. A new model of centrifugal blood pump for cardiopulmonary bypass: design improvement, performance, and hemolysis tests.

    PubMed

    Leme, Juliana; Fonseca, Jeison; Bock, Eduardo; da Silva, Cibele; da Silva, Bruno Utiyama; Dos Santos, Alex Eugnio; Dinkhuysen, Jarbas; Andrade, Aron; Biscegli, Jos F

    2011-05-01

    A new model of blood pump for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) application has been developed and evaluated in our laboratories. Inside the pump housing is a spiral impeller that is conically shaped and has threads on its surface. Worm gears provide an axial motion of the blood column. Rotational motion of the conical shape generates a centrifugal pumping effect and improves pumping performance. One annular magnet with six poles is inside the impeller, providing magnetic coupling to a brushless direct current motor. In order to study the pumping performance, a mock loop system was assembled. Mock loop was composed of Tygon tubes (Saint-Gobain Corporation, Courbevoie, France), oxygenator, digital flowmeter, pressure monitor, electronic driver, and adjustable clamp for flow control. Experiments were performed on six prototypes with small differences in their design. Each prototype was tested and flow and pressure data were obtained for rotational speed of 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3000 rpm. Hemolysis was studied using pumps with different internal gap sizes (1.35, 1.45, 1.55, and 1.7 mm). Hemolysis tests simulated CPB application with flow rate of 5 L/min against total pressure head of 350 mm Hg. The results from six prototypes were satisfactory, compared to the results from the literature. However, prototype #6 showed the best results. Best hemolysis results were observed with a gap of 1.45 mm, and showed a normalized index of hemolysis of 0.013 g/100 L. When combined, axial and centrifugal pumping principles produce better hydrodynamic performance without increasing hemolysis. PMID:21595709

  15. Exercise testing in severe emphysema: association with quality of life and lung function.

    PubMed

    Brown, Cynthia D; Benditt, Joshua O; Sciurba, Frank C; Lee, Shing M; Criner, Gerard J; Mosenifar, Zab; Shade, David M; Slivka, William A; Wise, Robert A

    2008-04-01

    Six-minute walk testing (6MWT) and cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) are used to evaluate impairment in emphysema. However, the extent of impairment in these tests as well as the correlation of these tests with each other and lung function in advanced emphysema is not well characterized. During screening for the National Emphysema Treatment Trial, maximum ergometer CPX and 6MWT were performed in 1,218 individuals with severe COPD with an average FEV(1) of 26.9 +/- 7.1 % predicted. Predicted values for 6MWT and CPX were calculated from reference equations. Correlation coefficients and multivariable regression models were used to determine the association between lung function, quality of life (QOL) scores, and exercise measures. The two forms of exercise testing were correlated with each other (r = 0.57, p < 0.0001). However, the impairment of performance on CPX was greater than on the 6MWT (27.6 +/- 16.8 vs. 67.9 +/- 18.9 % predicted). Both exercise tests had similar correlation with measures of QOL, but maximum exercise capacity was better correlated with lung function measures than 6-minute walk distance. After adjustment, 6MWD had a slightly greater association with total SGRQ score than maximal exercise (effect size 0.37 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.25 +/- 0.03 %predicted/unit). Despite advanced emphysema, patients are able to maintain 6MWD to a greater degree than maximum exercise capacity. Moreover, the 6MWT may be a better test of functional capacity given its greater association with QOL measures whereas CPX is a better test of physiologic impairment. PMID:18415810

  16. Heart Rate Recovery Is Impaired After Maximal Exercise Testing in Children with Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Anthony M.; Ward, Kendra M.; Muntz, Devin S.; Thompson, Alexis A.; Rodeghier, Mark; Fernhall, Bo; Liem, Robert I.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine heart rate recovery (HRR) as an indicator of autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction following maximal exercise testing in children and young adults with sickle cell anemia (SCA). Study design Recovery phase heart rate (HR) in the first 5 minutes following maximal exercise testing in 60 subjects with SCA and 30 matched controls without SCA was assessed. The difference between maximal HR and HR at both 1-minute (?HR1min) and 2-minute (?HR2min) recovery was our primary outcome. Results Compared with controls, subjects with SCA demonstrated significantly smaller mean ?HR1min (23 bpm, 95% CI [20, 26] vs. 32 bpm, 95% CI [26, 37], p = 0.006) and ?HR2min (39 bpm, 95% CI [36, 43] vs. 48 bpm, 95% CI [42, 53], p = 0.011). Subjects with SCA also showed smaller mean changes in HR from peak HR to 1 minute, from 1 minute to 2 minutes and from 2 through 5 minutes of recovery by repeated measures testing. In a multivariable regression model, older age was independently associated with smaller ?HR1min in subjects with SCA. Cardiopulmonary fitness and hydroxyurea use, however, were not independent predictors of ?HR1min. Conclusions Children with SCA demonstrate impaired HRR following maximal exercise. Reduced post-exercise HRR in SCA suggests impaired parasympathetic function, which may become progressively worse with age, in this population. PMID:25477159

  17. Cardiopulmonary performance at rest and during exercise in seven patients with increased transradiancy of one lung (`Macleod's syndrome')

    PubMed Central

    Warrell, D. A.; Hughes, J. M. B.; Rosenzweig, D. Y.

    1970-01-01

    A group of seven patients with increased transradiancy of one lung included four with chronic bronchitis. The function of the two lungs combined was assessed by measurement of the lung volumes, airway resistance, and carbon monoxide uptake at rest, and by measurement of pulmonary ventilation, gas exchange, blood gases, and cardiac output at rest and during steady state exercise. The contribution of the hypertransradiant lung to the overall functional abnormalities at rest was estimated using a radioactive gas technique. All the patients had airway obstruction. Pulmonary gas exchange was only mildly affected at rest because of equal reduction of ventilation and perfusion in the abnormal lung, but during exercise ventilation-perfusion inequality increased in some of the patients. Cardiac output was low in five patients during exercise and in four there was excessive lactate production. The greatest physiological abnormalities were seen in two of the chronic bronchitics who had abnormalities of ventilation and perfusion in both lungs. We suggest that a pulmonary vascular abnormality resulting in reduced cardiac output, as well as ventilatory impairment due to airway obstruction, may contribute to the limited exercise capacity of these patients. PMID:5489183

  18. Understanding Exercise, Diet and Lung Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Warm-up Endurance (Cardiopulmonary) Exercise Resistance (Strengthening) Exercise Flexibility (Stretching) Exercise Cool-down If you are over ... household items initially while forming the exercise habit. Flexibility (Stretching) Exercise Gentle stretching exercises can be used ...

  19. Predictive Accuracy of Exercise Stress Testing the Healthy Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamont, Linda S.

    1981-01-01

    Exercise stress testing provides information on the aerobic capacity, heart rate, and blood pressure responses to graded exercises of a healthy adult. The reliability of exercise tests as a diagnostic procedure is discussed in relation to sensitivity and specificity and predictive accuracy. (JN)

  20. Influence of training and maturity status on the cardiopulmonary responses to ramp incremental cycle and upper body exercise in girls.

    PubMed

    McNarry, Melitta A; Welsman, Joanne R; Jones, Andrew M

    2011-02-01

    It has been suggested that the potential for training to alter the physiological responses to exercise in children is related to a "maturational threshold". To address this, we investigated the interaction of swim-training status and maturity on cardiovascular and metabolic responses to lower and upper body exercise. Twenty-one prepubertal [Pre: 11 trained (T), 10 untrained (UT)], 30 pubertal (Pub: 14 T, 16 UT), and 18 postpubertal (Post: 8 T, 10 UT) girls completed ramp incremental exercise on a cycle and an upper body ergometer. In addition to pulmonary gas exchange measurements, stroke volume and cardiac output were estimated by thoracic bioelectrical impedance, and muscle oxygenation status was assessed using near-infrared spectroscopy. All T girls had a higher peak O(2) uptake during cycle (Pre: T 49 5 vs. UT 40 4; Pub: T 46 5 vs. UT 36 4; Post: T 48 5 vs. UT 39 8 mlkg(-1)min(-1); all P < 0.05) and upper body exercise (Pre: T 37 6 vs. UT 32 5; Pub: T 36 5 vs. UT 28 5; Post: T 39 3 vs. UT 28 7 mlkg(-1)min(-1); all P < 0.05). T girls also had a higher peak cardiac output during both modalities, and this reached significance in Pub (cycle: T 21 3 vs. UT 18 3; upper body: T 20 4 vs. UT 15 4 l/min; all P < 0.05) and Post girls (cycle: T 21 4 vs. UT 17 2; upper body: T 22 3 vs. UT 18 2 l/min; all P < 0.05). None of the measured pulmonary, cardiovascular, or metabolic parameters interacted with maturity, and the magnitude of the difference between T and UT girls was similar, irrespective of maturity stage. These results challenge the notion that differences in training status in young people are only evident once a maturational threshold has been exceeded. PMID:21088206

  1. Test retest reliability and minimal detectable change of a novel submaximal graded exercise test in the measurement of graded exercise test duration.

    PubMed

    Taylor, James D; Bandy, William D; Whittemore, Joe D

    2011-05-01

    Measurement of graded exercise test duration is clinically important and can be assessed by maximal graded exercise testing. Yet, limitations of maximal graded exercise testing exist. An alternative to maximal graded exercise testing is submaximal graded exercise testing. However, no studies have investigated the reliability of a submaximal graded exercise test in the measurement of graded exercise test duration. The purpose of this study was to determine the test-retest reliability and minimal detectable change (MDC) of a novel submaximal graded exercise test in the measurement of graded exercise test duration. Fifteen people (4 men, 11 women) with a mean age of 26.20 years (SD = 9.04) participated in this study. A novel submaximal graded exercise test was used to measure graded exercise test duration for each participant. Endpoints of the test were either 85% of age-predicted maximum heart rate or voluntarily stopping the test, whichever endpoint occurred first. Heart rate and graded exercise test duration were constantly measured throughout the test. Graded exercise test duration was defined as the total duration (minutes) of the test. For all participants, the submaximal graded exercise test was conducted at baseline and 48-72 hours thereafter. The intraclass correlation coefficient for the test-retest reliability of the test in determining graded exercise test duration was 0.94 (95% CI = 0.83-0.98). The MDC of the test in the measurement of graded exercise test duration was 0.86 minutes. The results suggest that clinicians can use this novel submaximal graded exercise test to reliably measure graded exercise test duration with a measurement error, as expressed by the MDC, of 0.86 minutes. PMID:21522078

  2. Apical ballooning syndrome following exercise treadmill testing

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, RB; Mamas, MA; El-Omar, M

    2011-01-01

    Transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome is an increasingly recognized cause of acute coronary syndrome, particularly in postmenopausal women, and is the subject of increasing interest to both clinicians and researchers. Emotional and physical stressors are often implicated in its development and, while excess sympathetic drive appears to act as a primary trigger, the exact mechanism remains controversial. The clinical presentation is characterized by transient, often severe, left ventricular dysfunction affecting the mid and apical myocardium. By definition, no significant coronary artery lesions are present, although this may not be recognized at initial presentation. While recovery of function with evidence of limited myocardial necrosis is common, significant complications may manifest in the acute phase. A case involving an elderly patient who developed classical features of the syndrome following an exercise treadmill test is presented. To the authors’ knowledge, the present case is the only such report that meets the recently proposed diagnostic criteria. The present case serves to highlight a rare but important complication of exercise testing in an elderly patient. Recent large systematic reviews have provided valuable insights into the clinical features of this condition. The current article examines the data from these studies and others to provide a comprehensive clinical overview. PMID:21747667

  3. Surgical Placement of Catheters for Long-term Cardiovascular Exercise Testing in Swine.

    PubMed

    De Wijs-Meijler, Daphne P M; Stam, Kelly; van Duin, Richard W B; Verzijl, Annemarie; Reiss, Irwin K; Duncker, Dirk J; Merkus, Daphne

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes the surgical procedure to chronically instrument swine and the procedure to exercise swine on a motor-driven treadmill. Early cardiopulmonary dysfunction is difficult to diagnose, particularly in animal models, as cardiopulmonary function is often measured invasively, requiring anesthesia. As many anesthetic agents are cardiodepressive, subtle changes in cardiovascular function may be masked. In contrast, chronic instrumentation allows for measurement of cardiopulmonary function in the awake state, so that measurements can be obtained under quiet resting conditions, without the effects of anesthesia and acute surgical trauma. Furthermore, when animals are properly trained, measurements can also be obtained during graded treadmill exercise. Flow probes are placed around the aorta or pulmonary artery for measurement of cardiac output and around the left anterior descending coronary artery for measurement of coronary blood flow. Fluid-filled catheters are implanted in the aorta, pulmonary artery, left atrium, left ventricle and right ventricle for pressure measurement and blood sampling. In addition, a 20 G catheter is positioned in the anterior interventricular vein to allow coronary venous blood sampling. After a week of recovery, swine are placed on a motor-driven treadmill, the catheters are connected to pressure and flow meters, and swine are subjected to a five-stage progressive exercise protocol, with each stage lasting 3 min. Hemodynamic signals are continuously recorded and blood samples are taken during the last 30 sec of each exercise stage. The major advantage of studying chronically instrumented animals is that it allows serial assessment of cardiopulmonary function, not only at rest but also during physical stress such as exercise. Moreover, cardiopulmonary function can be assessed repeatedly during disease development and during chronic treatment, thereby increasing statistical power and hence limiting the number of animals required for a study. PMID:26889804

  4. Testing a model of post-stroke exercise behavior.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, Marianne; Resnick, Barbara M; Macko, Richard F

    2006-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability in older Americans, and survivors tend to be sedentary, thereby risking loss of functional gains achieved during rehabilitation and increasing cardiovascular risk. Studies of motivation to exercise in older adults suggest that self-efficacy and outcome expectations are key determinants of initiation and adherence to exercise programs. This study tested a theoretical model of physical activity in stroke survivors. A survey of exercise beliefs and patterns was sent to National Stroke Association stroke support groups. Responses from 312 stroke survivors (mean age 63 years, 57% female, 70% White) indicated that only 31% exercised four times weekly. Self-efficacy and outcome expectations for exercise, before exercise history, and physician recommendation all directly and indirectly influenced self-reported exercise behavior and accounted for 33% of the total variance in exercise behavior. Model testing supported the theory and the model fit the data. Interventions to strengthen self-efficacy and outcome expectations for exercise, along with reminders for clinicians to encourage regular exercise programs, may increase the likelihood of initiating and maintaining an exercise program, potentially improving physical function and cardiovascular fitness in this population. PMID:16422040

  5. Prognostic Relevance of Changes in Exercise Test Variables in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Groepenhoff, Herman; Vonk-Noordegraaf, Anton; van de Veerdonk, Mariëlle C.; Boonstra, Anco; Westerhof, Nico; Bogaard, Harm J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Exercise variables determined in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) at the time of diagnosis, predict survival. It is unknown whether upon treatment, subsequent changes in these exercise variables reflect improvements in survival. The aim of this study was to determine changes in exercise variables in PAH patients and to relate these changes to survival. Methods Baseline cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) variables and six-minute-walk-distance (6MWD) were available from 65 idiopathic PAH patients (50 females; mean age 45±2yrs). The same variables were determined after treatment (13months) in a sub group of 43 patients. To estimate the association between changes in exercise variables and changes in cardiac function, right-ventricle ejection fraction (RVEF) was measured by cardiac MRI at baseline and after treatment in 34 patients. Mean follow-up time after the second CPET was 53 (range: 4-111) months. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to relate survival to baseline and treatment-associated changes in exercise variables. Results Survivors showed a significantly greater change in maximal oxygen uptake than non-survivors and this change in aerobic capacity was significantly related to changes in RVEF. From baseline until the end of the study period, two patients underwent a lung transplantation and 19 patients died. Survival analysis showed that baseline 6MWD (p<0.0001), maximal heart rate (p<0.0001) and the slope relating ventilation with carbon dioxide production (p≤0.05) were significant predictors of survival, whereas baseline oxygen uptake and oxygen pulse held no predictive value. Treatment associated changes in 6MWD (p<0.01), maximal heart rate (p<0.05), oxygen uptake (p<0.001) and oxygen pulse predicted survival (p<0.05), whereas changes in the slope relating ventilation with carbon dioxide production did not. Conclusion Exercise variables with prognostic significance when determined at baseline, retain their prognostic relevance after treatment. However, when changes in exercise variables upon treatment are considered, a different set of variables provides prognostic information. PMID:24039732

  6. Exercise testing and exercise stress echocardiography in asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis.

    PubMed

    Ennezat, P V; Marchaux, S; Iung, B; Chauvel, C; LeJemtel, T H; Pibarot, P

    2009-06-01

    Management of asymptomatic patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (AVS) remains a source of debate. Exercise testing is no longer contraindicated and needs now to be considered when evaluating asymptomatic patients with AVS. Several studies have clearly demonstrated that exercise-elicited symptoms during conventional upright exercise portends clinical events. Semi-supine exercise with continuous Doppler echocardiography monitoring elicits cardiovascular abnormalities that are not detected at rest. Abnormal left ventricular response to exercise and/or major increase in mean transvalvular gradient add to the prognostic value of elicited symptoms in asymptomatic patients with severe AVS. However, preliminary experience needs to be confirmed to warrant routine use of exercise Doppler echocardiography in the evaluation of patients with asymptomatic AVS. PMID:18812409

  7. Exercise intolerance in heart failure: update on exercise parameters for diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic interventions.

    PubMed

    Pardaens, Sofie; Calders, Patrick; Derom, Eric; De Sutter, Johan

    2013-10-01

    Exercise intolerance is a hallmark feature of chronic heart failure and is associated with poor prognosis. This review provides an update on cardiopulmonary exercise variables, proven to be prognostically important in heart failure. Besides the widely accepted peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2) and VEN/VCO2 slope, other exercise variables - exercise oscillatory ventilation (EOV) and partial pressure of end-tidal CO2, (PETCO2) - should gain attention in the interpretation of cardiopulmonary exercise testing. In addition to prognosis, the pathophysiological origin is also discussed. Different mechanisms underlie these exercise variables with an important contribution of haemodynamic, pulmonary and peripheral abnormalities. Given the different pathophysiological origin, a multivariate assessment with the inclusion of all the aforementioned parameters should be encouraged, not only for diagnostic and prognostic purposes but also for evaluating the effect of interventions. PMID:24283111

  8. A computer program for the interpretation of exercise tolerance tests.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, M B

    1986-10-01

    A software package has been developed to interpret exercise test data recorded by a metabolic measurement cart (MMC). This package reduces and interprets the exercise test data relative to population and patient specific criteria. The data flow for the data reduction and report printing is described. The data structures used in this processing are illustrated. The application of structured programming, a real-time executive and an easy-to-read language--such as Pascal--is illustrated for the implementation of a medical instrument. Issues of prediction and interpretation relative to exercise testing are discussed. PMID:3536283

  9. The cardiokymography exercise test compared to the thallium-201 perfusion exercise test in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, J.F.; Morganroth, J.; Soffer, J.; Panidis, I.; Chen, C.C.; David, D.

    1984-04-01

    To determine the usefulness of exercise cardiokymography (CKG) compared to thallium-201 perfusion scanning in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD), 179 patients with a mean age of 54 +/- 10 years (73% men) were studied. Previously documented CAD was present in 73 patients (41%); 13 (7%) were asymptomatic and 93 (53%) had chest pain syndrome. Exercise stress testing, CKG, and thallium-201 perfusion scanning were independently correlated with coronary angiographic data. Treadmill exercise stress test alone without CKG had a sensitivity of 68% and specificity of 62%. CKG showed a sensitivity of 76% and a specificity of 90%, and easily interpreted cardiokymograms were obtained in 78% of patients studied. Thallium-201 scans had a sensitivity of 79% and a specificity of 88%. However, when the CKG and treadmill exercise test results were concordant (both positive or both negative), the CKG exercise test had a sensitivity of 87% and specificity of 100%. Thus, when the CKG and exercise test results are concordant, the sensitivity and specificity are equal to or better than thallium-201 perfusion scanning for the prediction of CAD. Since CKG is an inexpensive and noninvasive test, its adjunctive use with routine exercise stress testing may be of great value.

  10. The value test: An exercise in futility

    SciTech Connect

    Cordato, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    This exercise has not been to demonstrate that Patricia Herman`s value test is flawed. Indeed, it appears to be a very diligent attempt to get it right. Even a perfect cost/benefit analysis will be fundamentally flawed because all such analysis is an attempt to do something that conceptually cannot be done. Cost/benefit analysis is a non-operational approach for making determinations about social efficiency. Making assumptions to the contrary and then proceeding does not change this fact; it does not change things to argue that this is the best we can do. If we do proceed with the analysis, any conclusion regarding social efficiency is pure speculation. The point is that the problems with the analysis precludes demonstrating that its the best we can do because there is no way to assess the analysis ex post. In order to determine whether the results of a cost/benefit analysis, ex post, moves us in the direction of enhanced social welfare one would have to understand the direction. To know this, the analyst would have to be able to overcome the problems that we have discussed, and this is a catch 22. This analysis also has broader implications for DSM. Support for DSM is based on the assumption that electricity is being overconsumed, but all of the problems that must be overcome to perform cost/benefit analysis must also be overcome to demonstrate that there is an overconsumption problem. It must be shown that existing restrictions on oil drilling/explorations, energy taxes/regulations, and monopoly/cartel influences are not already compensating for the overconsumption. To understand the extent of any overconsumption problem one must overcome the subjective value problem since interpersonal comparisons of costs and benefits have to be made. Combine these problems with the fact that the passage of time changes results and that the science behind some social cost problems is controversial, and it becomes doubtful that DSM as public policy has any economic justification.

  11. Cardio-Pulmonary Function Testing. Continuing Education Curriculum for Respiratory Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Paul Technical Vocational Inst., MN.

    Compiled from interviews with personnel in pulmonary function testing (PFT) laboratories in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area, this competency-based curriculum guide is intended to provide a knowledge of PFT for persons who provide respiratory care. The guide contains 20 sections covering the following topics: vital capacity, flow measurements,

  12. Cardio-Pulmonary Function Testing. Continuing Education Curriculum for Respiratory Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Paul Technical Vocational Inst., MN.

    Compiled from interviews with personnel in pulmonary function testing (PFT) laboratories in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area, this competency-based curriculum guide is intended to provide a knowledge of PFT for persons who provide respiratory care. The guide contains 20 sections covering the following topics: vital capacity, flow measurements,…

  13. A prognostic scoring system for arm exercise stress testing

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yan; Xian, Hong; Chandiramani, Pooja; Bainter, Emily; Wan, Leping; Martin, Wade H

    2016-01-01

    Objective Arm exercise stress testing may be an equivalent or better predictor of mortality outcome than pharmacological stress imaging for the ≥50% for patients unable to perform leg exercise. Thus, our objective was to develop an arm exercise ECG stress test scoring system, analogous to the Duke Treadmill Score, for predicting outcome in these individuals. Methods In this retrospective observational cohort study, arm exercise ECG stress tests were performed in 443 consecutive veterans aged 64.1 (11.1) years. (mean (SD)) between 1997 and 2002. From multivariate Cox models, arm exercise scores were developed for prediction of 5-year and 12-year all-cause and cardiovascular mortality and 5-year cardiovascular mortality or myocardial infarction (MI). Results Arm exercise capacity in resting metabolic equivalents (METs), 1 min heart rate recovery (HRR) and ST segment depression ≥1 mm were the stress test variables independently associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality by step-wise Cox analysis (all p<0.01). A score based on the relation HRR (bpm)+7.3×METs−10.5×ST depression (0=no; 1=yes) prognosticated 5-year cardiovascular mortality with a C-statistic of 0.81 before and 0.88 after adjustment for significant demographic and clinical covariates. Arm exercise scores for the other outcome end points yielded C-statistic values of 0.77–0.79 before and 0.82–0.86 after adjustment for significant covariates versus 0.64–0.72 for best fit pharmacological myocardial perfusion imaging models in a cohort of 1730 veterans who were evaluated over the same time period. Conclusions Arm exercise scores, analogous to the Duke Treadmill Score, have good power for prediction of mortality or MI in patients who cannot perform leg exercise. PMID:26835142

  14. The Sunflower Cardiopulmonary Research Project of Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Leon

    A three year project designed to determine the value of a health program incorporating a cardiopulmonary fitness program is described. The instructional programs were in heart health, pulmonary health, nutrition, and physical fitness. A noncompetitive exercise and fitness period was employed in addition to the normal physical education time.…

  15. Exercise testing and hemodynamic performance in healthy elderly persons

    SciTech Connect

    Hitzhusen, J.C.; Hickler, R.B.; Alpert, J.S.; Doherty, P.W.

    1984-11-01

    To determine the effect of age on cardiovascular performance, 39 healthy elderly men and women, 70 to 83 years old, underwent treadmill thallium-201 exercise perfusion imaging and radionuclide equilibrium angiography at rest and during supine bicycle exercise. Five volunteers who had a positive exercise thallium test response were excluded from the study. Radionuclide left ventricular ejection fraction, regional wall abnormalities, relative cardiac output, stroke volume, end-diastolic volume and end-systolic volume were measured. Seventy-four percent of the subjects maintained or increased their ejection fraction with exercise. With peak exercise, mean end-diastolic volume did not change, end-systolic volume decreased and cardiac output and stroke volume increased. Moreover, in 35% of the subjects, minor regional wall motion abnormalities developed during exercise. There was no significant difference in the response of men and women with regard to these variables. However, more women than men had difficulty performing bicycle ergometry because they had never bicycled before. Subjects who walked daily performed the exercise tests with less anxiety and with a smaller increase in heart rate and systolic blood pressure.

  16. Home-based mobile cardio-pulmonary rehabilitation consultant system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsu-En; Wang, Wen-Chih; Lu, Shao-Wei; Wu, Bo-Yuan; Ko, Li-Wei

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most popular cause of death in the world recently. For postoperatives, cardiac rehabilitation is still asked to maintain at home (phase II) to improve cardiac function. However, only one third of outpatients do the exercise regularly, reflecting the difficulty for home-based healthcare: lacking of monitoring and motivation. Hence, a cardio-pulmonary rehabilitation system was proposed in this research to improve rehabilitation efficiency for better prognosis. The proposed system was built on mobile phone and receiving electrocardiograph (ECG) signal from a wireless ECG holter via Bluetooth connection. Apart from heart rate (HR) monitor, an ECG derived respiration (EDR) technique is also included to provide respiration rate (RR). Both HR and RR are the most important vital signs during exercise but only used one physiological signal recorder in this system. In clinical test, there were 15 subjects affording Bruce Task (treadmill) to simulate rehabilitation procedure. Correlation between this system and commercial product (Custo-Med) was up to 98% in HR and 81% in RR. Considering the prevention of sudden heart attack, an arrhythmia detection expert system and healthcare server at the backend were also integrated to this system for comprehensive cardio-pulmonary monitoring whenever and wherever doing the exercise. PMID:22254478

  17. Predicted maximal heart rate for upper body exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Hill, M; Talbot, C; Price, M

    2016-03-01

    Age-predicted maximal heart rate (HRMAX ) equations are commonly used for the purpose of prescribing exercise regimens, as criteria for achieving maximal exertion and for diagnostic exercise testing. Despite the growing popularity of upper body exercise in both healthy and clinical settings, no recommendations are available for exercise modes using the smaller upper body muscle mass. The purpose of this study was to determine how well commonly used age-adjusted prediction equations for HRMAX estimate actual HRMAX for upper body exercise in healthy young and older adults. A total of 30 young (age: 20 ± 2 years, height: 171·9 ± 32·8 cm, mass: 77·7 ± 12·6 kg) and 20 elderly adults (age: 66 ± 6 years, height: 162 ± 8·1 cm, mass: 65·3 ± 12·3 kg) undertook maximal incremental exercise tests on a conventional arm crank ergometer. Age-adjusted maximal heart rate was calculated using prediction equations based on leg exercise and compared with measured HRMAX data for the arms. Maximal HR for arm exercise was significantly overpredicted compared with age-adjusted prediction equations in both young and older adults. Subtracting 10-20 beats min(-1) from conventional prediction equations provides a reasonable estimate of HRMAX for upper body exercise in healthy older and younger adults. PMID:25319169

  18. Modes of heart rate compensations during exercise ECG test.

    PubMed

    Viik, Jari

    2005-12-01

    Heart rate (HR) compensation of electrocardiographic (ECG) parameters is not an unique concept. However, in the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) ST-segment plotted as a function HR has been studied extensively during the last 20 years. In clinical practice quantitative methods are evolved for the exercise phase of the exercise test and post-exercise recovery phase has not been studied as extensively. Quantitative parameters, as ST/HR hysteresis, which represents the average difference in ST depressions between the exercise and recovery phases at an identical HR up to three minutes of recovery, has been shown to improve the detection of CAD. Furthermore, the ST/HR parameters have been demonstrated to be very competent in a prediction of mortality. PMID:16330399

  19. An Exercise for Illustrating the Logic of Hypothesis Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawton, Leigh

    2009-01-01

    Hypothesis testing is one of the more difficult concepts for students to master in a basic, undergraduate statistics course. Students often are puzzled as to why statisticians simply don't calculate the probability that a hypothesis is true. This article presents an exercise that forces students to lay out on their own a procedure for testing a…

  20. Put Graded Exercise Testing in Your Medical Office

    PubMed Central

    Cumming, Gordon R.

    1975-01-01

    Graded exercise testing can be performed in office practices and small hospitals to assess physical fitness, as an aid in the diagnosis of chest pain, and to identify possible occult coronary disease. The article details the conduction, interpretation, and application of a bicycle ergometer test suitable for an office practice. PMID:20469167

  1. Prevalence of arrhythmias during exercise stress testing in patients with congenital heart disease and severe right ventricular conduit dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Priromprintr, Bryant; Rhodes, Jonathan; Silka, Michael J; Batra, Anjan S

    2014-08-01

    The utility of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) to define the risks of arrhythmia and sudden death in postoperative patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) remains uncertain. As part of the US Melody valve trial, prospective standardized CPET, along with echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and cardiac catheterization, were performed in 170 CHD patients with right ventricular outflow tract conduit dysfunction before Melody valve implantation. Ventricular premature complexes (VPC) occurred in 75 patients (44%) and were common during all phases of CPET (13% baseline, 24% exercise, and 23% recovery). Although no subjects had sustained arrhythmias, 2 had nonsustained ventricular tachycardia and 3 had nonsustained supraventricular tachycardia during recovery. There were no statistically significant differences between patients with or without VPCs in echocardiographic, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, or catheterization measures of cardiac function. However, clinical parameters of age, New York Heart Association functional class ≥II, and ≥3 cardiac surgical procedures were correlated with VPCs. Persistent ventricular ectopy during all exercise stages was present in 11 patients (6.5%), including 3 of the 4 patients who died during follow-up. In conclusion, VPCs were common during CPET, although they were not correlated with various measures of hemodynamic impairment; conversely, increased age, functional class, and number of surgeries were correlated with an increased prevalence of VPCs. CPET appears to be of minimal risk for sustained arrhythmia provocation in CHD patients with right ventricular outflow tract conduits and various degrees of advanced subpulmonary ventricular dysfunction. PMID:24931290

  2. Exercise stress testing in asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Awais, Mazen; Bach, David S

    2009-05-01

    Aortic valve replacement is the accepted therapy for patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). However, the timing of surgery in asymptomatic patients is less well defined, as some -- but not all -- asymptomatic patients are at increased risk. Exercise stress testing is an attractive means to assess risk in such patients, as it is readily available, standardized, physiological, and presents a controlled environment in which to assess whether patients truly are asymptomatic. This review summarizes existing literature and current guideline recommendations addressing exercise testing in asymptomatic patients with AS, and provides a recommendation for its use in a subset of patients. PMID:19557975

  3. Jogging in place. Evaluation of a simplified exercise test

    SciTech Connect

    Papazoglou, N.; Kolokouri-Dervou, E.; Fanourakis, I.; Natsis, P.; Koutsiouba, P. )

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate jogging in place as an electrocardiographic exercise test. Jogging in place continuously recorded via an ordinary single-channel electrocardiograph was compared with the Bruce treadmill protocol with a three-channel monitor and recorder in 141 cases with a wide spectrum of chest complaints. Agreement for the presence or absence of electrocardiographic ischemia (ST-segment displacement greater than or equal to 1 mm at 80 ms from the J point, or U-wave inversion) for the two tests was observed in 91 percent of the cases (95 percent confidence intervals: 86 percent to 95.5 percent). One hundred of the previous cases with paired electrocardiographic exercise tests were compared with the presence of reversible defects on exercise myocardial thallium-201 scintigraphy. The electrocardiographic ischemia had a similar correct classification rate in both methods (83 percent with jogging in place and 85 percent with Bruce treadmill protocol; not significant) against the finding of scintigraphic ischemia. This was also true for 52 cases having selective coronary arteriography. The correct classification rate was 54 percent (28/52) with jogging in place and 48 percent (25/52) with Bruce treadmill protocol (not significant). Given the safety and the easy applicability, even in older persons, this simplified test can be recommended as a valid alternative to the established multistage exercise tests.

  4. Post-exercise syncope: Wingate syncope test and effective countermeasure

    PubMed Central

    Lacewell, Alisha N.; Buck, Tahisha M.; Romero, Steven A.; Halliwill, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Altered systemic hemodynamics following exercise can compromise cerebral perfusion and result in syncope. As the Wingate anaerobic test often induces pre-syncope, we hypothesized that a modified Wingate test could form the basis of a novel model for the study of post-exercise syncope and a test-bed for potential countermeasures. Along these lines, breathing through an impedance threshold device has been shown to increase tolerance to hypovolemia, and could prove beneficial in the setting of post-exercise syncope. Therefore, we hypothesized that a modified Wingate test followed by head-up tilt would produce post-exercise syncope, and that breathing through an impedance threshold device (countermeasure) would prevent post-exercise syncope in healthy individuals. Nineteen recreationally active men and women underwent a 60 head-up tilt during recovery from the Wingate test while arterial pressure, heart rate, end-tidal CO2, and cerebral tissue oxygenation were measured on a control and countermeasure day. The duration of tolerable tilt was increased by a median time of 3 min 48 sec with countermeasure compared to control (P < 0.05) and completion of the tilt test increased from 42% to 67% with countermeasure. During the tilt, mean arterial pressure was greater (108.0 4.1 vs.100.4 2.4 mmHg; P < 0.05) with countermeasure compared to control. These data suggest that the Wingate syncope test produces a high incidence of pre-syncope which is sensitive to countermeasures such as inspiratory impedance. PMID:24078670

  5. Samara Dispersal in Boxelder: An Exercise in Hypothesis Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minorsky, Peter V.; Willing, R. Paul

    1999-01-01

    Presents a fun, inexpensive, and pedagogically useful laboratory exercise that involves indoor studies of the dispersal properties of the winged fruits (samaras) of boxelder trees. Engages students in the process of hypothesis testing, experimental design, and data analysis as well as introducing students to important concepts related to…

  6. Samara Dispersal in Boxelder: An Exercise in Hypothesis Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minorsky, Peter V.; Willing, R. Paul

    1999-01-01

    Presents a fun, inexpensive, and pedagogically useful laboratory exercise that involves indoor studies of the dispersal properties of the winged fruits (samaras) of boxelder trees. Engages students in the process of hypothesis testing, experimental design, and data analysis as well as introducing students to important concepts related to

  7. Inflight exercise affects stand test responses after space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. M.; Moore, A. D. Jr; Fritsch-Yelle, J. M.; Greenisen, M. C.; Schneider, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether exercise performed by Space Shuttle crew members during short-duration space flights (9-16 d) affects the heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) responses to standing within 2-4 h of landing. METHODS: Thirty crew members performed self-selected inflight exercise and maintained exercise logs to monitor their exercise intensity and duration. Two subjects participated in this investigation during two different flights. A 10-min stand test, preceded by at least 6 min of quiet supine rest, was completed 10-15 d before launch (PRE) and within 4 h of landing (POST). Based upon their inflight exercise records, subjects were grouped as either high (HIex: > or = 3 times/week, HR > or = 70% HRmax, > or = 20 min/session, N = 11), medium (MEDex: > or = 3 times/week, HR < 70% HRmax, > or = 20 min/session, N = 10), or low (LOex: < or = 3 times/week, HR and duration variable, N = 11) exercisers. HR and BP responses to standing were compared between groups (ANOVA, P < or = 0.05). RESULTS: There were no PRE differences between the groups in supine or standing HR and BP. Although POST supine HR was similar to PRE, all groups had an increased standing HR compared with PRE. The increase in HR upon standing was significantly greater after flight in the LOex group (36 +/- 5 bpm) compared with HIex or MEDex groups (25 +/- 1 bpm; 22 +/- 2 bpm). Similarly, the decrease in pulse pressure (PP) from supine to standing was unchanged after space flight in the MEDex and HIex groups but was significantly greater in the LOex group (PRE: -9 +/- 3; POST: -19 +/- 4 mm Hg). CONCLUSIONS: Thus, moderate to high levels of inflight exercise attenuated HR and PP responses to standing after space flight.

  8. Physiological responses to maximal exercise testing and the modified incremental shuttle walk test in adults after thermal injury: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Stockton, Kellie Anne; Davis, Mark John; Brown, Michael Graeme; Boots, Robert; Paratz, Jennifer Davida

    2012-01-01

    The ongoing hypermetabolic response associated with burn injury contributes significantly to loss of function, morbidity, and mortality. Exercise is strongly recommended to assist recovery and overall functional outcome. To date, there have been limited studies investigating the validity and practicality of both maximal laboratory and field tests in adult burns survivors. The objective of this study was to determine the metabolic and ventilatory response to cardiopulmonary maximal exercise testing (CPET) and the modified shuttle walk test (MSWT) in adult burns patients. Fifteen people (13 male) with a mean TBSA of 38.5% (16.0%) underwent both MSWT and CPET within a 5-day period in random order. The majority of participants demonstrated a normal response to CPET. Two participants with a history of inhalation burns demonstrated a respiratory limitation to exercise with desaturation (91 and 89%) at the end of the CPET, which returned to normal within 2 minutes after exercise. The correlation between VO(2peak) as measured via CPET and distance as measured in MSWT was 0.7. Mean results measured in MSWT for maximal heart rate and perceived exertion scores were lower than those achieved with CPET results: 91 and 88%, respectively. There were no adverse events during both the MSWT and CPET. This study demonstrates that after burn injury, CPET and MSWT can be performed safely in the majority of patients early in the postdischarge rehabilitation period. MSWT is likely to be submaximal at 80 to 90% of CPET results but is easy to replicate and cost-effective, thus a viable mechanism for monitoring aerobic capacity. PMID:21983649

  9. Simple exercise test for the prediction of relative heat tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, W.L.; Lewis, D.A.; Anderson, R.K.; Kamon, E.

    1986-04-01

    A medical screening exercise test is presented which accurately predicts relative heat tolerance during work in very hot environments. The test consisted of 15-20 min of exercise at a standard absolute intensity of about 600 kcal/hr (140W) with the subject wearing a vapor-barrier suit. Five minutes after the subject exercised, recovery heart rate was measured. When this heart rate is used, a physiological limit (+/- approximately 5 min) can be predicted with 95% confidence for the most intense work-heat conditions found in nuclear power stations. In addition, site health and safety personnel can establish qualification criteria for work on hot jobs, based on the test results. The test as developed can be performed in an office environment with the use of a minimum of equipment by personnel with minimal expertise and training. Total maximal test duration is about 20-25 min per person and only heart rate need be monitored (simple pulse palpation will suffice). Test modality is adaptable to any ergometer, the most readily available and least expensive of which is bench-stepping. It is recommended that this test be available for use for those persons who, based upon routine medical examination or past history, are suspected of being relatively heat intolerant.

  10. Exercises

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Physical Therapist View full profile COPD: Lifestyle Management Exercise An exercise program is another very important step ... riding a stationary bike. Medication to Help You Exercise People with COPD often use a metered-dose ...

  11. Exercises

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PT Physical Therapist View full profile COPD: Lifestyle Management Exercise An exercise program is another very important ... BACK: Nutrition More Exercises Information Back to Lifestyle Management Print Page Email Page Add Page I want ...

  12. How many electrocardiographic leads are required for exercise treadmill tests

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, T.D.; Desser, K.B.; Lawson, M.

    1987-04-01

    Forty-four consecutive patients who had perfusion defects on thallium-201 scanning and positive exercise treadmill tests were prospectively studied. Thirty-eight (86%) subjects had diagnostic ST segment changes in lead V5, 37 (84%) in lead V4, and 44 (100%) in either lead V4, V5 or both. Thirty patients had ST segment changes in the inferior leads, 20 in lead aVR, and only four in lead I and/or aVL. All of these latter subjects had diagnostic ST segments in lead V4 and/or V5. It is concluded that: combined electrocardiographic leads V4 and V5 detect the vast majority of ischemic changes during exercise treadmill testing, regardless of the site of perfusion defects detected by thallium-201 scanning; and monitoring the inferior and lateral leads rarely provides more diagnostic information.

  13. Cardiopulmonary adaptation to weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. K.; Guy, H. J.; Elliott, A. R.; West, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    The lung is profoundly affected by gravity. The absence of gravity (microgravity) removes the mechanical stresses acting on the lung paranchyma itself, resulting in a reduction in the deformation of the lung due to its own weight, and consequently altering the distribution of fresh gas ventilation within the lung. There are also changes in the mechanical forces acting on the rib cage and abdomen, which alters the manner in which the lung expands. The other way in which microgravity affects the lung is through the removal of the gravitationally induced hydrostatic gradients in vascular pressures, both within the lung itself, and within the entire body. The abolition of a pressure gradient within the pulmonary circulation would be expected to result in a greater degree of uniformity of blood flow within the lung, while the removal of the hydrostatic gradient within the body should result in an increase in venous return and intra-thoracic blood volume, with attendant changes in cardiac output, stroke volume, and pulmonary diffusing capacity. During the 9 day flight of Spacelab Life Sciences-1 (SLS-1) we collected pulmonary function test data on the crew of the mission. We compared the results obtained in microgravity with those obtained on the ground in both the standing and supine positions, preflight and in the week immediately following the mission. A number of the tests in the package were aimed at studying the anticipated changes in cardiopulmonary function, and we report those in this communication.

  14. Use of electrocardiographic-thallium exercise testing in clinical practice

    SciTech Connect

    Gitler, B.; Fishbach, M.; Steingart, R.M.

    1984-02-01

    Although there is a great deal of data on the accuracy of combined electrocardiographic-thallium exercise testing, little is known about the use of these tests in clinical practice. A quantitative likelihood system was employed to characterize referral patterns for such testing, and the impact of test results on the likelihood of coronary artery disease was examined. Two hundred thirteen subjects consecutively referred for the purpose of establishing or excluding the presence of coronary artery disease were studied. No subject had a history of a prior myocardial infarction. By historical evaluation, 96 had a low likelihood of coronary disease (less than or equal to 0.20), 88 an intermediate likelihood (0.21 to 0.80) and 29 a high likelihood (greater than 0.80). As anticipated from theoretical analyses, testing produced the greatest shifts in disease likelihood in subjects with an intermediate pretest disease likelihood, and confirmed the historical evaluation in patients at the extremes of pretest disease likelihood. Therefore, although electrocardiographic-thallium stress testing is best suited for subjects with intermediate pretest disease likelihood, the majority of referrals had either a high or low likelihood. Clinicians appear to value confirmatory results in patients at the extremes of pretest disease likelihood. Electrocardiographic exercise testing would serve a similar purpose.

  15. Exercise testing and stress imaging in valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Henri, Christine; Piérard, Luc A; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Mongeon, François-Pierre; Pibarot, Philippe; Basmadjian, Arsène J

    2014-09-01

    The role of exercise testing and stress imaging in the management of patients with valvular heart disease (VHD) is reviewed in this article. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association and the European Society of Cardiology/European Association of Cardiothoracic Surgery have recently put emphasis on the role of exercise testing to clarify symptom status and the use of stress imaging to assess the dynamic component of valvular abnormalities and unmask subclinical myocardial dysfunction that could be missed at rest. Recent studies have demonstrated the incremental prognostic value of exercise echocardiography for asymptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis, moderate-severe mitral stenosis, and severe primary mitral regurgitation. In patients with low-flow, low-gradient aortic stenosis, dobutamine stress echocardiography is recommended to differentiate true severe from pseudosevere aortic stenosis. Data on the prognostic value of stress echocardiography in aortic regurgitation and functional mitral regurgitation are less robust. Data are sparse on the use of stress imaging in right-sided VHD, however recent studies using stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging offer some prognostic information. Although the strongest recommendations for surgical treatment continue to be based on symptom status and resting left ventricular repercussions, stress imaging can be useful to optimize risk stratification and timing of surgery in VHD. Randomized clinical trials are required to confirm that clinical decision-making based on stress imaging can lead to improved outcomes. PMID:25151284

  16. Exercise

    MedlinePLUS

    ... mind and spirit. Learn More Learn More Adaptive Tai Chi Deep breathing and slow, gentle movements are the ... Larger Text Print Exercise Yoga and MS Adaptive Tai Chi Get pumped for exercise Research shows strength training ...

  17. Predicting utility of exercise tests based on history/holter in patients with premature ventricular contractions.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Brad; Xie, Li; Temple, Joel; Octavio, Jenna; Srayyih, Maytham; Thacker, Deepika; Kharouf, Rami; Davies, Ryan; Gidding, Samuel S

    2015-01-01

    Premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) are considered benign in patients with structurally normal hearts, particularly if they suppress with exercise. Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) requires exercise testing to unmask the malignant phenotype. We studied risk factors and Holter monitor variables to help predict the necessity of exercise testing in patients with PVCs. We retrospectively reviewed 81 patients with PVCs that suppressed at peak exercise and structurally normal hearts referred to the exercise laboratory in 2011. We reviewed 11 patients from 2003 to 2012 whose PVCs were augmented at peak exercise (mean age 134years; 52% male, 180 exercise studies). We recorded clinical risk factors and comorbidities (family history of arrhythmia or sudden unexpected death [SUD], presence of syncope) and Holter testing parameters. Family history of VT or SUD (P=0.011) and presence of VT on Holter (P=0.011) were significant in predicting failure of PVCs to suppress at peak heart rate on exercise testing. Syncope was not statistically significant in predicting suppression (P=0.18); however, CPVT was diagnosed in four patients with syncope during exercise. Quantity of PVCs, Lown grade, couplets on Holter, monomorphism, and PVC elimination at peak heart rate on Holter were not predictors of PVC suppression on exercise testing. Patients with syncope during exercise, family history of arrhythmia or SUD, or a Holter monitor showing VT warrant exercise testing to assess for CPVT. PMID:25135604

  18. Comparison of dipyridamole-handgrip test and bicycle exercise test for thallium tomographic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Huikuri, H.V.; Korhonen, U.R.; Airaksinen, J.; Ikaeheimo, M.J.H.; Heikkilae, J.T.; Takkunen, J.T.

    1988-02-01

    Seventy-three patients with angina pectoris and 20 with atypical chest pain, who underwent coronary angiography, were examined by single-photon emission computed thallium tomography (TI-SPECT) using a combined dipyridamole-handgrip stress test. Perfusion defects were detected in 78 of 81 patients with angiographically significant coronary artery disease (CAD) (sensitivity 96%). In 9 of 12 patients without CAD, the thallium images were normal (specificity 75%). Thirty-five patients with CAD were reexamined by TI-SPECT using a dynamic bicycle exercise stress test. The sensitivity of the dipyridamole-handgrip test did not differ from the bicycle exercise test in diagnosing the CAD (97% vs 94%). Multiple thallium defects were seen in 19 of 22 (86%) patients with multivessel CAD by the dipyridamole-handgrip test but only in 14 of 22 (64%) by the bicycle exercise test. Noncardiac side-effects occurred in 17 of 93 (18%) patients after dipyridamole infusion. Cardiac symptoms were less common during the dipyridamole-handgrip test than during the bicycle exercise (15% vs 76%, p less than 0.01). These data suggest that the dipyridamole-handgrip test is a useful alternative stress method for thallium perfusion imaging, particularly in detecting multivessel CAD.

  19. Cardiopulmonary discipline science plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Life sciences research in the cardiopulmonary discipline must identify possible consequences of space flight on the cardiopulmonary system, understand the mechanisms of these effects, and develop effective and operationally practical countermeasures to protect crewmembers inflight and upon return to a gravitational environment. The long-range goal of the NASA Cardiopulmonary Discipline Research Program is to foster research to better understand the acute and long-term cardiovascular and pulmonary adaptation to space and to develop physiological countermeasures to ensure crew health in space and on return to Earth. The purpose of this Discipline Plan is to provide a conceptual strategy for NASA's Life Sciences Division research and development activities in the comprehensive area of cardiopulmonary sciences. It covers the significant research areas critical to NASA's programmatic requirements for the Extended-Duration Orbiter, Space Station Freedom, and exploration mission science activities. These science activities include ground-based and flight; basic, applied, and operational; and animal and human research and development. This document summarizes the current status of the program, outlines available knowledge, establishes goals and objectives, identifies science priorities, and defines critical questions in the subdiscipline areas of both cardiovascular and pulmonary function. It contains a general plan that will be used by both NASA Headquarters Program Offices and the field centers to review and plan basic, applied, and operational (intramural and extramural) research and development activities in this area.

  20. [Should cardiopulmonary rehabilitation be provided to patients with lung cancer?].

    PubMed

    Frsard, Isabelle; Adler, Ddler; Bhatia, Chetna; Licker, Marc; Triponez, Frdric; Robert, John; Bridevaux, Pierre-Olivier

    2013-04-10

    The exercise capacity has a specific importance in patients with non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) at all stages of the disease. In the preoperative period for the early stages of the disease, low exercise capacity can be improved and thus allow curative surgery for unfit patients with NSCLC. The body of current literature suggests a beneficial effect of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation on exercise capacity, quality of life and length of hospital stay or rate of post-operative complications. For patients with advanced disease, exercise capacity, which is a predictor of survival, could be maintained at higher level with adapted cardiopulmonary rehabilitation. Ongoing studies will precise the best programs for patients with NSCLC and help to establish guidelines for clinicians. PMID:23659153

  1. Exercise Testing, Training, and Beta-Adrenergic Blockade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmore, Jack H.

    1988-01-01

    This article summarizes the current knowledge on the effects of beta-adrenergic blocking drugs, used widely for treatment of cardiovascular diseases, on exercise performance, training benefits, and exercise prescription. (IAH)

  2. [Cardiopulmonary sensitivity and chemosensitivity].

    PubMed

    Pitzalis, M V; Massari, F; Mastropasqua, F; Iacoviello, M; Rizzon, P

    2001-05-01

    The autonomic control of the cardiovascular system plays an important role in maintaining the arterial pressure at the levels necessary for adequate tissue perfusion. In cardiovascular diseases, the impairment of the basic reflex mechanisms that are responsible for the moment-to-moment regulation could increase sympathetic activity and is correlated with an adverse outcome. The objective of the present review was to provide information about the methodological aspects exploring cardiopulmonary and chemoreceptor reflexes. Different techniques are available and all of them include assessment of reflexes through the activation or deactivation of either the cardiopulmonary baroreceptors or chemoreceptors. Intravenous saline load, head-down tilt, passive legs raising, head-out water immersion and the application of a lower body positive pressure are the principal methods utilized for activating cardiopulmonary baroreceptors; on the contrary deactivation could be achieved by acutely induced hypovolemia by furosemide or blood donation, inflation of a congestion cuff on the thighs or application of a negative pressure on the lower body. The transient exposure to a hypoxic or a hypercapnic gas mixture is frequently used to determine the peripheral and central chemoreflexes, respectively. The reflexes are quantified by the gain between output (i.e. heart rate, sympathetic activity, vascular resistance, ventilation) and input (oxygen saturation, end-tidal CO2 or changes in central venous pressure). One important limitation in assessing the cardiopulmonary baroreflex by using currently available techniques is that the involvement of the arterial baroreflex cannot be avoided. In addition, chemoreflexes cannot be interpreted unless the breathing rate is controlled. To date, several techniques are available for the quantification of cardiopulmonary baroreceptor and chemoreceptor reflexes and could provide new information on the abnormal autonomic mechanisms contributing to the pathophysiology of several cardiovascular diseases. PMID:11388330

  3. Blood pressure responses during exercise testing-is up best for prognosis?

    PubMed

    Laukkanen, Jari A; Kurl, Sudhir

    2012-05-01

    Exercise testing is not limited to observation of ischemic electrocardiographic findings during exercise, but also abnormal findings in blood pressure, heart rate, and exercise capacity are valuable. Individuals with exaggerated exercise blood pressure tend to develop future hypertension. Extensive elevation in systolic blood pressure during exercise has been found to increase the risk of left ventricular hypertrophy, myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular stroke, and cardiovascular death. Previous studies have revealed that blood pressure response to exercise is dependent on underlying heart disease and peripheral resistance. Therefore, subjects with documented cardiovascular disease may not be capable of generating a work-load to allow the manifestation of exercise-induced systolic hypertension. Systolic hypotension during exercise is associated with left ventricular dysfunction and inadequate cardiac output, and it is a marker of severe heart disease. Exercise testing with the definition of blood pressure can be performed in a logical way with test results used to decide on therapies and treatment strategies in addition to blood pressure at rest. A modest increment in blood pressure rise corresponding to work-load achieved during the exercise testing is the best sign from the prognostic point of view. The normal limits of exercise blood pressure response could be very helpful for clinicians. PMID:21345155

  4. Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis with negative allergy testing

    PubMed Central

    Kleiman, Jacob; Ben-Shoshan, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA) is a disorder where exercise following allergen ingestion triggers anaphylaxis although exercise and allergen exposure are independently tolerated. The diagnosis of FDEIA is based on a characteristic clinical history. The culprit allergen is usually confirmed through the use of skin prick testing (SPT) serum-specific IgE levels and a foodexercise challenge. We present a case of FDEIA suggested by clinical history and open foodexercise challenge with negative specific IgE levels and SPT that highlights the challenges involved in diagnosing and managing this rare disorder. PMID:24503659

  5. Discordance of exercise thallium testing with coronary arteriography in patients with atypical presentations

    SciTech Connect

    Bungo, M.W.; Leland, O.S. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Eighty-one patients with diagnostically difficult clinical presentations suggesting coronary disease underwent symptom-limited maximal-exercise treadmill testing (ETT) and exercise radionuclide scanning with /sup 201/Tl. Results of these tests were in agreement in only 47 percent of the cases. Either exercise thallium or ETT was positive in 94 percent of patients with disease. Among a population with a disease prevalence of 67 percent, agreement between exercise thallium an ETT predicted disease in 92 percent of instances or excluded disease in 82 percent of instances. Frequent discordance between these two tests in 53 percent of the cases unfortunately limits this usefulness.

  6. Refined Exercise testing can aid DNA-based Diagnosis in Muscle Channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Tan, S. Veronica; Matthews, Emma; Barber, Melissa; Burge, James A; Rajakulendran, Sanjeev; Fialho, Doreen; Sud, Richa; Haworth, Andrea; Koltzenburg, Martin; Hanna, Michael G

    2010-01-01

    Objective To improve the accuracy of genotype prediction and guide genetic testing in patients with muscle channelopathies we applied and refined specialised electrophysiological exercise test parameters. Methods We studied 56 genetically confirmed patients and 65 controls using needle electromyography, the long exercise test, and short exercise tests at room temperature, after cooling, and rewarming. Results Concordant amplitude-and-area decrements were more reliable than amplitude-only measurements when interpreting patterns of change during the short exercise tests. Concordant amplitude-and-area pattern I and pattern II decrements of >20% were 100% specific for PMC and MC respectively. When decrements at room temperature and after cooling were <20%, a repeat short exercise test after rewarming was useful in patients with myotonia congenita. Area measurements and rewarming distinguished true temperature sensitivity from amplitude reduction due to cold-induced slowing of muscle fibre conduction. In patients with negative short exercise tests, symptomatic eye closure myotonia predicted sodium channel myotonia over myotonia congenita. Distinctive tornado-shaped neuromyotonia-like discharges may be seen in patients with paramyotonia congenita. In the long exercise test, area decrements from pre-exercise baseline were more sensitive than amplitude decrements-from-maximum-CMAP in patients with Andersen-Tawil syndrome. Possible ethnic differences in the normative data of the long exercise test argue for the use of appropriate ethnically-matched controls. Interpretation Concordant CMAP amplitude-and-area decrements of >20% allow more reliable interpretation of the short exercise tests and aid accurate DNA-based diagnosis. In patients with negative exercise tests, specific clinical features are helpful in differentiating sodium from chloride channel myotonia. A modified algorithm is suggested.. PMID:21387378

  7. Evaluation and treatment of the asymptomatic patient with a positive exercise tolerance test

    SciTech Connect

    Imperi, G.A.; Conti, C.R.

    1986-11-01

    A positive exercise study in an asymptomatic patient presents a clinical dilemma. Many of these asymptomatic positive studies are false-positive, but a subset of these patients have silent coronary artery disease. Other noninvasive tests can be used in conjunction with exercise testing to help identify this subset of patients, but coronary angiography is often ultimately necessary to ensure an accurate diagnosis. An algorithm for the evaluation and treatment of the patient with an asymptomatic positive exercise study is proposed.

  8. The minimal important difference of exercise tests in severe COPD.

    PubMed

    Puhan, M A; Chandra, D; Mosenifar, Z; Ries, A; Make, B; Hansel, N N; Wise, R A; Sciurba, F

    2011-04-01

    Our aim was to determine the minimal important difference (MID) for 6-min walk distance (6MWD) and maximal cycle exercise capacity (MCEC) in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). 1,218 patients enrolled in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial completed exercise tests before and after 4-6 weeks of pre-trial rehabilitation, and 6 months after randomisation to surgery or medical care. The St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (domain and total scores) and University of California San Diego Shortness of Breath Questionnaire (total score) served as anchors for anchor-based MID estimates. In order to calculate distribution-based estimates, we used the standard error of measurement, Cohen's effect size and the empirical rule effect size. Anchor-based estimates for the 6MWD were 18.9 m (95% CI 18.1-20.1 m), 24.2 m (95% CI 23.4-25.4 m), 24.6 m (95% CI 23.4-25.7 m) and 26.4 m (95% CI 25.4-27.4 m), which were similar to distribution-based MID estimates of 25.7, 26.8 and 30.6 m. For MCEC, anchor-based estimates for the MID were 2.2 W (95% CI 2.0-2.4 W), 3.2 W (95% CI 3.0-3.4 W), 3.2 W (95% CI 3.0-3.4 W) and 3.3 W (95% CI 3.0-3.5 W), while distribution-based estimates were 5.3 and 5.5 W. We suggest a MID of 26 2 m for 6MWD and 4 1 W for MCEC for patients with severe COPD. PMID:20693247

  9. Prediction of functional aerobic capacity without exercise testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. S.; Blair, S. N.; Mahar, M. T.; Wier, L. T.; Ross, R. M.; Stuteville, J. E.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop functional aerobic capacity prediction models without using exercise tests (N-Ex) and to compare the accuracy with Astrand single-stage submaximal prediction methods. The data of 2,009 subjects (9.7% female) were randomly divided into validation (N = 1,543) and cross-validation (N = 466) samples. The validation sample was used to develop two N-Ex models to estimate VO2peak. Gender, age, body composition, and self-report activity were used to develop two N-Ex prediction models. One model estimated percent fat from skinfolds (N-Ex %fat) and the other used body mass index (N-Ex BMI) to represent body composition. The multiple correlations for the developed models were R = 0.81 (SE = 5.3 ml.kg-1.min-1) and R = 0.78 (SE = 5.6 ml.kg-1.min-1). This accuracy was confirmed when applied to the cross-validation sample. The N-Ex models were more accurate than what was obtained from VO2peak estimated from the Astrand prediction models. The SEs of the Astrand models ranged from 5.5-9.7 ml.kg-1.min-1. The N-Ex models were cross-validated on 59 men on hypertensive medication and 71 men who were found to have a positive exercise ECG. The SEs of the N-Ex models ranged from 4.6-5.4 ml.kg-1.min-1 with these subjects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  10. Exercise thallium stress testing compared with coronary angiography in patients without exclusions for suboptimal exercise or cardioactive medications

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, N.R.; Denis, L.

    1986-10-01

    From 1293 patients who underwent thallium stress testing and 1099 patients who had coronary angiography, a consecutive series of 122 who had both studies is evaluated. This group includes suboptimally exercised patients and those receiving one or several cardiovascular drugs that were not discontinued prior to exercise. When compared with the EKG stress test, thallium stress imaging was superior in sensitivity (80% vs 68%), specificity (84% vs 49%), accuracy (81% vs 62%), positive predictive value, (92% vs 75%), and negative predictive value (65% vs 45%) in this group, with 71% prevalence of angiographically significant coronary artery disease.

  11. Prolonged exercise testing in two children with a mild Multiple Acyl-CoA-Dehydrogenase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Takken, T; Custers, J WH; Visser, G; Dorland, L; Helders, PJM; de Koning, TJ

    2005-01-01

    Background Multiple Acyl-CoA-Dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) is an inherited metabolic disorder characterized by impaired oxidation of fatty acids and some amino acids. Methods We were interested whether children with MADD could tolerate a prolonged low-intensity exercise test and if this test could have any additional diagnostic value. Therefore, we performed a maximal exercise test and a low-intensity prolonged exercise test in 2 patients with MADD and in 5 control subjects. During a prolonged exercise test the subjects exercised on a cycle ergometer at a constant workload of 30% of their maximum for 90 minutes and heart rate, oxygen uptake, fuel utilization and changes in relevant blood and urinary parameters were monitored. Results The tests were tolerated well. During the prolonged exercise test the fatty acid oxidation (FAO) was quite low compared to 5 control subjects, while characteristic metabolites of MADD appeared in plasma and urine. Conclusion We suggest that the prolonged exercise test could be of diagnostic importance and might replace the fasting test as a diagnostic procedure in some cases, particularly in patients with anamnestic signs of intolerance for prolonged exercise. PMID:15907213

  12. The Effect of Estrogen Usage on Eccentric Exercise-Induced Damage in Rat Testes

    PubMed Central

    Can, Serpil; Selli, Jale; Buyuk, Basak; Aydin, Sergulen; Kocaaslan, Ramazan; Guvendi, Gulname Findik

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent years, lots of scientific studies are focused on the possible mechanism of inflammatory response and oxidative stress which are the mechanism related with tissue damage and exercise fatigue. It is well-known that free oxygen radicals may be induced under invitro conditions as well as oxidative stress by exhaustive physical exercise. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of anabolic steroids in conjunction with exercise in the process of spermatogenesis in the testes, using histological and stereological methods. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were divided to six groups, including the control group, the eccentric exercise administered group, the estrogen applied group, the estrogen applied and dissected one hour after eccentric exercise group, the no estrogen applied and dissected 48 hours after eccentric exercise group and the estrogen applied and dissected 48 hours after eccentric exercise group. Eccentric exercise was performed on a motorized rodent treadmill and the estrogen applied groups received daily physiological doses by subcutaneous injections. Testicular tissues were examined using specific histopathological, immunohistochemical and stereological methods. Sections of the testes tissue were stained using the TUNEL method to identify apoptotic cells. Apoptosis was calculated as the percentage of positive cells, using stereological analysis. A statistical analysis of the data was carried out with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) for the data obtained from stereological analysis. Results: Conventional light microscopic results revealed that testes tissues of the eccentric exercise administered group and the estrogen supplemented group exhibited slight impairment. In groups that were both eccentrically exercised and estrogen supplemented, more deterioration was detected in testes tissues. Likewise, immunohistochemistry findings were also more prominent in the eccentrically exercised and estrogen supplemented groups. Conclusions: The findings suggest that estrogen supplementation increases damage in testicular tissue due to eccentric exercise. PMID:26023337

  13. Exercise metabolism during moderate-intensity exercise in children with cystic fibrosis following heavy-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Daniel; Oades, Patrick J; Armstrong, Neil; Williams, Craig A

    2011-12-01

    Muscle metabolism is increased following exercise in healthy individuals, affecting exercise metabolism during subsequent physical work. We hypothesized that following heavy-intensity exercise (HIE), disease factors in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) would further exacerbate exercise metabolism and perceived exertion during subsequent exercise. Nineteen children with CF (age, 13.4 3.1 years; 10 female) and 19 healthy controls (age, 13.8 3.5 years; 10 female) performed 10 bouts of HIE interspersed with 1 min of recovery between each bout. Three minutes later participants completed a 10-min moderate-intensity exercise (MIE) test (test 1). The MIE test was subsequently repeated 1 h (test 2) and 24 h (test 3) later. Each MIE test was identical and participants exercised at individualized work rates, calibrated by an initial graded maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test, while metabolic and perceived exertion measurements were taken. Following HIE, mixed-model ANOVAs showed a significant difference in oxygen uptake (VO?) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) between the 2 groups across the MIE tests (p < 0.01). In controls, VO? (Lmin?) and RPE decreased significantly from test 1 to test 2 (p < 0.01) and test 2 to test 3 (p < 0.05). However, in children with CF, VO? (Lmin?) increased significantly from test 1 to test 2 (p < 0.01), while RPE did not differ, both VO? and RPE decreased significantly from test 2 to test 3 (p < 0.01). In conclusion, following HIE the metabolic and perceptual responses to MIE in both groups decreased 24 h later during test 3. These data show that children with mild-to-moderate CF have the capability to perform HIE and 24 h allows sufficient time for recovery. PMID:22087846

  14. Realistic Exercises for Assessing Learning. I. Conceptual Design and Testing. Report 04-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gronlund, Wayne R.; And Others

    Researchers at the Coast Guard Academy have designed and tested a series of exercises for assessing the development of intellectual skills in an interdisciplinary context and providing career-related motivation for continued learning. These exercises are based on realistic situations that cadets might encounter as commissioned officers in the…

  15. Flow for Exercise Adherence: Testing an Intrinsic Model of Health Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petosa, R. Lingyak; Holtz, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Background: Health behavior theory generally does not include intrinsic motivation as a determinate of health practices. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the flow theory of exercise adherence. Flow theory posits that exercise can be intrinsically rewarding if the experiences of self/time transcendence and control/mastery are achieved…

  16. Flow for Exercise Adherence: Testing an Intrinsic Model of Health Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petosa, R. Lingyak; Holtz, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Background: Health behavior theory generally does not include intrinsic motivation as a determinate of health practices. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the flow theory of exercise adherence. Flow theory posits that exercise can be intrinsically rewarding if the experiences of self/time transcendence and control/mastery are achieved

  17. Cardiopulmonary Responses to Supine Cycling during Short-Arm Centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vener, J. M.; Simonson, S. R.; Stocks, J.; Evettes, S.; Bailey, K.; Biagini, H.; Jackson, C. G. R.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate cardiopulmonary responses to supine cycling with concomitant +G(sub z) acceleration using the NASA/Ames Human Powered Short-Arm Centrifuge (HPC). Subjects were eight consenting males (32+/-5 yrs, 178+/-5 cm, 86.1+/- 6.2 kg). All subjects completed two maximal exercise tests on the HPC (with and without acceleration) within a three-day period. A two tailed t-test with statistical significance set at p less than or equal to 0.05 was used to compare treatments. Peak acceleration was 3.4+/-0.1 G(sub z), (head to foot acceleration). Peak oxygen uptake (VO2(sub peak) was not different between treatment groups (3.1+/-0.1 Lmin(exp -1) vs. 3.2+/-0.1 Lmin(exp -1) for stationary and acceleration trials, respectively). Peak HR and pulmonary minute ventilation (V(sub E(sub BTPS))) were significantly elevated (p less than or equal to 0.05) for the acceleration trial (182+/-3 BPM (Beats per Minute); 132.0+/-9.0 Lmin(exp -1)) when compared to the stationary trial (175+/-3 BPM; 115.5+/-8.5 Lmin(exp -1)). Ventilatory threshold expressed as a percent of VO2(sub peak) was not different for acceleration and stationary trials (72+/-2% vs. 68+/-2% respectively). Results suggest that 3.4 G(sub z) acceleration does not alter VO2(sub peak) response to supine cycling. However, peak HR and V(sub E(sub BTPS)) response may be increased while ventilatory threshold response expressed as a function of percent VO2(sub peak) is relatively unaffected. Thus, traditional exercise prescription based on VO2 response would be appropriate for this mode of exercise. Prescriptions based on HR response may require modification.

  18. Artificial neural network cardiopulmonary modeling and diagnosis

    DOEpatents

    Kangas, L.J.; Keller, P.E.

    1997-10-28

    The present invention is a method of diagnosing a cardiopulmonary condition in an individual by comparing data from a progressive multi-stage test for the individual to a non-linear multi-variate model, preferably a recurrent artificial neural network having sensor fusion. The present invention relies on a cardiovascular model developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled parameters and the parameters of an individual at a given time are used for diagnosis. 12 figs.

  19. Artificial neural network cardiopulmonary modeling and diagnosis

    DOEpatents

    Kangas, Lars J.; Keller, Paul E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a method of diagnosing a cardiopulmonary condition in an individual by comparing data from a progressive multi-stage test for the individual to a non-linear multi-variate model, preferably a recurrent artificial neural network having sensor fusion. The present invention relies on a cardiovascular model developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled parameters and the parameters of an individual at a given time are used for diagnosis.

  20. Pulmonary thallium-201 uptake following dipyridamole-exercise combination compared with single modality stress testing.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, G A; O'Donoghue, J P; Powe, J E; Gravelle, D R; MacDonald, A C; Finnie, K J

    1992-02-01

    Angiographic and clinical determinants of pulmonary uptake of thallium-201 were assessed in a laboratory setting where supine bicycle exercise is used for stress testing in the absence of limiting pharmacologic or physical factors, and where symptom-limited exercise is added to intravenous dipyridamole infusion in other cases. Angiographic correlation was available in 400 patients, including 130 tested with exercise, 94 in whom only handgrip or abbreviated bicycle exercise could be used after dipyridamole, and 176 in whom intravenous dipyridamole was combined with a significant level of exercise. For each test mode, lung/myocardial ratios on the immediate image were highly correlated (p less than or equal to 0.001) with a score based on the number of critical coronary artery stenoses, with grading by contrast ventriculography, and with the number of stenosed (greater than or equal to 50%) arteries; relationships (p less than 0.05) to history of myocardial infarction and to gender were also present. Multiple regression analysis showed the critical stenosis score and ventricular dysfunction to be the only significant determinants. When dipyridamole based tests were compared with exercise, curves of receiver-operating characteristics showed a tendency to better diagnostic performance. When dipyridamole is incorporated in stress testing, the value of increased lung uptake as an ancillary diagnostic sign is similar to that established for exercise. PMID:1734642

  1. Cardiopulmonary Bypass Without Heparin.

    PubMed

    Rehfeldt, Kent H; Barbara, David W

    2016-03-01

    Due to familiarity, short half-life, ease of monitoring, and the availability of a reversal agent, heparin remains the anticoagulant of choice for cardiac operations requiring cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). However, occasionally patients require CPB but should not receive heparin, most often because of acute or subacute heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). In these cases, if it is not feasible to wait for the disappearance of HIT antibodies, an alternative anticoagulant must be selected. A number of non-heparin anticoagulant options have been explored. However, current recommendations suggest the use of a direct thrombin inhibitor such as bivalirudin. This review describes the use of heparin alternatives for the conduct of CPB with a focus on the direct thrombin inhibitors. PMID:26872706

  2. Percolation Tests for Septic Systems: A Laboratory Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinker, John R., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Describes how the procedures by which a certificate soil tester evaluates a parcel of land for its suitability as a site for a private sewage system or septic tank can be used by college students as a laboratory exercise in environmental geology. (HM)

  3. Prognostic value of radionuclide exercise testing after myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Schocken, D.D.

    1984-08-01

    Abnormal systolic ventricular function and persistent ischemia are sensitive indicators of poor prognosis following myocardial infarction. The use of exercise improves the utility of both radionuclide ventriculography and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in the identification of postinfarction patients at high risk of subsequent cardiac events. 51 references.

  4. Validity and Reproducibility of an Incremental Sit-To-Stand Exercise Test for Evaluating Anaerobic Threshold in Young, Healthy Individuals.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Ohira, Masayoshi; Yokokawa, Yoshiharu; Nagasawa, Yuya

    2015-12-01

    Sit-to-stand exercise (STS) is a common activity of daily living. The objectives of the present study were: 1) to assess the validity of aerobic fitness measurements based on anaerobic thresholds (ATs), during incremental sit-to-stand exercise (ISTS) with and without arm support compared with an incremental cycle-ergometer (CE) test; and 2) to examine the reproducibility of the AT measured during the ISTSs. Twenty-six healthy individuals randomly performed the ISTS and CE test. Oxygen uptakes at the AT (AT-VO2) and heart rate at the AT (AT-HR) were determined during the ISTSs and CE test, and repeated-measures analyses of variance and Tukey's post-hoc test were used to evaluate the differences between these variables. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to assess the strength of the relationship between AT-VO2 and AT-HR during the ISTSs and CE test. Data analysis yielded the following correlations: AT-VO2 during the ISTS with arm support and the CE test, r = 0.77 (p < 0.05); AT-VO2 during the ISTS without arm support and the CE test, r = 0.70 (p < 0.05); AT-HR during the ISTS with arm support and the CE test, r = 0.80 (p < 0.05); and AT-HR during the ISTS without arm support and the CE test, r = 0.66 (p < 0.05). The AT-VO2 values during the ISTS with arm support (18.5 ± 1.9 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1)) and the CE test (18.4 ± 1.8 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1)) were significantly higher than those during the ISTS without arm support (16.6 ± 1.8 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1); p < 0.05). The AT-HR values during the ISTS with arm support (126 ± 10 bpm) and the CE test (126 ± 13 bpm) were significantly higher than those during the ISTS without arm support (119 ± 9 bpm; p < 0.05). The ISTS with arm support may provide a cardiopulmonary function load equivalent to the CE test; therefore, it is a potentially valid test for evaluating AT-VO2 and AT-HR in healthy, young adults. Key pointsThe ISTS is a simple test that varies only according to the frequency of standing up, and requires only a small space and a chair.The ISTS with arm support is valid and reproducible, and is a safe test for evaluating AT in healthy young adults.For evaluating the AT, the ISTS may serve as a valid alternative to conventional CPX, using either a cycle ergometer or treadmill, in cases where the latter methods are difficult to implement. PMID:26664266

  5. Validity and Reproducibility of an Incremental Sit-To-Stand Exercise Test for Evaluating Anaerobic Threshold in Young, Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Ohira, Masayoshi; Yokokawa, Yoshiharu; Nagasawa, Yuya

    2015-01-01

    Sit-to-stand exercise (STS) is a common activity of daily living. The objectives of the present study were: 1) to assess the validity of aerobic fitness measurements based on anaerobic thresholds (ATs), during incremental sit-to-stand exercise (ISTS) with and without arm support compared with an incremental cycle-ergometer (CE) test; and 2) to examine the reproducibility of the AT measured during the ISTSs. Twenty-six healthy individuals randomly performed the ISTS and CE test. Oxygen uptakes at the AT (AT-VO2) and heart rate at the AT (AT-HR) were determined during the ISTSs and CE test, and repeated-measures analyses of variance and Tukey’s post-hoc test were used to evaluate the differences between these variables. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to assess the strength of the relationship between AT-VO2 and AT-HR during the ISTSs and CE test. Data analysis yielded the following correlations: AT-VO2 during the ISTS with arm support and the CE test, r = 0.77 (p < 0.05); AT-VO2 during the ISTS without arm support and the CE test, r = 0.70 (p < 0.05); AT-HR during the ISTS with arm support and the CE test, r = 0.80 (p < 0.05); and AT-HR during the ISTS without arm support and the CE test, r = 0.66 (p < 0.05). The AT-VO2 values during the ISTS with arm support (18.5 ± 1.9 mL·min-1·kg-1) and the CE test (18.4 ± 1.8 mL·min-1·kg-1) were significantly higher than those during the ISTS without arm support (16.6 ± 1.8 mL·min-1·kg-1; p < 0.05). The AT-HR values during the ISTS with arm support (126 ± 10 bpm) and the CE test (126 ± 13 bpm) were significantly higher than those during the ISTS without arm support (119 ± 9 bpm; p < 0.05). The ISTS with arm support may provide a cardiopulmonary function load equivalent to the CE test; therefore, it is a potentially valid test for evaluating AT-VO2 and AT-HR in healthy, young adults. Key points The ISTS is a simple test that varies only according to the frequency of standing up, and requires only a small space and a chair. The ISTS with arm support is valid and reproducible, and is a safe test for evaluating AT in healthy young adults. For evaluating the AT, the ISTS may serve as a valid alternative to conventional CPX, using either a cycle ergometer or treadmill, in cases where the latter methods are difficult to implement. PMID:26664266

  6. Discordance of exercise thallium testing with coronary arteriography in patients with atypical presentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bungo, M. W.; Leland, O. S., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Eighty-one patients with diagnostically difficult clinical presentations suggesting coronary artery disease underwent symptom-limited maximal-exercise treadmill testing (ETT) and exercise radionuclide scanning with thallium-201 followed by coronary angiography. Results showed that in nearly half of the patients (47%) these tests were in agreement, while either exercise thallium or ETT was positive in 94% of patients with coronary artery disease. It was found that agreement between exercise thallium and ETT tests predicted disease in 92% of the instances or excluded disease in 82% of the instances. It is concluded that despite frequent discord between these two tests in 53% of the cases, a significant gain in exclusive diagnostic capability is realized when applied to a patient population anticipated to have a disease prevalence equal to the 67% encountered in this study.

  7. The effects of space flight on the cardiopulmonary system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.; Gaffney, F. Andrew; Garshnek, Victoria

    1989-01-01

    Alterations of the human cardiopulmonary system in space flight are examined, including fluid shifts, orthostatic intolerance, changes in cardiac dynamics and electromechanics, and changes in pulmonary function and exercise capacity. Consideration is given to lower body negative pressure data from Skylab experiments and studies on the Space Shuttle. Also, echocardiography, cardiac dysrhythmias during spaceflight, and the role of neural mechanisms in circulatory control after spaceflight are discussed.

  8. [Impact of subclinical hypothyroidism in cardiopulmonary response during effort and its recovery].

    PubMed

    Mainenti, Mriam R M; Teixeira, Patrcia F S; Oliveira, Ftima P; Vaisman, Mrio

    2007-12-01

    In order to identify the characteristics of subclinical hypothyroidism (SH) during physical stress and its recovery, 15 SH patients and 16 healthy women were compared by a treadmill cardiopulmonary test. Means of variables were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U test. Patients obtained lower values for peak expired fraction of O2 (14.90+/-1.05 x 16+/-1.14%; p = 0.014); systolic blood pressure variation (34.33+/-17.92 x 52.50+/-17.22; p = 0.009); exercise duration (8.83+/-2.91 x 14.5+/-5.63 min; p = 0.0005), maximal test load (11.6+/-4.22 x 18.94+/-5.45%; p = 0.0004), as well as tendencies in gas exchange ratio and peak heart rate. Between the first and the third recovery minutes, there was a reduction of only 0.71 mmHg in the diastolic blood pressure, whereas there was a 5.33-mmHg reduction to control group (p = 0.0009) (slower recovery of patients). It is presumable that SH may cause cardiopulmonary dysfunctions, with higher sensibility to the parameters previously cited. PMID:18209891

  9. [Echo-Doppler, exercise test, NMR in the follow-up of surgically treated aortic coarctation].

    PubMed

    Pedretti, E; Raisaro, A; Lanza, S; Bassanetti, F

    1993-01-01

    Persistent hypertension is one of the causes of sudden death which sometimes happens in patients operated on for coarctation of the aorta. Seven patients operated on for coarctation of the aorta were examined using exercise testing (Treadmill-Bruce), Echo-Doppler and NMR. Pressure gradients between the right upper and lower limbs were compared with those of normal young people and evaluated using NMR. The authors conclude that the patients operated on have resting blood pressure and pressure gradients, both resting and during exercise, greater than normal. Some patients operated on, with normal resting blood pressure and a slight gradient, can develop hypertension during exercise and a significant pressure gradient. Significant gradients during exercise are correlated to isthmic obstruction which is visible on the NMR. Follow-up after surgical repair of coarctation of the aorta cannot exclude measurement of exercise pressure gradients. This gives more physiological information compared with pressure gradients measured at rest. PMID:8488124

  10. Exercise oscillatory ventilation: Mechanisms and prognostic significance

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Bishnu P; Lewis, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    Alteration in breathing patterns characterized by cyclic variation of ventilation during rest and during exercise has been recognized in patients with advanced heart failure (HF) for nearly two centuries. Periodic breathing (PB) during exercise is known as exercise oscillatory ventilation (EOV) and is characterized by the periods of hyperpnea and hypopnea without interposed apnea. EOV is a non-invasive parameter detected during submaximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Presence of EOV during exercise in HF patients indicates significant impairment in resting and exercise hemodynamic parameters. EOV is also an independent risk factor for poor prognosis in HF patients both with reduced and preserved ejection fraction irrespective of other gas exchange variables. Circulatory delay, increased chemosensitivity, pulmonary congestion and increased ergoreflex signaling have been proposed as the mechanisms underlying the generation of EOV in HF patients. There is no proven treatment of EOV but its reversal has been noted with phosphodiesterase inhibitors, exercise training and acetazolamide in relatively small studies. In this review, we discuss the mechanistic basis of PB during exercise and the clinical implications of recognizing PB patterns in patients with HF.

  11. Studies with the USF/NASA toxicity screening test method - Exercise wheels and oxygen replenishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    Continuing efforts to improve the University of San Francisco/NASA toxicity screening test method have included the addition of exercise wheels to provide a different measure of incapacitation, and oxygen replenishment to offset any effect of oxygen depletion by the test animals. The addition of exercise wheels limited the number of animals in each test and doubled the required number of tests without any significant improvement in reproducibility. Oxygen replenishment appears to have an effect on survival in the last 5 minutes of the 30-minute test, but the effect is expected to be similar for most materials.

  12. Myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with a recent, normal exercise test

    PubMed Central

    Bovin, Ann; Klausen, Ib C; Petersen, Lars J

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the added value of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy imaging (MPI) in consecutive patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) and a recent, normal exercise electrocardiography (ECG). METHODS: This study was a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients referred for MPI during a 2-year period from 2006-2007 at one clinic. All eligible patients were suspected of suffering from CAD, and had performed a satisfactory bicycle exercise test (i.e., peak heart rate > 85% of the expected, age-predicted maximum) within 6 mo of referral, their exercise ECG was had no signs of ischemia, there was no exercise-limiting angina, and no cardiac events occurred between the exercise test and referral. The patients subsequently underwent a standard 2-d, stress-rest exercise MPI. Ischemia was defined based on visual scoring supported by quantitative segmental analysis (i.e., sum of stress score > 3). The results of cardiac catheterization were analyzed, and clinical follow up was performed by review of electronic medical files. RESULTS: A total of 56 patients fulfilled the eligibility criteria. Most patients had a low or intermediate ATPIII pre-test risk of CAD (6 patients had a high pre-test risk). The referral exercise test showed a mean Duke score of 5 (range: 2 to 11), which translated to a low post-exercise risk in 66% and intermediate risk in 34%. A total of seven patients were reported with ischemia by MPI. Three of these patients had high ATPIII pre-test risk scores. Six of these seven patients underwent cardiac catheterization, which showed significant stenosis in one patient with a high pre-test risk of CAD, and indeterminate lesions in three patients (two of whom had high pre-test risk scores). With MPI as a gate keeper for catheterization, no significant, epicardial stenosis was observed in any of the 50 patients (0%, 95% confidence interval 0.0 to 7.1) with low to intermediate pre-test risk of CAD and a negative exercise test. No cardiac events occurred in any patients within a median follow up period of > 1200 d. CONCLUSION: The added diagnostic value of MPI in patients with low or intermediate risk of CAD and a recent, normal exercise test is marginal. PMID:23538474

  13. Arm exercise testing with myocardial scintigraphy in asymptomatic patients with peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, S.; Rubler, S.; Bryk, H.; Sklar, B.; Glasser, L.

    1989-04-01

    Arm exercise with myocardial scintigraphy and oxygen consumption determinations was performed by 33 men with peripheral vascular disease, 40 to 74 years of age (group 2). None had evidence of coronary disease. Nineteen age-matched male control subjects (group 1) were also tested to determine the normal endurance and oxygen consumption during arm exercise in their age group and to compare the results with those obtained during a standard treadmill performance. The maximal heart rate, systolic blood pressure, pressure rate product, and oxygen consumption were all significantly lower for arm than for leg exercise. However, there was good correlation between all these parameters for both types of exertion. The maximal heart rate, work load and oxygen consumption were greater for group 1 subjects than in patients with peripheral vascular disease despite similar activity status. None of the group 1 subjects had abnormal arm exercise ECGs, while six members of group 2 had ST segment changes. Thallium-201 scintigraphy performed in the latter group demonstrated perfusion defects in 25 patients. After nine to 29 months of follow-up, three patients who had abnormal tests developed angina and one of them required coronary bypass surgery. Arm exercise with myocardial scintigraphy may be an effective method of detecting occult ischemia in patients with peripheral vascular disease. Those with good exercise tolerance and no electrocardiographic changes or /sup 201/T1 defects are probably at lower risk for the development of cardiac complications, while those who develop abnormalities at low exercise levels may be candidates for invasive studies.

  14. Comparison of Peak Cardiopulmonary Performance Parameters on a Robotics-Assisted Tilt Table, a Cycle and a Treadmill

    PubMed Central

    Saengsuwan, Jittima; Nef, Tobias; Laubacher, Marco; Hunt, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Robotics-assisted tilt table (RATT) technology provides body support, cyclical stepping movement and physiological loading. This technology can potentially be used to facilitate the estimation of peak cardiopulmonary performance parameters in patients who have neurological or other problems that may preclude testing on a treadmill or cycle ergometer. The aim of the study was to compare the magnitude of peak cardiopulmonary performance parameters including peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) and peak heart rate (HRpeak) obtained from a robotics-assisted tilt table (RATT), a cycle ergometer and a treadmill. The strength of correlations between the three devices, test-retest reliability and repeatability were also assessed. Eighteen healthy subjects performed six maximal exercise tests, with two tests on each of the three exercise modalities. Data from the second tests were used for the comparative and correlation analyses. For nine subjects, test-retest reliability and repeatability of VO2peak and HRpeak were assessed. Absolute VO2peak from the RATT, the cycle ergometer and the treadmill was (mean (SD)) 2.2 (0.56), 2.8 (0.80) and 3.2 (0.87) L/min, respectively (p < 0.001). HRpeak from the RATT, the cycle ergometer and the treadmill was 168 (9.5), 179 (7.9) and 184 (6.9) beats/min, respectively (p < 0.001). VO2peak and HRpeak from the RATT vs the cycle ergometer and the RATT vs the treadmill showed strong correlations. Test-retest reliability and repeatability were high for VO2peak and HRpeak for all devices. The results demonstrate that the RATT is a valid and reliable device for exercise testing. There is potential for the RATT to be used in severely impaired subjects who cannot use the standard modalities. PMID:25860019

  15. Estimation of VO2 Max: A Comparative Analysis of Five Exercise Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwiren, Linda D.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Thirty-eight healthy females measured maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) on the cycle ergometer and treadmill to compare five exercise tests (run, walk, step, and two tests using heart-rate response on the bicycle ergometer) in predicting VO2max. Results indicate that walk and run tests are satisfactory predictors of VO2max in 30- to 39-year-old

  16. Submaximal Treadmill Exercise Test to Predict VO[subscript 2]max in Fit Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vehrs, Pat R.; George, James D.; Fellingham, Gilbert W.; Plowman, Sharon A.; Dustman-Allen, Kymberli

    2007-01-01

    This study was designed to develop a single-stage submaximal treadmill jogging (TMJ) test to predict VO[subscript 2]max in fit adults. Participants (N = 400; men = 250 and women = 150), ages 18 to 40 years, successfully completed a maximal graded exercise test (GXT) at 1 of 3 laboratories to determine VO[subscript 2]max. The TMJ test was completed

  17. Symptom-limited graded treadmill exercise testing in young adults in the CARDIA study.

    PubMed

    Sidney, S; Haskell, W L; Crow, R; Sternfeld, B; Oberman, A; Armstrong, M A; Cutter, G R; Jacobs, D R; Savage, P J; Van Horn, L

    1992-02-01

    Symptom-limited, graded exercise treadmill testing was performed by 4,968 white and black adults, ages 18-30 yr, during the baseline examination for the CARDIA study. The mean estimated maximal exercise capacity by race/gender, expressed as metabolic units (METS), was: white men 13.8, black men 13.0, white women 11.1, and black women 9.4. Exercise test duration was higher in nonsmokers, positively related to physical activity score and pulmonary function (FEV1.ht-2), and inversely related to body mass index. Men had higher mean values than women for both test duration and a measure of submaximal performance, the workload 130 (WL130, the exercise test duration to a heart rate of 130 beats.min-1). Adjusted for age and education, white men had a longer mean test duration than black men (53 s longer, P less than 0.001), but nearly equal mean WL130. White women had higher mean values than black women for both test duration (114 s longer, P less than 0.001) and WL130 (36 s longer, P less than 0.001). Men had higher mean values than women for both outcome measures (P less than 0.001). Thus, in young adults significant gender and ethnic differences exist for exercise test performance, part of which can be explained by personal habits or traits. PMID:1549006

  18. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation through centuries].

    PubMed

    Gaji?, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    THE ANCIENT TIMES: Many early civilisations left testimonies about ancient times and resuscitation, as well. Some of them did it successfully and some of them did it less successfully; however, all of them wished to help a dying person and to bring him back to life. The first trustworthy note can be found in the Bible--Old Testament as a very realistic description of resuscitation of a child. THE MIDDLE AGES: The medieval scientists, Paracelsus and Vesalius, described first successful resuscitation attempts in the 15th and 16th century. These two men successfully applied ventilation methods by air inflation with blacksmith bellows. THE MODERN ERA: The first defibrillation was recorded in the 18th century in England, which was conducted by one of the volunteer society members. With the development of mechanics and techniques, the first precursors of modern respirators were introduced in the 19th century. The age of modern cardiopulmonary resuscitation began in the middle of 20th century, when Dr Peter Safar brought in the combination of artificial ventilation and chest compressions as the standard for implementing resuscitation. Adrenalin and defibrillation were introduced into the resuscitation techniques by Dr Redding and Dr Kouwenhaven, respectively; thus beginning the advance life support administration, which has been applied, with minor changes, until today. PMID:21905608

  19. A Pilot Test of the Additive Benefits of Physical Exercise to CBT for OCD.

    PubMed

    Rector, Neil A; Richter, Margaret A; Lerman, Bethany; Regev, Rotem

    2015-01-01

    The majority of "responders" to first-line cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) and pharmacological treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are left with residual symptoms that are clinically relevant and disabling. Therefore, there is pressing need for widely accessible efficacious alternative and/or adjunctive treatments for OCD. Accumulating evidence suggests that physical exercise may be one such intervention in the mood and anxiety disorders broadly, although we are aware of only two positive small-scale pilot studies that have tested its clinical benefits in OCD. This pilot study aimed to test the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of adding a structured physical exercise programme to CBT for OCD. A standard CBT group was delivered concurrently with a 12-week customized exercise programme to 11 participants. The exercise regimen was individualized for each participant based on peak heart rate measured using an incremental maximal exercise test. Reports of exercise adherence across the 12-week regimen exceeded 80%. A paired-samples t-test indicated very large treatment effects in Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale scores from pre- to post-treatment in CBT group cohorts led by expert CBT OCD specialists (d = 2.55) and junior CBT clinician non-OCD specialists (d = 2.12). These treatment effects are very large and exceed effects typically observed with individual and group-based CBT for OCD based on leading meta-analytic reviews, as well as previously obtained treatment effects for CBT using the same recruitment protocol without exercise. As such, this pilot work demonstrates the feasibility and significant potential clinical utility of a 12-week aerobic exercise programme delivered in conjunction with CBT for OCD. PMID:25738234

  20. Factorial Validity and Invariance Testing of the Exercise Dependence Scale-Revised in Swedish and Portuguese Exercisers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindwall, Magnus; Palmeira, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the factorial validity and factorial invariance of the 21-item Exercise Dependence Scale-Revised using 162 Swedish and 269 Portuguese exercisers. In addition, the prevalence of exercise dependence symptoms and links to exercise behavior, gender, and age in the two samples was also studied. Confirmatory factor

  1. Factorial Validity and Invariance Testing of the Exercise Dependence Scale-Revised in Swedish and Portuguese Exercisers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindwall, Magnus; Palmeira, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the factorial validity and factorial invariance of the 21-item Exercise Dependence Scale-Revised using 162 Swedish and 269 Portuguese exercisers. In addition, the prevalence of exercise dependence symptoms and links to exercise behavior, gender, and age in the two samples was also studied. Confirmatory factor…

  2. Comparison between treadmill and bicycle ergometer exercise tests in mild-to-moderate hypertensive Nigerians

    PubMed Central

    Abiodun, Olugbenga O; Balogun, Michael O; Akintomide, Anthony O; Adebayo, Rasaaq A; Ajayi, Olufemi E; Ogunyemi, Suraj A; Amadi, Valentine N; Adeyeye, Victor O

    2015-01-01

    Background Comparative cardiovascular responses to treadmill and bicycle ergometer (bike) exercise tests in hypertensive Nigerians are not known. This study compared cardiovascular responses to the two modes of exercise testing in hypertensives using maximal exercise protocols. Methods One hundred and ten male subjects with mild-to-moderate hypertension underwent maximal treadmill and bike test one after the other at a single visit in a simple random manner. Paired-sampled t-test was used to compare responses to both exercise tests while chi-squared test was used to compare categorical variables. Results The maximal heart rate (P<0.001), peak systolic blood pressure (P=0.02), rate pressure product (P<0.001), peak oxygen uptake (P<0.001), and exercise capacity (P<0.001) in metabolic equivalents were signifcantly higher on the treadmill than on the bike. Conclusion Higher cardiovascular responses on treadmill in Nigerian male hypertensives in this study, similar to findings in non-hypertensives and non-Nigerians in earlier studies, suggest that treadmill may be of better diagnostic utility in our population. PMID:26316811

  3. Reliability of Strength Testing using the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device and Free Weights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, Kirk L.; Loehr, James A.; Laughlin, Mitzi A.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Hagan, R. Donald

    2008-01-01

    The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) was developed for use on the International Space Station as a countermeasure against muscle atrophy and decreased strength. This investigation examined the reliability of one-repetition maximum (1RM) strength testing using ARED and traditional free weight (FW) exercise. Methods: Six males (180.8 +/- 4.3 cm, 83.6 +/- 6.4 kg, 36 +/- 8 y, mean +/- SD) who had not engaged in resistive exercise for at least six months volunteered to participate in this project. Subjects completed four 1RM testing sessions each for FW and ARED (eight total sessions) using a balanced, randomized, crossover design. All testing using one device was completed before progressing to the other. During each session, 1RM was measured for the squat, heel raise, and deadlift exercises. Generalizability (G) and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated for each exercise on each device and were used to predict the number of sessions needed to obtain a reliable 1RM measurement (G . 0.90). Interclass reliability coefficients and Pearson's correlation coefficients (R) also were calculated for the highest 1RM value (1RM9sub peak)) obtained for each exercise on each device to quantify 1RM relationships between devices.

  4. Exercise test in pediatric renal transplant recipients and its relationship with their cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Derakhshan, Ali; Derakhshan, Dorna; Amoozgar, Hamid; Shakiba, Mohammad Ali; Basiratnia, Mitra; Fallahzadeh, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-05-01

    Pediatric kidney transplant recipients are at increased risk of CVD. Exercise test is a good method to evaluate exercise capacity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and risk of potential CVDs. The aim of this study was to assess the exercise capacity in this population and determine its relationship with their cardiac function using conventional and tissue Doppler echocardiography. Exercise test, conventional and tissue Doppler echocardiography were performed on 44 kidney transplant children (age ranging 11-20, 59% male) with acceptable renal function, and the results were compared with their normal healthy counterparts. Our transplant patients achieved significantly lower maximal heart rate, maximal heart rate ratio, total energy expenditure during the exercise, and maximal O2 consumption (Max VO2 ) than the normal group (p < 0.05). No correlation was found between hemoglobin (Hb) level, dialysis duration, kidney function, and the exercise test parameters. Kidney transplant patients had preserved systolic despite diminished diastolic cardiac function compared to the normal children. Our pediatric renal transplant recipients had severely impaired diastolic dysfunction and significantly reduced MaxVO2 compared with their healthy counterparts. No correlation was found between MaxVO2 and measured indices of systolic and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:24483258

  5. Relation of Risk of Atrial Fibrillation With Systolic Blood Pressure Response During Exercise Stress Testing (from the Henry Ford ExercIse Testing Project).

    PubMed

    O'Neal, Wesley T; Qureshi, Waqas T; Blaha, Michael J; Ehrman, Jonathan K; Brawner, Clinton A; Nasir, Khurram; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H

    2015-12-15

    Decreases in systolic blood pressure during exercise may predispose to arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF) because of underlying abnormal autonomic tone. We examined the association between systolic blood pressure response and incident AF in 57,442 (mean age 54 13years, 47% women, and 29% black) patients free of baseline AF who underwent exercise treadmill stress testing from the Henry Ford ExercIse Testing project. Exercise systolic blood pressure response was examined as a categorical variable across clinically relevant categories (>20mm Hg: referent; 1 to 20mm Hg, and ?0mm Hg) and per 1-SD decrease. Cox regression, adjusting for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, medications, history of coronary heart disease, history of heart failure, and metabolic equivalent of task achieved, was used to compute hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between systolic blood pressure response and incident AF. Over a median follow-up of 5.0years, a total of 3,381 cases (5.9%) of AF were identified. An increased risk of AF was observed with decreasing systolic blood pressure response (>20mm Hg: HR 1.0, referent; 1 to 20mm Hg: HR 1.09, 95% CI 0.99, 1.20; ?0mm Hg: HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.40). Similar results were obtained per 1-SD decrease in systolic blood pressure response (HR 1.08, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.12). The results were consistent when stratified by age, sex, race, hypertension, and coronary heart disease. In conclusion, our results suggest that a decreased systolic blood pressure response during exercise may identify subjects who are at risk for developing AF. PMID:26603907

  6. The Stress Exercise Test and Oxygen Uptake in Normal Korean Men

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Wan Joo; Suh, Soon Kyu

    1986-01-01

    In order to observe physiologic responses to exercise and measure the normal value of maximal oxygen uptake, an exercise stress test, using a bicycle ergometer, was carried out on 82 normal males, 20 to 60 years of age. The exercise test consisted of 1 minute of unloaded cycling with an increment of 25 watts each minute to the point of exhaustion. Oxygen uptake, anaerobic threshold(AT), minute ventilation, and CO2 output were measured with an automatic gas analyzer and a pneumotachograph during the exercise. The results are summarized as follows: The maximal oxygen uptake in the 2029 year-old group of subjects was 39.6ml/min/kg, and it decreased with advancing age.The anaerobic threshold was 1.221.5 L/min in all age groups. No significant differences by age were observed. The mean ratio of the anaerobic threshold to the maximal oxygen uptake was 57%.The minute ventilation at maximal exercise was 65% of the maximal voluntary ventilation. This means that the subject cannot perform exercise at all, because of shortness of breath, that some potentially useful ventilation is left. PMID:3154608

  7. Simple Screening Test for Exercise-Induced Bronchospasm in the Middle School Athlete

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Tyler J.; Baker, Rachel H.; Weiss, Jason B.; Weiss, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    This article recommends and provides results from a simple screening test that could be incorporated into a standardized school evaluation for all children participating in sports and physical education classes. The test can be employed by physical educators utilizing their own gym to identify children who demonstrate signs of exercise-induced

  8. Soil Testing as a Classroom Exercise to Determine Soil-forming Processes and Soil Classification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bencloski, Joseph W.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a learning activity involving correctly matching soils with environments. The activity is intended for use in college level physical geography courses. Information is presented on instructional objectives, outline of preparatory lectures, soil test exercise worksheets, procedures, laboratory setting, testing procedures, collecting and

  9. Effect of Semirecumbent and Upright Body Position on Maximal and Submaximal Exercise Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Alexander; Antonishen, Kevin; Johnston, Chris; Pearce, Terri; Ryan, Michael; Sheel, A. William; McKenzie, Don C.

    2006-01-01

    The study was designed to determine the effect of upright-posture (UP) versus semirecumbent (SR) cycling on commonly used measures of maximal and submaximal exercise capacity. Nine healthy, untrained men (M age = 27 years, SD = 4.8 years) underwent steady-state submaximal aerobic testing followed by a ramped test to determine maximal oxygen

  10. Soil Testing as a Classroom Exercise to Determine Soil-forming Processes and Soil Classification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bencloski, Joseph W.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a learning activity involving correctly matching soils with environments. The activity is intended for use in college level physical geography courses. Information is presented on instructional objectives, outline of preparatory lectures, soil test exercise worksheets, procedures, laboratory setting, testing procedures, collecting and…

  11. Myocardial electrotonic response to submaximal exercise in dogs with healed myocardial infarctions: evidence for ?-adrenoceptor mediated enhanced coupling during exercise testing

    PubMed Central

    del Rio, Carlos L.; Clymer, Bradley D.; Billman, George E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Autonomic neural activation during cardiac stress testing is an established risk-stratification tool in post-myocardial infarction (MI) patients. However, autonomic activation can also modulate myocardial electrotonic coupling, a known factor to contribute to the genesis of arrhythmias. The present study tested the hypothesis that exercise-induced autonomic neural activation modulates electrotonic coupling (as measured by myocardial electrical impedance, MEI) in post-MI animals shown to be susceptible or resistant to ventricular fibrillation (VF). Methods: Dogs (n = 25) with healed MI instrumented for MEI measurements were trained to run on a treadmill and classified based on their susceptibility to VF (12 susceptible, 9 resistant). MEI and ECGs were recorded during 6-stage exercise tests (18 min/test; peak: 6.4 km/h @ 16%) performed under control conditions, and following complete ?-adrenoceptor (?-AR) blockade (propranolol); MEI was also measured at rest during escalating ?-AR stimulation (isoproterenol) or overdrive-pacing. Results: Exercise progressively increased heart rate (HR) and reduced heart rate variability (HRV). In parallel, MEI decreased gradually (enhanced electrotonic coupling) with exercise; at peak exercise, MEI was reduced by 5.3 0.4% (or -23 1.8?, P < 0.001). Notably, exercise-mediated electrotonic changes were linearly predicted by the degree of autonomic activation, as indicated by changes in either HR or in HRV (P < 0.001). Indeed, ?-AR blockade attenuated the MEI response to exercise while direct ?-AR stimulation (at rest) triggered MEI decreases comparable to those observed during exercise; ventricular pacing had no significant effects on MEI. Finally, animals prone to VF had a significantly larger MEI response to exercise. Conclusions: These data suggest that ?-AR activation during exercise can acutely enhance electrotonic coupling in the myocardium, particularly in dogs susceptible to ischemia-induced VF. PMID:25698976

  12. Influence of running stride frequency in heart rate variability analysis during treadmill exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Bailón, Raquel; Garatachea, Nuria; de la Iglesia, Ignacio; Casajús, Jose Antonio; Laguna, Pablo

    2013-07-01

    The analysis and interpretation of heart rate variability (HRV) during exercise is challenging not only because of the nonstationary nature of exercise, the time-varying mean heart rate, and the fact that respiratory frequency exceeds 0.4 Hz, but there are also other factors, such as the component centered at the pedaling frequency observed in maximal cycling tests, which may confuse the interpretation of HRV analysis. The objectives of this study are to test the hypothesis that a component centered at the running stride frequency (SF) appears in the HRV of subjects during maximal treadmill exercise testing, and to study its influence in the interpretation of the low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) components of HRV during exercise. The HRV of 23 subjects during maximal treadmill exercise testing is analyzed. The instantaneous power of different HRV components is computed from the smoothed pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution of the modulating signal assumed to carry information from the autonomic nervous system, which is estimated based on the time-varying integral pulse frequency modulation model. Besides the LF and HF components, the appearance is revealed of a component centered at the running SF as well as its aliases. The power associated with the SF component and its aliases represents 22±7% (median±median absolute deviation) of the total HRV power in all the subjects. Normalized LF power decreases as the exercise intensity increases, while normalized HF power increases. The power associated with the SF does not change significantly with exercise intensity. Consideration of the running SF component and its aliases is very important in HRV analysis since stride frequency aliases may overlap with LF and HF components. PMID:23358950

  13. Specialization in home care: a cardiopulmonary model.

    PubMed

    Bartock, B S; Finley-Cottone, D

    1992-01-01

    The Visiting Nurse Service of Rochester and Monroe County, Inc. has developed an innovative method of clinical practice to meet the needs of patients after acute episodes of heart or lung disease. The cardiopulmonary program has a multidisciplinary approach, focusing on disease management through physical assessment, symptom management, diagnostic testing, and rehabilitation via progressive activity tolerance. The program has been successful in either preventing or increasing the length of time between hospital admissions, and has increased the agency's referral base, improved staff job satisfaction, and reduced turnover. PMID:10116686

  14. Cigarette smoking decreases dynamic inspiratory capacity during maximal exercise in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Yoshihiro; Hattori, Noboru; Yokoyama, Akihito; Yamane, Kiminori; Sekikawa, Kiyokazu; Inamizu, Tsutomu; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the influence of cigarette smoking on exercise capacity, respiratory responses and dynamic changes in lung volume during exercise in patients with type 2 diabetes. Forty-one men with type, 2 diabetes without cardiopulmonary disease were recruited and divided into 28 non-current smokers and 13 current smokers. All subjects received lung function tests and cardiopulmonary exercise testing using tracings of the flow-volume loop. Exercise capacity was compared using the percentage of predicted oxygen uptake at maximal workload (%VO2max). Respiratory variables and inspiratory capacity (IC) were compared between the two groups at rest and at 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100% of maximum workload. Although there was no significant difference in lung function tests between the two groups, venous carboxyhemoglobin (CO-Hb) levels were significantly higher in current smokers. %VO2max was inversely correlated with CO-Hb levels. Changing patterns in respiratory rate, respiratory equivalent and IC were significantly different between the two groups. Current smokers had rapid breathing, a greater respiratory equivalent and a limited increase in IC during exercise. Cigarette smoking diminishes the increase in dynamic IC in patients with type 2 diabetes. As this effect of smoking on dynamic changes in lung volume will exacerbate dynamic hyperinflation in cases complicated by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, physicians should consider smoking habits and lung function when evaluating exercise capacity in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:22916510

  15. Antecedent acute cycling exercise affects attention control: an ERP study using attention network test

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Kai; Pesce, Caterina; Chiang, Yi-Te; Kuo, Cheng-Yuh; Fong, Dong-Yang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the after-effects of an acute bout of moderate intensity aerobic cycling exercise on neuroelectric and behavioral indices of efficiency of three attentional networks: alerting, orienting, and executive (conflict) control. Thirty young, highly fit amateur basketball players performed a multifunctional attentional reaction time task, the attention network test (ANT), with a two-group randomized experimental design after an acute bout of moderate intensity spinning wheel exercise or without antecedent exercise. The ANT combined warning signals prior to targets, spatial cueing of potential target locations and target stimuli surrounded by congruent or incongruent flankers, which were provided to assess three attentional networks. Event-related brain potentials and task performance were measured during the ANT. Exercise resulted in a larger P3 amplitude in the alerting and executive control subtasks across frontal, central and parietal midline sites that was paralleled by an enhanced reaction speed only on trials with incongruent flankers of the executive control network. The P3 latency and response accuracy were not affected by exercise. These findings suggest that after spinning, more resources are allocated to task-relevant stimuli in tasks that rely on the alerting and executive control networks. However, the improvement in performance was observed in only the executively challenging conflict condition, suggesting that whether the brain resources that are rendered available immediately after acute exercise translate into better attention performance depends on the cognitive task complexity. PMID:25914634

  16. Diagnostic Algorithm for Glycogenoses and Myoadenylate Deaminase Deficiency Based on Exercise Testing Parameters: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Rannou, Fabrice; Uguen, Arnaud; Scotet, Virginie; Le Maréchal, Cédric; Rigal, Odile; Marcorelles, Pascale; Gobin, Eric; Carré, Jean-Luc; Zagnoli, Fabien; Giroux-Metges, Marie-Agnès

    2015-01-01

    Aim Our aim was to evaluate the accuracy of aerobic exercise testing to diagnose metabolic myopathies. Methods From December 2008 to September 2012, all the consecutive patients that underwent both metabolic exercise testing and a muscle biopsy were prospectively enrolled. Subjects performed an incremental and maximal exercise testing on a cycle ergometer. Lactate, pyruvate, and ammonia concentrations were determined from venous blood samples drawn at rest, during exercise (50% predicted maximal power, peak exercise), and recovery (2, 5, 10, and 15 min). Biopsies from vastus lateralis or deltoid muscles were analysed using standard techniques (reference test). Myoadenylate deaminase (MAD) activity was determined using p-nitro blue tetrazolium staining in muscle cryostat sections. Glycogen storage was assessed using periodic acid-Schiff staining. The diagnostic accuracy of plasma metabolite levels to identify absent and decreased MAD activity was assessed using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results The study involved 51 patients. Omitting patients with glycogenoses (n = 3), MAD staining was absent in 5, decreased in 6, and normal in 37 subjects. Lactate/pyruvate at the 10th minute of recovery provided the greatest area under the ROC curves (AUC, 0.893 ± 0.067) to differentiate Abnormal from Normal MAD activity. The lactate/rest ratio at the 10th minute of recovery from exercise displayed the best AUC (1.0) for discriminating between Decreased and Absent MAD activities. The resulting decision tree achieved a diagnostic accuracy of 86.3%. Conclusion The present algorithm provides a non-invasive test to accurately predict absent and decreased MAD activity, facilitating the selection of patients for muscle biopsy and target appropriate histochemical analysis. PMID:26207760

  17. Cardiac arrhythmias during exercise testing in healthy men.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, E. F.; Owen, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    Clinically healthy male executives who participate in a long-term physical conditioning program have demonstrated cardiac arrhythmia during and after periodic ergometric testing at submaximal and maximal levels. In 1,385 tests on 248 subjects, it was found that 34% of subjects demonstrated an arrhythmia at some time and 13% of subjects developed arrhythmia on more than one test. Premature systoles of ventricular origin were most common, but premature systoles of atrial origin, premature systoles of junctional origin, paroxysmal atrial tachycardia, atrioventricular block, wandering pacemaker, and pre-excitation were also seen. Careful post-test monitoring and pulse rate regulated training sessions are suggested for such programs.

  18. The effect of regular Taekwondo exercise on Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and Stroop test in undergraduate student

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngil

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Taekwondo exercise on Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and the Stroop test in undergraduate students. [Methods] Fourteen male subjects participated in this study. They were separated into a Control group (N = 7) and an Exercise group (N = 7). Subjects participated in Taekwondo exercise training for 8 weeks. They underwent to Taekwondo exercise training for 85 minutes per day, 5 times a week at RPE of 11~15. The taekwondo exercise training comprised an aerobic exercise (20min) mode and a dynamic exercise (65min) mode. All data were analyzed by repeated measures two-way ANOVA. [Results] There were no significant differences in the physical characteristics of the subjects. Although weight and BMI showed a tendency to decreased in the exercise group (EG). Also, neurotrophic factors (BDNF, NGF, IGF-1) were not significantly different after 8 weeks in the two groups. However, BDNF and IGF-1 showed a tendency to increase in the exercise group (EG). Finally, the Stroop test (word, color) results were significantly different(p < .05) in the exercise group (EG). [Conclusion] These finding suggest that 8 weeks of regular Taekwondo exercise training may increase cognitive functions (Stroop test). However the training did not statistically affect neurotrophic factors (BDNF, NGF, IGF-1) in undergraduate students. PMID:26244125

  19. Impairment on cardiovascular and autonomic adjustments to maximal isometric exercise tests in offspring of hypertensive parents.

    PubMed

    Francica, Juliana V; Heeren, Marcelo V; Tubaldini, Mrcio; Sartori, Michelle; Mostarda, Cristiano; Araujo, Rubens C; Irigoyen, Maria-Cludia; De Angelis, Ktia

    2013-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare cardiovascular and autonomic responses to a mental stress test and to a maximal isometric exercise test between offspring of normotensive (ON, n = 10) and hypertensive parents (OH, n = 10). Subjects underwent a 3-min Stroop Color Word Test and a maximal isometric exercise test performed in an isokinetic dynamometer with continuous RR interval monitoring. At rest, arterial pressure and heart rate were similar between groups, but there was a significant reduction in total RR interval variance (ON: 5933 493 vs. OH: 2967 390 ms(2)) and an increase in low-high frequency components ratio of heart rate variability (ON: 2.3 0.4 vs. OH: 4.6 0.8) in OH group. In the first minute of the mental stress test and after both tests, the OH group presented increased heart rate as compared with the ON group. After both tests, only the ON group presented an increase in sympathetic component, thus reaching resting values similar to those of the OH group. Our data demonstrated increased resting cardiac sympathetic modulation in offspring of hypertensive parents at similar levels to that observed in offspring of normotensive parents after a mental stress test or a maximal isometric exercise test. Additionally, the exacerbated heart rate responses to these physiological tests in OH subjects may be associated with resting autonomic dysfunction, thus reinforcing these evaluations as important tools for detecting early dysfunctions in this genetically predisposed population. PMID:22729292

  20. Peak exercise capacity estimated from incremental shuttle walking test in patients with COPD: a methodological study

    PubMed Central

    Arnardttir, Ragnheiur Harpa; Emtner, Margareta; Hedenstrm, Hans; Larsson, Kjell; Boman, Gunnar

    2006-01-01

    Background In patients with COPD, both laboratory exercise tests and field walking tests are used to assess physical performance. In laboratory tests, peak exercise capacity in watts (W peak) and/or peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) are assessed, whereas the performance on walking tests usually is expressed as distance walked. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between an incremental shuttle walking test (ISWT) and two laboratory cycle tests in order to assess whether W peak could be estimated from an ISWT. Methods Ninety-three patients with moderate or severe COPD performed an ISWT, an incremental cycle test (ICT) to measure W peak and a semi-steady-state cycle test with breath-by-breath gas exchange analysis (CPET) to measure VO2 peak. Routine equations for conversion between cycle tests were used to estimate W peak from measured VO2 peak (CPET). Conversion equation for estimation of W peak from ISWT was found by univariate regression. Results There was a significant correlation between W peak and distance walked on ISWT body weight (r = 0.88, p < 0.0001). The agreement between W peak measured by ICT and estimated from ISWT was similar to the agreement between measured W peak (ICT) and W peak estimated from measured VO2 peak by CPET. Conclusion Peak exercise capacity measured by an incremental cycle test could be estimated from an ISWT with similar accuracy as when estimated from peak oxygen uptake in patients with COPD. PMID:17044921

  1. Prevalence of and variables associated with silent myocardial ischemia on exercise thallium-201 stress testing

    SciTech Connect

    Gasperetti, C.M.; Burwell, L.R.; Beller, G.A. )

    1990-07-01

    The prevalence of silent myocardial ischemia was prospectively assessed in a group of 103 consecutive patients (mean age 59 +/- 10 years, 79% male) undergoing symptom-limited exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy. Variables that best correlated with the occurrence of painless ischemia by quantitative scintigraphic criteria were examined. Fifty-nine patients (57%) had no angina on exercise testing. A significantly greater percent of patients with silent ischemia than of patients with angina had a recent myocardial infarction (31% versus 7%, p less than 0.01), had no prior angina (91% versus 64%, p less than 0.01), had dyspnea as an exercise test end point (56% versus 35%, p less than 0.05) and exhibited redistribution defects in the supply regions of the right and circumflex coronary arteries (50% versus 35%, p less than 0.05). The group with exercise angina had more ST depression (64% versus 41%, p less than 0.05) and more patients with four or more redistribution defects. However, there was no difference between the two groups with respect to mean total thallium-201 perfusion score, number of redistribution defects per patient, multi-vessel thallium redistribution pattern or extent of angiographic coronary artery disease. There was also no difference between the silent ischemia and angina groups with respect to antianginal drug usage, prevalence of diabetes mellitus, exercise duration, peak exercise heart rate, peak work load, peak double (rate-pressure) product and percent of patients achieving greater than or equal to 85% of maximal predicted heart rate for age. Thus, in this study group, there was a rather high prevalence rate of silent ischemia (57%) by exercise thallium-201 criteria.

  2. Coronary CT angiography in asymptomatic middle-aged athletes with ST segment anomalies during maximal exercise test.

    PubMed

    Ermolao, A; Roman, F; Gasperetti, A; Varnier, M; Bergamin, M; Zaccaria, M

    2016-01-01

    The clinical significance of ST segment anomalies occurring during exercise test in asymptomatic subjects is still debated. We designed a cross-sectional study to evaluate if the presence of these exercise test abnormalities were related with coronary CT angiography findings. Nine hundred forty athletes (range 30 to 60 years old), performed a maximal exercise test for sport eligibility. Forty-six subjects (4.9%) showing ST abnormalities during exercise and/or the recovery phase were referred to a 64-slice coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography. Among 44 subjects who underwent coronary CT angiography, 23 had an equivocal while 21 had a positive exercise test. Coronary CT angiography found, six and eight subjects with significant and not significant coronary artery disease, respectively. Further, seven patients demonstrated origin and course coronary anomalies. The positive predictive value for significant coronary artery disease of the exercise test was 13.6%. Our data suggest the referral to coronary CT angiography even of patients with equivocal repolarization anomalies during exercise and its recovery phase. Although the positive predictive value of a maximal exercise test in asymptomatic athletes appears lower than what observed in patients at high risk for coronary artery disease, about half of athletes with equivocal or positive exercise test demonstrated some coronary abnormalities. PMID:25623056

  3. The emerging role of exercise testing and stress echocardiography in valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Picano, Eugenio; Pibarot, Philippe; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Monin, Jean Luc; Bonow, Robert O

    2009-12-01

    Exercise testing has an established role in the evaluation of patients with valvular heart disease and can aid clinical decision making. Because symptoms may develop slowly and indolently in chronic valve diseases and are often not recognized by patients and their physicians, the symptomatic, blood pressure, and electrocardiographic responses to exercise can help identify patients who would benefit from early valve repair or replacement. In addition, stress echocardiography has emerged as an important component of stress testing in patients with valvular heart disease, with relevant established and potential applications. Stress echocardiography has the advantages of its wide availability, low cost, and versatility for the assessment of disease severity. The versatile applications of stress echocardiography can be tailored to the individual patient with aortic or mitral valve disease, both before and after valve replacement or repair. Hence, exercise-induced changes in valve hemodynamics, ventricular function, and pulmonary artery pressure, together with exercise capacity and symptomatic responses to exercise, provide the clinician with diagnostic and prognostic information that can contribute to subsequent clinical decisions. Nevertheless, there is a lack of convincing evidence that the results of stress echocardiography lead to clinical decisions that result in better outcomes, and therefore large-scale prospective randomized studies focusing on patient outcomes are needed in the future. PMID:19958961

  4. Results of the International Space Station Interim Resistance Exercise Device Man-in-the-Loop Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, A. D., Jr.; Amonette, W. E.; Bentley, J. R.; Rapley, M. G.; Blazine, K. L.; Loehr, J. A.; Collier, K. R.; Boettcher, C. R.; Skrocki, J. S.; Hohrnann, R. J.

    2004-01-01

    The Interim Resistance Exercise Device (iRED), developed for the International Space Station (ISS), was evaluated using human subjects for a Man-In-The-Loop Test (MILT). Thirty-two human subjects exercised using the iRED in a test that was conducted over a 63-working-day period. The subjects performed the same exercises will be used on board ISS, and the iRED operating constraints that are to be used on ISS were followed. In addition, eight of the subjects were astronauts who volunteered to be in the evaluation in order to become familiar with the iRED and provide a critique of the device. The MILT was scheduled to last for 57,000 exercise repetitions on the iRED. This number of repetitions was agreed to as a number typical of that expected during a 3-person, 17-week ISS Increment. One of the canisters of the iRED failed at the 49,683- repetition mark (87.1% of targeted goal). The remaining canister was operated using the plan for operations if one canister fails during flight (contingency operations). This canister remained functional past the 57,000-repetition mark. This report details the results of the iRED MILT, and lists specific recommendations regarding both operation of the iRED and future resistance exercise device development.

  5. Multiple-Choice Cloze Exercises: Textual Domain, Science. SPPED Test Development Notebook, Form 81-S [and] Answer Key for Multiple-Choice Cloze Exercises: Textual Domain, Science. SPPED Test Development Notebook, Form 85-S. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Div. of Research.

    The "Test Development Notebook" is a resource designed for the preparation of tests of literal comprehension for students in grades 1 through 12. This volume contains 200 multiple-choice cloze exercises taken from textbooks in science, and the accompanying answer key. Each exercise carries the code letter of the section to which it belongs. The…

  6. Cardiopulmonary Fitness and Endurance in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Sheng K.; Lin, Hsiao-Hui; Li, Yao-Chuen; Tsai, Chia-Liang; Cairney, John

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare cardiopulmonary fitness and endurance in 9-11-year-old children with DCD against a group of typically developing children in Taiwan. The Movement ABC test was used to evaluate the motor abilities of children. Forty-one participants (20 children with DCD and 21 children without DCD) were recruited for this

  7. Cardiopulmonary Fitness and Endurance in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Sheng K.; Lin, Hsiao-Hui; Li, Yao-Chuen; Tsai, Chia-Liang; Cairney, John

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare cardiopulmonary fitness and endurance in 9-11-year-old children with DCD against a group of typically developing children in Taiwan. The Movement ABC test was used to evaluate the motor abilities of children. Forty-one participants (20 children with DCD and 21 children without DCD) were recruited for this…

  8. The prevalence of arrhythmias, predictors for arrhythmias, and safety of exercise stress testing in children.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Reena M; Gates, Gregory J; Walsh, Christine A; Schiller, Myles S; Pass, Robert H; Ceresnak, Scott R

    2015-03-01

    Exercise testing is commonly performed in children for evaluation of cardiac disease. Few data exist, however, on the prevalence, types of arrhythmias, predictors for arrhythmias, and safety of exercise testing in children. A retrospective review of all patients ≤21 years undergoing exercise testing at our center from 2008 to 2012 was performed. Patients with clinically relevant arrhythmias were compared to those not experiencing a significant arrhythmia. 1,037 tests were performed in 916 patients. The mean age was 14 ± 4 years, 537 (55 %) were male, 281 (27 %) had congenital heart disease, 178 (17 %) had a history of a prior arrhythmia, and 17 (2 %) had a pacemaker or ICD. 291 (28 %) patients had a rhythm disturbance during the procedure. Clinically important arrhythmias were noted in 34 (3 %) patients and included: 19 (1.8 %) increasing ectopy with exercise, 5 (0.5 %) VT, 5 (0.5 %) second degree AV block, 3 (0.3 %) SVT, and 2 (0.2 %) AFIB. On multivariate logistic regression, variables associated with the development of clinically relevant arrhythmias included severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction on echo (OR 1.99, CI 1.20-3.30) and prior history of a documented arrhythmia (OR 2.94, CI 1.25-6.88). There were no adverse events related to testing with no patient requiring cardioversion, defibrillation, or acute anti-arrhythmic therapy. A total of 28 % of children developed a rhythm disturbance during exercise testing and 3 % were clinically important. Severe LV dysfunction and a history of documented arrhythmia were associated with the development of a clinically important arrhythmia. PMID:25384613

  9. Exercise Stress Testing Programs in the United States: A 1975 Status Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparling, Phillip B.

    1977-01-01

    This survey of exercise stress testing programs in the United States concludes that the rapid growth and diversity of these services have created a need for increased communication and cooperation among professionals concerning standards relative to procedures, protocols, and personnel. (Author/MJB)

  10. Effect of In-Flight Exercise and Extravehicular Activity on Postflight Stand Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Moore, Alan D., Jr.; Fritsch-Yelle, Janice; Greenisen, Michael; Schneider, Suzanne M.; Foster, Philip P.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether exercise performed by Space Shuttle crewmembers during short-duration spaceflights (9-16 days) affects the heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) responses to standing within 2-4 hr of landing. Thirty crewmembers performed self-selected in-flight exercise and maintained exercise logs to monitor their exercise intensity and duration. A 10min stand test, preceded by at least 6 min of quiet supine rest, was completed 10- 15 d before launch (PRE) and within four hours of landing (POST). Based upon their in-flight exercise records, subjects were grouped as either high (HIex: = 3x/week, HR = 70% ,HRMax, = 20 min/session, n = 11), medium (MEDex: = 3x/week, HR = 70% HRmax, = 20 min/session, n = 10), or low (LOex: = 3x/week, HR and duration variable, n = 11) exercisers. HR and BP responses to standing were compared between groups (ANOVA, or analysis of variance, P < 0.05). There were no PRE differences between the groups in supine or standing HR and BP. Although POST supine HR was similar to PRE, all groups had an increased standing HR compared to PRE. The increase in HR upon standing was significantly greater after flight in the LOex group (36+/-5 bpm) compared to HIex or MEDex groups (25+/-1bpm; 22+/-2 bpm). Similarly, the decrease in pulse pressure (PP) from supine to standing was unchanged after spaceflight in the MEDex and HIex groups, but was significantly less in the LOex group (PRE: -9+/- 3, POST: -19+/- 4 mmHg). Thus, moderate to high levels of in-flight exercise attenuated HR and PP responses to standing after spaceflight compared.

  11. Physiological basis of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation in patients with lung or heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Louvaris, Zafeiris

    2015-01-01

    Educational Aims To illustrate the common mechanisms limiting exercise tolerance in patients with chronic lung and heart disease To highlight the impact of lung and heart disease on daily physical activity levels To outline the effects of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation on functional capacity in patients with chronic lung and heart disease To discuss an innovative tele-rehabilitation intervention using information and communications technologies to improve functional capacity in patients with chronic lung and heart disease Summary Shortness of breath associated with cardiorespiratory abnormalities and peripheral muscle discomfort are the major factors that limit exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and those with congestive heart failure (CHF). Both of these symptoms negatively impact on patients’ daily physical activity levels. In turn, poor daily physical activity is commonly associated with increased rates of morbidity and mortality. Cardiopulmonary rehabilitation programmes partially reverse muscle weakness and dysfunction and increase functional capacity in both COPD and CHF. However, benefits gained from participation in cardiopulmonary rehabilitation programmes are regressing soon after the completion of these programmes. Moreover, several barriers limit access and uptake of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation programmes by eligible patients. A potential solution to the underutilisation of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation is the implementation of tele-rehabilitation interventions at home using information and communications technologies. Thus, tele-rehabilitation may be useful to encourage and educate patients with COPD or CHF on how best to maintain and/or further enhance daily physical activity levels. PMID:26306112

  12. Comparison of laboratory- and field-based exercise tests for COPD: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fotheringham, Iain; Meakin, Georgina; Punekar, Yogesh Suresh; Riley, John H; Cockle, Sarah M; Singh, Sally J

    2015-01-01

    Exercise tests are often used to evaluate the functional status of patients with COPD. However, to the best of our knowledge, a comprehensive systematic comparison of these tests has not been performed. We systematically reviewed studies reporting the repeatability and/or reproducibility of these tests, and studies comparing their sensitivity to therapeutic intervention. A systematic review identified primary manuscripts in English reporting relevant data on the following exercise tests: 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and 12-minute walk test, incremental and endurance shuttle walk tests (ISWT and ESWT, respectively), incremental and endurance cycle ergometer tests, and incremental and endurance treadmill tests. We identified 71 relevant studies. Good repeatability (for the 6MWT and ESWT) and reproducibility (for the 6MWT, 12-minute walk test, ISWT, ESWT, and incremental cycle ergometer test) were reported by most studies assessing these tests, providing patients were familiarized with them beforehand. The 6MWT, ISWT, and particularly the ESWT were reported to be sensitive to therapeutic intervention. Protocol variations (eg, track layout or supplemental oxygen use) affected performance significantly in several studies. This review shows that while the validity of several tests has been established, for others further study is required. Future work will assess the link between these tests, physiological mechanisms, and patient-reported measures. PMID:25834421

  13. Comparison of laboratory- and field-based exercise tests for COPD: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fotheringham, Iain; Meakin, Georgina; Punekar, Yogesh Suresh; Riley, John H; Cockle, Sarah M; Singh, Sally J

    2015-01-01

    Exercise tests are often used to evaluate the functional status of patients with COPD. However, to the best of our knowledge, a comprehensive systematic comparison of these tests has not been performed. We systematically reviewed studies reporting the repeatability and/or reproducibility of these tests, and studies comparing their sensitivity to therapeutic intervention. A systematic review identified primary manuscripts in English reporting relevant data on the following exercise tests: 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and 12-minute walk test, incremental and endurance shuttle walk tests (ISWT and ESWT, respectively), incremental and endurance cycle ergometer tests, and incremental and endurance treadmill tests. We identified 71 relevant studies. Good repeatability (for the 6MWT and ESWT) and reproducibility (for the 6MWT, 12-minute walk test, ISWT, ESWT, and incremental cycle ergometer test) were reported by most studies assessing these tests, providing patients were familiarized with them beforehand. The 6MWT, ISWT, and particularly the ESWT were reported to be sensitive to therapeutic intervention. Protocol variations (eg, track layout or supplemental oxygen use) affected performance significantly in several studies. This review shows that while the validity of several tests has been established, for others further study is required. Future work will assess the link between these tests, physiological mechanisms, and patient-reported measures. PMID:25834421

  14. Daily exercise routines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Patrick L.; Amoroso, Michael T.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on daily exercise routines are presented. Topics covered include: daily exercise and periodic stress testings; exercise equipment; physiological monitors; exercise protocols; physiological levels; equipment control; control systems; and fuzzy logic control.

  15. Computer-enhanced thallium scintigrams in asymptomatic men with abnormal exercise tests

    SciTech Connect

    Uhl, G.S.; Kay, T.N.; Hickman, J.R., Jr.

    1981-12-01

    The usefulness of computer-enhanced thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in excluding the diagnosis of coronary artery disease in asymptomatic patients showing abnormal exercise electrocardiograms is evaluated. Multigated thallium scans were obtained immediately following and 3 or 4 hours after maximal exercise testing in 191 consecutive asymptomatic Air Force aircrew members who had shown abnormal exercise electrocardiograms and who were due to undergo coronary angiography. Computer enhancement of the raw images is found to lead to four false positive and two false negative scintigrams as revealed by angiographic results, while the group of 15 with subcritical coronary disease exhibited equivocal results. Results reveal that enhanced thallium scintigrams are an accurate diagnostics tool in detecting myocardial ischemia in asymptomatic patients and may be used in counseling asymptomatic patients on their likelihood of having coronary artery disease.

  16. Comparative ergoespirometric adaptations to a treadmill exercise test in untrained show Andalusian and Arabian horses.

    PubMed

    Castejn-Riber, Cristina; Muoz, Ana; Trigo, Pablo; Riber, Cristina; Santisteban, Rafael; Castejn, Francisco

    2012-03-01

    Significant differences exist in the respiratory adaptation to exercise in different equine breeds. This research describes the ergoespirometric response to exercise of Andalusian (AN) and Arabian (A) horses, both selected according to morphological criteria. Thirteen untrained male horses (6 AN and 7 A) performed a treadmill exercise test (TET) with a slope of 6%, with workloads starting from 5 m/s and increasing 1 m/s every 3 min until the horses were not able to keep the required velocity. Tidal volume (TV), respiratory rate, minute ventilation (VE), oxygen uptake (VO2), carbon dioxide production, peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), exercise time to fatigue (ETF) and respiratory aerobic threshold (RAT) were determined. AN horses presented higher TV and VE, whereas respiratory rate, VO2 and VCO2 were lower at the same velocities. RER was similar between breeds. ETF was longer in A horses (556.7??66.5 in AN vs. 607.1??71.1 s in A) and no significant differences were found in RAT (5.50??0.50 in AN vs. 5.86??1.07 m/s in A). In summary, despite the more intense ventilatory response to exercise at the same velocity, AN horses had lower VO2. The AN horse develops a more intense ventilatory response to fixed velocities than the A horse and it could be interesting to clarify the role of the locomotion characteristics in this response. PMID:22183731

  17. Comparing Fat Oxidation in an Exercise Test with Moderate-Intensity Interval Training

    PubMed Central

    Alkahtani, Shaea

    2014-01-01

    This study compared fat oxidation rate from a graded exercise test (GXT) with a moderate-intensity interval training session (MIIT) in obese men. Twelve sedentary obese males (age 29 ± 4.1 years; BMI 29.1 ± 2.4 kg·m-2; fat mass 31.7 ± 4.4 %body mass) completed two exercise sessions: GXT to determine maximal fat oxidation (MFO) and maximal aerobic power (VO2max), and an interval cycling session during which respiratory gases were measured. The 30-min MIIT involved 5-min repetitions of workloads 20% below and 20% above the MFO intensity. VO2max was 31.8 ± 5.5 ml·kg-1·min-1 and all participants achieved ≥ 3 of the designated VO2max test criteria. The MFO identified during the GXT was not significantly different compared with the average fat oxidation rate in the MIIT session. During the MIIT session, fat oxidation rate increased with time; the highest rate (0.18 ± 0.11 g·min- 1) in minute 25 was significantly higher than the rate at minute 5 and 15 (p ≤ 0.01 and 0.05 respectively). In this cohort with low aerobic fitness, fat oxidation during the MIIT session was comparable with the MFO determined during a GXT. Future research may consider if the varying workload in moderate-intensity interval training helps adherence to exercise without compromising fat oxidation. Key Points Fat oxidation during interval exercise is not com-promised by the undulating exercise intensity Physiological measures corresponding with the MFO measured during the GXT correlated well to the MIIT The validity of exercise intensity markers derived from a GXT to reflect the physiological responses during MIIT. PMID:24570605

  18. The value of spirometry and exercise challenge test to diagnose and monitor children with asthma

    PubMed Central

    van den Wijngaart, Lara S; Roukema, Jolt; Merkus, Peter JFM

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is defined as a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways with characteristic symptoms including recurrent episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and coughing. It may result in abnormalities of ventilator function, which can be assessed by different pulmonary function tests. In this case report, we present a 15-year-old boy with asthma and illustrate the value and limitations of spirometry and exercise challenge test in daily practice. PMID:25802746

  19. Importance of early cardiac rehabilitation on changes in exercise capacity: a retrospective pilot study.

    PubMed

    McPhee, Patrick G; Winegard, Karen J; MacDonald, Maureen J; McKelvie, Robert S; Millar, Philip J

    2015-12-01

    Graded cardiopulmonary exercise tests were analyzed from 62 coronary artery disease patients (n = 48 males; age, 72 ± 10 years; body mass index, 27 ± 4 kg/m(2)) before and after 18 ± 2 months of cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Early initiation of CR (<114 days) produced greater increases in peak metabolic equivalents (METs) compared with the late (≥114 days) CR group (68% ± 51% vs. 41% ± 39%, p < 0.05). A negative correlation was found between CR delay and peak METs (r = -0.32; p = 0.02). Early initiation of CR may be important to maximize cardiorespiratory adaptations to chronic exercise training. PMID:26575102

  20. Palliative care in cardiopulmonary transplantation.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Maria; Clark, Stephen C

    2015-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary transplantation is a life-prolonging therapy available to a select population of patients with cardiac or respiratory failure. Transplantation is associated with significant morbidity, mortality and unmet palliative care need. Despite recommendations that palliative care should be a core component of the heart and lung transplant process, collaboration within clinical practice is extremely rare. A key reason for this is the misperception among patients, their families and transplant clinicians, that palliative care is analogous with end of life care. Other challenges include prognostication, communication, and the balance of hope and reality. We suggest a change in clinical practice within cardiopulmonary transplantation, whereby palliative care takes place alongside active management. Greater partnership working will demonstrate clinical credibility and highlight the impact of palliative care interventions. Education is required to address current misperceptions and further research should explore the effect of initiatives to improve palliative care provision for this patient group. PMID:25812577

  1. A model to predict multivessel coronary artery disease from the exercise thallium-201 stress test

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, S.G.; Abbott, R.D.; Boucher, C.A.; Watson, D.D.; Kaul, S. )

    1991-03-01

    The aim of this study was to (1) determine whether nonimaging variables add to the diagnostic information available from exercise thallium-201 images for the detection of multivessel coronary artery disease; and (2) to develop a model based on the exercise thallium-201 stress test to predict the presence of multivessel disease. The study populations included 383 patients referred to the University of Virginia and 325 patients referred to the Massachusetts General Hospital for evaluation of chest pain. All patients underwent both cardiac catheterization and exercise thallium-201 stress testing between 1978 and 1981. In the University of Virginia cohort, at each level of thallium-201 abnormality (no defects, one defect, more than one defect), ST depression and patient age added significantly in the detection of multivessel disease. Logistic regression analysis using data from these patients identified three independent predictors of multivessel disease: initial thallium-201 defects, ST depression, and age. A model was developed to predict multivessel disease based on these variables. As might be expected, the risk of multivessel disease predicted by the model was similar to that actually observed in the University of Virginia population. More importantly, however, the model was accurate in predicting the occurrence of multivessel disease in the unrelated population studied at the Massachusetts General Hospital. It is, therefore, concluded that (1) nonimaging variables (age and exercise-induced ST depression) add independent information to thallium-201 imaging data in the detection of multivessel disease; and (2) a model has been developed based on the exercise thallium-201 stress test that can accurately predict the probability of multivessel disease in other populations.

  2. Predicting Marathon Time Using Exhaustive Graded Exercise Test in Marathon Runners.

    PubMed

    Till, Eloise S; Armstrong, Stuart A; Harris, Greg; Maloney, Stephen

    2016-02-01

    Till, ES, Armstrong, SA, Harris, G, and Maloney, S. Predicting marathon time using exhaustive graded exercise test in marathon runners. J Strength Cond Res 30(2): 512-517, 2016-The study aimed to investigate the correlation between time on a treadmill test and exhaustion 2 weeks before a road marathon and the subsequent road marathon performance time (MPT). The study recruited 59 runners entered in the Melbourne 2012 marathon, Canberra 2013 marathon, and Gold Coast 2013 marathon. Forty runners completed both the graded exercise treadmill test to exhaustion and the 42.2 km marathon. Nineteen participants dropped out of the study due to illness, injury, or did not begin the treadmill test. A statistically significant correlation was found between treadmill time and MPT (adjusted R = 0.447). Sex, weekly running duration (t = -1.58, p = 0.12), years of running (t = 1.10, p = 0.28), and age (t = 0.94, p = 0.36) did not statistically correlate with MPT. The relationship between the graded exercise test and MPT can be used to predict MPT using y = -3.85x + 351.57, where y is MPT and x is treadmill time. This is a simple, accessible, and cost-effective method to aid athletes in predicting their race time over 42.2 km. Prediction of marathon time in a simple and accessible manner was believed to be useful to the growing population of marathon runners around the world. PMID:26815178

  3. Arm exercise-thallium imaging testing for the detection of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Balady, G.J.; Weiner, D.A.; Rothendler, J.A.; Ryan, T.J.

    1987-01-01

    Patients with lower limb impairment are often unable to undergo a standard bicycle or treadmill test for the evaluation of coronary artery disease. To establish an alternative method of testing, 50 subjects (aged 56 +/- 10 years) performed arm ergometry testing in conjunction with myocardial thallium scintigraphy. All underwent coronary angiography; significant coronary artery disease (greater than or equal to 70% stenosis) in at least one vessel was present in 41 (82%) of the 50 patients. Thallium scintigraphy was found to have an 83% sensitivity and 78% specificity for detecting coronary disease, compared with a sensitivity and specificity of 54% (p less than 0.01) and 67% (p = NS), respectively, for exercise electrocardiography. In the subgroup of 23 patients who had no prior myocardial infarction or left bundle branch block and were not taking digitalis, thallium scintigraphy had a sensitivity of 80% versus 50% for exercise electrocardiography. Scintigraphy yielded a sensitivity of 84, 74 and 90% for one, two and three vessel disease, respectively. Noninvasive arm ergometry exercise-thallium imaging testing appears to be reliable and useful and should be considered in the evaluation of coronary artery disease in patients with lower limb impairment.

  4. Significance of T wave normalization in the electrocardiogram during exercise stress test

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, J.J.; Heng, M.K.; Sevrin, R.; Udhoji, V.N.

    1987-12-01

    Although normalization of previously inverted T waves in the ECG is not uncommon during exercise treadmill testing, the clinical significance of this finding is still unclear. This was investigated in 45 patients during thallium-201 exercise testing. Patients with secondary T wave abnormalities on the resting ECG and ischemic exercise ST segment depression were excluded. On the thallium-201 scans, the left ventricle was divided into anterior-septal and inferior-posterior segments; these were considered equivalent to T wave changes in leads V1 and V5, and aVF, respectively. A positive thallium-201 scan was found in 43 of 45 (95%) patients and in 49 of 52 (94%) cardiac segments that showed T wave normalization. When thallium scans and T wave changes were matched to sites of involvement, 76% of T wave normalization in lead aV, was associated with positive thallium scans in the inferior-posterior segments, and 77% of T wave normalization in V1 and V5 was associated with positive thallium scans in the anterior-septal segments. These site correlations were similar for reversible and fixed thallium defects, and for patients not on digoxin therapy. Similar correlations were noted for the sites of T wave changes and coronary artery lesions in 12 patients who had angiography. In patients with a high prevalence for coronary artery disease, exercise T wave normalization is highly specific for the presence of the disease. In addition, it represents predominantly either previous injury or exercise-induced ischemic changes over the site of ECG involvement, rather than reciprocal changes of the opposite ventricular wall.

  5. Self-exercising checkers for unified built-in self-test (UBIST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaidis, Michael

    1989-03-01

    An original built-in self-test (BIST) scheme is proposed aimed at covering some of the shortcomings of self-checking circuits and applicable to all tests needed for integrated circuits. In this scheme, self-checking techniques and built-in self-test techniques are combined in a original way to take advantage of each other. The result is a unified BIST scheme (UBIST), allowing high fault coverage for all tests needed for integrated circuits, e.g., offline test (design verification, manufacturing test, maintenance test) and online concurrent error detection. An important concept introduced is that of self-exercising checkers. The strongly code-disjoint property of the checkers is ensured for a very large class of fault hypotheses by internal test pattern generation, and the design of the checkers is simplified.

  6. Use of the single-breath method of estimating cardiac output during exercise-stress testing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buderer, M. C.; Rummel, J. A.; Sawin, C. F.; Mauldin, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    The single-breath cardiac output measurement technique of Kim et al. (1966) has been modified for use in obtaining cardiac output measurements during exercise-stress tests on Apollo astronauts. The modifications involve the use of a respiratory mass spectrometer for data acquisition and a digital computer program for data analysis. The variation of the modified method for triplicate steady-state cardiac output measurements was plus or minus 1 liter/min. The combined physiological and methodological variation seen during a set of three exercise tests on a series of subjects was 1 to 2.5 liter/min. Comparison of the modified method with the direct Fick technique showed that although the single-breath values were consistently low, the scatter of data was small and the correlation between the two methods was high. Possible reasons for the low single-breath cardiac output values are discussed.

  7. Patterning of affective responses during a graded exercise test in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Charlotte C; Rowlands, Alex; Parfitt, Gaynor

    2012-05-01

    Past studies have shown the patterning of affective responses during a graded exercise test (GXT) in adult and male adolescent populations, but none have explored the patterns in adolescent girls or younger children. This study explored the patterning of affective responses during a GXT in adolescents and younger children. Forty-nine children (21 male and 28 female) aged between 8-14 years (10.8 1.8 years) completed a GXT. Ventilatory threshold (VT) was identified. At the end of each incremental step, participants reported affective valence. Results revealed that affective valence assessed by the Feeling Scale (FS) significantly declined from the onset of exercise until the point of VT in the younger children, but remained relatively stable in the adolescents. Exercise above the VT brought about significant declines in affective valence regardless of age or sex, but the decrease was significantly greater in adolescents. Results suggest it may be preferable to prescribe lower exercise intensities (below VT) for children, compared with adolescents, to ensure a positive affective response. PMID:22728418

  8. A prototype gas exchange monitor for exercise stress testing aboard NASA Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Joseph A.; Westenskow, Dwayne R.; Bauer, Anne

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes an easy-to-use monitor developed to track the weightlessness deconditioning aboard the NASA Space Station, together with the results of testing of a prototype instrument. The monitor measures the O2 uptake and CO2 production, and calculates the maximum O2 uptake and anaerobic threshold during an exercise stress test. The system uses two flowmeters in series to achieve a completely automatic calibration, and uses breath-by-breath compensation for sample line-transport delay. The monitor was evaluated using two laboratory methods and was shown to be accurate. The system's block diagram and the bench test setup diagram are included.

  9. Development and evaluation of a treadmill-based exercise tolerance test in cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Dunagan, Julie; Adams, Jenny; Cheng, Dunlei; Barton, Stephanie; Bigej-Cerqua, Janet; Mims, Lisa; Molden, Jennifer; Anderson, Valerie

    2013-07-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation exercise prescriptions should be based on exercise stress tests; however, limitations in performing stress tests in this setting typically force reliance on subjective measures like the Duke Activity Status Index (DASI). We developed and evaluated a treadmill-based exercise tolerance test (ETT) to provide objective physiologic measures without requiring additional equipment or insurance charges. The ETT is stopped when the patient's Borg scale rating of perceived exertion (RPE) reaches 15 or when any sign/symptom indicates risk of an adverse event. Outcomes of the study included reasons for stopping; maximum heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and rate pressure product; and adverse events. We tested equivalence to the DASI as requiring the 95% confidence interval for the mean difference between DASI and ETT metabolic equivalents (METs) to fall within the range (-1, 1). Among 502 consecutive cardiac rehabilitation patients, one suffered a panic attack; no other adverse events occurred. Most (80%) stopped because they reached an RPE of 15; the remaining 20% were stopped on indications that continuing risked an adverse event. Mean maximum systolic blood pressure, heart rate, and rate pressure product were significantly (P < 0.001) below thresholds of the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation. Two patients' heart rates exceeded 150 beats per minute, but their rate pressure products remained below 36,000. The mean difference between DASI and ETT METs was -0.8 (-0.98, -0.65), indicating equivalence at our threshold. In conclusion, the ETT can be performed within cardiac rehabilitation, providing a functional capacity assessment equivalent to the DASI and objective physiologic measures for developing exercise prescriptions and measuringprogress. PMID:23814381

  10. Reliability of Force-Velocity Tests in Cycling and Cranking Exercises in Men and Women.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Hamdi; Attiogb, Elvis; Rouis, Majdi; Vandewalle, Henry; Driss, Tarak

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the reliability of the force-velocity relationship during cycling and arm cranking exercises in active males and females. Twenty male and seventeen female physical education students performed three-session tests with legs and three-session tests with arms on a friction-loaded ergometer on six different sessions in a randomized order. The reliability of maximal power (P max), maximal pedal rate (V 0), and maximal force (F 0) were studied using the coefficient of variation (CV), the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and the test-retest correlation coefficient (r). Reliability indices were better for men (1.74 ? CV ? 4.36, 0.82 ? ICC ? 0.97, and 0.81 ? r ? 0.97) compared with women (2.34 ? CV ? 7.04, 0.44 ? ICC ? 0.98, and 0.44 ? r ? 0.98) and in cycling exercise (1.74 ? CV ? 3.85, 0.88 ? ICC ? 0.98, and 0.90 ? r ? 0.98) compared with arm exercise (2.37 ? CV ? 7.04, 0.44 ? ICC ? 0.95, and 0.44 ? r ? 0.95). Furthermore, the reliability indices were high for P max and F 0 whatever the expression of the results (raw data or data related to body dimensions). P max and F 0 could be used in longitudinal physical fitness investigations. However, further studies are needed to judge V 0 reliability. PMID:26539544

  11. Sex differences in response to maximal exercise stress test in trained adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sex comparisons between girls and boys in response to exercise in trained adolescents are missing and we investigated similarities and differences as a basis for clinical interpretation and guidance. Methods A total of 24 adolescent females and 27 adolescent males aged 1319?years underwent a maximal bicycle exercise stress test with measurement of cardiovascular variables, cardiac output, lung volumes, metabolic factors/lactate concentrations and breath-by-breath monitoring of ventilation, and determination of peak VO2. Results Maximum heart rate was similar in females (191??9?bpm) and males (194??7?bpm), cardiac index at maximum exercise was lower in females (7.0??1.0?l/min/m2) than in males (8.3??1.4?l/min/m2, P?exercise were similar (females: 1.04??0.06 vs. males: 1.05??0.05). Peak VO2 was lower in females (2.37??0.34?l/min) than in males (3.38??0.49?l/min, P?exercise is the key factor responsible for the greater peak VO2 in adolescent boys compared to girls. Conclusions Differences in peak VO2 in adolescent boys and girls disappear when peak VO2 is normalized to estimated leg muscle mass and therefore provide a tool to conduct individual and intersex comparisons of fitness when evaluating adolescent athletes in aerobic sports. PMID:22906070

  12. Comparison of Oxygen Consumption in Rats During Uphill (Concentric) and Downhill (Eccentric) Treadmill Exercise Tests

    PubMed Central

    Chavanelle, Vivien; Sirvent, Pascal; Ennequin, Gaël; Caillaud, Kévin; Montaurier, Christophe; Morio, Béatrice; Boisseau, Nathalie; Richard, Ruddy

    2014-01-01

    The study of the physiological adaptations of skeletal muscle in response to eccentric (ECC) contraction is based on protocols in which exercise intensities are determined relative to the concentric (CON) reference exercise (as percentage of the CON maximal oxygen consumption, or VO2max). In order to use similar exercise protocols in rats, we compared the VO2 values during uphill (CON) and downhill (ECC) running tests. VO2 was measured in 15 Wistar rats during incremental treadmill running exercises with different slopes: level (0%), positive (+15% incline: CON+15%) and negative (i15% incline: ECC-15%; and 130% incline: ECC-30%). Similar VO2 values were obtained in the ECC-30% and CON+15% running conditions at the three target speeds (15, 25 and 35 cm/sec). Conversely, VO2 values were lower (p < 0.05) in the ECC-15% than in the CON+15% condition (CON+15% VO2/ECC-15% VO2 ratios ranging from 1.86 to 2.05 at the three target speeds). Thus, doubling the downhill slope gradient in ECC condition leads to an oxygen consumption level that is not significantly different as in CON condition. These findings can be useful for designing animal research protocols to study the effects of ECC and CON exercise in ageing population or subjects suffering from cardiovascular diseases. Key Points VO2 in rats during treadmill race in eccentric and concentric conditions were measured. A novel breath-by-breath device allowing direct access to the animal was used. Three different slopes: +15%, -15% and -30% were used. VO2 values obtained in the -30% eccentric and the +15% concentric conditions were not significantly different. PMID:25177200

  13. Thallium-201 scintigraphy after intravenous infusion of adenosine compared with exercise thallium testing in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Coyne, E.P.; Belvedere, D.A.; Vande Streek, P.R.; Weiland, F.L.; Evans, R.B.; Spaccavento, L.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Adenosine is an endogenously produced compound that has significant effects as a coronary and systemic vasodilator. Previous studies suggest that intravenous infusion of adenosine, coupled with thallium-201 scintigraphy, may have specific value as a noninvasive means of evaluating coronary artery disease. The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of adenosine thallium testing with that of standard exercise thallium testing. One hundred subjects were studied with exercise thallium imaging and thallium imaging after adenosine infusion, including 47 with angiographically proved coronary artery disease and 53 control subjects. The overall sensitivity of the thallium procedures was 81% for the exercise study and 83% for the adenosine study (p = NS); the specificity was 74% for the exercise study and 75% for the adenosine study (p = NS). The diagnostic accuracy of the exercise study was 77% and that of the adenosine study was 79%. Ninety-four percent of subjects had an adverse effect due to the adenosine infusion; however, most of these effects were mild and well tolerated. All adverse effects abated within 30 to 45 s of the termination of the study, consistent with the very brief half-life of the agent. Thus, thallium-201 scintigraphy after intravenous infusion of adenosine has a diagnostic value similar to that of exercise thallium testing for evaluation of coronary artery disease. Adenosine thallium testing may be particularly useful in evaluating patients unable to perform treadmill exercise testing.

  14. INFLUENCE OF EXERCISE TESTING IN GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX IN PATIENTS WITH GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    MENDES-FILHO, Antonio Moreira; MORAES-FILHO, Joaquim Prado Pinto; NASI, Ary; EISIG, Jaime Natan; RODRIGUES, Tomas Navarro; BARBUTTI, Ricardo Correa; CAMPOS, Josemberg Marins; CHINZON, Dcio

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a worldwide prevalent condition that exhibits a large variety of signs and symptoms of esophageal or extra-esophageal nature and can be related to the esophagic adenocarcinoma. In the last few years, greater importance has been given to the influence of physical exercises on it. Some recent investigations, though showing conflicting results, point to an exacerbation of gastroesophageal reflux during physical exercises. Aim To evaluate the influence of physical activities in patients presenting with erosive and non erosive disease by ergometric stress testing and influence of the lower esophageal sphincter tonus and body mass index during this situation. Methods Twenty-nine patients with erosive disease (group I) and 10 patients with non-erosive disease (group II) were prospectively evaluated. All the patients were submitted to clinical evaluation, followed by upper digestive endoscopy, manometry and 24 h esophageal pH monitoring. An ergometric testing was performed 1 h before removing the esophageal pH probe. During the ergometric stress testing, the following variables were analyzed: test efficacy, maximum oxygen uptake, acid reflux duration, gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, influence of the lower esophageal sphincter tonus and influence of body mass index in the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux during these physical stress. Results Maximum oxigen consumption or VO 2 max, showed significant correlation when it was 70% or higher only in the erosive disease group, evaluating the patients with or without acid reflux during the ergometric testing (p=0,032). The other considered variables didn't show significant correlations between gastroesophageal reflux and physical activity (p>0,05). Conclusions 1) Highly intensive physical activity can predispose the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux episodes in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with erosive disease; 2) light or short sessions of physical activity have no influence on reflux, regardless of body mass index; 3) the lower esophageal sphincter tonus does not influence the occurrence of reflux disease episodes during exercise testing. PMID:24676289

  15. Ischemic preconditioning accelerates muscle deoxygenation dynamics and enhances exercise endurance during the work-to-work test

    PubMed Central

    Kido, Kohei; Suga, Tadashi; Tanaka, Daichi; Honjo, Toyoyuki; Homma, Toshiyuki; Fujita, Satoshi; Hamaoka, Takafumi; Isaka, Tadao

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) improves maximal exercise performance. However, the potential mechanism(s) underlying the beneficial effects of IPC remain unknown. The dynamics of pulmonary oxygen uptake (VO2) and muscle deoxygenation during exercise is frequently used for assessing O2 supply and extraction. Thus, this study examined the effects of IPC on systemic and local O2 dynamics during the incremental step transitions from low- to moderate- and from moderate- to severe-intensity exercise. Fifteen healthy, male subjects were instructed to perform the work-to-work cycling exercise test, which was preceded by the control (no occlusion) or IPC (3 × 5 min, bilateral leg occlusion at >300 mmHg) treatments. The work-to-work test was performed by gradually increasing the exercise intensity as follows: low intensity at 30 W for 3 min, moderate intensity at 90% of the gas exchange threshold (GET) for 4 min, and severe intensity at 70% of the difference between the GET and VO2 peak until exhaustion. During the exercise test, the breath-by-breath pulmonary VO2 and near-infrared spectroscopy-derived muscle deoxygenation were continuously recorded. Exercise endurance during severe-intensity exercise was significantly enhanced by IPC. There were no significant differences in pulmonary VO2 dynamics between treatments. In contrast, muscle deoxygenation dynamics in the step transition from low- to moderate-intensity was significantly faster in IPC than in CON (27.2 ± 2.9 vs. 19.8 ± 0.9 sec, P < 0.05). The present findings showed that IPC accelerated muscle deoxygenation dynamics in moderate-intensity exercise and enhanced severe-intensity exercise endurance during work-to-work test. The IPC-induced effects may result from mitochondrial activation in skeletal muscle, as indicated by the accelerated O2 extraction. PMID:25952936

  16. NASA's Functional Task Test: High Intensity Exercise Improves the Heart Rate Response to a Stand Test Following 70 Days of Bedrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurie, Steven S.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Phillips, Tiffany R.; Dillon, E. Lichar; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Urban, Randall J.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Stenger, Michael B.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular adaptations due to spaceflight are modeled with 6deg head-down tilt bed rest (BR) and result in decreased orthostatic tolerance. We investigated if high-intensity resistive and aerobic exercise with and without testosterone supplementation would improve the heart rate (HR) response to a 3.5-min stand test and how quickly these changes recovered following BR. During 70 days of BR male subjects performed no exercise (Control, n=10), high intensity supine resistive and aerobic exercise (Exercise, n=9), or supine exercise plus supplemental testosterone (Exercise+T, n=8; 100 mg i.m., weekly in 2-week on/off cycles). We measured HR for 2 min while subjects were prone and for 3 min after standing twice before and 0, 1, 6, and 11 days after BR. Mixed-effects linear regression models were used to evaluate group, time, and interaction effects. Compared to pre-bed rest, prone HR was elevated on BR+0 and BR+1 in Control, but not Exercise or Exercise+T groups, and standing HR was greater in all 3 groups. The increase in prone and standing HR in Control subjects was greater than either Exercise or Exercise+T groups and all groups recovered by BR+6. The change in HR from prone to standing more than doubled on BR+0 in all groups, but was significantly less in the Exericse+T group compared to the Control, but not Exercise group. Exercise reduces, but does not prevent the increase in HR observed in response to standing. The significantly lower HR response in the Exercise+T group requires further investigation to determine physiologic significance.

  17. The pacing stress test: thallium-201 myocardial imaging after atrial pacing. Diagnostic value in detecting coronary artery disease compared with exercise testing

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, G.V.; Aroesty, J.M.; Parker, J.A.; McKay, R.G.; Silverman, K.J.; Als, A.V.; Come, P.C.; Kolodny, G.M.; Grossman, W.

    1984-05-01

    Many patients suspected of having coronary artery disease are unable to undergo adequate exercise testing. An alternate stress, pacing tachycardia, has been shown to produce electrocardiographic changes that are as sensitive and specific as those observed during exercise testing. To compare thallium-201 imaging after atrial pacing stress with thallium imaging after exercise stress, 22 patients undergoing cardiac catheterization were studied with both standard exercise thallium imaging and pacing thallium imaging. Positive ischemic electrocardiographic changes (greater than 1 mm ST segment depression) were noted in 11 of 16 patients with coronary artery disease during exercise, and in 15 of the 16 patients during atrial pacing. One of six patients with normal or trivial coronary artery disease had a positive electrocardiogram with each test. Exercise thallium imaging was positive in 13 of 16 patients with coronary artery disease compared with 15 of 16 patients during atrial pacing. Three of six patients without coronary artery disease had a positive scan with exercise testing, and two of these same patients developed a positive scan with atrial pacing. Of those patients with coronary artery disease and an abnormal scan, 85% showed redistribution with exercise testing compared with 87% during atrial pacing. Segment by segment comparison of thallium imaging after either atrial pacing or exercise showed that there was a good correlation of the location and severity of the thallium defects (r . 0.83, p . 0.0001, Spearman rank correlation). It is concluded that the location and presence of both fixed and transient thallium defects after atrial pacing are closely correlated with the findings after exercise testing.

  18. Radionuclide observables during the Integrated Field Exercise of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Jonathan L; Miley, Harry S; Milbrath, Brian D

    2016-03-01

    In 2014 the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) undertook an Integrated Field Exercise (IFE14) in Jordan. The exercise consisted of a simulated 0.5-2 kT underground nuclear explosion triggering an On-site Inspection (OSI) to search for evidence of a Treaty violation. This research paper evaluates two of the OSI techniques used during the IFE14, laboratory-based gamma-spectrometry of soil samples and in-situ gamma-spectrometry, both of which were implemented to search for 17 OSI relevant particulate radionuclides indicative of nuclear explosions. The detection sensitivity is evaluated using real IFE and model data. It indicates that higher sensitivity laboratory measurements are the optimum technique during the IFE and within the Treaty/Protocol-specified OSI timeframes. PMID:26802699

  19. Noninvasive diagnostic test choices for the evaluation of coronary artery disease in women: a multivariate comparison of cardiac fluoroscopy, exercise electrocardiography and exercise thallium myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, J.; Chaitman, B.R.; Lam, J.; Lesperance, J.; Dupras, G.; Fines, P.; Bourassa, M.G.

    1984-07-01

    Several diagnostic noninvasive tests to detect coronary and multivessel coronary disease are available for women. However, all are imperfect and it is not yet clear whether one particular test provides substantially more information than others. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical findings, exercise electrocardiography, exercise thallium myocardial scintigraphy and cardiac fluoroscopy in 92 symptomatic women without previous infarction and determine which tests were most useful in determining the presence of coronary disease and its severity. Univariate analysis revealed two clinical, eight exercise electrocardiographic, seven myocardial scintigraphic and seven fluoroscopic variables predictive of coronary or multivessel disease with 70% or greater stenosis. The multivariate discriminant function analysis selected a reversible thallium defect, coronary calcification and character of chest pain syndrome as the variables most predictive of presence or absence of coronary disease. The ranked order of variables most predictive of multivessel disease were cardiac fluoroscopy score, thallium score and extent of ST segment depression in 14 electrocardiographic leads. Each provided statistically significant information to the model. The estimate of predictive accuracy was 89% for coronary disease and 97% for multivessel coronary disease. The results suggest that cardiac fluoroscopy or thallium scintigraphy provide significantly more diagnostic information than exercise electrocardiography in women over a wide range of clinical patient subsets.

  20. Comparative value of maximal treadmill testing, exercise thallium myocardial perfusion scintigraphy and exercise radionuclide ventriculography for distinguishing high- and low-risk patients soon after acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, J.; Goris, M.L.; Nash, E.; Kraemer, H.C.; DeBusk, R.F.; Berger, W.E.; Lew, H.

    1984-05-01

    The prognostic value of symptom-limited treadmill exercise electrocardiography, exercise thallium myocardial perfusion scintigraphy and rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculography was compared in 117 men, aged 54 +/- 9 years, tested 3 weeks after a clinically uncomplicated acute myocardial infarction (MI). During a mean follow-up period of 11.6 months, 8 men experienced ''hard'' medical events (cardiac death, nonfatal ventricular fibrillation or recurrent MI) and 14 were hospitalized for unstable angina pectoris, congestive heart failure or coronary bypass surgery (total of 22 combined events). By multivariate analysis (Cox proportional hazards model), peak treadmill work load and the change in left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) during exercise were significant (p less than 0.01) predictors of hard medical events; these 2 risk factors and recurrent ischemic chest pain in the coronary care unit were also significantly predictive (p less than 0.001) for combined events. A peak treadmill work load of 4 METs or less or a decrease in EF of 5% or more below the value at rest during submaximal effort distinguished 22 high-risk patients (20% of the study population) from 89 low-risk patients. The rate of hard medical events within 12 months was 23% (5 of 22 patients), vs 2% (2 of 89 patients) in the high- and low-risk patient subsets, respectively (p less than 0.001). Thus, in patients who underwent evaluation 3 weeks after a clinically uncomplicated MI, exercise radionuclide ventriculography contributed independent prognostic information to that provided by symptom-limited treadmill testing and was superior to exercise thallium scintigraphy for this purpose.

  1. Exercise dysfunction in patients seropositive for the human immunodeficiency virus

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.E.; Anders, G.T.; Blanton, H.M.; Hawkes, C.E.; Bush, B.A.; McAllister, C.K.; Matthews, J.I. )

    1990-03-01

    To confirm the presence of exercise dysfunction in patients seropositive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), 32 such patients without AIDS were evaluated with cardiopulmonary exercise testing, pulmonary function testing, bronchoalveolar lavage, chest roentgenography, and gallium scanning. No evidence of pulmonary opportunistic infection was found. When compared to an otherwise similar group of HIV-seronegative controls, the patients exercised to a significantly lower workload (195 +/- 30 versus 227 +/- 31 W, p less than 0.001). The ventilatory anaerobic threshold (VAT) values were also significantly lower for the patients (49.2 +/- 13.0 versus 61.9 +/- 9.1% of maximum predicted VO2, p less than 0.001). Nine of the patients had VAT values less than the 95% confidence interval for the controls. This subgroup exercised to a significantly lower maximum VO2 (69.9 +/- 11.2 versus 95.9 +/- 17.5% of maximum predicted VO2, p less than 0.001) and workload (165 +/- 21 versus 227 +/- 31 W) when compared to the control group. These patients demonstrated a mild tachypnea throughout exercise relative to the controls and had a significant increase in the slope of the heart rate to VO2 relationship. These findings are most consistent with a limitation of oxygen delivery to exercising muscles, which may represent occult cardiac disease in this group.

  2. Sport specific performance diagnosis in rowing: an incremental graded exercise test in coxless pairs.

    PubMed

    Coen, B; Urhausen, A; Kindermann, W

    2003-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop and validate an incremental graded exercise test performed in the rowing boat(coxless pair) in order to give specific performance evaluation data. Furthermore, an attempt was made to transfer these data to training recommendations. Thirty-four female rowers of national and international level performed a 4 x 6 min incremental graded exercise test GXT(boat) in coxless pairs on a lake (6 km, no wind, no waves). The boat velocity on the water (V; measured by a speedometer PACE COACH) was increased continuously from 3.55 m x s-I to 4.03 m x s-1. The individual anaerobic threshold(IAT) was determined by means of the lactate (LA) kinetics during and after exercise. Within 28 days all subjects performed arowing ergometry test GXT(ergo); Gjessing rowing ergometer: 40 watts increments every 3 min) as well as 70 min of constant endurance training in the boat in moderate velocity (ET; n- 10 pairs because of changing weather conditions). Results for V/LAIHR at IAT are: GXT(boat): 3.84+/- 0.10 m x s-1/2.44 +/- 0.66 mmol x 1-1/172 + 11 min(-1); GXT(ergo): 206+/-10 watts/2.53 +0.40 mmol x 1-171 +/- 10 min-' (means+/-SD). The Spearman rank order test showed significant correlations for HR (p < 0.001) and the mean performances of the coxless pairs (p < 0.05). A'5 % lower V during ET lead to a 10% lower HR and a 30% lower LA compared to the values at IAT. In conclusion, both a performance specific evaluation and velocity oriented control of training are possible by means of a 4 x 6 min incremental graded exercise test in coxlesspairs. However, this test on the water requires almost perfect weather conditions. The HR recommendations based on GXT (ergo) were confirmed during GXT(boat). PMID:12905091

  3. Identification of a Core Set of Exercise Tests for Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy: A Delphi Survey of Researchers and Clinicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verschuren, Olaf; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Keefer, Daniel; Wright, Virginia; Butler, Jane; Ada, Louise; Maher, Carol; Reid, Siobhan; Wright, Marilyn; Dalziel, Blythe; Wiart, Lesley; Fowler, Eileen; Unnithan, Viswanath; Maltais, Desiree B.; van den Berg-Emons, Rita; Takken, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Evidence-based recommendations regarding which exercise tests to use in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) are lacking. This makes it very difficult for therapists and researchers to choose the appropriate exercise-related outcome measures for this group. This study aimed to identify a core set of exercise tests for children

  4. Identification of a Core Set of Exercise Tests for Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy: A Delphi Survey of Researchers and Clinicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verschuren, Olaf; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Keefer, Daniel; Wright, Virginia; Butler, Jane; Ada, Louise; Maher, Carol; Reid, Siobhan; Wright, Marilyn; Dalziel, Blythe; Wiart, Lesley; Fowler, Eileen; Unnithan, Viswanath; Maltais, Desiree B.; van den Berg-Emons, Rita; Takken, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Evidence-based recommendations regarding which exercise tests to use in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) are lacking. This makes it very difficult for therapists and researchers to choose the appropriate exercise-related outcome measures for this group. This study aimed to identify a core set of exercise tests for children…

  5. Test-retest reliability of barbell velocity during the free-weight bench-press exercise.

    PubMed

    Stock, Matt S; Beck, Travis W; DeFreitas, Jason M; Dillon, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to calculate test-retest reliability statistics for peak barbell velocity during the free-weight bench-press exercise for loads corresponding to 10-90% of the 1-repetition maximum (1RM). Twenty-one healthy, resistance-trained men (mean ± SD age = 23.5 ± 2.7 years; body mass = 90.5 ± 14.6 kg; 1RM bench press = 125.4 ± 18.4 kg) volunteered for this study. A minimum of 48 hours after a maximal strength testing and familiarization session, the subjects performed single repetitions of the free-weight bench-press exercise at each tenth percentile (10-90%) of the 1RM on 2 separate occasions. For each repetition, the subjects were instructed to press the barbell as rapidly as possible, and peak barbell velocity was measured with a Tendo Weightlifting Analyzer. The test-retest intraclass correlation coefficients (model 2,1) and corresponding standard errors of measurement (expressed as percentages of the mean barbell velocity values) were 0.717 (4.2%), 0.572 (5.0%), 0.805 (3.1%), 0.669 (4.7%), 0.790 (4.6%), 0.785 (4.8%), 0.811 (5.8%), 0.714 (10.3%), and 0.594 (12.6%) for the weights corresponding to 10-90% 1RM. There were no mean differences between the barbell velocity values from trials 1 and 2. These results indicated moderate to high test-retest reliability for barbell velocity from 10 to 70% 1RM but decreased consistency at 80 and 90% 1RM. When examining barbell velocity during the free-weight bench-press exercise, greater measurement error must be overcome at 80 and 90% 1RM to be confident that an observed change is meaningful. PMID:21157383

  6. Preliminary Testing of the Role of Exercise and Predator Recognition for Bonytail and Razorback Sucker

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, Gordon A.; Carpenter, Jeanette; Krapfel, Robert; Figiel, Chester

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Hatchery-reared juvenile, 45-cm TL) flathead catfish. Predator-nai??ve juveniles (20- to 25-cm TL) exhibited no discernable preference when provided areas with and without (52 percent and 48 percent, n = 16 observations; 46 percent and 54 percent, n = 20 observations) large flathead catfish. However, once predation occurred, use of predator-free areas nearly doubled in two trials (36 percent and 64 percent, n = 50 observations; 33 percent and 67 percent, n = 12 observations). A more stringent test examining available area indicated predator-savvy razorback suckers used predator-free areas (88 percent, n = 21) illustrating predator avoidance was a learned behavior. Razorback suckers exercised (treatment) in water current (<0.3 m/s) for 10 weeks exhibited greater swimming stamina than unexercised, control fish. When exercised and unexercised razorback suckers were placed together with large predators in 2006, treatment fish had significantly fewer (n = 9, z = 1.69, p = 0.046) mortalities than control fish, suggesting increased stamina improved predator escape skills. Predator/prey tests comparing razorback suckers that had been previously exposed to a predation event with control fish, found treatment fish also had significantly fewer losses than predator-nai??ve fish (p = 0.017). Similar tests exposing predator-savvy and predator-nai??ve bonytail with largemouth bass showed a similar trend; predator-savvy bonytail suffered 38 percent fewer losses than control fish. However, there was not a statistically significant difference between the test groups (p = 0.143) due to small sample size. All exercise and predator exposure trials increased the survival rate of razorback sucker and bonytail compared to untreated counterparts.

  7. Computer-enhanced thallium scintigrams in asymptomatic men with abnormal exercise tests

    SciTech Connect

    Uhl, G.S.; Kay, T.N.; Hickman, J.R. Jr.

    1981-12-01

    The use of treadmill testing in asymptomatic patients and those with an atypical chest pain syndrome is increasing, yet the proportion of false positive stress electrocardiograms increases as the prevalence of disease decreases. To determine the diagnostic accuracy of computer-enhanced thallium perfusion scintigraphy in this subgroup of patients, multigated thallium scans were obtained after peak exercise and 3 or 4 hours after exercise and the raw images enhanced by a computer before interpretations were made. The patient group consisted of 191 asymptomatic U.S. Air force aircrewmen who had an abnormal exercise electrocardiogram. Of these, 135 had normal coronary angiographic findings, 15 had subcritical coronary stenosis (less than 50 percent diameter narrowing) and 41 had significant coronary artery disease. Use of computer enhancement resulted in only four false positive and two false negative scintigrams. The small subgroup with subcritical coronary disease had equivocal results on thallium scintigraphy, 10 men having abnormal scans and 5 showing no defects. The clinical significance of such subcritical disease in unclear, but it can be detected with thallium scintigraphy. Thallium scintigrams that have been enhanced by readily available computer techniques are an accurate diagnostic tool even in asymptomatic patients with an easily interpretable abnormal maximal stress electrocardiogram. Thallium scans can be effectively used in counseling asymptomatic patients on the likelihood of their having coronary artery disease.

  8. Significance of repeated exercise testing with thallium-201 scanning in asymptomatic diabetic males

    SciTech Connect

    Rubler, S.; Fisher, V.J.

    1985-12-01

    This study was conducted with asymptomatic middle-aged male subjects with diabetes mellitus to detect latent cardiac disease using noninvasive techniques. One group of 38 diabetic males (mean age 50.5 +/- 10.2 years) and a group of 15 normal males (mean age 46.9 +/- 10.0 years) participated in the initial trial; 13 diabetic patients and 7 control subjects were restudied 1-2 years later. Maximal treadmill exercise with a Bruce protocol and myocardial scintigraphy with thallium-201(201Tl) were used. Diabetic subjects on initial examination and retesting achieved a lower maximal heart rate and duration of exercise than control subjects. Abnormal electrocardiographic changes, thallium defects, or both were observed in 23/38 diabetic males (60.5%) on the first study and only one 65-year-old control subject had such findings. On retesting, the control subjects had no abnormalities while 76.9% of diabetic subjects had either 201Tl defects or ECG changes. We conclude that despite the fact that none of diabetic males had any clinical evidence or symptoms of heart disease, this high-risk group demonstrated abnormalities on exercise testing that merit careful subsequent evaluation and followup and could be an effective method of detecting early cardiac disease.

  9. Graded Maximal Exercise Testing to Assess Mouse Cardio-Metabolic Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Petrosino, Jennifer M.; Heiss, Valerie J.; Maurya, Santosh K.; Kalyanasundaram, Anuradha; Periasamy, Muthu; LaFountain, Richard A.; Wilson, Jacob M.; Simonetti, Orlando P.; Ziouzenkova, Ouliana

    2016-01-01

    Functional assessments of cardiovascular fitness (CVF) are needed to establish animal models of dysfunction, test the effects of novel therapeutics, and establish the cardio-metabolic phenotype of mice. In humans, the graded maximal exercise test (GXT) is a standardized diagnostic for assessing CVF and mortality risk. These tests, which consist of concurrent staged increases in running speed and inclination, provide diagnostic cardio-metabolic parameters, such as, VO2max, anaerobic threshold, and metabolic crossover. Unlike the human-GXT, published mouse treadmill tests have set, not staged, increases in inclination as speed progress until exhaustion (PXT). Additionally, they often lack multiple cardio-metabolic parameters. Here, we developed a mouse-GXT with the intent of improving mouse-exercise testing sensitivity and developing translatable parameters to assess CVF in healthy and dysfunctional mice. The mouse-GXT, like the human-GXT, incorporated staged increases in inclination, speed, and intensity; and, was designed by considering imitations of the PXT and differences between human and mouse physiology. The mouse-GXT and PXTs were both tested in healthy mice (C57BL/6J, FVBN/J) to determine their ability to identify cardio-metabolic parameters (anaerobic threshold, VO2max, metabolic crossover) observed in human-GXTs. Next, theses assays were tested on established diet-induced (obese-C57BL/6J) and genetic (cardiac isoform Casq2-/-) models of cardiovascular dysfunction. Results showed that both tests reported VO2max and provided reproducible data about performance. Only the mouse-GXT reproducibly identified anaerobic threshold, metabolic crossover, and detected impaired CVF in dysfunctional models. Our findings demonstrated that the mouse-GXT is a sensitive, non-invasive, and cost-effective method for assessing CVF in mice. This new test can be used as a functional assessment to determine the cardio-metabolic phenotype of various animal models or the effects of novel therapeutics. PMID:26859763

  10. Graded Maximal Exercise Testing to Assess Mouse Cardio-Metabolic Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Petrosino, Jennifer M; Heiss, Valerie J; Maurya, Santosh K; Kalyanasundaram, Anuradha; Periasamy, Muthu; LaFountain, Richard A; Wilson, Jacob M; Simonetti, Orlando P; Ziouzenkova, Ouliana

    2016-01-01

    Functional assessments of cardiovascular fitness (CVF) are needed to establish animal models of dysfunction, test the effects of novel therapeutics, and establish the cardio-metabolic phenotype of mice. In humans, the graded maximal exercise test (GXT) is a standardized diagnostic for assessing CVF and mortality risk. These tests, which consist of concurrent staged increases in running speed and inclination, provide diagnostic cardio-metabolic parameters, such as, VO2max, anaerobic threshold, and metabolic crossover. Unlike the human-GXT, published mouse treadmill tests have set, not staged, increases in inclination as speed progress until exhaustion (PXT). Additionally, they often lack multiple cardio-metabolic parameters. Here, we developed a mouse-GXT with the intent of improving mouse-exercise testing sensitivity and developing translatable parameters to assess CVF in healthy and dysfunctional mice. The mouse-GXT, like the human-GXT, incorporated staged increases in inclination, speed, and intensity; and, was designed by considering imitations of the PXT and differences between human and mouse physiology. The mouse-GXT and PXTs were both tested in healthy mice (C57BL/6J, FVBN/J) to determine their ability to identify cardio-metabolic parameters (anaerobic threshold, VO2max, metabolic crossover) observed in human-GXTs. Next, theses assays were tested on established diet-induced (obese-C57BL/6J) and genetic (cardiac isoform Casq2-/-) models of cardiovascular dysfunction. Results showed that both tests reported VO2max and provided reproducible data about performance. Only the mouse-GXT reproducibly identified anaerobic threshold, metabolic crossover, and detected impaired CVF in dysfunctional models. Our findings demonstrated that the mouse-GXT is a sensitive, non-invasive, and cost-effective method for assessing CVF in mice. This new test can be used as a functional assessment to determine the cardio-metabolic phenotype of various animal models or the effects of novel therapeutics. PMID:26859763

  11. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  15. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  16. 21 CFR 870.4200 - Cardiopulmonary bypass accessory equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass accessory equipment. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass accessory equipment. (a) Identification. Cardiopulmonary bypass accessory equipment is a device that has no contact with blood and that is used in the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit to...

  17. 21 CFR 870.4420 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker... Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return... from the chest or heart during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  18. 21 CFR 870.4200 - Cardiopulmonary bypass accessory equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass accessory equipment. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass accessory equipment. (a) Identification. Cardiopulmonary bypass accessory equipment is a device that has no contact with blood and that is used in the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit to...

  19. 21 CFR 870.4420 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker... Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return... from the chest or heart during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  20. 21 CFR 870.4310 - Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge is a device used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to measure the pressure of the blood perfusing... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure...

  1. 21 CFR 870.4310 - Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge is a device used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to measure the pressure of the blood perfusing... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure...

  2. 21 CFR 870.4310 - Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge is a device used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to measure the pressure of the blood perfusing... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure...

  3. 21 CFR 870.4310 - Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge is a device used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to measure the pressure of the blood perfusing... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure...

  4. 21 CFR 870.4310 - Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge is a device used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to measure the pressure of the blood perfusing... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure...

  5. Longitudinal Influences of Knowledge and Self-efficacy on Exercise Behavior: Tests of a Mutual Reinforcement Model.

    PubMed

    Rimal, R N

    2001-01-01

    The central tenet of social cognitive theory, that individuals' construal processes and behaviors mutually reinforce each other, is tested for exercise behavior. Two longitudinal data sets (year 1 to year 2 and year 1 to year 6) from the Stanford Five-City Project, a field experiment to promote cardiovascular disease prevention in California, are analyzed through structural equation modeling techniques to evaluate the effects of demographics, exercise knowledge, and exercise self-efficacy on exercise behavior. The effects of exercise behavior on subsequent knowledge and self-efficacy are also examined. In both data sets (year 1 to year 2, N = 1254 and year 1 to year 6, N = 939), education, income, age, and sex were significant predictors of exercise behavior. Self-efficacy and knowledge also predicted behavior. Prior exercise behavior predicted subsequent knowledge and self-efficacy. Prior knowledge and self-efficacy, in turn, predicted subsequent exercise behavior. Recommendations are made for enhancing the effectiveness of public health efforts designed to promote healthy behaviors. PMID:22049236

  6. Variance ECG detection of coronary artery disease--a comparison with exercise stress test and myocardial scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Sylvn, C; Hagerman, I; Yln, M; Nyquist, O; Nowak, J

    1994-03-01

    Variance electrocardiogram (ECG) is a newly developed method by which resting ECG is registered with 24 leads during 220 beats. The temporal beat-to-beat QRS microamplitude variability is computed and a nondimensional diagnostic variance ECG coronary artery disease (CAD) index is derived from it. Consecutive outpatients (n = 160) were referred to myocardial scintigraphy (SPECT) investigation for the evaluation of angina pectoris. The variance ECG CAD index was compared with a symptom-limited exercise stress test and SPECT during and after the exercise test and with coronary angiography (n = 67). Discriminant accuracy was tested with receiver-operating characteristics (ROC). Relative to angiographic coronary pathology (prevalence 0.85), diagnostic information for the variance ECG CAD index and for SPECT were both p < 0.001, while the outcome of the exercise stress test was non-contributory. Prevalence of persistent or transient perfusion defects at SPECT was 0.59. The exercise stress test had a diagnostic capacity of p < 0.01 for transient perfusion defects and variance ECG CAD index showed a high diagnostic performance (p < 0.001) for persistent perfusion defects. Overall pathology at SPECT was better (p < 0.05) identified by variance ECG CAD index than by symptom-limited exercise stress test. It was concluded that in this high prevalence population the variance ECG CAD index has a diagnostic capacity at least as good as that of SPECT and better than that of the exercise stress test. The variance ECG CAD index was strongly diagnostic for persistent perfusion defects while exercise stress test was slightly diagnostic for transient perfusion defects. Therefore, the two tests provide complementary diagnostic information. PMID:8168281

  7. Reliability of Force-Velocity Tests in Cycling and Cranking Exercises in Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Jaafar, Hamdi; Attiogbé, Elvis; Rouis, Majdi; Vandewalle, Henry; Driss, Tarak

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the reliability of the force-velocity relationship during cycling and arm cranking exercises in active males and females. Twenty male and seventeen female physical education students performed three-session tests with legs and three-session tests with arms on a friction-loaded ergometer on six different sessions in a randomized order. The reliability of maximal power (Pmax), maximal pedal rate (V0), and maximal force (F0) were studied using the coefficient of variation (CV), the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and the test-retest correlation coefficient (r). Reliability indices were better for men (1.74 ≤ CV ≤ 4.36, 0.82 ≤ ICC ≤ 0.97, and 0.81 ≤ r ≤ 0.97) compared with women (2.34 ≤ CV ≤ 7.04, 0.44 ≤ ICC ≤ 0.98, and 0.44 ≤ r ≤ 0.98) and in cycling exercise (1.74 ≤ CV ≤ 3.85, 0.88 ≤ ICC ≤ 0.98, and 0.90 ≤ r ≤ 0.98) compared with arm exercise (2.37 ≤ CV ≤ 7.04, 0.44 ≤ ICC ≤ 0.95, and 0.44 ≤ r ≤ 0.95). Furthermore, the reliability indices were high for Pmax and F0 whatever the expression of the results (raw data or data related to body dimensions). Pmax and F0 could be used in longitudinal physical fitness investigations. However, further studies are needed to judge V0 reliability. PMID:26539544

  8. A protocol of rope skipping exercise for primary school children: A pilot test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzi, A. N. M.; Rambely, A. S.; Chellapan, K.

    2014-06-01

    This paper aims to investigate the methods and sample used in rope skipping as an exercise approach. A systematic literature review was approached in identifying skipping performance in the related researches. The methods were compared to determine the best methodological approach for the targeted skipping based research measure. A pilot test was performed among seven students below 12 years old. As the outcome of the review, a skipping protocol design has been proposed for 10 years old primary school students. The proposed protocol design is to be submitted to PPUKM Ethical Committee for approval prior to its implementation in investigation memory enhancement in relation to designed skipping activities.

  9. STS-34 Mission Specialist (MS) Chang-Diaz tests CCA prior to WETF exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-34 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, wearing extravehicular mobility unit (EMU), tests his communications carrier assembly (CCA) with the help of Rockwell Space Operations (RSO) technician Pam S. Peters (right) prior to donning his EMU helmet. These procedures are necessary for an extravehicular activity (EVA) contingency exercise (underwater simulation) in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Chang-Diaz stands on a platform that will lower him into the WETF's 25 ft deep pool.

  10. Exercise performance and oxygen uptake efficiency slope in obese children performing standardized exercise.

    PubMed

    Marinov, B; Kostianev, S

    2003-01-01

    Oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES) is an index meant to provide an objective measure of cardiopulmonary function at submaximal exercise. The aim was to study the exercise performance and OUES in obese children performing standardized exercise. Sixty children aged 6-17 years performed incremental treadmill exercise test. They were divided into two groups matched by age, sex and height: thirty obese subjects (15 girls/15 boys; BMI = 27.4+/-1.7 m x kg(-2)) and 30 controls (BMI = 18.8+/-1.0 m x kg(-2)). Perceived exertion was assessed by means of CR-10 Borg scale. The duration of the exercise for the obese children was significantly shorter than for controls (p = 0.010) but obese children had greater absolute values for oxygen uptake (VO2 peak mL x min(-1) = 1907+/-249 vs. 1495+/-208; p = 0.013) which, adjusted for body mass, decreased significantly (VO2/kg mL x min(-1) x kg(-1) = 29.2+/-1.4 vs. 33.6+/-1.3; p < 0.001). OUES correlated strongly with VO2 peak (r = 0.91) and oxygen pulse (r = 0.80), as well as with anthropometric variables height (r = 0.88) and age (r = 0.83). Extremely high correlation was found between OUES calculated for 100% of exercise duration and OUES at the anaerobic threshold (r = 0.979; p < 0.001). No significant differences were found between the studied groups concerning the absolute values of OUES. Obese children rated perceived exertion significantly higher than controls (Borg score 6.2+/-0.4 vs. 5.2+/-0.4; p = 0.001). In conclusion, the absolute metabolic cost of exercise and perceived exertion were higher in the obesity group. OUES is an objective measure of cardiopulmonary reserve that doesn't require a maximal effort but it is considerably dependent on anthropometric variables which impedes its interpretation as exercise index in childhood. PMID:14570149

  11. Effects of light deprivation in physical performance and psychophysiological responses to a time-to-exhaustion exercise test.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Fabiano A; Santos, Tony M; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos; Noakes, Timothy D; Pires, Flávio O

    2015-11-01

    Studies have shown that there is no effect of light deprivation in closed-loop exercise performance, however less is known about the open-loop exercise performance. Thus, we verified if light deprivation may affect performance and psychophysiological responses to a time-to-exhaustion (TE), constant intensity exercise test. Twelve men performed TE tests (at 80% WPEAK of maximal incremental test) in control and light-deprived condition. Gaseous exchange (VE and VO2), heart rate (HR) and vastus lateralis electromyography (EMG) were continuously assessed, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and associative thoughts to exercise (ATE) were obtained every 60s. Responses at absolute time of exercise matched by the shortest time to exhaustion, and responses at exhaustion were compared between conditions (P<0.05). Exhaustion was shortened (5.0 ± 1.6 min vs 6.4 ± 2.4 min) and RPE slope was elevated in light deprivation, when compared to control (P<0.05). Responses of VE, VO2 and RPE were greater at exhaustion in light deprivation TE test than at the equivalent, paired time in control test. However, responses were similar at exhaustion of both TE tests; the exception was the lower EMG when the light was deprived. The light deprivation shortened the exhaustion and increased RPE in TE test, until the attainment of similar maximal psychophysiological responses. PMID:26297803

  12. Cardiopulmonary Bypass and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zakkar, Mustafa; Guida, Gustavo; Suleiman, M-Saadeh; Angelini, Gianni D.

    2015-01-01

    The development of the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) revolutionized cardiac surgery and contributed immensely to improved patients outcomes. CPB is associated with the activation of different coagulation, proinflammatory, survival cascades and altered redox state. Haemolysis, ischaemia, and perfusion injury and neutrophils activation during CPB play a pivotal role in oxidative stress and the associated activation of proinflammatory and proapoptotic signalling pathways which can affect the function and recovery of multiple organs such as the myocardium, lungs, and kidneys and influence clinical outcomes. The administration of agents with antioxidant properties during surgery either intravenously or in the cardioplegia solution may reduce ROS burst and oxidative stress during CPB. Alternatively, the use of modified circuits such as minibypass can modify both proinflammatory responses and oxidative stress. PMID:25722792

  13. Discussing cardiopulmonary resuscitation with patients.

    PubMed

    Attwood, S; Anderson, K; Mitchell, T

    The British Medical Association and the Royal College of Nursing acknowledge that patients should be involved in the decision-making process regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in order to gain compliance with any decision made on their behalf. In the past, it was apparent that decisions concerning the eligibility of patients for CPR were being made arbitrarily and older people were being treated unfairly in respect of their consideration for this intervention. This article reviews literature associated with patient involvement in decision-making regarding CPR and 'do not resuscitate' orders and how an assessment and rehabilitation unit promoted this activity as usual practice. In order to enhance partnership with patients and promote best possible practice in respect of CPR decision making the authors suggest a strategy that includes (1) evaluating documentation (2) development of a patient information leaflet and (3) an education programme for healthcare personnel. PMID:11893959

  14. Computer simulation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Beyar, R; Dinnar, U

    1985-04-01

    Based on recent experiments attributing blood flow in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to intra-thoracic pressure variations a computer study of the complete cardiovascular system with an arrested heart is presented. The model is based on a lumped parametric description of the vascular elements subjected to external pressure variations. The blood flow, which is generated in the system, is found to be within the reported experimental findings in similar conditions, and is highly sensitive to valving mechanisms within the heart and the large veins. Optimal conditions for CPR were searched mathematically and found to be consistent with known experimental data. Mechanisms of blood flow in CPR are discussed. The above model thus offers a tool to understand the various mechanisms involved in CPR and the relative importance of different physiological parameters, and may help in the design of an optimal CPR mode. PMID:3999720

  15. The Physiology of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Keith G; Nemergut, Edward C; Yannopoulos, Demetris; Sweeney, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Outcomes after cardiac arrest remain poor more than a half a century after closed chest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was first described. This review article is focused on recent insights into the physiology of blood flow to the heart and brain during CPR. Over the past 20 years, a greater understanding of heart-brain-lung interactions has resulted in novel resuscitation methods and technologies that significantly improve outcomes from cardiac arrest. This article highlights the importance of attention to CPR quality, recent approaches to regulate intrathoracic pressure to improve cerebral and systemic perfusion, and ongoing research related to the ways to mitigate reperfusion injury during CPR. Taken together, these new approaches in adult and pediatric patients provide an innovative, physiologically based road map to increase survival and quality of life after cardiac arrest. PMID:26562060

  16. Massive Rhabdomyolysis Following Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Sam; Yoon, Yong Han; Kim, Joung Taek

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report a case of massive rhabdomyolysis following an uncomplicated repair of a ventricular septal defect in a five-month-old baby. Postoperatively, the patient was hemodynamically stable but metabolic acidosis continued, accompanied by fever and delayed mental recovery. The next day, he became comatose and never regained consciousness thereafter. The computed tomography of the brain revealed a diffuse brain injury. The patient followed a downhill course and eventually died on postoperative day 33. An unusually high level of creatine phosphokinase was noticed, peaking (21,880 IU/L) on postoperative day 2, suggesting severe rhabdomyolysis. The relevant literature was reviewed, and the possibility of malignant hyperthermia obscured by cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermia was addressed. PMID:24782976

  17. Functional state assessment on the dynamics of interparametric concatenations during exercise tests.

    PubMed

    Poderys, Jonas; Venskaityt?, Eurelija; Poderien?, Kristina; Buliuolis, Alfonsas; Vainoras, Alfonsas

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to complement an analytical approach by new methodology of data sequences analysis of muscular and cardiovascular indices during the assessments of functional state. The participants of the study were 14 elite Greco-roman wrestlers and they underwent two exercise tests 30 squats per 45 s while 12-lead ECG was recorded continuously and 30-s vertical jumps test while the height, contact and flight times of each jump recorded. The parametric interactions parameters and their sequences analysis based on a mathematical method founded upon a matrix theory were applied. The obtained results enabled to identify dynamical changes of the independence of parameters or an opposite phenomenon - interaction. The dynamics of ECG or performance parameters did not allowed to find out the moments of critical changes during the exercising. The dynamics of concatenation between the time of push-off and the height of jumps while performing repeated jumps has a tendency to increase in the values of discriminant and the fluctuations at some point of jumping task comes on. Analysis of concatenation between ECG or muscle performance parameters allows distinguishing the individual peculiarities which could be in value of discriminant, in time of exercising before the fluctuations occurs, in character how the body behave as to compensate fatigue. It was concluded that assessment the dynamics of inter-parametric concatenation of physiological parameters based on the data sequences analysis provide a new approach in the field of functional state assessment allowing to reveal features of functional preparedness and fatigability during workloads. PMID:20944452

  18. Validity of the 6min walk test in outpatients with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Vancampfort, Davy; Buys, Roselien; Sienaert, Pascal; Wyckaert, Sabine; De Herdt, Amber; De Hert, Marc; Probst, Michel

    2015-12-15

    Cardiorespiratory fitness is a major modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. People with bipolar disorder have a reduced cardiorespiratory fitness and its assessment within a multidisciplinary treatment therefore is necessary. We investigated the validity of the 6min walk test in people with bipolar disorder. A secondary aim was to assess clinical and demographic characteristics that might interfere with cardiorespiratory fitness performance. 19 (5?) outpatients (47.18.3 years) underwent a 6min walk test and a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test on a cycle ergometer and completed the Positive-and-Negative-Affect-Schedule (PANAS) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The distance achieved on the 6min walk test correlated moderately with peak oxygen uptake obtained during the maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test. The variance in age, weight and the PANAS negative score explained 70% of the variance in the distance achieved on the 6min walk test. The 6min walk test can be used as a measure-of-proxy to gauge cardiorespiratory fitness in people with bipolar disorder when maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test equipment is not available. Negative mood should be considered when evaluating the cardiorespiratory fitness of this vulnerable population. PMID:26526768

  19. Usefulness of C-Reactive Protein Plasma Levels to Predict Exercise Intolerance in Patients With Chronic Systolic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Canada, Justin McNair; Fronk, Daniel Taylor; Cei, Laura Freeman; Carbone, Salvatore; Erdle, Claudia Oddi; Abouzaki, Nayef Antar; Melchior, Ryan David; Thomas, Christopher Scott; Christopher, Sanah; Turlington, Jeremy Shane; Trankle, Cory Ross; Thurber, Clinton Joseph; Evans, Ronald Kenneth; Dixon, Dave L; Van Tassell, Benjamin Wallace; Arena, Ross; Abbate, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Patients with heart failure (HF) have evidence of chronic systemic inflammation. Whether inflammation contributes to the exercise intolerance in patients with HF is, however, not well established. We hypothesized that the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), an established inflammatory biomarker, predict impaired cardiopulmonary exercise performance, in patients with chronic systolic HF. We measured CRP using high-sensitivity particle-enhanced immunonephelometry in 16 patients with ischemic heart disease (previous myocardial infarction) and chronic systolic HF, defined as a left ventricular ejection fraction ≤50% and New York Heart Association class II-III symptoms. All subjects with CRP >2 mg/L, reflecting systemic inflammation, underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing using a symptom-limited ramp protocol. CRP levels predicted shorter exercise times (R = -0.65, p = 0.006), lower oxygen consumption (VO2) at the anaerobic threshold (R = -0.66, p = 0.005), and lower peak VO2 (R = -0.70, p = 0.002), reflecting worse cardiovascular performance. CRP levels also significantly correlated with an elevated ventilation/carbon dioxide production slope (R = +0.64, p = 0.008), a reduced oxygen uptake efficiency slope (R = -0.55, p = 0.026), and reduced end-tidal CO2 level at rest and with exercise (R = -0.759, p = 0.001 and R = -0.739, p = 0.001, respectively), reflecting impaired gas exchange. In conclusion, the intensity of systemic inflammation, measured as CRP plasma levels, is associated with cardiopulmonary exercise performance, in patients with ischemic heart disease and chronic systolic HF. These data provide the rationale for targeted anti-inflammatory treatments in HF. PMID:26546248

  20. Cerebrovascular responses to submaximal exercise in women with COPD

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background COPD patients have decreased physical fitness, and have an increased risk of vascular disease. In the general population, fitness is positively associated with resting cerebral blood flow velocity, however, little is known about the cerebrovascular response during exercise particularly in COPD patients. We hypothesized that COPD patients would have lower cerebral blood flow during exercise secondary to decreased physical fitness and underlying vascular disease. Methods Cardiopulmonary exercise testing was conducted in 11 women with GOLD stage I-II COPD, and 11 healthy controls to assess fitness. Cerebro- and cardio-vascular responses were compared between groups during two steady-state exercise tests (50% peak O2 consumption and 30W). The main outcome variable was peak middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (VP) during exercise using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography. Results Physical fitness was decreased in COPD patients. VP was comparable between COPD and controls (25??22% versus 15??13%, respectively; P?>?0.05) when exercising at the same relative intensity, despite patients having higher blood pressure and greater arterial desaturation. However, VP was elevated in COPD (31??26% versus 13??10%; P???0.05) when exercising at the same workload as controls. Conclusions Our results are contradictory to our a-priori hypothesis, suggesting that during matched intensity exercise, cerebral blood flow velocity is similar between COPD and controls. However, exercise at a modestly greater workload imposes a large physical demand to COPD patients, resulting in increased CBF compared to controls. Normal activities of daily living may therefore impose a large cerebrovascular demand in COPD patients, consequently reducing their cerebrovascular reserve capacity. PMID:24898136

  1. Evaluation of the Best-designed Graded Exercise Test to Assess Peak Treadmill Speed.

    PubMed

    Peserico, C S; Zagatto, A M; Machado, F A

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the influence of different speed increments during treadmill exercise tests on peak treadmill speed (Vpeak) and its relationship with a 1-h treadmill running performance. 18 male recreational and amateur runners (10-km running pace: 10-15?kmh(-1)) performed, in an alternate order, 3 continuous incremental exercise tests with different speed increments (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0?kmh(-1)) on a motorized treadmill to determine Vpeak. Thereafter they undertook a 1-h time trial on a treadmill. Vpeak was determined as either (a) the highest speed that could be maintained for a complete minute (Vpeak-60?s), (b) the speed of the last complete stage (Vpeak-C), or (c) the speed of the last complete stage added to the product of the speed increment and the completed fraction of the incomplete stage (Vpeak-P). The Vpeak values were highly influenced by the different speed-incremented rates and the Vpeak-P determined during the protocol comprising speed increments of 1?kmh(-1) presented the highest correlation with 1-h time trial performance (r=0.89). The results suggest that a protocol with speed increments comprising 1?kmh(-1) and with a 3-min stage duration should be used as standard for the determination of Vpeak to assess aerobic fitness and predict endurance performance in recreational runners. Furthermore, the Vpeak-P should be used for the determination of Vpeak. PMID:25875318

  2. Comparison of glucose tolerance tests to detect the insulin sensitizing effects of a bout of continuous exercise.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Juan Fernando; Hamouti, Nassim; Fernndez-Elas, Valentn Emilio; Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine which of the available glucose tolerance tests (oral (OGTT) vs. intravenous (IVGTT)) could more readily detect the insulin sensitizing effects of a bout of continuous exercise. Ten healthy moderately fit young men (V?O2peak of 45.4 1.8 mLkg(-1)min(-1); age 27.5 2.7 yr) underwent 4 OGTT and 4 IVGTT on different days following a standardized dinner and overnight fast. One test was performed immediately after 55 min of cycle-ergometer exercise at 60% V?O2peak. Insulin sensitivity index was determined during a 50 min IVGTT according to Tura (CISI) and from a 120 min OGTT using the Matsuda composite index (MISI). After exercise, MISI improved 29 10% without reaching statistical significance (p = 0.182) due to its low reproducibility (coefficient of variation 16 3%; intra-class reliability 0.846). However, CISI significantly improved (50 4%; p < 0.001) after exercise showing better reproducibility (coefficient of variation 13 4%; intra-class reliability 0.955). Power calculation revealed that 6 participants were required for detecting the effects of exercise on insulin sensitivity when using IVGTT, whereas 54 were needed when using OGTT. The superior response of CISI compared with MISI suggests the preferential use of IVGTT to assess the effects of exercise on insulin sensitivity when using a glucose tolerance test. PMID:24971679

  3. Utility of routine exercise treadmill testing early after percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Babapulle, Mohan N; Diodati, Jean G; Blankenship, James C; Huynh, Thao; Cugno, Sabrina; Puri, Radha; Nguyen, Phuong A; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2007-01-01

    Background There have been few prospective studies examining the utility of routine exercise treadmill testing (ETT) early after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The objective of this study was to examine the impact of a routine ETT strategy early after PCI on follow-up cardiac events and procedures. Methods We examined 136 patients who underwent routine ETT at 6 weeks post-PCI in the ADORE trial. The ETT was classified as positive, indeterminate, or negative. The Duke Treadmill Score (DTS) was calculated for all patients. Follow-up occurred at 9 months. Results ETT results at 6 weeks were: 32 (23.5%) positive, 24 (17.6%) indeterminate and 80 (58.8%) negative. At 9 months, the composite event rate was 21.9% in those with a positive ETT, 20.8% in those with an indeterminate ETT and 12.5% in those with a negative ETT (p = 0.25 positive vs. negative ETT). The sensitivity of early ETT for predicting clinical events was 41.2%, the specificity was 73.3%, the positive predictive value was 21.9% and the negative predictive value was 87.5%. At 9 months, the cardiac procedure rate was 18.8% in those with a positive test, 13.0% in those with an indeterminate test, and 6.3% in those with a negative test (p = 0.07 positive vs. negative ETT). In a multivariate logistic regression model, coronary stenting during PCI and a ? 85% MPHR achieved were found to be inversely associated with clinical events. However, the DTS did not independently predict clinical events. Conclusion Although the statistical power of the study was limited by the small number of clinical events (particularly MI and death), the results of this study support the ACC/AHA guidelines that exercise treadmill testing should not be used routinely after PCI. PMID:17394661

  4. Cardiopulmonary Syndromes (PDQ)Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about common conditions that produce chest symptoms. The cardiopulmonary syndromes addressed in this summary are cancer-related dyspnea, malignant pleural effusion, pericardial effusion, and superior vena cava syndrome.

  5. Cardiopulmonary Syndromes (PDQ)Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about common conditions that produce chest symptoms. The cardiopulmonary syndromes addressed in this summary are cancer-related dyspnea, malignant pleural effusion, pericardial effusion, and superior vena cava syndrome.

  6. Cardiopulmonary Syndromes (PDQ)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about common conditions that produce chest symptoms. The cardiopulmonary syndromes addressed in this summary are cancer-related dyspnea, malignant pleural effusion, pericardial effusion, and superior vena cava syndrome.

  7. Comparing core stability and traditional trunk exercise on chronic low back pain patients using three functional lumbopelvic stability tests.

    PubMed

    Shamsi, Mohammad Bagher; Sarrafzadeh, Javad; Jamshidi, Aliashraf

    2015-02-01

    It is a matter of controversy whether core stability exercise is preferred to other types of exercise for chronic low back pain. Lumbopelvic stability is an important element in low back pain. No study was found using lumbopelvic stability tests in comparing core stability and other exercises. The single leg squat, dip test, and runner pose test appear to be suitable as tests for lumbopelvic stability. The aim of this study was to compare "core stability" and "traditional trunk exercise" using these tests and also the Oswestry disability questionnaire and pain intensity. Twenty-nine non-specific chronic low back pain subjects were alternately allocated in one of the two exercise groups. For both groups, a 16-sessions exercise program was provided. Before and after training: (1) video was recorded while subjects performed the tests; (2) Oswestry disability questionnaire was completed; and (3) pain intensity was measured by visual analogue scale. The test videos were scored by three physiotherapists. Statistical analysis revealed a significant improvement in stability test scores (p?=?0.020 and p?=?0.041) and reduction in disability (p?tests to assess stability change in two groups after training given the relatively small sample size. PMID:25317504

  8. Exercise Countermeasures Demonstration Project During the Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project Phase 2A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Guilliams, Mark E.; Moore, Alan D., Jr.; Williams, W. Jon; Greenisen, M. C.; Fortney, S. M.

    1998-01-01

    This demonstration project assessed the crew members' compliance to a portion of the exercise countermeasures planned for use onboard the International Space Station (ISS) and the outcomes of their performing these countermeasures. Although these countermeasures have been used separately in other projects and investigations, this was the first time they'd been used together for an extended period (60 days) in an investigation of this nature. Crew members exercised every day for six days, alternating every other day between aerobic and resistive exercise, and rested on the seventh day. On the aerobic exercise days, subjects exercised on an electronically braked cycle ergometer using a protocol that has been previously shown to maintain aerobic capacity in subjects exposed to a space flight analogue. On the resistive exercise days, crew members performed five major multijoint resistive exercises in a concentric mode, targeting those muscle groups and bones we believe are most severely affected by space flight. The subjects favorably tolerated both exercise protocols, with a 98% compliance to aerobic exercise prescription and a 91% adherence to the resistive exercise protocol. After 60 days, the crew members improved their peak aerobic capacity by an average 7%, and strength gains were noted in all subjects. These results suggest that these exercise protocols can be performed during ISS, lunar, and Mars missions, although we anticipate more frequent bouts with both protocols for long-duration spaceflight. Future projects should investigate the impact of increased exercise duration and frequency on subject compliance, and the efficacy of such exercise prescriptions.

  9. Comparison of dobutamine infusion and supine bicycle exercise for radionuclide cardiac stress testing

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, M.L.; Palac, R.; Mason, J.; Barnes, W.E.; Eastman, G.; Virupannavar, S.; Loeb, H.S.; Kaplan, E.

    1984-05-01

    A comparison is made of the inotropic drug dobutamine to supine bicycle exercise as a means of inducing stress in radionuclide ventriculography studies. Dobutamine has the following properties, making it favorable for widespread usage: 1) ability to be given safely in a peripheral vein, 2) rapid onset, and 3) short duration of action. Each patient underwent supine bicycle progressive resistance testing of 2 minutes per stage followed 30 minutes later by dobutamine administration. Accuracy of diagnosis was 0.93 and sensitivity was 0.89 with dobutamine, while with bicycle the accuracy was 0.93 and sensitivity was 0.94. While not designed to replace supine bicycle testing, incremental infusions of dobutamine appear to be nearly equal in accuracy and sensitivity, providing a satisfactory technique for cardiac evaluation of previously excluded patients.

  10. Physical Stress Echocardiography: Prediction of Mortality and Cardiac Events in Patients with Exercise Test showing Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Ana Carla Pereira de; Santos, Bruno F de Oliveira; Calasans, Flavia Ricci; Pinto, Ibraim M Francisco; Oliveira, Daniel Pio de; Melo, Luiza Dantas; Andrade, Stephanie Macedo; Tavares, Irlaneide da Silva; Sousa, Antonio Carlos Sobral; Oliveira, Joselina Luzia Menezes

    2014-11-01

    Background: Studies have demonstrated the diagnostic accuracy and prognostic value of physical stress echocardiography in coronary artery disease. However, the prediction of mortality and major cardiac events in patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia is limited. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of physical stress echocardiography in the prediction of mortality and major cardiac events in patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia. Methods: This is a retrospective cohort in which 866 consecutive patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia, and who underwent physical stress echocardiography were studied. Patients were divided into two groups: with physical stress echocardiography negative (G1) or positive (G2) for myocardial ischemia. The endpoints analyzed were all-cause mortality and major cardiac events, defined as cardiac death and non-fatal acute myocardial infarction. Results: G2 comprised 205 patients (23.7%). During the mean 85.6 15.0-month follow-up, there were 26 deaths, of which six were cardiac deaths, and 25 non-fatal myocardial infarction cases. The independent predictors of mortality were: age, diabetes mellitus, and positive physical stress echocardiography (hazard ratio: 2.69; 95% confidence interval: 1.20 - 6.01; p = 0.016). The independent predictors of major cardiac events were: age, previous coronary artery disease, positive physical stress echocardiography (hazard ratio: 2.75; 95% confidence interval: 1.15 - 6.53; p = 0.022) and absence of a 10% increase in ejection fraction. All-cause mortality and the incidence of major cardiac events were significantly higher in G2 (p < 0. 001 and p = 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: Physical stress echocardiography provides additional prognostic information in patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia.Fundamento: Estudos tm demonstrado a acurcia diagnstica e o valor prognstico da ecocardiografia com estresse fsico na doena arterial coronria, mas a predio de mortalidade e de eventos cardacos maiores, em pacientes com teste ergomtrico positivo para isquemia miocrdica, limitada. Objetivo: Avaliar a predio de mortalidade e de eventos cardacos maiores pela ecocardiografia com estresse fsico em pacientes com teste ergomtrico positivo para isquemia miocrdica. Mtodos: Trata-se de uma coorte retrospectiva em que foram estudados 866 pacientes consecutivos, com teste ergomtrico positivo para isquemia miocrdica, submetidos ecocardiografia com estresse fsico. Os pacientes foram divididos em dois grupos: ecocardiografia com estresse fsico negativa (G1) ou positiva (G2) para isquemia miocrdica. Os desfechos avaliados foram mortalidade por qualquer causa e eventos cardacos maiores, definidos como bito cardaco e infarto agudo do miocrdio no fatal. Resultados: O G2 constituiu-se de 205 (23,7%) pacientes. Durante o seguimento mdio de 85,6 15,0 meses, ocorreram 26 bitos, sendo seis por causa cardaca, e 25 casos de infarto agudo do miocrdio no fatais. Os preditores independentes de mortalidade foram idade, diabetes melito e a ecocardiografia com estresse fsico + (hazard ratio: 2,69; intervalo de confiana de 95%: 1,20 - 6,01; p = 0,016), com os seguintes eventos cardacos maiores: idade, doena arterial coronria prvia, ecocardiografia com estresse fsico + (hazard ratio: 2,75; intervalo de confiana de 95%: 1,15 - 6,53; p = 0,022) e ausncia do incremento de 10% na frao de ejeo. A mortalidade por qualquer causa e os eventos cardacos maiores foram significativamente superiores no G2 (p < 0, 001 e p = 0,001, respectivamente). Concluso: A ecocardiografia com estresse fsico oferece informaes prognsticas adicionais em pacientes com teste ergomtrico positivo para isquemia miocrdica. PMID:25352460

  11. Identification of false positive exercise tests with use of electrocardiographic criteria: A possible role for atrial repolarization waves

    SciTech Connect

    Sapin, P.M.; Koch, G.; Blauwet, M.B.; McCarthy, J.J.; Hinds, S.W.; Gettes, L.S. )

    1991-07-01

    Atrial repolarization waves are opposite in direction to P waves, may have a magnitude of 100 to 200 mu V and may extend into the ST segment and T wave. It was postulated that exaggerated atrial repolarization waves during exercise could produce ST segment depression mimicking myocardial ischemia. The P waves, PR segments and ST segments were studied in leads II, III, aVF and V4 to V6 in 69 patients whose exercise electrocardiogram (ECG) suggested ischemia (100 mu V horizontal or 150 mu V upsloping ST depression 80 ms after the J point). All had a normal ECG at rest. The exercise test in 25 patients (52% male, mean age 53 years) was deemed false positive because of normal coronary arteriograms and left ventricular function (5 patients) or normal stress single photon emission computed tomographic thallium or gated blood pool scans (16 patients), or both (4 patients). Forty-four patients with a similar age and gender distribution, anginal chest pain and at least one coronary stenosis greater than or equal to 80% served as a true positive control group. The false positive group was characterized by (1) markedly downsloping PR segments at peak exercise, (2) longer exercise time and more rapid peak exercise heart rate than those of the true positive group, and (3) absence of exercise-induced chest pain. The false positive group also displayed significantly greater absolute P wave amplitudes at peak exercise and greater augmentation of P wave amplitude by exercise in all six ECG leads than were observed in the true positive group.

  12. A computer program for comprehensive ST-segment depression/heart rate analysis of the exercise ECG test.

    PubMed

    Lehtinen, R; Vänttinen, H; Sievänen, H; Malmivuo, J

    1996-06-01

    The ST-segment depression/heart rate (ST/HR) analysis has been found to improve the diagnostic accuracy of the exercise ECG test in detecting myocardial ischemia. Recently, three different continuous diagnostic variables based on the ST/HR analysis have been introduced; the ST/HR slope, the ST/HR index and the ST/HR hysteresis. The latter utilises both the exercise and recovery phases of the exercise ECG test, whereas the two former are based on the exercise phase only. This present article presents a computer program which not only calculates the above three diagnostic variables but also plots the full diagrams of ST-segment depression against heart rate during both exercise and recovery phases for each ECG lead from given ST/HR data. The program can be used in the exercise ECG diagnosis of daily clinical practice provided that the ST/HR data from the ECG measurement system can be linked to the program. At present, the main purpose of the program is to provide clinical and medical researchers with a practical tool for comprehensive clinical evaluation and development of the ST/HR analysis. PMID:8835841

  13. Cardiopulmonary effects of traditional Thai dance on menopausal women: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Janyacharoen, Taweesak; Phusririt, Chonticha; Angkapattamakul, Sariya; Hurst, Cameron P; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the effects of Thai dance on cardiopulmonary factors in menopausal women. [Subjects] Sixty-six menopausal women aged 40?years or more. [Methods] Subjects were randomly assigned to either the Thai dance or control group. The Thai dance group performed a traditional Thai dancing exercise program for 60 minutes, 3 times per week for 6 weeks. The control group received general health guidance. The 6-minutewalk test, peak expiratory flow, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, maximal voluntary ventilation, and chest expansion were assessed at baseline and at the end of the study. [Results] Sixty-six menopausal women were eligible. At the end of the study, all variables were significantly better in the Thai dance group than the control group. Moreover, all variables improved significantly compared to baseline in the Thai dance group but not in the control group. For example, the mean 6-minutewalk test result in Thai dance group at the end of the study was 285.4 m, which was significantly higher than that at baseline (254.8 m) and the control group at baseline (247.0 m). [Conclusion] A 6-week Thai dance program improves cardiorespiratory endurance in menopausal women. PMID:26357441

  14. Cardiopulmonary effects of traditional Thai dance on menopausal women: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Janyacharoen, Taweesak; Phusririt, Chonticha; Angkapattamakul, Sariya; Hurst, Cameron P.; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the effects of Thai dance on cardiopulmonary factors in menopausal women. [Subjects] Sixty-six menopausal women aged 40 years or more. [Methods] Subjects were randomly assigned to either the Thai dance or control group. The Thai dance group performed a traditional Thai dancing exercise program for 60 minutes, 3 times per week for 6 weeks. The control group received general health guidance. The 6-minutewalk test, peak expiratory flow, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, maximal voluntary ventilation, and chest expansion were assessed at baseline and at the end of the study. [Results] Sixty-six menopausal women were eligible. At the end of the study, all variables were significantly better in the Thai dance group than the control group. Moreover, all variables improved significantly compared to baseline in the Thai dance group but not in the control group. For example, the mean 6-minutewalk test result in Thai dance group at the end of the study was 285.4 m, which was significantly higher than that at baseline (254.8 m) and the control group at baseline (247.0 m). [Conclusion] A 6-week Thai dance program improves cardiorespiratory endurance in menopausal women. PMID:26357441

  15. Cardiopulmonary Fitness Correlates with Regional Cerebral Grey Matter Perfusion and Density in Men with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    MacIntosh, Bradley J.; Swardfager, Walter; Crane, David E.; Ranepura, Nipuni; Saleem, Mahwesh; Oh, Paul I.; Stefanovic, Bojana; Herrmann, Nathan; Lanctt, Krista L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Physical activity is associated with positive effects on the brain but there is a paucity of clinical neuroimaging data in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), a cardiovascular condition associated with grey matter loss. The purpose of this study was to determine which brain regions are impacted by cardiopulmonary fitness and with the change in fitness after 6 months of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation. Methods CAD patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging at baseline, and peak volume of oxygen uptake during exercise testing (VO2Peak) was measured at baseline and after 6 months of training. T1-weighted structural images were used to perform grey matter (GM) voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pcASL) was used to produce cerebral blood flow (CBF) images. VBM and CBF data were tested voxel-wise using VO2Peak and age as explanatory variables. Results In 30 men with CAD (mean age 657 years), VBM and CBF identified 7 and 5 respective regions positively associated with baseline VO2Peak. These included the pre- and post-central, paracingulate, caudate, hippocampal regions and converging findings in the putamen. VO2Peak increased by 20% at follow-up in 29 patients (t?=?9.6, df?=?28, p<0.0001). Baseline CBF in the left post-central gyrus and baseline GM density in the right putamen predicted greater change in VO2Peak. Conclusion Perfusion and GM density were associated with fitness at baseline and with greater fitness gains with exercise. This study identifies new neurobiological correlates of fitness and demonstrates the utility of multi-modal MRI to evaluate the effects of exercise in CAD patients. PMID:24622163

  16. Performance, ventilation, and oxygen consumption in three different types of exercise test in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed Central

    Swinburn, C R; Wakefield, J M; Jones, P W

    1985-01-01

    Seventeen patients (six men and 11 women, mean age 66 years) with severe chronic obstructive lung disease (mean FEV1 0.8 (SD 0.3)1) performed three different types of exercise test on four occasions within one week. Three daily doses of placebo tablets were given between the third and fourth attempt at each test. The tests were the 12 minute walking test, a fixed rate and height paced step test, and a cycle ergometer test in which the work rate was increased by 10 watts each minute. Performance increased significantly (p less than 0.01) between the first and fourth attempts in each type of test (12 min walking distance 16% (SD 20%); steps climbed 96% (74%); duration of cycling 29% (41%]. There was a trend for the increase in performance between successive attempts to become progressively smaller but this was not significant. No effect of placebo on exercise performance was detected. The greatest intersubject range of performance was seen in the step test (14-126 steps) and the least in the walking test (438-1014 m). Significant correlations (p less than 0.01) were observed between performance in all three types of exercise test, but the correlations found between the results of the various tests of exercise performance and the FEV1 and the FVC were either weak (p less than 0.05) or non-significant. Ventilation (VE) and oxygen consumption (VO2) were subsequently measured and compared in eight patients during all three types of exercise test. Both the VE and the VO2 that were achieved in the step test were significantly greater than in either the cycle or the walking test. No patient was able to reach and sustain steady state values of VE and VO2 in the step test, whereas a steady state for both VE and VO2 was reached and sustained by all eight patients in the walking test. It is suggested that at least three practice attempts at any exercise test should be made before the introduction of either placebo or specific pharmacological treatment and that even then it may be necessary to allow for the effects of further repeated testing in the assessment of the results of treatment. Images PMID:4035628

  17. Exercise response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, J. A.; Sawin, C. F.; Michel, E. L.

    1975-01-01

    The bicycle ergometer and a graded stress protocol were used to conduct exercise stress tests for the Apollo project. The graded exercise tests permitted a progressive evaluation of physiological control system response and provided a better understanding of safe stress limits; heart rate was used for determining stress levels. During each test, workload, heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory gas exchange (oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and minute volume) measurements were made. The results are presented and discussed.

  18. Current Approaches to Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Truong, Huu Tam; Low, Li Shien; Kern, Karl B

    2015-07-01

    Real progress has been made in improving long-term outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the past 10 years. Many communities have doubled their survival-to-hospital-discharge rate during this period. Common features of such successful programs include the following: (1) 911 dispatcher-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) instruction, (2) bystander chest compression-only CPR program, (3) public access defibrillation, including targeted automated external defibrillator programs, (4) renewed emphasis on minimally interrupted chest compressions by emergency medical services responders, and (5) aggressive postresuscitation care, including targeted temperature management and early coronary angiography and intervention. An important lesson from these successful community efforts is that multiple, simultaneous changes to the local cardiac arrest response system are necessary to improve survival. The next exciting step in this quest appears to be the treatment of refractory cardiac arrest with the combination of mechanical CPR, intra-arrest hypothermia, extracorporeal CPR with mechanical circulatory support devices, and early coronary intervention. PMID:26071014

  19. The acute phase inflammatory response to maximal exercise testing in children and young adults with sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Liem, Robert I; Onyejekwe, Kasiemobi; Olszewski, Marie; Nchekwube, Chisalu; Zaldivar, Frank P; Radom-Aizik, Shlomit; Rodeghier, Mark J; Thompson, Alexis A

    2015-12-01

    Although individuals with sickle cell anaemia (SCA) have elevated baseline inflammation and endothelial activation, the acute phase response to maximal exercise has not been evaluated among children with SCA. We measured the acute phase response to maximal exercise testing for soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule (sVCAM) as well as interleukin 6 (IL6), total white blood cell (WBC) count, C-reactive protein (CRP) and D-dimer in a cohort of children with SCA and matched controls at baseline, immediately after, and 30, 60 and 120min following exercise. Despite higher baseline levels of all biomarkers except CRP, the acute phase response from baseline to immediately after exercise was significantly greater in subjects versus controls for CRP (21 vs. 02mg/l, P=002) and D-dimer (160 vs. 10?g/l, P<001) only. Similar between-group trends were observed over time for all biomarkers, including sVCAM, IL6, total WBC, CRP and D-dimer. Lower fitness, defined by peak oxygen consumption (VO2 ), was independently associated with greater acute phase responses to exercise for sVCAM. Our results suggest maximal exercise may not be associated with any greater escalation of endothelial activation or inflammation in SCA and provide preliminary biomarker evidence for the safety of brief, high-intensity physical exertion in children with SCA. PMID:26456230

  20. Validity of the 3-Minute All-Out Exercise Test on the CompuTrainer.

    PubMed

    Clark, Ida E; Gartner, Hannah E; Williams, Jade L; Pettitt, Robert W

    2016-03-01

    Clark, IE, Gartner, HE, Williams, JL, and Pettitt, RW. Validity of the 3-minute all-out exercise test on the CompuTrainer. J Strength Cond Res 30(3): 825-829, 2016-The 3-minute all-out exercise test (3MT) has emerged as a useful procedure for identifying critical power (CP) and the finite work capacity above CP (W') within a single visit. The CP concept enables for the prediction of exhaustive time limits (TLIMs) for a wide range of severe intensity power outputs and is a method for prescribing high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Road cyclists often use the CompuTrainer for indoor HIIT. The purpose of this study was to validate the 3MT for use on the CompuTrainer. On 4 separate visits, 10 competitive cyclists performed a 3MT, and three separate constant-load bouts projected to yield exhaustive TLIMs of 3, 6, and 9 minutes, respectively, using the Computrainer. Actual CP and W' were calculated using the linear work-time (W-t) and power-inverse time (1/t) models. The results for CP (W) from the 3MT (215 ± 40), the W-t model (212 ± 36), and the 1/t model (213 ± 36) did not differ (F = 2.96, p = 0.11, (Equation is included in full-text article.)= 0.43). Similarly, the results for W' (kJ) for the 3MT (11.2 ± 4.0), the W-t model (12.1 ± 6.5), and the 1/s model (11.7 ± 6.3) did not differ (F = 2.40, p = 0.15, (Equation is included in full-text article.)= 0.375). We conclude that use of the 3MT and the CP concept for performance assessment and HIIT prescription on the CompuTrainer is a valid procedure. PMID:26340469

  1. Evaluation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billica, Roger; Gosbee, John; Krupa, Debra T.

    1991-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques were investigated in microgravity with specific application to planned medical capabilities for Space Station Freedom (SSF). A KC-135 parabolic flight test was performed with the goal of evaluating and quantifying the efficacy of different types of microgravity CPR techniques. The flight followed the standard 40 parabola profile with 20 to 25 seconds of near-zero gravity in each parabola. Three experiments were involved chosen for their clinical background, certification, and practical experience in prior KC-135 parabolic flight. The CPR evaluation was performed using a standard training mannequin (recording resusci-Annie) which was used in practice prior to the actual flight. Aboard the KC-135, the prototype medical restraint system (MRS) for the SSF Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) was used for part of the study. Standard patient and crew restraints were used for interface with the MRS. During the portion of study where CPR was performed without MRS, a set of straps for crew restraint similar to those currently employed for the Space Shuttle program were used. The entire study was recorded via still camera and video.

  2. Comparison of Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation with Conventional Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Is Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Beneficial?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hun; Jung, Jae-Seung; Lee, Kwang-Hyung; Kim, Hee-Jung; Son, Ho-Sung; Sun, Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Background With improvements in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques, the quality and the effectiveness of CPR have been established; nevertheless, the survival rate after cardiac arrest still remains poor. Recently, many reports have shown good outcomes in cases where extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was used during prolonged CPR. Accordingly, we attempted to evaluate the impact of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) on the survival of patients who experienced a prolonged cardiac arrest and compared it with that of conventional CPR (CCPR). Methods Between March 2009 and April 2014, CPR, including both in-hospital and out-of-hospital CPR, was carried out in 955 patients. The ECPR group, counted from the start of the ECPR program in March 2010, included 81 patients in total, and the CCPR group consisted of 874 patients. All data were retrospectively collected from the patients medical records. Results The return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) rate was 2.24 times better in CPR of in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) patients than in CPR of out-of-hospital CA (OHCA) patients (p=0.0012). For every 1-minute increase in the CPR duration, the ROSC rate decreased by 1% (p=0.0228). Further, for every 10-year decrease in the age, the rate of survival discharge increased by 31%. The CPR of IHCA patients showed a 2.49 times higher survival discharge rate than the CPR of OHCA patients (p=0.03). For every 1-minute increase in the CPR duration, the rate of survival discharge was decreased by 4%. ECPR showed superiority in terms of the survival discharge in the univariate analysis, although with no statistical significance in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion The survival discharge rate of the ECPR group was comparable to that of the CCPR group. As the CPR duration increased, the survival discharge and the ROSC rate decreased. Therefore, a continuous effort to reduce the time for the decision of ECMO initiation and ECMO team activation is necessary, particularly during the CPR of relatively young patients and IHCA patients. PMID:26509125

  3. Lung function and the response to exercise in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, Simon; Bluestone, Rodney; Higgs, Brenda E.

    1969-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary function has been studied at rest and during graded exercise in 11 patients with systemic sclerosis. All patients had multi-system disease, five complained of breathlessness, and four had radiographic evidence of pulmonary fibrosis. All patients had gross effort intolerance. Lung volumes were reduced in half the patients, as was the transfer factor for CO when corrected for lung volume. Airway resistance was normal. Four patients hyperventilated on exercise, but the tidal volume was normal; three developed arterial desaturation during exercise. Six patients had an excessive elevation of blood lactate on exercise and three of these had evidence of muscle disease. Analysis of the exercise data suggested that in seven patients cardiac output and dead space were normal. In four patients there was a pattern of normal cardiac output, increased dead space, and increased venous admixture, suggesting ventilation/perfusion imbalance. There was no correlation between the results of the physiological tests and the extent of clinical involvement with the disease. The possible reasons for this and for the effort intolerance are reviewed. PMID:5795644

  4. Prognostic utility of the exercise thallium-201 test in ambulatory patients with chest pain: comparison with cardiac catheterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, S.; Lilly, D.R.; Gascho, J.A.; Watson, D.D.; Gibson, R.S.; Oliner, C.A.; Ryan, J.M.; Beller, G.A.

    1988-04-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the prognostic utility of the exercise thallium-201 stress test in ambulatory patients with chest pain who were also referred for cardiac catheterization. Accordingly, 4 to 8 year (mean +/- 1SD, 4.6 +/- 2.6 years) follow-up data were obtained for all but one of 383 patients who underwent both exercise thallium-201 stress testing and cardiac catheterization from 1978 to 1981. Eighty-three patients had a revascularization procedure performed within 3 months of testing and were excluded from analysis. Of the remaining 299 patients, 210 had no events and 89 had events (41 deaths, nine nonfatal myocardial infarctions, and 39 revascularization procedures greater than or equal to 3 months after testing). When all clinical, exercise, thallium-201, and catheterization variables were analyzed by Cox regression analysis, the number of diseased vessels (when defined as greater than or equal to 50% luminal diameter narrowing) was the single most important predictor of future cardiac events (chi 2 = 38.1) followed by the number of segments demonstrating redistribution on delayed thallium-201 images (chi 2 = 16.3), except in the case of nonfatal myocardial infarction, for which redistribution was the most important predictor of future events. When coronary artery disease was defined as 70% or greater luminal diameter narrowing, the number of diseased vessels significantly (p less than .01) lost its power to predict events (chi 2 = 14.5). Other variables found to independently predict future events included change in heart rate from rest to exercise (chi 2 = 13.0), ST segment depression on exercise (chi 2 = 13.0), occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias on exercise (chi 2 = 5.9), and beta-blocker therapy (chi 2 = 4.3).

  5. The measurement of peripheral blood volume reactions to tilt test by the electrical impedance technique after exercise in athletes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, A. A.; Popov, S. G.; Nikolaev, D. V.; Vikulov, A. D.

    2013-04-01

    We have investigated the distribution of peripheral blood volumes in different regions of the body in response to the tilt-test in endurance trained athletes after aerobic exercise. Distribution of peripheral blood volumes (ml/beat) simultaneously in six regions of the body (two legs, two hands, abdomen, neck and ECG) was assessed in response to the tilt-test using the impedance method (the impedance change rate (dZ/dT). Before and after exercise session cardiac stroke (CSV) and blood volumes in legs, arms and neck were higher in athletes both in lying and standing positions. Before exercise the increase of heart rate and the decrease of a neck blood volume in response to tilting was lower (p <0.05) but the decrease of leg blood volumes was higher (p<0.001) in athletes. The reactions in arms and abdomen blood volumes were similar. Also, the neck blood volumes as percentage of CSV (%/CSV) did not change in the control but increased in athletes (p <0.05) in response to the tilt test. After (10 min recovery) the aerobic bicycle exercise (mean HR = 156±8 beat/min, duration 30 min) blood volumes in neck and arms in response to the tilting were reduced equally, but abdomen (p<0.05) and leg blood volumes (p <0.001) were lowered more significantly in athletes. The neck blood flow (%/CSV) did not change in athletes but decreased in control (p<0.01), which was offset by higher tachycardia in response to tilt-test in controls after exercise. The data demonstrate greater orthostatic tolerance in athletes both before and after exercise during fatigue which is due to effective distribution of blood flows aimed at maintaining cerebral blood flow.

  6. Exercise Tolerance Testing in a Prospective Cohort of Adolescents with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Recovered Controls Following Infectious Mononucleosis

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Ben Z.; Boas, Steven; Shiraishi, Yukiko; Mears, Cynthia J.; Taylor, Renee

    2010-01-01

    Objective Six months following acute infectious mononucleosis (IM), 13%, of adolescents meet criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). We measured exercise tolerance in adolescents with CFS and controls 6 months following IM. Study design 21 adolescents with CFS 6 months following IM and 21 recovered controls performed a maximal incremental exercise tolerance test with breath-by-breath gas analysis. Values expressed are mean ± standard deviation. Results The adolescents diagnosed with CFS and controls did not differ in age, weight, body-mass index or peak work capacity. Lower VO2 (oxygen consumption) peak percent of predicted was seen in adolescents with CFS compared with controls (CFS 99.3 ± 16.6 vs control 110.7 ± 19.9, p = 0.05). Peak oxygen pulse also was lower in adolescents with CFS compared with recovered controls (CFS 12.4 ± 2.9 vs controls 14.9 ± 4.3, p = 0.03). Conclusions Adolescents with CFS 6 months following IM have a lower degree of fitness and efficiency of exercise than recovered adolescents. Whether these abnormal exercise findings are a cause or effect of CFS is unknown. IM can lead to both fatigue and measurable changes in exercise testing in a subset of adolescents. PMID:20447647

  7. Factors affecting sensitivity and specificity of a diagnostic test: the exercise thallium scintigram

    SciTech Connect

    Detrano, R.; Janosi, A.; Lyons, K.P.; Marcondes, G.; Abbassi, N.; Froelicher, V.F.

    1988-04-01

    Technical and methodological factors might affect the reported accuracies of diagnostic tests. To assess their influence on the accuracy of exercise thallium scintigraphy, the medical literature (1977 to 1986) was non-selectively searched and meta-analysis was applied to the 56 publications thus retrieved. These were analyzed for year of publication, sex and mean age of patients, percentage of patients with angina pectoris, percentage of patients with prior myocardial infarction, percentage of patients taking beta-blocking medications, and for angiographic referral (workup) bias, blinding of tests, and technical factors. The percentage of patients with myocardial infarction had the highest correlation with sensitivity (0.45, p = 0.0007). Only the inclusion of subjects with prior infarction and the percentage of men in the study group were independently and significantly (p less than 0.05) related to test sensitivity. Both the presence of workup bias and publication year adversely affected specificity (p less than 0.05). Of these two factors, publication year had the strongest association by stepwise linear regression. This analysis suggests that the reported sensitivity of thallium scintigraphy is higher and the specificity lower than that expected in clinical practice because of the presence of workup bias and the inappropriate inclusion of post-infarct patients.

  8. Cardiac Arrest During Medically-Supervised Exercise Training: A Report of Fifteen Successful Defibrillations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyfer, Howard R.; And Others

    The Cardio-Pulmonary Research Institute conducted an exercise program for men with a history of coronary heart disease. Over 7 years, there were 15 cases of cardiac arrest during exercise (one for every 6,000 man-hours of exercise). Trained medical personnel were present in all cases, and all were resuscitated by electrical defibrillation with no

  9. Problematic Exercise in Anorexia Nervosa: Testing Potential Risk Factors against Different Definitions

    PubMed Central

    Rizk, Melissa; Lalanne, Christophe; Berthoz, Sylvie; Kern, Laurence; Godart, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    “Hyperactivity” has a wide prevalence range of 31% to 80% in the anorexia nervosa literature that could be partly due to the plethora of definitions provided by researchers in this field. The purpose of this study was two-fold: 1) To assess the variance across prevalence rates of problematic exercise encountered in patients with anorexia nervosa, in relation to seven different definitions found in the literature. 2) To examine how core eating disorder symptoms and the dimensions of emotional profile are associated with these different definitions and the impact of these definitions on the assessment of patients’ quality of life. Exercise was evaluated in terms of duration, intensity, type and compulsion using a semi-structured questionnaire administered to 180 women suffering from severe anorexia nervosa. Seven different definitions of problematic exercise were identified in the literature: three entailing a single dimension of problematic exercise (duration, compulsion or intensity) and four combining these different dimensions. Emotional profile scores, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, eating disorder symptomatology, worries and concerns about body shape, self-esteem and quality of life were assessed using several established questionnaires. The prevalence of problematic exercise varied considerably from, 5% to 54%, depending on the number of criteria used for its definition. The type and level of eating disorder symptomatology was found to be associated with several definitions of problematic exercise. Surprisingly, a better self-reported quality of life was found among problematic exercisers compared to non-problematic exercisers in three of the definitions. The different definitions of problematic exercise explain the broad prevalence ranges and the conflicting associations generally reported in the literature between problematic exercise and eating disorder-related psychological parameters. There is an urgent need for a valid consensus on the definition of problematic exercise in anorexia nervosa. This will support the development of further research on the etiology and treatment of problematic exercise. PMID:26618359

  10. Problematic Exercise in Anorexia Nervosa: Testing Potential Risk Factors against Different Definitions.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Melissa; Lalanne, Christophe; Berthoz, Sylvie; Kern, Laurence; Godart, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    "Hyperactivity" has a wide prevalence range of 31% to 80% in the anorexia nervosa literature that could be partly due to the plethora of definitions provided by researchers in this field. The purpose of this study was two-fold: 1) To assess the variance across prevalence rates of problematic exercise encountered in patients with anorexia nervosa, in relation to seven different definitions found in the literature. 2) To examine how core eating disorder symptoms and the dimensions of emotional profile are associated with these different definitions and the impact of these definitions on the assessment of patients' quality of life. Exercise was evaluated in terms of duration, intensity, type and compulsion using a semi-structured questionnaire administered to 180 women suffering from severe anorexia nervosa. Seven different definitions of problematic exercise were identified in the literature: three entailing a single dimension of problematic exercise (duration, compulsion or intensity) and four combining these different dimensions. Emotional profile scores, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, eating disorder symptomatology, worries and concerns about body shape, self-esteem and quality of life were assessed using several established questionnaires. The prevalence of problematic exercise varied considerably from, 5% to 54%, depending on the number of criteria used for its definition. The type and level of eating disorder symptomatology was found to be associated with several definitions of problematic exercise. Surprisingly, a better self-reported quality of life was found among problematic exercisers compared to non-problematic exercisers in three of the definitions. The different definitions of problematic exercise explain the broad prevalence ranges and the conflicting associations generally reported in the literature between problematic exercise and eating disorder-related psychological parameters. There is an urgent need for a valid consensus on the definition of problematic exercise in anorexia nervosa. This will support the development of further research on the etiology and treatment of problematic exercise. PMID:26618359

  11. Pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation and stabilization.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Atul; Jayashree, M; Singhi, Sunit C

    2011-09-01

    Cardiopulmonary arrest refers to cessation of clinically detectable cardiac activity. In children, it usually results from progression of shock, respiratory failure or cardiac dysrhythmia. Early recognition and timely interventions in above group of patients is the key to prevent progression to cardiac arrest. The goal of resuscitation is to urgently re-establish oxygenation of vital organs by attention to Airway, Breathing and Circulation. Measures to restore airway patency include positioning, suctioning, continuous positive airway pressure, relieving a foreign-body airway obstruction and, endotracheal intubation, tracheotomy or laryngeal mask airway. Breathing is supported with O(2) and if needed, bag-mask ventilation, or endotracheal intubation and ventilation. Patients with absent or feeble central pulse are given cardiac compressions (CPR) at a rate of 100/ min synchronized with ventilation. In sudden witnessed collapse, immediate defibrillation is warranted, followed by CPR and administration of drugs. In unwitnessed collapse, CPR is performed for five cycles or 2 min before defibrillation. In patients with shock, a venous or an intraosseous access is rapidly established to administer 20 ml/kg saline bolus. Supraventricular tachycardia is treated with vagal maneuvers and adenosine, if the patient is stable and with synchronized cardioversion, if unstable. Ventricular tachycardia is treated with amiodarone or lidocaine, if stable, and cardioversion if unstable or if drugs fail. Ventricular fibrillation needs defibrillation. Aggressive supportive care is needed during the post-resuscitation phase. There is no definite marker to determine futility of CPR. Short duration of arrest, early initiation of CPR, hypothermia as the cause of arrest, and in-hospital arrest have better prognosis. PMID:21611715

  12. 4-Second Exercise Test: Reference Values for Ages 18–81 Years

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Claudio Gil; de Castro, Claudia Lucia Barros; Franca, João Felipe; Ramos, Plínio Santos

    2015-01-01

    Background Physiological reflexes modulated primarily by the vagus nerve allow the heart to decelerate and accelerate rapidly after a deep inspiration followed by rapid movement of the limbs. This is the physiological and pharmacologically validated basis for the 4-s exercise test (4sET) used to assess the vagal modulation of cardiac chronotropism. Objective To present reference data for 4sET in healthy adults. Methods After applying strict clinical inclusion/exclusion criteria, 1,605 healthy adults (61% men) aged between 18 and 81 years subjected to 4sET were evaluated between 1994 and 2014. Using 4sET, the cardiac vagal index (CVI) was obtained by calculating the ratio between the duration of two RR intervals in the electrocardiogram: 1) after a 4-s rapid and deep breath and immediately before pedaling and 2) at the end of a rapid and resistance-free 4-s pedaling exercise. Results CVI varied inversely with age (r = -0.33, p < 0.01), and the intercepts and slopes of the linear regressions between CVI and age were similar for men and women (p > 0.05). Considering the heteroscedasticity and the asymmetry of the distribution of the CVI values according to age, we chose to express the reference values in percentiles for eight age groups (years): 18–30, 31–40, 41–45, 46–50, 51–55, 56–60, 61–65, and 66+, obtaining progressively lower median CVI values ranging from 1.63 to 1.24. Conclusion The availability of CVI percentiles for different age groups should promote the clinical use of 4sET, which is a simple and safe procedure for the evaluation of vagal modulation of cardiac chronotropism. PMID:25830712

  13. Pharmacological and other nonexercise alternatives to exercise testing to evaluate myocardial perfusion and left ventricular function with radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    DePuey, E.G.; Rozanski, A. )

    1991-04-01

    Pharmacological vasodilatation with either dipyridamole or adenosine is a safe and accurate alternative to exercise testing to diagnose coronary artery disease with thallium 201 myocardial perfusion imaging. The technique also provides important prognostic information with regard to future cardiac events in patients undergoing diagnostic testing, in those evaluated preoperatively, and in those with recent myocardial infarctions. Multigated equilibrium and first-pass radionuclide ventriculography also are well suited to evaluate the effects of interventional procedures. Success has been achieved using this methodology in a variety of interventions including conventional exercise testing, pharmacological stress testing, atrial pacing, assessment of myocardial viability with nitroglycerin, mental stress testing, and ambulatory monitoring of left ventricular ejection fraction. 67 references.

  14. Factor XII Deficiency and Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Victor; Rosin, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Factor XII deficiency is a laboratory finding in patients who normally do not present with bleeding tendencies. This deficiency is important in the patient undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass because activated clotting times are not helpful in determining proper levels of heparin anticoagulation and its reversal. We present a case of a patient with factor XII deficiency that had coronary artery bypass grafting and cardiopulmonary bypass using heparin for anticoagulation. Cardiopulmonary bypass was successfully carried out by monitoring heparin concentration ensuring adequate heparinization during the procedure. Results from activated clotting time, heparin doseresponse, and heparin protamine titration are given. Heparin anticoagulation in patients with factor XII deficiency can be safely carried out with heparin concentration monitoring. PMID:26357792

  15. Factor XII Deficiency and Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    PubMed

    Uppal, Victor; Rosin, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Factor XII deficiency is a laboratory finding in patients who normally do not present with bleeding tendencies. This deficiency is important in the patient undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass because activated clotting times are not helpful in determining proper levels of heparin anticoagulation and its reversal. We present a case of a patient with factor XII deficiency that had coronary artery bypass grafting and cardiopulmonary bypass using heparin for anticoagulation. Cardiopulmonary bypass was successfully carried out by monitoring heparin concentration ensuring adequate heparinization during the procedure. Results from activated clotting time, heparin dose-response, and heparin protamine titration are given. Heparin anticoagulation in patients with factor XII deficiency can be safely carried out with heparin concentration monitoring. PMID:26357792

  16. A Maximal Graded Exercise Test to Accurately Predict VO2max in 18-65-Year-Old Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, James D.; Bradshaw, Danielle I.; Hyde, Annette; Vehrs, Pat R.; Hager, Ronald L.; Yanowitz, Frank G.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an age-generalized regression model to predict maximal oxygen uptake (VO sub 2 max) based on a maximal treadmill graded exercise test (GXT; George, 1996). Participants (N = 100), ages 18-65 years, reached a maximal level of exertion (mean plus or minus standard deviation [SD]; maximal heart rate [HR sub…

  17. Cigarette smoking and submaximal exercise test duration in a biracial population of young adults: the CARDIA study.

    PubMed

    Sidney, S; Sternfeld, B; Gidding, S S; Jacobs, D R; Bild, D E; Oberman, A; Haskell, W L; Crow, R S; Gardin, J M

    1993-08-01

    Symptom-limited, graded exercise treadmill testing was performed by 4,968 white and black adults, ages 18-30 yr, during the baseline examination for the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study. Compared with nonsmokers, the mean exercise test duration of smokers was 29-64 s shorter depending on race/gender group (all P < 0.001), but mean duration to heart rate 130 (beats.min-1) ranged from 20-50 s longer (P < 0.05). In each race/gender group, test duration to heart rates up to 150 was 15-35 s longer (P < 0.05) in smokers than in nonsmokers after adjustment for age, sum of skinfolds, hemoglobin, and physical activity score. The mean maximum heart rate was lower in smokers than in nonsmokers (difference ranging from 6.7 beats.min-1 in white men to 11.2 beats.min-1 lower in black women, P < 0.001), although maximum rating of perceived exertion was nearly identical in smokers and nonsmokers. Chronic smoking appears to blunt the heart rate response to exercise, so that exercise duration to submaximal heart rates is increased even though maximal performance is impaired. This may result from downloading of beta-receptors caused by smoking. Smoking status should be considered in the evaluation of physical fitness data utilizing submaximal test protocols, or else the fitness of smokers relative to nonsmokers is likely to be overestimated. PMID:8371651

  18. A Maximal Graded Exercise Test to Accurately Predict VO2max in 18-65-Year-Old Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, James D.; Bradshaw, Danielle I.; Hyde, Annette; Vehrs, Pat R.; Hager, Ronald L.; Yanowitz, Frank G.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an age-generalized regression model to predict maximal oxygen uptake (VO sub 2 max) based on a maximal treadmill graded exercise test (GXT; George, 1996). Participants (N = 100), ages 18-65 years, reached a maximal level of exertion (mean plus or minus standard deviation [SD]; maximal heart rate [HR sub

  19. Improvement of Orthography Test Performance by Relaxation Exercises: Results of a Controlled Field Experiment in Basic Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krampen, Gunter

    2010-01-01

    The effects of relaxation exercises on orthography performance in language arts education of fifth to seventh graders were experimentally tested. Participants were 399 basic secondary school students and their language arts teachers from the Hauptschule, a German type of secondary education covering grades five to nine that leads to a basic…

  20. Improvement of Orthography Test Performance by Relaxation Exercises: Results of a Controlled Field Experiment in Basic Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krampen, Gunter

    2010-01-01

    The effects of relaxation exercises on orthography performance in language arts education of fifth to seventh graders were experimentally tested. Participants were 399 basic secondary school students and their language arts teachers from the Hauptschule, a German type of secondary education covering grades five to nine that leads to a basic

  1. EKGs and Exercise Stress Tests: When You Need Them for Heart Disease - and When You Don't

    MedlinePLUS

    ... should probably have an EKG and an exercise stress test if you have symptoms of heart disease, such as chest pain, shortness of breath, an ... best ways to lower your risk of heart disease are to: Avoid smoking. Lose ... walking helps. Manage stress. Limit salt. Avoid foods that are high in ...

  2. The Free-Running Asthma Screening Test: An Approach to Screening for Exercise-Induced Asthma in Rural Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaman, Doris J.; Estes, Jenny

    1997-01-01

    This study documented the prevalence of exercise-induced asthma (EIA) in rural elementary schools, examining the use of a free-running asthma screening test and peak expiratory flow-rate measurement for school screening. Results indicated that 5.7% of the students had EIA. Absenteeism and poverty were related to EIA. (SM)

  3. 21 CFR 870.4430 - Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control. 870.4430 Section 870.4430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....4430 Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary...

  4. 21 CFR 870.4230 - Cardiopulmonary bypass defoamer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass defoamer. 870.4230 Section... bypass defoamer. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass defoamer is a device used in conjunction with an oxygenator during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to remove gas bubbles from the blood....

  5. 21 CFR 870.4205 - Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector. 870.4205... bypass bubble detector. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector is a device used to detect bubbles in the arterial return line of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. (b)...

  6. 21 CFR 870.4430 - Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control. 870.4430 Section 870.4430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....4430 Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary...

  7. 21 CFR 870.4205 - Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector. 870.4205... bypass bubble detector. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector is a device used to detect bubbles in the arterial return line of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. (b)...

  8. 21 CFR 870.4350 - Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator. 870.4350... bypass oxygenator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator is a device used to exchange... the FDA guidance document entitled Guidance for Cardiopulmonary Bypass Oxygenators 510(k) Submissions....

  9. 21 CFR 870.4230 - Cardiopulmonary bypass defoamer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass defoamer. 870.4230 Section... bypass defoamer. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass defoamer is a device used in conjunction with an oxygenator during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to remove gas bubbles from the blood....

  10. 21 CFR 870.4350 - Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator. 870.4350... bypass oxygenator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator is a device used to exchange... the FDA guidance document entitled Guidance for Cardiopulmonary Bypass Oxygenators 510(k) Submissions....

  11. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  12. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  13. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  14. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  15. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  16. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  17. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  18. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  19. 21 CFR 868.6175 - Cardiopulmonary emergency cart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous 868.6175 Cardiopulmonary emergency cart. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary emergency cart is a device intended to store and transport... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary emergency cart. 868.6175...

  20. 21 CFR 868.6175 - Cardiopulmonary emergency cart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous 868.6175 Cardiopulmonary emergency cart. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary emergency cart is a device intended to store and transport... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary emergency cart. 868.6175...

  1. 21 CFR 868.6175 - Cardiopulmonary emergency cart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous 868.6175 Cardiopulmonary emergency cart. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary emergency cart is a device intended to store and transport... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary emergency cart. 868.6175...

  2. 21 CFR 868.6175 - Cardiopulmonary emergency cart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous 868.6175 Cardiopulmonary emergency cart. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary emergency cart is a device intended to store and transport... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary emergency cart. 868.6175...

  3. 21 CFR 868.6175 - Cardiopulmonary emergency cart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous 868.6175 Cardiopulmonary emergency cart. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary emergency cart is a device intended to store and transport... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary emergency cart. 868.6175...

  4. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  5. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  6. 21 CFR 870.4205 - Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector. 870.4205... bypass bubble detector. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector is a device used to detect bubbles in the arterial return line of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. (b)...

  7. 21 CFR 870.4205 - Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector. 870.4205... bypass bubble detector. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector is a device used to detect bubbles in the arterial return line of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. (b)...

  8. 21 CFR 870.4205 - Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector. 870.4205... bypass bubble detector. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector is a device used to detect bubbles in the arterial return line of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. (b)...

  9. How Does Exercise Benefit Performance on Cognitive Tests in Primary-School Pupils?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Liam J. B.; Williams, Justin H. G.; Aucott, Lorna; Thomson, Jenny; Mon-Williams, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Aim: We have previously demonstrated improved cognitive performance after a classroom-based exercise regime. In this study, we examined the reproducibility of this effect in a more socio-economically diverse sample and also investigated whether cognitive benefits of exercise were moderated by body mass index (BMI) or symptoms of

  10. A Laboratory Exercise on Photoperiodic Changes in the Testes of the Mongolian Gerbil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treagust, David F.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    A laboratory exercise using a gerbil is described for use in the high school biology class and in accordance with the National Science Teachers Association guidelines. The authors cite references that deal with current awareness of the moral status concerning animals. The exercise includes measurement and calculations. (SA)

  11. Prevalence and clinical significance of painless ST segment depression during early postinfarction exercise testing

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, R.S.; Beller, G.A.; Kaiser, D.L.

    1987-03-01

    In a recent study of 190 survivors of acute myocardial infarction, the authors sought to determine whether exercise-induced painless ST segments depression indicates residual myocardial ischemia, as defined by /sup 201/Tl scintigraphic criteria. 2 weeks after uncomplicated myocardial infarction, and whether quantitative /sup 201/Tl imaging enhances the prognostic value of such an exercise electrocardiographic response.

  12. Dysregulated arginine metabolism and cardiopulmonary dysfunction in patients with thalassaemia.

    PubMed

    Morris, Claudia R; Kim, Hae-Young; Klings, Elizabeth S; Wood, John; Porter, John B; Trachtenberg, Felicia; Sweeters, Nancy; Olivieri, Nancy F; Kwiatkowski, Janet L; Virzi, Lisa; Hassell, Kathryn; Taher, Ali; Neufeld, Ellis J; Thompson, Alexis A; Larkin, Sandra; Suh, Jung H; Vichinsky, Elliott P; Kuypers, Frans A

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) commonly develops in thalassaemia syndromes, but is poorly characterized. The goal of this study was to provide a comprehensive description of the cardiopulmonary and biological profile of patients with thalassaemia at risk for PH. A case-control study of thalassaemia patients at high versus low PH-risk was performed. A single cross-sectional measurement for variables reflecting cardiopulmonary status and biological pathophysiology were obtained, including Doppler-echocardiography, 6-min-walk-test, Borg Dyspnoea Score, New York Heart Association functional class, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), chest-computerized tomography, pulmonary function testing and laboratory analyses targeting mechanisms of coagulation, inflammation, haemolysis, adhesion and the arginine-nitric oxide pathway. Twenty-seven thalassaemia patients were evaluated, 14 with an elevated tricuspid-regurgitant-jet-velocity (TRV)?25m/s. Patients with increased TRV had a higher frequency of splenectomy, and significantly larger right atrial size, left atrial volume and left septal-wall thickness on echocardiography and/or MRI, with elevated biomarkers of abnormal coagulation, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels and arginase concentration, and lower arginine-bioavailability compared to low-risk patients. Arginase concentration correlated significantly to several echocardiography/MRI parameters of cardiovascular function in addition to global-arginine-bioavailability and biomarkers of haemolytic rate, including LDH, haemoglobin and bilirubin. Thalassaemia patients with a TRV?25m/s have additional echocardiography and cardiac-MRI parameters suggestive of right and left-sided cardiac dysfunction. In addition, low arginine bioavailability may contribute to cardiopulmonary dysfunction in ?-thalassaemia. PMID:25907665

  13. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... please turn Javascript on. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You Can ... yourself. Studies have shown that exercise provides many health benefits and that older adults can gain a ...

  14. Cardiovascular Effects of 1 Year of Alagebrium and Endurance Exercise Training in Healthy Older Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Naoki; Hastings, Jeffrey L.; Carrick-Ranson, Graeme; Shafer, Keri M.; Shibata, Shigeki; Bhella, Paul S.; Abdullah, Shuaib M.; Barkley, Kyler W.; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Boyd, Kara N.; Livingston, Sheryl A.; Palmer, Dean; Levine, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Lifelong exercise training maintains a youthful compliance of the left ventricle (LV), whereas a year of exercise training started later in life fails to reverse LV stiffening, possibly because of accumulation of irreversible advanced glycation end products. Alagebrium breaks advanced glycation end product crosslinks and improves LV stiffness in aged animals. However, it is unclear whether a strategy of exercise combined with alagebrium would improve LV stiffness in sedentary older humans. Methods and Results Sixty-two healthy subjects were randomized into 4 groups: sedentary+placebo; sedentary+alagebrium (200 mg/d); exercise+placebo; and exercise+alagebrium. Subjects underwent right heart catheterization to define LV pressurevolume curves; secondary functional outcomes included cardiopulmonary exercise testing and arterial compliance. A total of 57 of 62 subjects (676 years; 37 f/20 m) completed 1 year of intervention followed by repeat measurements. Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and LV end-diastolic volume were measured at baseline, during decreased and increased cardiac filling. LV stiffness was assessed by the slope of LV pressurevolume curve. After intervention, LV mass and end-diastolic volume increased and exercise capacity improved (by ?8%) only in the exercise groups. Neither LV mass nor exercise capacity was affected by alagebrium. Exercise training had little impact on LV stiffness (trainingtime effect, P=0.46), whereas alagebrium showed a modest improvement in LV stiffness compared with placebo (medicationtime effect, P=0.04). Conclusions Alagebrium had no effect on hemodynamics, LV geometry, or exercise capacity in healthy, previously sedentary seniors. However, it did show a modestly favorable effect on age-associated LV stiffening. PMID:24130005

  15. Optimizing the 6-Min Walk Test as a Measure of Exercise Capacity in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Divay; Wise, Robert A.; Kulkarni, Hrishikesh S.; Benzo, Roberto P.; Criner, Gerard; Make, Barry; Slivka, William A.; Ries, Andrew L.; Reilly, John J.; Martinez, Fernando J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: It is uncertain whether the effort and expense of performing a second walk for the 6-min walk test improves test performance. Hence, we attempted to quantify the improvement in 6-min walk distance if an additional walk were to be performed. Methods: We studied patients consecutively enrolled into the National Emphysema Treatment Trial who prior to randomization and after 6 to 10 weeks of pulmonary rehabilitation performed two 6-min walks on consecutive days (N = 396). Patients also performed two 6-min walks at 6-month follow-up after randomization to lung volume reduction surgery (n = 74) or optimal medical therapy (n = 64). We compared change in the first walk distance to change in the second, average-of-two, and best-of-two walk distances. Results: Compared with the change in the first walk distance, change in the average-of-two and best-of-two walk distances had better validity and precision. Specifically, 6 months after randomization to lung volume reduction surgery, changes in the average-of-two (r = 0.66 vs r = 0.58, P = .01) and best-of-two walk distances (r = 0.67 vs r = 0.58, P = .04) better correlated with the change in maximal exercise capacity (ie, better validity). Additionally, the variance of change was 14% to 25% less for the average-of-two walk distances and 14% to 33% less for the best-of-two walk distances than the variance of change in the single walk distance, indicating better precision. Conclusions: Adding a second walk to the 6-min walk test significantly improves its performance in measuring response to a therapeutic intervention, improves the validity of COPD clinical trials, and would result in a 14% to 33% reduction in sample size requirements. Hence, it should be strongly considered by clinicians and researchers as an outcome measure for therapeutic interventions in patients with COPD. PMID:23364913

  16. Exercise, Heart and Health

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Regular physical activity provides a variety of health benefits, including improvement in cardiopulmonary or metabolic status, reduction of the risk of coronary artery disease or stroke, prevention of cancer, and decrease in total mortality. Exercise-related cardiac events are occasionally reported during highly competitive sports activity or vigorous exercises. However, the risk of sudden death is extremely low during vigorous exercise, and habitual vigorous exercise actually decreases the risk of sudden death during exercise. The cause of sudden death is ischemic in older subjects (?35 years old), while cardiomyopathies or genetic ion channel diseases are important underlying pathology in younger (<35 years old) victims. The subgroup of patients who are particularly at higher risk of exercise-related sudden death may be identified in different ways, such as pre-participation history taking, physical examination and/or supplementary cardiac evaluation. Limitations exist because current diagnostic tools are not sufficient to predict a coronary artery plaque with potential risk of disruption and/or an acute thrombotic occlusion. Proper and cost-effective methods for identification of younger subjects with cardiac structural problems or genetic ion channel diseases are still controversial. PMID:21519508

  17. Regional cerebral oxygenation during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Baris, R R; Israel, A L; Amory, D W; Benni, P

    1995-07-01

    A significant number of patients suffer transient neuropsychological dysfunction after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Recent studies have implicated reduced levels of O2 supply/demand ratio during the rewarming phase of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Using a near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system that permits continuous noninvasive monitoring of regional cerebral O2 saturation (rSO2), we investigated rSO2 during CPB. Following Institution Review Board approval and informed consent, 10 patients undergoing elective CABG were studied. Nonpulsatile CPB with a membrane oxygenator, haemodilution and alpha-state pH management was used. The NIRS system consisting of two low-power laser diode sources (780 nm and 810 nm) with a photodetector placed on the frontal cortex was used to measure continuously haemoglobin, oxyhaemoglobin and cerebral blood volume. Continuous rSO2 measurements were obtained before, during moderate hypothermia, and during the rewarming phase of CPB. A rSO2 < 50% was defined as abnormal. Onset of rSO2 < 50% was at 32 degrees C, and the highest incidence occurred during the late stages of rewarming (35-37 degrees C). On rewarming from hypothermic CPB, 70% of our patients sustained a rSO2 < 50% for an average total duration of 9.3 minutes, primarily at the end of the rewarming period. This suggests a transient global imbalance in cerebral O2 supply and demand in a large percentage of patients during the rewarming phase of CPB. However, it has not been determined how long a rSO2 < 50% can be permitted before neuropsychological dysfunction is induced. Additional studies correlating psychometric testing with rSO2 measurements should prove useful in detecting episodes of impaired cerebral oxygenation, and help define rewarming protocols. PMID:7488770

  18. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Older Adults' Expectations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godkin, M. Dianne; Toth, Ellen L.

    1994-01-01

    Examined knowledge, attitudes, and opinions of 60 older adults about cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Most had little or no accurate knowledge of CPR. Knowledge deficits and misconceptions of older adults should be addressed so that they may become informed and active participants in CPR decision-making process. (BF)

  19. Effects of an Exercise Programme on Functional Capacity, Body Composition and Risk of Falls in Patients with Cirrhosis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Román, Eva; García-Galcerán, Cristina; Torrades, Teresa; Herrera, Silvia; Marín, Ana; Doñate, Maite; Alvarado-Tapias, Edilmar; Malouf, Jorge; Nácher, Laura; Serra-Grima, Ricard; Guarner, Carlos; Soriano, German

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cirrhosis often have functional limitations, decreased muscle mass, and a high risk of falls. These variables could improve with exercise. The aim was to study the effects of moderate exercise on functional capacity, body composition and risk of falls in patients with cirrhosis. Twenty-three cirrhotic patients were randomized to an exercise programme (n = 14) or to a relaxation programme (n = 9). Both programmes consisted of a one-hour session 3 days a week for 12 weeks. At the beginning and end of the study, we measured functional capacity using the cardiopulmonary exercise test, evaluated body composition using anthropometry and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, and estimated risk of falls using the Timed Up&Go test. In the exercise group, cardiopulmonary exercise test showed an increase in total effort time (p<0.001) and ventilatory anaerobic threshold time (p = 0.009). Upper thigh circumference increased and mid-arm and mid-thigh skinfold thickness decreased. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry showed a decrease in fat body mass (-0.94 kg, 95%CI -0.48 to -1.41, p = 0.003) and an increase in lean body mass (1.05 kg, 95%CI 0.27 to 1.82, p = 0.01), lean appendicular mass (0.38 kg, 95%CI 0.06 to 0.69, p = 0.03) and lean leg mass (0.34 kg, 95%CI 0.10 to 0.57, p = 0.02). The Timed Up&Go test decreased at the end of the study compared to baseline (p = 0.02). No changes were observed in the relaxation group. We conclude that a moderate exercise programme in patients with cirrhosis improves functional capacity, increases muscle mass, and decreases body fat and the Timed Up&Go time. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01447537 PMID:27011355

  20. Prognostic value of predischarge low-level exercise thallium testing after thrombolytic treatment of acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Tilkemeier, P.L.; Guiney, T.E.; LaRaia, P.J.; Boucher, C.A. )

    1990-11-15

    Low-level exercise thallium testing is useful in identifying the high-risk patient after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). To determine whether this use also applies to patients after thrombolytic treatment of AMI, 64 patients who underwent early thrombolytic therapy for AMI and 107 patients without acute intervention were evaluated. The ability of both the electrocardiogram and thallium tests to predict future events was compared in both groups. After a mean follow-up of 374 days, there were 25 and 32% of cardiac events in the 2 groups, respectively, with versus without acute intervention. These included death, another AMI, coronary artery bypass grafting or angioplasty with 75% of the events occurring in the 3 months after the first infarction. The only significant predictors of outcome were left ventricular cavity dilatation in the intervention group and ST-segment depression and increased lung uptake in the nonintervention group. The sensitivity of exercise thallium was 55% in the intervention group and 81% in the nonintervention group (p less than 0.05). Therefore, in patients having thrombolytic therapy for AMI, nearly half the events after discharge are not predicted by predischarge low-level exercise thallium testing. The relatively weak correlation of outcome with unmasking ischemia in the laboratory before discharge may be due to an unstable coronary lesion or rapid progression of disease after the test. Tests considered useful for prognostication after AMI may not necessarily have a similar value if there has been an acute intervention, such as thrombolytic therapy.

  1. Cardiopulmonary function and scoliosis severity in idiopathic scoliosis children

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Seokwon; Kim, Nam Kyun; Jung, Jo Won; Choi, Jae Young; Kim, Hak Sun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Idiopathic scoliosis is a structural lateral curvature of the spine of unknown etiology. The relationship between degree of spine curvature and cardiopulmonary function has not yet been investigated. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between scoliosis and cardiopulmonary characteristics. Methods Ninety children who underwent preoperative pulmonary or cardiac evaluation at a single spine institution over 41 months were included. They were divided into the thoracic-dominant scoliosis (group A, n=78) and lumbar-dominant scoliosis (group B, n=12) groups. Scoliosis severity was evaluated using the Cobb method. In each group, relationships between Cobb angles and cardiopulmonary markers such as forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), FEV1/FVC, left ventricular ejection fraction, pulmonary artery flow velocity, and tissue Doppler velocities (E/E', E'/A') were analyzed by correlation analysis linear regression. Results In group A, 72 patients (92.3%) underwent pulmonary function tests (PFTs), and 41 (52.6%) underwent echocardiography. In group B, 9 patients (75.0%) underwent PFT and 8 (66.7%) underwent echocardiography. Cobb angles showed a significant negative correlation with FVC and FEV1 in group A (both P<0.05), but no such correlation in group B, and a significant negative correlation with mitral E/A ratio (P<0.05) and tissue Doppler E'/A' (P<0.05) in group A, with a positive correlation with mitral E/A ratio (P<0.05) in group B. Conclusion Pulmonary and cardiac function was significantly correlated with the degree of scoliosis in patients with thoracic-dominant scoliosis. Myocardial diastolic function might be impaired in patients with the most severe scoliosis. PMID:26213550

  2. Brain microvascular function during cardiopulmonary bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, H.R.; Husum, B.; Waaben, J.; Andersen, K.; Andersen, L.I.; Gefke, K.; Kaarsen, A.L.; Gjedde, A.

    1987-11-01

    Emboli in the brain microvasculature may inhibit brain activity during cardiopulmonary bypass. Such hypothetical blockade, if confirmed, may be responsible for the reduction of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose observed in animals subjected to cardiopulmonary bypass. In previous studies of cerebral blood flow during bypass, brain microcirculation was not evaluated. In the present study in animals (pigs), reduction of the number of perfused capillaries was estimated by measurements of the capillary diffusion capacity for hydrophilic tracers of low permeability. Capillary diffusion capacity, cerebral blood flow, and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose were measured simultaneously by the integral method, different tracers being used with different circulation times. In eight animals subjected to normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass, and seven subjected to hypothermic bypass, cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolic rate for glucose, and capillary diffusion capacity decreased significantly: cerebral blood flow from 63 to 43 ml/100 gm/min in normothermia and to 34 ml/100 gm/min in hypothermia and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose from 43.0 to 23.0 mumol/100 gm/min in normothermia and to 14.1 mumol/100 gm/min in hypothermia. The capillary diffusion capacity declined markedly from 0.15 to 0.03 ml/100 gm/min in normothermia but only to 0.08 ml/100 gm/min in hypothermia. We conclude that the decrease of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose during normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass is caused by interruption of blood flow through a part of the capillary bed, possibly by microemboli, and that cerebral blood flow is an inadequate indicator of capillary blood flow. Further studies must clarify why normal microvascular function appears to be preserved during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass.

  3. AGONIST-MEDIATED AIRWAY CHALLENGE: CARDIOPULMONARY INTERACTIONS MODULATE GAS EXCHANGE AND RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    To better understand the early phase response (0-60 minutes) to airway challenge, we examined cardiopulmonary reactions during ovalbumin (OVA), histamine, and methacholine aerosol challenge tests in guinea pigs. Propranolol and 100% O2 were used to modify the reacti...

  4. Physiological response to exercise after space flight - Apollo 7 to Apollo 11.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, J. A.; Michel, E. L.; Berry, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    Exercise response tests were conducted preflight and postflight on Apollo missions 7 to 11. The primary objective of these tests was to detect any changes in the cardiopulmonary response to exercise that were associated with the space flight environment and that could have limited lunar surface activities. A heart-rate-controlled bicycle ergometer was used to produce three heart rate stress levels: 120 beats per minute for 6 minutes; 140 beats per minute for 3 minutes and 160 beats per minute per 3 minutes. Work load, blood pressure and respiratory gas exchange were measured during each stress level. Significant decreases were observed immediately postflight in the following dependent variables at a heart rate of 160 beats per minute: work load, oxygen consumption, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure. No changes occurred in work efficiency at 100 watts or the ventilatory equivalent for oxygen at 2.0 liters per minute.

  5. Exercise behavior in older adults: a test of the transtheoretical model.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Corjena; Wyman, Jean; Gross, Cynthia; Peters, Jennifer; Findorff, Mary; Stock, Holly

    2007-01-01

    The transtheoretical model (TTM) was developed as a guide for understanding behavior change. Little attention has been given, however, to the appropriateness of the TTM for explaining the adoption of exercise behavior in older adults. The purposes of this study were to determine the reliability of the TTM instruments and validate TTM predictions in 86 community-dwelling older adults (mean age 75.1 +/- 7.0 years, 87% women) who were participants in a 16-week walking program. TTM construct scales--self-efficacy, decisional balance (pros and cons), and processes of change (behavioral and cognitive)--were generally reliable (all>.78). Behavioral processes of change increased from baseline to follow-up, but pros, cons, and cognitive processes did not change among participants who became regular exercisers. Stage of change did not predict exercise adoption, but baseline self-efficacy predicted walking behavior. These results lend partial support to the TTM in predicting exercise behavior. PMID:17387232

  6. Exercise physiology, testing, and training in patients supported by a left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Loyaga-Rendon, Renzo Y; Plaisance, Eric P; Arena, Ross; Shah, Keyur

    2015-08-01

    The left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is an accepted treatment alternative for the management of end-stage heart failure. As we move toward implantation of LVADs in less severe cases of HF, scrutiny of functional capacity and quality of life becomes more important. Patients demonstrate improvements in exercise capacity after LVAD implantation, but the effect is less than predicted. Exercise training produces multiple beneficial effects in heart failure patients, which would be expected to improve quality of life. In this review, we describe factors that are thought to participate in the persistent exercise impairment in LVAD-supported patients, summarize current knowledge about the effect of exercise training in LVAD-supported patients, and suggest areas for future research. PMID:25682553

  7. The future of aerobic exercise testing in clinical practice: is it the ultimate vital sign?

    PubMed

    Arena, Ross; Myers, Jonathan; Guazzi, Marco

    2010-05-01

    The four traditional vital signs: resting heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate and body temperature, serve as the cornerstone of a physical examination. Other assessments such as pain have been proposed as additional vital signs. To this point however, there has been limited consideration for aerobic exercise assessment as a vital sign. A wealth of literature demonstrating the prognostic, diagnostic and interventional value of the aerobic exercise assessment now exists, supporting its use in numerous clinical scenarios. Moreover, the assessment of the aerobic exercise response allows for the manifestation of physiologic abnormalities that are not readily apparent during the collection of resting data. This review will provide evidence supporting the assertion that the aerobic exercise assessment may be afforded vital sign status in future clinical practice. PMID:20462339

  8. [Detection of multivessel lesions after myocardial infarction. Improvement of the predictive value of early exercise stress test by discriminant analysis].

    PubMed

    Leroy, F; Langlois-Minet, P; Fievet, P; Agraou, B; Dujardin, J J

    1996-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess, by a discriminant analysis, the different parameters of exercise stress testing associated with multivessel disease after uncomplicated myocardial infarction and to determine whether their combination improved the diagnostic value of ST depression alone, the usual diagnostic criterion. One hundred and seventeen out of 240 consecutive pts admitted for acute myocardial infarction between october 1992 and may 1994 underwent early exercise stress testing and coronary angiography 8.5 +/- 3 days and 13 +/- 8 days respectively after infarction. The population was divided into two groups: a "study" group (pts recruited between october 1992 and october 1993) for whom a diagnostic equation had been established based on a discriminant analysis, and "a control" group (pts recruited between november 1993 and may 1994) allowing validation of the diagnostic equation. Of the 9 clinical and 14 exercise stress test variables, only 3 remained statistically significant after discriminant analysis in this study group: the number of METS achieved (p < 0.0005), maximal ST depression in V5 (p < 0.005) and maximal heart rate (p < 0.01). Using these three parameters, a discriminating equation was established in the study group and then validated in the control group. Using this equation, the percentage of pts correctly identified as having multivessel disease was 75% in the study group and 79% in the control group, whereas ST depression, the most commonly used criterion, only classified 68% of the study group and 60% of the control group correctly. This study confirmed the good tolerance of early maximal exercise stress testing after uncomplicated myo-cardial infarction. The combination of three easily discernable parameters improved the diagnostic performance of the stress test in identifying multivessel disease after myocardial infarction. PMID:8678750

  9. A simplified approach for evaluating multiple test outcomes and multiple disease states in relation to the exercise thallium-201 stress test in suspected coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, S.G.; Watson, D.D.; Gibson, R.S.; Beller, G.A.; Kaul, S. )

    1989-09-01

    This study describes a simplified approach for the interpretation of electrocardiographic and thallium-201 imaging data derived from the same patient during exercise. The 383 patients in this study had also undergone selective coronary arteriography within 3 months of the exercise test. This matrix approach allows for multiple test outcomes (both tests positive, both negative, 1 test positive and 1 negative) and multiple disease states (no coronary artery disease vs 1-vessel vs multivessel coronary artery disease). Because this approach analyzes the results of 2 test outcomes simultaneously rather than serially, it also negates the lack of test independence, if such an effect is present. It is also demonstrated that ST-segment depression on the electrocardiogram and defects on initial thallium-201 images provide conditionally independent information regarding the presence of coronary artery disease in patients without prior myocardial infarction. In contrast, ST-segment depression on the electrocardiogram and redistribution on the delayed thallium-201 images may not provide totally independent information regarding the presence of exercise-induced ischemia in patients with or without myocardial infarction.

  10. A pilot study to assess the feasibility of a submaximal exercise test to measure individual response to cardiac medication in dogs with acquired heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ferasin, L; Marcora, S

    2007-08-01

    Exercise testing is not commonly used in canine medicine because of several limitations. The aim of this study was to investigate the suitability of a treadmill test to measure the exercise capacity of untrained canine cardiac patients and to measure some biological parameters that might reflect the tolerance of dogs with heart failure to submaximal exercise. The exercise capacity of seven dogs with naturally occurring heart failure was evaluated before the institution of cardiac medication and 7 days after the beginning of the study. An additional re-examination was requested after 28 days. The exercise test was performed on a motorized treadmill at three different speeds (0.5 m/s, 1.0 m/s and 1.5 m/s). The following parameters were measured at the end of each stage and after 20 min recovery: heart rate, rectal temperature, glucose, lactate, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, PvO(2), PvCO(2), pH, haematocrit, bicarbonate, sodium, potassium and chloride. Serum cardiac troponin-I was also measured at the beginning of the test and at the end of the recovery period. Owners' perception reflected the ability of their dogs to exercise on the treadmill. Lactate level increased noticeably with the intensity of the exercise test, and its variation coincided with different exercise tolerance observed by the owners. Heart rate seemed to follow a similar trend in the few dogs presented in sinus rhythm. None of the remaining parameters appeared to be sensitive indicators of activity level in the dogs used in this study. The treadmill exercise test in dogs with acquired heart failure is feasible and might provide useful information for assessing individual response to cardiac medication. Lactate and heart rate seemed to reflect individual levels of exercise tolerance, although further studies are necessary to confirm the reliability and repeatability of this test. PMID:17253114

  11. Cardiovascular Response to Exercise Testing in Children and Adolescents Late After Kawasaki Disease According to Coronary Condition Upon Onset.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Hugo; Curnier, Daniel; Dallaire, Frédéric; Fournier, Anne; Portman, Michael; Dahdah, Nagib

    2015-10-01

    Multiple cardiovascular sequelae have been reported late after Kawasaki disease (KD), especially in patients with coronary artery lesions. In this perspective, we hypothesized that exercise response was altered after KD in patients with coronary aneurysms (CAA-KD) compared to those without history of coronary aneurysms (NS-KD). This study is a post hoc analysis of exercise data from an international multicenter trial. A group of 133 CAA-KD subjects was compared to a group of 117 NS-KD subjects. Subjects underwent a Bruce treadmill test followed to maximal exertion. Heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were assessed at each stage of the test including recovery. Myocardial perfusion was evaluated by stress and rest Tc-99m sestamibi SPECT imaging. Endurance time was similar between NS-KD and CAA-KD (11.3 ± 2.6 vs. 11.0 ± 2.6 min; p = 0.343). HR, SBP, and DBP responses to exercise were similar between groups (p = 0.075-0.942). Myocardial perfusion defects were present in 16.5 % CAA-KD versus 22.2 % NS-KD (p = 0.255). Analysis based on myocardial perfusion status identified a lower heart rate at 1 min into recovery as well as lower DBP at 1 and 5 min into recovery in patients with abnormal SPECT imaging (p = 0.017-0.042). Compared to patients without CA involvement, the presence of coronary aneurysms at the subacute phase of KD does not induce a differential effect on exercise parameters. In contrast, exercise-induced myocardial perfusion defect late after the onset of KD correlates with abnormal recovery parameters. PMID:25951815

  12. A comparison of dipyridamole-thallium imaging and exercise testing in the prediction of postoperative cardiac complications in patients requiring arterial reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    McPhail, N.V.; Ruddy, T.D.; Calvin, J.E.; Davies, R.A.; Barber, G.G.

    1989-07-01

    The individual and combined predictive values of dipyridamole-thallium imaging and exercise testing were compared in a prospective study of 70 patients who had abdominal aortic aneurysms or aortoiliac occlusive disease that required surgical repair. All patients were evaluated clinically by the same cardiologist and had exercise stress testing and dipyridamole-thallium imaging before admission for surgery. Ten patients were excluded from the study because they had evidence of severe ischemia when tested (ST segment depression greater than 2 mm on exercise testing, severe multivessel disease on thallium imaging). The remaining 60 patients were operated on (abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, 40; aortobifemoral repair, 17; femorofemoral graft, 3). The test results were withheld from the surgeon, anesthetist, and cardiologist before surgery. A total of 22 patients experienced major cardiac complications postoperatively (acute pulmonary edema, 17; acute myocardial infarction, 5; cardiac death, 2). Thallium imaging showed myocardial ischemia in 31/60 patients. Exercise testing was positive (greater than or equal to 1 mm ST segment depression) in 10/60 patients. Dipyridamole-thallium imaging with a high sensitivity and reasonable specificity is the initial test of choice. Exercise testing is a poor screening test because of its low sensitivity. The combination of the two tests gives the highest positive predictive value and the greatest likelihood ratio. Thus patients assessed initially and found to have positive thallium scan results may be further stratified by exercise testing.

  13. Effect of exercise position during stress testing on cardiac and pulmonary thallium kinetics and accuracy in evaluating coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, J.L.

    1986-06-01

    We compared the effects of symptom-limited upright and supine exercise on 201Tl distribution and kinetics in the heart and lungs of 100 consecutive patients. Our analysis was based on data obtained with a digital gamma camera in the 45 degrees left anterior oblique position at 5, 40, 240, and 275 min postadministration of (201Tl)chloride. We found significant differences in the results at the 5- and 40-min intervals; viz, higher cardiac and lower pulmonary thallium activity after upright exercise in 94 subjects at both intervals, and greater variability in total and regional cardiac thallium kinetics after supine exercise. With supine exercise, the relatively low initial cardiac activity, relatively high lung activity, and the greater variability in thallium kinetics combined to make interpretation of quantitative data and cardiac images difficult and less accurate with respect to detection of coronary artery disease. These observations have important implications for the interpreting physician when thallium stress tests are performed in the supine position.

  14. Safety and Feasibility of Regadenoson Use for Suboptimal Heart Rate Response During Symptom-Limited Standard Bruce Exercise Stress Test

    PubMed Central

    Partington, Sara L.; Lanka, Viswanatha; Hainer, Jon; Blankstein, Ron; Skali, Hicham; Forman, Daniel E.; Di Carli, Marcelo F.; Dorbala, Sharmila

    2012-01-01

    Background Regadenoson during exercise stress test (ETT) can provide maximal hyperemia for myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), along with exercise information. Our aim was to study the feasibility and safety of regadenoson injection at peak ETT for sub-maximal heart rate (HR) response. Methods Consecutive patients who underwent SPECT MPI with standard Bruce ETT or supine regadenoson (supine-Reg) were analyzed. ETT patients were grouped as ETT-Max [maximal HR >0.85* (220-age), N=1,522], ETT-Submax (submaximal HR no regadenoson, N=504), ETT-Reg (submaximal HR and regadenoson, N=211). Results The HR during ETT was submaximal in 715 (32%) patients. Of these, 211 patients (30%) underwent ETT-Reg (mean exercise duration: 5.5 2.5 minutes). ETT-Reg patients had a higher frequency of hypertension, diabetes, smoking and beta-blocker use, similar rest systolic blood pressure (SBP), but lower rest and peak HR and peak SBP compared to ETT-Max patients. There were no serious complications with regadenoson. Side effects (49% vs. 6%, P<0.0001) were fewer and aminophylline use was lower with ETT-Reg compared to supine-Reg (.0.5% vs. 8.1%, P =0.001). Conclusions Sub-maximal HR response to ETT is common. ETT-Reg is safe, feasible and well-tolerated. ETT-Reg facilitates a diagnostic MPI with reporting of functional capacity, exercise ECG/hemodynamic changes and MPI at maximal hyperemia. PMID:22565239

  15. [Exercise test in isolated anomalies of auriculo-ventricular conduction in children and adolescents. Value in idiopathic auriculo-ventricular blocks and ventricular pre-excitation syndromes].

    PubMed

    Matina, D; Faugre, G; Lvy, S; Grard, R

    1984-05-01

    Abnormal atrioventricular conduction in children and adolescents without obvious underlying cardiac disease poses the problem of long term prognosis. This study of 45 patients aged 8 to 18 years with congenital atrioventricular block (30 cases) or ventricular pre-excitation (15 cases), was undertaken to determine the value of exercise testing, a physiological adrenergic stress test, in the assessment of these patients. Our results show that exercise testing was valuable in determining the site of atrioventricular block: during exercise the degree of block increased in two patients, justifying electrophysiological investigations which showed infrahisian block in one case; when the block was stable or improved on exercise, the atropine test, performed in 21 cases, gave concordant results in 18 cases (the same change with atropine and exercise): the block was nodal in all these patients. A concordant response to exercise and atropine, improving the degree of block, indicates suprahisian block and endocavitary investigation would not seem to be necessary. On the other hand, when the degree of block increases or remains the same during exercise and/or the atropine test, the site of block cannot be predicted and endocavitary investigation and Holter monitoring may be required. In patients with ventricular pre-excitation, exercise testing provides information on the relative values of the effective refractory periods of the normal and accessory pathways: in the 10 cases in which endocavitary studies were undertaken, the exercise electrocardiogram changed in the expected manner (disappearance of the pre-excitation wave on exercise in patients with accessory pathways with longer refractory periods than the normal pathway and persistence of pre-excitation when the accessory pathway refractory period was shorter).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6428352

  16. Prediction of VO[subscript 2]max in Children and Adolescents Using Exercise Testing and Physical Activity Questionnaire Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Nate E.; Vehrs, Pat R.; Fellingham, Gilbert W.; George, James D.; Hager, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of a treadmill walk-jog-run exercise test previously validated in adults and physical activity questionnaire data to estimate maximum oxygen consumption (VO[subscript 2]max) in boys (n = 62) and girls (n = 66) aged 12 to 17 years old. Methods: Data were collected from Physical Activity…

  17. What Exercise of the Source Inversion Validation BlindTest I didn't Tell You?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, C.; Shao, G.

    2010-12-01

    Uncertainties of the finite fault inversions based upon strong motion data are investigated using the BlindTest I exercise of the SPICE earthquake source inversion validation project, motivated by previous counterintuitive results (Mai et al., 2007). The distributions of slip and the shapes of asymmetric cosine slip rate functions (Ji et al., 2003) on the fault surface are simultaneously inverted by matching 10 or 33 broadband 3-component velocity waveforms within the period ranging from DC to 2 Hz, using the finite fault method that carries waveform inversions in wavelet domain. The effects of subfault size, data noise, and the number of stations have been explored. Our results suggest that: 1) Although there are inevitable discrepancies between the inverted model and the target because of ignoring the spatial slip variations within individual subfaults, with precise velocity structure, precise fault geometry and good station coverage, the fault slip and rise time distribution can be well constrained even the data includes very large Gaussian noise. 2) It is crucial for source studies to develop new inversion schedule that can properly honor the frequency/temporal dependent energy distribution of seismic radiation and noise. For instance, inversions using the variance reduction function of velocity waveforms as the objective function have low sensitivities to the total seismic moment and peak slip. 3) Though the relative value of the objective function inside the model space is used to guide the inversion, the absolute value of the objective function cannot be used to evaluate the quality of the inverted model. 4) As the inversion based on the observations only on the surface, the spatiotemporal resolution of the source inversion is affected not only by the data quality but also the earthquake itself. For strike slip faulting on a vertical fault, the along-strike resolution is better than that along the down-dip direction.

  18. Effects of the oral contraceptive pill cycle on physiological responses to hypoxic exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandoval, Darleen A.; Matt, Kathleen S.

    2003-01-01

    To test whether the oral contraceptive pill cycle affects endocrine and metabolic responses to hypoxic (fraction of inspired oxygen = 13%, P(IO2): 95 mmHg; H) versus normoxic (P(IO2):153 mmHg; N) exercise, we examined eight women (28 +/- 1.2 yr) during the third (PILL) and placebo (PLA) weeks of their monthly oral contraceptive pill cycle. Cardiopulmonary, metabolic, and neuroendocrine measurements were taken before, during, and after three 5-min consecutive workloads at 30%, 45%, and 60% of normoxic V(O2peak) in H and N trials. Heart rate response to exercise was greater in H versus N, but was not different between PILL and PLA. Lactate levels were significantly greater during exercise, and both lactate and glucose levels were significantly greater for 30 min after exercise in H versus N (p < 0.0001). When expressed relative to baseline, lactate levels were lower in PILL versus PLA, but glucose was greater in PILL versus PLA (p < 0.001). Cortisol levels were also significantly greater in PILL versus PLA (p < 0.001). Norepinephrine levels were significantly increased during exercise (p < 0.0001) and in H versus N (p < 0.0001). However, epinephrine levels were not different over time or with trial. Thus, the presence of circulating estradiol and progesterone during the PILL phase reduces glucose and lactate responses to hypoxic exercise.

  19. Exercise testing and thallium-201 myocardial imaging in relation to coronary artery disease in patients with severe aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R R; Mews, G C; Van der Schaaf, A; Dickie, G; Surveyor, I

    1980-12-01

    Thirty-three patients with aortic valve disease, fifteen with regurgitation, eleven with stenosis and seven with mixed disease, undergoing assessment for valve replacement which included adequate coronary angiography, were studied. A symptom limited graded treadmill exercise test was undertaken with administration of 40-70 MBq of 201Tl. Myocardial imaging was started within 15 minutes and repeated after four hours using a 37 PM tube Searle gamma camera. Myocardial images were read independently by three observed. Of the 33 sets of images, 21 were -ve, 5 +ve, 2 I (Indeterminate) and 5 D (Difference of opinion). Eight of the 33 patients had significant coronary artery disease (CAD) and of these three were scored +ve (all triple vessel). Two patients without CAD were scored +ve. Eight subjects developed angina during exercise testing, of whom four had CAD, and four with CAD did no develop angina. Historically, 13 of the 33 subjects had typical angina, six having CAD; an additional eight had other significant chest pain, two having CAD. In these subjects with severe aortic valve disease, exercise testing and myocardial imaging with 201 TI was of little value in detecting CAD. All patients with CAD gave a history of significant chest pain. PMID:6938184

  20. Value of measuring end tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide as an adjunct to treadmill exercise testing

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, John B; Kiff, Peter J; Gardner, William N; Jackson, Graham; Bass, Christopher

    1988-01-01

    The end tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide (Pco2) was measured during treadmill exercise in 30 normal controls and 113 patients referred for assessment of chest pain. Among the 92 patients without significant ST depression hypocapnia occurred more often in those reporting typical than atypical chest pain (17 of 22 patients compared with 29 of 70; p<001). Hypocapnia was uncommon in patients with significant ST depression whether reporting typical or atypical chest pain (one of 10 patients and two of 11, respectively). Hypocapnia at rest (Pco2 <4 kPa) occurred in 16 (14%) patients but in only one control. Hypocapnia occurred during or after exercise in only one control and three of the 21 patients with significant ST depression on exercise (group 1). The remaining 92 patients were divided into those with a history suggestive of hyperventilation (group 2; n=30) and those without (group 3; n=62). Hypocapnia developed significantly more often in both these groups (21 and 25 patients respectively) than in controls or patients with significant ST depression. An abnormal response of the Pco2 to exercise provided objective data to support a clinical suspicion of chest pain induced by hyperventilation in 24 cases, suggested a cause for equivocal ST depression other than coronary stenosis in five patients, and led to the diagnosis of previously unsuspected respiratory disease in 14 patients. Measurement of end tidal Pco2 gives additional valuable diagnostic information during the conventional treadmill exercise test in patients with both typical and atypical chest pain. PMID:3133051

  1. Cardiopulmonary function in bicycle racing over mountainous terrain at moderate altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasawa, K.; Sakai, A.; Yanagidaira, Y.; Takeoka, M.; Asano, K.; Fujiwara, T.; Yanagisawa, K.; Kashimura, O.; Ueda, G.

    1995-09-01

    To examine cardiopulmonary function during exercise in a mountainous region at moderate altitude, we measured cardiac frequency, oxygen consumptionleft( {dot VO_2 } right), and percentage arterial hemoglobin oxygen saturation (%SaO2) before and after a bicycle race with a starting point at 638 m and finishing point at 1980 m. The time required to ascend an elevation of 10 m was prolonged with increasing altitude, and heart rate also increased with altitude. The %SaO2 at the starting point and at the finishing point differed significantly ( P<0.01). Faster cyclists exhibited higher %SaO2 and lowerdot VO_2 , while slower cyclists exhibited a reduction in %SaO2 and an increase indot VO_2 immediately after the race. The %SaO2 recovery time was significantly correlated with the racing time ( r=0.54, P<0.001). Therefore, the faster cyclists' oxygen debt upon completion of the race may be small and recovery of cardiopulmonary function may be fast, while the slower cyclists' oxygen debt may be large and recovery of cardiopulmonary function may be slow.

  2. Management of Cardiopulmonary Complications of Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Prabha; Vashishtha, C.; Nasa, M.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced portal hypertension accompanying end-stage liver disease results in an altered milieu due to inadequate detoxification of blood from splanchnic circulation by the failing liver. The portosystemic shunts with hepatic dysfunction result in an increased absorption and impaired neutralisation of the gastrointestinal bacteria and endotoxins leads to altered homeostasis with multiorgan dysfunction. The important cardiopulmonary complications are cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, hepatopulmonary syndrome, portopulmonary hypertension, and right-sided hydrothorax. PMID:21994850

  3. The standardization of results on hair testing for drugs of abuse: An interlaboratory exercise in Lombardy Region, Italy.

    PubMed

    Stramesi, C; Vignali, C; Groppi, A; Caligara, M; Lodi, F; Pichini, S; Jurado, C

    2012-05-10

    Hair testing for drugs of abuse is performed in Lombardy by eleven analytical laboratories accredited for forensic purposes, the most frequent purposes being driving license regranting and workplace drug testing. Individuals undergoing hair testing for these purposes can choose the laboratory in which the analyses have to be carried out. The aim of our study was to perform an interlaboratory exercise in order to verify the level of standardization of hair testing for drugs of abuse in these accredited laboratories; nine out of the eleven laboratories participated in this exercise. Sixteen hair strands coming from different subjects were longitudinally divided in 3-4 aliquots and distributed to participating laboratories, which were requested to apply their routine methods. All the participants analyzed opiates (morphine and 6-acetylmorphine) and cocainics (cocaine and benzoylecgonine) while only six analyzed methadone and amphetamines (amphetamine, methamphetamine, MDMA, MDA and MDEA) and five Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The majority of the participants (seven labs) performed acidic hydrolysis to extract the drugs from the hair and analysis by GC-MS, while two labs used LC-MS/MS. Eight laboratories performed initial screening tests by Enzyme Multiplied Immunoassay Technique (EMIT), Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) or Cloned Enzyme Donor Immunoassay (CEDIA). Results demonstrated a good qualitative performance for all the participants, since no false positive results were reported by any of them. Quantitative data were quite scattered, but less in samples with low concentrations of analytes than in those with higher concentrations. Results from this first regional interlaboratory exercise show that, on the one hand, individuals undergoing hair testing would have obtained the same qualitative results in any of the nine laboratories. On the other hand, the scatter in quantitative results could cause some inequalities if any interpretation of the data is required. PMID:22018743

  4. Effects of Respiratory Muscle and Endurance Training using an Individualized Training Device on Pulmonary Function and Exercise Capacity in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, JinHong; Park, Jun Hyuck; Yim, Jongeun

    2014-01-01

    Background Because respiratory muscle function plays a strong role in exercise capacity and cardiopulmonary response to exercise, systematic training and measurement of respiratory muscle function should be considered in stroke patients. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an individualized respiratory muscle training device combined with conventional physical therapy exercise can improve the pulmonary function and exercise capacity of stroke patients. Material/Methods Twenty stroke patients were randomly assigned to an exercise group (n=10) or a control group (n=10). Over 4 weeks, each group participated in exercise training interventions 3 times per week. In each session, the control group received basic exercise treatments for 30 min, followed by an automated full-body workout for 20 min. The exercise group performed the same exercise regimen as the control group, as well as an additional respiratory muscle training regimen using a respiratory exercise device for 20 min. Results Pulmonary function of forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume at 1 s (FEV1), FEV1/FVC, and peak expiratory flow (PEF) and exercise capacity of a 6-min walking test and Shortness of Breath Modified Borg Dyspnea Scale (SBMBDS) scores were assessed before and after the training. A significant intergroup difference was observed in the FVC, FEV1, PEF, 6MWT, and SBMBDS scores (p<0.05). Conclusions These findings suggest that exercise of the respiratory muscles using an individualized respiratory device had a positive effect on pulmonary function and exercise capacity and may be used for breathing rehabilitation in stroke patients. PMID:25488849

  5. Design and testing of an MRI-compatible cycle ergometer for non-invasive cardiac assessments during exercise

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool for cardiac research, and it is frequently used for resting cardiac assessments. However, research into non-pharmacological stress cardiac evaluation is limited. Methods We aimed to design a portable and relatively inexpensive MRI cycle ergometer capable of continuously measuring pedalling workload while patients exercise to maintain target heart rates. Results We constructed and tested an MRI-compatible cycle ergometer for a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Resting and sub-maximal exercise images (at 110 beats per minute) were successfully obtained in 8 healthy adults. Conclusions The MRI-compatible cycle ergometer constructed by our research group enabled cardiac assessments at fixed heart rates, while continuously recording power output by directly measuring pedal force and crank rotation. PMID:22423637

  6. Food Microbiology--Design and Testing of a Virtual Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, Steve; Stewart, Terry

    2010-01-01

    A web-based virtual laboratory exercise in identifying an unknown microorganism was designed for use with a cohort of 3rd-year university food-technology students. They were presented with a food-contamination case, and then walked through a number of diagnostic steps to identify the microorganism. At each step, the students were asked to select 1

  7. Food Microbiology--Design and Testing of a Virtual Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, Steve; Stewart, Terry

    2010-01-01

    A web-based virtual laboratory exercise in identifying an unknown microorganism was designed for use with a cohort of 3rd-year university food-technology students. They were presented with a food-contamination case, and then walked through a number of diagnostic steps to identify the microorganism. At each step, the students were asked to select 1…

  8. Oxidative stress responses to a graded maximal exercise test in older adults following explosive-type resistance training.

    PubMed

    Ceci, Roberta; Beltran Valls, Maria Reyes; Duranti, Guglielmo; Dimauro, Ivan; Quaranta, Federico; Pittaluga, Monica; Sabatini, Stefania; Caserotti, Paolo; Parisi, Paolo; Parisi, Attilio; Caporossi, Daniela

    2013-12-12

    We recently demonstrated that low frequency, moderate intensity, explosive-type resistance training (EMRT) is highly beneficial in elderly subjects towards muscle strength and power, with a systemic adaptive response of anti-oxidant and stress-induced markers. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the impact of EMRT on oxidative stress biomarkers induced in old people (70-75 years) by a single bout of acute, intense exercise. Sixteen subjects randomly assigned to either a control, not exercising group (n=8) or a trained group performing EMRT protocol for 12-weeks (n=8), were submitted to a graded maximal exercise stress test (GXT) at baseline and after the 12-weeks of EMRT protocol, with blood samples collected before, immediately after, 1 and 24h post-GXT test. Blood glutathione (GSH, GSSG, GSH/GSSG), plasma malonaldehyde (MDA), protein carbonyls and creatine kinase (CK) levels, as well as PBMCs cellular damage (Comet assay, apoptosis) and stress-protein response (Hsp70 and Hsp27 expression) were evaluated. The use of multiple biomarkers allowed us to confirm that EMRT per se neither affected redox homeostasis nor induced any cellular and oxidative damage. Following the GXT, the EMRT group displayed a higher GSH/GSSG ratio and a less pronounced increase in MDA, protein carbonyls and CK levels compared to control group. Moreover, we found that Hsp70 and Hsp27 proteins were induced after GXT only in EMRT group, while any significant modification within 24h was detected in untrained group. Apoptosis rates and DNA damage did not show any significant variation in relation to EMRT and/or GXT. In conclusion, the adherence to an EMRT protocol is able to induce a cellular adaptation allowing healthy elderly trained subjects to cope with the oxidative stress induced by an acute exercise more effectively than the aged-matched sedentary subjects. PMID:25460722

  9. Oxidative stress responses to a graded maximal exercise test in older adults following explosive-type resistance training?

    PubMed Central

    Ceci, Roberta; Beltran Valls, Maria Reyes; Duranti, Guglielmo; Dimauro, Ivan; Quaranta, Federico; Pittaluga, Monica; Sabatini, Stefania; Caserotti, Paolo; Parisi, Paolo; Parisi, Attilio; Caporossi, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that low frequency, moderate intensity, explosive-type resistance training (EMRT) is highly beneficial in elderly subjects towards muscle strength and power, with a systemic adaptive response of anti-oxidant and stress-induced markers. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the impact of EMRT on oxidative stress biomarkers induced in old people (7075 years) by a single bout of acute, intense exercise. Sixteen subjects randomly assigned to either a control, not exercising group (n=8) or a trained group performing EMRT protocol for 12-weeks (n=8), were submitted to a graded maximal exercise stress test (GXT) at baseline and after the 12-weeks of EMRT protocol, with blood samples collected before, immediately after, 1 and 24h post-GXT test. Blood glutathione (GSH, GSSG, GSH/GSSG), plasma malonaldehyde (MDA), protein carbonyls and creatine kinase (CK) levels, as well as PBMCs cellular damage (Comet assay, apoptosis) and stressprotein response (Hsp70 and Hsp27 expression) were evaluated. The use of multiple biomarkers allowed us to confirm that EMRT per se neither affected redox homeostasis nor induced any cellular and oxidative damage. Following the GXT, the EMRT group displayed a higher GSH/GSSG ratio and a less pronounced increase in MDA, protein carbonyls and CK levels compared to control group. Moreover, we found that Hsp70 and Hsp27 proteins were induced after GXT only in EMRT group, while any significant modification within 24h was detected in untrained group. Apoptosis rates and DNA damage did not show any significant variation in relation to EMRT and/or GXT. In conclusion, the adherence to an EMRT protocol is able to induce a cellular adaptation allowing healthy elderly trained subjects to cope with the oxidative stress induced by an acute exercise more effectively than the aged-matched sedentary subjects. PMID:25460722

  10. Functional exercise capacity and health-related quality of life in people with asbestos related pleural disease: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Functional exercise capacity in people with asbestos related pleural disease (ARPD) is unknown and there are no data on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The primary aims were to determine whether functional exercise capacity and HRQoL were reduced in people with ARPD. The secondary aim was to determine whether functional exercise capacity was related to peak exercise capacity, HRQoL, physical activity or respiratory function. Methods In participants with ARPD, exercise capacity was measured by the six-minute walk test (6MWT) and incremental cycle test (ICT); HRQoL by the St Georges Respiratory Questionnaire and physical activity by an activity monitor worn for one week. Participants also underwent lung function testing. Results 25 males completed the study with a mean (SD) age of 71 (6) years, FVC 82 (19)% predicted, FEV1/FVC 66 (11)%, TLC 80 (19)% predicted and DLCO 59 (13)% predicted. Participants had reduced exercise capacity demonstrated by six-minute walk distance (6MWD) of 76 (11)% predicted and peak work rate of 71 (21)% predicted. HRQoL was also reduced. The 6MWD correlated with peak work rate (r=0.58, p=0.002), St Georges Respiratory Questionnaire Total score (r=-0.57, p=0.003), metabolic equivalents from the activity monitor (r=0.45, p<0.05), and FVC % predicted (r=0.52, p<0.01). Conclusions People with ARPD have reduced exercise capacity and HRQoL. The 6MWT may be a useful surrogate measure of peak exercise capacity and physical activity levels in the absence of cardiopulmonary exercise testing and activity monitors. Trial registration ANZCTR12608000147381 PMID:23305075

  11. Dopamine receptor blockade improves pulmonary gas exchange but decreases exercise performance in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Tedjasaputra, Vincent; Bryan, Tracey L; van Diepen, Sean; Moore, Linn E; Bouwsema, Melissa M; Welsh, Robert C; Petersen, Stewart R; Stickland, Michael K

    2015-07-15

    Pulmonary gas exchange, as evaluated by the alveolar-arterial oxygen difference (A-aDO2), is impaired during intense exercise, and has been correlated with recruitment of intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses (IPAVA) as measured by agitated saline contrast echocardiography. Previous work has shown that dopamine (DA) recruits IPAVA and increases venous admixture (Q?s/Q?t) at rest. As circulating DA increases during exercise, we hypothesized that A-aDO2 and IPAVA recruitment would be decreased with DA receptor blockade. Twelve healthy males (age: 25 6 years, V?O2 max : 58.6 6.5 ml kg(-1) min(-1) ) performed two incremental staged cycling exercise sessions after ingestion of either placebo or a DA receptor blocker (metoclopramide 20 mg). Arterial blood gas, cardiorespiratory and IPAVA recruitment (evaluated by agitated saline contrast echocardiography) data were obtained at rest and during exercise up to 85% of V?O2 max . On different days, participants also completed incremental exercise tests and exercise tolerance (time-to-exhaustion (TTE) at 85% of V?O2 max ) with or without dopamine blockade. Compared to placebo, DA blockade did not change O2 consumption, CO2 production, or respiratory exchange ratio at any intensity. At 85% V?O2 max , DA blockade decreased A-aDO2, increased arterial O2 saturation and minute ventilation, but did not reduce IPAVA recruitment, suggesting that positive saline contrast is unrelated to A-aDO2. Compared to placebo, DA blockade decreased maximal cardiac output, V?O2 max and TTE. Despite improving pulmonary gas exchange, blocking dopamine receptors appears to be detrimental to exercise performance. These findings suggest that endogenous dopamine is important to the normal cardiopulmonary response to exercise and is necessary for optimal high-intensity exercise performance. PMID:25952760

  12. An analysis of the physiological strain of submaximal exercise in patients with chronic obstructive bronchitis.

    PubMed Central

    Spiro, S G; Hahn, H L; Edwards, R H; Pride, N B

    1975-01-01

    An increasing work rate was performed by 40 patients with chronic obstructive bronchitis, split into two groups according to FEV1 (group M, mean FEV1 1-451. and group S, mean FEV1 0-621.), and by 20 normal, non-athletic men of similar age to the patients. Values for cardiac frequency and ventilation were interpolated to standard oxygen uptakes of 0-75, 1-0, and, where possible, 1-5 min-1. The tidal volume at a ventilation of 20 and 30 1 min-1 was also determined. The cardiac frequencies at oxygen uptake of 0-75 and 1-01 min-1 were significantly higher in the patient groups than in the normal men, and were highest in patient group S. The cardiac output when related to the oxygen uptake was in the normal range in all three groups of subjects, so that the patients had smaller stroke volumes than the normal men. Ventilation at oxygen uptakes of 0-75 and 1-01 min-1 was significantly higher in both patient groups than in the normal subjects; there were no significant differences between the two patient groups, Values for dead space/tidal volume ration, alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient, and the percent venous admixture measured during a constant work rate test were significantly greater than normal in the patient groups. Possible factors limiting exercise tolerance in these patients were assessed by extending the increasing work rate test from submaximum to maximum exercise. Changes in blood gas tensions and blood lactate concentrations from resting levels were small, and probably did not limit exercise performance. Measurements at maximum exercise did not add appreciably to the analysis of the disturbed cardiopulmonary function. This study has shown that major disturbances in cardiopulmonary function can be demonstrated without the need for stressing a patient to the limit of his effort tolerance. PMID:1179325

  13. Sex-Based Effects on Immune Changes Induced by a Maximal Incremental Exercise Test in Well-Trained Swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Morgado, Jos P.; Monteiro, Cristina P.; Matias, Catarina N.; Alves, Francisco; Pessoa, Pedro; Reis, Joana; Martins, Ftima; Seixas, Teresa; Laires, Maria J.

    2014-01-01

    Studies examining the immune response to acute intensive swimming have shown increased leukocytosis and lymphocyte populations. However, studies concerning mucosal immunity and sex differences remain controversial. The objective of the study was to examine sex differences on the immune response to maximal incremental swimming exercise in well trained swimmers. Participants (11 females, controlled for menstrual cycle phase effects; 10 males) performed a maximal incremental 7x200 m front crawl set. Fingertip capillary blood samples were obtained after each 200 m swim for lactate assessment. Venous blood and saliva samples were collected before and 5 minutes after the swimming test to determine total numbers of leukocytes, lymphocytes and subpopulations, and serum and salivary immunoglobulin A (IgA) levels. IgA secretion rate was calculated. Menstrual cycle phase did not influence the immune response to exercise. As for sex differences, exercise induced an increase in leukocytes, total lymphocytes, CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, and CD16+/56+ in males. In females, only leukocytosis, of a lower magnitude than was observed in males, occurred. CD19+ increased and CD4+/CD8+ ratio decreased in both groups following exercise whilst IgA, SIgA concentrations, and srIgA did not change. Both males and females finished the incremental exercise very close to the targeted race velocity, attaining peak blood lactate concentrations of 14.62.25 and 10.41.99 mmol.L-1, respectively. The effect of a maximal incremental swimming task on immunity is sex dependent and more noticeable in men. Males, as a consequence of higher levels of immunosurveillance may therefore be at a lower risk of infection than females. Key Points Maximal exercise induces an immune response. This study investigated the influence of sex over the leukocytes subpopulations and mucosal immune responses to maximal swimming. Male swimmers showed a stronger increase of T helper, T cytotoxic and NK lymphocytes than females, suggesting they may be at a lower risk of infection, due to a higher immunosurveillance. Mucosal immunity remained unchanged in both sexes. PMID:25177203

  14. Feasibility and effectiveness of a home-based exercise training program before lung resection surgery

    PubMed Central

    Coats, Valrie; Maltais, Franois; Simard, Sbastien; Frchette, ric; Tremblay, Lise; Ribeiro, Fernanda; Saey, Didier

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with lung cancer often experience a reduction in exercise tolerance, muscle weakness and decreased quality of life. Although the effectiveness of pulmonary rehabilitation programs is well recognized in other forms of cancers and in many pulmonary diseases, few researchers have studied its impact in patients with lung cancer, particularly in those awaiting lung resection surgery (LRS). OBJECTIVES: To investigate the feasibility of a short, home-based exercise training program (HBETP) with patients under investigation for non-small cell lung cancer and potential candidates for LRS, and to determine the effectiveness of this program on exercise tolerance, skeletal muscle strength and quality of life. METHODS: Sixteen patients with lung cancer awaiting LRS participated in a four-week HBETP including moderate aerobic activities (walking and cycling) and muscle training performed three times weekly. Before and after the intervention, a cardiopulmonary exercise test, a 6 min walk test and the assessment of muscle strength and quality of life were performed. RESULTS: Thirteen patients completed the four-week HBETP and all the patients completed >75% of the prescribed exercise sessions. The duration of the cycle endurance test (26479 s versus 421241 s; P<0.05) and the 6 min walk test distance (54098 m versus 568101 m; P<0.05) were significantly improved. Moreover, the strength of the deltoid, triceps and hamstrings were significantly improved (? post-pre training 1.822.83 kg, 1.321.75 kg and 3.413.7 kg; P<0.05, respectively). CONCLUSION: In patients with lung cancer awaiting LRS, HBETP was feasible and improved exercise tolerance and muscle strength. This may be clinically relevant because poor exercise capacity and muscle weakness are predictors of postoperative complications. PMID:23616972

  15. Effect of L-carnitine on exercise performance in patients with mitochondrial myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gimenes, A.C.; Bravo, D.M.; Nápolis, L.M.; Mello, M.T.; Oliveira, A.S.B.; Neder, J.A.; Nery, L.E.

    2015-01-01

    Exercise intolerance due to impaired oxidative metabolism is a prominent symptom in patients with mitochondrial myopathy (MM), but it is still uncertain whether L-carnitine supplementation is beneficial for patients with MM. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of L-carnitine on exercise performance in MM. Twelve MM subjects (mean age±SD=35.4±10.8 years) with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) were first compared to 10 healthy controls (mean age±SD=29±7.8 years) before they were randomly assigned to receive L-carnitine supplementation (3 g/daily) or placebo in a double-blind crossover design. Clinical status, body composition, respiratory function tests, peripheral muscle strength (isokinetic and isometric torque) and cardiopulmonary exercise tests (incremental to peak exercise and at 70% of maximal), constant work rate (CWR) exercise test, to the limit of tolerance [Tlim]) were assessed after 2 months of L-carnitine/placebo administration. Patients with MM presented with lower mean height, total body weight, fat-free mass, and peripheral muscle strength compared to controls in the pre-test evaluation. After L-carnitine supplementation, the patients with MM significantly improved their Tlim (14±1.9 vs 11±1.4 min) and oxygen consumption (V˙O2) at CWR exercise, both at isotime (1151±115 vs 1049±104 mL/min) and at Tlim (1223±114 vs 1060±108 mL/min). These results indicate that L-carnitine supplementation may improve aerobic capacity and exercise tolerance during high-intensity CWRs in MM patients with CPEO. PMID:25714882

  16. Effect of L-carnitine on exercise performance in patients with mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed

    Gimenes, A C; Bravo, D M; Npolis, L M; Mello, M T; Oliveira, A S B; Neder, J A; Nery, L E

    2015-04-01

    Exercise intolerance due to impaired oxidative metabolism is a prominent symptom in patients with mitochondrial myopathy (MM), but it is still uncertain whether L-carnitine supplementation is beneficial for patients with MM. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of L-carnitine on exercise performance in MM. Twelve MM subjects (mean ageSD=35.410.8 years) with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) were first compared to 10 healthy controls (mean ageSD=297.8 years) before they were randomly assigned to receive L-carnitine supplementation (3 g/daily) or placebo in a double-blind crossover design. Clinical status, body composition, respiratory function tests, peripheral muscle strength (isokinetic and isometric torque) and cardiopulmonary exercise tests (incremental to peak exercise and at 70% of maximal), constant work rate (CWR) exercise test, to the limit of tolerance [Tlim]) were assessed after 2 months of L-carnitine/placebo administration. Patients with MM presented with lower mean height, total body weight, fat-free mass, and peripheral muscle strength compared to controls in the pre-test evaluation. After L-carnitine supplementation, the patients with MM significantly improved their Tlim (141.9 vs 111.4 min) and oxygen consumption ( V ? O 2 ) at CWR exercise, both at isotime (1151115 vs 1049104 mL/min) and at Tlim (1223114 vs 1060108 mL/min). These results indicate that L-carnitine supplementation may improve aerobic capacity and exercise tolerance during high-intensity CWRs in MM patients with CPEO. PMID:25714882

  17. The impact of a cold pressor test on brachial artery handgrip exercise-induced flow-mediated dilation.

    PubMed

    Stuckless, Troy J R; Pyke, Kyra E

    2015-10-01

    It is unknown how endothelial-dependent flow-mediated dilation (FMD) stimulated by a sustained, exercise-induced increase in shear stress (EX-FMD) is affected by a simultaneous sympathoexcitatory painful stimulus. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a cold pressor test (CPT) on brachial artery EX-FMD elicited by a handgrip exercise-induced increase in shear stress. Participants were healthy males (age 21±2 years) (n=28; 16 Experimental group, 12 Control). Brachial artery diameter and blood velocity were measured using echo and Doppler ultrasound, respectively. Shear stress was estimated by shear rate (shear rate = blood velocity / diameter) and targeted to reach 75 s(-1) in each of two EX-FMD trials in all subjects. In the Experimental group, the second EX-FMD trial was accompanied by simultaneous foot immersion in ice water (simultaneous CPT). The shear rate stimulus did not differ between groups (p=0.823) or trials (p=0.726) (group × trial interaction: p=0.646) (average exercise shear rate (mean ± SD): 67.6±6.2 s(-1)). The CPT (experienced during EX-FMD trial 2 in the Experimental group) increased mean arterial pressure (p<0.001) and heart rate (p=0.002) relative to the Control group. %EX-FMD was not different between groups (p=0.508) or trials (p=0.592) (group × trial interaction: p=0.879) (EX-FMD: Experimental group trial 1: 5.4±3.4%, trial 2: 5.6±2.6%; Control group trial 1: 6.0±3.7%, trial 2: 6.4±2.2%). In conclusion, the CPT did not impact concurrent EX-FMD, and this indicates that an acute painful stimulus does not interfere with conduit artery FMD responses during exercise in young healthy men. PMID:26021703

  18. Chronic exercise prevents repeated restraint stress-provoked enhancement of immobility in forced swimming test in ovariectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Tae-Kyung; Lee, Jang-Kyu; Leem, Yea-Hyun

    2015-06-01

    We assessed whether chronic treadmill exercise attenuated the depressive phenotype induced by restraint stress in ovariectomized mice (OVX). Immobility of OVX in the forced swimming test was comparable to that of sham mice (CON) regardless of the postoperative time. Immobility was also no difference between restrained mice (exposure to periodic restraint for 21 days; RST) and control mice (CON) on post-exposure 2nd and 9th day, but not 15th day. In contrast, the immobility of ovariectomized mice with repeated stress (OVX + RST) was profoundly enhanced compared to ovariectomized mice-alone (OVX), and this effect was reversed by chronic exercise (19 m/min, 60 min/day, 5 days/week for 8 weeks; OVX + RST + Ex) or fluoxetine administration (20 mg/kg, OVX + RST + Flu). In parallel with behavioral data, the immunoreactivity of Ki-67 and doublecortin (DCX) in OVX was significantly decreased by repeated stress. However, the reduced numbers of Ki-67- and DCX-positive cells in OVX + RST were restored in response to chronic exercise (OVX + RST + Ex) and fluoxetine (OVX + RST + Flu). In addition, the expression pattern of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase IV (CaMKIV) was similar to that of the hippocampal proliferation and neurogenesis markers (Ki-67 and DCX, respectively). These results suggest that menopausal depression may be induced by an interaction between repeated stress and low hormone levels, rather than a deficit in ovarian secretion alone, which can be improved by chronic exercise. PMID:25344674

  19. Perspective: Does Laboratory-Based Maximal Incremental Exercise Testing Elicit Maximum Physiological Responses in Highly-Trained Athletes with Cervical Spinal Cord Injury?

    PubMed Central

    West, Christopher R.; Leicht, Christof A.; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L.; Romer, Lee M.

    2016-01-01

    The physiological assessment of highly-trained athletes is a cornerstone of many scientific support programs. In the present article, we provide original data followed by our perspective on the topic of laboratory-based incremental exercise testing in elite athletes with cervical spinal cord injury. We retrospectively reviewed our data on Great Britain Wheelchair Rugby athletes collected during the last two Paralympic cycles. We extracted and compared peak cardiometabolic (heart rate and blood lactate) responses between a standard laboratory-based incremental exercise test on a treadmill and two different maximal field tests (4 min and 40 min maximal push). In the nine athletes studied, both field tests elicited higher peak responses than the laboratory-based test. The present data imply that laboratory-based incremental protocols preclude the attainment of true peak cardiometabolic responses. This may be due to the different locomotor patterns required to sustain wheelchair propulsion during treadmill exercise or that maximal incremental treadmill protocols only require individuals to exercise at or near maximal exhaustion for a relatively short period of time. We acknowledge that both field- and laboratory-based testing have respective merits and pitfalls and suggest that the choice of test be dictated by the question at hand: if true peak responses are required then field-based testing is warranted, whereas laboratory-based testing may be more appropriate for obtaining cardiometabolic responses across a range of standardized exercise intensities. PMID:26834642

  20. Perspective: Does Laboratory-Based Maximal Incremental Exercise Testing Elicit Maximum Physiological Responses in Highly-Trained Athletes with Cervical Spinal Cord Injury?

    PubMed

    West, Christopher R; Leicht, Christof A; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Romer, Lee M

    2015-01-01

    The physiological assessment of highly-trained athletes is a cornerstone of many scientific support programs. In the present article, we provide original data followed by our perspective on the topic of laboratory-based incremental exercise testing in elite athletes with cervical spinal cord injury. We retrospectively reviewed our data on Great Britain Wheelchair Rugby athletes collected during the last two Paralympic cycles. We extracted and compared peak cardiometabolic (heart rate and blood lactate) responses between a standard laboratory-based incremental exercise test on a treadmill and two different maximal field tests (4 min and 40 min maximal push). In the nine athletes studied, both field tests elicited higher peak responses than the laboratory-based test. The present data imply that laboratory-based incremental protocols preclude the attainment of true peak cardiometabolic responses. This may be due to the different locomotor patterns required to sustain wheelchair propulsion during treadmill exercise or that maximal incremental treadmill protocols only require individuals to exercise at or near maximal exhaustion for a relatively short period of time. We acknowledge that both field- and laboratory-based testing have respective merits and pitfalls and suggest that the choice of test be dictated by the question at hand: if true peak responses are required then field-based testing is warranted, whereas laboratory-based testing may be more appropriate for obtaining cardiometabolic responses across a range of standardized exercise intensities. PMID:26834642

  1. Exploratory studies of physiological components of motion sickness: Cardiopulmonary differences between high and low susceptibles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naifeh, K.

    1985-01-01

    A comprehensive examination of cardiovascular autonomic response to motion sickness was studied and whether differences in cardiopulmonary function exist in high and low susceptibility groups were determined. Measurement techniques were developed as was test equipment for its ability to provide accurately new measures of interest and to test the adequately of these new measures in differentiating between susceptibility groups. It was concluded that these groups can be differentiated using simple, brief stressors and measurements of cardiodynamic function.

  2. Cardiopulmonary data-acquisition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosier, W. G.; Reed, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    Computerized system controls and monitors bicycle and treadmill cardiovascular stress tests. It acquires and reduces stress data and displays heart rate, blood pressure, workload, respiratory rate, exhaled-gas composition, and other variables. Data are printed on hard-copy terminal every 30 seconds for quick operator response to patient. Ergometer workload is controlled in real time according to experimental protocol. Collected data are stored directly on tape in analog form and on floppy disks in digital form for later processing.

  3. Evaluation of leg perfusion during exercise using technetium 99m sestamibi. A new test for peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Wann, L S; Hellman, C; Dorros, G

    1992-09-01

    Thirty patients with occlusive peripheral vascular disease underwent clinical examination, segmental blood pressure determinations, intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography, and treadmill stress testing with injection of technetium 99m sestamibi at peak exercise. Radionuclide images of the thighs, calves, and feet showed clear delineation of major muscle groups. Diminished radiotracer distribution was closely correlated with the presence of occlusive vascular disease on angiography and with the presence of claudication and reduced segmental blood pressure. A quantitative scheme based on pixel intensity was developed to compare areas of regional perfusion. PMID:10147794

  4. Testing the recovery of stellar rotation signals from Kepler light curves using a blind hare-and-hounds exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aigrain, S.; Llama, J.; Ceillier, T.; Chagas, M. L. das; Davenport, J. R. A.; García, R. A.; Hay, K. L.; Lanza, A. F.; McQuillan, A.; Mazeh, T.; de Medeiros, J. R.; Nielsen, M. B.; Reinhold, T.

    2015-07-01

    We present the results of a blind exercise to test the recoverability of stellar rotation and differential rotation in Kepler light curves. The simulated light curves lasted 1000 d and included activity cycles, Sun-like butterfly patterns, differential rotation and spot evolution. The range of rotation periods, activity levels and spot lifetime were chosen to be representative of the Kepler data of solar-like stars. Of the 1000 simulated light curves, 770 were injected into actual quiescent Kepler light curves to simulate Kepler noise. The test also included five 1000-d segments of the Sun's total irradiance variations at different points in the Sun's activity cycle. Five teams took part in the blind exercise, plus two teams who participated after the content of the light curves had been released. The methods used included Lomb-Scargle periodograms and variants thereof, autocorrelation function and wavelet-based analyses, plus spot modelling to search for differential rotation. The results show that the `overall' period is well recovered for stars exhibiting low and moderate activity levels. Most teams reported values within 10 per cent of the true value in 70 per cent of the cases. There was, however, little correlation between the reported and simulated values of the differential rotation shear, suggesting that differential rotation studies based on full-disc light curves alone need to be treated with caution, at least for solar-type stars. The simulated light curves and associated parameters are available online for the community to test their own methods.

  5. Relation of resting heart rate to risk for all-cause mortality by gender after considering exercise capacity (the Henry Ford exercise testing project).

    PubMed

    Aladin, Amer I; Whelton, Seamus P; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H; Blaha, Michael J; Keteyian, Steven J; Juraschek, Stephen P; Rubin, Jonathan; Brawner, Clinton A; Michos, Erin D

    2014-12-01

    Whether resting heart rate (RHR) predicts mortality independent of fitness is not well established, particularly among women. We analyzed data from 56,634 subjects (49% women) without known coronary artery disease or atrial fibrillation who underwent a clinically indicated exercise stress test. Baseline RHR was divided into 5 groups with <60 beats/min as reference. The Social Security Death Index was used to ascertain vital status. Cox hazard models were performed to determine the association of RHR with all-cause mortality, major adverse cardiovascular events, myocardial infarction, or revascularization after sequential adjustment for demographics, cardiovascular disease risk factors, medications, and fitness (metabolic equivalents). The mean age was 53 ± 12 years and mean RHR was 73 ± 12 beats/min. More than half of the participants were referred for chest pain; 81% completed an adequate stress test and mean metabolic equivalents achieved was 9.2 ± 3. There were 6,255 deaths over 11.0-year mean follow-up. There was an increased risk of all-cause mortality with increasing RHR (p trend <0.001). Compared with the lowest RHR group, participants with an RHR ≥90 beats/min had a significantly increased risk of mortality even after adjustment for fitness (hazard ratio 1.22, 95% confidence interval 1.10 to 1.35). This relationship remained significant for men, but not significant for women after adjustment for fitness (p interaction <0.001). No significant associations were seen for men or women with major adverse cardiovascular events, myocardial infarction, or revascularization after accounting for fitness. In conclusion, after adjustment for fitness, elevated RHR was an independent risk factor for all-cause mortality in men but not women, suggesting gender differences in the utility of RHR for risk stratification. PMID:25439450

  6. Changes in Exercise Capacity of Cardiac Asymptomatic Hereditary Hemochromatosis Subjects over 5-Year Follow up

    PubMed Central

    Shizukuda, Yukitaka; Smith, Kevin P.; Tripodi, Dorothy J.; Arena, Ross; Yau, Yu-Ying; Bolan, Charles D.; Waclawiw, Myron A.; Leitman, Susan F.; Rosing, Douglas R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective A long-term effect of hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) on aerobic exercise capacity (AEC) has not been well described. Design Forty-three HH and 21 volunteer control (VC) subjects who were asymptomatic underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing using the Bruce protocol. AEC was assessed with minute ventilation (VE), oxygen uptake (VO2), and carbon dioxide production (VCO2) at baseline (BL) at a 5-year follow up (5Y) assessment. A paired t-test was used for analyses of normality data; otherwise, a Wilcoxon singed rank sum test was used. Results Thirty-three HH subjects and 18 VC subjects returned for a repeat CPX at 5Y (80% overall return rate). At 5Y, AEC was not different between the two groups. As compared with BL measurements, exercise time, peak VO2, and the VE/VCO2 slope did not differ statistically at 5Y between both groups. Iron depletion by phlebotomy for 5 years did not significantly affect AEC in newly diagnosed HH subjects at baseline (n=14) and cardiac arrhythmias during exercise tended to decrease after 5 years of therapy in this group. Conclusions The AEC of asymptomatic HH subjects treated with conventional therapy is not statistically affected by the disease over a 5-year period. PMID:22311055

  7. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in conjunction with short-term extracorporeal circulation devices to hold a reserve supply of blood in the...

  8. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in conjunction with short-term extracorporeal circulation devices to hold a reserve supply of blood in the...

  9. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  10. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  11. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4300 - Cardiopulmonary bypass gas control unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass gas control unit. 870.4300 Section 870.4300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... bypass gas control unit. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass gas control unit is a device...

  15. 21 CFR 870.4300 - Cardiopulmonary bypass gas control unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass gas control unit. 870.4300 Section 870.4300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... bypass gas control unit. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass gas control unit is a device...

  16. 21 CFR 870.4280 - Cardiopulmonary prebypass filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary prebypass filter. 870.4280 Section... prebypass filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary prebypass filter is a device used during priming of... bypass. The device is not used to filter blood. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  17. 21 CFR 870.4280 - Cardiopulmonary prebypass filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary prebypass filter. 870.4280 Section... prebypass filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary prebypass filter is a device used during priming of... bypass. The device is not used to filter blood. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  18. 21 CFR 870.4280 - Cardiopulmonary prebypass filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary prebypass filter. 870.4280 Section... prebypass filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary prebypass filter is a device used during priming of... bypass. The device is not used to filter blood. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  19. 21 CFR 870.4280 - Cardiopulmonary prebypass filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary prebypass filter. 870.4280 Section... prebypass filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary prebypass filter is a device used during priming of... bypass. The device is not used to filter blood. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  20. 21 CFR 870.4280 - Cardiopulmonary prebypass filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary prebypass filter. 870.4280 Section... prebypass filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary prebypass filter is a device used during priming of... bypass. The device is not used to filter blood. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  1. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in conjunction with short-term extracorporeal circulation devices to hold a reserve supply of blood in the...

  2. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in conjunction with short-term extracorporeal circulation devices to hold a reserve supply of blood in the...

  3. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in conjunction with short-term extracorporeal circulation devices to hold a reserve supply of blood in the...

  4. 21 CFR 870.4200 - Cardiopulmonary bypass accessory equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass accessory equipment. 870.4200 Section 870.4200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices 870.4200 Cardiopulmonary bypass accessory equipment....

  5. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger. 870.4240... bypass heat exchanger. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger is a device, consisting of a heat exchange system used in extracorporeal circulation to warm or cool the blood...

  6. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger. 870.4240... bypass heat exchanger. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger is a device, consisting of a heat exchange system used in extracorporeal circulation to warm or cool the blood...

  7. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger. 870.4240... bypass heat exchanger. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger is a device, consisting of a heat exchange system used in extracorporeal circulation to warm or cool the blood...

  8. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger. 870.4240... bypass heat exchanger. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger is a device, consisting of a heat exchange system used in extracorporeal circulation to warm or cool the blood...

  9. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger. 870.4240... bypass heat exchanger. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger is a device, consisting of a heat exchange system used in extracorporeal circulation to warm or cool the blood...

  10. MEASUREMENT OF CARDIOPULMONARY FUNCTION BY REBREATHING METHODOLOGY IN PIGLETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of a multiple gas rebreathing method for the measurement of cardiopulmonary function in mechanically ventilated neonates was evaluated. The following indices of cardiopulmonary function were assessed in 20 piglets (mean weight, 2.3 kg): (1) pulmonary capillary blood flow ...

  11. Reproducibility of the ST-segment depression/heart rate analysis of the exercise electrocardiographic test in asymptomatic middle-aged population.

    PubMed

    Lehtinen, R; Sievanen, H; Viik, J; Vuori, I; Malmivuo, J

    1997-05-15

    The reproducibility of the ST-segment depression against heart rate (ST/HR) hysteresis, ST/HR index, and end-exercise ST depression between the repeated exercise electrocardiographic tests were determined in 61 asymptomatic middle-aged subjects. The findings support the clinical utility of the ST/HR hysteresis, but it is noteworthy that the results also suggest that the magnitude of change in the exercise electrocardiographic variables, which has to be observed to make the clinician confident that a real diagnostic change has occurred, is surprisingly large. PMID:9165173

  12. Emergent Cardiopulmonary Bypass during Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    White, Amy M.; Riley, Jeffrey B.; Stulak, John M.; Greason, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: During orientation to the cardiac surgery operating room, new staff may not be exposed to emergent situations. Allowing team members the opportunity to practice their roles during less common, high-stakes emergency cardiac surgical scenarios may better prepare them when crises do arise in the OR. The Emergency Cardiopulmonary Bypass Course was developed to meet the needs of new staff starting in cardiac surgery. Recently, the course has expanded to include experienced staff. This communication describes a high fidelity simulation based course that includes four emergent cardiac surgery scenarios. PMID:26834290

  13. Sarcoidosis of the cardio-pulmonary systems.

    PubMed

    Dubrey, Simon; Sharma, Rakesh; Underwood, Richard; Mittal, Tarun; Wells, Athol

    2016-02-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system disease with a wide range of phenotypes. Pulmonary involvement is the most frequently identified target for sarcoidosis and is responsible for the majority of deaths. Cardiac sarcoid is less commonly identified, may be occult, is significantly influenced by race, and can portend an unpredictable and sometimes fatal outcome. Sarcoidosis remains an enigmatic disease spectrum of unknown aetiology, frequently difficult to diagnose and with a variable disease course. This article summarises current views on the diagnosis and management of cardiopulmonary involvement. PMID:26833512

  14. Cardiopulmonary Bypass in a Glaucoma Patient

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jaswinder; Dhaliwal, Rajinder Singh; Das, Debasis; Luthra, Suvitesh; Singh, Harkant

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in a patient with glaucoma is a challenge. The glaucomatous eye is at risk during CPB. We report a case of ostium secundum atrial septal defect that was not amenable to device closure. The unique feature in the patient was the presence of congenital glaucoma. She was blind in the left eye, and the visual acuity in the other eye was decreased because of glaucoma. She underwent direct closure of the atrial septal defect under CPB and fibrillatory arrest, with intraoperative monitoring of intraocular pressure. There was no change in visual acuity after 1 year of follow-up. PMID:17486875

  15. Relationship between work rate and oxygen uptake in mitochondrial myopathy during ramp-incremental exercise.

    PubMed

    Gimenes, A C; Neder, J A; Dal Corso, S; Nogueira, C R; Npolis, L; Mello, M T; Bulle, A S; Nery, L E

    2011-04-01

    We determined the response characteristics and functional correlates of the dynamic relationship between the rate (?) of oxygen consumption (VO(2)) and the applied power output (work rate = WR) during ramp-incremental exercise in patients with mitochondrial myopathy (MM). Fourteen patients (7 males, age 35.4 10.8 years) with biopsy-proven MM and 10 sedentary controls (6 males, age 29.0 7.8 years) took a ramp-incremental cycle ergometer test for the determination of the VO(2) on-exercise mean response time (MRT) and the gas exchange threshold (GET). The ?VO(2)/?WR slope was calculated up to GET (S(1)), above GET (S(2)) and over the entire linear portion of the response (S(T)). Knee muscle endurance was measured by isokinetic dynamometry. As expected, peak VO(2) and muscle performance were lower in patients than controls (P < 0.05). Patients had significantly lower ?VO(2)/?WR than controls, especially the S(2) component (6.8 1.5 vs 10.3 0.6 mLmin(-1)W(-1), respectively; P < 0.001). There were significant relationships between ?VO(2)/?WR (S(T)) and muscle endurance, MRT-VO(2), GET and peak VO(2) in MM patients (P < 0.05). In fact, all patients with ?VO(2)/?WR below 8 mLmin(-1)W(-1) had severely reduced peak VO(2) values (<60% predicted). Moreover, patients with higher cardiopulmonary stresses during exercise (e.g., higher ? ventilation/carbon dioxide output and ? heart rate/?VO(2)) had lower ?VO(2)/?WR (P < 0.05). In conclusion, a readily available, effort-independent index of aerobic dysfunction during dynamic exercise (?VO(2)/?WR) is typically reduced in patients with MM, being related to increased functional impairment and higher cardiopulmonary stress. PMID:21487644

  16. Gender-related associations of genetic polymorphisms of ?-adrenergic receptors, endothelial nitric oxide synthase and bradykinin B2 receptor with treadmill exercise test responses

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Rafael Amorim Belo; Barroso, Lcia Pereira; Pereira, Alexandre?da Costa; Krieger, Jos Eduardo; Mansur, Alfredo Jos

    2014-01-01

    Background Treadmill exercise test responses have been associated with cardiovascular prognosis in individuals without overt heart disease. Neurohumoral and nitric oxide responses may influence cardiovascular performance during exercise testing. Therefore, we evaluated associations between functional genetic polymorphisms of ?-adrenergic receptors, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, bradykinin receptor B2 and treadmill exercise test responses in men and women without overt heart disease. Methods We enrolled 766 (417 women; 349 men) individuals without established heart disease from a check-up programme at the Heart Institute, University of So Paulo Medical School. Exercise capacity, chronotropic reserve, maximum heart-rate achieved, heart-rate recovery, exercise systolic blood pressure (SBP), exercise diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and SBP recovery were assessed during exercise testing. Genotypes for the ?-adrenergic receptors ADRA1A Arg347Cys (rs1048101), ADRA2A 1780 C>T (rs553668), ADRA2B Del 301303 (rs28365031), endothelial nitric synthase (eNOS) 786 T>C (rs2070744), eNOS Glu298Asp (rs1799983) and BK2R (rs5810761) polymorphisms were assessed by PCR and high-resolution melting analysis. Results Maximum SBP was associated with ADRA1A rs1048101 (p=0.008) and BK2R rs5810761 (p=0.008) polymorphisms in men and ADRA2A rs553668 (p=0.008) and ADRA2B rs28365031 (p=0.022) in women. Maximum DBP pressure was associated with ADRA2A rs553668 (p=0.002) and eNOS rs1799983 (p=0.015) polymorphisms in women. Exercise capacity was associated with eNOS rs2070744 polymorphisms in women (p=0.01) and with eNOS rs1799983 in men and women (p=0.038 and p=0.024). Conclusions The findings suggest that genetic variants of ?-adrenergic receptors and bradykinin B2 receptor may be involved with blood pressure responses during exercise tests. Genetic variants of endothelial nitric oxide synthase may be involved with exercise capacity and blood pressure responses during exercise tests. These responses may be gender-related. PMID:25544888

  17. Cardiopulmonary bypass: development of John Gibbon's heart-lung machine

    PubMed Central

    Passaroni, Andria Cristina; Silva, Marcos Augusto de Moraes; Yoshida, Winston Bonetti

    2015-01-01

    Objective To provide a brief review of the development of cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods A review of the literature on the development of extracorporeal circulation techniques, their essential role in cardiovascular surgery, and the complications associated with their use, including hemolysis and inflammation. Results The advancement of extracorporeal circulation techniques has played an essential role in minimizing the complications of cardiopulmonary bypass, which can range from various degrees of tissue injury to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Investigators have long researched the ways in which cardiopulmonary bypass may insult the human body. Potential solutions arose and laid the groundwork for development of safer postoperative care strategies. Conclusion Steady progress has been made in cardiopulmonary bypass in the decades since it was first conceived of by Gibbon. Despite the constant evolution of cardiopulmonary bypass techniques and attempts to minimize their complications, it is still essential that clinicians respect the particularities of each patient's physiological function. PMID:26107456

  18. Neurological complications and risk factors of cardiopulmonary failure of EV-A71-related hand, foot and mouth disease

    PubMed Central

    Long, Lili; Xu, Lin; Xiao, Zhenghui; Hu, Shixiong; Luo, Ruping; Wang, Hua; Lu, Xiulan; Xu, Zhiyue; Yao, Xu; Zhou, Luo; Long, Hongyu; Gong, Jiaoe; Song, Yanmin; Zhao, Li; Luo, Kaiwei; Zhang, Mengqi; Feng, Li; Yang, Liming; Sheng, Xiaoqi; Fan, Xuegong; Xiao, Bo

    2016-01-01

    From 2010 to 2012, large outbreaks of EV-A71-related- hand foot and mouth disease (HFMD) occurred annually in China. Some cases had neurological complications and were closely associated with fatal cardiopulmonary collapse, but not all children with central nervous system (CNS) involvement demonstrated a poor prognosis. To identify which patients and which neurological complications are more likely to progress to cardiopulmonary failure, we retrospectively studied 1,125 paediatric inpatients diagnosed with EV-A71-related HFMD in Hunan province, including 1,017 cases with CNS involvement. These patients were divided into cardiopulmonary failure (976 people) group and group without cardiopulmonary failure (149 people). A logistic regression analysis was used to compare the clinical symptoms, laboratory test results, and neurological complications between these two groups. The most significant risk factors included young age, fever duration ≥3 days, coma, limb weakness, drowsiness and ANS involvement. Patients with brainstem encephalitis and more CNS-involved regions were more likely to progress to cardiopulmonary failure. These findings can help front-line clinicians rapidly and accurately determine patient prognosis, thus rationally distributing the limited medical resources and implementing interventions as early as possible. PMID:27001010

  19. Neurological complications and risk factors of cardiopulmonary failure of EV-A71-related hand, foot and mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Long, Lili; Xu, Lin; Xiao, Zhenghui; Hu, Shixiong; Luo, Ruping; Wang, Hua; Lu, Xiulan; Xu, Zhiyue; Yao, Xu; Zhou, Luo; Long, Hongyu; Gong, Jiaoe; Song, Yanmin; Zhao, Li; Luo, Kaiwei; Zhang, Mengqi; Feng, Li; Yang, Liming; Sheng, Xiaoqi; Fan, Xuegong; Xiao, Bo

    2016-01-01

    From 2010 to 2012, large outbreaks of EV-A71-related- hand foot and mouth disease (HFMD) occurred annually in China. Some cases had neurological complications and were closely associated with fatal cardiopulmonary collapse, but not all children with central nervous system (CNS) involvement demonstrated a poor prognosis. To identify which patients and which neurological complications are more likely to progress to cardiopulmonary failure, we retrospectively studied 1,125 paediatric inpatients diagnosed with EV-A71-related HFMD in Hunan province, including 1,017 cases with CNS involvement. These patients were divided into cardiopulmonary failure (976 people) group and group without cardiopulmonary failure (149 people). A logistic regression analysis was used to compare the clinical symptoms, laboratory test results, and neurological complications between these two groups. The most significant risk factors included young age, fever duration ≥3 days, coma, limb weakness, drowsiness and ANS involvement. Patients with brainstem encephalitis and more CNS-involved regions were more likely to progress to cardiopulmonary failure. These findings can help front-line clinicians rapidly and accurately determine patient prognosis, thus rationally distributing the limited medical resources and implementing interventions as early as possible. PMID:27001010

  20. Exercise testing soon after myocardial infarction: its relation to course and outcome at one year in patients aged less than 55 years.

    PubMed Central

    Peart, I; Odemuyiwa, O; Albers, C; Hall, A; Kelly, C; Hall, R J

    1989-01-01

    A consecutive series of 184 patients aged less than 55 years who had an acute myocardial infarction were enrolled in a study to examine outcome at one year. One hundred of these patients underwent a maximal exercise test six weeks after infarction to evaluate its ability to predict cardiac events. The in-hospital mortality for the series was 7.6% (14 deaths) and the one year mortality for the 170 survivors was 3.8% (seven deaths). During the exercise test 31 patients had angina and 21 had ST depression. During the one year follow up period 39 of 100 patients had angina on exertion, 15 patients underwent coronary artery surgery, three patients had a reinfarction, and one patient died. Angina during the exercise test but not ST segment depression during the exercise test predicted angina on exertion and the need for coronary artery surgery. In the year of follow up angina occurred during everyday exertion in 25 (81%) (95% confidence interval 62 to 92%) of the 31 patients who developed angina during the exercise test and in only 14 (20%) (95% confidence interval 12 to 32%) of 69 patients who did not, and coronary artery surgery was performed in 11 (35%) (95% confidence interval 19 to 54%) of the 31 patients with angina during the exercise test and only four (6%) (95% confidence interval 2 to 15%) of 69 patients without angina. The outcome after myocardial infarction in patients aged less than 55 years was good and the occurrence of angina, but not ST segment depression, during a maximal exercise test six weeks after infarction was an indication for further investigation. PMID:2930661

  1. Compulsive Exercise

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Exercise Compulsive exercise (also called obligatory exercise and anorexia athletica ) is best defined by an exercise addict's ... the two often go hand in hand. In anorexia nervosa, the excessive workouts usually begin as a ...

  2. Post-infarction exercise testing in patients under 55 years. Relation between ischaemic abnormalities and the extent of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed Central

    Peart, I; Seth, L; Albers, C; Odemuyiwa, O; Hall, R J

    1986-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the early post-infarction exercise test is useful in predicting the extent of coronary artery disease. The results of a heart rate limited exercise test three weeks after infarction and a symptom limited exercise test six weeks after infarction obtained by both standard lead electrocardiograms and 16 lead precordial maps were compared in 100 consecutive survivors of acute myocardial infarction under 55 years of age. Exercise tests were defined as being positive on the basis of angina, ST segment depression greater than or equal to 1 mm in any electrocardiogram lead, or exertional hypotension. Multivessel disease, that is two or three vessel disease, was present in 60 patients, and three vessel disease in 22 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value for multivessel disease of the three week test were 38%, 83%, and 76% respectively; and results for the six week test were 55%, 75%, and 77% respectively. Only 32% of patients with three vessel disease were identified at the three week test, and 59% at the six week test. Significantly more patients with multivessel and three vessel disease were identified by the symptom limited six week test. Precordial mapping offered no advantages over the standard 12 lead electrocardiogram in either the identification of patients with multivessel disease or the prediction of the distribution of coronary artery disease. Angina pectoris during the exercise test at six weeks was the single most useful predictor of multivessel disease. Multivessel disease was found in 27 (87%) of the 31 patients with angina with or without ST depression during the test at six weeks compared with 33 (48%) of the 69 patients who did not have angina during the test at six weeks. Exercise testing in the early post-infarction period in patients under 55 years of age is of limited value in predicting the extent of coronary artery disease. It is, therefore, unreasonable to use such exercise tests to select patients for coronary arteriography after myocardial infarction. None the less angina pectoris occurring during a symptom limited exercise test six weeks after infarction is a strong predictor of multivessel disease, and coronary arteriography is recommended in these patients. PMID:3947484

  3. Cardiorespiratory and sensory responses to exercise in adults with mild cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Quon, Bradley S; Wilkie, Sabrina S; Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Schaeffer, Michele R; Ramsook, Andrew H; Wilcox, Pearce G; Guenette, Jordan A

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate cardiorespiratory fitness and reasons for exercise curtailment in a contemporary adult cystic fibrosis (CF) cohort with mild lung disease. Adults with mild CF (n = 19, forced expiratory volume in 1 s = 95 17% predicted) were age-, sex-, ethnicity-, and body mass index-matched to healthy controls (n = 19) and underwent a detailed cardiopulmonary cycle exercise test. While CF subjects had a reduced peak oxygen uptake compared with controls, the values were normal when expressed as %predicted in 14/19 (74%) of subjects. Both groups demonstrated a normal cardiovascular limitation to exercise and stopped exercise primarily because of leg fatigue. Despite not being exercise-limited by respiratory factors, there was some evidence of ventilatory abnormalities as patients with mild CF had increased end-inspiratory lung volumes and reached an inflection/plateau in tidal volume relative to minute ventilation at lower exercise intensities compared with controls. Subjects with CF were not more likely to demonstrate expiratory flow limitation compared with controls and did not have evidence of dynamic hyperinflation during exercise. Despite increased end-inspiratory lung volumes and an earlier tidal volume inflection/plateau, CF subjects did not experience higher levels of dyspnea. In an exploratory analysis, a significant inverse correlation was observed between sweat chloride and peak work rate. Adult CF subjects with relatively well preserved spirometry have normal exercise performance relative to reference values and are primarily limited by nonrespiratory factors. However, ventilatory abnormalities were detected even in this mild CF cohort and should be evaluated in future therapeutic trials focused on disease-modifying therapies in mild CF. PMID:26429870

  4. Gastroenterology case report of mesalazine-induced cardiopulmonary hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ferrusqua, Jos; Prez-Martnez, Isabel; Gmez de la Torre, Ricardo; Fernndez-Almira, Mara Luisa; de Francisco, Ruth; Rodrigo, Luis; Riestra, Sabino

    2015-01-01

    Mesalazine is a 5-aminosalicylic acid derivative that has been widely used to treat patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Accumulating evidence indicates that mesalazine has a very low rate of adverse drug reactions and is well tolerated by patients. However, a few cases of pulmonary and cardiac disease related to mesalazine have been reported in the past, though infrequently, preventing clinicians from diagnosing the conditions early. We describe the case of a 32-year-old man with ulcerative colitis who was admitted with a two-month history of persistent fever following mesalazine treatment initiated 14 mo earlier. At the time of admission, mesalazine dose was increased from 1.5 to 3.0 g/d, and antibiotic therapy was started with no improvement. Three weeks after admission, the patient developed dyspnea, non-productive cough, and chest pain. Severe eosinophilia was detected in laboratory tests, and a computed tomography scan revealed interstitial infiltrates in both lungs, as well as a large pericardial effusion. The bronchoalveolar lavage reported a CD4/CD8 ratio of 0.5, and an increased eosinophil count. Transbronchial biopsy examination showed a severe eosinophilic infiltrate of the lung tissue. Mesalazine-induced cardiopulmonary hypersensitivity was suspected after excluding other possible etiologies. Consequently, mesalazine treatment was suspended, and corticosteroid therapy was initiated, resulting in resolution of symptoms and radiologic abnormalities. We conclude that mesalazine-induced pulmonary and cardiac hypersensitivity should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained cardiopulmonary symptoms and radiographic abnormalities in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25852295

  5. Relationship between nutritional risk and exercise capacity in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in male patients

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Xizheng; Liu, Jinming; Luo, Yanrong; Xu, Xiaowen; Han, Zhiqing; Li, Hailing

    2015-01-01

    Objective The nutritional status of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients is associated with their exercise capacity. In the present study, we have explored the relationship between nutritional risk and exercise capacity in severe male COPD patients. Methods A total of 58 severe COPD male patients were enrolled in this study. The patients were assigned to no nutritional risk group (n=33) and nutritional risk group (n=25) according to the Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS, 2002) criteria. Blood gas analysis, conventional pulmonary function testing, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing were performed on all the patients. Results Results showed that the weight and BMI of the patients in the nutritional risk group were significantly lower than in the no nutritional risk group (P<0.05). The pulmonary diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide of the no nutritional risk group was significantly higher than that of the nutritional risk group (P<0.05). Besides, the peak VO2 (peak oxygen uptake), peak O2 pulse (peak oxygen pulse), and peak load of the nutritional risk group were significantly lower than those of the no nutritional risk group (P<0.05) and there were significantly negative correlations between the NRS score and peak VO2, peak O2 pulse, or peak load (r<0, P<0.05). Conclusion The association between exercise capacity and nutritional risk based on NRS 2002 in severe COPD male patients is supported by these results of this study. PMID:26150712

  6. Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Artery Hypertension in a Patient with Compensated Cardiac Disease: Hemodynamic and Functional Response to Sildenafil Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaidis, Lazaros; Memon, Nabeel

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 54-year-old man who presented with exertional dyspnea and fatigue that had worsened over the preceding 2 years, despite a normally functioning bioprosthetic aortic valve and stable, mild left ventricular dysfunction (left ventricular ejection fraction, 0.45). His symptoms could not be explained by physical examination, an extensive biochemical profile, or multiple cardiac and pulmonary investigations. However, abnormal cardiopulmonary exercise test results and a right heart catheterization—combined with the use of a symptom-limited, bedside bicycle ergometer—revealed that the patient's exercise-induced pulmonary artery hypertension was out of proportion to his compensated left heart disease. A trial of sildenafil therapy resulted in objective improvements in hemodynamic values and functional class. PMID:25873799

  7. Increasing combat realism: the effectiveness of stun belt use on soldiers for the enhancement of live training and testing exercises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schricker, Bradley C.; Antalek, Christopher

    2006-05-01

    The ability to make correct decisions while operating in a combat zone enables American and Coalition warfighters to better respond to any threats they may encounter due to the minimization of negative training the warfighter encountered during their live, virtual, and constructive (LVC) training exercises. By increasing the physical effects encountered by one's senses during combat scenarios, combat realism is able to be increased, which is a key component in the reduction in negative training. The use of LVC simulations for training and testing augmentation purposes depends on a number of factors, not the least of which is the accurate representation of the training environment. This is particularly true in the realm of tactical engagement training through the use of Tactical Engagement Simulation Systems (TESS). The training environment is perceived through human senses, most notably sight and hearing. As with other haptic devices, the sense of touch is gaining traction as a viable medium through which to express the effects of combat battle damage from the synthetic training environment to participants within a simulated training exercise. New developments in this field are promoting the safe use of an electronic stun device to indicate to a trainee that they have been hit by a projectile, from either direct or indirect fire, through the course of simulated combat. A growing number of examples suggest that this added output medium can greatly enhance the realism of a training exercise and, thus, improve the training value. This paper serves as a literature survey of this concept, beginning with an explanation of TESS. It will then focus on how the electronic stun effect may be employed within a TESS and then detail some of the noted pros and cons of such an approach. The paper will conclude with a description of potential directions and work.

  8. 21 CFR 870.4210 - Cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula, or tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula... Devices 870.4210 Cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula, or tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula, or tubing is a device used in cardiopulmonary surgery...

  9. 21 CFR 870.4210 - Cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula, or tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula... Devices 870.4210 Cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula, or tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula, or tubing is a device used in cardiopulmonary surgery...

  10. Exercise-induced desaturation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on six-minute walk test

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Archana Chauhan; Gupta, Urmil; Sarkar, Malay; Padam, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Exercise-induced desaturation (EID) is associated with increased mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the relationship of EID with anthropometric and clinical parameters of resting pulmonary function test and six-minute walk test (6MWT) in COPD remains unclear. The study was designed to assess the correlate of EID and to identify various possible predictors of EID in stable normoxemic patients of COPD. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients with stable COPD diagnosed and staged as per the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) guidelines underwent 6MWT. A drop in standard pulse oximetry (SpO2) of ?4% or nadir up to ?88% was defined as EID. Based on EID during 6MWT, two groups were formed: desaturators (DS) and nondesaturators (NDS). DS and NDS were compared for baseline and clinical characters by the Student's t-test while Pearson and Spearman rho correlation coefficient assessed strength of the association of anthropometric and clinical variables with EID. The predictors of EID were identified by logistic regression and receiver operator curve analysis. Result: Out of 60 patients with stable COPD, 33 patients desaturated on exercise (n = 33/60). DS had significantly lower values of FEV1 (P < 0.001), FVC (P < 0.01) FEV1/FVC (P < 0.01) compared to NDS. EID had significant negative correlation with FEV1 (r = 0.31, P < 0.01), resting oxygen saturation (r = 0.549, P < 0.001) and 6MWD (r = 0.511, P < 0.001). Resting SpO2 ?93% was found to a predictor of EID with a sensitivity and specificity of 83% and 78%, respectively. Interpretation and Conclusion: The 6MWT is a safe and sensitive test to recognize EID in normoxic stable COPD patients. Resting oxygen saturation is a good predictor of EID. PMID:26180379

  11. The VO(2)-on kinetics in constant load exercise sub-anaerobic threshold reflects endothelial function and dysfunction in muscle microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Maione, D; Cicero, A Fg; Bacchelli, S; Cosentino, E R; Degli Esposti, D; Manners, D N; Rinaldi, E R; Rosticci, M; Senaldi, R; Ambrosioni, E; Borghi, C

    2015-12-29

    To propose a test to evaluate endothelial function, based on VO(2) on-transition kinetics in sub-anaerobic threshold (AT) constant load exercise, we tested healthy subjects and patients with ischemic-hypertensive cardiopathy by two cardiopulmonary tests on a cycle ergometer endowed with an electric motor to overcome initial inertia: a pre-test and, after at least 24 h, one 6 min constant load exercise at 90 % AT. We measured net phase 3 VO(2)-on kinetics and, by phase 2 time constant (tau), valued endothelial dysfunction. We found shorter tau in repeated tests, shorter time between first and second test, by persisting endothelium-dependent arteriolar vasodilatation and/or several other mechanisms. Reducing load to 80 % and 90 % AT did not produce significant changes in tau of healthy volunteers, while in heart patients an AT load of 70 %, compared to 80 % AT, shortened tau (delta=4.38+/-1.65 s, p=0.013). In heart patients, no correlation was found between NYHA class, ejection fraction (EF), and the two variables derived from incremental cycle cardio-pulmonary exercise, as well as between EF and tau; while NYHA class groups were well correlated with tau duration (r=0.92, p=0.0001). Doxazosin and tadalafil also significantly reduced tau. In conclusion, the O(2) consumption kinetics during the on-transition of constant load exercise below the anaerobic threshold are highly sensitive to endothelial function in muscular microcirculation, and constitute a marker for the evaluation of endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26047383

  12. Development and preliminary testing of a novel wheelchair integrated exercise/ rehabilitation system.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Beomsoo; Jeon, Doyoung

    2013-06-01

    The people with spinal cord injuries (SCI) or post stroke hemiplegia are easily exposed to secondary problems due to limited mobility. A new wheelchair integrated lower limb exercise/rehabilitation system is proposed to help their daily living and rehabilitation. The system consists of three main modules: 1) an electric wheelchair, 2) a lifter which raises and supports the subject's body weight, and 3) a lower limb exoskeleton. This paper describes the concept of the entire system and configurations of the prototype. In the design of the lower limb exoskeleton, the ergonomic joint mechanisms are introduced to assist the natural daily motions based on the biomechanics of each hip, knee and ankle joint. PMID:24187166

  13. Calf venous volume during stand-test after a 90-day bed-rest study with or without exercise countermeasure

    PubMed Central

    de Chantemle, Eric Belin; Pascaud, Ludovic; Custaud, Marc-Antoine; Capri, Arnaud; Louisy, Francis; Ferretti, Guido; Gharib, Claude; Arbeille, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    The objectives to determine both the contribution to orthostatic intolerance (OI) of calf venous volume during a stand-test, and the effects of a combined eccentricconcentric resistance exercise countermeasure on both vein response to orthostatic test and OI, after 90-day head-down tilt bed-rest (HDT). The subjects consisted of a control group (Co-gr, n = 9) and an exercise countermeasure group (CM-gr, n = 9). Calf volume and vein cross-sectional area (CSA) were assessed by plethysmography and echography during pre- and post-HDT stand-tests. From supine to standing (post-HDT), the tibial and gastronemius vein CSA increased significantly in intolerant subjects (tibial vein, +122% from pre-HDT; gastronemius veins, +145%; P < 0.05) whereas it did not in tolerant subjects. Intolerant subjects tended to have a higher increase in calf filling volume than tolerant subjects, in both sitting and standing positions. The countermeasure did not reduce OI. Absolute calf volume decreased similarly in both groups. Tibial and gastrocnemius vein CSA at rest did not change during HDT in either group. During the post-HDT stand-test, the calf filling volume increased more in the CM-gr than in the Co-gr both in the sitting (+1.3 5.1%, vs.7.3 4.3%; P < 0.05) and the standing positions (+56.1 23.7%vs.+1.6 9.6%; P < 0.05). The volume ejected by the muscle venous pump increased only in the CM-gr (+38.3 21.8%). This study showed that intolerant subjects had a higher increase in vein CSA in the standing position and a tendency to present a higher calf filling volume in the sitting and standing positions. It also showed that a combined eccentricconcentric resistance exercise countermeasure had no effects on either post-HDT OI or on the venous parameters related to it. PMID:15331681

  14. Lessons learned from the first U.S./Russian Federation joint tabletop exercise to prepare for conducting on-site inspections under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty

    SciTech Connect

    Filarowski, C; Gough, R; Hawkins, W; Knowles, S; Kreek, S; MacLeod, G; Rockett, P; Smith, A; Sweeney, J; Wild, J; Wohletz, K

    1999-03-24

    A U.S./Russian Federation Joint Tabletop Exercise took place in Snezhinsk, Russia, from 19 to 24 October 1998, whose objectives were the following: (1) To simulate the actions of the Inspection Team (IT), including interactions with the inspected State Party (ISP), in order to examine different ways the United States and Russian Federation (RF) approach inspections and develop appropriate recommendations for the international community. (2) To identify ambiguities and contradictions in the interpretation of Treaty and Protocol provisions that might become apparent in the course of an inspection and that need clarification in connection with the development of Operational Manuals and on-site inspection (OSI) infrastructure. (3) To confirm the efficacy of using bilateral tabletop exercises to assist in developing an effective Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) verification regime. (4) To identify strong and weak points in the preparation and implementation methods of such exercises for the purpose of further improving possible future exercises.

  15. The relationship between biventricular myocardial performance and metabolic parameters during incremental exercise and recovery in healthy adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pieles, Guido E; Gowing, Lucy; Forsey, Jonathan; Ramanujam, Paramanantham; Miller, Felicity; Stuart, A Graham; Williams, Craig A

    2015-12-15

    Background left ventricular (LV) and right ventricular (RV) myocardial reserve during exercise in adolescents has not been directly characterized. The aim of this study was to quantify myocardial performance response to exercise by using two-dimensional (2-D) speckle tracking echocardiography and describe the relationship between myocardial reserve, respiratory, and metabolic exercise parameters. A total of 23 healthy boys and girls (mean age 13.2 2.7 yr; stature 159.1 16.4 cm; body mass 49.5 16.6 kg; BSA 1.47 0.33 m(2)) completed an incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test (25 W3 min increments) with simultaneous acquisition of 2-D transthoracic echocardiography at rest, each exercise stage up to 100 W, and in recovery at 2 min and 10 min. Two-dimensional LV (LV Sl) and RV (RV Sl) longitudinal strain and LV circumferential strain (LV Sc) were analyzed to define the relationship between myocardial performance reserve and metabolic exercise parameters. Participants achieved a peak oxygen uptake (V?o2peak) of 40.6 8.9 mlkg(-1)min(-1) and a work rate of 154 42 W. LV Sl and LV Sc and RV Sl increased significantly across work rates (P < 0.05). LV Sl during exercise was significantly correlated to resting strain, V?o2peak, oxygen pulse, and work rate (0.530 ? r ? 0.784, P < 0.05). This study identifies a positive and moderate relationship between LV and RV myocardial performance and metabolic parameters during exercise by using a novel methodology. Relationships detected present novel data directly describing myocardial adaptation at different stages of exercise and recovery that in the future can help directly assess cardiac reserve in patients with cardiac pathology. PMID:26475589

  16. Elevated CK-MB isoenzyme after exercise stress test and atrial pacing in patients with ischemic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Marmor, A.T.; Klein, R.; Plich, M.; Groshar, D.; Schneeweiss, A.

    1988-12-01

    Using a highly sensitive monoclonal antibody kit for CK-MB, significant release of small amounts of CK-MB isoenzyme after exercise stress test was detected 4 to 6 h after induction of ischemia. This occurred in ten out of 15 patients with ischemic heart disease (66 percent) and in only one of the 18 healthy subjects (5.6 percent) serving as a control group. In five patients with coronary artery disease in whom atrial pacing was performed with simultaneous blood sampling from coronary sinus, a drastic elevation in CK-MB isoenzyme (from 2.04 +/- 2.06 ng/L to 10.88 +/- 6.9 ng/L; p less than 0.001) was detected within 10 to 30 min after induction of acute ischemia. A small but significant increase in total CK also was detected (from 21 +/- 12 IU/L to 52 +/- 14IU/L; p less than 0.01). These preliminary observations have to be further investigated in a larger group of patients before a definitive conclusion can be reached about the clinical significance of CK-MB release during exercise.

  17. A simple and portable paced step test for reproducible measurements of ventilation and oxygen consumption during exercise.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, P W; Wakefield, J M; Kontaki, E

    1987-01-01

    A single work rate paced step test is described. It was designed to allow the measurement of minute ventilation (VI) and oxygen consumption (VO2), under standardised conditions, during exercise in the clinic and lung function laboratory and in field work. The subjects and the operator found the test simple to perform. The values for ventilation at a given oxygen consumption were similar to those from more complex and stressful tests and had a high degree of reproducibility. The ergometer was a 12 inch (30 cm) step with hand rails. The subjects stepped down, once every four seconds in response to a buzzer for 10 minutes. VI and VO2 were measured with a small portable device. In 53 normal subjects of mean weight 69 (range 49-107) kg, mean VO2 measured during the last 5 minutes of the test was 0.89 (range 0.53-1.52) 1/min. Weight and height were independent contributors to the oxygen cost of stepping. The ventilatory equivalent for oxygen (VIO2, which equals VI divided by VO2) increased with age, and was similar to normal values for ventilation at 1.01/min VO2 obtained by workers who used multiple work rate tests on more complex equipment. The within subject variation in VIO2, expressed as the coefficient of variation (cv) and calculated for each age decade, was 14%. This again compared very favourably with the cv for values of ventilation at 1.01/min VO2 from other studies. In 20 normal subjects daily testing showed significant falls in VO2 and V1 over three days of 4% and 5.9% respectively; VIO2 fell by 2%. Testing over four consecutive weeks showed small significant differences between weeks but no clear trend; the within subject weekly variation accounted for less than 3.5% of the total variance for each of the variables. Testing at least four months apart showed a 3.3% fall in the oxygen cost of stepping. No significant diurnal effects on the exercise responses were found. PMID:3433238

  18. COMPARISON OF CARDIOPULMONARY FUNCTION IN AWAKE FISCHER-344 AND SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS EXPOSED TO CARBON DIOXIDE: A COMPUTERIZED TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A system has been developed to measure simultaneously the effects of inhaled toxicants on cardiopulmonary function in four awake rats before, during and after exposure. ne day prior to testing, Fischer-344 and Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with an intrapleural or carotid cat...

  19. Exercise testing and thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in the clinical evaluation of patients with Wolff Parkinson White syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Poyatos, M.E.; Suarez, L.; Lerman, J.; Guibourg, H.; Camps, J.; Perosio, A.

    1986-10-01

    In 58 patients with Wolff Parkinson White syndrome (WPW), we performed exercise stress testing in order to investigate the incidence of normalization of the auriculo-ventricular conduction and the ST-segment changes. For a more accurate evaluation of the latter, exercise and redistribution radionuclide images with Thallium-201 were obtained in 18 cases. Forty-nine had type A and nine had type B of WPW. Forty-eight had permanent, four had alternant and six had no pre-excitation (PE) when they started the test. Mean maximal functional capacity, mean maximal heart rate and mean maximal double product were not different when compared to an age-matched control group. Of the 48 patients who began the test with PE, in 23 (48%) it disappeared while PE persisted in 25 (52%). In 16 cases the disappearance of the PE was sudden and in seven it was progressive. Pre-excitation persisted in 39.5% of patients with type A and in 88.8% with type B (p less than 0.01). ST-segment depression was observed in 76.6% of patients with PE and in 28.6% of cases without PE (p less than 0.01). ST-segment depression occurred in 44.8% of patients with type A and in 100% of cases with type B (p less than 0.05). Transient abnormal Thallium-201 scans were observed in 62.5% of patients without PE and in 20% with PE. No patients showed exertional arrhythmias. This study suggests the possibility of measuring the duration of the refractory period of the accessory pathway in those patients n which the PE disappears suddenly, at a given heart rate.

  20. USE OF A PROGRAMMABLE CALCULATOR IN CARDIOPULMONARY PERFUSION

    PubMed Central

    Mills, J. David; Tallent, Jerome H.

    1978-01-01

    This study describes a hand-held, battery-powered, programmable instrument (Calculator Model SR-52) that can be taken directly into the operating room by cardiopulmonary perfusionists. Three programs are described in detail: 1) Cardiopulmonary perfusion parameters and estimated blood volume; 2) blood gas parameters and saturations, with temperature corrections; and 3) cardiopulmonary oxygen transfer and oxygenator efficiency. This inexpensive calculator allows perfusion personnel to manipulate easily-derived data into values which heretofore have required elaborate nomograms or special slide rulesor were not available within a reasonable computational time. PMID:15216068

  1. A marked increase in gastric fluid volume during cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Hirota, Kazuyoshi; Kudo, Mihoko; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Kushikata, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    Major physiological stress occurs during cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. This is related to hypothermia and artificial organ perfusion. Thus, serious gastrointestinal complications, particularly upper gastrointestinal bleeding, sometimes follow cardiac surgery. We have compared the antisecretory effects of a preanesthetic H2 antagonist (roxatidine, cardiopulmonary bypass-H2 group, n=15) and a proton pump inhibitor (rabeprazole, cardiopulmonary bypass-PPI group, n=15) in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, and also compared in patients undergoing a off-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery (off-pump cardiopulmonary bypass-H2 group, n=15). Gastric pH (5.140.61) and gastric fluid volume (13.22.4mL) at the end of surgery in off-pump cardiopulmonary bypass-H2 groups was significantly lower and higher than those in both cardiopulmonary bypass-H2 (6.250.54, 51.38.0mL) and cardiopulmonary bypass-PPI (7.290.13, 63.514.8mL) groups, respectively although those variables did not differ between groups after the induction of anesthesia. Plasma gastrin (1427pg/mL) at the end of surgery and maximal blood lactate levels (1.50 0.61mM) in off-pump cardiopulmonary bypass-H2 group were also significantly lower than those in both cardiopulmonary bypass-H2 (45596pg/mL, 3.970.80mM) and cardiopulmonary bypass-PPI (52527pg/mL, 3.150.44mM) groups, respectively. In addition, there was a significant correlation between gastric fluid volume and maximal blood lactate (r=0.596). In conclusion, cardiopulmonary bypass may cause an increase in gastric fluid volume which neither H2 antagonist nor PPI suppresses. A significant correlation between gastric fluid volume and maximal blood lactate suggests that gastric fluid volume may predict degree of gastrointestinal tract hypoperfusion. PMID:21765601

  2. USE OF A PROGRAMMABLE CALCULATOR IN CARDIOPULMONARY PERFUSION.

    PubMed

    Mills, J David; Tallent, Jerome H.

    1978-06-01

    This study describes a hand-held, battery-powered, programmable instrument (Calculator Model SR-52) that can be taken directly into the operating room by cardiopulmonary perfusionists. Three programs are described in detail: 1) Cardiopulmonary perfusion parameters and estimated blood volume; 2) blood gas parameters and saturations, with temperature corrections; and 3) cardiopulmonary oxygen transfer and oxygenator efficiency. This inexpensive calculator allows perfusion personnel to manipulate easily-derived data into values which heretofore have required elaborate nomograms or special slide rules-or were not available within a reasonable computational time. PMID:15216068

  3. Validity of COSMED's quark CPET mixing chamber system in evaluating energy metabolism during aerobic exercise in healthy male adults.

    PubMed

    Nieman, David C; Austin, Melanie D; Dew, Dustin; Utter, Alan C

    2013-01-01

    This study validated the accuracy of COSMED's Quark cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) metabolic mixing chamber system in measuring metabolic factors during maximal, graded exercise testing. Subjects included 32 physically active men between the ages of 18 and 34 years. During the first test session, subjects were measured for maximal oxygen consumption twice (15 min separation) with the CPET and Douglas bag systems (random order). During the second test session, subjects exercised through four stages of the Bruce treadmill protocol with measurement by the CPET and Douglas bag systems (random order) during steady state at the end of each 3-minute stage. Statistical analysis using a 2 (systems) x 5 (time) repeated measures ANOVA showed that the pattern of change in VO2, VCO2, VE, FeO2, FeCO2, and RER did not differ significantly between CPET and Douglas bag systems. This validation study indicates that the CPET mixing chamber system provides valid metabolic measurements that compare closely with the Douglas bag system during aerobic exercise. PMID:23541100

  4. Detection of Autonomic Dysfunction in Hemodialysis Patients Using the Exercise Treadmill Test: The Role of the Chronotropic Index, Heart Rate Recovery, and R-R Variability

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Maria Angela M. Q.; Nogueira, Andr B.; Pena, Felipe M.; Kiuchi, Marcio G.; Rodrigues, Ronaldo C.; Rodrigues, Rodrigo R.; Matos, Jorge P. S.; Lugon, Jocemir R.

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is highly prevalent in hemodialysis patients and has been implicated in their increased risk of cardiovascular mortality. Objective To evaluate the ability of different parameters of exercise treadmill test to detect autonomic dysfunction in hemodialysis patients. Methods Cross-sectional study involving hemodialysis patients and a control group. Clinical examination, blood sampling, echocardiogram, 24-hour Holter, and exercise treadmill test were performed. A ramp treadmill protocol symptom-limited with active recovery was employed. Results Forty-one hemodialysis patients and 41 controls concluded the study. There was significant difference between hemodialysis patients and controls in autonomic function parameters in 24h-Holter and exercise treadmill test. Probability of having autonomic dysfunction in hemodialysis patients compared to controls was 29.7 at the exercise treadmill test and 13.0 in the 24-hour Holter. Chronotropic index, heart rate recovery at the 1st min, and SDNN at exercise were used to develop an autonomic dysfunction score to grade autonomic dysfunction, in which, 83% of hemodialysis patients reached a scoring ?2 in contrast to 20% of controls. Hemodialysis was independently associated with either altered chronotropic index or autonomic dysfunction scoring ?2 in every tested model (OR=50.1, P=0.003; and OR=270.9, P=0.002, respectively, model 5). Conclusion The exercise treadmill test was feasible and useful to diagnose of the autonomic dysfunction in hemodialysis patients. Chronotropic index and autonomic dysfunction scoring ?2 were the most effective parameters to differentiate between hemodialysis patients and controls suggesting that these variables portrays the best ability to detect autonomic dysfunction in this setting. PMID:26042678

  5. Electrocardiogram signal variance analysis in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease--a comparison with exercise stress test in an angiographically documented high prevalence population.

    PubMed

    Nowak, J; Hagerman, I; Yln, M; Nyquist, O; Sylvn, C

    1993-09-01

    Variance electrocardiography (variance ECG) is a new resting procedure for detection of coronary artery disease (CAD). The method measures variability in the electrical expression of the depolarization phase induced by this disease. The time-domain analysis is performed on 220 cardiac cycles using high-fidelity ECG signals from 24 leads, and the phase-locked temporal electrical heterogeneity is expressed as a nondimensional CAD index (CAD-I) with the values of 0-150. This study compares the diagnostic efficiency of variance ECG and exercise stress test in a high prevalence population. A total of 199 symptomatic patients evaluated with coronary angiography was subjected to variance ECG and exercise test on a bicycle ergometer as a continuous ramp. The discriminant accuracy of the two methods was assessed employing the receiver operating characteristic curves constructed by successive consideration of several CAD-I cutpoint values and various threshold criteria based on ST-segment depression exclusively or in combination with exertional chest pain. Of these patients, 175 with CAD (> or = 50% luminal stenosis in 1 + major epicardial arteries) presented a mean CAD-I of 88 +/- 22, compared with 70 +/- 21 in 24 nonaffected patients (p < 0.01). Variance ECG provided a stochastically significant discrimination (p < 0.01) which was matched by exercise test only when chest pain variable was added to ST-segment depression as a discriminating criterion. Even then, the exercise test diagnosed single-vessel disease with a significantly lower sensitivity. At a cutpoint of CAD-I > or = 70, compared with ST-segment depression > or = 1 mm combined with exertional chest pain, the overall sensitivity of variance ECG was significantly higher (p < 0.01) than that of exercise test (79 vs. 48%). When combined, the two methods identified 93% of coronary angiography positive cases. Variance ECG is an efficient diagnostic method which compares favorably with exercise test for detection of CAD in high prevalence population. PMID:8242912

  6. Exercise after breast cancer treatment: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Dieli-Conwright, Christina M; Orozco, Breanna Z

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades, great strides have been made in the field of exercise-oncology research, particularly with breast cancer. This area of research is particularly important since there are >2.8 million breast cancer survivors who are in need of an intervention that can offset treatment-related side effects. Noticeable reductions in physical fitness (ie, cardiopulmonary fitness and muscular strength), negative changes in body composition (ie, increase in body mass, decrease in lean body mass, and increase in fat mass), increased fatigue, depression, or anxiety are some of the common side effects of cancer treatments that negatively impact overall quality of life and increase the risk for the development of comorbidities. Exercise plays a vital role in improving cardiopulmonary function, psychological events, muscular strength, and endurance in breast cancer survivors, and thus should be considered as a key factor of lifestyle intervention to reverse negative treatment-related side effects. The purpose of this review is to address current perspectives on the benefits of aerobic and resistance exercise after breast cancer treatments. This review is focused on the well-established benefits of exercise on physical and emotional well-being, bone health, lymphedema management, and the postulated benefits of exercise on risk reduction for recurrence of breast cancer. PMID:26543382

  7. Exercise after breast cancer treatment: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dieli-Conwright, Christina M; Orozco, Breanna Z

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades, great strides have been made in the field of exercise-oncology research, particularly with breast cancer. This area of research is particularly important since there are >2.8 million breast cancer survivors who are in need of an intervention that can offset treatment-related side effects. Noticeable reductions in physical fitness (ie, cardiopulmonary fitness and muscular strength), negative changes in body composition (ie, increase in body mass, decrease in lean body mass, and increase in fat mass), increased fatigue, depression, or anxiety are some of the common side effects of cancer treatments that negatively impact overall quality of life and increase the risk for the development of comorbidities. Exercise plays a vital role in improving cardiopulmonary function, psychological events, muscular strength, and endurance in breast cancer survivors, and thus should be considered as a key factor of lifestyle intervention to reverse negative treatment-related side effects. The purpose of this review is to address current perspectives on the benefits of aerobic and resistance exercise after breast cancer treatments. This review is focused on the well-established benefits of exercise on physical and emotional well-being, bone health, lymphedema management, and the postulated benefits of exercise on risk reduction for recurrence of breast cancer. PMID:26543382

  8. Patent Foramen Ovale Is Not Associated with Hypoxemia in Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Does Not Impair Exercise Performance

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Zarrin F.; Kelly, Julia L.; Shrikrishna, Dinesh; de Villa, Manuel; Mullen, Michael J.; Hopkinson, Nicholas S.; Morrell, Mary J.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Patent foramen ovale (PFO) may be disadvantageous in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It is unknown whether right-to-left shunting through PFO increases during exercise impairing exercise performance. Objectives: To determine whether (1) PFO prevalence is greater in hypoxemic versus less hypoxemic patients with COPD, (2) PFO is associated with clinically relevant impairment, and (3) right-to-left shunting increases during exercise and impairs exercise performance. Methods: Patients with COPD and age-matched control subjects underwent contrast transthoracic echocardiography and transcranial Doppler to identify PFO. Patients with COPD with no shunt and patients with large PFO underwent cardiopulmonary exercise tests with contrast transcranial Doppler, esophageal, and gastric balloon catheters. Measurements and Main Results: PFO prevalence was similar in 50 patients with COPD and 50 healthy control subjects (46% vs. 30%; P = 0.15). Large shunts were more common in patients with COPD (26% vs. 6%; P = 0.01). In an expanded COPD cohort, PFO prevalence was similar in 31 hypoxemic (Pao2 ≤ 7.3 kPa) and 63 less hypoxemic (Pao2 > 8.0 kPa) patients with COPD (39% vs. 52%; P = 0.27). Patients with intrapulmonary shunting had lower Pao2 than both patients with PFO and those with no right-to-left shunt (7.7 vs. 8.6 vs. 9.3 kPa, respectively; P = 0.002). Shunting significantly increased during exercise in patients with COPD with PFO. Endurance time at 60% Vo2max was 574 (178) seconds for patients with PFO and 534 (279) seconds for those without (P = ns). Conclusions: Hypoxemic patients with COPD do not have a higher prevalence of PFO. Patients with COPD with PFO do not perform less well either on a 6-minute walk or submaximal exercise testing despite increased right-to-left shunting during exercise. PMID:24450410

  9. SeDelGap Tests of Macro-Level Reading Comprehension: An Exercise in International Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bensoussan, Marsha; Mauranen, Anna

    Parallel studies at universities in Israel, Finland, Canada, and the United States used a "selected deletion gap-filling test," a variation on the cloze procedure designed to measure reading comprehension by testing the reader's familiarity with cohesive links and grasp of text coherence. The test design responded to the growing demand for a more

  10. Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing: More than a Symbolic Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshida, Roland K.; Friedman, Douglas L.

    1986-01-01

    The 1985 edition of the American Psychological Association's "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing" has greatly expanded its coverage of the testing of handicapped students. Recent surveys of practitioners' knowledge of basic testing and measurement concepts suggest the need for extensive in-service training if these standards are

  11. Serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels are not associated with exercise capacity and lung function parameters in two population-based studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Thyroid dysfunction has been described to be linked to a variety of cardiovascular morbidities. Through this pathway thyroid function might also be associated with cardiorespiratory function and exercise capacity. So far only few patient-studies with small study populations investigated the association between thyroid dysfunction and exercise capacity. Thus, the aim of our study was to investigate the association of serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels with lung function and cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) in the general population. Methods Data from the two independent cross-sectional population-based studies (Study of Health in Pomerania [SHIP] and SHIP-Trend-0) were pooled. SHIP was conducted between 2002 and 2006 and SHIP-Trend-0 between 2008 and 2012. Participants were randomly selected from population registries. In total, 4206 individuals with complete data were available for the present analysis. Thyroid function was defined based on serum TSH levels. Lung function was evaluated by forced expiratory volume in 1 s and forced vital capacity. CPET was based on symptom limited exercise tests on a bicycle in a sitting position according to a modified Jones protocol. Associations of serum TSH levels with lung function and CPET parameters were analysed by multivariable quantile regression adjusted for age, sex, height, weight, use of beta blockers, smoking status, and physical activity. Results Serum TSH levels, used as continuously distributed variable and categorized according to the clinical cut-offs 0.3 and 3.0 mIU/L or according to quintiles, were not consistently associated with parameters of lung function or CPET. Conclusions Our results suggest that thyroid dysfunction is not associated with lung function and cardiopulmonary exercise capacity in the general population. PMID:25182209

  12. Assessment of cardiopulmonary alterations in endotoxic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Christenson, J.T.; Kuikka, J.; Al-Sarraf, A.A.; Owunwanne, A.

    1986-01-01

    Using radionuclide first-pass technique, seven sheep were studied prior to and during endotoxic shock. In vitro labeled /sup 99m/TC red blood cells were used to measure right and left ventricular ejection fractions (RVEF and LVEF) and cardiopulmonary transit time (CPTT) prior to and at 1, 4, 30, and 60 minutes after the intravenous injection of endotoxin Escherichia coli, 3 mg/kg bodyweight. The LVEF decreased slightly from 51 to 42% but became normal four minutes later, while the RVEF remained decreased from 49 to 26% for 60 minutes. The CPTT was prolonged from 13 to 26 cardiac beats. The decrease in RVEF was well correlated with the prolongation of the CPTT.

  13. Factor V Leiden and Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Victor; Rosin, Mark; Marcoux, Jo-Anne; Olson, Marnie; Bezaire, Jennifer; Dalshaug, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: We present a case of a patient with factor V Leiden with an antithrombin III activity of 67% who received a successful aortic valve replacement supported by cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). A safe level of anticoagulation was achieved by monitoring activated clotting time (ACT) and heparin concentration ensuring adequate anticoagulation throughout the procedure. Results from ACT, heparin dose response, heparin protamine titration, and thrombelastography are given. Factor V Leiden patients can be safely anti-coagulated using heparin for CPB procedures when monitored with ACT, heparin protamine titration, and thrombelastography. Postoperative chest tube losses were 360 mL, less than half our institutional average. Anticoagulation for the pre-and post-operative phase is also discussed. PMID:26834284

  14. ["Topless" cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Fashion or science?].

    PubMed

    Markstaller, K; Eberle, B; Dick, W F

    2004-10-01

    A decade after the onset of a discussion whether ventilation could be omitted from bystander basic life support (BLS) algorithms, the state of the evidence is reevaluated. Initial animal studies and a prospective randomized patient trial had suggested that omission of ventilation during the first minutes of lay cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) did not impair patient outcomes. More recent studies demonstrate, however, that this may hold true only in very specific scenarios, and that the chest compression-only technique was never superior to standard BLS. Instead of calling basics of BLS training and practice into question, more and better training of lay persons and professionals appears mandatory, and targeted use of dispatcher-guided telephone CPR should be evaluated and, if it improves outcome, it should be encouraged. Future studies should focus much less on the omission but on the optimization of ventilation under the specific conditions of CPR. PMID:15340728

  15. Questionable Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liemohn, Wendell; Haydu, Traci; Phillips, Dawn

    1999-01-01

    This publication presents general guidelines for exercise prescription that have an anatomical basis but also consider the exerciser's ability to do the exercise correctly. It reviews various common questionable exercises, explaining how some exercises, especially those designed for flexibility and muscle fitness, can cause harm. Safer

  16. Value of standardised exercise tests and blood biochemistry in the selection and training of breeding stallions.

    PubMed

    Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, M M; Wensing, T; Barneveld, A; Breukink, H J

    1991-10-19

    Stallions selected by the Royal Dutch Warmblood Society were submitted to a standardised lungeing test at the beginning and at the end of a 100-day test of performance and ability. The heart rate, haematology and biochemistry values obtained in the first lungeing test showed no significant differences between the 15 stallions which were rejected by the Royal Dutch Warmblood Society during the first month of the 100-day test, the 15 stallions rejected during the last month and the 11 stallions which were approved for registration in the studbook. The 26 stallions submitted to the second lungeing test had significantly lower heart rates and blood lactate concentrations than in the first test. The standardised lungeing test had no value in predicting the rejection or approval of the stallions, and the fitness of a stallion at the beginning of the 100-day test did not influence its chance of being approved as a breeding stallion. The differences between the results of the first and the second tests suggest that the fitness of the stallions improved during the 100-day test. PMID:1759338

  17. Exercise Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Martin G.; Sharman, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Irrespective of apparent ‘normal' resting blood pressure (BP), some individuals may experience an excessive elevation in BP with exercise (i.e. systolic BP ≥210 mm Hg in men or ≥190 mm Hg in women or diastolic BP ≥110 mm Hg in men or women), a condition termed exercise hypertension or a ‘hypertensive response to exercise' (HRE). An HRE is a relatively common condition that is identified during standard exercise stress testing; however, due to a lack of information with respect to the clinical ramifications of an HRE, little value is usually placed on such a finding. In this review, we discuss both the clinical importance and underlying physiological contributors of exercise hypertension. Indeed, an HRE is associated with an increased propensity for target organ damage and also predicts the future development of hypertension, cardiovascular events and mortality, independent of resting BP. Moreover, recent work has highlighted that some of the elevated cardiovascular risks associated with an HRE may be related to high-normal resting BP (pre-hypertension) or ambulatory ‘masked' hypertension and that an HRE may be an early warning signal of abnormal BP control that is otherwise undetected with clinic BP. Whilst an HRE may be amenable to treatment via pharmacological and lifestyle interventions, the exact physiological mechanism of an HRE remains elusive, but it is likely a manifestation of multiple factors including large artery stiffness, increased peripheral resistance, neural circulatory control and metabolic irregularity. Future research focus may be directed towards determining threshold values to denote the increased risk associated with an HRE and further resolution of the underlying physiological factors involved in the pathogenesis of an HRE. PMID:26587435

  18. Exercise Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Martin G; Sharman, James E

    2014-05-01

    Irrespective of apparent 'normal' resting blood pressure (BP), some individuals may experience an excessive elevation in BP with exercise (i.e. systolic BP ?210 mm Hg in men or ?190 mm Hg in women or diastolic BP ?110 mm Hg in men or women), a condition termed exercise hypertension or a 'hypertensive response to exercise' (HRE). An HRE is a relatively common condition that is identified during standard exercise stress testing; however, due to a lack of information with respect to the clinical ramifications of an HRE, little value is usually placed on such a finding. In this review, we discuss both the clinical importance and underlying physiological contributors of exercise hypertension. Indeed, an HRE is associated with an increased propensity for target organ damage and also predicts the future development of hypertension, cardiovascular events and mortality, independent of resting BP. Moreover, recent work has highlighted that some of the elevated cardiovascular risks associated with an HRE may be related to high-normal resting BP (pre-hypertension) or ambulatory 'masked' hypertension and that an HRE may be an early warning signal of abnormal BP control that is otherwise undetected with clinic BP. Whilst an HRE may be amenable to treatment via pharmacological and lifestyle interventions, the exact physiological mechanism of an HRE remains elusive, but it is likely a manifestation of multiple factors including large artery stiffness, increased peripheral resistance, neural circulatory control and metabolic irregularity. Future research focus may be directed towards determining threshold values to denote the increased risk associated with an HRE and further resolution of the underlying physiological factors involved in the pathogenesis of an HRE. PMID:26587435

  19. Analysis on the Effect of Individualized Aerobic Exercise Intervention for Teenagers with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chun-qi, Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the intervention effect of individualized aerobic exercise on type 2 diabetes in teenagers. Method: To select 60 cases of teenager with type 2 diabetes in Zhoukou Hospital of Traditional Medicine in February 2013 to February 2014 as the research object, test all enrolled patients’ maximal oxygen and blood glucose fluctuation, and then give individualized aerobic exercise intervention, after 6 months intervention, compare the changes of patients’ indexes and evaluate the effect of individualized aerobic exercise intervention. Result: After the intervention, the patients’ plasma triglyceride and cholesterol content are significantly lower than before (P < 0.05); there’s no significant difference between high and low-density lipoprotein (P > 0.05). Moreover, the patients’ insulin and C-peptide level are significantly higher than those before intervention (P < 0.05); before intervention, their blood glucose and glycated hemogiobin level are higher than normal, after intervention, they are weakened, but there’s no significant difference (P > 0.05). The maximal oxygen uptake and different intensity of metabolic equivalents are higher than before, but there’s no significant difference (P > 0.05). Conclusion: For teenagers with type 2 diabetes, the implementation of individualized aerobic exercise intervention can effectively improve the patients’ lipid metabolism and cardio-pulmonary function, and effectively promote the insulin and C-peptide secretion, to provide scientific basis for effective control of blood glucose.

  20. Dynamic laryngeal narrowing during exercise: a mechanism for generating intrinsic PEEP in COPD?

    PubMed Central

    Baz, M; Haji, G S; Menzies-Gow, A; Tanner, R J; Polkey, M I; Hull, J H

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patients with COPD commonly exhibit pursed-lip breathing during exercise, a strategy that, by increasing intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure, may optimise lung mechanics and exercise tolerance. A similar role for laryngeal narrowing in modulating exercise airways resistance and the respiratory cycle volume–time course is postulated, yet remains unstudied in COPD. The aim of this study was to assess the characteristics of laryngeal narrowing and its role in exercise intolerance and dynamic hyperinflation in COPD. Methods We studied 19 patients (n=8 mild–moderate; n=11 severe COPD) and healthy age and sex matched controls (n=11). Baseline physiological characteristics and clinical status were assessed prior to an incremental maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test with continuous laryngoscopy. Laryngeal narrowing measures were calculated at the glottic and supra-glottic aperture at rest and peak exercise. Results At rest, expiratory laryngeal narrowing was pronounced at the glottic level in patients and related to FEV1 in the whole cohort (r=−0.71, p<0.001) and patients alone (r=−0.53, p=0.018). During exercise, glottic narrowing was inversely related to peak ventilation in all subjects (r=−0.55, p=0.0015) and patients (r=−0.71, p<0.001) and peak exercise tidal volume (r=−0.58, p=0.0062 and r=−0.55, p=0.0076, respectively). Exercise glottic narrowing was also inversely related to peak oxygen uptake (% predicted) in all subjects (r=−0.65, p<0.001) and patients considered alone (r=−0.58, p=0.014). Exercise inspiratory duty cycle was related to exercise glottic narrowing for all subjects (r=−0.69, p<0.001) and patients (r=−0.62, p<0.001). Conclusions Dynamic laryngeal narrowing during expiration is prevalent in patients with COPD and is related to disease severity, respiratory duty cycle and exercise capacity. PMID:25586938

  1. Unique Testing Capabilities of the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, an Exercise in Aeroelastic Scaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanco, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) is the world's most capable aeroelastic test facility. Its large size, transonic speed range, variable pressure capability, and use of either air or R-134a heavy gas as a test medium enable unparalleled manipulation of flow-dependent scaling quantities. Matching these scaling quantities enables dynamic similitude of a full-scale vehicle with a sub-scale model, a requirement for proper characterization of any dynamic phenomenon, and many static elastic phenomena. Select scaling parameters are presented in order to quantify the scaling advantages of TDT and the consequence of testing in other facilities. In addition to dynamic testing, the TDT is uniquely well-suited for high risk testing or for those tests that require unusual model mount or support systems. Examples of recently conducted dynamic tests requiring unusual model support are presented. In addition to its unique dynamic test capabilities, the TDT is also evaluated in its capability to conduct aerodynamic performance tests as a result of its flow quality. Results of flow quality studies and a comparison to a many other transonic facilities are presented. Finally, the ability of the TDT to support future NASA research thrusts and likely vehicle designs is discussed.

  2. Opening of Aortic Valve During Exercise Is Key to Preventing Development of Aortic Insufficiency During Ventricular Assist Device Treatment.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Teruhiko; Kinugawa, Koichiro; Nitta, Daisuke; Hatano, Masaru; Ono, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    Although we previously demonstrated that opening of the native aortic valve (AV) at rest prevents development of aortic insufficiency (AI) during continuous-flow (CF) left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support, the clinical impact of native AV opening during exercise remained unknown. We enrolled 37 patients with a closed native AV at rest 3 months after CF LVAD implantation and followed them from 2006 to 2014. Seven patients (19%) who achieved opening of the native AV during cardiopulmonary exercise testing at 3 months (opening AV group) had higher exercise tolerability and improved left ventricular contractility during exercise compared with those with a closed native AV (closed AV group) (p < 0.05 for all). The opening group experienced no AI at 6 months and had a higher readmission-free rate because of cardiovascular events compared with the closed group during the 2 years study period (100% vs. 56%, p = 0.005). Among those with a closed AV, use of the centrifugal pump was a significant predictor of AI-free status (p < 0.05; odds ratio, 5.400). In conclusion, opening of the native AV during exercise and centrifugal pump use were key to preventing the development of AI. Aggressive cardiac rehabilitation may have a prophylactic impact on development of AI during CF LVAD treatment. PMID:25955152

  3. Cardiopulmonary Syndromes (PDQ)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about common conditions that produce chest symptoms. The cardiopulmonary syndromes addressed in this summary are cancer-related dyspnea, malignant pleural effusion, pericardial effusion, and superior vena cava syndrome.

  4. [Preliminary study of colloid osmotic pressure for cardiopulmonary bypass].

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Xiang, L; Luo, J

    1996-12-01

    The ideal colloid osmotic pressure is beneficial to decrease the fluid accumulated in the pulmonary and other tissue during cardiopulmonary bypass. Schupbach reported the proper colloidosmotic pressure for cardiopulmonary bypass was 2.1 kPa (16 mmHg). Colloid osmotic pressures of blood and priming fluid during cardiopulmonary bypass were measured in 28 patients with heart disease by using colloid osmotic pressure detection apparatus. The value of colloid osmotic pressure suitable for the designed standard was apparently different among the Gelofusine group and other groups. P value was 0.005. Priming fluid for cardiopulmonary bypass needs to satisfy the quality and the quantity of colloid osmotic pressure. Using Albumin isn't economical. Whole blood and plazma are not suitable for increasing colloid osmotic pressure. Hydroxyethyl starch or Gelofusine is best choice in priming to get designed standard of colloid osmotic pressure. The ratio of hydroxyethyl starch or Gelofusine in priming fluid should beyond 1/2. PMID:9590779

  5. [Full Recovery from Cardiopulmonary Arrest caused by Traumatic Asphyxia].

    PubMed

    Hirade, Tomohiro; Murata, Susumu; Saito, Tsukasa; Ogawa, Kohei; Kodani, Nobuhiro; Sakakibara, Manabu; Hirade, Ritsuko; Kushizaki, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Takashi; Minami, Kotaro; Nikai, Tetsuro; Nishina, Masayoshi

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic asphyxia is a crush injury of the chest characterized by facial edema, cyanosis, conjunctival hemorrhage, and petechiae on the face and chest. The prognosis depends on the duration of chest compression and early cardiopulmonary resuscitation after cardiopulmonary arrest. Here we report a case of full recovery from cardiopulmonary arrest caused by traumatic asphyxia. The chest of a 56-year-old man was compressed by a machine while working. Immediately, his colleague started cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which was successful. When he was admitted to our hospital, his consciousness level was E1V2M2(Glasgow coma scale). Our treatment included therapeutic hypothermia, the duration of which was 24 hours at 34 C. Rewarming his body to 36 C took place over 48 hours. Thereafter, he recovered completely and was discharged on the 12th hospital day without neurologic sequela. Therapeutic hypothermia was possibly effective in this case. PMID:25743548

  6. Differences in muscle strength after ACL reconstruction do not influence cardiorespiratory responses to isometabolic exercise

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Marília S.; Lira, Claudio A. B.; Vancini, Rodrigo L.; Nakamoto, Fernanda P.; Cohen, Moisés; Silva, Antonio C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether the muscle strength decrease that follows anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction would lead to different cardiorespiratory adjustments during dynamic exercise. Method Eighteen active male subjects were submitted to isokinetic evaluation of knee flexor and extensor muscles four months after ACL surgery. Thigh circumference was also measured and an incremental unilateral cardiopulmonary exercise test was performed separately for both involved and uninvolved lower limbs in order to compare heart rate, oxygen consumption, minute ventilation, and ventilatory pattern (breath rate, tidal volume, inspiratory time, expiratory time, tidal volume/inspiratory time) at three different workloads (moderate, anaerobic threshold, and maximal). Results There was a significant difference between isokinetic extensor peak torque measured in the involved (116.5±29.1 Nm) and uninvolved (220.8±40.4 Nm) limbs, p=0.000. Isokinetic flexor peak torque was also lower in the involved limb than in the uninvolved limb (107.8±15.4 and 132.5±26.3 Nm, p=0.004, respectively). Lower values were also found in involved thigh circumference as compared with uninvolved limb (46.9±4.3 and 48.5±3.9 cm, p=0.005, respectively). No differences were found between the lower limbs in any of the variables of the incremental cardiopulmonary tests at all exercise intensities. Conclusions Our findings indicate that, four months after ACL surgery, there is a significant deficit in isokinetic strength in the involved limb, but these differences in muscle strength requirement do not produce differences in the cardiorespiratory adjustments to exercise. Based on the hypotheses from the literature which explain the differences in the physiological responses to exercise for different muscle masses, we can deduce that, after 4 months of a rehabilitation program after an ACL reconstruction, individuals probably do not present differences in muscle oxidative and peripheral perfusion capacities that could elicit higher levels of peripheral cardiorepiratory stimulus during exercise. PMID:24838811

  7. Anesthetic Management for Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Update for 2014.

    PubMed

    Bechtel, Allison; Huffmyer, Julie

    2014-04-10

    Cardiopulmonary bypass has revolutionized the practice of cardiac surgery and allows safe conduct of increasingly complex cardiac surgery. A brief review of the bypass circuit is undertaken in this review. A more thorough review of the anesthetic management is accomplished including choice of anesthetic medications and their effects. The inflammatory response to cardiopulmonary bypass is reviewed along with interventions that may help ameliorate the inflammation. PMID:24728883

  8. Sport climbing with pre-existing cardio-pulmonary medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Kuepper, T; Morrison, A; Gieseler, U; Schoeffl, V

    2009-06-01

    Over the past 25 years sport climbing has developed from an elite extreme sport subculture pursued by few into a mainstream recreational sport enjoyed globally by climbers of all ages, climbing abilities, and with pre-existing health conditions. As the demands and grades of climbing difficulty have increased over this period, most scientific literature on sport climbing focused on acute injuries and overuse syndromes, or performance physiology in healthy adult males. The physiological response to sport climbing is more similar to that of resistance training (i.e., body building) rather than a predominantly aerobic sport (i.e., running, cycling), so that heart rate and blood pressure during a climb will be disproportionately high relative to the 'exercise' of climbing, and breathing may be irregular. Therefore this review sought evidence-based recommendations for recreational sport climbing participation by those individuals with pre-existing cardiopulmonary medical conditions including coronary heart disease, chronic heart failure, cardiac dysrhythmia, pulmonary diseases (i.e., asthma) or hypertension. This review defines the criteria that must be fulfilled for safe sport climbing by those with pre-existing cardiopulmonary conditions or those with hypertension. PMID:19199210

  9. Posture Exercises

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search You are here Home » Posture Exercises Posture Exercises When a person develops kyphosis, the posture becomes ... and strengthen the back. Try the following two exercises to keep your spine more limber and flexible. ...

  10. What are the electrical stimulation design parameters for maximum VO2 aimed at cardio-pulmonary rehabilitation?

    PubMed

    Minogue, Conor M; Caulfield, Brian M; Reilly, Richard B

    2007-01-01

    Electrical Stimulation (ES) is increasingly being considered as a means to improve cardio-pulmonary performance in patients with reduced exercise capacity. This short review considers the ES signal parameters and protocols used in studies that have included a measurement of oxygen uptake during the session. It suggests that the tetanic signal parameters normally used for muscle strengthening are not suitable for producing a sustained increase in oxygen uptake. Instead, very low frequencies are preferred, perhaps because there is less fatigue of the type 1 muscle fibers. PMID:18002484

  11. Noninvasive ventilation and exercise tolerance in heart failure: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bndchen, Daiana C.; Gonzles, Ana I.; Noronha, Marcos De; Brggemann, Ana K.; Sties, Sabrina W.; Carvalho, Tales De

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with heart failure (HF) usually develop exercise intolerance. In this context, noninvasive ventilation (NIV) can help to increase physical performance. Objective: To undertake a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effects of NIV on exercise tolerance in patients with HF. Method: Search Strategy: Articles were searched in the following databases: Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO), and MEDLINE. Selection Criteria: This review included only randomized controlled trials involving patients with HF undergoing NIV, with or without other therapies, that used exercise tolerance as an outcome, verified by the distance travelled in the six-minute walk test (6MWT), VO2peak in the cardiopulmonary test, time spent in testing, and dyspnea. Data Collection and Analysis: The methodological quality of the studies was rated according to the PEDro scale. Data were pooled in fixed-effect meta-analysis whenever possible. Results: Four studies were selected. A meta-analysis including 18 participants showed that the use of NIV prior to the 6MWT promoted increased distance, [mean difference 65.29 m (95% CI 38.80 to 91.78)]. Conclusions: The use of NIV prior to the 6MWT in patients with HF may promote increased distance. However, the limited number of studies may have compromised a more definitive conclusion on the subject. PMID:25372000

  12. Anisn-Dort Neutron-Gamma Flux Intercomparison Exercise for a Simple Testing Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehmer, B.; Konheiser, J.; Borodkin, G.; Brodkin, E.; Egorov, A.; Kozhevnikov, A.; Zaritsky, S.; Manturov, G.; Voloschenko, A.

    2003-06-01

    The ability of transport codes ANISN, DORT, ROZ-6, MCNP and TRAMO, as well as nuclear data libraries BUGLE-96, ABBN-93, VITAMIN-B6 and ENDF/B-6 to deliver consistent gamma and neutron flux results was tested in the calculation of a one-dimensional cylindrical model consisting of a homogeneous core and an outer zone with a single material. Model variants with H2O, Fe, Cr and Ni in the outer zones were investigated. The results are compared with MCNP-ENDF/B-6 results. Discrepancies are discussed. The specified test model is proposed as a computational benchmark for testing calculation codes and data libraries.

  13. Impairment of cardiopulmonary receptor sensitivity in the early phase of heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Modesti, P A; Polidori, G; Bertolozzi, I; Vanni, S; Cecioni, I

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To characterise the efficiency of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex system in the early phase of heart failure and its relation to limitation of physical activity. Design: Forearm blood flow (venous occlusion plethysmography), vascular resistance, and central venous pressure (CVP), estimated from an antecubital vein, were measured in the supine position at baseline and 15 minutes after application of lower body negative pressure at ?7 and ?14 mm Hg (receptor downloading) or leg raising (receptor loading). Subjects: Heart failure patients without limitation (NYHA class I; n ?=? 18) or with slight limitation of physical activity (NYHA class II; n ?=? 13), and 11 healthy controls. Results: The efficiency of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex function, expressed by the slope of the relation between CVP changes and the corresponding changes of calculated forearm vascular resistance (gain), was reduced both in NYHA class I patients (mean (SD) ?1.99 (0.83) v ?2.78 (0.66) in controls; p < 0.05) and NYHA class II patients (?1.29 (0.5); p<0.001 v controls). However, change in peripheral vascular resistance during preload increase was similar in controls (?3.3 (0.9) units) and in NYHA class I patients (?3.3 (2.1) units; NS v controls), and was significantly reduced only in NYHA class II patients (?1.6 (1.3) units, p < 0.03 v controls). The gain in the cardiopulmonary reflex was related to the distance walked during the six minute corridor test. Conclusions: A reduced tonic efficacy of the cardiopulmonary reflex system is already detectable in the early phase of heart failure, the impairment in acute response to preload increase being detectable only in symptomatic patients. PMID:14676236

  14. The Resonating Arm Exerciser: design and pilot testing of a mechanically passive rehabilitation device that mimics robotic active assistance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Robotic arm therapy devices that incorporate actuated assistance can enhance arm recovery, motivate patients to practice, and allow therapists to deliver semi-autonomous training. However, because such devices are often complex and actively apply forces, they have not achieved widespread use in rehabilitation clinics or at home. This paper describes the design and pilot testing of a simple, mechanically passive device that provides robot-like assistance for active arm training using the principle of mechanical resonance. Methods The Resonating Arm Exerciser (RAE) consists of a lever that attaches to the push rim of a wheelchair, a forearm support, and an elastic band that stores energy. Patients push and pull on the lever to roll the wheelchair back and forth by about 20 cm around a neutral position. We performed two separate pilot studies of the device. In the first, we tested whether the predicted resonant properties of RAE amplified a user’s arm mobility by comparing his or her active range of motion (AROM) in the device achieved during a single, sustained push and pull to the AROM achieved during rocking. In a second pilot study designed to test the therapeutic potential of the device, eight participants with chronic stroke (35 ± 24 months since injury) and a mean, stable, initial upper extremity Fugl-Meyer (FM) score of 17 ± 8 / 66 exercised with RAE for eight 45 minute sessions over three weeks. The primary outcome measure was the average AROM measured with a tilt sensor during a one minute test, and the secondary outcome measures were the FM score and the visual analog scale for arm pain. Results In the first pilot study, we found people with a severe motor impairment after stroke intuitively found the resonant frequency of the chair, and the mechanical resonance of RAE amplified their arm AROM by a factor of about 2. In the second pilot study, AROM increased by 66% ± 20% (p = 0.003). The mean FM score increase was 8.5 ± 4 pts (p = 0.009). Subjects did not report discomfort or an increase in arm pain with rocking. Improvements were sustained at three months. Conclusions These results demonstrate that a simple mechanical device that snaps onto a manual wheelchair can use resonance to assist arm training, and that such training shows potential for safely increasing arm movement ability for people with severe chronic hemiparetic stroke. PMID:23597303

  15. Cognitive Aging and Physical Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woo, Ellen; Sharps, Matthew J.

    2003-01-01

    Younger (n=58) and older (n=49) adults completed the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test and recall tests of verbal and visual stimuli with maximum and minimum semantic support. Category support did not help young adults who exercised less. Older adults' exercise had no effect on use of category support; less-frequent exercisers had poorer results

  16. NAD(P)H oxidase and pro-inflammatory response during maximal exercise: role of C242T polymorphism of the P22PHOX subunit.

    PubMed

    Izzicupo, P; Di Valerio, V; D' Amico, M A; Di Mauro, M; Pennelli, A; Falone, S; Alberti, G; Amicarelli, F; Miscia, S; Gallina, S; Di Baldassarre, A

    2010-01-01

    Intense exercise induces a pro-inflammatory status through a mechanism involving the NAD(P)H oxidase system. We focused our attention on p22phox, a subunit of the NAD(P)H oxidase, and on its allelic polymorphism C242T, which is known to affect the functional activity of the enzyme. We investigated whether the p22phox C242T variants exhibit systemic effects in healthy subjects by analyzing the proinflammatory and cardiocirculatory responses to physical exercise in endurance athletes. The group of study consisted of 97 long distance runners, 37 +/- 4.4 yrs of age, with similar training history. The subjects underwent a maximal stress test during which both inflammatory and cardiopulmonary parameters were monitored. Our results demonstrate that T allele deeply influences the neutrophil activation in response to intense exercise, since T carriers were characterized by significantly lower release of myeloperoxidase (MPO), a classical leukocyte derived pro-inflammatory cytokine. In addition, the presence of T allele was associated with a higher cardiopulmonary efficiency as evidenced by a significantly lower Heart Rate (HR) at the peak of exercise and, when a dominant model was assumed, by a higher maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max). On the other hand, no effects of 242T mutation on the plasmatic total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and on the cortisol responses to the physical exercise were detected. In conclusion, our data support a systemic role for p22phox C242T polymorphism that, modifying the intensity of the inflammatory response, can influence the cardiovascular adaptations elicited by aerobic training. These results contribute to support the hypothesis of a systemic effect for the C242T polymorphism and of its possible functional rebound in healthy subjects. PMID:20378006

  17. A Novel Rotary Pulsatile Flow Pump for Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Teman, Nicholas R.; Mazur, Daniel E.; Toomasian, John; Jahangir, Emilia; Alghanem, Fares; Goudie, Marcus; Rojas-Peña, Alvaro; Haft, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that pulsatile blood flow is superior to continuous flow in cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). However, adoption of pulsatile flow (PF) technology has been limited due to practically and complexity of creating a consistent physiologic pulse. A pediatric pulsatile rotary ventricular pump (PRVP) was designed to address this problem. We evaluated the PRVP in an animal model, and determined its ability to generate PF during CPB. The PRVP (modified peristaltic pump, with tapering of the outlet of the pump chamber) was tested in 4 piglets (10-12kg). Cannulation was performed with right atrial and aortic cannulae, and pressure sensors were inserted into the femoral arteries. Pressure curves were obtained at different levels of flow and compared with both the animal's baseline physiologic function and a continuous flow (CF) roller pump. Pressure and flow waveforms demonstrated significant pulsatility in the PRVP setup compared to CF at all tested conditions. Measurement of hemodynamic energy data, including the percent pulsatile energy and the surplus hydraulic energy, also revealed a significant increase in pulsatility with the PRVP (p <0.001). PRVP creates physiologically significant PF, similar to the pulsatility of a native heart, and has the potential to be easily implemented in pediatric CPB. PMID:24625536

  18. A Reliable Method for Rhythm Analysis during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, U.; Irusta, U.; Ruiz, J.; Eftestl, T.; Kramer-Johansen, J.; Alonso-Atienza, F.; Alonso, E.; Gonzlez-Otero, D.

    2014-01-01

    Interruptions in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) compromise defibrillation success. However, CPR must be interrupted to analyze the rhythm because although current methods for rhythm analysis during CPR have high sensitivity for shockable rhythms, the specificity for nonshockable rhythms is still too low. This paper introduces a new approach to rhythm analysis during CPR that combines two strategies: a state-of-the-art CPR artifact suppression filter and a shock advice algorithm (SAA) designed to optimally classify the filtered signal. Emphasis is on designing an algorithm with high specificity. The SAA includes a detector for low electrical activity rhythms to increase the specificity, and a shock/no-shock decision algorithm based on a support vector machine classifier using slope and frequency features. For this study, 1185 shockable and 6482 nonshockable 9-s segments corrupted by CPR artifacts were obtained from 247 patients suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The segments were split into a training and a test set. For the test set, the sensitivity and specificity for rhythm analysis during CPR were 91.0% and 96.6%, respectively. This new approach shows an important increase in specificity without compromising the sensitivity when compared to previous studies. PMID:24895621

  19. Usefulness of blood pressure rise prior to exercise stress testing to predict the risk of future hypertension in normotensive Korean men.

    PubMed

    Jae, Sae Young; Kurl, Sudhir; Laukkanen, Jari A; Choi, Yoon-Ho; Park, Won Hah; Bunsawat, Kanokwan; Heffernan, Kevin S; Fernhall, Bo; Kang, Seok-Min; Park, Jeong Bae

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that blood pressure (BP) increase before exercise stress testing is associated with the incidence of hypertension in a prospective study of 3,805 normotensive men without hypertension at baseline. Changes in BP were defined as the difference between seated BP at rest and BP measured immediately before exercise stress testing. Hypertension was defined as systolic and diastolic BP ? 140/90 mm Hg or hypertension diagnosed by a physician at the second examination. During 18,923 patient-years of follow-up, 371 new cases of hypertension developed (incidence rate 19.6 per 1,000 patient-years). Men with systolic BP changes >0 mm Hg and diastolic BP changes >7 mm Hg had 1.70 times (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.37 to 2.12) and 2.23 times (95% CI 1.76 to 2.82) increased relative risk for incident hypertension compared with men whose systolic BP changes were <0 mm Hg and diastolic BP changes were <7 mm Hg after adjustment for confounders. Men in the highest quartile of mean BP change (>10 mm Hg) had a higher incidence of hypertension (relative risk 2.98, 95% CI 2.19 to 4.06) compared with those in the lowest quartile (<0 mm Hg), and each 1 mm Hg increment in mean BP was associated with a 6% (95% CI 1.05 to 1.09) higher incidence of hypertension after adjustment for risk factors. In conclusion, BP increase before exercise stress testing is associated with incident hypertension, independent of risk factors in normotensive men. The assessment of BP immediately before exercise testing may be a useful addition to the standard exercise stress testing procedures. PMID:25152425

  20. Pilot Testing a Cognitive-Behavioral Protocol on Psychosocial Predictors of Exercise, Nutrition, Weight, and Body Satisfaction Changes in a College-Level Health-Related Fitness Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annesi, James J.; Howton, Amy; Johnson, Ping H.; Porter, Kandice J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Small-scale pilot testing of supplementing a required college health-related fitness course with a cognitive-behavioral exercise-support protocol (The Coach Approach). Participants: Three classes were randomly assigned to Usual processes (n = 32), Coach Approach-supplemented: Mid-size Groups (n = 32), and Coach Approach-supplemented:…

  1. Pilot Testing a Cognitive-Behavioral Protocol on Psychosocial Predictors of Exercise, Nutrition, Weight, and Body Satisfaction Changes in a College-Level Health-Related Fitness Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annesi, James J.; Howton, Amy; Johnson, Ping H.; Porter, Kandice J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Small-scale pilot testing of supplementing a required college health-related fitness course with a cognitive-behavioral exercise-support protocol (The Coach Approach). Participants: Three classes were randomly assigned to Usual processes (n = 32), Coach Approach-supplemented: Mid-size Groups (n = 32), and Coach Approach-supplemented:

  2. Application of Computer Simulation Techniques in Military Exercise Control System Development: 1. NETMAN Model Sensitivity Test and Validation. Technical Report 407.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Arthur I.; And Others

    The methods, procedures, and results of a sensitivity test on NETMAN, a stochastic digital computer model designed to simulate the information collection and scoring control systems used in tactical warfare training exercises, are described. NETMAN enables its users to obtain information such as personnel requirements, training requirements, and…

  3. Aerobic exercise in adolescents with obesity: preliminary evaluation of a modular training program and the modified shuttle test

    PubMed Central

    Klijn, Peter HC; van der Baan-Slootweg, Olga H; van Stel, Henk F

    2007-01-01

    Background Increasing activity levels in adolescents with obesity requires the development of exercise programs that are both attractive to adolescents and easily reproducible. The aim of this study was to develop a modular aerobic training program for adolescents with severe obesity, with a focus on variety, individual targets and acquiring physical skills. We report here the effects on aerobic fitness from a pilot study. Furthermore, we examined the feasibility of the modified shuttle test (MST) as an outcome parameter for aerobic fitness in adolescents with severe obesity. Methods Fifteen adolescents from an inpatient body weight management program participated in the aerobic training study (age 14.7 2.1 yrs, body mass index 37.4 3.5). The subjects trained three days per week for 12 weeks, with each session lasting 3060 minutes. The modular training program consisted of indoor, outdoor and swimming activities. Feasibility of the MST was studied by assessing construct validity, test-retest reliability and sensitivity to change. Results Comparing pretraining and end of training period showed large clinically relevant and significant improvements for all aerobic indices: e.g. VO2 peak 17.5%, effect size (ES) 2.4; Wmax 8%, ES 0.8. In addition, a significant improvement was found for the efficiency of the cardiovascular system as assessed by the oxygen pulse (15.8%, ES 1.6). Construct validity, test-retest reliability and sensitivity to change of the MST were very good. MST was significantly correlated with VO2 peak (r = 0.79) and Wmax (r = 0.84) but not with anthropometric measures. The MST walking distance improved significantly by 32.5%, ES 2.5. The attendance rate at the exercise sessions was excellent. Conclusion This modular, varied aerobic training program has clinically relevant effects on aerobic performance in adolescents with severe obesity. The added value of our aerobic training program for body weight management programs for adolescents with severe obesity should be studied with a randomized trial. This study further demonstrated that the MST is a reliable, sensitive and easy to administer outcome measure for aerobic fitness in adolescent body weight management trials. PMID:17445257

  4. Alternative ventilation strategies in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Andrea; Layon, A Joseph; Wenzel, Volker; Dorges, Volker; Idris, Ahamed H

    2002-06-01

    The introduction of the 2000 Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation emphasizes a new, evidence-based approach to the science of ventilation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). New laboratory and clinical science underemphasizes the role of ventilation immediately after a dysrhythmic cardiac arrest (arrest primarily resulting from a cardiovascular event, such as ventricular defibrillation or asystole). However, the classic airway patency, breathing, and circulation (ABC) CPR sequence remains a fundamental factor for the immediate survival and neurologic outcome of patients after asphyxial cardiac arrest (cardiac arrest primarily resulting from respiratory arrest). The hidden danger of ventilation of the unprotected airway during cardiac arrest either by mouth-to-mouth or by mask can be minimized by applying ventilation techniques that decrease stomach gas insufflation. This goal can be achieved by decreasing peak inspiratory flow rate, increasing inspiratory time, and decreasing tidal volume to approximately 5 to 7 mL/kg, if oxygen is available. Laboratory and clinical evidence recently supported the important role of alternative airway devices to mask ventilation and endotracheal intubation in the chain of survival. In particular, the laryngeal mask airway and esophageal Combitube proved to be effective alternatives in providing oxygenation and ventilation to the patient in cardiac arrest in the prehospital arena in North America. Prompt recognition of supraglottic obstruction of the airway is fundamental for the management of patients in cardiac arrest when ventilation and oxygenation cannot be provided by conventional methods. "Minimally invasive" cricothyroidotomy devices are now available for the professional health care provider who is not proficient or comfortable with performing an emergency surgical tracheotomy or cricothyroidotomy. Finally, a recent device that affects the relative influence of positive pressure ventilation on the hemodynamics during cardiac arrest has been introduced, the inspiratory impedance threshold valve, with the goal of maximizing coronary and cerebral perfusion while performing CPR. Although the role of this alternative ventilatory methodology in CPR is rapidly being established, we cannot overemphasize the need for proper training to minimize complications and maximize the efficacy of these new devices. PMID:12386498

  5. HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK TEST CYCLES: COMBINING DRIVEABILITY WITH REALISTIC ENGINE EXERCISE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heavy-duty engine certification testing uses a cycle that is scaled to the capabilities of each engine. As such, every engine should be equally challenged by the cycle's power demands. It would seem that a chassis cycle, similarly scaled to the capabilities of each vehicle, could...

  6. Workplace Health Promotion: Assessing the Cardiopulmonary Risks of the Construction Workforce in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Tin, Sze Pui Pamela; Lam, Wendy W. T.; Yoon, Sungwon; Zhang, Na; Xia, Nan; Zhang, Weiwei; Ma, Ke; Fielding, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Objective Health needs of different employee subgroups within an industry can differ. We report the results of a workplace cardiopulmonary risk assessment targeting workers and support staff in the construction industry. Methods A free worksite-based cardiopulmonary risk assessment for 1,903 workers on infrastructural contracts across Hong Kong was initiated in May 2014. Cardiopulmonary risk screening was performed in 60-minute blocks for approximately 30 workers/block with individualized feedback and lifestyle counseling. Risk profiles stratified by occupational roles are differentiated using the χ2-test for categorical and Student’s t-test for continuous variables. Results Most construction workers and clerks/professionals were male (83.2% and 71.2%, respectively) and Chinese (78.7% and 90.9%, respectively). Construction workers were older (mean: 44.9 years, SD 11.5) and less well-educated (6.1% received tertiary education) than clerks/professionals (35.0 years, 10.7; 72.6% received tertiary education), but more likely to be hypertensive (22.6% vs. 15.4%, p<0.001), overweight/obese (71.7% vs. 56.6%, p<0.001), centrally obese (53.1% vs. 35.5%, p<0.001), and have undesirable levels of high-density lipoprotein (41.6% vs. 35.8%, p<0.05) and diabetic levels of non-fasting blood glucose (4.3% vs. 1.6%, p<0.05). Up to 12.6% of construction workers and 9.7% of office clerks/professions had three or more metabolic syndrome risk factors. While construction workers were more likely than clerks/professionals to be daily smokers, they reported better work-related physical activity and diet. Conclusions Simple worksite health risk screening can identify potentially high-cardiopulmonary-risk construction industry employee subgroups for onward confirmatory referral. Separate cardiopulmonary health promotion strategies that account for the varying lifestyle profiles of the two employee subgroups in the industry appear justified. PMID:26799393

  7. Diabetic patients have abnormal cerebral autoregulation during cardiopulmonary bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Croughwell, N.; Lyth, M.; Quill, T.J.; Newman, M.; Greeley, W.J.; Smith, L.R.; Reves, J.G. )

    1990-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that insulin-dependent diabetic patients with coronary artery bypass graft surgery experience altered coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption. In a study of 23 patients (11 diabetics and 12 age-matched controls), cerebral blood flow was measured using 133Xe clearance during nonpulsatile, alpha-stat blood gas managed cardiopulmonary bypass at the conditions of hypothermia and normothermia. In diabetic patients, the cerebral blood flow at 26.6 +/- 2.42 degrees C was 25.3 +/- 14.34 ml/100 g/min and at 36.9 +/- 0.58 degrees C it was 27.3 +/- 7.40 ml/100 g/min (p = NS). The control patients increased cerebral blood flow from 20.7 +/- 6.78 ml/100 g/min at 28.4 +/- 2.81 degrees C to 37.6 +/- 8.81 ml/100 g/min at 36.5 +/- 0.45 degrees C (p less than or equal to 0.005). The oxygen consumption was calculated from jugular bulb effluent and increased from hypothermic values of 0.52 +/- 0.20 ml/100 g/min in diabetics to 1.26 +/- 0.28 ml/100 g/min (p = 0.001) at normothermia and rose from 0.60 +/- 0.27 to 1.49 +/- 0.35 ml/100 g/min (p = 0.0005) in the controls. Thus, despite temperature-mediated changes in oxygen consumption, diabetic patients did not increase cerebral blood flow as metabolism increased. Arteriovenous oxygen saturation gradients and oxygen extraction across the brain were calculated from arterial and jugular bulb blood samples. The increase in arteriovenous oxygen difference between temperature conditions in diabetic patients and controls was significantly different (p = 0.01). These data reveal that diabetic patients lose cerebral autoregulation during cardiopulmonary bypass and compensate for an imbalance in adequate oxygen delivery by increasing oxygen extraction.

  8. Utility of Routine Exercise Testing to Detect Rate-Related QRS Widening in Patients Without Structural Heart Disease on Class Ic Antiarrhythmic Agents (Flecainide andPropafenone).

    PubMed

    Vallurupalli, Srikanth; Pothineni, Naga Venkata K; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Paydak, Hakan

    2015-09-01

    Class Ic antiarrhythmic agents are effective in the treatment of various atrial tachyarrhythmias. They are known to cause rate-related QRS widening in the presence of structural heart disease, which can lead to life-threatening arrhythmias. The role of routine exercise electrocardiography in patients without structural heart disease is unknown. All patients initiated on class Ic antiarrhythmic agents and who had exercise electrocardiography performed from June 2009 to June 2013 were included. Symptom-limited treadmill electrocardiography was performed to detect significant QRS widening at peak exercise (defined as an increase of >25% of baseline QRS). Fifty-six patients were included in the study. All patients were screened for structural heart disease before initiation of the medication. Significant QRS widening and atrial tachycardia occurred in a single patient, which terminated with cessation of exercise. This patient had a history of tachycardia-mediated cardiomyopathy with normalization of ejection fraction 3 years before being placed on flecainide. In conclusion, routine exercise testing to detect QRS widening is not warranted in patients with no structural heart disease. PMID:26100588

  9. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation with vasopressin in a dog.

    PubMed

    Schmittinger, Christian A; Astner, Sandra; Astner, Leonhard; Kssler, Josef; Wenzel, Volker

    2005-03-01

    That endogenous vasopressin levels in successfully resuscitated human patients were significantly higher than in patients who died pointed to the possible benefit of administering vasopressin during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Several CPR studies in pigs showed that vasopressin improved blood flow to vital organs, cerebral oxygen delivery, resuscitability and neurological outcome when compared with epinephrine. In a small clinical study, vasopressin significantly improved short-term survival when compared with epinephrine indicating its potential as an alternative pressor to epinephrine during CPR in human beings. As there was little clinical data available at that time, its recommended use was limited to adult human beings with shock-refractory ventricular fibrillation. In this report, we present the case of a dog in which the successful management of intraoperative asystolic cardiac arrest involved vasopressin. Unexpected cardiac arrest occurred during anaesthesia for the surgical removal of multiple mammary adenocarcinomata in a 11-year-old Yorkshire terrier. Despite an ASA physical status assignation of III, the dog was successfully resuscitated with external chest compressions, intermittent positive pressure ventilation and vasopressin (2 doses of 0.8 IU kg(-1)) and was discharged 3 days later without signs of neurological injury. We believe vasopressin contributed to restoring spontaneous circulation. It may prove increasingly useful in perioperative resuscitation in dogs. PMID:15762917

  10. Review and Outcome of Prolonged Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Youness, Houssein; Al Halabi, Tarek; Hussein, Hussein; Awab, Ahmed; Jones, Kellie; Keddissi, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The maximal duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is unknown. We report a case of prolonged CPR. We have then reviewed all published cases with CPR duration equal to or more than 20 minutes. The objective was to determine the survival rate, the neurological outcome, and the characteristics of the survivors. Measurements and Main Results. The CPR data for 82 patients was reviewed. The median duration of CPR was 75 minutes. Patients mean age was 43 ± 21 years with no significant comorbidities. The main causes of the cardiac arrests were myocardial infarction (29%), hypothermia (21%), and pulmonary emboli (12%). 74% of the arrests were witnessed, with a mean latency to CPR of 2 ± 6 minutes and good quality chest compression provided in 96% of the cases. Adjunct therapy included extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (18%), thrombolysis (15.8%), and rewarming for hypothermia (19.5%). 83% were alive at 1 year, with full neurological recovery reported in 63 patients. Conclusion. Patients undergoing prolonged CPR can survive with good outcome. Young age, myocardial infarction, and potentially reversible causes of cardiac arrest such as hypothermia and pulmonary emboli predict a favorable result, especially when the arrest is witnessed and followed by prompt and good resuscitative efforts. PMID:26885387

  11. Advances in clinical studies of cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shou-quan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The survival rate of patients after cardiac arrest (CA) remains lower since 2010 International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and Emergency Cardiovascular Care (ECC) was published. In clinical trials, the methods and techniques for CPR have been overly described. This article gives an overview of the progress in methods and techniques for CPR in the past years. DATA SOURCES: Original articles about cardiac arrest and CPR from MEDLINE (PubMed) and relevant journals were searched, and most of them were clinical randomized controlled trials (RCTs). RESULTS: Forty-two articles on methods and techniques of CPR were reviewed, including chest compression and conventional CPR, chest compression depth and speed, defibrillation strategies and priority, mechanical and manual chest compression, advanced airway management, impedance threshold device (ITD) and active compression-decompression (ACD) CPR, epinephrine use, and therapeutic hypothermia. The results of studies and related issues described in the international guidelines had been testified. CONCLUSIONS: Although large multicenter studies on CPR are still difficult to carry out, progress has been made in the past 4 years in the methods and techniques of CPR. The results of this review provide evidences for updating the 2015 international guidelines. PMID:26056537

  12. Exercise Prescription.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribisl, Paul M.

    If exercise programs are to become effective in producing the desired results, then the correct exercise prescription must be applied. Four variables should be controlled in the prescription of exercise: (a) type of activity, (b) intensity, (c) duration, and (d) frequency. The long-term prescription of exercise involves the use of a (a) starter…

  13. Cardiopulmonary data acquisition system. Version 2.0, volume 1: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The Cardiopulmonary Data Acquisition System is a computerized method of both collecting and analyzing physiological data on subjects during a treadmill or ergometer stress test in the clinic. The real time acquisition of the physiological data, such as, heart rate, blood pressure, work load, and respiratory gases is accomplished by an LSI-11 microcomputer which displays this data on a hard copy terminal. The data are also concurrently stored on a mass storage device and anytime after the test period a selectable number of copies of the plots or minute reports can be reproduced at the terminal.

  14. Prognostic importance of tissue velocity imaging during exercise echocardiography in patients with systolic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    van Zalen, Jet; Patel, Nikhil R; J Podd, Steven; Raju, Prashanth; McIntosh, Rob; Brickley, Gary; Beale, Louisa; Sturridge, Lydia P

    2015-01-01

    Resting echocardiography measurements are poor predictors of exercise capacity and symptoms in patients with heart failure (HF). Stress echocardiography may provide additional information and can be expressed using left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), or diastolic parameters (E/E?), but LVEF has some major limitations. Systolic annular velocity (S?) provides a measure of longitudinal systolic function, which is relatively easy to obtain and shows a good relationship with exercise capacity. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship among S?, E/E? and LVEF obtained during stress echocardiography and both mortality and hospitalisation. A secondary objective was to compare S? measured using a simplified two-wall model. A total of 80 patients with stable HF underwent exercise stress echocardiography and simultaneous cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Volumetric and tissue velocity imaging (TVI) measurements were obtained, as was peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak). Of the total number of patients, 11 died and 22 required cardiac hospitalisation. S? at peak exertion was a powerful predictor for death and hospitalisation. Cut-off points of 5.3?cm/s for death and 5.7?cm/s for hospitalisation provided optimum sensitivity and specificity. This study suggests that, in patients with systolic HF, S? at peak exertion calculated from the averaged spectral TVI systolic velocity of six myocardial segments, or using a simplified measure of two myocardial segments, is a powerful predictor of future events and stronger than LVEF, diastolic velocities at rest or exercise and VO2 peak. Results indicate that measuring S? during exercise echocardiography might play an important role in understanding the likelihood of adverse clinical outcomes in patients with HF.

  15. Life Span Exercise Among Elite Intercollegiate Student Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Sorenson, Shawn C.; Romano, Russell; Azen, Stanley P.; Schroeder, E. Todd; Salem, George J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite prominent public attention, data on life span health and exercise outcomes among elite, competitive athletes are sparse and do not reflect the diversity of modern athletes. Hypothesis: Life span exercise behavior differs between National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) student athletes and a nonathlete control group. Sustained exercise is associated with improved cardiopulmonary health outcomes. Study Design: Cross-sectional, descriptive epidemiology study. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Methods: A total of 496 students and alumni (age range, 17-84 year) at a large, NCAA Division I university, including student athletes and an age- and sex-matched nonathlete control group, completed anonymous, self-report health and exercise questionnaires. Age-stratified, cross-sectional analysis evaluated previous week’s total exercise volume (ExVol), self-rated exercise importance (ExImp), and compliance with American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) exercise guidelines for healthy adults. The association of ACSM guideline compliance with lifetime cardiopulmonary health outcomes was also assessed. Results: Current student athletes reported significantly greater ExVol (P < 0.001. Cohen d = 0.99, probability of clinically important difference [pCID] >99.5%), ExImp (P < 0.001, d = 1.96, pCID = 96%), and likelihood of compliance with ACSM guidelines (odds ratio [OR], 95% confidence interval [CI] = 30.6, 11.0-84.6) compared with nonathletes. No significant differences were found between alumni student athletes and nonathletes. Alumni student athletes demonstrated substantially lower ExVol (P < 0.001, d = –0.94, pCID >99.5%) and guideline compliance (OR = 0.09, 95% CI = 0.05-0.19) compared with current student athletes, whereas nonathletes had similar exercise behavior across the life span. Among alumni, ACSM guideline compliance was associated with significant attenuation of cardiopulmonary health concerns (P = 0.02, d = –0.50, pCID = 14%) independent of intercollegiate athletic participation. Conclusion: Although current NCAA Division I student athletes demonstrated significant, clinically important differences in exercise behavior compared with nonathletes, no group differences were evident later in life. Irrespective of collegiate athletic status, healthy exercise behavior among alumni was associated with cardiopulmonary health benefits. Clinical Relevance: To realize life span health benefits, it is imperative that student athletes maintain consistent patterns of healthy exercise beyond retirement from competitive sports. PMID:25553217

  16. Heparin Dose and Postoperative Bleeding in Patients Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Rosin, Mark W.; Holt, David

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Heparin is the most widely used anticoagulant for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Several authors suggest that lower doses of heparin during CPB would produce lower postoperative chest tube losses and fewer transfusion events. In the present study, a heparin doseresponse (HDR) test was used to determine the heparin dose for each patient. We hypothesize that higher doses of heparin do not cause increased postoperative bleeding and transfusion events in postoperative patients undergoing CPB when the heparin dose is determined by a HDR test. This prospective observational study followed 66 patients undergoing CPB-supported primary coronary artery bypass grafting. Patients were placed in one of two groups, sensitive (n = 37) or resistant (n = 29) based on the result of a HDR test slope. Data on patient characteristics, secondary outcomes, transfusion, and the primary outcome, chest tube losses, were collected. Patient characteristics differed in the baseline activated coagulation time (ACT) and thromboelastograph G parameter as well as number of patients with hypercholesterolemia. The resistant group had lower postheparin and postprotamine ACTs and heparin sensitivity index. Initial heparin dose, total heparin dose, heparin dose per kilogram, HDR, and protamine dose were higher in the heparin-resistant group. The primary outcome, postoperative chest tube loss volume, was collected at four time points and the two groups were then compared. The heparin-resistant group was noninferior to the sensitive group and had clinically fewer transfused patients and transfusion events. The resistant group was noninferior to the sensitive group with respect to chest tube losses at all measured time points. Higher doses of heparin determined by a HDR test do not cause increased postoperative chest tube losses or increased transfusion events. PMID:24649570

  17. Baroreflex-mediated heart rate and vascular resistance responses 24 h after maximal exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Plasma volume, heart rate (HR) variability, and stimulus-response relationships for baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance (FVR) and HR were studied in eight healthy men after and without performing a bout of maximal exercise to test the hypotheses that acute expansion of plasma volume is associated with 1) reduction in baroreflex-mediated HR response, and 2) altered operational range for central venous pressure (CVP). METHODS: The relationship between stimulus (DeltaCVP) and vasoconstrictive reflex response (DeltaFVR) during unloading of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors was assessed with lower-body negative pressure (LBNP, 0, -5, -10, -15, -20 mm Hg). The relationship between stimulus (Deltamean arterial pressure (MAP)) and cardiac reflex response (DeltaHR) during loading of arterial baroreceptors was assessed with steady-state infusion of phenylephrine (PE) designed to increase MAP by 15 mm Hg alone and during application of LBNP (PE+LBNP) and neck pressure (PE+LBNP+NP). Measurements of vascular volume and autonomic baroreflex responses were conducted on two different test days, each separated by at least 1 wk. On one day, baroreflex response was tested 24 h after graded cycle exercise to volitional exhaustion. On another day, measurement of baroreflex response was repeated with no exercise (control). The order of exercise and control treatments was counterbalanced. RESULTS: Baseline CVP was elevated (P = 0.04) from a control value of 10.5 +/- 0.4 to 12.3 +/- 0.4 mm Hg 24 h after exercise. Average DeltaFVR/DeltaCVP during LBNP was not different (P = 0.942) between the exercise (-1.35 +/- 0.32 pru x mm Hg-1) and control (-1.32 +/- 0.36 pru x mm Hg-1) conditions. However, maximal exercise caused a shift along the reflex response relationship to a higher CVP and lower FVR. HR baroreflex response (DeltaHR/DeltaMAP) to PE+LBNP+NP was lower (P = 0.015) after maximal exercise (-0.43 +/- 0.15 beats x min-1 x mm Hg-1) compared with the control condition (-0.83 +/- 0.14 beats x min-1 x mm Hg-1). CONCLUSION: Expansion of vascular volume after acute exercise is associated with altered operational range for CVP and reduced HR response to arterial baroreceptor stimulation.

  18. Cardiopulmonary bypass without preoperative exchange transfusion in sicklers.

    PubMed

    Maddali, Madan M; Rajakumar, Muthukkumar C; Fahr, Jutta; Albahrani, Maher J; Amna, Mohamed A

    2006-02-01

    The effect of hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass techniques on the sickling process was evaluated in patients with sickle cell hemoglobin. It was presumed that intraoperative hemolysis, as identified by hemoglobinuria, reflected increased sickling. Data of 43 patients with sickle cell traits and 2 with sickle cell disease, who were operated on under cardiopulmonary bypass and cold cardioplegic arrest in a tertiary center from the beginning of 1995 to the end of 2004, were retrospectively analyzed. A mean nasal temperature of 30.8 degrees C +/- 2.1 degrees C was achieved. Three patients with sickle cell trait developed intraoperative hemoglobinuria, albeit with normal surrogate values for hemolysis. However, they had significantly lower mean hemoglobin levels during cardiopulmonary bypass compared to those sickle cell patients who did not exhibit hemoglobinuria (hemoglobin, 6.0 +/- 0.2 vs. 7.4 +/- 0.9 g x dL(-1), p < 0.01). Total drainage and blood transfusion requirements in patients with normal and sickle cell hemoglobin were similar. It was concluded that hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass with cold cardioplegia is safe in sickle cell patients. Maintenance of adequate hemoglobin levels during cardiopulmonary bypass may be important to avoid triggering a sickling process. PMID:16432120

  19. Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Advances in Science, Techniques, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Topjian, Alexis A.; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.

    2009-01-01

    More than 25% of children survive to hospital discharge after in-hospital cardiac arrests, and 5% to 10% survive after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. This review of pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation addresses the epidemiology of pediatric cardiac arrests, mechanisms of coronary blood flow during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the 4 phases of cardiac arrest resuscitation, appropriate interventions during each phase, special resuscitation circumstances, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The key elements of pathophysiology that impact and match the timing, intensity, duration, and variability of the hypoxic-ischemic insult to evidence-based interventions are reviewed. Exciting discoveries in basic and applied-science laboratories are now relevant for specific subpopulations of pediatric cardiac arrest victims and circumstances (eg, ventricular fibrillation, neonates, congenital heart disease, extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation). Improving the quality of interventions is increasingly recognized as a key factor for improving outcomes. Evolving training strategies include simulation training, just-in-time and just-in-place training, and crisis-team training. The difficult issue of when to discontinue resuscitative efforts is addressed. Outcomes from pediatric cardiac arrests are improving. Advances in resuscitation science and state-of-the-art implementation techniques provide the opportunity for further improvement in outcomes among children after cardiac arrest. PMID:18977991

  20. PREDICTION OF VO2PEAK USING OMNI RATINGS OF PERCEIVED EXERTION FROM A SUBMAXIMAL CYCLE EXERCISE TEST

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Ryan J.; Goss, Fredric L.; Nagle-Stilley, Elizabeth F.; Gallagher, Michael; Schafer, Mark A.; Kim, Kevin H.; Robertson, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The primary aim of this study was to develop statistical models to predict peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) using OMNI Ratings of Perceived Exertion measured during submaximal cycle ergometry. Men (mean ± standard error: 20.90 ± 0.42 yrs) and women (21.59 ± 0.49 yrs) participants (n = 81) completed a load-incremented maximal cycle ergometer exercise test. Simultaneous multiple linear regression was used to develop separate VO2peak statistical models using submaximal ratings of perceived exertion for the overall body, legs, and chest/breathing as predictor variables. VO2peak (L·min−1) predicted for men and women from ratings of perceived exertion for the overall body (3.02 ± 0.06; 2.03 ± 0.04), legs (3.02 ± 0.06; 2.04 ± 0.04) and chest/breathing (3.02 ± 0.05; 2.03 ± 0.03) were similar with measured VO2peak (3.02 ± 0.10; 2.03 ± 0.06, ps > .05). Statistical models based on submaximal OMNI Ratings of Perceived Exertion provide an easily administered and accurate method to predict VO2peak. PMID:25068750